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Sample records for experiment k-6-22 growth

  1. Experiment K-6-22. Growth hormone regulation, synthesis and secretion in microgravity. Part 1: Somatotroph physiology. Part 2: Immunohistochemical analysis of hypothalamic hormones. Part 3: Plasma analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindeland, R.; Vale, W.; Hymer, W.; Sawchenko, P.; Vasques, M.; Krasnov, I.; Kaplanski, A.; Victorov, I.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of the 1887 mission were: (1) to determine if the results of the SL-3 pituitary gland experiment (1) were repeatable; and (2) to determine what effect a longer mission would have on the rat pituitary gland growth hormone (GH) system. In the 1887 experiment two issues were considered especially important. First, it was recognized that cells prepared from individual rat pituitary glands should be considered separately so that the data from the 5 glands could be analyzed in a statistically meaningful way. Second, results of the SL-3 flight involving the hollow fiber implant and HPLC GH-variant experiments suggested that the biological activity of the hormone had been negatively affected by flight. The results of the 1887 experiment documented the wisdom of addressing both issues in the protocol. Thus, the reduction in secretory capacity of flight cells during subsequent extended cell culture on Earth was documented statistically, and thereby established the validity of the SL-3 result. The results of both flight experiments thus support the contention that there is a secretory lesion in pituitary GH cells of flight animals. The primary objective of both missions was a clear definition of the effect of spaceflight on the GH cell system. There can no longer be any reasonable doubt that this system is affected in microgravity. One explanation for the reason(s) underlying the better known effects of spaceflight on organisms, viz. changes in bone, muscle and immune systems may very well rest with such changes in bGH. In spite of the fact that rats in the Cosmos 1887 flight were on Earth for two days after flight, the data show that the GH system had still not recovered from the effects of flight. Many questions remain. One of the more important concerns the GRF responsiveness of somatotrophs after flight. This will be tested in an upcoming experiment.

  2. Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment Video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This video, captured during the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) flown on STS-87 as a part of the fourth United States Microgravity payload, shows the growth of a dendrite, and the surface solidification that occurred on the front and back windows of the growth chamber. Dendrites are tiny, tree like structures that form as metals solidify.

  3. Kelp growth experiments

    SciTech Connect

    North, W. J.

    1980-01-01

    Harvest yields obtainable from giant kelp plants that are adequately fertilized were investigated. The following topics are discussed: desirable characteristics in a candidate macroalga, and giant kelp as a candidate macroalga for ocean farming. Nutrient requirements, field experiments, and approaches to acquiring yield data are reviewed. (MHR)

  4. IDGE: Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) flew on STS-62 to study the microscopic, tree-like structures (dendrites) that form within metals as they solidify from molten materials. The size, shape, and orientation of these dendrites affect the strength and usefulness of metals. Data from this experiment will be used to test and improve the mathematical models that support the industrial production of metals.

  5. Isothermal dendritic growth - A low gravity experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Hahn, R. C.; Lograsso, T. A.; Rubinstein, E. R.; Winsa, E.

    1987-01-01

    The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment has been designed to test dendritic growth theory at low undercoolings, under microgravity conditions in the Space Shuttle Cargo Bay-borne Material Science Laboratory. The experiment will be essentially autonomous, although limited in-flight interaction through a computer interface is planned. A crystal growth chamber able to yield oriented single-crystal dendritic growth will be incorporated; 'seeding' the chamber with a crystal of the requisite orientation will not in itself meet this requirement.

  6. ARC EMCS Experiments (Seedling Growth-2) Experiment Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heathcote, David; Steele, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Presentation of the status of the ARC ISS (International Space Station) Experiment, Seedling Growth-2 to the Payload Operations Investigator Working Group meeting at MSFC, Huntsville AL. The experiment employs the European Modular Cultivation System (ECMS).

  7. Bean Plants: A Growth Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Donna

    2004-01-01

    Teaching plant growth to seventh-grade life science students has been interesting for the author because she grew up in a rural area and always had to help in the garden. She made many assumptions about what her rural and suburban students knew. One year she decided to have them grow plants to observe the roots, stems, leaves, flowers, and fruit…

  8. Isothermal dendritic growth: A low gravity experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Hahn, R. C.; Lograsso, T. A.; Rubinstein, E. R.; Selleck, M. E.; Winsa, E.

    1988-01-01

    The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment is an active crystal growth experiment designed to test dendritic growth theory at low undercoolings where convection prohibits such studies at 1 g. The experiment will be essentially autonomous, though limited in-flight interaction through a computer interface is planned. One of the key components of the apparatus will be a crystal growth chamber capable of achieving oriented single crystal dendritic growth. Recent work indicates that seeding the chamber with a crystal of the proper orientation will not, in and of itself, be sufficient to meet this requirement. Additional flight hardware and software required for the STS flight experiment are currently being developed at NASA Lewis Research Center and at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

  9. Near-Death Experiences and Posttraumatic Growth.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Surbhi; Greyson, Bruce

    2015-10-01

    Posttraumatic growth denotes positive psychological change after a traumatic experience that is an improvement over the state before the trauma. Inasmuch as it involves existential reevaluation, posttraumatic growth overlaps with spiritual change, although it also encompasses other domains of positive outcome. This study investigated posttraumatic growth and presence and depth of near-death experience at the time of the close brush with death among 251 survivors of a close brush with death, using the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory and the Near-Death Experience (NDE) Scale. Near-death experiences were associated with greater posttraumatic growth than were close brushes with death in the absence of such an experience, and scores on the NDE Scale were significantly correlated with scores on the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory. To the extent that NDEs are interpreted as spiritual events, these findings support prior research suggesting that spiritual factors make a significant contribution to posttraumatic growth and are consistent with the model that posits challenges to the assumptive worldview as a major stimulus to posttraumatic growth. PMID:26348586

  10. Spacelab 3 vapor crystal growth experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnepple, W.; Vandenberg, L.; Skinner, N.; Ortale, C.

    1987-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Challenger, with Spacelab 3 as its payload, was launched into orbit April 29, 1985. The mission, number 51-B, emphasized materials processing in space, although a wide variety of experiments in other disciplines were also carried onboard. One of the materials processing experiments on this flight is described, specifically the growth of single crystals of mercuric iodide by physical vapor transport.

  11. Monitoring hydraulic fracture growth: Laboratory experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Groenenboom, J.; Dam, D.B. van

    2000-04-01

    The authors carry out small-scale hydraulic fracture experiments to investigate the physics of hydraulic fracturing. The laboratory experiments are combined with time-lapse ultrasonic measurements with active sources using both compressional and shear-wave transducers. For the time-lapse measurements they focus on ultrasonic measurement changes during fracture growth. As a consequence they can detect the hydraulic fracture and characterize its shape and geometry during growth. Hence, this paper deals with fracture characterization using time-lapse acoustic data. Hydraulic fracturing is used in the oil and gas industry to stimulate reservoir production.

  12. A Simple Mechanical Experiment on Exponential Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrew, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    With a rod, cord, pulleys, and slotted masses, students can observe and graph exponential growth in the cord tension over a factor of increase as large as several hundred. This experiment is adaptable for use either in algebra-based or calculus-based physics courses, fitting naturally with the study of sliding friction. Significant parts of the…

  13. Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment - SCN Dendrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE), flown on three Space Shuttle missions, is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operations. IDGE used transparent organic liquids that form dendrites (treelike structures) similar to the crystals that form inside metal alloys. Comparing Earth-based and space-based dentrite growth velocity, tip size and shape provid a better understanding of the fundamentals of dentritic growth, including gravity's effects. These shadowgraphic images show succinonitrile (SCN) dentrites growing in a melt (liquid). The space-grown crystals also have cleaner, better defined sidebranches. IDGE was developed by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institude (RPI) and NASA/ Glenn Research Center(GRC). Advanced follow-on experiments are being developed for flight on the International Space Station. Photo gredit: NASA/Glenn Research Center

  14. The Coupled Growth in Hypermonotectics flight experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Barry; Coriell, Sam

    2000-01-01

    The Coupled Growth in Hypermonotectic experiment is scheduled to fly on the International Space Station during UF-3 and is designed to obtain a fundamental understanding of the physics controlling solidification processes in hypermonotectic (immiscible) alloys. The first of three major experimental goals of the project is to demonstrate that steady state coupled growth and the production of an aligned fibrous microstructure is possible in these systems. The second goal is to determine the influence of alloy composition and growth rate on the microstructural features of the alloys. The last major experimental goal is to map out the compositional and growth rate limits of steady state coupled growth. Microgravity processing conditions are necessary to obtain this information which will be utilized for verification and modification of models for monotectic solidification that are being developed as part of the project. This paper discusses the justification for carrying out these experiments and the results obtained from an initial segment of the investigation during the Life and Microgravity Spacelab mission in 1996. .

  15. Protein-crystal growth experiment (planned)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujita, S.; Asano, K.; Hashitani, T.; Kitakohji, T.; Nemoto, H.; Kitamura, S.

    1988-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a microgravity environment on protein crystal growth, a system was developed using 5 cubic feet Get Away Special payload canister. In the experiment, protein (myoglobin) will be simultaneously crystallized from an aqueous solution in 16 crystallization units using three types of crystallization methods, i.e., batch, vapor diffusion, and free interface diffusion. Each unit has two compartments: one for the protein solution and the other for the ammonium sulfate solution. Compartments are separated by thick acrylic or thin stainless steel plates. Crystallization will be started by sliding out the plates, then will be periodically recorded up to 120 hours by a still camera. The temperature will be passively controlled by a phase transition thermal storage component and recorded in IC memory throughout the experiment. Microgravity environment can then be evaluated for protein crystal growth by comparing crystallization in space with that on Earth.

  16. Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment - PVA Dendrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE), flown on three Space Shuttle missions, is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operations. IDGE used transparent organic liquids that form dendrites (treelike structures) similar to those inside metal alloys. Comparing Earth-based and space-based dendrite growth velocity, tip size and shape provides a better understanding of the fundamentals of dentritic growth, including gravity's effects. Shalowgraphic images of pivalic acid (PVA) dendrites forming from the melt show the subtle but distinct effects of gravity-driven heat convection on dentritic growth. In orbit, the dendrite grows as its latent heat is liberated by heat conduction. This yields a blunt dendrite tip. On Earth, heat is carried away by both conduction and gravity-driven convection. This yields a sharper dendrite tip. In addition, under terrestrial conditions, the sidebranches growing in the direction of gravity are augmented as gravity helps carry heat out of the way of the growing sidebranches as opposed to microgravity conditions where no augmentation takes place. IDGE was developed by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and NASA/Glenn Research Center. Advanced follow-on experiments are being developed for flight on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: NASA/Glenn Research Center

  17. The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koss, Matthew

    2009-03-01

    The growth of dendrites is governed by the interplay between two simple and familiar processes---the irreversible diffusion of energy, and the reversible work done in the formation of new surface area. To advance our understanding of these processes, NASA sponsored a project that flew on the Space Shuttle Columbia is 1994, 1996, and 1997 to record and analyze benchmark data in an apparent-microgravity ``laboratory.'' In this laboratory, energy transfer by gravity driven convection was essentially eliminated and one could test independently, for the first time, both components of dendritic growth theory. The analysis of this data shows that although the diffusion of energy can be properly accounted for, the results from interfacial physics appear to be in disagreement and alternate models should receive increased attention. Unfortunately, currently and for the foreseeable future, there is no access or financial support to develop and conduct additional experiments of this type. However, the benchmark data of 35mm photonegatives, video, and all supporting instrument data are now available at the IDGE Archive at the College of the Holy Cross. This data may still have considerable relevance to researchers working specifically with dendritic growth, and more generally those working in the synthesis, growth & processing of materials, multiscale computational modeling, pattern formation, and systems far from equilibrium.

  18. The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, Martin E.; Koss, M. B.; Lupulescu, A. O.; LaCombe, J. C.; Frei, J. E.; Malarik, D. C.

    1999-01-01

    The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) constituted a series of three NASA-supported microgravity experiments, all of which flew aboard the space shuttle, Columbia. This experimental space flight series was designed and operated to grow and record dendrite solidification in the absence of gravity-induced convective heat transfer, and thereby produce a wealth of benchmark-quality data for testing solidification scaling laws. The data and analysis performed on the dendritic growth speed and tip size in Succinontrie (SCN) demonstrates that although the theory yields predictions that are reasonably in agreement with experiment, there are significant discrepancies. However, some of these discrepancies can be explained by accurately describing the diffusion of heat. The key finding involves recognition that the actual three-dimensional shape of dendrites includes time-dependent side-branching and a tip region that is not a paraboloid of revolution. Thus, the role of heat transfer in dendritic growth is validated, with the caveat that a more realistic model of the dendrite then a paraboloid is needed to account for heat flow in an experimentally observed dendrite. We are currently conducting additional analysis to further confirm and demonstrate these conclusions. The data and analyses for the growth selection physics remain much less definitive. From the first flight, the data indicated that the selection parameter, sigma*, is not exactly a constant, but exhibits a slight dependence on the supercooling. Additional data from the second flight are being examined to investigate the selection of a unique dendrite speed, tip size and shape. The IDGE flight series is now complete. We are currently completing analyses and moving towards final data archiving. It is gratifying to see that the IDGE published results and archived data sets are being used actively by other scientists and engineers. In addition, we are also pleased to report that the techniques and IDGE

  19. Anticipating posttraumatic growth from cancer: patients' and collaterals' experiences.

    PubMed

    Tallman, Benjamin A; Lohnberg, Jessica; Yamada, Torricia H; Halfdanarson, Thorvardur R; Altmaier, Elizabeth M

    2014-01-01

    Posttraumatic growth has been demonstrated to occur following the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Still unknown is whether patients expect such growth, how growth is perceived at early points in time that follow the cancer experience, and whether patient reports of growth are corroborated by others. Participants were 87 patients and 55 collaterals who reported their anticipation of growth pretreatment and their perceived growth at a 9-month follow-up. Patients' expectations for their own growth were significantly higher than collaterals' expectations for theirs. When anticipated growth was compared to later reported growth, patients overanticipated growth across all domains and collaterals underanticipated growth. PMID:24611890

  20. Marriage and Family Therapist Interns' Experiences of Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paris, Eleni; Linville, Deanna; Rosen, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Few studies have investigated therapist interns' growth experiences, both personal and professional, and the interplay between them. This qualitative study explored the reciprocal process of growth during clinical training: the personal life experiences that affect professional growth and the professional/clinical experiences that affect personal…

  1. Onboard photo: Crystal Growth Furnace experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-50) astronaut Bornie Dunbar wears protective goggles to assemble a zeolite sample cartridge for the Crystal Growth Furnace (CGF) in the United States Microgravity Laboratory-1 (USML-1) science module.

  2. Frog egg growth, experiment S003

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. S.; Tremor, J. W.

    1971-01-01

    The objective of experiment was to determine the effect of weightlessness on the ability of a fertilized frog egg to divide normally and to differentiate and form a normal embryo. This experiment was first attempted on the Gemini 8 mission and was completed only partially because of the early termination of that mission.

  3. Follow up on the crystal growth experiments of the LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, K. F.; Lind, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    The 4 solution growth experiments on the LDEF were presented thoroughly elsewhere. The CaCO3-experiment, and to a certain extent also the TTF-TCNQ-experiments yielded useful results. In Jan. 1992, the next series of solution growth experiments were sent to ESA for shipment to KSC. As on the LDEF, the SGF (solution growth facility) of the EURECA-1 contains 4 large experiments. From the beginning, the planning and developments were introduced. Still, the basic concept was maintained, and the CaCO3-experiment, that showed the best results on the LDEF, will now be repeated with improved technology and in larger scale on the EURECA-1. The contents of the 4 SGF experiments are as follows: (1) growth of calcium-carbonate crystals; (2) formation and transformation of tri-calcium-phosphate; (3) growth of zeolite crystals; and (4) soret coefficient measurements (diffusion). The scientific background for the choice of experiments and the major improvements of the SGF are reviewed. Furthermore, some ideas on basic microgravity solution growth experimentation from ESA's newly established EWG (Expert Working Group) on solution growth are reported.

  4. Amyloid growth: combining experiment and kinetic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, Tuomas; Cohen, Samuel; Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Christopher

    2012-02-01

    The conversion of proteins from their soluble forms into fibrillar amyloid nanostructures is a general type of behaviour encountered for many different proteins in the context of disease as well as for the generation of a select class of functional materials in nature. This talk focuses on the problem of defining the rates of the individual molecular level processes involved in the overall conversion reaction. A master equation approach is discussedootnotetextCohen et al, J Chem Phys 2011, 135, 065106 ootnotetextKnowles et al, Science, 2009, 326, 1533-1537 and used in combination with kinetic measurements to yield mechanistic insights into the amyloid growth phenomenon.

  5. Experiments with Corn To Demonstrate Plant Growth and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haldeman, Janice H.; Gray, Margarit S.

    2000-01-01

    Explores using corn seeds to demonstrate plant growth and development. This experiment allows students to formulate hypotheses, observe and record information, and practice mathematics. Presents background information, materials, procedures, and observations. (SAH)

  6. Halide eutectic growth experiment MA-131

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, A. S.; Yue, B. K.; Lee, J. Y. M.

    1976-01-01

    Fiberlike sodium chloride/lithium fluoride eutectic mixtures have been produced on earth and in space by the directional solidification technique. Macroscopic and microscopic examinations were made on longitudinal and transverse sections of Apollo Soyuz Test Project space grown and earth grown ingots. It was found that samples grown in space have a higher percentage of fibers alined with the growth axis. The enhanced alinement of fibers is attributed to the absence of convection currents in the liquid during solidification. Optical transmittance measurements of transverse sections of the space grown and earth grown ingots were performed with an infrared spectrometer. For a given sample thickness, the highest transmittance was obtained from ingots grown in space. For samples of different thicknesses, grown either in space or on earth, it was found that the thinner the sample, the higher the transmittance. This is in agreement with the general optical property of transparent materials.

  7. Skylab experiment performance evaluation manual. Appendix J: Experiment M555 gallium arsenide single crystal growth (MSFC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byers, M. S.

    1973-01-01

    Analyses for Experiment M555, Gallium Arsenide Single Crystal Growth (MSFC), to be used for evaluating the performance of the Skylab corollary experiments under preflight, inflight, and post-flight conditions are presented. Experiment contingency plan workaround procedure and malfunction analyses are presented in order to assist in making the experiment operationally successful.

  8. Visualization of Growth Curve Data from Phenotype MicroarrayExperiments

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, Janet S.; Joyner, Dominique C.; Borglin, Sharon E.; Hazen, Terry C.; Arkin, Adam P.; Bethel, E. Wes

    2007-04-19

    Phenotype microarrays provide a technology to simultaneouslysurvey the response of an organism to nearly 2,000 substrates, includingcarbon, nitrogen and potassium sources; varying pH; varying saltconcentrations; and antibiotics. In order to more quickly and easily viewand compare the large number of growth curves produced by phenotypemicroarray experiments, we have developed software to produce and displaycolor images, each of which corresponds to a set of 96 growth curves.Using color images to represent growth curves data has proven to be avaluable way to assess experiment quality, compare replicates, facilitatecomparison of the responses of different organisms, and identifysignificant phenotypes. The color images are linked to traditional plotsof growth versus time, as well as to information about the experiment,organism, and substrate. In order to share and view information and dataproject-wide, all information, plots, and data are accessible using onlya Web browser.

  9. Skylab experiments on semiconductors and alkali halides. [single crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    The space processing experiments performed during the Skylab missions included one on single crystal growth of germanium selenide and telluride, one on pure and doped germanium crystals, two on pure and doped indium antimonide, one on gallium-indium-antimony systems, and one on a sodium chloride-sodium fluoride eutectic. In each experiment, three ampoules of sample were processed in the multipurpose electric furnace within the Skylab Materials Processing Facility. All were successful in varying degrees and gave important information about crystal growth removed from the effects of earth surface gravity.

  10. Follow up on the crystal growth experiments of the LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, K. F.; Lind, M. D.

    1993-01-01

    The results of the 4 solution growth experiments on the LDEF have been published elsewhere. Both the crystals of CaCO3, which were large and well shaped, and the much smaller TTF-TCNQ crystals showed unusual morphological behavior. The follow up on these experiments was begun in 1981, when ESA initiated a 'Concept Definition Study' on a large, 150 kg, Solution Growth Facility (SGF) to be included in the payload of EURECA-1, the European Retrievable Carrier. This carrier was a continuation of the European Spacelab and at that time planned for launch in 1987. The long delay of the LDEF retrieval and of subsequent missions brought about reflections both on the concept of crystal growth in space and on the choice of crystallization materials that had been made for the LDEF. Already before the LDEF retrieval, research on TTF-TCNQ had been stopped, and a planned growth experiment with TTF-TCNQ on the SGF/EURECA had been cancelled. The target of the SGF investigation is now more fundamental in nature. None of the crystals to be grown here are, like TTF-TCNQ, in particular demand by science or industry, and the crystals only serve the purpose of model crystals. The real purpose of the investigation is to study the growth behavior. One of the experiments, the Soret Coefficient Measurement experiment is not growing crystals at all, but has it as its sole purpose to obtain accurate information on thermal diffusion, a process of importance in crystal growth from solution.

  11. Job Satisfaction and Professional Growth Experiences of Urban School Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aberli, Thomas Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Modern school leaders may fed uncertainty in their feelings of satisfaction given the complex and changing nature of the principalship. Reforms in administrative preparation and training programs attempt to provide professional growth experiences that address evolving administrative expectations while universities and school districts strive to…

  12. Computer Simulation of the Population Growth (Schizosaccharomyces Pombe) Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daley, Michael; Hillier, Douglas

    1981-01-01

    Describes a computer program (available from authors) developed to simulate "Growth of a Population (Yeast) Experiment." Students actively revise the counting techniques with realistically simulated haemocytometer or eye-piece grid and are reminded of the necessary dilution technique. Program can be modified to introduce such variables as…

  13. Organic crystal growth experiment facility (13-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanbayashi, Akio

    1992-01-01

    The interesting nature of metal-like organic compounds composed of charge transfer complexes has been recently realized. Crystals of these complexes can usually be grown by the solution crystallization method. It is difficult to grow such organic crystals on Earth, especially from the chemical reactions through diffusion controlled process in the solutions, because of gravitational disturbances, or sedimentation. The International Microgravity Lab. (IML-1) Organic Crystal Growth with G-Gitter Preventive Measure (OCGP) experiment is expected to grow a single crystal large enough to allow its intrinsic physical properties to be measured and its detailed crystal structure to be determined. This experiment also attempts to assess the experimental conditions including the microgravity environment for further study of the fundamental process of solution crystallization, nucleation, and growth from supersaturated phases including chemical reactions. Microgravity disturbances, G-jitter, may be an important environmental factor in the experimental method to assess. The vibration damping effects on organic crystal growth can be carefully studied.

  14. Growth disorders in type 1 diabetes: an Indian experience

    PubMed Central

    Virmani, Anju

    2015-01-01

    Though children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) are often tall at the time of diagnosis, they may experience growth retardation, pubertal delay or both, which may be due to poor glycemic control, associated diseases or chronic complications. Factors affecting growth include: gender, genetic environment, age at diagnosis, diabetes duration, puberty, metabolic control, and status of growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), and IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs). Insulin regulates expression of hepatic GH receptors, affects IGFs and IGFBPs synthesis by modulating GH postreceptor events, and significantly increases IGF-I bioactivity. Low portal insulin seen in T1DM leads to GH hypersecretion, low circulating IGF-I and IGFBP-3, and high circulating IGFBP-1. Newly diagnosed T1DM patients have decreased GHBP which can be restored with insulin therapy. Growth velocity should be appropriate for the age of the child/adolescent, and the mid-parental height. Height, weight and blood pressure (BP) should be measured and plotted on a growth chart at least 2–3 times a year. Puberty should also be assessed annually. Following precautions are to be taken in T1DM children: checking for pubertal onset and ensuring it is not delayed, testing early when growth falters (hypothyroidism/celiac disease/puberty/other conditions), aiming for best possible metabolic control (multidose regimens, regardless of type of insulin), and encouraging dietary calcium and protein, exposure to sunlight, Vitamin D supplements and exercise. PMID:25941656

  15. [Parameter determination of algae growth based on ecological tank experiment].

    PubMed

    Pang, Yong; Ding, Ling; Gao, Guang

    2005-05-01

    A dynamic simulation experiment of algae in an ecological tank was performed at the Taihu Laboratory for Lake Ecosystem Research. During the experiment, water from Taihu Lake was infused into the ecological tank and samples were taken continually to observe algae growth under varying conditions, such as temperature, sunlight and nutrients. Based on the experiment, an algae growth model, considering nitrogen and phosphorus cycle, was developed by using the advanced PHREEQC model. After that, a detailed calibration and validation of parameters in the model were done on the basis of experimental results. The least square method was used to determine the optimal set of parameters. The calculated values of algae and nutrient concentrations show fairly satisfying fittness with measured data. PMID:16124474

  16. Fostering Growth in the Survivorship Experience: Investigating Breast Cancer Survivors' Lived Experiences Scaling Mt. Kilimanjaro from a Posttraumatic Growth Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Shaunna M.; Sabiston, Catherine M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to use an ethnographic case study approach to explore breast cancer survivors' experiences scaling Mt. Kilimanjaro from a posttraumatic growth perspective. Three breast cancer survivors who participated in interviews and observations during a nine-day climb on the mountain were included in this study. Findings are…

  17. Fundamental magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor Instability Growth Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinars, D. B.; Peterson, K. J.; Vesey, R. A.; Jennings, C.; Herrmann, M. C.; McBride, R. D.; Martin, M. R.; Slutz, S. A.

    2013-10-01

    Sandia is investigating a magnetized liner inertial fusion concept that uses cylindrical Be or Al liners to compress magnetized and preheated fusion fuel. As part of this work, we have been studying the growth of instabilities in initially solid liners driven with 20-24 MA, 100-ns current pulses on the Z pulsed power facility. The magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability in particular can disrupt the plasma liner during its implosion. Previous experiments studied instability growth starting either from intentionally seeded single-mode perturbations or from diamond-turned best-finish surfaces. Here we report on experiments studying (1) the growth of intentionally seeded multi-mode perturbations, and (2) the growth from polished best-finish surfaces where the tooling mark orientation is changed from being predominantly azimuthal to axial. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  18. Improved Transparent Furnace For Crystal-Growth Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenthal, Bruce N.; White, Steve; Kalinowski, Joseph M.

    1989-01-01

    Novel design and fabrication process for transparent crystal-growing furnace developed. Design consists of one or more heater zones in which heating wire coiled around insides of quartz tubes. Ampoule of material supported inside furnace by guide wire. Crystal then grown by directional freezing of material in ampoule. Distinct feature of use of quartz is capability of direct visual observation of crystal-growth process during experiment. Study of transparent electronic materials conducted in new furnaces.

  19. Protein Crystal Growth (PCG) experiment aboard mission STS-66

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    On the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis' middeck, Astronaut Joseph R. Tarner, mission specialist, works at an area amidst several lockers which support the Protein Crystal Growth (PCG) experiment during the STS-66 mission. This particular section is called the Crystal Observation System, housed in the Thermal Enclosure System (COS/TES). Together with the Vapor Diffusion Apparatus (VDA), housed in Single Locker Thermal Enclosure (SLTES), the COS/TES represents the continuing research into the structure of proteins and other macromolecules such as viruses.

  20. The Mars Plant Growth Experiment and Implications for Planetary Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Heather

    Plants are the ultimate and necessary solution for O2 production at a human base on Mars. Currently it is unknown if seeds can germinate on the Martian surface. The Mars Plant growth experiment (MPX) is a proposal for the first step in the development of a plant- based O2 production system by demonstrating plant germination and growth on the Martian surface. There is currently no planetary protection policy in place that covers plants on the Martian surface. We describe a planetary protection plan in compliance with NASA and COSPAR policy for a closed plant growth chamber on a Mars rover. We divide the plant growth chamber into two categories for planetary protection, the Outside: the outside of the chamber exposed to the Martian environment, and the Inside: the inside of the chamber which is sealed off from Mars atmosphere and contains the plant seeds and ancillary components for seed growth. We will treat outside surfaces of the chamber as other outside surfaces on the rover, wiped with a mixture of isopropyl alcohol and water as per Category IVb planetary protection requirements. All internal components of the MPX except the seeds and camera (including the water system, the plant growth stage and interior surface walls) will be sterilized by autoclave and subjected to sterilizing dry heat at a temperature of 125°C at an absolute humidity corresponding to a relative humidity of less than 25 percent referenced to the standard conditions of 0°C and 760 torr pressure. The seeds and internal compartments of the MPX in contact with the growth media will be assembled and tested to be free of viable microbes. MPX, once assembled, cannot survive Dry Heat Microbial Reduction. The camera with the radiation and CO2 sensors will be sealed in their own container and vented through HEPA filters. The seeds will be vernalized (microbe free) as per current Space Station methods described by Paul et al. 2001. Documentation of the lack of viable microbes on representative seeds

  1. Application of constraint modelling to evaluation of crack growth experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Faleskog, J.; Nilsson, F.; Shehu, S.; Oeberg, H.

    1997-12-01

    A large number of fracture mechanics experiments were carried out using a variety of specimens in order to investigate the applicability of the J-Q approach to initiation and growth of cracks. The study was performed at different temperatures spanning the transition interval of a pressure vessel steel. A comparison of the cleavage initiation levels with the model by Ritchie et al. (RKR) was also conducted. The experiments did not show, although the scatter was large, any systematic geometry effects that could not be explained within the framework of the J-Q concept. This was also the case for surface-cracked plates subjected to nonproportional loading. The trends of the dependence of the initiation on constraint are in qualitative agreement with the RKR model, although this model seems to underestimate this dependence for the current material. The ductile initiation level seems to be fairly independent of constraint but showed a tendency of variation with temperature.

  2. Ignition and Growth Modeling of LX-17 Hockey Puck Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, C M

    2004-04-19

    Detonating solid plastic bonded explosives (PBX) formulated with the insensitive molecule triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) exhibit measurable reaction zone lengths, curved shock fronts, and regions of failing chemical reaction at abrupt changes in the charge geometry. A recent set of ''hockey puck'' experiments measured the breakout times of diverging detonation waves in ambient temperature LX-17 (92.5 % TATB plus 7.5% Kel-F binder) and the breakout times at the lower surfaces of 15 mm thick LX-17 discs placed below the detonator-booster plane. The LX-17 detonation waves in these discs grow outward from the initial wave leaving regions of unreacted or partially reacted TATB in the corners of these charges. This new experimental data is accurately simulated for the first time using the Ignition and Growth reactive flow model for LX-17, which is normalized to a great deal of detonation reaction zone, failure diameter and diverging detonation data. A pressure cubed dependence for the main growth of reaction rate yields excellent agreement with experiment, while a pressure squared rate diverges too quickly and a pressure quadrupled rate diverges too slowly in the LX-17 below the booster equatorial plane.

  3. Particle Nucleation and Growth During the NIFTy Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthelmie, R. J.; Pryor, S. C.; Spaulding, A. M.; Rossner, A.; Crimmins, B.; Hopke, P. K.; Mauldin, L.; Jobson, T.; Petaja, T.

    2008-12-01

    The measurements presented herein are being collected in order to assess the frequency and characteristics of nucleation events and high ultra-fine particle concentrations in this rural (but regionally polluted) setting, including the chemical composition of the ultra-fine particles, the principal mechanisms of nucleation, limitations on nucleation and growth and the ultimate fate of the resulting ultra-fine particles. We present a year of data from continuous measurements of particle size distributions (6 to 400 nm) at three- levels above and within a deciduous forest in southern Indiana (in the Ohio River Valley). These data are collected using two SMPS and one FMPS, and are supplemented with data concerning the spatial extent and the composition of ultra-fine particles using samples collected during May 2008 as part of the Nucleation In ForesTs (NIFTY) campaign. The long-term measurements indicate evidence of class A nucleation events on approximately 1 day in 5, and lesser magnitude or less well defined events on another 15% of days. These data indicate nucleation is most frequently observed in spring, but occurs in all seasons and subsequent growth is more rapid during leaf-on. During the NIFTY field experiment we enhanced the ongoing data collection at the forest site to include sulfuric acid, ammonia and VOC concentrations, and particle composition using two MOUDI-nano-MOUDI combinations. Preliminary analyses of these data indicate that the sub-32 nm diameter particles are almost completely ammonium-sulfate or ammonium-bisulfate and associated water but there is evidence that continued growth is aided by the addition of condensable organics. We further instrumented two additional sites - one directly south of the forest in a relatively rural setting, and one to the north in the city of Indianapolis. Results from these sites indicate strong evidence that the events are regional but the sites differ in terms of the magnitude of the events and the relative

  4. Martian Soil Plant Growth Experiment: The Effects of Adding Nitrogen, Bacteria, and Fungi to Enhance Plant Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kliman, D. M.; Cooper, J. B.; Anderson, R. C.

    2000-01-01

    Plant growth is enhanced by the presence of symbiotic soil microbes. In order to better understand how plants might prosper on Mars, we set up an experiment to test whether symbiotic microbes function to enhance plant growth in a Martian soil simulant.

  5. Crystal Growth by Physical Vapor Transport: Experiments and Simulation Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Worlikar, A.; Su, Ching-Hua; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Crystal growth from the vapor phase has various advantages over melt growth. The main advantage is from a lower processing temperature, which makes the process more amenable in instances where the melting temperature of the crystal is high. Other benefits stem from the inherent purification mechanism in the process due to differences in the vapor pressures of the native elements and impurities, and the enhanced interfacial morphological stability during the growth process. Further, the implementation of PVT growth in closed ampoules affords experimental simplicity with minimal needs for complex process control, which makes it an ideal candidate for space investigations in systems where gravity tends to have undesirable effects on the growth process. Bulk growth of wide band gap II-VI semiconductors by PVT has been developed and refined over the past several years at NASA MSFC. A new modeling approach for PVT has also been recently formulated and its validation and testing is the main objective of this work.

  6. Fatigue crack growth theory and experiment: A comparative analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sananda, K.

    1983-12-01

    A number of theoretical models have been proposed in the literature which explain the second or the fourth power dependence of fatigue crack growth rate on ..delta..K, the stress intensity factor range in the Paris-Erdogan relation da/dN = C ..delta..K /SUP m/ . All of these models pertain to the intermediate range of crack growth rates where the m values are relatively low in the range of 2 to 4. The values of m for many metals and alloys can be much larger than 4 at near threshold crack growth rates or at stress intensities close to the fast fracture, and in some cases throughout the range of ..delta..K when the faceted mode of crack growth occurs. For such cases, the models appear to have no relevance. In this report predictions of different theoretical models are critically examined in comparison to experimentally determined crack growth rates in a MA 956, oxide dispersion strengthened alloy. Cumulative damage models predict crack growth rates reasonably well except in the range where ductile striations are observed. Lack of agreement with any particular model in this range is related to the fact that at different regions across the specimen thickness different mechanisms, either plastic blunting or cumulative damage, control the crack growth.

  7. Indium antimonide crystal growth experiment M562. [Skylab weightless conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, H. C.; Witt, A. F.

    1974-01-01

    It was established that ideal diffusion controlled steady state conditions, never accomplished on earth, were achieved during the growth of Te-doped InSb crystals in Skylab. Surface tension effects led to nonwetting conditions under which free surface solidification took place in confined geometry. It was further found that, under forced contact conditions, surface tension effects led to the formation of surface ridges (not previously observed on earth) which isolated the growth system from its container. In addition, it was possible, for the first time, to identify unambiguously: the origin of segregation discontinuities associated with facet growth, the mode of nucleation and propagation of rotational twin boundaries, and the specific effect of mechanical-shock perturbations on segregation. The results obtained prove the advantageous conditions provided by outer space. Thus, fundamental data on solidification thought to be unattainable because of gravity-induced interference on earth are now within reach.

  8. Dendritic Growth of Hard-Sphere Crystals. Experiment 34

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russel, W. B.; Chaikin, P. M.; Zhu, Ji-Xiang; Meyer, W. V.; Rogers, R.

    1998-01-01

    Recent observations of the disorder-order transition for colloidal hard spheres under microgravity revealed dendritic crystallites roughly 1-2 mm in size for samples in the coexistence region of the phase diagram. Order-of-magnitude estimates rationalize the absence of large or dendritic crystals under normal gravity and their stability to annealing in microgravity. A linear stability analysis of the Ackerson and Schaetzel model for crystallization of hard spheres establishes the domain of instability for diffusion-limited growth at small supersaturations. The relationship between hard-sphere and molecular crystal growth is established and exploited to relate the predicted linear instability to the well-developed dendrites observed.

  9. How Being Female Influenced My Professional Experiences and Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foa, Edna B.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper I describe some of my professional experiences as a female, both as a graduate student and throughout my career. My own experience was unique because I began graduate school a few months after arriving in the U.S. with limited knowledge of English in a very competitive and demanding program , in addition to the fact that I was a…

  10. Experiments on LICHEN growth. 1. Seasonal patterns and environmental controls

    SciTech Connect

    Benedict, J.B. )

    1990-08-01

    Radial growth of mature Xanthoparmelia lineola and X. subdecipiens thalli (n = 10 thalli, 170 lobes) was measured bimonthly for 2 yr at a transplant locality on the East Slope of the Colorado Front Range (altitude 2,565 m). Growth occurred during every measurement period, but was most rapid in May, June, July, and August. Ninety-three percent of seasonal growth-rate variation during the first year of the study, and 92% during the second year, are explained by differences in the duration of daytime, snow-free thallus moisture (moisture available for photosynthesis); the strength of the relationship suggests that a positive net carbon assimilation rate is translated almost immediately into lobe elongation. No negative correlation was found between radial growth and thallus moisture recorded at night or beneath snow. In the cool, continental environment of the study area, duration of photosynthetically significant thallus moisture is influenced more strongly by air temperature, day length, and snow cover than by total precipitation. At higher altitudes and latitudes, where lichenometry is used for dating, these factors will have even greater importance.

  11. New Instrument INKA for Ice Nucleation and Growth Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Thea; Levin, Ezra; Höhler, Kristina; Nadolny, Jens; Möhler, Ottmar; DeMott, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Microphysical processes in clouds, such as the formation and growth of ice crystals, significantly influence the weather and the climate. Particularly the transition from the supercooled water to the solid ice phase is of great relevance since ice formation initiates the formation of precipitation and thereby strongly affects the cloud structure and life time. However, the formulation and parameterization of these processes and further laboratory studies are needed to obtain quantitative information on the ice activity of various atmospheric aerosol species. Therefore, we have constructed and built a new continuous flow diffusion chamber (CFDC) called INKA (Ice Nucleation Instrument of the KArlsruhe Institut of Technology) to be used both in the AIDA laboratory for detailed studies of ice nucleation and growth processes and in field applications for measuring the temperature-dependent abundance of ice nucleating particles (INPs). The CFDC design was originally developed and theoretically described by Rogers et al. (1988). The main part of the new INKA instrument, the chamber, consists of two vertically-oriented, concentric tubes with a total length of 150 cm. Together with particle-free, dry sheath air, the sampled aerosol particles flow through the annular space between these two cylinders. The wall temperatures of the cylinders can be adjusted and the walls of the annular gap are coated with thin ice layers. The bottom part (about 50 cm) of the outer cylinder of INKA is separately cooled, which allows operation in two different modes: In the ice nucleation mode, the CFDC is operated with a nucleation and growth section, covering the upper 100 cm of its length, which exposes the aerosol particles to a defined temperature and supersaturation. The bottom part is the so called droplet evaporation section which allows the ice particles to grow to a detectable size on the expense of present droplets. In the ice growth mode, the full length of the cylinders is operated

  12. Hydrodynamic growth and mix experiments at National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Caggiano, J.; Casey, D.; Cerjan, C.; Clark, D. S.; Edwards, J.; Grim, G.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A.; Hsing, W.; Hurricane, O.; Kilkenny, J.; Kline, J.; Knauer, J.; Landen, O.; McNaney, J.; Mintz, M.; Nikroo, A.; Parham, T.; Park, H.-S.; Pino, J.; Raman, K.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Rowley, D.; Tipton, R.; Weber, S.; Yeamans, C.

    2016-03-01

    Hydrodynamic growth and its effects on implosion performance and mix were studied at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Spherical shells with pre-imposed 2D modulations were used to measure Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth in the acceleration phase of implosions using in-flight x-ray radiography. In addition, implosion performance and mix have been studied at peak compression using plastic shells filled with tritium gas and imbedding localized CD diagnostic layer in various locations in the ablator. Neutron yield and ion temperature of the DT fusion reactions were used as a measure of shell-gas mix, while neutron yield of the TT fusion reaction was used as a measure of implosion performance. The results have indicated that the low-mode hydrodynamic instabilities due to surface roughness were the primary culprits to yield degradation, with atomic ablator-gas mix playing a secondary role.

  13. Accelerated growth of calcium silicate hydrates: Experiments and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nicoleau, Luc

    2011-12-15

    Despite the usefulness of isothermal calorimetry in cement analytics, without any further computations this brings only little information on the nucleation and growth of hydrates. A model originally developed by Garrault et al. is used in this study in order to simulate hydration curves of cement obtained by calorimetry with different known hardening accelerators. The limited basis set of parameters used in this model, having a physical or chemical significance, is valuable for a better understanding of mechanisms underlying in the acceleration of C-S-H precipitation. Alite hydration in presence of four different types of hardening accelerators was investigated. It is evidenced that each accelerator type plays a specific role on one or several growth parameters and that the model may support the development of new accelerators. Those simulations supported by experimental observations enable us to follow the formation of the C-S-H layer around grains and to extract interesting information on its apparent permeability.

  14. Plant Growth/Plant Phototropism - Skylab Student Experiment ED-61/62

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This chart describes the Skylab student experiment ED-61, Plant Growth, and experiment ED-62, Plant Phototropism. Two similar proposals were submitted by Joel G. Wordekemper of West Point, Nebraska, and Donald W. Schlack of Downey, California. Wordekemper's experiment (ED-61) was to see how the lack of gravity would affect the growth of roots and stems of plants. Schlack's experiment (ED-62) was to study the effect of light on a seed developing in zero gravity. The growth container of the rice seeds for their experiment consisted of eight compartments arranged in two parallel rows of four. Each had two windowed surfaces to allow periodic photography of the developing seedlings. In March 1972, NASA and the National Science Teachers Association selected 25 experiment proposals for flight on Skylab. Science advisors from the Marshall Space Flight Center aided and assisted the students in developing the proposals for flight on Skylab.

  15. Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) Is the First United States Microgravity Experiment Controlled From the Principal Investigator's University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malarik, Diane C.; Glicksman, Martin E.

    1997-01-01

    The scientific objective of the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) is to test fundamental assumptions about dendritic solidification of molten materials. IDGE is a microgravity materials science experiment using apparatus that was designed, built, tested, and operated by people from the NASA Lewis Research Center. The IDGE experiment was conceived by the principal investigator, Professor Martin E. Glicksman from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York. This experiment was a team effort of civil servants from the NASA Lewis Research Center, contractors from Aerospace Design & Fabrication, Inc. (ADF), and personnel at Rensselaer.

  16. Microgravity experiment to understand the effect of convection on PVT crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, N. B.; Duval, W. M. B.; Thomas, A. S. W.; Glicksman, M. E.; Adam, J. D.; Zhang, H.; Golombeck, J. C.; Watson, C.; Naumman, R.; Nelson, A. E.; Cacioppo, C.; Griffin, J.; Jugrav, M.; Rolin, T.; Seaquist, J.; Daniel, N.

    2003-07-01

    We have carried out very extensive theoretical and experimental studies on the physical vapour transport (PVT) growth of mercurous chloride. A microgravity experiment on the growth of mercurous chloride was designed and performed in the Space Experiment Facility (SEF) transparent furnace that was flown on Spacehab 4 (STS 77). Growth ampoules and cartridges were designed and fabricated to meet the science requirements. Two crystals were grown at the same time in the same furnace in <110> orientation at an speed of 5.5 mm/day and 8 mm/day by physical vapor transport in the microgravity condition to reduce gravity driven convection. The direct observation was made on the interface during the growth of crystals. We observed convex and detached growth for both growth runs.

  17. Plant Growth Experiments in Zeoponic Substrates: Applications for Advanced Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, Douglas W.; Gruener, J. E.; Henderson, K. E.; Steinberg, S. L.; Barta, D. J.; Galindo, C.; Henninger, D. L.

    2001-01-01

    A zeoponic plant-growth system is defined as the cultivation of plants in artificial soils, which have zeolites as a major component (Allen and Ming, 1995). Zeolites are crystalline, hydrated aluminosilicate minerals that have the ability to exchange constituent cations without major change of the mineral structure. Recently, zeoponic systems developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) slowly release some (Allen et at., 1995) or all of the essential plant-growth nutrients (Ming et at., 1995). These systems have NH4- and K-exchanged clinoptilolite (a natural zeolite) and either natural or synthetic apatite (a calcium phosphate mineral). For the natural apatite system, Ca and P were made available to the plant by the dissolution of apatite. Potassium and NH4-N were made available by ion-exchange reactions involving Ca(2+) from apatite dissolution and K(+) and NH4(+) on zeolitic exchange sites. In addition to NH4-N, K, Ca, and P, the synthetic apatite system also supplied Mg, S, and other micronutrients during dissolution (Figure 1). The overall objective of this research task is to develop zeoponic substrates wherein all plant growth nutrients are supplied by the plant growth medium for several growth seasons with only the addition of water. The substrate is being developed for plant growth in Advanced Life Support (ALS) testbeds (i.e., BioPLEX) and microgravity plant growth experiments. Zeoponic substrates have been used for plant growth experiments on two Space Shuttle flight experiments (STS-60; STS-63; Morrow et aI., 1995). These substrates may be ideally suited for plant growth experiments on the International Space Station and applications in ALS testbeds. However, there are several issues that need to be resolved before zeoponics will be the choice substrate for plant growth experiments in space. The objective of this paper is to provide an overview on recent research directed toward the refinement of zeoponic plant growth substrates.

  18. Experiment 9: ASTROCULTURE: Growth and Starch Accumulation of Potato Tuber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tibbitts, Theodore W.; Brown, Christopher S.; Croxdale, Judith G.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    1998-01-01

    Potato explants (leaf, small stem section, and axillary bud) flown on STS-73 developed tubers of 1.5 cm diameter and 1.7 g mass during the 16-day period of space flight. The experiment was undertaken in the ASTROCULTURE(TM) experiment package under controlled temperature, humidity, lighting, and carbon dioxide concentrations. The tubers that formed in the explant system under microgravity had the same gross morphology, the same anatomical configuration of cells and tissues, and the same sizes, shapes, and surface character of starch granules as tubers formed in a 1 g environment. The total accumulation of starch and other energy containing compounds was similar in space flight and ground control tubers. Enzyme activity of starch synthase, starch phosphorylase, and total hydrolase was similar in space flight and ground controls, but activity of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase was reduced in the space flight tuber tissue. This experiment documented that potatoes will metabolize and accumulate starch as effectively in space flight as on the ground. Thus, this data provides the potential for effective utilization of potatoes in life support systems of space bases.

  19. Inverse problem for the Verhulst equation of limited population growth with discrete experiment data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimov, Anvar; Kasenov, Syrym; Nurseitov, Daniyar; Serovajsky, Simon

    2016-08-01

    Verhulst limited growth model with unknown parameters of growth is considered. These parameters are defined by discrete experiment data. This inverse problem is solved with using gradient method with interpolation of data and without it. Approximation of the delta-function is used for the latter case. As an example the bacteria population E.coli is considered.

  20. Spaceflight hardware for conducting plant growth experiments in space: the early years 1960-2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porterfield, D. M.; Neichitailo, G. S.; Mashinski, A. L.; Musgrave, M. E.

    2003-01-01

    The best strategy for supporting long-duration space missions is believed to be bioregenerative life support systems (BLSS). An integral part of a BLSS is a chamber supporting the growth of higher plants that would provide food, water, and atmosphere regeneration for the human crew. Such a chamber will have to be a complete plant growth system, capable of providing lighting, water, and nutrients to plants in microgravity. Other capabilities include temperature, humidity, and atmospheric gas composition controls. Many spaceflight experiments to date have utilized incomplete growth systems (typically having a hydration system but lacking lighting) to study tropic and metabolic changes in germinating seedlings and young plants. American, European, and Russian scientists have also developed a number of small complete plant growth systems for use in spaceflight research. Currently we are entering a new era of experimentation and hardware development as a result of long-term spaceflight opportunities available on the International Space Station. This is already impacting development of plant growth hardware. To take full advantage of these new opportunities and construct innovative systems, we must understand the results of past spaceflight experiments and the basic capabilities of the diverse plant growth systems that were used to conduct these experiments. The objective of this paper is to describe the most influential pieces of plant growth hardware that have been used for the purpose of conducting scientific experiments during the first 40 years of research. c2002 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Modeling, simulation, and experiments of coating growth on nanofibers

    SciTech Connect

    Clemons, C. B.; Hamrick, P.; Heminger, J.; Kreider, K. L.; Young, G. W.; Buldum, A.; Evans, E.; Zhang, G.

    2008-02-15

    This work is a comparison of modeling and simulation results with experiments for an integrated experimental/modeling investigation of a procedure to coat nanofibers and core-clad nanostructures with thin film materials using plasma enhanced physical vapor deposition. In the experimental effort, electrospun polymer nanofibers are coated with metallic materials under different operating conditions to observe changes in the coating morphology. The modeling effort focuses on linking simple models at the reactor level, nanofiber level and atomic level to form a comprehensive model. The comprehensive model leads to the definition of an evolution equation for the coating free surface around an isolated nanofiber. This evolution equation was previously derived and solved under conditions of a nearly circular coating, with a concentration field that was only radially dependent and that was independent of the location of the coating free surface. These assumptions permitted the development of analytical expressions for the concentration field. The present work does not impose the above-mentioned conditions and considers numerical simulations of the concentration field that couple with level set simulations of the evolution equation for the coating free surface. Further, the cases of coating an isolated fiber as well as a multiple fiber mat are considered. Simulation results are compared with experimental results as the reactor pressure and power, as well as the nanofiber mat porosity, are varied.

  2. Plant Growth and Development in the ASTROCULTURE(trademark) Space-Based Growth Unit-Ground Based Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bula, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    The ASTROCULTURE(trademark) plant growth unit flown as part on the STS-63 mission in February 1995, represented the first time plants were flown in microgravity in a enclosed controlled environment plant growth facility. In addition to control of the major environmental parameters, nutrients were provided to the plants with the ZEOPONICS system developed by NASA Johnson Space Center scientists. Two plant species were included in this space experiment, dwarf wheat (Triticum aestivum) and a unique mustard called "Wisconsin Fast Plants" (Brassica rapa). Extensive post-flight analyses have been performed on the plant material and it has been concluded that plant growth and development was normal during the period the plants were in the microgravity environment of space. However, adequate plant growth and development control data were not available for direct comparisons of plant responses to the microgravity environment with those of plants grown at 1 g. Such data would allow for a more complete interpretation of the extent that microgravity affects plant growth and development.

  3. Children’s Experience of Posttraumatic Growth: Distinguishing General from Domain-Specific Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Laceulle, Odilia M.; Kleber, Rolf J.; Alisic, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Although the five domains of posttraumatic growth (new possibilities, relating to others, personal strength, spiritual change and appreciation of life) have been studied extensively in adults, little is known about these domains and their correlates in children. We aimed to examine whether demographic and/or social characteristics are related to children’s reports of overall posttraumatic growth and of growth in specific domains. In a general population study, children aged 8–12 years who had been exposed to adverse events (N = 1290) filled out questionnaires on their experiences, demographic characteristics (gender, age, time lag since event), stress reactions, peer support, religiosity and posttraumatic growth. All demographic and social characteristics were related to overall posttraumatic growth, except time lag. Associations varied across the five domains with the strongest effects being found for stress reactions and religiosity. A higher level of stress reactions was related to more growth in all domains (general effect), whereas religious children experienced more spiritual growth than non-religious children without differences on other domains (domain specific effect). Other effects were small, and some did not remain significant after Bonferroni corrections. These findings suggest the presence of both general and domain-specific correlates of child posttraumatic growth. Although effects were generally small, the current findings show the need to differentiate between the domains of posttraumatic growth in both further research and clinical practice. This will allow a better understanding of the mechanisms of posttraumatic growth in children as well as more tailored assessment and intervention. PMID:26714193

  4. Whisker/Cone growth on the thermal control surfaces experiment no. S0069

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwiener, James M.; Coston, James E., Jr.; Miller, Edgar R.; Mell, Richard J.; Wilkes, Donald R.

    1995-01-01

    An unusual surface 'growth' was found during scanning electron microscope (SEM) investigations of the Thermal Control Surface Experiment (TCSE) S0069 front thermal cover. This 'growth' is similar to the cone type whisker growth phenomena as studied by G. K. Wehner beginning in the 1960's. Extensive analysis has identified the most probable composition of the whiskers to be a silicate type glass. Sources of the growth material are outgassing products from the experiment and orbital atomic oxygen, which occurs naturally at the orbital altitudes of the LDEF mission in the form of neutral atomic oxygen. The highly ordered symmetry and directionality of the whiskers are attributed to the long term (5.8 year) stable flight orientation of the LDEF.

  5. Follow-on Research Activities for the Rensselaer Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (RIDGE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaCombe, J. C.; Koss, M. B.; Lupulescu, A. O.; Frei, J. E.; Giummarra, C.; Glicksman, M. E.

    2001-01-01

    The RIDGE effort continues the aegis of the earlier, NASA-sponsored, Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) series of experiments through the continued analysis of microgravity data acquired during these earlier space flights. The preliminary observations presented here demonstrate that there are significant differences between SCN and the more anisotropic PVA dendrites. The side branch structure becomes amplified only further behind the tip, and the interface shape is generally wider (i.e. more hyperbolic than parabolic) in PVA than in SCN. These characteristics are seen to affect the process of heat transport. Additionally, the dendrites grown during the fourth United States Microgravity Payload (USMP-4) exhibit time-dependent growth characteristics and may not always have reached steady-state growth during the experiment.

  6. Characterizing the growth to detonation in PETN and HNS with small-scale PDV cutback experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wixom, Ryan; Yarrington, Cole; Knepper, Robert; Tappan, Alexander; Olles, Joseph; Zelenok, Matthew; A-Team

    2015-06-01

    For many decades, cutback experiments have been used to characterize the equation of state and growth to steady detonation in explosive formulations. More recently, embedded gauges have been used to capture the growth to steady detonation in gas-gun impacted samples. Data resulting from these experiments are extremely valuable for parameterizing equation of state and reaction models used in hydrocode simulations. Due to the extremely fast growth to detonation in typical detonator explosives, cutback and embedded gauge experiments are extremely difficult, if not impossible. Using frequency shifted photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) we have measured particle velocity histories from explosive films impacted with electrically driven flyers. By varying the sample thickness and impact conditions we were able to capture the growth from inert shock to full detonation pressure within distances as short as 100 μm. These data were used to assess and improve burn-model parameterization and equations of state for simulating shock initiation. Additionally, we discuss details of the experiment and data analysis regarding the most accurate possible determination of the velocity spike.

  7. Numerical modeling and experiments of creep crack growth under cyclic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Brust, F.W.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents a summary of some recent studies of creep crack growth under history dependent load conditions. The effect of a proper constitutive law is illustrated. Moreover, the asymptotic fields are reconsidered under cyclic creep conditions. In addition, several experiments are modeled and the behavior of integral parameters is discussed.

  8. An Innovative Method for Preparing Semiconductor Change Used in Crystal Growth and Shear Cell Diffusion Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anrold, William A.; Matthiesen, David; Benett, Robert J.; Jayne, Douglas T.

    1997-01-01

    An innovative technique for machining semiconductors has been developed. This technique was used to prepare semiconductor charges for crystal growth and shear cell diffusion experiments. The technique allows brittle semiconductor materials to be quickly and accurately machined. Lightly doping the semiconductor material increases the conductivity enough to allow the material to be shaped by an electrical discharge machine (EDM).

  9. Coming to America for Spiritual or Academic Growth? Experiences of International Students at One Christian School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Lishu

    2013-01-01

    The number of international students flocking to North American private Christian schools has continued to grow. The author examined the overall experiences of 67 international high school students studying at a private Christian school in South Carolina. Their frustrations and struggles with academic and spiritual growth in a new cross-cultural…

  10. Advantages of ice crystal growth experiments in a low gravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. J.; Keller, V. W.; Hallett, J.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of convective fluid motions and mechanical supports on ice crystal growth in experiments conducted on earth can be inferred from studies conducted in their absence in a low-gravity environment. Current experimental results indicate the effects may be significant.

  11. Indirect-drive ablative Rayleigh-Taylor growth experiments on the Shenguang-II laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J. F.; Fan, Z. F.; Zheng, W. D.; Wang, M.; Pei, W. B.; Zhu, S. P.; Zhang, W. Y.; Miao, W. Y.; Yuan, Y. T.; Cao, Z. R.; Deng, B.; Jiang, S. E.; Liu, S. Y.; Ding, Y. K.; Wang, L. F.; Ye, W. H. He, X. T.

    2014-04-15

    In this research, a series of single-mode, indirect-drive, ablative Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability experiments performed on the Shenguang-II laser facility [X. T. He and W. Y. Zhang, Eur. Phys. J. D 44, 227 (2007)] using planar target is reported. The simulation results from the one-dimensional hydrocode for the planar foil trajectory experiment indicate that the energy flux at the hohlraum wall is obviously less than that at the laser entrance hole. Furthermore, the non-Planckian spectra of x-ray source can strikingly affect the dynamics of the foil flight and the perturbation growth. Clear images recorded by an x-ray framing camera for the RT growth initiated by small- and large-amplitude perturbations are obtained. The observed onset of harmonic generation and transition from linear to nonlinear growth regime is well predicted by two-dimensional hydrocode simulations.

  12. Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment - Science, engineering, and hardware development for USMP space flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Hahn, R. C.; Koss, M. B.; Tirmizi, S. H.; Selleck, M. E.; Velosa, A.; Winsa, E.

    1991-01-01

    The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) has been designed to provide microgravity data on dendritic growth for a critical test of theory. This paper updates progress on constructing a crystal growth chamber suitable for space flight. The IDGE chamber is constructed from glass and stainless steel and is hermetically sealed by electron beam welds and glass-metal seals. Initial tests of the chambers sample's melting point plateau show that the new chamber design is capable of preserving the 99.9995 percent purity of succinonitrile. Dendrite growth can be initiated in the center of the IDGE chamber by means of thermo-electric coolers and a capillary injector tube (stinger). The new IDGE chamber is ready for fully integrated tests with the prototype IDGE engineering hardware at NASA's Lewis Research Center.

  13. Growth of Inclined GaAs Nanowires by Molecular Beam Epitaxy: Theory and Experiment

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The growth of inclined GaAs nanowires (NWs) during molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on the rotating substrates is studied. The growth model provides explicitly the NW length as a function of radius, supersaturations, diffusion lengths and the tilt angle. Growth experiments are carried out on the GaAs(211)A and GaAs(111)B substrates. It is found that 20° inclined NWs are two times longer in average, which is explained by a larger impingement rate on their sidewalls. We find that the effective diffusion length at 550°C amounts to 12 nm for the surface adatoms and is more than 5,000 nm for the sidewall adatoms. Supersaturations of surface and sidewall adatoms are also estimated. The obtained results show the importance of sidewall adatoms in the MBE growth of NWs, neglected in a number of earlier studies. PMID:21076695

  14. Experiment 2: Vapor Transport Crystal Growth of Mercury Cadmium Telluride in Microgravity- USML-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedemeier, H.; Ge, Y. R.; Hutchins, M. A.

    1998-01-01

    The new epitaxial growth experiments of Hg(l-x)Cd(x)Te on (100) CdTe substrates by chemical vapor transport (CVT), using HgI2 as a transport agent, were performed in the transient growth regime of this ternary, heteroepitaxial system at normal and reduced gravity during the USML-2 flight. The surface and interface morphology, the compositional and structural uniformity, and carrier mobility of the epitaxial layer and islands grown in microgravity are measurably improved relative to ground specimens. These observations demonstrate the effects of convective flow on the transport, deposition, and growth processes of this solid-vapor system even in the transient growth regime. The properties of the Hg(l-x)Cd(x)Te layer grown in a microgravity environment compare quite favorably to those of layers obtained by other techniques.

  15. Crystal Growth Furnace - An overview of the system configuration and planned experiments on the First United States Microgravity Laboratory mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivas, R.; Schaefer, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    The Crystal Growth Furnace (CGF) system configuration for the First United States Microgravity Laboratory (USML-1) mission is reviewed, and the planned on-orbit experiments are briefly described. The CGF is configured to accommodate four scientific experiments involving crystal growth which are based on the classical Bridgman method and CVT method, including vapor transport crystal growth of mercury cadmium telluride; crystal growth of mercury zinc telluride by directional solidification; seeded Bridgman growth of zinc-doped cadmium telluride; and Bridgman growth of selenium-doped gallium arsenide.

  16. Vapor Growth of Binary and Ternary Chalcogenides in Preparation for Microgravity Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, C.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In the bulk crystal growth of some technologically important semiconducting chalcopyrites, such as ZnTe, CdS, ZnSe and ZnS, vapor growth techniques have significant advantages over melt growth techniques due to the high melting points of these materials. The realization of routine production of high-quality single crystals of these semiconductors requires a fundamental, systematic and in-depth study on the PVT growth process and crystal growth by vapor transport in low gravity offers a set of unique conditions for this study. Previously, two reasons have been put forward to account for this. The first is weight-related reductions in crystal strain and defects. These are thought to be caused by the weight of the crystals during processing at elevated temperatures and retained on cooling, particularly for materials with a low yield strength. The second, and more general, reason is related to the reduction in density-gradient driven convection. The PVT crystal growth process consists of essentially three processes: sublimation of the source material, transport of the vapor species and condensation of the vapor species to form the crystal. The latter two processes can be affected by the convection caused by gravitational accelerations on Earth. Reductions in such convection in low gravity is expected to yield a nearly diffusion-limited growth condition which results in more uniform growth rates (on the microscopic scale) and hence greater crystalline perfection and compositional homogeneity. The reduction of convective contamination by performing flight experiments in a reduced gravity environment will help to understand the relation between fluid phase processes (growth parameters) and defect and impurity incorporation in grown crystals.

  17. Ablation Front Rayleigh-Taylor Growth Experiments in Spherically Convergent Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Glendinning, S.G.; Cherfils, C.; Colvin, J.; Divol, L.; Galmiche, D.; Haan, S.; Marinak, M.M.; Remington, B.A.; Richard, A.L.; Wallace, R.

    1999-11-03

    Experiments were performed on the Nova laser, using indirectly driven capsules mounted in cylindrical gold hohlraums, to measure the Rayleigh-Taylor growth at the ablation front by time-resolved radiography. Modulations were preformed on the surface of Ge-doped plastic capsules. With initial modulations of 4 {micro}m, growth factors of about 6 in optical depth were seen, in agreement with simulations using the radiation hydrocode FCI2. With initial modulations of 1 {micro}m, growth factors of about 100-150 in optical depth were seen. The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability at the ablation front in an inertial confinement fusion capsule has been the subject of considerable investigation. Much of this research has been concentrated on planar experiments, in which RT growth is inferred from radiography. The evolution is somewhat different in a converging geometry; the spatial wavelength decreases (affecting the onset of nonlinear saturation), and the shell thickens and compresses rather than decompressing as in a planar geometry. In a cylindrically convergent geometry, the latter effect is proportional to the radius, while in spherically convergent geometry, the latter effect is proportional to the radius squared. Experiments were performed on the Nova and Omega lasers in cylindrical geometry (using both direct and indirect drive) and have been performed in spherical geometry using direct drive.

  18. Specifications for and preliminary design of a plant growth chamber for orbital experimental experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweet, H. C.; Simmonds, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    It was proposed that plant experiments be performed on board the space shuttle. To permit the proper execution of most tests, the craft must contain a plant growth chamber which is adequately designed to control those environmental factors which can induce changes in a plant's physiology and morphology. The various needs of, and environmental factors affecting, plants are identified. The permissilbe design, construction and performance limits for a plant-growth chamber are set, and tentative designs were prepared for units which are compatible with both the botanical requirements and the constraints imposed by the space shuttle.

  19. Conditions of growth of open corrosion pits in stainless steels -- Electrochemical experiments on model pits

    SciTech Connect

    Hakkarainen, T.J.

    1998-12-31

    The effects of the most important variables on continued growth and repassivation of open macroscopic corrosion pits in stainless steel sheets were investigated using two different artificial pit configurations. The pit growth was activated under anodic polarization either by injecting concentrated chloride solution into the pit or by initially filling the pit with chromic chloride crystals (CrCl{sub 3}-6H{sub 2}O). Experiments were made on sheet specimens of stainless steels of type UNS S31603 (316L) or UNS S312.54 in bulk solutions containing chloride and/or sulfate ions. Various aspects of the test arrangements and pitting of stainless steels are discussed, including the electrolyte composition within the pits, repassivation potentials and the IR-drops associated with pit growth. It is demonstrated that using the artificial pit configurations the effects of the main variables affecting the conditions for growth and repassivation of open corrosion pits can be investigated quantitatively, including electrode potentials, temperature, and composition of the bulk solution. It is concluded that for continued growth of corrosion pits with ``large`` openings to the bulk solution, a strongly oxidizing environment is required, and that sulfate ions in amounts comparable to or in excess of that of chloride ions may stabilize pit growth.

  20. Experiment MA-028 crystal growth. [low gravity manufacturing of single crystals from Apollo/Soyuz Test Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lind, D. M.

    1976-01-01

    A crystal growth experiment is reported on orbital space flights. The experiment was performed during the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project. The Crystal Growth Experiment assessed a novel process for growing single crystals of insoluble substances by allowing two or more reactant solutions to diffuse toward each other through a region of pure solvent in zero gravity. The experiment was entirely successful and yielded crystals of about the expected size, quality, and number.

  1. Alternative Student Growth Measures for Teacher Evaluation: Implementation Experiences of Early-Adopting Districts. REL 2015-093

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullough, Moira; English, Brittany; Angus, Megan Hague; Gill, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Alternative student growth measures for teacher evaluation: Implementation experiences of early-adopting districts: State requirements to include student achievement growth in teacher evaluations are prompting the development of alternative ways to measure growth in grades and subjects not covered by state assessments. These alternative growth…

  2. Ignition and Growth Modeling of Short Pulse Duration Shock Initiation Experiments on HNS IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarver, Craig; Chidester, Steven

    2013-06-01

    Short pulse duration shock initiation experiments on 1.60 g/cm3 density (92% TMD) HNS IV have been reported by Schwarz, Bowden et al., Dudley et al., Goveas et al., Greenaway et al., and others. This flyer threshold velocity for detonation/failure data plus measured unreacted HNS Hugoniot data and detonation cylinder test product expansion data were used as the experimental basis for the development of an Ignition and Growth reactive flow model for the shock initiation of HNS IV. The resulting Ignition and Growth HNS IV model parameters yielded good overall agreement with all of this experimental data. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.: Explosive, HNS IV, shock to detonation transition, Ignition and Growth: 82.33.Vx, 82.40.Fp.

  3. Experiment 3: Zeolite Crystal Growth in Microgravity- The USML-2 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bac, Nurcan; Warzywoda, Juliusz; Sacco, Albert, Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The extensive use of zeolites and their impact on the world's economy leads to many efforts to characterize their structure, and to improve the knowledge base for nucleation and growth of these crystals. The Zeolite Crystal Growth (ZCG) experiment on USML-2 aims to enhance the understanding of nucleation and growth of zeolite crystals while attempting to provide a means of controlling the defect concentration in microgravity. Zeolites A, X, Beta, and Silicalite were grown during the 16-day USML-2 mission. The solutions where the nucleation event was controlled yielded larger and more uniform crystals of better morphology and purity than their terrestrial/control counterparts. Space-grown Beta crystals were free of line defects while terrestrial/controls had substantial defects.

  4. The Effect of Elevated CO2 on the Growth Rate of Phytoplankton - Mesocosm Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Lee, K.; Koo, C.; Shin, K.; Lee, H.

    2004-12-01

    Recent independent lines of evidence suggest that higher CO2 concentration in surface seawater would accelerate growth of phytoplankton. A 20-day mesocosm experiment was carried out in June 2004 in the southern coastal region of Korea to investigate the influence of elevated CO2 concentration on the mono diatom species, Skeletonema costatum. The CO2 concentration of a control net was being left as an ambient condition (approximately 400ppm), while that of the other treatment was being maintained approximately 900ppm. The elevated production of Particulate Organic Carbon (POC), which was generated from increasing a primary production, was not discernable in this experiment. Therefore, a new study has been carried out with some modifications to observe possible increase in POC and Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) productions. The new experiment includes 5 mesocosms with different CO2 concentrations ranging from 280ppm to 900ppm. During the entire duration of this experiment, CO2 concentration in each treatment has remained constant.

  5. Drift compression experiments on MBE-4 and related emittance growth phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Eylon, S.; Faltens, A.; Fawley, W.; Garvey, T.; Hahn, K.; Henestroza, E.; Smith, L.

    1991-04-01

    We have recently conducted a series of experiments on the MBE-4 heavy ion accelerator in which a velocity tilt was placed on the beam in the first accelerating section beyond the injector, followed by drift compression over the remaining 11 meters. Depending upon the magnitude of the velocity tilt and the accompanying mismatch in the focusing lattice, emittance growth was observed, manifested by butterfly'' shapes in x {minus} x{prime} phase space. We discuss various analytical limits on ion beam compression and relate them to these experiments and also to a driver for a heavy ion fusion reactor. We also present numerical simulations which investigate various aspects of compression and consequent emittance growth. 2 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Calculations and measurements in support of the triglycine sulfate zero gravity growth experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springer, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Two areas of investigation which are required for maximum utilization of the flight experiment results from the solution growth of crystals of triglycine sulfate (TGS) are addressed. The use of an ultramicroscope to characterize structural defects in the grown TGS crystals is discussed. Mie theory is applied to the light scattering expected from idealized crystal defects in order to predict the sensitivity of ultramicroscopy in the detection of small defects. Secondly, the measurement of optical properties of TGS solutions in water is discussed. This data is needed in order to interpret interferometric studies of mass transport through the TGS solution during the growth phase of the flight experiment. In particular, refractive index data is obtained for a wide range of temperatures and concentrations of TGS solutions. Absorbance measurements in the ultraviolet have also been made for the same samples.

  7. Experiences of mentoring influences on the personal and professional growth of Hispanic registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Egues, Aida L

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to explore the meaning of the experiences of mentoring influences on the personal and professional growth of Hispanic registered nurses (RNs). Focus group methodology was employed in the New York City metropolitan area with monolingual English or bilingual English/Spanish RNs (N = 20) who perceived themselves to be at all levels of practice. The findings offer a summary of the experiences of mentoring for the 20 Hispanic RNs that includes little advancement support; hesitancy to being mentored; dependency on the self for personal and professional growth; and educational, practice, and socioeconomic barriers. This study suggests that mentoring of Hispanic nurses needs to be reexamined to improve and sustain a culture of mentoring that may enhance the education, recruitment, and retention of Hispanic RNs. PMID:24831071

  8. SHOCK INITIATION EXPERIMENTS ON PBX9501 EXPLOSIVE AT 150?C FOR IGNITION AND GROWTH MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Vandersall, K S; Tarver, C M; Garcia, F; Urtiew, P A

    2005-07-19

    Shock initiation experiments on the explosive PBX9501 (95% HMX, 2.5% estane, and 2.5% nitroplasticizer by weight) were performed at 150 C to obtain in-situ pressure gauge data and Ignition and Growth modeling parameters. A 101 mm diameter propellant driven gas gun was utilized to initiate the PBX9501 explosive with manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge packages placed between sample slices. The run-distance-to-detonation points on the Pop-plot for these experiments showed agreement with previously published data and Ignition and Growth modeling parameters were obtained with a good fit to the experimental data. This parameter set will allow accurate code predictions to be calculated for safety scenarios involving PBX9501 explosives at temperatures close to 150 C.

  9. Hydrodynamic growth experiments with the 3-D, “native-roughness” modulations on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Weber, S. V.; Casey, D.; Clark, D. S.; Coppari, F.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A.; Hsing, W.; Landen, O.; Nikroo, A.; Robey, H. F.; Weber, C. R.

    2016-05-01

    Hydrodynamic instability growth experiments with threedimensional (3-D) surface-roughness modulations were performed on plastic (CH) shell spherical implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The initial capsule outer-surface roughness was similar to the standard specifications (“native roughness”) used in a majority of implosions on NIF. At a convergence ratio of ∼3, the measured tent modulations were close to those predicted by 3-D simulations (within ∼15-20%), while measured 3-D, broadband modulations were ∼3-4 times larger than those simulated based on the growth of the known imposed initial surface modulations. One of the hypotheses to explain the results is based on the increased instability amplitudes due to modulations of the oxygen content in the bulk of the capsule. These new experiments results have prompted looking for ways to reduce UV light exposure during target fabrication.

  10. Adaptive Use of Information during Growth Can Explain Long-Term Effects of Early Life Experiences.

    PubMed

    English, Sinead; Fawcett, Tim W; Higginson, Andrew D; Trimmer, Pete C; Uller, Tobias

    2016-05-01

    Development is a continuous process during which individuals gain information about their environment and adjust their phenotype accordingly. In many natural systems, individuals are particularly sensitive to early life experiences, even in the absence of later constraints on plasticity. Recent models have highlighted how the adaptive use of information can explain age-dependent plasticity. These models assume that information gain and phenotypic adjustments either cannot occur simultaneously or are completely independent. This assumption is not valid in the context of growth, where finding food results both in a size increase and learning about food availability. Here, we describe a simple model of growth to provide proof of principle that long-term effects of early life experiences can arise through the coupled dynamics of information acquisition and phenotypic change in the absence of direct constraints on plasticity. The increase in reproductive value from gaining information and sensitivity of behavior to experiences declines across development. Early life experiences have long-term impacts on age of maturity, yet-due to compensatory changes in behavior-our model predicts no substantial effects on reproductive success. We discuss how the evolution of sensitive windows can be explained by experiences having short-term effects on informational and phenotypic states, which generate long-term effects on life-history decisions. PMID:27104994

  11. On the role of convective motion during dendrite growth: Experiments under variable gravity, revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallett, J.; Cho, N.; Harrison, K.; Lord, A.; Wedum, E.; Purcell, R.; Saunders, C. P. R.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments show the effect of self induced convection on individual dendrite growth in uniformly supercooled samples and solidification of the resulting mush under conditions of high and low g. Convection is visualized by a Schlieren optical system or a Mach Zender interferometer. For ice crystals growing from the vapor in air, a slight reduction in linear growth rate occur under low g. For ice crystals growing from NaCl solution, dendrite tip velocities are unchanged, but subsequent mush solidification is enhanced through drainage channels under higher g. By contrast, sodium sulfate decahydrate dendrites growing from solution produce convective plumes which lead to higher tip growth rate only as the crystal growth direction approaches that of gravity. Convective plumes are laminar for small crystals under conditions of these experiments; the rise velocity of such plumes is greater than individual vortex rings under identical conditions. Convection effects are only present in solution under a critical supercooling less than about 5 C for sodium sulfate and 2 C for ice in NaCl since at higher supercooling the crystallization velocity, proportional to the square of the supercooling, exceeds the convective velocity, proportional to the square root of the supercooling. The role of convective velocity in bulk solidification is to give a large scale flow which under extreme cases may lead to extensive secondary crystal production, which alters the resulting crystal texture of the completely solidified melt.

  12. Growth of thin Fe(0 0 1) films for terahertz emission experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meserole, C. A.; Fisher, G. L.; Hilton, D. J.; Averitt, R. D.; Funk, D. J.; Taylor, A. J.

    2007-06-01

    The electrical and magnetic properties of thin iron (Fe) films have sparked significant scientific interest. Our interest, however, is in the fundamental interactions between light and matter. We have discovered a novel application for thin Fe films. These films are sources of terahertz (THz) radiation when stimulated by an incident laser pulse. After intense femtosecond pulse excitation by a Ti:sapphire laser, these films emit picosecond, broadband THz frequencies. The terahertz emission provides a direct measure of the induced ultrafast change in magnetization within the Fe film. The THz generation experiments and the growth of appropriate thin Fe films for these experiments are discussed. Several criteria are used to select the substrate and film growth conditions, including that the substrate must permit the epitaxial growth of a continuous, monocrystalline or single crystal film, yet must also be transparent to the emitted THz radiation. An Fe(0 0 1) film grown on the (0 0 1) surface of a magnesium oxide (MgO) substrate makes an ideal sample. The Fe films are grown by physical vapor deposition (PVD) in an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) system. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) are used to characterize the Fe(0 0 1) films. Two substrate surface preparation methods are investigated. Fe(0 0 1) films grown on MgO(0 0 1) substrates that are used as-received and films grown on MgO(0 0 1) substrates that have been UV/ozone-cleaned ex vacuo and annealed in vacuo produce the same results in the THz generation experiments. Either substrate preparation method permits the growth of samples suitable for the THz emission experiments.

  13. Utilizing ARC EMCS Seedling Cassettes as Highly Versatile Miniature Growth Chambers for Model Organism Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, John L.; Steele, Marianne K.; Sun, Gwo-Shing; Heathcote, David; Reinsch, S.; DeSimone, Julia C.; Myers, Zachary A.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our ground testing was to demonstrate the capability of safely putting specific model organisms into dehydrated stasis, and to later rehydrate and successfully grow them inside flight proven ARC EMCS seedling cassettes. The ARC EMCS seedling cassettes were originally developed to support seedling growth during space flight. The seeds are attached to a solid substrate, launched dry, and then rehydrated in a small volume of media on orbit to initiate the experiment. We hypothesized that the same seedling cassettes should be capable of acting as culture chambers for a wide range of organisms with minimal or no modification. The ability to safely preserve live organisms in a dehydrated state allows for on orbit experiments to be conducted at the best time for crew operations and more importantly provides a tightly controlled physiologically relevant growth experiment with specific environmental parameters. Thus, we performed a series of ground tests that involved growing the organisms, preparing them for dehydration on gridded Polyether Sulfone (PES) membranes, dry storage at ambient temperatures for varying periods of time, followed by rehydration. Inside the culture cassettes, the PES membranes were mounted above blotters containing dehydrated growth media. These were mounted on stainless steel bases and sealed with plastic covers that have permeable membrane covered ports for gas exchange. The results showed we were able to demonstrate acceptable normal growth of C.elegans (nematodes), E.coli (bacteria), S.cerevisiae (yeast), Polytrichum (moss) spores and protonemata, C.thalictroides (fern), D.discoideum (amoeba), and H.dujardini (tardigrades). All organisms showed acceptable growth and rehydration in both petri dishes and culture cassettes initially, and after various time lengths of dehydration. At the end of on orbit ISS European Modular Cultivation System experiments the cassettes could be frozen at ultra-low temperatures, refrigerated, or chemically

  14. Hydrodynamic instability growth and mix experiments at the National Ignition Facilitya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Barrios, M.; Caggiano, J. A.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C. J.; Clark, D. S.; Edwards, M. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Glebov, V. Y.; Grim, G.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A.; Hoover, D. E.; Hsing, W. W.; Hurricane, O.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kline, J. L.; Knauer, J. P.; Kroll, J.; Landen, O. L.; Lindl, J. D.; Ma, T.; McNaney, J. M.; Mintz, M.; Moore, A.; Nikroo, A.; Parham, T.; Peterson, J. L.; Petrasso, R.; Pickworth, L.; Pino, J. E.; Raman, K.; Regan, S. P.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Rowley, D. P.; Sayre, D. B.; Tipton, R. E.; Weber, S. V.; Widmann, K.; Wilson, D. C.; Yeamans, C. B.

    2014-05-01

    Hydrodynamic instability growth and its effects on implosion performance were studied at the National Ignition Facility [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 443, 2841 (2004)]. Implosion performance and mix have been measured at peak compression using plastic shells filled with tritium gas and containing embedded localized carbon-deuterium diagnostic layers in various locations in the ablator. Neutron yield and ion temperature of the deuterium-tritium fusion reactions were used as a measure of shell-gas mix, while neutron yield of the tritium-tritium fusion reaction was used as a measure of implosion performance. The results have indicated that the low-mode hydrodynamic instabilities due to surface roughness were the primary culprits for yield degradation, with atomic ablator-gas mix playing a secondary role. In addition, spherical shells with pre-imposed 2D modulations were used to measure instability growth in the acceleration phase of the implosions. The capsules were imploded using ignition-relevant laser pulses, and ablation-front modulation growth was measured using x-ray radiography for a shell convergence ratio of ˜2. The measured growth was in good agreement with that predicted, thus validating simulations for the fastest growing modulations with mode numbers up to 90 in the acceleration phase. Future experiments will be focused on measurements at higher convergence, higher-mode number modulations, and growth occurring during the deceleration phase.

  15. Hydrodynamic instability growth and mix experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Barrios, M.; Caggiano, J. A.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C. J.; Clark, D. S.; Edwards, M. J.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A.; Hsing, W. W.; Hurricane, O.; Kroll, J.; Landen, O. L.; Lindl, J. D.; Ma, T.; McNaney, J. M.; Mintz, M.; Parham, T.; Peterson, J. L.; and others

    2014-05-15

    Hydrodynamic instability growth and its effects on implosion performance were studied at the National Ignition Facility [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 443, 2841 (2004)]. Implosion performance and mix have been measured at peak compression using plastic shells filled with tritium gas and containing embedded localized carbon-deuterium diagnostic layers in various locations in the ablator. Neutron yield and ion temperature of the deuterium-tritium fusion reactions were used as a measure of shell-gas mix, while neutron yield of the tritium-tritium fusion reaction was used as a measure of implosion performance. The results have indicated that the low-mode hydrodynamic instabilities due to surface roughness were the primary culprits for yield degradation, with atomic ablator-gas mix playing a secondary role. In addition, spherical shells with pre-imposed 2D modulations were used to measure instability growth in the acceleration phase of the implosions. The capsules were imploded using ignition-relevant laser pulses, and ablation-front modulation growth was measured using x-ray radiography for a shell convergence ratio of ∼2. The measured growth was in good agreement with that predicted, thus validating simulations for the fastest growing modulations with mode numbers up to 90 in the acceleration phase. Future experiments will be focused on measurements at higher convergence, higher-mode number modulations, and growth occurring during the deceleration phase.

  16. Evaluation of experiments involving the study of plant orientation and growth under different gravitational conditions.

    PubMed

    Merkys, A J; Laurinavicius, R S; Svegzdiene, D V; Rakleviciene, D P; Jarosius, A V; Rupainiene, O J

    1989-01-01

    The manifestation of gravitropic reaction in plants has been considered from the phylogenetic point of view. A chart has been suggested according to which it is supposed that the first indications of the ability to identify the direction of the gravitational vector were inherent in the most ancient eukaryotes, which gave rise to green, brown, yellow-green, golden and diatomaceous algae as well as fungi. The experiments on the role of gravity in plant ontogenesis are being continued. The sum total of the data obtained in a number of experiments in space shows that under these conditions a structurally modified but normally functioning gravireceptive apparatus is formed. The data confirming the modification, under changed gravity, of the processes of integral and cellullar growth of the axial organs of seedlings as well as of the anatomo-morphological structure and developmental rates of plants during their prolonged growth in space are presented. It is assumed that this fact testifies to the presence of systems interacting with gravity during plant ontogenesis. At the same time the necessity for further experiments in order to differentiate an immediate biological effect of gravity from the ones conditioned by it indirectly due to the changes in the behavior of liquids and gases is pointed out. The methodological aspects of biological experiments in space as the main source of reliable information on the biological role of gravity are discussed. PMID:11537336

  17. Neural Basis of Psychological Growth following Adverse Experiences: A Resting-State Functional MRI Study.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Takashi X; Jung, Minyoung; Kojima, Masahiko; Saito, Daisuke N; Kosaka, Hirotaka; Tomoda, Akemi

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, research on the aftereffects of stressful or traumatic events has emphasized the negative outcomes from these experiences. However, the positive outcomes deriving from adversity are increasingly being examined, and such positive changes are described as posttraumatic growth (PTG). To investigate the relationship between basal whole-brain functional connectivity and PTG, we employed resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and analyzed the neural networks using independent component analysis in a sample of 33 healthy controls. Correlations were calculated between the network connectivity strength and the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI) score. There were positive associations between the PTGI scores and brain activation in the rostral prefrontal cortex and superior parietal lobule (SPL) within the left central executive network (CEN) (respectively, r = 0.41, p < 0.001; r = 0.49, p < 0.001). Individuals with higher psychological growth following adverse experiences had stronger activation in prospective or working memory areas within the executive function network than did individuals with lower psychological growth (r = 0.40, p < 0.001). Moreover, we found that individuals with higher PTG demonstrated stronger connectivity between the SPL and supramarginal gyrus (SMG). The SMG is one of the brain regions associated with the ability to reason about the mental states of others, otherwise known as mentalizing. These findings suggest that individuals with higher psychological growth may have stronger functional connectivity between memory functions within the CEN and social functioning in the SMG, and that their better sociality may result from using more memory for mentalizing during their daily social interactions. PMID:26291449

  18. Neural Basis of Psychological Growth following Adverse Experiences: A Resting-State Functional MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Masahiko; Saito, Daisuke N.; Kosaka, Hirotaka; Tomoda, Akemi

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, research on the aftereffects of stressful or traumatic events has emphasized the negative outcomes from these experiences. However, the positive outcomes deriving from adversity are increasingly being examined, and such positive changes are described as posttraumatic growth (PTG). To investigate the relationship between basal whole-brain functional connectivity and PTG, we employed resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and analyzed the neural networks using independent component analysis in a sample of 33 healthy controls. Correlations were calculated between the network connectivity strength and the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI) score. There were positive associations between the PTGI scores and brain activation in the rostral prefrontal cortex and superior parietal lobule (SPL) within the left central executive network (CEN) (respectively, r = 0.41, p < 0.001; r = 0.49, p < 0.001). Individuals with higher psychological growth following adverse experiences had stronger activation in prospective or working memory areas within the executive function network than did individuals with lower psychological growth (r = 0.40, p < 0.001). Moreover, we found that individuals with higher PTG demonstrated stronger connectivity between the SPL and supramarginal gyrus (SMG). The SMG is one of the brain regions associated with the ability to reason about the mental states of others, otherwise known as mentalizing. These findings suggest that individuals with higher psychological growth may have stronger functional connectivity between memory functions within the CEN and social functioning in the SMG, and that their better sociality may result from using more memory for mentalizing during their daily social interactions. PMID:26291449

  19. SHOCK INITIATION EXPERIMENTS ON THE HMX BASED EXPLOSIVE LX-10 WITH ASSOCIATED IGNITION AND GROWTH MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Vandersall, K S; Tarver, C M; Garcia, F; Urtiew, P A; Chidester, S K

    2007-06-15

    Shock initiation experiments on the HMX based explosives LX-10 (95% HMX, 5% Viton by weight) and LX-07 (90% HMX, 10% Viton by weight) were performed to obtain in-situ pressure gauge data, run-distance-to-detonation thresholds, and Ignition and Growth modeling parameters. A 101 mm diameter propellant driven gas gun was utilized to initiate the explosive samples with manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge packages placed between sample slices. The run-distance-to-detonation points on the Pop-plot for these experiments and prior experiments on another HMX based explosive LX LX-04 (85% HMX, 15% Viton by weight) will be shown, discussed, and compared as a function of the binder content. This parameter set will provide additional information to ensure accurate code predictions for safety scenarios involving HMX explosives with different percent binder content additions.

  20. [Control locus, stress resistance and personal growth of the participants in experiment Mars-500].

    PubMed

    Solcova, I; Vinokhodova, A G

    2013-01-01

    The article deals with positive personal transformations in a simulated space mission. The investigation was focused on the aspects of control locus, stamina, proactive behavior to overcome challenges, and stress-related personal growth. Besides, ingenious psychophysiological techniques designed to select Russian cosmonauts were used for assessing stress-resistance and ability to control own emotions voluntarily. Experiment Mars-500 simulated the basic features of a mission to Mars. The crew consisted of 6 males 27 to 38 years of age who volunteered to spend 520 days in isolation and confinement in the IBMP experimental facility (Moscow). To detect personality changes, the volunteers were tested before the experiment and after its completion. According to the test results, the participants commonly demonstrated the ability to see the bright side of the Mars-500 adversities, which most often was caused by their social growth. Positive changes were particularly pronounced in the crewmembers who possessed a better ability to control own emotions. The simulated challenges were also beneficial for personal growth of the volunteers. PMID:24032161

  1. Shuttle Flight Experiment on USMP-4: In Situ Monitoring of Crystal Growth Using MEPHISTO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbaschian, Reza; deGroh, Henry C., III; Leonardi, E.; deVahlDavis, Graham; Coriell, Sam; Cambon, Gerard

    2001-01-01

    This reports on the MEPHISTO-4 experiment on the Space Shuttle Columbia, STS-87, November 19-December 5, 1997. Involved were NASA; the University of Florida at Gainesville; groups from France that developed and built the furnace; the National Institute of Standards and Technology; The University of New South Wales, Australia; and Purdue University. This was a solidification study in which three long rods of Bismuth- 1 at.% Tin were directionally solidified. The goals were to solidify in an environment free of natural convection; to determine the relationship among solidification growth velocity, growth mode, and temperature; and determine the diffusivity of Sn in Bi. The flight samples grew with a planar solid/liquid interface at velocities less than 3.4 gm/s, and cellular growth was present at velocities greater than 6.7 um/s; grain orientation influenced the planar to cellular transition. The temperature gradient in the liquid was 204 K/cm. The s/l interface was flat with slight concavity. Diffusion-dominated conditions were present during MEPHISTO-4. The Seebeck technique was used to determine the s/I interface temperature during growth, however, to date, analysis of the Seebeck results has not yielded a reliable measurement of the interface temperature. The partition coefficient for Bi alloyed with Sn was measured, k = 0.029.

  2. Growth and survival of tree seedlings in a large-scale rainfall manipulation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Parikh, N.R.; Holmgren, M.; Huston, M.

    1995-06-01

    Seedlings of three species with different tolerance to shade and drought, Acer saccharum, Liriodendron tulipifera, and Quercus alba, were planted on the hillslope site of the Walker Branch Throughfall Displacement Experiment during the winter of 1993-1994, and their growth measured during the following growing season. Volumetric soil moisture in the upper 35cm of soil was measured twice monthly, and relative light availability above each seedling was measured in August. The most shade tolerant species, sugar maple, leafed out earlier and by the beginning of April had produced 80% of its total leaf area, compared with only 16% for tulip poplar and 39% for white oak. Leaf area and stem growth of sugar maple were positively correlated with soil moisture, but not with light, while stem growth of tulip poplar and white oak were positively correlated with light, but not with soil moisture. Tulip poplar had the highest mortality (15%) followed by sugar maple (3%). Mortality was higher in dry locations, but was not related to growth during the season.

  3. Growth responses of crop and weed species to heavy metals in pot and field experiments.

    PubMed

    Farrag, Karam; Senesi, Nicola; Nigro, Franco; Petrozza, Angelo; Palma, Achille; Shaarawi, Samar; Brunetti, Gennaro

    2012-09-01

    Greenhouse and field studies were performed to examine the growth responses and possible phytoremediation capacity towards heavy metals of several Brassicaceae (Brassica alba, Brassica carinata, Brassica napus and Brassica nigra) and Poaceae (durum wheat and barley). Soils used featured total concentrations of Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn largely exceeding the maximum levels permitted by the Italian laws. Different organic amendments were tested such as a compost and the plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Bacillus licheniformis. In the greenhouse experiment, plant length, leaf area index and shoots dry matter were evaluated periodically for the Brassicaceae examined. Whereas plant length, grains production, weight of 1,000 seeds, ear fertility and tiller density were determined under field conditions at the end of the crop cycle for wheat and barley. In general, the species tested appeared to be tolerant to high heavy metal concentrations in soil, and slightly significant differences were found for all parameters considered. A marked growth increase was shown to occur for Brassicaceae cultivated on compost- and bacillus-amended contaminated soils, with respect to non-amended contaminated soils. With some exception, higher growth parameters were measured for wheat and barley plants cropped from contaminated soils in comparison to non-contaminated soils. Further, bacillus amendment enhanced the length of wheat and barley plants in both non-contaminated and contaminated soils, while different effects were observed for the other parameters evaluated. PMID:22573098

  4. Sample from the STS-42 Mercury Iodide Crystal Growth (MICG) experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-42 closeup view shows ampule containing a sample from the Mercury Iodide Crystal Growth (MICG) experiment. For this test, six seed crystals obtained from crystals grown on the ground are used to grow large samples under controlled conditions in separate ampules. Noting that it is difficult to produce flawless Mercury iodide crystals on Earth because of the effects of gravity-induced convection, investigators aim to take advantage of the weightlessness of space. Following the flight, the principal investigator analyzes the crystal's structure and determines the pressure environment that affords the best growth conditions. View was taken in the International Microgravity Laboratory 1 (IML-1) module located in the payload bay (PLB) of Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, and connected to the crew compartment via a spacelab (SL) tunnel.

  5. Walker Branch Throughfall Displacement Experiment Data Report: Site Characterization, System Performance, Weather, Species Composition, and Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, P.J.

    2001-09-04

    This numeric data package provides data sets, and accompanying documentation, on site characterization, system performance, weather, species composition, and growth for the Throughfall Displacement Experiment, which was established in the Walker Branch Watershed of East Tennessee to provide data on the responses of forests to altered precipitation regimes. The specific data sets include soil water content and potential, coarse fraction of the soil profile, litter layer temperature, soil temperature, monthly weather, daily weather, hourly weather, species composition of trees and saplings, mature tree and sapling annual growth, and relative leaf area index. Fortran and SAS{trademark} access codes are provided to read the ASCII data files. The data files and this documentation are available without charge on a variety of media and via the Internet from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC).

  6. SHOCK INITIATION EXPERIMENTS ON THE TATB BASED EXPLOSIVE RX-03-GO WITH IGNITION AND GROWTH MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Vandersall, K S; Garcia, F; Tarver, C M

    2009-06-23

    Shock initiation experiments on the TATB based explosive RX-03-GO (92.5% TATB, 7.5% Cytop A by weight) were performed to obtain in-situ pressure gauge data, characterize the run-distance-to-detonation behavior, and calculate Ignition and Growth modeling parameters. A 101 mm diameter propellant driven gas gun was utilized to initiate the explosive sample with manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge packages placed between sample slices. The RX-03-GO formulation utilized is similar to that of LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% Kel-f by weight) with the notable differences of a new binder material and TATB that has been dissolved and recrystallized in order to improve the purity and morphology. The shock sensitivity will be compared with that of prior data on LX-17 and other TATB formulations. Ignition and Growth modeling parameters were obtained with a reasonable fit to the experimental data.

  7. Growth experiment of organic metal crystal in low gravity (M-21)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anzai, Hiroyuki

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment is to grow large, high-quality single crystals of the organic metal (TMTTF-TCNQ) by the diffusion method without thermal fluctuation due to convection and gravitational sedimentation, and to evaluate the difference in properties between such crystals grown in low gravity and the ones obtained on Earth. The expected results may fix several physical properties of TMTTF-TCNQ, lead to the discovery of new phenomena, and enable us to analyze diffusion processes in a precise way. The result will contribute to the development of research on organic metals and, generally, on crystal growth.

  8. Phototropism experiments in microgravity-the Seedling Growth project in the EMCS on the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, John; Edelmann, Richard; Herranz, Raul; Medina, Francisco Javier; Millar, Katherine

    The microgravity environment aboard orbiting spacecraft has provided a unique laboratory to explore important topics in basic plant biology. Our group has utilized the European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS) aboard the International Space Station (ISS) to study plant growth, development, tropisms, and gene expression in a series of spaceflight experiments. The most current project performed on the ISS was termed Seeding Growth-1 (SG-1) which builds on the previous TROPI (for tropisms) experiments. TROPI-1 was the first EMCS experiment, and we discovered a novel red-light-based phototropism in hypocotyls of seedlings grown in microgravity (Millar et al. 2010). In TROPI-2, our experiments were extended to reduced gravity levels and found that 0.1-0.3 g can attenuate the red-light response (Kiss et al. 2012). In addition, we performed gene profiling studies and noted that approximately 280 genes that were differentially regulated at least two-fold in the space samples compared to the ground controls (Correll et al. 2013). Major technical and operational changes in SG-1 (launched in March 2013) compared to the TROPI experiments include: improvements in lighting conditions within the EMCS to optimize the environment for phototropism studies and the use of infrared illumination to provide high-quality images of the seedlings. In SG-1, the red-light-based phototropism in roots and hypocotyls of seedlings that was noted in TROPI-2 was confirmed and now can be more precisely characterized based on the improvements in procedures. As we move forward, the SG-2 experiments (to be launched in 2014), in addition to a continued focus on phototropism, will consider the cell cycle as well as the growth and proliferation of plant cells in microgravity (Matía et al. 2010). Furthermore, the lessons learned from sequential experiments from TROPI-1 to TROPI-2 to SG-1 can provide insights to other researchers developing space experiments in plant biology. References: Correll M.J., T

  9. Plant Growth During the Greenhouse II Experiment on the MIR Orbital Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salisbury, F. B.; Campbell, W. F.; Carman, J. G.; Bingham, G. E.; Bubenheim, D. L.; Yendler, B.; Sytchev, V.; Levinskikh, M. A.; Ivanova, I.; Chernova, L.; Podolsky, I.

    2002-01-01

    We carried out three experiments with Super Dwarf wheat in the Bulgarian/Russian growth chamber Svet (0.1 sq m growing area) on the Space Station Mir. This paper mostly describes the first of these NASA-supported trials, began on Aug. 13, 1995. Plants were sampled five times and harvested on Nov. 9 after 90 days. Equipment failures led to low irradiance (three, then four of six lamp sets failed), instances of high temperatures (ca. 37 C), and sometimes excessive-substrate moisture. Although plants grew for the 90 days, no wheat heads were produced. Considering the low light levels, plants were surprisingly green, but of course biomass production was low. Plants were highly disoriented (low light, mirror walls?). Fixed and dried samples and the root module were returned on the US Shuttle Atlantis on Nov. 20, 1995. Samples of the substrate, a nutrient-charged zeolite called Balkanine, were taken from the root module, carefully examined for roots, weighed, dried, and reweighed. The Svet control unit and the light bank were shipped to Moscow. An experiment validation test (EVT) of plant growth and experiment procedures, carried out in Moscow, was highly successful. Equipment built in Utah to measure CO2, H2O vapor, irradiance, air and leaf (IR) temperature, O2, pressure, and substrate moisture worked well in the EVT and in space. After this manuscript was first prepared, plants were grown in Mir with a new light bank and controller for 123 days in late 1996 and 39 days in 1996/1997. Plants grew exceptionally well with higher biomass production than in any previous space experiment, but the ca. 280 wheat heads that were produced in 1996 contained no seeds. Ethylene in the cabin atmosphere was responsible.

  10. Growth and Structure of Metallic Barrier Layer and Interconnect Films I: Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, F.H.; Gilmer, G.H.; O'Sullivan, P.L.; Sapjeta, J.; Torre, J.D.; Windt, D.L.

    1999-04-05

    We present experimented results directed at understanding the growth and structure of metallic barrier layer and interconnect films. Numerical simulation results associated with this experimental work are presented in an accompanying paper in these proceedings. Here, thin films of Al, Ti, Cu and Ta have been grown by magnetron sputtering onto oxidized Si substrates. Using a specially-constructed substrate holder, the orientation of the substrate with respect to the growth direction was varied from horizontal to vertical. Films were grown at both low and high argon pressure; in the case of Ta, the cathode power was varied as well. The film structure and in particular the surface roughness was measured by X-ray reflectance and also by atomic force microscopy. We find that the surface roughness increases markedly with orientation angle in the case of Ta and Cu films, and in Ti films grown at high argon pressure. At low pressure, however, the Ti film surface roughness remains constant for all substrate orientations. No variation in roughness with either orientation angle or argon pressure was observed in the Al films. These results suggest that, under certain circumstances, shadowing effects and/or grain orientation (i.e., texture) competition during growth can give rise to lower density, more porous (and thus more rough) films, particularly at large orientation angles, as on sidewalls in sub-micron trenches.

  11. Successful Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) Proves Current Theories of Dendritic Solidification are Flawed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The scientific objective of the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) is to test fundamental assumptions about dendritic solidification of molten materials. "Dendrites"-- from the ancient Greek word for tree--are tiny branching structures that form inside molten metal alloys when they solidify during manufacturing. The size, shape, and orientation of the dendrites have a major effect on the strength, ductility (ability to be molded or shaped), and usefulness of an alloy. Nearly all of the cast metal alloys used in everyday products (such as automobiles and airplanes) are composed of thousands to millions of tiny dendrites. Gravity, present on Earth, causes convection currents in molten alloys that disturb dendritic solidification and make its precise study impossible. In space, gravity is negated by the orbiting of the space shuttle. Consequently, IDGE (which was conducted on the space shuttle) gathered the first precise data regarding undisturbed dendritic solidification. IDGE is a microgravity materials science experiment that uses an apparatus which was designed, built, tested, and operated by people from the NASA Lewis Research Center. This experiment was conceived by the principal investigator, Professor Martin E. Glicksman, from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York. The experiment was a team effort of Lewis civil servants, contractors from Aerospace Design & Fabrication Inc. (ADF), and personnel at Rensselaer.

  12. Large scale statistics for computational verification of grain growth simulations with experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Demirel, M. C.; Kuprat, A. P.; George, D. C.; Straub, G. K.; Misra, A.; Alexander, K. B.; Rollett, A. D.

    2002-01-01

    It is known that by controlling microstructural development, desirable properties of materials can be achieved. The main objective of our research is to understand and control interface dominated material properties, and finally, to verify experimental results with computer simulations. We have previously showed a strong similarity between small-scale grain growth experiments and anisotropic three-dimensional simulations obtained from the Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD) measurements. Using the same technique, we obtained 5170-grain data from an Aluminum-film (120 {micro}m thick) with a columnar grain structure. Experimentally obtained starting microstructure and grain boundary properties are input for the three-dimensional grain growth simulation. In the computational model, minimization of the interface energy is the driving force for the grain boundary motion. The computed evolved microstructure is compared with the final experimental microstructure, after annealing at 550 C. Characterization of the structures and properties of grain boundary networks (GBN) to produce desirable microstructures is one of the fundamental problems in interface science. There is an ongoing research for the development of new experimental and analytical techniques in order to obtain and synthesize information related to GBN. The grain boundary energy and mobility data were characterized by Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD) technique and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) observations (i.e., for ceramic MgO and for the metal Al). Grain boundary energies are extracted from triple junction (TJ) geometry considering the local equilibrium condition at TJ's. Relative boundary mobilities were also extracted from TJ's through a statistical/multiscale analysis. Additionally, there are recent theoretical developments of grain boundary evolution in microstructures. In this paper, a new technique for three-dimensional grain growth simulations was used to simulate interface migration

  13. Plant growth during the Greenhouse II experiment on the Mir orbital station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salisbury, F. B.; Campbell, W. F.; Carman, J. G.; Bingham, G. E.; Bubenheim, D. L.; Yendler, B.; Sytchev, V.; Levinskikh, M. A.; Ivanova, I.; Chernova, L.; Podolsky, I.

    2003-01-01

    We carried out three experiments with Super Dwarf wheat in the Bulgarian/Russian growth chamber Svet (0.1 m2 growing area) on the Space Station Mir. This paper mostly describes the first of these NASA-supported trials, began on Aug. 13, 1995. Plants were sampled five times and harvested on Nov. 9 after 90 days. Equipment failures led to low irradiance (3, then 4 of 6 lamp sets failed), instances of high temperatures (ca. 37 degrees C), and sometimes excessive substrate moisture. Although plants grew for the 90 d, no wheat heads were produced. Considering the low light levels, plants were surprisingly green, but of course biomass production was low. Plants were highly disoriented (low light, mirror walls?). Fixed and dried samples and the root module were returned on the U.S. Shuttle Atlantis on Nov. 20, 1995. Samples of the substrate, a nutrient-charged zeolite called Balkanine, were taken from the root module, carefully examined for roots, weighed, dried, and reweighed. The Svet control unit and the light bank were shipped to Moscow. An experiment validation test (EVT) of plant growth and experimental procedures, carried out in Moscow, was highly successful. Equipment built in Utah to measure CO2, H2O vapor, irradiance, air and leaf (IR) temperature, O2, pressure, and substrate moisture worked well in the EVT and in space. After this manuscript was first prepared, plants were grown in Mir with a new light bank and controller for 123 d in late 1996 and 39 days in 1996/1997. Plants grew exceptionally well with higher biomass production than in any previous space experiment, but the ca. 280 wheat heads that were produced in 1996 contained no seeds. Ethylene in the cabin atmosphere was responsible. c2002 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd on behalf of COSPAR.

  14. Plant growth during the greenhouse II experiment on the Mir orbital station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salisbury, F. B.; Campbell, W. F.; Carman, J. G.; Bingham, G. E.; Bubenheim, D. L.; Yendler, B.; Sytchev, V.; Levinskikh, M. A.; Ivanova, I.; Chernova, L.; Podolsky, I.

    We carried out three experiments with Super Dwarf wheat in the Bulgarian/Russian growth chamber Svet (0.1 m2 growing area) on the Space Station Mir. This paper mostly describes the first of these NASA-supported trials, began on Aug. 13, 1995. Plants were sampled five times and harvested on Nov. 9 after 90 days. Equipment failures led to low irradiance (3, then 4 of 6 lamp sets failed), instances of high temperatures (ca. 37 °C), and sometimes excessive substrate moisture. Although plants grew for the 90 d, no wheat heads were produced. Considering the low light levels, plants were surprisingly green, but of course biomass production was low. Plants were highly disoriented (low light, mirror walls?). Fixed and dried samples and the root module were returned on the U.S. Shuttle Atlantis on Nov. 20, 1995. Samples of the substrate, a nutrient-charged zeolite called Balkanine, were taken from the root module, carefully examined for roots, weighed, dried, and reweighed. The Svet control unit and the light bank were shipped to Moscow. An experiment validation test (EVT) of plant growth and experimental procedures, carried out in Moscow, was highly successful. Equipment built in Utah to measure CO2, H2O vapor, irradiance, air and leaf (IR) temperature, O2, pressure, and substrate moisture worked well in the EVT and in space. After this manuscript was first prepared, plants were grown in Mir with a new light bank and controller for 123 d in late 1996 and 39 days in 1996/1997. Plants grew exceptionally well with higher biomass production than in any previous space experiment, but the ca. 280 wheat heads that were produced in 1996 contained no seeds. Ethylene in the cabin atmosphere was responsible.

  15. Multiscale study of bacterial growth: Experiments and model to understand the impact of gas exchange on global growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalanne-Aulet, David; Piacentini, Adalberto; Guillot, Pierre; Marchal, Philippe; Moreau, Gilles; Colin, Annie

    2015-11-01

    Using a millifluidics and macroscale setup, we study quantitatively the impact of gas exchange on bacterial growth. In millifluidic environments, the permeability of the incubator materials allows an unlimited oxygen supply by diffusion. Moreover, the efficiency of diffusion at small scales makes the supply instantaneous in comparison with the cell division time. In hermetic closed vials, the amount of available oxygen is low. The growth curve has the same trend but is quantitatively different from the millifluidic situation. The analysis of all the data allows us to write a quantitative modeling enabling us to capture the entire growth process.

  16. Design of Plant Gas Exchange Experiments in a Variable Pressure Growth Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corey, Kenneth A.

    1996-01-01

    Sustainable human presence in extreme environments such as lunar and martian bases will require bioregenerative components to human life support systems where plants are used for generation of oxygen, food, and water. Reduced atmospheric pressures will be used to minimize mass and engineering requirements. Few studies have assessed the metabolic and developmental responses of plants to reduced pressure and varied oxygen atmospheres. The first tests of hypobaric pressures on plant gas exchange and biomass production at the Johnson Space Center will be initiated in January 1996 in the Variable Pressure Growth Chamber (VPGC), a large, closed plant growth chamber rated for 10.2 psi. Experiments were designed and protocols detailed for two complete growouts each of lettuce and wheat to generate a general database for human life support requirements and to answer questions about plant growth processes in reduced pressure and varied oxygen environments. The central objective of crop growth studies in the VPGC is to determine the influence of reduced pressure and reduced oxygen on the rates of photosynthesis, dark respiration, evapotranspiration and biomass production of lettuce and wheat. Due to the constraint of one experimental unit, internal controls, called pressure transients, will be used to evaluate rates of CO2 uptake, O2 evolution, and H2O generation. Pressure transients will give interpretive power to the results of repeated growouts at both reduced and ambient pressures. Other experiments involve the generation of response functions to partial pressures of O2 and CO2 and to light intensity. Protocol for determining and calculating rates of gas exchange have been detailed. In order to build these databases and implement the necessary treatment combinations in short time periods, specific requirements for gas injections and removals have been defined. A set of system capability checks will include determination of leakage rates conducted prior to the actual crop

  17. Biofilm supported increase of chemical weathering and decrease of chemical denudation in pine growth experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balogh, Z.; Keller, C.; Gill, R. A.

    2006-12-01

    Vascular plants and associated microbial communities produced biofilm coatings increase weathering by extending contact periods of minerals with low pH liquids. We performed an experiment to isolate the effects of ectomycorrhiza-forming fungi and ectomycorrhiza- helper bacteria on chemical weathering and chemical denudation (i.e. chemical erosion), and their effects on these fluxes in association with red pine as a host. The study was conducted in a growth chamber using sandy growth medium in replicated flow-through columns. Biotite and anorthite supplied Ca, Mg and K. Concentrations of these cations were measured in input and output solutions, in tree biomass and on exchangeable cation sites of the growth medium; then weathering and denudation fluxes were estimated by mass-balance. In addition, mineral surface changes, biofilm cover and microbial attachment to surfaces were investigated with scanning electron microscopy. The column experiment demonstrated that both bacteria and fungi had a large weathering potential for Ca- bearing minerals, but the microbial communities were not able to regulate denudation losses without a vascular host. Chemical weathering and denudation were about equal in each microbe-only treatment. By the second 6 months of the experiment treatment effects became significant for the seedling systems (p<0.005). The ectomycorrhizal treatments produced the greatest weathering and least denudation, but non- ectomycorrhizal seedlings lowered denudation as well. The differences between the fluxes were significant in both ectomycorrhizal and non-ectomycorrhizal treatments, but the ectomycorrhizal treatment difference was larger, while abiotic weathering was less and equaled the abiotic denudation flux. The ability to retard denudation in both ectomycorrhizal and non-ectomycorrhizal treatment was linked to biofilm formation on mineral surfaces. An ectomycorrhizal hyphal network, as part of the biofilm or covered by the biofilm, was apparently able

  18. Growth and phase transformations: Insights from hydrothermal coarsening experiements using nanocrystalline titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penn, Rona Lee

    . In addition to decreasing attachment frequency, addition of mono- and di-carboxylic acids are seen to inhibit anatase single crystal growth along (001), resulting in morphology modification. Finally, room temperature adsorption experiments demonstrate a size dependence for surface-area-normalized adsorption of organic acids onto nanocrystalline titania. For example, the equilibrium constant for adsorption of adipic acid, a dicarboxylic organic acid, onto nanocrystalline titania (5-6 nm) in comparison to hydrothermally coarsened titania (16-17 nm) increases by a factor of 70.

  19. Grief and Personal Growth Experience of Spouses and Adult-Child Caregivers of Individuals with Alzheimer's Disease and Related Dementias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ott, Carol H.; Sanders, Sara; Kelber, Sheryl T.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the grief and personal growth experience of spouses and adult children of individuals with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias and the factors contributing to these experiences. Design and Methods: We used a modification of the Marwit-Meuser-Sanders Caregiver Grief model to examine the…

  20. Experiment requirements and implementation plan (Erip) for semiconductor materials growth in low-G environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouch, R. K.; Fripp, A. L.; Debnam, W. J.; Clark, I. O.

    1983-01-01

    The MEA-2 A facility was used to test the effect of the low gravity environment on suppressing convective mixing in the growth of Pb(1-x)Sn(x)Te crystals. The need to eliminate convection, the furnace characteristics and operation that will be required for successful experimental implementation, and to the level that is presently known, the measured physical properties of the Pb(1-x)Sn(x)Te system were discussed. In addition, a brief background of the present and potential utilization of Pb(1-x)Sn(x)Te is given. Additional experiments are anticipated in future MEA-A, improved MEA and other dedicated materials processing in space flight apparatus.

  1. Crystal Growth Furnace System Configuration and Planned Experiments on the Second United States Microgravity Laboratory Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivas, R.; Hambright, G.; Ainsworth, M.; Fiske, M.; Schaefer, D.

    1995-01-01

    The Crystal Growth Furnace (CGF) is currently undergoing modifications and refurbishment and is currently undergoing modifications and refurbishment and is manifested to refly on the Second United States Microgravity Laboratory (USML-2) mission scheduled for launch in September 1995. The CGF was developed for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) under the Microgravity Science and Applications Division (MSAD) programs at NASA Headquarters. The refurbishment and reflight program is being managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. Funding and program support for the CGF project is provided to MSFC by the office of Life and Microgravity Sciences and Applications at NASA Headquarters. This paper presents an overview of the CGF system configuration for the USML-2 mission, and provides a brief description of the planned on-orbit experiment operation.

  2. Ignition and Growth Reactive Flow Modeling of Recent HMX/TATB Detonation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarver, Craig

    2015-06-01

    Ignition and Growth model parameters for detonating PBX 9501 (95%HMX, 2.5 %Estane, 2.5%BDNPAF) and PBX 9502 (95%TATB, 5%Kel-F800) are used to simulate two experiments in which detonating HMX-based PBX's accelerate slower detonating TATB PBX's. The measured HMX and TATB detonation velocities, the angles produced in the detonating TATB charges by the leading HMX detonation waves, the arrival times of the complex detonation wave front, and the PDV records measured at several positions along the interfaces between the two explosives and LiF windows are accurately calculated. This work was performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  3. Short Shock Pulse Duration Experiments Plus Ignition and Growth Modeling on Composition B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Chadd; Tarver, Craig

    2013-06-01

    Short pulse duration shock initiation experiments were performed on 1.71 g/cm3 Composition B using electrically driven kapton flyer plates. Critical impact velocities for initiation at several flyer plate thicknesses and diameters were determined. For 2 mm diameter flyers, the critical velocities for shock initiation ranged from 4.06 to 4.72 km/s for flyer thicknesses ranging from 127 to 50.8 microns. Since the failure diameter of Composition B is approximately 4 mm, the kapton flyers imparted sufficient energy to overcome the effects of both rear and size rarefaction wave energy loses and cause detonation. The Ignition and Growth reactive flow model parameters for Composition B were modified to include unreacted Hugoniot, detonation reaction zone, and overdriven detonation experimental data and then applied to the kapton flyer data with good results. This work was performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.: Explosive, Composition B, shock to detonation transition, Ignition and Growth: 82.33.Vx, 82.40.Fp.

  4. The experience of acculturative stress-related growth from immigrants' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junhyoung; Kim, Hakjun

    2013-01-01

    Previous literature has mainly focused on the positive effects of stress associated with disability and illness, called stress-related growth. Little research has explored positive changes as a result of acculturative stress among a group of immigrants. In particular, older Asian immigrants may experience a high level of stress related to acculturation because they may face more challenges to adapt to and navigate a new culture. This study was designed to capture the characteristics of stress-related growth associated with acculturative stress. Using in-depth interviews among 13 older Korean immigrants, three main themes associated with the stress-coping strategies were identified: (a) the development of mental toughness, (b) engagement in meaningful activities, and (c) promotion of cultural understanding. These themes indicate that by following the stressful acculturation process, participants developed a better understanding of the new culture, engaged in various leisure activities, and enhanced mental strength. This finding provides information on how immigrants deal with acculturative stress and have positive psychological changes, which results in a sense of happiness and psychological well-being. PMID:24070225

  5. Shock Initiation Experiments with Ignition and Growth Modeling on Low Density Composition B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandersall, Kevin S.; Garcia, Frank; Tarver, Craig M.

    2015-06-01

    Shock initiation experiments on low density (~1.2 and ~1.5 g/cm3) Composition B were performed to obtain in-situ pressure gauge data, characterize the run-distance-to-detonation behavior, and provide a basis for Ignition and Growth reactive flow modeling. A 101 mm diameter gas gun was utilized to initiate the explosive charges with manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge packages placed between packed layers (~1.2 g/cm3) confined in Teflon rings or sample disks pressed to low density (~1.5 g/cm3) . The shock sensitivity was found to increase with decreasing density as expected. Ignition and Growth model parameters were derived that yielded reasonable agreement with the experimental data at both initial densities. The shock sensitivity at the tested densities will be compared to prior work published as near full density material. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. This work was funded in part by the Joint DoD-DOE Munitions Program.

  6. Growth of sinuous waves on thin liquid sheets: Comparison of predictions with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, Nayanika; Tirumkudulu, Mahesh S.

    2016-05-01

    A recent theory [M. S. Tirumkudulu and M. Paramati, "Stability of a moving radial liquid sheet: Time dependent equations," Phys. Fluids 25(10), 102-107 (2013)] has shown that a radially expanding liquid sheet is unstable to sinuous wave disturbances due to the thinning of the liquid sheet while ignoring the presence of a surrounding gas phase. In this work, we compare the predictions of the aforementioned theory with the measurements of Crapper et al. ["Large amplitude Kelvin-Helmholtz waves on thin liquid sheets," Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 342(1629), 209-224 (1975)] who measured the amplitude and spatial growth rates of sinuous waves induced in radially expanding liquid sheets produced by fan spray nozzles. The predicted growth rates are remarkably close to the measurements over a range of forcing frequencies and amplitudes even though the experiments were performed in the presence of a surrounding gas phase. This is in contrast to large discrepancies observed by Crapper et al. when the same measurements were compared with the predictions of a spatial stability analysis for a moving liquid sheet that accounts for the inertia of the surrounding gas phase but ignores the thickness variation of the sheet.

  7. The experience of acculturative stress-related growth from immigrants’ perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junhyoung; Kim, Hakjun

    2013-01-01

    Previous literature has mainly focused on the positive effects of stress associated with disability and illness, called stress-related growth. Little research has explored positive changes as a result of acculturative stress among a group of immigrants. In particular, older Asian immigrants may experience a high level of stress related to acculturation because they may face more challenges to adapt to and navigate a new culture. This study was designed to capture the characteristics of stress-related growth associated with acculturative stress. Using in-depth interviews among 13 older Korean immigrants, three main themes associated with the stress-coping strategies were identified: (a) the development of mental toughness, (b) engagement in meaningful activities, and (c) promotion of cultural understanding. These themes indicate that by following the stressful acculturation process, participants developed a better understanding of the new culture, engaged in various leisure activities, and enhanced mental strength. This finding provides information on how immigrants deal with acculturative stress and have positive psychological changes, which results in a sense of happiness and psychological well-being. PMID:24070225

  8. Visualization experiments of biofilm growth in the presence of carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manariotis, I. D.; Sygouni, V.; Chrysikopoulos, C. V.

    2013-12-01

    Capturing and storing CO2 emissions in properly selected deep geologic formations is considered a promising solution for the reduction of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, CO2 leakage may potentially occur from the storage geologic formation. Partition of CO2 in water may result in pH decrease. This change in aqueous phase may contribute to solubilization of undesired heavy metals from the solid matrix. In this work we investigate experimentally the impact of CO2 to shallow groundwater systems. A series of visualization experiments in a glass-etched micromodel were performed in order to estimate the effect of CO2 on biofilm formation. Biofilms were developed using Pseudomonas putida. Nutrient saturated with CO2 was injected in the micromodel through an inlet port, and fluid samples were collected at the outlet port. The transient growth of the biofilm was monitored by taking high-resolution digital photographs at various times, and the effect of CO2 on biofilm growth was estimated.

  9. Optimal Design for Informative Protocols in Xenograft Tumor Growth Inhibition Experiments in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lestini, Giulia; Mentré, France; Magni, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    Tumor growth inhibition (TGI) models are increasingly used during preclinical drug development in oncology for the in vivo evaluation of antitumor effect. Tumor sizes are measured in xenografted mice, often only during and shortly after treatment, thus preventing correct identification of some TGI model parameters. Our aims were (i) to evaluate the importance of including measurements during tumor regrowth and (ii) to investigate the proportions of mice included in each arm. For these purposes, optimal design theory based on the Fisher information matrix implemented in PFIM4.0 was applied. Published xenograft experiments, involving different drugs, schedules, and cell lines, were used to help optimize experimental settings and parameters using the Simeoni TGI model. For each experiment, a two-arm design, i.e., control versus treatment, was optimized with or without the constraint of not sampling during tumor regrowth, i.e., "short" and "long" studies, respectively. In long studies, measurements could be taken up to 6 g of tumor weight, whereas in short studies the experiment was stopped 3 days after the end of treatment. Predicted relative standard errors were smaller in long studies than in corresponding short studies. Some optimal measurement times were located in the regrowth phase, highlighting the importance of continuing the experiment after the end of treatment. In the four-arm designs, the results showed that the proportions of control and treated mice can differ. To conclude, making measurements during tumor regrowth should become a general rule for informative preclinical studies in oncology, especially when a delayed drug effect is suspected. PMID:27306546

  10. Growth, diffusion, and loss of subsurface ice on Mars : experiments and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Troy Lee

    Innovative experiments and models are used to explore the behavior of subsurface ice on Mars. Through communication with the atmosphere, the porous regolith of Mars hosts significant quantities of ice which grow, evolve, and are lost in response to climate changes. As a controlling property of rate of ice response to a changing equilibrium state, the diffusive properties of several regolith simulants are measured in Mars-like environments. Ice loss through a variety of particle sizes, particle size distributions, packing densities, and salt contents are examined and reveal that many unconsolidated media exhibit diffusion coefficients in the range of 2-6 cm^2 s^-1, indicating a response time on the order of several thousand years for ice within the upper meter of the regolith. Only high salt contents or mechanically packed micron-sized dust are observed to exhibit substantially lower coefficients, suggesting that strong diffusive barriers may not form as readily as previously invoked. The growth of ice directly from vapor under diffusive control is reproduced for Mars-like environmental conditions in the absence of the liquid phase. As predicted, ice deposits preferentially at grain contact points and the ice table interface is sharp and strongly controlled by near-surface temperature perturbations. The quantity of ice deposited as a function of depth and time accords well with new numerical models of vapor diffusion and ice deposition, though constriction of the pore space reduces the diffusion coefficient faster than originally expected. A numerical model incorporating a fast solution to subsurface ice growth predicts near-surface ice contents for the last 300,000 years of Mars' history at high latitude locations, including specifically the Phoenix landing site. Several parameterizations of constriction developed from laboratory observations of ice growth are employed and compared. The thickness of the ice-free layer above the ice table has the strongest effect on

  11. Factors involved in growth plasticity of cockles Cerastoderma edule (L.), identified by field survey and transplant experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Montaudouin, Xavier

    1996-12-01

    In Arcachon Bay, a macrotidal coastal lagoon in southwest France, growth rates of cockles Cerastoderma edule (L.) differ greatly between locations. Sampling of populations at different tidal levels showed that the mean shell length was significantly and positively correlated with immersion time, whereas no correlation was found with population density and microphytobenthos biomass. Transplants of cockles between two intertidal sites were used to examine the relative importance of habitat and site of origin for growth rate and condition index. Artifacts due to manipulation were assessed, i.e. the impact of enclosures on growth, conditon index and mortality. During a 5-mo reciprocal transplant experiment, growth rates of the transplanted cockles and the cockles already present were similar, whereas the sites of origin did not affect growth rate. Condition index, however, displayed significant differences in relation to both transplant and origin sites. During a further 6-mo experiment in which cockles were transplanted from one site to four new sites, growth was mainly influenced by tidal level. These results indicate that net growth started when cockles were immersed 30% of the time. It is concluded that, on the scale of Arcachon Bay (156 km 2), differences in growth and condition between cockle populations are largely phenotypic. Tidal level ( i.e. food supply and emersion stress) accounts for most of these differences, but the existence of genetically or physiologically different populations cannot be excluded.

  12. Brain composition in Heliconius butterflies, posteclosion growth and experience-dependent neuropil plasticity.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Stephen H; Merrill, Richard M; Ott, Swidbert R

    2016-06-15

    Behavioral and sensory adaptations are often reflected in the differential expansion of brain components. These volumetric differences represent changes in cell number, size, and/or connectivity, which may denote changes in the functional and evolutionary relationships between different brain regions, and between brain composition and behavioral ecology. Here we describe the brain composition of two species of Heliconius butterflies, a long-standing study system for investigating ecological adaptation and speciation. We confirm a previous report of a striking volumetric expansion of the mushroom body, and explore patterns of differential posteclosion and experience-dependent plasticity between different brain regions. This analysis uncovers age- and experience-dependent posteclosion mushroom body growth comparable to that in foraging Hymenoptera, but also identifies plasticity in several other neuropils. An interspecific analysis indicates that Heliconius display a remarkably large investment in mushroom bodies for a lepidopteran, and indeed rank highly compared to other insects. Our analyses lay the foundation for future comparative and experimental analyses that will establish Heliconius as a valuable case study in evolutionary neurobiology. PMID:26918905

  13. Ground Based Experiments in Support of Microgravity Research Results-Vapor Growth of Organic Nonlinear Optical Thin Film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zugrav, M. Ittu; Carswell, William E.; Haulenbeek, Glen B.; Wessling, Francis C.

    2001-01-01

    This work is specifically focused on explaining previous results obtained for the crystal growth of an organic material in a reduced gravity environment. On STS-59, in April 1994, two experiments were conducted with N,N-dimethyl-p-(2,2-dicyanovinyl) aniline (DCVA), a promising nonlinear optical (NLO) material. The space experiments were set to reproduce laboratory experiments that yielded small, bulk crystals of DCVA. The results of the flight experiment, however, were surprising. Rather than producing a bulk single crystal, the result was the production of two high quality, single crystalline thin films. This result was even more intriguing when it is considered that thin films are more desirable for NLO applications than are bulk single crystals. Repeated attempts on the ground to reproduce these results were fruitless. A second set of flight experiments was conducted on STS-69 in September 1995. This time eight DCVA experiments were flown, with each of seven experiments containing a slight change from the first reference experiment. The reference experiment was programmed with growth conditions identical to those of the STS-59 mission. The slight variations in each of the other seven were an attempt to understand what particular parameter was responsible for the preference of thin film growth over bulk crystal growth in microgravity. Once again the results were surprising. In all eight cases thin films were grown again, albeit with varying quality. So now we were faced with a phenomenon that not only takes place in microgravity, but also is very robust, resisting all attempts to force the growth of bulk single crystals.

  14. Plagioclase nucleation and growth kinetics in a hydrous basaltic melt by decompression experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzilli, Fabio; Agostini, C.; Landi, P.; Fortunati, A.; Mancini, L.; Carroll, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    Isothermal single-step decompression experiments (at temperature of 1075 °C and pressure between 5 and 50 MPa) were used to study the crystallization kinetics of plagioclase in hydrous high-K basaltic melts as a function of pressure, effective undercooling (Δ T eff) and time. Single-step decompression causes water exsolution and a consequent increase in the plagioclase liquidus, thus imposing an effective undercooling (∆ T eff), accompanied by increased melt viscosity. Here, we show that the decompression process acts directly on viscosity and thermodynamic energy barriers (such as interfacial-free energy), controlling the nucleation process and favoring the formation of homogeneous nuclei also at high pressure (low effective undercoolings). In fact, this study shows that similar crystal number densities ( N a) can be obtained both at low and high pressure (between 5 and 50 MPa), whereas crystal growth processes are favored at low pressures (5-10 MPa). The main evidence of this study is that the crystallization of plagioclase in decompressed high-K basalts is more rapid than that in rhyolitic melts on similar timescales. The onset of the crystallization process during experiments was characterized by an initial nucleation event within the first hour of the experiment, which produced the largest amount of plagioclase. This nucleation event, at short experimental duration, can produce a dramatic change in crystal number density ( N a) and crystal fraction ( ϕ), triggering a significant textural evolution in only 1 h. In natural systems, this may affect the magma rheology and eruptive dynamics on very short time scales.

  15. Growth and Morphology of Supercritical Fluids, a Fluid Physics Experiment Conducted on Mir, Complete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, R. Allen

    2001-01-01

    The Growth and Morphology of Supercritical Fluids (GMSF) is an international experiment facilitated by the NASA Glenn Research Center and under the guidance of U.S. principal investor Professor Hegseth of the University of New Orleans and three French coinvestigators: Daniel Beysens, Yves Garrabos, and Carole Chabot. The GMSF experiments were concluded in early 1999 on the Russian space station Mir. The experiments spanned the three science themes of near-critical phase separation rates, interface dynamics in near-critical boiling, and measurement of the spectrum of density fluctuation length scales very close to the critical point. The fluids used were pure CO2 or SF6. Three of the five thermostats used could adjust the sample volume with the scheduled crew time. Such a volume adjustment enabled variable sample densities around the critical density as well as pressure steps (as distinct from the usual temperature steps) applied to the sample. The French-built ALICE II facility was used for these experiments. It allows tightly thermostated (left photograph) samples (right photograph) to be controlled and viewed/measured. Its diagnostics include interferometry, shadowgraph, high-speed pressure measurements, and microscopy. Data were logged on DAT tapes, and PCMCIA cards and were returned to Earth only after the mission was over. The ground-breaking near critical boiling experiment has yielded the most results with a paper published in Physical Review Letters (ref. 1). The boiling work also received press in Science Magazine (ref. 2). This work showed that, in very compressible near-critical two-phase pure fluids, a vapor bubble was induced to temporarily overheat during a rapid heating of the sample wall. The temperature rise in the vapor was 23-percent higher than the rise in the driving container wall. The effect is due to adiabatic compression of the vapor bubble by the rapid expansion of fluid near the boundary during heatup. Thermal diffusivity is low near the

  16. Origin of diamond and growth inclusions thereof on evidence derived from physicochemical experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvin, Yuriy

    2010-05-01

    The conception of carbonate-silicate parent media for the bulk of mantle-derived diamonds (Litvin, 2007) is compatible with a great body of mineralogical data on substances captured in situ by diamonds from their growth melts. Also, the conception is in excellent agreement with the results of physicochemical experiment based on the criterion of diamonds and their inclusions syngenesis. The criterion reveals the behavior of growth melts under diamond formation. The multi-component diamond-forming media are changeable by contents of major and minor components, but bounded by carbonatite compositions. The generalized composition of the parent media, which fragments are included into natural diamonds, is revealed by the multi-component heterogeneous system MgO - CaO - FeO (Fe, Fe2O3) - MnO - NiO (Ni) - Na2O - K2O - Al2O3 - Cr2O3 (Cr) - TiO2 - ZrO2 - SiO2 - P2O5 - CuS (Cu2S) - FeS (Fe2S) - NiS - KCl - NaCl - SiC - Fe3C - CO2 (CO, CH4) - H2O - C. The principal mineralogical responsibility in diamond genesis appertains to carbon solutions in completely miscible melts of the major carbonate and silicate components (the silicate components belong to both peridotite-pyroxenite and eclogite-grospydite parageneses). The growth melts contain the minor components including admixed soluble components and phases (oxides, phosphates, chlorides, compounds of the C - O - H - N fluid system, etc.) as well as coexisting insoluble immiscible solid and liquid phases (sulfides, metals). On the basis of carbonatite (carbonate-silicate) conception, genetic classification of growth inclusions of minerals, melts and fluids in mantle-derived diamonds has been developed (Litvin, 2009). The classification reveals origin of the inclusions by clearing up their physicochemical links both with the major components of carbonate-silicate growth melts and minor soluble and insoluble components and phases which are contained therein. 1. The major silicate, alumina-silicate and carbonate components are

  17. Crystal Growth Furnace - An overview of the system configuration and planned experiments on the first United States Microgravity Laboratory mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivas, R.; Lee, K. N.; Schaefer, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    Attention is given to the Crystal Growth Furnace (CGF) currently in the Level IV integration cycle at the Kennedy Space Center in preparation for its maiden flight on the first United States Microgravity Laboratory (USML-1) mission to be launched in May 1992. CGF was developed for NASA under the Microgravity Science and Application division programs at NASA Headquarters. An overview of the CGF system and the system configuration for the USML-1 mission are presented, and the planned on-orbit experiments are described. The four important scientific experiments selected from industry and educational institutions for the CGF USML-1 mission will enable a better understanding of the complex phenomena inherent in materials processing that will lead to the ultimate improvement of both processes and materials. Crystal growth by chemical vapor transport has resulted in improved growth conditions with crystal morphology, lower defect densities, and higher growth rates than terrestrially observed.

  18. Impacts of a gape limited Brook Trout, Salvelinus fontinalis, on larval Northwestern salamander, Ambystoma gracile, growth: A field enclosure experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Currens, C.R.; Liss, W.J.; Hoffman, R.L.

    2007-01-01

    The formation of amphibian population structure is directly affected by predation. Although aquatic predators have been shown to have direct negative effects on larval salamanders in laboratory and field experiments, the potential impacts of gape-limited fish on larval salamander growth has been largely underexplored. We designed an enclosure experiment conducted in situ to quantify the effects of gape-limited Brook Trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) on larval Northwestern Salamander (Ambystoma gracile) growth. We specifically tested whether the presence of fish too small to consume larvae had a negative effect on larval growth. The results of this study indicate that the presence of a gape-limited S. fontinalis can have a negative effect on growth of larval A. gracile salamanders. Copyright 2007 Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles.

  19. Growing from experience: an exploratory study of posttraumatic growth in adolescent refugees

    PubMed Central

    Sleijpen, Marieke; Haagen, Joris; Mooren, Trudy; Kleber, Rolf J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to explore perceived posttraumatic growth (PTG) and its associations with potentially traumatic events (PTEs), dispositional optimism, perceived social support, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, and satisfaction with life (SWL) among adolescent refugees and asylum seekers. Method A cross-sectional design was employed including 111 refugees, aged 12–17, that were recruited from asylum seeker centres throughout the Netherlands. Measurements included the revised Posttraumatic Growth Inventory for Children, Children's Impact of Event Scale, Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, The Life Orientation Test, and the Satisfaction with Life Scale. Results Participants reported mean PTG scores (20.2) indicating an average response of some perceived change, while reporting high levels of PTSD symptoms (30.6). PTG and PTSD symptoms were not related with each other (r=0.07, p=0.50). PTG was positively associated with dispositional optimism (r=0.41, p<0.01) and social support (r=0.43, p<0.01). A hierarchical regression analysis demonstrated that dispositional optimism (β=0.33; p<0.05) and social support (β=0.27; p<0.05) positively predicted PTG, explaining 22% of the PTG variance above demographic variables and PTEs. PTG was also positively related with SWL (r=0.37, p<0.01). Conclusions Perceived PTG and PTSD symptoms appear to be independent constructs, which co-occur in adolescent refugees and asylum seekers. The relationship between PTG and mental health remains inconclusive; PTG was positively related to SWL and not associated with PTSD symptoms. Longitudinal research is required to determine causality between PTG and mental health in this refugee population confronted with many traumatic experiences and challenging migration tasks. PMID:26886487

  20. Fe-SAPONITE and Chlorite Growth on Stainless Steel in Hydrothermal Engineered Barrier Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheshire, M. C.; Caporuscio, F. A.; McCarney, M.

    2012-12-01

    The United States recently has initiated the Used Fuel Disposition campaign to evaluate various generic geological repositories for the disposal of high-level, spent nuclear fuel within environments ranging from hard-rock, salt/clay, to deep borehole settings. Previous work describing Engineered Barrier Systems (EBS) for repositories focused on low temperature and pressure conditions. The focus of this experimental work is to characterize the stability and alteration of a bentonite-based EBS with different waste container materials in brine at higher heat loads and pressures. All experiments were run at ~150 bar and 125 to 300 C for ~1 month. Unprocessed bentonite from Colony, Wyoming was used in the experiments as the clay buffer material. The redox conditions for each system were buffered along the magnetite-iron oxygen fugacity univariant curve using Fe3O4 and Feo filings. A K-Na-Ca-Cl-based salt solution was chosen to replicate deep groundwater compositions. The experimental mixtures were 1) salt solution-clay; 2) salt solution -clay-304 stainless steel; and 3) salt solution -clay-316 stainless steel with a water/bentonite ratio of ~9. Mineralogy and aqueous geochemistry of each experiment was evaluated to monitor the reactions that took place. No smectite illitization was observed in these reactions. However, it appears that K-smectite was produced, possibly providing a precursor to illitization. It is unclear whether reaction times were sufficient for bentonite illitization at 212 and 300 C or whether conditions conducive to illite formation were obtained. The more notable clay mineral reactions occurred at the stainless steel surfaces. Authigenic chlorite and Fe-saponite grew with their basal planes near perpendicular to the steel plate, forming a 10 - 40 μm thick 'corrosion' layer. Partial dissolution of the steel plates was the likely iron source for chlorite/saponite formation; however, dissolution of the Feo/Fe3O4 may also have acted as an iron source

  1. Long-term monitoring of growth in the Eastern Elliptio, Elliptio complanata (Bivalvia: Unionidae), in Rhode Island: A transplant experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kesler, D.H.; Newton, T.J.; Green, L.

    2007-01-01

    The lengths of marked specimens of the freshwater mussel, Eastern Elliptio (Elliptio complanata [Lightfoot 1786]), were monitored annually in 3 lakes in Rhode Island, USA, from 1991 to 2005. Mussels growing in Worden Pond showed a change in mean shell length of only 4.3 mm over 14 y, whereas mussel growth in 2 nearby lakes was 3 to 8x greater than growth in Worden Pond over the same time period. L???, the length at which shell growth stops, was significantly different (p < 0.001) among lakes and ranged from 60.5 to 87.4 mm. Transplant experiments revealed that mussels moved to Worden Pond stopped growing, whereas mussels moved from Worden Pond to the 2 other lakes grew at rates similar to the rates observed for resident mussels in the 2 lakes. Standard water-quality measures did not explain the observed growth cessation and lower condition indices of mussels in Worden Pond. Our growth data are consistent with food limitation. The consistent slow growth of E. complanata in Worden Pond, without high mortality, and its ability to increase growth when placed in environments more favorable than Worden Pond, suggests both growth plasticity and longevity in these animals. ?? 2007 by The North American Benthological Society.

  2. Pressure and temperature dependence of growth and morphology of Escherichia coli: experiments and stochastic model.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pradeep; Libchaber, Albert

    2013-08-01

    We have investigated the growth of Escherichia coli, a mesophilic bacterium, as a function of pressure (P) and temperature (T). Escherichia coli can grow and divide in a wide range of pressure (1-400 atm) and temperature (23-40°C). For T > 30°C, the doubling time of E. coli increases exponentially with pressure and exhibits a departure from exponential behavior at pressures between 250 and 400 atm for all the temperatures studied in our experiments. The sharp change in doubling time is followed by a sharp change in phenotypic transition of E. coli at high pressures where bacterial cells switch to an elongating cell type. We propose a model that this phenotypic change in bacteria at high pressures is an irreversible stochastic process, whereas the switching probability to elongating cell type increases with increasing pressure. The model fits well the experimental data. We discuss our experimental results in the light of structural and thus functional changes in proteins and membranes. PMID:23931326

  3. Experiments on Dynamic Overpressure Stabilization of Ablative Richtmyer--Meshkov Growth in ICF Targets on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotchev, O. V.; Goncharov, V. N.; Jaanimagi, P. A.; Knauer, J. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2002-11-01

    Dynamic overpressure sets the growth rate of the ablative Richtmyer--Meshkov (RM) instability and the late-time imprint levels in directly driven ICF targets. It leads to temporal oscillations of the perturbed ablation front, which have been predicted analytically and observed experimentally,(Y. Aglitskiy et al.), Phys. Plasmas 9, 2264 (2002). and in 2-D ORCHID simulations. These predictions were verified on OMEGA by measuring the perturbation amplitudes and frequencies directly with an x-ray framing camera through face-on x-ray radiography. Planar plastic targets with variable thickness (20 to 60 μm) and single-mode (λ = 10 to 30 μm) ripples on the front surface were irradiated with 1.5-ns square UV laser pulses at maximum energy. Results clearly indicate a phase reversal in the evolution of the target areal density perturbations, in good agreement with theory and simulation. Nonlinearity in the evolution of the preimposed mode, resulting in an enriched spectrum, was observed for initial amplitudes previously believed to develop linearly with time. Upcoming experiments with a high-resolution, streaked imager, will allow for the detailed recording of the evolution of the RM instability and the competing stabilization effect. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460.

  4. Accelerated Aging Experiments for Prognostics of Damage Growth in Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxena, Abhinav; Goebel, Kai Frank; Larrosa, Cecilia C.; Janapati, Vishnuvardhan; Roy, Surajit; Chang, Fu-Kuo

    2011-01-01

    Composite structures are gaining importance for use in the aerospace industry. Compared to metallic structures their behavior is less well understood. This lack of understanding may pose constraints on their use. One possible way to deal with some of the risks associated with potential failure is to perform in-situ monitoring to detect precursors of failures. Prognostic algorithms can be used to predict impending failures. They require large amounts of training data to build and tune damage model for making useful predictions. One of the key aspects is to get confirmatory feedback from data as damage progresses. These kinds of data are rarely available from actual systems. The next possible resource to collect such data is an accelerated aging platform. To that end this paper describes a fatigue cycling experiment with the goal to stress carbon-carbon composite coupons with various layups. Piezoelectric disc sensors were used to periodically interrogate the system. Analysis showed distinct differences in the signatures of growing failures between data collected at conditions. Periodic X-radiographs were taken to assess the damage ground truth. Results after signal processing showed clear trends of damage growth that were correlated to damage assessed from the X-ray images.

  5. Growth of Silicon Nanoclusters: Elucidation by gas-phase experiments and DFT calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Horoi, Mihai; Jackson, Koblar A.

    2004-10-01

    Semiconductor nanostructures are of great interest from both fundamental and applied perspectives. They are intriguing scientifically because their bonding and properties deviate strongly from those of their bulk solids and relevant industrially since nanodevices now approach the scale of large clusters. Understanding the behavior of any molecular system starts from ascertaining its structure. So a colossal effort was expended over the last two decades on characterizing semiconductor cluster geometries. As silicon is the most critical semiconductor, that effort largely focused on Si clusters. Structures of small Si clusters were elucidated early on by ab initio calculations, vibrationally resolved spectroscopy, and optical spectroscopies of matrix-isolated species. Progress for larger systems was enabled in late 1990s by an integrated suite of new tools. It includes ion mobility spectrometry, photoelectron spectroscopy, collisional dissociation, and threshold ionization on the side of experiment, and novel molecular optimization algorithms based on evolution paradigm and fast, but accurate semiempirical protocols for energy evaluation on the theory side. Coherent application of these methods has characterized Si clusters up to the region of radical transition from prolate to spherical growth at ~ 25 atoms.

  6. SHOCK INITIATION EXPERIMENTS PLUS IGNITION AND GROWTH MODELING OF DAMAGED LX-04 CHARGES

    SciTech Connect

    Chidester, S K; Garcia, F; Vandersall, K S; Tarver, C M

    2009-06-23

    Shock initiation experiments were performed on mechanically and thermally damaged LX-04 (85% HMX and 15% Viton by weight) to obtain in-situ manganin pressure gauge data and run distances to detonation at various shock pressures. The LX-04 charges were damaged mechanically by applying a compressive load of 600 psi for 20,000 cycles, thus creating many small narrow cracks, or by cutting wedge shaped parts that were then loosely reassembled, thus creating a few large cracks. The thermal damaged LX-04 charges were heated to 190 C for a long enough time for the beta to delta phase transition to occur and then cooled to ambient temperature. Mechanically damaged LX-04 exhibited only slightly increased shock sensitivity, while the thermally damaged LX-04 was much more shock sensitive. The pristine LX-04 Ignition and Growth model, modified only by igniting a larger amount of explosive during shock compression based on the damaged charge density, accurately calculated the increased shock sensitivity of the three damaged charges.

  7. Analogue experiments of salt flow and pillow growth due to basement faulting and differential loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warsitzka, M.; Kley, J.; Kukowski, N.

    2015-01-01

    Salt flow in sedimentary basins is mainly driven by differential loading and can be described by the concept of hydraulic head. A hydraulic head in the salt layer can be imposed by vertically displacing the salt layer (elevation head) or the weight of overburden sediments (pressure head). Basement faulting in salt-bearing extensional basins is widely acknowledged as a potential trigger for hydraulic heads and the growth of salt structures. In this study, scaled analogue experiments were designed to examine the kinematics of salt flow during the early evolution of a salt structure triggered by basement extension. In order to distinguish flow patterns driven by elevation head or by pressure head, we applied a short pulse of basement extension, which was followed by a long-lasting phase of sedimentation. During the experiments viscous silicone putty simulated ductile rock salt, and a PVC-beads/quartz-sand mixture was used to simulate a brittle supra-salt layer. In order to derive 2-D incremental displacement and strain patterns, the analogue experiments were monitored using an optical image correlation system (particle imaging velocimetry). By varying layer thicknesses and extension rates, the influence of these parameters on the kinematics of salt flow were tested. Model results reveal that significant flow can be triggered in the viscous layer by small-offset basement faulting. During basement extension downward flow occurs in the viscous layer above the basement fault tip. In contrast, upward flow takes place during post-extensional sediment accumulation. Flow patterns in the viscous material are characterized by channelized Poiseuille-type flow, which is associated with subsidence in regions of "salt" expulsion and surface uplift in regions of inflation of the viscous material. Inflation of the viscous material eventually leads to the formation of pillow structures adjacent to the basement faults (primary pillows). The subsidence of peripheral sinks adjacent to

  8. Light and Plants. A Series of Experiments Demonstrating Light Effects on Seed Germination, Plant Growth, and Plant Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downs, R. J.; And Others

    A brief summary of the effects of light on plant germination, growth and development, including photoperiodism and pigment formation, introduces 18 experiments and demonstrations which illustrate aspects of these effects. Detailed procedures for each exercise are given, the expected results outlined, and possible sources of difficulty discussed.…

  9. More Ideas for Monitoring Biological Experiments with the BBC Computer: Absorption Spectra, Yeast Growth, Enzyme Reactions and Animal Behaviour.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Openshaw, Peter

    1988-01-01

    Presented are five ideas for A-level biology experiments using a laboratory computer interface. Topics investigated include photosynthesis, yeast growth, animal movements, pulse rates, and oxygen consumption and production by organisms. Includes instructions specific to the BBC computer system. (CW)

  10. Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waag, Andreas

    This chapter is devoted to the growth of ZnO. It starts with various techniques to grow bulk samples and presents in some detail the growth of epitaxial layers by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), and pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The last section is devoted to the growth of nanorods. Some properties of the resulting samples are also presented. If a comparison between GaN and ZnO is made, very often the huge variety of different growth techniques available to fabricate ZnO is said to be an advantage of this material system. Indeed, growth techniques range from low cost wet chemical growth at almost room temperature to high quality MOCVD growth at temperatures above 1, 000∘C. In most cases, there is a very strong tendency of c-axis oriented growth, with a much higher growth rate in c-direction as compared to other crystal directions. This often leads to columnar structures, even at relatively low temperatures. However, it is, in general, not straight forward to fabricate smooth ZnO thin films with flat surfaces. Another advantage of a potential ZnO technology is said to be the possibility to grow thin films homoepitaxially on ZnO substrates. ZnO substrates are mostly fabricated by vapor phase transport (VPT) or hydrothermal growth. These techniques are enabling high volume manufacturing at reasonable cost, at least in principle. The availability of homoepitaxial substrates should be beneficial to the development of ZnO technology and devices and is in contrast to the situation of GaN. However, even though a number of companies are developing ZnO substrates, only recently good quality substrates have been demonstrated. However, these substrates are not yet widely available. Still, the situation concerning ZnO substrates seems to be far from low-cost, high-volume production. The fabrication of dense, single crystal thin films is, in general, surprisingly difficult, even when ZnO is grown on a ZnO substrate. However

  11. Effects of CO2 and nutrient availability on mineral weathering in controlled tree growth experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Erika L.; Walter, Lynn M.; Ku, Timothy C. W.; Kling, George W.; Zak, Donald R.

    2003-06-01

    We sought to determine the effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 on mineral weathering reactions in midlatitude carbonate-bearing forest soils of differing nutrient availability. Increased plant growth and soil respiration under elevated atmospheric CO2 suggest increased rates of carbon cycling, which may affect mineral weathering. A randomized complete block experiment was conducted, where aspen and maple saplings were grown in open top chambers under two levels of atmospheric CO2 and soil N. Soil solution chemistry and soil gas PCO2 profiles beneath aspen were collected from planting (1997) to harvest (1999). Carbonate mineral weathering products (Ca2+, Mg2+, HCO3-) dominated solutions, which were saturated with respect to calcite. Soil PCO2 values at 25 cm depth were 41% higher in high N soils, but CO2 treatment was not significant. An ANOVA model tested treatment effects on spring 1998 solution chemistry. CO2 treatment had a significant effect on DIC, which was 12% higher in elevated than ambient CO2 chambers. Little effect of CO2 treatment was observed in low N soils. In high N soils, solutions had higher concentrations of carbonate weathering products (DIC, 15%; HCO3-, 27%; Ca2+, 3%, not significant; Mg2+, 5%, not significant). Soil N availability had a significant, positive, effect on mean concentrations of Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, Na+, NO3-, SO42-, and DOC. The soil N treatment difference in solutes may result from differences in PCO2 and, additionally, NO3- from organic matter decomposition. Our results suggest that increased carbonate weathering may occur under increased atmospheric CO2 and in fertile soils.

  12. The Benefits of High School Experiences on Growth in Occupational Status in U.S.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Kyung-Nyun; Passmore, David L.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated high school graduates' school-to-work transition by considering their post-school occupational skill levels. Using an ordinal growth model analysis, occupational status increased in an arch-shaped curve as the number of years after high school graduation also increased. This growth trajectory was further related to…

  13. Flight Experiments of Physical Vapor Transport of ZnSe: Growth of Crystals in Various Convective Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua

    2015-01-01

    A low gravity material experiment will be performed in the Material Science Research Rack (MSRR) on International Space Station (ISS). The flight experiment will conduct crystal growths of ZnSe and related ternary compounds, such as ZnSeS and ZnSeTe, by physical vapor transport (PVT). The main objective of the project is to determine the relative contributions of gravity-driven fluid flows to the compositional distribution, incorporation of impurities and defects, and deviation from stoichiometry observed in the grown crystals as results of buoyancy-driven convection and growth interface fluctuations caused by irregular fluid-flows on Earth. The investigation consists of extensive ground-based experimental and theoretical research efforts and concurrent flight experimentation. The objectives of the ground-based studies are (1) obtain the experimental data and conduct the analyses required to define the optimum growth parameters for the flight experiments, (2) perfect various characterization techniques to establish the standard procedure for material characterization, (3) quantitatively establish the characteristics of the crystals grown on Earth as a basis for subsequent comparative evaluations of the crystals grown in a low-gravity environment and (4) develop theoretical and analytical methods required for such evaluations. ZnSe and related ternary compounds have been grown by vapor transport technique with real time in-situ non-invasive monitoring techniques. The grown crystals have been characterized extensively by various techniques to correlate the grown crystal properties with the growth conditions. This talk will focus on the ground-based studies on the PVT crystal growth of ZnSe and related ternary compounds, especially the effects of different growth orientations related to gravity direction on the grown crystals.

  14. Soil type affects Pinus ponderosa var. scopulorum (Pinaceae) seedling growth in simulated drought experiments1

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Alexander J.; Kilgore, Jason S.

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Effects of drought stress and media type interactions on growth of Pinus ponderosa var. scopulorum germinants were investigated. • Methods and Results: Soil properties and growth responses under drought were compared across four growth media types: two native soils (dolomitic limestone and granite), a soil-less industry standard conifer medium, and a custom-mixed conifer medium. After 35 d of growth, the seedlings under drought stress (reduced watering) produced less shoot and root biomass than watered control seedlings. Organic media led to decreased root biomass, but increased root length and shoot biomass relative to the mineral soils. • Conclusions: Media type affected root-to-shoot biomass partitioning of P. ponderosa var. scopulorum, which may influence net photosynthetic rates, growth, and long-term seedling survival. Further work should examine how specific soil properties like bulk density and organic matter influence biomass allocation in greenhouse studies. PMID:25202578

  15. Comparison of experiment and theory for elastic-plastic plane strain crack growth

    SciTech Connect

    Hermann, L; Rice, J R

    1980-02-01

    Recent theoretical results on elastic-plastic plane strain crack growth, and experimental results for crack growth in a 4140 steel in terms of the theoretical concepts are reviewed. The theory is based on a recent asymptotic analysis of crack surface opening and strain distributions at a quasi-statically advancing crack tip in an ideally-plastic solid. The analysis is incomplete in that some of the parameters which appear in it are known only approximately, especially at large scale yielding. Nevertheless, it suffices to derive a relation between the imposed loading and amount of crack growth, prior to general yielding, based on the assumption that a geometrically similar near-tip crack profile is maintained during growth. The resulting predictions for the variation of J with crack growth are found to fit well to the experimental results obtained on deeply cracked compact specimens.

  16. Experiment K-7-22: Growth Hormone Regulation Synthesis and Secretion in Microgravity. Part 1; Growth Hormone Regulation Synthesis and Secretion in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.; Grindeland, R.; Vale, W.; Sawchenko, P.; Ilyina-Kakueva, E. I.

    1994-01-01

    Changes in the musculoskeletal, immune, vascular, and endocrine system of the rat occur as a result of short-term spaceflight. Since pituitary gland growth hormone (GH) plays a role in the control of these systems, and since the results of an earlier spaceflight mission (Spacelab 3, 1985) showed that GH cell function was compromised in a number of post-flight tests, we repeated and extended the 1985 experiment in two subsequent spaceflights: the 12.5 day mission of Cosmos 1887 (in 1987) and the 14 day mission of Cosmos 2044 (in 1989). The results of these later two flight experiments are the subject of this report. They document repeatable and significant changes in the GH cell system of the spaceflown rat in several post-flight tests.

  17. Cancer-related trauma, stigma and growth: the 'lived' experience of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Threader, J; McCormack, L

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is associated with multiple layers of distress including stigma. Stigma attraction or devalued social identity is twofold: (1) it is a cancer associated with lifestyle risk factors and (2) treatment often results in confronting facial disfigurement. Subjective interpretations from nine head and neck cancer patients were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. An overarching superordinate theme--Distress, Stigma and Psychological Growth--encompassed four subordinate themes. Two themes captured the expressed trauma and terror as a result of diagnosis and treatment, and two the redefining of self despite stigma through meaning making. Distress was interpreted as a catalyst for awakening new life interpretations and combined with social support to facilitate two distinct pathways of growth: (1) psychological growth without support; (2) psychological and relational growth with support. Previously unfelt empathetic understanding and altruism for others with cancer emerged from the impact of stigma on 'self'. Acceptance allowed a new sense of identity that recognised cancer-related traumatic distress as integral to growth for these participants. The present study offers a unique insight into cancer-related trauma and stigma and the potential to redefine a more accepting, empathic and altruistic 'self' for psychological growth. Implications are discussed. PMID:25899673

  18. Curvature-driven pore growth in charged membranes during charge-pulse and voltage-clamp experiments.

    PubMed

    Kroeger, Jens H; Vernon, Dan; Grant, Martin

    2009-02-01

    We find that curvature-driven growth of pores in electrically charged membranes correctly reproduces charge-pulse experiments. Our model, consisting of a Langevin equation for the time dependence of the pore radius coupled to an ordinary differential equation for the number of pores, captures the statistics of the pore population and its effect on the membrane conductance. The calculated pore radius is a linear, and not an exponential, function of time, as observed experimentally. Two other important features of charge-pulse experiments are recovered: pores reseal for low and high voltages but grow irreversibly for intermediate values of the voltage. Our set of coupled ordinary differential equations is equivalent to the partial differential equation used previously to study pore dynamics, but permits the study of longer timescales necessary for the simulations of voltage-clamp experiments. An effective phase diagram for such experiments is obtained. PMID:19186129

  19. Curvature-Driven Pore Growth in Charged Membranes during Charge-Pulse and Voltage-Clamp Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Kroeger, Jens H.; Vernon, Dan; Grant, Martin

    2009-01-01

    We find that curvature-driven growth of pores in electrically charged membranes correctly reproduces charge-pulse experiments. Our model, consisting of a Langevin equation for the time dependence of the pore radius coupled to an ordinary differential equation for the number of pores, captures the statistics of the pore population and its effect on the membrane conductance. The calculated pore radius is a linear, and not an exponential, function of time, as observed experimentally. Two other important features of charge-pulse experiments are recovered: pores reseal for low and high voltages but grow irreversibly for intermediate values of the voltage. Our set of coupled ordinary differential equations is equivalent to the partial differential equation used previously to study pore dynamics, but permits the study of longer timescales necessary for the simulations of voltage-clamp experiments. An effective phase diagram for such experiments is obtained. PMID:19186129

  20. SHOCK INITIATION EXPERIMENTS ON PBX 9501 EXPLOSIVE AT PRESSURES BELOW 3 GPa WITH ASSOCIATED IGNITION AND GROWTH MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Chidester, S K; Thompson, D G; Vandersall, K S; Idar, D J; Tarver, C M; Garcia, F; Urtiew, P A

    2007-06-13

    Shock initiation experiments on the explosive PBX 9501 (95% HMX, 2.5% estane, and 2.5% nitroplasticizer by weight) were performed at pressures below 3 GPa to obtain in-situ pressure gauge data, run-distance-to-detonation thresholds, and Ignition and Growth modeling parameters. Propellant driven gas guns (101 mm and 155 mm) were utilized to initiate the PBX 9501 explosive with manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge packages placed between sample slices. The run-distance-to-detonation points on the Pop-plot for these experiments showed agreement with previously published data and Ignition and Growth modeling parameters were obtained with a good fit to the experimental data. This parameter set will allow accurate code predictions to be calculated for safety scenarios in the low-pressure regime (below 3 GPa) involving PBX 9501 explosive.

  1. Experiment 13: The Study of Dopant Segregation Behavior During the Growth of GaAs in Microgravity on USML-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthiesen, David H.; Kaforey, Monica L.; Bly, J. M.; Chait, Arnon; Kafalas, James; Carlson, Douglas

    1998-01-01

    An investigation into the segregation behavior of selenium doped gallium arsenide (Se/GaAs) during directional solidification in the microgravity environment was conducted using the Crystal Growth Furnace (CGF) aboard the second United States Microgravity Laboratory (USML-2). Two crystals were successfully processed on USML-2, which lasted from October 20 to November 7, 1995. The first sample was processed for 67 hours, 45 minutes (MET 5/04:53:45-8/00:23:50) and included 19 hours of growth at 0.5 microns/sec which yielded 3.42 cm of sample length, and 5 hours of growth at 1.5 microns/sec which yielded 2.7 cm of sample. During the second experiment, the furnace temperature was adjusted to move the melt-solid interface position towards the hot end of the furnace. The second sample was processed for 50 hours, 10 minutes (MET 8/18:48:49-10/21:58:54) and included 11 hours of growth at 0.5 microns/sec which yielded 1.98 cm of sample, and 1 hour, 25 minutes of growth at 5.0 microns/sec which yielded 2.6 cm of sample. This sample provides an order of magnitude change in growth rate and reproduces one of the growth rates used during USML-1. In contrast to the results from USML-1, no voids were present in either crystal grown on USML-2. The absence of voids in either sample indicates that growth rate changes alone were not responsible for the formation of voids found in the crystals grown on USML-1. Sections of the ground-based and flight crystals grown on USML-2 were cut and polished. All of the interface demarcation lines expected from the current pulse interface demarcation (CPID) system have been identified. These measurements have been analyzed for interface positions, interface shapes, and growth rates. Using a newly developed technique, based on experimental and numerical results, the seeding interface reproducibility from run to run was <= 2.5 mm. The seeding interface position could be controllably moved, with respect to the furnace zones, by adjusting the control

  2. Rapid population growth and fragile environments: the sub-Saharan African and south Asian experience.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, J C; Caldwell, P

    1994-02-18

    Case studies of the world's two poorest regions, sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, were used to illustrate the compromised standard of living of the poor and environmental damage due to continued rapid population growth. The conclusion was that the livelihoods of the poor should not be endangered for preserving the living standards of richer people. Nations must not ignore the challenges of reducing population growth as fast as can be achieved. The transitional period over the next 50 years is the main concern, because population growth rates will be slowing. Rural population growth is expected to decline from 60% of total population growth in South Asia to 7% between 2000 and 2025; similarly the decline in sub-Saharan Africa would be from 50% to 15%. Over the past 30 years, food production in South Asia has kept pace with population growth. Sub-Saharan Africa has adopted food importation to meet demand. African problems are a low resource base, faster population growth, and the fact that governments and individuals are too poor to maintain soil fertility. Long-term studies of how much soil depletion will occur are not available for these regions, and local area studies are not as pessimistic. Transition policies are needed to put "people first in terms of engineered or directed population and ecological change." The six main issues are the following: 1) the Brundtland Commission appropriately identified poverty as the main cause and effect of environmental degradation because of the threat to survival; 2) the verdict is still out about whether food production will keep pace with population growth through economic growth and investment in agriculture; 3) empirical research is needed to examine local social and regulatory institutions and the possibility of reinforcing these mechanisms rather than instituting central controls; 4) central coercion or modernizing economic policies can destroy local level controls; 5) famine is a complex ecological phenomenon and the

  3. Trauma-exposed firefighters: relationships among posttraumatic growth, posttraumatic stress, resource availability, coping and critical incident stress debriefing experience.

    PubMed

    Sattler, David N; Boyd, Bill; Kirsch, Julie

    2014-12-01

    This project examines protective factors associated with resilience/posttraumatic growth and risk factors associated with posttraumatic stress among firefighters exposed to critical incidents. The participants were 286 (257 men and 29 women) volunteer and paid firefighters in Whatcom County, Washington. Participants completed an anonymous survey asking about demographics, critical incident exposure, posttraumatic stress symptoms, posttraumatic growth, resource availability, coping, occupational stress and critical incident stress debriefing experience. Most participants had significant critical incident exposure, and about half had attended critical incident stress debriefing sessions. Posttraumatic growth was associated with being female, critical incident exposure, critical incident stress debriefing attendance, posttraumatic stress symptoms (negative association), occupational support, occupation satisfaction, occupational effort, problem-focused coping, emotion-focused coping and personal characteristic resources. Posttraumatic stress symptoms were positively associated with years of firefighting, burnout, occupational effort and disengagement coping and negatively associated with critical incident stress debriefing attendance, posttraumatic growth, social support, internal locus of control, personal characteristic resources, energy resources and condition resources. The findings support conservation of resources stress theory and show that the maintenance and acquisition of resources can offset losses and facilitate resilience/posttraumatic growth. Implications of the findings for enhancing firefighter resources, facilitating resilience and minimizing occupational stressors are discussed. PMID:25476961

  4. Phase partitioning, crystal growth, electrodeposition and cosmic ray experiments in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessling, Francis C.

    1987-01-01

    Five experiments are contained in one Get Away Special Canister (5 cu ft). The first utilizes microgravity to separate biological cells and to study the mechanism of phase partitioning in 12 separate cuvettes. Two experiments are designed to grow organic crystals by physical vapor transport. One experiment consists of eight electroplating cells with various chemicals to produce surfaces electroplated in microgravity. Some of the surfaces have micron sized particles of hard materials co-deposited during electrodeposition. The fifth experiment intercepts cosmic ray particles and records their paths on photographic emulsions. The first four experiments are controlled by an on-board C-MOS controller. The fifth experiment is totally passive. These are the first in Space. Their purpose is to create new commercial products with microgravity processing.

  5. Traveling Magnetic Field Applications for Vertical Bridgman Growth: Modeling and Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin

    2004-01-01

    Traveling magnetic fields offer a direct control of the metallic melt meridional flow in long cylinders. It induces the Lorentz body force that can counteract with the buoyancy force induced by radial temperature non-uniformity. It can significantly offset a natural convection in the system, or it can even set up the flow in opposite direction, thus affecting the interface shape, the growth rate and macrosegregation. Results of our numerical modeling of the Vertical Bridgman crystal growth of InSb will be discussed. The experimental part of this investigation will address the effect of the applied traveling magnetic fields on the interface shape of InSb crystals. Specifics of the growth apparatus design for this research will be provided in details.

  6. Ground based experiments on the growth and characterization of L-Arginine Phosphate (LAP) crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, S. M.; Cao, C.; Batra, A. K.; Lal, R. B.; Mookherji, T. K.

    1991-01-01

    L-Arginine Phosphate (LAP) is a new nonlinear optical material with higher efficiency for harmonic generation compared to KDP. Crystals of LAP were grown in the laboratory from supersaturated solutions by temperature lowering technique. Investigations revealed the presence of large dislocation densities inside the crystals which are observed to produce refractive index changes causing damage at high laser powers. This is a result of the convection during crystal growth from supersaturated solutions. It is proposed to grow these crystals in a diffusion controlled growth condition under microgravity environment and compare the crystals grown in space with those grown on ground. Physical properties of the solutions needed for modelling of crystal growth are also presented.

  7. Birth Experiences of Immigrant Latina Women in a New Growth Community.

    PubMed

    Niebler, Meagan; Documét, Patricia I; Chaves-Gnecco, Diego; Guadamuz, Thomas E

    2016-09-01

    A woman's birth experience can impact the physical and mental well-being of mothers long after the birth of their child. Little is known about the experiences of Latina women in areas with small, yet growing Latino populations. To understand Latina's perceptions of their childbirth experience and to see how insurance status impacts that experience, we conducted in-depth, semi-structured interviews with a non-proportional quota sampling of ten Latina women, five with and five without health insurance. Most women reported a positive global experience; the birth of a healthy child was the most important factor influencing birth experiences for all of them. Locus of control and support from medical providers and loved ones also shaped experiences. Uninsured women reported lower levels of perceived control and support, which did impact their birthing experience. These differences could be influenced by social status and position. Medical provider, hospital, and policy recommendations are made which could lead to improvements in uninsured Latinas' childbirth experiences. PMID:27294734

  8. Density dependent growth in adult brown frogs Rana arvalis and Rana temporaria - A field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loman, Jon; Lardner, Björn

    2009-11-01

    In species with complex life cycles, density regulation can operate on any of the stages. In frogs there are almost no studies of density effects on the performance of adult frogs in the terrestrial habitat. We therefore studied the effect of summer density on the growth rate of adult frogs during four years. Four 30 by 30 m plots in a moist meadow were used. In early summer, when settled after post-breeding migration, frogs ( Rana arvalis and Rana temporaria that have a very similar ecology and potentially compete) were enclosed by erecting a fence around the plots. Frogs were captured, measured, marked and partly relocated to create two high density and two low density plots. In early autumn the frogs were again captured and their individual summer growth determined. Growth effects were evaluated in relation to two density measures: density by design (high/low manipulation), and actual (numerical) density. R. arvalis in plots with low density by design grew faster than those in high density plots. No such effect was found for R. temporaria. For none of the species was growth related to actual summer density, determined by the Lincoln index and including the density manipulation. The result suggests that R. arvalis initially settled according to an ideal free distribution and that density had a regulatory effect (mediated through growth). The fact that there were no density effects on R. temporaria (and a significant difference in its response to that of R. arvalis) suggests it is a superior competitor to R. arvalis during the terrestrial phase. There were no density effects on frog condition index, suggesting that the growth rate modifications may actually be an adaptive trait of R. arvalis. The study demonstrates that density regulation may be dependent on resources in frogs' summer habitat.

  9. Youth Development Outcomes of the Camp Experience: Evidence for Multidimensional Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurber, Christopher A.; Scanlin, Marge M.; Scheuler, Leslie; Henderson, Karla A.

    2007-01-01

    Three thousand, three hundred and ninety-five families, whose child attended one of 80 different day or resident summer camps for at least one week, completed customized questionnaires that measured growth from precamp to postcamp in four domains: Positive Identity, Social Skills, Physical & Thinking Skills, and Positive Values & Spirituality.…

  10. Terrestrial whisker growth experiments which anticipate some special effects of a space station environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobbs, H. H.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of the absence of gravitationally driven thermal convection on the growth of whiskers by chemical reduction of metal salts was studied. It was possible to accomplish nearly complete suppression of such convection. Suppression of the convection does indeed effect the growth but in subtle, not necessarily detrimental ways: none of the changes observed were such as to hamper efforts to produce whiskers in space. Copper whiskers grown from cuprous iodide respond most positively to the suppression of convection; therefore, they are strongly recommended for tests in the space environment. Cobalt whiskers grown from cobaltous bromide show the greatest independence from conditions of convection and applied electric fields of any material studied; therefore, this medium is highly recommended. A strong pulse of electric field forces the whiskers to stick to the growth vessel top plate, this facilitates study or "harvesting'. On the space station it is recommended that the growth vessels be mounted outside the laboratory and joined with the station by means of double vacuum valves and gas service lines.

  11. The Experience of Stress and Personal Growth among Grandparents of Children with and without Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findler, Liora

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was to examine the contribution of internal and external resources to stress and personal growth among grandparents of children with and without an intellectual disability. Ninety-four grandparents of children with intellectual disability and 105 grandparents of children without intellectual disability completed the…

  12. Posttraumatic Growth and Depreciation as Independent Experiences and Predictors of Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cann, Arnie; Calhoun, Lawrence G.; Tedeschi, Richard G.; Solomon, David T.

    2010-01-01

    Positive changes (posttraumatic growth [PTG]) and negative changes (posttraumatic depreciation [PTD]) were assessed using the PTGI-42 with persons reporting changes from a stressful event. PTG and PTD were uncorrelated, and PTG was much greater than PTD. PTG was positively related to disruption of core beliefs and recent deliberate rumination and…

  13. Community development in a Research Experience for Teachers (RET) program: Teacher growth and translation of the experience back to the classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Carol Suzanne Chism

    This qualitative study explores how a scientific research experience helped seven secondary science teachers to grow professionally. The design of this Research Experience for Teachers (RET) program emphasized having teachers become members of university scientific research communities---participating in experimental design, data collection, analysis, and presenting of findings---in order to have a better understanding of research science. I conducted individual interviews with teacher and scientist participants, visited the teachers in their laboratories, videotaped classroom visits, and videotaped group meetings during the summers to learn what teachers brought back to their classrooms about the processes of science. I examined the teachers' views of research science, views shaped by their exposure to research science under the mentorship of a scientist participant. The teachers observed the collaborative efforts of research scientists and experienced doing scientific research, using technology and various experimental methods. Throughout their two-year experience, the teachers continually refined their images of scientists. I also examined how teachers in this program built a professional community as they developed curricula. Further, I investigated what the teachers brought from their experiences back to the classroom, deciding on a theme of "Communicating Science" as a way to convey aspects of scientific inquiry to students. Teacher growth as a result of this two-year program included developing more empathy for student learning and renewing their enthusiasm for both learning and teaching science. Teacher growth also included developing curricula to involve students in behaving as scientists. The teachers identified a few discrete communication practices of scientists that they deemed appropriate for students to adopt to increase their communication skills. Increased community building in classes to model scientific communities was seen as a way to motivate

  14. ISS-Crystal Growth of Photorefractive Materials (BSO): Critical Design Issues for Optimized Data Extraction from Space Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyers, Robert W.; Motakef, S.; Witt, A. F.; Wuensch, B.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Realization of the full potential of photorefractive materials in device technology is seriously impeded by our inability to achieve controlled formation of critical defects during single crystal growth and by difficulties in meeting the required degree of compositional uniformity on a micro-scale over macroscopic dimensions. The exact nature and origin of the critical defects which control photorefractivity could not as yet be identified because of gravitational interference. There exists, however, strong evidence that the density of defect formation and their spatial distribution are adversely affected by gravitational interference which precludes the establishment of quantifiable and controllable heat and mass transfer conditions during crystal growth. The current, NASA sponsored research at MIT is directed at establishing a basis for the development of a comprehensive approach to the optimization of property control during melt growth of photorefractive materials, making use of the m-g environment, provided in the International Space Station. The objectives to be pursued in m-g research on photorefractive BSO (Bi12SiO20) are: (a) identification of the x-level(s) responsible for photorefractivity in undoped BSO; (b) development of approaches leading to the control of x-level formation at uniform spatial distribution; (c) development of doping and processing procedures for optimization of the critical, application specific parameters, spectral response, sensitivity, response time and matrix stability. The presentation will focus on: the rationale for the justification of the space experiment, ground-based development efforts, design considerations for the space experiments, strategic plan of the space experiments, and approaches to the quantitative analysis of the space experiments.

  15. Quantitative and qualitative changes in primary and secondary stem organization of Aristolochia macrophylla during ontogeny: functional growth analysis and experiments

    PubMed Central

    Masselter, Tom; Speck, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    The anatomy of young and old stems of Aristolochia macrophylla has been investigated for a better understanding of how secondary growth processes cause changes in the stem anatomy of a lianescent plant. In A. macrophylla, following an increase in volume of secondary vascular tissues, the cortical tissues are deformed and the outer sclerenchymatous cylinder ruptures. Morphometric measurements prove that the inner zone of the cortical parenchymatous tissue is compressed prior to the rupture of the outer sclerenchymatous cylinder. After the rupture has occurred, the radial width of the inner primary cortex slightly increases again. This could be caused by strain relaxation, suggesting that the inner primary cortex mechanically behaves similarly to cellular technical foam rubbers. Two different experiments were undertaken to test the outer cortical cylinders mechanically. The outer cortical cylinders comprise the outer sclerenchymatous cortical tissue and a collenchymatous sheath underneath the epidermis and the epidermis. In a first experiment, transverse compression loads were applied to the outside of the cortical cylinders causing ovalization of the cylinder until failure. This experiment allowed the Young's Modulus of the outer cortical cylinders to be determined. In a second set of experiments, radial hydraulic pressure was applied to the inside of the cortical cylinders, mimicking the mechanical effects of internal growth processes. The increase of the internal pressure finally led to rupture of the cortical cylinders. The circumferential stresses acting on the inner surface of the cortical cylinders were calculated. These data allow quantitative estimates of the radial and circumferential pressures effected by vascular secondary growth processes during ontogeny in A. macrophylla stems. The experimental results further indicate that the outer sclerenchymatous cylinder is the main contributor to mechanical stability of young A. macrophylla stems. PMID:18573799

  16. AxBAxB… pulsed atomic layer deposition: Numerical growth model and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muneshwar, Triratna; Cadien, Ken

    2016-02-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is widely used for the fabrication of advanced semiconductor devices and related nanoscale structures. During ALD, large precursor doses (>1000 L per pulse) are often required to achieve surface saturation, of which only a small fraction is utilized in film growth while the rest is pumped from the system. Since the metal precursor constitutes a significant cost of ALD, strategies to enhance precursor utilization are essential for the scaling of ALD processes. In the precursor reaction step, precursor physisorption is restricted by steric hindrance (mA1) from ligands on the precursor molecules. On reaction, some of these ligands are removed as by-products resulting in chemisorbed species with reduced steric hindrance (mA1 → mA2, where mA2 < mA1) and some of the initially hindered surface reaction sites becoming accessible for further precursor physisorption. To utilize these additional reaction sites, we propose a generalized AxBAxB… pulsed deposition where the total precursor dose (ΦA) is introduced as multiple x (x > 1, x ∈ I) short-pulses rather than a single pulse. A numerical first-order surface reaction kinetics growth model is presented and applied to study the effect of AxBAxB… pulsed ALD on the growth per cycle (GPC). The model calculations predict higher GPC for AxBAxB… pulsing than with ABAB… deposition. In agreement with the model predictions, with AxBAxB… pulsed deposition, the GPC was found to increase by ˜46% for ZrN plasma enhanced ALD (PEALD), ˜49% for HfO2 PEALD, and ˜8% for thermal Al2O3 ALD with respect to conventional ABAB… pulsed growth.

  17. Growth of single crystals by vapor transport in zero-gravity environment, ground-based experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedemeier, H.

    1978-01-01

    Mass and heat transfer phenomena associated with the growth of single crystals by chemical vapor transport reactions were investigated. In this technique, a gaseous transport agent reacts with the solid source material to form exclusively gaseous products. The gas phase species migrate from the source to the condensation zone of the closed reaction ampoule where the reverse reaction occurs with formation of single crystals. The necessary concentration gradient is achieved by means of a temperature gradient.

  18. Autotrophic growth and lipid production of Chlorella sorokiniana in lab batch and BIOCOIL photobioreactors: Experiments and modeling.

    PubMed

    Concas, Alessandro; Malavasi, Veronica; Costelli, Cristina; Fadda, Paolo; Pisu, Massimo; Cao, Giacomo

    2016-07-01

    A novel mathematical model for the quantitative assessment of the effect of dissolved nitrogen on the autotrophic batch-growth and lipid accumulation of Chlorella sorokiniana, is proposed in this work. Model results have been validated through comparison with suitable experimental data performed in lab photobioreactors. Further experiments have been then performed using the BIOCOIL photobioreactor operated in fed-batch mode. The experimental results, which show that a maximum growth rate of 0.52day(-1) and a lipid content equal to 25%wt can be achieved with the BIOICOIL, have been successfully predicted through the proposed model. Therefore, the model might represent a first step toward the development of a tool for the scale-up and optimization of the operating conditions of BIOCOIL photobioreactors. Finally, the fatty acid methyl esters obtained by trans-esterification of lipids extracted from C. sorokiniana, have been analyzed in view of the assessment of their usability for producing biodiesel. PMID:27030952

  19. Replicated throughfall exclusion experiment in an Indonesian perhumid rainforest: wood production, litter fall and fine root growth under simulated drought.

    PubMed

    Moser, Gerald; Schuldt, Bernhard; Hertel, Dietrich; Horna, Viviana; Coners, Heinz; Barus, Henry; Leuschner, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    Climate change scenarios predict increases in the frequency and duration of ENSO-related droughts for parts of South-East Asia until the end of this century exposing the remaining rainforests to increasing drought risk. A pan-tropical review of recorded drought-related tree mortalities in more than 100 monitoring plots before, during and after drought events suggested a higher drought-vulnerability of trees in South-East Asian than in Amazonian forests. Here, we present the results of a replicated (n = 3 plots) throughfall exclusion experiment in a perhumid tropical rainforest in Sulawesi, Indonesia. In this first large-scale roof experiment outside semihumid eastern Amazonia, 60% of the throughfall was displaced during the first 8 months and 80% during the subsequent 17 months, exposing the forest to severe soil desiccation for about 17 months. In the experiment's second year, wood production decreased on average by 40% with largely different responses of the tree families (ranging from -100 to +100% change). Most sensitive were trees with high radial growth rates under moist conditions. In contrast, tree height was only a secondary factor and wood specific gravity had no influence on growth sensitivity. Fine root biomass was reduced by 35% after 25 months of soil desiccation while fine root necromass increased by 250% indicating elevated fine root mortality. Cumulative aboveground litter production was not significantly reduced in this period. The trees from this Indonesian perhumid rainforest revealed similar responses of wood and litter production and root dynamics as those in two semihumid Amazonian forests subjected to experimental drought. We conclude that trees from paleo- or neotropical forests growing in semihumid or perhumid climates may not differ systematically in their growth sensitivity and vitality under sublethal drought stress. Drought vulnerability may depend more on stem cambial activity in moist periods than on tree height or wood

  20. [Growth and development of plants in a sequence of generations under the conditions of space flight (experiment Greenhouse-3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levinskikh, M. A.; Sychev, V. N.; Signalova, O. B.; Derendiaeva, T. A.; Podol'skii, I. G.; Masgreiv, M. E.; Bingheim, G. E.; Musgrave, M. E. (Principal Investigator); Campbell, W. F. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose was to study characteristic features of growth and development of several plant generations in space flight in experiment GREENHOUSE-3 as a part of the Russian-US space research program MIR/NASA in 1997. The experiment consisted of cultivation of Brassica rapa L. in board greenhouse Svet. Two vegetative cycles were fully completed and the third vegetation was terminated on day 13 on the phase of budding. The total duration of the space experiment was 122 days, i.e. same as in the ground controls. In the experiment with Brassica rapa L. viable seeds produced by the first crop were planted in space flight and yielded next crop. Crops raised from the ground and space seeds were found to differ in height and number of buds. Both parameters were lowered in the plants grown from the space seeds. The prime course for smaller size and reduced organogenic potential of plantTs reproductive system seems to be a less content of nutrients in seeds that had matured in the space flight. Experiment GREENHOUSE-3 demonstrated principle feasibility of plant reproduction in space greenhouse from seeds developed in microgravity.

  1. [Growth and development of plants in a sequence of generations under the conditions of space flight (experiment Greenhouse-3)].

    PubMed

    Levinskikh, M A; Sychev, V N; Signalova, O B; Derendiaeva, T A; Podol'skiĭ, I G; Masgreĭv, M E; Bingheim, G E

    2001-01-01

    The purpose was to study characteristic features of growth and development of several plant generations in space flight in experiment GREENHOUSE-3 as a part of the Russian-US space research program MIR/NASA in 1997. The experiment consisted of cultivation of Brassica rapa L. in board greenhouse Svet. Two vegetative cycles were fully completed and the third vegetation was terminated on day 13 on the phase of budding. The total duration of the space experiment was 122 days, i.e. same as in the ground controls. In the experiment with Brassica rapa L. viable seeds produced by the first crop were planted in space flight and yielded next crop. Crops raised from the ground and space seeds were found to differ in height and number of buds. Both parameters were lowered in the plants grown from the space seeds. The prime course for smaller size and reduced organogenic potential of plantTs reproductive system seems to be a less content of nutrients in seeds that had matured in the space flight. Experiment GREENHOUSE-3 demonstrated principle feasibility of plant reproduction in space greenhouse from seeds developed in microgravity. PMID:11589157

  2. Can Platelet rich plasma stimulate human ACL growth in culture? A preliminary experience

    PubMed Central

    Dhillon, Mandeep Singh; Karna, Saroj Kumar; Dhatt, Sarvdeep Singh; Behera, Prateek; Bhatia, Alka

    2015-01-01

    Summary Introduction Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) contains numerous growth factors; Platelet poor plasma (PPP) is plasma proteins without platelets, containing growth factors other than platelet derived. We planned to evaluate the effect of both autologous PRP & PPP on human ACL cell growth characteristics in culture conditions to see if one was better than the other. Methods ACL remnants were collected from eleven patients during ACL reconstruction surgery; PPP and PRP were prepared from blood of these patients. Cells were isolated, identified and cultured and were then divided into six groups. Groups A–D had Fetal Bovine Serum (FBS) added to them along with different concentrations of PRP and PPP. Groups E and F had 5% and 10% PRP respectively but lacked FBS. Cell viability was assayed by MTT and Annexin V assay, and DNA content was evaluated by propidium iodide staining and flow cytometry. Results analysis of cultured cells showed that addition of PRP (5 or 10%) increased the viability of ACL cells in 4 out of 11 and promoted cell proliferation in 8 of 11 donor samples; 10% PRP was more effective than 5% PRP. However, the difference in effectiveness of 10% PRP was not significantly better than 5% PRP. 5% PPP had no significant effect on cell viability, but it led to an increase in DNA content in 5 of 11. There was no statistically significant effect of either PRP or PPP in preventing cell death (depicted by apoptosis rate). Conclusion PRP may have an enhancing effect on ACL cell viability and promotion of cell proliferation but the ideal concentration of PRP for these positive effects needs to be determined before it could be used in clinical settings for enhancing primary repair of torn ACL. Also larger, more controlled and better studies are needed to confirm its clinical utility. PMID:26605188

  3. Early positive effects of tree species richness on herbivory in a large-scale forest biodiversity experiment influence tree growth

    PubMed Central

    Schuldt, Andreas; Bruelheide, Helge; Härdtle, Werner; Assmann, Thorsten; Li, Ying; Ma, Keping; von Oheimb, Goddert; Zhang, Jiayong

    2015-01-01

    Despite the importance of herbivory for the structure and functioning of species-rich forests, little is known about how herbivory is affected by tree species richness, and more specifically by random vs. non-random species loss. We assessed herbivore damage and its effects on tree growth in the early stage of a large-scale forest biodiversity experiment in subtropical China that features random and non-random extinction scenarios of tree mixtures numbering between one and 24 species. In contrast to random species loss, the non-random extinction scenarios were based on the tree species’ local rarity and specific leaf area – traits that may strongly influence the way herbivory is affected by plant species richness. Herbivory increased with tree species richness across all scenarios and was unaffected by the different species compositions in the random and non-random extinction scenarios. Whereas tree growth rates were positively related to herbivory on plots with smaller trees, growth rates significantly declined with increasing herbivory on plots with larger trees. Our results suggest that the effects of herbivory on growth rates increase from monocultures to the most species-rich plant communities and that negative effects with increasing tree species richness become more pronounced with time as trees grow larger. Synthesis. Our results indicate that key trophic interactions can be quick to become established in forest plantations (i.e. already 2.5 years after tree planting). Stronger herbivory effects on tree growth with increasing tree species richness suggest a potentially important role of herbivory in regulating ecosystem functions and the structural development of species-rich forests from the very start of secondary forest succession. The lack of significant differences between the extinction scenarios, however, contrasts with findings from natural forests of higher successional age, where rarity had negative effects on herbivory. This indicates that

  4. Size as a Risk Factor for Growth in Conservatively Managed Vestibular Schwannomas: The Birmingham Experience.

    PubMed

    Daultrey, Charles R J; Rainsbury, James W; Irving, Richard M

    2016-10-01

    This article discusses conservatively managed tumors, whether larger tumors at presentation are more likely to grow, and whether position at presentation corresponds with growth. A review is presented of more than 900 patients managed at Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, between 1997 and 2012. Tumors were arbitrarily divided into 3 groups: intracanalicular (IC), and extracanalicular (EC) tumors measuring 1 to 10 mm or 11 to 20 mm at the cerebellopontine angle. This series shows that larger EC tumors grow faster than IC tumors and that EC tumors overall at presentation are more likely to grow than IC tumors. PMID:27565393

  5. Development of the Plant Growth Facility for Use in the Shuttle Middeck and Test Units for Ground-Based Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, David K.; Wells, H. William

    1996-01-01

    The plant growth facility (PGF), currently under development as a Space Shuttle middeck facility for the support of research on higher plants in microgravity, is presented. The PGF provides controlled fluorescent lighting and the active control of temperature, relative humidity and CO2 concentration. These parameters are designed to be centrally controlled by a dedicated microprocessor. The status of the experiment can be displayed for onboard analysis, and will be automatically archived for post-flight analysis. The facility is designed to operate for 15 days and will provide air filtration to remove ethylene and trace organics with replaceable potassium permanganate filters. Similar ground units will be available for pre-flight experimentation.

  6. Easy Growth Experiment on Peas Stimulates Interest in Biology for 10-11 Year Old Pupils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwen, Birgitta

    2007-01-01

    How do we support the enthusiasm children show for biology in school? Unfortunately, lack of exciting practical work and boring biology lessons seem to make science less popular. As a senior lecturer in plant physiology at Karlstad University I have simplified experiments intended for students at university and then tested them on 10-11 year old…

  7. Growth as Product and as Process: Student Learning Outcomes Attained through College Experiences in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cen, Yuhao

    2012-01-01

    Little empirical research has been done on student learning outcomes and college experiences in China, where the gross enrollment rate in higher education reached 26.5 percent and the undergraduate population exceeded 22 million in 2010. This study seeks to describe, explain, and interpret student learning as perceived from students in Chinese…

  8. Growth and Decay: An Experiment Demonstrating Radioactivity Relationships and Chelate Solvent Extraction Separations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downey, D. M.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    The separation of lead and bismuth by chelate solvent extraction is of interest because of the simplicity which the use of radiotracers allows in its demonstration. Theoretical background information, procedures, materials needed, and typical results are provided for an experiment involving the extraction. (JN)

  9. Metolachlor formulation and ground cover effects on cotton and weed growth - greenhouse experiments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metolachlor is an important tool for managing glyphosate-resistant pigweeds. Cover crop residues in conservation tillage impede the effectiveness of metolachlor. Greenhouse experiments were conducted to evaluate the influence of cover crops with the following ground covers: no cover, full cover, and...

  10. Counselor Development in the Process of Mastering Cultural Competence: A Study of Professional Growth Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakefield, Marie A.

    2012-01-01

    Grounded theory methodology was employed to explore the experiences of counseling professionals as they work to develop a higher level of cultural competence. Three key findings support the core theme, navigating change toward cultural competent practices: (1) environmental awareness; (2) dispositions toward the development in cultural competency…

  11. "Every Experience Is a Moving Force": Identity and Growth through Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Kimberly A.

    2003-01-01

    This narrative of the experience of a native English speaking (NES) cooperating teacher working with a nonnative English speaking (NNES) student teacher in an MA Teaching English as a Second Language practicum begins with a discussion of teacher identity, then outlines the significance of caring in teacher-student relations Noddings (Caring: A…

  12. Tracking Perceived and Observed Growth of Inquiry Practice: A Formative Plan to Improve Professional Development Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Jeff C.; Smart, Julie; Horton, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    The authors worked with 22 middle school math and science teachers for one year with the goal of improving the quantity and quality of inquiry-based instruction implemented in the classroom. The professional development experience was framed by the 4E x 2 Instruction Model, which combines key components of inquiry instruction (Engage, Explore,…

  13. Backscatter for Ice Sheet 2 Growth Phase in the Winter 1994 Winter Sea Ice Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, S. V.

    1996-01-01

    None. This is raw data from a data set taken during the CRRELEX94 experiment. The data are polarimetric C-band radar measurements of a saline ice sheet grown in the outdoor Geophysical Research Facility at the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Lab. See references for other descriptions of data.

  14. Topological events in two-dimensional grain growth: Experiments and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Fradkov, V.E.; Glicksman, M.E.; Palmer, M.; Rajan, K. . Materials Engineering Dept.)

    1994-08-01

    Grain growth in polycrystals is a process that occurs as a result of the vanishing of small grains. The mean topological class of vanishing two-dimensional (2-D) grains was found experimentally to be about 4.5. This result suggests that most vanishing grains are either 4- or 5-sided. A recent theory of 2-D grain growth is explicitly based on this fact, treating the switching as random events. The process of shrinking of 4- and 5-sided two-dimensional grains was observed experimentally on polycrystalline films of transparent, pure succinonitrile (SCN). Grain shrinking was studied theoretically and simulated by computer (both dynamic and Monte Carlo). It was found that most shrinking grains are topologically stable and remain within their topological class until they are much smaller than their neighbors. They discuss differences which were found with respect to the behavior of 2-D polycrystals, a 2-D ideal soap froth, and a 2-D section of a 3-D grain structure.

  15. Gnamma Pit Growth: Insights from Wind Tunnel Experiments and Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Schmeeckle, M. W.

    2014-12-01

    Gnamma pit is an Australian aboriginal term for weathering pit, and its formation is controlled by a mix of mineral decay and eolian processes. Prior literature suggests that two processes limit pit growth: decay along grain boundaries sufficient to allow mineral detachment; and eolian events sufficient to deflate accumulate minerals. However, prior literature contains little empirical data on the nature of these processes. Our research focuses on developing a better understanding of wind thresholds that deflate particles from pits. A set of wind-tunnel tests with a range of weathering pit shapes and grus particle sizes explored the wind threshold needed to deflate particles in different situations. An empirical equation expresses the way to estimate wind the speed threshold via pit depth and particle size. With this equation, the threshold for evacuating particles in the pit can be estimated by measuring the pit depth and smallest particles in the weathering pit, that indicates that the wind speed would not exceed this value when this pit is still active. We also developed a computational fluid dynamics model to investigate the distribution of wall shear stress. Ultimately, there exists some potential to utilize our refined understanding of gnamma pits as an indicator of paleo-wind intensity in pit locations where the accumulated sediment can be dated (e.g., by OSL) and such filled pits excavated to understand the paleo-wind conditions that would have once allowed the growth of such a pit.

  16. Benchmark experiments and numerical modelling of the columnar-equiaxed dendritic growth in the transparent alloy Neopentylglycol-(d)Camphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturz, L.; Wu, M.; Zimmermann, G.; Ludwig, A.; Ahmadein, M.

    2015-06-01

    Solidification benchmark experiments on columnar and equiaxed dendritic growth, as well as the columnar-equiaxed transition have been carried out under diffusion-dominated conditions for heat and mass transfer in a low-gravity environment. The system under investigation is the transparent organic alloy system Neopentylglycol-37.5wt.-%(d)Camphor, processed aboard a TEXUS sounding rocket flight. Solidifications was observed by standard optical methods in addition to measurements of the thermal fields within the sheet like experimental cells of 1 mm thickness. The dendrite tip kinetic, primary dendrite arm spacing, temporal and spatial temperature evolution, columnar tip velocity and the critical parameters at the CET have been analysed. Here we focus on a detailed comparison of the experiment “TRACE” with a 5-phase volume averaging model to validate the numerical model and to give insight into the corresponding physical mechanisms and parameters leading to CET. The results are discussed in terms of sensitivity versus numerical parameters.

  17. Pampre : a new laboratory experiment to better understand the physico-chemical processes of Titan aerosols formation and growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szopa, C.; Cernogora, G.; Boufendi, L.; Correia, J. J.; Coll, P.

    2003-04-01

    Titan s atmosphere contains aerosols issued from the organic chemistry induced by the photochemistry of N2 and CH4, the major gaseous atmospheric compounds. These organic aerosols are important as they : i) have a significant influence on the properties of the atmosphere, linked to their optical properties; ii) represent the best known example of transition from the gaseous to the solid phase by chemistry; iii) represent the most complex organics produced in Titan s atmosphere, making them particularly interesting from an exo/astrobiological point of view. However, few direct information are available about them, and their processes of formation and growth are not well understood. In order to bring answers to these questions, we developed a new type of laboratory simulation which is dedicated to better understand the physico-chemical processes involved in the formation and growth of the aerosols. The main originality of this experiment (named PAMPRE) comes from its ability to produce aerosols in volume, as they are maintained in levitation thanks to an electric force compensating gravity, whereas the other similar experiments produce tholins on the reactors walls. Thus, one should produce analogs of Titan s aerosols within representative conditions. Moreover, beyond the ex-situ analyses generally led to characterize the aerosols properties with conventional techniques (MEB, GC-MS), the experimental set-up allows to operate in situ studies of the reactive plasma by UV-vis spectroscopy, in order to deduce the electron energy distribution function which have to be compared with the sun spectrum. Beyond the characterization of the aerosols properties and formation, this experiment will also provide information and materials that will be used to operate the calibrations of the Aerosol and Collector Pyrolyser and Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometer experiments of the Cassini-Huygens mission, and to develop the ICAPS-IMPF facility which should be present in the ISS within

  18. The impacts of lower population growth on the quality of life and economic development: China's experience.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Z; Zhang, L

    1994-02-01

    China's population in 1993 was 1.18 billion, which makes it the most populous nation in the world. The Chinese population policy aims to control growth and improve the quality of human resources. Most Chinese recognize the need for family planning. Replacement level fertility has been achieved, because there are limited resources to support a large population. Scarce resources are limiting economic development. There has been a loss of arable land, and the dream of 2 hectares of land, a cow, a wife and children, and a comfortable bed are not attainable. Water resources are also limited, the ratio of water to arable land is unevenly balanced, and there is overdrawing of groundwater. Energy shortages, environmental pollution, and pressure on employment are other effects of population pressure. The surplus labor force is about 150-190 million farmering laborers. Labor productivity has declined due to excess labor. Projections are that 20-25% of employees are surplus, and unemployed in urban areas will total 10 million. Without a strong family planning program, there will be a rural labor surplus of 200-360 million people by the year 2000. One benefit of lower population growth is the savings in child-rearing expenses. Estimated births averted between 1971 and 1992 was about 250 million, which translates to a savings of $500 billion. About 66% of this sum would be recovered in the same period and 33% would be recovered between 1993-2007. Government and nongovernmental spending on family planning totaled an estimated $10 billion between 1971-92. The ratio of input to output for averted births is 1 to 17. Total spending would have been RMB 2500 billion yuan for child rearing of averted births between 1971-92 and RMB 1828 billion yuan between 1991-2005. The saved money could be invested in economic development. An estimated 10% of national income could be saved. Another benefit from low population growth is the increased consumption evident between 1971-90. There has not

  19. Fuel Performance Experiments and Modeling: Fission Gas Bubble Nucleation and Growth in Alloy Nuclear Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    McDeavitt, Sean; Shao, Lin; Tsvetkov, Pavel; Wirth, Brian; Kennedy, Rory

    2014-04-07

    Advanced fast reactor systems being developed under the DOE's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative are designed to destroy TRU isotopes generated in existing and future nuclear energy systems. Over the past 40 years, multiple experiments and demonstrations have been completed using U-Zr, U-Pu-Zr, U-Mo and other metal alloys. As a result, multiple empirical and semi-empirical relationships have been established to develop empirical performance modeling codes. Many mechanistic questions about fission as mobility, bubble coalescience, and gas release have been answered through industrial experience, research, and empirical understanding. The advent of modern computational materials science, however, opens new doors of development such that physics-based multi-scale models may be developed to enable a new generation of predictive fuel performance codes that are not limited by empiricism.

  20. Ignition and Growth Modeling of Detonation Reaction Zone Experiments on Single Crystals of PETN and HMX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Bradley; Tarver, Craig

    2015-06-01

    Fedorov et al. reported nanosecond time resolved interface particle velocity records for detonation reaction zone profiles of single crystals of PETN and HMX with adjoining LiF windows. Von Neumann spike and Chapman-Jouguet pressures were measured, and reaction zone lengths and times wereinferred. The single crystal detonation velocities and von Neumann spike pressures are higher than those measured for heterogeneous PETN and HMX-based explosives pressed to 98-99% theoretical maximum density. Due to the absence of voids, the single crystal detonation reaction zone lengths and times for both PETN and HMX were longer than those for their heterogeneous explosives. Ignition and Growth modeling results are compared to the single crystal PETN and HMX measurements and to previous experimental results for pressed PETN and HMX charges. This work was performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Serving Community College Students: Student Preparation, Development and Growth through the REU Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, C. S.; Osborn, J.; Smith, M.

    2014-12-01

    Effectively recruiting and engaging community college students in STEM research experiences is an increasingly important goal of the NSF but has not historically been the primary focus of most NSF-REU Site programs. The Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship in Earth and Environmental Sciences (SURFEES) program at Chapman University, a primarily undergraduate institution in Southern California, is the site of the first NSF-REU program in the NSF's Division of Earth Sciences that selects participants exclusively from local partnering community colleges. Building on and now running parallel with a successful internally-funded summer research program already in place and available only to Chapman undergraduates, the SURFEES program incorporates specific mentor and participant pre-experience training, pre-, mid-, and post-assessment instruments, and programming targeted to the earth and environmental sciences as well as to community college students. Perhaps most importantly, the application, selection and pairing of student participants with faculty mentors was conducted with specific goals of identifying those applicants with the greatest potential for a transformative experience while also meeting self-defined targets of under-represented minority, female, and low-income participants. Initial assessment results of the first participant cohort from summer 2014 and lessons learned for creating/adapting an NSF-REU site to involve community college students will be discussed.

  2. Determination of longevities, chamber building rates and growth functions for Operculina complanata from long term cultivation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woeger, Julia; Kinoshita, Shunichi; Wolfgang, Eder; Briguglio, Antonino; Hohenegger, Johann

    2016-04-01

    Operculina complanata was collected in 20 and 50 m depth around the Island of Sesoko belonging to Japans southernmost prefecture Okinawa in a series of monthly sampling over a period of 16 months (Apr.2014-July2015). A minimum of 8 specimens (4 among the smallest and 4 among the largest) per sampling were cultured in a long term experiment that was set up to approximate conditions in the field as closely as possible. A set up allowing recognition of individual specimens enabled consistent documentation of chamber formation, which in combination with μ-CT-scanning after the investigation period permitted the assignment of growth steps to specific time periods. These data were used to fit various mathematical models to describe growth (exponential-, logistic-, generalized logistic-, Gompertz-function) and chamber building rate (Michaelis-Menten-, Bertalanffy- function) of Operculina complanata. The mathematically retrieved maximum lifespan and mean chamber building rate found in cultured Operculina complanata were further compared to first results obtained by the simultaneously conducted "natural laboratory approach". Even though these comparisons hint at a somewhat stunted growth and truncated life spans of Operculina complanata in culture, they represent a possibility to assess and improve the quality of further cultivation set ups, opening new prospects to a better understanding of the their theoretical niches.

  3. Young women’s perceived health and lifetime sexual experience: Results from The National Survey of Family Growth

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Caroline; Trussell, James

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Sexuality is a component of health and wellbeing for all women, including adolescents. Yet relationships between young women’s health perceptions and sexual behavior are unclear. Aim We examined associations between perceived health and lifetime sexual experiences among young U.S. women. Methods We used data from 4,413 young women ages 15–24 years in the National Survey of Family Growth, 2002–2008. Descriptive, bivariate and multivariate statistics estimated relationships between categories of perceived health and types of lifetime sexual experience. Main outcome measures A self-rated health Likert item and sexual history questions were administered with a computer-assisted survey instrument. Results Young women reported excellent (30%), very good (41%), good (23%) and fair-poor (6%) health. Sexual experiences included vaginal (64%), oral (64%) and anal (20%) sex. Negative experiences included involuntary sex (11%) and STI history (8%). In multivariate logistic regression models, lower perceived health (“good” rather than “excellent”) was positively associated with vaginal (OR 1.5, CI 1.1–2.1, p=0.02), oral (OR 1.5, CI 1.1–2.1, p=0.005) and anal (OR 1.4, CI 1.0–2.0, p=0.03) sex. In models stratified by age, point estimates for vaginal (OR 1.8, CI 1.2–2.6, p=0.002) and oral (OR 1.9, CI 1.4–2.6, p<0.001) sex were higher among adolescents ages 15–19 years but associations were insignificant among young adults ages 20–24 years. When controlling for negative sexual experiences, point estimates were stable in models including STI history but statistically insignificant when including involuntary sexual experience. Other characteristics associated with sexual experiences varied by type of experience and included age, race/ethnicity, employment situation, poverty level, insurance status, childhood family situation, religious service participation, cohabitation/marital experience and body mass index. Conclusions Further investigation

  4. [Growth and development of plants in a row of generations under the conditions of space flight (experiment Greenhouse-5)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levinskikh, M. A.; Sychev, V. N.; Derendiaeva, T. A.; Signalova, O. B.; Podol'skii, I. G.; Avdeev, S. V.; Bingheim, G. E.; Campbell, W. F. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Results of the experiment aimed at harvesting a second space generation of wheat var. Apogee in Mir greenhouse Svet (experiment GREENHOUSE-5) are presented. In space flight, germination rate of space seeds from the first crop made up 89% against 100% of the ground seeds. The full biological ripeness was observed in 20 plants grown from the ground seeds and one plant grown from the space seeds following 80- to 90-d vegetation. The plant of the second space generation was morphologically different neither from the species in the first space crop nor from the ground controls. To study the biological characteristics of Apogee seeds gathered in the first and second crops in spaceflight experiment GREENHOUSE-5, the seeds were planted on their return to the laboratory. Morphometric analysis showed that they were essentially similar to the controls. Hence, the space experiments in Mir greenhouse Svet performed during 1998-1999 gave proof that plants cultivated in microgravity can pass the ontogenetic cycle more than once. However, initial results of the investigations into growth and development of plants through several generations are still in-sufficient to speak of possible delayed effects of the spaceflight factors (microgravity, multicomponent radiation, harmful trace contaminants etc.).

  5. GROWTH OF THE INTERNATIONAL CRITICALITY SAFETY AND REACTOR PHYSICS EXPERIMENT EVALUATION PROJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    J. Blair Briggs; John D. Bess; Jim Gulliford

    2011-09-01

    Since the International Conference on Nuclear Criticality Safety (ICNC) 2007, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) have continued to expand their efforts and broaden their scope. Eighteen countries participated on the ICSBEP in 2007. Now, there are 20, with recent contributions from Sweden and Argentina. The IRPhEP has also expanded from eight contributing countries in 2007 to 16 in 2011. Since ICNC 2007, the contents of the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments1' have increased from 442 evaluations (38000 pages), containing benchmark specifications for 3955 critical or subcritical configurations to 516 evaluations (nearly 55000 pages), containing benchmark specifications for 4405 critical or subcritical configurations in the 2010 Edition of the ICSBEP Handbook. The contents of the Handbook have also increased from 21 to 24 criticality-alarm-placement/shielding configurations with multiple dose points for each, and from 20 to 200 configurations categorized as fundamental physics measurements relevant to criticality safety applications. Approximately 25 new evaluations and 150 additional configurations are expected to be added to the 2011 edition of the Handbook. Since ICNC 2007, the contents of the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments2' have increased from 16 different experimental series that were performed at 12 different reactor facilities to 53 experimental series that were performed at 30 different reactor facilities in the 2011 edition of the Handbook. Considerable effort has also been made to improve the functionality of the searchable database, DICE (Database for the International Criticality Benchmark Evaluation Project) and verify the accuracy of the data contained therein. DICE will be discussed in separate papers at ICNC 2011. The status of the ICSBEP and the IRPh

  6. Third and Final Shuttle Mission of the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment Conducted: Highest Supercooling Ever Recorded Achieved

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, Martin E.; Malarik, Diane C.

    1999-01-01

    Dendrites describe the treelike crystal morphology commonly assumed in metals and alloys that freeze from supercooled or supersaturated melts. There remains a high level of engineering interest in dendritic solidification because the size, shape, and orientation of the dendrites determine the final microstructure of a material. It is the microstructure that then determines the physical properties of cast or welded products. Although it is well known that dendritic growth is controlled by the transport of latent heat from the moving solid-liquid interface, an accurate and predictive model has not yet been developed. The effects of gravity-induced convection on the transfer of heat from the interface have prevented adequate testing, under terrestrial conditions, of solidification models. The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) constituted a series of three microgravity experiments flown aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia. The apparatus was used to grow and record dendrite solidification in the absence of gravity-induced convective heat transfer, thereby producing a wealth of benchmark-quality data for testing solidification models and theories.

  7. Growth experiment of narrow band-gap semiconductor PbSnTe single crystals in space (M-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Tomoaki

    1993-01-01

    An experiment on crystal growth of Pb(1-x)Sn(x)Te in microgravity is planned. This material is an alloy of the compound semiconductors PbTe and SnTe. It is a promising material for infrared diode lasers and detectors in the wavelength region between 6 and 30 micron. Since the electrical properties of Pb(1-x)Sn(x)Te depend greatly on the Pb/Sn ratio and crystalline defects as well as impurity concentration, homogeneous, defect-free, high-quality crystals are anticipated. Although many growth methods, such as the pulling method, the Bridgman method, the vapor growth method, etc., have been applied to the growth of Pb(1-x)Sn(x)Te, large, homogeneous, low-defect-density crystals have not yet been grown on Earth. The unsuccessful results were caused by buoyancy-driven convection in the fluids induced by the specific gravity difference between heated and cooled fluids on Earth. A crystal is grown by cooling the melt from one end of the ampoule. In crystal growth from the melt, about 30 percent of the SnTe in the melt is rejected at the solid-liquid interface during solidification. On Earth, the rejected SnTe is completely mixed with the remaining melt by convection in the melt. Therefore, SnTe concentration in the melt, and accordingly in the crystal, increases as the crystal grows. In the microgravity environment, buoyancy-driven convection is suppressed because the specific gravity difference is negligible. In that case, the rejected SnTe remains at the solid-liquid interface and its concentration increases only at the interface. If the growth rate is higher than the PbTe-SnTe interdiffusion rate, the amount of SnTe which diffuses from the interface into the melt increases as SnTe piles up at the interface, and finally it balances the amount of rejected SnTe during solidification, resulting in steady-state SnTe transportation at the interface. By using this principle, compositionally homogeneous crystals can be grown. Furthermore, low-defect-density crystals will be

  8. Experiments to measure ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov growth of Gaussian bumps in plastic capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, Eric; Batha, Steve; Sedillo, Tom; Evans, Scott; Sorce, Chuck; Landen, Otto; Braun, Dave

    2010-06-02

    Growth of hydrodynamic instabilities at the interfaces of inertial confinement fusion capsules (ICF) due to ablator and fuel non-uniformities have been of primary concern to the ICF program since its inception. To achieve thermonuclear ignition at Megajoule class laser systems such as the NIF, targets must be designed for high implosion velocities, which requires higher in-flight aspect ratios (IFAR) and diminished shell stability. Controlling capsule perturbations is thus of the utmost importance. Recent simulations have shown that features on the outer surface of an ICF capsule as small as 10 microns wide and 100's of nanometers tall such as bumps, divots, or even dust particles can profoundly impact capsule performance by leading to material jetting or mix into the hotspot. Recent x-ray images of implosions on the NIF may be evidence of such mixing. Unfortunately, our ability to accurately predict these effects is uncertain due to disagreement between equation of state (EOS) models. In light of this, we have begun a campaign to measure the growth of isolated defects (Gaussian bumps) due to ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov in CH capsules to validate these models. The platform that has been developed uses halfraums with radiation temperatures near 75 eV (Rev. 4 foot-level) driven by 15-20 beams from the Omega laser (Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, NY), which sends a ~2.5 Mbar shock into a planar CH foil. Gaussian-shaped bumps (20 microns wide, 4-7 microns tall) are deposited onto the ablation side of the target. On-axis radiography with a saran (Cl Heα - 2.8 keV) backlighter is used to measure bump evolution prior to shock breakout. Shock speed measurements will also be made with Omega's active shock breakout (ASBO) and streaked optical pyrometery (SOP) diagnostics in conjunction with filtered x-ray photodiode arrays (DANTE) to determine drive conditions in the target. These data will be used to discriminate between EOS models so

  9. Mountain growth, orographic precipitation, and the formation of high-plateaus. Insights from numerical modeling experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Castellanos, D.

    2011-12-01

    Orographic precipitation is thought to exert a significant control on the growth of orogens, namely on the distribution of tectonic uplift and deformation in the multi-million-year time-scale. Computer tectonic models based on simple physical laws predict that the concentration of erosional surface mass removal in either side of an orogen can have a significant impact on the how tectonic deformation propagates within the orogenic building. Proxies or simple formulations of climatic processes such as precipitation and evaporation are key to such coupled tectonic/climatic models. Intramountain high plateaus are extreme cases of climatic control on sediment flow, because they often consist of internally-drained (endorheic) basins that trap most erosional products within the orogen. Such intramountain sediment accumulation leads to high-plateaus characterized by high topography and, in spite of the compressional tectonics, low relief. The development of high-plateaus has been extensively studied in relation to the tectonic setting and to inherited structures in the crust, but in this presentation I will concentrate on the potential climatic controls. Computer modeling results will be shown suggesting that a preexisting dry climate, through its effects on surface transport and orogenic evolution, may significantly modify tectonic deformation and contribute to the later formation of a high plateau. This is due to the following feedback: (1) dry climatic conditions at the early stages of orogenesis favor the tectonic defeat of rivers draining the orogen, promoting internal drainage (endorheism); (2) endorheism extends the life of intramountain basins maximizing the mass trapped within the orogen, rising lithostatic stress underneath and expelling fault deformation towards the flanks of the orogen; and (3) this propagation of deformation further isolates the central parts of the orogen from incoming precipitation, reinforcing sediment trapping and topographic leveling of

  10. Experiments on the scaling of growth and saturation of two-plasmon decay with plasma conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fein, J. R.; Holloway, J. P.; Edgell, D. H.; Froula, D. H.; Haberberger, D.; Keiter, P. A.; Myatt, J. F.; Trantham, M. R.; Drake, R. P.

    2015-11-01

    In inertial confinement fusion (ICF), multiple overlapping lasers interact with under-dense plasma to drive the two-plasmon decay (TPD) instability. The resulting plasma waves can produce hot electrons that preheat the ICF capsule fuel and reduce compression efficiency. Preliminary experiments have demonstrated that TPD can be controlled through varying electron density scale-length and temperature by increasing plasma Z. Additionally, simulations have indicated that TPD may saturate by nonlinear processes that depend on plasma Z through the ion-acoustic wave damping rate. We have performed experiments on OMEGA EP to thoroughly study the dependence of TPD on plasma conditions, through varying target material over a wide range of Z. Hot electron energy is observed to decrease as plasma Z increases, in a manner that is consistent with the shortening electron density scale-lengths that were measured. Finally, we present a scaling of total hot electron energy with the TPD linear gain parameter to identify whether the instability has nonlinearly saturated. This work is funded by the US DOE, through grant DE-NA0001840, by the NNSA/OICF through the LLE, U. of Rochester under grant DE-NA0001944, and by the DTRA, grant DTRA-1-10-0077.

  11. Laboratory and numerical decompression experiments: an insight into the nucleation and growth of bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spina, L.; Colucci, S.; De'Michieli Vitturi, M.; Scheu, B.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2014-12-01

    Numerical modeling, joined with experimental investigations, is fundamental for studying the dynamics of magmatic fluid into the conduit, where direct observations are unattainable. Furthermore, laboratory experiments can provide invaluable data to vunalidate complex multiphase codes. With the aim on unveil the essence of nucleation process, as well as the behavior of the multiphase magmatic fluid, we performed slow decompression experiments in a shock tube system. We choose silicon oil as analogue for the magmatic melt, and saturated it with Argon at 10 MPa for 72h. The slow decompression to atmospheric conditions was monitored through a high speed camera and pressure sensors, located into the experimental conduit. The experimental conditions of the decompression process have then been reproduced numerically with a compressible multiphase solver based on OpenFOAM. Numerical simulations have been performed by the OpenFOAM compressibleInterFoam solver for 2 compressible, non-isothermal immiscible fluids, using a VOF (volume of fluid) phase-fraction based interface capturing approach. The data extracted from 2D images obtained from laboratory analyses were compared to the outcome of numerical investigation, showing the capability of the model to capture the main processes studied.

  12. Incidence of Endophthalmitis after Intravitreal Anti-vascular Endothelial Growth Factor: Experience in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rashaed, Saba; Alsulaiman, Sulaiman M.; Alrushood, Abdulaziz Adel; Almasaud, Jluwi; Arevalo, J. Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report the incidence of endophthalmitis, the clinical and microbiological aspects, after intravitreal (IVT) injection of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor. Methods: A chart review was performed of patients diagnosed with endophthalmitis after receiving IVT injections of bevacizumab (Avastin) and ranibizumab (Lucentis) presenting to King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital (KKESH) from May 2006 to December 2012. Endophthalmitis was diagnosed clinically as an intraocular infection with vitreous involvement that required treatment with IVT antibiotics or had undergone pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) to remove the suspected microorganism. Main outcome measures were the incidence of endophthalmitis and the clinical and microbiological features. Results: Seven cases of endophthalmitis were identified, there was 1 (0.004%) case of endophthalmitis of 22674 IVT injections performed at KKESH. All cases were after IVT bevacizumab. Three (42.85%) cases were culture-positive and caused by Staphylococcus epidermidis. The initial management was vitreous tap and IVT injection of antibiotics followed by PPV in 6 (85.7%) cases. One (14.3%) case underwent evisceration. Visual acuity improved at last visit in only 2 (28.6%) cases. The rate of endophthalmitis was 0.0004% for bevacizumab. Conclusions: The rate of endophthalmitis after IVT bevacizumab and ranibizumab was very low. We recommend following a standardized injection protocol, adherence to sterile techniques, and proper patient follow-up are determinant factors for low incidence rates. In addition, endophthalmitis after IVT bevacizumab and ranibizumab have poor visual outcomes despite prompt treatment. PMID:26957840

  13. Growth of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes from human solid cancers: summary of a 5-year experience.

    PubMed

    Yannelli, J R; Hyatt, C; McConnell, S; Hines, K; Jacknin, L; Parker, L; Sanders, M; Rosenberg, S A

    1996-02-01

    Between 1989 and 1993, 255 tumor biopsies representing 4 tumor histologies (melanoma, breast cancer, colon cancer and renal cell cancer) were received by the Surgery Branch of the National Cancer Institute. Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) were grown from single-cell suspensions of tumor biopsies over the course of 30-45 days. The TIL were grown in medium containing IL-2. To obtain numbers suitable for therapy (>10(11)), TIL were expanded using a large-scale system of cell culture and harvesting. While the largest number of biopsies was obtained from melanoma patients, TIL were successfully grown from 160 of 255 tumor biopsies representing all 4 histologies. Under the culture conditions employed, several characteristics of TIL expansion were observed. The cell surface phenotype of TIL which grew out from the tumor biopsies was generally a mix of CD3+/CD4+ or CD3+/CD8+ lymphocytes. Only TIL from melanoma biopsies were found to be consistently cytolytic and, in many cases, lysed autologous tumor cells preferentially. Interestingly, TIL derived from extra-nodal sites of metastatic melanoma biopsies (subcutaneous, lung, bowel; 36 of 67, 54%) were more likely to have these cytolytic characteristics than TIL derived from tumor-involved lymph node biopsies (7 of 39, 18%). The present study summarizes 5 years of laboratory effort and validates the technologies developed for the large-scale growth and harvesting of TIL. In addition, it summarizes the laboratory effort supporting previously published clinical reports on TIL from our group. PMID:8621219

  14. Short pulse duration shock initiation experiments plus ignition and growth modeling on Composition B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Chadd M.; Tarver, Craig M.

    2014-05-01

    Composition B (63% RDX, 36% TNT, 1% wax) is still a widely used energetic material whose shock initiation characteristics are necessary to understand. It is now possible to shock initiate Composition B and other secondary explosives at diameters well below their characteristic failure diameters for unconfined self-sustaining detonation. This is done using very high velocity, very thin, small diameter flyer plates accelerated by electric or laser power sources. Recently experimental detonation versus failure to detonate threshold flyer velocity curves for Composition B using several KaptonTM flyer thicknesses and diameters were measured. Flyer plates with diameters of 2 mm successfully detonated Composition B, which has a nominal failure diameter of 4.3 mm. The shock pressures required for these initiations are greater than the Chapman-Jouguet (C-J) pressure in self-sustaining Composition B detonation waves. The initiation process is two-dimensional, because both rear and side rarefactions can affect the shocked Composition B reaction rates. The Ignition and Growth reactive flow model for Composition B is extended to yield accurate simulations of this new threshold velocity data for various flyer thicknesses.

  15. Managing data for a multicountry longitudinal study: experience from the WHO Multicentre Growth Reference Study.

    PubMed

    Onyango, Adelheid W; Pinol, Alain J; de Onis, Mercedes

    2004-03-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) Multicentre Growth Reference (MGRS) data management protocol was designed to create and manage a large data bank of information collected from multiple sites over a period of several years. Data collection and processing instruments were prepared centrally and used in a standardized fashion across sites. The data management system contained internal validation features for timely detection of data errors, and its standard operating procedures stipulated a method of master file updating and correction that maintained a clear trail for data auditing purposes. Each site was responsible for collecting, entering, verifying, and validating data, and for creating site-level master files. Data from the sites were sent to the MGRS Coordinating Centre every month for master file consolidation and more extensive quality control checking. All errors identified at the Coordinating Centre were communicated to the site for correction at source. The protocol imposed transparency on the sites' data management activities but also ensured access to technical help with operation and maintenance of the system. Through the rigorous implementation of what has been a highly demanding protocol, the MGRS has accumulated a large body of very high-quality data. PMID:15069919

  16. Growth rate for the selective epitaxial growth of III-V compounds inside submicron shallow-trench-isolation trenches on Si (001) substrates by MOVPE: Modeling and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, S.; Merckling, C.; Guo, W.; Waldron, N.; Caymax, M.; Vandervorst, W.; Seefeldt, M.; Heyns, M.

    2014-04-01

    A mathematical model was developed to examine the growth rate of III-V compounds inside sub-micron trenches by MOVPE. Based on this model, we theoretically analyzed the possible dependence of the growth rate on the trench width primarily from two aspects, i.e. Knudson diffusion and enhanced equilibrium vapor pressure due to the shrinking trench size. Then, associated with the experimental data from the growth of both InAlAs and InAs, we found that the average growth rate inside submicron trenches is primarily influenced by trench diffusion type under typical growth conditions.

  17. A new data processing technique for Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yongteng; Tu, Shaoyong; Miao, Wenyong; Wu, Junfeng; Wang, Lifeng; Yin, Chuansheng; Hao, Yidan; Ye, Wenhua; Ding, Yongkun; Jiang, Shaoen

    2016-06-01

    Typical face-on experiments for Rayleigh-Taylor instability study involve the time-resolved radiography of an accelerated foil with line-of-sight of the radiography along the direction of motion. The usual method which derives perturbation amplitudes from the face-on images reverses the actual image transmission procedure, so the obtained results will have a large error in the case of large optical depth. In order to improve the accuracy of data processing, a new data processing technique has been developed to process the face-on images. This technique based on convolution theorem, refined solutions of optical depth can be achieved by solving equations. Furthermore, we discuss both techniques for image processing, including the influence of modulation transfer function of imaging system and the backlighter spatial profile. Besides, we use the two methods to the process the experimental results in Shenguang-II laser facility and the comparison shows that the new method effectively improve the accuracy of data processing.

  18. Reproducible Crystal Growth Experiments in Microgravity Science Glovebox at the International Space Station (SUBSA Investigation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostrogorsky, A.; Marin, C.; Volz, M. P.; Bonner, W. A.

    2005-01-01

    Solidification Using a Baffle in Sealed Ampoules (SUBSA) is the first investigation conducted in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) Facility at the International Space Station (ISS) Alpha. 8 single crystals of InSb, doped with Te and Zn, were directionally solidified in microgravity. The experiments were conducted in a furnace with a transparent gradient section, and a video camera, sending images to the earth. The real time images (i) helped seeding, (ii) allowed a direct measurement of the solidification rate. The post-flight characterization of the crystals includes: computed x-ray tomography, Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS), Hall measurements, Atomic Absorption (AA), and 4 point probe analysis. For the first time in microgravity, several crystals having nearly identical initial transients were grown. Reproducible initial transients were obtained with Te-doped InSb. Furthermore, the diffusion controlled end-transient was demonstrated experimentally (SUBSA 02). From the initial transients, the diffusivity of Te and Zn in InSb was determined.

  19. Effects of Atmospheric Pollutants on Plant Growth and on Soil Magnetic Properties: Preliminary Results from Controlled Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapkota, B.; Cioppa, M. T.

    2009-05-01

    of the trace element concentration investigated by AAS show that Pb is below detection limit; Mn is between 2-7 ppm while Zn is below 1ppm. Fe, however is 40 ppm in the control soils and is between 42-160 ppm in contaminated soils. Such low concentrations of Fe could be due to incomplete digestion during sample preparation. Trace element concentrations in soils and in fully grown plants will be examined, from which the concentrations of the trace elements consumed by plants will be inferred. To better understand the effects of the contaminant on plant growth and on soil magnetic characteristics, additional experiments are recommended. It is anticipated that this research will help to improve our understanding about pollution distribution dynamics through the assessment and evaluation of known anthropogenic pollutants in controlled experiments.

  20. Benchmark Data Set for Wheat Growth Models: Field Experiments and AgMIP Multi-Model Simulations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asseng, S.; Ewert, F.; Martre, P.; Rosenzweig, C.; Jones, J. W.; Hatfield, J. L.; Ruane, A. C.; Boote, K. J.; Thorburn, P.J.; Rotter, R. P.

    2015-01-01

    The data set includes a current representative management treatment from detailed, quality-tested sentinel field experiments with wheat from four contrasting environments including Australia, The Netherlands, India and Argentina. Measurements include local daily climate data (solar radiation, maximum and minimum temperature, precipitation, surface wind, dew point temperature, relative humidity, and vapor pressure), soil characteristics, frequent growth, nitrogen in crop and soil, crop and soil water and yield components. Simulations include results from 27 wheat models and a sensitivity analysis with 26 models and 30 years (1981-2010) for each location, for elevated atmospheric CO2 and temperature changes, a heat stress sensitivity analysis at anthesis, and a sensitivity analysis with soil and crop management variations and a Global Climate Model end-century scenario.

  1. Beyond Agar: Gel Substrates with Improved Optical Clarity and Drug Efficiency and Reduced Autofluorescence for Microbial Growth Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Jaeger, Philipp A.; McElfresh, Cameron; Wong, Lily R.

    2015-01-01

    Agar, a seaweed extract, has been the standard support matrix for microbial experiments for over a century. Recent developments in high-throughput genetic screens have created a need to reevaluate the suitability of agar for use as colony support, as modern robotic printing systems now routinely spot thousands of colonies within the area of a single microtiter plate. Identifying optimal biophysical, biochemical, and biological properties of the gel support matrix in these extreme experimental conditions is instrumental to achieving the best possible reproducibility and sensitivity. Here we systematically evaluate a range of gelling agents by using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model microbe. We find that carrageenan and Phytagel have superior optical clarity and reduced autofluorescence, crucial for high-resolution imaging and fluorescent reporter screens. Nutrient choice and use of refined Noble agar or pure agarose reduce the effective dose of numerous selective drugs by >50%, potentially enabling large cost savings in genetic screens. Using thousands of mutant yeast strains to compare colony growth between substrates, we found no evidence of significant growth or nutrient biases between gel substrates, indicating that researchers could freely pick and choose the optimal gel for their respective application and experimental condition. PMID:26070672

  2. Surface growth for molten silicon infiltration into carbon millimeter-sized channels: Lattice-Boltzmann simulations, experiments and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergi, Danilo; Camarano, Antonio; Molina, José Miguel; Ortona, Alberto; Narciso, Javier

    2016-01-01

    The process of liquid silicon (Si) infiltration is investigated for channels with radii from 0.25[mm] to 0.75[mm] drilled in compact carbon (C) preforms. The advantage of this setup is that the study of the phenomenon results can be simplified. For comparison purposes, attempts are made in order to work out a framework for evaluating the accuracy of simulations. The approach relies on dimensionless numbers involving the properties of the surface reaction. It turns out that complex hydrodynamic behavior derived from second Newton law can be made consistent with Lattice-Boltzmann (LB) simulations. The experiments give clear evidence that the growth of silicon carbide (SiC) proceeds in two different stages and basic mechanisms are highlighted. LB simulations prove to be an effective tool for the description of the growing phase. Namely, essential experimental constraints can be implemented. As a result, the existing models are useful to gain more insight on the process of reactive infiltration into porous media in the first stage of penetration, i.e. up to pore closure because of surface growth. A way allowing one to implement the resistance from chemical reaction in Darcy law is also proposed.

  3. Modeling of light-dependent algal photosynthesis and growth: experiments with the Barents sea diatoms Thalassiosira nordenskioldii and Chaetoceros furcellatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakshaug, Egil; Johnsen, Geir; Andresen, Kjersti; Vernet, Maria

    1991-04-01

    The models by SAKSHAUGet al (1989, Limnology and Oceanography, 34, 198-205) and WEBBet al. (1974, Oecologia, 17, 281-291), for prediction of the gross growth rate of phytoplankton and short-term photosynthesis, respectively, have been modified on the basis of experiments with cultures of the centric diatoms Thalassiosira nordenskioeldii and Chaetoceros furcellatus grown at 0.5°C at combinations of two irradiances (25 and 400μmol m -2s -1) and two day-lengths (12 and 24 h). The models have one spectrum, °σ, which represents chlorophyll a (Chl a) specific absorption of photosynthetically usable light, and introduces a factor q which represents Chla per PSU, functionally defined. The models describe phytoplankton growth in terms of physiologically relevant coefficients. A properly scaled fluorescence excitation spectrum (° F) represents a more appropriate estimate for °σ than the Chl a-specific absorption spectrum ° ac judging from calculations of Φmax (= αB/° σ). On the basis of ° F, Φmax is 0.04 g-at C(mol photons) -1 for gross growth and about 0.05-0.08 for short-term carbon uptake (unfiltered samples). Calculations based on ° ac yield values for Φmax which on average are 44% lower. P vs I (photosynthesis vs irradiance) parameters are relatively independent of day-length and highly dependent on growth irradiance. The product of q [mg Chl a (mol PSU) -1] and τ (the minimum turnover time of the photosynthetic unit, h) increases 2-3-fold from high to low irradiance, thus PmB (= Φmax/ qτ) and Ik(=1/ qτ° σ)decreased. ° F decreases from high to low irradiance. Carbon-specific dark respiration rates are <0.09 day -1. Pigment ratios vary inversely with irradiance and day-length. The Chl a:C ratio is particularly low under high, strong continuous light; Chl c: Cha a ratios are higher for shalde- than for light-adapted cells, while the converse is true for the ratio of the sum of the photoprotective pigments diadinoxanthin and diatoxanthin to Chl a

  4. Design and development of green roof substrate to improve runoff water quality: plant growth experiments and adsorption.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, K; Raja, Franklin D

    2014-10-15

    Many studies worldwide have investigated the potential benefits achievable by transforming brown roofs of buildings to green roofs. However, little literature examined the runoff quality/sorption ability of green roofs. As the green roof substrate is the main component to alter the quality of runoff, this investigation raises the possibility of using a mixture of low-cost inorganic materials to develop a green roof substrate. The tested materials include exfoliated vermiculite, expanded perlite, crushed brick and sand along with organic component (coco-peat). Detailed physical and chemical analyses revealed that each of these materials possesses different characteristics and hence a mix of these materials was desirable to develop an optimal green roof substrate. Using factorial design, 18 different substrate mixes were prepared and detailed examination indicated that mix-12 exhibited desirable characteristics of green roof substrate with low bulk density (431 kg/m(3)), high water holding capacity (39.4%), air filled porosity (19.5%), and hydraulic conductivity (4570 mm/h). The substrate mix also provided maximum support to Portulaca grandiflora (380% total biomass increment) over one month of growth. To explore the leaching characteristics and sorption capacity of developed green roof substrate, a down-flow packed column arrangement was employed. High conductivity and total dissolved solids along with light metal ions (Na, K, Ca and Mg) were observed in the leachates during initial stages of column operation; however the concentration of ions ceased during the final stages of operation (600 min). Experiments with metal-spiked deionized water revealed that green roof substrate possess high sorption capacity towards various heavy metal ions (Al, Fe, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn and Cd). Thus the developed growth substrate possesses desirable characteristics for green roofs along with high sorption capacity. PMID:24981747

  5. Olivine Weathering in Soil, and Its Effects on Growth and Nutrient Uptake in Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.): A Pot Experiment

    PubMed Central

    ten Berge, Hein F. M.; van der Meer, Hugo G.; Steenhuizen, Johan W.; Goedhart, Paul W.; Knops, Pol; Verhagen, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Mineral carbonation of basic silicate minerals regulates atmospheric CO2 on geological time scales by locking up carbon. Mining and spreading onto the earth's surface of fast-weathering silicates, such as olivine, has been proposed to speed up this natural CO2 sequestration (‘enhanced weathering’). While agriculture may offer an existing infrastructure, weathering rate and impacts on soil and plant are largely unknown. Our objectives were to assess weathering of olivine in soil, and its effects on plant growth and nutrient uptake. In a pot experiment with perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), weathering during 32 weeks was inferred from bioavailability of magnesium (Mg) in soil and plant. Olivine doses were equivalent to 1630 (OLIV1), 8150, 40700 and 204000 (OLIV4) kg ha−1. Alternatively, the soluble Mg salt kieserite was applied for reference. Olivine increased plant growth (+15.6%) and plant K concentration (+16.5%) in OLIV4. At all doses, olivine increased bioavailability of Mg and Ni in soil, as well as uptake of Mg, Si and Ni in plants. Olivine suppressed Ca uptake. Weathering estimated from a Mg balance was equivalent to 240 kg ha−1 (14.8% of dose, OLIV1) to 2240 kg ha−1 (1.1%, OLIV4). This corresponds to gross CO2 sequestration of 290 to 2690 kg ha−1 (29 103 to 269 103 kg km−2.) Alternatively, weathering estimated from similarity with kieserite treatments ranged from 13% to 58% for OLIV1. The Olsen model for olivine carbonation predicted 4.0% to 9.0% weathering for our case, independent of olivine dose. Our % values observed at high doses were smaller than this, suggesting negative feedbacks in soil. Yet, weathering appears fast enough to support the ‘enhanced weathering’ concept. In agriculture, olivine doses must remain within limits to avoid imbalances in plant nutrition, notably at low Ca availability; and to avoid Ni accumulation in soil and crop. PMID:22912685

  6. The impact of interventional nephrologists on the growth of a peritoneal dialysis program: Long-term, single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Ros-Ruiz, Silvia; Alonso-Esteve, Ángela; Gutiérrez-Vílchez, Elena; Rudas-Bermúdez, Edisson; Hernández, Domingo

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is an underutilized form of renal replacement therapy. Although a variety of factors have been deemed responsible, timely insertion of a PD catheter may also be a contributory factor. Furthermore, a good catheter implantation technique is important to allow for effective peritoneal access function and long-term technique survival. Studies regarding results obtained by nephrologists in comparison with surgeons have been limited to small single-center experiences. Thus, the objective of this study was to explore the impact of the peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheter insertion by nephrologists compared to surgeons on early catheter complications and on technique survival. We also examine whether PD catheter insertion by nephrologists has a positive impact on the growth in the number of patients using PD. We performed 313 consecutive procedures: 192 catheter insertions and 121 catheter removal from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2013. The main reasons for catheter removal were: renal transplantation, 52 (43%) follow of transfer to HD, 48 (40%) and catheter malfunction, 16 (13%). The patients were mostly male (63.4%) with the mean age of 50.8±15.1 years and 23.8 were diabetics. We only observed seven (2.5%) early complications (<4 weeks) associated to peritoneal catheter surgery (3 peritonitis episodes, 2 hemoperitoneum episodes, one complicated hernia and one omental entrapment). There were not significant differences in surgery-related complications in both periods. The penetration ratio of PD after 2006 was 117% higher compared with procedures performing before this date. In conclusions, we have demonstrated a positive impact on the growth of the PD population when catheter insertion is performed by nephrologists with a minimal incidence of complications associated. PMID:26520209

  7. Jamin-interferometer-setup for the determination of concentration and temperature dependent face-specific crystal growth rates from a single experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eder, Cornelia; Choscz, Carsten; Müller, Vesna; Briesen, Heiko

    2015-09-01

    An interference technique that permits the investigation of the crystal growth from a temperature controlled solution is presented. Contrary to Mach-Zehnder- or Michelson-type interferometers, the Jamin-interferometer applied in this work is characterized by improved thermal and long-time stability. In consequence a single experiment may comprise several temperature steps leading to significant changes in the bulk concentration. A procedure for the automated analysis of the acquired sequence of interference patterns is presented. Within this evaluation procedure the position of the selected crystal face, the bulk concentration and the vertical concentration distribution above the crystal are determined simultaneously. Long-term single crystal growth experiments in the range from 20 to 60 °C with sucrose and lactose crystals are used to test the method. The exact bulk concentration is determined by the interferometer. The obtained results for the growth rate of sucrose are consistent with values given in the literature. The vertical concentration distribution above the two saccharide crystals differs clearly indicating that the diffusion strongly limits the sucrose growth but not the growth of the lactose crystal. The major benefit of the described setup is that the data of a single experiment are sufficient to deduce the parameters of the model equation for the growth rate as a function of temperature and supersaturation.

  8. The outcome of protoplanetary dust growth: pebbles, boulders, or planetesimals?. I. Mapping the zoo of laboratory collision experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güttler, C.; Blum, J.; Zsom, A.; Ormel, C. W.; Dullemond, C. P.

    2010-04-01

    Context. The growth processes from protoplanetary dust to planetesimals are not fully understood. Laboratory experiments and theoretical models have shown that collisions among the dust aggregates can lead to sticking, bouncing, and fragmentation. However, no systematic study on the collisional outcome of protoplanetary dust has been performed so far, so that a physical model of the dust evolution in protoplanetary disks is still missing. Aims: We intend to map the parameter space for the collisional interaction of arbitrarily porous dust aggregates. This parameter space encompasses the dust-aggregate masses, their porosities and the collision velocity. With such a complete mapping of the collisional outcomes of protoplanetary dust aggregates, it will be possible to follow the collisional evolution of dust in a protoplanetary disk environment. Methods: We use literature data, perform laboratory experiments, and apply simple physical models to get a complete picture of the collisional interaction of protoplanetary dust aggregates. Results: We found four different kinds of sticking, two kinds of bouncing, and three kinds of fragmentation as possible outcomes in collisions among protoplanetary dust aggregates. Our best collision model distinguishes between porous and compact dust. We also differentiate between collisions among similar-sized and different-sized bodies. All in all, eight combinations of porosity and mass ratio can be discerned. For each of these cases, we present a complete collision model for dust-aggregate masses between 10-12 and 102 g and collision velocities in the range of 10-4 ldots 104 cm s-1 for arbitrary porosities. This model comprises the collisional outcome, the mass(es) of the resulting aggregate(s) and their porosities. Conclusions: We present the first complete collision model for protoplanetary dust. This collision model can be used for the determination of the dust-growth rate in protoplanetary disks. This paper is dedicated to the

  9. Observations of vortex merger and growth reduction in a dual-mode, supersonic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Willow; Malamud, Guy; Shimony, Assaf; Trantham, Matt; Klein, Sallee; Shvarts, Dov; Kuranz, Carolyn; Drake, R. Paul

    2015-11-01

    The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) generates vortical structures and turbulence at an interface with shear flow. This instability is ubiquitous in natural and engineering systems including astrophysical environments and laboratory plasmas. Detailed measurements of modulation amplitude growth reduction and vortex merger evolving from well-defined initial conditions can benchmark hydrodynamic models and theories. This experiment provides the first measurements of the vortex merger rate of well-characterized seed perturbations evolving under the influence of the KHI in a supersonic flow. These data were obtained by utilizing a sustained laser pulse to drive a steady shockwave into low-density carbon foam, introducing shear along a precision-machined plastic interface. The evolution and merger of the modulations was measured with x-ray radiography and reproduced with 2D hydrodynamic simulations. This work is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, through the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, grant number DE-NA0001840, and the National Laser User Facility Program, grant number DE-NA0002032, and through the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester by the NNSA/OICF under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC52-08NA28302.

  10. Pressure and Temperature Dependence of Growth and Morphology of Escherichia coli: Experiments and Stochastic Model

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pradeep; Libchaber, Albert

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated the growth of Escherichia coli, a mesophilic bacterium, as a function of pressure (P) and temperature (T). Escherichia coli can grow and divide in a wide range of pressure (1–400 atm) and temperature (23–40°C). For T > 30°C, the doubling time of E. coli increases exponentially with pressure and exhibits a departure from exponential behavior at pressures between 250 and 400 atm for all the temperatures studied in our experiments. The sharp change in doubling time is followed by a sharp change in phenotypic transition of E. coli at high pressures where bacterial cells switch to an elongating cell type. We propose a model that this phenotypic change in bacteria at high pressures is an irreversible stochastic process, whereas the switching probability to elongating cell type increases with increasing pressure. The model fits well the experimental data. We discuss our experimental results in the light of structural and thus functional changes in proteins and membranes. PMID:23931326

  11. Cation Uptake and Allocation by Red Pine Seedlings under Cation-Nutrient Stress in a Column Growth Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Zhenqing; Balogh-Brunstad, Zsuzsanna; Grant, Michael R.; Harsh, James B.; Gill, Richard; Thomashow, Linda; Dohnalkova, Alice; Stacks, Daryl; Letourneau, Melissa; Keller, Chester K.

    2014-01-10

    Background and Aims Plant nutrient uptake is affected by environmental stress, but how plants respond to cation-nutrient stress is poorly understood. We assessed the impact of varying degrees of cation-nutrient limitation on cation uptake in an experimental plant-mineral system. Methods Column experiments, with red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.) seedlings growing in sand/mineral mixtures, were conducted for up to nine months under a range of Ca- and K-limited conditions. The Ca and K were supplied from both minerals and nutrient solutions with varying Ca and K concentrations. Results Cation nutrient stress had little impact on carbon allocation after nine months of plant growth and K was the limiting nutrient for biomass production. The Ca/Sr and K/Rb ratio results allowed independent estimation of dissolution incongruency and discrimination against Sr and Rb during cation uptake processes. The fraction of K in biomass from biotite increased with decreasing K supply from nutrient solutions. The mineral anorthite was consistently the major source of Ca, regardless of nutrient treatment. Conclusions Red pine seedlings exploited more mineral K in response to more severe K deficiency. This did not occur for Ca. Plant discrimination factors must be carefully considered to accurately identify nutrient sources using cation tracers.

  12. Can plants grow on Mars and the moon: a growth experiment on Mars and moon soil simulants.

    PubMed

    Wamelink, G W Wieger; Frissel, Joep Y; Krijnen, Wilfred H J; Verwoert, M Rinie; Goedhart, Paul W

    2014-01-01

    When humans will settle on the moon or Mars they will have to eat there. Food may be flown in. An alternative could be to cultivate plants at the site itself, preferably in native soils. We report on the first large-scale controlled experiment to investigate the possibility of growing plants in Mars and moon soil simulants. The results show that plants are able to germinate and grow on both Martian and moon soil simulant for a period of 50 days without any addition of nutrients. Growth and flowering on Mars regolith simulant was much better than on moon regolith simulant and even slightly better than on our control nutrient poor river soil. Reflexed stonecrop (a wild plant); the crops tomato, wheat, and cress; and the green manure species field mustard performed particularly well. The latter three flowered, and cress and field mustard also produced seeds. Our results show that in principle it is possible to grow crops and other plant species in Martian and Lunar soil simulants. However, many questions remain about the simulants' water carrying capacity and other physical characteristics and also whether the simulants are representative of the real soils. PMID:25162657

  13. Can Plants Grow on Mars and the Moon: A Growth Experiment on Mars and Moon Soil Simulants

    PubMed Central

    Wamelink, G. W. Wieger; Frissel, Joep Y.; Krijnen, Wilfred H. J.; Verwoert, M. Rinie; Goedhart, Paul W.

    2014-01-01

    When humans will settle on the moon or Mars they will have to eat there. Food may be flown in. An alternative could be to cultivate plants at the site itself, preferably in native soils. We report on the first large-scale controlled experiment to investigate the possibility of growing plants in Mars and moon soil simulants. The results show that plants are able to germinate and grow on both Martian and moon soil simulant for a period of 50 days without any addition of nutrients. Growth and flowering on Mars regolith simulant was much better than on moon regolith simulant and even slightly better than on our control nutrient poor river soil. Reflexed stonecrop (a wild plant); the crops tomato, wheat, and cress; and the green manure species field mustard performed particularly well. The latter three flowered, and cress and field mustard also produced seeds. Our results show that in principle it is possible to grow crops and other plant species in Martian and Lunar soil simulants. However, many questions remain about the simulants' water carrying capacity and other physical characteristics and also whether the simulants are representative of the real soils. PMID:25162657

  14. The 3-5 semiconductor solid solution single crystal growth. [low gravity float zone growth experiments using gallium indium antimonides and cadmium tellurides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gertner, E. R.

    1980-01-01

    Techniques used for liquid and vapor phase epitaxy of gallium indium arsenide are described and the difficulties encountered are examined. Results show that the growth of bulk III-V solid solution single crystals in a low gravity environment will not have a major technological impact. The float zone technique in a low gravity environment is demonstrated using cadmium telluride. It is shown that this approach can result in the synthesis of a class of semiconductors that can not be grown in normal gravity because of growth problems rooted in the nature of their phase diagrams.

  15. Magmatic underplating and crustal growth in the Emeishan Large Igneous Province, SW China, revealed by a passive seismic experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yun; Xu, Yigang; Xu, Tao; Si, Shaokun; Liang, Xiaofeng; Tian, Xiaobo; Deng, Yangfan; Chen, Lin; Wang, Peng; Xu, Yihe; Lan, Haiqiang; Xiao, Fuhui; Li, Wei; Zhang, Xi; Yuan, Xiaohui; Badal, José; Teng, Jiwen

    2015-12-01

    In an attempt to characterize the subsurface structure that is related to fossil mantle plume activity, a comprehensive geophysical investigation was conducted in the Emeishan Large Igneous Province (ELIP). The nature and geometry of the crust were examined within the scheme of the domal structure of ELIP, which comprises the Inner, Intermediate and Outer zones, which are defined on the basis of the biostratigraphy of pre-volcanic sediments. The bulk crustal properties within the Inner Zone are characterized by high density, high P-wave velocity, high Vp/Vs ratios and large crustal thickness. A visible continuous seismic converter is present in the upper part of the crust in the whole Intermediate Zone and the eastern part of the Inner Zone, but it is absent in the Inner Zone, where another seismic converter is observed in the lower part of the crust. The geometric configuration of these converters is attributable to the addition of mantle-derived melts to the pre-existing crust and subsequent interaction between them. The crustal geometry, which is delineated by the migrated image of receiver functions from the passive seismic experiment, and the crustal properties collectively suggest that a mafic layer of 15-20 km thickness and 150-180 km width exists at the base of the crust in the Inner Zone. Such a mafic layer reflects a vertical crustal growth through magmatic underplating at the base of the crust and intraplating within the upper crust. The salient spatial correlation between the deep crustal structure and the dome strongly supports a genetic link between crustal thickening and plume activity, if the pre-volcanic domal uplift is generated by the Permian Emeishan mantle plume. This arrangement is further supported by the consistency of the extent of crustal uplift estimated by isostatic equilibrium modeling and sedimentary data. This study therefore characterizes and provides evidence for a plume-modified crust in a large igneous province.

  16. Calculations for NIF first quad gas-filled hohlraum experiments testing beryllium microstructure growth and laser plasma interaction physics

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, S. R.; Fernández, J. C.; Hoffman, N. M.; Kindel, J. M.; Langdon, A. Bruce

    2004-01-01

    The first quad of the NIF provides four nearly collinear f/20 laser beams, which can be treated as a single f/8 beam of maximum energy 16 kJ. We are designing experiments on halfraums in which the composite beam is focused in the plane of the (single) halfraum laser entry hole (LEH) with its symmetry axis collinear with the halfiaum symmetry axis. For most of the calculations, the halfraum diameter is 1.6mm, the LEH is 1.2mm, and axial length is 3.0mm. The incident laser power consists of an early foot followed by a final peak. Peak radiation temperatures for this relatively narrow hohlraum are greater than for wider hohlraums of the same length. Plasma conditions within the halfraum are calculated with Lasnex using azimuthally symmetric, (r,z) geometry, taking into account a polyimide membrane which contains the fill gas (CH{sub 2}) within the halfraum. Estimates for microstructure growth due to the volume crystalline structure within a beryllium slab mounted in the halfraum sidewall are obtained by a post-processor, which applies plasma conditions within the halfraum to an ablatively accelerated, two-dimensional beryllium slab. We present a detailed simulation of the hohlraum conditions resulting from a laser spot of diameter 500 {mu}m, with peak intensity at 3.5 x 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}, a comparison with a simulation with the same power-time profile at an intensity about 1/4 as great, and a comparison with a simulation with more detailed attention to hydro coupling between the gold and gas-fill regions of the hohlraum. We are currently attempting to model the consequences of possible beam filamentation during the pulse.

  17. A step-by-step experiment of 3C-SiC hetero-epitaxial growth on 4H-SiC by CVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Bin; Jia, Ren-Xu; Hu, Ji-Chao; Tsai, Cheng-Ying; Lin, Hao-Hsiung; Zhang, Yu-Ming

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the growth mechanism of hetero-epitaxial SiC, a step-by-step experiment of 3C-SiC epitaxial layers grown on 4H-SiC on-axis substrates by the CVD method are reported in this paper. Four step experiments with four one-quarter 4H-SiC wafers were performed. Optical microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to characterize the morphology of the epitaxial layers. It was previously found that the main factor affecting the epilayer morphology was double-positioning boundary (DPB) defects, which normally were in high density with shallow grooves. However, a protrusive regular "hill" morphology with a much lower density was shown in our experiment in high-temperature growth conditions. The anisotropic migration of adatoms is regarded as forming the morphology of DPB defects, and a new "DPB defects assist epitaxy" growth mode has been proposed based on the Frank-van der Merwe growth mode. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction were used to examine the polytypes and the quality of the epitaxial layers.

  18. A diffusion-controlled kinetic model for growth of Au-catalyzed ZnO nanorods: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejazi, S. R.; Madaah Hosseini, H. R.

    2007-11-01

    A kinetic model for growth of ZnO nanorods via vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism based on the bulk diffusion of Zn atoms through the Au-Zn droplet is presented. The dependences of the growth rate on size are given quantitatively. A general expression for the growth rate of nanorods during VLS process is derived. The derived formula shows the dependences of growth rate on lateral size of nanorods, concentration and supersaturation of Zn atoms in the liquid droplet. Based on the presented kinetic model the smaller nanorods have faster growth rate. Au-catalyzed ZnO nanorods are grown by chemical vapor transport and condensation (CVTC) process experimentally. Theoretical and experimental rate/radius curves are compared to each other. Theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  19. On the nature of growth and new growth based on experiments designed to reveal a structure and function for laboratory space. Part I. A synopsis of experimental results and discussion (thermodynamics aspects, transmission of cell radiations, the role of oxygen).

    PubMed

    Reid, B L

    1989-06-01

    Experiments were designed to investigate the contribution of space existing outside the immediate range of chemical reactions of crystal growth and biological phenomena with special reference to growth. Results have been interpreted on the basis that space has both structure and function. Properties derived from the interpretation include action at a distance, memory and the ability to sustain matter in steady states which inter alia constitute patterns of growth. A throughflow (or dissipation) of space was shown necessary to sustain the pattern. Patterns so formed in biomatter can reproduce themselves as virtual images which can be rescued as real images which exhibit a remarkable fidelity of copy. The discussion enters contributions to the prime idea that space has structure and function by recource to modern ideas on non-linear thermodynamics, radiations between cells, quantum field theory and vortex theory, only the first two of which are treated in this paper. PMID:2755366

  20. Influence of CO2 change during 90-day experiment on growth characteristics and photosynthetic activity in vegetables grown in Lunar Palace 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Lingzhi; Liu, Hong; Wang, Minjuan; Fu, Yuming; Dong, Chen; Liu, Guanghui

    To establish bioregenerative life support system (BLSS) on lunar or Mars bases in the future, it is necessary to firstly conduct manned simulation experiments on the ground. For this purpose, Lunar palace 1 as an integrative experimental facility for permanent astrobase life support artificial closed ecosystem was set up, and 90-day experiment was carried out in this system. Vegtables as one of the important plant units, provide various nutrient content for crews in the system, such as vitamin, antioxidants and so on. However, it is not clear yet that how the CO _{2} change during 90-day experiment to affect on growth characteristics and photosynthetic activity in vegtables grown in the system. In this study, red lettuce, red rape, romaine lettuce, and bibb lettuce grown in the system were chosen as the subject investigated. Growth, expressed as dry weight, length of shoot and root, leaf area, was mearsured, and photosynthesis,expressed as net photosynthetic rate, intercellular CO _{2} concentration, chlorophyll contents and fluorescence was analyzed to detemind influence of CO _{2} change during 90-day experiment on growth in vegtables grown in the system.

  1. Appendix I: Weather, soils, cultural practices, and cotton growth data from the 1989 FACE Experiment in IBSNAT Format

    SciTech Connect

    Kimball, B.A.; La Morte, R.L.; Peresta, G.J.; Mauney, J.R.; Lewin, K.F.; Hendrey, G.R.

    1992-12-31

    A major objective of the free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment (FACE) project is to provide data suitable for validation of plant growth models. These models are intended to have the capability to predict the effects of the increasing atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration and its interactions with climate variables on future plant growth, yield, and water use. And indeed one such model called COTCO2 has been written for cotton in cooperation with the FACE project. Therefore, it is important that the data from the project be assembled for convenient use by modelers seeking to validate COTCO2 or other cotton growth models. The objective of this Appendix is to present these data in a standard format used by many plant growth models (the data are also available on diskette by request). 31 refs.

  2. Surface-crack growth: Models, experiments, and structures; Proceedings of the Symposium, Sparks, NV, Apr. 25, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuter, Walter G. (Editor); Underwood, John H. (Editor); Newman, James C., Jr. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The present volume on surface-crack growth modeling, experimental methods, and structures, discusses elastoplastic behavior, the fracture analysis of three-dimensional bodies with surface cracks, optical measurements of free-surface effects on natural surfaces and through cracks, an optical and finite-element investigation of a plastically deformed surface flaw under tension, fracture behavior prediction for rapidly loaded surface-cracked specimens, and surface cracks in thick laminated fiber composite plates. Also discussed are a novel study procedure for crack initiation and growth in thermal fatigue testing, the growth of surface cracks under fatigue and monotonically increasing load, the subcritical growth of a surface flaw, surface crack propagation in notched and unnotched rods, and theoretical and experimental analyses of surface cracks in weldments.

  3. Heat flow control and segregation in directional solidification: Development of an experimental and theoretical basis for Bridgman-type growth experiments in a microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, A. F.

    1986-01-01

    Within the framework of the proposed research, emphasis was placed on application of magnetic fields to semiconductor growth systems. It was found that magnetic fields up to 3 kGauss do not affect the growth behavior nor the macro-segregation behavior in the system Ge(Ga). Applied fields are found to significantlty alter the radial dopant distribution, which is attributed to alterations in the spatial orientation of convective cells. Increasing the magnetic field to 30 kGauss is found to have a fundamental effect on dopant segregation. Emphasis is also placed on the potential of KC-135 flights for preliminary studies on the effects of reduced gravity environments on the wetting behavior of semiconductor systems in growth configuration. The limited number of experiments conducted does not allow any conclusions on the merits of KC-135 flights for semiconductor processing research.

  4. Using analog flow experiments to model morphologies developed during episodic dome growth: A case study of Mount St Helens, 1980-1986

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altman, K. M.; Teasdale, R.

    2009-12-01

    From 1980 to 1986 the dacite dome at Mount St. Helens was emplaced as a series of 17 events, identified by different growth rates, volumes, height to diameter ratios, emplacement rates, surface textures and dome morphologies (Swanson, 1989). Rates of emplacement characterize three periods; between October 18, 1980 and the end of 1981 the growth rate was 1.8 x 10^6 m^3/month; between March 1982 and March 1984 the growth rate was 1.3 x 10^6 m^3/month; followed by a growth rate of 0.62 x 10^6 m^3/month until the end of the emplacement events in 1986 (Swanson, 1989). The shape of the dome changed from 1980 to 1986 as a function of magma viscosity, tensile strength of the hot core, and thickness of the outer shell (Swanson, 1989). The height to diameter ratios (h:d) recorded throughout the growth of the dome have been used to quantify the changes in the shape of the dome. The dome was flatter during the first period of emplacement when larger volumes kept the dome hotter and hindered the formation of a thick, cool outer crust (Swanson, 1989). Once the growth rate slowed by June 1981, a thick skin had formed and allowed the dome to steepen (Swanson, 1989). Analog models presented here aim to reproduce the emplacement of the domes based on observations and data recorded at Mount St. Helens from 1980 to 1986. Flow experiments use a slurry of PEG (poly-ethelyne glycol) mixed with kaolin powder that is pumped into a tank of cold water (Fink and Griffiths, 1998). PEG is used because it is liquid at room temperature and solidifies in the cold water. Kaolin powder is added to the PEG to simulate the viscosity of the dacite domes. The observed and recorded data from Mount St. Helens are used to constrain analog flow model parameters such as slope, effusion rate, and PEG viscosity in an attempt to recreate the dome morphologies observed in the 1980 to 1986 episodes. As expected, dome morphology in experiments varies with the crustal thickness developed during experiments. The

  5. SHOCK INITIATION EXPERIMENTS ON THE LLM-105 EXPLOSIVE RX-55-AA AT 25?C AND 150?C WITH IGNITION AND GROWTH MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, F; Vandersall, K S; Tarver, C M; Urtiew, P A

    2007-06-15

    Shock initiation experiments on the LLM-105 based explosive RX-55-AA (95% LLM-105, 5% Viton by weight) were performed at 25 C and 150 C to obtain in-situ pressure gauge data, run-distance-to-detonation thresholds, and Ignition and Growth modeling parameters. A 101 mm diameter propellant driven gas gun was utilized to initiate the explosive sample with manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge packages placed between sample slices. The run-distance-to-detonation points on the Pop-plot for these experiments showed agreement at 25 C with previously published data on a similar LLM-105 based formulation RX-55-AB as well as a slight sensitivity increase at elevated temperature (150 C) as expected. Ignition and Growth modeling parameters were obtained with a reasonable fit to the experimental data.

  6. Cross-national comparison of prenatal methamphetamine exposure on infant and early child physical growth: A natural experiment

    PubMed Central

    Abar, Beau; LaGasse, Linda L.; Wouldes, Trecia; Derauf, Chris; Newman, Elana; Shah, Rizwan; Smith, Lynne M.; Arria, Amelia M.; Huestis, Marilyn A.; DellaGrotta, Sheri; Dansereau, Lynne M.; Wilcox, Tara; Neal, Charles R.; Lester, Barry M.

    2013-01-01

    The current study seeks to compare the effects of prenatal methamphetamine exposure (PME) on infant and child physical growth between the United States (US) and New Zealand (NZ). This cross-national comparison provides a unique opportunity to examine the potential impact of services provided to drug using mothers on child health. Methods The longitudinal Infant Development, Environment and Lifestyle (IDEAL) study of PME from birth to 36 months was conducted in the US and NZ. The US cohort included 204 children with PME and 212 non-PME matched comparisons (NPME); the NZ cohort included 108 children with PME and 115 NPME matched comparisons. Latent growth curve models were used to examine effects of PME, country of origin, and the country × PME interaction on growth in length/height and weight. Results In regard to length/height, PME and country of origin were associated with initial length and growth over time. There was also a significant interaction effect, such that children with PME in the US were shorter at birth than children with PME in NZ after controlling for other prenatal exposures, infant set, socioeconomic status, and maternal height. In regard to weight, there was only an effect of country of origin. Conclusions Effects of PME on infant and child growth were shown to differ across countries, with exposed children in NZ faring better than exposed children in the US. Implications for prevention programs and public policy are discussed. PMID:23943149

  7. Growth and Phenology of Three Dwarf Shrub Species in a Six-Year Soil Warming Experiment at the Alpine Treeline

    PubMed Central

    Anadon-Rosell, Alba; Rixen, Christian; Cherubini, Paolo; Wipf, Sonja; Hagedorn, Frank; Dawes, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    Global warming can have substantial impacts on the phenological and growth patterns of alpine and Arctic species, resulting in shifts in plant community composition and ecosystem dynamics. We evaluated the effects of a six-year experimental soil warming treatment (+4°C, 2007–2012) on the phenology and growth of three co-dominant dwarf shrub species growing in the understory of Larix decidua and Pinus uncinata at treeline in the Swiss Alps. We monitored vegetative and reproductive phenology of Vaccinium myrtillus, Vaccinium gaultherioides and Empetrum hermaphroditum throughout the early growing season of 2012 and, following a major harvest at peak season, we measured the biomass of above-ground ramet fractions. For all six years of soil warming we measured annual shoot growth of the three species and analyzed ramet age and xylem ring width of V. myrtillus. Our results show that phenology of the three species was more influenced by snowmelt timing, and also by plot tree species (Larix or Pinus) in the case of V. myrtillus, than by soil warming. However, the warming treatment led to increased V. myrtillus total above-ground ramet biomass (+36% in 2012), especially new shoot biomass (+63% in 2012), as well as increased new shoot increment length and xylem ring width (+22% and +41%, respectively; average for 2007–2012). These results indicate enhanced overall growth of V. myrtillus under soil warming that was sustained over six years and was not caused by an extended growing period in early summer. In contrast, E. hermaphroditum only showed a positive shoot growth response to warming in 2011 (+21%), and V. gaultherioides showed no significant growth response. Our results indicate that V. myrtillus might have a competitive advantage over the less responsive co-occurring dwarf shrub species under future global warming. PMID:24956273

  8. Growth and phenology of three dwarf shrub species in a six-year soil warming experiment at the alpine treeline.

    PubMed

    Anadon-Rosell, Alba; Rixen, Christian; Cherubini, Paolo; Wipf, Sonja; Hagedorn, Frank; Dawes, Melissa A

    2014-01-01

    Global warming can have substantial impacts on the phenological and growth patterns of alpine and Arctic species, resulting in shifts in plant community composition and ecosystem dynamics. We evaluated the effects of a six-year experimental soil warming treatment (+4°C, 2007-2012) on the phenology and growth of three co-dominant dwarf shrub species growing in the understory of Larix decidua and Pinus uncinata at treeline in the Swiss Alps. We monitored vegetative and reproductive phenology of Vaccinium myrtillus, Vaccinium gaultherioides and Empetrum hermaphroditum throughout the early growing season of 2012 and, following a major harvest at peak season, we measured the biomass of above-ground ramet fractions. For all six years of soil warming we measured annual shoot growth of the three species and analyzed ramet age and xylem ring width of V. myrtillus. Our results show that phenology of the three species was more influenced by snowmelt timing, and also by plot tree species (Larix or Pinus) in the case of V. myrtillus, than by soil warming. However, the warming treatment led to increased V. myrtillus total above-ground ramet biomass (+36% in 2012), especially new shoot biomass (+63% in 2012), as well as increased new shoot increment length and xylem ring width (+22% and +41%, respectively; average for 2007-2012). These results indicate enhanced overall growth of V. myrtillus under soil warming that was sustained over six years and was not caused by an extended growing period in early summer. In contrast, E. hermaphroditum only showed a positive shoot growth response to warming in 2011 (+21%), and V. gaultherioides showed no significant growth response. Our results indicate that V. myrtillus might have a competitive advantage over the less responsive co-occurring dwarf shrub species under future global warming. PMID:24956273

  9. The use of capacitive resistivity imaging (CRI) for monitoring laboratory experiments simulating permafrost growth, persistence and thaw in bedrock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuras, O.; Uhlemann, S.; Krautblatter, M.; Murton, J.; Haslam, E.; Wilkinson, P.; Meldrum, P.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the impact on bedrock properties of permafrost degradation as a result of climate change is of major interest in a number of areas, including the assessment of rising instability of high-altitude mountain rock walls. The remote sensing of rock walls with the primary aim of monitoring the spatial and temporal behaviour of rock temperature (and thus permafrost distribution) is an emerging field of research for geohazard mitigation where geophysical tomography has the potential to make a significant and lasting contribution. Recent work has shown that temperature-calibrated Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) using galvanic sensors is capable of imaging recession and re-advance of rock permafrost in response to the ambient temperature regime, yet the use of galvanic sensors can impose practical limitations on field measurements. In this study, we evaluate the use of Capacitive Resistivity Imaging (CRI), a technique based upon low-frequency, capacitively-coupled measurements across permanently installed multi-sensor arrays, in order to emulate well-established ERT methodology, but without the need for galvanic contact on frozen soils or rocks. Numerical simulation of multi-sensor CRI measurements on the rock samples under a quasi-static electromagnetic regime allowed us initially to validate our measurement concept and prototype CRI instrumentation. We have subsequently applied CRI as well as conventional ERT to controlled long-term experiments in the Permafrost Laboratory at the University of Sussex, simulating permafrost growth, persistence and thaw in bedrock. Water-saturated samples of limestone and chalk (450 mm high, 300 mm × 300 mm wide) of varying porosity are being monitored. The lower half of each sample is maintained at temperatures below 0°C (simulating permafrost) and the upper half is cycled above and below 0°C (simulating seasonal thawing and freezing of the overlying active layer). Samples are instrumented with both capacitive and

  10. Simulating Population Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byington, Scott

    1997-01-01

    Presents a strategy to help students grasp the important implications of population growth. Involves an interactive demonstration that allows students to experience exponential and logistic population growth followed by a discussion of the implications of population-growth principles. (JRH)

  11. Do University Teachers Become More Effective with Experience? A Multilevel Growth Model of Students' Evaluations of Teaching over 13 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Herbert W.

    2007-01-01

    Do university teachers, like good wine, improve with age? The purpose of this methodological/substantive study is to apply a multiple-level growth modeling approach to the long-term stability of students' evaluations of teaching effectiveness (SETs). For a diverse cohort of 195 teachers who were evaluated continuously over 13 years (6,024 classes,…

  12. F.A.C.E.S. (Faculty Academic Community Education Showcase): Professional Growth Experiences in a Career University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colbert, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    Institutes of higher education exist for the purpose of developing, fostering, nurturing, and stimulating the intellectual growth and development of students. The core values of a college education provide students conceptual and practical educational opportunities that focus on improving their skills and knowledge. These skills and knowledge…

  13. Pre-Service Teachers' Growth in Understandings of Best Practice Literacy Instruction through Paired Course and Field Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipp, Jamie; Helfrich, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Illiteracy is on the rise in the United States, and the potential negative impact on today's struggling reader is devastating. Now more than ever, preparing pre-service teachers to be effective teachers of literacy is crucial. This study examined the growth in understandings of best practice literacy of eleven pre-service teachers through paired…

  14. Skylab experiments. Volume 3: Materials science. [Skylab experiments on metallurgy, crystal growth, semiconductors, and combustion physics in weightless environment for high school level education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The materials science and technology investigation conducted on the Skylab vehicle are discussed. The thirteen experiments that support these investigations have been planned to evaluate the effect of a weightless environment on melting and resolidification of a variety of metals and semiconductor crystals, and on combustion of solid flammable materials. A glossary of terms which define the space activities and a bibliography of related data are presented.

  15. Modifying mixing and instability growth through the adjustment of initial conditions in a high-energy-density counter-propagating shear experiment on OMEGA

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Merritt, E. C.; Doss, F. W.; Loomis, E. N.; Flippo, K. A.; Kline, J. L.

    2015-06-24

    Counter-propagating shear experiments conducted at the OMEGA Laser Facility have been evaluating the effect of target initial conditions, specifically the characteristics of a tracer foil located at the shear boundary, on Kelvin-Helmholtz instability evolution and experiment transition toward nonlinearity and turbulence in the high-energy-density (HED) regime. Experiments are focused on both identifying and uncoupling the dependence of the model initial turbulent length scale in variable-density turbulence models of k-ϵ type on competing physical instability seed lengths as well as developing a path toward fully developed turbulent HED experiments. We present results from a series of experiments controllably and independently varyingmore » two initial types of scale lengths in the experiment: the thickness and surface roughness (surface perturbation scale spectrum) of a tracer layer at the shear interface. We show that decreasing the layer thickness and increasing the surface roughness both have the ability to increase the relative mixing in the system, and thus theoretically decrease the time required to begin transitioning to turbulence in the system. In addition, we also show that we can connect a change in observed mix width growth due to increased foil surface roughness to an analytically predicted change in model initial turbulent scale lengths.« less

  16. Modifying mixing and instability growth through the adjustment of initial conditions in a high-energy-density counter-propagating shear experiment on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Merritt, E. C.; Doss, F. W.; Loomis, E. N.; Flippo, K. A.; Kline, J. L.

    2015-06-24

    Counter-propagating shear experiments conducted at the OMEGA Laser Facility have been evaluating the effect of target initial conditions, specifically the characteristics of a tracer foil located at the shear boundary, on Kelvin-Helmholtz instability evolution and experiment transition toward nonlinearity and turbulence in the high-energy-density (HED) regime. Experiments are focused on both identifying and uncoupling the dependence of the model initial turbulent length scale in variable-density turbulence models of k-ϵ type on competing physical instability seed lengths as well as developing a path toward fully developed turbulent HED experiments. We present results from a series of experiments controllably and independently varying two initial types of scale lengths in the experiment: the thickness and surface roughness (surface perturbation scale spectrum) of a tracer layer at the shear interface. We show that decreasing the layer thickness and increasing the surface roughness both have the ability to increase the relative mixing in the system, and thus theoretically decrease the time required to begin transitioning to turbulence in the system. In addition, we also show that we can connect a change in observed mix width growth due to increased foil surface roughness to an analytically predicted change in model initial turbulent scale lengths.

  17. Modifying mixing and instability growth through the adjustment of initial conditions in a high-energy-density counter-propagating shear experiment on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Merritt, E. C. Doss, F. W.; Loomis, E. N.; Flippo, K. A.; Kline, J. L.

    2015-06-15

    Counter-propagating shear experiments conducted at the OMEGA Laser Facility have been evaluating the effect of target initial conditions, specifically the characteristics of a tracer foil located at the shear boundary, on Kelvin-Helmholtz instability evolution and experiment transition toward nonlinearity and turbulence in the high-energy-density (HED) regime. Experiments are focused on both identifying and uncoupling the dependence of the model initial turbulent length scale in variable-density turbulence models of k-ϵ type on competing physical instability seed lengths as well as developing a path toward fully developed turbulent HED experiments. We present results from a series of experiments controllably and independently varying two initial types of scale lengths in the experiment: the thickness and surface roughness (surface perturbation scale spectrum) of a tracer layer at the shear interface. We show that decreasing the layer thickness and increasing the surface roughness both have the ability to increase the relative mixing in the system, and thus theoretically decrease the time required to begin transitioning to turbulence in the system. We also show that we can connect a change in observed mix width growth due to increased foil surface roughness to an analytically predicted change in model initial turbulent scale lengths.

  18. What have we learned about phototropism from spaceflight experiments? Novel responses to light discovered during the Seedling Growth project on the ISS.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, John Z.; Edelmann, Richard; Herranz, Raul; Medina, Francisco Javier; Vandenbrink, Joshua

    2016-07-01

    In response to external stimuli, plants exhibit directed growth responses termed tropisms. Phototropism is directed growth of plants in response to light while gravitropism is the tropistic movement of plants in response to gravity. The integration of these tropisms (along with other growth movements) results in the overall growth form of the plant. Utilizing the European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS) on the International Space Station (ISS), we were able to decouple phototropism from the effects of gravitropism. The Seedling Growth (SG-1, 2, 3) series of experiments employed the centrifuge in the EMCS to create fractional/reduced gravity environments (0, 0.3, 0.5, 0.8 and 1g) to help discern the relationship between the phototropic response and gravitropism in seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana. In SG, seedlings were exposed to continuous red light, continuous blue light, and red-to-blue light cycles at various gravity levels in order to characterize the phototropic response. Image downlinks from the ISS allowed for analysis of growth and curvature measurements under differential light and gravity conditions. Previous results from our space experiments identified a unique red-light-based phototropism in roots and shoots. The most recent results from SG-1 and SG-2 (2015) reveal a novel positive phototropic curvature in roots of seedlings illuminated with blue light under microgravity conditions. In addition, a positive phototropic response of roots and shoots exposed to red light was observed in microgravity, confirming our previous observations. The phototropic response of shoots to blue light appears to be largely unaffected by fractional gravity. In addition to the WT (Landsberg ecotype), phytochrome A and B mutants were utilized to elucidate the role phytochromes play in blue and red light perception and the resulting phototropic responses. Understanding the relationship between phototropic and gravitropic responses is an important first step in being able

  19. Building a better mousetrap II: using Design of Experiments with unconfounded ions to compare the growth of different microalgae.

    PubMed

    Hallenbeck, Patrick C; Grogger, Melanie; Mraz, Megan; Veverka, Donald

    2015-05-01

    A large number of unconfounded media variations were used with a Scheffe Mix Model to examine in an unambiguous fashion the effects of variations in six important ions; NH4(+), NO3(-), Na(+), K(+), PO4(-), and Cl(-), on the growth of Chlorella vulgaris. This allows several novel observations on media components, for example, the inhibitory effects of chloride, to be made. Using a side by side comparison, it is shown that two strains of Chlorella show significant physiological and functional differences brought out by this approach. Testing selected formulations with a diverse set of algae demonstrated different effects on both growth and cellular lipid content, in some cases driving significant lipid production. This suggests that future work using a larger portion of media composition space could lead to the development of novel media supporting maximal biomass production and lipid production. PMID:25465789

  20. Experiment K-7-22: Growth Hormone Regulation Synthesis and Secretion in Microgravity. Part 3; Plasma Analysis Hormone Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindeland, R. E.; Popova, I. A.; Grossman, E.; Rudolph, I.

    1994-01-01

    Plasma from space flight and tail suspended rats was analyzed for a number of constituents in order to evaluate their metabolic status and endocrine function. The data presented here cover plasma hormone measurements. Corticosterone, thyroxine, and testosterone were measured by radioimmunoassay. Prolactin and growth hormone were measured by double antibody immunoassays using hormones and antisera prepared in house. Data were evaluated by analysis of variance.

  1. Laboratory Experiments on Heterogeneous CO2 Ice Nucleation and Growth Rates on Meteor Smoke Particle Analogues in the Martian Mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachbar, M.; Duft, D.; Mangan, T.; Gomez Martin, J. C.; Plane, J. M. C.; Leisner, T.

    2014-12-01

    CO2 ice particles with radii of about 100 nm have been detected in the Martian mesosphere region at heights between 80 km and 100 km. Gravity waves propagating upward cause a cooling of this region leading to temporary supersaturated conditions during which heterogeneous nucleation of CO2 can take place. Large uncertainties in describing the nucleation processes at the extreme conditions of the Martian mesopause region state the need of laboratory measurements. Sub-3 nanometer radius meteor smoke particle (MSP) analogues are created in a microwave plasma and stored in an electrodynamic trap for examining CO2 ice nucleation as well as growth rates at low particle temperatures between 60 K and 75 K and CO2 concentrations up to 1017 m-3 which are reasonably close to conditions present in the Martian mesosphere. Ice nucleation and growth processes of the particles are examined by analyzing the mass distribution of the particles with a time of flight spectrometer as a function of the residence time under supersaturated conditions. In this paper, first measurements of CO2 ice nucleation and growth on iron oxide and silicate particles will be presented. These results are extrapolated to realistic Martian conditions reducing the large uncertainty in dealing with CO2 ice nucleation on MSPs.

  2. The Boston-Area Climate Experiment: Initial responses of plant growth and soil respiration to twelve combinations of warming and altered precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dukes, J. S.; Höppner, S. S.; Suseela, V.; Goranson, C. E.

    2009-12-01

    Until recently, experimental studies of climate change focused on temperature or precipitation, but rarely both. Additionally, warming studies almost universally focused on the effects of a single step increase in temperature. It is not known whether most ecosystem and community variables respond unimodally, linearly or otherwise to temperature increases, or how these responses would be affected by accompanying changes in precipitation. The Boston-Area Climate Experiment (BACE) was constructed to address these issues. The BACE imposes a factorial combination of precipitation and temperature manipulations on old-field plots. Unlike most previous experiments, the BACE features four levels of warming, enabling tests of the hypotheses that species- and ecosystem-level responses to warming are nonlinear, and that the character of these responses depends strongly on precipitation. The experiment uses infrared heaters to achieve warming of up to 4 °C, with feedback control from infrared radiometers. Rainout shelters remove half of the incoming precipitation from the drought treatment and this water is immediately sprinkled on the wet treatment. Here, we report some initial responses of ecosystem processes to the experimental manipulations in the BACE. Precipitation and warming treatments both affected plant growth, with effects of the treatments dependant on the season. In the spring, herbaceous plant growth increased approximately linearly with warming but was not affected by precipitation. In the summer, plant growth increased with warming in the wet treatment, but decreased with warming in the drought treatment. Warming also affected soil moisture, leading to markedly drier soils in the drought treatment but less dramatic soil drying in the wet treatment. Warming increased soil respiration during much of the year, but during much of the growing season this stimulatory effect was less pronounced in the drier treatments, as soil moisture became limiting. In its first

  3. The Growth of Instructional Coaching Partner Conversations in a PreK-3rd Grade Teacher Professional Development Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Earl E.; Bell, David L.; Spelman, Maureen; Briody, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Instructional coaching that supports teachers' with revising teaching practices is not understood. This study sought to understand the impact of the instructional coaching experience by recording coaching conversations/interactions with teachers. The purpose was to determine if the type of coaching conversations changed overtime during three…

  4. Influence of non steady gravity on natural convection during micro-gravity solidification of semiconductors. I - Time scale analysis. II - Implications for crystal growth experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, P. R.; Motakef, S.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to the influence of temporal variations in the magnitude of gravity on natural convection during unidirectional solidification of semiconductors. It is shown that the response time to step changes in g at low Rayleigh numbers is controlled by the momentum diffusive time scale. At higher Rayleigh numbers, the response time to increases in g is reduced because of inertial effects. The degree of perturbation of flow fields by transients in the gravitational acceleration on the Space Shuttle and the Space Station is determined. The analysis is used to derive the requirements for crystal growth experiments conducted on low duration low-g vehicles. Also, the effectiveness of sounding rockets and KC-135 aircraft for microgravity experiments is examined.

  5. Slow Crack Growth of Brittle Materials With Exponential Crack-Velocity Formulation. Part 2; Constant Stress Rate Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Nemeth, Noel N.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2002-01-01

    The previously determined life prediction analysis based on an exponential crack-velocity formulation was examined using a variety of experimental data on glass and advanced structural ceramics in constant stress rate and preload testing at ambient and elevated temperatures. The data fit to the relation of strength versus the log of the stress rate was very reasonable for most of the materials. Also, the preloading technique was determined equally applicable to the case of slow-crack-growth (SCG) parameter n greater than 30 for both the power-law and exponential formulations. The major limitation in the exponential crack-velocity formulation, however, was that the inert strength of a material must be known a priori to evaluate the important SCG parameter n, a significant drawback as compared with the conventional power-law crack-velocity formulation.

  6. Slow Crack Growth of Brittle Materials With Exponential Crack-Velocity Formulation. Part 3; Constant Stress and Cyclic Stress Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Nemeth, Noel N.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2002-01-01

    The previously determined life prediction analysis based on an exponential crack-velocity formulation was examined using a variety of experimental data on advanced structural ceramics tested under constant stress and cyclic stress loading at ambient and elevated temperatures. The data fit to the relation between the time to failure and applied stress (or maximum applied stress in cyclic loading) was very reasonable for most of the materials studied. It was also found that life prediction for cyclic stress loading from data of constant stress loading in the exponential formulation was in good agreement with the experimental data, resulting in a similar degree of accuracy as compared with the power-law formulation. The major limitation in the exponential crack-velocity formulation, however, was that the inert strength of a material must be known a priori to evaluate the important slow-crack-growth (SCG) parameter n, a significant drawback as compared with the conventional power-law crack-velocity formulation.

  7. Chemical Vapor Deposition of MoS2: Insight Into the Growth Mechanism by Separated Gas Flow Experiments.

    PubMed

    Yanase, Takashi; Watanabe, Sho; Weng, Mengting; Nagahama, Taro; Shimada, Toshihiro

    2016-04-01

    We report detailed experiments on chemical vapor deposition of an atomic' layer semiconductor MoS2. We developed a new type of CVD system in which MoO3 and S sources are separately supplied to the substrates. It has become possible to precisely control the supply of the materials separately in the order of seconds. Raman and XPS analysis of the films grown under various conditions revealed that the initially obtained films are S-deficient and complete stoichiometry is reached after several minutes under S vapor flow. PMID:27451608

  8. Nucleation and growth of hydroxyapatite on titanium pretreated in NaOH solution: experiments and thermodynamic explanation.

    PubMed

    de Andrade, M C; Filgueiras, M R; Ogasawara, T

    1999-09-15

    Titanium was submitted to chemical attack with sodium hydroxide solution under hydrothermal (SBF) conditions and then kept for 4 weeks in simulated body fluid after heat treatment. The resultant coating titanium samples were characterized regarding nucleation and growth of hydroxyapatite on their surfaces using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy, as well as low angle X-ray diffraction. In order to obtain a thermodynamic explanation of same results, Eh-pH diagrams of Na-Ti-H2O and Ca-Ti-H2O systems at 25, 100, 200, and 300 degrees C were built for selected activities of the species in aqueous solutions. Values of pairs corresponding to the predominance limit of the species in solution at equilibrium with 0.21 atm of oxygen pressure were taken from these Eh-pH diagrams for subsequent building of the pNa-pH and pCa-pH diagrams of the same systems at each referred temperature (pi = -log10ai). In addition, the titanate-apatite free energy of formation was estimated and then a pCa-pH diagram of the Ca-P-Ti-H2O system at 25 degrees C was built. Examination of the resultant diagrams could elucidate the thermodynamic viability of the process. PMID:10398004

  9. Do children orphaned by AIDS experience distress over time? A latent growth curve analysis of depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Chi, Peilian; Li, Xiaoming; Barnett, Douglas; Zhao, Junfeng; Zhao, Guoxiang

    2014-01-01

    This longitudinal study aimed to examine the enduring effects of parental HIV/AIDS on children's psychological well-being in Asia. A sample of 1625 children aged from 6 to 18 years old were assessed annually for their depressive symptoms over three years. Latent growth curve modeling (LGCM) was used to examine the trajectories of depressive symptoms among AIDS orphans and vulnerable children in comparison with children from HIV-free families. AIDS orphans demonstrated the highest initial level of depressive symptoms among the three groups. On average, children's depressive symptoms' scores can be expected to realize an approximate 25% decrease for AIDS orphans, 19% decrease for vulnerable children, and 15% decrease for comparison children over a three-year period. Individual differences within the groups showed that children with higher initial level of depressive symptoms can be expected to decrease slower over time. Multiple group LGCM showed that the three groups of children demonstrated significantly different trajectories of depressive symptoms. Among the key demographic factors, only age exerted an effect on the trajectory of depressive symptoms of vulnerable children, indicating that the younger children showed higher level of initial depressive symptoms and lower rate of decrease than the older children. The current study enriched our knowledge on the longitudinal effect of parental HIV/AIDS on children's emotional distress. Future psychological support might take the children's developmental stages and cultural appropriateness into consideration and deliver service for the most vulnerable group of children affected by HIV/AIDS. PMID:24090100

  10. A series of experiments aimed at clarifying the mode of action of barley straw in cyanobacterial growth control.

    PubMed

    Iredale, Robert S; McDonald, Adrian T; Adams, David G

    2012-11-15

    For over 25 years it has been known that rotting barley straw can be used to prevent the development of blooms of cyanobacteria and algae in freshwater bodies, although its effectiveness can be variable. The mode of action is still not understood, although a number of hypotheses have been suggested, many of which are supported by little or no experimental evidence. Here, we provide the first experimental confirmation that microbial activity is responsible for the release of either the growth inhibitory fraction, or its precursor, from whole straw, after three or more weeks of decomposition. However, a much more rapid release of inhibitory components was achieved by fine chopping of fresh straw. In bioassays of straw activity the choice of both the cyanobacterial test strain and the assay temperature affected the outcome. The inhibitory activity of straw was greater when decomposition was carried out in the presence of UV-supplemented visible light and this activity was reduced in the presence of catalase, implying that straw activity may in part involve hydrogen peroxide. A better understanding of straw decomposition is required to clarify the mode of action of straw and allow the optimisation of its use in the field. PMID:22989994

  11. The space experiment CERASP: Definition of a space-suited radiation source and growth conditions for human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellweg, Christine E.; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Spitta, Luis; Thelen, Melanie; Arenz, Andrea; Franz, Markus; Schulze-Varnholt, Dirk; Berger, Thomas; Reitz, Günther

    The combined action of ionizing radiation and microgravity will continue to influence future space missions, with special risks for astronauts on the Moon surface or for long duration missions to Mars. It has been estimated that on a 3-year mission to Mars about 3% of the bodies' cell nuclei would have been hit by one iron ion with the consequence that nuclear DNA will be heavily damaged. There is increasing evidence that basic cellular functions are sensitive not only to radiation but also to microgravity. DNA repair studies in space on bacteria, yeast cells and human fibroblasts, which were irradiated before, flight, gave contradictory results: from inhibition of repair by microgravity to enhancement, whereas others did not detect any influence of microgravity on repair. The space experiment CERASP (CEllular Responses to RAdiation in SPace) to be performed at the International Space Station (ISS) is aimed to supply basic information on the cellular response in microgravity to radiation applied during flight. It makes use of a recombinant human cell line as reporter for cellular signal transduction modulation by genotoxic environmental conditions. The main biological endpoints under investigation will be gene activation based on enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP, originally isolated from the bioluminescent jellyfish Aequorea victoria) expression controlled by a DNA damage-dependent promoter element which reflects the activity of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF- κB) pathway. The NF- κB family of proteins plays a major role in the inflammatory and immune response, cell proliferation and differentiation, anti-apoptosis and tumorgenesis. For radiation exposure during space flight a radiation source has been constructed as damage accumulation by cosmic radiation will certainly be insufficient for analysis. The space experiment specific hardware consists of a specially designed radiation source made up of the β-emitter promethium-147, combined with a

  12. The preferential growth of branched GDGT source microorganisms under aerobic conditions in peat revealed by stable isotope probing experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huguet, Arnaud; Meador, Travis B.; Laggoun-Défarge, Fatima; Könneke, Martin; Derenne, Sylvie; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2016-04-01

    Branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (brGDGTs) membrane lipids are widely distributed in aquatic and terrestrial environments and are being increasingly used as temperature proxies. Nevertheless, little is known regarding the microorganisms that produce these lipids, which are found in especially high abundance in the anaerobic horizons of peat bogs. We initiated stable isotope probing incubations of peat samples from a Sphagnum-dominated peatland (Jura Mountains, France) to measure the incorporation of (D)-D2O and 13C-labeled dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) into brGDGTs, and thus gauge the activity, growth, and turnover times of their source organisms. Peat samples were collected from two adjacent sites with contrasting humidity levels (hereafter called "fen" and "bog" sites). For each site, samples from the surficial aerobic layer (acrotelm) and deeper anaerobic layer (catotelm) were collected and were incubated under both anaerobic and aerobic conditions for the acrotelm samples and only anaerobic conditions for the catotelm. The incubations were performed at 12 ° C, consistent with the mean summer air temperature at the sampling site. After two months of incubation, there was no incorporation of 13C label in brGDGTs for samples incubated under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions, showing that brGDGT-producing bacteria are heterotrophic microorganisms, as previously observed in organo-mineral soils (Weijers et al., 2011). Similarly, little to no deuterium incorporation was observed for brGDGTs isolated from anaerobically-incubated deep samples. In contrast, in the aerobic incubations of acrotelm samples from bog and fen, the weighted average δD of brGDGT core lipids (CLs) increased by up to 3332‰ and 933‰ after two months, respectively, indicating that fresh brGDGT CLs were biosynthesized at the peat surface. D incorporation into brGDGT CLs converted to production rates ranging from 30-106 ng cm‑3y‑1 in the aerobic acrotelm from bog and

  13. IMPACTS OF MESOGRAZERS ON EPIPHYTE AND ENDOPHYTE GROWTH ASSOCIATED WITH CHEMICALLY DEFENDED MACROALGE FROM THE WESTERN ANTARCTIC PENINSULA: A MESOCOSM EXPERIMENT(1).

    PubMed

    Aumack, Craig F; Amsler, Charles D; McClintock, James B; Baker, Bill J

    2011-02-01

    It has been hypothesized that the extensive mesograzer community along the western Antarctic Peninsula regulates epiphytic algae as well as emergent filaments from endophytic species. Should grazing limit growth of fouling or potentially pathogenic microphytes, then Antarctic macrophytes may actually benefit from the remarkably high densities of mesograzer amphipods that occur in these waters. Although initially counterintuitive, the negative impacts of epi/endophyte fouling may outweigh stresses caused by limited amphipod grazing on chemically defended macrophytes by reducing stress from endo/epiphyte biomass. If so, then alleviating mesograzing stress should result in significant increases in endo/epiphytic biomass. To test this hypothesis, a mesocosm experiment was conducted. Individuals representing four common species of Antarctic macroalgae were placed in flow-through seawater mesocosms. Amphipods were added to five mesocosms at simulated natural densities, while the other five remained herbivore free. At the end of 7 weeks, endo/epiphytic growth on individual macrophytes was quantified. Most species of macroalgae demonstrated noticeably higher instances of endophyte coverage, epiphytic diversity, and diatom colonization in consumer-free mesocosms than in the presence of amphipods. These data suggest that macroalgae along the western Antarctic Peninsula rely on grazers to control populations of potentially harmful epiphytes. We hypothesize that the chemically defended macroalgal flora lives in mutualism with high densities of mesograzers, providing amphipods with shelter from predation while continually being cleaned of potentially harmful endo/epiphytes. PMID:27021708

  14. Nucleation and Grain Growth During Dehydration of Polycrystalline Gypsum Observed in Time-series Synchrotron X-ray Micro-tomography Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclere, H.; Bedford, J. D.; Fusseis, F.; Wheeler, J.; Faulkner, D.

    2015-12-01

    Nucleation and growth of new minerals in response to disequilibrium is the most fundamental metamorphic process. However, our current understanding of metamorphic reactions is largely based on inference from mineral assemblages brought to the surface by uplift and erosion, rather than from direct observation. The experimental investigation of metamorphism has also been limited, typically to concealed vessels thus restricting the possibility of direct microstructural monitoring. Recent advances in synchrotron-based X-ray micro-tomography allow for new experiments that utilise X-ray transparent setups in order to image these processes on the micron-scale in 4D. We conducted in-situ constant temperature experiments at the Advanced Photon Source (Argonne National Laboratory, USA) to dehydrate confined cylinders of Volterra Gypsum (5mm length x 2mm diameter). The relatively modest temperature of reaction and the apparently simple mineralogy make gypsum an ideal material for investigating processes associated with metamorphic devolatilization. Using a purpose-built X-ray transparent experimental cell (Fusseis et al., 2014, J. Synchrotron Rad. 21, 251-253) to apply an effective pressure of 5MPa, the samples were heated to 388K for approximately 10 hours to acquire three-dimensional time-series tomography datasets comprising forty time steps. Images show grains of the product material (bassanite) growing throughout the sample accompanied by an evolving porous network. These datasets provide new visual insights into the spatiotemporal association between porosity development and the formation of product minerals during devolatilization. The direct observation of reaction also has important implications for general metamorphic theory as we can track the complete history of grain growth from nucleation through to interaction with surrounding grains.

  15. Correction of the equilibrium temperature caused by slight evaporation of water in protein crystal growth cells during long-term space experiments at International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Takahisa; Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Yoshizaki, Izumi; Tsukamoto, Katsuo; Murayama, Kenta; Fukuyama, Seijiro; Hosokawa, Kouhei; Oshi, Kentaro; Ito, Daisuke; Yamazaki, Tomoya; Tachibana, Masaru; Miura, Hitoshi

    2015-08-01

    The normal growth rates of the {110} faces of tetragonal hen egg-white lysozyme crystals, R, were measured as a function of the supersaturation σ parameter using a reflection type interferometer under μG at the International Space Station (NanoStep Project). Since water slightly evaporated from in situ observation cells during a long-term space station experiment for several months, equilibrium temperature T(e) changed, and the actual σ, however, significantly increased mainly due to the increase in salt concentration C(s). To correct σ, the actual C(s) and protein concentration C(p), which correctly represent the measured T(e) value in space, were first calculated. Second, a new solubility curve with the corrected C(s) was plotted. Finally, the revised σ was obtained from the new solubility curve. This correction method successfully revealed that the 2.8% water was evaporated from the solution, leading to 2.8% increase in the C(s) and C(p) of the solution. PMID:26329200

  16. Population growth and economic growth.

    PubMed

    Narayana, D L

    1984-01-01

    This discussion of the issues relating to the problem posed by population explosion in the developing countries and economic growth in the contemporary world covers the following: predictions of economic and social trends; the Malthusian theory of population; the classical or stationary theory of population; the medical triage model; ecological disaster; the Global 2000 study; the limits to growth; critiques of the Limits to Growth model; nonrenewable resources; food and agriculture; population explosion and stabilization; space and ocean colonization; and the limits perspective. The Limits to Growth model, a general equilibrium anti-growth model, is the gloomiest economic model ever constructed. None of the doomsday models, the Malthusian theory, the classical stationary state, the neo-Malthusian medical triage model, the Global 2000 study, are so far reaching in their consequences. The course of events that followed the publication of the "Limits to Growth" in 1972 in the form of 2 oil shocks, food shock, pollution shock, and price shock seemed to bear out formally the gloomy predictions of the thesis with a remarkable speed. The 12 years of economic experience and the knowledge of resource trends postulate that even if the economic pressures visualized by the model are at work they are neither far reaching nor so drastic. Appropriate action can solve them. There are several limitations to the Limits to Growth model. The central theme of the model, which is overshoot and collapse, is unlikely to be the course of events. The model is too aggregative to be realistic. It exaggerates the ecological disaster arising out of the exponential growth of population and industry. The gross underestimation of renewable resources is a basic flaw of the model. The most critical weakness of the model is its gross underestimation of the historical trend of technological progress and the technological possiblities within industry and agriculture. The model does correctly emphasize

  17. After-School Growth: What Young People Have to Say. A Response to "Democracy and Development: The Role of Outside-of-School Experiences in Preparing Young People to Be Active Citizens"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gildin, Bonny

    2011-01-01

    In the context of a conference on after-school programs, sponsored by the nonprofit All Stars Project, youth from the organization's programs discuss their experiences and growth as citizens in a video-captured panel discussion. Their discussion illustrates how outside-of-school social and cultural development helps disenfranchised youth to see…

  18. Vicarious Occupational Posttraumatic Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Larry

    2012-01-01

    Traditional studies of posttraumatic growth center on the individual or close family members as they deal with traumatic events. The current study examines workers who experience posttraumatic growth when a coworker has a traumatic experience. The participants in this study were firefighters in suburban Cook County, Illinois. Participants were…

  19. Mercury iodide crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cadoret, R.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of the Mercury Iodide Crystal Growth (MICG) experiment is the growth of near-perfect single crystals of mercury Iodide (HgI2) in a microgravity environment which will decrease the convection effects on crystal growth. Evaporation and condensation are the only transformations involved in this experiment. To accomplish these objectives, a two-zone furnace will be used in which two sensors collect the temperature data (one in each zone).

  20. pH-driven shifts in overall and transcriptionally active denitrifiers control gaseous product stoichiometry in growth experiments with extracted bacteria from soil

    PubMed Central

    Brenzinger, Kristof; Dörsch, Peter; Braker, Gesche

    2015-01-01

    Soil pH is a strong regulator for activity as well as for size and composition of denitrifier communities. Low pH not only lowers overall denitrification rates but also influences denitrification kinetics and gaseous product stoichiometry. N2O reductase is particularly sensitive to low pH which seems to impair its activity post-transcriptionally, leading to higher net N2O production. Little is known about how complex soil denitrifier communities respond to pH change and whether their ability to maintain denitrification over a wider pH range relies on phenotypic redundancy. In the present study, we followed the abundance and composition of an overall and transcriptionally active denitrifier community extracted from a farmed organic soil in Sweden (pHH2O = 7.1) when exposed to pH 5.4 and drifting back to pH 6.6. The soil was previously shown to retain much of its functioning (low N2O/N2 ratios) over a wide pH range, suggesting a high functional versatility of the underlying community. We found that denitrifier community composition, abundance and transcription changed throughout incubation concomitant with pH change in the medium, allowing for complete reduction of nitrate to N2 with little accumulation of intermediates. When exposed to pH 5.4, the denitrifier community was able to grow but reduced N2O to N2 only when near-neutral pH was reestablished by the alkalizing metabolic activity of an acid-tolerant part of the community. The genotypes proliferating under these conditions differed from those dominant in the control experiment run at neutral pH. Denitrifiers of the nirS-type appeared to be severely suppressed by low pH and nirK-type and nosZ-containing denitrifiers showed strongly reduced transcriptional activity and growth, even after restoration of neutral pH. Our study suggests that low pH episodes alter transcriptionally active populations which shape denitrifier communities and determine their gas kinetics. PMID:26441895

  1. pH-driven shifts in overall and transcriptionally active denitrifiers control gaseous product stoichiometry in growth experiments with extracted bacteria from soil.

    PubMed

    Brenzinger, Kristof; Dörsch, Peter; Braker, Gesche

    2015-01-01

    Soil pH is a strong regulator for activity as well as for size and composition of denitrifier communities. Low pH not only lowers overall denitrification rates but also influences denitrification kinetics and gaseous product stoichiometry. N2O reductase is particularly sensitive to low pH which seems to impair its activity post-transcriptionally, leading to higher net N2O production. Little is known about how complex soil denitrifier communities respond to pH change and whether their ability to maintain denitrification over a wider pH range relies on phenotypic redundancy. In the present study, we followed the abundance and composition of an overall and transcriptionally active denitrifier community extracted from a farmed organic soil in Sweden (pH H2O = 7.1) when exposed to pH 5.4 and drifting back to pH 6.6. The soil was previously shown to retain much of its functioning (low N2O/N2 ratios) over a wide pH range, suggesting a high functional versatility of the underlying community. We found that denitrifier community composition, abundance and transcription changed throughout incubation concomitant with pH change in the medium, allowing for complete reduction of nitrate to N2 with little accumulation of intermediates. When exposed to pH 5.4, the denitrifier community was able to grow but reduced N2O to N2 only when near-neutral pH was reestablished by the alkalizing metabolic activity of an acid-tolerant part of the community. The genotypes proliferating under these conditions differed from those dominant in the control experiment run at neutral pH. Denitrifiers of the nirS-type appeared to be severely suppressed by low pH and nirK-type and nosZ-containing denitrifiers showed strongly reduced transcriptional activity and growth, even after restoration of neutral pH. Our study suggests that low pH episodes alter transcriptionally active populations which shape denitrifier communities and determine their gas kinetics. PMID:26441895

  2. Experiment K-7-22: Growth Hormone Regulation Synthesis and Secretion in Microgravity. Part 2; Hypothalamic Growth Hormone-Releasing Factor, Somatostatin Immunoreactivity, and Messenger RNA Levels in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawchenko, P. E.; Arias, C.; Krasnov, I.; Grindeland, R. E.; Vale, W.

    1994-01-01

    Immunohistochemical analyses of hypothalamic hormones carried out on tissue from rats flown on an earlier flight (Cosmos 1887) suggested preferential effects on hypophysiotropic principles involved in the regulation of growth hormone secretion and synthesis. We found that staining in the median eminence for peptides that provide both stimulatory (growth hormone-releasing factor, or GRF) and inhibitory (somatostatin, SS) influences on growth hormone secretion were depressed in flight animals relative to synchronous controls, while staining for other neuroendocrine peptides, cortocotropin-releasing factor and arginine vasopressin, were similar in these two groups. While this suggests some selective impact of weightlessness on the two principal central nervous system regulators of growth hormone dynamics, the fact that both GRF- and SS-immunoreactivity (IR) appeared affected in the same direction is somewhat problematic, and makes tentative any intimation that effects on CNS control mechanisms may be etiologically significant contributors to the sequelae of reduced growth hormone secretion seen in prolonged space flight. To provide an additional, and more penetrating, analysis we attempted in hypothalamic material harvested from animals flown on Cosmos 2044 to complement immunohistochemical analyses of GRF and SS staining with quantitative, in situ assessments of messenger RNAs encoding the precursors for both these hormones.

  3. Growth Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... gland problem or disease. The pituitary gland makes growth hormone, which stimulates the growth of bone and other ... of it may be very short. Treatment with growth hormone can stimulate growth. People can also have too ...

  4. Temperature Shift Experiments Suggest That Metabolic Impairment and Enhanced Rates of Photorespiration Decrease Organic Acid Levels in Soybean Leaflets Exposed to Supra-Optimal Growth Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Sicher, Richard C

    2015-01-01

    Elevated growth temperatures are known to affect foliar organic acid concentrations in various plant species. In the current study, citrate, malate, malonate, fumarate and succinate decreased 40 to 80% in soybean leaflets when plants were grown continuously in controlled environment chambers at 36/28 compared to 28/20 °C. Temperature effects on the above mentioned organic acids were partially reversed three days after plants were transferred among optimal and supra-optimal growth temperatures. In addition, CO2 enrichment increased foliar malate, malonate and fumarate concentrations in the supra-optimal temperature treatment, thereby mitigating effects of high temperature on respiratory metabolism. Glycerate, which functions in the photorespiratory pathway, decreased in response to CO2 enrichment at both growth temperatures. The above findings suggested that diminished levels of organic acids in soybean leaflets upon exposure to high growth temperatures were attributable to metabolic impairment and to changes of photorespiratory flux. Leaf development rates differed among temperature and CO2 treatments, which affected foliar organic acid levels. Additionally, we report that large decreases of foliar organic acids in response to elevated growth temperatures were observed in legume species. PMID:26251925

  5. Temperature Shift Experiments Suggest That Metabolic Impairment and Enhanced Rates of Photorespiration Decrease Organic Acid Levels in Soybean Leaflets Exposed to Supra-Optimal Growth Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Sicher, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated growth temperatures are known to affect foliar organic acid concentrations in various plant species. In the current study, citrate, malate, malonate, fumarate and succinate decreased 40 to 80% in soybean leaflets when plants were grown continuously in controlled environment chambers at 36/28 compared to 28/20 °C. Temperature effects on the above mentioned organic acids were partially reversed three days after plants were transferred among optimal and supra-optimal growth temperatures. In addition, CO2 enrichment increased foliar malate, malonate and fumarate concentrations in the supra-optimal temperature treatment, thereby mitigating effects of high temperature on respiratory metabolism. Glycerate, which functions in the photorespiratory pathway, decreased in response to CO2 enrichment at both growth temperatures. The above findings suggested that diminished levels of organic acids in soybean leaflets upon exposure to high growth temperatures were attributable to metabolic impairment and to changes of photorespiratory flux. Leaf development rates differed among temperature and CO2 treatments, which affected foliar organic acid levels. Additionally, we report that large decreases of foliar organic acids in response to elevated growth temperatures were observed in legume species. PMID:26251925

  6. Bone, Calcium and Spaceflight: A Living Systems Experiment Relating Animals and Plants the Effects of Calcium on Plant Growth and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiss-Bubenheim, Debra; Navarro, B. J.; Souza, Kenneth A. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This educational outreach activity provided students with information about ARC's role in conducting life sciences research in space. Students were introduced to the scientific method while conducting a plant experiment that was correlated to the flight animal experiment. Students made daily observations, collected data and reported on their findings. This classroom experiment providing a hands-on learning opportunity about terrestrial and space biology in which exposed the students to new fields of study for future endeavors.

  7. Quantitative determination of zero-gravity effects on electronic materials processing germanium crystal growth with simultaneous interface demarcation experiment MA-060, section 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, H. C.; Witt, A. F.; Lichtensteiger, M.; Herman, C. J.

    1982-01-01

    The crystal growth and segregation characteristics of a melt in a directional solidification configuration under near zero g conditions were investigated. The germanium (doped with gallium) system was selected because it was extensively studied on Earth and because it lends itself to a very detailed macroscopic and microscopic characterization. An extensive study was performed of the germanium crystals grown during the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project mission. It was found that single crystal growth was achieved and that the interface demarcation functioned successfully. On the basis of the results obtained to date, there is no indication that convection driven by thermal or surface tension gradients was present in the melt. The gallium segregation, in the absence of gravity, was found to be fundamentally different in its initial and its subsequent stages from that of the ground based tests. None of the existing theoretical models for growth and segregation can account for the observed segregation behavior in the absence of gravity.

  8. Protein crystal growth tray assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor); Miller, Teresa Y. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A protein crystal growth tray assembly includes a tray that has a plurality of individual crystal growth chambers. Each chamber has a movable pedestal which carries a protein crystal growth compartment at an upper end. The several pedestals for each tray assembly are ganged together for concurrent movement so that the solutions in the various pedestal growth compartments can be separated from the solutions in the tray's growth chambers until the experiment is to be activated.

  9. Detoxication of zinc and cadmium by the freshwater protozoan Tetrahymena pyriformis. II. Growth experiments and ultrastructural studies on sequestration of heavy metals

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlop, S.; Chapman, G.

    1981-04-01

    Sublethal concentrations of zinc and cadmium limited the growth of batch cultures of the ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis. Electron microscopy of cultured populations revealed many electron-dense cytoplasmic granules in cells exposed to zinc (60 ppM), but fewer in cells grown with less zinc (6 ppM) or cadmium (2 ppM). Ultrasturctural abnormalities were observed only in cells grown with cadmium. These contained autophagic vacuoles and had damaged nuclei. Zinc was shown to exert a protective effect against cadmium toxicity both in terms of growth and ulstructural appearance. Electron probe x-ray microanalysis revealed both zinc and cadmium within the cytoplasmic granules of cells exposed to these metals. Since the granules are normally composed predominantly of calcium and magnesium, these ions are implicated in the intracellular detoxication of zinc and cadmium. Zinc was detected only in the granules, while cadmium was also found in autophagic vacuoles and damaged nuclei.

  10. Assessment of crop growth and soil water modules in SWAT2000 using extensive field experiment data in an irrigation district of the Yellow River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yi; He, Chansheng; Sophocleous, Marios; Yin, Zhifang; Hongrui, Ren; Ouyang, Zhu

    2008-04-01

    SummarySWAT, a physically-based, hydrological model simulates crop growth, soil water and groundwater movement, and transport of sediment and nutrients at both the process and watershed scales. While the different versions of SWAT have been widely used throughout the world for agricultural and water resources applications, little has been done to test the performance, variability, and transferability of the parameters in the crop growth, soil water, and groundwater modules in an integrated way with multiple sets of field experimental data at the process scale. Using an multiple years of field experimental data of winter wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.) in the irrigation district of the Yellow River Basin, this paper assesses the performance of the plant-soil-groundwater modules and the variability and transferability of SWAT2000. Comparison of the simulated results by SWAT to the observations showed that SWAT performed quite unsatisfactorily in LAI predictions during the senescence stage, in yield predictions, and in soil-water estimation under dry soil-profile conditions. The unsatisfactory performance in LAI prediction might be attributed to over-simplified senescence modeling; in yield prediction to the improper computation of the harvest index; and in soil water under dry conditions to the exclusion of groundwater evaporation from the soil water balance in SWAT. In this paper, improvements in crop growth, soil water, and groundwater modules in SWAT were implemented. The saturated soil profile was coupled to the oscillating groundwater table. A variable evaporation coefficient taking into account soil water deficit index, groundwater depth, and crop root depth was used to replace the fixed coefficient in computing groundwater evaporation. The soil water balance included the groundwater evaporation. The modifications improved simulations of crop evapotranspiration and biomass as well as soil water dynamics under dry soil-profile conditions. The evaluation shows that

  11. Assessment of crop growth and soil water modules in SWAT2000 using extensive field experiment data in an irrigation district of the Yellow River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luo, Y.; He, C.; Sophocleous, M.; Yin, Z.; Hongrui, R.; Ouyang, Z.

    2008-01-01

    SWAT, a physically-based, hydrological model simulates crop growth, soil water and groundwater movement, and transport of sediment and nutrients at both the process and watershed scales. While the different versions of SWAT have been widely used throughout the world for agricultural and water resources applications, little has been done to test the performance, variability, and transferability of the parameters in the crop growth, soil water, and groundwater modules in an integrated way with multiple sets of field experimental data at the process scale. Using an multiple years of field experimental data of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in the irrigation district of the Yellow River Basin, this paper assesses the performance of the plant-soil-groundwater modules and the variability and transferability of SWAT2000. Comparison of the simulated results by SWAT to the observations showed that SWAT performed quite unsatisfactorily in LAI predictions during the senescence stage, in yield predictions, and in soil-water estimation under dry soil-profile conditions. The unsatisfactory performance in LAI prediction might be attributed to over-simplified senescence modeling; in yield prediction to the improper computation of the harvest index; and in soil water under dry conditions to the exclusion of groundwater evaporation from the soil water balance in SWAT. In this paper, improvements in crop growth, soil water, and groundwater modules in SWAT were implemented. The saturated soil profile was coupled to the oscillating groundwater table. A variable evaporation coefficient taking into account soil water deficit index, groundwater depth, and crop root depth was used to replace the fixed coefficient in computing groundwater evaporation. The soil water balance included the groundwater evaporation. The modifications improved simulations of crop evapotranspiration and biomass as well as soil water dynamics under dry soil-profile conditions. The evaluation shows that the

  12. Ameliorating Effects of Biochar Derived from Poultry Manure and White Clover Residues on Soil Nutrient Status and Plant growth Promotion--Greenhouse Experiments.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, M Kaleem; Anwar, Ahsan Ali

    2015-01-01

    Biochar application to agricultural soils is rapidly emerging as a new management strategy for its potential role in carbon sequestration, soil quality improvements, and plant growth promotion. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of biochars derived from white clover residues and poultry manure on soil quality characteristics, growth and N accumulation in maize (Zea mays L.) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grown in a loam soil under greenhouse conditions. Treatments comprised of: untreated control; mineral N fertilizer (urea N, UN) at the rate of 200, and 100 mg N kg(-1), white clover residues biochar (WCRB), poultry manure biochar (PMB) at 30 Mg ha(-1), and the possible combinations of WCRB+PMB (50:50), UN+WCRB (50:50), UN+PMB (50:50), and UN+WCRB+PMB (50:25:25). The treatments were arranged in a completely randomized design with three replications. Results indicated a significant increase in the growth and biomass production of maize and wheat supplemented with biochars alone or mixed with N fertilizer. Biochars treatments showed varying impact on plant growth depended upon the type of the biochar, and in general plant growth under PMB was significantly higher than that recorded under WCRB. The growth characteristics in the combined treatments (half biochar+half N) were either higher or equivalent to that recorded under full fertilizer N treatment (N200). The biochar treatments WCRB, PMB, and WCRB+PMB (50:50) increased maize shoot N by 18, 26 and 21%, respectively compared to the control while wheat shoot N did not show positive response. The N-uptake by maize treated with WCRB, PMB, and WCRB+PMB (50:50) was 54, 116, and 90 mg g(-1) compared to the 33 mg g(-1) in the control while the N-uptake by wheat was 41, 60, and 53 mg g(-1) compared to 24 mg g(-1) in the control. The mixed treatments (half biochar+half N) increased N-uptake by 2.3 folds in maize and 1.7 to 2.5 folds in wheat compared to the N100 showing increasing effect of biochar on N

  13. Ameliorating Effects of Biochar Derived from Poultry Manure and White Clover Residues on Soil Nutrient Status and Plant growth Promotion - Greenhouse Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, M. Kaleem; Anwar, Ahsan Ali

    2015-01-01

    Biochar application to agricultural soils is rapidly emerging as a new management strategy for its potential role in carbon sequestration, soil quality improvements, and plant growth promotion. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of biochars derived from white clover residues and poultry manure on soil quality characteristics, growth and N accumulation in maize (Zea mays L.) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grown in a loam soil under greenhouse conditions. Treatments comprised of: untreated control; mineral N fertilizer (urea N, UN) at the rate of 200, and 100 mg N kg-1, white clover residues biochar (WCRB), poultry manure biochar (PMB) at 30 Mg ha–1, and the possible combinations of WCRB+PMB (50:50), UN+WCRB (50:50), UN+PMB (50:50), and UN+WCRB+PMB (50:25:25). The treatments were arranged in a completely randomized design with three replications. Results indicated a significant increase in the growth and biomass production of maize and wheat supplemented with biochars alone or mixed with N fertilizer. Biochars treatments showed varying impact on plant growth depended upon the type of the biochar, and in general plant growth under PMB was significantly higher than that recorded under WCRB. The growth characteristics in the combined treatments (half biochar+half N) were either higher or equivalent to that recorded under full fertilizer N treatment (N200). The biochar treatments WCRB, PMB, and WCRB+PMB (50:50) increased maize shoot N by 18, 26 and 21%, respectively compared to the control while wheat shoot N did not show positive response. The N-uptake by maize treated with WCRB, PMB, and WCRB+PMB (50:50) was 54, 116, and 90 mg g-1 compared to the 33 mg g-1 in the control while the N-uptake by wheat was 41, 60, and 53 mg g-1 compared to 24 mg g-1 in the control. The mixed treatments (half biochar+half N) increased N-uptake by 2.3folds in maize and 1.7 to 2.5folds in wheat compared to the N100 showing increasing effect of biochar on N use efficiency

  14. Mouth Growths

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dry Mouth Mouth Growths Mouth Sores and Inflammation Toothache Malocclusion Teeth Grinding Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis Growths can ... Dry Mouth Mouth Growths Mouth Sores and Inflammation Toothache Malocclusion Teeth Grinding Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis NOTE: This ...

  15. Bone, Calcium and Spaceflight: A Living Systems Experiment Relating Animals and Plants the Effects of Calcium on Plant Growth and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiss-Bubenheim, D.; Navarro, B.J.; Morey-Holton, E.; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This NASA-sponsored educational outreach activity provided local students with information about Ames Research Center's (ARC) role in conducting life sciences research in space. Students were introduced to the scientific method while conducting a plant experiment that correlated with the Spacelab Life Sciences-2 (SLS-2) flight animal experiment of Dr. Emily Morey-Holton entitled "Bone, Calcium and Spaceflight". Students made daily observations, collected data and reported on their findings. Students also had the opportunity to witness the STS-58 landing at Edwards Air Force Base in southern California and attended a briefing given by the Payload Commander, Dr. Rhea Seddon at ARC last month. This classroom experiment providing a hands-on learning opportunity about terrestrial and space biology and, hopefully, introduced the students to new fields of study for future endeavors.

  16. Growth rates made easy.

    PubMed

    Hall, Barry G; Acar, Hande; Nandipati, Anna; Barlow, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    In the 1960s-1980s, determination of bacterial growth rates was an important tool in microbial genetics, biochemistry, molecular biology, and microbial physiology. The exciting technical developments of the 1990s and the 2000s eclipsed that tool; as a result, many investigators today lack experience with growth rate measurements. Recently, investigators in a number of areas have started to use measurements of bacterial growth rates for a variety of purposes. Those measurements have been greatly facilitated by the availability of microwell plate readers that permit the simultaneous measurements on up to 384 different cultures. Only the exponential (logarithmic) portions of the resulting growth curves are useful for determining growth rates, and manual determination of that portion and calculation of growth rates can be tedious for high-throughput purposes. Here, we introduce the program GrowthRates that uses plate reader output files to automatically determine the exponential portion of the curve and to automatically calculate the growth rate, the maximum culture density, and the duration of the growth lag phase. GrowthRates is freely available for Macintosh, Windows, and Linux. We discuss the effects of culture volume, the classical bacterial growth curve, and the differences between determinations in rich media and minimal (mineral salts) media. This protocol covers calibration of the plate reader, growth of culture inocula for both rich and minimal media, and experimental setup. As a guide to reliability, we report typical day-to-day variation in growth rates and variation within experiments with respect to position of wells within the plates. PMID:24170494

  17. Learning from Inquiry-Based Laboratories in Nonmajor Biology: An Interpretive Study of the Relationships among Inquiry Experience, Epistemologies, and Conceptual Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Carolyn S.; Tsoi, Mai Yin; Calkin, Jamie; Darley, Marshall

    2003-01-01

    The use of inquiry-based laboratory in college science classes is on the rise. This study investigated how five nonmajor biology students learned from an inquiry-based laboratory experience. Using interpretive data analysis, the five students' conceptual ecologies, learning beliefs, and science epistemologies were explored. Findings indicated that…

  18. Effect of Organic Manures on the Growth of Cymbopogon citratus and Chrysopogon zizanioides for the Phytoremediation of Chromite-Asbestos Mine Waste: A Pot Scale Experiment.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Adarsh; Maiti, Subodh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The abandoned chromite-asbestos mines are located in the Roro hills, West Singhbhum, Jharkhand, India, where mining operation ceased in 1983, and since then these mines are causing environmental pollution. The present study was planned to phytoremediate these metalloid and metal contaminated mine waste by using two aromatic grasses, Cymbopogon citratus and Chrysopogon zizanioides by applying different proportions of amendments (chicken manure, farmyard manure and garden soil). Mine waste has neutral pH, low electrical conductivity and organic carbon with higher concentration of total metals (Cr and Ni) as compared to soil. Application of manures resulted significant improvements of mine waste characteristics and plant growth, reduction in the availability of total extractable toxic metals (Cr, Ni) and increase in Mn, Zn and Cu concentration in the substrate. The maximum growth and biomass production for C. citratus and C. zizanioides were found in T-IV combination comprising of mine waste (90%), chicken manure (2.5%), farmyard manure (2.5%) and garden soil (5%). Addition of T-IV combination also resulted in low Cr and Ni accumulation in roots and reduction in translocation to shoots. Study indicates that C. citratus and C. zizanioides can be used for phytostabilization of abandoned chromite-asbestos mine waste with amendments. PMID:25495934

  19. DMA Modulus as a Screening Parameter for Compatibility of Polymeric Containment Materials with Various Solutions for use in Space Shuttle Microgravity Protein Crystal Growth (PCG) Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingard, Charles Doug; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Protein crystals are grown in microgravity experiments inside the Space Shuttle during orbit. Such crystals are basically grown in a five-component system containing a salt, buffer, polymer, organic and water. During these experiments, a number of different polymeric containment materials must be compatible with up to hundreds of different PCG solutions in various concentrations for durations up to 180 days. When such compatibility experiments are performed at NASA/MSFC (Marshall Space Flight Center) simultaneously on containment material samples immersed in various solutions in vials, the samples are rather small out of necessity. DMA4 modulus was often used as the primary screening parameter for such small samples as a pass/fail criterion for incompatibility issues. In particular, the TA Instruments DMA 2980 film tension clamp was used to test rubber O-rings as small in I.D. as 0.091 in. by cutting through the cross-section at one place, then clamping the stretched linear cord stock at each end. The film tension clamp was also used to successfully test short length samples of medical/surgical grade tubing with an O.D. of 0.125 in.

  20. Electronic structure and mechanical properties of ternary ZrTaN alloys studied by ab initio calculations and thin-film growth experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abadias, G.; Kanoun, M. B.; Goumri-Said, S.; Koutsokeras, L.; Dub, S. N.; Djemia, Ph.

    2014-10-01

    The structure, phase stability, and mechanical properties of ternary alloys of the Zr-Ta-N system are investigated by combining thin-film growth and ab initio calculations. Zr1-xTaxN films with 0≤x≤1 were deposited by reactive magnetron cosputtering in Ar +N2 plasma discharge and their structural properties characterized by x-ray diffraction. We considered both ordered and disordered alloys, using supercells and special quasirandom structure approaches, to account for different possible metal atom distributions on the cation sublattice. Density functional theory within the generalized gradient approximation was employed to calculate the electronic structure as well as predict the evolution of the lattice parameter and key mechanical properties, including single-crystal elastic constants and polycrystalline elastic moduli, of ternary Zr1-xTaxN compounds with cubic rocksalt structure. These calculated values are compared with experimental data from thin-film measurements using Brillouin light scattering and nanoindentation tests. We also study the validity of Vegard's empirical rule and the effect of growth-dependent stresses on the lattice parameter. The thermal stability of these Zr1-xTaxN films is also studied, based on their structural and mechanical response upon vacuum annealing at 850 °C for 3 h. Our findings demonstrate that Zr1-xTaxN alloys with Ta fraction 0.51⩽x⩽0.78 exhibit enhanced toughness, while retaining high hardness ˜30 GPa, as a result of increased valence electron concentration and phase stability tuning. Calculations performed for disordered or ordered structures both lead to the same conclusion regarding the mechanical behavior of these nitride alloys, in agreement with recent literature findings [H. Kindlund, D. G. Sangiovanni, L. Martinez-de-Olcoz, J. Lu, J. Jensen, J. Birch, I. Petrov, J. E. Greene, V. Chirita, and L. Hultman, APL Materials 1, 042104 (2013), 10.1063/1.4822440].

  1. Chemical Control of Plant Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agricultural Research Center (USDA), Beltsville, MD.

    Seven experiments are presented in this Science Study Aid to help students investigate the control of plant growth with chemicals. Plant growth regulators, weed control, and chemical pruning are the topics studied in the experiments which are based on investigations that have been and are being conducted at the U. S. Agricultural Research Center,…

  2. Sensitivity of the curve-to-growth technique utilized in rocket experiments to determine the line shape of solar He I resonance lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. Y. R.; Ogawa, H. S.

    1986-01-01

    The sensitivity of the curve-of-growth (COG) technique utilized in rocket measurements to determine the line profiles of the solar He I resonance emissions is theoretically examined with attention to the possibility of determining the line core shape using this technique. The line at 584.334 A is chosen as an illustration. Various possible source functions of the solar line have been assumed in the computation of the integrated transmitted intensity. A recent observational data set obtained by the present researchers is used as the constraint of the computation. It is confirmed that the COG technique can indeed provide a good measurement of the solar line width. However, to obtain detailed knowledge of the solar profile at line center and in the core region, (1) it is necessary to be able to carry out relative solar flux measurements with a 1-percent or better precision, and (2) it must be possible to measure the He gas pressure in the absorption cell to lower than 0.1 mtorr. While these numbers apply specifically to the present geometry, the results are readily scaled to other COG measurements using other experimental parameters.

  3. Large Area Crop Inventory Experiment (LACIE). Evaluation of the LACIE transition year crop calendar model. [Wheat growth in the Great Plains Corridor, North America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheffin, R. E.; Woolley, S. K. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The estimates of developmental stage dates from the LACIE adjustable crop calendar (ACC) winter wheat model was somewhat more accurate than the historical crop calendar after jointing. The ACC winter wheat model was not so accurate for the Texas Panhandle as it was for the other areas of the USPG-7 because dry soil conditions delayed fall planting in the Panhandle. Since the LACIE ACC winter wheat model does not contain a moisture term and it was started with historical planting dates, lengthy delays in planting mean that the ACC model will probably be started early and will estimate the developmental growth stages to occur too early in the season. The LACIE ACC spring wheat model was also started early in most areas because of late planting due to fields wet from melting snow and rain. The starter model used to estimate spring planting dates was not accurate under these wet soil conditions and tended to predict the developmental stages to occur earlier than the dates observed in the fields.

  4. Multistage nucleation of two-dimensional Si islands on Si(111)-7x7 during MBE growth: STM experiments and extended rate-equation model

    SciTech Connect

    Filimonov, Sergey; Cherepanov, Vasily; Voigtlaender, Bert; Hervieu, Yuri

    2007-07-15

    The submonolayer density of two-dimensional (2D) islands in Si/Si(111)-7x7 molecular beam epitaxy is measured using scanning tunneling microscopy. At a relatively low deposition temperature of 673 K, the density of 2D islands is a power function of the deposition flux N{sub 2D}{proportional_to}F{sup {chi}} with the exponent {chi}=0.24 being smaller than that predicted by the standard nucleation theory. The nonstandard scaling of the 2D island density is explained by the multistage character of the nucleation process on the Si(111)-7x7 surface which involves consecutive stages of formation of stable Si clusters, formation of pairs of clusters, and transformation of the cluster pairs to 2D islands. Using an extended rate-equation model, we analyze the temperature and growth rate dependencies of the density of single clusters, cluster pairs, and 2D islands and show that an activation barrier of {approx}1.26 eV delays the transformation of cluster pairs to 2D islands. The delayed transformation of cluster pairs to 2D islands is the reason for the nonstandard scaling of the 2D island density observed at low deposition temperatures.

  5. Effects of pH value on growth morphology of LaPO4 nanocrystals: investigated from experiment and theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Luo; Zhang, Zhongju; Wang, Xin

    2016-05-01

    The morphologies of the materials have strong effects on their performance in particular applications. In our experiment, we synthesized LaPO4 successfully by the typical hydrothermal method in acidic conditions. The morphologies, preferred orientation and crystal facets are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, selected-area electron diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Combining the experimental findings, the surface energies of two major surfaces, (110) and (031) planes, were calculated using density functional theory methods. The theoretical calculations on the slabs surface energies were performed to simulate the shape of nanoparticles by the Wulff construction. The experimental results indicate that LaPO4 prepared in this work shows rodlike structure. The equilibrium shape of clava with large length-diameter ratio is achieved. With increasing hydrogen ion concentration in solutions, the morphologies present as sticks and their length-diameter ratios tend bigger, which is consistent with experimental results to a great extent.

  6. Plant growth controls short-term changes in soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks of croplands - new insights from the CarboZALF experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Mathias; Jurisch, Nicole; Garcia Alba, Joana; Albiac Borraz, Elisa; Schmidt, Marten; Verch, Gernot; Sommer, Michael; Augustin, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    The long-term influence of crop rotations, climate conditions or soil type on soil organic carbon stock (SOC) patterns and gaseous C emissions of agricultural landscapes is widely recognized. However, the question of short-term seasonal changes in SOC within these areas remains unclear. A main reason for this is the detection problem of temporal and spatial variability in gaseous C exchange and thus, changes in SOC stocks (ΔSOC) in a high resolution. This study introduces dynamic C balances as a method to obtain seasonal changes in SOC stocks. Dynamic C balances were calculated by a combination of automatic chamber CO2 exchange measurements and empirical biomass models. Measurements were performed for three consecutive years at a colluvial depression (Colluvic Regosol) in the hummocky ground moraine landscape of NE Germany (CarboZALF experimental site). The investigated crop rotation was maize, winter fodder rye, maize, winter fodder rye, and sudangrass. The site is characterized by a gradient in ground water level (GWL) and related spatial heterogeneity in soil properties, such as SOC as well as soil nitrogen (Nt) stocks. Modelled dynamic C balances reveal that up to 79% of the standard deviation of estimated annual ΔSOC between single chambers emerged during the main period of crop growth (three months in summer). No significant changes in ΔSOC were detected outside the growing season. Instead, differences between chambers remain constant despite ΔSOC dynamics. Environmental variables (Nt stocks of Ap horizon and GWL), affecting plant-mediated C sequestration, explained up to 95% of temporal and spatial variability in CO2 exchange and ΔSOC. Thus, plant activities were the major catalyst for small scale differences in annual ΔSOC of croplands.

  7. Assessment of Hormone Receptor and Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 Status in Breast Carcinoma Using Thin-Prep Cytology Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology FISH Experience From China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhihui; Yuan, Peng; Guo, Huiqin; Zhao, Linlin; Ying, Jianming; Wang, Mingrong; Zhao, Huan; Pan, Qinjing; Xu, Binghe

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) overexpression can be used to predict patient prognosis in breast cancer (BC). Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is a reliable predictive marker in invasive breast cancer (IBC). Thin-Prep (TP) specimens are commonly utilized for immunocytochemistry (ICC) in fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC). Thus, we sought to investigate if the incorporation of molecular diagnosis performed on TP-processed specimens is applicable in clinical practice. Hormone receptors (HRs) and HER2 immunocytochemistry was performed on 542 primary breast cancer FNAC specimens using the TP method. One hundred fourteen HER2 fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses were performed on HER2 ICC 2+ FNAC specimens and the corresponding tissue samples. HRs results of TP slides and those of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) slides were correlated well for ER (concordance rate = 93.3%, kappa value = 0.85) and PR (concordance rate = 88.6%, kappa value = 0.75). HER2 results for the TP slides and those of the matched FFPE slides also correlated well (concordance rate = 80.0%, kappa value = 0.62). The specificity of HER2 was 97.3%; however, the sensitivity was only 67.1%. Cytological specimens and histological samples showed a strong correlation (concordance rate = 99.1%, kappa value = 0.98) while being used to evaluate HER2 gene amplification. FNAC is a minimally invasive technique that can be used as an alternative method to collect tissue especially in cases where an excisional or core biopsy is difficult to obtain, or when recurrence is present. The results of ICC HRs in FNAC TP specimens may be used instead, but HER2 assessment may not be reliable enough for clinical use. FISH testing is necessary in this setting.

  8. Nutrient limitation restricts growth and reproductive output in a tropical montane cloud forest bromeliad: findings from a long-term forest fertilization experiment.

    PubMed

    Lasso, Eloisa; Ackerman, James D

    2013-01-01

    From studies in seasonal lowland tropical forests, bromeliad epiphytes appear to be limited mainly by water, and to a lesser extent by nutrient supply, especially phosphorous. Less is understood about the mineral nutrition of tropical montane cloud forest (TMCF) epiphytes, even though their highest diversity is in this habitat. Nutrient limitation is known to be a key factor restricting forest productivity in TMCF, and if epiphytes are nutritionally linked to their host trees, as has been suggested, we would expect that they are also nutrient limited. We studied the effect of a higher nutrient input on reproduction and growth of the tank bromeliad Werauhia sintenisii in experimental plots located in a TMCF in Puerto Rico, where all macro- and micronutrients had been added quarterly starting in 1989 and continuing throughout the duration of this study. We found that bromeliads growing in fertilized plots were receiving litterfall with higher concentrations of N, P, and Zn and had higher concentrations of P, Zn, Fe, Al, and Na in their vegetative body. The N:P ratios found (fertilized = 27.5 and non-fertilized = 33.8) suggest that W. sintenisii may also be phosphorous limited as are lowland epiphytes. Fertilized plants had slightly longer inflorescences, and more flowers per inflorescence, than non-fertilized plants, but their flowers produced nectar in similar concentrations and quantities. Fertilized plants produced more seeds per fruit and per plant. Frequency of flowering in two consecutive years was higher for fertilized plants than for controls, suggesting that fertilized plants overcome the cost of reproduction more readily than non-fertilized plants. These results provide evidence that TMCF epiphytic bromeliads are nutrient limited like their lowland counterparts. PMID:22767363

  9. Eyelid Growths

    MedlinePlus

    ... a microscope). The growth is usually removed surgically. Did You Know... A growth on the eyelid that ... respond to initial treatments. Resources In This Article Did You Know 1 Did You Know... Figure 1 ...

  10. Growth Hormone

    MedlinePlus

    ... the dose of glucose. Growth hormone stimulates the production of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) . ... regular intervals for years afterward to monitor GH production and to detect tumor recurrence. Other blood tests ...

  11. Delayed growth

    MedlinePlus

    Growth - slow (child 0 - 5 years); Weight gain - slow (child 0 - 5 years); Slow rate of growth; Retarded growth and development; ... A child should have regular, well-baby check-ups with a health care provider. These checkups are usually scheduled ...

  12. Influence of season growth, soils and irrigation water composition on the concentration of uranium in two lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) varieties. Field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, M. M.; Neves, O.; Marcelino, M.

    2012-04-01

    Former uranium mines areas are frequently the sources of environmental radionuclides problems even many years after the closure of mining operations. A concern for inhabitants from mining areas is the use of contaminated land or irrigation water for agriculture, and the potential transfer of metals from soils to vegetables, and to humans through the food chain. The main aim of this study was to compare the uranium concentration in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. varieties Marady and Romana) grown in different seasons (autumn and summer) and exposed to high and low uranium concentrations both in irrigation water and agricultural soil. The content of uranium in irrigation water, soil (total and available fraction) and in lettuce leaf samples was analyzed in a certified laboratory. In the field experiments, two agricultural soils were divided into two plots (four replicates each); one of them was irrigated with uranium contaminated water (0.94 to 1.14 mg/L) and the other with uncontaminated water (< 0.02 mg/L). Irrigation with contaminated water together with highest soil uranium available concentration (10 to 13 mg/kg) had negative effects on both studied lettuce varieties, namely yield reduction (up to 53% and 87% in autumn and summer experiments, respectively) and increase of uranium leaf concentration (up to 1.4 and 7 fold in autumn and summer, respectively). Effect on lettuce yield was mainly due to the high soil salinity (1.01 to 6.31 mS/cm) as a consequence of high irrigation water electrical conductivity (up to 1.82 mS/cm) and low lettuce soil salinity tolerance (1 to 3 mS/cm). The highest lettuce uranium concentration (dry weight) observed was 2.13 and 5.37 mg/kg for Marady and Romana variety, respectively. The highest uranium lettuce concentration in Romana variety was also the effect of its growing in summer season when it was subject to greatest frequency and amount of water irrigation. The consumption by an adult of the lettuce that concentrate more uranium

  13. Protein crystal growth in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenblum, William M.; Delucas, Lawrence J.; Wilson, William W.

    1989-01-01

    Major advances have been made in several of the experimental aspects of protein crystallography, leaving protein crystallization as one of the few remaining bottlenecks. As a result, it has become important that the science of protein crystal growth is better understood and that improved methods for protein crystallization are developed. Preliminary experiments with both small molecules and proteins indicate that microgravity may beneficially affect crystal growth. For this reason, a series of protein crystal growth experiments using the Space Shuttle was initiated. The preliminary space experiments were used to evolve prototype hardware that will form the basis for a more advanced system that can be used to evaluate effects of gravity on protein crystal growth. Various optical techniques are being utilized to monitor the crystal growth process from the incipient or nucleation stage and throughout the growth phase. The eventual goal of these studies is to develop a system which utilizes optical monitoring for dynamic control of the crystallization process.

  14. Growth and Expansion of the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project and the Newly Organized International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project

    SciTech Connect

    J. Blair Briggs; Lori Scott; Yolanda Rugama; Enrico Satori

    2007-05-01

    Since ICNC 2003, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) has continued to expand its efforts and broaden its scope. Criticality-alarm / shielding type benchmarks and fundamental physics measurements that are relevant to criticality safety applications are not only included in the scope of the project, but benchmark data are also included in the latest version of the handbook. A considerable number of improvements have been made to the searchable database, DICE and the criticality-alarm / shielding benchmarks and fundamental physics measurements have been included in the database. There were 12 countries participating on the ICSBEP in 2003. That number has increased to 18 with recent contributions of data and/or resources from Brazil, Czech Republic, Poland, India, Canada, and China. South Africa, Germany, Argentina, and Australia have been invited to participate. Since ICNC 2003, the contents of the “International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments” have increased from 350 evaluations (28,000 pages) containing benchmark specifications for 3070 critical or subcritical configurations to 442 evaluations (over 38,000 pages) containing benchmark specifications for 3957 critical or subcritical configurations, 23 criticality-alarm-placement / shielding configurations with multiple dose points for each, and 20 configurations that have been categorized as fundamental physics measurements that are relevant to criticality safety applications in the 2006 Edition of the ICSBEP Handbook. Approximately 30 new evaluations and 250 additional configurations are expected to be added to the 2007 Edition of the Handbook. Since ICNC 2003, a reactor physics counterpart to the ICSBEP, The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) was initiated. Beginning in 1999, the IRPhEP was conducted as a pilot activity by the by the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy

  15. BIFoR FACE: A ten-year Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE) Experiment in Old Growth Deciduous English Woodland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, R. M.; MacKenzie, A. R.; Ellsworth, D.; Hemming, D.; Crous, K.; Pope, F.; Blaen, P.; Poynter, A.; Hamilton, L.; Blenkhorn, D.; Jarvis-Rouse, F.

    2015-12-01

    The Birmingham Institute of Forest research (BIFoR) will perform fundamental physical, biological, ecological, social and cultural research of direct relevance to forested landscapes worldwide. A core platform for BIFoR to study the ten-year response of a mature temperate deciduous forest ecosystem to against a large step-change in atmospheric [CO2] is the BIFoR Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE) experiment. BIFoR FACE is being established in Mill Haft, a mature (~150 year-old) oak (Quercus robur) and hazel (Corylus avellana) coppice-with-standards woodland in central England. The facility will enable elevated CO2 (eCO2) treatments to be introduced in 30 m diameter rings (3 treatment and 6 control plots), commencing in spring 2016. Under eCO2 conditions primary research questions will investigate carbon uptake and storage, corresponding nutrient limitations, and biodiversity and ecosystem responses. As well as describing the facility and experimental design, we present baseline data collected throughout 2015, prior to fumigation. These data include: biophysical tree properties; atmospheric CO2/H2O fluxes; airborne and ground laser scatterometry; leaf area index; geophysical survey data; phenology camera derivatives; soil and water chemical and physical properties; and invertebrate surveys. Data from an intensive campaign conducted during august 2015 are also shown, including in- and above- canopy characterisation of biogenic VOCs using a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer, aerosol loading including bioaerosols, and enhanced atmospheric chemistry. Further campaign results are presented from leaf level photosynthetic carbon-dioxide response curve (A/Ci) performed at different canopy heights on oak trees, and on the dominant understory species - hazel and sycamore (Acer pseudoplatinus) across the site. BIFoR FACE is an exciting new international facility for forest science - ideas for collaborations are encouraged. Please see http

  16. Culturing Fundamentals Used To Design And Execute A Long-Term Multi-stressor Experiment To Assess Impact Of Deoxygenation, Ocean Acidification, And Warming On Benthic Foraminiferal Community Composition, Growth, And Carbonate Yield: Design And Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhard, J. M.; Wit, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    The geochemistry recorded in carbonate foraminiferal tests (shells) is often used as proxy for past oceanographic events and environments. By understanding past oceanic and climatic conditions, we can better predict future climate scenarios, a relevant ability in these times of global change. The fact that foraminifera are biological entities can be pivotal for understanding their geochemical records. Thus, growing foraminifera under known physicochemical conditions and analyzing the geochemistry of their cultured carbonate can yield insightful perspectives for proxy refinement and development. Because parameters often co-vary in nature, proper proxy calibration can only be done with materials grown in strictly controlled and known environments. This presentation will review the various crucial aspects of foraminiferal maintenance and culturing, especially from the perspective of proxy development. These fundamentals were used to design a long-term multi-stressor experiment with oxygen, pCO2 (pH), and temperature as variables to test the single, double or triple threats of deoxygenation, ocean acidification, and oceanic warming. Results on assemblage composition, survivorship and growth of a continental shelf benthic foraminiferal community will be presented. Although one agglutinated morphospecies grew in each of the five treatments, growth of individual calcareous species was more restricted. Initial results indicate that pCO2 was not the factor that impacted communities most. Supported in part by NSF OCE-1219948.

  17. Analytics of crystal growth in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, W. R.; Chang, C. E.; Shlichta, P. J.; Chen, P. S.; Kim, C. K.

    1974-01-01

    Two crystal growth processes considered for spacelab experiments were studied to anticipate and understand phenomena not ordinarily encountered on earth. Computer calculations were performed on transport processes in floating zone melting and on growth of a crystal from solution in a spacecraft environment. Experiments intended to simulate solution growth at micro accelerations were performed.

  18. Dendritic Growth Investigators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Representatives of NASA materials science experiments supported the NASA exhibit at the Rernselaer Polytechnic Institute's Space Week activities, April 5 through 11, 1999. From left to right are: Angie Jackman, project manager at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center for dendritic growth experiments; Dr. Martin Glicksman of Rennselaer Polytechnic Instutute, Troy, NY, principal investigator on the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) that flew three times on the Space Shuttle; and Dr. Matthew Koss of College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA, a co-investigator on the IDGE and now principal investigator on the Transient Dendritic Solidification Experiment being developed for the International Space Station (ISS). The image at far left is a dendrite grown in Glicksman's IDGE tests aboard the Shuttle. Glicksman is also principal investigator for the Evolution of Local Microstructures: Spatial Instabilities of Coarsening Clusters.

  19. Space Station Live: Seedling Growth

    NASA Video Gallery

    Public Affairs Officer Lori Meggs talks with Carol Jacobs, payload operations director at the Marshall Space Flight Center's POIC, about the Seedling Growth experiment talking place aboard the Inte...

  20. Protein crystal growth - Growth kinetics for tetragonal lysozyme crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, M. L.; Snyder, R. S.; Naumann, R.

    1986-01-01

    Results are reported from theoretical and experimental studies of the growth rate of lysozyme as a function of diffusion in earth-gravity conditions. The investigations were carried out to form a comparison database for future studies of protein crystal growth in the microgravity environment of space. A diffusion-convection model is presented for predicting crystal growth rates in the presence of solutal concentration gradients. Techniques used to grow and monitor the growth of hen egg white lysozyme are detailed. The model calculations and experiment data are employed to discuss the effects of transport and interfacial kinetics in the growth of the crystals, which gradually diminished the free energy in the growth solution. Density gradient-driven convection, caused by presence of the gravity field, was a limiting factor in the growth rate.

  1. U.S. Population Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillner, Harry

    This autoinstructional lesson deals with the study of man and his environment. No previous experience or learning in this field is required. Emphasis is placed on analysis of population growth and the impact population growth and trends have on natural resource depletion. The behavioral objectives (five) are listed. The study guide for the…

  2. Effects of High-Flow Experiments from Glen Canyon Dam on Abundance, Growth, and Survival Rates of Early Life Stages of Rainbow Trout in the Lees Ferry Reach of the Colorado River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Korman, Josh; Kaplinski, Matthew; Melis, Theodore S.

    2010-01-01

    High-flow experiments (HFEs) from Glen Canyon Dam are primarily intended to conserve fine sediment and improve habitat conditions for native fish in the Colorado River as it flows through Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. These experimental flows also have the potential to affect the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) population in the Lees Ferry tailwater reach immediately below the dam, which supports a highly valued recreational fishery and likely influences the abundance of rainbow trout in Grand Canyon. Understanding how flow regimes affect the survival and growth of juvenile rainbow trout is critical to interpreting trends in adult abundance. This study reports on the effects of HFEs in 2004 and 2008 on early life stages of rainbow trout in the Lees Ferry reach on the basis of monthly sampling of redds (egg nests) and the abundance of the age-0 trout (fertilization to about 1 to 2 months from emergence) and their growth during a 7-year period between 2003 and 2009. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that the March 2008 HFE resulted in a large increase in early survival rates of age-0 trout because of an improvement in habitat conditions. A stock-recruitment analysis demonstrated that age-0 abundance in July 2008 was more than fourfold higher than expected, given the number of viable eggs that produced these fish. A hatch-date analysis showed that early survival rates were much higher for cohorts that hatched about 1 month after the 2008 HFE (about April 15, 2008) relative to those fish that hatched before this date. These cohorts, fertilized after the 2008 HFE, would have emerged into a benthic invertebrate community that had recovered, and was possibly enhanced by, the HFE. Interannual differences in growth of age-0 trout, determined on the basis of otolith microstructure, support this hypothesis. Growth rates in the summer and fall of 2008 (0.44 mm/day) were virtually the same as in 2006 (0.46 mm/day), the highest recorded during 6 years, even though

  3. Atmosphere control for plant growth flight experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Ferolyn T.; Sudar, Martin; Timm, Marc; Yost, Bruce

    1989-01-01

    An atmosphere exchange system (AES) has been designed to provide a conditioned atmosphere supply to plant specimens in flight without incurring the large weight and volume associated with bottled gases. The paper examines the atmosphere filter cartridge (AFC) designed to remove trace organic atmosphere contaminants from the Space Shuttle cabin and to condition the cabin atmosphere prior to exposure to plant specimens. The AES and AFC are described and illustrated. The AFC design requirements are discussed and results are presented from tests on the performance of the AFC. Also, consideration is given to the potential applications of the AFC and future design concepts for atmosphere control.

  4. Space Experiment Facility (SEF) Vapor Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this facility is to investigate the potential of space grown semiconductor materials by the vapor transport technique and develop powdered metal and ceramic sintering techniques in microgravity. The materials processed or developed in the SEF have potential application for improving infrared detectors, nuclear particle detectors, photovoltaic cells, bearing cutting tools, electrical brushes and catalysts for chemical production. Flown on STS-60 Commercial Center: Consortium for Materials Development in Space - University of Alabama Huntsville (UAH)

  5. Real-World Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borja, Rhea R.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents IISME, a U.S. program that can give educators a real-world experience and that can deepen their subject-matter knowledge. It also presents the experiences of some teachers who are into this program. IISME's summer-fellowship program started out with 40 teachers and 12 companies. The group's growth picked up in 2001, when it…

  6. Purification optimization for a recombinant single-chain variable fragment against type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) by using design of experiment (DoE).

    PubMed

    Song, Yong-Hong; Sun, Xue-Wen; Jiang, Bo; Liu, Ji-En; Su, Xian-Hui

    2015-12-01

    Design of experiment (DoE) is a statistics-based technique for experimental design that could overcome the shortcomings of traditional one-factor-at-a-time (OFAT) approach for protein purification optimization. In this study, a DoE approach was applied for optimizing purification of a recombinant single-chain variable fragment (scFv) against type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) expressed in Escherichia coli. In first capture step using Capto L, a 2-level fractional factorial analysis and successively a central composite circumscribed (CCC) design were used to identify the optimal elution conditions. Two main effects, pH and trehalose, were identified, and high recovery (above 95%) and low aggregates ratio (below 10%) were achieved at the pH range from 2.9 to 3.0 with 32-35% (w/v) trehalose added. In the second step using cation exchange chromatography, an initial screening of media and elution pH and a following CCC design were performed, whereby the optimal selectivity of the scFv was obtained on Capto S at pH near 6.0, and the optimal conditions for fulfilling high DBC and purity were identified as pH range of 5.9-6.1 and loading conductivity range of 5-12.5 mS/cm. Upon a further gel filtration, the final purified scFv with a purity of 98% was obtained. Finally, the optimized conditions were verified by a 20-fold scale-up experiment. The purities and yields of intermediate and final products all fell within the regions predicted by DoE approach, suggesting the robustness of the optimized conditions. We proposed that the DoE approach described here is also applicable in production of other recombinant antibody constructs. PMID:26297993

  7. Growth chart

    MedlinePlus

    Height and weight chart ... Growth charts are used to compare your child's height, weight, and head size against children of the ... From these numbers, the national average weight and height for each age and gender were established. The ...

  8. Protein crystal growth in a microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, Charles E.

    1988-01-01

    Protein crystal growth is a major experimental problem and is the bottleneck in widespread applications of protein crystallography. Research efforts now being pursued and sponsored by NASA are making fundamental contributions to the understanding of the science of protein crystal growth. Microgravity environments offer the possibility of performing new types of experiments that may produce a better understanding of protein crystal growth processes and may permit growth environments that are more favorable for obtaining high quality protein crystals. A series of protein crystal growth experiments using the space shuttle was initiated. The first phase of these experiments was focused on the development of micro-methods for protein crystal growth by vapor diffusion techniques, using a space version of the hanging drop method. The preliminary space experiments were used to evolve prototype hardware that will form the basis for a more advanced system that can be used to evaluate effects of gravity on protein crystal growth.

  9. Dendritic Alloy Solidification Experiment (DASE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckermann, C.; Karma, A.; Steinbach, I.; deGroh, H. C., III

    2001-01-01

    A space experiment, and supporting ground-based research, is proposed to study the microstructural evolution in free dendritic growth from a supercooled melt of the transparent model alloy succinonitrile-acetone (SCN-ACE). The research is relevant to equiaxed solidification of metal alloy castings. The microgravity experiment will establish a benchmark for testing of equiaxed dendritic growth theories, scaling laws, and models in the presence of purely diffusive, coupled heat and solute transport, without the complicating influences of melt convection. The specific objectives are to: determine the selection of the dendrite tip operating state, i.e. the growth velocity and tip radius, for free dendritic growth of succinonitrile-acetone alloys; determine the growth morphology and sidebranching behavior for freely grown alloy dendrites; determine the effects of the thermal/solutal interactions in the growth of an assemblage of equiaxed alloy crystals; determine the effects of melt convection on the free growth of alloy dendrites; measure the surface tension anisotropy strength of succinon itrile -acetone alloys establish a theoretical and modeling framework for the experiments. Microgravity experiments on equiaxed dendritic growth of alloy dendrites have not been performed in the past. The proposed experiment builds on the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) of Glicksman and coworkers, which focused on the steady growth of a single crystal from pure supercooled melts (succinonitrile and pivalic acid). It also extends the Equiaxed Dendritic Solidification Experiment (EDSE) of the present investigators, which is concerned with the interactions and transients arising in the growth of an assemblage of equiaxed crystals (succinonitrile). However, these experiments with pure substances are not able to address the issues related to coupled heat and solute transport in growth of alloy dendrites.

  10. Thick silicon growth techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, H. E.; Mlavsky, A. I.; Jewett, D. N.

    1973-01-01

    Hall mobility measurements on a number of single crystal silicon ribbons grown from graphite dies have shown some ribbons to have mobilities consistent with their resistivities. The behavior of other ribbons appears to be explained by the introduction of impurities of the opposite sign. Growth of a small single crystal silicon ribbon has been achieved from a beryllia dia. Residual internal stresses of the order of 7 to 18,000 psi have been determined to exist in some silicon ribbon, particularly those grown at rates in excess of 1 in./min. Growth experiments have continued toward definition of a configuration and parameters to provide a reasonable yield of single crystal ribbons. High vacuum outgassing of graphite dies and evacuation and backfilling of growth chambers have provided significant improvements in surface quality of ribbons grown from graphite dies.

  11. Naled ice growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schohl, G. A.; Ettema, R.

    1986-02-01

    Based on theoretical formulation and dimensional analysis, supported by the results of laboratory experiments, a theory and a detailed description of naled ice growth are presented. The theory, concepts, and data should be of interest to engineers concerned with the effects of naleds (also referred to as aufeis or icings) on engineering works. The growth of a two dimensional, or laterally confined (flume), naled is shown to depend primarily on seven, independent, dimensionless parameters. The early, two dimensional, phase of growth, a naled consists of a mixture of ice and water, or ice-water slush, forming on a frigid base. The influence of two of the three remaining parameters is not felt until after a transition time has passed. The continuing, cyclic process by which slush layers form and eventually freeze results in the ice laminations that are a feature of naled ice.

  12. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    A chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor system with a vertical deposition chamber was used for the growth of Si films on glass, glass-ceramic, and polycrystalline ceramic substrates. Silicon vapor was produced by pyrolysis of SiH4 in a H2 or He carrier gas. Preliminary deposition experiments with two of the available glasses were not encouraging. Moderately encouraging results, however, were obtained with fired polycrystalline alumina substrates, which were used for Si deposition at temperatures above 1,000 C. The surfaces of both the substrates and the films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, reflection electron diffraction, scanning electron microscopy optical microscopy, and surface profilometric techniques. Several experiments were conducted to establish baseline performance data for the reactor system, including temperature distributions on the sample pedestal, effects of carrier gas flow rate on temperature and film thickness, and Si film growth rate as a function of temperature.

  13. Facilitating post traumatic growth

    PubMed Central

    Turner, de Sales; Cox, Helen

    2004-01-01

    Background Whilst negative responses to traumatic injury have been well documented in the literature, there is a small but growing body of work that identifies posttraumatic growth as a salient feature of this experience. We contribute to this discourse by reporting on the experiences of 13 individuals who were traumatically injured, had undergone extensive rehabilitation and were discharged from formal care. All participants were injured through involvement in a motor vehicle accident, with the exception of one, who was injured through falling off the roof of a house. Methods In this qualitative study, we used an audio-taped in-depth interview with each participant as the means of data collection. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically to determine the participants' unique perspectives on the experience of recovery from traumatic injury. In reporting the findings, all participants' were given a pseudonym to assure their anonymity. Results Most participants indicated that their involvement in a traumatic occurrence was a springboard for growth that enabled them to develop new perspectives on life and living. Conclusion There are a number of contributions that health providers may make to the recovery of individuals who have been traumatically injured to assist them to develop new views of vulnerability and strength, make changes in relationships, and facilitate philosophical, physical and spiritual growth. PMID:15248894

  14. Surrogate Seeds For Growth Of Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlichta, Paul J.

    1989-01-01

    Larger crystals of higher quality grown. Alternative method for starting growth of crystal involves use of seed crystal of different material instead of same material as solution. Intended for growing single-crystal proteins for experiments but applicable in general to growth of crystals from solutions and to growth of semiconductor or other crystals from melts.

  15. Exploring Old Growth Forests: A Teacher's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemieux, Chris; Powers, Jennene; Quinby, Peter; Schultz, Caroline; Stabb, Mark

    "Exploring Old Growth Forests" is an Ontario (Canada) program that provides secondary students with hands-on experiences in old growth forests. Activity-based and student-centered, the program aims to develop student awareness of the importance of old growth forests and the need to conserve them. This manual provides teachers with background…

  16. Population growth and consumption.

    PubMed

    Chalkley, K

    1997-04-01

    The relationship between population growth, resource consumption, and environmental degradation is complex. The rise in "greenhouse gases" that will cause climatic change is clearly due to human activity, and pollutants are often concentrated in densely populated areas. However, even an area with a negative population growth, such as Russia, can experience severe environmental degradation due to poor management. Consumption patterns have the most effect on ozone depletion, while population growth threatens biodiversity of and within species through the destruction of ecosystems. Migration joins population growth and social factors, such as land inequality, as major causes of deforestation, and global demand for water is expected to increase faster than the rate of population growth. Coastal development and over-fishing threaten to deplete the oceans, while soil quality is threatened by inappropriate land use. Estimates of the earth's carrying capacity range from less than 3 billion to more than 44 billion people, indicating how difficult it is to assess this figure. Development efforts throughout the world may lead to human gains that will ultimately be negated by environmental losses. These factors have led to growing support for environmentally sustainable development. PMID:12319715

  17. Solidification under microgravity conditions - Dendritic growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Hahn, R. C.; Lograsso, T. A.; Rubinstein, E. R.; Winsa, E.

    1987-01-01

    The experimental approach and apparatus of a zero-gravity active crystal growth experiment to test dendritic growth theory at low supercoolings are discussed. The experiment consists of 20 experimental cycles. Estimates have been made as to how low gravitational accelerations would have to be reduced to observe convection-free dendritic growth at supercoolings from 0.01-1.0 K. The experiment requires temperature control of + or - 2 mK and photographic resolution of a few microns with a depth of field of + or - 6 mm. The thermostatic bath and temperature control system, photographic system, growth chamber, and dendrite detection system are described in detail.

  18. Chemical Growth Regulators for Guayule Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dastoor, M. N.; Schubert, W. W.; Petersen, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    Test Tubes containing Guayule - tissue cultures were used in experiments to test effects of chemical-growth regulators. The shoots grew in response to addition of 2-(3,4-dichlorophenoxy)-triethylamine (triethylamine (TEA) derivative) to agar medium. Preliminary results indicate that a class of compounds that promotes growth in soil may also promote growth in a culture medium. Further experiments are needed to define the effect of the TEA derivative.

  19. Transport and Growth Kinetics in Microgravity Protein Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otalora, F.; Garcia-Ruiz, J. M.; Carotenuto, L.; Castagnolo, D.; Novella, M. L.; Chernov, A. A.

    2002-01-01

    The dynamic coupling between mass transport and incorporation of growth units into the surface of a crystal growing from solution in microgravity is used to derive quantitative information on the crystal growth kinetics. To this end, new procedures for experiment preparation, interferometric data processing and model fitting have been developed. The use of experimental data from the bulk diffusive maw transport together with a model for steady state stagnant crystal growth allows the detailed quantitative understanding of the kinetics of both the concentration depletion zone around the crystal and the growth of the crystal interface. The protein crystal used in the experiment is shown to be growing in the mixed kinetic regime (0.2 x 10(exp -6) centimeters per second less than beta R/D less than 0.9 x 10(exp -6) centimeters per second).

  20. Spacelab J experiment descriptions

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, T.Y.

    1993-08-01

    Brief descriptions of the experiment investigations for the Spacelab J Mission which was launched from the Kennedy Space Center aboard the Endeavour in Sept. 1992 are presented. Experiments cover the following: semiconductor crystals; single crystals; superconducting composite materials; crystal growth; bubble behavior in weightlessness; microgravity environment; health monitoring of Payload Specialists; cultured plant cells; effect of low gravity on calcium metabolism and bone formation; and circadian rhythm. Separate abstracts have been prepared for articles from this report.

  1. Spacelab J experiment descriptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Teresa Y. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    Brief descriptions of the experiment investigations for the Spacelab J Mission which was launched from the Kennedy Space Center aboard the Endeavour in Sept. 1992 are presented. Experiments cover the following: semiconductor crystals; single crystals; superconducting composite materials; crystal growth; bubble behavior in weightlessness; microgravity environment; health monitoring of Payload Specialists; cultured plant cells; effect of low gravity on calcium metabolism and bone formation; and circadian rhythm.

  2. Real-Time Assessment of Guided Bone Regeneration in Standardized Calvarial Defects Using a Combination of Bone Graft and Platelet-Derived Growth Factor With and Without Collagen Membrane: An In Vivo Microcomputed Tomographic and Histologic Experiment in Rats.

    PubMed

    Alrasheed, Abdulaziz; Al-Ahmari, Fatemah; Ramalingam, Sundar; Nooh, Nasser; Wang, Cun-Yu; Al-Hezaimi, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present in vivo microcomputed tomography (μCT) and histologic experiment was to assess the efficacy of guided bone regeneration (GBR) around standardized calvarial defects using recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor (rhPDGF) with and without resorbable collagen membrane (RCM). A total of 50 female Wistar albino rats with a mean age of 7.5 months and mean weight of 275 g were used. The calvarium was exposed following midsagittal scalp incision and flap reflection. A full-thickness standardized calvarial defect (4.6 mm diameter) was created. Study animals were randomly divided into five groups based on biomaterials used for GBR within the defect: (1) no treatment (negative control), (2) bone graft alone (BG), (3) bone graft covered by RCM (BG + RCM), (4) bone graft soaked in rhPDGF (BG + rhPDGF), and (5) bone graft soaked in rhPDGF and covered with RCM (BG + rhPDGF + RCM). In vivo μCT for determination of newly formed bone volume (NFBV) and mineral density (NFBMD) and remnant bone particles volume (RBPV) and mineral density (RBPMD) was done at baseline and at 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks postoperatively. Eight weeks following surgery, the animals were sacrificed and harvested calvarial specimens were subjected to histologic and biomechanical analysis. There was an increase in NFBV and NFBMD associated with a corresponding decrease in RBPV and RBPMD in all the study groups. Two-way analysis of variance revealed significant differences in the measured values within and between the groups across the timelines examined during the study period (P < .05). While the NFBV was significantly higher in the bone graft, BG + RCM, and BG + rhPDGF + RCM groups, the NFBMD was similar in all the groups except negative control. The greatest decreases in RBPV and RBPMD were observed in the BG + rhPDGF + RCM group in comparison to the other groups. Similarly, BG + rhPDGF + RCM groups had hardness and elastic modulus similar to that of natural bone. The in vivo

  3. Droplet Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marder, Michael Paolo

    When a mixture of two materials, such as aluminum and tin, or alcohol and water, is cooled below a certain temperature, the two components begin to separate. If one component is dilute in the other, it may separate out in the form of small spheres, and these will begin to enlarge, depleting the supersaturated material around them. If the dynamics is sufficiently slow, thermodynamics gives one considerable information about how the droplets grow. Two types of experiment have explored this behavior and given puzzling results. Nucleation experiments measure the rate at which droplets initially appear from a seemingly homogeneous mixture. Near the critical point in binary liquids, experiments conducted in the 1960's and early 1970's showed that nucleation was vastly slower than theory seemed to predict. The resolution of this problem arises by considering in detail the dynamics of growing droplets and comparing it with what experiments actually measure. Here will be presented a more detailed comparison of theory and experiment than has before been completed, obtaining satisfactory agreement with no free parameters needed. A second type of experiment measures droplet size distributions after long times. In the late stage, droplets compete with each other for material, a few growing at the expense of others. A theory first proposed by Lifshitz and Slyozov claims that this distribution, properly scaled, should be universal, and independent of properties of materials. Yet experimental measurements consistently find distributions that are more broad and squat than the theory would predict. Satisfactory agreement with experiment can be achieved by considering two points. First, one must study the complete time development of droplet size distributions, to understand when the asymptotic regime obtains. Second, droplet size distributions are spread by correlations between droplets. If one finds a small droplet, it is small because large droplets nearby are competing with it

  4. Summaries of early materials processing in space experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.; Mason, D.

    1979-01-01

    Objectives, methods, and results of low-gravity materials processing experiments are summarized, and a bibliography of published results for each experiment is provided. Included are drop tower experiments, the Apollo demonstration experiments, the skylab experiments and demonstration experiments, and the Apollo-Soyuz experiments and demonstrations. The findings of these experiments in the fields of crystal growth, metallurgy, and fluid behavior are summarized.

  5. Ice forming experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vali, G.

    1982-01-01

    A low gravity experiment to assess the effect of the presence of supercooled cloud droplets on the diffusional growth rate of ice crystals is described. The theoretical work and the feasibility studies are summarized. The nucleation of ice crystals in supercooled clouds is also discussed.

  6. Transient Dentritic Solidification Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Transient Dentritic Solidification Experiment (TDSE) is being developed as a candidate for flight aboard the International Space Station. TDSE will study the growth of dentrites (treelike crystalline structures) in a transparent material (succinonitrile or SCN) that mimics the behavior of widely used iron-based metals. Basic work by three Space Shuttle flights (STS-62, STS-75, and STS-87) of the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operations. The TDSE is similar to IDGE, but will maintain a constant temperature while varying pressure on the dentrites. Shown here is a cutaway of the isothermal bath containing its growth cell at the heart of the TDSE. The principal investigator is Matthew Koss of College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA. Note: an Acrobat PDF version is available from http://microgravity.nasa.gov/gallery

  7. Biotechnology Science Experiments on Mir

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroes, Roger L.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the microgravity biotechnology experiments carried out on the Shuttle/Mir program. Four experiments investigated the growth of protein crystals, and three investigated cellular growth. Many hundreds of protein samples were processed using four different techniques. The objective of these experiments was to determine optimum conditions for the growth of very high quality single crystals to be used for structure determination. The Biotechnology System (BTS) was used to process the three cell growth investigations. The samples processed by these experiments were: bovine chondrocytes, human renal epithelial cells, and human breast cancer cells and endothelial cells. The objective was to determine the unique properties of cell aggregates produced in the microgravity environment.

  8. Growth Of Single Crystalline Copper Nanowhiskers

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, Matthias; Richter, Gunther

    2010-11-24

    Nanowhiskers are defect free single crystals with high aspect ratios and as result exhibit superior physical, e.g. mechanical properties. This paper sheds light on the kinetics of copper nanowhisker growth and thickening. Whisker growth was provoked by covering silicon wafers with a thin carbon film and subsequently coating them with copper by molecular beam epitaxy. The whiskers grown were examined by scanning electron microscopy and the length and diameter were measured as a function of the amount of copper deposited. The experiments show that nanowhisker growth follows Ruth and Hirth's growth model. A fit of the model parameters to the acquired data shows that adsorption of atoms on the substrate and on the whisker surface, with subsequent surface diffusion to the whisker tip, delivers by far the greatest portion of material for whisker growth. Additionally, the experiments demonstrate that the crystallographic orientation of the substrate surface greatly influences the growth rate in the early stage of whisker growth.

  9. College-Student Personal-Growth and Attributions of Cause

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, W. P., Jr.; Lopez-Baez, Sandra I.

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about levels of personal growth attributed by students to typical college life experiences. This paper documents two studies of student self-reported and posttraumatic growth and compares growth levels across populations. Both studies measure student attributions of cause to academic and non-academic experiences, respectively. It…

  10. Cell Growth Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Exogene Corporation uses advanced technologies to enhance production of bio-processed substances like proteins, antibiotics and amino acids. Among them are genetic modification and a genetic switch. They originated in research for Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Extensive experiments in cell growth through production of hemoglobin to improve oxygen supply to cells were performed. By improving efficiency of oxygen use by cells, major operational expenses can be reduced. Greater product yields result in decreased raw material costs and more efficient use of equipment. A broad range of applications is cited.

  11. Crystal growth of artificial snow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimura, S.; Oka, A.; Taki, M.; Kuwano, R.; Ono, H.; Nagura, R.; Narimatsu, Y.; Tanii, J.; Kamimiytat, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Snow crystals were grown onboard the space shuttle during STS-7 and STS-8 to facilitate the investigation of crystal growth under conditions of weightlessness. The experimental design and hardware are described. Space-grown snow crystals were polyhedrons looking like spheres, which were unlike snow crystals produced in experiments on Earth.

  12. Playing Games with Games People Play. Contributions of Gestalt Theory to Individual Counseling. Self-Discovery through Art: A Group Experience. A Review of Personal Research on Experimental-Gestalt Growth Groups. Gestalt Dreamwork as a Method for Self Discovery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guinan, James F.; And Others

    The existential Gestalt approach to facilitating the human growth process is discussed, from somewhat different vantage points, in these papers. Two seek to elaborate the basic principles and facilitating "techniques" of Gestalt therapy, while maintaining that one can truly understand only by experiencing. The use of Focus Groups, in which a focal…

  13. Development of methods for orderly growth of nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reznik, R. R.; Kotlyar, K. P.; Khrebtov, A. I.; Samsonenko, Yu B.; Soshnikov, I. P.; Dyakonov, V.; Zadiranov, U. M.; Tankelevskaya, E. M.; Kudryashov, D. A.; Shevchuk, D. S.; Cirlin, G. E.

    2015-12-01

    Method of manufacturing substrates for self-catalyst/free-catalyst ordered growth of the nanowires has been developed. Experiments show the possibility of autocatalytic growth of ordered GaAs NWs on the substrates produced during the research.

  14. Soybean Growth Aboard ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a photo of soybeans growing in the Advanced Astroculture (ADVASC) Experiment aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The ADVASC experiment was one of the several new experiments and science facilities delivered to the ISS by Expedition Five aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavor STS-111 mission. An agricultural seed company will grow soybeans in the ADVASC hardware to determine whether soybean plants can produce seeds in a microgravity environment. Secondary objectives include determination of the chemical characteristics of the seed in space and any microgravity impact on the plant growth cycle. Station science will also be conducted by the ever-present ground crew, with a new cadre of controllers for Expedition Five in the ISS Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Controllers work in three shifts around the clock, 7 days a week, in the POCC, the world's primary science command post for the Space Station. The POCC links Earth-bound researchers around the world with their experiments and crew aboard the Space Station.

  15. Experiences on IGSCC crack manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Veron, P.

    1997-02-01

    The author presents his experience in manufacturing IGSCC realistic defects, mainly in INCONEL 600 MA Steam Generator Tubes. From that experience he extracts some knowledge about this cracking (influence of chemistry in the environment, stress state, crack growth rate, and occurrence in laboratory condition of break before leak).

  16. The Growth of Large Single Crystals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baer, Carl D.

    1990-01-01

    Presented is an experiment which demonstrates principles of experimental design, solubility, and crystal growth and structure. Materials, procedures and results are discussed. Suggestions for adapting this activity to the high school laboratory are provided. (CW)

  17. Wheat growth monitoring with radar vegetation indices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microwave remote sensing can help in the monitoring of crop growth. Many experiments have been carried out to investigate the sensitivity of microwave sensors to crop growth parameters. These have clearly shown that canopy structure and water content can greatly affect the measurements. For agricult...

  18. The crop growth research chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagenbach, Kimberly

    1993-01-01

    The Crop Growth Research Chamber (CGRC) has been defined by CELSS principle investigators and science advisory panels as a necessary ground-based tool in the development of a regenerative life support system. The focus of CGRC research will be on the biomass production component of the CELSS system. The ground-based Crop Growth Research Chamber is for the study of plant growth and development under stringently controlled environments isolated from the external environment. The chamber has importance in three areas of CELSS activities: (1) crop research; (2) system control and integration, and (3) flight hardware design and experimentation. The laboratory size of the CGRC will be small enough to allow duplication of the unit, the conducting of controlled experiments, and replication of experiments, but large enough to provide information representative of larger plant communities. Experiments will focus on plant growth in a wide variety of environments and the effects of those environments on plant production of food, water, oxygen, toxins, and microbes. To study these effects in a closed system, tight control of the environment is necessary.

  19. Halogen lamp experiment, HALEX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, G.; Stapelmann, J.

    1986-01-01

    The main purpose of the Halogen Lamp Experiment (HALEX) was to investigate the operation of a halogen lamp during an extended period in a microgravity environment and to prove its behavior in space. The Mirror Heating Facilities for Crystal Growth and Material Science Experiments in space relies on one or two halogen lamps as a furnace to melt the specimens. The HALEX aim is to verify: full power operation of a halogen lamp for a period of about 60 hours; achievement of about 10% of its terrestrial life span; and operation of the halogen lamp under conditions similar to furnace operation.

  20. Vicarious posttraumatic growth among interpreters.

    PubMed

    Splevins, Katie A; Cohen, Keren; Joseph, Stephen; Murray, Craig; Bowley, Jake

    2010-12-01

    An emerging evidence base indicates that posttraumatic growth might be experienced vicariously by those working alongside trauma survivors. In this study we explored the vicarious experiences of eight interpreters working in a therapeutic setting with asylum seekers and refugees. We adopted a qualitative approach, using semistructured interviews and interpretative phenomenological analysis. Four interrelated themes emerged from the findings: feeling what your client feels, beyond belief, finding your own way to deal with it, and a different person. Although all participants experienced distress, they also perceived themselves to have grown in some way. The implications for a theory of vicarious posttraumatic growth are discussed, along with clinical applications. PMID:20663936

  1. Psychology Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGraw, Ken; Tew, Mark D.; Williams, John E.

    2001-01-01

    A goal of the PsychExperiments project was to reduce the financial burden on psychology departments for hardware/software used in their laboratories. In its third year, the PsychExperiments site now hosts 39 experiments. Over 200 classrooms worldwide have signed up as official site users and there have been nearly 10,000 data sessions conducted.…

  2. Measuring Growth with the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Walter P., Jr.; Lopez-Baez, Sandra I.

    2008-01-01

    The Posttraumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI; R. G. Tedeschi & L. G. Calhoun, 1996) was used to measure the growth of university students (N = 347). Results were compared with those of trauma studies and indicate that the PTGI is a general measure of growth suitable for future nontrauma studies. Results reflect a minimal relationship between…

  3. Growth hormone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    The growth hormone suppression test determines whether growth hormone production is being suppressed by high blood sugar. ... away. The lab measures the glucose and growth hormone (GH) levels in each sample.

  4. Growth hormone test

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003706.htm Growth hormone test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The growth hormone test measures the amount of growth hormone in ...

  5. Growth hormone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003376.htm Growth hormone suppression test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The growth hormone suppression test determines whether growth hormone production is ...

  6. Growth laws and mechanisms of global control in bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Matthew

    2009-03-01

    The growth laws of Schaechter, Maaløe and Kjeldgaard are among the most striking discoveries in bacterial growth physiology: cell composition (mass/cell, RNA/cell, etc.) is a simple function of growth rate alone -- irrespective of how that growth rate is established. I will review the growth laws, and discuss recent experiments that have uncovered new laws. A systems-level mathematical model is developed that suggests the growth laws arise from the partitioning of the protein synthesizing machinery of the cell (the ribosomes), and furthermore indicates a deep connection between growth rate control and central metabolism.

  7. Plant Growth Facility (PGF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In a microgravity environment aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia Life and Microgravity Mission STS-78, compression wood formation and hence altered lignin deposition and cell wall structure, was induced upon mechanically bending the stems of the woody gymnosperms, Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and loblolly pine (Pinus taeda). Although there was significant degradation of many of the plant specimens in space-flight due to unusually high temperatures experienced during the mission, it seems evident that gravity had little or no effect on compression wood formation upon bending even in microgravity. Instead, it apparently results from alterations in the stress gradient experienced by the plant itself during bending under these conditions. This preliminary study now sets the stage for long-term plant growth experiments to determine whether compression wood formation can be induced in microgravity during phototropic-guided realignment of growing woody plant specimens, in the absence of any externally provided stress and strain.

  8. Large-area sheet task advanced dendritic web growth development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.; Hopkins, R. H.; Meier, D. L.; Schruben, J.

    1982-01-01

    Thermal models were developed that accurately predict the thermally generated stresses in the web crystal which, if too high, cause the crystal to degenerate. The application of the modeling results to the design of low-stress experimental growth configurations will allow the growth of wider web crystals at higher growth velocities. A new experimental web growth machine was constructed. This facility includes all the features necessary for carrying out growth experiments under steady thermal conditions. Programmed growth initiation was developed to give reproducible crystal starts. Width control permits the growth of long ribbons at constant width. Melt level is controlled to 0.1 mm or better. Thus, the capability exists to grow long web crystals of constant width and thickness with little operator intervention, and web growth experiments can now be performed with growth variables controlled to a degree not previously possible.

  9. Gravity and Skeletal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morey-Holton, Emily; Turner, Russell T.

    1999-01-01

    Two simultaneous experiments were performed using 5-week-old male Sprague Dawley rats; in one study, the rats were flown in low earth orbit; in the other study, the hindlimbs of the growing rats were elevated to prevent weight bearing. Following 9 d of unloading, weight bearing was restored for 4, 28, and 76 hrs. Afterwards, additional hindlimb unloading experiments were performed to evaluate the skeletal response to 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 16, and 24 hrs of restored weight bearing following 7 d of unloading. Cancellous and cortical bone histomorphometry were evaluated in the left tibia at the proximal metaphysis and in the left femur at mid-diaphysis, respectively. Steady-state mRNA levels for bone matrix proteins and skeletal signaling peptides were determined in total cellular RNA extracted from trabeculae from the right proximal tibiametaphysis and periosteum from the right femur. Spaceflight and hindlimb unloading each resulted in cancellous osteopenia, as well as a tendency towards decreased periosteal bone formation. Both models for skeletal unloading resulted in site specific reductions in mRNA levels for transforming growth factor-beta (sub 1) (TGF-beta) osteocalcin (OC), and prepro-alpha (I) subunit of type 1 collagen (collagen) and little or no changes in mRNA levels for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAP) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I). Restoration of normal weight bearing resulted in transient increases in mRNA levels for the bone matrix proteins and TGF-beta in the proximal metaphysis and periosteum and no changes in either GAP or IGF-I mRNA levels. The timecourse for the response differed between the two skeletal compartments; the tibial metaphysis responded much more quickly to reloading. These results suggest that the skeletal adaptation to acute physiological changes in mechanical usage are mediated, in part, by changes in mRNA levels for bone matrix proteins and TGF-beta.

  10. Crystal growth by precipitation under microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Authier, A.; Lefaucheux, F.; Robert, M. C.

    1979-01-01

    The importance of understanding the mechanisms associated with defect generation during growth and the influence of gravity is stressed. An experiment is described. The advantages of adapting this experiment to the FES are then discussed. A brief survey of the ground based research under way is given.

  11. Growth of electronic materials in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthiesen, D. H.

    1991-01-01

    A growth experiment aimed at growing two selenium-doped gallium arsenide crystals, each of which are one inch in diameter and 3.45 inches in length, is described. Emphasis is placed on the effect of microgravity on the segregation behavior of electronic materials. The lessons learned from the 1975 ASTP mission have been incorporated in this experiment.

  12. USML-1 Glovebox experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    This report covers the development of and results from three experiments that were flown in the Materials Science Glovebox on USML-1: Marangoni convection in Closed Containers (MCCC), Double Float Zone (DFZ), and Fiber Pulling in Microgravity (FPM). The Glovebox provided a convenient, low cost method for doing simple 'try and see' experiments that could test new concepts or elucidate microgravity phenomena. Since the Glovebox provided essentially one (or possibly two levels of confinement, many of the stringent verification and test requirements on the experiment apparatus could be relaxed and a streamlined test and verification plan for flight qualification could be implemented. Furthermore, the experiments were contained in their own carrying cases whose external configurations could be identified early in the integration sequence for stowage considerations while delivery of the actual experiment apparatus could be postponed until only a few months before flight. This minimized the time fluids must be contained and reduced the possibility of corrosive reactions that could ruin the experiment. In many respects, this exercise was as much about developing a simpler, cheaper way of doing crew-assisted science as it was about the actual scientific accomplishments of the individual experiments. The Marangoni Convection in Closed Containers experiment was designed to study the effects of a void space in a simulated Bridgman crystal growth configuration and to determine if surface tension driven convective flows that may result from thermal gradients along any free surfaces could affect the solidification process. The Fiber Pulling in Microgravity experiment sought to separate the role of gravity drainage from capillarity effects in the break-up of slender cylindrical liquid columns. The Stability of a Double Float Zone experiment explored the feasibility of a quasi-containerless process in which a solidifying material is suspended by two liquid bridges of its own melt.

  13. Los Alamos beam halo experiment: comparing theory, simulation and experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, Thomas P.,; Qiang, J.

    2002-01-01

    We compare macroparticle simulations with measurements from a proton beam-halo experiment in a 52-quadrupole periodic-focusing channel. Three different initial distributions with the same Courant-Snyder parameters and emittances, but different shapes, predict different beam profiles in the transport system. Input distributions with greater population in the tails produce larger rates of emittance growth, a result that is qualitatively consistent with the particle-core model of halo formation in mismatched beams. The simulations underestimate the growth rate of halo and emittance for mismatched beams. Better agreement between simulations and experiment may require an input distribution that represents more accurately the tails of the real input beam.

  14. Microgravity Materials and Biotechnology Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlasse, Marcus

    1998-01-01

    Presentation will deal with an overview of the Materials Science and Biotechnology/Crystal Growth flight experiments and their requirements for a successful execution. It will also deal with the hardware necessary to perform these experiments as well as the hardware requirements. This information will serve as a basis for the Abstract: workshop participants to review the poss7ibilifies for a low cost unmanned carrier and the simple automation to carry-out experiments in a microgravity environment with little intervention from the ground. The discussion will include what we have now and what will be needed to automate totally the hardware and experiment protocol at relatively low cost.

  15. Quantitative nature of overexpression experiments

    PubMed Central

    Moriya, Hisao

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression experiments are sometimes considered as qualitative experiments designed to identify novel proteins and study their function. However, in order to draw conclusions regarding protein overexpression through association analyses using large-scale biological data sets, we need to recognize the quantitative nature of overexpression experiments. Here I discuss the quantitative features of two different types of overexpression experiment: absolute and relative. I also introduce the four primary mechanisms involved in growth defects caused by protein overexpression: resource overload, stoichiometric imbalance, promiscuous interactions, and pathway modulation associated with the degree of overexpression. PMID:26543202

  16. An Apparatus for Growth of Small Crystals From Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitrovic, Mico M.

    1995-01-01

    Describes an apparatus for crystal growth that was designed to study growth kinetics of small crystals from solutions and to obtain crystals of various substances. Describes the use of the apparatus in laboratory practical experiments in the field of crystal growth physics within the course "Solid State Physics". (JRH)

  17. Endorsement of Growth Factors in Experiential Training Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiweewa, John; Gilbride, Dennis; Luke, Melissa; Seward, Derek

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify student growth factors during a semester long Master's level group counseling class. Results indicated that 12 growth factors accounted for 86% of the total number of critical incidents that participants reported as influencing their personal growth and awareness during the group experience. Two other…

  18. Growth of Campylobacter Incubated Aerobically in Media Supplemented with Peptones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growth of Campylobacter cultures incubated aerobically in media supplemented with peptones was studied, and additional experiments were conducted to compare growth of the bacteria in media supplemented with peptones to growth in media supplemented with fumarate-pyruvate-minerals-vitamins (FPMV). A b...

  19. Language Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bugh, Marylou

    1978-01-01

    When a child uses his words and his ideas in learning to read, he also assists in the normal integration of his personality. Starting with a method of language experience developed by Sylvia Ashton-Warner, the author, a reading consultant, describes a language experience-reading program which utilizes the student's own curiosity and interests. (RK)

  20. Simulated Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snadden, R. B.; Runquist, O.

    1975-01-01

    Presents an experiment in which a programmable calculator is employed as a data generating system for simulated laboratory experiments. The example used as an illustration is a simulated conductimetric titration of an aqueous solution of HC1 with an aqueous solution of NaOH. (Author/EB)

  1. Impact of Client Suicide on Practitioner Posttraumatic Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munson, Joseph Simon

    2009-01-01

    Our purpose was to examine posttraumatic growth in clinicians after the suicide death of a client. An experience such as a client suicide could be an opportunity for growth or a danger for the practitioner to become traumatized. Thus, the clinician who works with clients who complete suicide may either suffer or experience a positive change from…

  2. TRIO experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Clemmer, R.G.; Finn, P.A.; Malecha, R.F.; Misra, B.; Billone, M.C.; Bowers, D.L.; Fischer, A.K.; Greenwood, L.R.; Mattas, R.F.; Tam, S.W.

    1984-09-01

    The TRIO experiment is a test of in-situ tritium recovery and heat transfer performance of a miniaturized solid breeder blanket assembly. The assembly (capsule) was monitored for temperature and neutron flux profiles during irradiation and a sweep gas flowed through the capsule to an anaytical train wherein the amounts of tritium in its various chemical forms were determined. The capsule was designed to operate at different temperatures and sweep gas conditions. At the end of the experiment the amount of tritium retained in the solid was at a concentration of less than 0.1 wppM. More than 99.9% of tritium generated during the experiment was successfully recovered. The results of the experiment showed that the tritium inventories at the beginning and at the end of the experiment follow a relationship which appears to be characteristic of intragranular diffusion.

  3. Crystal Growth Using MEPHISTO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Henry C., III

    1999-01-01

    The shuttle flight experiment "In Situ Monitoring of Crystal Growth Using MEPHISTO" was accomplished during STS-87 as part of the fourth flight of the United States Microgravity Payload (USMP-4), which was flown from November 19 to December 5, 1997. The data returned from that flight are just now beginning to yield quantitative results. This project is an international collaboration: the furnace system known as MEPHISTO was built in France by CNES (French National Space Agency) and CEA (French Atomic Energy Commission); the principal investigator, Prof. Reza Abbaschian, is from the University of Florida at Gainesville; and numerical and analytical modeling support includes collaborators from the University of New South Wales, Australia, the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee, the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and the NASA Lewis Research Center. MEPHISTO is a French acronym that translates into English as Materials for the Study of Interesting Phenomena of Solidification on Earth and in Orbit. Since this was the fourth flight of the MEPHISTO furnace, the experiment is referred to as MEPHISTO-4. MEPHISTO-4 was a directional solidification experiment that studied the liquid-to-solid transformation of bismuth alloyed with tin. Directional solidification is a freezing technique common to the processing of the electronic materials used in integrated circuits and detectors, such as silicon and germanium. When liquids are frozen on Earth, they must be cooled. The cooling causes stirring because of density variations in the liquid. This stirring, known as natural convection, influences the quality of the resulting solid. During freezing, regions of high and low concentrations of tin are created. This introduces another important phenomenon: diffusion, or the movement by molecular action of matter from regions of high concentration to regions of lower concentration. In MEPHISTO-4, it is tin that diffuses from the high-concentration region in front of the

  4. Students Observe Microgravity Space Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    High school students observe the progress of the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) during the U.S. Microgravity Payload-4 (USMP-4) mission (STS-87, Nov. 19 - Dec. 5, 1997) at the IDGE Remote Operations Control Center (ROCC) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) in Troy, NY. As part of the its outreach activity, the experiment team set up the center so students and the public could observe IDGE in progress and learn more about space and microgravity research. Phot credit: RPI

  5. Students Observe Microgravity Space Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    High school students observe the progress of the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) during the U.S. Microgravity Payload-4 mission (STS-87, Nov. 19 - Dec. 5, 1997) at the IDGE Remote Operations Control Center (ROCC) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) in Troy, NY. As part of the its outreach activity, the experiment team set up the center so students and the public could observe IDGE in progress and learn more about space and microgravity research. Photo credit: RPI

  6. Do Student Growth Scores Measure Academic Growth?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pomplun, Mark R.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated convergent validity evidence for student growth scores with high school course grades. The Measures of Academic Progress and Educational Planning and Assessment System growth scores for approximately 1,800 ninth-grade students over 2 years were related to language, arts, and mathematics course grades for developmental,…

  7. The impact of space research on semiconductor crystal growth technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, A. F.

    1983-01-01

    Crystal growth experiments in reduced gravity environment and related ground-based research have contributed significantly to the establishment of a scientific basis for semiconductor growth from the melt. NASA-sponsored research has been instrumental in the introduction of heat pipes for heat and mass transfer control in crystal growth and in the development of magnetic field induced melt stabilization, approaches primarily responsible for recent advances in crystal growth technology.

  8. Experience Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laslett, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    The author, a tertiary chemistry teacher, spent a period of six weeks in a research project with an industrial firm. Describes his experience, the benefits and insight he gained from such an exchange. (GA)

  9. Interpretive Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeHaan, Frank, Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Describes an interpretative experiment involving the application of symmetry and temperature-dependent proton and fluorine nmr spectroscopy to the solution of structural and kinetic problems in coordination chemistry. (MLH)

  10. Time for Experience: Growing up under the Experience Economy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Argenton, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Experience is one of the major paths to growth and autonomy, and as such, of outstanding educational value. But it also has a much wider sociocultural context, rooted in life itself. It is about learning that which cannot be taught, learning to think, which precedes all other-defined forms of education. It is an encounter with the unknown, where…

  11. Experiment Databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanschoren, Joaquin; Blockeel, Hendrik

    Next to running machine learning algorithms based on inductive queries, much can be learned by immediately querying the combined results of many prior studies. Indeed, all around the globe, thousands of machine learning experiments are being executed on a daily basis, generating a constant stream of empirical information on machine learning techniques. While the information contained in these experiments might have many uses beyond their original intent, results are typically described very concisely in papers and discarded afterwards. If we properly store and organize these results in central databases, they can be immediately reused for further analysis, thus boosting future research. In this chapter, we propose the use of experiment databases: databases designed to collect all the necessary details of these experiments, and to intelligently organize them in online repositories to enable fast and thorough analysis of a myriad of collected results. They constitute an additional, queriable source of empirical meta-data based on principled descriptions of algorithm executions, without reimplementing the algorithms in an inductive database. As such, they engender a very dynamic, collaborative approach to experimentation, in which experiments can be freely shared, linked together, and immediately reused by researchers all over the world. They can be set up for personal use, to share results within a lab or to create open, community-wide repositories. Here, we provide a high-level overview of their design, and use an existing experiment database to answer various interesting research questions about machine learning algorithms and to verify a number of recent studies.

  12. Crack Growth in Single-Crystal Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Leipold, M. H.

    1986-01-01

    Report describes experiments on crack growth in single-crystal silicon at room temperature in air. Crack growth in (111) cleavage plane of wafers, 50 by 100 by 0.76 mm in dimension, cut from Czochralski singlecrystal silicon studied by double-torsion load-relaxation method and by acoustic-emission measurements. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray topography also employed. Results aid in design and fabrication of silicon photovoltaic and microelectronic devices.

  13. Fractal scaling of microbial colonies affects growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Károlyi, György

    2005-03-01

    The growth dynamics of filamentary microbial colonies is investigated. Fractality of the fungal or actinomycetes colonies is shown both theoretically and in numerical experiments to play an important role. The growth observed in real colonies is described by the assumption of time-dependent fractality related to the different ages of various parts of the colony. The theoretical results are compared to a simulation based on branching random walks.

  14. The Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariana Nicoara, Floare

    2016-04-01

    My name is Nicoara Floarea and I am teacher at Secondary School Calatele and I teach students from preparatory class and the second grade . They are six-eight years old. In my activity, for introducing scientific concepts to my students, I use various and active methods or traditional methods including experiments. The experiment stimulates students' curiosity, their creativity, the understanding and knowledge taught accessibility. I propose you two such experiments: The life cycle of the plants (long-term experiment, with rigorous observation time):We use beans, wheat or other; They are grown in pots and on the cotton soaked with water,keeping under students' observation protecting them ( just soak them regularly) and we waiting the plants rise. For discussions and comments of plant embryo development we use the plants which rose on the cotton soaked with water plants at the end of the first week. Last school year we had in the pot climbing beans which in May made pods. They were not too great but our experiment was a success. The students could deduce that there will develop those big beans which after drying will be planted again. The influence of light on plants (average duration experiment with the necessary observation time): We use two pots in which plants are of the same type (two geraniums), one of them is situated so as to get direct sunlight and other plant we put in a closed box. Although we wet both plants after a week we see that the plant that benefited from sunlight has turned strain in direct sunlight, developing normally in return the plant out of the box I have yellowed leaves, photosynthesis does not She has occurred . Students will understand the vital role of the Sun in plants' life, both in the classroom and in nature. The experiment is a method of teaching students extremely pleasant, with a remarkable percentage of acquiring more knowledge.

  15. Some Experiments With Agar-Grown Seedlings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeland, P. W.

    1973-01-01

    Two percent agar gel is reported as a better medium for germination and growth studies. Students can be encouraged to undertake many simple experiments and make precise observations by using this medium. (PS)

  16. The growth of birdwings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meunier, K.

    1980-01-01

    Growth and order allometry is defined and applied to the growth of bird effects of negative wing allometry discussed with regard to body size and flight power. Transposition and evolutionary significance are explained.

  17. Growth hormone deficiency - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... the same age. The child will have normal intelligence in most cases. In older children, puberty may ... hormones cause the body to make. Tests can measure these growth factors. Accurate growth hormone deficiency testing ...

  18. Protein crystal growth in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Robert S.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of low gravity on the growth of protein crystals and those parameters which will affect growth and crystal quality was studied. The proper design of the flight hardware and experimental protocols are highly dependent on understanding the factors which influence the nucleation and growth of crystals of biological macromolecules. Thus, those factors are investigated and the body of knowledge which has been built up for small molecule crystallization. These data also provide a basis of comparison for the results obtained from low-g experiments. The flows around growing crystals are detailed. The preliminary study of the growth of isocitrate lyase, the crystal morphologies found and the preliminary x ray results are discussed. The design of two apparatus for protein crystal growth by temperature control are presented along with preliminary results.

  19. Experiment 2042

    SciTech Connect

    Dash, Zora V.; Dennis, Bert R.; Dreesen, Donald S.; Fehler, Michael C.; House, Leigh S.; Walter, Fritz; Zyvoloski, George A.

    1984-09-10

    Experiment 2042, an injection test in EE-3, was conducted from May 15, 1984 through May 19, 1984. During this four day test ~2 million gallons of water were injected with a maximum injection rate of ~10BPM at 6000 psi. It was planned as a pumping test of the lower zone of well EE-3 (the open hole region from 11,400 ft to 11,648 ft) to test the reservoir characteristics and fracture-seismic system first created during Experiment 2025. However early in the experiment it became apparent that there was some sort connection between the lower zone and the upper "low pressure" zone in EE-3 (from the casing shoe at 10374 ft to about 10900 ft). Available information ruled out a packer failure or other direct connection between these zones so the experiment was continued as planned. Although not a major goal of the experiment, it was hoped that fractures would propagate from EE-3 to EE-2, so hydraulic communication could be established between the two wells, however this did not occur.

  20. Understanding customer experience.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Christopher; Schwager, Andre

    2007-02-01

    Anyone who has signed up for cell phone service, attempted to claim a rebate, or navigated a call center has probably suffered from a company's apparent indifference to what should be its first concern: the customer experiences that culminate in either satisfaction or disappointment and defection. Customer experience is the subjective response customers have to direct or indirect contact with a company. It encompasses every aspect of an offering: customer care, advertising, packaging, features, ease of use, reliability. Customer experience is shaped by customers' expectations, which largely reflect previous experiences. Few CEOs would argue against the significance of customer experience or against measuring and analyzing it. But many don't appreciate how those activities differ from CRM or just how illuminating the data can be. For instance, the majority of the companies in a recent survey believed they have been providing "superior" experiences to customers, but most customers disagreed. The authors describe a customer experience management (CEM) process that involves three kinds of monitoring: past patterns (evaluating completed transactions), present patterns (tracking current relationships), and potential patterns (conducting inquiries in the hope of unveiling future opportunities). Data are collected at or about touch points through such methods as surveys, interviews, focus groups, and online forums. Companies need to involve every function in the effort, not just a single customer-facing group. The authors go on to illustrate how a cross-functional CEM system is created. With such a system, companies can discover which customers are prospects for growth and which require immediate intervention. PMID:17345685

  1. Community Capacity Building as a vital mechanism for enhancing the growth and efficacy of a sustainable scientific software ecosystem: experiences running a real-time bi-coastal "Open Science for Synthesis" Training Institute for young Earth and Environmental scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schildhauer, M.; Jones, M. B.; Bolker, B.; Lenhardt, W. C.; Hampton, S. E.; Idaszak, R.; Rebich Hespanha, S.; Ahalt, S.; Christopherson, L.

    2014-12-01

    Continuing advances in computational capabilities, access to Big Data, and virtual collaboration technologies are creating exciting new opportunities for accomplishing Earth science research at finer resolutions, with much broader scope, using powerful modeling and analytical approaches that were unachievable just a few years ago. Yet, there is a perceptible lag in the abilities of the research community to capitalize on these new possibilities, due to lacking the relevant skill-sets, especially with regards to multi-disciplinary and integrative investigations that involve active collaboration. UC Santa Barbara's National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS), and the University of North Carolina's Renaissance Computing Institute (RENCI), were recipients of NSF OCI S2I2 "Conceptualization awards", charged with helping define the needs of the research community relative to enabling science and education through "sustained software infrastructure". Over the course of our activities, a consistent request from Earth scientists was for "better training in software that enables more effective, reproducible research." This community-based feedback led to creation of an "Open Science for Synthesis" Institute— a innovative, three-week, bi-coastal training program for early career researchers. We provided a mix of lectures, hands-on exercises, and working group experience on topics including: data discovery and preservation; code creation, management, sharing, and versioning; scientific workflow documentation and reproducibility; statistical and machine modeling techniques; virtual collaboration mechanisms; and methods for communicating scientific results. All technologies and quantitative tools presented were suitable for advancing open, collaborative, and reproducible synthesis research. In this talk, we will report on the lessons learned from running this ambitious training program, that involved coordinating classrooms among two remote sites, and

  2. (Plant growth with limited water)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    When water is in short supply, soybean stem growth is inhibited by a physical limitation followed in a few hours by metabolic changes that reduce the extensibility of the cell walls. The extensibility then becomes the main limitation. With time, there is a modest recovery in extensibility along with an accumulation of a 28kD protein in the walls of the growth-affected cells. A 3lkD protein that was 80% similar in amino acid sequence also was present but did not accumulate in the walls of the stem cells. In the stem, growth was inhibited and the mRNA for the 28kD protein increased in response to water deprivation but the mRNA for the 3 1 kD protein did not. The roots continued to grow and the mRNA for the 28kD protein did not accumulate but the mRNA for the 3lkD protein did. Thus, there was a tissuespecific response of gene expression that correlated with the contrasting growth response to low water potential in the same seedlings. Further work using immunogold labeling, fluorescence labeling, and western blotting gave evidence that the 28kD protein is located in the cell wall as well as several compartments in the cytoplasm. Preliminary experiments indicate that the 28kD protein is a phosphatase.

  3. Lipid tubule growth by osmotic pressure

    PubMed Central

    Rangamani, Padmini; Zhang, Di; Oster, George; Shen, Amy Q.

    2013-01-01

    We present here a procedure for growing lipid tubules in vitro. This method allows us to grow tubules of consistent shape and structure, and thus can be a useful tool for nano-engineering applications. There are three stages during the tubule growth process: initiation, elongation and termination. Balancing the forces that act on the tubule head shows that the growth of tubules during the elongation phase depends on the balance between osmotic pressure and the viscous drag exerted on the membrane from the substrate and the external fluid. Using a combination of mathematical modelling and experiment, we identify the key forces that control tubule growth during the elongation phase. PMID:24004559

  4. Nucleation and growth control in protein crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Nyce, Thomas A.; Meehan, Edward J.; Sowers, Jennifer W.; Monaco, Lisa A.

    1990-01-01

    The five topics summarized in this final report are as follows: (1) a technique for the expedient, semi-automated determination of protein solubilities as a function of temperature and application of this technique to proteins other than lysozyme; (2) a small solution cell with adjustable temperature gradients for the growth of proteins at a predetermined location through temperature programming; (3) a microscopy system with image storage and processing capability for high resolution optical studies of temperature controlled protein growth and etching kinetics; (4) growth experiments with lysozyme in thermosyphon flow ; and (5) a mathematical model for the evolution of evaporation/diffusion induced concentration gradients in the hanging drop protein crystallization technique.

  5. Evidence for Eigenfrequencies in Dendritic Growth Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacombe, Jeffrey C.; Koss, Matthew B.; Giummarra, Cindie; Frei, Julie E.; Lupulescu, Afina O.; Glicksman, Martin E.

    Microgravity dendritic growth experiments, conducted aboard the space shuttle Columbia, are described. In-situ video images reveal that pivalic acid dendrites growing in the diffusion-controlled environment of low-earth orbit exhibit a range of transient or non-steady-state behaviors. The observed transient features of the growth process are being studied with the objective of understanding the mechanisms responsible for these behaviors. Included in these observations is possible evidence for characteristic frequencies or limit cycles in the growth behavior near the tip of the dendrites. These data, and their interpretations, will be discussed.

  6. [Population Growth and Development].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clausen, A. W.

    Rapid population growth as a central development problem, the proper domain of government in reducing population growth, and effective measures which can be taken to reduce fertility are examined. Rapid population growth puts a brake on development because it exacerbates the difficult choice between higher consumption now and the investment needed…

  7. Neutrino Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, R. D.

    2010-08-04

    Recent studies of neutrino oscillations have established the existence of finite neutrino masses and mixing between generations of neutrinos. The combined results from studies of atmospheric neutrinos, solar neutrinos, reactor antineutrinos and neutrinos produced at accelerators paint an intriguing picture that clearly requires modification of the standard model of particle physics. These results also provide clear motivation for future neutrino oscillation experiments as well as searches for direct neutrino mass and nuclear double-beta decay. I will discuss the program of new neutrino oscillation experiments aimed at completing our knowledge of the neutrino mixing matrix.

  8. Growth hormone, growth factors, and acromegaly

    SciTech Connect

    Ludecke, D.K.; Tolis, G.T.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains five sections, each consisting of several papers. The section headings are: Biochemistry and Physiology of GH and Growth Factors, Pathology of Acromegaly, Clinical Endocrinology of Acromegaly, Nonsurgical Therapy of Acromegaly, and Surgical Therapy of Acromegaly.

  9. Growth Factors and Tension-Induced Skeletal Muscle Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    1994-01-01

    have performed experiments to determine whether mechanical stimulation of cultured avian muscle cells alters their response to anabolic steroids or glucocorticoids. In static cultures, testosterone had no effect on muscle cell growth, but 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone and the synthetic steroid stanozolol increased cell growth by up to 18% and 30%, respectively, after a three day exposure. We completed development of a new IBM-based mechanical cell stimulator system to provide greater flexibility in operating and monitoring our experiments. Our previous long term studies on myofiber growth were designed around a perfusion system of our own design. We have recently changed to performing these studies using a modified CELLCO cartridge bioreactor system Z since it has been certified as the ground-based model for the Shuttle's Space Tissue Loss (STL) F= Cell Culture Module. The current goals of this aspect of the project are three fold: 1) to design a Z cell culture system for studying avian skeletal myofiber atrophy on the Shuttle and Space Station; 0 2) to expand the use of bioreactors to cells which do not grow in either suspension or attached to the hollow fibers; and 3) to combine the bioreactor system with our computerized mechanical cell stimulator to have a better in vitro model to study tension/gravity/stretch regulation of skeletal muscle size. Preliminary studies also reported on involved : (1) how release of tension can induce rapid atrophy of tissues cultured avian skeletal muscle cells, and (2) a mechanism to transfer and maintain avian skeletal muscle organoids in modified cartridges in the Space Tissue Loss Module.

  10. Protein crystal growth in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delucas, Lawrence J.; Bugg, Charles E.

    1991-01-01

    Studies of protein crystal growth in the microgravity environment in space are described with special attention given to the crystal growth facilities and the techniques used in Space Shuttle experiments. The properties of large space-grown crystals of gamma interferon, elastase, lathyros ochrus lectin I, and few other proteins grown on various STS flights are described. A comparison of the microgravity-grown crystals with the bast earth-grown crystals demonstrated that the space-grown crystals are more highly ordered at the molecular level than their earth-grown counterparts. When crystallization conditions were optimized, the microgravity-grown protein crystals were larger, displayed more uniform morphologies, and yielded diffraction data to significantly higher resolution than their earth-grown counterparts.

  11. Ammonothermal Growth of Gallium Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimputkar, Siddha

    Bulk, single crystal Gallium Nitride (GaN) crystals are essential for enabling high performance electronic and optoelectronic devices by providing arbitrarily oriented, high quality, large, single crystal GaN substrates. Methods of producing single crystals of sufficient size and quality at a rate that would enable successful commercialization has been a major focus for research groups and companies worldwide. Recent advances have demonstrated remarkable improvements, though high cost and lack of high volume production remain key challenges. Major investments in bulk GaN growth were made at UCSB with particular focus on the ammonothermal method. The existing lab was upgraded and a new facility was designed and built with improved experimental setups for ammonothermal growth of GaN. The facilities can simultaneously operate up to 15 reactors of differing designs and capabilities with the ability to grow crystals up to 2 inches in diameter. A novel in-situ technique was devised to investigate the growth chemistry which occurs at typical operating conditions of 3,000 atm and 600 °C. Improvements in ammonothermal GaN include improved growth rates for c-plane by a factor of four to 344 μm/day with an overall record growth rate of 544 μm/day achieved for the (112¯2) plane. Crystal qualities comparable to that of the seed crystal were achieved. Impurity concentrations for transition metals were consistently reduced by a factor of 100 to concentrations below 1017 atoms/cm3. Optical transparency was improved by significantly reducing the yellow coloration typically seen for ammonothermal GaN. Single crystal GaN was successfully grown on large seeds and a 1 inch x ½ inch x ½ inch GaN crystal was demonstrated. To better understand the growth chemistry, models were created for the decomposition of ammonia under growth conditions, with initial experiments performed using the designed in-situ setup to verify the model's accuracy. To investigate the surface morphology and

  12. Effect of tannins on the in viro growth of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and in vivo growth of generic Escherichia coli excreted from steers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of commercially available chestnut and mimosa tannins in vitro (experiment 1) or in vivo (experiment 2) on the growth or recovery of Escherichia coli O157:H7 or generic fecal E. coli was evaluated. In experiment 1, the mean growth rate of E. coli O157:H7, determined via the measurement o...

  13. A new growth curve model for biological growth: some inferential studies on the growth of Cirrhinus mrigala.

    PubMed

    Bhowmick, Amiya Ranjan; Bhattacharya, Sabyasachi

    2014-08-01

    Growth of living organisms is a fundamental biological process. It depicts the physiological development of the species related to the environment. Mathematical development of growth curve models has a long history since its birth. We propose a mathematical model to describe the evolution of relative growth rate as a function of time based on a real life experiment on a major Indian Carp Cirrhinus mrigala. We establish that the proposed model is able to describe the fish growth dynamics more accurately for our experimental data than some existing models e.g. logistic, Gompertz, exponential. Approximate expressions of the points of inflection and the time of achieving the maximum relative growth rate are derived. We study, in detail, the existence of a nonlinear least squares estimator of the model parameters and their consistency properties. Test-statistics is developed to study the equality of points of inflection and equality of the amount of time necessary to achieve the maximum relative growth rate for a species at two different locations. Using the theory of variance stabilizing transformations, we propose a new test statistic to test the effect of the decay parameter for the proposed growth law. The testing procedure is found to be more sensitive in comparison with the test based on nonlinear least squares estimates. Our proposed model provides a general framework to model growth in other disciplines as well. PMID:24933474

  14. Astronaut Daniel Bursch with CPCG experiment on Discovery's middeck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Astronaut Daniel W. Bursch, mission specialist, is pictured on Discovery's middeck with the Commercial Protein Crystal Growth (CPCG) experiment. This experiment is designed to explore the structure of specific protein molecules in space-grown crystals.

  15. Closeup of fluids experiment apparatus (FEA) with outside housing removed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    A closeup of the fluids experiment apparatus (FEA) with the outside housing removed. It will house shuttle mission 41-D's student experiment, 'The Purification and Growth of Single Crystal Indium by the Float Zone Technique in a zero gravity environment'.

  16. Human growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Strobl, J S; Thomas, M J

    1994-03-01

    The study of human growth hormone is a little more than 100 years old. Growth hormone, first identified for its dramatic effect on longitudinal growth, is now known to exert generalized effects on protein, lipid, and carbohydrate metabolism. Additional roles for growth hormone in human physiology are likely to be discovered in the areas of sleep research and reproduction. Furthermore, there is some indication that growth hormone also may be involved in the regulation of immune function, mental well-being, and the aging process. Recombinant DNA technology has provided an abundant and safe, albeit expensive, supply of human growth hormone for human use, but the pharmacological properties of growth hormone are poor. Most growth hormone-deficient individuals exhibit a secretory defect rather than a primary defect in growth hormone production, however, and advances in our understanding of the neuroendocrine regulation of growth hormone secretion have established the basis for the use of drugs to stimulate release of endogenously synthesized growth hormone. This promises to be an important area for future drug development. PMID:8190748

  17. Telomere dynamics in wild brown trout: effects of compensatory growth and early growth investment.

    PubMed

    Näslund, Joacim; Pauliny, Angela; Blomqvist, Donald; Johnsson, Jörgen I

    2015-04-01

    After a period of food deprivation, animals often respond with a period of faster than normal growth. Such responses have been suggested to result in decreased chromosomal maintenance, which in turn may affect the future fitness of an individual. Here, we present a field experiment in which a food deprivation period of 24 days was enforced on fish from a natural population of juvenile brown trout (Salmo trutta) at the start of the high-growth season in spring. The growth of the food-deprived fish and a non-deprived control group was then monitored in the wild during 1 year. Fin tissue samples were taken at the start of the experiment and 1 year after food deprivation to monitor the telomere dynamics, using reduced telomere length as an indicator of maintenance cost. The food-deprived fish showed partial compensatory growth in both mass and length relative to the control group. However, we found no treatment effects on telomere dynamics, suggesting that growth-compensating brown trout juveniles are able to maintain their telomeres during their second year in the stream. However, body size at the start of the experiment, reflecting growth rate during their first year of life, was negatively correlated with change in telomere length over the following year. This result raises the possibility that rapid growth early in life induces delayed costs in cellular maintenance. PMID:25698140

  18. Growth factors in orthopedic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zaharia, C; Despa, N; Simionescu, M; Jinga, V; Fleseriu, I

    2010-01-01

    Growth factors have represented an essential issue of interest for the researchers and clinicians in orthopedics and trauma over the last 40 years. In the last 10 to 15 years, the advances registered in this field have permitted the identification of the most active cellular and humoral factors as well as the improvement of their use in the orthopedic and trauma surgery. Their domain of application has been continuously enlarged and the results have been visible from the beginning. The authors present their appreciation on the actual state of this subject as well as their experience with results and related conclusions. PMID:20302195

  19. Protein crystal growth in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delucas, Lawrence J.; Smith, Craig D.; Smith, H. Wilson; Vijay-Kumar, Senadhi; Senadhi, Shobha E.; Ealick, Steven E.; Carter, Daniel C.; Snyder, Robert S.

    1989-01-01

    The crystals of most proteins or other biological macromolecules are poorly ordered and diffract to lower resolutions than those observed for most crystals of simple organic and inorganic compounds. Crystallization in the microgravity environment of space may improve crystal quality by eliminating convection effects near growing crystal surfaces. A series of 11 different protein crystal growth experiments was performed on U.S. Space Shuttle flight STS-26 in September 1988. The microgravity-grown crystals of gamma-interferon D1, porcine elastase, and isocitrate lyase are larger, display more uniform morphologies, and yield diffraction data to significantly higher resolutions than the best crystals of these proteins grown on earth.

  20. Soil experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Linton; Butler, Todd; Smith, Mike; Cline, Charles; Scruggs, Steve; Zakhia, Nadim

    1987-01-01

    An experimental procedure was devised to investigate the effects of the lunar environment on the physical properties of simulated lunar soil. The test equipment and materials used consisted of a vacuum chamber, direct shear tester, static penetrometer, and fine grained basalt as the simulant. The vacuum chamber provides a medium for applying the environmental conditions to the soil experiment with the exception of gravity. The shear strength parameters are determined by the direct shear test. Strength parameters and the resistance of soil penetration by static loading will be investigated by the use of a static cone penetrometer. In order to conduct a soil experiment without going to the moon, a suitable lunar simulant must be selected. This simulant must resemble lunar soil in both composition and particle size. The soil that most resembles actual lunar soil is basalt. The soil parameters, as determined by the testing apparatus, will be used as design criteria for lunar soil engagement equipment.

  1. XMASS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Ko

    2016-06-01

    XMASS is a single phase liquid xenon scintillator detector. The project is designed for multi purposes, dark matter, neutrinoless double beta decay and 7Be/pp solar neutrino. As the first step of project, XMASS-I detector with 832kg sensitive volume started operation from Dec. 2010. In this paper, recent obtained physics results from commissioning data, refurbishment of detector and future step of experiment are presented.

  2. Telerobotic Tending of Space Based Plant Growth Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backes, P. G.; Long, M. K.; Das, H.

    1994-01-01

    The kinematic design of a telerobotic mechanism for tending a plant growth space science experiment chamber is described. Ground based control of tending mechanisms internal to space science experiments will allow ground based principal investigators to interact directly with their space science experiments.

  3. Plant growth strategies are remodeled by spaceflight

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Arabidopsis plants were grown on the International Space Station within specialized hardware that combined a plant growth habitat with a camera system that can capture images at regular intervals of growth. The Imaging hardware delivers telemetric data from the ISS, specifically images received in real-time from experiments on orbit, providing science without sample return. Comparable Ground Controls were grown in a sister unit that is maintained in the Orbital Environment Simulator at Kennedy Space Center. One of many types of biological data that can be analyzed in this fashion is root morphology. Arabidopsis seeds were geminated on orbit on nutrient gel Petri plates in a configuration that encouraged growth along the surface of the gel. Photos were taken every six hours for the 15 days of the experiment. Results In the absence of gravity, but the presence of directional light, spaceflight roots remained strongly negatively phototropic and grew in the opposite direction of the shoot growth; however, cultivars WS and Col-0 displayed two distinct, marked differences in their growth patterns. First, cultivar WS skewed strongly to the right on orbit, while cultivar Col-0 grew with little deviation away from the light source. Second, the Spaceflight environment also impacted the rate of growth in Arabidopsis. The size of the Flight plants (as measured by primary root and hypocotyl length) was uniformly smaller than comparably aged Ground Control plants in both cultivars. Conclusions Skewing and waving, thought to be gravity dependent phenomena, occur in spaceflight plants. In the presence of an orienting light source, phenotypic trends in skewing are gravity independent, and the general patterns of directional root growth typified by a given genotype in unit gravity are recapitulated on orbit, although overall growth patterns on orbit are less uniform. Skewing appears independent of axial orientation on the ISS – suggesting that other tropisms (such as

  4. SANE experiment

    SciTech Connect

    H. Baghdasaryan, SANE Collaboration

    2012-04-01

    The Spin Asymmetries of the Nucleon Experiment (SANE) is a measurement of parallel and near-perpendicular double spin asymmetries in an inclusive electron scattering. The main goal of the experiment was to measure A{sub {parallel}} and A{sub 80} and extract the spin asymmetries of the proton A{sub 1}{sup p}, A{sub 2}{sup p} and spin structure functions g{sub 1}{sup p} and g{sub 2}{sup p}. Using the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility's polarized electron beam and the University of Virginia's polarized frozen ammonia ({sup 14}NH{sub 3}) target in Hall C, the experiment ran in 2009, collecting data in a Q{sup 2} region from 2.5 to 6.5 GeV{sup 2} and between Bjorken x of 0.3 to 0.8. Particle detection was accomplished using the Big Electron Telescope Array (BETA), a novel non-magnetic detector. This talk will address the progress of the analysis designed to extract the proton spin asymmetries and structure functions. Preliminary results will be presented.

  5. Transport Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Timothy M.; Wuebbles, Donald J.; Boering, Kristie A.; Eckman, Richard S.; Lerner, Jean; Plumb, R. Alan; Rind, David H.; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Waugh, Darryn W.; Wei, Chu-Feng

    1999-01-01

    MM II defined a series of experiments to better understand and characterize model transport and to assess the realism of this transport by comparison to observations. Measurements from aircraft, balloon, and satellite, not yet available at the time of MM I [Prather and Remsberg, 1993], provide new and stringent constraints on model transport, and address the limits of our transport modeling abilities. Simulations of the idealized tracers the age spectrum, and propagating boundary conditions, and conserved HSCT-like emissions probe the relative roles of different model transport mechanisms, while simulations of SF6 and C02 make the connection to observations. Some of the tracers are related, and transport diagnostics such as the mean age can be derived from more than one of the experiments for comparison to observations. The goals of the transport experiments are: (1) To isolate the effects of transport in models from other processes; (2) To assess model transport for realistic tracers (such as SF6 and C02) for comparison to observations; (3) To use certain idealized tracers to isolate model mechanisms and relationships to atmospheric chemical perturbations; (4) To identify strengths and weaknesses of the treatment of transport processes in the models; (5) To relate evaluated shortcomings to aspects of model formulation. The following section are included:Executive Summary, Introduction, Age Spectrum, Observation, Tropical Transport in Models, Global Mean Age in Models, Source-Transport Covariance, HSCT "ANOY" Tracer Distributions, and Summary and Conclusions.

  6. Prevalent vegetation growth enhancement in urban environment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuqing; Liu, Shuguang; Zhou, Decheng

    2016-05-31

    Urbanization, a dominant global demographic trend, leads to various changes in environments (e.g., atmospheric CO2 increase, urban heat island). Cities experience global change decades ahead of other systems so that they are natural laboratories for studying responses of other nonurban biological ecosystems to future global change. However, the impacts of urbanization on vegetation growth are not well understood. Here, we developed a general conceptual framework for quantifying the impacts of urbanization on vegetation growth and applied it in 32 Chinese cities. Results indicated that vegetation growth, as surrogated by satellite-observed vegetation index, decreased along urban intensity across all cities. At the same time, vegetation growth was enhanced at 85% of the places along the intensity gradient, and the relative enhancement increased with urban intensity. This growth enhancement offset about 40% of direct loss of vegetation productivity caused by replacing productive vegetated surfaces with nonproductive impervious surfaces. In light of current and previous field studies, we conclude that vegetation growth enhancement is prevalent in urban settings. Urban environments do provide ideal natural laboratories to observe biological responses to environmental changes that are difficult to mimic in manipulative experiments. However, one should be careful in extrapolating the finding to nonurban environments because urban vegetation is usually intensively managed, and attribution of the responses to diverse driving forces will be challenging but must be pursued. PMID:27185955

  7. Elevated temperature crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K. S.; Vanstone, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this program was to extend the work performed in the base program (CR 182247) into the regime of time-dependent crack growth under isothermal and thermal mechanical fatigue (TMF) loading, where creep deformation also influences the crack growth behavior. The investigation was performed in a two-year, six-task, combined experimental and analytical program. The path-independent integrals for application to time-dependent crack growth were critically reviewed. The crack growth was simulated using a finite element method. The path-independent integrals were computed from the results of finite-element analyses. The ability of these integrals to correlate experimental crack growth data were evaluated under various loading and temperature conditions. The results indicate that some of these integrals are viable parameters for crack growth prediction at elevated temperatures.

  8. Dynamic telerobotic control of crystallization experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, K. B.; Zuk, W. M.; Perozzo, M. A.; Walker, M. A.; Birnbaum, G. I.; Kung, W.; Cavaliere, A.; Uffen, D. R.; Scholaert, H.

    1992-01-01

    A dynamically controlled system has been used to prepare crystals of lysozyme. The temperature of the crystallization chamber was adjusted based upon a scintillation signal used to detect the degree of nucleation and incipient crystal growth. Experiments conducted in one country were controlled and monitored by researchers in another, providing the first demonstration of telerobotic control of a protein crystallization experiment.

  9. Pharmaceutical experiment aboard STS-67 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Astronaut William G. Gregory, pilot, works with a pharmaceutical experiment on the middeck of the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Endeavour during the STS-67 mission. Commercial Materials Dispersion Apparatus Instruments Technology Associates Experiments (CMIX-03) includes not only pharmaceutical, but also biotechnology, cell biology, fluids, and crystal growth investigation

  10. Composition and Recorders: A Motivating Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birnie, Rebecca A.

    2014-01-01

    Composition with students on the elementary level sparks imagination and creativity while engaging students in an experience that can demonstrate personal musical growth. Traditionally, music educators have not been taught how to compose music, let alone lead their students in composing experiences. As music educators take the beginning steps of…

  11. Growth of platinum nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    Movie showing the growth of platinum nanocrystals in a liquid cell observed in situ using the JEOL 3010 TEM at the National Center for Electron Microscopy. This is the first ever-real time movie showing nucleation and growth by monomer attachment or by smaller nanocrystals coalescing to form larger nanocrystals. All the nanocrystals end up being roughly the same shape and size. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2009/08/04/growth-spurts/

  12. Modeling Fish Growth in Low Dissolved Oxygen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neilan, Rachael Miller

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a computational project designed for undergraduate students as an introduction to mathematical modeling. Students use an ordinary differential equation to describe fish weight and assume the instantaneous growth rate depends on the concentration of dissolved oxygen. Published laboratory experiments suggest that continuous…

  13. Crystal growth furnace safety system validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackowski, D. W.; Hartfield, R.; Bhavnani, S. H.; Belcher, V. M.

    1994-01-01

    The findings are reported regarding the safe operation of the NASA crystal growth furnace (CGF) and potential methods for detecting containment failures of the furnace. The main conclusions are summarized by ampoule leak detection, cartridge leak detection, and detection of hazardous species in the experiment apparatus container (EAC).

  14. Detached growth of germanium by directional solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palosz, W.; Volz, M. P.; Cobb, S.; Motakef, S.; Szofran, F. R.

    2005-04-01

    The conditions of detached solidification under controlled pressure differential across the meniscus were investigated. Uncoated and graphite- or BN-coated silica and pBN crucibles were used. Detached and partly detached growth was achieved in pBN and BN-coated crucibles, respectively. The results of the experiments are discussed based on the theory of Duffar et al.

  15. Motivating and Evaluating Growth in Ballet Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Julie Hammond

    2012-01-01

    In teaching young dancers ballet, the utilization of effective assessments in partnership with supportive and creative teaching strategies can transform not only the learning experience, but the dancer as well. In this article, the author shares a "growth grade rubric" that specifically addresses three areas in ballet training: (1) skills and…

  16. Detached Growth of Germanium by Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.; Volz, M. P.; Cobb, S.; Motakef, S.; Szofran, F. R.

    2004-01-01

    The conditions of detached solidification under controlled pressure differential across the meniscus were investigated. Uncoated and graphite- or BN-coated silica and pBN crucibles were used. Detached and partly detached growth was achieved in pBN and BN-coated crucibles, respectively. The results of the experiments are discussed based on the theory of Duffar et al.

  17. Solution growth of crystals in zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, R. B.

    1982-01-01

    A series of experiments will be performed in which triglycine sulfate (TGS) crystals will be grown by a low-temperature solution growth technique in the microgravity environment of the orbital Spacelab. Triglycine sulfate (TGS) crystals will be grown in the Fluid Experiment System (FES) facility on Spacelab 3 by slowly extracting heat at a controlled rate through a seed crystal of TGS suspended on an insulated sting in a saturated solution of TGS. The FES rack assembly designed for SL-3 is shown in Figure I-1, and a detailed view of the test cell layout is presented in Figure I-2. Variations in the liquid density, solution concentration and temperature around the growing crystal will be studied using a variety of techniques, such as schlieren, shadowgraph, and interferometric measurements. Growth in Earth gravity will also be studied by the same optical techniques, and in both cases the resulting crystalline features will be compared and correlated with the growth conditions.

  18. Leaf growth is conformal.

    PubMed

    Alim, Karen; Armon, Shahaf; Shraiman, Boris I; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2016-01-01

    Growth pattern dynamics lie at the heart of morphogenesis. Here, we investigate the growth of plant leaves. We compute the conformal transformation that maps the contour of a leaf at a given stage onto the contour of the same leaf at a later stage. Based on the mapping we predict the local displacement field in the leaf blade and find it to agree with the experimentally measured displacement field to 92%. This approach is applicable to any two-dimensional system with locally isotropic growth, enabling the deduction of the whole growth field just from observation of the tissue contour. PMID:27597439

  19. Differential flank growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieschang, H. E.; Sievers, A.

    1994-08-01

    With the mathematical basis for the precise analysis of developmental processes in plants, the patterns of growth in phototropic and gravitropic responses have become better understood. A detailed temporal and spatial quantification of a growth process is an important tool for evaluating hypotheses about the underlying physiological mechanisms. Studies of growth rates and curvature show that the original Cholodny-Went hypothesis cannot explain the complex growth patterns during tropic responses of shoots and roots. In addition, regulating factors other than the lateral redistribution of hormones must be taken into account. Electrophysiological studies on roots led to a modification of the Cholodny-Went hypothesis in that redistributions of bioelectrical activities are observed.

  20. Chemistry Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasseur, Guy; Remsberg, Ellis; Purcell, Patrick; Bhatt, Praful; Sage, Karen H.; Brown, Donald E.; Scott, Courtney J.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Tie, Xue-Xi; Huang, Theresa

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the chemistry component of the model comparison is to assess to what extent differences in the formulation of chemical processes explain the variance between model results. Observed concentrations of chemical compounds are used to estimate to what degree the various models represent realistic situations. For readability, the materials for the chemistry experiment are reported in three separate sections. This section discussed the data used to evaluate the models in their simulation of the source gases and the Nitrogen compounds (NO(y)) and Chlorine compounds (Cl(y)) species.

  1. Political economy of population growth.

    PubMed

    Mehta, S; Mehta, H S

    1987-01-01

    Tracing the origin of political economy as a class-science, this paper focuses on the political economy of population growth. Exposing the limitations of Malthusian ideas and their invalidity even for the capitalist economies, it discusses the subsequent revival of the Malthusian model during the period of de-colonization and the misinterpretation of the relationship between population growth and development in the developing and developed countries. Taking India, China, and Japan as some case studies, the paper examines the relationship between birth rate levels and some correlates. It elaborates on the Indian experience, emphasizing the association of population growth with poverty and unemployment and lays bare some of the hidden causes of these phenomena. The authors examine some interstate variations in India and identify constraints and prospects of the existing population policy. The paper proposes outlines of a democratic population policy as an integral part of India's development strategy which should recognize human beings not simply as consumers but also as producers of material values. It pleads for 1) restructuring of property relations; 2) bringing down the mortality rates and raising of the literacy levels, especially among females; and 3) improving nutritional levels, as prerequisites for bringing down birth rates. PMID:12179026

  2. Nucleation and growth transformation kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erukhimovitch, V.; Baram, J.

    1995-03-01

    As a result of the reassessment of the Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (KJMA) theory for the kinetics of nucleation and growth transformations, an integral-equation formulation has been developed instead of the well-known and widely used Avrami equation. The presented formulation considers interfacial and diffusional growths, in one, two, and three dimensions, with both time-dependent and time-invariant nucleation and growth rates. The integral-equation model corrects reported inadequacies of the KJMA theory when applied in numerous experiments and various solid-state transformations. It is shown that in the example cases examined in this paper, crystallization from the amorphous state in melt-spun ribbons, isothermal aging of CuAlZn, pearlitic transition in an eutectoid steel, and crystallization in a PEKK polymer, the thermodynamic and kinetic interpretation and parameters extracted from best fits of the Avrami equations to the experimental data are erroneous. The KJMA formulation is a simplification of the real physical conditions. The main limitation of the new model is that almost all the integral equations representing the kinetics of solid-state transformations have no analytical solutions.

  3. Acoustic and Electrical Property Changes Due to Microbial Growth and Biofilm Formation in Porous Media

    EPA Science Inventory

    A laboratory study was conducted to investigate the effect of microbial growth and biofilm formation on compressional waves, and complex conductivity during stimulated microbial growth. Over the 29 day duration of the experiment, compressional wave amplitudes and arrival times f...

  4. Past experience Skylab mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pogue, William

    1990-01-01

    The design of the Skylab missions, 1973 to 1974, was intended to exclude any direct handling of hazardous, toxic, or reactive materials. The materials processing facility and multipurpose furnace provided a contained environment for conducting metals melting, brazing, sphere forming, and crystal growth experiments. At the end of the third mission, following the completion of all other experiments, the materials processing facility was used for a series of flammability experiments. The flammability tests were done last because of the contamination expected from the burning of the materials within the facility. The flammability tests demonstrated a number of peculiar effects that have implications for future design (fire detection, location, and suppression/control). Although the results of the flammability tests contain lessons appropriate to planning, a number of events during the flight illustrate situations or conditions that pose considerations beyond the commonly accepted range of concern for safety-related matters. This presentation includes a discussion of: Skylab flammability studies and the implications for fire suppression/control; false fire alarms and the Skylab fire detection system; space environmental effects on materials that are normally benign; spills/release of contaminants; the detrimental effect that the release of non-hazardous materials have on detection systems; and the problem of locating sources/originating point of hazards.

  5. Population growth rates: issues and an application.

    PubMed Central

    Godfray, H Charles J; Rees, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Current issues in population dynamics are discussed in the context of The Royal Society Discussion Meeting 'Population growth rate: determining factors and role in population regulation'. In particular, different views on the centrality of population growth rates to the study of population dynamics and the role of experiments and theory are explored. Major themes emerging include the role of modern statistical techniques in bringing together experimental and theoretical studies, the importance of long-term experimentation and the need for ecology to have model systems, and the value of population growth rate as a means of understanding and predicting population change. The last point is illustrated by the application of a recently introduced technique, integral projection modelling, to study the population growth rate of a monocarpic perennial plant, its elasticities to different life-history components and the evolution of an evolutionarily stable strategy size at flowering. PMID:12396521

  6. Activist model of political party growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffs, Rebecca A.; Hayward, John; Roach, Paul A.; Wyburn, John

    2016-01-01

    The membership of British political parties has a direct influence on their political effectiveness. This paper applies the mathematics of epidemiology to the analysis of the growth and decline of such memberships. The party members are divided into activists and inactive members, where all activists influence the quality of party recruitment, but only a subset of activists recruit and thus govern numerical growth. The activists recruit for only a limited period, which acts as a restriction on further party growth. This Limited Activist model is applied to post-war and recent memberships of the Labour, Scottish National and Conservative parties. The model reproduces data trends, and relates realistically to historical narratives. It is concluded that the political parties analysed are not in danger of extinction but experience repeated periods of growth and decline in membership, albeit at lower numbers than in the past.

  7. On Transients in Detached Bridgman Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.

    2011-01-01

    In detached Bridgman growth, a gap exists between the growing crystal and the crucible wall. According to crystal shape stability theory, only specific gap widths will be dynamically stable. Beginning with a crystal diameter that differs from stable conditions, the transient crystal growth process is analyzed. The transient shapes are calculated assuming that the growth angle is constant. Anisotropy and dynamic contact angle effects are considered. In microgravity, dynamic stability depends only on capillary effects and is decoupled from heat transfer. However, heat transfer will influence the crystal-melt interface shape. The local angles and the crystal-melt-vapor triple junction are analyzed and the applicability of the Herring formula is discussed. A potential microgravity experiment is proposed which would enhance our understanding of the detached growth dynamic stability problem.

  8. ELF3 controls thermoresponsive growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Box, Mathew S; Huang, B Emma; Domijan, Mirela; Jaeger, Katja E; Khattak, Asif Khan; Yoo, Seong Jeon; Sedivy, Emma L; Jones, D Marc; Hearn, Timothy J; Webb, Alex A R; Grant, Alastair; Locke, James C W; Wigge, Philip A

    2015-01-19

    Plant development is highly responsive to ambient temperature, and this trait has been linked to the ability of plants to adapt to climate change. The mechanisms by which natural populations modulate their thermoresponsiveness are not known. To address this, we surveyed Arabidopsis accessions for variation in thermal responsiveness of elongation growth and mapped the corresponding loci. We find that the transcriptional regulator EARLY FLOWERING3 (ELF3) controls elongation growth in response to temperature. Through a combination of modeling and experiments, we show that high temperature relieves the gating of growth at night, highlighting the importance of temperature-dependent repressors of growth. ELF3 gating of transcriptional targets responds rapidly and reversibly to changes in temperature. We show that the binding of ELF3 to target promoters is temperature dependent, suggesting a mechanism where temperature directly controls ELF3 activity. PMID:25557663

  9. Optical diagnostics of solution crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Yongkee; Reddy, B. R.; George, Tharayil G.; Lal, Ravindra B.

    1995-01-01

    Solution crystal growth monitoring of LAP/TGS crystals by various optical diagnostics systems, such as conventional and Mach-Zehnder (M-Z) interferometers, optical heterodyne technique, and ellipsometry, is under development. The study of the dynamics of the crystal growth process requires a detailed knowledge of crystal growth rate and the concentration gradient near growing crystals in aqueous solution. Crystal growth rate can be measured using conventional interferometry. Laser beam reflections from the crystal front as well as the back surface interfere with each other, and the fringe shift due to the growing crystal yields information about the growth rate. Our preliminary results indicate a growth rate of 6 A/sec for LAP crystals grown from solution. Single wavelength M-Z interferometry is in use to calculate the concentration gradient near the crystal. Preliminary investigation is in progress using an M-Z interferometer with 2 cm beam diameter to cover the front region of the growing crystal. In the optical heterodyne technique, phase difference between two rf signals (250 KHZ) is measured of which one is a reference signal, and the other growth signal, whose phase changes due to a change in path length as the material grows. From the phase difference the growth rate can also be calculated. Our preliminary results indicate a growth rate of 1.5 A/sec. the seed and solution temperatures were 26.46 C and 27.92 C respectively, and the solution was saturated at 29.0 C. an ellipsometer to measure the growth rate and interface layer is on order from JOBIN YVON, France. All these systems are arranged in such a manner that measurements can be made either sequentially or simultaneously. These techniques will be adapted for flight experiment.

  10. Strategic growth decisions in helper cichlids.

    PubMed

    Heg, Dik; Bender, Nicole; Hamilton, Ian

    2004-12-01

    Recently, it has been shown that group-living subordinate clownfish Amphiprion percula increase their growth rate after acquiring the dominant breeder male position in the group. Evidence was found for strategic growth adjustments of subordinate fishes depending on the threat of eviction, i.e. subordinates adjust their growth rates so they remain smaller than the dominant fish and thereby limit the threat of being expelled from the territory. However, it is impossible to exclude several alternative factors that potentially could have influenced the observed changes in growth, owing to the nature of that experiment (removing the second-ranking fish--the breeder male--caused the third-ranking fish to change sex to become breeder male and change rank). We studied strategic growth decisions in the group-living Lake Tanganyika cichlid Neolamprologus pulcher under controlled laboratory conditions with ad libitum food availability. First, we show that male breeders grow faster than subordinate male helpers of the same initial size and confirm that N. pulcher shows status-dependent growth. Second, we improved on the experimental design by not removing the dominant breeder male in the group; instead we replaced the breeder male with a new breeder male in a full factorial design and measured growth of the subordinate male helpers is a function of the size difference with the old and the new breeder male. As predicted, male helpers showed strategic growth adjustments, i.e. growing faster when the size difference with the breeder male is large. Strategic growth adjustments were less pronounced than status-dependent growth adjustments. PMID:15801617

  11. Growth and growth hormone: An overview.

    PubMed

    Teran, Enrique; Chesner, Jaclyn; Rapaport, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Growth is a good indicator of a child's health. Growth disturbances, including short stature or growth failure, could be indications of illnesses such as chronic disease, nutritional deficits, celiac disease or hormonal abnormalities. Therefore, a careful assessment of the various requirements for normal growth needs to be done by history, physical examination, and screening laboratory tests. More details will be reviewed about the GH-IGF axis, its abnormalities with special emphasis on GH deficiency, its diagnosis and treatment. GH treatment indications in the US will be reviewed and a few only will be highlighted. They will include GH deficiency, as well as the treatment of children born SGA, including the results of a US study using FDA approved dose of 0.48mg/kg/week. GH deficiency in adults will also be briefly reviewed. Treatment of patients with SHOX deficiency will also be discussed. Possible side effects of GH treatment and the importance of monitoring safety will be highlighted. PMID:26936284

  12. Transformations of emotional experience.

    PubMed

    de Cortiñas, Lia Pistiner

    2013-06-01

    In this paper the author approaches mental pain and the problems in a psychoanalytic treatment of patients with difficulties in the psychic transformation of their emotional experiences. The author is interested in the symbolic failure related to the obstruction of development of phantasies, dreams, dream-thoughts, etc. She differentiates symbolization disturbances related to hypertrophic projective identification from a detention of these primitive communications and emotional isolation. She puts forward the conjecture that one factor in the arrest of this development is the detention of projective identifications and that, when this primitive means of communication is re-established in a container-contained relationship of mutual benefit, this initiates the development of a symbolization process that can replace the pathological 'protection'. Another hypothesis she develops is that of inaccessible caesuras that, associated with the detention of projective identification, obstruct any integrative or interactive movement. This caesura and the detention of projective identifications affect mental functions needed for dealing with mental pain. The personality is left with precarious mental equipment for transforming emotional experiences. How can a psychoanalytical process stimulate the development of creative symbolization, transforming the emotional experiences and leading towards mental growth? The author approaches the clinical problem with the metaphor of the psychic birth of emotional experience. The modulation of mental pain in a container-contained relationship is a central problem for the development of the human mind. For discovering and giving a meaning to emotional experience, the infant depends on reverie, a function necessary in order to develop an evolved consciousness capable of being aware, which is different from the rudimentary consciousness that perceives but does not understand. The development of mature mental equipment is associated with the

  13. Does solar radiation affect the growth of tomato seeds relative to their environment?

    SciTech Connect

    Holzer, K.

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this experiment is to sequentially study and analyze the data collected from the germination and growth of irradiated Rutgers Supreme tomato seeds to adult producing plants. This experiment will not use irradiated seeds as a control as the authors plans to note growth in artificial verses natural environment as the basic experiment.

  14. Does solar radiation affect the growth of tomato seeds relative to their environment?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzer, Kristi

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment is to sequentially study and analyze the data collected from the germination and growth of irradiated Rutgers Supreme tomato seeds to adult producing plants. This experiment will not use irradiated seeds as a control as I plan to note growth in artificial verses natural environment as the basic experiment.

  15. Growth Characteristics Downstream of a Shallow Bump: Computation and Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joslin, Ronald D.; Grosch, Chester E.

    1996-01-01

    Measurements of the velocity field created by a shallow bump on a wall revealed that an energy peak in the spanwise spectrum associated with the driver decays and an initially small-amplitude secondary mode rapidly grows with distance downstream of the bump. Linear theories could not provide an explanation for this growing mode. The present Navier-Stokes simulation replicates and confirms the experimental results. Insight into the structure of the flow was obtained from a study of the results of the calculations and is presented.

  16. Role Playing as an Imaginative Experience for Language Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yawkey, Thomas Daniels

    This paper discusses the value of role play in facilitating children's language development and suggests strategies for using role play effectively in early childhood and intermediate classrooms. Role play requires the child (1) to listen and observe peer talk and action and to use language memory, attention and concentration behaviors; (2) to…

  17. Personal Growth and the Outdoor Experience: Some Empirical Evidence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yaffey, Dave

    1992-01-01

    The Personal Orientation Inventory (POI), a measure of self-actualizing tendencies, was administered to 10 instructors at Plas y Brenin, to 23 tutors at Outward Bound Wales, and to 35 students before and after a course at Outward Bound Aberdovey. Instructors scored higher on the POI than students. Student scores significantly increased after the…

  18. Micro-Imagers for Spaceborne Cell-Growth Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behar, Alberto; Matthews, Janet; SaintAnge, Beverly; Tanabe, Helen

    2006-01-01

    A document discusses selected aspects of a continuing effort to develop five micro-imagers for both still and video monitoring of cell cultures to be grown aboard the International Space Station. The approach taken in this effort is to modify and augment pre-existing electronic micro-cameras. Each such camera includes an image-detector integrated-circuit chip, signal-conditioning and image-compression circuitry, and connections for receiving power from, and exchanging data with, external electronic equipment. Four white and four multicolor light-emitting diodes are to be added to each camera for illuminating the specimens to be monitored. The lens used in the original version of each camera is to be replaced with a shorter-focal-length, more-compact singlet lens to make it possible to fit the camera into the limited space allocated to it. Initially, the lenses in the five cameras are to have different focal lengths: the focal lengths are to be 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, and 3 cm. Once one of the focal lengths is determined to be the most nearly optimum, the remaining four cameras are to be fitted with lenses of that focal length.

  19. The Determination of Relative Elemental Growth Rate Profiles from Segmental Growth Rates (A Methodological Evaluation).

    PubMed Central

    Peters, W. S.; Bernstein, N.

    1997-01-01

    Relative elemental growth rate (REGR) profiles describe spatial patterns of growth intensity; they are indispensable for causal growth analyses. Published methods of REGR profile determination from marking experiments fall in two classes: the profile is either described by a series of segmental growth rates, or calculated as the slope of a function describing the displacement velocities of points along the organ. The latter technique is usually considered superior for theoretical reasons, but to our knowledge, no comparative methodological study of the two approaches is currently available. We formulated a model REGR profile that resembles those reported from primary roots. We established the displacement velocity profile and derived growth trajectories, which enabled us to perform hypothetical marking experiments on the model with varying spacing of marks and durations of measurement. REGR profiles were determined from these data by alternative methods, and results were compared to the original profile. We find that with our model plotting of segmental relative growth rates versus segment position provides exact REGR profile estimations, if the initial segment length is less than 10% of the length of the whole growing zone, and if less than 20% of the growing zone is displaced past its boundary during the measurement. Based on our analysis, we discuss systematic errors that occur in marking experiments. PMID:12223680

  20. Impact of Population Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrlich, Paul R.; Holdren, John P.

    1971-01-01

    Discusses the interrelated crises in population growth, natural resources, and environmental quality. Major problems include population control, redirection of technology, closed resource cycles, equitable opportunity distribution and prosperity. Population growth is regarded as causing a disportionate world-wide negative environmental impact.…

  1. Spiritual Growth and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakefield, Dara V.

    Spiritual living demands growth, and spiritual development has many parallels with human development. Ministers who are knowledgeable of the various stages are best prepared to assist and optimize spiritual growth. The primary benefit of nurturing believers through developmental stages is assured spiritual health and maturity in the context of a…

  2. Modeling Exponential Population Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormick, Bonnie

    2009-01-01

    The concept of population growth patterns is a key component of understanding evolution by natural selection and population dynamics in ecosystems. The National Science Education Standards (NSES) include standards related to population growth in sections on biological evolution, interdependence of organisms, and science in personal and social…

  3. Hail Growth Hysteresis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, David B.; Rasmussen, Roy M.

    1992-12-01

    The transition between wet and dry growth for graupel and hail is examined, and new figures are presented illustrating the critical water contents necessary for transitions into or out of the wet-growth regime. These figures are extended to smaller sizes and lower bulk densities than considered in previous studies. In addition, the possibility of hysteresis in the transitions is examined.

  4. Microgravity Plant Growth Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Two visitors watch a TV monitor showing plant growth inside a growth chamber designed for operation aboard the Space Shuttle as part of NASA's Space Product Development program. The exhibit, featuring work by the Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics, was at AirVenture 2000 sponsored by the Experimental Aircraft Association in Oshkosh, WI.

  5. Plant Growth Regulators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickell, Louis G.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the effect of "plant growth regulators" on plants, such as controlling the flowering, fruit development, plant size, and increasing crop yields. Provides a list of plant growth regulators which includes their chemical, common, and trade names, as well as their different use(s). (GA)

  6. Growth Hormone Promotes Lymphangiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Banziger-Tobler, Nadja Erika; Halin, Cornelia; Kajiya, Kentaro; Detmar, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The lymphatic system plays an important role in inflammation and cancer progression, although the molecular mechanisms involved are poorly understood. As determined using comparative transcriptional profiling studies of cultured lymphatic endothelial cells versus blood vascular endothelial cells, growth hormone receptor was expressed at much higher levels in lymphatic endothelial cells than in blood vascular endothelial cells. These findings were confirmed by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses. Growth hormone induced in vitro proliferation, sprouting, tube formation, and migration of lymphatic endothelial cells, and the mitogenic effect was independent of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 or -3 activation. Growth hormone also inhibited serum starvation-induced lymphatic endothelial cell apoptosis. No major alterations of lymphatic vessels were detected in the normal skin of bovine growth hormone-transgenic mice. However, transgenic delivery of growth hormone accelerated lymphatic vessel ingrowth into the granulation tissue of full-thickness skin wounds, and intradermal delivery of growth hormone resulted in enlargement and enhanced proliferation of cutaneous lymphatic vessels in wild-type mice. These results identify growth hormone as a novel lymphangiogenic factor. PMID:18583315

  7. Growth regulation of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lippman, M.E. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains proceedings of an Ortho-UCLA Symposium on growth regulation of cancer. Included are the following chapters: Swiss 3T3 mouse embryo fibroblasts transfected with a human Prepro-GRP gene synthesize and secrete Pro-GRP rather than GRP, proto-oncogenes as mediators of growth and development: discussion summary, animal studies and clinical trials.

  8. A Collaborative Partnership Responds to Funding Lags, Tradition, and Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dill, Vicky

    1989-01-01

    This article describes how St. Cloud State University solved a number of its growth problems, related to increased teacher education program enrollment, by utilizing a district/university partnership model that springs from an active field experience program. (IAH)

  9. Growth factors for nanobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciftcioglu, Neva; Kajander, E. Olavi

    1999-12-01

    Nanobacteria are novel microorganisms recently isolated from fetal bovine serum and blood of cows and humans. These coccoid, gram negative bacteria in alpha-2 subgroup of Proteobacteria grow slowly under mammalian cell culture conditions but not in common media for microbes. Now we have found two different kinds of culture supplement preparations that improve their growth and make them culturable in the classical sense. These are supernatant fractions of conditioned media obtained from 1 - 3 months old nanobacteria cultures and from about a 2 weeks old Bacillus species culture. Both improved multiplication and particle yields and the latter increased their resistance to gentamicin. Nanobacteria cultured with any of the methods shared similar immunological property, structure and protein pattern. The growth supporting factors were heat-stabile and nondialyzable, and dialysis improved the growth promoting action. Nanobacteria formed stony colonies in a bacteriological medium supplemented with the growth factors. This is an implication that nanobacterial growth is influenced by pre-existing bacterial flora.

  10. Growth and inequality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2015-11-01

    How are growth and inequality related? Evidently, this question is of prime importance in the social sciences, as socioeconomic inequality is one of the major forces shaping the course of human history. Moreover, this question is of importance also in the physical sciences, as the notion of socioeconomic inequality can be applied to analyze physical growth. In this paper we consider general growth processes whose dynamics are governed by ordinary differential equations, and present a comprehensive inequality-based socioeconophysical study of their evolutions. From a social-sciences perspective, the results established describe the inequality that will be generated by different types of economic growth. From a physical-sciences perspective, the results established provide a socioeconomic classification of growth processes.

  11. Transient Dendritic Solidification Experiment (TDSE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Transient Dendritic Solidification Experiment (TDSE) is being developed as a candidate for flight aboard the International Space Station. TDSE will study the growth of dendrites (treelike crystalline structures) in a transparent material (succinonitrile or SCN) that mimics the behavior or widely used iron-based metals. Basic work by three Space Shuttle missions of the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operations. The TDSE is similar to IDGE, but will maintain a constant temperature while varying pressure on the dendrites. Shown here is an exploded view of major elements of the TDSE. A similar view is availble without labels. The principal investigator is Matthew Koss of College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  12. Investigation of crystal growth from solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyagawa, I.

    1975-01-01

    Growth of organic compounds from solution, in particular Rochelle salt and triglycine sulphate, was investigated. Ground-based experiments showed that gravity-driven convection currents in the growth solution influenced defect production in crystals, degraded ferroelectric quality, and indicated that an experiment done in a zero-gravity environment would be beneficial. A crystal of Rochelle salt was grown on board Skylab-4. The quality of this crystal was compared to earth-grown crystals and its unusual features were studied. A typical defect produced in this convection-free environment was a long straight tube extending in the direction of the c crystal axis. These tubes were much longer and more regularly arranged than in similar earth-grown crystals. The crystal was actually several crystals with corresponding axes parallel to each other. Ferroelectric hysteresis experiments showed that some parts of the crystal had many defects, while other parts were of extremely good quality.

  13. Fun Microbiology: How To Measure Growth of a Fungus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, James K.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Describes an experiment to demonstrate a simple method for measuring fungus growth by monitoring the effect of temperature on the growth of Trichoderma viride. Among the advantages that this experimental model provides is introducing students to the importance of using the computer as a scientific tool for analyzing and presenting data. (AIM)

  14. Ammonia And Ethylene Optrodes For Research On Plant Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Quan; Tabacco, Mary Beth

    1995-01-01

    Fiber-optic sensors developed for use in measuring concentrations of ammonia and ethylene near plants during experiments on growth of plants in enclosed environments. Developmental fiber-optic sensors satisfy need to measure concentrations as low as few parts per billion (ppb) and expected to contribute to research on roles of ethylene and ammonia in growth of plants.

  15. Personal Growth Groups: Measuring Outcome and Evaluating Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Tabitha L.; Reysen, Rebekah; Eskridge, Talunja; Ohrt, Jonathan H.

    2013-01-01

    Although researchers speculate counselor-trainees who participate in personal growth groups as part of their course curriculum experience essential group processes and personal growth, there is a lack of empirical evidence supporting this claim. This quantitative study investigates counselor-trainee's perceptions of the therapeutic, developmental,…

  16. A study of crystal growth by solution technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lal, R. B.

    1981-01-01

    The mechanism of crystal growth by solution technique was studied. A low temperature solution crystal growth setup was developed. Crystals of triglycine sulfate (TGS) were grown using this arrangement. Some additional tasks were performed toward fabrication of experiments for future space flight.

  17. Student Observe Microgravity Space Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Paula Crawford (assisted by an American Sign Language interpreter) lectures students about materials science research in space during the U.S. Microgravity Payload-4 mission (STS-87, Nov. 19 - Dec. 5, 1997) in the visitor's center set up by the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) team at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) in Troy, NY. IDGE, flown on three Space Shuttle mission, is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operation. Photo credit: Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

  18. FGF signalling regulates bone growth through autophagy.

    PubMed

    Cinque, Laura; Forrester, Alison; Bartolomeo, Rosa; Svelto, Maria; Venditti, Rossella; Montefusco, Sandro; Polishchuk, Elena; Nusco, Edoardo; Rossi, Antonio; Medina, Diego L; Polishchuk, Roman; De Matteis, Maria Antonietta; Settembre, Carmine

    2015-12-10

    Skeletal growth relies on both biosynthetic and catabolic processes. While the role of the former is clearly established, how the latter contributes to growth-promoting pathways is less understood. Macroautophagy, hereafter referred to as autophagy, is a catabolic process that plays a fundamental part in tissue homeostasis. We investigated the role of autophagy during bone growth, which is mediated by chondrocyte rate of proliferation, hypertrophic differentiation and extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition in growth plates. Here we show that autophagy is induced in growth-plate chondrocytes during post-natal development and regulates the secretion of type II collagen (Col2), the major component of cartilage ECM. Mice lacking the autophagy related gene 7 (Atg7) in chondrocytes experience endoplasmic reticulum storage of type II procollagen (PC2) and defective formation of the Col2 fibrillary network in the ECM. Surprisingly, post-natal induction of chondrocyte autophagy is mediated by the growth factor FGF18 through FGFR4 and JNK-dependent activation of the autophagy initiation complex VPS34-beclin-1. Autophagy is completely suppressed in growth plates from Fgf18(-/-) embryos, while Fgf18(+/-) heterozygous and Fgfr4(-/-) mice fail to induce autophagy during post-natal development and show decreased Col2 levels in the growth plate. Strikingly, the Fgf18(+/-) and Fgfr4(-/-) phenotypes can be rescued in vivo by pharmacological activation of autophagy, pointing to autophagy as a novel effector of FGF signalling in bone. These data demonstrate that autophagy is a developmentally regulated process necessary for bone growth, and identify FGF signalling as a crucial regulator of autophagy in chondrocytes. PMID:26595272

  19. Ultraslow growth rates of giant gypsum crystals

    PubMed Central

    Van Driessche, A. E. S.; García-Ruíz, J. M.; Tsukamoto, K.; Patiño-Lopez, L. D.; Satoh, H.

    2011-01-01

    Mineralogical processes taking place close to equilibrium, or with very slow kinetics, are difficult to quantify precisely. The determination of ultraslow dissolution/precipitation rates would reveal characteristic timing associated with these processes that are important at geological scale. We have designed an advanced high-resolution white-beam phase-shift interferometry microscope to measure growth rates of crystals at very low supersaturation values. To test this technique, we have selected the giant gypsum crystals of Naica ore mines in Chihuahua, Mexico, a challenging subject in mineral formation. They are thought to form by a self-feeding mechanism driven by solution-mediated anhydrite-gypsum phase transition, and therefore they must be the result of an extremely slow crystallization process close to equilibrium. To calculate the formation time of these crystals we have measured the growth rates of the {010} face of gypsum growing from current Naica waters at different temperatures. The slowest measurable growth rate was found at 55 °C, 1.4 ± 0.2 × 10-5 nm/s, the slowest directly measured normal growth rate for any crystal growth process. At higher temperatures, growth rates increase exponentially because of decreasing gypsum solubility and higher kinetic coefficient. At 50 °C neither growth nor dissolution was observed indicating that growth of giant crystals of gypsum occurred at Naica between 58 °C (gypsum/anhydrite transition temperature) and the current temperature of Naica waters, confirming formation temperatures determined from fluid inclusion studies. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of applying advanced optical techniques in laboratory experiments to gain a better understanding of crystal growth processes occurring at a geological timescale. PMID:21911400

  20. Ordered Self-Similar Patterns in Anisotropic Stochastic Growth.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhenwei; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2016-07-01

    We propose an anisotropic stochastic growth model to rationalize the anisotropic self-assembly of supramolecules to form elongated two-dimensional ribbon structures in a recent experiment. The model exhibits distinct growth scenarios that are critically controlled by the ratio of the transverse and the longitudinal growth rate. In the regime of suppressed transverse growth, the model generates the experimentally observed elongated structures through layer-by-layer growing. We further observe the convergence of rough clusters toward smooth regular elliptic patterns by averaging over a number of independent growth processes. Remarkably, these resulting elliptic clusters are self-similar in each instantaneous moment in the growth process. Statistical analysis suggests that the realization of such ordered patterns does not rely on the delicate coordination of different parts in the cluster growth. The self-similarity phenomenon derived from this idealized model may have wider implications, notably in the designed clustering of various elementary building blocks with anisotropic interactions. PMID:27003104

  1. Milk stimulates growth of prostate cancer cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Tate, Patricia L; Bibb, Robert; Larcom, Lyndon L

    2011-11-01

    Concern has been expressed about the fact that cows' milk contains estrogens and could stimulate the growth of hormone-sensitive tumors. In this study, organic cows' milk and two commercial substitutes were digested in vitro and tested for their effects on the growth of cultures of prostate and breast cancer cells. Cows' milk stimulated the growth of LNCaP prostate cancer cells in each of 14 separate experiments, producing an average increase in growth rate of over 30%. In contrast, almond milk suppressed the growth of these cells by over 30%. Neither cows' milk nor almond milk affected the growth of MCF-7 breast cancer cells or AsPC-1 pancreatic cancer cells significantly. Soy milk increased the growth rate of the breast cancer cells. These data indicate that prostate and breast cancer patients should be cautioned about the possible promotional effects of commercial dairy products and their substitutes. PMID:22043817

  2. On Dinosaur Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Gregory M.

    2014-05-01

    Despite nearly two centuries of investigation, a comprehensive understanding of dinosaur biology has proven intractable. The recent development of means to study tissue-level growth, age these animals, and make growth curves has revolutionized our knowledge of dinosaur lives. From such data it is now understood that dinosaurs grew both disruptively and determinately; that they rarely if ever exceeded a century in age; that they became giants through accelerated growth and dwarfed through truncated development; that they were likely endothermic, sexually matured like crocodiles, and showed survivorship like populations of large mammals; and that basal birds retained dinosaurian physiology.

  3. Using Spreadsheets To Model Population Growth, Competition and Predation in Nature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Ashley J. R.

    1999-01-01

    Describes how to place mathematical equations modeling population growth into a spreadsheet that performs calculations quickly and easily. Suggests experiments that can be performed with the spreadsheets. (WRM)

  4. Single-cell dynamics reveals sustained growth during diauxic shifts.

    PubMed

    Boulineau, Sarah; Tostevin, Filipe; Kiviet, Daniel J; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein; Nghe, Philippe; Tans, Sander J

    2013-01-01

    Stochasticity in gene regulation has been characterized extensively, but how it affects cellular growth and fitness is less clear. We study the growth of E. coli cells as they shift from glucose to lactose metabolism, which is characterized by an obligatory growth arrest in bulk experiments that is termed the lag phase. Here, we follow the growth dynamics of individual cells at minute-resolution using a single-cell assay in a microfluidic device during this shift, while also monitoring lac expression. Mirroring the bulk results, the majority of cells displays a growth arrest upon glucose exhaustion, and resume when triggered by stochastic lac expression events. However, a significant fraction of cells maintains a high rate of elongation and displays no detectable growth lag during the shift. This ability to suppress the growth lag should provide important selective advantages when nutrients are scarce. Trajectories of individual cells display a highly non-linear relation between lac expression and growth, with only a fraction of fully induced levels being sufficient for achieving near maximal growth. A stochastic molecular model together with measured dependencies between nutrient concentration, lac expression level, and growth accurately reproduces the observed switching distributions. The results show that a growth arrest is not obligatory in the classic diauxic shift, and underscore that regulatory stochasticity ought to be considered in terms of its impact on growth and survival. PMID:23637881

  5. Graphene growth on SiC(000-1): optimization of surface preparation and growth conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Zachary R.; Jernigan, Glenn G.; Bussmann, Konrad M.; Nyakiti, Luke O.; Garces, Nelson Y.; Nath, Anindya; Wheeler, Virginia D.; Myers-Ward, Rachael L.; Gaskill, D. K.; Eddy, Charles R.

    2015-09-01

    Graphene growth of high crystal quality and single-layer thickness can be achieved by low pressure sublimation (LPS) on SiC(0001). On SiC(0001), which is the C-terminated polar surface, there has been much less success growing uniform, single-layer films. In this work, a systematic study of surface preparation by hydrogen etching followed by LPS in an argon ambient was performed. Hydrogen etching is an important first step in the graphene growth process because it removes damage caused by polishing the substrate surface. However, for SiC(0001), etching at too high of a temperature or for too long has been found to result in pit formation due to the preferential etching of screw dislocations that intersect the surface. It was found that temperatures above 1450°C in 200mbar of hydrogen result in pitting of the surface, whereas etch temperatures at and below 1450°C can result in atomically at terraces of ~ 1 µm width. Following the hydrogen etch optimization, argon-mediated graphene growth was carried out at several different temperatures. For the growth experiments, pressure and growth time were both fixed. Regardless of growth temperature, all of the films were found to have non-uniform thickness. Further, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low energy electron diffraction measurements reveal that trace amounts of oxygen, which may be present during growth, significantly affects the graphene growth process on this polar surface.

  6. Importance of characterizing growth trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Regnault, Nolwenn; Gillman, Matthew W

    2016-01-01

    In the era of the obesity epidemic in children, characterizing childhood growth trajectories (weight, height or BMI/ weight-for-length) is becoming essential for surveillance. Clinicians routinely use growth curves to identify abnormal growth trajectories. Clinical epidemiologists use growth trajectories for different purposes. They are interested in the determinants of growth but also in the consequences of certain patterns of growth on later health and diseases. Characterizing growth trajectories is also necessary if one wants to predict future growth based on past growth and might be useful in the future to compare the anticipated impact of various interventions. PMID:25413648

  7. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth on STS-26

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Mission Specialist George (Pinky) D. Nelson uses a 35 mm camera to photograph a protein crystal grown during the STS-26 Protein Crystal Growth (PCG-II-01) experiment. The protein crystal growth (PCG) carrier is shown deployed from the PCG Refrigerator/Incubator Mocule (R/IM) located in the middeck forward locker. The R/IM contained three Vapor Diffusion Apparatus (VDS) trays (one of which is shown). A total of sixty protein crystal samples were processed during the STS-26 mission.

  8. Material Science Experiments on Mir

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroes, Roger L.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the microgravity materials experiments carried out on the Shuttle/Mir program. There were six experiments, all of which investigated some aspect of diffusivity in liquid melts. The Liquid Metal Diffusion (LMD) experiment investigated the diffusivity of molten Indium samples at 185 C using a radioactive tracer, In-114m. By monitoring two different gamma ray energies (190 keV and 24 keV) emitted by the samples it was possible to measure independently the diffusion rates in the bulk and at the surface of the samples. The Queens University Experiment in Liquid Diffusion (QUELD) was the furnace facility used to process 213 samples for the five other experiments. These experiments investigated the diffusion, ripening, crystal growth, and glass formation in metal, semiconductor, and glass samples. This facility had the capability to process samples in an isothermal or gradient configuration for varying periods of time at temperatures up to 900 C. Both the LMD and the QUELD furnaces were mounted on the Microgravity Isolation Mount (MIM) which provided isolation from g-jitter. All the microgravity experiments were supported by the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS); a three head three axes acceleration monitoring system which measured and recorded the acceleration environment.

  9. Noise in Exponential Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer-Biswas, Srividya; Wright, Charles; Henry, Jon; Burov, Stas; Lin, Yihan; Crosson, Sean; Dinner, Aaron; Scherer, Norbert

    2013-03-01

    The interplay between growth and division of cells is has been studied in the context of exponential growth of bacterial cells (in suitable conditions) for decades. However, bulk culture studies obscure phenomena that manifest in single cells over many generations. We introduce a unique technology combining microfluidics, single-cell imaging, and quantitative analysis. This enables us to track the growth of single Caulobacter crescentus stalked cells over hundreds of generations. The statistics that we extract indicate a size thresholding mechanism for cell division and a non-trivial scaling collapse of division time distributions at different temperatures. In this talk I shall discuss these observations and a stochastic model of growth and division that captures all our observations with no free parameters.

  10. Growth hormone deficiency - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... gender. The child will still have normal body proportions, but may be chubby. The child's face often ... A physical exam, including weight, height, and body proportions, will show signs of slowed growth. The child ...

  11. Cellular growth in biofilms

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, B.D.; Whitaker, S.

    1999-09-20

    In this paper the authors develop a macroscopic evolutionary equation for the growth of the cellular phase starting from a microscopic description of mass transport and a simple structured model for product formation. The methods of continuum mechanics and volume averaging are used to develop the macroscopic representation by carefully considering the fluxes of chemical species that pertain to cell growth. The concept of structured models is extended to include the transport of reacting chemical species at the microscopic scale. The resulting macroscopic growth model is similar in form to previously published models for the transport of a single substrate and electron donor and for the production of cellular mass and exopolymer. The method of volume averaging indicated under what conditions the developed growth model is valid and provides an explicit connection between the relevant microscopic model parameters and their corresponding macroscopic counterparts.

  12. Planar elliptic growth

    SciTech Connect

    Mineev, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The planar elliptic extension of the Laplacian growth is, after a proper parametrization, given in a form of a solution to the equation for areapreserving diffeomorphisms. The infinite set of conservation laws associated with such elliptic growth is interpreted in terms of potential theory, and the relations between two major forms of the elliptic growth are analyzed. The constants of integration for closed form solutions are identified as the singularities of the Schwarz function, which are located both inside and outside the moving contour. Well-posedness of the recovery of the elliptic operator governing the process from the continuum of interfaces parametrized by time is addressed and two examples of exact solutions of elliptic growth are presented.

  13. ECOSYSTEM GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermodynamically, ecosystem growth and development is the process by which energy throughflow and stored biomass increase. Several proposed hypotheses describe the natural tendencies that occur as an ecosystem matures, and here, we consider five: minimum entropy production, maxi...

  14. Growth hormone stimulation test

    MedlinePlus

    The growth hormone (GH) stimulation test measures the ability of the body to produce GH. ... killing medicine (antiseptic). The first sample is drawn early in the morning. Medicine is given through the ...

  15. Normal growth and development

    MedlinePlus

    ... DIET Poor nutrition can cause problems with a child's intellectual development. A child with a poor diet may be ... care provider if you have concerns about your child's growth and development. Related topics include: Developmental milestones record - 4 months ...

  16. Growth of dopamine crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Vidya; Patki, Mugdha

    2016-05-01

    Many nonlinear optical (NLO) crystals have been identified as potential candidates in optical and electro-optical devices. Use of NLO organic crystals is expected in photonic applications. Hence organic nonlinear optical materials have been intensely investigated due to their potentially high nonlinearities, and rapid response in electro-optic effect compared to inorganic NLO materials. There are many methods to grow organic crystals such as vapor growth method, melt growth method and solution growth method. Out of these methods, solution growth method is useful in providing constraint free crystal. Single crystals of Dopamine have been grown by evaporating the solvents from aqueous solution. Crystals obtained were of the size of orders of mm. The crystal structure of dopamine was determined using XRD technique. Images of crystals were obtained using FEG SEM Quanta Series under high vacuum and low KV.

  17. Crack-growth analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bianca, C.; Creager, M.

    1976-01-01

    Flexible, adaptable, integrative routine, computer program incorporates Collipriest-Ehret and Paris-Forman equations. Calculates growth from initial defect size and terminates calculation when crack is sufficiently large for critical condition. Wheeler, Willenborg, and Grumman Closure models are available.

  18. Modeling tin whisker growth.

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberger, Christopher Robert

    2013-08-01

    Tin, lead, and lead-tin solders are the most commonly used solders due to their low melting temperatures. However, due to the toxicity problems, lead must now be removed from solder materials. This has lead to the re-emergence of the issue of tin whisker growth. Tin whiskers are a microelectronic packaging issue because they can lead to shorts if they grow to sufficient length. However, the cause of tin whisker growth is still not well understood and there is lack of robust methods to determine when and if whiskering will be a problem. This report summarizes some of the leading theories on whisker growth and attempts to provide some ideas towards establishing the role microstructure plays in whisker growth.

  19. Growth outcome: nutritionist perspective.

    PubMed

    Agostoni, Carlo; Fattore, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Increasing evidence points to a fundamental role of early nutrition on rates of growth and development, and later health. We may identify three major fields of scientific interest and clinical application. (1) In developing countries poor growth is associated with greater risk of morbidity and mortality from infectious diseases, mainly lower respiratory infections and diarrhea. In these settings, failure to promote compensatory growth may have negative short-term consequences, and the nutritionist's task is the primary prevention of nutrient deficiencies to promote the full expression of the individual genetic potential, while allowing for recovery of early secondary functional deficiencies. (2) A second challenge for nutritionists is represented by the approach to growth impairments in rare disorders, ranging from congenital disorders to chronic infections. Most disorders are favorably influenced by improved nutritional status and better growth, and patients may satisfactorily reach adolescence, pubertal and reproductive age, up to ageing. Even for the less positive conditions, an improvement in the quality of life for families is in any case a rewarding aim. (3) A third challenge is represented by the definition of the role of nutrition on growth in physiological conditions for all individuals. Concern has been raised about the potential adverse long-term consequences of accelerated child growth rates, possibly resulting in a predisposition to develop non-communicable chronic diseases in the adult age. Accordingly, this hypothesis might explain the benefits of breastfeeding in terms of slower early growth, and the fetal origins hypothesis in terms of adverse postnatal catch-up growth in infants born small. Therefore, growth as viewed by a pediatric nutritionist perspective is a complex matter, ranging from the early stages of intrauterine development up to adult ages and ageing processes. Cost/benefit analyses of interventions on growth such as cost per DALYs

  20. Crystal growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R. P.; Gaur, S. S.; Sheehan, M. E.; Nancollas, G. H.

    1988-02-01

    The kinetics of crystal growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate has been investigated up to very large extents of growth over a range of supersaturations maintained using the Constant Composition technique. It is suggested that the initial rapid growth of aged seed crystals resulting in marked lattice perfection, reduces the density of growth sites on the crystal surfaces. A method for the preparation of perfected crystallites of calcium oxalate monohydrate through pregrowth of aged crystals has been developed. At large extents of growth with respect to initial seed crystals ( > 200% for aged crystals and 30-60% for pregrown crystals), the rates of crystallization at constant supersaturation undergo marked increases accompanying the formulation of secondary nuclei. These nucleation thresholds depend both upon supersaturation and upon the initial specific surface area of the crystallites and may be important factors in the formation of calcium oxalate stones in vivo. Experiments in whole urine suggest that the kinetics of growth, secondary nucleation, aggregation and cementation of particles may be important factors in kidney stone formation.