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Sample records for experiment fordetermining hysteretic

  1. Inverse modeling of a multistep outflow experiment fordetermining hysteretic hydraulic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Faybishenko, B.; Finsterle, S.; Sonnenborg, T.O.

    1998-05-01

    A new, closed-form hysteretic model of the capillary pressure-saturation and relative permeability-saturation relationship has been implemented into ITOUGH2. The hysteretic capillary pressure function is based on the van Genuchten model, with a modified version of the dependent domain model of Mualem to describe the scanning curves. Hysteresis in the relative permeability relations is considered to be mainly a result of nonwetting fluid entrap- ment. The hysteresis model was used in combination with inverse modeling techniques to examine the potential of a simple drainage- imbibition experiment to determine hysteretic hydraulic properties.

  2. Hysteretic phenomena in GFET: Comprehensive theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurchak, Anatolii I.; Morozovska, Anna N.; Strikha, Maksym V.

    2017-07-01

    We propose a comprehensive analytical theory for the description of versatile hysteretic phenomena in a graphene field effect transistor (GFET). Our theory account for the existence of the three most important rival factors, such as external dipoles on graphene free surface, localized states at the graphene-substrate interface, and the bound polarization charge coming from a ferroelectric substrate. In particular, we demonstrated that the absorbed dipole molecules (e.g., dissociated or highly polarized water molecules) can cause hysteretic form of carrier concentration as a function of gate voltage and corresponding dependence of graphene conductivity in GFET on the substrate of different types, including the most common SiO2 and ferroelectric ones. It was shown that the increase in the gate voltage sweeping rate leads to the complete vanishing of hysteresis for GFET on SiO2 substrate as well as for GFET on ferroelectric substrate for applied electric fields E less than the critical value Ec. For E > Ec, the cross-over from the anti-hysteresis to hysteresis take place. The carriers' trapping from the graphene channel by the interface states describes the "anti-hysteresis" in GFET on PZT substrate well enough. These results well correlate with the available experimental data up to the quantitative agreement. So, the obtained analytical results predict new and clarify existing effects in GFET. They describe quantitatively the physical principles of GFET operation and can become the first necessary step to transform the state-of-art from almost empirical to analytical level, because they can be directly applied to describe the basic characteristics of advanced non-volatile ultra-fast memory devices using GFET on versatile substrates.

  3. Hysteretic behavior in torsional oscillator experiments & de Gennes, Bean and Livingston effect in hcp 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Minoru; Ueda, Hiroaki; Yagi, Masahiko; Shimizu, Nobutaka; Rogacki, Kris.; Inoue, Kazuo

    2014-03-01

    Recent reports on the absence of supersolid signal in 4He in Vycor as well as reports on effects of the sample elasticity to torsional oscillator (TO) experiments caused people to ask if supersolid may not exist. There are recent activities to check such questions more quantitatively. We revisit our TO study, which was performed on relatively small number of bulk hcp 4He samples, but under quite different conditions as under DC rotation as well as under wide range of AC excitation Vac with extremely high stability. We proposed a transition at Tc = 75(~ 60) mK well below the onset temperature of the anomaly around 500 mK in the same sample. The transition at Tc was detected by three independent methods. Namely, the hysteresis appears below this Tc when AC excitation was changed under a certain sequence. We analyzed the maximum period shift across the hysteretic loop as a function of Vac. This quantity appears abruptly below Tc and surprisingly its T dependence coincides with that of the extra energy dissipation rotational velocity Omega linear slope under DC rotation, also below Tc. We discuss that the maximum is caused by de Gennes, Bean and Livingston effect, which is a quantized vortices effect known for superconductors. The third Tc detection is given by a jump in the log Vac linear dependence of the period shift. Authors acknowledge support from ISSP, Univ. Tokyo.

  4. An analytical model of dissipated viscous and hysteretic energy due to interaction forces in a pneumatic tire: Theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brancati, Renato; Strano, Salvatore; Timpone, Francesco

    2011-10-01

    When in use, a tire dissipates energy according to various mechanisms: rolling resistance, viscosity, hysteresis, friction energy, etc. This dissipation of energy contributes to influencing tire temperature, contact conditions and the resulting friction coefficient. This research project deals with viscoelastic and hysteretic mechanisms, and presents an explicit expression of the energy dissipated by tire-road interactions caused by these mechanisms. It is based on the Dahl model with regard to the hysteretic force together with a spring and a frequency variable damping coefficient with regard to the viscoelastic one. The energy expression found in this way can be used in tire thermal models to determine one of the heat flows needed to estimate the contact temperature and to find out the actual friction coefficient to be used in real time tire-road interaction models. Experimental tests were carried out, for longitudinal interaction only, in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed expression by identifying the parameters and validating the results.

  5. Nonlinear Hysteretic Torsional Waves.

    PubMed

    Cabaret, J; Béquin, P; Theocharis, G; Andreev, V; Gusev, V E; Tournat, V

    2015-07-31

    We theoretically study and experimentally report the propagation of nonlinear hysteretic torsional pulses in a vertical granular chain made of cm-scale, self-hanged magnetic beads. As predicted by contact mechanics, the torsional coupling between two beads is found to be nonlinear hysteretic. This results in a nonlinear pulse distortion essentially different from the distortion predicted by classical nonlinearities and in a complex dynamic response depending on the history of the wave particle angular velocity. Both are consistent with the predictions of purely hysteretic nonlinear elasticity and the Preisach-Mayergoyz hysteresis model, providing the opportunity to study the phenomenon of nonlinear dynamic hysteresis in the absence of other types of material nonlinearities. The proposed configuration reveals a plethora of interesting phenomena including giant amplitude-dependent attenuation, short-term memory, as well as dispersive properties. Thus, it could find interesting applications in nonlinear wave control devices such as strong amplitude-dependent filters.

  6. Nonlinear Hysteretic Torsional Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabaret, J.; Béquin, P.; Theocharis, G.; Andreev, V.; Gusev, V. E.; Tournat, V.

    2015-07-01

    We theoretically study and experimentally report the propagation of nonlinear hysteretic torsional pulses in a vertical granular chain made of cm-scale, self-hanged magnetic beads. As predicted by contact mechanics, the torsional coupling between two beads is found to be nonlinear hysteretic. This results in a nonlinear pulse distortion essentially different from the distortion predicted by classical nonlinearities and in a complex dynamic response depending on the history of the wave particle angular velocity. Both are consistent with the predictions of purely hysteretic nonlinear elasticity and the Preisach-Mayergoyz hysteresis model, providing the opportunity to study the phenomenon of nonlinear dynamic hysteresis in the absence of other types of material nonlinearities. The proposed configuration reveals a plethora of interesting phenomena including giant amplitude-dependent attenuation, short-term memory, as well as dispersive properties. Thus, it could find interesting applications in nonlinear wave control devices such as strong amplitude-dependent filters.

  7. Probing hysteretic elasticity in weakly nonlinear materials

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Paul A; Haupert, Sylvain; Renaud, Guillaume; Riviere, Jacques; Talmant, Maryline; Laugier, Pascal

    2010-12-07

    Our work is aimed at assessing the elastic and dissipative hysteretic nonlinear parameters' repeatability (precision) using several classes of materials with weak, intermediate and high nonlinear properties. In this contribution, we describe an optimized Nonlinear Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (NRUS) measuring and data processing protocol applied to small samples. The protocol is used to eliminate the effects of environmental condition changes that take place during an experiment, and that may mask the intrinsic elastic nonlinearity. As an example, in our experiments, we identified external temperature fluctuation as a primary source of material resonance frequency and elastic modulus variation. A variation of 0.1 C produced a frequency variation of 0.01 %, which is similar to the expected nonlinear frequency shift for weakly nonlinear materials. In order to eliminate environmental effects, the variation in f{sub 0} (the elastically linear resonance frequency proportional to modulus) is fit with the appropriate function, and that function is used to correct the NRUS calculation of nonlinear parameters. With our correction procedure, we measured relative resonant frequency shifts of 10{sup -5} , which are below 10{sup -4}, often considered the limit to NRUS sensitivity under common experimental conditions. Our results show that the procedure is an alternative to the stringent control of temperature often applied. Applying the approach, we report nonlinear parameters for several materials, some with very small nonclassical nonlinearity. The approach has broad application to NRUS and other Nonlinear Elastic Wave Spectroscopy approaches.

  8. Time delay control of hysteretic composite plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Long-Xiang; Li, Shi-Hong; Liu, Kun; Cai, Guo-Ping; Li, Hong-Guang

    2015-04-01

    Due to boosting usage of flexible and damping materials, it is of great significance for both science and engineering to explore active control methods for vibration within time-delayed hysteretic structures. This paper conducts theoretical and experimental research on a time-delayed controller for a flexible plate with a single-layer rubber glued on its back. First of all, the dynamic equation for a composite plate is given on the base of the Kirchhoff-Love assumption, where damping-restoring force is described by the Bouc-Wen hysteresis model. Then, the influence of time delay is taken into account and the state equation of the plate with time delay is obtained. Next, a standard state equation, with implicit time delay, is derived using one specific form of integral transformation and vector augmentation. Finally, an instantaneous optimal control method is used to design an active controller. This controller does not only involve state feedback of the current step, but also a linear addition of former state feedbacks within several steps. In order to verify this method, experimental work is conducted. Problems encountered like differential computation and lifting of displacement signal are also handled. According to a comparison between simulations and experiments, the control method given in this paper is feasible and valid, and it is available for both small and large time delay.

  9. Hysteretic Superconducting Heat-Flux Quantum Modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarcello, Claudio; Solinas, Paolo; Di Ventra, Massimiliano; Giazotto, Francesco

    2017-04-01

    We discuss heat transport in a thermally biased superconducting quantum-interference device (SQUID) in the presence of an external magnetic flux, when a non-negligible inductance of the SQUID ring is taken into account. A properly sweeping driving flux causes the thermal current to modulate and behave hysteretically. The response of this device is analyzed as a function of both the hysteresis parameter and the degree of asymmetry of the SQUID, highlighting the parameter range over which hysteretic behavior is observable. Markedly, the temperature of the SQUID also shows hysteretic evolution, with sharp transitions characterized by temperature jumps up to, e.g., approximately 0.02 K for a realistic Al-based setup. In view of these results, the proposed device can effectively find an application as a temperature-based superconducting memory element, working even at gigahertz frequencies by suitably choosing the superconductor on which the device is based.

  10. Modeling geologic storage of carbon dioxide: Comparison ofnon-hysteretic and hysteretic characteristic curves

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, Christine

    2006-07-17

    Numerical models of geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2)in brine-bearing formations use characteristic curves to represent theinteractions of non-wetting-phase CO2 and wetting-phase brine. When aproblem includes both injection of CO2 (a drainage process) and itssubsequent post-injection evolution (a combination of drainage andwetting), hysteretic characteristic curves are required to correctlycapture the behavior of the CO2 plume. In the hysteretic formulation,capillary pressure and relative permeability depend not only on thecurrent grid-block saturation, but also on the history of the saturationin the grid block. For a problem that involves only drainage or onlywetting, a non-hysteretic formulation, in which capillary pressure andrelative permeability depend only on the current value of the grid-blocksaturation, is adequate. For the hysteretic formulation to be robustcomputationally, care must be taken to ensure the differentiability ofthe characteristic curves both within and beyond the turning-pointsaturations where transitions between branches of the curves occur. Twoexample problems involving geologic CO2 storage are simulated withTOUGH2, a multiphase, multicomponent code for flow and transport codethrough geological media. Both non-hysteretic and hysteretic formulationsare used, to illustrate the applicability and limitations ofnon-hysteretic methods.The first application considers leakage of CO2from the storage formation to the ground surface, while the secondexamines the role of heterogeneity within the storageformation.

  11. Hysteretic magnetoresistance and unconventional anomalous Hall effect in the frustrated magnet TmB4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunku, Sai Swaroop; Kong, Tai; Ito, Toshimitsu; Canfield, Paul C.; Shastry, B. Sriram; Sengupta, Pinaki; Panagopoulos, Christos

    2016-05-01

    We study TmB4, a frustrated magnet on the Archimedean Shastry-Sutherland lattice, through magnetization and transport experiments. The lack of anisotropy in resistivity shows that TmB4 is an electronically three-dimensional system. The magnetoresistance (MR) is hysteretic at low temperature even though a corresponding hysteresis in magnetization is absent. The Hall resistivity shows unconventional anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and is linear above saturation despite a large MR. We propose that complex structures at magnetic domain walls may be responsible for the hysteretic MR and may also lead to the AHE.

  12. Hysteretic magnetoresistance and unconventional anomalous Hall effect in the frustrated magnet TmB4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunku, Sai Swaroop; Kong, Tai; Ito, Toshimitsu; Canfield, Paul C.; Shastry, B. Sriram; Sengupta, Pinaki; Panagopoulos, Christos

    We study TmB4, a frustrated magnet on the Archimedean Shastry-Sutherland lattice, through magnetization and transport experiments. The lack of anisotropy in resistivity shows that TmB4 is an electronically three-dimensional system. The magnetoresistance (MR) is hysteretic at low-temperature even though a corresponding hysteresis in magnetization is absent. The Hall resistivity shows unconventional anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and is linear above saturation despite a large MR. We suggest that both hysteretic MR and AHE arise from the formation of complex non-coplanar structures at magnetic domain walls. Current address: Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University.

  13. Hysteretic magnetoresistance and unconventional anomalous Hall effect in the frustrated magnet TmB4

    DOE PAGES

    Sunku, Sai Swaroop; Kong, Tai; Ito, Toshimitsu; ...

    2016-05-11

    We study TmB4, a frustrated magnet on the Archimedean Shastry-Sutherland lattice, through magnetization and transport experiments. The lack of anisotropy in resistivity shows that TmB4 is an electronically three-dimensional system. The magnetoresistance (MR) is hysteretic at low temperature even though a corresponding hysteresis in magnetization is absent. The Hall resistivity shows unconventional anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and is linear above saturation despite a large MR. In conclusion, we propose that complex structures at magnetic domain walls may be responsible for the hysteretic MR and may also lead to the AHE.

  14. Large hysteretic magnetoresistance of silicide nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T.; Naser, B.; Chamberlin, R. V.; Schilfgaarde, M. V.; Bennett, P. A.; Bird, J. P.

    2007-11-01

    We demonstrate a large (as much as 100%) and strongly hysteretic magnetoresistance (MR) in nominally nonferromagnetic silicide films and nanowires. This unusual MR is quenched above a few kelvins, where conventional behavior due to weak antilocalization is recovered. The dynamic characteristics of this effect are suggestive of weakly interacting, localized paramagnetic moments that form at the surface oxide of the silicide nanostructures, with dramatic consequences for transport when the system size is reduced to the nanoscale.

  15. Hysteretic damping in rotordynamics: An equivalent formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genta, Giancarlo; Amati, Nicola

    2010-10-01

    The hysteretic damping model cannot be applied to time domain dynamic simulations: this is a well-known feature that has been discussed in the literature since the time when analog computers were widespread. The constant equivalent damping often introduced to overcome this problem is also discussed, and its limitations are stated, in particular those linked with its application in rotordynamics to simulate rotating damping. An alternative model based on the nonviscous damping (NVD) model, but with a limited number of additional degrees of freedom, is proposed, and the relevant equations are derived. Some examples show applications to the rotordynamics field.

  16. Random Response of Linear Hysteretic Damping

    SciTech Connect

    Floris, Claudio

    2008-07-08

    The probabilistic characterization of the response of a single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) oscillator with linear hysteretic damping excited by ground motion described by zero mean stationary Gaussian processes is achieved by profiting from a steady-state solution of the motion equation, valid when the excitation is given by the superposition of harmonics. The model of linear hysteretic damping has been introduced to fit damping mechanisms in which the dissipation rate is independent of frequency, and mathematically it is described by the Hilbert transform of the response. Though this model is debated since it violates the principle of causality, its intrinsic simplicity makes it preferable to other models. The steady-state solution of the motion equation proposed in this paper allows a closed form evaluation of the respone mean square value. However, the numerical examples show that this quantity is affected by the mechanism of energy dissipation only when this is large. On the contrary, for a low capacity of dissipation the response mean square value is rather insensitive to the dissipation mechanism.

  17. On hysteretic response and stationary phase fronts in rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemczura, J.; Ravi-Chandar, K.

    2010-09-01

    We consider the dynamic response of natural, latex and synthetic, nitrile rubbers under non-monotonic dynamic loading conditions; in particular, we recreate an experiment first considered by Kolsky (Nature 224:1301, 1969) in which two segments of a long rubber specimen are initially maintained at different strain levels by external force and then allowed to evolve dynamically towards equilibrium. We show that as a result of the hysteretic behavior, a phase boundary that is stationary with respect to the material points can be established in both these materials. We also show that this phase boundary persists indefinitely in strain-crystallizing natural, latex rubber, but disappears quickly in the non-crystallizing nitrile rubber.

  18. Hysteretic behavior of soft magnetic elastomer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krautz, Maria; Werner, David; Schrödner, Mario; Funk, Alexander; Jantz, Alexander; Popp, Jana; Eckert, Jürgen; Waske, Anja

    2017-03-01

    Composites of polymer and micron-sized particles of carbonyl-iron were investigated in terms of their magnetization behavior. Thermoplastic elastomers with varying Young's modulus (EPolymer=0.14-14.6 MPa) were used as matrix material. Field dependent magnetization curves reveal that the hysteretic behavior of the composites strongly depends on both the particle fraction (7, 10, 14, 21, 31 vol%) and on the mechanical properties of the polymer. It is shown that hysteresis only appears above a certain fraction of magnetic particles which can be accounted to the magnetic exchange between the particles. However, hysteresis is suppressed in the composite with largest Young's modulus of the polymer matrix, even at largest particle fraction.

  19. Adaptive control design for hysteretic smart systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiang; Smith, Ralph C.

    2009-03-01

    Ferroelectric and ferromagnetic actuators are being considered for a range of industrial, aerospace, aeronautic and biomedical applications due to their unique transduction capabilities. However, they also exhibit hysteretic and nonlinear behavior that must be accommodated in models and control designs. If uncompensated, these effects can yield reduced system performance and, in the worst case, can produce unpredictable behavior of the control system. One technique for control design is to approximately linearize the actuator dynamics using an adaptive inverse compensator that is also able to accommodate model uncertainties and error introduced by the inverse algorithm. This paper describes the design of an adaptive inverse control technique based on the homogenized energy model for hysteresis. The resulting inverse filter is incorporated in an L1 control theory to provide a robust control algorithm capable of providing high speed, high accuracy tracking in the presence of actuator hysteresis and nonlinearities. Properties of the control design are illustrated through numerical examples.

  20. Hysteretic magnetoresistance and unconventional anomalous Hall effect in the frustrated magnet TmB4

    SciTech Connect

    Sunku, Sai Swaroop; Kong, Tai; Ito, Toshimitsu; Canfield, Paul C.; Shastry, B. Sriram; Sengupta, Pinaki; Panagopoulos, Christos

    2016-05-11

    We study TmB4, a frustrated magnet on the Archimedean Shastry-Sutherland lattice, through magnetization and transport experiments. The lack of anisotropy in resistivity shows that TmB4 is an electronically three-dimensional system. The magnetoresistance (MR) is hysteretic at low temperature even though a corresponding hysteresis in magnetization is absent. The Hall resistivity shows unconventional anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and is linear above saturation despite a large MR. In conclusion, we propose that complex structures at magnetic domain walls may be responsible for the hysteretic MR and may also lead to the AHE.

  1. Hysteretic magnetoresistance and unconventional anomalous Hall effect in the frustrated magnet TmB4

    SciTech Connect

    Sunku, Sai Swaroop; Kong, Tai; Ito, Toshimitsu; Canfield, Paul C.; Shastry, B. Sriram; Sengupta, Pinaki; Panagopoulos, Christos

    2016-05-11

    We study TmB4, a frustrated magnet on the Archimedean Shastry-Sutherland lattice, through magnetization and transport experiments. The lack of anisotropy in resistivity shows that TmB4 is an electronically three-dimensional system. The magnetoresistance (MR) is hysteretic at low temperature even though a corresponding hysteresis in magnetization is absent. The Hall resistivity shows unconventional anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and is linear above saturation despite a large MR. In conclusion, we propose that complex structures at magnetic domain walls may be responsible for the hysteretic MR and may also lead to the AHE.

  2. Experimental and numerical study on hysteretic performance of SMA spring-friction bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Peng; Xue, Suduo; Nie, Pan; Wang, Wenting

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents an experimental and numerical study to investigate the hysteretic performance of a new type of isolator consisting of shape memory alloy springs and friction bearing called an SMA spring-friction bearing (SFB). The SFB is a sliding-type isolator with SMA devices used for the seismic protection of engineering structures. The principle of operation of the isolation bearing is introduced. In order to explore the possibility of applying SMA elements in passive seismic control devices, large diameter superelastic tension/compression NiTi SMA helical springs used in the SFB isolator were developed. Mechanical experiments of the SMA helical spring were carried out to understand its superelastic characteristics. After that, a series of quasi-static tests on a single SFB isolator prototype were conducted to measure its force-displacement relationships for different loading conditions and study the corresponding variation law of its mechanical performance. The experimental results demonstrate that the SFB exhibits full hysteretic curves, excellent energy dissipation capacity, and moderate recentering ability. Finally, a theoretical model capable of emulating the hysteretic behavior of the SMA-based isolator was then established and implemented in MATLAB software. The comparison of the numerical results with the experimental results shows the efficacy of the proposed model for simulating the response of the SFB.

  3. The hysteretic evapotranspiration - vapor pressure deficit relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Manzoni, S.; Katul, G. G.; Porporato, A. M.; Yang, D.

    2013-12-01

    Diurnal hysteresis between evapotranspiration (ET) and vapor pressure deficit (VPD) was reported in many ecosystems but justification for its onset and magnitude remain incomplete with biotic and abiotic factors invoked as possible explanations. To place these explanations within a mathematical framework, ';rate-dependent' hysteresis originating from a phase angle difference between periodic input and output time series is first considered. Lysimeter evaporation (E) measurements from wet bare soils and model calculations using the Penman equation demonstrate that the E-VPD hysteresis emerges without any biotic effects due to a phase angle difference (or time lag) between net radiation the main driver of E, and VPD. Modulations originating from biotic effects on the ET-VPD hysteresis were then considered. The phase angle difference representation earlier employed was mathematically transformed into a storage problem and applied to the soil-plant system. The transformed system shows that soil moisture storage within the root zone can produce an ET-VPD hysteresis prototypical of those generated by phase-angle differences. To explore the interplay between all the lags in the soil-plant-atmosphere system and phase angle differences among forcing and response variables, a detailed soil-plant-atmosphere continuum (SPAC) model was developed and applied to a grassland ecosystem. The results of the SPAC model suggest that the hysteresis magnitude depends on the radiation-VPD lag. The soil moisture dry-down simulations also suggest that modeled root water potential and leaf water potential are both better indicators of the hysteresis magnitude than soil moisture, suggesting that plant water status is the main factor regulating the hysteretic relation between ET and VPD. Hence, the genesis and magnitude of the ET-VPD hysteresis are controlled directly by both biotic factors and abiotic factors such as time lag between radiation and VPD originating from boundary layer processes

  4. Dynamic hysteretic sensing model of bending-mode Galfenol transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shuying; Zheng, Jiaju; Sang, Jie; Zhang, Pengfei; Wang, Bowen; Huang, Wenmei

    2015-05-01

    A dynamic hysteretic sensing model has been developed to predict the dynamic responses of the magnetic induction, the stress, and the output voltage for a bending-mode Galfenol unimorph transducer subjected simultaneously to acceleration and bias magnetic field. This model is obtained by coupling the hysteretic Armstrong model and the structural dynamic model of the Galfenol unimorph beam. The structural dynamic model of the beam is founded based on the Euler-Bernouli beam theory, the nonlinear constitutive equations, and the Faraday law of electromagnetic induction. Comparisons between the calculated and measured results show the model can describe dynamic nonlinear voltage characteristics of the device, and can predict hysteretic behaviors between the magnetic induction and the stress. Moreover, the model can effectively analyze the effects of the bias magnetic field, the acceleration amplitude, and frequency on the root mean square voltage of the device.

  5. Hysteretic Behavior of Prestressed Concrete Bridge Pier with Fiber Model

    PubMed Central

    Hui-li, Wang; Guang-qi, Feng; Si-feng, Qin

    2014-01-01

    The hysteretic behavior and seismic characteristics of the prestressed concrete bridge pier were researched. The effects of the prestressed tendon ratio, the longitudinal reinforcement ratio, and the stirrup reinforcement ratio on the hysteretic behavior and seismic characteristics of the prestressed concrete bridge pier have been obtained with the fiber model analysis method. The analysis show some results about the prestressed concrete bridge pier. Firstly, greater prestressed tendon ratio and more longitudinal reinforcement can lead to more obvious pier's hysteresis loop “pinching effect,” smaller residual displacement, and lower energy dissipation capacity. Secondly, the greater the stirrup reinforcement ratio is, the greater the hysteresis loop area is. That also means that bridge piers will have better ductility and stronger shear capacity. The results of the research will provide a theoretical basis for the hysteretic behavior analysis of the prestressed concrete pier. PMID:24578635

  6. Hysteretic behavior of prestressed concrete bridge pier with fiber model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-li; Feng, Guang-qi; Qin, Si-feng

    2014-01-01

    The hysteretic behavior and seismic characteristics of the prestressed concrete bridge pier were researched. The effects of the prestressed tendon ratio, the longitudinal reinforcement ratio, and the stirrup reinforcement ratio on the hysteretic behavior and seismic characteristics of the prestressed concrete bridge pier have been obtained with the fiber model analysis method. The analysis show some results about the prestressed concrete bridge pier. Firstly, greater prestressed tendon ratio and more longitudinal reinforcement can lead to more obvious pier's hysteresis loop "pinching effect," smaller residual displacement, and lower energy dissipation capacity. Secondly, the greater the stirrup reinforcement ratio is, the greater the hysteresis loop area is. That also means that bridge piers will have better ductility and stronger shear capacity. The results of the research will provide a theoretical basis for the hysteretic behavior analysis of the prestressed concrete pier.

  7. Hysteretic resistance spikes in quantum hall ferromagnets without domains.

    PubMed

    Freire, Henrique J P; Egues, J Carlos

    2007-07-13

    We use spin-density-functional theory to study recently reported hysteretic magnetoresistance rho(xx) spikes in Mn-based 2D electron gases [Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 266802 (2002)10.1103/PhysRevLett.89.266802]. We find hysteresis loops in our calculated Landau fan diagrams and total energies signaling quantum Hall ferromagnet phase transitions. Spin-dependent exchange-correlation effects are crucial to stabilize the relevant magnetic phases arising from distinct symmetry-broken excited- and ground-state solutions of the Kohn-Sham equations. Besides hysteretic spikes in rho(xx), we predict hysteretic dips in the Hall resistance rho(xy). Our theory, without domain walls, satisfactorily explains the recent data.

  8. Dynamic hysteretic sensing model of bending-mode Galfenol transducer

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Shuying Zheng, Jiaju; Sang, Jie; Zhang, Pengfei; Wang, Bowen; Huang, Wenmei

    2015-05-07

    A dynamic hysteretic sensing model has been developed to predict the dynamic responses of the magnetic induction, the stress, and the output voltage for a bending-mode Galfenol unimorph transducer subjected simultaneously to acceleration and bias magnetic field. This model is obtained by coupling the hysteretic Armstrong model and the structural dynamic model of the Galfenol unimorph beam. The structural dynamic model of the beam is founded based on the Euler-Bernouli beam theory, the nonlinear constitutive equations, and the Faraday law of electromagnetic induction. Comparisons between the calculated and measured results show the model can describe dynamic nonlinear voltage characteristics of the device, and can predict hysteretic behaviors between the magnetic induction and the stress. Moreover, the model can effectively analyze the effects of the bias magnetic field, the acceleration amplitude, and frequency on the root mean square voltage of the device.

  9. A novel practical control approach for rate independent hysteretic systems.

    PubMed

    Goforth, Frank J; Zheng, Qing; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2012-05-01

    A disturbance rejection based control approach, active disturbance rejection control (ADRC), is proposed for hysteretic systems with unknown characteristics. It is an appealing alternative to hysteresis compensation because it does not require a detailed model of hysteresis, by treating the nonlinear hysteresis as a common disturbance and actively rejecting it. The stability characteristic of the ADRC is analyzed. It is shown that, in the face of the inherent dynamic uncertainties, the estimation and closed-loop tracking errors of ADRC are bounded, with their bounds monotonously decreasing with the observer and controller bandwidths, respectively. Simulation results on a typical hysteretic system further demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  10. Hysteretic dynamics of active particles in a periodic orienting field

    PubMed Central

    Romensky, Maksym; Scholz, Dimitri; Lobaskin, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Active motion of living organisms and artificial self-propelling particles has been an area of intense research at the interface of biology, chemistry and physics. Significant progress in understanding these phenomena has been related to the observation that dynamic self-organization in active systems has much in common with ordering in equilibrium condensed matter such as spontaneous magnetization in ferromagnets. The velocities of active particles may behave similar to magnetic dipoles and develop global alignment, although interactions between the individuals might be completely different. In this work, we show that the dynamics of active particles in external fields can also be described in a way that resembles equilibrium condensed matter. It follows simple general laws, which are independent of the microscopic details of the system. The dynamics is revealed through hysteresis of the mean velocity of active particles subjected to a periodic orienting field. The hysteresis is measured in computer simulations and experiments on unicellular organisms. We find that the ability of the particles to follow the field scales with the ratio of the field variation period to the particles' orientational relaxation time, which, in turn, is related to the particle self-propulsion power and the energy dissipation rate. The collective behaviour of the particles due to aligning interactions manifests itself at low frequencies via increased persistence of the swarm motion when compared with motion of an individual. By contrast, at high field frequencies, the active group fails to develop the alignment and tends to behave like a set of independent individuals even in the presence of interactions. We also report on asymptotic laws for the hysteretic dynamics of active particles, which resemble those in magnetic systems. The generality of the assumptions in the underlying model suggests that the observed laws might apply to a variety of dynamic phenomena from the motion of

  11. Assessing catchment connectivity using hysteretic loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Jason; Masselink, Rens; Goni, Mikel; Gimenez, Rafael; Casali, Javier; Seeger, Manuel; Keesstra, Saskia

    2017-04-01

    Storm events mobilize large proportions of sediments in catchment systems. Therefore understanding catchment sediment dynamics throughout the continuity of storms and how initial catchment states act as controls on the transport of sediment to catchment outlets is important for effective catchment management. Sediment connectivity is a concept which can explain the origin, pathways and sinks of sediments within catchments (Baartman et al., 2013; Parsons et al., 2015; Masselink et al., 2016a,b; Mekonnen et al., 2016). However, sediment connectivity alone does not provide a practicable mechanism by which the catchment's initial state - and thus the location of entrained sediment in the sediment transport cascade - can be characterized. Studying the dynamic relationship between water discharge (Q) and suspended sediment (SS) at the catchment outlet can provide a valuable research tool to infer the likely source areas and flow pathways contributing to sediment transport because the relationship can be characterized by predictable hysteresis patterns. Hysteresis is observed when the sediment concentration associated with a certain flow rate is different depending on the direction in which the analysis is performed - towards the increase or towards the diminution of the flow. However, the complexity of the phenomena and factors which determine the hysteresis make its interpretation ambiguous. Previous work has described various types of hysteretic loops as well as the cause for the shape of the loop, mainly pointing to the origin of the sediments. The data set for this study comes from four experimental watersheds in Navarre (Spain), owned and maintained by the Government of Navarre. These experimental watersheds have been monitored and studied since 1996 (La Tejería and Latxaga) and 2001 (Oskotz principal and Oskotz woodland). La Tejería and Latxaga watersheds are similar to each other regarding size (approximately 200 ha), geology (marls and sandstones), soils (fine

  12. Studying the hysteretic behaviour of unconsolidated sediments using an electroencephalography apparatus: a laboratory study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggeri, Paolo; Jougnot, Damien; Chavarriaga, Ricardo; Brandner, Catherine; del Rocio Millán Ruiz, José; Linde, Niklas

    2015-04-01

    In soil science, the hysteretic nature of the water retention curve plays an important role in describing a soil's propensity to retain water and conduct fluid flow. However, hysteresis effects remain difficult to study and to quantify. Geophysical methods provide suitable and non-invasive tools that could be used for this purpose. For example, the degree of water saturation in a soil can be determined by measuring its electrical resistivity, while a water flux through a soil generates a measureable electrical potential difference (streaming potential). The objective of this work is to study the hysteretic behaviour of unconsolidated sediments during repeated drainage and imbibition cycles under well-constrained laboratory conditions. Monitoring was performed using a 32-electrode electroencephalography (EEG) apparatus (Biosemi) coupled with a current injection system. We used a 150 cm high sand-filled column in which we monitored self-potential (SP) signals using 15 electrodes in direct contact with the medium (so-called "naked" electrodes), and 15 electrodes that were inserted in small porous pots that were filled with water of the same conductivity and chloride concentration as the water saturating the sand (so-called "chamber" electrodes). For both electrode types, the electrodes were placed between 5 and 145 cm height with an electrode spacing of 10 cm. Pressure (10 tensiometers) and mass, together with the temperature and the relative humidity in the room, were constantly monitored for the entire duration of the experiments. We performed ten cycles of drainage and imbibition by changing the water level of an external reservoir connected to the column. Each drainage and imbibition cycle took approximately 25 and 17 hours, respectively, for a total duration of the experiment of 24 days. After each imbibition and drainage cycle, we performed complex conductivity measurements by injecting a known electric current at two electrodes using a sine wave with varying

  13. Plane stress problems using hysteretic rigid body spring network models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christos, Sofianos D.; Vlasis, Koumousis K.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, a discrete numerical scheme is presented capable of modeling the hysteretic behavior of 2D structures. Rigid Body Spring Network (RBSN) models that were first proposed by Kawai (Nucl Eng Des 48(1):29-207, 1978) are extended to account for hysteretic elastoplastic behavior. Discretization is based on Voronoi tessellation, as proposed specifically for RBSN models to ensure uniformity. As a result, the structure is discretized into convex polygons that form the discrete rigid bodies of the model. These are connected with three zero length, i.e., single-node springs in the middle of their common facets. The springs follow the smooth hysteretic Bouc-Wen model which efficiently incorporates classical plasticity with no direct reference to a yield surface. Numerical results for both static and dynamic loadings are presented, which validate the proposed simplified spring-mass formulation. In addition, they verify the model's applicability on determining primarily the displacement field and plastic zones compared to the standard elastoplastic finite element method.

  14. Microscopic theory of hysteretic hydrogen adsorption in nanoporous materials.

    PubMed

    Kang, Joongoo; Wei, Su-Huai; Kim, Yong-Hyun

    2010-02-10

    Understanding gas adsorption confined in nanoscale pores is a fundamental issue with broad applications in catalysis and gas storage. Recently, hysteretic H(2) adsorption was observed in several nanoporous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Here, using first-principles calculations and simulated adsorption/desorption isotherms, we present a microscopic theory of the enhanced adsorption hysteresis of H(2) molecules using the MOF Co(1,4-benzenedipyrazolate) [Co(BDP)] as a model system. Using activated H(2) diffusion along the small-pore channels as a dominant equilibration process, we demonstrate that the system shows hysteretic H(2) adsorption under changes of external pressure. For a small increase of temperature, the pressure width of the hysteresis, as well as the adsorption/desorption pressure, dramatically increases. The sensitivity of gas adsorption to temperature changes is explained by the simple thermodynamics of the gas reservoir. Detailed analysis of transient adsorption dynamics reveals that the hysteretic H(2) adsorption is an intrinsic adsorption characteristic in the diffusion-controlled small-pore systems.

  15. Hysteretic transitions in the Kuramoto model with inertia.

    PubMed

    Olmi, Simona; Navas, Adrian; Boccaletti, Stefano; Torcini, Alessandro

    2014-10-01

    We report finite-size numerical investigations and mean-field analysis of a Kuramoto model with inertia for fully coupled and diluted systems. In particular, we examine, for a gaussian distribution of the frequencies, the transition from incoherence to coherence for increasingly large system size and inertia. For sufficiently large inertia the transition is hysteretic, and within the hysteretic region clusters of locked oscillators of various sizes and different levels of synchronization coexist. A modification of the mean-field theory developed by Tanaka, Lichtenberg, and Oishi [Physica D 100, 279 (1997)] allows us to derive the synchronization curve associated to each of these clusters. We have also investigated numerically the limits of existence of the coherent and of the incoherent solutions. The minimal coupling required to observe the coherent state is largely independent of the system size, and it saturates to a constant value already for moderately large inertia values. The incoherent state is observable up to a critical coupling whose value saturates for large inertia and for finite system sizes, while in the thermodinamic limit this critical value diverges proportionally to the mass. By increasing the inertia the transition becomes more complex, and the synchronization occurs via the emergence of clusters of whirling oscillators. The presence of these groups of coherently drifting oscillators induces oscillations in the order parameter. We have shown that the transition remains hysteretic even for randomly diluted networks up to a level of connectivity corresponding to a few links per oscillator. Finally, an application to the Italian high-voltage power grid is reported, which reveals the emergence of quasiperiodic oscillations in the order parameter due to the simultaneous presence of many competing whirling clusters.

  16. Principle and validation of modified hysteretic models for magnetorheological dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xian-Xu; Chen, Peng; Qian, Li-Jun

    2015-08-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) dampers, semi-active actuators for vibration and shock control systems, have attracted increasing attention during the past two decades. However, it is difficult to establish a precise mathematical model for the MR dampers and their control systems due to their intrinsic strong nonlinear hysteretic behavior. A phenomenological model based on the Bouc-Wen model can be used to effectively describe the nonlinear hysteretic behavior of the MR dampers, but the structure of the phenomenological model is complex and the Bouc-Wen model is functionally redundant. In this paper, based on the phenomenological model, (1) a normalized phenomenological model is derived through incorporating a ‘normalization’ concept, and (2) a restructured model, also incorporating the ‘normalization’ concept, is proposed and realized. In order to demonstrate this, a multi-islands genetic algorithm (GA) is employed to identify the parameters of the restructured model, the normalized phenomenological model, and the phenomenological model. The performance of the three models for describing and predicting the damping force characteristics of the MR dampers are compared and analyzed using the identified parameters. The research results indicate that, as compared with the phenomenological model and the normalized phenomenological model, (1) the restructured model can not only effectively decrease the number of the model parameters and reduce the complexity of the model, but can also describe the nonlinear hysteretic behavior of MR dampers more accurately, and (2) the meanings of several model parameters of the restructured model are clearer and the initial ranges of the model parameters are more explicit, which is of significance for parameter identification.

  17. Fast, Low-Power, Hysteretic Level-Detector Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arditti, Mordechai

    1993-01-01

    Circuit for detection of preset levels of voltage or current intended to replace standard fast voltage comparator. Hysteretic analog/digital level detector operates at unusually low power with little sacrifice of speed. Comprises low-power analog circuit and complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) digital circuit connected in overall closed feedback loop to decrease rise and fall times, provide hysteresis, and trip-level control. Contains multiple subloops combining linear and digital feedback. Levels of sensed signals and hysteresis level easily adjusted by selection of components to suit specific application.

  18. Comparing Extremal and Hysteretic Optimization on the Satisfiability Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, Bruno; Boettcher, Stefan

    2006-03-01

    We apply physically inspired optimization methods to the classical combinatorial Satisfiablity problem. Treating the usual boolean variables as Ising spins and each clause as a p-spin interaction we can use the pre-existing physical intuition about spin glasses and magnetic systems to find the optimal solution for this problem (the ground state energy). We compare the performance of Extremal OptimizationootnotetextPRL 23:5211, 2001 (τEO) and Hysteretic OptimizationootnotetextPRL 89:150201, 2002 (HO) and determine the parameter values that provide the best results. Comparisons with previously published results on well known benchmarksootnotetextDIMACS 35:393, 1997 are also made.

  19. Global adaptive control for uncertain nonaffine nonlinear hysteretic systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-Hua; Huang, Liangpei; Xiao, Dongming; Guo, Yong

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the global output tracking is investigated for a class of uncertain nonlinear hysteretic systems with nonaffine structures. By combining the solution properties of the hysteresis model with the novel backstepping approach, a robust adaptive control algorithm is developed without constructing a hysteresis inverse. The proposed control scheme is further modified to tackle the bounded disturbances by adaptively estimating their bounds. It is rigorously proven that the designed adaptive controllers can guarantee global stability of the closed-loop system. Two numerical examples are provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed control schemes.

  20. Control of multilevel voltage states in a hysteretic superconducting-quantum-interference-device ring-resonator system.

    PubMed

    Stiffell, P; Everitt, M J; Clark, T D; Ralph, J F

    2005-11-01

    In this paper we study numerical solutions to the quasiclassical equations of motion for a superconducting-quantum-interference device ring-radio frequency (rf) resonator system in the regime where the ring is highly hysteretic. In line with experiment, we show that for a suitable choice of ring circuit parameters the solutions to these equations of motion comprise sets of levels in the rf voltage-current dynamics of the coupled system. We further demonstrate that transitions, both up and down, between these levels can be controlled by voltage pulses applied to the system, thus opening up the possibility of high order (e.g., 10 state), multilevel logic and memory.

  1. Calibration of a hysteretic model for glass fiber reinforced gypsum wall panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janardhana, Maganti; Robin Davis, P.; Ravichandran, S. S.; Prasad, A. M.; Menon, D.

    2014-06-01

    Glass fiber reinforced gypsum (GFRG) wall panels are prefabricated panels with hollow cores, originally developed in Australia and subsequently adopted by India and China for use in buildings. This paper discusses identification and calibration of a suitable hysteretic model for GFRG wall panels filled with reinforced concrete. As considerable pinching was observed in the experimental results, a suitable hysteretic model with pinched hysteretic rule is used to conduct a series of quasi-static as inelastic hysteretic response analyses of GFRG panels with two different widths. The calibration of the pinching model parameters was carried out to approximately match the simulated and experimental responses up to 80% of the peak load in the post peak region. Interestingly, the same values of various parameters (energy dissipation and pinching related parameters) were obtained for all five test specimens.

  2. Vibration analysis of nonlinear systems with the bilinear hysteretic oscillator by using incremental harmonic balance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Huai; Kong, Xianren; Li, Haiqin; Yang, Zhenguo

    2017-01-01

    This paper considers dynamics of bilinear hysteretic systems, which are widely used for vibration control and vibration absorption such as magneto-rheological damper, metal-rubber. The method of incremental harmonic balance (IHB) technique that hysteresis is considered in the corrective term is improved in order to determine periodic solutions of bilinear hysteretic systems. The improved continuation method called two points tracing algorithm which is stable to the turning point makes the calculation more efficient for tracing amplitude-frequency response. Precise Hsu's method for analysing the stability of periodic solutions is introduced. The effects of different parameters of bilinear hysteretic oscillator on the response are discussed numerically. Some numerical simulations of considered bilinear hysteretic systems, including a single DOF and a 2DOF system, are effectively obtained by the modified IHB method and the results compare very well with the 4-oder Runge-Kutta method.

  3. Hysteretic memory and end plate effects on the response of a flexible cylinder undergoing Vortex-Induced Vibrations (VIV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gedikli, Ersegun Deniz; Dahl, Jason M.

    2015-11-01

    The response of rigid cylinders undergoing VIV has been observed to be hysteretic with respect to the nominal reduced velocity, as transition of the wake is delayed dependent on whether the flow has been slowed down or sped up. In the present study, a similar behavior is observed for a flexible, tension-dominated cylinder, however the hysteretic behavior is shown to affect the transition between excited modes. The test cylinder has diameter of 6.35 mm, aspect ratio of 40 and mass ratio of 3.76. The dynamic response of the cylinder is measured visually, by tracking 26 dots along the span of the cylinder using two high-speed cameras between the Reynolds number of 1080 and 4660. It is observed that a clear memory effect exists, where the speed at which transition between the first mode and second mode excitation in the cross-flow direction changes dependent on whether the flow is increasing or decreasing in speed. A second series of experiments is conducted to investigate end plate effects on the flexible cylinder. Experiments are conducted with and without an end plate located at the end pivot point on the cylinder. Clear differences are observed between each condition illustrating the strong three-dimensional behavior of vortex shedding behind the flexible cylinder.

  4. Transverse hysteretic damping characteristics of a serpentine belt: Modeling and experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hao; Hu, Yumei; Pi, Yangjun

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, the transverse dynamic hysteretic damping characteristics (HDC) of a serpentine belt are investigated. The variable stiffness and variable damping model (VSDM) constituted of a variable-stiffness spring and a variable-damping damper is developed to estimate the HDC of the belt. A test rig is designed to test the force-displacement hysteresis damping curve and resonance frequencies of serpentine belts with different lengths under diverse loading conditions. The force-displacement hysteresis damping curve getting from the experiment is then used to determine the transverse stiffness and damping coefficients needed for the VSDM. The experiment particularly shows that the orientation of the hysteresis curve swings left and right around each natural frequency as it is a symmetrical point. This interesting phenomenon is explicated in detail with the loss angle which is calculated by two methods. Moreover, two sub-analytical models included in the VSDM are proposed to model the dependence of transverse dynamic stiffness and damping coefficient of a belt on belt length, pretension and excitation frequency. A comparison of the hysteresis curves obtained from the VSDM and experiment indicates that they are in good agreement.

  5. Assessing the severity of fatigue crack using acoustics modulated by hysteretic vibration for a cantilever beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qingbo; Lin, Yin

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigates fatigue crack severity assessment using acoustics modulated by hysteretic vibration for a cantilever beam. In this study, a nonlinear oscillator system is constructed to induce the hysteretic frequency response of the cantilever beam in dynamics, and the hysteretic vibration is then used to modulate the acoustic waves to generate the vibro-acoustic modulation (VAM) effect. Through modulation of hysteretic vibration, the hysteretic response of the VAM can be achieved. The experimental results further validated that the VAM hysteresis phenomenon can be enhanced with the increase of crack severity owing to the change of beam's effective stiffness. Simulations in the proposed physical model explained the reason of enhancement of hysteresis phenomenon. Combined with nonlinear bistable structural model, a fatigue crack severity assessment approach was proposed by evaluating the hysteretic region (e.g., bandwidth or jumping frequency) in the vibration frequency response of the VAM effect. The reported study is valuable in building a monotonic relationship to assess the severity of fatigue crack by a nonlinear acoustics approach.

  6. Research on strip hysteretic behavior and mill vertical vibration system nonlinear dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiaobin; Zang, Yong; Jin, Ke

    2016-10-01

    Rolling mill vibration is a technical problem in the iron and steel industry for many years and has serious impact and harm on production. There were serious vibrations in the middle mills when rolling thin container strip for the compact strip production (CSP) strip hot rolling process. This paper studied the hysteretic characteristic of rolled strip and established the vertical vibration system single-degree-of-freedom dynamics model of the F3 mill rollers. The influence of parameters on the system characteristics was studied, such as the linear damping coefficient, linear stiffness coefficient, nonlinear displacement coefficient, nonlinear velocity coefficient and exciting force, and then, the vibration source and vibration-restraining measure were studied from the roll gap. The results show that with increasing linear stiffness, damping and hysteresis coefficient, it can reduce the possibility of chaotic system; the linear stiffness coefficient had the greatest influence, and hysteresis damping coefficient had minimal influence on chaotic threshold. In order to reduce rolling mill vibration amplitude, we should reduce the external excitation force firstly, and in order to improve the dynamic performance of the system, we should control the speed of nonlinear coefficient values. The contrast experiments were carried out at the production scene finally.

  7. Periodic reference tracking control approach for smart material actuators with complex hysteretic characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhiyong; Hao, Lina; Song, Bo; Yang, Ruiguo; Cao, Ruimin; Cheng, Yu

    2016-10-01

    Micro/nano positioning technologies have been attractive for decades for their various applications in both industrial and scientific fields. The actuators employed in these technologies are typically smart material actuators, which possess inherent hysteresis that may cause systems behave unexpectedly. Periodic reference tracking capability is fundamental for apparatuses such as scanning probe microscope, which employs smart material actuators to generate periodic scanning motion. However, traditional controller such as PID method cannot guarantee accurate fast periodic scanning motion. To tackle this problem and to conduct practical implementation in digital devices, this paper proposes a novel control method named discrete extended unparallel Prandtl-Ishlinskii model based internal model (d-EUPI-IM) control approach. To tackle modeling uncertainties, the robust d-EUPI-IM control approach is investigated, and the associated sufficient stabilizing conditions are derived. The advantages of the proposed controller are: it is designed and represented in discrete form, thus practical for digital devices implementation; the extended unparallel Prandtl-Ishlinskii model can precisely represent forward/inverse complex hysteretic characteristics, thus can reduce modeling uncertainties and benefits controllers design; in addition, the internal model principle based control module can be utilized as a natural oscillator for tackling periodic references tracking problem. The proposed controller was verified through comparative experiments on a piezoelectric actuator platform, and convincing results have been achieved.

  8. Experimental demonstration of a damage detection technique for nonlinear hysteretic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jann N.; Xia, Ye; Loh, Chin-Hsiung

    2011-04-01

    Many civil and mechanical engineering structures exhibit nonlinear hysteretic behavior when subject to dynamic loads, such as earthquakes. The modeling and identification of non-linear hysteretic systems with stiffness and strength degradations is a practical but challenging problem encountered in the engineering field. A recently developed technique, referred to as the adaptive quadratic sum-square error with unknown inputs (AQSSE-UI), is capable of identifying time dependant parameters of nonlinear hysteretic structures. In this paper, the AQSSE-UI technique is applied to the parametric identification of nonlinear hysteretic reinforced concrete structures with stiffness and strength degradations, and the performance of the AQSSE technique is demonstrated by the experimental test data. A 1/3 scaled 2-story RC frame has been tested experimentally on the shake table at NCREE, Taiwan. This 2-story RC frame was subject to different levels of ground excitations back to back. The structure is firstly considered as an equivalent linear model with time-varying stiffness parameters, and the tracking of the degradation of the stiffness parameters is carried out using the AQSSE-UI technique. Then the same RC frame is considered as a nonlinear hysteretic model with inelastic hinges following the generalized Bouc-Wen model, and the time-varying nonlinear parameters are identified again using the AQSSE-UI technique. Experimental results demonstrate that the AQSSE technique is quite effective for the tracking of: (i) the stiffness degradation of linear structures, and (ii) the non-linear hysteretic parameters with stiffness and strength degradations.

  9. Multilevel radiative thermal memory realized by the hysteretic metal-insulator transition of vanadium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Kota Nishikawa, Kazutaka; Iizuka, Hideo

    2016-02-01

    Thermal information processing is attracting much interest as an analog of electronic computing. We experimentally demonstrated a radiative thermal memory utilizing a phase change material. The hysteretic metal-insulator transition of vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}) allows us to obtain a multilevel memory. We developed a Preisach model to explain the hysteretic radiative heat transfer between a VO{sub 2} film and a fused quartz substrate. The transient response of our memory predicted by the Preisach model agrees well with the measured response. Our multilevel thermal memory paves the way for thermal information processing as well as contactless thermal management.

  10. Multilevel radiative thermal memory realized by the hysteretic metal-insulator transition of vanadium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Kota; Nishikawa, Kazutaka; Iizuka, Hideo

    2016-02-01

    Thermal information processing is attracting much interest as an analog of electronic computing. We experimentally demonstrated a radiative thermal memory utilizing a phase change material. The hysteretic metal-insulator transition of vanadium dioxide (VO2) allows us to obtain a multilevel memory. We developed a Preisach model to explain the hysteretic radiative heat transfer between a VO2 film and a fused quartz substrate. The transient response of our memory predicted by the Preisach model agrees well with the measured response. Our multilevel thermal memory paves the way for thermal information processing as well as contactless thermal management.

  11. Spatial, Hysteretic, and Adaptive Host-Guest Chemistry in a Metal-Organic Framework with Open Watson-Crick Sites.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hong; Li, Mian; Lin, Xiao-Rong; Chen, Wei; Chen, Guang-Hui; Huang, Xiao-Chun; Li, Dan

    2015-09-01

    Biological and artificial molecules and assemblies capable of supramolecular recognition, especially those with nucleobase pairing, usually rely on autonomous or collective binding to function. Advanced site-specific recognition takes advantage of cooperative spatial effects, as in local folding in protein-DNA binding. Herein, we report a new nucleobase-tagged metal-organic framework (MOF), namely ZnBTCA (BTC=benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxyl, A=adenine), in which the exposed Watson-Crick faces of adenine residues are immobilized periodically on the interior crystalline surface. Systematic control experiments demonstrated the cooperation of the open Watson-Crick sites and spatial effects within the nanopores, and thermodynamic and kinetic studies revealed a hysteretic host-guest interaction attributed to mild chemisorption. We further exploited this behavior for adenine-thymine binding within the constrained pores, and a globally adaptive response of the MOF host was observed.

  12. COMPARING SIMULATED AND EXPERIMENTAL HYSTERETIC TWO- PHASE TRANSIENT FLUID FLOW PHENOMENA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A hysteretic model for two-phase permeability (k)-saturation (S)-pressure (P) relations is outlined that accounts for effects of nonwetting fluid entrapment. The model can be employed in unsaturated fluid flow computer codes to predict temporal and spatial fluid distributions. Co...

  13. COMPARING SIMULATED AND EXPERIMENTAL HYSTERETIC TWO- PHASE TRANSIENT FLUID FLOW PHENOMENA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A hysteretic model for two-phase permeability (k)-saturation (S)-pressure (P) relations is outlined that accounts for effects of nonwetting fluid entrapment. The model can be employed in unsaturated fluid flow computer codes to predict temporal and spatial fluid distributions. Co...

  14. An improved PSO algorithm for parameter identification of nonlinear dynamic hysteretic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junhao; Xia, Pinqi

    2017-02-01

    The nonlinear dynamic hysteretic models used in nonlinear dynamic analysis contain generally lots of model parameters which need to be identified accurately and effectively. The accuracy and effectiveness of identification depend generally on the complexity of model, number of model parameters and proximity of initial values of the parameters. The particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm has the random searching ability and has been widely applied to the parameter identification in the nonlinear dynamic hysteretic models. However, the PSO algorithm may get trapped in the local optimum and appear the premature convergence not to obtain the real optimum results. In this paper, an improved PSO algorithm for identifying parameters of nonlinear dynamic hysteretic models has been presented by defining a fitness function for hysteretic model. The improved PSO algorithm can enhance the global searching ability and avoid to appear the premature convergence of the conventional PSO algorithm, and has been applied to identify the parameters of two nonlinear dynamic hysteretic models which are the Leishman-Beddoes (LB) dynamic stall model of rotor blade and the anelastic displacement fields (ADF) model of elastomeric damper which can be used as the lead-lag damper in rotor. The accuracy and effectiveness of the improved PSO algorithm for identifying parameters of the LB model and the ADF model are validated by comparing the identified results with test results. The investigations have indicated that in order to reduce the influence of randomness caused by using the PSO algorithm on the accuracy of identified parameters, it is an effective method to increase the number of repeated identifications.

  15. Escape from the Zero-Voltage State in Hysteretic Dc-Squids with Different Dimensionless Inductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, M. G.; Intelisano, A.; Leoni, R.; Milanese, N.; Torrioli, G.; Cosmelli, C.; Carelli, P.; Chiarello, F.

    We studied the escape process from the zero-voltage state to the running state in hysteretic dc-SQUIDs made with trilayer Nb-AlOx-Nb junctions. We analyze the experimental results, according to the thermal activation model, for devices having similar parameters except for the dimensionless inductance βL, which however is always very small. The interest in hysteretic dc-SQUIDs is in the possibility of using them to perform non-invasive measurements of the flux states in rf-SQUIDs: this achievement would be very important both in tests of macroscopic quantum properties of SQUIDs and in measurements on a class of quantum bits that has been recently proposed, based on magnetic flux states in SQUIDs.

  16. A quasi-modal parameter based system identification procedure with non-proportional hysteretic damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Minli; Hahn, Eric J.; Liu, Jike; Lu, Zhongrong

    2016-11-01

    This paper introduced a modal parameter based identification procedure to identify the equivalent system of structures under harmonic excitations. The developed identification technique assumed non-proportional hysteretic damping in the equivalent system, which would be applicable in identifying more general structures. By introducing quasi-modal parameter, modal analysis equation was decoupled under physical coordinate; hence, the modal parameters of each vibration mode are identified independently. Double iteration algorithm was developed to solve the derived non-linear identification equation with complex unknowns. The developed identification procedure was applied to identify the equivalent system of a numerical model in order to evaluate the feasibility of the technique in practice. The identification procedure was also applied to identify an experimental mass and bar rig for validation purpose. Identification results showed that the identification procedure could identify accurately and robustly the equivalent system with non-proportional hysteretic damping assumption; hence, it is likely to be applicable in the field.

  17. User's Guide for Hysteretic Capillary Pressure and Relative Permeability Functions in TOUGH2

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, C. A.

    2013-03-01

    This document provides a user’s guide for the most recent version of the hysteretic code, which runs within iTOUGH2 (Finsterle, 1999a,b,c) or TOUGH2 V2.1 (Pruess et al., 2012). The usage of the hysteretic module is the same in both codes, which for brevity here are both referred to simply as TOUGH2. The current code differs only slightly from what was presented in Doughty (2007), hence that document provides the basic information on the processes being modeled and how they are conceptualized. This document focuses on a description of the user-specified parameters required to run hysteretic TOUGH2. In the few instances where the conceptualization differs from that of Doughty (2007), the features described here are the current ones. Sample problems presented in this user’s guide use the equation-of-state module ECO2N (Pruess, 2005). The components present in ECO2N are H{sub 2}O, NaCl, and CO{sub 2}. Two fluid phases and one solid phase are considered: an aqueous phase, which primarily consists of liquid H{sub 2}O and may contain dissolved NaCl and CO{sub 2}; a supercritical phase which primarily consists of CO{sub 2}, but also includes a small amount of gaseous H{sub 2}O; and a solid phase consisting of precipitated NaCl. Details of the ECO2N formulation may be found in Pruess (2005). The aqueous phase is the wetting phase and is denoted ‘liquid’, whereas the supercritical phase is the non-wetting phase and is denoted ‘gas’. The hysteretic formalism may be applied to other TOUGH2 equation-of-state modules that consider two fluid phases, as long as the liquid phase is the wetting phase and the gas phase is the non-wetting phase.

  18. Novel hysteretic noisy chaotic neural network for broadcast scheduling problems in packet radio networks.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ming; Zhao, Lin; Cao, Wei; Xu, Yaoqun; Dai, Xuefeng; Wang, Xiaoxu

    2010-09-01

    Noisy chaotic neural network (NCNN), which can exhibit stochastic chaotic simulated annealing (SCSA), has been proven to be a powerful tool in solving combinatorial optimization problems. In order to retain the excellent optimization property of SCSA and improve the optimization performance of the NCNN using hysteretic dynamics without increasing network parameters, we first construct an equivalent model of the NCNN and then control noises in the equivalent model to propose a novel hysteretic noisy chaotic neural network (HNCNN). Compared with the NCNN, the proposed HNCNN can exhibit both SCSA and hysteretic dynamics without introducing extra system parameters, and can increase the effective convergence toward optimal or near-optimal solutions at higher noise levels. Broadcast scheduling problem (BSP) in packet radio networks (PRNs) is to design an optimal time-division multiple-access (TDMA) frame structure with minimal frame length, maximal channel utilization, and minimal average time delay. In this paper, the proposed HNCNN is applied to solve BSP in PRNs to demonstrate its performance. Simulation results show that the proposed HNCNN with higher noise amplitudes is more likely to find an optimal or near-optimal TDMA frame structure with a minimal average time delay than previous algorithms.

  19. A proposed model to include a residual NAPL saturation in a hysteretic capillary pressure-saturation relationship.

    PubMed

    Van Geel, P J; Roy, S D

    2002-09-01

    A residual non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) present in the vadose zone can act as a contaminant source for many years as the compounds of concern partition to infiltrating groundwater and air contained in the soil voids. Current pressure-saturation-relative permeability relationships do not include a residual NAPL saturation term in their formulation. This paper presents the results of series of two- and three-phase pressure cell experiments conducted to evaluate the residual NAPL saturation and its impact on the pressure-saturation relationship. A model was proposed to incorporate a residual NAPL saturation term into an existing hysteretic three-phase parametric model developed by Parker and Lenhard [Water Resour. Res. 23(12) (1987) 2187], Lenhard and Parker [Water Resour. Res. 23(12) (1987) 2197] and Lenhard [J. Contam. Hydrol. 9 (1992) 243]. The experimental results indicated that the magnitude of the residual NAPL saturation was a function of the maximum total liquid saturation reached and the water saturation. The proposed model to incorporate a residual NAPL saturation term is similar in form to the entrapment model proposed by Parker and Lenhard, which was based on an expression presented by Land [Soc. Pet. Eng. J. (June 1968) 149].

  20. Hysteretic patterns of suspended sediment discharge in a glacierized Andean catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, L.; Carrillo, R.; Escauriaza, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    Sediment transport during flood events often reveals hysteretic patterns. Hysteresis can be clockwise (when flow discharge peaks after the peak of bedload) or counterclockwise (when flow discharge peaks before the peak of bedload), and recent indexes have been developed in order to quantify the degree of hysteretic patterns. Hysteresis patterns and degree can be used to infer the dynamics of sediment availability, as counterclockwise and clockwise hysteresis have been interpreted as representative of limited and unlimited sediment supply conditions, respectively. This work focuses on the temporal variability of suspended sediment transport measured in the Estero Morales, a 27 km2 Andean catchment located in central Chile. The elevations range from 1850 m a.s.l to 3815 m a.s.l., and the basin host glaciers with a current extent of 1.8 km2. Runoff is dominated by snowmelt in late spring, and glacier melt from December to March. Liquid discharge and turbidity have been measured continuously from October 2013 to March 2014. The analysis of hysteretic loops of daily discharge fluctuations of spring and summer shows that patterns are mostly clockwise during snowmelt and early glacier melt period, and counterclockwise during late glacier melting, revealing a reduction of sediment supply conditions overtime. This is confirmed by the analysis of regressions between liquid discharge and turbidity, revealing that a higher discharge is progressively needed to transport the same concentration of suspended sediments as the glacier melting season progress. These evidences indicate that suspended sediment transport in glacierized basins is affected by complex interactions among runoff generation, and sediment availability, and that the analysis of temporal hysteresis can help inferring the activity of sediment sources at the basin scale. The research was supported by the projects FONDECYT 1130378 and IDRC 107081-00.

  1. Hysteretic effects in the first-order irreversible phase transition of the ZGB model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loscar, Ernesto S.; Albano, Ezequiel V.

    2009-04-01

    The first-order irreversible phase transition (FOIPT) of the ZGB model [Ziff, Gulari, Barshad, Phys. Rev. Lett. 56 (1986) 2553] for the catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide is studied numerically by using the constant-coverage (CC) ensemble. The CC method allows us to study hysteretic effects close to coexistence, as well as the location of the coexistence point. Also, evidence that the FOIPT exhibits a condensation/evaporation pseudo-transition (in finite samples), as observed in its reversible counterparts, is presented and discussed.

  2. Spatially Extended Avalanches in a Hysteretic Capillary Condensation System: Superfluid {sup {bold 4}}He in Nuclepore

    SciTech Connect

    Lilly, M.P.; Wootters, A.H.; Hallock, R.B.

    1996-11-01

    Capacitive studies of hysteretic capillary condensation of superfluid {sup 4}He in Nuclepore have shown that the initial draining of the pores occurs over a small range of the chemical potential with avalanches present as groups of pores drain. In the work reported here, the avalanches in this system are shown to be nonlocal events which involve pores distributed at low density across the entire sample. The nonlocal avalanche behavior is shown to be enabled by the presence of a superfluid film connection among the pores. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  3. Negative differential conductance and hysteretic current switching of benzene molecular junction in a transverse electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wen-Huan; Ding, Guo-Hui; Dong, Bing

    2014-11-01

    We study charge transport through single benzene molecular junction (BMJ) directly sandwiched between two platinum electrodes by using a tight-binding model and the non-equilibrium Green's function approach. Pronounced negative differential conductance is observed at finite bias voltage, resulting from charge redistribution in BMJ and a Coulomb blockade effect at the interface of molecule-electrode contacts. In the presence of a transverse electric field, hysteretic switching behavior and large spin-polarization of current are obtained, indicating the potential application of BMJ for acting as a nanoscale current modulator or spintronic molecular device.

  4. Enhancement of harmonics generation in hysteretic elastic media induced by conditioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mechri, C.; Scalerandi, M.; Bentahar, M.

    2017-04-01

    The physical origin of harmonics generation in non classical (hysteretic) elastic media and the mechanisms of energy transfer among harmonics are still not completely understood. Furthermore the well known conditioning effect observed in such materials is known to have a significant influence on the elastic response of consolidated granular media and damaged composites and metals. Here, we show that the elastic non linearity of samples belonging to these two categories increases after having been excited with a relatively low amplitude stress. The observed behaviours could be described by activation features intrinsically present in phenomenological multistate models proposed in the literature.

  5. Hysteretic ac loss in a coated superconductor subjected to oscillating magnetic fields: ferromagnetic effect and frequency dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Guang-Tong

    2014-06-01

    Numerical simulations of the hysteretic ac loss in a coated superconductor with a more realistic version of the architecture were performed via the finite-element technique in the presence of an oscillating magnetic field. The coated superconductor was electromagnetically modeled by resorting to the quasistatic approximation of a vector potential approach in conjunction with nonlinear descriptions of the superconducting layer and the ferromagnetic substrate therein by a power-law model and the Langevin equation, respectively. A diverse effect of the ferromagnetic substrate on the hysteretic ac loss, depending on the strength of the applied magnetic field, was displayed, and its underlying cause was identified. The dependence of the hysteretic ac loss on the applied frequency is found to be related to a critical amplitude of the applied magnetic field, and the eddy-current loss dissipated in the metal coatings becomes prominent as the frequency increases only at high applied magnetic fields.

  6. Calorie restriction hysteretically primes aging Saccharomyces cerevisiae toward more effective oxidative metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Erich B; Cunha, Fernanda M; Basso, Thiago O; Della Bianca, Bianca E; Gombert, Andreas K; Kowaltowski, Alicia J

    2013-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) is an intervention known to extend the lifespan of a wide variety of organisms. In S. cerevisiae, chronological lifespan is prolonged by decreasing glucose availability in the culture media, a model for CR. The mechanism has been proposed to involve an increase in the oxidative (versus fermentative) metabolism of glucose. Here, we measured wild-type and respiratory incompetent (ρ(0)) S. cerevisiae biomass formation, pH, oxygen and glucose consumption, and the evolution of ethanol, glycerol, acetate, pyruvate and succinate levels during the course of 28 days of chronological aging, aiming to identify metabolic changes responsible for the effects of CR. The concomitant and quantitative measurements allowed for calculations of conversion factors between different pairs of substrates and products, maximum specific substrate consumption and product formation rates and maximum specific growth rates. Interestingly, we found that the limitation of glucose availability in CR S. cerevisiae cultures hysteretically increases oxygen consumption rates many hours after the complete exhaustion of glucose from the media. Surprisingly, glucose-to-ethanol conversion and cellular growth supported by glucose were not quantitatively altered by CR. Instead, we found that CR primed the cells for earlier, faster and more efficient metabolism of respiratory substrates, especially ethanol. Since lifespan-enhancing effects of CR are absent in respiratory incompetent ρ(0) cells, we propose that the hysteretic effect of glucose limitation on oxidative metabolism is central toward chronological lifespan extension by CR in this yeast.

  7. Hysteretic Performance Identification for a Frame Structure with MR Damper under Limited Excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bin; Zhou, Ren; He, Jia; Masri, Sami F.

    2010-05-01

    Nonlinearity exists widely in engineering structures and may arise in damaged structures, but the identification theory for nonlinear dynamic systems is far less established than that for linear systems. Most of the currently available vibration-based identification approaches for structural damage detection are based on eigenvalues and mode shapes extraction which are suitable for linear systems. For the purpose of early warning and damage prognosis, it is crucial to develop efficient and reliable identification methods for nonlinear hysteretic performance because the restoring force is the direct indicator of damage initiation and development. In this paper, a general time series data-based approach was employed to identify the nonlinear behavior of a multi-degree-of-freedom frame structure equipped with a MR damper only using the excitation force applied on limited locations and the corresponding structural response measurement. The performance of the proposed methodology was validated for a 4-story frame model structure with and without a MR damper. The system matrices of the linear frame model structure were identified firstly with a least-squares techniques and the equivalent system of the frame structure with MR damper were identified. Then the location and the hysteretic performance of the MR damper were identified and compared with the test measurements. Results show that the proposed data-based approach is efficient for nonlinear behavior identification of engineering structures.

  8. Numerical Simulation of Hysteretic Live Load Effect in a Soil-Steel Bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobótka, Maciej

    2014-03-01

    The paper presents numerical simulation of hysteretic live load effect in a soil-steel bridge. The effect was originally identified experimentally by Machelski [1], [2]. The truck was crossing the bridge one way and the other in the full-scale test performed. At the same time, displacements and stress in the shell were measured. The major conclusion from the research was that the measured quantities formed hysteretic loops. A numerical simulation of that effect is addressed in the present work. The analysis was performed using Flac finite difference code. The methodology of solving the mechanical problems implemented in Flac enables us to solve the problem concerning a sequence of load and non-linear mechanical behaviour of the structure. The numerical model incorporates linear elastic constitutive relations for the soil backfill, for the steel shell and the sheet piles, being a flexible substructure for the shell. Contact zone between the shell and the soil backfill is assumed to reflect elastic-plastic constitutive model. Maximum shear stress in contact zone is limited by the Coulomb condition. The plastic flow rule is described by dilation angle ψ = 0. The obtained results of numerical analysis are in fair agreement with the experimental evidence. The primary finding from the performed simulation is that the slip in the interface can be considered an explanation of the hysteresis occurrence in the charts of displacement and stress in the shell.

  9. A Material Showing Colossal Positive and Negative Volumetric Thermal Expansion with Hysteretic Magnetic Transition.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ji-Xiang; Xu, Yang; Meng, Yin-Shan; Zhao, Liang; Hayami, Shinya; Sato, Osamu; Liu, Tao

    2017-10-09

    It is an ongoing challenge to design and synthesize magnetic materials that undergo colossal thermal expansion and that possess potential applications as microscale or nanoscale actuators with magnetic functionality. A paramagnetic metallocyanate building block was used to construct a cyanide-bridged Fe-Co complex featuring both positive and negative colossal volumetric thermal-expansion behavior. A detailed study revealed that metal-to-metal charge transfer between 180 and 240 K induced a volumetric thermal expansion coefficient of 1498 MK(-1) accompanied with hysteretic spin transition. Rotation of the magnetic building blocks induced change of π⋅⋅⋅π interactions, resulting in a negative volume expansion coefficient of -489 MK(-1) , and another hysteretic magnetic transition between 300 and 350 K. This work presents a strategy for incorporating both colossal positive and negative volumetric thermal expansion with shape and magnetic memory effects in a material. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. First passage times in M2[X ]|G |1 |R queue with hysteretic overload control policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechinkin, Alexander V.; Razumchik, Rostislav R.; Zaryadov, Ivan S.

    2016-06-01

    One of the reported approaches towards the solution of overload problem in networks of SIP servers is the implementation of multi-level hysteretic control of arrivals in SIP servers. Each level, being the parameter of the policy, specifies operation mode of SIP server i.e. it implicitly indicates what SIP server must do with the arriving packets. The choice of parameters' values is not guided by standards and is usually left for the network owner. In general, all operation modes of the considered policy can be grouped into two groups: normal mode (when all arriving packets are accepted) and congested mode (when part or all arriving packets are being dropped). Such grouping may serve as the criteria for choosing parameters' values of the policy: pick those values which minimize SIP server sojourn time in congested mode. In this short note we propose some analytical results which facilitate the solution of stated minimization problem. The considered mathematical model of SIP server is the queueing system M2[X ]|G |1 |R with batch arrivals and bi-level hysteretic control policy, which specifies three operation modes: normal (customers both flows are accepted), overload (only customers from one flow are accepted), discard (customers from both flows are blocked/lost)). The switching between modes can occur only on service completions. Analytical method allowing computation of stationary sojourn times in different operation modes (as well as first passage times between modes) is presented in brief. Numerical example is given.

  11. Creep-free ac hysteretic dynamics in epitaxial ferroelectric BiFeO3 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Yeongjae; Jeon, Byung Chul; Yang, Sang Mo; Hwang, Inrok; Cho, Myung Rae; Sando, Daniel; Lee, Seung Ran; Yoon, Jong-Gul; Noh, Tae Won

    2015-03-01

    Dynamics of domain wall (DW) in ferroelectric (FE) films principally governs their switching properties under applied electric field (E) . At finite temperature (T) , the DW motion and their FE switching characteristics can be understood only by introducing the creep motion. Despite this importance, there have been little studies on creep motion of FE films under ac-driven force. In this work, we investigate ac-driven hysteretic dynamics of FE domains in epitaxial BiFeO3 (BFO) films through polarization-electric field hysteresis loops with varying frequency and other switching characters. All BFO films were grown at the optimized growth condition, by employing different bottom electrodes of La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 (LSMO) and SrRuO3 (SRO); only BFO/SRO shows nearly creep-free hysteretic dynamics. We argue that inhomogeneous internal E plays a significant role in such distinctive FE dynamics of BFO domains, which are affected by surface morphologies of bottom electrodes. Our results highlight that growth-mode-induced interfacial structure between an FE film and a bottom electrode result in engineering domain dynamics of FE switching characteristics. This work was supported by IBS-R009-D1.

  12. Hysteretic Behavior of Proprotein Convertase 1/3 (PC1/3)

    PubMed Central

    Icimoto, Marcelo Y.; Barros, Nilana M.; Ferreira, Juliana C.; Marcondes, Marcelo F.; Andrade, Douglas; Machado, Mauricio F.; Juliano, Maria A.; Júdice, Wagner A.; Juliano, Luiz; Oliveira, Vitor

    2011-01-01

    The proprotein convertases (PCs) are calcium-dependent proteases responsible for processing precursor proteins into their active forms in eukariotes. The PC1/3 is a pivotal enzyme of this family that participates in the proteolytic maturation of prohormones and neuropeptides inside the regulated secretory pathway. In this paper we demonstrate that mouse proprotein convertase 1/3 (mPC1/3) has a lag phase of activation by substrates that can be interpreted as a hysteretic behavior of the enzyme for their hydrolysis. This is an unprecedented observation in peptidases, but is frequent in regulatory enzymes with physiological relevance. The lag phase of mPC1/3 is dependent on substrate, calcium concentration and pH. This hysteretic behavior may have implications in the physiological processes in which PC1/3 participates and could be considered an additional control step in the peptide hormone maturation processes as for instance in the transformation of proinsulin to insulin. PMID:21935423

  13. An alternative measurement tool for the identification of hysteretic responses in biological joints.

    PubMed

    Borkowski, Sean L; Sangiorgio, Sophia N; Ebramzadeh, Edward; Masri, Sami F

    2014-11-01

    In structural engineering, sophisticated multi-dimensional analysis techniques, such as the Restoring Force Method (RFM), have been established for complex, nonlinear hysteretic systems. The purpose of the present study was to apply the RFM to quantify nonlinear spine hysteresis responses under applied moments. First, synthetic hysteretic spine responses (n=50) were generated based on representative results from pure moment flexion-extension loading of a human cadaveric lumbar spine segment. Then, the RFM was applied to each hysteresis response to describe the flexion-extension rotation as a function of applied moment and simulated axial displacement using a set of 16 unique coefficients. Range of motion, neutral zone, elastic zone, and stiffness were also measured. The RFM coefficient corresponding to the 1st-order linear dependence of rotation on applied moment was dominant, and paralleled changes in elastic zone. The remaining RFM coefficients were not captured from the traditional biomechanical analysis. Therefore, the RFM may potentially supplement the traditional analysis to develop a more comprehensive, quantitative description of spine hysteresis. The results suggest the potential for more thorough and specific characterization of spine kinematics, and may lead to future applications of such techniques in characterizing biological structures.

  14. Bifurcation analysis of a non-linear hysteretic oscillator under harmonic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il Chang, Seo

    2004-09-01

    The steady state oscillations of a system incorporating a non-linear hysteretic damper are studied analytically by applying a perturbation technique. The hysteretic damper of the system subject to harmonic resonant force is modelled by combining a Maxwell's model and Kelvin-Voigt's model in series. The non-linearity is imposed by replacing a spring element by a cubic-non-linear spring. The response of the system is described by two coupled second order differential equations including a non-linear constitutive equation. Proper rescaling of the variables and parameters of the equations of motion leads to a set of weakly non-linear equations of motion to which the method of averaging is applied. The bifurcation analysis of the reduced four-dimensional amplitude- and phase-equations of motion shows typical non-linear behaviors including saddle-node and Hopf bifurcations and separate solution branch. By the stability analysis, the saddle-node and Hopf bifurcation sets are obtained in parameter spaces. The software package AUTO is used to numerically study the bifurcation sets and limit cycle solutions bifurcating from the Hopf bifurcation points. It is shown that the limit cycle responses of the averaged system exist over broad parameter ranges.

  15. Hysteretic behavior of special shaped columns composed of steel and reinforced concrete (SRC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zongping; Xu, Jinjun; Xue, Jianyang

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes a series of experimental investigations on seventeen specimens of steel reinforced concrete special shaped (SRCSS) columns under low cyclic reversed loading using parallel crosshead equipment. Nine T-shaped SRC columns, four L-shaped SRC columns and four +-shaped SRC columns were tested to examine the effects of shape steel configuration, loading angle, axial compressive ratio and shear-span ratio on the behavior (strength, stiffness, energy dissipation, ductility, etc.) of SRCSS column specimens. The failure modes and hysteretic performance of all the specimens were obtained in the tests. Test results demonstrate that the shear-span ratio is the main parameter affecting the failure modes of SRCSS columns. The specimens with small shear-span ratio are prone to shear failure, and the primary failure planes in SRCSS columns are parallel to the loading direction. As a result, there is a symmetry between positive and negative loading directions in the hysteretic curves of the SRCSS columns. The majority of displacement ductility coefficients for all the specimens are over 3.0, so that the SRCSS columns demonstrate a better deformation capacity. In addition, the equivalent viscous damping coefficients of all the specimens are greater than 0.2, indicating that the seismic behavior of SRCSS columns is adequate. Finally, the superposition theory was used to calculate the limits of axial compressive ratio for the specimens, and it is found that the test axial compressive ratio is close to or smaller than the calculated axial compressive ratio limit.

  16. Giant relaxation oscillations in a very strongly hysteretic superconductive quantum interference device ring-tank circuit system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, T. D.; Prance, R. J.; Whiteman, R.; Prance, H.; Everitt, M. J.; Bulsara, A. R.; Ralph, J. F.

    2001-09-01

    In this article, we show that the radio frequency (rf) dynamical characteristics of a very strongly hysteretic superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) ring, coupled to a rf tank circuit resonator, display relaxation oscillations. We demonstrate that the overall form of these characteristics, together with the relaxation oscillations, can be modeled accurately by solving the quasiclassical nonlinear equations of motion for the system. We suggest that in these very strongly hysteretic regimes, SQUID ring-resonator systems may find application in logic and memory devices.

  17. INDIRECT INTELLIGENT SLIDING MODE CONTROL OF A SHAPE MEMORY ALLOY ACTUATED FLEXIBLE BEAM USING HYSTERETIC RECURRENT NEURAL NETWORKS

    PubMed Central

    Hannen, Jennifer C.; Crews, John H.; Buckner, Gregory D.

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces an indirect intelligent sliding mode controller (IISMC) for shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators, specifically a flexible beam deflected by a single offset SMA tendon. The controller manipulates applied voltage, which alters SMA tendon temperature to track reference bending angles. A hysteretic recurrent neural network (HRNN) captures the nonlinear, hysteretic relationship between SMA temperature and bending angle. The variable structure control strategy provides robustness to model uncertainties and parameter variations, while effectively compensating for system nonlinearities, achieving superior tracking compared to an optimized PI controller. PMID:22962538

  18. On Response of a Single-Degree-of-Freedom Oscillator with Constant Hysteretic Damping Under Arbitrary Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Goutam

    2016-10-01

    The simple constant hysteretic damping model is known to be non-causal although it is used often in diverse branches of engineering. In this paper the response of a single degree of freedom oscillator having linear hysteretic damping under arbitrary force excitation has been studied after deriving the impulse response function of the system. Some shortcomings of the results available in literature have been pointed out. It has been shown that the damping model can be practically used for calculating the response of a physical system when the damping is small and the force has small duration.

  19. Repetitive Control for Hysteretic Systems: Theory and Application in Piezo-Based Nanopositioners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Yingfeng

    This dissertation studies the design and analysis of repetitive controllers for hysteretic systems. An example hysteretic system is a piezoelectric actuator (piezoactuator), the workhorse of actuators used for positioning and manipulating objects and tools at the micro and nano scale. For example, in scanning probe microscopes (SPMs) a piezoactuator is used to raster (back and forth in a repetitive fashion) a probe tool with sub-nanometer precision relative to a sample surface for imaging, manipulating, and fabricating organic or inorganic nano-scale features. Likewise, piezoactuators are used to position optics in space telescopes and tools in micro-machining systems. Despite their importance, piezoactuators exhibit hysteresis effect, a nonlinear behavior between the applied input voltage and the resulting output displacement of the piezoactuator. If left uncompensated for, hysteresis (and dynamic effects) cause positioning error that significantly limits the performance of piezo-based positioning systems. Repetitive control, a feedback-based approach which exploits the process of repetition, is commonly applied to track periodic reference trajectories and/or to reject periodic disturbances. The major challenges in the design of RC are closed-loop stability, robustness, and minimizing the steady-state tracking error. For hysteretic systems such as piezo-based nanopositioners, the nonlinearity can drastically limit the performance of RC designed around a linear dynamics model. In this work, the effect of hysteresis on the closed-loop stability of RC is analyzed and the allowable size of the hysteresis nonlinearity for a stable RC is quantified. In the stability analysis, the bounded-input bounded-output (BIBO) stability of the repetitive controlled hysteretic system in the L2 -norm sense is shown. Combining this result with the Small-Gain Theorem, an acceptable size of the hysteresis nonlinearity is determined that guarantees closed-loop stability. Therefore, one

  20. Modeling the nonlinear hysteretic response in DAE experiments of Berea sandstone: A case-study

    SciTech Connect

    Pecorari, Claudio

    2015-03-31

    Dynamic acousto-elasticity (DAE) allows probing the instantaneous state of a material while the latter slowly and periodically is changed by an external, dynamic source. In DAE investigations of geo-materials, hysteresis of the material's modulus defect displays intriguing features which have not yet been interpreted in terms of any specific mechanism occurring at atomic or mesoscale. Here, experimental results on dry Berea sandstone, which is the rock type best investigated by means of a DAE technique, are analyzed in terms of three rheological models providing simplified representations of mechanisms involving dislocations interacting with point defects which are distributed along the dislocations' core or glide planes, and microcracks with finite stiffness in compression. Constitutive relations linking macroscopic strain and stress are derived. From the latter, the modulus defect associated to each mechanism is recovered. These models are employed to construct a composite one which is capable of reproducing several of the main features observed in the experimental data. The limitations of the present approach and, possibly, of the current implementation of DAE are discussed.

  1. Double-trap model for hysteretic current-voltage characteristics of a polystyrene/ZnO nanorods stacked layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, You-Lin; Lin, Jing-Jenn; Lin, Shih-Hung; Sung, Yi-Hsing

    2017-11-01

    Hysteretic current-voltage (I-V) characteristics are quite common in metal-insulator-metal (MIM) devices used for resistive switching random access memory (RRAM). Two types of hysteretic I-V curves are usually observed, figure eight and counter figure eight (counter-clockwise and clockwise in the positive voltage sweep direction, respectively). In this work, a clockwise hysteretic I-V curve was found for an MIM device with polystyrene (PS)/ZnO nanorods stack as an insulator layer. Three distinct regions I ∼ V, I ∼ V2, and I ∼ V0.6 are observed in the double logarithmic plot of the I-V curves, which cannot be explained completely with the conventional trap-controlled space-charge-limited-current (SCLC) model. A model based on the energy band with two separate traps plus local energy variation and trap-controlled SCLC has been developed, which can successfully describe the behavior of the clockwise hysteretic I-V characteristics obtained in this work.

  2. Hysteretic Four-Step Spin Crossover within a Three-Dimensional Porous Hofmann-like Material

    SciTech Connect

    Clements, John E.; Price, Jason R.; Neville, Suzanne M.; Kepert, Cameron J.

    2016-10-21

    Materials that display multiple stepped spin crossover (SCO) transitions with accompanying hysteresis present the opportunity for ternary, quaternary, and quinary electronic switching and data storage but are rare in existence. Herein, we present the first report of a four-step hysteretic SCO framework. Single-crystal structure analysis of a porous 3D Hofmann-like material showed long-range ordering of spin states: HS, HS0.67LS0.33, HS0.5LS0.5, HS0.33LS0.67, and LS. These detailed structural studies provide insight into how multistep SCO materials can be rationally designed through control of host–host and host–guest interactions.

  3. Nonlinear coda wave analysis of hysteretic elastic behavior in strongly scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouarabi, M. Ait; Boubenider, F.; Gliozzi, A. S.; Scalerandi, M.

    2016-10-01

    Strongly scattering elastic media, such as consolidated granular materials, respond to ultrasonic pulse excitations with a long response signal with peculiar properties. The portion of the signal at late times, termed coda, is due to multiple scattering. It contains information about the elastic properties of the material, and it has been proven to be very sensitive to small variations in the modulus. Here we propose a technique based on a nonlinear analysis of the coda of a signal, which might be applied to quantify the nonlinear elastic response in consolidated granular media exhibiting a hysteretic elastic behavior. The method proposed allows for an intrinsic definition of the reference signal which is normally needed for applying coda-based methods.

  4. High fidelity point-spread function retrieval in the presence of electrostatic, hysteretic pixel response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Andrew; Guyonnet, Augustin; Lage, Craig; Antilogus, Pierre; Astier, Pierre; Doherty, Peter; Gilmore, Kirk; Kotov, Ivan; Lupton, Robert; Nomerotski, Andrei; O'Connor, Paul; Stubbs, Christopher; Tyson, Anthony; Walter, Christopher

    2016-08-01

    We employ electrostatic conversion drift calculations to match CCD pixel signal covariances observed in at field exposures acquired using candidate sensor devices for the LSST Camera.1, 2 We thus constrain pixel geometry distortions present at the end of integration, based on signal images recorded. We use available data from several operational voltage parameter settings to validate our understanding. Our primary goal is to optimize flux point spread function (FPSF) estimation quantitatively, and thereby minimize sensor-induced errors which may limit performance in precision astronomy applications. We consider alternative compensation scenarios that will take maximum advantage of our understanding of this underlying mechanism in data processing pipelines currently under development. To quantitatively capture the pixel response in high-contrast/high dynamic range operational extrema, we propose herein some straightforward laboratory tests that involve altering the time order of source illumination on sensors, within individual test exposures. Hence the word hysteretic in the title of this paper.

  5. Hysteretic Flux Response and Nondegenerate Gain of Flux-Driven Josephson Parametric Amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorzalek, Stefan; Fedorov, Kirill G.; Zhong, Ling; Goetz, Jan; Wulschner, Friedrich; Fischer, Michael; Eder, Peter; Xie, Edwar; Inomata, Kunihiro; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Nakamura, Yasunobu; Marx, Achim; Deppe, Frank; Gross, Rudolf

    2017-08-01

    Josephson parametric amplifiers (JPAs) have become key devices in quantum science and technology with superconducting circuits. In particular, they can be utilized as quantum-limited amplifiers or as a source of squeezed microwave fields. Here, we report on the detailed measurements of five flux-driven JPAs exhibiting a hysteretic dependence of the resonant frequency on the applied magnetic flux. We model the measured characteristics by numerical simulations based on the two-dimensional potential landscape of the dc superconducting quantum interference devices, which provide the JPA nonlinearity for a nonzero screening parameter βL>0 and demonstrate excellent agreement between the numerical results and the experimental data. Furthermore, we study the nondegenerate response of different JPAs and accurately describe the experimental results with our theory.

  6. Fast transient charging at the graphene/SiO2 interface causing hysteretic device characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young Gon; Kang, Chang Goo; Jung, Uk Jin; Kim, Jin Ju; Hwang, Hyeon Jun; Chung, Hyun-Jong; Seo, Sunae; Choi, Rino; Lee, Byoung Hun

    2011-05-01

    Device instabilities of graphene metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors such as hysteresis and Dirac point shifts have been attributed to charge trapping in the underlying substrate, especially in SiO2. In this letter, trapping time constants around 87 μs and 1.76 ms were identified using a short pulse current-voltage method. The values of two trapping time constants with reversible trapping behavior indicate that the hysteretic behaviors of graphene field effect transistors are due to neither charge trapping in the bulk SiO2 or tunneling into other interfacial materials. Also, it is concluded that the dc measurement method significantly underestimated the performance of graphene devices.

  7. Ground state search, hysteretic behaviour, and reversal mechanism of skyrmionic textures in confined helimagnetic nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Beg, Marijan; Carey, Rebecca; Wang, Weiwei; Cortés-Ortuño, David; Vousden, Mark; Bisotti, Marc-Antonio; Albert, Maximilian; Chernyshenko, Dmitri; Hovorka, Ondrej; Stamps, Robert L.; Fangohr, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic skyrmions have the potential to provide solutions for low-power, high-density data storage and processing. One of the major challenges in developing skyrmion-based devices is the skyrmions’ magnetic stability in confined helimagnetic nanostructures. Through a systematic study of equilibrium states, using a full three-dimensional micromagnetic model including demagnetisation effects, we demonstrate that skyrmionic textures are the lowest energy states in helimagnetic thin film nanostructures at zero external magnetic field and in absence of magnetocrystalline anisotropy. We also report the regions of metastability for non-ground state equilibrium configurations. We show that bistable skyrmionic textures undergo hysteretic behaviour between two energetically equivalent skyrmionic states with different core orientation, even in absence of both magnetocrystalline and demagnetisation-based shape anisotropies, suggesting the existence of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya-based shape anisotropy. Finally, we show that the skyrmionic texture core reversal dynamics is facilitated by the Bloch point occurrence and propagation. PMID:26601904

  8. The sulphatase of ox liver. XXV. Sulphatase A as a hysteretic enzyme.

    PubMed

    Roy, A B

    1985-01-21

    The kinetic behaviour of the system native--substrate-modified sulphatase A (arylsulphate sulphohydrolase, EC 3.1.6.1) has been investigated and it has been shown that the progress curve of the complete reaction, including both the inactivation and reactivation stages, can be treated as that of a simple hysteretic system in which the substrate-modified enzyme is activated by a product of the reaction. It has been concluded that the early suggestions that the modification of sulphatase A was accompanied by the exposure of a second ligand-binding site are incorrect. It has been shown that, in the absence of sulphate, the rate of reversion of substrate-modified to native sulphatase A is increased by 4-nitrocatechol but not by the same concentration of 2-nitrophenol. A detailed reaction sequence is proposed. This explains the kinetic behaviour of sulphatase A with nitrocatechol sulphate or 2-nitrophenyl sulphate as substrate and in the presence or absence of sulphate.

  9. Hysteretic Spin Crossover in Two-Dimensional (2D) Hofmann-Type Coordination Polymers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Wang, Lu; Su, Yu-Jun; Chen, Yan-Cong; Tucek, Jiri; Zboril, Radek; Ni, Zhao-Ping; Tong, Ming-Liang

    2015-09-08

    Three new two-dimensional (2D) Hofmann-type coordination polymers with general formula [Fe(3-NH2py)2M(CN)4] (3-NH2py = 3-aminopyridine, M = Ni (1), Pd (2), Pt (3)) have been synthesized. Magnetic susceptibility measurements show that they exhibited cooperative spin crossover (SCO) with remarkable hysteretic behaviors. Their hysteresis widths are 25, 37, and 30 K for 1-3, respectively. The single-crystal structure of 1 suggest that the pseudo-octahedral Fe sites are equatorially bridged by [M(CN)4](2-) to form 2D grids and axially coordinated by 3-NH2py ligands. The intermolecular interactions between layers (the offset face-to-face π···π interactions, hydrogen bonds, and weak N(amino)···Ni(II) contacts) together with the covalent bonds bridged by [M(CN)4](2-) units are responsible to the significant cooperativity.

  10. Propagation of flexural waves in inhomogeneous plates exhibiting hysteretic nonlinearity: Nonlinear acoustic black holes.

    PubMed

    Gusev, Vitalyi E; Ni, Chenyin; Lomonosov, Alexey; Shen, Zhonghua

    2015-08-01

    Theory accounting for the influence of hysteretic nonlinearity of micro-inhomogeneous material on flexural wave in the plates of continuously varying thickness is developed. For the wedges with thickness increasing as a power law of distance from its edge strong modifications of the wave dynamics with propagation distance are predicted. It is found that nonlinear absorption progressively disappearing with diminishing wave amplitude leads to complete attenuation of acoustic waves in most of the wedges exhibiting black hole phenomenon. It is also demonstrated that black holes exist beyond the geometrical acoustic approximation. Applications include nondestructive evaluation of micro-inhomogeneous materials and vibrations damping. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Synthesis of nanorod-FeP@C composites with hysteretic lithiation in lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun; Wang, Chunde; Liang, Jianwen; Zuo, Jian; Yang, Qing

    2015-06-14

    Nanorod-FeP@C composites are synthesized via a one-pot solution reaction of ferrocene (Fe(C5H5)2) with excess triphenylphosphine (PPh3) in sealed vacuum tubes at 390 °C, in which PPh3 is used as both the phosphorus source and solvent in the reaction. The structure and lithium storage performance of the as-prepared nanorod-FeP@C composites are intensively characterized, and it is interesting that the composites exhibit an increased capacity during cycling serving as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). Meanwhile, mechanism investigations reveal that the capacity increase of the composites results from a hysteretic lithiation of the nanostructured FeP phase due to the coating of the carbon shell in the composites. Meanwhile, cyclic stability investigation shows that the composites have a very good cyclic stability that shows potential for the composites with a long lifespan as a promising kind of anode material.

  12. On the identification of hysteretic systems. Part I: Fitness landscapes and evolutionary identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worden, K.; Manson, G.

    2012-05-01

    Fairly recent work has shown that evolutionary optimisation schemes (genetic algorithms and differential evolution) offer an effective means of identifying nonlinear dynamical systems, even when the parameter estimation problem is complicated by nonlinearity in the parameters and/or the presence of unmeasured states. In particular, an evolutionary approach to the parameter estimation problem for hysteretic systems has shown promise. The current paper considers aspects of the parameter estimation problem for systems of Bouc-Wen type. In the first place, an investigation into the nature of the objective or cost function for the optimisation is made with the aim of better understanding the performance of the identification scheme. The first part of the paper also discusses the issue of setting initial estimates or ranges for the system parameters. The data on which the analysis is based are generated by computer simulation; the specific evolutionary algorithm considered is Differential Evolution (DE). Although the DE algorithm has proved to be very effective in the identification context, a minor disadvantage manifests itself in the need to set algorithm hyperparameters for the optimisation. This observation leads to the second main objective of the current paper which is to present a recently developed variant of the DE algorithm - the Self-Adaptive Differential Evolution (SADE) algorithm - which learns and adapts a subset of its own hyperparameters throughout the optimisation process. The use of the algorithm for the hysteretic system identification problem is illustrated using the simulated data and it is shown that the algorithm can provide several orders-of-magnitude improvement on the minimisation of the problem objective function.

  13. Hysteretic configurations in a rotating U-tube with capped ends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidman, P. D.

    2015-06-01

    The effect of air trapped above the liquid columns in a U-tube rotating about an axis offset from the axis of symmetry is investigated. This extends the work of Denardo, Barber, Folley and Wright (Am. J. Phys., 57, 1989) who investigated the same problem for an open-ended U-tube for which no air is trapped. They found that, owing to a combination of gravitational, centrifugal and constraint forces on the liquid, the position of the liquid-air interfaces can be hysteretic as the angular velocity is varied. The existence and strength of the hysteresis loop depends on the dimensionless offset parameter δ and the dimensionless initial liquid height γ . Associated with the hysteresis is an instability in which the liquid jumps from one equilibrium state to another, herein defined as configuration I and configuration II. With the ends of the U-tube capped, the stable liquid configurations depend on two additional parameters defined for a stationary U-tube: α , the initial ratio of trapped air to liquid volume in each U-tube column and β , the normalized pressure of air trapped above the liquid in each column. In this study β is taken at the constant value corresponding to atmospheric pressure and, based on a previous study, we adopt Boyle’s law for determining the expansion/compression of air in a rotating U-tube. A parametric study varying α shows that a critical value occurs marking the threshold between hysteretic and nonhysteretic states. A parametric study of the effect of δ is also presented.

  14. Hysteretic sediment fluxes in rainfall-driven soil erosion: Particle size effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheraghi, Mohsen; Jomaa, Seifeddine; Sander, Graham C.; Barry, D. A.

    2016-11-01

    A detailed laboratory study was conducted to examine the effects of particle size on hysteretic sediment transport under time-varying rainfall. A rainfall pattern composed of seven sequential stepwise varying rainfall intensities (30, 37.5, 45, 60, 45, 37.5, and 30 mm h-1), each of 20 min duration, was applied to a 5 m × 2 m soil erosion flume. The soil in the flume was initially dried, ploughed to a depth of 20 cm and had a mechanically smoothed surface. Flow rates and sediment concentration data for seven particle size classes (<2, 2-20, 20-50, 50-100, 100-315, 315-1000, and >1000 µm) were measured in the flume effluent. Clockwise hysteresis loops in the sediment concentration versus discharge curves were measured for the total eroded soil and the finer particle sizes (<2, 2-20, and 20-50 µm). However, for particle sizes greater than 50 µm, hysteresis effects decreased and suspended concentrations tended to vary linearly with discharge. The Hairsine and Rose (HR) soil erosion model agreed well with the experimental data for the total eroded soil and for the finer particle size classes (up to 50 µm). For the larger particle size classes, the model provided reasonable qualitative agreement with the measurements although the fit was poor for the largest size class (>1000 µm). Overall, it is found that hysteresis varies amongst particle sizes and that the predictions of the HR model are consistent with hysteretic behavior of different sediment size classes.

  15. Self-action of propagating and standing Lamb waves in the plates exhibiting hysteretic nonlinearity: Nonlinear zero-group velocity modes.

    PubMed

    Gusev, Vitalyi E; Lomonosov, Alexey M; Ni, Chenyin; Shen, Zhonghua

    2017-09-01

    An analytical theory accounting for the influence of hysteretic nonlinearity of micro-inhomogeneous plate material on the Lamb waves near the S1 zero group velocity point is developed. The theory predicts that the main effect of the hysteretic quadratic nonlinearity consists in the modification of the frequency and the induced absorption of the Lamb modes. The effects of the nonlinear self-action in the propagating and standing Lamb waves are expected to be, respectively, nearly twice and three times stronger than those in the plane propagating acoustic waves. The theory is restricted to the simplest hysteretic nonlinearity, which is influencing only one of the Lamé moduli of the materials. However, possible extensions of the theory to the cases of more general hysteretic nonlinearities are discussed as well as the perspectives of its experimental testing. Applications include nondestructive evaluation of micro-inhomogeneous and cracked plates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of alpha-ketoglutarate and its structural analogues on hysteretic properties of alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Bunik, V I; Romash, O G; Gomazkova, V S

    1991-01-28

    The burst of product accumulation during the KGD reaction was investigated. It has been shown not to be the obligatory feature of catalysis, but appears when increasing the enzyme saturation by KG. Structural analogues of KG and the SH-group modification suppress the initial burst without preventing catalysis. The results obtained are in favour of the existence of the regulatory site for binding KG and its structural analogues essential for hysteretic properties of KGD.

  17. Attenuation due to hysteretic damage in the free vibration of a beam

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, Daniel A.; Pecorari, Claudio

    2014-02-18

    We present an asymptotic analysis of nonlinear free vibration of a beam with a damage plane represented by nonlinear hysteretic bending and shear springs. The perturbation parameter is the product of the ratio of the nonlinear to linear parts of the stiffness times the amplitude of the free vibration. The loss of energy and ensuing attenuation due to hysteresis is accounted for by reducing the amplitude of vibration after each cycle by an amount such that the loss in total system energy equals the work done to traverse the hysteresis loop. A new Fourier representation for each cycle of the hysteresis and the deflection solution is used for this purpose and leads to higher harmonics, an evolving complex stiffness and corrected natural frequency that are linked to the attenuation. The frequency increases to its linear value from an initially reduced value. The damage parameter, frequency shift and fundamental amplitudes are presented as functions of the initial damage parameter and time (cycles of vibration). The amplitudes of several of the higher harmonics are also presented as functions of time. Many of the results exhibit sufficient sensitivity with respect to the damage parameter that they should be able to be used to characterize the damage.

  18. Impact of Capacitive Effect and Ion Migration on the Hysteretic Behavior of Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Yang, Mengjin; Zheng, Xiaojia; Wu, Congcong; Li, Wenle; Yan, Yongke; Bisquert, Juan; Garcia-Belmonte, Germà; Zhu, Kai; Priya, Shashank

    2015-12-03

    In the past five years, perovskite solar cells (PSCs) based on organometal halide perovskite have exhibited extraordinary photovoltaic (PV) performance. However, the PV measurements of PSCs have been widely recognized to depend on voltage scanning condition (hysteretic current density-voltage [J-V] behavior), as well as on voltage treatment history. In this study, we find that varied PSC responses are attributable to two causes. First, capacitive effect associated with electrode polarization provides a slow transient non-steady-state photocurrent that modifies the J-V response. Second, modification of interfacial barriers induced by ion migration can modulate charge-collection efficiency so that it causes a pseudo-steady-state photocurrent, which changes according to previous voltage conditioning. Both phenomena are strongly influenced by ions accumulating at outer interfaces, but their electrical and PV effects are different. The time scale for decay of capacitive current is on the order of seconds, whereas the slow redistribution of mobile ions requires several minutes.

  19. Effect of local buckling on hysteretic behavior of beam-column with circular cross-section

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, Yukio; Murakawa, Hidekazu; Shaker, R.E.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper, the hysteretic behavior of beam-column member having circular cross-section under simultaneously acting constant compressive axial load and cyclic lateral load is investigated. Elasto-plastic large deformation analysis by means of Finite Element Method (FEM) is utilized in this research. An emphasis is placed on the effect of the axial compressive load and geometrical parameters on the deterioration of the ultimate strength, the stiffness and the energy-dissipation capacity. Also, effect of the tangent modulus in the strain hardening region and different hardening rules are discussed. From this study, it is found that, in the absence of the axial compressive load, no deterioration in the strength, the stiffness and the absorbed energy are observed in all investigated members having different geometries. Meanwhile, in the case of the presence of axial load, local buckling (locally accumulated deflection under cyclic loading) may be induced depending on the geometrical parameters, namely, diameter-to-thickness ratio D/t and slenderness parameter {lambda} as well as the value of axial load ratio. Such local buckling reduces the ultimate strength and the stiffness of the member. The strength and the stiffness of the member are improved with smaller values of D/t and {lambda} and larger tangent modulus in the strain hardening region of the material.

  20. Vibration of Timoshenko beam on hysteretically damped elastic foundation subjected to moving load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, WeiLi; Xia, Yong; Weng, Shun

    2015-08-01

    The vibration of beams on foundations under moving loads has many applications in several fields, such as pavements in highways or rails in railways. However, most of the current studies only consider the energy dissipation mechanism of the foundation through viscous behavior; this assumption is unrealistic for soils. The shear rigidity and radius of gyration of the beam are also usually excluded. Therefore, this study investigates the vibration of an infinite Timoshenko beam resting on a hysteretically damped elastic foundation under a moving load with constant or harmonic amplitude. The governing differential equations of motion are formulated on the basis of the Hamilton principle and Timoshenko beam theory, and are then transformed into two algebraic equations through a double Fourier transform with respect to moving space and time. Beam deflection is obtained by inverse fast Fourier transform. The solution is verified through comparison with the closed-form solution of an Euler-Bernoulli beam on a Winkler foundation. Numerical examples are used to investigate: (a) the effect of the spatial distribution of the load, and (b) the effects of the beam properties on the deflected shape, maximum displacement, critical frequency, and critical velocity. These findings can serve as references for the performance and safety assessment of railway and highway structures.

  1. Correction of hysteretic respiratory motion in SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging: Simulation and patient studies.

    PubMed

    Dasari, Paul K R; Könik, Arda; Pretorius, P Hendrik; Johnson, Karen L; Segars, William P; Shazeeb, Mohammed S; King, Michael A

    2017-02-01

    Amplitude-based respiratory gating is known to capture the extent of respiratory motion (RM) accurately but results in residual motion in the presence of respiratory hysteresis. In our previous study, we proposed and developed a novel approach to account for respiratory hysteresis by applying the Bouc-Wen (BW) model of hysteresis to external surrogate signals of anterior/posterior motion of the abdomen and chest with respiration. In this work, using simulated and clinical SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) studies, we investigate the effects of respiratory hysteresis and evaluate the benefit of correcting it using the proposed BW model in comparison with the abdomen signal typically employed clinically. The MRI navigator data acquired in free-breathing human volunteers were used in the specially modified 4D NCAT phantoms to allow simulating three types of respiratory patterns: monotonic, mild hysteresis, and strong hysteresis with normal myocardial uptake, and perfusion defects in the anterior, lateral, inferior, and septal locations of the mid-ventricular wall. Clinical scans were performed using a Tc-99m sestamibi MPI protocol while recording respiratory signals from thoracic and abdomen regions using a visual tracking system (VTS). The performance of the correction using the respiratory signals was assessed through polar map analysis in phantom and 10 clinical studies selected on the basis of having substantial RM. In phantom studies, simulations illustrating normal myocardial uptake showed significant differences (P < 0.001) in the uniformity of the polar maps between the RM uncorrected and corrected. No significant differences were seen in the polar map uniformity across the RM corrections. Studies simulating perfusion defects showed significantly decreased errors (P < 0.001) in defect severity and extent for the RM corrected compared to the uncorrected. Only for the strong hysteretic pattern, there was a significant difference (P < 0.001) among

  2. Interactions Between Mineral Surfaces, Substrates, Enzymes, and Microbes Result in Hysteretic Temperature Sensitivities and Microbial Carbon Use Efficiencies and Weaker Predicted Carbon-Climate Feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, W. J.; Tang, J.

    2014-12-01

    We hypothesize that the large observed variability in decomposition temperature sensitivity and carbon use efficiency arises from interactions between temperature, microbial biogeochemistry, and mineral surface sorptive reactions. To test this hypothesis, we developed a numerical model that integrates the Dynamic Energy Budget concept for microbial physiology, microbial trait-based community structure and competition, process-specific thermodynamically ­­based temperature sensitivity, a non-linear mineral sorption isotherm, and enzyme dynamics. We show, because mineral surfaces interact with substrates, enzymes, and microbes, both temperature sensitivity and microbial carbon use efficiency are hysteretic and highly variable. Further, by mimicking the traditional approach to interpreting soil incubation observations, we demonstrate that the conventional labile and recalcitrant substrate characterization for temperature sensitivity is flawed. In a 4 K temperature perturbation experiment, our fully dynamic model predicted more variable but weaker carbon-climate feedbacks than did the static temperature sensitivity and carbon use efficiency model when forced with yearly, daily, and hourly variable temperatures. These results imply that current earth system models likely over-estimate the response of soil carbon stocks to global warming.

  3. Ceramic problems/challenges in high temperature oxide superconductors - Hysteretic force measurements as a new analysis tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, P. E. D.; Ratto, J. J.; Housley, R. M.; Porter, J. R.; Marshall, D. B.

    1989-01-01

    A technique is presented for analyzing high-temperature oxide superconductors using hysteretic magnetic force/distance measurements. Emphasis is placed on developing low weight, highly robust superconducting materials for space applications. Bi-Ca-Sr-Cu superconductors are prepared and characterized by standard techniques. It is found that standard techniques such as XRD, SEM, and TEM are insufficient to completely characterize superconductors. The magnetic properties of the superconductors are studied with the new technique, based on measuring the force between a magnet and the superconductor as a function of their separation.

  4. Ceramic problems/challenges in high temperature oxide superconductors - Hysteretic force measurements as a new analysis tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, P. E. D.; Ratto, J. J.; Housley, R. M.; Porter, J. R.; Marshall, D. B.

    1989-01-01

    A technique is presented for analyzing high-temperature oxide superconductors using hysteretic magnetic force/distance measurements. Emphasis is placed on developing low weight, highly robust superconducting materials for space applications. Bi-Ca-Sr-Cu superconductors are prepared and characterized by standard techniques. It is found that standard techniques such as XRD, SEM, and TEM are insufficient to completely characterize superconductors. The magnetic properties of the superconductors are studied with the new technique, based on measuring the force between a magnet and the superconductor as a function of their separation.

  5. Hyperfine-induced hysteretic funnel structure in spin blockaded tunneling current of coupled vertical quantum dots at low magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Leary, A.; Wicha, A.; Harack, B.; Coish, W. A.; Hilke, M.; Yu, G.; Gupta, J. A.; Payette, C.; Austing, D. G.

    2013-12-04

    We outline the properties of the hyperfine-induced funnel structure observed in the two-electron spin blockade region of a weakly coupled vertical double quantum dot device. Hysteretic steps in the leakage current occur due to dynamic nuclear polarization when either the bias voltage or the magnetic field is swept up and down. When the bias voltage is swept, an intriguing ∼3 mT wide cusp near 0 T appears in the down-sweep position, and when the magnetic field is swept, the current at 0 T can be switched from 'low' to 'high' as the bias is increased.

  6. Efficiency studies of hysteretic and PWM boost converters: Controller- and battery-type effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Juan Herminio, III

    A continuous conduction boost converter is studied as a function of four battery types and two controllers. The battery types are alkaline, NiCd, NiMH, and sealed lead-acid. The controllers implement voltage-mode pulse-width modulation (PWM) and hysteretic current-mode (HCM) control schemes, respectively. The boost converter is designed to produce an output of 3W at 12V DC with battery voltages ranging from 6V to 3V. The study focuses on converter efficiency as affected by battery type, controller type, and the combined effects of battery type and controller type. Computer simulations predict and experimental results verify that differences in converter efficiency between the different battery types are due to differences in capacity, current-handling capabilities, and sustained voltage levels. The HCM controller uses a control scheme, in which the switching frequency decreases as battery voltage decreases, resulting in lower MOSFET switching losses. This effect partially compensates for the increased conduction losses in converter components as more current is drawn from batteries at lower input voltages. The PWM controller has a fixed switching frequency (50 kHz) and both its switching and conduction losses increase with decreasing input voltage. Efficiency levels of 88% are achieved for higher battery voltages, decreasing to 80% for lower voltages. A difference of up to 2% higher efficiency is observed in the HCM over the PWM. The major power losses are due to the combination of the inductor's ESR and the resistance of the wire used to increase the Hall-effect current sensor turns-ratio (increasing from 400mW to 1.2W). Simulations predict that in the absence of this resistance, efficiency levels of 95% can be achieved. Conduction losses through the rectifier are in the range of 40mW to 50mW for both controllers. MOSFET switching losses amount to 50mW for both controllers at high input voltages, increasing to 100mW for the PWM, but only to 65mW for the HCM at

  7. Tracing the characteristics of a flux qubit with a hysteretic dc-superconducting quantum interference device comparator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, M. G.; Chiarello, F.; Leoni, R.; Simeone, D.; Torrioli, G.; Cosmelli, C.; Buttiglione, R.; Poletto, S.; Carelli, P.

    2003-12-01

    A hysteretic dc-superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) is used to trace the flux characteristic of a tunable rf-SQUID, the basic element for the realization of superconducting flux qubits. This allows important simplifications of circuitry and electronics in developing devices for quantum computing, by eliminating the necessity of more complex magnetometers. A hysteretic dc-SQUID is usually operated as a comparator, distinguishing only which one of two adjacent flux states is occupied by the rf-SQUID. The necessary sensitivity, moreover, is usually reached only at temperatures in the mK range. However, by exploiting the statistical properties of the current-voltage curve in the region where the switching from the zero-voltage state occurs, it is possible to obtain an accurate tracing of the input flux, even at a relatively high temperature (a few Kelvin). In our case, the input signal is given by the internal flux of a tunable rf-SQUID, the building block of a flux qubit.

  8. Gaussian closure technique applied to the hysteretic Bouc model with non-zero mean white noise excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waubke, Holger; Kasess, Christian H.

    2016-11-01

    Devices that emit structure-borne sound are commonly decoupled by elastic components to shield the environment from acoustical noise and vibrations. The elastic elements often have a hysteretic behavior that is typically neglected. In order to take hysteretic behavior into account, Bouc developed a differential equation for such materials, especially joints made of rubber or equipped with dampers. In this work, the Bouc model is solved by means of the Gaussian closure technique based on the Kolmogorov equation. Kolmogorov developed a method to derive probability density functions for arbitrary explicit first-order vector differential equations under white noise excitation using a partial differential equation of a multivariate conditional probability distribution. Up to now no analytical solution of the Kolmogorov equation in conjunction with the Bouc model exists. Therefore a wide range of approximate solutions, especially the statistical linearization, were developed. Using the Gaussian closure technique that is an approximation to the Kolmogorov equation assuming a multivariate Gaussian distribution an analytic solution is derived in this paper for the Bouc model. For the stationary case the two methods yield equivalent results, however, in contrast to statistical linearization the presented solution allows to calculate the transient behavior explicitly. Further, stationary case leads to an implicit set of equations that can be solved iteratively with a small number of iterations and without instabilities for specific parameter sets.

  9. The numerical simulation of hysteretic performance of K-type steel tube node in large span transmission tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chuncheng; Li, Guoqiang; Fan, Xiaoling

    2017-04-01

    This paper used ABAQUS software to make numerical experimental studies on the seismic performance of the common K-type node in large span steel tower. It analyzed different parameters of the main and branch pipe diameter, axial pressure of the main pipe, thickness of the connection plate and gap dimension. At last, it obtained performance of hysteresis curves, skeleton curves and energy dissipation capacity, and received the influence of these parameters on seismic performance of K-type node. Research shows that the steel pipe node itself has a good seismic performance. When the axial pressure is increased, the seismic performance is significantly decreasing. The node prone to fail because of stress concentration. Increasing the main and branch pipe diameter and node plate thickness can significantly improve the seismic performance of circular tube node. The effect of branch pipe gap size on node hysteretic performance improvement is not obvious.

  10. On the continuum-scale simulation of gravity-driven fingers with hysteretic Richards equation: Trucation error induced numerical artifacts

    SciTech Connect

    ELIASSI,MEHDI; GLASS JR.,ROBERT J.

    2000-03-08

    The authors consider the ability of the numerical solution of Richards equation to model gravity-driven fingers. Although gravity-driven fingers can be easily simulated using a partial downwind averaging method, they find the fingers are purely artificial, generated by the combined effects of truncation error induced oscillations and capillary hysteresis. Since Richards equation can only yield a monotonic solution for standard constitutive relations and constant flux boundary conditions, it is not the valid governing equation to model gravity-driven fingers, and therefore is also suspect for unsaturated flow in initially dry, highly nonlinear, and hysteretic media where these fingers occur. However, analysis of truncation error at the wetting front for the partial downwind method suggests the required mathematical behavior of a more comprehensive and physically based modeling approach for this region of parameter space.

  11. Transport gap and hysteretic behavior of the Ising quantum Hall ferromagnets in |N |>0 Landau levels of bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wenchen; Côté, R.

    2014-12-01

    The chiral two-dimensional electron gas in Landau levels |N |>0 of a Bernal-stacked graphene bilayer has a valley-pseudospin Ising quantum Hall ferromagnetic behavior at odd filling factors νN=1 ,3 of these fourfold degenerate states. At zero interlayer electrical bias, the ground state at these fillings is spin polarized and electrons occupy one valley or the other while a finite electrical bias produces a series of valley pseudospin-flip transitions. In this work, we discuss the hysteretic behavior of the Ising quantum Hall ferromagnets. We compute the transport gap due to different excitations: bulk electron-hole pairs, electron-hole pairs confined to the coherent region of a valley-pseudospin domain wall, and spin or valley-pseudospin skyrmion-antiskyrmion pairs. We determine which of these excitations has the lowest energy at a given value of the Zeeman coupling, bias, and magnetic field.

  12. Hysteretic properties of Nd2Fe14B-based permanent magnets: First principles and micromagnetic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysocki, Aleksander; Kukusta, Denis; Ke, Liqin; Antropov, Vladimir

    2014-03-01

    We combine ab initio electronic structure calculations with micromagnetic simulations to investigate permanent magnet properties of Nd2Fe14B-based systems. First, magnetic moments, anisotropy constants and exchange interactions of bulk Nd2Fe14B are calculated from first principles. These parameters are then used to construct a micromagnetic model for realistic samples and evaluate hysteresis loop at finite temperatures using Monte Carlo method. Several generic microstructures are considered including randomly oriented grains, hard/soft multilayers, and core/shell geometries. We find optimal grain sizes and hard phase/soft phase volume ratio which maximize maximum energy products of the systems. Further, we discuss the nature of the thermal spin reorientation effect in the bulk material and how it affects the finite temperature hysteretic properties.

  13. Piezoelectric sensing and non-parametric statistical signal processing for health monitoring of hysteretic dampers used in seismic-resistant structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego, A.; Benavent-Climent, A.; Romo-Melo, L.

    2015-08-01

    The paper proposes a new application of non-parametric statistical processing of signals recorded from vibration tests for damage detection and evaluation on I-section steel segments. The steel segments investigated constitute the energy dissipating part of a new type of hysteretic damper that is used for passive control of buildings and civil engineering structures subjected to earthquake-type dynamic loadings. Two I-section steel segments with different levels of damage were instrumented with piezoceramic sensors and subjected to controlled white noise random vibrations. The signals recorded during the tests were processed using two non-parametric methods (the power spectral density method and the frequency response function method) that had never previously been applied to hysteretic dampers. The appropriateness of these methods for quantifying the level of damage on the I-shape steel segments is validated experimentally. Based on the results of the random vibrations, the paper proposes a new index that predicts the level of damage and the proximity of failure of the hysteretic damper.

  14. Investigation of Deterioration Behavior of Hysteretic Loops in Nonlinear Static Procedure Analysis of Concrete Structures with Shear Walls

    SciTech Connect

    Ghodrati Amiri, G.; Amidi, S.; Khorasani, M.

    2008-07-08

    In the recent years, scientists developed the seismic rehabilitation of structures and their view points were changed from sufficient strength to the performance of structures (Performance Base Design) to prepare a safe design. Nonlinear Static Procedure analysis (NSP) or pushover analysis is a new method that is chosen for its speed and simplicity in calculations. 'Seismic Rehabilitation Code for Existing Buildings' and FEMA 356 considered this method. Result of this analysis is a target displacement that is the base of the performance and rehabilitation procedure of the structures. Exact recognition of that displacement could develop the workability of pushover analysis. In these days, Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis (NDP) is only method can exactly apply the seismic ground motions. In this case because it consumes time, costs very high and is more difficult than other methods, is not applicable as much as NSP. A coefficient used in NSP for determining the target displacement is C2 (Stiffness and Strength Degradations Coefficient) and is applicable for correcting the errors due to eliminating the stiffness and strength degradations in hysteretic loops. In this study it has been tried to analysis three concrete frames with shear walls by several accelerations that scaled according to FEMA 273 and FEMA 356. These structures were designed with Iranian 2800 standard (vers.3). Finally after the analyzing by pushover method and comparison results with dynamic analysis, calculated C2 was comprised with values in rehabilitation codes.

  15. Modelling hysteretic flow through a slab of soil with a Preisach operator based on the van Genuchten equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, D.

    2010-12-01

    In this paper we present a model based on the Preisach operator for describing the hysteretic flow of water through a slab of soil. This work significantly improves on the model co-developed by author, where pathological problems in the model have been eliminated by taking a different approach. The starting point for both the present and previous models is the expression, Lθ'(t)=I(t)-D(t), relating water flow to the difference between infiltration and drainage. Here θ is the volumetric moisture content satisfying 0≤θ≤1, L is the thickness of the slab, I(t) is the rate of infiltration and D(t) is the rate of drainage below the soil. In the model presented here the hysteresis relationship is defined as ψ(t)=P{θ(t)}, where P is the Preisach operator, and ψ(t) is the matric potential. Finally we use rain and moisture data taken from the Feale watershed in Co. Kerry, Ireland to validate the model.

  16. The formation of hysteretic magnetic properties in amorphous alloys of various classes upon thermomagmetic treatment in a transverse magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kekalo, I. B.; Mogil'nikov, P. S.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we have studied the effects of the thermomagnetic treatment in a transverse magnetic field (TMaT⊥) on the permeability of the amorphous alloy Co69Fe3.7Cr3.8Si12.5B11 with such a low saturation magnetostriction ( λ s 10-7) that, in the ribbons of this alloy rolled into a toroid, a sharp longitudinal magnetic texture is observed ( K sq > 0.90). It has been revealed that the permeability μ4 ( H = 4 mOe, f = 1 kHz) as a function of the annealing temperature or time of holding at a temperature is described by a curve with a maximum. This maximum is observed at a coefficient of the squareness of the hysteresis loop K sq,m in the range of 0.2 ≤ K sq,m ≤ 0.4. The regimes of the TMaT have been determined that provide optimum values of the permeability μ4 (15000) without a loss of the ductile state of the ribbons of this alloy. Based on the example of an iron-based alloy of composition Fe57Co31Si2.9B9.1 with λs = 35 × 10-6, it has been shown that the formation of the hysteretic magnetic properties upon the TMaT⊥ depends substantially on the magnitude of the magnetostriction and the Curie temperature of the amorphous alloys.

  17. Digital controller design for Bouc-Wen model with high-order hysteretic nonlinearities through approximated scalar sign function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jian; Shieh, Leang-San; Zhang, Yongpeng; Song, Gangbing

    2011-10-01

    In the models of piezoelectric actuator (PEA) systems, the hysteresis effects are often described by the concise Bouc-Wen models; however, these models are nonlinear and non-smooth because of the existence of terms which involve the absolute-value function. In particular, a challenging control problem is posed when, due to the properties of certain materials, such absolute-value terms are of high order. This control problem has been rarely studied. This article proposes the use of the approximated scalar sign function (ASSF), which is a numerically stable and differentiable nonlinear function, to represent the hysteresis function, with single-order or high-order absolute-value terms. This innovative step leads to a nonlinear but sufficiently smooth model. Then, a systematic digital design methodology is presented, which involves the following steps: (1) establish an optimal linear model based upon the resulting smooth model, (2) adopt a PI-based analogue controller and (3) apply the prediction-based digital redesign technique for digital implementation. A digital observer is also developed for state reconstruction, and to improve the input disturbance rejection. The positioning control of a PEA system with a high-order hysteretic Bouc-Wen model is implemented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed ASSF based modelling and controller design approaches.

  18. Kinetic and hysteretic behavior of ATP hydrolysis of the highly stable dimeric ATP synthase of Polytomella sp.

    PubMed

    Villavicencio-Queijeiro, Alexa; Pardo, Juan Pablo; González-Halphen, Diego

    2015-06-01

    The F1FO-ATP synthase of the colorless alga Polytomella sp. exhibits a robust peripheral arm constituted by nine atypical subunits only present in chlorophycean algae. The isolated dimeric enzyme exhibits a latent ATP hydrolytic activity which can be activated by some detergents. To date, the kinetic behavior of the algal ATPase has not been studied. Here we show that while the soluble F1 sector exhibits Michaelis-Menten kinetics, the dimer exhibits a more complex behavior. The kinetic parameters (Vmax and Km) were obtained for both the F1 sector and the dimeric enzyme as isolated or activated by detergent, and this activation was also seen on the enzyme reconstituted in liposomes. Unlike other ATP synthases, the algal dimer hydrolyzes ATP on a wide range of pH and temperature. The enzyme was inhibited by oligomycin, DCCD and Mg-ADP, although oligomycin induced a peculiar inhibition pattern that can be attributed to structural differences in the algal subunit-c. The hydrolytic activity was temperature-dependent and exhibited activation energy of 4 kcal/mol. The enzyme also exhibited a hysteretic behavior with a lag phase strongly dependent on temperature but not on pH, that may be related to a possible regulatory role in vivo. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Hysteretic memory in pH-response of water contact angle on poly(acrylic acid) brushes.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Vivek; Harkin, Adrienne V; Robertson, Megan L; Conrad, Jacinta C

    2016-04-21

    We investigated the pH-dependent response of flat polyacid brushes of varying length and dispersity in the extended brush regime. Our model system consisted of poly(acrylic acid) brushes, which change from hydrophobic and neutral at low pH to hydrophilic and negatively charged at high pH, synthesized on silicon substrates using a grafting-from approach at constant grafting density. We observed three trends in the pH-response: first, the dry brush thickness increased as the pH was increased for brushes above a critical length, and this effect was magnified as the dispersity increased; second, the water contact angle measured at low pH was larger for brushes of greater dispersity; and third, brushes of sufficient dispersity exhibited hysteretic memory behavior in the pH-dependence of the contact angle, in which the contact angle upon increasing and decreasing pH differed. As a consequence, the pKa of the brushes measured upon increasing pH was consistently higher than that measured upon decreasing pH. The observed pH response is consistent with proposed changes in the conformation and charge distribution of the polyelectrolyte brushes that depend on the direction of pH change and the dispersity of the brushes.

  20. Evolution of water repellency of organic growing media used in Horticulture and consequences on hysteretic behaviours of the water retention curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Jean-Charles; Qi, Guifang; Charpentier, Sylvain; Boivin, Pascal

    2010-05-01

    Most of growing media used in horticulture (particularly peat substrates) shows hysteresis phenomena during desiccation and rehydration cycles, which greatly affects their hydraulic properties. The origins of these properties have often been related to one or several of the specific mechanisms such as the non-geometrical uniformity of the pores (also called ‘ink bottle' effect), presence of trapped air, shrinkage-swelling phenomena, and changes in water repellency. However, recent results showed that changes in wettability during desiccation and rehydration could be considered as one of the main factors leading to hysteretic behaviour in these materials with high organic matter contents (Naasz et al., 2008). The general objective was to estimate the evolutions of changes in water repellency on the water retention properties and associated hysteresis phenomena in relation to the intensity and the number of drying/wetting cycles. For this, simultaneous shrinkage/swelling and water retention curves were obtained using method previously developed for soil shrinkage analysis by Boivin (2006) that we have adapted for growing media and to their physical behaviours during rewetting. The experiment was performed in a climatic chamber at 20°C. A cylinder with the growing medium tested was placed on a porous ceramic disk which is used to control the pressure and to full/empty water of the sample. The whole of the device was then placed on a balance to record the water loss/storage with time; whereas linear displacement transducers were used to measure the changes in sample height and diameter upon drying and wetting in the axial and radial directions. Ceramic cups (2 cm long and 0.21 cm diameter) connected to pressure transducers were inserted in the middle of the samples to record the water pressure head. In parallell, contact angles were measured by direct droplet method at different steps during the drying/rewetting cycles. First results obtained on weakly decomposed

  1. A 2D spring model for the simulation of ultrasonic wave propagation in nonlinear hysteretic media.

    PubMed

    Delsanto, P P; Gliozzi, A S; Hirsekorn, M; Nobili, M

    2006-07-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) approach to the simulation of ultrasonic wave propagation in nonclassical nonlinear (NCNL) media is presented. The approach represents the extension to 2D of a previously proposed one dimensional (1D) Spring Model, with the inclusion of a PM space treatment of the intersticial regions between grains. The extension to 2D is of great practical relevance for its potential applications in the field of quantitative nondestructive evaluation and material characterization, but it is also useful, from a theoretical point of view, to gain a better insight of the interaction mechanisms involved. The model is tested by means of virtual 2D experiments. The expected NCNL behaviors are qualitatively well reproduced.

  2. Estimation of hysteretic losses for MgB2 tapes under the operating conditions of a generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas-Llanos, Carlos Roberto; Zermeño, Víctor M. R.; Sanz, Santiago; Trillaud, Frederic; Grilli, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Hysteretic losses in the MgB2 wound superconducting coils of a 550 kW synchronous hybrid scaled generator were estimated as part of the European project SUPRAPOWER led by the Spanish Fundación Tecnalia Research & Innovation. Particular interest was given to the losses caused by the magnetic flux ripples in the rotor coils originating from the conventional stator during nominal operation. To compute these losses, a 2D finite element analysis was conducted and Maxwell’s equations written in the H-formulation were solved considering the nonlinear material properties of the conductor materials. The modeled tapes are made of multiple MgB2 filaments embedded in a Ni matrix and soldered to a high purity copper strip and insulated with Dacron braid. Three geometrical models of single tape cross sections of decreasing complexity were studied: (1) the first model reproduced closely the actual cross section obtained from tape micrographs. (2) The second model was obtained from the computed elasto-plastic deformation of a round Ni wire. (3) The third model was based on a simplified cross section with the superconducting filaments bundled in a single elliptical bulky structure. The last geometry allowed the validation of the modeling technique by comparing numerical losses with results from well-established analytical expressions. Additionally, the following cases of filament transpositions of the multi-filamentary tape were studied: no transposition, partial and full transposition; thereby improving understanding of the relevance of the tape fabrication process on the magnitude of the determination of ac losses. Finally, choosing the right level of geometrical detail, the following operational regimes of the machine and its impact on individual superconducting tape losses in the rotor were studied: bias-dc current, ramping current under ramping background field and magnetic flux ripples under dc background current and field.

  3. Broadly hysteretic H2 adsorption in the microporous metal-organic framework Co(1,4-benzenedipyrazolate).

    PubMed

    Choi, Hye Jin; Dincă, Mircea; Long, Jeffrey R

    2008-06-25

    Reaction of Co(CF3SO3)2 with the new molecule 1,4-benzenedi(4'-pyrazolyl) (H2BDP) in N,N'-diethylformamide (DEF) at 130 degrees C generates the metal-organic framework Co(BDP).2DEF.H2O (1). X-ray analysis reveals the structure of 1 to contain chains of tetrahedrally ligated Co2+ ions linked through BDP2- ligands to generate a three-dimensional framework with 10 x 10 A2 channels. Thermogravimetric data shows the framework to have a high thermal stability, and complete desolvation occurs upon heating at 170 degrees C under dynamic vacuum for two days to afford 1d. X-ray powder diffraction data indicates that 1d possesses a substantially different structure, but converts back to 1 upon exposure to DEF, consistent with the presence of a flexible framework. Nitrogen adsorption isotherms measured for 1d at 77 and 87 K reveal an unprecedented five-step adsorption process and a Langmuir surface area of 2670 m2/g. In addition, high-pressure H2 adsorption data reveal hysteretic uptake and release, with hysteresis loops of width 1.1, 3.8, 13, and 27 bar that shift to higher pressures as the temperature increases from 50 to 65, 77, and 87 K, respectively. The high H2 uptake capacity of 5.5 excess wt % at 50 K suggests that such materials could potentially find utility for hydrogen storage via a kinetic trapping mechanism. Variable-temperature kinetics measurements have also allowed the first study of H2 diffusion within a metal-organic framework, revealing an energy barrier of 0.62 kJ/mol for H2 diffusing within the pores.

  4. Hysteretic and intermittent regimes in the subcritical bifurcation of a quasi-one-dimensional system of interacting particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessup, Tommy; Coste, Christophe; Saint Jean, Michel

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we study the effects of white Gaussian additive thermal noise on a subcritical pitchfork bifurcation. We consider a quasi-one-dimensional system of particles that are transversally confined, with short-range (non-Coulombic) interactions and periodic boundary conditions in the longitudinal direction. In such systems, there is a structural transition from a linear order to a staggered row, called the zigzag transition. There is a finite range of transverse confinement stiffnesses for which the stable configuration at zero temperature is a localized zigzag pattern surrounded by aligned particles, which evidences the subcriticality of the bifurcation. We show that these configurations remain stable for a wide temperature range. At zero temperature, the transition between a straight line and such localized zigzag patterns is hysteretic. We have studied the influence of thermal noise on the hysteresis loop. Its description is more difficult than at T =0 K since thermally activated jumps between the two configurations always occur and the system cannot stay forever in a unique metastable state. Two different regimes have to be considered according to the temperature value with respect to a critical temperature Tc(τobs) that depends on the observation time τobs. An hysteresis loop is still observed at low temperature, with a width that decreases as the temperature increases toward Tc(τobs) . In contrast, for T >Tc(τobs) the memory of the initial condition is lost by stochastic jumps between the configurations. The study of the mean residence times in each configuration gives a unique opportunity to precisely determine the barrier height that separates the two configurations, without knowing the complete energy landscape of this many-body system. We also show how to reconstruct the hysteresis loop that would exist at T =0 K from high-temperature simulations.

  5. Hysteretic behavior of bladder afferent neurons in response to changes in bladder pressure.

    PubMed

    Ross, Shani E; Sperry, Zachariah J; Mahar, Colin M; Bruns, Tim M

    2016-08-12

    Mechanosensitive afferents innervating the bladder increase their firing rate as the bladder fills and pressure rises. However, the relationship between afferent firing rates and intravesical pressure is not a simple linear one. Firing rate responses to pressure can differ depending on prior activity, demonstrating hysteresis in the system. Though this hysteresis has been commented on in published literature, it has not been quantified. Sixty-six bladder afferents recorded from sacral dorsal root ganglia in five alpha-chloralose anesthetized felines were identified based on their characteristic responses to pressure (correlation coefficient ≥ 0.2) during saline infusion (2 ml/min). For saline infusion trials, we calculated a maximum hysteresis ratio between the firing rate difference at each pressure and the overall firing rate range (or Hmax) of 0.86 ± 0.09 (mean ± standard deviation) and mean hysteresis ratio (or Hmean) of 0.52 ± 0.13 (n = 46 afferents). For isovolumetric trials in two experiments (n = 33 afferents) Hmax was 0.72 ± 0.14 and Hmean was 0.40 ± 0.14. A comprehensive state model that integrates these hysteresis parameters to determine the bladder state may improve upon existing neuroprostheses for bladder control.

  6. The hysteretic contribution of friction for the polished rubber on the concrete surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feshanjerdi, M.; Khorrami, M.; Masoudi, A. A.; Razzaghi Kashani, M.

    2017-02-01

    The rubber friction coefficient, and the contact area during stationary sliding is calculated, for the contact of a polished rubber block and a concrete surface, when both surfaces are rough. The calculation is based on an extended version of Persson's contact mechanics theory. Compared to only the substrate being rough, when both of the surfaces are rough but their cross correlation is zero, the friction coefficient is larger. Introducing a positive correlation decreases the friction coefficient, while introducing a negative correlation increases the friction coefficient. To support these theoretical arguments, some experiments have been performed. We have produced roughness on the rubber surface, using abrasive paper, and measured the surface topographies for the concrete and the polished rubber surfaces. The auto spectral density functions for the both surfaces have been calculated, and the rubber viscoelastic modulus mastercurve has been obtained. We have measured the rubber friction at different sliding velocities, when the rubber surfaces are rough and smooth, and compared it to the theoretical results. It is seen that when the rubber surface is rough, the rubber friction coefficient is larger compared to the case the rubber surface is smooth. The theoretical results are in good agreement with experimental observation.

  7. Electrooptical Analysis of Microbial Cell Suspensions forDetermination of Antibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Guliy, Olga I; Bunin, Victor D; Korzhenevich, Vyacheslav I; Volkov, Alexey A; Ignatov, Oleg V

    2016-12-01

    The effects of ampicillin; kanamycin, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline on electrophysical characteristics of cells of sensitive (ampicillin; kanamycin, chloramphenicol) and resistant (ampicillin; kanamycin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline) Escherichia coli strains were studied. Under the action of antibiotics sensitive and resistant E. coli strains acquire different electro-optical properties. Changes in suspension-orientational spectra, that are observed under the action of ampicillin; kanamycin, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline can be used in determination of antibiotic resistance of the studied bacterial strains. In our opinion, the methods of microbial suspension electro-optical analysis can be used in microbiology, mеdicinе, veterinary, and are an effective tool for solving the problems connected with determination of microbial cell antibiotic resistance.

  8. Selective All-Wet Metallization of Silicon for Hysteretic Power Microswitches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uncuer, Muhammet

    electroless Au-to-Au contact from the source to the drain has been characterized. It has been found that the current-voltage (Ids-Vds) curves show ohmic characteristics with modest contact resistance of 5 kΩ. Moreover, the fabricated devices display over-damped behavior with a switching time of around 80 µs and squeeze-film damping of 0.0023 N-s/m². Lifetime/reliability experiments have shown promising results (exceeding 2000 stable hot cycling with a current load of 1 mA); however more improvement is necessary for an eventual marketable product. What is more, intentional stress-imbalance is induced on the fabricated micro-structures to determine thin-film stresses for the electroless Cu (tensile stress of 45 MPa for 100 nm thick film) and Au/Cu (tensile stress of 56 MPa for 100 nm thick film) for the material characterization purposes.

  9. On the identification of Hammerstein systems in the presence of an input hysteretic nonlinearity with nonlocal memory: Piezoelectric actuators - an experimental case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butcher, Mark; Giustiniani, Alessandro; Masi, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    The identification problem of the linear dynamic part of piezo based actuators is addressed in this paper, exploiting the use of binary signals, specifically the pseudo random binary sequences (PRBS). Due to the presence of nonlocal memory hysteretic behavior in piezoelectric active materials, the dependence of the identification results on this strongly nonlinear effect is analyzed and useful guidelines for the design of the PRBS stimulating signal are derived. Moreover, some properties of hysteresis like cancellation and congruency are experimentally analyzed and their effects on the identification process are discussed. Finally, the use of a hysteresis compensation strategy in the identification process is evaluated and discussed.

  10. Tl 2Ba 2CaCu 2O 8- x superconducting films deposited by aerosol and their hysteretic ac losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conde-Gallardo, A.; Klein, T.; Escribe-Filippini, C.; Marcus, J.; Lopez-Rios, T.; Jergel, M.

    1998-04-01

    ac susceptibility measurements have been performed on Tl 2Ba 2CaCu 2O 8- x superconducting films. The films were grown in two steps: first Ba-Ca-Cu-Ag-O precursor films have been prepared by spraying an aerosol on MgO substrates and the Tl was then subsequently introduced by diffusion into the precursor films. The most favourable preparation conditions have been determined by comparing the structural and magnetic properties of the films. A detailed study of the ac susceptibility shows that the ac losses are due to intragrain bulk hysteretic pinning eventhough small geometrical barriers contributions could also be observed.

  11. Collisions, Cannibals, and the Memory of Long-lost Bed Forms: The Hyster(et)ical Story Revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerolmack, D. J.; Martin, R. L.

    2015-12-01

    Sandy river-bed morphology often lags changes in water discharge, producing hysteresis in the relation between discharge and bed-form geometry. While this effect is well known, its origins are not. In this talk we present experimental and field results that reveal these origins. We show that the primary mechanism of bed form growth in a rising flood is merger induced by collisions, which occur due to a dispersion in migration rates. At the start of a flood the bed forms are small and transport rate is high, so growth is rapid. Conversely, on the falling limb of a flood the bed forms are large while the transport rate is small. If the flood recedes rapidly enough, the large bed forms cease migrating and small, secondary bed forms emerge on their backs. These smaller features cannibalize the original, relict structures which slowly diffuse away. (We do not distinguish between ripples and dunes, the data do not indicate any reason to do so, and we therefore recuse ourselves from discussing that tiring topic.). The timescale of decay is much larger than growth, leaving a memory of peak-flood conditions that may persist until the next flood. Thus, the timescales of both growth (Tg) and decay (Td) are related to a simple bed form turnover time - the time to displace a bed form's volume by transport - however, the turnover time is different for growth vs. decay. This reveals three different regimes for the response of bed forms to a flood: (1) a slow flood with a timescale Tf > Td > Tg is quasi-steady, i.e., bed forms grow and shrink with no lag between morphology and flow; (2) an intermediate flood with Td > Tf > Tg exhibits quasi-steady growth, but decay lags the flow; and (3) a fast flood with Td > Tg > Tf produces a lag between morphology and flow over the entire hydrograph. Regimes 2 and 3 produce hysteretical behavior, with 3 being the most extreme. We discuss the implications of these results for: predicting stage-discharge relations, anticipating and understanding

  12. Hysteretic Faraday waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Périnet, Nicolas; Falcón, Claudio; Chergui, Jalel; Shin, Seungwon; Juric, Damir

    2016-11-01

    We study with numerical simulations the two-dimensional Faraday waves in two immiscible incompressible fluids when the lower fluid layer is shallow. After the appearance of the well known subharmonic stationary waves, a further instability is observed while the control parameter passes a secondary threshold. A new state then arises, composed of stationary waves with about twice the original pattern amplitude. The bifurcation presents hysteresis: there exists a finite range of the control parameter in which both states are stable. By means of a simple stress balance, we show that a change of the shear stress can explain this hysteresis. Our predictions based on this model are in agreement with our numerical results. Project funded by FONDECYT Grants 1130354, 3140522 and the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF- 2014R1A2A1A11051346). Computations supported by the supercomputing infrastructures of the NLHPC (ECM-02) and GENCI (IDRIS).

  13. Hysteretic Faraday waves.

    PubMed

    Périnet, Nicolas; Falcón, Claudio; Chergui, Jalel; Juric, Damir; Shin, Seungwon

    2016-06-01

    We report on the numerical and theoretical study of the subcritical bifurcation of parametrically amplified waves appearing at the interface between two immiscible incompressible fluids when the layer of the lower fluid is very shallow. As a critical control parameter is surpassed, small amplitude surface waves bifurcate subcritically toward highly nonlinear ones with twice their amplitude. We relate this hysteresis with the change of shear stress using a simple stress balance, in agreement with numerical results.

  14. Robust solution procedure for the discrete energy-averaged model on the calculation of 3D hysteretic magnetization and magnetostriction of iron-gallium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tari, H.; Scheidler, J. J.; Dapino, M. J.

    2015-06-01

    A reformulation of the Discrete Energy-Averaged model for the calculation of 3D hysteretic magnetization and magnetostriction of iron-gallium (Galfenol) alloys is presented in this paper. An analytical solution procedure based on an eigenvalue decomposition is developed. This procedure avoids the singularities present in the existing approximate solution by offering multiple local minimum energy directions for each easy crystallographic direction. This improved robustness is crucial for use in finite element codes. Analytical simplifications of the 3D model to 2D and 1D applications are also presented. In particular, the 1D model requires calculation for only one easy direction, while all six easy directions must be considered for general applications. Compared to the approximate solution procedure, it is shown that the resulting robustness comes at no expense for 1D applications, but requires almost twice the computational effort for 3D applications. To find model parameters, we employ the average of the hysteretic data, rather than anhysteretic curves, which would require additional measurements. An efficient optimization routine is developed that retains the dimensionality of the prior art. The routine decouples the parameters into exclusive sets, some of which are found directly through a fast preprocessing step to improve accuracy and computational efficiency. The effectiveness of the model is verified by comparison with existing measurement data.

  15. Composition dependent phase transition and its induced hysteretic effect in the thermal conductivity of WxMo1-xTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xue-Jun; Lv, Yang-Yang; Li, Lei; Li, Xiao; Yao, Shu-Hua; Chen, Yan-Bin; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Lu, Hong; Lu, Ming-Hui; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2017-05-01

    Recently, transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) materials have shown promise in electronics and optoelectronics applications. Most of their properties are closely related to their abundant structural phases and phase transitions. For more practical applications in the future, it is necessary to tune the phase transitions in this material system. Here, we demonstrate the modulation of phase transitions in miscible WxMo1-xTe2 samples by appropriate alloying. The temperature dependent thermal conductivity along the c-axis, which strongly relates to the phase structures and the defect level, has been measured using the time-domain thermoreflectance method. In addition, a tunable hysteretic effect, induced by phase transitions, is observed in both thermal and electrical transport properties and confirmed by the consistent hysteresis in the Raman spectroscopic study. This hysteretic effect can be applied to realize phase-change storage devices. Furthermore, we provide a phase diagram to illustrate the composition dependent phase transition in WxMo1-xTe2. This work demonstrates an approach to modulate phase transition and thermal hysteresis in such a TMD material system by alloying engineering.

  16. Metastability and hysteretic vortex pinning near the order-disorder transition in NbSe2: Interplay between plastic and elastic energy barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marziali Bermúdez, M.; Louden, E. R.; Eskildsen, M. R.; Dewhurst, C. D.; Bekeris, V.; Pasquini, G.

    2017-03-01

    We studied thermal and dynamic history effects in the vortex lattice (VL) near the order-disorder transition in clean NbSe2 single crystals. Comparing the evolution of the effective vortex pinning and the bulk VL structure, we observed metastable superheated and supercooled VL configurations that coexist with a hysteretic effective pinning response due to thermal cycling of the system. A novel scenario, governed by the interplay between (lower) elastic and (higher) plastic energy barriers, is proposed as an explanation for our observations: Plastic barriers, which prevent the annihilation or creation of topological defects, require dynamic assistance to be overcome and to achieve a stable VL at each temperature. Conversely, thermal hysteresis in the pining response is ascribed to low energy barriers, which inhibit rearrangement within a single VL correlation volume and are easily overcome as the relative strength of competing interactions changes with temperature.

  17. Effect of local buckling and work-hardening properties of the material on the hysteretic behavior of cantilever I-beam subjected to lateral cyclic load

    SciTech Connect

    Shaker, R.E.; Murakawa, Hidekazu; Ueda, Yukio

    1993-12-31

    The hysteretic behavior of cantilever I-beam subjected to cyclic lateral loads is investigated in this paper. Finite Element Method (FEM) considering the geometrical and material non-linearities is utilized in this study. Special attention is paid to the effects of local buckling occurring in the flanges and the web, and the material work-hardening properties on the performance of I-beam in view of a seismic design considerations. The behavior of I-beam subjected to cyclic lateral loads is closely examined with respect to the ductility, strength and absorbed energy. From this study, it is found that smaller slenderness ratios of the flange and web are recommended for improving the ductility, strength and absorbed energy. Also, the material having lower yield-to-tensile strength improves the ductility of I-beam under cyclic lateral loads as well as monotonically increasing load.

  18. The relationship between the transition voltage of the I- V curve of the ferroelectrics and the coercive field of the P- V hysteretic curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xingjiao, Li; Junbo, Bao; Ningzhang, Wang; Jingping, Xu; Tao, Chen; Xuecheng, Zou; Hanhua, Feng; Shaoping, Li

    2002-07-01

    The relationship between the transition voltage of the I- V curve of the ferroelectrics and the coercive field of the P- V hysteretic curve is calculated. The first mathematical analysis to explain the relation between the transition voltage Vt and the coercive voltage Vc is obtained. The origin of the interrelation between the transition voltage of the I- V curve and the coercive field is that the height of the boundary barrier is inversely proportional to the effective dielectric constant of the near-boundary region, which is dependent on a derivative of polarization on the electric field, ∂P/ ∂E. The term ξ( eVt) plus the term ( enb2δ/ dNdPs)( eVc) equals a constant. Vt is the function of Eg, Ps, Vc, and E. There is a linear relation between Vc and Vt. This relationship will induce the matchable relations between the I- V curve and the E- P loop. As long as the Vc of the V- P loop exists, the correspondent Vt of I- V curve will certainly exist. It will be the foundation of a new ferroelectric memory, which operates by the I- V characteristics. These relations are the conditions that can enable nonvolatile memory and nondestructive readout.

  19. Temperature-dependent transport and hysteretic behaviors induced by interfacial states in MoS2 field-effect transistors with lead-zirconate-titanate ferroelectric gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yilin; Xie, Dan; Zhang, Xiaowen; Xu, Jianlong; Li, Xinming; Li, Xian; Dai, Ruixuan; Li, Xiao; Li, Peilian; Gao, Xingsen; Zhu, Hongwei

    2017-01-01

    We report the temperature and gate-voltage-dependent electrical properties of lead-zirconate-titanate-gated MoS2 field-effect transistors (MoS2-PZT FETs) within a temperature range of 300 to 380 K. The MoS2 transistors with PZT gating exhibit large reproducible clockwise hysteresis, which is induced by the dynamic charge-trapping/de-trapping process of interfacial states between PZT films and MoS2 channels under the modulation of ferroelectric polarization of PZT films. In this way, the modulation of the gate effect on the hysteresis behavior has been achieved by activating the dynamic charge-trapping/de-trapping process in the interfacial states under different V gs . Moreover, the temperature dependence of the current in the range of 300 to 380 K indicates thermally activated hysteretic behaviors. The hysteresis in the transfer characteristics of MoS2-PZT FETs shows a simultaneous enlargement with increasing temperature, which can be attributed to the thermally sensitive dynamic trapping/de-trapping process of interfacial states.

  20. Dynamic phase transition properties and hysteretic behavior of a ferrimagnetic core-shell nanoparticle in the presence of a time dependent magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yüksel, Yusuf; Vatansever, Erol; Polat, Hamza

    2012-10-01

    We have presented dynamic phase transition features and stationary-state behavior of a ferrimagnetic small nanoparticle system with a core-shell structure. By means of detailed Monte Carlo simulations, a complete picture of the phase diagrams and magnetization profiles has been presented and the conditions for the occurrence of a compensation point Tcomp in the system have been investigated. According to Néel nomenclature, the magnetization curves of the particle have been found to obey P-type, N-type and Q-type classification schemes under certain conditions. Much effort has been devoted to investigating the hysteretic response of the particle, and we observed the existence of triple hysteresis loop behavior, which originates from the existence of a weak ferromagnetic core coupling Jc/Jsh, as well as a strong antiferromagnetic interface exchange interaction Jint/Jsh. Most of the calculations have been performed for a particle in the presence of oscillating fields of very high frequencies and high amplitudes in comparison with exchange interactions, which resembles a magnetic system under the influence of ultrafast switching fields. Particular attention has also been paid to the influence of the particle size on the thermal and magnetic properties, as well as magnetic features such as coercivity, remanence and the compensation temperature of the particle. We have found that, in the presence of ultrafast switching fields, the particle may exhibit a dynamic phase transition from paramagnetic to a dynamically ordered phase with increasing ferromagnetic shell thickness.

  1. Hysteretic characteristics of 1/λ⁴ scattering of light during adsorption and desorption of water in porous Vycor glass with nanopores.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Shigeo; Nakamura, Jiro

    2013-10-01

    Porous Vycor glass with nanopores is transparent in the visible region and is often used in colorimetric chemical sensing when impregnated with selectively reacting reagents. However, it has some disadvantages in sensing, since changes in the humidity of ambient air strongly affect its transmission. In this work, by combining a humidity-controlled thermostatic chamber and an ultraviolet-visible and near-infrared spectrophotometer through fiber optics, we analyzed the effect of increasing and decreasing humidity in the ambient air on the transparency change of the nanoporous glass. The transparency response in the visible region to changes in humidity is analyzed to correlate the turbidity response of the glass with the amount of water in it. The turbidity is found to be dependent on the inverse fourth power of the wavelength (1/λ⁴), which implies that Rayleigh-type scattering takes place for both adsorption and desorption of water. We show that measures of the extent of the optical inhomogeneity that causes the scattering, such as the effective radius of scatterers and their number density, exhibit a pronounced hysteretic characteristic for the imbibition and drainage of water, while the absorption inherent to imbibed water also shows another type of hysteresis that is quite similar to the sorption isotherms of water. On the basis of the above observations, we show that the transitory white turbidity of nanoporous glasses during changes in humidity can be consistently interpreted and quantitatively analyzed by a simple Rayleigh scattering mechanism.

  2. Hysteretic photochromic switching of Eu-Mg defects in GaN links the shallow transient and deep ground states of the Mg acceptor

    PubMed Central

    Singh, A. K.; O’Donnell, K. P.; Edwards, P. R.; Lorenz, K.; Kappers, M. J.; Boćkowski, M.

    2017-01-01

    Although p-type activation of GaN by Mg underpins a mature commercial technology, the nature of the Mg acceptor in GaN is still controversial. Here, we use implanted Eu as a ‘spectator ion’ to probe the lattice location of Mg in doubly doped GaN(Mg):Eu. Photoluminescence spectroscopy of this material exemplifies hysteretic photochromic switching (HPS) between two configurations, Eu0 and Eu1(Mg), of the same Eu-Mg defect, with a hyperbolic time dependence on ‘switchdown’ from Eu0 to Eu1(Mg). The sample temperature and the incident light intensity at 355 nm tune the characteristic switching time over several orders of magnitude, from less than a second at 12.5 K, ~100 mW/cm2 to (an estimated) several hours at 50 K, 1 mW/cm2. Linking the distinct Eu-Mg defect configurations with the shallow transient and deep ground states of the Mg acceptor in the Lany-Zunger model, we determine the energy barrier between the states to be 27.7(4) meV, in good agreement with the predictions of theory. The experimental results further suggest that at low temperatures holes in deep ground states are localized on N atoms axially bonded to Mg acceptors. PMID:28155896

  3. The impact of the Pb(Zr,Ti)O3-ZnO interface quality on the hysteretic properties of a metal-ferroelectric-semiconductor structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pintilie, I.; Pasuk, I.; Ibanescu, G. A.; Negrea, R.; Chirila, C.; Vasile, E.; Pintilie, L.

    2012-11-01

    The hysteretic properties of metal-ferroelectric-semiconductor (MFS) structures based on Pb(Zr0.2Ti0.8)O3 (PZT) and ZnO films were studied with respect of the quality of the PZT-ZnO interface. The films were grown by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) on platinized silicon (Pt/Si) substrate and on single crystal, (001) oriented SrTiO3 (STO) substrates. The structural analysis has revealed that the PZT-ZnO stack grown on single crystal STO is epitaxial, while the structure grown on Pt/Si has columnar texture. The temperature change of the capacitance-voltage (C-V) hysteresis direction, from clockwise at low temperatures to counter clockwise at high temperatures, was observed at around 300 K in the case of the MFS structure grown by PLD on Pt/Si substrate. This temperature is lower than the one reported for the case of the PZT-ZnO structure grown by sol-gel on Pt/Si substrate (Pintilie et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 96, 012903 (2010)). In the fully epitaxial structures the C-V hysteresis is counter clockwise even at 100 K. These findings strongly points out that the quality of the PZT-ZnO interface is essential for having a C-V hysteresis of ferroelectric nature, with negligible influence from the part of the interface states and with a memory window of about 5 V at room temperature.

  4. Positive exchange-bias and giant vertical hysteretic shift in La0.3Sr0.7FeO3/SrRuO3 bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Rakesh; Pandey, Parul; Singh, R. P.; Rana, D. S.

    2014-01-01

    The exchange-bias effects in the mosaic epitaxial bilayers of the itinerant ferromagnet (FM) SrRuO3 and the antiferromagnetic (AFM) charge-ordered La0.3Sr0.7FeO3 were investigated. An uncharacteristic low-field positive exchange bias, a cooling-field driven reversal of positive to negative exchange-bias and a layer thickness optimised unusual vertical magnetization shift were all novel facets of exchange bias realized for the first time in magnetic oxides. The successive magnetic training induces a transition from positive to negative exchange bias regime with changes in domain configurations. These observations are well corroborated by the hysteretic loop asymmetries which display the modifications in the AFM spin correlations. These exotic features emphasize the key role of i) mosaic disorder induced subtle interplay of competing AFM-superexchange and FM double exchange at the exchange biased interface and, ii) training induced irrecoverable alterations in the AFM spin structure. PMID:24569516

  5. Correlations Between Hysteretic Categorical and Continuous Judgments of Perceptual Stimuli Supporting a Unified Dynamical Systems Approach to Perception.

    PubMed

    Kim, S; Frank, T D

    2017-01-01

    We report from two variants of a figure-ground experiment that is known in the literature to involve a bistable perceptual domain. The first variant was conducted as a two-alternative forced-choice experiment and in doing so tested participants on a categorical measurement scale. The second variant involved a Likert scale measure that was considered to represent a continuous measurement scale. The two variants were conducted as a single within-subjects experiment. Measures of bistability operationalized in terms of hysteresis size scores showed significant positive correlations across the two response conditions. The experimental findings are consistent with a dualistic interpretation of self-organizing perceptual systems when they are described on a macrolevel by means of so-called amplitude equations. This is explicitly demonstrated for a Lotka-Volterra-Haken amplitude equation model of task-related brain activity. As a by-product, the proposed dynamical systems perspective also sheds new light on the anchoring problem of producing numerical, continuous judgments.

  6. Observation of hysteretic transport due to dynamic nuclear spin polarization in a GaAs lateral double quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takashi; Hitachi, Kenichi; Sasaki, Satoshi; Muraki, Koji

    2011-11-18

    We report a new transport feature in a GaAs lateral double quantum dot that emerges for magnetic-field sweeps and shows hysteresis due to dynamic nuclear spin polarization (DNP). This DNP signal appears in the Coulomb blockade regime by virtue of the finite interdot tunnel coupling and originates from the crossing between ground levels of the spin triplet and singlet extensively used for nuclear spin manipulations in pulsed-gate experiments. The magnetic-field dependence of the current level is suggestive of unbalanced DNP between the two dots, which opens up the possibility of controlling electron and nuclear spin states via dc transport.

  7. Hysteretic behavior of Fe(phen){sub 2}(NCS){sub 2} spin-transition microparticles vs. the environment: A huge reversible component resolved by first order reversal curves

    SciTech Connect

    Tanasa, Radu; Stancu, Alexandru; Enachescu, Cristian; Laisney, Jérôme; Boillot, Marie-Laure

    2014-01-20

    We discuss the influence of the embedding matrix on the thermal hysteretic behavior of spin transition microparticles of Fe(phen){sub 2}(NCS){sub 2} by using a series of experimental first order reversal curves (FORCs). The shape of FORCs supports the hypothesis considering additional interactions between the spin-transition microparticles and the embedding matrix, which compares to a negative pressure on the particles. A mean-field approach based on negative variable external pressures, together with a cut off/switch on of particles-matrix interactions accounts for the experimental features.

  8. On the Passivity of Hysteretic Systems with Double Hysteretic Loops

    PubMed Central

    Pozo, Francesc; Zapateiro, Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    The Bouc–Wen hysteresis model is widely employed to mathematically represent the dynamical behavior of several physical devices, materials and systems such as magnetorheological dampers, lanthanide zirconium or aluminum oxides, mechanical structures or biomedical systems. However, these mathematical models must account for different properties such as the bounded-input bounded-output stability, asymptotic motion, thermodynamic admissibility or passivity in order to be physically consistent with the systems they represent. The passivity of a system is related to energy dissipation. More precisely, a system is passive if it does not generate energy but only dissipates it. The objective of this paper is to prove that two different double-loop Bouc–Wen models are passive under a particular set of model parameters. PMID:28793719

  9. 2169 steel waveform experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    Furnish, Michael David; Alexander, C. Scott; Reinhart, William Dodd; Brown, Justin L.

    2012-11-01

    In support of LLNL efforts to develop multiscale models of a variety of materials, we have performed a set of eight gas gun impact experiments on 2169 steel (21% Cr, 6% Ni, 9% Mn, balance predominantly Fe). These experiments provided carefully controlled shock, reshock and release velocimetry data, with initial shock stresses ranging from 10 to 50 GPa (particle velocities from 0.25 to 1.05 km/s). Both windowed and free-surface measurements were included in this experiment set to increase the utility of the data set, as were samples ranging in thickness from 1 to 5 mm. Target physical phenomena included the elastic/plastic transition (Hugoniot elastic limit), the Hugoniot, any phase transition phenomena, and the release path (windowed and free-surface). The Hugoniot was found to be nearly linear, with no indications of the Fe phase transition. Releases were non-hysteretic, and relatively consistent between 3- and 5-mmthick samples (the 3 mm samples giving slightly lower wavespeeds on release). Reshock tests with explosively welded impactors produced clean results; those with glue bonds showed transient releases prior to the arrival of the reshock, reducing their usefulness for deriving strength information. The free-surface samples, which were steps on a single piece of steel, showed lower wavespeeds for thin (1 mm) samples than for thicker (2 or 4 mm) samples. A configuration used for the last three shots allows release information to be determined from these free surface samples. The sample strength appears to increase with stress from ~1 GPa to ~ 3 GPa over this range, consistent with other recent work but about 40% above the Steinberg model.

  10. Intra-molecular interactions dominating the dehydration of a poly(2-isopropyl-2-oxazoline)-based densely grafted polymer comb in aqueous solution and hysteretic liquid-liquid phase separation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuanyuan; Tang, Hui; Wu, Peiyi

    2017-03-01

    Temperature-induced phase transition together with the liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) phenomenon of poly(oligo(2-isopropyl-2-oxazoline)methacrylate) with the comb-shaped architecture (comb-PiPOx) in aqueous solution has been discussed at the molecular level. Differing from linear poly(2-isopropyl-2-oxazoline) (linear-PiPOx), polymer-rich liquid droplets appear at higher temperature compared with the phase transition determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) in comb-PiPOx solution. As investigated using variable-temperature Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra analysis, the densely grafted architecture gives rise to an intra-molecular interaction (hydrophobic interaction of alkyl groups and H-bond of carbonyl groups) dominating the dehydration process of comb-PiPOx. With temperature increment, most of the water within hydrated polymers is expelled to the outer water phase through intra-molecular association, corresponding to the transition temperature. Afterwards, the dehydration of methyl groups on side chain ends reflects the massive aggregation of polymer chains through inter-molecular association, accompanied by hysteretic LLPS.

  11. Hysteretic Vortex-Matching Effects in High-Tc Superconductors with Nanoscale Periodic Pinning Landscapes Fabricated by He Ion-Beam Projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zechner, G.; Jausner, F.; Haag, L. T.; Lang, W.; Dosmailov, M.; Bodea, M. A.; Pedarnig, J. D.

    2017-07-01

    Square arrays of submicrometer columnar defects in thin YBa2 Cu3 O7 -δ (YBCO) films with spacings down to 300 nm are fabricated by a He ion-beam projection technique. Pronounced peaks in the critical current and corresponding minima in the resistance demonstrate the commensurate arrangement of flux quanta with the artificial pinning landscape, despite the strong intrinsic pinning in epitaxial YBCO films. While these vortex-matching signatures are exactly at the predicted values in field-cooled experiments, they are displaced in zero-field-cooled, magnetic-field-ramped experiments, conserving the equidistance of the matching peaks and minima. These observations reveal an unconventional critical state in a cuprate superconductor with an artificial, periodic pinning array. The long-term stability of such out-of-equilibrium vortex arrangements paves the way for electronic applications employing fluxons.

  12. The uncoupled ATPase activity of the ABC transporter BtuC2D2 leads to a hysteretic conformational change, conformational memory, and improved activity

    PubMed Central

    Livnat-Levanon, Nurit; I. Gilson, Amy; Ben-Tal, Nir; Lewinson, Oded

    2016-01-01

    ABC transporters comprise a large and ubiquitous family of proteins. From bacteria to man they translocate solutes at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. Unlike other enzymes that use ATP as an energy source, ABC transporters are notorious for having high levels of basal ATPase activity: they hydrolyze ATP also in the absence of their substrate. It is unknown what are the effects of such prolonged and constant activity on the stability and function of ABC transporters or any other enzyme. Here we report that prolonged ATP hydrolysis is beneficial to the ABC transporter BtuC2D2. Using ATPase assays, surface plasmon resonance interaction experiments, and transport assays we observe that the constantly active transporter remains stable and functional for much longer than the idle one. Remarkably, during extended activity the transporter undergoes a slow conformational change (hysteresis) and gradually attains a hyperactive state in which it is more active than it was to begin with. This phenomenon is different from stabilization of enzymes by ligand binding: the hyperactive state is only reached through ATP hydrolysis, and not ATP binding. BtuC2D2 displays a strong conformational memory for this excited state, and takes hours to return to its basal state after catalysis terminates. PMID:26905293

  13. Synthesis, structure, and magnetic characterization of a hysteretic charge-transfer salt metamagnet, decamethylferrocenium 2,3-dicyano-1,4-naphthoquinonide, [Fe(Cp*)2][DCNQ].

    PubMed

    Yee, G T; Whitton, M J; Sommer, R D; Frommen, C M; Reiff, W M

    2000-05-01

    The synthesis and single-crystal structure of a new one-to-one charge-transfer salt, derived from decamethylferrocene and 2,3-dicyano-1,4-naphthoquinone, are described. [Fe(Cp*)2][DCNQ] crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pbca, with a = 17.3149(5) A, b = 14.6862(4) A, c = 21.0507(6) A, and Z = 8. Magnetization vs temperature data obtained in 100 G suggest that the compound exhibits dominant one-dimensional ferromagnetic coupling and that it subsequently undergoes an antiferromagnetic phase transition below TN approximately 4 K. Results of magnetization vs applied field experiments show that the compound is a metamagnet with a critical field of approximately 3 kG at 1.8 K. In the nominally antiferromagnetic state, apparent canting of the moments gives rise to a small amount of hysteresis. This picture is supported by ac susceptibility data. The 57Fe Mössbauer spectrum exhibits the expected decamethylferrocenium unresolved quadrupole doublet (delta = 0.53 mm/s) at 77 K and magnetic hyperfine splitting, Hint = 37.9 T, corresponding to long-range magnetic order at 1.63 K.

  14. Identification of Damage in Hysteretic Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-01

    APPROXIMATELY ITS ERROR. C 1 DX=-O.5*DA FV(2 )=QF(ALPHA.O. 5*DX) FV(4)=QF(ALPHA+1. 5*DX) KOUNT=KOUNT.2 WT=DX/6.0 ESTL-W*(FV(1)e4.O*FV(2)+FV(3)) ESTR =-WT*(FV(3...44.0*FV(4)+FV(5)) SUM=ESTL+ ESTR ARESTL-W*(ABS(FV(1) )+ABS(4.O*FV(2) )+ABS(FV(3))) ARESTRT-*(ABS(FV(3))+ABS(4.0*1(4))+ABS(FV(S))) ARE--AEA+(ARESTL+ARESTR...LORR( LVL)0O F1T(LVL)=FV(3) F2T(LVL)=FV(4) F3T(LVL)=FV(5) DA=DX DAT(LVL)=DX AREST-ARESTL ARE STT (LVL )=ARESTR EST=ESTL ESTT(LVL)= ESTR EPS=EPS/1 .4

  15. Two-dimensional vertical moisture-pressure dynamics above groundwater waves: Sand flume experiments and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoushtari, Seyed Mohammad Hossein Jazayeri; Cartwright, Nick; Perrochet, Pierre; Nielsen, Peter

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a new laboratory dataset on the moisture-pressure relationship above a dispersive groundwater wave in a two-dimensional vertical unconfined sand flume aquifer driven by simple harmonic forcing. A total of five experiments were conducted in which all experimental parameters were kept constant except for the oscillation period, which ranged from 268 s to 2449 s between tests. Moisture content and suction head sensor pairings were co-located at two locations in the unsaturated zone both approximately 0.2 m above the mean watertable elevation and respectively 0.3 m and 0.75 m from the driving head boundary. For all oscillation periods except for the shortest (T = 268s), the formation of a hysteretic moisture-pressure scanning loop was observed. Consistent with the decay of the saturated zone groundwater wave, the size of the observed moisture-pressure scanning loops decayed with increasing distance landward and the decay rate is larger for the shorter oscillation periods. At the shortest period (T = 268s), the observed moisture-pressure relationship was observed to be non-hysteretic but with a capillary capacity that differs from that of the static equilibrium wetting and drying curves. This finding is consistent with observations from existing one-dimensional vertical sand column experiments. The relative damping of the moisture content with distance landward is higher than that for the suction head consistent with the fact that transmission of pressure through a porous medium occurs more readily than mass transfer. This is further supported by the fact that observed phase lags for the unsaturated zone variables (i.e. suction head and moisture content) relative to the driving head are greater than the saturated zone variables (i.e. piezometric head). Harmonic analysis of the data reveals no observable generation of higher harmonics in either moisture or pressure despite the strongly non-linear relationship between the two. In addition, a phase lag

  16. Nonlinear Ultrasound Propagation in Solid ^4{He} Compared with Shear Modulus Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasa, Izumi; Kojima, Harry

    2016-10-01

    Ultrasound attenuation (α ) and velocity (V) at 9.6 MHz are measured in polycrystalline hcp ^4{He} . The ultrasound signal above 200 mK is linear and understood in terms of resonant vibration of dislocation segments pinned between network nodes with an average pinning length of 3.7 μ m, much shorter than 59 μ m estimated from a shear modulus measurement. Dramatic changes in α and V are observed below 200 mK. The changes are strongly dependent on temperature and are nonlinear and hysteretic. These effects result from pinning of dislocations by ^3{He} impurities (nominal concentration of 0.3 ppm). The dislocation damping constant due to thermal phonons, the binding energy between dislocation and ^3{He} , and the average network pinning length obtained from the ultrasound data are compared with those from the shear modulus experiments.

  17. Probing quantum and classical turbulence analogy in von Kármán liquid helium, nitrogen, and water experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saint-Michel, B.; Herbert, E.; Salort, J.; Baudet, C.; Bon Mardion, M.; Bonnay, P.; Bourgoin, M.; Castaing, B.; Chevillard, L.; Daviaud, F.; Diribarne, P.; Dubrulle, B.; Gagne, Y.; Gibert, M.; Girard, A.; Hébral, B.; Lehner, Th.; Rousset, B.

    2014-12-01

    We report measurements of the dissipation in the Superfluid helium high REynold number von Kármán flow experiment for different forcing conditions. Statistically steady flows are reached; they display a hysteretic behavior similar to what has been observed in a 1:4 scale water experiment. Our macroscopical measurements indicate no noticeable difference between classical and superfluid flows, thereby providing evidence of the same dissipation scaling laws in the two phases. A detailed study of the evolution of the hysteresis cycle with the Reynolds number supports the idea that the stability of the steady states of classical turbulence in this closed flow is partly governed by the dissipative scales. It also supports the idea that the normal and the superfluid components at these temperatures (1.6 K) are locked down to the dissipative length scale.

  18. Psychology Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGraw, Ken; Tew, Mark D.; Williams, John E.

    2001-01-01

    A goal of the PsychExperiments project was to reduce the financial burden on psychology departments for hardware/software used in their laboratories. In its third year, the PsychExperiments site now hosts 39 experiments. Over 200 classrooms worldwide have signed up as official site users and there have been nearly 10,000 data sessions conducted.…

  19. Psychology Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGraw, Ken; Tew, Mark D.; Williams, John E.

    2001-01-01

    A goal of the PsychExperiments project was to reduce the financial burden on psychology departments for hardware/software used in their laboratories. In its third year, the PsychExperiments site now hosts 39 experiments. Over 200 classrooms worldwide have signed up as official site users and there have been nearly 10,000 data sessions conducted.…

  20. BISE Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-30

    ISS024-E-012668 (30 Aug. 2010) --- NASA astronaut Tracy Caldwell Dyson, Expedition 24 flight engineer, uses Neurospat hardware to perform the Bodies in the Space Environment (BISE) experiment in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. The Canadian Space Agency-sponsored BISE experiment studies how astronauts perceive up and down in microgravity.

  1. BISE Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-30

    ISS024-E-012670 (30 Aug. 2010) --- NASA astronaut Tracy Caldwell Dyson, Expedition 24 flight engineer, uses Neurospat hardware to perform the Bodies in the Space Environment (BISE) experiment in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. The Canadian Space Agency-sponsored BISE experiment studies how astronauts perceive up and down in microgravity.

  2. Language Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bugh, Marylou

    1978-01-01

    When a child uses his words and his ideas in learning to read, he also assists in the normal integration of his personality. Starting with a method of language experience developed by Sylvia Ashton-Warner, the author, a reading consultant, describes a language experience-reading program which utilizes the student's own curiosity and interests. (RK)

  3. Simulated Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snadden, R. B.; Runquist, O.

    1975-01-01

    Presents an experiment in which a programmable calculator is employed as a data generating system for simulated laboratory experiments. The example used as an illustration is a simulated conductimetric titration of an aqueous solution of HC1 with an aqueous solution of NaOH. (Author/EB)

  4. Choice experiments

    Treesearch

    Thomas P Holmes; Wiktor L Adamawicz; Fredrik Carlsson

    2017-01-01

    There has been an explosion of interest during the past two decades in a class of nonmarket stated-preference valuation methods known as choice experiments. The overall objective of a choice experiment is to estimate economic values for characteristics (or attributes) of an environmental good that is the subject of policy analysis, where...

  5. TRIO experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Clemmer, R.G.; Finn, P.A.; Malecha, R.F.; Misra, B.; Billone, M.C.; Bowers, D.L.; Fischer, A.K.; Greenwood, L.R.; Mattas, R.F.; Tam, S.W.

    1984-09-01

    The TRIO experiment is a test of in-situ tritium recovery and heat transfer performance of a miniaturized solid breeder blanket assembly. The assembly (capsule) was monitored for temperature and neutron flux profiles during irradiation and a sweep gas flowed through the capsule to an anaytical train wherein the amounts of tritium in its various chemical forms were determined. The capsule was designed to operate at different temperatures and sweep gas conditions. At the end of the experiment the amount of tritium retained in the solid was at a concentration of less than 0.1 wppM. More than 99.9% of tritium generated during the experiment was successfully recovered. The results of the experiment showed that the tritium inventories at the beginning and at the end of the experiment follow a relationship which appears to be characteristic of intragranular diffusion.

  6. Hydronuclear experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, R.N.; Westervelt, D.R.

    1987-02-01

    Hydronuclear experiments, a method for assessing some aspects of nuclear weapon safety, were conducted at Los Alamos during the 1958 to 1961 moratorium on nuclear testing. The experiments resulted in subcritical multiplying assemblies or a very slight degree of supercriticality and, in some cases, involved a slight, but insignificant, fission energy release. These experiments helped to identify so-called one-point safety problems associated with some of the nuclear weapons systems of that time. The need for remedial action was demonstrated, although some of the necessary design changes could not be made until after the resumption of weapons testing at the end of 1961.

  7. Conditioning-induced elastic nonlinearity in hysteretic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gliozzi, A. S.; Scalerandi, M.; Antonaci, P.; Bruno, C. L. E.

    2010-08-01

    The definition and measurement of the nonlinear elastic properties of a sample is of great importance for a large number of applications, including characterization of material performances and damage detection. However, such measurements are often influenced by spurious effects due to a combination of nonlinearity and nonequilibrium phenomena. We will present experimental data to show how nonlinearity due to small cracks in concrete samples increases as a consequence of conditioning, i.e., after having perturbed them with a constant amplitude excitation. In addition, our experimental data highlight "memory effects," i.e., they show that when the excitation is removed, the elastic modulus does not return instantaneously to the initial value.

  8. Memristive model of hysteretic field emission from carbon nanotube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorodetskiy, Dmitriy V.; Gusel'nikov, Artem V.; Shevchenko, Sergey N.; Kanygin, Mikhail A.; Okotrub, Alexander V.; Pershin, Yuriy V.

    2016-01-01

    Some instances of electron field emitters are characterized by frequency-dependent hysteresis in their current-voltage characteristics. We argue that such emitters can be classified as memristive systems and introduce a general framework to describe their response. As a specific example of our approach, we consider field emission from a carbon nanotube array. Our experimental results demonstrate a low-field hysteresis, which is likely caused by an electrostatic alignment of some of the nanotubes in the applied field. We formulate a memristive model of such phenomena, whose results are in agreement with the experimental results.

  9. Characterizing Hysteretic Water Quality in Southern Appalachian Streams

    Treesearch

    Mark S. Riedel; James M. Vose; Paul V. Bolstad

    2004-01-01

    Water quality in mountain streams of the southern Appalachians varies seasonally and with storms. In an effort to validate Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) for sediment in the Chattooga River Watershed (NE Georgia, NW South Carolina, and SW North Carolina), we studied four tributary streams over an eighteen-month period. Two of the streams had completely forested...

  10. Ultrasensitive hysteretic force sensing with parametric nonlinear oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papariello, Luca; Zilberberg, Oded; Eichler, Alexander; Chitra, R.

    2016-08-01

    We propose a method for linear detection of weak forces using parametrically driven nonlinear resonators. The method is based on a peculiar feature in the response of the resonator to a near resonant periodic external force. This feature stems from a complex interplay among the parametric drive, external force, and nonlinearities. For weak parametric drive, the response exhibits the standard Duffing-like single jump hysteresis. For stronger drive amplitudes, we find a qualitatively new double jump hysteresis which arises from stable solutions generated by the cubic Duffing nonlinearity. The additional jump exists only if the external force is present and the frequency at which it occurs depends linearly on the amplitude of the external force, permitting a straightforward ultrasensitive detection of weak forces. With state-of-the-art nanomechanical resonators, our scheme should permit force detection in the attonewton range.

  11. Ultrasensitive hysteretic force sensing with parametric nonlinear oscillators.

    PubMed

    Papariello, Luca; Zilberberg, Oded; Eichler, Alexander; Chitra, R

    2016-08-01

    We propose a method for linear detection of weak forces using parametrically driven nonlinear resonators. The method is based on a peculiar feature in the response of the resonator to a near resonant periodic external force. This feature stems from a complex interplay among the parametric drive, external force, and nonlinearities. For weak parametric drive, the response exhibits the standard Duffing-like single jump hysteresis. For stronger drive amplitudes, we find a qualitatively new double jump hysteresis which arises from stable solutions generated by the cubic Duffing nonlinearity. The additional jump exists only if the external force is present and the frequency at which it occurs depends linearly on the amplitude of the external force, permitting a straightforward ultrasensitive detection of weak forces. With state-of-the-art nanomechanical resonators, our scheme should permit force detection in the attonewton range.

  12. Asymmetric wetting of patterned surfaces composed of intrinsically hysteretic materials.

    PubMed

    Anantharaju, Neeharika; Panchagnula, Mahesh V; Vedantam, Srikanth

    2009-07-07

    Wetting of chemically heterogeneous surfaces is modeled using a phase field theory. We focus on a chemically heterogeneous surface composed of squares of one component material embedded in another. Unlike previous studies where the component materials were characterized only by an equilibrium contact angle, in this paper each of the component materials is constitutively allowed to exhibit hysteresis. Using this approach, we investigate the effect of heterogeneity length scale on observed macroscopic behavior. Cassie theory is found to be applicable only in the limit of vanishing length scale. For surfaces with a finite heterogeneity length scale, the advancing and receding contact angles deviate from Cassie theory. We find that this deviation and its length scale dependence are asymmetric and depend on the wetting properties of the embedded material relative to the contiguous substrate.

  13. Interpretive Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeHaan, Frank, Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Describes an interpretative experiment involving the application of symmetry and temperature-dependent proton and fluorine nmr spectroscopy to the solution of structural and kinetic problems in coordination chemistry. (MLH)

  14. Interpretive Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeHaan, Frank, Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Describes an interpretative experiment involving the application of symmetry and temperature-dependent proton and fluorine nmr spectroscopy to the solution of structural and kinetic problems in coordination chemistry. (MLH)

  15. Wanted: Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Floyd D.

    1974-01-01

    Describes a project to produce a series of laboratory manuals and instructional materials in which nuclear experiments are presented for the undergraduate advanced laboratory. The manuals are being compiled in the areas of physics, chemistry, geology and environmental sciences. (BR)

  16. Wanted: Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Floyd D.

    1974-01-01

    Describes a project to produce a series of laboratory manuals and instructional materials in which nuclear experiments are presented for the undergraduate advanced laboratory. The manuals are being compiled in the areas of physics, chemistry, geology and environmental sciences. (BR)

  17. EXPERIMENT - SHUTTLE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1982-03-05

    S82-27835 (26 Feb. 1982) --- The astronaut crew members for NASA?s third space transportation system (STS-3) flight meet with Todd E. Nelson, who devised a scientific experiment to fly on their mission. Astronauts Jack R. Lousma, left, commander, and C. Gordon Fullerton, pilot, along with the 18-year-old high school senior, discussed the experiment, entitled ?Insects in Flight Motion Study,? during a press briefing in JSC?s public affairs facility. Photo credit: NASA

  18. EXPERIMENTS - SHUTTLE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1982-03-01

    S82-27604 (26 Feb. 1982) --- The astronaut crew members for NASA?s third space transportation system (STS-3) flight meet with Todd E. Nelson, who devised a scientific experiment to fly on their mission. Astronauts Jack R. Lousma, left, commander, and C. Gordon Fullerton, pilot, along with the 18-year-old high school senior, discussed the experiment, entitled ?Insects in Flight Motion Study,? during a press briefing in JSC?s public affairs facility. Photo credit: NASA

  19. Experiment Databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanschoren, Joaquin; Blockeel, Hendrik

    Next to running machine learning algorithms based on inductive queries, much can be learned by immediately querying the combined results of many prior studies. Indeed, all around the globe, thousands of machine learning experiments are being executed on a daily basis, generating a constant stream of empirical information on machine learning techniques. While the information contained in these experiments might have many uses beyond their original intent, results are typically described very concisely in papers and discarded afterwards. If we properly store and organize these results in central databases, they can be immediately reused for further analysis, thus boosting future research. In this chapter, we propose the use of experiment databases: databases designed to collect all the necessary details of these experiments, and to intelligently organize them in online repositories to enable fast and thorough analysis of a myriad of collected results. They constitute an additional, queriable source of empirical meta-data based on principled descriptions of algorithm executions, without reimplementing the algorithms in an inductive database. As such, they engender a very dynamic, collaborative approach to experimentation, in which experiments can be freely shared, linked together, and immediately reused by researchers all over the world. They can be set up for personal use, to share results within a lab or to create open, community-wide repositories. Here, we provide a high-level overview of their design, and use an existing experiment database to answer various interesting research questions about machine learning algorithms and to verify a number of recent studies.

  20. The Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariana Nicoara, Floare

    2016-04-01

    My name is Nicoara Floarea and I am teacher at Secondary School Calatele and I teach students from preparatory class and the second grade . They are six-eight years old. In my activity, for introducing scientific concepts to my students, I use various and active methods or traditional methods including experiments. The experiment stimulates students' curiosity, their creativity, the understanding and knowledge taught accessibility. I propose you two such experiments: The life cycle of the plants (long-term experiment, with rigorous observation time):We use beans, wheat or other; They are grown in pots and on the cotton soaked with water,keeping under students' observation protecting them ( just soak them regularly) and we waiting the plants rise. For discussions and comments of plant embryo development we use the plants which rose on the cotton soaked with water plants at the end of the first week. Last school year we had in the pot climbing beans which in May made pods. They were not too great but our experiment was a success. The students could deduce that there will develop those big beans which after drying will be planted again. The influence of light on plants (average duration experiment with the necessary observation time): We use two pots in which plants are of the same type (two geraniums), one of them is situated so as to get direct sunlight and other plant we put in a closed box. Although we wet both plants after a week we see that the plant that benefited from sunlight has turned strain in direct sunlight, developing normally in return the plant out of the box I have yellowed leaves, photosynthesis does not She has occurred . Students will understand the vital role of the Sun in plants' life, both in the classroom and in nature. The experiment is a method of teaching students extremely pleasant, with a remarkable percentage of acquiring more knowledge.

  1. Experiment 2042

    SciTech Connect

    Dash, Zora V.; Dennis, Bert R.; Dreesen, Donald S.; Fehler, Michael C.; House, Leigh S.; Walter, Fritz; Zyvoloski, George A.

    1984-09-10

    Experiment 2042, an injection test in EE-3, was conducted from May 15, 1984 through May 19, 1984. During this four day test ~2 million gallons of water were injected with a maximum injection rate of ~10BPM at 6000 psi. It was planned as a pumping test of the lower zone of well EE-3 (the open hole region from 11,400 ft to 11,648 ft) to test the reservoir characteristics and fracture-seismic system first created during Experiment 2025. However early in the experiment it became apparent that there was some sort connection between the lower zone and the upper "low pressure" zone in EE-3 (from the casing shoe at 10374 ft to about 10900 ft). Available information ruled out a packer failure or other direct connection between these zones so the experiment was continued as planned. Although not a major goal of the experiment, it was hoped that fractures would propagate from EE-3 to EE-2, so hydraulic communication could be established between the two wells, however this did not occur.

  2. Neutrino Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, R. D.

    2010-08-04

    Recent studies of neutrino oscillations have established the existence of finite neutrino masses and mixing between generations of neutrinos. The combined results from studies of atmospheric neutrinos, solar neutrinos, reactor antineutrinos and neutrinos produced at accelerators paint an intriguing picture that clearly requires modification of the standard model of particle physics. These results also provide clear motivation for future neutrino oscillation experiments as well as searches for direct neutrino mass and nuclear double-beta decay. I will discuss the program of new neutrino oscillation experiments aimed at completing our knowledge of the neutrino mixing matrix.

  3. HEGRA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The La Palma cosmic-ray observatory HEGRA (High-Energy Gamma-Ray Astronomy) is an air shower experiment, located at the OBSERVATORIO DEL ROQUE DE LOS MUCHACHOS (2200 m above sea level, 28.75°N, 17.89°W) on the Canary island of La Palma, and is operated by institutes from Germany, Spain and Yerevan....

  4. Aesthetic experience.

    PubMed

    Sirois, François J

    2008-02-01

    An initial clinical question, 'Why does an analysand talk about his/her relationship with an aesthetic object?' opens an investigation into the nature of aesthetic experience. Three principal aspects of the psychoanalytic approach are presented: sublimation, a Freudian concept concerning the vicissitudes of the drives; reparation, a Kleinian concept linked to depressive anxiety; and transformation, a concept of object-relations theory about primitive ego-states. The article discusses the psychic function of aesthetic feelings in mastering anxiety as related to ego, id and superego. The transformation of the experience of passivity is a common link underlying these aspects. Such transformation relies on tolerating ambiguous and contrary feelings within the self, fostered by contact with an aesthetic object. This balance can, however, be upset: two excessive forms of aesthetic experience ensue, namely, fascination and bewitchment. The first belongs to the experience of awe; the second can lead to claustrophobic anxiety. The initial clinical question requires an elaboration of aesthetic transference, a variant of the narcissistic transference, whereby the analysand invites the analyst to share his/her internal state as a common unspoken object.

  5. Soil experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Linton; Butler, Todd; Smith, Mike; Cline, Charles; Scruggs, Steve; Zakhia, Nadim

    1987-01-01

    An experimental procedure was devised to investigate the effects of the lunar environment on the physical properties of simulated lunar soil. The test equipment and materials used consisted of a vacuum chamber, direct shear tester, static penetrometer, and fine grained basalt as the simulant. The vacuum chamber provides a medium for applying the environmental conditions to the soil experiment with the exception of gravity. The shear strength parameters are determined by the direct shear test. Strength parameters and the resistance of soil penetration by static loading will be investigated by the use of a static cone penetrometer. In order to conduct a soil experiment without going to the moon, a suitable lunar simulant must be selected. This simulant must resemble lunar soil in both composition and particle size. The soil that most resembles actual lunar soil is basalt. The soil parameters, as determined by the testing apparatus, will be used as design criteria for lunar soil engagement equipment.

  6. XMASS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, Ko

    2016-06-21

    XMASS is a single phase liquid xenon scintillator detector. The project is designed for multi purposes, dark matter, neutrinoless double beta decay and {sup 7}Be/pp solar neutrino. As the first step of project, XMASS-I detector with 832 kg sensitive volume started operation from Dec. 2010. In this paper, recent obtained physics results from commissioning data, refurbishment of detector and future step of experiment are presented.

  7. SANE experiment

    SciTech Connect

    H. Baghdasaryan, SANE Collaboration

    2012-04-01

    The Spin Asymmetries of the Nucleon Experiment (SANE) is a measurement of parallel and near-perpendicular double spin asymmetries in an inclusive electron scattering. The main goal of the experiment was to measure A{sub {parallel}} and A{sub 80} and extract the spin asymmetries of the proton A{sub 1}{sup p}, A{sub 2}{sup p} and spin structure functions g{sub 1}{sup p} and g{sub 2}{sup p}. Using the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility's polarized electron beam and the University of Virginia's polarized frozen ammonia ({sup 14}NH{sub 3}) target in Hall C, the experiment ran in 2009, collecting data in a Q{sup 2} region from 2.5 to 6.5 GeV{sup 2} and between Bjorken x of 0.3 to 0.8. Particle detection was accomplished using the Big Electron Telescope Array (BETA), a novel non-magnetic detector. This talk will address the progress of the analysis designed to extract the proton spin asymmetries and structure functions. Preliminary results will be presented.

  8. Transport Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Timothy M.; Wuebbles, Donald J.; Boering, Kristie A.; Eckman, Richard S.; Lerner, Jean; Plumb, R. Alan; Rind, David H.; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Waugh, Darryn W.; Wei, Chu-Feng

    1999-01-01

    MM II defined a series of experiments to better understand and characterize model transport and to assess the realism of this transport by comparison to observations. Measurements from aircraft, balloon, and satellite, not yet available at the time of MM I [Prather and Remsberg, 1993], provide new and stringent constraints on model transport, and address the limits of our transport modeling abilities. Simulations of the idealized tracers the age spectrum, and propagating boundary conditions, and conserved HSCT-like emissions probe the relative roles of different model transport mechanisms, while simulations of SF6 and C02 make the connection to observations. Some of the tracers are related, and transport diagnostics such as the mean age can be derived from more than one of the experiments for comparison to observations. The goals of the transport experiments are: (1) To isolate the effects of transport in models from other processes; (2) To assess model transport for realistic tracers (such as SF6 and C02) for comparison to observations; (3) To use certain idealized tracers to isolate model mechanisms and relationships to atmospheric chemical perturbations; (4) To identify strengths and weaknesses of the treatment of transport processes in the models; (5) To relate evaluated shortcomings to aspects of model formulation. The following section are included:Executive Summary, Introduction, Age Spectrum, Observation, Tropical Transport in Models, Global Mean Age in Models, Source-Transport Covariance, HSCT "ANOY" Tracer Distributions, and Summary and Conclusions.

  9. Transport Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Timothy M.; Wuebbles, Donald J.; Boering, Kristie A.; Eckman, Richard S.; Lerner, Jean; Plumb, R. Alan; Rind, David H.; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Waugh, Darryn W.; Wei, Chu-Feng

    1999-01-01

    MM II defined a series of experiments to better understand and characterize model transport and to assess the realism of this transport by comparison to observations. Measurements from aircraft, balloon, and satellite, not yet available at the time of MM I [Prather and Remsberg, 1993], provide new and stringent constraints on model transport, and address the limits of our transport modeling abilities. Simulations of the idealized tracers the age spectrum, and propagating boundary conditions, and conserved HSCT-like emissions probe the relative roles of different model transport mechanisms, while simulations of SF6 and C02 make the connection to observations. Some of the tracers are related, and transport diagnostics such as the mean age can be derived from more than one of the experiments for comparison to observations. The goals of the transport experiments are: (1) To isolate the effects of transport in models from other processes; (2) To assess model transport for realistic tracers (such as SF6 and C02) for comparison to observations; (3) To use certain idealized tracers to isolate model mechanisms and relationships to atmospheric chemical perturbations; (4) To identify strengths and weaknesses of the treatment of transport processes in the models; (5) To relate evaluated shortcomings to aspects of model formulation. The following section are included:Executive Summary, Introduction, Age Spectrum, Observation, Tropical Transport in Models, Global Mean Age in Models, Source-Transport Covariance, HSCT "ANOY" Tracer Distributions, and Summary and Conclusions.

  10. Benchmarking in a differentially heated rotating annulus experiment: Multiple equilibria in the light of laboratory experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincze, Miklos; Harlander, Uwe; Borchert, Sebastian; Achatz, Ulrich; Baumann, Martin; Egbers, Christoph; Fröhlich, Jochen; Hertel, Claudia; Heuveline, Vincent; Hickel, Stefan; von Larcher, Thomas; Remmler, Sebastian

    2014-05-01

    modes. Thus certain "benchmarks" have been created that can later be used as test cases for atmospheric numerical model validation. Both in the experiments and in the numerics multiple equilibrium states have been observed in the form of hysteretic behavior depending on the initial conditions. The precise quantification of these state and wave mode transitions may shed light to some aspects of the basic underlying dynamics of the baroclinic annulus configuration, still to be understood.

  11. Chemistry Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasseur, Guy; Remsberg, Ellis; Purcell, Patrick; Bhatt, Praful; Sage, Karen H.; Brown, Donald E.; Scott, Courtney J.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Tie, Xue-Xi; Huang, Theresa

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the chemistry component of the model comparison is to assess to what extent differences in the formulation of chemical processes explain the variance between model results. Observed concentrations of chemical compounds are used to estimate to what degree the various models represent realistic situations. For readability, the materials for the chemistry experiment are reported in three separate sections. This section discussed the data used to evaluate the models in their simulation of the source gases and the Nitrogen compounds (NO(y)) and Chlorine compounds (Cl(y)) species.

  12. Chemistry Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasseur, Guy; Remsberg, Ellis; Purcell, Patrick; Bhatt, Praful; Sage, Karen H.; Brown, Donald E.; Scott, Courtney J.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Tie, Xue-Xi; Huang, Theresa

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the chemistry component of the model comparison is to assess to what extent differences in the formulation of chemical processes explain the variance between model results. Observed concentrations of chemical compounds are used to estimate to what degree the various models represent realistic situations. For readability, the materials for the chemistry experiment are reported in three separate sections. This section discussed the data used to evaluate the models in their simulation of the source gases and the Nitrogen compounds (NO(y)) and Chlorine compounds (Cl(y)) species.

  13. PASSAGES experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-10-19

    ISS025-E-008371 (20 Oct. 2010) --- NASA astronaut Doug Wheelock, Expedition 25 commander, uses Neurospat hardware to perform a science session with the European Space Agency PASSAGES experiment in the Columbus laboratory of the International Space Station. PASSAGES is designed to test how astronauts interpret visual information in weightlessness. It aims at studying the effects of microgravity on the use of the ‘Eye-Height’ strategy for estimating allowed actions in an environment, and whether this could possibly decrease after a long exposure to weightlessness.

  14. Skylab Workshop experience in experiment accommodation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanlon, W. H.; Hassel, R. R.

    1974-01-01

    This paper examines the experiment support facilities available from the Orbital Workshop (OWS) module of the Skylab. Experiments and associated support provisions have been selected and described to illustrate the various accommodations and degree of complexities involved in the integration of these experiments into the Workshop. The interfaces described start with the simple and proceed to the complex. On the basis of the experience gained in integrating the experiments into the Workshop, conclusions are drawn and suggestions are made on ways to facilitate future experiment operations and at the same time simplify and reduce the cost of integration efforts.

  15. Sleep Monitoring Experiment - Skylab Experiment M133

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    This 1970 photograph shows equipment for the Skylab's Sleep Monitoring Experiment (M133), a medical evaluation designed to objectively determine the amount and quality of crewmembers' inflight sleep. The experiment monitored and recorded electroencephalographic (EEG) and electrooculographic (EOG) activity during astronauts' sleep periods. One of the astronauts was selected for this experiment and wore a fitted cap during his sleep periods. The Marshall Space Flight Center had program management responsibility for the development of Skylab hardware and experiments.

  16. Notes on Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physics Education, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Describes: (1) experiments using a simple phonocardiograph; (2) radioactivity experiments involving a VELA used as a ratemeter; (3) a 25cm continuously operating Foucault pendulum; and (4) camera control of experiments. Descriptions of equipment needed are provided when applicable. (JN)

  17. Notes on Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physics Education, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Describes: (1) experiments using a simple phonocardiograph; (2) radioactivity experiments involving a VELA used as a ratemeter; (3) a 25cm continuously operating Foucault pendulum; and (4) camera control of experiments. Descriptions of equipment needed are provided when applicable. (JN)

  18. Solar Array Experiment (SAE) Flight Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, H. C.; Young, L. E.; Turner, G. F.

    1985-01-01

    The space flight testing of a large, flat, flexible panel solar array is examined. The experiment objectives are: to demonstrate the functional operational of the wind deployment and packaging system; Electrical performance; Thermal performance; and dynamic performance. A complete description of the experiment and the flight results are given.

  19. The User Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    User experience (UX) is about arranging the elements of a product or service to optimize how people will interact with it. In this article, the author talks about the importance of user experience and discusses the design of user experiences in libraries. He first looks at what UX is. Then he describes three kinds of user experience design: (1)…

  20. The User Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    User experience (UX) is about arranging the elements of a product or service to optimize how people will interact with it. In this article, the author talks about the importance of user experience and discusses the design of user experiences in libraries. He first looks at what UX is. Then he describes three kinds of user experience design: (1)…

  1. Commercial Biomedical Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Experiments to seek solutions for a range of biomedical issues are at the heart of several investigations that will be hosted by the Commercial Instrumentation Technology Associates (ITA), Inc. Biomedical Experiments (CIBX-2) payload. CIBX-2 is unique, encompassing more than 20 separate experiments including cancer research, commercial experiments, and student hands-on experiments from 10 schools as part of ITA's ongoing University Among the Stars program. Valerie Cassanto of ITA checks the Canadian Protein Crystallization Experiment (CAPE) carried by STS-86 to Mir in 1997. The experiments are sponsored by NASA's Space Product Development Program (SPD).

  2. Commercial Biomedical Experiments Payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Experiments to seek solutions for a range of biomedical issues are at the heart of several investigations that will be hosted by the Commercial Instrumentation Technology Associates (ITA), Inc. The biomedical experiments CIBX-2 payload is unique, encompassing more than 20 separate experiments including cancer research, commercial experiments, and student hands-on experiments from 10 schools as part of ITA's ongoing University Among the stars program. Here, Astronaut Story Musgrave activates the CMIX-5 (Commercial MDA ITA experiment) payload in the Space Shuttle mid deck during the STS-80 mission in 1996 which is similar to CIBX-2. The experiments are sponsored by NASA's Space Product Development Program (SPD).

  3. Commercial Biomedical Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Experiments to seek solutions for a range of biomedical issues are at the heart of several investigations that will be hosted by the Commercial Instrumentation Technology Associates (ITA), Inc. Biomedical Experiments (CIBX-2) payload. CIBX-2 is unique, encompassing more than 20 separate experiments including cancer research, commercial experiments, and student hands-on experiments from 10 schools as part of ITA's ongoing University Among the Stars program. Valerie Cassanto of ITA checks the Canadian Protein Crystallization Experiment (CAPE) carried by STS-86 to Mir in 1997. The experiments are sponsored by NASA's Space Product Development Program (SPD).

  4. Commercial Biomedical Experiments Payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Experiments to seek solutions for a range of biomedical issues are at the heart of several investigations that will be hosted by the Commercial Instrumentation Technology Associates (ITA), Inc. The biomedical experiments CIBX-2 payload is unique, encompassing more than 20 separate experiments including cancer research, commercial experiments, and student hands-on experiments from 10 schools as part of ITA's ongoing University Among the stars program. Here, Astronaut Story Musgrave activates the CMIX-5 (Commercial MDA ITA experiment) payload in the Space Shuttle mid deck during the STS-80 mission in 1996 which is similar to CIBX-2. The experiments are sponsored by NASA's Space Product Development Program (SPD).

  5. Adaptive Structures Flight Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Maurice

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: adaptive structures flight experiments; enhanced resolution using active vibration suppression; Advanced Controls Technology Experiment (ACTEX); ACTEX program status; ACTEX-2; ACTEX-2 program status; modular control patch; STRV-1b Cryocooler Vibration Suppression Experiment; STRV-1b program status; Precision Optical Bench Experiment (PROBE); Clementine Spacecraft Configuration; TECHSAT all-composite spacecraft; Inexpensive Structures and Materials Flight Experiment (INFLEX); and INFLEX program status.

  6. Adaptive structures flight experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Maurice

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: adaptive structures flight experiments; enhanced resolution using active vibration suppression; Advanced Controls Technology Experiment (ACTEX); ACTEX program status; ACTEX-2; ACTEX-2 program status; modular control patch; STRV-1b Cryocooler Vibration Suppression Experiment; STRV-1b program status; Precision Optical Bench Experiment (PROBE); Clementine Spacecraft Configuration; TECHSAT all-composite spacecraft; Inexpensive Structures and Materials Flight Experiment (INFLEX); and INFLEX program status.

  7. Radiometer experiment for the aeroassist flight experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davy, W. C.; Park, C.; Arnold, J. O.; Balakrishnan, A.

    1985-06-01

    A forthcoming NASA flight experiment is described that provides an opportunity to obtain a large base of radiometric data for high-altitude, high-velocity thermochemically nonequilibrated-flow conditions. As a preliminary to the design of a radiometer for this experiment, an approximate method for predicting both equilibrium and nonequilibrium radiative surface fluxes is described. Spectral results for one trajectory state, a velocity of 10 km/sec at an altitude of 85 km, are presented. These results are then used to develop some of the instrument parameters that will be needed for designing of the three genre of radiometers that are proposed for this experiment.

  8. Biomedical experiments. Part A: Biostack experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buecker, H.; Horneck, G.; Reinholz, E.; Scheuermann, W.; Ruether, W.; Graul, E. H.; Planel, H.; Soleilhavoup, J. P.; Cuer, P.; Kaiser, R.

    1972-01-01

    The biostack experiment is described which was designed to study the biologic effects of individual heavy nuclei of galactic cosmic radiation during space flight outside the magnetosphere of the earth. Specifically, the biostack experiment was designed to promote research on the effects of high energy/high Z particles of galactic cosmic radiation on a broad spectrum of biologic systems, from the molecular to the highly organized and developed forms of life. The experiment was considered unique and scientifically meritorious because of its potential yield of information - currently unavailable on earth - on the interaction of biologic systems with the heavy particles of galactic cosmic radiation.

  9. The ERASMUS experiment archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isakeit, Dieter; Sabbatini, Massimo; Carey, William

    2005-08-01

    The Erasmus Experiment Archive is an electronic database, accessible through the Internet, that collects in a single reference repository scientific, technical and operational information regarding the experiments performed in the experiment facilities which fall under the responsibility of the ESA Directorate of Human Spaceflight, Microgravity and Exploration. The archive is operated, filled with content and kept up-to-date by the Erasmus User Centre. which forms part of the Directorate. The archive shares its records and is interoperable with similar experiment archives of the partner agencies NASA USA) and JAXA (Japan) through a mutually agreed standard for experiment records called the International Distributed Experiment Archive (IDEA).

  10. STEP Experiment Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brumfield, M. L. (Compiler)

    1984-01-01

    A plan to develop a space technology experiments platform (STEP) was examined. NASA Langley Research Center held a STEP Experiment Requirements Workshop on June 29 and 30 and July 1, 1983, at which experiment proposers were invited to present more detailed information on their experiment concept and requirements. A feasibility and preliminary definition study was conducted and the preliminary definition of STEP capabilities and experiment concepts and expected requirements for support services are presented. The preliminary definition of STEP capabilities based on detailed review of potential experiment requirements is investigated. Topics discussed include: Shuttle on-orbit dynamics; effects of the space environment on damping materials; erectable beam experiment; technology for development of very large solar array deployers; thermal energy management process experiment; photovoltaic concentrater pointing dynamics and plasma interactions; vibration isolation technology; flight tests of a synthetic aperture radar antenna with use of STEP.

  11. Experiments and Calculations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siddons, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses several science experiments/activities and their associated measurements. These include a simple projectile activity, cartesian diver (used to measure altitude and atmospheric pressure), experiment demonstrating atmospheric pressure, and activities using a stroboscope, and electrometer. (JN)

  12. Challenging Students with Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambruso, Mark D.

    2003-01-01

    Supports the use of a science experiment option in the high school curriculum to enhance student learning. Presents a science experiment rubric and connects the use of science projects with standards. (DDR)

  13. Neutrino oscillation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Kenzo

    2000-12-01

    The present status of neutrino oscillation experiments and prospects of forthcoming experiments are reviewed. Particular emphasis is placed on the recent results from Super-Kamiokande atmospheric neutrino and solar neutrino observations. .

  14. Experiments and Calculations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siddons, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses several science experiments/activities and their associated measurements. These include a simple projectile activity, cartesian diver (used to measure altitude and atmospheric pressure), experiment demonstrating atmospheric pressure, and activities using a stroboscope, and electrometer. (JN)

  15. CFE experiment In JEM

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-10-07

    ISS029-E-020901 (7 Oct. 2011) --- NASA astronaut Mike Fossum, Expedition 29 commander, points to the Capillary Flow Experiment (CFE) experiment in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station.

  16. Experiments in Magnetohydrodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayner, J. P.

    1970-01-01

    Describes three student experiments in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In these experiments, it was found that the electrical conductivity of the local water supply was sufficient to demonstrate effectively some of the features of MHD flowmeters, generators, and pumps. (LC)

  17. Notes on Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physics Education, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Describes apparatus needed and instructions for conducting four experiments. Experiments focus on light waves, measurement of contact resistance, demonstration of longitudinal waves, and a simple method of measuring the refractive indices of transparent plates and liquids. (JM)

  18. Experiments in Magnetohydrodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayner, J. P.

    1970-01-01

    Describes three student experiments in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In these experiments, it was found that the electrical conductivity of the local water supply was sufficient to demonstrate effectively some of the features of MHD flowmeters, generators, and pumps. (LC)

  19. Notes on Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physics Education, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Describes apparatus needed and instructions for conducting four experiments. Experiments focus on light waves, measurement of contact resistance, demonstration of longitudinal waves, and a simple method of measuring the refractive indices of transparent plates and liquids. (JM)

  20. The ITALSAT experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paraboni, A.

    1989-01-01

    Some information is given on the ITALSAT millimetric waves propagation experiment, which is to be conducted with the ITALSAT satellite, whose launch is foreseen for the middle of 1990. The purpose of the experiment is one of experimenting with advanced technologies and techniques employing the 20/30 GHz bands in wideband telecommunications. Among the most qualified features of this system are the multispot antenna and the exchange function performed directly onboard. Details of the experiment are given.

  1. Experiences with Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumbacher, Daniel L.

    2006-01-01

    The presentation "NASA Experience with Launch Vehicles" is a compilation of Mr. Dumbacher's career experiences with the Space Shuttle Program, the Delta - Clipper Experimental flight test project, the X-33 demonstrator project, and recent experiences with the Orbital Spaceplane Program agd the current NASA effort on Exploration Launch Systems. Mr. Dumbacher will discuss his personal experiences and provide lessons learned from each program. The accounts provided by Mr. Dumbacher are his own and do not necessarily represent the official NASA position.

  2. ACTS Aeronautical Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agan, Martin J.; Nakamura, Daniel I.; Campbell, Alan D.; Sternowski, Robert H.; Whiting, Wendy A.; Shameson, Leon

    1996-01-01

    This paper discusses a series of aeronautical experiments that utilize the advanced communication technology satellite (ACTS). As part of the ongoing effort to investigate commercial applications of ACTS technologies, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and various industry/government partners have developed a series of experiments that utilize the ACTS mobile terminal (AMT) and the broadband aeronautical terminal to investigate aeronautical uses of the ACTS. This paper discusses these experiments including the experiment configurations, technologies, results and future implications.

  3. ACTS Aeronautical Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agan, Martin J.; Nakamura, Daniel I.; Campbell, Alan D.; Sternowski, Robert H.; Whiting, Wendy A.; Shameson, Leon

    1996-01-01

    This paper discusses a series of aeronautical experiments that utilize the advanced communication technology satellite (ACTS). As part of the ongoing effort to investigate commercial applications of ACTS technologies, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and various industry/government partners have developed a series of experiments that utilize the ACTS mobile terminal (AMT) and the broadband aeronautical terminal to investigate aeronautical uses of the ACTS. This paper discusses these experiments including the experiment configurations, technologies, results and future implications.

  4. The Experiment Factory: Standardizing Behavioral Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Sochat, Vanessa V.; Eisenberg, Ian W.; Enkavi, A. Zeynep; Li, Jamie; Bissett, Patrick G.; Poldrack, Russell A.

    2016-01-01

    The administration of behavioral and experimental paradigms for psychology research is hindered by lack of a coordinated effort to develop and deploy standardized paradigms. While several frameworks (Mason and Suri, 2011; McDonnell et al., 2012; de Leeuw, 2015; Lange et al., 2015) have provided infrastructure and methods for individual research groups to develop paradigms, missing is a coordinated effort to develop paradigms linked with a system to easily deploy them. This disorganization leads to redundancy in development, divergent implementations of conceptually identical tasks, disorganized and error-prone code lacking documentation, and difficulty in replication. The ongoing reproducibility crisis in psychology and neuroscience research (Baker, 2015; Open Science Collaboration, 2015) highlights the urgency of this challenge: reproducible research in behavioral psychology is conditional on deployment of equivalent experiments. A large, accessible repository of experiments for researchers to develop collaboratively is most efficiently accomplished through an open source framework. Here we present the Experiment Factory, an open source framework for the development and deployment of web-based experiments. The modular infrastructure includes experiments, virtual machines for local or cloud deployment, and an application to drive these components and provide developers with functions and tools for further extension. We release this infrastructure with a deployment (http://www.expfactory.org) that researchers are currently using to run a set of over 80 standardized web-based experiments on Amazon Mechanical Turk. By providing open source tools for both deployment and development, this novel infrastructure holds promise to bring reproducibility to the administration of experiments, and accelerate scientific progress by providing a shared community resource of psychological paradigms. PMID:27199843

  5. The Experiment Factory: Standardizing Behavioral Experiments.

    PubMed

    Sochat, Vanessa V; Eisenberg, Ian W; Enkavi, A Zeynep; Li, Jamie; Bissett, Patrick G; Poldrack, Russell A

    2016-01-01

    The administration of behavioral and experimental paradigms for psychology research is hindered by lack of a coordinated effort to develop and deploy standardized paradigms. While several frameworks (Mason and Suri, 2011; McDonnell et al., 2012; de Leeuw, 2015; Lange et al., 2015) have provided infrastructure and methods for individual research groups to develop paradigms, missing is a coordinated effort to develop paradigms linked with a system to easily deploy them. This disorganization leads to redundancy in development, divergent implementations of conceptually identical tasks, disorganized and error-prone code lacking documentation, and difficulty in replication. The ongoing reproducibility crisis in psychology and neuroscience research (Baker, 2015; Open Science Collaboration, 2015) highlights the urgency of this challenge: reproducible research in behavioral psychology is conditional on deployment of equivalent experiments. A large, accessible repository of experiments for researchers to develop collaboratively is most efficiently accomplished through an open source framework. Here we present the Experiment Factory, an open source framework for the development and deployment of web-based experiments. The modular infrastructure includes experiments, virtual machines for local or cloud deployment, and an application to drive these components and provide developers with functions and tools for further extension. We release this infrastructure with a deployment (http://www.expfactory.org) that researchers are currently using to run a set of over 80 standardized web-based experiments on Amazon Mechanical Turk. By providing open source tools for both deployment and development, this novel infrastructure holds promise to bring reproducibility to the administration of experiments, and accelerate scientific progress by providing a shared community resource of psychological paradigms.

  6. The Concerned Observer Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabiger, Michael

    1991-01-01

    Describes a classroom experiment--the "concerned observer" experiment--for production students that dramatizes basic film language by relating it to several levels of human observation. Details the experiment's three levels, and concludes that film language mimics wide-ranging states of human emotion and ideological persuasion. (PRA)

  7. Labor Market Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haupert, Michael J.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a class experiment where students search a hypothetical job market for jobs paying wages in a known range but with an unknown wage distribution. The experiment is divided into three "trials", each one introducing different variables (unemployment insurance, search costs, and recession). Includes experiment instructions and a…

  8. A Mastery Learning Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Stephen A.; And Others

    Yale Public Schools (Yale, Michigan) conducted a field experiment in implementing mastery learning. The purpose of the experiment was to provide a hands-on experience for teachers in the implementation of mastery learning and to use students as their own controls in order to compare the results of the implementation of mastery learning both in…

  9. NASTRAN: Users' experiences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The proceedings of a conference on NASA Structural Analysis (NASTRAN) to analyze the experiences of users of the program are presented. The subjects discussed include the following: (1) statics and buckling, (2) vibrations and dynamics, (3) substructing, (4) new capability, (5) user's experience, and (6) system experience. Specific applications of NASTRAN to spacecraft, aircraft, nuclear power plants, and materials tests are reported.

  10. Graphing from Everyday Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carraher, David; Schliemann, Analucia; Nemirousky, Ricardo

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the importance of teaching grounded in the everyday experiences and concerns of the learners. Studies how people with limited school experience can understand graphs and concludes that individuals with limited academic education can clarify the role of everyday experiences in learning about graphs. (ASK)

  11. Basic Experiments in Telecommunications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andresen, S. G.

    Presented is a set of laboratory experiments developed to provide students with demonstrations and hands-on experiences with a variety of basic communications methods. These experiments may be used with students who have training in engineering, as well as those with social sciences who have no engineering background. Detailed exercises dealing…

  12. The Concerned Observer Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabiger, Michael

    1991-01-01

    Describes a classroom experiment--the "concerned observer" experiment--for production students that dramatizes basic film language by relating it to several levels of human observation. Details the experiment's three levels, and concludes that film language mimics wide-ranging states of human emotion and ideological persuasion. (PRA)

  13. Labor Market Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haupert, Michael J.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a class experiment where students search a hypothetical job market for jobs paying wages in a known range but with an unknown wage distribution. The experiment is divided into three "trials", each one introducing different variables (unemployment insurance, search costs, and recession). Includes experiment instructions and a…

  14. Using Experience for Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boud, David, Ed.; And Others

    This book contains 13 articles on learning from experience and its relationship to adult learning and adult education. The introductory article, "Understanding Learning from Experience" (Boud, Cohen, Walker), examines five propositions about learning from experience. The following papers are organized into three sections that focus…

  15. Theme: Supervised Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, David E.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Includes "It's Time to Stop Quibbling over the Acronym" (Cox); "Information Rich--Experience Poor" (Elliot et al.); "Supervised Agricultural Experience Selection Process" (Yokum, Boggs); "Point System" (Fraze, Vaughn); "Urban Diversity Rural Style" (Morgan, Henry); "Nonoccupational Supervised Experience" (Croom); "Reflecting Industry" (Miller);…

  16. Theme: Supervised Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, David E.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Includes "It's Time to Stop Quibbling over the Acronym" (Cox); "Information Rich--Experience Poor" (Elliot et al.); "Supervised Agricultural Experience Selection Process" (Yokum, Boggs); "Point System" (Fraze, Vaughn); "Urban Diversity Rural Style" (Morgan, Henry); "Nonoccupational Supervised Experience" (Croom); "Reflecting Industry" (Miller);…

  17. Future Outlook: Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yoichiro

    2008-11-01

    The personal view for the next to the next neutrino detector, the ultimate experiment, is discussed. Considering the size, cost and head winds against the basic science, the ultimate experiment will be the only experiment in the world. Here two such experiments one for the neutrino oscillation and the other for the double beta decay were discussed. The ultimate experiment needs to include a bread and butter science and to have a discovery potential for an unexpected phenomenon. There are many technical challenges and international co-operations are absolutely necessary.

  18. Industrial application experiment series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bluhm, S. A.

    1980-01-01

    The deployment of parabolic dish systems into the industrial sector for the purpose of providing users, suppliers, sponsors, and developers with a realistic assessment of system feasibility in selected near-term industrial applications will be accomplished initially through the industrial module experiment and later through additional experiments involving thermal, electric, and combined thermal and electrical systems. The approach is to progress through steps, from single module to multi-module systems, from thermal-only applications to more complex combined thermal and electric applications. The experience of other solar thermal experiments, particularly those involving parabolic dish hardware, will be utilized to the fullest extent possible in experiment planning and implementation.

  19. GRIP Experiment 2010

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-17

    Michael Kavaya, of the NASA Langley Research Center, a Principal Investigator for the DAWN experiment, looks over data with Jeffrey Beyon during a flight of the NASA DC-8, Tuesday, Aug. 17, 2010, in the Gulf of Mexico. The DAWN experiment, also known as the Doppler Aerosol Wind Lidar, is one of many experiments supporting the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment, a NASA Earth science field experiment in 2010 that is being conducted to better understand how tropical storms form and develop into major hurricanes. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  20. Bistability in Organic Magnetic Materials: A Comparative Study of the Key Differences between Hysteretic and Non-hysteretic Spin Transitions in Dithiazolyl Radicals.

    PubMed

    Vela, Sergi; Reardon, Michael B; Jakobsche, Charles E; Turnbull, Mark M; Ribas-Arino, Jordi; Novoa, Juan J

    2017-03-08

    Dithiazolyl (DTA)-based radicals have furnished many examples of organic spin-transition materials, some of them occurring with hysteresis and some others without. Herein, we present a combined computational and experimental study aimed at deciphering the factors controlling the existence or absence of hysteresis by comparing the phase transitions of 4-cyanobenzo-1,3,2-dithiazolyl and 1,3,5-trithia-2,4,6-triazapentalenyl radicals, which are prototypical examples of non-bistable and bistable spin transitions, respectively. Both materials present low-temperature diamagnetic and high-temperature paramagnetic structures, characterized by dimerized (⋅⋅⋅A-A⋅⋅⋅A-A⋅⋅⋅)n and regular (⋅⋅⋅A⋅⋅⋅A⋅⋅⋅A⋅⋅⋅A⋅⋅⋅)n π-stacks of radicals, respectively. We show that the regular π-stacks are not potential energy minima but average structures arising from a dynamic inter-conversion between two degenerate dimerized configurations: (⋅⋅⋅A-A⋅⋅⋅A-A⋅⋅⋅)n ↔(-A⋅⋅⋅A-A⋅⋅⋅A-)n . The emergence of this intra-stack dynamics upon heating gives rise to a second-order phase transition that is responsible for the change in the dominant magnetic interactions of the system. This suggests that the promotion of a (⋅⋅⋅A-A⋅⋅⋅A-A⋅⋅⋅)n ↔(-A⋅⋅⋅A-A⋅⋅⋅A-)n dynamics is a general mechanism for triggering spin transitions in DTA-based materials. Yet, this intra-stack dynamics does not suffice to generate bistability, which also requires a rearrangement of the intermolecular bonds between the π-stacks via a first-order phase transition.

  1. Experiments with Individual Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Mark

    2004-05-01

    I describe several different experiments we have performed with individual photons. For example, while well known experiments involving phenomena such as the photoelectric effect and Compton scattering strongly suggest the existence of photons, they do not prove the existence of light quanta. To prove the existence of light quanta one must perform an experiment whose results cannot be explained using classical waves. We have performed such an experiment--it demonstrates the localization of light quanta by showing that a single photon only goes one way when it leaves a beamsplitter [1]. In a second experiment we demonstrate that this single photon will interfere with itself when it transits an interferometer. The experiments have been performed by undergraduates, and the goal of this project is to develop a series of experiments exploring fundamental aspects of quantum mechanics for an undergraduate teaching lab. [1] P. Grangier, G. Roger and A. Aspect, Europhys. Lett. 1, 173 (1986).

  2. Atmospheric variability experiment /AVE II/ pilot experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. E.; Scroggins, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    The Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE II) was conducted in May 1974. Rawinsonde releases were made at 54 upper-air stations in two thirds of the eastern U.S. at 3-hr intervals for a 24-hr period. Radar data were obtained from 11 stations located near the center of the observational area, and as many data as possible were collected from the Nimbus 5, NOAA 2, ATS-3, and DMSP satellites. The present paper provides an overview of the experiment and describes how the user community can obtain copies of the data.

  3. The Experience of Emotion

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Lisa Feldman; Mesquita, Batja; Ochsner, Kevin N.; Gross, James J.

    2007-01-01

    Experiences of emotion are content-rich events that emerge at the level of psychological description, but must be causally constituted by neurobiological processes. This chapter outlines an emerging scientific agenda for understanding what these experiences feel like and how they arise. We review the available answers to what is felt (i.e., the content that makes up an experience of emotion) and how neurobiological processes instantiate these properties of experience. These answers are then integrated into a broad framework that describes, in psychological terms, how the experience of emotion emerges from more basic processes. We then discuss the role of such experiences in the economy of the mind and behavior. PMID:17002554

  4. ACTS Experiments Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schertler, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of the ACTS Experiments Program is presented. ACTS is being developed and will flight test the advanced technologies associated with: a Ka-band multibeam antenna, onboard signal processing and switching as well as laser communications. A nominal 3 yr experiments program is planned. Through the experiments program, the capabilities of the ACTS system will be made available to U.S. industry, university and government experimenters to test, prove the feasibility and evaluate the key ACTS system technologies. Communication modes of operation using the baseband processor and microwave switch matrix are presented, along with the antenna coverage pattern. Potential experiment categories are also presented and briefly discussed. An overall schedule of activities associated with the experiments program is outlined. Results of the ACTS Experiments Program will provide information vital to successful industry implementation of ACTS technology in a future operational system.

  5. Future reactor experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Liangjian

    2015-07-15

    The non-zero neutrino mixing angle θ{sub 13} has been discovered and precisely measured by the current generation short-baseline reactor neutrino experiments. It opens the gate of measuring the leptonic CP-violating phase and enables the neutrino mass ordering. The JUNO and RENO-50 proposals aim at resolving the neutrino mass ordering using reactors. The experiment design, physics sensitivity, technical challenges as well as the progresses of those two proposed experiments are reviewed in this paper.

  6. Gyroscope relativity experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decher, R.

    1971-01-01

    A gyroscope test of general relativity theory is proposed. The basic ideas and hardware concepts conceived by the investigators to implement the experiment are discussed. The goal is to measure the extremely small relativistic precession of gyroscopes in an earth-orbiting satellite. The experiment hardware (cryogenic gyroscopes, a telescope and superconducting circuits) is enclosed in a liquid helium dewar. The experiment will operate in orbit for about one year.

  7. VISUAL ACUITY (EXPERIMENTS)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-06-18

    S65-35589 (18 June 1965) --- Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., pilot for the prime crew on the Gemini-5 spaceflight, takes pictures of predetermined land areas during visual acuity experiments over Laredo, Texas. The experiments will aid in learning to identify known terrestrial features under controlled conditions. Knowledge gained from these experiments will have later application for space pilots identifying terrestrial features from space.

  8. Microgravity Experiments On Animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalton, B. P.; Leon, H.; Hogan, R.; Clarke, B.; Tollinger, D.

    1991-01-01

    Paper describes experiments on animal subjects planned for Spacelab Life Sciences 1 mission. Laboratory equipment evaluated, and physiological experiments performed. Represents first step in establishing technology for maintaining and manipulating rodents, nonhuman primates, amphibians, and plants during space flight without jeopardizing crew's environment. In addition, experiments focus on effects of microgravity on cardiopulmonary, cardiovascular, and musculoskeletal systems; on regulation of volume of blood and production of red blood cells; and on calcium metabolism and gravity receptors.

  9. GRIP Experiment 2010

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-16

    Errol Korn, seated left, deploys a dropsonde experiment over the Gulf of Mexico during a flight aboard the NASA DC-8 as Janel Thomas, a University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) graduate student, and Bob Pasken, look on , Tuesday, Aug. 17, 2010. The Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment is a NASA Earth science field experiment in 2010 that is being conducted to better understand how tropical storms form and develop into major hurricanes. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  10. GRIP Experiment 2010

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-15

    Syed Ismail, from the Langley Research Center, principal investigator for the Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) is seen aboard the NASA DC-8 aircraft, Monday, August 16, 2010, at Fort Lauderdale Hollywood International Airport in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. The Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment is a NASA Earth science field experiment in 2010 that is being conducted to better understand how tropical storms form and develop into major hurricanes. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  11. GRIP Experiment 2010

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-15

    The NASA DC-8 airplane sits on the tarmac, Monday, Aug. 16, 2010, at Fort Lauderdale Hollywood International Airport in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. , as preparations continue for its part in the GRIP experiment. The Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment is a NASA Earth science field experiment in 2010 that is being conducted to better understand how tropical storms form and develop into major hurricanes. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  12. GRIP Experiment 2010

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-14

    The NASA DC-8 airplane sits on the tarmac, Sunday, Aug. 15, 2010, at Fort Lauderdale International Airport in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. , as preparations continue for its part in the GRIP experiment. The Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment is a NASA Earth science field experiment in 2010 that is being conducted to better understand how tropical storms form and develop into major hurricanes. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  13. Microgravity Experiments On Animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalton, B. P.; Leon, H.; Hogan, R.; Clarke, B.; Tollinger, D.

    1991-01-01

    Paper describes experiments on animal subjects planned for Spacelab Life Sciences 1 mission. Laboratory equipment evaluated, and physiological experiments performed. Represents first step in establishing technology for maintaining and manipulating rodents, nonhuman primates, amphibians, and plants during space flight without jeopardizing crew's environment. In addition, experiments focus on effects of microgravity on cardiopulmonary, cardiovascular, and musculoskeletal systems; on regulation of volume of blood and production of red blood cells; and on calcium metabolism and gravity receptors.

  14. Chemiluminescence: An Illuminating Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gafney, Harry D.; Adamson, Arthur W.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which luminescence is observed during a reaction between sodium borohydride and trisbipyridalruthenium (III). Includes a discussion of the theory of chemiluminescence. (MLH)

  15. [Near death experiences].

    PubMed

    Rubia Vila, Francisco José

    2012-01-01

    Near Death Experiences are those accounted by people who after being clinically dead return to life spontaneously or after reanimation. These experiences have been used traditionally to support the belief in the existence of the soul and of life after death. However, today neuroscience tries to explain these experiences from the scientific point of view, i.e. explaining them based on their brain substrates. Their resemblance to mystic experiences and to altered states of consciousness seems to indicate that they may be produced by hyperactivity of limbic structures caused by anoxia or hypercapnia.

  16. SEDS experiment design definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, Joseph A.; Alexander, Charles M.; Oldson, John C.

    1990-01-01

    The Small Expendable-tether Deployment System (SEDS) was developed to design, build, integrate, fly, and safely deploy and release an expendable tether. A suitable concept for an on-orbit test of SEDS was developed. The following tasks were performed: (1) Define experiment objectives and requirements; (2) Define experiment concepts to reach those objectives; (3) Support NASA in experiment concept selection and definition; (4) Perform analyses and tests of SEDS hardware; (5) Refine the selected SEDS experiment concept; and (6) Support interactive SEDS system definition process. Results and conclusions are given.

  17. Chemiluminescence: An Illuminating Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gafney, Harry D.; Adamson, Arthur W.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which luminescence is observed during a reaction between sodium borohydride and trisbipyridalruthenium (III). Includes a discussion of the theory of chemiluminescence. (MLH)

  18. The Student Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haselgrove, Susanne, Ed.

    This collection of papers discusses the experience of students in the United Kingdom's new, mass higher education system. The papers are viewed as dispatches from the "front line" rather than conventional analyses by education researchers. The organization of the papers mirrors the stages of students' experience of higher…

  19. Beyond the Practicum Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Jessica

    2009-01-01

    The practicum is an important part of most TESL programmes; however, many novice teachers seek practical experiences beyond the practicum as part of their preparation for entering the profession. Collaborative projects between language learners and pre-service language teachers can offer such valuable practical experiences for both groups. The…

  20. Notes on Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physics Education, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Describes: (1) two experiments using a laser (resonant cavity for light and pinhole camera effect with a hologram); (2) optical differaction patterns displayed by microcomputer; and (3) automating the Hall effect (with comments on apparatus needed and computer program used); and (4) an elegant experiment in mechanical equilibrium. (JN)

  1. Real-World Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borja, Rhea R.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents IISME, a U.S. program that can give educators a real-world experience and that can deepen their subject-matter knowledge. It also presents the experiences of some teachers who are into this program. IISME's summer-fellowship program started out with 40 teachers and 12 companies. The group's growth picked up in 2001, when it…

  2. On the Poggendorff Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coelho, Ricardo Lopes; Silva, P. A. S.; Borges, Paulo de Faria

    2015-01-01

    Poggendorff showed experimentally, in the middle of the 19th century, that the weight of an Atwood machine is reduced when it is brought to motion. His experiment has been revisited from time to time, making use of instrumentation that reflects the technological development of the moment. In this paper, the evolution of the experiment is briefly…

  3. Varieties of Musical Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bharucha, J. Jamshed; Curtis, Meagan; Paroo, Kaivon

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we argue that music cognition involves the use of acoustic and auditory codes to evoke a variety of conscious experiences. The variety of domains that are encompassed by music is so diverse that it is unclear whether a single domain of structure or experience is defining. Music is best understood as a form of communication in which…

  4. Neutrino Oscillation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholberg, Kate

    The discovery of neutrino oscillations was recognized by the 2015 Nobel Prize. Tremendous progress has been made in the past two decades on understanding of neutrino mass and mixing properties, yet there are remaining unknowns. This talk presented an overview of neutrino oscillation experiments, with emphasis on recent results from beam and reactor experiments, as well as exciting prospects for the next decades.

  5. Japanese Experiment Module

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-11-05

    The Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) is moved on its workstand in the Space Station Processing Facility. The JEM will undergo pre-assembly measurements. Developed by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), the JEM will enhance the unique research capabilities of the orbiting complex by providing an additional environment for astronauts to conduct science experiments.

  6. Experiment in Structural Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diener, Z. P.

    The concern of the experiment is to find out the roles of abstraction and generalization in the learning of mathematical structures. The basic question is whether to generalize before abstracting or vice-versa in order to maximize transfer. The experiment involves four mathematical tasks and a transfer of activity. Experimental procedures are…

  7. Play as Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henricks, Thomas S.

    2015-01-01

    The author investigates what he believes one of the more important aspects of play--the experience it generates in its participants. He considers the quality of this experience in relation to five ways of viewing play--as action, interaction, activity, disposition, and within a context. He treats broadly the different forms of affect, including…

  8. Fluorescence Experiments with Quinine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Reilly, James E.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a series of experiments which illustrate the analytical capabilities of fluorescence, and outlines two straightforward analyses involving real analyses. These experiments are suitable for an undergraduate instrumental analysis course and require approximately six to seven hours of laboratory time. (MLH)

  9. MSFC Skylab corollary experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The evolution of the development and integration of Skylab experiments from initial concepts through mission operations is documented. All experiment systems are covered as well as management controls which were developed and exercised to assure acceptable operational capability and optimize data acquisition for final scientific results.

  10. THX Experiment Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark; Wroblewski, Adam; Locke, Randy; Georgiadis, Nick

    2016-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of experiments conducted at NASA GRC to provide turbulent flow measurements needed for new turbulence model development and validation. The experiments include particle image velocimetry (PIV) and hot-wire measurements of mean flow velocity and temperature fields, as well as fluctuating components.

  11. Experience and appreciation

    Treesearch

    Yi-Fu Tuan

    1977-01-01

    A young child has keen senses, but his world is not thereby more filled with sensory values than that of an adult. To enjoy the physical environment fully the mere capacity to experience stimuli is not enough; it must be complemented by appreciation, which is an intellectual activity. A young child's experiences of nature are often more intense than those of an...

  12. Science Experience Unit: Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson-Florissant School District, Ferguson, MO.

    GRADES OR AGES: Intermediate grades. SUBJECT MATTER: Conservation. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: The guide is divided into 24 experiments. It is mimeographed and staple-bound with a paper cover. OBJECTIVES AND ACTIVITIES: A specific skill or knowledge objective is stated at the beginning of each experiment. Detailed procedures are listed…

  13. The Student Athlete Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gayles, Joy Gaston

    2009-01-01

    Prior to the 1980s, the literature on the experiences of collegiate student athletes was rather scarce. Since that time the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) has passed several eligibility rules to address concerns about the academic performance and the overall experience of student athletes on college campuses. As such, the…

  14. The Jumping Ring Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baylie, M.; Ford, P. J.; Mathlin, G. P.; Palmer, C.

    2009-01-01

    The jumping ring experiment has become central to liquid nitrogen shows given as part of the outreach and open day activities carried out within the University of Bath. The basic principles of the experiment are described as well as the effect of changing the geometry of the rings and their metallurgical state. In general, aluminium rings are…

  15. The Jumping Ring Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baylie, M.; Ford, P. J.; Mathlin, G. P.; Palmer, C.

    2009-01-01

    The jumping ring experiment has become central to liquid nitrogen shows given as part of the outreach and open day activities carried out within the University of Bath. The basic principles of the experiment are described as well as the effect of changing the geometry of the rings and their metallurgical state. In general, aluminium rings are…

  16. Experience with MODSIM II

    SciTech Connect

    Streets, J.; Berg, D.; Oleynik, G.; Pordes, R.; Slimmer, D.

    1992-02-01

    We present results of computer simulations for Data Acquisition systems for large fixed target experiments in an object oriented simulation language, MODSIM. This paper summarizes our experiences and presents preliminary results from the simulation already completed. We also indicate the resources required for this project.

  17. Varieties of Musical Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bharucha, J. Jamshed; Curtis, Meagan; Paroo, Kaivon

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we argue that music cognition involves the use of acoustic and auditory codes to evoke a variety of conscious experiences. The variety of domains that are encompassed by music is so diverse that it is unclear whether a single domain of structure or experience is defining. Music is best understood as a form of communication in which…

  18. Music and Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koob, Joseph E., II

    1984-01-01

    Describes the educational theories of John Dewey, and especially his emphasis on the importance of experience. In terms of music education, this involves providing students with expressive experiences and directing students so that there is growth in understanding, meaning, and value. (CS)

  19. Franklin: User Experiences

    SciTech Connect

    National Energy Research Supercomputing Center; He, Yun; Kramer, William T.C.; Carter, Jonathan; Cardo, Nicholas

    2008-05-07

    The newest workhorse of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center is a Cray XT4 with 9,736 dual core nodes. This paper summarizes Franklin user experiences from friendly early user period to production period. Selected successful user stories along with top issues affecting user experiences are presented.

  20. Near-death experiences.

    PubMed Central

    Blackmore, S J

    1996-01-01

    Reactions to claims of near-death experiences (NDE) range from the popular view that this must be evidence for life after death, to outright rejection of the experiences as, at best, drug induced hallucinations or, at worse, pure invention. Twenty years, and much research, later, it is clear that neither extreme is correct. PMID:8683504

  1. Supervised Business Experience Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This handbook explains how to conduct a supervised business education experience program in Missouri, outlining the program, rationale, components, principles, and resources. Specifically, the 11 units cover the following: (1) introduction to supervised business experience; (2) program design; (3) state policies; (4) the advisory committee; (5)…

  2. Shusterman on Somatic Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maattanen, Pentti

    2010-01-01

    Richard Shusterman's "Body Consciousness" aims at formulating a theory of somaesthetics and somatic experience. There has indeed been a growing interest in the role of the body in experience. Shusterman examines the arguments of six important writers who have been influential in this discussion. The emphasis on the body is natural for a…

  3. Shusterman on Somatic Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maattanen, Pentti

    2010-01-01

    Richard Shusterman's "Body Consciousness" aims at formulating a theory of somaesthetics and somatic experience. There has indeed been a growing interest in the role of the body in experience. Shusterman examines the arguments of six important writers who have been influential in this discussion. The emphasis on the body is natural for a…

  4. Ball Collision Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, R.

    2015-01-01

    Experiments are described on collisions between two billiard balls and between a bat and a ball. The experiments are designed to extend a student's understanding of collision events and could be used either as a classroom demonstration or for a student project.

  5. Peak Experience Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Daniel G.; Evans, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    This paper emerges from the continued analysis of data collected in a series of international studies concerning Childhood Peak Experiences (CPEs) based on developments in understanding peak experiences in Maslow's hierarchy of needs initiated by Dr Edward Hoffman. Bridging from the series of studies, Canadian researchers explore collected…

  6. Seasat land experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, J. E.; Barath, F.; Bryant, N.; Cannon, P. J.; Elachi, C.; Goetz, A.; Krishen, K.; Macdonald, H. C.; Marmelstein, A.; Miller, L. J.

    1978-01-01

    An overview of the Seasat land experiments is presented. The potential roles for active microwave imaging systems on board satellites were reviewed with particular emphasis on the Seasat Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). Recommendations were made concerning the type of experiments that could most profitably be conducted over land with the Seasat SAR system capabilities available.

  7. Notes on Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physics Education, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Describes briefly three experiments, which are presented by three physics teachers to share their ideas with other teachers and readers. These experiments are: (1) a simple hazemeter for window pollution assessment; (2) the speed of light; and (3) the ball-bearing electric motor. (HM)

  8. Human Simulated Diving Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, David S.; Speck, Dexter F.

    1979-01-01

    This report details several simulated divinq experiments on the human. These are suitable for undergraduate or graduate laboratories in human or environmental physiology. The experiment demonstrates that a diving reflex is precipitated by both facial cooling and apnea. (Author/RE)

  9. Undergraduate Infrared Spectroscopy Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacCarthy, Patrick; Bowman, Susan J.

    1982-01-01

    Highlights procedures and results of an experiment using atomic absorption spectroscope to illustrate a fundamental chemical concept. The experiment demonstrates the dependence of the solubility product of lead sulfate on ionic strength in the presence of a slight excess of anion. (Author/JN)

  10. Boyle's Law Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermens, Richard A.

    1983-01-01

    Suggests that ideal experiments fit into course time constraints and be meaningful, relevant to course content, safe, inexpensive, simple, reproducible, and easy to set up/maintain. Describes a Boyle's Law experiment that uses a minimum of equipment and meets the foregoing criteria. Apparatus used, procedures, and safety precautions are…

  11. Notes on Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physics Education, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Describes briefly three experiments, which are presented by three physics teachers to share their ideas with other teachers and readers. These experiments are: (1) a simple hazemeter for window pollution assessment; (2) the speed of light; and (3) the ball-bearing electric motor. (HM)

  12. Fluids Experiment Apparatus (FEA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, M.

    1984-01-01

    The Fluids Experiment Apparatus FEA is a modular zero gravity chemistry/physics laboratory to support fundamental space processing research. It can be used to conduct basic and applied process or product experiments in general liquid chemistry, crystal growth, fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, and cell culturing. The various FEA subsystems are readily configured to perform a wide range of investigations.

  13. Grip Experiment 2010

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-16

    A researcher with the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment works aboard the NASA DC-8 during a flight over the Gulf of Mexico, Tuesday, Aug. 17, 2010. GRIP is a NASA Earth science field experiment in 2010 that is being conducted to better understand how tropical storms form and develop into major hurricanes. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  14. Real-World Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borja, Rhea R.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents IISME, a U.S. program that can give educators a real-world experience and that can deepen their subject-matter knowledge. It also presents the experiences of some teachers who are into this program. IISME's summer-fellowship program started out with 40 teachers and 12 companies. The group's growth picked up in 2001, when it…

  15. Corn blight watch experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The corn blight problem is briefly described how the experiment was organized and conducted, the effect of the blight on the 1971 crop, and some conclusions that may be drawn as a result of the experiment. The information is based on preliminary reports of the Corn Blight Watch Steering Committee and incorporates much illustrative material conceived at Purdue University.

  16. Experiments in Science Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hempstead, C. A.

    1973-01-01

    Analyzes the role of experiments in science teaching, and applies this analysis to the teaching of Millikan's experiment in physics. Critically examines an article written by T. J. Harvey entitled Millikan made easy'' which was previously published in The School Science Review. (JR)

  17. Undergraduate Infrared Spectroscopy Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacCarthy, Patrick; Bowman, Susan J.

    1982-01-01

    Highlights procedures and results of an experiment using atomic absorption spectroscope to illustrate a fundamental chemical concept. The experiment demonstrates the dependence of the solubility product of lead sulfate on ionic strength in the presence of a slight excess of anion. (Author/JN)

  18. Some Novel Fieldwork Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vincent, Julian F. V.; Kitchener, Andrew C.

    1988-01-01

    Describes results and experiences of four field-course experiments designed to explore the relationships between animals and their physical environment. Reports on the response of animals to flow rate of water, relationship between size and rate of locomotion, and mathematical and physical techniques used to study how animals live. (RT)

  19. Beyond the Practicum Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Jessica

    2009-01-01

    The practicum is an important part of most TESL programmes; however, many novice teachers seek practical experiences beyond the practicum as part of their preparation for entering the profession. Collaborative projects between language learners and pre-service language teachers can offer such valuable practical experiences for both groups. The…

  20. Nonparametric identification experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Yeung

    1988-01-01

    The following constitutes a summary of this paper: on-orbit identification methodology starts with nonparametric techniques for a priori system identification; development of the nonparametric identification and model determination experiment software has been completed; the validation experiments to be performed on the JPL Control and Identification Technology Validation Laboratory have been designed.

  1. Experience with MODSIM II

    SciTech Connect

    Streets, J.; Berg, D.; Oleynik, G.; Pordes, R.; Slimmer, D.

    1992-02-01

    We present results of computer simulations for Data Acquisition systems for large fixed target experiments in an object oriented simulation language, MODSIM. This paper summarizes our experiences and presents preliminary results from the simulation already completed. We also indicate the resources required for this project.

  2. On the Poggendorff Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coelho, Ricardo Lopes; Silva, P. A. S.; Borges, Paulo de Faria

    2015-01-01

    Poggendorff showed experimentally, in the middle of the 19th century, that the weight of an Atwood machine is reduced when it is brought to motion. His experiment has been revisited from time to time, making use of instrumentation that reflects the technological development of the moment. In this paper, the evolution of the experiment is briefly…

  3. A Duplicate Construction Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridgeman, Brent

    This experiment was designed to assess the ability of item writers to construct truly parallel tests based on a "duplicate-construction experiment" in which Cronbach argues that if the universe description and sampling are ideally refined, the two independently constructed tests will be entirely equivalent, and that within the limits of item…

  4. Peak Experience Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Daniel G.; Evans, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    This paper emerges from the continued analysis of data collected in a series of international studies concerning Childhood Peak Experiences (CPEs) based on developments in understanding peak experiences in Maslow's hierarchy of needs initiated by Dr Edward Hoffman. Bridging from the series of studies, Canadian researchers explore collected…

  5. Ball Collision Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, R.

    2015-01-01

    Experiments are described on collisions between two billiard balls and between a bat and a ball. The experiments are designed to extend a student's understanding of collision events and could be used either as a classroom demonstration or for a student project.

  6. Extravehicular activity welding experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, J. Kevin

    1989-01-01

    The In-Space Technology Experiments Program (INSTEP) provides an opportunity to explore the many critical questions which can only be answered by experimentation in space. The objective of the Extravehicular Activity Welding Experiment definition project was to define the requirements for a spaceflight experiment to evaluate the feasibility of performing manual welding tasks during EVA. Consideration was given to experiment design, work station design, welding hardware design, payload integration requirements, and human factors (including safety). The results of this effort are presented. Included are the specific objectives of the flight test, details of the tasks which will generate the required data, and a description of the equipment which will be needed to support the tasks. Work station requirements are addressed as are human factors, STS integration procedures and, most importantly, safety considerations. A preliminary estimate of the cost and the schedule for completion of the experiment through flight and postflight analysis are given.

  7. Hadron production experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Boris A.

    2013-02-01

    The HARP and NA61/SHINE hadroproduction experiments as well as their implications for neutrino physics are discussed. HARP measurements have already been used for predictions of neutrino beams in K2K and MiniBooNE/SciBooNE experiments and are also being used to improve the atmospheric neutrino flux predictions and to help in the optimization of neutrino factory and super-beam designs. First measurements released recently by the NA61/SHINE experiment are of significant importance for a precise prediction of the J-PARC neutrino beam used for the T2K experiment. Both HARP and NA61/SHINE experiments provide also a large amount of input for validation and tuning of hadron production models in Monte-Carlo generators.

  8. Health education telecommunications experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, A. A.

    1975-01-01

    The Health/Education Telecommunications Experiment (HET) was conducted jointly by NASA and HEW on NASA's ATS-6 communications satellite. This experiment actually consisted of six experiments testing health and education applications of a communication spacecraft producing a broadcast of color television directly from space to over 120 low-cost receivers located in remote rural areas throughout the U.S. (including Alaska). The experiments were conducted over the period from 2 July 1974 to 20 May 1975 and operated on an almost daily basis. The overall telecommunications system to support these experiments consisted of many elements: The ATS-6 spacecraft; five different types of earth stations consisting of 120 video receive terminals, 51 telephony tranceivers and eight video originating terminals of three different types. Actual performance of the equipment as measured in the field was shown to equal or exceed predicted values.

  9. Space Experiment Module (SEM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodell, Charles L.

    1999-01-01

    The Space Experiment Module (SEM) Program is an education initiative sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Shuttle Small Payloads Project. The program provides nationwide educational access to space for Kindergarten through University level students. The SEM program focuses on the science of zero-gravity and microgravity. Within the program, NASA provides small containers or "modules" for students to fly experiments on the Space Shuttle. The experiments are created, designed, built, and implemented by students with teacher and/or mentor guidance. Student experiment modules are flown in a "carrier" which resides in the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle. The carrier supplies power to, and the means to control and collect data from each experiment.

  10. USML-1 Glovebox experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    This report covers the development of and results from three experiments that were flown in the Materials Science Glovebox on USML-1: Marangoni convection in Closed Containers (MCCC), Double Float Zone (DFZ), and Fiber Pulling in Microgravity (FPM). The Glovebox provided a convenient, low cost method for doing simple 'try and see' experiments that could test new concepts or elucidate microgravity phenomena. Since the Glovebox provided essentially one (or possibly two levels of confinement, many of the stringent verification and test requirements on the experiment apparatus could be relaxed and a streamlined test and verification plan for flight qualification could be implemented. Furthermore, the experiments were contained in their own carrying cases whose external configurations could be identified early in the integration sequence for stowage considerations while delivery of the actual experiment apparatus could be postponed until only a few months before flight. This minimized the time fluids must be contained and reduced the possibility of corrosive reactions that could ruin the experiment. In many respects, this exercise was as much about developing a simpler, cheaper way of doing crew-assisted science as it was about the actual scientific accomplishments of the individual experiments. The Marangoni Convection in Closed Containers experiment was designed to study the effects of a void space in a simulated Bridgman crystal growth configuration and to determine if surface tension driven convective flows that may result from thermal gradients along any free surfaces could affect the solidification process. The Fiber Pulling in Microgravity experiment sought to separate the role of gravity drainage from capillarity effects in the break-up of slender cylindrical liquid columns. The Stability of a Double Float Zone experiment explored the feasibility of a quasi-containerless process in which a solidifying material is suspended by two liquid bridges of its own melt.

  11. Dual-domain mass-transfer parameters from electrical hysteresis: theory and analytical approach applied to laboratory, synthetic streambed, and groundwater experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Briggs, Martin; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Ong, John B.; Harvey, Judson W.; Lane, Jr., John W.

    2014-01-01

    Models of dual-domain mass transfer (DDMT) are used to explain anomalous aquifer transport behavior such as the slow release of contamination and solute tracer tailing. Traditional tracer experiments to characterize DDMT are performed at the flow path scale (meters), which inherently incorporates heterogeneous exchange processes; hence, estimated “effective” parameters are sensitive to experimental design (i.e., duration and injection velocity). Recently, electrical geophysical methods have been used to aid in the inference of DDMT parameters because, unlike traditional fluid sampling, electrical methods can directly sense less-mobile solute dynamics and can target specific points along subsurface flow paths. Here we propose an analytical framework for graphical parameter inference based on a simple petrophysical model explaining the hysteretic relation between measurements of bulk and fluid conductivity arising in the presence of DDMT at the local scale. Analysis is graphical and involves visual inspection of hysteresis patterns to (1) determine the size of paired mobile and less-mobile porosities and (2) identify the exchange rate coefficient through simple curve fitting. We demonstrate the approach using laboratory column experimental data, synthetic streambed experimental data, and field tracer-test data. Results from the analytical approach compare favorably with results from calibration of numerical models and also independent measurements of mobile and less-mobile porosity. We show that localized electrical hysteresis patterns resulting from diffusive exchange are independent of injection velocity, indicating that repeatable parameters can be extracted under varied experimental designs, and these parameters represent the true intrinsic properties of specific volumes of porous media of aquifers and hyporheic zones.

  12. Understanding customer experience.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Christopher; Schwager, Andre

    2007-02-01

    Anyone who has signed up for cell phone service, attempted to claim a rebate, or navigated a call center has probably suffered from a company's apparent indifference to what should be its first concern: the customer experiences that culminate in either satisfaction or disappointment and defection. Customer experience is the subjective response customers have to direct or indirect contact with a company. It encompasses every aspect of an offering: customer care, advertising, packaging, features, ease of use, reliability. Customer experience is shaped by customers' expectations, which largely reflect previous experiences. Few CEOs would argue against the significance of customer experience or against measuring and analyzing it. But many don't appreciate how those activities differ from CRM or just how illuminating the data can be. For instance, the majority of the companies in a recent survey believed they have been providing "superior" experiences to customers, but most customers disagreed. The authors describe a customer experience management (CEM) process that involves three kinds of monitoring: past patterns (evaluating completed transactions), present patterns (tracking current relationships), and potential patterns (conducting inquiries in the hope of unveiling future opportunities). Data are collected at or about touch points through such methods as surveys, interviews, focus groups, and online forums. Companies need to involve every function in the effort, not just a single customer-facing group. The authors go on to illustrate how a cross-functional CEM system is created. With such a system, companies can discover which customers are prospects for growth and which require immediate intervention.

  13. Japanese Experiment Module arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-03-29

    Several components for delivery to the International Space Station sit in test stands inside the Space Station Processing Facility highbay. To the right, from back to front, are the Japanese Experiment Module, the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module, and the European Space Agency's Columbus scientific research module. To the left in front is the starboard truss segment S5. Behind it is the test stand that will hold the Experiment Logistics Module Pressurized Section for the Japanese Experiment Module. The logistics module is one of the components of the Japanese Experiment Module or JEM, also known as Kibo, which means "hope" in Japanese. Kibo comprises six components: two research facilities -- the Pressurized Module and Exposed Facility; a Logistics Module attached to each of them; a Remote Manipulator System; and an Inter-Orbit Communication System unit. Kibo also has a scientific airlock through which experiments are transferred and exposed to the external environment of space. Kibo is Japan's first human space facility and its primary contribution to the station. Kibo will enhance the unique research capabilities of the orbiting complex by providing an additional environment in which astronauts can conduct science experiments. The various components of JEM will be assembled in space over the course of three Space Shuttle missions. The first of those three missions, STS-123, will carry the Experiment Logistics Module Pressurized Section aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, targeted for launch in 2007.

  14. LDR structural experiment definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Richard A.; Gates, Richard M.

    1988-01-01

    A study was performed to develop the definition of a structural flight experiment for a large precision segmented reflector that would utilize the Space Station. The objective of the study was to use the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) baseline configuration for focusing on experiment definition activity which would identify the Space Station accommodation requirements and interface constraints. Results of the study defined three Space Station based experiments to demonstrate the technologies needed for an LDR type structure. The basic experiment configurations are the same as the JPL baseline except that the primary mirror truss is 10 meters in diameter instead of 20. The primary objectives of the first experiment are to construct the primary mirror support truss and to determine its structural and thermal characteristics. Addition of the optical bench, thermal shield and primary mirror segments and alignment of the optical components occur on the second experiment. The structure will then be moved to the payload pointing system for pointing, optical control and scientific optical measurement for the third experiment.

  15. Radiochemical solar neutrino experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrin, V. N.; Cleveland, B. T.

    2011-12-01

    Radiochemical experiments have been crucial to solar neutrino research. Even today, they provide the only direct measurement of the rate of the proton-proton fusion reaction, p+p→d+e++νe, which generates most of the Sun's energy. We first give a little history of radiochemical solar neutrino experiments with emphasis on the gallium experiment SAGE - the only currently operating detector of this type. The combined result of all data from the Ga experiments is a capture rate of 67.6±3.7 SNU. For comparison to theory, we use the calculated flux at the Sun from a standard solar model, take into account neutrino propagation from the Sun to the Earth and the results of neutrino source experiments with Ga, and obtain 67.3-3.5+3.9 SNU. Using the data from all solar neutrino experiments we calculate an electron neutrino pp flux of ϕpp♁=(3.41-0.77+0.76)×1010/(cm-s), which agrees well with the prediction from a detailed solar model of ϕpp♁=(3.30-0.14+0.13)×1010/(cm-s). Four tests of the Ga experiments have been carried out with very intense reactor-produced neutrino sources and the ratio of observed to calculated rates is 0.88±0.05. One explanation for this unexpectedly low result is that the cross section for neutrino capture by the two lowest-lying excited states in 71Ge has been overestimated. We end with consideration of possible time variation in the Ga experiments and an enumeration of other possible radiochemical experiments that might have been.

  16. Industrial application experiment series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bluhm, S. A.

    1981-01-01

    Two procurements within the Industrial Application Experiment Series of the Thermal Power Systems Project are discussed. The first procurement, initiated in April 1980, resulted in an award to the Applied Concepts Corporation for the Capital Concrete Experiment: two Fresnel concentrating collectors will be evaluated in single-unit installations at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Parabolic Dish Test Site and at Capitol Concrete Products, Topeka, Kansas. The second procurement, initiated in March 1981, is titled, "Thermal System Engineering Experiment B." The objective of the procurement is the rapid deployment of developed parabolic dish collectors.

  17. Nightshade Prototype Experiments (Silverleaf)

    SciTech Connect

    Danielson, Jeremy; Bauer, Amy L.

    2016-12-23

    The Red Sage campaign is a series of subcritical dynamic plutonium experiments designed to measure ejecta. Nightshade, the first experiments in Red Sage scheduled for fiscal year 2019, will measure the amount of ejecta emission into vacuum from a double-­shocked plutonium surface. To address the major technical risks in Nightshade, a Level 2 milestone was developed for fiscal year 2016. Silverleaf, a series of four experiments, was executed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in July and August 2016 to demonstrate a prototype of the Nightshade package and to satisfy this Level 2 milestone. This report is documentation that Red Sage Level 2 milestone requirements were successfully met.

  18. Hydrothermal organic synthesis experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shock, Everett L.

    1992-01-01

    Ways in which heat is useful in organic synthesis experiments are described, and experiments on the hydrothermal destruction and synthesis of organic compounds are discussed. It is pointed out that, if heat can overcome kinetic barriers to the formation of metastable states from reduced or oxidized starting materials, abiotic synthesis under hydrothermal conditions is a distinct possibility. However, carefully controlled experiments which replicate the descriptive variables of natural hydrothermal systems have not yet been conducted with the aim of testing the hypothesis of hydrothermal organic systems.

  19. THERMAL DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    KRAJEWSKI,R.F.; ANDREWS,J.W.; WEI,G.

    1999-09-01

    A laboratory experiment has been conducted which tests for the effects of distribution system purging on system Delivery Effectiveness (DE) as defined in ASHRAE 152P. The experiment is described in its configuration, instrumentation, and data acquisition system. Data gathered in the experiment is given and discussed. The results show that purging of the distribution system alone does not offer any improvement of the system DE. Additional supporting tests were conducted regarding experimental simulations of buffer zones and bare pipe and are also discussed.

  20. Advanced biostack experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buecker, H.

    1981-01-01

    The Advanced Biostack Experiment is described. The objectives are: (1) to confirm, complement, and enlarge the information obtained from the previous experiments by applying improved and advanced methods of localization and physical and biological evaluation, performing advanced experiments based on these data, and including additional biological specimens and additional radiation detectors; (2) to determine the biological importance of nuclear disintegration stars; (3) to determine the interference of HZE particle induced effects with those of other space flight factors (e.g., weightlessness); and (4) to determine the distribution of HZE particles and of disintegration stars at different locations inside the module and on the pallet.

  1. ROCSAT-1 telecommunication experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, J. F.; Taur, R. R.; Chu, T. H.; Li, H. S.; Su, Y. T.; Kiang, Y. W.; Su, S. L.; Shih, M. P.; Lin, H. D.; Chung, C. D.

    1993-01-01

    This paper addresses a telecommunication payload project approved by the R.O.C. NSPO's ROCSAT-1 space program. This project will enable several innovative experiments via the low-earth-orbit satellite ROCSAT-1, including multipath fading channel characterization, ionospheric scintillation measurement, real-time voice communications, and CDMA data communications. A unified L/S-band transponder payload is proposed for conducting these experiments in an efficient way. The results of these experiments would provide the evolving mobile communication communities with fruitful information.

  2. Nimbus-5 ITPR Experiment.

    PubMed

    Smith, W L; Hilleary, D T; Fischer, J C; Howell, H B; Woolf, H M

    1974-03-01

    The Nimbus-5 infrared temperature profile radiometer (ITPR) experiment was designed to measure upwelling infrared radiation in appropriate spectral intervals and with sufficient geographical resolution for sounding the atmosphere's temperature distribution down to the earth's surface even under partly cloudy sky conditions. A primary scientific goal of the experiment was the specification of the mesoscale features of surface and atmospheric temperature and water vapor that are associated with intense weather systems. In this paper the ITPR instrument is described and some initial spacecraft results are given that demonstrate the success of the experiment in achieving its scientific goals.

  3. Advanced biostack experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Buecker, H.

    1981-11-01

    The Advanced Biostack Experiment is described. The objectives are: (1) to confirm, complement, and enlarge the information obtained from the previous experiments by applying improved and advanced methods of localization and physical and biological evaluation, performing advanced experiments based on these data, and including additional biological specimens and additional radiation detectors (2) to determine the biological importance of nuclear disintegration stars (3) to determine the interference of HZE particle induced effects with those of other space flight factors (e.g., weightlessness) and (4) to determine the distribution of HZE particles and of disintegration stars at different locations inside the module and on the pallet.

  4. The three eggs experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şahin Bülbül, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    The three eggs experiment concerns 37 pre-service science teachers’ predictions about the impact shapes of three uncooked eggs dropped from different heights. This experiment looks at energy transformation from potential to kinetic energy, where the smaller parts of the egg shell spread far from the center of the impact. This experience encouraged the pre-service science teachers to use their familiar models, such as a fried egg, omelet, puddle, dropping or explosions, to explain their predictions. These models from everyday life presented can be used as a tool to explain unfamiliar phenomena.

  5. Fracturing Experiment 2016

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Donald W.; Keppler, H.; Kuriyagawa, Michio; Murphy, Hugh D.; Walter, Fritz

    1982-09-27

    Experiment 2016 was conducted on June 20 and 21, 1982. This experiment represented our third attempt at a fracture connection between the bottom of hole EE-2, and the openhole section of EE-3. The primary objective of Experiment 2016 was to hydraulically connect holes EE-2 and EE-3, utilizing a greater amount of injected fluid--1.3 million gallons were pumped into EE-2--and somewhat higher injection rates up to 35 BPM (as compared to 30 BPM during Expt. 2012).

  6. EXPERIMENTS - APOLLO 17

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1972-11-17

    S72-53470 (November 1972) --- The Far-Ultraviolet Spectrometer, Experiment S-169, one of the lunar orbital science experiments which will be mounted in the SIM bay of the Apollo 17 Service Module. Controls for activating and deactivating the experiment and for opening and closing a protective cover are located in the Command Module. Atomic composition, density and scale height for several constituents of the lunar atmosphere will be measured by the far-ultraviolet spectrometer. Solar far-UV radiation reflected from the lunar surface as well as UV radiation emitted by galactic sources also will be detected by the instrument.

  7. Solid Surface Combustion Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-09-12

    STS064-10-011 (12 Sept. 1994) --- The Solid Surface Combustion Experiment (SSCE), designed to supply information on flame spread over solid fuel surfaces in the reduced-gravity environment of space, is pictured during flight day four operations. The middeck experiment measured the rate of spreading, the solid-phase temperature, and the gas-phase temperature of flames spreading over rectangular fuel beds. STS-64 marked the seventh trip into space for the Lewis Research Center experiment. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  8. GRIP Experiment 2010

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-14

    Jeffrey Beyon, left, and Paul Joseph Petzar, right, from NASA's Langley Research Center, work with DAWN Air Data Acquisition and Processing software aboard NASA's DC-8 research aircraft, Sunday, Aug. 15, 2010, in support of the GRIP experiment at Fort Lauderdale International Airport in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. The Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment is a NASA Earth science field experiment in 2010 that is being conducted to better understand how tropical storms form and develop into major hurricanes. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  9. GRIP Experiment 2010

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-14

    Jeffrey Beyon, lower right, and Paul Joseph Petzar, right, researchers from NASA's Langley Research Center, speak with Ramesh Kakar right, of the NASA Earth Science Division as they work with DAWN Air Data Acquisition and Processing software aboard NASA's DC-8 research aircraft, Sunday, Aug. 15, 2010, in support of the GRIP experiment at Fort Lauderdale International Airport in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. The Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment is a NASA Earth science field experiment in 2010 that is being conducted to better understand how tropical storms form and develop into major hurricanes. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  10. GRIP Experiment 2010

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-14

    Errol Korn, lower left, explains the dropsonde experiment to Janel Thomas, a University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) graduate student, seated, as Bob Pasken, standing left, and Jeff Halverson, a GRIP project scientist from UMBC, look on inside NASA's DC-8 airplane, at Fort Lauderdale International Airport in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., Sunday, Aug. 15, 2010. The Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment is a NASA Earth science field experiment in 2010 that is being conducted to better understand how tropical storms form and develop into major hurricanes. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  11. GRIP Experiment 2010

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-15

    Susan Kool, a researcher from the Langley Research Center, works on monitoring the Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) aboard the NASA DC-8 aircraft, Monday, Aug. 16, 2010, at Fort Lauderdale Hollywood International Airport in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. LASE probes the atmosphere using lasers and is part of the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment is a NASA Earth science field experiment in 2010 that is being conducted to better understand how tropical storms form and develop into major hurricanes. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  12. Advanced biostack experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buecker, H.

    1981-01-01

    The Advanced Biostack Experiment is described. The objectives are: (1) to confirm, complement, and enlarge the information obtained from the previous experiments by applying improved and advanced methods of localization and physical and biological evaluation, performing advanced experiments based on these data, and including additional biological specimens and additional radiation detectors; (2) to determine the biological importance of nuclear disintegration stars; (3) to determine the interference of HZE particle induced effects with those of other space flight factors (e.g., weightlessness); and (4) to determine the distribution of HZE particles and of disintegration stars at different locations inside the module and on the pallet.

  13. BASS Experiment Imagery

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-04-09

    ISS035-E-015827 (10 April 2013) --- This is one of a series of close-up images photographed during a run of the Burning and Suppression of Solids (BASS) experiment onboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station. Following a series of preparations, NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy (out of frame) conducted a series of runs of the experiment, which examines the burning and extinction characteristics of a wide variety of fuel samples in microgravity. The experiment is planned for guiding strategies for extinguishing fires in microgravity. BASS results contribute to the combustion computational models used in the design of fire detection and suppression systems in microgravity and on Earth.

  14. BASS-II Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-27

    ISS040-E-023287 (27 June 2014) --- This is a close-up image photographed during a run of the Burning and Suppression of Solids (BASS) experiment onboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station. Following a series of preparations, NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman (out of frame), Expedition 40 flight engineer, conducted runs of the experiment, which examines the burning and extinction characteristics of a wide variety of fuel samples in microgravity. The experiment is planned for guiding strategies for extinguishing fires in microgravity. BASS results contribute to the combustion computational models used in the design of fire detection and suppression systems in microgravity and on Earth.

  15. BASS Experiment Imagery

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-04-09

    ISS035-E-015900 (10 April 2013) --- This is one of a series of close-up images photographed during a run of the Burning and Suppression of Solids (BASS) experiment onboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station. Following a series of preparations, NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy (out of frame) conducted several runs of the experiment, which examines the burning and extinction characteristics of a wide variety of fuel samples in microgravity. The experiment is planned for guiding strategies for extinguishing fires in microgravity. BASS results contribute to the combustion computational models used in the design of fire detection and suppression systems in microgravity and on Earth.

  16. BASS Experiment Imagery

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-04-09

    ISS035-E-015952 (10 April 2013) --- This is one of a series of close-up images photographed during a run of the Burning and Suppression of Solids (BASS) experiment onboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station. Following a series of preparations, on April 5 NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy (out of frame) conducted several runs of the experiment, which examines the burning and extinction characteristics of a wide variety of fuel samples in microgravity. The experiment is planned for guiding strategies for extinguishing fires in microgravity. BASS results contribute to the combustion computational models used in the design of fire detection and suppression systems in microgravity and on Earth.

  17. BASS Experiment Imagery

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-04-05

    ISS035-E-014987 (6 April 2013) --- This is a close-up image photographed during a run of the Burning and Suppression of Solids (BASS) experiment onboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station. Following a series of preparations, NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy (out of frame) conducted runs of the experiment, which examines the burning and extinction characteristics of a wide variety of fuel samples in microgravity. The experiment is planned for guiding strategies for extinguishing fires in microgravity. BASS results contribute to the combustion computational models used in the design of fire detection and suppression systems in microgravity and on Earth.

  18. BASS Experiment Imagery

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-04-09

    ISS035-E-015679 (10 April 2013) --- This is one of a series of close-up images photographed during a run of the Burning and Suppression of Solids (BASS) experiment onboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station. Following a series of preparations, NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy (out of frame) conducted a series of runs of the experiment, which examines the burning and extinction characteristics of a wide variety of fuel samples in microgravity. The experiment is planned for guiding strategies for extinguishing fires in microgravity. BASS results contribute to the combustion computational models used in the design of fire detection and suppression systems in microgravity and on Earth.

  19. BASS Experiment Imagery

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-04-05

    ISS035-E-014971 (6 April 2013) --- This is a close-up image photographed during a run of the Burning and Suppression of Solids (BASS) experiment onboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station. Following a series of preparations, NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy (out of frame) conducted runs of the experiment, which examines the burning and extinction characteristics of a wide variety of fuel samples in microgravity. The experiment is planned for guiding strategies for extinguishing fires in microgravity. BASS results contribute to the combustion computational models used in the design of fire detection and suppression systems in microgravity and on Earth.

  20. BASS-II Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-23

    ISS040-E-073120 (23 July 2014) --- This is a close-up image photographed during a run of the Burning and Suppression of Solids (BASS) experiment onboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station. Following a series of preparations, NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman (out of frame), Expedition 40 flight engineer, conducted runs of the experiment, which examines the burning and extinction characteristics of a wide variety of fuel samples in microgravity. The experiment is planned for guiding strategies for extinguishing fires in microgravity. BASS results contribute to the combustion computational models used in the design of fire detection and suppression systems in microgravity and on Earth.

  1. BASS Experiment Imagery

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-04-09

    ISS035-E-015930 (10 April 2013) --- This is one of a series of close-up images photographed during a run of the Burning and Suppression of Solids (BASS) experiment onboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station. Following a series of preparations, NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy (out of frame) conducted several runs of the experiment, which examines the burning and extinction characteristics of a wide variety of fuel samples in microgravity. The experiment is planned for guiding strategies for extinguishing fires in microgravity. BASS results contribute to the combustion computational models used in the design of fire detection and suppression systems in microgravity and on Earth.

  2. A Colorful Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, C. Bruce

    1978-01-01

    This experiment, mixing solutions of potassium iodide and lead nitrate to give a bright yellow lead iodide precipitate, often leads students into other topics such as making paint from the precipitate. (BB)

  3. [Mechanical staplers. Personal experience].

    PubMed

    Carzaniga, P L; Gatti, A; Russo, F; Sforza, M; Vertemati, G

    1992-12-01

    The Authors briefly summarise their experience of using various types of mechanical staplers in abdominal and thoracic surgery with excellent results both in general and in terms of reducing operating times.

  4. Notes on Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physics Education, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Explains how to demonstrate the following: the hysteresis effect and the existence of domains in Rochelle salt (sodium potassium tartrate); diffraction experiments using a slide with multiple slits; and an analogue technique for learning terminal velocity. (GA)

  5. A Sea Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glickstein, Neil

    1989-01-01

    Described is a teacher education program organized by the Sea Education Association in Woods Hole (Massachusetts). The experience, including activities and examples of studies conducted, is discussed. Contact information for future cruises is included. (CW)

  6. Experiments with needle bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferretti, Pericle

    1933-01-01

    Experiments and results are presented in testing needle bearings, especially in comparison with roller bearings. Reduction in coefficient of friction is discussed as well as experimental methods and recording devices.

  7. Foraging Experiences with Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Helen Ross

    1976-01-01

    Provided are foraging experiences and wild foods information for utilization in the urban school curriculum. Food uses are detailed for roses, dandelions, wild onions, acorns, cattails, violets and mints. (BT)

  8. A Colorful Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, C. Bruce

    1978-01-01

    This experiment, mixing solutions of potassium iodide and lead nitrate to give a bright yellow lead iodide precipitate, often leads students into other topics such as making paint from the precipitate. (BB)

  9. Experimenting with Detergents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Gail; Phillips, Donald B.

    1977-01-01

    Lists materials and procedures for experimenting with detergents. Included are methods for determination of the densities of dry detergents, ph values of detergent solutions, and a discussion of the ability of detergents to remove iodine stains from cloth. (CS)

  10. Notes on Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physics Education, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Describes (1) computer graphics for the coefficient of restitution; (2) an experiment on the optical processing of images; and (3) a simple, coherent optical system for character recognition using Polaroid (Type 665) negative film. (JN)

  11. Celestial mechanics experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorell, J.; Anderson, J. D.; Jordan, J. F.; Reasenberg, R. D.; Shapiro, I. I.

    1973-01-01

    The efforts and accomplishments of the CME Team are summarized. The objectives and experiment status, gravity field of Mars, test of general relativity, and the generation of normal points are discussed.

  12. Experiments with a sunbird

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güémez, J.; Valiente, R.; Fiolhais, C.; Fiolhais, M.

    2003-12-01

    A theoretical description of the sunbird, a drinking bird without any external liquid, is compared with experiment. The transient times and the periods of oscillation given by a simulation of the dynamics agree with the measured values.

  13. Illustrating the Classical Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeller, Richard A.

    1988-01-01

    Describes an activity that (1) illustrates the classical experiment as a research tool; (2) demonstrates the interplay among hypotheses, methods, and data; and (3) nurtures the excitement of a method of study. (BSR)

  14. The monsoon experiment MONEX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, P. K.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of monsoons in different parts of the world on the Earth's atmosphere were studied by MONEX, India's Monsoon Experiment program. Data were gathered from meteorological satellites, sounding rockets, aircraft, land and shipborne stations.

  15. Experiments in Animal Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polt, James M.

    1971-01-01

    Describes experiments in conditioning, sensory processes, social behavior, imprinting, innate preferences for color and form, and discrimination learning suitable for secondary school students. Mealworms, crickets, and chicks are used as subjects. (AL)

  16. Notes on Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physics Education, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Introduced are two experiments: radon detection method shows real data using vacuum cleaner, soft toilet paper, and Geiger-Muller tube; critical potentials measurement describes the operation of Teltron tube with VELA. (YP)

  17. The Madison Dynamo Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, R. D.

    2005-10-01

    A spherical dynamo experiment has been constructed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison's liquid-sodium facility. The experiment is designed to self-generate magnetic fields from flows of conducting metal. The apparatus consists of a 1 m diameter, spherical stainless steel vessel filled with liquid sodium. Two 100 Hp motors drive impellers which generate the flow. The motors have been operated up to 1200 RPM (60% of design specification), achieving a magnetic Reynolds number of 130, based on impeller tip speed. Various polarizations of external magnetic fields have been applied to the sodium, and the induced magnetic field has been measured by both internal and external Hall probe arrays. Cavitation of the sodium is monitored using an ultrasonic transducer and suppressed through pressurization. Operating parameters and performance of the experiment are presented. Future plans for the experiment are discussed.

  18. Notes on Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physics Education, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Describes (1) computer graphics for the coefficient of restitution; (2) an experiment on the optical processing of images; and (3) a simple, coherent optical system for character recognition using Polaroid (Type 665) negative film. (JN)

  19. Experiments with Helmholtz Resonators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Presents experiments that use Helmholtz resonators and have been designed for a sophomore-level course in oscillations and waves. Discusses the theory of the Helmholtz resonator and resonance curves. (JRH)

  20. Dihalocarbene Insertion Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goh, S. H.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the insertion reaction using the insertion of carbenes into carbon-hydrogen bonds as an example. Outlines an experiment that will illustrate dihalocarbene insertions into diisopropyl ether. (GS)

  1. Experimenting with Detergents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Gail; Phillips, Donald B.

    1977-01-01

    Lists materials and procedures for experimenting with detergents. Included are methods for determination of the densities of dry detergents, ph values of detergent solutions, and a discussion of the ability of detergents to remove iodine stains from cloth. (CS)

  2. Foraging Experiences with Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Helen Ross

    1976-01-01

    Provided are foraging experiences and wild foods information for utilization in the urban school curriculum. Food uses are detailed for roses, dandelions, wild onions, acorns, cattails, violets and mints. (BT)

  3. Packed Bed Reactor Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The purpose of the Packed Bed Reactor Experiment in low gravity is to determine how a mixture of gas and liquid flows through a packed bed in reduced gravity. A packed bed consists of a metal pipe ...

  4. Notes on Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physics Education, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Explains how to demonstrate the following: the hysteresis effect and the existence of domains in Rochelle salt (sodium potassium tartrate); diffraction experiments using a slide with multiple slits; and an analogue technique for learning terminal velocity. (GA)

  5. Notes on Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physics Education, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Describes four physics experiments including "Investigation of Box Resonances Using a Micro"; "A Direct Reading Wattmeter, DC or AC"; "Exercises in the Application of Ohm's Law"; and "Hysteresis on Gas Discharges." Discusses procedures, instrumentation, and analysis in each example. (CW)

  6. Notes on Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physics Education, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Describes three experiments: (1) "Liquid Flow from Orifices"; (2) "Microcomputer-Controlled Investigation of Battery Discharge and Recovery"; and (3) "Measurement of the Speed of Sound." Drawings and diagrams accompany each. (RT)

  7. Experiments in Animal Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polt, James M.

    1971-01-01

    Describes experiments in conditioning, sensory processes, social behavior, imprinting, innate preferences for color and form, and discrimination learning suitable for secondary school students. Mealworms, crickets, and chicks are used as subjects. (AL)

  8. Notes on Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physics Education, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Introduced are two experiments: radon detection method shows real data using vacuum cleaner, soft toilet paper, and Geiger-Muller tube; critical potentials measurement describes the operation of Teltron tube with VELA. (YP)

  9. Reid BCAT Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-17

    ISS040-E-013856 (17 June 2014) --- NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman, Expedition 40 flight engineer, conducts a session with the Binary Colloidal Alloy Test (BCAT) experiment at a workstation in the Harmony node of the International Space Station.

  10. The Freshman Year Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, John N.

    1986-01-01

    The movement to enhance the freshman year experience by changing the way institutions treat, welcome, assimilate, support, and inform freshman students is discussed and illustrated. The potential importance of the movement to admissions officers and registrars is emphasized. (MSE)

  11. MSG SAME Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-07-15

    ISS024-E-008351 (15 July 2010) --- NASA astronaut Shannon Walker, Expedition 24 flight engineer, works with the Smoke Aerosol Measurement Experiment (SAME) in the Microgravity Sciences Glovebox (MSG) located in the Columbus laboratory of the International Space Station.

  12. MSG SAME Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-07-14

    ISS024-E-008364 (14 July 2010)--- Astronaut Shannon Walker, Expedition 24 flight engineer, works on the Smoke Aerosol Measurement Experiment (SAME) inside the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) in the European laboratory Columbus on the International Space Station.

  13. MSG SAME Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-07-14

    ISS024-E-008369 (14 July 2010)--- Astronaut Shannon Walker, Expedition 24 flight engineer, works on the Smoke Aerosol Measurement Experiment (SAME) inside the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) in the European laboratory Columbus on the International Space Station.

  14. Electrophoresis experiment for space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderhoff, J. W.; Micale, F. J.

    1976-01-01

    The Apollo 16 electrophoresis experiment was analyzed, demonstrating that the separation of the two different-size monodisperse latexes did indeed take place, but that the separation was obscured by the pronounced electroosmotic flow of the liquid medium. The results of this experiment, however, were dramatic since it is impossible to carry out a similar separation on earth. It can be stated unequivocally from this experiment that any electrophoretic separation will be enhanced under microgravity conditions. The only question is the degree of this enhancement, which can be expected to vary from one experimental technique to another. The low-electroosmotic-mobility coating (Z6040-MC) developed under this program was found to be suitable for a free-fluid electrophoretic separation such as the experiment designed for the ASTP flight. The problem with this coating, however, is that its permanency is limited because of the slow desorption of the methylcellulose from the coated surface.

  15. Experimenting with Apostatic Selection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, J. A.; Cooper, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    Reviewed is some of the experimental evidence for apostatic selection from work with artificial prey. Guidelines for further experiments are suggested including experimental design, analysis, variables, and selection in the wild. (Author/CW)

  16. CCF Experiment #1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Images from CCF camera during Experiment #1, or EU#1, square groove geometry operations. The free surface, or gas/liquid interface, assumes a curved shape under subcritical flow conditions as its m...

  17. Notes on Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physics Education, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Describes four physics experiments including "Investigation of Box Resonances Using a Micro"; "A Direct Reading Wattmeter, DC or AC"; "Exercises in the Application of Ohm's Law"; and "Hysteresis on Gas Discharges." Discusses procedures, instrumentation, and analysis in each example. (CW)

  18. Experimenting with Apostatic Selection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, J. A.; Cooper, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    Reviewed is some of the experimental evidence for apostatic selection from work with artificial prey. Guidelines for further experiments are suggested including experimental design, analysis, variables, and selection in the wild. (Author/CW)

  19. ACTS mobile SATCOM experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbe, Brian S.; Frye, Robert E.; Jedrey, Thomas C.

    1993-01-01

    Over the last decade, the demand for reliable mobile satellite communications (satcom) for voice, data, and video applications has increased dramatically. As consumer demand grows, the current spectrum allocation at L-band could become saturated. For this reason, NASA and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory are developing the Advanced Communications Technology Satellites (ACTS) mobile terminal (AMT) and are evaluating the feasibility of K/Ka-band (20/30 GHz) mobile satcom to meet these growing needs. U.S. industry and government, acting as co-partners, will evaluate K/Ka-band mobile satcom and develop new technologies by conducting a series of applications-oriented experiments. The ACTS and the AMT testbed will be used to conduct these mobile satcom experiments. The goals of the ACTS Mobile Experiments Program and the individual experiment configurations and objectives are further presented.

  20. Experiment-o-mania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drndarski, Marina

    2015-04-01

    Every 21st century student is expected to develop science literacy skills. As this is not part of Serbian national curriculum yet, we decided to introduce it with this project. Experiment-o-mania provides students to experience science in different and exciting way. It makes opportunity for personalized learning offering space and time to ask (why, where, how, what if) and to try. Therefore, we empower young people with skills of experimenting, and they love science back. They ask questions, make hypothesis, make problems and solve them, make mistakes, discuss about the results. Subsequently this raises the students' interest for school curriculum. This vision of science teaching is associated with inquiry-based learning. Experiment-o-mania is the unique and recognizable teaching methodology for the elementary school Drinka Pavlović, Belgrade, Serbia. Experiment-o-mania implies activities throughout the school year. They are held on extra class sessions, through science experiments, science projects or preparations for School's Days of science. Students learn to ask questions, make observations, classify data, communicate ideas, conduct experiments, analyse results and make conclusions. All science teachers participate in designing activities and experiments for students in Experiment-o-mania teaching method. But they are not alone. Teacher of fine arts, English teachers and others also take part. Students have their representatives in this team, too. This is a good way to blend knowledge among different school subject and popularize science in general. All the experiments are age appropriate and related to real life situations, local community, society and the world. We explore Fibonacci's arrays, saving energy, solar power, climate change, environmental problems, pollution, daily life situations in the country or worldwide. We introduce great scientists as Nikola Tesla, Milutin Milanković and sir Isaac Newton. We celebrate all relevant international days, weeks

  1. ISE structural dynamic experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lock, Malcolm H.; Clark, S. Y.

    1988-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: directed energy systems - vibration issue; Neutral Particle Beam Integrated Space Experiment (NPB-ISE) opportunity/study objective; vibration sources/study plan; NPB-ISE spacecraft configuration; baseline slew analysis and results; modal contributions; fundamental pitch mode; vibration reduction approaches; peak residual vibration; NPB-ISE spacecraft slew experiment; goodbye ISE - hello Zenith Star Program.

  2. Spacelab J experiment descriptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Teresa Y. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    Brief descriptions of the experiment investigations for the Spacelab J Mission which was launched from the Kennedy Space Center aboard the Endeavour in Sept. 1992 are presented. Experiments cover the following: semiconductor crystals; single crystals; superconducting composite materials; crystal growth; bubble behavior in weightlessness; microgravity environment; health monitoring of Payload Specialists; cultured plant cells; effect of low gravity on calcium metabolism and bone formation; and circadian rhythm.

  3. Capillary Flow Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-19

    ISS040-E-015545 (19 June 2014) --- European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst, Expedition 40 flight engineer, conducts a session with the Capillary Flow Experiment (CFE-2) in the Harmony node of the International Space Station. CFE is a suite of fluid physics experiments that investigate how fluids behave in microgravity which could benefit water and fuel delivery systems on future spacecraft. Scientists designed the CFE-2 to study properties of fluids and bubbles inside containers with a specific 3-D geometry.

  4. Capillary Flow Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-19

    ISS040-E-015539 (19 June 2014) --- NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman, Expedition 40 flight engineer, conducts a session with the Capillary Flow Experiment (CFE-2) in the Harmony node of the International Space Station. CFE is a suite of fluid physics experiments that investigate how fluids behave in microgravity which could benefit water and fuel delivery systems on future spacecraft. Scientists designed the CFE-2 to study properties of fluids and bubbles inside containers with a specific 3-D geometry.

  5. ISE structural dynamic experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lock, Malcolm H.; Clark, S. Y.

    1988-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: directed energy systems - vibration issue; Neutral Particle Beam Integrated Space Experiment (NPB-ISE) opportunity/study objective; vibration sources/study plan; NPB-ISE spacecraft configuration; baseline slew analysis and results; modal contributions; fundamental pitch mode; vibration reduction approaches; peak residual vibration; NPB-ISE spacecraft slew experiment; goodbye ISE - hello Zenith Star Program.

  6. Spacelab J experiment descriptions

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, T.Y.

    1993-08-01

    Brief descriptions of the experiment investigations for the Spacelab J Mission which was launched from the Kennedy Space Center aboard the Endeavour in Sept. 1992 are presented. Experiments cover the following: semiconductor crystals; single crystals; superconducting composite materials; crystal growth; bubble behavior in weightlessness; microgravity environment; health monitoring of Payload Specialists; cultured plant cells; effect of low gravity on calcium metabolism and bone formation; and circadian rhythm. Separate abstracts have been prepared for articles from this report.

  7. Hamlet and psychoanalytic experience.

    PubMed

    Schwaber, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Hamlet draws us into its rendered world, enabling us to experience it with depth, awareness, and resonance, in a mode we recognize as aesthetic. By way of Shakespeare's play--primarily the first act--and a detailed case study, aesthetic and psychoanalytic experience are compared, to suggest that, for our own analytic discourse, we revalue Freud's unease that his case studies read like short stories.

  8. CFE-2 Experiment Run

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-11

    ISS038-E-000263 (11 Nov. 2013) --- NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, Expedition 38 flight engineer, conducts a session with the Capillary Flow Experiment (CFE) in the Harmony node of the International Space Station. CFE is a suite of fluid physics experiments that investigate how fluids move up surfaces in microgravity. The results aim to improve current computer models that are used by designers of low gravity fluid systems and may improve fluid transfer systems for water on future spacecraft.

  9. CFE-2 Experiment Run

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-11

    ISS038-E-000269 (11 Nov. 2013) --- NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, Expedition 38 flight engineer, conducts a session with the Capillary Flow Experiment (CFE) in the Harmony node of the International Space Station. CFE is a suite of fluid physics experiments that investigate how fluids move up surfaces in microgravity. The results aim to improve current computer models that are used by designers of low gravity fluid systems and may improve fluid transfer systems for water on future spacecraft.

  10. Capillary Flow Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-19

    ISS040-E-015523 (19 June 2014) --- European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst, Expedition 40 flight engineer, conducts a session with the Capillary Flow Experiment (CFE-2) in the Harmony node of the International Space Station. CFE is a suite of fluid physics experiments that investigate how fluids behave in microgravity which could benefit water and fuel delivery systems on future spacecraft. Scientists designed the CFE-2 to study properties of fluids and bubbles inside containers with a specific 3-D geometry.

  11. Capillary Flow Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-19

    ISS040-E-015536 (19 June 2014) --- European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst, Expedition 40 flight engineer, conducts a session with the Capillary Flow Experiment (CFE-2) in the Harmony node of the International Space Station. CFE is a suite of fluid physics experiments that investigate how fluids behave in microgravity which could benefit water and fuel delivery systems on future spacecraft. Scientists designed the CFE-2 to study properties of fluids and bubbles inside containers with a specific 3-D geometry.

  12. Capillary Flow Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-19

    ISS040-E-015532 (19 June 2014) --- European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst, Expedition 40 flight engineer, conducts a session with the Capillary Flow Experiment (CFE-2) in the Harmony node of the International Space Station. CFE is a suite of fluid physics experiments that investigate how fluids behave in microgravity which could benefit water and fuel delivery systems on future spacecraft. Scientists designed the CFE-2 to study properties of fluids and bubbles inside containers with a specific 3-D geometry.

  13. Wiseman during BASS experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-02

    ISS040-E-031397 (2 July 2014) --- NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman, Expedition 40 flight engineer, works with a combustion experiment known as the Burning and Suppression of Solids (BASS) in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. The experiment seeks to provide insight on how flames burn in space compared to Earth which may provide fire safety benefits aboard future spacecraft.

  14. Capillary Flow Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-19

    ISS040-E-015543 (19 June 2014) --- European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst, Expedition 40 flight engineer, conducts a session with the Capillary Flow Experiment (CFE-2) in the Harmony node of the International Space Station. CFE is a suite of fluid physics experiments that investigate how fluids behave in microgravity which could benefit water and fuel delivery systems on future spacecraft. Scientists designed the CFE-2 to study properties of fluids and bubbles inside containers with a specific 3-D geometry.

  15. GRIP Experiment 2010

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-16

    A researcher points out the trajectory of a weather pattern on a computer monitor during a flight aboard the NASA DC-8 aircraft, Tuesday, Aug. 17, 2010, over the Gulf of Mexico. Sceintists and researchers flew Tuesday to study weather as part of the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment is a NASA Earth science field experiment in 2010 that is being conducted to better understand how tropical storms form and develop into major hurricanes. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  16. GRIP Experiment 2010

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-16

    Cloud formations are seen through the window of NASA DC-8 aircraft during a flight, Tuesday, Aug. 17, 2010, over the Gulf of Mexico where researchers were studying weather patterns as part of trhe Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment, a NASA Earth science field experiment in 2010 that is being conducted to better understand how tropical storms form and develop into major hurricanes. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  17. GRIP Experiment 2010

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-29

    The eye of Hurricane Earl in the Atlantic Ocean is seen from NASA’s DC-8 research aircraft, Monday, Aug. 30, 2010. This flight through the eyewall caught Earl just as it was intensifying from a Category 2 to a Category 4 hurricane. The flights are part of the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment, a NASA Earth science field experiment being conducted to better understand how tropical storms form and develop into major hurricanes. (NASA/Jane Peterson)

  18. Accelerator Experiments for Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, J

    2003-10-15

    Many recent discoveries in astrophysics involve phenomena that are highly complex. Carefully designed experiments, together with sophisticated computer simulations, are required to gain insights into the underlying physics. We show that particle accelerators are unique tools in this area of research, by providing precision calibration data and by creating extreme experimental conditions relevant for astrophysics. In this paper we discuss laboratory experiments that can be carried out at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center and implications for astrophysics.

  19. Advanced Doppler tracking experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.

    1989-01-01

    The Doppler tracking method is currently the only technique available for broadband gravitational wave searches in the approx. 10(exp -4) to 10(exp -1) Hz low frequency band. A brief review is given of the Doppler method, a discussion of the main noise sources, and a review of experience with current spacecraft and the prospects for sensitivity improvements in an advanced Doppler tracking experiment.

  20. Japanese Experiment Module arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-03-29

    The Experiment Logistics Module Pressurized Section for the Japanese Experiment Module arrives at the Space Station Processing Facility for uncrating. The logistics module is one of the components of the Japanese Experiment Module or JEM, also known as Kibo, which means "hope" in Japanese. Kibo comprises six components: two research facilities -- the Pressurized Module and Exposed Facility; a Logistics Module attached to each of them; a Remote Manipulator System; and an Inter-Orbit Communication System unit. Kibo also has a scientific airlock through which experiments are transferred and exposed to the external environment of space. Kibo is Japan's first human space facility and its primary contribution to the station. Kibo will enhance the unique research capabilities of the orbiting complex by providing an additional environment in which astronauts can conduct science experiments. The various components of JEM will be assembled in space over the course of three Space Shuttle missions. The first of those three missions, STS-123, will carry the Experiment Logistics Module Pressurized Section aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, targeted for launch in 2007.

  1. Japanese Experiment Module arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-03-29

    Inside the Space Station Processing Facility, workers monitor progress as a huge crane is used to remove the top of the crate carrying the Experiment Logistics Module Pressurized Section for the Japanese Experiment Module. The logistics module is one of the components of the Japanese Experiment Module or JEM, also known as Kibo, which means "hope" in Japanese. Kibo comprises six components: two research facilities -- the Pressurized Module and Exposed Facility; a Logistics Module attached to each of them; a Remote Manipulator System; and an Inter-Orbit Communication System unit. Kibo also has a scientific airlock through which experiments are transferred and exposed to the external environment of space. Kibo is Japan's first human space facility and its primary contribution to the station. Kibo will enhance the unique research capabilities of the orbiting complex by providing an additional environment in which astronauts can conduct science experiments. The various components of JEM will be assembled in space over the course of three Space Shuttle missions. The first of those three missions, STS-123, will carry the Experiment Logistics Module Pressurized Section aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, targeted for launch in 2007.

  2. Japanese Experiment Module arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-03-29

    Inside the Space Station Processing Facility, the Experiment Logistics Module Pressurized Section for the Japanese Experiment Module is revealed after the top of the crate is removed. The logistics module is one of the components of the Japanese Experiment Module or JEM, also known as Kibo, which means "hope" in Japanese. Kibo comprises six components: two research facilities -- the Pressurized Module and Exposed Facility; a Logistics Module attached to each of them; a Remote Manipulator System; and an Inter-Orbit Communication System unit. Kibo also has a scientific airlock through which experiments are transferred and exposed to the external environment of space. Kibo is Japan's first human space facility and its primary contribution to the station. Kibo will enhance the unique research capabilities of the orbiting complex by providing an additional environment in which astronauts can conduct science experiments. The various components of JEM will be assembled in space over the course of three Space Shuttle missions. The first of those three missions, STS-123, will carry the Experiment Logistics Module Pressurized Section aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, targeted for launch in 2007.

  3. Japanese Experiment Module arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-03-29

    The Experiment Logistics Module Pressurized Section for the Japanese Experiment Module arrives at the Space Station Processing Facility. The logistics module is one of the components of the Japanese Experiment Module or JEM, also known as Kibo, which means "hope" in Japanese. Kibo comprises six components: two research facilities -- the Pressurized Module and Exposed Facility; a Logistics Module attached to each of them; a Remote Manipulator System; and an Inter-Orbit Communication System unit. Kibo also has a scientific airlock through which experiments are transferred and exposed to the external environment of space. Kibo is Japan's first human space facility and its primary contribution to the station. Kibo will enhance the unique research capabilities of the orbiting complex by providing an additional environment in which astronauts can conduct science experiments. The various components of JEM will be assembled in space over the course of three Space Shuttle missions. The first of those three missions, STS-123, will carry the Experiment Logistics Module Pressurized Section aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, targeted for launch in 2007.

  4. Skylab sleep monitoring experiment (experiment M133)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, J. D., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A summary of the conceptual design of the Skylab sleep monitoring experiment and a comprehensive compilation of the data-analysis results from the three Skylab missions is presented. One astronaut was studied per flight, electroencephalographic, electro-oculographic, and headmotion signals acquired during sleep by use of an elastic recording cap containing sponge electrodes and an attached miniature preamplifier/accelerometer unit are shown. A control-panel assembly, mounted in the sleep compartment, tested electrodes, preserved analog signals, and automatically analyzed data in real time (providing a telemetered indication of sleep stage). Results indicate that men are able to obtain adequate sleep in regularly scheduled eight-hour rest periods during extended space missions.

  5. Virginia precipitation scatter experiment: Experiment description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, E.; Crane, R. K.; Wells, P.; Downey, F. X.

    1972-01-01

    A year's statistical data were acquired for the purposed of refining existing coordination procedures for the sharing of common frequency allocations between terrestrial and space services. The measurement program was conducted between October 3, 1970 and October 2, 1971, to empirically determine the cumulative distributions of scattering cross section per unit volume of hydrometeors at heights up to 9 km above the surface and of rain rate at the surface. The measurements were made in southeastern Virginia using a bistatic, continuous-wave, vertically polarized radar system operating at S- and X-band frequencies and tipping-bucket rain gages. The bistatic radar system was configured to represent an interference situation between a radio-relay system and a space communication system Earth terminal; the results may be interpreted as measured distributions of transmission loss for interference due to rain. A description of the experiment and equipment is included.

  6. Modal identification experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvaternik, Raymond G.

    1992-01-01

    The Modal Identification Experiment (MIE) is a proposed on-orbit experiment being developed by NASA's Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology wherein a series of vibration measurements would be made on various configurations of Space Station Freedom (SSF) during its on-orbit assembly phase. The experiment is to be conducted in conjunction with station reboost operations and consists of measuring the dynamic responses of the spacecraft produced by station-based attitude control system and reboost thrusters, recording and transmitting the data, and processing the data on the ground to identify the natural frequencies, damping factors, and shapes of significant vibratory modes. The experiment would likely be a part of the Space Station on-orbit verification. Basic research objectives of MIE are to evaluate and improve methods for analytically modeling large space structures, to develop techniques for performing in-space modal testing, and to validate candidate techniques for in-space modal identification. From an engineering point of view, MIE will provide the first opportunity to obtain vibration data for the fully-assembled structure because SSF is too large and too flexible to be tested as a single unit on the ground. Such full-system data is essential for validating the analytical model of SSF which would be used in any engineering efforts associated with structural or control system changes that might be made to the station as missions evolve over time. Extensive analytical simulations of on-orbit tests, as well exploratory laboratory simulations using small-scale models, have been conducted in-house and under contract to develop a measurement plan and evaluate its potential performance. In particular, performance trade and parametric studies conducted as part of these simulations were used to resolve issues related to the number and location of the measurements, the type of excitation, data acquisition and data processing, effects of noise and nonlinearities

  7. Experiments in Computing: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Moisseinen, Nella

    2014-01-01

    Experiments play a central role in science. The role of experiments in computing is, however, unclear. Questions about the relevance of experiments in computing attracted little attention until the 1980s. As the discipline then saw a push towards experimental computer science, a variety of technically, theoretically, and empirically oriented views on experiments emerged. As a consequence of those debates, today's computing fields use experiments and experiment terminology in a variety of ways. This paper analyzes experimentation debates in computing. It presents five ways in which debaters have conceptualized experiments in computing: feasibility experiment, trial experiment, field experiment, comparison experiment, and controlled experiment. This paper has three aims: to clarify experiment terminology in computing; to contribute to disciplinary self-understanding of computing; and, due to computing's centrality in other fields, to promote understanding of experiments in modern science in general. PMID:24688404

  8. Experiments in computing: a survey.

    PubMed

    Tedre, Matti; Moisseinen, Nella

    2014-01-01

    Experiments play a central role in science. The role of experiments in computing is, however, unclear. Questions about the relevance of experiments in computing attracted little attention until the 1980s. As the discipline then saw a push towards experimental computer science, a variety of technically, theoretically, and empirically oriented views on experiments emerged. As a consequence of those debates, today's computing fields use experiments and experiment terminology in a variety of ways. This paper analyzes experimentation debates in computing. It presents five ways in which debaters have conceptualized experiments in computing: feasibility experiment, trial experiment, field experiment, comparison experiment, and controlled experiment. This paper has three aims: to clarify experiment terminology in computing; to contribute to disciplinary self-understanding of computing; and, due to computing's centrality in other fields, to promote understanding of experiments in modern science in general.

  9. National Flood Interoperability Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maidment, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    The National Flood Interoperability Experiment is led by the academic community in collaboration with the National Weather Service through the new National Water Center recently opened on the Tuscaloosa campus of the University of Alabama. The experiment will also involve the partners in IWRSS (Integrated Water Resources Science and Services), which include the USGS, the Corps of Engineers and FEMA. The experiment will address the following questions: (1) How can near-real-time hydrologic forecasting at high spatial resolution, covering the nation, be carried out using the NHDPlus or next generation geofabric (e.g. hillslope, watershed scales)? (2) How can this lead to improved emergency response and community resilience? (3) How can improved an improved interoperability framework support the first two goals and lead to sustained innovation in the research to operations process? The experiment will run from September 2014 through August 2015, in two phases. The mobilization phase from September 2014 until May 2015 will assemble the components of the interoperability framework. A Summer Institute to integrate the components will be held from June to August 2015 at the National Water Center involving faculty and students from the University of Alabama and other institutions coordinated by CUAHSI. It is intended that the insight that arises from this experiment will help lay the foundation for a new national scale, high spatial resolution, near-real-time hydrologic simulation system for the United States.

  10. FIRE Arctic Clouds Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, J. A.; Hobbs, P. V.; King, M. D.; Randall, D. A.; Minnis, P.; Issac, G. A.; Pinto, J. O.; Uttal, T.; Bucholtz, A.; Cripe, D. G.; hide

    1998-01-01

    An overview is given of the First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) Arctic Clouds Experiment that was conducted in the Arctic during April through July, 1998. The principal goal of the field experiment was to gather the data needed to examine the impact of arctic clouds on the radiation exchange between the surface, atmosphere, and space, and to study how the surface influences the evolution of boundary layer clouds. The observations will be used to evaluate and improve climate model parameterizations of cloud and radiation processes, satellite remote sensing of cloud and surface characteristics, and understanding of cloud-radiation feedbacks in the Arctic. The experiment utilized four research aircraft that flew over surface-based observational sites in the Arctic Ocean and Barrow, Alaska. In this paper we describe the programmatic and science objectives of the project, the experimental design (including research platforms and instrumentation), conditions that were encountered during the field experiment, and some highlights of preliminary observations, modelling, and satellite remote sensing studies.

  11. Cryogenic fluid management experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhardt, R. N.; Bailey, W. J.; Fester, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    The cryogenic fluid management experiment (CFME), designed to characterize subcritical liquid hydrogen storage and expulsion in the low-q space environment, is discussed. The experiment utilizes a fine mesh screen fluid management device to accomplish gas-free liquid expulsion and a thermodynamic vent system to intercept heat leak and control tank pressure. The experiment design evolved from a single flight prototype to provision for a multimission (up to 7) capability. A detailed design of the CFME, a dynamic test article, and dedicated ground support equipment were generated. All materials and parts were identified, and components were selected and specifications prepared. Long lead titanium pressurant spheres and the flight tape recorder and ground reproduce unit were procured. Experiment integration with the shuttle orbiter, Spacelab, and KSC ground operations was coordinated with the appropriate NASA centers, and experiment interfaces were defined. Phase 1 ground and flight safety reviews were conducted. Costs were estimated for fabrication and assembly of the CFME, which will become the storage and supply tank for a cryogenic fluid management facility to investigate fluid management in space.

  12. IBEX magnetic coupling experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, C.A.; Kiekel, P.D.; Miller, R.B.; Ekdahl, C.A.; Wagner, J.; Ramirez, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    The magnetic coupling of one pulse to another is a key issue for some modes of high-current beam propagation. Experiments are in progress on Sandia's IBEX accelerator to address issues relevant to magnetic coupling. The IBEX experiments differ from previous experiments in that the B/sub theta/ field acting on the second pulse is the result of residual plasma current from the first pulse rather than current applied by an external means. This new feature makes the propagation sensitive to beam and plasma current profiles that are key to the physics of the magnetic coupling problem. These experiments do not attempt to study the air chemistry issues, as this would require much higher current densities than are available from IBEX. We are using the IBEX accelerator with a mismatched magnetized diode to produce two high-current pulses separated by approx.130 nsec. A pulse pair has been propagated over a 1.5-m path in low pressure air. Extraction of two pulses, each having different parameters, complicates the experiment but also provides new insight into the magnetic coupling proplem. 7 figs.

  13. Commercial Experiment Transporter: COMET

    SciTech Connect

    Wessling, F.C.; Robinson, M.; Martinez, R.S.; Gallimore, T.; Combs, N.

    1994-09-01

    A launch system consisting of ground-support equipment, a four-stage rocket, a service module, a recovery system and a recovery site, and an orbital operations center is being assembled. The system is designed to launch 818 kg (1800 lb) to a 552-km (300-n.mi.) low earth orbit at a 40-deg inclination. Experiment space exists in both the service module and the recovery system. The service module provides space for 68 kg (150 lb) of experiments plus telemetry services, attitude control, and power and uses no consumables to maintain attitude. Consequently, the service module can maintain orbit attitude for years. Power of 400 W is supplied by solar cells and batteries for both experiment operation and housekeeping. The recovery system houses an experiment carrier for 136 kg (300 lb) of experiments, a retro rocket, a heat shield, and a parachute. An orbital operations control center provides tracking, telemetry, and commanding for the satellite. The payloads are also briefly described. The first launch was scheduled for 1995.

  14. Research by retrieving experiments.

    PubMed

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2007-06-01

    Newton did not discover that apples fall: the information was available prior to his gravitational hypothesis. Hypotheses can be tested not only by performing experiments but also by retrieving experiments from the literature (via PubMed, for example). Here I show how disconnected facts from known data, if properly connected, can generate novel predictions testable in turn by other published data. With examples from cell cycle, aging, cancer and other fields of biology and medicine, I discuss how new knowledge was and will be derived from old information. Millions of experiments have been already performed to test unrelated hypotheses and the results of those experiments are available to 'test' your hypotheses too. But most data (99% by some estimates) remain unpublished, because they were negative, seemed of low priority, or did not fit the story. Yet for other investigators those data may be valuable. The well-known story of Franklin and Watson is a case in point. By making preliminary data widely available, 'data-owners' will benefit most, receiving the credit for otherwise unused results. If posted (pre-published) on searchable databases, these data may fuel thousands of projects without the need for repetitive experiments. Enormous 'pre-published' databases coupled with Google-like search engines can change the structure of scientific research, and shrinking funding will make this inevitable.

  15. Influence of the onsite experience on recreation experience preference judgments

    Treesearch

    William P. Stewart

    1992-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the impact of actual experience on experience preference. Experience preference measurements were taken before and after a hiking experience. A shift between pre-activity and post-activity experience preference judgments was hypothesized due to the effect of psychological adjustment to reduce dissonance between pre-activity...

  16. Japanese Experiment Module (JEM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) pressure module is removed from its shipping crate and moved across the floor of the Space Station Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) to a work stand. A research laboratory, the pressurized module is the first element of the JEM, named 'Kibo' (Hope) to arrive at KSC. Japan's primary contribution to the International Space Station, the module will enhance unique research capabilities of the orbiting complex by providing an additional environment in which astronauts will conduct experiments. The JEM also includes an exposed facility or platform for space environment experiments, a robotic manipulator system, and two logistics modules. The various JEM components will be assembled in space over the course of three Shuttle missions.

  17. KISMET tungsten dispersal experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wohletz, K.; Kunkle, T.; Hawkins, W.

    1996-12-01

    Results of the KISMET tungsten dispersal experiment indicate a relatively small degree of wall-rock contamination caused by this underground explosive experiment. Designed as an add-on to the KISMET test, which was performed in the U-1a.02 drift of the LYNER facility at Nevada Test Site on 1 March 1995, this experiment involved recovery and analysis of wall-rock samples affected by the high- explosive test. The chemical, high-explosive blast drove tungsten powder, placed around the test package as a plutonium analog, into the surrounding wall- rock alluvium. Sample analyses by an analytical digital electron microscope (ADEM) show tungsten dispersed in the rock as tiny (<10 {mu}m) particles, agglomerates, and coatings on alluvial clasts. Tungsten concentrations, measured by energy dispersive spectral analysis on the ADEM, indicate penetration depths less than 0.1 m and maximum concentrations of 1.5 wt % in the alluvium.

  18. Japanese Experiment Module (JEM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) pressure module is removed from its shipping crate and moved across the floor of the Space Station Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) to a work stand. A research laboratory, the pressurized module is the first element of the JEM, named 'Kibo' (Hope) to arrive at KSC. Japan's primary contribution to the International Space Station, the module will enhance unique research capabilities of the orbiting complex by providing an additional environment in which astronauts will conduct experiments. The JEM also includes an exposed facility or platform for space environment experiments, a robotic manipulator system, and two logistics modules. The various JEM components will be assembled in space over the course of three Shuttle missions.

  19. Experiments in mixed reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krum, David M.; Sadek, Ramy; Kohli, Luv; Olson, Logan; Bolas, Mark

    2010-01-01

    As part of the Institute for Creative Technologies and the School of Cinematic Arts at the University of Southern California, the Mixed Reality lab develops technologies and techniques for presenting realistic immersive training experiences. Such experiences typically place users within a complex ecology of social actors, physical objects, and collections of intents, motivations, relationships, and other psychological constructs. Currently, it remains infeasible to completely synthesize the interactivity and sensory signatures of such ecologies. For this reason, the lab advocates mixed reality methods for training and conducts experiments exploring such methods. Currently, the lab focuses on understanding and exploiting the elasticity of human perception with respect to representational differences between real and virtual environments. This paper presents an overview of three projects: techniques for redirected walking, displays for the representation of virtual humans, and audio processing to increase stress.

  20. Electrophoresis experiments for space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Robert S.; Rhodes, Percy H.

    2000-01-01

    It has long been hoped that space could alleviate the problems of large-scale, high-capacity electrophoresis. Support media and reduced chamber dimensions of capillary electrophoresis have established the physical boundaries for Earth-based systems. Ideally, electrophoresis conducted in a virtual weightless environment in an unrestricted ``free'' fluid should have great potential. The electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing experiments done in the reduced gravity over the past twenty-five years have demonstrated the absence of thermal convection and sedimentation as well as the presence of electrohydrodynamics that requires careful control. One commercial venture produced gram amounts of an electrophoretically purified protein during seven Space Shuttle flights but the market disappeared in the six years between experiment conception and performance on the Space Shuttle. Our accumulated experience in microgravity plus theoretical models predict improvements that should be possible with electrophoresis if past problems are considered and both invention of new technologies and innovation of procedures on the Space Station are encouraged. .

  1. Droplet Combustion Experiment movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Droplet Combustion Experiment (DCE) was designed to investigate the fundamental combustion aspects of single, isolated droplets under different pressures and ambient oxygen concentrations for a range of droplet sizes varying between 2 and 5 mm. The DCE principal investigator was Forman Williams, University of California, San Diego. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1 mission (STS-83, April 4-8 1997; the shortened mission was reflown as MSL-1R on STS-94). Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station. (1.1 MB, 12-second MPEG, screen 320 x 240 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available)A still JPG composite of this movie is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300164.html.

  2. Future Experiments in Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krizmanic, John F.

    2002-01-01

    The measurement methodologies of astrophysics experiments reflect the enormous variation of the astrophysical radiation itself. The diverse nature of the astrophysical radiation, e.g. cosmic rays, electromagnetic radiation, and neutrinos, is further complicated by the enormous span in energy, from the 1.95 Kappa relic neutrino background to cosmic rays with energy greater than 10(exp 20)eV. The measurement of gravity waves and search for dark matter constituents are also of astrophysical interest. Thus, the experimental techniques employed to determine the energy of the incident particles are strongly dependent upon the specific particles and energy range to be measured. This paper summarizes some of the calorimetric methodologies and measurements planned by future astrophysics experiments. A focus will be placed on the measurement of higher energy astrophysical radiation. Specifically, future cosmic ray, gamma ray, and neutrino experiments will be discussed.

  3. Inflatable Antenna Experiment (IAE)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-05-20

    S77-E-5033 (20 May 1996) --- Following its deployment from the Space Shuttle Endeavour, the Spartan 207/Inflatable Antenna Experiment (IAE) payload is backdropped against a wall of grayish clouds. The view was photographed with an Electronic Still Camera (ESC) and downlinked to flight controllers on the first full day of orbital operations by the six-member crew. Managed by Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Spartan is designed to provide short-duration, free-flight opportunities for a variety of scientific studies. The Spartan configuration on this flight is unique in that the IAE is part of an additional separate unit which is ejected once the experiment is completed. The IAE experiment will lay the groundwork for future technology development in inflatable space structures, which will be launched and then inflated like a balloon on-orbit.

  4. Inflatable Antenna Experiment (IAE)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-05-20

    S77-E-5022 (20 May 1996)--- Following its deployment from the Space Shuttle Endeavour, the Spartan 207/Inflatable Antenna Experiment (IAE) payload is backdropped over clouds and water. The view was photographed with an Electronic Still Camera (ESC) and downlinked to flight controllers on the first full day of orbital operations by the six-member crew. Managed by Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Spartan is designed to provide short-duration, free-flight opportunities for a variety of scientific studies. The Spartan configuration on this flight is unique in that the IAE is part of an additional separate unit which is ejected once the experiment is completed. The IAE experiment will lay the groundwork for future technology development in inflatable space structures, which will be launched and then inflated like a balloon on-orbit.

  5. Inflatable Antenna Experiment (IAE)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-05-20

    S77-E-5027 (20 May 1996)--- Following its deployment from the Space Shuttle Endeavour, the Spartan 207/Inflatable Antenna Experiment (IAE) payload is backdropped over clouds and water. The view was photographed with an Electronic Still Camera (ESC) and downlinked to flight controllers on the first full day of orbital operations by the six-member crew. Managed by Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Spartan is designed to provide short-duration, free-flight opportunities for a variety of scientific studies. The Spartan configuration on this flight is unique in that the IAE is part of an additional separate unit which is ejected once the experiment is completed. The IAE experiment will lay the groundwork for future technology development in inflatable space structures, which will be launched and then inflated like a balloon on-orbit.

  6. IAE - Inflatable Antenna Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-06-10

    STS077-705-004 (20 May 1996) --- Following its deployment from the Space Shuttle Endeavour, the Inflatable Antenna Experiment (IAE) portion of the Spartan 207 payload begins to inflate, backdropped against clouds over the Pacific Ocean. The view was photographed with a handheld 70mm camera during the first full day of orbital operations by the six-member crew. Managed by Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Spartan is designed to provide short-duration, free-flight opportunities for a variety of scientific studies. The Spartan configuration on this flight is unique in that the IAE is part of an additional separate unit which is ejected once the experiment is completed. The IAE experiment will lay the groundwork for future technology development in inflatable space structures, which will be launched and then inflated like a balloon on-orbit.

  7. IAE - Inflatable Antenna Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-06-10

    STS077-705-051 (20 May 1996) --- Following its deployment from the Space Shuttle Endeavour and its subsequent inflation process, the Spartan 207/Inflatable Antenna Experiment (IAE) payload is backdropped over mountains. The view was photographed with a handheld 70mm camera during the first full day of orbital operations by the six-member crew. Managed by Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Spartan is designed to provide short-duration, free-flight opportunities for a variety of scientific studies. The Spartan configuration on this flight is unique in that the IAE is part of an additional separate unit which is ejected once the experiment is completed. The IAE experiment will lay the groundwork for future technology development in inflatable space structures, which will be launched and then inflated like a balloon on-orbit.

  8. IAE - Inflatable Antenna Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-06-10

    STS077-705-012 (20 May 1996) --- Following its deployment from the Space Shuttle Endeavour, the Inflatable Antenna Experiment (IAE) portion of the Spartan 207 payload is backdropped over Earth as it continues its inflation process. The view was photographed with a handheld 70mm camera during the first full day of orbital operations by the six-member crew. Managed by Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Spartan is designed to provide short-duration, free-flight opportunities for a variety of scientific studies. The Spartan configuration on this flight is unique in that the IAE is part of an additional separate unit which is ejected once the experiment is completed. The IAE experiment will lay the groundwork for future technology development in inflatable space structures, which will be launched and then inflated like a balloon on-orbit.

  9. IAE - Inflatable Antenna Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-05-20

    STS077-150-022 (20 May 1996) --- After leaving the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle Endeavour, the Spartan 207/Inflatable Antenna Experiment (IAE) payload goes through the final stages its inflation process, backdropped over clouds and blue water. The view was photographed with a large format still camera on the first full day of in-space operations by the six-member crew. Managed by Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Spartan is designed to provide short-duration, free-flight opportunities for a variety of scientific studies. The Spartan configuration on this flight is unique in that the IAE is part of an additional separate unit which is ejected once the experiment is completed. The IAE experiment will lay the groundwork for future technology development in inflatable space structures, which will be launched and then inflated like a balloon on-orbit.

  10. IAE - Inflatable Antenna Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-05-20

    STS077-150-010 (20 May 1996) --- Soon after leaving the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle Endeavour, the Spartan 207/Inflatable Antenna Experiment (IAE) payload goes through its inflation process, backdropped over clouds. The view was photographed with a large format still camera on the first full day of in-space operations by the six-member crew. Managed by Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Spartan is designed to provide short-duration, free-flight opportunities for a variety of scientific studies. The Spartan configuration on this flight is unique in that the IAE is part of an additional separate unit which is ejected once the experiment is completed. The IAE experiment will lay the groundwork for future technology development in inflatable space structures, which will be launched and then inflated like a balloon on-orbit.

  11. IAE - Inflatable Antenna Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-05-20

    STS077-150-044 (20 May 1996) --- Following its deployment from the Space Shuttle Endeavour, the Spartan 207/Inflatable Antenna Experiment (IAE) payload is backdropped over the Grand Canyon. After the IAE completed its inflation process in free-flight, this view was photographed with a large format still camera. The activity came on the first full day of in-space operations by the six-member crew. Managed by Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Spartan is designed to provide short-duration, free-flight opportunities for a variety of scientific studies. The Spartan configuration on this flight is unique in that the IAE is part of an additional separate unit which is ejected once the experiment is completed. The IAE experiment will lay the groundwork for future technology development in inflatable space structures, which will be launched and then inflated like a balloon on-orbit.

  12. IAE - Inflatable Antenna Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-06-10

    STS077-705-016 (20 May 1996) --- Following its deployment from the Space Shuttle Endeavour, the Inflatable Antenna Experiment (IAE) part of the Spartan 207 payload nears completion of its inflation process over California?s Pacific Coast near Santa Barbara and Point Conception. The view was photographed with a handheld 70mm camera during the first full day of orbital operations by the six-member crew. Managed by Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Spartan is designed to provide short-duration, free-flight opportunities for a variety of scientific studies. The Spartan configuration on this flight is unique in that the IAE is part of an additional separate unit which is ejected once the experiment is completed. The IAE experiment will lay the groundwork for future technology development in inflatable space structures, which will be launched and then inflated like a balloon on-orbit.

  13. IAE - Inflatable Antenna Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-05-20

    STS077-150-094 (20 May 1996) --- Following its deployment from the Space Shuttle Endeavour, the Spartan 207/Inflatable Antenna Experiment (IAE) payload is backdropped over the Mississippi River and metropolitan St. Louis. The metropolitan area lies just below the gold-colored Spartan at bottom of photo. The view was photographed with a large format still camera on the first full day of in-space operations by the six-member crew. Managed by Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Spartan is designed to provide short-duration, free-flight opportunities for a variety of scientific studies. The Spartan configuration on this flight is unique in that the IAE is part of an additional separate unit which is ejected once the experiment is completed. The IAE experiment will lay the groundwork for future technology development in inflatable space structures, which will be launched and then inflated like a balloon on-orbit.

  14. GRIP Experiment 2010

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-15

    Errol Korn, lower left, explains the dropsonde experiment to Janel Thomas, a University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) graduate student, seated, as Bob Pasken, standing left, and Jeff Halverson, a GRIP project scientist from UMBC, look on inside NASA's DC-8 airplane, at Fort Lauderdale International Airport in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., Sunday, Aug. 15, 2010. The Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment is a NASA Earth science field experiment in 2010 that is being conducted to better understand how tropical storms form and develop into major hurricanes. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers) To read more about the GRIP Mission go here NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is home to the nation's largest organization of combined scientists, engineers and technologists that build spacecraft, instruments and new technology to study the Earth, the sun, our solar system, and the universe. Follow us on Twitter Join us on Facebook

  15. EXPERIMENTS - APOLLO 17

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1972-11-17

    S72-53471 (November 1972) --- The Infrared Scanning Radiometer, Experiment S-171, one of the lunar orbital science experiments which will be mounted in the SIM bay of the Apollo 17 Service Module. The ISR experiment will provide a lunar surface temperature map with improved temperature and spatial resolution over what has been impossible before. Previous Earth-based observations of the lunar surface thermal balance have been limited to the front side with a temperature resolution of about 210 degrees K (-80 degrees F) and a surface resolution of about 15 kilometers (9.3 miles). When correlated with orbital photography and lunar sounder data, ISR temperature measurements are expected to aid in locating surface rock fields, crustal structural differences, volcanic activity and fissures emitting "hot" gases.

  16. Droplet Combustion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Droplet Combustion Experiment (DCE) was designed to investigate the fundamental combustion aspects of single, isolated droplets under different pressures and ambient oxygen concentrations for a range of droplet sizes varying between 2 and 5 mm. The DCE principal investigator was Forman Williams, University of California, San Diego. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1 mission (STS-83, April 4-8 1997; the shortened mission was reflown as MSL-1R on STS-94). Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station. (199KB JPEG, 1311 x 1477 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) The MPG from which this composite was made is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300165.html.

  17. Droplet Combustion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Droplet Combustion Experiment (DCE) was designed to investigate the fundamental combustion aspects of single, isolated droplets under different pressures and ambient oxygen concentrations for a range of droplet sizes varying between 2 and 5 mm. The DCE principal investigator was Forman Williams, University of California, San Diego. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station. (120KB JPEG, 655 x 736 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) The MPG from which this composite was made is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300167.html.

  18. The Nab experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Christopher

    2012-10-01

    Neutron decay is a clean semi-leptonic process which depends on the vector GV and axial-vector GA coupling constants. The ratio λ= GA/GV, which can be extracted from various correlations in decay products of the neutron, is important for determination of Vud in unitarity tests of the CKM matrix, and to test extensions of the standard model. The goal of the newly funded Nab experiment is to measure the electron-neutrino decay correlation a with a relative uncertainty of 10-3, and the Fierz interference term b with an overall uncertainty of 3x10-3. This experiment uses a new technique to determine the electron-neutrino angle from the energy of the electron and proton, detected in coincidence. We will present the physical design and projected sensitivity of this experiment.

  19. An Organoleptic Laboratory Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risley, John M.

    1996-12-01

    Flavorings in foods and fragrances in personal care products is a topic often discussed in chemistry classes designed for the general education of non-science majors. A laboratory experiment has been designed to accompany the lecture topic. Compounds in ten different classes of organic molecules that are used in the fragrance and food industry are provided to students. Students whiff the vapors of each compound and describe the organoleptic properties using a set of terms utilized in the fragrance and food industry. A set of questions guides students to an understanding of the relationship between structure of molecules and smell. Students are permitted to create their own fragrance based on the results of the experiment. Student response has been favorable. The experiment rectifies misconceptions students have about structure and odor, and gives positive reinforcement to the lecture material.

  20. Light Microscopy Microscope Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-02-04

    Ground testing for the first confocal Light Microscopy Microscope (LMM) Experiment. Procter and Gamble is working with NASA Glenn scientists to prepare for a study that examines product stabilizers in a microgravity environment. The particles in the tube glow orange because they have been fluorescently tagged with a dye that reacts to green laser lights to allow construction of a 3D image point by point. The experiment, which will be sent to the ISS later this year, will help P&G develop improved product stabilizers to extend shelf life and develop more environmentally friendly packaging.

  1. Ti Hemi boombox experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Phillip Isaac; Hull, Lawrence Mark

    2015-05-14

    Previous deformation experiments in which IR imaging was used pointed to a correlation in between IR signature in areas where heat was expected to be. The surface is not uniform during deformation experiments which cause cracks in the image in areas with increased temperature. To measure temperature under dynamic conditions, simultaneous reflectivity and radiance measurement under events of interest is needed. To measure a temperature measurement, a Reflectance measurement taken by framing camera at the edge of the camera sensitivity (700nm). Allows relative measurement at this wavelength. At reasonable temperatures the spectral radiance should peak near 2u and be 3-4 orders of magnitude higher than at 700 nm.

  2. Experiment SPHERE status 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaulov, S. B.; Besshapov, S. P.; Kabanova, N. V.; Sysoeva, T. I.; Antonov, R. A.; Anyuhina, A. M.; Bronvech, E. A.; Chernov, D. V.; Galkin, V. I.; Tkaczyk, W.; Finger, M.; Sonsky, M.

    2009-12-01

    The expedition carried out in March, 2008 to Lake Baikal became an important stage in the development of the SPHERE experiment. During the expedition the SPHERE-2 installation was hoisted, for the first time, on a tethered balloon, APA, to a height of 700 m over the lake surface covered with ice and snow. A series of test measurements were made. Preliminary results of the data processing are presented. The next plan of the SPHERE experiment is to begin a set of statistics for constructing the CR spectrum in the energy range 10-10 eV.

  3. Experiments in autonomous robotics

    SciTech Connect

    Hamel, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    The Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research (CESAR) is performing basic research in autonomous robotics for energy-related applications in hazardous environments. The CESAR research agenda includes a strong experimental component to assure practical evaluation of new concepts and theories. An evolutionary sequence of mobile research robots has been planned to support research in robot navigation, world sensing, and object manipulation. A number of experiments have been performed in studying robot navigation and path planning with planar sonar sensing. Future experiments will address more complex tasks involving three-dimensional sensing, dexterous manipulation, and human-scale operations.

  4. DEEP UNDERGROUND NEUTRINO EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Robert J.

    2016-03-03

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) collaboration will perform an experiment centered on accelerator-based long-baseline neutrino studies along with nucleon decay and topics in neutrino astrophysics. It will consist of a modular 40-kt (fiducial) mass liquid argon TPC detector located deep underground at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in South Dakota and a high-resolution near detector at Fermilab in Illinois. This conguration provides a 1300-km baseline in a megawatt-scale neutrino beam provided by the Fermilab- hosted international Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility.

  5. Experiment in Water Dowsing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    0)0 "• •,• • -• )• .EEP C .7 7:i EXPERIMENT IN WATER DOWSING Til I"SIS EEDavid 1. (Gaisford. 1). E. AFIT/GEE/F.NS/94S-O I ~~m - DEPARTMENT... WATER DOWSING THESIS David I. Gaisford, P. E. AFIT/GEE/ENS/94S-01 Approved for Public Release; distribution unlimited =TC QUALITY pSP-ECTED 3 S0694-30622...Specils THESIS APPROVAL Student: David I. Gaisford Class: GEE 94S Thesis Title: Experiment in Water Dowsing Defense Date: 11 Aug 94 Committee Name

  6. Halogen lamp experiment, HALEX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, G.; Stapelmann, J.

    1986-01-01

    The main purpose of the Halogen Lamp Experiment (HALEX) was to investigate the operation of a halogen lamp during an extended period in a microgravity environment and to prove its behavior in space. The Mirror Heating Facilities for Crystal Growth and Material Science Experiments in space relies on one or two halogen lamps as a furnace to melt the specimens. The HALEX aim is to verify: full power operation of a halogen lamp for a period of about 60 hours; achievement of about 10% of its terrestrial life span; and operation of the halogen lamp under conditions similar to furnace operation.

  7. Microwave PASER Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Antipov, S.; Poluektov, O.; Jing, C.

    2009-01-22

    The PASER (Particle Acceleration by Stimulated Emission of Radiation) concept for particle acceleration entails the direct transfer of energy from an active medium to a charged particle beam. The PASER was originally formulated for optical (laser) media; we are planning a PASER demonstration experiment based on an optically pumped X-band paramagnetic medium consisting of porphyrin or fullerene (C{sub 60}) derivatives in a toluene solution or polystyrene matrix. We discuss the background of this project and report on the status of the experiment to measure the acceleration of electrons using the microwave PASER.

  8. Experiments with nonneutral plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    O’Neil, T. M.

    2016-03-25

    Selected experiments with nonneutral plasmas are discussed. These include the laser cooling of a pure ion plasma to a crystalline state, a measurement of the Salpeter enhancement factor for fusion in a strongly correlated plasma and the measurement of thermally excited plasma waves. Also, discussed are experiments that demonstrate Landau damping, trapping and plasma wave echoes in the 2D ExB drift flow of a pure electron plasma, which is isomorphic to the 2D ideal flow (incompressible and inviscid flow) of a neutral fluid.

  9. World Ocean Circulation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, R. Allyn

    1992-01-01

    The oceans are an equal partner with the atmosphere in the global climate system. The World Ocean Circulation Experiment is presently being implemented to improve ocean models that are useful for climate prediction both by encouraging more model development but more importantly by providing quality data sets that can be used to force or to validate such models. WOCE is the first oceanographic experiment that plans to generate and to use multiparameter global ocean data sets. In order for WOCE to succeed, oceanographers must establish and learn to use more effective methods of assembling, quality controlling, manipulating and distributing oceanographic data.

  10. Experiments with RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Westfall, Gary D.

    2000-12-31

    Experiments with the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) will begin in December 1999. RHIC consists of two superconducting rings capable of accelerating and storing Au beams of 100 GeV/nucleon and proton beams of 250 GeV. Four experiments are being prepared for RHIC: STAR, PHENIX, PHOBOS, and BRAHMS. These detector systems are designed to search for signals of the quark gluon plasma in Au-Au collisions. A spin physics program using polarized protons will also be carried out at RHIC.

  11. NOSL experiment support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brook, M.

    1986-01-01

    An optical lightning detector was constructed and flown, along with Vinton cameras and a Fairchild Line Scan Spectrometer, on a U-2 during the summer of 1979. The U-2 lightning data was obtained in daylight, and was supplemented with ground truth taken at Langmuir Laboratory. Simulations were prepared as required to establish experiment operating procedures and science training for the astronauts who would operate the Night/Day Optical Survey of Thunderstorm Lightning (NOSL) equipment during the STS-2 NOSL experiment on the Space Shuttle. Data was analyzed and papers were prepared for publication.

  12. Halogen lamp experiment, HALEX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, G.; Stapelmann, J.

    1986-01-01

    The main purpose of the Halogen Lamp Experiment (HALEX) was to investigate the operation of a halogen lamp during an extended period in a microgravity environment and to prove its behavior in space. The Mirror Heating Facilities for Crystal Growth and Material Science Experiments in space relies on one or two halogen lamps as a furnace to melt the specimens. The HALEX aim is to verify: full power operation of a halogen lamp for a period of about 60 hours; achievement of about 10% of its terrestrial life span; and operation of the halogen lamp under conditions similar to furnace operation.

  13. The Archimedes experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calloni, E.; Caprara, S.; Laurentis, M. De; Esposito, G.; Grilli, M.; Majorana, E.; Pepe, G. P.; Petrarca, S.; Puppo, P.; Rapagnani, P.; Ricci, F.; Rosa, L.; Rovelli, C.; Ruggi, P.; Saini, N. L.; Stornaiolo, C.; Tafuri, F.

    2016-07-01

    Archimedes is an INFN-funded pathfinder experiment aimed at verifying the feasibility of measuring the interaction of vacuum fluctuations with gravity. The final experiment will measure the force exerted by the gravitational field on a Casimir cavity whose vacuum energy is modulated with a superconductive transition, by using a balance as a small force detector. Archimedes is two-year project devoted to test the most critical experimental aspects, in particular the balance resonance frequency and quality factor, the thermal modulation efficiency and the superconductive sample realization.

  14. GRIP Experiment 2010

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-15

    Simone Tanelli, a researcher from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, talks about the Airbrorne Precipitation Radar (APR-2) aboard the NASA DC-8 aircraft, Monday, Aug.16, 2010, at Fort Lauderdale Hollywood International Airport in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. The APR-2, a dual frequency weather radar, is just one of the experiments supporting the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) mission, a NASA Earth science field experiment that is being conducted to better understand how tropical storms form and develop into major hurricanes. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  15. GRIP Experiment 2010

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-16

    An unidentified researcher looks over the wiring connecting the Airbrorne Precipitation Radar (APR-2) during a flight aboard the NASA DC-8 aircraft, Tuesday, Aug. 17, 2010, over the Gulf of Mexico. Scientists taking part in the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment, a NASA Earth science field experiment in 2010 that is being conducted to better understand how tropical storms form and develop into major hurricanes, flew out over a weather pattern Tuesday to begin their research. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  16. Chondrule Crystallization Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hweins, R. H.; Connolly, H. C., Jr.; Lofgren, G. E.; Libourel, G.

    2004-01-01

    Given the great diversity of chondrules, laboratory experiments are invaluable in yielding information on chondrule formation process(es) and for deciphering their initial conditions of formation together with their thermal history. In addition, they provide some critical parameters for astrophysical models of the solar system and of nebular disk evolution in particular (partial pressures, temperature, time, opacity, etc). Most of the experiments simulating chondrules have assumed formation from an aggregate of solid grains, with total pressure of no importance and with virtually no gain or loss of elements from or to the ambient environment. They used pressed pellets attached to wires and suffered from some losses of alkalis and Fe.

  17. Microgravity ignition experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motevalli, Vahid; Elliott, William; Garrant, Keith

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop a flight ready apparatus of the microgravity ignition experiment for the GASCan 2 program. This involved redesigning, testing, and making final modifications to the existing apparatus. The microgravity ignition experiment is intended to test the effect of microgravity on the time to ignition of a sample of alpha-cellulose paper. An infrared heat lamp is used to heat the paper sample within a sealed canister. The interior of the canister was redesigned to increase stability and minimize conductive heat transfer to the sample. This design was fabricated and tested and a heat transfer model of the paper sample was developed.

  18. STELLA experiment: Hardware issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusche, K. P.; Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Campbell, L. P.; Cline, D. B.; Fiorito, R. B.; Gallardo, J. C.; Gottschalk, S. C.; He, P.; Kimura, W. D.; Liu, Y.; Pantell, R. H.; Pogorelsky, I. V.; Quimby, D. C.; Robinson, K. E.; Rule, D. W.; Sandweiss, J.; Skaritka, J.; van Steenbergen, A.; Steinhauer, L. C.; Yakimenko, V.

    1999-07-01

    The STaged ELectron Laser Acceleration (STELLA) experiment is currently being assembled and tested at the BNL Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). The existing BNL inverse free electron laser (IFEL) has been positioned upstream of the inverse Cerenkov acceleration (ICA) experiment on Beamline #1. This beamline also features new quadrupoles and a new spectrometer capable of a +/-20% energy acceptance. A new laser beam transport system has been installed to permit accurate control of the laser phase for the laser beams sent to the IFEL and ICA devices. Detection of the microbunches will be performed using a coherent transition radiation (CTR) diagnostic similar to one already demonstrated at the ATF.

  19. AGS experiments: 1985, 1986, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    This report contains: Experimental areas layout, table of beam parameters and fluxes, experiment schedule ''as run,'' experiment long range schedule, a listing of experiments by number, two-page summaries of each experiment, also ordered by number, and publications of AGS experiments, 1982-1987.

  20. AGS experiments, 1988, 1989, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1991-04-01

    This report contains: experimental areas layout; table of beam parameters and fluxes; experiment schedule as run''; experiment long range schedule; a listing of experiments by number; two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; publications of AGS experiments; and list of experimenters.

  1. Hydrology in a peaty high marsh: hysteretic flow and biogeochemical implications

    EPA Science Inventory

    Terrestrial nutrient input to coastal waters is a critical water quality problem worldwide, and salt marshes may provide a valuable nutrient buffer (either by removal or by smoothing out pulse inputs) between terrestrial sources and sensitive estuarine habitats. One of the major...

  2. Role of open boundary conditions on the hysteretic behaviour of one-dimensional spin crossover nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiruta, Daniel; Linares, Jorge; Miyashita, Seiji; Boukheddaden, Kamel

    2014-05-01

    In order to explain clearly the role of the open boundary conditions (OBCs) on phase transition in one dimensional system, we consider an Ising model with both short-range (J) and long-range (G) interactions, which has allowed us to study the cooperative nature of spin-crossover (SCO) materials at the nanometer scale. At this end, we developed a transfer-matrix method for one-dimensional (1D) SCO system with free boundary conditions, and we give numerical evidences for how the thermal spin transition curves vary as a function of the physical parameters (J, G) or an applied pressure. Moreover for OBCs case, we have derived the bulk, surface and finite-size contributions to the free energy and we have investigated the variation of these energies as function of J and system size. We have found that the surface free energy behaves like J⟨σ⟩2, where ⟨σ⟩ is the average magnetization per site. Since the properties of the nanometric scale are dramatically influenced by the system's size (N), our analytical outcomes for the size dependence represent a step to achieve new characteristic of the future devices and also a way to find various novel properties which are absent in the bulk materials.

  3. Using Hysteretic Energy to Evaluate Damping Characteristics of Hard Coating on Titanium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-21

    large dependence of damping properties on the microstructure of the coating. (Patsias, Byrne and Shipton 2004) Blackwell , like Ivancic, also used Ti...the inaccuracies of half-power bandwidth on nonlinear systems, as previously mentioned. ( Blackwell 2004) In 2007, Reed overcame air damping... consuming processes. Furthermore, the equipment to conduct the test (vacuum chamber, electromagnets, & radiant heaters) is very specialized and not

  4. A Preisach-Based Nonequilibrium Methodology for Simulating Performance of Hysteretic Magnetic Refrigeration Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Timothy D.; Bruno, Nickolaus M.; Chen, Jing-Han; Karaman, Ibrahim; Ross, Joseph H.; Shamberger, Patrick J.

    2015-09-01

    In giant magnetocaloric effect (GMCE) materials a large entropy change couples to a magnetostructural first-order phase transition, potentially providing a basis for magnetic refrigeration cycles. However, hysteresis loss greatly reduces the availability of refrigeration work in such cycles. Here, we present a methodology combining a Preisach model for rate-independent hysteresis with a thermodynamic analysis of nonequilibrium phase transformations which, for GMCE materials exhibiting hysteresis, allows an evaluation of refrigeration work and efficiency terms for an arbitrary cycle. Using simplified but physically meaningful descriptors for the magnetic and thermal properties of a Ni45Co5Mn36.6In13.4 at.% single-crystal alloy, we relate these work/efficiency terms to fundamental material properties, demonstrating the method's use as a materials design tool. Following a simple two-parameter model for the alloy's hysteresis properties, we compute and interpret the effect of each parameter on the cyclic refrigeration work and efficiency terms. We show that hysteresis loss is a critical concern in cycles based on GMCE systems, since the resultant lost work can reduce the refrigeration work to zero; however, we also find that the lost work may be mitigated by modifying other aspects of the transition, such as the width over which the one-way transformation occurs.

  5. Converting HAZUS capacity curves to seismic hazard-compatible building fragility functions: effect of hysteretic models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryu, Hyeuk; Luco, Nicolas; Baker, Jack W.; Karaca, Erdem

    2008-01-01

    A methodology was recently proposed for the development of hazard-compatible building fragility models using parameters of capacity curves and damage state thresholds from HAZUS (Karaca and Luco, 2008). In the methodology, HAZUS curvilinear capacity curves were used to define nonlinear dynamic SDOF models that were subjected to the nonlinear time history analysis instead of the capacity spectrum method. In this study, we construct a multilinear capacity curve with negative stiffness after an ultimate (capping) point for the nonlinear time history analysis, as an alternative to the curvilinear model provided in HAZUS. As an illustration, here we propose parameter values of the multilinear capacity curve for a moderate-code low-rise steel moment resisting frame building (labeled S1L in HAZUS). To determine the final parameter values, we perform nonlinear time history analyses of SDOF systems with various parameter values and investigate their effects on resulting fragility functions through sensitivity analysis. The findings improve capacity curves and thereby fragility and/or vulnerability models for generic types of structures.

  6. Finite-size effects of hysteretic dynamics in multilayer graphene on a ferroelectric

    SciTech Connect

    Morozovska, Anna N.; Pusenkova, Anastasiia S.; Varenyk, Oleksandr V.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Eliseev, Eugene A.; Strikha, Maxym V.

    2015-06-11

    The origin and influence of finite-size effects on the nonlinear dynamics of space charge stored by multilayer graphene on a ferroelectric and resistivity of graphene channel were analyzed. In this paper, we develop a self-consistent approach combining the solution of electrostatic problems with the nonlinear Landau-Khalatnikov equations for a ferroelectric. The size-dependent behaviors are governed by the relations between the thicknesses of multilayer graphene, ferroelectric film, and the dielectric layer. The appearance of charge and electroresistance hysteresis loops and their versatility stem from the interplay of polarization reversal dynamics and its incomplete screening in an alternating electric field. These features are mostly determined by the dielectric layer thickness. The derived analytical expressions for electric fields and space-charge-density distribution in a multilayer system enable knowledge-driven design of graphene-on-ferroelectric heterostructures with advanced performance. We further investigate the effects of spatially nonuniform ferroelectric domain structures on the graphene layers’ conductivity and predict its dramatic increase under the transition from multi- to single-domain state in a ferroelectric. Finally, this intriguing effect can open possibilities for the graphene-based sensors and explore the underlying physical mechanisms in the operation of graphene field-effect transistor with ferroelectric gating.

  7. Finite-size effects of hysteretic dynamics in multilayer graphene on a ferroelectric

    DOE PAGES

    Morozovska, Anna N.; Pusenkova, Anastasiia S.; Varenyk, Oleksandr V.; ...

    2015-06-11

    The origin and influence of finite-size effects on the nonlinear dynamics of space charge stored by multilayer graphene on a ferroelectric and resistivity of graphene channel were analyzed. In this paper, we develop a self-consistent approach combining the solution of electrostatic problems with the nonlinear Landau-Khalatnikov equations for a ferroelectric. The size-dependent behaviors are governed by the relations between the thicknesses of multilayer graphene, ferroelectric film, and the dielectric layer. The appearance of charge and electroresistance hysteresis loops and their versatility stem from the interplay of polarization reversal dynamics and its incomplete screening in an alternating electric field. These featuresmore » are mostly determined by the dielectric layer thickness. The derived analytical expressions for electric fields and space-charge-density distribution in a multilayer system enable knowledge-driven design of graphene-on-ferroelectric heterostructures with advanced performance. We further investigate the effects of spatially nonuniform ferroelectric domain structures on the graphene layers’ conductivity and predict its dramatic increase under the transition from multi- to single-domain state in a ferroelectric. Finally, this intriguing effect can open possibilities for the graphene-based sensors and explore the underlying physical mechanisms in the operation of graphene field-effect transistor with ferroelectric gating.« less

  8. Model-Based Robust Control Design for Magnetostrictive Transducers Operating in Hysteretic and Nonlinear Regimes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    ag ne tiz at io n (A /m ) Data Model −1.5 −1 −0.5 0 0.5 1 1.5 x 10 5 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 1.2 1.4 x 10 −3 Field (A/m) S tr ai n Data Model (a) (b...31] R.C. Smith, M.J. Dapino and S . Seelecke, “A Free Energy Model for Hysteresis in Magnetostrictive Transducers,” Journal of Applied Physics, 93(1...of Intelligent Material Systems and Structures, 11(1), pp. 62-79, 2000. [35] R.C. Smith, S . Seelecke, M.J. Dapino and Z. Ounaies, “A Unified Model

  9. Role of open boundary conditions on the hysteretic behaviour of one-dimensional spin crossover nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Chiruta, Daniel; Linares, Jorge E-mail: miya@spin.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Boukheddaden, Kamel; Miyashita, Seiji E-mail: miya@spin.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-05-21

    In order to explain clearly the role of the open boundary conditions (OBCs) on phase transition in one dimensional system, we consider an Ising model with both short-range (J) and long-range (G) interactions, which has allowed us to study the cooperative nature of spin-crossover (SCO) materials at the nanometer scale. At this end, we developed a transfer-matrix method for one-dimensional (1D) SCO system with free boundary conditions, and we give numerical evidences for how the thermal spin transition curves vary as a function of the physical parameters (J, G) or an applied pressure. Moreover for OBCs case, we have derived the bulk, surface and finite-size contributions to the free energy and we have investigated the variation of these energies as function of J and system size. We have found that the surface free energy behaves like J〈σ〉{sup 2}, where 〈σ〉 is the average magnetization per site. Since the properties of the nanometric scale are dramatically influenced by the system's size (N), our analytical outcomes for the size dependence represent a step to achieve new characteristic of the future devices and also a way to find various novel properties which are absent in the bulk materials.

  10. An experimental evaluation of the fully coupled hysteretic electro-mechanical behaviour of piezoelectric actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butcher, Mark; Davino, Daniele; Giustiniani, Alessandro; Masi, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Piezoelectrics are the most commonly used of the multifunctional smart materials in industrial applications, because of their relatively low cost and ease of use in electric and electronic oriented applications. Nevertheless, while datasheets usually give just small signal quasi-static parameters, their full potential can only be exploited only if a full characterization is available because the maximum stroke or the higher piezo coupling coefficients are available at different electro-mechanical biases, where often small signal analysis is not valid. In this paper a method to get the quasi-static fully coupled characterization is presented. The method is tested on a commercial piezo actuator but can be extended to similar devices.

  11. A One-Dimensional Plane Wave Propagation Code for Layered Rate-Dependent Hysteretic Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    THYME I :!EPC I .NEL)- I 10 IF -’MOD,’NT It1EqtMPLT I -’.M4E. 0 30 TO 103 -- 45 IF’lEEP.EC’.0...ELEMEHT" * I, THYME.i 183 THYME -4.,4 IF-tlCH-T.iT. 20 󈧢 TO 125 ;0 TO -10 PELORIIGi ~II 411’’ C Of 4T I LIE I’ WES. i3T.ESH1’ GO TO 410 𔃾" E:MI= E...34 THYME * THYME 4114 PM’ t.GI.E0.GO TO 1.25 4 1" f 1O To 41’:’ 4 1 4 n IF’-EF. LT. EMA’ I’ GO TO0 41. EMRIA I’ EF 4 17 MF&’’= :F N.’ IN T GILA I

  12. Voltage-driven hysteretic changes in magnetization in multiferroic Co/BTO composite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Li; Hu, Jia-Mian; Gao, Yao; Wu, Liang; Ma, Jing; Lin, Y. H.; Nan, C. W.

    2014-09-01

    Multiferroic Co/BaTiO3 layered composite thin films were grown on Nb-doped SrTiO3 single crystal by pulse laser deposition, in which the polycrystalline Co film was annealed under magnetic field to induce in-plane uniaxial magnetic easy axis. Voltage-induced magnetization changes along and perpendicular to the easy axis were measured by Magneto-Optical Kerr effect (MOKE) magnetometer without applied magnetic field. These changes in magnetization could be due to magnetoelectric coupling between Co and BaTiO3, and to possibly electro-optical effect of BTO if the MOKE laser could penetrate the top Co film. After excluding the electro-optical interference by analyzing the experimental results within an optical model, a hysteric loop of magnetization versus voltage is identified with a relative change in magnetization of about 8%.

  13. Oxygen vacancy effect on dielectric and hysteretic properties of zigzag ferroelectric iron dioxide nanoribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zriouel, S.; Taychour, B.; Yahyaoui, F. El; Drissi, L. B.

    2017-07-01

    Zigzag FeO2 nanoribbon defected by the removal of oxygen atoms is simulated using Monte Carlo simulations. All possible arrangements of positions and number of oxygen vacancy are investigated. Temperature dependence of polarization, dielectric susceptibility, internal energy, specific heat and dielectric hysteresis loops are all studied. Results show the presence of second order phase transition and Q - type behavior. Dielectric properties dependence on ribbon's edge, positions and number of oxygen vacancy are discussed in detail. Moreover, single and square hysteresis loops are observed whatever the number of oxygen vacancy in the system.

  14. Real space mapping of oxygen vacancy diffusion and electrochemical transformations by hysteretic current reversal curve measurements

    DOEpatents

    Kalinin, Sergei V.; Balke, Nina; Borisevich, Albina Y.; Jesse, Stephen; Maksymovych, Petro; Kim, Yunseok; Strelcov, Evgheni

    2014-06-10

    An excitation voltage biases an ionic conducting material sample over a nanoscale grid. The bias sweeps a modulated voltage with increasing maximal amplitudes. A current response is measured at grid locations. Current response reversal curves are mapped over maximal amplitudes of the bias cycles. Reversal curves are averaged over the grid for each bias cycle and mapped over maximal bias amplitudes for each bias cycle. Average reversal curve areas are mapped over maximal amplitudes of the bias cycles. Thresholds are determined for onset and ending of electrochemical activity. A predetermined number of bias sweeps may vary in frequency where each sweep has a constant number of cycles and reversal response curves may indicate ionic diffusion kinetics.

  15. Direct numerical simulation of electroconvective instability and hysteretic current-voltage response of a permselective membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Van Sang; Li, Zirui; Lim, Kian Meng; White, Jacob K.; Han, Jongyoon

    2012-10-01

    We present a systematic, multiscale, fully detailed numerical modeling for dynamics of fluid flow and ion transport covering Ohmic, limiting, and overlimiting current regimes in conductance of ion-selective membrane. By numerically solving the Poisson-Nernst-Planck-Navier-Stokes equations, it is demonstrated that the electroconvective instability, arising from the electric field acting upon the extended space charge layer, and the induced strong vortical fluid flow are the dominant factors of the overlimiting current in the planar membrane system. More importantly, at the transition between the limiting and the overlimiting current regimes, hysteresis of electric current is identified. The hysteresis demonstrates the important role of the electroconvective flow in enhancing of current in electrolyte systems with ion-selective membrane.

  16. Hydrology in a peaty high marsh: hysteretic flow and biogeochemical implications

    EPA Science Inventory

    Terrestrial nutrient input to coastal waters is a critical water quality problem worldwide, and salt marshes may provide a valuable nutrient buffer (either by removal or by smoothing out pulse inputs) between terrestrial sources and sensitive estuarine habitats. One of the major...

  17. Self-assembly of the 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane multilayers on Si and hysteretic current-voltage characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, A. K.; Aswal, D. K.; Koiry, S. P.; Gupta, S. K.; Yakhmi, J. V.; Sürgers, C.; Guerin, D.; Lenfant, S.; Vuillaume, D.

    2008-03-01

    We report the deposition of 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS) multilayers on SiOx/Si(p++) substrates by a layer-by-layer self-assembly process. The multilayers were grafted in a glove box having nitrogen ambient with both humidity and oxygen contents <1 ppm using APTMS solutions prepared in an anhydrous toluene. Deposition of the multilayers has been carried out as a function of solution concentration and grafting time. Characterization of the multilayers using static de-ionized water contact angle, ellipsometry, X-rayphotoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscope measurements revealed that self-assembling of the multilayers takes place in two distinct stages: (i) the first APTMS monolayer chemisorbs on a hydroxylated oxide surface by a silanization process and, (ii) the surface amino group of the first monolayer chemisorbs the hydrolyzed silane group of other APTMS molecules present in the solution, leading to the formation of a bilayer. The second stage is a self-replicating process that results in the layer-by-layer self-assembly of the multilayers with trapped NH3 + ions. The current-voltage characteristics of the multilayers exhibit a hysteresis effect along with a negative differential resistance, suggesting their potential application in the molecular memory devices. A possible mechanism for the observed hysteresis effect based on filling and de-filling of the NH3 + acting as traps is presented.

  18. Inverse model construction for control implementation of macro fiber composite actuators operating in hysteretic regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuebner, Michael; Smith, Ralph C.

    2010-04-01

    Macro Fiber Composite (MFC) actuators utilize PZT fibers embedded in an epoxy matrix for structural actuation. Due to their construction, they are lightweight and provide broadband inputs. Significant advantages of MFC actuators are their high performance, durability, and flexibility when compared to traditional piezoceramic actuators. They are presently being considered for a range of applications including positioning of membrane mirrors and structural control in the aerospace and automotive industry. However, they exhibit varying degrees of hysteresis and constitutive nonlinearities throughout their operating range that must be incorporated in models to achieve the full capabilities of the materials. In this paper, hysteresis is modeled using the homogenized energy model. The inverse model is then used to construct an inverse compensator framework suitable for subsequent control design. The performance of the inverse compensator is illustrated through a numerical example.

  19. Butyrylcholinesterase for protection from organophosphorus poisons; catalytic complexities and hysteretic behavior

    PubMed Central

    Masson, Patrick; Lockridge, Oksana

    2009-01-01

    Butyrylcholinesterase is a promiscuous enzyme that displays complex kinetic behavior. It is toxicologically important because it detoxifies organophosphorus poisons (OP) by making a covalent bond with the OP. The OP and the butyrylcholinesterase are both inactivated in the process. Inactivation of butyrylcholinesterase has no adverse effects. However inactivation of acetylcholinesterase in nerve synapses can be lethal. OP-inhibited butyrylcholinesterase and acetylcholinesterase can be reactivated with oximes provided the OP has not aged. Strategies for preventing the toxicity of OP include a) treatment with an OP scavenger, b) reaction of nonaged enzyme with oximes, c) reactivation of aged enzyme, d) slowing down aging with peripheral site ligands, and e) design of mutants that rapidly hydrolyze OP. Option (a) has progressed through phase I clinical trials with human butyrylcholinesterase. Option (b) is in routine clinical use. The others are at the basic research level. Butyrylcholinesterase displays complex kinetic behavior including activation by positively charged esters, ability to hydrolyze amides, and a lag time (hysteresis) preceding hydrolysis of benzoylcholine and N-methyl indoxyl acetate. Mass spectrometry has identified new OP binding motifs on tyrosine and lysine in proteins that have no active site serine. It is proposed, but not yet proven, that low dose exposure involves OP modification of proteins that have no active site serine. PMID:20004171

  20. An autonomous CMOS hysteretic sensor for the detection of desorption-free DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang-Ho; Choi, Suk-Hwan; Lee, Jeong-Oen; Sohn, Mi-Jin; Yoon, Jun-Bo; Cho, Gyu-Hyeong

    2011-07-15

    This paper describes a sensor for label-free, fully electrical detection of DNA hybridization based on capacitive changes in the electrode-electrolyte interface. The sensor measures capacitive changes in real time according to a charging-discharging principle that is limited by the hysteresis window. In addition, a novel autonomous searching technique, which exclusively monitors desorption-free hybridized electrodes among electrode arrays, enhances the performance of the sensor compared with conventional capacitive measurement. The sensor system achieves a detection range of 80 dB. The integrated circuit sensor is fabricated with a 0.35 μm CMOS process. The proposed sensor offers rapid, robust and inexpensive measurement of capacitance with highly integrated detection circuitry. It also facilitates quantitative evaluations of molecular densities on a chip with distinctive impedance variations by monitoring desorption-free hybridized electrodes. Our electrical biosensor has great potential for use with bio analytical tools and point-of-care diagnosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Non-hysteretic superconducting quantum interference proximity transistor with enhanced responsivity

    SciTech Connect

    Jabdaraghi, R. N.; Meschke, M.; Pekola, J. P.

    2014-02-24

    This Letter presents fabrication and characterization of an optimized superconducting quantum interference proximity transistor. The present device, characterized by reduced tunnel junction area and shortened normal-metal section, demonstrates no hysteresis at low temperatures as we increased the Josephson inductance of the weak link by decreasing its cross section. It has consequently almost an order of magnitude improved magnetic field responsivity as compared to the earlier design. The modulation of both the current and the voltage across the junction have been measured as a function of magnetic flux piercing the superconducting loop.

  2. Nonlinear Adaptive Parameter Estimation Techniques for Magnetic Transducers Operating in Hysteretic Regimes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    transducers are lightweight, exhibit both actuator and sensor capabilities, are highly effective for broadband and high frequency transduction, and have...capabilities, actuator and sensor capabilities, and the ability to generate large forces while maintaining highly accurate set point placement. This has led...to their use as actuators in industrial applications such as high speed milling and highly sensitive sensors for applications such as torque sensing

  3. Nonlinear analysis of cylindrical and conical hysteretic whirl motions in rotor-dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorge, Francesco

    2014-09-01

    The internal friction of a rotor-shaft-support system is mainly due to the shaft structural hysteresis and to some possible shrink-fit release of the assembly. The experimentation points out the destabilizing effect of the internal friction in the over-critical rotor running. Nevertheless, this detrimental influence may be efficiently counterbalanced by other external dissipative sources located in the supports or by a proper anisotropic configuration of the support stiffness. The present analysis considers a rotor-shaft system which is symmetric with respect to the mid-span and is constrained by viscous-flexible supports with different stiffness on two orthogonal planes. The cylindrical and conical whirling modes are easily uncoupled and separately analysed. The internal dissipation is modelled by nonlinear Coulombian forces and moments, which counteract the translational and rotational motion of the rotor relative to a frame rotating with the shaft ends. The nonlinear equations of motion are solved by averaging approaches of the Krylov-Bogoliubov type. In both the over-critical whirling motions, cylindrical and conical, stable limit cycles may be attained whose amplitude is as large as the external dissipation applied by the supports is low. The stiffness anisotropy of the supports may be recognised as quite beneficial for the cylindrical whirl.

  4. Maximizing hysteretic losses in magnetic ferrite nanoparticles via model-driven synthesis and materials optimization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ritchie; Christiansen, Michael G; Anikeeva, Polina

    2013-10-22

    This article develops a set of design guidelines for maximizing heat dissipation characteristics of magnetic ferrite MFe2O4 (M = Mn, Fe, Co) nanoparticles in alternating magnetic fields. Using magnetic and structural nanoparticle characterization, we identify key synthetic parameters in the thermal decomposition of organometallic precursors that yield optimized magnetic nanoparticles over a wide range of sizes and compositions. The developed synthetic procedures allow for gram-scale production of magnetic nanoparticles stable in physiological buffer for several months. Our magnetic nanoparticles display some of the highest heat dissipation rates, which are in qualitative agreement with the trends predicted by a dynamic hysteresis model of coherent magnetization reversal in single domain magnetic particles. By combining physical simulations with robust scalable synthesis and materials characterization techniques, this work provides a pathway to a model-driven design of magnetic nanoparticles tailored to a variety of biomedical applications ranging from cancer hyperthermia to remote control of gene expression.

  5. Thermal Control Surfaces Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, D. R.

    1999-01-01

    This report is the final experiment report for the TCSE and summarizes many years of hardware development and analyses. Also included are analyses presented in a number of TCSE papers that were prepared and given at scientific conferences including three LDEF Post-Retrieval Symposiums.

  6. Learning Through Group Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ottaway, A.K.C.

    This book recounts experiments with small groups of social workers and teachers who came together in order to improve their understanding of human relations and personality development. The technique employed can be called non-directive tutoring, and is a type of group-centered discussion. The role of the leader is to clarify and interpret what is…

  7. Northland Support Wilderness Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringer, Martin

    Northland Support Wilderness Experience (NSWE) was a bicultural (White and Maori) wilderness therapy program that operated in New Zealand from 1985 to 1990. NSWE conducted 11 wilderness expeditions per year with approximately 10 participants each, and provided 18-month followups for participants, parents, and significant others. Participants were…

  8. The Doppler Pendulum Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, C. K.; Wong, H. K.

    2011-01-01

    An experiment to verify the Doppler effect of sound waves is described. An ultrasonic source is mounted at the end of a simple pendulum. As the pendulum swings, the rapid change of frequency can be recorded by a stationary receiver using a simple frequency-to-voltage converter. The experimental results are in close agreement with the Doppler…

  9. Experiment with Conical Pendulum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tongaonkar, S. S.; Khadse, V. R.

    2011-01-01

    Conical pendulum is similar to simple pendulum with the difference that the bob, instead of moving back and forth, swings around in a horizontal circle. Thus, in a conical pendulum the bob moves at a constant speed in a circle with the string tracing out a cone. This paper describes an experiment with conical pendulum, with determination of g from…

  10. Enhance Your Twitter Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Shannon McClintock

    2010-01-01

    The author has been encouraging teachers, students, and others to join Twitter and build their personal learning networks (PLNs) ever since she delved into this great social networking site. In this article, she offers a few other tools and tips that can improve the Twitter experience of those who have opened up an account and dabbled a bit but…

  11. The Huck Finn Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levesque, Bonnie; And Others

    This paper describes "The Huck Finn Experience," a high motivation interdisciplinary unit that takes students on a 6-week journey back to the life and times of Mark Twain through the fictional character of Huckleberry Finn. The unit described in the paper was designed for eighth-grade students but could be easily adapted to be successful…

  12. An NMR Kinetics Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Don; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Outlines advantages of and provides background information, procedures, and typical student data for an experiment determining rate of hydration of p-methyoxyphenylacetylene (III), followed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Reaction rate can be adjusted to meet time framework of a particular laboratory by altering concentration of…

  13. A Simple Adsorption Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guirado, Gonzalo; Ayllon, Jose A.

    2011-01-01

    The study of adsorption phenomenon is one of the most relevant and traditional physical chemistry experiments performed by chemistry undergraduate students in laboratory courses. In this article, we describe an easy, inexpensive, and straightforward way to experimentally determine adsorption isotherms using pieces of filter paper as the adsorbent…

  14. Experiments in Pulsed Ultrasonics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, S. B.; Forster, G. A.

    1970-01-01

    Describes and apparatus designed to generate and detect pulsed ultrasonics in solids and liquids over the frequency range 1-20 MHz. Experiments are suggested for velocity of sound, elastic constant and ultrasonic attenuation measurements on various materials over a wide temperature range. The equipment should be useful for demonstration purposes.…

  15. Parent Hearing Aid Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz, Karen; Roberts, Mallory; Mullings, Day; Harward, Richard

    2012-01-01

    This study addresses parent experiences in obtaining and managing hearing aids for their young child. The purpose was to identify challenges parents encounter to determine what state agencies can do to improve parent access to amplification. Data were collected July through September of 2010; 40 parents of children ages birth to 3 years old…

  16. InSPACE experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-08-01

    ISS020-E-026859 (1 Aug. 2009) --- European Space Agency astronaut Frank De Winne, Expedition 20 flight engineer, works with the Investigating the Structure of Paramagnetic Aggregates from Colloidal Emulsions (InSPACE) experiment in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) in the Columbus laboratory of the International Space Station.

  17. Preliminary Advanced Colloids Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-29

    ISS029-E-011867 (29 Sept. 2011) --- NASA astronaut Mike Fossum, Expedition 29 commander, works with the Light Microscopy Module (LMM) control box in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station in preparation for another session with the Preliminary Advanced Colloids Experiment (PACE) hardware.

  18. InSPACE Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-12-31

    View of Command and Monitoring Panel (CMP),and Power Distribution and Conversion Box (PDC),on the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) rack during Investigating the Structure of Paramagnetic Aggregates from Colloidal Emulsions 3 (InSPACE-3) Experiment,in the U.S. Laboratory. Photo was taken during Expedition 34.

  19. Notes on Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bligh, P. H.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Introduces three physics experiments for high school and college classes. Topics include measuring the ratio of heat capacities using a microcomputer and a glass syringe, producing large electric sparks using a variation of a Leyden bucket, and observing transmission line behavior using television signals. Includes descriptions of materials and…

  20. Experiments with Aspirin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borer, Londa L.; Barry, Edward

    2000-01-01

    Presents a series of experiments that can be used to demonstrate how aspirin can be synthesized and characterized, how the hydrolysis of aspirin can be used as an introduction to kinetics, and how coordination chemistry (chelation) can be introduced by preparing and characterizing the copper complexes of aspirin and salicylic acid. (Contains over…