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Sample records for experiment k-6-22 growth

  1. Experiment K-6-22. Growth hormone regulation, synthesis and secretion in microgravity. Part 1: Somatotroph physiology. Part 2: Immunohistochemical analysis of hypothalamic hormones. Part 3: Plasma analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindeland, R.; Vale, W.; Hymer, W.; Sawchenko, P.; Vasques, M.; Krasnov, I.; Kaplanski, A.; Victorov, I.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of the 1887 mission were: (1) to determine if the results of the SL-3 pituitary gland experiment (1) were repeatable; and (2) to determine what effect a longer mission would have on the rat pituitary gland growth hormone (GH) system. In the 1887 experiment two issues were considered especially important. First, it was recognized that cells prepared from individual rat pituitary glands should be considered separately so that the data from the 5 glands could be analyzed in a statistically meaningful way. Second, results of the SL-3 flight involving the hollow fiber implant and HPLC GH-variant experiments suggested that the biological activity of the hormone had been negatively affected by flight. The results of the 1887 experiment documented the wisdom of addressing both issues in the protocol. Thus, the reduction in secretory capacity of flight cells during subsequent extended cell culture on Earth was documented statistically, and thereby established the validity of the SL-3 result. The results of both flight experiments thus support the contention that there is a secretory lesion in pituitary GH cells of flight animals. The primary objective of both missions was a clear definition of the effect of spaceflight on the GH cell system. There can no longer be any reasonable doubt that this system is affected in microgravity. One explanation for the reason(s) underlying the better known effects of spaceflight on organisms, viz. changes in bone, muscle and immune systems may very well rest with such changes in bGH. In spite of the fact that rats in the Cosmos 1887 flight were on Earth for two days after flight, the data show that the GH system had still not recovered from the effects of flight. Many questions remain. One of the more important concerns the GRF responsiveness of somatotrophs after flight. This will be tested in an upcoming experiment.

  2. Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment Video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This video, captured during the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) flown on STS-87 as a part of the fourth United States Microgravity payload, shows the growth of a dendrite, and the surface solidification that occurred on the front and back windows of the growth chamber. Dendrites are tiny, tree like structures that form as metals solidify.

  3. Kelp growth experiments

    SciTech Connect

    North, W. J.

    1980-01-01

    Harvest yields obtainable from giant kelp plants that are adequately fertilized were investigated. The following topics are discussed: desirable characteristics in a candidate macroalga, and giant kelp as a candidate macroalga for ocean farming. Nutrient requirements, field experiments, and approaches to acquiring yield data are reviewed. (MHR)

  4. IDGE: Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) flew on STS-62 to study the microscopic, tree-like structures (dendrites) that form within metals as they solidify from molten materials. The size, shape, and orientation of these dendrites affect the strength and usefulness of metals. Data from this experiment will be used to test and improve the mathematical models that support the industrial production of metals.

  5. ARC EMCS Experiments (Seedling Growth-2) Experiment Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heathcote, David; Steele, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Presentation of the status of the ARC ISS (International Space Station) Experiment, Seedling Growth-2 to the Payload Operations Investigator Working Group meeting at MSFC, Huntsville AL. The experiment employs the European Modular Cultivation System (ECMS).

  6. Bean Plants: A Growth Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Donna

    2004-01-01

    Teaching plant growth to seventh-grade life science students has been interesting for the author because she grew up in a rural area and always had to help in the garden. She made many assumptions about what her rural and suburban students knew. One year she decided to have them grow plants to observe the roots, stems, leaves, flowers, and fruit…

  7. Near-Death Experiences and Posttraumatic Growth.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Surbhi; Greyson, Bruce

    2015-10-01

    Posttraumatic growth denotes positive psychological change after a traumatic experience that is an improvement over the state before the trauma. Inasmuch as it involves existential reevaluation, posttraumatic growth overlaps with spiritual change, although it also encompasses other domains of positive outcome. This study investigated posttraumatic growth and presence and depth of near-death experience at the time of the close brush with death among 251 survivors of a close brush with death, using the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory and the Near-Death Experience (NDE) Scale. Near-death experiences were associated with greater posttraumatic growth than were close brushes with death in the absence of such an experience, and scores on the NDE Scale were significantly correlated with scores on the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory. To the extent that NDEs are interpreted as spiritual events, these findings support prior research suggesting that spiritual factors make a significant contribution to posttraumatic growth and are consistent with the model that posits challenges to the assumptive worldview as a major stimulus to posttraumatic growth.

  8. Spacelab 3 vapor crystal growth experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnepple, W.; Vandenberg, L.; Skinner, N.; Ortale, C.

    1987-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Challenger, with Spacelab 3 as its payload, was launched into orbit April 29, 1985. The mission, number 51-B, emphasized materials processing in space, although a wide variety of experiments in other disciplines were also carried onboard. One of the materials processing experiments on this flight is described, specifically the growth of single crystals of mercuric iodide by physical vapor transport.

  9. A Simple Mechanical Experiment on Exponential Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrew, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    With a rod, cord, pulleys, and slotted masses, students can observe and graph exponential growth in the cord tension over a factor of increase as large as several hundred. This experiment is adaptable for use either in algebra-based or calculus-based physics courses, fitting naturally with the study of sliding friction. Significant parts of the…

  10. Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment - SCN Dendrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE), flown on three Space Shuttle missions, is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operations. IDGE used transparent organic liquids that form dendrites (treelike structures) similar to the crystals that form inside metal alloys. Comparing Earth-based and space-based dentrite growth velocity, tip size and shape provid a better understanding of the fundamentals of dentritic growth, including gravity's effects. These shadowgraphic images show succinonitrile (SCN) dentrites growing in a melt (liquid). The space-grown crystals also have cleaner, better defined sidebranches. IDGE was developed by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institude (RPI) and NASA/ Glenn Research Center(GRC). Advanced follow-on experiments are being developed for flight on the International Space Station. Photo gredit: NASA/Glenn Research Center

  11. The Coupled Growth in Hypermonotectics flight experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Barry; Coriell, Sam

    2000-01-01

    The Coupled Growth in Hypermonotectic experiment is scheduled to fly on the International Space Station during UF-3 and is designed to obtain a fundamental understanding of the physics controlling solidification processes in hypermonotectic (immiscible) alloys. The first of three major experimental goals of the project is to demonstrate that steady state coupled growth and the production of an aligned fibrous microstructure is possible in these systems. The second goal is to determine the influence of alloy composition and growth rate on the microstructural features of the alloys. The last major experimental goal is to map out the compositional and growth rate limits of steady state coupled growth. Microgravity processing conditions are necessary to obtain this information which will be utilized for verification and modification of models for monotectic solidification that are being developed as part of the project. This paper discusses the justification for carrying out these experiments and the results obtained from an initial segment of the investigation during the Life and Microgravity Spacelab mission in 1996. .

  12. Protein-crystal growth experiment (planned)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujita, S.; Asano, K.; Hashitani, T.; Kitakohji, T.; Nemoto, H.; Kitamura, S.

    1988-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a microgravity environment on protein crystal growth, a system was developed using 5 cubic feet Get Away Special payload canister. In the experiment, protein (myoglobin) will be simultaneously crystallized from an aqueous solution in 16 crystallization units using three types of crystallization methods, i.e., batch, vapor diffusion, and free interface diffusion. Each unit has two compartments: one for the protein solution and the other for the ammonium sulfate solution. Compartments are separated by thick acrylic or thin stainless steel plates. Crystallization will be started by sliding out the plates, then will be periodically recorded up to 120 hours by a still camera. The temperature will be passively controlled by a phase transition thermal storage component and recorded in IC memory throughout the experiment. Microgravity environment can then be evaluated for protein crystal growth by comparing crystallization in space with that on Earth.

  13. Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment - PVA Dendrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE), flown on three Space Shuttle missions, is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operations. IDGE used transparent organic liquids that form dendrites (treelike structures) similar to those inside metal alloys. Comparing Earth-based and space-based dendrite growth velocity, tip size and shape provides a better understanding of the fundamentals of dentritic growth, including gravity's effects. Shalowgraphic images of pivalic acid (PVA) dendrites forming from the melt show the subtle but distinct effects of gravity-driven heat convection on dentritic growth. In orbit, the dendrite grows as its latent heat is liberated by heat conduction. This yields a blunt dendrite tip. On Earth, heat is carried away by both conduction and gravity-driven convection. This yields a sharper dendrite tip. In addition, under terrestrial conditions, the sidebranches growing in the direction of gravity are augmented as gravity helps carry heat out of the way of the growing sidebranches as opposed to microgravity conditions where no augmentation takes place. IDGE was developed by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and NASA/Glenn Research Center. Advanced follow-on experiments are being developed for flight on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: NASA/Glenn Research Center

  14. A Simple Mechanical Experiment on Exponential Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrew, Ralph

    2015-04-01

    With a rod, cord, pulleys, and slotted masses, students can observe and graph exponential growth in the cord tension over a factor of increase as large as several hundred. This experiment is adaptable for use either in algebra-based or calculus-based physics courses, fitting naturally with the study of sliding friction. Significant parts of the activity are accessible to students in physical science and environmental science courses.

  15. The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koss, Matthew

    2009-03-01

    The growth of dendrites is governed by the interplay between two simple and familiar processes---the irreversible diffusion of energy, and the reversible work done in the formation of new surface area. To advance our understanding of these processes, NASA sponsored a project that flew on the Space Shuttle Columbia is 1994, 1996, and 1997 to record and analyze benchmark data in an apparent-microgravity ``laboratory.'' In this laboratory, energy transfer by gravity driven convection was essentially eliminated and one could test independently, for the first time, both components of dendritic growth theory. The analysis of this data shows that although the diffusion of energy can be properly accounted for, the results from interfacial physics appear to be in disagreement and alternate models should receive increased attention. Unfortunately, currently and for the foreseeable future, there is no access or financial support to develop and conduct additional experiments of this type. However, the benchmark data of 35mm photonegatives, video, and all supporting instrument data are now available at the IDGE Archive at the College of the Holy Cross. This data may still have considerable relevance to researchers working specifically with dendritic growth, and more generally those working in the synthesis, growth & processing of materials, multiscale computational modeling, pattern formation, and systems far from equilibrium.

  16. The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, Martin E.; Koss, M. B.; Lupulescu, A. O.; LaCombe, J. C.; Frei, J. E.; Malarik, D. C.

    1999-01-01

    The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) constituted a series of three NASA-supported microgravity experiments, all of which flew aboard the space shuttle, Columbia. This experimental space flight series was designed and operated to grow and record dendrite solidification in the absence of gravity-induced convective heat transfer, and thereby produce a wealth of benchmark-quality data for testing solidification scaling laws. The data and analysis performed on the dendritic growth speed and tip size in Succinontrie (SCN) demonstrates that although the theory yields predictions that are reasonably in agreement with experiment, there are significant discrepancies. However, some of these discrepancies can be explained by accurately describing the diffusion of heat. The key finding involves recognition that the actual three-dimensional shape of dendrites includes time-dependent side-branching and a tip region that is not a paraboloid of revolution. Thus, the role of heat transfer in dendritic growth is validated, with the caveat that a more realistic model of the dendrite then a paraboloid is needed to account for heat flow in an experimentally observed dendrite. We are currently conducting additional analysis to further confirm and demonstrate these conclusions. The data and analyses for the growth selection physics remain much less definitive. From the first flight, the data indicated that the selection parameter, sigma*, is not exactly a constant, but exhibits a slight dependence on the supercooling. Additional data from the second flight are being examined to investigate the selection of a unique dendrite speed, tip size and shape. The IDGE flight series is now complete. We are currently completing analyses and moving towards final data archiving. It is gratifying to see that the IDGE published results and archived data sets are being used actively by other scientists and engineers. In addition, we are also pleased to report that the techniques and IDGE

  17. Marriage and Family Therapist Interns' Experiences of Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paris, Eleni; Linville, Deanna; Rosen, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Few studies have investigated therapist interns' growth experiences, both personal and professional, and the interplay between them. This qualitative study explored the reciprocal process of growth during clinical training: the personal life experiences that affect professional growth and the professional/clinical experiences that affect personal…

  18. Parabolic growth patterns in 96-well plate cell growth experiments.

    PubMed

    Faessel, H M; Levasseur, L M; Slocum, H K; Greco, W R

    1999-05-01

    In preparing for the routine use of the ubiquitous in vitro cell growth inhibition assay for the study of anticancer agents, we characterized the statistical properties of the assay and found some surprising results. Parabolic well-to-well cell growth patterns were discovered, which could profoundly affect the results of routine growth inhibition studies of anticancer and other agents. Four human ovarian cell lines, A2780/WT, A2780/DX5, A2780/DX5B, and A121, and one human ileocecal adenocarcinoma cell line, HCT-8, were seeded into plastic 96-well plates with a 12-channel pipette, without drugs, and grown from 1-5 d. The wells were washed with a plate washer, cells stained with sulforhodamine B (SRB), and dye absorbance measured with a plate reader. Variance models were fit to the data from replicates to determine the nature of the heteroscedastic error structure. Exponential growth models were fit to data to estimate doubling times for each cell line. Polynomial models were fit to data from 10-plate stacks of 96-well plates to explore nonuniformity of cell growth in wells in different regions of the stacks. Each separate step in the assay was examined for precision, patterns, and underlying causes of variation. Differential evaporation of water from wells is likely a major, but not exclusive, contributor to the systematic well-to-well cell growth patterns. Because the fundamental underlying causes of the parabolic growth patterns were not conclusively found, a randomization step for the growth assay was developed.

  19. Experiences in home-based growth monitoring.

    PubMed

    Suelan, F; Briones, H

    1992-01-01

    A growth monitoring project (GMP) of child weighing was implemented by the Philippines' Department of Health (DOH) through the Integrated Provincial Health Office to monitor either children's nutritional progress or their faltering of growth. Weaknesses, however, were found in the GMP. For example, only 31% of preschoolers included in the Nutrition Center of the Philippines (NCP) survey had growth charts. An 1990 UNICEF-DOH survey also found that the growth chart was used primarily by mothers and service providers to record infant immunization. Mothers brought their children to well-baby clinics in barangay health centers only when their children were sick. Conducted only once per year, weighing was not perceived as a tool in detecting and preventing sickness, and ensuring normal growth. Asked to help improve the GMP, the NCP consulted intended beneficiaries and cooperators to develop a plan to pilot an intensive monitoring project in four towns of Negros Occidental, starting in January 1991 and ending in December 1992. The resultant Home-Based Growth Monitoring (HBGM) project would place emphasis upon enabling rural mothers to become self-sustaining agents for child growth monitoring. A key feature was the establishment of a weighing post in a strategic place for every 2-3 family clusters. The HBGM project was piloted in 1991 in Calatrava, Toboso, Cauayan, and Sipalay. This paper describes project implementation, problems and solutions, and results.

  20. Population growth and development: the Kenyan experience.

    PubMed

    Nyamwange, M

    1995-01-01

    Rapid population growth in Kenya and high fertility impacts negatively on economic development. The growth and high fertility results in declines in gross national product, per capita food consumption, and land quality; a high dependency ratio; urban crowding; and inadequate health systems. East Africa has the highest crude birth rates in Africa, and Kenya has the highest birth rate of 54/1000 population in East Africa. The African crude death rate is 50% higher than the world average, but Kenya's death rate is the lowest in East Africa and comparable to North American and European death rates. Kenya has the highest rate of natural increase of about 4%. Population growth rates rose over the decades. Kenya's average population density is well above the sub-Saharan African average and much lower than very high density countries. Population is unequally distributed. Regional densities are widely divergent, and the highest densities in Western province are well above densities in Rwanda and Burundi. Urban growth has increased, as has migration to urban areas. Nairobi has 57% of urban population. Improved health and nutrition have contributed to increased life expectancy. The desired family size is large. The impact of demographic factors on economic conditions is evident in the decline in gross national product per capita growth to under 1% during 1972-88. A slight upswing occurred during 1988-93, but other crises are emerging. Food production has not kept pace with population growth. Production has been low due to serious land degradation, short fallow periods, and traditional farming practices. Population pressure has forced families to shift agriculture onto marginal lands, and desertification has increased. A growing proportion of the population is unemployed or underemployed. Population programs should address the underlying conditions for fertility decline.

  1. Frog egg growth, experiment S003

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. S.; Tremor, J. W.

    1971-01-01

    The objective of experiment was to determine the effect of weightlessness on the ability of a fertilized frog egg to divide normally and to differentiate and form a normal embryo. This experiment was first attempted on the Gemini 8 mission and was completed only partially because of the early termination of that mission.

  2. Follow up on the crystal growth experiments of the LDEF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, K. F.; Lind, M. D.

    1992-06-01

    The 4 solution growth experiments on the LDEF were presented thoroughly elsewhere. The CaCO3-experiment, and to a certain extent also the TTF-TCNQ-experiments yielded useful results. In Jan. 1992, the next series of solution growth experiments were sent to ESA for shipment to KSC. As on the LDEF, the SGF (solution growth facility) of the EURECA-1 contains 4 large experiments. From the beginning, the planning and developments were introduced. Still, the basic concept was maintained, and the CaCO3-experiment, that showed the best results on the LDEF, will now be repeated with improved technology and in larger scale on the EURECA-1. The contents of the 4 SGF experiments are as follows: (1) growth of calcium-carbonate crystals; (2) formation and transformation of tri-calcium-phosphate; (3) growth of zeolite crystals; and (4) soret coefficient measurements (diffusion). The scientific background for the choice of experiments and the major improvements of the SGF are reviewed. Furthermore, some ideas on basic microgravity solution growth experimentation from ESA's newly established EWG (Expert Working Group) on solution growth are reported.

  3. Large growth Rayleigh-Taylor experiments using shaped laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remington, B. A.; Haan, S. W.; Glendinning, S. G.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Munro, D. H.; Wallace, R. J.

    1991-12-01

    Larege growth Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) experiments have been conducted by pulse-shaped radiative acceleration of planar fluorosilicone foils with 50-μm wavelength initial surface perturbations. Foils with large-amplitude initial perturbation quickly enter the nonlinear RT regime, and show little growth. Foils with very-small-amplitude initial perturbations grow exponentially for longer, and show much larger growth factors. From comparisons with two-dimensional computer simulations, we deduce that the observed growth is about 60% of that expected for classical RT growth.

  4. Large growth Rayleigh-Taylor experiments using shaped laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B.A.; Haan, S.W.; Glendinning, S.G.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Munro, D.H.; Wallace, R.J. )

    1991-12-02

    Larege growth Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) experiments have been conducted by pulse-shaped radiative acceleration of planar fluorosilicone foils with 50-{mu}m wavelength initial surface perturbations. Foils with large-amplitude initial perturbation quickly enter the nonlinear RT regime, and show little growth. Foils with very-small-amplitude initial perturbations grow exponentially for longer, and show much larger growth factors. From comparisons with two-dimensional computer simulations, we deduce that the observed growth is about 60% of that expected for classical RT growth.

  5. Experiments with Corn To Demonstrate Plant Growth and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haldeman, Janice H.; Gray, Margarit S.

    2000-01-01

    Explores using corn seeds to demonstrate plant growth and development. This experiment allows students to formulate hypotheses, observe and record information, and practice mathematics. Presents background information, materials, procedures, and observations. (SAH)

  6. Adolescents' Accounts of Growth Experiences in Youth Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dworkin, Jodi B.; Larson, Reed; Hansen, David

    2003-01-01

    Conducted 10 focus groups in which adolescents discussed their "growth experiences" in extracurricular and community-based activities. The 55 participants reported personal and interpersonal processes and generally described themselves as agents of their own development and change. (SLD)

  7. Large growth Rayleigh-Taylor experiments on Nova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remington, B. A.; Haan, S. W.; Glendinning, S. G.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Munro, D. H.; Wallace, R. J.

    1991-01-01

    Large growth Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) experiments have been conducted by pulse-shaped radiative acceleration of fluorosilicone foils with 50 micron wavelength initial surface perturbations. Foils with very small amplitude initial perturbations grow exponentially for much longer, and show growth factors of up to 60. From comparisons with 2-dimensional computer simulations, we estimate that the growth rate is approximately 60 percent of classical, the reduction attributed to ablative and gradient scale length stabilization.

  8. Large growth Rayleigh-Taylor experiments on Nova

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B.A.; Haan, S.W.; Glendinning, S.G.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Munro, D.H.; Wallace, R.J.

    1991-01-22

    Large growth Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) experiments have been conducted by pulse-shaped radiative acceleration of fluorosilicone foils with 50 {mu}m wavelength initial surface perturbations. Foils with very small amplitude initial perturbations grow exponentially for much longer, and show growth factors of up to 60. From comparisons with 2-dimensional computer simulations, we estimate that the growth rate is approximately 60% of classical, the reduction attributed to ablative and gradient scale length stabilization.

  9. Visualization of Growth Curve Data from Phenotype MicroarrayExperiments

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, Janet S.; Joyner, Dominique C.; Borglin, Sharon E.; Hazen, Terry C.; Arkin, Adam P.; Bethel, E. Wes

    2007-04-19

    Phenotype microarrays provide a technology to simultaneouslysurvey the response of an organism to nearly 2,000 substrates, includingcarbon, nitrogen and potassium sources; varying pH; varying saltconcentrations; and antibiotics. In order to more quickly and easily viewand compare the large number of growth curves produced by phenotypemicroarray experiments, we have developed software to produce and displaycolor images, each of which corresponds to a set of 96 growth curves.Using color images to represent growth curves data has proven to be avaluable way to assess experiment quality, compare replicates, facilitatecomparison of the responses of different organisms, and identifysignificant phenotypes. The color images are linked to traditional plotsof growth versus time, as well as to information about the experiment,organism, and substrate. In order to share and view information and dataproject-wide, all information, plots, and data are accessible using onlya Web browser.

  10. Skylab experiments on semiconductors and alkali halides. [single crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    The space processing experiments performed during the Skylab missions included one on single crystal growth of germanium selenide and telluride, one on pure and doped germanium crystals, two on pure and doped indium antimonide, one on gallium-indium-antimony systems, and one on a sodium chloride-sodium fluoride eutectic. In each experiment, three ampoules of sample were processed in the multipurpose electric furnace within the Skylab Materials Processing Facility. All were successful in varying degrees and gave important information about crystal growth removed from the effects of earth surface gravity.

  11. Very-high-growth-factor Planar Ablative Rayleigh Taylor Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D K; Braun, D G; Glendinning, S G; Edwards, M J; Milovich, J L; Sorce, C M; Collins, G W; Haan, S W; Page, R H

    2006-10-30

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability is an important factor in bounding the performance envelope of ignition targets. This paper describes an experiment for ablative RT instability that for the first time achieves growth factors close to those expected to occur in ignition targets at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The large growth allows small seed perturbations to be detected and can be used to place an upper bound on perturbation growth at the ablation front resulting from microstructure in the preferred Be ablator. The experiments were performed on the Omega laser using a halfraum 1.2 mm long by 2 mm diameter with a 75% laser entrance hole. The halfraum was filled with {approx} 1 atm of neopentane to delay gold plasma from closing the diagnostic line of sight down the axis of the halfraum. The ablator was mounted at the base of the halfraum, and was accelerated by a two stepped X-ray pulse consisting of an early time section {approx} 100 eV to emulate the NIF foot followed by an approximately constant {approx} 150 eV drive sustained over an additional 5-7ns. It is this long pulse duration and late time observation that distinguishes the present work from previous experiments, and is responsible for the large growth that is achieved. The growth of a 2D sinusoidal perturbation machined on the drive side of the ablator was measured using face-on radiography. The diagnostic view remained open until {approx} 11 ns with maximum growth factors measured to be {approx} 200. The trajectory of the ablator was measured using streaked backlit radiography. The design and analysis of the experiments is described, and implications for experiments on ignition target ablators are discussed.

  12. Follow up on the crystal growth experiments of the LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, K. F.; Lind, M. D.

    1993-01-01

    The results of the 4 solution growth experiments on the LDEF have been published elsewhere. Both the crystals of CaCO3, which were large and well shaped, and the much smaller TTF-TCNQ crystals showed unusual morphological behavior. The follow up on these experiments was begun in 1981, when ESA initiated a 'Concept Definition Study' on a large, 150 kg, Solution Growth Facility (SGF) to be included in the payload of EURECA-1, the European Retrievable Carrier. This carrier was a continuation of the European Spacelab and at that time planned for launch in 1987. The long delay of the LDEF retrieval and of subsequent missions brought about reflections both on the concept of crystal growth in space and on the choice of crystallization materials that had been made for the LDEF. Already before the LDEF retrieval, research on TTF-TCNQ had been stopped, and a planned growth experiment with TTF-TCNQ on the SGF/EURECA had been cancelled. The target of the SGF investigation is now more fundamental in nature. None of the crystals to be grown here are, like TTF-TCNQ, in particular demand by science or industry, and the crystals only serve the purpose of model crystals. The real purpose of the investigation is to study the growth behavior. One of the experiments, the Soret Coefficient Measurement experiment is not growing crystals at all, but has it as its sole purpose to obtain accurate information on thermal diffusion, a process of importance in crystal growth from solution.

  13. Crewmember working on the mid deck Zeolite Crystal Growth experiment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    View showing Payload Specialist Bonnie Dunbar, in the mid deck, conducting the Zeolite Crystal Growth (ZCG) Experiment in the mid deck stowage locker work area. View shows assembly of zeolite sample in the metal autoclave cylinders prior to insertion into the furnace.

  14. Crewmember working on the spacelab Zeolite Crystal Growth experiment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    View showing Payload Specialists Bonnie Dunbar and Larry DeLucas in the aft section of the U. S. Microgravity Laboratory-1. Dunbar is preparing to load a sample in the Crystal Growth Furnace (CGF) Integrated Furnace Experiment Assembly (IFEA) in rack 9 of the Microgravity Laboratory. DeLucas is checking out the multi-purpose Glovebox Facility.

  15. Computer Simulation of the Population Growth (Schizosaccharomyces Pombe) Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daley, Michael; Hillier, Douglas

    1981-01-01

    Describes a computer program (available from authors) developed to simulate "Growth of a Population (Yeast) Experiment." Students actively revise the counting techniques with realistically simulated haemocytometer or eye-piece grid and are reminded of the necessary dilution technique. Program can be modified to introduce such variables as…

  16. Job Satisfaction and Professional Growth Experiences of Urban School Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aberli, Thomas Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Modern school leaders may fed uncertainty in their feelings of satisfaction given the complex and changing nature of the principalship. Reforms in administrative preparation and training programs attempt to provide professional growth experiences that address evolving administrative expectations while universities and school districts strive to…

  17. Fostering Growth in the Survivorship Experience: Investigating Breast Cancer Survivors' Lived Experiences Scaling Mt. Kilimanjaro from a Posttraumatic Growth Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Shaunna M.; Sabiston, Catherine M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to use an ethnographic case study approach to explore breast cancer survivors' experiences scaling Mt. Kilimanjaro from a posttraumatic growth perspective. Three breast cancer survivors who participated in interviews and observations during a nine-day climb on the mountain were included in this study. Findings are…

  18. Large growth, planar Rayleigh-Taylor experiments on Nova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remington, B. A.; Haan, S. W.; Glendinning, S. G.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Munro, D. H.; Wallace, R. J.

    1992-04-01

    A set of indirect-drive experiments to study large growth Rayleigh-Taylor instability using shaped laser pulses at the Nova laser facility has been conducted. Planar foils of fluorosilicone were accelerated by x-ray ablation. The foil trajectory was measured using edge-on radiography. In separate experiments using face-on radiography, contrast in optical depth was measured as a function of time, from which the evolution of 50 μm wavelength initially sinusoidal surface perturbations was deduced. Holding other parameters fixed, the amplitude of the initial perturbation was varied by up to a factor of 30 in separate shots. The foils with the smallest initial perturbation exhibited growth factors of 75 in contrast. Foils with large initial amplitude perturbation gave growth factors of 6 or less, and displayed the ``bubble-and-spike'' shape characteristic of the nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Comparisons of two-dimensional computer simulations with both the measured foil trajectory and the perturbation growth show good agreement, provided that a suitable opacity model is chosen. In the linear regime the observed growth rates are 60%-75% of classical, the reduction attributed primarily to ablative stabilization. The observed onset of harmonic generation, signaling the transition into the nonlinear regime, is well predicted by third-order theory.

  19. Large growth, planar Rayleigh--Taylor experiments on Nova

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B.A.; Haan, S.W.; Glendinning, S.G.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Munro, D.H.; Wallace, R.J. )

    1992-04-01

    A set of indirect-drive experiments to study large growth Rayleigh--Taylor instability using shaped laser pulses at the Nova laser facility has been conducted. Planar foils of fluorosilicone were accelerated by x-ray ablation. The foil trajectory was measured using edge-on radiography. In separate experiments using face-on radiography, contrast in optical depth was measured as a function of time, from which the evolution of 50 {mu}m wavelength initially sinusoidal surface perturbations was deduced. Holding other parameters fixed, the amplitude of the initial perturbation was varied by up to a factor of 30 in separate shots. The foils with the smallest initial perturbation exhibited growth factors of 75 in contrast. Foils with large initial amplitude perturbation gave growth factors of 6 or less, and displayed the bubble-and-spike'' shape characteristic of the nonlinear Rayleigh--Taylor instability. Comparisons of two-dimensional computer simulations with both the measured foil trajectory and the perturbation growth show good agreement, provided that a suitable opacity model is chosen. In the linear regime the observed growth rates are 60%--75% of classical, the reduction attributed primarily to ablative stabilization. The observed onset of harmonic generation, signaling the transition into the nonlinear regime, is well predicted by third-order theory.

  20. The isothermal dendritic growth experiment: Scientific status of a USMP-2 space flight experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Koss, M. B.; Hahn, R. C.; Rojas, A.; Karthikeyan, M.; Winsa, E. A.

    1993-07-01

    The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE), to be performed on three of the USMP flights, starting with United States Microgravity Payload-2 (USMP-2), is designed to provide microgravity data on dendritic growth for a critical test of theory. Ground based test data using succinontrile (SCN), from both a flight capable growth chamber and a laboratory growth chamber, are compared to theoretical estimates of dendritic tip radii and velocities at several microgravity levels. The comparison shows that the data from the flight chamber are consistent with the historical data and that dendritic growth in a microgravity environment of 10-3 g0 or lower should exhibit significant differences from the dendritic growth of SCN at go.

  1. Atmospheric nucleation and growth in the CLOUD experiment at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkby, Jasper; Cloud Collaboration

    2013-05-01

    Nucleation and growth of new particles in the atmosphere is thought to account for up to half of all cloud condensation nuclei. However the vapours and formation rates that underly this process are poorly understood, due both to the ultra low concentrations of participating vapours in the presence of high backgrounds and to the many sources of uncontrolled variability in the atmosphere. In consequence, laboratory measurements made under clean and precisely controlled conditions play an important role in identifying the vapours responsible and quantifying their associated nucleation and growth rates. The CLOUD experiment at CERN is studying the nucleation and growth of aerosol particles, and their interaction with clouds, in a 3 m stainless steel aerosol/cloud chamber. The experiment is optimised to study the influence of ions, for which the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS) provides an adjustable source of 'cosmic rays'. Extraordinary care has been paid in the design and construction of CLOUD and its associated systems-gas, thermal, UV and electric field-to suppress contaminants at the technological limit. The unprecedented low contamination achieved in the CLOUD chamber has revealed that atmospheric nucleation and growth is sensitive to certain atmospheric vapours at mixing ratios of only a few parts-per-trillion by volume (pptv). Here we provide an overview of the design of CLOUD and its experimental programme over four years of operation at CERN.

  2. Survival of the Fattest: Titanite Growth During Thermal Cycling Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickland, T. D.; Glazner, A. F.

    2015-12-01

    Titanite, an important accessory mineral in plutonic rocks, is commonly interpreted as crystallizing early owing to euhedral habit and large size (up to 1 cm across), but this form can also result from temperature cycling. We performed experiments in the synthetic system titanite-albite (ttn-ab) to observe how ttn growth responds to thermal cycling. Thermal cycling causes crystal coarsening through precipitation-dissolution where crystals with larger surface areas outlive smaller or newly nucleated crystals during up-temperature cycle segments. Experiments were carried out using a 1-atmosphere furnace at a mean temperature of 1280°C, 30°C below the experimentally determined liquidus for bulk composition ttn50ab50. Temperature cycles were pseudo-sinusoidal, with amplitudes up to 20°C, a 24-minute period, and run times up to 100 hours. Heterogeneous nucleation on starting material oxides and carbonates occurred in all experiments. Median sizes of the largest 50 crystals show that growth rates increase from 2.7 μm2hr-1 to 15.3 μm2hr-1 from static to high amplitude. Static runs generated crystal number densities of ~8000 mm-2, whereas large-amplitude runs were ~400 mm-2. 20°C amplitude at ~70 hours run time created the largest crystal size of 4610 μm2. Growth rate is a strong function of cycle amplitude. Crystals grown during cycling conditions are more euhedral and significantly larger than those grown under static run conditions. Cycled runs compared to static show reduced crystal number densities by one order of magnitude and growth rates increased by a factor of 5. Thermal cycling coarsens crystal populations and is an important process to consider when interpreting plutonic rock textures.

  3. The work of fault growth in laboratory sandbox experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbert, Justin W.; Cooke, Michele L.; Souloumiac, Pauline; Madden, Elizabeth H.; Mary, Baptiste C. L.; Maillot, Bertrand

    2015-12-01

    Contractional sandbox experiments that simulate crustal accretion and direct shear tests both provide direct data on the amount of work required to create faults (Wprop) in granular materials. Measurements of force changes associated with faulting reveal the work consumed by fault growth, which can be used to predict fault growth path and timing. Within the contractional experiments, the sequence and style of early faulting is consistent for the range of sand pack thicknesses tested, from 12 to 30 mm. Contrary to expectations that Wprop is only a material property, the experimental data show that for the same material, Wprop increases with sand pack thickness. This normal stress dependence stems from the frictional nature of granular materials. With the same static and sliding friction values, incipient faults initiated deeper in the sand pack have larger shear stress drops, due to increased normal compression, σn. For CV32 sand, the relationship between Wprop and σn, calculated from the force drop data as Wprop (J/m2) = 2.0 ×10-4 (m)σn (Pa), is consistent with the relationship calculated from direct shear test data as Wprop (J/m2) = 2.4 ×10-4 (m)σn (Pa). Testing of different materials within the contractional sandbox (fine sand and glass beads) shows the sensitivity of Wprop to material properties. Both material properties and normal stress should be considered in calculations of the work consumed by fault growth in both analog experiments and crustal fault systems.

  4. The Mars Plant Growth Experiment and Implications for Planetary Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Heather

    Plants are the ultimate and necessary solution for O2 production at a human base on Mars. Currently it is unknown if seeds can germinate on the Martian surface. The Mars Plant growth experiment (MPX) is a proposal for the first step in the development of a plant- based O2 production system by demonstrating plant germination and growth on the Martian surface. There is currently no planetary protection policy in place that covers plants on the Martian surface. We describe a planetary protection plan in compliance with NASA and COSPAR policy for a closed plant growth chamber on a Mars rover. We divide the plant growth chamber into two categories for planetary protection, the Outside: the outside of the chamber exposed to the Martian environment, and the Inside: the inside of the chamber which is sealed off from Mars atmosphere and contains the plant seeds and ancillary components for seed growth. We will treat outside surfaces of the chamber as other outside surfaces on the rover, wiped with a mixture of isopropyl alcohol and water as per Category IVb planetary protection requirements. All internal components of the MPX except the seeds and camera (including the water system, the plant growth stage and interior surface walls) will be sterilized by autoclave and subjected to sterilizing dry heat at a temperature of 125°C at an absolute humidity corresponding to a relative humidity of less than 25 percent referenced to the standard conditions of 0°C and 760 torr pressure. The seeds and internal compartments of the MPX in contact with the growth media will be assembled and tested to be free of viable microbes. MPX, once assembled, cannot survive Dry Heat Microbial Reduction. The camera with the radiation and CO2 sensors will be sealed in their own container and vented through HEPA filters. The seeds will be vernalized (microbe free) as per current Space Station methods described by Paul et al. 2001. Documentation of the lack of viable microbes on representative seeds

  5. Macromolecular crystal growth experiments on International Microgravity Laboratory--1.

    PubMed Central

    Day, J.; McPherson, A.

    1992-01-01

    Macromolecular crystal growth experiments, using satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV) and canavalin from jack beans as samples, were conducted on a US Space Shuttle mission designated International Microgravity Laboratory--1 (IML-1), flown January 22-29, 1992. Parallel experiments using identical samples were carried out in both a vapor diffusion-based device (PCG) and a liquid-liquid diffusion-based instrument (CRYOSTAT). The experiments in each device were run at 20-22 degrees C and at colder temperatures. Crystals were grown in virtually every trial, but the characteristics of the crystals were highly dependent on the crystallization technique employed and the temperature experience of the sample. In general, very good results, based on visual inspection of the crystals, were obtained in both PCG and CRYOSTAT. Unusually impressive results were, however, achieved for STMV in the CRYOSTAT instrument. STMV crystals grown in microgravity by liquid-liquid diffusion were more than 10-fold greater in total volume than any STMV crystals previously grown in the laboratory. X-ray diffraction data collected from eight STMV crystals grown in CRYOSTAT demonstrated a substantial improvement in diffraction quality over the entire resolution range when compared to data from crystals grown on Earth. In addition, the extent of the diffraction pattern for the STMV crystals grown in space extended to 1.8 A resolution, whereas the best crystals that were ever grown under conditions of Earth's gravity produced data limited to 2.3 A resolution. Other observations indicate that the growth of macromolecular crystals is indeed influenced by the presence or absence of gravity. These observations further suggest, consistent with earlier results, that the elimination of gravity provides a more favorable environment for such processes. PMID:1303744

  6. Ignition and Growth Modeling of LX-17 Hockey Puck Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, C M

    2004-04-19

    Detonating solid plastic bonded explosives (PBX) formulated with the insensitive molecule triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) exhibit measurable reaction zone lengths, curved shock fronts, and regions of failing chemical reaction at abrupt changes in the charge geometry. A recent set of ''hockey puck'' experiments measured the breakout times of diverging detonation waves in ambient temperature LX-17 (92.5 % TATB plus 7.5% Kel-F binder) and the breakout times at the lower surfaces of 15 mm thick LX-17 discs placed below the detonator-booster plane. The LX-17 detonation waves in these discs grow outward from the initial wave leaving regions of unreacted or partially reacted TATB in the corners of these charges. This new experimental data is accurately simulated for the first time using the Ignition and Growth reactive flow model for LX-17, which is normalized to a great deal of detonation reaction zone, failure diameter and diverging detonation data. A pressure cubed dependence for the main growth of reaction rate yields excellent agreement with experiment, while a pressure squared rate diverges too quickly and a pressure quadrupled rate diverges too slowly in the LX-17 below the booster equatorial plane.

  7. Particle Nucleation and Growth During the NIFTy Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthelmie, R. J.; Pryor, S. C.; Spaulding, A. M.; Rossner, A.; Crimmins, B.; Hopke, P. K.; Mauldin, L.; Jobson, T.; Petaja, T.

    2008-12-01

    The measurements presented herein are being collected in order to assess the frequency and characteristics of nucleation events and high ultra-fine particle concentrations in this rural (but regionally polluted) setting, including the chemical composition of the ultra-fine particles, the principal mechanisms of nucleation, limitations on nucleation and growth and the ultimate fate of the resulting ultra-fine particles. We present a year of data from continuous measurements of particle size distributions (6 to 400 nm) at three- levels above and within a deciduous forest in southern Indiana (in the Ohio River Valley). These data are collected using two SMPS and one FMPS, and are supplemented with data concerning the spatial extent and the composition of ultra-fine particles using samples collected during May 2008 as part of the Nucleation In ForesTs (NIFTY) campaign. The long-term measurements indicate evidence of class A nucleation events on approximately 1 day in 5, and lesser magnitude or less well defined events on another 15% of days. These data indicate nucleation is most frequently observed in spring, but occurs in all seasons and subsequent growth is more rapid during leaf-on. During the NIFTY field experiment we enhanced the ongoing data collection at the forest site to include sulfuric acid, ammonia and VOC concentrations, and particle composition using two MOUDI-nano-MOUDI combinations. Preliminary analyses of these data indicate that the sub-32 nm diameter particles are almost completely ammonium-sulfate or ammonium-bisulfate and associated water but there is evidence that continued growth is aided by the addition of condensable organics. We further instrumented two additional sites - one directly south of the forest in a relatively rural setting, and one to the north in the city of Indianapolis. Results from these sites indicate strong evidence that the events are regional but the sites differ in terms of the magnitude of the events and the relative

  8. Crystal Nucleation and Growth in Mount Unzen Dacite Decompression Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almberg, L. D.; Larsen, J. F.; Eichelberger, J. C.

    2005-12-01

    Central to understanding eruption dynamics is the interplay of decompression and degassing, which triggers crystal nucleation and growth. Microlite and microphenocryst textures are an often-used tool to decipher the rates of magma ascent for specific eruptions. It is critical to determine the depth and time scale at which these processes take place to fully understand the system behavior. Conduit material retrieved from 1500 m depth from the USDP-4 at Mount Unzen, Japan provides a snap shot of a viscous magma en route to the surface and is a perfect counterpoint to compare with laboratory experiments under controlled P, T, and XH2O conditions. The core samples were identified as representing material from the 1991-1995 eruption based upon their elemental and isotopic composition and coincidence with a temperature maximum and alteration minimum (Nakada et al, ICDP Symposium, Potsdam, 2005). Three plagioclase crystal populations coexist in the spine emplaced at the conclusion of the eruption sequence in 1995, microlites (<20 μm), microphenocrysts (20-100 μm) and phenocrysts (>100 μm). Only phenocrysts and microlites are present in the samples extracted from 1500 m during drilling of the USDP-4 core. These textural differences are the focus of decompression experiments, with the purpose of replicating shallow level crystallization that may have occurred between 1500 m depth and the surface. It is possible that the microphenocrysts present in the dome lavas and absent in the conduit core could have formed at very shallow levels during magmatic ascent. Our experimental work delineates the role of decompression in controlling crystal size distributions in Unzen dacite, for comparison with the natural dome lavas and USDP-4 core samples. We conducted isothermal (870 ± 3°C) single and multi-step decompression experiments, equilibrated at 40 ± 3 MPa under water saturation and NNO conditions, and decompressed to 7.5 ± 0.5 MPa or 318 m depth. We ran such experiments for

  9. Growth of the teaching nursing home. The Veterans Administration experience.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, L Z; Wieland, D; Pearlman, R A; Grover, P; Mabry, J

    1990-01-01

    Nursing homes are becoming increasingly involved with medical education, and the Veterans Administration (VA) has been particularly active in this movement. We conducted a system-wide survey of VA nursing home facilities to determine the degree to which they participate in medical and other professional training and the features associated with such training. Of the 116 VA nursing homes in 1987, 113 (97.4%) returned completed questionnaires. Compared to "standard" VA facilities (n = 85), "teaching" nursing homes (n = 28)--those in which physicians received at least 20 hours of training per capita annually--were significantly larger, admitted and discharged significantly more patients per occupied bed, and placed a significantly larger proportion of discharged patients in noninstitutional community settings. Care costs in the teaching nursing homes were slightly but not significantly higher, despite significant increases in levels of professional staffing and amounts of training activities in all disciplines. During the survey year, teaching nursing homes provided training experiences for 440 students, residents, and fellows in internal and rehabilitation medicine, as well as for 2,700 other health professionals. The growth of teaching nursing homes in the VA system appears to be associated with positive changes in the pattern of health-care delivery, and it is increasing the number of health-care professionals trained in long-term care.

  10. Martian Soil Plant Growth Experiment: The Effects of Adding Nitrogen, Bacteria, and Fungi to Enhance Plant Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kliman, D. M.; Cooper, J. B.; Anderson, R. C.

    2000-01-01

    Plant growth is enhanced by the presence of symbiotic soil microbes. In order to better understand how plants might prosper on Mars, we set up an experiment to test whether symbiotic microbes function to enhance plant growth in a Martian soil simulant.

  11. Growth and Diversity in Doctoral Education: Assessing the Australian Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Margot; Evans, Terry; Macauley, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The major growth of doctoral education in recent decades has attracted attention from policy makers and researchers. In this article we explore the growth of doctoral education in Australia, its impact on diversity in respect of the doctoral population, shifts in disciplinary strengths, institutional concentration and award programs. We conclude…

  12. Growth in Nephrops norvegicus from a tag-recapture experiment

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Paula S.; Browne, Patricia; Fullbrook, Liam; Graham, Conor T.; Hancox, Lee; Johnson, Mark P.; Lauria, Valentina; Power, Anne Marie

    2016-01-01

    Nephrops norvegicus is a commercially valuable fishery in the EU but management of stocks is challenging due to difficulties in aging individuals and calculating growth and biomass production. Growth of N. norvegicus was estimated by releasing 1177 tagged individuals in western Ireland in Summer 2013 and recapturing these in 2014 (n = 207, an average of 344 days later) and 2015 (n = 38, 654–665 days later). Moulting occurred twice per year in approximately half of the males and only once in females. Mean growth increments after approximately one year were 5.1 mm Carapace Length (CL) in males and 1.4 mm CL in females. After two years, males had grown by 12.0 mm CL and females by 4.6 mm CL, on average, across size classes. Low variation in growth increments was seen across female size classes, but significantly lower growth was observed in larger males, meeting an important assumption of the Von Bertalanffy Growth Function. Asymptotic carapace lengths were 70.8 mm (males) and 55.2 mm (females) with respective growth constants (k) of 0.161 yr−1 and 0.077 yr−1. The results suggest that this is a very productive fishery and that survivability of returns from creel fishing is high. PMID:27725735

  13. Fire growth experiments: toward a standard room fire test

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, R.B.; Fisher, F.L.

    1980-05-01

    The use of full-scale room fire experiments and the development of a standard room fire test are discussed. A series of room fire experiments with a gas burner ignition source, and gypsum wallboard, glass fiber insulation and plywood linings are described in detail. The results of the experiments are discussed in the context of a standard room fire test.

  14. Cell Assisted Cell Growth Experiments with Dictyostelium discoideum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Albert; Ip, Wui; Franck, Carl

    2007-03-01

    In eukaryotic cell culture, it is routinely recommended to keep the cells above a minimum cell density to maintain vigorous growth. We are investigating the basis for this prescription by viewing cell growth as a social behavior facilitated by cell-cell communication. Employing Dictyostelium discoideum, we find good evidence for a slow-fast transition in the cell growth rate vs. density in well mixed, 25 ml, cell cultures. We also use low height microfluidic chambers (four orders of magnitude smaller in volume) to find similar behavior even though the system is not well mixed and the cells are confined to substrates. A preliminary measurement at a flow rate that should strongly perturb cell-cell communication by means of diffusing signal molecules suggests that cell communication essential for growth is not accomplished by such means but possibly via direct contacts.

  15. Indium antimonide crystal growth experiment M562. [Skylab weightless conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, H. C.; Witt, A. F.

    1974-01-01

    It was established that ideal diffusion controlled steady state conditions, never accomplished on earth, were achieved during the growth of Te-doped InSb crystals in Skylab. Surface tension effects led to nonwetting conditions under which free surface solidification took place in confined geometry. It was further found that, under forced contact conditions, surface tension effects led to the formation of surface ridges (not previously observed on earth) which isolated the growth system from its container. In addition, it was possible, for the first time, to identify unambiguously: the origin of segregation discontinuities associated with facet growth, the mode of nucleation and propagation of rotational twin boundaries, and the specific effect of mechanical-shock perturbations on segregation. The results obtained prove the advantageous conditions provided by outer space. Thus, fundamental data on solidification thought to be unattainable because of gravity-induced interference on earth are now within reach.

  16. How Being Female Influenced My Professional Experiences and Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foa, Edna B.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper I describe some of my professional experiences as a female, both as a graduate student and throughout my career. My own experience was unique because I began graduate school a few months after arriving in the U.S. with limited knowledge of English in a very competitive and demanding program , in addition to the fact that I was a…

  17. Experiments on LICHEN growth. 1. Seasonal patterns and environmental controls

    SciTech Connect

    Benedict, J.B. )

    1990-08-01

    Radial growth of mature Xanthoparmelia lineola and X. subdecipiens thalli (n = 10 thalli, 170 lobes) was measured bimonthly for 2 yr at a transplant locality on the East Slope of the Colorado Front Range (altitude 2,565 m). Growth occurred during every measurement period, but was most rapid in May, June, July, and August. Ninety-three percent of seasonal growth-rate variation during the first year of the study, and 92% during the second year, are explained by differences in the duration of daytime, snow-free thallus moisture (moisture available for photosynthesis); the strength of the relationship suggests that a positive net carbon assimilation rate is translated almost immediately into lobe elongation. No negative correlation was found between radial growth and thallus moisture recorded at night or beneath snow. In the cool, continental environment of the study area, duration of photosynthetically significant thallus moisture is influenced more strongly by air temperature, day length, and snow cover than by total precipitation. At higher altitudes and latitudes, where lichenometry is used for dating, these factors will have even greater importance.

  18. Experiments on the growth and form of icicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Antony Szu-Han

    Icicles are a ubiquitous and picturesque feature of cold winter weather. Their familiar form emerges from a subtle interplay between the solidification dynamics of ice and the gravity-driven flow of the thin water film flowing over their evolving surface. The latent heat released by freezing is advected by the water film and ultimately carried away by the surrounding sub-zero air, which is also flowing. Like many processes far from equilibrium, icicle growth can exhibit nonlinear pattern formation. While scaling theory predicts that icicles converge to `platonic', self-similar shapes, natural icicles often exhibit regular ripple patterns about their circumference, which are due to a morphological instability. This thesis presents a comprehensive experimental study of icicles that sheds new light on the dynamics of their growth and the origin of their form. A table-top apparatus was designed and built for the controlled growth of icicles, under different conditions of temperature, water supply rate, ambient air motion, and water purity. Image analysis and Fourier methods were used to examine their morphology. Contrary to theoretical expectations, ripples do not appear on icicles made from pure water. Instead, ripples grow and travel on icicles made from salt solutions, even at very low concentrations. The addition of non-ionic surfactant or dissolved gases does not produce ripples, unless ionic impurities are also present. The ripple wavelength is independent of time and growth conditions. The ripple amplification rate and traveling velocity vary weakly with the ionic concentration, as do the tip and radial growth speeds of the icicle. While the tip and radial growth also depend on the ambient temperature and input mass flux, the ripple dynamics is not correlated with extrinsic conditions. If the ambient temperature or input mass flux is sufficiently low, the tip growth only advances for a short period of time before it ceases. After cessation, the shape of the

  19. New Instrument INKA for Ice Nucleation and Growth Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Thea; Levin, Ezra; Höhler, Kristina; Nadolny, Jens; Möhler, Ottmar; DeMott, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Microphysical processes in clouds, such as the formation and growth of ice crystals, significantly influence the weather and the climate. Particularly the transition from the supercooled water to the solid ice phase is of great relevance since ice formation initiates the formation of precipitation and thereby strongly affects the cloud structure and life time. However, the formulation and parameterization of these processes and further laboratory studies are needed to obtain quantitative information on the ice activity of various atmospheric aerosol species. Therefore, we have constructed and built a new continuous flow diffusion chamber (CFDC) called INKA (Ice Nucleation Instrument of the KArlsruhe Institut of Technology) to be used both in the AIDA laboratory for detailed studies of ice nucleation and growth processes and in field applications for measuring the temperature-dependent abundance of ice nucleating particles (INPs). The CFDC design was originally developed and theoretically described by Rogers et al. (1988). The main part of the new INKA instrument, the chamber, consists of two vertically-oriented, concentric tubes with a total length of 150 cm. Together with particle-free, dry sheath air, the sampled aerosol particles flow through the annular space between these two cylinders. The wall temperatures of the cylinders can be adjusted and the walls of the annular gap are coated with thin ice layers. The bottom part (about 50 cm) of the outer cylinder of INKA is separately cooled, which allows operation in two different modes: In the ice nucleation mode, the CFDC is operated with a nucleation and growth section, covering the upper 100 cm of its length, which exposes the aerosol particles to a defined temperature and supersaturation. The bottom part is the so called droplet evaporation section which allows the ice particles to grow to a detectable size on the expense of present droplets. In the ice growth mode, the full length of the cylinders is operated

  20. Hydrodynamic growth and mix experiments at National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Caggiano, J.; Casey, D.; Cerjan, C.; Clark, D. S.; Edwards, J.; Grim, G.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A.; Hsing, W.; Hurricane, O.; Kilkenny, J.; Kline, J.; Knauer, J.; Landen, O.; McNaney, J.; Mintz, M.; Nikroo, A.; Parham, T.; Park, H.-S.; Pino, J.; Raman, K.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Rowley, D.; Tipton, R.; Weber, S.; Yeamans, C.

    2016-03-01

    Hydrodynamic growth and its effects on implosion performance and mix were studied at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Spherical shells with pre-imposed 2D modulations were used to measure Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth in the acceleration phase of implosions using in-flight x-ray radiography. In addition, implosion performance and mix have been studied at peak compression using plastic shells filled with tritium gas and imbedding localized CD diagnostic layer in various locations in the ablator. Neutron yield and ion temperature of the DT fusion reactions were used as a measure of shell-gas mix, while neutron yield of the TT fusion reaction was used as a measure of implosion performance. The results have indicated that the low-mode hydrodynamic instabilities due to surface roughness were the primary culprits to yield degradation, with atomic ablator-gas mix playing a secondary role.

  1. Accelerated growth of calcium silicate hydrates: Experiments and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nicoleau, Luc

    2011-12-15

    Despite the usefulness of isothermal calorimetry in cement analytics, without any further computations this brings only little information on the nucleation and growth of hydrates. A model originally developed by Garrault et al. is used in this study in order to simulate hydration curves of cement obtained by calorimetry with different known hardening accelerators. The limited basis set of parameters used in this model, having a physical or chemical significance, is valuable for a better understanding of mechanisms underlying in the acceleration of C-S-H precipitation. Alite hydration in presence of four different types of hardening accelerators was investigated. It is evidenced that each accelerator type plays a specific role on one or several growth parameters and that the model may support the development of new accelerators. Those simulations supported by experimental observations enable us to follow the formation of the C-S-H layer around grains and to extract interesting information on its apparent permeability.

  2. Quantitative determination of zero-gravity effects on crystal growth from the melt (experiment MA-060). [germanium crystal growth experiment during ASTP mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, H. C.; Herman, C. J.; Lichtensteiger, M.; Witt, A. F.

    1976-01-01

    The purpose of experiment MA-060 was to investigate quantitatively the effects of near-zero gravity conditions on crystal growth and dopant segregation during directional solidification from the melt. Gallium-doped germanium single crystals were successfully grown from the melt with simultaneous interface demarcation during the Apollo Soyuz Test Project mission. The analysis of the experimental data indicates striking differences of dopant segregation and growth behavior in the presence and absence of gravity. The results obtained are believed to have far-reaching implications on materials processing under zero-gravity conditions and on the theory of crystal growth and segregation in general.

  3. Cell growth pattern and wall microfibrillar arrangement: experiments with nitella.

    PubMed

    Gertel, E T; Green, P B

    1977-08-01

    In cylindrical cells growing throughout their length, over-all transverse reinforcement of the wall by microfibrils is believed to be required for cell elongation. The multinet theory states that in such cells microfibrils are deposited at the inner surface of the wall with transverse orientation and are then passively reoriented toward the longitudinal direction by the predominant longitudinal strain (surface expension). In the present study young Nitella cells were physically forced to grow in highly abnormal patterns: in length only, in girth only, or with localized suppression of growth. Subsequent gradients of microfibrillar arrangement within the wall cross-section were measured with polarized light and interference microscopes. The novel wall structures produced were in all cases explainable by passive reorientation, i.e. by the multinet theory. The study also showed that orientation of synthesis remains insensitive to several of the physical manipulations that strongly influence the passive behavior of wall microfibrils. Only the localized complete suppression of surface growth led to the deposition of nontransverse cellulose. These results suggest that the presence of strain is needed for continued oriented synthesis, but that the directional aspect of strain is not an "instructional" agent continuously guiding the orientation of synthesis, once this orientation has been established.

  4. How being female influenced my professional experiences and growth.

    PubMed

    Foa, Edna B

    2012-12-01

    In this paper I describe some of my professional experiences as a female, both as a graduate student and throughout my career. My own experience was unique because I began graduate school a few months after arriving in the U.S. with limited knowledge of English in a very competitive and demanding program , in addition to the fact that I was a faculty wife in that department. A major dilemma in achieving a successful academic career involves finding an optimal balance between the demands of a career and those of motherhood. In earlier years the burden of compromises dictated by the needs of children customarily fell on the shoulders of women, and this often delayed the development of their careers. This has changed some over the years as many couples share child-rearing responsibilities, but remains a hurdle for many professional women. While institutional biases and conflicting demands still produce special challenges to women who strive to make significant contributions to their fields, such women are more in charge of their careers today than they were 30 or 40years ago. But in my experience, the achievement of contributing significantly to knowledge in the field, for both men and for women, involves quite a few sacrifices.

  5. Experiment 9: ASTROCULTURE: Growth and Starch Accumulation of Potato Tuber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tibbitts, Theodore W.; Brown, Christopher S.; Croxdale, Judith G.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    1998-01-01

    Potato explants (leaf, small stem section, and axillary bud) flown on STS-73 developed tubers of 1.5 cm diameter and 1.7 g mass during the 16-day period of space flight. The experiment was undertaken in the ASTROCULTURE(TM) experiment package under controlled temperature, humidity, lighting, and carbon dioxide concentrations. The tubers that formed in the explant system under microgravity had the same gross morphology, the same anatomical configuration of cells and tissues, and the same sizes, shapes, and surface character of starch granules as tubers formed in a 1 g environment. The total accumulation of starch and other energy containing compounds was similar in space flight and ground control tubers. Enzyme activity of starch synthase, starch phosphorylase, and total hydrolase was similar in space flight and ground controls, but activity of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase was reduced in the space flight tuber tissue. This experiment documented that potatoes will metabolize and accumulate starch as effectively in space flight as on the ground. Thus, this data provides the potential for effective utilization of potatoes in life support systems of space bases.

  6. Microgravity experiment to understand the effect of convection on PVT crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, N. B.; Duval, W. M. B.; Thomas, A. S. W.; Glicksman, M. E.; Adam, J. D.; Zhang, H.; Golombeck, J. C.; Watson, C.; Naumman, R.; Nelson, A. E.; Cacioppo, C.; Griffin, J.; Jugrav, M.; Rolin, T.; Seaquist, J.; Daniel, N.

    2003-07-01

    We have carried out very extensive theoretical and experimental studies on the physical vapour transport (PVT) growth of mercurous chloride. A microgravity experiment on the growth of mercurous chloride was designed and performed in the Space Experiment Facility (SEF) transparent furnace that was flown on Spacehab 4 (STS 77). Growth ampoules and cartridges were designed and fabricated to meet the science requirements. Two crystals were grown at the same time in the same furnace in <110> orientation at an speed of 5.5 mm/day and 8 mm/day by physical vapor transport in the microgravity condition to reduce gravity driven convection. The direct observation was made on the interface during the growth of crystals. We observed convex and detached growth for both growth runs.

  7. Clinical experience with monoclonal antibodies to epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Emiliano; Rowinsky, Eric K

    2005-03-01

    Recent knowledge about the intermediate steps and final consequences of ligand-dependent epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation has clearly supported the notion that EGFR plays a fundamental role in regulating the proliferation and survival of malignant neoplasms. Among the rationally designed target-based therapeutics that are being assessed, those targeting EGFR appear to be some of the most clinically relevant. The strategy of using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to block ligand binding to the extracellular domain of the EGFR has led to the development of therapeutics that robustly arrest malignant cell proliferation and, in some cases, induce profound tumor regression. The chimeric mAb against EGFR, cetuximab, has already been approved by regulatory agencies worldwide to treat patients with advanced colorectal cancer. Other mAbs against EGFR, particularly panitumumab (ABX-EGF), h-R3, and EMD72000, are in advanced stages of clinical development. PMID:15717942

  8. Advances in growth chart design and use: the UK experience.

    PubMed

    Wright, Charlotte M; Williams, Anthony F; Cole, Tim J

    2013-01-01

    As part of the process of adopting the WHO standard in the United Kingdom, the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH) was commissioned by the UK Department of Health to design new UK-WHO growth charts. The working group for this project combined expertise ranging from statistics and graphic design to qualitative research, as well as paediatrics, nursing and dietetics. New charts for children under 4 years were published in 2009 and are now widely used in the UK and beyond (www.growthcharts.rcpch.ac.uk). This paper will describe what we have learned in general about the process of designing charts and how these principles were applied to the design of a novel chart designed specifically for sick and premature infants. A successful design first requires clarity about the exact purpose of the chart and who will use it. The layout of the chart can then be varied in many ways to fit that use and ensure users are not misled. Users need consistent and well-evidenced rules for chart use. Drafting the instructions serves as a powerful test of the validity and clarity of the design. However, charts need also to be formally evaluated, as expert views will not reflect those of the average user. The Neonatal and Infant Close Monitoring (NICM) chart included various novel design features, including date boxes for gestational age adjustment and low SD lines to help assess very small infants. It was evaluated at three stages using plotting exercises and each phase led to substantial design changes. Growth charts are conceptually very complex, with the capacity to mislead as well as inform and should always be formally evaluated before implementation.

  9. Plant Growth Experiments in Zeoponic Substrates: Applications for Advanced Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, Douglas W.; Gruener, J. E.; Henderson, K. E.; Steinberg, S. L.; Barta, D. J.; Galindo, C.; Henninger, D. L.

    2001-01-01

    A zeoponic plant-growth system is defined as the cultivation of plants in artificial soils, which have zeolites as a major component (Allen and Ming, 1995). Zeolites are crystalline, hydrated aluminosilicate minerals that have the ability to exchange constituent cations without major change of the mineral structure. Recently, zeoponic systems developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) slowly release some (Allen et at., 1995) or all of the essential plant-growth nutrients (Ming et at., 1995). These systems have NH4- and K-exchanged clinoptilolite (a natural zeolite) and either natural or synthetic apatite (a calcium phosphate mineral). For the natural apatite system, Ca and P were made available to the plant by the dissolution of apatite. Potassium and NH4-N were made available by ion-exchange reactions involving Ca(2+) from apatite dissolution and K(+) and NH4(+) on zeolitic exchange sites. In addition to NH4-N, K, Ca, and P, the synthetic apatite system also supplied Mg, S, and other micronutrients during dissolution (Figure 1). The overall objective of this research task is to develop zeoponic substrates wherein all plant growth nutrients are supplied by the plant growth medium for several growth seasons with only the addition of water. The substrate is being developed for plant growth in Advanced Life Support (ALS) testbeds (i.e., BioPLEX) and microgravity plant growth experiments. Zeoponic substrates have been used for plant growth experiments on two Space Shuttle flight experiments (STS-60; STS-63; Morrow et aI., 1995). These substrates may be ideally suited for plant growth experiments on the International Space Station and applications in ALS testbeds. However, there are several issues that need to be resolved before zeoponics will be the choice substrate for plant growth experiments in space. The objective of this paper is to provide an overview on recent research directed toward the refinement of zeoponic plant growth substrates.

  10. Rayleigh-taylor instability growth experiments in a cylindrically convergent geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, S. T., LLNL

    1997-06-11

    Convergent geometry Rayleigh-Taylor experiments have been performed with a 122-point detonation initiation system on cylinders having sinusoidal perturbations on the outer surface ranging from mode-6 to mode-36. Experiments were performed with various perturbation mode numbers, perturbation amplitudes, and ring accelerations. Feedthrough perturbation growth on the inner surface was observed in several experiments, and in one experiment the feed through perturbation underwent a phase inversion. These experimental results were found to be in good agreement with linear, small-amplitude analysis of feedthrough growth in an incompressible, cylindrically convergent geometry.

  11. Inverse problem for the Verhulst equation of limited population growth with discrete experiment data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimov, Anvar; Kasenov, Syrym; Nurseitov, Daniyar; Serovajsky, Simon

    2016-08-01

    Verhulst limited growth model with unknown parameters of growth is considered. These parameters are defined by discrete experiment data. This inverse problem is solved with using gradient method with interpolation of data and without it. Approximation of the delta-function is used for the latter case. As an example the bacteria population E.coli is considered.

  12. Model experiments for the Czochralski crystal growth technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, A.; Pal, J.; Gerbeth, G.

    2013-03-01

    A lot of the physical and the numerical modeling of Czochralski crystal growth is done on the generic Rayleigh-Bénard system. To better approximate the conditions in a Czochralski puller, the influences of a rounded crucible bottom, deviations of the thermal boundary conditions from the generic case, crucible and/or crystal rotation, and the influence of magnetic fields are often studied separately. The present contribution reviews some of these topics while concentrating on studies of the flow and related temperature fluctuations in systems where a rotating magnetic field (RMF) was applied. The three-dimensional convective patterns and the resulting temperature fluctuations will be discussed both for the mere buoyant case and for the application of an RMF. It is shown that a system between a Rayleigh-Bénard and a more realistic configuration, which is still cylindrical but whose surface is partially covered by a crystal model, behaves much the same as a Rayleigh-Bénard system. An RMF can be used to damp the temperature fluctuations. Secondly, a more Czochralski-like system is examined. It turns out that the RMF does not provide the desired damping of the temperature fluctutions in the parameter range considered.

  13. RTA beam dynamics experiments: limiting cumulative transverse instability growth in a linear periodic system

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, T; Lidia, S; Westenskow, G

    2000-06-10

    A critical issue for a Two-Beam accelerator based upon extended relativistic klystrons is controlling the cumulative dipole instability growth We describe a theoretical scheme to reduce the growth from an exponential to a more manageable linear rate, and a new experiment to test this concept. The experiment utilizes a 1-MeV, 600-Amp, 200-ns electron beam and a short beamline of periodically spaced RF dipole pillbox cavities and solenoid magnets for transport. Descriptions of the RTA injector and the planned beamline are presented, followed by theoretical studies of the beam transport and dipole mode growth.

  14. Spaceflight hardware for conducting plant growth experiments in space: the early years 1960-2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porterfield, D. M.; Neichitailo, G. S.; Mashinski, A. L.; Musgrave, M. E.

    2003-01-01

    The best strategy for supporting long-duration space missions is believed to be bioregenerative life support systems (BLSS). An integral part of a BLSS is a chamber supporting the growth of higher plants that would provide food, water, and atmosphere regeneration for the human crew. Such a chamber will have to be a complete plant growth system, capable of providing lighting, water, and nutrients to plants in microgravity. Other capabilities include temperature, humidity, and atmospheric gas composition controls. Many spaceflight experiments to date have utilized incomplete growth systems (typically having a hydration system but lacking lighting) to study tropic and metabolic changes in germinating seedlings and young plants. American, European, and Russian scientists have also developed a number of small complete plant growth systems for use in spaceflight research. Currently we are entering a new era of experimentation and hardware development as a result of long-term spaceflight opportunities available on the International Space Station. This is already impacting development of plant growth hardware. To take full advantage of these new opportunities and construct innovative systems, we must understand the results of past spaceflight experiments and the basic capabilities of the diverse plant growth systems that were used to conduct these experiments. The objective of this paper is to describe the most influential pieces of plant growth hardware that have been used for the purpose of conducting scientific experiments during the first 40 years of research. c2002 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Spaceflight hardware for conducting plant growth experiments in space: the early years 1960-2000.

    PubMed

    Porterfield, D M; Neichitailo, G S; Mashinski, A L; Musgrave, M E

    2003-01-01

    The best strategy for supporting long-duration space missions is believed to be bioregenerative life support systems (BLSS). An integral part of a BLSS is a chamber supporting the growth of higher plants that would provide food, water, and atmosphere regeneration for the human crew. Such a chamber will have to be a complete plant growth system, capable of providing lighting, water, and nutrients to plants in microgravity. Other capabilities include temperature, humidity, and atmospheric gas composition controls. Many spaceflight experiments to date have utilized incomplete growth systems (typically having a hydration system but lacking lighting) to study tropic and metabolic changes in germinating seedlings and young plants. American, European, and Russian scientists have also developed a number of small complete plant growth systems for use in spaceflight research. Currently we are entering a new era of experimentation and hardware development as a result of long-term spaceflight opportunities available on the International Space Station. This is already impacting development of plant growth hardware. To take full advantage of these new opportunities and construct innovative systems, we must understand the results of past spaceflight experiments and the basic capabilities of the diverse plant growth systems that were used to conduct these experiments. The objective of this paper is to describe the most influential pieces of plant growth hardware that have been used for the purpose of conducting scientific experiments during the first 40 years of research.

  16. Plant Growth and Development in the ASTROCULTURE(trademark) Space-Based Growth Unit-Ground Based Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bula, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    The ASTROCULTURE(trademark) plant growth unit flown as part on the STS-63 mission in February 1995, represented the first time plants were flown in microgravity in a enclosed controlled environment plant growth facility. In addition to control of the major environmental parameters, nutrients were provided to the plants with the ZEOPONICS system developed by NASA Johnson Space Center scientists. Two plant species were included in this space experiment, dwarf wheat (Triticum aestivum) and a unique mustard called "Wisconsin Fast Plants" (Brassica rapa). Extensive post-flight analyses have been performed on the plant material and it has been concluded that plant growth and development was normal during the period the plants were in the microgravity environment of space. However, adequate plant growth and development control data were not available for direct comparisons of plant responses to the microgravity environment with those of plants grown at 1 g. Such data would allow for a more complete interpretation of the extent that microgravity affects plant growth and development.

  17. Children's Experience of Posttraumatic Growth: Distinguishing General from Domain-Specific Correlates.

    PubMed

    Laceulle, Odilia M; Kleber, Rolf J; Alisic, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Although the five domains of posttraumatic growth (new possibilities, relating to others, personal strength, spiritual change and appreciation of life) have been studied extensively in adults, little is known about these domains and their correlates in children. We aimed to examine whether demographic and/or social characteristics are related to children's reports of overall posttraumatic growth and of growth in specific domains. In a general population study, children aged 8-12 years who had been exposed to adverse events (N = 1290) filled out questionnaires on their experiences, demographic characteristics (gender, age, time lag since event), stress reactions, peer support, religiosity and posttraumatic growth. All demographic and social characteristics were related to overall posttraumatic growth, except time lag. Associations varied across the five domains with the strongest effects being found for stress reactions and religiosity. A higher level of stress reactions was related to more growth in all domains (general effect), whereas religious children experienced more spiritual growth than non-religious children without differences on other domains (domain specific effect). Other effects were small, and some did not remain significant after Bonferroni corrections. These findings suggest the presence of both general and domain-specific correlates of child posttraumatic growth. Although effects were generally small, the current findings show the need to differentiate between the domains of posttraumatic growth in both further research and clinical practice. This will allow a better understanding of the mechanisms of posttraumatic growth in children as well as more tailored assessment and intervention.

  18. Children’s Experience of Posttraumatic Growth: Distinguishing General from Domain-Specific Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Laceulle, Odilia M.; Kleber, Rolf J.; Alisic, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Although the five domains of posttraumatic growth (new possibilities, relating to others, personal strength, spiritual change and appreciation of life) have been studied extensively in adults, little is known about these domains and their correlates in children. We aimed to examine whether demographic and/or social characteristics are related to children’s reports of overall posttraumatic growth and of growth in specific domains. In a general population study, children aged 8–12 years who had been exposed to adverse events (N = 1290) filled out questionnaires on their experiences, demographic characteristics (gender, age, time lag since event), stress reactions, peer support, religiosity and posttraumatic growth. All demographic and social characteristics were related to overall posttraumatic growth, except time lag. Associations varied across the five domains with the strongest effects being found for stress reactions and religiosity. A higher level of stress reactions was related to more growth in all domains (general effect), whereas religious children experienced more spiritual growth than non-religious children without differences on other domains (domain specific effect). Other effects were small, and some did not remain significant after Bonferroni corrections. These findings suggest the presence of both general and domain-specific correlates of child posttraumatic growth. Although effects were generally small, the current findings show the need to differentiate between the domains of posttraumatic growth in both further research and clinical practice. This will allow a better understanding of the mechanisms of posttraumatic growth in children as well as more tailored assessment and intervention. PMID:26714193

  19. Whisker/Cone growth on the thermal control surfaces experiment no. S0069

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwiener, James M.; Coston, James E., Jr.; Miller, Edgar R.; Mell, Richard J.; Wilkes, Donald R.

    1995-01-01

    An unusual surface 'growth' was found during scanning electron microscope (SEM) investigations of the Thermal Control Surface Experiment (TCSE) S0069 front thermal cover. This 'growth' is similar to the cone type whisker growth phenomena as studied by G. K. Wehner beginning in the 1960's. Extensive analysis has identified the most probable composition of the whiskers to be a silicate type glass. Sources of the growth material are outgassing products from the experiment and orbital atomic oxygen, which occurs naturally at the orbital altitudes of the LDEF mission in the form of neutral atomic oxygen. The highly ordered symmetry and directionality of the whiskers are attributed to the long term (5.8 year) stable flight orientation of the LDEF.

  20. Follow-on Research Activities for the Rensselaer Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (RIDGE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaCombe, J. C.; Koss, M. B.; Lupulescu, A. O.; Frei, J. E.; Giummarra, C.; Glicksman, M. E.

    2001-01-01

    The RIDGE effort continues the aegis of the earlier, NASA-sponsored, Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) series of experiments through the continued analysis of microgravity data acquired during these earlier space flights. The preliminary observations presented here demonstrate that there are significant differences between SCN and the more anisotropic PVA dendrites. The side branch structure becomes amplified only further behind the tip, and the interface shape is generally wider (i.e. more hyperbolic than parabolic) in PVA than in SCN. These characteristics are seen to affect the process of heat transport. Additionally, the dendrites grown during the fourth United States Microgravity Payload (USMP-4) exhibit time-dependent growth characteristics and may not always have reached steady-state growth during the experiment.

  1. From burden to spritual growth: Korean students' experience in a spiritual care practicum.

    PubMed

    So, Woi Sook; Shin, Hye Sook

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about how students learn spiritual caregiving. A phenomenological study was conducted to examine the experience of Korean nursing students in a spiritual care practicum. Interviews with 12 students were analyzed and organized into 40 themes, 17 theme clusters, and five categories describing their experience in the practicum. Students initially experienced burdens and helplessness,followed by improvement of coping skills, self-reflection, and spiritual growth.

  2. Biofilm growth in porous media: Experiments, computational modeling at the porescale, and upscaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peszynska, Malgorzata; Trykozko, Anna; Iltis, Gabriel; Schlueter, Steffen; Wildenschild, Dorthe

    2016-09-01

    Biofilm growth changes many physical properties of porous media such as porosity, permeability and mass transport parameters. The growth depends on various environmental conditions, and in particular, on flow rates. Modeling the evolution of such properties is difficult both at the porescale where the phase morphology can be distinguished, as well as during upscaling to the corescale effective properties. Experimental data on biofilm growth is also limited because its collection can interfere with the growth, while imaging itself presents challenges. In this paper we combine insight from imaging, experiments, and numerical simulations and visualization. The experimental dataset is based on glass beads domain inoculated by biomass which is subjected to various flow conditions promoting the growth of biomass and the appearance of a biofilm phase. The domain is imaged and the imaging data is used directly by a computational model for flow and transport. The results of the computational flow model are upscaled to produce conductivities which compare well with the experimentally obtained hydraulic properties of the medium. The flow model is also coupled to a newly developed biomass-nutrient growth model, and the model reproduces morphologies qualitatively similar to those observed in the experiment.

  3. An Innovative Method for Preparing Semiconductor Change Used in Crystal Growth and Shear Cell Diffusion Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anrold, William A.; Matthiesen, David; Benett, Robert J.; Jayne, Douglas T.

    1997-01-01

    An innovative technique for machining semiconductors has been developed. This technique was used to prepare semiconductor charges for crystal growth and shear cell diffusion experiments. The technique allows brittle semiconductor materials to be quickly and accurately machined. Lightly doping the semiconductor material increases the conductivity enough to allow the material to be shaped by an electrical discharge machine (EDM).

  4. Advantages of ice crystal growth experiments in a low gravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. J.; Keller, V. W.; Hallett, J.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of convective fluid motions and mechanical supports on ice crystal growth in experiments conducted on earth can be inferred from studies conducted in their absence in a low-gravity environment. Current experimental results indicate the effects may be significant.

  5. Coming to America for Spiritual or Academic Growth? Experiences of International Students at One Christian School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Lishu

    2013-01-01

    The number of international students flocking to North American private Christian schools has continued to grow. The author examined the overall experiences of 67 international high school students studying at a private Christian school in South Carolina. Their frustrations and struggles with academic and spiritual growth in a new cross-cultural…

  6. Indirect-drive ablative Rayleigh-Taylor growth experiments on the Shenguang-II laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J. F.; Fan, Z. F.; Zheng, W. D.; Wang, M.; Pei, W. B.; Zhu, S. P.; Zhang, W. Y.; Miao, W. Y.; Yuan, Y. T.; Cao, Z. R.; Deng, B.; Jiang, S. E.; Liu, S. Y.; Ding, Y. K.; Wang, L. F.; Ye, W. H. He, X. T.

    2014-04-15

    In this research, a series of single-mode, indirect-drive, ablative Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability experiments performed on the Shenguang-II laser facility [X. T. He and W. Y. Zhang, Eur. Phys. J. D 44, 227 (2007)] using planar target is reported. The simulation results from the one-dimensional hydrocode for the planar foil trajectory experiment indicate that the energy flux at the hohlraum wall is obviously less than that at the laser entrance hole. Furthermore, the non-Planckian spectra of x-ray source can strikingly affect the dynamics of the foil flight and the perturbation growth. Clear images recorded by an x-ray framing camera for the RT growth initiated by small- and large-amplitude perturbations are obtained. The observed onset of harmonic generation and transition from linear to nonlinear growth regime is well predicted by two-dimensional hydrocode simulations.

  7. Experiment 2: Vapor Transport Crystal Growth of Mercury Cadmium Telluride in Microgravity- USML-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedemeier, H.; Ge, Y. R.; Hutchins, M. A.

    1998-01-01

    The new epitaxial growth experiments of Hg(l-x)Cd(x)Te on (100) CdTe substrates by chemical vapor transport (CVT), using HgI2 as a transport agent, were performed in the transient growth regime of this ternary, heteroepitaxial system at normal and reduced gravity during the USML-2 flight. The surface and interface morphology, the compositional and structural uniformity, and carrier mobility of the epitaxial layer and islands grown in microgravity are measurably improved relative to ground specimens. These observations demonstrate the effects of convective flow on the transport, deposition, and growth processes of this solid-vapor system even in the transient growth regime. The properties of the Hg(l-x)Cd(x)Te layer grown in a microgravity environment compare quite favorably to those of layers obtained by other techniques.

  8. Crystal Growth Furnace - An overview of the system configuration and planned experiments on the First United States Microgravity Laboratory mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivas, R.; Schaefer, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    The Crystal Growth Furnace (CGF) system configuration for the First United States Microgravity Laboratory (USML-1) mission is reviewed, and the planned on-orbit experiments are briefly described. The CGF is configured to accommodate four scientific experiments involving crystal growth which are based on the classical Bridgman method and CVT method, including vapor transport crystal growth of mercury cadmium telluride; crystal growth of mercury zinc telluride by directional solidification; seeded Bridgman growth of zinc-doped cadmium telluride; and Bridgman growth of selenium-doped gallium arsenide.

  9. Vapor Growth of Binary and Ternary Chalcogenides in Preparation for Microgravity Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In the bulk crystal growth of some technologically important semiconducting chalcopyrites, such as ZnTe, CdS, ZnSe and ZnS, vapor growth techniques have significant advantages over melt growth techniques due to the high melting points of these materials. The realization of routine production of high-quality single crystals of these semiconductors requires a fundamental, systematic and in-depth study on the PVT growth process and crystal growth by vapor transport in low gravity offers a set of unique conditions for this study. Previously, two reasons have been put forward to account for this. The first is weight-related reductions in crystal strain and defects. These are thought to be caused by the weight of the crystals during processing at elevated temperatures and retained on cooling, particularly for materials with a low yield strength. The second, and more general, reason is related to the reduction in density-gradient driven convection. The PVT crystal growth process consists of essentially three processes: sublimation of the source material, transport of the vapor species and condensation of the vapor species to form the crystal. The latter two processes can be affected by the convection caused by gravitational accelerations on Earth. Reductions in such convection in low gravity is expected to yield a nearly diffusion-limited growth condition which results in more uniform growth rates (on the microscopic scale) and hence greater crystalline perfection and compositional homogeneity. The reduction of convective contamination by performing flight experiments in a reduced gravity environment will help to understand the relation between fluid phase processes (growth parameters) and defect and impurity incorporation in grown crystals.

  10. Ablation Front Rayleigh-Taylor Growth Experiments in Spherically Convergent Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Glendinning, S.G.; Cherfils, C.; Colvin, J.; Divol, L.; Galmiche, D.; Haan, S.; Marinak, M.M.; Remington, B.A.; Richard, A.L.; Wallace, R.

    1999-11-03

    Experiments were performed on the Nova laser, using indirectly driven capsules mounted in cylindrical gold hohlraums, to measure the Rayleigh-Taylor growth at the ablation front by time-resolved radiography. Modulations were preformed on the surface of Ge-doped plastic capsules. With initial modulations of 4 {micro}m, growth factors of about 6 in optical depth were seen, in agreement with simulations using the radiation hydrocode FCI2. With initial modulations of 1 {micro}m, growth factors of about 100-150 in optical depth were seen. The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability at the ablation front in an inertial confinement fusion capsule has been the subject of considerable investigation. Much of this research has been concentrated on planar experiments, in which RT growth is inferred from radiography. The evolution is somewhat different in a converging geometry; the spatial wavelength decreases (affecting the onset of nonlinear saturation), and the shell thickens and compresses rather than decompressing as in a planar geometry. In a cylindrically convergent geometry, the latter effect is proportional to the radius, while in spherically convergent geometry, the latter effect is proportional to the radius squared. Experiments were performed on the Nova and Omega lasers in cylindrical geometry (using both direct and indirect drive) and have been performed in spherical geometry using direct drive.

  11. Specifications for and preliminary design of a plant growth chamber for orbital experimental experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweet, H. C.; Simmonds, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    It was proposed that plant experiments be performed on board the space shuttle. To permit the proper execution of most tests, the craft must contain a plant growth chamber which is adequately designed to control those environmental factors which can induce changes in a plant's physiology and morphology. The various needs of, and environmental factors affecting, plants are identified. The permissilbe design, construction and performance limits for a plant-growth chamber are set, and tentative designs were prepared for units which are compatible with both the botanical requirements and the constraints imposed by the space shuttle.

  12. Designing of Multi-Interface Diverging Experiments to Model Rayleigh-Taylor Growth in Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosskopf, Michael; Drake, R.; Kuranz, C.; Plewa, T.; Hearn, N.; Meakin, C.; Arnett, D.; Miles, A.; Robey, H.; Hansen, J.; Hsing, W.; Edwards, M.

    2008-05-01

    In previous experiments on the Omega Laser, researchers studying blast-wave-driven instabilities have observed the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities under conditions scaled to the He/H interface of SN1987A. Most of these experiments have been planar experiments, as the energy available proved unable to accelerate enough mass in a diverging geometry. With the advent of the NIF laser, which can deliver hundreds of kJ to an experiment, it is possible to produce 3D, blast-wave-driven, multiple-interface explosions and to study the mixing that develops. We report scaling simulations to model the interface dynamics of a multilayered, diverging Rayleigh-Taylor experiment for NIF using CALE, a hybrid adaptive Lagrangian-Eulerian code developed at LLNL. Specifically, we looked both qualitatively and quantitatively at the Rayleigh-Taylor growth and multi-interface interactions in mass-scaled, spherically divergent systems using different materials. The simulations will assist in the target design process and help choose diagnostics to maximize the information we receive in a particular shot. Simulations are critical for experimental planning, especially for experiments on large-scale facilities. *This research was sponsored by LLNL through contract LLNL B56128 and by the NNSA through DOE Research Grant DE-FG52-04NA00064.

  13. Experiment MA-028 crystal growth. [low gravity manufacturing of single crystals from Apollo/Soyuz Test Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lind, D. M.

    1976-01-01

    A crystal growth experiment is reported on orbital space flights. The experiment was performed during the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project. The Crystal Growth Experiment assessed a novel process for growing single crystals of insoluble substances by allowing two or more reactant solutions to diffuse toward each other through a region of pure solvent in zero gravity. The experiment was entirely successful and yielded crystals of about the expected size, quality, and number.

  14. Ignition and Growth Modeling of Short Pulse Duration Shock Initiation Experiments on HNS IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarver, Craig; Chidester, Steven

    2013-06-01

    Short pulse duration shock initiation experiments on 1.60 g/cm3 density (92% TMD) HNS IV have been reported by Schwarz, Bowden et al., Dudley et al., Goveas et al., Greenaway et al., and others. This flyer threshold velocity for detonation/failure data plus measured unreacted HNS Hugoniot data and detonation cylinder test product expansion data were used as the experimental basis for the development of an Ignition and Growth reactive flow model for the shock initiation of HNS IV. The resulting Ignition and Growth HNS IV model parameters yielded good overall agreement with all of this experimental data. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.: Explosive, HNS IV, shock to detonation transition, Ignition and Growth: 82.33.Vx, 82.40.Fp.

  15. Experiment 3: Zeolite Crystal Growth in Microgravity- The USML-2 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bac, Nurcan; Warzywoda, Juliusz; Sacco, Albert, Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The extensive use of zeolites and their impact on the world's economy leads to many efforts to characterize their structure, and to improve the knowledge base for nucleation and growth of these crystals. The Zeolite Crystal Growth (ZCG) experiment on USML-2 aims to enhance the understanding of nucleation and growth of zeolite crystals while attempting to provide a means of controlling the defect concentration in microgravity. Zeolites A, X, Beta, and Silicalite were grown during the 16-day USML-2 mission. The solutions where the nucleation event was controlled yielded larger and more uniform crystals of better morphology and purity than their terrestrial/control counterparts. Space-grown Beta crystals were free of line defects while terrestrial/controls had substantial defects.

  16. The Effect of Elevated CO2 on the Growth Rate of Phytoplankton - Mesocosm Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Lee, K.; Koo, C.; Shin, K.; Lee, H.

    2004-12-01

    Recent independent lines of evidence suggest that higher CO2 concentration in surface seawater would accelerate growth of phytoplankton. A 20-day mesocosm experiment was carried out in June 2004 in the southern coastal region of Korea to investigate the influence of elevated CO2 concentration on the mono diatom species, Skeletonema costatum. The CO2 concentration of a control net was being left as an ambient condition (approximately 400ppm), while that of the other treatment was being maintained approximately 900ppm. The elevated production of Particulate Organic Carbon (POC), which was generated from increasing a primary production, was not discernable in this experiment. Therefore, a new study has been carried out with some modifications to observe possible increase in POC and Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) productions. The new experiment includes 5 mesocosms with different CO2 concentrations ranging from 280ppm to 900ppm. During the entire duration of this experiment, CO2 concentration in each treatment has remained constant.

  17. Alternative Student Growth Measures for Teacher Evaluation: Implementation Experiences of Early-Adopting Districts. REL 2015-093

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullough, Moira; English, Brittany; Angus, Megan Hague; Gill, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Alternative student growth measures for teacher evaluation: Implementation experiences of early-adopting districts: State requirements to include student achievement growth in teacher evaluations are prompting the development of alternative ways to measure growth in grades and subjects not covered by state assessments. These alternative growth…

  18. Experiences of mentoring influences on the personal and professional growth of Hispanic registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Egues, Aida L

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to explore the meaning of the experiences of mentoring influences on the personal and professional growth of Hispanic registered nurses (RNs). Focus group methodology was employed in the New York City metropolitan area with monolingual English or bilingual English/Spanish RNs (N = 20) who perceived themselves to be at all levels of practice. The findings offer a summary of the experiences of mentoring for the 20 Hispanic RNs that includes little advancement support; hesitancy to being mentored; dependency on the self for personal and professional growth; and educational, practice, and socioeconomic barriers. This study suggests that mentoring of Hispanic nurses needs to be reexamined to improve and sustain a culture of mentoring that may enhance the education, recruitment, and retention of Hispanic RNs. PMID:24831071

  19. SHOCK INITIATION EXPERIMENTS ON PBX9501 EXPLOSIVE AT 150?C FOR IGNITION AND GROWTH MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Vandersall, K S; Tarver, C M; Garcia, F; Urtiew, P A

    2005-07-19

    Shock initiation experiments on the explosive PBX9501 (95% HMX, 2.5% estane, and 2.5% nitroplasticizer by weight) were performed at 150 C to obtain in-situ pressure gauge data and Ignition and Growth modeling parameters. A 101 mm diameter propellant driven gas gun was utilized to initiate the PBX9501 explosive with manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge packages placed between sample slices. The run-distance-to-detonation points on the Pop-plot for these experiments showed agreement with previously published data and Ignition and Growth modeling parameters were obtained with a good fit to the experimental data. This parameter set will allow accurate code predictions to be calculated for safety scenarios involving PBX9501 explosives at temperatures close to 150 C.

  20. Hydrodynamic growth experiments with the 3-D, “native-roughness” modulations on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Weber, S. V.; Casey, D.; Clark, D. S.; Coppari, F.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A.; Hsing, W.; Landen, O.; Nikroo, A.; Robey, H. F.; Weber, C. R.

    2016-05-01

    Hydrodynamic instability growth experiments with threedimensional (3-D) surface-roughness modulations were performed on plastic (CH) shell spherical implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The initial capsule outer-surface roughness was similar to the standard specifications (“native roughness”) used in a majority of implosions on NIF. At a convergence ratio of ∼3, the measured tent modulations were close to those predicted by 3-D simulations (within ∼15-20%), while measured 3-D, broadband modulations were ∼3-4 times larger than those simulated based on the growth of the known imposed initial surface modulations. One of the hypotheses to explain the results is based on the increased instability amplitudes due to modulations of the oxygen content in the bulk of the capsule. These new experiments results have prompted looking for ways to reduce UV light exposure during target fabrication.

  1. Experiences of mentoring influences on the personal and professional growth of Hispanic registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Egues, Aida L

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to explore the meaning of the experiences of mentoring influences on the personal and professional growth of Hispanic registered nurses (RNs). Focus group methodology was employed in the New York City metropolitan area with monolingual English or bilingual English/Spanish RNs (N = 20) who perceived themselves to be at all levels of practice. The findings offer a summary of the experiences of mentoring for the 20 Hispanic RNs that includes little advancement support; hesitancy to being mentored; dependency on the self for personal and professional growth; and educational, practice, and socioeconomic barriers. This study suggests that mentoring of Hispanic nurses needs to be reexamined to improve and sustain a culture of mentoring that may enhance the education, recruitment, and retention of Hispanic RNs.

  2. On the role of convective motion during dendrite growth: Experiments under variable gravity, revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallett, J.; Cho, N.; Harrison, K.; Lord, A.; Wedum, E.; Purcell, R.; Saunders, C. P. R.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments show the effect of self induced convection on individual dendrite growth in uniformly supercooled samples and solidification of the resulting mush under conditions of high and low g. Convection is visualized by a Schlieren optical system or a Mach Zender interferometer. For ice crystals growing from the vapor in air, a slight reduction in linear growth rate occur under low g. For ice crystals growing from NaCl solution, dendrite tip velocities are unchanged, but subsequent mush solidification is enhanced through drainage channels under higher g. By contrast, sodium sulfate decahydrate dendrites growing from solution produce convective plumes which lead to higher tip growth rate only as the crystal growth direction approaches that of gravity. Convective plumes are laminar for small crystals under conditions of these experiments; the rise velocity of such plumes is greater than individual vortex rings under identical conditions. Convection effects are only present in solution under a critical supercooling less than about 5 C for sodium sulfate and 2 C for ice in NaCl since at higher supercooling the crystallization velocity, proportional to the square of the supercooling, exceeds the convective velocity, proportional to the square root of the supercooling. The role of convective velocity in bulk solidification is to give a large scale flow which under extreme cases may lead to extensive secondary crystal production, which alters the resulting crystal texture of the completely solidified melt.

  3. Growth of thin Fe(0 0 1) films for terahertz emission experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meserole, C. A.; Fisher, G. L.; Hilton, D. J.; Averitt, R. D.; Funk, D. J.; Taylor, A. J.

    2007-06-01

    The electrical and magnetic properties of thin iron (Fe) films have sparked significant scientific interest. Our interest, however, is in the fundamental interactions between light and matter. We have discovered a novel application for thin Fe films. These films are sources of terahertz (THz) radiation when stimulated by an incident laser pulse. After intense femtosecond pulse excitation by a Ti:sapphire laser, these films emit picosecond, broadband THz frequencies. The terahertz emission provides a direct measure of the induced ultrafast change in magnetization within the Fe film. The THz generation experiments and the growth of appropriate thin Fe films for these experiments are discussed. Several criteria are used to select the substrate and film growth conditions, including that the substrate must permit the epitaxial growth of a continuous, monocrystalline or single crystal film, yet must also be transparent to the emitted THz radiation. An Fe(0 0 1) film grown on the (0 0 1) surface of a magnesium oxide (MgO) substrate makes an ideal sample. The Fe films are grown by physical vapor deposition (PVD) in an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) system. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) are used to characterize the Fe(0 0 1) films. Two substrate surface preparation methods are investigated. Fe(0 0 1) films grown on MgO(0 0 1) substrates that are used as-received and films grown on MgO(0 0 1) substrates that have been UV/ozone-cleaned ex vacuo and annealed in vacuo produce the same results in the THz generation experiments. Either substrate preparation method permits the growth of samples suitable for the THz emission experiments.

  4. Utilizing ARC EMCS Seedling Cassettes as Highly Versatile Miniature Growth Chambers for Model Organism Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, John L.; Steele, Marianne K.; Sun, Gwo-Shing; Heathcote, David; Reinsch, S.; DeSimone, Julia C.; Myers, Zachary A.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our ground testing was to demonstrate the capability of safely putting specific model organisms into dehydrated stasis, and to later rehydrate and successfully grow them inside flight proven ARC EMCS seedling cassettes. The ARC EMCS seedling cassettes were originally developed to support seedling growth during space flight. The seeds are attached to a solid substrate, launched dry, and then rehydrated in a small volume of media on orbit to initiate the experiment. We hypothesized that the same seedling cassettes should be capable of acting as culture chambers for a wide range of organisms with minimal or no modification. The ability to safely preserve live organisms in a dehydrated state allows for on orbit experiments to be conducted at the best time for crew operations and more importantly provides a tightly controlled physiologically relevant growth experiment with specific environmental parameters. Thus, we performed a series of ground tests that involved growing the organisms, preparing them for dehydration on gridded Polyether Sulfone (PES) membranes, dry storage at ambient temperatures for varying periods of time, followed by rehydration. Inside the culture cassettes, the PES membranes were mounted above blotters containing dehydrated growth media. These were mounted on stainless steel bases and sealed with plastic covers that have permeable membrane covered ports for gas exchange. The results showed we were able to demonstrate acceptable normal growth of C.elegans (nematodes), E.coli (bacteria), S.cerevisiae (yeast), Polytrichum (moss) spores and protonemata, C.thalictroides (fern), D.discoideum (amoeba), and H.dujardini (tardigrades). All organisms showed acceptable growth and rehydration in both petri dishes and culture cassettes initially, and after various time lengths of dehydration. At the end of on orbit ISS European Modular Cultivation System experiments the cassettes could be frozen at ultra-low temperatures, refrigerated, or chemically

  5. Hydrodynamic instability growth and mix experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Barrios, M.; Caggiano, J. A.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C. J.; Clark, D. S.; Edwards, M. J.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A.; Hsing, W. W.; Hurricane, O.; Kroll, J.; Landen, O. L.; Lindl, J. D.; Ma, T.; McNaney, J. M.; Mintz, M.; Parham, T.; Peterson, J. L.; and others

    2014-05-15

    Hydrodynamic instability growth and its effects on implosion performance were studied at the National Ignition Facility [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 443, 2841 (2004)]. Implosion performance and mix have been measured at peak compression using plastic shells filled with tritium gas and containing embedded localized carbon-deuterium diagnostic layers in various locations in the ablator. Neutron yield and ion temperature of the deuterium-tritium fusion reactions were used as a measure of shell-gas mix, while neutron yield of the tritium-tritium fusion reaction was used as a measure of implosion performance. The results have indicated that the low-mode hydrodynamic instabilities due to surface roughness were the primary culprits for yield degradation, with atomic ablator-gas mix playing a secondary role. In addition, spherical shells with pre-imposed 2D modulations were used to measure instability growth in the acceleration phase of the implosions. The capsules were imploded using ignition-relevant laser pulses, and ablation-front modulation growth was measured using x-ray radiography for a shell convergence ratio of ∼2. The measured growth was in good agreement with that predicted, thus validating simulations for the fastest growing modulations with mode numbers up to 90 in the acceleration phase. Future experiments will be focused on measurements at higher convergence, higher-mode number modulations, and growth occurring during the deceleration phase.

  6. STS-95 space experiment for plant growth and development, and auxin polar transport.

    PubMed

    Ueda, J; Miyamoto, K; Yuda, T; Hoshino, T; Sato, K; Fujii, S; Kamigaichi, S; Izumi, R; Ishioka, N; Aizawa, S; Yoshizaki, I; Shimazu, T; Fukui, K

    2000-06-01

    The principal objective of the space experiment, BRIC-AUX on STS-95, was the integrated analysis of the growth and development of etiolated pea and maize seedlings in space, and the effect of microgravity conditions in space on auxin polar transport in the segments. Microgravity conditions in space strongly affected the growth and development of etiolated pea and maize seedlings. Etiolated pea and maize seedlings were leaned and curved during space flight, respectively. Finally the growth inhibition of these seedlings was also observed. Roots of some pea seedlings grew toward the aerial space of Plant Growth Chamber. Extensibilities of cell walls of the third internode of etiolated pea epicotyls and the top region of etiolated maize coleoptiles which were germinated and grown under microgravity conditions in space were significantly low. Activities of auxin polar transport in the second internode segments of etiolated pea seedlings and coleoptile segments of etiolated maize seedlings were significantly inhibited and extremely promoted, respectively, under microgravity conditions in space. These results strongly suggest that auxin polar transport as well as the growth and development of plants is controlled under gravity on the earth.

  7. Experience-dependent plasticity and modulation of growth regulatory molecules at central synapses.

    PubMed

    Foscarin, Simona; Ponchione, Danilo; Pajaj, Ermira; Leto, Ketty; Gawlak, Maciej; Wilczynski, Grzegorz M; Rossi, Ferdinando; Carulli, Daniela

    2011-01-01

    Structural remodeling or repair of neural circuits depends on the balance between intrinsic neuronal properties and regulatory cues present in the surrounding microenvironment. These processes are also influenced by experience, but it is still unclear how external stimuli modulate growth-regulatory mechanisms in the central nervous system. We asked whether environmental stimulation promotes neuronal plasticity by modifying the expression of growth-inhibitory molecules, specifically those of the extracellular matrix. We examined the effects of an enriched environment on neuritic remodeling and modulation of perineuronal nets in the deep cerebellar nuclei of adult mice. Perineuronal nets are meshworks of extracellular matrix that enwrap the neuronal perikaryon and restrict plasticity in the adult CNS. We found that exposure to an enriched environment induces significant morphological changes of Purkinje and precerebellar axon terminals in the cerebellar nuclei, accompanied by a conspicuous reduction of perineuronal nets. In the animals reared in an enriched environment, cerebellar nuclear neurons show decreased expression of mRNAs coding for key matrix components (as shown by real time PCR experiments), and enhanced activity of matrix degrading enzymes (matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9), which was assessed by in situ zymography. Accordingly, we found that in mutant mice lacking a crucial perineuronal net component, cartilage link protein 1, perineuronal nets around cerebellar neurons are disrupted and plasticity of Purkinje cell terminal is enhanced. Moreover, all the effects of environmental stimulation are amplified if the afferent Purkinje axons are endowed with enhanced intrinsic growth capabilities, induced by overexpression of GAP-43. Our observations show that the maintenance and growth-inhibitory function of perineuronal nets are regulated by a dynamic interplay between pre- and postsynaptic neurons. External stimuli act on this interaction and shift the

  8. SHOCK INITIATION EXPERIMENTS ON THE HMX BASED EXPLOSIVE LX-10 WITH ASSOCIATED IGNITION AND GROWTH MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Vandersall, K S; Tarver, C M; Garcia, F; Urtiew, P A; Chidester, S K

    2007-06-15

    Shock initiation experiments on the HMX based explosives LX-10 (95% HMX, 5% Viton by weight) and LX-07 (90% HMX, 10% Viton by weight) were performed to obtain in-situ pressure gauge data, run-distance-to-detonation thresholds, and Ignition and Growth modeling parameters. A 101 mm diameter propellant driven gas gun was utilized to initiate the explosive samples with manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge packages placed between sample slices. The run-distance-to-detonation points on the Pop-plot for these experiments and prior experiments on another HMX based explosive LX LX-04 (85% HMX, 15% Viton by weight) will be shown, discussed, and compared as a function of the binder content. This parameter set will provide additional information to ensure accurate code predictions for safety scenarios involving HMX explosives with different percent binder content additions.

  9. Growth-rate influences on coral climate proxies tested by a multiple colony culture experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Erika; Suzuki, Atsushi; Nakamura, Takashi; Iwase, Akihiro; Ishimura, Toyoho; Iguchi, Akira; Sakai, Kazuhiko; Okai, Takashi; Inoue, Mayuri; Araoka, Daisuke; Murayama, Shohei; Kawahata, Hodaka

    2013-01-01

    As application of coral-based climate reconstruction has become more frequent at tropical sites, increased attention is being paid to the potential ambiguities of coral thermometers that are intrinsic to the biomineralisation process, including the so-called vital effect, the growth-rate-related kinetic effect, and the [CO32-] effect. Here we studied how the growth rate influenced the skeletal oxygen and carbon isotope ratios (δ18O and δ13C) and the Sr/Ca ratio in a common-garden experiment involving the long-term culture of Porites australiensis clone colonies. Comparison of the seasonal minimum δ18O values during summer showed a negligible influence of the large intercolony variation in growth rate (2-10 mm yr-1) on δ18O variation, but δ18O was relatively sensitive to temporary intracolony growth-rate changes related to colony health. In contrast, the Sr/Ca ratio was robust against both inter- and intracolony growth-rate variation. We found a positive shift in δ13C in slower growing corals, which we attributed to the kinetic behaviour of the calcification reaction. The seasonal fluctuation in δ13C corresponded not to changes in light intensity nor to δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon in seawater, but to photosynthetic efficiency as measured by pulse-amplitude photometry. These findings support the inference that coral skeletal Sr/Ca and δ18O in a long-lived colony can function as a palaeoclimate archive by recording signals of clonal growth. We also propose practical guidelines for the proper interpretation of coral records.

  10. The effect of material properties on growth rates of folding and boudinage: Experiments with wax models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neurath, C.; Smith, R. B.

    The growth of unstable structures was studied experimentally in layered wax models. The rheological properties of the two wax types were determined independently by a series of cylinder compression tests. Both waxes enhibited (1) a non-Newtonian stress vs strain-rate relationship (2) strain softening and (3) temperature-dependent viscosity. The stress-strain-rate relationships approximated a power-law, with stress exponents of 5 for the microcrystalline wax and 1.8 for paraffin wax. Blocks of paraffin with a single embedded layer of microcrystalline wax were deformed in two-dimensional pure shear with the layer oriented either parallel to the compressive strain axis so that it shortened and folded, or perpendicular to that axis so that it would stretch and boundinage would form. The growth rates of tiny initial disturbances were measured. The growth rates for folding and boudinage were much higher than could be accounted for by theories assuming Newtonian material properties. Theories taking non-Newtonian behaviour into account (Smith, R. B. 1975. Bull. geol. Soc. Am.86, 1601-1609; Fletcher, R. C. 1974. Am. J. Sci.274, 1029-1043) better describe the folding growth rates. Boudinage, however, grew almost three times faster than would be predicted even by existing non-Newtonian theory. A possible reason for this discrepancy is that the waxes do not exhibit steady-state creep as assumed in the theory. We, therefore, extend the theory to include strain-softening. The crucial step in this theory is the use of a scalar measure of the deformation as a state variable in the constitutive law. In this way the isotropic manifestation of strain-softening can be taken into account. The analysis shows that strain-softening can lead to greatly increased boudinage growth rates while having little influence on the growth rates of folds, which is in agreement with the experiments.

  11. [Control locus, stress resistance and personal growth of the participants in experiment Mars-500].

    PubMed

    Solcova, I; Vinokhodova, A G

    2013-01-01

    The article deals with positive personal transformations in a simulated space mission. The investigation was focused on the aspects of control locus, stamina, proactive behavior to overcome challenges, and stress-related personal growth. Besides, ingenious psychophysiological techniques designed to select Russian cosmonauts were used for assessing stress-resistance and ability to control own emotions voluntarily. Experiment Mars-500 simulated the basic features of a mission to Mars. The crew consisted of 6 males 27 to 38 years of age who volunteered to spend 520 days in isolation and confinement in the IBMP experimental facility (Moscow). To detect personality changes, the volunteers were tested before the experiment and after its completion. According to the test results, the participants commonly demonstrated the ability to see the bright side of the Mars-500 adversities, which most often was caused by their social growth. Positive changes were particularly pronounced in the crewmembers who possessed a better ability to control own emotions. The simulated challenges were also beneficial for personal growth of the volunteers.

  12. [Control locus, stress resistance and personal growth of the participants in experiment Mars-500].

    PubMed

    Solcova, I; Vinokhodova, A G

    2013-01-01

    The article deals with positive personal transformations in a simulated space mission. The investigation was focused on the aspects of control locus, stamina, proactive behavior to overcome challenges, and stress-related personal growth. Besides, ingenious psychophysiological techniques designed to select Russian cosmonauts were used for assessing stress-resistance and ability to control own emotions voluntarily. Experiment Mars-500 simulated the basic features of a mission to Mars. The crew consisted of 6 males 27 to 38 years of age who volunteered to spend 520 days in isolation and confinement in the IBMP experimental facility (Moscow). To detect personality changes, the volunteers were tested before the experiment and after its completion. According to the test results, the participants commonly demonstrated the ability to see the bright side of the Mars-500 adversities, which most often was caused by their social growth. Positive changes were particularly pronounced in the crewmembers who possessed a better ability to control own emotions. The simulated challenges were also beneficial for personal growth of the volunteers. PMID:24032161

  13. Analysis of electrical phenomena accompanying the growth of Neurospora crassa hyphae: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Aslanidi, K B; Aslanidi, O V; Vachadze, D M; Mornev, O A; Potapova, T V; Chailakhyan, L M; Shtemanetyan, E G

    1997-01-01

    To describe electrical phenomena observed in growth of Neurospora crassa hyphae, a theoretical model was developed considering the hypha as a one-dimensional electric cable with non-uniform longitudinal distribution of current sources reflecting the activity of proton pumps. A profile of the density of the pump current along the hypha is proposed, at which the results of simulation quantitatively coincide with the results of physiological experiments. The model values of energy coupling in the growth zones were estimated. The experimental dependence of the elongation rate of regenerating apical hypha fragments on their lengths was determined. Based on the comparison of these experimental results with the results of analysis of the model, the contribution of the axial metabolite transport, from the distal parts of the hypha to the apical part, to the dynamics of the apical cell growth was estimated. The possibility of evaluating the intensity of high-molecular-weight syntheses and/or accumulation of substances in granules was demonstrated. The growth rate of the regenerating hypha fragments was shown to correlate with the electric current flowing into the apical fragment 0.2-mm in length.

  14. Growth responses of crop and weed species to heavy metals in pot and field experiments.

    PubMed

    Farrag, Karam; Senesi, Nicola; Nigro, Franco; Petrozza, Angelo; Palma, Achille; Shaarawi, Samar; Brunetti, Gennaro

    2012-09-01

    Greenhouse and field studies were performed to examine the growth responses and possible phytoremediation capacity towards heavy metals of several Brassicaceae (Brassica alba, Brassica carinata, Brassica napus and Brassica nigra) and Poaceae (durum wheat and barley). Soils used featured total concentrations of Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn largely exceeding the maximum levels permitted by the Italian laws. Different organic amendments were tested such as a compost and the plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Bacillus licheniformis. In the greenhouse experiment, plant length, leaf area index and shoots dry matter were evaluated periodically for the Brassicaceae examined. Whereas plant length, grains production, weight of 1,000 seeds, ear fertility and tiller density were determined under field conditions at the end of the crop cycle for wheat and barley. In general, the species tested appeared to be tolerant to high heavy metal concentrations in soil, and slightly significant differences were found for all parameters considered. A marked growth increase was shown to occur for Brassicaceae cultivated on compost- and bacillus-amended contaminated soils, with respect to non-amended contaminated soils. With some exception, higher growth parameters were measured for wheat and barley plants cropped from contaminated soils in comparison to non-contaminated soils. Further, bacillus amendment enhanced the length of wheat and barley plants in both non-contaminated and contaminated soils, while different effects were observed for the other parameters evaluated. PMID:22573098

  15. Shuttle Flight Experiment on USMP-4: In Situ Monitoring of Crystal Growth Using MEPHISTO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbaschian, Reza; deGroh, Henry C., III; Leonardi, E.; deVahlDavis, Graham; Coriell, Sam; Cambon, Gerard

    2001-01-01

    This reports on the MEPHISTO-4 experiment on the Space Shuttle Columbia, STS-87, November 19-December 5, 1997. Involved were NASA; the University of Florida at Gainesville; groups from France that developed and built the furnace; the National Institute of Standards and Technology; The University of New South Wales, Australia; and Purdue University. This was a solidification study in which three long rods of Bismuth- 1 at.% Tin were directionally solidified. The goals were to solidify in an environment free of natural convection; to determine the relationship among solidification growth velocity, growth mode, and temperature; and determine the diffusivity of Sn in Bi. The flight samples grew with a planar solid/liquid interface at velocities less than 3.4 gm/s, and cellular growth was present at velocities greater than 6.7 um/s; grain orientation influenced the planar to cellular transition. The temperature gradient in the liquid was 204 K/cm. The s/l interface was flat with slight concavity. Diffusion-dominated conditions were present during MEPHISTO-4. The Seebeck technique was used to determine the s/I interface temperature during growth, however, to date, analysis of the Seebeck results has not yielded a reliable measurement of the interface temperature. The partition coefficient for Bi alloyed with Sn was measured, k = 0.029.

  16. Growth and survival of tree seedlings in a large-scale rainfall manipulation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Parikh, N.R.; Holmgren, M.; Huston, M.

    1995-06-01

    Seedlings of three species with different tolerance to shade and drought, Acer saccharum, Liriodendron tulipifera, and Quercus alba, were planted on the hillslope site of the Walker Branch Throughfall Displacement Experiment during the winter of 1993-1994, and their growth measured during the following growing season. Volumetric soil moisture in the upper 35cm of soil was measured twice monthly, and relative light availability above each seedling was measured in August. The most shade tolerant species, sugar maple, leafed out earlier and by the beginning of April had produced 80% of its total leaf area, compared with only 16% for tulip poplar and 39% for white oak. Leaf area and stem growth of sugar maple were positively correlated with soil moisture, but not with light, while stem growth of tulip poplar and white oak were positively correlated with light, but not with soil moisture. Tulip poplar had the highest mortality (15%) followed by sugar maple (3%). Mortality was higher in dry locations, but was not related to growth during the season.

  17. Walker Branch Throughfall Displacement Experiment Data Report: Site Characterization, System Performance, Weather, Species Composition, and Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, P.J.

    2001-09-04

    This numeric data package provides data sets, and accompanying documentation, on site characterization, system performance, weather, species composition, and growth for the Throughfall Displacement Experiment, which was established in the Walker Branch Watershed of East Tennessee to provide data on the responses of forests to altered precipitation regimes. The specific data sets include soil water content and potential, coarse fraction of the soil profile, litter layer temperature, soil temperature, monthly weather, daily weather, hourly weather, species composition of trees and saplings, mature tree and sapling annual growth, and relative leaf area index. Fortran and SAS{trademark} access codes are provided to read the ASCII data files. The data files and this documentation are available without charge on a variety of media and via the Internet from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC).

  18. Shock Initiation Experiments Plus Ignition and Growth Modeling of PBXN-112

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Frank; Vandersall, Kevin; Tarver, Craig

    2011-06-01

    Shock initiation experiments on the HMX based explosive PBXN-112 (89% HMX, 11% polyaurylmethacrylate by weight) were performed to obtain in-situ pressure gauge data, to characterize the run-distance-to-detonation behavior, and to provide a basis for Ignition and Growth reactive flow modeling. A 101 mm diameter gas gun was utilized to initiate the explosive charge with manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge packages placed between sample slices. The shock sensitivity of PBXN-112 is compared to that of other HMX formulations. Ignition and Growth model parameters were derived that yielded a good fit to the experimental data. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. Microfluidic experiments reveal that antifreeze proteins bound to ice crystals suffice to prevent their growth

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Yeliz; Drori, Ran; Pertaya-Braun, Natalya; Altan, Aysun; Barton, Tyler; Bar-Dolev, Maya; Groisman, Alex; Davies, Peter L.; Braslavsky, Ido

    2013-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are a subset of ice-binding proteins that control ice crystal growth. They have potential for the cryopreservation of cells, tissues, and organs, as well as for production and storage of food and protection of crops from frost. However, the detailed mechanism of action of AFPs is still unclear. Specifically, there is controversy regarding reversibility of binding of AFPs to crystal surfaces. The experimentally observed dependence of activity of AFPs on their concentration in solution appears to indicate that the binding is reversible. Here, by a series of experiments in temperature-controlled microfluidic devices, where the medium surrounding ice crystals can be exchanged, we show that the binding of hyperactive Tenebrio molitor AFP to ice crystals is practically irreversible and that surface-bound AFPs are sufficient to inhibit ice crystal growth even in solutions depleted of AFPs. These findings rule out theories of AFP activity relying on the presence of unbound protein molecules. PMID:23300286

  20. SHOCK INITIATION EXPERIMENTS ON THE TATB BASED EXPLOSIVE RX-03-GO WITH IGNITION AND GROWTH MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Vandersall, K S; Garcia, F; Tarver, C M

    2009-06-23

    Shock initiation experiments on the TATB based explosive RX-03-GO (92.5% TATB, 7.5% Cytop A by weight) were performed to obtain in-situ pressure gauge data, characterize the run-distance-to-detonation behavior, and calculate Ignition and Growth modeling parameters. A 101 mm diameter propellant driven gas gun was utilized to initiate the explosive sample with manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge packages placed between sample slices. The RX-03-GO formulation utilized is similar to that of LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% Kel-f by weight) with the notable differences of a new binder material and TATB that has been dissolved and recrystallized in order to improve the purity and morphology. The shock sensitivity will be compared with that of prior data on LX-17 and other TATB formulations. Ignition and Growth modeling parameters were obtained with a reasonable fit to the experimental data.

  1. Shock initiation experiments with ignition and growth modeling on low density HMX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Frank; Vandersall, Kevin S.; Tarver, Craig M.

    2014-05-01

    Shock initiation experiments on low density (~1.2 and ~1.6 g/cm3) HMX were performed to obtain in-situ pressure gauge data, characterize the run-distance-to-detonation behavior, and provide a basis for Ignition and Growth reactive flow modeling. A 101 mm diameter gas gun was utilized to initiate the explosive charges with manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge packages placed between packed layers (~1.2 g/cm3) or sample disks pressed to low density (~1.6 g/cm3). The measured shock sensitivity of the ~1.2 g/cm3 HMX was similar to that previously measured by Sheffield et al. and the ~1.6 g/cm3 HMX was measured to be much less shock sensitive. Ignition and Growth model parameters were utilized that yielded good agreement with the experimental data at both initial densities.

  2. Growth and form of planetary seedlings: results from a microgravity aggregation experiment.

    PubMed

    Blum, J; Wurm, G; Kempf, S; Poppe, T; Klahr, H; Kozasa, T; Rott, M; Henning, T; Dorschner, J; Schräpler, R; Keller, H U; Markiewicz, W J; Mann, I; Gustafson, B A; Giovane, F; Neuhaus, D; Fechtig, H; Grün, E; Feuerbacher, B; Kochan, H; Ratke, L; El Goresy, A; Morfill, G; Weidenschilling, S J; Schwehm, G; Metzler, K; Ip, W H

    2000-09-18

    The outcome of the first stage of planetary formation, which is characterized by ballistic agglomeration of preplanetary dust grains due to Brownian motion in the free molecular flow regime of the solar nebula, is still somewhat speculative. We performed a microgravity experiment flown onboard the space shuttle in which we simulated, for the first time, the onset of free preplanetary dust accumulation and revealed the structures and growth rates of the first dust agglomerates in the young solar system. We find that a thermally aggregating swarm of dust particles evolves very rapidly and forms unexpected open-structured agglomerates.

  3. Phototropism experiments in microgravity-the Seedling Growth project in the EMCS on the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, John; Edelmann, Richard; Herranz, Raul; Medina, Francisco Javier; Millar, Katherine

    The microgravity environment aboard orbiting spacecraft has provided a unique laboratory to explore important topics in basic plant biology. Our group has utilized the European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS) aboard the International Space Station (ISS) to study plant growth, development, tropisms, and gene expression in a series of spaceflight experiments. The most current project performed on the ISS was termed Seeding Growth-1 (SG-1) which builds on the previous TROPI (for tropisms) experiments. TROPI-1 was the first EMCS experiment, and we discovered a novel red-light-based phototropism in hypocotyls of seedlings grown in microgravity (Millar et al. 2010). In TROPI-2, our experiments were extended to reduced gravity levels and found that 0.1-0.3 g can attenuate the red-light response (Kiss et al. 2012). In addition, we performed gene profiling studies and noted that approximately 280 genes that were differentially regulated at least two-fold in the space samples compared to the ground controls (Correll et al. 2013). Major technical and operational changes in SG-1 (launched in March 2013) compared to the TROPI experiments include: improvements in lighting conditions within the EMCS to optimize the environment for phototropism studies and the use of infrared illumination to provide high-quality images of the seedlings. In SG-1, the red-light-based phototropism in roots and hypocotyls of seedlings that was noted in TROPI-2 was confirmed and now can be more precisely characterized based on the improvements in procedures. As we move forward, the SG-2 experiments (to be launched in 2014), in addition to a continued focus on phototropism, will consider the cell cycle as well as the growth and proliferation of plant cells in microgravity (Matía et al. 2010). Furthermore, the lessons learned from sequential experiments from TROPI-1 to TROPI-2 to SG-1 can provide insights to other researchers developing space experiments in plant biology. References: Correll M.J., T

  4. Factors driving mortality and growth at treeline: a 30-year experiment of 92 000 conifers.

    PubMed

    Barbeito, Ignacio; Dawes, Melissa A; Rixen, Christian; Senn, Josef; Bebi, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Understanding the interplay between environmental factors contributing to treeline formation and how these factors influence different life stages remains a major research challenge. We used an afforestation experiment including 92 000 trees to investigate the spatial and temporal dynamics of tree mortality and growth at treeline in the Swiss Alps. Seedlings of three high-elevation conifer species (Larix decidua, Pinus mugo ssp. uncinata, and Pinus cembra) were systematically planted along an altitudinal gradient at and above the current treeline (2075 to 2230 m above sea level [a.s.l.]) in 1975 and closely monitored during the following 30 years. We used decision-tree models and generalized additive models to identify patterns in mortality and growth along gradients in elevation, snow duration, wind speed, and solar radiation, and to quantify interactions between the different variables. For all three species, snowmelt date was always the most important environmental factor influencing mortality, and elevation was always the most important factor for growth over the entire period studied. Individuals of all species survived at the highest point of the afforestation for more than 30 years, although mortality was greater above 2160 m a.s.l., 50-100 m above the current treeline. Optimal conditions for height growth differed from those for survival in all three species: early snowmelt (ca. day of year 125-140 [where day 1 is 1 January]) yielded lowest mortality rates, but relatively later snowmelt (ca. day 145-150) yielded highest growth rates. Although snowmelt and elevation were important throughout all life stages of the trees, the importance of radiation decreased over time and that of wind speed increased. Our findings provide experimental evidence that tree survival and height growth require different environmental conditions and that even small changes in the duration of snow cover, in addition to changes in temperature, can strongly impact tree survival and

  5. Plant Growth During the Greenhouse II Experiment on the MIR Orbital Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salisbury, F. B.; Campbell, W. F.; Carman, J. G.; Bingham, G. E.; Bubenheim, D. L.; Yendler, B.; Sytchev, V.; Levinskikh, M. A.; Ivanova, I.; Chernova, L.; Podolsky, I.

    2002-01-01

    We carried out three experiments with Super Dwarf wheat in the Bulgarian/Russian growth chamber Svet (0.1 sq m growing area) on the Space Station Mir. This paper mostly describes the first of these NASA-supported trials, began on Aug. 13, 1995. Plants were sampled five times and harvested on Nov. 9 after 90 days. Equipment failures led to low irradiance (three, then four of six lamp sets failed), instances of high temperatures (ca. 37 C), and sometimes excessive-substrate moisture. Although plants grew for the 90 days, no wheat heads were produced. Considering the low light levels, plants were surprisingly green, but of course biomass production was low. Plants were highly disoriented (low light, mirror walls?). Fixed and dried samples and the root module were returned on the US Shuttle Atlantis on Nov. 20, 1995. Samples of the substrate, a nutrient-charged zeolite called Balkanine, were taken from the root module, carefully examined for roots, weighed, dried, and reweighed. The Svet control unit and the light bank were shipped to Moscow. An experiment validation test (EVT) of plant growth and experiment procedures, carried out in Moscow, was highly successful. Equipment built in Utah to measure CO2, H2O vapor, irradiance, air and leaf (IR) temperature, O2, pressure, and substrate moisture worked well in the EVT and in space. After this manuscript was first prepared, plants were grown in Mir with a new light bank and controller for 123 days in late 1996 and 39 days in 1996/1997. Plants grew exceptionally well with higher biomass production than in any previous space experiment, but the ca. 280 wheat heads that were produced in 1996 contained no seeds. Ethylene in the cabin atmosphere was responsible.

  6. Is wide availability of abortion essential to national population growth control programs? Experiences of 116 countries.

    PubMed

    Mumford, S D; Kessel, E

    1984-07-15

    No nation wanting to reduce its growth rate to less than or equal to 1% can expect to do so without the widespread use of abortion. This study, based on the experience of 116 of the world's largest countries, supports the contention that abortion is essential to any national population growth control effort. Existing circumstances in developed countries have facilitated reduction of growth rates to less than 1%, with abortion rates generally in the range of 200 to 500 per 1000 live births. However, developing countries are faced with a different and more difficult set of circumstances that require even greater reliance on abortion. These obstacles include a young population with resultant rapidly growing numbers of young fertile women, poor contraceptive use-effectiveness, low prevalence of contraception, and poor or nonexistent systems for providing contraceptives. By virtue of their profession, physicians play a critical role in family planning and carry a special responsibility in ensuring that abortion services are available to all women who need them.

  7. Successful Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) Proves Current Theories of Dendritic Solidification are Flawed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The scientific objective of the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) is to test fundamental assumptions about dendritic solidification of molten materials. "Dendrites"-- from the ancient Greek word for tree--are tiny branching structures that form inside molten metal alloys when they solidify during manufacturing. The size, shape, and orientation of the dendrites have a major effect on the strength, ductility (ability to be molded or shaped), and usefulness of an alloy. Nearly all of the cast metal alloys used in everyday products (such as automobiles and airplanes) are composed of thousands to millions of tiny dendrites. Gravity, present on Earth, causes convection currents in molten alloys that disturb dendritic solidification and make its precise study impossible. In space, gravity is negated by the orbiting of the space shuttle. Consequently, IDGE (which was conducted on the space shuttle) gathered the first precise data regarding undisturbed dendritic solidification. IDGE is a microgravity materials science experiment that uses an apparatus which was designed, built, tested, and operated by people from the NASA Lewis Research Center. This experiment was conceived by the principal investigator, Professor Martin E. Glicksman, from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York. The experiment was a team effort of Lewis civil servants, contractors from Aerospace Design & Fabrication Inc. (ADF), and personnel at Rensselaer.

  8. Plant growth during the Greenhouse II experiment on the Mir orbital station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salisbury, F. B.; Campbell, W. F.; Carman, J. G.; Bingham, G. E.; Bubenheim, D. L.; Yendler, B.; Sytchev, V.; Levinskikh, M. A.; Ivanova, I.; Chernova, L.; Podolsky, I.

    2003-01-01

    We carried out three experiments with Super Dwarf wheat in the Bulgarian/Russian growth chamber Svet (0.1 m2 growing area) on the Space Station Mir. This paper mostly describes the first of these NASA-supported trials, began on Aug. 13, 1995. Plants were sampled five times and harvested on Nov. 9 after 90 days. Equipment failures led to low irradiance (3, then 4 of 6 lamp sets failed), instances of high temperatures (ca. 37 degrees C), and sometimes excessive substrate moisture. Although plants grew for the 90 d, no wheat heads were produced. Considering the low light levels, plants were surprisingly green, but of course biomass production was low. Plants were highly disoriented (low light, mirror walls?). Fixed and dried samples and the root module were returned on the U.S. Shuttle Atlantis on Nov. 20, 1995. Samples of the substrate, a nutrient-charged zeolite called Balkanine, were taken from the root module, carefully examined for roots, weighed, dried, and reweighed. The Svet control unit and the light bank were shipped to Moscow. An experiment validation test (EVT) of plant growth and experimental procedures, carried out in Moscow, was highly successful. Equipment built in Utah to measure CO2, H2O vapor, irradiance, air and leaf (IR) temperature, O2, pressure, and substrate moisture worked well in the EVT and in space. After this manuscript was first prepared, plants were grown in Mir with a new light bank and controller for 123 d in late 1996 and 39 days in 1996/1997. Plants grew exceptionally well with higher biomass production than in any previous space experiment, but the ca. 280 wheat heads that were produced in 1996 contained no seeds. Ethylene in the cabin atmosphere was responsible. c2002 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd on behalf of COSPAR.

  9. Plant growth during the greenhouse II experiment on the Mir orbital station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salisbury, F. B.; Campbell, W. F.; Carman, J. G.; Bingham, G. E.; Bubenheim, D. L.; Yendler, B.; Sytchev, V.; Levinskikh, M. A.; Ivanova, I.; Chernova, L.; Podolsky, I.

    We carried out three experiments with Super Dwarf wheat in the Bulgarian/Russian growth chamber Svet (0.1 m2 growing area) on the Space Station Mir. This paper mostly describes the first of these NASA-supported trials, began on Aug. 13, 1995. Plants were sampled five times and harvested on Nov. 9 after 90 days. Equipment failures led to low irradiance (3, then 4 of 6 lamp sets failed), instances of high temperatures (ca. 37 °C), and sometimes excessive substrate moisture. Although plants grew for the 90 d, no wheat heads were produced. Considering the low light levels, plants were surprisingly green, but of course biomass production was low. Plants were highly disoriented (low light, mirror walls?). Fixed and dried samples and the root module were returned on the U.S. Shuttle Atlantis on Nov. 20, 1995. Samples of the substrate, a nutrient-charged zeolite called Balkanine, were taken from the root module, carefully examined for roots, weighed, dried, and reweighed. The Svet control unit and the light bank were shipped to Moscow. An experiment validation test (EVT) of plant growth and experimental procedures, carried out in Moscow, was highly successful. Equipment built in Utah to measure CO2, H2O vapor, irradiance, air and leaf (IR) temperature, O2, pressure, and substrate moisture worked well in the EVT and in space. After this manuscript was first prepared, plants were grown in Mir with a new light bank and controller for 123 d in late 1996 and 39 days in 1996/1997. Plants grew exceptionally well with higher biomass production than in any previous space experiment, but the ca. 280 wheat heads that were produced in 1996 contained no seeds. Ethylene in the cabin atmosphere was responsible.

  10. Design of Plant Gas Exchange Experiments in a Variable Pressure Growth Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corey, Kenneth A.

    1996-01-01

    Sustainable human presence in extreme environments such as lunar and martian bases will require bioregenerative components to human life support systems where plants are used for generation of oxygen, food, and water. Reduced atmospheric pressures will be used to minimize mass and engineering requirements. Few studies have assessed the metabolic and developmental responses of plants to reduced pressure and varied oxygen atmospheres. The first tests of hypobaric pressures on plant gas exchange and biomass production at the Johnson Space Center will be initiated in January 1996 in the Variable Pressure Growth Chamber (VPGC), a large, closed plant growth chamber rated for 10.2 psi. Experiments were designed and protocols detailed for two complete growouts each of lettuce and wheat to generate a general database for human life support requirements and to answer questions about plant growth processes in reduced pressure and varied oxygen environments. The central objective of crop growth studies in the VPGC is to determine the influence of reduced pressure and reduced oxygen on the rates of photosynthesis, dark respiration, evapotranspiration and biomass production of lettuce and wheat. Due to the constraint of one experimental unit, internal controls, called pressure transients, will be used to evaluate rates of CO2 uptake, O2 evolution, and H2O generation. Pressure transients will give interpretive power to the results of repeated growouts at both reduced and ambient pressures. Other experiments involve the generation of response functions to partial pressures of O2 and CO2 and to light intensity. Protocol for determining and calculating rates of gas exchange have been detailed. In order to build these databases and implement the necessary treatment combinations in short time periods, specific requirements for gas injections and removals have been defined. A set of system capability checks will include determination of leakage rates conducted prior to the actual crop

  11. Biofilm supported increase of chemical weathering and decrease of chemical denudation in pine growth experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balogh, Z.; Keller, C.; Gill, R. A.

    2006-12-01

    Vascular plants and associated microbial communities produced biofilm coatings increase weathering by extending contact periods of minerals with low pH liquids. We performed an experiment to isolate the effects of ectomycorrhiza-forming fungi and ectomycorrhiza- helper bacteria on chemical weathering and chemical denudation (i.e. chemical erosion), and their effects on these fluxes in association with red pine as a host. The study was conducted in a growth chamber using sandy growth medium in replicated flow-through columns. Biotite and anorthite supplied Ca, Mg and K. Concentrations of these cations were measured in input and output solutions, in tree biomass and on exchangeable cation sites of the growth medium; then weathering and denudation fluxes were estimated by mass-balance. In addition, mineral surface changes, biofilm cover and microbial attachment to surfaces were investigated with scanning electron microscopy. The column experiment demonstrated that both bacteria and fungi had a large weathering potential for Ca- bearing minerals, but the microbial communities were not able to regulate denudation losses without a vascular host. Chemical weathering and denudation were about equal in each microbe-only treatment. By the second 6 months of the experiment treatment effects became significant for the seedling systems (p<0.005). The ectomycorrhizal treatments produced the greatest weathering and least denudation, but non- ectomycorrhizal seedlings lowered denudation as well. The differences between the fluxes were significant in both ectomycorrhizal and non-ectomycorrhizal treatments, but the ectomycorrhizal treatment difference was larger, while abiotic weathering was less and equaled the abiotic denudation flux. The ability to retard denudation in both ectomycorrhizal and non-ectomycorrhizal treatment was linked to biofilm formation on mineral surfaces. An ectomycorrhizal hyphal network, as part of the biofilm or covered by the biofilm, was apparently able

  12. Multiscale study of bacterial growth: Experiments and model to understand the impact of gas exchange on global growth.

    PubMed

    Lalanne-Aulet, David; Piacentini, Adalberto; Guillot, Pierre; Marchal, Philippe; Moreau, Gilles; Colin, Annie

    2015-01-01

    Using a millifluidics and macroscale setup, we study quantitatively the impact of gas exchange on bacterial growth. In millifluidic environments, the permeability of the incubator materials allows an unlimited oxygen supply by diffusion. Moreover, the efficiency of diffusion at small scales makes the supply instantaneous in comparison with the cell division time. In hermetic closed vials, the amount of available oxygen is low. The growth curve has the same trend but is quantitatively different from the millifluidic situation. The analysis of all the data allows us to write a quantitative modeling enabling us to capture the entire growth process.

  13. Analyzing Quasi-Experiments: Some Implications of Assuming Continuous Growth Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumberg, Carol Joyce; Porter, Andrew C.

    1983-01-01

    The general class of continuous growth models are described and examples representative of growth models suggested for various types of academic and/or physical growth are given. The fan spread hypothesis is discussed in relationship to natural growth models, as well as differential linear growth. (PN)

  14. Grief and Personal Growth Experience of Spouses and Adult-Child Caregivers of Individuals with Alzheimer's Disease and Related Dementias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ott, Carol H.; Sanders, Sara; Kelber, Sheryl T.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the grief and personal growth experience of spouses and adult children of individuals with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias and the factors contributing to these experiences. Design and Methods: We used a modification of the Marwit-Meuser-Sanders Caregiver Grief model to examine the…

  15. Crystal Growth Furnace System Configuration and Planned Experiments on the Second United States Microgravity Laboratory Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivas, R.; Hambright, G.; Ainsworth, M.; Fiske, M.; Schaefer, D.

    1995-01-01

    The Crystal Growth Furnace (CGF) is currently undergoing modifications and refurbishment and is currently undergoing modifications and refurbishment and is manifested to refly on the Second United States Microgravity Laboratory (USML-2) mission scheduled for launch in September 1995. The CGF was developed for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) under the Microgravity Science and Applications Division (MSAD) programs at NASA Headquarters. The refurbishment and reflight program is being managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. Funding and program support for the CGF project is provided to MSFC by the office of Life and Microgravity Sciences and Applications at NASA Headquarters. This paper presents an overview of the CGF system configuration for the USML-2 mission, and provides a brief description of the planned on-orbit experiment operation.

  16. Experiment requirements and implementation plan (Erip) for semiconductor materials growth in low-G environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouch, R. K.; Fripp, A. L.; Debnam, W. J.; Clark, I. O.

    1983-01-01

    The MEA-2 A facility was used to test the effect of the low gravity environment on suppressing convective mixing in the growth of Pb(1-x)Sn(x)Te crystals. The need to eliminate convection, the furnace characteristics and operation that will be required for successful experimental implementation, and to the level that is presently known, the measured physical properties of the Pb(1-x)Sn(x)Te system were discussed. In addition, a brief background of the present and potential utilization of Pb(1-x)Sn(x)Te is given. Additional experiments are anticipated in future MEA-A, improved MEA and other dedicated materials processing in space flight apparatus.

  17. Ignition and Growth Reactive Flow Modeling of Recent HMX/TATB Detonation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarver, Craig

    2015-06-01

    Ignition and Growth model parameters for detonating PBX 9501 (95%HMX, 2.5 %Estane, 2.5%BDNPAF) and PBX 9502 (95%TATB, 5%Kel-F800) are used to simulate two experiments in which detonating HMX-based PBX's accelerate slower detonating TATB PBX's. The measured HMX and TATB detonation velocities, the angles produced in the detonating TATB charges by the leading HMX detonation waves, the arrival times of the complex detonation wave front, and the PDV records measured at several positions along the interfaces between the two explosives and LiF windows are accurately calculated. This work was performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  18. Highly transient elastodynamic crack growth in a bimaterial interface: Higher order asymptotic analysis and optical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cheng; Lambros, John; Rosakis, Ares J.

    1993-12-01

    A HIGHER ORDER asymptotic analysis of the transient deformation field surrounding the tip of a crack running dynamically along a bimaterial interface is presented. An asymptotic methodology is used to reduce the problem to one of the Riemann-Hilbert type. Its solution furnishes displacement potentials which are used to evaluate explicitly the near-tip transient stress field. Crack-tip fields corresponding to crack speeds up to the lower of the two shear wave speeds are investigated. An experimental study of dynamic crack growth in PMMA steel interfaces using the optical method of CGS and high speed photography, is also described. Transonic terminal speeds (up to 1.4 cPMMAS) and initial accelerations ( $˜10 8 ms 2) are reported and discussed. Transient effects are found to be severe and more important than in homogeneous dynamic fracture. For subsonic crack growth, these experiments arc used to demonstrate the necessity of employing a fully transient expression in the analysis of optical data to predict accurately the complex dynamic stress intensity factor history.

  19. The experience of acculturative stress-related growth from immigrants' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junhyoung; Kim, Hakjun

    2013-01-01

    Previous literature has mainly focused on the positive effects of stress associated with disability and illness, called stress-related growth. Little research has explored positive changes as a result of acculturative stress among a group of immigrants. In particular, older Asian immigrants may experience a high level of stress related to acculturation because they may face more challenges to adapt to and navigate a new culture. This study was designed to capture the characteristics of stress-related growth associated with acculturative stress. Using in-depth interviews among 13 older Korean immigrants, three main themes associated with the stress-coping strategies were identified: (a) the development of mental toughness, (b) engagement in meaningful activities, and (c) promotion of cultural understanding. These themes indicate that by following the stressful acculturation process, participants developed a better understanding of the new culture, engaged in various leisure activities, and enhanced mental strength. This finding provides information on how immigrants deal with acculturative stress and have positive psychological changes, which results in a sense of happiness and psychological well-being.

  20. The experience of acculturative stress-related growth from immigrants’ perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junhyoung; Kim, Hakjun

    2013-01-01

    Previous literature has mainly focused on the positive effects of stress associated with disability and illness, called stress-related growth. Little research has explored positive changes as a result of acculturative stress among a group of immigrants. In particular, older Asian immigrants may experience a high level of stress related to acculturation because they may face more challenges to adapt to and navigate a new culture. This study was designed to capture the characteristics of stress-related growth associated with acculturative stress. Using in-depth interviews among 13 older Korean immigrants, three main themes associated with the stress-coping strategies were identified: (a) the development of mental toughness, (b) engagement in meaningful activities, and (c) promotion of cultural understanding. These themes indicate that by following the stressful acculturation process, participants developed a better understanding of the new culture, engaged in various leisure activities, and enhanced mental strength. This finding provides information on how immigrants deal with acculturative stress and have positive psychological changes, which results in a sense of happiness and psychological well-being. PMID:24070225

  1. Growth of sinuous waves on thin liquid sheets: Comparison of predictions with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, Nayanika; Tirumkudulu, Mahesh S.

    2016-05-01

    A recent theory [M. S. Tirumkudulu and M. Paramati, "Stability of a moving radial liquid sheet: Time dependent equations," Phys. Fluids 25(10), 102-107 (2013)] has shown that a radially expanding liquid sheet is unstable to sinuous wave disturbances due to the thinning of the liquid sheet while ignoring the presence of a surrounding gas phase. In this work, we compare the predictions of the aforementioned theory with the measurements of Crapper et al. ["Large amplitude Kelvin-Helmholtz waves on thin liquid sheets," Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 342(1629), 209-224 (1975)] who measured the amplitude and spatial growth rates of sinuous waves induced in radially expanding liquid sheets produced by fan spray nozzles. The predicted growth rates are remarkably close to the measurements over a range of forcing frequencies and amplitudes even though the experiments were performed in the presence of a surrounding gas phase. This is in contrast to large discrepancies observed by Crapper et al. when the same measurements were compared with the predictions of a spatial stability analysis for a moving liquid sheet that accounts for the inertia of the surrounding gas phase but ignores the thickness variation of the sheet.

  2. Shock Initiation Experiments with Ignition and Growth Modeling on Low Density Composition B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandersall, Kevin S.; Garcia, Frank; Tarver, Craig M.

    2015-06-01

    Shock initiation experiments on low density (~1.2 and ~1.5 g/cm3) Composition B were performed to obtain in-situ pressure gauge data, characterize the run-distance-to-detonation behavior, and provide a basis for Ignition and Growth reactive flow modeling. A 101 mm diameter gas gun was utilized to initiate the explosive charges with manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge packages placed between packed layers (~1.2 g/cm3) confined in Teflon rings or sample disks pressed to low density (~1.5 g/cm3) . The shock sensitivity was found to increase with decreasing density as expected. Ignition and Growth model parameters were derived that yielded reasonable agreement with the experimental data at both initial densities. The shock sensitivity at the tested densities will be compared to prior work published as near full density material. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. This work was funded in part by the Joint DoD-DOE Munitions Program.

  3. The experience of acculturative stress-related growth from immigrants' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junhyoung; Kim, Hakjun

    2013-01-01

    Previous literature has mainly focused on the positive effects of stress associated with disability and illness, called stress-related growth. Little research has explored positive changes as a result of acculturative stress among a group of immigrants. In particular, older Asian immigrants may experience a high level of stress related to acculturation because they may face more challenges to adapt to and navigate a new culture. This study was designed to capture the characteristics of stress-related growth associated with acculturative stress. Using in-depth interviews among 13 older Korean immigrants, three main themes associated with the stress-coping strategies were identified: (a) the development of mental toughness, (b) engagement in meaningful activities, and (c) promotion of cultural understanding. These themes indicate that by following the stressful acculturation process, participants developed a better understanding of the new culture, engaged in various leisure activities, and enhanced mental strength. This finding provides information on how immigrants deal with acculturative stress and have positive psychological changes, which results in a sense of happiness and psychological well-being. PMID:24070225

  4. Visualization experiments of biofilm growth in the presence of carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manariotis, I. D.; Sygouni, V.; Chrysikopoulos, C. V.

    2013-12-01

    Capturing and storing CO2 emissions in properly selected deep geologic formations is considered a promising solution for the reduction of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, CO2 leakage may potentially occur from the storage geologic formation. Partition of CO2 in water may result in pH decrease. This change in aqueous phase may contribute to solubilization of undesired heavy metals from the solid matrix. In this work we investigate experimentally the impact of CO2 to shallow groundwater systems. A series of visualization experiments in a glass-etched micromodel were performed in order to estimate the effect of CO2 on biofilm formation. Biofilms were developed using Pseudomonas putida. Nutrient saturated with CO2 was injected in the micromodel through an inlet port, and fluid samples were collected at the outlet port. The transient growth of the biofilm was monitored by taking high-resolution digital photographs at various times, and the effect of CO2 on biofilm growth was estimated.

  5. [Cell growth and motility in culture (in vitro) under microgravity conditions. The Fibroblast Experiment].

    PubMed

    Tairbekov, M G; Margolis, L B; Baĭbakov, B A; Gabova, A V; Dergacheva, G B

    1994-01-01

    The experiment "Fibroblast" was performed in 1992 on biosatellite "Cosmos-2229" in onboard device "Biobox" designed by the order of European Space Agency. The main objective was elucidation of the mechanisms responsible for the effect of space flight factors, mostly microgravity, on cell culture. We studied time-related changes in growth, motility and some morphological characteristics of the cells in monolayer cultures on a solid substrate and in three-dimensional cultures supported by sponge gels. Studies were carried out on connective tissue cells isolated from the mouse embryos. Comparative after-flight analysis of the cell cultures exposed to space flight and of those under the normal gravity conditions (1 g) on the Earth has revealed some differences. The space flight conditions, mainly microgravity, induced marked changes in morphological characteristics and functional activity of the cultured fibroblasts: changes in the nucleus size and shape, retardation of cell growth and division rate. We believe that these changes may be due to weakening of intercellular contacts and cell adhesion to the substrate. These findings are important both for general biology and space medicine, specifically for the problems of tissue regeneration and wound healing under the conditions of long-term space flight.

  6. Growth, diffusion, and loss of subsurface ice on Mars : experiments and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Troy Lee

    Innovative experiments and models are used to explore the behavior of subsurface ice on Mars. Through communication with the atmosphere, the porous regolith of Mars hosts significant quantities of ice which grow, evolve, and are lost in response to climate changes. As a controlling property of rate of ice response to a changing equilibrium state, the diffusive properties of several regolith simulants are measured in Mars-like environments. Ice loss through a variety of particle sizes, particle size distributions, packing densities, and salt contents are examined and reveal that many unconsolidated media exhibit diffusion coefficients in the range of 2-6 cm^2 s^-1, indicating a response time on the order of several thousand years for ice within the upper meter of the regolith. Only high salt contents or mechanically packed micron-sized dust are observed to exhibit substantially lower coefficients, suggesting that strong diffusive barriers may not form as readily as previously invoked. The growth of ice directly from vapor under diffusive control is reproduced for Mars-like environmental conditions in the absence of the liquid phase. As predicted, ice deposits preferentially at grain contact points and the ice table interface is sharp and strongly controlled by near-surface temperature perturbations. The quantity of ice deposited as a function of depth and time accords well with new numerical models of vapor diffusion and ice deposition, though constriction of the pore space reduces the diffusion coefficient faster than originally expected. A numerical model incorporating a fast solution to subsurface ice growth predicts near-surface ice contents for the last 300,000 years of Mars' history at high latitude locations, including specifically the Phoenix landing site. Several parameterizations of constriction developed from laboratory observations of ice growth are employed and compared. The thickness of the ice-free layer above the ice table has the strongest effect on

  7. Brain composition in Heliconius butterflies, posteclosion growth and experience-dependent neuropil plasticity.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Stephen H; Merrill, Richard M; Ott, Swidbert R

    2016-06-15

    Behavioral and sensory adaptations are often reflected in the differential expansion of brain components. These volumetric differences represent changes in cell number, size, and/or connectivity, which may denote changes in the functional and evolutionary relationships between different brain regions, and between brain composition and behavioral ecology. Here we describe the brain composition of two species of Heliconius butterflies, a long-standing study system for investigating ecological adaptation and speciation. We confirm a previous report of a striking volumetric expansion of the mushroom body, and explore patterns of differential posteclosion and experience-dependent plasticity between different brain regions. This analysis uncovers age- and experience-dependent posteclosion mushroom body growth comparable to that in foraging Hymenoptera, but also identifies plasticity in several other neuropils. An interspecific analysis indicates that Heliconius display a remarkably large investment in mushroom bodies for a lepidopteran, and indeed rank highly compared to other insects. Our analyses lay the foundation for future comparative and experimental analyses that will establish Heliconius as a valuable case study in evolutionary neurobiology.

  8. Ground Based Experiments in Support of Microgravity Research Results-Vapor Growth of Organic Nonlinear Optical Thin Film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zugrav, M. Ittu; Carswell, William E.; Haulenbeek, Glen B.; Wessling, Francis C.

    2001-01-01

    This work is specifically focused on explaining previous results obtained for the crystal growth of an organic material in a reduced gravity environment. On STS-59, in April 1994, two experiments were conducted with N,N-dimethyl-p-(2,2-dicyanovinyl) aniline (DCVA), a promising nonlinear optical (NLO) material. The space experiments were set to reproduce laboratory experiments that yielded small, bulk crystals of DCVA. The results of the flight experiment, however, were surprising. Rather than producing a bulk single crystal, the result was the production of two high quality, single crystalline thin films. This result was even more intriguing when it is considered that thin films are more desirable for NLO applications than are bulk single crystals. Repeated attempts on the ground to reproduce these results were fruitless. A second set of flight experiments was conducted on STS-69 in September 1995. This time eight DCVA experiments were flown, with each of seven experiments containing a slight change from the first reference experiment. The reference experiment was programmed with growth conditions identical to those of the STS-59 mission. The slight variations in each of the other seven were an attempt to understand what particular parameter was responsible for the preference of thin film growth over bulk crystal growth in microgravity. Once again the results were surprising. In all eight cases thin films were grown again, albeit with varying quality. So now we were faced with a phenomenon that not only takes place in microgravity, but also is very robust, resisting all attempts to force the growth of bulk single crystals.

  9. Factors involved in growth plasticity of cockles Cerastoderma edule (L.), identified by field survey and transplant experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Montaudouin, Xavier

    1996-12-01

    In Arcachon Bay, a macrotidal coastal lagoon in southwest France, growth rates of cockles Cerastoderma edule (L.) differ greatly between locations. Sampling of populations at different tidal levels showed that the mean shell length was significantly and positively correlated with immersion time, whereas no correlation was found with population density and microphytobenthos biomass. Transplants of cockles between two intertidal sites were used to examine the relative importance of habitat and site of origin for growth rate and condition index. Artifacts due to manipulation were assessed, i.e. the impact of enclosures on growth, conditon index and mortality. During a 5-mo reciprocal transplant experiment, growth rates of the transplanted cockles and the cockles already present were similar, whereas the sites of origin did not affect growth rate. Condition index, however, displayed significant differences in relation to both transplant and origin sites. During a further 6-mo experiment in which cockles were transplanted from one site to four new sites, growth was mainly influenced by tidal level. These results indicate that net growth started when cockles were immersed 30% of the time. It is concluded that, on the scale of Arcachon Bay (156 km 2), differences in growth and condition between cockle populations are largely phenotypic. Tidal level ( i.e. food supply and emersion stress) accounts for most of these differences, but the existence of genetically or physiologically different populations cannot be excluded.

  10. Plagioclase nucleation and growth kinetics in a hydrous basaltic melt by decompression experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzilli, Fabio; Agostini, C.; Landi, P.; Fortunati, A.; Mancini, L.; Carroll, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    Isothermal single-step decompression experiments (at temperature of 1075 °C and pressure between 5 and 50 MPa) were used to study the crystallization kinetics of plagioclase in hydrous high-K basaltic melts as a function of pressure, effective undercooling (Δ T eff) and time. Single-step decompression causes water exsolution and a consequent increase in the plagioclase liquidus, thus imposing an effective undercooling (∆ T eff), accompanied by increased melt viscosity. Here, we show that the decompression process acts directly on viscosity and thermodynamic energy barriers (such as interfacial-free energy), controlling the nucleation process and favoring the formation of homogeneous nuclei also at high pressure (low effective undercoolings). In fact, this study shows that similar crystal number densities ( N a) can be obtained both at low and high pressure (between 5 and 50 MPa), whereas crystal growth processes are favored at low pressures (5-10 MPa). The main evidence of this study is that the crystallization of plagioclase in decompressed high-K basalts is more rapid than that in rhyolitic melts on similar timescales. The onset of the crystallization process during experiments was characterized by an initial nucleation event within the first hour of the experiment, which produced the largest amount of plagioclase. This nucleation event, at short experimental duration, can produce a dramatic change in crystal number density ( N a) and crystal fraction ( ϕ), triggering a significant textural evolution in only 1 h. In natural systems, this may affect the magma rheology and eruptive dynamics on very short time scales.

  11. Growth and Morphology of Supercritical Fluids, a Fluid Physics Experiment Conducted on Mir, Complete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, R. Allen

    2001-01-01

    The Growth and Morphology of Supercritical Fluids (GMSF) is an international experiment facilitated by the NASA Glenn Research Center and under the guidance of U.S. principal investor Professor Hegseth of the University of New Orleans and three French coinvestigators: Daniel Beysens, Yves Garrabos, and Carole Chabot. The GMSF experiments were concluded in early 1999 on the Russian space station Mir. The experiments spanned the three science themes of near-critical phase separation rates, interface dynamics in near-critical boiling, and measurement of the spectrum of density fluctuation length scales very close to the critical point. The fluids used were pure CO2 or SF6. Three of the five thermostats used could adjust the sample volume with the scheduled crew time. Such a volume adjustment enabled variable sample densities around the critical density as well as pressure steps (as distinct from the usual temperature steps) applied to the sample. The French-built ALICE II facility was used for these experiments. It allows tightly thermostated (left photograph) samples (right photograph) to be controlled and viewed/measured. Its diagnostics include interferometry, shadowgraph, high-speed pressure measurements, and microscopy. Data were logged on DAT tapes, and PCMCIA cards and were returned to Earth only after the mission was over. The ground-breaking near critical boiling experiment has yielded the most results with a paper published in Physical Review Letters (ref. 1). The boiling work also received press in Science Magazine (ref. 2). This work showed that, in very compressible near-critical two-phase pure fluids, a vapor bubble was induced to temporarily overheat during a rapid heating of the sample wall. The temperature rise in the vapor was 23-percent higher than the rise in the driving container wall. The effect is due to adiabatic compression of the vapor bubble by the rapid expansion of fluid near the boundary during heatup. Thermal diffusivity is low near the

  12. Origin of diamond and growth inclusions thereof on evidence derived from physicochemical experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvin, Yuriy

    2010-05-01

    The conception of carbonate-silicate parent media for the bulk of mantle-derived diamonds (Litvin, 2007) is compatible with a great body of mineralogical data on substances captured in situ by diamonds from their growth melts. Also, the conception is in excellent agreement with the results of physicochemical experiment based on the criterion of diamonds and their inclusions syngenesis. The criterion reveals the behavior of growth melts under diamond formation. The multi-component diamond-forming media are changeable by contents of major and minor components, but bounded by carbonatite compositions. The generalized composition of the parent media, which fragments are included into natural diamonds, is revealed by the multi-component heterogeneous system MgO - CaO - FeO (Fe, Fe2O3) - MnO - NiO (Ni) - Na2O - K2O - Al2O3 - Cr2O3 (Cr) - TiO2 - ZrO2 - SiO2 - P2O5 - CuS (Cu2S) - FeS (Fe2S) - NiS - KCl - NaCl - SiC - Fe3C - CO2 (CO, CH4) - H2O - C. The principal mineralogical responsibility in diamond genesis appertains to carbon solutions in completely miscible melts of the major carbonate and silicate components (the silicate components belong to both peridotite-pyroxenite and eclogite-grospydite parageneses). The growth melts contain the minor components including admixed soluble components and phases (oxides, phosphates, chlorides, compounds of the C - O - H - N fluid system, etc.) as well as coexisting insoluble immiscible solid and liquid phases (sulfides, metals). On the basis of carbonatite (carbonate-silicate) conception, genetic classification of growth inclusions of minerals, melts and fluids in mantle-derived diamonds has been developed (Litvin, 2009). The classification reveals origin of the inclusions by clearing up their physicochemical links both with the major components of carbonate-silicate growth melts and minor soluble and insoluble components and phases which are contained therein. 1. The major silicate, alumina-silicate and carbonate components are

  13. Impacts of a gape limited Brook Trout, Salvelinus fontinalis, on larval Northwestern salamander, Ambystoma gracile, growth: A field enclosure experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Currens, C.R.; Liss, W.J.; Hoffman, R.L.

    2007-01-01

    The formation of amphibian population structure is directly affected by predation. Although aquatic predators have been shown to have direct negative effects on larval salamanders in laboratory and field experiments, the potential impacts of gape-limited fish on larval salamander growth has been largely underexplored. We designed an enclosure experiment conducted in situ to quantify the effects of gape-limited Brook Trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) on larval Northwestern Salamander (Ambystoma gracile) growth. We specifically tested whether the presence of fish too small to consume larvae had a negative effect on larval growth. The results of this study indicate that the presence of a gape-limited S. fontinalis can have a negative effect on growth of larval A. gracile salamanders. Copyright 2007 Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles.

  14. Growing from experience: an exploratory study of posttraumatic growth in adolescent refugees

    PubMed Central

    Sleijpen, Marieke; Haagen, Joris; Mooren, Trudy; Kleber, Rolf J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to explore perceived posttraumatic growth (PTG) and its associations with potentially traumatic events (PTEs), dispositional optimism, perceived social support, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, and satisfaction with life (SWL) among adolescent refugees and asylum seekers. Method A cross-sectional design was employed including 111 refugees, aged 12–17, that were recruited from asylum seeker centres throughout the Netherlands. Measurements included the revised Posttraumatic Growth Inventory for Children, Children's Impact of Event Scale, Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, The Life Orientation Test, and the Satisfaction with Life Scale. Results Participants reported mean PTG scores (20.2) indicating an average response of some perceived change, while reporting high levels of PTSD symptoms (30.6). PTG and PTSD symptoms were not related with each other (r=0.07, p=0.50). PTG was positively associated with dispositional optimism (r=0.41, p<0.01) and social support (r=0.43, p<0.01). A hierarchical regression analysis demonstrated that dispositional optimism (β=0.33; p<0.05) and social support (β=0.27; p<0.05) positively predicted PTG, explaining 22% of the PTG variance above demographic variables and PTEs. PTG was also positively related with SWL (r=0.37, p<0.01). Conclusions Perceived PTG and PTSD symptoms appear to be independent constructs, which co-occur in adolescent refugees and asylum seekers. The relationship between PTG and mental health remains inconclusive; PTG was positively related to SWL and not associated with PTSD symptoms. Longitudinal research is required to determine causality between PTG and mental health in this refugee population confronted with many traumatic experiences and challenging migration tasks. PMID:26886487

  15. Fe-SAPONITE and Chlorite Growth on Stainless Steel in Hydrothermal Engineered Barrier Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheshire, M. C.; Caporuscio, F. A.; McCarney, M.

    2012-12-01

    The United States recently has initiated the Used Fuel Disposition campaign to evaluate various generic geological repositories for the disposal of high-level, spent nuclear fuel within environments ranging from hard-rock, salt/clay, to deep borehole settings. Previous work describing Engineered Barrier Systems (EBS) for repositories focused on low temperature and pressure conditions. The focus of this experimental work is to characterize the stability and alteration of a bentonite-based EBS with different waste container materials in brine at higher heat loads and pressures. All experiments were run at ~150 bar and 125 to 300 C for ~1 month. Unprocessed bentonite from Colony, Wyoming was used in the experiments as the clay buffer material. The redox conditions for each system were buffered along the magnetite-iron oxygen fugacity univariant curve using Fe3O4 and Feo filings. A K-Na-Ca-Cl-based salt solution was chosen to replicate deep groundwater compositions. The experimental mixtures were 1) salt solution-clay; 2) salt solution -clay-304 stainless steel; and 3) salt solution -clay-316 stainless steel with a water/bentonite ratio of ~9. Mineralogy and aqueous geochemistry of each experiment was evaluated to monitor the reactions that took place. No smectite illitization was observed in these reactions. However, it appears that K-smectite was produced, possibly providing a precursor to illitization. It is unclear whether reaction times were sufficient for bentonite illitization at 212 and 300 C or whether conditions conducive to illite formation were obtained. The more notable clay mineral reactions occurred at the stainless steel surfaces. Authigenic chlorite and Fe-saponite grew with their basal planes near perpendicular to the steel plate, forming a 10 - 40 μm thick 'corrosion' layer. Partial dissolution of the steel plates was the likely iron source for chlorite/saponite formation; however, dissolution of the Feo/Fe3O4 may also have acted as an iron source

  16. Growth of Silicon Nanoclusters: Elucidation by gas-phase experiments and DFT calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Horoi, Mihai; Jackson, Koblar A.

    2004-10-01

    Semiconductor nanostructures are of great interest from both fundamental and applied perspectives. They are intriguing scientifically because their bonding and properties deviate strongly from those of their bulk solids and relevant industrially since nanodevices now approach the scale of large clusters. Understanding the behavior of any molecular system starts from ascertaining its structure. So a colossal effort was expended over the last two decades on characterizing semiconductor cluster geometries. As silicon is the most critical semiconductor, that effort largely focused on Si clusters. Structures of small Si clusters were elucidated early on by ab initio calculations, vibrationally resolved spectroscopy, and optical spectroscopies of matrix-isolated species. Progress for larger systems was enabled in late 1990s by an integrated suite of new tools. It includes ion mobility spectrometry, photoelectron spectroscopy, collisional dissociation, and threshold ionization on the side of experiment, and novel molecular optimization algorithms based on evolution paradigm and fast, but accurate semiempirical protocols for energy evaluation on the theory side. Coherent application of these methods has characterized Si clusters up to the region of radical transition from prolate to spherical growth at ~ 25 atoms.

  17. Experiments on Dynamic Overpressure Stabilization of Ablative Richtmyer--Meshkov Growth in ICF Targets on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotchev, O. V.; Goncharov, V. N.; Jaanimagi, P. A.; Knauer, J. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2002-11-01

    Dynamic overpressure sets the growth rate of the ablative Richtmyer--Meshkov (RM) instability and the late-time imprint levels in directly driven ICF targets. It leads to temporal oscillations of the perturbed ablation front, which have been predicted analytically and observed experimentally,(Y. Aglitskiy et al.), Phys. Plasmas 9, 2264 (2002). and in 2-D ORCHID simulations. These predictions were verified on OMEGA by measuring the perturbation amplitudes and frequencies directly with an x-ray framing camera through face-on x-ray radiography. Planar plastic targets with variable thickness (20 to 60 μm) and single-mode (λ = 10 to 30 μm) ripples on the front surface were irradiated with 1.5-ns square UV laser pulses at maximum energy. Results clearly indicate a phase reversal in the evolution of the target areal density perturbations, in good agreement with theory and simulation. Nonlinearity in the evolution of the preimposed mode, resulting in an enriched spectrum, was observed for initial amplitudes previously believed to develop linearly with time. Upcoming experiments with a high-resolution, streaked imager, will allow for the detailed recording of the evolution of the RM instability and the competing stabilization effect. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460.

  18. SHOCK INITIATION EXPERIMENTS PLUS IGNITION AND GROWTH MODELING OF DAMAGED LX-04 CHARGES

    SciTech Connect

    Chidester, S K; Garcia, F; Vandersall, K S; Tarver, C M

    2009-06-23

    Shock initiation experiments were performed on mechanically and thermally damaged LX-04 (85% HMX and 15% Viton by weight) to obtain in-situ manganin pressure gauge data and run distances to detonation at various shock pressures. The LX-04 charges were damaged mechanically by applying a compressive load of 600 psi for 20,000 cycles, thus creating many small narrow cracks, or by cutting wedge shaped parts that were then loosely reassembled, thus creating a few large cracks. The thermal damaged LX-04 charges were heated to 190 C for a long enough time for the beta to delta phase transition to occur and then cooled to ambient temperature. Mechanically damaged LX-04 exhibited only slightly increased shock sensitivity, while the thermally damaged LX-04 was much more shock sensitive. The pristine LX-04 Ignition and Growth model, modified only by igniting a larger amount of explosive during shock compression based on the damaged charge density, accurately calculated the increased shock sensitivity of the three damaged charges.

  19. Accelerated Aging Experiments for Prognostics of Damage Growth in Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxena, Abhinav; Goebel, Kai Frank; Larrosa, Cecilia C.; Janapati, Vishnuvardhan; Roy, Surajit; Chang, Fu-Kuo

    2011-01-01

    Composite structures are gaining importance for use in the aerospace industry. Compared to metallic structures their behavior is less well understood. This lack of understanding may pose constraints on their use. One possible way to deal with some of the risks associated with potential failure is to perform in-situ monitoring to detect precursors of failures. Prognostic algorithms can be used to predict impending failures. They require large amounts of training data to build and tune damage model for making useful predictions. One of the key aspects is to get confirmatory feedback from data as damage progresses. These kinds of data are rarely available from actual systems. The next possible resource to collect such data is an accelerated aging platform. To that end this paper describes a fatigue cycling experiment with the goal to stress carbon-carbon composite coupons with various layups. Piezoelectric disc sensors were used to periodically interrogate the system. Analysis showed distinct differences in the signatures of growing failures between data collected at conditions. Periodic X-radiographs were taken to assess the damage ground truth. Results after signal processing showed clear trends of damage growth that were correlated to damage assessed from the X-ray images.

  20. Long-term monitoring of growth in the Eastern Elliptio, Elliptio complanata (Bivalvia: Unionidae), in Rhode Island: A transplant experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kesler, D.H.; Newton, T.J.; Green, L.

    2007-01-01

    The lengths of marked specimens of the freshwater mussel, Eastern Elliptio (Elliptio complanata [Lightfoot 1786]), were monitored annually in 3 lakes in Rhode Island, USA, from 1991 to 2005. Mussels growing in Worden Pond showed a change in mean shell length of only 4.3 mm over 14 y, whereas mussel growth in 2 nearby lakes was 3 to 8x greater than growth in Worden Pond over the same time period. L???, the length at which shell growth stops, was significantly different (p < 0.001) among lakes and ranged from 60.5 to 87.4 mm. Transplant experiments revealed that mussels moved to Worden Pond stopped growing, whereas mussels moved from Worden Pond to the 2 other lakes grew at rates similar to the rates observed for resident mussels in the 2 lakes. Standard water-quality measures did not explain the observed growth cessation and lower condition indices of mussels in Worden Pond. Our growth data are consistent with food limitation. The consistent slow growth of E. complanata in Worden Pond, without high mortality, and its ability to increase growth when placed in environments more favorable than Worden Pond, suggests both growth plasticity and longevity in these animals. ?? 2007 by The North American Benthological Society.

  1. Light and Plants. A Series of Experiments Demonstrating Light Effects on Seed Germination, Plant Growth, and Plant Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downs, R. J.; And Others

    A brief summary of the effects of light on plant germination, growth and development, including photoperiodism and pigment formation, introduces 18 experiments and demonstrations which illustrate aspects of these effects. Detailed procedures for each exercise are given, the expected results outlined, and possible sources of difficulty discussed.…

  2. More Ideas for Monitoring Biological Experiments with the BBC Computer: Absorption Spectra, Yeast Growth, Enzyme Reactions and Animal Behaviour.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Openshaw, Peter

    1988-01-01

    Presented are five ideas for A-level biology experiments using a laboratory computer interface. Topics investigated include photosynthesis, yeast growth, animal movements, pulse rates, and oxygen consumption and production by organisms. Includes instructions specific to the BBC computer system. (CW)

  3. Experiment Requirements and Implementation Plan (ERIP) for semiconductor materials growth in low-G environment experiment no. MPS-77F087

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouch, R. K.; Fripp, A. L.; Debnam, W. J.; Clark, I. O.

    1981-01-01

    Crystals of the intermetallic compound Pb1-xSnxTe will be grown in furnaces on the Space Shuttle. The reasons for conducting this growth in space, the program of investigation to develop the space experiment and the requirements that are placed on the Space Shuttle furnace are discussed. Also included are relevent thermophysical properties of Pb1-xSnxTe to the degree which they are known.

  4. Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waag, Andreas

    This chapter is devoted to the growth of ZnO. It starts with various techniques to grow bulk samples and presents in some detail the growth of epitaxial layers by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), and pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The last section is devoted to the growth of nanorods. Some properties of the resulting samples are also presented. If a comparison between GaN and ZnO is made, very often the huge variety of different growth techniques available to fabricate ZnO is said to be an advantage of this material system. Indeed, growth techniques range from low cost wet chemical growth at almost room temperature to high quality MOCVD growth at temperatures above 1, 000∘C. In most cases, there is a very strong tendency of c-axis oriented growth, with a much higher growth rate in c-direction as compared to other crystal directions. This often leads to columnar structures, even at relatively low temperatures. However, it is, in general, not straight forward to fabricate smooth ZnO thin films with flat surfaces. Another advantage of a potential ZnO technology is said to be the possibility to grow thin films homoepitaxially on ZnO substrates. ZnO substrates are mostly fabricated by vapor phase transport (VPT) or hydrothermal growth. These techniques are enabling high volume manufacturing at reasonable cost, at least in principle. The availability of homoepitaxial substrates should be beneficial to the development of ZnO technology and devices and is in contrast to the situation of GaN. However, even though a number of companies are developing ZnO substrates, only recently good quality substrates have been demonstrated. However, these substrates are not yet widely available. Still, the situation concerning ZnO substrates seems to be far from low-cost, high-volume production. The fabrication of dense, single crystal thin films is, in general, surprisingly difficult, even when ZnO is grown on a ZnO substrate. However

  5. The Benefits of High School Experiences on Growth in Occupational Status in U.S.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Kyung-Nyun; Passmore, David L.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated high school graduates' school-to-work transition by considering their post-school occupational skill levels. Using an ordinal growth model analysis, occupational status increased in an arch-shaped curve as the number of years after high school graduation also increased. This growth trajectory was further related to…

  6. Flight Experiments of Physical Vapor Transport of ZnSe: Growth of Crystals in Various Convective Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua

    2015-01-01

    A low gravity material experiment will be performed in the Material Science Research Rack (MSRR) on International Space Station (ISS). The flight experiment will conduct crystal growths of ZnSe and related ternary compounds, such as ZnSeS and ZnSeTe, by physical vapor transport (PVT). The main objective of the project is to determine the relative contributions of gravity-driven fluid flows to the compositional distribution, incorporation of impurities and defects, and deviation from stoichiometry observed in the grown crystals as results of buoyancy-driven convection and growth interface fluctuations caused by irregular fluid-flows on Earth. The investigation consists of extensive ground-based experimental and theoretical research efforts and concurrent flight experimentation. The objectives of the ground-based studies are (1) obtain the experimental data and conduct the analyses required to define the optimum growth parameters for the flight experiments, (2) perfect various characterization techniques to establish the standard procedure for material characterization, (3) quantitatively establish the characteristics of the crystals grown on Earth as a basis for subsequent comparative evaluations of the crystals grown in a low-gravity environment and (4) develop theoretical and analytical methods required for such evaluations. ZnSe and related ternary compounds have been grown by vapor transport technique with real time in-situ non-invasive monitoring techniques. The grown crystals have been characterized extensively by various techniques to correlate the grown crystal properties with the growth conditions. This talk will focus on the ground-based studies on the PVT crystal growth of ZnSe and related ternary compounds, especially the effects of different growth orientations related to gravity direction on the grown crystals.

  7. Post-traumatic growth: a qualitative analysis of experiences regarding positive psychological changes among Iranian women with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mehrabi, Esmat; Hajian, Sepideh; Simbar, Masoomeh; Houshyari, Mohammad; Zayeri, Farid

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Cancer diagnosis is an extremely stressful experience that has a profound impact on a patient’s life. Cancer related perceived stress and complications may lead to the experience of positive psychological changes and post-traumatic growth (PTG). Since there is lack of qualitative research assessing the experience of PTG in Iranian women with breast cancer, this study aims to investigate experiences relating to PTG of Iranian women. Methods: A qualitative phenomenological approach was selected to explore the experiences of Iranian women with PTG. Data were gathered using semi-structured, in-depth interviews with 18 eligible patients, which were then transcribed and analyzed using Van Manen’s thematic analysis approach. Data gathering and analyses were conducted simultaneously. In addition, MAXQDA software was used for data management. Results: In this study, the participants were 18 Iranian women between the ages of 31 and 65 years. Four prominent themes were extracted from the participant’s statements that demonstrated the Iranian women’s experiences with breast cancer-induced psychological growth and maturity: 1) appreciate of life, 2) stability, 3) spiritual prosperity, and 4) effective interaction. Conclusion: Health care professionals are strongly recommended to design robust and timely intervention programs to improving PTG among breast cancer survivors and reduce their perceived distress resulting from cancer diagnosis. PMID:26435823

  8. Experiment K-7-22: Growth Hormone Regulation Synthesis and Secretion in Microgravity. Part 1; Growth Hormone Regulation Synthesis and Secretion in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.; Grindeland, R.; Vale, W.; Sawchenko, P.; Ilyina-Kakueva, E. I.

    1994-01-01

    Changes in the musculoskeletal, immune, vascular, and endocrine system of the rat occur as a result of short-term spaceflight. Since pituitary gland growth hormone (GH) plays a role in the control of these systems, and since the results of an earlier spaceflight mission (Spacelab 3, 1985) showed that GH cell function was compromised in a number of post-flight tests, we repeated and extended the 1985 experiment in two subsequent spaceflights: the 12.5 day mission of Cosmos 1887 (in 1987) and the 14 day mission of Cosmos 2044 (in 1989). The results of these later two flight experiments are the subject of this report. They document repeatable and significant changes in the GH cell system of the spaceflown rat in several post-flight tests.

  9. Curvature-Driven Pore Growth in Charged Membranes during Charge-Pulse and Voltage-Clamp Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Kroeger, Jens H.; Vernon, Dan; Grant, Martin

    2009-01-01

    We find that curvature-driven growth of pores in electrically charged membranes correctly reproduces charge-pulse experiments. Our model, consisting of a Langevin equation for the time dependence of the pore radius coupled to an ordinary differential equation for the number of pores, captures the statistics of the pore population and its effect on the membrane conductance. The calculated pore radius is a linear, and not an exponential, function of time, as observed experimentally. Two other important features of charge-pulse experiments are recovered: pores reseal for low and high voltages but grow irreversibly for intermediate values of the voltage. Our set of coupled ordinary differential equations is equivalent to the partial differential equation used previously to study pore dynamics, but permits the study of longer timescales necessary for the simulations of voltage-clamp experiments. An effective phase diagram for such experiments is obtained. PMID:19186129

  10. Psychosocial experiences of breast cancer survivors involved in a dragon boat program: exploring links to positive psychological growth.

    PubMed

    Sabiston, Catherine M; McDonough, Meghan H; Crocker, Peter R E

    2007-08-01

    This study explored psychosocial experiences of breast cancer survivors involved in dragon boat programs. Twenty women (M(age) = 58.69, SD = 6.85) were interviewed for 45-60 min about their experiences as members of survivor dragon boat teams. Interviews were analyzed using constructivist grounded theory methods. The dragon boat program facilitated social support from women with common challenges and a shared understanding of survivorship. It also provided opportunities to (re)gain a sense of personal control, develop new identities as athletes, and overcome physical challenges. Together these elements contributed to positive psychological growth and linked to the literature on posttraumatic growth. Future physical activity interventions targeting breast cancer survivors may benefit from developing strategies that share key characteristics of dragon boating.

  11. Modeling Island-Growth Capture Zone Distributions (CZD) with the Generalized Wigner Distribution (GWD): New Developments in Theory and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimpinelli, Alberto; Einstein, T. L.; González, Diego Luis; Sathiyanarayanan, Rajesh; Hamouda, Ajmi Bh.

    2011-03-01

    Earlier we showed [PRL 99, 226102 (2007)] that the CZD in growth could be well described by P (s) = asβ exp (-bs2) , where s is the CZ area divided by its average value. Painstaking simulations by Amar's [PRE 79, 011602 (2009)] and Evans's [PRL 104, 149601 (2010)] groups showed inadequacies in our mean field Fokker-Planck argument relating β to the critical nucleus size. We refine our derivation to retrieve their β ~ i + 2 [PRL 104, 149602 (2010)]. We discuss applications of this formula and methodology to experiments on Ge/Si(001) and on various organics on Si O2 , as well as to kinetic Monte Carlo studies homoepitaxial growth on Cu(100) with codeposited impurities of different sorts. In contrast to theory, there can be significant changes to β with coverage. Some experiments also show temperature dependence. Supported by NSF-MRSEC at UMD, Grant DMR 05-20471.

  12. SHOCK INITIATION EXPERIMENTS ON PBX 9501 EXPLOSIVE AT PRESSURES BELOW 3 GPa WITH ASSOCIATED IGNITION AND GROWTH MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Chidester, S K; Thompson, D G; Vandersall, K S; Idar, D J; Tarver, C M; Garcia, F; Urtiew, P A

    2007-06-13

    Shock initiation experiments on the explosive PBX 9501 (95% HMX, 2.5% estane, and 2.5% nitroplasticizer by weight) were performed at pressures below 3 GPa to obtain in-situ pressure gauge data, run-distance-to-detonation thresholds, and Ignition and Growth modeling parameters. Propellant driven gas guns (101 mm and 155 mm) were utilized to initiate the PBX 9501 explosive with manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge packages placed between sample slices. The run-distance-to-detonation points on the Pop-plot for these experiments showed agreement with previously published data and Ignition and Growth modeling parameters were obtained with a good fit to the experimental data. This parameter set will allow accurate code predictions to be calculated for safety scenarios in the low-pressure regime (below 3 GPa) involving PBX 9501 explosive.

  13. Experiment 13: The Study of Dopant Segregation Behavior During the Growth of GaAs in Microgravity on USML-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthiesen, David H.; Kaforey, Monica L.; Bly, J. M.; Chait, Arnon; Kafalas, James; Carlson, Douglas

    1998-01-01

    An investigation into the segregation behavior of selenium doped gallium arsenide (Se/GaAs) during directional solidification in the microgravity environment was conducted using the Crystal Growth Furnace (CGF) aboard the second United States Microgravity Laboratory (USML-2). Two crystals were successfully processed on USML-2, which lasted from October 20 to November 7, 1995. The first sample was processed for 67 hours, 45 minutes (MET 5/04:53:45-8/00:23:50) and included 19 hours of growth at 0.5 microns/sec which yielded 3.42 cm of sample length, and 5 hours of growth at 1.5 microns/sec which yielded 2.7 cm of sample. During the second experiment, the furnace temperature was adjusted to move the melt-solid interface position towards the hot end of the furnace. The second sample was processed for 50 hours, 10 minutes (MET 8/18:48:49-10/21:58:54) and included 11 hours of growth at 0.5 microns/sec which yielded 1.98 cm of sample, and 1 hour, 25 minutes of growth at 5.0 microns/sec which yielded 2.6 cm of sample. This sample provides an order of magnitude change in growth rate and reproduces one of the growth rates used during USML-1. In contrast to the results from USML-1, no voids were present in either crystal grown on USML-2. The absence of voids in either sample indicates that growth rate changes alone were not responsible for the formation of voids found in the crystals grown on USML-1. Sections of the ground-based and flight crystals grown on USML-2 were cut and polished. All of the interface demarcation lines expected from the current pulse interface demarcation (CPID) system have been identified. These measurements have been analyzed for interface positions, interface shapes, and growth rates. Using a newly developed technique, based on experimental and numerical results, the seeding interface reproducibility from run to run was <= 2.5 mm. The seeding interface position could be controllably moved, with respect to the furnace zones, by adjusting the control

  14. Growth of the peritrich epibiont Zoothamnium intermedium Precht, 1935 (Ciliophora, Peritrichia) estimated from laboratory experiments.

    PubMed

    Utz, L R P

    2008-05-01

    Peritrich ciliates are commonly found colonizing living substrates. Although this a well known phenomenon, biological aspects of this relationship need to be studied in more detail. Assessment of growth rates in peritrichs has been the subject of very few studies. Only species in the genera Carchesium Ehrenberg, 1830 and Vorticella Linnaeus, 1767 had their growth rates evaluated in the field and in the laboratory. In the present study, growth, colonization (colonies/host), and proliferation (zooids/colony) rates of the peritrich epibiont Zoothamnium intermedium Precht, 1935 attached to the calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa Dana 1848 were evaluated in the laboratory in two food regimes: bacteria only, and algal based diet. Results showed that growth, colonization, and proliferation rates were similar for both diets. Maximum growth rates obtained for Z. intermedium was 0.85 and 0.83 per day, for bacteria and algae respectively. Maximum colonization rates were 0.5 per day for both diets, and the maximum proliferation rates were 0.44 and 0.42 per day for bacteria and algae respectively. These results demonstrate that Z. intermedium is able to grow at the same rate of other peritrichs on bacterial and algal based diets.

  15. Phase partitioning, crystal growth, electrodeposition and cosmic ray experiments in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessling, Francis C.

    1987-01-01

    Five experiments are contained in one Get Away Special Canister (5 cu ft). The first utilizes microgravity to separate biological cells and to study the mechanism of phase partitioning in 12 separate cuvettes. Two experiments are designed to grow organic crystals by physical vapor transport. One experiment consists of eight electroplating cells with various chemicals to produce surfaces electroplated in microgravity. Some of the surfaces have micron sized particles of hard materials co-deposited during electrodeposition. The fifth experiment intercepts cosmic ray particles and records their paths on photographic emulsions. The first four experiments are controlled by an on-board C-MOS controller. The fifth experiment is totally passive. These are the first in Space. Their purpose is to create new commercial products with microgravity processing.

  16. Trauma-exposed firefighters: relationships among posttraumatic growth, posttraumatic stress, resource availability, coping and critical incident stress debriefing experience.

    PubMed

    Sattler, David N; Boyd, Bill; Kirsch, Julie

    2014-12-01

    This project examines protective factors associated with resilience/posttraumatic growth and risk factors associated with posttraumatic stress among firefighters exposed to critical incidents. The participants were 286 (257 men and 29 women) volunteer and paid firefighters in Whatcom County, Washington. Participants completed an anonymous survey asking about demographics, critical incident exposure, posttraumatic stress symptoms, posttraumatic growth, resource availability, coping, occupational stress and critical incident stress debriefing experience. Most participants had significant critical incident exposure, and about half had attended critical incident stress debriefing sessions. Posttraumatic growth was associated with being female, critical incident exposure, critical incident stress debriefing attendance, posttraumatic stress symptoms (negative association), occupational support, occupation satisfaction, occupational effort, problem-focused coping, emotion-focused coping and personal characteristic resources. Posttraumatic stress symptoms were positively associated with years of firefighting, burnout, occupational effort and disengagement coping and negatively associated with critical incident stress debriefing attendance, posttraumatic growth, social support, internal locus of control, personal characteristic resources, energy resources and condition resources. The findings support conservation of resources stress theory and show that the maintenance and acquisition of resources can offset losses and facilitate resilience/posttraumatic growth. Implications of the findings for enhancing firefighter resources, facilitating resilience and minimizing occupational stressors are discussed.

  17. Trauma-exposed firefighters: relationships among posttraumatic growth, posttraumatic stress, resource availability, coping and critical incident stress debriefing experience.

    PubMed

    Sattler, David N; Boyd, Bill; Kirsch, Julie

    2014-12-01

    This project examines protective factors associated with resilience/posttraumatic growth and risk factors associated with posttraumatic stress among firefighters exposed to critical incidents. The participants were 286 (257 men and 29 women) volunteer and paid firefighters in Whatcom County, Washington. Participants completed an anonymous survey asking about demographics, critical incident exposure, posttraumatic stress symptoms, posttraumatic growth, resource availability, coping, occupational stress and critical incident stress debriefing experience. Most participants had significant critical incident exposure, and about half had attended critical incident stress debriefing sessions. Posttraumatic growth was associated with being female, critical incident exposure, critical incident stress debriefing attendance, posttraumatic stress symptoms (negative association), occupational support, occupation satisfaction, occupational effort, problem-focused coping, emotion-focused coping and personal characteristic resources. Posttraumatic stress symptoms were positively associated with years of firefighting, burnout, occupational effort and disengagement coping and negatively associated with critical incident stress debriefing attendance, posttraumatic growth, social support, internal locus of control, personal characteristic resources, energy resources and condition resources. The findings support conservation of resources stress theory and show that the maintenance and acquisition of resources can offset losses and facilitate resilience/posttraumatic growth. Implications of the findings for enhancing firefighter resources, facilitating resilience and minimizing occupational stressors are discussed. PMID:25476961

  18. Birth Experiences of Immigrant Latina Women in a New Growth Community.

    PubMed

    Niebler, Meagan; Documét, Patricia I; Chaves-Gnecco, Diego; Guadamuz, Thomas E

    2016-09-01

    A woman's birth experience can impact the physical and mental well-being of mothers long after the birth of their child. Little is known about the experiences of Latina women in areas with small, yet growing Latino populations. To understand Latina's perceptions of their childbirth experience and to see how insurance status impacts that experience, we conducted in-depth, semi-structured interviews with a non-proportional quota sampling of ten Latina women, five with and five without health insurance. Most women reported a positive global experience; the birth of a healthy child was the most important factor influencing birth experiences for all of them. Locus of control and support from medical providers and loved ones also shaped experiences. Uninsured women reported lower levels of perceived control and support, which did impact their birthing experience. These differences could be influenced by social status and position. Medical provider, hospital, and policy recommendations are made which could lead to improvements in uninsured Latinas' childbirth experiences. PMID:27294734

  19. Ground based experiments on the growth and characterization of L-Arginine Phosphate (LAP) crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, S. M.; Cao, C.; Batra, A. K.; Lal, R. B.; Mookherji, T. K.

    1991-01-01

    L-Arginine Phosphate (LAP) is a new nonlinear optical material with higher efficiency for harmonic generation compared to KDP. Crystals of LAP were grown in the laboratory from supersaturated solutions by temperature lowering technique. Investigations revealed the presence of large dislocation densities inside the crystals which are observed to produce refractive index changes causing damage at high laser powers. This is a result of the convection during crystal growth from supersaturated solutions. It is proposed to grow these crystals in a diffusion controlled growth condition under microgravity environment and compare the crystals grown in space with those grown on ground. Physical properties of the solutions needed for modelling of crystal growth are also presented.

  20. Density dependent growth in adult brown frogs Rana arvalis and Rana temporaria - A field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loman, Jon; Lardner, Björn

    2009-11-01

    In species with complex life cycles, density regulation can operate on any of the stages. In frogs there are almost no studies of density effects on the performance of adult frogs in the terrestrial habitat. We therefore studied the effect of summer density on the growth rate of adult frogs during four years. Four 30 by 30 m plots in a moist meadow were used. In early summer, when settled after post-breeding migration, frogs ( Rana arvalis and Rana temporaria that have a very similar ecology and potentially compete) were enclosed by erecting a fence around the plots. Frogs were captured, measured, marked and partly relocated to create two high density and two low density plots. In early autumn the frogs were again captured and their individual summer growth determined. Growth effects were evaluated in relation to two density measures: density by design (high/low manipulation), and actual (numerical) density. R. arvalis in plots with low density by design grew faster than those in high density plots. No such effect was found for R. temporaria. For none of the species was growth related to actual summer density, determined by the Lincoln index and including the density manipulation. The result suggests that R. arvalis initially settled according to an ideal free distribution and that density had a regulatory effect (mediated through growth). The fact that there were no density effects on R. temporaria (and a significant difference in its response to that of R. arvalis) suggests it is a superior competitor to R. arvalis during the terrestrial phase. There were no density effects on frog condition index, suggesting that the growth rate modifications may actually be an adaptive trait of R. arvalis. The study demonstrates that density regulation may be dependent on resources in frogs' summer habitat.

  1. Community development in a Research Experience for Teachers (RET) program: Teacher growth and translation of the experience back to the classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Carol Suzanne Chism

    This qualitative study explores how a scientific research experience helped seven secondary science teachers to grow professionally. The design of this Research Experience for Teachers (RET) program emphasized having teachers become members of university scientific research communities---participating in experimental design, data collection, analysis, and presenting of findings---in order to have a better understanding of research science. I conducted individual interviews with teacher and scientist participants, visited the teachers in their laboratories, videotaped classroom visits, and videotaped group meetings during the summers to learn what teachers brought back to their classrooms about the processes of science. I examined the teachers' views of research science, views shaped by their exposure to research science under the mentorship of a scientist participant. The teachers observed the collaborative efforts of research scientists and experienced doing scientific research, using technology and various experimental methods. Throughout their two-year experience, the teachers continually refined their images of scientists. I also examined how teachers in this program built a professional community as they developed curricula. Further, I investigated what the teachers brought from their experiences back to the classroom, deciding on a theme of "Communicating Science" as a way to convey aspects of scientific inquiry to students. Teacher growth as a result of this two-year program included developing more empathy for student learning and renewing their enthusiasm for both learning and teaching science. Teacher growth also included developing curricula to involve students in behaving as scientists. The teachers identified a few discrete communication practices of scientists that they deemed appropriate for students to adopt to increase their communication skills. Increased community building in classes to model scientific communities was seen as a way to motivate

  2. Dropwise condensation: experiments and simulations of nucleation and growth of water drops in a cooling system.

    PubMed

    Leach, R N; Stevens, F; Langford, S C; Dickinson, J T

    2006-10-10

    Dropwise condensation of water vapor from a naturally cooling, hot water reservoir onto a hydrophobic polymer film and a silanized glass slide was studied by direct observation and simulations. The observed drop growth kinetics suggests that smallest drops grow principally by the diffusion of water adsorbed on the substrate to the drop perimeter, while drops larger than about 50 microm in diameter grow principally by direct deposition from the vapor onto the drop surface. Drop coalescence plays a critical role in determining the drop-size distribution and stimulates the nucleation of new, small drops on the substrates. Simulations of drop growth incorporating these growth mechanisms provide a good description of the observed drop-size distribution. Because of the large role played by coalescence, details of individual drop growth make little difference to the final drop-size distribution. The rate of condensation per unit substrate area is especially high for the smallest drops and may help account for the high heat transfer rates associated with dropwise condensation relative to filmwise condensation in heat exchange applications.

  3. A Longitudinal Solution to the Problem of Differential Linear Growth Patterns in Quasi-Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olejnik, Stephen; Porter, Andrew C.

    Differential achievement growth patterns between comparison groups is a problem associated with data analysis in compensatory education programs. Children in greatest need of additional assistance, are usually assigned to the program rather than to an alternative treatment so that the comparison groups may vary in several ways, in addition to the…

  4. Youth Development Outcomes of the Camp Experience: Evidence for Multidimensional Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurber, Christopher A.; Scanlin, Marge M.; Scheuler, Leslie; Henderson, Karla A.

    2007-01-01

    Three thousand, three hundred and ninety-five families, whose child attended one of 80 different day or resident summer camps for at least one week, completed customized questionnaires that measured growth from precamp to postcamp in four domains: Positive Identity, Social Skills, Physical & Thinking Skills, and Positive Values & Spirituality.…

  5. The Experience of Stress and Personal Growth among Grandparents of Children with and without Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findler, Liora

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was to examine the contribution of internal and external resources to stress and personal growth among grandparents of children with and without an intellectual disability. Ninety-four grandparents of children with intellectual disability and 105 grandparents of children without intellectual disability completed the…

  6. Posttraumatic Growth and Depreciation as Independent Experiences and Predictors of Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cann, Arnie; Calhoun, Lawrence G.; Tedeschi, Richard G.; Solomon, David T.

    2010-01-01

    Positive changes (posttraumatic growth [PTG]) and negative changes (posttraumatic depreciation [PTD]) were assessed using the PTGI-42 with persons reporting changes from a stressful event. PTG and PTD were uncorrelated, and PTG was much greater than PTD. PTG was positively related to disruption of core beliefs and recent deliberate rumination and…

  7. [Academic international cultural exchange: an experience of personal and scientific growth].

    PubMed

    Dalmolin, Indiara Sartori; Pereira, Eliane Ramos; Silva, Rose Mary Costa Rosa Andrade; Gouveia, Maria José Baltazar; Sardinheiro, José Júlio

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to describe the student experience to integrate an international academic mobility program during undergraduate nursing. It is reported academic experience in Portugal, Algarve University, made possible by the Federal University of Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The experience of exchange performed within six months, enabled the acquisition of new scientific knowledge and cultural rights, including innovations in healthcare technology, development of research and academic links. As contributions are expected to stimulate and intensify the international mobility especially at undergraduate level, considering its importance to the improvement of academic excellence and the Brazilian higher education through scientific and cultural exchange abroad.

  8. Quantitative and qualitative changes in primary and secondary stem organization of Aristolochia macrophylla during ontogeny: functional growth analysis and experiments.

    PubMed

    Masselter, Tom; Speck, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    The anatomy of young and old stems of Aristolochia macrophylla has been investigated for a better understanding of how secondary growth processes cause changes in the stem anatomy of a lianescent plant. In A. macrophylla, following an increase in volume of secondary vascular tissues, the cortical tissues are deformed and the outer sclerenchymatous cylinder ruptures. Morphometric measurements prove that the inner zone of the cortical parenchymatous tissue is compressed prior to the rupture of the outer sclerenchymatous cylinder. After the rupture has occurred, the radial width of the inner primary cortex slightly increases again. This could be caused by strain relaxation, suggesting that the inner primary cortex mechanically behaves similarly to cellular technical foam rubbers. Two different experiments were undertaken to test the outer cortical cylinders mechanically. The outer cortical cylinders comprise the outer sclerenchymatous cortical tissue and a collenchymatous sheath underneath the epidermis and the epidermis. In a first experiment, transverse compression loads were applied to the outside of the cortical cylinders causing ovalization of the cylinder until failure. This experiment allowed the Young's Modulus of the outer cortical cylinders to be determined. In a second set of experiments, radial hydraulic pressure was applied to the inside of the cortical cylinders, mimicking the mechanical effects of internal growth processes. The increase of the internal pressure finally led to rupture of the cortical cylinders. The circumferential stresses acting on the inner surface of the cortical cylinders were calculated. These data allow quantitative estimates of the radial and circumferential pressures effected by vascular secondary growth processes during ontogeny in A. macrophylla stems. The experimental results further indicate that the outer sclerenchymatous cylinder is the main contributor to mechanical stability of young A. macrophylla stems.

  9. ISS-Crystal Growth of Photorefractive Materials (BSO): Critical Design Issues for Optimized Data Extraction from Space Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyers, Robert W.; Motakef, S.; Witt, A. F.; Wuensch, B.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Realization of the full potential of photorefractive materials in device technology is seriously impeded by our inability to achieve controlled formation of critical defects during single crystal growth and by difficulties in meeting the required degree of compositional uniformity on a micro-scale over macroscopic dimensions. The exact nature and origin of the critical defects which control photorefractivity could not as yet be identified because of gravitational interference. There exists, however, strong evidence that the density of defect formation and their spatial distribution are adversely affected by gravitational interference which precludes the establishment of quantifiable and controllable heat and mass transfer conditions during crystal growth. The current, NASA sponsored research at MIT is directed at establishing a basis for the development of a comprehensive approach to the optimization of property control during melt growth of photorefractive materials, making use of the m-g environment, provided in the International Space Station. The objectives to be pursued in m-g research on photorefractive BSO (Bi12SiO20) are: (a) identification of the x-level(s) responsible for photorefractivity in undoped BSO; (b) development of approaches leading to the control of x-level formation at uniform spatial distribution; (c) development of doping and processing procedures for optimization of the critical, application specific parameters, spectral response, sensitivity, response time and matrix stability. The presentation will focus on: the rationale for the justification of the space experiment, ground-based development efforts, design considerations for the space experiments, strategic plan of the space experiments, and approaches to the quantitative analysis of the space experiments.

  10. Quantitative and qualitative changes in primary and secondary stem organization of Aristolochia macrophylla during ontogeny: functional growth analysis and experiments

    PubMed Central

    Masselter, Tom; Speck, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    The anatomy of young and old stems of Aristolochia macrophylla has been investigated for a better understanding of how secondary growth processes cause changes in the stem anatomy of a lianescent plant. In A. macrophylla, following an increase in volume of secondary vascular tissues, the cortical tissues are deformed and the outer sclerenchymatous cylinder ruptures. Morphometric measurements prove that the inner zone of the cortical parenchymatous tissue is compressed prior to the rupture of the outer sclerenchymatous cylinder. After the rupture has occurred, the radial width of the inner primary cortex slightly increases again. This could be caused by strain relaxation, suggesting that the inner primary cortex mechanically behaves similarly to cellular technical foam rubbers. Two different experiments were undertaken to test the outer cortical cylinders mechanically. The outer cortical cylinders comprise the outer sclerenchymatous cortical tissue and a collenchymatous sheath underneath the epidermis and the epidermis. In a first experiment, transverse compression loads were applied to the outside of the cortical cylinders causing ovalization of the cylinder until failure. This experiment allowed the Young's Modulus of the outer cortical cylinders to be determined. In a second set of experiments, radial hydraulic pressure was applied to the inside of the cortical cylinders, mimicking the mechanical effects of internal growth processes. The increase of the internal pressure finally led to rupture of the cortical cylinders. The circumferential stresses acting on the inner surface of the cortical cylinders were calculated. These data allow quantitative estimates of the radial and circumferential pressures effected by vascular secondary growth processes during ontogeny in A. macrophylla stems. The experimental results further indicate that the outer sclerenchymatous cylinder is the main contributor to mechanical stability of young A. macrophylla stems. PMID:18573799

  11. Growth of single crystals by vapor transport in zero-gravity environment, ground-based experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedemeier, H.

    1978-01-01

    Mass and heat transfer phenomena associated with the growth of single crystals by chemical vapor transport reactions were investigated. In this technique, a gaseous transport agent reacts with the solid source material to form exclusively gaseous products. The gas phase species migrate from the source to the condensation zone of the closed reaction ampoule where the reverse reaction occurs with formation of single crystals. The necessary concentration gradient is achieved by means of a temperature gradient.

  12. [Growth and development of plants in a sequence of generations under the conditions of space flight (experiment Greenhouse-3)].

    PubMed

    Levinskikh, M A; Sychev, V N; Signalova, O B; Derendiaeva, T A; Podol'skiĭ, I G; Masgreĭv, M E; Bingheim, G E

    2001-01-01

    The purpose was to study characteristic features of growth and development of several plant generations in space flight in experiment GREENHOUSE-3 as a part of the Russian-US space research program MIR/NASA in 1997. The experiment consisted of cultivation of Brassica rapa L. in board greenhouse Svet. Two vegetative cycles were fully completed and the third vegetation was terminated on day 13 on the phase of budding. The total duration of the space experiment was 122 days, i.e. same as in the ground controls. In the experiment with Brassica rapa L. viable seeds produced by the first crop were planted in space flight and yielded next crop. Crops raised from the ground and space seeds were found to differ in height and number of buds. Both parameters were lowered in the plants grown from the space seeds. The prime course for smaller size and reduced organogenic potential of plantTs reproductive system seems to be a less content of nutrients in seeds that had matured in the space flight. Experiment GREENHOUSE-3 demonstrated principle feasibility of plant reproduction in space greenhouse from seeds developed in microgravity.

  13. [Growth and development of plants in a sequence of generations under the conditions of space flight (experiment Greenhouse-3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levinskikh, M. A.; Sychev, V. N.; Signalova, O. B.; Derendiaeva, T. A.; Podol'skii, I. G.; Masgreiv, M. E.; Bingheim, G. E.; Musgrave, M. E. (Principal Investigator); Campbell, W. F. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose was to study characteristic features of growth and development of several plant generations in space flight in experiment GREENHOUSE-3 as a part of the Russian-US space research program MIR/NASA in 1997. The experiment consisted of cultivation of Brassica rapa L. in board greenhouse Svet. Two vegetative cycles were fully completed and the third vegetation was terminated on day 13 on the phase of budding. The total duration of the space experiment was 122 days, i.e. same as in the ground controls. In the experiment with Brassica rapa L. viable seeds produced by the first crop were planted in space flight and yielded next crop. Crops raised from the ground and space seeds were found to differ in height and number of buds. Both parameters were lowered in the plants grown from the space seeds. The prime course for smaller size and reduced organogenic potential of plantTs reproductive system seems to be a less content of nutrients in seeds that had matured in the space flight. Experiment GREENHOUSE-3 demonstrated principle feasibility of plant reproduction in space greenhouse from seeds developed in microgravity.

  14. Replicated throughfall exclusion experiment in an Indonesian perhumid rainforest: wood production, litter fall and fine root growth under simulated drought.

    PubMed

    Moser, Gerald; Schuldt, Bernhard; Hertel, Dietrich; Horna, Viviana; Coners, Heinz; Barus, Henry; Leuschner, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    Climate change scenarios predict increases in the frequency and duration of ENSO-related droughts for parts of South-East Asia until the end of this century exposing the remaining rainforests to increasing drought risk. A pan-tropical review of recorded drought-related tree mortalities in more than 100 monitoring plots before, during and after drought events suggested a higher drought-vulnerability of trees in South-East Asian than in Amazonian forests. Here, we present the results of a replicated (n = 3 plots) throughfall exclusion experiment in a perhumid tropical rainforest in Sulawesi, Indonesia. In this first large-scale roof experiment outside semihumid eastern Amazonia, 60% of the throughfall was displaced during the first 8 months and 80% during the subsequent 17 months, exposing the forest to severe soil desiccation for about 17 months. In the experiment's second year, wood production decreased on average by 40% with largely different responses of the tree families (ranging from -100 to +100% change). Most sensitive were trees with high radial growth rates under moist conditions. In contrast, tree height was only a secondary factor and wood specific gravity had no influence on growth sensitivity. Fine root biomass was reduced by 35% after 25 months of soil desiccation while fine root necromass increased by 250% indicating elevated fine root mortality. Cumulative aboveground litter production was not significantly reduced in this period. The trees from this Indonesian perhumid rainforest revealed similar responses of wood and litter production and root dynamics as those in two semihumid Amazonian forests subjected to experimental drought. We conclude that trees from paleo- or neotropical forests growing in semihumid or perhumid climates may not differ systematically in their growth sensitivity and vitality under sublethal drought stress. Drought vulnerability may depend more on stem cambial activity in moist periods than on tree height or wood

  15. Replicated throughfall exclusion experiment in an Indonesian perhumid rainforest: wood production, litter fall and fine root growth under simulated drought.

    PubMed

    Moser, Gerald; Schuldt, Bernhard; Hertel, Dietrich; Horna, Viviana; Coners, Heinz; Barus, Henry; Leuschner, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    Climate change scenarios predict increases in the frequency and duration of ENSO-related droughts for parts of South-East Asia until the end of this century exposing the remaining rainforests to increasing drought risk. A pan-tropical review of recorded drought-related tree mortalities in more than 100 monitoring plots before, during and after drought events suggested a higher drought-vulnerability of trees in South-East Asian than in Amazonian forests. Here, we present the results of a replicated (n = 3 plots) throughfall exclusion experiment in a perhumid tropical rainforest in Sulawesi, Indonesia. In this first large-scale roof experiment outside semihumid eastern Amazonia, 60% of the throughfall was displaced during the first 8 months and 80% during the subsequent 17 months, exposing the forest to severe soil desiccation for about 17 months. In the experiment's second year, wood production decreased on average by 40% with largely different responses of the tree families (ranging from -100 to +100% change). Most sensitive were trees with high radial growth rates under moist conditions. In contrast, tree height was only a secondary factor and wood specific gravity had no influence on growth sensitivity. Fine root biomass was reduced by 35% after 25 months of soil desiccation while fine root necromass increased by 250% indicating elevated fine root mortality. Cumulative aboveground litter production was not significantly reduced in this period. The trees from this Indonesian perhumid rainforest revealed similar responses of wood and litter production and root dynamics as those in two semihumid Amazonian forests subjected to experimental drought. We conclude that trees from paleo- or neotropical forests growing in semihumid or perhumid climates may not differ systematically in their growth sensitivity and vitality under sublethal drought stress. Drought vulnerability may depend more on stem cambial activity in moist periods than on tree height or wood

  16. [A model of world population growth as an experiment in systematic research].

    PubMed

    Kapitsa, S

    1997-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed for the estimation of global population growth, and the estimates were compared with those of the UN and covered the stretch of 4.4 million years B.C. to the years 2175 and 2500 A.D. The estimates were also broken down into human, geological, and technological historical periods. The model showed that human population would stabilize at the level of 14 billion around 2500 A.D. and 13 billion around 2200 A.D., in accordance with UN projections. It also revealed the history of human population growth through the following stages (UN figures are listed in parentheses): 100,000, about 1.6 million years ago; 5 (1-5) million, 35,000 B.C.; 21 (10-15) million, 7000 B.C.; 46 (47) million, 2000 B.C.; 93 (100-230) million, at the time of Christ; 185 (275-345) million, 1000 A.D.; 366 (450-540) million, 1500 A.D.; 887 (907) million, 1800 A.D.; 1158 (1170) million, 1850 A.D.; 1656 (1650-1710) million, 1900 A.D.; 2812 (2515) million, 1950 A.D.; 5253 (5328) million, 1990 A.D.; 6265 (6261) million, 2000 A.D.; 10,487 (10,019) million, 2050 A.D.; 12,034 (11,186) million, 2100 A.D.; 12,648 (11,543) million, 2150 A.D.; 12,946 (11,600) million, 2200 A.D.; and 13,536 million, 2500 A.D. The model advanced the investigation of phenomena by studying the interactions between economical, technological, social, cultural, and biological processes. The analysis showed that humanity has reached a critical phase in its growth and that development in each period depended on external, not internal, factors. This permits the formulation of the principle of demographic imperative (distinct from the Malthusian principle), which states that resources determine the speed and extent of the growth of population.

  17. Closing the Gap between Experiment and Theory: Crystal Growth by Temperature Accelerated Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Montalenti, F.; Sorensen, M. R.; Voter, A. F.

    2001-09-17

    We present atomistic simulations of crystal growth where realistic experimental deposition rates are reproduced, without needing any a priori information on the relevant diffusion processes. Using the temperature accelerated dynamics method, we simulate the deposition of 4 monolayers (ML) of Ag/Ag(100) at the rate of 0.075 ML/s, thus obtaining a boost of several orders of magnitude with respect to ordinary molecular dynamics. In the temperature range analyzed (0--70 K), steering and activated mechanisms compete in determining the surface roughness.

  18. Size as a Risk Factor for Growth in Conservatively Managed Vestibular Schwannomas: The Birmingham Experience.

    PubMed

    Daultrey, Charles R J; Rainsbury, James W; Irving, Richard M

    2016-10-01

    This article discusses conservatively managed tumors, whether larger tumors at presentation are more likely to grow, and whether position at presentation corresponds with growth. A review is presented of more than 900 patients managed at Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, between 1997 and 2012. Tumors were arbitrarily divided into 3 groups: intracanalicular (IC), and extracanalicular (EC) tumors measuring 1 to 10 mm or 11 to 20 mm at the cerebellopontine angle. This series shows that larger EC tumors grow faster than IC tumors and that EC tumors overall at presentation are more likely to grow than IC tumors. PMID:27565393

  19. Early positive effects of tree species richness on herbivory in a large-scale forest biodiversity experiment influence tree growth

    PubMed Central

    Schuldt, Andreas; Bruelheide, Helge; Härdtle, Werner; Assmann, Thorsten; Li, Ying; Ma, Keping; von Oheimb, Goddert; Zhang, Jiayong

    2015-01-01

    Despite the importance of herbivory for the structure and functioning of species-rich forests, little is known about how herbivory is affected by tree species richness, and more specifically by random vs. non-random species loss. We assessed herbivore damage and its effects on tree growth in the early stage of a large-scale forest biodiversity experiment in subtropical China that features random and non-random extinction scenarios of tree mixtures numbering between one and 24 species. In contrast to random species loss, the non-random extinction scenarios were based on the tree species’ local rarity and specific leaf area – traits that may strongly influence the way herbivory is affected by plant species richness. Herbivory increased with tree species richness across all scenarios and was unaffected by the different species compositions in the random and non-random extinction scenarios. Whereas tree growth rates were positively related to herbivory on plots with smaller trees, growth rates significantly declined with increasing herbivory on plots with larger trees. Our results suggest that the effects of herbivory on growth rates increase from monocultures to the most species-rich plant communities and that negative effects with increasing tree species richness become more pronounced with time as trees grow larger. Synthesis. Our results indicate that key trophic interactions can be quick to become established in forest plantations (i.e. already 2.5 years after tree planting). Stronger herbivory effects on tree growth with increasing tree species richness suggest a potentially important role of herbivory in regulating ecosystem functions and the structural development of species-rich forests from the very start of secondary forest succession. The lack of significant differences between the extinction scenarios, however, contrasts with findings from natural forests of higher successional age, where rarity had negative effects on herbivory. This indicates that

  20. Development of the Plant Growth Facility for Use in the Shuttle Middeck and Test Units for Ground-Based Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, David K.; Wells, H. William

    1996-01-01

    The plant growth facility (PGF), currently under development as a Space Shuttle middeck facility for the support of research on higher plants in microgravity, is presented. The PGF provides controlled fluorescent lighting and the active control of temperature, relative humidity and CO2 concentration. These parameters are designed to be centrally controlled by a dedicated microprocessor. The status of the experiment can be displayed for onboard analysis, and will be automatically archived for post-flight analysis. The facility is designed to operate for 15 days and will provide air filtration to remove ethylene and trace organics with replaceable potassium permanganate filters. Similar ground units will be available for pre-flight experimentation.

  1. Crystal growth furnace: An overview of the system configuration and planned experiments on the first United States Microgravity Laboratory mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, R.; Lee, K. N.; Schaefer, D. A.

    The Crystal Growth Furnace (CGF), currently in the Level IV integration cycle at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in preparation for its maiden flight on the First United States Microgravity Laboratory (USML-1) mission to be launched in May 1992, has been developed for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) under the Microgravity Science and Application Division (MSAD) programs at NASA Headquarters. The project is being managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, under contract NAS8-36637. This paper presents an overview of CGF system description and the system configuration for the USML-1 mission and also briefly describes the planned on-orbit experiments.

  2. Estimating Treatment Effects and Precision for Quasi-Experiments Assuming Differential Group and Individual Growth Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olejnik, Stephen F.; Porter, Andrew C.

    The statistical properties of two methods of estimating gain scores for groups in quasi-experiments are compared: (1) gains in scores standardized separately for each group; and (2) analysis of covariance with estimated true pretest scores. The fan spread hypothesis is assumed for groups but not necessarily assumed for members of the groups.…

  3. Growth as Product and as Process: Student Learning Outcomes Attained through College Experiences in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cen, Yuhao

    2012-01-01

    Little empirical research has been done on student learning outcomes and college experiences in China, where the gross enrollment rate in higher education reached 26.5 percent and the undergraduate population exceeded 22 million in 2010. This study seeks to describe, explain, and interpret student learning as perceived from students in Chinese…

  4. Growth and Decay: An Experiment Demonstrating Radioactivity Relationships and Chelate Solvent Extraction Separations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downey, D. M.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    The separation of lead and bismuth by chelate solvent extraction is of interest because of the simplicity which the use of radiotracers allows in its demonstration. Theoretical background information, procedures, materials needed, and typical results are provided for an experiment involving the extraction. (JN)

  5. Easy Growth Experiment on Peas Stimulates Interest in Biology for 10-11 Year Old Pupils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwen, Birgitta

    2007-01-01

    How do we support the enthusiasm children show for biology in school? Unfortunately, lack of exciting practical work and boring biology lessons seem to make science less popular. As a senior lecturer in plant physiology at Karlstad University I have simplified experiments intended for students at university and then tested them on 10-11 year old…

  6. "Every Experience Is a Moving Force": Identity and Growth through Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Kimberly A.

    2003-01-01

    This narrative of the experience of a native English speaking (NES) cooperating teacher working with a nonnative English speaking (NNES) student teacher in an MA Teaching English as a Second Language practicum begins with a discussion of teacher identity, then outlines the significance of caring in teacher-student relations Noddings (Caring: A…

  7. Counselor Development in the Process of Mastering Cultural Competence: A Study of Professional Growth Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakefield, Marie A.

    2012-01-01

    Grounded theory methodology was employed to explore the experiences of counseling professionals as they work to develop a higher level of cultural competence. Three key findings support the core theme, navigating change toward cultural competent practices: (1) environmental awareness; (2) dispositions toward the development in cultural competency…

  8. Shriners Hospitals for Children, Honolulu's experience with telemedicine: program implementation, maintenance, growth, and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Ono, Craig M; Lindsey, Jana L

    2004-10-01

    Shriners Hospitals for Children, Honolulu Telemedicine Program conducts real-time video consultations with remotes sites in Hawaii, Guam, Saipan, American Samoa, the Federated States of Micronesia, and the Republic of the Marshall Islands. The program began in 1999 and has provided over 240 consultations. This report is a summary of the Shriners Hospitals experience and lessons learned regarding program implementation and maintenance.

  9. Ignition and growth modeling of short pulse shock initiation experiments on fine particle Hexanitrostilbene (HNS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarver, Craig M.; Chidester, Steven K.

    2014-05-01

    Hexanitrostilbene (HNS) is a booster explosive that is usually initiated using short pulse duration shock waves produced by high velocity impacts with thin flyer plates. HNS is generally used at a density of 1.60 g/cm3 which implies a porosity of 8%. It has been produced in several forms (I - IV, ultrafine, etc.) with various particle surface areas. The threshold flyer velocities for shock induced detonation versus failure to detonate for these different surface area materials vary slightly, but, in this paper, an average Ignition and Growth reactive flow model parameter set was determined using all of the experimental data from several aluminium and KaptonTM flyer plate studies. This data ranged from shock pressures of 4 GPa to above the Chapman-Jouguet (C-J) detonation pressure (~20 GPa) and from 1 to 120 nanoseconds in time duration. Good agreement was obtained for the available short pulse duration detonation verses failure to threshold flyer velocity data using the Ignition and Growth model,

  10. Topological events in two-dimensional grain growth: Experiments and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Fradkov, V.E.; Glicksman, M.E.; Palmer, M.; Rajan, K. . Materials Engineering Dept.)

    1994-08-01

    Grain growth in polycrystals is a process that occurs as a result of the vanishing of small grains. The mean topological class of vanishing two-dimensional (2-D) grains was found experimentally to be about 4.5. This result suggests that most vanishing grains are either 4- or 5-sided. A recent theory of 2-D grain growth is explicitly based on this fact, treating the switching as random events. The process of shrinking of 4- and 5-sided two-dimensional grains was observed experimentally on polycrystalline films of transparent, pure succinonitrile (SCN). Grain shrinking was studied theoretically and simulated by computer (both dynamic and Monte Carlo). It was found that most shrinking grains are topologically stable and remain within their topological class until they are much smaller than their neighbors. They discuss differences which were found with respect to the behavior of 2-D polycrystals, a 2-D ideal soap froth, and a 2-D section of a 3-D grain structure.

  11. Benchmark experiments and numerical modelling of the columnar-equiaxed dendritic growth in the transparent alloy Neopentylglycol-(d)Camphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturz, L.; Wu, M.; Zimmermann, G.; Ludwig, A.; Ahmadein, M.

    2015-06-01

    Solidification benchmark experiments on columnar and equiaxed dendritic growth, as well as the columnar-equiaxed transition have been carried out under diffusion-dominated conditions for heat and mass transfer in a low-gravity environment. The system under investigation is the transparent organic alloy system Neopentylglycol-37.5wt.-%(d)Camphor, processed aboard a TEXUS sounding rocket flight. Solidifications was observed by standard optical methods in addition to measurements of the thermal fields within the sheet like experimental cells of 1 mm thickness. The dendrite tip kinetic, primary dendrite arm spacing, temporal and spatial temperature evolution, columnar tip velocity and the critical parameters at the CET have been analysed. Here we focus on a detailed comparison of the experiment “TRACE” with a 5-phase volume averaging model to validate the numerical model and to give insight into the corresponding physical mechanisms and parameters leading to CET. The results are discussed in terms of sensitivity versus numerical parameters.

  12. Fuel Performance Experiments and Modeling: Fission Gas Bubble Nucleation and Growth in Alloy Nuclear Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    McDeavitt, Sean; Shao, Lin; Tsvetkov, Pavel; Wirth, Brian; Kennedy, Rory

    2014-04-07

    Advanced fast reactor systems being developed under the DOE's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative are designed to destroy TRU isotopes generated in existing and future nuclear energy systems. Over the past 40 years, multiple experiments and demonstrations have been completed using U-Zr, U-Pu-Zr, U-Mo and other metal alloys. As a result, multiple empirical and semi-empirical relationships have been established to develop empirical performance modeling codes. Many mechanistic questions about fission as mobility, bubble coalescience, and gas release have been answered through industrial experience, research, and empirical understanding. The advent of modern computational materials science, however, opens new doors of development such that physics-based multi-scale models may be developed to enable a new generation of predictive fuel performance codes that are not limited by empiricism.

  13. Serving Community College Students: Student Preparation, Development and Growth through the REU Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, C. S.; Osborn, J.; Smith, M.

    2014-12-01

    Effectively recruiting and engaging community college students in STEM research experiences is an increasingly important goal of the NSF but has not historically been the primary focus of most NSF-REU Site programs. The Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship in Earth and Environmental Sciences (SURFEES) program at Chapman University, a primarily undergraduate institution in Southern California, is the site of the first NSF-REU program in the NSF's Division of Earth Sciences that selects participants exclusively from local partnering community colleges. Building on and now running parallel with a successful internally-funded summer research program already in place and available only to Chapman undergraduates, the SURFEES program incorporates specific mentor and participant pre-experience training, pre-, mid-, and post-assessment instruments, and programming targeted to the earth and environmental sciences as well as to community college students. Perhaps most importantly, the application, selection and pairing of student participants with faculty mentors was conducted with specific goals of identifying those applicants with the greatest potential for a transformative experience while also meeting self-defined targets of under-represented minority, female, and low-income participants. Initial assessment results of the first participant cohort from summer 2014 and lessons learned for creating/adapting an NSF-REU site to involve community college students will be discussed.

  14. Ignition and Growth Modeling of Detonation Reaction Zone Experiments on Single Crystals of PETN and HMX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Bradley; Tarver, Craig

    2015-06-01

    Fedorov et al. reported nanosecond time resolved interface particle velocity records for detonation reaction zone profiles of single crystals of PETN and HMX with adjoining LiF windows. Von Neumann spike and Chapman-Jouguet pressures were measured, and reaction zone lengths and times wereinferred. The single crystal detonation velocities and von Neumann spike pressures are higher than those measured for heterogeneous PETN and HMX-based explosives pressed to 98-99% theoretical maximum density. Due to the absence of voids, the single crystal detonation reaction zone lengths and times for both PETN and HMX were longer than those for their heterogeneous explosives. Ignition and Growth modeling results are compared to the single crystal PETN and HMX measurements and to previous experimental results for pressed PETN and HMX charges. This work was performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. GROWTH OF THE INTERNATIONAL CRITICALITY SAFETY AND REACTOR PHYSICS EXPERIMENT EVALUATION PROJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    J. Blair Briggs; John D. Bess; Jim Gulliford

    2011-09-01

    Since the International Conference on Nuclear Criticality Safety (ICNC) 2007, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) have continued to expand their efforts and broaden their scope. Eighteen countries participated on the ICSBEP in 2007. Now, there are 20, with recent contributions from Sweden and Argentina. The IRPhEP has also expanded from eight contributing countries in 2007 to 16 in 2011. Since ICNC 2007, the contents of the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments1' have increased from 442 evaluations (38000 pages), containing benchmark specifications for 3955 critical or subcritical configurations to 516 evaluations (nearly 55000 pages), containing benchmark specifications for 4405 critical or subcritical configurations in the 2010 Edition of the ICSBEP Handbook. The contents of the Handbook have also increased from 21 to 24 criticality-alarm-placement/shielding configurations with multiple dose points for each, and from 20 to 200 configurations categorized as fundamental physics measurements relevant to criticality safety applications. Approximately 25 new evaluations and 150 additional configurations are expected to be added to the 2011 edition of the Handbook. Since ICNC 2007, the contents of the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments2' have increased from 16 different experimental series that were performed at 12 different reactor facilities to 53 experimental series that were performed at 30 different reactor facilities in the 2011 edition of the Handbook. Considerable effort has also been made to improve the functionality of the searchable database, DICE (Database for the International Criticality Benchmark Evaluation Project) and verify the accuracy of the data contained therein. DICE will be discussed in separate papers at ICNC 2011. The status of the ICSBEP and the IRPh

  16. Determination of longevities, chamber building rates and growth functions for Operculina complanata from long term cultivation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woeger, Julia; Kinoshita, Shunichi; Wolfgang, Eder; Briguglio, Antonino; Hohenegger, Johann

    2016-04-01

    Operculina complanata was collected in 20 and 50 m depth around the Island of Sesoko belonging to Japans southernmost prefecture Okinawa in a series of monthly sampling over a period of 16 months (Apr.2014-July2015). A minimum of 8 specimens (4 among the smallest and 4 among the largest) per sampling were cultured in a long term experiment that was set up to approximate conditions in the field as closely as possible. A set up allowing recognition of individual specimens enabled consistent documentation of chamber formation, which in combination with μ-CT-scanning after the investigation period permitted the assignment of growth steps to specific time periods. These data were used to fit various mathematical models to describe growth (exponential-, logistic-, generalized logistic-, Gompertz-function) and chamber building rate (Michaelis-Menten-, Bertalanffy- function) of Operculina complanata. The mathematically retrieved maximum lifespan and mean chamber building rate found in cultured Operculina complanata were further compared to first results obtained by the simultaneously conducted "natural laboratory approach". Even though these comparisons hint at a somewhat stunted growth and truncated life spans of Operculina complanata in culture, they represent a possibility to assess and improve the quality of further cultivation set ups, opening new prospects to a better understanding of the their theoretical niches.

  17. Studies of Emittance Growth and Halo Particle Production in Intense Charged Particle Beams Using the Paul Trap Simulator Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilson, Erik

    2009-11-01

    The Paul Trap Simulator Experiment (PTSX) is a compact laboratory experiment that places the physicist in the frame-of-reference of a long, charged-particle bunch coasting through a kilometers-long magnetic alternating-gradient (AG) transport system. The transverse dynamics of particles in both systems are described by the same set of equations, including nonlinear space-charge effects. The time-dependent voltages applied to the PTSX quadrupole electrodes are equivalent to the spatially-periodic magnetic fields applied in the AG system. The transverse emittance of the charge bunch, which is the area in the transverse phase space that the beam distribution occupies, is an important metric of beam quality. Maintaining low emittance is an important goal when defining AG system tolerances and when designing AG systems to perform beam manipulations such as transverse beam compression. Results will be presented from experiments in which white noise and colored noise of various amplitudes and durations has been applied to the PTSX electrodes. This noise is observed to drive continuous emittance growth over hundreds of lattice periods. Additional results will be presented from experiments that determine the conditions necessary to adiabatically reduce the charge bunch's transverse size. During adiabatic transitions, there is no change in the transverse emittance. The transverse compression can be achieved either by a gradual change in the PTSX voltage waveform amplitude or frequency.

  18. [Growth and development of plants in a row of generations under the conditions of space flight (experiment Greenhouse-5)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levinskikh, M. A.; Sychev, V. N.; Derendiaeva, T. A.; Signalova, O. B.; Podol'skii, I. G.; Avdeev, S. V.; Bingheim, G. E.; Campbell, W. F. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Results of the experiment aimed at harvesting a second space generation of wheat var. Apogee in Mir greenhouse Svet (experiment GREENHOUSE-5) are presented. In space flight, germination rate of space seeds from the first crop made up 89% against 100% of the ground seeds. The full biological ripeness was observed in 20 plants grown from the ground seeds and one plant grown from the space seeds following 80- to 90-d vegetation. The plant of the second space generation was morphologically different neither from the species in the first space crop nor from the ground controls. To study the biological characteristics of Apogee seeds gathered in the first and second crops in spaceflight experiment GREENHOUSE-5, the seeds were planted on their return to the laboratory. Morphometric analysis showed that they were essentially similar to the controls. Hence, the space experiments in Mir greenhouse Svet performed during 1998-1999 gave proof that plants cultivated in microgravity can pass the ontogenetic cycle more than once. However, initial results of the investigations into growth and development of plants through several generations are still in-sufficient to speak of possible delayed effects of the spaceflight factors (microgravity, multicomponent radiation, harmful trace contaminants etc.).

  19. Third and Final Shuttle Mission of the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment Conducted: Highest Supercooling Ever Recorded Achieved

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, Martin E.; Malarik, Diane C.

    1999-01-01

    Dendrites describe the treelike crystal morphology commonly assumed in metals and alloys that freeze from supercooled or supersaturated melts. There remains a high level of engineering interest in dendritic solidification because the size, shape, and orientation of the dendrites determine the final microstructure of a material. It is the microstructure that then determines the physical properties of cast or welded products. Although it is well known that dendritic growth is controlled by the transport of latent heat from the moving solid-liquid interface, an accurate and predictive model has not yet been developed. The effects of gravity-induced convection on the transfer of heat from the interface have prevented adequate testing, under terrestrial conditions, of solidification models. The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) constituted a series of three microgravity experiments flown aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia. The apparatus was used to grow and record dendrite solidification in the absence of gravity-induced convective heat transfer, thereby producing a wealth of benchmark-quality data for testing solidification models and theories.

  20. Mountain growth, orographic precipitation, and the formation of high-plateaus. Insights from numerical modeling experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Castellanos, D.

    2011-12-01

    Orographic precipitation is thought to exert a significant control on the growth of orogens, namely on the distribution of tectonic uplift and deformation in the multi-million-year time-scale. Computer tectonic models based on simple physical laws predict that the concentration of erosional surface mass removal in either side of an orogen can have a significant impact on the how tectonic deformation propagates within the orogenic building. Proxies or simple formulations of climatic processes such as precipitation and evaporation are key to such coupled tectonic/climatic models. Intramountain high plateaus are extreme cases of climatic control on sediment flow, because they often consist of internally-drained (endorheic) basins that trap most erosional products within the orogen. Such intramountain sediment accumulation leads to high-plateaus characterized by high topography and, in spite of the compressional tectonics, low relief. The development of high-plateaus has been extensively studied in relation to the tectonic setting and to inherited structures in the crust, but in this presentation I will concentrate on the potential climatic controls. Computer modeling results will be shown suggesting that a preexisting dry climate, through its effects on surface transport and orogenic evolution, may significantly modify tectonic deformation and contribute to the later formation of a high plateau. This is due to the following feedback: (1) dry climatic conditions at the early stages of orogenesis favor the tectonic defeat of rivers draining the orogen, promoting internal drainage (endorheism); (2) endorheism extends the life of intramountain basins maximizing the mass trapped within the orogen, rising lithostatic stress underneath and expelling fault deformation towards the flanks of the orogen; and (3) this propagation of deformation further isolates the central parts of the orogen from incoming precipitation, reinforcing sediment trapping and topographic leveling of

  1. Experiments to measure ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov growth of Gaussian bumps in plastic capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, Eric; Batha, Steve; Sedillo, Tom; Evans, Scott; Sorce, Chuck; Landen, Otto; Braun, Dave

    2010-06-02

    Growth of hydrodynamic instabilities at the interfaces of inertial confinement fusion capsules (ICF) due to ablator and fuel non-uniformities have been of primary concern to the ICF program since its inception. To achieve thermonuclear ignition at Megajoule class laser systems such as the NIF, targets must be designed for high implosion velocities, which requires higher in-flight aspect ratios (IFAR) and diminished shell stability. Controlling capsule perturbations is thus of the utmost importance. Recent simulations have shown that features on the outer surface of an ICF capsule as small as 10 microns wide and 100's of nanometers tall such as bumps, divots, or even dust particles can profoundly impact capsule performance by leading to material jetting or mix into the hotspot. Recent x-ray images of implosions on the NIF may be evidence of such mixing. Unfortunately, our ability to accurately predict these effects is uncertain due to disagreement between equation of state (EOS) models. In light of this, we have begun a campaign to measure the growth of isolated defects (Gaussian bumps) due to ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov in CH capsules to validate these models. The platform that has been developed uses halfraums with radiation temperatures near 75 eV (Rev. 4 foot-level) driven by 15-20 beams from the Omega laser (Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, NY), which sends a ~2.5 Mbar shock into a planar CH foil. Gaussian-shaped bumps (20 microns wide, 4-7 microns tall) are deposited onto the ablation side of the target. On-axis radiography with a saran (Cl Heα - 2.8 keV) backlighter is used to measure bump evolution prior to shock breakout. Shock speed measurements will also be made with Omega's active shock breakout (ASBO) and streaked optical pyrometery (SOP) diagnostics in conjunction with filtered x-ray photodiode arrays (DANTE) to determine drive conditions in the target. These data will be used to discriminate between EOS models so

  2. Short pulse duration shock initiation experiments plus ignition and growth modeling on Composition B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Chadd M.; Tarver, Craig M.

    2014-05-01

    Composition B (63% RDX, 36% TNT, 1% wax) is still a widely used energetic material whose shock initiation characteristics are necessary to understand. It is now possible to shock initiate Composition B and other secondary explosives at diameters well below their characteristic failure diameters for unconfined self-sustaining detonation. This is done using very high velocity, very thin, small diameter flyer plates accelerated by electric or laser power sources. Recently experimental detonation versus failure to detonate threshold flyer velocity curves for Composition B using several KaptonTM flyer thicknesses and diameters were measured. Flyer plates with diameters of 2 mm successfully detonated Composition B, which has a nominal failure diameter of 4.3 mm. The shock pressures required for these initiations are greater than the Chapman-Jouguet (C-J) pressure in self-sustaining Composition B detonation waves. The initiation process is two-dimensional, because both rear and side rarefactions can affect the shocked Composition B reaction rates. The Ignition and Growth reactive flow model for Composition B is extended to yield accurate simulations of this new threshold velocity data for various flyer thicknesses.

  3. Managing data for a multicountry longitudinal study: experience from the WHO Multicentre Growth Reference Study.

    PubMed

    Onyango, Adelheid W; Pinol, Alain J; de Onis, Mercedes

    2004-03-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) Multicentre Growth Reference (MGRS) data management protocol was designed to create and manage a large data bank of information collected from multiple sites over a period of several years. Data collection and processing instruments were prepared centrally and used in a standardized fashion across sites. The data management system contained internal validation features for timely detection of data errors, and its standard operating procedures stipulated a method of master file updating and correction that maintained a clear trail for data auditing purposes. Each site was responsible for collecting, entering, verifying, and validating data, and for creating site-level master files. Data from the sites were sent to the MGRS Coordinating Centre every month for master file consolidation and more extensive quality control checking. All errors identified at the Coordinating Centre were communicated to the site for correction at source. The protocol imposed transparency on the sites' data management activities but also ensured access to technical help with operation and maintenance of the system. Through the rigorous implementation of what has been a highly demanding protocol, the MGRS has accumulated a large body of very high-quality data.

  4. Incidence of Endophthalmitis after Intravitreal Anti-vascular Endothelial Growth Factor: Experience in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rashaed, Saba; Alsulaiman, Sulaiman M.; Alrushood, Abdulaziz Adel; Almasaud, Jluwi; Arevalo, J. Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report the incidence of endophthalmitis, the clinical and microbiological aspects, after intravitreal (IVT) injection of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor. Methods: A chart review was performed of patients diagnosed with endophthalmitis after receiving IVT injections of bevacizumab (Avastin) and ranibizumab (Lucentis) presenting to King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital (KKESH) from May 2006 to December 2012. Endophthalmitis was diagnosed clinically as an intraocular infection with vitreous involvement that required treatment with IVT antibiotics or had undergone pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) to remove the suspected microorganism. Main outcome measures were the incidence of endophthalmitis and the clinical and microbiological features. Results: Seven cases of endophthalmitis were identified, there was 1 (0.004%) case of endophthalmitis of 22674 IVT injections performed at KKESH. All cases were after IVT bevacizumab. Three (42.85%) cases were culture-positive and caused by Staphylococcus epidermidis. The initial management was vitreous tap and IVT injection of antibiotics followed by PPV in 6 (85.7%) cases. One (14.3%) case underwent evisceration. Visual acuity improved at last visit in only 2 (28.6%) cases. The rate of endophthalmitis was 0.0004% for bevacizumab. Conclusions: The rate of endophthalmitis after IVT bevacizumab and ranibizumab was very low. We recommend following a standardized injection protocol, adherence to sterile techniques, and proper patient follow-up are determinant factors for low incidence rates. In addition, endophthalmitis after IVT bevacizumab and ranibizumab have poor visual outcomes despite prompt treatment. PMID:26957840

  5. Safety experience with IMC-C225, an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibody.

    PubMed

    Needle, Michael N

    2002-10-01

    In phase II trials, the anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibody IMC-C225 did not appear to significantly exacerbate the common toxicities associated with cytotoxic chemotherapy when combined with standard anticancer treatments in patients with colorectal cancer, squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, or pancreatic cancer. The most common treatment-related adverse events reported during therapy with IMC-C225 were an acne-like rash and hypersensitivity reactions. The acne-like rash appeared as a sterile, suppurative form of folliculitis, commonly starting on the face, scalp, chest, and upper back. It resolved without scarring once treatment was stopped. Notably, the appearance of acne-like rash, particularly grade 3, was associated with higher treatment responses in patients with refractory colorectal cancer. The hypersensitivity reactions occurred less often than acne-like rash. They responded to standard treatments and were less common after the first dose. In summary, IMC-C225 is generally well tolerated as a single agent and when combined with chemotherapy or radiotherapy and possesses a manageable toxicity profile.

  6. Reconstructing cosmic growth with kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich observations in the era of stage IV experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, David; Louis, Thibaut; Bull, Philip; Ferreira, Pedro G.

    2016-08-01

    Future ground-based cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments will generate competitive large-scale structure data sets by precisely characterizing CMB secondary anisotropies over a large fraction of the sky. We describe a method for constraining the growth rate of structure to sub-1% precision out to z ≈1 , using a combination of galaxy cluster peculiar velocities measured using the kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) effect, and the velocity field reconstructed from galaxy redshift surveys. We consider only thermal SZ-selected cluster samples, which will consist of O (1 04- 1 05) sources for Stage 3 and 4 CMB experiments respectively. Three different methods for separating the kSZ effect from the primary CMB are compared, including a novel blind "constrained realization" method that improves signal-to-noise by a factor of ˜2 over a commonly-used aperture photometry technique. Assuming a correlation between the integrated tSZ y -parameter and the cluster optical depth, it should then be possible to break the kSZ velocity-optical depth degeneracy. The effects of including CMB polarization and SZ profile uncertainties are also considered. In the absence of systematics, a combination of future Stage 4 experiments should be able to measure the product of the growth and expansion rates, α ≡f H , to better than 1% in bins of Δ z =0.1 out to z ≈1 —competitive with contemporary redshift-space distortion constraints from galaxy surveys. We conclude with a discussion of the likely impact of various systematics.

  7. Stable carbon and oxygen isotope fractionation processes during speleothem growth: systematic investigation in novel laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, D.; Hansen, M.; Dreybrodt, W.

    2012-04-01

    The most widely applied climate proxies in speleothems are stable carbon and oxygen isotopes (δ13C and δ18O). The interpretation of the stable isotope signals in terms of past temperature and/or precipitation variability is complex because both δ18O and δ13C depend on a complex interplay of various processes occurring in the atmosphere, the soil and karst above the cave and inside the cave. Quantitative reconstruction of climate parameters such as temperature and precipitation has, thus, remained impossible so far. Here we present several novel laboratory experiments aiming to understand the basic physical and chemical processes affecting the δ18O and δ13C signals during precipitation of calcium carbonate on the stalagmite surface. In particular, we aim to quantify the influence of kinetic isotope fractionation and verify recently published modelling studies (Dreybrodt, 2008; Scholz et al., 2009, Dreybrodt and Scholz, 2011). Several experiments are conducted: Degassing of CO2 from a thin film of water sparged with CO2 flowing down an inclined glass plate. pH and electric conductivity are systematically documented in order to monitor degassing of CO2. The results show that degassing of CO2 is fast, and the pCO2 of the solution is in equilibrium with the atmosphere after a short distance of flow. Carbon isotope exchange between atmospheric CO2 and dissolved bicarbonate. The results show that carbon isotope exchange may have a significant effect on the δ13C value of the dissolved bicarbonate and, thus, speleothem calcite, in particular for slow drip rates. Degassing of CO2 and calcite precipitation from a thin film of water supersaturated with respect to calcite flowing down an inclined calcium carbonate plate. Drip water is sampled after different lengths of flow path and, thus, different residence times on the plate, and pH, electrical conductivity and the stable isotope composition of the water are determined. Decreasing conductivity with increasing distance

  8. A new data processing technique for Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yongteng; Tu, Shaoyong; Miao, Wenyong; Wu, Junfeng; Wang, Lifeng; Yin, Chuansheng; Hao, Yidan; Ye, Wenhua; Ding, Yongkun; Jiang, Shaoen

    2016-06-01

    Typical face-on experiments for Rayleigh-Taylor instability study involve the time-resolved radiography of an accelerated foil with line-of-sight of the radiography along the direction of motion. The usual method which derives perturbation amplitudes from the face-on images reverses the actual image transmission procedure, so the obtained results will have a large error in the case of large optical depth. In order to improve the accuracy of data processing, a new data processing technique has been developed to process the face-on images. This technique based on convolution theorem, refined solutions of optical depth can be achieved by solving equations. Furthermore, we discuss both techniques for image processing, including the influence of modulation transfer function of imaging system and the backlighter spatial profile. Besides, we use the two methods to the process the experimental results in Shenguang-II laser facility and the comparison shows that the new method effectively improve the accuracy of data processing.

  9. Reproducible Crystal Growth Experiments in Microgravity Science Glovebox at the International Space Station (SUBSA Investigation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostrogorsky, A.; Marin, C.; Volz, M. P.; Bonner, W. A.

    2005-01-01

    Solidification Using a Baffle in Sealed Ampoules (SUBSA) is the first investigation conducted in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) Facility at the International Space Station (ISS) Alpha. 8 single crystals of InSb, doped with Te and Zn, were directionally solidified in microgravity. The experiments were conducted in a furnace with a transparent gradient section, and a video camera, sending images to the earth. The real time images (i) helped seeding, (ii) allowed a direct measurement of the solidification rate. The post-flight characterization of the crystals includes: computed x-ray tomography, Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS), Hall measurements, Atomic Absorption (AA), and 4 point probe analysis. For the first time in microgravity, several crystals having nearly identical initial transients were grown. Reproducible initial transients were obtained with Te-doped InSb. Furthermore, the diffusion controlled end-transient was demonstrated experimentally (SUBSA 02). From the initial transients, the diffusivity of Te and Zn in InSb was determined.

  10. Three-dimensional simulations of Nova high growth factor capsule implosion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinak, M. M.; Tipton, R. E.; Landen, O. L.; Murphy, T. J.; Amendt, P.; Haan, S. W.; Hatchett, S. P.; Keane, C. J.; McEachern, R.; Wallace, R.

    1996-05-01

    Capsule implosion experiments carried out on the Nova laser [E. M. Campbell et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 57, 2101 (1986)] are simulated with the three-dimensional HYDRA radiation hydrodynamics code [NTIS Document No. DE-96004569 (M. M. Marinak et al. in UCRL-LR-105821-95-3)]. Simulations of ordered, near single mode perturbations indicate that structures which evolve into round spikes can penetrate farthest into the hot spot. Bubble-shaped perturbations can burn through the capsule shell fastest, in which case they cause even more damage. A simulation of a capsule with a multimode perturbation of moderate amplitude shows spike amplitudes evolving in good agreement with a saturation model during the deceleration phase. The presence of sizable low mode asymmetry, caused either by drive asymmetry or perturbations in the capsule shell, can dramatically affect the manner in which spikes approach the center of the hot spot. Three-dimensional coupling between the low mode shell perturbations intrinsic to Nova capsules and the drive asymmetry is found to be important, bringing the simulated neutron yields into closer agreement with the experimental values.

  11. Effects of Atmospheric Pollutants on Plant Growth and on Soil Magnetic Properties: Preliminary Results from Controlled Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapkota, B.; Cioppa, M. T.

    2009-05-01

    of the trace element concentration investigated by AAS show that Pb is below detection limit; Mn is between 2-7 ppm while Zn is below 1ppm. Fe, however is 40 ppm in the control soils and is between 42-160 ppm in contaminated soils. Such low concentrations of Fe could be due to incomplete digestion during sample preparation. Trace element concentrations in soils and in fully grown plants will be examined, from which the concentrations of the trace elements consumed by plants will be inferred. To better understand the effects of the contaminant on plant growth and on soil magnetic characteristics, additional experiments are recommended. It is anticipated that this research will help to improve our understanding about pollution distribution dynamics through the assessment and evaluation of known anthropogenic pollutants in controlled experiments.

  12. Benchmark Data Set for Wheat Growth Models: Field Experiments and AgMIP Multi-Model Simulations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asseng, S.; Ewert, F.; Martre, P.; Rosenzweig, C.; Jones, J. W.; Hatfield, J. L.; Ruane, A. C.; Boote, K. J.; Thorburn, P.J.; Rotter, R. P.

    2015-01-01

    The data set includes a current representative management treatment from detailed, quality-tested sentinel field experiments with wheat from four contrasting environments including Australia, The Netherlands, India and Argentina. Measurements include local daily climate data (solar radiation, maximum and minimum temperature, precipitation, surface wind, dew point temperature, relative humidity, and vapor pressure), soil characteristics, frequent growth, nitrogen in crop and soil, crop and soil water and yield components. Simulations include results from 27 wheat models and a sensitivity analysis with 26 models and 30 years (1981-2010) for each location, for elevated atmospheric CO2 and temperature changes, a heat stress sensitivity analysis at anthesis, and a sensitivity analysis with soil and crop management variations and a Global Climate Model end-century scenario.

  13. [Microcosm experiments on the influence of different N/P ratios on phytoplankton community growth in the East China Sea].

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Zhu, Xu-Yu; Zeng, Jiang-Ning; Shou, Lu; Chen, Quan-Zhen; Jiang, Zhi-Bing

    2012-06-01

    In the present study, a microcosm experiment was conducted in situ for 30 days, in order to investigate the effects of different N/P ratios (1N: 1P, 4N: 1P, 8N: 1P, 16N: 1P, 32N: 1P, 64N: 1P, 128N: 1P, and 256N: 1P) on phytoplankton community growth in the East China Sea. The results indicated that the species number, cell abundance, Chl-a content, specific growth rate as well as species composition of the phytoplankton community significantly varied with the N/P ratios. After 6 days of culture, the species number, cell abundance, Chl-a content and specific growth rate in the high N/P ratio groups were significantly higher than those in the low N/P ratio groups. After 30 days of culture, the cell abundance in the groups close to the Redfield ratio (8N: 1P, 16N: 1P, and 32N: 1P) was significantly higher than those in the other treatments. On the other hand, the phytoplankton community in all the treatments was observed a definite succession from diatoms to dinoflagellates during the present study. Nonetheless, the N/P ratios strongly affected the duration of dinoflagellate bloom as well as the dominated species: at the beginning of culture (0th day-12th day), the diatoms dominated the phytoplankton community; then the relative contribution of dinoflagellates to the total cell abundance exceeded diatoms in the 4N: 1P, 16N: 1P, and 32N: 1P groups on the 18th day. After that, the relative contribution of dinoflagellates exceeded diatoms ordinally in the other groups from the 24th day to 30th day. At the end of culture, the phytoplankton community was dominated by the dinoflagellates in all the groups except for the 8N: 1P, 16N: 1P, and 32N: 1P treatments.

  14. Beyond Agar: Gel Substrates with Improved Optical Clarity and Drug Efficiency and Reduced Autofluorescence for Microbial Growth Experiments.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Philipp A; McElfresh, Cameron; Wong, Lily R; Ideker, Trey

    2015-08-15

    Agar, a seaweed extract, has been the standard support matrix for microbial experiments for over a century. Recent developments in high-throughput genetic screens have created a need to reevaluate the suitability of agar for use as colony support, as modern robotic printing systems now routinely spot thousands of colonies within the area of a single microtiter plate. Identifying optimal biophysical, biochemical, and biological properties of the gel support matrix in these extreme experimental conditions is instrumental to achieving the best possible reproducibility and sensitivity. Here we systematically evaluate a range of gelling agents by using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model microbe. We find that carrageenan and Phytagel have superior optical clarity and reduced autofluorescence, crucial for high-resolution imaging and fluorescent reporter screens. Nutrient choice and use of refined Noble agar or pure agarose reduce the effective dose of numerous selective drugs by >50%, potentially enabling large cost savings in genetic screens. Using thousands of mutant yeast strains to compare colony growth between substrates, we found no evidence of significant growth or nutrient biases between gel substrates, indicating that researchers could freely pick and choose the optimal gel for their respective application and experimental condition.

  15. Beyond Agar: Gel Substrates with Improved Optical Clarity and Drug Efficiency and Reduced Autofluorescence for Microbial Growth Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Jaeger, Philipp A.; McElfresh, Cameron; Wong, Lily R.

    2015-01-01

    Agar, a seaweed extract, has been the standard support matrix for microbial experiments for over a century. Recent developments in high-throughput genetic screens have created a need to reevaluate the suitability of agar for use as colony support, as modern robotic printing systems now routinely spot thousands of colonies within the area of a single microtiter plate. Identifying optimal biophysical, biochemical, and biological properties of the gel support matrix in these extreme experimental conditions is instrumental to achieving the best possible reproducibility and sensitivity. Here we systematically evaluate a range of gelling agents by using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model microbe. We find that carrageenan and Phytagel have superior optical clarity and reduced autofluorescence, crucial for high-resolution imaging and fluorescent reporter screens. Nutrient choice and use of refined Noble agar or pure agarose reduce the effective dose of numerous selective drugs by >50%, potentially enabling large cost savings in genetic screens. Using thousands of mutant yeast strains to compare colony growth between substrates, we found no evidence of significant growth or nutrient biases between gel substrates, indicating that researchers could freely pick and choose the optimal gel for their respective application and experimental condition. PMID:26070672

  16. Surface growth for molten silicon infiltration into carbon millimeter-sized channels: Lattice-Boltzmann simulations, experiments and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergi, Danilo; Camarano, Antonio; Molina, José Miguel; Ortona, Alberto; Narciso, Javier

    2016-01-01

    The process of liquid silicon (Si) infiltration is investigated for channels with radii from 0.25[mm] to 0.75[mm] drilled in compact carbon (C) preforms. The advantage of this setup is that the study of the phenomenon results can be simplified. For comparison purposes, attempts are made in order to work out a framework for evaluating the accuracy of simulations. The approach relies on dimensionless numbers involving the properties of the surface reaction. It turns out that complex hydrodynamic behavior derived from second Newton law can be made consistent with Lattice-Boltzmann (LB) simulations. The experiments give clear evidence that the growth of silicon carbide (SiC) proceeds in two different stages and basic mechanisms are highlighted. LB simulations prove to be an effective tool for the description of the growing phase. Namely, essential experimental constraints can be implemented. As a result, the existing models are useful to gain more insight on the process of reactive infiltration into porous media in the first stage of penetration, i.e. up to pore closure because of surface growth. A way allowing one to implement the resistance from chemical reaction in Darcy law is also proposed.

  17. Olivine Weathering in Soil, and Its Effects on Growth and Nutrient Uptake in Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.): A Pot Experiment

    PubMed Central

    ten Berge, Hein F. M.; van der Meer, Hugo G.; Steenhuizen, Johan W.; Goedhart, Paul W.; Knops, Pol; Verhagen, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Mineral carbonation of basic silicate minerals regulates atmospheric CO2 on geological time scales by locking up carbon. Mining and spreading onto the earth's surface of fast-weathering silicates, such as olivine, has been proposed to speed up this natural CO2 sequestration (‘enhanced weathering’). While agriculture may offer an existing infrastructure, weathering rate and impacts on soil and plant are largely unknown. Our objectives were to assess weathering of olivine in soil, and its effects on plant growth and nutrient uptake. In a pot experiment with perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), weathering during 32 weeks was inferred from bioavailability of magnesium (Mg) in soil and plant. Olivine doses were equivalent to 1630 (OLIV1), 8150, 40700 and 204000 (OLIV4) kg ha−1. Alternatively, the soluble Mg salt kieserite was applied for reference. Olivine increased plant growth (+15.6%) and plant K concentration (+16.5%) in OLIV4. At all doses, olivine increased bioavailability of Mg and Ni in soil, as well as uptake of Mg, Si and Ni in plants. Olivine suppressed Ca uptake. Weathering estimated from a Mg balance was equivalent to 240 kg ha−1 (14.8% of dose, OLIV1) to 2240 kg ha−1 (1.1%, OLIV4). This corresponds to gross CO2 sequestration of 290 to 2690 kg ha−1 (29 103 to 269 103 kg km−2.) Alternatively, weathering estimated from similarity with kieserite treatments ranged from 13% to 58% for OLIV1. The Olsen model for olivine carbonation predicted 4.0% to 9.0% weathering for our case, independent of olivine dose. Our % values observed at high doses were smaller than this, suggesting negative feedbacks in soil. Yet, weathering appears fast enough to support the ‘enhanced weathering’ concept. In agriculture, olivine doses must remain within limits to avoid imbalances in plant nutrition, notably at low Ca availability; and to avoid Ni accumulation in soil and crop. PMID:22912685

  18. Olivine weathering in soil, and its effects on growth and nutrient uptake in Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.): a pot experiment.

    PubMed

    ten Berge, Hein F M; van der Meer, Hugo G; Steenhuizen, Johan W; Goedhart, Paul W; Knops, Pol; Verhagen, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Mineral carbonation of basic silicate minerals regulates atmospheric CO(2) on geological time scales by locking up carbon. Mining and spreading onto the earth's surface of fast-weathering silicates, such as olivine, has been proposed to speed up this natural CO(2) sequestration ('enhanced weathering'). While agriculture may offer an existing infrastructure, weathering rate and impacts on soil and plant are largely unknown. Our objectives were to assess weathering of olivine in soil, and its effects on plant growth and nutrient uptake. In a pot experiment with perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), weathering during 32 weeks was inferred from bioavailability of magnesium (Mg) in soil and plant. Olivine doses were equivalent to 1630 (OLIV1), 8150, 40700 and 204000 (OLIV4) kg ha(-1). Alternatively, the soluble Mg salt kieserite was applied for reference. Olivine increased plant growth (+15.6%) and plant K concentration (+16.5%) in OLIV4. At all doses, olivine increased bioavailability of Mg and Ni in soil, as well as uptake of Mg, Si and Ni in plants. Olivine suppressed Ca uptake. Weathering estimated from a Mg balance was equivalent to 240 kg ha(-1) (14.8% of dose, OLIV1) to 2240 kg ha(-1) (1.1%, OLIV4). This corresponds to gross CO(2) sequestration of 290 to 2690 kg ha(-1) (29 10(3) to 269 10(3) kg km(-2).) Alternatively, weathering estimated from similarity with kieserite treatments ranged from 13% to 58% for OLIV1. The Olsen model for olivine carbonation predicted 4.0% to 9.0% weathering for our case, independent of olivine dose. Our % values observed at high doses were smaller than this, suggesting negative feedbacks in soil. Yet, weathering appears fast enough to support the 'enhanced weathering' concept. In agriculture, olivine doses must remain within limits to avoid imbalances in plant nutrition, notably at low Ca availability; and to avoid Ni accumulation in soil and crop.

  19. Design and development of green roof substrate to improve runoff water quality: plant growth experiments and adsorption.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, K; Raja, Franklin D

    2014-10-15

    Many studies worldwide have investigated the potential benefits achievable by transforming brown roofs of buildings to green roofs. However, little literature examined the runoff quality/sorption ability of green roofs. As the green roof substrate is the main component to alter the quality of runoff, this investigation raises the possibility of using a mixture of low-cost inorganic materials to develop a green roof substrate. The tested materials include exfoliated vermiculite, expanded perlite, crushed brick and sand along with organic component (coco-peat). Detailed physical and chemical analyses revealed that each of these materials possesses different characteristics and hence a mix of these materials was desirable to develop an optimal green roof substrate. Using factorial design, 18 different substrate mixes were prepared and detailed examination indicated that mix-12 exhibited desirable characteristics of green roof substrate with low bulk density (431 kg/m(3)), high water holding capacity (39.4%), air filled porosity (19.5%), and hydraulic conductivity (4570 mm/h). The substrate mix also provided maximum support to Portulaca grandiflora (380% total biomass increment) over one month of growth. To explore the leaching characteristics and sorption capacity of developed green roof substrate, a down-flow packed column arrangement was employed. High conductivity and total dissolved solids along with light metal ions (Na, K, Ca and Mg) were observed in the leachates during initial stages of column operation; however the concentration of ions ceased during the final stages of operation (600 min). Experiments with metal-spiked deionized water revealed that green roof substrate possess high sorption capacity towards various heavy metal ions (Al, Fe, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn and Cd). Thus the developed growth substrate possesses desirable characteristics for green roofs along with high sorption capacity.

  20. The impact of interventional nephrologists on the growth of a peritoneal dialysis program: Long-term, single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Ros-Ruiz, Silvia; Alonso-Esteve, Ángela; Gutiérrez-Vílchez, Elena; Rudas-Bermúdez, Edisson; Hernández, Domingo

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is an underutilized form of renal replacement therapy. Although a variety of factors have been deemed responsible, timely insertion of a PD catheter may also be a contributory factor. Furthermore, a good catheter implantation technique is important to allow for effective peritoneal access function and long-term technique survival. Studies regarding results obtained by nephrologists in comparison with surgeons have been limited to small single-center experiences. Thus, the objective of this study was to explore the impact of the peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheter insertion by nephrologists compared to surgeons on early catheter complications and on technique survival. We also examine whether PD catheter insertion by nephrologists has a positive impact on the growth in the number of patients using PD. We performed 313 consecutive procedures: 192 catheter insertions and 121 catheter removal from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2013. The main reasons for catheter removal were: renal transplantation, 52 (43%) follow of transfer to HD, 48 (40%) and catheter malfunction, 16 (13%). The patients were mostly male (63.4%) with the mean age of 50.8±15.1 years and 23.8 were diabetics. We only observed seven (2.5%) early complications (<4 weeks) associated to peritoneal catheter surgery (3 peritonitis episodes, 2 hemoperitoneum episodes, one complicated hernia and one omental entrapment). There were not significant differences in surgery-related complications in both periods. The penetration ratio of PD after 2006 was 117% higher compared with procedures performing before this date. In conclusions, we have demonstrated a positive impact on the growth of the PD population when catheter insertion is performed by nephrologists with a minimal incidence of complications associated.

  1. Jamin-interferometer-setup for the determination of concentration and temperature dependent face-specific crystal growth rates from a single experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eder, Cornelia; Choscz, Carsten; Müller, Vesna; Briesen, Heiko

    2015-09-01

    An interference technique that permits the investigation of the crystal growth from a temperature controlled solution is presented. Contrary to Mach-Zehnder- or Michelson-type interferometers, the Jamin-interferometer applied in this work is characterized by improved thermal and long-time stability. In consequence a single experiment may comprise several temperature steps leading to significant changes in the bulk concentration. A procedure for the automated analysis of the acquired sequence of interference patterns is presented. Within this evaluation procedure the position of the selected crystal face, the bulk concentration and the vertical concentration distribution above the crystal are determined simultaneously. Long-term single crystal growth experiments in the range from 20 to 60 °C with sucrose and lactose crystals are used to test the method. The exact bulk concentration is determined by the interferometer. The obtained results for the growth rate of sucrose are consistent with values given in the literature. The vertical concentration distribution above the two saccharide crystals differs clearly indicating that the diffusion strongly limits the sucrose growth but not the growth of the lactose crystal. The major benefit of the described setup is that the data of a single experiment are sufficient to deduce the parameters of the model equation for the growth rate as a function of temperature and supersaturation.

  2. The outcome of protoplanetary dust growth: pebbles, boulders, or planetesimals?. I. Mapping the zoo of laboratory collision experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güttler, C.; Blum, J.; Zsom, A.; Ormel, C. W.; Dullemond, C. P.

    2010-04-01

    Context. The growth processes from protoplanetary dust to planetesimals are not fully understood. Laboratory experiments and theoretical models have shown that collisions among the dust aggregates can lead to sticking, bouncing, and fragmentation. However, no systematic study on the collisional outcome of protoplanetary dust has been performed so far, so that a physical model of the dust evolution in protoplanetary disks is still missing. Aims: We intend to map the parameter space for the collisional interaction of arbitrarily porous dust aggregates. This parameter space encompasses the dust-aggregate masses, their porosities and the collision velocity. With such a complete mapping of the collisional outcomes of protoplanetary dust aggregates, it will be possible to follow the collisional evolution of dust in a protoplanetary disk environment. Methods: We use literature data, perform laboratory experiments, and apply simple physical models to get a complete picture of the collisional interaction of protoplanetary dust aggregates. Results: We found four different kinds of sticking, two kinds of bouncing, and three kinds of fragmentation as possible outcomes in collisions among protoplanetary dust aggregates. Our best collision model distinguishes between porous and compact dust. We also differentiate between collisions among similar-sized and different-sized bodies. All in all, eight combinations of porosity and mass ratio can be discerned. For each of these cases, we present a complete collision model for dust-aggregate masses between 10-12 and 102 g and collision velocities in the range of 10-4 ldots 104 cm s-1 for arbitrary porosities. This model comprises the collisional outcome, the mass(es) of the resulting aggregate(s) and their porosities. Conclusions: We present the first complete collision model for protoplanetary dust. This collision model can be used for the determination of the dust-growth rate in protoplanetary disks. This paper is dedicated to the

  3. Observations of vortex merger and growth reduction in a dual-mode, supersonic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Willow; Malamud, Guy; Shimony, Assaf; Trantham, Matt; Klein, Sallee; Shvarts, Dov; Kuranz, Carolyn; Drake, R. Paul

    2015-11-01

    The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) generates vortical structures and turbulence at an interface with shear flow. This instability is ubiquitous in natural and engineering systems including astrophysical environments and laboratory plasmas. Detailed measurements of modulation amplitude growth reduction and vortex merger evolving from well-defined initial conditions can benchmark hydrodynamic models and theories. This experiment provides the first measurements of the vortex merger rate of well-characterized seed perturbations evolving under the influence of the KHI in a supersonic flow. These data were obtained by utilizing a sustained laser pulse to drive a steady shockwave into low-density carbon foam, introducing shear along a precision-machined plastic interface. The evolution and merger of the modulations was measured with x-ray radiography and reproduced with 2D hydrodynamic simulations. This work is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, through the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, grant number DE-NA0001840, and the National Laser User Facility Program, grant number DE-NA0002032, and through the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester by the NNSA/OICF under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC52-08NA28302.

  4. Can plants grow on Mars and the moon: a growth experiment on Mars and moon soil simulants.

    PubMed

    Wamelink, G W Wieger; Frissel, Joep Y; Krijnen, Wilfred H J; Verwoert, M Rinie; Goedhart, Paul W

    2014-01-01

    When humans will settle on the moon or Mars they will have to eat there. Food may be flown in. An alternative could be to cultivate plants at the site itself, preferably in native soils. We report on the first large-scale controlled experiment to investigate the possibility of growing plants in Mars and moon soil simulants. The results show that plants are able to germinate and grow on both Martian and moon soil simulant for a period of 50 days without any addition of nutrients. Growth and flowering on Mars regolith simulant was much better than on moon regolith simulant and even slightly better than on our control nutrient poor river soil. Reflexed stonecrop (a wild plant); the crops tomato, wheat, and cress; and the green manure species field mustard performed particularly well. The latter three flowered, and cress and field mustard also produced seeds. Our results show that in principle it is possible to grow crops and other plant species in Martian and Lunar soil simulants. However, many questions remain about the simulants' water carrying capacity and other physical characteristics and also whether the simulants are representative of the real soils.

  5. Cation Uptake and Allocation by Red Pine Seedlings under Cation-Nutrient Stress in a Column Growth Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Zhenqing; Balogh-Brunstad, Zsuzsanna; Grant, Michael R.; Harsh, James B.; Gill, Richard; Thomashow, Linda; Dohnalkova, Alice; Stacks, Daryl; Letourneau, Melissa; Keller, Chester K.

    2014-01-10

    Background and Aims Plant nutrient uptake is affected by environmental stress, but how plants respond to cation-nutrient stress is poorly understood. We assessed the impact of varying degrees of cation-nutrient limitation on cation uptake in an experimental plant-mineral system. Methods Column experiments, with red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.) seedlings growing in sand/mineral mixtures, were conducted for up to nine months under a range of Ca- and K-limited conditions. The Ca and K were supplied from both minerals and nutrient solutions with varying Ca and K concentrations. Results Cation nutrient stress had little impact on carbon allocation after nine months of plant growth and K was the limiting nutrient for biomass production. The Ca/Sr and K/Rb ratio results allowed independent estimation of dissolution incongruency and discrimination against Sr and Rb during cation uptake processes. The fraction of K in biomass from biotite increased with decreasing K supply from nutrient solutions. The mineral anorthite was consistently the major source of Ca, regardless of nutrient treatment. Conclusions Red pine seedlings exploited more mineral K in response to more severe K deficiency. This did not occur for Ca. Plant discrimination factors must be carefully considered to accurately identify nutrient sources using cation tracers.

  6. Can Plants Grow on Mars and the Moon: A Growth Experiment on Mars and Moon Soil Simulants

    PubMed Central

    Wamelink, G. W. Wieger; Frissel, Joep Y.; Krijnen, Wilfred H. J.; Verwoert, M. Rinie; Goedhart, Paul W.

    2014-01-01

    When humans will settle on the moon or Mars they will have to eat there. Food may be flown in. An alternative could be to cultivate plants at the site itself, preferably in native soils. We report on the first large-scale controlled experiment to investigate the possibility of growing plants in Mars and moon soil simulants. The results show that plants are able to germinate and grow on both Martian and moon soil simulant for a period of 50 days without any addition of nutrients. Growth and flowering on Mars regolith simulant was much better than on moon regolith simulant and even slightly better than on our control nutrient poor river soil. Reflexed stonecrop (a wild plant); the crops tomato, wheat, and cress; and the green manure species field mustard performed particularly well. The latter three flowered, and cress and field mustard also produced seeds. Our results show that in principle it is possible to grow crops and other plant species in Martian and Lunar soil simulants. However, many questions remain about the simulants' water carrying capacity and other physical characteristics and also whether the simulants are representative of the real soils. PMID:25162657

  7. Can plants grow on Mars and the moon: a growth experiment on Mars and moon soil simulants.

    PubMed

    Wamelink, G W Wieger; Frissel, Joep Y; Krijnen, Wilfred H J; Verwoert, M Rinie; Goedhart, Paul W

    2014-01-01

    When humans will settle on the moon or Mars they will have to eat there. Food may be flown in. An alternative could be to cultivate plants at the site itself, preferably in native soils. We report on the first large-scale controlled experiment to investigate the possibility of growing plants in Mars and moon soil simulants. The results show that plants are able to germinate and grow on both Martian and moon soil simulant for a period of 50 days without any addition of nutrients. Growth and flowering on Mars regolith simulant was much better than on moon regolith simulant and even slightly better than on our control nutrient poor river soil. Reflexed stonecrop (a wild plant); the crops tomato, wheat, and cress; and the green manure species field mustard performed particularly well. The latter three flowered, and cress and field mustard also produced seeds. Our results show that in principle it is possible to grow crops and other plant species in Martian and Lunar soil simulants. However, many questions remain about the simulants' water carrying capacity and other physical characteristics and also whether the simulants are representative of the real soils. PMID:25162657

  8. The 3-5 semiconductor solid solution single crystal growth. [low gravity float zone growth experiments using gallium indium antimonides and cadmium tellurides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gertner, E. R.

    1980-01-01

    Techniques used for liquid and vapor phase epitaxy of gallium indium arsenide are described and the difficulties encountered are examined. Results show that the growth of bulk III-V solid solution single crystals in a low gravity environment will not have a major technological impact. The float zone technique in a low gravity environment is demonstrated using cadmium telluride. It is shown that this approach can result in the synthesis of a class of semiconductors that can not be grown in normal gravity because of growth problems rooted in the nature of their phase diagrams.

  9. Magmatic underplating and crustal growth in the Emeishan Large Igneous Province, SW China, revealed by a passive seismic experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yun; Xu, Yigang; Xu, Tao; Si, Shaokun; Liang, Xiaofeng; Tian, Xiaobo; Deng, Yangfan; Chen, Lin; Wang, Peng; Xu, Yihe; Lan, Haiqiang; Xiao, Fuhui; Li, Wei; Zhang, Xi; Yuan, Xiaohui; Badal, José; Teng, Jiwen

    2015-12-01

    In an attempt to characterize the subsurface structure that is related to fossil mantle plume activity, a comprehensive geophysical investigation was conducted in the Emeishan Large Igneous Province (ELIP). The nature and geometry of the crust were examined within the scheme of the domal structure of ELIP, which comprises the Inner, Intermediate and Outer zones, which are defined on the basis of the biostratigraphy of pre-volcanic sediments. The bulk crustal properties within the Inner Zone are characterized by high density, high P-wave velocity, high Vp/Vs ratios and large crustal thickness. A visible continuous seismic converter is present in the upper part of the crust in the whole Intermediate Zone and the eastern part of the Inner Zone, but it is absent in the Inner Zone, where another seismic converter is observed in the lower part of the crust. The geometric configuration of these converters is attributable to the addition of mantle-derived melts to the pre-existing crust and subsequent interaction between them. The crustal geometry, which is delineated by the migrated image of receiver functions from the passive seismic experiment, and the crustal properties collectively suggest that a mafic layer of 15-20 km thickness and 150-180 km width exists at the base of the crust in the Inner Zone. Such a mafic layer reflects a vertical crustal growth through magmatic underplating at the base of the crust and intraplating within the upper crust. The salient spatial correlation between the deep crustal structure and the dome strongly supports a genetic link between crustal thickening and plume activity, if the pre-volcanic domal uplift is generated by the Permian Emeishan mantle plume. This arrangement is further supported by the consistency of the extent of crustal uplift estimated by isostatic equilibrium modeling and sedimentary data. This study therefore characterizes and provides evidence for a plume-modified crust in a large igneous province.

  10. Treatment of oligodontia with endo-osseous fixtures: experience in eight consecutive patients at the end of dental growth.

    PubMed

    Becelli, Roberto; Morello, Roberto; Renzi, Giancarlo; Dominici, Chiara

    2007-11-01

    Clinical manifestations of oligodontia consist in agenesia of multiple teeth eventually with deciduous retained teeth, atrophy of alveolar ridge, aberrations of teeth dimension, and shape, with consequent aesthetic and functional defects. The first choice treatment is based on a team collaboration of maxillo-facial surgeon, orthodontist, and prosthodontist, and is conditioned by various clinical parameters as number and site of lacking teeth, age and dental development of patients, eventual alveolar ridge atrophy. Treatment planning should be individualized for each patient. In our experience, based on 8 consecutive patients at the end of dental growth affected by oligodontia, endo-osseous fixtures positioning was carried out in consideration of long-lasting stability and optimal aesthetical characteristics. In 5 patients rehabilitative preprosthetic surgical procedures were performed, consisting in 2 sinus lift with immediate positioning of 3 fixtures in both cases, 4 heterologous bone graft in postextractive sites with retained ankylotic deciduous teeth and 1 positioning of reabsorbable biomembrane. A temporary removable denture was positioned immediately after surgery in order to obtain a prompt aesthetical and psychosocial restore. Osseointegration ratio as observed at 8.5 years follow-up was analyzed according to surgical variables and differences in prosthetic rehabilitation (fixtures supporting single crown versus multiple crowns). Successful osteointegration was observed at 8.5 years mean follow-up in 58 fixtures, corresponding to a 96.6% ratio. Failure of integration was encountered in fixtures immediately positioned in postextractive sites having a mild grade of bone atrophy, supporting single crown. A rate of success of 100% was observed in cases of immediate or delayed positioning in postextractive or traditional sites.Fixtures positioning in patients affected by isolated oligodontia, without malformative syndromes, and at the end of dental development

  11. The application of time-dependent ice crystal trajectory and growth model for the evaluation of cloud seeding experiment using liquid carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, K.; Wakimizu, K.; Maki, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Morita, O.; Tomine, K.

    2012-12-01

    This study evaluated the results of cloud seeding experiment conducted on 17th January, 2008, in western Kyushu, Japan, using simplified time-dependent ice crystal growth and trajectory cloud model, which is characterized by 1) depositional diffusion growth process only of an ice crystal, and 2) the pursuit of the growing ice crystal based on wind field and ice crystal terminal velocity. For the estimation of the ice crystal growth and trajectory, the model specifies ice supersaturation ratio that expresses the degree of competition growth among ice crystals formed by LC seeding for existing water vapor, assuming no effect of natural ice crystals. The model is based on ice crystal growth along a- and c-axes depending on air temperature and ice supersatuation, according to Chen and Lamb (1994). The cloud seeding experiment was conducted by applying homogeneous nucleation (rapid cooling of air mass and subsequent formation of many ice crystals~1013/g LC) of Liquid Carbon (LC) dioxide seeding under typical winter-type snowfall-inducing weather situation characterized by the outbreak of cold air masses from the Siberia. The result of aircraft horizontally-penetrating seeding of LC into lower layer (-2 degree C) of supercooled convective cloud with 1km thickness above the freezing level led to the formation of an artificially-induced 'isolated' radar echo (the left figures of Fig. 1) in dominant 'no-natural radar echo region'. In other words, natural biases were eliminated by the formation of the isolated radar echo. This fact provides the shortcut for evaluating the result of cloud seeding experiment. In the next, the observed cloud seeding results were evaluated by estimating the trajectory of artificially-induced growing ice crystal. The results show that the trajectory of artificial ice crystals depends on the degree of completion growth mode. Free growth brings rapid growth of an ice crystal and, therefore, the ice crystal falls into lower layers for a short time

  12. A step-by-step experiment of 3C-SiC hetero-epitaxial growth on 4H-SiC by CVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Bin; Jia, Ren-Xu; Hu, Ji-Chao; Tsai, Cheng-Ying; Lin, Hao-Hsiung; Zhang, Yu-Ming

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the growth mechanism of hetero-epitaxial SiC, a step-by-step experiment of 3C-SiC epitaxial layers grown on 4H-SiC on-axis substrates by the CVD method are reported in this paper. Four step experiments with four one-quarter 4H-SiC wafers were performed. Optical microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to characterize the morphology of the epitaxial layers. It was previously found that the main factor affecting the epilayer morphology was double-positioning boundary (DPB) defects, which normally were in high density with shallow grooves. However, a protrusive regular "hill" morphology with a much lower density was shown in our experiment in high-temperature growth conditions. The anisotropic migration of adatoms is regarded as forming the morphology of DPB defects, and a new "DPB defects assist epitaxy" growth mode has been proposed based on the Frank-van der Merwe growth mode. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction were used to examine the polytypes and the quality of the epitaxial layers.

  13. A diffusion-controlled kinetic model for growth of Au-catalyzed ZnO nanorods: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejazi, S. R.; Madaah Hosseini, H. R.

    2007-11-01

    A kinetic model for growth of ZnO nanorods via vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism based on the bulk diffusion of Zn atoms through the Au-Zn droplet is presented. The dependences of the growth rate on size are given quantitatively. A general expression for the growth rate of nanorods during VLS process is derived. The derived formula shows the dependences of growth rate on lateral size of nanorods, concentration and supersaturation of Zn atoms in the liquid droplet. Based on the presented kinetic model the smaller nanorods have faster growth rate. Au-catalyzed ZnO nanorods are grown by chemical vapor transport and condensation (CVTC) process experimentally. Theoretical and experimental rate/radius curves are compared to each other. Theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  14. Influence of CO2 change during 90-day experiment on growth characteristics and photosynthetic activity in vegetables grown in Lunar Palace 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Lingzhi; Liu, Hong; Wang, Minjuan; Fu, Yuming; Dong, Chen; Liu, Guanghui

    To establish bioregenerative life support system (BLSS) on lunar or Mars bases in the future, it is necessary to firstly conduct manned simulation experiments on the ground. For this purpose, Lunar palace 1 as an integrative experimental facility for permanent astrobase life support artificial closed ecosystem was set up, and 90-day experiment was carried out in this system. Vegtables as one of the important plant units, provide various nutrient content for crews in the system, such as vitamin, antioxidants and so on. However, it is not clear yet that how the CO _{2} change during 90-day experiment to affect on growth characteristics and photosynthetic activity in vegtables grown in the system. In this study, red lettuce, red rape, romaine lettuce, and bibb lettuce grown in the system were chosen as the subject investigated. Growth, expressed as dry weight, length of shoot and root, leaf area, was mearsured, and photosynthesis,expressed as net photosynthetic rate, intercellular CO _{2} concentration, chlorophyll contents and fluorescence was analyzed to detemind influence of CO _{2} change during 90-day experiment on growth in vegtables grown in the system.

  15. Results of Pulse-Scaling Experiments on Rapid-Growth DKDP Triplers Using the Optical Sciences Laser at 351 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Runkel, M; Burnham, A K; Milam, D; Sell, W; Feit, M; Rubenchik, A

    2000-12-11

    Results are reported from recently performed bulk-damage, pulse-scaling experiments on DKDP tripler samples taken from NIF-size, rapid-growth boule BD7. The tests were performed on LLNL's Optical Sciences Laser. A matrix of samples was exposed to single shots at 351 mn (3 {omega}) with average fluences from 4 to 8 J/cm{sup 2} for pulse durations of 1, 3 and 10 ns. The damage sites were scatter-mapped after testing to determine the damage evolution as a function of local beam fluence. The average bulk damage microcavity (pinpoint) density varied nearly linearly with fluence with peak values of approximately 16,000 pp/mm{sup 3} at 1 ns, 10,000 pp/mm{sup 3} at 3 ns and 400 pp/mm{sup 3} at 10 ns for fluences in the 8-10 J/cm{sup 2} range. The average size of a pinpoint was 10(+14,-9) {micro}m at 1 ns, 37 {+-} 20 {micro}m at 3 ns and {approx} 110 {micro}m at 10 ns, although all pulse durations produced pinpoints with a wide distribution of sizes. Analysis of the pinpoint density data yielded pulse-scaling behavior of t{sup 0.35}. Significant planar cracking around the pinpoint as was observed for the 10 ns case but not for the 1 and 3 ns pulses. Crack formation around pinpoints has also been observed frequently for Zeus ADT tests at {approx}8 ns. The high pinpoint densities also lead to significant eruption of near-surface bulk damage. Measurements of the damage site area for surface and bulk gave ratios (A{sub surf}/A{sub bulk}) of 2:1 at 1 ns, 7:1 at 3 ns and 110:1 at 10 ns. Maximum aperture averaged transmission losses on the order 15 percent have been measured by photometry for the worst damage at 1 and 3 ns for beam fluences in the 8-10 J/cm{sup 2} range. Analysis of this data yielded a pulse-scaling behavior of t{sup 0.25} for the obscured area. It was also determined that the crystals used in this test would survive unconditioned exposure to 4 J/cm{sup 2} shots on the NIF laser and still meet the obscuration requirement of 0.1%.

  16. Surface-crack growth: Models, experiments, and structures; Proceedings of the Symposium, Sparks, NV, Apr. 25, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuter, Walter G. (Editor); Underwood, John H. (Editor); Newman, James C., Jr. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The present volume on surface-crack growth modeling, experimental methods, and structures, discusses elastoplastic behavior, the fracture analysis of three-dimensional bodies with surface cracks, optical measurements of free-surface effects on natural surfaces and through cracks, an optical and finite-element investigation of a plastically deformed surface flaw under tension, fracture behavior prediction for rapidly loaded surface-cracked specimens, and surface cracks in thick laminated fiber composite plates. Also discussed are a novel study procedure for crack initiation and growth in thermal fatigue testing, the growth of surface cracks under fatigue and monotonically increasing load, the subcritical growth of a surface flaw, surface crack propagation in notched and unnotched rods, and theoretical and experimental analyses of surface cracks in weldments.

  17. Heat flow control and segregation in directional solidification: Development of an experimental and theoretical basis for Bridgman-type growth experiments in a microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, A. F.

    1986-01-01

    Within the framework of the proposed research, emphasis was placed on application of magnetic fields to semiconductor growth systems. It was found that magnetic fields up to 3 kGauss do not affect the growth behavior nor the macro-segregation behavior in the system Ge(Ga). Applied fields are found to significantlty alter the radial dopant distribution, which is attributed to alterations in the spatial orientation of convective cells. Increasing the magnetic field to 30 kGauss is found to have a fundamental effect on dopant segregation. Emphasis is also placed on the potential of KC-135 flights for preliminary studies on the effects of reduced gravity environments on the wetting behavior of semiconductor systems in growth configuration. The limited number of experiments conducted does not allow any conclusions on the merits of KC-135 flights for semiconductor processing research.

  18. SHOCK INITIATION EXPERIMENTS ON THE LLM-105 EXPLOSIVE RX-55-AA AT 25?C AND 150?C WITH IGNITION AND GROWTH MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, F; Vandersall, K S; Tarver, C M; Urtiew, P A

    2007-06-15

    Shock initiation experiments on the LLM-105 based explosive RX-55-AA (95% LLM-105, 5% Viton by weight) were performed at 25 C and 150 C to obtain in-situ pressure gauge data, run-distance-to-detonation thresholds, and Ignition and Growth modeling parameters. A 101 mm diameter propellant driven gas gun was utilized to initiate the explosive sample with manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge packages placed between sample slices. The run-distance-to-detonation points on the Pop-plot for these experiments showed agreement at 25 C with previously published data on a similar LLM-105 based formulation RX-55-AB as well as a slight sensitivity increase at elevated temperature (150 C) as expected. Ignition and Growth modeling parameters were obtained with a reasonable fit to the experimental data.

  19. Quantitative determination of zero-gravity effects on electronic materials processing germanium crystal growth with simultaneous interface demarcation. Experiment MA-060

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, H. C.; Witt, A. F.

    1977-01-01

    Experiment MA-060 was designed to establish the crystal growth and segregation characteristics of a melt in a directional solidification configuration under near zero-g conditions. The interface demarcation technique was incorporated into the experiment since it constitutes a unique tool for recording the morphology of the growth rate throughout solidification, and for establishing an absolute time reference framework for all stages of the solidification process. An extensive study was performed of the germanium crystals grown during the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project mission. It was found that single crystal growth was achieved and that the interface demarcation functioned successfully. There was no indication that convection driven by thermal or surface tension gradients was present in the melt. The gallium segregation, in the absence of gravity, was found to be fundamentally different in its initial and its subsequent stages from that of the ground-based tests. None of the existing theoretical models for growth and segregation can account for the observed segregation behavior in the absence of gravity.

  20. Cross-national comparison of prenatal methamphetamine exposure on infant and early child physical growth: a natural experiment.

    PubMed

    Abar, Beau; LaGasse, Linda L; Wouldes, Trecia; Derauf, Chris; Newman, Elana; Shah, Rizwan; Smith, Lynne M; Arria, Amelia M; Huestis, Marilyn A; DellaGrotta, Sheri; Dansereau, Lynne M; Wilcox, Tara; Neal, Charles R; Lester, Barry M

    2014-10-01

    The current study seeks to compare the effects of prenatal methamphetamine exposure (PME) on infant and child physical growth between the USA and New Zealand (NZ). This cross-national comparison provides a unique opportunity to examine the potential impact of services provided to drug using mothers on child health. The longitudinal Infant Development, Environment and Lifestyle study of PME from birth to 36 months was conducted in the USA and NZ. The US cohort included 204 children with PME and 212 non-PME matched comparisons (NPME); the NZ cohort included 108 children with PME and 115 NPME matched comparisons. Latent growth curve models were used to examine effects of PME, country of origin, and the country × PME interaction on growth in length/height and weight. In regard to length/height, PME and country of origin were associated with initial length and growth over time. There was also a significant interaction effect, such that children with PME in the USA were shorter at birth than children with PME in NZ after controlling for other prenatal exposures, infant set, socioeconomic status, and maternal height. In regard to weight, there was only an effect of country of origin. Effects of PME on infant and child growth were shown to differ across countries, with exposed children in NZ faring better than exposed children in the USA. Implications for prevention programs and public policy are discussed.

  1. Growth and development, and auxin polar transport in higher plants under microgravity conditions in space: BRIC-AUX on STS-95 space experiment.

    PubMed

    Ueda, J; Miyamoto, K; Yuda, T; Hoshino, T; Fujii, S; Mukai, C; Kamigaichi, S; Aizawa, S; Yoshizaki, I; Shimazu, T; Fukui, K

    1999-12-01

    The principal objectives of the space experiment, BRIC-AUX on STS 95, were the integrated analysis of the growth and development of etiolated pea and maize seedlings in space and a study of the effects of microgravity conditions in space on auxin polar transport in these segments. Microgravity significantly affected the growth and development of etiolated pea and maize seedlings. Epicotyls of etiolated pea seedlings were the most oriented toward about 40 to 60 degrees from the vertical. Mesocotyls of etiolated maize seedlings were curved at random during space flight but coleoptiles were almost straight. Finally the growth inhibition of these seedlings in space was also observed. Roots of some pea seedlings grew toward to the aerial space of Plant Growth Chamber. Extensibilities of cell walls of the third internode of etiolated pea epicotyls and the top region of etiolated maize coleoptiles, which were germinated and grown under microgravity conditions in space, were significantly low as compared with those grown on the ground of the earth. Activities of auxin polar transport in the second internode segments of etiolated pea seedlings and coleoptile segments of etiolated maize seedlings were significantly inhibited and promoted, respectively, under microgravity conditions in space. These results strongly suggest that auxin polar transport as well as the growth and development of plants is controlled under gravity on the earth.

  2. Hinokitiol inhibits cell growth through induction of S-phase arrest and apoptosis in human colon cancer cells and suppresses tumor growth in a mouse xenograft experiment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youn-Sun; Choi, Kyeong-Mi; Kim, Wonkyun; Jeon, Young-Soo; Lee, Yong-Moon; Hong, Jin-Tae; Yun, Yeo-Pyo; Yoo, Hwan-Soo

    2013-12-27

    Hinokitiol (1), a tropolone-related natural compound, induces apoptosis and has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antitumor activities. In this study, the inhibitory effects of 1 were investigated on human colon cancer cell growth and tumor formation of xenograft mice. HCT-116 and SW-620 cells derived from human colon cancers were found to be similarly susceptible to 1, with IC50 values of 4.5 and 4.4 μM, respectively. Compound 1 induced S-phase arrest in the cell cycle progression and decreased the expression levels of cyclin A, cyclin E, and Cdk2. Conversely, 1 increased the expression of p21, a Cdk inhibitor. Compound 1 decreased Bcl-2 expression and increased the expression of Bax, and cleaved caspase-9 and -3. The effect of 1 on tumor formation when administered orally was evaluated in male BALB/c-nude mice implanted intradermally separately with HCT-116 and SW-620 cells. Tumor volumes and tumor weights in the mice treated with 1 (100 mg/kg) were decreased in both cases. These results suggest that the suppression of tumor formation by compound 1 in human colon cancer may occur through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

  3. F.A.C.E.S. (Faculty Academic Community Education Showcase): Professional Growth Experiences in a Career University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colbert, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    Institutes of higher education exist for the purpose of developing, fostering, nurturing, and stimulating the intellectual growth and development of students. The core values of a college education provide students conceptual and practical educational opportunities that focus on improving their skills and knowledge. These skills and knowledge…

  4. Do University Teachers Become More Effective with Experience? A Multilevel Growth Model of Students' Evaluations of Teaching over 13 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Herbert W.

    2007-01-01

    Do university teachers, like good wine, improve with age? The purpose of this methodological/substantive study is to apply a multiple-level growth modeling approach to the long-term stability of students' evaluations of teaching effectiveness (SETs). For a diverse cohort of 195 teachers who were evaluated continuously over 13 years (6,024 classes,…

  5. Association mapping for chilling tolerance in elite flint and dent maize inbred lines evaluated in growth chamber and field experiments.

    PubMed

    Strigens, Alexander; Freitag, Niclas M; Gilbert, Xavier; Grieder, Christoph; Riedelsheimer, Christian; Schrag, Tobias A; Messmer, Rainer; Melchinger, Albrecht E

    2013-10-01

    Chilling sensitivity of maize is a strong limitation for its cultivation in the cooler areas of the northern and southern hemisphere because reduced growth in early stages impairs on later biomass accumulation. Efficient breeding for chilling tolerance is hampered by both the complex physiological response of maize to chilling temperatures and the difficulty to accurately measure chilling tolerance in the field under fluctuating climatic conditions. For this research, we used genome-wide association (GWA) mapping to identify genes underlying chilling tolerance under both controlled and field conditions in a broad germplasm collection of 375 maize inbred lines genotyped with 56 110 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). We identified 19 highly significant association signals explaining between 5.7 and 52.5% of the phenotypic variance observed for early growth and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters. The allelic effect of several SNPs identified for early growth was associated with temperature and incident radiation. Candidate genes involved in ethylene signalling, brassinolide, and lignin biosynthesis were found in their vicinity. The frequent involvement of candidate genes into signalling or gene expression regulation underlines the complex response of photosynthetic performance and early growth to climatic conditions, and supports pleiotropism as a major cause of co-locations of quantitative trait loci for these highly polygenic traits.

  6. Pre-Service Teachers' Growth in Understandings of Best Practice Literacy Instruction through Paired Course and Field Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipp, Jamie; Helfrich, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Illiteracy is on the rise in the United States, and the potential negative impact on today's struggling reader is devastating. Now more than ever, preparing pre-service teachers to be effective teachers of literacy is crucial. This study examined the growth in understandings of best practice literacy of eleven pre-service teachers through paired…

  7. Skylab experiments. Volume 3: Materials science. [Skylab experiments on metallurgy, crystal growth, semiconductors, and combustion physics in weightless environment for high school level education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The materials science and technology investigation conducted on the Skylab vehicle are discussed. The thirteen experiments that support these investigations have been planned to evaluate the effect of a weightless environment on melting and resolidification of a variety of metals and semiconductor crystals, and on combustion of solid flammable materials. A glossary of terms which define the space activities and a bibliography of related data are presented.

  8. Modifying mixing and instability growth through the adjustment of initial conditions in a high-energy-density counter-propagating shear experiment on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Merritt, E. C. Doss, F. W.; Loomis, E. N.; Flippo, K. A.; Kline, J. L.

    2015-06-15

    Counter-propagating shear experiments conducted at the OMEGA Laser Facility have been evaluating the effect of target initial conditions, specifically the characteristics of a tracer foil located at the shear boundary, on Kelvin-Helmholtz instability evolution and experiment transition toward nonlinearity and turbulence in the high-energy-density (HED) regime. Experiments are focused on both identifying and uncoupling the dependence of the model initial turbulent length scale in variable-density turbulence models of k-ϵ type on competing physical instability seed lengths as well as developing a path toward fully developed turbulent HED experiments. We present results from a series of experiments controllably and independently varying two initial types of scale lengths in the experiment: the thickness and surface roughness (surface perturbation scale spectrum) of a tracer layer at the shear interface. We show that decreasing the layer thickness and increasing the surface roughness both have the ability to increase the relative mixing in the system, and thus theoretically decrease the time required to begin transitioning to turbulence in the system. We also show that we can connect a change in observed mix width growth due to increased foil surface roughness to an analytically predicted change in model initial turbulent scale lengths.

  9. Modifying mixing and instability growth through the adjustment of initial conditions in a high-energy-density counter-propagating shear experiment on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Merritt, E. C.; Doss, F. W.; Loomis, E. N.; Flippo, K. A.; Kline, J. L.

    2015-06-24

    Counter-propagating shear experiments conducted at the OMEGA Laser Facility have been evaluating the effect of target initial conditions, specifically the characteristics of a tracer foil located at the shear boundary, on Kelvin-Helmholtz instability evolution and experiment transition toward nonlinearity and turbulence in the high-energy-density (HED) regime. Experiments are focused on both identifying and uncoupling the dependence of the model initial turbulent length scale in variable-density turbulence models of k-ϵ type on competing physical instability seed lengths as well as developing a path toward fully developed turbulent HED experiments. We present results from a series of experiments controllably and independently varying two initial types of scale lengths in the experiment: the thickness and surface roughness (surface perturbation scale spectrum) of a tracer layer at the shear interface. We show that decreasing the layer thickness and increasing the surface roughness both have the ability to increase the relative mixing in the system, and thus theoretically decrease the time required to begin transitioning to turbulence in the system. In addition, we also show that we can connect a change in observed mix width growth due to increased foil surface roughness to an analytically predicted change in model initial turbulent scale lengths.

  10. Modifying mixing and instability growth through the adjustment of initial conditions in a high-energy-density counter-propagating shear experiment on OMEGA

    DOE PAGES

    Merritt, E. C.; Doss, F. W.; Loomis, E. N.; Flippo, K. A.; Kline, J. L.

    2015-06-24

    Counter-propagating shear experiments conducted at the OMEGA Laser Facility have been evaluating the effect of target initial conditions, specifically the characteristics of a tracer foil located at the shear boundary, on Kelvin-Helmholtz instability evolution and experiment transition toward nonlinearity and turbulence in the high-energy-density (HED) regime. Experiments are focused on both identifying and uncoupling the dependence of the model initial turbulent length scale in variable-density turbulence models of k-ϵ type on competing physical instability seed lengths as well as developing a path toward fully developed turbulent HED experiments. We present results from a series of experiments controllably and independently varyingmore » two initial types of scale lengths in the experiment: the thickness and surface roughness (surface perturbation scale spectrum) of a tracer layer at the shear interface. We show that decreasing the layer thickness and increasing the surface roughness both have the ability to increase the relative mixing in the system, and thus theoretically decrease the time required to begin transitioning to turbulence in the system. In addition, we also show that we can connect a change in observed mix width growth due to increased foil surface roughness to an analytically predicted change in model initial turbulent scale lengths.« less

  11. What have we learned about phototropism from spaceflight experiments? Novel responses to light discovered during the Seedling Growth project on the ISS.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, John Z.; Edelmann, Richard; Herranz, Raul; Medina, Francisco Javier; Vandenbrink, Joshua

    2016-07-01

    In response to external stimuli, plants exhibit directed growth responses termed tropisms. Phototropism is directed growth of plants in response to light while gravitropism is the tropistic movement of plants in response to gravity. The integration of these tropisms (along with other growth movements) results in the overall growth form of the plant. Utilizing the European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS) on the International Space Station (ISS), we were able to decouple phototropism from the effects of gravitropism. The Seedling Growth (SG-1, 2, 3) series of experiments employed the centrifuge in the EMCS to create fractional/reduced gravity environments (0, 0.3, 0.5, 0.8 and 1g) to help discern the relationship between the phototropic response and gravitropism in seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana. In SG, seedlings were exposed to continuous red light, continuous blue light, and red-to-blue light cycles at various gravity levels in order to characterize the phototropic response. Image downlinks from the ISS allowed for analysis of growth and curvature measurements under differential light and gravity conditions. Previous results from our space experiments identified a unique red-light-based phototropism in roots and shoots. The most recent results from SG-1 and SG-2 (2015) reveal a novel positive phototropic curvature in roots of seedlings illuminated with blue light under microgravity conditions. In addition, a positive phototropic response of roots and shoots exposed to red light was observed in microgravity, confirming our previous observations. The phototropic response of shoots to blue light appears to be largely unaffected by fractional gravity. In addition to the WT (Landsberg ecotype), phytochrome A and B mutants were utilized to elucidate the role phytochromes play in blue and red light perception and the resulting phototropic responses. Understanding the relationship between phototropic and gravitropic responses is an important first step in being able

  12. Building a better mousetrap II: using Design of Experiments with unconfounded ions to compare the growth of different microalgae.

    PubMed

    Hallenbeck, Patrick C; Grogger, Melanie; Mraz, Megan; Veverka, Donald

    2015-05-01

    A large number of unconfounded media variations were used with a Scheffe Mix Model to examine in an unambiguous fashion the effects of variations in six important ions; NH4(+), NO3(-), Na(+), K(+), PO4(-), and Cl(-), on the growth of Chlorella vulgaris. This allows several novel observations on media components, for example, the inhibitory effects of chloride, to be made. Using a side by side comparison, it is shown that two strains of Chlorella show significant physiological and functional differences brought out by this approach. Testing selected formulations with a diverse set of algae demonstrated different effects on both growth and cellular lipid content, in some cases driving significant lipid production. This suggests that future work using a larger portion of media composition space could lead to the development of novel media supporting maximal biomass production and lipid production. PMID:25465789

  13. A reference growth curve for nutritional experiments in zebrafish (Danio rerio) and changes in whole body proteome during development.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Requeni, P; Conceição, L E C; Olderbakk Jordal, A-E; Rønnestad, I

    2010-12-01

    Zebrafish is one of the most used vertebrate model organisms in molecular and developmental biology, recently gaining popularity also in medical research. However, very little work has been done to assess zebrafish as a model species in nutritional studies in aquaculture in order to utilize the methodological toolbox that this species represents. As a starting point to acquire some baseline data for further nutritional studies, growth of a population of zebrafish was followed for 15 weeks. Furthermore, whole body proteome was screened during development by means of bi-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Fish were reared under best practice laboratory conditions from hatching until 103 days post-fertilization (dpf) and regularly fed ad libitum with Artemia nauplii from 12 dpf. A growth burst occurred within 9-51 dpf, reaching a plateau after 65 dpf. Fork length and body weight were significantly lower in males than in females from 58 dpf onwards. Proteomics analysis showed 28 spot proteins differently expressed through development and according to sex. Of these proteins, 20 were successfully identified revealing proteins involved in energy production, muscle development, eye lens differentiation, and sexual maturation. In summary, zebrafish exhibited a rapid growth until approximately 50 dpf, when most individuals started to allocate part of the dietary energy intake for sexual maturation. However, proteomic analysis revealed that some individuals reached sexual maturity earlier and already from 30 dpf onwards. Thus, in order to design nutritional studies with zebrafish fed Artemia nauplii, it is recommended to select a period between 20 and 40 dpf, when fish allocate most of the ingested energy for non-reproductive growth purposes.

  14. Experiment K-7-22: Growth Hormone Regulation Synthesis and Secretion in Microgravity. Part 3; Plasma Analysis Hormone Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindeland, R. E.; Popova, I. A.; Grossman, E.; Rudolph, I.

    1994-01-01

    Plasma from space flight and tail suspended rats was analyzed for a number of constituents in order to evaluate their metabolic status and endocrine function. The data presented here cover plasma hormone measurements. Corticosterone, thyroxine, and testosterone were measured by radioimmunoassay. Prolactin and growth hormone were measured by double antibody immunoassays using hormones and antisera prepared in house. Data were evaluated by analysis of variance.

  15. Simulating Population Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byington, Scott

    1997-01-01

    Presents a strategy to help students grasp the important implications of population growth. Involves an interactive demonstration that allows students to experience exponential and logistic population growth followed by a discussion of the implications of population-growth principles. (JRH)

  16. Designing of Aspherically-Diverging, Multi-Interface Experiments to Model Rayleigh-Taylor Growth in Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosskopf, Michael; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.; Miles, A. R.; Hansen, J. F.; Plewa, T.; Hearn, N.; Arnett, D.; Wheeler, J. C.

    2010-05-01

    One branch of work in the laboratory astrophysics community has been focused on developing the understanding of hydrodynamic mixing in supernovae. Current experiments have been limited to studying these processes in planar systems due in large part to limitations of drive energy. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is now capable of providing experiments with far more than ten times the energy than has been previously available on laser facilities, enabling supernova-relevant hydrodynamics experiments in which hydrodynamic instabilities develop from a blast-wave driven through multiple, coupled interfaces in a diverging system. This presentation discusses the design of such target designs, both spherical and aspheric, in which the relative masses of the layers are scaled to those within the star. It reports scaling simulations with CALE to model the global dynamics of such experiments. The simulations investigate the diagnosability and experimental value of different designs using a variety of materials. Simulation results exploring whether an experiment investigating aspheric supernova is a feasible extension from the current design and what observable dynamics would be able to be expected will also be reported, including multiple drive and experimental geometries. This research was sponsored by LLNL through contract LLNL B56128 and by the NNSA through DOE Research Grant DE-FG52-04NA00064.

  17. Fungal and bacterial growth responses to N fertilization and pH in the 150-year 'Park Grass' UK grassland experiment.

    PubMed

    Rousk, Johannes; Brookes, Philip C; Bååth, Erland

    2011-04-01

    The effects of nitrogen (N) fertilization (0-150 kg N ha⁻¹ year⁻¹ since 1865) and pH (3.3-7.4) on fungal and bacterial growth, biomass and phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) composition were investigated in grassland soils from the 'Park Grass Experiment', Rothamsted Research, UK. Bacterial growth decreased and fungal growth increased with lower pH, resulting in a 50-fold increase in the relative importance of fungi between pH 7.4 and 3.3. The PLFA-based fungal:bacterial biomass ratio was unchanged between pH 4.5 and 7.4, and decreased only below pH 4.5. Respiration and substrate-induced respiration biomass both decreased three- to fourfold with lower pH, but biomass concentrations estimated using PLFAs were unaffected by pH. N fertilization did not affect bacterial growth and marginally affected fungal growth while PLFA biomass marker concentrations were all reduced by higher N additions. Respiration decreased with higher N application, suggesting a reduced quality of the soil organic carbon. The PLFA composition was strongly affected by both pH and N. A comparison with a pH gradient in arable soil allowed us to generalize the pH effect between systems. There are 30-50-fold increases in the relative importance of fungi between high (7.4-8.3) and low (3.3-4.5) pH with concomitant reductions of respiration by 30-70%.

  18. The Growth of Instructional Coaching Partner Conversations in a PreK-3rd Grade Teacher Professional Development Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Earl E.; Bell, David L.; Spelman, Maureen; Briody, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Instructional coaching that supports teachers' with revising teaching practices is not understood. This study sought to understand the impact of the instructional coaching experience by recording coaching conversations/interactions with teachers. The purpose was to determine if the type of coaching conversations changed overtime during three…

  19. Shock-tube experiments on Richtmyer-Meshkov instability growth using an enlarged double-bump perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holder, D. A.; Smith, A. V.; Barton, C. J.; Youngs, D. L.

    2003-07-01

    This article reports on the latest experiments in the series of Richtmyer Meshkov instability (RMI) shock-tube experiments. Previous work described a double-bump experiment that evidenced some degree of unrepeatability. The present work features an enlarged perturbation introduced to improve repeatability. In common with the previous work, the experiments were conducted at shock Mach number 1.26 (70 kPa overpressure), using the Atomic Weapons Establishment 200 × 100 mm shock tube with a three-zone test cell arrangement of air/sulphur hexafluoride/air. The sulphur hexafluoride gas (SF6) was chosen for its high density (5.1 relative to air) providing an Atwood number of 0.67. Gas separation was by means of microfilm membranes, supported by fine wire meshes. A double-bump perturbation of two-dimensional geometry was superimposed on the downstream membrane representing a 0.6% addition to the dense gas volume. Visualization of the turbulent gas mixing was by laser sheet illumination of the seeded SF6 gas using a copper vapor laser pulsing at 12.5 kHz. Mie scattered light was recorded using a 35-mm rotating drum camera to capture a sequence of 50 images per experiment. Sample experimental results shown alongside corresponding three-dimensional hydrocode calculations highlight the problems in both analysis and comparison caused by multiple scattering arising from the necessary use of a high seeding concentration. Included is a demonstration of the effectiveness of introducing into the hydrocode a Monte Carlo-based simulation of the multiple scattering process. The results so derived yield greatly improved qualitative agreement with the experimental images. Quantitative analysis took the form of deriving relative intensity data from line-outs through experimental images and their code equivalents. A comparison revealed substantial agreement on major features.

  20. Slow Crack Growth of Brittle Materials With Exponential Crack-Velocity Formulation. Part 3; Constant Stress and Cyclic Stress Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Nemeth, Noel N.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2002-01-01

    The previously determined life prediction analysis based on an exponential crack-velocity formulation was examined using a variety of experimental data on advanced structural ceramics tested under constant stress and cyclic stress loading at ambient and elevated temperatures. The data fit to the relation between the time to failure and applied stress (or maximum applied stress in cyclic loading) was very reasonable for most of the materials studied. It was also found that life prediction for cyclic stress loading from data of constant stress loading in the exponential formulation was in good agreement with the experimental data, resulting in a similar degree of accuracy as compared with the power-law formulation. The major limitation in the exponential crack-velocity formulation, however, was that the inert strength of a material must be known a priori to evaluate the important slow-crack-growth (SCG) parameter n, a significant drawback as compared with the conventional power-law crack-velocity formulation.

  1. Slow Crack Growth of Brittle Materials With Exponential Crack-Velocity Formulation. Part 2; Constant Stress Rate Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Nemeth, Noel N.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2002-01-01

    The previously determined life prediction analysis based on an exponential crack-velocity formulation was examined using a variety of experimental data on glass and advanced structural ceramics in constant stress rate and preload testing at ambient and elevated temperatures. The data fit to the relation of strength versus the log of the stress rate was very reasonable for most of the materials. Also, the preloading technique was determined equally applicable to the case of slow-crack-growth (SCG) parameter n greater than 30 for both the power-law and exponential formulations. The major limitation in the exponential crack-velocity formulation, however, was that the inert strength of a material must be known a priori to evaluate the important SCG parameter n, a significant drawback as compared with the conventional power-law crack-velocity formulation.

  2. Effects of age and reproductive experience on the distribution of prolactin and growth hormone secreting cells in the anterior pituitary of a passerine.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Debora; Vleck, Carol M

    2015-10-01

    Plasma prolactin (PRL) is released from lactotrophs in the anterior pituitary. As plasma PRL levels rise during incubation in domestic fowl, the number of lactotrophs (PRL-immunoreactive, PRL-IR cells) increases while the number of growth hormone secreting cells, somatotrophs (GH-IR cells), declines. We measured plasma PRL levels using radioimmunoassay (RIA) and examined the distribution of lactotrophs and somatotrophs in the anterior pituitary of breeding and nonbreeding zebra finches of known ages with and without prior breeding experience using fluorescent immunohistochemistry (IHC). Plasma PRL levels were higher in breeding than in nonbreeding birds, regardless of age, sex, or previous breeding history. PRL-IR cells were localized primarily, but not exclusively, to the cephalic aspect of the anterior pituitary (AP) and along the ventral margin. Birds with prior reproductive experience had more PRL-IR cells than birds with no prior reproductive experience and breeders had slightly higher PRL-IR cell counts than did nonbreeders, but there was no correlation between the number of PRL-IR cells and plasma PRL levels. GH-IR cells were concentrated in the caudal aspect of the AP with some cells in the cephalic lobe, but numbers did not differ between any of the groups studied. An increase in PRL-IR cells corresponded with an increase in GH-IR cells. An increase in lactotroph number with reproductive experience in zebra finches may facilitate future reproductive events by allowing for more robust PRL secretion and increased reproductive success.

  3. Chemical Vapor Deposition of MoS2: Insight Into the Growth Mechanism by Separated Gas Flow Experiments.

    PubMed

    Yanase, Takashi; Watanabe, Sho; Weng, Mengting; Nagahama, Taro; Shimada, Toshihiro

    2016-04-01

    We report detailed experiments on chemical vapor deposition of an atomic' layer semiconductor MoS2. We developed a new type of CVD system in which MoO3 and S sources are separately supplied to the substrates. It has become possible to precisely control the supply of the materials separately in the order of seconds. Raman and XPS analysis of the films grown under various conditions revealed that the initially obtained films are S-deficient and complete stoichiometry is reached after several minutes under S vapor flow. PMID:27451608

  4. Optimizing and Improving the Growth Quality of ZnO Nanowire Arrays Guided by Statistical Design of Experiments.

    PubMed

    Xu, Sheng; Adiga, Nagesh; Ba, Shan; Dasgupta, Tirthankar; Wu, C F Jeff; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2009-07-28

    Controlling the morphology of the as-synthesized nanostructures is usually challenging, and there lacks of a general theoretical guidance in experimental approach. In this study, a novel way of optimizing the aspect ratio of hydrothermally grown ZnO nanowire (NW) arrays is presented by utilizing a systematic statistical design and analysis method. In this work, we use pick-the-winner rule and one-pair-at-a-time main effect analysis to sequentially design the experiments and identify optimal reaction settings. By controlling the hydrothermal reaction parameters (reaction temperature, time, precursor concentration, and capping agent), we improved the aspect ratio of ZnO NWs from around 10 to nearly 23. The effect of noise on the experimental results was identified and successfully reduced, and the statistical design and analysis methods were very effective in reducing the number of experiments performed and in identifying the optimal experimental settings. In addition, the antireflection spectrum of the as-synthesized ZnO NWs clearly shows that higher aspect ratio of the ZnO NW arrays leads to about 30% stronger suppression in the UV-vis range emission. This shows great potential applications as antireflective coating layers in photovoltaic devices.

  5. Nucleation and growth of hydroxyapatite on titanium pretreated in NaOH solution: experiments and thermodynamic explanation.

    PubMed

    de Andrade, M C; Filgueiras, M R; Ogasawara, T

    1999-09-15

    Titanium was submitted to chemical attack with sodium hydroxide solution under hydrothermal (SBF) conditions and then kept for 4 weeks in simulated body fluid after heat treatment. The resultant coating titanium samples were characterized regarding nucleation and growth of hydroxyapatite on their surfaces using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy, as well as low angle X-ray diffraction. In order to obtain a thermodynamic explanation of same results, Eh-pH diagrams of Na-Ti-H2O and Ca-Ti-H2O systems at 25, 100, 200, and 300 degrees C were built for selected activities of the species in aqueous solutions. Values of pairs corresponding to the predominance limit of the species in solution at equilibrium with 0.21 atm of oxygen pressure were taken from these Eh-pH diagrams for subsequent building of the pNa-pH and pCa-pH diagrams of the same systems at each referred temperature (pi = -log10ai). In addition, the titanate-apatite free energy of formation was estimated and then a pCa-pH diagram of the Ca-P-Ti-H2O system at 25 degrees C was built. Examination of the resultant diagrams could elucidate the thermodynamic viability of the process. PMID:10398004

  6. The preferential growth of branched GDGT source microorganisms under aerobic conditions in peat revealed by stable isotope probing experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huguet, Arnaud; Meador, Travis B.; Laggoun-Défarge, Fatima; Könneke, Martin; Derenne, Sylvie; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2016-04-01

    Branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (brGDGTs) membrane lipids are widely distributed in aquatic and terrestrial environments and are being increasingly used as temperature proxies. Nevertheless, little is known regarding the microorganisms that produce these lipids, which are found in especially high abundance in the anaerobic horizons of peat bogs. We initiated stable isotope probing incubations of peat samples from a Sphagnum-dominated peatland (Jura Mountains, France) to measure the incorporation of (D)-D2O and 13C-labeled dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) into brGDGTs, and thus gauge the activity, growth, and turnover times of their source organisms. Peat samples were collected from two adjacent sites with contrasting humidity levels (hereafter called "fen" and "bog" sites). For each site, samples from the surficial aerobic layer (acrotelm) and deeper anaerobic layer (catotelm) were collected and were incubated under both anaerobic and aerobic conditions for the acrotelm samples and only anaerobic conditions for the catotelm. The incubations were performed at 12 ° C, consistent with the mean summer air temperature at the sampling site. After two months of incubation, there was no incorporation of 13C label in brGDGTs for samples incubated under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions, showing that brGDGT-producing bacteria are heterotrophic microorganisms, as previously observed in organo-mineral soils (Weijers et al., 2011). Similarly, little to no deuterium incorporation was observed for brGDGTs isolated from anaerobically-incubated deep samples. In contrast, in the aerobic incubations of acrotelm samples from bog and fen, the weighted average δD of brGDGT core lipids (CLs) increased by up to 3332‰ and 933‰ after two months, respectively, indicating that fresh brGDGT CLs were biosynthesized at the peat surface. D incorporation into brGDGT CLs converted to production rates ranging from 30-106 ng cm-3y-1 in the aerobic acrotelm from bog and fen

  7. The preferential growth of branched GDGT source microorganisms under aerobic conditions in peat revealed by stable isotope probing experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huguet, Arnaud; Meador, Travis B.; Laggoun-Défarge, Fatima; Könneke, Martin; Derenne, Sylvie; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2016-04-01

    Branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (brGDGTs) membrane lipids are widely distributed in aquatic and terrestrial environments and are being increasingly used as temperature proxies. Nevertheless, little is known regarding the microorganisms that produce these lipids, which are found in especially high abundance in the anaerobic horizons of peat bogs. We initiated stable isotope probing incubations of peat samples from a Sphagnum-dominated peatland (Jura Mountains, France) to measure the incorporation of (D)-D2O and 13C-labeled dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) into brGDGTs, and thus gauge the activity, growth, and turnover times of their source organisms. Peat samples were collected from two adjacent sites with contrasting humidity levels (hereafter called "fen" and "bog" sites). For each site, samples from the surficial aerobic layer (acrotelm) and deeper anaerobic layer (catotelm) were collected and were incubated under both anaerobic and aerobic conditions for the acrotelm samples and only anaerobic conditions for the catotelm. The incubations were performed at 12 ° C, consistent with the mean summer air temperature at the sampling site. After two months of incubation, there was no incorporation of 13C label in brGDGTs for samples incubated under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions, showing that brGDGT-producing bacteria are heterotrophic microorganisms, as previously observed in organo-mineral soils (Weijers et al., 2011). Similarly, little to no deuterium incorporation was observed for brGDGTs isolated from anaerobically-incubated deep samples. In contrast, in the aerobic incubations of acrotelm samples from bog and fen, the weighted average δD of brGDGT core lipids (CLs) increased by up to 3332‰ and 933‰ after two months, respectively, indicating that fresh brGDGT CLs were biosynthesized at the peat surface. D incorporation into brGDGT CLs converted to production rates ranging from 30-106 ng cm‑3y‑1 in the aerobic acrotelm from bog and

  8. Correction of the equilibrium temperature caused by slight evaporation of water in protein crystal growth cells during long-term space experiments at International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Takahisa; Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Yoshizaki, Izumi; Tsukamoto, Katsuo; Murayama, Kenta; Fukuyama, Seijiro; Hosokawa, Kouhei; Oshi, Kentaro; Ito, Daisuke; Yamazaki, Tomoya; Tachibana, Masaru; Miura, Hitoshi

    2015-08-01

    The normal growth rates of the {110} faces of tetragonal hen egg-white lysozyme crystals, R, were measured as a function of the supersaturation σ parameter using a reflection type interferometer under μG at the International Space Station (NanoStep Project). Since water slightly evaporated from in situ observation cells during a long-term space station experiment for several months, equilibrium temperature Te changed, and the actual σ, however, significantly increased mainly due to the increase in salt concentration Cs. To correct σ, the actual Cs and protein concentration Cp, which correctly represent the measured Te value in space, were first calculated. Second, a new solubility curve with the corrected Cs was plotted. Finally, the revised σ was obtained from the new solubility curve. This correction method successfully revealed that the 2.8% water was evaporated from the solution, leading to 2.8% increase in the Cs and Cp of the solution.

  9. Response of potato to discontinuous exposures of atmospheric ethylene: results of a long-term experiment in open-top chambers and crop growth modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dueck, Th. A.; Van Dijk, C. J.; Grashoff, C.; Groenwold, J.; Schapendonk, A. H. C. M.; Tonneijck, A. E. G.

    A field experiment in open-top chambers (OTCs) was performed to quantitatively assess the growth and yield response of potato to discontinuous exposures to atmospheric ethylene (200, 400 and 800 ppb, applied twice weekly and 200 and 400 ppb applied 4 times weekly, each for 3 h/event). To evaluate the effect of ethylene on potato tuber yield, a module was developed for an existing crop growth simulation model by incorporating the effects of ethylene on epinasty and photosynthesis. Explorations with the model showed that in a worst case scenario, ethylene-induced epinasty had only a marginal effect on tuber yield. Short-term exposures to ethylene under laboratory conditions inhibited photosynthesis, but it recovered within 48 h. When exposed to ethylene for longer than 12 h, irreversible damage of the photosynthesis apparatus occurred. Exposure to ethylene in the OTCs resulted in epinasty and reduced flowering. The number of flowers on potato decreased with increasing concentrations of ethylene, irrespective of the exposure frequency. Calculations showed that the number of flowers was significantly reduced at ca. 170 ppb ethylene, averaged over the hours of exposure. Ethylene concentrations up to 800 ppb, administered 4 times weekly for 3 h during the growing season, did not affect vegetative growth and yield in fumigated potatoes. Under these experimental conditions, the modified simulation model incorporating the effects of ethylene on epinasty and photosynthesis forecasts a 5% effect on tuber yield at concentrations of 1600 ppb. All results indicate that ethylene concentrations higher than 800 ppb are required to adversely affect tuber yield of potato.

  10. Modeling and estimation of replication fitness of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in vitro experiments by using a growth competition assay.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hulin; Huang, Yangxin; Dykes, Carrie; Liu, Dacheng; Ma, Jingming; Perelson, Alan S; Demeter, Lisa M

    2006-03-01

    Growth competition assays have been developed to quantify the relative fitnesses of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) mutants. In this article we develop mathematical models to describe viral/cellular dynamic interactions in the assay experiment, from which new competitive fitness indices or parameters are defined. These indices include the log fitness ratio (LFR), the log relative fitness (LRF), and the production rate ratio (PRR). From the population genetics perspective, we clarify the confusion and correct the inconsistency in the definition of relative fitness in the literature of HIV-1 viral fitness. The LFR and LRF are easier to estimate from the experimental data than the PRR, which was misleadingly defined as the relative fitness in recent HIV-1 research literature. Calculation and estimation methods based on two data points and multiple data points were proposed and were carefully studied. In particular, we suggest using both standard linear regression (method of least squares) and a measurement error model approach for more-accurate estimates of competitive fitness parameters from multiple data points. The developed methodologies are generally applicable to any growth competition assays. A user-friendly computational tool also has been developed and is publicly available on the World Wide Web at http://www.urmc.rochester.edu/bstools/vfitness/virusfitness.htm.

  11. Modeling and Estimation of Replication Fitness of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 In Vitro Experiments by Using a Growth Competition Assay

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hulin; Huang, Yangxin; Dykes, Carrie; Liu, Dacheng; Ma, Jingming; Perelson, Alan S.; Demeter, Lisa M.

    2006-01-01

    Growth competition assays have been developed to quantify the relative fitnesses of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) mutants. In this article we develop mathematical models to describe viral/cellular dynamic interactions in the assay experiment, from which new competitive fitness indices or parameters are defined. These indices include the log fitness ratio (LFR), the log relative fitness (LRF), and the production rate ratio (PRR). From the population genetics perspective, we clarify the confusion and correct the inconsistency in the definition of relative fitness in the literature of HIV-1 viral fitness. The LFR and LRF are easier to estimate from the experimental data than the PRR, which was misleadingly defined as the relative fitness in recent HIV-1 research literature. Calculation and estimation methods based on two data points and multiple data points were proposed and were carefully studied. In particular, we suggest using both standard linear regression (method of least squares) and a measurement error model approach for more-accurate estimates of competitive fitness parameters from multiple data points. The developed methodologies are generally applicable to any growth competition assays. A user-friendly computational tool also has been developed and is publicly available on the World Wide Web at http://www.urmc.rochester.edu/bstools/vfitness/virusfitness.htm. PMID:16474144

  12. Spatio-Temporal Variation in Contrasting Effects of Resident Vegetation on Establishment, Growth and Reproduction of Dry Grassland Plants: Implications for Seed Addition Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Knappová, Jana; Knapp, Michal; Münzbergová, Zuzana

    2013-01-01

    Successful establishment of plants is limited by both biotic and abiotic conditions and their interactions. Seedling establishment is also used as a direct measure of habitat suitability, but transient changes in vegetation might provide windows of opportunity allowing plant species to colonize sites which otherwise appear unsuitable. We aimed to study spatio-temporal variability in the effects of resident vegetation on establishment, growth and reproduction of dry grassland species in abandoned arable fields representing potentially suitable habitats. Seeds were sown in disturbed (bare of vegetation and roots) and undisturbed plots in three fields abandoned in the last 20 years. To assess the effects of temporal variation on plant establishment, we initiated our experiments in two years (2007 and 2008). Seventeen out of the 35 sown species flowered within two years after sowing, while three species completely failed to become established. The vegetation in the undisturbed plots facilitated seedling establishment only in the year with low spring precipitation, and the effect did not hold for all species. In contrast, growth and flowering rate were consistently much greater in the disturbed plots, but the effect size differed between the fields and years of sowing. We show that colonization is more successful when site opening by disturbance coincide with other suitable conditions such as weather or soil characteristics. Seasonal variability involved in our study emphasizes the necessity of temporal replication of sowing experiments. Studies assessing habitat suitability by seed sowing should either involve both vegetation removal treatments and untreated plots or follow the gradient of vegetation cover. We strongly recommend following the numbers of established individuals, their sizes and reproductive success when assessing habitat suitability by seed sowing since one can gain completely different results in different phases of plant life cycle. PMID:23755288

  13. Spatio-temporal variation in contrasting effects of resident vegetation on establishment, growth and reproduction of dry grassland plants: implications for seed addition experiments.

    PubMed

    Knappová, Jana; Knapp, Michal; Münzbergová, Zuzana

    2013-01-01

    Successful establishment of plants is limited by both biotic and abiotic conditions and their interactions. Seedling establishment is also used as a direct measure of habitat suitability, but transient changes in vegetation might provide windows of opportunity allowing plant species to colonize sites which otherwise appear unsuitable. We aimed to study spatio-temporal variability in the effects of resident vegetation on establishment, growth and reproduction of dry grassland species in abandoned arable fields representing potentially suitable habitats. Seeds were sown in disturbed (bare of vegetation and roots) and undisturbed plots in three fields abandoned in the last 20 years. To assess the effects of temporal variation on plant establishment, we initiated our experiments in two years (2007 and 2008). Seventeen out of the 35 sown species flowered within two years after sowing, while three species completely failed to become established. The vegetation in the undisturbed plots facilitated seedling establishment only in the year with low spring precipitation, and the effect did not hold for all species. In contrast, growth and flowering rate were consistently much greater in the disturbed plots, but the effect size differed between the fields and years of sowing. We show that colonization is more successful when site opening by disturbance coincide with other suitable conditions such as weather or soil characteristics. Seasonal variability involved in our study emphasizes the necessity of temporal replication of sowing experiments. Studies assessing habitat suitability by seed sowing should either involve both vegetation removal treatments and untreated plots or follow the gradient of vegetation cover. We strongly recommend following the numbers of established individuals, their sizes and reproductive success when assessing habitat suitability by seed sowing since one can gain completely different results in different phases of plant life cycle.

  14. Nucleation and Grain Growth During Dehydration of Polycrystalline Gypsum Observed in Time-series Synchrotron X-ray Micro-tomography Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclere, H.; Bedford, J. D.; Fusseis, F.; Wheeler, J.; Faulkner, D.

    2015-12-01

    Nucleation and growth of new minerals in response to disequilibrium is the most fundamental metamorphic process. However, our current understanding of metamorphic reactions is largely based on inference from mineral assemblages brought to the surface by uplift and erosion, rather than from direct observation. The experimental investigation of metamorphism has also been limited, typically to concealed vessels thus restricting the possibility of direct microstructural monitoring. Recent advances in synchrotron-based X-ray micro-tomography allow for new experiments that utilise X-ray transparent setups in order to image these processes on the micron-scale in 4D. We conducted in-situ constant temperature experiments at the Advanced Photon Source (Argonne National Laboratory, USA) to dehydrate confined cylinders of Volterra Gypsum (5mm length x 2mm diameter). The relatively modest temperature of reaction and the apparently simple mineralogy make gypsum an ideal material for investigating processes associated with metamorphic devolatilization. Using a purpose-built X-ray transparent experimental cell (Fusseis et al., 2014, J. Synchrotron Rad. 21, 251-253) to apply an effective pressure of 5MPa, the samples were heated to 388K for approximately 10 hours to acquire three-dimensional time-series tomography datasets comprising forty time steps. Images show grains of the product material (bassanite) growing throughout the sample accompanied by an evolving porous network. These datasets provide new visual insights into the spatiotemporal association between porosity development and the formation of product minerals during devolatilization. The direct observation of reaction also has important implications for general metamorphic theory as we can track the complete history of grain growth from nucleation through to interaction with surrounding grains.

  15. Experience with growth hormone therapy in Turner syndrome in a single centre: low total height gain, no further gains after puberty onset and unchanged body proportions.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, R; Ranke, M B; Binder, G; Herdach, F; Zapadlo, M; Grauer, M L; Schwarze, C P; Wollmann, H A

    2000-01-01

    The experience gained since 1987, through observation of 85 girls with Turner syndrome under growth hormone (GH) treatment, has enabled the analysis of one of the largest cohorts. Our results show that age, karyotype and height reflect the heterogeneity of the patients examined at our growth centre. In 47 girls, followed over 4 years on GH (median dose 0.72 IU/kg/week), the median age was 9.4 years and mean height SDS was -3.55 (Prader) and -0.14 (Turner-specific), while height and other anthropometrical parameters [weight, body mass index, sitting height (SH), leg length (LL) SH/LL, head circumference, arm span] were documented and compared to normative data as well as to Turner-specific references established on the basis of a larger (n = 165) untreated cohort from Tübingen. The latter data are also documented in this article. Although there was a trend towards normalization of these parameters during the observation period, no inherent alterations in the Turner-specific anthropometric pattern occurred. In 42 girls who started GH treatment at a median age of 11.8 years, final height (bone age >15 years) was achieved at 16.7 years. The overall gain in height SDS (Turner) from start to end of GH therapy was 0.7 (+/- 0.8) SD, but 0.9 (+/- 0.6) SD from GH start to onset of puberty (spontaneous 12.2 years, induced 13.9 years) and -0.2 (+/- 0.8) from onset of puberty to end of growth. Height gain did not occur in 12 patients (29%) and a gain of > 5 cm was only observed in 16 patients (38%). Height gain correlated positively with age at puberty onset, duration, and dose of GH, and negatively with height and bone age at the time GH treatment started. Final height correlated positively with height SDS at GH start and negatively with the ratio of SH/LL (SDS). We conclude that, in the future, GH should be given at higher doses, but oestrogen substitution should be done cautiously, owing to its potentially harmful effect on growth. LL appears to determine height variation

  16. Role of local conditions of a turbulent boundary layer flow on the colonization and growth of a biofilm: direct numerical simulations and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coundoul, F.; Moulin, F.; Bonometti, T.

    2012-04-01

    . [1]. (which are limited to the inertial sub-layer and the upper roughness sub-layer). The objective of this study was to investigate the role of local conditions of a turbulent boundary layer flow in the development of a river biofilm especially in the phases of colonization and initial growth by using a numerical approach. A direct numerical simulations (DNS) of a turbulent boundary layer flow over a bed of hemispheres was performed using an Immersed Boundary Method. The validity of the scheme was checked by comparison with experimental and numerical results for a flow above a bed of regular cubes. Numerical simulations for a flow above hemispheres are presented and compared with measurements performed during river biofilm growth experiments in a hydraulic flume. The access to local flow conditions in the numerical simulation leads to a better understanding of the morphology of the colonization patches observed in the experiments.

  17. Effects of dust-caused early snowmelt on soil moisture, soil carbon and nitrogen, and plant growth and reproductive output in a snow manipulation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conner, L. G.; Gill, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    Regional climate forecasts for the western United States predict slightly more snow accumulation during the winter but warmer springs and earlier spring snowmelt. Snowmelt will be further advanced by radiative forcing from dust and black carbon deposition on mountain snowpack. We expect earlier snowmelt to reduce regional water supplies (Painter et al., 2010) and suspect that it may also lead to drier soil conditions which could impact nutrient cycling and plant growth and reproduction in alpine and subalpine environments. Our snow manipulation experiment included 12 sites at two elevations in paired forest and meadow sites. We added dust to the snow surface during spring ablation. The dust treatment reduced snowpack by 20 to 40% and advanced the snowfree date by 9 to 14 days. Following snowmelt, there was a temporary difference in soil moisture in the upper 0-15 cm of soil between the treatment and control plots. Following snowmelt, the temporary differences in soil moisture quickly converged during soil drydown to a lower limit determined by the soil characteristics specific to each site. This brief window of differences in soil moisture may have temporary impacts on ecosystem processes; however, the impacts are mediated by plant and microbial phenology. Some of the plants and microbes in seasonally-snow-covered environments are adapted to take advantage of the early season environments which include low temperatures and frequent freezing, while other plants and microbes have evolved to avoid this transition period through prolonged dormancy. These adaptations, and the transient nature of environmental differences caused by early snowmelt, may limit the impacts of early snowmelt on carbon and nitrogen cycling and on plant growth and reproduction in subalpine forest and meadows.

  18. Correction of the equilibrium temperature caused by slight evaporation of water in protein crystal growth cells during long-term space experiments at International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Takahisa; Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Yoshizaki, Izumi; Tsukamoto, Katsuo; Murayama, Kenta; Fukuyama, Seijiro; Hosokawa, Kouhei; Oshi, Kentaro; Ito, Daisuke; Yamazaki, Tomoya; Tachibana, Masaru; Miura, Hitoshi

    2015-08-01

    The normal growth rates of the {110} faces of tetragonal hen egg-white lysozyme crystals, R, were measured as a function of the supersaturation σ parameter using a reflection type interferometer under μG at the International Space Station (NanoStep Project). Since water slightly evaporated from in situ observation cells during a long-term space station experiment for several months, equilibrium temperature T(e) changed, and the actual σ, however, significantly increased mainly due to the increase in salt concentration C(s). To correct σ, the actual C(s) and protein concentration C(p), which correctly represent the measured T(e) value in space, were first calculated. Second, a new solubility curve with the corrected C(s) was plotted. Finally, the revised σ was obtained from the new solubility curve. This correction method successfully revealed that the 2.8% water was evaporated from the solution, leading to 2.8% increase in the C(s) and C(p) of the solution. PMID:26329200

  19. Correction of the equilibrium temperature caused by slight evaporation of water in protein crystal growth cells during long-term space experiments at International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Takahisa; Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Yoshizaki, Izumi; Tsukamoto, Katsuo; Murayama, Kenta; Fukuyama, Seijiro; Hosokawa, Kouhei; Oshi, Kentaro; Ito, Daisuke; Yamazaki, Tomoya; Tachibana, Masaru; Miura, Hitoshi

    2015-08-01

    The normal growth rates of the {110} faces of tetragonal hen egg-white lysozyme crystals, R, were measured as a function of the supersaturation σ parameter using a reflection type interferometer under μG at the International Space Station (NanoStep Project). Since water slightly evaporated from in situ observation cells during a long-term space station experiment for several months, equilibrium temperature T(e) changed, and the actual σ, however, significantly increased mainly due to the increase in salt concentration C(s). To correct σ, the actual C(s) and protein concentration C(p), which correctly represent the measured T(e) value in space, were first calculated. Second, a new solubility curve with the corrected C(s) was plotted. Finally, the revised σ was obtained from the new solubility curve. This correction method successfully revealed that the 2.8% water was evaporated from the solution, leading to 2.8% increase in the C(s) and C(p) of the solution.

  20. Growth of ScN(111) on Sc2O3(111) for GaN integration on Si(111): Experiment and ab-initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sana, P.; Tetzner, H.; Dabrowski, J.; Lupina, L.; Costina, I.; Thapa, S. B.; Storck, P.; Schroeder, T.; Zoellner, M. H.

    2016-10-01

    Growth mechanism of ScN on Sc2O3 for integration of Ga-polar GaN on Si(111) is investigated by in-situ X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, ex-situ time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry, atomic force microscopy, and ab-initio density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The ScN films are grown by molecular beam epitaxy from e-beam evaporated Sc and N plasma. The films grow in a layer-by-layer (Frank-van der Merwe, FM) fashion. Diffusion of nitrogen into Sc2O3 and segregation of oxygen onto ScN are observed. The segregated O atoms are gradually removed from the surface by N atoms from the plasma. Experiment and theory show that nitrogen cannot be efficiently incorporated into Sc2O3 by exposing it to N plasma alone, and calculations indicate that anion intermixing between ScN and Sc2O3 should be weak. On the basis of ab-initio data, the in-diffusion of N into Sc2O3 is attributed mostly to the effect of interaction between ScN ad-dimers on the Sc2O3 surface in the initial stage of growth. The segregation of O to the ScN surface is understood as driven by the tendency to compensate build-up of the electric field in the polar ScN film. This segregation is computed to be energetically favorable (by 0.4 eV per O atom) already for a monolayer of ScN; the energy gain increases to 1.0 eV and 1.6 eV per O atom for two and three ScN layers, respectively. Finally, it is verified by DFT that the ScN deposition method in which Sc metallic film is deposited first and then nitridized would lead to strong incorporation of O into the grown film, accompanied by strong reduction of the Sc2O3 substrate.

  1. Growth hormone and growth?

    PubMed

    Harvey, Steve

    2013-09-01

    Pituitary GH is obligatory for normal growth in mammals, but the importance of pituitary GH in avian growth is less certain. In birds, pituitary GH is biologically active and has growth promoting actions in the tibia-test bioassay. Its importance in normal growth is indicated by the growth suppression following the surgical removal of the pituitary gland or after the immunoneutralization of endogenous pituitary GH. The partial restoration of growth in some studies with GH-treated hypophysectomized birds also suggests GH dependency in avian growth, as does the dwarfism that occurs in some strains with GHR dysfunctions. Circulating GH concentrations are also correlated with body weight gain, being high in young, rapidly growing birds and low in slower growing older birds. Nevertheless, despite these observations, there is an extensive literature that concludes pituitary GH is not important in avian growth. This is based on numerous studies with hypophysectomized and intact birds that show only slight, transitory or absent growth responses to exogenous GH-treatment. Moreover, while circulating GH levels correlate with weight gain in young birds, this may merely reflect changes in the control of pituitary GH secretion during aging, as numerous studies involving experimental alterations in growth rate fail to show positive correlations between plasma GH concentrations and the alterations in growth rate. Furthermore, growth is known to occur in the absence of pituitary GH, as most embryonic development occurs prior to the ontogenetic appearance of pituitary somatotrophs and the appearance of GH in embryonic circulation. Early embryonic growth is also independent of the endocrine actions of pituitary GH, since removal of the presumptive pituitary gland does not impair early growth. Embryonic growth does, however, occur in the presence of extrapituitary GH, which is produced by most tissues and has autocrine or paracrine roles that locally promote growth and development

  2. Population growth and economic growth.

    PubMed

    Narayana, D L

    1984-01-01

    This discussion of the issues relating to the problem posed by population explosion in the developing countries and economic growth in the contemporary world covers the following: predictions of economic and social trends; the Malthusian theory of population; the classical or stationary theory of population; the medical triage model; ecological disaster; the Global 2000 study; the limits to growth; critiques of the Limits to Growth model; nonrenewable resources; food and agriculture; population explosion and stabilization; space and ocean colonization; and the limits perspective. The Limits to Growth model, a general equilibrium anti-growth model, is the gloomiest economic model ever constructed. None of the doomsday models, the Malthusian theory, the classical stationary state, the neo-Malthusian medical triage model, the Global 2000 study, are so far reaching in their consequences. The course of events that followed the publication of the "Limits to Growth" in 1972 in the form of 2 oil shocks, food shock, pollution shock, and price shock seemed to bear out formally the gloomy predictions of the thesis with a remarkable speed. The 12 years of economic experience and the knowledge of resource trends postulate that even if the economic pressures visualized by the model are at work they are neither far reaching nor so drastic. Appropriate action can solve them. There are several limitations to the Limits to Growth model. The central theme of the model, which is overshoot and collapse, is unlikely to be the course of events. The model is too aggregative to be realistic. It exaggerates the ecological disaster arising out of the exponential growth of population and industry. The gross underestimation of renewable resources is a basic flaw of the model. The most critical weakness of the model is its gross underestimation of the historical trend of technological progress and the technological possiblities within industry and agriculture. The model does correctly emphasize

  3. Population growth and economic growth.

    PubMed

    Narayana, D L

    1984-01-01

    This discussion of the issues relating to the problem posed by population explosion in the developing countries and economic growth in the contemporary world covers the following: predictions of economic and social trends; the Malthusian theory of population; the classical or stationary theory of population; the medical triage model; ecological disaster; the Global 2000 study; the limits to growth; critiques of the Limits to Growth model; nonrenewable resources; food and agriculture; population explosion and stabilization; space and ocean colonization; and the limits perspective. The Limits to Growth model, a general equilibrium anti-growth model, is the gloomiest economic model ever constructed. None of the doomsday models, the Malthusian theory, the classical stationary state, the neo-Malthusian medical triage model, the Global 2000 study, are so far reaching in their consequences. The course of events that followed the publication of the "Limits to Growth" in 1972 in the form of 2 oil shocks, food shock, pollution shock, and price shock seemed to bear out formally the gloomy predictions of the thesis with a remarkable speed. The 12 years of economic experience and the knowledge of resource trends postulate that even if the economic pressures visualized by the model are at work they are neither far reaching nor so drastic. Appropriate action can solve them. There are several limitations to the Limits to Growth model. The central theme of the model, which is overshoot and collapse, is unlikely to be the course of events. The model is too aggregative to be realistic. It exaggerates the ecological disaster arising out of the exponential growth of population and industry. The gross underestimation of renewable resources is a basic flaw of the model. The most critical weakness of the model is its gross underestimation of the historical trend of technological progress and the technological possiblities within industry and agriculture. The model does correctly emphasize

  4. Influence of nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations and ratios on Lemna gibba growth responses to triclosan in laboratory and stream mesocosm experiments.

    PubMed

    Fulton, Barry A; Brain, Richard A; Usenko, Sascha; Back, Jeffrey A; King, Ryan S; Brooks, Bryan W

    2009-12-01

    The effects of co-occurring nutrient and contaminant stressors are very likely to interact in aquatic systems, particularly at the level of primary producers. Site-specific nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) concentrations are often much lower and differ in relative availability than those used in nutrient-saturated laboratory assays for aquatic plants, which can introduce uncertainty in prospective ecological hazard and risk assessments. Because triclosan, an antimicrobial agent included in personal care products, potentially presents high relative risk among antimicrobial agents to aquatic plants and algae, we performed laboratory experiments with the model aquatic macrophyte Lemna gibba across a gradient of environmentally relevant N:P levels with and without triclosan co-exposure. Frond numbers (7 d) were significantly higher in N:P treatments of 16 and 23 but were lower in N:P of 937 and 2,500 treatments relative to standardized control media (N:P=3). When triclosan co-exposure occurred at high nutrient concentrations, frond number median effective concentration values at N:P 0.75, 3, and 16 were more than twofold lower than triclosan median effective concentration values in low nutrient media N:P ratios. However, a triclosan median effective concentration for frond number was twofold lower at N:P of 2,500 than at other N:P ratios in low concentration media. Influences of P enrichment on triclosan toxicity to L. gibba were further explored during a 14-d outdoor experimental stream mesocosm study. Effects of 2.6 and 20.8 microg L(-1) triclosan on L. gibba growth rates were more pronounced with increasing P treatment levels, which was generally consistent with our laboratory observations. Findings from these laboratory and field studies indicate that site-specific nutrient concentrations and ratios should be considered during assessments of primary producer responses to chemical stressors. PMID:19388793

  5. Metabolic and growth characteristics of novel diverse microbes isolated from deep cores collected at the Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment (NGEE)-Arctic site in Barrow, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, R.; Pettenato, A.; Tas, N.; Hubbard, S. S.; Jansson, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Arctic is characterized by vast amounts of carbon stored in permafrost and is an important focal point for the study of climate change as increasing temperature may accelerate microbially mediated release of Carbon stored in permafrost into the atmosphere as CO2 and CH4. Yet surprisingly, very little is known about the vulnerability of permafrost and response of microorganisms in the permafrost to their changing environment. This deficiency is largely due to the difficulty in study of largely uncultivated and unknown permafrost microbes. As part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment (NGEE) in the Arctic, we collected permafrost cores in an effort to isolate resident microbes. The cores were from the Barrow Environmental Observatory (BEO), located at the northern most location on the Alaskan Arctic Coastal Plain near Barrow, AK, and up to 3m in depth. In this location, permafrost starts from 0.5m in depth and is characterized by variable water content and higher pH than surface soils. Enrichments for heterotrophic bacteria were initiated at 4°C and 1°C in the dark in several different media types, under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Positive enrichments were identified by an increase in optical density and cell counts after incubation period ranging from two to four weeks. After serial transfers into fresh media, individual colonies were obtained on agar surface. Several strains were isolated that include Firmicutes such as Bacillus, Clostridium, Sporosarcina, and Paenibacillus species and Iron-reducing Betaproteobacteria such as Rhodoferax species. In addition, methanogenic enrichments continue to grow and produce methane gas at 2°C. In this study, we present the characterization, carbon substrate utilization, pH, temperature and osmotic tolerance, as well as the effect of increasing climate change parameters on the growth rate and respiratory gas production from these permafrost isolates.

  6. Vicarious Occupational Posttraumatic Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Larry

    2012-01-01

    Traditional studies of posttraumatic growth center on the individual or close family members as they deal with traumatic events. The current study examines workers who experience posttraumatic growth when a coworker has a traumatic experience. The participants in this study were firefighters in suburban Cook County, Illinois. Participants were…

  7. pH-driven shifts in overall and transcriptionally active denitrifiers control gaseous product stoichiometry in growth experiments with extracted bacteria from soil

    PubMed Central

    Brenzinger, Kristof; Dörsch, Peter; Braker, Gesche

    2015-01-01

    Soil pH is a strong regulator for activity as well as for size and composition of denitrifier communities. Low pH not only lowers overall denitrification rates but also influences denitrification kinetics and gaseous product stoichiometry. N2O reductase is particularly sensitive to low pH which seems to impair its activity post-transcriptionally, leading to higher net N2O production. Little is known about how complex soil denitrifier communities respond to pH change and whether their ability to maintain denitrification over a wider pH range relies on phenotypic redundancy. In the present study, we followed the abundance and composition of an overall and transcriptionally active denitrifier community extracted from a farmed organic soil in Sweden (pHH2O = 7.1) when exposed to pH 5.4 and drifting back to pH 6.6. The soil was previously shown to retain much of its functioning (low N2O/N2 ratios) over a wide pH range, suggesting a high functional versatility of the underlying community. We found that denitrifier community composition, abundance and transcription changed throughout incubation concomitant with pH change in the medium, allowing for complete reduction of nitrate to N2 with little accumulation of intermediates. When exposed to pH 5.4, the denitrifier community was able to grow but reduced N2O to N2 only when near-neutral pH was reestablished by the alkalizing metabolic activity of an acid-tolerant part of the community. The genotypes proliferating under these conditions differed from those dominant in the control experiment run at neutral pH. Denitrifiers of the nirS-type appeared to be severely suppressed by low pH and nirK-type and nosZ-containing denitrifiers showed strongly reduced transcriptional activity and growth, even after restoration of neutral pH. Our study suggests that low pH episodes alter transcriptionally active populations which shape denitrifier communities and determine their gas kinetics. PMID:26441895

  8. Experiment K-7-22: Growth Hormone Regulation Synthesis and Secretion in Microgravity. Part 2; Hypothalamic Growth Hormone-Releasing Factor, Somatostatin Immunoreactivity, and Messenger RNA Levels in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawchenko, P. E.; Arias, C.; Krasnov, I.; Grindeland, R. E.; Vale, W.

    1994-01-01

    Immunohistochemical analyses of hypothalamic hormones carried out on tissue from rats flown on an earlier flight (Cosmos 1887) suggested preferential effects on hypophysiotropic principles involved in the regulation of growth hormone secretion and synthesis. We found that staining in the median eminence for peptides that provide both stimulatory (growth hormone-releasing factor, or GRF) and inhibitory (somatostatin, SS) influences on growth hormone secretion were depressed in flight animals relative to synchronous controls, while staining for other neuroendocrine peptides, cortocotropin-releasing factor and arginine vasopressin, were similar in these two groups. While this suggests some selective impact of weightlessness on the two principal central nervous system regulators of growth hormone dynamics, the fact that both GRF- and SS-immunoreactivity (IR) appeared affected in the same direction is somewhat problematic, and makes tentative any intimation that effects on CNS control mechanisms may be etiologically significant contributors to the sequelae of reduced growth hormone secretion seen in prolonged space flight. To provide an additional, and more penetrating, analysis we attempted in hypothalamic material harvested from animals flown on Cosmos 2044 to complement immunohistochemical analyses of GRF and SS staining with quantitative, in situ assessments of messenger RNAs encoding the precursors for both these hormones.

  9. Impact of plant growth and morphology and of sediment concentration on sediment retention efficiency of vegetative filter strips: Flume experiments and VFSMOD modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrechts, Thomas; François, Sébastien; Lutts, Stanley; Muñoz-Carpena, Rafael; Bielders, Charles L.

    2014-04-01

    Vegetative filter strips (VFS) implemented downstream to the source of pollution can trap sediments and thus limit sediment export from agricultural fields. However, their retention efficiencies are determined by many factors, among others the type of plant species and its growth stage. The impact of plant growth and morphology, as well as of incoming sediment concentration, on the efficiency of VFS to trap sediments was assessed by means of an experimental flume. Two different plant species were tested, Lolium perenne and Trifolium repens, after 2 and 4 months of plant growth and for 2 different incoming silty-loam sediment concentrations. Measured retention efficiencies were compared to simulated values using VFSMOD based on goodness-of-fit indicators that take into account uncertainty linked to the measurements. The sediment storage capacity upstream of the VFS was limited in terms of mass, and therefore an increase in sediment concentration led to a decrease in sediment retention efficiency. After 2 months of plant growth, plant morphology affected the VFS potential to trap sediments, as reflected in the higher retention efficiency of T. repens due to its creeping shoot architecture. However, plant growth and development modified the plant morphology and VFS trapping potential. Indeed, L. perenne VFS retention efficiency increased from 35% after 2 months of growth to 50% after 4 months, due to the tillering capacity of grass species. Conversely, the trapping efficiency of T. repens decreased from 49% to 40% after 4 months. This highlights the possible degradation of VFS with time, which in the case of T.repens was due to an increased heterogeneity of plant density within the strips. These modifications of plant characteristics with growth stage, which affected sediment trapping efficiencies, can be effectively integrated into mechanistic models like VFSMOD, mainly through stem spacing and Manning's surface roughness coefficient inputs. Since these parameters

  10. Bone, Calcium and Spaceflight: A Living Systems Experiment Relating Animals and Plants the Effects of Calcium on Plant Growth and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiss-Bubenheim, Debra; Navarro, B. J.; Souza, Kenneth A. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This educational outreach activity provided students with information about ARC's role in conducting life sciences research in space. Students were introduced to the scientific method while conducting a plant experiment that was correlated to the flight animal experiment. Students made daily observations, collected data and reported on their findings. This classroom experiment providing a hands-on learning opportunity about terrestrial and space biology in which exposed the students to new fields of study for future endeavors.

  11. Quantitative determination of zero-gravity effects on electronic materials processing germanium crystal growth with simultaneous interface demarcation experiment MA-060, section 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, H. C.; Witt, A. F.; Lichtensteiger, M.; Herman, C. J.

    1982-01-01

    The crystal growth and segregation characteristics of a melt in a directional solidification configuration under near zero g conditions were investigated. The germanium (doped with gallium) system was selected because it was extensively studied on Earth and because it lends itself to a very detailed macroscopic and microscopic characterization. An extensive study was performed of the germanium crystals grown during the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project mission. It was found that single crystal growth was achieved and that the interface demarcation functioned successfully. On the basis of the results obtained to date, there is no indication that convection driven by thermal or surface tension gradients was present in the melt. The gallium segregation, in the absence of gravity, was found to be fundamentally different in its initial and its subsequent stages from that of the ground based tests. None of the existing theoretical models for growth and segregation can account for the observed segregation behavior in the absence of gravity.

  12. Growth Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... gland problem or disease. The pituitary gland makes growth hormone, which stimulates the growth of bone and other ... of it may be very short. Treatment with growth hormone can stimulate growth. People can also have too ...

  13. Detoxication of zinc and cadmium by the freshwater protozoan Tetrahymena pyriformis. II. Growth experiments and ultrastructural studies on sequestration of heavy metals

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlop, S.; Chapman, G.

    1981-04-01

    Sublethal concentrations of zinc and cadmium limited the growth of batch cultures of the ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis. Electron microscopy of cultured populations revealed many electron-dense cytoplasmic granules in cells exposed to zinc (60 ppM), but fewer in cells grown with less zinc (6 ppM) or cadmium (2 ppM). Ultrasturctural abnormalities were observed only in cells grown with cadmium. These contained autophagic vacuoles and had damaged nuclei. Zinc was shown to exert a protective effect against cadmium toxicity both in terms of growth and ulstructural appearance. Electron probe x-ray microanalysis revealed both zinc and cadmium within the cytoplasmic granules of cells exposed to these metals. Since the granules are normally composed predominantly of calcium and magnesium, these ions are implicated in the intracellular detoxication of zinc and cadmium. Zinc was detected only in the granules, while cadmium was also found in autophagic vacuoles and damaged nuclei.

  14. Assessment of crop growth and soil water modules in SWAT2000 using extensive field experiment data in an irrigation district of the Yellow River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luo, Y.; He, C.; Sophocleous, M.; Yin, Z.; Hongrui, R.; Ouyang, Z.

    2008-01-01

    SWAT, a physically-based, hydrological model simulates crop growth, soil water and groundwater movement, and transport of sediment and nutrients at both the process and watershed scales. While the different versions of SWAT have been widely used throughout the world for agricultural and water resources applications, little has been done to test the performance, variability, and transferability of the parameters in the crop growth, soil water, and groundwater modules in an integrated way with multiple sets of field experimental data at the process scale. Using an multiple years of field experimental data of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in the irrigation district of the Yellow River Basin, this paper assesses the performance of the plant-soil-groundwater modules and the variability and transferability of SWAT2000. Comparison of the simulated results by SWAT to the observations showed that SWAT performed quite unsatisfactorily in LAI predictions during the senescence stage, in yield predictions, and in soil-water estimation under dry soil-profile conditions. The unsatisfactory performance in LAI prediction might be attributed to over-simplified senescence modeling; in yield prediction to the improper computation of the harvest index; and in soil water under dry conditions to the exclusion of groundwater evaporation from the soil water balance in SWAT. In this paper, improvements in crop growth, soil water, and groundwater modules in SWAT were implemented. The saturated soil profile was coupled to the oscillating groundwater table. A variable evaporation coefficient taking into account soil water deficit index, groundwater depth, and crop root depth was used to replace the fixed coefficient in computing groundwater evaporation. The soil water balance included the groundwater evaporation. The modifications improved simulations of crop evapotranspiration and biomass as well as soil water dynamics under dry soil-profile conditions. The evaluation shows that the

  15. Assessment of crop growth and soil water modules in SWAT2000 using extensive field experiment data in an irrigation district of the Yellow River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yi; He, Chansheng; Sophocleous, Marios; Yin, Zhifang; Hongrui, Ren; Ouyang, Zhu

    2008-04-01

    SummarySWAT, a physically-based, hydrological model simulates crop growth, soil water and groundwater movement, and transport of sediment and nutrients at both the process and watershed scales. While the different versions of SWAT have been widely used throughout the world for agricultural and water resources applications, little has been done to test the performance, variability, and transferability of the parameters in the crop growth, soil water, and groundwater modules in an integrated way with multiple sets of field experimental data at the process scale. Using an multiple years of field experimental data of winter wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.) in the irrigation district of the Yellow River Basin, this paper assesses the performance of the plant-soil-groundwater modules and the variability and transferability of SWAT2000. Comparison of the simulated results by SWAT to the observations showed that SWAT performed quite unsatisfactorily in LAI predictions during the senescence stage, in yield predictions, and in soil-water estimation under dry soil-profile conditions. The unsatisfactory performance in LAI prediction might be attributed to over-simplified senescence modeling; in yield prediction to the improper computation of the harvest index; and in soil water under dry conditions to the exclusion of groundwater evaporation from the soil water balance in SWAT. In this paper, improvements in crop growth, soil water, and groundwater modules in SWAT were implemented. The saturated soil profile was coupled to the oscillating groundwater table. A variable evaporation coefficient taking into account soil water deficit index, groundwater depth, and crop root depth was used to replace the fixed coefficient in computing groundwater evaporation. The soil water balance included the groundwater evaporation. The modifications improved simulations of crop evapotranspiration and biomass as well as soil water dynamics under dry soil-profile conditions. The evaluation shows that

  16. Face-by-face growth of sucrose crystals from aqueous solutions in the presence of raffinose. I. Experiments and kinetic-adsorption model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sgualdino, G.; Aquilano, D.; Cincotti, A.; Pastero, L.; Vaccari, G.

    2006-06-01

    Experimental growth kinetics of {1 0 0}, {1 0 1¯}, {1 1 0} and {1¯ 1¯ 0}, the four most important F (flat) forms of sucrose crystal, has been investigated within a range of low supersaturations ( 0.040⩽σ⩽0.080) and under varying raffinose concentrations (0.0 ⩽Craff⩽8.0% H 2O). The comparison with growth isotherms determined in pure solution confirms that raffinose dramatically slows down the growth rates of the first three forms, which still go on growing by the screw dislocation mechanism. Further, dead zones occur for both the {1 0 1¯} and {1 1 0} forms. On the contrary the {1¯ 1¯ 0} form is weakly affected, at least up to Craff≈3% H 2O, owing to the low structural compatibility between its surface sites and the adsorbed raffinose molecules. Both Cabrera-Vermilyea and Kubota-Mullin models, associated with Langmuir-type equilibrium isotherms, are tested to find the more suitable description of the kinetic behaviour in the presence of raffinose. The Kubota-Mullin model resulting the better one, we concluded that adsorption occurs at kink sites of all the interested forms. The predictive power of α h k l , the effectiveness coefficient of this model, is outlined as well. Finally, the disagreements between the model predictions and the experimental behaviour of the {1 0 0} form are attributed to the peculiar structure of its surface.

  17. Ameliorating Effects of Biochar Derived from Poultry Manure and White Clover Residues on Soil Nutrient Status and Plant growth Promotion - Greenhouse Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, M. Kaleem; Anwar, Ahsan Ali

    2015-01-01

    Biochar application to agricultural soils is rapidly emerging as a new management strategy for its potential role in carbon sequestration, soil quality improvements, and plant growth promotion. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of biochars derived from white clover residues and poultry manure on soil quality characteristics, growth and N accumulation in maize (Zea mays L.) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grown in a loam soil under greenhouse conditions. Treatments comprised of: untreated control; mineral N fertilizer (urea N, UN) at the rate of 200, and 100 mg N kg-1, white clover residues biochar (WCRB), poultry manure biochar (PMB) at 30 Mg ha–1, and the possible combinations of WCRB+PMB (50:50), UN+WCRB (50:50), UN+PMB (50:50), and UN+WCRB+PMB (50:25:25). The treatments were arranged in a completely randomized design with three replications. Results indicated a significant increase in the growth and biomass production of maize and wheat supplemented with biochars alone or mixed with N fertilizer. Biochars treatments showed varying impact on plant growth depended upon the type of the biochar, and in general plant growth under PMB was significantly higher than that recorded under WCRB. The growth characteristics in the combined treatments (half biochar+half N) were either higher or equivalent to that recorded under full fertilizer N treatment (N200). The biochar treatments WCRB, PMB, and WCRB+PMB (50:50) increased maize shoot N by 18, 26 and 21%, respectively compared to the control while wheat shoot N did not show positive response. The N-uptake by maize treated with WCRB, PMB, and WCRB+PMB (50:50) was 54, 116, and 90 mg g-1 compared to the 33 mg g-1 in the control while the N-uptake by wheat was 41, 60, and 53 mg g-1 compared to 24 mg g-1 in the control. The mixed treatments (half biochar+half N) increased N-uptake by 2.3folds in maize and 1.7 to 2.5folds in wheat compared to the N100 showing increasing effect of biochar on N use efficiency

  18. Ameliorating Effects of Biochar Derived from Poultry Manure and White Clover Residues on Soil Nutrient Status and Plant growth Promotion--Greenhouse Experiments.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, M Kaleem; Anwar, Ahsan Ali

    2015-01-01

    Biochar application to agricultural soils is rapidly emerging as a new management strategy for its potential role in carbon sequestration, soil quality improvements, and plant growth promotion. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of biochars derived from white clover residues and poultry manure on soil quality characteristics, growth and N accumulation in maize (Zea mays L.) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grown in a loam soil under greenhouse conditions. Treatments comprised of: untreated control; mineral N fertilizer (urea N, UN) at the rate of 200, and 100 mg N kg(-1), white clover residues biochar (WCRB), poultry manure biochar (PMB) at 30 Mg ha(-1), and the possible combinations of WCRB+PMB (50:50), UN+WCRB (50:50), UN+PMB (50:50), and UN+WCRB+PMB (50:25:25). The treatments were arranged in a completely randomized design with three replications. Results indicated a significant increase in the growth and biomass production of maize and wheat supplemented with biochars alone or mixed with N fertilizer. Biochars treatments showed varying impact on plant growth depended upon the type of the biochar, and in general plant growth under PMB was significantly higher than that recorded under WCRB. The growth characteristics in the combined treatments (half biochar+half N) were either higher or equivalent to that recorded under full fertilizer N treatment (N200). The biochar treatments WCRB, PMB, and WCRB+PMB (50:50) increased maize shoot N by 18, 26 and 21%, respectively compared to the control while wheat shoot N did not show positive response. The N-uptake by maize treated with WCRB, PMB, and WCRB+PMB (50:50) was 54, 116, and 90 mg g(-1) compared to the 33 mg g(-1) in the control while the N-uptake by wheat was 41, 60, and 53 mg g(-1) compared to 24 mg g(-1) in the control. The mixed treatments (half biochar+half N) increased N-uptake by 2.3 folds in maize and 1.7 to 2.5 folds in wheat compared to the N100 showing increasing effect of biochar on N

  19. Ameliorating Effects of Biochar Derived from Poultry Manure and White Clover Residues on Soil Nutrient Status and Plant growth Promotion--Greenhouse Experiments.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, M Kaleem; Anwar, Ahsan Ali

    2015-01-01

    Biochar application to agricultural soils is rapidly emerging as a new management strategy for its potential role in carbon sequestration, soil quality improvements, and plant growth promotion. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of biochars derived from white clover residues and poultry manure on soil quality characteristics, growth and N accumulation in maize (Zea mays L.) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grown in a loam soil under greenhouse conditions. Treatments comprised of: untreated control; mineral N fertilizer (urea N, UN) at the rate of 200, and 100 mg N kg(-1), white clover residues biochar (WCRB), poultry manure biochar (PMB) at 30 Mg ha(-1), and the possible combinations of WCRB+PMB (50:50), UN+WCRB (50:50), UN+PMB (50:50), and UN+WCRB+PMB (50:25:25). The treatments were arranged in a completely randomized design with three replications. Results indicated a significant increase in the growth and biomass production of maize and wheat supplemented with biochars alone or mixed with N fertilizer. Biochars treatments showed varying impact on plant growth depended upon the type of the biochar, and in general plant growth under PMB was significantly higher than that recorded under WCRB. The growth characteristics in the combined treatments (half biochar+half N) were either higher or equivalent to that recorded under full fertilizer N treatment (N200). The biochar treatments WCRB, PMB, and WCRB+PMB (50:50) increased maize shoot N by 18, 26 and 21%, respectively compared to the control while wheat shoot N did not show positive response. The N-uptake by maize treated with WCRB, PMB, and WCRB+PMB (50:50) was 54, 116, and 90 mg g(-1) compared to the 33 mg g(-1) in the control while the N-uptake by wheat was 41, 60, and 53 mg g(-1) compared to 24 mg g(-1) in the control. The mixed treatments (half biochar+half N) increased N-uptake by 2.3 folds in maize and 1.7 to 2.5 folds in wheat compared to the N100 showing increasing effect of biochar on N

  20. Bone, Calcium and Spaceflight: A Living Systems Experiment Relating Animals and Plants the Effects of Calcium on Plant Growth and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiss-Bubenheim, D.; Navarro, B.J.; Morey-Holton, E.; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This NASA-sponsored educational outreach activity provided local students with information about Ames Research Center's (ARC) role in conducting life sciences research in space. Students were introduced to the scientific method while conducting a plant experiment that correlated with the Spacelab Life Sciences-2 (SLS-2) flight animal experiment of Dr. Emily Morey-Holton entitled "Bone, Calcium and Spaceflight". Students made daily observations, collected data and reported on their findings. Students also had the opportunity to witness the STS-58 landing at Edwards Air Force Base in southern California and attended a briefing given by the Payload Commander, Dr. Rhea Seddon at ARC last month. This classroom experiment providing a hands-on learning opportunity about terrestrial and space biology and, hopefully, introduced the students to new fields of study for future endeavors.

  1. Learning from Inquiry-Based Laboratories in Nonmajor Biology: An Interpretive Study of the Relationships among Inquiry Experience, Epistemologies, and Conceptual Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Carolyn S.; Tsoi, Mai Yin; Calkin, Jamie; Darley, Marshall

    2003-01-01

    The use of inquiry-based laboratory in college science classes is on the rise. This study investigated how five nonmajor biology students learned from an inquiry-based laboratory experience. Using interpretive data analysis, the five students' conceptual ecologies, learning beliefs, and science epistemologies were explored. Findings indicated that…

  2. Growth and exopolysaccharide yield of Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus DSM 20081 in batch and continuous bioreactor experiments at constant pH.

    PubMed

    Mende, Susann; Krzyzanowski, Leona; Weber, Jost; Jaros, Doris; Rohm, Harald

    2012-02-01

    Some Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus strains are able to synthesize exopolysaccharides (EPS) and are therefore highly important for the dairy industry as starter cultures. The aim of this study was to investigate the nutritional requirements for growth and EPS production of Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus DSM 20081. A medium was developed from a semi-defined medium (SDM) in which glucose was replaced by lactose and different combinations of supplements (nucleobases, vitamins, salts, sodium formate and orotic acid) were added. Constant pH batch fermentation with the modified medium resulted in an EPS yield of approximately 210 mg glucose equivalents per liter medium. This was a 10-fold increase over flask cultivation of this strain in SDM. Although not affecting cell growth, the mixture of salts enhanced the EPS synthesis. Whereas EPS production was approximately 12 mg/g dry biomass without salt supplementation, a significantly higher yield (approximately 20 mg/g dry biomass) was observed after adding the salt mixture. In continuous fermentation, a maximal EPS concentration was obtained at a dilution rate of 0.31/h (80 mg EPS/L), which corresponded to a specific EPS production of 49 mg/g dry biomass.

  3. Effect of Organic Manures on the Growth of Cymbopogon citratus and Chrysopogon zizanioides for the Phytoremediation of Chromite-Asbestos Mine Waste: A Pot Scale Experiment.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Adarsh; Maiti, Subodh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The abandoned chromite-asbestos mines are located in the Roro hills, West Singhbhum, Jharkhand, India, where mining operation ceased in 1983, and since then these mines are causing environmental pollution. The present study was planned to phytoremediate these metalloid and metal contaminated mine waste by using two aromatic grasses, Cymbopogon citratus and Chrysopogon zizanioides by applying different proportions of amendments (chicken manure, farmyard manure and garden soil). Mine waste has neutral pH, low electrical conductivity and organic carbon with higher concentration of total metals (Cr and Ni) as compared to soil. Application of manures resulted significant improvements of mine waste characteristics and plant growth, reduction in the availability of total extractable toxic metals (Cr, Ni) and increase in Mn, Zn and Cu concentration in the substrate. The maximum growth and biomass production for C. citratus and C. zizanioides were found in T-IV combination comprising of mine waste (90%), chicken manure (2.5%), farmyard manure (2.5%) and garden soil (5%). Addition of T-IV combination also resulted in low Cr and Ni accumulation in roots and reduction in translocation to shoots. Study indicates that C. citratus and C. zizanioides can be used for phytostabilization of abandoned chromite-asbestos mine waste with amendments. PMID:25495934

  4. Effect of Organic Manures on the Growth of Cymbopogon citratus and Chrysopogon zizanioides for the Phytoremediation of Chromite-Asbestos Mine Waste: A Pot Scale Experiment.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Adarsh; Maiti, Subodh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The abandoned chromite-asbestos mines are located in the Roro hills, West Singhbhum, Jharkhand, India, where mining operation ceased in 1983, and since then these mines are causing environmental pollution. The present study was planned to phytoremediate these metalloid and metal contaminated mine waste by using two aromatic grasses, Cymbopogon citratus and Chrysopogon zizanioides by applying different proportions of amendments (chicken manure, farmyard manure and garden soil). Mine waste has neutral pH, low electrical conductivity and organic carbon with higher concentration of total metals (Cr and Ni) as compared to soil. Application of manures resulted significant improvements of mine waste characteristics and plant growth, reduction in the availability of total extractable toxic metals (Cr, Ni) and increase in Mn, Zn and Cu concentration in the substrate. The maximum growth and biomass production for C. citratus and C. zizanioides were found in T-IV combination comprising of mine waste (90%), chicken manure (2.5%), farmyard manure (2.5%) and garden soil (5%). Addition of T-IV combination also resulted in low Cr and Ni accumulation in roots and reduction in translocation to shoots. Study indicates that C. citratus and C. zizanioides can be used for phytostabilization of abandoned chromite-asbestos mine waste with amendments.

  5. Mouth Growths

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dry Mouth Mouth Growths Mouth Sores and Inflammation Toothache Malocclusion Teeth Grinding Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis Growths can ... Dry Mouth Mouth Growths Mouth Sores and Inflammation Toothache Malocclusion Teeth Grinding Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis NOTE: This ...

  6. DMA Modulus as a Screening Parameter for Compatibility of Polymeric Containment Materials with Various Solutions for use in Space Shuttle Microgravity Protein Crystal Growth (PCG) Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingard, Charles Doug; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Protein crystals are grown in microgravity experiments inside the Space Shuttle during orbit. Such crystals are basically grown in a five-component system containing a salt, buffer, polymer, organic and water. During these experiments, a number of different polymeric containment materials must be compatible with up to hundreds of different PCG solutions in various concentrations for durations up to 180 days. When such compatibility experiments are performed at NASA/MSFC (Marshall Space Flight Center) simultaneously on containment material samples immersed in various solutions in vials, the samples are rather small out of necessity. DMA4 modulus was often used as the primary screening parameter for such small samples as a pass/fail criterion for incompatibility issues. In particular, the TA Instruments DMA 2980 film tension clamp was used to test rubber O-rings as small in I.D. as 0.091 in. by cutting through the cross-section at one place, then clamping the stretched linear cord stock at each end. The film tension clamp was also used to successfully test short length samples of medical/surgical grade tubing with an O.D. of 0.125 in.

  7. Growth rates made easy.

    PubMed

    Hall, Barry G; Acar, Hande; Nandipati, Anna; Barlow, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    In the 1960s-1980s, determination of bacterial growth rates was an important tool in microbial genetics, biochemistry, molecular biology, and microbial physiology. The exciting technical developments of the 1990s and the 2000s eclipsed that tool; as a result, many investigators today lack experience with growth rate measurements. Recently, investigators in a number of areas have started to use measurements of bacterial growth rates for a variety of purposes. Those measurements have been greatly facilitated by the availability of microwell plate readers that permit the simultaneous measurements on up to 384 different cultures. Only the exponential (logarithmic) portions of the resulting growth curves are useful for determining growth rates, and manual determination of that portion and calculation of growth rates can be tedious for high-throughput purposes. Here, we introduce the program GrowthRates that uses plate reader output files to automatically determine the exponential portion of the curve and to automatically calculate the growth rate, the maximum culture density, and the duration of the growth lag phase. GrowthRates is freely available for Macintosh, Windows, and Linux. We discuss the effects of culture volume, the classical bacterial growth curve, and the differences between determinations in rich media and minimal (mineral salts) media. This protocol covers calibration of the plate reader, growth of culture inocula for both rich and minimal media, and experimental setup. As a guide to reliability, we report typical day-to-day variation in growth rates and variation within experiments with respect to position of wells within the plates.

  8. Electronic structure and mechanical properties of ternary ZrTaN alloys studied by ab initio calculations and thin-film growth experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abadias, G.; Kanoun, M. B.; Goumri-Said, S.; Koutsokeras, L.; Dub, S. N.; Djemia, Ph.

    2014-10-01

    The structure, phase stability, and mechanical properties of ternary alloys of the Zr-Ta-N system are investigated by combining thin-film growth and ab initio calculations. Zr1-xTaxN films with 0≤x≤1 were deposited by reactive magnetron cosputtering in Ar +N2 plasma discharge and their structural properties characterized by x-ray diffraction. We considered both ordered and disordered alloys, using supercells and special quasirandom structure approaches, to account for different possible metal atom distributions on the cation sublattice. Density functional theory within the generalized gradient approximation was employed to calculate the electronic structure as well as predict the evolution of the lattice parameter and key mechanical properties, including single-crystal elastic constants and polycrystalline elastic moduli, of ternary Zr1-xTaxN compounds with cubic rocksalt structure. These calculated values are compared with experimental data from thin-film measurements using Brillouin light scattering and nanoindentation tests. We also study the validity of Vegard's empirical rule and the effect of growth-dependent stresses on the lattice parameter. The thermal stability of these Zr1-xTaxN films is also studied, based on their structural and mechanical response upon vacuum annealing at 850 °C for 3 h. Our findings demonstrate that Zr1-xTaxN alloys with Ta fraction 0.51⩽x⩽0.78 exhibit enhanced toughness, while retaining high hardness ˜30 GPa, as a result of increased valence electron concentration and phase stability tuning. Calculations performed for disordered or ordered structures both lead to the same conclusion regarding the mechanical behavior of these nitride alloys, in agreement with recent literature findings [H. Kindlund, D. G. Sangiovanni, L. Martinez-de-Olcoz, J. Lu, J. Jensen, J. Birch, I. Petrov, J. E. Greene, V. Chirita, and L. Hultman, APL Materials 1, 042104 (2013), 10.1063/1.4822440].

  9. Control of nucleation and growth in protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Meehan, Edward J.

    1988-01-01

    The potential advantages of nucleation and growth control through temperature, rather than the addition of precipitants or removal of solvent, are discussed. A simple light scattering arrangement for the characterization of nucleation and growth conditions in solutions is described. The temperature dependence of the solubility of low ionic strength lysozyme solutions is applied in preliminary nucleation and growth experiments.

  10. Multistage nucleation of two-dimensional Si islands on Si(111)-7x7 during MBE growth: STM experiments and extended rate-equation model

    SciTech Connect

    Filimonov, Sergey; Cherepanov, Vasily; Voigtlaender, Bert; Hervieu, Yuri

    2007-07-15

    The submonolayer density of two-dimensional (2D) islands in Si/Si(111)-7x7 molecular beam epitaxy is measured using scanning tunneling microscopy. At a relatively low deposition temperature of 673 K, the density of 2D islands is a power function of the deposition flux N{sub 2D}{proportional_to}F{sup {chi}} with the exponent {chi}=0.24 being smaller than that predicted by the standard nucleation theory. The nonstandard scaling of the 2D island density is explained by the multistage character of the nucleation process on the Si(111)-7x7 surface which involves consecutive stages of formation of stable Si clusters, formation of pairs of clusters, and transformation of the cluster pairs to 2D islands. Using an extended rate-equation model, we analyze the temperature and growth rate dependencies of the density of single clusters, cluster pairs, and 2D islands and show that an activation barrier of {approx}1.26 eV delays the transformation of cluster pairs to 2D islands. The delayed transformation of cluster pairs to 2D islands is the reason for the nonstandard scaling of the 2D island density observed at low deposition temperatures.

  11. Chemical Control of Plant Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agricultural Research Center (USDA), Beltsville, MD.

    Seven experiments are presented in this Science Study Aid to help students investigate the control of plant growth with chemicals. Plant growth regulators, weed control, and chemical pruning are the topics studied in the experiments which are based on investigations that have been and are being conducted at the U. S. Agricultural Research Center,…

  12. Estimation of autotrophic maximum specific growth rate constant--experience from the long-term operation of a laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor system.

    PubMed

    Su, Yu-min; Makinia, Jacek; Pagilla, Krishna R

    2008-04-01

    The autotrophic maximum specific growth rate constant, muA,max, is the critical parameter for design and performance of nitrifying activated sludge systems. In literature reviews (i.e., Henze et al., 1987; Metcalf and Eddy, 1991), a wide range of muA,max values have been reported (0.25 to 3.0 days(-1)); however, recent data from several wastewater treatment plants across North America revealed that the estimated muA,max values remained in the narrow range 0.85 to 1.05 days(-1). In this study, long-term operation of a laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor system was investigated for estimating this coefficient according to the low food-to-microorganism ratio bioassay and simulation methods, as recommended in the Water Environment Research Foundation (Alexandria, Virginia) report (Melcer et al., 2003). The estimated muA,max values using steady-state model calculations for four operating periods ranged from 0.83 to 0.99 day(-1). The International Water Association (London, United Kingdom) Activated Sludge Model No. 1 (ASM1) dynamic model simulations revealed that a single value of muA,max (1.2 days(-1)) could be used, despite variations in the measured specific nitrification rates. However, the average muA,max was gradually decreasing during the activated sludge chlorination tests, until it reached the value of 0.48 day(-1) at the dose of 5 mg chlorine/(g mixed liquor suspended solids x d). Significant discrepancies between the predicted XA/YA ratios were observed. In some cases, the ASM1 predictions were approximately two times higher than the steady-state model predictions. This implies that estimating this ratio from a complex activated sludge model and using it in simple steady-state model calculations should be accepted with great caution and requires further investigation.

  13. Assessment of Hormone Receptor and Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 Status in Breast Carcinoma Using Thin-Prep Cytology Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology FISH Experience From China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhihui; Yuan, Peng; Guo, Huiqin; Zhao, Linlin; Ying, Jianming; Wang, Mingrong; Zhao, Huan; Pan, Qinjing; Xu, Binghe

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) overexpression can be used to predict patient prognosis in breast cancer (BC). Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is a reliable predictive marker in invasive breast cancer (IBC). Thin-Prep (TP) specimens are commonly utilized for immunocytochemistry (ICC) in fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC). Thus, we sought to investigate if the incorporation of molecular diagnosis performed on TP-processed specimens is applicable in clinical practice. Hormone receptors (HRs) and HER2 immunocytochemistry was performed on 542 primary breast cancer FNAC specimens using the TP method. One hundred fourteen HER2 fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses were performed on HER2 ICC 2+ FNAC specimens and the corresponding tissue samples. HRs results of TP slides and those of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) slides were correlated well for ER (concordance rate = 93.3%, kappa value = 0.85) and PR (concordance rate = 88.6%, kappa value = 0.75). HER2 results for the TP slides and those of the matched FFPE slides also correlated well (concordance rate = 80.0%, kappa value = 0.62). The specificity of HER2 was 97.3%; however, the sensitivity was only 67.1%. Cytological specimens and histological samples showed a strong correlation (concordance rate = 99.1%, kappa value = 0.98) while being used to evaluate HER2 gene amplification. FNAC is a minimally invasive technique that can be used as an alternative method to collect tissue especially in cases where an excisional or core biopsy is difficult to obtain, or when recurrence is present. The results of ICC HRs in FNAC TP specimens may be used instead, but HER2 assessment may not be reliable enough for clinical use. FISH testing is necessary in this setting. PMID:26091472

  14. Nutrient limitation restricts growth and reproductive output in a tropical montane cloud forest bromeliad: findings from a long-term forest fertilization experiment.

    PubMed

    Lasso, Eloisa; Ackerman, James D

    2013-01-01

    From studies in seasonal lowland tropical forests, bromeliad epiphytes appear to be limited mainly by water, and to a lesser extent by nutrient supply, especially phosphorous. Less is understood about the mineral nutrition of tropical montane cloud forest (TMCF) epiphytes, even though their highest diversity is in this habitat. Nutrient limitation is known to be a key factor restricting forest productivity in TMCF, and if epiphytes are nutritionally linked to their host trees, as has been suggested, we would expect that they are also nutrient limited. We studied the effect of a higher nutrient input on reproduction and growth of the tank bromeliad Werauhia sintenisii in experimental plots located in a TMCF in Puerto Rico, where all macro- and micronutrients had been added quarterly starting in 1989 and continuing throughout the duration of this study. We found that bromeliads growing in fertilized plots were receiving litterfall with higher concentrations of N, P, and Zn and had higher concentrations of P, Zn, Fe, Al, and Na in their vegetative body. The N:P ratios found (fertilized = 27.5 and non-fertilized = 33.8) suggest that W. sintenisii may also be phosphorous limited as are lowland epiphytes. Fertilized plants had slightly longer inflorescences, and more flowers per inflorescence, than non-fertilized plants, but their flowers produced nectar in similar concentrations and quantities. Fertilized plants produced more seeds per fruit and per plant. Frequency of flowering in two consecutive years was higher for fertilized plants than for controls, suggesting that fertilized plants overcome the cost of reproduction more readily than non-fertilized plants. These results provide evidence that TMCF epiphytic bromeliads are nutrient limited like their lowland counterparts. PMID:22767363

  15. Plant growth controls short-term changes in soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks of croplands - new insights from the CarboZALF experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Mathias; Jurisch, Nicole; Garcia Alba, Joana; Albiac Borraz, Elisa; Schmidt, Marten; Verch, Gernot; Sommer, Michael; Augustin, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    The long-term influence of crop rotations, climate conditions or soil type on soil organic carbon stock (SOC) patterns and gaseous C emissions of agricultural landscapes is widely recognized. However, the question of short-term seasonal changes in SOC within these areas remains unclear. A main reason for this is the detection problem of temporal and spatial variability in gaseous C exchange and thus, changes in SOC stocks (ΔSOC) in a high resolution. This study introduces dynamic C balances as a method to obtain seasonal changes in SOC stocks. Dynamic C balances were calculated by a combination of automatic chamber CO2 exchange measurements and empirical biomass models. Measurements were performed for three consecutive years at a colluvial depression (Colluvic Regosol) in the hummocky ground moraine landscape of NE Germany (CarboZALF experimental site). The investigated crop rotation was maize, winter fodder rye, maize, winter fodder rye, and sudangrass. The site is characterized by a gradient in ground water level (GWL) and related spatial heterogeneity in soil properties, such as SOC as well as soil nitrogen (Nt) stocks. Modelled dynamic C balances reveal that up to 79% of the standard deviation of estimated annual ΔSOC between single chambers emerged during the main period of crop growth (three months in summer). No significant changes in ΔSOC were detected outside the growing season. Instead, differences between chambers remain constant despite ΔSOC dynamics. Environmental variables (Nt stocks of Ap horizon and GWL), affecting plant-mediated C sequestration, explained up to 95% of temporal and spatial variability in CO2 exchange and ΔSOC. Thus, plant activities were the major catalyst for small scale differences in annual ΔSOC of croplands.

  16. Inhibiting the transient choroidal thickening response using the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor l-NAME prevents the ameliorative effects of visual experience on ocular growth in two different visual paradigms.

    PubMed

    Nickla, Debora L; Wilken, Erika; Lytle, Grace; Yom, Sung; Mertz, James

    2006-08-01

    It is generally accepted that the increase in choroidal thickness in response to myopic defocus in chicks acts to move the retina towards the image plane. It may also constitute part of the signal cascade in the visual regulation of eye growth. To test this, we used the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor l-NAME to inhibit the defocus induced choroidal thickening under two different visual conditions, and looked at the effects on ocular growth rate. Exp. 1: Deprivation/Vision: chicks were monocularly deprived of form vision with translucent diffusers from day 6 to day 9. In the middle of each day the diffusers were removed for 2 h. One group received an intravitreal injection of 30 microl l-NAME (16 micromole; n=12) prior to the vision, a second group received injections of physiological saline (n=11). Exp. 2: Recovery/Vision: chicks were made myopic by form deprivation from day 6 to day 10. On days 11 to 14 the diffusers were removed for 2 h per day for 4 days to allow eyes to "recover" from the myopia. One group received an injection of l-NAME prior to vision (n=8), the other saline (n=6). Refractive errors were measured with a refractometer at the start (days 6 and 11) and end (days 10 and 15, respectively) of both experiments. Ocular dimensions were measured with high frequency A-scan ultrasonography at the start and end, and on the third experimental day immediately before and after the period of vision. Choroidal retinoic acid synthesis was measured by HPLC. Finally, NO production and scleral proteoglycan synthesis were measured in eyes wearing positive lenses 6 and 24h after an injection of l-NAME. l-NAME prevented the transient vision-induced choroidal thickening in both experiments. Furthermore, l-NAME inhibited the protective effect of brief daily vision: eyes became significantly more myopic than saline controls (exp. 1: -9 D vs -2.7D; exp. 2: -0.9 D vs +4.3 D; p<0.005 for both) and grew faster (change in lens-sclera: exp. 1: 295 vs 158 microm; exp. 2: 147

  17. Rapid growth of hydrofluorocarbon 134a and hydrochlorofluorocarbons 141b, 142b, and 22 from Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE) observations at Cape Grim, Tasmania, and Mace Head, Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Doherty, S.; Cunnold, D. M.; Manning, A.; Miller, B. R.; Wang, R. H. J.; Krummel, P. B.; Fraser, P. J.; Simmonds, P. G.; McCulloch, A.; Weiss, R. F.; Salameh, P.; Porter, L. W.; Prinn, R. G.; Huang, J.; Sturrock, G.; Ryall, D.; Derwent, R. G.; Montzka, S. A.

    2004-03-01

    An update of in situ Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE) hydrofluorocarbon (HFC)/hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) measurements made at Mace Head, Ireland, and Cape Grim, Tasmania, from 1998 to 2002 are reported. HCFC-142b, HCFC-141b, HCFC-22 and HFC-134a show continued rapid growth in the atmosphere at mean rates of 1.1, 1.6, 6.0, and 3.4 ppt/year, respectively. Emissions inferred from measurements are compared to recent estimates from consumption data. Minor updates to the industry estimates of emissions are reported together with a discussion of how to best determine OH concentrations from these trace gas measurements. In addition, AGAGE measurements and derived emissions are compared to those deduced from NOAA-Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory flask measurements (which are mostly made at different locations). European emission estimates obtained from Mace Head pollution events using the Nuclear Accident Model (NAME) dispersion model and the best fit algorithm (known as simulated annealing) are presented as 3-year rolling average emissions over Europe for the period 1999-2001. Finally, the measurements of HCFC-141b, HCFC-142b, and HCFC-22 discussed in this paper have been combined with the Atmospheric Lifetime Experiment (ALE)/Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (GAGE)/AGAGE measurements of CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, CCl4, and CH3CCl3 to produce the evolution of tropospheric chlorine loading.

  18. Influence of season growth, soils and irrigation water composition on the concentration of uranium in two lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) varieties. Field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, M. M.; Neves, O.; Marcelino, M.

    2012-04-01

    Former uranium mines areas are frequently the sources of environmental radionuclides problems even many years after the closure of mining operations. A concern for inhabitants from mining areas is the use of contaminated land or irrigation water for agriculture, and the potential transfer of metals from soils to vegetables, and to humans through the food chain. The main aim of this study was to compare the uranium concentration in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. varieties Marady and Romana) grown in different seasons (autumn and summer) and exposed to high and low uranium concentrations both in irrigation water and agricultural soil. The content of uranium in irrigation water, soil (total and available fraction) and in lettuce leaf samples was analyzed in a certified laboratory. In the field experiments, two agricultural soils were divided into two plots (four replicates each); one of them was irrigated with uranium contaminated water (0.94 to 1.14 mg/L) and the other with uncontaminated water (< 0.02 mg/L). Irrigation with contaminated water together with highest soil uranium available concentration (10 to 13 mg/kg) had negative effects on both studied lettuce varieties, namely yield reduction (up to 53% and 87% in autumn and summer experiments, respectively) and increase of uranium leaf concentration (up to 1.4 and 7 fold in autumn and summer, respectively). Effect on lettuce yield was mainly due to the high soil salinity (1.01 to 6.31 mS/cm) as a consequence of high irrigation water electrical conductivity (up to 1.82 mS/cm) and low lettuce soil salinity tolerance (1 to 3 mS/cm). The highest lettuce uranium concentration (dry weight) observed was 2.13 and 5.37 mg/kg for Marady and Romana variety, respectively. The highest uranium lettuce concentration in Romana variety was also the effect of its growing in summer season when it was subject to greatest frequency and amount of water irrigation. The consumption by an adult of the lettuce that concentrate more uranium

  19. Growth and Expansion of the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project and the Newly Organized International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project

    SciTech Connect

    J. Blair Briggs; Lori Scott; Yolanda Rugama; Enrico Satori

    2007-05-01

    Since ICNC 2003, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) has continued to expand its efforts and broaden its scope. Criticality-alarm / shielding type benchmarks and fundamental physics measurements that are relevant to criticality safety applications are not only included in the scope of the project, but benchmark data are also included in the latest version of the handbook. A considerable number of improvements have been made to the searchable database, DICE and the criticality-alarm / shielding benchmarks and fundamental physics measurements have been included in the database. There were 12 countries participating on the ICSBEP in 2003. That number has increased to 18 with recent contributions of data and/or resources from Brazil, Czech Republic, Poland, India, Canada, and China. South Africa, Germany, Argentina, and Australia have been invited to participate. Since ICNC 2003, the contents of the “International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments” have increased from 350 evaluations (28,000 pages) containing benchmark specifications for 3070 critical or subcritical configurations to 442 evaluations (over 38,000 pages) containing benchmark specifications for 3957 critical or subcritical configurations, 23 criticality-alarm-placement / shielding configurations with multiple dose points for each, and 20 configurations that have been categorized as fundamental physics measurements that are relevant to criticality safety applications in the 2006 Edition of the ICSBEP Handbook. Approximately 30 new evaluations and 250 additional configurations are expected to be added to the 2007 Edition of the Handbook. Since ICNC 2003, a reactor physics counterpart to the ICSBEP, The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) was initiated. Beginning in 1999, the IRPhEP was conducted as a pilot activity by the by the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy

  20. BIFoR FACE: A ten-year Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE) Experiment in Old Growth Deciduous English Woodland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, R. M.; MacKenzie, A. R.; Ellsworth, D.; Hemming, D.; Crous, K.; Pope, F.; Blaen, P.; Poynter, A.; Hamilton, L.; Blenkhorn, D.; Jarvis-Rouse, F.

    2015-12-01

    The Birmingham Institute of Forest research (BIFoR) will perform fundamental physical, biological, ecological, social and cultural research of direct relevance to forested landscapes worldwide. A core platform for BIFoR to study the ten-year response of a mature temperate deciduous forest ecosystem to against a large step-change in atmospheric [CO2] is the BIFoR Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE) experiment. BIFoR FACE is being established in Mill Haft, a mature (~150 year-old) oak (Quercus robur) and hazel (Corylus avellana) coppice-with-standards woodland in central England. The facility will enable elevated CO2 (eCO2) treatments to be introduced in 30 m diameter rings (3 treatment and 6 control plots), commencing in spring 2016. Under eCO2 conditions primary research questions will investigate carbon uptake and storage, corresponding nutrient limitations, and biodiversity and ecosystem responses. As well as describing the facility and experimental design, we present baseline data collected throughout 2015, prior to fumigation. These data include: biophysical tree properties; atmospheric CO2/H2O fluxes; airborne and ground laser scatterometry; leaf area index; geophysical survey data; phenology camera derivatives; soil and water chemical and physical properties; and invertebrate surveys. Data from an intensive campaign conducted during august 2015 are also shown, including in- and above- canopy characterisation of biogenic VOCs using a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer, aerosol loading including bioaerosols, and enhanced atmospheric chemistry. Further campaign results are presented from leaf level photosynthetic carbon-dioxide response curve (A/Ci) performed at different canopy heights on oak trees, and on the dominant understory species - hazel and sycamore (Acer pseudoplatinus) across the site. BIFoR FACE is an exciting new international facility for forest science - ideas for collaborations are encouraged. Please see http

  1. Culturing Fundamentals Used To Design And Execute A Long-Term Multi-stressor Experiment To Assess Impact Of Deoxygenation, Ocean Acidification, And Warming On Benthic Foraminiferal Community Composition, Growth, And Carbonate Yield: Design And Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhard, J. M.; Wit, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    The geochemistry recorded in carbonate foraminiferal tests (shells) is often used as proxy for past oceanographic events and environments. By understanding past oceanic and climatic conditions, we can better predict future climate scenarios, a relevant ability in these times of global change. The fact that foraminifera are biological entities can be pivotal for understanding their geochemical records. Thus, growing foraminifera under known physicochemical conditions and analyzing the geochemistry of their cultured carbonate can yield insightful perspectives for proxy refinement and development. Because parameters often co-vary in nature, proper proxy calibration can only be done with materials grown in strictly controlled and known environments. This presentation will review the various crucial aspects of foraminiferal maintenance and culturing, especially from the perspective of proxy development. These fundamentals were used to design a long-term multi-stressor experiment with oxygen, pCO2 (pH), and temperature as variables to test the single, double or triple threats of deoxygenation, ocean acidification, and oceanic warming. Results on assemblage composition, survivorship and growth of a continental shelf benthic foraminiferal community will be presented. Although one agglutinated morphospecies grew in each of the five treatments, growth of individual calcareous species was more restricted. Initial results indicate that pCO2 was not the factor that impacted communities most. Supported in part by NSF OCE-1219948.

  2. Growth Hormone

    MedlinePlus

    ... the dose of glucose. Growth hormone stimulates the production of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) . ... regular intervals for years afterward to monitor GH production and to detect tumor recurrence. Other blood tests ...

  3. Eyelid Growths

    MedlinePlus

    ... a microscope). The growth is usually removed surgically. Did You Know... A growth on the eyelid that ... respond to initial treatments. Resources In This Article Did You Know 1 Did You Know... Figure 1 ...

  4. Protein crystal growth in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenblum, William M.; Delucas, Lawrence J.; Wilson, William W.

    1989-01-01

    Major advances have been made in several of the experimental aspects of protein crystallography, leaving protein crystallization as one of the few remaining bottlenecks. As a result, it has become important that the science of protein crystal growth is better understood and that improved methods for protein crystallization are developed. Preliminary experiments with both small molecules and proteins indicate that microgravity may beneficially affect crystal growth. For this reason, a series of protein crystal growth experiments using the Space Shuttle was initiated. The preliminary space experiments were used to evolve prototype hardware that will form the basis for a more advanced system that can be used to evaluate effects of gravity on protein crystal growth. Various optical techniques are being utilized to monitor the crystal growth process from the incipient or nucleation stage and throughout the growth phase. The eventual goal of these studies is to develop a system which utilizes optical monitoring for dynamic control of the crystallization process.

  5. Delayed growth

    MedlinePlus

    Growth - slow (child 0 - 5 years); Weight gain - slow (child 0 - 5 years); Slow rate of growth; Retarded growth and development; ... A child should have regular, well-baby check-ups with a health care provider. These checkups are usually scheduled ...

  6. Analytics of crystal growth in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, W. R.; Chang, C. E.; Shlichta, P. J.; Chen, P. S.; Kim, C. K.

    1974-01-01

    Two crystal growth processes considered for spacelab experiments were studied to anticipate and understand phenomena not ordinarily encountered on earth. Computer calculations were performed on transport processes in floating zone melting and on growth of a crystal from solution in a spacecraft environment. Experiments intended to simulate solution growth at micro accelerations were performed.

  7. Growth factors

    SciTech Connect

    Golde, D.W.; Herschman, H.R.; Lusis, A.J.; Groopman, J.E.

    1980-05-01

    Humoral regulation of somatic and hematopoietic cell growth has been intensely investigated during the past decade. Growth hormone is unique because it regulates the size of the person within the constraints of the genetic program. The somatomedins and insulin growth factors are low molecular weight polypeptides believed to mediate some functions of growth hormone. Epithelial growth factor and nerve growth factor are well-characterized polypeptides that influence the growth and differentiation of epithelial and neural tissues and interact with specific cell surface receptors. The hematopoietins are a family of polypeptide hormones that specifically regulate the proliferation and differentiation of stem cells giving rise to erythrocytes, granulocytes, monocytes, megakaryocytes, and B and T lymphocytes. Platelet-derived growth factor modulates the proliferation of fibroblasts in vitro and may have a role in the development of atherosclerosis and myelofibrosis. New knowledge on the biochemistry and physiology of growth factors will probably have a substantial impact on our understanding of human diseases involving abnormal cell growth.

  8. Real-World Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borja, Rhea R.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents IISME, a U.S. program that can give educators a real-world experience and that can deepen their subject-matter knowledge. It also presents the experiences of some teachers who are into this program. IISME's summer-fellowship program started out with 40 teachers and 12 companies. The group's growth picked up in 2001, when it…

  9. Atmosphere control for plant growth flight experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Ferolyn T.; Sudar, Martin; Timm, Marc; Yost, Bruce

    1989-01-01

    An atmosphere exchange system (AES) has been designed to provide a conditioned atmosphere supply to plant specimens in flight without incurring the large weight and volume associated with bottled gases. The paper examines the atmosphere filter cartridge (AFC) designed to remove trace organic atmosphere contaminants from the Space Shuttle cabin and to condition the cabin atmosphere prior to exposure to plant specimens. The AES and AFC are described and illustrated. The AFC design requirements are discussed and results are presented from tests on the performance of the AFC. Also, consideration is given to the potential applications of the AFC and future design concepts for atmosphere control.

  10. Primate experiments on mandibular growth direction.

    PubMed

    Tomer, B S; Harvold, E P

    1982-08-01

    Induced oral respiration in eight growing monkeys led to a lowering of the chin, a steeper mandibular plane angle, and an increase in the gonial angle as compared with eight control animals. The posterior border of the mandible maintained its normal inclination relative to the skull. The mandible underwent a posterior rotation in the experimental animals and an anterior rotation in the controls. The findings suggest that the position of the chin and the inclination of the mandibular plane are controlled by the balance between the suprahyoid and the orofacial muscles. Since the posterior border of the ramus undergoes gradual remodeling and maintains its normal inclination, it is assumed that the masticatory muscles are not significantly affected by the altered respiratory function. It is therefore concluded that the ramus with the masticatory muscles and the chin with its suprahyoid and orofacial muscles represent two relatively independent systems.

  11. Effects of High-Flow Experiments from Glen Canyon Dam on Abundance, Growth, and Survival Rates of Early Life Stages of Rainbow Trout in the Lees Ferry Reach of the Colorado River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Korman, Josh; Kaplinski, Matthew; Melis, Theodore S.

    2010-01-01

    High-flow experiments (HFEs) from Glen Canyon Dam are primarily intended to conserve fine sediment and improve habitat conditions for native fish in the Colorado River as it flows through Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. These experimental flows also have the potential to affect the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) population in the Lees Ferry tailwater reach immediately below the dam, which supports a highly valued recreational fishery and likely influences the abundance of rainbow trout in Grand Canyon. Understanding how flow regimes affect the survival and growth of juvenile rainbow trout is critical to interpreting trends in adult abundance. This study reports on the effects of HFEs in 2004 and 2008 on early life stages of rainbow trout in the Lees Ferry reach on the basis of monthly sampling of redds (egg nests) and the abundance of the age-0 trout (fertilization to about 1 to 2 months from emergence) and their growth during a 7-year period between 2003 and 2009. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that the March 2008 HFE resulted in a large increase in early survival rates of age-0 trout because of an improvement in habitat conditions. A stock-recruitment analysis demonstrated that age-0 abundance in July 2008 was more than fourfold higher than expected, given the number of viable eggs that produced these fish. A hatch-date analysis showed that early survival rates were much higher for cohorts that hatched about 1 month after the 2008 HFE (about April 15, 2008) relative to those fish that hatched before this date. These cohorts, fertilized after the 2008 HFE, would have emerged into a benthic invertebrate community that had recovered, and was possibly enhanced by, the HFE. Interannual differences in growth of age-0 trout, determined on the basis of otolith microstructure, support this hypothesis. Growth rates in the summer and fall of 2008 (0.44 mm/day) were virtually the same as in 2006 (0.46 mm/day), the highest recorded during 6 years, even though

  12. Learning that Comes from the Negative Interpretation of Life Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merriam, Sharan B.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Interviews with 18 adults who identified negative outcomes from life experience learning showed that, if experience challenges self-definition, growth-inhibiting responses develop. When the threat to self is reduced, growth may result from negative experiences. (SK)

  13. Space Station Live: Seedling Growth

    NASA Video Gallery

    Public Affairs Officer Lori Meggs talks with Carol Jacobs, payload operations director at the Marshall Space Flight Center's POIC, about the Seedling Growth experiment talking place aboard the Inte...

  14. Dendritic Alloy Solidification Experiment (DASE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckermann, C.; Karma, A.; Steinbach, I.; deGroh, H. C., III

    2001-01-01

    A space experiment, and supporting ground-based research, is proposed to study the microstructural evolution in free dendritic growth from a supercooled melt of the transparent model alloy succinonitrile-acetone (SCN-ACE). The research is relevant to equiaxed solidification of metal alloy castings. The microgravity experiment will establish a benchmark for testing of equiaxed dendritic growth theories, scaling laws, and models in the presence of purely diffusive, coupled heat and solute transport, without the complicating influences of melt convection. The specific objectives are to: determine the selection of the dendrite tip operating state, i.e. the growth velocity and tip radius, for free dendritic growth of succinonitrile-acetone alloys; determine the growth morphology and sidebranching behavior for freely grown alloy dendrites; determine the effects of the thermal/solutal interactions in the growth of an assemblage of equiaxed alloy crystals; determine the effects of melt convection on the free growth of alloy dendrites; measure the surface tension anisotropy strength of succinon itrile -acetone alloys establish a theoretical and modeling framework for the experiments. Microgravity experiments on equiaxed dendritic growth of alloy dendrites have not been performed in the past. The proposed experiment builds on the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) of Glicksman and coworkers, which focused on the steady growth of a single crystal from pure supercooled melts (succinonitrile and pivalic acid). It also extends the Equiaxed Dendritic Solidification Experiment (EDSE) of the present investigators, which is concerned with the interactions and transients arising in the growth of an assemblage of equiaxed crystals (succinonitrile). However, these experiments with pure substances are not able to address the issues related to coupled heat and solute transport in growth of alloy dendrites.

  15. Purification optimization for a recombinant single-chain variable fragment against type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) by using design of experiment (DoE).

    PubMed

    Song, Yong-Hong; Sun, Xue-Wen; Jiang, Bo; Liu, Ji-En; Su, Xian-Hui

    2015-12-01

    Design of experiment (DoE) is a statistics-based technique for experimental design that could overcome the shortcomings of traditional one-factor-at-a-time (OFAT) approach for protein purification optimization. In this study, a DoE approach was applied for optimizing purification of a recombinant single-chain variable fragment (scFv) against type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) expressed in Escherichia coli. In first capture step using Capto L, a 2-level fractional factorial analysis and successively a central composite circumscribed (CCC) design were used to identify the optimal elution conditions. Two main effects, pH and trehalose, were identified, and high recovery (above 95%) and low aggregates ratio (below 10%) were achieved at the pH range from 2.9 to 3.0 with 32-35% (w/v) trehalose added. In the second step using cation exchange chromatography, an initial screening of media and elution pH and a following CCC design were performed, whereby the optimal selectivity of the scFv was obtained on Capto S at pH near 6.0, and the optimal conditions for fulfilling high DBC and purity were identified as pH range of 5.9-6.1 and loading conductivity range of 5-12.5 mS/cm. Upon a further gel filtration, the final purified scFv with a purity of 98% was obtained. Finally, the optimized conditions were verified by a 20-fold scale-up experiment. The purities and yields of intermediate and final products all fell within the regions predicted by DoE approach, suggesting the robustness of the optimized conditions. We proposed that the DoE approach described here is also applicable in production of other recombinant antibody constructs.

  16. Extrapituitary growth hormone and growth?

    PubMed

    Harvey, Steve; Baudet, Marie-Laure

    2014-09-01

    While growth hormone (GH) is obligatory for postnatal growth, it is not required for a number of growth-without-GH syndromes, such as early embryonic or fetal growth. Instead, these syndromes are thought to be dependent upon local growth factors, rather than pituitary GH. The GH gene is, however, also expressed in many extrapituitary tissues, particularly during early development and extrapituitary GH may be one of the local growth factors responsible for embryonic or fetal growth. Moreover, as the expression of the GH receptor (GHR) gene mirrors that of GH in extrapituitary tissues the actions of GH in early development are likely to be mediated by local autocrine or paracrine mechanisms, especially as extrapituitary GH expression occurs prior to the ontogeny of pituitary somatotrophs or the appearance of GH in the circulation. The extrapituitary expression of pituitary somatotrophs or the appearance of GH in the circulation. The extrapituitary expression of GH in embryos has also been shown to be of functional relevance in a number of species, since the immunoneutralization of endogenous GH or the blockade of GH production is accompanied by growth impairment or cellular apoptosis. The extrapituitary expression of the GH gene also persists in some central and peripheral tissues postnatally, which may reflect its continued functional importance and physiological or pathophysiological significance. The expression and functional relevance of extrapituitary GH, particularly during embryonic growth, is the focus of this brief review.

  17. Protein crystal growth - Growth kinetics for tetragonal lysozyme crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, M. L.; Snyder, R. S.; Naumann, R.

    1986-01-01

    Results are reported from theoretical and experimental studies of the growth rate of lysozyme as a function of diffusion in earth-gravity conditions. The investigations were carried out to form a comparison database for future studies of protein crystal growth in the microgravity environment of space. A diffusion-convection model is presented for predicting crystal growth rates in the presence of solutal concentration gradients. Techniques used to grow and monitor the growth of hen egg white lysozyme are detailed. The model calculations and experiment data are employed to discuss the effects of transport and interfacial kinetics in the growth of the crystals, which gradually diminished the free energy in the growth solution. Density gradient-driven convection, caused by presence of the gravity field, was a limiting factor in the growth rate.

  18. The evolution of growth trajectories: what limits growth rate?

    PubMed

    Dmitriew, Caitlin M

    2011-02-01

    According to life-history theory, growth rates are subject to strong directional selection due to reproductive and survival advantages associated with large adult body size. Yet, growth is commonly observed to occur at rates lower than the maximum that is physiologically possible and intrinsic growth rates often vary among populations. This implies that slower growth is favoured under certain conditions. Realized growth rate is thus the result of a compromise between the costs and advantages of growing rapidly, and the optimal rate of growth is not equivalent to the fundamental maximum rate. The ecological and evolutionary factors influencing growth rate are reviewed, with particular emphasis on how growth might be constrained by direct fitness costs. Costs of accelerating growth might contribute to the variance in fitness that is not attributable to age or size at maturity, as well as to the variation in life-history strategies observed within and among species. Two main approaches have been taken to study the fitness trade-offs relating to growth rate. First, environmental manipulations can be used to produce treatment groups with different rates of growth. Second, common garden experiments can be used to compare fitness correlates among populations with different intrinsic growth rates. Data from these studies reveal a number of potential costs for growth over both the short and long term. In order to acquire the energy needed for faster growth, animals must increase food intake. Accordingly, in many taxa, the major constraint on growth rate appears to arise from the trade-off between predation risk and foraging effort. However, growth rates are also frequently observed to be submaximal in the absence of predation, suggesting that growth trajectories also impact fitness via other channels, such as the reallocation of finite resources between growth and other traits and functions. Despite the prevalence of submaximal growth, even when predators are absent, there

  19. Protein crystal growth in a microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, Charles E.

    1988-01-01

    Protein crystal growth is a major experimental problem and is the bottleneck in widespread applications of protein crystallography. Research efforts now being pursued and sponsored by NASA are making fundamental contributions to the understanding of the science of protein crystal growth. Microgravity environments offer the possibility of performing new types of experiments that may produce a better understanding of protein crystal growth processes and may permit growth environments that are more favorable for obtaining high quality protein crystals. A series of protein crystal growth experiments using the space shuttle was initiated. The first phase of these experiments was focused on the development of micro-methods for protein crystal growth by vapor diffusion techniques, using a space version of the hanging drop method. The preliminary space experiments were used to evolve prototype hardware that will form the basis for a more advanced system that can be used to evaluate effects of gravity on protein crystal growth.

  20. Naled ice growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schohl, G. A.; Ettema, R.

    1986-02-01

    Based on theoretical formulation and dimensional analysis, supported by the results of laboratory experiments, a theory and a detailed description of naled ice growth are presented. The theory, concepts, and data should be of interest to engineers concerned with the effects of naleds (also referred to as aufeis or icings) on engineering works. The growth of a two dimensional, or laterally confined (flume), naled is shown to depend primarily on seven, independent, dimensionless parameters. The early, two dimensional, phase of growth, a naled consists of a mixture of ice and water, or ice-water slush, forming on a frigid base. The influence of two of the three remaining parameters is not felt until after a transition time has passed. The continuing, cyclic process by which slush layers form and eventually freeze results in the ice laminations that are a feature of naled ice.

  1. Thick silicon growth techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, H. E.; Mlavsky, A. I.; Jewett, D. N.

    1973-01-01

    Hall mobility measurements on a number of single crystal silicon ribbons grown from graphite dies have shown some ribbons to have mobilities consistent with their resistivities. The behavior of other ribbons appears to be explained by the introduction of impurities of the opposite sign. Growth of a small single crystal silicon ribbon has been achieved from a beryllia dia. Residual internal stresses of the order of 7 to 18,000 psi have been determined to exist in some silicon ribbon, particularly those grown at rates in excess of 1 in./min. Growth experiments have continued toward definition of a configuration and parameters to provide a reasonable yield of single crystal ribbons. High vacuum outgassing of graphite dies and evacuation and backfilling of growth chambers have provided significant improvements in surface quality of ribbons grown from graphite dies.

  2. Kinetics of Prion Growth

    PubMed Central

    Pöschel, Thorsten; Brilliantov, Nikolai V.; Frömmel, Cornelius

    2003-01-01

    We study the kinetics of prion fibril growth, described by the nucleated polymerization model analytically and by means of numerical experiments. The elementary processes of prion fibril formation lead us to a set of differential equations for the number of fibrils, their total mass, and the number of prion monomers. In difference to previous studies we analyze this set by explicitly taking into account the time-dependence of the prion monomer concentration. The theoretical results agree with experimental data, whereas the generally accepted hypothesis of constant monomer concentration leads to a fibril growth behavior which is not in agreement with experiments. The obtained size distribution of the prion fibril aggregates is shifted significantly toward shorter lengths as compared to earlier results, which leads to a enhanced infectivity of the prion material. Finally, we study the effect of filtering of the inoculated material on the incubation time of the disease. PMID:14645042

  3. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    A chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor system with a vertical deposition chamber was used for the growth of Si films on glass, glass-ceramic, and polycrystalline ceramic substrates. Silicon vapor was produced by pyrolysis of SiH4 in a H2 or He carrier gas. Preliminary deposition experiments with two of the available glasses were not encouraging. Moderately encouraging results, however, were obtained with fired polycrystalline alumina substrates, which were used for Si deposition at temperatures above 1,000 C. The surfaces of both the substrates and the films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, reflection electron diffraction, scanning electron microscopy optical microscopy, and surface profilometric techniques. Several experiments were conducted to establish baseline performance data for the reactor system, including temperature distributions on the sample pedestal, effects of carrier gas flow rate on temperature and film thickness, and Si film growth rate as a function of temperature.

  4. Double dendrite growth in solidification.

    PubMed

    Utter, Brian; Bodenschatz, E

    2005-07-01

    We present experiments on the doublon growth morphology in directional solidification. Samples used are succinonitrile with small amounts of poly(ethylene oxide), acetone, or camphor as the solute. Doublons, or symmetry-broken dendrites, are generic diffusion-limited growth structures expected at large undercooling and low anisotropy. Low anisotropy growth is achieved by selecting a grain near the {111} plane leading to either seaweed (dense branching morphology) or doublon growth depending on experimental parameters. We find selection of doublons to be strongly dependent on solute concentration and sample orientation. Doublons are selected at low concentrations (low solutal undercooling) in contrast to the prediction of doublons at large thermal undercooling in pure materials. Doublons also exhibit preferred growth directions and changing the orientation of a specific doublonic grain changes the character and stability of the doublons. We observe transitions between seaweed and doublon growth with changes in concentration and sample orientation.

  5. Facilitating post traumatic growth

    PubMed Central

    Turner, de Sales; Cox, Helen

    2004-01-01

    Background Whilst negative responses to traumatic injury have been well documented in the literature, there is a small but growing body of work that identifies posttraumatic growth as a salient feature of this experience. We contribute to this discourse by reporting on the experiences of 13 individuals who were traumatically injured, had undergone extensive rehabilitation and were discharged from formal care. All participants were injured through involvement in a motor vehicle accident, with the exception of one, who was injured through falling off the roof of a house. Methods In this qualitative study, we used an audio-taped in-depth interview with each participant as the means of data collection. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically to determine the participants' unique perspectives on the experience of recovery from traumatic injury. In reporting the findings, all participants' were given a pseudonym to assure their anonymity. Results Most participants indicated that their involvement in a traumatic occurrence was a springboard for growth that enabled them to develop new perspectives on life and living. Conclusion There are a number of contributions that health providers may make to the recovery of individuals who have been traumatically injured to assist them to develop new views of vulnerability and strength, make changes in relationships, and facilitate philosophical, physical and spiritual growth. PMID:15248894

  6. Surrogate Seeds For Growth Of Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlichta, Paul J.

    1989-01-01

    Larger crystals of higher quality grown. Alternative method for starting growth of crystal involves use of seed crystal of different material instead of same material as solution. Intended for growing single-crystal proteins for experiments but applicable in general to growth of crystals from solutions and to growth of semiconductor or other crystals from melts.

  7. Exploring Old Growth Forests: A Teacher's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemieux, Chris; Powers, Jennene; Quinby, Peter; Schultz, Caroline; Stabb, Mark

    "Exploring Old Growth Forests" is an Ontario (Canada) program that provides secondary students with hands-on experiences in old growth forests. Activity-based and student-centered, the program aims to develop student awareness of the importance of old growth forests and the need to conserve them. This manual provides teachers with background…

  8. Spacelab J experiment descriptions

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, T.Y.

    1993-08-01

    Brief descriptions of the experiment investigations for the Spacelab J Mission which was launched from the Kennedy Space Center aboard the Endeavour in Sept. 1992 are presented. Experiments cover the following: semiconductor crystals; single crystals; superconducting composite materials; crystal growth; bubble behavior in weightlessness; microgravity environment; health monitoring of Payload Specialists; cultured plant cells; effect of low gravity on calcium metabolism and bone formation; and circadian rhythm. Separate abstracts have been prepared for articles from this report.

  9. Spacelab J experiment descriptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Teresa Y. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    Brief descriptions of the experiment investigations for the Spacelab J Mission which was launched from the Kennedy Space Center aboard the Endeavour in Sept. 1992 are presented. Experiments cover the following: semiconductor crystals; single crystals; superconducting composite materials; crystal growth; bubble behavior in weightlessness; microgravity environment; health monitoring of Payload Specialists; cultured plant cells; effect of low gravity on calcium metabolism and bone formation; and circadian rhythm.

  10. Economic Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, James B.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A conceptual introduction for teachers explains economic growth and how it is measured. Four instructional units follow, beginning with a preschool and kindergarten unit which offers young students an opportunity to interview puppet workers, set up a classroom corner store, and learn the importance of capital resources for increasing productivity…

  11. Chemical Growth Regulators for Guayule Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dastoor, M. N.; Schubert, W. W.; Petersen, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    Test Tubes containing Guayule - tissue cultures were used in experiments to test effects of chemical-growth regulators. The shoots grew in response to addition of 2-(3,4-dichlorophenoxy)-triethylamine (triethylamine (TEA) derivative) to agar medium. Preliminary results indicate that a class of compounds that promotes growth in soil may also promote growth in a culture medium. Further experiments are needed to define the effect of the TEA derivative.

  12. Transport and Growth Kinetics in Microgravity Protein Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otalora, F.; Garcia-Ruiz, J. M.; Carotenuto, L.; Castagnolo, D.; Novella, M. L.; Chernov, A. A.

    2002-01-01

    The dynamic coupling between mass transport and incorporation of growth units into the surface of a crystal growing from solution in microgravity is used to derive quantitative information on the crystal growth kinetics. To this end, new procedures for experiment preparation, interferometric data processing and model fitting have been developed. The use of experimental data from the bulk diffusive maw transport together with a model for steady state stagnant crystal growth allows the detailed quantitative understanding of the kinetics of both the concentration depletion zone around the crystal and the growth of the crystal interface. The protein crystal used in the experiment is shown to be growing in the mixed kinetic regime (0.2 x 10(exp -6) centimeters per second less than beta R/D less than 0.9 x 10(exp -6) centimeters per second).

  13. Ice forming experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vali, G.

    1982-01-01

    A low gravity experiment to assess the effect of the presence of supercooled cloud droplets on the diffusional growth rate of ice crystals is described. The theoretical work and the feasibility studies are summarized. The nucleation of ice crystals in supercooled clouds is also discussed.

  14. Real-Time Assessment of Guided Bone Regeneration in Standardized Calvarial Defects Using a Combination of Bone Graft and Platelet-Derived Growth Factor With and Without Collagen Membrane: An In Vivo Microcomputed Tomographic and Histologic Experiment in Rats.

    PubMed

    Alrasheed, Abdulaziz; Al-Ahmari, Fatemah; Ramalingam, Sundar; Nooh, Nasser; Wang, Cun-Yu; Al-Hezaimi, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present in vivo microcomputed tomography (μCT) and histologic experiment was to assess the efficacy of guided bone regeneration (GBR) around standardized calvarial defects using recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor (rhPDGF) with and without resorbable collagen membrane (RCM). A total of 50 female Wistar albino rats with a mean age of 7.5 months and mean weight of 275 g were used. The calvarium was exposed following midsagittal scalp incision and flap reflection. A full-thickness standardized calvarial defect (4.6 mm diameter) was created. Study animals were randomly divided into five groups based on biomaterials used for GBR within the defect: (1) no treatment (negative control), (2) bone graft alone (BG), (3) bone graft covered by RCM (BG + RCM), (4) bone graft soaked in rhPDGF (BG + rhPDGF), and (5) bone graft soaked in rhPDGF and covered with RCM (BG + rhPDGF + RCM). In vivo μCT for determination of newly formed bone volume (NFBV) and mineral density (NFBMD) and remnant bone particles volume (RBPV) and mineral density (RBPMD) was done at baseline and at 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks postoperatively. Eight weeks following surgery, the animals were sacrificed and harvested calvarial specimens were subjected to histologic and biomechanical analysis. There was an increase in NFBV and NFBMD associated with a corresponding decrease in RBPV and RBPMD in all the study groups. Two-way analysis of variance revealed significant differences in the measured values within and between the groups across the timelines examined during the study period (P < .05). While the NFBV was significantly higher in the bone graft, BG + RCM, and BG + rhPDGF + RCM groups, the NFBMD was similar in all the groups except negative control. The greatest decreases in RBPV and RBPMD were observed in the BG + rhPDGF + RCM group in comparison to the other groups. Similarly, BG + rhPDGF + RCM groups had hardness and elastic modulus similar to that of natural bone. The in vivo

  15. Growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Bidlingmaier, Martin; Strasburger, Christian J

    2010-01-01

    Human growth hormone (hGH) is a proteohormone secreted by the pituitary gland. It acts through binding to the hGH receptor, inducing either direct effects or initiating the production of insulin-like growth-factor I (IGF-I), the most important mediator of hGH effects. Growth hormone is primarily known to promote longitudinal growth in children and adolescents, but has also various important metabolic functions throughout adult life. Effects of hGH on the adult organism are well established from studies with recombinant growth hormone (rhGH) therapy in growth hormone deficient subjects. In this particular group of patients, replacement of hGH leads to increased lipolysis and lean body mass, decreased fat mass, improvements in VO(2max), and maximal power output. Although extrapolation from these findings to the situation in well trained healthy subjects is impossible, and controlled studies in healthy subjects are scarce, abuse of hGH seems to be popular among athletes trying to enhance physical performance. Detection of the application of rhGH is difficult, especially because the amino acid sequence of rhGH is identical to the major 22,000 Da isoform of hGH normally secreted by the pituitary. Furthermore, some physiological properties of hGH secretion also hindered the development of a doping test: secreted in a pulsatile manner, it has a very short half-life in circulation, which leads to highly variable serum levels. Concentration alone therefore cannot prove the exogenous administration of hGH.Two approaches have independently been developed for the detection of hGH doping: The so-called "marker approach" investigates changes in hGH-dependent parameters like IGF-I or components of bone and collagen metabolism, which are increased after hGH injection. In contrast, the so-called "isoform approach" directly analyses the spectrum of molecular isoforms in circulation: the pituitary gland secretes a spectrum of homo- and heterodimers and - multimers of a variable

  16. Summaries of early materials processing in space experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.; Mason, D.

    1979-01-01

    Objectives, methods, and results of low-gravity materials processing experiments are summarized, and a bibliography of published results for each experiment is provided. Included are drop tower experiments, the Apollo demonstration experiments, the skylab experiments and demonstration experiments, and the Apollo-Soyuz experiments and demonstrations. The findings of these experiments in the fields of crystal growth, metallurgy, and fluid behavior are summarized.

  17. Biotechnology Science Experiments on Mir

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroes, Roger L.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the microgravity biotechnology experiments carried out on the Shuttle/Mir program. Four experiments investigated the growth of protein crystals, and three investigated cellular growth. Many hundreds of protein samples were processed using four different techniques. The objective of these experiments was to determine optimum conditions for the growth of very high quality single crystals to be used for structure determination. The Biotechnology System (BTS) was used to process the three cell growth investigations. The samples processed by these experiments were: bovine chondrocytes, human renal epithelial cells, and human breast cancer cells and endothelial cells. The objective was to determine the unique properties of cell aggregates produced in the microgravity environment.

  18. Shaped Crystal Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatartchenko, Vitali A.

    Crystals of specified shape and size (shaped crystals) with controlled crystal growth (SCG) defect and impurity structure have to be grown for the successful development of modern engineering. Since the 1950s many hundreds of papers and patents concerned with shaped growth have been published. In this chapter, we do not try to enumerate the successful applications of shaped growth to different materials but rather to carry out a fundamental physical and mathematical analysis of shaping as well as the peculiarities of shaped crystal structures. Four main techniques, based on which the lateral surface can be shaped without contact with the container walls, are analyzed: the Czochralski technique (CZT), the Verneuil technique (VT), the floating zone technique (FZT), and technique of pulling from shaper (TPS). Modifications of these techniques are analyzed as well. In all these techniques the shape of the melt meniscus is controlled by surface tension forces, i.e., capillary forces, and here they are classified as capillary shaping techniques (CST). We look for conditions under which the crystal growth process in each CST is dynamically stable. Only in this case are all perturbations attenuated and a crystal of constant cross section shaping technique (CST) grown without any special regulation. The dynamic stability theory of the crystal growth process for all CST is developed on the basis of Lyapunov's dynamic stability theory. Lyapunov's equations for the crystal growth processes follow from fundamental laws. The results of the theory allow the choice of stable regimes for crystal growth by all CST as well as special designs of shapers in TPS. SCG experiments by CZT, VT, and FZT are discussed but the main consideration is given to TPS. Shapers not only allow crystal of very complicated cross section to be grown but provide a special distribution of impurities. A history of TPS is provided later in the chapter, because it can only be described after explanation of the

  19. Laws of population growth.

    PubMed

    Rozenfeld, Hernán D; Rybski, Diego; Andrade, José S; Batty, Michael; Stanley, H Eugene; Makse, Hernán A

    2008-12-01

    An important issue in the study of cities is defining a metropolitan area, because different definitions affect conclusions regarding the statistical distribution of urban activity. A commonly employed method of defining a metropolitan area is the Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs), based on rules attempting to capture the notion of city as a functional economic region, and it is performed by using experience. The construction of MSAs is a time-consuming process and is typically done only for a subset (a few hundreds) of the most highly populated cities. Here, we introduce a method to designate metropolitan areas, denoted "City Clustering Algorithm" (CCA). The CCA is based on spatial distributions of the population at a fine geographic scale, defining a city beyond the scope of its administrative boundaries. We use the CCA to examine Gibrat's law of proportional growth, which postulates that the mean and standard deviation of the growth rate of cities are constant, independent of city size. We find that the mean growth rate of a cluster by utilizing the CCA exhibits deviations from Gibrat's law, and that the standard deviation decreases as a power law with respect to the city size. The CCA allows for the study of the underlying process leading to these deviations, which are shown to arise from the existence of long-range spatial correlations in population growth. These results have sociopolitical implications, for example, for the location of new economic development in cities of varied size. PMID:19033186

  20. Droplet Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marder, Michael Paolo

    When a mixture of two materials, such as aluminum and tin, or alcohol and water, is cooled below a certain temperature, the two components begin to separate. If one component is dilute in the other, it may separate out in the form of small spheres, and these will begin to enlarge, depleting the supersaturated material around them. If the dynamics is sufficiently slow, thermodynamics gives one considerable information about how the droplets grow. Two types of experiment have explored this behavior and given puzzling results. Nucleation experiments measure the rate at which droplets initially appear from a seemingly homogeneous mixture. Near the critical point in binary liquids, experiments conducted in the 1960's and early 1970's showed that nucleation was vastly slower than theory seemed to predict. The resolution of this problem arises by considering in detail the dynamics of growing droplets and comparing it with what experiments actually measure. Here will be presented a more detailed comparison of theory and experiment than has before been completed, obtaining satisfactory agreement with no free parameters needed. A second type of experiment measures droplet size distributions after long times. In the late stage, droplets compete with each other for material, a few growing at the expense of others. A theory first proposed by Lifshitz and Slyozov claims that this distribution, properly scaled, should be universal, and independent of properties of materials. Yet experimental measurements consistently find distributions that are more broad and squat than the theory would predict. Satisfactory agreement with experiment can be achieved by considering two points. First, one must study the complete time development of droplet size distributions, to understand when the asymptotic regime obtains. Second, droplet size distributions are spread by correlations between droplets. If one finds a small droplet, it is small because large droplets nearby are competing with it

  1. Growth Rings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garmston, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    In adaptive schools, working groups grow, develop, and learn from experience, becoming more effective as they go. Three premises about group development include the following: each group is unique, some groups mature, and attrition need not block development. Four guidelines for successful group meetings include decide who decides, define the…

  2. Growth Of Single Crystalline Copper Nanowhiskers

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, Matthias; Richter, Gunther

    2010-11-24

    Nanowhiskers are defect free single crystals with high aspect ratios and as result exhibit superior physical, e.g. mechanical properties. This paper sheds light on the kinetics of copper nanowhisker growth and thickening. Whisker growth was provoked by covering silicon wafers with a thin carbon film and subsequently coating them with copper by molecular beam epitaxy. The whiskers grown were examined by scanning electron microscopy and the length and diameter were measured as a function of the amount of copper deposited. The experiments show that nanowhisker growth follows Ruth and Hirth's growth model. A fit of the model parameters to the acquired data shows that adsorption of atoms on the substrate and on the whisker surface, with subsequent surface diffusion to the whisker tip, delivers by far the greatest portion of material for whisker growth. Additionally, the experiments demonstrate that the crystallographic orientation of the substrate surface greatly influences the growth rate in the early stage of whisker growth.

  3. College-Student Personal-Growth and Attributions of Cause

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, W. P., Jr.; Lopez-Baez, Sandra I.

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about levels of personal growth attributed by students to typical college life experiences. This paper documents two studies of student self-reported and posttraumatic growth and compares growth levels across populations. Both studies measure student attributions of cause to academic and non-academic experiences, respectively. It…

  4. Cell Growth Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Exogene Corporation uses advanced technologies to enhance production of bio-processed substances like proteins, antibiotics and amino acids. Among them are genetic modification and a genetic switch. They originated in research for Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Extensive experiments in cell growth through production of hemoglobin to improve oxygen supply to cells were performed. By improving efficiency of oxygen use by cells, major operational expenses can be reduced. Greater product yields result in decreased raw material costs and more efficient use of equipment. A broad range of applications is cited.

  5. Experiences on IGSCC crack manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Veron, P.

    1997-02-01

    The author presents his experience in manufacturing IGSCC realistic defects, mainly in INCONEL 600 MA Steam Generator Tubes. From that experience he extracts some knowledge about this cracking (influence of chemistry in the environment, stress state, crack growth rate, and occurrence in laboratory condition of break before leak).

  6. Playing Games with Games People Play. Contributions of Gestalt Theory to Individual Counseling. Self-Discovery through Art: A Group Experience. A Review of Personal Research on Experimental-Gestalt Growth Groups. Gestalt Dreamwork as a Method for Self Discovery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guinan, James F.; And Others

    The existential Gestalt approach to facilitating the human growth process is discussed, from somewhat different vantage points, in these papers. Two seek to elaborate the basic principles and facilitating "techniques" of Gestalt therapy, while maintaining that one can truly understand only by experiencing. The use of Focus Groups, in which a focal…

  7. The evolution of growth trajectories: what limits growth rate?

    PubMed

    Dmitriew, Caitlin M

    2011-02-01

    According to life-history theory, growth rates are subject to strong directional selection due to reproductive and survival advantages associated with large adult body size. Yet, growth is commonly observed to occur at rates lower than the maximum that is physiologically possible and intrinsic growth rates often vary among populations. This implies that slower growth is favoured under certain conditions. Realized growth rate is thus the result of a compromise between the costs and advantages of growing rapidly, and the optimal rate of growth is not equivalent to the fundamental maximum rate. The ecological and evolutionary factors influencing growth rate are reviewed, with particular emphasis on how growth might be constrained by direct fitness costs. Costs of accelerating growth might contribute to the variance in fitness that is not attributable to age or size at maturity, as well as to the variation in life-history strategies observed within and among species. Two main approaches have been taken to study the fitness trade-offs relating to growth rate. First, environmental manipulations can be used to produce treatment groups with different rates of growth. Second, common garden experiments can be used to compare fitness correlates among populations with different intrinsic growth rates. Data from these studies reveal a number of potential costs for growth over both the short and long term. In order to acquire the energy needed for faster growth, animals must increase food intake. Accordingly, in many taxa, the major constraint on growth rate appears to arise from the trade-off between predation risk and foraging effort. However, growth rates are also frequently observed to be submaximal in the absence of predation, suggesting that growth trajectories also impact fitness via other channels, such as the reallocation of finite resources between growth and other traits and functions. Despite the prevalence of submaximal growth, even when predators are absent, there

  8. Crystal growth of artificial snow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimura, S.; Oka, A.; Taki, M.; Kuwano, R.; Ono, H.; Nagura, R.; Narimatsu, Y.; Tanii, J.; Kamimiytat, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Snow crystals were grown onboard the space shuttle during STS-7 and STS-8 to facilitate the investigation of crystal growth under conditions of weightlessness. The experimental design and hardware are described. Space-grown snow crystals were polyhedrons looking like spheres, which were unlike snow crystals produced in experiments on Earth.

  9. Soybean Growth Aboard ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a photo of soybeans growing in the Advanced Astroculture (ADVASC) Experiment aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The ADVASC experiment was one of the several new experiments and science facilities delivered to the ISS by Expedition Five aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavor STS-111 mission. An agricultural seed company will grow soybeans in the ADVASC hardware to determine whether soybean plants can produce seeds in a microgravity environment. Secondary objectives include determination of the chemical characteristics of the seed in space and any microgravity impact on the plant growth cycle. Station science will also be conducted by the ever-present ground crew, with a new cadre of controllers for Expedition Five in the ISS Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Controllers work in three shifts around the clock, 7 days a week, in the POCC, the world's primary science command post for the Space Station. The POCC links Earth-bound researchers around the world with their experiments and crew aboard the Space Station.

  10. Psychology Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGraw, Ken; Tew, Mark D.; Williams, John E.

    2001-01-01

    A goal of the PsychExperiments project was to reduce the financial burden on psychology departments for hardware/software used in their laboratories. In its third year, the PsychExperiments site now hosts 39 experiments. Over 200 classrooms worldwide have signed up as official site users and there have been nearly 10,000 data sessions conducted.…

  11. Halogen lamp experiment, HALEX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, G.; Stapelmann, J.

    1986-01-01

    The main purpose of the Halogen Lamp Experiment (HALEX) was to investigate the operation of a halogen lamp during an extended period in a microgravity environment and to prove its behavior in space. The Mirror Heating Facilities for Crystal Growth and Material Science Experiments in space relies on one or two halogen lamps as a furnace to melt the specimens. The HALEX aim is to verify: full power operation of a halogen lamp for a period of about 60 hours; achievement of about 10% of its terrestrial life span; and operation of the halogen lamp under conditions similar to furnace operation.

  12. Gravitational effects in dendritic growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Singh, N. B.; Chopra, M.

    1983-01-01

    The theories of diffusion-controlled dendritic crystallization will be reviewed briefly, along with recently published critical experiments on the kinetics and morphology of dendritic growth in pure substances. The influence of the gravitational body force on dendrite growth kinetics will be shown to be highly dependent on the growth orientation with respect to the gravity vector and on the level of the thermal supercooling. In fact, an abrupt transition occurs at a critical supercooling, above which diffusional transport dominates the growth process and below which convective transport dominates. Our most recent work on binary mixtures shows that dilute solute additions influence the crystallization process indirectly, by altering the interfacial stability, rather than by directly affecting the transport mode. Directions for future studies in this field will also be discussed.

  13. The Growth of Large Single Crystals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baer, Carl D.

    1990-01-01

    Presented is an experiment which demonstrates principles of experimental design, solubility, and crystal growth and structure. Materials, procedures and results are discussed. Suggestions for adapting this activity to the high school laboratory are provided. (CW)

  14. Nonequilibrium Growth Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanlal, Pradipkumar

    A number of issues in nonequilibrium aggregation and pattern formation are addressed. Using analytical, numerical, and computer simulation methods, an attempt is made to infer or conclude on a number of aspects of compact, fractal and dendritic growth. Using the ballistic aggregation model, we develop a mean-field continuum theory that successfully predicts the morphology of thin films formed by vapor deposition and aggregation on a seed. In addition, by relating the evolution of the surface of ballistic deposits to a problem of spin dynamics, we develop a theory for the roughness of the interface, showing it to be a self-affine fractal, and at the same time having a bounded interface length. We also develop a deterministic continuum model for the fractal growth of diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA), related to the problem of two-dimensional viscous fluid flow in a hele-shaw cell. With the introduction of a real-space renormalization scheme we solve the equations numerically to produce fractal growth and patterns reminiscent of real fluid flow experiments. In addition, we show the fractal patterns to have the same metric properties of DLA, with a prediction for the asymptotic value for the fractal dimension; D = 1.65. An important consequence of these results is that DLA is sufficiently unstable and sensitive to initial conditions to produce fractal growth in the absence of external noise present in computer simulation results. Further, we examine the effect of an underlying lattice on the growth process in both the discrete and continuum deterministic formulations of DLA. In both cases, the lattice anisotropy destroys the fractal characteristics and this is confirmed by studying large on-lattice DLA simulations. And finally, we infer a relationship between the lattice anisotropy and the phenomenological formulations of the interfacial anisotropy, and examine the nature of the transition between fractal and dendritic growth as a function of the interfacial

  15. [Growth factors in proliferative diabetic retinopathy].

    PubMed

    Ioniţă, M

    1997-01-01

    This work presents the possible implications of the angiogenic growth factors and some cell mediators in the initiation and development of the neovascular proliferation in diabetic retinopathy. According to the physiopathologic theories stated above, that are implied in the generation of proliferative diabetic retinopathy, here are some therapeutic experiments based on the action of the angiogenic growth factors. PMID:9409959

  16. Wheat growth monitoring with radar vegetation indices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microwave remote sensing can help in the monitoring of crop growth. Many experiments have been carried out to investigate the sensitivity of microwave sensors to crop growth parameters. These have clearly shown that canopy structure and water content can greatly affect the measurements. For agricult...

  17. Understanding customer experience.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Christopher; Schwager, Andre

    2007-02-01

    Anyone who has signed up for cell phone service, attempted to claim a rebate, or navigated a call center has probably suffered from a company's apparent indifference to what should be its first concern: the customer experiences that culminate in either satisfaction or disappointment and defection. Customer experience is the subjective response customers have to direct or indirect contact with a company. It encompasses every aspect of an offering: customer care, advertising, packaging, features, ease of use, reliability. Customer experience is shaped by customers' expectations, which largely reflect previous experiences. Few CEOs would argue against the significance of customer experience or against measuring and analyzing it. But many don't appreciate how those activities differ from CRM or just how illuminating the data can be. For instance, the majority of the companies in a recent survey believed they have been providing "superior" experiences to customers, but most customers disagreed. The authors describe a customer experience management (CEM) process that involves three kinds of monitoring: past patterns (evaluating completed transactions), present patterns (tracking current relationships), and potential patterns (conducting inquiries in the hope of unveiling future opportunities). Data are collected at or about touch points through such methods as surveys, interviews, focus groups, and online forums. Companies need to involve every function in the effort, not just a single customer-facing group. The authors go on to illustrate how a cross-functional CEM system is created. With such a system, companies can discover which customers are prospects for growth and which require immediate intervention.

  18. USML-1 Glovebox experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    This report covers the development of and results from three experiments that were flown in the Materials Science Glovebox on USML-1: Marangoni convection in Closed Containers (MCCC), Double Float Zone (DFZ), and Fiber Pulling in Microgravity (FPM). The Glovebox provided a convenient, low cost method for doing simple 'try and see' experiments that could test new concepts or elucidate microgravity phenomena. Since the Glovebox provided essentially one (or possibly two levels of confinement, many of the stringent verification and test requirements on the experiment apparatus could be relaxed and a streamlined test and verification plan for flight qualification could be implemented. Furthermore, the experiments were contained in their own carrying cases whose external configurations could be identified early in the integration sequence for stowage considerations while delivery of the actual experiment apparatus could be postponed until only a few months before flight. This minimized the time fluids must be contained and reduced the possibility of corrosive reactions that could ruin the experiment. In many respects, this exercise was as much about developing a simpler, cheaper way of doing crew-assisted science as it was about the actual scientific accomplishments of the individual experiments. The Marangoni Convection in Closed Containers experiment was designed to study the effects of a void space in a simulated Bridgman crystal growth configuration and to determine if surface tension driven convective flows that may result from thermal gradients along any free surfaces could affect the solidification process. The Fiber Pulling in Microgravity experiment sought to separate the role of gravity drainage from capillarity effects in the break-up of slender cylindrical liquid columns. The Stability of a Double Float Zone experiment explored the feasibility of a quasi-containerless process in which a solidifying material is suspended by two liquid bridges of its own melt.

  19. The crop growth research chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagenbach, Kimberly

    1993-01-01

    The Crop Growth Research Chamber (CGRC) has been defined by CELSS principle investigators and science advisory panels as a necessary ground-based tool in the development of a regenerative life support system. The focus of CGRC research will be on the biomass production component of the CELSS system. The ground-based Crop Growth Research Chamber is for the study of plant growth and development under stringently controlled environments isolated from the external environment. The chamber has importance in three areas of CELSS activities: (1) crop research; (2) system control and integration, and (3) flight hardware design and experimentation. The laboratory size of the CGRC will be small enough to allow duplication of the unit, the conducting of controlled experiments, and replication of experiments, but large enough to provide information representative of larger plant communities. Experiments will focus on plant growth in a wide variety of environments and the effects of those environments on plant production of food, water, oxygen, toxins, and microbes. To study these effects in a closed system, tight control of the environment is necessary.

  20. Step-Growth Polymerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stille, J. K.

    1981-01-01

    Following a comparison of chain-growth and step-growth polymerization, focuses on the latter process by describing requirements for high molecular weight, step-growth polymerization kinetics, synthesis and molecular weight distribution of some linear step-growth polymers, and three-dimensional network step-growth polymers. (JN)

  1. Language Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bugh, Marylou

    1978-01-01

    When a child uses his words and his ideas in learning to read, he also assists in the normal integration of his personality. Starting with a method of language experience developed by Sylvia Ashton-Warner, the author, a reading consultant, describes a language experience-reading program which utilizes the student's own curiosity and interests. (RK)

  2. Art Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spodek, Bernard; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Presents four articles that examine the role of art experiences in early childhood education: "Educationally Appropriate Art Activities for Young Children," by Bernard Spodek; "Teachers and Children Together: Constructing New Learning," by Lella Gandini; "Fostering Experiences between Young Children and Clay," by Cathy Weisman Topal; and…

  3. TRIO experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Clemmer, R.G.; Finn, P.A.; Malecha, R.F.; Misra, B.; Billone, M.C.; Bowers, D.L.; Fischer, A.K.; Greenwood, L.R.; Mattas, R.F.; Tam, S.W.

    1984-09-01

    The TRIO experiment is a test of in-situ tritium recovery and heat transfer performance of a miniaturized solid breeder blanket assembly. The assembly (capsule) was monitored for temperature and neutron flux profiles during irradiation and a sweep gas flowed through the capsule to an anaytical train wherein the amounts of tritium in its various chemical forms were determined. The capsule was designed to operate at different temperatures and sweep gas conditions. At the end of the experiment the amount of tritium retained in the solid was at a concentration of less than 0.1 wppM. More than 99.9% of tritium generated during the experiment was successfully recovered. The results of the experiment showed that the tritium inventories at the beginning and at the end of the experiment follow a relationship which appears to be characteristic of intragranular diffusion.

  4. Measuring Growth with the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Walter P., Jr.; Lopez-Baez, Sandra I.

    2008-01-01

    The Posttraumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI; R. G. Tedeschi & L. G. Calhoun, 1996) was used to measure the growth of university students (N = 347). Results were compared with those of trauma studies and indicate that the PTGI is a general measure of growth suitable for future nontrauma studies. Results reflect a minimal relationship between…

  5. Microgravity Materials and Biotechnology Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlasse, Marcus

    1998-01-01

    Presentation will deal with an overview of the Materials Science and Biotechnology/Crystal Growth flight experiments and their requirements for a successful execution. It will also deal with the hardware necessary to perform these experiments as well as the hardware requirements. This information will serve as a basis for the Abstract: workshop participants to review the poss7ibilifies for a low cost unmanned carrier and the simple automation to carry-out experiments in a microgravity environment with little intervention from the ground. The discussion will include what we have now and what will be needed to automate totally the hardware and experiment protocol at relatively low cost.

  6. Growth hormone test

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003706.htm Growth hormone test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The growth hormone test measures the amount of growth hormone in ...

  7. Plant Growth Facility (PGF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In a microgravity environment aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia Life and Microgravity Mission STS-78, compression wood formation and hence altered lignin deposition and cell wall structure, was induced upon mechanically bending the stems of the woody gymnosperms, Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and loblolly pine (Pinus taeda). Although there was significant degradation of many of the plant specimens in space-flight due to unusually high temperatures experienced during the mission, it seems evident that gravity had little or no effect on compression wood formation upon bending even in microgravity. Instead, it apparently results from alterations in the stress gradient experienced by the plant itself during bending under these conditions. This preliminary study now sets the stage for long-term plant growth experiments to determine whether compression wood formation can be induced in microgravity during phototropic-guided realignment of growing woody plant specimens, in the absence of any externally provided stress and strain.

  8. Mixture Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Piepel, Gregory F.

    2007-12-01

    A mixture experiment involves combining two or more components in various proportions or amounts and then measuring one or more responses for the resulting end products. Other factors that affect the response(s), such as process variables and/or the total amount of the mixture, may also be studied in the experiment. A mixture experiment design specifies the combinations of mixture components and other experimental factors (if any) to be studied and the response variable(s) to be measured. Mixture experiment data analyses are then used to achieve the desired goals, which may include (i) understanding the effects of components and other factors on the response(s), (ii) identifying components and other factors with significant and nonsignificant effects on the response(s), (iii) developing models for predicting the response(s) as functions of the mixture components and any other factors, and (iv) developing end-products with desired values and uncertainties of the response(s). Given a mixture experiment problem, a practitioner must consider the possible approaches for designing the experiment and analyzing the data, and then select the approach best suited to the problem. Eight possible approaches include 1) component proportions, 2) mathematically independent variables, 3) slack variable, 4) mixture amount, 5) component amounts, 6) mixture process variable, 7) mixture of mixtures, and 8) multi-factor mixture. The article provides an overview of the mixture experiment designs, models, and data analyses for these approaches.

  9. Growth laws and mechanisms of global control in bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Matthew

    2009-03-01

    The growth laws of Schaechter, Maaløe and Kjeldgaard are among the most striking discoveries in bacterial growth physiology: cell composition (mass/cell, RNA/cell, etc.) is a simple function of growth rate alone -- irrespective of how that growth rate is established. I will review the growth laws, and discuss recent experiments that have uncovered new laws. A systems-level mathematical model is developed that suggests the growth laws arise from the partitioning of the protein synthesizing machinery of the cell (the ribosomes), and furthermore indicates a deep connection between growth rate control and central metabolism.

  10. Performance of some growth variables.

    PubMed

    Billen, N; Schätzle, H; Seufert, G; Arndt, U

    1990-01-01

    European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst.) and Silver fir (Abies alba Mill.) were exposed to low concentrations of ozone (O(3)) and sulfur dioxide (SO(2)), alone and combined, and simulated acid rain (pH 4.0) in sheltered open-top chambers in Hohenheim (Southwest Germany) for almost five years. The concentrations of O(3) and SO(2) used were related to annual ambient average found in southern West Germany. Two control chambers were ventilated with charcoal filtered air and rainfall was simulated at pH 4.0 and 5.0. Because of large dense plant growth in the chambers it was only possible to measure uncompleted growth of shoots in the upper canopy. Therefore, growth analysis was restricted to this area. The treatment with acidic precipitation decreased the annual shoot growth of beech and reduced leaf surface area of those trees. Exposure to SO(2), O(3) alone and in combination resulted in further reduction of shoot length and leaf surface area. Fumigation with SO(2) and O(3) + SO(2) caused insignificant decreases of shoot length, total dry weight and needle surface area of spruce. The lateral leader shoot growth of spruce exposed to O(3) was significantly reduced only in the last year of the experiment. Growth rates of the spruce exposed to charcoal filtered air and non-acidic precipitation were reduced more than those of beech and fir. Growth variables determined for fir reflected different rates of incremental change. Exposure to O(3) resulted in the largest dry matter production of all fir groups but those exposed to charcoal filtered air and non-acidic precipitation responded with the best lateral leader shoot growth, lowest specific leaf area (SLA) and leaf area ratio (LAR) respectively indicating best metabolic efficiency. At the conclusion of this study a classification of sensitivity was developed for the tree species.

  11. Silicon dendritic web growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, S.

    1984-01-01

    Technological goals for a silicon dendritic web growth program effort are presented. Principle objectives for this program include: (1) grow long web crystals front continuously replenished melt; (2) develop temperature distribution in web and melt; (3) improve reproductibility of growth; (4) develop configurations for increased growth rates (width and speed); (5) develop new growth system components as required for improved growth; and (6) evaluate quality of web growth.

  12. Microgravity Effects on Plant Growth and Lignification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowles, Joe R.; Lemay, Richard; Jahns, Gary

    1988-12-01

    Lignin is a major cellular component of higher plants. One function of lignin is to support vertical plant growth in a gravity environment. Various investigators working in the 1 g environment have concluded that lignification is influenced by gravity. An experiment was designed for flight on Spacelab II to determine the effect of microgravity on lignification in young plant seedlings. A secondary objective of the experiment was to examine the effect of microgravity on overall seedling growth. Mung bean and oat seeds germinated and the seedlings grew during the Spacelab II mission. Growth of flight mung bean and oat seedlings, however, was slower, and the seedlings exhibited stem and root orientation difficulties. Flight pine seedlings were similar in appearance and growth to 1 g controls. The rate of lignin formation in seedlings grown in space was significantly less in all three species in comparison to 1 g controls. The experiment provided direct evidence that lignification is slowed in a microgravity environment.

  13. Hydronuclear experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, R.N.; Westervelt, D.R.

    1987-02-01

    Hydronuclear experiments, a method for assessing some aspects of nuclear weapon safety, were conducted at Los Alamos during the 1958 to 1961 moratorium on nuclear testing. The experiments resulted in subcritical multiplying assemblies or a very slight degree of supercriticality and, in some cases, involved a slight, but insignificant, fission energy release. These experiments helped to identify so-called one-point safety problems associated with some of the nuclear weapons systems of that time. The need for remedial action was demonstrated, although some of the necessary design changes could not be made until after the resumption of weapons testing at the end of 1961.

  14. Gravity and Skeletal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morey-Holton, Emily; Turner, Russell T.

    1999-01-01

    Two simultaneous experiments were performed using 5-week-old male Sprague Dawley rats; in one study, the rats were flown in low earth orbit; in the other study, the hindlimbs of the growing rats were elevated to prevent weight bearing. Following 9 d of unloading, weight bearing was restored for 4, 28, and 76 hrs. Afterwards, additional hindlimb unloading experiments were performed to evaluate the skeletal response to 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 16, and 24 hrs of restored weight bearing following 7 d of unloading. Cancellous and cortical bone histomorphometry were evaluated in the left tibia at the proximal metaphysis and in the left femur at mid-diaphysis, respectively. Steady-state mRNA levels for bone matrix proteins and skeletal signaling peptides were determined in total cellular RNA extracted from trabeculae from the right proximal tibiametaphysis and periosteum from the right femur. Spaceflight and hindlimb unloading each resulted in cancellous osteopenia, as well as a tendency towards decreased periosteal bone formation. Both models for skeletal unloading resulted in site specific reductions in mRNA levels for transforming growth factor-beta (sub 1) (TGF-beta) osteocalcin (OC), and prepro-alpha (I) subunit of type 1 collagen (collagen) and little or no changes in mRNA levels for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAP) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I). Restoration of normal weight bearing resulted in transient increases in mRNA levels for the bone matrix proteins and TGF-beta in the proximal metaphysis and periosteum and no changes in either GAP or IGF-I mRNA levels. The timecourse for the response differed between the two skeletal compartments; the tibial metaphysis responded much more quickly to reloading. These results suggest that the skeletal adaptation to acute physiological changes in mechanical usage are mediated, in part, by changes in mRNA levels for bone matrix proteins and TGF-beta.

  15. Large-area sheet task advanced dendritic web growth development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.; Hopkins, R. H.; Meier, D. L.; Schruben, J.

    1982-01-01

    Thermal models were developed that accurately predict the thermally generated stresses in the web crystal which, if too high, cause the crystal to degenerate. The application of the modeling results to the design of low-stress experimental growth configurations will allow the growth of wider web crystals at higher growth velocities. A new experimental web growth machine was constructed. This facility includes all the features necessary for carrying out growth experiments under steady thermal conditions. Programmed growth initiation was developed to give reproducible crystal starts. Width control permits the growth of long ribbons at constant width. Melt level is controlled to 0.1 mm or better. Thus, the capability exists to grow long web crystals of constant width and thickness with little operator intervention, and web growth experiments can now be performed with growth variables controlled to a degree not previously possible.

  16. Nerve growth factor promotes human hemopoietic colony growth and differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, H.; Coughlin, M.D.; Bienenstock, J.; Denburg, J.A. )

    1988-09-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a neurotropic polypeptide necessary for the survival and growth of some central neurons, as well as sensory afferent and sympathetic neurons. Much is now known of the structural and functional characteristics of NGF, whose gene has recently been clones. Since it is synthesized in largest amounts by the male mouse submandibular gland, its role exclusively in nerve growth is questionable. These experiments indicate that NGF causes a significant stimulation of granulocyte colonies grown from human peripheral blood in standard hemopoietic methylcellulose assays. Further, NGF appears to act in a relatively selective fashion to induce the differentiation of eosinophils and basophils/mast cells. Depletion experiments show that the NGF effect may be T-cell dependent and that NGF augments the colony-stimulating effect of supernatants from the leukemic T-cell (Mo) line. The hemopoietic activity of NGF is blocked by {sup 125}I-polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies to NGF. The authors conclude that NGF may indirectly act as a local growth factor in tissues other than those of the nervous system by causing T cells to synthesize or secrete molecules with colony-stimulating activity. In view of the synthesis of NGF in tissue injury, the involvement of basophils/mast cells and eosinophils in allergic and other inflammatory processes, and the association of mast cells with fibrosis and tissue repair, they postulate that NGF plays an important biological role in a variety of repair processes.

  17. [Growth charts and intrauterine growth retardation].

    PubMed

    Gouyon, J-B; Ferdynus, C; Quantin, C

    2013-09-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction indicates that a fetus is unable to achieve its growth potential. The individual growth potential is approximated by customization of growth charts. Neonatal growth charts rely on body weight measures at birth while fetal growth charts rely on body weight estimated from biometric measurements of the fetus. The neonatal and fetal growth charts are not equivalent and have different meanings for epidemiologists and clinicians. Fetal growth charts also assess fetal growth velocity, but individual assessment of fetal weight may be flawed by lack of precision. Neonatal charts are constructed based on data obtained in the whole population or in a subgroup without gestational diseases. The two types of neonatal charts markedly differ at low gestational ages as 30% of preterm infants present intrauterine growth restriction, usually due to maternal diseases. Even if intrauterine growth restriction is a risk factor of fetal mortality, neonatal mortality, and short- and long-term morbidity, the predictive value of the charts (whether or not they are customized) at an individual level is low and may be improved by additional investigations.

  18. Crystal growth by precipitation under microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Authier, A.; Lefaucheux, F.; Robert, M. C.

    1979-01-01

    The importance of understanding the mechanisms associated with defect generation during growth and the influence of gravity is stressed. An experiment is described. The advantages of adapting this experiment to the FES are then discussed. A brief survey of the ground based research under way is given.

  19. Growth of electronic materials in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthiesen, D. H.

    1991-01-01

    A growth experiment aimed at growing two selenium-doped gallium arsenide crystals, each of which are one inch in diameter and 3.45 inches in length, is described. Emphasis is placed on the effect of microgravity on the segregation behavior of electronic materials. The lessons learned from the 1975 ASTP mission have been incorporated in this experiment.

  20. Interpretive Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeHaan, Frank, Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Describes an interpretative experiment involving the application of symmetry and temperature-dependent proton and fluorine nmr spectroscopy to the solution of structural and kinetic problems in coordination chemistry. (MLH)

  1. The Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariana Nicoara, Floare

    2016-04-01

    My name is Nicoara Floarea and I am teacher at Secondary School Calatele and I teach students from preparatory class and the second grade . They are six-eight years old. In my activity, for introducing scientific concepts to my students, I use various and active methods or traditional methods including experiments. The experiment stimulates students' curiosity, their creativity, the understanding and knowledge taught accessibility. I propose you two such experiments: The life cycle of the plants (long-term experiment, with rigorous observation time):We use beans, wheat or other; They are grown in pots and on the cotton soaked with water,keeping under students' observation protecting them ( just soak them regularly) and we waiting the plants rise. For discussions and comments of plant embryo development we use the plants which rose on the cotton soaked with water plants at the end of the first week. Last school year we had in the pot climbing beans which in May made pods. They were not too great but our experiment was a success. The students could deduce that there will develop those big beans which after drying will be planted again. The influence of light on plants (average duration experiment with the necessary observation time): We use two pots in which plants are of the same type (two geraniums), one of them is situated so as to get direct sunlight and other plant we put in a closed box. Although we wet both plants after a week we see that the plant that benefited from sunlight has turned strain in direct sunlight, developing normally in return the plant out of the box I have yellowed leaves, photosynthesis does not She has occurred . Students will understand the vital role of the Sun in plants' life, both in the classroom and in nature. The experiment is a method of teaching students extremely pleasant, with a remarkable percentage of acquiring more knowledge.

  2. Time for Experience: Growing up under the Experience Economy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Argenton, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Experience is one of the major paths to growth and autonomy, and as such, of outstanding educational value. But it also has a much wider sociocultural context, rooted in life itself. It is about learning that which cannot be taught, learning to think, which precedes all other-defined forms of education. It is an encounter with the unknown, where…

  3. Posttraumatic Stress and Growth in Student Service Members and Veterans: The Role of Personal Growth Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borowa, Dominika; Robitschek, Christine; Harmon, Kevin Andrew; Shigemoto, Yuki

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study explored the extent to which personal growth initiative (PGI) may predict posttraumatic stress and growth in student service members/veterans (SSM/V). Participants: Participants were 136 SSM/V (79% men) representing multiple branches of the armed forces. Forty-four percent of participants reported having combat experience.…

  4. An Apparatus for Growth of Small Crystals From Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitrovic, Mico M.

    1995-01-01

    Describes an apparatus for crystal growth that was designed to study growth kinetics of small crystals from solutions and to obtain crystals of various substances. Describes the use of the apparatus in laboratory practical experiments in the field of crystal growth physics within the course "Solid State Physics". (JRH)

  5. Growth of Campylobacter Incubated Aerobically in Media Supplemented with Peptones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growth of Campylobacter cultures incubated aerobically in media supplemented with peptones was studied, and additional experiments were conducted to compare growth of the bacteria in media supplemented with peptones to growth in media supplemented with fumarate-pyruvate-minerals-vitamins (FPMV). A b...

  6. Endorsement of Growth Factors in Experiential Training Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiweewa, John; Gilbride, Dennis; Luke, Melissa; Seward, Derek

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify student growth factors during a semester long Master's level group counseling class. Results indicated that 12 growth factors accounted for 86% of the total number of critical incidents that participants reported as influencing their personal growth and awareness during the group experience. Two other…

  7. Possible effects of pollock and herring on the growth and reproductive success of Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus): insights from feeding experiments using an alternative animal model, Rattus norvegicus.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Carolyn P; Trites, A W; Kitts, D D

    2003-01-01

    The decline of Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus) in the Gulf of Alaska appears to have been associated with a switch of diet from one dominated by fatty forage fishes (such as herring; Clupea pallasi) to one dominated by low-fat fish (such as pollock; Theragra chalcogramma). Observations made during the decline include reduced body size of sea lions, low pregnancy rates, and high mortality. We used the general mammalian model, the laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus), to test whether changing the quality of prey consumed could cause changes in size and reproductive performance. Five groups of twelve female, weanling rats were fed diets composed of herring (H), pollock (P), pollock supplemented with herring oil (PH), pollock supplemented with pollock oil (PP), or a semi-purified diet (ICN). Mean body weights were greatest for H, followed by PH, P, PP and finally ICN, although ICN was the only group significantly different from the others (P<0.05). Food intakes before mating were 10 % higher for groups on the lower-fat diets (P and ICN), resulting in similar energy intakes in all groups. The protein efficiency ratio was highest for the H diet, slightly lower for all pollock diets, and significantly lower for ICN (P<0.05). The fetal weights for mothers fed P were significantly reduced (P<0.05). The present study shows that the energy content was a major limiting factor in the nutritional quality of pollock. When food intake was adjusted to meet energetic requirements, there were no detrimental consequences from eating pollock. However, supplementation of pollock meal with additional pollock oil may reduce growth and reproductive performance, although the reasons for this were not apparent. PMID:12568666

  8. BRX promotes Arabidopsis shoot growth.

    PubMed

    Beuchat, Julien; Scacchi, Emanuele; Tarkowska, Danuse; Ragni, Laura; Strnad, Miroslav; Hardtke, Christian S

    2010-10-01

    • BREVIS RADIX (BRX) has been identified through a loss-of-function allele in the Umkirch-1 accession in a natural variation screen for Arabidopsis root growth vigor. Physiological and gene expression analyses have suggested that BRX is rate limiting for auxin-responsive gene expression by mediating cross-talk with the brassinosteroid pathway, as impaired root growth and reduced auxin perception of brx can be (partially) rescued by external brassinosteroid application. • Using genetic tools, we show that brx mutants also display significantly reduced cotyledon and leaf growth. • Similar to the root, the amplitude and penetrance of this phenotype depends on genetic background and shares the physiological features, reduced auxin perception and brassinosteroid rescue. Furthermore, reciprocal grafting experiments between mutant and complemented brx shoot scions and root stocks suggest that the shoot phenotypes are not an indirect consequence of the root phenotype. Finally, BRX gain-of-function lines display epinastic leaf growth and, in the case of dominant negative interference, increased epidermal cell size. Consistent with an impact of BRX on brassinosteroid biosynthesis, this phenotype is accompanied by increased brassinosteroid levels. • In summary, our results demonstrate a ubiquitous, although quantitatively variable role of BRX in modulating the growth rate in both the root and shoot.

  9. Impact of Client Suicide on Practitioner Posttraumatic Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munson, Joseph Simon

    2009-01-01

    Our purpose was to examine posttraumatic growth in clinicians after the suicide death of a client. An experience such as a client suicide could be an opportunity for growth or a danger for the practitioner to become traumatized. Thus, the clinician who works with clients who complete suicide may either suffer or experience a positive change from…

  10. Understanding customer experience.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Christopher; Schwager, Andre

    2007-02-01

    Anyone who has signed up for cell phone service, attempted to claim a rebate, or navigated a call center has probably suffered from a company's apparent indifference to what should be its first concern: the customer experiences that culminate in either satisfaction or disappointment and defection. Customer experience is the subjective response customers have to direct or indirect contact with a company. It encompasses every aspect of an offering: customer care, advertising, packaging, features, ease of use, reliability. Customer experience is shaped by customers' expectations, which largely reflect previous experiences. Few CEOs would argue against the significance of customer experience or against measuring and analyzing it. But many don't appreciate how those activities differ from CRM or just how illuminating the data can be. For instance, the majority of the companies in a recent survey believed they have been providing "superior" experiences to customers, but most customers disagreed. The authors describe a customer experience management (CEM) process that involves three kinds of monitoring: past patterns (evaluating completed transactions), present patterns (tracking current relationships), and potential patterns (conducting inquiries in the hope of unveiling future opportunities). Data are collected at or about touch points through such methods as surveys, interviews, focus groups, and online forums. Companies need to involve every function in the effort, not just a single customer-facing group. The authors go on to illustrate how a cross-functional CEM system is created. With such a system, companies can discover which customers are prospects for growth and which require immediate intervention. PMID:17345685

  11. Neutrino Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, R. D.

    2010-08-04

    Recent studies of neutrino oscillations have established the existence of finite neutrino masses and mixing between generations of neutrinos. The combined results from studies of atmospheric neutrinos, solar neutrinos, reactor antineutrinos and neutrinos produced at accelerators paint an intriguing picture that clearly requires modification of the standard model of particle physics. These results also provide clear motivation for future neutrino oscillation experiments as well as searches for direct neutrino mass and nuclear double-beta decay. I will discuss the program of new neutrino oscillation experiments aimed at completing our knowledge of the neutrino mixing matrix.

  12. Some Experiments With Agar-Grown Seedlings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeland, P. W.

    1973-01-01

    Two percent agar gel is reported as a better medium for germination and growth studies. Students can be encouraged to undertake many simple experiments and make precise observations by using this medium. (PS)

  13. HEGRA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The La Palma cosmic-ray observatory HEGRA (High-Energy Gamma-Ray Astronomy) is an air shower experiment, located at the OBSERVATORIO DEL ROQUE DE LOS MUCHACHOS (2200 m above sea level, 28.75°N, 17.89°W) on the Canary island of La Palma, and is operated by institutes from Germany, Spain and Yerevan....

  14. Community Capacity Building as a vital mechanism for enhancing the growth and efficacy of a sustainable scientific software ecosystem: experiences running a real-time bi-coastal "Open Science for Synthesis" Training Institute for young Earth and Environmental scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schildhauer, M.; Jones, M. B.; Bolker, B.; Lenhardt, W. C.; Hampton, S. E.; Idaszak, R.; Rebich Hespanha, S.; Ahalt, S.; Christopherson, L.

    2014-12-01

    Continuing advances in computational capabilities, access to Big Data, and virtual collaboration technologies are creating exciting new opportunities for accomplishing Earth science research at finer resolutions, with much broader scope, using powerful modeling and analytical approaches that were unachievable just a few years ago. Yet, there is a perceptible lag in the abilities of the research community to capitalize on these new possibilities, due to lacking the relevant skill-sets, especially with regards to multi-disciplinary and integrative investigations that involve active collaboration. UC Santa Barbara's National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS), and the University of North Carolina's Renaissance Computing Institute (RENCI), were recipients of NSF OCI S2I2 "Conceptualization awards", charged with helping define the needs of the research community relative to enabling science and education through "sustained software infrastructure". Over the course of our activities, a consistent request from Earth scientists was for "better training in software that enables more effective, reproducible research." This community-based feedback led to creation of an "Open Science for Synthesis" Institute— a innovative, three-week, bi-coastal training program for early career researchers. We provided a mix of lectures, hands-on exercises, and working group experience on topics including: data discovery and preservation; code creation, management, sharing, and versioning; scientific workflow documentation and reproducibility; statistical and machine modeling techniques; virtual collaboration mechanisms; and methods for communicating scientific results. All technologies and quantitative tools presented were suitable for advancing open, collaborative, and reproducible synthesis research. In this talk, we will report on the lessons learned from running this ambitious training program, that involved coordinating classrooms among two remote sites, and

  15. Sugar supplementation stimulates growth performance in calves with growth retardation.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tomohiro; Hidaka, Yuichi; Kamimura, Shunichi

    2010-01-01

    The growth effect of sugar supplementation was determined in 49 retarded growth calves. Calves were supplemented with sugar at 1 g/kg BW 2 times weekly for 8 weeks. Glucose tolerance tests prior to the experiment showed no difference between the retarded growth calves and normal growth controls. After sugar supplementation, the calves were classified into 4 groups characterized by high (H) or low (L) periodic changes in daily weight gain (DG) with a breakpoint of 0.8 kg/d in three periods, birth to sugar supplementation (Birth-Pre), the 8 weeks during supplementation (Pre-Post) and after feeding to delivery to market (Post-Market). The periodic DG showed a marked increase after supplementation in Pre-Post and Post-Market compared with before supplementation during Birth-Pre in 2 groups (0.93 and 1.11 vs. 0.51 kg/day for L-H-H [n=19], 0.66 and 1.19 vs. 0.42 kg/day for L-L-H [n=24]), but no difference was observed in L-H-L (n=3) and L-L-L (n=3). Peripheral blood was collected on the day before supplementation (Pre), 8 weeks after supplementation (Post) and eight weeks after cease of supplementation. The blood concentrations of both insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and glucose showed significant increases in L-H-H and L-L-H, but decreases in non-esterified fatty acid were observed in L-H-H and L-L-L on day Post compared with day Pre, respectively (p<0.05). At delivery to market, the sugar-supplemented calves had body weights similar to the market average. The growth effect of sugar supplementation could be stimulated through rumen papillae development induce by sucrose, the main component of table sugar.

  16. A novel method for measurement of crystal growth rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Do Yeon; Yang, Dae Ryook

    2013-06-01

    A new method for measurement of crystal growth rate is proposed, in an attempt to make the measuring of growth rate more convenient than the existing methods. In this newly proposed method, the point of nucleation under a constant cooling rate condition was measured as changing the amount of seeds. The growth kinetics parameters were then estimated using the experimental data to match the points of nucleation. Experiments were performed with potash alum in the water system and growth kinetic parameters were estimated. Compared with existing results, the proposed method showed tolerable discrepancy in the growth kinetic parameters. The proposed method can be an alternative technique for measurement of growth rate.

  17. Crystal growth of calcium sulphate dihydrate at low supersaturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christoffersen, M. R.; Christoffersen, J.; Weijnen, M. P. C.; Van Rosmalen, G. M.

    1982-08-01

    The growth rate of calcium sulphate dihydrate crystals, gypsum, in aqueous suspension has been shown to be screw dislocation controlled in the supersaturation range 1.03< {C}/{C s}<1.15 . Constant composition experiments show that the overall rate of growth decreases with increasing mass of the crystals. A combination of normal spiral growth, growth of cooperating spirals with non-parallel Burgers vectors, and growth of grain boundary spirals, together with partial outgrowth of concave parts of the crystals, can explain the rate of growth found for different preparations of gypsum crytals.

  18. Soil experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Linton; Butler, Todd; Smith, Mike; Cline, Charles; Scruggs, Steve; Zakhia, Nadim

    1987-01-01

    An experimental procedure was devised to investigate the effects of the lunar environment on the physical properties of simulated lunar soil. The test equipment and materials used consisted of a vacuum chamber, direct shear tester, static penetrometer, and fine grained basalt as the simulant. The vacuum chamber provides a medium for applying the environmental conditions to the soil experiment with the exception of gravity. The shear strength parameters are determined by the direct shear test. Strength parameters and the resistance of soil penetration by static loading will be investigated by the use of a static cone penetrometer. In order to conduct a soil experiment without going to the moon, a suitable lunar simulant must be selected. This simulant must resemble lunar soil in both composition and particle size. The soil that most resembles actual lunar soil is basalt. The soil parameters, as determined by the testing apparatus, will be used as design criteria for lunar soil engagement equipment.

  19. Fast growth of KDP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dongli; Xue, Dongfeng

    2008-04-01

    A novel rapid crystal growth system was conveniently constructed on the basis of the high-speed acquisition card and the Laboratory Virtual Instrument Engineering Workbench software. All growth parameters were real-time monitored and controlled to provide a stable environment with small fluctuation for crystal growth. A simple equation was derived from the solution properties to calculate the cooling curves corresponding to different growth parameters. The combination of the calculated cooling curve and our designed growth system can lead to the rapid growth of potassium dihydrogen phosphate crystal routinely.

  20. XMASS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Ko

    2016-06-01

    XMASS is a single phase liquid xenon scintillator detector. The project is designed for multi purposes, dark matter, neutrinoless double beta decay and 7Be/pp solar neutrino. As the first step of project, XMASS-I detector with 832kg sensitive volume started operation from Dec. 2010. In this paper, recent obtained physics results from commissioning data, refurbishment of detector and future step of experiment are presented.

  1. Multiwell experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Sattler, A.R.; Warpinski, N.R.; Lorenz, J.C.; Hart, C.M.; Branagan, P.T.

    1985-01-01

    The Multiwell Experiment is a research-oriented field laboratory. Its overall objectives are to characterize lenticular, low-permeability gas reservoirs and to develop technology for their production. This field laboratory has been established at a site in the east-central Piceance basin, Colorado. Here the Mesaverde formation lies at a depth of 4000 to 8250 ft. This interval contains different, distinct reservoir types depending upon their depositional environments. These different zones serve as the focus of the various testing and stimulation programs. Field work began in late 1981 and is scheduled through mid-1988. One key to the Multiwell Experiment is three closely spaced wells. Core, log, well testing, and well-to-well seismic data are providing a far better definition of the geological setting than has been available previously. The closely spaced wells also allow interference and tracer tests to obtain in situ reservoir parameters. The vertical variation of in situ stress throughout the intervals of interest is being measured. A series of stimulation experiments is being conducted in one well and the other two wells are being used as observation wells for improved fracture diagnostics and well testing. Another key to achieving the Multiwell Experiment objectives is the synergism resulting from a broad spectrum of activities: geophysical surveys, sedimentological studies, core and log analyses, well testing, in situ stress determination, stimulation, fracture diagnostics, and reservoir analyses. The results from the various activities will define the reservoir and the hydraulic fracture. These, in turn, define the net pay stimulated: the intersection of a hydraulic fracture of known geometry with a reservoir of known morphology and properties. Accomplishments of the past year are listed. 4 refs.

  2. Ecosystem experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Mooney, H.A.; Medina, E.; Schindler, D.W.; Schulze, E.D.; Walker, B.H.

    1991-01-01

    Large scale, human-induced modifications to terrestrial and hydrological systems have been a major factor in contributing to global change. The objective of this book is to explore the potential of ecosystem experimentation as a tool to understanding and predicting more precisely the consequences of our changing biosphere. The papers in this book are the result of two SCOPE workshops to evaluated understanding of the response of ecosystems to large scale perturbations and to design ecosystem experiments to study the impace of increased atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations on ecosystem processes. The general topics addressed include the following: how changes in driving variables affect different biotic interactions within ecosystems; the human role in modifying forest structure and the resulting ecosystem processes; the role of ecosystem experiments in the study of controlling factors such as hydrological controls, temperature, and biotic controlles; analysis of ecosystem dynamics as a complex and chaotic system; role of ecosystem experiments in the study of the impact of acid deposition; role of ecosystem experimentation in the study of global change impace on the biosphere and the biospheric feedbacks to global environmental change.

  3. Transport Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Timothy M.; Wuebbles, Donald J.; Boering, Kristie A.; Eckman, Richard S.; Lerner, Jean; Plumb, R. Alan; Rind, David H.; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Waugh, Darryn W.; Wei, Chu-Feng

    1999-01-01

    MM II defined a series of experiments to better understand and characterize model transport and to assess the realism of this transport by comparison to observations. Measurements from aircraft, balloon, and satellite, not yet available at the time of MM I [Prather and Remsberg, 1993], provide new and stringent constraints on model transport, and address the limits of our transport modeling abilities. Simulations of the idealized tracers the age spectrum, and propagating boundary conditions, and conserved HSCT-like emissions probe the relative roles of different model transport mechanisms, while simulations of SF6 and C02 make the connection to observations. Some of the tracers are related, and transport diagnostics such as the mean age can be derived from more than one of the experiments for comparison to observations. The goals of the transport experiments are: (1) To isolate the effects of transport in models from other processes; (2) To assess model transport for realistic tracers (such as SF6 and C02) for comparison to observations; (3) To use certain idealized tracers to isolate model mechanisms and relationships to atmospheric chemical perturbations; (4) To identify strengths and weaknesses of the treatment of transport processes in the models; (5) To relate evaluated shortcomings to aspects of model formulation. The following section are included:Executive Summary, Introduction, Age Spectrum, Observation, Tropical Transport in Models, Global Mean Age in Models, Source-Transport Covariance, HSCT "ANOY" Tracer Distributions, and Summary and Conclusions.

  4. Astronaut Daniel Bursch with CPCG experiment on Discovery's middeck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Astronaut Daniel W. Bursch, mission specialist, is pictured on Discovery's middeck with the Commercial Protein Crystal Growth (CPCG) experiment. This experiment is designed to explore the structure of specific protein molecules in space-grown crystals.

  5. Protein crystal growth in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Robert S.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of low gravity on the growth of protein crystals and those parameters which will affect growth and crystal quality was studied. The proper design of the flight hardware and experimental protocols are highly dependent on understanding the factors which influence the nucleation and growth of crystals of biological macromolecules. Thus, those factors are investigated and the body of knowledge which has been built up for small molecule crystallization. These data also provide a basis of comparison for the results obtained from low-g experiments. The flows around growing crystals are detailed. The preliminary study of the growth of isocitrate lyase, the crystal morphologies found and the preliminary x ray results are discussed. The design of two apparatus for protein crystal growth by temperature control are presented along with preliminary results.

  6. The growth of birdwings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meunier, K.

    1980-01-01

    Growth and order allometry is defined and applied to the growth of bird effects of negative wing allometry discussed with regard to body size and flight power. Transposition and evolutionary significance are explained.

  7. Growth hormone deficiency - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... the same age. The child will have normal intelligence in most cases. In older children, puberty may ... hormones cause the body to make. Tests can measure these growth factors. Accurate growth hormone deficiency testing ...

  8. Growth, growth hormone and cognitive functions.

    PubMed

    Sartorio, A; Conti, A; Molinari, E; Riva, G; Morabito, F; Faglia, G

    1996-01-01

    The interactions among short stature, growth hormone (GH) and cognitive functions have been extensively studied so far. However, although it seems well established that short stature is associated with cognitive problems, little effort has been made to point out the presence of specific psychological effects related to the different forms of short stature. In 'short normal' children, the presence of a scholastic underachievement seems to suggest that short stature 'itself' might predispose these patients to some of their psychosocial difficulties. The higher incidence of academic failure, in presence of a normal intellectual functioning, has been attributed to environmental and psychosocial factors, including over-protective parents and low self-esteem resulting from the impact of short stature. These problems appear to be common also to other forms of short stature (such as Turner's syndrome) where, however, they are frequently associated with other specific deficits. The in vivo model which might allow, at least in part, better understanding of GH (per se)-dependent effects is represented by GH deficiency (GHD), in which, however, the specific role of GH on psychological functioning is frequently masked by the presence of associated hormonal deficiencies. Children with isolated GHD are reported to have specific educational deficits, in particular learning disability and attention-deficit disorders, which have been tentatively attributed to a compromised intellectual potential. The psychological effects of long-term GH treatment in children with GHD still remain controversial, with some retrospective studies describing a generally beneficial outcome. Since early experiences in school are closely related to success in adult life, the possible implications that GHD during childhood holds during adulthood have been recently considered. Although regional differences have been observed in subgroups of adults with GHD, it seems that these patients have normal cognitive

  9. (Plant growth with limited water)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    When water is in short supply, soybean stem growth is inhibited by a physical limitation followed in a few hours by metabolic changes that reduce the extensibility of the cell walls. The extensibility then becomes the main limitation. With time, there is a modest recovery in extensibility along with an accumulation of a 28kD protein in the walls of the growth-affected cells. A 3lkD protein that was 80% similar in amino acid sequence also was present but did not accumulate in the walls of the stem cells. In the stem, growth was inhibited and the mRNA for the 28kD protein increased in response to water deprivation but the mRNA for the 3 1 kD protein did not. The roots continued to grow and the mRNA for the 28kD protein did not accumulate but the mRNA for the 3lkD protein did. Thus, there was a tissuespecific response of gene expression that correlated with the contrasting growth response to low water potential in the same seedlings. Further work using immunogold labeling, fluorescence labeling, and western blotting gave evidence that the 28kD protein is located in the cell wall as well as several compartments in the cytoplasm. Preliminary experiments indicate that the 28kD protein is a phosphatase.

  10. Nucleation and growth control in protein crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Nyce, Thomas A.; Meehan, Edward J.; Sowers, Jennifer W.; Monaco, Lisa A.

    1990-01-01

    The five topics summarized in this final report are as follows: (1) a technique for the expedient, semi-automated determination of protein solubilities as a function of temperature and application of this technique to proteins other than lysozyme; (2) a small solution cell with adjustable temperature gradients for the growth of proteins at a predetermined location through temperature programming; (3) a microscopy system with image storage and processing capability for high resolution optical studies of temperature controlled protein growth and etching kinetics; (4) growth experiments with lysozyme in thermosyphon flow ; and (5) a mathematical model for the evolution of evaporation/diffusion induced concentration gradients in the hanging drop protein crystallization technique.

  11. Evidence for Eigenfrequencies in Dendritic Growth Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacombe, Jeffrey C.; Koss, Matthew B.; Giummarra, Cindie; Frei, Julie E.; Lupulescu, Afina O.; Glicksman, Martin E.

    Microgravity dendritic growth experiments, conducted aboard the space shuttle Columbia, are described. In-situ video images reveal that pivalic acid dendrites growing in the diffusion-controlled environment of low-earth orbit exhibit a range of transient or non-steady-state behaviors. The observed transient features of the growth process are being studied with the objective of understanding the mechanisms responsible for these behaviors. Included in these observations is possible evidence for characteristic frequencies or limit cycles in the growth behavior near the tip of the dendrites. These data, and their interpretations, will be discussed.

  12. Chemistry Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasseur, Guy; Remsberg, Ellis; Purcell, Patrick; Bhatt, Praful; Sage, Karen H.; Brown, Donald E.; Scott, Courtney J.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Tie, Xue-Xi; Huang, Theresa

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the chemistry component of the model comparison is to assess to what extent differences in the formulation of chemical processes explain the variance between model results. Observed concentrations of chemical compounds are used to estimate to what degree the various models represent realistic situations. For readability, the materials for the chemistry experiment are reported in three separate sections. This section discussed the data used to evaluate the models in their simulation of the source gases and the Nitrogen compounds (NO(y)) and Chlorine compounds (Cl(y)) species.

  13. [Growth hormone treatment update].

    PubMed

    2014-02-01

    Short stature in children is a common cause for referral to pediatric endocrinologists, corresponding most times to normal variants of growth. Initially growth hormone therapy was circumscribed to children presenting growth hormone deficiency. Since the production of recombinant human hormone its use had spread to other pathologies.

  14. Energy and Economic Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sonenblum, Sidney

    This report reviews the economic impacts of the energy dilemma. Presented are viewpoints that have emerged relating to: (1) the desirability of economic growth; (2) the relationship between economic growth and energy usage; (3) the effects of energy wage in limiting or expanding the opportunities for growth; and (4) whether there is some sense in…

  15. [Population Growth and Development].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clausen, A. W.

    Rapid population growth as a central development problem, the proper domain of government in reducing population growth, and effective measures which can be taken to reduce fertility are examined. Rapid population growth puts a brake on development because it exacerbates the difficult choice between higher consumption now and the investment needed…

  16. Growth Factors and Tension-Induced Skeletal Muscle Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    1994-01-01

    have performed experiments to determine whether mechanical stimulation of cultured avian muscle cells alters their response to anabolic steroids or glucocorticoids. In static cultures, testosterone had no effect on muscle cell growth, but 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone and the synthetic steroid stanozolol increased cell growth by up to 18% and 30%, respectively, after a three day exposure. We completed development of a new IBM-based mechanical cell stimulator system to provide greater flexibility in operating and monitoring our experiments. Our previous long term studies on myofiber growth were designed around a perfusion system of our own design. We have recently changed to performing these studies using a modified CELLCO cartridge bioreactor system Z since it has been certified as the ground-based model for the Shuttle's Space Tissue Loss (STL) F= Cell Culture Module. The current goals of this aspect of the project are three fold: 1) to design a Z cell culture system for studying avian skeletal myofiber atrophy on the Shuttle and Space Station; 0 2) to expand the use of bioreactors to cells which do not grow in either suspension or attached to the hollow fibers; and 3) to combine the bioreactor system with our computerized mechanical cell stimulator to have a better in vitro model to study tension/gravity/stretch regulation of skeletal muscle size. Preliminary studies also reported on involved : (1) how release of tension can induce rapid atrophy of tissues cultured avian skeletal muscle cells, and (2) a mechanism to transfer and maintain avian skeletal muscle organoids in modified cartridges in the Space Tissue Loss Module.

  17. Protein crystal growth in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delucas, Lawrence J.; Bugg, Charles E.

    1991-01-01

    Studies of protein crystal growth in the microgravity environment in space are described with special attention given to the crystal growth facilities and the techniques used in Space Shuttle experiments. The properties of large space-grown crystals of gamma interferon, elastase, lathyros ochrus lectin I, and few other proteins grown on various STS flights are described. A comparison of the microgravity-grown crystals with the bast earth-grown crystals demonstrated that the space-grown crystals are more highly ordered at the molecular level than their earth-grown counterparts. When crystallization conditions were optimized, the microgravity-grown protein crystals were larger, displayed more uniform morphologies, and yielded diffraction data to significantly higher resolution than their earth-grown counterparts.

  18. Zeolite crystal growth in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacco, Albert, Jr.; Thompson, Robert W.; Dixon, Anthony G.

    1991-01-01

    The growth of large, uniform zeolite crystals in high yield in space can have a major impact on the chemical process industry. Large zeolite crystals will be used to improve basic understanding of adsorption and catalytic mechanisms, and to make zeolite membranes. To grow large zeolites in microgravity, it is necessary to control the nucleation event and fluid motion, and to enhance nutrient transfer. Data is presented that suggests nucleation can be controlled using chemical compounds (e.g., Triethanolamine, for zeolite A), while not adversely effecting growth rate. A three-zone furnace has been designed to perform multiple syntheses concurrently. The operating range of the furnace is 295 K to 473 K. Teflon-lined autoclaves (10 ml liquid volume) have been designed to minimize contamination, reduce wall nucleation, and control mixing of pre-gel solutions on orbit. Zeolite synthesis experiments will be performed on USML-1 in 1992.

  19. Convective flow during dendritic growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Huang, S. C.

    1979-01-01

    A review is presented of the major experimental findings obtained from recent ground-based research conducted under the SPAR program. Measurements of dendritic growth at small supercoolings indicate that below approximately 1.5 K a transition occurs from diffusive control to convective control in succinonitrile, a model system chosen for this study. The key theoretical ideas concerning diffusive and convective heat transport during dendritic growth are discussed, and it is shown that a transition in the transport control should occur when the characteristic length for diffusion becomes larger than the characteristic length for convection. The experimental findings and the theoretical ideas discussed suggest that the Fluid Experiment System could provide appropriate experimental diagnostics for flow field visualization and quantification of the fluid dynamical effects presented here.

  20. A new growth curve model for biological growth: some inferential studies on the growth of Cirrhinus mrigala.

    PubMed

    Bhowmick, Amiya Ranjan; Bhattacharya, Sabyasachi

    2014-08-01

    Growth of living organisms is a fundamental biological process. It depicts the physiological development of the species related to the environment. Mathematical development of growth curve models has a long history since its birth. We propose a mathematical model to describe the evolution of relative growth rate as a function of time based on a real life experiment on a major Indian Carp Cirrhinus mrigala. We establish that the proposed model is able to describe the fish growth dynamics more accurately for our experimental data than some existing models e.g. logistic, Gompertz, exponential. Approximate expressions of the points of inflection and the time of achieving the maximum relative growth rate are derived. We study, in detail, the existence of a nonlinear least squares estimator of the model parameters and their consistency properties. Test-statistics is developed to study the equality of points of inflection and equality of the amount of time necessary to achieve the maximum relative growth rate for a species at two different locations. Using the theory of variance stabilizing transformations, we propose a new test statistic to test the effect of the decay parameter for the proposed growth law. The testing procedure is found to be more sensitive in comparison with the test based on nonlinear least squares estimates. Our proposed model provides a general framework to model growth in other disciplines as well. PMID:24933474

  1. A new growth curve model for biological growth: some inferential studies on the growth of Cirrhinus mrigala.

    PubMed

    Bhowmick, Amiya Ranjan; Bhattacharya, Sabyasachi

    2014-08-01

    Growth of living organisms is a fundamental biological process. It depicts the physiological development of the species related to the environment. Mathematical development of growth curve models has a long history since its birth. We propose a mathematical model to describe the evolution of relative growth rate as a function of time based on a real life experiment on a major Indian Carp Cirrhinus mrigala. We establish that the proposed model is able to describe the fish growth dynamics more accurately for our experimental data than some existing models e.g. logistic, Gompertz, exponential. Approximate expressions of the points of inflection and the time of achieving the maximum relative growth rate are derived. We study, in detail, the existence of a nonlinear least squares estimator of the model parameters and their consistency properties. Test-statistics is developed to study the equality of points of inflection and equality of the amount of time necessary to achieve the maximum relative growth rate for a species at two different locations. Using the theory of variance stabilizing transformations, we propose a new test statistic to test the effect of the decay parameter for the proposed growth law. The testing procedure is found to be more sensitive in comparison with the test based on nonlinear least squares estimates. Our proposed model provides a general framework to model growth in other disciplines as well.

  2. Composition and Recorders: A Motivating Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birnie, Rebecca A.

    2014-01-01

    Composition with students on the elementary level sparks imagination and creativity while engaging students in an experience that can demonstrate personal musical growth. Traditionally, music educators have not been taught how to compose music, let alone lead their students in composing experiences. As music educators take the beginning steps of…

  3. The Integration of Multimedia and Field Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, George

    A professor of science education at Florida State University shares his experiences with the growth of the field of environmental education and the problems inherent in trying to teach formal environmental education outdoors. Although field experience is best, it must be limited in most situations since logistics get in the way. Technology can…

  4. Pharmaceutical experiment aboard STS-67 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Astronaut William G. Gregory, pilot, works with a pharmaceutical experiment on the middeck of the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Endeavour during the STS-67 mission. Commercial Materials Dispersion Apparatus Instruments Technology Associates Experiments (CMIX-03) includes not only pharmaceutical, but also biotechnology, cell biology, fluids, and crystal growth investigation

  5. Human growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Strobl, J S; Thomas, M J

    1994-03-01

    The study of human growth hormone is a little more than 100 years old. Growth hormone, first identified for its dramatic effect on longitudinal growth, is now known to exert generalized effects on protein, lipid, and carbohydrate metabolism. Additional roles for growth hormone in human physiology are likely to be discovered in the areas of sleep research and reproduction. Furthermore, there is some indication that growth hormone also may be involved in the regulation of immune function, mental well-being, and the aging process. Recombinant DNA technology has provided an abundant and safe, albeit expensive, supply of human growth hormone for human use, but the pharmacological properties of growth hormone are poor. Most growth hormone-deficient individuals exhibit a secretory defect rather than a primary defect in growth hormone production, however, and advances in our understanding of the neuroendocrine regulation of growth hormone secretion have established the basis for the use of drugs to stimulate release of endogenously synthesized growth hormone. This promises to be an important area for future drug development. PMID:8190748

  6. Transformations of emotional experience.

    PubMed

    de Cortiñas, Lia Pistiner

    2013-06-01

    In this paper the author approaches mental pain and the problems in a psychoanalytic treatment of patients with difficulties in the psychic transformation of their emotional experiences. The author is interested in the symbolic failure related to the obstruction of development of phantasies, dreams, dream-thoughts, etc. She differentiates symbolization disturbances related to hypertrophic projective identification from a detention of these primitive communications and emotional isolation. She puts forward the conjecture that one factor in the arrest of this development is the detention of projective identifications and that, when this primitive means of communication is re-established in a container-contained relationship of mutual benefit, this initiates the development of a symbolization process that can replace the pathological 'protection'. Another hypothesis she develops is that of inaccessible caesuras that, associated with the detention of projective identification, obstruct any integrative or interactive movement. This caesura and the detention of projective identifications affect mental functions needed for dealing with mental pain. The personality is left with precarious mental equipment for transforming emotional experiences. How can a psychoanalytical process stimulate the development of creative symbolization, transforming the emotional experiences and leading towards mental growth? The author approaches the clinical problem with the metaphor of the psychic birth of emotional experience. The modulation of mental pain in a container-contained relationship is a central problem for the development of the human mind. For discovering and giving a meaning to emotional experience, the infant depends on reverie, a function necessary in order to develop an evolved consciousness capable of being aware, which is different from the rudimentary consciousness that perceives but does not understand. The development of mature mental equipment is associated with the

  7. Supervision of School Counseling Students: A Focus on Personal Growth, Wellness, and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Adina; Koltz, Rebecca L.

    2015-01-01

    Results of a grounded theory study exploring the experiences and processes of school counseling students' professional and personal growth are provided. The researchers used focus groups over a two-year period to better comprehend students their experiences of growth. Several themes emerged: defining personal growth, wellness, and clinical…

  8. Energy efficiency of intraperiplasmic growth of Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus.

    PubMed Central

    Rittenberg, S C; Hespell, R B

    1975-01-01

    The Y-ATP (energy efficiency) of intraperiplasmic growth of Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus was determined from the distribution of radioactivity of the substrate organism ([U-14C]Escherichia coli) btween CO2 and bdellovibrio cells at the end of growth. A "best" Y-ATP value of 18.5 was obtained from single growth cycle experiments and an average value of 25.9 from multicycle experiments. Both values are much higher than the usual value of 10.5 for bacteria growing in rich media. The bases for the unusual energy efficiency for growth of B. bacteriovorus are discussed. PMID:1090596

  9. Protein crystal growth in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delucas, Lawrence J.; Smith, Craig D.; Smith, H. Wilson; Vijay-Kumar, Senadhi; Senadhi, Shobha E.; Ealick, Steven E.; Carter, Daniel C.; Snyder, Robert S.

    1989-01-01

    The crystals of most proteins or other biological macromolecules are poorly ordered and diffract to lower resolutions than those observed for most crystals of simple organic and inorganic compounds. Crystallization in the microgravity environment of space may improve crystal quality by eliminating convection effects near growing crystal surfaces. A series of 11 different protein crystal growth experiments was performed on U.S. Space Shuttle flight STS-26 in September 1988. The microgravity-grown crystals of gamma-interferon D1, porcine elastase, and isocitrate lyase are larger, display more uniform morphologies, and yield diffraction data to significantly higher resolutions than the best crystals of these proteins grown on earth.

  10. Growth factors in orthopedic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zaharia, C; Despa, N; Simionescu, M; Jinga, V; Fleseriu, I

    2010-01-01

    Growth factors have represented an essential issue of interest for the researchers and clinicians in orthopedics and trauma over the last 40 years. In the last 10 to 15 years, the advances registered in this field have permitted the identification of the most active cellular and humoral factors as well as the improvement of their use in the orthopedic and trauma surgery. Their domain of application has been continuously enlarged and the results have been visible from the beginning. The authors present their appreciation on the actual state of this subject as well as their experience with results and related conclusions. PMID:20302195

  11. Proximate causes of adaptive growth rates: growth efficiency variation among latitudinal populations of Rana temporaria.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, B; Laurila, A

    2005-07-01

    In ectothermic organisms, declining season length and lower temperature towards higher latitudes often select for latitudinal variation in growth and development. However, the energetic mechanisms underlying this adaptive variation are largely unknown. We investigated growth, food intake and growth efficiency of Rana temporaria tadpoles from eight populations along a 1500 km latitudinal gradient across Sweden. To gain an insight into the mechanisms of adaptation at organ level, we also examined variation in tadpole gut length. The tadpoles were raised at two temperatures (16 and 20 degrees C) in a laboratory common garden experiment. We found increased growth rate towards higher latitudes, regardless of temperature treatment. This increase in growth was not because of a higher food intake rate, but populations from higher latitudes had higher growth efficiency, i.e. they were more efficient at converting ingested food into body mass. Low temperature reduced growth efficiency most strongly in southern populations. Relative gut length increased with latitude, and tadpoles at low temperature tended to have longer guts. However, variation in gut length was not the sole adaptive explanation for increased growth efficiency as latitude and body length still explained significant amounts of variation in growth efficiency. Hence, additional energetic adaptations are probably involved in growth efficiency variation along the latitudinal gradient.

  12. Telerobotic Tending of Space Based Plant Growth Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backes, P. G.; Long, M. K.; Das, H.

    1994-01-01

    The kinematic design of a telerobotic mechanism for tending a plant growth space science experiment chamber is described. Ground based control of tending mechanisms internal to space science experiments will allow ground based principal investigators to interact directly with their space science experiments.

  13. Dynamics of root growth in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Johnsson, A; Karlsson, C; Chapman, D K; Braseth, J D; Iversen, T H

    1996-06-27

    An experiment to study the growth of garden cress roots in microgravity is described. The experiment, denoted RANDOM, was an ESA Biorack experiment in the IML-2 flight in July 1994. In the absence of gravity, it can be anticipated that the roots would show random growth, changing their direction randomly. The hypothesis that such random growth movements occur according to random walk theory, leads to predictions as to the detailed manner in which deviations increase with time. The experiment was designed to test this random walk hypothesis. The paper concentrates on the technological aspects of studying the roots in microgravity. The development of suitable plant chambers, fitting containers developed by ESA, is described as well as the techniques used to grow the seeds between agar slices. hardware was developed to record photographically root movements between the agar slices. Photos were taken once per hour. Some plant chambers were designed to allow fixation of plant material in space. The practical solutions found using glutaraldehyde for prefixation in the Spacelab, within the restrictions given, are described. The experimental results show that the growth pattern in fact followed the prediction from the random walk approach. The average changes in the growth direction stayed constant and equal to zero during the experiment while the squared angular deviations increased proportional to time. Furthermore, plant material prefixed in orbit was permanently fixed after the flight. Light microscopy and electron microscopy pictures are shown as examples of the results achieved. The long prefixation period meant a drawback for the quality of the fixation process. However, sections suitable for study were achieved. The main goals of the RANDOM experiment were therefore achieved.

  14. Laser driven hydrodynamic instability experiments. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B.A.; Weber, S.V.; Haan, S.W.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Glendinning, S.G.; Wallace, R.J.; Goldstein, W.H.; Wilson, B.G.; Nash, J.K.

    1993-02-17

    An extensive series of experiments has been conducted on the Nova laser to measure hydrodynamic instabilities in planar foils accelerated by x-ray ablation. Single mode experiments allow a measurement of the fundamental growth rates from the linear well into the nonlinear regime. Two-mode foils allow a first direct observation of mode coupling. Surface-finish experiments allow a measurement of the evolution of a broad spectrum of random initial modes.

  15. Transient Dendritic Solidification Experiment (TDSE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Transient Dendritic Solidification Experiment (TDSE) is being developed as a candidate for flight aboard the International Space Station. TDSE will study the growth of dendrites (treelike crystalline structures) in a transparent material (succinonitrile or SCN) that mimics the behavior or widely used iron-based metals. Basic work by three Space Shuttle missions of the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operations. The TDSE is similar to IDGE, but will maintain a constant temperature while varying pressure on the dendrites. Shown here is an exploded view of major elements of the TDSE. A similar view is availble without labels. The principal investigator is Matthew Koss of College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  16. Growth Characteristics Downstream of a Shallow Bump: Computation and Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joslin, Ronald D.; Grosch, Chester E.

    1996-01-01

    Measurements of the velocity field created by a shallow bump on a wall revealed that an energy peak in the spanwise spectrum associated with the driver decays and an initially small-amplitude secondary mode rapidly grows with distance downstream of the bump. Linear theories could not provide an explanation for this growing mode. The present Navier-Stokes simulation replicates and confirms the experimental results. Insight into the structure of the flow was obtained from a study of the results of the calculations and is presented.

  17. Supplementary Education: Global Growth, Japan's Experience, Canada's Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dierkes, Julian

    2008-01-01

    Supplementary education is on the rise globally, taking many different forms, from private tutors to small schools and large corporations. These providers exist outside conventional public and private school systems, offering remedial education and tutoring, parallel instruction to conventional schools, and accelerated or more advanced…

  18. Personal Growth and the Outdoor Experience: Some Empirical Evidence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yaffey, Dave

    1992-01-01

    The Personal Orientation Inventory (POI), a measure of self-actualizing tendencies, was administered to 10 instructors at Plas y Brenin, to 23 tutors at Outward Bound Wales, and to 35 students before and after a course at Outward Bound Aberdovey. Instructors scored higher on the POI than students. Student scores significantly increased after the…

  19. Flight experiment on acousto-optic crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N. B.; Duval, Walter M. B.

    1991-01-01

    The physical vapor transport method was used for growing mercurous chloride crystals in different convective conditions. Optical homogeneity is found to be extremely dependent on convection levels. Results of numerical studies indicate that for a gravity level of 0.001 g or less the Stefan wind drives the flow and no recirculating cells are observed.

  20. Prevalent vegetation growth enhancement in urban environment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuqing; Liu, Shuguang; Zhou, Decheng

    2016-05-31

    Urbanization, a dominant global demographic trend, leads to various changes in environments (e.g., atmospheric CO2 increase, urban heat island). Cities experience global change decades ahead of other systems so that they are natural laboratories for studying responses of other nonurban biological ecosystems to future global change. However, the impacts of urbanization on vegetation growth are not well understood. Here, we developed a general conceptual framework for quantifying the impacts of urbanization on vegetation growth and applied it in 32 Chinese cities. Results indicated that vegetation growth, as surrogated by satellite-observed vegetation index, decreased along urban intensity across all cities. At the same time, vegetation growth was enhanced at 85% of the places along the intensity gradient, and the relative enhancement increased with urban intensity. This growth enhancement offset about 40% of direct loss of vegetation productivity caused by replacing productive vegetated surfaces with nonproductive impervious surfaces. In light of current and previous field studies, we conclude that vegetation growth enhancement is prevalent in urban settings. Urban environments do provide ideal natural laboratories to observe biological responses to environmental changes that are difficult to mimic in manipulative experiments. However, one should be careful in extrapolating the finding to nonurban environments because urban vegetation is usually intensively managed, and attribution of the responses to diverse driving forces will be challenging but must be pursued.

  1. Detached Growth of Germanium by Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.; Volz, M. P.; Cobb, S.; Motakef, S.; Szofran, F. R.

    2004-01-01

    The conditions of detached solidification under controlled pressure differential across the meniscus were investigated. Uncoated and graphite- or BN-coated silica and pBN crucibles were used. Detached and partly detached growth was achieved in pBN and BN-coated crucibles, respectively. The results of the experiments are discussed based on the theory of Duffar et al.

  2. Crystal growth furnace safety system validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackowski, D. W.; Hartfield, R.; Bhavnani, S. H.; Belcher, V. M.

    1994-01-01

    The findings are reported regarding the safe operation of the NASA crystal growth furnace (CGF) and potential methods for detecting containment failures of the furnace. The main conclusions are summarized by ampoule leak detection, cartridge leak detection, and detection of hazardous species in the experiment apparatus container (EAC).

  3. Modeling Fish Growth in Low Dissolved Oxygen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neilan, Rachael Miller

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a computational project designed for undergraduate students as an introduction to mathematical modeling. Students use an ordinary differential equation to describe fish weight and assume the instantaneous growth rate depends on the concentration of dissolved oxygen. Published laboratory experiments suggest that continuous…

  4. Motivating and Evaluating Growth in Ballet Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Julie Hammond

    2012-01-01

    In teaching young dancers ballet, the utilization of effective assessments in partnership with supportive and creative teaching strategies can transform not only the learning experience, but the dancer as well. In this article, the author shares a "growth grade rubric" that specifically addresses three areas in ballet training: (1) skills and…

  5. Dartmouth Houses "Limits to Growth" Legacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lepkowski, Wil

    1981-01-01

    Reviews the work, experiences, and views of Dennis L. and Donella Meadows, past-principal investigators of the "Limits to Growth" study. Focuses on current "Limits" work at Dartmouth's Resource Policy Center founded by D. L. Meadows with National Science Foundation support. Core activity at the Center is modeling for policy analysis. (DS)

  6. Insulin-responsiveness of tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Chantelau, Ernst

    2009-05-01

    In October 2008, the 2nd International Insulin & Cancer Workshop convened roughly 30 researchers from eight countries in Düsseldorf/Germany. At this meeting, which was industry-independent like the preceding one in 2007, the following issues were discussed a) association between certain cancers and endogenous insulin production in humans, b) growth-promoting effects of insulin in animal experiments, c) mitogenic and anti-apoptotic activity of pharmaceutic insulin and insulin analogues in in vitro experiments, d) potential mechanisms of insulin action on cell growth, mediated by IGF-1 receptor and insulin receptor signaling, and e) IGF-1 receptor targeting for inhibition of tumor growth. It was concluded that further research is necessary to elucidate the clinical effects of these observations, and their potential for human neoplastic disease and treatment.

  7. Growth of platinum nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    Movie showing the growth of platinum nanocrystals in a liquid cell observed in situ using the JEOL 3010 TEM at the National Center for Electron Microscopy. This is the first ever-real time movie showing nucleation and growth by monomer attachment or by smaller nanocrystals coalescing to form larger nanocrystals. All the nanocrystals end up being roughly the same shape and size. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2009/08/04/growth-spurts/

  8. Leaf growth is conformal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alim, Karen; Armon, Shahaf; Shraiman, Boris I.; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2016-10-01

    Growth pattern dynamics lie at the heart of morphogenesis. Here, we investigate the growth of plant leaves. We compute the conformal transformation that maps the contour of a leaf at a given stage onto the contour of the same leaf at a later stage. Based on the mapping we predict the local displacement field in the leaf blade and find it to agree with the experimentally measured displacement field to 92%. This approach is applicable to any two-dimensional system with locally isotropic growth, enabling the deduction of the whole growth field just from observation of the tissue contour.

  9. Leaf growth is conformal.

    PubMed

    Alim, Karen; Armon, Shahaf; Shraiman, Boris I; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2016-01-01

    Growth pattern dynamics lie at the heart of morphogenesis. Here, we investigate the growth of plant leaves. We compute the conformal transformation that maps the contour of a leaf at a given stage onto the contour of the same leaf at a later stage. Based on the mapping we predict the local displacement field in the leaf blade and find it to agree with the experimentally measured displacement field to 92%. This approach is applicable to any two-dimensional system with locally isotropic growth, enabling the deduction of the whole growth field just from observation of the tissue contour. PMID:27597439

  10. Political economy of population growth.

    PubMed

    Mehta, S; Mehta, H S

    1987-01-01

    Tracing the origin of political economy as a class-science, this paper focuses on the political economy of population growth. Exposing the limitations of Malthusian ideas and their invalidity even for the capitalist economies, it discusses the subsequent revival of the Malthusian model during the period of de-colonization and the misinterpretation of the relationship between population growth and development in the developing and developed countries. Taking India, China, and Japan as some case studies, the paper examines the relationship between birth rate levels and some correlates. It elaborates on the Indian experience, emphasizing the association of population growth with poverty and unemployment and lays bare some of the hidden causes of these phenomena. The authors examine some interstate variations in India and identify constraints and prospects of the existing population policy. The paper proposes outlines of a democratic population policy as an integral part of India's development strategy which should recognize human beings not simply as consumers but also as producers of material values. It pleads for 1) restructuring of property relations; 2) bringing down the mortality rates and raising of the literacy levels, especially among females; and 3) improving nutritional levels, as prerequisites for bringing down birth rates.

  11. Acoustic and Electrical Property Changes Due to Microbial Growth and Biofilm Formation in Porous Media

    EPA Science Inventory

    A laboratory study was conducted to investigate the effect of microbial growth and biofilm formation on compressional waves, and complex conductivity during stimulated microbial growth. Over the 29 day duration of the experiment, compressional wave amplitudes and arrival times f...

  12. Does solar radiation affect the growth of tomato seeds relative to their environment?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzer, Kristi

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment is to sequentially study and analyze the data collected from the germination and growth of irradiated Rutgers Supreme tomato seeds to adult producing plants. This experiment will not use irradiated seeds as a control as I plan to note growth in artificial verses natural environment as the basic experiment.

  13. Does solar radiation affect the growth of tomato seeds relative to their environment?

    SciTech Connect

    Holzer, K.

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this experiment is to sequentially study and analyze the data collected from the germination and growth of irradiated Rutgers Supreme tomato seeds to adult producing plants. This experiment will not use irradiated seeds as a control as the authors plans to note growth in artificial verses natural environment as the basic experiment.

  14. On Transients in Detached Bridgman Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.

    2011-01-01

    In detached Bridgman growth, a gap exists between the growing crystal and the crucible wall. According to crystal shape stability theory, only specific gap widths will be dynamically stable. Beginning with a crystal diameter that differs from stable conditions, the transient crystal growth process is analyzed. The transient shapes are calculated assuming that the growth angle is constant. Anisotropy and dynamic contact angle effects are considered. In microgravity, dynamic stability depends only on capillary effects and is decoupled from heat transfer. However, heat transfer will influence the crystal-melt interface shape. The local angles and the crystal-melt-vapor triple junction are analyzed and the applicability of the Herring formula is discussed. A potential microgravity experiment is proposed which would enhance our understanding of the detached growth dynamic stability problem.

  15. ELF3 controls thermoresponsive growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Box, Mathew S; Huang, B Emma; Domijan, Mirela; Jaeger, Katja E; Khattak, Asif Khan; Yoo, Seong Jeon; Sedivy, Emma L; Jones, D Marc; Hearn, Timothy J; Webb, Alex A R; Grant, Alastair; Locke, James C W; Wigge, Philip A

    2015-01-19

    Plant development is highly responsive to ambient temperature, and this trait has been linked to the ability of plants to adapt to climate change. The mechanisms by which natural populations modulate their thermoresponsiveness are not known. To address this, we surveyed Arabidopsis accessions for variation in thermal responsiveness of elongation growth and mapped the corresponding loci. We find that the transcriptional regulator EARLY FLOWERING3 (ELF3) controls elongation growth in response to temperature. Through a combination of modeling and experiments, we show that high temperature relieves the gating of growth at night, highlighting the importance of temperature-dependent repressors of growth. ELF3 gating of transcriptional targets responds rapidly and reversibly to changes in temperature. We show that the binding of ELF3 to target promoters is temperature dependent, suggesting a mechanism where temperature directly controls ELF3 activity.

  16. Activist model of political party growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffs, Rebecca A.; Hayward, John; Roach, Paul A.; Wyburn, John

    2016-01-01

    The membership of British political parties has a direct influence on their political effectiveness. This paper applies the mathematics of epidemiology to the analysis of the growth and decline of such memberships. The party members are divided into activists and inactive members, where all activists influence the quality of party recruitment, but only a subset of activists recruit and thus govern numerical growth. The activists recruit for only a limited period, which acts as a restriction on further party growth. This Limited Activist model is applied to post-war and recent memberships of the Labour, Scottish National and Conservative parties. The model reproduces data trends, and relates realistically to historical narratives. It is concluded that the political parties analysed are not in danger of extinction but experience repeated periods of growth and decline in membership, albeit at lower numbers than in the past.

  17. Growth and growth hormone: An overview.

    PubMed

    Teran, Enrique; Chesner, Jaclyn; Rapaport, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Growth is a good indicator of a child's health. Growth disturbances, including short stature or growth failure, could be indications of illnesses such as chronic disease, nutritional deficits, celiac disease or hormonal abnormalities. Therefore, a careful assessment of the various requirements for normal growth needs to be done by history, physical examination, and screening laboratory tests. More details will be reviewed about the GH-IGF axis, its abnormalities with special emphasis on GH deficiency, its diagnosis and treatment. GH treatment indications in the US will be reviewed and a few only will be highlighted. They will include GH deficiency, as well as the treatment of children born SGA, including the results of a US study using FDA approved dose of 0.48mg/kg/week. GH deficiency in adults will also be briefly reviewed. Treatment of patients with SHOX deficiency will also be discussed. Possible side effects of GH treatment and the importance of monitoring safety will be highlighted. PMID:26936284

  18. Optical diagnostics of solution crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Yongkee; Reddy, B. R.; George, Tharayil G.; Lal, Ravindra B.

    1995-01-01

    Solution crystal growth monitoring of LAP/TGS crystals by various optical diagnostics systems, such as conventional and Mach-Zehnder (M-Z) interferometers, optical heterodyne technique, and ellipsometry, is under development. The study of the dynamics of the crystal growth process requires a detailed knowledge of crystal growth rate and the concentration gradient near growing crystals in aqueous solution. Crystal growth rate can be measured using conventional interferometry. Laser beam reflections from the crystal front as well as the back surface interfere with each other, and the fringe shift due to the growing crystal yields information about the growth rate. Our preliminary results indicate a growth rate of 6 A/sec for LAP crystals grown from solution. Single wavelength M-Z interferometry is in use to calculate the concentration gradient near the crystal. Preliminary investigation is in progress using an M-Z interferometer with 2 cm beam diameter to cover the front region of the growing crystal. In the optical heterodyne technique, phase difference between two rf signals (250 KHZ) is measured of which one is a reference signal, and the other growth signal, whose phase changes due to a change in path length as the material grows. From the phase difference the growth rate can also be calculated. Our preliminary results indicate a growth rate of 1.5 A/sec. the seed and solution temperatures were 26.46 C and 27.92 C respectively, and the solution was saturated at 29.0 C. an ellipsometer to measure the growth rate and interface layer is on order from JOBIN YVON, France. All these systems are arranged in such a manner that measurements can be made either sequentially or simultaneously. These techniques will be adapted for flight experiment.

  19. Probabilistic Gompertz model of irreversible growth.

    PubMed

    Bardos, D C

    2005-05-01

    Characterizing organism growth within populations requires the application of well-studied individual size-at-age models, such as the deterministic Gompertz model, to populations of individuals whose characteristics, corresponding to model parameters, may be highly variable. A natural approach is to assign probability distributions to one or more model parameters. In some contexts, size-at-age data may be absent due to difficulties in ageing individuals, but size-increment data may instead be available (e.g., from tag-recapture experiments). A preliminary transformation to a size-increment model is then required. Gompertz models developed along the above lines have recently been applied to strongly heterogeneous abalone tag-recapture data. Although useful in modelling the early growth stages, these models yield size-increment distributions that allow negative growth, which is inappropriate in the case of mollusc shells and other accumulated biological structures (e.g., vertebrae) where growth is irreversible. Here we develop probabilistic Gompertz models where this difficulty is resolved by conditioning parameter distributions on size, allowing application to irreversible growth data. In the case of abalone growth, introduction of a growth-limiting biological length scale is then shown to yield realistic length-increment distributions.

  20. In situ atomic force microscopy of layer-by-layer crystal growth and key growth concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashkovich, L. N.; de Yoreo, J. J.; Orme, C. A.; Chernov, A. A.

    2006-12-01

    Contradictions that have been found recently between the representations of classical theory and experiments on crystal growth from solutions are considered. Experimental data show that the density of kinks is low in many cases as a result of the low rate of their fluctuation generation, the Gibbs-Thomson law is not always applicable in these cases, and there is inconsistency with the Cabrera-Vermilyea model. The theory of growth of non-Kossel crystals, which is to be developed, is illustrated by the analysis of the experimental dependence of the growth rate on the solution stoichiometry.