Science.gov

Sample records for experience structured interactions

  1. C-SIDE: The control-structure interaction demonstration experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohl, James B.; Davis, Hugh W.

    1993-01-01

    The Control-Structure Interaction Demonstration Experiment (C-SIDE) is sponsored by the Electro-Optics and Cryogenics Division of Ball Aerospace Systems Group. Our objective is to demonstrate methods of solution to structure control problems utilizing currently available hardware in a system that is an extension of our corporate experience. The larger space structures with which Ball has been associated are the SEASAT radar antenna, Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR) -A, -B and -C antennas and the Radarsat spacecraft. The motivation for the C-SIDE configuration is to show that integration of active figure control in the radar's system-level design can relieve antenna mechanical design constraints. This presentation is primarily an introduction to the C-SIDE testbed. Its physical and functional layouts, and major components are described. The sensor is of special interest as it enables direct surface figure measurements from a remote location. The Remote Attitude Measurement System (RAMS) makes high-rate, unobtrusive measurements of many locations, several of which may be collocated easily with actuators. The control processor is a 386/25 executing a reduced order model-based algorithm with provision for residual mode filters to compensate for structure interaction. The actuators for the ground demonstration are non-contacting, linear force devices. Results presented illustrate some basic characteristics of control-structure interaction with this hardware. The testbed will be used for evaluation of current technologies and for research in several areas. A brief indication of the evolution of the C-SIDE is given at the conclusion.

  2. Technically Speaking: On the Structure and Experience of Interaction Involving Augmentative Alternative Communications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelke, Christopher Robert

    2013-01-01

    Technically Speaking: On the Structure and Experience of Interaction Involving Augmentative Alternative Communications examines the ways that communication is structured and experienced by looking at interactions involving augmented communicators--people with severe speech disabilities who use forms of assistive technology in order to communicate…

  3. Remote Manipulator System (RMS)-based Controls-Structures Interaction (CSI) flight experiment feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demeo, Martha E.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of an experiment which will provide an on-orbit validation of Controls-Structures Interaction (CSI) technology, was investigated. The experiment will demonstrate the on-orbit characterization and flexible-body control of large flexible structure dynamics using the shuttle Remote Manipulator System (RMS) with an attached payload as a test article. By utilizing existing hardware as well as establishing integration, operation and safety algorithms, techniques and procedures, the experiment will minimize the costs and risks of implementing a flight experiment. The experiment will also offer spin-off enhancement to both the Shuttle RMS (SRMS) and the Space Station RMS (SSRMS).

  4. Spatial memories of virtual environments: how egocentric experience, intrinsic structure, and extrinsic structure interact.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Jonathan W; McNamara, Timothy P

    2008-04-01

    Previous research has uncovered three primary cues that influence spatial memory organization:egocentric experience, intrinsic structure (object defined), and extrinsic structure (environment defined). In the present experiments, we assessed the relative importance of these cues when all three were available during learning. Participants learned layouts from two perspectives in immersive virtual reality. In Experiment 1, axes defined by intrinsic and extrinsic structures were in conflict, and learning occurred from two perspectives, each aligned with either the intrinsic or the extrinsic structure. Spatial memories were organized around a reference direction selected from the first perspective, regardless of its alignment with intrinsic or extrinsic structures. In Experiment 2, axes defined by intrinsic and extrinsic structures were congruent, and spatial memories were organized around reference axes defined by those congruent structures, rather than by the initially experienced view. The findings are discussed in the context of spatial memory theory as it relates to real and virtual environments.

  5. Spatial memories of virtual environments: how egocentric experience, intrinsic structure, and extrinsic structure interact.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Jonathan W; McNamara, Timothy P

    2008-04-01

    Previous research has uncovered three primary cues that influence spatial memory organization:egocentric experience, intrinsic structure (object defined), and extrinsic structure (environment defined). In the present experiments, we assessed the relative importance of these cues when all three were available during learning. Participants learned layouts from two perspectives in immersive virtual reality. In Experiment 1, axes defined by intrinsic and extrinsic structures were in conflict, and learning occurred from two perspectives, each aligned with either the intrinsic or the extrinsic structure. Spatial memories were organized around a reference direction selected from the first perspective, regardless of its alignment with intrinsic or extrinsic structures. In Experiment 2, axes defined by intrinsic and extrinsic structures were congruent, and spatial memories were organized around reference axes defined by those congruent structures, rather than by the initially experienced view. The findings are discussed in the context of spatial memory theory as it relates to real and virtual environments. PMID:18488647

  6. Nonlinear soil-structure interaction calculations simulating the SIMQUAKE experiment using STEALTH 2D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, H. T.; Hofmann, R.; Yee, G.; Vaughan, D. K.

    1980-01-01

    Transient, nonlinear soil-structure interaction simulations of an Electric Power Research Institute, SIMQUAKE experiment were performed using the large strain, time domain STEALTH 2D code and a cyclic, kinematically hardening cap soil model. Results from the STEALTH simulations were compared to identical simulations performed with the TRANAL code and indicate relatively good agreement between all the STEALTH and TRANAL calculations. The differences that are seen can probably be attributed to: (1) large (STEALTH) vs. small (TRANAL) strain formulation and/or (2) grid discretization differences.

  7. Flow structure interaction around an axial-flow hydrokinetic turbine: Experiments and CFD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, S.; Chamorro, L.; Hill, C.; Arndt, R.; Sotiropoulos, F.

    2014-12-01

    We carry out large-eddy simulation of turbulent flow past a complete hydrokinetic turbine mounted on the bed of a straight rectangular open channel. The complex turbine geometry, including the rotor and all stationary components, is handled by employing the curvilinear immersed boundary (CURVIB) method [1], and velocity boundary conditions near all solid surfaces are reconstructed using a wall model based on solving the simplified boundary layer equations [2]. In this study we attempt to directly resolve flow-blade interactions without introducing turbine parameterization methods. The computed wake profiles of velocities and turbulent stresses agree well with the experimentally measured values.

  8. Modal interactions due to friction in the nonlinear vibration response of the "Harmony" test structure: Experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claeys, M.; Sinou, J.-J.; Lambelin, J.-P.; Todeschini, R.

    2016-08-01

    The nonlinear vibration response of an assembly with friction joints - named "Harmony" - is studied both experimentally and numerically. The experimental results exhibit a softening effect and an increase of dissipation with excitation level. Modal interactions due to friction are also evidenced. The numerical methodology proposed groups together well-known structural dynamic methods, including finite elements, substructuring, Harmonic Balance and continuation methods. On the one hand, the application of this methodology proves its capacity to treat a complex system where several friction movements occur at the same time. On the other hand, the main contribution of this paper is the experimental and numerical study of evidence of modal interactions due to friction. The simulation methodology succeeds in reproducing complex form of dynamic behavior such as these modal interactions.

  9. LDR structural experiment definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, R. A.

    1988-01-01

    A system study to develop the definition of a structural flight experiment for a large precision segmented reflector on the Space Station was accomplished by the Boeing Aerospace Company for NASA's Langley Research Center. The objective of the study was to use a Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) baseline configuration as the basis for focusing an experiment definition, so that the resulting accommodation requirements and interface constraints could be used as part of the mission requirements data base for Space Station. The primary objectives of the first experiment are to construct the primary mirror support truss and to determine its structural and thermal characteristics. Addition of an optical bench, thermal shield and primary mirror segments, and alignment of the optical components, would occur on a second experiment. The structure would then be moved to the payload point system for pointing, optical control, and scientific optical measurement for a third experiment. Experiment 1 will deploy the primary support truss while it is attached to the instrument module structure. The ability to adjust the mirror attachment points and to attach several dummy primary mirror segments with a robotic system will also be demonstrated. Experiment 2 will be achieved by adding new components and equipment to experiment one. Experiment 3 will demonstrate advanced control strategies, active adjustment of the primary mirror alignment, and technologies associated with optical sensing.

  10. Interaction of curcumin with Al(III) and its complex structures based on experiments and theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Teng; Wang, Long; Zhang, Sui; Sun, Ping-Chuan; Ding, Chuan-Fan; Chu, Yan-Qiu; Zhou, Ping

    2011-10-01

    Curcumin has been recognized as a potential natural drug to treat the Alzheimer's disease (AD) by chelating baleful metal ions, scavenging radicals and preventing the amyloid β (Aβ) peptides from the aggregation. In this paper, Al(III)-curcumin complexes with Al(III) were synthesized and characterized by liquid-state 1H, 13C and 27Al nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), mass spectroscopy (MS), ultraviolet spectroscopy (UV) and generalized 2D UV-UV correlation spectroscopy. In addition, the density functional theory (DFT)-based UV and chemical shift calculations were also performed to view insight into the structures and properties of curcumin and its complexes. It was revealed that curcumin could interact strongly with Al(III) ion, and form three types of complexes under different molar ratios of [Al(III)]/[curcumin], which would restrain the interaction of Al(III) with the Aβ peptide, reducing the toxicity effect of Al(III) on the peptide.

  11. LDR structural experiment definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Richard A.; Gates, Richard M.

    1988-01-01

    A study was performed to develop the definition of a structural flight experiment for a large precision segmented reflector that would utilize the Space Station. The objective of the study was to use the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) baseline configuration for focusing on experiment definition activity which would identify the Space Station accommodation requirements and interface constraints. Results of the study defined three Space Station based experiments to demonstrate the technologies needed for an LDR type structure. The basic experiment configurations are the same as the JPL baseline except that the primary mirror truss is 10 meters in diameter instead of 20. The primary objectives of the first experiment are to construct the primary mirror support truss and to determine its structural and thermal characteristics. Addition of the optical bench, thermal shield and primary mirror segments and alignment of the optical components occur on the second experiment. The structure will then be moved to the payload pointing system for pointing, optical control and scientific optical measurement for the third experiment.

  12. Structural Assembly Demonstration Experiment (SADE) experiment design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akin, D. L.; Bowden, M. L.

    1982-01-01

    The Structural Assembly Demonstration Experiment concept is to erect a hybrid deployed/assembled structure as an early space experiment in large space structures technology. The basic objectives can be broken down into three generic areas: (1) by performing assembly tasks both in space and in neutral buoyancy simulation, a mathematical basis will be found for the validity conditions of neutral buoyancy, thus enhancing the utility of water as a medium for simulation of weightlessness; (2) a data base will be established describing the capabilities and limitations of EVA crewmembers, including effects of such things as hardware size and crew restraints; and (3) experience of the M.I.T. Space Systems Lab in neutral buoyancy simulation of large space structures assembly indicates that the assembly procedure may create the largest loads that a structure will experience during its lifetime. Data obtained from the experiment will help establish an accurate loading model to aid designers of future space structures.

  13. Experiments in interactive panoramic cinema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Scott S.; Anderson, Steve; Ruiz, Susana; Naimark, Michael; Hoberman, Perry; Bolas, Mark; Weinberg, Richard

    2005-03-01

    For most of the past 100 years, cinema has been the premier medium for defining and expressing relations to the visible world. However, cinematic spectacles delivered in darkened theaters are predicated on a denial of both the body and the physical surroundings of the spectators who are watching it. To overcome these deficiencies, filmmakers have historically turned to narrative, seducing audiences with compelling stories and providing realistic characters with whom to identify. This paper describes several research projects in interactive panoramic cinema that attempt to sidestep the narrative preoccupations of conventional cinema and instead are based on notions of space, movement and embodied spectatorship rather than traditional storytelling. Example projects include interactive works developed with the use of a unique 360 degree camera and editing system, and also development of panoramic imagery for a large projection environment with 14 screens on 3 adjacent walls in a 5-4-5 configuration with observations and findings from an experiment projecting panoramic video on 12 of the 14, in a 4-4-4 270 degree configuration.

  14. Structure enhancement methodology using theory and experiment: gas-phase molecular structures using a dynamic interaction between electron diffraction, molecular mechanics, and ab initio data.

    PubMed

    Kafka, Graeme R; Masters, Sarah L; Rankin, David W H

    2007-07-01

    A new method of incorporating ab initio theoretical data dynamically into the gas-phase electron diffraction (GED) refinement process has been developed to aid the structure determination of large, sterically crowded molecules. This process involves calculating a set of differences between parameters that define the positions of peripheral atoms (usually hydrogen), as determined using molecular mechanics (MM), and those which use ab initio methods. The peripheral-atom positions are then updated continually during the GED refinement process, using MM, and the returned positions are modified using this set of differences to account for the differences between ab initio and MM methods, before being scaled back to the average parameters used to define them, as refined from experimental data. This allows the molecule to adopt a completely asymmetric structure if required, without being constrained by the MM parametrization, whereas the calculations can be performed on a practical time scale. The molecular structures of tri-tert-butylphosphine oxide and tri-tert-butylphosphine imide have been re-examined using this new technique, which we call SEMTEX (Structure Enhancement Methodology using Theory and EXperiment).

  15. Interactive Modelling of Molecular Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustad, J. R.; Kreylos, O.; Hamann, B.

    2004-12-01

    The "Nanotech Construction Kit" (NCK) [1] is a new project aimed at improving the understanding of molecular structures at a nanometer-scale level by visualization and interactive manipulation. Our very first prototype is a virtual-reality program allowing the construction of silica and carbon structures from scratch by assembling them one atom at a time. In silica crystals or glasses, the basic building block is an SiO4 unit, with the four oxygen atoms arranged around the central silicon atom in the shape of a regular tetrahedron. Two silicate units can connect to each other by their silicon atoms covalently bonding to one shared oxygen atom. Geometrically, this means that two tetrahedra can link at their vertices. Our program is based on geometric representations and uses simple force fields to simulate the interaction of building blocks, such as forming/breaking of bonds and repulsion. Together with stereoscopic visualization and direct manipulation of building blocks using wands or data gloves, this enables users to create realistic and complex molecular models in short amounts of time. The NCK can either be used as a standalone tool, to analyze or experiment with molecular structures, or it can be used in combination with "traditional" molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In a first step, the NCK can create initial configurations for subsequent MD simulation. In a more evolved setup, the NCK can serve as a visual front-end for an ongoing MD simulation, visualizing changes in simulation state in real time. Additionally, the NCK can be used to change simulation state on-the-fly, to experiment with different simulation conditions, or force certain events, e.g., the forming of a bond, and observe the simulation's reaction. [1] http://graphics.cs.ucdavis.edu/~okreylos/ResDev/NanoTech

  16. Precision experiments in electroweak interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, M.L.

    1990-03-01

    The electroweak theory of Glashow, Weinberg, and Salam (GWS) has become one of the twin pillars upon which our understanding of all particle physics phenomena rests. It is a brilliant achievement that qualitatively and quantitatively describes all of the vast quantity of experimental data that have been accumulated over some forty years. Note that the word quantitatively must be qualified. The low energy limiting cases of the GWS theory, Quantum Electrodynamics and the V-A Theory of Weak Interactions, have withstood rigorous testing. The high energy synthesis of these ideas, the GWS theory, has not yet been subjected to comparably precise scrutiny. The recent operation of a new generation of proton-antiproton (p{bar p}) and electron-positron (e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}) colliders has made it possible to produce and study large samples of the electroweak gauge bosons W{sup {plus minus}} and Z{sup 0}. We expect that these facilities will enable very precise tests of the GWS theory to be performed in the near future. In keeping with the theme of this Institute, Physics at the 100 GeV Mass Scale, these lectures will explore the current status and the near-future prospects of these experiments.

  17. Numerical simulations of shake-table experiment for dynamic soil-pile-structure interaction in liquefiable soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Liang; Maula, Baydaa Hussain; Ling, Xianzhang; Su, Lei

    2014-03-01

    A shake-table experiment on pile foundations in liquefiable soils composed of liquefiable sand and overlying soft clay is studied. A three-dimensional (3D) effective stress finite element (FE) analysis is employed to simulate the experiment. A recently developed multi-surface elasto-plastic constitutive model and a fully coupled dynamic inelastic FE formulation ( u- p) are used to model the liquefaction behavior of the sand. The soil domains are discretized using a solid-fl uid fully coupled ( u- p) 20-8 noded brick element. The pile is simulated using beam-column elements. Upon careful calibration, very good agreement is obtained between the computed and the measured dynamic behavior of the ground and the pile. A parametric analysis is also conducted on the model to investigate the effect of pile-pinning, pile diameter, pile stiffness, ground inclination angle, superstructure mass and pile head restraints on the ground improvement. It is found that the pile foundation has a noticeable pinning effect that reduces the lateral soil displacement. It is observed that a larger pile diameter and fixed pile head restraints contribute to decreasing the lateral pile deformation; however, a higher ground inclination angle tends to increase the lateral pile head displacements and pile stiffness, and superstructure mass seems to effectively influence the lateral pile displacements.

  18. Structural Assembly Demonstration Experiment (SADE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akin, David L.; Mills, Raymond A.; Bowden, Mary L.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of the Structural Assembly Demonstration Experiment (SADE) was to create a near-term Shuttle flight experiment focusing on the deployment and erection of structural truss elements. The activities of the MIT Space Systems Laboratory consist of three major areas: preparing and conducting neutral buoyancy simulation test series; producing a formal SADE Experiment plan; and studying the structural dynamics issues of the truss structure. Each of these areas is summarized.

  19. ISE structural dynamic experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lock, Malcolm H.; Clark, S. Y.

    1988-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: directed energy systems - vibration issue; Neutral Particle Beam Integrated Space Experiment (NPB-ISE) opportunity/study objective; vibration sources/study plan; NPB-ISE spacecraft configuration; baseline slew analysis and results; modal contributions; fundamental pitch mode; vibration reduction approaches; peak residual vibration; NPB-ISE spacecraft slew experiment; goodbye ISE - hello Zenith Star Program.

  20. Compressible turbulent boundary layer interaction experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Settles, G. S.; Bogdonoff, S. M.

    1981-01-01

    Four phases of research results are reported: (1) experiments on the compressible turbulent boundary layer flow in a streamwise corner; (2) the two dimensional (2D) interaction of incident shock waves with a compressible turbulent boundary layer; (3) three dimensional (3D) shock/boundary layer interactions; and (4) cooperative experiments at Princeton and numerical computations at NASA-Ames.

  1. Interactive Screen Experiments with Single Photons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronner, Patrick; Strunz, Andreas; Silberhorn, Christine; Meyn, Jan-Peter

    2009-01-01

    Single photons are used for fundamental quantum physics experiments as well as for applications. Originally being a topic of advance courses, such experiments are increasingly a subject of undergraduate courses. We provide interactive screen experiments (ISE) for supporting the work in a real laboratory, and for students who do not have access to…

  2. Structural verification for GAS experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peden, Mark Daniel

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to assist the Get Away Special (GAS) experimenter in conducting a thorough structural verification of its experiment structural configuration, thus expediting the structural review/approval process and the safety process in general. Material selection for structural subsystems will be covered with an emphasis on fasteners (GSFC fastener integrity requirements) and primary support structures (Stress Corrosion Cracking requirements and National Space Transportation System (NSTS) requirements). Different approaches to structural verifications (tests and analyses) will be outlined especially those stemming from lessons learned on load and fundamental frequency verification. In addition, fracture control will be covered for those payloads that utilize a door assembly or modify the containment provided by the standard GAS Experiment Mounting Plate (EMP). Structural hazard assessment and the preparation of structural hazard reports will be reviewed to form a summation of structural safety issues for inclusion in the safety data package.

  3. Numerical Experiments with Shock-Turbulence Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lele, S. K.; Larsson, J.; Bhagatwala, A.; Moin, P.

    2009-04-01

    Many applications in engineering and physical sciences involve turbulent flows interacting with shock waves. High-speed flows around aerodynamic bodies and through propulsion systems for high-speed flight abound with interactions of shear driven turbulence with complex shock waves. Supernova explosions and implosion of a cryogenic fuel pellet for inertial confinement fusion also involve the interaction of shockwaves with turbulence and strong density variations. Numerical simulations of such physical phenomena impose conflicting demands on the numerical algorithms. Capturing broadband spatial and temporal variations in a turbulent flow suggests the use of high-bandwidth schemes with minimal dissipation and dispersion, while capturing the flow discontinuity at a shock wave requires numerical dissipation. We summarize results from a series of benchmark test problems for assessing the ability of three different approaches to shock capturing: high order WENO, nonlinear artificial diffusivity with compact finite differences, and a hybrid approach combining high-order central differencing with WENO near the shocks. These test problems allow an assessment of the tradeoff needed between preserving non-dissipation of small-scale flow fluctuations and avoiding significant Gibbs' oscillation near a shock. Numerical experiments on Taylor-Green problem and compressible isotropic turbulence are used to evaluate the performance of these schemes on flows with broadband fluctuations. The compressible turbulence test case also contains local eddy-shocklets. The performance of each scheme is characterized in terms of an effective bandwidth. Finally some results on a canonical shock-turbulence interaction problem, i.e. the interaction of isotropic turbulence with a (nominally) normal shock, are discussed. These results achieve a turbulence Reynolds number which is significantly larger than previous DNS studies of this problem. It is observed that when the turbulence interacting with

  4. Solar Array Module Plasma Interaction Experiment (SAMPIE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the Solar Array Module Plasma Interaction Experiment (SAMPIE) is to investigate, by means of a shuttle-based flight experiment and relevant ground-based testing, the arcing and current collection behavior of materials and geometries likely to be exposed to the LEO plasma on high-voltage space power systems, in order to minimize adverse environmental interactions. An overview of the SAMPIE program is presented in outline and graphical form.

  5. Design for Engaging Experience and Social Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harteveld, Casper; ten Thij, Eleonore; Copier, Marinka

    2011-01-01

    One of the goals of game designers is to design for an engaging experience and for social interaction. The question is how. We know that games can be engaging and allow for social interaction, but how do we achieve this or even improve on it? This article provides an overview of several scientific approaches that deal with this question. It…

  6. Organizational Learning from Cross-Cultural Experiences: An Ethnomethodological Case Study Examining the Relative Importance of Social Structure and Cultural Values during Dynamic Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldecker, Gary T.

    2011-01-01

    This study explored how social structure and cultural values dynamically interact in collective learning between two religious organizations cooperating in a joint project. It further explored the enablers of and impediments to collective learning in this context. The study employed the theoretical framework provided by the Organizational Learning…

  7. Controls-structures-electromagnetics interaction program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grantham, William L.; Bailey, Marion C.; Belvin, Wendell K.; Williams, Jeffrey P.

    1987-01-01

    A technology development program is described involving Controls Structures Electromagnetics Interaction (CSEI) for large space structures. The CSEI program was developed as part of the continuing effort following the successful kinematic deployment and RF tests of the 15 meter Hoop/Column antenna. One lesson learned was the importance of making reflector surface adjustment after fabrication and deployment. Given are program objectives, ground based test configuration, Intelsat adaptive feed, reflector shape prediction model, control experiment concepts, master schedule, and Control Of Flexible Structures-II (COFS-II) baseline configuration.

  8. Acoustoelasticity. [sound-structure interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowell, E. H.

    1977-01-01

    Sound or pressure variations inside bounded enclosures are investigated. Mathematical models are given for determining: (1) the interaction between the sound pressure field and the flexible wall of a Helmholtz resonator; (2) coupled fluid-structural motion of an acoustic cavity with a flexible and/or absorbing wall; (3) acoustic natural modes in multiple connected cavities; and (4) the forced response of a cavity with a flexible and/or absorbing wall. Numerical results are discussed.

  9. Structure and interactions of biological helices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornyshev, Alexei A.; Lee, Dominic J.; Leikin, Sergey; Wynveen, Aaron

    2007-07-01

    Helices are essential building blocks of living organisms, be they molecular fragments of proteins ( α -helices), macromolecules (DNA and collagen), or multimolecular assemblies (microtubules and viruses). Their interactions are involved in packing of meters of genetic material within cells and phage heads, recognition of homologous genes in recombination and DNA repair, stability of tissues, and many other processes. Helical molecules form a variety of mesophases in vivo and in vitro. Recent structural studies, direct measurements of intermolecular forces, single-molecule manipulations, and other experiments have accumulated a wealth of information and revealed many puzzling physical phenomena. It is becoming increasingly clear that in many cases the physics of biological helices cannot be described by theories that treat them as simple, unstructured polyelectrolytes. The present article focuses on the most important and interesting aspects of the physics of structured macromolecules, highlighting various manifestations of the helical motif in their structure, elasticity, interactions with counterions, aggregation, and poly- and mesomorphic transitions.

  10. Probing - and - Molecular Interactions via Irmpd Experiments and Computational Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Scott; McMahon, Terry

    2015-06-01

    Experiments carried out at the CLIO Free Electron Facility have been used to probe a range of novel bonding motifs and dissociation dynamics in a variety of chemical systems. Among these are species which exhibit anion-pi interactions in complexes of halide ions with aromatic ring systems with electron withdrawing substituents; charge solvated and zwitterionic clusters of protonated methylamines with phenylalanines; hydrogen bonded dimers of nucleic acid analogues and Pd complexes potentially involving agnostic hydrogen bond interactions. Accompanying DFT computational work is used to assist in identifying the most probable structure(s) present in the IRMPD experiments.

  11. An experiment with interactive planning models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beville, J.; Wagner, J. H.; Zannetos, Z. S.

    1970-01-01

    Experiments on decision making in planning problems are described. Executives were tested in dealing with capital investments and competitive pricing decisions under conditions of uncertainty. A software package, the interactive risk analysis model system, was developed, and two controlled experiments were conducted. It is concluded that planning models can aid management, and predicted uses of the models are as a central tool, as an educational tool, to improve consistency in decision making, to improve communications, and as a tool for consensus decision making.

  12. Young Children as Explorers: Interactive Learning Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Best Practices in Early Childhood Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This curriculum, designed for young children ages 3-6, focuses on math, science, and social studies and includes integrated activities to use with over 30 software titles. Young Children as Explorers: Interactive Learning Experiences addresses learning standards established by the National Council for Teachers of Mathematics, National Research…

  13. Some effects of cloud-aerosol interaction on cloud microphysics structure and precipitation formation: numerical experiments with a spectral microphysics cloud ensemble model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khain, A.; Pokrovsky, A.; Sednev, I.

    A spectral microphysics Hebrew University Cloud Model (HUCM) is used to evaluate some effects of cloud-aerosol interaction on mixed-phase cloud microphysics and aerosol particle size distribution in the region of the Eastern Mediterranean coastal circulation. In case of a high concentration of aerosol particles (APs), the rate of warm rain formation is several times lower, a significant fraction of droplets ascends above the freezing level. These drops produce a large amount of comparably small graupel particles and ice crystals. The warm rain from these clouds is less intense as compared to clouds with low drop concentration. At the same time, melted rain from clouds with high droplet concentration is more intense than from low drop concentration clouds. Melted rain can take place downwind at a distance of several tens of kilometers from the convective zone. It is shown that APs entering clouds above the cloud base influence the evolution of the drop size spectrum and the rate of rain formation. The chemical composition of APs influences the concentration of nucleated droplets and, therefore, changes accumulated rain significantly (in our experiments these changes are of 25-30%). Clouds in a coastal circulation influence significantly the concentration and size distribution of APs. First, they decrease the concentration of largest APs by nucleation scavenging. In our experiments, about 40% of APs were nucleated within clouds. The remaining APs are transported to middle levels by cloud updrafts and then enter the land at the levels of 3 to 7 km. In our experiments, the concentration of small APs increased several times at these levels. The cut off APs spectrum with an increased concentration of small APs remains downwind of the convective zone for several of tens and even hundreds of kilometers. The schemes of drop nucleation (based on the dependence of nucleated drop concentration on supersaturation in a certain power) and autoconversion (based on the Kessler

  14. Spin Mass Interaction Limiting Experiment (SMILE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Junyi; Romalis, Michael

    2016-05-01

    We present preliminary results of an upcoming experiment to limit possible anomalous spin mass interactions. Such interactions arise naturally if light pseudoscalar bosons like the axion exist and a bound on such interactions places constraints on the couplings of the axion, which is of particular interest both as a solution to the strong CP problem in QCD and as a dark matter candidate. In this experiment, we measure the couplings of the axion using a 3 He-K co-magnetometer by modulating the positions of two 200kg source masses that produces an energy shift in the atoms proportional to the axion's coupling constants. Astroyphysical observations currently exceed the best laboratory limits of light axions' couplings to nucleons by two order of magnitudes but we expect, for the first time in a laboratory experiment, to surpass those astrophysical bounds. Construction of the experiment has been completed and we present here some preliminary results and discuss possible systematic effects. Supported by NSF PHY-1404325.

  15. NASA/DOD Controls-Structures Interaction Technology 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, Jerry R. (Compiler)

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this conference was to report to industry, academia, and government agencies on the current status of controls-structures interaction technology. The agenda covered ground testing, integrated design, analysis, flight experiments, and concepts.

  16. NASA'S controls-structures interaction program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanks, Brantley R.

    1989-01-01

    A NASA program is about to start which has the objective to advance Controls-Structures Interaction (CSI) technology to a point where it can be used in spacecraft design for future missions. Because of the close interrelationships between the structure, the control hardware, and the analysis/design, a highly interdisciplinary activity is defined in which structures, dynamics, controls, computer and electronics engineers work together on a daily basis and are co-located to a large extent. Methods will be developed which allow the controls and structures analysis and design functions to use the same mathematical models. Hardware tests and applications are emphasized and will require development of concepts and test methods to carry out. Because of a variety of mission application problem classes, several time-phased, focus ground test articles are planned. They will be located at the Langley Researdh Center (LaRC), the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). It is anticipated that the ground tests will be subject to gravity and other environmental effects to the extent that orbital flights tests will be needed for verification of some technology items. The need for orbital flight experiments will be quantified based on ground test results and mission needs. Candidate on-orbit experiments will be defined and preliminary design/definition and cost studies will be carried out for one or more high-priority experiments.

  17. Control/structure interaction design methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Hugh C.; Layman, William E.

    1989-01-01

    The Control Structure Interaction Program is a technology development program for spacecraft that exhibit interactions between the control system and structural dynamics. The program objectives include development and verification of new design concepts (such as active structure) and new tools (such as a combined structure and control optimization algorithm) and their verification in ground and possibly flight test. The new CSI design methodology is centered around interdisciplinary engineers using new tools that closely integrate structures and controls. Verification is an important CSI theme and analysts will be closely integrated to the CSI Test Bed laboratory. Components, concepts, tools and algorithms will be developed and tested in the lab and in future Shuttle-based flight experiments. The design methodology is summarized in block diagrams depicting the evolution of a spacecraft design and descriptions of analytical capabilities used in the process. The multiyear JPL CSI implementation plan is described along with the essentials of several new tools. A distributed network of computation servers and workstations was designed that will provide a state-of-the-art development base for the CSI technologies.

  18. Structural Dynamics and Control Interaction of Flexible Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert S. (Editor); Scofield, Harold N. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    A workshop on structural dynamics and control interaction of flexible structures was held to promote technical exchange between the structural dynamics and control disciplines, foster joint technology, and provide a forum for discussing and focusing critical issues in the separate and combined areas. Issues and areas of emphasis were identified in structure-control interaction for the next generation of flexible systems.

  19. Discovery & Interaction in Astro 101 Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, Frank Patrick; Maurone, Philip; DeWarf, Laurence E.

    2016-01-01

    The availability of low-cost, high-performance computing hardware and software has transformed the manner by which astronomical concepts can be re-discovered and explored in a laboratory that accompanies an astronomy course for arts students. We report on a strategy, begun in 1992, for allowing each student to understand fundamental scientific principles by interactively confronting astronomical and physical phenomena, through direct observation and by computer simulation. These experiments have evolved as :a) the quality and speed of the hardware has greatly increasedb) the corresponding hardware costs have decreasedc) the students have become computer and Internet literated) the importance of computationally and scientifically literate arts graduates in the workplace has increased.We present the current suite of laboratory experiments, and describe the nature, procedures, and goals in this two-semester laboratory for liberal arts majors at the Astro 101 university level.

  20. Interaction of multipactor discharge andrf structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishek, Rami Alfred

    1997-08-01

    Multipactor is a resonant, low-to-medium rf voltage breakdown phenomenon in microwave cavities, windows, and accelerator structures. A simple model is used to study the temporal evolution of a first-order, two-surface multipactor discharge and its interaction with the surrounding rf structure. The model assumes an infinitesimally thin sheet of electrons released with monoenergetic velocities in a parallel plate geometry. The loading of the structure by the changing multipactor current, a combination of de-tuning and of reducing the quality factor of the resonant structure, is found to cause saturation. The steady state multipactor current has been derived analytically, and compares favorably with the computational results of the model. This current, properly normalized, is found to depend only on the magnitude of the drive current and the first cross- over point of the wall material's secondary yield curve (as well as the initial velocity of secondaries). Transiently, the behavior of the multipactor depends on the quality factor of the rf structure. Non-resonant structures experience a fairly steady growth of the discharge towards the steady state level predicted by the theory. Highly-resonant structures, on the other hand, experience large oscillatory transients in the level of the discharge before it settles to the steady state. During these oscillations, the discharge feeds from the significant energy stored in the structure, and can be very damaging to the structure itself. Simulations performed with two electron sheets instead of one reveal a novel phase-focusing mechanism in which one sheet grows at the expense of the other. This 'cannibalism' results from the different impact energies, hence different yields, encountered by the different sheets (parts of the bunch). This mechanism may result in the multipactor electrons being very tightly bunched. However, this cannibalism operates on a relatively long time scale. A multipactor discharge can take place

  1. Ice interaction with offshore structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cammaert, A.B.; Muggeridge, D.B.

    1988-01-01

    Oil platforms and other offshore structures being built in the arctic regions must be able to withstand icebergs, ice islands, and pack ice. This reference explain the effect ice has on offshore structures and demonstrates design and construction methods that allow such structures to survive in harsh, ice-ridden environments. It analyzes the characteristics of sea ice as well as dynamic ice forces on structures. Techniques for ice modeling and field testing facilitate the design and construction of sturdy, offshore constructions. Computer programs included.

  2. Stand By for Fun: Experience and Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crockford, Douglas

    1986-01-01

    This paper explores interactivity, and considers what should be done to create a mass market for interactive media. It is suggested that one way to do so is to examine the video game phenomenon, and a model of interactivity is proposed. The model, a "home interactive theater," would involve interaction in the telling of a story, with the…

  3. Spacecraft control/flexible structures interaction study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, M. H.; Hillard, S. E.

    1974-01-01

    An initial study to begin development of a flight experiment to measure spacecraft control/flexible structure interactions was completed. The approach consisted of developing the equations of motion for a vehicle possessing a flexible solar array, then linearizing about some nominal motion of the craft. A set of solutions is assumed for array deflection using a continuous normal mode method and important parameters are identified. Interrelationships between these parameters, measurement techniques, and input requirements are discussed which assure minimization of special vehicle maneuvers and optimization of data to be obtained during the normal flight sequence. Limited consideration is given to flight data retrieval and processing techniques as correlated with the requirements imposed by the measurement system. Results indicate that inflight measurement of the bending and torsional mode shapes and respective frequencies, and damping ratios, is necessary. Other parameters may be measured from design data.

  4. The TOYSAT structural control experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breakwell, J. A.; Chambers, G. J.

    1983-01-01

    The Lockheed TOYSAT experiment is described. The experiment was designed to test hypothesis concerning the application of optimal control theory to flexible spacecraft. The theory is presented, and results described.

  5. An Interactive Introduction to Protein Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, W. Theodore

    2004-01-01

    To improve student understanding of protein structure and the significance of noncovalent interactions in protein structure and function, students are assigned a project to write a paper complemented with computer-generated images. The assignment provides an opportunity for students to select a protein structure that is of interest and detail…

  6. Jet-Supercavity Interaction: Insights from Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeny, M. J.; Krane, M. H.; Kirschner, I. N.; Kinzel, M. P.

    2015-12-01

    An experimental study was performed to evaluate some of the claims of Paryshev (2006) regarding changes to ventilated cavity behavior caused by the interaction of a jet with the cavity closure region. The experiments, conducted in the 1.22m dia. Garfield Thomas Water Tunnel, were performed for EDD to tunnel diameter of 0.022, Fr = 14.5 and 26.2. The model consisted of a converging-section nozzle mounted to the base of a 27.9mm 37° cone cavitator placed on the tunnel centerline at the end of a 138.4mm long streamlined strut. A ventilated cavity was formed over the model, then an air jet, issuing from a converging nozzle, was initiated. Changes to cavity behavior were quantified in terms of cavitation number, thrust-to- drag ratio, and stagnation pressure ratio at the jet nozzle. The results show that, while the overall trends predicted by Paryshev were observed, the data did not fully collapse, suggesting that many of the effects neglected by Paryshev's model have measureable effect.

  7. The Effects of Magnetic Anomalies Discovered at Mars on the Structure of the Martian Ionosphere and the Solar Wind Interaction as Follows from Radio Occultation Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, N. F.; Acuna, M. H.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Cloutier, P.; Kliore, A. J.; Breus, T. K.; Krymskii, A. M.; Bauer, S. J.

    1999-01-01

    The electron density distribution in the ionosphere of nonmagnetic (or weakly magnetized) planet depends not only on the solar ultraviolet intensity, but also on the nature of the SW interaction with this planet. Two scenarios previously have been developed based on the observations of the bow shock crossings and on the electron density distribution within the ionosphere. According to one of them Mars has an intrinsic magnetosphere produced by a dipole magnetic field and the Martian ionosphere is protected from the SW flow except during "overpressure conditions, when the planetary magnetic field can not balance the SW dynamic pressure. In the second scenario the Martian intrinsic magnetic dipole field is so weak that Mars has mainly an induced magnetosphere and a Venus-like SW/ionosphere interaction. Today the possible existence of a sufficiently strong global magnetic field that participates in the SW/Mars interaction can no longer be supported. The results obtained by the Mars-Global-Surveyor (MGS) space-craft show the existence of highly variable, but also very localized magnetic fields of crustal origin at Mars as high as 400-1500 nT. The absence of the large-scale global magnetic field at Mars makes it similar to Venus, except for possible effects of the magnetic anomalies associated with the remnant crustal magnetization. However the previous results on the Martian ionosphere obtained mainly by the radio occultation methods show that there appears to be a permanent existence of a global horizontal magnetic field in the Martian ionosphere. Moreover the global induced magnetic field in the Venus ionosphere is not typical at the solar zenith angles explored by the radio occultation methods. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  8. Creating Learning Experiences through Interactive Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Alexis

    2014-01-01

    In this small-scale study, the use of a simple interactive device was designed and studied ethnographically to discover how groups visiting a museum as part of a guided tour interacted with the device as viewed from the perspective of the group tour guides. As the emphasis placed on utilizing interactive devices in museums is increasing, one can…

  9. Computes Generalized Electromagnetic Interactions Between Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, William

    1999-02-20

    Object oriented software for computing generalized electromagnetic interactions between structures in the frequency domains. The software is based on integral equations. There is also a static integral equation capability.

  10. Some Experiments in Atomic Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Kent R.

    1974-01-01

    The role of spectral color slides in laboratory situations is discussed, then experiments for secondary school students concerning color and wave length, evidence of quantization, and the ionization energy of the hydrogen atom are outlined. Teaching guidelines for creating a set of spectrograms and photographic specifications are provided. (DT)

  11. Generalized Structured Component Analysis with Latent Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun; Ho, Moon-Ho Ringo; Lee, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Generalized structured component analysis (GSCA) is a component-based approach to structural equation modeling. In practice, researchers may often be interested in examining the interaction effects of latent variables. However, GSCA has been geared only for the specification and testing of the main effects of variables. Thus, an extension of GSCA…

  12. Reduced Order Models for Fluid-Structure Interaction Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallardo, Daniele

    With the advent of active flow control devices for regulating the structural responses of systems involving fluid-structure interaction phenomena, there is a growing need of efficient models that can be used to control the system. The first step is then to be able to model the system in an efficient way based on reduced-order models. This is needed so that accurate predictions of the system evolution could be performed in a fast manner, ideally in real time. However, existing reduced-order models of fluid-structure interaction phenomena that provide closed-form solutions are applicable to only a limited set of scenarios while for real applications high-fidelity experiments or numerical simulations are required, which are unsuitable as efficient or reduced-order models. This thesis proposes a novel reduced-order and efficient model for fluid-structure interaction phenomena. The model structure employed is such that it is generic for different fluid-structure interaction problems. Based on this structure, the model is first built for a given fluid-structure interaction problem based on a database generated through high-fidelity numerical simulations while it can subsequently be used to predict the structural response over a wide set of flow conditions for the fluid-structure interaction problem at hand. The model is tested on two cases: a cylinder suspended in a low Reynolds number flow that includes the lock-in region and an airfoil subjected to plunge oscillations in a high Reynolds number regime. For each case, in addition to training profile we also present validation profiles that are used to determine the performance of the reduced-order model. The reduced-order model devised in this study proved to be an effective and efficient modeling method for fluid-structure interaction phenomena and it shown its applicability in very different kind of scenarios.

  13. Structural assembly demonstration experiment, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akin, David L.; Bowden, Mary L.; Miller, Rene H.

    1983-01-01

    The goal of this phase of the structural assembly and demonstration experiment (SADE) program was to begin to define a shuttle flight experiment that would yield data to compare on-orbit assembly operations of large space structures with neutral buoyancy simulations. In addition, the experiment would be an early demonstration of structural hardware and human capabilities in extravehicular activity (EVA). The objectives of the MIT study, as listed in the statement of work, were: to provide support in establishing a baseline neutral buoyancy testing data base, to develop a correlation technique between neutral buoyancy test results and on-orbit operations, and to prepare the SADE experiment plan (MSFC-PLAN-913).

  14. Regularity of nuclear structure under random interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Y. M.

    2011-05-06

    In this contribution I present a brief introduction to simplicity out of complexity in nuclear structure, specifically, the regularity of nuclear structure under random interactions. I exemplify such simplicity by two examples: spin-zero ground state dominance and positive parity ground state dominance in even-even nuclei. Then I discuss two recent results of nuclear structure in the presence of random interactions, in collaboration with Prof. Arima. Firstly I discuss sd bosons under random interactions, with the focus on excited states in the yrast band. We find a few regular patterns in these excited levels. Secondly I discuss our recent efforts towards obtaining eigenvalues without diagonalizing the full matrices of the nuclear shell model Hamiltonian.

  15. Fluid-Structure Interaction in Internal Physiological Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heil, Matthias; Hazel, Andrew L.

    2011-01-01

    We provide a selective review of recent progress in the analysis of several physiological and physiologically inspired fluid-structure interaction problems, our aim being to explain the underlying physical mechanisms that cause the observed behaviors. Specifically, we discuss recent studies of self-excited oscillations in collapsible tubes, focusing primarily on studies of an idealized model system, the Starling resistor -- a device used in most laboratory experiments. We next review studies of a particular physiological, flow-induced oscillation: vocal-fold oscillations during phonation. Finally, we discuss the closure and reopening of pulmonary airways, physiological fluid-structure interaction problems that also involve the airways' liquid lining.

  16. Working Smart Workbook. An Interactive Learning Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles Unified School District, CA. Div. of Adult and Occupational Education.

    This workbook accompanies an interactive videodisc used in the Working Smart workplace literacy project prepared for the hotel and food services industry in the Los Angeles, California area. The first instructional unit addresses preparing the work area, including stocking supplies and cleaning the work area. The second instructional unit covers…

  17. Developing Interactive Language Experiences for the Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuchinskas, Gloria

    1982-01-01

    Offers suggestions for developing interactive language programs for classroom use using a microcomputer, and cites educational principles involved: concern is production of language; children learn language by modeling; computer is motivating factor; and student should not be passive receiver of computer program. A program entitled "Writing…

  18. RANS Modeling of Benchmark Shockwave / Boundary Layer Interaction Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiadis, Nick; Vyas, Manan; Yoder, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    This presentation summarizes the computations of a set of shock wave / turbulent boundary layer interaction (SWTBLI) test cases using the Wind-US code, as part of the 2010 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) shock / boundary layer interaction workshop. The experiments involve supersonic flows in wind tunnels with a shock generator that directs an oblique shock wave toward the boundary layer along one of the walls of the wind tunnel. The Wind-US calculations utilized structured grid computations performed in Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes mode. Three turbulence models were investigated: the Spalart-Allmaras one-equation model, the Menter Shear Stress Transport wavenumber-angular frequency two-equation model, and an explicit algebraic stress wavenumber-angular frequency formulation. Effects of grid resolution and upwinding scheme were also considered. The results from the CFD calculations are compared to particle image velocimetry (PIV) data from the experiments. As expected, turbulence model effects dominated the accuracy of the solutions with upwinding scheme selection indicating minimal effects.!

  19. Fundamental Structure of Matter and Strong Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Ping Chen

    2011-11-01

    More than 99% of the visible matter in the universe are the protons and neutrons. Their internal structure is mostly governed by the strong interaction. Understanding their internal structure in terms of fundamental degrees-of-freedom is one of the most important subjects in modern physics. Worldwide efforts in the last few decades have lead to numerous surprises and discoveries, but major challenges still remain. An overview of the progress will be presented with a focus on the recent studies of the proton and neutron's electromagnetic and spin structure. Future perspectives will be discussed.

  20. Flow Interaction With Highly Flexible Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoele, Kourosh

    Studying the interaction between fluid and structure is an essential step towards the understanding of many engineering and physical problems, from the flow instability of structures to the biolocomotion of insects, birds and fishes. The simulation of such problems is computationally challenging. This justifies the attempts to develop more sophisticated and more efficient numerical models of fluid-solid interactions. In this dissertation, we proposed numerical models both in potential flow and fully viscous flow for the interaction of immersed structure with a strongly unsteady flow. In particular we have developed efficient approaches to study two groups of problems, the flow interaction with skeleton-reinforced fish fins and flow interaction with highly flexible bluff bodies. Fins of bony fishes are characterized by a skeleton-reinforced membrane structure consisting of a soft collagen membrane strengthened by embedded flexible rays. Morphologically, each ray is connected to a group of muscles so that the fish can control the rotational motion of each ray individually, enabling multi-degree of freedom control over the fin motion and deformation. We have developed fluid-structure interaction models to simulate the kinematics and dynamic performance of a structurally idealized fin. The first method includes a boundary-element model of the fluid motion and a fully-nonlinear Euler-Bernoulli beam model of the embedded rays. In the second method, we use an improved immersed boundary approach. Using these models, we study thrust generation and propulsion efficiency of the fin at different combinations of parameters at both high-Re and intermediate-Re flow. Effects of kinematic as well as structural properties are examined. It has been illustrated that the fish's capacity to control the motion of each individual ray, as well as the anisotropic deformability of the fin determined by distribution of the rays (especially the detailed distribution of ray stiffness), is

  1. Interaction Energy Based Protein Structure Networks

    PubMed Central

    Vijayabaskar, M.S.; Vishveshwara, Saraswathi

    2010-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of a protein is formed and maintained by the noncovalent interactions among the amino-acid residues of the polypeptide chain. These interactions can be represented collectively in the form of a network. So far, such networks have been investigated by considering the connections based on distances between the amino-acid residues. Here we present a method of constructing the structure network based on interaction energies among the amino-acid residues in the protein. We have investigated the properties of such protein energy-based networks (PENs) and have shown correlations to protein structural features such as the clusters of residues involved in stability, formation of secondary and super-secondary structural units. Further we demonstrate that the analysis of PENs in terms of parameters such as hubs and shortest paths can provide a variety of biologically important information, such as the residues crucial for stabilizing the folded units and the paths of communication between distal residues in the protein. Finally, the energy regimes for different levels of stabilization in the protein structure have clearly emerged from the PEN analysis. PMID:21112295

  2. Polymer nanocomposites: structure, interaction, and functionality.

    PubMed

    Keledi, Gergely; Hári, József; Pukánszky, Béla

    2012-03-21

    This feature article discusses the main factors determining the properties of polymer nanocomposites with special attention paid to structure and interactions. Usually more complicated structure develops in nanocomposites than in traditional particulate filled polymers, and that is especially valid for composites prepared from plate-like nanofillers. Besides the usually assumed exfoliated/intercalated morphology, i.e. individual platelets and tactoids, such nanocomposites often contain large particles, and a network structure developing at large extent of exfoliation. Aggregation and orientation are the most important structural phenomena in nanotube or nanofiber reinforced composites, and ag-gregation is a major problem also in composites prepared with spherical particles. The surface characteristics of nanofillers and interactions are rarely determined or known; the related problems are discussed in the paper in detail. The surface of these reinforcements is modified practically always. The goal of the modification is to improve dispersion and/or adhesion in nanotube and spherical particle reinforced composites, and to help exfoliation in nanocomposites containing platelets. However, modification decreases surface energy often leading to decreased interaction with the matrix. Very limited information exists about interphase formation and the properties of the interphase in nanocomposites, although they must influence properties considerably. The properties of nanocomposites are usually far from the expectations, the main reason being insufficient homogeneity, undefined structure and improper adhesion. In spite of considerable difficulties nanocomposites have great potentials especially in functional applications. Several nanocomposite products are already used in industrial practice demonstrated by a few examples in the article. PMID:22349033

  3. Acoustics of Fluid-Structure Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, M. S.

    1998-08-01

    Acoustics of Fluid-Structure Interactions addresses an increasingly important branch of fluid mechanics--the absorption of noise and vibration by fluid flow. This subject, which offers numerous challenges to conventional areas of acoustics, is of growing concern in places where the environment is adversely affected by sound. Howe presents useful background material on fluid mechanics and the elementary concepts of classical acoustics and structural vibrations. Using examples, many of which include complete worked solutions, he vividly illustrates the theoretical concepts involved. He provides the basis for all calculations necessary for the determination of sound generation by aircraft, ships, general ventilation and combustion systems, as well as musical instruments. Both a graduate textbook and a reference for researchers, Acoustics of Fluid-Structure Interactions is an important synthesis of information in this field. It will also aid engineers in the theory and practice of noise control.

  4. Coulomb Interactions in Hanbury Brown-Twiss Experiments with Electrons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Kan

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation examines the effect of Coulomb interactions in Hanbury Brown-Twiss (HBT) type experiments with electrons. HBT experiments deal with intensity interference, which is related to the second-order correlation function of the particle field. This is an extension of the usual amplitude interference experiment, such as Young's…

  5. Laser Mode Structure Experiments for Undergraduate Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Richard A.; Gehrz, Robert D.

    Experiments dealing with laser mode structure are presented which are suitable for an upper division undergraduate laboratory. The theory of cavity modes is summarized. The mode structure of the radiation from a helium-neon laser is measured by using a photodiode detector and spectrum analyzer to detect intermode beating. Off-axial modes can be…

  6. On some structure-turbulence interaction problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maekawa, S.; Lin, Y. K.

    1976-01-01

    The interactions between a turbulent flow structure; responding to its excitation were studied. The turbulence was typical of those associated with a boundary layer, having a cross-spectral density indicative of convection and statistical decay. A number of structural models were considered. Among the one-dimensional models were an unsupported infinite beam and a periodically supported infinite beam. The fuselage construction of an aircraft was then considered. For the two-dimensional case a simple membrane was used to illustrate the type of formulation applicable to most two-dimensional structures. Both the one-dimensional and two-dimensional structures studied were backed by a cavity filled with an initially quiescent fluid to simulate the acoustic environment when the structure forms one side of a cabin of a sea vessel or aircraft.

  7. Microscopic Approaches to Nuclear Structure: Configuration Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ormand, W E

    2007-09-21

    The configuration interaction (CI) approach to solving the nuclear many-body problem, also known as the interacting shell model, has proven to be powerful tool in understanding the structure of nuclei. The principal criticism of past applications of the shell model is the reliance on empirical tuning to interaction matrix elements. If an accurate description of nuclei far from the valley of stability, where little or no data is available, a more fundamental approach is needed. This starts with recent ab initio approaches with effective interactions in the no-core shell model (NCSM). Using effective-field theory for guidance, fully ab initio descriptions of nuclei up to {sup 16}O with QCD based NN, NNN, and NNNN interactions will be possible within the next five years. An important task is then to determine how to use these NCSM results to develop effective interactions to describe heavier nuclei without the need to resort to an empirical retuning with every model space. Thus, it is likely that more traditional CI applications utilizing direct diagonalization and more fundamental interactions will be applicable to nuclei with perhaps up to one hundred constituents. But, these direct diagonalization CI applications will always be computationally limited due to the rapid increase in the number of configurations with particle number. Very recently, the shifted-contour method has been applied to the Auxiliary-field Monte Carlo approach to the Shell Model (AFMCSM), and preliminary applications exhibit a remarkable taming of the notorious sign problem. If the mitigation of the sign problem holds true, the AFMCSM will offer a method to compute quantum correlations to mean-field applications for just about all nuclei; giving exact results for CI model spaces that can approach 10{sup 20-25}. In these lectures, I will discuss modern applications of CI to the nuclear many-body problem that have the potential to guide nuclear structure theory into the next decade.

  8. Rigel: An interactive structured grid generation system

    SciTech Connect

    Hachfeld, W.D.; Khamayseh, A.K.; Hansen, G.A.

    1998-02-01

    An interactive structured grid generation application that facilitates the construction of complex, discretized, simulation models directly from the original CAD geometry specifications is presented. The application, named Rigel, reads physical model descriptions generated by modern CAD packages. Rigel includes a suite of interactive geometry editing functions to assist the user in the construction of a topologically correct geometry from the original CAD specification. Once a topologically correct geometry is created, an interactively steered grid generation capability is provided to facilitate the construction of an appropriate discretization for the simulation. Grid quality enhancement is supported with the application of user-directed elliptic smoothing, refinement, and coarsening operators. After a grid is completed, various output filters are supplied to write an input file for the target simulation code. This paper is intended to provide an overview of the mechanics of this process and to highlight some of the novel algorithms and techniques employed.

  9. Structural insights into microtubule doublet interactions inaxonemes

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, Kenneth H.; Sui, Haixin

    2007-06-06

    Coordinated sliding of microtubule doublets, driven by dynein motors, produces periodic beating of the axoneme. Recent structural studies of the axoneme have used cryo-electron tomography to reveal new details of the interactions among some of the multitude of proteins that form the axoneme and regulate its movement. Connections among the several sets of dyneins, in particular, suggest ways in which their actions may be coordinated. Study of the molecular architecture of isolated doublets has provided a structural basis for understanding the doublet's mechanical properties that are related to the bending of the axoneme, and has also offered insight into its potential role in the mechanism of dynein activity regulation.

  10. Proton-neutron interaction and nuclear structure

    SciTech Connect

    Casten, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    The pervasive role of the proton-neutron interaction in nuclear structure is discussed. Particular emphasis is given to its influence on the onset of collectivity and deformation, on intruder states, and on the evolution of subshell structure. The N/sub p/N/sub n/ scheme is outlined and some applications of it to collective model calculations and to nuclei far off stability are described. The concept of N/sub p/N/sub n/ multiplets is introduced. 32 refs., 20 figs.

  11. Structural interaction with transportation and handling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Problems involved in the handling and transportation of finished space vehicles from the factory to the launch site are presented, in addition to recommendations for properly accounting for in space vehicle structural design, adverse interactions during transportation. Emphasis is given to the protection of vehicle structures against those environments and loads encountered during transportation (including temporary storage) which would exceed the levels that the vehicle can safely withstand. Current practices for verifying vehicle safety are appraised, and some of the capabilities and limitations of transportation and handling systems are summarized.

  12. Soil/Structure Interactions in Earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramey, G. W.; Moore, R. K.; Yoo, C. H.; Bush, Thomas D., Jr.; Stallings, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    In effort to improve design of Earthquake-resistant structures, mathematical study undertaken to simulate interactions among soil, foundation, and superstructure during various kinds of vibrational excitation. System modeled as three lumped masses connected vertically by springs, with lowest mass connected to horizontal vibrator (representing ground) through springs and dashpot. Behavior of springs described by elastic or elastoplastic force/deformation relationships. Relationships used to approximate nonlinear system behavior and soil/foundation-interface behavior.

  13. NASA SDO Social Media - An Interactive Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durscher, R.; Wawro, M.; NASA SDO Social Media Team

    2011-12-01

    The world of social media has become an important outlet of information and news around the world. Social networking now accounts for over 25% of all time spent online in the US. NASA puts strong emphasis on its social media programs, and, in fact, is the top-ranked social media user in the public sector. We will describe our SDO Social Media project, which aims to engage the public in learning about the SDO mission, the Sun, space weather, and the impact the Sun has on Earth and other NASA exploration missions. We'll discuss the various social media outlets and the techniques we use for reaching and engaging our audience. Effectiveness is measured through the use of various automatically-gathered statistics and level of public engagement. Of key importance to effective social media use is having access to scientists who can quickly respond to questions and express their answers in meaningful ways to the public. Our presentation will highlight the importance of scientist involvement and suggest ways for encouraging more scientists to support these efforts. It will also address how our social media approach has been paving the way for other Mission E/PO teams in using our best practices and experiences.

  14. Experiments In Characterizing Vibrations Of A Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Yeung; Hadaegh, Fred Y.; Bayard, David S.

    1993-01-01

    Report discusses experiments conducted to test methods of identification of vibrational and coupled rotational/vibrational modes of flexible structure. Report one in series that chronicle development of integrated system of methods, sensors, actuators, analog and digital signal-processing equipment, and algorithms to suppress vibrations in large, flexible structure even when dynamics of structure partly unknown and/or changing. Two prior articles describing aspects of research, "Autonomous Frequency-Domain Indentification" (NPO-18099), and "Automated Characterization Of Vibrations Of A Structure" (NPO-18141).

  15. Solvent-Ion Interactions in Salt Water: A Simple Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willey, Joan D.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a procedurally quick, simple, and inexpensive experiment which illustrates the magnitude and some effects of solvent-ion interactions in aqueous solutions. Theoretical information, procedures, and examples of temperature, volume and hydration number calculations are provided. (JN)

  16. Joint Air Sea Interaction (JASIN) experiment, Northwest coast of Scotland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Businger, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    The joint air sea interaction (JASIN) experiment took place off the Northwest coast of Scotland. Sea surface and boundary layer parameters were measured. The JASIN data was used as ground truth for various sensors on the SEASAT satellite.

  17. Self-Structure and Emotional Experience

    PubMed Central

    Ditzfeld, Christopher P.; Showers, Carolin J.

    2013-01-01

    Two studies examine individual differences in affective reactivity by linking emotional experience to cognitive self-structure. Consistent with the view that individuals with an evaluatively compartmentalized self-structure are emotionally reactive, we find that evaluative compartmentalization is associated with the experience of, and desire for, high-arousal positive affect, whereas evaluative integration is associated with the experience of low-arousal positive and negative affect and the desire for low-arousal positive affect. Although compartmentalized individuals are less granular in their tendency to report experiencing both high- and low-arousal affect (cf. Feldman Barrett, 2004), they are strongly differentiated in their perceptions of high-arousal states as positive and low-arousal states as negative. Thus, compartmentalized individuals’ reactivity may be explained by their preference for high-arousal positive states and the “breadth” of their emotionality (e.g., the tendency to experience sadness and nervousness at the same time). PMID:24125479

  18. Binary colloidal structures assembled through Ising interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Karim S.; Sagastegui, Amanda; Li, Yu; Tahir, Mukarram A.; Socolar, Joshua E. S.; Wiley, Benjamin J.; Yellen, Benjamin B.

    2012-04-01

    New methods for inducing microscopic particles to assemble into useful macroscopic structures could open pathways for fabricating complex materials that cannot be produced by lithographic methods. Here we demonstrate a colloidal assembly technique that uses two parameters to tune the assembly of over 20 different pre-programmed structures, including kagome, honeycomb and square lattices, as well as various chain and ring configurations. We programme the assembled structures by controlling the relative concentrations and interaction strengths between spherical magnetic and non-magnetic beads, which behave as paramagnetic or diamagnetic dipoles when immersed in a ferrofluid. A comparison of our experimental observations with potential energy calculations suggests that the lowest energy configuration within binary mixtures is determined entirely by the relative dipole strengths and their relative concentrations.

  19. SSI (soil-structure interactions) and structural benchmarks

    SciTech Connect

    Philippacopoulos, A.J.; Miller, C.A.; Costantino, C.J.; Graves, H.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents the latest results of the ongoing program entitled, ''Standard Problems for Structural Computer Codes'', currently being worked on at BNL for the USNRC, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. During FY 1986, efforts were focussed on three tasks, namely, (1) an investigation of ground water effects on the response of Category I structures, (2) the Soil-Structure Interaction Workshop and (3) studies on structural benchmarks associated with Category I structures. The objective of the studies on ground water effects is to verify the applicability and the limitations of the SSI methods currently used by the industry in performing seismic evaluations of nuclear plants which are located at sites with high water tables. In a previous study by BNL (NUREG/CR-4588), it has been concluded that the pore water can influence significantly the soil-structure interaction process. This result, however, is based on the assumption of fully saturated soil profiles. Consequently, the work was further extended to include cases associated with variable water table depths. In this paper, results related to ''cut-off'' depths beyond which the pore water effects can be ignored in seismic calculations, are addressed. Comprehensive numerical data are given for soil configurations typical to those encountered in nuclear plant sites. These data were generated by using a modified version of the SLAM code which is capable of handling problems related to the dynamic response of saturated soils.

  20. Quantifying human subjective experience and social interaction using the eXperience Induction Machine.

    PubMed

    Bernardet, Ulysses; Väljamäe, Aleksander; Inderbitzin, Martin; Wierenga, Sytse; Mura, Anna; Verschure, Paul F M J

    2011-06-30

    With the advance of novel brain imaging technology more correlations between complex human properties and the neuronal substrate can be assessed. However, thus far, not many well-validated paradigms exist that would allow for a systematic and quantitative exploration of these phenomena. For instance, despite the rapid technological advances in the domain of mixed and virtual reality systems, a fundamental issue remains how we can define and quantify "presence". A standard approach has been to use questionnaires and self-report measures. However, it has been well established that humans' capabilities to access and externalize their internal states are limited. Hence, we have investigated the question whether other less subjective measures can be devised that can corroborate subjective self-reports on presence. In particular, we have developed a quantitative recollection task that assesses the ability of human subjects (N=40) to recollect the factual structure and organization of a structured and fully controlled experience in a human accessible mixed reality space, the eXperience Induction Machine (XIM). In this structured experience - referred to as the "Autodemo"--a virtual guide explains the key elements and properties of XIM while the user is able to freely move around in the space. To evaluate the users' experience and the amount of factual information retained about the Autodemo, we used the ITC-SOPI questionnaire and a recall test specifically designed for the Autodemo. We found significant correlations between spatial presence and engagement factors of ITC-SOPI and recall performance. Moreover we observed an interaction with the participants' gender. Our results show that we can assess correlates of "presence" by focusing on other dependent measures such as those related to memory and performance. Additionally, our work exemplifies how virtual and mixed reality systems provide new ways to address fundamental questions in psychology and cognitive neuroscience

  1. The structure and dynamics of interactive documents

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, J.T.

    1999-04-01

    Advances in information technology continue to accelerate as the new millennium approaches. With these advances, electronic information management is becoming increasingly important and is now supported by a seemingly bewildering array of hardware and software whose sole purpose is the design and implementation of interactive documents employing multimedia applications. Multimedia memory and storage applications such as Compact Disk-Read Only Memory (CD-ROMs) are already a familiar interactive tool in both the entertainment and business sectors. Even home enthusiasts now have the means at their disposal to design and produce CD-ROMs. More recently, Digital Video Disk (DVD) technology is carving its own niche in these markets and may (once application bugs are corrected and prices are lowered) eventually supplant CD-ROM technology. CD-ROM and DVD are not the only memory and storage applications capable of supporting interactive media. External, high-capacity drives and disks such as the Iomega{copyright} zip{reg_sign} and jaz{reg_sign} are also useful platforms for launching interactive documents without the need for additional hardware such as CD-ROM burners and copiers. The main drawback here, however, is the relatively high unit price per disk when compared to the unit cost of CD-ROMs. Regardless of the application chosen, there are fundamental structural characteristics that must be considered before effective interactive documents can be created. Additionally, the dynamics of interactive documents employing hypertext links are unique and bear only slight resemblance to those of their traditional hard-copy counterparts. These two considerations form the essential content of this paper.

  2. Structural Priming and Frequency Effects Interact in Chinese Sentence Comprehension.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hang; Dong, Yanping; Boland, Julie E; Yuan, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Previous research in several European languages has shown that the language processing system is sensitive to both structural frequency and structural priming effects. However, it is currently not clear whether these two types of effects interact during online sentence comprehension, especially for languages that do not have morphological markings. To explore this issue, the present study investigated the possible interplay between structural priming and frequency effects for sentences containing the Chinese ambiguous construction V NP1 de NP2 in a self-paced reading experiment. The sentences were disambiguated to either the more frequent/preferred NP structure or the less frequent VP structure. Each target sentence was preceded by a prime sentence of three possible types: NP primes, VP primes, and neutral primes. When the ambiguous construction V NP1 de NP2 was disambiguated to the dispreferred VP structure, participants experienced more processing difficulty following an NP prime relative to following a VP prime or a neutral baseline. When the ambiguity was resolved to the preferred NP structure, prime type had no effect. These results suggest that structural priming in comprehension is modulated by the baseline frequency of alternative structures, with the less frequent structure being more subject to structural priming effects. These results are discussed in the context of the error-based, implicit learning account of structural priming. PMID:26869954

  3. Structural Priming and Frequency Effects Interact in Chinese Sentence Comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hang; Dong, Yanping; Boland, Julie E.; Yuan, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Previous research in several European languages has shown that the language processing system is sensitive to both structural frequency and structural priming effects. However, it is currently not clear whether these two types of effects interact during online sentence comprehension, especially for languages that do not have morphological markings. To explore this issue, the present study investigated the possible interplay between structural priming and frequency effects for sentences containing the Chinese ambiguous construction V NP1 de NP2 in a self-paced reading experiment. The sentences were disambiguated to either the more frequent/preferred NP structure or the less frequent VP structure. Each target sentence was preceded by a prime sentence of three possible types: NP primes, VP primes, and neutral primes. When the ambiguous construction V NP1 de NP2 was disambiguated to the dispreferred VP structure, participants experienced more processing difficulty following an NP prime relative to following a VP prime or a neutral baseline. When the ambiguity was resolved to the preferred NP structure, prime type had no effect. These results suggest that structural priming in comprehension is modulated by the baseline frequency of alternative structures, with the less frequent structure being more subject to structural priming effects. These results are discussed in the context of the error-based, implicit learning account of structural priming. PMID:26869954

  4. Droplet structure interactions in direct containment heating

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, L. Jr.; Pilch, M.; Tarbell, W.W.

    1988-01-01

    Direct containment heating (DCH) in light water reactors can occur during severe accidents that involve the meltout of the bottom of the reactor vessel while the vessel is at high pressure. The ejected core debris can heat and pressurize the atmosphere and challenge the integrity of containment. The results of recent large-scale direct containment heating tests in the Surtsey facility at the Sandia National Laboratories have demonstrated the importance of the interactions of core debris with structure. In the DCH-2, -3, and -4 tests, > 50% of the simulated core debris injected into the large vessel was found frozen to the ceiling or sidewalls. This finding led to questions concerning the detailed physics of debris/structure interactions. It was expected that vigorous splashing assisted by gravity would have limited the quantity of frozen debris to much smaller amounts. Accordingly, a search of the technical literature was undertaken in the areas of liquid drop interactions with surfaces and with other liquid drops to provide the bases for modeling. The available information was reviewed for applicability to the DCH process. The results of the search and review led to a correlation for the splashing process and a preliminary explanation of the DCH test results in the form of illustrative models.

  5. Effects of backlight structure on absorption experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Iglesias, C A

    2004-11-08

    The impact of spectral details in the backlight of absorption spectroscopy experiments is considered. It is shown that experimentally unresolved structure in the backlight spectrum can introduce significant errors in the inferred transmission. Furthermore, it is shown that a valuable experimental procedure previously used to test the accuracy of the data fails to reveal these errors.

  6. Fluid-structure interaction of reticulated porous wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strong, Elizabeth; Jawed, Mohammad; Reis, Pedro

    Insects of the orders Neuroptera and Hymenoptera locomote via flapping flight with reticulated wings that have porous structures that confers them with remarkable lightweight characteristics. Yet these porous wings still perform as contiguous plates to provide the necessary aerodynamic lift and drag required for flight. Even though the fluid flow past the bulk of these insects may be in high Reynolds conditions, viscosity can dominate over inertia in the flow through the porous sub-features. Further considering the flexibility of these reticulated wings yields a highly nonlinear fluid-structure interaction problem. We perform a series of dynamically-scaled precision model experiments to gain physical insight into this system. Our experiments are complemented with computer simulations that combine the Discrete Elastic Rods method and a model for the fluid loading that takes into account the `leakiness' through the porous structure. Our results are anticipated to find applications in micro-air vehicle aerodynamics.

  7. Seismic Soil-Foundation-Structure Interaction in Urban Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trombetta, Nicholas Wade

    The interactions between a structure, its foundation, and the surrounding soil during an earthquake are referred to as soil-foundation-structure interaction (SFSI). The interactions between multiple structures, and their foundations, through the surrounding soil are collectively known as structure-soil-structure interaction (SSSI). Modern design codes in use in the United States, and abroad, provide guidance for considering SFSI during the seismic design of structural systems. However, these same codes do not provide any guidance for considering SSSI. This situation is a direct result of the current paucity of research into the effects of SSSI on structural performance. This dissertation describes the results of four centrifuge experiments designed to study the influence of SSSI on the seismic performance of building-foundation systems. Following these experiments, numerical models were developed and their efficiency at reproducing measured response evaluated. The experimental program involved two pairs of tests. During Test-1 and Test-2, the SFSI and SSSI-influenced responses of two three-dimensional inelastic frame structures were recorded. During Test-3 and Test-4, the interactions between an inelastic frame structure and an elastic rocking wall arranged in a variety of orientations were recorded. In each of the pair of test series, one configuration was devoted to the evaluation of the response of the model frame structures far from any neighboring structure. Ultimately, the experimental results demonstrate that when structures are placed next to each other, the seismic demands in inelastic frame structures can increase. As such, seismic structural performance may be negatively impacted by SSSI. The tests reveal that footings of buildings placed nearest to other buildings can be physically restrained when loaded towards the other building -- a physical mechanism that had not previously been observed. This asymmetrical physical restraint resulted in a stiffened

  8. PrP charge structure encodes interdomain interactions

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Javier; Sánchez, Rosa; Castellanos, Milagros; Makarava, Natallia; Aguzzi, Adriano; Baskakov, Ilia V.; Gasset, María

    2015-01-01

    Almost all proteins contain charged residues, and their chain distribution is tailored to fulfill essential ionic interactions for folding, binding and catalysis. Among proteins, the hinged two-domain chain of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) exhibits a peculiar charge structure with unclear consequences in its structural malleability. To decipher the charge design role, we generated charge-reverted mutants for each domain and analyzed their effect on conformational and metabolic features. We found that charges contain the information for interdomain interactions. Use of dynamic light scattering and thermal denaturation experiments delineates the compaction of the α-fold by an electrostatic compensation between the polybasic 23–30 region and the α3 electronegative surface. This interaction increases stability and disfavors fibrillation. Independently of this structural effect, the N-terminal electropositive clusters regulate the α-cleavage efficiency. In the fibrillar state, use of circular dichroism, atomic-force and fluorescence microscopies reveal that the N-terminal positive clusters and the α3 electronegative surface dictate the secondary structure, the assembly hierarchy and the growth length of the fibril state. These findings show that the PrP charge structure functions as a code set up to ensure function and reduce pathogenic routes. PMID:26323476

  9. PrP charge structure encodes interdomain interactions.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Javier; Sánchez, Rosa; Castellanos, Milagros; Makarava, Natallia; Aguzzi, Adriano; Baskakov, Ilia V; Gasset, María

    2015-01-01

    Almost all proteins contain charged residues, and their chain distribution is tailored to fulfill essential ionic interactions for folding, binding and catalysis. Among proteins, the hinged two-domain chain of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) exhibits a peculiar charge structure with unclear consequences in its structural malleability. To decipher the charge design role, we generated charge-reverted mutants for each domain and analyzed their effect on conformational and metabolic features. We found that charges contain the information for interdomain interactions. Use of dynamic light scattering and thermal denaturation experiments delineates the compaction of the α-fold by an electrostatic compensation between the polybasic 23-30 region and the α3 electronegative surface. This interaction increases stability and disfavors fibrillation. Independently of this structural effect, the N-terminal electropositive clusters regulate the α-cleavage efficiency. In the fibrillar state, use of circular dichroism, atomic-force and fluorescence microscopies reveal that the N-terminal positive clusters and the α3 electronegative surface dictate the secondary structure, the assembly hierarchy and the growth length of the fibril state. These findings show that the PrP charge structure functions as a code set up to ensure function and reduce pathogenic routes. PMID:26323476

  10. Fluid/structure interactions. Internal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, D. S.

    1991-05-01

    Flow-induced vibrations are found wherever structures are exposed to high velocity fluid flows. Internal flows are usually characterized by the close proximity of solid boundaries. There are surfaces against which separated flows may reattach, or from which pressure disturbances may be reflected resulting in acoustic resonance. When the fluid is a liquid, the close proximity of solid boundaries to a vibrating component can produce very high added mass effects. This paper presents three different experimental studies of flow-induced vibration problems associated with internal flows. The emphasis was on experimental techniques developed for understanding excitation mechanisms. In difficult flow-induced vibration problems, a useful experimental technique is flow visualization using a large scale model and strobe light triggered by the phenomenon being observed. This should be supported by point measurements of velocity and frequency spectra. When the flow excitation is associated with acoustic resonance, the sound can be fed back to enhance or eliminate the instability. This is potentially a very useful tool for studying and controlling fluid-structure interaction problems. Some flow-induced vibration problems involve a number of different excitation mechanisms and care must be taken to ensure that the mechanisms are properly identified. Artificially imposing structural vibrations or acoustic fields may induce flow structures not naturally present in the system.

  11. Control/structure interaction conceptual design tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Hugh C.

    1990-01-01

    The JPL Control/Structure Interaction Program is developing new analytical methods for designing micro-precision spacecraft with controlled structures. One of these, the Conceptual Design Tool, will illustrate innovative new approaches to the integration of multi-disciplinary analysis and design methods. The tool will be used to demonstrate homogeneity of presentation, uniform data representation across analytical methods, and integrated systems modeling. The tool differs from current 'integrated systems' that support design teams most notably in its support for the new CSI multi-disciplinary engineer. The design tool will utilize a three dimensional solid model of the spacecraft under design as the central data organization metaphor. Various analytical methods, such as finite element structural analysis, control system analysis, and mechanical configuration layout, will store and retrieve data from a hierarchical, object oriented data structure that supports assemblies of components with associated data and algorithms. In addition to managing numerical model data, the tool will assist the designer in organizing, stating, and tracking system requirements.

  12. MuPIT interactive: webserver for mapping variant positions to annotated, interactive 3D structures.

    PubMed

    Niknafs, Noushin; Kim, Dewey; Kim, Ryangguk; Diekhans, Mark; Ryan, Michael; Stenson, Peter D; Cooper, David N; Karchin, Rachel

    2013-11-01

    Mutation position imaging toolbox (MuPIT) interactive is a browser-based application for single-nucleotide variants (SNVs), which automatically maps the genomic coordinates of SNVs onto the coordinates of available three-dimensional (3D) protein structures. The application is designed for interactive browser-based visualization of the putative functional relevance of SNVs by biologists who are not necessarily experts either in bioinformatics or protein structure. Users may submit batches of several thousand SNVs and review all protein structures that cover the SNVs, including available functional annotations such as binding sites, mutagenesis experiments, and common polymorphisms. Multiple SNVs may be mapped onto each structure, enabling 3D visualization of SNV clusters and their relationship to functionally annotated positions. We illustrate the utility of MuPIT interactive in rationalizing the impact of selected polymorphisms in the PharmGKB database, somatic mutations identified in the Cancer Genome Atlas study of invasive breast carcinomas, and rare variants identified in the exome sequencing project. MuPIT interactive is freely available for non-profit use at http://mupit.icm.jhu.edu .

  13. MuPIT Interactive: Webserver for mapping variant positions to annotated, interactive 3D structures

    PubMed Central

    Niknafs, Noushin; Kim, Dewey; Kim, Ryang Guk; Diekhans, Mark; Ryan, Michael; Stenson, Peter D.; Cooper, David N.; Karchin, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    Mutation Position Imaging Toolbox (MuPIT) Interactive is a browser-based application for single nucleotide variants (SNVs), which automatically maps the genomic coordinates of SNVs onto the coordinates of available three-dimensional protein structures. The application is designed for interactive browser-based visualization of the putative functional relevance of SNVs by biologists who are not necessarily experts either in bioinformatics or protein structure. Users may submit batches of several thousand SNVs and review all protein structures that cover the SNVs, including available functional annotations such as binding sites, mutagenesis experiments, and common polymorphisms. Multiple SNVs may be mapped onto each structure, enabling 3D visualization of SNV clusters and their relationship to functionally annotated positions. We illustrate the utility of MuPIT Interactive in rationalizing the impact of selected polymorphisms in the PharmGKB database, somatic mutations identified in the Cancer Genome Atlas study of invasive breast carcinomas, and rare variants identified in the Exome Sequencing Project. MuPIT Interactive is freely available for non-profit use at http://mupit.icm.jhu.edu. PMID:23793516

  14. Structure and Interactions in Neurofilament Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Jayna; Ojeda-Lopez, Miguel; Safinya, Cyrus

    2004-03-01

    Neurofilaments (NFs) are a major constituent of myelinated axons of nerve cells, which assemble from three subunit proteins of low, medium, and high molecular weight to form a 10 nm diameter rod with sidearms radiating from the center. The sidearm interactions impart structural stability and result in an oriented network of NFs running parallel to the axon. Over or under expression of NF subunits is related to abnormal NF-networks, which are known hallmarks of motor neuron diseases (ALS). Here, we reassemble NFs from subunit proteins purified from bovine spinal cord. We demonstrate the formation of the NF network in vitro where synchrotron x-ray scattering (SSRL) reveals a well-defined interfilament spacing while the defect structure in polarized optical microcopy shows the liquid crystalline nature. The spacing varies depending on subunit molar ratios and salt conditions and we relate this change to the mechanical stability of the lattice. This change in lattice spacing yields insight into the stabilizing interactions between the NF sidearms. Supported by NSF DMR- 0203755, CTS-0103516, and NIH GM-59288.

  15. User experience interaction design for digital educational games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jiugen; Zhang, Wenting; Xing, Ruonan

    2014-04-01

    Leading the elements of games into education is the newest teaching concepts in the field of educational technology, which is by using healthy games to impel and preserve the learner's motivation, improve the learning efficiency and bring one experience in learning something by playing games. First of all, this article has introduced the concept of Digital Game and User Experience and brought the essence of Digital Game to light to construct the frame of user experience interaction design for digital educational games and offer one design idea for the development of related products and hoping that Digital Game will bring us continuous innovation experience.

  16. Advanced Accelerating Structures and Their Interaction with Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gai Wei

    2009-01-22

    In this paper, we give a brief description of several advanced accelerating structures, such as dielectric loaded waveguides, photonic band gap, metamaterials and improved iris-loaded cavities. We describe wakefields generated by passing high current electron beams through these structures, and applications of wakefields to advanced accelerator schemes. One of the keys to success for high gradient wakefield acceleration is to develop high current drive beam sources. As an example, the high current RF photo injector at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator, passed a {approx}80 nC electron beam through a high gradient dielectric loaded structure to achieve a 100 MV/m gradient. We will summarize recent related experiments on beam-structure interactions and also discuss high current electron beam generation and propagation and their applications to wakefield acceleration.

  17. Advanced accelerating structures and their interaction with electron beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, W.; High Energy Physics

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we give a brief description of several advanced accelerating structures, such as dielectric loaded waveguides, photonic band gap, metamaterials and improved iris-loaded cavities. We describe wakefields generated by passing high current electron beams through these structures, and applications of wakefields to advanced accelerator schemes. One of the keys to success for high gradient wakefield acceleration is to develop high current drive beam sources. As an example, the high current RF photo injector at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator, passed a {approx}80 nC electron beam through a high gradient dielectric loaded structure to achieve a 100 MV/m gradient. We will summarize recent related experiments on beam-structure interactions and also discuss high current electron beam generation and propagation and their applications to wakefield acceleration.

  18. Code System for Fluid-Structure Interaction Analysis.

    2001-05-30

    Version 00 PELE-IC is a two-dimensional semi-implicit Eulerian hydrodynamics program for the solution of incompressible flow coupled to flexible structures. The code was developed to calculate fluid-structure interactions and bubble dynamics of a pressure-suppression system following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The fluid, structure, and coupling algorithms have been verified by calculation of benchmark problems and air and steam blowdown experiments. The code is written for both plane and cylindrical coordinates. The coupling algorithm is generalmore » enough to handle a wide variety of structural shapes. The concepts of void fractions and interface orientation are used to track the movement of free surfaces, allowing great versatility in following fluid-gas interfaces both for bubble definition and water surface motion without the use of marker particles.« less

  19. PELE-IC. Fluid-Structure Interaction Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    McMaster, W.H.; Gong, E.Y.

    1992-01-13

    PELE-IC is a two-dimensional semi-implicit Eulerian hydrodynamics program for the solution of incompressible flow coupled to flexible structures. The code was developed to calculate fluid-structure interactions and bubble dynamics of a pressure-suppression system following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The fluid, structure, and coupling algorithms have been verified by calculation of benchmark problems and air and steam blowdown experiments. The code is written for both plane and cylindrical coordinates. The coupling algorithm is general enough to handle a wide variety of structural shapes. The concepts of void fractions and interface orientation are used to track the movement of free surfaces, allowing great versatility in following fluid-gas interfaces both for bubble definition and water surface motion without the use of marker particles.

  20. Effective Interactions for Nuclear Structure Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Signoracci, Angelo

    Experimental interest in nuclei far from stability, especially due to proposed advancements in rare isotope facilities, has stimulated improvements in theoretical predictions of exotic isotopes. However, standard techniques developed for nuclear structure calculations, Configuration Interaction theory and Energy Density Functional methods, lack either the generality or the accuracy necessary for reliable calculations away from stability. Hybrid methods, which combine Configuration Interaction theory and Energy Density Functional methods in order to exploit their beneficial properties, are currently under investigation for improved theoretical capabilities. A new technique to produce nuclear Hamiltonians has been developed, implementing renormalization group methods, many-body perturbative techniques, and Energy Density Functional methods. Connection to the underlying physics is a primary focus, limiting the number of free parameters necessary in the procedure. The main benefit of this approach is the improvement in the quality of effective interactions outside of standard model spaces. In the Hybrid Renormalization Procedure developed in this dissertation, Skyrme energy density functionals provide a realistic single particle basis that accounts for the long tail of loosely bound orbits, especially significant for valence orbits of exotic isotopes. A microscopic nucleon-nucleon potential is softened with renormalization group techniques to eliminate the hard core of the nuclear interaction. Many-body perturbative techniques, in the form of Rayleigh-Schrodinger theory, implement the realistic basis to convert the low-momentum interaction into a model space of interest. The basis is an important ingredient in the renormalization and greatly affects the results obtained with the Hybrid Renormalization Procedure, specifically through the single particle energies derived from Skyrme functionals. A comparison of the standard harmonic oscillator basis and the realistic

  1. The Plasma Interaction Experiment (PIX) description and test program. [electrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ignaczak, L. R.; Haley, F. A.; Domino, E. J.; Culp, D. H.; Shaker, F. J.

    1978-01-01

    The plasma interaction experiment (PIX) is a battery powered preprogrammed auxiliary payload on the LANDSAT-C launch. This experiment is part of a larger program to investigate space plasma interactions with spacecraft surfaces and components. The varying plasma densities encountered during available telemetry coverage periods are deemed sufficient to determine first order interactions between the space plasma environment and the biased experimental surfaces. The specific objectives of the PIX flight experiment are to measure the plasma coupling current and the negative voltage breakdown characteristics of a solar array segment and a gold plated steel disk. Measurements will be made over a range of surface voltages up to plus or minus kilovolt. The orbital environment will provide a range of plasma densities. The experimental surfaces will be voltage biased in a preprogrammed step sequence to optimize the data returned for each plasma region and for the available telemetry coverage.

  2. Solar Array Module Plasma Interaction Experiment (SAMPIE): Technical requirements document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillard, G. Barry; Ferguson, Dale C.

    1992-01-01

    The Solar Array Module Plasma Interactions Experiment (SAMPIE) is a NASA shuttle space flight experiment scheduled for launch in early 1994. The SAMPIE experiment will investigate plasma interactions of high voltage space power systems in low earth orbit. Solar cell modules, representing several technologies, will be biased to high voltages to characterize both arcing and plasma current collection. Other solar modules, specially modified in accordance with current theories of arcing and breakdown, will demonstrate the possibility of arc suppression. Finally, several test modules will be included to study the basic nature of these interactions. The science and technology goals for the project are defined in the Technical Requirements Document (TRD) which is presented here.

  3. A slewing control experiment for flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, J.-N.; Horta, L. G.; Robertshaw, H. H.

    1985-01-01

    A hardware set-up has been developed to study slewing control for flexible structures including a steel beam and a solar panel. The linear optimal terminal control law is used to design active controllers which are implemented in an analog computer. The objective of this experiment is to demonstrate and verify the dynamics and optimal terminal control laws as applied to flexible structures for large angle maneuver. Actuation is provided by an electric motor while sensing is given by strain gages and angle potentiometer. Experimental measurements are compared with analytical predictions in terms of modal parameters of the system stability matrix and sufficient agreement is achieved to validate the theory.

  4. Solar array experiments on the SPHINX satellite. [Space Plasma High voltage INteraction eXperiment satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, N. J.

    1974-01-01

    The Space Plasma, High Voltage Interaction Experiment (SPHINX) is the name given to an auxiliary payload satellite scheduled to be launched in January 1974. The principal experiments carried on this satellite are specifically designed to obtain the engineering data on the interaction of high voltage systems with the space plasma. The classes of experiments are solar array segments, insulators, insulators with pin holes and conductors. The satellite is also carrying experiments to obtain flight data on three new solar array configurations: the edge illuminated-multijunction cells, the teflon encased cells, and the violet cells.

  5. Simulated Interactive Research Experiments as Educational Tools for Advanced Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomandl, Mathias; Mieling, Thomas; Losert-Valiente Kroon, Christiane M.; Hopf, Martin; Arndt, Markus

    2015-09-01

    Experimental research has become complex and thus a challenge to science education. Only very few students can typically be trained on advanced scientific equipment. It is therefore important to find new tools that allow all students to acquire laboratory skills individually and independent of where they are located. In a design-based research process we have investigated the feasibility of using a virtual laboratory as a photo-realistic and scientifically valid representation of advanced scientific infrastructure to teach modern experimental science, here, molecular quantum optics. We found a concept based on three educational principles that allows undergraduate students to become acquainted with procedures and concepts of a modern research field. We find a significant increase in student understanding using our Simulated Interactive Research Experiment (SiReX), by evaluating the learning outcomes with semi-structured interviews in a pre/post design. This suggests that this concept of an educational tool can be generalized to disseminate findings in other fields.

  6. Modeling ultrafast shadowgraphy in laser-plasma interaction experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siminos, E.; Skupin, S.; Sävert, A.; Cole, J. M.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Kaluza, M. C.

    2016-06-01

    Ultrafast shadowgraphy is a new experimental technique that uses few-cycle laser pulses to image density gradients in a rapidly evolving plasma. It enables structures that move at speeds close to the speed of light, such as laser driven wakes, to be visualized. Here we study the process of shadowgraphic image formation during the propagation of a few cycle probe pulse transversely through a laser-driven wake using three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. In order to construct synthetic shadowgrams a near-field snapshot of the ultrashort probe pulse is analyzed by means of Fourier optics, taking into account the effect of a typical imaging setup. By comparing synthetic and experimental shadowgrams we show that the generation of synthetic data is crucial for the correct interpretation of experiments. Moreover, we study the dependence of synthetic shadowgrams on various parameters such as the imaging system aperture, the position of the object plane and the probe pulse delay, duration and wavelength. Finally, we show that time-dependent information from the interaction can be recovered from a single shot by using a broadband, chirped probe pulse and subsequent spectral filtering.

  7. Simulated Interactive Research Experiments as Educational Tools for Advanced Science.

    PubMed

    Tomandl, Mathias; Mieling, Thomas; Losert-Valiente Kroon, Christiane M; Hopf, Martin; Arndt, Markus

    2015-09-15

    Experimental research has become complex and thus a challenge to science education. Only very few students can typically be trained on advanced scientific equipment. It is therefore important to find new tools that allow all students to acquire laboratory skills individually and independent of where they are located. In a design-based research process we have investigated the feasibility of using a virtual laboratory as a photo-realistic and scientifically valid representation of advanced scientific infrastructure to teach modern experimental science, here, molecular quantum optics. We found a concept based on three educational principles that allows undergraduate students to become acquainted with procedures and concepts of a modern research field. We find a significant increase in student understanding using our Simulated Interactive Research Experiment (SiReX), by evaluating the learning outcomes with semi-structured interviews in a pre/post design. This suggests that this concept of an educational tool can be generalized to disseminate findings in other fields.

  8. Simulated Interactive Research Experiments as Educational Tools for Advanced Science

    PubMed Central

    Tomandl, Mathias; Mieling, Thomas; Losert-Valiente Kroon, Christiane M.; Hopf, Martin; Arndt, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Experimental research has become complex and thus a challenge to science education. Only very few students can typically be trained on advanced scientific equipment. It is therefore important to find new tools that allow all students to acquire laboratory skills individually and independent of where they are located. In a design-based research process we have investigated the feasibility of using a virtual laboratory as a photo-realistic and scientifically valid representation of advanced scientific infrastructure to teach modern experimental science, here, molecular quantum optics. We found a concept based on three educational principles that allows undergraduate students to become acquainted with procedures and concepts of a modern research field. We find a significant increase in student understanding using our Simulated Interactive Research Experiment (SiReX), by evaluating the learning outcomes with semi-structured interviews in a pre/post design. This suggests that this concept of an educational tool can be generalized to disseminate findings in other fields. PMID:26370627

  9. Physical scale experiments on torrential filter structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiari, Michael; Moser, Markus; Trojer, Martin; Hübl, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of the INTERREG Project "SedAlp" physical scale model experiments are carried out in the hydraulic laboratory of the Institute of Mountain Risk Engineering at the University of Life Sciences in Vienna in order to optimize torrent protection structures. Two different types of check dams are investigated. A screen-dam with inclined vertical beams is compared with a beam-dam with horizontal beams. The experiments evaluate the variation of sediment transport of these structures including the influence of coarse woody debris. Therefore the distance between the steel elements can be adjusted to show their ability to filter sediment. The physical scale of the experiments is 1:30. All experimental runs are Froude scaled. Both dams are tested in elongated and pear-shaped sediment retention basins in order to investigate the shape effect of the deposition area. For a systematic comparison of the two check dams experiments with fluvial bedload transport are made. First a typical hydrograph for an extreme flood with unlimited sediment supply is modelled. A typical torrential sediment mixture with a wide grain-size distribution is fed by a conveyor belt according the transport capacity of the upstream reach. Then the deposition is scanned with a laser-scan device in order to analyse the deposition pattern and the deposited volume. Afterwards a flood with a lower reoccurrence period without sediment transport from upstream is modelled to investigate the ability of the protection structure for self-emptying. To investigate the influence of driftwood on the deposition behaviour experiments with logs are made. Different log diameters and lengths are added upstream the basin. The results show, that the deposition during the experiments was not controlled by sorting-effects at the location of the dam. The deposition always started from upstream, where the transport capacity was reduced due to the milder slope and the widening of the basin. No grain sorting effects

  10. Fluid-structure interaction in deformable microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Debadi; Prakash, J. Ravi; Friend, James; Yeo, Leslie

    2012-10-01

    A polydimethylsiloxane microfluidic device composed of a single microchannel with a thin flexible layer present over a short length along one side of the channel was fabricated and modelled in order to investigate the complex fluid-structure interaction that arises between a flowing fluid and a deformable wall. Experimental measurements of thin layer deformation and pressure drop are compared with predictions of two- and three-dimensional computational models that numerically solve the coupled set of equations governing both the elasticity of the thin layer and the fluid. It is shown that the two-dimensional model, which assumes the flexible thin layer comprises an infinitely wide elastic beam of finite thickness, reasonably approximates a three-dimensional model, and is in excellent agreement with experimental observations of the thin layer profile when the width of the thin layer is beyond a critical value, roughly twice the length of the thin layer.

  11. Structure and Interactions in Neurofilament Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Jayna

    2005-03-01

    Neurofilaments (NFs) are a major constituent of nerve cell axons that assemble from three subunit proteins of low (NF-L), medium (NF-M), and high molecular weight (NF-H) to form a 10 nm diameter rod with radiating sidearms. The sidearm interactions result in an oriented network of NFs running parallel to the axon. Here, we reassemble NFs in vitro from varying weight ratios of two of the subunit proteins, NF-L and NF-M, purified from bovine spinal cord. We demonstrate the formation of the NF network where synchrotron x-ray scattering (SSRL) reveals a well-defined interfilament spacing, while the defect structure in polarized optical microcopy shows the liquid crystalline nature. The interfilament spacing varies depending on NF-M sidearm density and we relate this change to sidearm interactions. We show that at a low density of sidearms, repulsive forces dominate creating a lattice spacing that is regulated by the buffer volume. With an increasing sidearm density, the equilibrium interfilament spacing decreases as a result of competing repulsive and attractive forces. Supported by NIH GM-59288, NSF DMR- 0203755, & CTS-0404444.

  12. Online Education as Interactive Experience: Some Guiding Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLellan, Hilary

    1999-01-01

    Presents conceptual models and proven practices that are emerging at the convergence of economics, entertainment, and virtual community-building and applies them to the design of online courses. Discusses the experience economy; digital storytelling; social presence; personal space and computer interaction; and online technologies and types of…

  13. Nucleon structure and the high energy interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selyugin, O. V.

    2015-06-01

    On the basis of the representation of the generalized structure of nucleons a new model of the hadron interaction at high energies is presented. A new t dependence of the generalized parton distributions is obtained from the comparative analysis of different sets of the parton distribution functions, based on the description of the entire set of experimental data for the electromagnetic form factors of the proton and neutron. Taking into account the different moments of the generalized parton distributions of the hadron, quantitative descriptions of all existing experimental data of the proton-proton and proton-antiproton elastic scatterings from √{s }=9.8 GeV to 8 TeV, including the Coulomb range and large momentum transfers up to -t =15 GeV2 , are obtained with a few free high-energy fitting parameters. The real part of the hadronic elastic scattering amplitude is determined only through the complex s that satisfies the dispersion relations. The negligible contributions of the hard Pomeron and the presence of the non-small contributions of the maximal Odderon are obtained. The non-dying form of the spin-flip amplitude is examined as well. The structures of the Born term and unitarized scattering amplitude are analyzed. It is shown that the black disk limit for the elastic scattering amplitude is not reached at LHC energies. Predictions for LHC energies are made.

  14. MINER{nu}A, a Neutrino--Nucleus Interaction Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Solano Salinas, C. J.; Chamorro, A.; Romero, C.

    2007-10-26

    With the fantastic results of KamLAND and SNO for neutrino physics, a new generation of neutrino experiments are being designed and build, specially to study the neutrino oscillations to resolve most of the incognita still we have in the neutrino physics. At FERMILAB we have the experiments MINOS and, in a near future, NO{nu}A, to study this kind of oscillations. One big problem these experiments will have is the lack of a good knowledge of the Physics of neutrino interactions with matter, and this will generate big systematic errors. MINER{nu}A, also at FERMILAB, will cover this space studying with high statistics and great precision the neutrino--nucleus interactions.

  15. VLF wave-wave interaction experiments in the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, D. C. D.

    1978-01-01

    VLF wave-wave interaction experiments were carried out by injecting various forms of VLF pulses into the magnetosphere from a 21.2 km dipole antenna at Siple, Antarctica. The injected signals propagate along a geomagnetic field line and often interact strongly with energetic electrons trapped in the radiation belts near the equator. Signals may be amplified and trigger emissions. These signals may then interact with one another through these energetic electrons. This report is divided into three parts. In the first part, simulations of VLF pulses propagating in the magnetosphere are carried out. In the second part, it is found for the first time that a 10 ms gap in a triggering wave can induce emission, which may then interact with the post-gap signals. In the third part, sideband triggering is reported for the first time.

  16. Early steps towards quarks and their interactions using neutrino beams in CERN bubble chamber experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Don H.

    2016-06-01

    Results from neutrino experiments at CERN in the1970's, using bubble chamber detectors filled with heavy liquids, gave early evidence for the existence of quarks and gluons as real dynamical objects. In detail, the measured moments of the non-singlet structure functions provided crucial support for the validity of the present theory of the strong inter-quark interactions, quantum chromodynamics.

  17. Telescience operations with the solar array module plasma interaction experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wald, Lawrence W.; Bibyk, Irene K.

    1995-01-01

    The Solar Array Module Plasma Interactions Experiment (SAMPIE) is a flight experiment that flew on the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-62) in March 1994, as part of the OAST-2 mission. The overall objective of SAMPIE was to determine the adverse environmental interactions within the space plasma of low earth orbit (LEO) on modern solar cells and space power system materials which are artificially biased to high positive and negative direct current (DC) voltages. The two environmental interactions of interest included high voltage arcing from the samples to the space plasma and parasitic current losses. High voltage arcing can cause physical damage to power system materials and shorten expected hardware life. parasitic current losses can reduce power system efficiency because electric currents generated in a power system drain into the surrounding plasma via parasitic resistance. The flight electronics included two programmable high voltage DC power supplies to bias the experiment samples, instruments to measure the surrounding plasma environment in the STS cargo bay, and the on-board data acquisition system (DAS). The DAS provided in-flight experiment control, data storage, and communications through the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Hitchhiker flight avionics to the GSFC Payload Operations Control Center (POCC). The DAS and the SAMPIE POCC computer systems were designed for telescience operations; this paper will focus on the experiences of the SAMPIE team regarding telescience development and operations from the GSFC POCC during STS-62. The SAMPIE conceptual development, hardware design, and system verification testing were accomplished at the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC). SAMPIE was developed under the In-Space Technology Experiment Program (IN-STEP), which sponsors NASA, industry, and university flight experiments designed to enable and enhance space flight technology. The IN-STEP Program is sponsored by the Office of Space Access and Technology (OSAT).

  18. Acoustic-structure interaction problems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Love, E.; Taylor, R.L.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to compare and evaluate different numerical methods for solving problems of interaction between elastic solids and acoustic fluids. In particular, we concentrate our efforts on solution techniques involving the finite element method. To that end, in Chapter 2 we discuss different options for analysis of infinite fluids. In particular, the method of mesh trunction and the use of radiation elements and the use of infinite elements are discussed. Also discussed is the analysis of scattering from rigid boundaries. Chapter 3 is a brief discussion of finite element formulations for elastic solids. We review the development, of two dimensional plane strain elements and one dimensional plate and shell elements. In Chapter 4, there is a discussion of the method used to couple the solid and the fluid. We give examples for solution of scattering of pressure waves from thin elastic shell structures. Chapter 5 is a brief conclusion of results and includes recommendations for the best methods of solution and additional research.

  19. The FrPNC Experiment, weak interaction studies in Francium at TRIUMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, E.; Aubin, S.; Collister, R.; Behr, J. A.; Gwinner, G.; Orozco, L. A.; Pearson, M. R.; Tandecki, M.; Sheng, D.; Zhang, J.

    2012-09-01

    Francium is an excellent system to study the nuclear weak force due to its large nucleus and relatively simple atomic structure. The FrPNC experiment has a facility to produce cold trapped atomic francium samples for parity non-conservation studies. We are preparing to measure both the nuclear spin independent and dependent parts of the weak interaction in francium. The first one gives information about weak neutral currents at low energies, while the second one is sensitive to weak interactions between nucleons. We present the current status of the experiment.

  20. Plasma-materials interactions during rf experiments in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, S.A.; Bernabei, S.; Budny, R.; Chu, T.K.; Colestock, P.; Hinnov, E.; Hooke, W.; Hosea, J.; Hwang, D.; Jobes, F.

    1984-09-01

    Plasma-materials interactions studied in recent ICRF heating and lower hybrid current drive experiments are reviewed. The microscopic processes responsible for impurity generation are discussed. In ICRF experiments, improvements in machine operation and in antenna and feedthrough design have allowed efficient plasma heating at RF powers up to 3 MW. No significant loss of energy from the plasma core due to impurity radiation occurs. Lower hybrid current drive results in the generation and maintenance of hundreds of kiloamperes of plasma current carried by suprathermal electrons. The loss of these electrons and their role in impurity generation are assessed. Methods to avoid this problem are evaluated.

  1. Large-scale molten core/material interaction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.Y.

    1984-01-01

    The paper described the facility and melting technology for large-scale molten core/material interaction experiments being carried out at Sandia National Laboratories. The facility is largest of its kind anywhere. It is capable of producing core melts up to 500 kg at a temperature of 3000/sup 0/K. Results of a recent experiment involving the release of 230 kg of core melt into a magnesia brick crucible is discussed in detail. Data on thermal and mechanical responses of magnesia brick, heat flux partitioning, melt penetration, gas and aerosol generation are presented.

  2. Extracting short-ranged interactions from structure factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louis, A. A.

    2011-12-01

    Inverting scattering experiments to obtain effective interparticle interactions is generally a poorly conditioned problem. L. Reatto [Phil. Mag. A 58, 37 (1986)] showed that for atomic liquids close to the triple point, inversions are hard because the structure closely resembles that of an equivalent hard-sphere fluid. Here I demonstrate that at low concentrations and for particles with short-ranged attractive potentials, S(k) also exhibits a very weak dependence on potential shape. Instead, different potentials all generate an S(k) that closely resembles that of the Baxter model with a similar second-virial coefficient. By contrast, in this energetic fluid regime, the inversion of an attractive interaction from real-space correlations such as the radial distribution function g(r) is well conditioned. Nevertheless, one may extract further information from S(k) by measuring isosbestic points, values of k where the scattering intensity I(k) or the structure factor S(k) is invariant to changes in interaction-potential well depth. These points suggest a new extended corresponding states principle for particles in solution based on the packing fraction, the second osmotic virial coefficient, and a new measure of effective potential range.

  3. Computational and experimental techniques for coupled acoustic/structure interactions.

    SciTech Connect

    Sumali, Anton Hartono; Pierson, Kendall Hugh; Walsh, Timothy Francis; Dohner, Jeffrey Lynn; Reese, Garth M.; Day, David Minot

    2004-01-01

    This report documents the results obtained during a one-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) initiative aimed at investigating coupled structural acoustic interactions by means of algorithm development and experiment. Finite element acoustic formulations have been developed based on fluid velocity potential and fluid displacement. Domain decomposition and diagonal scaling preconditioners were investigated for parallel implementation. A formulation that includes fluid viscosity and that can simulate both pressure and shear waves in fluid was developed. An acoustic wave tube was built, tested, and shown to be an effective means of testing acoustic loading on simple test structures. The tube is capable of creating a semi-infinite acoustic field due to nonreflecting acoustic termination at one end. In addition, a micro-torsional disk was created and tested for the purposes of investigating acoustic shear wave damping in microstructures, and the slip boundary conditions that occur along the wet interface when the Knudsen number becomes sufficiently large.

  4. Study made of interaction between sound fields and structural vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, R. H.; Smith, P. W., Jr.

    1967-01-01

    Study analyzes structural vibrations and the interactions between them and sound fields. It outlines a conceptual framework to analyze the vibrations of systems and their interactions, incorporating the results of earlier studies and establishing a unified basis for continuing research.

  5. U.S. perspective on technology demonstration experiments for adaptive structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aswani, Mohan; Wada, Ben K.; Garba, John A.

    1991-01-01

    Evaluation of design concepts for adaptive structures is being performed in support of several focused research programs. These include programs such as Precision Segmented Reflector (PSR), Control Structure Interaction (CSI), and the Advanced Space Structures Technology Research Experiment (ASTREX). Although not specifically designed for adaptive structure technology validation, relevant experiments can be performed using the Passive and Active Control of Space Structures (PACOSS) testbed, the Space Integrated Controls Experiment (SPICE), the CSI Evolutionary Model (CEM), and the Dynamic Scale Model Test (DSMT) Hybrid Scale. In addition to the ground test experiments, several space flight experiments have been planned, including a reduced gravity experiment aboard the KC-135 aircraft, shuttle middeck experiments, and the Inexpensive Flight Experiment (INFLEX).

  6. VEEVVIE: Visual Explorer for Empirical Visualization, VR and Interaction Experiments.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, C; Gutenko, I; Kaufman, A E

    2016-01-01

    Empirical, hypothesis-driven, experimentation is at the heart of the scientific discovery process and has become commonplace in human-factors related fields. To enable the integration of visual analytics in such experiments, we introduce VEEVVIE, the Visual Explorer for Empirical Visualization, VR and Interaction Experiments. VEEVVIE is comprised of a back-end ontology which can model several experimental designs encountered in these fields. This formalization allows VEEVVIE to capture experimental data in a query-able form and makes it accessible through a front-end interface. This front-end offers several multi-dimensional visualization widgets with built-in filtering and highlighting functionality. VEEVVIE is also expandable to support custom experimental measurements and data types through a plug-in visualization widget architecture. We demonstrate VEEVVIE through several case studies of visual analysis, performed on the design and data collected during an experiment on the scalability of high-resolution, immersive, tiled-display walls.

  7. Structure factors in granular experiments with homogeneous fluidization.

    PubMed

    Puglisi, Andrea; Gnoli, Andrea; Gradenigo, Giacomo; Sarracino, Alessandro; Villamaina, Dario

    2012-01-01

    Velocity and density structure factors are measured over a hydrodynamic range of scales in a horizontal quasi-2D fluidized granular experiment, with packing fractions φ ∈ [10%, 40%]. The fluidization is realized by vertically vibrating a rough plate, on top of which particles perform a Brownian-like horizontal motion in addition to inelastic collisions. On one hand, the density structure factor is equal to that of elastic hard spheres, except in the limit of large length-scales, as it occurs in the presence of an effective interaction. On the other hand, the velocity field shows a more complex structure which is a genuine expression of a non-equilibrium steady state and which can be compared to a recent fluctuating hydrodynamic theory with non-equilibrium noise. The temporal decay of velocity modes autocorrelations is compatible with linear hydrodynamic equations with rates dictated by viscous momentum diffusion, corrected by a typical interaction time with the thermostat. Equal-time velocity structure factors display a peculiar shape with a plateau at large length-scales and another one at small scales, marking two different temperatures: the "bath" temperature T(b), depending on shaking parameters, and the "granular" temperature T(g) < T(b), which is affected by collisions. The two ranges of scales are separated by a correlation length which grows with φ, after proper rescaling with the mean free path. PMID:22239797

  8. The Dynamic Reactance Interaction - How Vested Interests Affect People's Experience, Behavior, and Cognition in Social Interactions.

    PubMed

    Steindl, Christina; Jonas, Eva

    2015-01-01

    In social interactions, individuals may sometimes pursue their own interests at the expense of their interaction partner. Such self-interested behaviors impose a threat to the interaction partner's freedom to act. The current article investigates this threat in the context of interdependence and reactance theory. We explore how vested interests influence reactance process stages of an advisor-client interaction. We aim to explore the interactional process that evolves. In two studies, participants took the perspective of a doctor (advisor) or a patient (client). In both studies we incorporated a vested interest. In Study 1 (N = 82) we found that in response to a vested interest of their interaction partner, patients indicated a stronger experience of reactance, more aggressive behavioral intentions, and more biased cognitions than doctors. A serial multiple mediation revealed that a vested interest engendered mistrust toward the interaction partner and this mistrust led to an emerging reactance process. Study 2 (N = 207) further demonstrated that doctors expressed their reactance in a subtle way: they revealed a classic confirmation bias when searching for additional information on their preliminary decision preference, indicating stronger defense motivation. We discuss how these findings can help us to understand how social interactions develop dynamically.

  9. The Dynamic Reactance Interaction - How Vested Interests Affect People's Experience, Behavior, and Cognition in Social Interactions.

    PubMed

    Steindl, Christina; Jonas, Eva

    2015-01-01

    In social interactions, individuals may sometimes pursue their own interests at the expense of their interaction partner. Such self-interested behaviors impose a threat to the interaction partner's freedom to act. The current article investigates this threat in the context of interdependence and reactance theory. We explore how vested interests influence reactance process stages of an advisor-client interaction. We aim to explore the interactional process that evolves. In two studies, participants took the perspective of a doctor (advisor) or a patient (client). In both studies we incorporated a vested interest. In Study 1 (N = 82) we found that in response to a vested interest of their interaction partner, patients indicated a stronger experience of reactance, more aggressive behavioral intentions, and more biased cognitions than doctors. A serial multiple mediation revealed that a vested interest engendered mistrust toward the interaction partner and this mistrust led to an emerging reactance process. Study 2 (N = 207) further demonstrated that doctors expressed their reactance in a subtle way: they revealed a classic confirmation bias when searching for additional information on their preliminary decision preference, indicating stronger defense motivation. We discuss how these findings can help us to understand how social interactions develop dynamically. PMID:26640444

  10. Control Of Flexible Structures-2 (COFS-2) flight control, structure and gimbal system interaction study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fay, Stanley; Gates, Stephen; Henderson, Timothy; Sackett, Lester; Kirchwey, Kim; Stoddard, Isaac; Storch, Joel

    1988-01-01

    The second Control Of Flexible Structures Flight Experiment (COFS-2) includes a long mast as in the first flight experiment, but with the Langley 15-m hoop column antenna attached via a gimbal system to the top of the mast. The mast is to be mounted in the Space Shuttle cargo bay. The servo-driven gimbal system could be used to point the antenna relative to the mast. The dynamic interaction of the Shuttle Orbiter/COFS-2 system with the Orbiter on-orbit Flight Control System (FCS) and the gimbal pointing control system has been studied using analysis and simulation. The Orbiter pointing requirements have been assessed for their impact on allowable free drift time for COFS experiments. Three fixed antenna configurations were investigated. Also simulated was Orbiter attitude control behavior with active vernier jets during antenna slewing. The effect of experiment mast dampers was included. Control system stability and performance and loads on various portions of the COFS-2 structure were investigated. The study indicates possible undesirable interaction between the Orbiter FCS and the flexible, articulated COFS-2 mast/antenna system, even when restricted to vernier reaction jets.

  11. Improved Structure Factors for Modeling XRTS Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanton, Liam; Murillo, Michael; Benage, John; Graziani, Frank

    2012-10-01

    Characterizing warm dense matter (WDM) has gained renewed interest due to advances in powerful lasers and next generation light sources. Because WDM is strongly coupled and moderately degenerate, we must often rely on simulations, which are necessarily based on ions interacting through a screened potential that must be determined. Given such a potential, ionic radial distribution functions (RDFs) and structure factors (SFs) can be calculated and related to XRTS data and EOS quantities. While many screening models are available, such as the Debye- (Yukawa-) potential, they are known to over-screen and are unable capture accurate bound state effects, which have been shown to contribute to both scattering data from XRTS as well as the short-range repulsion in the RDF. Here, we present a model which incorporates an improvement to the screening length in addition to a consistent treatment of the core electrons. This new potential improves the accuracy of both bound state and screening effects without contributing to the computational complexity of Debye-like models. Calculations of ionic RDFs and SFs are compared to experimental data and quantum molecular dynamics simulations for Be, Na, Mg and Al in the WDM and liquid metal regime.

  12. Fluid-structure interaction -- 1996. PVP-Volume 337

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.; Ma, D.C.; Shin, Y.W.; Kulak, R.F.; Chang, F.C.; Kaneko, S.; Brochard, D.; Moody, F.J.

    1996-12-01

    This special volume contains papers on various topics of interest to the pressure vessel and piping industries. These papers are presented in nine sessions covering three topics. The titles of these three sessions are: (1) fluid-structure interaction and structural mechanics; (2) sloshing and fluid-structure interaction; and (3) transient thermal hydraulics, heat transfer, and coupled vessel-piping structural response. Separate abstracts were prepared for most of the papers in this volume.

  13. Eco-evolutionary experience in novel species interactions.

    PubMed

    Saul, Wolf-Christian; Jeschke, Jonathan M

    2015-03-01

    A better understanding of how ecological novelty influences interactions in new combinations of species is key for predicting interaction outcomes, and can help focus conservation and management efforts on preventing the introduction of novel organisms or species (including invasive species, GMOs, synthetic organisms, resurrected species and emerging pathogens) that seem particularly 'risky' for resident species. Here, we consider the implications of different degrees of eco-evolutionary experience of interacting resident and non-resident species, define four qualitative risk categories for estimating the probability of successful establishment and impact of novel species and discuss how the effects of novelty change over time. Focusing then on novel predator-prey interactions, we argue that novelty entails density-dependent advantages for non-resident species, with their largest effects often being at low prey densities. This is illustrated by a comparison of predator functional responses and prey predation risk curves between novel species and ecologically similar resident species, and raises important issues for the conservation of endangered resident prey species. PMID:25626585

  14. Structure and ubiquitin binding of the ubiquitin-interacting motif

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher,R.; Wang, B.; Alam, S.; Higginson, D.; Robinson, H.; Sundquist, C.; Hill, C.

    2003-01-01

    Ubiquitylation is used to target proteins into a large number of different biological processes including proteasomal degradation, endocytosis, virus budding, and vacuolar protein sorting (Vps). Ubiquitylated proteins are typically recognized using one of several different conserved ubiquitin binding modules. Here, we report the crystal structure and ubiquitin binding properties of one such module, the ubiquitin-interacting motif (UIM). We found that UIM peptides from several proteins involved in endocytosis and vacuolar protein sorting including Hrs, Vps27p, Stam1, and Eps15 bound specifically, but with modest affinity (K{sub d} = 0.1-1 mM), to free ubiquitin. Full affinity ubiquitin binding required the presence of conserved acidic patches at the N and C terminus of the UIM, as well as highly conserved central alanine and serine residues. NMR chemical shift perturbation mapping experiments demonstrated that all of these UIM peptides bind to the I44 surface of ubiquitin. The 1.45 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the second yeast Vps27p UIM (Vps27p-2) revealed that the ubiquitin-interacting motif forms an amphipathic helix. Although Vps27p-2 is monomeric in solution, the motif unexpectedly crystallized as an antiparallel four-helix bundle, and the potential biological implications of UIM oligomerization are therefore discussed.

  15. Perceptions and experiences of people with mental illness regarding their interactions with police.

    PubMed

    Livingston, James D; Desmarais, Sarah L; Verdun-Jones, Simon; Parent, Richard; Michalak, Erin; Brink, Johann

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the perceptions and lived experiences of people with mental illness in relation to their interactions with the police. A community-based participatory research approach was used and a procedural justice theoretical perspective guided the study. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted by peer researchers with 60 people with mental illness who had interacted with the police and were living in Metro Vancouver, Canada. Among the study participants, contact with the police was frequent and occurred under a diverse range of circumstances. The majority of participants perceived being treated in a procedurally just manner by the police officer(s) who were involved in their most recent interaction. Almost three-quarters (n=43, 72%) of participants were generally satisfied with how the police officer(s) had handled their most recent interaction. The slight majority of participants (n=30, 51%) rated their previous contacts with the police as a positive experience overall, with 32% (n=19) indicating that their previous interactions with the police were negative life experiences. The findings paint a more balanced picture than that which is often portrayed by the media. Emphasizing a procedural justice framework for police handling of situations involving people with mental illness is a vital step toward improving how these interactions are experienced and perceived.

  16. Perceptions and experiences of people with mental illness regarding their interactions with police.

    PubMed

    Livingston, James D; Desmarais, Sarah L; Verdun-Jones, Simon; Parent, Richard; Michalak, Erin; Brink, Johann

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the perceptions and lived experiences of people with mental illness in relation to their interactions with the police. A community-based participatory research approach was used and a procedural justice theoretical perspective guided the study. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted by peer researchers with 60 people with mental illness who had interacted with the police and were living in Metro Vancouver, Canada. Among the study participants, contact with the police was frequent and occurred under a diverse range of circumstances. The majority of participants perceived being treated in a procedurally just manner by the police officer(s) who were involved in their most recent interaction. Almost three-quarters (n=43, 72%) of participants were generally satisfied with how the police officer(s) had handled their most recent interaction. The slight majority of participants (n=30, 51%) rated their previous contacts with the police as a positive experience overall, with 32% (n=19) indicating that their previous interactions with the police were negative life experiences. The findings paint a more balanced picture than that which is often portrayed by the media. Emphasizing a procedural justice framework for police handling of situations involving people with mental illness is a vital step toward improving how these interactions are experienced and perceived. PMID:24684784

  17. NASA/DOD Control/Structures Interaction Technology, 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Robert L. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    Control/structures interactions, deployment dynamics and system performance of large flexible spacecraft are discussed. Spacecraft active controls, deployable truss structures, deployable antennas, solar power systems for space stations, pointing control systems for space station gimballed payloads, computer-aided design for large space structures, and passive damping for flexible structures are among the topics covered.

  18. Structural study of surfactant-dependent interaction with protein

    SciTech Connect

    Mehan, Sumit; Aswal, Vinod K.; Kohlbrecher, Joachim

    2015-06-24

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to study the complex structure of anionic BSA protein with three different (cationic DTAB, anionic SDS and non-ionic C12E10) surfactants. These systems form very different surfactant-dependent complexes. We show that the structure of protein-surfactant complex is initiated by the site-specific electrostatic interaction between the components, followed by the hydrophobic interaction at high surfactant concentrations. It is also found that hydrophobic interaction is preferred over the electrostatic interaction in deciding the resultant structure of protein-surfactant complexes.

  19. Structural study of surfactant-dependent interaction with protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehan, Sumit; Aswal, Vinod K.; Kohlbrecher, Joachim

    2015-06-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to study the complex structure of anionic BSA protein with three different (cationic DTAB, anionic SDS and non-ionic C12E10) surfactants. These systems form very different surfactant-dependent complexes. We show that the structure of protein-surfactant complex is initiated by the site-specific electrostatic interaction between the components, followed by the hydrophobic interaction at high surfactant concentrations. It is also found that hydrophobic interaction is preferred over the electrostatic interaction in deciding the resultant structure of protein-surfactant complexes.

  20. Structure of local interactions in complex financial dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, X. F.; Chen, T. T.; Zheng, B.

    2014-01-01

    With the network methods and random matrix theory, we investigate the interaction structure of communities in financial markets. In particular, based on the random matrix decomposition, we clarify that the local interactions between the business sectors (subsectors) are mainly contained in the sector mode. In the sector mode, the average correlation inside the sectors is positive, while that between the sectors is negative. Further, we explore the time evolution of the interaction structure of the business sectors, and observe that the local interaction structure changes dramatically during a financial bubble or crisis. PMID:24936906

  1. Police officers’ experiences of supportive and unsupportive social interactions following traumatic incidents

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Rachel; Pistrang, Nancy; Billings, Jo

    2013-01-01

    Background Police officers are routinely exposed to potentially traumatic incidents yet the majority do not develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Social support has been identified as one factor that may maintain wellbeing in this population, although what constitutes supportive or unsupportive interactions is unclear. Objective To explore police officers’ experiences of supportive and unsupportive interactions following distressing incidents. Method Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 19 police officers. Transcripts were analysed using Braun and Clarke's (2006) thematic analysis approach. Results Participants described a range of supportive interactions with colleagues, friends, and family, as well as social constraints that hindered interactions. Ambivalence about talking about the impact of distressing events was striking throughout the accounts. The context and source of available support, as well as beliefs about talking, influenced their interactions. Humour was a central feature of interactions with colleagues; more emotional talk occurred with partners and close family, albeit with officers limiting details in order to protect others. Conclusions The findings provide tentative insights into the processes of social support that may contribute to the resilience of police officers following traumatic incidents. Further research is needed to examine whether the experiences of supportive and unsupportive interactions differ for those with and without PTSD. PMID:23516046

  2. Quantifying long-range correlations and 1/f patterns in a minimal experiment of social interaction

    PubMed Central

    Bedia, Manuel G.; Aguilera, Miguel; Gómez, Tomás; Larrode, David G.; Seron, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, researchers in social cognition have found the “perceptual crossing paradigm” to be both a theoretical and practical advance toward meeting particular challenges. This paradigm has been used to analyze the type of interactive processes that emerge in minimal interactions and it has allowed progress toward understanding of the principles of social cognition processes. In this paper, we analyze whether some critical aspects of these interactions could not have been observed by previous studies. We consider alternative indicators that could complete, or even lead us to rethink, the current interpretation of the results obtained from both experimental and simulated modeling in the fields of social interactions and minimal perceptual crossing. In particular, we discuss the possibility that previous experiments have been analytically constrained to a short-term dynamic type of player response. Additionally, we propose the possibility of considering these experiments from a more suitable framework based on the use and analysis of long-range correlations and fractal dynamics. We will also reveal evidence supporting the idea that social interactions are deployed along many scales of activity. Specifically, we propose that the fractal structure of the interactions could be a more adequate framework to understand the type of social interaction patterns generated in a social engagement. PMID:25429277

  3. Solving Fluid Structure Interaction Problems with an Immersed Boundary Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barad, Michael F.; Brehm, Christoph; Kiris, Cetin C.

    2016-01-01

    An immersed boundary method for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations can be used for moving boundary problems as well as fully coupled fluid-structure interaction is presented. The underlying Cartesian immersed boundary method of the Launch Ascent and Vehicle Aerodynamics (LAVA) framework, based on the locally stabilized immersed boundary method previously presented by the authors, is extended to account for unsteady boundary motion and coupled to linear and geometrically nonlinear structural finite element solvers. The approach is validated for moving boundary problems with prescribed body motion and fully coupled fluid structure interaction problems. Keywords: Immersed Boundary Method, Higher-Order Finite Difference Method, Fluid Structure Interaction.

  4. Experiments Evaluating the Interaction between Deformable Substrates and Prograding Clinoforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatmas, E. S.; Foreman, B.; Abeyta, A.; Paola, C.

    2013-12-01

    Passive margins often contain salt and mobile shale layers that act as deformable substrates underlying coastal sediments. By understanding the interaction between deformable substrates and migrating clinoforms in simplified, experimental settings, we hope to clarify their fundamental behavior in natural deltaic settings. Substrate deformation occurs by a number of processes and can result in rugose ocean floor bathymetry which can locally trap sediment. In our experiments, we focus on how differential sediment loading on two substrates of different rheologies (Newtonian versus Bingham) affects aspects of clinoform deposition. We are particularly interested in the effects of the progradation rate and substrate rheology on the locus of clinoform deposition over time as the substrate and delta interact. Our experimental setup uses a rectangular flume that is 230 cm long, 8 cm wide and 30 cm tall. The materials we used for the mobile shale experiments involved a mixture of kaolinite and water which provide a Bingham rheology, and the sediment was a quartz sand and coal mixture. For a Newtonian rheology we used corn syrup as a deformable substrate, capturing the Newtonian rheology of subsurface salt, and the sediment consisted of a mixture of equal volumes of walnut shells and kaolinite clay. For each experiment we systematically changed sediment feed rate and substrate thickness. Deformation styles differ qualitatively between Bingham (kaolinite/mobile shale) and Newtonian (corn syrup/salt) experiments. In mobile-shale (Bingham) experiments, a bulge forms at the toe of the clinoform and the clinoform eventually overtops this bulge, creating alternating thick and thin stratigraphic accumulations down depositional dip. For the salt (Newtonian) experiments, deformation occurs behind the clinoform foreset in the form of diapirs. Preliminary results show minimal impacts on shoreline progradation rate as the delta loads mobile shale substrates. This suggests that the

  5. Experiments on Diffusion Flame Structure of a Laminar Vortex Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Shin-Juh; Dahm, Werner J. A.

    1999-01-01

    The study of flame-vortex interactions provides one of the means to better understand turbulent combustion, and allows for canonical configurations that contain the fundamental elements found in turbulent flames, These include concentrated vorticity, entrainment and mixing, strain and nonequilibrium phenomena, diffusion and differential diffusion, partial premixing and diluent effects, and heat release effects. In flame- vortex configurations, these fundamental elements can be studied under more controlled conditions than is possible in direct investigations of turbulent flames. Since the paper of Marble, the problem of the flame-vortex interaction has received considerable attention theoretically, numerically and experimentally. Several configurations exist for study of the premixed flame/vortex ring interaction but more limited results have been obtained to date for the diffusion flame/vortex ring case. The setup of Chen and Dahm, which is conceptually similar to that of Karagozian and Manda and Karagozian, Suganuma and Strom where the ring is composed of fuel and air and combustion begins during the ring formation process, is used in the current study. However, it is essential to conduct the experiments in microgravity to remove the asymmetries caused by buoyancy and thus obtain highly symmetric and repeatable interactions. In previous studies it was found that the flame structure of the vortex ring was similar to that obtained analytically by Karagozian and Manda. Dilution of propane with nitrogen led mainly to a reduction in flame luminosities, flame burnout times were affected by both fuel volumes and amount of dilution, and a simple model of the burnout times was developed. In this paper, a discussion on reacting ring displacement and flame burnout time will be given, and the flame structures of vortex rings containing ethane and air will be compared to those of propane reacting in air.

  6. Structure and interactions of human respiratory mucin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purdy, Kirstin; Sheehan, John; Rubinstein, Michael; Wong, Gerard

    2006-03-01

    Human respiratory mucin plays a crucial role in the pathology of Cystic Fibrosis lung infections. Mucin is a flexible, linear polyelectrolyte, characterized by its many charged oligo-carbohydrate side chains that give it its bottle-brush structure. The macroscopic properties of a mucin suspension are known to change drastically with changes in ion concentration and solution pH, but little is known about the effect of these variables on individual mucin structure. We present preliminary results on the structural response of individual human respiratory mucin molecules to variations in concentration of ions of different valences via small angle x-ray diffraction.

  7. Application of linker technique to trap transiently interacting protein complexes for structural studies

    PubMed Central

    Reddy Chichili, Vishnu Priyanka; Kumar, Veerendra; Sivaraman, J.

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are key events controlling several biological processes. We have developed and employed a method to trap transiently interacting protein complexes for structural studies using glycine-rich linkers to fuse interacting partners, one of which is unstructured. Initial steps involve isothermal titration calorimetry to identify the minimum binding region of the unstructured protein in its interaction with its stable binding partner. This is followed by computational analysis to identify the approximate site of the interaction and to design an appropriate linker length. Subsequently, fused constructs are generated and characterized using size exclusion chromatography and dynamic light scattering experiments. The structure of the chimeric protein is then solved by crystallization, and validated both in vitro and in vivo by substituting key interacting residues of the full length, unlinked proteins with alanine. This protocol offers the opportunity to study crucial and currently unattainable transient protein interactions involved in various biological processes. PMID:26985443

  8. Structure soil structure interaction effects: Seismic analysis of safety related collocated concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, J.R.

    2000-06-20

    The Process, Purification and Stack Buildings are collocated safety related concrete shear wall structures with plan dimensions in excess of 100 feet. An important aspect of their seismic analysis was the determination of structure soil structure interaction (SSSI) effects, if any. The SSSI analysis of the Process Building, with one other building at a time, was performed with the SASSI computer code for up to 50 frequencies. Each combined model had about 1500 interaction nodes. Results of the SSSI analysis were compared with those from soil structure interaction (SSI) analysis of the individual buildings, done with ABAQUS and SASSI codes, for three parameters: peak accelerations, seismic forces and the in-structure floor response spectra (FRS). The results may be of wider interest due to the model size and the potential applicability to other deep soil layered sites. Results obtained from the ABAQUS analysis were consistently higher, as expected, than those from the SSI and SSSI analyses using the SASSI. The SSSI effect between the Process and Purification Buildings was not significant. The Process and Stack Building results demonstrated that under certain conditions a massive structure can have an observable effect on the seismic response of a smaller and less stiff structure.

  9. Fluid-structure interactions in compressible cavity flows

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Justin L.; Casper, Katya Marie; Beresh, Steven J.; Hunter, Patrick S.; Spillers, Russell Wayne; Henfling, John F.; Mayes, Randall L.

    2015-06-08

    Experiments were performed to understand the complex fluid-structure interactions that occur during aircraft internal store carriage. A cylindrical store was installed in a rectangular cavity having a length-to-depth ratio of 3.33 and a length-to-width ratio of 1. The Mach number ranged from 0.6 to 2.5 and the incoming boundary layer was turbulent. Fast-response pressure measurements provided aeroacoustic loading in the cavity, while triaxial accelerometers provided simultaneous store response. Despite occupying only 6% of the cavity volume, the store significantly altered the cavity acoustics. The store responded to the cavity flow at its natural structural frequencies, and it exhibited a directionally dependent response to cavity resonance. Specifically, cavity tones excited the store in the streamwise and wall-normal directions consistently, whereas a spanwise response was observed only occasionally. Also, the streamwise and wall-normal responses were attributed to the longitudinal pressure waves and shear layer vortices known to occur during cavity resonance. Although the spanwise response to cavity tones was limited, broadband pressure fluctuations resulted in significant spanwise accelerations at store natural frequencies. As a result, the largest vibrations occurred when a cavity tone matched a structural natural frequency, although energy was transferred more efficiently to natural frequencies having predominantly streamwise and wall-normal motions.

  10. Fluid-structure interactions in compressible cavity flows

    DOE PAGES

    Wagner, Justin L.; Casper, Katya Marie; Beresh, Steven J.; Hunter, Patrick S.; Spillers, Russell Wayne; Henfling, John F.; Mayes, Randall L.

    2015-06-08

    Experiments were performed to understand the complex fluid-structure interactions that occur during aircraft internal store carriage. A cylindrical store was installed in a rectangular cavity having a length-to-depth ratio of 3.33 and a length-to-width ratio of 1. The Mach number ranged from 0.6 to 2.5 and the incoming boundary layer was turbulent. Fast-response pressure measurements provided aeroacoustic loading in the cavity, while triaxial accelerometers provided simultaneous store response. Despite occupying only 6% of the cavity volume, the store significantly altered the cavity acoustics. The store responded to the cavity flow at its natural structural frequencies, and it exhibited a directionallymore » dependent response to cavity resonance. Specifically, cavity tones excited the store in the streamwise and wall-normal directions consistently, whereas a spanwise response was observed only occasionally. Also, the streamwise and wall-normal responses were attributed to the longitudinal pressure waves and shear layer vortices known to occur during cavity resonance. Although the spanwise response to cavity tones was limited, broadband pressure fluctuations resulted in significant spanwise accelerations at store natural frequencies. As a result, the largest vibrations occurred when a cavity tone matched a structural natural frequency, although energy was transferred more efficiently to natural frequencies having predominantly streamwise and wall-normal motions.« less

  11. Structural and functional bases of laser-microvessels interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Valentine I.; Terman, Oleg A.; Builin, Vitalij; Lebedeva, Natalia A.; Samoilov, Nickolai

    1993-07-01

    Structural and functional microcirculatory changes in tissues and organs (muscles, liver, derma, epinephros, brain cortex) under various dosages and powers of laser irradiation in the red (633 nm) and near infrared (890 nm) spectrum regions have been studied in experiments and clinic. In case of nonsensitized tissues the `photoactivation' range of power densities and doses of laser irradiation has been established. We have identified a short-term reaction of microvessels and a long-term reaction (adaptation). The former consists of intensification of microcirculation and metabolism rise in parenchymatous cells; the latter is connected with neoangiogenesis acceleration. The intensification of the blood microcirculation includes a dilation of microvessels of all orders, an amplification of arteriolar vasomotions and an opening of `reserved' capillaries. Data on the structural reconstruction of myocytes and endotheliocytes have shown that the high differential parenchymatous cells and its membrane structures are sensitive to low energy laser irradiation and, on the other hand, under low energy laser irradiation there is an activation of synthetic processes in the cells. Thus, during the laser-tissue interaction in such complex system as human organism the microcirculation plays the key role among the other systems.

  12. Interface structure of co-rotating interaction regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogilvie, K. W.; Roelof, E. C.; Forsyth, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    Plasma and particle observations on Ulysses during its passes through the southern and northern heliosphere have revealed that, inside the streamer belt, the large-scale structure of the quiet global heliosphere is dominated by corotating interaction regions (CIRs). Therefore, considerable attention is now being given to the internal plasma structure of CIRs, and in particular, to the manifestations of the stream interfaces that should mark their origins as interactions between low speed solar wind (in the low-latitude streamer belt) and high speed solar wind (from the equatorial extensions of the high latitude polar coronal holes). The SWICS and HI-SCALE experiments on Ulysses combine plasma and energetic particle measurements that are of considerable utility for such studies because, between them, they cover the proton energy range from 10 eV to 5 MeV. These measurements are used, together with magnetic field data, to study the remarkable series of CIRs that occurred during the period beginning July 1992 and the end of 1993 as Ulysses rose from the ecliptic to a southern heliographic latitude of 48 deg. The structure of the regions between the forward and reverse shocks were previously analyzed in terms of the proton specific entropy argument log that should exhibit a discontinuous jump at the stream interface. It was claimed that the stream interface, defined with respect to specific entropy, is also associated with a discontinuity in energetic proton intensities. The energetic particle data (greater than 60 keV) and how they were ordered with respect to interfaces and with respect to the magnetic field were examined.

  13. Controller-structure interaction compensation using adaptive residual mode filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Roger A.; Balas, Mark J.

    1990-01-01

    It is not feasible to construct controllers for large space structures or large scale systems (LSS's) which are of the same order as the structures. The complexity of the dynamics of these systems is such that full knowledge of its behavior cannot by processed by today's controller design methods. The controller for system performance of such a system is therefore based on a much smaller reduced-order model (ROM). Unfortunately, the interaction between the LSS and the ROM-based controller can produce instabilities in the closed-loop system due to the unmodeled dynamics of the LSS. Residual mode filters (RMF's) allow the systematic removal of these instabilities in a matter which does not require a redesign of the controller. In addition RMF's have a strong theoretical basis. As simple first- or second-order filters, the RMF CSI compensation technique is at once modular, simple and highly effective. RMF compensation requires knowledge of the dynamics of the system modes which resulted in the previous closed-loop instabilities (the residual modes), but this information is sometimes known imperfectly. An adaptive, self-tuning RMF design, which compensates for uncertainty in the frequency of the residual mode, has been simulated using continuous-time and discrete-time models of a flexible robot manipulator. Work has also been completed on the discrete-time experimental implementation on the Martin Marietta flexible robot manipulator experiment. This paper will present the results of that work on adaptive, self-tuning RMF's, and will clearly show the advantage of this adaptive compensation technique for controller-structure interaction (CSI) instabilities in actively-controlled LSS's.

  14. Neutron Interactions in the CUORE Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dolinski, Michelle Jean

    2008-10-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay (0vDBD) is a lepton-number violating process that can occur only for a massive Majorana neutrino. The search for 0vDBD is currently the only practical experimental way to determine whether neutrinos are identical to their own antiparticles (Majorana neutrinos) or have distinct particle and anti-particle states (Dirac neutrinos). In addition, the observation of 0vDBD can provide information about the absolute mass scale of the neutrino. The Cuoricino experiment was a sensitive search for 0vDBD, as well as a proof of principle for the next generation experiment, CUORE. CUORE will search for 0vDBD of 130Te with a ton-scale array of unenriched TeO2 bolometers. By increasing mass and decreasing the background for 0vDBD, the half-life sensitivity of CUORE will be a factor of twenty better than that of Cuoricino. The site for both of these experiments is the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, an underground laboratory with 3300 meters water equivalent rock overburden and a cosmic ray muon attenuation factor of 10-6. Because of the extreme low background requirements for CUORE, it is important that all potential sources of background in the 0vDBD peak region at 2530 keV are well understood. One potential source of background for CUORE comes from neutrons, which can be produced underground both by (α,n) reactions and by fast cosmic ray muon interactions. Preliminary simulations by the CUORE collaboration indicate that these backgrounds will be negligible for CUORE. However, in order to accurately simulate the expected neutron background, it is important to understand the cross sections for neutron interactions with detector materials. In order to help refine these simulations, I have measured the gamma-ray production cross sections for interactions of neutrons on the abundant stable isotopes of Te using the GEANIE detector array at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. In addition, I have used the GEANIE

  15. Fluid Structure Interaction in a Turbine Blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorla, Rama S. R.

    2004-01-01

    An unsteady, three dimensional Navier-Stokes solution in rotating frame formulation for turbomachinery applications is presented. Casting the governing equations in a rotating frame enabled the freezing of grid motion and resulted in substantial savings in computer time. The turbine blade was computationally simulated and probabilistically evaluated in view of several uncertainties in the aerodynamic, structural, material and thermal variables that govern the turbine blade. The interconnection between the computational fluid dynamics code and finite element structural analysis code was necessary to couple the thermal profiles with the structural design. The stresses and their variations were evaluated at critical points on the Turbine blade. Cumulative distribution functions and sensitivity factors were computed for stress responses due to aerodynamic, geometric, mechanical and thermal random variables.

  16. JPL control-structure interaction technology: Micro-precision CSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laskin, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Control-Structure Interaction (CSI) Program is described in outline and graphic form. Particular emphasis is given to the activities of the Jet Propulsion Lab. The goals of the program are (1) controlled structure performance enhancement, (2) controlled structure unified methods for design/analysis, and (3) ground validation methods for CSI flight systems.

  17. A Virtual Rock Physics Laboratory Through Visualized and Interactive Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanorio, T.; Di Bonito, C.; Clark, A. C.

    2014-12-01

    As new scientific challenges demand more comprehensive and multidisciplinary investigations, laboratory experiments are not expected to become simpler and/or faster. Experimental investigation is an indispensable element of scientific inquiry and must play a central role in the way current and future generations of scientist make decisions. To turn the complexity of laboratory work (and that of rocks!) into dexterity, engagement, and expanded learning opportunities, we are building an interactive, virtual laboratory reproducing in form and function the Stanford Rock Physics Laboratory, at Stanford University. The objective is to combine lectures on laboratory techniques and an online repository of visualized experiments consisting of interactive, 3-D renderings of equipment used to measure properties central to the study of rock physics (e.g., how to saturate rocks, how to measure porosity, permeability, and elastic wave velocity). We use a game creation system together with 3-D computer graphics, and a narrative voice to guide the user through the different phases of the experimental protocol. The main advantage gained in employing computer graphics over video footage is that students can virtually open the instrument, single out its components, and assemble it. Most importantly, it helps describe the processes occurring within the rock. These latter cannot be tracked while simply recording the physical experiment, but computer animation can efficiently illustrate what happens inside rock samples (e.g., describing acoustic waves, and/or fluid flow through a porous rock under pressure within an opaque core-holder - Figure 1). The repository of visualized experiments will complement lectures on laboratory techniques and constitute an on-line course offered through the EdX platform at Stanford. This will provide a virtual laboratory for anyone, anywhere to facilitate teaching/learning of introductory laboratory classes in Geophysics and expand the number of courses

  18. Interactive visualization tools for the structural biologist

    PubMed Central

    Porebski, Benjamin T.; Ho, Bosco K.; Buckle, Ashley M.

    2013-01-01

    In structural biology, management of a large number of Protein Data Bank (PDB) files and raw X-ray diffraction images often presents a major organizational problem. Existing software packages that manipulate these file types were not designed for these kinds of file-management tasks. This is typically encountered when browsing through a folder of hundreds of X-ray images, with the aim of rapidly inspecting the diffraction quality of a data set. To solve this problem, a useful functionality of the Macintosh operating system (OSX) has been exploited that allows custom visualization plugins to be attached to certain file types. Software plugins have been developed for diffraction images and PDB files, which in many scenarios can save considerable time and effort. The direct visualization of diffraction images and PDB structures in the file browser can be used to identify key files of interest simply by scrolling through a list of files. PMID:24068844

  19. Interactive visualization tools for the structural biologist.

    PubMed

    Porebski, Benjamin T; Ho, Bosco K; Buckle, Ashley M

    2013-10-01

    In structural biology, management of a large number of Protein Data Bank (PDB) files and raw X-ray diffraction images often presents a major organizational problem. Existing software packages that manipulate these file types were not designed for these kinds of file-management tasks. This is typically encountered when browsing through a folder of hundreds of X-ray images, with the aim of rapidly inspecting the diffraction quality of a data set. To solve this problem, a useful functionality of the Macintosh operating system (OSX) has been exploited that allows custom visualization plugins to be attached to certain file types. Software plugins have been developed for diffraction images and PDB files, which in many scenarios can save considerable time and effort. The direct visualization of diffraction images and PDB structures in the file browser can be used to identify key files of interest simply by scrolling through a list of files. PMID:24068844

  20. Ecological Networks: Structure, Interaction Strength, and Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Samit; Sinha, Somdatta

    The fundamental building blocks of any ecosystem, the food webs, which are assemblages of species through various interconnections, provide a central concept in ecology. The study of a food web allows abstractions of the complexity and interconnectedness of natural communities that transcend the specific details of the underlying systems. For example, Fig. 1 shows a typical food web, where the species are connected through their feeding relationships. The top predator, Heliaster (starfish) feeds on many gastropods like Hexaplex, Morula, Cantharus, etc., some of whom predate on each other [129]. Interactions between species in a food web can be of many types, such as predation, competition, mutualism, commensalism, and ammensalism (see Section 1.1, Fig. 2).

  1. Supersonic Parachute Aerodynamic Testing and Fluid Structure Interaction Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingard, J. S.; Underwood, J. C.; Darley, M. G.; Marraffa, L.; Ferracina, L.

    2014-06-01

    The ESA Supersonic Parachute program expands the knowledge of parachute inflation and flying characteristics in supersonic flows using wind tunnel testing and fluid structure interaction to develop new inflation algorithms and aerodynamic databases.

  2. Controls structures interaction, an interdisciplinary challenge for large spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanks, Brantley R.

    1990-01-01

    Controls structures interaction (CSI), a phenomenon which occurs when control forces interact with the flexible motion of a structure, can, if improperly treated in design and development, cause reduced performance or control instabilities. Properly applied, it can improve flexible spacecraft performance. In this paper, the NASA CSI technology program for future spacecraft applications is described. The program objectives and organization are outlined, and the nature of individual program tasks is described. The interdisciplinary aspects of CSI are also addressed.

  3. Structural Variation and Uniformity among Tetraloop-Receptor Interactions and Other Loop-Helix Interactions in RNA Crystal Structures

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Li; Chai, Dinggeng; Fraser, Marie E.; Zimmerly, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Tetraloop-receptor interactions are prevalent structural units in RNAs, and include the GAAA/11-nt and GNRA-minor groove interactions. In this study, we have compiled a set of 78 nonredundant loop-helix interactions from X-ray crystal structures, and examined them for the extent of their sequence and structural variation. Of the 78 interactions in the set, only four were classical GAAA/11-nt motifs, while over half (48) were GNRA-minor groove interactions. The GNRA-minor groove interactions were not a homogeneous set, but were divided into five subclasses. The most predominant subclass is characterized by two triple base pair interactions in the minor groove, flanked by two ribose zipper contacts. This geometry may be considered the “standard” GNRA-minor groove interaction, while the other four subclasses are alternative ways to form interfaces between a minor groove and tetraloop. The remaining 26 structures in the set of 78 have loops interacting with mostly idiosyncratic receptors. Among the entire set, a number of sequence-structure correlations can be identified, which may be used as initial hypotheses in predicting three-dimensional structures from primary sequences. Conversely, other sequence patterns are not predictive; for example, GAAA loop sequences and GG/CC receptors bind to each other with three distinct geometries. Finally, we observe an example of structural evolution in group II introns, in which loop-receptor motifs are substituted for each other while maintaining the larger three-dimensional geometry. Overall, the study gives a more complete view of RNA loop-helix interactions that exist in nature. PMID:23152878

  4. Adaptive piezoelectric shell structures: theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzou, H. S.; Zhong, J. P.

    1993-07-01

    Active "smart" space and mechanical structures with adaptive dynamic characteristics have long been interested in a variety of high-performance systems, e.g. flexible space structures, flexible robots, "smart" machines etc. In this paper, an active adaptive structure made of piezoelectric materials is proposed and evaluated. Electromechanical equations of motion and generalised boundary conditions of a generic piezoelectric shell subjected to mechanical and electrical excitations are derived using Hamilton's principle and the linear piezoelectric theory. The structural adaptivity is achieved by a voltage feedback (open or closed loops) utilising the converse piezoelectric effect. Applications of the theory is demonstrated in a bimorph beam case and a cylindrical shell case. Frequency manipulation of the bimorph beam is studied theoretically and experimentally. Damping control of the cylindrical shell via in-plane membrane forces is also investigated.

  5. Characterization of DNA-protein interactions using high-throughput sequencing data from pulldown experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreland, Blythe; Oman, Kenji; Curfman, John; Yan, Pearlly; Bundschuh, Ralf

    Methyl-binding domain (MBD) protein pulldown experiments have been a valuable tool in measuring the levels of methylated CpG dinucleotides. Due to the frequent use of this technique, high-throughput sequencing data sets are available that allow a detailed quantitative characterization of the underlying interaction between methylated DNA and MBD proteins. Analyzing such data sets, we first found that two such proteins cannot bind closer to each other than 2 bp, consistent with structural models of the DNA-protein interaction. Second, the large amount of sequencing data allowed us to find rather weak but nevertheless clearly statistically significant sequence preferences for several bases around the required CpG. These results demonstrate that pulldown sequencing is a high-precision tool in characterizing DNA-protein interactions. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMR-1410172.

  6. Structural studies of SSB interaction with RecO.

    PubMed

    Ryzhikov, Mikhail; Korolev, Sergey

    2012-01-01

    Interaction of recombination protein RecO with single-stranded (ss) DNA-binding protein (SSB) is essential for DNA damage repair and restart of stalled replication (Cox, Crit Rev Biochem Mol Biol 42(1):41-63, 2007). To understand mechanism of this interaction and its role in DNA repair, we deciphered a high-resolution structure of RecO complex with C-terminal tail of SSB (SSB-Ct). The structure revealed a key role of hydrophobic interactions between two proteins and suggests the mechanism of RecO recruitment to DNA during homologous recombination and strand annealing. PMID:22976180

  7. Ground test experiment for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tollison, D. K.; Waites, H. B.

    1985-01-01

    In recent years a new body of control theory has been developed for the design of control systems for Large Space Structures (LSS). The problems of testing this theory on LSS hardware are aggravated by the expense and risk of actual in orbit tests. Ground tests on large space structures can provide a proving ground for candidate control systems, but such tests require a unique facility for their execution. The current development of such a facility at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is the subject of this report.

  8. Structures-propulsion interactions and requirements. [large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyner, J. V.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of low-thrust primary propulsion system characteristics on the mass, area, and orbit transfer characteristics of large space systems (LSS) were determined. Three general structural classes of LSS were considered, each with a broad range of diameters and nonstructural surface densities. While transferring the deployed structure from LEO and to GEO, an acceleration range of 0.02 to 0.1 g's was found to maximize deliverable payload based on structural mass impact. After propulsion system parametric analyses considering four propellant combinations produced values for available payload mass, length and volume, a thrust level range which maximizes deliverable LSS diameter was determined corresponding to a structure and propulsion vehicle. The engine start and/or shutdown thrust transients on the last orbit transfer (apogee) burn can impose transient loads which would be greater than the steady-state loads at the burnout acceleration. The effect of the engine thrust transients on the LSS was determined from the dynamic models upon which various engine ramps were imposed.

  9. Structural Dynamics and Control Interaction of Flexible Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert S. (Editor); Scofield, Harold N. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    A Workshop was held to promote technical exchange between the structural dynamic and control disciplines, foster joint technology, and provide a forum for discussing and focusing critical issues in the separate and combined areas. The workshop was closed by a panel meeting. Panel members' viewpoints and their responses to questions are included.

  10. Structural Neuroimaging Genetics Interactions in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Moon, Seok Woo; Dinov, Ivo D; Kim, Jaebum; Zamanyan, Alen; Hobel, Sam; Thompson, Paul M; Toga, Arthur W

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates late-onset cognitive impairment using neuroimaging and genetics biomarkers for Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) participants. Eight-hundred and eight ADNI subjects were identified and divided into three groups: 200 subjects with Alzheimer's disease (AD), 383 subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 225 asymptomatic normal controls (NC). Their structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data were parcellated using BrainParser, and the 80 most important neuroimaging biomarkers were extracted using the global shape analysis Pipeline workflow. Using Plink via the Pipeline environment, we obtained 80 SNPs highly-associated with the imaging biomarkers. In the AD cohort, rs2137962 was significantly associated bilaterally with changes in the hippocampi and the parahippocampal gyri, and rs1498853, rs288503, and rs288496 were associated with the left and right hippocampi, the right parahippocampal gyrus, and the left inferior temporal gyrus. In the MCI cohort, rs17028008 and rs17027976 were significantly associated with the right caudate and right fusiform gyrus, rs2075650 (TOMM40) was associated with the right caudate, and rs1334496 and rs4829605 were significantly associated with the right inferior temporal gyrus. In the NC cohort, Chromosome 15 [rs734854 (STOML1), rs11072463 (PML), rs4886844 (PML), and rs1052242 (PML)] was significantly associated with both hippocampi and both insular cortices, and rs4899412 (RGS6) was significantly associated with the caudate. We observed significant correlations between genetic and neuroimaging phenotypes in the 808 ADNI subjects. These results suggest that differences between AD, MCI, and NC cohorts may be examined by using powerful joint models of morphometric, imaging and genotypic data. PMID:26444770

  11. Designing an experiment to measure cellular interaction forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAlinden, Niall; Glass, David G.; Millington, Owain R.; Wright, Amanda J.

    2013-09-01

    Optical trapping is a powerful tool in Life Science research and is becoming common place in many microscopy laboratories and facilities. The force applied by the laser beam on the trapped object can be accurately determined allowing any external forces acting on the trapped object to be deduced. We aim to design a series of experiments that use an optical trap to measure and quantify the interaction force between immune cells. In order to cause minimum perturbation to the sample we plan to directly trap T cells and remove the need to introduce exogenous beads to the sample. This poses a series of challenges and raises questions that need to be answered in order to design a set of effect end-point experiments. A typical cell is large compared to the beads normally trapped and highly non-uniform - can we reliably trap such objects and prevent them from rolling and re-orientating? In this paper we show how a spatial light modulator can produce a triple-spot trap, as opposed to a single-spot trap, giving complete control over the object's orientation and preventing it from rolling due, for example, to Brownian motion. To use an optical trap as a force transducer to measure an external force you must first have a reliably calibrated system. The optical trapping force is typically measured using either the theory of equipartition and observing the Brownian motion of the trapped object or using an escape force method, e.g. the viscous drag force method. In this paper we examine the relationship between force and displacement, as well as measuring the maximum displacement from equilibrium position before an object falls out of the trap, hence determining the conditions under which the different calibration methods should be applied.

  12. Income, Experience, and the Structure of Internal Labor Markets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Arthur J.

    This paper examines the relationships between the structure of internal labor markets and the mobility, experience, and income of workers. The author discusses the taxonomy of the markets and the predicted differential impact of experience. Internal labor markets are classified according to the assumption that structure is related to mobility. In…

  13. Two-dimensional Supramolecular Structures by Hydrogen and Halogen Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keon Yoon, Jong; Kim, Howon; Huem Jeon, Jeong; Kahng, Se-Jong

    2010-03-01

    Supramolecualr ordering has been actively studied due to it's possible applications to the fabrication processes of nano-electronic devices. Van der Waals interaction and hydrogen bonding are frequently studied mechanisms for various molecular structures based on non-uniform charge distributions. Halogen atoms in molecules can have electrostatic interactions with similar strength. Big halogen atoms have strong non-uniform charge distributions. To study molecular orderings formed by hydrogen and halogen interactions, we chose a molecular system containing oxygen, hydrogen, and bromine atoms, a bromo-quinone. A two-dimensional molecular network was studied on Au(111) using a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope. Bromo-quinone molecules form self-assembled square grids having windmill structures. Their molecular orderings, chiral structures, and defects are explained in terms of hydrogen and halogen interactions.

  14. Coherent structure dynamics during turbulence-flame interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haffner, Eileen; Green, Melissa; Hamlington, Peter; Poludnenko, Alexi; Oran, Elaine

    2015-11-01

    Several studies have been conducted to characterize the turbulence-flame interaction in reacting flows quantitatively. It has been observed that increased turbulence intensity both wrinkles and broadens the flame front throughout the preheat zone and reaction zone. In addition, previous studies showed that interaction with the flame changes the orientation of turbulent structures and and in some cases incites loss of vorticity, but the physical mechanism of this interaction was still unclear. An Eulerian analysis (Q criterion) is preformed to track structures through the flow, and to visualize the vortex transformation as it encounters the flame. This is coupled with the contours of the fuel-mass fraction, density, and pressure throughout the flame brush to provide insight into the physical interaction between turbulent structures and the flame. A complete description of the physical mechanism could provide insight into ways to design engine inlets for efficient mixing in combustion applications.

  15. Community structure description in amino acid interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Gaci, Omar

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we represent proteins by amino acid interaction networks. This is a graph whose vertices are the protein's amino acids and whose edges are the interactions between them. We begin by identifying the main topological properties of these interaction networks using graph theory measures. We observe that the amino acids interact specifically, according to their structural role, and depending on whether they participate or not in the secondary structure. Thus, certain amino acids tend to group together to form local clouds. Then, we study the formation of node aggregations through community structure detections. We observe that the composition of organizations confirms a specific aggregation between loops around a core composed of secondary.

  16. The NASA controls-structures interaction technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, Jerry R.; Layman, W. E.; Waites, H. B.; Hayduk, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The interaction between a flexible spacecraft structure and its control system is commonly referred to as controls-structures interaction (CSI). The CSI technology program is developing the capability and confidence to integrate the structure and control system, so as to avoid interactions that cause problems and to exploit interactions to increase spacecraft capability. A NASA program has been initiated to advance CSI technology to a point where it can be used in spacecraft design for future missions. The CSI technology program is a multicenter program utilizing the resources of the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The purpose is to describe the current activities, results to date, and future activities of the NASA CSI technology program.

  17. Entanglement dynamics of three interacting two-level atoms within a common structured environment

    SciTech Connect

    An, Nguyen Ba; Kim, Jaewan; Kim, Kisik

    2011-08-15

    We derive exact time evolution of three two-level atoms coupled to a common environment. The environment is structured and is modeled by a leaky cavity with Lorentzian spectral density. The atoms are initially prepared in a generalized W state and later on experience pairwise dipole-dipole interactions and couplings to the cavity. We study tripartite disentangling and entangling dynamics as well as protecting bipartite entanglement with both atom-atom interactions and atom-cavity couplings taken simultaneously into account.

  18. Probing the Structure of Nucleons in Electromagnetic Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Volker D. Burkert

    2000-01-01

    I discuss open problems in nucleon structure studies using electromagnetic probes. The focus is on the regime of strong interaction QCD. Significant progress in our understanding of the nucleon structure in the region of strong QCD may be expected in the first decade of the new millennium due to major experimental and theoretical efforts currently underway in this field.

  19. Probing the structure of nucleons in electromagnetic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Burkert, V.D.

    1999-06-01

    The author discusses open problems in nucleon structure studies using electromagnetic probes. The focus is on the regime of strong interaction QCD. Significant progress in their understanding of the nucleon structure in the region of strong QCD may be expected in the first decade of the new millennium due to major experimental and theoretical efforts currently underway in this field.

  20. Interactive Hangman Teaches Amino Acid Structures and Abbreviations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, Britney O.; Sears, Duane; Clegg, Dennis O.

    2014-01-01

    We developed an interactive exercise to teach students how to draw the structures of the 20 standard amino acids and to identify the one-letter abbreviations by modifying the familiar game of "Hangman." Amino acid structures were used to represent single letters throughout the game. To provide additional practice in identifying…

  1. The Interaction of Information Structure and Syntactic Representation in Chinese

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Yu-Yin

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation concerns the interaction of syntax and information structure in Mandarin Chinese and puts the theoretical assumption of parallelism between clauses and noun phrases to the test. It examines and validates the information structural status of the object phrases preposed to clause-internal positions. I argue that Rizzi's (1997)…

  2. Connecting Protein Structure to Intermolecular Interactions: A Computer Modeling Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abualia, Mohammed; Schroeder, Lianne; Garcia, Megan; Daubenmire, Patrick L.; Wink, Donald J.; Clark, Ginevra A.

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of protein folding relies on a solid foundation of a number of critical chemical concepts, such as molecular structure, intra-/intermolecular interactions, and relating structure to function. Recent reports show that students struggle on all levels to achieve these understandings and use them in meaningful ways. Further, several…

  3. Pedagogical Interaction in High School, the Structural and Functional Model of Pedagogical Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semenova, Larissa A.; Kazantseva, Anastassiya I.; Sergeyeva, Valeriya V.; Raklova, Yekaterina M.; Baiseitova, Zhanar B.

    2016-01-01

    The study covers the problems of pedagogical technologies and their experimental implementation in the learning process. The theoretical aspects of the "student-teacher" interaction are investigated. A structural and functional model of pedagogical interaction is offered, which determines the conditions for improving pedagogical…

  4. Evolutionary dynamics of general group interactions in structured populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Aming; Broom, Mark; Du, Jinming; Wang, Long

    2016-02-01

    The evolution of populations is influenced by many factors, and the simple classical models have been developed in a number of important ways. Both population structure and multiplayer interactions have been shown to significantly affect the evolution of important properties, such as the level of cooperation or of aggressive behavior. Here we combine these two key factors and develop the evolutionary dynamics of general group interactions in structured populations represented by regular graphs. The traditional linear and threshold public goods games are adopted as models to address the dynamics. We show that for linear group interactions, population structure can favor the evolution of cooperation compared to the well-mixed case, and we see that the more neighbors there are, the harder it is for cooperators to persist in structured populations. We further show that threshold group interactions could lead to the emergence of cooperation even in well-mixed populations. Here population structure sometimes inhibits cooperation for the threshold public goods game, where depending on the benefit to cost ratio, the outcomes are bistability or a monomorphic population of defectors or cooperators. Our results suggest, counterintuitively, that structured populations are not always beneficial for the evolution of cooperation for nonlinear group interactions.

  5. The role of nucleobase interactions in RNA structure and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Bottaro, Sandro; Di Palma, Francesco; Bussi, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    The intricate network of interactions observed in RNA three-dimensional structures is often described in terms of a multitude of geometrical properties, including helical parameters, base pairing/stacking, hydrogen bonding and backbone conformation. We show that a simple molecular representation consisting in one oriented bead per nucleotide can account for the fundamental structural properties of RNA. In this framework, canonical Watson-Crick, non-Watson-Crick base-pairing and base-stacking interactions can be unambiguously identified within a well-defined interaction shell. We validate this representation by performing two independent, complementary tests. First, we use it to construct a sequence-independent, knowledge-based scoring function for RNA structural prediction, which compares favorably to fully atomistic, state-of-the-art techniques. Second, we define a metric to measure deviation between RNA structures that directly reports on the differences in the base–base interaction network. The effectiveness of this metric is tested with respect to the ability to discriminate between structurally and kinetically distant RNA conformations, performing better compared to standard techniques. Taken together, our results suggest that this minimalist, nucleobase-centric representation captures the main interactions that are relevant for describing RNA structure and dynamics. PMID:25355509

  6. Evolutionary dynamics of general group interactions in structured populations.

    PubMed

    Li, Aming; Broom, Mark; Du, Jinming; Wang, Long

    2016-02-01

    The evolution of populations is influenced by many factors, and the simple classical models have been developed in a number of important ways. Both population structure and multiplayer interactions have been shown to significantly affect the evolution of important properties, such as the level of cooperation or of aggressive behavior. Here we combine these two key factors and develop the evolutionary dynamics of general group interactions in structured populations represented by regular graphs. The traditional linear and threshold public goods games are adopted as models to address the dynamics. We show that for linear group interactions, population structure can favor the evolution of cooperation compared to the well-mixed case, and we see that the more neighbors there are, the harder it is for cooperators to persist in structured populations. We further show that threshold group interactions could lead to the emergence of cooperation even in well-mixed populations. Here population structure sometimes inhibits cooperation for the threshold public goods game, where depending on the benefit to cost ratio, the outcomes are bistability or a monomorphic population of defectors or cooperators. Our results suggest, counterintuitively, that structured populations are not always beneficial for the evolution of cooperation for nonlinear group interactions. PMID:26986362

  7. NASA/DOD Control/Structures Interaction Technology, 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Robert L. (Compiler)

    1987-01-01

    Papers presented at the CSI Technology Conference are given. The conference was jointly sponsored by the NASA Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology and the Department of Defense. The conference is the beginning of a series of annual conferences whose purpose is to report to industry, academia, and government agencies the current status of Control/Structures Interaction technology. The conference program was divided into five sessions: (1) Future spacecraft requirements; Technology issues and impact; (2) DOD special topics; (3) Large space systems technology; (4) Control of flexible structures, and (5) Selected NASA research in control structures interaction.

  8. CSI design of articulated space structures. [Controls Structures Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelkar, Atul G.; Koganti, Gopichand; Alberts, Thomas E.; Hou, Gene; Woodard, Stanley E.

    1992-01-01

    Integrated control and structural design of flexible spacecraft with articulated appendages is considered. A procedure is proposed by which the resulting design is optimal with respect to a measure of performance for all possible system articulation conditions. The controller design is of the dynamic dissipative type which provides guaranteed closed-loop stability. The procedure is demonstrated for a simple multibody flexible spacecraft model with an articulated appendage.

  9. Different Strokes for Different Folks: Jung's Typology and Structured Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haber, Russell Alan

    1980-01-01

    Examined and compared the evaluations of students differentiated by Carl Jung's psychotypology when they were involved in either a session of nonverbal communication experiences or a session of fantasy experiences. Some of the Jungian psychological types preferred different structured experiences. (Author)

  10. Astronomy Patch Day: An Interactive Astronomy Experience for Girl Scouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knierman, K. A.; McCarthy, D. W.; Schutz, K.

    2005-12-01

    To help encourage a new generation of women in science, we have created Astronomy Patch Day for the Sahuaro Girl Scout Council in Tucson, Arizona. This all-day event is an interactive experience for Girl Scouts ages 5-18 to learn about astronomical concepts and women in astronomy. Our first Astronomy Patch Day, held on March 19, 2005, in conjunction with the Sahuaro Council's annual Science, Math, and Related Technologies (SMART) program, was very successful, reaching about 150-200 girls and their leaders. Individual troops rotated every half hour among our six activity booths: Earth-Moon, Solar System, Stars, Galaxies, Universe, and Ask an Astronomer, which were staffed by trained Girl Scout Leaders as well as faculty, post-doctoral researchers, and graduate students from Steward Observatory. To earn a patch, younger girls (ages 5-12) had to complete activities at three booths and older girls had to complete all six activities. Positive feedback for this event was received from both the girls and leaders. We plan to hold Astronomy Patch Day annually, possibly with different and/or additional activities in future years. K. Knierman is supported by an Arizona/NASA Space Grant Fellowship. This outreach program is supported by NIRCam/JWST E/PO.

  11. Relaunch of the Interactive Plasma Physics Educational Experience (IPPEX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, A.; Rusaitis, L.; Zwicker, A.; Stotler, D. P.

    2015-11-01

    In the late 1990's PPPL's Science Education Department developed an innovative online site called the Interactive Plasma Physics Educational Experience (IPPEX). It featured (among other modules) two Java based applications which simulated tokamak physics: A steady state tokamak (SST) and a time dependent tokamak (TDT). The physics underlying the SST and the TDT are based on the ASPECT code which is a global power balance code developed to evaluate the performance of fusion reactor designs. We have relaunched the IPPEX site with updated modules and functionalities: The site itself is now dynamic on all platforms. The graphic design of the site has been modified to current standards. The virtual tokamak programming has been redone in Javascript, taking advantage of the speed and compactness of the code. The GUI of the tokamak has been completely redesigned, including more intuitive representations of changes in the plasma, e.g., particles moving along magnetic field lines. The use of GPU accelerated computation provides accurate and smooth visual representations of the plasma. We will present the current version of IPPEX as well near term plans of incorporating real time NSTX-U data into the simulation.

  12. JPL control/structure interaction test bed real-time control computer architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Hugh C.

    1989-01-01

    The Control/Structure Interaction Program is a technology development program for spacecraft that exhibit interactions between the control system and structural dynamics. The program objectives include development and verification of new design concepts - such as active structure - and new tools - such as combined structure and control optimization algorithm - and their verification in ground and possibly flight test. A focus mission spacecraft was designed based upon a space interferometer and is the basis for design of the ground test article. The ground test bed objectives include verification of the spacecraft design concepts, the active structure elements and certain design tools such as the new combined structures and controls optimization tool. In anticipation of CSI technology flight experiments, the test bed control electronics must emulate the computation capacity and control architectures of space qualifiable systems as well as the command and control networks that will be used to connect investigators with the flight experiment hardware. The Test Bed facility electronics were functionally partitioned into three units: a laboratory data acquisition system for structural parameter identification and performance verification; an experiment supervisory computer to oversee the experiment, monitor the environmental parameters and perform data logging; and a multilevel real-time control computing system. The design of the Test Bed electronics is presented along with hardware and software component descriptions. The system should break new ground in experimental control electronics and is of interest to anyone working in the verification of control concepts for large structures.

  13. Freestanding film structures for laser plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Klyuenkov, E B; Lopatin, A Ya; Luchin, V I; Salashchenko, Nikolai N; Tsybin, N N

    2013-04-30

    The technique is developed for fabricating 5-500-nm-thick freestanding films of various materials and multilayer compositions. Apart from the traditional use in spectral filtration of soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet radiation, the possibility of using the ultrathin films fabricated by this technique as targets in experiments on laser acceleration of ions is considered. A sample of the target in the form of a 5-nm-thick carbon film on a supporting net is fabricated. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  14. Environmental constraints shaping constituent order in emerging communication systems: Structural iconicity, interactive alignment and conventionalization.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Peer; Fusaroli, Riccardo; Tylén, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Where does linguistic structure come from? Recent gesture elicitation studies have indicated that constituent order (corresponding to for instance subject-verb-object, or SVO in English) may be heavily influenced by human cognitive biases constraining gesture production and transmission. Here we explore the alternative hypothesis that syntactic patterns are motivated by multiple environmental and social-interactional constraints that are external to the cognitive domain. In three experiments, we systematically investigate different motivations for structure in the gestural communication of simple transitive events. The first experiment indicates that, if participants communicate about different types of events, manipulation events (e.g. someone throwing a cake) and construction events (e.g. someone baking a cake), they spontaneously and systematically produce different constituent orders, SOV and SVO respectively, thus following the principle of structural iconicity. The second experiment shows that participants' choice of constituent order is also reliably influenced by social-interactional forces of interactive alignment, that is, the tendency to re-use an interlocutor's previous choice of constituent order, thus potentially overriding affordances for iconicity. Lastly, the third experiment finds that the relative frequency distribution of referent event types motivates the stabilization and conventionalization of a single constituent order for the communication of different types of events. Together, our results demonstrate that constituent order in emerging gestural communication systems is shaped and stabilized in response to multiple external environmental and social factors: structural iconicity, interactive alignment and distributional frequency. PMID:26402649

  15. Environmental constraints shaping constituent order in emerging communication systems: Structural iconicity, interactive alignment and conventionalization.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Peer; Fusaroli, Riccardo; Tylén, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Where does linguistic structure come from? Recent gesture elicitation studies have indicated that constituent order (corresponding to for instance subject-verb-object, or SVO in English) may be heavily influenced by human cognitive biases constraining gesture production and transmission. Here we explore the alternative hypothesis that syntactic patterns are motivated by multiple environmental and social-interactional constraints that are external to the cognitive domain. In three experiments, we systematically investigate different motivations for structure in the gestural communication of simple transitive events. The first experiment indicates that, if participants communicate about different types of events, manipulation events (e.g. someone throwing a cake) and construction events (e.g. someone baking a cake), they spontaneously and systematically produce different constituent orders, SOV and SVO respectively, thus following the principle of structural iconicity. The second experiment shows that participants' choice of constituent order is also reliably influenced by social-interactional forces of interactive alignment, that is, the tendency to re-use an interlocutor's previous choice of constituent order, thus potentially overriding affordances for iconicity. Lastly, the third experiment finds that the relative frequency distribution of referent event types motivates the stabilization and conventionalization of a single constituent order for the communication of different types of events. Together, our results demonstrate that constituent order in emerging gestural communication systems is shaped and stabilized in response to multiple external environmental and social factors: structural iconicity, interactive alignment and distributional frequency.

  16. Quantum Theory of Atomic and Molecular Structures and Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makrides, Constantinos

    This dissertation consists of topics in two related areas of research that together provide quantum mechanical descriptions of atomic and molecular interactions and reactions. The first is the ab initio electronic structure calculation that provides the atomic and molecular interaction potential, including the long-range potential. The second is the quantum theory of interactions that uses such potentials to understand scattering, long-range molecules, and reactions. In ab initio electronic structure calculations, we present results of dynamic polarizabilities for a variety of atoms and molecules, and the long-range dispersion coefficients for a number of atom-atom and atom-molecule cases. We also present results of a potential energy surface for the triatomic lithium-ytterbium-lithium system, aimed at understanding the related chemical reactions. In the quantum theory of interactions, we present a multichannel quantum-defect theory (MQDT) for atomic interactions in a magnetic field. This subject, which is complex especially for atoms with hyperfine structure, is essential for the understanding and the realization of control and tuning of atomic interactions by a magnetic field: a key feature that has popularized cold atom physics in its investigations of few-body and many-body quantum systems. Through the example of LiK, we show how MQDT provides a systematic and an efficient understanding of atomic interaction in a magnetic field, especially magnetic Feshbach resonances in nonzero partial waves.

  17. Pushing Structural Information into the Yeast Interactome by High-Throughput Protein Docking Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Mosca, Roberto; Pons, Carles; Fernández-Recio, Juan; Aloy, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    The last several years have seen the consolidation of high-throughput proteomics initiatives to identify and characterize protein interactions and macromolecular complexes in model organisms. In particular, more that 10,000 high-confidence protein-protein interactions have been described between the roughly 6,000 proteins encoded in the budding yeast genome (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). However, unfortunately, high-resolution three-dimensional structures are only available for less than one hundred of these interacting pairs. Here, we expand this structural information on yeast protein interactions by running the first-ever high-throughput docking experiment with some of the best state-of-the-art methodologies, according to our benchmarks. To increase the coverage of the interaction space, we also explore the possibility of using homology models of varying quality in the docking experiments, instead of experimental structures, and assess how it would affect the global performance of the methods. In total, we have applied the docking procedure to 217 experimental structures and 1,023 homology models, providing putative structural models for over 3,000 protein-protein interactions in the yeast interactome. Finally, we analyze in detail the structural models obtained for the interaction between SAM1-anthranilate synthase complex and the MET30-RNA polymerase III to illustrate how our predictions can be straightforwardly used by the scientific community. The results of our experiment will be integrated into the general 3D-Repertoire pipeline, a European initiative to solve the structures of as many as possible protein complexes in yeast at the best possible resolution. All docking results are available at http://gatealoy.pcb.ub.es/HT_docking/. PMID:19714207

  18. Interactive effects of warming, eutrophication and size structure: impacts on biodiversity and food-web structure.

    PubMed

    Binzer, Amrei; Guill, Christian; Rall, Björn C; Brose, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Warming and eutrophication are two of the most important global change stressors for natural ecosystems, but their interaction is poorly understood. We used a dynamic model of complex, size-structured food webs to assess interactive effects on diversity and network structure. We found antagonistic impacts: Warming increases diversity in eutrophic systems and decreases it in oligotrophic systems. These effects interact with the community size structure: Communities of similarly sized species such as parasitoid-host systems are stabilized by warming and destabilized by eutrophication, whereas the diversity of size-structured predator-prey networks decreases strongly with warming, but decreases only weakly with eutrophication. Nonrandom extinction risks for generalists and specialists lead to higher connectance in networks without size structure and lower connectance in size-structured communities. Overall, our results unravel interactive impacts of warming and eutrophication and suggest that size structure may serve as an important proxy for predicting the community sensitivity to these global change stressors.

  19. Social setting, intuition and experience in laboratory experiments interact to shape cooperative decision-making

    PubMed Central

    Capraro, Valerio; Cococcioni, Giorgia

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that cooperative decision-making in one-shot interactions is a history-dependent dynamic process: promoting intuition versus deliberation typically has a positive effect on cooperation (dynamism) among people living in a cooperative setting and with no previous experience in economic games on cooperation (history dependence). Here, we report on a laboratory experiment exploring how these findings transfer to a non-cooperative setting. We find two major results: (i) promoting intuition versus deliberation has no effect on cooperative behaviour among inexperienced subjects living in a non-cooperative setting; (ii) experienced subjects cooperate more than inexperienced subjects, but only under time pressure. These results suggest that cooperation is a learning process, rather than an instinctive impulse or a self-controlled choice, and that experience operates primarily via the channel of intuition. Our findings shed further light on the cognitive basis of human cooperative decision-making and provide further support for the recently proposed social heuristics hypothesis. PMID:26156762

  20. A Method of Simulating Fluid Structure Interactions for Deformable Decelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gidzak, Vladimyr Mykhalo

    A method is developed for performing simulations that contain fluid-structure interactions between deployable decelerators and a high speed compressible flow. The problem of coupling together multiple physical systems is examined with discussion of the strength of coupling for various methods. A non-monolithic strongly coupled option is presented for fluid-structure systems based on grid deformation. A class of algebraic grid deformation methods is then presented with examples of increasing complexity. The strength of the fluid-structure coupling is validated against two analytic problems, chosen to test the time dependent behavior of structure on fluid interactions, and of fluid on structure interruptions. A one-dimentional material heating model is also validated against experimental data. Results are provided for simulations of a wind tunnel scale disk-gap-band parachute with comparison to experimental data. Finally, a simulation is performed on a flight scale tension cone decelerator, with examination of time-dependent material stress, and heating.

  1. How Structure Defines Affinity in Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Erijman, Ariel; Rosenthal, Eran; Shifman, Julia M.

    2014-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPI) in nature are conveyed by a multitude of binding modes involving various surfaces, secondary structure elements and intermolecular interactions. This diversity results in PPI binding affinities that span more than nine orders of magnitude. Several early studies attempted to correlate PPI binding affinities to various structure-derived features with limited success. The growing number of high-resolution structures, the appearance of more precise methods for measuring binding affinities and the development of new computational algorithms enable more thorough investigations in this direction. Here, we use a large dataset of PPI structures with the documented binding affinities to calculate a number of structure-based features that could potentially define binding energetics. We explore how well each calculated biophysical feature alone correlates with binding affinity and determine the features that could be used to distinguish between high-, medium- and low- affinity PPIs. Furthermore, we test how various combinations of features could be applied to predict binding affinity and observe a slow improvement in correlation as more features are incorporated into the equation. In addition, we observe a considerable improvement in predictions if we exclude from our analysis low-resolution and NMR structures, revealing the importance of capturing exact intermolecular interactions in our calculations. Our analysis should facilitate prediction of new interactions on the genome scale, better characterization of signaling networks and design of novel binding partners for various target proteins. PMID:25329579

  2. Reduced-order models for vertical human-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Nimmen, Katrien; Lombaert, Geert; De Roeck, Guido; Van den Broeck, Peter

    2016-09-01

    For slender and lightweight structures, the vibration serviceability under crowd- induced loading is often critical in design. Currently, designers rely on equivalent load models, upscaled from single-person force measurements. Furthermore, it is important to consider the mechanical interaction with the human body as this can significantly reduce the structural response. To account for these interaction effects, the contact force between the pedestrian and the structure can be modelled as the superposition of the force induced by the pedestrian on a rigid floor and the force resulting from the mechanical interaction between the structure and the human body. For the case of large crowds, however, this approach leads to models with a very high system order. In the present contribution, two equivalent reduced-order models are proposed to approximate the dynamic behaviour of the full-order coupled crowd-structure system. A numerical study is performed to evaluate the impact of the modelling assumptions on the structural response to pedestrian excitation. The results show that the full-order moving crowd model can be well approximated by a reduced-order model whereby the interaction with the pedestrians in the crowd is modelled using a single (equivalent) SDOF system.

  3. Evolutionary dynamics of group interactions on structured populations: a review

    PubMed Central

    Perc, Matjaž; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús; Szolnoki, Attila; Floría, Luis M.; Moreno, Yamir

    2013-01-01

    Interactions among living organisms, from bacteria colonies to human societies, are inherently more complex than interactions among particles and non-living matter. Group interactions are a particularly important and widespread class, representative of which is the public goods game. In addition, methods of statistical physics have proved valuable for studying pattern formation, equilibrium selection and self-organization in evolutionary games. Here, we review recent advances in the study of evolutionary dynamics of group interactions on top of structured populations, including lattices, complex networks and coevolutionary models. We also compare these results with those obtained on well-mixed populations. The review particularly highlights that the study of the dynamics of group interactions, like several other important equilibrium and non-equilibrium dynamical processes in biological, economical and social sciences, benefits from the synergy between statistical physics, network science and evolutionary game theory. PMID:23303223

  4. The growth of structure in interacting dark energy models

    SciTech Connect

    Caldera-Cabral, Gabriela; Maartens, Roy; Schaefer, Bjoern Malte E-mail: roy.maartens@port.ac.uk

    2009-07-01

    If dark energy interacts with dark matter, there is a change in the background evolution of the universe, since the dark matter density no longer evolves as a{sup −3}. In addition, the non-gravitational interaction affects the growth of structure. In principle, these changes allow us to detect and constrain an interaction in the dark sector. Here we investigate the growth factor and the weak lensing signal for a new class of interacting dark energy models. In these models, the interaction generalises the simple cases where one dark fluid decays into the other. In order to calculate the effect on structure formation, we perform a careful analysis of the perturbed interaction and its effect on peculiar velocities. Assuming a normalization to today's values of dark matter density and overdensity, the signal of the interaction is an enhancement (suppression) of both the growth factor and the lensing power, when the energy transfer in the background is from dark matter to dark energy (dark energy to dark matter)

  5. Modifications in structure and interaction of nanoparticle-protein-surfactant complexes in electrolyte solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehan, Sumit; Kumar, S.; Aswal, V. K.; Schweins, R.

    2016-05-01

    SANS experiments of three-component system of anionic silica nanoparticles, anionic BSA protein and anionic SDS surfactants have been carried out without and with electrolyte in aqueous solution. In both the cases, the interaction of surfactant with protein results in formation of bead-necklace structure of protein-surfactant complexes in solution. These protein-surfactant complexes interact very differently with nanoparticles in absence and presence of electrolyte. In absence of electrolyte, nanoparticles remain in dispersed phase in solution, whereas with the addition of electrolyte the nanoparticles fractal aggregates are formed. SANS describes the phase behavior to be governed by competition of electrostatic and depletion interactions among the components solution.

  6. Structural selection of ionic-complementary peptides with electrostatic interactions.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhiqiang; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Jian; Qin, Meng; Wang, Wei

    2010-09-01

    The structures of the peptides and their assembly are largely modulated by the environment. To discover the physical principles governing the structural modulations of peptides by the environment would be useful for many applications. As the typical examples, the structures of three kinds of ionic-complementary EAK16-family peptides under various environmental conditions are studied with simulations in this work. A model with intermediate resolution is used, in which both the backbone hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions are explicitly considered. The thermodynamics of these peptides (including the free energy and heat capacity) are described for various strengths of the electrostatic interactions which reflect the variation of environment. With these results, the phase diagrams of these peptides related to the temperature and the strength of electrostatic interactions are presented and compared. Based on the differences in the phase structures of the peptide, the different aggregation behaviors are explained based on the monomeric structural features of the peptides. Through the analysis on the stability of various secondary structures of these peptides, it is demonstrated that the charge pattern is the basic reason of the different responses of the EAK16-family peptides to the environmental changes. These results provide some examples and insights for the principles of structural selection by environment and may be helpful for further analysis and designs of peptide systems. PMID:21230118

  7. The Fifth NASA/DOD Controls-Structures Interaction Technology Conference, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, Jerry R. (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    This publication is a compilation of the papers presented at the Fifth NASA/DoD Controls-Structures Interaction (CSI) Technology Conference held in Lake Tahoe, Nevada, March 3-5, 1992. The conference, which was jointly sponsored by the NASA Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology and the Department of Defense, was organized by the NASA Langley Research Center. The purpose of this conference was to report to industry, academia, and government agencies on the current status of controls-structures interaction technology. The agenda covered ground testing, integrated design, analysis, flight experiments and concepts.

  8. The Fifth NASA/DOD Controls-Structures Interaction Technology Conference, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, Jerry R. (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    This publication is a compilation of the papers presented at the Fifth NASA/DoD Controls-Structures Interaction (CSI) Technology Conference held in Lake Tahoe, Nevada, March 3-5, 1992. The conference, which was jointly sponsored by the NASA Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology and the Department of Defense, was organized by the NASA Langley Research Center. The purpose of this conference was to report to industry, academia, and government agencies on the current status of controls-structures interaction technology. The agenda covered ground testing, integrated design, analysis, flight experiments and concepts.

  9. An Experiment with WWW Interactive Learning in University Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntyre, David R.; Wolff, Francis G.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses an exploration with the use of interactive learning on the Web in an Introduction to C Programming Course taught at Cleveland State University, and compares the results with the same course taught during a previous semester using no interactive Web instruction. (Author/AEF)

  10. Modal identification experiment design for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyoung M.; Doiron, Harold H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes an on-orbit modal identification experiment design for large space structures. Space Station Freedom (SSF) systems design definition and structural dynamic models were used as representative large space structures for optimizing experiment design. Important structural modes of study models were selected to provide a guide for experiment design and used to assess the design performance. A pulsed random excitation technique using propulsion jets was developed to identify closely-spaced modes. A measuremenat location selection approach was developed to estimate accurate mode shapes as well as frequencies and damping factors. The data acquisition system and operational scenarios were designed to have minimal impacts on the SSF. A comprehensive simulation was conducted to assess the overall performance of the experiment design.

  11. Interactive diversity promotes the evolution of cooperation in structured populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Qi; Li, Aming; Zhou, Lei; Wang, Long

    2016-10-01

    Evolutionary games on networks traditionally assume that each individual adopts an identical strategy to interact with all its neighbors in each generation. Considering the prevalent diversity of individual interactions in the real society, here we propose the concept of interactive diversity, which allows individuals to adopt different strategies against different neighbors in each generation. We investigate the evolution of cooperation based on the edge dynamics rather than the traditional nodal dynamics in networked systems. The results show that, without invoking any other mechanisms, interactive diversity drives the frequency of cooperation to a high level for a wide range of parameters in both well-mixed and structured populations. Even in highly connected populations, cooperation still thrives. When interactive diversity and large topological heterogeneity are combined together, however, in the relaxed social dilemma, cooperation level is lower than that with just one of them, implying that the combination of many promotive factors may make a worse outcome. By an analytical approximation, we get the condition under which interactive diversity provides more advantages for cooperation than traditional evolutionary dynamics does. Numerical simulations validating the approximation are also presented. Our work provides a new line to explore the latent relation between the ubiquitous cooperation and individuals’ distinct responses in different interactions. The presented results suggest that interactive diversity should receive more attention in pursuing mechanisms fostering cooperation.

  12. Ground test experiment for large space structures, appendix I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tollison, D. K.; Waites, H. B.

    1984-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a Large Space Structure (LSS) ground test verification experiment facility having adequate fidelity and flexibility to accommodate the demands of LSS control theory testing. The first experiment is in the subsystem verification and integration phase. This test employs the ASTROMAST, a lightweight S glass composite deployable beam structure, as the test article and is cited to prove out centralized and distributed sensor control strategies.

  13. Kinetic and Structural Studies of Interactions between Glycosaminoglycans and Langerin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Liu, Xinyue; Kao, Chelsea; Zhang, Emily; Li, Quanhong; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J

    2016-08-16

    Langerin, a C-type lectin, is expressed in Langerhans cells. It was reported that langerin binds sulfated glycans, which is an important initial step for its role in blocking human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission by capturing HIV pathogens and mediating their internalization into Birbeck granules for their elimination. It is fundamentally important to understand these interactions at the molecular level for the design of new highly specific therapeutic agents for HIV. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR), which allows for the real-time, direct, quantitative analysis of the label-free molecular interactions, has been used successfully for biophysical characterization of glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-protein interactions. In this study, we report kinetics, structural analysis, and the effects of physiological conditions (e.g., pH, salt concentration, and Ca(2+) and Zn(2+)concentrations) on the interactions between GAGs and langerin using SPR. SPR results revealed that langerin binds to heparin with high affinity (KD ∼ 2.4 nM) and the oligosaccharide length required for the interactions is larger than a tetrasaccharide. This heparin/heparan sulfate-binding protein also interacts with other GAGs, including dermatan sulfate, chondroitin sulfates C-E and KS. In addition, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis was used to characterize the structure of sulfated glycans that bound to langerin. PMID:27447199

  14. Interactive Hangman teaches amino acid structures and abbreviations.

    PubMed

    Pennington, Britney O; Sears, Duane; Clegg, Dennis O

    2014-01-01

    We developed an interactive exercise to teach students how to draw the structures of the 20 standard amino acids and to identify the one-letter abbreviations by modifying the familiar game of "Hangman." Amino acid structures were used to represent single letters throughout the game. To provide additional practice in identifying structures, hints to the answers were written in "amino acid sentences" for the students to translate. Students were required to draw the structure of the corresponding letter they wished to guess on a whiteboard. Each student received a reference sheet of the structures and abbreviations, but was required to draw from memory when guessing a letter. Preassessments and postassessments revealed a drastic improvement in the students' ability to recognize and draw structures from memory. This activity provides a fun, educational game to play in biochemistry discussion sections or during long incubations in biochemistry laboratories.

  15. Diversifying Science: Underrepresented Student Experiences in Structured Research Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurtado, Sylvia; Cabrera, Nolan L.; Lin, Monica H.; Arellano, Lucy; Espinosa, Lorelle L.

    2009-01-01

    Targeting four institutions with structured science research programs for undergraduates, this study focuses on how underrepresented students experience science. Several key themes emerged from focus group discussions: learning to become research scientists, experiences with the culture of science, and views on racial and social stigma.…

  16. KLIFS: a structural kinase-ligand interaction database

    PubMed Central

    Kooistra, Albert J.; Kanev, Georgi K.; van Linden, Oscar P.J.; Leurs, Rob; de Esch, Iwan J.P.; de Graaf, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinases play a crucial role in cell signaling and are important drug targets in several therapeutic areas. The KLIFS database contains detailed structural kinase-ligand interaction information derived from all (>2900) structures of catalytic domains of human and mouse protein kinases deposited in the Protein Data Bank in order to provide insights into the structural determinants of kinase-ligand binding and selectivity. The kinase structures have been processed in a consistent manner by systematically analyzing the structural features and molecular interaction fingerprints (IFPs) of a predefined set of 85 binding site residues with bound ligands. KLIFS has been completely rebuilt and extended (>65% more structures) since its first release as a data set, including: novel automated annotation methods for (i) the assessment of ligand-targeted subpockets and the analysis of (ii) DFG and (iii) αC-helix conformations; improved and automated protocols for (iv) the generation of sequence/structure alignments, (v) the curation of ligand atom and bond typing for accurate IFP analysis and (vi) weekly database updates. KLIFS is now accessible via a website (http://klifs.vu-compmedchem.nl) that provides a comprehensive visual presentation of different types of chemical, biological and structural chemogenomics data, and allows the user to easily access, compare, search and download the data. PMID:26496949

  17. Why we interact: on the functional role of the striatum in the subjective experience of social interaction.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Ulrich J; Schilbach, Leonhard; Timmermans, Bert; Kuzmanovic, Bojana; Georgescu, Alexandra L; Bente, Gary; Vogeley, Kai

    2014-11-01

    There is ample evidence that human primates strive for social contact and experience interactions with conspecifics as intrinsically rewarding. Focusing on gaze behavior as a crucial means of human interaction, this study employed a unique combination of neuroimaging, eye-tracking, and computer-animated virtual agents to assess the neural mechanisms underlying this component of behavior. In the interaction task, participants believed that during each interaction the agent's gaze behavior could either be controlled by another participant or by a computer program. Their task was to indicate whether they experienced a given interaction as an interaction with another human participant or the computer program based on the agent's reaction. Unbeknownst to them, the agent was always controlled by a computer to enable a systematic manipulation of gaze reactions by varying the degree to which the agent engaged in joint attention. This allowed creating a tool to distinguish neural activity underlying the subjective experience of being engaged in social and non-social interaction. In contrast to previous research, this allows measuring neural activity while participants experience active engagement in real-time social interactions. Results demonstrate that gaze-based interactions with a perceived human partner are associated with activity in the ventral striatum, a core component of reward-related neurocircuitry. In contrast, interactions with a computer-driven agent activate attention networks. Comparisons of neural activity during interaction with behaviorally naïve and explicitly cooperative partners demonstrate different temporal dynamics of the reward system and indicate that the mere experience of engagement in social interaction is sufficient to recruit this system.

  18. SEISMIC RESPONSE OF DAM WITH SOIL-STRUCTURE INTERACTION.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bycroft, G.N.; Mork, P.N.

    1987-01-01

    An analytical solution to the response of a long trapezoidal-section dam on a foundation consisting of an elastic half-space and subjected to simulated earthquake motion is developed. An optimum seismic design is achieved when the cross section of the dam is triangular. The effect of soil structure interaction is to lower the strain occurring in the dam.

  19. Interactions of Latent Variables in Structural Equation Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bollen, Kenneth A.; Paxton, Pamela

    1998-01-01

    Provides a discussion of an alternative two-stage least squares (2SLS) technique to include interactions of latent variables in structural equation models. The method requires selection of instrumental variables, and rules for selection are presented. An empirical example and Statistical Analysis System programs are presented. (SLD)

  20. Website on Protein Interaction and Protein Structure Related Work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samanta, Manoj; Liang, Shoudan; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    In today's world, three seemingly diverse fields - computer information technology, nanotechnology and biotechnology are joining forces to enlarge our scientific knowledge and solve complex technological problems. Our group is dedicated to conduct theoretical research exploring the challenges in this area. The major areas of research include: 1) Yeast Protein Interactions; 2) Protein Structures; and 3) Current Transport through Small Molecules.

  1. Thesaurus Structure Design: A Conceptual Approach for Improved Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Huertas, Maria J.

    1997-01-01

    Explores creating a thesaurus from a cognitive viewpoint, based on a system that organizes its knowledge representation/classification according to the authors' and users' images of the subject domain, in order to increase user-text interaction. Discusses the general framework, methods for implementing author-text structures, and an approach…

  2. A space station Structures and Assembly Verification Experiment, SAVE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, R. A.; Raney, J. P.; Deryder, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    The Space Station structure has been baselined to be a 5 M (16.4 ft) erectable truss. This structure will provide the overall framework to attach laboratory modules and other systems, subsystems and utilities. The assembly of this structure represents a formidable EVA challenge. To validate this capability the Space Station Structures/Dynamics Technical Integration Panel (TIP) met to develop the necessary data for an integrated STS structures flight experiment. As a result of this meeting, the Langley Research Center initiated a joint Langley/Boeing Aerospace Company study which supported the structures/dynamics TIP in developing the preliminary definition and design of a 5 M erectable space station truss and the resources required for a proposed flight experiment. The purpose of the study was to: (1) devise methods of truss assembly by astronauts; (2) define a specific test matrix for dynamic characterization; (3) identify instrumentation and data system requirements; (4) determine the power, propulsion and control requirements for the truss on-orbit for 3 years; (5) study the packaging of the experiment in the orbiter cargo bay; (6) prepare a preliminary cost estimate and schedule for the experiment; and (7) provide a list of potential follow-on experiments using the structure as a free flyer. The results of this three month study are presented.

  3. Spectral function in electro-weak interactions and its impact on neutrino oscillation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, C.-M.

    2015-10-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments have entered the high-precision era in the last few years. The oscillation parameters, as a measure of the neutrino properties, are extracted from the energy-dependent oscillation probability function. Different types of nuclear dynamics deeply influence the determination of neutrino energies in neutrino oscillation experiments. As a consequence, a comprehensive understanding of various nuclear dynamics interprets the scenario behind the neutrino interaction with nucleus and nuclei. The initial ground-state structure of the target nucleus is categorized in one typical nuclear dynamics, and its realistic description is generally referred as the spectral function (SF). Implementing the SF for each target nucleus into the GENIE neutrino event generator is the preliminary step necessary to obtain a reliable determination of the kinematics of all detectable final-products from neutrino interactions. At the intermedium-range of neutrino energies (˜ 1 GeV), the kinematic energy reconstruction is the vastly used approach and consists in identifying final-products as coming from the charged-current quasi-elastic-like (CCQE-like) neutrino interactions.

  4. Spectral function in electro-weak interactions and its impact on neutrino oscillation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Jen, C.-M.

    2015-10-15

    Neutrino oscillation experiments have entered the high-precision era in the last few years. The oscillation parameters, as a measure of the neutrino properties, are extracted from the energy-dependent oscillation probability function. Different types of nuclear dynamics deeply influence the determination of neutrino energies in neutrino oscillation experiments. As a consequence, a comprehensive understanding of various nuclear dynamics interprets the scenario behind the neutrino interaction with nucleus and nuclei. The initial ground-state structure of the target nucleus is categorized in one typical nuclear dynamics, and its realistic description is generally referred as the spectral function (SF). Implementing the SF for each target nucleus into the GENIE neutrino event generator is the preliminary step necessary to obtain a reliable determination of the kinematics of all detectable final-products from neutrino interactions. At the intermedium-range of neutrino energies (∼ 1 GeV), the kinematic energy reconstruction is the vastly used approach and consists in identifying final-products as coming from the charged-current quasi-elastic-like (CCQE-like) neutrino interactions.

  5. Control-structure-thermal interactions in analysis of lunar telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Roger C.

    1992-01-01

    The lunar telescope project was an excellent model for the CSTI study because a telescope is a very sensitive instrument, and thermal expansion or mechanical vibration of the mirror assemblies will rapidly degrade the resolution of the device. Consequently, the interactions are strongly coupled. The lunar surface experiences very large temperature variations that range from approximately -180 C to over 100 C. Although the optical assemblies of the telescopes will be well insulated, the temperature of the mirrors will inevitably fluctuate in a similar cycle, but of much smaller magnitude. In order to obtain images of high quality and clarity, allowable thermal deformations of any point on a mirror must be less than 1 micron. Initial estimates indicate that this corresponds to a temperature variation of much less than 1 deg through the thickness of the mirror. Therefore, a lunar telescope design will most probably include active thermal control, a means of controlling the shape of the mirrors, or a combination of both systems. Historically, the design of a complex vehicle was primarily a sequential process in which the basic structure was defined without concurrent detailed analyses or other subsystems. The basic configuration was then passed to the different teams responsible for each subsystem, and their task was to produce a workable solution without requiring major alterations to any principal components or subsystems. Consequently, the final design of the vehicle was not always the most efficient, owing to the fact that each subsystem design was partially constrained by the previous work. This procedure was necessary at the time because the analysis process was extremely time-consuming and had to be started over with each significant alteration of the vehicle. With recent advances in the power and capacity of small computers, and the parallel development of powerful software in structural, thermal, and control system analysis, it is now possible to produce very

  6. Some experiences with the viscous-inviscid interaction approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandalsem, W. R.; Steger, J. L.; Rao, K. V.

    1987-01-01

    Methods for simulating compressible viscous flow using the viscid-inviscid interaction approach are described. The formulations presented range from the more familiar full-potential/boundary-layer interaction schemes to a method for coupling Euler/Navier-Stokes and boundary-layer algorithms. An effort is made to describe the advantages and disadvantages of each formulation. Sample results are presented which illustrate the applicability of the methods.

  7. MOLVIE: an interactive visualization environment for molecular structures.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huandong; Li, Ming; Xu, Ying

    2003-05-01

    A Molecular visualization interactive environment (MOLVIE), is designed to display three-dimensional (3D) structures of molecules and support the structural analysis and research on proteins. The paper presents the features, design considerations and applications of MOLVIE, especially the new functions used to compare the structures of two molecules and view the partial fragment of a molecule. Being developed in JAVA, MOLVIE is platform-independent. Moreover, it may run on a webpage as an applet for remote users. MOLVIE is available at http://www.cs.ucsb.edu/~mli/Bioinf/software/index.html. PMID:12725967

  8. On media data structures for interactive streaming in immersive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Gene; Ortega, Antonio; Cheung, Ngai-Man; Girod, Bernd

    2010-07-01

    Interactive media streaming is the communication paradigm where an observer periodically requests new desired subsets from the streaming sender in real-time, upon which the sender sends the appropriate media data, corresponding to the received requests, for immediate decoding and display. This is in contrast to non-interactive media streaming, e.g., TV broadcast, where the entire media set is compressed and delivered to the observer before the observer interacts with the data (such as switching TV channels). Examples of interactive streaming abound in different media modalities: interactive browsing of JPEG2000 images, interactive light field or multiview video streaming, etc. Interactive media streaming has the obvious advantage of bandwidth efficiency: only the media subsets corresponding to observer's requests are transmitted. This is important when an observer only views a small subset out of a very large media data set during a typical streaming session. The technical challenge is how to structure media data such that good compression efficiency can be achieved by exploiting correlation among media subsets (thus inducing a particular decoding order if correlation is exploited during encoding), while providing sufficient flexibility for the observer to freely navigate the media data set in his/her desired unique order. In this overview paper, we survey different proposals in the literature that simultaneously achieve the conflicting objectives of compression efficiency and decoding flexibility.

  9. Bottom-up effects of plant diversity on multitrophic interactions in a biodiversity experiment.

    PubMed

    Scherber, Christoph; Eisenhauer, Nico; Weisser, Wolfgang W; Schmid, Bernhard; Voigt, Winfried; Fischer, Markus; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef; Roscher, Christiane; Weigelt, Alexandra; Allan, Eric; Bessler, Holger; Bonkowski, Michael; Buchmann, Nina; Buscot, François; Clement, Lars W; Ebeling, Anne; Engels, Christof; Halle, Stefan; Kertscher, Ilona; Klein, Alexandra-Maria; Koller, Robert; König, Stephan; Kowalski, Esther; Kummer, Volker; Kuu, Annely; Lange, Markus; Lauterbach, Dirk; Middelhoff, Cornelius; Migunova, Varvara D; Milcu, Alexandru; Müller, Ramona; Partsch, Stephan; Petermann, Jana S; Renker, Carsten; Rottstock, Tanja; Sabais, Alexander; Scheu, Stefan; Schumacher, Jens; Temperton, Vicky M; Tscharntke, Teja

    2010-11-25

    Biodiversity is rapidly declining, and this may negatively affect ecosystem processes, including economically important ecosystem services. Previous studies have shown that biodiversity has positive effects on organisms and processes across trophic levels. However, only a few studies have so far incorporated an explicit food-web perspective. In an eight-year biodiversity experiment, we studied an unprecedented range of above- and below-ground organisms and multitrophic interactions. A multitrophic data set originating from a single long-term experiment allows mechanistic insights that would not be gained from meta-analysis of different experiments. Here we show that plant diversity effects dampen with increasing trophic level and degree of omnivory. This was true both for abundance and species richness of organisms. Furthermore, we present comprehensive above-ground/below-ground biodiversity food webs. Both above ground and below ground, herbivores responded more strongly to changes in plant diversity than did carnivores or omnivores. Density and richness of carnivorous taxa was independent of vegetation structure. Below-ground responses to plant diversity were consistently weaker than above-ground responses. Responses to increasing plant diversity were generally positive, but were negative for biological invasion, pathogen infestation and hyperparasitism. Our results suggest that plant diversity has strong bottom-up effects on multitrophic interaction networks, with particularly strong effects on lower trophic levels. Effects on higher trophic levels are indirectly mediated through bottom-up trophic cascades.

  10. The absence of tertiary interactions in a self-assembled DNA crystal structure.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nam; Birktoft, Jens J; Sha, Ruojie; Wang, Tong; Zheng, Jianping; Constantinou, Pamela E; Ginell, Stephan L; Chen, Yi; Mao, Chengde; Seeman, Nadrian C

    2012-04-01

    DNA is a highly effective molecule for controlling nanometer-scale structure. The convenience of using DNA lies in the programmability of Watson-Crick base-paired secondary interactions, useful both to design branched molecular motifs and to connect them through sticky-ended cohesion. Recently, the tensegrity triangle motif has been used to self-assemble three-dimensional crystals whose structures have been determined; sticky ends were reported to be the only intermolecular cohesive elements in those crystals. A recent communication in this journal suggested that tertiary interactions between phosphates and cytosine N(4) groups are responsible for intermolecular cohesion in these crystals, in addition to the secondary and covalent interactions programmed into the motif. To resolve this issue, we report experiments challenging this contention. Gel electrophoresis demonstrates that the tensegrity triangle exists in conditions where cytosine-PO(4) tertiary interactions seem ineffective. Furthermore, we have crystallized a tensegrity triangle using a junction lacking the cytosine suggested for involvement in tertiary interactions. The unit cell is isomorphous with that of a tensegrity triangle crystal reported earlier. This structure has been solved by molecular replacement and refined. The data presented here leave no doubt that the tensegrity triangle crystal structures reported earlier depend only on base pairing and covalent interactions for their formation. PMID:22434713

  11. Adaptivity and smart algorithms for fluid-structure interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. Tinsley

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews new approaches in CFD which have the potential for significantly increasing current capabilities of modeling complex flow phenomena and of treating difficult problems in fluid-structure interaction. These approaches are based on the notions of adaptive methods and smart algorithms, which use instantaneous measures of the quality and other features of the numerical flowfields as a basis for making changes in the structure of the computational grid and of algorithms designed to function on the grid. The application of these new techniques to several problem classes are addressed, including problems with moving boundaries, fluid-structure interaction in high-speed turbine flows, flow in domains with receding boundaries, and related problems.

  12. AN INCOMPRESSIBLE ALE METHOD FOR FLUID-STRUCTURE INTERACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, T A

    2004-12-01

    Multi-disciplinary analysis is becoming more and more important to tackle todays complex engineering problems. Therefore, computational tools must be able to handle the complex multi-physics requirements of these problems. A computer code may need to handle the physics associated with fluid dynamics, structural mechanics, heat transfer, chemistry, electro-magnetics, or a variety of other disciplines--all coupled in a highly non-linear system. The objective of this project was to couple an incompressible fluid dynamics package to a solid mechanics code. The code uses finite-element methods and is useful for three-dimensional transient problems with fluid-structure interaction. The code is designed for efficient performance on large multi-processor machines. An ALE finite element method was developed to investigate fluid-structure interaction. The write-up contains information about the method, the problem formulation, and some results from example test problems.

  13. Adaptive-Control Experiments On A Large Flexible Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ih, Che-Hang C.; Bayard, David S.; Wang, Shyh J.; Eldred, Daniel B.

    1990-01-01

    Antennalike flexible structure built for research in advanced technology including suppression of vibrations and control of initial deflections. Structure instrumented with sensors and actuators connected to digital electronic control system, programmed with control algorithms to be tested. Particular attention in this research focused on direct model-reference adaptive-control algorithm based on command generator tracker theory. Built to exhibit multiple vibrational modes, low modal frequencies, and low structural damping. Made three-dimensional so complicated interactions among components of structure and control system investigated.

  14. Low-cost Active Structural Control Space Experiment (LASC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinett, Rush; Bukley, Angelia P.

    1992-01-01

    The DOE Lab Director's Conference identified the need for the DOE National Laboratories to actively and aggressively pursue ways to apply DOE technology to problems of national need. Space structures are key elements of DOD and NASA space systems and a space technology area in which DOE can have a significant impact. LASC is a joint agency space technology experiment (DOD Phillips, NASA Marshall, and DOE Sandia). The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: phase 4 investigator testbed; control of large flexible structures in orbit; INFLEX; Controls, Astrophysics; and structures experiments in space; SARSAT; and LASC mission objectives.

  15. Control/structure interactions of Freedom's solar dynamic modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, R. D.; Yunis, I.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to address potential control/structures interaction (CSI) problems of large flexible multibody structures in the presence of pointing and tracking requirements. A control approach is introduced for the simultaneous tracking and vibration control of multibody space structures. The application that is discussed is Space Station Freedom configured with solar dynamic (SD) modules. The SD fine-pointing and tracking requirements may necessitate controller frequencies above the structural natural frequencies of Freedom and the SD modules. It is well known that this can give rise to CSI problems if the controller is designed without due consideration given to the structural dynamics of the system. In this paper, possible CSI problems of Freedom's solar dynamic power systems are demonstrated using a simple lumped mass model. A NASTRAN model of Freedom developed at NASA Lewis is used to demonstrate potential CSI problems and the proposed tracking and vibration control approach.

  16. On-line interactive virtual experiments on nanoscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadar, Manuella; Ileana, Ioan; Hutanu, Constantin

    2009-01-01

    This paper is an overview on the next generation web which allows students to experience virtual experiments on nano science, physics devices, processes and processing equipment. Virtual reality is used to support a real university lab in which a student can experiment real lab sessions. The web material is presented in an intuitive and highly visual 3D form that is accessible to a diverse group of students. Such type of laboratory provides opportunities for professional and practical education for a wide range of users. The expensive equipment and apparatuses that build the experimental stage in a particular standard laboratory is used to create virtual educational research laboratories. Students learn how to prepare the apparatuses and facilities for the experiment. The online experiments metadata schema is the format for describing online experiments, much like the schema behind a library catalogue used to describe the books in a library. As an online experiment is a special kind of learning object, one specifies its schema as an extension to an established metadata schema for learning objects. The content of the courses, metainformation as well as readings and user data are saved on the server in a database as XML objects.

  17. Optimizing Interacting Potentials to Form Targeted Materials Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Torquato, Salvatore

    2015-09-28

    Conventional applications of the principles of statistical mechanics (the "forward" problems), start with particle interaction potentials, and proceed to deduce local structure and macroscopic properties. Other applications (that may be classified as "inverse" problems), begin with targeted configurational information, such as low-order correlation functions that characterize local particle order, and attempt to back out full-system configurations and/or interaction potentials. To supplement these successful experimental and numerical "forward" approaches, we have focused on inverse approaches that make use of analytical and computational tools to optimize interactions for targeted self-assembly of nanosystems. The most original aspect of our work is its inherently inverse approach: instead of predicting structures that result from given interaction potentials among particles, we determine the optimal potential that most robustly stabilizes a given target structure subject to certain constraints. Our inverse approach could revolutionize the manner in which materials are designed and fabricated. There are a number of very tangible properties (e.g. zero thermal expansion behavior), elastic constants, optical properties for photonic applications, and transport properties.

  18. The Energetic Particles in Shock-ICME Interaction Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, C.

    2015-12-01

    Previous results show that the energetic particles intensity will decreased in the ICMEs. But, in the year of 2008, Shen et al. reported a definite case that the intensity of solar energetic particles (SEP) in the shock-MC interaction structure increase greatly. They further found that such enhancement is the main cause of the largest SEP event in solar cycle 23. The questions remained are: Did all the shock-ICME(MC) structure cause the enhancement of the SEP intensity? If not, why it only happened in some events? Is there any other mechanism which can make the energetic particle intensity in ICME enhanced? To answer these questions, the SEP signatures in all ICMEs including the shock-ICME interaction structures from 1996 to 2014 are studied detail. It is found that the SEP intensities enhanced in about half of the shock-ICME interaction events. Meanwhile, large fraction of energetic particles intensity enhanced ICMEs are interacted with shocks. To find the possible condition and physical mechanismof such enhancement, the parameters of the shock, ICME(MC) and etc. are detailed analyzed.

  19. Interactive Negotiation of Perspectives in Japanese: Predicate-Final Structure as a Resource to Organize Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakamura, Kanae

    2009-01-01

    While the predicate-final structure of the Japanese language has been considered one of the main causes of its late projectability (Tanaka, 1999), this study demonstrates that the final predicate component of a "turn constructional unit" (TCU) furnishes a useful resource for conversational participants to negotiate various aspects of interaction.…

  20. Nail-like targets for laser plasma interaction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pasley, J; Wei, M; Shipton, E; Chen, S; Ma, T; Beg, F N; Alexander, N; Stephens, R B; MacPhee, A G; Hey, D; Pape, S L; Patel, P; Mackinnon, A J; Key, M H; Offermann, D; Link, A; Chowdhury, E; Van-Woerkom, L D; Freeman, R R

    2007-12-18

    The interaction of ultra-high power picosecond laser pulses with solid targets is of interest both for benchmarking the results of hybrid particle in cell (PIC) codes and also for applications to re-entrant cone guided fast ignition. We describe the construction of novel targets in which copper/titanium wires are formed into 'nail-like' objects by a process of melting and micromachining, so that energy can be reliably coupled to a 24 {micro}m diameter wire. An extreme-ultraviolet image of the interaction of the Titan laser with such a target is shown.

  1. DRAFT: an interactive map plotting program for structural geologists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Andrew C.

    DRAFT is a FORTRAN IV program for interactive generation and compilation of geological maps at any scale for geometric analysis, using any combination or quantity of three input file types, and is designed to be simple to use by users with little experience. The input data may consist of three basic types: (1) orientation, (2) alphanumeric, or (3) streamed digitizer data. Output is to the terminal and four-pen graph plotter. All nonstandard FORTRAN IV features used are listed.

  2. Fluid-structure interaction in compliant insect wings.

    PubMed

    Eberle, A L; Reinhall, P G; Daniel, T L

    2014-06-01

    Insect wings deform significantly during flight. As a result, wings act as aeroelastic structures wherein both the driving motion of the structure and the aerodynamic loading of the surrounding fluid potentially interact to modify wing shape. We explore two key issues associated with the design of compliant wings: over a range of driving frequencies and phases of pitch-heave actuation, how does wing stiffness influence (1) the lift and thrust generated and (2) the relative importance of fluid loading on the shape of the wing? In order to examine a wide range of parameters relevant to insect flight, we develop a computationally efficient, two-dimensional model that couples point vortex methods for fluid force computations with structural finite element methods to model the fluid-structure interaction of a wing in air. We vary the actuation frequency, phase of actuation, and flexural stiffness over a range that encompasses values measured for a number of insect taxa (10-90 Hz; 0-π rad; 10(-7)-10(-5) N m(2)). We show that the coefficients of lift and thrust are maximized at the first and second structural resonant frequencies of the system. We also show that even in regions of structural resonance, fluid loading never contributes more than 20% to the development of flight forces. PMID:24855064

  3. Molecular Dynamics of Shock Wave Interaction with Nanoscale Structured Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Qananwah, Ahmad K.

    Typical theoretical treatments of shock wave interactions are based on a continuum approach, which cannot resolve the spatial variations in solids with nano-scale porous structure. Nano-structured materials have the potential to attenuate the strength of traveling shock waves because of their high surface-to-volume ratio. To investigate such interactions we have developed a molecular dynamics simulation model, based on Short Range Attractive interactions. A piston, modeled as a uni-directional repulsive force field translating at a prescribed velocity, impinges on a region of gas which is compressed to form a shock, which in turn is driven against an atomistic solid wall. Periodic boundary conditions are used in the directions orthogonal to the piston motion, and we have considered solids based on either embedded atom potentials (target structure) or tethered potential (rigid piston, holding wall). Velocity, temperature and stress fields are computed locally in both gas and solid regions, and displacements within the solid are interpreted in terms of its elastic constants. In this work we present results of the elastic behavior of solid structures subjected to shock wave impact and analysis of energy transport and absorption in porous materials. The results indicated that the presence of nano-porous material layers in front of a target wall reduced the stress magnitude detected inside and the energy deposited there by about 30 percent while, at the same time, its loading rate was decreased substantially.

  4. Genetic Risk by Experience Interaction for Childhood Internalizing Problems: Converging Evidence across Multiple Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vendlinski, Matthew K.; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Essex, Marilyn J.; Goldsmith, H. Hill

    2011-01-01

    Background: Identifying how genetic risk interacts with experience to predict psychopathology is an important step toward understanding the etiology of mental health problems. Few studies have examined genetic risk by experience interaction (GxE) in the development of childhood psychopathology. Methods: We used both co-twin and parent mental…

  5. Some Experience with Interactive Computing in Teaching Introductory Statistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diegert, Carl

    Students in two biostatistics courses at the Cornell Medical College and in a course in applications of computer science given in Cornell's School of Industrial Engineering were given access to an interactive package of computer programs enabling them to perform statistical analysis without the burden of hand computation. After a general…

  6. Experience-dependent Structural Plasticity in the Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Min; Zuo, Yi

    2011-01-01

    Synapses are the fundamental units of neuronal circuits. Synaptic plasticity can occur through changes in synaptic strength, as well as through the addition/removal of synapses. Two-photon microscopy, in combination with fluorescence labeling, offers a powerful tool to peek into the living brain and follow structural reorganization at individual synapses. Time-lapse imaging depicts a dynamic picture, in which experience-dependent plasticity of synaptic structures varies between different cortical regions and layers, as well as between neuronal subtypes. Recent studies have demonstrated that the formation and elimination of synaptic structures happens rapidly in a subpopulation of cortical neurons during various sensorimotor learning experiences, and that stabilized synaptic structures are associated with long-lasting memories for the task. Thus, circuit plasticity, mediated by structural remodeling, provides an underlying mechanism for learning and memory. PMID:21397343

  7. Fluid-Structure Interactions with Flexible and Rigid Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daily, David Jesse

    Fluid structure interactions occur to some extent in nearly every type of fluid flow. Understanding how structures interact with fluids and visa-versa is of vital importance in many engineering applications. The purpose of this research is to explore how fluids interact with flexible and rigid structures. A computational model was used to model the fluid structure interactions of vibrating synthetic vocal folds. The model simulated the coupling of the fluid and solid domains using a fluid-structure interface boundary condition. The fluid domain used a slightly compressible flow solver to allow for the possibility of acoustic coupling with the subglottal geometry and vibration of the vocal fold model. As the subglottis lengthened, the frequency of vibration decreased until a new acoustic mode could form in the subglottis. Synthetic aperture particle image velocimetry (SAPIV) is a three-dimensional particle tracking technique. SAPIV was used to image the jet of air that emerges from vibrating human vocal folds (glottal jet) during phonation. The three-dimensional reconstruction of the glottal jet found faint evidence of flow characteristics seen in previous research, such as axis-switching, but did not have sufficient resolution to detect small features. SAPIV was further applied to reconstruct the smaller flow characteristics of the glottal jet of vibrating synthetic vocal folds. Two- and four-layer synthetic vocal fold models were used to determine how the glottal jet from the synthetic models compared to the glottal jet from excised human vocal folds. The two- and four-layer models clearly exhibited axis-switching which has been seen in other 3D analyses of the glottal jet. Cavitation in a quiescent fluid can break a rigid structure such as a glass bottle. A new cavitation number was derived to include acceleration and pressure head at cavitation onset. A cavitation stick was used to validate the cavitation number by filling it with different depths and hitting

  8. CME Interaction with Large-Scale Coronal Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswarny, Nat

    2012-01-01

    This talk presents some key observations that highlight the importance of CME interaction with other large scale structures such as CMEs and coronal holes . Such interactions depend on the phase of the solar cycle: during maximum, CMEs are ejected more frequently, so CME-CME interaction becomes dominant. During the rise phase, the polar coronal holes are strong, so the interaction between polar coronal holes and CMEs is important, which also leads to a possible increase in the number of interplanetary CMEs observed as magnetic clouds. During the declining phase, there are more equatorial coronal holes, so CMEs originating near these coronal holes are easily deflected. CMEs can be deflected toward and away from the Sun-Earth line resulting in interesting geospace consequences. For example, the largest geomagnetic storm of solar cycle 23 was due to a CME that was deflected towards the Sun-earth line from E22. CME deflection away from the Sun-Earth line diminishes the chance of a CME producing a geomagnetic storm. CME interaction in the coronagraphic field of view was first identified using enhanced radio emission, which is an indication of acceleration of low energy (approx.10 keV) electrons in the interaction site. CME interaction, therefore, may also have implications for proton acceleration. For example, solar energetic particle events typically occur with a higher intensity, whenever multiple CMEs occur in quick succession from the same source region. CME deflection may also have implications to the arrival of energetic particles to earth because magnetic connectivity may be changed by the interaction. I illustrate the above points using examples from SOHO, STEREO, Wind, and ACE data .

  9. Factor selection and structural identification in the interaction ANOVA model.

    PubMed

    Post, Justin B; Bondell, Howard D

    2013-03-01

    When faced with categorical predictors and a continuous response, the objective of an analysis often consists of two tasks: finding which factors are important and determining which levels of the factors differ significantly from one another. Often times, these tasks are done separately using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) followed by a post hoc hypothesis testing procedure such as Tukey's Honestly Significant Difference test. When interactions between factors are included in the model the collapsing of levels of a factor becomes a more difficult problem. When testing for differences between two levels of a factor, claiming no difference would refer not only to equality of main effects, but also to equality of each interaction involving those levels. This structure between the main effects and interactions in a model is similar to the idea of heredity used in regression models. This article introduces a new method for accomplishing both of the common analysis tasks simultaneously in an interaction model while also adhering to the heredity-type constraint on the model. An appropriate penalization is constructed that encourages levels of factors to collapse and entire factors to be set to zero. It is shown that the procedure has the oracle property implying that asymptotically it performs as well as if the exact structure were known beforehand. We also discuss the application to estimating interactions in the unreplicated case. Simulation studies show the procedure outperforms post hoc hypothesis testing procedures as well as similar methods that do not include a structural constraint. The method is also illustrated using a real data example.

  10. On RNA-RNA interaction structures of fixed topological genus.

    PubMed

    Fu, Benjamin M M; Han, Hillary S W; Reidys, Christian M

    2015-04-01

    Interacting RNA complexes are studied via bicellular maps using a filtration via their topological genus. Our main result is a new bijection for RNA-RNA interaction structures and a linear time uniform sampling algorithm for RNA complexes of fixed topological genus. The bijection allows to either reduce the topological genus of a bicellular map directly, or to lose connectivity by decomposing the complex into a pair of single stranded RNA structures. Our main result is proved bijectively. It provides an explicit algorithm of how to rewire the corresponding complexes and an unambiguous decomposition grammar. Using the concept of genus induction, we construct bicellular maps of fixed topological genus g uniformly in linear time. We present various statistics on these topological RNA complexes and compare our findings with biological complexes. Furthermore we show how to construct loop-energy based complexes using our decomposition grammar.

  11. Minimal metabolic pathway structure is consistent with associated biomolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Bordbar, Aarash; Nagarajan, Harish; Lewis, Nathan E; Latif, Haythem; Ebrahim, Ali; Federowicz, Stephen; Schellenberger, Jan; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2014-01-01

    Pathways are a universal paradigm for functionally describing cellular processes. Even though advances in high-throughput data generation have transformed biology, the core of our biological understanding, and hence data interpretation, is still predicated on human-defined pathways. Here, we introduce an unbiased, pathway structure for genome-scale metabolic networks defined based on principles of parsimony that do not mimic canonical human-defined textbook pathways. Instead, these minimal pathways better describe multiple independent pathway-associated biomolecular interaction datasets suggesting a functional organization for metabolism based on parsimonious use of cellular components. We use the inherent predictive capability of these pathways to experimentally discover novel transcriptional regulatory interactions in Escherichia coli metabolism for three transcription factors, effectively doubling the known regulatory roles for Nac and MntR. This study suggests an underlying and fundamental principle in the evolutionary selection of pathway structures; namely, that pathways may be minimal, independent, and segregated. PMID:24987116

  12. Minimal metabolic pathway structure is consistent with associated biomolecular interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bordbar, Aarash; Nagarajan, Harish; Lewis, Nathan E; Latif, Haythem; Ebrahim, Ali; Federowicz, Stephen; Schellenberger, Jan; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2014-01-01

    Pathways are a universal paradigm for functionally describing cellular processes. Even though advances in high-throughput data generation have transformed biology, the core of our biological understanding, and hence data interpretation, is still predicated on human-defined pathways. Here, we introduce an unbiased, pathway structure for genome-scale metabolic networks defined based on principles of parsimony that do not mimic canonical human-defined textbook pathways. Instead, these minimal pathways better describe multiple independent pathway-associated biomolecular interaction datasets suggesting a functional organization for metabolism based on parsimonious use of cellular components. We use the inherent predictive capability of these pathways to experimentally discover novel transcriptional regulatory interactions in Escherichia coli metabolism for three transcription factors, effectively doubling the known regulatory roles for Nac and MntR. This study suggests an underlying and fundamental principle in the evolutionary selection of pathway structures; namely, that pathways may be minimal, independent, and segregated. PMID:24987116

  13. Relative displacement method for track-structure interaction.

    PubMed

    Schanack, Frank; Ramos, Óscar Ramón; Reyes, Juan Patricio; Pantaleón, Marcos J

    2014-01-01

    The track-structure interaction effects are usually analysed with conventional FEM programs, where it is difficult to implement the complex track-structure connection behaviour, which is nonlinear, elastic-plastic and depends on the vertical load. The authors developed an alternative analysis method, which they call the relative displacement method. It is based on the calculation of deformation states in single DOF element models that satisfy the boundary conditions. For its solution, an iterative optimisation algorithm is used. This method can be implemented in any programming language or analysis software. A comparison with ABAQUS calculations shows a very good result correlation and compliance with the standard's specifications. PMID:24634610

  14. Relative Displacement Method for Track-Structure Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Óscar Ramón; Pantaleón, Marcos J.

    2014-01-01

    The track-structure interaction effects are usually analysed with conventional FEM programs, where it is difficult to implement the complex track-structure connection behaviour, which is nonlinear, elastic-plastic and depends on the vertical load. The authors developed an alternative analysis method, which they call the relative displacement method. It is based on the calculation of deformation states in single DOF element models that satisfy the boundary conditions. For its solution, an iterative optimisation algorithm is used. This method can be implemented in any programming language or analysis software. A comparison with ABAQUS calculations shows a very good result correlation and compliance with the standard's specifications. PMID:24634610

  15. Reconciling CMB and structure growth measurements with dark energy interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourtsidou, Alkistis; Tram, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    We study a coupled quintessence model with pure momentum exchange and present the effects of such an interaction on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and matter power spectrum. For a wide range of negative values of the coupling parameter β structure growth is suppressed and the model can reconcile the tension between cosmic microwave background observations and structure growth inferred from cluster counts. We find that this model is as good as Λ CDM for CMB and baryon acoustic oscillation data, while the addition of cluster data makes the model strongly preferred, improving the best-fit χ2 value by more than 16.

  16. High frequency flow-structural interaction in dense subsonic fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Baw-Lin; Ofarrell, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    Prediction of the detailed dynamic behavior in rocket propellant feed systems and engines and other such high-energy fluid systems requires precise analysis to assure structural performance. Designs sometimes require placement of bluff bodies in a flow passage. Additionally, there are flexibilities in ducts, liners, and piping systems. A design handbook and interactive data base have been developed for assessing flow/structural interactions to be used as a tool in design and development, to evaluate applicable geometries before problems develop, or to eliminate or minimize problems with existing hardware. This is a compilation of analytical/empirical data and techniques to evaluate detailed dynamic characteristics of both the fluid and structures. These techniques have direct applicability to rocket engine internal flow passages, hot gas drive systems, and vehicle propellant feed systems. Organization of the handbook is by basic geometries for estimating Strouhal numbers, added mass effects, mode shapes for various end constraints, critical onset flow conditions, and possible structural response amplitudes. Emphasis is on dense fluids and high structural loading potential for fatigue at low subsonic flow speeds where high-frequency excitations are possible. Avoidance and corrective measure illustrations are presented together with analytical curve fits for predictions compiled from a comprehensive data base.

  17. A field experiment comparing different workgroup interactive techniques.

    PubMed

    Eisele, Per

    2007-02-01

    Participants (N=149) belonging to real life workgroups from different work organisations took part in a project with the aim of improving organisational culture. Two techniques for enhancing effectiveness were used in the study, the individual-group-individual technique and the nominal group technique. In a control group were participants in nonstructured interactive groups. Thus, the workgroups were randomised into these 3 conditions. Analysis indicated that both techniques affect idea generation but not generation of goals.

  18. Mutualistic Interactions and Community Structure in Biological Metacommunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rikvold, Per Arne; Filotas, Elise; Grant, Martin; Parrott, Lael

    2011-03-01

    The role of space in determining species coexistence and community structure is well established. However, previous studies mainly focus on simple competition and predation systems, and the role of mutualistic interspecies interactions is not well understood. Here we use a spatially explicit metacommunity model, in which new species enter by a mutation process, to study the effect of fitness-dependent dispersal on the structure of communities with interactions comprising mutualism, competition, and exploitation. We find that the diversity and interaction network undergo a nonequilibrium phase transition with increasing dispersal rate. Low dispersion rate favors spontaneous emergence of many dissimilar, strongly mutualistic and species-poor local communities. Due to the local dissimilarities, the global diversity is high. High dispersion rate promotes local biodiversity and supports similar, species-rich local communities with a wide range of interactions. The strong similarity between neighboring local communities leads to reduced global diversity. Supported by NSERC (Canada), FQRNT (Québec), NSF (U.S.A.)

  19. Evolution of spatially structured host-parasite interactions.

    PubMed

    Lion, S; Gandon, S

    2015-01-01

    Spatial structure has dramatic effects on the demography and the evolution of species. A large variety of theoretical models have attempted to understand how local dispersal may shape the coevolution of interacting species such as host-parasite interactions. The lack of a unifying framework is a serious impediment for anyone willing to understand current theory. Here, we review previous theoretical studies in the light of a single epidemiological model that allows us to explore the effects of both host and parasite migration rates on the evolution and coevolution of various life-history traits. We discuss the impact of local dispersal on parasite virulence, various host defence strategies and local adaptation. Our analysis shows that evolutionary and coevolutionary outcomes crucially depend on the details of the host-parasite life cycle and on which life-history trait is involved in the interaction. We also discuss experimental studies that support the effects of spatial structure on the evolution of host-parasite interactions. This review highlights major similarities between some theoretical results, but it also reveals an important gap between evolutionary and coevolutionary models. We discuss possible ways to bridge this gap within a more unified framework that would reconcile spatial epidemiology, evolution and coevolution.

  20. Rotor-Fuselage Interaction: Analysis and Validation with Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, John D.; Bettschart, Nicolas

    1997-01-01

    The problem of rotor-fuselage aerodynamic interaction has to be considered in industry applications from various aspects. First, in order to increase helicopter speed and reduce operational costs, rotorcraft tend to be more and more compact, with a main rotor closer to the fuselage surface. This creates significant perturbations both on the main rotor and on the fuselage, including steady and unsteady effects due to blade and wake passage and perturbed inflow at the rotor disk. Furthermore,the main rotor wake affects the tail boom, empennage and anti-torque system. This has important consequences for helicopter control and vibrations at low speeds and also on tail rotor acoustics (main rotor wake-tail rotor interactions). This report describes the US Army-France MOD cooperative work on this problem from both the theoretical and experimental aspects. Using experimental 3D velocity field and fuselage surface pressure measurements, three codes that model the interactions of a helicopter rotor with a fuselage are compared. These comparisons demonstrate some of the strengths and weaknesses of current models for the combined rotor-fuselage analysis.

  1. Solid breeder/structure mechanical interaction and thermal stability

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.Y.; Billone, M.C.; Taghavi, K.

    1985-04-01

    Solid breeder/structure mechanical interaction (BSMI) during fusion reactor blanket operation is a potential failure mode which could limit the lifetime of the blanket. The severity of BSMI will generally depend on the materials, specific blanket designs, and blanket operating conditions. Thermomechanical analyses performed for a helium-cooled blanket employing Li/sub 2/O/HT-9 plates indicate that BSMI could be a serious concern for this blanket.

  2. Genetics-based interactions among plants, pathogens, and herbivores define arthropod community structure.

    PubMed

    Busby, Posy E; Lamit, Louis J; Keith, Arthur R; Newcombe, George; Gehring, Catherine A; Whitham, Thomas G; Dirzo, Rodolfo

    2015-07-01

    Plant resistance to pathogens or insect herbivores is common, but its potential for indirectly influencing plant-associated communities is poorly known. Here, we test whether pathogens' indirect effects on arthropod communities and herbivory depend on plant resistance to pathogens and/or herbivores, and address the overarching interacting foundation species hypothesis that genetics-based interactions among a few highly interactive species can structure a much larger community. In a manipulative field experiment using replicated genotypes of two Populus species and their interspecific hybrids, we found that genetic variation in plant resistance to both pathogens and insect herbivores modulated the strength of pathogens' indirect effects on arthropod communities and insect herbivory. First, due in part to the pathogens' differential impacts on leaf biomass among the two Populus species and the hybrids, the pathogen most strongly impacted arthropod community composition, richness, and abundance on the pathogen-susceptible tree species. Second, we found similar patterns comparing pathogen-susceptible and pathogen-resistant genotypes within species. Third, within a plant species, pathogens caused a fivefold greater reduction in herbivory on insect-herbivore-susceptible plant genotypes than on herbivore-resistant genotypes, demonstrating that the pathogen-herbivore interaction is genotype dependent. We conclude that interactions among plants, pathogens, and herbivores can structure multitrophic communities, supporting the interacting foundation species hypothesis. Because these interactions are genetically based, evolutionary changes in genetic resistance could result in ecological changes in associated communities, which may in turn feed back to affect plant fitness.

  3. First Laser-Plasma Interaction and Hohlraum Experiments on NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Dewald, E L; Glenzer, S H; Landen, O L; Suter, L J; Jones, O S; Schein, J; Froula, D; Divol, L; Campbell, K; Schneider, M S; McDonald, J W; Niemann, C; Mackinnon, A J

    2005-06-17

    Recently the first hohlraum experiments have been performed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in support of indirect drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) designs. The effects of laser beam smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) and polarization smoothing (PS) on the beam propagation in long scale gas-filled pipes has been studied at plasma scales as found in indirect drive gas filled ignition hohlraum designs. The long scale gas-filled target experiments have shown propagation over 7 mm of dense plasma without filamentation and beam break up when using full laser smoothing. Vacuum hohlraums have been irradiated with laser powers up to 6 TW, 1-9 ns pulse lengths and energies up to 17 kJ to activate several diagnostics, to study the hohlraum radiation temperature scaling with the laser power and hohlraum size, and to make contact with hohlraum experiments performed at the NOVA and Omega laser facilities. Subsequently, novel long laser pulse hohlraum experiments have tested models of hohlraum plasma filling and long pulse hohlraum radiation production. The validity of the plasma filling assessment in analytical models and in LASNEX calculations has been proven for the first time. The comparison of these results with modeling will be discussed.

  4. Charmed-Particle Lifetimes from Neutrino Interactions Experiment #531

    SciTech Connect

    Reay, W. N.

    1980-01-01

    Detection of charm in several Fermilab experiments, among them E-531, was discussed by L. Hand, L. Voyvodic, and the author in Fermilab Report in March 1979. Since that time, there have been significant new results from E-531 on charmed particles and their lifetimes and a discussion of these results is useful at this time.

  5. Shock induced fluid-structure interaction on a flexible wall in supersonic turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willems, S.; Gülhan, A.; Esser, B.

    2013-06-01

    Since escalating fluid-structure interactions (FSI) can cause a complete loss of a spacecraft, a detailed knowledge of the mechanisms of flow-structure interactions in supersonic flows is important for the design of future space transportation systems. The first step is to analyze the basic mechanisms at a generic test case that is ascertainable also with high quality simulations. Therefore, this work was devoted to the investigation of the shock wave boundary layer interaction on an elastic panel. During the wind tunnel experiments, the panel deflection was measured with fast nonintrusive displacement sensors. On the flow side pressure, high-speed Schlieren photography and oil-film technique were used. The flow manipulation due to the panel deflection becomes manifest in a deformation of the impinging shock and the separation zone. The panel deflection consists of a constant and a dynamic component. The experimental results are discussed and compared to numerical results.

  6. Solar neutrino interactions with liquid scintillators used for double beta-decay experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejiri, Hiroyasu; Zuber, Kai

    2016-08-01

    Solar neutrinos interact within double-beta-decay (DBD) detectors and hence will contribute to backgrounds (BGs) for DBD experiments. Background contributions due to solar neutrinos are evaluated for their interactions with atomic electrons and nuclei in liquid scintillation detectors used for DBD experiments. They are shown to be serious BGs for high-sensitivity DBD experiments to search for the Majorana neutrino masses in the inverted and normal hierarchy regions.

  7. STS-74/Mir photogrammetric appendage structural dynamics experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Sharon S.; Gilbert, Michael G.

    1996-01-01

    The Photogrammetric Appendage Structural Dynamics Experiment (PASDE) is an International Space Station (ISS) Phase-1 risk mitigation experiment. Phase-1 experiments are performed during docking missions of the U.S. Space Shuttle to the Russian Space Station Mir. The purpose of the experiment is to demonstrate the use of photogrammetric techniques for determination of structural dynamic mode parameters of solar arrays and other spacecraft appendages. Photogrammetric techniques are a low cost alternative to appendage mounted accelerometers for the ISS program. The objective of the first flight of PASDE, on STS-74 in November 1995, was to obtain video images of Mir Kvant-2 solar array response to various structural dynamic excitation events. More than 113 minutes of high quality structural response video data was collected during the mission. The PASDE experiment hardware consisted of three instruments each containing two video cameras, two video tape recorders, a modified video signal time inserter, and associated avionics boxes. The instruments were designed, fabricated, and tested at the NASA Langley Research Center in eight months. The flight hardware was integrated into standard Hitchhiker canisters at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and then installed into the Space Shuttle cargo bay in locations selected to achieve good video coverage and photogrammetric geometry.

  8. Dynamic near-field optical interaction between oscillating nanomechanical structures

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Phillip; Chen, Xiang; Zhang, Zhen; Ford, Matthew; Rosenmann, Daniel; Jung, II Woong; Sun, Cheng; Balogun, Oluwaseyi

    2015-01-01

    Near-field optical techniques exploit light-matter interactions at small length scales for mechanical sensing and actuation of nanomechanical structures. Here, we study the optical interaction between two mechanical oscillators—a plasmonic nanofocusing probe-tip supported by a low frequency cantilever, and a high frequency nanomechanical resonator—and leverage their interaction for local detection of mechanical vibrations. The plasmonic nanofocusing probe provides a confined optical source to enhance the interaction between the two oscillators. Dynamic perturbation of the optical cavity between the probe-tip and the resonator leads to nonlinear modulation of the scattered light intensity at the sum and difference of their frequencies. This double-frequency demodulation scheme is explored to suppress unwanted background and to detect mechanical vibrations with a minimum detectable displacement sensitivity of 0.45 pm/Hz1/2, which is limited by shot noise and electrical noise. We explore the demodulation scheme for imaging the bending vibration mode shape of the resonator with a lateral spatial resolution of 20 nm. We also demonstrate the time-resolved aspect of the local optical interaction by recording the ring-down vibrations of the resonator at frequencies of up to 129 MHz. The near-field optical technique is promising for studying dynamic mechanical processes in individual nanostructures. PMID:26014599

  9. Dynamic near-field optical interaction between oscillating nanomechanical structures

    DOE PAGES

    Ahn, Phillip; Chen, Xiang; Zhang, Zhen; Ford, Matthew; Rosenmann, Daniel; Jung, II Woong; Sun, Cheng; Balogun, Oluwaseyi

    2015-05-27

    Near-field optical techniques exploit light-matter interactions at small length scales for mechanical sensing and actuation of nanomechanical structures. Here, we study the optical interaction between two mechanical oscillators—a plasmonic nanofocusing probe-tip supported by a low frequency cantilever, and a high frequency nanomechanical resonator—and leverage their interaction for local detection of mechanical vibrations. The plasmonic nanofocusing probe provides a confined optical source to enhance the interaction between the two oscillators. Dynamic perturbation of the optical cavity between the probe-tip and the resonator leads to nonlinear modulation of the scattered light intensity at the sum and difference of their frequencies. This double-frequencymore » demodulation scheme is explored to suppress unwanted background and to detect mechanical vibrations with a minimum detectable displacement sensitivity of 0.45pm/Hz1/2, which is limited by shot noise and electrical noise. We explore the demodulation scheme for imaging the bending vibration mode shape of the resonator with a lateral spatial resolution of 20nm. We also demonstrate the time-resolved aspect of the local optical interaction by recording the ring-down vibrations of the resonator at frequencies of up to 129MHz. The near-field optical technique is promising for studying dynamic mechanical processes in individual nanostructures.« less

  10. Dynamic near-field optical interaction between oscillating nanomechanical structures

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Phillip; Chen, Xiang; Zhang, Zhen; Ford, Matthew; Rosenmann, Daniel; Jung, II Woong; Sun, Cheng; Balogun, Oluwaseyi

    2015-05-27

    Near-field optical techniques exploit light-matter interactions at small length scales for mechanical sensing and actuation of nanomechanical structures. Here, we study the optical interaction between two mechanical oscillators—a plasmonic nanofocusing probe-tip supported by a low frequency cantilever, and a high frequency nanomechanical resonator—and leverage their interaction for local detection of mechanical vibrations. The plasmonic nanofocusing probe provides a confined optical source to enhance the interaction between the two oscillators. Dynamic perturbation of the optical cavity between the probe-tip and the resonator leads to nonlinear modulation of the scattered light intensity at the sum and difference of their frequencies. This double-frequency demodulation scheme is explored to suppress unwanted background and to detect mechanical vibrations with a minimum detectable displacement sensitivity of 0.45pm/Hz1/2, which is limited by shot noise and electrical noise. We explore the demodulation scheme for imaging the bending vibration mode shape of the resonator with a lateral spatial resolution of 20nm. We also demonstrate the time-resolved aspect of the local optical interaction by recording the ring-down vibrations of the resonator at frequencies of up to 129MHz. The near-field optical technique is promising for studying dynamic mechanical processes in individual nanostructures.

  11. Structural features underlying raloxifene's biophysical interaction with bone matrix.

    PubMed

    Bivi, Nicoletta; Hu, Haitao; Chavali, Balagopalakrishna; Chalmers, Michael J; Reutter, Christopher T; Durst, Gregory L; Riley, Anna; Sato, Masahiko; Allen, Matthew R; Burr, David D; Dodge, Jeffrey A

    2016-02-15

    Raloxifene, a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), reduces fracture risk at least in part by improving the mechanical properties of bone in a cell- and estrogen receptor-independent manner. In this study, we determined that raloxifene directly interacts with the bone tissue. Through the use of multiple and complementary biophysical techniques including nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), we show that raloxifene interacts specifically with the organic component or the organic/mineral composite, and not with hydroxyapatite. Structure-activity studies reveal that the basic side chain of raloxifene is an instrumental determinant in the interaction with bone. Thus, truncation of portions of the side chain reduces bone binding and also diminishes the increase in mechanical properties. Our results support a model wherein the piperidine interacts with bone matrix through electrostatic interactions with the piperidine nitrogen and through hydrophobic interactions (van der Waals) with the aliphatic groups in the side chain and the benzothiophene core. Furthermore, in silico prediction of the potential binding sites on the surface of collagen revealed the presence of a groove with sufficient space to accommodate raloxifene analogs. The hydroxyl groups on the benzothiophene nucleus, which are necessary for binding of SERMs to the estrogen receptor, are not required for binding to the bone surface, but mediate a more robust binding of the compound to the bone powder. In conclusion, we report herein a novel property of raloxifene analogs that allows them to interact with the bone tissue through potential contacts with the organic matrix and in particular collagen. PMID:26795112

  12. Structural features underlying raloxifene's biophysical interaction with bone matrix.

    PubMed

    Bivi, Nicoletta; Hu, Haitao; Chavali, Balagopalakrishna; Chalmers, Michael J; Reutter, Christopher T; Durst, Gregory L; Riley, Anna; Sato, Masahiko; Allen, Matthew R; Burr, David D; Dodge, Jeffrey A

    2016-02-15

    Raloxifene, a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), reduces fracture risk at least in part by improving the mechanical properties of bone in a cell- and estrogen receptor-independent manner. In this study, we determined that raloxifene directly interacts with the bone tissue. Through the use of multiple and complementary biophysical techniques including nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), we show that raloxifene interacts specifically with the organic component or the organic/mineral composite, and not with hydroxyapatite. Structure-activity studies reveal that the basic side chain of raloxifene is an instrumental determinant in the interaction with bone. Thus, truncation of portions of the side chain reduces bone binding and also diminishes the increase in mechanical properties. Our results support a model wherein the piperidine interacts with bone matrix through electrostatic interactions with the piperidine nitrogen and through hydrophobic interactions (van der Waals) with the aliphatic groups in the side chain and the benzothiophene core. Furthermore, in silico prediction of the potential binding sites on the surface of collagen revealed the presence of a groove with sufficient space to accommodate raloxifene analogs. The hydroxyl groups on the benzothiophene nucleus, which are necessary for binding of SERMs to the estrogen receptor, are not required for binding to the bone surface, but mediate a more robust binding of the compound to the bone powder. In conclusion, we report herein a novel property of raloxifene analogs that allows them to interact with the bone tissue through potential contacts with the organic matrix and in particular collagen.

  13. Quantifying the energetic interplay of RNA tertiary and secondary structure interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, S K; Zheng, M; Wu, M; Tinoco, I; Cech, T R

    1999-01-01

    To understand the RNA-folding problem, we must know the extent to which RNA structure formation is hierarchical (tertiary folding of preformed secondary structure). Recently, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to show that Mg2+-dependent tertiary interactions force secondary structure rearrangement in the 56-nt tP5abc RNA, a truncated subdomain of the Tetrahymena group I intron. Here we combine mutagenesis with folding computations, nondenaturing gel electrophoresis, high-resolution NMR spectroscopy, and chemical-modification experiments to probe further the energetic interplay of tertiary and secondary interactions in tP5abc. Point mutations predicted to destabilize the secondary structure of folded tP5abc greatly disrupt its Mg2+-dependent folding, as monitored by nondenaturing gels. Imino proton assignments and sequential NOE walks of the two-dimensional NMR spectrum of one of the tP5abc mutants confirm the predicted secondary structure, which does not change in the presence of Mg2+. In contrast to these data on tP5abc, the same point mutations in the context of the P4-P6 domain (of which P5abc is a subdomain) shift the Mg2+ dependence of P4-P6 folding only moderately, and dimethyl sulfate (DMS) modification experiments demonstrate that Mg2+ does cause secondary structure rearrangement of the P4-P6 mutants' P5abc subdomains. Our data provide experimental support for two simple conclusions: (1) Even single point mutations at bases involved only in secondary structure can be enough to tip the balance between RNA tertiary and secondary interactions. (2) Domain context must be considered in evaluating the relative importance of tertiary and secondary contributions. This tertiary/secondary interplay is likely relevant to the folding of many large RNA and to bimolecular snRNA-snRNA and snRNA-intron RNA interactions. PMID:10606276

  14. Structural consequences of weak interactions in dispirooxindole derivatives.

    PubMed

    Ravikumar, Krishnan; Sridhar, Balasubramanian; Nanubolu, Jagadeesh Babu; Karthik, Govindaraju; Reddy, Basi Venkata Subba

    2015-11-01

    Spiro scaffolds are being increasingly utilized in drug discovery due to their inherent three-dimensionality and structural variations, resulting in new synthetic routes to introduce spiro building blocks into more pharmaceutically active molecules. Multicomponent cascade reactions, involving the in situ generation of carbonyl ylides from α-diazocarbonyl compounds and aldehydes, and 1,3-dipolar cycloadditon with 3-arylideneoxindoles gave a novel class of dispirooxindole derivatives, namely 1,1''-dibenzyl-5'-(4-chlorophenyl)-4'-phenyl-4',5'-dihydrodispiro[indoline-3,2'-furan-3',3''-indoline]-2,2''-dione, C44H33ClN2O3, (I), 1''-acetyl-1-benzyl-5'-(4-chlorophenyl)-4'-phenyl-4',5'-dihydrodispiro[indoline-3,2'-furan-3',3''-indoline]-2,2''-dione, C39H29ClN2O4, (II), 1''-acetyl-1-benzyl-4',5'-diphenyl-4',5'-dihydrodispiro[indoline-3,2'-furan-3',3''-indoline]-2,2''-dione, C39H30N2O4, (III), and 1''-acetyl-1-benzyl-4',5'-diphenyl-4',5'-dihydrodispiro[indoline-3,2'-furan-3',3''-indoline]-2,2''-dione acetonitrile hemisolvate, C39H30N2O4·0.5C2H3N, (IV). All four compounds exist as racemic mixtures of the SSSR and RRRS stereoisomers. In these structures, the two H atoms of the dihydrofuran ring and the two substituted oxindole rings are in a trans orientation, facilitating intramolecular C-H···O and π-π interactions. These weak interactions play a prominent role in the structural stability and aid the highly regio- and diastereoselective synthesis. In each of the four structures, the molecular assembly in the crystal is also governed by weak noncovalent interactions. Compound (IV) is the solvated analogue of (III) and the two compounds show similar structural features. PMID:26524175

  15. Transient thermal hydraulics, heat transfer, fluid-structure interaction, and structural dynamics. PVP-Vol. 270

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Y.W.; Wang, C.Y.; Chang, F.C. ); Katze, D.; Moody, F.J.

    1994-01-01

    This symposium addresses transient effects of thermal-hydraulics and heat transfer on structural responses and fluid-structure interactions. Thermal hydraulics, or simply fluid dynamics and heat transfer, in industrial process systems will, in general, generate loads on the structures. Depending on the magnitude and how the structures respond, the feedback effects on the thermal hydraulics may become significant and special consideration would be required. In such situations, thermal hydraulics analysis, independent of the structural dynamics analysis, or vice versa, would be undesirable and often the fluid-structure interaction becomes a necessary consideration. This publication volume presents a collection of papers addressing various aspects of these topics. Separate abstracts were prepared for 21 papers in this conference.

  16. Structure of colloidosomes with tunable particle density: Simulation versus experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantoni, Riccardo; Salari, Johannes W. O.; Klumperman, Bert

    2012-06-01

    Colloidosomes are created in the laboratory from a Pickering emulsion of water droplets in oil. The colloidosomes have approximately the same diameter and by choosing (hairy) particles of different diameters it is possible to control the particle density on the droplets. The experiment is performed at room temperature. The radial distribution function of the assembly of (primary) particles on the water droplet is measured in the laboratory and in a computer experiment of a fluid model of particles with pairwise interactions on the surface of a sphere.

  17. Inhalation experiments with mixtures of hydrocarbons. Experimental design, statistics and interpretation of kinetics and possible interactions.

    PubMed

    Eide, I; Zahlsen, K

    1996-01-01

    The paper describes experimental and statistical methods for toxicokinetic evaluation of mixtures in inhalation experiments. Synthetic mixtures of three C9 n-paraffinic, naphthenic and aromatic hydrocarbons (n-nonane, trimethylcyclohexane and trimethylbenzene, respectively) were studied in the rat after inhalation for 12h. The hydrocarbons were mixed according to principles for statistical experimental design using mixture design at four vapour levels (75, 150, 300 and 450 ppm) to support an empirical model with linear, interaction and quadratic terms (Taylor polynome). Immediately after exposure, concentrations of hydrocarbons were measured by head space gas chromatography in blood, brain, liver, kidneys and perirenal fat. Multivariate data analysis and modelling were performed with PLS (projections to latent structures). The best models were obtained after removing all interaction terms, suggesting that there were no interactions between the hydrocarbons with respect to absorption and distribution. Uptake of paraffins and particularly aromatics is best described by quadratic models, whereas the uptake of the naphthenic hydrocarbons is nearly linear. All models are good, with high correlation (r2) and prediction properties (Q2), the latter after cross validation. The concentrations of aromates in blood were high compared to the other hydrocarbons. At concentrations below 250 ppm, the naphthene reached higher concentrations in the brain compared to the paraffin and the aromate. Statistical experimental design, multivariate data analysis and modelling have proved useful for the evaluation of synthetic mixtures. The principles may also be used in the design of liquid mixtures, which may be evaporated partially or completely.

  18. Diversifying Science: Underrepresented Student Experiences in Structured Research Programs

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Nolan L.; Lin, Monica H.; Arellano, Lucy; Espinosa, Lorelle L.

    2013-01-01

    Targeting four institutions with structured science research programs for undergraduates, this study focuses on how underrepresented students experience science. Several key themes emerged from focus group discussions: learning to become research scientists, experiences with the culture of science, and views on racial and social stigma. Participants spoke of essential factors for becoming a scientist, but their experiences also raised complex issues about the role of race and social stigma in scientific training. Students experienced the collaborative and empowering culture of science, exhibited strong science identities and high self-efficacy, while developing directed career goals as a result of “doing science” in these programs. PMID:23503690

  19. Adaptive control experiment with a large flexible structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ih, Che-Hang Charles; Bayard, David S.; Wang, Shyh Jong; Eldred, Daniel B.

    1988-01-01

    A large space antenna-like ground experiment structure has been developed for conducting research and validation of advanced control technology. A set of proof-of-concept adaptive control experiments for transient and initial deflection regulation with a small set of sensors and actuators were conducted. Very limited knowledge of the plant dynamics and its environment was used in the design of the adaptive controller so that performance could be demonstrated under conditions of gross underlying uncertainties. High performance has been observed under such stringent conditions. These experiments have established a baseline for future studies involving more complex hardware and environmental conditions, and utilizing additional sets of sensors and actuators.

  20. Primate paternal care: interactions between biology and social experience

    PubMed Central

    Storey, Anne E.; Ziegler, Toni E.

    2016-01-01

    We review recent research on the roles of hormones and social experiences on the development of paternal care in humans and non-human primates. Generally, lower concentrations of testosterone and higher concentrations of oxytocin are associated with greater paternal responsiveness. Hormonal changes prior to the birth appear to be important in preparation for fatherhood and changes after the birth are related to how much time fathers spend with offspring and whether they provide effective care. Prolactin may facilitate approach and the initiation of infant care, and in some biparental non-human primates, it affects body mass regulation. Glucocorticoids are involved in coordinating reproductive and parental behavior between mates. New research involving intranasal oxytocin and neuropeptide receptor polymorphisms may help us understand individual variation in paternal responsiveness. This area of research, integrating both biological factors and the role of early and adult experience, has the potential to suggest individually designed interventions that can strengthen relationships between fathers and their offspring. PMID:26253726

  1. Cross-Modal Interactions in the Experience of Musical Performances: Physiological Correlates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapados, Catherine; Levitin, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to investigate cross-modal interactions in the emotional experience of music listeners. Previous research showed that visual information present in a musical performance is rich in expressive content, and moderates the subjective emotional experience of a participant listening and/or observing musical stimuli [Vines,…

  2. Generation of filamentary structures by beam-plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.Y.; Lin, Y.

    2006-05-15

    The previous simulations by Wang and Lin [Phys. Plasmas. 10, 3528 (2003)] showed that filaments, frequently observed in space plasmas, can form via the interaction between an ion beam and a background plasma. In this study, the physical mechanism for the generation of the filaments is investigated by a two-dimensional hybrid simulation, in which a field-aligned ion beam with relative beam density n{sub b}=0.1 and beam velocity V{sub b}=10V{sub A} is initiated in a uniform plasma. Right-hand nonresonant ion beam modes, consistent with the linear theory, are found to be dominant in the linear stage of the beam-plasma interaction. In the later nonlinear stage, the nonresonant modes decay and the resonant modes grow through a nonlinear wave coupling. The interaction among the resonant modes leads to the formation of filamentary structures, which are the field-aligned structures (k perpendicular B) of magnetic field B, density, and temperature in the final stage. The filaments are nonlinearly generated in a prey-predator fashion by the parallel and oblique resonant ion beam modes, which meanwhile evolve into two types of shear Alfven modes, with one mainly propagating along the background field B{sub 0} and the other obliquely propagating. The filamentary structures are found to be phase standing in the plasma frame, but their amplitude oscillates with time. In the dominant filament mode, fluctuations in the background ion density, background ion temperature, and beam density are in phase with the fluctuations in B, whereas the significantly enhanced beam temperature is antiphase with B. It is found that the filaments are produced by the interaction of at least two ion beam modes with comparable amplitudes, not by only one single mode, thus their generation mechanism is different from other mechanisms such as the stimulated excitation by the decay of an Alfven wave.

  3. Interaction strength and model geometry effects on the structure of crossing-shock wave/turbulent boundary-layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, T. J.; Settles, G. S.

    1993-01-01

    The flowfield structure of a range of symmetric crossing-shock wave/turbulent boundary-layer interactions of varying strength is presented. The test geometry, consisting of a symmetric pair of opposing sharp fins at angle of attack, alpha, mounted to a flat plate, is studied experimentally for a range of alpha from 7 to 15 degrees at Mach numbers of 3 and 4. Results reveal that the basic flowfield shock structure remains similar in nature over the range of interaction strengths examined, with the only changes being in the scale and location of the various features present. The separated flow regions are classified as being either completely or partially separated, the completely separated case being the one in which the entire incoming boundary layer separates from the plate surface. For the current experiments, all but the weakest of the interactions exhibited complete boundary layer separation. Finally, the effects of model geometry are analyzed by comparing data for shock generators of varying lengths, with the results showing no evidence of upstream influence due to the shock generator trailing edges.

  4. Fluid/Structure Interaction Studies of Aircraft Using High Fidelity Equations on Parallel Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru; VanDalsem, William (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Abstract Aeroelasticity which involves strong coupling of fluids, structures and controls is an important element in designing an aircraft. Computational aeroelasticity using low fidelity methods such as the linear aerodynamic flow equations coupled with the modal structural equations are well advanced. Though these low fidelity approaches are computationally less intensive, they are not adequate for the analysis of modern aircraft such as High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) and Advanced Subsonic Transport (AST) which can experience complex flow/structure interactions. HSCT can experience vortex induced aeroelastic oscillations whereas AST can experience transonic buffet associated structural oscillations. Both aircraft may experience a dip in the flutter speed at the transonic regime. For accurate aeroelastic computations at these complex fluid/structure interaction situations, high fidelity equations such as the Navier-Stokes for fluids and the finite-elements for structures are needed. Computations using these high fidelity equations require large computational resources both in memory and speed. Current conventional super computers have reached their limitations both in memory and speed. As a result, parallel computers have evolved to overcome the limitations of conventional computers. This paper will address the transition that is taking place in computational aeroelasticity from conventional computers to parallel computers. The paper will address special techniques needed to take advantage of the architecture of new parallel computers. Results will be illustrated from computations made on iPSC/860 and IBM SP2 computer by using ENSAERO code that directly couples the Euler/Navier-Stokes flow equations with high resolution finite-element structural equations.

  5. Finite element solution of transient fluid-structure interaction problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everstine, Gordon C.; Cheng, Raymond S.; Hambric, Stephen A.

    1991-01-01

    A finite element approach using NASTRAN is developed for solving time-dependent fluid-structure interaction problems, with emphasis on the transient scattering of acoustic waves from submerged elastic structures. Finite elements are used for modeling both structure and fluid domains to facilitate the graphical display of the wave motion through both media. For the liquid, the use of velocity potential as the fundamental unknown results in a symmetric matrix equation. The approach is illustrated for the problem of transient scattering from a submerged elastic spherical shell subjected to an incident tone burst. The use of an analogy between the equations of elasticity and the wave equation of acoustics, a necessary ingredient to the procedure, is summarized.

  6. Shock-driven fluid-structure interaction for civil design

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Stephen L; Deiterding, Ralf

    2011-11-01

    The multiphysics fluid-structure interaction simulation of shock-loaded structures requires the dynamic coupling of a shock-capturing flow solver to a solid mechanics solver for large deformations. The Virtual Test Facility combines a Cartesian embedded boundary approach with dynamic mesh adaptation in a generic software framework of flow solvers using hydrodynamic finite volume upwind schemes that are coupled to various explicit finite element solid dynamics solvers (Deiterding et al., 2006). This paper gives a brief overview of the computational approach and presents first simulations that utilize the general purpose solid dynamics code DYNA3D for complex 3D structures of interest in civil engineering. Results from simulations of a reinforced column, highway bridge, multistory building, and nuclear reactor building are presented.

  7. Isotope labeling for NMR studies of macromolecular structure and interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, P.E.

    1994-12-01

    Implementation of biosynthetic methods for uniform or specific isotope labeling of proteins, coupled with the recent development of powerful heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods, has led to a dramatic increase in the size and complexity of macromolecular systems that are now amenable to NMR structural analysis. In recent years, a new technology has emerged that combines uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeling with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods to allow NMR structural studies of systems approaching 25 to 30 kDa in molecular weight. In addition, with the introduction of specific {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N labels into ligands, meaningful NMR studies of complexes of even higher molecular weight have become feasible. These advances usher in a new era in which the earlier, rather stringent molecular weight limitations have been greatly surpassed and NMR can begin to address many central biological problems that involve macromolecular structure, dynamics, and interactions.

  8. Structural correlations in diffusiophoretic colloidal mixtures with nonreciprocal interactions.

    PubMed

    Bartnick, Jörg; Heinen, Marco; Ivlev, Alexei V; Löwen, Hartmut

    2016-01-20

    Nonreciprocal effective interaction forces can occur between mesoscopic particles in colloidal suspensions that are driven out of equilibrium. These forces violate Newton's third law actio  =  reactio on coarse-grained length and time scales. Here we explore the statistical mechanics of Brownian particles with nonreciprocal effective interactions. Our model system is a binary fluid mixture of spherically symmetric, diffusiophoretic mesoscopic particles, and we focus on the time-averaged particle pair- and triplet-correlation functions. Based on the many-body Smoluchowski equation we develop a microscopic statistical theory for the particle correlations and test it by computer simulations. For model systems in two and three spatial dimensions, we show that nonreciprocity induces distinct nonequilibrium pair correlations. Our predictions can be tested in experiments with chemotactic colloidal suspensions.

  9. The effect of an interactive experience on music majors' perceptions of music for deaf students.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, K A; Johnson, K E

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of an interactive experience on music majors' perceptions of music experiences for deaf students. Twenty-three members of a pre-existing college brass ensemble served as subjects, and a 1-hour interactive concert/presentation for 10 deaf elementary children served as the independent variable. The interactive experience was designed to provide social, musical, and educational interactions between the college musicians and the deaf children. A pretest-posttest design was utilized, and the dependent variable was a questionnaire designed to examine the subjects' perceptions regarding music for deaf students, including how prepared, comfortable, and willing they felt to provide music experiences for deaf students. Results reveal that this single interactive experience had a significant effect on the subjects' perceptions of the value of music in the education of deaf children (p <.05). Although the pretest and posttest scores indicate that the subjects felt apprehensive about their preparedness to work with deaf students, the subjects felt significantly more positive about their preparedness following the interaction (p <.001). An analysis of open comments indicates that the subjects perceived the experience as (a) very positive, (b) increasing their knowledge and perception of music for deaf students, (c) helping them better relate to the deaf population, (d) promoting interest in similar experiences and in gaining more information, and (e) eliciting a feeling that future teachers should have similar experiences. Quotes from the subjects are given, and implications for teacher training/music therapy programs are discussed.

  10. Quantifying sequence and structural features of protein-RNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Li, Songling; Yamashita, Kazuo; Amada, Karlou Mar; Standley, Daron M

    2014-09-01

    Increasing awareness of the importance of protein-RNA interactions has motivated many approaches to predict residue-level RNA binding sites in proteins based on sequence or structural characteristics. Sequence-based predictors are usually high in sensitivity but low in specificity; conversely structure-based predictors tend to have high specificity, but lower sensitivity. Here we quantified the contribution of both sequence- and structure-based features as indicators of RNA-binding propensity using a machine-learning approach. In order to capture structural information for proteins without a known structure, we used homology modeling to extract the relevant structural features. Several novel and modified features enhanced the accuracy of residue-level RNA-binding propensity beyond what has been reported previously, including by meta-prediction servers. These features include: hidden Markov model-based evolutionary conservation, surface deformations based on the Laplacian norm formalism, and relative solvent accessibility partitioned into backbone and side chain contributions. We constructed a web server called aaRNA that implements the proposed method and demonstrate its use in identifying putative RNA binding sites. PMID:25063293

  11. Structuring Effective Practicum Experiences for Pre-Service Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyss, Vanessa L.; Siebert, Cathy J.; Dowling, Karen A.

    2012-01-01

    Practicum experiences are an extremely critical component to any teacher education program. Yet how pre-service teachers are included in classrooms can be organized in multiple ways and is influenced by many factors. Structurally, universities must consider school schedules and student course offering schedules. More important is ensuring…

  12. Evaluation of a College-Structured Practical Experience Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Arthur A., Jr.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The effects of a structured program on students' learning, skill development and socialization into the pharmaceutical profession were examined among students entering their final year at the University of Illinois College of Pharmacy. The experiment covered the summer months of 1974. (LBH)

  13. Chromatic patchy particles: Effects of specific interactions on liquid structure

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilyev, Oleg A.; Tkachenko, Alexei V.; Klumov, Boris A.

    2015-07-13

    We study the structural and thermodynamic properties of patchy particle liquids, with a special focus on the role of “color,” i.e., specific interactions between individual patches. A possible experimental realization of such “chromatic” interactions is by decorating the particle patches with single-stranded DNA linkers. The complementarity of the linkers can promote selective bond formation between predetermined pairs of patches. By using MD simulations, we compare the local connectivity, the bond orientation order, and other structural properties of the aggregates formed by the “colored” and “colorless” systems. The analysis is done for spherical particles with two different patch arrangements (tetrahedral and cubic). It is found that the aggregated (liquid) phase of the “colorless” patchy particles is better connected, denser and typically has stronger local order than the corresponding “colored” one. This, in turn, makes the colored liquid less stable thermodynamically. Specifically, we predict that in a typical case the chromatic interactions should increase the relative stability of the crystalline phase with respect to the disordered liquid, thus expanding its region in the phase diagram.

  14. Chromatic patchy particles: Effects of specific interactions on liquid structure

    DOE PAGES

    Vasilyev, Oleg A.; Tkachenko, Alexei V.; Klumov, Boris A.

    2015-07-13

    We study the structural and thermodynamic properties of patchy particle liquids, with a special focus on the role of “color,” i.e., specific interactions between individual patches. A possible experimental realization of such “chromatic” interactions is by decorating the particle patches with single-stranded DNA linkers. The complementarity of the linkers can promote selective bond formation between predetermined pairs of patches. By using MD simulations, we compare the local connectivity, the bond orientation order, and other structural properties of the aggregates formed by the “colored” and “colorless” systems. The analysis is done for spherical particles with two different patch arrangements (tetrahedral andmore » cubic). It is found that the aggregated (liquid) phase of the “colorless” patchy particles is better connected, denser and typically has stronger local order than the corresponding “colored” one. This, in turn, makes the colored liquid less stable thermodynamically. Specifically, we predict that in a typical case the chromatic interactions should increase the relative stability of the crystalline phase with respect to the disordered liquid, thus expanding its region in the phase diagram.« less

  15. Causal inference and the hierarchical structure of experience

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Samuel G. B.; Keil, Frank C.

    2014-01-01

    Children and adults make rich causal inferences about the physical and social world, even in novel situations where they cannot rely on prior knowledge of causal mechanisms. We propose that this capacity is supported in part by constraints provided by event structure—the cognitive organization of experience into discrete events that are hierarchically organized. These event-structured causal inferences are guided by a level-matching principle, with events conceptualized at one level of an event hierarchy causally matched to other events at that same level, and a boundary-blocking principle, with events causally matched to other events that are parts of the same superordinate event. These principles are used to constrain inferences about plausible causal candidates in unfamiliar situations, both in diagnosing causes (Experiment 1) and predicting effects (Experiment 2). The results could not be explained by construal level (Experiment 3) or similarity-matching (Experiment 4), and were robust across a variety of physical and social causal systems. Taken together, these experiments demonstrate a novel way in which non-causal information we extract from the environment can help to constrain inferences about causal structure. PMID:25347533

  16. Habitat structure, trophic structure and ecosystem function: interactive effects in a bromeliad-insect community.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Diane S

    2006-09-01

    Although previous studies have shown that ecosystem functions are affected by either trophic structure or habitat structure, there has been little consideration of their combined effects. Such interactions may be particularly important in systems where habitat and trophic structure covary. I use the aquatic insects in bromeliads to examine the combined effects of trophic structure and habitat structure on a key ecosystem function: detrital processing. In Costa Rican bromeliads, trophic structure naturally covaries with both habitat complexity and habitat size, precluding any observational analysis of interactions between factors. I therefore designed mesocosms that allowed each factor to be manipulated separately. Increases in mesocosm complexity reduced predator (damselfly larva) efficiency, resulting in high detritivore abundances, indirectly increasing detrital processing rates. However, increased complexity also directly reduced the per capita foraging efficiency of the detritivores. Over short time periods, these trends effectively cancelled each other out in terms of detrital processing. Over longer time periods, more complex patterns emerged. Increases in mesocosm size also reduced both predator efficiency and detritivore efficiency, leading to no net effect on detrital processing. In many systems, ecosystem functions may be impacted by strong interactions between trophic structure and habitat structure, cautioning against examining either effect in isolation.

  17. In-Cell Protein Structures from 2D NMR Experiments.

    PubMed

    Müntener, Thomas; Häussinger, Daniel; Selenko, Philipp; Theillet, Francois-Xavier

    2016-07-21

    In-cell NMR spectroscopy provides atomic resolution insights into the structural properties of proteins in cells, but it is rarely used to solve entire protein structures de novo. Here, we introduce a paramagnetic lanthanide-tag to simultaneously measure protein pseudocontact shifts (PCSs) and residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) to be used as input for structure calculation routines within the Rosetta program. We employ this approach to determine the structure of the protein G B1 domain (GB1) in intact Xenopus laevis oocytes from a single set of 2D in-cell NMR experiments. Specifically, we derive well-defined GB1 ensembles from low concentration in-cell NMR samples (∼50 μM) measured at moderate magnetic field strengths (600 MHz), thus offering an easily accessible alternative for determining intracellular protein structures. PMID:27379949

  18. Simulation of the photogrammetric appendage structural dynamics experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard S.; Gilbert, Michael G.; Welch, Sharon S.

    1995-01-01

    The Photogrammetric Appendage Structural Dynamics Experiment (PASDE) uses six video cameras in the Space Shuttle cargo bay to measure vibration of the Russian Mir space station Kvant-ll solar array. It occurs on Shuttle/Mir docking mission STS-74 scheduled for launch in November 1995. The objective of PASDE is to demonstrate photogrammetric technology for measuring 'untargeted' spacecraft appendage structural dynamics. This paper discusses a pre-flight simulation test conducted in July 1995, focusing on the image processing aspects. The flight camera system recorded vibrations of a full-scale structural test article having grids of white lines on black background, similar in appearance to the Mir solar array. Using image correlation analysis, line intersections on the structure are tracked in the video recordings to resolutions of less than 0.1 pixel. Calibration and merging of multiple camera views generated 3-dimensional displacements from which structural modal parameters are then obtained.

  19. Structures and Interaction Analyses of Integrin αMβ2 Cytoplasmic Tails*

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Geok-Lin; Tang, Xiao-Yan; Amalraj, Monalisa; Tan, Suet-Mien; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2011-01-01

    Integrins are heterodimeric (α and β subunits) signal transducer proteins involved in cell adhesions and migrations. The cytosolic tails of integrins are essential for transmitting bidirectional signaling and also implicated in maintaining the resting states of the receptors. In addition, cytosolic tails of integrins often undergo post-translation modifications like phosphorylation. However, the consequences of phosphorylation on the structures and interactions are not clear. The leukocyte-specific integrin αMβ2 is essential for myeloid cell adhesion, phagocytosis, and degranulation. In this work, we determined solution structures of the myristoylated cytosolic tail of αM and a Ser phosphorylated variant in dodecylphosphocholine micelles by NMR spectroscopy. Furthermore, the interactions between non-phosphorylated and phosphorylated αM tails with β2 tail were investigated by NMR and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The three-dimensional structures of the 24-residue cytosolic tail of αM or phosphorylated αM are characterized by an N-terminal amphipathic helix and a loop at the C terminus. The residues at the loop are involved in packing interactions with the hydrophobic face of the helix. 15N-1H heteronuclear single quantum coherence experiments identified residues of αM and β2 tails that may be involved in the formation of a tail-tail heterocomplex. We further examined interactions between myristoylated β2 tail in dodecylphosphocholine micelles with dansylated αM tail peptides by FRET. These studies revealed enhanced interactions between αM or phosphorylated αM tails with β2 tail with Kd values ∼5.2 ± 0.6 and ∼4.4 ± 0.7 μm, respectively. Docked structures of tail-tail complexes delineated that the αM/β2 interface at the cytosolic region could be sustained by a network of polar interactions, ionic interactions, and/or hydrogen bonds. PMID:22052909

  20. Stability and Interaction of Coherent Structure in Supersonic Reactive Wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Suresh

    1983-01-01

    A theoretical formulation and analysis is presented for a study of the stability and interaction of coherent structure in reacting free shear layers. The physical problem under investigation is a premixed hydrogen-oxygen reacting shear layer in the wake of a thin flat plate. The coherent structure is modeled as a periodic disturbance and its stability is determined by the application of linearized hydrodynamic stability theory which results in a generalized eigenvalue problem for reactive flows. Detailed stability analysis of the reactive wake for neutral, symmetrical and antisymmetrical disturbance is presented. Reactive stability criteria is shown to be quite different from classical non-reactive stability. The interaction between the mean flow, coherent structure and fine-scale turbulence is theoretically formulated using the von-Kaman integral technique. Both time-averaging and conditional phase averaging are necessary to separate the three types of motion. The resulting integro-differential equations can then be solved subject to initial conditions with appropriate shape functions. In the laminar flow transition region of interest, the spatial interaction between the mean motion and coherent structure is calculated for both non-reactive and reactive conditions and compared with experimental data wherever available. The fine-scale turbulent motion determined by the application of integral analysis to the fluctuation equations. Since at present this turbulence model is still untested, turbulence is modeled in the interaction problem by a simple algebraic eddy viscosity model. The applicability of the integral turbulence model formulated here is studied parametrically by integrating these equations for the simple case of self-similar mean motion with assumed shape functions. The effect of the motion of the coherent structure is studied and very good agreement is obtained with previous experimental and theoretical works for non-reactive flow. For the reactive case

  1. Control-structure interaction in precision pointing servo loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanos, John T.

    1989-01-01

    The control-structure interaction problem is addressed via stability analysis of a generic linear servo loop model. With the plant described by the rigid body mode and a single elastic mode, structural flexibility is categorized into one of three types: (1) appendage, (2) in-the-loop minimum phase, and (3) in-the-loop nonminimum phase. Closing the loop with proportional-derivative (PD) control action and introducing sensor roll-off dynamics in the feedback path, stability conditions are obtained. Trade studies are conducted with modal frequency, modal participation, modal damping, loop bandwidth, and sensor bandwidth treated as free parameters. Results indicate that appendage modes are most likely to produce instability if they are near the sensor rolloff, whereas in-the-loop modes are most dangerous near the loop bandwidth. The main goal of this paper is to provide a fundamental understanding of the control-structure interaction problem so that it may benefit the design of complex spacecraft and pointing system servo loops. In this framework, the JPL Pathfinder gimbal pointer is considered as an example.

  2. Understanding metallic bonding: Structure, process and interaction by Rasch analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Maurice M. W.; Oon, Pey-Tee

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey of 3006 Year 10-12 students on their understandings of metallic bonding. The instrument was developed based on Chi's ontological categories of scientific concepts and students' understanding of metallic bonding as reported in the literature. The instrument has two parts. Part one probed into students' understanding of metallic bonding as (a) a submicro structure of metals, (b) a process in which individual metal atoms lose their outermost shell electrons to form a 'sea of electrons' and octet metal cations or (c) an all-directional electrostatic force between delocalized electrons and metal cations, that is, an interaction. Part two assessed students' explanation of malleability of metals, for example (a) as a submicro structural rearrangement of metal atoms/cations or (b) based on all-directional electrostatic force. The instrument was validated by the Rasch Model. Psychometric assessment showed that the instrument possessed reasonably good properties of measurement. Results revealed that it was reliable and valid for measuring students' understanding of metallic bonding. Analysis revealed that the structure, process and interaction understandings were unidimensional and in an increasing order of difficulty. Implications for the teaching of metallic bonding, particular through the use of diagrams, critiques and model-based learning, are discussed.

  3. The boundary structure in the analysis of reversibly interacting systems by sedimentation velocity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huaying; Balbo, Andrea; Brown, Patrick H; Schuck, Peter

    2011-05-01

    Sedimentation velocity (SV) experiments of heterogeneous interacting systems exhibit characteristic boundary structures that can usually be very easily recognized and quantified. For slowly interacting systems, the boundaries represent concentrations of macromolecular species sedimenting at different rates, and they can be interpreted directly with population models based solely on the mass action law. For fast reactions, migration and chemical reactions are coupled, and different, but equally easily discernable boundary structures appear. However, these features have not been commonly utilized for data analysis, for the lack of an intuitive and computationally simple model. The recently introduced effective particle theory (EPT) provides a suitable framework. Here, we review the motivation and theoretical basis of EPT, and explore practical aspects for its application. We introduce an EPT-based design tool for SV experiments of heterogeneous interactions in the software SEDPHAT. As a practical tool for the first step of data analysis, we describe how the boundary resolution of the sedimentation coefficient distribution c(s) can be further improved with a Bayesian adjustment of maximum entropy regularization to the case of heterogeneous interactions between molecules that have been previously studied separately. This can facilitate extracting the characteristic boundary features by integration of c(s). In a second step, these are assembled into isotherms as a function of total loading concentrations and fitted with EPT. Methods for addressing concentration errors in isotherms are discussed. Finally, in an experimental model system of alpha-chymotrypsin interacting with soybean trypsin inhibitor, we show that EPT provides an excellent description of the experimental sedimentation boundary structure of fast interacting systems. PMID:21315155

  4. Search for Non-standard Interactions with the MINOS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Isvan, Zeynep

    2011-10-01

    MINOS searches for neutrino oscillations using the disappearance of muon neutrinos between two detectors, over a baseline of 735 km. We recently reported the most precise measurement of neutrino oscillations in the atmospheric sector and the first tagged measurement of antineutrino oscillations. The neutrino mass splitting and mixing angle are measured to be |{Delta}m{sup 2}| = 2.32{sub -0.08}{sup +0.12} x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta} > 0.90 (90% C.L.) for an exposure of 7.25 x 10{sup 20} protons-on-target (PoT). Antineutrino oscillation parameters are measured as {Delta}{bar m}{sup 2} = (3.36{sub -0.40}{sup +0.46}(stat.) {+-} 0.06(syst.)) x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} and sin{sup 2}(2{bar {theta}}) = 0.86{sub -0.12}{sup +0.11}(stat.) {+-} 0.01(syst.) with an exposure of 1.7 x 10{sup 20} PoT in NuMI antineutrino running mode. We use the apparent difference in neutrino and antineutrino oscillation parameters to constrain non-standard matter interactions which could occur during propagation through the Earth's crust to the Far Detector.

  5. Wave-current interaction, experiments with controlled uniform shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Bruno; Touboul, Julien; Rey, Vincent

    2016-04-01

    Vertically varying currents have a non negligible impact on the propagation of waves. Even though the analytical aspect of the interaction between wave and sheared current is being an active subject of research, experimental data remain rare. Here, the effects of a uniformly shear were investigated in the 10 m long by 0.3 m wide wave flume of the Université de Toulon, France. The main difficulty of the study was to produce several conditions of current with constant shear (du/dz = cst) that would persist along the channel. This was achieved by using curved wire screens upstream the channel (Dunn and Tavoularis, 2007). The geometry and properties of the screens were adjusted to deflect the streamline towards the channel bed or the free surface in order to change the velocity profile. The study focused on regular wave propagating against the current for several wave frequencies and amplitudes. Properties of the free surface and flow velocity are discussed for current with positive and negative shear in order to quantify the influence of the current on the waves. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The DGA (Direction Générale de l'Armement, France) is acknowledged for its financial support through the ANR grant N° ANR-13-ASTR-0007.

  6. Epoxide Chemistry: Guided Inquiry Experiment Emphasizing Structure Determination and Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurty, H. G.; Jain, Niveta; Samby, Kiran

    2000-04-01

    This paper presents an operationally simple three-step synthesis of an a-hydroxy acid based on epoxide chemistry. The focus of the experiment is on the preparation of the chalcone epoxide and its reaction with hot alcoholic alkali. The experiment leads to an unpredicted reaction product. Its structure is established as 2-benzyl-2-phenylglycollic acid by chemical and spectroscopic analysis. The hydroxyacid is a good example to bring home an important NMR principle: the nonequivalence of hydrogens adjacent to a stereogenic center. The formation of the alpha-hydroxy acid is a mechanistic puzzle. A stepwise mechanism can be developed applying lecture-based organic chemistry concepts. On the other hand, acid-catalyzed (H2SO4, BF3) reaction of the chalcone epoxide gives benzoylphenylacetaldehyde. The exercise can be used as a multistep organic chemistry experiment. It also gives students a research-type experience.

  7. The Dynamic Reactance Interaction – How Vested Interests Affect People’s Experience, Behavior, and Cognition in Social Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Steindl, Christina; Jonas, Eva

    2015-01-01

    In social interactions, individuals may sometimes pursue their own interests at the expense of their interaction partner. Such self-interested behaviors impose a threat to the interaction partner’s freedom to act. The current article investigates this threat in the context of interdependence and reactance theory. We explore how vested interests influence reactance process stages of an advisor–client interaction. We aim to explore the interactional process that evolves. In two studies, participants took the perspective of a doctor (advisor) or a patient (client). In both studies we incorporated a vested interest. In Study 1 (N = 82) we found that in response to a vested interest of their interaction partner, patients indicated a stronger experience of reactance, more aggressive behavioral intentions, and more biased cognitions than doctors. A serial multiple mediation revealed that a vested interest engendered mistrust toward the interaction partner and this mistrust led to an emerging reactance process. Study 2 (N = 207) further demonstrated that doctors expressed their reactance in a subtle way: they revealed a classic confirmation bias when searching for additional information on their preliminary decision preference, indicating stronger defense motivation. We discuss how these findings can help us to understand how social interactions develop dynamically. PMID:26640444

  8. Simulation and modeling techniques for parachute fluid-structure interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Keith Robert

    This thesis is on advanced flow simulation and modeling techniques for fluid-structure interactions (FSI) encountered in parachute systems. The main fluid dynamics solver is based on the Deforming-Spatial-Domain/Stabilized Space-Time (DSD/SST) finite element formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations of incompressible flows. The DSD/SST formulation, which was introduced earlier for flow computations involving moving boundaries and interfaces, gives us the capability to handle parachute structural deformations. The structural dynamics solver is based on a total Lagrangian finite element formulation of the equilibrium equations for a "tension structure" composed of membranes, cables, and concentrated masses. The fluid and structure are coupled iteratively within a nonlinear iteration loop, with multiple nonlinear iterations improving the convergence of the coupled system. Unstructured mesh generation and mesh moving techniques for handling of parachute deformations are developed and/or adapted to address the challenges posed by the coupled problem. The FSI methodology was originally implemented on the Thinking Machines CM-5 supercomputer and is now actively used on the CRAY T3E-1200. Applications to a variety of round and cross parachutes used by the US Army are presented, and different stages of the parachute operations, including inflation and terminal descent, are modeled.

  9. Structural Interaction and Functional Regulation of Polycystin-2 by Filamin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Dai, Xiao-Qing; Li, Qiang; Wang, Zuocheng; Cantero, María del Rocío; Li, Shu; Shen, Ji; Tu, Jian-Cheng; Cantiello, Horacio; Chen, Xing-Zhen

    2012-01-01

    Filamins are important actin cross-linking proteins implicated in scaffolding, membrane stabilization and signal transduction, through interaction with ion channels, receptors and signaling proteins. Here we report the physical and functional interaction between filamins and polycystin-2, a TRP-type cation channel mutated in 10–15% patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Yeast two-hybrid and GST pull-down experiments demonstrated that the C-termini of filamin isoforms A, B and C directly bind to both the intracellular N- and C-termini of polycystin-2. Reciprocal co-immunoprecipitation experiments showed that endogenous polycystin-2 and filamins are in the same complexes in renal epithelial cells and human melanoma A7 cells. We then examined the effect of filamin on polycystin-2 channel function by electrophysiology studies with a lipid bilayer reconstitution system and found that filamin-A substantially inhibits polycystin-2 channel activity. Our study indicates that filamins are important regulators of polycystin-2 channel function, and further links actin cytoskeletal dynamics to the regulation of this channel protein. PMID:22802962

  10. Turbulence structures associated with fire-atmosphere interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, C. B.; Seto, D.; Heilman, W. E.

    2013-12-01

    Wildland fires radically modify the atmospheric boundary layer by emitting large sensible and latent heat fluxes. These fluxes drive fire-atmosphere interactions at multiple scales resulting in fire-induced circulations in and around the fire front. During the fire front passage, FFP, turbulence kinetic energy increases due to increased heating and wind shear that develops in response to both free convection and fire-induced winds. New field observations from multiple fire experiments have shown that turbulence spectral energy increases during the FFP as a result of small eddies being shed from the fire front and that that normalized velocity spectra using the friction velocity collapse into a narrow band in the inertial subrange, suggesting that Monin-Obukhov scaling is a valid scaling parameter that can be used for wildfire prediction systems. Additionally, during FFP the mean profiles of winds and sensible heat flux change compared to ambient conditions due to the fire-atmosphere interactions. These profiles are also different during different environmental conditions such as grass fires in open field and fires within a forest canopy. This presentation will discuss new turbulence observations from the FireFlux II field experiment conducted in 2013 which indicate that during FFP there are also an increases in horizontal mean winds, friction velocity, horizontal and vertical velocity variances and a decrease in anisotropy in turbulence kinetic energy and are similar to lower intensity fires.

  11. Flow interaction experiment. Volume 1: Aerothermal modeling, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikjooy, M.; Mongia, H. C.; Sullivan, J. P.; Murthy, S. N. B.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental and computational study is reported for the flow of a turbulent jet discharging into a rectangular enclosure. The experimental configurations consisting of primary jets only, annular jets only, and a combination of annular and primary jets are investigated to provide a better understanding of the flow field in an annular combustor. A laser Doppler velocimeter is used to measure mean velocity and Reynolds stress components. Major features of the flow field include recirculation, primary and annular jet interaction, and high turbulence. A significant result from this study is the effect the primary jets have on the flow field. The primary jets are seen to create statistically larger recirculation zones and higher turbulence levels. In addition, a technique called marker nephelometry is used to provide mean concentration values in the model combustor. Computations are performed using three levels of turbulence closures, namely k-epsilon model, algebraic second moment (ASM), and differential second moment (DSM) closure. Two different numerical schemes are applied. One is the lower-order power-law differencing scheme (PLDS) and the other is the higher-order flux-spline differencing scheme (FSDS). A comparison is made of the performance of these schemes. The numerical results are compared with experimental data. For the cases considered in this study, the FSDS is more accurate than the PLDS. For a prescribed accuracy, the flux-spline scheme requires a far fewer number of grid points. Thus, it has the potential for providing a numerical error-free solution, especially for three-dimensional flows, without requiring an excessively fine grid. Although qualitatively good comparison with data was obtained, the deficiencies regarding the modeled dissipation rate (epsilon) equation, pressure-strain correlation model, and the inlet epsilon profile and other critical closure issues need to be resolved before one can achieve the degree of accuracy required to

  12. Flow interaction experiment. Volume 2: Aerothermal modeling, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikjooy, M.; Mongia, H. C.; Sullivan, J. P.; Murthy, S. N. B.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental and computational study is reported for the flow of a turbulent jet discharging into a rectangular enclosure. The experimental configurations consisting of primary jets only, annular jets only, and a combination of annular and primary jets are investigated to provide a better understanding of the flow field in an annular combustor. A laser Doppler velocimeter is used to measure mean velocity and Reynolds stress components. Major features of the flow field include recirculation, primary and annular jet interaction, and high turbulence. A significant result from this study is the effect the primary jets have on the flow field. The primary jets are seen to create statistically larger recirculation zones and higher turbulence levels. In addition, a technique called marker nephelometry is used to provide mean concentration values in the model combustor. Computations are performed using three levels of turbulence closures, namely k-epsilon model, algebraic second moment (ASM), and differential second moment (DSM) closure. Two different numerical schemes are applied. One is the lower-order power-law differencing scheme (PLDS) and the other is the higher-order flux-spline differencing scheme (FSDS). A comparison is made of the performance of these schemes. The numerical results are compared with experimental data. For the cases considered in this study, the FSDS is more accurate than the PLDS. For a prescribed accuracy, the flux-spline scheme requires a far fewer number of grid points. Thus, it has the potential for providing a numerical error-free solution, especially for three-dimensional flows, without requiring an excessively fine grid. Although qualitatively good comparison with data was obtained, the deficiencies regarding the modeled dissipation rate (epsilon) equation, pressure-strain correlation model, and the inlet epsilon profile and other critical closure issues need to be resolved before one can achieve the degree of accuracy required to

  13. Human antibody-Fc receptor interactions illuminated by crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Woof, Jenny M; Burton, Dennis R

    2004-02-01

    Immunoglobulins couple the recognition of invading pathogens with the triggering of potent effector mechanisms for pathogen elimination. Different immunoglobulin classes trigger different effector mechanisms through interaction of immunoglobulin Fc regions with specific Fc receptors (FcRs) on immune cells. Here, we review the structural information that is emerging on three human immunoglobulin classes and their FcRs. New insights are provided, including an understanding of the antibody conformational adjustments that are required to bring effector cell and target cell membranes sufficiently close for efficient killing and signal transduction to occur. The results might also open up new possibilities for the design of therapeutic antibodies.

  14. Phases of Strongly Interacting Matter in the Brahms Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staszel, P.

    2007-11-01

    We review results obtained by the BRAHMS experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) for the systems of Au + Au and Cu + Cu colliding at √ {sNN} = 200 GeV and at 62.4 GeV, and p + p colliding at √ {sNN} = 200 GeV. The observed number of charged particles produced per unit of rapidity in the central rapidity region indicates that a high energy density system is produced at the initial stage of the Au + Au reaction. Analysis of anti-particle to particle ratios as a function of rapidity and collision energy reveal that particle populations at the chemical freeze-out stage for heavy-ion reactions at and above SPS energies are controlled by the baryon chemical potential. We present rapidity dependent bar {p}/π - ratios within 0 < y < 3 for Au + Au and Cu + Cu at √ {sNN} = 200 GeV. The ratios are enhanced in nucleus-nucleus collisions as compared to p + p collisions. The particle ratios are discussed in terms of their system size and rapidity dependence. From comparison of RAA for different systems and energies it is found that RAA increases with decreasing collision energy, decreasing system size, and when going towards more peripheral collisions. However, RAA shows only a very weak dependence on rapidity (for 0 < y < 3.2), both for pions and protons.

  15. Chondroitin Sulfate Tetrasaccharides: Synthesis, Three-Dimensional Structure and Interaction with Midkine.

    PubMed

    Solera, Cristina; Macchione, Giuseppe; Maza, Susana; Kayser, M Mar; Corzana, Francisco; de Paz, José L; Nieto, Pedro M

    2016-02-12

    The biological activity of midkine, a cytokine implicated in neuro- and tumourigenesis, is regulated by its binding to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), such as heparin and chondroitin sulfate (CS). To better understand the molecular recognition of GAG sequences by this growth factor, the interactions between synthetic chondroitin sulfate-like tetrasaccharides and midkine were studied by using different techniques. Firstly, a synthetic approach for the preparation of CS-like oligosaccharides in the sequence GalNAc-GlcA was developed. A fluorescence polarisation competition assay was then employed to analyse the relative binding affinities of the synthetic compounds and revealed that midkine interacted with CS-like tetrasaccharides in the micromolar range. The 3D structure of these tetramers was studied in detail by a combination of NMR spectroscopy experiments and molecular dynamics simulations. Saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy experiments indicate that the CS tetrasaccharides bind to midkine in an extended conformation, with similar saturation effects along the entire sugar chain. These results are compatible with docking studies that suggest an interaction of the tetrasaccharide with midkine in a folded structure. Overall, this study provides valuable information on the interaction between midkine and well-defined, chemically synthesised CS oligosaccharides and these data can be useful for the design of more active compounds that modulate the biological function of this protein.

  16. Near minimum-time maneuvers of the advanced space structures technology research experiment (ASTREX) test article: Theory and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vadali, Srinivas R.; Carter, Michael T.

    1994-01-01

    The Phillips Laboratory at the Edwards Air Force Base has developed the Advanced Space Structures Technology Research Experiment (ASTREX) facility to serve as a testbed for demonstrating the applicability of proven theories to the challenges of spacecraft maneuvers and structural control. This report describes the work performed on the ASTREX test article by Texas A&M University under contract NAS119373 as a part of the Control-Structure Interaction (CSI) Guest Investigator Program. The focus of this work is on maneuvering the ASTREX test article with compressed air thrusters that can be throttled, while attenuating structural excitation. The theoretical foundation for designing the near minimum-time thrust commands is based on the generation of smooth, parameterized optimal open-loop control profiles, and the determination of control laws for final position regulation and tracking using Lyapunov stability theory. Details of the theory, mathematical modeling, model updating, and compensation for the presence of 'real world' effects are described and the experimental results are presented. The results show an excellent match between theory and experiments.

  17. Experiment study on RC frame retrofitted by the external structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunyang; Shi, Junji; Hiroshi, Kuramoto; Taguchi, Takashi; Kamiya, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    A new retrofitting method is proposed herein for reinforced concrete (RC) structures through attachment of an external structure. The external structure consists of a fiber concrete encased steel frame, connection slab and transverse beams. The external structure is connected to the existing structure through a connection slab and transverse beams. Pseudostatic experiments were carried out on one unretrofitted specimen and three retrofitted frame specimens. The characteristics, including failure mode, crack pattern, hysteresis loops behavior, relationship of strain and displacement of the concrete slab, are demonstrated. The results show that the load carrying capacity is obviously increased, and the extension length of the slab and the number of columns within the external frame are important influence factors on the working performance of the existing structure. In addition, the displacement difference between the existing structure and the outer structure was caused mainly by three factors: shear deformation of the slab, extraction of transverse beams, and drift of the conjunction part between the slab and the existing frame. Furthermore, the total deformation determined by the first two factors accounted for approximately 80% of the damage, therefore these factors should be carefully considered in engineering practice to enhance the effects of this new retrofitting method.

  18. Dual keel space station control/structures interaction study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, John W.; Lallman, Frederick J.; Cooper, Paul A.

    1987-01-01

    A study was made to determine the influence of truss bay size on the performance of the space station control system. The objective was to determine if any control problems existed during reboost and to assess the level of potential control/structures interaction during operation of the control moment gyros used for vertical stabilization. The models analyzed were detailed finite-element representations of the 5 meter and 9 foot growth versions of the 300 kW dual keel station. Results are presented comparing the performance of the reboost control system for both versions of the space station. Standards for comparison include flexible effects at the attitude control sensor locations and flexible contributions to pointing error at the solar collectors. Bode analysis results are presented for the attitude control system and control, structural, and damping sensitivities are examined.

  19. Discrete Data Transfer Technique for Fluid-Structure Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a general three-dimensional algorithm for data transfer between dissimilar meshes. The algorithm is suitable for applications of fluid-structure interaction and other high-fidelity multidisciplinary analysis and optimization. Because the algorithm is independent of the mesh topology, we can treat structured and unstructured meshes in the same manner. The algorithm is fast and accurate for transfer of scalar or vector fields between dissimilar surface meshes. The algorithm is also applicable for the integration of a scalar field (e.g., coefficients of pressure) on one mesh and injection of the resulting vectors (e.g., force vectors) onto another mesh. The author has implemented the algorithm in a C++ computer code. This paper contains a complete formulation of the algorithm with a few selected results.

  20. Development of a Fluid Structures Interaction Test Technique for Fabrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zilliac, Gregory G.; Heineck, James T.; Schairer, Edward T.; Mosher, Robert N.; Garbeff, Theodore Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Application of fluid structures interaction (FSI) computational techniques to configurations of interest to the entry, descent and landing (EDL) community is limited by two factors - limited characterization of the material properties for fabrics of interest and insufficient experimental data to validate the FSI codes. Recently ILC Dover Inc. performed standard tests to characterize the static stress-strain response of four candidate fabrics for use in EDL applications. The objective of the tests described here is to address the need for a FSI dataset for CFD validation purposes. To reach this objective, the structural response of fabrics was measured in a very simple aerodynamic environment with well controlled boundary conditions. Two test series were undertaken. The first series covered a range of tunnel conditions and the second focused on conditions that resulted in fabric panel buckling.

  1. SUMMARY OF GEOCHEMICAL TRANSPORT EXPERIMENTS AND MODELS FOR SOLUTE-SEDIMENT INTERACTIONS IN STREAMS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bencala, Kenneth E.; Zellweger, Gary W.; McKnight, Diane; Kennedy, Vance C.; Jackman, Alan P.

    1985-01-01

    A variety of in-stream experiments have been conducted in small, mountain streams to investigate in-stream solute transport, interactions between surface and subsurface flows, and geochemical interactions between solutes and sediments. Models for cation transport have been developed. The emphasis has been on attempting to demonstrate the relative roles of physical transport processes and geochemical reactions. A summary of experiments conducted in three streams is presented.

  2. Passively Adaptive Inflatable Structure for the Shooting Star Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinker, Michael L..

    1998-01-01

    An inflatable structural system is described for the Shooting Star Experiment that is a technology demonstrator flight for solar thermal propulsion. The inflatable structure is a pressurized assembly used in orbit to support a fresnel lens for focusing sunlight into a thermal storage engine. When the engine temperature reaches a preset level, the propellant is injected into the storage engine, absorbs heat from a heat exchanger, and is expanded through the nozzle to produce thrust. The inflatable structure is an adaptive system in that a regulator and relief valve are utilized to maintain pressure within design limits during the full range of orbital conditions. Further, the polyimide film material used for construction of the inflatable is highly nonlinear, with modulus varying as a function of frequency, temperature, and level of excitation. A series of tests is described for characterizing the structure in response to various operating conditions.

  3. Structural investigations on a linear isolated depsipeptide: the importance of dispersion interactions.

    PubMed

    Stamm, A; Bernhard, D; Gerhards, M

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we present the first investigations on an isolated linear depsipetide CyCO-Gly-Lac-NH-PhOMe (cyclohexylcarbonyl-glycine-lactate-2-anisidine abbreviated as MOC) in a molecular beam experiment. Depsipeptides are a special subclass of peptides which contain at least one ester bond replacing a peptide bond. This leads to a different folding behavior and a different biological activity compared to a "normal" peptide. In order to analyze the folding of an isolated depsipeptide on a molecular level a variety of combined IR/UV methods including IR/IR/UV experiments are applied to MOC. Three different isomers are identified in combination with DFT calculations using the hybrid functional B3LYP-D3 with a TZVP basis set. The most stable structure shows a tweezer-like arrangement between the aromatic chromophore and the aliphatic cyclohexyl ring. A characteristic feature of this structure is that it is stabilized by dispersion interactions resulting from CH/π interactions. If dispersion is not taken into account this structural arrangement is no longer a minimum on the potential energy surface indicating the importance of dispersion interactions.

  4. Disability Support Workers' Experience of Interaction with a Person with Profound Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forster, Sheridan; Iacono, Teresa

    2008-01-01

    Background: The primary communication partner for many people with profound intellectual disability (PID) who are living in supported accommodation is their disability support worker (DSW). The experiences of DSWs in interacting with people with PID have received limited attention in the literature. Method: The nature of interactions between…

  5. Innovative Interactive Visitor Experiences Focused on Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lettvin, E. E.

    2011-12-01

    Pacific Science Center has adopted a multi-pronged approach to introduce visitors to the concepts of climate change and linkages to human behavior in an informal science education setting. We leverage key fixed exhibit assets derived from collaborations with NOAA: Science on a Sphere and an exhibit kiosk showcasing local CO2 measurements that are adjacent on our exhibit floor. NOAA PMEL Scientists deployed a sensor at the top of the Space Needle that measures variability in atmospheric CO2 over Seattle; the kiosk showcases these near-real-time, daily, weekly and monthly measurements as well as similar observations from a NOAA buoy near Aberdeen, Washington. Displays of these data enable visitors to see first-hand varying CO2 levels in urban and remote marine environments as well as seasonal cycling. It also reveals quantifiable increases in CO2 levels over a relatively short time (~5 years). Trained interpreters help visitors understand linkages between personal behavior and corresponding CO2 footprints. Interpreters discuss connections between local and regional CO2 measurements displayed on the kiosk, and global Sphere datasets including NOAA Carbon Tracker, changing arctic sea ice coverage and sea level rise projections. Portable Discovery Carts, consisting of props and interactive, hands-on activities provide a platform for facilitated interpretation on a series of topics. We have developed two climate focused carts: 'Sinks and Sources' that examines materials and activities that produce and absorb carbon, and 'Ocean Acidification' that shows how absorption of atmospheric CO2 is changing ocean composition and its habitability for marine life. These carts can be deployed anywhere on the exhibit floor but are primarily used adjacent to the Sphere and the kiosk, making it possible to have a range of conversations about global and local CO2 levels, linkages to individual and collective behaviour and associated implications. Additional collaborations with members of

  6. Dynamical spin structure factor of one-dimensional interacting fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyuzin, Vladimir A.; Maslov, Dmitrii L.

    2015-02-01

    We revisit the dynamic spin susceptibility χ (q ,ω ) of one-dimensional interacting fermions. To second order in the interaction, backscattering results in a logarithmic correction to χ (q ,ω ) at q ≪kF , even if the single-particle spectrum is linearized near the Fermi points. Consequently, the dynamic spin structure factor Im χ (q ,ω ) is nonzero at frequencies above the single-particle continuum. In the boson language, this effect results from the marginally irrelevant backscattering operator of the sine-Gordon model. Away from the threshold, the high-frequency tail of Im χ (q ,ω ) due to backscattering is larger than that due to finite mass by a factor of kF/q . We derive the renormalization group equations for the coupling constants of the g -ology model at finite ω and q and find the corresponding expression for χ (q ,ω ) , valid to all orders in the interaction but not in the immediate vicinity of the continuum boundary, where the finite-mass effects become dominant.

  7. Structural Interactions within Lithium Salt Solvates: Cyclic Carbonates and Esters

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, D. M.; Afroz, Taliman; Allen, Joshua L.; Boyle, Paul D.; Trulove, Paul C.; De Long, Hugh C.; Henderson, Wesley A.

    2014-11-13

    Only limited information is available regarding the manner in which cyclic carbonate and ester solvents coordinate Li+ cations in electrolyte solutions for lithium batteries. One approach to gleaning significant insight into these interactions is to examine crystalline solvate structures. To this end, eight new solvate structures are reported with ethylene carbonate, γ-butyrolactone and γ-valerolactone: (EC)3:LiClO4, (EC)2:LiClO4, (EC)2:LiBF4, (GBL)4:LiPF6, (GBL)1:LiClO4, (GVL)1:LiClO4, (GBL)1:LiBF4 and (GBL)1:LiCF3SO3. The crystal structure of (EC)1:LiCF3SO3 is also re-reported for comparison. These structures enable the factors which govern the manner in which the ions are coordinated and the ion/solvent packing—in the solid-state—to be scrutinized in detail.

  8. Structural Interactions within Lithium Salt Solvates. Acyclic Carbonates and Esters

    SciTech Connect

    Afroz, Taliman; Seo, D. M.; Han, Sang D.; Boyle, Paul D.; Henderson, Wesley A.

    2015-03-06

    Solvate crystal structures serve as useful models for the molecular-level interactions within the diverse solvates present in liquid electrolytes. Although acyclic carbonate solvents are widely used for Li-ion battery electrolytes, only three solvate crystal structures with lithium salts are known for these and related solvents. The present work, therefore, reports six lithium salt solvate structures with dimethyl and diethyl carbonate: (DMC)2:LiPF6, (DMC)1:LiCF3SO3, (DMC)1/4:LiBF4, (DEC)2:LiClO4, (DEC)1:LiClO4 and (DEC)1:LiCF3SO3 and four with the structurally related methyl and ethyl acetate: (MA)2:LiClO4, (MA)1:LiBF4, (EA)1:LiClO4 and (EA)1:LiBF4.

  9. Magnetic monopole interactions: shell structure of meson and baryon states

    SciTech Connect

    Akers, D.

    1986-12-01

    It is suggested that a low-mass magnetic monopole of Dirac charge g = (137/2)e may be interacting with a c-quark's magnetic dipole moment to produce Zeeman splitting of meson states. The mass M/sub 0/ = 2397 MeV of the monopole is in contrast to the 10/sup 16/-GeV monopoles of grand unification theories (GUT). It is shown that shell structure of energy E/sub n/ = M/sub 0/ + 1/4nM/sub 0/... exists for meson states. The presence of symmetric meson states leads to the identification of the shell structure. The possible existence of the 2397-MeV magnetic monopole is shown to quantize quark masses in agreement with calculations of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). From the shell structure of meson states, the existence of two new mesons is predicted: eta(1814 +/- 50 MeV) with I/sup G/(J/sup PC/) = 0/sup +/(0/sup - +/) and eta/sub c/ (3907 +/- 100 MeV) with J/sup PC/ = 0/sup - +/. The presence of shell structure for baryon states is shown.

  10. Blast waves and how they interact with structures.

    PubMed

    Cullis, I G

    2001-02-01

    The paper defines and describes blast waves, their interaction with a structure and its subsequent response. Explosions generate blast waves, which need not be due to explosives. A blast wave consists of two parts: a shock wave and a blast wind. The paper explains how shock waves are formed and their basic properties. The physics of blast waves is non-linear and therefore non-intuitive. To understand how an explosion generates a blast wave a numerical modelling computer code, called a hydrocode has to be employed. This is briefly explained and the cAst Eulerian hydrocode is used to illustrate the formation and propagation of the blast wave generated by a 1 kg sphere of TNT explosive detonated 1 m above the ground. The paper concludes with a discussion of the response of a structure to a blast wave and shows that this response is governed by the structures natural frequency of vibration compared to the duration of the blast wave. The basic concepts introduced are illustrated in a second simulation that introduces two structures into the blast field of the TNT charge. PMID:11307674

  11. Dissecting the structural basis of MEIG1 interaction with PACRG

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Walavalkar, Ninad M.; Buchwald, William A.; Teves, Maria E.; Zhang, Ling; Liu, Hong; Bilinovich, Stephanie; Peterson, Darrell L.; Strauss III, Jerome F.; Williams Jr, David C.; Zhang, Zhibing

    2016-01-01

    The product of the meiosis-expressed gene 1 (MEIG1) is found in the cell bodies of spermatocytes and recruited to the manchette, a structure unique to elongating spermatids, by Parkin co-regulated gene (PACRG). This complex is essential for targeting cargo to the manchette during sperm flagellum assembly. Here we show that MEIG1 adopts a unique fold that provides a large surface for interacting with other proteins. We mutated 12 exposed and conserved amino acids and show that four of these mutations (W50A, K57E, F66A, Y68A) dramatically reduce binding to PACRG. These four amino acids form a contiguous hydrophobic patch on one end of the protein. Furthermore, each of these four mutations diminishes the ability of MEIG1 to stabilize PACRG when expressed in bacteria. Together these studies establish the unique structure and key interaction surface of MEIG1 and provide a framework to explore how MEIG1 recruits proteins to build the sperm tail. PMID:26726850

  12. Structural interactions of a voltage sensor toxin with lipid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Mihailescu, Mihaela; Krepkiy, Dmitriy; Milescu, Mirela; Gawrisch, Klaus; Swartz, Kenton J.; White, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Protein toxins from tarantula venom alter the activity of diverse ion channel proteins, including voltage, stretch, and ligand-activated cation channels. Although tarantula toxins have been shown to partition into membranes, and the membrane is thought to play an important role in their activity, the structural interactions between these toxins and lipid membranes are poorly understood. Here, we use solid-state NMR and neutron diffraction to investigate the interactions between a voltage sensor toxin (VSTx1) and lipid membranes, with the goal of localizing the toxin in the membrane and determining its influence on membrane structure. Our results demonstrate that VSTx1 localizes to the headgroup region of lipid membranes and produces a thinning of the bilayer. The toxin orients such that many basic residues are in the aqueous phase, all three Trp residues adopt interfacial positions, and several hydrophobic residues are within the membrane interior. One remarkable feature of this preferred orientation is that the surface of the toxin that mediates binding to voltage sensors is ideally positioned within the lipid bilayer to favor complex formation between the toxin and the voltage sensor. PMID:25453087

  13. Structural interactions of a voltage sensor toxin with lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Mihailescu, Mihaela; Krepkiy, Dmitriy; Milescu, Mirela; Gawrisch, Klaus; Swartz, Kenton J; White, Stephen

    2014-12-16

    Protein toxins from tarantula venom alter the activity of diverse ion channel proteins, including voltage, stretch, and ligand-activated cation channels. Although tarantula toxins have been shown to partition into membranes, and the membrane is thought to play an important role in their activity, the structural interactions between these toxins and lipid membranes are poorly understood. Here, we use solid-state NMR and neutron diffraction to investigate the interactions between a voltage sensor toxin (VSTx1) and lipid membranes, with the goal of localizing the toxin in the membrane and determining its influence on membrane structure. Our results demonstrate that VSTx1 localizes to the headgroup region of lipid membranes and produces a thinning of the bilayer. The toxin orients such that many basic residues are in the aqueous phase, all three Trp residues adopt interfacial positions, and several hydrophobic residues are within the membrane interior. One remarkable feature of this preferred orientation is that the surface of the toxin that mediates binding to voltage sensors is ideally positioned within the lipid bilayer to favor complex formation between the toxin and the voltage sensor. PMID:25453087

  14. Simulating Pediatric Ventricular Assist Device Operation Using Fluid Structure Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Chris; Bazilevs, Yuri; Marsden, Alison

    2012-11-01

    Ventricular Assist Devices (VADs) provide mechanical circulatory support to patients in heart failure. They are primarily used to extend life until cardiac transplant, but also show promise as a ``bridge-to-recovery'' device in pediatric patients. Commercially available pediatric pumps are pulsatile displacement pumps, with two distinct chambers for air and blood separated by a thin, flexible membrane. The air chamber pneumatically drives the membrane, which drives blood through the other chamber via displacement. The primary risk factor associated with these devices is stroke or embolism due to thrombogenesis in the blood chamber, occurring in as many as 40% of patients. Our goal is to perform simulations that accurately model the hemodynamics of the device, as well as the non-linear membrane buckling. We apply a finite-element based fluid solver, with an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) framework to account for mesh motion. Isogeometric Analysis with a Kirchhoff-Love shell formulation is used on the membrane, and two distinct fluid subdomains are used for the air and blood chambers. The Fluid Structure Interaction (FSI) problem is solved simultaneously, using a Matrix Free method to model the interactions at the fluid-structure boundary. Methods and results are presented.

  15. Reduced order modeling of fluid/structure interaction.

    SciTech Connect

    Barone, Matthew Franklin; Kalashnikova, Irina; Segalman, Daniel Joseph; Brake, Matthew Robert

    2009-11-01

    This report describes work performed from October 2007 through September 2009 under the Sandia Laboratory Directed Research and Development project titled 'Reduced Order Modeling of Fluid/Structure Interaction.' This project addresses fundamental aspects of techniques for construction of predictive Reduced Order Models (ROMs). A ROM is defined as a model, derived from a sequence of high-fidelity simulations, that preserves the essential physics and predictive capability of the original simulations but at a much lower computational cost. Techniques are developed for construction of provably stable linear Galerkin projection ROMs for compressible fluid flow, including a method for enforcing boundary conditions that preserves numerical stability. A convergence proof and error estimates are given for this class of ROM, and the method is demonstrated on a series of model problems. A reduced order method, based on the method of quadratic components, for solving the von Karman nonlinear plate equations is developed and tested. This method is applied to the problem of nonlinear limit cycle oscillations encountered when the plate interacts with an adjacent supersonic flow. A stability-preserving method for coupling the linear fluid ROM with the structural dynamics model for the elastic plate is constructed and tested. Methods for constructing efficient ROMs for nonlinear fluid equations are developed and tested on a one-dimensional convection-diffusion-reaction equation. These methods are combined with a symmetrization approach to construct a ROM technique for application to the compressible Navier-Stokes equations.

  16. Structure-Interaction Effects In Novel Nanostructured Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Nam B.

    Recent advances in experimental and computational methods have opened up new directions in graphene fundamental studies. In addition to understanding the basic properties of this material and its quasi-one dimensional structures, significant efforts are devoted to describing their long ranged dispersive interactions. Other two-dimensional materials, such as silicene, germanene, and transition metal dichalcogenides, are also being investigated aiming at finding complementary to graphene systems with other "wonder" properties. The focus of this work is to utilize first principles simulations methods to build our basic knowledge of structure-interaction relations in two-dimensional materials and design their properties. In particular, mechanical folding and extended defects in zigzag and armchair graphene nanoribbons can be used to modulate their electronic and spin polarization characteristics and achieve different stacking patterns. Our simulations concerning zigzag silicene nanoribbons show width-dependent antiferromagnetic-ferromagnetic transitions unlike the case of zigzag graphene nanoribbons, which are always antiferromagnetic. Heterostructures, build by stacking graphene, silicene, and MoS2, are also investigated. It is found that hybridization alters the electronic properties of the individual layers and new flexural and breathing phonon modes display unique behaviors in the heterostructure compositions. Anchored to SiC substrate graphene nanoribbons are also proposed as possible systems to be used in graphene electronics. Our findings are of importance not only for fundamental science, but they could also be used for future experimental developments.

  17. Interaction of a Single Large Wave with a Tall Fixed Structure. Part i: Experimental Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petroff, Catherine; Arnason, Halldor; Yeh, Harry

    2002-11-01

    This work is part of a joint effort to develop experimental and numerical capabilities to better understand the interactions of large waves with solid structures as pertaining to tsunami mitigation. This abstract reports on the laboratory experiments conducted as part of this ongoing investigation. The experiments were performed at the Harris Hydraulics Laboratory at the University of Washington using scale models of square and circular cylindrical structures in a 2-foot wide, 50-foot long rectangular channel. The models represent a row of structures or a single structure in a channel subjected to a broken tsunami wave or bore. Bores were generated using a rapidly lifted gate and various amounts of impounded water. We present the measured water surfaces and impact forces on the structures as well as velocity fields measured through Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV). These data along with high-speed video were used to validate a numerical simulation performed with the Eulerian-Lagrangian Marker and Micro Cell method developed at SMU. The laboratory data presented shows the flow patterns around the scaled structures and how the flow affects the observed force records. Velocity field data makes it possible to predict wake effects and local scour around the structures, which relates directly to their stability during an actual tsunami event and to recommendations for the reduction of tsunami hazards.

  18. Structural chromosomal anomalies detected by prenatal genetic diagnosis: our experience.

    PubMed

    Farcaş, Simona; Crişan, C D; Andreescu, Nicoleta; Stoian, Monica; Motoc, A G M

    2013-01-01

    The prenatal diagnosis is currently widely spread and facilitates the acquiring of important genetic information about the fetus by a rate extremely accelerate and considered without precedent. In this paper, we like to present our experience concerning the genetic diagnosis and counseling offered for pregnancies in which a structural chromosomal aberration was found. The study group is formed by 528 prenatal samples of amniotic fluid and chorionic villi, received by our laboratory from 2006 through October 2012 for cytogenetic diagnosis. The appropriate genetic investigation was selected based on the indications for prenatal diagnosis. The cases with structural chromosomal anomalies and polymorphic variants were analyzed as regard to the maternal age, gestational age, referral indications and type of chromosomal anomaly found. A total number of 21 structural chromosomal anomalies and polymorphic variants were identified in the study group. Out of 21 structural chromosomal anomalies and polymorphic variants, six deletions and microdeletions, four situations with abnormal long "p" arm of acrocentric chromosomes, two duplications, two reciprocal translocations, two inversions, two additions, one Robertsonian translocation associating trisomy 13, one 9q heteromorphism and one complex chromosome rearrangement were noticed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first Romanian study in which the diagnostic strategies and the management of the prenatal cases with structural rearrangements are presented. The data provided about the diagnosis strategy and the management of the prenatal cases with structural chromosomal anomalies represents a useful tool in genetic counseling of pregnancies diagnosed with rare structural chromosomal anomalies. PMID:23771085

  19. Drum-mate: interaction dynamics and gestures in human-humanoid drumming experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kose-Bagci, Hatice; Dautenhahn, Kerstin; Syrdal, Dag S.; Nehaniv, Chrystopher L.

    2010-06-01

    This article investigates the role of interaction kinesics in human-robot interaction (HRI). We adopted a bottom-up, synthetic approach towards interactive competencies in robots using simple, minimal computational models underlying the robot's interaction dynamics. We present two empirical, exploratory studies investigating a drumming experience with a humanoid robot (KASPAR) and a human. In the first experiment, the turn-taking behaviour of the humanoid is deterministic and the non-verbal gestures of the robot accompany its drumming to assess the impact of non-verbal gestures on the interaction. The second experiment studies a computational framework that facilitates emergent turn-taking dynamics, whereby the particular dynamics of turn-taking emerge from the social interaction between the human and the humanoid. The results from the HRI experiments are presented and analysed qualitatively (in terms of the participants' subjective experiences) and quantitatively (concerning the drumming performance of the human-robot pair). The results point out a trade-off between the subjective evaluation of the drumming experience from the perspective of the participants and the objective evaluation of the drumming performance. A certain number of gestures was preferred as a motivational factor in the interaction. The participants preferred the models underlying the robot's turn-taking which enable the robot and human to interact more and provide turn-taking closer to 'natural' human-human conversations, despite differences in objective measures of drumming behaviour. The results are consistent with the temporal behaviour matching hypothesis previously proposed in the literature which concerns the effect that the participants adapt their own interaction dynamics to the robot's.

  20. IRIS Controlled Source Seismic Experiments: Continental Structure, Instrumentation, and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooney, W. D.; Keller, G. R.

    2004-12-01

    The controlled-source seismology program of IRIS/PASSCAL has made major contributions to the study of continental structure and evolution. It has also undergone major developments in seismic instrumentation. The first PASSCAL experiments (1984/85) targeted the Basin and Range Province and the Ouachita orogenic belt. The Basin and Range study provided remarkably clear images of this thin, highly-extended crust, while the Ouachita experiment tested competing hypotheses for the deep structure of this Paleozoic orogen. However, both of these projects were limited by a lack of seismic instruments. The situation improved in the late 1980's with the benefit of a mixed array of 600 seismic recorders from the USGS, Stanford, and the Geological Survey of Canada. The resolution achieved with these instruments was revolutionary. Results include the imaging of such remarkable features as crustal-scale duplexes in the Brooks Range compressional orogen of northern Alaska, and of crustal "core complexes" in the extended crust of southwest Arizona. The 3-channel PASSCAL Jr. instrument was developed, leading to experiments in which ˜1000 instruments were deployed, including three-component recording. This complex mix of instruments served the community well for several years, but required large, complex instrument centers and lots of technical support. With input from PASSCAL and the international community, a newly designed, compact instrument (the Texan) was finalized in the spring of 1998, and the first 200 instruments was delivered to the Univ. of Texas-El Paso in late 1998. The present instrument pool of Texans exceeds 1,400 and these have been used on such projects as the high-resolution imaging of the Los Angeles and San Fernando basins (LARSE I and II experiments), where active thrust faults have been imaged. Controlled-source seismic experiments are now very numerous. During calendar year 2004 alone, portable Texan instruments have traveled from Venezuela to Denmark

  1. The Role of Personal Experience and Social Interaction in Knowledge Creation and Utilisation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handzic, Meliha; Tolhurst, Denise

    This paper reports the results of an empirical examination of the effects of personal experience and social interaction on individual knowledge and performance in a specific decision making task context. The study revealed a differential effect of increased experience on the quality of participants decisions. In particular, increased experience…

  2. Lysozyme Thermal Denaturation and Self-Interaction: Four Integrated Thermodynamic Experiments for the Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwinefus, Jeffrey J.; Schaefle, Nathaniel J.; Muth, Gregory W.; Miessler, Gary L.; Clark, Christopher A.

    2008-01-01

    As part of an effort to infuse our physical chemistry laboratory with biologically relevant, investigative experiments, we detail four integrated thermodynamic experiments that characterize the denaturation (or unfolding) and self-interaction of hen egg white lysozyme as a function of pH and ionic strength. Students first use Protein Explorer to…

  3. Study of turbulence and interacting inertial modes in a differentially rotating spherical shell experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff, Michael; Harlander, Uwe; Triana, Santiago Andrés

    2016-08-01

    We present a study of inertial modes in a differentially rotating spherical shell (spherical Couette flow) experiment with a radius ratio of η =1 /3 . Inertial modes are Coriolis-restored linear wave modes which often arise in rapidly rotating fluids. Recent experimental work has shown that inertial modes exist in a spherical Couette flow for Ωi<Ωo , where Ωi and Ωo are the inner and outer sphere rotation rate. A finite number of particular inertial modes has previously been found. By scanning the Rossby number from -2.5 experiments. We show that the kinetic energy of the dominant inertial mode dramatically increases with decreasing Rossby number, which eventually leads to a wave breaking and an increase of small-scale structures at a critical Rossby number. Such a transition in a spherical Couette flow has not been described before. The critical Rossby number scales with the Ekman number as E1 /5. Additionally, the increase of small-scale features beyond the transition transfers energy to a massively enhanced mean flow around the tangent cylinder. In this context, we discuss an interaction between the dominant inertial modes with a geostrophic Rossby mode exciting secondary modes whose frequencies match the triadic resonance condition.

  4. A Structural Dynamics Approach to the Simulation of Spacecraft Control/Structure Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    A relatively simple approach to the analysis of linear spacecraft control/structure interaction problems is presented. The approach uses a commercially available structural system dynamic analysis package for both controller and plant dynamics, thus obviating the need to transfer data between separate programs. The unilateral coupling between components in the control system block diagram is simulated using sparse matrix stiffness and damping elements available in the structural dynamic code. The approach is illustrated with a series of simple tutorial examples of a rigid spacecraft core with flexible appendages.

  5. Interaction of Lamb mode (A(o)) with structural discontinuity and generation of "Turning modes" in a T-joint.

    PubMed

    Ramadas, C; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan; Joshi, M; Krishnamurthy, C V

    2011-07-01

    In the present work, the interaction of the fundamental anti-symmetric guided Lamb mode (A(o)) with a structural discontinuity in a composite structure was studied through Finite Element numerical simulations and experiments. The structural component selected for this study was a T-joint section made from glass/epoxy material. This co-cured composite structure is made-up of an upper shell (skin) and a spar as the sub-components. It was observed that when A(o) mode interacts with the junction (structural discontinuity) of these sub-components, a mode-converted S(o) mode is generated. Experiments were conducted using air-coupled ultrasound to validate the numerical simulations. The back-propagating "Turning modes", which propagate from the thin region to the spar web and vice versa, were also numerically simulated and experimentally verified.

  6. DISCOS- DYNAMIC INTERACTION SIMULATION OF CONTROLS AND STRUCTURES (IBM VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, H. P.

    1994-01-01

    The Dynamic Interaction Simulation of Controls and Structure (DISCOS) program was developed for the dynamic simulation and stability analysis of passive and actively controlled spacecraft. In the use of DISCOS, the physical system undergoing analysis may be generally described as a cluster of contiguous flexible structures (bodies) that comprise a mechanical system, such as a spacecraft. The entire system (spacecraft) or portions thereof may be either spinning or nonspinning. Member bodies of the system may undergo large relative excursions, such as those of appendage deployment or rotor/ stator motion. The general system of bodies is, by its inherent nature, a feedback system in which inertial forces (such as those due to centrifugal and Coriolis acceleration) and the restoring and damping forces are motion-dependent. The system may possess a control system in which certain position and rate errors are actively controlled through the use of reaction control jets, servomotors, or momentum wheels. Bodies of the system may be interconnected by linear or nonlinear springs and dampers, by a gimbal and slider block mechanism, or by any combination of these. The DISCOS program can be used to obtain nonlinear and linearized time response of the system, interaction constant forces in the system, total system resonance properties, and frequency domain response and stability information for the system. DISCOS is probably the most powerful computational tool to date for the computer simulation of actively controlled coupled multi-flexible-body systems. The program is not easy to understand and effectively apply, but is not intended for simple problems. The DISCOS user is expected to have extensive working knowledge of rigid-body and flexible-body dynamics, finite-element techniques, numerical methods, and frequency-domain analysis. Various applications of DISCOS include simulation of the Shuttle payload deployment/retrieval mechanism, solar panel array deployment, antenna

  7. Sequence and Structure Dependent DNA-DNA Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopchick, Benjamin; Qiu, Xiangyun

    Molecular forces between dsDNA strands are largely dominated by electrostatics and have been extensively studied. Quantitative knowledge has been accumulated on how DNA-DNA interactions are modulated by varied biological constituents such as ions, cationic ligands, and proteins. Despite its central role in biology, the sequence of DNA has not received substantial attention and ``random'' DNA sequences are typically used in biophysical studies. However, ~50% of human genome is composed of non-random-sequence DNAs, particularly repetitive sequences. Furthermore, covalent modifications of DNA such as methylation play key roles in gene functions. Such DNAs with specific sequences or modifications often take on structures other than the canonical B-form. Here we present series of quantitative measurements of the DNA-DNA forces with the osmotic stress method on different DNA sequences, from short repeats to the most frequent sequences in genome, and to modifications such as bromination and methylation. We observe peculiar behaviors that appear to be strongly correlated with the incurred structural changes. We speculate the causalities in terms of the differences in hydration shell and DNA surface structures.

  8. Structure and interactions in isotropic and liquid crystalline neurofilament networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Jayna Bea

    2007-12-01

    Neurofilaments (NFs) are cytoskeletal proteins that are localized within nerve cells, which form long oriented bundles running the length of axons. While abnormal aggregations of these proteins have been implicated in several neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease and ALS, interfilament interactions in both the normal and diseased states are not well understood. In vivo, NFs are supramolecular structures composed of three subunit proteins of low (NF-L), medium (NF-M), and high molecular (NF-H) weight that assemble into a 10 nm diameter rod with radiating sidearms, forming a bottle-brush conformation. In this study we alter the subunit composition and probe the resulting networks with polarized microscopy and synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), in order to isolate the role of each subunit in interfilament interactions. By reassembling NFs in vitro from varying ratios of the subunit proteins, purified from bovine spinal cord, we form filaments with controlled subunit compositions. The resulting filaments, at a high volume fraction, are nematic liquid crystalline gels with a well defined spacing, determined with SAXS. Upon dilution the difference between the subunits is realized with NF-M grafted filaments being dominated by attractive interactions and remaining aligned, while those flanked with NF-H sidearms repel and become isotropic gels. Interplay between these forces is seen in the ternary system composed of all three subunit proteins (NF-LMH). The polyampholytic subunits have a charge distribution that varies along the length of the sidearm, which forms the brush layer, and the distribution is different for each subunit. The interfilament interactions are highly dependent on environmental conditions including salt concentration, pH, and osmotic pressure. Increasing ionic strength induces attractive interactions and a stabilization of the nematic phase in filaments that were repulsive at lower monovalent salt concentration. The

  9. Development of a structured undergraduate research experience: Framework and implications.

    PubMed

    Brown, Anne M; Lewis, Stephanie N; Bevan, David R

    2016-09-10

    Participating in undergraduate research can be a pivotal experience for students in life science disciplines. Development of critical thinking skills, in addition to conveying scientific ideas in oral and written formats, is essential to ensuring that students develop a greater understanding of basic scientific knowledge and the research process. Modernizing the current life sciences research environment to accommodate the growing demand by students for experiential learning is needed. By developing and implementing a structured, theory-based approach to undergraduate research in the life sciences, specifically biochemistry, it has been successfully shown that more students can be provided with a high-quality, high-impact research experience. The structure of this approach allowed students to develop novel, independent projects in a computational molecular modeling lab. Students engaged in an experience in which career goals, problem-solving skills, time management skills, and independence in a research lab were developed. After experiencing this approach to undergraduate research, students reported feeling challenged to think critically and prepared for future career paths. The approach allowed for a progressive learning environment where more undergraduate students could participate in publishable research. Future areas for development include implementation in a bench-top lab and extension to disciplines beyond biochemistry. In this study, it has been shown that utilizing the structured approach to undergraduate research could allow for more students to experience undergraduate research and develop into more confident, independent life scientists well prepared for graduate schools and professional research environments. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(5):463-474, 2016.

  10. Development of a structured undergraduate research experience: Framework and implications.

    PubMed

    Brown, Anne M; Lewis, Stephanie N; Bevan, David R

    2016-09-10

    Participating in undergraduate research can be a pivotal experience for students in life science disciplines. Development of critical thinking skills, in addition to conveying scientific ideas in oral and written formats, is essential to ensuring that students develop a greater understanding of basic scientific knowledge and the research process. Modernizing the current life sciences research environment to accommodate the growing demand by students for experiential learning is needed. By developing and implementing a structured, theory-based approach to undergraduate research in the life sciences, specifically biochemistry, it has been successfully shown that more students can be provided with a high-quality, high-impact research experience. The structure of this approach allowed students to develop novel, independent projects in a computational molecular modeling lab. Students engaged in an experience in which career goals, problem-solving skills, time management skills, and independence in a research lab were developed. After experiencing this approach to undergraduate research, students reported feeling challenged to think critically and prepared for future career paths. The approach allowed for a progressive learning environment where more undergraduate students could participate in publishable research. Future areas for development include implementation in a bench-top lab and extension to disciplines beyond biochemistry. In this study, it has been shown that utilizing the structured approach to undergraduate research could allow for more students to experience undergraduate research and develop into more confident, independent life scientists well prepared for graduate schools and professional research environments. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(5):463-474, 2016. PMID:27124101

  11. Structural Design Feasibility Study for the Global Climate Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lewin,K.F.; Nagy, J.

    2008-12-01

    Neon, Inc. is proposing to establish a Global Change Experiment (GCE) Facility to increase our understanding of how ecological systems differ in their vulnerability to changes in climate and other relevant global change drivers, as well as provide the mechanistic basis for forecasting ecological change in the future. The experimental design was initially envisioned to consist of two complementary components; (A) a multi-factor experiment manipulating CO{sub 2}, temperature and water availability and (B) a water balance experiment. As the design analysis and cost estimates progressed, it became clear that (1) the technical difficulties of obtaining tight temperature control and maintaining elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide levels within an enclosure were greater than had been expected and (2) the envisioned study would not fit into the expected budget envelope if this was done in a partially or completely enclosed structure. After discussions between NEON management, the GCE science team, and Keith Lewin, NEON, Inc. requested Keith Lewin to expand the scope of this design study to include open-field exposure systems. In order to develop the GCE design to the point where it can be presented within a proposal for funding, a feasibility study of climate manipulation structures must be conducted to determine design approaches and rough cost estimates, and to identify advantages and disadvantages of these approaches including the associated experimental artifacts. NEON, Inc requested this design study in order to develop concepts for the climate manipulation structures to support the NEON Global Climate Experiment. This study summarizes the design concepts considered for constructing and operating the GCE Facility and their associated construction, maintenance and operations costs. Comparisons and comments about experimental artifacts, construction challenges and operational uncertainties are provided to assist in selecting the final facility design. The overall goal

  12. Managing uncertainty in collaborative robotics engineering projects: The influence of task structure and peer interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Michelle

    Uncertainty is ubiquitous in life, and learning is an activity particularly likely to be fraught with uncertainty. Previous research suggests that students and teachers struggle in their attempts to manage the psychological experience of uncertainty and that students often fail to experience uncertainty when uncertainty may be warranted. Yet, few educational researchers have explicitly and systematically observed what students do, their behaviors and strategies, as they attempt to manage the uncertainty they experience during academic tasks. In this study I investigated how students in one fifth grade class managed uncertainty they experienced while engaged in collaborative robotics engineering projects, focusing particularly on how uncertainty management was influenced by task structure and students' interactions with their peer collaborators. The study was initiated at the beginning of instruction related to robotics engineering and preceded through the completion of several long-term collaborative robotics projects, one of which was a design project. I relied primarily on naturalistic observation of group sessions, semi-structured interviews, and collection of artifacts. My data analysis was inductive and interpretive, using qualitative discourse analysis techniques and methods of grounded theory. Three theoretical frameworks influenced the conception and design of this study: community of practice, distributed cognition, and complex adaptive systems theory. Uncertainty was a pervasive experience for the students collaborating in this instructional context. Students experienced uncertainty related to the project activity and uncertainty related to the social system as they collaborated to fulfill the requirements of their robotics engineering projects. They managed their uncertainty through a diverse set of tactics for reducing, ignoring, maintaining, and increasing uncertainty. Students experienced uncertainty from more different sources and used more and

  13. Shared understandings: structuring the writing experience through dialogue.

    PubMed

    Englert, C S; Mariage, T V

    1991-01-01

    When teachers view writing as a social process in which authors write for real audiences and authentic purposes, they change their instruction accordingly to meet the needs of writers with learning disabilities. As more experienced members of a larger community of writers, teachers play a primary role in apprenticing students into the inherently social functions of writing. Through teacher-student dialogues about the complexities of the writing process, students gradually develop and control their own writing "voice" as they use and transform the shared understandings of the group process. Text structure, writing strategies, and metacognitive knowledge of the writing process provide opportunities for teachers and students with learning disabilities to interact and create shared understandings about the composition process. This article reviews some recent attempts to use text structures and the writing process as frameworks to guide the composition dialogue.

  14. Intermolecular interactions and 3D structure in cellulose-NaOH-urea aqueous system.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhiwei; Fang, Yan; Xiang, Junfeng; Ma, Yanping; Lu, Ang; Kang, Hongliang; Huang, Yong; Guo, Hongxia; Liu, Ruigang; Zhang, Lina

    2014-08-28

    The dissolution of cellulose in NaOH/urea aqueous solution at low temperature is a key finding in cellulose science and technology. In this paper, (15)N and (23)Na NMR experiments were carried out to clarify the intermolecular interactions in cellulose/NaOH/urea aqueous solution. It was found that there are direct interactions between OH(-) anions and amino groups of urea through hydrogen bonds and no direct interaction between urea and cellulose. Moreover, Na(+) ions can interact with both cellulose and urea in an aqueous system. These interactions lead to the formation of cellulose-NaOH-urea-H2O inclusion complexes (ICs). (23)Na relaxation results confirmed that the formation of urea-OH(-) clusters can effectively enhance the stability of Na(+) ions that attracted to cellulose chains. Low temperature can enhance the hydrogen bonding interaction between OH(-) ions and urea and improve the binding ability of the NaOH/urea/H2O clusters that attached to cellulose chains. Cryo-TEM observation confirmed the formation of cellulose-NaOH-urea-H2O ICs, which is in extended conformation with mean diameter of about 3.6 nm and mean length of about 300 nm. Possible 3D structure of the ICs was proposed by the M06-2X/6-31+G(d) theoretical calculation, revealing the O3H···O5 intramolecular hydrogen bonds could remain in the ICs. This work clarified the interactions in cellulose/NaOH/urea aqueous solution and the 3D structure of the cellulose chain in dilute cellulose/NaOH/urea aqueous solution.

  15. Land management practices interactively affect wetland beetle ecological and phylogenetic community structure.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Sandor L; Song, Hojun; Jenkins, David G

    2015-06-01

    Management practices can disturb ecological communities in grazing lands, which represent one-quarter of land surface. But three knowledge gaps exist regarding disturbances: disturbances potentially interact but are most often studied singly; experiments with multiple ecosystems as treatment units are rare; and relatively new metrics of phylogenetic community structure have not been widely applied. We addressed all three of these needs with a factorial experiment; 40 seasonal wetlands embedded in a Florida ranch were treated with pasture intensification, cattle exclosure, and prescribed fire. Treatment responses were evaluated through four years for aquatic beetle (Coleoptera: Adephaga) assemblages using classic ecological metrics (species richness, diversity) and phylogenetic community structure (PCS) metrics. Adephagan assemblages consisted of 23 genera representing three families in a well-resolved phylogeny. Prescribed fire significantly reduced diversity one year post-fire, followed by a delayed pasture X fire interaction. Cattle exclosure significantly reduced one PCS metric after one year and a delayed pasture x fence x fire interaction was detected with another PCs metric. Overall, effects of long-term pasture intensification were modified by cattle exclosure and prescribed fire. Also, PCS metrics revealed effects otherwise undetected by classic ecological metrics. Management strategies (e.g., "flash grazing," prescribed fires) in seasonal wetlands may successfully balance economic gains from high forage quality with ecological benefits of high wetland diversity in otherwise simplified grazing lands. Effects are likely taxon specific; multiple taxa should be similarly evaluated.

  16. Unraveling microalgal molecular interactions using evolutionary and structural bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Vlachakis, Dimitrios; Pavlopoulou, Athanasia; Kazazi, Dorothea; Kossida, Sophia

    2013-10-10

    Microalgae are unicellular microorganisms indispensible for environmental stability and life on earth, because they produce approximately half of the atmospheric oxygen, with simultaneously feeding on the harmful greenhouse gas carbon dioxide. Using gene fusion analysis, a series of five fusion/fission events was identified, that provided the basis for critical insights to their evolutionary history. Moreover, the three-dimensional structures of both the fused and the component proteins were predicted, allowing us to envisage putative protein-protein interactions that are invaluable for the efficient usage, handling and exploitation of microalgae. Collectively, our proposed approach on the five fusion/fission alga protein events contributes towards the expansion of the microalgae knowledgebase, bridging protein evolution of the ancient microalgal species and the rapidly evolving, modern, bioinformatics field.

  17. Species interactions and the structure of complex communication networks.

    PubMed

    Tobias, Joseph A; Planqué, Robert; Cram, Dominic L; Seddon, Nathalie

    2014-01-21

    A universal challenge faced by animal species is the need to communicate effectively against a backdrop of heterospecific signals. It is often assumed that this need results in signal divergence to minimize interference among community members, yet previous support for this idea is mixed, and few studies have tested the opposing hypothesis that interactions among competing species promote widespread convergence in signaling regimes. Using a null model approach to analyze acoustic signaling in 307 species of Amazonian birds, we show that closely related lineages signal together in time and space and that acoustic signals given in temporal or spatial proximity are more similar in design than expected by chance. These results challenge the view that multispecies choruses are structured by temporal, spatial, or acoustic partitioning and instead suggest that social communication between competing species can fundamentally organize signaling assemblages, leading to the opposite pattern of clustering in signals and signaling behavior.

  18. Fluid Structure Interaction of Parachutes in Supersonic Planetary Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sengupta, Anita

    2011-01-01

    A research program to provide physical insight into disk-gap-band parachute operation in the supersonic regime on Mars was conducted. The program included supersonic wind tunnel tests, computational fluid dynamics and fluid structure interaction simulations. Specifically, the nature and cause of the "area oscillation" phenomenon were investigated to determine the scale, aerodynamic, and aero-elastic dependence of the supersonic parachute collapse and re-inflation event. A variety of non-intrusive, temporally resolved, and high resolution diagnostic techniques were used to interrogate the flow and generate validation datasets. The results of flow visualization, particle image velocimetry, load measurements, and photogrammetric reconstruction will be presented. Implications to parachute design, use, and verification will also be discussed.

  19. Glycyl radical activating enzymes: structure, mechanism, and substrate interactions.

    PubMed

    Shisler, Krista A; Broderick, Joan B

    2014-03-15

    The glycyl radical enzyme activating enzymes (GRE-AEs) are a group of enzymes that belong to the radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) superfamily and utilize a [4Fe-4S] cluster and SAM to catalyze H-atom abstraction from their substrate proteins. GRE-AEs activate homodimeric proteins known as glycyl radical enzymes (GREs) through the production of a glycyl radical. After activation, these GREs catalyze diverse reactions through the production of their own substrate radicals. The GRE-AE pyruvate formate lyase activating enzyme (PFL-AE) is extensively characterized and has provided insights into the active site structure of radical SAM enzymes including GRE-AEs, illustrating the nature of the interactions with their corresponding substrate GREs and external electron donors. This review will highlight research on PFL-AE and will also discuss a few GREs and their respective activating enzymes.

  20. Solitary waves on inclined films: Flow structure and binary interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malamataris, N. A.; Vlachogiannis, M.; Bontozoglou, V.

    2002-03-01

    The downstream evolution of disturbances, introduced at the inlet of a liquid film flowing along an inclined plane wall, is studied numerically by solving the full, time-dependent Navier-Stokes equation. Computational results are validated against the predictions of spatial linear stability analysis and against detailed data of the entire evolution process. The structure of the flow field below the waves is analyzed, and the results are used to test assumptions frequently invoked in the theoretical study of film flow by long-wave equations. An interesting prediction is that solitary waves exhibit strongly nonparabolic velocity profiles in front of the main hump, including a slim region of backflow. The computational scheme is subsequently used to study solitary wave interactions. It is predicted that coalescence (the inelastic collision of two humps) is not inevitable but occurs only when the waves differ appreciably in height. Waves of similar size repel monotonically, whereas for intermediate differences in height a strong oscillatory interaction between the two humps is predicted. Encouraging qualitative agreement with the limited experimental information available is noted.

  1. Structural insights into the EB1–APC interaction

    PubMed Central

    Honnappa, Srinivas; John, Corinne M; Kostrewa, Dirk; Winkler, Fritz K; Steinmetz, Michel O

    2005-01-01

    EB1 proteins bind to microtubule ends where they act in concert with other components, including the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor suppressor, to regulate the microtubule filament system. We find that EB1 is a stable dimer with a parallel coiled coil and show that dimerization is essential for the formation of its C-terminal domain (EB1-C). The crystal structure of EB1-C reveals a highly conserved surface patch with a deep hydrophobic cavity at its center. EB1-C binds two copies of an APC-derived C-terminal peptide (C-APCp1) with equal 5 μM affinity. The conserved APC Ile2805–Pro2806 sequence motif serves as an anchor for the interaction of C-APCp1 with the hydrophobic cavity of EB1-C. Phosphorylation of the conserved Cdc2 site Ser2789–Lys2792 in C-APCp1 reduces binding four-fold, indicating that the interaction APC–EB1 is post-translationally regulated in cells. Our findings provide a basis for understanding the dynamic crosstalk of EB1 proteins with their molecular targets in eukaryotic organisms. PMID:15616574

  2. Computational modeling of fluid structural interaction in arterial stenosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bali, Leila; Boukedjane, Mouloud; Bahi, Lakhdar

    2013-12-01

    Atherosclerosis affects the arterial blood vessels causing stenosis because of which the artery hardens resulting in loss of elasticity in the affected region. In this paper, we present: an approach to model the fluid-structure interaction through such an atherosclerosis affected region of the artery, The blood is assumed as an incompressible Newtonian viscous fluid, and the vessel wall was treated as a thick-walled, incompressible and isotropic material with uniform mechanical properties. The numerical simulation has been studied in the context of The Navier-Stokes equations for an interaction with an elastic solid. The study of fluid flow and wall motion was initially carried out separately, Discretized forms of the transformed wall and flow equations, which are coupled through the boundary conditions at their interface, are obtained by control volume method and simultaneously to study the effects of wall deformability, solutions are obtained for both rigid and elastic walls. The results indicate that deformability of the wall causes an increase in the time average of pressure drop, but a decrease in the maximum wall shear stress. Displacement and stress distributions in the wall are presented.

  3. Spin-orbit interaction in relativistic nuclear structure models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebran, J.-P.; Mutschler, A.; Khan, E.; Vretenar, D.

    2016-08-01

    Relativistic self-consistent mean-field (SCMF) models naturally account for the coupling of the nucleon spin to its orbital motion, whereas nonrelativistic SCMF methods necessitate a phenomenological ansatz for the effective spin-orbit potential. Recent experimental studies aim to explore the isospin properties of the effective spin-orbit interaction in nuclei. SCMF models are very useful in the interpretation of the corresponding data; however, standard relativistic mean-field and nonrelativistic Hartree-Fock models use effective spin-orbit potentials with different isovector properties, mainly because exchange contributions are not treated explicitly in the former. The impact of exchange terms on the effective spin-orbit potential in relativistic mean-field models is analyzed, and it is shown that it leads to an isovector structure similar to the one used in standard nonrelativistic Hartree-Fock models. Data on the isospin dependence of spin-orbit splittings in spherical nuclei could be used to constrain the isovector-scalar channel of relativistic mean-field models. The reproduction of the empirical kink in the isotope shifts of even Pb nuclei by relativistic effective interactions points to the occurrence of pseudospin symmetry in the single-neutron spectra in these nuclei.

  4. Diffusion and Subdiffusion of Interacting Particles on Comblike Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bénichou, O.; Illien, P.; Oshanin, G.; Sarracino, A.; Voituriez, R.

    2015-11-01

    We study the dynamics of a tracer particle (TP) on a comb lattice populated by randomly moving hard-core particles in the dense limit. We first consider the case where the TP is constrained to move on the backbone of the comb only. In the limit of high density of the particles, we present exact analytical results for the cumulants of the TP position, showing a subdiffusive behavior ˜t3 /4. At longer times, a second regime is observed where standard diffusion is recovered, with a surprising nonanalytical dependence of the diffusion coefficient on the particle density. When the TP is allowed to visit the teeth of the comb, based on a mean-field-like continuous time random walk description, we unveil a rich and complex scenario with several successive subdiffusive regimes, resulting from the coupling between the geometrical constraints of the comb lattice and particle interactions. In this case, remarkably, the presence of hard-core interactions asymptotically speeds up the TP motion along the backbone of the structure.

  5. Competitive intransitivity, population interaction structure, and strategy coexistence.

    PubMed

    Laird, Robert A; Schamp, Brandon S

    2015-01-21

    Intransitive competition occurs when competing strategies cannot be listed in a hierarchy, but rather form loops-as in the game rock-paper-scissors. Due to its cyclic competitive replacement, competitive intransitivity promotes strategy coexistence, both in rock-paper-scissors and in higher-richness communities. Previous work has shown that this intransitivity-mediated coexistence is strongly influenced by spatially explicit interactions, compared to when populations are well mixed. Here, we extend and broaden this line of research and examine the impact on coexistence of intransitive competition taking place on a continuum of small-world networks linking spatial lattices and regular random graphs. We use simulations to show that the positive effect of competitive intransitivity on strategy coexistence holds when competition occurs on networks toward the spatial end of the continuum. However, in networks that are sufficiently disordered, increasingly violent fluctuations in strategy frequencies can lead to extinctions and the prevalence of monocultures. We further show that the degree of disorder that leads to the transition between these two regimes is positively dependent on population size; indeed for very large populations, intransitivity-mediated strategy coexistence may even be possible in regular graphs with completely random connections. Our results emphasize the importance of interaction structure in determining strategy dynamics and diversity.

  6. Does age matter in song bird vocal interactions? Results from interactive playback experiments

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The song of oscines provides an extensively studied model of age-dependent behaviour changes. Male and female receivers might use song characteristics to obtain information about the age of a signaller, which is often related to its quality. Whereas most of the age-dependent song changes have been studied in solo singing, the role of age in vocal interactions is less well understood. We addressed this issue in a playback study with common nightingales (Luscinia megarhynchos). Previous studies showed that male nightingales had smaller repertoires in their first year than older males and males adjusted their repertoire towards the most common songs in the breeding population. We now compared vocal interaction patterns in a playback study in 12 one year old and 12 older nightingales (cross-sectional approach). Five of these males were tested both in their first and second breeding season (longitudinal approach). Song duration and latency to respond did not differ between males of different ages in either approach. In the cross-sectional approach, one year old nightingales matched song types twice as often as did older birds. Similarly, in the longitudinal approach all except one bird reduced the number of song type matches in their second season. Individuals tended to overlap songs at higher rates in their second breeding season than in their first. The higher levels of song type matches in the first year and song overlapping by birds in their second year suggest that these are communicative strategies to establish relationships with competing males and/or choosy females. PMID:22071317

  7. State Effect of Traumatic Experience on Personality Structure

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hong-seock; Lee, Sang-Kyu; Lee, Heung-Pyo

    2012-01-01

    Objective Personality is defined as the trait-like qualities of a person. However, it has been recently suggested that the state effect of a situation leads to changes in scores on personality assessments. We predicted that traumatic experiences would induce changes not only in personality scores but also in the factor structures of personality assessments. Methods MethodsaaWe conducted a cross-sectional, case-controlled study using two data sets: a traumatized adolescent sample (n=71) and a non-traumatized adolescent sample (n=296). Personality factor structures were compared between the two samples using exploratory factor analyses for 25 lower-ordered subscales of the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). In the non-traumatized sample, evaluation of the scree plot suggested a five-factor solution supporting TCI's original seven-factor model. Results The traumatized sample showed a three-factor structure representing a biological factor, a social factor and an existential factor. This decrease in number of personality factors was caused by strengthened correlations among personality subscales related to coping with traumatic situations. Cloninger's psychobiological model of personality (i.e., temperament-character) was adequate in capturing personality traits of non-traumatized adolescents, but the tripartite view of existential psychology (i.e., body-mind-spirit) clearly corresponded to the factor structure of the traumatized adolescents. Conclusion The three-factor solution of the present traumatized group is consistent with the tripartite model of personality (i.e., body-mind-spirit), while the five-factor solution of the non-traumatized group corresponds to Cloninger's seven-factor model. This is the first study to describe the state effects of traumatic experiences on personality structure. PMID:23251200

  8. RF ACCELERATING STRUCTURE FOR THE MUON COOLING EXPERIMENT.

    SciTech Connect

    CORLETT,J.; GREEN,M.; LI,D.; HOLTKAMP,N.; MORETTI,A.; KIRK,H.G.; PALMER,R.B.; ZHAO,Y.; SUMMERS,D.

    1999-03-29

    The ionization cooling of muons requires longitudinal acceleration of the muons after scattering in a hydrogen target. In order to maximize the accelerating voltage, we propose using linear accelerating structures with cells bounded by thin beryllium metal foils. This produces an on-axis field equivalent to the maximum surface field, whereas with beam-pipes the accelerating field is approximately half that of the peak surface field in the cavity. The muons interact only weakly with the thin foils. A {pi}/2 interleaved cavity structure has been chosen, with alternate cells coupled together externally, and the two groups of cells fed in quadrature. At present they are considering an operating temperature of 77K to gain a factor of at least two in Q-value over room temperature. The authors describe the design of the {pi}/2 interleaved cavity structure, design of an alternative {pi}-mode open structure, preliminary experimental results from a low-power test cavity, and plans for high-power testing.

  9. The extended interacting wind structure of Eta Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gull, T. R.; Nielsen, K. E.; Corcoran, M. F.; Madura, T. I.; Owocki, S. P.; Russell, C. M. P.; Hillier, D. J.; Hamaguchi, K.; Kober, G. V.; Weis, K.; Stahl, O.; Okazaki, A. T.

    2009-07-01

    The highly eccentric binary system, η Car, provides clues to the transition of massive stars from hydrogen-burning via the CNO cycle to a helium-burning evolutionary state. The fast-moving wind of η Car B creates a cavity in η Car A's slower, but more massive, stellar wind, providing an in situ probe. The Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (HST/STIS), with its high spatial and spectral resolutions, is well matched to follow temporal spatial and velocity variations of multiple wind features. We use observations obtained across 1998-2004 to produce a rudimentary three-dimensional model of the wind interaction in the η Car system. Broad (+/-500 km s-1) [FeII] emission line structures extend 0.7arcsec (~1600 au) from the stellar core. In contrast, [FeIII], [ArIII], [NeIII] and [SIII] lines extend only 0.3arcsec (700 au) from NE to SW and are blue shifted from -500 to +200 km s-1. All observed spectral features vary with the 5.54-year orbital period. The highly ionized, forbidden emission disappears during the low state, associated with periastron passage. The high-ionization emission originates in the outer wind interaction region that is directly excited by the far-ultraviolet radiation from η Car B. The HST/STIS spectra reveal a time-varying, distorted paraboloidal structure, caused by the interaction of the massive stellar winds. The model and observations are consistent with the orbital plane aligned with the skirt of the Homunculus. However, the axis of the distorted paraboloid, relative to the major axis of the binary orbit, is shifted in a prograde rotation along the plane, which projected on the sky is from NE to NW. Based on observations made with the National Aeronautics and Space Agency/European Space Agency (NASA/ESA) HST. Support for Programme numbers 7302, 8036, 8483, 8619, 9083, 9337, 9420, 9973, 10957 and 11273 was provided by NASA directly to the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph Science Team and through grants from the

  10. 3Drefine: an interactive web server for efficient protein structure refinement

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Debswapna; Nowotny, Jackson; Cao, Renzhi; Cheng, Jianlin

    2016-01-01

    3Drefine is an interactive web server for consistent and computationally efficient protein structure refinement with the capability to perform web-based statistical and visual analysis. The 3Drefine refinement protocol utilizes iterative optimization of hydrogen bonding network combined with atomic-level energy minimization on the optimized model using a composite physics and knowledge-based force fields for efficient protein structure refinement. The method has been extensively evaluated on blind CASP experiments as well as on large-scale and diverse benchmark datasets and exhibits consistent improvement over the initial structure in both global and local structural quality measures. The 3Drefine web server allows for convenient protein structure refinement through a text or file input submission, email notification, provided example submission and is freely available without any registration requirement. The server also provides comprehensive analysis of submissions through various energy and statistical feedback and interactive visualization of multiple refined models through the JSmol applet that is equipped with numerous protein model analysis tools. The web server has been extensively tested and used by many users. As a result, the 3Drefine web server conveniently provides a useful tool easily accessible to the community. The 3Drefine web server has been made publicly available at the URL: http://sysbio.rnet.missouri.edu/3Drefine/. PMID:27131371

  11. Controls-structures interaction guest investigator program: Overview and phase 1 experimental results and future plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith-Taylor, Rudeen; Tanner, Sharon E.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Controls-Structures Interaction (CSI) Guest Investigator program is described in terms of its support of the development of CSI technologies. The program is based on the introduction of CSI researchers from industry and academia to available test facilities for experimental validation of technologies and methods. Phase 1 experimental results are reviewed with attention given to their use of the Mini-MAST test facility and the facility for the Advance Control Evaluation of Structures. Experiments were conducted regarding the following topics: collocated/noncollocated controllers, nonlinear math modeling, controller design, passive/active suspension systems design, and system identification and fault isolation. The results demonstrate that significantly enhanced performance from the control techniques can be achieved by integrating knowledge of the structural dynamics under consideration into the approaches.

  12. Towards a mechanistic understanding of temperature and enrichment effects on species interaction strength, omnivory and food-web structure.

    PubMed

    Sentis, Arnaud; Hemptinne, Jean-Louis; Brodeur, Jacques

    2014-07-01

    Revealing the links between species functional traits, interaction strength and food-web structure is of paramount importance for understanding and predicting the relationships between food-web diversity and stability in a rapidly changing world. However, little is known about the interactive effects of environmental perturbations on individual species, trophic interactions and ecosystem functioning. Here, we combined modelling and laboratory experiments to investigate the effects of warming and enrichment on a terrestrial tritrophic system. We found that the food-web structure is highly variable and switches between exploitative competition and omnivory depending on the effects of temperature and enrichment on foraging behaviour and species interaction strength. Our model contributes to identifying the mechanisms that explain how environmental effects cascade through the food web and influence its topology. We conclude that considering environmental factors and flexible food-web structure is crucial to improve our ability to predict the impacts of global changes on ecosystem diversity and stability.

  13. Predicting the protein-protein interactions using primary structures with predicted protein surface

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many biological functions involve various protein-protein interactions (PPIs). Elucidating such interactions is crucial for understanding general principles of cellular systems. Previous studies have shown the potential of predicting PPIs based on only sequence information. Compared to approaches that require other auxiliary information, these sequence-based approaches can be applied to a broader range of applications. Results This study presents a novel sequence-based method based on the assumption that protein-protein interactions are more related to amino acids at the surface than those at the core. The present method considers surface information and maintains the advantage of relying on only sequence data by including an accessible surface area (ASA) predictor recently proposed by the authors. This study also reports the experiments conducted to evaluate a) the performance of PPI prediction achieved by including the predicted surface and b) the quality of the predicted surface in comparison with the surface obtained from structures. The experimental results show that surface information helps to predict interacting protein pairs. Furthermore, the prediction performance achieved by using the surface estimated with the ASA predictor is close to that using the surface obtained from protein structures. Conclusion This work presents a sequence-based method that takes into account surface information for predicting PPIs. The proposed procedure of surface identification improves the prediction performance with an F-measure of 5.1%. The extracted surfaces are also valuable in other biomedical applications that require similar information. PMID:20122202

  14. Electronic Structure Theory for Radicaloid Systems and Intermolecular Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurlancheek, Westin

    A radical molecule contains one or more electrons that are unpaired. A radicaloid may be defined as a molecule in which there are that are partially unpaired. As a result, the electronic structure of the radicaloid can be quite complicated for a variety of reasons. For a singlet biradicaloid, the singlet and triplet wavefunction can be quite close energetically which can lead to problems when trying to describe the system with a single determinant. The simplest solution to this problem is to allow the wavefunction to break spin-symmetry in order to get a lower energy. Unfortunately this action can lead to wavefunctions that are no longer eigenfunctions of the < S2> operator. In the second chapter we investigate a distannyne which has a biradicaloid resonance structure. By examining the orbital Hessian, it is discovered that the spin-symmetric solution is a saddle-point in wavefunction space and is structurally different than the spin-polarized solution. We then increase the complexity of the model system and see that the spin-symmetric solution is only a minimum for the exact experimental system and not for a simplified model system in which bulky organic substituents are replaced by simpler phenyl groups. Therefore, the breaking of spin-symmetry is absolutely critical in the small model systems and the full substituents play a non-trivial role. However, the breaking of the spin-symmetry can have consequences for physical quantities when correlated methods are used. At the point of spin polarization or unrestriction the orbital Hessian will have one eigenvalue which is zero. Since the relaxed density matrix in correlated methods like Second-Order Mo ller-Plesset theory (MP2) depend on the inverse of the Hessian, at the unrestriction point this quantity will be undefined. Some unphysical artifacts are identified as a direct consequence of this fact. First, discontinuities in first order molecular properties such as the dipole moment are seen at the geometries

  15. Frequency domain identification experiment on a large flexible structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, D. S.; Hadaegh, F. Y.; Yam, Y.; Scheid, R. E.; Mettler, E.; Milman, M. H.

    1989-01-01

    Recent experiences in the field of flexible structure control in space have indicated a need for on-orbit system identification to support robust control redesign to avoid in-flight instabilities and maintain high spacecraft performance. The authors highlight an automated frequency domain system identification methodology recently developed to fill this need. The methodology supports (1) the estimation of system quantities useful for robust control analysis and design, (2) experiment design tailored to performing system identification in a typically constrained on-orbit environment, and (3) the automation of operations to reduce human-in-the-loop requirements. A basic overview of the methodology is presented first, followed by an experimental verification of the approach performed on the JPL/AFAL testbed facility.

  16. Shallow lunar structure determined from the passive seismic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Dorman, J.; Duennebier, F.; Lammlein, D.; Latham, G.

    1975-01-01

    Data relevant to the shallow structure of the moon obtained at the Apollo seismic stations are compared with previously published results of the active seismic experiments. It is concluded that the lunar surface is covered by a layer of low seismic velocity which appears to be equivalent to the lunar regolith defined previously by geological observations. This layer is underlain by a zone of distinctly higher seismic velocity at all of the Apollo landing sites. The regolith thicknesses at the Apollo 11, 12, and 15 sites are estimated from the shear-wave resonance to be 4.4, 3.7, and 4.4 m, respectively. These thicknesses and those determined at the other Apollo sites by the active seismic experiments appear to be correlated with the age determinations and the abundances of extralunar components at the sites.

  17. Structuring of the Magnetospheric Plasma by the Solar Terrestrial Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, Dominique

    The existence of a magnetospheric cavity around a planet depends on the interactions of the planet including its atmospheric and magnetic environment with the interplanetary medium. A magnetized planet like the Earth sets a magnetic obstacle against the supersonic super-Alfvénic solar wind flow. The solar wind pressure shapes the magnetosphere, compressing it on the dayside to a few Earth's radii while the nightside tail extends to hundreds of Earth's radii. Away from a homogeneous and constant distribution, very different plasma regions have been identified inside the magnetosphere. Mass and energy transfers with the solar wind are considered as responsible for the magnetospheric plasma structure and dynamics at large-scale as well as for impulsive or transient events. However, these transfer processes remain poorly understood, and reconnection and other working assumptions are presently put forward and developed. Detailed descriptions of the magnetosphere at various complexity levels can be found in textboo ks on space plasma physics. This simplified introduction only aims at proposing keys to get an insight into the structure of the magnetospheric plasma, into a few basic concepts and specific processes at the root of the present understanding and also into questions and issues to be addressed in the future.

  18. Interactions of structural defects with metallic impurities in multicrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    McHugo, S.A.; Hieslmair, H.; Weber, E.R.; Rosenblum, M.D.; Kalejs, J.P.

    1996-11-01

    Interactions between structural defects and metallic impurities were studied in multicrystalline silicon for solar cells applications. The objective was to gain insight into the relationship between solar cell processing, metallic impurity behavior and the resultant effect on material/device performance. With an intense synchrotron x-ray source, high sensitivity x-ray fluorescence measurements were utilized to determine impurity distributions with a spatial resolution of {approx} 1{micro}m. Diffusion length mapping and final solar cell characteristics gauged material/device performance. The materials were tested in both the as-grown state and after full solar cell processing. Iron and nickel metal impurities were located at structural defects in as-grown material, while after solar cell processing, both impurities were still observed in low performance regions. These results indicate that multicrystalline silicon solar cell performance is directly related to metal impurities which are not completely removed during typical processing treatments. A discussion of possible mechanisms for this incomplete removal is presented.

  19. Fluid Structure Interaction Simulations of Pediatric Ventricular Assist Device Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Chris; Marsden, Alison; Bazilevs, Yuri

    2011-11-01

    Pediatric ventricular assist devices (PVADs) are used for mechanical circulatory support in children with failing hearts. They can be used to allow the heart to heal naturally or to extend the life of the patient until transplant. A PVAD has two chambers, blood and air, separated by a flexible membrane. The air chamber is pressurized, which drives the membrane and pumps the blood. The primary risk associated with these devices is stroke or embolism from thrombogenesis. Simulation of these devices is difficult due to a complex coupling of two fluid domains and a thin membrane, requiring fluid-structure interaction modeling. The goal of this work is to accurately simulate the hemodynamics of a PVAD. We perform FSI simulations using an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) finite element framework to account for large motions of the membrane and the fluid domains. The air, blood, and membrane are meshed as distinct subdomains, and a method for non-matched discretizations at the fluid-structure interface is presented. The use of isogeometric analysis to model the membrane mechanics is also discussed, and the results of simulations are presented.

  20. Hamilton's Principle for External Viscous FLUID-STRUCTURE Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BENAROYA, H.; WEI, T.

    2000-11-01

    Hamilton's principle is extended so as to be able to model external flow-structure interaction. This is accomplished by using Reynold's Transport theorem. In this form Hamilton's principle is hybrid in the sense that it has an analytical part as well as a part that depends on experimentally derived functions. Examples are presented. The discussion on implications and extensions is extensive. In this work, a general theory is developed for the case where the configuration is not prescribed at the end times of the variational principle. This leads to a single governing equation of motion. This limitation can be removed by prescribing the end times, as usually done. This is outlined in the present paper, and will be the subject of a future paper.A detailed discussion is also presented of the experimental work performed in parallel with and in support of the theoretical developments. As a true fluid-structural model, it is necessary to fully couple the dynamics. This has been the foundation of our formulation.

  1. Numerical simulation of shock interaction with above-ground structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, Joseph D.; Lohner, Rainald

    1994-05-01

    This final report for DNA contract DNA 001-89-C-0098 for the time period May 15, 1989 to Dec 31, 1992 describes the results of several of the computations conducted under this research effort. The numerical simulations conducted simulated shock wave diffraction phenomenon about complex-geometry two-dimensional and three-dimensional structures. Since a significant part of this effort was composed of parametric studies that have been delivered to the sponsors, the Defense Nuclear Agency and the Air Force Ballistic Missile Organization (BMO), and conducted under the now defunct Rail Garrison project, we included in this report a detailed description of the results of the major computations, and a brief summary of all the repetitive computations. The final report is divided into three sections. Chapter 1 describes in detail the two-dimensional numerical methodology and typical two-dimensional computation, i.e., the application of the numerical methodology to the simulation of shock interaction with a typical 2-D train (a 2-D cut at the center of a 3-D train). Chapter 2 describes the numerical development of a passive shock reflector, a major effort undertaken in this project. The objective of this effort was to design a passive device that, while allowing the ventilation of the enclosure under steady conditions, will prevent blast waves impinging on the wall from entering the enclosure when the structure is impacted by a shock.

  2. Investigating Intermolecular Interactions via Scanning Tunneling Microscopy: An Experiment for the Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pullman, David; Peterson, Karen I.

    2004-01-01

    A scanning tunneling microscope (STM) project designed as a module for the undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory is described. The effects of van der Waals interactions on the condensed-phase structure are examined by the analysis of the pattern of the monolayer structures.

  3. Holographic particle velocimetry - A 3D measurement technique for vortex interactions, coherent structures and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hui; Hussain, Fazle

    1991-10-01

    To understand the topology and dynamics of coherent structures (CS), the interactions of CS with fine-scale turbulence, and the effects of CS on entrainment, mixing and combustion, experimental tools are needed that can measure velocity (preferably vorticity) vector fields in both 3D space and time. While traditional measurement techniques are not able to serve this purpose, holographic particle velocimetry (HPV) appears to be promising. In a demonstration experiment, the instantaneous 3D velocity vector fields in some simple vortical flows have been obtained using the HPV technique. In this preliminary report, the principles of the HPV technique are illustrated and the key issues in its implementation are discussed.

  4. Fluid–Structure Interaction-Based Biomechanical Perception Model for Tactile Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    The reproduced tactile sensation of haptic interfaces usually selectively reproduces a certain object attribute, such as the object's material reflected by vibration and its surface shape by a pneumatic nozzle array. Tactile biomechanics investigates the relation between responses to an external load stimulus and tactile perception and guides the design of haptic interface devices via a tactile mechanism. Focusing on the pneumatic haptic interface, we established a fluid–structure interaction-based biomechanical model of responses to static and dynamic loads and conducted numerical simulation and experiments. This model provides a theoretical basis for designing haptic interfaces and reproducing tactile textures. PMID:24260228

  5. Wall effect on fluid-structure interactions of a tethered bluff body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sumant; Raghav, Vrishank; Komerath, Narayanan; Smith, Marilyn

    2013-11-01

    Wind tunnel experiments have shown an unexplained amplification of the free motion of a tethered bluff body in a small wind tunnel relative to that in a large wind tunnel. The influence of wall proximity on fluid-structure interaction is explored using a compound pendulum motion in the plane orthogonal to a steady freestream with a doublet model for aerodynamic forces. Wall proximity amplifies a purely symmetric single degree of freedom oscillation with the addition of an out-of-phase force. The success of this simple level of simulation enables progress to develop metrics for unsteady wall interference in dynamic testing of tethered bluff bodies.

  6. Structural Refinement of Proteins by Restrained Molecular Dynamics Simulations with Non-interacting Molecular Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Rong; Han, Wei; Fiorin, Giacomo; Islam, Shahidul M.; Schulten, Klaus; Roux, Benoît

    2015-01-01

    The knowledge of multiple conformational states is a prerequisite to understand the function of membrane transport proteins. Unfortunately, the determination of detailed atomic structures for all these functionally important conformational states with conventional high-resolution approaches is often difficult and unsuccessful. In some cases, biophysical and biochemical approaches can provide important complementary structural information that can be exploited with the help of advanced computational methods to derive structural models of specific conformational states. In particular, functional and spectroscopic measurements in combination with site-directed mutations constitute one important source of information to obtain these mixed-resolution structural models. A very common problem with this strategy, however, is the difficulty to simultaneously integrate all the information from multiple independent experiments involving different mutations or chemical labels to derive a unique structural model consistent with the data. To resolve this issue, a novel restrained molecular dynamics structural refinement method is developed to simultaneously incorporate multiple experimentally determined constraints (e.g., engineered metal bridges or spin-labels), each treated as an individual molecular fragment with all atomic details. The internal structure of each of the molecular fragments is treated realistically, while there is no interaction between different molecular fragments to avoid unphysical steric clashes. The information from all the molecular fragments is exploited simultaneously to constrain the backbone to refine a three-dimensional model of the conformational state of the protein. The method is illustrated by refining the structure of the voltage-sensing domain (VSD) of the Kv1.2 potassium channel in the resting state and by exploring the distance histograms between spin-labels attached to T4 lysozyme. The resulting VSD structures are in good agreement with

  7. Structural Refinement of Proteins by Restrained Molecular Dynamics Simulations with Non-interacting Molecular Fragments.

    PubMed

    Shen, Rong; Han, Wei; Fiorin, Giacomo; Islam, Shahidul M; Schulten, Klaus; Roux, Benoît

    2015-10-01

    The knowledge of multiple conformational states is a prerequisite to understand the function of membrane transport proteins. Unfortunately, the determination of detailed atomic structures for all these functionally important conformational states with conventional high-resolution approaches is often difficult and unsuccessful. In some cases, biophysical and biochemical approaches can provide important complementary structural information that can be exploited with the help of advanced computational methods to derive structural models of specific conformational states. In particular, functional and spectroscopic measurements in combination with site-directed mutations constitute one important source of information to obtain these mixed-resolution structural models. A very common problem with this strategy, however, is the difficulty to simultaneously integrate all the information from multiple independent experiments involving different mutations or chemical labels to derive a unique structural model consistent with the data. To resolve this issue, a novel restrained molecular dynamics structural refinement method is developed to simultaneously incorporate multiple experimentally determined constraints (e.g., engineered metal bridges or spin-labels), each treated as an individual molecular fragment with all atomic details. The internal structure of each of the molecular fragments is treated realistically, while there is no interaction between different molecular fragments to avoid unphysical steric clashes. The information from all the molecular fragments is exploited simultaneously to constrain the backbone to refine a three-dimensional model of the conformational state of the protein. The method is illustrated by refining the structure of the voltage-sensing domain (VSD) of the Kv1.2 potassium channel in the resting state and by exploring the distance histograms between spin-labels attached to T4 lysozyme. The resulting VSD structures are in good agreement with

  8. Information-driven structural modelling of protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, João P G L M; Karaca, Ezgi; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein docking aims at predicting the three-dimensional structure of a protein complex starting from the free forms of the individual partners. As assessed in the CAPRI community-wide experiment, the most successful docking algorithms combine pure laws of physics with information derived from various experimental or bioinformatics sources. Of these so-called "information-driven" approaches, HADDOCK stands out as one of the most successful representatives. In this chapter, we briefly summarize which experimental information can be used to drive the docking prediction in HADDOCK, and then focus on the docking protocol itself. We discuss and illustrate with a tutorial example a "classical" protein-protein docking prediction, as well as more recent developments for modelling multi-body systems and large conformational changes. PMID:25330973

  9. Passive and active structural monitoring experience: Civil engineering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, L. D.; Westermo, B. D.; Crum, D. B.; Law, W. R.; Trombi, R. G.

    2000-05-01

    State Departments of Transportation and regional city government officials are beginning to view the long-term monitoring of infrastructure as being beneficial for structural damage accumulation assessment, condition based maintenance, life extension, and post-earthquake or -hurricane (-tornado, -typhoon, etc.) damage assessment. Active and passive structural monitoring systems were installed over the last few years to monitor concerns in a wide range of civil infrastructure applications. This paper describes the monitoring technologies and systems employed for such applications. Bridge system applications were directed at monitoring corrosion damage accumulation, composite reinforcements for life extension, general service cracking damage related to fatigue and overloads, and post-earthquake damage. Residential system applications were directed primarily at identifying damage accumulation and post-earthquake damage assessment. A professional sports stadium was monitored for isolated ground instability problems and for post-earthquake damage assessment. Internet-based, remote, data acquisition system experience is discussed with examples of long-term passive and active system data collected from many of the individual sites to illustrate the potential for both passive and active structural health monitoring. A summary of system-based operating characteristics and key engineering recommendations are provided to achieve specific structural monitoring objectives for a wide range of civil infrastructure applications.

  10. Solution structures of rat amylin peptide: simulation, theory, and experiment.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Allam S; Wang, Lu; Lin, Yu-Shan; Ling, Yun; Chopra, Manan; Zanni, Martin T; Skinner, James L; De Pablo, Juan J

    2010-02-01

    Amyloid deposits of amylin in the pancreas are an important characteristic feature found in patients with Type-2 diabetes. The aggregate has been considered important in the disease pathology and has been studied extensively. However, the secondary structures of the individual peptide have not been clearly identified. In this work, we present detailed solution structures of rat amylin using a combination of Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations. A new Monte Carlo method is presented to determine the free energy of distinct biomolecular conformations. Both folded and random-coil conformations of rat amylin are observed in water and their relative stability is examined in detail. The former contains an alpha-helical segment comprised of residues 7-17. We find that at room temperature the folded structure is more stable, whereas at higher temperatures the random-coil structure predominates. From the configurations and weights we calculate the alpha-carbon NMR chemical shifts, with results that are in reasonable agreement with experiments of others. We also calculate the infrared spectrum in the amide I stretch regime, and the results are in fair agreement with the experimental line shape presented herein.

  11. Laboratory plasma interactions experiments: Results and implications to future space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, Philip

    1986-01-01

    The experimental results discussed show the significance of the effects caused by spacecraft plasma interactions, in particular the generation of Electromagnetic Interference. As the experimental results show, the magnitude of the adverse effects induced by Plasma Interactions (PI) will be more significant for spacecraft of the next century. Therefore, research is needed to control possible adverse effects. Several techniques to control the selected PI effects are discussed. Tests, in the form of flight experiments, are needed to validate these proposed ideas.

  12. DOMMINO 2.0: integrating structurally resolved protein-, RNA-, and DNA-mediated macromolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Xingyan; Dhroso, Andi; Han, Jing Ginger; Shyu, Chi-Ren; Korkin, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    Macromolecular interactions are formed between proteins, DNA and RNA molecules. Being a principle building block in macromolecular assemblies and pathways, the interactions underlie most of cellular functions. Malfunctioning of macromolecular interactions is also linked to a number of diseases. Structural knowledge of the macromolecular interaction allows one to understand the interaction's mechanism, determine its functional implications and characterize the effects of genetic variations, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms, on the interaction. Unfortunately, until now the interactions mediated by different types of macromolecules, e.g. protein-protein interactions or protein-DNA interactions, are collected into individual and unrelated structural databases. This presents a significant obstacle in the analysis of macromolecular interactions. For instance, the homogeneous structural interaction databases prevent scientists from studying structural interactions of different types but occurring in the same macromolecular complex. Here, we introduce DOMMINO 2.0, a structural Database Of Macro-Molecular INteractiOns. Compared to DOMMINO 1.0, a comprehensive database on protein-protein interactions, DOMMINO 2.0 includes the interactions between all three basic types of macromolecules extracted from PDB files. DOMMINO 2.0 is automatically updated on a weekly basis. It currently includes ∼1,040,000 interactions between two polypeptide subunits (e.g. domains, peptides, termini and interdomain linkers), ∼43,000 RNA-mediated interactions, and ∼12,000 DNA-mediated interactions. All protein structures in the database are annotated using SCOP and SUPERFAMILY family annotation. As a result, protein-mediated interactions involving protein domains, interdomain linkers, C- and N- termini, and peptides are identified. Our database provides an intuitive web interface, allowing one to investigate interactions at three different resolution levels: whole subunit network

  13. Colloidal Disorder-Order Transition Experiment Probes Particle Interactions in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Everything in the universe is made up of the same basic building blocks - atoms. All physical properties of matter such as weight, hardness, and color are determined by the kind of atoms present and the way they interact with each other. The Colloidal Disorder-Order Transition (CDOT) shuttle flight experiment tested fundamental theories that model atomic interactions. The experiment was part of the Second United States Microgravity Laboratory (USML-2) aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia, which flew from October 20 to November 5, 1995.

  14. Bioluminescence to reveal structure and interaction of coastal planktonic communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moline, Mark A.; Blackwell, Shelley M.; Case, James F.; Haddock, Steven H. D.; Herren, Christen M.; Orrico, Cristina M.; Terrill, Eric

    2009-02-01

    Ecosystem function will in large part be determined by functional groups present in biological communities. The simplest distinction with respect to functional groups of an ecosystem is the differentiation between primary and secondary producers. A challenge thus far has been to examine these groups simultaneously with sufficient temporal and spatial resolution for observations to be relevant to the scales of change in coastal oceans. This study takes advantage of general differences in the bioluminescence flash kinetics between planktonic dinoflagellates and zooplankton to measure relative abundances of the two groups within the same-time space volume. This novel approach for distinguishing these general classifications using a single sensor is validated using fluorescence data and exclusion experiments. The approach is then applied to data collected from an autonomous underwater vehicle surveying >500 km in Monterey Bay and San Luis Obispo Bay, CA during the summers of 2002-2004. The approach also reveals that identifying trophic interaction between the two planktonic communities may also be possible.

  15. PiDNA: Predicting protein-DNA interactions with structural models.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Kang; Chen, Chien-Yu

    2013-07-01

    Predicting binding sites of a transcription factor in the genome is an important, but challenging, issue in studying gene regulation. In the past decade, a large number of protein-DNA co-crystallized structures available in the Protein Data Bank have facilitated the understanding of interacting mechanisms between transcription factors and their binding sites. Recent studies have shown that both physics-based and knowledge-based potential functions can be applied to protein-DNA complex structures to deliver position weight matrices (PWMs) that are consistent with the experimental data. To further use the available structural models, the proposed Web server, PiDNA, aims at first constructing reliable PWMs by applying an atomic-level knowledge-based scoring function on numerous in silico mutated complex structures, and then using the PWM constructed by the structure models with small energy changes to predict the interaction between proteins and DNA sequences. With PiDNA, the users can easily predict the relative preference of all the DNA sequences with limited mutations from the native sequence co-crystallized in the model in a single run. More predictions on sequences with unlimited mutations can be realized by additional requests or file uploading. Three types of information can be downloaded after prediction: (i) the ranked list of mutated sequences, (ii) the PWM constructed by the favourable mutated structures, and (iii) any mutated protein-DNA complex structure models specified by the user. This study first shows that the constructed PWMs are similar to the annotated PWMs collected from databases or literature. Second, the prediction accuracy of PiDNA in detecting relatively high-specificity sites is evaluated by comparing the ranked lists against in vitro experiments from protein-binding microarrays. Finally, PiDNA is shown to be able to select the experimentally validated binding sites from 10,000 random sites with high accuracy. With PiDNA, the users can

  16. Nonstandard interactions spoiling the C P violation sensitivity at DUNE and other long baseline experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masud, Mehedi; Mehta, Poonam

    2016-07-01

    It is by now established that neutrino oscillations occur due to nonzero masses and parameters in the leptonic mixing matrix. The extraction of oscillation parameters may be complicated due to subleading effects such as nonstandard neutrino interactions and one needs to have a fresh look how a particular parameter value is inferred from experimental data. In the present work, we focus on an important parameter entering the oscillation framework-the leptonic C P -violating phase δ , about which we know very little. We demonstrate that the sensitivity to C P violation gets significantly impacted due to nonstandard neutrino interaction effects for the upcoming long baseline experiment, Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. We also draw a comparison with the sensitivities of other ongoing neutrino beam experiments such as NO ν A and T2K as well as a future generation experiment, T2HK.

  17. Interaction of a thin shock with turbulence. I. Effect on shock structure: Analytic model

    SciTech Connect

    Ao Xianzhi; Zank, Gary P.; Pogorelov, Nikolai V.; Shaikh, Dastgeer

    2008-12-15

    A two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical model describing the interaction of thin shock waves with turbulence is developed by adopting a multiscale perturbation analysis. The interaction is found to be governed by a two-dimensional inviscid Burgers' equation that includes ''perturbation terms.'' Initially prescribed perturbation profiles are explored with numerical simulations to show how the shock front is modified by turbulence. Our numerical simulations show that magnetic field perturbations play a very important role in modifying the structure of perpendicular and parallel shocks. While turbulence can balance the nonlinear steepening of a shock wave at some regions, it can also help to create a larger jump in physical quantities such as the magnetic field at other regions. The plasma medium in these regions can therefore experience a higher compression, which will result in a downstream state that differs from the usual Rankine-Hugoniot state.

  18. The effects of metapopulation structure on indirect interactions in host-parasitoid assemblages.

    PubMed Central

    Bonsall, M B; Hassell, M P

    2000-01-01

    The interaction between two species that do not compete for resources but share a common natural enemy is known as apparent competition. In the absence of other limiting factors, such three-species interactions are impermanent, with one species being excluded from the assemblage by the natural enemy. Here, the effects of metapopulation structure are explored in a system of two hosts that experience apparent competition through a shared parasitoid. A coupled-map lattice model is developed and used to explore species coexistence and patterns of patch occupancy at the metapopulation scale. Linking local and regional dynamics favours coexistence by uncoupling the dynamics of the three species in space. Coexistence is promoted by the inferior species being either a fugitive or a sedentary species. The occurrence of these two mutually exclusive mechanisms of coexistence is influenced by the relative dispersal of the inferior apparent competitor. PMID:11413634

  19. DISCOS- DYNAMIC INTERACTION SIMULATION OF CONTROLS AND STRUCTURES (IBM VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, H. P.

    1994-01-01

    The Dynamic Interaction Simulation of Controls and Structure (DISCOS) program was developed for the dynamic simulation and stability analysis of passive and actively controlled spacecraft. In the use of DISCOS, the physical system undergoing analysis may be generally described as a cluster of contiguous flexible structures (bodies) that comprise a mechanical system, such as a spacecraft. The entire system (spacecraft) or portions thereof may be either spinning or nonspinning. Member bodies of the system may undergo large relative excursions, such as those of appendage deployment or rotor/ stator motion. The general system of bodies is, by its inherent nature, a feedback system in which inertial forces (such as those due to centrifugal and Coriolis acceleration) and the restoring and damping forces are motion-dependent. The system may possess a control system in which certain position and rate errors are actively controlled through the use of reaction control jets, servomotors, or momentum wheels. Bodies of the system may be interconnected by linear or nonlinear springs and dampers, by a gimbal and slider block mechanism, or by any combination of these. The DISCOS program can be used to obtain nonlinear and linearized time response of the system, interaction constant forces in the system, total system resonance properties, and frequency domain response and stability information for the system. DISCOS is probably the most powerful computational tool to date for the computer simulation of actively controlled coupled multi-flexible-body systems. The program is not easy to understand and effectively apply, but is not intended for simple problems. The DISCOS user is expected to have extensive working knowledge of rigid-body and flexible-body dynamics, finite-element techniques, numerical methods, and frequency-domain analysis. Various applications of DISCOS include simulation of the Shuttle payload deployment/retrieval mechanism, solar panel array deployment, antenna

  20. Trait-mediated interactions: influence of prey size, density and experience.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Michael W; Bolker, Benjamin M

    2008-05-01

    1. The role of non-consumptive predator effects in structuring ecological communities has become an important area of study for ecologists. Numerous studies have shown that adaptive changes in prey in response to a predator can improve survival in subsequent encounters with that predator. 2. Prey-mediated changes in the shapes of predators' functional response surfaces determine the qualitative predictions of theoretical models. However, few studies have quantified the effects of adaptive prey responses on the shape of predator functional responses. 3. This study explores how prey density, size and previous predator experience interact to change the functional response curves of different-sized predators. 4. We use a response surface design to determine how previous exposure to small or large odonate predators affected the short-term survival of squirrel tree frog (Hyla squirella) tadpoles across a range of sizes and densities (i.e. the shape of odonate functional response curves). 5. Predator-induced tadpoles in a given size class did not differ in shape, although induction changed tadpole behaviour significantly. Induced tadpoles survived better in lethal encounters with either predator than did similar-sized predator-naive tadpoles. 6. Induction by either predator resulted in increased survival with both predators at a given size. However, different mechanisms led to increased survival for induced tadpoles. Attack rate for the small predators, whereas handling time increased for the large predators. PMID:18312336

  1. Experience versus talent shapes the structure of the Web.

    PubMed

    Kong, Joseph S; Sarshar, Nima; Roychowdhury, Vwani P

    2008-09-16

    We use sequential large-scale crawl data to empirically investigate and validate the dynamics that underlie the evolution of the structure of the web. We find that the overall structure of the web is defined by an intricate interplay between experience or entitlement of the pages (as measured by the number of inbound hyperlinks a page already has), inherent talent or fitness of the pages (as measured by the likelihood that someone visiting the page would give a hyperlink to it), and the continual high rates of birth and death of pages on the web. We find that the web is conservative in judging talent and the overall fitness distribution is exponential, showing low variability. The small variance in talent, however, is enough to lead to experience distributions with high variance: The preferential attachment mechanism amplifies these small biases and leads to heavy-tailed power-law (PL) inbound degree distributions over all pages, as well as over pages that are of the same age. The balancing act between experience and talent on the web allows newly introduced pages with novel and interesting content to grow quickly and surpass older pages. In this regard, it is much like what we observe in high-mobility and meritocratic societies: People with entitlement continue to have access to the best resources, but there is just enough screening for fitness that allows for talented winners to emerge and join the ranks of the leaders. Finally, we show that the fitness estimates have potential practical applications in ranking query results.

  2. Embodied social interaction constitutes social cognition in pairs of humans: A minimalist virtual reality experiment

    PubMed Central

    Froese, Tom; Iizuka, Hiroyuki; Ikegami, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Scientists have traditionally limited the mechanisms of social cognition to one brain, but recent approaches claim that interaction also realizes cognitive work. Experiments under constrained virtual settings revealed that interaction dynamics implicitly guide social cognition. Here we show that embodied social interaction can be constitutive of agency detection and of experiencing another's presence. Pairs of participants moved their “avatars” along an invisible virtual line and could make haptic contact with three identical objects, two of which embodied the other's motions, but only one, the other's avatar, also embodied the other's contact sensor and thereby enabled responsive interaction. Co-regulated interactions were significantly correlated with identifications of the other's avatar and reports of the clearest awareness of the other's presence. These results challenge folk psychological notions about the boundaries of mind, but make sense from evolutionary and developmental perspectives: an extendible mind can offload cognitive work into its environment. PMID:24419102

  3. Embodied social interaction constitutes social cognition in pairs of humans: a minimalist virtual reality experiment.

    PubMed

    Froese, Tom; Iizuka, Hiroyuki; Ikegami, Takashi

    2014-01-14

    Scientists have traditionally limited the mechanisms of social cognition to one brain, but recent approaches claim that interaction also realizes cognitive work. Experiments under constrained virtual settings revealed that interaction dynamics implicitly guide social cognition. Here we show that embodied social interaction can be constitutive of agency detection and of experiencing another's presence. Pairs of participants moved their "avatars" along an invisible virtual line and could make haptic contact with three identical objects, two of which embodied the other's motions, but only one, the other's avatar, also embodied the other's contact sensor and thereby enabled responsive interaction. Co-regulated interactions were significantly correlated with identifications of the other's avatar and reports of the clearest awareness of the other's presence. These results challenge folk psychological notions about the boundaries of mind, but make sense from evolutionary and developmental perspectives: an extendible mind can offload cognitive work into its environment.

  4. 3did: a catalog of domain-based interactions of known three-dimensional structure.

    PubMed

    Mosca, Roberto; Céol, Arnaud; Stein, Amelie; Olivella, Roger; Aloy, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The database of 3D interacting domains (3did, available online for browsing and bulk download at http://3did.irbbarcelona.org) is a catalog of protein-protein interactions for which a high-resolution 3D structure is known. 3did collects and classifies all structural templates of domain-domain interactions in the Protein Data Bank, providing molecular details for such interactions. The current version also includes a pipeline for the discovery and annotation of novel domain-motif interactions. For every interaction, 3did identifies and groups different binding modes by clustering similar interfaces into 'interaction topologies'. By maintaining a constantly updated collection of domain-based structural interaction templates, 3did is a reference source of information for the structural characterization of protein interaction networks. 3did is updated every 6 months.

  5. Two-dimensional modeling of an aircraft engine structural bladed disk-casing modal interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legrand, Mathias; Pierre, Christophe; Cartraud, Patrice; Lombard, Jean-Pierre

    2009-01-01

    In modern turbo machines such as aircraft jet engines, structural contacts between the casing and bladed disk may occur through a variety of mechanisms: coincidence of vibration modes, thermal deformation of the casing, rotor imbalance due to design uncertainties to name a few. These nonlinear interactions may result in severe damage to both structures and it is important to understand the physical circumstances under which they occur. In this study, we focus on a modal coincidence during which the vibrations of each structure take the form of a k-nodal diameter traveling wave characteristic of axi-symmetric geometries. A realistic two-dimensional model of the casing and bladed disk is introduced in order to predict the occurrence of this very specific interaction phenomenon versus the rotation speed of the engine. The equations of motion are solved using an explicit time integration scheme in conjunction with the Lagrange multiplier method where friction is accounted for. This model is validated from the comparison with an analytical solution. The numerical results show that the structures may experience different kinds of behaviors (namely damped, sustained and divergent motions) mainly depending on the rotational velocity of the bladed disk.

  6. What are preferred water-aromatic interactions in proteins and crystal structures of small molecules?

    PubMed

    Janjić, Goran V; Malkov, Saša N; Zivković, Miodrag V; Zarić, Snežana D

    2014-11-21

    The distribution of water molecules around aromatic rings in the protein structures and crystal structures of small molecules shows quite a small number of the strongest OH-π interactions, a larger number of parallel interactions, and the largest number of the weakest CH-O interactions.

  7. Computer experiments on the structure and dynamics of spiral galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohl, F.

    1972-01-01

    The evolution of an initially balanced rotating disk of stars with an initial velocity dispersion given by Toomre's local criterion was investigated by means of a computer model for isolated disks of stars. It was found that the disk is unstable against very large scale modes. A stable axisymmetric disk with a velocity dispersion much larger than that given by Toomre's criterion was generated. The final mass distribution for the disk gives a high density central core and a disk population of stars that is closely approximated by an exponential variation. Various methods and rates of cooling the hot axisymmetric disks were investigated. It was found that the cooling resulted in the development of two-arm spiral structures which persisted as long as cooling continued. An experiment was performed to induce spiral structure in a galaxy by means of the close passage of a companion galaxy. Parameters similar to those expected for M51 and its companion were used. It was found that because of the high velocity dispersion of the disturbed disk galaxy, only a weak two-arm spiral structure appeared. The evolution of a uniformly rotating disk galaxy which is a stationary solution of the collisionless Boltzmann equation was investigated for various values of the initial rms velocity dispersion. It was found that the disk becomes stable at a value of the velocity dispersion predicted by theory.

  8. Precision Experiments with Single Particles in Ion Traps for Tests of Fundamental Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quint, Wolfgang

    2007-06-01

    Ion trap technology has made it possible to store, cool and observe single ions or ensembles of few ions under well controlled experimental conditions and at very low temperatures [1]. Single particles in traps allow for clean investigations of basic interactions and also for the determination of fundamental constants. This has been demonstrated by investigations of Quantum Electrodynamics (QED) with respect to the g-factor of the free electron [2] and of the electron bound in hydrogen-like carbon and oxygen [3], which form the most precise determinations of the fine-structure constant and of the mass of the electron, respectively. A precision test of CPT invariance has been performed in a proton-antiproton mass comparison with single particles in a Penning trap [4]. Optical quantum jump spectroscopy with single laser-cooled ions in rf traps has paved the way for optical frequency standards and for the investigation of a possible variation of fundamental constants. With the novel technique of deceleration, trapping and cooling, even high-accuracy experiments with highly charged ions up to uranium U91+ will be possible at the HITRAP facility at GSI Darmstadt [5]. [1] Observation of a Phase Transition of Stored Laser-Cooled Ions, F. Diedrich, E. Peik, J.M. Chen, W. Quint, H. Walther, Phys. Rev. Lett. 59, 2931 (1987) [2] New Determination of the Fine Structure Constant from the Electron g Value and QED, G. Gabrielse et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 030802 (2006). [3] New Determination of the Electron's Mass, T. Beier et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 011603 (2002). [4] Precision Mass Spectroscopy of the Antiproton and Proton Using Simultaneously Trapped Particles, G. Gabrielse et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 3198 (1999). [5] Trapping ions of hydrogen-like uranium: The HITRAP project at GSI, T. Beier et al., NIM B 235, 473 (2005).

  9. Assessing Spurious Interaction Effects in Structural Equation Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harring, Jeffrey R.; Weiss, Brandi A.; Li, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have stressed the importance of simultaneously estimating interaction and quadratic effects in multiple regression analyses, even if theory only suggests an interaction effect should be present. Specifically, past studies suggested that failing to simultaneously include quadratic effects when testing for interaction effects could…

  10. Flow-structure-acoustic interaction in a human voice model.

    PubMed

    Becker, Stefan; Kniesburges, Stefan; Müller, Stefan; Delgado, Antonio; Link, Gerhard; Kaltenbacher, Manfred; Döllinger, Michael

    2009-03-01

    For the investigation of the physical processes of human phonation, inhomogeneous synthetic vocal folds were developed to represent the full fluid-structure-acoustic coupling. They consisted of polyurethane rubber with a stiffness in the range of human vocal folds and were mounted in a channel, shaped like the vocal tract in the supraglottal region. This test facility permitted extensive observations of flow-induced vocal fold vibrations, the periodic flow field, and the acoustic signals in the far field of the channel. Detailed measurements were performed applying particle-image velocimetry, a laser-scanning vibrometer, a microphone, unsteady pressure sensors, and a hot-wire probe, with the aim of identifying the physical mechanisms in human phonation. The results support the existence of the Coanda effect during phonation, with the flow attaching to one vocal fold and separating from the other. This behavior is not linked to one vocal fold and changes stochastically from cycle to cycle. The oscillating flow field generates a tonal sound. The broadband noise is presumed to be caused by the interaction of the asymmetric flow with the downstream-facing surfaces of the vocal folds, analogous to trailing-edge noise. PMID:19275292

  11. Bicuspid aortic valve hemodynamics: a fluid-structure interaction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Santanu; Seaman, Clara; Sucosky, Philippe

    2011-11-01

    The bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is a congenital defect in which the aortic valve forms with two leaflets instead of three. While calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) also develops in the normal tricuspid aortic valve (TAV), its progression in the BAV is more rapid. Although studies have suggested a mechano-potential root for the disease, the native BAV hemodynamics remains largely unknown. This study aimed at characterizing BAV hemodynamics and quantifying the degree of wall-shear stress (WSS) abnormality on BAV leaflets. Fluid-structure interaction models validated with particle-image velocimetry were designed to predict the flow and leaflet dynamics in idealized TAV and BAV anatomies. Valvular function was quantified in terms of the effective orifice area. The regional leaflet WSS was characterized in terms of oscillatory shear index, temporal shear magnitude and temporal shear gradient. The predictions indicate the intrinsic degree of stenosis of the BAV anatomy, reveal drastic differences in shear stress magnitude and pulsatility on BAV and TAV leaflets and confirm the side- and site-specificity of the leaflet WSS. Given the ability of abnormal fluid shear stress to trigger valvular inflammation, these results support the existence of a mechano-etiology of CAVD in the BAV.

  12. Global nuclear structure effects of the tensor interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Zalewski, M.; Olbratowski, P.; Rafalski, M.; Werner, T. R.; Satula, W.; Wyss, R. A.

    2009-12-15

    A direct fit of the isoscalar spin-orbit (SO) and both isoscalar and isovector tensor coupling constants to the f{sub 5/2}-f{sub 7/2} SO splittings in {sup 40}Ca, {sup 56}Ni, and {sup 48}Ca nuclei requires a drastic reduction of the isoscalar SO strength and strong attractive tensor coupling constants. The aim of this work is to address further consequences of these strong attractive tensor and weak SO fields on binding energies, nuclear deformability, and high-spin states. In particular, the contribution to the nuclear binding energy from the tensor field shows a generic magic structure with tensorial magic numbers N(Z)=14,32,56, or 90, corresponding to the maximum spin asymmetries in 1d{sub 5/2}, 1f{sub 7/2}+2p{sub 3/2}, 1g{sub 9/2}+2d{sub 5/2}, and 1h{sub 11/2}+2f{sub 7/2} single-particle configurations, respectively, and that these numbers are smeared out by pairing correlations and deformation effects. The consequences of strong attractive tensor fields and weak SO interaction for nuclear stability at the drip lines are also examined, particularly those close to the tensorial doubly magic nuclei. The possibility of an entirely new tensor-force-driven deformation effect is discussed.

  13. Fluid-Structure interaction modeling in deformable porous arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakerzadeh, Rana; Zunino, Paolo

    2015-11-01

    A computational framework is developed to study the coupling of blood flow in arteries interacting with a poroelastic arterial wall featuring possibly large deformations. Blood is modeled as an incompressible, viscous, Newtonian fluid using the Navier-Stokes equations and the arterial wall consists of a thick material which is modeled as a Biot system that describes the mechanical behavior of a homogeneous and isotropic elastic skeleton, and connecting pores filled with fluid. Discretization via finite element method leads to the system of nonlinear equations and a Newton-Raphson scheme is adopted to solve the resulting nonlinear system through consistent linearization. Moreover, interface conditions are imposed on the discrete level via mortar finite elements or Nitsche's coupling. The discrete linearized coupled FSI system is solved by means of a splitting strategy, which allows solving the Navier-Stokes and Biot equations separately. The numerical results investigate the effects of proroelastic parameters on the pressure wave propagation in arteries, filtration of incompressible fluids through the porous media, and the structure displacement. The fellowship support from the Computational Modeling & Simulation PhD program at University of Pittsburgh for Rana Zakerzadeh is gratefully acknowledged.

  14. Structural features of DNA interaction with caffeine and theophylline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nafisi, Shohreh; Manouchehri, Firouzeh; Tajmir-Riahi, Heidar-Ali; Varavipour, Maryam

    2008-03-01

    Caffeine and theophylline are strong antioxidants that prevent DNA damage. The anticancer and antiviral activities of these natural products are implicated in their mechanism of actions. However, there has been no information on the interactions of these xanthine derivatives with individual DNA at molecular level. The aim of this study was to examine the stability and structural features of calf-thymus DNA complexes with caffeine and theophylline in aqueous solution, using constant DNA concentration (6.25 mM) and various caffeine or theophylline/DNA(P) ratios of 1/80, 1/40, 1/20, 1/10, 1/5, 1/2 and 1/1. FTIR, UV-visible spectroscopic methods were used to determine the ligand external binding modes, the binding constant and the stability of caffeine, theophylline-DNA complexes in aqueous solution. Spectroscopic evidence showed that the complexation of caffeine and theophylline with DNA occurred via G-C and A-T and PO 2 group with overall binding constants of K(caffeine-DNA) = 9.7 × 10 3 M -1 and K(theophylline-DNA) = 1.7 × 10 4 M -1. The affinity of ligand-DNA binding is in the order of theophylline > caffeine. A partial B to A-DNA transition occurs upon caffeine and theophylline complexation.

  15. Numerical simulation of the fluid-structure interaction between air blast waves and soil structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umar, S.; Risby, M. S.; Albert, A. Luthfi; Norazman, M.; Ariffin, I.; Alias, Y. Muhamad

    2014-03-01

    Normally, an explosion threat on free field especially from high explosives is very dangerous due to the ground shocks generated that have high impulsive load. Nowadays, explosion threats do not only occur in the battlefield, but also in industries and urban areas. In industries such as oil and gas, explosion threats may occur on logistic transportation, maintenance, production, and distribution pipeline that are located underground to supply crude oil. Therefore, the appropriate blast resistances are a priority requirement that can be obtained through an assessment on the structural response, material strength and impact pattern of material due to ground shock. A highly impulsive load from ground shocks is a dynamic load due to its loading time which is faster than ground response time. Of late, almost all blast studies consider and analyze the ground shock in the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) because of its influence on the propagation and interaction of ground shock. Furthermore, analysis in the FSI integrates action of ground shock and reaction of ground on calculations of velocity, pressure and force. Therefore, this integration of the FSI has the capability to deliver the ground shock analysis on simulation to be closer to experimental investigation results. In this study, the FSI was implemented on AUTODYN computer code by using Euler-Godunov and the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE). Euler-Godunov has the capability to deliver a structural computation on a 3D analysis, while ALE delivers an arbitrary calculation that is appropriate for a FSI analysis. In addition, ALE scheme delivers fine approach on little deformation analysis with an arbitrary motion, while the Euler-Godunov scheme delivers fine approach on a large deformation analysis. An integrated scheme based on Euler-Godunov and the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian allows us to analyze the blast propagation waves and structural interaction simultaneously.

  16. Students' experiences with interactivity and learning in a high school physics multimedia distance learning course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarreal-Stewart, Irene

    The purpose guiding this research has been to learn about and describe the phenomena of interactivity from the learners' perspectives and to learn which of the interactivity affordances and practices were actually used by students and why in the process of learning physics using an interactive multimedia distance learning course system. The bigger purpose behind learning about and describing interactivity has been to gain knowledge and perspective for its instructional design to benefit the learner, the school as curriculum implementer, and instructional media designers to create better products. Qualitative methodology in the interpretivist tradition was used, that is, in-depth interviews and on-site observations, to gain understanding of interactivity from the learners' perspective and to gain understanding of the student learning context impacting and shaping the students' interactivity experiences. NVivo was used to sort, organize and index data. All data were read on three levels: literally, interpretively, and reflexively; and were read comparatively to other perspectives to get descriptions and interpretations that were holistic to the implementation and had potential insight to improve practice for instructional designers, teachers, administrators, specifically to improve the learning experience for students. Site-Specific Findings: Students watched videos, resisted using phone and e-mail, and worked math problems to demonstrate learning, which resulted in very little interactivity, virtually no dialogue about physics, no physical activity, one-way communication, multifaceted dissatisfaction, student need for teacher involvement in the learning enterprise, student appreciation for interactivity, and expressed desire for a real, live teacher. I also found that some students did experience the system as interactive, did experience learner control and self-directed learning, and despite dissatisfaction, liked and appreciated the course. Wider Applications

  17. The bait compatibility index: computational bait selection for interaction proteomics experiments.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sudipto; Kaur, Parminder; Ewing, Rob M

    2010-10-01

    Protein interaction network maps have been generated for multiple species, making use of large-scale methods such as yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) and affinity purification mass spectrometry (AP-MS). These methods take fundamentally different approaches toward characterizing protein networks, and the resulting data sets provide complementary views of the protein interactome. The specific determinants of the outcome of Y2H and AP-MS experiments, in terms of detection of interacting proteins are, however, poorly understood. Here we show that a statistical model built using sequence- and annotation-based features of bait proteins is able to identify bait features that are significant determinants of the outcome of interaction proteomics experiments. We show that bait features are able to explain in part the disparities observed between Y2H and AP-MS constructed networks and can be used to derive the "bait compatibility index", a numeric score that assesses the compatibility of bait proteins with each technology. Aside from understanding the bias and limitations of interaction proteomics, our approach provides a rational, data-driven method for prioritization of baits for interaction proteomics experiments, an essential requirement for future proteome-wide applications of these technologies.

  18. Observing the structure of the landscape with the CMB experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ashoorioon, Amjad

    2010-04-01

    Assuming that inflation happened through a series of tunneling in the string theory landscape, it is argued that one can determine the structure of vacua using precise measurements of the scalar spectral index and tensor perturbations at large scales. It is shown that for a vacuum structure where the energy gap between the minima is constant, i.e. ε{sub i} = im{sub f}{sup 4}, one obtains the scalar spectral index, n{sub s}, to be ≅ 0.9687, for the modes that exit the horizon 60 e-folds before the end of inflation. Alternatively, for a vacuum structure in which the energy gap increases linearly with the vacuum index, i.e. ε{sub i} = ½i{sup 2}m{sub f}{sup 4}, n{sub s} turns out to be ≅ 0.9614. Both these two models are motivated within the string theory landscape using flux-compactification and their predictions for scalar spectral index are compatible with WMAP results. For both these two models, the results for the scalar spectral index turn out to be independent of m{sub f}. Nonetheless, assuming that inflation started at Planckian energies and that there had been successful thermalization at each step, one can constrain m{sub f} < 2.6069 × 10{sup −5}m{sub P} and m{sub f} < 6.5396 × 10{sup −7}m{sub P} in these two models, respectively. Violation of the single-field consistency relation between the tensor and scalar spectra is another prediction of chain inflation models. This corresponds to having a smaller tensor/scalar ratio at large scales in comparison with the slow-roll counterparts. Similar to slow-roll inflation, it is argued that one can reconstruct the vacuum structure using the CMB experiments.

  19. Experiments on explosive interactions between zirconium-containing melt and water (ZREX).

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, D. H.

    1998-04-10

    The results of two series of experiments on explosive interactions between zirconium-containing melt and water are described. The first series of experiments involved dropping 1-kg batches of zirconium-zirconium dioxide mixture melt into a column of water while the second series employed 1.2-kg batches of zirconium-stainless steel mixture melt. Explosions took place only in those tests which were externally triggered. While the extent of zirconium oxidation in the triggered experiments was quite large, the explosion energies estimated from the experimental measurements were found to be small compared to the combined thermal and chemical energy available.

  20. How Do Interaction Experiences Influence Doctoral Students' Academic Pursuits in Biomedical Research?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kong, Xiaoqing; Chakraverty, Devasmita; Jeffe, Donna B.; Andriole, Dorothy A.; Wathington, Heather D.; Tai, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    This exploratory qualitative study investigated how doctoral students reported their personal and professional interaction experiences that they believed might facilitate or impede their academic pursuits in biomedical research. We collected 19 in-depth interviews with doctoral students in biomedical research from eight universities, and we based…

  1. On the Use of Interactive Texts in Undergraduate Chemical Reaction Engineering Courses: A Pedagogical Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asensio, Daniela A.; Barassi, Francisca J.; Zambon, Mariana T.; Mazza, Germán D.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a pedagogical experience carried out at the University of Comahue, Argentina, with an interactive text (IT) concerning Homogeneous Chemical Reactors Analysis. The IT was built on the frame of the "Mathematica" software with the aim of providing students with a robust computational tool. Students'…

  2. Professional Interaction, Relevant Practical Experience, and Intellectual Contributions at Nondoctoral AACSB-Accredited Accounting Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arlinghaus, Barry P.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses a survey of faculty members at nondoctoral AACSB-accredited accounting programs in the United States. The purpose of the survey was to determine the environment for professional interaction and relevant experience in light of institutional demands for intellectual contributions. The findings show that the…

  3. Towards Understanding the Two Way Interaction Effects of Extraversion and Openness to Experience on Career Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arora, Ridhi; Rangnekar, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we examined potential two-way interaction effects of the Big Five personality traits extraversion and openness to experience on career commitment measured in terms of three components of career identity, career resilience, and career planning. Participants included 450 managers from public and private sector organizations in North…

  4. Enhancing Children's Language Learning and Cognition Experience through Interactive Kinetic Typography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lau, Newman M. L.; Chu, Veni H. T.

    2015-01-01

    This research aimed at investigating the method of using kinetic typography and interactive approach to conduct a design experiment for children to learn vocabularies. Typography is the unique art and technique of arranging type in order to make language visible. By adding animated movement to characters, kinetic typography expresses language…

  5. Effects of Professional Experience and Group Interaction on Information Requested in Analyzing IT Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehmann, Constance M.; Heagy, Cynthia D.

    2008-01-01

    The authors investigated the effects of professional experience and group interaction on the information that information technology professionals and graduate accounting information system (AIS) students request when analyzing business cases related to information systems design and implementation. Understanding these effects can contribute to…

  6. User Experience of Mobile Interactivity: How Do Mobile Websites Affect Attitudes and Relational Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dou, Xue

    2013-01-01

    Mobile media offer new opportunities for fostering communications between individuals and companies. Corporate websites are being increasingly accessed via smart phones and companies are scrambling to offer a mobile-friendly user experience on their sites. However, very little is known about how interactivity in the mobile context affects user…

  7. Men's and Women's Satisfying and Frustrating Experiences in Close Relationship Interactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedland, Randi

    Clinicians and family theorists have speculated that men and women differ in their orientations to close relationships, although these stereotypic patterns have not been investigated empirically. To determine whether people's interactional experiences are characterized by distinctive, sex-linked orientations to expressiveness and caring, 252 men…

  8. Plasma-wall interaction data needs critical to a Burning Core Experiment (BCX)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-11-01

    The Division of Development and Technology has sponsored a four day US-Japan workshop ''Plasma-Wall Interaction Data Needs Critical to a Burning Core Experiment (BCX)'', held at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California on June 24 to 27, 1985. The workshop, which brought together fifty scientists and engineers from the United States, Japan, Germany, and Canada, considered the plasma-material interaction and high heat flux (PMI/HHF) issues for the next generation of magnetic fusion energy devices, the Burning Core Experiment (BCX). Materials options were ranked, and a strategy for future PMI/HHF research was formulated. The foundation for international collaboration and coordination of this research was also established. This volume contains the last three of the five technical sessions. The first of the three is on plasma materials interaction issues, the second is on research facilities and the third is from smaller working group meetings on graphite, beryllium, advanced materials and future collaborations.

  9. Analyses of fluid-structure interaction and structural response of reactor vessels to a postulated accident

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.

    1993-08-01

    This paper describes fluid-structure-interaction and structure response analyses of a reactor vessel subjected to loadings associated with postulated accidents, using the improved hybrid Lagrangian-Eulerian code ALICE-II. The objective of the present analyses is to study the cover response and potential for missile generation in response to a fuel-coolant interaction in the core region. Three calculations were performed using the cover weight as a parameter. To study the effect of the cavity water outside the reactor vessel, vessel response calculations for both wet- and dry-cavity designs are compared. Results indicate that for all cases studied and for the design parameters assumed, the calculated cover displacements are all smaller than the bolts` ultimate displacement and no missile generation of the closure head is predicted. Also, solutions reveal that the cavity water of the wet-cavity design plays an important role of restraining the downward displacement of the bottom head. Based on these studies, the analyses predict that the structure integrity is maintained throughout the postulated accident for the wet-cavity design.

  10. Curvilinear Immersed Boundary Method for Simulating Fluid Structure Interaction with Complex 3D Rigid Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Borazjani, Iman; Ge, Liang; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2010-01-01

    The sharp-interface CURVIB approach of Ge and Sotiropoulos [L. Ge, F. Sotiropoulos, A Numerical Method for Solving the 3D Unsteady Incompressible Navier-Stokes Equations in Curvilinear Domains with Complex Immersed Boundaries, Journal of Computational Physics 225 (2007) 1782–1809] is extended to simulate fluid structure interaction (FSI) problems involving complex 3D rigid bodies undergoing large structural displacements. The FSI solver adopts the partitioned FSI solution approach and both loose and strong coupling strategies are implemented. The interfaces between immersed bodies and the fluid are discretized with a Lagrangian grid and tracked with an explicit front-tracking approach. An efficient ray-tracing algorithm is developed to quickly identify the relationship between the background grid and the moving bodies. Numerical experiments are carried out for two FSI problems: vortex induced vibration of elastically mounted cylinders and flow through a bileaflet mechanical heart valve at physiologic conditions. For both cases the computed results are in excellent agreement with benchmark simulations and experimental measurements. The numerical experiments suggest that both the properties of the structure (mass, geometry) and the local flow conditions can play an important role in determining the stability of the FSI algorithm. Under certain conditions unconditionally unstable iteration schemes result even when strong coupling FSI is employed. For such cases, however, combining the strong-coupling iteration with under-relaxation in conjunction with the Aitken’s acceleration technique is shown to effectively resolve the stability problems. A theoretical analysis is presented to explain the findings of the numerical experiments. It is shown that the ratio of the added mass to the mass of the structure as well as the sign of the local time rate of change of the force or moment imparted on the structure by the fluid determine the stability and convergence of the

  11. MOLECULAR INTERACTION POTENTIALS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    One reasonable approach to the analysis of the relationships between molecular structure and toxic activity is through the investigation of the forces and intermolecular interactions responsible for chemical toxicity. The interaction between the xenobiotic and the bio...

  12. Structural and Biological Interaction of hsc-70 Protein with Phosphatidylserine in Endosomal Microautophagy.

    PubMed

    Morozova, Kateryna; Clement, Cristina C; Kaushik, Susmita; Stiller, Barbara; Arias, Esperanza; Ahmad, Atta; Rauch, Jennifer N; Chatterjee, Victor; Melis, Chiara; Scharf, Brian; Gestwicki, Jason E; Cuervo, Ana-Maria; Zuiderweg, Erik R P; Santambrogio, Laura

    2016-08-26

    hsc-70 (HSPA8) is a cytosolic molecular chaperone, which plays a central role in cellular proteostasis, including quality control during protein refolding and regulation of protein degradation. hsc-70 is pivotal to the process of macroautophagy, chaperone-mediated autophagy, and endosomal microautophagy. The latter requires hsc-70 interaction with negatively charged phosphatidylserine (PS) at the endosomal limiting membrane. Herein, by combining plasmon resonance, NMR spectroscopy, and amino acid mutagenesis, we mapped the C terminus of the hsc-70 LID domain as the structural interface interacting with endosomal PS, and we estimated an hsc-70/PS equilibrium dissociation constant of 4.7 ± 0.1 μm. This interaction is specific and involves a total of 4-5 lysine residues. Plasmon resonance and NMR results were further experimentally validated by hsc-70 endosomal binding experiments and endosomal microautophagy assays. The discovery of this previously unknown contact surface for hsc-70 in this work elucidates the mechanism of hsc-70 PS/membrane interaction for cytosolic cargo internalization into endosomes. PMID:27405763

  13. Development of AN Interactive MR Fluid Experiment for Smart Materials Curricula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannerot, R.; Song, G.

    This paper presents the development of an interactive MR (Magneto-Rheological) fluid experiment. The hands-on experiment is developed to introduce MR fluids to students who are interested in this smart fluid. This apparatus is also used as a teaching tool for courses in smart materials. The experiment is designed to show students the basic operations of MR fluids and some common applications. This interactive experiment includes three devices with associated control buttons and all the devices are housed in a clear display case for easy visualization. 1) MR fluid morphing device, which clearly shows the morphing of MR material between fluid and semi-solid with the control of the electromagnet. 2) MR brake, which allow a user clearly feel the change of resistance level of the crank shaft with increasing of current to the electromagnets. 3) Vibration damping using MR fluid damper, which shows that the vibration of a platform induced by a rotating motor with an imbalanced mass can be suppressed by a simple MR fluid damper. This interactive experiment is fully autonomous and has been used in University of Houston. It has been demonstrated that it is an effective tool to assist student to learn MR fluids.

  14. Nonstandard interactions and resolving the ordering of neutrino masses at DUNE and other long baseline experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masud, Mehedi; Mehta, Poonam

    2016-09-01

    In the era of precision neutrino physics, we study the influence of nonstandard interactions (NSI) of matter on the question of neutrino mass ordering and its resolution. At long-baseline experiments, since matter effects play a crucial role in addressing this very important question, it is timely to investigate how subleading effects due to NSI may affect and drastically alter inferences pertaining to this question. We demonstrate that the sensitivity to mass ordering gets significantly impacted due to NSI effects for various long-baseline experiments, including the upcoming long-baseline experiment Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE). Finally, we draw a comparison between DUNE and the sensitivities offered by two of the current neutrino beam experiments, NOvA and T2K.

  15. Laser-plasma interaction in the context of inertial fusion: experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labaune, C.; Lewis, K.; Bandulet, H.; Depierreux, S.; Hüller, S.; Masson-Laborde, P. E.; Pesme, D.; Loiseau, P.

    2007-08-01

    Many nonlinear processes may affect the laser beam propagation and the laser energy deposition in the underdense plasma surrounding the pellet. These processes, associated with anomalous and nonlinear absorption mechanisms, are fundamental issues in the context of Inertial Confinement Fusion. The work presented in this article refers to laser-plasma interaction experiments which were conducted under well-controlled conditions, and to their theoretical and numerical modeling. Thanks to important diagnostics improvements, the plasma and laser parameters were sufficiently characterized in these experiments to make it possible to carry out numerical simulations modeling the laser plasma interaction in which the hydrodynamics conditions were very close to the experimental ones. Two sets of experiments were carried out with the LULI 2000 and the six beam LULI laser facilities. In the first series of experiments, the interaction between two single hot spots was studied as a function of their distance, intensity and light polarization. In the second series, the intensity distribution of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) inside the plasma was studied by means of a new temporally resolved imaging system. Two-dimensional (2D) simulations were carried out with our code Harmony2D in order to model these experiments. For both series of experiments, the numerical results show a very good agreement with the experimental ones for what concerns the main SBS features, namely the spatial and temporal behavior of the SBS-driven acoustic waves, as well as the average SBS reflectivities. Thus, these well diagnosed experiments, carried out with well defined conditions, make it possible to benchmark our theoretical and numerical modelings and, hence, to improve our predictive capabilities for future experiments.

  16. MEMS Reliability: Infrastructure, Test Structures, Experiments, and Failure Modes

    SciTech Connect

    TANNER,DANELLE M.; SMITH,NORMAN F.; IRWIN,LLOYD W.; EATON,WILLIAM P.; HELGESEN,KAREN SUE; CLEMENT,J. JOSEPH; MILLER,WILLIAM M.; MILLER,SAMUEL L.; DUGGER,MICHAEL T.; WALRAVEN,JEREMY A.; PETERSON,KENNETH A.

    2000-01-01

    The burgeoning new technology of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) shows great promise in the weapons arena. We can now conceive of micro-gyros, micro-surety systems, and micro-navigators that are extremely small and inexpensive. Do we want to use this new technology in critical applications such as nuclear weapons? This question drove us to understand the reliability and failure mechanisms of silicon surface-micromachined MEMS. Development of a testing infrastructure was a crucial step to perform reliability experiments on MEMS devices and will be reported here. In addition, reliability test structures have been designed and characterized. Many experiments were performed to investigate failure modes and specifically those in different environments (humidity, temperature, shock, vibration, and storage). A predictive reliability model for wear of rubbing surfaces in microengines was developed. The root causes of failure for operating and non-operating MEMS are discussed. The major failure mechanism for operating MEMS was wear of the polysilicon rubbing surfaces. Reliability design rules for future MEMS devices are established.

  17. Light sterile neutrinos, lepton number violating interactions and short baseline neutrino experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, K. S.; McKay, D. W.; Mocioiu, Irina; Pakvasa, Sandip

    2016-06-01

    We develop the consequences of introducing a purely leptonic, non-standard interaction (NSI) ΔL = 2, four-fermion effective Lagrangian and standard model neutrino mixing with a fourth, sterile neutrino in the analysis of short-baseline, neutrino experiments. We focus on the muon decay at rest (DAR) results from the Liquid Scintillation Neutrino Experiment (LSND) and the Karlsruhe and Rutherford medium Energy Neutrino Experiment (KARMEN), seeking a reconciliation between the two. Both v¯e appearance from v¯μ oscillation and v¯e survival after production from NSI decay of the µ+ contribute to the expected signal. This is a unique feature of our scheme. We comment on further implications of the lepton number violating interaction and sterile neutrino-standard neutrino mixing.

  18. Experiments on beam plasma interactions and EM waves in magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelps, Alan D. R.

    2012-04-01

    An energetic electron beam can exhibit several types of interesting behaviour when interacting with plasmas and/or magnetic fields. The focus in the present work is on electron cyclotron maser interactions. The instabilities that occur are also often observed in space as well as in the laboratory. Some of the high power sources of electromagnetic radiation, such as gyrodevices, make use of similar instability mechanisms. Laboratory experiments and numerical simulations have led to both a better understanding of natural phenomena and the development of high power electromagnetic radiation sources for several applications in fusion plasma physics. The gyrotron is one such device that is being used to provide auxiliary heating for large tokamaks via electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH). It is planned to use a number of gyrotrons supplied by several nations in the ITER experiment. In the ITER experiment these gyrotrons will not only be used for auxiliary heating but also for advanced tailoring of the tokamak plasma properties.

  19. Simulation of Fluid-Structure and Fluid-Mediated Structure-Structure Interactions in Stokes Regime Using Immersed Boundary Method

    PubMed Central

    Baghalnezhad, Masoud; Mirzaee, Iraj

    2014-01-01

    The Stokes flow induced by the motion of an elastic massless filament immersed in a two-dimensional fluid is studied. Initially, the filament is deviated from its equilibrium state and the fluid is at rest. The filament will induce fluid motion while returning to its equilibrium state. Two different test cases are examined. In both cases, the motion of a fixed-end massless filament induces the fluid motion inside a square domain. However, in the second test case, a deformable circular string is placed in the square domain and its interaction with the Stokes flow induced by the filament motion is studied. The interaction between the fluid and deformable body/bodies can become very complicated from the computational point of view. An immersed boundary method is used in the present study. In order to substantiate the accuracy of the numerical method employed, the simulated results associated with the Stokes flow induced by the motion of an extending star string are compared well with those obtained by the immersed interface method. The results show the ability and accuracy of the IBM method in solving the complicated fluid-structure and fluid-mediated structure-structure interaction problems happening in a wide variety of engineering and biological systems. PMID:24711736

  20. Simulation of fluid-structure and fluid-mediated structure-structure interactions in Stokes regime using immersed boundary method.

    PubMed

    Baghalnezhad, Masoud; Dadvand, Abdolrahman; Mirzaee, Iraj

    2014-01-01

    The Stokes flow induced by the motion of an elastic massless filament immersed in a two-dimensional fluid is studied. Initially, the filament is deviated from its equilibrium state and the fluid is at rest. The filament will induce fluid motion while returning to its equilibrium state. Two different test cases are examined. In both cases, the motion of a fixed-end massless filament induces the fluid motion inside a square domain. However, in the second test case, a deformable circular string is placed in the square domain and its interaction with the Stokes flow induced by the filament motion is studied. The interaction between the fluid and deformable body/bodies can become very complicated from the computational point of view. An immersed boundary method is used in the present study. In order to substantiate the accuracy of the numerical method employed, the simulated results associated with the Stokes flow induced by the motion of an extending star string are compared well with those obtained by the immersed interface method. The results show the ability and accuracy of the IBM method in solving the complicated fluid-structure and fluid-mediated structure-structure interaction problems happening in a wide variety of engineering and biological systems.

  1. Non-Chemical Distant Cellular Interactions as a potential confounder of cell biology experiments.

    PubMed

    Farhadi, Ashkan

    2014-01-01

    Distant cells can communicate with each other through a variety of methods. Two such methods involve electrical and/or chemical mechanisms. Non-chemical, distant cellular interactions may be another method of communication that cells can use to modify the behavior of other cells that are mechanically separated. Moreover, non-chemical, distant cellular interactions may explain some cases of confounding effects in Cell Biology experiments. In this article, we review non-chemical, distant cellular interactions studies to try to shed light on the mechanisms in this highly unconventional field of cell biology. Despite the existence of several theories that try to explain the mechanism of non-chemical, distant cellular interactions, this phenomenon is still speculative. Among candidate mechanisms, electromagnetic waves appear to have the most experimental support. In this brief article, we try to answer a few key questions that may further clarify this mechanism.

  2. Residents' perceptions and experiences of social interaction and participation in leisure activities in residential aged care.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jessica E; O'Connell, Beverly; Gaskin, Cadeyrn J

    2013-10-01

    Social interaction and participation in leisure activities are positively related to the health and well-being of elderly people. The main focus of this exploratory study was to investigate elderly peoples' perceptions and experiences of social interaction and leisure activities living in a residential aged care (RAC) facility. Six residents were interviewed. Themes emerging from discussions about their social interactions included: importance of family, fostering friendships with fellow residents, placement at dining room tables, multiple communication methods, and minimal social isolation and boredom. Excursions away from the RAC facility were favourite activities. Participants commonly were involved in leisure activities to be socially connected. Poor health, family, the RAC facility, staffing, transportation, and geography influenced their social interaction and participation in leisure activities. The use of new technologies and creative problem solving with staff are ways in which residents could enhance their social lives and remain engaged in leisure activities. PMID:24299253

  3. Space-time structure of weak and electromagnetic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hestenes, D.

    1982-02-01

    The generator of electromagnetic gauge transformations in the Dirac equation has a unique geometric interpretation and a unique extension to the generators of the gauge group SU(2) x U(1) for the Weinberg--Salam theory of weak and electromagnetic interactions. It follows that internal symmetries of the weak interactions can be interpreted as space-time symmetries of spinor fields in the Dirac algebra. The possibilities for interpreting strong interaction symmetries in a similar way are highly restricted.

  4. FRETsg: Biomolecular structure model building from multiple FRET experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, G. F.; Grubmüller, H.

    2004-04-01

    Fluorescence energy transfer (FRET) experiments of site-specifically labelled proteins allow one to determine distances between residues at the single molecule level, which provide information on the three-dimensional structural dynamics of the biomolecule. To systematically extract this information from the experimental data, we describe a program that generates an ensemble of configurations of residues in space that agree with the experimental distances between these positions. Furthermore, a fluctuation analysis allows to determine the structural accuracy from the experimental error. Program summaryTitle of program: FRETsg Catalogue identifier: ADTU Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADTU Computer: SGI Octane, Pentium II/III, Athlon MP, DEC Alpha Operating system: Unix, Linux, Windows98/NT/XP Programming language used: ANSI C No. of bits in a word: 32 or 64 No. of processors used: 1 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 11407 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1647 Distribution format: gzipped tar file Nature of the physical problem: Given an arbitrary number of distance distributions between an arbitrary number of points in three-dimensional space, find all configurations (set of coordinates) that obey the given distances. Method of solution: Each distance is described by a harmonic potential. Starting from random initial configurations, their total energy is minimized by steepest descent. Fluctuations of positions are chosen to generate distance distribution widths that best fit the given values.

  5. Three Dimensional Viscous Finite Element Formulation For Acoustic Fluid Structure Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Lei; White, Robert D.; Grosh, Karl

    2010-01-01

    A three dimensional viscous finite element model is presented in this paper for the analysis of the acoustic fluid structure interaction systems including, but not limited to, the cochlear-based transducers. The model consists of a three dimensional viscous acoustic fluid medium interacting with a two dimensional flat structure domain. The fluid field is governed by the linearized Navier-Stokes equation with the fluid displacements and the pressure chosen as independent variables. The mixed displacement/pressure based formulation is used in the fluid field in order to alleviate the locking in the nearly incompressible fluid. The structure is modeled as a Mindlin plate with or without residual stress. The Hinton-Huang’s 9-noded Lagrangian plate element is chosen in order to be compatible with 27/4 u/p fluid elements. The results from the full 3d FEM model are in good agreement with experimental results and other FEM results including Beltman’s thin film viscoacoustic element [2] and two and half dimensional inviscid elements [21]. Although it is computationally expensive, it provides a benchmark solution for other numerical models or approximations to compare to besides experiments and it is capable of modeling any irregular geometries and material properties while other numerical models may not be applicable. PMID:20174602

  6. Trophic and Non-Trophic Interactions in a Biodiversity Experiment Assessed by Next-Generation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Tiede, Julia; Wemheuer, Bernd; Traugott, Michael; Daniel, Rolf; Tscharntke, Teja; Ebeling, Anne; Scherber, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Plant diversity affects species richness and abundance of taxa at higher trophic levels. However, plant diversity effects on omnivores (feeding on multiple trophic levels) and their trophic and non-trophic interactions are not yet studied because appropriate methods were lacking. A promising approach is the DNA-based analysis of gut contents using next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. Here, we integrate NGS-based analysis into the framework of a biodiversity experiment where plant taxonomic and functional diversity were manipulated to directly assess environmental interactions involving the omnivorous ground beetle Pterostichus melanarius. Beetle regurgitates were used for NGS-based analysis with universal 18S rDNA primers for eukaryotes. We detected a wide range of taxa with the NGS approach in regurgitates, including organisms representing trophic, phoretic, parasitic, and neutral interactions with P. melanarius. Our findings suggest that the frequency of (i) trophic interactions increased with plant diversity and vegetation cover; (ii) intraguild predation increased with vegetation cover, and (iii) neutral interactions with organisms such as fungi and protists increased with vegetation cover. Experimentally manipulated plant diversity likely affects multitrophic interactions involving omnivorous consumers. Our study therefore shows that trophic and non-trophic interactions can be assessed via NGS to address fundamental questions in biodiversity research. PMID:26859146

  7. Trophic and Non-Trophic Interactions in a Biodiversity Experiment Assessed by Next-Generation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Tiede, Julia; Wemheuer, Bernd; Traugott, Michael; Daniel, Rolf; Tscharntke, Teja; Ebeling, Anne; Scherber, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Plant diversity affects species richness and abundance of taxa at higher trophic levels. However, plant diversity effects on omnivores (feeding on multiple trophic levels) and their trophic and non-trophic interactions are not yet studied because appropriate methods were lacking. A promising approach is the DNA-based analysis of gut contents using next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. Here, we integrate NGS-based analysis into the framework of a biodiversity experiment where plant taxonomic and functional diversity were manipulated to directly assess environmental interactions involving the omnivorous ground beetle Pterostichus melanarius. Beetle regurgitates were used for NGS-based analysis with universal 18S rDNA primers for eukaryotes. We detected a wide range of taxa with the NGS approach in regurgitates, including organisms representing trophic, phoretic, parasitic, and neutral interactions with P. melanarius. Our findings suggest that the frequency of (i) trophic interactions increased with plant diversity and vegetation cover; (ii) intraguild predation increased with vegetation cover, and (iii) neutral interactions with organisms such as fungi and protists increased with vegetation cover. Experimentally manipulated plant diversity likely affects multitrophic interactions involving omnivorous consumers. Our study therefore shows that trophic and non-trophic interactions can be assessed via NGS to address fundamental questions in biodiversity research.

  8. Trophic and Non-Trophic Interactions in a Biodiversity Experiment Assessed by Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Tiede, Julia; Wemheuer, Bernd; Traugott, Michael; Daniel, Rolf; Tscharntke, Teja; Ebeling, Anne; Scherber, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Plant diversity affects species richness and abundance of taxa at higher trophic levels. However, plant diversity effects on omnivores (feeding on multiple trophic levels) and their trophic and non-trophic interactions are not yet studied because appropriate methods were lacking. A promising approach is the DNA-based analysis of gut contents using next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. Here, we integrate NGS-based analysis into the framework of a biodiversity experiment where plant taxonomic and functional diversity were manipulated to directly assess environmental interactions involving the omnivorous ground beetle Pterostichus melanarius. Beetle regurgitates were used for NGS-based analysis with universal 18S rDNA primers for eukaryotes. We detected a wide range of taxa with the NGS approach in regurgitates, including organisms representing trophic, phoretic, parasitic, and neutral interactions with P. melanarius. Our findings suggest that the frequency of (i) trophic interactions increased with plant diversity and vegetation cover; (ii) intraguild predation increased with vegetation cover, and (iii) neutral interactions with organisms such as fungi and protists increased with vegetation cover. Experimentally manipulated plant diversity likely affects multitrophic interactions involving omnivorous consumers. Our study therefore shows that trophic and non-trophic interactions can be assessed via NGS to address fundamental questions in biodiversity research. PMID:26859146

  9. A new multimodal interactive way of subjective scoring of 3D video quality of experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taewan; Lee, Kwanghyun; Lee, Sanghoon; Bovik, Alan C.

    2014-03-01

    People that watch today's 3D visual programs, such as 3D cinema, 3D TV and 3D games, experience wide and dynamically varying ranges of 3D visual immersion and 3D quality of experience (QoE). It is necessary to be able to deploy reliable methodologies that measure each viewers subjective experience. We propose a new methodology that we call Multimodal Interactive Continuous Scoring of Quality (MICSQ). MICSQ is composed of a device interaction process between the 3D display and a separate device (PC, tablet, etc.) used as an assessment tool, and a human interaction process between the subject(s) and the device. The scoring process is multimodal, using aural and tactile cues to help engage and focus the subject(s) on their tasks. Moreover, the wireless device interaction process makes it possible for multiple subjects to assess 3D QoE simultaneously in a large space such as a movie theater, and at di®erent visual angles and distances.

  10. An Interactive Exercise To Learn Eukaryotic Cell Structure and Organelle Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klionsky, Daniel J.; Tomashek, John J.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a cooperative, interactive problem-solving exercise for studying eukaryotic cell structure and function. Highlights the dynamic aspects of movement through the cell. Contains 15 references. (WRM)

  11. Bridging experiment and theory: A template for unifying NMR data and electronic structure calculations

    DOE PAGES

    Brown, David M. L.; Cho, Herman; de Jong, Wibe A.

    2016-02-09

    Here, the testing of theoretical models with experimental data is an integral part of the scientific method, and a logical place to search for new ways of stimulating scientific productivity. Often experiment/theory comparisons may be viewed as a workflow comprised of well-defined, rote operations distributed over several distinct computers, as exemplified by the way in which predictions from electronic structure theories are evaluated with results from spectroscopic experiments. For workflows such as this, which may be laborious and time consuming to perform manually, software that could orchestrate the operations and transfer results between computers in a seamless and automated fashionmore » would offer major efficiency gains. Such tools also promise to alter how researchers interact with data outside their field of specialization by, e.g., making raw experimental results more accessible to theorists, and the outputs of theoretical calculations more readily comprehended by experimentalists.« less

  12. Learning about Intermolecular Interactions from the Cambridge Structural Database

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battle, Gary M.; Allen, Frank H.

    2012-01-01

    A clear understanding and appreciation of noncovalent interactions, especially hydrogen bonding, are vitally important to students of chemistry and the life sciences, including biochemistry, molecular biology, pharmacology, and medicine. The opportunities afforded by the IsoStar knowledge base of intermolecular interactions to enhance the…

  13. Nonlinear dynamic fluid-structure interaction calculations with coupled finite element and finite volume programs

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.W.; Kashiwa, B.A.; Meier, R.W.; Bishop, S.

    1994-08-01

    Two- and three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction computer programs for the simulation of nonlinear dynamics were developed and applied to a number of problems. The programs were created by coupling Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian finite volume fluid dynamics programs with strictly Lagrangian finite element structural dynamics programs. The resulting coupled programs can use either fully explicit or implicit time integration. The implicit time integration is accomplished by iterations of the fluid dynamics pressure solver and the structural dynamics system solver. The coupled programs have been used to solve problems involving incompressible fluids, membrane and shell elements, compressible multiphase flows, explosions in both air and water, and large displacements. In this paper, we present the approach used for the coupling and describe test problems that verify the two-dimensional programs against an experiment and an analytical linear problem. The experiment involves an explosion underwater near an instrumented thin steel plate. The analytical linear problem is the vibration of an infinite cylinder surrounded by an incompressible fluid to a given radius.

  14. Nonlinear dynamic fluid-structure interaction calculations with coupled finite element and finite volume programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, M. W.; Kashiwa, B. A.; Meier, R. W.; Bishop, S.

    1994-07-01

    Two- and three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction computer programs for the simulation of nonlinear dynamics were developed and applied to a number of problems. The programs were created by coupling Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian finite volume fluid dynamics programs with strictly Lagrangian finite element structural dynamics programs. The resulting coupled programs can use either fully explicit or implicit time integration. The implicit time integration is accomplished by iterations of the fluid dynamics pressure solver and the structural dynamics system solver. The coupled programs have been used to solve problems involving incompressible fluids, membrane and shell elements, compressible multiphase flows, explosions in both air and water, and large displacements. In this paper, we present the approach used for the coupling and describe test problems that verify the two-dimensional programs against an experiment and an analytical linear problem. The experiment involves an explosion underwater near an instrumented thin steel plate. The analytical linear problem is the vibration of an infinite cylinder surrounded by an incompressible fluid to a given radius.

  15. Fluid-structure interaction in abdominal aortic aneurysms: Structural and geometrical considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesri, Yaser; Niazmand, Hamid; Deyranlou, Amin; Sadeghi, Mahmood Reza

    2015-08-01

    Rupture of the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is the result of the relatively complex interaction of blood hemodynamics and material behavior of arterial walls. In the present study, the cumulative effects of physiological parameters such as the directional growth, arterial wall properties (isotropy and anisotropy), iliac bifurcation and arterial wall thickness on prediction of wall stress in fully coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) analysis of five idealized AAA models have been investigated. In particular, the numerical model considers the heterogeneity of arterial wall and the iliac bifurcation, which allows the study of the geometric asymmetry due to the growth of the aneurysm into different directions. Results demonstrate that the blood pulsatile nature is responsible for emerging a time-dependent recirculation zone inside the aneurysm, which directly affects the stress distribution in aneurismal wall. Therefore, aneurysm deviation from the arterial axis, especially, in the lateral direction increases the wall stress in a relatively nonlinear fashion. Among the models analyzed in this investigation, the anisotropic material model that considers the wall thickness variations, greatly affects the wall stress values, while the stress distributions are less affected as compared to the uniform wall thickness models. In this regard, it is confirmed that wall stress predictions are more influenced by the appropriate structural model than the geometrical considerations such as the level of asymmetry and its curvature, growth direction and its extent.

  16. Study of electronic structures of solids with strongly interacting electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yen-Sheng

    This work contains studies of two classes of perovskite transition metal oxides. The first class is the layered perovskite cuprates and the related nickelate. The second class is the three dimensional perovskite manganites. Both model and ab initio calculations are carried out for the two classes of systems. The dissertation is therefore divided into the following four parts. The first part is about the 3-band Hubbard model. The model is commonly used for describing the electronic properties of the important CuO2 layers in the crystals of high-Tc superconducting cuprates, such as doped La2CuO4 and YBa2Cu3O 7. The straightforward perturbation expansion on the model taking tpd/ɛpd (~0.36 for the cuprates) as the small parameter does not converge. In this work, I show that there exist canonical transformations on the model Hamiltonian such that the perturbation expansion based on the transformed Hamiltonians converges. In the second part, crystal Hartree-Fock calculations are carried out for La2NiO4 and La2CuO4. The results predict correctly that these two materials are antiferromagnetic insulators, in contrast to the wrong predictions made by the density functional calculations using the local spin density approximation (LSDA). The spin form factors of the materials are also calculated. The results agree with previous theoretical works using an embedded cluster model. The calculated spin form factor of La2CuO4 is consistent with the few experimental data currently available, while the results for La2NiO4 show a large discrepancy between theory and experiment. We question the accuracy of the experimental results of La2NiO4 and call for more experiments to settle the issue. In the third part, crystal Hartree-Fock calculations are carried out for LaMnO3. Our main focus is on the magnetic and orbital orderings, the effect of the crystal distortion from the cubic perovskite structure, and the analysis of the projected density of states. In addition, we also find

  17. Long-term experiments to better understand soil-human interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormann, B. T.; Homann, P. S.

    2011-12-01

    Interactions between soils and people may be transforming global conditions, but the interactions are poorly understood. Changes in soils have proven difficult to quantify, especially in complex ecosystems manifesting large spatiotemporal variability. Long-term ecosystem experiments that evaluate soil change and demonstrate alternative choices are important to understanding changes, discovering new controls and drivers, and influencing decisions. Inspired by agriculture studies, like Rothamsted, the US Forest Service established in 1990 a network of operational-scale experiments across the Pacific Northwest to evaluate long-term effects of different forest management and disturbance regimes. With a strong experimental design, these experiments are now helping to better understand the long-term effects of managing tree harvesting (clearcutting and thinning), woody debris, and tree and understory species composition, and-serendipitously-the effects of fire. Initial results from the Southern Oregon experimental site indicate surprisingly rapid soil changes in some regimes but not others. We've also learned that rapid change presents challenges to repeat sampling. We present our sample-archive and comparable-layer approaches that seek to accommodate changes in surface elevation, aggregation and disaggregation, and mineral-soil exports. Thinning mature forest stands (80-100 yrs old) did not significantly change soil C in 11-yrs. A small upper-layer C increase was observed after thinning, but it was similar to the control. Significant increases in upper-layer soil N were observed with most treatments, but all increases were similar to the control. Leaving woody debris had little effect. The most remarkable change occurred when mature stands were clearcut and Douglas-firs were planted and tended. Associated with rapid growth of Douglas-fir, an average of 8 Mg C ha-1 was lost from weathered soil 4-18 cm deep. This contrasts with clearcuts where early-seral hardwoods and

  18. PDEStrIAn: A Phosphodiesterase Structure and Ligand Interaction Annotated Database As a Tool for Structure-Based Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Chimed; Kooistra, Albert J; Kanev, Georgi K; Leurs, Rob; de Esch, Iwan J P; de Graaf, Chris

    2016-08-11

    A systematic analysis is presented of the 220 phosphodiesterase (PDE) catalytic domain crystal structures present in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) with a focus on PDE-ligand interactions. The consistent structural alignment of 57 PDE ligand binding site residues enables the systematic analysis of PDE-ligand interaction fingerprints (IFPs), the identification of subtype-specific PDE-ligand interaction features, and the classification of ligands according to their binding modes. We illustrate how systematic mining of this phosphodiesterase structure and ligand interaction annotated (PDEStrIAn) database provides new insights into how conserved and selective PDE interaction hot spots can accommodate the large diversity of chemical scaffolds in PDE ligands. A substructure analysis of the cocrystallized PDE ligands in combination with those in the ChEMBL database provides a toolbox for scaffold hopping and ligand design. These analyses lead to an improved understanding of the structural requirements of PDE binding that will be useful in future drug discovery studies.

  19. Phytoplankton community structure in the VAHINE mesocosm experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, Karine; Cornet, Véronique; Caffin, Mathieu; Rodier, Martine; Desnues, Anne; Berthelot, Hugo; Turk-Kubo, Kendra; Heliou, Jules

    2016-09-01

    The VAHINE mesocosm experiment was designed to trigger a diazotroph bloom and to follow the subsequent transfer of diazotroph-derived nitrogen (DDN) in the rest of the food web. Three mesocosms (50 m3) located inside the Nouméa lagoon (New Caledonia, southwestern Pacific) were enriched with dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) in order to promote N2 fixation in these low-nutrient, low-chlorophyll (LNLC) waters. Initially, the diazotrophic community was dominated by diatom diazotroph associations (DDAs), mainly by Rhizosolenia/Richelia intracellularis, and by Trichodesmium, which fueled enough DDN to sustain the growth of other diverse diatom species and Synechococcus populations that were well adapted to limiting DIP levels. After DIP fertilization (1 µM) on day 4, an initial lag time of 10 days was necessary for the mesocosm ecosystems to start building up biomass. However, changes in community structure were already observed during this first period, with a significant drop of both Synechococcus and diatom populations, while Prochlorococcus benefited from DIP addition. At the end of this first period, corresponding to when most added DIP was consumed, the diazotroph community changed drastically and became dominated by Cyanothece-like (UCYN-C) populations, which were accompanied by a monospecific bloom of the diatom Cylindrotheca closterium. During the second period, biomass increased sharply together with primary production and N2-fixation fluxes near tripled. Diatom populations, as well as Synechococcus and nanophytoeukaryotes, showed a re-increase towards the end of the experiment, showing efficient transfer of DDN to non-diazotrophic phytoplankton.

  20. PHENIX (Pioneering High Energy Nuclear Interaction eXperiment): Data Tables and Figures from Published Papers

    DOE Data Explorer

    The PHENIX Experiment is the largest of the four experiments currently taking data at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. PHENIX, the Pioneering High Energy Nuclear Interaction eXperiment, is an exploratory experiment for the investigation of high energy collisions of heavy ions and protons. PHENIX is designed specifically to measure direct probes of the collisions such as electrons, muons, and photons. The primary goal of PHENIX is to discover and study a new state of matter called the Quark-Gluon Plasma. More than 60 published papers and preprints are listed here with links to the full text and separate links to the supporting PHENIX data in plain text tables and to EPS and GIF figures from the papers.

  1. PHENIX (Pioneering High Energy Nuclear Interaction eXperiment) Data Plots from the PHENIX Plot Database

    DOE Data Explorer

    The PHENIX Experiment is the largest of the four experiments currently taking data at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. PHENIX, the Pioneering High Energy Nuclear Interaction eXperiment, is an exploratory experiment for the investigation of high energy collisions of heavy ions and protons. PHENIX is designed specifically to measure direct probes of the collisions such as electrons, muons, and photons.The primary goal of PHENIX is to discover and study a new state of matter called the Quark-Gluon Plasma.[From http://www.phenix.bnl.gov/phenix/WWW/intro/] The PHENIX plot database allows searching by collision species, energies of the X and Y axis, and specific runs. Figures and data plots from published PHENIX papers are also available at http://www.phenix.bnl.gov//WWW/talk/pub_papers.php. (Specialized Interface)

  2. Interactions between concentric form-from-structure and face perception revealed by visual masking but not adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Feczko, Eric; Shulman, Gordon L.; Petersen, Steven E.; Pruett, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Findings from diverse subfields of vision research suggest a potential link between high-level aspects of face perception and concentric form-from-structure perception. To explore this relationship, typical adults performed two adaptation experiments and two masking experiments to test whether concentric, but not nonconcentric, Glass patterns (a type of form-from-structure stimulus) utilize a processing mechanism shared by face perception. For the adaptation experiments, subjects were presented with an adaptor for 5 or 20 s, prior to discriminating a target. In the masking experiments, subjects saw a mask, then a target, and then a second mask. Measures of discriminability and bias were derived and repeated measures analysis of variance tested for pattern-specific masking and adaptation effects. Results from Experiment 1 show no Glass pattern-specific effect of adaptation to faces; results from Experiment 2 show concentric Glass pattern masking, but not adaptation, may impair upright/inverted face discrimination; results from Experiment 3 show concentric and radial Glass pattern masking impaired subsequent upright/inverted face discrimination more than translational Glass pattern masking; and results from Experiment 4 show concentric and radial Glass pattern masking impaired subsequent face gender discrimination more than translational Glass pattern masking. Taken together, these findings demonstrate interactions between concentric form-from-structure and face processing, suggesting a possible common processing pathway. PMID:24563526

  3. Doped titanium oxide photcatalysts: Preparation, structure and interaction with viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qi

    Since the discovery of photoelectrochemical splitting of water on n-titanium oxide (n-TiO2) electrodes by Fujishima and Honda in 1972, there has been much interest in semiconductor-based materials as photocatalysts for both solar energy conversion and environmental applications in the past several decades. Among various semiconductor-based photocatalysts, TiO2 is the only candidate suitable for industrial use because of its high chemical stability, good photoactivity, relatively low cost, and nontoxicity. However, the photocatalytic capability of TiO 2 is limited to only ultraviolet (UV) light (wavelength, lambda, < 400 nm), seriously limiting its solar efficiency. In this study, both chemical and physical modification approaches were developed to extend the absorption band-edge of TiO2 into the visible light region with improved stability, photocatalytic efficiency and ease of the doping process. Two major approaches were used in the material synthesis and processing, including the ion-beam-assisted-deposition (IBAD) technique and sol-gel based processes. Both nitrogen-doped TiO2 (TiON) and nitrogen/palladium co-doped TiO2 (TiON/PdO) photocatalysts were created and their photocatalytic activity was investigated by the degradation of methylene blue (MB) and disinfection of bacteria and viruses under visible light illumination. The sol-gel process was optimized to produce high quality TiON-based photocatalysts by carefully modulating the precursor ratio and calcination temperature. A TiON inverse opal structure was created, which demonstrated enhanced visible light absorption and subsequently improved photocatalytic efficiency by the combination of chemical and physical modifications on n-TiO2. The effect of palladium dopant on the optical and photocatalytic properties of TiON/PdO photocatalyst was examined, which suggests that a careful optimization of the transition metal ion dopant concentration is needed to achieve high photocatalytic efficiency in these anion

  4. Vibro-acoustic analysis of the acoustic-structure interaction of flexible structure due to acoustic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djojodihardjo, Harijono

    2015-03-01

    The application of BE-FE acoustic-structure interaction on a structure subject to acoustic load is elaborated using the boundary element-finite element acoustic structural coupling and the utilization of the computational scheme developed earlier. The plausibility of the numerical treatment is investigated and validated through application to generic cases. The analysis carried out in the work is intended to serve as a baseline in the analysis of acoustic structure interaction for lightweight structures. Results obtained thus far exhibit the robustness of the method developed.

  5. Climate model experiments to explore the interactions between the land surface and summer monsoon over India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Charles; Turner, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    Regional rainfall patterns, in both time and space, are being increasingly influenced by anthropogenic land use changes. For example, a significant increase in irrigated land has been made across India over the last 40 years, but the ways in which this has affected the summer monsoon are not well understood. The interactions between land surface parameters (such as soil moisture) and atmospheric fields (such as rainfall or heat fluxes) therefore require further investigation. In a companion paper, we discuss some of these interactions based on already available climate model data from Phase 5 of the Climate Modelling Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). In contrast, in this study we conduct our own climate model experiments to study the links between soil moisture and atmospheric processes. We use HadGEM2, a state-of-the-art general circulation/global climate model (GCM) from the UK Meteorological Office Hadley Centre. Running the model in atmosphere-only mode (i.e. where sea surface temperatures and sea ice are prescribed), we investigate the effect of coupling and uncoupling soil moisture from the atmosphere. In the first experiment, nominated the 'Control', soil moisture is allowed to be free running i.e. fully coupled to the atmosphere, globally. Conversely, in Experiment A, soil moisture is prescribed i.e. uncoupled to the atmosphere, again globally. Lastly, Experiments B and C combine the two; soil moisture is fully coupled over India and uncoupled elsewhere in B, and vice versa in C. Preliminary results of these experiments will be presented.

  6. Measurements of interactions between waves and energetic ions in basic plasma experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidbrink, W. W.; Boehmer, H.; McWilliams, R.; Preiwisch, A.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, L.; Zhou, S.; Bovet, A.; Fasoli, A.; Furno, I.; Gustafson, K.; Ricci, P.; Carter, T.; Leneman, D.; Tripathi, S. K. P.; Vincena, S.

    2012-12-01

    To measure the transport of fast ions by various types of waves, complementary experiments are conducted in linear and toroidal magnetic fields in the large plasma device and the toroidal plasma experiment. Lithium sources that are immersed in the plasma provide the energetic ions. Spatial scans of collectors measure the transport. Techniques to find the beam and optimize the spatial sensitivity are described. Measurements of Coulomb scattering, resonant interaction with Alfvén waves, and transport by drift-wave and interchange turbulence are summarized.

  7. Experimenting with ecosystem interaction networks in search of threshold potentials in real-world marine ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Thrush, Simon F; Hewitt, Judi E; Parkes, Samantha; Lohrer, Andrew M; Pilditch, Conrad; Woodin, Sarah A; Wethey, David S; Chiantore, Mariachiara; Asnaghi, Valentina; De Juan, Silvia; Kraan, Casper; Rodil, Ivan; Savage, Candida; Van Colen, Carl

    2014-06-01

    Thresholds profoundly affect our understanding and management of ecosystem dynamics, but we have yet to develop practical techniques to assess the risk that thresholds will be crossed. Combining ecological knowledge of critical system interdependencies with a large-scale experiment, we tested for breaks in the ecosystem interaction network to identify threshold potential in real-world ecosystem dynamics. Our experiment with the bivalves Macomona liliana and Austrovenus stutchburyi on marine sandflats in New Zealand demonstrated that reductions in incident sunlight changed the interaction network between sediment biogeochemical fluxes, productivity, and macrofauna. By demonstrating loss of positive feedbacks and changes in the architecture of the network, we provide mechanistic evidence that stressors lead to break points in dynamics, which theory predicts predispose a system to a critical transition.

  8. Effects of interaction experiences and undergraduate coursework on attitudes toward gay and lesbian issues.

    PubMed

    Sevecke, Jessica R; Rhymer, Katrina N; Almazan, Elbert P; Jacob, Susan

    2015-01-01

    College experiences can expand knowledge, decrease negative stereotypes, and increase acceptance toward diversity, especially regarding gay and lesbian issues. This study found that the more interaction undergraduate students have with gay and lesbian people on campus, the more accepting their attitudes are regarding (1) same-sex, consensual sex, (2) same-sex relations between adults is not unnatural, (3) vote for a gay presidential candidate, (4) friends with a feminine man, (5) friends with a masculine woman, (6) knowledge of GL issues important for future career, and (7) comfortable with GL roommate. Furthermore, the more undergraduate students are exposed to coursework addressing gay and lesbian issues, the more positive their attitudes are regarding the importance of knowledge of gay/lesbian issues for future career and comfort with a gay/lesbian roommate. Discussion explores possible long-term implications of systematic interaction experiences and coursework at all levels within the educational system to prevent negative attitude formation.

  9. MOVING TO INEQUALITY: NEIGHBORHOOD EFFECTS AND EXPERIMENTS MEET STRUCTURE1

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    The Moving to Opportunity (MTO) housing experiment has proven to be an important intervention not just in the lives of the poor, but in social science theories of neighborhood effects. Competing causal claims have been the subject of considerable disagreement, culminating in the debate between Clampet-Lundquist and Massey (2008) and Ludwig et al. (2008). This paper assesses the debate by clarifying analytically distinct questions posed by neighborhood-level theories, reconceptualizing selection bias as a fundamental social process worthy of study in its own right rather than as a statistical nuisance, and reconsidering the scientific method of experimentation, and hence causality, in the social world of the city. I also analyze MTO and independent survey data from Chicago to examine trajectories of residential attainment. Although MTO provides crucial leverage for estimating neighborhood effects on individuals, as proponents rightly claim, I demonstrate the implications imposed by a stratified urban structure and how MTO simultaneously provides a new window on the social reproduction of concentrated inequality. PMID:25360053

  10. Integrated database of information from structural genomics experiments.

    PubMed

    Asada, Yukuhiko; Sugahara, Michihiro; Mizutani, Hisashi; Naitow, Hisashi; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Matsuura, Yoshinori; Agari, Yoshihiro; Ebihara, Akio; Shinkai, Akeo; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Kaminuma, Eri; Kobayashi, Norio; Nishikata, Koro; Shimoyama, Sayoko; Toyoda, Tetsuro; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Kunishima, Naoki

    2013-05-01

    Information from structural genomics experiments at the RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Japan has been compiled and published as an integrated database. The contents of the database are (i) experimental data from nine species of bacteria that cover a large variety of protein molecules in terms of both evolution and properties (http://database.riken.jp/db/bacpedia), (ii) experimental data from mutant proteins that were designed systematically to study the influence of mutations on the diffraction quality of protein crystals (http://database.riken.jp/db/bacpedia) and (iii) experimental data from heavy-atom-labelled proteins from the heavy-atom database HATODAS (http://database.riken.jp/db/hatodas). The database integration adopts the semantic web, which is suitable for data reuse and automatic processing, thereby allowing batch downloads of full data and data reconstruction to produce new databases. In addition, to enhance the use of data (i) and (ii) by general researchers in biosciences, a comprehensible user interface, Bacpedia (http://bacpedia.harima.riken.jp), has been developed.

  11. Interactive Effects of Warming and Increased Precipitation on Community Structure and Composition in an Annual Forb Dominated Desert Steppe

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yanhui; Zhou, Guangsheng; Xu, Zhenzhu; Liu, Tao; Zhang, Xinshi

    2013-01-01

    To better understand how warming, increased precipitation and their interactions influence community structure and composition, a field experiment simulating hydrothermal interactions was conducted at an annual forb dominated desert steppe in northern China over 2 years. Increased precipitation increased species richness while warming significantly decreased species richness, and their effects were additive rather than interactive. Although interannual variations in weather conditions may have a major affect on plant community composition on short term experiments, warming and precipitation treatments affected individual species and functional group composition. Warming caused C4 grasses such as Cleistogenes squarrosa to increase while increased precipitation caused the proportions of non-perennial C3 plants like Artemisia capillaris to decrease and perennial C4 plants to increase. PMID:23894600

  12. Locating the neutrino interaction vertex with the help of electronic detectors in the OPERA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gornushkin, Yu. A.; Dmitrievsky, S. G.; Chukanov, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    The OPERA experiment is designed for the direct observation of the appearance of ντ from νμ → ντ oscillation in a νμ beam. A description of the procedure of neutrino interaction vertex localization (Brick Finding) by electronic detectors of a hybrid OPERA setup is presented. The procedure includes muon track and hadronic shower axis reconstruction and a determination of the target bricks with the highest probability to contain the vertex.

  13. Search for neutrino oscillations in the MINOS experiment by using quasi-elastic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Piteira, Rodolphe

    2005-09-29

    The enthusiasm of the scientific community for studying oscillations of neutrinos is equaled only by the mass of their detectors. The MINOS experiment determines and compares the near spectrum of muonic neutrinos from the NUMI beam to the far one, in order to measure two oscillation parameters: Δm$2\\atop{23}$ and sin2 (2θ23). The spectra are obtained by analyzing the charged current interactions which difficulty lies in identifying the interactions products (e.g. muons). An alternative method identifying the traces of muons, bent by the magnetic field of the detectors, and determining their energies is presented in this manuscript. The sensitivity of the detectors is optimal for the quasi-elastic interactions, for which a selection method is proposed, to study their oscillation. Even though it reduces the statistics, such a study introduces fewer systematic errors, constituting the ideal method on the long range.

  14. Clinal resistance structure and pathogen local adaptation in a serpentine flax-flax rust interaction.

    PubMed

    Springer, Yuri P

    2007-08-01

    Because disease resistance is a hallmark signature of pathogen-mediated selection pressure on hosts, studies of resistance structure (the spatial distribution of disease resistance genes among conspecific host populations) can provide valuable insights into the influence of pathogens on host evolution and spatial variation in the magnitude of their effects. To date few studies of wild plant-pathogen interactions have characterized resistance structure by sampling across the host's biogeographic range, and only a handful have paired such investigations with studies of disease levels under natural conditions. I used a greenhouse cross-inoculation experiment to characterize genetic resistance of 16 populations of California dwarf flax (Hesperolinon californicum) to attack by multiple samples of the rust fungus Melampsora lini. I documented a latitudinal cline in resistance structure, manifest across the host's biogeographic range, which mirrored almost identically a cline in infection prevalence documented through field surveys of disease in study populations. These results provide empirical evidence for clinal patterns of antagonistic selection pressure, demonstrate that such patterns can be manifest across broad biogeographic scales, and suggest that rates of disease prevalence in wild plant populations may be tightly linked to the distribution of host resistance genes. Tests for local adaptation of the fungus revealed evidence of the phenomenon (significantly greater infection in sympatric plant-fungal pairings) as well as the potential for substantial bias to be introduced into statistical analyses by spatial patterns of host resistance structure.

  15. Structural Optimization of a Force Balance Using a Computational Experiment Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, P. A.; DeLoach, R.

    2002-01-01

    This paper proposes a new approach to force balance structural optimization featuring a computational experiment design. Currently, this multi-dimensional design process requires the designer to perform a simplification by executing parameter studies on a small subset of design variables. This one-factor-at-a-time approach varies a single variable while holding all others at a constant level. Consequently, subtle interactions among the design variables, which can be exploited to achieve the design objectives, are undetected. The proposed method combines Modern Design of Experiments techniques to direct the exploration of the multi-dimensional design space, and a finite element analysis code to generate the experimental data. To efficiently search for an optimum combination of design variables and minimize the computational resources, a sequential design strategy was employed. Experimental results from the optimization of a non-traditional force balance measurement section are presented. An approach to overcome the unique problems associated with the simultaneous optimization of multiple response criteria is described. A quantitative single-point design procedure that reflects the designer's subjective impression of the relative importance of various design objectives, and a graphical multi-response optimization procedure that provides further insights into available tradeoffs among competing design objectives are illustrated. The proposed method enhances the intuition and experience of the designer by providing new perspectives on the relationships between the design variables and the competing design objectives providing a systematic foundation for advancements in structural design.

  16. Glycodendritic structures based on Boltorn hyperbranched polymers and their interactions with Lens culinaris lectin.

    PubMed

    Arce, Eva; Nieto, Pedro M; Díaz, Vicente; Castro, Rossana García; Bernad, Antonio; Rojo, Javier

    2003-01-01

    Multivalent scaffolds bearing carbohydrates have been prepared to mediate biological processes where carbohydrates are involved. These systems consist of dendritic structures based on Boltorn H20 and H30 hyperbranched polymers to which carbohydrates are linked through a convenient spacer. Mannose has been chosen as a sugar unit to test the viability of this strategy. These glycodendritic compounds have been prepared in a few steps with good yields, showing a high solubility in physiological media and low toxicity. The binding of these dendritic polymers to the mannose-binding lectin Lens culinaris (LCA) was studied using STD-NMR experiments and quantitative precipitation assays. The results demonstrate the existence of a clear interaction between the mannose derivative systems and the Lens lectin where the dendritic scaffold does not have an important role in mannose binding but supplies the necessary multivalence for lectin cluster formation. These glycodendritic structures are able to interact with a receptor, and therefore they can be considered as promising tools for biological studies. PMID:12862436

  17. Measurements of flow structure interaction in a plaqued artificial artery using an index matched flow facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Akash; Brock, Larry; Sheng, Jian

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the experiment is to study the flow structure interaction in an arterial model with a simulated plaque inside a closed loop index matched pulsatile flow facility. The test section is 24.5 inches long 6 inches wide. The experimental models are compliant polymer (PDMS) tubes having an outer diameter of 9 mm and a wall thickness of 1 mm. The plaque on the models are simulated by means of a radially asymmetric bump. Both flow and polymeric structures are doped with different particles and imaged with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) method. To minimize the optical distortion near liquid solid interface, the facility is fully index matched with NaI at 40% by weight. A suite of analysis procedures quantifying complex interactions including solid-fluid phase separation, near wall flow analysis, and wall shear stress approximation as well as wall deformation quantification, have been developed and applied to study the healthy and plaqued artificial arteries in steady and pulsatile flow conditions. 3D ensemble velocity fields, wall shear stress distributions and corresponding strain deformations will be presented.

  18. Glycodendritic structures based on Boltorn hyperbranched polymers and their interactions with Lens culinaris lectin.

    PubMed

    Arce, Eva; Nieto, Pedro M; Díaz, Vicente; Castro, Rossana García; Bernad, Antonio; Rojo, Javier

    2003-01-01

    Multivalent scaffolds bearing carbohydrates have been prepared to mediate biological processes where carbohydrates are involved. These systems consist of dendritic structures based on Boltorn H20 and H30 hyperbranched polymers to which carbohydrates are linked through a convenient spacer. Mannose has been chosen as a sugar unit to test the viability of this strategy. These glycodendritic compounds have been prepared in a few steps with good yields, showing a high solubility in physiological media and low toxicity. The binding of these dendritic polymers to the mannose-binding lectin Lens culinaris (LCA) was studied using STD-NMR experiments and quantitative precipitation assays. The results demonstrate the existence of a clear interaction between the mannose derivative systems and the Lens lectin where the dendritic scaffold does not have an important role in mannose binding but supplies the necessary multivalence for lectin cluster formation. These glycodendritic structures are able to interact with a receptor, and therefore they can be considered as promising tools for biological studies.

  19. Robust Generation of Dynamic Data Structure Visualizations with Multiple Interaction Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, James H., II; Hendrix, T. Dean; Umphress, David A.; Barowski, Larry A.; Jain, Jhilmil; Montgomery, Lacey N.

    2009-01-01

    jGRASP has three integrated approaches for interacting with its dynamic viewers for data structures: debugger, workbench, and text-based interactions that allow individual Java statements and expressions to be executed/evaluated. These approaches can be used together to provide a complementary set of interactions with the dynamic viewers. Data…

  20. The Goals and Structure of Face-to-Face Interaction Between Infants and Fathers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yogman, Michael W.

    This study investigates similarities and differences in the interactions of infants with mothers and fathers, and examines the structural characteristics of social interaction between infants and fathers. Data are based on analyses of videotapes showing face-to-face interaction of five healthy first born infants with their mothers and fathers. The…

  1. Genetic Risk by Experience Interaction for Childhood Internalizing Problems: Converging Evidence across Multiple Methods

    PubMed Central

    Vendlinski, Matthew K.; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Essex, Marilyn J.; Goldsmith, H. Hill

    2010-01-01

    Background Identifying how genetic risk interacts with experience to predict psychopathology is an important step toward understanding the etiology of mental health problems. Few studies have examined genetic risk by experience interaction (GxE) in the development of childhood psychopathology. Methods We used both co-twin and parent mental health as markers of genetic risk to test whether GxE predicted internalizing problems in a sample of 8-year-old twins. Multi-instrument composites were used to characterize both parent and child psychopathology, and five experiential risk factors (socioeconomic status, single parent upbringing, negative parent-child interactions, number of negative life events, negative impact of negative life events) composed a cumulative risk index. Results We found consistent evidence for GxE for child internalizing problems, with significant interaction effects emerging both when genetic risk was indexed by co-twin mental health and when it was based on parent mental health. When co-twin mental health was used to estimate genetic risk, child internalizing problems were more heritable for children at low rather than high experiential risk. When parent mental health was used to estimate genetic risk, the association between genetic risk and internalizing problems was stronger for children at elevated experiential risk. Consideration of the interaction effect sizes helps to reconcile these findings. Conclusions Our results suggest that the processes involved in both diathesis-stress and bioecological models of development may operate for child internalizing problems. Effect sizes indicated that the main effects of genetic and experiential risk were much better predictors of child internalizing problems than was their interaction. PMID:21198591

  2. Halogenated ligands and their interactions with amino acids: implications for structure-activity and structure-toxicity relationships.

    PubMed

    Kortagere, Sandhya; Ekins, Sean; Welsh, William J

    2008-09-01

    The properties of chemicals are rooted in their molecular structure. It follows that structural analysis of specific interactions between ligands and biomolecules at the molecular level is invaluable for defining structure-activity relationships (SARs) and structure-toxicity relationships (STRs). This study has elucidated the structural and molecular basis of interactions of biomolecules with alkyl and aryl halides that are extensively used as components in many commercial pesticides, disinfectants, and drugs. We analyzed the protein structures deposited in Protein Data Bank (PDB) for structural information associated with interactions between halogenated ligands and proteins. This analysis revealed distinct patterns with respect to the nature and structural characteristics of halogen interactions with specific types of atoms and groups in proteins. Fluorine had the highest propensity of interactions for glycine, while chlorine for leucine, bromine for arginine, and iodine for lysine. Chlorine, bromine and iodine had the lowest propensity of interactions for cysteine, while fluorine had a lowest propensity for proline. These trends for highest propensity shifted towards the hydrophobic residues for all the halogens when only interactions with the side chain were considered. Halogens had equal propensities of interaction for the halogen bonding partners (nitrogen and oxygen atoms), albeit with different geometries. The optimal angle for interactions with halogens was approximately 120 degrees for oxygen atoms, and approximately 96 degrees for nitrogen atoms. The distance distributions of halogens with various amino acids were mostly bimodal, and the angle distributions were unimodal. Insights gained from this study have implications for the rational design of safer drugs and commercially important chemicals.

  3. Adaptive nonlinear polynomial neural networks for control of boundary layer/structural interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, B. Eugene, Jr.; Cellucci, Richard L.; Abbott, Dean W.; Barron, Roger L.; Jordan, Paul R., III; Poor, H. Vincent

    1993-01-01

    The acoustic pressures developed in a boundary layer can interact with an aircraft panel to induce significant vibration in the panel. Such vibration is undesirable due to the aerodynamic drag and structure-borne cabin noises that result. The overall objective of this work is to develop effective and practical feedback control strategies for actively reducing this flow-induced structural vibration. This report describes the results of initial evaluations using polynomial, neural network-based, feedback control to reduce flow induced vibration in aircraft panels due to turbulent boundary layer/structural interaction. Computer simulations are used to develop and analyze feedback control strategies to reduce vibration in a beam as a first step. The key differences between this work and that going on elsewhere are as follows: that turbulent and transitional boundary layers represent broadband excitation and thus present a more complex stochastic control scenario than that of narrow band (e.g., laminar boundary layer) excitation; and secondly, that the proposed controller structures are adaptive nonlinear infinite impulse response (IIR) polynomial neural network, as opposed to the traditional adaptive linear finite impulse response (FIR) filters used in most studies to date. The controllers implemented in this study achieved vibration attenuation of 27 to 60 dB depending on the type of boundary layer established by laminar, turbulent, and intermittent laminar-to-turbulent transitional flows. Application of multi-input, multi-output, adaptive, nonlinear feedback control of vibration in aircraft panels based on polynomial neural networks appears to be feasible today. Plans are outlined for Phase 2 of this study, which will include extending the theoretical investigation conducted in Phase 2 and verifying the results in a series of laboratory experiments involving both bum and plate models.

  4. Adaptive nonlinear polynomial neural networks for control of boundary layer/structural interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, B. Eugene, Jr.; Cellucci, Richard L.; Abbott, Dean W.; Barron, Roger L.; Jordan, Paul R., III; Poor, H. Vincent

    1993-12-01

    The acoustic pressures developed in a boundary layer can interact with an aircraft panel to induce significant vibration in the panel. Such vibration is undesirable due to the aerodynamic drag and structure-borne cabin noises that result. The overall objective of this work is to develop effective and practical feedback control strategies for actively reducing this flow-induced structural vibration. This report describes the results of initial evaluations using polynomial, neural network-based, feedback control to reduce flow induced vibration in aircraft panels due to turbulent boundary layer/structural interaction. Computer simulations are used to develop and analyze feedback control strategies to reduce vibration in a beam as a first step. The key differences between this work and that going on elsewhere are as follows: that turbulent and transitional boundary layers represent broadband excitation and thus present a more complex stochastic control scenario than that of narrow band (e.g., laminar boundary layer) excitation; and secondly, that the proposed controller structures are adaptive nonlinear infinite impulse response (IIR) polynomial neural network, as opposed to the traditional adaptive linear finite impulse response (FIR) filters used in most studies to date. The controllers implemented in this study achieved vibration attenuation of 27 to 60 dB depending on the type of boundary layer established by laminar, turbulent, and intermittent laminar-to-turbulent transitional flows. Application of multi-input, multi-output, adaptive, nonlinear feedback control of vibration in aircraft panels based on polynomial neural networks appears to be feasible today. Plans are outlined for Phase 2 of this study, which will include extending the theoretical investigation conducted in Phase 2 and verifying the results in a series of laboratory experiments involving both bum and plate models.

  5. Interaction of some limbic structures which exert inhibitory effect on corticosterone secretion.

    PubMed

    Suárez, M; Perassi, N I

    1990-12-01

    The interaction between limbic structures which exert inhibitory influence on corticosterone secretion was investigated in the rat. The following experiments were performed: 1) electrical stimulation at mammillary medial nucleus (MMN) in rats with lesioned anterodrosal thalami nucleus (ADTN) or intermediate tegmental area; 2) electrical stimulation at ADTN in rats with lesioned retrosplenial cortex (RC). Bilateral stimulation at MMN in ADTN or RC-lesioned rats produces an increase in plasma corticosterone concentration. In animals with lesioned RC, values of plasma corticosterone after stimulation at ADTN were higher than before stimulation. Taking into consideration that electrical stimulation of MMN or ADTN in intact rats produces a decrease in plasma corticosterone concentration, these studies demonstrate that MMN and ADTN exert inhibitory influence on corticoadrenal activity only when their projection areas remain intact.

  6. When openness to experience and conscientiousness are related to creative behavior: an interactional approach.

    PubMed

    George, J M; Zhou, J

    2001-06-01

    This study adopted an interactional approach to understanding how 2 of the Five-Factor traits, openness to experience and conscientiousness, are related to creative behavior in the workplace. Openness to experience is theorized to result in high levels of creative behavior and conscientiousness is theorized to result in low levels of creative behavior when the situation allows for the manifestation of the trait influences. More specifically, the authors hypothesized that openness to experience would result in high levels of creative behavior if feedback valence were positive and job holders were presented with a heuristic task that allowed them to be creative. The authors also hypothesized that conscientiousness would result in low levels of creative behavior if supervisors engaged in close monitoring and coworkers were unsupportive. The authors tested their hypotheses in a sample of office workers, and 5 out of the 6 hypotheses were supported. PMID:11419810

  7. SAFAS: Unifying Form and Structure through Interactive 3D Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polys, Nicholas F.; Bacim, Felipe; Setareh, Mehdi; Jones, Brett D.

    2015-01-01

    There has been a significant gap between the tools used for the design of a building's architectural form and those that evaluate the structural physics of that form. Seeking to bring the perspectives of visual design and structural engineering closer together, we developed and evaluated a design tool for students and practitioners to explore the…

  8. Analysis of high speed flow, thermal and structural interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Earl A.

    1994-01-01

    Research for this grant focused on the following tasks: (1) the prediction of severe, localized aerodynamic heating for complex, high speed flows; (2) finite element adaptive refinement methodology for multi-disciplinary analyses; (3) the prediction of thermoviscoplastic structural response with rate-dependent effects and large deformations; (4) thermoviscoplastic constitutive models for metals; and (5) coolant flow/structural heat transfer analyses.

  9. Balancing positive and negative plant interactions: how mosses structure vascular plant communities.

    PubMed

    Gornall, Jemma L; Woodin, Sarah J; Jónsdóttir, Ingibjorg S; van der Wal, René

    2011-07-01

    Our understanding of positive and negative plant interactions is primarily based on vascular plants, as is the prediction that facilitative effects dominate in harsh environments. It remains unclear whether this understanding is also applicable to moss-vascular plant interactions, which are likely to be influential in low-temperature environments with extensive moss ground cover such as boreal forest and arctic tundra. In a field experiment in high-arctic tundra, we investigated positive and negative impacts of the moss layer on vascular plants. Ramets of the shrub Salix polaris, herb Bistorta vivipara, grass Alopecurus borealis and rush Luzula confusa were transplanted into plots manipulated to contain bare soil, shallow moss (3 cm) and deep moss (6 cm) and harvested after three growing seasons. The moss layer had both positive and negative impacts upon vascular plant growth, the relative extent of which varied among vascular plant species. Deep moss cover reduced soil temperature and nitrogen availability, and this was reflected in reduced graminoid productivity. Shrub and herb biomass were greatest in shallow moss, where soil moisture also appeared to be highest. The relative importance of the mechanisms by which moss may influence vascular plants, through effects on soil temperature, moisture and nitrogen availability, was investigated in a phytotron growth experiment. Soil temperature, and not nutrient availability, determined Alopecurus growth, whereas Salix only responded to increased temperature if soil nitrogen was also increased. We propose a conceptual model showing the relative importance of positive and negative influences of the moss mat on vascular plants along a gradient of moss depth and illustrate species-specific outcomes. Our findings suggest that, through their strong influence on the soil environment, mat-forming mosses structure the composition of vascular plant communities. Thus, for plant interaction theory to be widely applicable to

  10. Sloshing, fluid-structure interaction and structural response due to shock and impact loads 1994. PVP-Vol. 272

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, D.C. ); Shin, Y.S.; Brochard, D.; Fujita, K.

    1994-01-01

    This volume is comprised of papers presented in two symposia at the 1994 ASME Pressure Vessels and Piping Conference. These sessions, sponsored by the Fluid-Structure Interaction and Seismic Engineering Technical Committees, provided a forum for the discussion of recent advances in sloshing, fluid-structure interaction, and structural dynamics produced by high energy excitations. The papers presented at the four technical sessions on Sloshing and Fluid-Structure Interaction represent a broad spectrum of fluid-structure systems: sloshing, fluid-structure interaction, and dynamic and seismic response of various fluid-structure systems such as reactor components, liquid storage tanks, submerged structures and piping systems, etc. The paper presented at the session on Structural Dynamics Produced by High-Energy Excitations cover underwater explosion effects on submerged structures, bubble loading phenomena, finite element mesh refinements on failure predictions, penetration and impact problems, and dynamic design of blast containment vessels. Also included are numerical analysis, design, and testing to understand difficult transient response phenomena. Separate abstracts were prepared for 24 papers in this volume.

  11. Buffet induced structural/flight-control system interaction of the X-29A aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voracek, David F.; Clarke, Robert

    1991-01-01

    High-alpha flight creates unique aerodynamic phenomena which increase the level of structural mode excitation; in conjunction with high-gain digital control systems, this structural response may result in an aeroservoelastic interaction. One such interaction has been observed during high-alpha flight testing of the X-29A. Data are presented which demonstrate the enhanced modal power in this aircraft's structural accelerometers, the feedback sensors, and the command signals as a function of alpha value. The structural interaction is traced from the aerodynamic buffet to the flight-control surfaces.

  12. Norm Development, Decision Making, and Structuration in CMC Group Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turman, Paul D.

    2005-01-01

    The use of new and advanced technologies has a significant potential to impact the way students communicate in a number of contexts and settings. Many students will find themselves in both academic and career situations where computer-mediated communication (CMC) group interaction will be necessary. As a result, it is important to integrate…

  13. Iron light interactions during the CROZet natural iron bloom and EXport experiment (CROZEX): II—Taxonomic responses and elemental stoichiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. Mark; Hickman, Anna E.; Poulton, Alex J.; Seeyave, Sophie; Lucas, Mike I.

    2007-09-01

    The CROZet natural iron bloom and EXport experiment (CROZEX) investigated the annual phytoplankton bloom that occurs in the vicinity of the Crozet plateau in the Polar Frontal Zone (PFZ) of the Southern Ocean. Shipboard manipulation experiments designed to investigate potential responses of phytoplankton community structure and elemental stoichiometry to iron (Fe) and/or light perturbation are compared to in situ data collected during CROZEX. The outcome of individual experiments was strongly influenced by initial phytoplankton community structure. For example Fe amendment of high (>8 μM) silicic acid waters resulted in a strong response by medium-sized diatoms, including Eucampia antarctica. In contrast Phaeocystis antarctica dominated the community response to increased Fe within an experiment initiated during the early declining stage of the bloom. Conversely, small diatoms responded more strongly to increased irradiance, while the population of very large diatoms remained relatively static. Consistent with experimental results, the intense natural blooms north of the Crozet plateau were observed to be dominated by either P. antarctica or medium-sized diatoms while small phytoplankton and large diatoms dominated lower-chlorophyll waters in the south. In situ data and results from experiments supported previous observations of lower nitrate to phosphate removal ratios for diatoms compared to P. antarctica. Experimental and in situ data also supported previous work showing that silicic acid to nitrate removal ratios can be reduced under conditions of enhanced Fe availability. Higher irradiance decreased this ratio still further. Interactions between Fe and light were thus likely to have contributed to the observed decoupling of the major element cycles between the intense bloom that occurs north of Crozet and more typical PFZ conditions to the South. Specifically, silicic acid became exhausted in both systems, with drawdown in the south potentially resulting from

  14. The front line of social capital creation--a natural experiment in symbolic interaction.

    PubMed

    Patulny, Roger; Siminski, Peter; Mendolia, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    This paper offers theoretical and empirical contributions to understanding the micro-sociological processes behind the creation of social capital. Theoretically, we argue that the emotional and shared experience of participating in symbolic interaction rituals may affect social capital in four different ways, via: (i) a 'citizenship' effect, connecting participants symbolically to the broader, civic society; (ii) a 'supportive' effect, bonding participants with each other; (iii) an exclusive 'tribal' effect, which crowds-out connections with other groups and the wider society; and (iv) an 'atomising' effect, whereby intense experiences create mental health problems that damage social capital. We illustrate this with a case study of Australian veterans of the Vietnam War. The randomness of the National Service conscription lotteries of that era translates into a high-quality natural experiment. We formulate several hypotheses about which of the four effects dominates for veterans who participated in the 'symbolic interaction' of training and deployment. We test these hypotheses using data from the 2006 Australian Census of Population and Housing, and the NSW 45 & Up Study. We found that war service reduced 'bonding' social capital, but increased 'bridging' social capital, and this is not explained completely by mental health problems. This suggests that while the combined 'tribal' and 'atomizing' effects of service outweigh the 'supportive' effects, the 'citizenship' effect is surprisingly robust. Although they feel unsupported and isolated, veterans are committed to their community and country. These paradoxical findings suggest that social capital is formed through symbolic interaction. The emotional and symbolic qualities of interaction rituals may formulate non-strategic (perhaps irrational) connections with society regardless of the status of one's personal support networks. PMID:24836279

  15. The front line of social capital creation--a natural experiment in symbolic interaction.

    PubMed

    Patulny, Roger; Siminski, Peter; Mendolia, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    This paper offers theoretical and empirical contributions to understanding the micro-sociological processes behind the creation of social capital. Theoretically, we argue that the emotional and shared experience of participating in symbolic interaction rituals may affect social capital in four different ways, via: (i) a 'citizenship' effect, connecting participants symbolically to the broader, civic society; (ii) a 'supportive' effect, bonding participants with each other; (iii) an exclusive 'tribal' effect, which crowds-out connections with other groups and the wider society; and (iv) an 'atomising' effect, whereby intense experiences create mental health problems that damage social capital. We illustrate this with a case study of Australian veterans of the Vietnam War. The randomness of the National Service conscription lotteries of that era translates into a high-quality natural experiment. We formulate several hypotheses about which of the four effects dominates for veterans who participated in the 'symbolic interaction' of training and deployment. We test these hypotheses using data from the 2006 Australian Census of Population and Housing, and the NSW 45 & Up Study. We found that war service reduced 'bonding' social capital, but increased 'bridging' social capital, and this is not explained completely by mental health problems. This suggests that while the combined 'tribal' and 'atomizing' effects of service outweigh the 'supportive' effects, the 'citizenship' effect is surprisingly robust. Although they feel unsupported and isolated, veterans are committed to their community and country. These paradoxical findings suggest that social capital is formed through symbolic interaction. The emotional and symbolic qualities of interaction rituals may formulate non-strategic (perhaps irrational) connections with society regardless of the status of one's personal support networks.

  16. Separating the effects of intra- and interspecific age-structured interactions in an experimental fish assemblage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, R.C.; Trexler, J.C.; Loftus, W.F.

    2001-01-01

    We documented patterns of age-structured biotic interactions in four mesocosm experiments with an assemblage of three species of co-occurring fishes from the Florida Everglades, the eastern mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki), sailfin molly (Poecilia latipinna), and bluefin killifish (Lucania goodei). These species were chosen based on their high abundance and overlapping diets. Juvenile mosquitofish and sailfin mollies, at a range of densities matching field estimates, were maintained in the presence of adult mosquitofish, sailfin mollies, and bluefin killifish to test for effects of competition and predation on juvenile survival and growth. The mesocosms held 1,200 1 of water and all conditions were set to simulate those in Shark River Slough, Everglades National Park (ENP), USA. We placed floating mats of periphyton and bladderwort in each tank in standard volumes that matched field values to provide cover and to introduce invertebrate prey. Of 15 possible intra- and interspecific age-structured interactions, we found 7 to be present at the densities of these fish found in Shark River Slough marshes. Predation by adult mosquitofish on juvenile fish, including conspecifics, was the strongest effect observed. We also observed growth limitation in mosquitofish and sailfin molly juveniles from intra- and interspecific competition. When maintained at high densities, juvenile mosquitofish changed their diets to include more cladocerans and fewer chironomid larvae relative to low densities. We estimated size-specific gape limitation by adult mosquitofish when consuming juvenile mosquitofish and sailfin mollies. At high field densities, intraspecific competition might prolong the time period when juveniles are vulnerable to predation by adult mosquitofish. These results suggest that path analysis, or other techniques used to document food-web interactions, must include age-specific roles of these fishes.

  17. HAMLET Interacts with Lipid Membranes and Perturbs Their Structure and Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Anne; Lanekoff, Ingela; Chao, Yinxia; Martinez, Aurora; Svanborg, Catharina; Karlsson, Roger

    2010-01-01

    Background Cell membrane interactions rely on lipid bilayer constituents and molecules inserted within the membrane, including specific receptors. HAMLET (human α-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) is a tumoricidal complex of partially unfolded α-lactalbumin (HLA) and oleic acid that is internalized by tumor cells, suggesting that interactions with the phospholipid bilayer and/or specific receptors may be essential for the tumoricidal effect. This study examined whether HAMLET interacts with artificial membranes and alters membrane structure. Methodology/Principal Findings We show by surface plasmon resonance that HAMLET binds with high affinity to surface adherent, unilamellar vesicles of lipids with varying acyl chain composition and net charge. Fluorescence imaging revealed that HAMLET accumulates in membranes of vesicles and perturbs their structure, resulting in increased membrane fluidity. Furthermore, HAMLET disrupted membrane integrity at neutral pH and physiological conditions, as shown by fluorophore leakage experiments. These effects did not occur with either native HLA or a constitutively unfolded Cys-Ala HLA mutant (rHLAall-Ala). HAMLET also bound to plasma membrane vesicles formed from intact tumor cells, with accumulation in certain membrane areas, but the complex was not internalized by these vesicles or by the synthetic membrane vesicles. Conclusions/Significance The results illustrate the difference in membrane affinity between the fatty acid bound and fatty acid free forms of partially unfolded HLA and suggest that HAMLET engages membranes by a mechanism requiring both the protein and the fatty acid. Furthermore, HAMLET binding alters the morphology of the membrane and compromises its integrity, suggesting that membrane perturbation could be an initial step in inducing cell death. PMID:20186341

  18. The interaction of early life experiences with COMT val158met affects anxiety sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Baumann, C; Klauke, B; Weber, H; Domschke, K; Zwanzger, P; Pauli, P; Deckert, J; Reif, A

    2013-11-01

    The pathogenesis of anxiety disorders is considered to be multifactorial with a complex interaction of genetic factors and individual environmental factors. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine gene-by-environment interactions of the genes coding for catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) and monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) with life events on measures related to anxiety. A sample of healthy subjects (N = 782; thereof 531 women; mean age M = 24.79, SD = 6.02) was genotyped for COMT rs4680 and MAOA-uVNTR (upstream variable number of tandem repeats), and was assessed for childhood adversities [Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ)], anxiety sensitivity [Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI)] and anxious apprehension [Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ)]. Main and interaction effects of genotype, environment and gender on measures related to anxiety were assessed by means of regression analyses. Association analysis showed no main gene effect on either questionnaire score. A significant interactive effect of childhood adversities and COMT genotype was observed: Homozygosity for the low-active met allele and high CTQ scores was associated with a significant increment of explained ASI variance [R(2) = 0.040, false discovery rate (FDR) corrected P = 0.04]. A borderline interactive effect with respect to MAOA-uVNTR was restricted to the male subgroup. Carriers of the low-active MAOA allele who reported more aversive experiences in childhood exhibited a trend for enhanced anxious apprehension (R(2) = 0.077, FDR corrected P = 0.10). Early aversive life experiences therefore might increase the vulnerability to anxiety disorders in the presence of homozygosity for the COMT 158met allele or low-active MAOA-uVNTR alleles. PMID:24118915

  19. The interaction of early life experiences with COMT val158met affects anxiety sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Baumann, C; Klauke, B; Weber, H; Domschke, K; Zwanzger, P; Pauli, P; Deckert, J; Reif, A

    2013-11-01

    The pathogenesis of anxiety disorders is considered to be multifactorial with a complex interaction of genetic factors and individual environmental factors. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine gene-by-environment interactions of the genes coding for catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) and monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) with life events on measures related to anxiety. A sample of healthy subjects (N = 782; thereof 531 women; mean age M = 24.79, SD = 6.02) was genotyped for COMT rs4680 and MAOA-uVNTR (upstream variable number of tandem repeats), and was assessed for childhood adversities [Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ)], anxiety sensitivity [Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI)] and anxious apprehension [Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ)]. Main and interaction effects of genotype, environment and gender on measures related to anxiety were assessed by means of regression analyses. Association analysis showed no main gene effect on either questionnaire score. A significant interactive effect of childhood adversities and COMT genotype was observed: Homozygosity for the low-active met allele and high CTQ scores was associated with a significant increment of explained ASI variance [R(2) = 0.040, false discovery rate (FDR) corrected P = 0.04]. A borderline interactive effect with respect to MAOA-uVNTR was restricted to the male subgroup. Carriers of the low-active MAOA allele who reported more aversive experiences in childhood exhibited a trend for enhanced anxious apprehension (R(2) = 0.077, FDR corrected P = 0.10). Early aversive life experiences therefore might increase the vulnerability to anxiety disorders in the presence of homozygosity for the COMT 158met allele or low-active MAOA-uVNTR alleles.

  20. Differential effects of intranasal oxytocin on sexual experiences and partner interactions in couples.

    PubMed

    Behnia, Behnoush; Heinrichs, Markus; Bergmann, Wiebke; Jung, Stefanie; Germann, Janine; Schedlowski, Manfred; Hartmann, Uwe; Kruger, Tillmann H C

    2014-03-01

    Knowledge about the effects of the neuropeptide oxytocin (OXT) on human sexual behaviors and partner interactions remains limited. Based on our previous studies, we hypothesize that OXT should be able to positively influence parameters of sexual function and couple interactions. Employing a naturalistic setting involving 29 healthy heterosexual couples (n=58 participants), we analyzed the acute effects of intranasally administered OXT (24IU) on sexual drive, arousal, orgasm and refractory aspects of sexual behavior together with partner interactions. Data were assessed by psychometric instruments (Acute Sexual Experiences Scale, Arizona Sexual Experience Scale) as well as biomarkers, such as cortisol, α-amylase and heart rate. Intranasal OXT administration did not alter "classical" parameters of sexual function, such as sexual drive, arousal or penile erection and lubrication. However, analysis of variance and a hierarchical linear model (HLM) revealed specific effects related to the orgasmic/post-orgasmic interval as well as parameters of partner interactions. According to HLM analysis, OXT increased the intensity of orgasm, contentment after sexual intercourse and the effect of study participation. According to ANOVA analysis, these effects were more pronounced in men. Men additionally indicated higher levels of sexual satiety after sexual intercourse with OXT administration. Women felt more relaxed and subgroups indicated better abilities to share sexual desires or to empathize with their partners. The effect sizes were small to moderate. Biomarkers indicated moderate psychophysiological activation but were not affected by OXT, gender or method of contraception. Using a naturalistic setting, intranasal OXT administration in couples exerted differential effects on parameters of sexual function and partner interactions. These results warrant further investigations, including subjects with sexual and relationship problems.