Science.gov

Sample records for experience structured interactions

  1. C-SIDE: The control-structure interaction demonstration experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohl, James B.; Davis, Hugh W.

    1993-01-01

    The Control-Structure Interaction Demonstration Experiment (C-SIDE) is sponsored by the Electro-Optics and Cryogenics Division of Ball Aerospace Systems Group. Our objective is to demonstrate methods of solution to structure control problems utilizing currently available hardware in a system that is an extension of our corporate experience. The larger space structures with which Ball has been associated are the SEASAT radar antenna, Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR) -A, -B and -C antennas and the Radarsat spacecraft. The motivation for the C-SIDE configuration is to show that integration of active figure control in the radar's system-level design can relieve antenna mechanical design constraints. This presentation is primarily an introduction to the C-SIDE testbed. Its physical and functional layouts, and major components are described. The sensor is of special interest as it enables direct surface figure measurements from a remote location. The Remote Attitude Measurement System (RAMS) makes high-rate, unobtrusive measurements of many locations, several of which may be collocated easily with actuators. The control processor is a 386/25 executing a reduced order model-based algorithm with provision for residual mode filters to compensate for structure interaction. The actuators for the ground demonstration are non-contacting, linear force devices. Results presented illustrate some basic characteristics of control-structure interaction with this hardware. The testbed will be used for evaluation of current technologies and for research in several areas. A brief indication of the evolution of the C-SIDE is given at the conclusion.

  2. Technically Speaking: On the Structure and Experience of Interaction Involving Augmentative Alternative Communications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelke, Christopher Robert

    2013-01-01

    Technically Speaking: On the Structure and Experience of Interaction Involving Augmentative Alternative Communications examines the ways that communication is structured and experienced by looking at interactions involving augmented communicators--people with severe speech disabilities who use forms of assistive technology in order to communicate…

  3. Technically Speaking: On the Structure and Experience of Interaction Involving Augmentative Alternative Communications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelke, Christopher Robert

    2013-01-01

    Technically Speaking: On the Structure and Experience of Interaction Involving Augmentative Alternative Communications examines the ways that communication is structured and experienced by looking at interactions involving augmented communicators--people with severe speech disabilities who use forms of assistive technology in order to communicate…

  4. Interaction of light with hematite hierarchical structures: Experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Distaso, Monica; Zhuromskyy, Oleksander; Seemann, Benjamin; Pflug, Lukas; Mačković, Mirza; Encina, Ezequiel; Taylor, Robin Klupp; Müller, Rolf; Leugering, Günter; Spiecker, Erdmann; Peschel, Ulf; Peukert, Wolfgang

    2017-03-01

    Mesocrystalline particles have been recognized as a class of multifunctional materials with potential applications in different fields. However, the internal organization of nanocomposite mesocrystals and its influence on the final properties have not yet been investigated. In this paper, a novel strategy based on electrodynamic simulations is developed to shed light on how the internal structure of mesocrystals influences their optical properties. In a first instance, a unified design protocol is reported for the fabrication of hematite/PVP particles with different morphologies such as pseudo-cubes, rods-like and apple-like structures and controlled particle size distributions. The optical properties of hematite/PVP mesocrystals are effectively simulated by taking their aggregate and nanocomposite structure into consideration. The superposition T-Matrix approach accounts for the aggregate nature of mesocrystalline particles and validate the effective medium approximation used in the framework of the Mie theory and electromagnetic simulation such as Finite Element Method. The approach described in our paper provides the framework to understand and predict the optical properties of mesocrystals and more general, of hierarchical nanostructured particles.

  5. Remote Manipulator System (RMS)-based Controls-Structures Interaction (CSI) flight experiment feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demeo, Martha E.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of an experiment which will provide an on-orbit validation of Controls-Structures Interaction (CSI) technology, was investigated. The experiment will demonstrate the on-orbit characterization and flexible-body control of large flexible structure dynamics using the shuttle Remote Manipulator System (RMS) with an attached payload as a test article. By utilizing existing hardware as well as establishing integration, operation and safety algorithms, techniques and procedures, the experiment will minimize the costs and risks of implementing a flight experiment. The experiment will also offer spin-off enhancement to both the Shuttle RMS (SRMS) and the Space Station RMS (SSRMS).

  6. Spatial memories of virtual environments: how egocentric experience, intrinsic structure, and extrinsic structure interact.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Jonathan W; McNamara, Timothy P

    2008-04-01

    Previous research has uncovered three primary cues that influence spatial memory organization:egocentric experience, intrinsic structure (object defined), and extrinsic structure (environment defined). In the present experiments, we assessed the relative importance of these cues when all three were available during learning. Participants learned layouts from two perspectives in immersive virtual reality. In Experiment 1, axes defined by intrinsic and extrinsic structures were in conflict, and learning occurred from two perspectives, each aligned with either the intrinsic or the extrinsic structure. Spatial memories were organized around a reference direction selected from the first perspective, regardless of its alignment with intrinsic or extrinsic structures. In Experiment 2, axes defined by intrinsic and extrinsic structures were congruent, and spatial memories were organized around reference axes defined by those congruent structures, rather than by the initially experienced view. The findings are discussed in the context of spatial memory theory as it relates to real and virtual environments.

  7. Experiment for validation of fluid-structure interaction models and algorithms.

    PubMed

    Hessenthaler, A; Gaddum, N R; Holub, O; Sinkus, R; Röhrle, O; Nordsletten, D

    2016-11-04

    In this paper a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) experiment is presented. The aim of this experiment is to provide a challenging yet easy-to-setup FSI test case that addresses the need for rigorous testing of FSI algorithms and modeling frameworks. Steady-state and periodic steady-state test cases with constant and periodic inflow were established. Focus of the experiment is on biomedical engineering applications with flow being in the laminar regime with Reynolds numbers 1283 and 651. Flow and solid domains were defined using computer-aided design (CAD) tools. The experimental design aimed at providing a straightforward boundary condition definition. Material parameters and mechanical response of a moderately viscous Newtonian fluid and a nonlinear incompressible solid were experimentally determined. A comprehensive data set was acquired by using magnetic resonance imaging to record the interaction between the fluid and the solid, quantifying flow and solid motion.

  8. Nonlinear soil-structure interaction calculations simulating the SIMQUAKE experiment using STEALTH 2D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, H. T.; Hofmann, R.; Yee, G.; Vaughan, D. K.

    1980-01-01

    Transient, nonlinear soil-structure interaction simulations of an Electric Power Research Institute, SIMQUAKE experiment were performed using the large strain, time domain STEALTH 2D code and a cyclic, kinematically hardening cap soil model. Results from the STEALTH simulations were compared to identical simulations performed with the TRANAL code and indicate relatively good agreement between all the STEALTH and TRANAL calculations. The differences that are seen can probably be attributed to: (1) large (STEALTH) vs. small (TRANAL) strain formulation and/or (2) grid discretization differences.

  9. Experiences with nonlinear dynamics of panels and membranes considering fluid-structure interaction and acoustic fatigue

    SciTech Connect

    Ferman, M.A.

    1994-12-31

    A collection of some highlights of the Author`s experiences with nonlinear dynamics in analyses and tests of Panels and Membranes encountered over the past 40 years is given. The primary focus is placed on a major block of his work since the early 70`s, involving work with fluid-structure interaction with Panels and Membranes, and with efforts in Acoustic Fatigue of Panels. While the Author had encountered nonlinear problems throughout Ins career involving flutter, vibration in general, and dynamic thrust instability; it was the more recent work with panels and membranes that greatly expanded his experience. This was triggered by the advent of highly maneuverable aircraft, powered by large powerful, noisy engines, and new materials in the mid 70`s. The significance of nonlinearity for these applications is most obvious from the results shown here-it simply cannot be ignored for optimal, safe design.

  10. Observations of flow path interactions with surface structures during initial soil development stage using irrigation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartl, Steffen; Biemelt, Detlef; Badorreck, Annika; Gerke, Horst H.

    2010-05-01

    Structures and processes are dynamically linked especially during initial stages of soil and ecosystem development. Here we assume that soil pore structures and micro topography determine the flow paths and water fluxes as well as further structure changes. Reports about flow path developments at the soil surface are still limited because of an insufficient knowledge of the changing micro topography at the surface. The objective of this presentation is to evaluate methods for parameterisation of surface micro topography for analysing interactions between infiltration and surface runoff. Complex irrigation experiments were carried out at an experimental site in the neighbourhood of the artificially created water catchment "Chicken Creek". The irrigation rates between 160 mm/h and 250 mm/h were held constant over a time period of 20 minutes. The incoming intensities were measured as well as the raindrop-velocity and -size distributions. The surface runoff was continuously registered, soil samples were taken, and soil water potential heads were monitored using tensiometers. Surface and subsurface flow paths were identified using different tracers. The soil surface structures were recorded using a high resolution digital camera before, during, and after irrigation. Micro topography was surveyed using close-range photogrammetry. With this experimental design both, flow paths on the surface and in the soil as well as structure and texture changes could be observed simultaneously. In 2D vertical cross-sections, the effect of initial sediment deposition structure on infiltration and runoff was observed. Image analysis of surface pictures allowed identifying structural and soil textural changes during the runoff process. Similar structural changes related to surface flow paths were found with the photogrammetric surface analysis. We found evidence for the importance of the initial structures on the flow paths as well as a significant influence of the system development

  11. Peer Observed Interaction and Structured Evaluation (POISE): a Canadian experience with peer supervision for genetic counselors.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Claire; Honeywell, Christina; Mettler, Gabrielle

    2011-04-01

    Peer observation, while often used in other professions, has not been formally applied in genetic counseling. The objective of this study was to pilot a method of peer evaluation whereby genetic counselors observed, and were observed by, each other during patient interaction. All of the available genetic counselors participated in both rounds of the pilot study (six in round one, seven in round two). The genetic counselors that observed the session used an observation room. Most participants reported learning a new skill. Sensitivity to, and comfort with, the feedback process improved. We conclude that Peer-Observed Interaction and Structured Evaluation (POISE) provides an opportunity to refresh counseling approaches and develop feedback skills without causing undue team discord. This new approach to peer supervision in genetic counselling offers a live observation approach for genetic counsellor supervision.

  12. Flow structure interaction around an axial-flow hydrokinetic turbine: Experiments and CFD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, S.; Chamorro, L.; Hill, C.; Arndt, R.; Sotiropoulos, F.

    2014-12-01

    We carry out large-eddy simulation of turbulent flow past a complete hydrokinetic turbine mounted on the bed of a straight rectangular open channel. The complex turbine geometry, including the rotor and all stationary components, is handled by employing the curvilinear immersed boundary (CURVIB) method [1], and velocity boundary conditions near all solid surfaces are reconstructed using a wall model based on solving the simplified boundary layer equations [2]. In this study we attempt to directly resolve flow-blade interactions without introducing turbine parameterization methods. The computed wake profiles of velocities and turbulent stresses agree well with the experimentally measured values.

  13. Adaptive Structures Flight Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Maurice

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: adaptive structures flight experiments; enhanced resolution using active vibration suppression; Advanced Controls Technology Experiment (ACTEX); ACTEX program status; ACTEX-2; ACTEX-2 program status; modular control patch; STRV-1b Cryocooler Vibration Suppression Experiment; STRV-1b program status; Precision Optical Bench Experiment (PROBE); Clementine Spacecraft Configuration; TECHSAT all-composite spacecraft; Inexpensive Structures and Materials Flight Experiment (INFLEX); and INFLEX program status.

  14. Adaptive structures flight experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Maurice

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: adaptive structures flight experiments; enhanced resolution using active vibration suppression; Advanced Controls Technology Experiment (ACTEX); ACTEX program status; ACTEX-2; ACTEX-2 program status; modular control patch; STRV-1b Cryocooler Vibration Suppression Experiment; STRV-1b program status; Precision Optical Bench Experiment (PROBE); Clementine Spacecraft Configuration; TECHSAT all-composite spacecraft; Inexpensive Structures and Materials Flight Experiment (INFLEX); and INFLEX program status.

  15. [Encouraging experiences of interactive lectures].

    PubMed

    Lehtonen, Sanna; Linden, Anni-Maija; Ojala, Päivi M; Polvi, Anne; Sallinen, Ville; Viranta, Suvi

    2009-01-01

    Traditional lectures typically represent unidirectional transfer of information from teacher to students whilst interactive lectures involve student activity. We analyzed the experiences of students and teachers of interactive lectures by observation and questionnaires during a course organized by Helsinki Biomedical Graduate School. Teachers and the majority of students found interactive lectures highly motivating although we observed that only a fraction of students participated in discussions. Students were of the opinion that interactivity improved their learning. Supplementing lectures with interactive elements encourages students to adopt active learning techniques.

  16. Modal interactions due to friction in the nonlinear vibration response of the "Harmony" test structure: Experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claeys, M.; Sinou, J.-J.; Lambelin, J.-P.; Todeschini, R.

    2016-08-01

    The nonlinear vibration response of an assembly with friction joints - named "Harmony" - is studied both experimentally and numerically. The experimental results exhibit a softening effect and an increase of dissipation with excitation level. Modal interactions due to friction are also evidenced. The numerical methodology proposed groups together well-known structural dynamic methods, including finite elements, substructuring, Harmonic Balance and continuation methods. On the one hand, the application of this methodology proves its capacity to treat a complex system where several friction movements occur at the same time. On the other hand, the main contribution of this paper is the experimental and numerical study of evidence of modal interactions due to friction. The simulation methodology succeeds in reproducing complex form of dynamic behavior such as these modal interactions.

  17. Experiment in Structural Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diener, Z. P.

    The concern of the experiment is to find out the roles of abstraction and generalization in the learning of mathematical structures. The basic question is whether to generalize before abstracting or vice-versa in order to maximize transfer. The experiment involves four mathematical tasks and a transfer of activity. Experimental procedures are…

  18. Fluid structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, K.

    A few nonflow field problems are considered, taking into account mainly fluid-shell dynamic interaction and fluid-solid impact. Fluid-shell systems are used as models for sloshing and POGO (structure-propulsion coupling oscillation) in liquid rockets, floating lids of oil tanks, large tanks containing fluid, nuclear containment vessels, and head injury studies in biomechanics. The study of structure-water impact finds applications in the problems associated with water landings of reentry vehicles, water entry of torpedoes, and slamming of ships in heavy seas. At least three different methods can be used in handling wet structures. Attention is given to the method which treats fluid by boundary elements and structure by finite elements.

  19. Control Structures Interaction (CSI) Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Layman, W. E.

    1989-01-01

    Control Structures Interaction (CSI) technology for control of space structures is being developed cooperatively by JPL, LaRC and MSFC for NASA OAST/RM. The mid-'90s goal of JPL's CSI program is to demonstrate with analysis, ground and flight tests, the super quiet structures needed for large diffraction-limited instruments such as optical stellar interferometers and large advanced successors to the Hubble Space Telescope. Microprecision CSI technology is intended as a new "building block" for use by the designers of large optical systems. The thrust of the microprecision CSI technology effort is to achieve nanometer-levels of space structure stability/accuracy with designs which employ otherwise conventional spacecraft technologies. JPL design experiences have indicated the following CSI technology development areas are especially applicable to large optical system projects: (1) Active structural members; (2) Control/structures design methods; (3) Microdynamic effects characterization; and (4) Ground and flight test validation of CSI methods.

  20. Interaction of curcumin with Al(III) and its complex structures based on experiments and theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Teng; Wang, Long; Zhang, Sui; Sun, Ping-Chuan; Ding, Chuan-Fan; Chu, Yan-Qiu; Zhou, Ping

    2011-10-01

    Curcumin has been recognized as a potential natural drug to treat the Alzheimer's disease (AD) by chelating baleful metal ions, scavenging radicals and preventing the amyloid β (Aβ) peptides from the aggregation. In this paper, Al(III)-curcumin complexes with Al(III) were synthesized and characterized by liquid-state 1H, 13C and 27Al nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), mass spectroscopy (MS), ultraviolet spectroscopy (UV) and generalized 2D UV-UV correlation spectroscopy. In addition, the density functional theory (DFT)-based UV and chemical shift calculations were also performed to view insight into the structures and properties of curcumin and its complexes. It was revealed that curcumin could interact strongly with Al(III) ion, and form three types of complexes under different molar ratios of [Al(III)]/[curcumin], which would restrain the interaction of Al(III) with the Aβ peptide, reducing the toxicity effect of Al(III) on the peptide.

  1. LDR structural experiment definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Richard A.; Gates, Richard M.

    1988-01-01

    A study was performed to develop the definition of a structural flight experiment for a large precision segmented reflector that would utilize the Space Station. The objective of the study was to use the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) baseline configuration for focusing on experiment definition activity which would identify the Space Station accommodation requirements and interface constraints. Results of the study defined three Space Station based experiments to demonstrate the technologies needed for an LDR type structure. The basic experiment configurations are the same as the JPL baseline except that the primary mirror truss is 10 meters in diameter instead of 20. The primary objectives of the first experiment are to construct the primary mirror support truss and to determine its structural and thermal characteristics. Addition of the optical bench, thermal shield and primary mirror segments and alignment of the optical components occur on the second experiment. The structure will then be moved to the payload pointing system for pointing, optical control and scientific optical measurement for the third experiment.

  2. Methods to test the interactive effects of drought and plant invasion on ecosystem structure and function using complementary common garden and field experiments.

    PubMed

    Alba, Christina; NeSmith, Julienne E; Fahey, Catherine; Angelini, Christine; Flory, Stephen Luke

    2017-03-01

    Abiotic global change drivers affect ecosystem structure and function, but how they interact with biotic factors such as invasive plants is understudied. Such interactions may be additive, synergistic, or offsetting, and difficult to predict. We present methods to test the individual and interactive effects of drought and plant invasion on native ecosystems. We coupled a factorial common garden experiment containing resident communities exposed to drought (imposed with rainout shelters) and invasion with a field experiment where the invader was removed from sites spanning a natural soil moisture gradient. We detail treatments and their effects on abiotic conditions, including soil moisture, light, temperature, and humidity, which shape community and ecosystem responses. Ambient precipitation during the garden experiment exceeded historic norms despite severe drought in prior years. Soil moisture was 48% lower in drought than ambient plots, but the invader largely offset drought effects. Additionally, temperature and light were lower and humidity higher in invaded plots. Field sites spanned up to a 10-fold range in soil moisture and up to a 2.5-fold range in light availability. Invaded and resident vegetation did not differentially mediate soil moisture, unlike in the garden experiment. Herbicide effectively removed invaded and resident vegetation, with removal having site-specific effects on soil moisture and light availability. However, light was generally higher in invader-removal than control plots, whereas resident removal had less effect on light, similar to the garden experiment. Invasion mitigated a constellation of abiotic conditions associated with drought stress in the garden experiment. In the field, where other factors co-varied, these patterns did not emerge. Still, neither experiment suggested that drought and invasion will have synergistic negative effects on ecosystems, although invasion can limit light availability. Coupling factorial garden

  3. Structural interaction with control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, R. B.; Zvara, J.

    1971-01-01

    A monograph which assesses the state of the art of space vehicle design and development is presented. The monograph presents criteria and recommended practices for determining the structural data and a mathematical structural model of the vehicle needed for accurate prediction of structure and control-system interaction; for design to minimize undesirable interactions between the structure and the control system; and for determining techniques to achieve the maximum desirable interactions and associated structural design benefits. All space vehicles are treated, including launch vehicles, spacecraft, and entry vehicles. Important structural characteristics which affect the structural model used for structural and control-system interaction analysis are given.

  4. Structure enhancement methodology using theory and experiment: gas-phase molecular structures using a dynamic interaction between electron diffraction, molecular mechanics, and ab initio data.

    PubMed

    Kafka, Graeme R; Masters, Sarah L; Rankin, David W H

    2007-07-05

    A new method of incorporating ab initio theoretical data dynamically into the gas-phase electron diffraction (GED) refinement process has been developed to aid the structure determination of large, sterically crowded molecules. This process involves calculating a set of differences between parameters that define the positions of peripheral atoms (usually hydrogen), as determined using molecular mechanics (MM), and those which use ab initio methods. The peripheral-atom positions are then updated continually during the GED refinement process, using MM, and the returned positions are modified using this set of differences to account for the differences between ab initio and MM methods, before being scaled back to the average parameters used to define them, as refined from experimental data. This allows the molecule to adopt a completely asymmetric structure if required, without being constrained by the MM parametrization, whereas the calculations can be performed on a practical time scale. The molecular structures of tri-tert-butylphosphine oxide and tri-tert-butylphosphine imide have been re-examined using this new technique, which we call SEMTEX (Structure Enhancement Methodology using Theory and EXperiment).

  5. Experiments in interactive panoramic cinema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Scott S.; Anderson, Steve; Ruiz, Susana; Naimark, Michael; Hoberman, Perry; Bolas, Mark; Weinberg, Richard

    2005-03-01

    For most of the past 100 years, cinema has been the premier medium for defining and expressing relations to the visible world. However, cinematic spectacles delivered in darkened theaters are predicated on a denial of both the body and the physical surroundings of the spectators who are watching it. To overcome these deficiencies, filmmakers have historically turned to narrative, seducing audiences with compelling stories and providing realistic characters with whom to identify. This paper describes several research projects in interactive panoramic cinema that attempt to sidestep the narrative preoccupations of conventional cinema and instead are based on notions of space, movement and embodied spectatorship rather than traditional storytelling. Example projects include interactive works developed with the use of a unique 360 degree camera and editing system, and also development of panoramic imagery for a large projection environment with 14 screens on 3 adjacent walls in a 5-4-5 configuration with observations and findings from an experiment projecting panoramic video on 12 of the 14, in a 4-4-4 270 degree configuration.

  6. Tethered poly(2-isopropyl-2-oxazoline) chains: temperature effects on layer structure and interactions probed by AFM experiments and modeling.

    PubMed

    An, Junxue; Liu, Xiaoyan; Linse, Per; Dėdinaitė, Andra; Winnik, Françoise M; Claesson, Per M

    2015-03-17

    Thermoresponsive polymer layers on silica surfaces have been obtained by utilizing electrostatically driven adsorption of a cationic-nonionic diblock copolymer. The cationic block provides strong anchoring to the surface for the nonionic block of poly(2-isopropyl-2-oxazoline), referred to as PIPOZ. The PIPOZ chain interacts favorably with water at low temperatures, but above 46 °C aqueous solutions of PIPOZ phase separate as water becomes a poor solvent for the polymer. We explore how a change in solvent condition affects interactions between such adsorbed layers and report temperature effects on both normal forces and friction forces. To gain further insight, we utilize self-consistent lattice mean-field theory to follow how changes in temperature affect the polymer segment density distributions and to calculate surface force curves. We find that with worsening of the solvent condition an attraction develops between the adsorbed PIPOZ layers, and this observation is in good agreement with predictions of the mean-field theory. The modeling also demonstrates that the segment density profile and the degree of chain interpenetration under a given load between two PIPOZ-coated surfaces rise significantly with increasing temperature.

  7. Precision experiments in electroweak interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, M.L.

    1990-03-01

    The electroweak theory of Glashow, Weinberg, and Salam (GWS) has become one of the twin pillars upon which our understanding of all particle physics phenomena rests. It is a brilliant achievement that qualitatively and quantitatively describes all of the vast quantity of experimental data that have been accumulated over some forty years. Note that the word quantitatively must be qualified. The low energy limiting cases of the GWS theory, Quantum Electrodynamics and the V-A Theory of Weak Interactions, have withstood rigorous testing. The high energy synthesis of these ideas, the GWS theory, has not yet been subjected to comparably precise scrutiny. The recent operation of a new generation of proton-antiproton (p{bar p}) and electron-positron (e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}) colliders has made it possible to produce and study large samples of the electroweak gauge bosons W{sup {plus minus}} and Z{sup 0}. We expect that these facilities will enable very precise tests of the GWS theory to be performed in the near future. In keeping with the theme of this Institute, Physics at the 100 GeV Mass Scale, these lectures will explore the current status and the near-future prospects of these experiments.

  8. Structural Assembly Demonstration Experiment (SADE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akin, David L.; Mills, Raymond A.; Bowden, Mary L.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of the Structural Assembly Demonstration Experiment (SADE) was to create a near-term Shuttle flight experiment focusing on the deployment and erection of structural truss elements. The activities of the MIT Space Systems Laboratory consist of three major areas: preparing and conducting neutral buoyancy simulation test series; producing a formal SADE Experiment plan; and studying the structural dynamics issues of the truss structure. Each of these areas is summarized.

  9. Control-structure interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Joseph K.; Ianculescu, George D.; Kenney, Charles S.; Laub, Alan J.; Ly, Jason H. Q.; Papadopoulos, Philip M.

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility of using conventional proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control and an alternative optimal control to perform the pointing and tracking functions of the Space Station solar dynamic power module is investigated. A very large state model of 6 rigid body modes and 272 flexible modes is used in conjunction with classical linear-quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) optimal control to produce a full-order controller that satisfies the requirements. The results are compared with a classically designed PID controller that was implemented for a much smaller (6 rigid body, 40 flexible modes) model. The conventional control design approach is shown to be very much influenced by the order reduction of the plant model, i.e., the number of retained elastic modes from the full-order model, suggesting that for a complex, large space structure, such as the Space Station Freedom solar dynamic module, application of conventional control system design methods may not be adequate. The use of LQG control is recommended, and method for solving the large matrix. Riccati equation that arises from the optimal formulation is provided.

  10. ISE structural dynamic experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lock, Malcolm H.; Clark, S. Y.

    1988-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: directed energy systems - vibration issue; Neutral Particle Beam Integrated Space Experiment (NPB-ISE) opportunity/study objective; vibration sources/study plan; NPB-ISE spacecraft configuration; baseline slew analysis and results; modal contributions; fundamental pitch mode; vibration reduction approaches; peak residual vibration; NPB-ISE spacecraft slew experiment; goodbye ISE - hello Zenith Star Program.

  11. ISE structural dynamic experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lock, Malcolm H.; Clark, S. Y.

    1988-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: directed energy systems - vibration issue; Neutral Particle Beam Integrated Space Experiment (NPB-ISE) opportunity/study objective; vibration sources/study plan; NPB-ISE spacecraft configuration; baseline slew analysis and results; modal contributions; fundamental pitch mode; vibration reduction approaches; peak residual vibration; NPB-ISE spacecraft slew experiment; goodbye ISE - hello Zenith Star Program.

  12. Structural verification for GAS experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peden, Mark Daniel

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to assist the Get Away Special (GAS) experimenter in conducting a thorough structural verification of its experiment structural configuration, thus expediting the structural review/approval process and the safety process in general. Material selection for structural subsystems will be covered with an emphasis on fasteners (GSFC fastener integrity requirements) and primary support structures (Stress Corrosion Cracking requirements and National Space Transportation System (NSTS) requirements). Different approaches to structural verifications (tests and analyses) will be outlined especially those stemming from lessons learned on load and fundamental frequency verification. In addition, fracture control will be covered for those payloads that utilize a door assembly or modify the containment provided by the standard GAS Experiment Mounting Plate (EMP). Structural hazard assessment and the preparation of structural hazard reports will be reviewed to form a summation of structural safety issues for inclusion in the safety data package.

  13. Rapid Method Development in Hydrophilic Interaction Liquid Chromatography for Pharmaceutical Analysis Using a Combination of Quantitative Structure-Retention Relationships and Design of Experiments.

    PubMed

    Taraji, Maryam; Haddad, Paul R; Amos, Ruth I J; Talebi, Mohammad; Szucs, Roman; Dolan, John W; Pohl, Chris A

    2017-02-07

    A design-of-experiment (DoE) model was developed, able to describe the retention times of a mixture of pharmaceutical compounds in hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) under all possible combinations of acetonitrile content, salt concentration, and mobile-phase pH with R(2) > 0.95. Further, a quantitative structure-retention relationship (QSRR) model was developed to predict retention times for new analytes, based only on their chemical structures, with a root-mean-square error of prediction (RMSEP) as low as 0.81%. A compound classification based on the concept of similarity was applied prior to QSRR modeling. Finally, we utilized a combined QSRR-DoE approach to propose an optimal design space in a quality-by-design (QbD) workflow to facilitate the HILIC method development. The mathematical QSRR-DoE model was shown to be highly predictive when applied to an independent test set of unseen compounds in unseen conditions with a RMSEP value of 5.83%. The QSRR-DoE computed retention time of pharmaceutical test analytes and subsequently calculated separation selectivity was used to optimize the chromatographic conditions for efficient separation of targets. A Monte Carlo simulation was performed to evaluate the risk of uncertainty in the model's prediction, and to define the design space where the desired quality criterion was met. Experimental realization of peak selectivity between targets under the selected optimal working conditions confirmed the theoretical predictions. These results demonstrate how discovery of optimal conditions for the separation of new analytes can be accelerated by the use of appropriate theoretical tools.

  14. Interactive Screen Experiments with Single Photons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronner, Patrick; Strunz, Andreas; Silberhorn, Christine; Meyn, Jan-Peter

    2009-01-01

    Single photons are used for fundamental quantum physics experiments as well as for applications. Originally being a topic of advance courses, such experiments are increasingly a subject of undergraduate courses. We provide interactive screen experiments (ISE) for supporting the work in a real laboratory, and for students who do not have access to…

  15. Interactive Screen Experiments with Single Photons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronner, Patrick; Strunz, Andreas; Silberhorn, Christine; Meyn, Jan-Peter

    2009-01-01

    Single photons are used for fundamental quantum physics experiments as well as for applications. Originally being a topic of advance courses, such experiments are increasingly a subject of undergraduate courses. We provide interactive screen experiments (ISE) for supporting the work in a real laboratory, and for students who do not have access to…

  16. Organizational Learning from Cross-Cultural Experiences: An Ethnomethodological Case Study Examining the Relative Importance of Social Structure and Cultural Values during Dynamic Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldecker, Gary T.

    2011-01-01

    This study explored how social structure and cultural values dynamically interact in collective learning between two religious organizations cooperating in a joint project. It further explored the enablers of and impediments to collective learning in this context. The study employed the theoretical framework provided by the Organizational Learning…

  17. Organizational Learning from Cross-Cultural Experiences: An Ethnomethodological Case Study Examining the Relative Importance of Social Structure and Cultural Values during Dynamic Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldecker, Gary T.

    2011-01-01

    This study explored how social structure and cultural values dynamically interact in collective learning between two religious organizations cooperating in a joint project. It further explored the enablers of and impediments to collective learning in this context. The study employed the theoretical framework provided by the Organizational Learning…

  18. Design for Engaging Experience and Social Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harteveld, Casper; ten Thij, Eleonore; Copier, Marinka

    2011-01-01

    One of the goals of game designers is to design for an engaging experience and for social interaction. The question is how. We know that games can be engaging and allow for social interaction, but how do we achieve this or even improve on it? This article provides an overview of several scientific approaches that deal with this question. It…

  19. Acoustoelasticity. [sound-structure interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowell, E. H.

    1977-01-01

    Sound or pressure variations inside bounded enclosures are investigated. Mathematical models are given for determining: (1) the interaction between the sound pressure field and the flexible wall of a Helmholtz resonator; (2) coupled fluid-structural motion of an acoustic cavity with a flexible and/or absorbing wall; (3) acoustic natural modes in multiple connected cavities; and (4) the forced response of a cavity with a flexible and/or absorbing wall. Numerical results are discussed.

  20. Structure and interactions of biological helices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornyshev, Alexei A.; Lee, Dominic J.; Leikin, Sergey; Wynveen, Aaron

    2007-07-01

    Helices are essential building blocks of living organisms, be they molecular fragments of proteins ( α -helices), macromolecules (DNA and collagen), or multimolecular assemblies (microtubules and viruses). Their interactions are involved in packing of meters of genetic material within cells and phage heads, recognition of homologous genes in recombination and DNA repair, stability of tissues, and many other processes. Helical molecules form a variety of mesophases in vivo and in vitro. Recent structural studies, direct measurements of intermolecular forces, single-molecule manipulations, and other experiments have accumulated a wealth of information and revealed many puzzling physical phenomena. It is becoming increasingly clear that in many cases the physics of biological helices cannot be described by theories that treat them as simple, unstructured polyelectrolytes. The present article focuses on the most important and interesting aspects of the physics of structured macromolecules, highlighting various manifestations of the helical motif in their structure, elasticity, interactions with counterions, aggregation, and poly- and mesomorphic transitions.

  1. Localized structures in convective experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burguete, J.; Mancini, H.

    2014-01-01

    In this work we review localized structures appearing in thermo-convective experiments performed in extended (large "aspect ratio") fluid layers. After a brief general review (not exhaustive), we focus on some results obtained in pure fluids in a Bénard-Marangoni system with non-homogeneous heating where some structures of this kind appear. The experimental results are compared in reference to the most classical observed in binary mixtures experiments or simulations. In the Bénard-Marangoni experiment we present the stability diagram where localized structures appear and the typical situations where these local mechanisms have been studied experimentally. Some new experimental results are also included. The authors want to honor Prof. H. Brand in his 60th. birthday and to thank him for helpful discussions.

  2. Affective loop experiences: designing for interactional embodiment

    PubMed Central

    Höök, Kristina

    2009-01-01

    Involving our corporeal bodies in interaction can create strong affective experiences. Systems that both can be influenced by and influence users corporeally exhibit a use quality we name an affective loop experience. In an affective loop experience, (i) emotions are seen as processes, constructed in the interaction, starting from everyday bodily, cognitive or social experiences; (ii) the system responds in ways that pull the user into the interaction, touching upon end users' physical experiences; and (iii) throughout the interaction the user is an active, meaning-making individual choosing how to express themselves—the interpretation responsibility does not lie with the system. We have built several systems that attempt to create affective loop experiences with more or less successful results. For example, eMoto lets users send text messages between mobile phones, but in addition to text, the messages also have colourful and animated shapes in the background chosen through emotion-gestures with a sensor-enabled stylus pen. Affective Diary is a digital diary with which users can scribble their notes, but it also allows for bodily memorabilia to be recorded from body sensors mapping to users' movement and arousal and placed along a timeline. Users can see patterns in their bodily reactions and relate them to various events going on in their lives. The experiences of building and deploying these systems gave us insights into design requirements for addressing affective loop experiences, such as how to design for turn-taking between user and system, how to create for ‘open’ surfaces in the design that can carry users' own meaning-making processes, how to combine modalities to create for a ‘unity’ of expression, and the importance of mirroring user experience in familiar ways that touch upon their everyday social and corporeal experiences. But a more important lesson gained from deploying the systems is how emotion processes are co-constructed and

  3. Affective loop experiences: designing for interactional embodiment.

    PubMed

    Höök, Kristina

    2009-12-12

    Involving our corporeal bodies in interaction can create strong affective experiences. Systems that both can be influenced by and influence users corporeally exhibit a use quality we name an affective loop experience. In an affective loop experience, (i) emotions are seen as processes, constructed in the interaction, starting from everyday bodily, cognitive or social experiences; (ii) the system responds in ways that pull the user into the interaction, touching upon end users' physical experiences; and (iii) throughout the interaction the user is an active, meaning-making individual choosing how to express themselves-the interpretation responsibility does not lie with the system. We have built several systems that attempt to create affective loop experiences with more or less successful results. For example, eMoto lets users send text messages between mobile phones, but in addition to text, the messages also have colourful and animated shapes in the background chosen through emotion-gestures with a sensor-enabled stylus pen. Affective Diary is a digital diary with which users can scribble their notes, but it also allows for bodily memorabilia to be recorded from body sensors mapping to users' movement and arousal and placed along a timeline. Users can see patterns in their bodily reactions and relate them to various events going on in their lives. The experiences of building and deploying these systems gave us insights into design requirements for addressing affective loop experiences, such as how to design for turn-taking between user and system, how to create for 'open' surfaces in the design that can carry users' own meaning-making processes, how to combine modalities to create for a 'unity' of expression, and the importance of mirroring user experience in familiar ways that touch upon their everyday social and corporeal experiences. But a more important lesson gained from deploying the systems is how emotion processes are co-constructed and experienced

  4. An experiment with interactive planning models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beville, J.; Wagner, J. H.; Zannetos, Z. S.

    1970-01-01

    Experiments on decision making in planning problems are described. Executives were tested in dealing with capital investments and competitive pricing decisions under conditions of uncertainty. A software package, the interactive risk analysis model system, was developed, and two controlled experiments were conducted. It is concluded that planning models can aid management, and predicted uses of the models are as a central tool, as an educational tool, to improve consistency in decision making, to improve communications, and as a tool for consensus decision making.

  5. Interaction between Syntactic Structure and Information Structure in the Processing of a Head-Final Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koizumi, Masatoshi; Imamura, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    The effects of syntactic and information structures on sentence processing load were investigated using two reading comprehension experiments in Japanese, a head-final SOV language. In the first experiment, we discovered the main effects of syntactic and information structures, as well as their interaction, showing that interaction of these two…

  6. Interaction between Syntactic Structure and Information Structure in the Processing of a Head-Final Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koizumi, Masatoshi; Imamura, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    The effects of syntactic and information structures on sentence processing load were investigated using two reading comprehension experiments in Japanese, a head-final SOV language. In the first experiment, we discovered the main effects of syntactic and information structures, as well as their interaction, showing that interaction of these two…

  7. NASA'S controls-structures interaction program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanks, Brantley R.

    1989-01-01

    A NASA program is about to start which has the objective to advance Controls-Structures Interaction (CSI) technology to a point where it can be used in spacecraft design for future missions. Because of the close interrelationships between the structure, the control hardware, and the analysis/design, a highly interdisciplinary activity is defined in which structures, dynamics, controls, computer and electronics engineers work together on a daily basis and are co-located to a large extent. Methods will be developed which allow the controls and structures analysis and design functions to use the same mathematical models. Hardware tests and applications are emphasized and will require development of concepts and test methods to carry out. Because of a variety of mission application problem classes, several time-phased, focus ground test articles are planned. They will be located at the Langley Researdh Center (LaRC), the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). It is anticipated that the ground tests will be subject to gravity and other environmental effects to the extent that orbital flights tests will be needed for verification of some technology items. The need for orbital flight experiments will be quantified based on ground test results and mission needs. Candidate on-orbit experiments will be defined and preliminary design/definition and cost studies will be carried out for one or more high-priority experiments.

  8. NASA/DOD Controls-Structures Interaction Technology 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, Jerry R. (Compiler)

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this conference was to report to industry, academia, and government agencies on the current status of controls-structures interaction technology. The agenda covered ground testing, integrated design, analysis, flight experiments, and concepts.

  9. Control/structure interaction design methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Hugh C.; Layman, William E.

    1989-01-01

    The Control Structure Interaction Program is a technology development program for spacecraft that exhibit interactions between the control system and structural dynamics. The program objectives include development and verification of new design concepts (such as active structure) and new tools (such as a combined structure and control optimization algorithm) and their verification in ground and possibly flight test. The new CSI design methodology is centered around interdisciplinary engineers using new tools that closely integrate structures and controls. Verification is an important CSI theme and analysts will be closely integrated to the CSI Test Bed laboratory. Components, concepts, tools and algorithms will be developed and tested in the lab and in future Shuttle-based flight experiments. The design methodology is summarized in block diagrams depicting the evolution of a spacecraft design and descriptions of analytical capabilities used in the process. The multiyear JPL CSI implementation plan is described along with the essentials of several new tools. A distributed network of computation servers and workstations was designed that will provide a state-of-the-art development base for the CSI technologies.

  10. Spin Mass Interaction Limiting Experiment (SMILE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Junyi; Romalis, Michael

    2016-05-01

    We present preliminary results of an upcoming experiment to limit possible anomalous spin mass interactions. Such interactions arise naturally if light pseudoscalar bosons like the axion exist and a bound on such interactions places constraints on the couplings of the axion, which is of particular interest both as a solution to the strong CP problem in QCD and as a dark matter candidate. In this experiment, we measure the couplings of the axion using a 3 He-K co-magnetometer by modulating the positions of two 200kg source masses that produces an energy shift in the atoms proportional to the axion's coupling constants. Astroyphysical observations currently exceed the best laboratory limits of light axions' couplings to nucleons by two order of magnitudes but we expect, for the first time in a laboratory experiment, to surpass those astrophysical bounds. Construction of the experiment has been completed and we present here some preliminary results and discuss possible systematic effects. Supported by NSF PHY-1404325.

  11. Plasma Interaction Experiment (PIX) flight results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grier, N. T.; Stevens, N. J.

    1979-01-01

    An auxiliary payload package called PIX (plasma interaction experiment) was launched on March 5, 1978, on the LANDSAT 3 launch vehicle to study interactions between the space charged-particle environment and surfaces at high applied positive and negative voltages. Three experimental surfaces were used in this package: a plain disk to act as a control, a disk on a Kapton sheet to determine the effect of surrounding insulation on current collection, and a small solar-array segment to evaluate the effect of distributing biased surfaces among an array of insulators. Only half of the results from the 4 hours of PIX operations were recovered. The results did verify effects found in ground simulation testing. The results of this experiment are discussed in detail.

  12. Coherent structures in interacting vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jian; Xue, Jingyu; Mao, Xuerui; Caulfield, C. P.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate experimentally the nonlinear structures that develop from interacting vortex rings induced by a sinusoidally oscillating ellipsoidal disk in fluid at rest. We vary the scaled amplitude or Keulegan-Carpenter number 0.3 structures with clear azimuthal wave number emerge as sequential vortex rings are shed from the disk. These organized structures exhibit wave numbers ranging from m =2 to m =9 and can be further divided into two distinct classes, distinguished by the phase and symmetry properties above and below the disk. We find some discrepancies between experiments and linear stability analysis, due to the inherent nonlinear mechanisms in the experiments, particulary on the boundary between the two branches, presenting unevenly distributed flow structures along the azimuthal direction.

  13. Structural Dynamics and Control Interaction of Flexible Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert S. (Editor); Scofield, Harold N. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    A workshop on structural dynamics and control interaction of flexible structures was held to promote technical exchange between the structural dynamics and control disciplines, foster joint technology, and provide a forum for discussing and focusing critical issues in the separate and combined areas. Issues and areas of emphasis were identified in structure-control interaction for the next generation of flexible systems.

  14. Discovery & Interaction in Astro 101 Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, Frank Patrick; Maurone, Philip; DeWarf, Laurence E.

    2016-01-01

    The availability of low-cost, high-performance computing hardware and software has transformed the manner by which astronomical concepts can be re-discovered and explored in a laboratory that accompanies an astronomy course for arts students. We report on a strategy, begun in 1992, for allowing each student to understand fundamental scientific principles by interactively confronting astronomical and physical phenomena, through direct observation and by computer simulation. These experiments have evolved as :a) the quality and speed of the hardware has greatly increasedb) the corresponding hardware costs have decreasedc) the students have become computer and Internet literated) the importance of computationally and scientifically literate arts graduates in the workplace has increased.We present the current suite of laboratory experiments, and describe the nature, procedures, and goals in this two-semester laboratory for liberal arts majors at the Astro 101 university level.

  15. Experiments on Structural Properties of Yukawa balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arp, Oliver; Block, Dietmar; Piel, Alexander; Melzer, Andre

    2006-10-01

    Recently, it was shown that it is possible to confine spherical dust clouds in a plasma [1,2]. It was found that these dust clouds have a crystalline structure which differs noteably from the well known fcc, bcc and hcp order in extended crystalline systems. These objects are called 'Yukawa Balls' because of the screened Coulomb interaction between the particles. The experiments show that the particles arrange in nested shells with hcp order on individual shells. This seems to be a unique feature of few-particle systems with strong coupling as it is also reported for trapped laser-cooled ions [3]. Interestingly, the structure in the center of ions clouds changes to bulk order as the ion number and hence the cloud size grows. Here, we present results from experiments on small and large Yukawa balls to discuss whether this can be observed for Yukawa balls as well. Additionally, first experiments are reported which investigate structural changes due to a elliptical deformation of the dust cloud. [1] O. Arp et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 165004 (2004). [2] O. Arp et al., Phys. of Plasmas 12, 122102 (2005). [3] D.H.E. Dubin and T.M. O'Neill, Rev. Mod. Phys. 71, 87 (1999).

  16. Interactive computer code for dynamic and soil structure interaction analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mulliken, J.S.

    1995-12-01

    A new interactive computer code is presented in this paper for dynamic and soil-structure interaction (SSI) analyses. The computer program FETA (Finite Element Transient Analysis) is a self contained interactive graphics environment for IBM-PC`s that is used for the development of structural and soil models as well as post-processing dynamic analysis output. Full 3-D isometric views of the soil-structure system, animation of displacements, frequency and time domain responses at nodes, and response spectra are all graphically available simply by pointing and clicking with a mouse. FETA`s finite element solver performs 2-D and 3-D frequency and time domain soil-structure interaction analyses. The solver can be directly accessed from the graphical interface on a PC, or run on a number of other computer platforms.

  17. Transient cavitation in fluid-structure interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kot, C.A.; Hsieh, B.J.; Youngdahl, C.K.; Valentin, R.A.

    1981-11-01

    A generalized column separation model is extended to predict transient cavitation associated with fluid-structure interactions. The essential feature of the combined fluid-structure interaction calculations is the coupling between the fluid transient, which is computed one dimensionally, and the structural response which can be multidimensional. Proper coupling is achieved by defining an average, one-dimensional, structural velocity and by assuming a spatially uniform pressure loading of the structure. This procedure is found to be effective even for complex finite element structural models for which the required computational time step is orders of magnitude smaller than that for the fluid transient. Computational examples and comparison with experimental data show that neglecting cavitation and setting the fluid velocity at all times equal to that of the structural boundary leads to unreal negative pressure predictions. A properly coupled column separation model reproduces the important features of fluid-structure interactions, converges rapidly, and gives reasonable fluid and structural response predictions. 9 refs.

  18. Ice interaction with offshore structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cammaert, A.B.; Muggeridge, D.B.

    1988-01-01

    Oil platforms and other offshore structures being built in the arctic regions must be able to withstand icebergs, ice islands, and pack ice. This reference explain the effect ice has on offshore structures and demonstrates design and construction methods that allow such structures to survive in harsh, ice-ridden environments. It analyzes the characteristics of sea ice as well as dynamic ice forces on structures. Techniques for ice modeling and field testing facilitate the design and construction of sturdy, offshore constructions. Computer programs included.

  19. Interactive control of isolated heart experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Van Alste, J.A.; Schoute, A.L.; Vaartjes, S.R.; Boom, H.B.K.

    1983-01-01

    this paper presents a study of the pressure generating properties of working isolated left ventricles of rabbit hearts including the dependence on time, ventricular volume and flow at any chosen moment. An experimental set-up is built of which the central part consists of a servomotor driven piston pump. This volume actuator is connected to the left ventricle via a cannula tied in the mitral orifice and is controlled by a small computer. This computer also controls the electrical stimulator, artificial valves, a pressure calibration circuit and the end diastolic pressure or end diastolic volume. The experimental protocol requires many repetitive functions, with adjustable interval times and magnitudes. A special language syntax has been developed for (i) experiment definition, (ii) experiment composition in advance, (iii) real-time control during the actual experiment and (iv) registration of the actual protocol parameters. The interactive control was realized using the special language and an interpreter as one of the parallel processes for the experimental control. 4 references.

  20. Excitonic energy level structure and pigment-protein interactions in the recombinant water-soluble chlorophyll protein. II. Spectral hole-burning experiments.

    PubMed

    Pieper, J; Rätsep, M; Trostmann, I; Schmitt, F-J; Theiss, C; Paulsen, H; Eichler, H J; Freiberg, A; Renger, G

    2011-04-14

    Persistent spectral hole burning at 4.5 K has been used to investigate the excitonic energy level structure and the excited state dynamics of the recombinant class-IIa water-soluble chlorophyll-binding protein (WSCP) from cauliflower. The hole-burned spectra are composed of four main features: (i) a narrow zero-phonon hole (ZPH) at the burn wavelength, (ii) a number of vibrational ZPHs, (iii) a broad low-energy hole at ~665 and ~683 nm for chlorophyll b- and chlorophyll a-WSCP, respectively, and (iv) a second satellite hole at ~658 and ~673 nm for chlorophyll b- and chlorophyll a-WSCP, respectively. The doublet of broad satellite holes is assigned to an excitonically coupled chlorophyll dimer. The lower-energy holes at ~665 and ~683 nm for chlorophyll b- and chlorophyll a-WSCP, respectively, represent the lower exciton states. Taking into account the parameters of electron-phonon coupling, the lower exciton state can be assigned as the fluorescence origin. The lower exciton state is populated by two processes: (i) exciton relaxation from the higher exciton state and (ii) vibrational relaxation within the lower exciton state. Assuming identical site energies for the two excitonically coupled chlorophyll molecules, the dipole-dipole interaction energy J is directly determined to be 85 and 100 cm(-1) for chlorophyll b- and chlorophyll a-WSCP, respectively, based on the positions of the satellite holes. The Gaussian low-energy absorption band identified by constant fluence hole burning at 4.5 K has a width of ~150 cm(-1) and peaks at 664.9 and 682.7 nm for chlorophyll b- and chlorophyll a-WSCP, respectively. The action spectrum is broader and blue-shifted compared to the fluorescent lower exciton state. This finding can be explained by a slow protein relaxation between energetically inequivalent conformational substates within the lowest exciton state in agreement with the results of Schmitt et al. (J. Phys. Chem. B2008, 112, 13951).

  1. Interactive Raster Data Structure Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    4-23 4-9 Basic Concepts of Conventional Relational Structures and Relational Algebra Operations. . .............. 4-24 4-10 Structural...Graphics-Oriented Relational Algebraic Interpreter Systems... ... ......... .. 4-33 4-15 Logical Picture Representation by Relational Tablets...attempts required users familiar with lineal -based features to conceive of cartographic * entities as scan lines and pixels of data. The relative maturity

  2. PRISM: protein interactions by structural matching.

    PubMed

    Ogmen, Utkan; Keskin, Ozlem; Aytuna, A Selim; Nussinov, Ruth; Gursoy, Attila

    2005-07-01

    Prism (http://gordion.hpc.eng.ku.edu.tr/prism) is a website for protein interface analysis and prediction of putative protein-protein interactions. It is composed of a database holding protein interface structures derived from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). The server also includes summary information about related proteins and an interactive protein interface viewer. A list of putative protein-protein interactions obtained by running our prediction algorithm can also be accessed. These results are applied to a set of protein structures obtained from the PDB at the time of algorithm execution (January 2004). Users can browse through the non-redundant dataset of representative interfaces on which the prediction algorithm depends, retrieve the list of similar structures to these interfaces or see the results of interaction predictions for a particular protein. Another service provided is interactive prediction. This is done by running the algorithm for user input structures.

  3. Stand By for Fun: Experience and Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crockford, Douglas

    1986-01-01

    This paper explores interactivity, and considers what should be done to create a mass market for interactive media. It is suggested that one way to do so is to examine the video game phenomenon, and a model of interactivity is proposed. The model, a "home interactive theater," would involve interaction in the telling of a story, with the…

  4. An Interactive Introduction to Protein Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, W. Theodore

    2004-01-01

    To improve student understanding of protein structure and the significance of noncovalent interactions in protein structure and function, students are assigned a project to write a paper complemented with computer-generated images. The assignment provides an opportunity for students to select a protein structure that is of interest and detail…

  5. An Interactive Introduction to Protein Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, W. Theodore

    2004-01-01

    To improve student understanding of protein structure and the significance of noncovalent interactions in protein structure and function, students are assigned a project to write a paper complemented with computer-generated images. The assignment provides an opportunity for students to select a protein structure that is of interest and detail…

  6. Chitosan-soyprotein interaction as determined by thermal unfolding experiments.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Tomoko; Morita, Kazuhisa; Saito, Tsutomu; Kugimiya, Wataru; Fukamizo, Tamo

    2006-07-01

    Chitosan interaction with soybean beta-conglycinin beta(3) was investigated by thermal unfolding experiments using CD spectroscopy. The negative ellipticity of the protein was enhanced with rising solution temperature. The transition temperature of thermal unfolding of the protein (T(m)) was 63.4 degrees C at pH 3.0 (0.15 M KCl). When chitosan was added to the protein solution, the T(m) value was elevated by 7.7 degrees C, whereas the T(m) elevation upon addition of chitosan hexamer (GlcN)(6) was 2.2 degrees C. These carbohydrates appear to interact with the protein stabilizing the protein structure, and the interaction ability could be evaluated from the T(m) elevation. Similar experiments were conducted at various pHs from 2.0 to 3.5, and the T(m) elevation was found to be enhanced in the higher pH region. We conclude that chitosan interacts with beta-conglycinin through electrostatic interactions between the positive charges of the chitosan polysaccharide and the negative charges of the protein surface.

  7. Combustion: Structural interaction in a viscoelastic material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, T. Y.; Chang, J. P.; Kumar, M.; Kuo, K. K.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of interaction between combustion processes and structural deformation of solid propellant was considered. The combustion analysis was performed on the basis of deformed crack geometry, which was determined from the structural analysis. On the other hand, input data for the structural analysis, such as pressure distribution along the crack boundary and ablation velocity of the crack, were determined from the combustion analysis. The interaction analysis was conducted by combining two computer codes, a combustion analysis code and a general purpose finite element structural analysis code.

  8. PSAIA – Protein Structure and Interaction Analyzer

    PubMed Central

    Mihel, Josip; Šikić, Mile; Tomić, Sanja; Jeren, Branko; Vlahoviček, Kristian

    2008-01-01

    Background PSAIA (Protein Structure and Interaction Analyzer) was developed to compute geometric parameters for large sets of protein structures in order to predict and investigate protein-protein interaction sites. Results In addition to most relevant established algorithms, PSAIA offers a new method PIADA (Protein Interaction Atom Distance Algorithm) for the determination of residue interaction pairs. We found that PIADA produced more satisfactory results than comparable algorithms implemented in PSAIA. Particular advantages of PSAIA include its capacity to combine different methods to detect the locations and types of interactions between residues and its ability, without any further automation steps, to handle large numbers of protein structures and complexes. Generally, the integration of a variety of methods enables PSAIA to offer easier automation of analysis and greater reliability of results. PSAIA can be used either via a graphical user interface or from the command-line. Results are generated in either tabular or XML format. Conclusion In a straightforward fashion and for large sets of protein structures, PSAIA enables the calculation of protein geometric parameters and the determination of location and type for protein-protein interaction sites. XML formatted output enables easy conversion of results to various formats suitable for statistic analysis. Results from smaller data sets demonstrated the influence of geometry on protein interaction sites. Comprehensive analysis of properties of large data sets lead to new information useful in the prediction of protein-protein interaction sites. PMID:18400099

  9. System Identification Tools for Control Structure Interaction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    DT! FILE COPY AL-TR-89-054 AD: 00 Final Report System Identification Tools for O for the period - September 1988 to Control Structure Interaction May...Classification) System Identification Tools for Control Structure Interaction (U) 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Kosut, Robert L.; Kabuli, Guntekin M. 13a. TYPE OF...identification, dynamics, 22 01 system identification , robustness, dynamic modeling, robust 22 02 control design, control design procedure 19. ABSTRACT

  10. Creating Learning Experiences through Interactive Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Alexis

    2014-01-01

    In this small-scale study, the use of a simple interactive device was designed and studied ethnographically to discover how groups visiting a museum as part of a guided tour interacted with the device as viewed from the perspective of the group tour guides. As the emphasis placed on utilizing interactive devices in museums is increasing, one can…

  11. Generalized Structured Component Analysis with Latent Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun; Ho, Moon-Ho Ringo; Lee, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Generalized structured component analysis (GSCA) is a component-based approach to structural equation modeling. In practice, researchers may often be interested in examining the interaction effects of latent variables. However, GSCA has been geared only for the specification and testing of the main effects of variables. Thus, an extension of GSCA…

  12. Generalized Structured Component Analysis with Latent Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun; Ho, Moon-Ho Ringo; Lee, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Generalized structured component analysis (GSCA) is a component-based approach to structural equation modeling. In practice, researchers may often be interested in examining the interaction effects of latent variables. However, GSCA has been geared only for the specification and testing of the main effects of variables. Thus, an extension of GSCA…

  13. Some Experiments in Atomic Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Kent R.

    1974-01-01

    The role of spectral color slides in laboratory situations is discussed, then experiments for secondary school students concerning color and wave length, evidence of quantization, and the ionization energy of the hydrogen atom are outlined. Teaching guidelines for creating a set of spectrograms and photographic specifications are provided. (DT)

  14. Some Experiments in Atomic Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Kent R.

    1974-01-01

    The role of spectral color slides in laboratory situations is discussed, then experiments for secondary school students concerning color and wave length, evidence of quantization, and the ionization energy of the hydrogen atom are outlined. Teaching guidelines for creating a set of spectrograms and photographic specifications are provided. (DT)

  15. Proceedings: Avian Interactions with Utility Structures. International Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The first international workshop on Avian Interactions with Utility Structures featured an exchange of information on the impact of utility structures on avian populations. EPRI cosponsored the workshop with the Avian Power Line Interaction Committee (APLIC), formed in 1988 and designed to share data and experience regarding avian interactions with utility structures. The workshop -- held September 13--16, 1992 in Miami-welcomed engineers, scientists, academic researchers, and representatives from conservation and special interest groups. Attendees from 10 countries presented 28 papers that provide a basis for understanding and establishing new research directions to reduce bird mortality due to collisions and electrocutions. Papers highlighted advances in technology and analysis tools, the geographic extent of the problem, and regulatory needs of utilities and other interested parties involved in preventing and mitigating avian/power line interaction problems.

  16. Structural assembly demonstration experiment, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akin, David L.; Bowden, Mary L.; Miller, Rene H.

    1983-01-01

    The goal of this phase of the structural assembly and demonstration experiment (SADE) program was to begin to define a shuttle flight experiment that would yield data to compare on-orbit assembly operations of large space structures with neutral buoyancy simulations. In addition, the experiment would be an early demonstration of structural hardware and human capabilities in extravehicular activity (EVA). The objectives of the MIT study, as listed in the statement of work, were: to provide support in establishing a baseline neutral buoyancy testing data base, to develop a correlation technique between neutral buoyancy test results and on-orbit operations, and to prepare the SADE experiment plan (MSFC-PLAN-913).

  17. Joint Optics Structures Experiment (JOSE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Founds, David

    1987-01-01

    The objectives of the JOSE program is to develop, demonstrate, and evaluate active vibration suppression techniques for Directed Energy Weapons (DEW). DEW system performance is highly influenced by the line-of-sight (LOS) stability and in some cases by the wave front quality. The missions envisioned for DEW systems by the Strategic Defense Initiative require LOS stability and wave front quality to be significantly improved over any current demonstrated capability. The Active Control of Space Structures (ACOSS) program led to the development of a number of promising structural control techniques. DEW structures are vastly more complex than any structures controlled to date. They will be subject to disturbances with significantly higher magnitudes and wider bandwidths, while holding higher tolerances on allowable motions and deformations. Meeting the performance requirements of the JOSE program requires upgrading the ACOSS techniques to meet new more stringent requirements, the development of requisite sensors and acturators, improved control processors, highly accurate system identification methods, and the integration of hardware and methodologies into a successful demonstration.

  18. Joint Optics Structures Experiment (JOSE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Founds, David

    1987-06-01

    The objectives of the JOSE program is to develop, demonstrate, and evaluate active vibration suppression techniques for Directed Energy Weapons (DEW). DEW system performance is highly influenced by the line-of-sight (LOS) stability and in some cases by the wave front quality. The missions envisioned for DEW systems by the Strategic Defense Initiative require LOS stability and wave front quality to be significantly improved over any current demonstrated capability. The Active Control of Space Structures (ACOSS) program led to the development of a number of promising structural control techniques. DEW structures are vastly more complex than any structures controlled to date. They will be subject to disturbances with significantly higher magnitudes and wider bandwidths, while holding higher tolerances on allowable motions and deformations. Meeting the performance requirements of the JOSE program requires upgrading the ACOSS techniques to meet new more stringent requirements, the development of requisite sensors and acturators, improved control processors, highly accurate system identification methods, and the integration of hardware and methodologies into a successful demonstration.

  19. Empathy, engagement, entrainment: the interaction dynamics of aesthetic experience.

    PubMed

    Brinck, Ingar

    2017-04-08

    A recent version of the view that aesthetic experience is based in empathy as inner imitation explains aesthetic experience as the automatic simulation of actions, emotions, and bodily sensations depicted in an artwork by motor neurons in the brain. Criticizing the simulation theory for committing to an erroneous concept of empathy and failing to distinguish regular from aesthetic experiences of art, I advance an alternative, dynamic approach and claim that aesthetic experience is enacted and skillful, based in the recognition of others' experiences as distinct from one's own. In combining insights from mainly psychology, phenomenology, and cognitive science, the dynamic approach aims to explain the emergence of aesthetic experience in terms of the reciprocal interaction between viewer and artwork. I argue that aesthetic experience emerges by participatory sense-making and revolves around movement as a means for creating meaning. While entrainment merely plays a preparatory part in this, aesthetic engagement constitutes the phenomenological side of coupling to an artwork and provides the context for exploration, and eventually for moving, seeing, and feeling with art. I submit that aesthetic experience emerges from bodily and emotional engagement with works of art via the complementary processes of the perception-action and motion-emotion loops. The former involves the embodied visual exploration of an artwork in physical space, and progressively structures and organizes visual experience by way of perceptual feedback from body movements made in response to the artwork. The latter concerns the movement qualities and shapes of implicit and explicit bodily responses to an artwork that cue emotion and thereby modulate over-all affect and attitude. The two processes cause the viewer to bodily and emotionally move with and be moved by individual works of art, and consequently to recognize another psychological orientation than her own, which explains how art can cause

  20. Regularity of nuclear structure under random interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Y. M.

    2011-05-06

    In this contribution I present a brief introduction to simplicity out of complexity in nuclear structure, specifically, the regularity of nuclear structure under random interactions. I exemplify such simplicity by two examples: spin-zero ground state dominance and positive parity ground state dominance in even-even nuclei. Then I discuss two recent results of nuclear structure in the presence of random interactions, in collaboration with Prof. Arima. Firstly I discuss sd bosons under random interactions, with the focus on excited states in the yrast band. We find a few regular patterns in these excited levels. Secondly I discuss our recent efforts towards obtaining eigenvalues without diagonalizing the full matrices of the nuclear shell model Hamiltonian.

  1. Interaction Between Air Propellers and Airplane Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durand, W F

    1927-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was the determination of the character and amount of interaction between air propellers as usually mounted on airplanes and the adjacent parts of the airplane structure - or, more specifically, those parts of the airplane structure within the wash of the propeller, and capable of producing any significant effect on propeller performance. In report no. 177 such interaction between air propellers and certain simple geometrical forms was made the subject of investigation and report. The present investigation aims to carry this general study one stage further by substituting actual airplane structures for the simple geometrical forms. From the point of view of the present investigation, the airplane structures, viewed as an obstruction in the wake of the propeller, must also be viewed as a necessary part of the airplane and not as an appendage which might be installed or removed at will. (author)

  2. Intermolecular potentials from shock structure experiments. [for monatomic gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturtevant, B.; Steinhilper, E. A.

    1974-01-01

    Ground-state intermolecular interaction potentials determined from shock structure experiments with four monatomic gases are reported. These potentials are assessed for self-consistency, using the law of corresponding states, and their suitability for engineering applications in rarefied gas dynamics is discussed.

  3. Fundamental Structure of Matter and Strong Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Ping Chen

    2011-11-01

    More than 99% of the visible matter in the universe are the protons and neutrons. Their internal structure is mostly governed by the strong interaction. Understanding their internal structure in terms of fundamental degrees-of-freedom is one of the most important subjects in modern physics. Worldwide efforts in the last few decades have lead to numerous surprises and discoveries, but major challenges still remain. An overview of the progress will be presented with a focus on the recent studies of the proton and neutron's electromagnetic and spin structure. Future perspectives will be discussed.

  4. Flow Interaction With Highly Flexible Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoele, Kourosh

    Studying the interaction between fluid and structure is an essential step towards the understanding of many engineering and physical problems, from the flow instability of structures to the biolocomotion of insects, birds and fishes. The simulation of such problems is computationally challenging. This justifies the attempts to develop more sophisticated and more efficient numerical models of fluid-solid interactions. In this dissertation, we proposed numerical models both in potential flow and fully viscous flow for the interaction of immersed structure with a strongly unsteady flow. In particular we have developed efficient approaches to study two groups of problems, the flow interaction with skeleton-reinforced fish fins and flow interaction with highly flexible bluff bodies. Fins of bony fishes are characterized by a skeleton-reinforced membrane structure consisting of a soft collagen membrane strengthened by embedded flexible rays. Morphologically, each ray is connected to a group of muscles so that the fish can control the rotational motion of each ray individually, enabling multi-degree of freedom control over the fin motion and deformation. We have developed fluid-structure interaction models to simulate the kinematics and dynamic performance of a structurally idealized fin. The first method includes a boundary-element model of the fluid motion and a fully-nonlinear Euler-Bernoulli beam model of the embedded rays. In the second method, we use an improved immersed boundary approach. Using these models, we study thrust generation and propulsion efficiency of the fin at different combinations of parameters at both high-Re and intermediate-Re flow. Effects of kinematic as well as structural properties are examined. It has been illustrated that the fish's capacity to control the motion of each individual ray, as well as the anisotropic deformability of the fin determined by distribution of the rays (especially the detailed distribution of ray stiffness), is

  5. Working Smart Workbook. An Interactive Learning Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles Unified School District, CA. Div. of Adult and Occupational Education.

    This workbook accompanies an interactive videodisc used in the Working Smart workplace literacy project prepared for the hotel and food services industry in the Los Angeles, California area. The first instructional unit addresses preparing the work area, including stocking supplies and cleaning the work area. The second instructional unit covers…

  6. Characterizing nanoparticle interactions: Linking models to experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ramakrishnan, S.; Zukoski, C. F.

    2000-07-15

    Self-assembly of nanoparticles involves manipulating particle interactions such that attractions are on the order of the average thermal energy in the system. If the self-assembly is to result in an ordered packing, an understanding of their phase behavior is necessary. Here we test the ability of simple pair potentials to characterize the interactions and phase behavior of silico tungstic acid (STA), a 1.2 nm particle. The strength of interaction is controlled by dispersing STA in different background salt concentrations. The experimental variables used in characterizing the interactions are the osmotic compressibility (d{pi}/d{rho}), the second virial coefficient (B{sub 2}), relative solution viscosity ({eta}/{eta}{sub c}), and the solubility ({rho}{sigma}{sup 3}){sub sat}. Various techniques are then developed to extract the parameters of square well, the adhesive hard sphere (AHS), and the Yukawa pair potentials that best describe the experimental data. The AHS model describes the solution thermodynamic behavior only where the system is weakly attractive but, as would be expected, fails when long range repulsions or nonmonotonic pair potentials become important. Model free representations are presented which offer the opportunity to extract pair potential parameters. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  7. On some structure-turbulence interaction problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maekawa, S.; Lin, Y. K.

    1976-01-01

    The interactions between a turbulent flow structure; responding to its excitation were studied. The turbulence was typical of those associated with a boundary layer, having a cross-spectral density indicative of convection and statistical decay. A number of structural models were considered. Among the one-dimensional models were an unsupported infinite beam and a periodically supported infinite beam. The fuselage construction of an aircraft was then considered. For the two-dimensional case a simple membrane was used to illustrate the type of formulation applicable to most two-dimensional structures. Both the one-dimensional and two-dimensional structures studied were backed by a cavity filled with an initially quiescent fluid to simulate the acoustic environment when the structure forms one side of a cabin of a sea vessel or aircraft.

  8. Structural similarity enhances interaction propensity of proteins.

    PubMed

    Lukatsky, D B; Shakhnovich, B E; Mintseris, J; Shakhnovich, E I

    2007-02-02

    We study statistical properties of interacting protein-like surfaces and predict two strong, related effects: (i) statistically enhanced self-attraction of proteins; (ii) statistically enhanced attraction of proteins with similar structures. The effects originate in the fact that the probability to find a pattern self-match between two identical, even randomly organized interacting protein surfaces is always higher compared with the probability for a pattern match between two different, promiscuous protein surfaces. This theoretical finding explains statistical prevalence of homodimers in protein-protein interaction networks reported earlier. Further, our findings are confirmed by the analysis of curated database of protein complexes that showed highly statistically significant overrepresentation of dimers formed by structurally similar proteins with highly divergent sequences ("superfamily heterodimers"). We suggest that promiscuous homodimeric interactions pose strong competitive interactions for heterodimers evolved from homodimers. Such evolutionary bottleneck is overcome using the negative design evolutionary pressure applied against promiscuous homodimer formation. This is achieved through the formation of highly specific contacts formed by charged residues as demonstrated both in model and real superfamily heterodimers.

  9. Microscopic Approaches to Nuclear Structure: Configuration Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ormand, W E

    2007-09-21

    The configuration interaction (CI) approach to solving the nuclear many-body problem, also known as the interacting shell model, has proven to be powerful tool in understanding the structure of nuclei. The principal criticism of past applications of the shell model is the reliance on empirical tuning to interaction matrix elements. If an accurate description of nuclei far from the valley of stability, where little or no data is available, a more fundamental approach is needed. This starts with recent ab initio approaches with effective interactions in the no-core shell model (NCSM). Using effective-field theory for guidance, fully ab initio descriptions of nuclei up to {sup 16}O with QCD based NN, NNN, and NNNN interactions will be possible within the next five years. An important task is then to determine how to use these NCSM results to develop effective interactions to describe heavier nuclei without the need to resort to an empirical retuning with every model space. Thus, it is likely that more traditional CI applications utilizing direct diagonalization and more fundamental interactions will be applicable to nuclei with perhaps up to one hundred constituents. But, these direct diagonalization CI applications will always be computationally limited due to the rapid increase in the number of configurations with particle number. Very recently, the shifted-contour method has been applied to the Auxiliary-field Monte Carlo approach to the Shell Model (AFMCSM), and preliminary applications exhibit a remarkable taming of the notorious sign problem. If the mitigation of the sign problem holds true, the AFMCSM will offer a method to compute quantum correlations to mean-field applications for just about all nuclei; giving exact results for CI model spaces that can approach 10{sup 20-25}. In these lectures, I will discuss modern applications of CI to the nuclear many-body problem that have the potential to guide nuclear structure theory into the next decade.

  10. Numerical analysis of soil-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanlangen, Harry

    1991-05-01

    A study to improve some existing procedures for the finite element analysis of soil deformation and collapse is presented. Special attention is paid to problems of soil structure interaction. Emphasis is put on the behavior of soil rather than on that of structures. This seems to be justifiable if static interaction of stiff structures and soft soil is considered. In such a case nonlinear response will exclusively stem from soil deformation. In addition, the quality of the results depends to a high extent on the proper modeling of soil flow along structures and not on the modeling of the structure itself. An exception is made when geotextile reinforcement is considered. In that case the structural element, i.e., the geotextile, is highly flexible. The equation of continuum equilibrium, which serves as a starting point for the finite element formulation of large deformation elastoplasticity, is discussed with special attention being paid to the interpretation of some objective stress rate tensors. The solution of nonlinear finite element equations is addressed. Soil deformation in the prefailure range is discussed. Large deformation effect in the analysis of soil deformation is touched on.

  11. Liner target interaction experiments on Pegasus II

    SciTech Connect

    Hockaday, M.P.; Chrien, R.E.; Bartsch, R.

    1995-09-01

    The Los Alamos High Energy Density Physics program uses capacitively driven low voltage, inductive-storage pulse power to implode cylindrical targets for hydrodynamics experiments. Once a precision driver liner was characterized an experimental series characterizing the aluminum target dynamics was performed. The target was developed for shock-induced quasi-particle ejecta experiments including holography. The concept for the Liner shock experiment is that the driver liner is used to impact the target liner which then accelerates toward a collimator with a slit in it. A shock wave is set up in the target liner and as the shock emerges from the back side of the target liner, ejecta are generated. By taking a laser hologram the particle distribution of the ejecta are hoped to be determined. The goal for the second experimental series was to characterize the target dynamics and not to measure and generate the ejecta. Only the results from the third shot, Pegasus II-26 fired April 26th, 1994, from the series is discussed in detail. The second experimental series successfully characterized the target dynamics necessary to move forward towards the planned quasi-ejecta experiments.

  12. Laser Mode Structure Experiments for Undergraduate Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Richard A.; Gehrz, Robert D.

    Experiments dealing with laser mode structure are presented which are suitable for an upper division undergraduate laboratory. The theory of cavity modes is summarized. The mode structure of the radiation from a helium-neon laser is measured by using a photodiode detector and spectrum analyzer to detect intermode beating. Off-axial modes can be…

  13. Laser Mode Structure Experiments for Undergraduate Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Richard A.; Gehrz, Robert D.

    Experiments dealing with laser mode structure are presented which are suitable for an upper division undergraduate laboratory. The theory of cavity modes is summarized. The mode structure of the radiation from a helium-neon laser is measured by using a photodiode detector and spectrum analyzer to detect intermode beating. Off-axial modes can be…

  14. RANS Modeling of Benchmark Shockwave / Boundary Layer Interaction Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiadis, Nick; Vyas, Manan; Yoder, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    This presentation summarizes the computations of a set of shock wave / turbulent boundary layer interaction (SWTBLI) test cases using the Wind-US code, as part of the 2010 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) shock / boundary layer interaction workshop. The experiments involve supersonic flows in wind tunnels with a shock generator that directs an oblique shock wave toward the boundary layer along one of the walls of the wind tunnel. The Wind-US calculations utilized structured grid computations performed in Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes mode. Three turbulence models were investigated: the Spalart-Allmaras one-equation model, the Menter Shear Stress Transport wavenumber-angular frequency two-equation model, and an explicit algebraic stress wavenumber-angular frequency formulation. Effects of grid resolution and upwinding scheme were also considered. The results from the CFD calculations are compared to particle image velocimetry (PIV) data from the experiments. As expected, turbulence model effects dominated the accuracy of the solutions with upwinding scheme selection indicating minimal effects.!

  15. THz Radiation Generation via Laser Plasma Interaction Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yugami, Noboru; Higashiguchi, Takeshi

    2008-12-01

    Recently radiation generation from the interaction between laser and plasma is studied. Terahertz radiation from photo-conductive antenna which is based on semiconductor technology is widely used, The power is in the order of nano-watt level so that it is hard to use for application. On the other hand, terahertz radiation from laser plasma interaction is much higher than that of semiconductor technology. In our experiments, we have studied by use DARC (dc to ac radiation converter) mechanism by using YAG laser with nano-second pulse duration. DARC is novel radiation source using the interaction between laser-created ionization front and static electric field. The frequency of radiation is determined by both plasma density of ionization front and the geometry of DARC structure. We observed radiation pulse of frequency of 1.2 THz and pulse duration of 2 ps with ZnSe crystal as media detected by EO (electro-optics) sampling technique. Note from Publisher: This article contains the abstract only.

  16. Coulomb Interactions in Hanbury Brown-Twiss Experiments with Electrons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Kan

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation examines the effect of Coulomb interactions in Hanbury Brown-Twiss (HBT) type experiments with electrons. HBT experiments deal with intensity interference, which is related to the second-order correlation function of the particle field. This is an extension of the usual amplitude interference experiment, such as Young's…

  17. Coulomb Interactions in Hanbury Brown-Twiss Experiments with Electrons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Kan

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation examines the effect of Coulomb interactions in Hanbury Brown-Twiss (HBT) type experiments with electrons. HBT experiments deal with intensity interference, which is related to the second-order correlation function of the particle field. This is an extension of the usual amplitude interference experiment, such as Young's…

  18. Fluid Structure Interaction Effect on Sandwich Composite Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    14. SUBJECT TERMS Fluid Structure Interaction, FSI, composite, balsa, low velocity impact, sandwich composites, VARTM , Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer...11 1. Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding ( VARTM ) ...................11 2. Procedure...required equipment for VARTM composite production. ..............10 Figure 4. VARTM Lay-up (From [8

  19. Dissipative Structures At Laser-Solid Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanai, Laszlo

    1989-05-01

    The questions which are discussed in this lecture refer to one of sections of laser-solid interactions, namely: to formation of different dissipative structures on the surface of metals and semiconductors when they are irradiated by intensive laser light in chemically active media (f.e.air). Some particular examples of the development at different spatial and time instabilities, periodic and stochastic structures, auto-wave processes are present-ed using testing materials vanadium metal and semiconducting V205 single crystals and light sources: cw and pulsed CO2 and YAG lasers.

  20. Proton-neutron interaction and nuclear structure

    SciTech Connect

    Casten, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    The pervasive role of the proton-neutron interaction in nuclear structure is discussed. Particular emphasis is given to its influence on the onset of collectivity and deformation, on intruder states, and on the evolution of subshell structure. The N/sub p/N/sub n/ scheme is outlined and some applications of it to collective model calculations and to nuclei far off stability are described. The concept of N/sub p/N/sub n/ multiplets is introduced. 32 refs., 20 figs.

  1. Structural interaction with transportation and handling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Problems involved in the handling and transportation of finished space vehicles from the factory to the launch site are presented, in addition to recommendations for properly accounting for in space vehicle structural design, adverse interactions during transportation. Emphasis is given to the protection of vehicle structures against those environments and loads encountered during transportation (including temporary storage) which would exceed the levels that the vehicle can safely withstand. Current practices for verifying vehicle safety are appraised, and some of the capabilities and limitations of transportation and handling systems are summarized.

  2. Structural insights into microtubule doublet interactions inaxonemes

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, Kenneth H.; Sui, Haixin

    2007-06-06

    Coordinated sliding of microtubule doublets, driven by dynein motors, produces periodic beating of the axoneme. Recent structural studies of the axoneme have used cryo-electron tomography to reveal new details of the interactions among some of the multitude of proteins that form the axoneme and regulate its movement. Connections among the several sets of dyneins, in particular, suggest ways in which their actions may be coordinated. Study of the molecular architecture of isolated doublets has provided a structural basis for understanding the doublet's mechanical properties that are related to the bending of the axoneme, and has also offered insight into its potential role in the mechanism of dynein activity regulation.

  3. Soil/Structure Interactions in Earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramey, G. W.; Moore, R. K.; Yoo, C. H.; Bush, Thomas D., Jr.; Stallings, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    In effort to improve design of Earthquake-resistant structures, mathematical study undertaken to simulate interactions among soil, foundation, and superstructure during various kinds of vibrational excitation. System modeled as three lumped masses connected vertically by springs, with lowest mass connected to horizontal vibrator (representing ground) through springs and dashpot. Behavior of springs described by elastic or elastoplastic force/deformation relationships. Relationships used to approximate nonlinear system behavior and soil/foundation-interface behavior.

  4. Soil/Structure Interactions in Earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramey, G. W.; Moore, R. K.; Yoo, C. H.; Bush, Thomas D., Jr.; Stallings, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    In effort to improve design of Earthquake-resistant structures, mathematical study undertaken to simulate interactions among soil, foundation, and superstructure during various kinds of vibrational excitation. System modeled as three lumped masses connected vertically by springs, with lowest mass connected to horizontal vibrator (representing ground) through springs and dashpot. Behavior of springs described by elastic or elastoplastic force/deformation relationships. Relationships used to approximate nonlinear system behavior and soil/foundation-interface behavior.

  5. Structural investigation of the interactions of biotinylruthenocene with avidin.

    PubMed

    Strzelczyk, Paweł; Bujacz, Anna; Plażuk, Damian; Zakrzewski, Janusz; Bujacz, Grzegorz

    2013-06-25

    The crystal structure of avidin, a protein from hen egg white, was determined in the form of a complex with biotinylruthenocene. This biotin-derived organometallic ligand is a potential anticancer agent for targeted therapy based upon avidin-biotin technology. Isothermal titration calorimetry experiments, involving avidin complexes with biotin (vitamin H or B7) derivatives, show differences in their affinity to the protein in comparison to its avidin-biotin complex, the strongest known biochemical interaction in Nature. The crystal structure of the first complex of avidin with biotinylruthenocene, determined at 2.5Å resolution (PDB: 4I60), shows unique interactions of the ruthenocene moiety with avidin. Biotin derivatives exhibit weaker affinity to avidin then biotin, which allows their wider use in biotechnology. The specific properties of biotinylruthenocene and the knowledge of its interactions with avidin may be useful in biochemical, medical, and nanotechnological applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Statistical structure of host-phage interactions.

    PubMed

    Flores, Cesar O; Meyer, Justin R; Valverde, Sergi; Farr, Lauren; Weitz, Joshua S

    2011-07-12

    Interactions between bacteria and the viruses that infect them (i.e., phages) have profound effects on biological processes, but despite their importance, little is known on the general structure of infection and resistance between most phages and bacteria. For example, are bacteria-phage communities characterized by complex patterns of overlapping exploitation networks, do they conform to a more ordered general pattern across all communities, or are they idiosyncratic and hard to predict from one ecosystem to the next? To answer these questions, we collect and present a detailed metaanalysis of 38 laboratory-verified studies of host-phage interactions representing almost 12,000 distinct experimental infection assays across a broad spectrum of taxa, habitat, and mode of selection. In so doing, we present evidence that currently available host-phage infection networks are statistically different from random networks and that they possess a characteristic nested structure. This nested structure is typified by the finding that hard to infect bacteria are infected by generalist phages (and not specialist phages) and that easy to infect bacteria are infected by generalist and specialist phages. Moreover, we find that currently available host-phage infection networks do not typically possess a modular structure. We explore possible underlying mechanisms and significance of the observed nested host-phage interaction structure. In addition, given that most of the available host-phage infection networks examined here are composed of taxa separated by short phylogenetic distances, we propose that the lack of modularity is a scale-dependent effect, and then, we describe experimental studies to test whether modular patterns exist at macroevolutionary scales.

  7. Experiments In Characterizing Vibrations Of A Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Yeung; Hadaegh, Fred Y.; Bayard, David S.

    1993-01-01

    Report discusses experiments conducted to test methods of identification of vibrational and coupled rotational/vibrational modes of flexible structure. Report one in series that chronicle development of integrated system of methods, sensors, actuators, analog and digital signal-processing equipment, and algorithms to suppress vibrations in large, flexible structure even when dynamics of structure partly unknown and/or changing. Two prior articles describing aspects of research, "Autonomous Frequency-Domain Indentification" (NPO-18099), and "Automated Characterization Of Vibrations Of A Structure" (NPO-18141).

  8. Experiments In Characterizing Vibrations Of A Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Yeung; Hadaegh, Fred Y.; Bayard, David S.

    1993-01-01

    Report discusses experiments conducted to test methods of identification of vibrational and coupled rotational/vibrational modes of flexible structure. Report one in series that chronicle development of integrated system of methods, sensors, actuators, analog and digital signal-processing equipment, and algorithms to suppress vibrations in large, flexible structure even when dynamics of structure partly unknown and/or changing. Two prior articles describing aspects of research, "Autonomous Frequency-Domain Indentification" (NPO-18099), and "Automated Characterization Of Vibrations Of A Structure" (NPO-18141).

  9. Development of an active structure flight experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, R. A.; Wyse, R. E.; Schubert, S. R.

    1993-02-01

    The design and development of the Air Force and TRW's Advanced Control Technology Experiment (ACTEX) flight experiment is described in this paper. The overall objective of ACTEX is to provide an active structure trailblazer which will demonstrate the compatibility of active structures with operational spacecraft performance and lifetime measures. At the heart of the experiment is an active tripod driven by a digitally-programmable analog control electronics subsystem. Piezoceramic sensors and actuators embedded in a graphite epoxy host material provide the sensing and actuation mechanism for the active tripod. Low noise ground-programmable electronics provide a virtually unlimited number of control schemes that can be implemented in the space environment. The flight experiment program provides the opportunity to gather performance, reliability, adaptability, and lifetime performance data on vibration suppression hardware for the next generation of DoD and NASA spacecraft.

  10. Self-Structure and Emotional Experience

    PubMed Central

    Ditzfeld, Christopher P.; Showers, Carolin J.

    2013-01-01

    Two studies examine individual differences in affective reactivity by linking emotional experience to cognitive self-structure. Consistent with the view that individuals with an evaluatively compartmentalized self-structure are emotionally reactive, we find that evaluative compartmentalization is associated with the experience of, and desire for, high-arousal positive affect, whereas evaluative integration is associated with the experience of low-arousal positive and negative affect and the desire for low-arousal positive affect. Although compartmentalized individuals are less granular in their tendency to report experiencing both high- and low-arousal affect (cf. Feldman Barrett, 2004), they are strongly differentiated in their perceptions of high-arousal states as positive and low-arousal states as negative. Thus, compartmentalized individuals’ reactivity may be explained by their preference for high-arousal positive states and the “breadth” of their emotionality (e.g., the tendency to experience sadness and nervousness at the same time). PMID:24125479

  11. Modal representations in control/structure interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blelloch, Paul A.; Young, Jeffrey W.; Carney, Kelly S.

    1989-01-01

    When control/structure interaction problems are examined, a standard method for representing the structure is to choose a truncated set of normal modes calculated from either a finite-element or a distributed-parameter model. However, the normal modes can neglect important static information about the structure. Using a set of fixed interface modes results in a much more accurate closed-loop model, even when relatively low-bandwidth controllers are used. The fixed interface modes are calculated with control input degrees of freedom held fixed, and standard finite-element software can be used. Illustrative examples include a simple hinged beam and a complex model of the phase-I Space Station configuration.

  12. Structural Priming and Frequency Effects Interact in Chinese Sentence Comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hang; Dong, Yanping; Boland, Julie E.; Yuan, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Previous research in several European languages has shown that the language processing system is sensitive to both structural frequency and structural priming effects. However, it is currently not clear whether these two types of effects interact during online sentence comprehension, especially for languages that do not have morphological markings. To explore this issue, the present study investigated the possible interplay between structural priming and frequency effects for sentences containing the Chinese ambiguous construction V NP1 de NP2 in a self-paced reading experiment. The sentences were disambiguated to either the more frequent/preferred NP structure or the less frequent VP structure. Each target sentence was preceded by a prime sentence of three possible types: NP primes, VP primes, and neutral primes. When the ambiguous construction V NP1 de NP2 was disambiguated to the dispreferred VP structure, participants experienced more processing difficulty following an NP prime relative to following a VP prime or a neutral baseline. When the ambiguity was resolved to the preferred NP structure, prime type had no effect. These results suggest that structural priming in comprehension is modulated by the baseline frequency of alternative structures, with the less frequent structure being more subject to structural priming effects. These results are discussed in the context of the error-based, implicit learning account of structural priming. PMID:26869954

  13. Structural Priming and Frequency Effects Interact in Chinese Sentence Comprehension.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hang; Dong, Yanping; Boland, Julie E; Yuan, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Previous research in several European languages has shown that the language processing system is sensitive to both structural frequency and structural priming effects. However, it is currently not clear whether these two types of effects interact during online sentence comprehension, especially for languages that do not have morphological markings. To explore this issue, the present study investigated the possible interplay between structural priming and frequency effects for sentences containing the Chinese ambiguous construction V NP1 de NP2 in a self-paced reading experiment. The sentences were disambiguated to either the more frequent/preferred NP structure or the less frequent VP structure. Each target sentence was preceded by a prime sentence of three possible types: NP primes, VP primes, and neutral primes. When the ambiguous construction V NP1 de NP2 was disambiguated to the dispreferred VP structure, participants experienced more processing difficulty following an NP prime relative to following a VP prime or a neutral baseline. When the ambiguity was resolved to the preferred NP structure, prime type had no effect. These results suggest that structural priming in comprehension is modulated by the baseline frequency of alternative structures, with the less frequent structure being more subject to structural priming effects. These results are discussed in the context of the error-based, implicit learning account of structural priming.

  14. Joint Air Sea Interaction (JASIN) experiment, Northwest coast of Scotland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Businger, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    The joint air sea interaction (JASIN) experiment took place off the Northwest coast of Scotland. Sea surface and boundary layer parameters were measured. The JASIN data was used as ground truth for various sensors on the SEASAT satellite.

  15. Solvent-Ion Interactions in Salt Water: A Simple Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willey, Joan D.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a procedurally quick, simple, and inexpensive experiment which illustrates the magnitude and some effects of solvent-ion interactions in aqueous solutions. Theoretical information, procedures, and examples of temperature, volume and hydration number calculations are provided. (JN)

  16. NASA SDO Social Media - An Interactive Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durscher, R.; Wawro, M.; NASA SDO Social Media Team

    2011-12-01

    The world of social media has become an important outlet of information and news around the world. Social networking now accounts for over 25% of all time spent online in the US. NASA puts strong emphasis on its social media programs, and, in fact, is the top-ranked social media user in the public sector. We will describe our SDO Social Media project, which aims to engage the public in learning about the SDO mission, the Sun, space weather, and the impact the Sun has on Earth and other NASA exploration missions. We'll discuss the various social media outlets and the techniques we use for reaching and engaging our audience. Effectiveness is measured through the use of various automatically-gathered statistics and level of public engagement. Of key importance to effective social media use is having access to scientists who can quickly respond to questions and express their answers in meaningful ways to the public. Our presentation will highlight the importance of scientist involvement and suggest ways for encouraging more scientists to support these efforts. It will also address how our social media approach has been paving the way for other Mission E/PO teams in using our best practices and experiences.

  17. The structure and dynamics of interactive documents

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, J.T.

    1999-04-01

    Advances in information technology continue to accelerate as the new millennium approaches. With these advances, electronic information management is becoming increasingly important and is now supported by a seemingly bewildering array of hardware and software whose sole purpose is the design and implementation of interactive documents employing multimedia applications. Multimedia memory and storage applications such as Compact Disk-Read Only Memory (CD-ROMs) are already a familiar interactive tool in both the entertainment and business sectors. Even home enthusiasts now have the means at their disposal to design and produce CD-ROMs. More recently, Digital Video Disk (DVD) technology is carving its own niche in these markets and may (once application bugs are corrected and prices are lowered) eventually supplant CD-ROM technology. CD-ROM and DVD are not the only memory and storage applications capable of supporting interactive media. External, high-capacity drives and disks such as the Iomega{copyright} zip{reg_sign} and jaz{reg_sign} are also useful platforms for launching interactive documents without the need for additional hardware such as CD-ROM burners and copiers. The main drawback here, however, is the relatively high unit price per disk when compared to the unit cost of CD-ROMs. Regardless of the application chosen, there are fundamental structural characteristics that must be considered before effective interactive documents can be created. Additionally, the dynamics of interactive documents employing hypertext links are unique and bear only slight resemblance to those of their traditional hard-copy counterparts. These two considerations form the essential content of this paper.

  18. A deployable structure and solar array controls experiment for STEP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishimoto, T. S.

    1984-01-01

    A candidate configuration for a controls experiment on the Space Technology Experiments Platform (STEP) is described. The elements of the experiment are the mast, the solar array, and an articulation module between the two. The characteristic dimensions are very compatible for integration on a pallet such a STEP's proposed configuration. The controls' objective would be the measurement of orbiter interaction as well as the system identification of the appendages. The flight experiment configuration would also provide a test bed for various active vibration controls concepts. The instrumentation being considered would measure accelerations, strains, displacements, and temperatures. The deployable mast has eight elements defining a structural bay. Uniaxial measurements would be required to define loads at a cross section of the structure. Displacements due to thermal distortion of the mast and the local state of the solar concentrator may be measured by an optical ranging technique from the orbiter aft flight deck.

  19. Fluid-structure interaction of reticulated porous wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strong, Elizabeth; Jawed, Mohammad; Reis, Pedro

    Insects of the orders Neuroptera and Hymenoptera locomote via flapping flight with reticulated wings that have porous structures that confers them with remarkable lightweight characteristics. Yet these porous wings still perform as contiguous plates to provide the necessary aerodynamic lift and drag required for flight. Even though the fluid flow past the bulk of these insects may be in high Reynolds conditions, viscosity can dominate over inertia in the flow through the porous sub-features. Further considering the flexibility of these reticulated wings yields a highly nonlinear fluid-structure interaction problem. We perform a series of dynamically-scaled precision model experiments to gain physical insight into this system. Our experiments are complemented with computer simulations that combine the Discrete Elastic Rods method and a model for the fluid loading that takes into account the `leakiness' through the porous structure. Our results are anticipated to find applications in micro-air vehicle aerodynamics.

  20. Engineering Structurally Interacting RNA (sxRNA)

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Francis; Lapsia, Sameer; Spadaro, Salvatore; Wurz, Zachary E.; Bhaduri-McIntosh, Sumita; Tenenbaum, Scott A.

    2017-01-01

    RNA-based three-way junctions (3WJs) are naturally occurring structures found in many functional RNA molecules including rRNA, tRNA, snRNA and ribozymes. 3WJs are typically characterized as resulting from an RNA molecule folding back on itself in cis but could also form in trans when one RNA, for instance a microRNA binds to a second structured RNA, such as a mRNA. Trans-3WJs can influence the final shape of one or both of the RNA molecules and can thus provide a means for modulating the availability of regulatory motifs including potential protein or microRNA binding sites. Regulatory 3WJs generated in trans represent a newly identified regulatory category that we call structurally interacting RNA or sxRNA for convenience. Here we show that they can be rationally designed using familiar cis-3WJ examples as a guide. We demonstrate that an sxRNA “bait” sequence can be designed to interact with a specific microRNA “trigger” sequence, creating a regulatable RNA-binding protein motif that retains its functional activity. Further, we show that when placed downstream of a coding sequence, sxRNA can be used to switch “ON” translation of that sequence in the presence of the trigger microRNA and the amount of translation corresponded with the amount of microRNA present. PMID:28350000

  1. Engineering Structurally Interacting RNA (sxRNA).

    PubMed

    Doyle, Francis; Lapsia, Sameer; Spadaro, Salvatore; Wurz, Zachary E; Bhaduri-McIntosh, Sumita; Tenenbaum, Scott A

    2017-03-28

    RNA-based three-way junctions (3WJs) are naturally occurring structures found in many functional RNA molecules including rRNA, tRNA, snRNA and ribozymes. 3WJs are typically characterized as resulting from an RNA molecule folding back on itself in cis but could also form in trans when one RNA, for instance a microRNA binds to a second structured RNA, such as a mRNA. Trans-3WJs can influence the final shape of one or both of the RNA molecules and can thus provide a means for modulating the availability of regulatory motifs including potential protein or microRNA binding sites. Regulatory 3WJs generated in trans represent a newly identified regulatory category that we call structurally interacting RNA or sxRNA for convenience. Here we show that they can be rationally designed using familiar cis-3WJ examples as a guide. We demonstrate that an sxRNA "bait" sequence can be designed to interact with a specific microRNA "trigger" sequence, creating a regulatable RNA-binding protein motif that retains its functional activity. Further, we show that when placed downstream of a coding sequence, sxRNA can be used to switch "ON" translation of that sequence in the presence of the trigger microRNA and the amount of translation corresponded with the amount of microRNA present.

  2. Structures in multiple spin-2 interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldacchino, Oliver; Schmidt-May, Angnis

    2017-04-01

    We study generalisations of ghost-free bimetric theory which involve more than two spin-2 fields. The consistent interactions can enter in the form of two different couplings and in the majority of this work we concentrate on the simpler one. The corresponding action involves one metric coupled to N tensor fields which do not interact with each other. We derive maximally symmetric solutions to the multimetric equations of motion and identify the mass eigenstates in the linearised theory around these backgrounds. Our results are then applied to the problem of singling out multimetric models which possess certain additional structures. In particular, we look for a relation between scale invariant background solutions, the perturbative emergence of Weyl invariance and the presence of partially massless spin-2 fields in the linear theory. Our findings generalise known results in bimetric theory and allow us to point out similarities and differences between the bi- and multimetric models.

  3. Apollo experience report: Spacecraft structural windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pigg, O. E.; Weiss, S. P.

    1973-01-01

    The window structural design and verification experience is presented for the Apollo command and lunar modules. This report presents window design philosophy, design criteria, hardware description, and qualification and acceptance test programs and discusses the problems encountered and solutions developed in these areas. The structural characteristics of glass are not generally well understood by designers. The optics and instrument glass covers were not considered to be structural components and thus were not normally subjected to the design, qualification, and acceptance standards necessary to preclude failures. These two factors contributed significantly to window problems on both Apollo spacecraft.

  4. Quantifying human subjective experience and social interaction using the eXperience Induction Machine.

    PubMed

    Bernardet, Ulysses; Väljamäe, Aleksander; Inderbitzin, Martin; Wierenga, Sytse; Mura, Anna; Verschure, Paul F M J

    2011-06-30

    With the advance of novel brain imaging technology more correlations between complex human properties and the neuronal substrate can be assessed. However, thus far, not many well-validated paradigms exist that would allow for a systematic and quantitative exploration of these phenomena. For instance, despite the rapid technological advances in the domain of mixed and virtual reality systems, a fundamental issue remains how we can define and quantify "presence". A standard approach has been to use questionnaires and self-report measures. However, it has been well established that humans' capabilities to access and externalize their internal states are limited. Hence, we have investigated the question whether other less subjective measures can be devised that can corroborate subjective self-reports on presence. In particular, we have developed a quantitative recollection task that assesses the ability of human subjects (N=40) to recollect the factual structure and organization of a structured and fully controlled experience in a human accessible mixed reality space, the eXperience Induction Machine (XIM). In this structured experience - referred to as the "Autodemo"--a virtual guide explains the key elements and properties of XIM while the user is able to freely move around in the space. To evaluate the users' experience and the amount of factual information retained about the Autodemo, we used the ITC-SOPI questionnaire and a recall test specifically designed for the Autodemo. We found significant correlations between spatial presence and engagement factors of ITC-SOPI and recall performance. Moreover we observed an interaction with the participants' gender. Our results show that we can assess correlates of "presence" by focusing on other dependent measures such as those related to memory and performance. Additionally, our work exemplifies how virtual and mixed reality systems provide new ways to address fundamental questions in psychology and cognitive neuroscience

  5. Simulation of the fine structure of the 12 July 1996 Stratosphere-Troposphere Experiment: Radiation, Aerosols and Ozone (STERAO-A) storm accounting for effects of terrain and interaction with mesoscale flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenchikov, Georgiy; Pickering, Kenneth; Decaria, Alex; Tao, W.-K.; Scala, John; Ott, Lesley; Bartels, Diana; Matejka, Thomas

    2005-07-01

    Vertical mixing of chemical tracers and optically active constituents by deep convection affects regional and global chemical balances in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. This important process is not explicitly resolved in global and regional models and has to be parameterized. However, mixing depends strongly on the spatial structure, strength, and temporal evolution of the particular storm, complicating parameterization of this important effect in the large-scale models. To better quantify dynamic fields and associated mixing processes, we simulate a thunderstorm observed on 12 July 1996 during the STERAO-A (Stratosphere-Troposphere Experiment: Radiation, Aerosols, and Ozone) Deep Convection field project using the Goddard Cloud Ensemble (GCE) model. The 12 July STERAO-A storm had very complex temporal and spatial structure. The meteorological environment and evolution of the storm were significantly different than those of the 10 July STERAO-A storm extensively discussed in previous studies. Our 2-D and 3-D GCE model runs with uniform one-sounding initialization were unable to reproduce the full life cycle of the 12 July storm observed by the CHILL radar system. To describe the storm evolution, we modified the 3-D GCE model to include the effects of terrain and the capability of using nonuniform initial fields. We conducted a series of numerical experiments and reproduced the observed life cycle and fine spatial structure of the storm. The main characteristics of the 3-D simulation of the 12 July storm were compared with observations, with 2-D simulations of the same storm, and with the evolution of the 10 July storm. The simulated 3-D convection appears to be stronger and more realistic than in our 2-D simulations. Having developed in a less unstable environment than the 10 July 1996 STERAO-A storm, our simulation of the 12 July storm produced weaker but sustainable convection that was significantly fed by wind shear instability in the lower troposphere

  6. Computer Controlled Experiments Using the Interactive Microcomputer Peripheral.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Edgar; Howard, Peter

    1985-01-01

    Describes the Interactive Microcomputer Peripheral (including major features, source, and current cost) and physics experiments using the instrument. The instrument can also be used for such purposes as counting, timing, and frequency measurement as well as for experiments in biology and experimental psychology. (JN)

  7. Flow Experiences of Children in an Interactive Social Game Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inal, Yavuz; Cagiltay, Kursat

    2007-01-01

    This study examines children's flow experiences in an interactive social game environment. A total of 33 children aged from 7 to 9 years participated in the study for 6 weeks. Data were collected through observations and interviews. In order to measure the flow experiences of the children, items of a flow scale were administered to the children…

  8. Seismic Soil-Foundation-Structure Interaction in Urban Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trombetta, Nicholas Wade

    The interactions between a structure, its foundation, and the surrounding soil during an earthquake are referred to as soil-foundation-structure interaction (SFSI). The interactions between multiple structures, and their foundations, through the surrounding soil are collectively known as structure-soil-structure interaction (SSSI). Modern design codes in use in the United States, and abroad, provide guidance for considering SFSI during the seismic design of structural systems. However, these same codes do not provide any guidance for considering SSSI. This situation is a direct result of the current paucity of research into the effects of SSSI on structural performance. This dissertation describes the results of four centrifuge experiments designed to study the influence of SSSI on the seismic performance of building-foundation systems. Following these experiments, numerical models were developed and their efficiency at reproducing measured response evaluated. The experimental program involved two pairs of tests. During Test-1 and Test-2, the SFSI and SSSI-influenced responses of two three-dimensional inelastic frame structures were recorded. During Test-3 and Test-4, the interactions between an inelastic frame structure and an elastic rocking wall arranged in a variety of orientations were recorded. In each of the pair of test series, one configuration was devoted to the evaluation of the response of the model frame structures far from any neighboring structure. Ultimately, the experimental results demonstrate that when structures are placed next to each other, the seismic demands in inelastic frame structures can increase. As such, seismic structural performance may be negatively impacted by SSSI. The tests reveal that footings of buildings placed nearest to other buildings can be physically restrained when loaded towards the other building -- a physical mechanism that had not previously been observed. This asymmetrical physical restraint resulted in a stiffened

  9. PrP charge structure encodes interdomain interactions

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Javier; Sánchez, Rosa; Castellanos, Milagros; Makarava, Natallia; Aguzzi, Adriano; Baskakov, Ilia V.; Gasset, María

    2015-01-01

    Almost all proteins contain charged residues, and their chain distribution is tailored to fulfill essential ionic interactions for folding, binding and catalysis. Among proteins, the hinged two-domain chain of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) exhibits a peculiar charge structure with unclear consequences in its structural malleability. To decipher the charge design role, we generated charge-reverted mutants for each domain and analyzed their effect on conformational and metabolic features. We found that charges contain the information for interdomain interactions. Use of dynamic light scattering and thermal denaturation experiments delineates the compaction of the α-fold by an electrostatic compensation between the polybasic 23–30 region and the α3 electronegative surface. This interaction increases stability and disfavors fibrillation. Independently of this structural effect, the N-terminal electropositive clusters regulate the α-cleavage efficiency. In the fibrillar state, use of circular dichroism, atomic-force and fluorescence microscopies reveal that the N-terminal positive clusters and the α3 electronegative surface dictate the secondary structure, the assembly hierarchy and the growth length of the fibril state. These findings show that the PrP charge structure functions as a code set up to ensure function and reduce pathogenic routes. PMID:26323476

  10. INSPIRE - Premission. [Interactive NASA Space Physics Ionosphere Radio Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, William W. L.; Mideke, Michael; Pine, William E.; Ericson, James D.

    1992-01-01

    The Interactive NASA Space Physics Ionosphere Radio Experiment (INSPIRE) designed to assist in a Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC) project is discussed. INSPIRE is aimed at recording data from a large number of receivers on the ground to determine the exact propagation paths and absorption of radio waves at frequencies between 50 Hz and 7 kHz. It is indicated how to participate in the experiment that will involve high school classes, colleges, and amateur radio operators.

  11. INSPIRE - Premission. [Interactive NASA Space Physics Ionosphere Radio Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, William W. L.; Mideke, Michael; Pine, William E.; Ericson, James D.

    1992-01-01

    The Interactive NASA Space Physics Ionosphere Radio Experiment (INSPIRE) designed to assist in a Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC) project is discussed. INSPIRE is aimed at recording data from a large number of receivers on the ground to determine the exact propagation paths and absorption of radio waves at frequencies between 50 Hz and 7 kHz. It is indicated how to participate in the experiment that will involve high school classes, colleges, and amateur radio operators.

  12. Control/structure interaction conceptual design tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Hugh C.

    1990-01-01

    The JPL Control/Structure Interaction Program is developing new analytical methods for designing micro-precision spacecraft with controlled structures. One of these, the Conceptual Design Tool, will illustrate innovative new approaches to the integration of multi-disciplinary analysis and design methods. The tool will be used to demonstrate homogeneity of presentation, uniform data representation across analytical methods, and integrated systems modeling. The tool differs from current 'integrated systems' that support design teams most notably in its support for the new CSI multi-disciplinary engineer. The design tool will utilize a three dimensional solid model of the spacecraft under design as the central data organization metaphor. Various analytical methods, such as finite element structural analysis, control system analysis, and mechanical configuration layout, will store and retrieve data from a hierarchical, object oriented data structure that supports assemblies of components with associated data and algorithms. In addition to managing numerical model data, the tool will assist the designer in organizing, stating, and tracking system requirements.

  13. Optimal Force Generation with Fluid-Structure Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Diing-wen

    Typical computational and experimental methods are unsuitable for studying large scale optimization problems involving complex fluid structure interactions, primarily due to their time-consuming nature. A novel experimental approach is proposed here that provides a high-fidelity and efficient alternative to discover optimal parameters arising from the passive interaction between structural elasticity and fluid dynamic forces. This approach utilizes motors, force transducers, and active controllers to emulate the effects of elasticity, eliminating the physical need to replace structural components in the experiment. A clustering genetic algorithm is then used to tune the structural parameters to achieve desired optimality conditions, resulting in approximated global optimal regions within the search bound. A prototype fluid-structure interaction experiment inspired by the lift generation of flapping wing insects is presented to highlight the capabilities of this approach. The experiment aims to maximize the average lift on a sinusoidally translating plate, by optimizing the damping ratio and natural frequency of the plate's elastic pitching dynamics. Reynolds number, chord length, and stroke length are varied between optimizations to explore their relationships to the optimal structural parameters. The results reveal that only limited ranges of stroke lengths are conducive to lift generation; there also exists consistent trends between optimal stroke length, natural frequency, and damping ratio. The measured lift, pitching angle, and torque on the plate for optimal scenarios exhibit the same frequency as the translation frequency, and the phase angles of the optimal structural parameters at this frequency are found to be independent of the stroke length. This critical phase can be then characterized by a linear function of the chord length and Reynolds number. Particle image velocimetry measurements are acquired for the kinematics generated with optimal and

  14. Structure and Interactions in Neurofilament Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Jayna; Ojeda-Lopez, Miguel; Safinya, Cyrus

    2004-03-01

    Neurofilaments (NFs) are a major constituent of myelinated axons of nerve cells, which assemble from three subunit proteins of low, medium, and high molecular weight to form a 10 nm diameter rod with sidearms radiating from the center. The sidearm interactions impart structural stability and result in an oriented network of NFs running parallel to the axon. Over or under expression of NF subunits is related to abnormal NF-networks, which are known hallmarks of motor neuron diseases (ALS). Here, we reassemble NFs from subunit proteins purified from bovine spinal cord. We demonstrate the formation of the NF network in vitro where synchrotron x-ray scattering (SSRL) reveals a well-defined interfilament spacing while the defect structure in polarized optical microcopy shows the liquid crystalline nature. The spacing varies depending on subunit molar ratios and salt conditions and we relate this change to the mechanical stability of the lattice. This change in lattice spacing yields insight into the stabilizing interactions between the NF sidearms. Supported by NSF DMR- 0203755, CTS-0103516, and NIH GM-59288.

  15. Advanced accelerating structures and their interaction with electron beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, W.; High Energy Physics

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we give a brief description of several advanced accelerating structures, such as dielectric loaded waveguides, photonic band gap, metamaterials and improved iris-loaded cavities. We describe wakefields generated by passing high current electron beams through these structures, and applications of wakefields to advanced accelerator schemes. One of the keys to success for high gradient wakefield acceleration is to develop high current drive beam sources. As an example, the high current RF photo injector at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator, passed a {approx}80 nC electron beam through a high gradient dielectric loaded structure to achieve a 100 MV/m gradient. We will summarize recent related experiments on beam-structure interactions and also discuss high current electron beam generation and propagation and their applications to wakefield acceleration.

  16. Advanced Accelerating Structures and Their Interaction with Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gai Wei

    2009-01-22

    In this paper, we give a brief description of several advanced accelerating structures, such as dielectric loaded waveguides, photonic band gap, metamaterials and improved iris-loaded cavities. We describe wakefields generated by passing high current electron beams through these structures, and applications of wakefields to advanced accelerator schemes. One of the keys to success for high gradient wakefield acceleration is to develop high current drive beam sources. As an example, the high current RF photo injector at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator, passed a {approx}80 nC electron beam through a high gradient dielectric loaded structure to achieve a 100 MV/m gradient. We will summarize recent related experiments on beam-structure interactions and also discuss high current electron beam generation and propagation and their applications to wakefield acceleration.

  17. A slewing control experiment for flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, J.-N.; Horta, L. G.; Robertshaw, H. H.

    1985-01-01

    A hardware set-up has been developed to study slewing control for flexible structures including a steel beam and a solar panel. The linear optimal terminal control law is used to design active controllers which are implemented in an analog computer. The objective of this experiment is to demonstrate and verify the dynamics and optimal terminal control laws as applied to flexible structures for large angle maneuver. Actuation is provided by an electric motor while sensing is given by strain gages and angle potentiometer. Experimental measurements are compared with analytical predictions in terms of modal parameters of the system stability matrix and sufficient agreement is achieved to validate the theory.

  18. Progress on control experiments of flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan

    1990-01-01

    Progress at the NASA Langley Research Center in the area of control experiments for flexible structures is described. First the author presents the experimental results for a linear model which represents slewing maneuvers of a generic space station solar panel carried out to evaluate experimentally some control technologies. Then the status of the rotational/translational maneuvering experiment of a flexible steel panel carried by a translation cart is presented. Finally, experimental results of the NASA minimast testbed using velocity command stepper motors as reaction mass reactors are shown. All the test configurations are briefly described, including actuator and sensor, test setup, and test software. The status of some research activities oriented primarily to the experimental methods for control of flexible structures is presented.

  19. User experience interaction design for digital educational games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jiugen; Zhang, Wenting; Xing, Ruonan

    2014-04-01

    Leading the elements of games into education is the newest teaching concepts in the field of educational technology, which is by using healthy games to impel and preserve the learner's motivation, improve the learning efficiency and bring one experience in learning something by playing games. First of all, this article has introduced the concept of Digital Game and User Experience and brought the essence of Digital Game to light to construct the frame of user experience interaction design for digital educational games and offer one design idea for the development of related products and hoping that Digital Game will bring us continuous innovation experience.

  20. SSME LOX post flow analysis/fluid structure interaction. Volume 2: Fluid structure interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The progress made in resolving the computational issues associated with modeling high temperature and pressure viscous flows in advanced propulsion systems is documented. An overview of adaptive computational methods for various classes of fluid-structure interaction problems is presented. The key features associated with several approaches are outlined and the advantages/disadvantages of each are summarized. A mathematical formulation is presented for general fluid-structure interaction problems with a moving domain. The two adaptive approaches are discussed used in solving the benchmark problems. The first scheme is a user interactive scheme which is quite versatile and easy to implement but requires an excessive amount of monitoring by the operator and is computationally inefficient. The second method is a new, local remeshing method for handling a general class of fluid-structure interaction problems. This method couples many of the attractive features of other approaches into a computationally efficient and versatile method. The results obtained for two test cases are presented. Results from both the user interactive and local remeshing procedure are described. The current status of the project and future goals to be completed are summarized.

  1. Interaction and the structures of coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opaprakasit, Pakorn

    The origin of a decrease in the amount of soluble material from coal upon a reflux treatment has been investigated in an attempt to obtain insight into the nature of the interaction in the macromolecular network structure of coal. This decrease in the extractable material is a result of an increase in the amount of physical cross-links associated with secondary interactions. The alternate possibility of covalent cross-link formation by ether linkage was found to be unlikely because the coal hydroxyl content remains unchanged upon heat treatment. The functional groups responsible for forming these physical cross-links and their contents vary from coal to coal with coal rank. Carboxylate/cation complexes, similar to those found in ionomers, dominate in low rank coal. In high rank coal, the clusters involving pi-cation interactions were observed. Both mechanisms seem to play a role in mid rank coals. These physical cross-links are responsible for a lowering of the extraction yield of coal, but are disrupted by a treatment with acid solution, resulting in an increase in the extraction yield. As a consequence, the cross-links in coal structure should be classified into two types; a "permanent" covalent cross-link, which break under extreme conditions such as chemical reaction and pyrolysis, and "reversible" cross-links, largely associated with ionomer-like structure and pi-cation interactions. The interaction between a "magic" solvent of N-methylpyrollidone and carbon disulfide (NMP/CS2) and its role in the unusual extractability enhancement of Upper Freeport coal has also been investigated. The results strongly suggest that NMP/CS2 mixed solvents form complexes with cations. These mixed solvents are capable of forming a solid complex with cations from NaOH and some simple salts, such as NaCl and LiCl. Given that Upper Freeport coal contains a large amount of mineral matter, it is not surprising that these types of complexes could be formed in the present of the mixed

  2. The Plasma Interaction Experiment (PIX) description and test program. [electrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ignaczak, L. R.; Haley, F. A.; Domino, E. J.; Culp, D. H.; Shaker, F. J.

    1978-01-01

    The plasma interaction experiment (PIX) is a battery powered preprogrammed auxiliary payload on the LANDSAT-C launch. This experiment is part of a larger program to investigate space plasma interactions with spacecraft surfaces and components. The varying plasma densities encountered during available telemetry coverage periods are deemed sufficient to determine first order interactions between the space plasma environment and the biased experimental surfaces. The specific objectives of the PIX flight experiment are to measure the plasma coupling current and the negative voltage breakdown characteristics of a solar array segment and a gold plated steel disk. Measurements will be made over a range of surface voltages up to plus or minus kilovolt. The orbital environment will provide a range of plasma densities. The experimental surfaces will be voltage biased in a preprogrammed step sequence to optimize the data returned for each plasma region and for the available telemetry coverage.

  3. Solar Array Module Plasma Interaction Experiment (SAMPIE): Technical requirements document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillard, G. Barry; Ferguson, Dale C.

    1992-01-01

    The Solar Array Module Plasma Interactions Experiment (SAMPIE) is a NASA shuttle space flight experiment scheduled for launch in early 1994. The SAMPIE experiment will investigate plasma interactions of high voltage space power systems in low earth orbit. Solar cell modules, representing several technologies, will be biased to high voltages to characterize both arcing and plasma current collection. Other solar modules, specially modified in accordance with current theories of arcing and breakdown, will demonstrate the possibility of arc suppression. Finally, several test modules will be included to study the basic nature of these interactions. The science and technology goals for the project are defined in the Technical Requirements Document (TRD) which is presented here.

  4. The Photogrammetric Appendage Structural Dynamics Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Michael G.; Welch, Sharon S.; Moore, Christopher L.

    1995-01-01

    The Photogrammetric Appendage Structural Dynamics Experiment (PASDE) is a Hitchhiker payload scheduled to fly as part of the International Space Station (ISS) Phase-1 flight program to the Russian Space Station Mir. The objective of the first flight of PASDE on STS-74 is to obtain video images of the Mir Kvant-2 solar array response to various structural dynamic excitation events. This experiment will demonstrate the use of photogrammetric techniques for on-orbit structural dynamics measurements. Photogrammetric measurements will provide a low cost alternative to appendage mounted accelerometers to the ISS program. The PASDE experiment hardware consists of three instruments each containing two video cameras, two video tape recorders, a modified video signal time inserter, and associated avionics boxes. The instruments were designed and built at the NASA Langley Research Center, and are integrated into standard Hitchhiker canisters at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The Hitchhiker canisters are then installed into the Space Shuttle cargo bay in locations selected to achieve good video coverage and photogrammetric geometry. The measurement resolution of the instruments is expected to be on the order of 0.25 cm (0.1 in.).

  5. The Photogrammetric Appendage Structural Dynamics Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Michael G.; Welch, Sharon S.; Moore, Christopher L.

    1995-09-01

    The Photogrammetric Appendage Structural Dynamics Experiment (PASDE) is a Hitchhiker payload scheduled to fly as part of the International Space Station (ISS) Phase-1 flight program to the Russian Space Station Mir. The objective of the first flight of PASDE on STS-74 is to obtain video images of the Mir Kvant-2 solar array response to various structural dynamic excitation events. This experiment will demonstrate the use of photogrammetric techniques for on-orbit structural dynamics measurements. Photogrammetric measurements will provide a low cost alternative to appendage mounted accelerometers to the ISS program. The PASDE experiment hardware consists of three instruments each containing two video cameras, two video tape recorders, a modified video signal time inserter, and associated avionics boxes. The instruments were designed and built at the NASA Langley Research Center, and are integrated into standard Hitchhiker canisters at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The Hitchhiker canisters are then installed into the Space Shuttle cargo bay in locations selected to achieve good video coverage and photogrammetric geometry. The measurement resolution of the instruments is expected to be on the order of 0.25 cm (0.1 in.).

  6. Inquiry style interactive virtual experiments: a case on circular motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shaona; Han, Jing; Pelz, Nathaniel; Wang, Xiaojun; Peng, Liangyu; Xiao, Hua; Bao, Lei

    2011-11-01

    Interest in computer-based learning, especially in the use of virtual reality simulations is increasing rapidly. While there are good reasons to believe that technologies have the potential to improve teaching and learning, how to utilize the technology effectively in teaching specific content difficulties is challenging. To help students develop robust understandings of correct physics concepts, we have developed interactive virtual experiment simulations that have the unique feature of enabling students to experience force and motion via an analogue joystick, allowing them to feel the applied force and simultaneously see its effects. The simulations provide students learning experiences that integrate both scientific representations and low-level sensory cues such as haptic cues under a single setting. In this paper, we introduce a virtual experiment module on circular motion. A controlled study has been conducted to evaluate the impact of using this virtual experiment on students' learning of force and motion in the context of circular motion. The results show that the interactive virtual experiment method is preferred by students and is more effective in helping students grasp the physics concepts than the traditional education method such as problem-solving practices. Our research suggests that well-developed interactive virtual experiments can be useful tools in teaching difficult concepts in science.

  7. Shock structure in shock-turbulence interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donzis, Diego A.

    2012-12-01

    The structure of a shock wave interacting with isotropic turbulence is investigated. General principles of similarity scaling show that consistency with known physical limiting behavior requires incomplete similarity solutions where the governing non-dimensional parameters, namely, the Reynolds, convective, and turbulent Mach numbers (Rλ, M, and Mt, respectively), can be combined to reduce the number of similarity parameters that describes the phenomenon. An important parameter is found to be K = Mt/Rλ1/2(M - 1) which is proportional to the ratio of laminar shock thickness to the Kolmogorov length scale. The shock thickness under turbulent conditions, on the other hand, is essentially a random variable. Under a quasi-equilibrium assumption, shown to be valid when K2 ≪ 1, analytical results are obtained for the first and second moments of the turbulent shock thickness, velocity gradient, and dilatation at the shock. It is shown that these quantities exhibit universal behavior in the parameter K with corrections in Mt/(M - 1), for velocity fields with arbitrary statistics. Excellent agreement is observed with available data from direct numerical simulations. Two-point statistics of velocity gradients at the shock show that the distribution of dilatation over the shock surface is determined by transverse structure functions of the incoming turbulence. The regimes of the interaction are also investigated. It is found that the appropriate parameter to delimit the different regimes is Mt/(M - 1). Flow retardation ahead of the shock is suggested as a mechanism for so-called broken shocks.

  8. Active aerodynamic control of wake-airfoil interaction noise - Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Lavrich, P. L.; Sofrin, T. G.; Topol, D. A.

    A proof of concept experiment is conducted that shows the potential for active aerodynamic control of rotor wake/stator interaction noise in a simplified manner. A single airfoil model representing the stator was fitted with a moveable trailing edge flap controlled by a servo motor. The control system moves the motor driven flap in the correct angular displacement phase and rate to reduce the unsteady load on the airfoil during the wake interaction.

  9. Evaluating the ISDN line to deliver interactive multimedia experiences

    SciTech Connect

    Michaels, D.K.

    1994-05-06

    We will use the 128 kilobit/sec ISDN connection from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to the Livermore High School Math Learning Center to provide students there with interactive multimedia educational experiences. These experiences may consist of tutorials, exercises, and interactive puzzles to teach students` course material. We will determine if it is possible to store the multimedia files at LLNL and deliver them to the student machines via FTP as they are needed. An evaluation of the effect of the ISDN data rate is a substantial component of our research and suggestions on how to best use the ISDN line in this capacity will be given.

  10. Physical scale experiments on torrential filter structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiari, Michael; Moser, Markus; Trojer, Martin; Hübl, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of the INTERREG Project "SedAlp" physical scale model experiments are carried out in the hydraulic laboratory of the Institute of Mountain Risk Engineering at the University of Life Sciences in Vienna in order to optimize torrent protection structures. Two different types of check dams are investigated. A screen-dam with inclined vertical beams is compared with a beam-dam with horizontal beams. The experiments evaluate the variation of sediment transport of these structures including the influence of coarse woody debris. Therefore the distance between the steel elements can be adjusted to show their ability to filter sediment. The physical scale of the experiments is 1:30. All experimental runs are Froude scaled. Both dams are tested in elongated and pear-shaped sediment retention basins in order to investigate the shape effect of the deposition area. For a systematic comparison of the two check dams experiments with fluvial bedload transport are made. First a typical hydrograph for an extreme flood with unlimited sediment supply is modelled. A typical torrential sediment mixture with a wide grain-size distribution is fed by a conveyor belt according the transport capacity of the upstream reach. Then the deposition is scanned with a laser-scan device in order to analyse the deposition pattern and the deposited volume. Afterwards a flood with a lower reoccurrence period without sediment transport from upstream is modelled to investigate the ability of the protection structure for self-emptying. To investigate the influence of driftwood on the deposition behaviour experiments with logs are made. Different log diameters and lengths are added upstream the basin. The results show, that the deposition during the experiments was not controlled by sorting-effects at the location of the dam. The deposition always started from upstream, where the transport capacity was reduced due to the milder slope and the widening of the basin. No grain sorting effects

  11. Simulated Interactive Research Experiments as Educational Tools for Advanced Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomandl, Mathias; Mieling, Thomas; Losert-Valiente Kroon, Christiane M.; Hopf, Martin; Arndt, Markus

    2015-09-01

    Experimental research has become complex and thus a challenge to science education. Only very few students can typically be trained on advanced scientific equipment. It is therefore important to find new tools that allow all students to acquire laboratory skills individually and independent of where they are located. In a design-based research process we have investigated the feasibility of using a virtual laboratory as a photo-realistic and scientifically valid representation of advanced scientific infrastructure to teach modern experimental science, here, molecular quantum optics. We found a concept based on three educational principles that allows undergraduate students to become acquainted with procedures and concepts of a modern research field. We find a significant increase in student understanding using our Simulated Interactive Research Experiment (SiReX), by evaluating the learning outcomes with semi-structured interviews in a pre/post design. This suggests that this concept of an educational tool can be generalized to disseminate findings in other fields.

  12. Simulated Interactive Research Experiments as Educational Tools for Advanced Science

    PubMed Central

    Tomandl, Mathias; Mieling, Thomas; Losert-Valiente Kroon, Christiane M.; Hopf, Martin; Arndt, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Experimental research has become complex and thus a challenge to science education. Only very few students can typically be trained on advanced scientific equipment. It is therefore important to find new tools that allow all students to acquire laboratory skills individually and independent of where they are located. In a design-based research process we have investigated the feasibility of using a virtual laboratory as a photo-realistic and scientifically valid representation of advanced scientific infrastructure to teach modern experimental science, here, molecular quantum optics. We found a concept based on three educational principles that allows undergraduate students to become acquainted with procedures and concepts of a modern research field. We find a significant increase in student understanding using our Simulated Interactive Research Experiment (SiReX), by evaluating the learning outcomes with semi-structured interviews in a pre/post design. This suggests that this concept of an educational tool can be generalized to disseminate findings in other fields. PMID:26370627

  13. Simulated Interactive Research Experiments as Educational Tools for Advanced Science.

    PubMed

    Tomandl, Mathias; Mieling, Thomas; Losert-Valiente Kroon, Christiane M; Hopf, Martin; Arndt, Markus

    2015-09-15

    Experimental research has become complex and thus a challenge to science education. Only very few students can typically be trained on advanced scientific equipment. It is therefore important to find new tools that allow all students to acquire laboratory skills individually and independent of where they are located. In a design-based research process we have investigated the feasibility of using a virtual laboratory as a photo-realistic and scientifically valid representation of advanced scientific infrastructure to teach modern experimental science, here, molecular quantum optics. We found a concept based on three educational principles that allows undergraduate students to become acquainted with procedures and concepts of a modern research field. We find a significant increase in student understanding using our Simulated Interactive Research Experiment (SiReX), by evaluating the learning outcomes with semi-structured interviews in a pre/post design. This suggests that this concept of an educational tool can be generalized to disseminate findings in other fields.

  14. Nucleon structure and the high energy interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selyugin, O. V.

    2015-06-01

    On the basis of the representation of the generalized structure of nucleons a new model of the hadron interaction at high energies is presented. A new t dependence of the generalized parton distributions is obtained from the comparative analysis of different sets of the parton distribution functions, based on the description of the entire set of experimental data for the electromagnetic form factors of the proton and neutron. Taking into account the different moments of the generalized parton distributions of the hadron, quantitative descriptions of all existing experimental data of the proton-proton and proton-antiproton elastic scatterings from √{s }=9.8 GeV to 8 TeV, including the Coulomb range and large momentum transfers up to -t =15 GeV2 , are obtained with a few free high-energy fitting parameters. The real part of the hadronic elastic scattering amplitude is determined only through the complex s that satisfies the dispersion relations. The negligible contributions of the hard Pomeron and the presence of the non-small contributions of the maximal Odderon are obtained. The non-dying form of the spin-flip amplitude is examined as well. The structures of the Born term and unitarized scattering amplitude are analyzed. It is shown that the black disk limit for the elastic scattering amplitude is not reached at LHC energies. Predictions for LHC energies are made.

  15. Interactive monitoring system for backing calorimeter at ZEUS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozniak, Krzysztof T.; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.; Jezynski, Tomasz; Luszczak, Zbigniew; Zaczek, Michal

    2004-07-01

    This work describes a design and development of the Internet system for the data quality monitoring during the Backing Calorimeter (BAC) operation in the ZEUS experiment and for the archive data analysis. The development includes functional data base system application, data interaction processes and the web interface, built using PHP scripts and JAVA applets. The system implementation process, in ZEUS experiment, was described and its performance results were presented, based on the selected examples.

  16. World Business Leaders Interaction in Higher Education: A Novel Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coronel, Gustavo; Mathai, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a disruptive approach that offers higher education students and faculty the experience of learning from world business leaders and interacting with fellow members at their institutions. The World Business Forum event was transmitted live to 36 higher education institutions in 19 countries. Webcast and social media…

  17. Interactions and Practices to Enhance the Inclusion Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobin, Ruthanne

    2007-01-01

    In a collaborative research project, two inclusion teachers and their principal demonstrate ways to enhance the inclusion experience for five exceptional students: four with mild intellectual disabilities and one with a learning disability. The findings revealed that one teacher engaged in positive interactions in the classroom by positioning the…

  18. A survey of experiments and experimental facilities for active control of flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, Dean W., Jr.; Horner, Garnett C.; Juang, Jer-Nan; Klose, Gerhard

    1989-01-01

    A brief survey of large space structure control related experiments and facilities was presented. This survey covered experiments performed before and up to 1982, and those of the present period (1982-...). Finally, the future planned experiments and facilities in support of the control-structure interaction (CSI) program were reported. It was stated that new, improved ground test facilities are needed to verify the new CSI design techniques that will allow future space structures to perform planned NASA missions.

  19. Interactive Plasma Physics Education Using Data from Fusion Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderon, Brisa; Davis, Bill; Zwicker, Andrew

    2010-11-01

    The Internet Plasma Physics Education Experience (IPPEX) website was created in 1996 to give users access to data from plasma and fusion experiments. Interactive material on electricity, magnetism, matter, and energy was presented to generate interest and prepare users to understand data from a fusion experiment. Initially, users were allowed to analyze real-time and archival data from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) experiment. IPPEX won numerous awards for its novel approach of allowing users to participate in ongoing research. However, the latest revisions of IPPEX were in 2001 and the interactive material is no longer functional on modern browsers. Also, access to real-time data was lost when TFTR was shut down. The interactive material on IPPEX is being rewritten in ActionScript3.0, and real-time and archival data from the National Spherical Tokamak Experiment (NSTX) will be made available to users. New tools like EFIT animations, fast cameras, and plots of important plasma parameters will be included along with an existing Java-based ``virtual tokamak.'' Screenshots from the upgraded website and future directions will be presented.

  20. MINER{nu}A, a Neutrino--Nucleus Interaction Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Solano Salinas, C. J.; Chamorro, A.; Romero, C.

    2007-10-26

    With the fantastic results of KamLAND and SNO for neutrino physics, a new generation of neutrino experiments are being designed and build, specially to study the neutrino oscillations to resolve most of the incognita still we have in the neutrino physics. At FERMILAB we have the experiments MINOS and, in a near future, NO{nu}A, to study this kind of oscillations. One big problem these experiments will have is the lack of a good knowledge of the Physics of neutrino interactions with matter, and this will generate big systematic errors. MINER{nu}A, also at FERMILAB, will cover this space studying with high statistics and great precision the neutrino--nucleus interactions.

  1. Early steps towards quarks and their interactions using neutrino beams in CERN bubble chamber experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Don H.

    2016-06-01

    Results from neutrino experiments at CERN in the1970's, using bubble chamber detectors filled with heavy liquids, gave early evidence for the existence of quarks and gluons as real dynamical objects. In detail, the measured moments of the non-singlet structure functions provided crucial support for the validity of the present theory of the strong inter-quark interactions, quantum chromodynamics.

  2. VLF wave-wave interaction experiments in the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, D. C. D.

    1978-01-01

    VLF wave-wave interaction experiments were carried out by injecting various forms of VLF pulses into the magnetosphere from a 21.2 km dipole antenna at Siple, Antarctica. The injected signals propagate along a geomagnetic field line and often interact strongly with energetic electrons trapped in the radiation belts near the equator. Signals may be amplified and trigger emissions. These signals may then interact with one another through these energetic electrons. This report is divided into three parts. In the first part, simulations of VLF pulses propagating in the magnetosphere are carried out. In the second part, it is found for the first time that a 10 ms gap in a triggering wave can induce emission, which may then interact with the post-gap signals. In the third part, sideband triggering is reported for the first time.

  3. Acoustic-structure interaction problems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Love, E.; Taylor, R.L.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to compare and evaluate different numerical methods for solving problems of interaction between elastic solids and acoustic fluids. In particular, we concentrate our efforts on solution techniques involving the finite element method. To that end, in Chapter 2 we discuss different options for analysis of infinite fluids. In particular, the method of mesh trunction and the use of radiation elements and the use of infinite elements are discussed. Also discussed is the analysis of scattering from rigid boundaries. Chapter 3 is a brief discussion of finite element formulations for elastic solids. We review the development, of two dimensional plane strain elements and one dimensional plate and shell elements. In Chapter 4, there is a discussion of the method used to couple the solid and the fluid. We give examples for solution of scattering of pressure waves from thin elastic shell structures. Chapter 5 is a brief conclusion of results and includes recommendations for the best methods of solution and additional research.

  4. Fluid-structural interactions using Navier-Stokes flow equations coupled with shell finite element structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.; Byun, Chansup

    1993-01-01

    A computational procedure is presented to study fluid-structural interaction problems for three-dimensional aerospace structures. The flow is modeled using the three-dimensional unsteady Euler/Navier-Stokes equations and solved using the finite-difference approach. The three dimensional structure is modeled using shell/plate finite-element formulation. The two disciplines are coupled using a domain decomposition approach. Accurate procedures both in time and space are developed to combine the solutions from the flow equations with those of the structural equations. Time accuracy is maintained using aeroelastic configuration-adaptive moving grids that are computed every time step. The work done by aerodynamic forces due to structural deformations is preserved using consistent loads. The present procedure is validated by computing the aeroelastic response of a wing and comparing with experiment. Results are illustrated for a typical wing-body configuration.

  5. Telescience operations with the solar array module plasma interaction experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wald, L.W.; Bibyk, I.K.

    1995-09-01

    The Solar Array Module Plasma Interactions Experiment (SAMPIE) is a flight experiment that flew on the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-62) in March 1994, as part of the OAST-2 mission. The overall objective of SAMPIE was to determine the adverse environmental interactions within the space plasma of low earth orbit (LEO) on modern solar cells and space power system materials which are artificially biased to high positive and negative direct current (DC) voltages. The two environmental interactions of interest included high voltage arcing from the samples to the space plasma and parasitic current losses. High voltage arcing can cause physical damage to power system materials and shorten expected hardware life. Parasitic current losses can reduce power system efficiency because electric currents generated in a power system drain into the surrounding plasma via parasitic resistance. The flight electronics included two programmable high voltage DC power supplies to bias the experiment samples, instruments to measure the surrounding plasma environment in the STS cargo bay, and the on-board data acquisition system (DAS). The DAS provided in-flight experiment control, data storage, and communications through the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Hitchhiker flight avionics to the GSFC Payload Operations Control Center (POCC). The DAS and the SAMPIE POCC computer systems were designed for telescience operations; this paper will focus on the experiences of the SAMPIE team regarding telescience development and operations from the GSFC POCC during STS-62. The SAMPIE conceptual development, hardware design, and system verification testing were accomplished at the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC). SAMPIE was developed under the In-Space Technology Experiment Program (IN-STEP), which sponsors NASA, industry, and university flight experiments designed to enable and enhance space flight technology.

  6. Telescience operations with the solar array module plasma interaction experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wald, Lawrence W.; Bibyk, Irene K.

    1995-01-01

    The Solar Array Module Plasma Interactions Experiment (SAMPIE) is a flight experiment that flew on the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-62) in March 1994, as part of the OAST-2 mission. The overall objective of SAMPIE was to determine the adverse environmental interactions within the space plasma of low earth orbit (LEO) on modern solar cells and space power system materials which are artificially biased to high positive and negative direct current (DC) voltages. The two environmental interactions of interest included high voltage arcing from the samples to the space plasma and parasitic current losses. High voltage arcing can cause physical damage to power system materials and shorten expected hardware life. parasitic current losses can reduce power system efficiency because electric currents generated in a power system drain into the surrounding plasma via parasitic resistance. The flight electronics included two programmable high voltage DC power supplies to bias the experiment samples, instruments to measure the surrounding plasma environment in the STS cargo bay, and the on-board data acquisition system (DAS). The DAS provided in-flight experiment control, data storage, and communications through the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Hitchhiker flight avionics to the GSFC Payload Operations Control Center (POCC). The DAS and the SAMPIE POCC computer systems were designed for telescience operations; this paper will focus on the experiences of the SAMPIE team regarding telescience development and operations from the GSFC POCC during STS-62. The SAMPIE conceptual development, hardware design, and system verification testing were accomplished at the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC). SAMPIE was developed under the In-Space Technology Experiment Program (IN-STEP), which sponsors NASA, industry, and university flight experiments designed to enable and enhance space flight technology. The IN-STEP Program is sponsored by the Office of Space Access and Technology (OSAT).

  7. Computational and experimental techniques for coupled acoustic/structure interactions.

    SciTech Connect

    Sumali, Anton Hartono; Pierson, Kendall Hugh; Walsh, Timothy Francis; Dohner, Jeffrey Lynn; Reese, Garth M.; Day, David Minot

    2004-01-01

    This report documents the results obtained during a one-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) initiative aimed at investigating coupled structural acoustic interactions by means of algorithm development and experiment. Finite element acoustic formulations have been developed based on fluid velocity potential and fluid displacement. Domain decomposition and diagonal scaling preconditioners were investigated for parallel implementation. A formulation that includes fluid viscosity and that can simulate both pressure and shear waves in fluid was developed. An acoustic wave tube was built, tested, and shown to be an effective means of testing acoustic loading on simple test structures. The tube is capable of creating a semi-infinite acoustic field due to nonreflecting acoustic termination at one end. In addition, a micro-torsional disk was created and tested for the purposes of investigating acoustic shear wave damping in microstructures, and the slip boundary conditions that occur along the wet interface when the Knudsen number becomes sufficiently large.

  8. Interactive Lecture Experiments in Large Introductory Physics Classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milner-Bolotin, Marina M.; Kotlicki, A.; Rieger, G.; Bates, F.; Moll, R.; McPhee, K.; Nashon, S.

    2006-12-01

    We describe Interactive Lecture Experiments (ILE), which build on Interactive Lecture Demonstrations proposed by Sokoloff and Thornton (2004) and extends it by providing students with the opportunity to analyze experiments demonstrated in the lecture outside of the classroom. Real time experimental data is collected, using Logger Pro combined with the digital video technology. This data is uploaded to the Internet and made available to the students for further analysis. Student learning is assessed in the following lecture using conceptual questions (clickers). The goal of this project is to use ILE to make large lectures more interactive and promote student interest in science, critical thinking and data analysis skills. We report on the systematic study conducted using the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey, Force Concept Inventory, open-ended physics problems and focus group interviews to determine the impact of ILE on student academic achievement, motivation and attitudes towards physics. Three sections of students (750 students) experienced four ILE experiments. The surveys were administered twice and academic results for students who experienced the ILE for a particular topic were compared to the students, from a different section, who did not complete the ILE for that topic. Additional qualitative data on students’ attitudes was collected using open ended survey questions and interviews. We will present preliminary conclusions about the role of ILEs as an effective pedagogy in large introductory physics courses. Sokoloff, D.R. and R.K. Thornton (2004). Interactive Lecture Demonstrations: Active Learning in Introductory Physics, J.Wiley & Sons, INC. Interactive Lecture Experiments: http://www.physics.ubc.ca/ year1lab/p100/LectureLabs/lectureLabs.html

  9. A simulation language approach to structural interaction problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutchins, M. A.; Purvis, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    Advantages and disadvantages of using simulation languages in solving structural problems are given. Structural and solid mechanics problems which have strong interactions with other disciplines are emphasized. An aeroservoelastic illustration is described with significant interactions between the dynamics of a flexible flight vehicle structure, the aerodynamics to which it is subjected, the dynamic flight equations, and the vehicle's servo-control system.

  10. Approaches to Testing Interaction Effects Using Structural Equation Modeling Methodology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Fuzhong; Harmer, Peter; Duncan, Terry E.; Duncan, Susan C.; Acock, Alan; Boles, Shawn

    1998-01-01

    Reviews a single indicator approach and multiple indicator approaches that simplify testing interaction effects using structural equation modeling. An illustrative application examines the interactive effect of perceptions of competence and perceptions of autonomy on exercise-intrinsic motivation. (SLD)

  11. Study made of interaction between sound fields and structural vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, R. H.; Smith, P. W., Jr.

    1967-01-01

    Study analyzes structural vibrations and the interactions between them and sound fields. It outlines a conceptual framework to analyze the vibrations of systems and their interactions, incorporating the results of earlier studies and establishing a unified basis for continuing research.

  12. The FrPNC Experiment, weak interaction studies in Francium at TRIUMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, E.; Aubin, S.; Collister, R.; Behr, J. A.; Gwinner, G.; Orozco, L. A.; Pearson, M. R.; Tandecki, M.; Sheng, D.; Zhang, J.

    2012-09-01

    Francium is an excellent system to study the nuclear weak force due to its large nucleus and relatively simple atomic structure. The FrPNC experiment has a facility to produce cold trapped atomic francium samples for parity non-conservation studies. We are preparing to measure both the nuclear spin independent and dependent parts of the weak interaction in francium. The first one gives information about weak neutral currents at low energies, while the second one is sensitive to weak interactions between nucleons. We present the current status of the experiment.

  13. U.S. perspective on technology demonstration experiments for adaptive structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aswani, Mohan; Wada, Ben K.; Garba, John A.

    1991-01-01

    Evaluation of design concepts for adaptive structures is being performed in support of several focused research programs. These include programs such as Precision Segmented Reflector (PSR), Control Structure Interaction (CSI), and the Advanced Space Structures Technology Research Experiment (ASTREX). Although not specifically designed for adaptive structure technology validation, relevant experiments can be performed using the Passive and Active Control of Space Structures (PACOSS) testbed, the Space Integrated Controls Experiment (SPICE), the CSI Evolutionary Model (CEM), and the Dynamic Scale Model Test (DSMT) Hybrid Scale. In addition to the ground test experiments, several space flight experiments have been planned, including a reduced gravity experiment aboard the KC-135 aircraft, shuttle middeck experiments, and the Inexpensive Flight Experiment (INFLEX).

  14. Plasma-materials interactions during rf experiments in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, S.A.; Bernabei, S.; Budny, R.; Chu, T.K.; Colestock, P.; Hinnov, E.; Hooke, W.; Hosea, J.; Hwang, D.; Jobes, F.

    1984-09-01

    Plasma-materials interactions studied in recent ICRF heating and lower hybrid current drive experiments are reviewed. The microscopic processes responsible for impurity generation are discussed. In ICRF experiments, improvements in machine operation and in antenna and feedthrough design have allowed efficient plasma heating at RF powers up to 3 MW. No significant loss of energy from the plasma core due to impurity radiation occurs. Lower hybrid current drive results in the generation and maintenance of hundreds of kiloamperes of plasma current carried by suprathermal electrons. The loss of these electrons and their role in impurity generation are assessed. Methods to avoid this problem are evaluated.

  15. Interest enhancements to science experiments: Interactions with student gender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Michael E.

    Males are more likely than females to aspire to and enter scientific careers, a pattern that might be attributed to gender differences in the appeal of school science. Differences might arise, in part, from gender-related interactions with the interest value of school science experiments. If modifiable, the interest value of experiments could influence attitudes toward science and subsequent choices concerning science involvement. In this study, middle school students carried out versions of science experiments designed to vary in their interest value. Experiment modifications, guided by a three-component model of interest, ranged from introduction of fantasy scenarios to manipulation of the difficulty and social context of the experiments. Subjects were 101 middle school students, 46 males and 55 females. Of primary interest were MANOVA comparisons of self-reported interest in the experiments, by gender and experimental condition. In general, interest enhancements were more effective for girls than boys. Boys were more attentive to aspects of the experiments that elicit perceptions of control, whereas girls were more attentive to social aspects.

  16. IMMERSE: Interactive Mentoring for Multimodal Experiences in Realistic Social Encounters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-28

    California, Santa Cruz USA United States of America VC Virtual Character VR Virtual Reality WME Working Memory Element IMMERSE Final Report...Creating Playable Social Experiences through Whole-body Interaction with Virtual Characters, Ninth AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence and...Social Pragmatics 4.2.3 MiBA Signal Visualization 4.2.4 Social Simulation Engine and Performance AI 4.2.5 Virtual World Simulator 4.2.6 Models and

  17. Beam-target interaction experiments for Bremsstrahlung converter applications

    SciTech Connect

    Buckles, R; Caparaso, G; Chen, Y-J; Crist, C; Falabella, S; Houck, T; Krogh, M; McCarrick, J; Richardson, R; Sampayan, S; Sanders, D; Weir, J; Westenkow, G

    1999-03-01

    The authors are investigating the possible adverse effects of (1) backstreaming ion emission from the Bremsstrahlung converter target and (2) the interaction of the resultant plasma with the electron beam during subsequent pulses for multi-pulse radiography facilities. These effects would primarily manifest themselves in a static focusing system as a rapidly varying x-ray spot. To study these effects, they are conducting beam-target interaction experiments on the ETA-II accelerator (a 6.0 MeV, 2.5 kA, 70 ns FWHM pulsed, electron accelerator). They are measuring spot dynamics and characterizing the resultant plasma for various configurations. Thus far, their experiments show that the first effect is not strongly present when the beam initially interacts with the target. Electron beam pulses delivered to the target after formation of a plasma are strongly affected. They have also performed initial experiments to determine the effect of the beam propagating through the plasma. This data shows that the head of the beam is relatively robust, but that backstreaming ions from the plasma can still manifest itself as a dynamic focus toward the tail of the beam. They report on the details of the experimental work to suppress these effects.

  18. Control Of Flexible Structures-2 (COFS-2) flight control, structure and gimbal system interaction study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fay, Stanley; Gates, Stephen; Henderson, Timothy; Sackett, Lester; Kirchwey, Kim; Stoddard, Isaac; Storch, Joel

    1988-01-01

    The second Control Of Flexible Structures Flight Experiment (COFS-2) includes a long mast as in the first flight experiment, but with the Langley 15-m hoop column antenna attached via a gimbal system to the top of the mast. The mast is to be mounted in the Space Shuttle cargo bay. The servo-driven gimbal system could be used to point the antenna relative to the mast. The dynamic interaction of the Shuttle Orbiter/COFS-2 system with the Orbiter on-orbit Flight Control System (FCS) and the gimbal pointing control system has been studied using analysis and simulation. The Orbiter pointing requirements have been assessed for their impact on allowable free drift time for COFS experiments. Three fixed antenna configurations were investigated. Also simulated was Orbiter attitude control behavior with active vernier jets during antenna slewing. The effect of experiment mast dampers was included. Control system stability and performance and loads on various portions of the COFS-2 structure were investigated. The study indicates possible undesirable interaction between the Orbiter FCS and the flexible, articulated COFS-2 mast/antenna system, even when restricted to vernier reaction jets.

  19. Structure factors in granular experiments with homogeneous fluidization.

    PubMed

    Puglisi, Andrea; Gnoli, Andrea; Gradenigo, Giacomo; Sarracino, Alessandro; Villamaina, Dario

    2012-01-07

    Velocity and density structure factors are measured over a hydrodynamic range of scales in a horizontal quasi-2D fluidized granular experiment, with packing fractions φ ∈ [10%, 40%]. The fluidization is realized by vertically vibrating a rough plate, on top of which particles perform a Brownian-like horizontal motion in addition to inelastic collisions. On one hand, the density structure factor is equal to that of elastic hard spheres, except in the limit of large length-scales, as it occurs in the presence of an effective interaction. On the other hand, the velocity field shows a more complex structure which is a genuine expression of a non-equilibrium steady state and which can be compared to a recent fluctuating hydrodynamic theory with non-equilibrium noise. The temporal decay of velocity modes autocorrelations is compatible with linear hydrodynamic equations with rates dictated by viscous momentum diffusion, corrected by a typical interaction time with the thermostat. Equal-time velocity structure factors display a peculiar shape with a plateau at large length-scales and another one at small scales, marking two different temperatures: the "bath" temperature T(b), depending on shaking parameters, and the "granular" temperature T(g) < T(b), which is affected by collisions. The two ranges of scales are separated by a correlation length which grows with φ, after proper rescaling with the mean free path.

  20. Exploring novel structures for manipulating relativistic laser-plasma interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Liangliang

    2016-10-01

    The prospect of realizing compact particle accelerators and x-ray sources based on high power lasers has gained numerous attention. Utilization of all the proposed schemes in the field requires the laser-matter-interaction process to be repeatable or moreover, controllable. This has been very challenging at ultra-high light intensities due to the pre-pulse issue and the limitation on target manufacturing. With recent development on pulse cleaning technique, such as XPW and the use of plasma mirror, we now propose a novel approach that leverages recent advancements in 3D nano-printing of materials and high contrast lasers to manipulate the laser-matter interactions on the micro-scales. The current 3D direct laser-writing (DLW) technique can produce repeatable structures with at a resolution as high as 100 nm. Based on 3D PIC simulations, we explored two typical structures, the micro-cylinder and micro-tube targets. The former serves to enhance and control laser-electron acceleration and the latter is dedicated to manipulate relativistic light intensity. First principle-of-proof experiments were carried out in the SCARLET laser facility and confirmed some of our predictions on enhancing direct laser acceleration of electrons and ion acceleration. We believe that the use of the micro-structured elements provides another degree of freedom in LPI and these new results will open new paths towards micro-engineering interaction process that will benefit high field science, laser-based proton therapy, near-QED physics, and relativistic nonlinear optics. This work is supported by the AFOSR Basic Research Initiative (FA9550-14-1-0085).

  1. VEEVVIE: Visual Explorer for Empirical Visualization, VR and Interaction Experiments.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, C; Gutenko, I; Kaufman, A E

    2016-01-01

    Empirical, hypothesis-driven, experimentation is at the heart of the scientific discovery process and has become commonplace in human-factors related fields. To enable the integration of visual analytics in such experiments, we introduce VEEVVIE, the Visual Explorer for Empirical Visualization, VR and Interaction Experiments. VEEVVIE is comprised of a back-end ontology which can model several experimental designs encountered in these fields. This formalization allows VEEVVIE to capture experimental data in a query-able form and makes it accessible through a front-end interface. This front-end offers several multi-dimensional visualization widgets with built-in filtering and highlighting functionality. VEEVVIE is also expandable to support custom experimental measurements and data types through a plug-in visualization widget architecture. We demonstrate VEEVVIE through several case studies of visual analysis, performed on the design and data collected during an experiment on the scalability of high-resolution, immersive, tiled-display walls.

  2. The Dynamic Reactance Interaction - How Vested Interests Affect People's Experience, Behavior, and Cognition in Social Interactions.

    PubMed

    Steindl, Christina; Jonas, Eva

    2015-01-01

    In social interactions, individuals may sometimes pursue their own interests at the expense of their interaction partner. Such self-interested behaviors impose a threat to the interaction partner's freedom to act. The current article investigates this threat in the context of interdependence and reactance theory. We explore how vested interests influence reactance process stages of an advisor-client interaction. We aim to explore the interactional process that evolves. In two studies, participants took the perspective of a doctor (advisor) or a patient (client). In both studies we incorporated a vested interest. In Study 1 (N = 82) we found that in response to a vested interest of their interaction partner, patients indicated a stronger experience of reactance, more aggressive behavioral intentions, and more biased cognitions than doctors. A serial multiple mediation revealed that a vested interest engendered mistrust toward the interaction partner and this mistrust led to an emerging reactance process. Study 2 (N = 207) further demonstrated that doctors expressed their reactance in a subtle way: they revealed a classic confirmation bias when searching for additional information on their preliminary decision preference, indicating stronger defense motivation. We discuss how these findings can help us to understand how social interactions develop dynamically.

  3. Recent Results from CLAS on Baryon Structure and Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ilieva, Yordanka Yordanova

    2013-08-01

    The understanding of baryon structure and interactions from Quantum Chromodynamics is one of the main objectives of modern hadron physics. Of particular interest is the regime of confinement where perturbative methods are not applicable to derive testable predictions. Understanding the transition from hadronic to partonic degrees of freedom, the hyperon-nucleon interaction, and nuclei in terms of quarks and gluons are some of the key problems. Here we present results of photoproduction experiments on light nuclear targets from Jefferson Lab Hall B. Our observation of onset of dimensional scaling in the cross section of two-body photodisintegration of (3)He at energy and momentum transfer well below 1 GeV suggests that quarks and gluons may be relevant degrees of freedom for the description of nuclear dynamics at energies lower than previously considered. Our program to study lambda-nucleon scattering via a large set of polarization observables for final-state interactions in exclusive hyperon photoproduction off the deuteron has produced preliminary results for single-polarization observables. The beam-spin asymmetry shows interesting features at large lambda polar angles and large kaon momenta.

  4. Structure and ubiquitin binding of the ubiquitin-interacting motif

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher,R.; Wang, B.; Alam, S.; Higginson, D.; Robinson, H.; Sundquist, C.; Hill, C.

    2003-01-01

    Ubiquitylation is used to target proteins into a large number of different biological processes including proteasomal degradation, endocytosis, virus budding, and vacuolar protein sorting (Vps). Ubiquitylated proteins are typically recognized using one of several different conserved ubiquitin binding modules. Here, we report the crystal structure and ubiquitin binding properties of one such module, the ubiquitin-interacting motif (UIM). We found that UIM peptides from several proteins involved in endocytosis and vacuolar protein sorting including Hrs, Vps27p, Stam1, and Eps15 bound specifically, but with modest affinity (K{sub d} = 0.1-1 mM), to free ubiquitin. Full affinity ubiquitin binding required the presence of conserved acidic patches at the N and C terminus of the UIM, as well as highly conserved central alanine and serine residues. NMR chemical shift perturbation mapping experiments demonstrated that all of these UIM peptides bind to the I44 surface of ubiquitin. The 1.45 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the second yeast Vps27p UIM (Vps27p-2) revealed that the ubiquitin-interacting motif forms an amphipathic helix. Although Vps27p-2 is monomeric in solution, the motif unexpectedly crystallized as an antiparallel four-helix bundle, and the potential biological implications of UIM oligomerization are therefore discussed.

  5. NASA/DOD Control/Structures Interaction Technology, 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Robert L. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    Control/structures interactions, deployment dynamics and system performance of large flexible spacecraft are discussed. Spacecraft active controls, deployable truss structures, deployable antennas, solar power systems for space stations, pointing control systems for space station gimballed payloads, computer-aided design for large space structures, and passive damping for flexible structures are among the topics covered.

  6. Structural study of surfactant-dependent interaction with protein

    SciTech Connect

    Mehan, Sumit; Aswal, Vinod K.; Kohlbrecher, Joachim

    2015-06-24

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to study the complex structure of anionic BSA protein with three different (cationic DTAB, anionic SDS and non-ionic C12E10) surfactants. These systems form very different surfactant-dependent complexes. We show that the structure of protein-surfactant complex is initiated by the site-specific electrostatic interaction between the components, followed by the hydrophobic interaction at high surfactant concentrations. It is also found that hydrophobic interaction is preferred over the electrostatic interaction in deciding the resultant structure of protein-surfactant complexes.

  7. Structure of local interactions in complex financial dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, X. F.; Chen, T. T.; Zheng, B.

    2014-01-01

    With the network methods and random matrix theory, we investigate the interaction structure of communities in financial markets. In particular, based on the random matrix decomposition, we clarify that the local interactions between the business sectors (subsectors) are mainly contained in the sector mode. In the sector mode, the average correlation inside the sectors is positive, while that between the sectors is negative. Further, we explore the time evolution of the interaction structure of the business sectors, and observe that the local interaction structure changes dramatically during a financial bubble or crisis. PMID:24936906

  8. Market structure explained by pairwise interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bury, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Financial markets are a typical example of complex systems where interactions between constituents lead to many remarkable features. Here we give empirical evidence, by making as few assumptions as possible, that the market microstructure capturing almost all of the available information in the data of stock markets does not involve higher order than pairwise interactions. We give an economic interpretation of this pairwise model. We show that it accurately recovers the empirical correlation coefficients; thus the collective behaviors are quantitatively described by models that capture the observed pairwise correlations but no higher-order interactions. Furthermore, we show that an order-disorder transition occurs, as predicted by the pairwise model. Last, we make the link with the graph-theoretic description of stock markets recovering the non-random and scale-free topology, shrinking length during crashes and meaningful clustering features, as expected.

  9. [Physicians' experience with and attitudes to interaction between health care levels].

    PubMed

    Pettersen, Betty; Johnsen, Roar

    2007-03-01

    We have studied physicians' experience with and attitudes to interaction between health care levels, and their opinions on how this can be improved. Three focus groups were established. They consisted of 15 male and 2 female physicians with 3 months to 28 years of experience. Interviews with the participants were transcribed and qualitatively analysed. Physicians had different opinions on which characteristics are important to establish a good professional interaction, and their opinions varied according to which health care level they represent. While GPs emphasised confidence, respect, knowledge of each other and accessibility, that is a relational perspective; the local hospital physicians put more emphasis on capacity, i.e. competence, stability and accessibility. Physicians at the central Hospital emphasized capacity and structure, i.e. their own and collaborators' professional interest, accessibility and formalised structures for interactions. A sense of personal knowledge and verbal and written contact was important, but guidelines and treatment plans were also considered to be important for interaction. There was a strong ownership to the individual patient across all three levels, which was an unexpected finding. Good interaction seems to be a balance between the relational perspective, with emphasis on dialogue, structural arrangements, accessibility and continuity and professional competence. In addition, there is a need to clarify responsibilities for each patient.

  10. Control-structures Interaction Test of the LACE Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Lawrence W., Jr.; Fisher, Shalom

    1992-01-01

    It is clear that additional experience and validation of Control Structures Interaction (CSI) techniques are needed in controlling the structural dynamics of flexible spacecraft. It is also clear that the effects of the space environment such as weightlessness dictate that this be done in space. Unfortunately, orbital tests are difficult to achieve because of the high cost of the test article, the launch into orbit, the instrumentation, and communication systems. The Low-power Atmospheric Compensation Experiment (LACE) Satellite has provided an opportunity to achieve a CSI test in space for very little cost. First, the CSI test rode piggy-back and did not interfere with the primary objective of LACE. Second, the novel technique of using ground based measurements of vibration of the orbiting satellite was employed. The LACE has a heavy central body to which is attached booms with lengths as long as 150 feet. The ground measurements were obtained using laser Doppler radar at the MIT Lincoln Laboratory Firepond Facility. The initial tests demonstrated the accuracy of the vibration measurements and obtained structural responses for enhancing the accuracy of the mathematical model of the structural dynamics. Germanium corner-cube retroreflectors attached to the central body and a boom deployed to 18 feet ensured a high strength return signal. Subsequent tests demonstrated the ability of an open-loop damper to attenuate the vibrations of the orbiting satellite. The LACE test results are important in contributing to the validation of a CSI technique, and demonstrating a novel ground measurement technique for orbital tests that is accurate but which has very low cost.

  11. Solving Fluid Structure Interaction Problems with an Immersed Boundary Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barad, Michael F.; Brehm, Christoph; Kiris, Cetin C.

    2016-01-01

    An immersed boundary method for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations can be used for moving boundary problems as well as fully coupled fluid-structure interaction is presented. The underlying Cartesian immersed boundary method of the Launch Ascent and Vehicle Aerodynamics (LAVA) framework, based on the locally stabilized immersed boundary method previously presented by the authors, is extended to account for unsteady boundary motion and coupled to linear and geometrically nonlinear structural finite element solvers. The approach is validated for moving boundary problems with prescribed body motion and fully coupled fluid structure interaction problems. Keywords: Immersed Boundary Method, Higher-Order Finite Difference Method, Fluid Structure Interaction.

  12. Perceptions and experiences of people with mental illness regarding their interactions with police.

    PubMed

    Livingston, James D; Desmarais, Sarah L; Verdun-Jones, Simon; Parent, Richard; Michalak, Erin; Brink, Johann

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the perceptions and lived experiences of people with mental illness in relation to their interactions with the police. A community-based participatory research approach was used and a procedural justice theoretical perspective guided the study. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted by peer researchers with 60 people with mental illness who had interacted with the police and were living in Metro Vancouver, Canada. Among the study participants, contact with the police was frequent and occurred under a diverse range of circumstances. The majority of participants perceived being treated in a procedurally just manner by the police officer(s) who were involved in their most recent interaction. Almost three-quarters (n=43, 72%) of participants were generally satisfied with how the police officer(s) had handled their most recent interaction. The slight majority of participants (n=30, 51%) rated their previous contacts with the police as a positive experience overall, with 32% (n=19) indicating that their previous interactions with the police were negative life experiences. The findings paint a more balanced picture than that which is often portrayed by the media. Emphasizing a procedural justice framework for police handling of situations involving people with mental illness is a vital step toward improving how these interactions are experienced and perceived. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. HAARP High Power Experiments and Observations of Ionospheric Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-01

    set up a spatial interference pattern measured at WIND. The Kodiak SuperDARN radar scanned the modified region above HAARP and observed the growth of...ionospheric and space plasmas impose a fluctuation spectrum on the HF waves, indicating various scales sizes of plasma structure. The SuperDARN backscatter...access to more distant regions, including the recent lunar echo experiment. We have also begun to use the SuperDARN radar at Kodiak, Alaska to image the

  14. Couples' experiences of interacting with outside others in chronic fatigue syndrome: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Joanna; King, Nigel; Wearden, Alison

    2014-03-01

    Social isolation and stigma are frequently reported by patients with chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis and relationships in the home environment with those close to the patients (their 'significant others') may thus be particularly important. Rather little attention has yet been paid to the beliefs and experiences of 'significant others' themselves in this context. This study sought to explore in-depth the beliefs and experiences of both patients and 'significant others' in relation to chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis. In-depth interviews using a semi-structured interview schedule designed around the core constructs of the Common-Sense Model of self-regulation were conducted with two patients with chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis and their spouses. Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis was used to analyse interview data. Experiences of social interactions in relation to chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis with others outside of the relationship dyad emerged as a key issue for all participants when reflecting on their experiences of living with the condition. These concerns are presented under two themes: interactions with healthcare professionals and interactions with the social world. It is evident that significant others play an important role in the lived experience of chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis. For both patients and significant others, the wider social world and interactions with outside others may be important influences on dyadic coping in chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis. Both future research and treatment interventions could usefully include a 'significant other' perspective.

  15. The FIRST experiment: interaction region and MAPS vertex detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiriti, E.; de Napoli, M.; Romano, F.; FIRST Collaboration

    2011-06-01

    The improvement of the precision of the measurement of the nuclear cross-section, in order to fulfill the requirements of the actual Monte Carlo simulations for hadrontherapy and space radioprotection, is the main goal of the FIRST experiment. After a brief introduction on the treatment planning in hadrontherapy, this paper describes main characteristics and components of the experiment. The features of the interaction region detectors and their main needs (low material budget, high angular coverage, two tracks resolution and large trigger rate) are discussed. Special emphasis is devoted in discussing the new silicon pixel vertex detector, in particular its new developed data acquisition and its characterization with the first test results obtained with a prototype of the detector.

  16. Fluid-structure interactions in compressible cavity flows

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Justin L.; Casper, Katya Marie; Beresh, Steven J.; Hunter, Patrick S.; Spillers, Russell Wayne; Henfling, John F.; Mayes, Randall L.

    2015-06-08

    Experiments were performed to understand the complex fluid-structure interactions that occur during aircraft internal store carriage. A cylindrical store was installed in a rectangular cavity having a length-to-depth ratio of 3.33 and a length-to-width ratio of 1. The Mach number ranged from 0.6 to 2.5 and the incoming boundary layer was turbulent. Fast-response pressure measurements provided aeroacoustic loading in the cavity, while triaxial accelerometers provided simultaneous store response. Despite occupying only 6% of the cavity volume, the store significantly altered the cavity acoustics. The store responded to the cavity flow at its natural structural frequencies, and it exhibited a directionally dependent response to cavity resonance. Specifically, cavity tones excited the store in the streamwise and wall-normal directions consistently, whereas a spanwise response was observed only occasionally. Also, the streamwise and wall-normal responses were attributed to the longitudinal pressure waves and shear layer vortices known to occur during cavity resonance. Although the spanwise response to cavity tones was limited, broadband pressure fluctuations resulted in significant spanwise accelerations at store natural frequencies. As a result, the largest vibrations occurred when a cavity tone matched a structural natural frequency, although energy was transferred more efficiently to natural frequencies having predominantly streamwise and wall-normal motions.

  17. Fluid-structure interactions in compressible cavity flows

    DOE PAGES

    Wagner, Justin L.; Casper, Katya Marie; Beresh, Steven J.; ...

    2015-06-08

    Experiments were performed to understand the complex fluid-structure interactions that occur during aircraft internal store carriage. A cylindrical store was installed in a rectangular cavity having a length-to-depth ratio of 3.33 and a length-to-width ratio of 1. The Mach number ranged from 0.6 to 2.5 and the incoming boundary layer was turbulent. Fast-response pressure measurements provided aeroacoustic loading in the cavity, while triaxial accelerometers provided simultaneous store response. Despite occupying only 6% of the cavity volume, the store significantly altered the cavity acoustics. The store responded to the cavity flow at its natural structural frequencies, and it exhibited a directionallymore » dependent response to cavity resonance. Specifically, cavity tones excited the store in the streamwise and wall-normal directions consistently, whereas a spanwise response was observed only occasionally. Also, the streamwise and wall-normal responses were attributed to the longitudinal pressure waves and shear layer vortices known to occur during cavity resonance. Although the spanwise response to cavity tones was limited, broadband pressure fluctuations resulted in significant spanwise accelerations at store natural frequencies. As a result, the largest vibrations occurred when a cavity tone matched a structural natural frequency, although energy was transferred more efficiently to natural frequencies having predominantly streamwise and wall-normal motions.« less

  18. Structural and functional bases of laser-microvessels interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Valentine I.; Terman, Oleg A.; Builin, Vitalij; Lebedeva, Natalia A.; Samoilov, Nickolai

    1993-07-01

    Structural and functional microcirculatory changes in tissues and organs (muscles, liver, derma, epinephros, brain cortex) under various dosages and powers of laser irradiation in the red (633 nm) and near infrared (890 nm) spectrum regions have been studied in experiments and clinic. In case of nonsensitized tissues the `photoactivation' range of power densities and doses of laser irradiation has been established. We have identified a short-term reaction of microvessels and a long-term reaction (adaptation). The former consists of intensification of microcirculation and metabolism rise in parenchymatous cells; the latter is connected with neoangiogenesis acceleration. The intensification of the blood microcirculation includes a dilation of microvessels of all orders, an amplification of arteriolar vasomotions and an opening of `reserved' capillaries. Data on the structural reconstruction of myocytes and endotheliocytes have shown that the high differential parenchymatous cells and its membrane structures are sensitive to low energy laser irradiation and, on the other hand, under low energy laser irradiation there is an activation of synthetic processes in the cells. Thus, during the laser-tissue interaction in such complex system as human organism the microcirculation plays the key role among the other systems.

  19. Quantifying long-range correlations and 1/f patterns in a minimal experiment of social interaction

    PubMed Central

    Bedia, Manuel G.; Aguilera, Miguel; Gómez, Tomás; Larrode, David G.; Seron, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, researchers in social cognition have found the “perceptual crossing paradigm” to be both a theoretical and practical advance toward meeting particular challenges. This paradigm has been used to analyze the type of interactive processes that emerge in minimal interactions and it has allowed progress toward understanding of the principles of social cognition processes. In this paper, we analyze whether some critical aspects of these interactions could not have been observed by previous studies. We consider alternative indicators that could complete, or even lead us to rethink, the current interpretation of the results obtained from both experimental and simulated modeling in the fields of social interactions and minimal perceptual crossing. In particular, we discuss the possibility that previous experiments have been analytically constrained to a short-term dynamic type of player response. Additionally, we propose the possibility of considering these experiments from a more suitable framework based on the use and analysis of long-range correlations and fractal dynamics. We will also reveal evidence supporting the idea that social interactions are deployed along many scales of activity. Specifically, we propose that the fractal structure of the interactions could be a more adequate framework to understand the type of social interaction patterns generated in a social engagement. PMID:25429277

  20. Police officers’ experiences of supportive and unsupportive social interactions following traumatic incidents

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Rachel; Pistrang, Nancy; Billings, Jo

    2013-01-01

    Background Police officers are routinely exposed to potentially traumatic incidents yet the majority do not develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Social support has been identified as one factor that may maintain wellbeing in this population, although what constitutes supportive or unsupportive interactions is unclear. Objective To explore police officers’ experiences of supportive and unsupportive interactions following distressing incidents. Method Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 19 police officers. Transcripts were analysed using Braun and Clarke's (2006) thematic analysis approach. Results Participants described a range of supportive interactions with colleagues, friends, and family, as well as social constraints that hindered interactions. Ambivalence about talking about the impact of distressing events was striking throughout the accounts. The context and source of available support, as well as beliefs about talking, influenced their interactions. Humour was a central feature of interactions with colleagues; more emotional talk occurred with partners and close family, albeit with officers limiting details in order to protect others. Conclusions The findings provide tentative insights into the processes of social support that may contribute to the resilience of police officers following traumatic incidents. Further research is needed to examine whether the experiences of supportive and unsupportive interactions differ for those with and without PTSD. PMID:23516046

  1. Quantifying long-range correlations and 1/f patterns in a minimal experiment of social interaction.

    PubMed

    Bedia, Manuel G; Aguilera, Miguel; Gómez, Tomás; Larrode, David G; Seron, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, researchers in social cognition have found the "perceptual crossing paradigm" to be both a theoretical and practical advance toward meeting particular challenges. This paradigm has been used to analyze the type of interactive processes that emerge in minimal interactions and it has allowed progress toward understanding of the principles of social cognition processes. In this paper, we analyze whether some critical aspects of these interactions could not have been observed by previous studies. We consider alternative indicators that could complete, or even lead us to rethink, the current interpretation of the results obtained from both experimental and simulated modeling in the fields of social interactions and minimal perceptual crossing. In particular, we discuss the possibility that previous experiments have been analytically constrained to a short-term dynamic type of player response. Additionally, we propose the possibility of considering these experiments from a more suitable framework based on the use and analysis of long-range correlations and fractal dynamics. We will also reveal evidence supporting the idea that social interactions are deployed along many scales of activity. Specifically, we propose that the fractal structure of the interactions could be a more adequate framework to understand the type of social interaction patterns generated in a social engagement.

  2. Neutron star structure with chiral interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logoteta, Domenico; Bombaci, Ignazio

    2017-06-01

    We use two-body and three-body nuclear interactions derived in the framework of chiral perturbation theory (ChPT) with and without the explicit ∆ isobar contributions to calculate the energy per particle of symmetric nuclear matter and pure neutron matter employing the microscopic Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approach. In particular, we present nuclear matter calculations using the new fully local in coordinate-space two-nucleon interaction at the next-to-next-to-next-to-leading-order (N3LO) of ChPT with ∆ isobar intermediate states (N3LO∆) recently developed by Piarulli et al. [1]. We compute the β-equilibrium equation of state and determine the neutron star mass-radius and mass-central density sequences. We find that the adopted interactions are able to provide satisfactory properties of nuclear matter at saturation density as well as to fulfill the limit of two-solar mass for the maximum mass configuration as required by recent observations.

  3. Controller-structure interaction compensation using adaptive residual mode filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Roger A.; Balas, Mark J.

    1990-01-01

    It is not feasible to construct controllers for large space structures or large scale systems (LSS's) which are of the same order as the structures. The complexity of the dynamics of these systems is such that full knowledge of its behavior cannot by processed by today's controller design methods. The controller for system performance of such a system is therefore based on a much smaller reduced-order model (ROM). Unfortunately, the interaction between the LSS and the ROM-based controller can produce instabilities in the closed-loop system due to the unmodeled dynamics of the LSS. Residual mode filters (RMF's) allow the systematic removal of these instabilities in a matter which does not require a redesign of the controller. In addition RMF's have a strong theoretical basis. As simple first- or second-order filters, the RMF CSI compensation technique is at once modular, simple and highly effective. RMF compensation requires knowledge of the dynamics of the system modes which resulted in the previous closed-loop instabilities (the residual modes), but this information is sometimes known imperfectly. An adaptive, self-tuning RMF design, which compensates for uncertainty in the frequency of the residual mode, has been simulated using continuous-time and discrete-time models of a flexible robot manipulator. Work has also been completed on the discrete-time experimental implementation on the Martin Marietta flexible robot manipulator experiment. This paper will present the results of that work on adaptive, self-tuning RMF's, and will clearly show the advantage of this adaptive compensation technique for controller-structure interaction (CSI) instabilities in actively-controlled LSS's.

  4. Interface structure of co-rotating interaction regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogilvie, K. W.; Roelof, E. C.; Forsyth, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    Plasma and particle observations on Ulysses during its passes through the southern and northern heliosphere have revealed that, inside the streamer belt, the large-scale structure of the quiet global heliosphere is dominated by corotating interaction regions (CIRs). Therefore, considerable attention is now being given to the internal plasma structure of CIRs, and in particular, to the manifestations of the stream interfaces that should mark their origins as interactions between low speed solar wind (in the low-latitude streamer belt) and high speed solar wind (from the equatorial extensions of the high latitude polar coronal holes). The SWICS and HI-SCALE experiments on Ulysses combine plasma and energetic particle measurements that are of considerable utility for such studies because, between them, they cover the proton energy range from 10 eV to 5 MeV. These measurements are used, together with magnetic field data, to study the remarkable series of CIRs that occurred during the period beginning July 1992 and the end of 1993 as Ulysses rose from the ecliptic to a southern heliographic latitude of 48 deg. The structure of the regions between the forward and reverse shocks were previously analyzed in terms of the proton specific entropy argument log that should exhibit a discontinuous jump at the stream interface. It was claimed that the stream interface, defined with respect to specific entropy, is also associated with a discontinuity in energetic proton intensities. The energetic particle data (greater than 60 keV) and how they were ordered with respect to interfaces and with respect to the magnetic field were examined.

  5. Antagonistic interactions of soil pseudomonads are structured in time.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, Susanne A; Soucy, Jean-Paul R; Kassen, Rees

    2017-04-06

    Social interactions have been invoked as potential major selective forces structuring natural microbial communities and thus may help explain the astonishing bacterial diversity of natural ecosystems. Here, we investigate the prevalence and structure of exotoxin-mediated antagonistic interactions among free-living soil Pseudomonas strains collected over the course of two years at distances of up to one kilometer. Unlike some previous studies on antagonistic interactions among natural isolates, we found the prevalence of exotoxin-mediated inhibitions to be relatively low. When present, antagonistic interactions show a weakly negative relationship with genetic relatedness and metabolic similarity. Intriguingly, isolates sampled from the same growing season were significantly more likely to inhibit each other than they were to inhibit isolates from different growing seasons. Exotoxin-mediated antagonistic interactions between soil pseudomonads thus seem to be structured in time but do not appear to be a major selective force structuring free-living soil bacterial communities of soil pseudomonads.

  6. Experiments on Diffusion Flame Structure of a Laminar Vortex Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Shin-Juh; Dahm, Werner J. A.

    1999-01-01

    The study of flame-vortex interactions provides one of the means to better understand turbulent combustion, and allows for canonical configurations that contain the fundamental elements found in turbulent flames, These include concentrated vorticity, entrainment and mixing, strain and nonequilibrium phenomena, diffusion and differential diffusion, partial premixing and diluent effects, and heat release effects. In flame- vortex configurations, these fundamental elements can be studied under more controlled conditions than is possible in direct investigations of turbulent flames. Since the paper of Marble, the problem of the flame-vortex interaction has received considerable attention theoretically, numerically and experimentally. Several configurations exist for study of the premixed flame/vortex ring interaction but more limited results have been obtained to date for the diffusion flame/vortex ring case. The setup of Chen and Dahm, which is conceptually similar to that of Karagozian and Manda and Karagozian, Suganuma and Strom where the ring is composed of fuel and air and combustion begins during the ring formation process, is used in the current study. However, it is essential to conduct the experiments in microgravity to remove the asymmetries caused by buoyancy and thus obtain highly symmetric and repeatable interactions. In previous studies it was found that the flame structure of the vortex ring was similar to that obtained analytically by Karagozian and Manda. Dilution of propane with nitrogen led mainly to a reduction in flame luminosities, flame burnout times were affected by both fuel volumes and amount of dilution, and a simple model of the burnout times was developed. In this paper, a discussion on reacting ring displacement and flame burnout time will be given, and the flame structures of vortex rings containing ethane and air will be compared to those of propane reacting in air.

  7. Experiments Evaluating the Interaction between Deformable Substrates and Prograding Clinoforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatmas, E. S.; Foreman, B.; Abeyta, A.; Paola, C.

    2013-12-01

    Passive margins often contain salt and mobile shale layers that act as deformable substrates underlying coastal sediments. By understanding the interaction between deformable substrates and migrating clinoforms in simplified, experimental settings, we hope to clarify their fundamental behavior in natural deltaic settings. Substrate deformation occurs by a number of processes and can result in rugose ocean floor bathymetry which can locally trap sediment. In our experiments, we focus on how differential sediment loading on two substrates of different rheologies (Newtonian versus Bingham) affects aspects of clinoform deposition. We are particularly interested in the effects of the progradation rate and substrate rheology on the locus of clinoform deposition over time as the substrate and delta interact. Our experimental setup uses a rectangular flume that is 230 cm long, 8 cm wide and 30 cm tall. The materials we used for the mobile shale experiments involved a mixture of kaolinite and water which provide a Bingham rheology, and the sediment was a quartz sand and coal mixture. For a Newtonian rheology we used corn syrup as a deformable substrate, capturing the Newtonian rheology of subsurface salt, and the sediment consisted of a mixture of equal volumes of walnut shells and kaolinite clay. For each experiment we systematically changed sediment feed rate and substrate thickness. Deformation styles differ qualitatively between Bingham (kaolinite/mobile shale) and Newtonian (corn syrup/salt) experiments. In mobile-shale (Bingham) experiments, a bulge forms at the toe of the clinoform and the clinoform eventually overtops this bulge, creating alternating thick and thin stratigraphic accumulations down depositional dip. For the salt (Newtonian) experiments, deformation occurs behind the clinoform foreset in the form of diapirs. Preliminary results show minimal impacts on shoreline progradation rate as the delta loads mobile shale substrates. This suggests that the

  8. Fluid Structure Interaction in a Turbine Blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorla, Rama S. R.

    2004-01-01

    An unsteady, three dimensional Navier-Stokes solution in rotating frame formulation for turbomachinery applications is presented. Casting the governing equations in a rotating frame enabled the freezing of grid motion and resulted in substantial savings in computer time. The turbine blade was computationally simulated and probabilistically evaluated in view of several uncertainties in the aerodynamic, structural, material and thermal variables that govern the turbine blade. The interconnection between the computational fluid dynamics code and finite element structural analysis code was necessary to couple the thermal profiles with the structural design. The stresses and their variations were evaluated at critical points on the Turbine blade. Cumulative distribution functions and sensitivity factors were computed for stress responses due to aerodynamic, geometric, mechanical and thermal random variables.

  9. Toolkit Design for Interactive Structured Graphics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    GUI toolkits provide higher-level support for creating custom application widgets, or provide support for structured graphics. Amulet [21] is a...1997). The Amulet Environment: New Models for Effective User Interface Software Development". IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering, 23(6), pp. 347

  10. New graduate nurses' experiences of interactions in the critical care unit.

    PubMed

    Saghafi, Farida; Hardy, Jennifer; Hillege, Sharon

    2012-08-01

    This paper reports on one of the key findings from a recent descriptive phenomenological study on lived experience of 10 new graduate nurses (NGNs) in an intensive care unit (ICU) in a major acute care hospital. Interpersonal relationships experienced by NGNs in ICU give rise to diverse thoughts, perceptions and feelings that may have significant impact on their professional development, job satisfaction and retention. The researcher conducted in-depth, semi-structured audio-taped interviews to collect the data. Interaction with others as key theme and related subthemes: interaction with patients; interaction with other members of the ICU team; who is approachable; and feedback emerged. The NGNs' perception of their ability to interact with others, as part of their professional development, is influenced by both (i) how they see themselves and (ii) how they perceive that others see them.

  11. Sensitivity of the T2HKK experiment to nonstandard interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukasawa, Shinya; Ghosh, Monojit; Yasuda, Osamu

    2017-03-01

    If the flavor-dependent nonstandard interactions (NSIs) in neutrino propagation exist, then the matter effect is modified, and the modification is parametrized by the dimensionless parameter ɛα β (α , β =e , μ , τ ). In this paper, we discuss the sensitivity of the T2HKK experiment, the possibility of which is now seriously discussed as a future extension of the T2K experiment, to such NSIs. On the assumption that ɛα μ=0 (α =e , μ , τ ) and ɛτ τ=|ɛe τ|/(1 +ɛe e), which are satisfied by other experiments to a good approximation, we find that, among the possible off-axis flux configurations of 1.3°, 1.5°, 2.0°, and 2.5°, the case of the off-axis angle 1.3° gives the highest sensitivity to ɛe e and |ɛe τ|. Our results show that the 1.3° off-axis configuration can exclude NSIs for |ɛe e|≳1 or |ɛe τ|≳0.2 at 3 σ . We also find that in the presence of NSIs T2HKK (for the off-axis angle 1.3°) has better sensitivity to the two C P phases [δC P and arg(ɛe τ)] than DUNE. This is because of the synergy between the two detectors, i.e., one in Kamioka and one in Korea. T2HKK has better sensitivity to the C P phases than the atmospheric neutrino experiment at Hyper-Kamiokande in inverted hierarchy, but in normal hierarchy, the atmospheric neutrino experiment has the best sensitivity to the C P phases.

  12. The Structure of Flow over Interacting Barchan Dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, J. A.; Best, J.; Christensen, K. T.; Mejia-Alvarez, R.

    2009-12-01

    Barchans are crescent-shaped dunes, found in both aeolian and subaqueous environments, which are formed in unidirectional flows with a limited sediment supply. While the morphology of barchans is well documented, less is known concerning the flow structure over barchans, and specifically the fluid dynamic interactions between barchans. Yet, without understanding the influence of dune interactions upon the flow, and vice versa, the mechanisms responsible for dune migration and interaction remain elusive. This paper uses physical modeling to detail the flow fields of interacting barchan dunes, and examines the implications of these interactions for the kinematic behavior of barchans that has been described in past work (Endo et al., 2004). Four idealized, fixed, barchan dune models were manufactured, the shape and dimensions of which were based upon previous empirical studies of dune morphology. The dune sizes were chosen to cover the range of size interactions documented by Endo et al. (2004), and covered volumetric size ratios (upstream: downstream dune) of 0.025, 0.056, 0.175, as well as investigating the interaction of identical size dunes. These models were placed in an Eiffel-type, open-circuit wind tunnel with a working test-section 6090 mm long by 914 mm wide by 457 mm high and a free-stream turbulence intensity of 0.16%. Flow quantification was achieved using particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) that used an 11 megapixel camera operating at 0.5Hz. PIV measurements of the mean and turbulent flow field were made in the streamwise-wall-normal plane, along the centerline of the barchans(s), at a Reynolds number of 59,000. Flow fields over the lee and stoss sides of the downstream barchan were quantified at various distances between the two dunes, ranging from where the two dunes touched to where the upstream dune was six dune wavelengths upflow. This paper will present results of the interaction between these barchan dunes and a comparison between these flow

  13. Interactive visualization tools for the structural biologist.

    PubMed

    Porebski, Benjamin T; Ho, Bosco K; Buckle, Ashley M

    2013-10-01

    In structural biology, management of a large number of Protein Data Bank (PDB) files and raw X-ray diffraction images often presents a major organizational problem. Existing software packages that manipulate these file types were not designed for these kinds of file-management tasks. This is typically encountered when browsing through a folder of hundreds of X-ray images, with the aim of rapidly inspecting the diffraction quality of a data set. To solve this problem, a useful functionality of the Macintosh operating system (OSX) has been exploited that allows custom visualization plugins to be attached to certain file types. Software plugins have been developed for diffraction images and PDB files, which in many scenarios can save considerable time and effort. The direct visualization of diffraction images and PDB structures in the file browser can be used to identify key files of interest simply by scrolling through a list of files.

  14. Interactive visualization tools for the structural biologist

    PubMed Central

    Porebski, Benjamin T.; Ho, Bosco K.; Buckle, Ashley M.

    2013-01-01

    In structural biology, management of a large number of Protein Data Bank (PDB) files and raw X-ray diffraction images often presents a major organizational problem. Existing software packages that manipulate these file types were not designed for these kinds of file-management tasks. This is typically encountered when browsing through a folder of hundreds of X-ray images, with the aim of rapidly inspecting the diffraction quality of a data set. To solve this problem, a useful functionality of the Macintosh operating system (OSX) has been exploited that allows custom visualization plugins to be attached to certain file types. Software plugins have been developed for diffraction images and PDB files, which in many scenarios can save considerable time and effort. The direct visualization of diffraction images and PDB structures in the file browser can be used to identify key files of interest simply by scrolling through a list of files. PMID:24068844

  15. Ecological Networks: Structure, Interaction Strength, and Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Samit; Sinha, Somdatta

    The fundamental building blocks of any ecosystem, the food webs, which are assemblages of species through various interconnections, provide a central concept in ecology. The study of a food web allows abstractions of the complexity and interconnectedness of natural communities that transcend the specific details of the underlying systems. For example, Fig. 1 shows a typical food web, where the species are connected through their feeding relationships. The top predator, Heliaster (starfish) feeds on many gastropods like Hexaplex, Morula, Cantharus, etc., some of whom predate on each other [129]. Interactions between species in a food web can be of many types, such as predation, competition, mutualism, commensalism, and ammensalism (see Section 1.1, Fig. 2).

  16. Temporal coherence structure rapidly shapes neuronal interactions

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Kai; Xu, Yanbo; Yin, Pingbo; Oxenham, Andrew J.; Fritz, Jonathan B.; Shamma, Shihab A.

    2017-01-01

    Perception of segregated sources is essential in navigating cluttered acoustic environments. A basic mechanism to implement this process is the temporal coherence principle. It postulates that a signal is perceived as emitted from a single source only when all of its features are temporally modulated coherently, causing them to bind perceptually. Here we report on neural correlates of this process as rapidly reshaped interactions in primary auditory cortex, measured in three different ways: as changes in response rates, as adaptations of spectrotemporal receptive fields following stimulation by temporally coherent and incoherent tone sequences, and as changes in spiking correlations during the tone sequences. Responses, sensitivity and presumed connectivity were rapidly enhanced by synchronous stimuli, and suppressed by alternating (asynchronous) sounds, but only when the animals engaged in task performance and were attentive to the stimuli. Temporal coherence and attention are therefore both important factors in auditory scene analysis. PMID:28054545

  17. Neutron Interactions in the CUORE Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dolinski, Michelle Jean

    2008-10-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay (0vDBD) is a lepton-number violating process that can occur only for a massive Majorana neutrino. The search for 0vDBD is currently the only practical experimental way to determine whether neutrinos are identical to their own antiparticles (Majorana neutrinos) or have distinct particle and anti-particle states (Dirac neutrinos). In addition, the observation of 0vDBD can provide information about the absolute mass scale of the neutrino. The Cuoricino experiment was a sensitive search for 0vDBD, as well as a proof of principle for the next generation experiment, CUORE. CUORE will search for 0vDBD of 130Te with a ton-scale array of unenriched TeO2 bolometers. By increasing mass and decreasing the background for 0vDBD, the half-life sensitivity of CUORE will be a factor of twenty better than that of Cuoricino. The site for both of these experiments is the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, an underground laboratory with 3300 meters water equivalent rock overburden and a cosmic ray muon attenuation factor of 10-6. Because of the extreme low background requirements for CUORE, it is important that all potential sources of background in the 0vDBD peak region at 2530 keV are well understood. One potential source of background for CUORE comes from neutrons, which can be produced underground both by (α,n) reactions and by fast cosmic ray muon interactions. Preliminary simulations by the CUORE collaboration indicate that these backgrounds will be negligible for CUORE. However, in order to accurately simulate the expected neutron background, it is important to understand the cross sections for neutron interactions with detector materials. In order to help refine these simulations, I have measured the gamma-ray production cross sections for interactions of neutrons on the abundant stable isotopes of Te using the GEANIE detector array at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. In addition, I have used the GEANIE

  18. Supersonic Parachute Aerodynamic Testing and Fluid Structure Interaction Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingard, J. S.; Underwood, J. C.; Darley, M. G.; Marraffa, L.; Ferracina, L.

    2014-06-01

    The ESA Supersonic Parachute program expands the knowledge of parachute inflation and flying characteristics in supersonic flows using wind tunnel testing and fluid structure interaction to develop new inflation algorithms and aerodynamic databases.

  19. Investigation of Acoustic-Structure Interaction Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Kin Loong

    1995-01-01

    A new procedure to formulate and analyze vibration problems of structural-acoustic coupled system has been established. At first, free vibration analysis of the acoustic system by the modal expansion method was applied for elliptic cavities, then the system equations of structure -acoustic coupled systems are formulated utilizing the concept of the equivalent mass source. The modal expansion method and a matrix transformation technique are used to solve the free and forced vibration problems. The final formulation of this method in the free vibration problems gives rise to a standard eigenvalue problem. The validity of the procedure is verified by comparing its results with the exact solutions for a one-dimensional coupled system. Parameters dictating coupling effects are also identified and discussed. In the final part of the dissertation, a new solution method was introduced to solve the forced response of acoustic -structure coupled system, which includes damping and absorbing elements. The new method proposed here does not require any matrix inversion as has been used in conventional methods. The method proposed here also has a better numerical efficiency. The other advantage of the method is that the effect of the absorbing material on the system response can be modeled as a virtual sound source with its own magnitude and phase. The system frequency response functions can be expressed as a summation of the uncoupled component modes of the system, The procedure for the forced response solution was again confirmed by comparing its results with the exact solution available for the one dimensional case. Possible applications of the method are also discussed.

  20. A survey of experiments and experimental facilities for control of flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, Dean W., Jr.; Juang, Jer-Nan; Klose, Gerhard J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a survey of U.S. ground experiments and facilities dedicated to the study of active control of flexible structures. The facilities will be briefly described in terms of capability, configuration, size and instrumentation. Topics on the experiments include vibration suppression, slewing and system identification. Future research directions, particularly of the NASA Langley Research Center's Controls/Structures Interaction (CSI) ground test program, will be discussed.

  1. Interaction of almond cystatin with pesticides: Structural and functional analysis.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Azad Alam; Khaki, Peerzada Shariq Shaheen; Bano, Bilqees

    2017-03-01

    Pesticides are chemical substances that eliminate or control a variety of agricultural pests that damage crops and livestock. They not only affect the targeted pests but also affect the nontargeted systems, raising more concerns for their effect on both plant and animal systems. Cystatins (cysteine protease inhibitor) are ubiquitously present in all living cells and show a variety of important physiological functions. The present study shows the effect of different pesticides (pendimethalin, methoxyfenozide, and Cu(II) hydroxide) on purified almond cystatin. Almond cystatin showed concentration-dependent loss in papain inhibitory activity on interaction with the pesticides, showing maximum loss in the presence of Cu(II) hydroxide and minimum in the case of methoxyfenozide. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed maximum degradation of purified cystatin in the presence of Cu(II) hydroxide with insignificant effect in the presence of methoxyfenozide. Structural alterations were significant in the case of Cu(II) hydroxide and less in the case of methoxyfenozide as revealed by UV and fluorescence spectral studies. Secondary structural alterations were further conformed by circular dichroism and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The α-helix content of almond cystatin decreases from 35.64% (native) to 34.83%, 30.79%, and 29.62% for methoxyfenozide-, pendimethalin-, and Cu(II) hydroxide-treated cystatin, respectively. A Fourier transform infrared study shows an amide I band shift for almond cystatin from 1649.15 ± 0.5 to 1646.48 ± 0.6, 1640.44 ± 0.6, and 1635.11 ± 0.3 cm(-1) for methoxyfenozide, pendimethalin, and Cu(II) hydroxide, respectively. Values obtained for different thermodynamic parameters (ΔH(0) , ΔG(0) , N, and ΔS(0) ) by isothermal titration calorimetric experiments reveal maximum binding of almond cystatin with Cu(II) hydroxide followed by pendimethalin and little interaction with methoxyfenozide.

  2. Structure and thermodynamics of Drug-RNA aptamer interactions.

    PubMed

    Da Costa, J B; Dieckmann, T

    2013-04-01

    This mini-review will provide an overview on the recent studies of structure and thermodynamics of RNA aptamers that target drug molecules. These aptamers are studied to provide insight into RNA drug interactions. This interaction is important due to the many roles RNA plays in cell biology.

  3. Structuring Peer Interaction To Promote High-Level Cognitive Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Alison

    2002-01-01

    Examines the kind of peer learning that demands high-level cognitive processing, discussing how peer interaction influences cognitive processes (structuring peer interaction and using guided reciprocal peer questioning); how to promote cognitive processing (knowledge construction and integration and socio- cognitive conflict); metacognition; and…

  4. A Virtual Rock Physics Laboratory Through Visualized and Interactive Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanorio, T.; Di Bonito, C.; Clark, A. C.

    2014-12-01

    As new scientific challenges demand more comprehensive and multidisciplinary investigations, laboratory experiments are not expected to become simpler and/or faster. Experimental investigation is an indispensable element of scientific inquiry and must play a central role in the way current and future generations of scientist make decisions. To turn the complexity of laboratory work (and that of rocks!) into dexterity, engagement, and expanded learning opportunities, we are building an interactive, virtual laboratory reproducing in form and function the Stanford Rock Physics Laboratory, at Stanford University. The objective is to combine lectures on laboratory techniques and an online repository of visualized experiments consisting of interactive, 3-D renderings of equipment used to measure properties central to the study of rock physics (e.g., how to saturate rocks, how to measure porosity, permeability, and elastic wave velocity). We use a game creation system together with 3-D computer graphics, and a narrative voice to guide the user through the different phases of the experimental protocol. The main advantage gained in employing computer graphics over video footage is that students can virtually open the instrument, single out its components, and assemble it. Most importantly, it helps describe the processes occurring within the rock. These latter cannot be tracked while simply recording the physical experiment, but computer animation can efficiently illustrate what happens inside rock samples (e.g., describing acoustic waves, and/or fluid flow through a porous rock under pressure within an opaque core-holder - Figure 1). The repository of visualized experiments will complement lectures on laboratory techniques and constitute an on-line course offered through the EdX platform at Stanford. This will provide a virtual laboratory for anyone, anywhere to facilitate teaching/learning of introductory laboratory classes in Geophysics and expand the number of courses

  5. Controls structures interaction, an interdisciplinary challenge for large spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanks, Brantley R.

    1990-01-01

    Controls structures interaction (CSI), a phenomenon which occurs when control forces interact with the flexible motion of a structure, can, if improperly treated in design and development, cause reduced performance or control instabilities. Properly applied, it can improve flexible spacecraft performance. In this paper, the NASA CSI technology program for future spacecraft applications is described. The program objectives and organization are outlined, and the nature of individual program tasks is described. The interdisciplinary aspects of CSI are also addressed.

  6. ePsych: interactive demonstrations and experiments in psychology.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Gary L; Steinman, Bernard; McCarley, Nancy

    2002-05-01

    ePsych (http://epsych.msstate.edu), a new Web site currently under active development, is intended to teach students about the discipline of psychology. The site presumes little prior knowledge about the field and so may be used in introductory classes, but it incorporates sufficient depth of coverage to be useful in more advanced classes as well. Numerous interactive and dynamic elements are incorporated into various modules, orientations, and guidebooks. These elements include Java-based experiments and demonstrations, video clips, and animated diagrams. Rapid access to all material is provided through a layer-based navigation system that allows users to visit various "Worlds of the Mind." Active learning is encouraged, by challenging students with puzzles and problems and by providing the opportunity to "dig deeper" to learn more about the phenomena at hand.

  7. Plasma interaction experiment 2 (PIX 2): Laboratory and flight results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grier, N. T.

    1985-01-01

    The Plasma Interaction Experiments 1 and 2 (PIX 1 and 2) were designed as first steps toward understanding interactions between high-voltage solar arrays and the surrounding plasma. The PIX 2 consisted of an approximately 2000-sq cm array divided into four equal segments. Each of the segments could be biased independently and the current measured separately. In addition to the solar array segments, PIX 2 had a hot-wire-filament electron emitter and a spherical Langmuir probe. The emitter was operated when the array segments were biased positively bove 125 V. Thermal electrons from the emitter aided in balancing the electron currents collected by the array. Laboratory and flight results of PIX 2 are presented. At high positive voltages on the solar array segments, the flight currents were approximately an order of magnitude larger than the ground test currents. This is attributed to the tank walls in the laboratory interfering with the electron currents to the array segments. From previous tests it is known that the tank walls limit the electron currents at high voltages. This was the first verification of the extent of the laboratory tank effect on the plasma coupling current.

  8. Interaction mechanisms of Ionizable Organic Pollutants with Aromatized Biochar: Adsorption Experiments and DFT Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kun; Chen, Baoliang

    2017-04-01

    The molecular interaction between biochars and ionizable organic pollutants (IOPs) are of great concern in natural environments, however the underlying mechanisms and their quantification under different pH range are not vivid. The adsorption of IOPs onto high temperature biochars derived from bamboo wood biomass (BW700) was conducted to quantify the various interactions between sorbent surface and IOPs under different pH conditions. The aromatized surface of BW700 were characterized by Fourier Transformed Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) specific surface area with N2 and CHN elemental compositions. Seven IOPs were selected as model sorbates, and batch sorption experiments were conducted to quantify the ratio of π-π interactions and hydrogen bonding interactions. The pH-dependent adsorption curves and the adsorption isotherms not only indicated that the adsorption capacity was related with species of IOPs, but also showed the presence of adsorbing peak owing some of the other mechanisms when taking the ice-like adlayer into consideration. Finally, density functional theory (DFT) calculations provided a possible structure of the complex combined with ice-like adlayer with aromatic substrate of BW700, and indicated that the formation of extra adsorption sites originated from the X-H ... O-H ... π interactions. The contribution of π-π interactions, hydrogen bonding interactions and X-H ... O-H ... π interactions were distinguished by the pKa value of IOPs owing to their species. Our findings provide new insight for distinction and quantification of various interactions under different pH conditions, and it is the first time to put forward the X-H ... O-H ... π interactions for the interaction mechanism of IOPs with biochar.

  9. Experiments on the Nuclear Interactions of Pions and Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ralph C. Minehart

    2005-04-15

    This is the final technical report. Yearly Progress Reports were submitted throughout the duration of the project. Along with our publications, these reports provide a detailed record of our accomplishments. This report largely consists of a summary of the technical activities carried out during last 2-1/2 years of the project, along with a list of papers published in the period from 2002-2005. Our work during this period involved the following: 1. Electro-production of excited states of the nucleon through the analysis of exclusive single pion production reactions induced by polarized electrons incident on both polarized and unpolarized nucleon targets. (JLab) 2. Measurement of proton and deuteron spin structure functions in and above the nucleon resonance region at low and moderate $Q^2$, using inclusive electron-proton and electron deuteron scattering (JLAB). 3. Contributions to the PRIMEX experiment (JLab). 4. A precise measurement of the branching ratio for pion beta decay was carried out along with other members of the PIBETA collaboration (PSI). The first three, labeled JLab, were experiments made with the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson Laboratory in Newport News, VA. The PIBETA experiment was carried out using a low energy pion beam at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Villigen, Switzerland.

  10. Aromatic-Aromatic Interactions in Biological System: Structure Activity Relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Rajagopal, Appavu; Deepa, Mohan; Govindaraju, Munisamy

    2016-02-26

    While, intramolecular hydrogen bonds have attracted the greatest attention in studies of peptide conformations, the recognition that several other weakly polar interactions may be important determinants of folded structure has been growing. Burley and Petsko provided a comprehensive overview of the importance of weakly polar interactions, in shaping protein structures. The interactions between aromatic rings, which are spatially approximate, have attracted special attention. A survey of the proximal aromatic residue pairs in proteins, allowed Burley and Petsko to suggest that, “phenyl ring centroids are separated by a preferential distance of between 4.5 and 7 Å, and dihedral angles approximately 90° are most common”.

  11. Structural Dynamics and Control Interaction of Flexible Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert S. (Editor); Scofield, Harold N. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    A Workshop was held to promote technical exchange between the structural dynamic and control disciplines, foster joint technology, and provide a forum for discussing and focusing critical issues in the separate and combined areas. The workshop was closed by a panel meeting. Panel members' viewpoints and their responses to questions are included.

  12. Structures-propulsion interactions and requirements. [large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyner, J. V.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of low-thrust primary propulsion system characteristics on the mass, area, and orbit transfer characteristics of large space systems (LSS) were determined. Three general structural classes of LSS were considered, each with a broad range of diameters and nonstructural surface densities. While transferring the deployed structure from LEO and to GEO, an acceleration range of 0.02 to 0.1 g's was found to maximize deliverable payload based on structural mass impact. After propulsion system parametric analyses considering four propellant combinations produced values for available payload mass, length and volume, a thrust level range which maximizes deliverable LSS diameter was determined corresponding to a structure and propulsion vehicle. The engine start and/or shutdown thrust transients on the last orbit transfer (apogee) burn can impose transient loads which would be greater than the steady-state loads at the burnout acceleration. The effect of the engine thrust transients on the LSS was determined from the dynamic models upon which various engine ramps were imposed.

  13. Structures-propulsion interactions and requirements. [large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyner, J. V.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of low-thrust primary propulsion system characteristics on the mass, area, and orbit transfer characteristics of large space systems (LSS) were determined. Three general structural classes of LSS were considered, each with a broad range of diameters and nonstructural surface densities. While transferring the deployed structure from LEO and to GEO, an acceleration range of 0.02 to 0.1 g's was found to maximize deliverable payload based on structural mass impact. After propulsion system parametric analyses considering four propellant combinations produced values for available payload mass, length and volume, a thrust level range which maximizes deliverable LSS diameter was determined corresponding to a structure and propulsion vehicle. The engine start and/or shutdown thrust transients on the last orbit transfer (apogee) burn can impose transient loads which would be greater than the steady-state loads at the burnout acceleration. The effect of the engine thrust transients on the LSS was determined from the dynamic models upon which various engine ramps were imposed.

  14. Operational experience with VAWT blades. [structural performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, W. N.

    1979-01-01

    The structural performance of 17 meter diameter wind turbine rotors is discussed. Test results for typical steady and vibratory stress measurements are summarized along with predicted values of stress based on a quasi-static finite element model.

  15. Space Technology Experiment Platform (STEP). A Shuttle-borne support facility for structures, structural dynamics, and control technology flight experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, J. E.; Pinson, L. D.

    1983-01-01

    The Space Transportation System (STS) is used for technology experiments in space. The Space Technology Experiment Platform (STEP) is a Shuttle-borne experiment support facility for use by structures, structural dynamics, and controls technology flight experiments. STEP represents a key element in the commitment to STS utilization. The STEP concept and definition process is discussed, and the results obtained to date on the configuration and function capability are summarized, and preliminary schedule information is presented.

  16. Effect of ethanol on structures and interactions among globular proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Sarathi; Aswal, V. K.; Kohlbrecher, J.

    2017-02-01

    Structures and interactions among globular proteins BSA and lysozyme are explored by small angle neutron scattering (SANS) technique at pD ≈ 7.0 by varying ethanol concentration. Interaction behaviours are also obtained in presence of monovalent salt (NaCl). SANS analysis shows that for both lower and higher BSA concentrations and in presence of NaCl, combination of intermediate-range repulsion and weak long-range attraction is responsible for the effective interaction behaviours with the variation of ethanol concentration. For lysozyme, interaction nature is same as BSA in absence of NaCl but in presence of NaCl, fractal structure factor explains the interaction behaviours.

  17. The NASA controls-structures interaction technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, Jerry R.; Layman, W. E.; Waites, H. B.; Hayduk, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The interaction between a flexible spacecraft structure and its control system is commonly referred to as controls-structures interaction (CSI). The CSI technology program is developing the capability and confidence to integrate the structure and control system, so as to avoid interactions that cause problems and to exploit interactions to increase spacecraft capability. A NASA program has been initiated to advance CSI technology to a point where it can be used in spacecraft design for future missions. The CSI technology program is a multicenter program utilizing the resources of the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The purpose is to describe the current activities, results to date, and future activities of the NASA CSI technology program.

  18. Connecting Protein Structure to Intermolecular Interactions: A Computer Modeling Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abualia, Mohammed; Schroeder, Lianne; Garcia, Megan; Daubenmire, Patrick L.; Wink, Donald J.; Clark, Ginevra A.

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of protein folding relies on a solid foundation of a number of critical chemical concepts, such as molecular structure, intra-/intermolecular interactions, and relating structure to function. Recent reports show that students struggle on all levels to achieve these understandings and use them in meaningful ways. Further, several…

  19. Interactive Multidimensional Scaling of Cognitive Structure Underlying Person Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kehoe, Jerard; Reynolds, Thomas J.

    1977-01-01

    A computer-interactive multidimensional scaling program was used together with free response methods to represent and label dimensions of individual cognitive structure underlying persons' perceptions. The dimensional structures derived were predictive of semantic differential, paired comparison, and Repertory Grid Test triad judgments.…

  20. Interactive Hangman Teaches Amino Acid Structures and Abbreviations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, Britney O.; Sears, Duane; Clegg, Dennis O.

    2014-01-01

    We developed an interactive exercise to teach students how to draw the structures of the 20 standard amino acids and to identify the one-letter abbreviations by modifying the familiar game of "Hangman." Amino acid structures were used to represent single letters throughout the game. To provide additional practice in identifying…

  1. Membrane Structure: Lipid-Protein Interactions in Microsomal Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Trump, Benjamin F.; Duttera, Sue M.; Byrne, William L.; Arstila, Antti U.

    1970-01-01

    The relationships of phospholipid to membrane structure and function were examined in hepatic microsomes. Findings indicate that normal microsomal membrane structure is dependent on lipid-protein interactions and that it correlates closely with glucose-6-phosphatase activity. Modification of most phospholipid with phospholipase-C is associated with widening of the membrane which can be reversed following readdition of phospholipid. Images PMID:4317915

  2. Interactive Hangman Teaches Amino Acid Structures and Abbreviations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, Britney O.; Sears, Duane; Clegg, Dennis O.

    2014-01-01

    We developed an interactive exercise to teach students how to draw the structures of the 20 standard amino acids and to identify the one-letter abbreviations by modifying the familiar game of "Hangman." Amino acid structures were used to represent single letters throughout the game. To provide additional practice in identifying…

  3. Connecting Protein Structure to Intermolecular Interactions: A Computer Modeling Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abualia, Mohammed; Schroeder, Lianne; Garcia, Megan; Daubenmire, Patrick L.; Wink, Donald J.; Clark, Ginevra A.

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of protein folding relies on a solid foundation of a number of critical chemical concepts, such as molecular structure, intra-/intermolecular interactions, and relating structure to function. Recent reports show that students struggle on all levels to achieve these understandings and use them in meaningful ways. Further, several…

  4. The Interaction of Information Structure and Syntactic Representation in Chinese

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Yu-Yin

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation concerns the interaction of syntax and information structure in Mandarin Chinese and puts the theoretical assumption of parallelism between clauses and noun phrases to the test. It examines and validates the information structural status of the object phrases preposed to clause-internal positions. I argue that Rizzi's (1997)…

  5. Pedagogical Interaction in High School, the Structural and Functional Model of Pedagogical Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semenova, Larissa A.; Kazantseva, Anastassiya I.; Sergeyeva, Valeriya V.; Raklova, Yekaterina M.; Baiseitova, Zhanar B.

    2016-01-01

    The study covers the problems of pedagogical technologies and their experimental implementation in the learning process. The theoretical aspects of the "student-teacher" interaction are investigated. A structural and functional model of pedagogical interaction is offered, which determines the conditions for improving pedagogical…

  6. Evolutionary dynamics of general group interactions in structured populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Aming; Broom, Mark; Du, Jinming; Wang, Long

    2016-02-01

    The evolution of populations is influenced by many factors, and the simple classical models have been developed in a number of important ways. Both population structure and multiplayer interactions have been shown to significantly affect the evolution of important properties, such as the level of cooperation or of aggressive behavior. Here we combine these two key factors and develop the evolutionary dynamics of general group interactions in structured populations represented by regular graphs. The traditional linear and threshold public goods games are adopted as models to address the dynamics. We show that for linear group interactions, population structure can favor the evolution of cooperation compared to the well-mixed case, and we see that the more neighbors there are, the harder it is for cooperators to persist in structured populations. We further show that threshold group interactions could lead to the emergence of cooperation even in well-mixed populations. Here population structure sometimes inhibits cooperation for the threshold public goods game, where depending on the benefit to cost ratio, the outcomes are bistability or a monomorphic population of defectors or cooperators. Our results suggest, counterintuitively, that structured populations are not always beneficial for the evolution of cooperation for nonlinear group interactions.

  7. The role of nucleobase interactions in RNA structure and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Bottaro, Sandro; Di Palma, Francesco; Bussi, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    The intricate network of interactions observed in RNA three-dimensional structures is often described in terms of a multitude of geometrical properties, including helical parameters, base pairing/stacking, hydrogen bonding and backbone conformation. We show that a simple molecular representation consisting in one oriented bead per nucleotide can account for the fundamental structural properties of RNA. In this framework, canonical Watson-Crick, non-Watson-Crick base-pairing and base-stacking interactions can be unambiguously identified within a well-defined interaction shell. We validate this representation by performing two independent, complementary tests. First, we use it to construct a sequence-independent, knowledge-based scoring function for RNA structural prediction, which compares favorably to fully atomistic, state-of-the-art techniques. Second, we define a metric to measure deviation between RNA structures that directly reports on the differences in the base–base interaction network. The effectiveness of this metric is tested with respect to the ability to discriminate between structurally and kinetically distant RNA conformations, performing better compared to standard techniques. Taken together, our results suggest that this minimalist, nucleobase-centric representation captures the main interactions that are relevant for describing RNA structure and dynamics. PMID:25355509

  8. NASA/DOD Control/Structures Interaction Technology, 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Robert L. (Compiler)

    1987-01-01

    Papers presented at the CSI Technology Conference are given. The conference was jointly sponsored by the NASA Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology and the Department of Defense. The conference is the beginning of a series of annual conferences whose purpose is to report to industry, academia, and government agencies the current status of Control/Structures Interaction technology. The conference program was divided into five sessions: (1) Future spacecraft requirements; Technology issues and impact; (2) DOD special topics; (3) Large space systems technology; (4) Control of flexible structures, and (5) Selected NASA research in control structures interaction.

  9. Characterization of DNA-protein interactions using high-throughput sequencing data from pulldown experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreland, Blythe; Oman, Kenji; Curfman, John; Yan, Pearlly; Bundschuh, Ralf

    Methyl-binding domain (MBD) protein pulldown experiments have been a valuable tool in measuring the levels of methylated CpG dinucleotides. Due to the frequent use of this technique, high-throughput sequencing data sets are available that allow a detailed quantitative characterization of the underlying interaction between methylated DNA and MBD proteins. Analyzing such data sets, we first found that two such proteins cannot bind closer to each other than 2 bp, consistent with structural models of the DNA-protein interaction. Second, the large amount of sequencing data allowed us to find rather weak but nevertheless clearly statistically significant sequence preferences for several bases around the required CpG. These results demonstrate that pulldown sequencing is a high-precision tool in characterizing DNA-protein interactions. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMR-1410172.

  10. Ground test experiment for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tollison, D. K.; Waites, H. B.

    1985-01-01

    In recent years a new body of control theory has been developed for the design of control systems for Large Space Structures (LSS). The problems of testing this theory on LSS hardware are aggravated by the expense and risk of actual in orbit tests. Ground tests on large space structures can provide a proving ground for candidate control systems, but such tests require a unique facility for their execution. The current development of such a facility at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is the subject of this report.

  11. JPL control/structure interaction test bed real-time control computer architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Hugh C.

    1989-01-01

    The Control/Structure Interaction Program is a technology development program for spacecraft that exhibit interactions between the control system and structural dynamics. The program objectives include development and verification of new design concepts - such as active structure - and new tools - such as combined structure and control optimization algorithm - and their verification in ground and possibly flight test. A focus mission spacecraft was designed based upon a space interferometer and is the basis for design of the ground test article. The ground test bed objectives include verification of the spacecraft design concepts, the active structure elements and certain design tools such as the new combined structures and controls optimization tool. In anticipation of CSI technology flight experiments, the test bed control electronics must emulate the computation capacity and control architectures of space qualifiable systems as well as the command and control networks that will be used to connect investigators with the flight experiment hardware. The Test Bed facility electronics were functionally partitioned into three units: a laboratory data acquisition system for structural parameter identification and performance verification; an experiment supervisory computer to oversee the experiment, monitor the environmental parameters and perform data logging; and a multilevel real-time control computing system. The design of the Test Bed electronics is presented along with hardware and software component descriptions. The system should break new ground in experimental control electronics and is of interest to anyone working in the verification of control concepts for large structures.

  12. Uncertainty-Based Design Methods for Flow-Structure Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    07 Final _ 2/01/05 - 01/31/07 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Uncertainty-based Design Methods for Flow- N00014-04-1-0007 Structure ...project is to develop advanced tools for efficient simulations of flow- structure interactions that account for random excitation and uncertain input...with emphasis on realistic three-dimensional nonlinear representatiol of the structures of interest. This capability will set the foundation for the

  13. Structural analysis of in silico mutant experiments of human inner-kinetochore structure.

    PubMed

    Henze, Richard; Huwald, Jan; Mostajo, Nelly; Dittrich, Peter; Ibrahim, Bashar

    2015-01-01

    Large multi-molecular complexes like the kinetochore are lacking of suitable methods to determine their spatial structure. Here, we use and evaluate a novel modeling approach that combines rule-bases reaction network models with spatial molecular geometries. In particular, we introduce a method that allows to study in silico the influence of single interactions (e.g. bonds) on the spatial organization of large multi-molecular complexes and apply this method to an extended model of the human inner-kinetochore. Our computational analysis method encompasses determination of bond frequency, geometrical distances, statistical moments, and inter-dependencies between bonds using mutual information. For the analysis we have extend our previously reported human inner-kinetochore model by adding 13 new protein interactions and three protein geometry details. The model is validated by comparing the results of in silico with reported in vitro single protein deletion experiments. Our studies revealed that most simulations mimic the in vitro behavior of the kinetochore complex as expected. To identify the most important bonds in this model, we have created 39 mutants in silico by selectively disabling single protein interactions. In a total of 11,800 simulation runs we have compared the resulting structures to the wild-type. In particular, this allowed us to identify the interaction Cenp-W-H3 and Cenp-S-Cenp-X as having the strongest influence on the inner-kinetochore's structure. We conclude that our approach can become a useful tool for the in silico dynamical study of large, multi-molecular complexes.

  14. Computational modeling of RNA 3D structures and interactions.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Wayne K; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2016-04-01

    RNA molecules have key functions in cellular processes beyond being carriers of protein-coding information. These functions are often dependent on the ability to form complex three-dimensional (3D) structures. However, experimental determination of RNA 3D structures is difficult, which has prompted the development of computational methods for structure prediction from sequence. Recent progress in 3D structure modeling of RNA and emerging approaches for predicting RNA interactions with ions, ligands and proteins have been stimulated by successes in protein 3D structure modeling. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Environmental constraints shaping constituent order in emerging communication systems: Structural iconicity, interactive alignment and conventionalization.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Peer; Fusaroli, Riccardo; Tylén, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Where does linguistic structure come from? Recent gesture elicitation studies have indicated that constituent order (corresponding to for instance subject-verb-object, or SVO in English) may be heavily influenced by human cognitive biases constraining gesture production and transmission. Here we explore the alternative hypothesis that syntactic patterns are motivated by multiple environmental and social-interactional constraints that are external to the cognitive domain. In three experiments, we systematically investigate different motivations for structure in the gestural communication of simple transitive events. The first experiment indicates that, if participants communicate about different types of events, manipulation events (e.g. someone throwing a cake) and construction events (e.g. someone baking a cake), they spontaneously and systematically produce different constituent orders, SOV and SVO respectively, thus following the principle of structural iconicity. The second experiment shows that participants' choice of constituent order is also reliably influenced by social-interactional forces of interactive alignment, that is, the tendency to re-use an interlocutor's previous choice of constituent order, thus potentially overriding affordances for iconicity. Lastly, the third experiment finds that the relative frequency distribution of referent event types motivates the stabilization and conventionalization of a single constituent order for the communication of different types of events. Together, our results demonstrate that constituent order in emerging gestural communication systems is shaped and stabilized in response to multiple external environmental and social factors: structural iconicity, interactive alignment and distributional frequency. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Different Strokes for Different Folks: Jung's Typology and Structured Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haber, Russell Alan

    1980-01-01

    Examined and compared the evaluations of students differentiated by Carl Jung's psychotypology when they were involved in either a session of nonverbal communication experiences or a session of fantasy experiences. Some of the Jungian psychological types preferred different structured experiences. (Author)

  17. Unconventional interactions between water and heterocyclic nitrogens in protein structures.

    PubMed

    Stollar, Elliott J; Gelpí, Jose Luis; Velankar, Sameer; Golovin, Adel; Orozco, Modesto; Luisi, Ben F

    2004-10-01

    We report an unusual interaction in which a water molecule approaches the heterocyclic nitrogen of tryptophan and histidine along an axis that is roughly perpendicular to the aromatic plane of the side chain. The interaction is distinct from the well-known conventional aromatic hydrogen-bond, and it occurs at roughly the same frequency in protein structures. Calculations indicate that the water-indole interaction is favorable energetically, and we find several cases in which such contacts are conserved among structural orthologs. The indole-water interaction links side chains and peptide backbone in turn regions, connects the side chains in beta-sheets, and bridges secondary elements from different domains. We suggest that the water-indole interaction can be indirectly responsible for the quenching of tryptophan fluorescence that is observed in the folding of homeodomains and, possibly, many other proteins. We also observe a similar interaction between water and the imidazole nitrogens of the histidine side chain. Taken together, these observations suggest that the unconventional water-indole and water-imidazole interactions provide a small but favorable contribution to protein structures.

  18. Predicting PDZ domain mediated protein interactions from structure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background PDZ domains are structural protein domains that recognize simple linear amino acid motifs, often at protein C-termini, and mediate protein-protein interactions (PPIs) in important biological processes, such as ion channel regulation, cell polarity and neural development. PDZ domain-peptide interaction predictors have been developed based on domain and peptide sequence information. Since domain structure is known to influence binding specificity, we hypothesized that structural information could be used to predict new interactions compared to sequence-based predictors. Results We developed a novel computational predictor of PDZ domain and C-terminal peptide interactions using a support vector machine trained with PDZ domain structure and peptide sequence information. Performance was estimated using extensive cross validation testing. We used the structure-based predictor to scan the human proteome for ligands of 218 PDZ domains and show that the predictions correspond to known PDZ domain-peptide interactions and PPIs in curated databases. The structure-based predictor is complementary to the sequence-based predictor, finding unique known and novel PPIs, and is less dependent on training–testing domain sequence similarity. We used a functional enrichment analysis of our hits to create a predicted map of PDZ domain biology. This map highlights PDZ domain involvement in diverse biological processes, some only found by the structure-based predictor. Based on this analysis, we predict novel PDZ domain involvement in xenobiotic metabolism and suggest new interactions for other processes including wound healing and Wnt signalling. Conclusions We built a structure-based predictor of PDZ domain-peptide interactions, which can be used to scan C-terminal proteomes for PDZ interactions. We also show that the structure-based predictor finds many known PDZ mediated PPIs in human that were not found by our previous sequence-based predictor and is less dependent on

  19. Freestanding film structures for laser plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Klyuenkov, E B; Lopatin, A Ya; Luchin, V I; Salashchenko, Nikolai N; Tsybin, N N

    2013-04-30

    The technique is developed for fabricating 5-500-nm-thick freestanding films of various materials and multilayer compositions. Apart from the traditional use in spectral filtration of soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet radiation, the possibility of using the ultrathin films fabricated by this technique as targets in experiments on laser acceleration of ions is considered. A sample of the target in the form of a 5-nm-thick carbon film on a supporting net is fabricated. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  20. Structure and membrane interactions of the homodimeric antibiotic peptide homotarsinin

    PubMed Central

    Verly, Rodrigo M.; Resende, Jarbas M.; Junior, Eduardo F. C.; de Magalhães, Mariana T. Q.; Guimarães, Carlos F. C. R.; Munhoz, Victor H. O.; Bemquerer, Marcelo Porto; Almeida, Fábio C. L.; Santoro, Marcelo M.; Piló-Veloso, Dorila; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) from amphibian skin are valuable template structures to find new treatments against bacterial infections. This work describes for the first time the structure and membrane interactions of a homodimeric AMP. Homotarsinin, which was found in Phyllomedusa tarsius anurans, consists of two identical cystine-linked polypeptide chains each of 24 amino acid residues. The high-resolution structures of the monomeric and dimeric peptides were determined in aqueous buffers. The dimer exhibits a tightly packed coiled coil three-dimensional structure, keeping the hydrophobic residues screened from the aqueous environment. An overall cationic surface of the dimer assures enhanced interactions with negatively charged membranes. An extensive set of biophysical data allowed us to establish structure-function correlations with antimicrobial assays against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Although both peptides present considerable antimicrobial activity, the dimer is significantly more effective in both antibacterial and membrane biophysical assays. PMID:28102305

  1. Structure and membrane interactions of the homodimeric antibiotic peptide homotarsinin.

    PubMed

    Verly, Rodrigo M; Resende, Jarbas M; Junior, Eduardo F C; de Magalhães, Mariana T Q; Guimarães, Carlos F C R; Munhoz, Victor H O; Bemquerer, Marcelo Porto; Almeida, Fábio C L; Santoro, Marcelo M; Piló-Veloso, Dorila; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2017-01-19

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) from amphibian skin are valuable template structures to find new treatments against bacterial infections. This work describes for the first time the structure and membrane interactions of a homodimeric AMP. Homotarsinin, which was found in Phyllomedusa tarsius anurans, consists of two identical cystine-linked polypeptide chains each of 24 amino acid residues. The high-resolution structures of the monomeric and dimeric peptides were determined in aqueous buffers. The dimer exhibits a tightly packed coiled coil three-dimensional structure, keeping the hydrophobic residues screened from the aqueous environment. An overall cationic surface of the dimer assures enhanced interactions with negatively charged membranes. An extensive set of biophysical data allowed us to establish structure-function correlations with antimicrobial assays against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Although both peptides present considerable antimicrobial activity, the dimer is significantly more effective in both antibacterial and membrane biophysical assays.

  2. Structure and membrane interactions of the homodimeric antibiotic peptide homotarsinin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verly, Rodrigo M.; Resende, Jarbas M.; Junior, Eduardo F. C.; de Magalhães, Mariana T. Q.; Guimarães, Carlos F. C. R.; Munhoz, Victor H. O.; Bemquerer, Marcelo Porto; Almeida, Fábio C. L.; Santoro, Marcelo M.; Piló-Veloso, Dorila; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) from amphibian skin are valuable template structures to find new treatments against bacterial infections. This work describes for the first time the structure and membrane interactions of a homodimeric AMP. Homotarsinin, which was found in Phyllomedusa tarsius anurans, consists of two identical cystine-linked polypeptide chains each of 24 amino acid residues. The high-resolution structures of the monomeric and dimeric peptides were determined in aqueous buffers. The dimer exhibits a tightly packed coiled coil three-dimensional structure, keeping the hydrophobic residues screened from the aqueous environment. An overall cationic surface of the dimer assures enhanced interactions with negatively charged membranes. An extensive set of biophysical data allowed us to establish structure-function correlations with antimicrobial assays against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Although both peptides present considerable antimicrobial activity, the dimer is significantly more effective in both antibacterial and membrane biophysical assays.

  3. A Method of Simulating Fluid Structure Interactions for Deformable Decelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gidzak, Vladimyr Mykhalo

    A method is developed for performing simulations that contain fluid-structure interactions between deployable decelerators and a high speed compressible flow. The problem of coupling together multiple physical systems is examined with discussion of the strength of coupling for various methods. A non-monolithic strongly coupled option is presented for fluid-structure systems based on grid deformation. A class of algebraic grid deformation methods is then presented with examples of increasing complexity. The strength of the fluid-structure coupling is validated against two analytic problems, chosen to test the time dependent behavior of structure on fluid interactions, and of fluid on structure interruptions. A one-dimentional material heating model is also validated against experimental data. Results are provided for simulations of a wind tunnel scale disk-gap-band parachute with comparison to experimental data. Finally, a simulation is performed on a flight scale tension cone decelerator, with examination of time-dependent material stress, and heating.

  4. Relaunch of the Interactive Plasma Physics Educational Experience (IPPEX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, A.; Rusaitis, L.; Zwicker, A.; Stotler, D. P.

    2015-11-01

    In the late 1990's PPPL's Science Education Department developed an innovative online site called the Interactive Plasma Physics Educational Experience (IPPEX). It featured (among other modules) two Java based applications which simulated tokamak physics: A steady state tokamak (SST) and a time dependent tokamak (TDT). The physics underlying the SST and the TDT are based on the ASPECT code which is a global power balance code developed to evaluate the performance of fusion reactor designs. We have relaunched the IPPEX site with updated modules and functionalities: The site itself is now dynamic on all platforms. The graphic design of the site has been modified to current standards. The virtual tokamak programming has been redone in Javascript, taking advantage of the speed and compactness of the code. The GUI of the tokamak has been completely redesigned, including more intuitive representations of changes in the plasma, e.g., particles moving along magnetic field lines. The use of GPU accelerated computation provides accurate and smooth visual representations of the plasma. We will present the current version of IPPEX as well near term plans of incorporating real time NSTX-U data into the simulation.

  5. Astronomy Patch Day: An Interactive Astronomy Experience for Girl Scouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knierman, K. A.; McCarthy, D. W.; Schutz, K.

    2005-12-01

    To help encourage a new generation of women in science, we have created Astronomy Patch Day for the Sahuaro Girl Scout Council in Tucson, Arizona. This all-day event is an interactive experience for Girl Scouts ages 5-18 to learn about astronomical concepts and women in astronomy. Our first Astronomy Patch Day, held on March 19, 2005, in conjunction with the Sahuaro Council's annual Science, Math, and Related Technologies (SMART) program, was very successful, reaching about 150-200 girls and their leaders. Individual troops rotated every half hour among our six activity booths: Earth-Moon, Solar System, Stars, Galaxies, Universe, and Ask an Astronomer, which were staffed by trained Girl Scout Leaders as well as faculty, post-doctoral researchers, and graduate students from Steward Observatory. To earn a patch, younger girls (ages 5-12) had to complete activities at three booths and older girls had to complete all six activities. Positive feedback for this event was received from both the girls and leaders. We plan to hold Astronomy Patch Day annually, possibly with different and/or additional activities in future years. K. Knierman is supported by an Arizona/NASA Space Grant Fellowship. This outreach program is supported by NIRCam/JWST E/PO.

  6. Reduced-order models for vertical human-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Nimmen, Katrien; Lombaert, Geert; De Roeck, Guido; Van den Broeck, Peter

    2016-09-01

    For slender and lightweight structures, the vibration serviceability under crowd- induced loading is often critical in design. Currently, designers rely on equivalent load models, upscaled from single-person force measurements. Furthermore, it is important to consider the mechanical interaction with the human body as this can significantly reduce the structural response. To account for these interaction effects, the contact force between the pedestrian and the structure can be modelled as the superposition of the force induced by the pedestrian on a rigid floor and the force resulting from the mechanical interaction between the structure and the human body. For the case of large crowds, however, this approach leads to models with a very high system order. In the present contribution, two equivalent reduced-order models are proposed to approximate the dynamic behaviour of the full-order coupled crowd-structure system. A numerical study is performed to evaluate the impact of the modelling assumptions on the structural response to pedestrian excitation. The results show that the full-order moving crowd model can be well approximated by a reduced-order model whereby the interaction with the pedestrians in the crowd is modelled using a single (equivalent) SDOF system.

  7. Recent experiences using finite-element-based structural optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, B. K.; Mcconnell, J. C.; Love, Mike H.

    1989-01-01

    Structural optimization has been available to the structural analysis community as a tool for many years. The popular use of displacement method finite-element techniques to analyze linearly elastic structures has resulted in an ability to calculate the weight and constraint gradients inexpensively for numerical optimization of structures. Here, recent experiences in the investigation and use of structural optimization are discussed. In particular, experience with the commercially available ADS/NASOPT code is addressed. An overview of the ADS/NASOPT procedure and how it was implemented is given. Two example problems are also discussed.

  8. Mitral valve dynamics in structural and fluid-structure interaction models.

    PubMed

    Lau, K D; Diaz, V; Scambler, P; Burriesci, G

    2010-11-01

    Modelling and simulation of heart valves is a challenging biomechanical problem due to anatomical variability, pulsatile physiological pressure loads and 3D anisotropic material behaviour. Current valvular models based on the finite element method can be divided into: those that do model the interaction between the blood and the valve (fluid-structure interaction or 'wet' models) and those that do not (structural models or 'dry' models). Here an anatomically sized model of the mitral valve has been used to compare the difference between structural and fluid-structure interaction techniques in two separately simulated scenarios: valve closure and a cardiac cycle. Using fluid-structure interaction, the valve has been modelled separately in a straight tubular volume and in a U-shaped ventricular volume, in order to analyse the difference in the coupled fluid and structural dynamics between the two geometries. The results of the structural and fluid-structure interaction models have shown that the stress distribution in the closure simulation is similar in all the models, but the magnitude and closed configuration differ. In the cardiac cycle simulation significant differences in the valvular dynamics were found between the structural and fluid-structure interaction models due to difference in applied pressure loads. Comparison of the fluid domains of the fluid-structure interaction models have shown that the ventricular geometry generates slower fluid velocity with increased vorticity compared to the tubular geometry. In conclusion, structural heart valve models are suitable for simulation of static configurations (opened or closed valves), but in order to simulate full dynamic behaviour fluid-structure interaction models are required.

  9. Mitral valve dynamics in structural and fluid–structure interaction models

    PubMed Central

    Lau, K.D.; Diaz, V.; Scambler, P.; Burriesci, G.

    2010-01-01

    Modelling and simulation of heart valves is a challenging biomechanical problem due to anatomical variability, pulsatile physiological pressure loads and 3D anisotropic material behaviour. Current valvular models based on the finite element method can be divided into: those that do model the interaction between the blood and the valve (fluid–structure interaction or ‘wet’ models) and those that do not (structural models or ‘dry’ models). Here an anatomically sized model of the mitral valve has been used to compare the difference between structural and fluid–structure interaction techniques in two separately simulated scenarios: valve closure and a cardiac cycle. Using fluid–structure interaction, the valve has been modelled separately in a straight tubular volume and in a U-shaped ventricular volume, in order to analyse the difference in the coupled fluid and structural dynamics between the two geometries. The results of the structural and fluid–structure interaction models have shown that the stress distribution in the closure simulation is similar in all the models, but the magnitude and closed configuration differ. In the cardiac cycle simulation significant differences in the valvular dynamics were found between the structural and fluid–structure interaction models due to difference in applied pressure loads. Comparison of the fluid domains of the fluid–structure interaction models have shown that the ventricular geometry generates slower fluid velocity with increased vorticity compared to the tubular geometry. In conclusion, structural heart valve models are suitable for simulation of static configurations (opened or closed valves), but in order to simulate full dynamic behaviour fluid–structure interaction models are required. PMID:20702128

  10. Medium Modification of Hadronic Interactions from Low Energy Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, E.

    Medium-modification of hadronic interactions is defined as the differences between hadron-hadron interaction in the nuclear medium and the corresponding interaction in free space. Deeply penetrating hadrons provide such information and we discuss here pionic atoms and scattering by nuclei of 21.5 MeV pions. Brief mention is made also of the interaction of 500-700 MeV/c K+ with nuclei.

  11. Evolutionary dynamics of group interactions on structured populations: a review

    PubMed Central

    Perc, Matjaž; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús; Szolnoki, Attila; Floría, Luis M.; Moreno, Yamir

    2013-01-01

    Interactions among living organisms, from bacteria colonies to human societies, are inherently more complex than interactions among particles and non-living matter. Group interactions are a particularly important and widespread class, representative of which is the public goods game. In addition, methods of statistical physics have proved valuable for studying pattern formation, equilibrium selection and self-organization in evolutionary games. Here, we review recent advances in the study of evolutionary dynamics of group interactions on top of structured populations, including lattices, complex networks and coevolutionary models. We also compare these results with those obtained on well-mixed populations. The review particularly highlights that the study of the dynamics of group interactions, like several other important equilibrium and non-equilibrium dynamical processes in biological, economical and social sciences, benefits from the synergy between statistical physics, network science and evolutionary game theory. PMID:23303223

  12. The growth of structure in interacting dark energy models

    SciTech Connect

    Caldera-Cabral, Gabriela; Maartens, Roy; Schaefer, Bjoern Malte E-mail: roy.maartens@port.ac.uk

    2009-07-01

    If dark energy interacts with dark matter, there is a change in the background evolution of the universe, since the dark matter density no longer evolves as a{sup −3}. In addition, the non-gravitational interaction affects the growth of structure. In principle, these changes allow us to detect and constrain an interaction in the dark sector. Here we investigate the growth factor and the weak lensing signal for a new class of interacting dark energy models. In these models, the interaction generalises the simple cases where one dark fluid decays into the other. In order to calculate the effect on structure formation, we perform a careful analysis of the perturbed interaction and its effect on peculiar velocities. Assuming a normalization to today's values of dark matter density and overdensity, the signal of the interaction is an enhancement (suppression) of both the growth factor and the lensing power, when the energy transfer in the background is from dark matter to dark energy (dark energy to dark matter)

  13. Structural Requirements of the Fructan-Lipid Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Vereyken, Ingrid J.; van Kuik, J. Albert; Evers, Toon H.; Rijken, Pieter J.; de Kruijff, Ben

    2003-01-01

    Fructans are a group of fructose-based oligo- and polysaccharides. They are proposed to be involved in membrane protection of plants during dehydration. In accordance with this hypothesis, they show an interaction with hydrated lipid model systems. However, the structural requirements for this interaction are not known both with respect to the fructans as to the lipids. To get insight into this matter, the interaction of several inulins and levan with lipids was investigated using a monomolecular lipid system or the MC 540 probe in a bilayer system. MD was used to get conformational information concerning the polysaccharides. It was found that levan-type fructan interacted comparably with model membranes composed of glyco- or phospholipids but showed a preference for lipids with a small headgroup. Furthermore, it was found that there was an inulin chain-length-dependent interaction with lipids. The results also suggested that inulin-type fructan had a more profound interaction with the membrane than levan-type fructan. MD simulations indicated that the favorable conformation for levan is a helix, whereas inulin tends to form random coil structures. This suggests that flexibility is an important determinant for the fructan-lipid interaction. PMID:12719244

  14. Electron-interface phonon interaction in multiple quantum well structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J. P.; Teng, H. B.; Haddad, G. I.; Stroscio, M. A.

    1998-08-01

    Intersubband relaxation rates due to electron interactions with the interface phonons are evaluated for multiple quantum well structures designed for step quantum well lasers operating at mid-infrared to submillimetre wavelengths. The interface phonon modes and electron-phonon interaction Hamiltonians for the structures are derived using the transfer matrix method, based on the macroscopic dielectric continuum model, whereas the electron wavefunctions are obtained by solving the Schrödinger equation. Fermi's golden rule is employed to calculate the electron relaxation rates between the subbands in these structures. The relaxation rates for two different structures are examined and compared with those calculated using the bulk phonon modes and the Fröhlich interaction Hamiltonian. The sum rule for the relationship between the form factors of the various localized phonon modes and the bulk phonon modes is verified. The results obtained in this work illustrate that the transfer matrix method provides a convenient way for deriving the properties of the interface phonon modes in different structures of current interest and that, for preferential electron relaxation in intersubband laser structures, the effects of the interface phonon modes are significant and should be considered for optimal design of these laser structures.

  15. Interactions between propagating rotational rifts and linear rheological heterogeneities: Insights from three-dimensional laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, N. E.; Cruden, A. R.; Betts, P. G.

    2017-03-01

    The lateral propagation of rifts is a consequence of the relative divergence of lithospheric plates about a pole of rotation. Modern and ancient examples of rifts are known to overprint preexisting linear anisotropies in the crust and lithosphere, such as lithospheric boundaries, crustal sutures, and thermal anomalies. Here we investigate how propagating rifts interact with preexisting structures by using three-dimensional analogue experiments with rotational extensional boundary conditions and variably oriented linear weak zones in the lithospheric mantle. When linear weaknesses are oriented at low angles to the rift axis, early strain localization occurs in narrow domains, which merge at later stages, resulting in continental breakup by unzipping. Strong strain partitioning is observed when the linear heterogeneity is oriented at high angles with respect to the rift axis. In these experiments, early subparallel V-shaped basins propagate toward the pole of rotation until they are abandoned and strain is transferred entirely to structures developed in the vicinity of the strongly oblique weak lithosphere zone boundary. The experimental results are characterized in terms of their evolution, patterns of strain localization, and surface topography as a function of the lithospheric heterogeneity obliquity angle. Comparison of the experiments to ancient and modern examples in nature may help to elucidate the common but still poorly understood process of propagating rift-lithospheric heterogeneity interaction.

  16. Understanding and predicting effects of modified interactions through a qualitative analysis of community structure.

    PubMed

    Dambacher, Jeffrey M; Ramos-Jiliberto, Rodrigo

    2007-09-01

    Models of ecological communities are traditionally based on relationships between pairs of species, where the strengths of per capita interactions are fixed and independent of population abundance. A growing body of literature, however; describes interactions whose strength is modified by the density of either a third species or by one of the species involved in a pairwise interaction. These modified interactions have been treated as indirect effects, and the terminology addressing them is diverse and overlapping. In this paper we develop a general analytical framework based on a qualitative analysis of community structure to account for the consequence of modified interactions in complex ecological communities. Modified interactions are found to create both direct and indirect effects between species. The sign of a direct effect can change in some instances depending on the magnitude of a key variable or parameter, which leads to a threshold change in system structure and dynamics. By considering alternative structures of a community, we extend our ability to model perturbations that move the system far from a previous equilibrium. Using specific examples, we reinterpret existing results, develop hypotheses to guide experiments or management interventions, and explore the role of modified interactions and positive feedback in creating and maintaining alternative stable states. Through a qualitative analysis of community structure, system feedback is demonstrated as being key in understanding and predicting the dynamics of complex ecological communities.

  17. Control structure interactions in large space structures Analysis using energy approach. [for constant and pulsed thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrivastava, S. K.; Ried, R. C.; Manoharan, M. G.

    1983-01-01

    A simple energy approach to study the problem of control structure interactions in large space structures is presented. For the illustrative cases of free-free beam and free rectangular plate, the vibrational energy imparted during operation of constant and pulsed thrusters is found in a nondimensional form. Then based on a parametric study, suggestions are made on the choice of the thruster location and parameters to minimize the control structure interactions.

  18. Core and periphery structures in protein interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Feng; Li, Bo; Wan, Xiu-Feng; Scheuermann, Richard H

    2009-01-01

    Background Characterizing the structural properties of protein interaction networks will help illuminate the organizational and functional relationships among elements in biological systems. Results In this paper, we present a systematic exploration of the core/periphery structures in protein interaction networks (PINs). First, the concepts of cores and peripheries in PINs are defined. Then, computational methods are proposed to identify two types of cores, k-plex cores and star cores, from PINs. Application of these methods to a yeast protein interaction network has identified 110 k-plex cores and 109 star cores. We find that the k-plex cores consist of either "party" proteins, "date" proteins, or both. We also reveal that there are two classes of 1-peripheral proteins: "party" peripheries, which are more likely to be part of protein complex, and "connector" peripheries, which are more likely connected to different proteins or protein complexes. Our results also show that, besides connectivity, other variations in structural properties are related to the variation in biological properties. Furthermore, the negative correlation between evolutionary rate and connectivity are shown toysis. Moreover, the core/periphery structures help to reveal the existence of multiple levels of protein expression dynamics. Conclusion Our results show that both the structure and connectivity can be used to characterize topological properties in protein interaction networks, illuminating the functional organization of cellular systems. PMID:19426456

  19. The Fifth NASA/DOD Controls-Structures Interaction Technology Conference, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, Jerry R. (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    This publication is a compilation of the papers presented at the Fifth NASA/DoD Controls-Structures Interaction (CSI) Technology Conference held in Lake Tahoe, Nevada, March 3-5, 1992. The conference, which was jointly sponsored by the NASA Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology and the Department of Defense, was organized by the NASA Langley Research Center. The purpose of this conference was to report to industry, academia, and government agencies on the current status of controls-structures interaction technology. The agenda covered ground testing, integrated design, analysis, flight experiments and concepts.

  20. The Fifth NASA/DOD Controls-Structures Interaction Technology Conference, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, Jerry R. (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    This publication is a compilation of the papers presented at the Fifth NASA/DoD Controls-Structures Interaction (CSI) Technology Conference held in Lake Tahoe, Nevada, March 3-5, 1992. The conference, which was jointly sponsored by the NASA Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology and the Department of Defense, was organized by the NASA Langley Research Center. The purpose of this conference was to report to industry, academia, and government agencies on the current status of controls-structures interaction technology. The agenda covered ground testing, integrated design, analysis, flight experiments and concepts.

  1. Social setting, intuition and experience in laboratory experiments interact to shape cooperative decision-making.

    PubMed

    Capraro, Valerio; Cococcioni, Giorgia

    2015-07-22

    Recent studies suggest that cooperative decision-making in one-shot interactions is a history-dependent dynamic process: promoting intuition versus deliberation typically has a positive effect on cooperation (dynamism) among people living in a cooperative setting and with no previous experience in economic games on cooperation (history dependence). Here, we report on a laboratory experiment exploring how these findings transfer to a non-cooperative setting. We find two major results: (i) promoting intuition versus deliberation has no effect on cooperative behaviour among inexperienced subjects living in a non-cooperative setting; (ii) experienced subjects cooperate more than inexperienced subjects, but only under time pressure. These results suggest that cooperation is a learning process, rather than an instinctive impulse or a self-controlled choice, and that experience operates primarily via the channel of intuition. Our findings shed further light on the cognitive basis of human cooperative decision-making and provide further support for the recently proposed social heuristics hypothesis.

  2. Social setting, intuition and experience in laboratory experiments interact to shape cooperative decision-making

    PubMed Central

    Capraro, Valerio; Cococcioni, Giorgia

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that cooperative decision-making in one-shot interactions is a history-dependent dynamic process: promoting intuition versus deliberation typically has a positive effect on cooperation (dynamism) among people living in a cooperative setting and with no previous experience in economic games on cooperation (history dependence). Here, we report on a laboratory experiment exploring how these findings transfer to a non-cooperative setting. We find two major results: (i) promoting intuition versus deliberation has no effect on cooperative behaviour among inexperienced subjects living in a non-cooperative setting; (ii) experienced subjects cooperate more than inexperienced subjects, but only under time pressure. These results suggest that cooperation is a learning process, rather than an instinctive impulse or a self-controlled choice, and that experience operates primarily via the channel of intuition. Our findings shed further light on the cognitive basis of human cooperative decision-making and provide further support for the recently proposed social heuristics hypothesis. PMID:26156762

  3. Advanced Smart Structures Flight Experiments for Precision Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denoyer, Keith K.; Erwin, R. Scott; Ninneman, R. Rory

    2000-07-01

    This paper presents an overview as well as data from four smart structures flight experiments directed by the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory's Space Vehicles Directorate in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The Middeck Active Control Experiment $¯Flight II (MACE II) is a space shuttle flight experiment designed to investigate modeling and control issues for achieving high precision pointing and vibration control of future spacecraft. The Advanced Controls Technology Experiment (ACTEX-I) is an experiment that has demonstrated active vibration suppression using smart composite structures with embedded piezoelectric sensors and actuators. The Satellite Ultraquiet Isolation Technology Experiment (SUITE) is an isolation platform that uses active piezoelectric actuators as well as damped mechanical flexures to achieve hybrid passive/active isolation. The Vibration Isolation, Suppression, and Steering Experiment (VISS) is another isolation platform that uses viscous dampers in conjunction with electromagnetic voice coil actuators to achieve isolation as well as a steering capability for an infra-red telescope.

  4. THERMAL SHOCK ANALYSIS OF WINDOWS INTERACTING WITH ENERGETIC, FOCUSED BEAM OF THE BNL MUON TARGET EXPERIMENT.

    SciTech Connect

    SIMOS, N.; KIRK, H.; PRIGL, R.; BROWN, K.; MCDONALD, K.

    2001-06-18

    In this paper, issues associated with the interaction of a proton beam with windows designed for the muon targetry experiment E951 at BNL are explored. Specifically, a 24 GeV proton beam up to 16 TP per pulse and a pulse length of 100 ns is tightly focused (to 0.5 mm rms radius) on an experimental target. The need to maintain an enclosed environment around the target implies the use of beam windows that will survive the passage of the proton beam. The required beam parameters in such a setting will induce very high thermal, quasi-static and shock stresses in the window structure that exceed the strength of most common materials. In this effort, a detailed analysis of the thermal/shock response of beam windows is attempted through a transient thermal and stress wave propagation formulation that incorporates energy deposition rates calculated the by hadron interaction code MARS. The thermal response of the window structure and the subsequent stress wave generation and propagation are computed using the finite element analysis procedures of the ANSYS code. This analysis attempts to address issues pertaining to an optimal combination of material, window thickness and pulse structure that will allow for a window to safely survive the extreme demands of the experiment.

  5. Search for ντ Interactions with the Nuclear Emulsion Films of the Opera Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pupilli, Fabio

    2013-11-01

    The OPERA experiment aims at measuring the νμ → ντ oscillation through the ντ appearance in an almost pure νμ beam (CNGS). For the direct identification of the short-lived τ lepton, produced in ντ CC interactions, a micrometric detection resolution is needed. Therefore the OPERA detector makes use of nuclear emulsion films, the highest spatial resolution tracking device, combined with lead plates in an emulsion cloud chamber (ECC) structure called `brick'. In this paper the nuclear emulsion analysis chain is reported; the strategy and the algorithms set up will be described together with their performances.

  6. Microfluidic Experiments Studying Pore Scale Interactions of Microbes and Geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M.; Kocar, B. D.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding how physical phenomena, chemical reactions, and microbial behavior interact at the pore-scale is crucial to understanding larger scale trends in groundwater chemistry. Recent studies illustrate the utility of microfluidic devices for illuminating pore-scale physical-biogeochemical processes and their control(s) on the cycling of iron, uranium, and other important elements 1-3. These experimental systems are ideal for examining geochemical reactions mediated by microbes, which include processes governed by complex biological phenomenon (e.g. biofilm formation, etc.)4. We present results of microfluidic experiments using a model metal reducing bacteria and varying pore geometries, exploring the limitations of the microorganisms' ability to access tight pore spaces, and examining coupled biogeochemical-physical controls on the cycling of redox sensitive metals. Experimental results will provide an enhanced understanding of coupled physical-biogeochemical processes transpiring at the pore-scale, and will constrain and compliment continuum models used to predict and describe the subsurface cycling of redox-sensitive elements5. 1. Vrionis, H. A. et al. Microbiological and geochemical heterogeneity in an in situ uranium bioremediation field site. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 71, 6308-6318 (2005). 2. Pearce, C. I. et al. Pore-scale characterization of biogeochemical controls on iron and uranium speciation under flow conditions. Environ. Sci. Technol. 46, 7992-8000 (2012). 3. Zhang, C., Liu, C. & Shi, Z. Micromodel investigation of transport effect on the kinetics of reductive dissolution of hematite. Environ. Sci. Technol. 47, 4131-4139 (2013). 4. Ginn, T. R. et al. Processes in microbial transport in the natural subsurface. Adv. Water Resour. 25, 1017-1042 (2002). 5. Scheibe, T. D. et al. Coupling a genome-scale metabolic model with a reactive transport model to describe in situ uranium bioremediation. Microb. Biotechnol. 2, 274-286 (2009).

  7. Interactive diversity promotes the evolution of cooperation in structured populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Qi; Li, Aming; Zhou, Lei; Wang, Long

    2016-10-01

    Evolutionary games on networks traditionally assume that each individual adopts an identical strategy to interact with all its neighbors in each generation. Considering the prevalent diversity of individual interactions in the real society, here we propose the concept of interactive diversity, which allows individuals to adopt different strategies against different neighbors in each generation. We investigate the evolution of cooperation based on the edge dynamics rather than the traditional nodal dynamics in networked systems. The results show that, without invoking any other mechanisms, interactive diversity drives the frequency of cooperation to a high level for a wide range of parameters in both well-mixed and structured populations. Even in highly connected populations, cooperation still thrives. When interactive diversity and large topological heterogeneity are combined together, however, in the relaxed social dilemma, cooperation level is lower than that with just one of them, implying that the combination of many promotive factors may make a worse outcome. By an analytical approximation, we get the condition under which interactive diversity provides more advantages for cooperation than traditional evolutionary dynamics does. Numerical simulations validating the approximation are also presented. Our work provides a new line to explore the latent relation between the ubiquitous cooperation and individuals’ distinct responses in different interactions. The presented results suggest that interactive diversity should receive more attention in pursuing mechanisms fostering cooperation.

  8. Cross-kingdom interactions matter: fungal-mediated interactions structure an insect community on oak.

    PubMed

    Tack, Ayco J M; Gripenberg, Sofia; Roslin, Tomas

    2012-03-01

    Although phytophagous insects and plant pathogens frequently share the same host plant, interactions among such phylogenetically distant taxa have received limited attention. Here, we place pathogens and insects in the context of a multitrophic-level community. Focusing on the invasive powdery mildew Erysiphe alphitoides and the insect community on oak (Quercus robur), we demonstrate that mildew-insect interactions may be mediated by both the host plant and by natural enemies, and that the trait-specific outcome of individual interactions can range from negative to positive. Moreover, mildew affects resource selection by insects, thereby modifying the distribution of a specialist herbivore at two spatial scales (within and among trees). Finally, a long-term survey suggests that species-specific responses to mildew scale up to generate landscape-level variation in the insect community structure. Overall, our results show that frequently overlooked cross-kingdom interactions may play a major role in structuring terrestrial plant-based communities.

  9. NMR Solution Structure, Stability, and Interaction of the Recombinant Bovine Fibrinogen αC-Domain Fragment†

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Robert A.; Tsurupa, Galina; Hantgan, Roy R.; Tjandra, Nico; Medved, Leonid

    2008-01-01

    According to the current hypothesis, in fibrinogen, the COOH-terminal portions of two Aα chains are folded into compact αC-domains that interact intramolecularly with each other and with the central region of the molecule; in fibrin, the αC-domains switch to an intermolecular interaction resulting in αC polymers. In agreement, our recent NMR study identified within the bovine fibrinogen Aα374-538 αC-domain fragment an ordered compact structure including a β-hairpin restricted at the base by a 423–453 disulfide linkage. To establish the complete structure of the αC-domain and to further test the hypothesis, we expressed a shorter αC-fragment, Aα406-483, and performed detailed analysis of its structure, stability, and interactions. NMR experiments on the Aα406-483 fragment identified a second loose β-hairpin formed by residues 459–476, yielding a structure consisting of an intrinsically unstable mixed parallel/anti-parallel β-sheet. Size-exclusion chromatography and sedimentation velocity experiments revealed that the Aα406-483 fragment forms soluble oligomers whose fraction increases with increasing concentration. This was confirmed by sedimentation equilibrium analysis, which also revealed that the addition of each monomer to an assembling αC oligomer substantially increases its stabilizing free energy. In agreement, unfolding experiments monitored by CD established that oligomerization of Aα406-483 results in increased thermal stability. Altogether, these experiments establish the complete NMR solution structure of the Aα406-483 αC-domain fragment, provide direct evidence for the intra- and intermolecular interactions between the αC-domains, and confirm that these interactions are thermodynamically driven. PMID:17590019

  10. Fluid-structure Interaction Simulations of Deformable Soft Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borazjani, Iman

    2011-11-01

    Soft tissue interacts with the surrounding fluid environment in many biological and biomedical applications. Simulating such an interaction is quite challenging due to the large non-linear deformations of tissue, flow pulsatility, transition to turbulence, and non-linear fluid-structure interaction. We have extended our previous three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction (FSI) framework for rigid bodies (Borazjani, Ge, and Sotiropoulos, Journal of Computational Physics, 2008) to deformable soft tissue by coupling our incompressible Navier-Stokes solver for fluids with a non-linear large deformation finite element method for soft tissue. We use Fung-type constitutive law for the soft tissue that can capture the stress-strain behavior of the tissue. The FSI solver adopts a strongly-coupled partitioned approach that is stabilized with under-relaxation and Aitken acceleration technique. We validate our solvers against the experimental data for tissue valves and elastic tubes. We show the capabilities of our solver by simulating the fluid-structure interaction of tissue valves implanted in the aortic positions and elastic collapsible tubes. This work was partly supported by the Center for Computational Research at the University at Buffalo.

  11. Interactive Hangman teaches amino acid structures and abbreviations.

    PubMed

    Pennington, Britney O; Sears, Duane; Clegg, Dennis O

    2014-01-01

    We developed an interactive exercise to teach students how to draw the structures of the 20 standard amino acids and to identify the one-letter abbreviations by modifying the familiar game of "Hangman." Amino acid structures were used to represent single letters throughout the game. To provide additional practice in identifying structures, hints to the answers were written in "amino acid sentences" for the students to translate. Students were required to draw the structure of the corresponding letter they wished to guess on a whiteboard. Each student received a reference sheet of the structures and abbreviations, but was required to draw from memory when guessing a letter. Preassessments and postassessments revealed a drastic improvement in the students' ability to recognize and draw structures from memory. This activity provides a fun, educational game to play in biochemistry discussion sections or during long incubations in biochemistry laboratories.

  12. Giant Electron-Hole Interactions in Confined Layered Structures for Molecular Oxygen Activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Chen, Shichuan; Yong, Dingyu; Zhang, Xiaodong; Li, Shuang; Shao, Wei; Sun, Xianshun; Pan, Bicai; Xie, Yi

    2017-04-05

    Numerous efforts have been devoted to understanding the excitation processes of photocatalysts, whereas the potential Coulomb interactions between photogenerated electrons and holes have been long ignored. Once these interactions are considered, excitonic effects will arise that undoubtedly influence the sunlight-driven catalytic processes. Herein, by taking bismuth oxyhalide as examples, we proposed that giant electron-hole interactions would be expected in confined layered structures, and excitons would be the dominating photoexcited species. Photocatalytic molecular oxygen activation tests were performed as a proof of concept, where singlet oxygen generation via energy transfer process was brightened. Further experiments verify that structural confinement is curial to the giant excitonic effects, where the involved catalytic process could be readily regulated via facet-engineering, thus enabling diverse reactive oxygen species generation. This study not only provides an excitonic prospective on photocatalytic processes, but also paves a new approach for pursuing systems with giant electron-hole interactions.

  13. KLIFS: a structural kinase-ligand interaction database

    PubMed Central

    Kooistra, Albert J.; Kanev, Georgi K.; van Linden, Oscar P.J.; Leurs, Rob; de Esch, Iwan J.P.; de Graaf, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinases play a crucial role in cell signaling and are important drug targets in several therapeutic areas. The KLIFS database contains detailed structural kinase-ligand interaction information derived from all (>2900) structures of catalytic domains of human and mouse protein kinases deposited in the Protein Data Bank in order to provide insights into the structural determinants of kinase-ligand binding and selectivity. The kinase structures have been processed in a consistent manner by systematically analyzing the structural features and molecular interaction fingerprints (IFPs) of a predefined set of 85 binding site residues with bound ligands. KLIFS has been completely rebuilt and extended (>65% more structures) since its first release as a data set, including: novel automated annotation methods for (i) the assessment of ligand-targeted subpockets and the analysis of (ii) DFG and (iii) αC-helix conformations; improved and automated protocols for (iv) the generation of sequence/structure alignments, (v) the curation of ligand atom and bond typing for accurate IFP analysis and (vi) weekly database updates. KLIFS is now accessible via a website (http://klifs.vu-compmedchem.nl) that provides a comprehensive visual presentation of different types of chemical, biological and structural chemogenomics data, and allows the user to easily access, compare, search and download the data. PMID:26496949

  14. Modal identification experiment design for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyoung M.; Doiron, Harold H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes an on-orbit modal identification experiment design for large space structures. Space Station Freedom (SSF) systems design definition and structural dynamic models were used as representative large space structures for optimizing experiment design. Important structural modes of study models were selected to provide a guide for experiment design and used to assess the design performance. A pulsed random excitation technique using propulsion jets was developed to identify closely-spaced modes. A measuremenat location selection approach was developed to estimate accurate mode shapes as well as frequencies and damping factors. The data acquisition system and operational scenarios were designed to have minimal impacts on the SSF. A comprehensive simulation was conducted to assess the overall performance of the experiment design.

  15. Development Causal Structures of Organism-Environment Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labouvie, E. W.

    1974-01-01

    Proposes an extension of multivariate, structural analyses for studying organism-environment interactions. Based on characteristics of the assumed feedback mechanisms between behavioral and environmental systems, it appears possible to analyze longitudinally ordered sequences in terms of recursive versus nonrecursive and distal versus proximal…

  16. Website on Protein Interaction and Protein Structure Related Work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samanta, Manoj; Liang, Shoudan; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    In today's world, three seemingly diverse fields - computer information technology, nanotechnology and biotechnology are joining forces to enlarge our scientific knowledge and solve complex technological problems. Our group is dedicated to conduct theoretical research exploring the challenges in this area. The major areas of research include: 1) Yeast Protein Interactions; 2) Protein Structures; and 3) Current Transport through Small Molecules.

  17. L2 Requests: Preference Structure in Talk-in-Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taleghani-Nikazm, Carmen; Huth, Thorsten

    2010-01-01

    This study provides an empirical examination of how American learners of German accomplish the social action of requesting in L2 conversation, demonstrating how L2 learners use their linguistic and interactional resources to orient to preference structure in their talk. The data illustrate the sequential contingencies surrounding requests and…

  18. Dynamic Soil-Structure Interaction Behavior on the Seafloor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    34 - .. .-- -- , ,.,m .-- l I ,li m~ii, ; li. ,m,, l l ~ l l l ~i- Forword DyA~mic Soil-Structure Interaction (S-SI) behavior on the sea floor describes the...using Fast Fourier and profile C has all strengths increased by 3-1/3. The Transform methods. The second advantage of the pro- actual water depth at

  19. Dialogue Games: Meta-Communication Structures for Natural Language Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, James A.; Moore, James A.

    Studies of natural dialogue indicate that people interact according to established patterns which are organized around the participants' goals. These patterns have been represented by a set of knowledge structures called "Dialogue-games" which are founded on conventional knowledge about communication and its uses to achieve goals. The…

  20. "Songese": Maternal Structuring of Musical Interaction with Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longhi, Elena

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the temporal structure of mother-infant interactions with songs, with particular attention to two aspects: 1) the singing of the mothers to their infants, and 2) the non-verbal behaviours mothers and infants produce in synchrony with the musical beat. Four mother-infant dyads were video-recorded when the…

  1. Distance learning via interactive telecommunications: ACCESS Network's experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Junichi

    1989-05-01

    A variety of formal and informal telecourses, via interactive television (one-way audio, two-way video), for distant learners are presented. Three interactive formats (telephone, phone-in on radio, and audio teleconferencing) have been utilized in linking a studio instructor with students at home or in the classroom. More interactive segments have been allocated during the broadcast to improve the teaching-learning process. A field trial to test the usefulness of a computer conferencing facility for students studying at a distance and interacting with their teachers is described.

  2. Development and Testing of an Inflatable, Rigidizable Space Structure Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    STRUCTURE EXPERIMENT THESIS Sarah K. Helms, Second Lieutenant, USAF AFIT/GA/ENY/06-M03 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIR UNIVERSITY AIR FORCE...The views expressed in this thesis are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the...06-M03 DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF AN INFLATABLE, RIGIDIZABLE SPACE STRUCTURE EXPERIMENT THESIS Presented to the Faculty

  3. Control-structure-thermal interactions in analysis of lunar telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Roger C.

    1992-12-01

    The lunar telescope project was an excellent model for the CSTI study because a telescope is a very sensitive instrument, and thermal expansion or mechanical vibration of the mirror assemblies will rapidly degrade the resolution of the device. Consequently, the interactions are strongly coupled. The lunar surface experiences very large temperature variations that range from approximately -180 C to over 100 C. Although the optical assemblies of the telescopes will be well insulated, the temperature of the mirrors will inevitably fluctuate in a similar cycle, but of much smaller magnitude. In order to obtain images of high quality and clarity, allowable thermal deformations of any point on a mirror must be less than 1 micron. Initial estimates indicate that this corresponds to a temperature variation of much less than 1 deg through the thickness of the mirror. Therefore, a lunar telescope design will most probably include active thermal control, a means of controlling the shape of the mirrors, or a combination of both systems. Historically, the design of a complex vehicle was primarily a sequential process in which the basic structure was defined without concurrent detailed analyses or other subsystems. The basic configuration was then passed to the different teams responsible for each subsystem, and their task was to produce a workable solution without requiring major alterations to any principal components or subsystems. Consequently, the final design of the vehicle was not always the most efficient, owing to the fact that each subsystem design was partially constrained by the previous work. This procedure was necessary at the time because the analysis process was extremely time-consuming and had to be started over with each significant alteration of the vehicle. With recent advances in the power and capacity of small computers, and the parallel development of powerful software in structural, thermal, and control system analysis, it is now possible to produce very

  4. Control-structure-thermal interactions in analysis of lunar telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Roger C.

    1992-01-01

    The lunar telescope project was an excellent model for the CSTI study because a telescope is a very sensitive instrument, and thermal expansion or mechanical vibration of the mirror assemblies will rapidly degrade the resolution of the device. Consequently, the interactions are strongly coupled. The lunar surface experiences very large temperature variations that range from approximately -180 C to over 100 C. Although the optical assemblies of the telescopes will be well insulated, the temperature of the mirrors will inevitably fluctuate in a similar cycle, but of much smaller magnitude. In order to obtain images of high quality and clarity, allowable thermal deformations of any point on a mirror must be less than 1 micron. Initial estimates indicate that this corresponds to a temperature variation of much less than 1 deg through the thickness of the mirror. Therefore, a lunar telescope design will most probably include active thermal control, a means of controlling the shape of the mirrors, or a combination of both systems. Historically, the design of a complex vehicle was primarily a sequential process in which the basic structure was defined without concurrent detailed analyses or other subsystems. The basic configuration was then passed to the different teams responsible for each subsystem, and their task was to produce a workable solution without requiring major alterations to any principal components or subsystems. Consequently, the final design of the vehicle was not always the most efficient, owing to the fact that each subsystem design was partially constrained by the previous work. This procedure was necessary at the time because the analysis process was extremely time-consuming and had to be started over with each significant alteration of the vehicle. With recent advances in the power and capacity of small computers, and the parallel development of powerful software in structural, thermal, and control system analysis, it is now possible to produce very

  5. Linkers in the structural biology of protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Reddy Chichili, Vishnu Priyanka; Kumar, Veerendra; Sivaraman, J

    2013-02-01

    Linkers or spacers are short amino acid sequences created in nature to separate multiple domains in a single protein. Most of them are rigid and function to prohibit unwanted interactions between the discrete domains. However, Gly-rich linkers are flexible, connecting various domains in a single protein without interfering with the function of each domain. The advent of recombinant DNA technology made it possible to fuse two interacting partners with the introduction of artificial linkers. Often, independent proteins may not exist as stable or structured proteins until they interact with their binding partner, following which they gain stability and the essential structural elements. Gly-rich linkers have been proven useful for these types of unstable interactions, particularly where the interaction is weak and transient, by creating a covalent link between the proteins to form a stable protein-protein complex. Gly-rich linkers are also employed to form stable covalently linked dimers, and to connect two independent domains that create a ligand-binding site or recognition sequence. The lengths of linkers vary from 2 to 31 amino acids, optimized for each condition so that the linker does not impose any constraints on the conformation or interactions of the linked partners. Various structures of covalently linked protein complexes have been described using X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance and cryo-electron microscopy techniques. In this review, we evaluate several structural studies where linkers have been used to improve protein quality, to produce stable protein-protein complexes, and to obtain protein dimers.

  6. Structural diagnosis of bridge using output-only vibration in moving vehicle laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chul-Woo; Isemoto, Ryo; Kawatani, Mitsuo; Sugiura, Kunitomo

    This paper investigates feasibility for bridge health monitoring from output-only vibration measurements in a moving vehicle laboratory experiment. A parameter from the AR coefficient is also adopted to detect abnormality of the bridge. Consideration goes into structural diagnosis of the bridge from pattern change of identified system parameters due to damage. Observations demonstrate the feasibility of structural diagnosis of the bridge from the identified system parameters of the vehicle-bridge interactive system.

  7. Structural mode significance using INCA. [Interactive Controls Analysis computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Frank H.; Downing, John P.; Thorpe, Christopher J.

    1990-01-01

    Structural finite element models are often too large to be used in the design and analysis of control systems. Model reduction techniques must be applied to reduce the structural model to manageable size. In the past, engineers either performed the model order reduction by hand or used distinct computer programs to retrieve the data, to perform the significance analysis and to reduce the order of the model. To expedite this process, the latest version of INCA has been expanded to include an interactive graphical structural mode significance and model order reduction capability.

  8. Biological Structures, Interactions, Function and Behavior: Research Opportunities for Physicists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concepcion, Gisela P.

    2008-06-01

    Studies on marine biomolecules at the Marine Natural Products Laboratory (MNPL) and studies on biomedically relevant proteins at the Virtual Laboratory of Biomolecular Structures (VIRLS) of the University of the Philippines Marine Science Institute (UPMSI) are presented. These serve to illustrate some underlying principles of biological structures, interactions, function and behavior, and also to draw out some unresolved questions in biology of possible interest to non-biologists. The Biological Structures course offered at UPMSI, which aims to introduce underlying biological principles to non-biology majors and to promote trans-disciplinary research efforts, is also presented.

  9. MOLVIE: an interactive visualization environment for molecular structures.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huandong; Li, Ming; Xu, Ying

    2003-05-01

    A Molecular visualization interactive environment (MOLVIE), is designed to display three-dimensional (3D) structures of molecules and support the structural analysis and research on proteins. The paper presents the features, design considerations and applications of MOLVIE, especially the new functions used to compare the structures of two molecules and view the partial fragment of a molecule. Being developed in JAVA, MOLVIE is platform-independent. Moreover, it may run on a webpage as an applet for remote users. MOLVIE is available at http://www.cs.ucsb.edu/~mli/Bioinf/software/index.html.

  10. Structural mode significance using INCA. [Interactive Controls Analysis computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Frank H.; Downing, John P.; Thorpe, Christopher J.

    1990-01-01

    Structural finite element models are often too large to be used in the design and analysis of control systems. Model reduction techniques must be applied to reduce the structural model to manageable size. In the past, engineers either performed the model order reduction by hand or used distinct computer programs to retrieve the data, to perform the significance analysis and to reduce the order of the model. To expedite this process, the latest version of INCA has been expanded to include an interactive graphical structural mode significance and model order reduction capability.

  11. A Structural Examination of the Learning Experiences Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tokar, David M.; Buchanan, Taneisha S.; Subich, Linda M.; Hall, Rosalie J.; Williams, Christine M.

    2012-01-01

    The underlying factor structure of the Learning Experiences Questionnaire (LEQ; Schaub, 2004) was examined using data from 742 male and female college-age respondents. The LEQ items reflect a variety of learning experiences (generated based on Bandura's (1986, 1997) four sources of self-efficacy perceptions) that might occur in each of Holland's…

  12. A Structural Examination of the Learning Experiences Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tokar, David M.; Buchanan, Taneisha S.; Subich, Linda M.; Hall, Rosalie J.; Williams, Christine M.

    2012-01-01

    The underlying factor structure of the Learning Experiences Questionnaire (LEQ; Schaub, 2004) was examined using data from 742 male and female college-age respondents. The LEQ items reflect a variety of learning experiences (generated based on Bandura's (1986, 1997) four sources of self-efficacy perceptions) that might occur in each of Holland's…

  13. Monte Carlo studies on neutron interactions in radiobiological experiments.

    PubMed

    Shahmohammadi Beni, Mehrdad; Hau, Tak Cheong; Krstic, D; Nikezic, D; Yu, K N

    2017-01-01

    Monte Carlo method was used to study the characteristics of neutron interactions with cells underneath a water medium layer with varying thickness. The following results were obtained. (1) The fractions of neutron interaction with 1H, 12C, 14N and 16O nuclei in the cell layer were studied. The fraction with 1H increased with increasing medium thickness, while decreased for 12C, 14N and 16O nuclei. The bulges in the interaction fractions with 12C, 14N and 16O nuclei were explained by the resonance spikes in the interaction cross-section data. The interaction fraction decreased in the order: 1H > 16O > 12C > 14N. (2) In general, as the medium thickness increased, the number of "interacting neutrons" which exited the medium and then further interacted with the cell layer increased. (3) The area under the angular distributions for "interacting neutrons" decreased with increasing incident neutron energy. Such results would be useful for deciphering the reasons behind discrepancies among existing results in the literature.

  14. Monte Carlo studies on neutron interactions in radiobiological experiments

    PubMed Central

    Shahmohammadi Beni, Mehrdad; Hau, Tak Cheong; Krstic, D.; Nikezic, D.

    2017-01-01

    Monte Carlo method was used to study the characteristics of neutron interactions with cells underneath a water medium layer with varying thickness. The following results were obtained. (1) The fractions of neutron interaction with 1H, 12C, 14N and 16O nuclei in the cell layer were studied. The fraction with 1H increased with increasing medium thickness, while decreased for 12C, 14N and 16O nuclei. The bulges in the interaction fractions with 12C, 14N and 16O nuclei were explained by the resonance spikes in the interaction cross-section data. The interaction fraction decreased in the order: 1H > 16O > 12C > 14N. (2) In general, as the medium thickness increased, the number of “interacting neutrons” which exited the medium and then further interacted with the cell layer increased. (3) The area under the angular distributions for “interacting neutrons” decreased with increasing incident neutron energy. Such results would be useful for deciphering the reasons behind discrepancies among existing results in the literature. PMID:28704557

  15. Interaction and e-Learning: The Student Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorpe, Mary; Godwin, Steve

    2006-01-01

    A distinction between interpersonal and content interaction was identified in the literature, and applied in research undertaken on a selection of 36 courses. These courses differed in both the kinds of interaction offered and its integration in the teaching and assessment. They included different combinations and use of conferencing, email,…

  16. Hey! I Can Read This! The Interactive Book Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butt, Donna Sabino; Thurman, Kathy Barlow

    This teaching resource goes beyond songs, games, and finger plays to function as a one-of-a-kind interactive book. Teachers are given basic instructions on how to create a variety of different interactive books for their students to enjoy. Lists of materials needed to create each book are also included with the instructions. The resource book…

  17. Control/structure interaction methods for space station power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blelloch, Paul

    1989-01-01

    The Structural Dynamics Research Corporation and the NASA Lewis Research Center have been working together to develop tools and methods for the analysis of control/structure interaction problems related to the space station power systems. Flexible modes of the solar arrays below 0.1 Hz, suggest that even for relatively slow control systems, the potential for control/structure interaction exists. The emphasis of the effort has been to develop tools which couple NASTRAN's powerful capabilities in structural dynamics with EASY5's powerful capabilities in control systems analysis. One product is an interface software package called CO-ST-IN for COntrol-STructure-INteraction. CO-ST-IN acts to translate data between NASTRAN and EASY5, facilitating the analysis of complex coupled problems. Interfaces to SDRC I-DEAS and MATRIXx are also offered. Beside transferring standard modal information, CO-ST-IN implements a number of advanced methods. These include a modal ordering algorithm that helps eliminate uncontrollable or unobservable modes from the analysis, an implementation of the more accurate mode acceleration algorithm for recovery of element forces and stresses directly in EASY5 and an implementation of fixed interface modes in NASTRAN, which reduces the error in the closed-loop model due to the use of truncated mode sets.

  18. A space station Structures and Assembly Verification Experiment, SAVE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, R. A.; Raney, J. P.; Deryder, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    The Space Station structure has been baselined to be a 5 M (16.4 ft) erectable truss. This structure will provide the overall framework to attach laboratory modules and other systems, subsystems and utilities. The assembly of this structure represents a formidable EVA challenge. To validate this capability the Space Station Structures/Dynamics Technical Integration Panel (TIP) met to develop the necessary data for an integrated STS structures flight experiment. As a result of this meeting, the Langley Research Center initiated a joint Langley/Boeing Aerospace Company study which supported the structures/dynamics TIP in developing the preliminary definition and design of a 5 M erectable space station truss and the resources required for a proposed flight experiment. The purpose of the study was to: (1) devise methods of truss assembly by astronauts; (2) define a specific test matrix for dynamic characterization; (3) identify instrumentation and data system requirements; (4) determine the power, propulsion and control requirements for the truss on-orbit for 3 years; (5) study the packaging of the experiment in the orbiter cargo bay; (6) prepare a preliminary cost estimate and schedule for the experiment; and (7) provide a list of potential follow-on experiments using the structure as a free flyer. The results of this three month study are presented.

  19. A Guide for Developing Human-Robot Interaction Experiments in the Robotic Interactive Visualization and Experimentation Technology (RIVET) Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-01

    ARL-TR-7683 ● MAY 2016 US Army Research Laboratory A Guide for Developing Human-Robot Interaction Experiments in the Robotic...ARL-TR-7683 ● MAY 2016 US Army Research Laboratory A Guide for Developing Human-Robot Interaction Experiments in the Robotic...ES) US Army Research Laboratory ATTN: RDRL-HRS-E Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5425 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER ARL-TR-7683 9

  20. Geographic structure in a widespread plant-mycorrhizal interaction: pines and false truffles.

    PubMed

    Hoeksema, J D; Thompson, J N

    2007-05-01

    Mutualistic interactions are likely to exhibit a strong geographic mosaic in their coevolutionary dynamics, but the structure of geographic variation in these interactions is much more poorly characterized than in host-parasite interactions. We used a cross-inoculation experiment to characterize the scales and patterns at which geographic structure has evolved in an interaction between three pine species and one ectomycorrhizal fungus species along the west coast of North America. We found substantial and contrasting patterns of geographic interaction structure for the plants and fungi. The fungi exhibited a clinal pattern of local adaptation to their host plants across the geographic range of three coastal pines. In contrast, plant growth parameters were unaffected by fungal variation, but varied among plant populations and species. Both plant and fungal performance measures varied strongly with latitude. This set of results indicates that in such widespread species interactions, interacting species may evolve asymmetrically in a geographic mosaic because of differing evolutionary responses to clinally varying biotic and abiotic factors.

  1. AN INCOMPRESSIBLE ALE METHOD FOR FLUID-STRUCTURE INTERACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, T A

    2004-12-01

    Multi-disciplinary analysis is becoming more and more important to tackle todays complex engineering problems. Therefore, computational tools must be able to handle the complex multi-physics requirements of these problems. A computer code may need to handle the physics associated with fluid dynamics, structural mechanics, heat transfer, chemistry, electro-magnetics, or a variety of other disciplines--all coupled in a highly non-linear system. The objective of this project was to couple an incompressible fluid dynamics package to a solid mechanics code. The code uses finite-element methods and is useful for three-dimensional transient problems with fluid-structure interaction. The code is designed for efficient performance on large multi-processor machines. An ALE finite element method was developed to investigate fluid-structure interaction. The write-up contains information about the method, the problem formulation, and some results from example test problems.

  2. Structure-based prediction of host-pathogen protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Mariano, Rachelle; Wuchty, Stefan

    2017-03-16

    The discovery, validation, and characterization of protein-based interactions from different species are crucial for translational research regarding a variety of pathogens, ranging from the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum to HIV-1. Here, we review recent advances in the prediction of host-pathogen protein interfaces using structural information. In particular, we observe that current methods chiefly perform machine learning on sequence and domain information to produce large sets of candidate interactions that are further assessed and pruned to generate final, highly probable sets. Structure-based studies have also emphasized the electrostatic properties and evolutionary transformations of pathogenic interfaces, supplying crucial insight into antigenic determinants and the ways pathogens compete for host protein binding. Advancements in spectroscopic and crystallographic methods complement the aforementioned techniques, permitting the rigorous study of true positives at a molecular level. Together, these approaches illustrate how protein structure on a variety of levels functions coordinately and dynamically to achieve host takeover.

  3. Adaptivity and smart algorithms for fluid-structure interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. Tinsley

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews new approaches in CFD which have the potential for significantly increasing current capabilities of modeling complex flow phenomena and of treating difficult problems in fluid-structure interaction. These approaches are based on the notions of adaptive methods and smart algorithms, which use instantaneous measures of the quality and other features of the numerical flowfields as a basis for making changes in the structure of the computational grid and of algorithms designed to function on the grid. The application of these new techniques to several problem classes are addressed, including problems with moving boundaries, fluid-structure interaction in high-speed turbine flows, flow in domains with receding boundaries, and related problems.

  4. A vorticity based approach to handle the fluid-structure interaction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahbakhsh, Iman; Ghassemi, Hassan; Sabetghadam, Fereidoun

    2016-02-01

    A vorticity based approach for the numerical solution of the fluid-structure interaction problems is introduced in which the fluid and structure(s) can be viewed as a continuum. Retrieving the vorticity field and recalculating a solenoidal velocity field, specially at the fluid-structure interface, are the kernel of the proposed algorithm. In the suggested method, a variety of constitutive equations as a function of left Cauchy-Green deformation tensor can be applied for modeling the structure domain. A nonlinear Mooney-Rivlin and Saint Venant-Kirchhoff model are expressed in terms of the left Cauchy-Green deformation tensor and the presented method is able to model the behavior of a visco-hyperelastic structure in the incompressible flow. Some numerical experiments, with considering the neo-Hookean model for structure domain, are executed and the results are validated via the available results from literature.

  5. Why we interact: on the functional role of the striatum in the subjective experience of social interaction.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Ulrich J; Schilbach, Leonhard; Timmermans, Bert; Kuzmanovic, Bojana; Georgescu, Alexandra L; Bente, Gary; Vogeley, Kai

    2014-11-01

    There is ample evidence that human primates strive for social contact and experience interactions with conspecifics as intrinsically rewarding. Focusing on gaze behavior as a crucial means of human interaction, this study employed a unique combination of neuroimaging, eye-tracking, and computer-animated virtual agents to assess the neural mechanisms underlying this component of behavior. In the interaction task, participants believed that during each interaction the agent's gaze behavior could either be controlled by another participant or by a computer program. Their task was to indicate whether they experienced a given interaction as an interaction with another human participant or the computer program based on the agent's reaction. Unbeknownst to them, the agent was always controlled by a computer to enable a systematic manipulation of gaze reactions by varying the degree to which the agent engaged in joint attention. This allowed creating a tool to distinguish neural activity underlying the subjective experience of being engaged in social and non-social interaction. In contrast to previous research, this allows measuring neural activity while participants experience active engagement in real-time social interactions. Results demonstrate that gaze-based interactions with a perceived human partner are associated with activity in the ventral striatum, a core component of reward-related neurocircuitry. In contrast, interactions with a computer-driven agent activate attention networks. Comparisons of neural activity during interaction with behaviorally naïve and explicitly cooperative partners demonstrate different temporal dynamics of the reward system and indicate that the mere experience of engagement in social interaction is sufficient to recruit this system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Spectral function in electro-weak interactions and its impact on neutrino oscillation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Jen, C.-M.

    2015-10-15

    Neutrino oscillation experiments have entered the high-precision era in the last few years. The oscillation parameters, as a measure of the neutrino properties, are extracted from the energy-dependent oscillation probability function. Different types of nuclear dynamics deeply influence the determination of neutrino energies in neutrino oscillation experiments. As a consequence, a comprehensive understanding of various nuclear dynamics interprets the scenario behind the neutrino interaction with nucleus and nuclei. The initial ground-state structure of the target nucleus is categorized in one typical nuclear dynamics, and its realistic description is generally referred as the spectral function (SF). Implementing the SF for each target nucleus into the GENIE neutrino event generator is the preliminary step necessary to obtain a reliable determination of the kinematics of all detectable final-products from neutrino interactions. At the intermedium-range of neutrino energies (∼ 1 GeV), the kinematic energy reconstruction is the vastly used approach and consists in identifying final-products as coming from the charged-current quasi-elastic-like (CCQE-like) neutrino interactions.

  7. CO-ST-IN - CONTROL-STRUCTURE-INTERACTION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carney, K.

    1994-01-01

    CO-ST-IN is a program developed for NASA to help facilitate the study of Control Structure Interaction, the dynamic coupling between control systems and flexible structures. Current space structures are larger and more flexible than previous designs. At the same time, increased demands are being placed on the performance of control systems. For many space structures it is essential to analyze the interaction of control systems with structural flexibility. CO-ST-IN was designed to complement and enhance rather than to replace the structural dynamics and control system analysis tools already available at NASA. The functions performed by CO-ST-IN can be roughly divided into three areas: 1) data transfer between structural dynamics and control systems software (MSC/NASTRAN, I-DEAS, EASY5 and MATRIXx are currently supported to varying degrees); 2) modal selection at both the component and system level as a means of model reduction; and 3) simulation of the coupled system (given simple controllers). CO-ST-IN reduces the size of the structural model by selecting system modes on the basis of input/output coupling (three algorithms along with a number of other options are offered). This allows the analyst to use far fewer modes in the coupled analysis, since the program will select those which are most closely coupled to the structural inputs and outputs. Another special capability is the calculation of structural outputs such as element forces and stresses using either the mode acceleration or mode displacement approach directly within the coupled simulation. This eliminates the need to return to MSC/NASTRAN for recovery of this data, accelerating the turnaround time of analyses. The transfer of input forces for transient analysis in MSC/NASTRAN is also supported. CO-ST-IN was implemented on a DEC VAX with the VMS operating system. This FORTRAN77 program has a memory requirement of 9.4 MB. CO-ST-IN was developed in 1989.

  8. CO-ST-IN - CONTROL-STRUCTURE-INTERACTION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carney, K.

    1994-01-01

    CO-ST-IN is a program developed for NASA to help facilitate the study of Control Structure Interaction, the dynamic coupling between control systems and flexible structures. Current space structures are larger and more flexible than previous designs. At the same time, increased demands are being placed on the performance of control systems. For many space structures it is essential to analyze the interaction of control systems with structural flexibility. CO-ST-IN was designed to complement and enhance rather than to replace the structural dynamics and control system analysis tools already available at NASA. The functions performed by CO-ST-IN can be roughly divided into three areas: 1) data transfer between structural dynamics and control systems software (MSC/NASTRAN, I-DEAS, EASY5 and MATRIXx are currently supported to varying degrees); 2) modal selection at both the component and system level as a means of model reduction; and 3) simulation of the coupled system (given simple controllers). CO-ST-IN reduces the size of the structural model by selecting system modes on the basis of input/output coupling (three algorithms along with a number of other options are offered). This allows the analyst to use far fewer modes in the coupled analysis, since the program will select those which are most closely coupled to the structural inputs and outputs. Another special capability is the calculation of structural outputs such as element forces and stresses using either the mode acceleration or mode displacement approach directly within the coupled simulation. This eliminates the need to return to MSC/NASTRAN for recovery of this data, accelerating the turnaround time of analyses. The transfer of input forces for transient analysis in MSC/NASTRAN is also supported. CO-ST-IN was implemented on a DEC VAX with the VMS operating system. This FORTRAN77 program has a memory requirement of 9.4 MB. CO-ST-IN was developed in 1989.

  9. Optimizing Interacting Potentials to Form Targeted Materials Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Torquato, Salvatore

    2015-09-28

    Conventional applications of the principles of statistical mechanics (the "forward" problems), start with particle interaction potentials, and proceed to deduce local structure and macroscopic properties. Other applications (that may be classified as "inverse" problems), begin with targeted configurational information, such as low-order correlation functions that characterize local particle order, and attempt to back out full-system configurations and/or interaction potentials. To supplement these successful experimental and numerical "forward" approaches, we have focused on inverse approaches that make use of analytical and computational tools to optimize interactions for targeted self-assembly of nanosystems. The most original aspect of our work is its inherently inverse approach: instead of predicting structures that result from given interaction potentials among particles, we determine the optimal potential that most robustly stabilizes a given target structure subject to certain constraints. Our inverse approach could revolutionize the manner in which materials are designed and fabricated. There are a number of very tangible properties (e.g. zero thermal expansion behavior), elastic constants, optical properties for photonic applications, and transport properties.

  10. Interaction site prediction by structural similarity to neighboring clusters in protein-protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Monji, Hiroyuki; Koizumi, Satoshi; Ozaki, Tomonobu; Ohkawa, Takenao

    2011-02-15

    Recently, revealing the function of proteins with protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks is regarded as one of important issues in bioinformatics. With the development of experimental methods such as the yeast two-hybrid method, the data of protein interaction have been increasing extremely. Many databases dealing with these data comprehensively have been constructed and applied to analyzing PPI networks. However, few research on prediction interaction sites using both PPI networks and the 3D protein structures complementarily has explored. We propose a method of predicting interaction sites in proteins with unknown function by using both of PPI networks and protein structures. For a protein with unknown function as a target, several clusters are extracted from the neighboring proteins based on their structural similarity. Then, interaction sites are predicted by extracting similar sites from the group of a protein cluster and the target protein. Moreover, the proposed method can improve the prediction accuracy by introducing repetitive prediction process. The proposed method has been applied to small scale dataset, then the effectiveness of the method has been confirmed. The challenge will now be to apply the method to large-scale datasets.

  11. Low-cost Active Structural Control Space Experiment (LASC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinett, Rush; Bukley, Angelia P.

    1992-01-01

    The DOE Lab Director's Conference identified the need for the DOE National Laboratories to actively and aggressively pursue ways to apply DOE technology to problems of national need. Space structures are key elements of DOD and NASA space systems and a space technology area in which DOE can have a significant impact. LASC is a joint agency space technology experiment (DOD Phillips, NASA Marshall, and DOE Sandia). The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: phase 4 investigator testbed; control of large flexible structures in orbit; INFLEX; Controls, Astrophysics; and structures experiments in space; SARSAT; and LASC mission objectives.

  12. Cellular Shape Memory Alloy Structures: Experiments & Modeling (Part 1)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    AFOSR  Grant  #FA9550-­‐08-­‐1-­‐0313 Cellular  Shape  Memory   Alloy  Structures:   Experiments  &  Modeling J.  Shaw  (UM...2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Cellular Shape Memory Alloy Structures: Experiments & Modeling (Part 1) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...dense,  0.37  g/cc) Combine benefits of light-weight cellular structures with Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) adaptive behavior CombinaKon •Amplified

  13. Interactive Negotiation of Perspectives in Japanese: Predicate-Final Structure as a Resource to Organize Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakamura, Kanae

    2009-01-01

    While the predicate-final structure of the Japanese language has been considered one of the main causes of its late projectability (Tanaka, 1999), this study demonstrates that the final predicate component of a "turn constructional unit" (TCU) furnishes a useful resource for conversational participants to negotiate various aspects of interaction.…

  14. Measurement of Phase Space Structure of Fast Ions Interacting with Alfven Eigenmodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaoka, Kenichi; Osakabe, Masaki; Isobe, Mitsutaka; Ogawa, Kunihiro; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Kobayashi, Shinji; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Katoh, Yuto; Fontdecaba, Jose M.

    2015-11-01

    Experimentally observed Alfven eigenmodes (AEs) shows nonlinear behaviors such as intermittency, fast sweep in frequency and so on. In order to understand such nonlinear behaviors of AEs, it is widely recognized that the phase space structure have to be taken into account. However, there are few direct measurements of phase space structure in experiments so far. Here, we propose to apply the wave-particle interaction analyzer (WPIA) technique being developed for magnetosphere plasma physics (ERG project) to magnetically confinement fusion experiments. In the meeting, we present a high speed pulse analyzer system for WPIA using the field programmable gate array (FPGA) module and discuss the phase space structures observed in the LHD experiment. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant-in-Aid for Young Scientists (A) 26709071.

  15. Fluid-structure interaction in compliant insect wings.

    PubMed

    Eberle, A L; Reinhall, P G; Daniel, T L

    2014-06-01

    Insect wings deform significantly during flight. As a result, wings act as aeroelastic structures wherein both the driving motion of the structure and the aerodynamic loading of the surrounding fluid potentially interact to modify wing shape. We explore two key issues associated with the design of compliant wings: over a range of driving frequencies and phases of pitch-heave actuation, how does wing stiffness influence (1) the lift and thrust generated and (2) the relative importance of fluid loading on the shape of the wing? In order to examine a wide range of parameters relevant to insect flight, we develop a computationally efficient, two-dimensional model that couples point vortex methods for fluid force computations with structural finite element methods to model the fluid-structure interaction of a wing in air. We vary the actuation frequency, phase of actuation, and flexural stiffness over a range that encompasses values measured for a number of insect taxa (10-90 Hz; 0-π rad; 10(-7)-10(-5) N m(2)). We show that the coefficients of lift and thrust are maximized at the first and second structural resonant frequencies of the system. We also show that even in regions of structural resonance, fluid loading never contributes more than 20% to the development of flight forces.

  16. Some experiences with the viscous-inviscid interaction approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandalsem, W. R.; Steger, J. L.; Rao, K. V.

    1987-01-01

    Methods for simulating compressible viscous flow using the viscid-inviscid interaction approach are described. The formulations presented range from the more familiar full-potential/boundary-layer interaction schemes to a method for coupling Euler/Navier-Stokes and boundary-layer algorithms. An effort is made to describe the advantages and disadvantages of each formulation. Sample results are presented which illustrate the applicability of the methods.

  17. From Geometry to Diagnosis: Experiences of Geomatics in Structural Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riveiro, B.; Arias, P.; Armesto, J.; Caamaño, J. C.; Solla, M.

    2012-07-01

    Terrestrial photogrammetry and laser scanning are technologies that have been successfully used for metric surveying and 3D modelling in many different fields (archaeological and architectural documentation, industrial retrofitting, mining, structural monitoring, road surveying, etc.). In the case of structural applications, these techniques have been successfully applied to 3D modelling and sometimes monitoring; but they have not been sufficiently implemented to date, as routine tools in infrastructure management systems, in terms of automation of data processing and integration in the condition assessment procedures. In this context, this paper presents a series of experiences in the usage of terrestrial photogrammetry and laser scanning in the context of dimensional and structural evaluation of structures. These experiences are particularly focused on historical masonry structures, but modern prestressed concrete bridges are also investigated. The development of methodological procedures for data collection, and data integration in some cases, is tackled for each particular structure (with access limitations, geometrical configuration, range of measurement, etc.). The accurate geometrical information provided by both terrestrial techniques motivates the implementation of such results in the complex, and sometimes slightly approximated, geometric scene that is frequently used in structural analysis. In this sense, quantitative evaluating of the influence of real and accurate geometry in structural analysis results must be carried out. As main result in this paper, a series of experiences based on the usage of photogrammetric and laser scanning to structural engineering are presented.

  18. Structural and functional analysis of the GABARAP interaction motif (GIM)

    DOE PAGES

    Rogov, Vladimir V.; Stolz, Alexandra; Ravichandran, Arvind C.; ...

    2017-06-27

    Through the canonical LC3 interaction motif (LIR), [W/F/Y]–X1–X2[I/L/V], protein complexes are recruited to autophagosomes to perform their functions as either autophagy adaptors or receptors. How these adaptors/receptors selectively interact with either LC3 or GABARAP families remains unclear. Herein, we determine the range of selectivity of 30 known core LIR motifs towards individual LC3s and GABARAPs. From these, we define a GABARAP Interaction Motif (GIM) sequence ([W/F]–[V/I]–X2–V) that the adaptor protein PLEKHM1 tightly conforms to. Using biophysical and structural approaches, we show that the PLEKHM1–LIR is indeed 11–fold more specific for GABARAP than LC3B. Selective mutation of the X1 and X2more » positions either completely abolished the interaction with all LC3 and GABARAPs or increased PLEKHM1–GIM selectivity 20–fold towards LC3B. Finally, we show that conversion of p62/SQSTM1, FUNDC1 and FIP200 LIRs into our newly defined GIM, by introducing two valine residues, enhances their interaction with endogenous GABARAP over LC3B. In conclusion, the identification of a GABARAP–specific interaction motif will aid the identification and characterization of the expanding array of autophagy receptor and adaptor proteins and their in vivo functions.« less

  19. Visual Interaction with Dimensionality Reduction: A Structured Literature Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sacha, Dominik; Zhang, Leishi; Sedlmair, Michael; Lee, John A; Peltonen, Jaakko; Weiskopf, Daniel; North, Stephen C; Keim, Daniel A

    2017-01-01

    Dimensionality Reduction (DR) is a core building block in visualizing multidimensional data. For DR techniques to be useful in exploratory data analysis, they need to be adapted to human needs and domain-specific problems, ideally, interactively, and on-the-fly. Many visual analytics systems have already demonstrated the benefits of tightly integrating DR with interactive visualizations. Nevertheless, a general, structured understanding of this integration is missing. To address this, we systematically studied the visual analytics and visualization literature to investigate how analysts interact with automatic DR techniques. The results reveal seven common interaction scenarios that are amenable to interactive control such as specifying algorithmic constraints, selecting relevant features, or choosing among several DR algorithms. We investigate specific implementations of visual analysis systems integrating DR, and analyze ways that other machine learning methods have been combined with DR. Summarizing the results in a "human in the loop" process model provides a general lens for the evaluation of visual interactive DR systems. We apply the proposed model to study and classify several systems previously described in the literature, and to derive future research opportunities.

  20. Fluid-Structure Interactions with Flexible and Rigid Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daily, David Jesse

    Fluid structure interactions occur to some extent in nearly every type of fluid flow. Understanding how structures interact with fluids and visa-versa is of vital importance in many engineering applications. The purpose of this research is to explore how fluids interact with flexible and rigid structures. A computational model was used to model the fluid structure interactions of vibrating synthetic vocal folds. The model simulated the coupling of the fluid and solid domains using a fluid-structure interface boundary condition. The fluid domain used a slightly compressible flow solver to allow for the possibility of acoustic coupling with the subglottal geometry and vibration of the vocal fold model. As the subglottis lengthened, the frequency of vibration decreased until a new acoustic mode could form in the subglottis. Synthetic aperture particle image velocimetry (SAPIV) is a three-dimensional particle tracking technique. SAPIV was used to image the jet of air that emerges from vibrating human vocal folds (glottal jet) during phonation. The three-dimensional reconstruction of the glottal jet found faint evidence of flow characteristics seen in previous research, such as axis-switching, but did not have sufficient resolution to detect small features. SAPIV was further applied to reconstruct the smaller flow characteristics of the glottal jet of vibrating synthetic vocal folds. Two- and four-layer synthetic vocal fold models were used to determine how the glottal jet from the synthetic models compared to the glottal jet from excised human vocal folds. The two- and four-layer models clearly exhibited axis-switching which has been seen in other 3D analyses of the glottal jet. Cavitation in a quiescent fluid can break a rigid structure such as a glass bottle. A new cavitation number was derived to include acceleration and pressure head at cavitation onset. A cavitation stick was used to validate the cavitation number by filling it with different depths and hitting

  1. Uncovering the structural basis of protein interactions with efficient clustering of 3-D interaction interfaces.

    PubMed

    Aung, Z; Tan, S-H; Ng, S-K; Tan, K-L

    2007-01-01

    The biological mechanisms with which proteins interact with one another are best revealed by studying the structural interfaces between interacting proteins. Protein-protein interfaces can be extracted from 3-D structural data of protein complexes and then clustered to derive biological insights. However, conventional protein interface clustering methods lack computational scalability and statistical support. In this work, we present a new method named "PPiClust" to systematically encode, cluster and analyze similar 3-D interface patterns in protein complexes efficiently. Experimental results showed that our method is effective in discovering visually consistent and statistically significant clusters of interfaces, and at the same time sufficiently time-efficient to be performed on a single computer. The interface clusters are also useful for uncovering the structural basis of protein interactions. Analysis of the resulting interface clusters revealed groups of structurally diverse proteins having similar interface patterns. We also found, in some of the interface clusters, the presence of well-known linear binding motifs which were non-contiguous in the primary sequences. These results suggest that PPiClust can discover not only statistically significant but also biologically significant protein interface clusters from protein complex structural data.

  2. CME Interaction with Large-Scale Coronal Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswarny, Nat

    2012-01-01

    This talk presents some key observations that highlight the importance of CME interaction with other large scale structures such as CMEs and coronal holes . Such interactions depend on the phase of the solar cycle: during maximum, CMEs are ejected more frequently, so CME-CME interaction becomes dominant. During the rise phase, the polar coronal holes are strong, so the interaction between polar coronal holes and CMEs is important, which also leads to a possible increase in the number of interplanetary CMEs observed as magnetic clouds. During the declining phase, there are more equatorial coronal holes, so CMEs originating near these coronal holes are easily deflected. CMEs can be deflected toward and away from the Sun-Earth line resulting in interesting geospace consequences. For example, the largest geomagnetic storm of solar cycle 23 was due to a CME that was deflected towards the Sun-earth line from E22. CME deflection away from the Sun-Earth line diminishes the chance of a CME producing a geomagnetic storm. CME interaction in the coronagraphic field of view was first identified using enhanced radio emission, which is an indication of acceleration of low energy (approx.10 keV) electrons in the interaction site. CME interaction, therefore, may also have implications for proton acceleration. For example, solar energetic particle events typically occur with a higher intensity, whenever multiple CMEs occur in quick succession from the same source region. CME deflection may also have implications to the arrival of energetic particles to earth because magnetic connectivity may be changed by the interaction. I illustrate the above points using examples from SOHO, STEREO, Wind, and ACE data .

  3. On-line interactive virtual experiments on nanoscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadar, Manuella; Ileana, Ioan; Hutanu, Constantin

    2009-01-01

    This paper is an overview on the next generation web which allows students to experience virtual experiments on nano science, physics devices, processes and processing equipment. Virtual reality is used to support a real university lab in which a student can experiment real lab sessions. The web material is presented in an intuitive and highly visual 3D form that is accessible to a diverse group of students. Such type of laboratory provides opportunities for professional and practical education for a wide range of users. The expensive equipment and apparatuses that build the experimental stage in a particular standard laboratory is used to create virtual educational research laboratories. Students learn how to prepare the apparatuses and facilities for the experiment. The online experiments metadata schema is the format for describing online experiments, much like the schema behind a library catalogue used to describe the books in a library. As an online experiment is a special kind of learning object, one specifies its schema as an extension to an established metadata schema for learning objects. The content of the courses, metainformation as well as readings and user data are saved on the server in a database as XML objects.

  4. Characterization of the Structural Features and Interactions of Sclerostin

    PubMed Central

    Veverka, Vaclav; Henry, Alistair J.; Slocombe, Patrick M.; Ventom, Andrew; Mulloy, Barbara; Muskett, Frederick W.; Muzylak, Mariusz; Greenslade, Kevin; Moore, Adrian; Zhang, Li; Gong, Jianhua; Qian, Xueming; Paszty, Chris; Taylor, Richard J.; Robinson, Martyn K.; Carr, Mark D.

    2009-01-01

    The secreted glycoprotein sclerostin has recently emerged as a key negative regulator of Wnt signaling in bone and has stimulated considerable interest as a potential target for therapeutics designed to treat conditions associated with low bone mass, such as osteoporosis. We have determined the structure of sclerostin, which resulted in the identification of a previously unknown binding site for heparin, suggestive of a functional role in localizing sclerostin to the surface of target cells. We have also mapped the interaction site for an antibody that blocks the inhibition of Wnt signaling by sclerostin. This shows minimal overlap with the heparin binding site and highlights a key role for this region of sclerostin in protein interactions associated with the inhibition of Wnt signaling. The conserved N- and C-terminal arms of sclerostin were found to be unstructured, highly flexible, and unaffected by heparin binding, which suggests a role in stabilizing interactions with target proteins. PMID:19208630

  5. Structural Analysis of Chemokine Receptor-Ligand Interactions.

    PubMed

    Arimont, Marta; Sun, Shan-Liang; Leurs, Rob; Smit, Martine; de Esch, Iwan J P; de Graaf, Chris

    2017-03-10

    This review focuses on the construction and application of structural chemokine receptor models for the elucidation of molecular determinants of chemokine receptor modulation and the structure-based discovery and design of chemokine receptor ligands. A comparative analysis of ligand binding pockets in chemokine receptors is presented, including a detailed description of the CXCR4, CCR2, CCR5, CCR9, and US28 X-ray structures, and their implication for modeling molecular interactions of chemokine receptors with small-molecule ligands, peptide ligands, and large antibodies and chemokines. These studies demonstrate how the integration of new structural information on chemokine receptors with extensive structure-activity relationship and site-directed mutagenesis data facilitates the prediction of the structure of chemokine receptor-ligand complexes that have not been crystallized. Finally, a review of structure-based ligand discovery and design studies based on chemokine receptor crystal structures and homology models illustrates the possibilities and challenges to find novel ligands for chemokine receptors.

  6. Factor selection and structural identification in the interaction ANOVA model.

    PubMed

    Post, Justin B; Bondell, Howard D

    2013-03-01

    When faced with categorical predictors and a continuous response, the objective of an analysis often consists of two tasks: finding which factors are important and determining which levels of the factors differ significantly from one another. Often times, these tasks are done separately using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) followed by a post hoc hypothesis testing procedure such as Tukey's Honestly Significant Difference test. When interactions between factors are included in the model the collapsing of levels of a factor becomes a more difficult problem. When testing for differences between two levels of a factor, claiming no difference would refer not only to equality of main effects, but also to equality of each interaction involving those levels. This structure between the main effects and interactions in a model is similar to the idea of heredity used in regression models. This article introduces a new method for accomplishing both of the common analysis tasks simultaneously in an interaction model while also adhering to the heredity-type constraint on the model. An appropriate penalization is constructed that encourages levels of factors to collapse and entire factors to be set to zero. It is shown that the procedure has the oracle property implying that asymptotically it performs as well as if the exact structure were known beforehand. We also discuss the application to estimating interactions in the unreplicated case. Simulation studies show the procedure outperforms post hoc hypothesis testing procedures as well as similar methods that do not include a structural constraint. The method is also illustrated using a real data example.

  7. Factor Selection and Structural Identification in the Interaction ANOVA Model

    PubMed Central

    Post, Justin B.; Bondell, Howard D.

    2013-01-01

    Summary When faced with categorical predictors and a continuous response, the objective of analysis often consists of two tasks: finding which factors are important and determining which levels of the factors differ significantly from one another. Often times these tasks are done separately using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) followed by a post-hoc hypothesis testing procedure such as Tukey’s Honestly Significant Difference test. When interactions between factors are included in the model the collapsing of levels of a factor becomes a more difficult problem. When testing for differences between two levels of a factor, claiming no difference would refer not only to equality of main effects, but also equality of each interaction involving those levels. This structure between the main effects and interactions in a model is similar to the idea of heredity used in regression models. This paper introduces a new method for accomplishing both of the common analysis tasks simultaneously in an interaction model while also adhering to the heredity-type constraint on the model. An appropriate penalization is constructed that encourages levels of factors to collapse and entire factors to be set to zero. It is shown that the procedure has the oracle property implying that asymptotically it performs as well as if the exact structure were known beforehand. We also discuss the application to estimating interactions in the unreplicated case. Simulation studies show the procedure outperforms post hoc hypothesis testing procedures as well as similar methods that do not include a structural constraint. The method is also illustrated using a real data example. PMID:23323643

  8. A structural view of nuclear hormone receptor: endocrine disruptor interactions.

    PubMed

    le Maire, Albane; Bourguet, William; Balaguer, Patrick

    2010-04-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) represent a broad class of exogenous substances that cause adverse effects in the endocrine system by interfering with hormone biosynthesis, metabolism, or action. The molecular mechanisms of EDCs involve different pathways including interactions with nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) which are primary targets of a large variety of environmental contaminants. Here, based on the crystal structures currently available in the Protein Data Bank, we review recent studies showing the many ways in which EDCs interact with NHRs and impact their signaling pathways. Like the estrogenic chemical diethylstilbestrol, some EDCs mimic the natural hormones through conserved protein-ligand contacts, while others, such as organotins, employ radically different binding mechanisms. Such structure-based knowledge, in addition to providing a better understanding of EDC activities, can be used to predict the endocrine-disrupting potential of environmental pollutants and may have applications in drug discovery.

  9. On RNA-RNA interaction structures of fixed topological genus.

    PubMed

    Fu, Benjamin M M; Han, Hillary S W; Reidys, Christian M

    2015-04-01

    Interacting RNA complexes are studied via bicellular maps using a filtration via their topological genus. Our main result is a new bijection for RNA-RNA interaction structures and a linear time uniform sampling algorithm for RNA complexes of fixed topological genus. The bijection allows to either reduce the topological genus of a bicellular map directly, or to lose connectivity by decomposing the complex into a pair of single stranded RNA structures. Our main result is proved bijectively. It provides an explicit algorithm of how to rewire the corresponding complexes and an unambiguous decomposition grammar. Using the concept of genus induction, we construct bicellular maps of fixed topological genus g uniformly in linear time. We present various statistics on these topological RNA complexes and compare our findings with biological complexes. Furthermore we show how to construct loop-energy based complexes using our decomposition grammar. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Structure of the Interacting Starburst Galaxy II Zw 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cigan, P. J.; Gallagher, J. S.; Rudie, G.; Wehner, E. H.

    2005-09-01

    II Zw 23 (UGC 3179) is a luminous (MB -21) nearby compact narrow emission line starburst galaxy with blue optical colors and strong emission lines. We present a photometric and morphological study of II Zw 23 and its interacting companion, PC016099, using data obtained with the WIYN 3.5-m telescope in combination with a WFPC2 image from the HST archives. II Zw 23 has a highly disturbed outer structure with long trails of debris that may be feeding tidal dwarfs. Its central regions appear disk-like, a structure that is consistent with the overall rotation pattern observed in the Hα emission line velocity field measured from Densepak observations obtained with WIYN. We discuss these results in terms of the different evolutionary paths followed by stars and gas during strong interactions and the possibility of rapid secondary galactic disk formation in such events.

  11. Minimal metabolic pathway structure is consistent with associated biomolecular interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bordbar, Aarash; Nagarajan, Harish; Lewis, Nathan E; Latif, Haythem; Ebrahim, Ali; Federowicz, Stephen; Schellenberger, Jan; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2014-01-01

    Pathways are a universal paradigm for functionally describing cellular processes. Even though advances in high-throughput data generation have transformed biology, the core of our biological understanding, and hence data interpretation, is still predicated on human-defined pathways. Here, we introduce an unbiased, pathway structure for genome-scale metabolic networks defined based on principles of parsimony that do not mimic canonical human-defined textbook pathways. Instead, these minimal pathways better describe multiple independent pathway-associated biomolecular interaction datasets suggesting a functional organization for metabolism based on parsimonious use of cellular components. We use the inherent predictive capability of these pathways to experimentally discover novel transcriptional regulatory interactions in Escherichia coli metabolism for three transcription factors, effectively doubling the known regulatory roles for Nac and MntR. This study suggests an underlying and fundamental principle in the evolutionary selection of pathway structures; namely, that pathways may be minimal, independent, and segregated. PMID:24987116

  12. Relative Displacement Method for Track-Structure Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Óscar Ramón; Pantaleón, Marcos J.

    2014-01-01

    The track-structure interaction effects are usually analysed with conventional FEM programs, where it is difficult to implement the complex track-structure connection behaviour, which is nonlinear, elastic-plastic and depends on the vertical load. The authors developed an alternative analysis method, which they call the relative displacement method. It is based on the calculation of deformation states in single DOF element models that satisfy the boundary conditions. For its solution, an iterative optimisation algorithm is used. This method can be implemented in any programming language or analysis software. A comparison with ABAQUS calculations shows a very good result correlation and compliance with the standard's specifications. PMID:24634610

  13. Three-dimensional structural analysis using interactive graphics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biffle, J.; Sumlin, H. A.

    1975-01-01

    The application of computer interactive graphics to three-dimensional structural analysis was described, with emphasis on the following aspects: (1) structural analysis, and (2) generation and checking of input data and examination of the large volume of output data (stresses, displacements, velocities, accelerations). Handling of three-dimensional input processing with a special MESH3D computer program was explained. Similarly, a special code PLTZ may be used to perform all the needed tasks for output processing from a finite element code. Examples were illustrated.

  14. High frequency flow-structural interaction in dense subsonic fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Baw-Lin; Ofarrell, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    Prediction of the detailed dynamic behavior in rocket propellant feed systems and engines and other such high-energy fluid systems requires precise analysis to assure structural performance. Designs sometimes require placement of bluff bodies in a flow passage. Additionally, there are flexibilities in ducts, liners, and piping systems. A design handbook and interactive data base have been developed for assessing flow/structural interactions to be used as a tool in design and development, to evaluate applicable geometries before problems develop, or to eliminate or minimize problems with existing hardware. This is a compilation of analytical/empirical data and techniques to evaluate detailed dynamic characteristics of both the fluid and structures. These techniques have direct applicability to rocket engine internal flow passages, hot gas drive systems, and vehicle propellant feed systems. Organization of the handbook is by basic geometries for estimating Strouhal numbers, added mass effects, mode shapes for various end constraints, critical onset flow conditions, and possible structural response amplitudes. Emphasis is on dense fluids and high structural loading potential for fatigue at low subsonic flow speeds where high-frequency excitations are possible. Avoidance and corrective measure illustrations are presented together with analytical curve fits for predictions compiled from a comprehensive data base.

  15. Deciphering Supramolecular Structures with Protein-Protein Interaction Network Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Toshiyuki; Yoda, Takao; Shirai, Tsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Many biological molecules are assembled into supramolecules that are essential to perform complicated functions in the cell. However, experimental information about the structures of supramolecules is not sufficient at this point. We developed a method of predicting and modeling the structures of supramolecules in a biological network by combining structural data of the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and interaction data in IntAct databases. Templates for binary complexes in IntAct were extracted from PDB. Modeling was attempted by assembling binary complexes with superposed shared subunits. A total of 3,197 models were constructed, and 1,306 (41% of the total) contained at least one subunit absent from experimental structures. The models also suggested 970 (25% of the total) experimentally undetected subunit interfaces, and 41 human disease-related amino acid variants were mapped onto these model-suggested interfaces. The models demonstrated that protein-protein interaction network modeling is useful to fill the information gap between biological networks and structures. PMID:26549015

  16. Inferring the structure and dynamics of interactions in schooling fish

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Yael; Tunstrøm, Kolbjørn; Ioannou, Christos C.; Huepe, Cristián; Couzin, Iain D.

    2011-01-01

    Determining individual-level interactions that govern highly coordinated motion in animal groups or cellular aggregates has been a long-standing challenge, central to understanding the mechanisms and evolution of collective behavior. Numerous models have been proposed, many of which display realistic-looking dynamics, but nonetheless rely on untested assumptions about how individuals integrate information to guide movement. Here we infer behavioral rules directly from experimental data. We begin by analyzing trajectories of golden shiners (Notemigonus crysoleucas) swimming in two-fish and three-fish shoals to map the mean effective forces as a function of fish positions and velocities. Speeding and turning responses are dynamically modulated and clearly delineated. Speed regulation is a dominant component of how fish interact, and changes in speed are transmitted to those both behind and ahead. Alignment emerges from attraction and repulsion, and fish tend to copy directional changes made by those ahead. We find no evidence for explicit matching of body orientation. By comparing data from two-fish and three-fish shoals, we challenge the standard assumption, ubiquitous in physics-inspired models of collective behavior, that individual motion results from averaging responses to each neighbor considered separately; three-body interactions make a substantial contribution to fish dynamics. However, pairwise interactions qualitatively capture the correct spatial interaction structure in small groups, and this structure persists in larger groups of 10 and 30 fish. The interactions revealed here may help account for the rapid changes in speed and direction that enable real animal groups to stay cohesive and amplify important social information. PMID:21795604

  17. Mutualistic Interactions and Community Structure in Biological Metacommunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rikvold, Per Arne; Filotas, Elise; Grant, Martin; Parrott, Lael

    2011-03-01

    The role of space in determining species coexistence and community structure is well established. However, previous studies mainly focus on simple competition and predation systems, and the role of mutualistic interspecies interactions is not well understood. Here we use a spatially explicit metacommunity model, in which new species enter by a mutation process, to study the effect of fitness-dependent dispersal on the structure of communities with interactions comprising mutualism, competition, and exploitation. We find that the diversity and interaction network undergo a nonequilibrium phase transition with increasing dispersal rate. Low dispersion rate favors spontaneous emergence of many dissimilar, strongly mutualistic and species-poor local communities. Due to the local dissimilarities, the global diversity is high. High dispersion rate promotes local biodiversity and supports similar, species-rich local communities with a wide range of interactions. The strong similarity between neighboring local communities leads to reduced global diversity. Supported by NSERC (Canada), FQRNT (Québec), NSF (U.S.A.)

  18. Evolution of spatially structured host-parasite interactions.

    PubMed

    Lion, S; Gandon, S

    2015-01-01

    Spatial structure has dramatic effects on the demography and the evolution of species. A large variety of theoretical models have attempted to understand how local dispersal may shape the coevolution of interacting species such as host-parasite interactions. The lack of a unifying framework is a serious impediment for anyone willing to understand current theory. Here, we review previous theoretical studies in the light of a single epidemiological model that allows us to explore the effects of both host and parasite migration rates on the evolution and coevolution of various life-history traits. We discuss the impact of local dispersal on parasite virulence, various host defence strategies and local adaptation. Our analysis shows that evolutionary and coevolutionary outcomes crucially depend on the details of the host-parasite life cycle and on which life-history trait is involved in the interaction. We also discuss experimental studies that support the effects of spatial structure on the evolution of host-parasite interactions. This review highlights major similarities between some theoretical results, but it also reveals an important gap between evolutionary and coevolutionary models. We discuss possible ways to bridge this gap within a more unified framework that would reconcile spatial epidemiology, evolution and coevolution. © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  19. Computational Study of Colloidal Droplet Interactions with Three Dimensional Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-18

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The colloidal droplet spreading on and sorption into a porous medium is important to 3D printing technology. In this study... colloidal fluid distribution in the porous structure after sorption of single/multiple droplets in powder beds. The spreading of the droplet on the surface...Feb-2015 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Computational Study of Colloidal Droplet Interactions with Three Dimensional

  20. Solid breeder/structure mechanical interaction and thermal stability

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.Y.; Billone, M.C.; Taghavi, K.

    1985-04-01

    Solid breeder/structure mechanical interaction (BSMI) during fusion reactor blanket operation is a potential failure mode which could limit the lifetime of the blanket. The severity of BSMI will generally depend on the materials, specific blanket designs, and blanket operating conditions. Thermomechanical analyses performed for a helium-cooled blanket employing Li/sub 2/O/HT-9 plates indicate that BSMI could be a serious concern for this blanket.

  1. Nail-like targets for laser plasma interaction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pasley, J; Wei, M; Shipton, E; Chen, S; Ma, T; Beg, F N; Alexander, N; Stephens, R B; MacPhee, A G; Hey, D; Pape, S L; Patel, P; Mackinnon, A J; Key, M H; Offermann, D; Link, A; Chowdhury, E; Van-Woerkom, L D; Freeman, R R

    2007-12-18

    The interaction of ultra-high power picosecond laser pulses with solid targets is of interest both for benchmarking the results of hybrid particle in cell (PIC) codes and also for applications to re-entrant cone guided fast ignition. We describe the construction of novel targets in which copper/titanium wires are formed into 'nail-like' objects by a process of melting and micromachining, so that energy can be reliably coupled to a 24 {micro}m diameter wire. An extreme-ultraviolet image of the interaction of the Titan laser with such a target is shown.

  2. SAMPIE (Solar Array Module Plasma Interactions Experiment). (Videotape)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    SAMPIE is an in-space technology experiment that flew on STS-62. Its intent is to investigate the potentially damaging effects of space plasma (gases) on different types, sizes, and shapes of solar cells, solar modules, and spacecraft materials.

  3. Shock Wave / Boundary Layer Interaction Experiment on Control Surface

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    like ice cubes do in water. When heat is added to the water/ ice mixture, ice melts , but the temperature of the mixture remains at 0ºC until all the ice ...ramp will likely experience similar oscillations (Figure 1). Various other groups have also performed numerical [9][10] and experimental [11][12][13... experimental data from all payloads in addition to some “housekeeping” signals. It also sends experiment control signals to the payloads. The

  4. Interactive Approach on Experiments in Mechanical Engineering : Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumon, Makoto; Torigoe, Ippei; Mizumoto, Ikuro; Yamaguchi, Teruo; Kohzawa, Ryuichi; Ohshima, Yasutaka

    Experiments in the engineering education play important roles in motivating students to study voluntarily. A trial aiming to enhance this effect in the experiment of vibration at Mechanical System Engineering, Kumamoto University is introduced. The trial consists of 1) oral presentation by students, 2) web-based learning system and 3) feedback through reports. An evaluation by questionnaire was conducted to show the validity of this trial. This result revealed that the trial succeeded to encourage students.

  5. Genetics-based interactions among plants, pathogens, and herbivores define arthropod community structure.

    PubMed

    Busby, Posy E; Lamit, Louis J; Keith, Arthur R; Newcombe, George; Gehring, Catherine A; Whitham, Thomas G; Dirzo, Rodolfo

    2015-07-01

    Plant resistance to pathogens or insect herbivores is common, but its potential for indirectly influencing plant-associated communities is poorly known. Here, we test whether pathogens' indirect effects on arthropod communities and herbivory depend on plant resistance to pathogens and/or herbivores, and address the overarching interacting foundation species hypothesis that genetics-based interactions among a few highly interactive species can structure a much larger community. In a manipulative field experiment using replicated genotypes of two Populus species and their interspecific hybrids, we found that genetic variation in plant resistance to both pathogens and insect herbivores modulated the strength of pathogens' indirect effects on arthropod communities and insect herbivory. First, due in part to the pathogens' differential impacts on leaf biomass among the two Populus species and the hybrids, the pathogen most strongly impacted arthropod community composition, richness, and abundance on the pathogen-susceptible tree species. Second, we found similar patterns comparing pathogen-susceptible and pathogen-resistant genotypes within species. Third, within a plant species, pathogens caused a fivefold greater reduction in herbivory on insect-herbivore-susceptible plant genotypes than on herbivore-resistant genotypes, demonstrating that the pathogen-herbivore interaction is genotype dependent. We conclude that interactions among plants, pathogens, and herbivores can structure multitrophic communities, supporting the interacting foundation species hypothesis. Because these interactions are genetically based, evolutionary changes in genetic resistance could result in ecological changes in associated communities, which may in turn feed back to affect plant fitness.

  6. Genetic Risk by Experience Interaction for Childhood Internalizing Problems: Converging Evidence across Multiple Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vendlinski, Matthew K.; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Essex, Marilyn J.; Goldsmith, H. Hill

    2011-01-01

    Background: Identifying how genetic risk interacts with experience to predict psychopathology is an important step toward understanding the etiology of mental health problems. Few studies have examined genetic risk by experience interaction (GxE) in the development of childhood psychopathology. Methods: We used both co-twin and parent mental…

  7. Genetic Risk by Experience Interaction for Childhood Internalizing Problems: Converging Evidence across Multiple Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vendlinski, Matthew K.; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Essex, Marilyn J.; Goldsmith, H. Hill

    2011-01-01

    Background: Identifying how genetic risk interacts with experience to predict psychopathology is an important step toward understanding the etiology of mental health problems. Few studies have examined genetic risk by experience interaction (GxE) in the development of childhood psychopathology. Methods: We used both co-twin and parent mental…

  8. Experiments In Multivariable Adaptive Control Of A Flexible Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ih, Che-Hang C.; Bayard, David S.; Ahmed, Asif; Wang, Shyh J.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes experiments in use of six-input/six-output multivariable adaptive control system to suppress vibrations in complicated flexible structure. Represents significant upgrade relative to two-input/two-output system, yielding significant improvement in spatial controllability and effective damping of largest set of modes. Structure exhibits low modal frequencies and complicated dynamics like those of large structures in outer space. Conclusions drawn from research relevant to such applications as active suppression of wind and earthquake vibrations in tall buildings and other large terrestrial structures.

  9. Coupling fluid-structure interaction with phase-field fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wick, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    In this work, a concept for coupling fluid-structure interaction with brittle fracture in elasticity is proposed. The fluid-structure interaction problem is modeled in terms of the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian technique and couples the isothermal, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with nonlinear elastodynamics using the Saint-Venant Kirchhoff solid model. The brittle fracture model is based on a phase-field approach for cracks in elasticity and pressurized elastic solids. In order to derive a common framework, the phase-field approach is re-formulated in Lagrangian coordinates to combine it with fluid-structure interaction. A crack irreversibility condition, that is mathematically characterized as an inequality constraint in time, is enforced with the help of an augmented Lagrangian iteration. The resulting problem is highly nonlinear and solved with a modified Newton method (e.g., error-oriented) that specifically allows for a temporary increase of the residuals. The proposed framework is substantiated with several numerical tests. In these examples, computational stability in space and time is shown for several goal functionals, which demonstrates reliability of numerical modeling and algorithmic techniques. But also current limitations such as the necessity of using solid damping are addressed.

  10. Flavonoid interactions with human transthyretin: combined structural and thermodynamic analysis.

    PubMed

    Trivella, Daniela B B; dos Reis, Caio V; Lima, Luís Maurício T R; Foguel, Débora; Polikarpov, Igor

    2012-10-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) is a carrier protein involved in human amyloidosis. The development of small molecules that may act as TTR amyloid inhibitors is a promising strategy to treat these pathologies. Here we selected and characterized the interaction of flavonoids with the wild type and the V30M amyloidogenic mutant TTR. TTR acid aggregation was evaluated in vitro in the presence of the different flavonoids. The best TTR aggregation inhibitors were studied by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) in order to reveal their thermodynamic signature of binding to TTRwt. Crystal structures of TTRwt in complex with the top binders were also obtained, enabling us to in depth inspect TTR interactions with these flavonoids. The results indicate that changing the number and position of hydroxyl groups attached to the flavonoid core strongly influence flavonoid recognition by TTR, either by changing ligand affinity or its mechanism of interaction with the two sites of TTR. We also compared the results obtained for TTRwt with the V30M mutant structure in the apo form, allowing us to pinpoint structural features that may facilitate or hamper ligand binding to the V30M mutant. Our data show that the TTRwt binding site is labile and, in particular, the central region of the cavity is sensible for the small differences in the ligands tested and can be influenced by the Met30 amyloidogenic mutation, therefore playing important roles in flavonoid binding affinity, mechanism and mutant protein ligand binding specificities.

  11. The structure and interactions of starch with food constituents.

    PubMed

    Biliaderis, C G

    1991-01-01

    For most starch-containing foods, the physical and functional properties can be traced to characteristic molecular species being present, their interactions with each other, and modifications caused by environmental conditions (moisture, temperature, shear) during processing and storage. In the present paper, the chemistry and physical chemistry of starch are discussed with an emphasis on how structure (molecular and supermolecular) and composition influence the functionality of this polysaccharide. New experimental findings brought forward on structure indicate that this polymeric carbohydrate is found in various metastable states, depending on the thermomechanical history of the product. Even more important to processing and quality attributes of starch products is the recognition that the dynamics of the supermolecular structure and interactions between starch and other food constituents are governed by the mobility of the amorphous phase of each particular system. In this respect, water, acting as a plasticizer, depresses the glass transition temperature (Tg) and thereby alters the kinetics of state transformations (e.g., gelatinization, retrogradation) and reactivity of starch. The effects of water on phase transition behavior of starch as well as the underlying molecular mechanisms to the phenomena of gelatinization, gelation, retrogradation, and starch-lipid interactions are reviewed herein. Finally, consideration is given to factors affecting the digestibility of starch from the viewpoint of processing-related changes in the susceptibility of starch to alpha-amylase.

  12. Structured learning of human interactions in TV shows.

    PubMed

    Patron-Perez, Alonso; Marszalek, Marcin; Reid, Ian; Zisserman, Andrew

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this work is recognition and spatiotemporal localization of two-person interactions in video. Our approach is person-centric. As a first stage we track all upper bodies and heads in a video using a tracking-by-detection approach that combines detections with KLT tracking and clique partitioning, together with occlusion detection, to yield robust person tracks. We develop local descriptors of activity based on the head orientation (estimated using a set of pose-specific classifiers) and the local spatiotemporal region around them, together with global descriptors that encode the relative positions of people as a function of interaction type. Learning and inference on the model uses a structured output SVM which combines the local and global descriptors in a principled manner. Inference using the model yields information about which pairs of people are interacting, their interaction class, and their head orientation (which is also treated as a variable, enabling mistakes in the classifier to be corrected using global context). We show that inference can be carried out with polynomial complexity in the number of people, and describe an efficient algorithm for this. The method is evaluated on a new dataset comprising 300 video clips acquired from 23 different TV shows and on the benchmark UT--Interaction dataset.

  13. Dynamic near-field optical interaction between oscillating nanomechanical structures

    DOE PAGES

    Ahn, Phillip; Chen, Xiang; Zhang, Zhen; ...

    2015-05-27

    Near-field optical techniques exploit light-matter interactions at small length scales for mechanical sensing and actuation of nanomechanical structures. Here, we study the optical interaction between two mechanical oscillators—a plasmonic nanofocusing probe-tip supported by a low frequency cantilever, and a high frequency nanomechanical resonator—and leverage their interaction for local detection of mechanical vibrations. The plasmonic nanofocusing probe provides a confined optical source to enhance the interaction between the two oscillators. Dynamic perturbation of the optical cavity between the probe-tip and the resonator leads to nonlinear modulation of the scattered light intensity at the sum and difference of their frequencies. This double-frequencymore » demodulation scheme is explored to suppress unwanted background and to detect mechanical vibrations with a minimum detectable displacement sensitivity of 0.45pm/Hz1/2, which is limited by shot noise and electrical noise. We explore the demodulation scheme for imaging the bending vibration mode shape of the resonator with a lateral spatial resolution of 20nm. We also demonstrate the time-resolved aspect of the local optical interaction by recording the ring-down vibrations of the resonator at frequencies of up to 129MHz. The near-field optical technique is promising for studying dynamic mechanical processes in individual nanostructures.« less

  14. Dynamic near-field optical interaction between oscillating nanomechanical structures

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Phillip; Chen, Xiang; Zhang, Zhen; Ford, Matthew; Rosenmann, Daniel; Jung, II Woong; Sun, Cheng; Balogun, Oluwaseyi

    2015-05-27

    Near-field optical techniques exploit light-matter interactions at small length scales for mechanical sensing and actuation of nanomechanical structures. Here, we study the optical interaction between two mechanical oscillators—a plasmonic nanofocusing probe-tip supported by a low frequency cantilever, and a high frequency nanomechanical resonator—and leverage their interaction for local detection of mechanical vibrations. The plasmonic nanofocusing probe provides a confined optical source to enhance the interaction between the two oscillators. Dynamic perturbation of the optical cavity between the probe-tip and the resonator leads to nonlinear modulation of the scattered light intensity at the sum and difference of their frequencies. This double-frequency demodulation scheme is explored to suppress unwanted background and to detect mechanical vibrations with a minimum detectable displacement sensitivity of 0.45pm/Hz1/2, which is limited by shot noise and electrical noise. We explore the demodulation scheme for imaging the bending vibration mode shape of the resonator with a lateral spatial resolution of 20nm. We also demonstrate the time-resolved aspect of the local optical interaction by recording the ring-down vibrations of the resonator at frequencies of up to 129MHz. The near-field optical technique is promising for studying dynamic mechanical processes in individual nanostructures.

  15. Dynamic near-field optical interaction between oscillating nanomechanical structures

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Phillip; Chen, Xiang; Zhang, Zhen; Ford, Matthew; Rosenmann, Daniel; Jung, II Woong; Sun, Cheng; Balogun, Oluwaseyi

    2015-01-01

    Near-field optical techniques exploit light-matter interactions at small length scales for mechanical sensing and actuation of nanomechanical structures. Here, we study the optical interaction between two mechanical oscillators—a plasmonic nanofocusing probe-tip supported by a low frequency cantilever, and a high frequency nanomechanical resonator—and leverage their interaction for local detection of mechanical vibrations. The plasmonic nanofocusing probe provides a confined optical source to enhance the interaction between the two oscillators. Dynamic perturbation of the optical cavity between the probe-tip and the resonator leads to nonlinear modulation of the scattered light intensity at the sum and difference of their frequencies. This double-frequency demodulation scheme is explored to suppress unwanted background and to detect mechanical vibrations with a minimum detectable displacement sensitivity of 0.45 pm/Hz1/2, which is limited by shot noise and electrical noise. We explore the demodulation scheme for imaging the bending vibration mode shape of the resonator with a lateral spatial resolution of 20 nm. We also demonstrate the time-resolved aspect of the local optical interaction by recording the ring-down vibrations of the resonator at frequencies of up to 129 MHz. The near-field optical technique is promising for studying dynamic mechanical processes in individual nanostructures. PMID:26014599

  16. Optimal experiment design for identification of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, D. S.; Hadaegh, F. Y.; Meldrum, D. R.

    1988-01-01

    The optimal experiment design for on-orbit identification of modal frequency and damping parameters in large flexible space structures is discussed. The main result is a separation principle for D-optimal design which states that under certain conditions the sensor placement problem is decoupled from the input design problem. This decoupling effect significantly simplifies the overall optimal experiment design determination for large MIMO structural systems with many unknown modal parameters. The error from using the uncoupled design is estimated in terms of the inherent damping of the structure. A numerical example is given, demonstrating the usefulness of the simplified criteria in determining optimal designs for on-orbit Space Station identification experiments.

  17. Structural Analysis of Chemokine Receptor–Ligand Interactions

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    This review focuses on the construction and application of structural chemokine receptor models for the elucidation of molecular determinants of chemokine receptor modulation and the structure-based discovery and design of chemokine receptor ligands. A comparative analysis of ligand binding pockets in chemokine receptors is presented, including a detailed description of the CXCR4, CCR2, CCR5, CCR9, and US28 X-ray structures, and their implication for modeling molecular interactions of chemokine receptors with small-molecule ligands, peptide ligands, and large antibodies and chemokines. These studies demonstrate how the integration of new structural information on chemokine receptors with extensive structure–activity relationship and site-directed mutagenesis data facilitates the prediction of the structure of chemokine receptor–ligand complexes that have not been crystallized. Finally, a review of structure-based ligand discovery and design studies based on chemokine receptor crystal structures and homology models illustrates the possibilities and challenges to find novel ligands for chemokine receptors. PMID:28165741

  18. Unexpected Control Structure Interaction on International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, Susan F.; Platonov, Valery; Medina, Elizabeth A.; Borisenko, Alexander; Bogachev, Alexey

    2017-01-01

    On June 23, 2011, the International Space Station (ISS) was performing a routine 180 degree yaw maneuver in support of a Russian vehicle docking when the on board Russian Segment (RS) software unexpectedly declared two attitude thrusters failed and switched thruster configurations in response to unanticipated ISS dynamic motion. Flight data analysis after the maneuver indicated that higher than predicted structural loads had been induced at various locations on the United States (U.S.) segment of the ISS. Further analysis revealed that the attitude control system was firing thrusters in response to both structural flex and rigid body rates, which resonated the structure and caused high loads and fatigue cycles. It was later determined that the thruster themselves were healthy. The RS software logic, which was intended to react to thruster failures, had instead been heavily influenced by interaction between the control system and structural flex. This paper will discuss the technical aspects of the control structure interaction problem that led to the RS control system firing thrusters in response to structural flex, the factors that led to insufficient preflight analysis of the thruster firings, and the ramifications the event had on the ISS. An immediate consequence included limiting which thrusters could be used for attitude control. This complicated the planning of on-orbit thruster events and necessitated the use of suboptimal thruster configurations that increased propellant usage and caused thruster lifetime usage concerns. In addition to the technical aspects of the problem, the team dynamics and communication shortcomings that led to such an event happening in an environment where extensive analysis is performed in support of human space flight will also be examined. Finally, the technical solution will be presented, which required a multidisciplinary effort between the U.S. and Russian control system engineers and loads and dynamics structural engineers to

  19. Structure and thermodynamic properties of water--methanol mixtures: Role of the water--water interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, H. ); Gubbins, K.E. )

    1992-08-15

    Thermodynamic properties and structures of water--methanol mixtures at various temperatures have been investigated by means of Monte Carlo simulations and subsequent analyses. The OPLS model by Jorgensen was used for the methanol--methanol interaction and both the Caravetta--Clementi (CC) potential and TIP4P potential by Jorgensen {ital et} {ital al}. were used for the water--water interaction. We show that the role of water--water interaction is very important in discussing aqueous solutions of alcohols, and examine the origin of the exothermic mixing processes. We have investigated the sensitivity of the temperature dependence of the enthalpy of mixing to the water--water interaction. The CC potential is able to reproduce the temperature dependence observed in experiments, although the absolute values of the mixing enthalpy were larger than the experimental ones. While the TIP4P potential results in better agreement for the excess enthalpy and volume near room temperature, the temperature dependence of the excess enthalpy did not agree with experiment. The difference in the magnitude of the exothermic hydration for different water--water interactions is explained in terms of the energetic stability of the clathrate hydrate compared with ice, on the basis that the structure of water in the vicinity of a methanol molecule is similar to the clathrate hydrate. It is found that the energetic stability of the clathrate hydrate for the CC model is higher than that for TIP4P, and this is responsible for the larger exothermic hydration. The higher stability of the clathrate hydrate structure for the CC potential, in turn, arises from the difference in the pair interaction energy surface between two kinds of potential functions; the minimum energy structure and the flexibility of the hydrogen bonded pair.

  20. Structure and thermodynamic properties of water-methanol mixtures: Role of the water-water interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hideki; Gubbins, Keith E.

    1992-08-01

    Thermodynamic properties and structures of water-methanol mixtures at various temperatures have been investigated by means of Monte Carlo simulations and subsequent analyses. The OPLS model by Jorgensen was used for the methanol-methanol interaction and both the Caravetta-Clementi (CC) potential and TIP4P potential by Jorgensen et al. were used for the water-water interaction. We show that the role of water-water interaction is very important in discussing aqueous solutions of alcohols, and examine the origin of the exothermic mixing processes. We have investigated the sensitivity of the temperature dependence of the enthalpy of mixing to the water-water interaction. The CC potential is able to reproduce the temperature dependence observed in experiments, although the absolute values of the mixing enthalpy were larger than the experimental ones. While the TIP4P potential results in better agreement for the excess enthalpy and volume near room temperature, the temperature dependence of the excess enthalpy did not agree with experiment. The difference in the magnitude of the exothermic hydration for different water-water interactions is explained in terms of the energetic stability of the clathrate hydrate compared with ice, on the basis that the structure of water in the vicinity of a methanol molecule is similar to the clathrate hydrate. It is found that the energetic stability of the clathrate hydrate for the CC model is higher than that for TIP4P, and this is responsible for the larger exothermic hydration. The higher stability of the clathrate hydrate structure for the CC potential, in turn, arises from the difference in the pair interaction energy surface between two kinds of potential functions; the minimum energy structure and the flexibility of the hydrogen bonded pair.

  1. Interactive effects of warming, eutrophication and size structure: impacts on biodiversity and food-web structure.

    PubMed

    Binzer, Amrei; Guill, Christian; Rall, Björn C; Brose, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Warming and eutrophication are two of the most important global change stressors for natural ecosystems, but their interaction is poorly understood. We used a dynamic model of complex, size-structured food webs to assess interactive effects on diversity and network structure. We found antagonistic impacts: Warming increases diversity in eutrophic systems and decreases it in oligotrophic systems. These effects interact with the community size structure: Communities of similarly sized species such as parasitoid-host systems are stabilized by warming and destabilized by eutrophication, whereas the diversity of size-structured predator-prey networks decreases strongly with warming, but decreases only weakly with eutrophication. Nonrandom extinction risks for generalists and specialists lead to higher connectance in networks without size structure and lower connectance in size-structured communities. Overall, our results unravel interactive impacts of warming and eutrophication and suggest that size structure may serve as an important proxy for predicting the community sensitivity to these global change stressors. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. STS-74/Mir photogrammetric appendage structural dynamics experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Sharon S.; Gilbert, Michael G.

    1996-01-01

    The Photogrammetric Appendage Structural Dynamics Experiment (PASDE) is an International Space Station (ISS) Phase-1 risk mitigation experiment. Phase-1 experiments are performed during docking missions of the U.S. Space Shuttle to the Russian Space Station Mir. The purpose of the experiment is to demonstrate the use of photogrammetric techniques for determination of structural dynamic mode parameters of solar arrays and other spacecraft appendages. Photogrammetric techniques are a low cost alternative to appendage mounted accelerometers for the ISS program. The objective of the first flight of PASDE, on STS-74 in November 1995, was to obtain video images of Mir Kvant-2 solar array response to various structural dynamic excitation events. More than 113 minutes of high quality structural response video data was collected during the mission. The PASDE experiment hardware consisted of three instruments each containing two video cameras, two video tape recorders, a modified video signal time inserter, and associated avionics boxes. The instruments were designed, fabricated, and tested at the NASA Langley Research Center in eight months. The flight hardware was integrated into standard Hitchhiker canisters at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and then installed into the Space Shuttle cargo bay in locations selected to achieve good video coverage and photogrammetric geometry.

  3. Genetic variation, predator–prey interactions and food web structure

    PubMed Central

    Moya-Laraño, Jordi

    2011-01-01

    Food webs are networks of species that feed on each other. The role that within-population phenotypic and genetic variation plays in food web structure is largely unknown. Here, I show via simulation how variation in two key traits, growth rates and phenology, by influencing the variability of body sizes present through time, can potentially affect several structural parameters in the direction of enhancing food web persistence: increased connectance, decreased interaction strengths, increased variation among interaction strengths and increased degree of omnivory. I discuss other relevant traits whose variation could affect the structure of food webs, such as morphological and additional life-history traits, as well as animal personalities. Furthermore, trait variation could also contribute to the stability of food web modules through metacommunity dynamics. I propose future research to help establish a link between within-population variation and food web structure. If appropriately established, such a link could have important consequences for biological conservation, as it would imply that preserving (functional) genetic variation within populations could ensure the preservation of entire communities. PMID:21444316

  4. Front surface structured targets for enhancing laser-plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Joseph; George, Kevin; Ji, Liangliang; Yalamanchili, Sasir; Simonoff, Ethan; Cochran, Ginevra; Daskalova, Rebecca; Poole, Patrick; Willis, Christopher; Lewis, Nathan; Schumacher, Douglass

    2016-10-01

    We present recent progress made using front surface structured interfaces for enhancing ultrashort, relativistic laser-plasma interactions. Structured targets can increase laser absorption and enhance ion acceleration through a number of mechanisms such as direct laser acceleration and laser guiding. We detail experimental results obtained at the Scarlet laser facility on hollow, micron-scale plasma channels for enhancing electron acceleration. These targets show a greater than three times enhancement in the electron cutoff energy as well as an increased slope temperature for the electron distribution when compared to a flat interface. Using three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, we have modeled the interaction to give insight into the physical processes responsible for the enhancement. Furthermore, we have used PIC simulations to design structures that are more advantageous for ion acceleration. Such targets necessitate advanced target fabrication methods and we describe techniques used to manufacture optimized structures, including vapor-liquid-solid growth, cryogenic etching, and 3D printing using two-photon-polymerization. This material is based upon work supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Award Number FA9550-14-1-0085.

  5. Generation of filamentary structures by beam-plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.Y.; Lin, Y.

    2006-05-15

    The previous simulations by Wang and Lin [Phys. Plasmas. 10, 3528 (2003)] showed that filaments, frequently observed in space plasmas, can form via the interaction between an ion beam and a background plasma. In this study, the physical mechanism for the generation of the filaments is investigated by a two-dimensional hybrid simulation, in which a field-aligned ion beam with relative beam density n{sub b}=0.1 and beam velocity V{sub b}=10V{sub A} is initiated in a uniform plasma. Right-hand nonresonant ion beam modes, consistent with the linear theory, are found to be dominant in the linear stage of the beam-plasma interaction. In the later nonlinear stage, the nonresonant modes decay and the resonant modes grow through a nonlinear wave coupling. The interaction among the resonant modes leads to the formation of filamentary structures, which are the field-aligned structures (k perpendicular B) of magnetic field B, density, and temperature in the final stage. The filaments are nonlinearly generated in a prey-predator fashion by the parallel and oblique resonant ion beam modes, which meanwhile evolve into two types of shear Alfven modes, with one mainly propagating along the background field B{sub 0} and the other obliquely propagating. The filamentary structures are found to be phase standing in the plasma frame, but their amplitude oscillates with time. In the dominant filament mode, fluctuations in the background ion density, background ion temperature, and beam density are in phase with the fluctuations in B, whereas the significantly enhanced beam temperature is antiphase with B. It is found that the filaments are produced by the interaction of at least two ion beam modes with comparable amplitudes, not by only one single mode, thus their generation mechanism is different from other mechanisms such as the stimulated excitation by the decay of an Alfven wave.

  6. Interaction strength and model geometry effects on the structure of crossing-shock wave/turbulent boundary-layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, T. J.; Settles, G. S.

    1993-01-01

    The flowfield structure of a range of symmetric crossing-shock wave/turbulent boundary-layer interactions of varying strength is presented. The test geometry, consisting of a symmetric pair of opposing sharp fins at angle of attack, alpha, mounted to a flat plate, is studied experimentally for a range of alpha from 7 to 15 degrees at Mach numbers of 3 and 4. Results reveal that the basic flowfield shock structure remains similar in nature over the range of interaction strengths examined, with the only changes being in the scale and location of the various features present. The separated flow regions are classified as being either completely or partially separated, the completely separated case being the one in which the entire incoming boundary layer separates from the plate surface. For the current experiments, all but the weakest of the interactions exhibited complete boundary layer separation. Finally, the effects of model geometry are analyzed by comparing data for shock generators of varying lengths, with the results showing no evidence of upstream influence due to the shock generator trailing edges.

  7. Interaction strength and model geometry effects on the structure of crossing-shock wave/turbulent boundary-layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, T. J.; Settles, G. S.

    1993-01-01

    The flowfield structure of a range of symmetric crossing-shock wave/turbulent boundary-layer interactions of varying strength is presented. The test geometry, consisting of a symmetric pair of opposing sharp fins at angle of attack, alpha, mounted to a flat plate, is studied experimentally for a range of alpha from 7 to 15 degrees at Mach numbers of 3 and 4. Results reveal that the basic flowfield shock structure remains similar in nature over the range of interaction strengths examined, with the only changes being in the scale and location of the various features present. The separated flow regions are classified as being either completely or partially separated, the completely separated case being the one in which the entire incoming boundary layer separates from the plate surface. For the current experiments, all but the weakest of the interactions exhibited complete boundary layer separation. Finally, the effects of model geometry are analyzed by comparing data for shock generators of varying lengths, with the results showing no evidence of upstream influence due to the shock generator trailing edges.

  8. Fluid/Structure Interaction Studies of Aircraft Using High Fidelity Equations on Parallel Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru; VanDalsem, William (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Abstract Aeroelasticity which involves strong coupling of fluids, structures and controls is an important element in designing an aircraft. Computational aeroelasticity using low fidelity methods such as the linear aerodynamic flow equations coupled with the modal structural equations are well advanced. Though these low fidelity approaches are computationally less intensive, they are not adequate for the analysis of modern aircraft such as High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) and Advanced Subsonic Transport (AST) which can experience complex flow/structure interactions. HSCT can experience vortex induced aeroelastic oscillations whereas AST can experience transonic buffet associated structural oscillations. Both aircraft may experience a dip in the flutter speed at the transonic regime. For accurate aeroelastic computations at these complex fluid/structure interaction situations, high fidelity equations such as the Navier-Stokes for fluids and the finite-elements for structures are needed. Computations using these high fidelity equations require large computational resources both in memory and speed. Current conventional super computers have reached their limitations both in memory and speed. As a result, parallel computers have evolved to overcome the limitations of conventional computers. This paper will address the transition that is taking place in computational aeroelasticity from conventional computers to parallel computers. The paper will address special techniques needed to take advantage of the architecture of new parallel computers. Results will be illustrated from computations made on iPSC/860 and IBM SP2 computer by using ENSAERO code that directly couples the Euler/Navier-Stokes flow equations with high resolution finite-element structural equations.

  9. Shock-driven fluid-structure interaction for civil design

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Stephen L; Deiterding, Ralf

    2011-11-01

    The multiphysics fluid-structure interaction simulation of shock-loaded structures requires the dynamic coupling of a shock-capturing flow solver to a solid mechanics solver for large deformations. The Virtual Test Facility combines a Cartesian embedded boundary approach with dynamic mesh adaptation in a generic software framework of flow solvers using hydrodynamic finite volume upwind schemes that are coupled to various explicit finite element solid dynamics solvers (Deiterding et al., 2006). This paper gives a brief overview of the computational approach and presents first simulations that utilize the general purpose solid dynamics code DYNA3D for complex 3D structures of interest in civil engineering. Results from simulations of a reinforced column, highway bridge, multistory building, and nuclear reactor building are presented.

  10. Isotope labeling for NMR studies of macromolecular structure and interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, P.E.

    1994-12-01

    Implementation of biosynthetic methods for uniform or specific isotope labeling of proteins, coupled with the recent development of powerful heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods, has led to a dramatic increase in the size and complexity of macromolecular systems that are now amenable to NMR structural analysis. In recent years, a new technology has emerged that combines uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeling with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods to allow NMR structural studies of systems approaching 25 to 30 kDa in molecular weight. In addition, with the introduction of specific {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N labels into ligands, meaningful NMR studies of complexes of even higher molecular weight have become feasible. These advances usher in a new era in which the earlier, rather stringent molecular weight limitations have been greatly surpassed and NMR can begin to address many central biological problems that involve macromolecular structure, dynamics, and interactions.

  11. Finite element solution of transient fluid-structure interaction problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everstine, Gordon C.; Cheng, Raymond S.; Hambric, Stephen A.

    1991-01-01

    A finite element approach using NASTRAN is developed for solving time-dependent fluid-structure interaction problems, with emphasis on the transient scattering of acoustic waves from submerged elastic structures. Finite elements are used for modeling both structure and fluid domains to facilitate the graphical display of the wave motion through both media. For the liquid, the use of velocity potential as the fundamental unknown results in a symmetric matrix equation. The approach is illustrated for the problem of transient scattering from a submerged elastic spherical shell subjected to an incident tone burst. The use of an analogy between the equations of elasticity and the wave equation of acoustics, a necessary ingredient to the procedure, is summarized.

  12. HIPPIE: Integrating Protein Interaction Networks with Experiment Based Quality Scores

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Martin H.; Fontaine, Jean-Fred; Vinayagam, Arunachalam; Porras, Pablo; Wanker, Erich E.; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    Protein function is often modulated by protein-protein interactions (PPIs) and therefore defining the partners of a protein helps to understand its activity. PPIs can be detected through different experimental approaches and are collected in several expert curated databases. These databases are used by researchers interested in examining detailed information on particular proteins. In many analyses the reliability of the characterization of the interactions becomes important and it might be necessary to select sets of PPIs of different confidence levels. To this goal, we generated HIPPIE (Human Integrated Protein-Protein Interaction rEference), a human PPI dataset with a normalized scoring scheme that integrates multiple experimental PPI datasets. HIPPIE's scoring scheme has been optimized by human experts and a computer algorithm to reflect the amount and quality of evidence for a given PPI and we show that these scores correlate to the quality of the experimental characterization. The HIPPIE web tool (available at http://cbdm.mdc-berlin.de/tools/hippie) allows researchers to do network analyses focused on likely true PPI sets by generating subnetworks around proteins of interest at a specified confidence level. PMID:22348130

  13. Rotor-Fuselage Interaction: Analysis and Validation with Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, John D.; Bettschart, Nicolas

    1997-01-01

    The problem of rotor-fuselage aerodynamic interaction has to be considered in industry applications from various aspects. First, in order to increase helicopter speed and reduce operational costs, rotorcraft tend to be more and more compact, with a main rotor closer to the fuselage surface. This creates significant perturbations both on the main rotor and on the fuselage, including steady and unsteady effects due to blade and wake passage and perturbed inflow at the rotor disk. Furthermore,the main rotor wake affects the tail boom, empennage and anti-torque system. This has important consequences for helicopter control and vibrations at low speeds and also on tail rotor acoustics (main rotor wake-tail rotor interactions). This report describes the US Army-France MOD cooperative work on this problem from both the theoretical and experimental aspects. Using experimental 3D velocity field and fuselage surface pressure measurements, three codes that model the interactions of a helicopter rotor with a fuselage are compared. These comparisons demonstrate some of the strengths and weaknesses of current models for the combined rotor-fuselage analysis.

  14. Three Slit Experiments and the Structure of Quantum Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ududec, Cozmin; Barnum, Howard; Emerson, Joseph

    2011-03-01

    In spite of the interference manifested in the double-slit experiment, quantum theory predicts that a measure of interference defined by Sorkin and involving various outcome probabilities from an experiment with three slits, is identically zero. We adapt Sorkin's measure into a general operational probabilistic framework for physical theories, and then study its relationship to the structure of quantum theory. In particular, we characterize the class of probabilistic theories for which the interference measure is zero as ones in which it is possible to fully determine the state of a system via specific sets of `two-slit' experiments.

  15. Diversifying Science: Underrepresented Student Experiences in Structured Research Programs

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Nolan L.; Lin, Monica H.; Arellano, Lucy; Espinosa, Lorelle L.

    2013-01-01

    Targeting four institutions with structured science research programs for undergraduates, this study focuses on how underrepresented students experience science. Several key themes emerged from focus group discussions: learning to become research scientists, experiences with the culture of science, and views on racial and social stigma. Participants spoke of essential factors for becoming a scientist, but their experiences also raised complex issues about the role of race and social stigma in scientific training. Students experienced the collaborative and empowering culture of science, exhibited strong science identities and high self-efficacy, while developing directed career goals as a result of “doing science” in these programs. PMID:23503690

  16. Structure of colloidosomes with tunable particle density: Simulation versus experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantoni, Riccardo; Salari, Johannes W. O.; Klumperman, Bert

    2012-06-01

    Colloidosomes are created in the laboratory from a Pickering emulsion of water droplets in oil. The colloidosomes have approximately the same diameter and by choosing (hairy) particles of different diameters it is possible to control the particle density on the droplets. The experiment is performed at room temperature. The radial distribution function of the assembly of (primary) particles on the water droplet is measured in the laboratory and in a computer experiment of a fluid model of particles with pairwise interactions on the surface of a sphere.

  17. Structural correlations in diffusiophoretic colloidal mixtures with nonreciprocal interactions.

    PubMed

    Bartnick, Jörg; Heinen, Marco; Ivlev, Alexei V; Löwen, Hartmut

    2016-01-20

    Nonreciprocal effective interaction forces can occur between mesoscopic particles in colloidal suspensions that are driven out of equilibrium. These forces violate Newton's third law actio  =  reactio on coarse-grained length and time scales. Here we explore the statistical mechanics of Brownian particles with nonreciprocal effective interactions. Our model system is a binary fluid mixture of spherically symmetric, diffusiophoretic mesoscopic particles, and we focus on the time-averaged particle pair- and triplet-correlation functions. Based on the many-body Smoluchowski equation we develop a microscopic statistical theory for the particle correlations and test it by computer simulations. For model systems in two and three spatial dimensions, we show that nonreciprocity induces distinct nonequilibrium pair correlations. Our predictions can be tested in experiments with chemotactic colloidal suspensions.

  18. Peculiarities of Cultural Interaction in Education: The US Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baybakova, Olga; Sidun, Larysa

    2015-01-01

    Article deals with the problem of multicultural education. Ukraine, being a multicultural society, requires a new conception of the world, aimed at integrating cultures and nations, their further convergence as well as cultural enrichment. In this context the experience of many foreign countries, especially the USA, is very interesting. This…

  19. First Laser-Plasma Interaction and Hohlraum Experiments on NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Dewald, E L; Glenzer, S H; Landen, O L; Suter, L J; Jones, O S; Schein, J; Froula, D; Divol, L; Campbell, K; Schneider, M S; McDonald, J W; Niemann, C; Mackinnon, A J

    2005-06-17

    Recently the first hohlraum experiments have been performed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in support of indirect drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) designs. The effects of laser beam smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) and polarization smoothing (PS) on the beam propagation in long scale gas-filled pipes has been studied at plasma scales as found in indirect drive gas filled ignition hohlraum designs. The long scale gas-filled target experiments have shown propagation over 7 mm of dense plasma without filamentation and beam break up when using full laser smoothing. Vacuum hohlraums have been irradiated with laser powers up to 6 TW, 1-9 ns pulse lengths and energies up to 17 kJ to activate several diagnostics, to study the hohlraum radiation temperature scaling with the laser power and hohlraum size, and to make contact with hohlraum experiments performed at the NOVA and Omega laser facilities. Subsequently, novel long laser pulse hohlraum experiments have tested models of hohlraum plasma filling and long pulse hohlraum radiation production. The validity of the plasma filling assessment in analytical models and in LASNEX calculations has been proven for the first time. The comparison of these results with modeling will be discussed.

  20. Peculiarities of Cultural Interaction in Education: The US Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baybakova, Olga; Sidun, Larysa

    2015-01-01

    Article deals with the problem of multicultural education. Ukraine, being a multicultural society, requires a new conception of the world, aimed at integrating cultures and nations, their further convergence as well as cultural enrichment. In this context the experience of many foreign countries, especially the USA, is very interesting. This…

  1. Chromatic patchy particles: Effects of specific interactions on liquid structure

    DOE PAGES

    Vasilyev, Oleg A.; Tkachenko, Alexei V.; Klumov, Boris A.

    2015-07-13

    We study the structural and thermodynamic properties of patchy particle liquids, with a special focus on the role of “color,” i.e., specific interactions between individual patches. A possible experimental realization of such “chromatic” interactions is by decorating the particle patches with single-stranded DNA linkers. The complementarity of the linkers can promote selective bond formation between predetermined pairs of patches. By using MD simulations, we compare the local connectivity, the bond orientation order, and other structural properties of the aggregates formed by the “colored” and “colorless” systems. The analysis is done for spherical particles with two different patch arrangements (tetrahedral andmore » cubic). It is found that the aggregated (liquid) phase of the “colorless” patchy particles is better connected, denser and typically has stronger local order than the corresponding “colored” one. This, in turn, makes the colored liquid less stable thermodynamically. Specifically, we predict that in a typical case the chromatic interactions should increase the relative stability of the crystalline phase with respect to the disordered liquid, thus expanding its region in the phase diagram.« less

  2. Chromatic patchy particles: Effects of specific interactions on liquid structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilyev, Oleg A.; Klumov, Boris A.; Tkachenko, Alexei V.

    2015-07-01

    We study the structural and thermodynamic properties of patchy particle liquids, with a special focus on the role of "color," i.e., specific interactions between individual patches. A possible experimental realization of such "chromatic" interactions is by decorating the particle patches with single-stranded DNA linkers. The complementarity of the linkers can promote selective bond formation between predetermined pairs of patches. By using MD simulations, we compare the local connectivity, the bond orientation order, and other structural properties of the aggregates formed by the "colored" and "colorless" systems. The analysis is done for spherical particles with two different patch arrangements (tetrahedral and cubic). It is found that the aggregated (liquid) phase of the "colorless" patchy particles is better connected, denser and typically has stronger local order than the corresponding "colored" one. This, in turn, makes the colored liquid less stable thermodynamically. Specifically, we predict that in a typical case the chromatic interactions should increase the relative stability of the crystalline phase with respect to the disordered liquid, thus expanding its region in the phase diagram.

  3. Interactions of solar wind streams and related small structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odstrcil, D.

    1994-09-01

    Coronal holes produce high-speed, low-density, and high-temperature streams that propagate into the interplanetary space. These streams interact with the slow-speed, high-density, and low-temperature stream of the ambient solar wind. We investigate this problem using the time-dependent, two- dimensional hydrodynamic model in the spherical-equatorial coordinate system. More accurate numerical methods and finer difference meshes used enable us to track the evolution of detailed features of the fast and slow stream interaction. An analysis of formation of shock pairs (forward and reverse shocks) is presented for both erupting and corotating parts of fast streams. Further, it is shown that the process of interaction of fast and slow solar wind streams may contain richer structures. Such structures may originate during the reconfinement process (internal shocks), spatial substructures (flux tubes), and small temporal modulations (shock wings). They may influence the global shape of stream interfaces and heating of the plasma. Finally, conclusion can be made that boundaries between the fast and slow coronal streams seem to be stable against small random fluctuations and against small introduced disturbances and the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is not initiated.

  4. Chromatic patchy particles: Effects of specific interactions on liquid structure

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilyev, Oleg A.; Tkachenko, Alexei V.; Klumov, Boris A.

    2015-07-13

    We study the structural and thermodynamic properties of patchy particle liquids, with a special focus on the role of “color,” i.e., specific interactions between individual patches. A possible experimental realization of such “chromatic” interactions is by decorating the particle patches with single-stranded DNA linkers. The complementarity of the linkers can promote selective bond formation between predetermined pairs of patches. By using MD simulations, we compare the local connectivity, the bond orientation order, and other structural properties of the aggregates formed by the “colored” and “colorless” systems. The analysis is done for spherical particles with two different patch arrangements (tetrahedral and cubic). It is found that the aggregated (liquid) phase of the “colorless” patchy particles is better connected, denser and typically has stronger local order than the corresponding “colored” one. This, in turn, makes the colored liquid less stable thermodynamically. Specifically, we predict that in a typical case the chromatic interactions should increase the relative stability of the crystalline phase with respect to the disordered liquid, thus expanding its region in the phase diagram.

  5. Habitat structure, trophic structure and ecosystem function: interactive effects in a bromeliad-insect community.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Diane S

    2006-09-01

    Although previous studies have shown that ecosystem functions are affected by either trophic structure or habitat structure, there has been little consideration of their combined effects. Such interactions may be particularly important in systems where habitat and trophic structure covary. I use the aquatic insects in bromeliads to examine the combined effects of trophic structure and habitat structure on a key ecosystem function: detrital processing. In Costa Rican bromeliads, trophic structure naturally covaries with both habitat complexity and habitat size, precluding any observational analysis of interactions between factors. I therefore designed mesocosms that allowed each factor to be manipulated separately. Increases in mesocosm complexity reduced predator (damselfly larva) efficiency, resulting in high detritivore abundances, indirectly increasing detrital processing rates. However, increased complexity also directly reduced the per capita foraging efficiency of the detritivores. Over short time periods, these trends effectively cancelled each other out in terms of detrital processing. Over longer time periods, more complex patterns emerged. Increases in mesocosm size also reduced both predator efficiency and detritivore efficiency, leading to no net effect on detrital processing. In many systems, ecosystem functions may be impacted by strong interactions between trophic structure and habitat structure, cautioning against examining either effect in isolation.

  6. Bacterial protein interaction networks: puzzle stones from solved complex structures add to a clearer picture.

    PubMed

    Terradot, Laurent; Noirot-Gros, Marie-Francoise

    2011-06-01

    Global scale studies of protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks have considerably expanded our view of how proteins act in the cell. In particular, bacterial "interactome" surveys have revealed that proteins can sometimes interact with a large number of protein partners and connect different cellular processes. More targeted, pathway-orientated PPI studies have also helped to propose functions for unknown proteins based on the "guilty by association" principle. However, given the immense repertoire of PPIs generated and the variability of PPI networks, more studies are required to understand the role(s) of these interactions in the cell. With the availability of bioinformatic analysis tools, transcriptomics and co-expression experiments for a given interaction, interactomes are being deciphered. More recently, functional and structural studies have been derived from these PPI networks. In this review, we will give a number of examples of how combining functional and structural studies into PPI networks has contributed to understanding the functions of some of these interactions. We discuss how interactomes now represent a unique opportunity to determine the structures of bacterial protein complexes on a large scale by the integration of multiple technologies. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  7. Feeding your inflaton: non-Gaussian signatures of interaction structure

    SciTech Connect

    Barnaby, Neil; Shandera, Sarah E-mail: shandera@gravity.psu.edu

    2012-01-01

    Primordial non-Gaussianity is generated by interactions of the inflaton field, either self-interactions or couplings to other sectors. These two physically different mechanisms can lead to nearly indistinguishable bispectra of the equilateral type, but generate distinct patterns in the relative scaling of higher order moments. We illustrate these classes in a simple effective field theory framework where the flatness of the inflaton potential is protected by a softly broken shift symmetry. Since the distinctive difference between the two classes of interactions is the scaling of the moments, we investigate the implications for observables that depend on the series of moments. We obtain analytic expressions for the Minkowski functionals and the halo mass function for an arbitrary structure of moments, and use these to demonstrate how different classes of interactions might be distinguished observationally. Our analysis casts light on a number of theoretical issues, in particular we clarify the difference between the physics that keeps the distribution of fluctuations nearly Gaussian, and the physics that keeps the calculation under control.

  8. Stability and Interaction of Coherent Structure in Supersonic Reactive Wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Suresh

    1983-01-01

    A theoretical formulation and analysis is presented for a study of the stability and interaction of coherent structure in reacting free shear layers. The physical problem under investigation is a premixed hydrogen-oxygen reacting shear layer in the wake of a thin flat plate. The coherent structure is modeled as a periodic disturbance and its stability is determined by the application of linearized hydrodynamic stability theory which results in a generalized eigenvalue problem for reactive flows. Detailed stability analysis of the reactive wake for neutral, symmetrical and antisymmetrical disturbance is presented. Reactive stability criteria is shown to be quite different from classical non-reactive stability. The interaction between the mean flow, coherent structure and fine-scale turbulence is theoretically formulated using the von-Kaman integral technique. Both time-averaging and conditional phase averaging are necessary to separate the three types of motion. The resulting integro-differential equations can then be solved subject to initial conditions with appropriate shape functions. In the laminar flow transition region of interest, the spatial interaction between the mean motion and coherent structure is calculated for both non-reactive and reactive conditions and compared with experimental data wherever available. The fine-scale turbulent motion determined by the application of integral analysis to the fluctuation equations. Since at present this turbulence model is still untested, turbulence is modeled in the interaction problem by a simple algebraic eddy viscosity model. The applicability of the integral turbulence model formulated here is studied parametrically by integrating these equations for the simple case of self-similar mean motion with assumed shape functions. The effect of the motion of the coherent structure is studied and very good agreement is obtained with previous experimental and theoretical works for non-reactive flow. For the reactive case

  9. Cross-Modal Interactions in the Experience of Musical Performances: Physiological Correlates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapados, Catherine; Levitin, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to investigate cross-modal interactions in the emotional experience of music listeners. Previous research showed that visual information present in a musical performance is rich in expressive content, and moderates the subjective emotional experience of a participant listening and/or observing musical stimuli [Vines,…

  10. Cross-Modal Interactions in the Experience of Musical Performances: Physiological Correlates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapados, Catherine; Levitin, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to investigate cross-modal interactions in the emotional experience of music listeners. Previous research showed that visual information present in a musical performance is rich in expressive content, and moderates the subjective emotional experience of a participant listening and/or observing musical stimuli [Vines,…

  11. Experiences of using an interactive audience response system in lectures

    PubMed Central

    Uhari, Matti; Renko, Marjo; Soini, Hannu

    2003-01-01

    Background Lectures are good for presenting information and providing explanations, but because they lack active participation they have been neglected. Methods Students' experiences were evaluated after exposing them to the use of voting during lectures in their paediatrics course. Questions were delivered to the students taking paediatrics course. Thirty-six students out of the total of 40 (90%) attended the opening lecture, at which the first survey concerning previous experiences of lectures was performed. Thirty-nine students (98%) answered the second series of questions at the end of the paediatrics course. Results Most of the students felt that voting improved their activity during lectures, enhanced their learning, and that it was easier to make questions during lectures than earlier. Conclusions The students gained new, exciting insights much more often during the paediatrics course than before. We as teachers found that voting during lectures could easily overcome some of the obstacles of good lecturing. PMID:14678571

  12. Primate paternal care: interactions between biology and social experience

    PubMed Central

    Storey, Anne E.; Ziegler, Toni E.

    2016-01-01

    We review recent research on the roles of hormones and social experiences on the development of paternal care in humans and non-human primates. Generally, lower concentrations of testosterone and higher concentrations of oxytocin are associated with greater paternal responsiveness. Hormonal changes prior to the birth appear to be important in preparation for fatherhood and changes after the birth are related to how much time fathers spend with offspring and whether they provide effective care. Prolactin may facilitate approach and the initiation of infant care, and in some biparental non-human primates, it affects body mass regulation. Glucocorticoids are involved in coordinating reproductive and parental behavior between mates. New research involving intranasal oxytocin and neuropeptide receptor polymorphisms may help us understand individual variation in paternal responsiveness. This area of research, integrating both biological factors and the role of early and adult experience, has the potential to suggest individually designed interventions that can strengthen relationships between fathers and their offspring. PMID:26253726

  13. Pauli structures arising from confined particles interacting via a statistical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batle, Josep; Ciftja, Orion; Farouk, Ahmed; Alkhambashi, Majid; Abdalla, Soliman

    2017-09-01

    There have been suggestions that the Pauli exclusion principle alone can lead a non-interacting (free) system of identical fermions to form crystalline structures dubbed Pauli crystals. Single-shot imaging experiments for the case of ultra-cold systems of free spin-polarized fermionic atoms in a two-dimensional harmonic trap appear to show geometric arrangements that cannot be characterized as Wigner crystals. This work explores this idea and considers a well-known approach that enables one to treat a quantum system of free fermions as a system of classical particles interacting with a statistical interaction potential. The model under consideration, though classical in nature, incorporates the quantum statistics by endowing the classical particles with an effective interaction potential. The reasonable expectation is that possible Pauli crystal features seen in experiments may manifest in this model that captures the correct quantum statistics as a first order correction. We use the Monte Carlo simulated annealing method to obtain the most stable configurations of finite two-dimensional systems of confined particles that interact with an appropriate statistical repulsion potential. We consider both an isotropic harmonic and a hard-wall confinement potential. Despite minor differences, the most stable configurations observed in our model correspond to the reported Pauli crystals in single-shot imaging experiments of free spin-polarized fermions in a harmonic trap. The crystalline configurations observed appear to be different from the expected classical Wigner crystal structures that would emerge should the confined classical particles had interacted with a pair-wise Coulomb repulsion.

  14. Thermodynamic and Structural Properties of Methanol-Water Solutions Using Non-Additive Interaction Models

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yang; Warren, G. Lee; Patel, Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    We study bulk structural and thermodynamic properties of methanol-water solutions via molecular dynamics simulations using novel interaction potentials based on the charge equilibration (fluctuating charge) formalism to explicitly account for molecular polarization at the atomic level. The study uses the TIP4P-FQ potential for water-water interactions, and the CHARMM-based (Chemistry at HARvard Molecular Mechanics) fluctuating charge potential for methanol-methanol and methanol-water interactions. In terms of bulk solution properties, we discuss liquid densities, enthalpies of mixing, dielectric constants, self-diffusion constants, as well as structural properties related to local hydrogen bonding structure as manifested in radial distribution functions and cluster analysis. We further explore the electronic response of water and methanol in the differing local environments established by the interaction of each species predominantly with molecules of the other species. The current force field for the alcohol-water interaction performs reasonably well for most properties, with the greatest deviation from experiment observed for the excess mixing enthalpies, which are predicted to be too favorable. This is qualitatively consistent with the overestimation of the methanol-water gas-phase interaction energy for the lowest-energy conformer (methanol as proton donor). Hydration free energies for methanol in TIP4P-FQ water are predicted to be −5.6±0.2 kcal/mole, in respectable agreement with the experimental value of −5.1 kcal/mole. With respect to solution micro-structure, the present cluster analysis suggests that the micro-scale environment for concentrations where select thermodynamic quantities reach extremal values is described by a bi-percolating network structure. PMID:18074339

  15. Structuring Effective Practicum Experiences for Pre-Service Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyss, Vanessa L.; Siebert, Cathy J.; Dowling, Karen A.

    2012-01-01

    Practicum experiences are an extremely critical component to any teacher education program. Yet how pre-service teachers are included in classrooms can be organized in multiple ways and is influenced by many factors. Structurally, universities must consider school schedules and student course offering schedules. More important is ensuring…

  16. Structure and Dynamics of Interacting Nanoparticles in Semidilute Polymer Solutions

    DOE PAGES

    Pollng-Skutvik, Ryan; Mongcopa, Katrina Irene S.; Faraone, Antonio; ...

    2016-08-17

    We investigate the structure and dynamics of silica nanoparticles and polymer chains in semidilute solutions of high molecular weight polystyrene in 2-butanone to determine the effect of long-range interparticle interactions on the coupling between particle and polymer dynamics. Particles at concentrations of 1–10 wt % are well dispersed in the semidilute polymer solutions and exhibit long-range electrostatic repulsions between particles. Because the particles are comparably sized to the radius of gyration of the polymer, the particle dynamics is predicted to couple to that of the polymer. We verify that the polymer structure and dynamics are not significantly affected by themore » particles, indicating that the particle–polymer coupling does not change with increasing particle loading. We find that the coupling between the dynamics of comparably sized particles and polymer results in subdiffusive particle dynamics, as expected. Over the interparticle distance, however, the particle dynamics is hindered and not fully described by the relaxation of the surrounding polymer chains. Instead, the particle dynamics is inversely related to the structure factor, suggesting that physical particle–polymer coupling on short length scales and interparticle interactions on long length scales both present energetic barriers to particle motion that lead to subdiffusive dynamics and de Gennes narrowing, respectively.« less

  17. Structure and Dynamics of Interacting Nanoparticles in Semidilute Polymer Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Pollng-Skutvik, Ryan; Mongcopa, Katrina Irene S.; Faraone, Antonio; Narayanan, Suresh; Conrad, Jacinta C.; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan

    2016-08-17

    We investigate the structure and dynamics of silica nanoparticles and polymer chains in semidilute solutions of high molecular weight polystyrene in 2-butanone to determine the effect of long-range interparticle interactions on the coupling between particle and polymer dynamics. Particles at concentrations of 1–10 wt % are well dispersed in the semidilute polymer solutions and exhibit long-range electrostatic repulsions between particles. Because the particles are comparably sized to the radius of gyration of the polymer, the particle dynamics is predicted to couple to that of the polymer. We verify that the polymer structure and dynamics are not significantly affected by the particles, indicating that the particle–polymer coupling does not change with increasing particle loading. We find that the coupling between the dynamics of comparably sized particles and polymer results in subdiffusive particle dynamics, as expected. Over the interparticle distance, however, the particle dynamics is hindered and not fully described by the relaxation of the surrounding polymer chains. Instead, the particle dynamics is inversely related to the structure factor, suggesting that physical particle–polymer coupling on short length scales and interparticle interactions on long length scales both present energetic barriers to particle motion that lead to subdiffusive dynamics and de Gennes narrowing, respectively.

  18. Understanding metallic bonding: Structure, process and interaction by Rasch analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Maurice M. W.; Oon, Pey-Tee

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey of 3006 Year 10-12 students on their understandings of metallic bonding. The instrument was developed based on Chi's ontological categories of scientific concepts and students' understanding of metallic bonding as reported in the literature. The instrument has two parts. Part one probed into students' understanding of metallic bonding as (a) a submicro structure of metals, (b) a process in which individual metal atoms lose their outermost shell electrons to form a 'sea of electrons' and octet metal cations or (c) an all-directional electrostatic force between delocalized electrons and metal cations, that is, an interaction. Part two assessed students' explanation of malleability of metals, for example (a) as a submicro structural rearrangement of metal atoms/cations or (b) based on all-directional electrostatic force. The instrument was validated by the Rasch Model. Psychometric assessment showed that the instrument possessed reasonably good properties of measurement. Results revealed that it was reliable and valid for measuring students' understanding of metallic bonding. Analysis revealed that the structure, process and interaction understandings were unidimensional and in an increasing order of difficulty. Implications for the teaching of metallic bonding, particular through the use of diagrams, critiques and model-based learning, are discussed.

  19. Structure and Dynamics of Interacting Nanoparticles in Semidilute Polymer Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Pollng-Skutvik, Ryan; Mongcopa, Katrina Irene S.; Faraone, Antonio; Narayanan, Suresh; Conrad, Jacinta C.; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan

    2016-08-17

    We investigate the structure and dynamics of silica nanoparticles and polymer chains in semidilute solutions of high molecular weight polystyrene in 2-butanone to determine the effect of long-range interparticle interactions on the coupling between particle and polymer dynamics. Particles at concentrations of 1–10 wt % are well dispersed in the semidilute polymer solutions and exhibit long-range electrostatic repulsions between particles. Because the particles are comparably sized to the radius of gyration of the polymer, the particle dynamics is predicted to couple to that of the polymer. We verify that the polymer structure and dynamics are not significantly affected by the particles, indicating that the particle–polymer coupling does not change with increasing particle loading. We find that the coupling between the dynamics of comparably sized particles and polymer results in subdiffusive particle dynamics, as expected. Over the interparticle distance, however, the particle dynamics is hindered and not fully described by the relaxation of the surrounding polymer chains. Instead, the particle dynamics is inversely related to the structure factor, suggesting that physical particle–polymer coupling on short length scales and interparticle interactions on long length scales both present energetic barriers to particle motion that lead to subdiffusive dynamics and de Gennes narrowing, respectively.

  20. Control-structure interaction in precision pointing servo loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanos, John T.

    1989-01-01

    The control-structure interaction problem is addressed via stability analysis of a generic linear servo loop model. With the plant described by the rigid body mode and a single elastic mode, structural flexibility is categorized into one of three types: (1) appendage, (2) in-the-loop minimum phase, and (3) in-the-loop nonminimum phase. Closing the loop with proportional-derivative (PD) control action and introducing sensor roll-off dynamics in the feedback path, stability conditions are obtained. Trade studies are conducted with modal frequency, modal participation, modal damping, loop bandwidth, and sensor bandwidth treated as free parameters. Results indicate that appendage modes are most likely to produce instability if they are near the sensor rolloff, whereas in-the-loop modes are most dangerous near the loop bandwidth. The main goal of this paper is to provide a fundamental understanding of the control-structure interaction problem so that it may benefit the design of complex spacecraft and pointing system servo loops. In this framework, the JPL Pathfinder gimbal pointer is considered as an example.

  1. Structures of multidomain proteins adsorbed on hydrophobic interaction chromatography surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gospodarek, Adrian M; Sun, Weitong; O'Connell, John P; Fernandez, Erik J

    2014-12-05

    In hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC), interactions between buried hydrophobic residues and HIC surfaces can cause conformational changes that interfere with separations and cause yield losses. This paper extends our previous investigations of protein unfolding in HIC chromatography by identifying protein structures on HIC surfaces under denaturing conditions and relating them to solution behavior. The thermal unfolding of three model multidomain proteins on three HIC surfaces of differing hydrophobicities was investigated with hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry (HXMS). The data were analyzed to obtain unfolding rates and Gibbs free energies for unfolding of adsorbed proteins. The melting temperatures of the proteins were lowered, but by different amounts, on the different surfaces. In addition, the structures of the proteins on the chromatographic surfaces were similar to the partially unfolded structures produced in the absence of a surface by temperature as well as by chemical denaturants. Finally, it was found that patterns of residue exposure to solvent on different surfaces at different temperatures can be largely superimposed. These findings suggest that protein unfolding on various HIC surfaces might be quantitatively related to protein unfolding in solution and that details of surface unfolding behavior might be generalized.

  2. The water-benzene interaction: insight from electronic structure theories.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Alfè, Dario; Michaelides, Angelos; Wang, Enge

    2009-04-21

    Weak noncovalent interactions such as van der Waals and hydrogen bonding are ubiquitous in nature, yet their accurate description with electronic structure theories is challenging. Here we assess the ability of a variety of theories to describe a water-benzene binding energy curve. Specifically, we test Hartree-Fock, second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, coupled cluster, density functional theory with several exchange-correlation functionals with and without empirical vdW corrections, and quantum Monte Carlo (QMC). Given the relative paucity of QMC reports for noncovalent interactions, it is interesting to see that QMC and coupled cluster with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations [CCSD(T)] are in very good agreement for most of the binding energy curve, although at short distances there are small deviations on the order of 20 meV.

  3. The Accelerator Neutrino Neutron Interaction Experiment (ANNIE) Front Anti-Coincidence Counter (FACC) Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mingqian

    The searching for proton decay (PDK) is going on current Water Cherenkov (WCh) detectors such as Super-Kamiokande. However, PDK-like backgrounds produced by the neutrino interactions will limit the sensitivity of the detectors. The Accelerator Neutrino Neutron Interaction Experiment (ANNIE) is going to measure the neutron yield of neutrino interactions in gadolinium-loaded water by the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) with known characteristics. In this thesis, neutrino, neutrino oscillations, Dirac neutrino and Majorana neutrino and neutrino interactions are introduced. ANNIE experiment is also introduced. And two modes of proton decays are discussed. The ANNIE experiment requires detection of the neutrons produced by the BNB interactions with water. However, dirt muons produced by the interaction of the BNB with the rock and dirt upstream of the ANNIE hall will cause a correlated background. Therefore, the Front Anti-Coincidence Counter (FACC) was built to measure the rock muons. This thesis details the design, installation, and commissioning of the ANNIE FACC.

  4. The Boundary Structure in the Analysis of Reversibly Interacting Systems by Sedimentation Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huaying; Balbo, Andrea; Brown, Patrick H.; Schuck, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Sedimentation velocity (SV) experiments of heterogeneous interacting systems exhibit characteristic boundary structures that can usually be very easily recognized and quantified. For slowly interacting systems, the boundaries represent concentrations of macromolecular species and they can be interpreted directly with population models based solely on the mass action law. For fast reactions, migration and chemical reactions are coupled, and different, but equally easily discernable boundary structures appear. However, these features have not been commonly utilized for data analysis, for the lack of an intuitive and computationally simple model. The recently introduced effective particle theory (EPT) provides a suitable framework. Here, we review the motivation and theoretical basis of EPT, and explore practical aspects for its application. We introduce an EPT-based design tool for SV experiments of heterogeneous interactions in the software SEDPHAT. As a practical tool for the first step of data analysis, we describe how the boundary resolution can be further improved in c(s) with a Bayesian adjustment of maximum entropy regularization to the case of heterogeneous interactions between molecules that have been previously studied separately. This can facilitate extracting the characteristic boundary features by integration of c(s) and their assembly into isotherms as a function of total loading concentrations, which are fitted with EPT in a second stage. Methods for addressing concentration errors in isotherms are discussed. Finally, in an experimental model system of alpha-chymotrypsin interacting with soybean trypsin inhibitor, we show that EPT provides an excellent description of the experimental sedimentation boundary structure of fast interacting systems. PMID:21315155

  5. Beam-cavity interaction measurements in a DAW structure

    SciTech Connect

    Iwashita, Y.; Schriber, S.O.; Potter, J.M.; Swenson, D.A.; Mavrogenes, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    Mode excitations induced by relativistic electron beams have been measured in a disk-and-washer (DAW) structure. The structure had three washers, each with four radial support stems, and half-disk end terminations. The design DAW operating frequency was 1300 MHz, the same as that used to accelerate the electron beam. Both short-pulse (35-ps, 800-Hz, 17-nC/pulse) and long-pulse (10-..mu..s, 2-A average) conditions were used in the beam-excitation experiments. Mode spectra were measured and identified using low-power techniques employed after the high-power beam measurements. Mode frequency calculations for the complete three-washer geometry were performed using URMEL for up to m = 7. Calculated results are compared with data determined from low-power and beam-driven excitation of the DAW structure. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Beam-cavity interaction measurements in a DAW structure

    SciTech Connect

    Iwashita, Y.; Mavrogenes, G.S.; Potter, J.M.; Schriber, S.O.; Swenson, D.A.

    1985-10-01

    Mode excitations induced by relativistic electron beams have been measured in a disk-and-washer (DAW) structure. The structure had three washers, each with four radial support stems, and half-disk end terminations. The design DAW operating frequency was 1300 MHz, the same as that used to accelerate the electron beam. Both short-pulse (35-ps, 800-Hz, 17-nC/pulse) and long-pulse (10-..mu..s, 2-A average) conditions were used in the beam-excitation experiments. Mode spectra were measured and identified using lowpower techniques employed after the high-power beam measurements. Mode frequency calculations for the complete three-washer geometry were performed using URMEL for up to m = 7. Calculated results are compared with data determined from low-power and beamdriven excitation of the DAW structure.

  7. Beam-cavity interaction measurements in a DAW structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwashita, Y.; Schriber, S. O.; Potter, J. M.; Swenson, D. A.; Mavrogenes, G. S.

    Mode excitations induced by relativistic electron beams have been measured in a disk and washer (DAW) structure. The structure had three washers, each with four radial support stems, and half disk end terminations. The design DAW operating frequency was 1300 MHz, the same as that used to accelerate the electron beam. Both short pulse (35-ps, 800-Hz, 17-nC/pulse) and long pulse (10-(MU)s, 2-A average) conditions were used in the beam excitation experiments. Mode spectra were measured and identified using low power techniques employed after the high power beam measurements. Mode frequency calculations for the complete three washer geometry were performed using URMEL for up to m = 7. Calculated results are compared with data determined from low power and beam driven excitation of the DAW structure.

  8. Simulation of the photogrammetric appendage structural dynamics experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard S.; Gilbert, Michael G.; Welch, Sharon S.

    1995-01-01

    The Photogrammetric Appendage Structural Dynamics Experiment (PASDE) uses six video cameras in the Space Shuttle cargo bay to measure vibration of the Russian Mir space station Kvant-ll solar array. It occurs on Shuttle/Mir docking mission STS-74 scheduled for launch in November 1995. The objective of PASDE is to demonstrate photogrammetric technology for measuring 'untargeted' spacecraft appendage structural dynamics. This paper discusses a pre-flight simulation test conducted in July 1995, focusing on the image processing aspects. The flight camera system recorded vibrations of a full-scale structural test article having grids of white lines on black background, similar in appearance to the Mir solar array. Using image correlation analysis, line intersections on the structure are tracked in the video recordings to resolutions of less than 0.1 pixel. Calibration and merging of multiple camera views generated 3-dimensional displacements from which structural modal parameters are then obtained.

  9. Experience-dependent structural synaptic plasticity in the mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Holtmaat, Anthony; Svoboda, Karel

    2009-09-01

    Synaptic plasticity in adult neural circuits may involve the strengthening or weakening of existing synapses as well as structural plasticity, including synapse formation and elimination. Indeed, long-term in vivo imaging studies are beginning to reveal the structural dynamics of neocortical neurons in the normal and injured adult brain. Although the overall cell-specific morphology of axons and dendrites, as well as of a subpopulation of small synaptic structures, are remarkably stable, there is increasing evidence that experience-dependent plasticity of specific circuits in the somatosensory and visual cortex involves cell type-specific structural plasticity: some boutons and dendritic spines appear and disappear, accompanied by synapse formation and elimination, respectively. This Review focuses on recent evidence for such structural forms of synaptic plasticity in the mammalian cortex and outlines open questions.

  10. Causal inference and the hierarchical structure of experience

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Samuel G. B.; Keil, Frank C.

    2014-01-01

    Children and adults make rich causal inferences about the physical and social world, even in novel situations where they cannot rely on prior knowledge of causal mechanisms. We propose that this capacity is supported in part by constraints provided by event structure—the cognitive organization of experience into discrete events that are hierarchically organized. These event-structured causal inferences are guided by a level-matching principle, with events conceptualized at one level of an event hierarchy causally matched to other events at that same level, and a boundary-blocking principle, with events causally matched to other events that are parts of the same superordinate event. These principles are used to constrain inferences about plausible causal candidates in unfamiliar situations, both in diagnosing causes (Experiment 1) and predicting effects (Experiment 2). The results could not be explained by construal level (Experiment 3) or similarity-matching (Experiment 4), and were robust across a variety of physical and social causal systems. Taken together, these experiments demonstrate a novel way in which non-causal information we extract from the environment can help to constrain inferences about causal structure. PMID:25347533

  11. Magnetised bow shocks and oblique shock interactions: HEDLA experiments on the Magpie pulsed-power facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdiak, G. C.; Lebedev, S. V.; Chittenden, J. P.; Clayson, T.; Garcia, C.; Hare, J. D.; Niasse, N.; Suttle, L. G.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Frank, A.; Ciardi, A.

    2016-10-01

    We present results from magnetised shock experiments performed on the Magpie ( 1 MA, 250 ns) pulsed-power facility. Shocks are formed around cylindrical and oblique planar obstacles positioned in a supersonic, super-Alfvenic plasma flow (MS = 5 , MA = 2.5 , vf = 70 km/s). The plasma flow is produced by an inverse, exploding wire array z-pinch and carries an embedded magnetic field that is well frozen in (ReM = 20). We show how the structure of bow and oblique shocks is dramatically affected by the orientation of the advected magnetic field with respect to the obstacles. More complex obstacle geometries allow us to study the interaction of multiple magnetised oblique shocks. These systems can cause the annihilation of magnetic flux and the generation of shear flow along a slip layer. Work supported by DOE cooperative agreements No. DE-F03- 02NA00057 and No. DE-SC-0001063.

  12. The effect of an interactive experience on music majors' perceptions of music for deaf students.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, K A; Johnson, K E

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of an interactive experience on music majors' perceptions of music experiences for deaf students. Twenty-three members of a pre-existing college brass ensemble served as subjects, and a 1-hour interactive concert/presentation for 10 deaf elementary children served as the independent variable. The interactive experience was designed to provide social, musical, and educational interactions between the college musicians and the deaf children. A pretest-posttest design was utilized, and the dependent variable was a questionnaire designed to examine the subjects' perceptions regarding music for deaf students, including how prepared, comfortable, and willing they felt to provide music experiences for deaf students. Results reveal that this single interactive experience had a significant effect on the subjects' perceptions of the value of music in the education of deaf children (p <.05). Although the pretest and posttest scores indicate that the subjects felt apprehensive about their preparedness to work with deaf students, the subjects felt significantly more positive about their preparedness following the interaction (p <.001). An analysis of open comments indicates that the subjects perceived the experience as (a) very positive, (b) increasing their knowledge and perception of music for deaf students, (c) helping them better relate to the deaf population, (d) promoting interest in similar experiences and in gaining more information, and (e) eliciting a feeling that future teachers should have similar experiences. Quotes from the subjects are given, and implications for teacher training/music therapy programs are discussed.

  13. Turbulence structures associated with fire-atmosphere interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, C. B.; Seto, D.; Heilman, W. E.

    2013-12-01

    Wildland fires radically modify the atmospheric boundary layer by emitting large sensible and latent heat fluxes. These fluxes drive fire-atmosphere interactions at multiple scales resulting in fire-induced circulations in and around the fire front. During the fire front passage, FFP, turbulence kinetic energy increases due to increased heating and wind shear that develops in response to both free convection and fire-induced winds. New field observations from multiple fire experiments have shown that turbulence spectral energy increases during the FFP as a result of small eddies being shed from the fire front and that that normalized velocity spectra using the friction velocity collapse into a narrow band in the inertial subrange, suggesting that Monin-Obukhov scaling is a valid scaling parameter that can be used for wildfire prediction systems. Additionally, during FFP the mean profiles of winds and sensible heat flux change compared to ambient conditions due to the fire-atmosphere interactions. These profiles are also different during different environmental conditions such as grass fires in open field and fires within a forest canopy. This presentation will discuss new turbulence observations from the FireFlux II field experiment conducted in 2013 which indicate that during FFP there are also an increases in horizontal mean winds, friction velocity, horizontal and vertical velocity variances and a decrease in anisotropy in turbulence kinetic energy and are similar to lower intensity fires.

  14. Modeling Gene-Environment Interactions With Quasi-Natural Experiments.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Lauren; Conley, Dalton

    2017-02-01

    This overview develops new empirical models that can effectively document Gene × Environment (G×E) interactions in observational data. Current G×E studies are often unable to support causal inference because they use endogenous measures of the environment or fail to adequately address the nonrandom distribution of genes across environments, confounding estimates. Comprehensive measures of genetic variation are incorporated into quasi-natural experimental designs to exploit exogenous environmental shocks or isolate variation in environmental exposure to avoid potential confounders. In addition, we offer insights from population genetics that improve upon extant approaches to address problems from population stratification. Together, these tools offer a powerful way forward for G×E research on the origin and development of social inequality across the life course.

  15. Coherent structures in wind shear induced wave–turbulence–vegetation interaction in water bodies

    DOE PAGES

    Banerjee, Tirtha; Vercauteren, Nikki; Muste, Marian; ...

    2017-08-26

    Flume experiments with particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) were conducted recently to study a complex flow problem where wind shear acts on the surface of a static water body in presence of flexible emergent vegetation and induces a rich dynamics of wave–turbulence–vegetation interaction inside the water body without any gravitational gradient. The experiments were aimed at mimicking realistic vegetated wetlands and the present work is targeted to improve the understanding of the coherent structures associated with this interaction by employing a combination of techniques such as quadrant analysis, proper orthogonal decomposition (POD), Shannon entropy and mutual information content (MIC). The turbulentmore » transfer of momentum is found to be dominated by organized motions such as sweeps and ejections, while the wave component of vertical momentum transport does not show any such preference. Furthermore, by reducing the data using POD we see that wave energy for large flow depths and turbulent energy for all water depths is concentrated among the top few modes, which can allow development of simple reduced order models. Vegetation flexibility is found to induce several roll type structures, however if the vegetation density is increased, drag effects dominate over flexibility and organize the flow. The interaction between waves and turbulence is also found to be highest among flexible sparse vegetation. But, rapidly evolving parts of the flow such as the air–water interface reduces wave–turbulence interaction.« less

  16. Discrete Data Transfer Technique for Fluid-Structure Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a general three-dimensional algorithm for data transfer between dissimilar meshes. The algorithm is suitable for applications of fluid-structure interaction and other high-fidelity multidisciplinary analysis and optimization. Because the algorithm is independent of the mesh topology, we can treat structured and unstructured meshes in the same manner. The algorithm is fast and accurate for transfer of scalar or vector fields between dissimilar surface meshes. The algorithm is also applicable for the integration of a scalar field (e.g., coefficients of pressure) on one mesh and injection of the resulting vectors (e.g., force vectors) onto another mesh. The author has implemented the algorithm in a C++ computer code. This paper contains a complete formulation of the algorithm with a few selected results.

  17. Structural basis of Keap1 interactions with Nrf2.

    PubMed

    Canning, Peter; Sorrell, Fiona J; Bullock, Alex N

    2015-11-01

    Keap1 is a highly redox-sensitive member of the BTB-Kelch family that assembles with the Cul3 protein to form a Cullin-RING E3 ligase complex for the degradation of Nrf2. Oxidative stress disables Keap1, allowing Nrf2 protein levels to accumulate for the transactivation of critical stress response genes. Consequently, the Keap1-Nrf2 system is extensively pursued for the development of protein-protein interaction inhibitors that will stabilize Nrf2 for therapeutic effect in conditions of neurodegeneration, inflammation, and cancer. Here we review current progress toward the structure determination of Keap1 and its protein complexes with Cul3, Nrf2 substrate, and small-molecule antagonists. Together the available structures establish a rational three-dimensional model to explain the two-site binding of Nrf2 as well as its efficient ubiquitination.

  18. Development of a Fluid Structures Interaction Test Technique for Fabrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zilliac, Gregory G.; Heineck, James T.; Schairer, Edward T.; Mosher, Robert N.; Garbeff, Theodore Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Application of fluid structures interaction (FSI) computational techniques to configurations of interest to the entry, descent and landing (EDL) community is limited by two factors - limited characterization of the material properties for fabrics of interest and insufficient experimental data to validate the FSI codes. Recently ILC Dover Inc. performed standard tests to characterize the static stress-strain response of four candidate fabrics for use in EDL applications. The objective of the tests described here is to address the need for a FSI dataset for CFD validation purposes. To reach this objective, the structural response of fabrics was measured in a very simple aerodynamic environment with well controlled boundary conditions. Two test series were undertaken. The first series covered a range of tunnel conditions and the second focused on conditions that resulted in fabric panel buckling.

  19. Structural basis of Keap1 interactions with Nrf2

    PubMed Central

    Canning, Peter; Sorrell, Fiona J.; Bullock, Alex N.

    2015-01-01

    Keap1 is a highly redox-sensitive member of the BTB-Kelch family that assembles with the Cul3 protein to form a Cullin–RING E3 ligase complex for the degradation of Nrf2. Oxidative stress disables Keap1, allowing Nrf2 protein levels to accumulate for the transactivation of critical stress response genes. Consequently, the Keap1–Nrf2 system is extensively pursued for the development of protein–protein interaction inhibitors that will stabilize Nrf2 for therapeutic effect in conditions of neurodegeneration, inflammation, and cancer. Here we review current progress toward the structure determination of Keap1 and its protein complexes with Cul3, Nrf2 substrate, and small-molecule antagonists. Together the available structures establish a rational three-dimensional model to explain the two-site binding of Nrf2 as well as its efficient ubiquitination. PMID:26057936

  20. Exploratory numerical experiments with a macroscopic theory of interfacial interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, D.; Solano-López, P.; Donoso, J. M.

    2017-09-01

    Phenomenological theories of interfacial interactions are founded on the core idea to model macroscopically the thin layer that forms between media in contact as a two-dimensional continuum (surface phase or interface) characterised by physical properties per unit area; the temporal evolution of the latter is governed by surface balance equations whose set acts as bridging channel in between the governing equations of the volume phases. These theories have targeted terrestrial applications since long time and their exploitation has inspired our research programme to build up, on the same core idea, a macroscopic theory of gas-surface interactions targeting the complex phenomenology of hypersonic reentry flows as alternative to standard methods in aerothermodynamics based on accommodation coefficients. The objective of this paper is the description of methods employed and results achieved in the exploratory study that kicked off our research programme, that is, the unsteady heat transfer between two solids in contact in planar and cylindrical configurations with and without interface. It is a simple numerical-demonstrator test case designed to facilitate quick numerical calculations but, at the same time, to bring forth already sufficiently meaningful aspects relevant to thermal protection due to the formation of the interface. The paper begins with a brief introduction on the subject matter and a review of relevant literature within an aerothermodynamics perspective. Then the case is considered in which the interface is absent. The importance of tension (force per unit area) continuity as boundary condition on the same footing of heat-flux continuity is recognised and the role of the former in governing the establishment of the temperature-difference distribution over the separation surface is explicitly shown. Evidence is given that the standard temperature-continuity boundary condition is just a particular case. Subsequently the case in which the interface is

  1. Exploratory numerical experiments with a macroscopic theory of interfacial interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, D.; Solano-López, P.; Donoso, J. M.

    2017-04-01

    Phenomenological theories of interfacial interactions are founded on the core idea to model macroscopically the thin layer that forms between media in contact as a two-dimensional continuum (surface phase or interface) characterised by physical properties per unit area; the temporal evolution of the latter is governed by surface balance equations whose set acts as bridging channel in between the governing equations of the volume phases. These theories have targeted terrestrial applications since long time and their exploitation has inspired our research programme to build up, on the same core idea, a macroscopic theory of gas-surface interactions targeting the complex phenomenology of hypersonic reentry flows as alternative to standard methods in aerothermodynamics based on accommodation coefficients. The objective of this paper is the description of methods employed and results achieved in the exploratory study that kicked off our research programme, that is, the unsteady heat transfer between two solids in contact in planar and cylindrical configurations with and without interface. It is a simple numerical-demonstrator test case designed to facilitate quick numerical calculations but, at the same time, to bring forth already sufficiently meaningful aspects relevant to thermal protection due to the formation of the interface. The paper begins with a brief introduction on the subject matter and a review of relevant literature within an aerothermodynamics perspective. Then the case is considered in which the interface is absent. The importance of tension (force per unit area) continuity as boundary condition on the same footing of heat-flux continuity is recognised and the role of the former in governing the establishment of the temperature-difference distribution over the separation surface is explicitly shown. Evidence is given that the standard temperature-continuity boundary condition is just a particular case. Subsequently the case in which the interface is

  2. The Dynamic Reactance Interaction – How Vested Interests Affect People’s Experience, Behavior, and Cognition in Social Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Steindl, Christina; Jonas, Eva

    2015-01-01

    In social interactions, individuals may sometimes pursue their own interests at the expense of their interaction partner. Such self-interested behaviors impose a threat to the interaction partner’s freedom to act. The current article investigates this threat in the context of interdependence and reactance theory. We explore how vested interests influence reactance process stages of an advisor–client interaction. We aim to explore the interactional process that evolves. In two studies, participants took the perspective of a doctor (advisor) or a patient (client). In both studies we incorporated a vested interest. In Study 1 (N = 82) we found that in response to a vested interest of their interaction partner, patients indicated a stronger experience of reactance, more aggressive behavioral intentions, and more biased cognitions than doctors. A serial multiple mediation revealed that a vested interest engendered mistrust toward the interaction partner and this mistrust led to an emerging reactance process. Study 2 (N = 207) further demonstrated that doctors expressed their reactance in a subtle way: they revealed a classic confirmation bias when searching for additional information on their preliminary decision preference, indicating stronger defense motivation. We discuss how these findings can help us to understand how social interactions develop dynamically. PMID:26640444

  3. Thermodynamic and structural properties of methanol-water solutions using nonadditive interaction models.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yang; Warren, G Lee; Patel, Sandeep

    2008-05-01

    We study bulk structural and thermodynamic properties of methanol-water solutions via molecular dynamics simulations using novel interaction potentials based on the charge equilibration (fluctuating charge) formalism to explicitly account for molecular polarization at the atomic level. The study uses the TIP4P-FQ potential for water-water interactions, and the CHARMM-based (Chemistry at HARvard Molecular Mechanics) fluctuating charge potential for methanol-methanol and methanol-water interactions. In terms of bulk solution properties, we discuss liquid densities, enthalpies of mixing, dielectric constants, self-diffusion constants, as well as structural properties related to local hydrogen bonding structure as manifested in radial distribution functions and cluster analysis. We further explore the electronic response of water and methanol in the differing local environments established by the interaction of each species predominantly with molecules of the other species. The current force field for the alcohol-water interaction performs reasonably well for most properties, with the greatest deviation from experiment observed for the excess mixing enthalpies, which are predicted to be too favorable. This is qualitatively consistent with the overestimation of the methanol-water gas-phase interaction energy for the lowest-energy conformer (methanol as proton donor). Hydration free energies for methanol in TIP4P-FQ water are predicted to be -5.6 +/- 0.2 kcal/mol, in respectable agreement with the experimental value of -5.1 kcal/mol. With respect to solution microstructure, the present cluster analysis suggests that the microscale environment for concentrations where select thermodynamic quantities reach extremal values is described by a bipercolating network structure.

  4. Structural Interactions within Lithium Salt Solvates: Cyclic Carbonates and Esters

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, D. M.; Afroz, Taliman; Allen, Joshua L.; Boyle, Paul D.; Trulove, Paul C.; De Long, Hugh C.; Henderson, Wesley A.

    2014-11-13

    Only limited information is available regarding the manner in which cyclic carbonate and ester solvents coordinate Li+ cations in electrolyte solutions for lithium batteries. One approach to gleaning significant insight into these interactions is to examine crystalline solvate structures. To this end, eight new solvate structures are reported with ethylene carbonate, γ-butyrolactone and γ-valerolactone: (EC)3:LiClO4, (EC)2:LiClO4, (EC)2:LiBF4, (GBL)4:LiPF6, (GBL)1:LiClO4, (GVL)1:LiClO4, (GBL)1:LiBF4 and (GBL)1:LiCF3SO3. The crystal structure of (EC)1:LiCF3SO3 is also re-reported for comparison. These structures enable the factors which govern the manner in which the ions are coordinated and the ion/solvent packing—in the solid-state—to be scrutinized in detail.

  5. Structural Interactions within Lithium Salt Solvates. Acyclic Carbonates and Esters

    SciTech Connect

    Afroz, Taliman; Seo, D. M.; Han, Sang D.; Boyle, Paul D.; Henderson, Wesley A.

    2015-03-06

    Solvate crystal structures serve as useful models for the molecular-level interactions within the diverse solvates present in liquid electrolytes. Although acyclic carbonate solvents are widely used for Li-ion battery electrolytes, only three solvate crystal structures with lithium salts are known for these and related solvents. The present work, therefore, reports six lithium salt solvate structures with dimethyl and diethyl carbonate: (DMC)2:LiPF6, (DMC)1:LiCF3SO3, (DMC)1/4:LiBF4, (DEC)2:LiClO4, (DEC)1:LiClO4 and (DEC)1:LiCF3SO3 and four with the structurally related methyl and ethyl acetate: (MA)2:LiClO4, (MA)1:LiBF4, (EA)1:LiClO4 and (EA)1:LiBF4.

  6. Magnetic monopole interactions: shell structure of meson and baryon states

    SciTech Connect

    Akers, D.

    1986-12-01

    It is suggested that a low-mass magnetic monopole of Dirac charge g = (137/2)e may be interacting with a c-quark's magnetic dipole moment to produce Zeeman splitting of meson states. The mass M/sub 0/ = 2397 MeV of the monopole is in contrast to the 10/sup 16/-GeV monopoles of grand unification theories (GUT). It is shown that shell structure of energy E/sub n/ = M/sub 0/ + 1/4nM/sub 0/... exists for meson states. The presence of symmetric meson states leads to the identification of the shell structure. The possible existence of the 2397-MeV magnetic monopole is shown to quantize quark masses in agreement with calculations of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). From the shell structure of meson states, the existence of two new mesons is predicted: eta(1814 +/- 50 MeV) with I/sup G/(J/sup PC/) = 0/sup +/(0/sup - +/) and eta/sub c/ (3907 +/- 100 MeV) with J/sup PC/ = 0/sup - +/. The presence of shell structure for baryon states is shown.

  7. Dynamic protein interaction networks and new structural paradigms in signaling

    PubMed Central

    Csizmok, Veronika; Follis, Ariele Viacava; Kriwacki, Richard W.; Forman-Kay, Julie D.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding signaling and other complex biological processes requires elucidating the critical roles of intrinsically disordered proteins and regions (IDPs/IDRs), which represent ~30% of the proteome and enable unique regulatory mechanisms. In this review we describe the structural heterogeneity of disordered proteins that underpins these mechanisms and the latest progress in obtaining structural descriptions of ensembles of disordered proteins that are needed for linking structure and dynamics to function. We describe the diverse interactions of IDPs that can have unusual characteristics such as “ultrasensitivity” and “regulated folding and unfolding”. We also summarize the mounting data showing that large-scale assembly and protein phase separation occurs within a variety of signaling complexes and cellular structures. In addition, we discuss efforts to therapeutically target disordered proteins with small molecules. Overall, we interpret the remodeling of disordered state ensembles due to binding and post-translational modifications within an expanded framework for allostery that provides significant insights into how disordered proteins transmit biological information. PMID:26922996

  8. Interaction of Object Binding Cues in Binaural Masking Pattern Experiments.

    PubMed

    Verhey, Jesko L; Lübken, Björn; van de Par, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Object binding cues such as binaural and across-frequency modulation cues are likely to be used by the auditory system to separate sounds from different sources in complex auditory scenes. The present study investigates the interaction of these cues in a binaural masking pattern paradigm where a sinusoidal target is masked by a narrowband noise. It was hypothesised that beating between signal and masker may contribute to signal detection when signal and masker do not spectrally overlap but that this cue could not be used in combination with interaural cues. To test this hypothesis an additional sinusoidal interferer was added to the noise masker with a lower frequency than the noise whereas the target had a higher frequency than the noise. Thresholds increase when the interferer is added. This effect is largest when the spectral interferer-masker and masker-target distances are equal. The result supports the hypothesis that modulation cues contribute to signal detection in the classical masking paradigm and that these are analysed with modulation bandpass filters. A monaural model including an across-frequency modulation process is presented that account for this effect. Interestingly, the interferer also affects dichotic thresholds indicating that modulation cues also play a role in binaural processing.

  9. Search for Non-standard Interactions with the MINOS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Isvan, Zeynep

    2011-10-01

    MINOS searches for neutrino oscillations using the disappearance of muon neutrinos between two detectors, over a baseline of 735 km. We recently reported the most precise measurement of neutrino oscillations in the atmospheric sector and the first tagged measurement of antineutrino oscillations. The neutrino mass splitting and mixing angle are measured to be |{Delta}m{sup 2}| = 2.32{sub -0.08}{sup +0.12} x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta} > 0.90 (90% C.L.) for an exposure of 7.25 x 10{sup 20} protons-on-target (PoT). Antineutrino oscillation parameters are measured as {Delta}{bar m}{sup 2} = (3.36{sub -0.40}{sup +0.46}(stat.) {+-} 0.06(syst.)) x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} and sin{sup 2}(2{bar {theta}}) = 0.86{sub -0.12}{sup +0.11}(stat.) {+-} 0.01(syst.) with an exposure of 1.7 x 10{sup 20} PoT in NuMI antineutrino running mode. We use the apparent difference in neutrino and antineutrino oscillation parameters to constrain non-standard matter interactions which could occur during propagation through the Earth's crust to the Far Detector.

  10. Wave-current interaction, experiments with controlled uniform shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Bruno; Touboul, Julien; Rey, Vincent

    2016-04-01

    Vertically varying currents have a non negligible impact on the propagation of waves. Even though the analytical aspect of the interaction between wave and sheared current is being an active subject of research, experimental data remain rare. Here, the effects of a uniformly shear were investigated in the 10 m long by 0.3 m wide wave flume of the Université de Toulon, France. The main difficulty of the study was to produce several conditions of current with constant shear (du/dz = cst) that would persist along the channel. This was achieved by using curved wire screens upstream the channel (Dunn and Tavoularis, 2007). The geometry and properties of the screens were adjusted to deflect the streamline towards the channel bed or the free surface in order to change the velocity profile. The study focused on regular wave propagating against the current for several wave frequencies and amplitudes. Properties of the free surface and flow velocity are discussed for current with positive and negative shear in order to quantify the influence of the current on the waves. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The DGA (Direction Générale de l'Armement, France) is acknowledged for its financial support through the ANR grant N° ANR-13-ASTR-0007.

  11. Structured residual technique for malfunction isolation in interacting systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, C.R.; Miller, D.W.; Hajek, B.K. )

    1992-01-01

    Researchers in the field of fault detection and isolation have presented schemes for diagnosing faults in systems in the presence of unknown input disturbances. These techniques, known collectively as input disturbance decoupling, can be used to isolate a particular system from other systems in a complex process plant. The ability to isolate the operation of a system from systems with which it interacts is desirable when diagnosing faults in complex plants. The diagnosis problem can then be broken down into a set of relatively simple diagnostic tasks and the results evaluated using a knowledge-based approach. One such approach, known as hierarchical classification, has been used for malfunction diagnosis in both nuclear power and chemical plants. Systems that strongly interact are common in nuclear power plants. For example, in the simplified boiling water reactor (BWR) pressure control system (PCS) model of Fig. 1, steam flow from the main steam lines collects in the steam header. The header acts as a source of steam to several plant systems besides the high-pressure turbine. Thus, a change in any one of these auxiliary systems will affect the operation of the PCS. These unmeasured influences complicate the problem of isolating the PCS from the remainder of the plant. The authors have used structured residuals as a disturbance decoupling technique to isolate interacting systems in a BWR model. In this paper, we provide a brief summary of the method and show an example of its application.

  12. Analytic and Simulation Studies of Dust Grain Interaction and Structuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampe, Martin; Joyce, Glenn; Ganguli, Gurudas

    For dust grains in stationary plasma, a quantitative assessment is made of the effect of centrifugal potential barriers on ion trajectories near a grain. It is shown that in most situations of interest the barriers are weak and only marginally affect the validity of the orbital-motion-limited (OML) theory. The OML theory is then used to show that the electrostatic interaction between grains is always repulsive. The ion-shadowing force is calculated, and it is shown that this force can lead to a weak net attraction between grains at long range, under certain conditions with large grains, dense plasma, and/or low gas pressure. For grains in streaming plasma at or near the sheath, it is shown that nonlinear effects are weak and the grains can be represented as dressed particles interacting via the dynamically shielded Coulomb interaction, which includes wakefields, Landau damping, and collisional damping. The Dynamically Shielded Dust (DSD) simulation code, which is based on this model, is described and a simulation is shown for strongly coupled grains in flowing plasma. The simulation shows ordering of the grains into rigid strings aligned with the ion flow, and looser glass-like organization of the strings in the transverse plane. The presence of strings with odd and even numbers of grains results in stratification of the grains into planes with an alternating structure.

  13. Communication and laboratory performance in parapsychology experiments: demand characteristics and the social organization of interaction.

    PubMed

    Wooffitt, Robin

    2007-09-01

    This paper reports findings from a conversation analytic study of experimenter-participant interaction in parapsychology experiments. It shows how properties of communication through which the routine business of the experiment is conducted may have an impact on the research participant's subsequent performance. In this, the study explores social psychological features of the psychology laboratory. In particular, it examines aspects of Orne's (1962) account of what he called the demand characteristics of the psychological experiment. The data come from a corpus of audio recordings of experimenter-participant interaction during experiments on extra-sensory perception. These kinds of experiments, and the phenomena they purport to study, are undoubtedly controversial; however, the paper argues that there are grounds for social psychologists to consider parapsychology experiments as a class (albeit distinctive) of psychology experiments, and, therefore, as sites in which general social psychological and communicative phenomena can be studied. The empirical sections of the paper examine interaction during part of the experimental procedure when the experimenter verbally reviews a record of the participant's imagery reported during an earlier part of the experiment. The analysis shows that the way in which the experimenter acknowledges the research participants' utterances may be significant for the trajectory of the experiment and explores how the participants' subsequent performance in the experiment may be influenced by interactionally generated contingencies.

  14. Experiment study on RC frame retrofitted by the external structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunyang; Shi, Junji; Hiroshi, Kuramoto; Taguchi, Takashi; Kamiya, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    A new retrofitting method is proposed herein for reinforced concrete (RC) structures through attachment of an external structure. The external structure consists of a fiber concrete encased steel frame, connection slab and transverse beams. The external structure is connected to the existing structure through a connection slab and transverse beams. Pseudostatic experiments were carried out on one unretrofitted specimen and three retrofitted frame specimens. The characteristics, including failure mode, crack pattern, hysteresis loops behavior, relationship of strain and displacement of the concrete slab, are demonstrated. The results show that the load carrying capacity is obviously increased, and the extension length of the slab and the number of columns within the external frame are important influence factors on the working performance of the existing structure. In addition, the displacement difference between the existing structure and the outer structure was caused mainly by three factors: shear deformation of the slab, extraction of transverse beams, and drift of the conjunction part between the slab and the existing frame. Furthermore, the total deformation determined by the first two factors accounted for approximately 80% of the damage, therefore these factors should be carefully considered in engineering practice to enhance the effects of this new retrofitting method.

  15. Near minimum-time maneuvers of the advanced space structures technology research experiment (ASTREX) test article: Theory and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vadali, Srinivas R.; Carter, Michael T.

    1994-01-01

    The Phillips Laboratory at the Edwards Air Force Base has developed the Advanced Space Structures Technology Research Experiment (ASTREX) facility to serve as a testbed for demonstrating the applicability of proven theories to the challenges of spacecraft maneuvers and structural control. This report describes the work performed on the ASTREX test article by Texas A&M University under contract NAS119373 as a part of the Control-Structure Interaction (CSI) Guest Investigator Program. The focus of this work is on maneuvering the ASTREX test article with compressed air thrusters that can be throttled, while attenuating structural excitation. The theoretical foundation for designing the near minimum-time thrust commands is based on the generation of smooth, parameterized optimal open-loop control profiles, and the determination of control laws for final position regulation and tracking using Lyapunov stability theory. Details of the theory, mathematical modeling, model updating, and compensation for the presence of 'real world' effects are described and the experimental results are presented. The results show an excellent match between theory and experiments.

  16. Structural organization and interactions of transmembrane domains in tetraspanin proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kovalenko, Oleg V; Metcalf, Douglas G; DeGrado, William F; Hemler, Martin E

    2005-01-01

    Background Proteins of the tetraspanin family contain four transmembrane domains (TM1-4) linked by two extracellular loops and a short intracellular loop, and have short intracellular N- and C-termini. While structure and function analysis of the larger extracellular loop has been performed, the organization and role of transmembrane domains have not been systematically assessed. Results Among 28 human tetraspanin proteins, the TM1-3 sequences display a distinct heptad repeat motif (abcdefg)n. In TM1, position a is occupied by structurally conserved bulky residues and position d contains highly conserved Asn and Gly residues. In TM2, position a is occupied by conserved small residues (Gly/Ala/Thr), and position d has a conserved Gly and two bulky aliphatic residues. In TM3, three a positions of the heptad repeat are filled by two leucines and a glutamate/glutamine residue, and two d positions are occupied by either Phe/Tyr or Val/Ile/Leu residues. No heptad motif is apparent in TM4 sequences. Mutations of conserved glycines in human CD9 (Gly25 and Gly32 in TM1; Gly67 and Gly74 in TM2) caused aggregation of mutant proteins inside the cell. Modeling of the TM1-TM2 interface in CD9, using a novel algorithm, predicts tight packing of conserved bulky residues against conserved Gly residues along the two helices. The homodimeric interface of CD9 was mapped, by disulfide cross-linking of single-cysteine mutants, to the vicinity of residues Leu14 and Phe17 in TM1 (positions g and c) and Gly77, Gly80 and Ala81 in TM2 (positions d, g and a, respectively). Mutations of a and d residues in both TM1 and TM2 (Gly25, Gly32, Gly67 and Gly74), involved in intramolecular TM1-TM2 interaction, also strongly diminished intermolecular interaction, as assessed by cross-linking of Cys80. Conclusion Our results suggest that tetraspanin intra- and intermolecular interactions are mediated by conserved residues in adjacent, but distinct regions of TM1 and TM2. A key structural element that

  17. Community structure of non-coding RNA interaction network.

    PubMed

    Nacher, Jose C

    2013-04-02

    Rapid technological advances have shown that the ratio of non-protein coding genes rises to 98.5% in humans, suggesting that current knowledge on genetic information processing might be largely incomplete. It implies that protein-coding sequences only represent a small fraction of cellular transcriptional information. Here, we examine the community structure of the network defined by functional interactions between non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) and proteins related bio-macromolecules (PRMs) using a two-fold approach: modularity in bipartite network and k-clique community detection. First, the high modularity scores as well as the distribution of community sizes showing a scaling-law revealed manifestly non-random features. Second, the k-clique sub-graphs and overlaps show that the identified communities of the ncRNA molecules of H. sapiens can potentially be associated with certain functions. These findings highlight the complex modular structure of ncRNA interactions and its possible regulatory roles in the cell.

  18. A self-excited flapper from fluid-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curet, Oscar M.; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    2010-11-01

    The flexible nature of lifting and propulsive surfaces is a common characteristic of aquatic and aerial locomotion in animals. These surfaces may not only move actively, but also passively or with a combination of both. What is the nature of this passive movement? What is the role of this passive motion on force generation, efficiency and muscle control? Here, we present results using a simple wing model with two degrees of freedom designed to study passive flapping, and fluid-structure interaction. The wing is composed of a flat plate with a hinged trailing flap. The wing is cantilevered to the main body to enable a flapping motion with a well-defined natural frequency. We test the wing model in a wind tunnel. At low speed the wing is stationary. Above a critical velocity the trailing wing section starts to oscillate, generating an oscillating lift force on the wing. This oscillating lift force results on a self-excited flapping motion of the wing. We measure the kinematics and the forces generated by the wing as a function of flow velocity and stiffness of the cantilever. Comparisons with aeroelasticity theory will be presented as well as details of the fluid-structure interactions.

  19. Modeling fluid-structure interactions in shallow microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shidhore, Tanmay C.; Christov, Ivan C.

    2016-11-01

    Rectangular microfluidic conduits with deformable walls are some of the simplest and most extensively studied microfluidic devices, primarily due to their practical design applications in a variety of fields like biology, medical diagnostics (e.g., lab-on-a-chip), nanotechnology, etc. Experimentally, these devices are found to deform into a non-rectangular cross-section due to fluid-structure interactions occurring at the channel walls. These deformations significantly affect the flow profile, which results in a non-linear relationship between the flow rate and the pressure drop, which cannot be explained by a 'generalised Poiseuille flow solution'. To this end, we perform a numerical study of these fluid-structure interactions and their effect on the flow rate and the pressure drop occurring in microfluidic conduits with a single deformable wall. The behavior of several shallow conduit systems (l >> w >> h) with rigid base and side walls and a soft top wall (e.g., PDMS) is simulated under laminar flow conditions using the commercial software suite ANSYS. Simulation results are compared against experimental pressure drop-flow rate data from the literature and also newly developed analytical expressions for the wall deformation, the pressure and the normalized flow rate.

  20. Simulating Pediatric Ventricular Assist Device Operation Using Fluid Structure Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Chris; Bazilevs, Yuri; Marsden, Alison

    2012-11-01

    Ventricular Assist Devices (VADs) provide mechanical circulatory support to patients in heart failure. They are primarily used to extend life until cardiac transplant, but also show promise as a ``bridge-to-recovery'' device in pediatric patients. Commercially available pediatric pumps are pulsatile displacement pumps, with two distinct chambers for air and blood separated by a thin, flexible membrane. The air chamber pneumatically drives the membrane, which drives blood through the other chamber via displacement. The primary risk factor associated with these devices is stroke or embolism due to thrombogenesis in the blood chamber, occurring in as many as 40% of patients. Our goal is to perform simulations that accurately model the hemodynamics of the device, as well as the non-linear membrane buckling. We apply a finite-element based fluid solver, with an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) framework to account for mesh motion. Isogeometric Analysis with a Kirchhoff-Love shell formulation is used on the membrane, and two distinct fluid subdomains are used for the air and blood chambers. The Fluid Structure Interaction (FSI) problem is solved simultaneously, using a Matrix Free method to model the interactions at the fluid-structure boundary. Methods and results are presented.

  1. Fluid Structure Interaction Analysis on Sidewall Aneurysm Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Qing

    2016-11-01

    Wall shear stress is considered as an important factor for cerebral aneurysm growth and rupture. The objective of present study is to evaluate wall shear stress in aneurysm sac and neck by a fluid-structure-interaction (FSI) model, which was developed and validated against the particle image velocimetry (PIV) data. In this FSI model, the flow characteristics in a straight tube with different asymmetric aneurysm sizes over a range of Reynolds numbers from 200 to 1600 were investigated. The FSI results agreed well with PIV data. It was found that at steady flow conditions, when Reynolds number above 700, one large recirculating vortex would be formed, occupying the entire aneurysm sac. The center of the vortex is located at region near to the distal neck. A pair of counter rotating vortices would however be formed at Reynolds number below 700. Wall shear stresses reached highest level at the distal neck of the aneurysmal sac. The vortex strength, in general, is stronger at higher Reynolds number. Fluid Structure Interaction Analysis on Sidewall Aneurysm Models.

  2. Reduced order modeling of fluid/structure interaction.

    SciTech Connect

    Barone, Matthew Franklin; Kalashnikova, Irina; Segalman, Daniel Joseph; Brake, Matthew Robert

    2009-11-01

    This report describes work performed from October 2007 through September 2009 under the Sandia Laboratory Directed Research and Development project titled 'Reduced Order Modeling of Fluid/Structure Interaction.' This project addresses fundamental aspects of techniques for construction of predictive Reduced Order Models (ROMs). A ROM is defined as a model, derived from a sequence of high-fidelity simulations, that preserves the essential physics and predictive capability of the original simulations but at a much lower computational cost. Techniques are developed for construction of provably stable linear Galerkin projection ROMs for compressible fluid flow, including a method for enforcing boundary conditions that preserves numerical stability. A convergence proof and error estimates are given for this class of ROM, and the method is demonstrated on a series of model problems. A reduced order method, based on the method of quadratic components, for solving the von Karman nonlinear plate equations is developed and tested. This method is applied to the problem of nonlinear limit cycle oscillations encountered when the plate interacts with an adjacent supersonic flow. A stability-preserving method for coupling the linear fluid ROM with the structural dynamics model for the elastic plate is constructed and tested. Methods for constructing efficient ROMs for nonlinear fluid equations are developed and tested on a one-dimensional convection-diffusion-reaction equation. These methods are combined with a symmetrization approach to construct a ROM technique for application to the compressible Navier-Stokes equations.

  3. Structure and functional interactions of the Tsg101 UEV domain.

    PubMed

    Pornillos, Owen; Alam, Steven L; Rich, Rebecca L; Myszka, David G; Davis, Darrell R; Sundquist, Wesley I

    2002-05-15

    Human Tsg101 plays key roles in HIV budding and in cellular vacuolar protein sorting (VPS). In performing these functions, Tsg101 binds both ubiquitin (Ub) and the PTAP tetrapeptide 'late domain' motif located within the viral Gag protein. These interactions are mediated by the N-terminal domain of Tsg101, which belongs to the catalytically inactive ubiquitin E2 variant (UEV) family. We now report the structure of Tsg101 UEV and chemical shift mapping of the Ub and PTAP binding sites. Tsg101 UEV resembles canonical E2 ubiquitin conjugating enzymes, but has an additional N-terminal helix, an extended beta-hairpin that links strands 1 and 2, and lacks the two C-terminal helices normally found in E2 enzymes. PTAP-containing peptides bind in a hydrophobic cleft exposed by the absence of the C-terminal helices, whereas ubiquitin binds in a novel site surrounding the beta-hairpin. These studies provide a structural framework for understanding how Tsg101 mediates the protein-protein interactions required for HIV budding and VPS.

  4. A complementary study of analytical and computational fluid-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andre, Michael; Bletzinger, Kai-Uwe; Wüchner, Roland

    2015-02-01

    This paper introduces new initial value problems for the design and analysis of fluid-structure interaction algorithms. The problems are constructed from a finite number of sinusoidal perturbations of thin structures superposed on incompressible fluids. Explicit analytical solutions are provided for rigorous quantitative comparisons including viscous effects. The equation governing a single inviscid mode is split into fluid and structure subproblems and numerical parameters are derived for several partitioned algorithms based on a Dirichlet-Neumann decomposition and a second-order backward difference time discretization. Numerical experiments are performed using a stabilized fractional-step finite element method for the fluid and membrane finite elements for the structure. The convergence behaviour of the finite element solutions to the analytical solutions is demonstrated. Finally, the stability and performance of the numerical parameters derived from a single inviscid mode are presented for more general problems including multiple modes and viscous effects.

  5. Passively Adaptive Inflatable Structure for the Shooting Star Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinker, Michael L..

    1998-01-01

    An inflatable structural system is described for the Shooting Star Experiment that is a technology demonstrator flight for solar thermal propulsion. The inflatable structure is a pressurized assembly used in orbit to support a fresnel lens for focusing sunlight into a thermal storage engine. When the engine temperature reaches a preset level, the propellant is injected into the storage engine, absorbs heat from a heat exchanger, and is expanded through the nozzle to produce thrust. The inflatable structure is an adaptive system in that a regulator and relief valve are utilized to maintain pressure within design limits during the full range of orbital conditions. Further, the polyimide film material used for construction of the inflatable is highly nonlinear, with modulus varying as a function of frequency, temperature, and level of excitation. A series of tests is described for characterizing the structure in response to various operating conditions.

  6. Electromechanical co-design and experiment of structurally integrated antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jinzhu; Huang, Jin; Song, Liwei; Zhang, Dan; Ma, Yunchao

    2015-03-01

    This paper proposes an electromechanical co-design method of a structurally integrated antenna to simultaneously meet mechanical and electrical requirements. The method consists of three stages. The first stage involves finishing an initial design of the microstrip antenna without a facesheet or honeycomb, according to some predefined performances. Subsequently, the facesheet and honeycomb of the structurally integrated antenna are designed using an electromechanical co-design optimization. Based on the results from the first and second stages, a fine full-wave electromagnetic model is developed and the coarse design results are further optimized to meet the electrical performance. The co-design method is applied to the design of a 2.5 GHz structurally integrated antenna, and then the designed antenna is fabricated. Experiments from the mechanical and electrical performances are conducted, and the results confirm the effectiveness of the co-design method. This method shows great promise for the multidisciplinary design of a structurally integrated antenna.

  7. The Three Dimensional Structure and Interaction Studies of HCV p7 in DHPC by Solution NMR

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Gabriel A.; Dawson, Lindsay A.; Tian, Ye; Opella, Stanley J.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) protein p7 plays an important role in the assembly and release of mature virus particles. This small 63-residue membrane protein has been shown to induce channel activity, which may contribute to its functions. p7 is highly conserved throughout the entire range of HCV genotypes, which contributes to making p7 a potential target for anti-viral drugs. The secondary structure of p7 from the J4 genotype and the tilt angles of the helices within bilayers have been previously characterized by NMR. Here we describe the three-dimensional structure of p7 in short chain phospholipid (DHPC) micelles, which provide a reasonably effective membrane-mimicking environment that is compatible with solution NMR experiments. Using a combination of chemical shifts and residual dipolar couplings we determined the structure of p7 using an implicit membrane potential combining both CS-Rosetta decoys and Xplor-NIH refinement. The final set of structures has a backbone RMSD of 2.18 Å. Molecular dynamic simulations in NAMD indicate that several side chain interactions might be taking place, and that these could affect the dynamics of the protein. In addition to probing the dynamics of p7, several drug-protein and protein-protein interactions were evaluated. Established channel-blocking compounds such as amantadine, hexamethylene amiloride (HMA), and long alkyl-chain iminosugar derivatives inhibit the ion channel activity of p7. It has also been shown that the protein interacts with the HCV non-structural protein 2 (NS2) at the endoplasmic reticulum, and that this interaction may be important for the infectivity of the virus. Changes in the chemical shift frequencies of solution NMR spectra identify the residues taking part in these interactions. PMID:23841474

  8. Flow interaction experiment. Volume 1: Aerothermal modeling, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikjooy, M.; Mongia, H. C.; Sullivan, J. P.; Murthy, S. N. B.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental and computational study is reported for the flow of a turbulent jet discharging into a rectangular enclosure. The experimental configurations consisting of primary jets only, annular jets only, and a combination of annular and primary jets are investigated to provide a better understanding of the flow field in an annular combustor. A laser Doppler velocimeter is used to measure mean velocity and Reynolds stress components. Major features of the flow field include recirculation, primary and annular jet interaction, and high turbulence. A significant result from this study is the effect the primary jets have on the flow field. The primary jets are seen to create statistically larger recirculation zones and higher turbulence levels. In addition, a technique called marker nephelometry is used to provide mean concentration values in the model combustor. Computations are performed using three levels of turbulence closures, namely k-epsilon model, algebraic second moment (ASM), and differential second moment (DSM) closure. Two different numerical schemes are applied. One is the lower-order power-law differencing scheme (PLDS) and the other is the higher-order flux-spline differencing scheme (FSDS). A comparison is made of the performance of these schemes. The numerical results are compared with experimental data. For the cases considered in this study, the FSDS is more accurate than the PLDS. For a prescribed accuracy, the flux-spline scheme requires a far fewer number of grid points. Thus, it has the potential for providing a numerical error-free solution, especially for three-dimensional flows, without requiring an excessively fine grid. Although qualitatively good comparison with data was obtained, the deficiencies regarding the modeled dissipation rate (epsilon) equation, pressure-strain correlation model, and the inlet epsilon profile and other critical closure issues need to be resolved before one can achieve the degree of accuracy required to

  9. Flow interaction experiment. Volume 2: Aerothermal modeling, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikjooy, M.; Mongia, H. C.; Sullivan, J. P.; Murthy, S. N. B.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental and computational study is reported for the flow of a turbulent jet discharging into a rectangular enclosure. The experimental configurations consisting of primary jets only, annular jets only, and a combination of annular and primary jets are investigated to provide a better understanding of the flow field in an annular combustor. A laser Doppler velocimeter is used to measure mean velocity and Reynolds stress components. Major features of the flow field include recirculation, primary and annular jet interaction, and high turbulence. A significant result from this study is the effect the primary jets have on the flow field. The primary jets are seen to create statistically larger recirculation zones and higher turbulence levels. In addition, a technique called marker nephelometry is used to provide mean concentration values in the model combustor. Computations are performed using three levels of turbulence closures, namely k-epsilon model, algebraic second moment (ASM), and differential second moment (DSM) closure. Two different numerical schemes are applied. One is the lower-order power-law differencing scheme (PLDS) and the other is the higher-order flux-spline differencing scheme (FSDS). A comparison is made of the performance of these schemes. The numerical results are compared with experimental data. For the cases considered in this study, the FSDS is more accurate than the PLDS. For a prescribed accuracy, the flux-spline scheme requires a far fewer number of grid points. Thus, it has the potential for providing a numerical error-free solution, especially for three-dimensional flows, without requiring an excessively fine grid. Although qualitatively good comparison with data was obtained, the deficiencies regarding the modeled dissipation rate (epsilon) equation, pressure-strain correlation model, and the inlet epsilon profile and other critical closure issues need to be resolved before one can achieve the degree of accuracy required to

  10. Some Experiments in Man-Machine Interaction Relevant to Computer Assisted Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, P. G.

    1982-01-01

    Briefly describes some experiments in human-machine interaction in the context of its relevance to multimedia audiovisual instruction, with emphasis on the use of microcomputer systems augmented with slides or audiocassettes. Fifteen references are listed. (Author/LLS)

  11. Data-driven interactive 3D medical image segmentation based on structured patch model.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Hyun; Yun, Il Dong; Lee, Sang Uk

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel three dimensional interactive medical image segmentation method based on high level knowledge of training set. Since the interactive system should provide intermediate results to an user quickly, insufficient low level models are used for most of previous methods. To exploit the high level knowledge within a short time, we construct a structured patch model that consists of multiple corresponding patch sets. The structured patch model includes the spatial relationships between neighboring patch sets and the prior knowledge of the corresponding patch set on each local region. The spatial relationships accelerate the search of corresponding patch in test time, while the prior knowledge improves the segmentation accuracy. The proposed framework provides not only fast editing tool, but the incremental learning system through adding the segmentation result to the training set. Experiments demonstrate that the proposed method is useful for fast and accurate segmentation of target objects from the multiple medical images.

  12. Structure of colloidal gels at intermediate concentrations: the role of competing interactions.

    PubMed

    Capellmann, Ronja F; Valadez-Pérez, Néstor E; Simon, Benedikt; Egelhaaf, Stefan U; Laurati, Marco; Castañeda-Priego, Ramón

    2016-11-23

    Colloidal gels formed by colloid-polymer mixtures with an intermediate volume fraction (ϕc ≈ 0.4) are investigated by confocal microscopy. In addition, we have performed Monte Carlo simulations based on a simple effective pair potential that includes a short-range attractive contribution representing depletion interactions, and a longer-range repulsive contribution describing the electrostatic interactions due to the presence of residual charges. Despite neglecting non-equilibrium effects, experiments and simulations yield similar gel structures, characterised by, e.g., the pair, angular and bond distribution functions. We find that the structure hardly depends on the strength of the attraction if the electrostatic contribution is fixed, but changes significantly if the electrostatic screening is changed. This delicate balance between attractions and repulsions, which we quantify by the second virial coefficient, also determines the location of the gelation boundary.

  13. Effects of non-structural components and soil-structure interaction on the seismic response of framed structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditommaso, Rocco; Auletta, Gianluca; Iacovino, Chiara; Nigro, Antonella; Carlo Ponzo, Felice

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, several nonlinear numerical models of reinforced concrete framed structures have been defined in order to evaluate the effects of non-structural elements and soil-structure interaction on the elastic dynamic behaviour of buildings. In the last few years, many and various studies have highlighted the significant effects derived from the interaction between structural and non-structural components on the main dynamic characteristics of a building. Usually, structural and non-structural elements act together, adding both masses and stiffness. The presence of infill panels is generally neglected in the design process of structural elements, although these elements can significantly increase the lateral stiffness of a structure leading to a modification in the dynamic properties. Particularly, at the Damage Limit State (where an elastic behaviour is expected), soil-structure interaction effects and non-structural elements may further affect the elastic natural period of buildings, changing the spectral accelerations compared with those provided by seismic codes in case of static analyses. In this work, a parametric study has been performed in order to evaluate the elastic fundamental period of vibration of buildings as a function of structural morphology (height, plan area, ratio between plan dimensions), infills presence and distribution and soil characteristics. Acknowledgements This study was partially funded by the Italian Department of Civil Protection within the project DPC-RELUIS 2016 - RS4 ''Seismic observatory of structures and health monitoring'' and by the "Centre of Integrated Geomorphology for the Mediterranean Area - CGIAM" within the Framework Agreement with the University of Basilicata "Study, Research and Experimentation in the Field of Analysis and Monitoring of Seismic Vulnerability of Strategic and Relevant Buildings for the purposes of Civil Protection and Development of Innovative Strategies of Seismic Reinforcement".

  14. A Structural Dynamics Approach to the Simulation of Spacecraft Control/Structure Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    A relatively simple approach to the analysis of linear spacecraft control/structure interaction problems is presented. The approach uses a commercially available structural system dynamic analysis package for both controller and plant dynamics, thus obviating the need to transfer data between separate programs. The unilateral coupling between components in the control system block diagram is simulated using sparse matrix stiffness and damping elements available in the structural dynamic code. The approach is illustrated with a series of simple tutorial examples of a rigid spacecraft core with flexible appendages.

  15. Nonlinear interaction and wave breaking with a submerged porous structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Chih-Min; Sau, Amalendu; Hwang, Robert R.; Yang, W. C.

    2016-12-01

    Numerical simulations are performed to investigate interactive velocity, streamline, turbulent kinetic energy, and vorticity perturbations in the near-field of a submerged offshore porous triangular structure, as Stokes waves of different heights pass through. The wave-structure interaction and free-surface breaking for the investigated flow situations are established based on solutions of 2D Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations in a Cartesian grid in combination with K-ɛ turbulent closure and the volume of fluid methodology. The accuracy and stability of the adopted model are ascertained by extensive comparisons of computed data with the existing experimental and theoretical findings and through efficient predictions of the internal physical kinetics. Simulations unfold "clockwise" and "anticlockwise" rotation of fluid below the trough and the crest of the viscous waves, and the penetrated wave energy creates systematic flow perturbation in the porous body. The interfacial growths of the turbulent kinetic energy and the vorticity appear phenomenal, around the apex of the immersed structure, and enhanced significantly following wave breaking. Different values of porosity parameter and two non-porous cases have been examined in combination with varied incident wave height to reveal/analyze the nonlinear flow behavior in regard to local spectral amplification and phase-plane signatures. The evolution of leading harmonics of the undulating free-surface and the vertical velocity exhibits dominating roles of the first and the second modes in inducing the nonlinearity in the post-breaking near-field that penetrates well below the surface layer. The study further suggests the existence of a critical porosity that can substantially enhance the wave-shoaling and interface breaking.

  16. Interactions between Intracellular Domains as Key Determinants of the Quaternary Structure and Function of Receptor Heteromers*

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Gemma; Ferré, Sergi; Cordomi, Arnau; Moreno, Estefania; Mallol, Josefa; Casadó, Vicent; Cortés, Antoni; Hoffmann, Hanne; Ortiz, Jordi; Canela, Enric I.; Lluís, Carme; Pardo, Leonardo; Franco, Rafael; Woods, Amina S.

    2010-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) heteromers are macromolecular complexes with unique functional properties different from those of its individual protomers. Little is known about what determines the quaternary structure of GPCR heteromers resulting in their unique functional properties. In this study, using resonance energy transfer techniques in experiments with mutated receptors, we provide for the first time clear evidence for a key role of intracellular domains in the determination of the quaternary structure of GPCR heteromers between adenosine A2A, cannabinoid CB1, and dopamine D2 receptors. In these interactions, arginine-rich epitopes form salt bridges with phosphorylated serine or threonine residues from CK1/2 consensus sites. Each receptor (A2A, CB1, and D2) was found to include two evolutionarily conserved intracellular domains to establish selective electrostatic interactions with intracellular domains of the other two receptors, indicating that these particular electrostatic interactions constitute a general mechanism for receptor heteromerization. Mutation experiments indicated that the interactions of the intracellular domains of the CB1 receptor with A2A and D2 receptors are fundamental for the correct formation of the quaternary structure needed for the function (MAPK signaling) of the A2A-CB1-D2 receptor heteromers. Analysis of MAPK signaling in striatal slices of CB1 receptor KO mice and wild-type littermates supported the existence of A1-CB1-D2 receptor heteromer in the brain. These findings allowed us to propose the first molecular model of the quaternary structure of a receptor heteromultimer. PMID:20562103

  17. Privatization of cooperative benefits stabilizes mutualistic cross-feeding interactions in spatially structured environments.

    PubMed

    Pande, Samay; Kaftan, Filip; Lang, Stefan; Svatoš, Aleš; Germerodt, Sebastian; Kost, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Metabolic cross-feeding interactions are ubiquitous in natural microbial communities. However, it remains generally unclear whether the production and exchange of metabolites incurs fitness costs to the producing cells and if so, which ecological mechanisms can facilitate a cooperative exchange of metabolites among unrelated individuals. We hypothesized that positive assortment within structured environments can maintain mutualistic cross-feeding. To test this, we engineered Acinetobacter baylyi and Escherichia coli to reciprocally exchange essential amino acids. Interspecific coculture experiments confirmed that non-cooperating types were selectively favoured in spatially unstructured (liquid culture), yet disfavoured in spatially structured environments (agar plates). Both an individual-based model and experiments with engineered genotypes indicated that a segregation of cross-feeders and non-cooperating auxotrophs stabilized cooperative cross-feeding in spatially structured environments. Chemical imaging confirmed that auxotrophs were spatially excluded from cooperative benefits. Together, these results demonstrate that cooperative cross-feeding between different bacterial species is favoured in structured environments such as bacterial biofilms, suggesting this type of interactions might be common in natural bacterial communities.

  18. Structural Hamiltonian chaos in the coherent parametric atom-field interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioussoupov, V. I.; Kon'kov, L. E.; Prants, S. V.

    2001-07-01

    We consider one of the simplest semiclassical models in laser and atomic physics, a collection of two-level atoms interacting coherently with an electromagnetic standing wave in an ideal single-mode cavity within the rotating-wave approximation (RWA). In the strong-coupling limit, atoms and a cavity field constitute a strongly coupled atom-field dynamical system whose atomic and field variables oscillate in a self-consistent way with the Rabi frequency. It is proven analytically by the Melnikov method and numerically by computing maximal Lyapunov exponents and Poincaré sections that the parametric Rabi oscillations in a vibrating cavity may be chaotic in a sense of exponential sensitivity to initial conditions. Wavelet spectra computed with typical signals of the oscillations demonstrate clearly that Hamiltonian chaos in the coherent atom-field interaction with modulated coupling is structural. Structural chaos is characterized by positive values of the maximal Lyapunov exponents and regular structures which coexist in the same signal. Duration of a train of regular oscillations is defined by the period of modulation, but oscillations between successive trains are chaotic. Results of numerical experiments and estimation of the control parameters and approximations involved show that a Rydberg atom maser operating with a collection of two-level atoms inside a high-quality superconducting microwave cavity is a promising device for observing manifestations of structural Hamiltonian chaos in real experiments.

  19. The NIF Shear Experiment: Emergent Coherent Structures and Initial Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flippo, K. A.; Doss, F. W.; Merritt, E. C.; di Stefano, C. A.; Devolder, B. G.; Kurien, S.; Kot, L.; Loomis, E. N.; Murphy, T. J.; Perry, T. S.; Kline, J. L.; Huntington, C. M.; Nagel, S. R.; MacLaren, S. A.; Schmidt, D. W.

    2016-10-01

    The NIF Shear experiments are designed to stress turbulence models at high Atwood numbers, high convective Mach number, and in a highly compressible regime. The NIF laser system is used to drive two hohlraums on either end of the experiment, which convert the laser drive into a bath of soft x-rays, 250eV in temperature. The counter-propagating shocks and flow, pressure balance the shear layer, such that it can grow due to the KH instability in the center of the experiment for 20 ns. These experiments are the first High Energy Density (HED) hydro-instability studies to show emergent coherent Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) structures arising from random broadband seeds, and the first to control the phenomenological evolution of the tracer layer by controlling the initial surface roughness conditions. The change in initial conditions forces the system evolution on a different path that does not appear to reach a universal nor self-similar state by the end of the experiment. The experiment was modeled using the multi-physics hydrodynamic code RAGE with the BHR turbulence model. The initial scale-length of the model is modified to match the data. When the model is turned off, the pure hydrodynamics do not capture the behavior of the mixing layer and cannot match the data.

  20. An immersed boundary method for fluid-structure interaction with compressible multiphase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li; Currao, Gaetano M. D.; Han, Feng; Neely, Andrew J.; Young, John; Tian, Fang-Bao

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional immersed boundary method for fluid-structure interaction with compressible multiphase flows involving large structure deformations. This method involves three important parts: flow solver, structure solver and fluid-structure interaction coupling. In the flow solver, the compressible multiphase Navier-Stokes equations for ideal gases are solved by a finite difference method based on a staggered Cartesian mesh, where a fifth-order accuracy Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillation (WENO) scheme is used to handle spatial discretization of the convective term, a fourth-order central difference scheme is employed to discretize the viscous term, the third-order TVD Runge-Kutta scheme is used to discretize the temporal term, and the level-set method is adopted to capture the multi-material interface. In this work, the structure considered is a geometrically non-linear beam which is solved by using a finite element method based on the absolute nodal coordinate formulation (ANCF). The fluid dynamics and the structure motion are coupled in a partitioned iterative manner with a feedback penalty immersed boundary method where the flow dynamics is defined on a fixed Lagrangian grid and the structure dynamics is described on a global coordinate. We perform several validation cases (including fluid over a cylinder, structure dynamics, flow induced vibration of a flexible plate, deformation of a flexible panel induced by shock waves in a shock tube, an inclined flexible plate in a hypersonic flow, and shock-induced collapse of a cylindrical helium cavity in the air), and compare the results with experimental and other numerical data. The present results agree well with the published data and the current experiment. Finally, we further demonstrate the versatility of the present method by applying it to a flexible plate interacting with multiphase flows.

  1. Evaluation for the design of experience in virtual environments: modeling breakdown of interaction and illusion.

    PubMed

    Marsh, T; Wright, P; Smith, S

    2001-04-01

    New and emerging media technologies have the potential to induce a variety of experiences in users. In this paper, it is argued that the inducement of experience presupposes that users are absorbed in the illusion created by these media. Looking to another successful visual medium, film, this paper borrows from the techniques used in "shaping experience" to hold spectators' attention in the illusion of film, and identifies what breaks the illusion/experience for spectators. This paper focuses on one medium, virtual reality (VR), and advocates a transparent or "invisible style" of interaction. We argue that transparency keeps users in the "flow" of their activities and consequently enhances experience in users. Breakdown in activities breaks the experience and subsequently provides opportunities to identify and analyze potential causes of usability problems. Adopting activity theory, we devise a model of interaction with VR--through consciousness and activity--and introduce the concept of breakdown in illusion. From this, a model of effective interaction with VR is devised and the occurrence of breakdown in interaction and illusion is identified along a continuum of engagement. Evaluation guidelines for the design of experience are proposed and applied to usability problems detected in an empirical study of a head-mounted display (HMD) VR system. This study shows that the guidelines are effective in the evaluation of VR. Finally, we look at the potential experiences that may be induced in users and propose a way to evaluate user experience in virtual environments (VEs) and other new and emerging media.

  2. Structural chromosomal anomalies detected by prenatal genetic diagnosis: our experience.

    PubMed

    Farcaş, Simona; Crişan, C D; Andreescu, Nicoleta; Stoian, Monica; Motoc, A G M

    2013-01-01

    The prenatal diagnosis is currently widely spread and facilitates the acquiring of important genetic information about the fetus by a rate extremely accelerate and considered without precedent. In this paper, we like to present our experience concerning the genetic diagnosis and counseling offered for pregnancies in which a structural chromosomal aberration was found. The study group is formed by 528 prenatal samples of amniotic fluid and chorionic villi, received by our laboratory from 2006 through October 2012 for cytogenetic diagnosis. The appropriate genetic investigation was selected based on the indications for prenatal diagnosis. The cases with structural chromosomal anomalies and polymorphic variants were analyzed as regard to the maternal age, gestational age, referral indications and type of chromosomal anomaly found. A total number of 21 structural chromosomal anomalies and polymorphic variants were identified in the study group. Out of 21 structural chromosomal anomalies and polymorphic variants, six deletions and microdeletions, four situations with abnormal long "p" arm of acrocentric chromosomes, two duplications, two reciprocal translocations, two inversions, two additions, one Robertsonian translocation associating trisomy 13, one 9q heteromorphism and one complex chromosome rearrangement were noticed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first Romanian study in which the diagnostic strategies and the management of the prenatal cases with structural rearrangements are presented. The data provided about the diagnosis strategy and the management of the prenatal cases with structural chromosomal anomalies represents a useful tool in genetic counseling of pregnancies diagnosed with rare structural chromosomal anomalies.

  3. The Solar Array Module Plasma Interactions Experiment (SAMPIE): Science and technology objectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillard, G. Barry

    1992-01-01

    The Solar Array Module Plasma Interactions Experiment (SAMPIE) is an approved NASA Space Shuttle space flight experiment to be launched in Jul. 1993. The SAMPIE experiment is designed to investigate the interaction of high voltage space power systems with ionospheric plasma. To study the behavior of solar cells, a number of cell coupons, representing technologies of current interest, will be biased to high voltages to characterize both negative potential arcing and positive potential current collection. Additionally, various theories of arc suppression will be tested by including several specially modified cell coupons. Finally, SAMPIE will include experiments to study the basic nature of these interactions. The rationale for a space flight experiment, the measurements to be made, the significance of the expected results, and the current design status of the flight hardware are described.

  4. Structure-activity relationship of nuclear receptor-ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Greschik, Holger; Moras, Dino

    2003-01-01

    Small molecules such as retinoids, steroid hormones, fatty acids, cholesterol metabolites, or xenobiotics are involved in the regulation of numerous physiological and patho-physiological processes by binding to and controlling the activity of members of the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily of transcription factors. In addition to natural ligands, synthetic agonists or antagonists have been identified that in some cases specifically target NR isotypes, or elicit tissue-, signaling pathway-, or promoter-selective transcriptional responses. For these ligands the term "selective NR modulators" (SNRMs) has been introduced. Structure determination of apo- and holo-NR ligand-binding domains (LBDs)--some of them complexed to small coactivator or corepressor fragments--revealed the major principles of ligand-dependent NR action and determinants of (isotype-) selective ligand binding. These studies also stimulated the interpretation of tissue-specific effects of SNRMs on wild-type or mutant receptors. In contrast to the increasing knowledge on the structure-activity relationship of NRs with known SNRMs, rather basic questions remain about the regulation of orphan NRs (for which no ligands are known) or "adopted" orphan NRs (for which only recently ligands were identified). Several crystal structures of orphan NR LBDs uncovered unexpected properties, contributed to the understanding of orphan NR function, and may in the future permit the identification or design of ligands. This review will (i) focus on the current understanding of the structure-activity relationship of NR-ligand interactions, (ii) discuss recent advances in the field of "orphan" NR crystallography, and (iii) outline future challenges in NR structural biology.

  5. Disability Support Workers' Experience of Interaction with a Person with Profound Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forster, Sheridan; Iacono, Teresa

    2008-01-01

    Background: The primary communication partner for many people with profound intellectual disability (PID) who are living in supported accommodation is their disability support worker (DSW). The experiences of DSWs in interacting with people with PID have received limited attention in the literature. Method: The nature of interactions between…

  6. Building a Learning Experience: What Do Learners' Online Interaction Data Imply?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kokoç, Mehmet; Altun, Arif

    2016-01-01

    It is still under debate whether learners' interaction data within e-learning and/or open learning environments could be considered as reflections of their learning experiences to be effective or not. Therefore, it is meaningful to explore the nature of these interactions and to make meaningful conclusions. This study aims to explore what the…

  7. Computational Modeling for Fluid-Porous Structure Interaction with Large Structural Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakerzadeh, Rana; Zunino, Paolo

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we utilize numerical models to investigate the importance of poroelasticity in the interaction of blood flow with a porohyperelastic vessel wall, and to establish a connection between the apparent viscoelastic behavior of the structure part and the intramural filtration flow. The main novelty is in the design of a Nitsche's splitting strategy, which separates the fluid from the structure sub-problems for the Fluid-Porous Structure Interaction system undergoing large deformations. The general idea is to use this model to study the influence of different parameters on energy dissipation in a poroelastic medium. We also study a new benchmark test specifically designed to investigate the effect of poroelasticity on large deformations.

  8. Interaction of Lamb mode (A(o)) with structural discontinuity and generation of "Turning modes" in a T-joint.

    PubMed

    Ramadas, C; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan; Joshi, M; Krishnamurthy, C V

    2011-07-01

    In the present work, the interaction of the fundamental anti-symmetric guided Lamb mode (A(o)) with a structural discontinuity in a composite structure was studied through Finite Element numerical simulations and experiments. The structural component selected for this study was a T-joint section made from glass/epoxy material. This co-cured composite structure is made-up of an upper shell (skin) and a spar as the sub-components. It was observed that when A(o) mode interacts with the junction (structural discontinuity) of these sub-components, a mode-converted S(o) mode is generated. Experiments were conducted using air-coupled ultrasound to validate the numerical simulations. The back-propagating "Turning modes", which propagate from the thin region to the spar web and vice versa, were also numerically simulated and experimentally verified.

  9. DISCOS- DYNAMIC INTERACTION SIMULATION OF CONTROLS AND STRUCTURES (IBM VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, H. P.

    1994-01-01

    The Dynamic Interaction Simulation of Controls and Structure (DISCOS) program was developed for the dynamic simulation and stability analysis of passive and actively controlled spacecraft. In the use of DISCOS, the physical system undergoing analysis may be generally described as a cluster of contiguous flexible structures (bodies) that comprise a mechanical system, such as a spacecraft. The entire system (spacecraft) or portions thereof may be either spinning or nonspinning. Member bodies of the system may undergo large relative excursions, such as those of appendage deployment or rotor/ stator motion. The general system of bodies is, by its inherent nature, a feedback system in which inertial forces (such as those due to centrifugal and Coriolis acceleration) and the restoring and damping forces are motion-dependent. The system may possess a control system in which certain position and rate errors are actively controlled through the use of reaction control jets, servomotors, or momentum wheels. Bodies of the system may be interconnected by linear or nonlinear springs and dampers, by a gimbal and slider block mechanism, or by any combination of these. The DISCOS program can be used to obtain nonlinear and linearized time response of the system, interaction constant forces in the system, total system resonance properties, and frequency domain response and stability information for the system. DISCOS is probably the most powerful computational tool to date for the computer simulation of actively controlled coupled multi-flexible-body systems. The program is not easy to understand and effectively apply, but is not intended for simple problems. The DISCOS user is expected to have extensive working knowledge of rigid-body and flexible-body dynamics, finite-element techniques, numerical methods, and frequency-domain analysis. Various applications of DISCOS include simulation of the Shuttle payload deployment/retrieval mechanism, solar panel array deployment, antenna

  10. Computer implementation of analysis and optimization procedures for control-structure interaction problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. Keith; Park, K. C.

    1990-01-01

    Implementation aspects of control-structure interaction analysis and optimization by the staggered use of single-discipline analysis modules are discussed. The single-discipline modules include structural analysis, controller synthesis and optimization. The software modularity is maintained by employing a partitioned control-structure interaction analysis procedure, thus avoiding the need for embedding the single-discipline modules into a monolithic program. A software testbed has been constructed as a stand-alone analysis and optimization program and tested for its versatility and software modularity by applying it to the dynamic analysis and preliminary design of a prototype Earth Pointing Satellite. Experience with the in-core testbed program so far demonstrates that the testbed is efficient, preserves software modularity, and enables the analyst to choose a different set of algorithms, control strategies and design parameters via user software interfaces. Thus, the present software architecture is recommended for adoption by control-structure interaction analysts as a preliminary analysis and design tool.

  11. Search for Contact Interactions in Dilepton Final State in the CMS Experiment: Generator-Level Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaleski, Shawn

    2017-01-01

    A set of contact interaction (CI) Monte Carlo events, for which Standard Model Drell-Yan events are background, are generated using a leading-order parton-shower generator, Pythia8. We consider three isoscalar models with three different helicity structures, left-left (LL), left-right/right-left (LR), and right­right (RR), each with destructive and constructive interference. For each of these models, 150,000 events are generated for analysis of CI interactions in the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) with a centre of mass energy of 13 TeV. This study is a generator level study, and detector effects are accounted for by application of kinematic cuts on the generator-level quantities rather than application of a detailed detector simulation package (e.g. GEANT). Distributions of dilepton invariant mass, Collins-Soper angle, and the forward-backward asymmetry are compared with those arising from pure Drell-Yan events.

  12. Innovative Interactive Visitor Experiences Focused on Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lettvin, E. E.

    2011-12-01

    Pacific Science Center has adopted a multi-pronged approach to introduce visitors to the concepts of climate change and linkages to human behavior in an informal science education setting. We leverage key fixed exhibit assets derived from collaborations with NOAA: Science on a Sphere and an exhibit kiosk showcasing local CO2 measurements that are adjacent on our exhibit floor. NOAA PMEL Scientists deployed a sensor at the top of the Space Needle that measures variability in atmospheric CO2 over Seattle; the kiosk showcases these near-real-time, daily, weekly and monthly measurements as well as similar observations from a NOAA buoy near Aberdeen, Washington. Displays of these data enable visitors to see first-hand varying CO2 levels in urban and remote marine environments as well as seasonal cycling. It also reveals quantifiable increases in CO2 levels over a relatively short time (~5 years). Trained interpreters help visitors understand linkages between personal behavior and corresponding CO2 footprints. Interpreters discuss connections between local and regional CO2 measurements displayed on the kiosk, and global Sphere datasets including NOAA Carbon Tracker, changing arctic sea ice coverage and sea level rise projections. Portable Discovery Carts, consisting of props and interactive, hands-on activities provide a platform for facilitated interpretation on a series of topics. We have developed two climate focused carts: 'Sinks and Sources' that examines materials and activities that produce and absorb carbon, and 'Ocean Acidification' that shows how absorption of atmospheric CO2 is changing ocean composition and its habitability for marine life. These carts can be deployed anywhere on the exhibit floor but are primarily used adjacent to the Sphere and the kiosk, making it possible to have a range of conversations about global and local CO2 levels, linkages to individual and collective behaviour and associated implications. Additional collaborations with members of

  13. IRIS Controlled Source Seismic Experiments: Continental Structure, Instrumentation, and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooney, W. D.; Keller, G. R.

    2004-12-01

    The controlled-source seismology program of IRIS/PASSCAL has made major contributions to the study of continental structure and evolution. It has also undergone major developments in seismic instrumentation. The first PASSCAL experiments (1984/85) targeted the Basin and Range Province and the Ouachita orogenic belt. The Basin and Range study provided remarkably clear images of this thin, highly-extended crust, while the Ouachita experiment tested competing hypotheses for the deep structure of this Paleozoic orogen. However, both of these projects were limited by a lack of seismic instruments. The situation improved in the late 1980's with the benefit of a mixed array of 600 seismic recorders from the USGS, Stanford, and the Geological Survey of Canada. The resolution achieved with these instruments was revolutionary. Results include the imaging of such remarkable features as crustal-scale duplexes in the Brooks Range compressional orogen of northern Alaska, and of crustal "core complexes" in the extended crust of southwest Arizona. The 3-channel PASSCAL Jr. instrument was developed, leading to experiments in which ˜1000 instruments were deployed, including three-component recording. This complex mix of instruments served the community well for several years, but required large, complex instrument centers and lots of technical support. With input from PASSCAL and the international community, a newly designed, compact instrument (the Texan) was finalized in the spring of 1998, and the first 200 instruments was delivered to the Univ. of Texas-El Paso in late 1998. The present instrument pool of Texans exceeds 1,400 and these have been used on such projects as the high-resolution imaging of the Los Angeles and San Fernando basins (LARSE I and II experiments), where active thrust faults have been imaged. Controlled-source seismic experiments are now very numerous. During calendar year 2004 alone, portable Texan instruments have traveled from Venezuela to Denmark

  14. Sequence and Structure Dependent DNA-DNA Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopchick, Benjamin; Qiu, Xiangyun

    Molecular forces between dsDNA strands are largely dominated by electrostatics and have been extensively studied. Quantitative knowledge has been accumulated on how DNA-DNA interactions are modulated by varied biological constituents such as ions, cationic ligands, and proteins. Despite its central role in biology, the sequence of DNA has not received substantial attention and ``random'' DNA sequences are typically used in biophysical studies. However, ~50% of human genome is composed of non-random-sequence DNAs, particularly repetitive sequences. Furthermore, covalent modifications of DNA such as methylation play key roles in gene functions. Such DNAs with specific sequences or modifications often take on structures other than the canonical B-form. Here we present series of quantitative measurements of the DNA-DNA forces with the osmotic stress method on different DNA sequences, from short repeats to the most frequent sequences in genome, and to modifications such as bromination and methylation. We observe peculiar behaviors that appear to be strongly correlated with the incurred structural changes. We speculate the causalities in terms of the differences in hydration shell and DNA surface structures.

  15. Structural basis of ligand interaction with atypical chemokine receptor 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavsson, Martin; Wang, Liwen; van Gils, Noortje; Stephens, Bryan S.; Zhang, Penglie; Schall, Thomas J.; Yang, Sichun; Abagyan, Ruben; Chance, Mark R.; Kufareva, Irina; Handel, Tracy M.

    2017-01-01

    Chemokines drive cell migration through their interactions with seven-transmembrane (7TM) chemokine receptors on cell surfaces. The atypical chemokine receptor 3 (ACKR3) binds chemokines CXCL11 and CXCL12 and signals exclusively through β-arrestin-mediated pathways, without activating canonical G-protein signalling. This receptor is upregulated in numerous cancers making it a potential drug target. Here we collected over 100 distinct structural probes from radiolytic footprinting, disulfide trapping, and mutagenesis to map the structures of ACKR3:CXCL12 and ACKR3:small-molecule complexes, including dynamic regions that proved unresolvable by X-ray crystallography in homologous receptors. The data are integrated with molecular modelling to produce complete and cohesive experimentally driven models that confirm and expand on the existing knowledge of the architecture of receptor:chemokine and receptor:small-molecule complexes. Additionally, we detected and characterized ligand-induced conformational changes in the transmembrane and intracellular regions of ACKR3 that elucidate fundamental structural elements of agonism in this atypical receptor.

  16. Structural basis of ligand interaction with atypical chemokine receptor 3

    PubMed Central

    Gustavsson, Martin; Wang, Liwen; van Gils, Noortje; Stephens, Bryan S.; Zhang, Penglie; Schall, Thomas J.; Yang, Sichun; Abagyan, Ruben; Chance, Mark R.; Kufareva, Irina; Handel, Tracy M.

    2017-01-01

    Chemokines drive cell migration through their interactions with seven-transmembrane (7TM) chemokine receptors on cell surfaces. The atypical chemokine receptor 3 (ACKR3) binds chemokines CXCL11 and CXCL12 and signals exclusively through β-arrestin-mediated pathways, without activating canonical G-protein signalling. This receptor is upregulated in numerous cancers making it a potential drug target. Here we collected over 100 distinct structural probes from radiolytic footprinting, disulfide trapping, and mutagenesis to map the structures of ACKR3:CXCL12 and ACKR3:small-molecule complexes, including dynamic regions that proved unresolvable by X-ray crystallography in homologous receptors. The data are integrated with molecular modelling to produce complete and cohesive experimentally driven models that confirm and expand on the existing knowledge of the architecture of receptor:chemokine and receptor:small-molecule complexes. Additionally, we detected and characterized ligand-induced conformational changes in the transmembrane and intracellular regions of ACKR3 that elucidate fundamental structural elements of agonism in this atypical receptor. PMID:28098154

  17. Numerical Modelling of Wave Interaction with Porous Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, F.; M., D.; M., D.; G., C.

    This paper presents a numerical model for simulating wave interaction with porous structures. By using the free surface-capturing approach together with a novel Cartesian cut cell treatment, the Finite Volume Model calculates the two phase flows out side of porous structure based on the Navier-Stokes equations, while the flow in the porous structure is described by Navier-Stokes type model equations. The free surface of water is treated as a contact discontinuity in the density field which is captured automatically as part of the numerical solution by using a time-accurate artificial compressibility method and high resolution Godunov-type scheme. The numerical model is first calibrated by simple test for a steady flow passing through a porous block. Reasonably good agreements with other numerical results are obtained. After that, the numerical model is used to simulate the breaking wave overtopping a caisson breakwater, protected by a layer of armor units. The results show that the porous armor layer is effective in reducing the overtopping rate as well as in protecting the stability of the caisson breakwater.

  18. "What matters most:" a cultural mechanism moderating structural vulnerability and moral experience of mental illness stigma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lawrence H; Chen, Fang-pei; Sia, Kathleen Janel; Lam, Jonathan; Lam, Katherine; Ngo, Hong; Lee, Sing; Kleinman, Arthur; Good, Byron

    2014-02-01

    To understand Chinese immigrants' experiences with mental illness stigma and mental health disparities, we integrate frameworks of 'structural vulnerability' and 'moral experience' to identify how interaction between structural discrimination and cultural engagements might shape stigma. Fifty Chinese immigrants, including 64% Fuzhounese immigrants who experienced particularly harsh socio-economical deprivation, from two Chinese bilingual psychiatric inpatient units in New York City were interviewed from 2006 to 2010 about their experiences of mental illness stigma. Interview questions were derived from 4 stigma measures, covering various life domains. Participants were asked to elaborate their rating of measure items, and thus provided open-ended, narrative data. Analysis of the narrative data followed a deductive approach, guided by frameworks of structural discrimination and "what matters most" - a cultural mechanism signifying meaningful participation in the community. After identifying initial coding classifications, analysis focused on the interface between the two main concepts. Results indicated that experiences with mental illness stigma were contingent on the degree to which immigrants were able to participate in work to achieve "what mattered most" in their cultural context, i.e., accumulation of financial resources. Structural vulnerability - being situated in an inferior position when facing structural discrimination - made access to affordable mental health services challenging. As such, structural discrimination increased healthcare spending and interfered with financial accumulation, often resulting in future treatment nonadherence and enforcing mental health disparities. Study participants' internalizing their structurally-vulnerable position further led to a depreciated sense of self, resulting in a reduced capacity to advocate for healthcare system changes. Paradoxically, the multi-layered structural marginalization experienced by Chinese

  19. Spin Structure Functions of the Proton - SANE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes

    2012-03-01

    The Spin Asymmetries of the Nucleon Experiment (SANE) is a measurement of inclusive electron scattering parallel and near perpendicular double spin asymmetries from a proton target. The main goal of the experiment was to measure A and A80 and to extract the spin asymmetries of the proton A1^p, A2^p and the spin structure functions g1^p and g2^p. Using the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility's polarized electron beam and the University of Virginia's polarized frozen ammonia (^14NH3) target in Hall C, the experiment ran in 2009, collecting data in a Q^2 region from 2.5 to 6.5 GeV^2 and between Bjorken x of 0.3 and 0.8. Particle detection was accomplished using the Big Electron Telescope Array (BETA), a novel non-magnetic detector. The physics motivation for the experiment and a brief overview of the polarized target and the detector will be presented along with the analysis developed in order to extract the proton spin asymmetries and structure functions. Results will be presented.

  20. Interactive Internet delivery of scientific visualization via structured prerendered imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jerry; Bethel, E. Wes; Yoon, Ilmi

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we explore leveraging industry-standard media formats to effectively deliver interactive, 3D scientific visualization to a remote viewer. Our work is motivated by the need for remote visualization of time-varying, 3D data produced by scientific simulations or experiments while taking several practical factors into account, including: maximizing ease of use from the user's perspective, maximizing reuse of image frames, and taking advantage of existing software infrastructure wherever possible. Visualization or graphics applications first generate images at some number of view orientations for 3D scenes and temporal locations for time-varying scenes. We then encode the resulting imagery into one of two industry-standard formats: QuickTime VR Object Movies or a combination of HTML and JavaScript code implementing the client-side navigator. Using an industry-standard QuickTime player or web browser, remote users may freely navigate through the pre-rendered images of time-varying, 3D visualization output. Since the only inputs consist of image data, a viewpoint and time stamps, our approach is generally applicable to all visualization and graphics rendering applications capable of generating image files in an ordered fashion. Our design is a form of latency-tolerant remote visualization infrastructure where processing time for visualization, rendering and content delivery is effectively decoupled from interactive exploration. Our approach trades off increased interactivity, reduced load and effective reuse of coherent frames between multiple users (from the server's perspective) at the expense of unconstrained exploration. This paper presents the system architecture along with an analysis and discussion of its strengths and limitations.