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Sample records for experimental alcoholic liver

  1. Insulin resistance in clinical and experimental alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Rotonya M.; Correnti, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is the number one cause of liver failure worldwide; its management costs billions of health care dollars annually. Since the advent of the obesity epidemic, insulin resistance and diabetes have become common clinical findings in patients with ALD; and the development of insulin resistance predicts the progression from simple steatosis to cirrhosis in ALD patients. Both clinical and experimental data implicate the impairment of several mediators of insulin signaling in ALD, and experimental data suggest that insulin-sensitizing therapies improve liver histology. This review explores the contribution of impaired insulin signaling in ALD and summarizes the current understanding of the synergistic relationship between alcohol and nutrient excess in promoting hepatic inflammation and disease. PMID:25998863

  2. Strategies, models and biomarkers in experimental non-alcoholic fatty liver disease research

    PubMed Central

    Willebrords, Joost; Pereira, Isabel Veloso Alves; Maes, Michaël; Yanguas, Sara Crespo; Colle, Isabelle; Van Den Bossche, Bert; Da silva, Tereza Cristina; Oliveira, Cláudia P; Andraus, Wellington; Alves, Venâncio Avancini Ferreira; Cogliati, Bruno; Vinken, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease encompasses a spectrum of liver diseases, including simple steatosis, steatohepatitis, liver fibrosis and cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is currently the most dominant chronic liver disease in Western countries due to the fact that hepatic steatosis is associated with insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus, obesity, metabolic syndrome and drug-induced injury. A variety of chemicals, mainly drugs, and diets is known to cause hepatic steatosis in humans and rodents. Experimental non-alcoholic fatty liver disease models rely on the application of a diet or the administration of drugs to laboratory animals or the exposure of hepatic cell lines to these drugs. More recently, genetically modified rodents or zebrafish have been introduced as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease models. Considerable interest now lies in the discovery and development of novel non-invasive biomarkers of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, with specific focus on hepatic steatosis. Experimental diagnostic biomarkers of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, such as (epi)genetic parameters and ‘-omics’-based read-outs are still in their infancy, but show great promise. . In this paper, the array of tools and models for the study of liver steatosis is discussed. Furthermore, the current state-of-art regarding experimental biomarkers such as epigenetic, genetic, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabonomic biomarkers will be reviewed. PMID:26073454

  3. Experimental study of osthole on treatment of hyperlipidemic and alcoholic fatty liver in animals

    PubMed Central

    Song, Fang; Xie, Mei-Lin; Zhu, Lu-Jia; Zhang, Ke-Ping; Xue, Jie; Gu, Zhen-Lun

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effects of osthole on fatty liver, and investigate the possible mechanism. METHODS: A quail model with hyperlipidemic fatty liver and rat model with alcoholic fatty liver were set up by feeding high fat diet and alcohol, respectively. These experimental animals were then treated with osthole 5-20 mg/kg for 6 wk, respectively. Whereafter, the lipid in serum and hepatic tissue, and coefficient of hepatic weight were measured. RESULTS: After treatment with osthole the levels of serum total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), lower density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), coefficient of hepatic weight, and the hepatic tissue contents of TC and TG were significantly decreased. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in liver was improved. In alcohol-induced fatty liver rats, the level of malondialdehyde (MDA) in liver was decreased. In high fat-induced fatty liver quails, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) in liver was significantly improved. The histological evaluation of liver specimens demonstrated that the osthole dramatically decreased lipid accumulation. CONCLUSION: These results suggested that osthole had therapeutic effects on both alcohol and high fat-induced fatty liver. The mechanism might be associated with its antioxidation. PMID:16865778

  4. Deficiency of intestinal mucin-2 ameliorates experimental alcoholic liver disease in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Phillipp; Chen, Peng; Wang, Hui J.; Wang, Lirui; McCole, Declan F.; Brandl, Katharina; Stärkel, Peter; Belzer, Clara; Hellerbrand, Claus; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu; Ho, Samuel B.; Schnabl, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    The intestinal mucus layer protects the epithelium from noxious agents, viruses, and pathogenic bacteria present in the gastrointestinal tract. It is composed of mucins, predominantly mucin-2 (Muc2), secreted by goblet cells of the intestine. Experimental alcoholic liver disease requires translocation of bacterial products across the intestinal barrier into the systemic circulation, which induces an inflammatory response in the liver and contributes to steatohepatitis. We investigated the roles of the intestinal mucus layer, and in particular Muc2, in development of experimental alcohol-associated liver disease in mice. We studied experimental alcohol-induced liver disease, induced by the Tsukamoto-French method (which involves continuous intragastric feeding of an isocaloric diet or alcohol) in wild-type and Muc2−/− mice. Muc2−/− mice showed less alcohol-induced liver injury and steatosis that developed in wild-type mice. Most notably, Muc2−/− mice had significantly lower plasma levels of lipopolysaccharide than wild-type mice after alcohol feeding. In contrast to wild-type mice, Muc2−/− mice were protected from alcohol-associated microbiome changes that are dependent on intestinal mucins. The anti-microbial proteins Reg3b and Reg3g were expressed at significantly higher levels in the jejunum of Muc2−/− mice fed the isocaloric diet or alcohol, compared with wild-type mice. Consequently, Muc2−/− mice showed increased killing of commensal bacteria and prevented intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Conclusion: Muc2−/− mice are protected from intestinal bacterial overgrowth and dysbiosis in response to alcohol feeding. Subsequently, lower amounts of bacterial products such as endotoxin translocate into the systemic circulation, decreasing liver disease. PMID:23408358

  5. Alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Penny, Steven M

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, approximately 100,000 deaths are attributed to alcohol abuse each year. In 2009, the World Health Organization listed alcohol use as one of the leading causes of the global burden of disease and injury. Alcoholic liver disease, a direct result of chronic alcohol abuse, insidiously destroys the normal functions of the liver. The end result of the disease, cirrhosis, culminates in a dysfunctional and diffusely scarred liver. This article discusses the clinical manifestations, imaging considerations, and treatment of alcoholic liver disease and cirrhosis. Normal liver function, liver hemodynamics, the disease of alcoholism, and the deleterious effects of alcohol also are reviewed.

  6. Alcoholic liver disease: The gut microbiome and liver crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Phillipp; Seebauer, Caroline T.; Schnabl, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Alcoholic fatty liver disease can progress to steatohepatitis, alcoholic hepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis. Patients with alcohol abuse show quantitative and qualitative changes in the composition of the intestinal microbiome. Furthermore, patients with alcoholic liver disease have increased intestinal permeability and elevated systemic levels of gut-derived microbial products. Maintaining eubiosis, stabilizing the mucosal gut barrier or preventing cellular responses to microbial products protect from experimental alcoholic liver disease. Therefore, intestinal dysbiosis and pathological bacterial translocation appear fundamental for the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. This review highlights causes for intestinal dysbiosis and pathological bacterial translocation, their relationship and consequences for alcoholic liver disease. We also discuss how the liver affects the intestinal microbiota. PMID:25872593

  7. Alcoholic liver disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... FF, ed. Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2018 . Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2018:59-60. Carithers RL, McClain C. Alcoholic ... Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 86. Haines EJ, Oyama LC. ...

  8. Alcoholic Liver Disease and Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gallegos-Orozco, Juan F; Charlton, Michael R

    2016-08-01

    Excessive alcohol use is a common health care problem worldwide and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Alcoholic liver disease represents the second most frequent indication for liver transplantation in North America and Europe. The pretransplant evaluation of patients with alcoholic liver disease should aim at identifying those at high risk for posttransplant relapse of alcohol use disorder, as return to excessive drinking can be deleterious to graft and patient survival. Carefully selected patients with alcoholic liver disease, including those with severe alcoholic hepatitis, will have similar short-term and long-term outcomes when compared with other indications for liver transplantation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Pathologic changes in the cytokeratin pericanalicular sheath in experimental cholestasis and alcoholic fatty liver.

    PubMed

    Ohta, M; Marceau, N; French, S W

    1988-07-01

    The architectural framework of the pericanalicular sheath composed of cytokeratin intermediate filaments (IFs) was examined after phalloidin treatment, bile duct ligation, and alcoholic fatty liver in rats to assess the role of IFs in experimental cholestasis. Electron microscopy examination of whole mount unembedded extracted liver slices was employed to visualize the cytoskeleton. Immunofluorescence staining and immunoelectron microscopy of the sheath were also performed using monoclonal antibodies to rat hepatocyte cytokeratins CK49 and CK55. The thickness of the wall and the diameter of the lumens were measured. In the phalloidin-treated rats, the pericanalicular sheath was markedly dilated and thickened. Immunofluorescence staining showed that the CK49 and CK55 IFs were localized in the pericanalicular region, particularly in the pericentral area. Immunoelectron microscopy documented that the IFs at the thickened pericanalicular sheath consisted of both CK49 and CK55, which means that the thickening of the bile canaliculus was in part due to an increase of IFs and not just due to an increase in actin filaments. In the livers where the bile duct was ligated, the pericanalicular sheath was irregularly dilated and some parts of the sheath appeared thinned out or missing. The belt desmosome also appeared absent focally in the pericanalicular sheath. Immunofluorescence studies showed that the staining for CK49 and CK55 was reduced focally in the pericanalicular region. The CK55 antibody stained the cytoplasm of hepatocytes in the periportal area more intensely when compared with the controls. These results indicated that the pericanalicular sheath and the belt desmosome were focally disrupted in response to extrahepatic bile duct obstruction. In the ethanol-fed rats, the pericanalicular sheath was dilated, thickened and tortuous, and appeared focally flattened by large fat droplets. IFs in the cytoplasm were pushed to the cell periphery and were compressed against

  10. Experimental models of liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Yanguas, Sara Crespo; Cogliati, Bruno; Willebrords, Joost; Maes, Michaël; Colle, Isabelle; van den Bossche, Bert; de Oliveira, Claudia Pinto Marques Souza; Andraus, Wellington; Alves, Venâncio Avancini Ferreira; Leclercq, Isabelle; Vinken, Mathieu

    2016-05-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is a wound healing response to insults and as such affects the entire world population. In industrialized countries, the main causes of liver fibrosis include alcohol abuse, chronic hepatitis virus infection and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. A central event in liver fibrosis is the activation of hepatic stellate cells, which is triggered by a plethora of signaling pathways. Liver fibrosis can progress into more severe stages, known as cirrhosis, when liver acini are substituted by nodules, and further to hepatocellular carcinoma. Considerable efforts are currently devoted to liver fibrosis research, not only with the goal of further elucidating the molecular mechanisms that drive this disease, but equally in view of establishing effective diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. The present paper provides a state-of-the-art overview of in vivo and in vitro models used in the field of experimental liver fibrosis research.

  11. Liver fibrosis markers in alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Chrostek, Lech; Panasiuk, Anatol

    2014-07-07

    Alcohol is one of the main factors of liver damage. The evaluation of the degree of liver fibrosis is of great value for therapeutic decision making in patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Staging of liver fibrosis is essential to define prognosis and management of the disease. Liver biopsy is a gold standard as it has high sensitivity and specificity in fibrosis diagnostics. Taking into account the limitations of liver biopsy, there is an exigency to introduce non-invasive serum markers for fibrosis that would be able to replace liver biopsy. Ideal serum markers should be specific for the liver, easy to perform and independent to inflammation and fibrosis in other organs. Serum markers of hepatic fibrosis are divided into direct and indirect. Indirect markers reflect alterations in hepatic function, direct markers reflect extracellular matrix turnover. These markers should correlate with dynamic changes in fibrogenesis and fibrosis resolution. The assessment of the degree of liver fibrosis in alcoholic liver disease has diagnostic and prognostic implications, therefore noninvasive assessment of fibrosis remains important. There are only a few studies evaluating the diagnostic and prognostic values of noninvasive biomarkers of fibrosis in patients with ALD. Several noninvasive laboratory tests have been used to assess liver fibrosis in patients with alcoholic liver disease, including the hyaluronic acid, FibroTest, FibrometerA, Hepascore, Forns and APRI indexes, FIB4, an algorithm combining Prothrombin index (PI), α-2 macroglobulin and hyaluronic acid. Among these tests, Fibrotest, FibrometerA and Hepascore demonstrated excellent diagnostic accuracy in identifying advanced fibrosis and cirrhosis, and additionally, Fibrotest was independently associated with survival. Therefore, the use of biomarkers may reduce the need for liver biopsy and permit an earlier treatment of alcoholic patients.

  12. Folate, Alcohol, and Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Medici, Valentina; Halsted, Charles H.

    2013-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is typically associated with folate deficiency, which is the result of reduced dietary folate intake, intestinal malabsorption, reduced liver uptake and storage, and increased urinary folate excretion. Folate deficiency favors the progression of liver disease through mechanisms that include its effects on methionine metabolism with consequences for DNA synthesis and stability and the epigenetic regulation of gene expression involved in pathways of liver injury. This paper reviews the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease with particular focus on ethanol-induced alterations in methionine metabolism which may act in synergy with folate deficiency to decrease antioxidant defense as well as DNA stability while regulating epigenetic mechanisms of relevant gene expressions. We also review the current evidence available on potential treatments of alcoholic liver disease based on correcting abnormalities in methionine metabolism and the methylation regulation of relevant gene expressions. PMID:23136133

  13. Experimental acute alcohol pancreatitis-related liver damage and endotoxemia: synbiotics but not metronidazole have a protective effect.

    PubMed

    Marotta, F; Barreto, R; Wu, C C; Naito, Y; Gelosa, F; Lorenzetti, A; Yoshioka, M; Fesce, E

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the effect of gut manipulation by either novel synbiotics or by metronidazole on either endotoxemia or the severity of liver damage in the course of acute pancreatitis from alcohol ingestion. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed for 1 week through an intragastric tube a liquid diet with either: (i) 1 mL t.i.d. of a mixture of synbiotics (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus helveticus and Bifidobacterium in an enriched medium); (ii) 20 mg/kg t.i.d. metronidazole; or (iii) standard diet. Then, acute pancreatitis was induced by caerulein and when the disease was full-blown, rats were fed an alcohol-rich diet. Synbiotic and metronidazole treatment was given for a further 2 weeks. Transaminase and endotoxemia levels were measured before treatment, after 6 h, after 24 h and 2 weeks later, at the time the rats were killed. Liver samples were obtained for histological analysis. Synbiotics but not metronidazole improved the acute pancreatitis-induced increase in endotoxemia and transaminase levels. The addition of alcohol worsened these variables to a limited extent in the synbiotic-treated group, while metronidazole had a negative effect on liver damage. Gut flora pretreatment with synbiotics was able to effectively protect against endotoxin/bacterial translocation, as well as liver damage in the course of acute pancreatitis and concomitant heavy alcohol consumption. The beneficial effect of synbiotics on liver histology seems to be correlated with endotoxemia. Metronidazole did not produce such a beneficial effect; in fact, it further worsened liver damage when alcohol was added to the background of ongoing acute pancreatic inflammation.

  14. Paracetamol, alcohol and the liver

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, Laurie F

    2000-01-01

    It is claimed that chronic alcoholics are at increased risk of paracetamol (acetaminophen) hepatotoxicity not only following overdosage but also with its therapeutic use. Increased susceptibility is supposed to be due to induction of liver microsomal enzymes by ethanol with increased formation of the toxic metabolite of paracetamol. However, the clinical evidence in support of these claims is anecdotal and the same liver damage after overdosage occurs in patients who are not chronic alcoholics. Many alcoholic patients reported to have liver damage after taking paracetamol with ‘therapeutic intent’ had clearly taken substantial overdoses. No proper clinical studies have been carried out to investigate the alleged paracetamol–alcohol interaction and acute liver damage has never been produced by therapeutic doses of paracetamol given as a challenge to a chronic alcoholic. The paracetamol–alcohol interaction is complex; acute and chronic ethanol have opposite effects. In animals, chronic ethanol causes induction of hepatic microsomal enzymes and increases paracetamol hepatotoxicity as expected (ethanol primarily induces CYP2E1 and this isoform is important in the oxidative metabolism of paracetamol). However, in man, chronic alcohol ingestion causes only modest (about twofold) and short-lived induction of CYP2E1, and there is no corresponding increase (as claimed) in the toxic metabolic activation of paracetamol. The paracetamol–ethanol interaction is not specific for any one isoform of cytochrome P450, and it seems that isoenzymes other than CYP2E1 are primarily responsible for the oxidative metabolism of paracetamol in man. Acute ethanol inhibits the microsomal oxidation of paracetamol both in animals and man. This protects against liver damage in animals and there is evidence that it also does so in man. The protective effect disappears when ethanol is eliminated and the relative timing of ethanol and paracetamol intake is critical. In many of the reports

  15. Activation of liver alcohol dehydrogenase by glycosylation.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, C S; White, J H

    1983-01-01

    D-Fructose and D-glucose activate alcohol dehydrogenase from horse liver to oxidize ethanol. One mol of D-[U-14C]fructose or D-[U-14C]glucose is covalently incorporated per mol of the maximally activated enzyme. Amino acid and N-terminal analyses of the 14C-labelled glycopeptide isolated from a proteolytic digest of the [14C]glycosylated enzyme implicate lysine-315 as the site of the glycosylation. 13C-n.m.r.-spectroscopic studies indicate that D-[13C]glucose is covalently linked in N-glucosidic and Amadori-rearranged structures in the [13C]glucosylated alcohol dehydrogenase. Experimental results are consistent with the formation of the N-glycosylic linkage between glycose and lysine-315 of liver alcohol dehydrogenase in the initial step that results in an enhanced catalytic efficiency to oxidize ethanol. PMID:6342612

  16. Experimental non-alcoholic fatty liver disease results in decreased hepatic uptake transporter expression and function in rats

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Craig D.; Lickteig, Andrew J.; Augustine, Lisa M.; Oude Elferink, Ronald P.J.; Besselsen, David G.; Erickson, Robert P.; Cherrington, Nathan J.

    2009-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) encompasses a spectrum of diagnoses ranging from simple fatty liver (SFL), to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). This study aimed to determine the effect of moderate and severe NAFLD on hepatic transporter expression and function in vivo. Rats were fed a high-fat diet (SFL model) or a methionine-choline-deficient diet (NASH model) for eight weeks. Hepatic uptake transporter function was determined by bromosulfophthalein (BSP) disposition. Transporter expression was determined by branched DNA signal amplification assay and western blotting; inflammation was identified by immunostaining of liver slices for interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β). MC- rats showed significant retention of BSP in the plasma when compared to control rats. Hepatic NTCP, OATP1a1, 1a4, 1b2 and 2b1; and OAT 2 and 3 mRNA levels were significantly decreased in high-fat and MC- diet rats when compared to control. Protein expression of OATP1a1 was significantly decreased in high-fat animals, while OATP1a1 and OATP1b2 expression was significantly lower in MC- rats when compared to control. Liver tissue from high-fat and MC- rats stained positive for IL-1β, a pro-inflammatory cytokine known to decrease expression of NTCP, OATP and OAT transporters, suggesting a plausible mechanism for the observed transporter alterations. These data suggest that different stages of NAFLD result in altered hepatic uptake transporter expression that can lead to a functional impairment of xenobiotic uptake from the blood. Furthermore, NAFLD may alter the plasma retention time of clinically relevant drugs that are reliant on these transporters and may increase the potential drug toxicity. PMID:19358839

  17. Inflammation in Alcoholic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, H. Joe; Gao, Bin; Zakhari, Samir; Nagy, Laura E.

    2013-01-01

    Frank Burr Mallory’s landmark observation in 1911 on the histopathology of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) was the first identification of a link between an inflammation and ALD. In this review, we summarize recent advances regarding the origins and roles of various inflammatory components in ALD. Metabolism of ethanol generates a number of metabolites, including acetate, reactive oxygen species, acetaldehyde, and epigenetic changes, that can induce inflammatory responses. Alcohol and its metabolites can also initiate and aggravate inflammatory conditions by promoting gut leakiness of microbial products, by sensitizing immune cells to stimulation and by activating innate immune pathways, such as complement. Chronic alcohol consumption also sensitizes non-immune cells, e.g., hepatocytes, to inflammatory signals and impairs their ability to respond to protective signals. Based on these advances, a number of inflammatory targets have been identified with potential for therapeutic intervention in ALD, presenting new opportunities and challenges for translational research. PMID:22524187

  18. [Prophylaxis of alcoholic disease of the liver].

    PubMed

    Beliakin, S A

    2009-08-01

    Military doctors should have a uniform position to the use of alcohol. Now alcohol is the basic pathogenic factor in development of a lethal cirrhosis of a liver. The most known sayings justifying the use of alcohol, are insolvent. Useful doses of alcohol does not exist. The quantity of used alcohol has the great value. Only at achievement of age 21 year it is possible to use safe doses of alcohol. A safe dose of pure alcohol (ethanol) less than 30,0 in day. In a basis of prophylaxis of a cirrhosis of a liver there is a medical educational activity.

  19. New advances in molecular mechanisms and emerging therapeutic targets in alcoholic liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jessica A; Manley, Sharon; Ding, Wen-Xing

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease is a major health problem in the United States and worldwide. Chronic alcohol consumption can cause steatosis, inflammation, fibrosis, cirrhosis and even liver cancer. Significant progress has been made to understand key events and molecular players for the onset and progression of alcoholic liver disease from both experimental and clinical alcohol studies. No successful treatments are currently available for treating alcoholic liver disease; therefore, development of novel pathophysiological-targeted therapies is urgently needed. This review summarizes the recent progress on animal models used to study alcoholic liver disease and the detrimental factors that contribute to alcoholic liver disease pathogenesis including miRNAs, S-adenosylmethionine, Zinc deficiency, cytosolic lipin-1β, IRF3-mediated apoptosis, RIP3-mediated necrosis and hepcidin. In addition, we summarize emerging adaptive protective effects induced by alcohol to attenuate alcohol-induced liver pathogenesis including FoxO3, IL-22, autophagy and nuclear lipin-1α. PMID:25278688

  20. Liver Transplantation for Alcoholic Liver Disease and Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Burra, Patrizia; Zanetto, Alberto; Germani, Giacomo

    2018-02-09

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is one of the main important causes of cancer-related death and its mortality is increasingly worldwide. In Europe, alcohol abuse accounts for approximately half of all liver cancer cases and it will become the leading cause of hepatocellular carcinoma in the next future with the sharp decline of chronic viral hepatitis. The pathophysiology of alcohol-induced carcinogenesis involves acetaldehyde catabolism, oxidative stress and chronic liver inflammation. Genetic background plays also a significant role and specific patterns of gene mutations in alcohol-related hepatocellular carcinoma have been characterized. Survival is higher in patients who undergo specific surveillance programmes than in patients who do not. However, patients with alcohol cirrhosis present a significantly greater risk of liver decompensation than those with cirrhosis due to other aetiologies. Furthermore, the adherence to screening program can be suboptimal. Liver transplant for patients with Milan-in hepatocellular carcinoma represents the best possible treatment in case of tumour recurrence/progression despite loco-regional or surgical treatments. Long-term result after liver transplantation for alcohol related liver disease is good. However, cardiovascular disease and de novo malignancies can significantly hamper patients' survival and should be carefully considered by transplant team. In this review, we have focused on the evolution of alcohol-related hepatocellular carcinoma epidemiology and risk factors as well as on liver transplantation in alcoholic patients with and without hepatocellular carcinoma.

  1. Alcoholic Liver Disease: Pathogenesis and Current Management

    PubMed Central

    Osna, Natalia A.; Donohue, Terrence M.; Kharbanda, Kusum K.

    2017-01-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption is a global healthcare problem. The liver sustains the greatest degree of tissue injury by heavy drinking because it is the primary site of ethanol metabolism. Chronic and excessive alcohol consumption produces a wide spectrum of hepatic lesions, the most characteristic of which are steatosis, hepatitis, and fibrosis/cirrhosis. Steatosis is the earliest response to heavy drinking and is characterized by the deposition of fat in hepatocytes. Steatosis can progress to steatohepatitis, which is a more severe, inflammatory type of liver injury. This stage of liver disease can lead to the development of fibrosis, during which there is excessive deposition of extracellular matrix proteins. The fibrotic response begins with active pericellular fibrosis, which may progress to cirrhosis, characterized by excessive liver scarring, vascular alterations, and eventual liver failure. Among problem drinkers, about 35 percent develop advanced liver disease because a number of disease modifiers exacerbate, slow, or prevent alcoholic liver disease progression. There are still no FDA-approved pharmacological or nutritional therapies for treating patients with alcoholic liver disease. Cessation of drinking (i.e., abstinence) is an integral part of therapy. Liver transplantation remains the life-saving strategy for patients with end-stage alcoholic liver disease. PMID:28988570

  2. Diagnosis and Management of Alcoholic Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Dugum, Mohannad; McCullough, Arthur

    2015-06-28

    Alcohol is a leading cause of liver disease and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Several factors, including the amount and duration of alcohol consumption, affect the development and progression of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). ALD represents a spectrum of liver pathology ranging from fatty change to fibrosis to cirrhosis. Early diagnosis of ALD is important to encourage alcohol abstinence, minimize the progression of liver fibrosis, and manage cirrhosis-related complications including hepatocellular carcinoma. A number of questionnaires and laboratory tests are available to screen for alcohol intake. Liver biopsy remains the gold-standard diagnostic tool for ALD, but noninvasive accurate alternatives, including a number of biochemical tests as well as liver stiffness measurement, are increasingly being utilized in the evaluation of patients with suspected ALD. The management of ALD depends largely on complete abstinence from alcohol. Supportive care should focus on treating alcohol withdrawal and providing enteral nutrition while managing the complications of liver failure. Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) is a devastating acute form of ALD that requires early recognition and specialized tertiary medical care. Assessment of AH severity using defined scoring systems is important to allocate resources and initiate appropriate therapy. Corticosteroids or pentoxifylline are commonly used in treating AH but provide a limited survival benefit. Liver transplantation represents the ultimate therapy for patients with alcoholic cirrhosis, with most transplant centers mandating a 6 month period of abstinence from alcohol before listing. Early liver transplantation is also emerging as a therapeutic measure in specifically selected patients with severe AH. A number of novel targeted therapies for ALD are currently being evaluated in clinical trials.

  3. Alcoholic pancreatitis: Lessons from the liver

    PubMed Central

    Clemens, Dahn L; Mahan, Katrina J

    2010-01-01

    The association between alcohol consumption and pancreatitis has been recognized for over 100 years. Despite the fact that this association is well recognized, the mechanisms by which alcohol abuse leads to pancreatic tissue damage are not entirely clear. Alcohol abuse is the major factor associated with pancreatitis in the Western world. Interestingly, although most cases of chronic pancreatitis and many cases of acute pancreatitis are associated with alcohol abuse, only a small percentage of individuals who abuse alcohol develop this disease. This situation is reminiscent of the association between alcohol abuse and the incidence of alcoholic liver disease. The liver and the pancreas are developmentally very closely related. Even though these two organs are quite different, they exhibit a number of general structural and functional similarities. Furthermore, the diseases mediated by alcohol abuse in these organs exhibit some striking similarities. The diseases in both organs are characterized by parenchymal cell damage, activation of stellate cells, aberrant wound healing, and fibrosis. Because of the similarities between the liver and the pancreas, and the alcohol-associated diseases of these organs, we may be able to apply much of the knowledge that we have gained regarding the effects of alcohol on the liver to the pancreas. PMID:20238397

  4. Autophagy in alcohol-induced liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dolganiuc, Angela; Thomes, Paul G.; Ding, Wen-Xing; Lemasters, John J.; Donohue, Terrence M.

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol is the most abused substance worldwide and a significant source of liver injury; the mechanisms of alcohol-induced liver disease are not fully understood. Significant cellular toxicity and impairment of protein synthesis and degradation occur in alcohol-exposed liver cells, along with changes in energy balance and modified responses to pathogens. Autophagy is the process of cellular catabolism through the lysosomal-dependent machinery, which maintains a balance among protein synthesis, degradation, and recycling of self. Autophagy is part of normal homeostasis and it can be triggered by multiple factors that threaten cell integrity including starvation, toxins, or pathogens. Multiple factors regulate autophagy; survival and preservation of cellular integrity at the expense of inadequately-folded proteins and damaged high energy-generating intracellular organelles are prominent targets of autophagy in pathologic conditions. Coincidentally, inadequately-folded proteins accumulate and high energy-generating intracellular organelles, such as mitochondria, are damaged by alcohol abuse; these alcohol-induced pathological findings prompted investigation of the role of autophagy in the pathogenesis of alcohol-induced liver damage. Our review summarizes the current knowledge about the role and implications of autophagy in alcohol-induced liver disease. PMID:22551004

  5. Challenges in transplantation for alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Berlakovich, Gabriela A

    2014-07-07

    Transplantation for the treatment of alcoholic cirrhosis is more controversially discussed than it is for any other indication. The crucial aspect in this setting is abstinence before and after liver transplantation. We established pre-transplant selection criteria for potential transplant candidates. Provided that the underlying disease can be treated, there is no reason to withhold liver transplantation in a patient suffering from alcoholic cirrhosis. Evaluation of the patient by a multidisciplinary team, including an addiction specialist, is considered to be the gold standard. However, several centers demand a specified period of abstinence - usually 6 mo- irrespective of the specialist's assessment. The 6-mo rule is viewed critically because liver transplantation was found to clearly benefit selected patients with acute alcoholic hepatitis; the benefit was similar to that achieved for other acute indications. However, the discussion may well be an academic one because the waiting time for liver transplantation exceeds six months at the majority of centers. The actual challenge in liver transplantation for alcoholic cirrhosis may well be the need for lifelong post-transplant follow-up rather than the patient's pre-transplant evaluation. A small number of recipients experience a relapse of alcoholism; these patients are at risk for organ damage and graft-related death. Post-transplant surveillance protocols should demonstrate alcohol relapse at an early stage, thus permitting the initiation of adequate treatment. Patients with alcoholic cirrhosis are at high risk of developing head and neck, esophageal, or lung cancer. The higher risk of malignancies should be considered in the routine assessment of patients suffering from alcoholic cirrhosis. Tumor surveillance protocols for liver transplant recipients, currently being developed, should become a part of standard care; these will improve survival by permitting diagnosis at an early stage. In conclusion, the key

  6. Digitalis metabolism and human liver alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Frey, W A; Vallee, B L

    1980-01-01

    Human liver alcohol dehydrogenase (alcohol: NAD" oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) catalyzes the oxidation of the 3 beta-OH group of digitoxigenin, digoxigenin, and gitoxigenin to their 3-keto derivatives, which have been characterized by high performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. These studies have identified human liver alcohol dehydrogenase as the unknown NAD(H)-dependent liver enzyme specific for the free hydroxyl group at C3 of the cardiac genins; this hydroxyl is the critical site of the genins' enzymatic oxidation and concomitant pharmacological inactivation in humans. Several kinetic approaches have demonstrated that ethanol and the pharmacologically active components of the digitalis glycosides are oxidized with closely similar kcat/Km values at the same site on human liver alcohol dehydrogenase, for which they compete. Human liver alcohol dehydrogenase thereby becomes an important biochemical link in the metabolism, pharmacology, and toxicology of ethanol and these glycosides, structurally unrelated agents that are both used widely. Both the competition of ethanol with these cardiac sterols and the narrow margin of safety in the therapeutic use of digitalis derivatives would seem to place at increased risk those individuals who receive digitalis and simultaneously consume large amounts of ethanol or whose alcohol dehydrogenase function is impaired. PMID:6987673

  7. Houttuynia cordata alleviates high-fat diet-induced non-alcoholic fatty liver in experimental rats.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyun; Koppula, Sushruta

    2015-03-01

    Houttuynia cordata Thunb. (Saururaceae) is used traditionally in Asian countries to treat various disease symptoms. To study the effect of H. cordata ethyl acetate (HC-EA) extract on high-fat diet (HFD)-induced hepatic steatosis. HFD fed rats were orally dosed with HC-EA (100, 200, or 300 mg/kg) once daily for 8 weeks and the lipid profiles and protein expressions in hepatocytes were evaluated. HFD rats showed an increase (p < 0.05) in the plasma lipid levels of total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), free fatty acids (FFAs), and reduced the high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels. Treatment with HC-EA extract (300 mg/kg) restored the changes in plasma lipid levels of TC, TG, LDL, FFA, and HDL in HFD-fed rats by 34.8, 31.1, 51.4, 32.4, and 56.3%, respectively, compared with control rats (p < 0.01). HC-EA treatment also decreased the hepatic lipid accumulation (p < 0.001 at 300 mg/kg) and improved hepatic histological lesions. HC-EA extract enhanced AMPK phosphorylation and its primary downstream targeting enzyme, acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), up-regulated the gene expression of carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1 (CPT-1), and down-regulated sterol regulatory element binding protein 1, fatty acid synthase, and glutamate pyruvate transaminase protein levels in the livers of HFD-fed rats. Further, the increased expression of hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP) composition such as CYP2E1 and CYP4A was also suppressed. Data suggest that HC-EA extract might act by regulating the AMPK-dependent pathway and related mediators and might be used in treating obesity-related liver diseases.

  8. Epigenetic Events in Liver Cancer Resulting From Alcoholic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    French, Samuel W.

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms play an extensive role in the development of liver cancer (i.e., hepatocellular carcinoma [HCC]) associated with alcoholic liver disease (ALD) as well as in liver disease associated with other conditions. For example, epigenetic mechanisms, such as changes in the methylation and/or acetylation pattern of certain DNA regions or of the histone proteins around which the DNA is wrapped, contribute to the reversion of normal liver cells into progenitor and stem cells that can develop into HCC. Chronic exposure to beverage alcohol (i.e., ethanol) can induce all of these epigenetic changes. Thus, ethanol metabolism results in the formation of compounds that can cause changes in DNA methylation and interfere with other components of the normal processes regulating DNA methylation. Alcohol exposure also can alter histone acetylation/deacetylation and methylation patterns through a variety of mechanisms and signaling pathways. Alcohol also acts indirectly on another molecule called toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) that is a key component in a crucial regulatory pathway in the cells and whose dysregulation is involved in the development of HCC. Finally, alcohol use regulates an epigenetic mechanism involving small molecules called miRNAs that control transcriptional events and the expression of genes important to ALD. PMID:24313165

  9. Is the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin a risk factor for alcoholic liver disease?

    PubMed Central

    Harrison-Findik, Duygu Dee

    2009-01-01

    Despite heavy consumption over a long period of time, only a small number of alcoholics develop alcoholic liver disease. This alludes to the possibility that other factors, besides alcohol, may be involved in the progression of the disease. Over the years, many such factors have indeed been identified, including iron. Despite being crucial for various important biological processes, iron can also be harmful due to its ability to catalyze Fenton chemistry. Alcohol and iron have been shown to interact synergistically to cause liver injury. Iron-mediated cell signaling has been reported to be involved in the pathogenesis of experimental alcoholic liver disease. Hepcidin is an iron-regulatory hormone synthesized by the liver, which plays a pivotal role in iron homeostasis. Both acute and chronic alcohol exposure suppress hepcidin expression in the liver. The sera of patients with alcoholic liver disease, particularly those exhibiting higher serum iron indices, have also been reported to display reduced prohepcidin levels. Alcohol-mediated oxidative stress is involved in the inhibition of hepcidin promoter activity and transcription in the liver. This in turn leads to an increase in intestinal iron transport and liver iron storage. Hepcidin is expressed primarily in hepatocytes. It is noteworthy that both hepatocytes and Kupffer cells are involved in the progression of alcoholic liver disease. However, the activation of Kupffer cells and TNF-α signaling has been reported not to be involved in the down-regulation of hepcidin expression by alcohol in the liver. Alcohol acts within the parenchymal cells of the liver to suppress the synthesis of hepcidin. Due to its crucial role in the regulation of body iron stores, hepcidin may act as a secondary risk factor in the progression of alcoholic liver disease. The clarification of the mechanisms by which alcohol disrupts iron homeostasis will allow for further understanding of the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. PMID

  10. Managing non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Ngu, Jing Hieng; Goh, George Boon Bee; Poh, Zhongxian; Soetikno, Roy

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is increasing rapidly with the obesity and diabetes mellitus epidemics. It is rapidly becoming the most common cause of liver disease worldwide. NAFLD can progress to serious complications such as cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and death. Therefore, it is important to recognise this condition so that early intervention can be implemented. Lifestyle modifications and strict control of metabolic risk factors are the mainstay of treatment. As disease progression is slow in the majority of NAFLD patients, most can be managed well by primary care physicians. NAFLD patients with advanced liver fibrosis should be referred to specialist care for further assessment. PMID:27439352

  11. Lower Muscle Endurance in Patients with Alcoholic Liver Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Henning; Aagaard, Niels K.; Jakobsen, Johannes; Dorup, Inge; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    Patients with alcoholic liver disease often complain of restricted physical capacity, which could be due to decreased muscle endurance. The aim of this study was to assess the muscular endurance in patients with alcoholic liver disease. In a cross sectional study, 24 patients with alcoholic liver disease and 22 controls were evaluated using…

  12. Management of alcohol misuse in patients with liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jennifer L; Patel, Milan Prakash; McGee, Breann; Liang, Tiebing; Chandler, Kristina; Tayarachakul, Sucharat; O’Connor, Sean; Liangpunsakul, Suthat

    2017-01-01

    Excessive alcohol use not only causes alcoholic liver disease (ALD) but also increases the risk of liver-related mortality in patients who already have other chronic liver diseases. Screening for alcohol misuse or alcohol use disorder (AUD) among patients with underlying liver disease is essential. This clinical review covers what is known about ALD, the impact of alcohol in patients with underlying liver diseases, current management of alcohol misuse and AUD, and the management of alcohol misuse and AUD specifically in patients with liver diseases. Several treatment options for alcohol misuse and AUD exist such as psychosocial intervention and behavioral and pharmacological therapies. The strategies used in the treatment of alcohol misuse and AUD are still applicable in those who consume alcohol and have underlying liver disease. However, certain medications still need to be carefully used due to potentially worsening already compromised liver function. Screening of ongoing alcohol use in subjects with liver disease is important, and prompt intervention is needed to prevent the associated morbidity and mortality from the detrimental effects of continued alcohol use on underlying liver disease. Considering alcoholism is a complex disease, probably a multidisciplinary approach combining psychotherapy and comprehensive medical care will be the most effective. Future research could focus on identifying additional treatment options for addressing the psychotherapy component since the self-determination and will to quit drinking alcohol can play such a crucial role in promoting abstinence. PMID:27940551

  13. Aetiology and pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Lieber, C S

    1993-09-01

    Until the 1960s, liver disease of the alcoholic patient was attributed exclusively to dietary deficiencies. Since then, however, our understanding of the impact of alcoholism on nutritional status has undergone a progressive evolution. Alcohol, because of its high energy content, was at first perceived to act exclusively as 'empty calories' displacing other nutrients in the diet, and causing primary malnutrition through decreased intake of essential nutrients. With improvement in the overall nutrition of the population, the role of primary malnutrition waned and secondary malnutrition was emphasized as a result of a better understanding of maldigestion and malabsorption caused by chronic alcohol consumption and various diseases associated with chronic alcoholism. At the same time, the concept of the direct toxicity of alcohol came to the forefront as an explanation for the widespread cellular injury. Some of the hepatotoxicity was found to result from the metabolic disturbances associated with the oxidation of ethanol via the liver alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) pathway and the redox changes produced by the generated NADH, which in turn affects the metabolism of lipids, carbohydrates, proteins and purines. Exaggeration of the redox change by the relative hypoxia which prevails physiologically in the perivenular zone contributes to the exacerbation of the ethanol-induced lesions in zone 3. In addition to ADH, ethanol can be oxidized by liver microsomes: studies over the last twenty years have culminated in the molecular elucidation of the ethanol-inducible cytochrome P450IIE1 (CYP2E1) which contributes not only to ethanol metabolism and tolerance, but also to the selective hepatic perivenular toxicity of various xenobiotics. Their activation by CYP2E1 now provides an understanding for the increased susceptibility of the heavy drinker to the toxicity of industrial solvents, anaesthetic agents, commonly prescribed drugs, 'over the counter' analgesics, chemical

  14. Liver proteomics in progressive alcoholic steatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Fernando, Harshica; Wiktorowicz, John E.; Soman, Kizhake V.

    2013-02-01

    Fatty liver is an early stage of alcoholic and nonalcoholic liver disease (ALD and NALD) that progresses to steatohepatitis and other irreversible conditions. In this study, we identified proteins that were differentially expressed in the livers of rats fed 5% ethanol in a Lieber–DeCarli diet daily for 1 and 3 months by discovery proteomics (two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry) and non-parametric modeling (Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines). Hepatic fatty infiltration was significantly higher in ethanol-fed animals as compared to controls, and more pronounced at 3 months of ethanol feeding. Discovery proteomics identified changes in the expression of proteins involved inmore » alcohol, lipid, and amino acid metabolism after ethanol feeding. At 1 and 3 months, 12 and 15 different proteins were differentially expressed. Of the identified proteins, down regulation of alcohol dehydrogenase (− 1.6) at 1 month and up regulation of aldehyde dehydrogenase (2.1) at 3 months could be a protective/adaptive mechanism against ethanol toxicity. In addition, betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase 2 a protein responsible for methionine metabolism and previously implicated in fatty liver development was significantly up regulated (1.4) at ethanol-induced fatty liver stage (1 month) while peroxiredoxin-1 was down regulated (− 1.5) at late fatty liver stage (3 months). Nonparametric analysis of the protein spots yielded fewer proteins and narrowed the list of possible markers and identified D-dopachrome tautomerase (− 1.7, at 3 months) as a possible marker for ethanol-induced early steatohepatitis. The observed differential regulation of proteins have potential to serve as biomarker signature for the detection of steatosis and its progression to steatohepatitis once validated in plasma/serum. -- Graphical abstract: The figure shows the Hierarchial cluster analysis of differentially expressed protein spots obtained after ethanol feeding for 1

  15. Acute alcoholic hepatitis, end stage alcoholic liver disease and liver transplantation: An Italian position statement

    PubMed Central

    Testino, Gianni; Burra, Patrizia; Bonino, Ferruccio; Piani, Francesco; Sumberaz, Alessandro; Peressutti, Roberto; Giannelli Castiglione, Andrea; Patussi, Valentino; Fanucchi, Tiziana; Ancarani, Ornella; De Cerce, Giovanna; Iannini, Anna Teresa; Greco, Giovanni; Mosti, Antonio; Durante, Marilena; Babocci, Paola; Quartini, Mariano; Mioni, Davide; Aricò, Sarino; Baselice, Aniello; Leone, Silvia; Lozer, Fabiola; Scafato, Emanuele; Borro, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease encompasses a broad spectrum of diseases ranging from steatosis steatohepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis to hepatocellular carcinoma. Forty-four per cent of all deaths from cirrhosis are attributed to alcohol. Alcoholic liver disease is the second most common diagnosis among patients undergoing liver transplantation (LT). The vast majority of transplant programmes (85%) require 6 mo of abstinence prior to transplantation; commonly referred to as the “6-mo rule”. Both in the case of progressive end-stage liver disease (ESLD) and in the case of severe acute alcoholic hepatitis (AAH), not responding to medical therapy, there is a lack of evidence to support a 6-mo sobriety period. It is necessary to identify other risk factors that could be associated with the resumption of alcohol drinking. The “Group of Italian Regions” suggests that: in a case of ESLD with model for end-stage liver disease < 19 a 6-mo abstinence period is required; in a case of ESLD, a 3-mo sober period before LT may be more ideal than a 6-mo period, in selected patients; and in a case of severe AAH, not responding to medical therapies (up to 70% of patients die within 6 mo), LT is mandatory, even without achieving abstinence. The multidisciplinary transplant team must include an addiction specialist/hepato-alcohologist. Patients have to participate in self-help groups. PMID:25356027

  16. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Engin, Atilla

    2017-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is in parallel with the obesity epidemic and it is the most common cause of liver diseases. The development of hepatic steatosis in majority of patients is linked to dietary fat ingestion. NAFLD is characterized by excess accumulation of triglyceride in the hepatocyte due to both increased inflow of free fatty acids and de novo hepatic lipogenesis. Insulin resistance with the deficiency of insulin receptor substrate-2 (IRS-2)-associated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activity causes an increase in intracellular fatty acid-derived metabolites such as diacylglycerol, fatty acyl CoA or ceramides. Lipotoxicity-related mechanism of NAFLD could be explained still best by the "double-hit" hypothesis. Insulin resistance is the major mechanism in the development and progression of NAFLD/Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Metabolic oxidative stress, autophagy, and inflammation induce NASH progression. In the "first hit" the hepatic concentrations of diacylglycerol increase with rising saturated liver fat content in human NAFLD. Activities of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes are decreased in liver tissue of patients with NASH. Furthermore, hepatocyte lipoapoptosis is a critical feature of NASH. In "second hit" reduced glutathione levels due to oxidative stress lead to overactivation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/c-Jun signaling that induces cell death in the steatotic liver. Accumulation of toxic levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is caused by the ineffectual cycling of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) oxidoreductin (Ero1)-protein disulfide isomerase oxidation cycle through the downstream of the inner membrane mitochondrial oxidative metabolism and Kelch like-ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1)- Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) pathway.

  17. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Macías, Juan; Pineda, Juan A; Real, Luis M

    2017-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is one of the most frequent chronic hepatic conditions worldwide. The spectrum of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease goes from hepatic steatosis to steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Risk factors for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease are metabolic, mainly obesity and the accompanying consequences. Treatment and prevention of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease should target those metabolic abnormalities. The frequency of and the factors associated with hepatic steatosis in HIV infection seem to be similar to those reported in the general population, though direct comparisons are lacking. Hepatic steatosis in HIV infection may also be secondary to antiretroviral drugs or HCV-related factors in HCV-coinfected subjects. However, more recent data suggest that hepatic steatosis in HIV infection represents true non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. As such, management of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in HIV infection should follow the same principles as in the general population.

  18. Chronic alcohol drinking: Liver and pancreatic cancer?

    PubMed

    Zakhari, Samir

    2015-09-01

    Cancer is a multifactorial disease that results from complex interactions of numerous risk factors - genetic and environmental - over time, eventually leading to the diseased phenotypes. Thus, while epidemiological studies can point to risk factors, they cannot determine cause and effect relationships, and are unable to give biological and clinical insights into carcinogenesis. The link between any risk factor and carcinogenesis needs to be validated in experimental models. This is particularly true in epidemiological studies on alcohol consumption and its consequences. While there is no doubt that heavy alcohol consumption has devastating health effects, the inconsistencies in alcohol-related epidemiological studies and cancer suffer from possible sources of the variability in outcomes, ranging from inaccuracy of self-report of consumption to the problem of correlating cancer that started decades earlier to current or recent alcohol consumption. To further study the interactions between alcohol and cancer, the use of "Molecular Pathological Epidemiology" (MPE) advocated by Ogino et al. for dissecting the interplay between etiological factors, cellular and molecular characteristics, and disease progression in cancer is appropriate. MPE does not consider cancer as a single entity, rather it integrates analyses of epidemiological studies with the macroenvironment and molecular and microenvironment. This approach allows investigating the relationships between potential etiological agents and cancer based on molecular signatures. More research is needed to fully elucidate the link between heavy alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer, and to further investigate the roles of acetaldehyde and FAEEs in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Intestinal fungi contribute to development of alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, An-Ming; Inamine, Tatsuo; Hochrath, Katrin; Chen, Peng; Wang, Lirui; Llorente, Cristina; Bluemel, Sena; Hartmann, Phillipp; Xu, Jun; Koyama, Yukinori; Kisseleva, Tatiana; Torralba, Manolito G; Moncera, Kelvin; Beeri, Karen; Chen, Chien-Sheng; Freese, Kim; Hellerbrand, Claus; Lee, Serene Ml; Hoffman, Hal M; Mehal, Wajahat Z; Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe; Mutlu, Ece A; Keshavarzian, Ali; Brown, Gordon D; Ho, Samuel B; Bataller, Ramon; Stärkel, Peter; Fouts, Derrick E; Schnabl, Bernd

    2017-06-30

    Chronic liver disease with cirrhosis is the 12th leading cause of death in the United States, and alcoholic liver disease accounts for approximately half of all cirrhosis deaths. Chronic alcohol consumption is associated with intestinal bacterial dysbiosis, yet we understand little about the contribution of intestinal fungi, or mycobiota, to alcoholic liver disease. Here we have demonstrated that chronic alcohol administration increases mycobiota populations and translocation of fungal β-glucan into systemic circulation in mice. Treating mice with antifungal agents reduced intestinal fungal overgrowth, decreased β-glucan translocation, and ameliorated ethanol-induced liver disease. Using bone marrow chimeric mice, we found that β-glucan induces liver inflammation via the C-type lectin-like receptor CLEC7A on Kupffer cells and possibly other bone marrow-derived cells. Subsequent increases in IL-1β expression and secretion contributed to hepatocyte damage and promoted development of ethanol-induced liver disease. We observed that alcohol-dependent patients displayed reduced intestinal fungal diversity and Candida overgrowth. Compared with healthy individuals and patients with non-alcohol-related cirrhosis, alcoholic cirrhosis patients had increased systemic exposure and immune response to mycobiota. Moreover, the levels of extraintestinal exposure and immune response correlated with mortality. Thus, chronic alcohol consumption is associated with an altered mycobiota and translocation of fungal products. Manipulating the intestinal mycobiome might be an effective strategy for attenuating alcohol-related liver disease.

  20. Influence of unrecorded alcohol consumption on liver cirrhosis mortality

    PubMed Central

    Lachenmeier, Dirk W; Monakhova, Yulia B; Rehm, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Unrecorded alcohol includes illegally distributed alcohol as well as homemade or surrogate alcohol which is unintended for consumption by humans (e.g., cosmetics containing alcohol). The highest unrecorded alcohol consumption occurs in Eastern Europe and some of these countries have an over proportional liver cirrhosis mortality. Compounds besides ethanol have been hypothesized as being responsible for this observation. On the other hand, chemical investigations were unable to prove that unrecorded alcohol regularly contains contaminants above toxicological thresholds. However, illegally produced spirits regularly contain higher percentages of alcohol (above 45% by volume), but for considerably less costs compared with licit beverages, potentially causing more problematic patterns of drinking. In this review, it is investigated whether patterns of drinking rather than product composition can explain the liver cirrhosis mortality rates. Statistical examination of World Health Organization country data shows that the originally detected correlation of the percentage of unrecorded alcohol consumption and liver cirrhosis mortality rates disappears when the data is adjusted for the prevalence of heavy episodic drinking. It may be concluded that there is currently a lack of data to demonstrate causality between the composition of illicit spirits (e.g., higher levels of certain contaminants in home-produced products) and liver toxicity on a population scale. Exceptions may be cases of poisoning with antiseptic liquids containing compounds such as polyhexamethyleneguanidine, which were reported to be consumed as surrogate alcohol in Russia, leading to an outbreak of acute cholestatic liver injury, histologically different from conventional alcoholic liver disease. PMID:24966592

  1. Alcoholic liver disease and pancreatitis: global health problems being addressed by the US National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Warren, Kenneth R; Murray, Margaret M

    2013-08-01

    The review article summarizes the mission of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) with focus on the NIAAA's current and future research version for alcoholic liver disease and alcoholic pancreatitis. © 2013 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. Alcohol and malnutrition in the pathogenesis of experimental alcoholic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Rossi, M A

    1980-02-01

    In this study, the morphology and the catecholamine levels of the myocardium in both well-nourished and malnourished alcohol-fed rats were examined. Alcohol has been administered to rats for 16 weeks. Rats fed a diet containing alcohol corresponding to 40 per cent. of total calorific intake and inadequate amounts of calories and nutrients developed morphological changes in the heart, while the controls did not. In addition, an increase in cardiac noradrenaline concentration and heart: body weight ratio could be observed. There were no differences in myocardial morphology and catecholamine concentration between well-nourished rats fed alcohol as 35 per cent. of the calorific intake and pair-fed controls. A dispute exists about whether alcohol is directly toxic to the heart or indirectly injurious due to associated dietary deficiency. The present results, taken together, make the theory of cardiotoxicity of alcohol an unlikely one, at least in the case of the rat; and they offer considerable support for the hypothesis that the association between chronic consumption of alcoholic beverages and cardiomyopathy is a result of a primary multifactorial nutritional deficiency, resulting from displacement of nutrient-associated calories by the "empty" calories--devoid of protein, vitamins, and minerals--of alcohol, and/or a secondary nutritional deficiency due to injurious effects of alcohol on the liver, pancreas and intestine. It is suggested that continued exposure to high levels of catecholamine, directly related to malnutrition, may play a role in the development of myocardial pathology.

  3. Liver membrane antibodies in alcoholic liver disease: 1. prevalence and immunoglobulin class.

    PubMed Central

    Burt, A D; Anthony, R S; Hislop, W S; Bouchier, I A; MacSween, R N

    1982-01-01

    Using an indirect immunofluorescence technique liver membrane antibodies of IgG and IgA class have been demonstrated in a statistically significant proportion of sera from patients with alcoholic hepatitis and alcoholic cirrhosis. IgG and IgA class antibodies were found respectively in 23 and 25% of 48 patients with alcoholic hepatitis, in 27 and 33% of 84 with active cirrhosis, and 67 and 58% of 12 with inactive cirrhosis. These results provide evidence of a humoral immune response in alcoholic liver disease which is directed against, as yet undefined, liver-cell membrane antigens. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7040177

  4. Psychiatric morbidity in patients with alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Ewusi-Mensah, I; Saunders, J B; Wodak, A D; Murray, R M; Williams, R

    1983-11-12

    Seventy one patients with alcoholic liver disease and an equal number with non-alcoholic liver disease were interviewed using the schedule for affective disorders and schizophrenia. Forty seven (66%) of the group with alcoholic liver disease had or had had psychiatric illnesses compared with 23 (32%) of the control group (p less than 0.001). Affective disorder, particularly major depression, neurotic disorders, and antisocial personality, were all more common among the patients with alcoholic liver disease than the controls. No patient had schizophrenia or other forms of psychosis. Among the patients with alcoholic liver disease 11 men (24%) and 14 women (54%) had an affective or a neurotic disorder that had antedated their heavy drinking, and 30 (77%) of those who had had such a problem at any time had symptoms at the time of interview. Abstinence from alcohol is essential for patients with severe alcoholic liver disease. In view of the high prevalence of psychiatric disorders in these patients psychiatric assessment is important to increase the patients' likelihood of complying with such advice.

  5. Psychiatric morbidity in patients with alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ewusi-Mensah, I; Saunders, J B; Wodak, A D; Murray, R M; Williams, R

    1983-01-01

    Seventy one patients with alcoholic liver disease and an equal number with non-alcoholic liver disease were interviewed using the schedule for affective disorders and schizophrenia. Forty seven (66%) of the group with alcoholic liver disease had or had had psychiatric illnesses compared with 23 (32%) of the control group (p less than 0.001). Affective disorder, particularly major depression, neurotic disorders, and antisocial personality, were all more common among the patients with alcoholic liver disease than the controls. No patient had schizophrenia or other forms of psychosis. Among the patients with alcoholic liver disease 11 men (24%) and 14 women (54%) had an affective or a neurotic disorder that had antedated their heavy drinking, and 30 (77%) of those who had had such a problem at any time had symptoms at the time of interview. Abstinence from alcohol is essential for patients with severe alcoholic liver disease. In view of the high prevalence of psychiatric disorders in these patients psychiatric assessment is important to increase the patients' likelihood of complying with such advice. PMID:6416437

  6. Alcoholism and liver disease in Mexico: Genetic and environmental factors

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Sonia; Zepeda-Carrillo, Eloy Alfonso; Moreno-Luna, Laura Eugenia; Panduro, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    Alcoholism and cirrhosis, which are two of the most serious health problems worldwide, have a broad spectrum of clinical outcomes. Both diseases are influenced by genetic susceptibility and cultural traits that differ globally but are specific for each population. In contrast to other regions around the world, Mexicans present the highest drinking score and a high mortality rate for alcoholic liver disease with an intermediate category level of per capita alcohol consumption. Mexico has a unique history of alcohol consumption that is linked to profound anthropological and social aspects. The Mexican population has an admixture genome inherited from different races, Caucasian, Amerindian and African, with a heterogeneous distribution within the country. Thus, genes related to alcohol addiction, such as dopamine receptor D2 in the brain, or liver alcohol-metabolizing enzymes, such as alcohol dehydrogenase class I polypeptide B, cytochrome P450 2E1 and aldehyde dehydrogenase class 2, may vary from one individual to another. Furthermore, they may be inherited as risk or non-risk haplogroups that confer susceptibility or resistance either to alcohol addiction or abusive alcohol consumption and possibly liver disease. Thus, in this era of genomics, personalized medicine will benefit patients if it is directed according to individual or population-based data. Additional association studies will be required to establish novel strategies for the prevention, care and treatment of liver disease in Mexico and worldwide. PMID:24307790

  7. Alcoholism and liver disease in Mexico: genetic and environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Roman, Sonia; Zepeda-Carrillo, Eloy Alfonso; Moreno-Luna, Laura Eugenia; Panduro, Arturo

    2013-11-28

    Alcoholism and cirrhosis, which are two of the most serious health problems worldwide, have a broad spectrum of clinical outcomes. Both diseases are influenced by genetic susceptibility and cultural traits that differ globally but are specific for each population. In contrast to other regions around the world, Mexicans present the highest drinking score and a high mortality rate for alcoholic liver disease with an intermediate category level of per capita alcohol consumption. Mexico has a unique history of alcohol consumption that is linked to profound anthropological and social aspects. The Mexican population has an admixture genome inherited from different races, Caucasian, Amerindian and African, with a heterogeneous distribution within the country. Thus, genes related to alcohol addiction, such as dopamine receptor D2 in the brain, or liver alcohol-metabolizing enzymes, such as alcohol dehydrogenase class I polypeptide B, cytochrome P450 2E1 and aldehyde dehydrogenase class 2, may vary from one individual to another. Furthermore, they may be inherited as risk or non-risk haplogroups that confer susceptibility or resistance either to alcohol addiction or abusive alcohol consumption and possibly liver disease. Thus, in this era of genomics, personalized medicine will benefit patients if it is directed according to individual or population-based data. Additional association studies will be required to establish novel strategies for the prevention, care and treatment of liver disease in Mexico and worldwide.

  8. Bermuda Triangle for the liver: alcohol, obesity, and viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Zakhari, Samir

    2013-08-01

    Despite major progress in understanding and managing liver disease in the past 30 years, it is now among the top 10 most common causes of death globally. Several risk factors, such as genetics, diabetes, obesity, excessive alcohol consumption, viral infection, gender, immune dysfunction, and medications, acting individually or in concert, are known to precipitate liver damage. Viral hepatitis, excessive alcohol consumption, and obesity are the major factors causing liver injury. Estimated numbers of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected subjects worldwide are staggering (370 and 175 million, respectively), and of the 40 million known human immunodeficiency virus positive subjects, 4 and 5 million are coinfected with HBV and HCV, respectively. Alcohol and HCV are the leading causes of end-stage liver disease worldwide and the most common indication for liver transplantation in the United States and Europe. In addition, the global obesity epidemic that affects up to 40 million Americans, and 396 million worldwide, is accompanied by an alarming incidence of end-stage liver disease, a condition exacerbated by alcohol. This article focuses on the interactions between alcohol, viral hepatitis, and obesity (euphemistically described here as the Bermuda Triangle of liver disease), and discusses common mechanisms and synergy. © 2013 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) and Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH) in HIV.

    PubMed

    Rockstroh, Jürgen Kurt

    2017-04-01

    Abnormal liver enzymes (LE) are common in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) even in the absence of viral hepatitis or alcohol abuse. With availability of antiretroviral combination therapy, life expectancy has improved dramatically and as a consequence the spectrum of liver disease is changing. Increased reports on the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) or non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in HIV coinfected patients raise questions around prevalence, clinical manifestations, and clinical outcome of these liver diseases in HIV coinfection. Moreover, the potential impact of combination antiretroviral therapy as well as direct HIV effects on the emergence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease needs to be explored. This review summarizes the recent literature on NAFLD and NASH in HIV.

  10. Establishment of the Tree Shrew as an Alcohol-Induced Fatty Liver Model for the Study of Alcoholic Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Huijie; Jia, Kun; He, Jun; Shi, Changzheng; Fang, Meixia; Song, Linliang; Zhang, Pu; Zhao, Yue; Fu, Jiangnan; Li, Shoujun

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver diseases (ALDs) is not clear. As a result, there is no effective treatment for ALDs. One limitation is the lack of a suitable animal model for use in studying ALDs. The tree shrew is a lower primate animal, characterized by a high-alcohol diet. This work aimed to establish a fatty liver model using tree shrews and to assess the animals’ suitability for the study of ALDs. Tree shrews were treated with alcohol solutions (10% and 20%) for two weeks. Hemophysiology, blood alcohol concentrations (BACs), oxidative stress factors, alcohol metabolic enzymes and hepatic pathology were checked and assayed with an automatic biochemical analyzer, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), western blot, hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining and oil red O staining, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Compared with the normal group, the levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and malondialdehyde (MDA) were significantly enhanced in alcohol-treated tree shrews. However, the activity of reduced glutathione hormone (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) declined. Notable changes in alcohol dehydrogenase(ADH1), aldehyde dehydrogenase(ALDH2), CYP2E1, UDP-glucuronosyl transferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) and nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2 (Nrf2) were observed. HE and oil red O staining showed that hepatocyte swelling, hydropic degeneration, and adipohepatic syndrome occurred in the tree shrews. Alcohol can induce fatty liver-like pathological changes and result in alterations in liver function, oxidative stress factors, alcohol metabolism enzymes and Nrf2. Therefore, the established fatty liver model of tree shrews induced by alcohol should be a promising tool for the study of ALDs. PMID:26030870

  11. Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD)--A Review.

    PubMed

    Karim, M F; Al-Mahtab, M; Rahman, S; Debnath, C R

    2015-10-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an emerging problem in Hepatology clinics. It is closely related to the increased frequency of overweight or obesity. It has recognised association with metabolic syndrome. Central obesity, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia are commonest risk factors. Association with hepatitis C genotype 3 is also recognised. NAFLD is an important cause of cyptogenic cirrhosis of liver. It affects all populations and all age groups. Most patients with NAFLD are asymptomatic or vague upper abdominal pain. Liver function tests are mostly normal or mild elevation of aminotranferases. Histological features almost identical to those of alcohol-induced liver damage and can range from mild steatosis to cirrhosis. Two hit hypothesis is prevailing theory for the development of NAFLD. Diagnosis is usually made by imaging tools like ultrasonogram which reveal a bright liver while liver biopsy is gold standard for diagnosis as well as differentiating simple fatty liver and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Prognosis is variable. Simple hepatic steatosis generally has a benign long-term prognosis. However, one to two third of NASH progress to fibrosis or cirrhosis and may have a similar prognosis as cirrhosis from other liver diseases. Treatment is mostly control of underlying disorders and dietary advice, exercise, insulin sensitizers, antioxidants, or cytoprotective agents. The prevalence of NAFLD is increasing. So it needs more research to address this problem.

  12. Pathophysiology and Management of Alcoholic Liver Disease: Update 2016.

    PubMed

    Stickel, Felix; Datz, Christian; Hampe, Jochen; Bataller, Ramon

    2017-03-15

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a leading cause of cirrhosis, liver cancer, and acute and chronic liver failure and as such causes significant morbidity and mortality. While alcohol consumption is slightly decreasing in several European countries, it is rising in others and remains high in many countries around the world. The pathophysiology of ALD is still incompletely understood but relates largely to the direct toxic effects of alcohol and its main intermediate, acetaldehyde. Recently, novel putative mechanisms have been identified in systematic scans covering the entire human genome and raise new hypotheses on previously unknown pathways. The latter also identify host genetic risk factors for significant liver injury, which may help design prognostic risk scores. The diagnosis of ALD is relatively easy with a panel of well-evaluated tests and only rarely requires a liver biopsy. Treatment of ALD is difficult and grounded in abstinence as the pivotal therapeutic goal; once cirrhosis is established, treatment largely resembles that of other etiologies of advanced liver damage. Liver transplantation is a sound option for carefully selected patients with cirrhosis and alcoholic hepatitis because relapse rates are low and prognosis is comparable to other etiologies. Still, many countries are restrictive in allocating donor livers for ALD patients. Overall, few therapeutic options exist for severe ALD. However, there is good evidence of benefit for only corticosteroids in severe alcoholic hepatitis, while most other efforts are of limited efficacy. Considering the immense burden of ALD worldwide, efforts of medical professionals and industry partners to develop targeted therapies in ALF has been disappointingly low.

  13. A Preclinical Model of Chronic Alcohol Consumption Reveals Increased Metastatic Seeding of Colon Cancer Cells in the Liver.

    PubMed

    Im, Hwi-Jin; Kim, Hyeong-Geug; Lee, Jin-Seok; Kim, Hyo-Seon; Cho, Jung-Hyo; Jo, Il-Joo; Park, Sung-Joo; Son, Chang-Gue

    2016-04-01

    Liver metastasis is the main cause of death from colorectal cancer. Alcohol consumption impacts liver function and is suggested to be an independent risk factor for liver metastasis of colorectal cancer, but no experimental evidence supporting this hypothesis has been demonstrated to date. In this study, we investigated the effect of alcohol intake on liver metastasis. We examined colon cancer cell spread from the spleen in mice provided with water (control group), alcohol for 4 weeks before tumor injection (prealcohol), alcohol for 3 weeks after tumor injection (postalcohol), or alcohol throughout the 7-week study (alcohol). Alcohol intake significantly increased hepatic metastatic burden in the prealcohol (2.4-fold, P < 0.001), postalcohol (2.0-fold, P < 0.01), and alcohol groups (2.2-fold, P < 0.001). A fluorescence-based metastasis tracking assay also confirmed an alcohol-induced increase in the abundance of tumor cells in the liver (2.5-fold, P < 0.001). Investigation of the host microenvironment revealed an alcohol-induced inflammatory response marked by elevated TNFα, IL1β, IL6, and IFNγ protein levels, as well as increased expression of intercellular molecule-1 (ICAM1) in hepatic tissues after 4 weeks of alcohol consumption. Moreover, the peripheral blood of mice provided with alcohol for 4 weeks exhibited reduced natural killer and CD8(+) T-cell counts. Collectively, our findings suggest that chronic alcohol consumption accelerates liver metastasis of colorectal cancer cells through alterations to the liver microenvironment and inactivation of immune surveillance. Cancer Res; 76(7); 1698-704. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. The Natural Course of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Calzadilla Bertot, Luis; Adams, Leon Anton

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most prevalent form of chronic liver disease in the world, paralleling the epidemic of obesity and Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). NAFLD exhibits a histological spectrum, ranging from “bland steatosis” to the more aggressive necro-inflammatory form, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) which may accumulate fibrosis to result in cirrhosis. Emerging data suggests fibrosis, rather than NASH per se, to be the most important histological predictor of liver and non-liver related death. Nevertheless, only a small proportion of individuals develop cirrhosis, however the large proportion of the population affected by NAFLD has led to predictions that NAFLD will become a leading cause of end stage liver disease, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and indication for liver transplantation. HCC may arise in non-cirrhotic liver in the setting of NAFLD and is associated with the presence of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and male gender. The MetS and its components also play a key role in the histological progression of NAFLD, however other genetic and environmental factors may also influence the natural history. The importance of NAFLD in terms of overall survival extends beyond the liver where cardiovascular disease and malignancy represents additional important causes of death. PMID:27213358

  15. Current treatment for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Moctezuma-Velázquez, C

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the most prevalent hepatopathy, estimated at 30% in the general population. In the coming years, it will likely be the most common indication for liver transplantation and the most frequent cause of hepatocellular carcinoma. Current treatment for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is based on dietary and exercise interventions that have been shown to be efficacious, even for reverting fibrosis. Unfortunately, compliance with general measures involving lifestyle modifications is very poor, making pharmacologic strategies a necessary option. At present, there are no treatments for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease approved by regulatory agencies, and the only ones with sufficient evidence and recommended by international societies are treatments with pioglitazone and vitamin E, which are not exempt from adverse effects. We review herein the current management of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, including dietary and physical activity interventions, available treatments, equivocal therapies, emerging treatments, and treatments presently in clinical trials. Copyright © 2018 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  16. Alcoholic Liver Disease: Pathogenesis and New Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    GAO, BIN; BATALLER, RAMON

    2011-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a major cause of chronic liver disease worldwide and can lead to fibrosis and cirrhosis. The latest surveillance report published by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism showed that liver cirrhosis was the 12th leading cause of death in the United States, with a total of 29,925 deaths in 2007, 48% of which were alcohol related. The spectrum of ALD includes simple steatosis, alcoholic hepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and superimposed hepatocellular carcinoma. Early work on the pathogenesis of the disease focused on ethanol metabolism–associated oxidative stress and glutathione depletion, abnormal methionine metabolism, malnutrition, and production of endotoxins that activate Kupffer cells. We review findings from recent studies that have characterized specific intracellular signaling pathways, transcriptional factors, aspects of innate immunity, chemokines, epigenetic features, microRNAs, and stem cells that are associated with ALD, improving our understanding of its pathogenesis. Despite this progress, no targeted therapies are available. The cornerstone of treatment for alcoholic hepatitis remains as it was 40 years ago: abstinence, nutritional support, and corticosteroids. There is an urgent need to develop new pathophysiology-oriented therapies. Recent translational studies of human samples and animal models have identified promising therapeutic targets. PMID:21920463

  17. Links of gut microbiota composition with alcohol dependence syndrome and alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Dubinkina, Veronika B; Tyakht, Alexander V; Odintsova, Vera Y; Yarygin, Konstantin S; Kovarsky, Boris A; Pavlenko, Alexander V; Ischenko, Dmitry S; Popenko, Anna S; Alexeev, Dmitry G; Taraskina, Anastasiya Y; Nasyrova, Regina F; Krupitsky, Evgeny M; Shalikiani, Nino V; Bakulin, Igor G; Shcherbakov, Petr L; Skorodumova, Lyubov O; Larin, Andrei K; Kostryukova, Elena S; Abdulkhakov, Rustam A; Abdulkhakov, Sayar R; Malanin, Sergey Y; Ismagilova, Ruzilya K; Grigoryeva, Tatiana V; Ilina, Elena N; Govorun, Vadim M

    2017-10-17

    Alcohol abuse has deleterious effects on human health by disrupting the functions of many organs and systems. Gut microbiota has been implicated in the pathogenesis of alcohol-related liver diseases, with its composition manifesting expressed dysbiosis in patients suffering from alcoholic dependence. Due to its inherent plasticity, gut microbiota is an important target for prevention and treatment of these diseases. Identification of the impact of alcohol abuse with associated psychiatric symptoms on the gut community structure is confounded by the liver dysfunction. In order to differentiate the effects of these two factors, we conducted a comparative "shotgun" metagenomic survey of 99 patients with the alcohol dependence syndrome represented by two cohorts-with and without liver cirrhosis. The taxonomic and functional composition of the gut microbiota was subjected to a multifactor analysis including comparison with the external control group. Alcoholic dependence and liver cirrhosis were associated with profound shifts in gut community structures and metabolic potential across the patients. The specific effects on species-level community composition were remarkably different between cohorts with and without liver cirrhosis. In both cases, the commensal microbiota was found to be depleted. Alcoholic dependence was inversely associated with the levels of butyrate-producing species from the Clostridiales order, while the cirrhosis-with multiple members of the Bacteroidales order. The opportunist pathogens linked to alcoholic dependence included pro-inflammatory Enterobacteriaceae, while the hallmarks of cirrhosis included an increase of oral microbes in the gut and more frequent occurrence of abnormal community structures. Interestingly, each of the two factors was associated with the expressed enrichment in many Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus-but the exact set of the species was different between alcoholic dependence and liver cirrhosis. At the level of

  18. Ethnic Differences in Presentation and Severity of Alcoholic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Halsted, Charles H.; Medici, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Background The frequency of alcoholic liver disease (ALD), including alcoholic steatosis, hepatitis and cirrhosis, varies significantly by ethnicity. Methods With the goal to assess the role of ethnicity in determining the age of onset and severity of ALD and to compare the risk factors for its progression among ethnic groups, we conducted a retrospective chart review of all patients with ALD who were admitted or were followed as outpatients at University of California Davis Medical Center between 2002 and 2010. After excluding HBsAg and HIV positive subjects, we reviewed the charts of 791 ALD patients including 130 with alcoholic fatty liver, 154 with alcoholic hepatitis, and 507 with alcoholic cirrhosis. Results When controlling for all variables in the model, Hispanic patients presented at significantly 4-10 years younger ages than White/Caucasian patients, in each of the three disease severity categories and the results were confirmed after excluding HCV Ab/RNA positive subjects. There were more obese Hispanic patients than White/Caucasian patients, whereas the proportion of patients with hepatitis C was significantly greater in African/American subjects with alcoholic hepatitis and the proportion of patients with diabetes mellitus was significantly lower in White/Caucasian subjects than in Hispanic subjects with cirrhosis. The proportion of subjects with severe alcoholic hepatitis was similar in Hispanic and White/Caucasian patients, but lower in African/American subjects. Conclusion Ethnicity is a major factor affecting the age and severity of presentation of different subtypes of ALD. PMID:25702770

  19. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: A poorly known pandemic.

    PubMed

    Augustin, Salvador; Graupera, Isabel; Caballeria, Juan

    2017-12-20

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) consists of an excessive depositing of fat in the liver, which can end up by causing inflammation, fibrosis and also cirrhosis with the corresponding complications including liver cancer. NAFLD has become the most common liver disease worldwide. The incidence has increased in parallel with the obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome epidemic, thus resulting in becoming one of the main indications for liver transplant. The diagnosis has principally been through histology but with the development of non-invasive methods, these have helped in simplifying the management of these patients in clinical practice. The only therapeutic strategies currently available are focused on weight loss (lifestyle changes or bariatric surgery). There is still no approved pharmacological option for the treatment of NAFLD, however there are a number of molecular studies in advanced stages of development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Ultrastructural liver changes in the experimental thyrotoxicosis.

    PubMed

    Pasyechko, Nadiya Vasylivna; Kuleshko, Iryna Ihorivna; Kulchinska, Veronika Mykolaiivna; Naumova, Liudmyla Valeriivna; Smachylo, Iryna Volodymyrivna; Bob, Anzhela Olehivna; Radetska, Liudmyla Volodymyrivna; Havryliuk, Mykhailo Yevhenovych; Sopel, Olha Mykolaiivna; Mazur, Liudmyla Petrivna

    Aim of the study is to evaluate ultrastructural changes of rat liver in experimental thyrotoxicosis. For the study, 36 male rats have been utilized, weighing approximately 150-190 g, which were divided into three groups: the first, control group (12 animals) was composed of healthy rats that received intragastric sodium chloride 0.9% solution, the second group (12 animals) - animals with experimental thyrotoxicosis, which received intragastric solution of L-thyroxine at the rate of 200 μg/kg for 2 weeks, and the third group (12 animals) - rats with experimental thyrotoxicosis, which received intragastric solution of L-thyroxine at the rate of 200 μg/kg for 4 weeks. For electron-microscopic studies small pieces of liver tissue were taken at the end of the 2nd and 4th weeks of the experiment. The material was studied and documented in electron micrographs by using a TEM-125K electron microscope. In experiment in white male rats the electron-microscopic state of the liver in thyrotoxicosis has been studied. It has been established that thyrotoxicosis is accompanied by the significant changes of the hepatocytes ultrastructure, blood and bile capillaries. Experimental thyrotoxicosis causes significant damage of the liver plasma membranes and intracellular structural components of hepatocytes and endothelial cells. In experimental thyrotoxicosis, on the background of microcirculatory disorders, significant damage of plasmatic and intracellular organoid membranes of hepatocytes in the liver develops, which has an adverse effect on the functionality of the organ. The found ultrastructural changes are aggravated depending on the duration of thyrotoxicosis.

  1. Microbiota-based treatments in alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Sung, Hotaik; Kim, Seung Woo; Hong, Meegun; Suk, Ki Tae

    2016-08-07

    Gut microbiota plays a key role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Consumption of alcohol leads to increased gut permeability, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, and enteric dysbiosis. These factors contribute to the increased translocation of microbial products to the liver via the portal tract. Subsequently, bacterial endotoxins such as lipopolysaccharide, in association with the Toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathway, induce a gamut of damaging immune responses in the hepatic milieu. Because of the close association between deleterious inflammation and ALD-induced microbiota imbalance, therapeutic approaches that seek to reestablish gut homeostasis should be considered in the treatment of alcoholic patients. To this end, a number of preliminary studies on probiotics have confirmed their effectiveness in suppressing proinflammatory cytokines and improving liver function in the context of ALD. In addition, there have been few studies linking the administration of prebiotics and antibiotics with reduction of alcohol-induced liver damage. Because these preliminary results are promising, large-scale randomized studies are warranted to elucidate the impact of these microbiota-based treatments on the gut flora and associated immune responses, in addition to exploring questions about optimal delivery. Finally, fecal microbiota transplant has been shown to be an effective method of modulating gut microbiota and deserve further investigation as a potential therapeutic option for ALD.

  2. Microbiota-based treatments in alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Hotaik; Kim, Seung Woo; Hong, Meegun; Suk, Ki Tae

    2016-01-01

    Gut microbiota plays a key role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Consumption of alcohol leads to increased gut permeability, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, and enteric dysbiosis. These factors contribute to the increased translocation of microbial products to the liver via the portal tract. Subsequently, bacterial endotoxins such as lipopolysaccharide, in association with the Toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathway, induce a gamut of damaging immune responses in the hepatic milieu. Because of the close association between deleterious inflammation and ALD-induced microbiota imbalance, therapeutic approaches that seek to reestablish gut homeostasis should be considered in the treatment of alcoholic patients. To this end, a number of preliminary studies on probiotics have confirmed their effectiveness in suppressing proinflammatory cytokines and improving liver function in the context of ALD. In addition, there have been few studies linking the administration of prebiotics and antibiotics with reduction of alcohol-induced liver damage. Because these preliminary results are promising, large-scale randomized studies are warranted to elucidate the impact of these microbiota-based treatments on the gut flora and associated immune responses, in addition to exploring questions about optimal delivery. Finally, fecal microbiota transplant has been shown to be an effective method of modulating gut microbiota and deserve further investigation as a potential therapeutic option for ALD. PMID:27547010

  3. Towards Standardizing the Alcoholism Evaluation Of Potential Liver Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Beresford, Thomas P; Lucey, Michael R

    2018-03-01

    For teams around the world, alcoholic liver disease patients comprise the largest, and clinically most controversial, group applying for liver transplant. And yet evaluation decisions for them remain highly variable by locale. Targeting standardized assessment, we provide guidelines on what information the transplant team should seek, from what sources, and how best to make use of it. This report focuses on 'what to do and how to do it' in providing appropriate assessments for this complex patient group. Proper evaluation includes (a) taking the clinical history from the patient and a required, corroborating third person, (b) assessing patient cognition, (c) establishing alcohol/substance use diagnosis to differentiate alcohol dependence, abuse and polysubstance dependence, (d) assessing ambivalence in primary alcohol addiction, (e) measuring social stability and (f) using Vaillant's factors for abstinence prognosis. Properly applied, these six factors will allow standardized selection in most cases taken across programs despite differences in resources, available expertise and decision practices. This report focuses on the essentials of the psychiatric/behavioral evaluation for 'alcoholic' persons referred for liver transplant. Attention to those essentials offers clinical standardization across transplant programs in different locales.

  4. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and dyslipidemia: An update.

    PubMed

    Katsiki, Niki; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2016-08-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease worldwide, progressing from simple steatosis to necroinflammation and fibrosis (leading to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, NASH), and in some cases to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Inflammation, oxidative stress and insulin resistance are involved in NAFLD development and progression. NAFLD has been associated with several cardiovascular (CV) risk factors including obesity, dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, hypertension and smoking. NAFLD is also characterized by atherogenic dyslipidemia, postprandial lipemia and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) dysfunction. Most importantly, NAFLD patients have an increased risk for both liver and CV disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality. In this narrative review, the associations between NAFLD, dyslipidemia and vascular disease in NAFLD patients are discussed. NAFLD treatment is also reviewed with a focus on lipid-lowering drugs. Finally, future perspectives in terms of both NAFLD diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets are considered. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease: Role of oxidative metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ceni, Elisabetta; Mello, Tommaso; Galli, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol consumption is a predominant etiological factor in the pathogenesis of chronic liver diseases, resulting in fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis, fibrosis/cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Although the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) involves complex and still unclear biological processes, the oxidative metabolites of ethanol such as acetaldehyde and reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a preeminent role in the clinical and pathological spectrum of ALD. Ethanol oxidative metabolism influences intracellular signaling pathways and deranges the transcriptional control of several genes, leading to fat accumulation, fibrogenesis and activation of innate and adaptive immunity. Acetaldehyde is known to be toxic to the liver and alters lipid homeostasis, decreasing peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and increasing sterol regulatory element binding protein activity via an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent mechanism. AMPK activation by ROS modulates autophagy, which has an important role in removing lipid droplets. Acetaldehyde and aldehydes generated from lipid peroxidation induce collagen synthesis by their ability to form protein adducts that activate transforming-growth-factor-β-dependent and independent profibrogenic pathways in activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Furthermore, activation of innate and adaptive immunity in response to ethanol metabolism plays a key role in the development and progression of ALD. Acetaldehyde alters the intestinal barrier and promote lipopolysaccharide (LPS) translocation by disrupting tight and adherent junctions in human colonic mucosa. Acetaldehyde and LPS induce Kupffer cells to release ROS and proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines that contribute to neutrophils infiltration. In addition, alcohol consumption inhibits natural killer cells that are cytotoxic to HSCs and thus have an important antifibrotic function in the liver. Ethanol metabolism may also interfere with cell

  6. Non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis in patients with alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Rosa; Buzzetti, Elena; Roccarina, Davide; Tsochatzis, Emmanuel A

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) consists of a broad spectrum of disorders, ranging from simple steatosis to alcoholic steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. Fatty liver develops in more than 90% of heavy drinkers, however only 30%-35% of them develop more advanced forms of ALD. Therefore, even if the current “gold standard” for the assessment of the stage of alcohol-related liver injury is histology, liver biopsy is not reasonable in all patients who present with ALD. Currently, although several non-invasive fibrosis markers have been suggested as alternatives to liver biopsy in patients with ALD, none has been sufficiently validated. As described in other liver disease, the diagnostic accuracy of such tests in ALD is acceptable for the diagnosis of significant fibrosis or cirrhosis but not for lesser fibrosis stages. Existing data suggest that the use of non-invasive tests could be tailored to first tier screening of patients at risk, in order to diagnose early patients with progressive liver disease and offer targeted interventions for the prevention of decompensation. We review these tests and critically appraise the existing evidence. PMID:26494961

  7. Non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis in patients with alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Rosa; Buzzetti, Elena; Roccarina, Davide; Tsochatzis, Emmanuel A

    2015-10-21

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) consists of a broad spectrum of disorders, ranging from simple steatosis to alcoholic steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. Fatty liver develops in more than 90% of heavy drinkers, however only 30%-35% of them develop more advanced forms of ALD. Therefore, even if the current "gold standard" for the assessment of the stage of alcohol-related liver injury is histology, liver biopsy is not reasonable in all patients who present with ALD. Currently, although several non-invasive fibrosis markers have been suggested as alternatives to liver biopsy in patients with ALD, none has been sufficiently validated. As described in other liver disease, the diagnostic accuracy of such tests in ALD is acceptable for the diagnosis of significant fibrosis or cirrhosis but not for lesser fibrosis stages. Existing data suggest that the use of non-invasive tests could be tailored to first tier screening of patients at risk, in order to diagnose early patients with progressive liver disease and offer targeted interventions for the prevention of decompensation. We review these tests and critically appraise the existing evidence.

  8. Microbiota, a key player in alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Cassard, Anne-Marie; Ciocan, Dragos

    2017-12-22

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Only 20% of heavy alcohol consumers develop alcoholic liver cirrhosis. The intestinal microbiota (IM) has been recently identified as a key player in the severity of liver injury in ALD. Common features of ALD include a decrease of gut epithelial tight junction protein expression, mucin production, and antimicrobial peptide levels. This disruption of the gut barrier, which is a prerequisite for ALD, leads to the passage of bacterial products into the blood stream (endotoxemia). Moreover, metabolites produced by bacteria, such as short chain fatty acids, volatile organic compounds (VOS), and bile acids (BA), are involved in ALD pathology. Probiotic treatment, IM transplantation, or the consumption of dietary fiber, such as pectin, which all alter the ratio of bacterial species, have been shown to improve liver injury in animal models of ALD and to be associated with an improvement in gut barrier function. Although the connections between the microbiota and the host in ALD are well established, the underlying mechanisms are still an active area of research. Targeting the microbiome through the use of prebiotic, probiotic, and postbiotic modalities could be an attractive new approach to manage ALD.

  9. Hyperhomocysteinemia, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and alcoholic liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Cheng; Kaplowitz, Neil

    2004-01-01

    Deficiencies in vitamins or other factors (B6, B12, folic acid, betaine) and genetic disorders for the metabolism of the non-protein amino acid-homocysteine (Hcy) lead to hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy). HHcy is an integral component of several disorders including cardiovascular disease, neurodegeneration, diabetes and alcoholic liver disease. HHcy unleashes mediators of inflammation such as NFκB, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8, increases production of intracellular superoxide anion causing oxidative stress and reducing intracellular level of nitric oxide (NO), and induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress which can explain many processes of Hcy-promoted cell injury such as apoptosis, fat accumulation, and inflammation. Animal models have played an important role in determining the biological effects of HHcy. ER stress may also be involved in other liver diseases such as α1-antitrypsin (α1-AT) deficiency and hepatitis C and/or B virus infection. Future research should evaluate the possible potentiative effects of alcohol and hepatic virus infection on ER stress-induced liver injury, study potentially beneficial effects of lowering Hcy and preventing ER stress in alcoholic humans, and examine polymorphism of Hcy metabolizing enzymes as potential risk-factors for the development of HHcy and liver disease. PMID:15188490

  10. Mechanisms and cell signaling in alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Beier, Juliane I.; McClain, Craig J.

    2013-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. For example, the Veterans Administration Cooperative Studies reported that patients with cirrhosis and superimposed alcoholic hepatitis had a 4-year mortality of >60%. The poor prognosis of ALD implies that preventing disease progression would be more effective than treating end-stage liver disease. An obvious avenue of prevention would be to remove the damaging agent; however, the infamously high rate of recidivism in alcoholics makes maintaining abstinence a difficult treatment goal to prevent ALD. Indeed, although the progression of ALD is well-characterized, there is no universally accepted therapy available to halt or reverse this process in humans. With better understanding of the mechanism(s) and risk factors that mediate the initiation and progression of ALD, rational targeted therapy can be developed to treat or prevent ALD. The purpose of this review is to summarize the established and proposed mechanisms by which chronic alcohol abuse damages the liver and to highlight key signaling events known or hypothesized to mediate these effects. PMID:20868231

  11. Effect of resveratrol on experimental non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Heebøll, Sara; Thomsen, Karen Louise; Clouston, Andrew; Sundelin, Elias Immanuel; Radko, Yulia; Christensen, Lars Porskjær; Ramezani-Moghadam, Mehdi; Kreutzfeldt, Martin; Pedersen, Steen Bønløkke; Jessen, Niels; Hebbard, Lionel; George, Jacob; Grønbæk, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are increasing clinical problems for which effective treatments are required. The polyphenol resveratrol prevents the development of fatty liver disease in a number of experimental studies. We hypothesized that it could revert steatohepatitis, including hepatic inflammation and fibrosis, in an experimental NASH model. To induce hepatic steatohepatitis, a 65% fat, 2% cholesterol and 0.5% cholate (HFC) diet was fed to rats for 1 or 16 weeks, prior to treatment. Subsequently, the diet was supplemented with resveratrol (approx. 100mg/rat/day) to three intervention groups; week 2-4, 2-7 or 17-22. Treated animals were sacrificed at the end of each intervention period with appropriate control and HFC diet controls. Blood and liver were harvested for analysis. When commenced early, resveratrol treatment partially mitigated transaminase elevations, hepatic enlargement and TNFα induced protein-3 protein expression, but generally resveratrol treatment had no effect on elevated hepatic triglyceride levels, histological steatohepatitis or fibrosis. We observed a slight reduction in Collagen1α1 mRNA expression and no reduction in the mRNA expression of other markers of fibrosis, inflammation or steatosis (TGFβ, TNFα, α2-MG, or SREBP-1c). Resveratrol metabolites were detected in serum, including trans-resveratrol-3-O-sulphate/trans-resveratrol-4'-O-sulphate (mean concentration 7.9 μg/ml). Contrary to the findings in experimental steatosis, resveratrol treatment had no consistent therapeutic effect in alleviating manifest experimental steatohepatitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Liver fibrosis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease - diagnostic challenge with prognostic significance.

    PubMed

    Stål, Per

    2015-10-21

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease in the Western world, with a prevalence of 20%. In a subgroup of patients, inflammation, ballooning degeneration of hepatocytes and a varying degree of fibrosis may develop, a condition named non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Advanced liver fibrosis (stage F3) and cirrhosis (stage F4) are histologic features that most accurately predict increased mortality in both liver-related and cardiovascular diseases. Patients with advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis are at risk for complications such as hepatocellular carcinoma and esophageal varices and should therefore be included in surveillance programs. However, liver disease and fibrosis are often unrecognized in patients with NAFLD, possibly leading to a delayed diagnosis of complications. The early diagnosis of advanced fibrosis in NAFLD is therefore crucial, and it can be accomplished using serum biomarkers (e.g., the NAFLD Fibrosis Score, Fib-4 Index or BARD) or non-invasive imaging techniques (transient elastography or acoustic radiation force impulse imaging). The screening of risk groups, such as patients with obesity and/or type 2 diabetes mellitus, for NAFLD development with these non-invasive methods may detect advanced fibrosis at an early stage. Additionally, patients with a low risk for advanced fibrosis can be identified, and the need for liver biopsies can be minimized. This review focuses on the diagnostic challenge and prognostic impact of advanced liver fibrosis in NAFLD.

  13. Liver fibrosis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease - diagnostic challenge with prognostic significance

    PubMed Central

    Stål, Per

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease in the Western world, with a prevalence of 20%. In a subgroup of patients, inflammation, ballooning degeneration of hepatocytes and a varying degree of fibrosis may develop, a condition named non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Advanced liver fibrosis (stage F3) and cirrhosis (stage F4) are histologic features that most accurately predict increased mortality in both liver-related and cardiovascular diseases. Patients with advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis are at risk for complications such as hepatocellular carcinoma and esophageal varices and should therefore be included in surveillance programs. However, liver disease and fibrosis are often unrecognized in patients with NAFLD, possibly leading to a delayed diagnosis of complications. The early diagnosis of advanced fibrosis in NAFLD is therefore crucial, and it can be accomplished using serum biomarkers (e.g., the NAFLD Fibrosis Score, Fib-4 Index or BARD) or non-invasive imaging techniques (transient elastography or acoustic radiation force impulse imaging). The screening of risk groups, such as patients with obesity and/or type 2 diabetes mellitus, for NAFLD development with these non-invasive methods may detect advanced fibrosis at an early stage. Additionally, patients with a low risk for advanced fibrosis can be identified, and the need for liver biopsies can be minimized. This review focuses on the diagnostic challenge and prognostic impact of advanced liver fibrosis in NAFLD. PMID:26494963

  14. Non-alcoholic fatty liver and the gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Bashiardes, Stavros; Shapiro, Hagit; Rozin, Shachar; Shibolet, Oren; Elinav, Eran

    2016-09-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFLD) is a common, multi-factorial, and poorly understood liver disease whose incidence is globally rising. NAFLD is generally asymptomatic and associated with other manifestations of the metabolic syndrome. Yet, up to 25% of NAFLD patients develop a progressive inflammatory liver disease termed non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) that may progress towards cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and the need for liver transplantation. In recent years, several lines of evidence suggest that the gut microbiome represents a significant environmental factor contributing to NAFLD development and its progression into NASH. Suggested microbiome-associated mechanisms contributing to NAFLD and NASH include dysbiosis-induced deregulation of the gut endothelial barrier function, which facilitates systemic bacterial translocation, and intestinal and hepatic inflammation. Furthermore, increased microbiome-modulated metabolites such as lipopolysaccharides, short chain fatty acids (SCFAs), bile acids, and ethanol, may affect liver pathology through multiple direct and indirect mechanisms. Herein, we discuss the associations, mechanisms, and clinical implications of the microbiome's contribution to NAFLD and NASH. Understanding these contributions to the development of fatty liver pathogenesis and its clinical course may serve as a basis for development of therapeutic microbiome-targeting approaches for treatment and prevention of NAFLD and NASH. Intestinal host-microbiome interactions play diverse roles in the pathogenesis and progression of NAFLD and NASH. Elucidation of the mechanisms driving these microbial effects on the pathogenesis of NAFLD and NASH may enable to identify new diagnostic and therapeutic targets of these common metabolic liver diseases. This article is part of a special issue on microbiota.

  15. [Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease--new view].

    PubMed

    Raszeja-Wyszomirska, Joanna; Lawniczak, Małgorzata; Marlicz, Wojciech; Miezyńska-Kurtycz, Joanna; Milkiewicz, Piotr

    2008-06-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) covers a wide spectrum of liver pathology--from steatosis alone, through the necroinflammatory disorder of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) to cirrhosis and liver cancer. NAFLD/NASH is mostly related with visceral adiposity, obesity, type 2 diabetes melitus (DM t.2) and metabolic syndrome. Pathogenetic concepts of NAFLD include overnutrition and underactivity, insulin resistance (IR) and genetic factor. The prevalence of NAFLD has been estimated to be 17-33% in some countries, NASH may be present in about 1/3 of such cases, while 20-25% of NASH cases could progress to cirrhosis. NAFLD is now recognized as one of the most frequent reason of liver tests elevation without clinical symptoms. Insulin resistance is considering as having a central role in NAFLD pathogenesis. In hepatocytes, IR is related to hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinaemia, formation of advanced glycation end-products, increased free fatty acids and their metabolites, oxidative stress and altered profiles of adipocytokines. Early stages of fatty liver are clinically silent and include elevation of ALT and GGTP, hyperechogenic liver in USG and/or hepatomegaly. Among clinical symptoms, abdominal discomfort is relatively common as well as chronic fatigue. NAFLD/NASH is not a benign disease, progressive liver biopsy have shown histological progression of fibrosis in 32%, the estimated rate of cirrhosis development is 20% and a liver--related death is 12% over 10 years. No treatment has scientifically proved to ameliorate NAFLD or to avoid its progression. The various therapeutic alternatives are aimed at interfering with the risk factors involved in the pathogenesis of the disorder in order to prevent the progression to end-stage liver disease. The most important therapeutic measure is increasing insulin sensitivity by an attempt to change a lifestyle mostly by dieting and physical activity in order to loose weight. The most used agent is metformin, the others

  16. Role of transmethylation reactions in alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Kharbanda, Kusum K

    2007-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease is a major health care problem worldwide. Findings from many laboratories, including ours, have demonstrated that ethanol feeding impairs several of the many steps involved in methionine metabolism. Ethanol consumption predominantly results in a decrease in the hepatocyte level of S-adenosylmethionine and the increases in two toxic metabolites, homocysteine and S-adenosylhomocysteine. These changes, in turn, result in serious functional consequences which include decreases in essential methylation reactions via inhibition of various methyltransferases. Of particular interest to our laboratory is the inhibition of three important enzymes, phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferase, isoprenylcysteine carboxyl methyltransferase and protein L-isoaspartate methyltransferase. Decreased activity of these enzymes results in increased fat deposition, increased apoptosis and increased accumulation of damaged proteins-all of which are hallmark features of alcoholic liver injury. Of all the therapeutic modalities available, betaine has been shown to be the safest, least expensive and most effective in attenuating ethanol-induced liver injury. Betaine, by virtue of aiding in the remethylation of homocysteine, removes both toxic metabolites (homocysteine and S-adenosylhomocysteine), restores S-adenosylmethionine level, and reverses steatosis, apoptosis and damaged proteins accumulation. In conclusion, betaine appears to be a promising therapeutic agent in relieving the methylation and other defects associated with alcoholic abuse. PMID:17854136

  17. The Altered Hepatic Tubulin Code in Alcoholic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Groebner, Jennifer L.; Tuma, Pamela L.

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that lead to the progression of alcoholic liver disease have been actively examined for decades. Because the hepatic microtubule cytoskeleton supports innumerable cellular processes, it has been the focus of many such mechanistic studies. It has long been appreciated that α-tubulin is a major target for modification by highly reactive ethanol metabolites and reactive oxygen species. It is also now apparent that alcohol exposure induces post-translational modifications that are part of the natural repertoire, mainly acetylation. In this review, the modifications of the “tubulin code” are described as well as those adducts by ethanol metabolites. The potential cellular consequences of microtubule modification are described with a focus on alcohol-induced defects in protein trafficking and enhanced steatosis. Possible mechanisms that can explain hepatic dysfunction are described and how this relates to the onset of liver injury is discussed. Finally, we propose that agents that alter the cellular acetylation state may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for treating liver disease. PMID:26393662

  18. The Altered Hepatic Tubulin Code in Alcoholic Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Groebner, Jennifer L; Tuma, Pamela L

    2015-09-18

    The molecular mechanisms that lead to the progression of alcoholic liver disease have been actively examined for decades. Because the hepatic microtubule cytoskeleton supports innumerable cellular processes, it has been the focus of many such mechanistic studies. It has long been appreciated that α-tubulin is a major target for modification by highly reactive ethanol metabolites and reactive oxygen species. It is also now apparent that alcohol exposure induces post-translational modifications that are part of the natural repertoire, mainly acetylation. In this review, the modifications of the "tubulin code" are described as well as those adducts by ethanol metabolites. The potential cellular consequences of microtubule modification are described with a focus on alcohol-induced defects in protein trafficking and enhanced steatosis. Possible mechanisms that can explain hepatic dysfunction are described and how this relates to the onset of liver injury is discussed. Finally, we propose that agents that alter the cellular acetylation state may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for treating liver disease.

  19. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Is the Liver Another Target?

    PubMed Central

    Mirrakhimov, Aibek E.; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y.

    2012-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is recurrent obstruction of the upper airway during sleep leading to intermittent hypoxia (IH). OSA has been associated with all components of the metabolic syndrome as well as with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD is a common condition ranging in severity from uncomplicated hepatic steatosis to steatohepatitis (NASH), liver fibrosis, and cirrhosis. The gold standard for the diagnosis and staging of NAFLD is liver biopsy. Obesity and insulin resistance lead to liver steatosis, but the causes of the progression to NASH are not known. Emerging evidence suggests that OSA may play a role in the progression of hepatic steatosis and the development of NASH. Several cross-sectional studies showed that the severity of IH in patients with OSA predicted the severity of NAFLD on liver biopsy. However, neither prospective nor interventional studies with continuous positive airway pressure treatment have been performed. Studies in a mouse model showed that IH causes triglyceride accumulation in the liver and liver injury as well as hepatic inflammation. The mouse model provided insight in the pathogenesis of liver injury showing that (1) IH accelerates the progression of hepatic steatosis by inducing adipose tissue lipolysis and increasing free fatty acids (FFA) flux into the liver; (2) IH up-regulates lipid biosynthetic pathways in the liver; (3) IH induces oxidative stress in the liver; (4) IH up-regulates hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha and possibly HIF-2 alpha, which may increase hepatic steatosis and induce liver inflammation and fibrosis. However, the role of FFA and different transcription factors in the pathogenesis of IH-induced NAFLD is yet to be established. Thus, multiple lines of evidence suggest that IH of OSA may contribute to the progression of NAFLD but definitive clinical studies and experiments in the mouse model have yet to be done. PMID:23087670

  20. Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: East Versus West

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Swastik; Duseja, Ajay K

    2012-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an important cause of liver disease worldwide with prevalence ranging from 10% to 30% in various countries. It has become an important cause of unexplained rise in transaminases, cryptogenic cirrhosis, and cryptogenic hepatocellular carcinoma. Pathogenesis is related to obesity, insulin resistance, oxidative stress, lipotoxicity, and resultant inflammation in the liver progressing to fibrosis. Pharmacological treatment in patients with NAFLD is still evolving and the treatment of these patients rests upon lifestyle modification with diet and exercise being the cornerstones of therapy. While there are many similarities between patients with NAFLD from Asia and the West, there are certain features which make the patients with NAFLD from Asia stand apart. This review highlights the data on NAFLD from Asia comparing it with the data from the West. PMID:25755421

  1. Perceptions of post-transplant recidivism in liver transplantation for alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Yoshikuni; Sugawara, Yasuhiko; Akamatsu, Nobuhisa; Kaneko, Junichi; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Tamura, Sumihito; Aoki, Taku; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2014-11-27

    Although alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is regarded as a common indication for liver transplantation (LT), debatable issues exist on the requirement for preceding alcoholic abstinence, appropriate indication criteria, predictive factors for alcoholic recidivism, and outcomes following living-donor LT. In most institutions, an abstinence period of six months before LT has been adopted as a mandatory selection criterion. Data indicating that pre-transplant abstinence is an associated predictive factor for alcoholic recidivism supports the reasoning behind this. However, conclusive evidence about the benefit of adopting an abstinence period is yet to be established. On the other hand, a limited number of reports available on living-donor LT experiences for ALD patients suggest that organ donations from relatives have no suppressive effect on alcoholic recidivism. Prevention of alcoholic recidivism has proved to be the most important treatment after LT based on the resultant inferior long-term outcome of patients. Further evaluations are still needed to establish strategies before and after LT for ALD.

  2. Protective effect of heat-treated cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) juice on alcohol detoxification in experimental rats.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Vivek K; Kim, Na-Hyung; Kim, Ji-Eun; Kim, Kangmin; Kang, Sun Chul

    2016-05-01

    In this study, heat-treated cucumber juice was assessed for its protective effect on blood alcohol levels and hepatic alcohol metabolic enzyme system in experimental rats. Initially, during detoxification of alcohol, all groups were orally dosed to 22% alcohol (6ml/kg body weight) along with different concentrations of heat-treated cucumber juice (10, 100 and 500mg/kg) and commercial goods for hangover-removal on sale (2ml/kg). Cucumber juice was dosed before 30 min, and simultaneously after 30min of alcohol administration, and its hepatoprotective effect on blood alcohol levels and hepatic alcohol metabolic enzyme system in experimental rats was evaluated. As a result, after 7h, remarkable reduction was found in the blood alcohol levels for all concentrations of cucumber juice treatment. Treatment with cucumber juice resulted in increasing dehydrogenase (ADH) and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzymatic activities in rat liver at 9h after alcohol administration thereby stimulated blood alcohol metabolism as compared with control group. The effect of heat-treated cucumber juice on alcohol detoxification was observed only in the rats treated before 30min from alcohol administration. These findings indicate that heat-treated cucumber juice has significant protective effect on alcohol detoxification in experimental rats, suggesting its usefulness in the treatment of liver injury caused by alcohol consumption.

  3. Serum adipokines might predict liver histology findings in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Jamali, Raika; Razavizade, Mohsen; Arj, Abbas; Aarabi, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-06-07

    To assess significance of serum adipokines to determine the histological severity of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Patients with persistent elevation in serum aminotransferase levels and well-defined characteristics of fatty liver at ultrasound were enrolled. Individuals with a history of alcohol consumption, hepatotoxic medication, viral hepatitis or known liver disease were excluded. Liver biopsy was performed to confirm non-alcoholic liver disease (NAFLD). The degrees of liver steatosis, lobular inflammation and fibrosis were determined based on the non-alcoholic fatty liver activity score (NAS) by a single expert pathologist. Patients with a NAS of five or higher were considered to have steatohepatitis. Those with a NAS of two or lower were defined as simple fatty liver. Binary logistic regression was used to determine the independent association of adipokines with histological findings. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was employed to determine cut-off values of serum adipokines to discriminate the grades of liver steatosis, lobular inflammation and fibrosis. Fifty-four participants aged 37.02 ± 9.82 were enrolled in the study. Higher serum levels of visfatin, IL-8, TNF-α levels were associated independently with steatosis grade of more than 33% [β = 1.08 (95%CI: 1.03-1.14), 1.04 (95%CI: 1.008-1.07), 1.04 (95%CI: 1.004-1.08), P < 0.05]. Elevated serum IL-6 and IL-8 levels were associated independently with advanced lobular inflammation [β = 1.4 (95%CI: 1.09-1.8), 1.07 (95%CI: 1.003-1.15), P < 0.05]. Similarly, higher TNF-α, resistin, and hepcidin levels were associated independently with advanced fibrosis stage [β = 1.06 (95%CI: 1.002-1.12), 19.86 (95%CI: 2.79-141.19), 560.72 (95%CI: 5.98-5255.33), P < 0.05]. Serum IL-8 and TNF-α values were associated independently with the NAS score, considering a NAS score of 5 as the reference value [β = 1.05 (95%CI: 1.01-1.1), 1.13 (95%CI: 1.04-1.22), P < 0.05]. Certain adipokines may

  4. Diagnosis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

    PubMed

    Yki-Järvinen, Hannele

    2016-06-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) increases risk of mortality from liver and cardiovascular disease (CVD) and is the major cause of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which may develop without cirrhosis. NAFLD predicts type 2 diabetes, even independently of obesity. Globally, the prevalence of NAFLD averages 25% and is as common as the metabolic syndrome. The majority of patients with type 2 diabetes have NAFLD. The challenge for the diabetologist is to identify patients at risk of advanced liver disease and HCC. At a minimum, liver function tests (LFTs), despite being neither specific nor sensitive, should be performed in all patients with the metabolic syndrome or type 2 diabetes. Increases in LFTs, for which the updated reference values are lower (serum ALT ≈30 U/l in men and ≈20 U/l in women) than those hitherto used in many laboratories, should prompt assessment of fibrosis biomarkers and referral of individuals at risk to a NAFLD/hepatology clinic. Preferably, evaluation of NAFLD should be based on measurement of steatosis biomarkers or ultrasound if easily available. A large number of individuals carry the patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 3 (PNPLA3) I148M variant (30-50%) or the transmembrane 6 superfamily member 2 (TM6SF2) E167K variant (11-15%). These variants increase the risk of advanced liver disease and HCC but not of diabetes or CVD. Genotyping of selected patients for these variants is recommended. Many patients have 'double trouble', i.e. carry both a genetic risk factor and have the metabolic syndrome. Excess use of alcohol could be a cause of 'triple trouble', but such patients would be classified as having alcoholic fatty liver disease. This review summarises a presentation given at the symposium 'The liver in focus' at the 2015 annual meeting of the EASD. It is accompanied by two other reviews on topics from this symposium (by Kenneth Cusi, DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3952-1 , and by John Jones, DOI: 10.1007/s00125

  5. Fructose and sugar: A major mediator of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Thomas; Abdelmalek, Manal F; Sullivan, Shelby; Nadeau, Kristen J; Green, Melanie; Roncal, Carlos; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Kuwabara, Masanari; Sato, Yuka; Kang, Duk-Hee; Tolan, Dean R; Sanchez-Lozada, Laura G; Rosen, Hugo R; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Diehl, Anna Mae; Johnson, Richard J

    2018-05-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome; its rising prevalence parallels the rise in obesity and diabetes. Historically thought to result from overnutrition and a sedentary lifestyle, recent evidence suggests that diets high in sugar (from sucrose and/or high-fructose corn syrup [HFCS]) not only increase the risk of NAFLD, but also non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Herein, we review the experimental and clinical evidence that fructose precipitates fat accumulation in the liver, due to both increased lipogenesis and impaired fat oxidation. Recent evidence suggests that the predisposition to fatty liver is linked to the metabolism of fructose by fructokinase C, which results in ATP consumption, nucleotide turnover and uric acid generation that mediate fat accumulation. Alterations to gut permeability, the microbiome, and associated endotoxemia contribute to the risk of NAFLD and NASH. Early clinical studies suggest that reducing sugary beverages and total fructose intake, especially from added sugars, may have a significant benefit on reducing hepatic fat accumulation. We suggest larger, more definitive trials to determine if lowering sugar/HFCS intake, and/or blocking uric acid generation, may help reduce NAFLD and its downstream complications of cirrhosis and chronic liver disease. Copyright © 2018 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Clinical approaches to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Schwenger, Katherine JP; Allard, Johane P

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) ranges from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), leading to fibrosis and potentially cirrhosis, and it is one of the most common causes of liver disease worldwide. NAFLD is associated with other medical conditions such as metabolic syndrome, obesity, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. NASH can only be diagnosed through liver biopsy, but noninvasive techniques have been developed to identify patients who are most likely to have NASH or fibrosis, reducing the need for liver biopsy and risk to patients. Disease progression varies between individuals and is linked to a number of risk factors. Mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis are associated with diet and lifestyle, influx of free fatty acids to the liver from adipose tissue due to insulin resistance, hepatic oxidative stress, cytokines production, reduced very low-density lipoprotein secretion and intestinal microbiome. Weight loss through improved diet and increased physical activity has been the cornerstone therapy of NAFLD. Recent therapies such as pioglitazone and vitamin E have been shown to be beneficial. Omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and statins may offer additional benefits. Bariatric surgery should be considered in morbidly obese patients. More research is needed to assess the impact of these treatments on a long-term basis. The objective of this article is to briefly review the diagnosis, management and treatment of this disease in order to aid clinicians in managing these patients. PMID:24587650

  7. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: An expanded review

    PubMed Central

    Benedict, Mark; Zhang, Xuchen

    2017-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) encompasses the simple steatosis to more progressive steatosis with associated hepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and in some cases hepatocellular carcinoma. NAFLD is a growing epidemic, not only in the United States, but worldwide in part due to obesity and insulin resistance leading to liver accumulation of triglycerides and free fatty acids. Numerous risk factors for the development of NAFLD have been espoused with most having some form of metabolic derangement or insulin resistance at the core of its pathophysiology. NAFLD patients are at increased risk of liver-related as well as cardiovascular mortality, and NAFLD is rapidly becoming the leading indication for liver transplantation. Liver biopsy remains the gold standard for definitive diagnosis, but the development of noninvasive advanced imaging, biochemical and genetic tests will no doubt provide future clinicians with a great deal of information and opportunity for enhanced understanding of the pathogenesis and targeted treatment. As it currently stands several medications/supplements are being used in the treatment of NAFLD; however, none seem to be the “magic bullet” in curtailing this growing problem yet. In this review we summarized the current knowledge of NAFLD epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, pathogenesis, pathologic changes, natural history, and treatment in order to aid in further understanding this disease and better managing NAFLD patients. PMID:28652891

  8. Biphasic effect of alcohol intake on the development of fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hirokazu; Ono, Masafumi; Hyogo, Hideyuki; Tsuji, Chika; Kitajima, Yoichiro; Ono, Naofumi; Eguchi, Takahisa; Fujimoto, Kazuma; Chayama, Kazuaki; Saibara, Toshiji; Anzai, Keizo; Eguchi, Yuichiro

    2015-11-01

    Fatty liver is an important clinical feature not only in alcoholic and non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases, but in other chronic liver diseases as well. Our aim was to elucidate the effect and relationship between habitual alcohol intake and obesity in the development of fatty liver disease. We enrolled 8,029 subjects undergoing abdominal ultrasonography with general medical examinations, and analyzed the factors associated with fatty liver based on daily alcohol intake, body mass index (BMI), and waist circumference. For fatty liver, BMI, waist circumference, total cholesterol, triglycerides, and fasting plasma glucose were significant and independent risk factors. Heavy alcohol intake (50 g/day) was a significant risk factor for fatty liver in women (odds ratio [OR], 3.35). Analysis based on the presence or absence of obesity revealed that moderate alcohol intake was a significant negative risk factor for fatty liver in both male and female obese (BMI ≥25 kg/m(2)) subjects (OR, 0.74 for non-obese and 0.39 for obese patients, respectively). Heavy alcohol intake was also a significant negative risk factor in obese males (0.62). In contrast, heavy alcohol intake was a risk factor in non-obese males (OR, 1.29) and in all females (OR, 2.22 for non-obese and 6.6 for obese patients, respectively). The influence of alcohol intake on fatty liver differed depending on the level of alcohol consumption, gender, and the presence of obesity, and showed biphasic effects.

  9. Gut-Liver Axis Derangement in Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Poeta, Marco; Pierri, Luca; Vajro, Pietro

    2017-08-02

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most frequent type of chronic liver disease in the pediatric age group, paralleling an obesity pandemic. A "multiple-hit" hypothesis has been invoked to explain its pathogenesis. The "first hit" is liver lipid accumulation in obese children with insulin resistance. In the absence of significant lifestyle modifications leading to weight loss and increased physical activity, other factors may act as "second hits" implicated in liver damage progression leading to more severe forms of inflammation and hepatic fibrosis. In this regard, the gut-liver axis (GLA) seems to play a central role. Principal players are the gut microbiota, its bacterial products, and the intestinal barrier. A derangement of GLA (namely, dysbiosis and altered intestinal permeability) may promote bacteria/bacterial product translocation into portal circulation, activation of inflammation via toll-like receptors signaling in hepatocytes, and progression from simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steato-hepatitis (NASH). Among other factors a relevant role has been attributed to the farnesoid X receptor, a nuclear transcriptional factor activated from bile acids chemically modified by gut microbiota (GM) enzymes. The individuation and elucidation of GLA derangement in NAFLD pathomechanisms is of interest at all ages and especially in pediatrics to identify new therapeutic approaches in patients recalcitrant to lifestyle changes. Specific targeting of gut microbiota via pre-/probiotic supplementation, feces transplantation, and farnesoid X receptor modulation appear promising.

  10. The nutritional geometry of liver disease including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Stephen J; Raubenheimer, David; Cogger, Victoria C; Macia, Laurence; Solon-Biet, Samantha M; Le Couteur, David G; George, Jacob

    2018-02-01

    Nutrition has a profound effect on chronic liver disease, especially non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Most observational studies and clinical trials have focussed on the effects of total energy intake, or the intake of individual macronutrients and certain micronutrients, such as vitamin D, on liver disease. Although these studies have shown the importance of nutrition on hepatic outcomes, there is not yet any unifying framework for understanding the relationship between diet and liver disease. The Geometric Framework for Nutrition (GFN) is an innovative model for designing nutritional experiments or interpreting nutritional data that can determine the effects of nutrients and their interactions on animal behaviour and phenotypes. Recently the GFN has provided insights into the relationship between dietary energy and macronutrients on obesity and ageing in mammals including humans. Mouse studies using the GFN have disentangled the effects of macronutrients on fatty liver and the gut microbiome. The GFN is likely to play a significant role in disentangling the effects of nutrients on liver disease, especially NAFLD, in humans. Copyright © 2017 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Reluctance to Accept Alcohol Treatment by Alcoholic Liver Disease Transplant Patients: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Heyes, Cathy M.; Schofield, Toni; Gribble, Robert; Day, Carolyn A.; Haber, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Liver transplantation (LT) is the optimum treatment for patients with end-stage alcoholic liver disease (ALD). However, despite a recognized risk of relapse to harmful drinking, ALD transplant patients are reluctant to use speciality alcohol treatment to support their abstinence, even when offered within the LT context. This study aimed to understand and identify factors contributing to alcohol treatment reluctance by ALD patients undergoing transplantation. Methods We conducted an in-depth qualitative study of ALD transplant patients. Minimally structured face-to-face interviews explored participants' alcohol-related experiences and their reasons for not using alcohol treatment during the course of their transplantation. Thematic analysis was used to analyze and interpret interview data to understand treatment reluctance based on participants' experiences. Results Five major themes were identified among 3 subgroups of patients (pretransplant and posttransplant abstainers and posttransplant relapsers): (i) the “contract” of mandatory abstinence, (ii) the “gap in the program” involving the lack of candour between patient and staff about alcohol-related matters and the lack of addiction services, (iii) a preference by participants to self-manage their alcohol use disorder, (iv) social support as a facilitator of abstinence and the risk of relapse when social support is diminished, and (v) the fear of stigmatization. Each of these factors were dynamically interrelated and differed slightly for each subgroup. Conclusions The LT services may benefit from the inclusion of integrated specialist addiction services in their model of care. Such an approach may enhance the acceptability of alcohol treatment and reduce the risk of relapse among ALD transplant participants, especially for those whose social supports have diminished. PMID:27795986

  12. Fecal microbiota manipulation prevents dysbiosis and alcohol-induced liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Ferrere, Gladys; Wrzosek, Laura; Cailleux, Frédéric; Turpin, Williams; Puchois, Virginie; Spatz, Madeleine; Ciocan, Dragos; Rainteau, Dominique; Humbert, Lydie; Hugot, Cindy; Gaudin, Françoise; Noordine, Marie-Louise; Robert, Véronique; Berrebi, Dominique; Thomas, Muriel; Naveau, Sylvie; Perlemuter, Gabriel; Cassard, Anne-Marie

    2017-04-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a leading cause of liver failure and mortality. In humans, severe alcoholic hepatitis is associated with key changes to intestinal microbiota (IM), which influences individual sensitivity to develop advanced ALD. We used the different susceptibility to ALD observed in two distinct animal facilities to test the efficiency of two complementary strategies (fecal microbiota transplantation and prebiotic treatment) to reverse dysbiosis and prevent ALD. Mice were fed alcohol in two distinct animal facilities with a Lieber DeCarli diet. Fecal microbiota transplantation was performed with fresh feces from alcohol-resistant donor mice to alcohol-sensitive receiver mice three times a week. Another group of mice received pectin during the entire alcohol consumption period. Ethanol induced steatosis and liver inflammation, which were associated with disruption of gut homeostasis, in alcohol-sensitive, but not alcohol resistant mice. IM analysis showed that the proportion of Bacteroides was specifically lower in alcohol-sensitive mice (p<0.05). Principal coordinate analysis showed that the IM of sensitive and resistant mice clustered differently. We targeted IM using two different strategies to prevent alcohol-induced liver lesions: (1) pectin treatment which induced major modifications of the IM, (2) fecal microbiota transplantation which resulted in an IM very close to that of resistant donor mice in the sensitive recipient mice. Both methods prevented steatosis, liver inflammation, and restored gut homeostasis. Manipulation of IM can prevent alcohol-induced liver injury. The IM should be considered as a new therapeutic target in ALD. Sensitivity to alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is driven by intestinal microbiota in alcohol fed mice. Treatment of mice with alcohol-induced liver lesions by fecal transplant from alcohol fed mice resistant to ALD or with prebiotic (pectin) prevents ALD. These findings open new possibilities for treatment of human

  13. Sarcopenia in Alcoholic Liver Disease: Clinical and Molecular Advances.

    PubMed

    Dasarathy, Jaividhya; McCullough, Arthur J; Dasarathy, Srinivasan

    2017-08-01

    Despite advances in treatment of alcohol use disorders that focus on increasing abstinence and reducing recidivism, alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is projected to be the major cause of cirrhosis and its complications. Malnutrition is recognized as the most frequent complication in ALD, and despite the high clinical significance, there are no effective therapies to reverse malnutrition in ALD. Malnutrition is a relatively imprecise term, and sarcopenia or skeletal muscle loss, the major component of malnutrition, is primarily responsible for the adverse clinical consequences in patients with liver disease. It is, therefore, critical to define the specific abnormality (sarcopenia) rather than malnutrition in ALD, so that therapies targeting sarcopenia can be developed. Skeletal muscle mass is maintained by a balance between protein synthesis and proteolysis. Both direct effects of ethanol (EtOH) and its metabolites on the skeletal muscle and the consequences of liver disease result in disturbed proteostasis (protein homeostasis) and consequent sarcopenia. Once cirrhosis develops in patients with ALD, abstinence is unlikely to be effective in completely reversing sarcopenia, as other contributors including hyperammonemia, hormonal, and cytokine abnormalities aggravate sarcopenia and maintain a state of anabolic resistance initiated by EtOH. Cirrhosis is also a state of accelerated starvation, with increased gluconeogenesis that requires amino acid diversion from signaling and substrate functions. Novel therapeutic options are being recognized that are likely to supplant the current "deficiency replacement" approach and instead focus on specific molecular perturbations, given the increasing availability of small molecules that can target specific signaling components. Myostatin antagonists, leucine supplementation, and mitochondrial protective agents are currently in various stages of evaluation in preclinical studies to prevent and reverse sarcopenia, in cirrhosis in

  14. Peroxisomal enzymes in the liver of rats with experimental diabetes mellitus type 2.

    PubMed

    Turecký, L; Kupčová, V; Uhlíková, E; Mojto, V

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is relatively frequently associated with fatty liver disease. Increased oxidative stress probably plays an important role in the development of this hepatopathy. One of possible sources of reactive oxygen species in liver is peroxisomal system. There are several reports about changes of peroxisomal enzymes in experimental diabetes, mainly enzymes of fatty acid oxidation. The aim of our study was to investigate the possible changes of activities of liver peroxisomal enzymes, other than enzymes of beta-oxidation, in experimental diabetes mellitus type 2. Biochemical changes in liver of experimental animals suggest the presence of liver steatosis. The changes of serum parameters in experimental group are similar to changes in serum of patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. We have shown that diabetes mellitus influenced peroxisomal enzymes by the different way. Despite of well-known induction of peroxisomal beta-oxidation, the activities of catalase, aminoacid oxidase and NADH-cytochrome b(5) reductase were not significantly changed and the activities of glycolate oxidase and NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase were significantly decreased. The effect of diabetes on liver peroxisomes is probably due to the increased supply of fatty acids to liver in diabetic state and also due to increased oxidative stress. The changes of metabolic activity of peroxisomal compartment may participate on the development of diabetic hepatopathy.

  15. Glycosyltransferases and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Yu-Tao; Su, Hai-Ying; An, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common form of chronic liver disease and its incidence is increasing worldwide. However, the underlying mechanisms leading to the development of NAFLD are still not fully understood. Glycosyltransferases (GTs) are a diverse class of enzymes involved in catalyzing the transfer of one or multiple sugar residues to a wide range of acceptor molecules. GTs mediate a wide range of functions from structure and storage to signaling, and play a key role in many fundamental biological processes. Therefore, it is anticipated that GTs have a role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. In this article, we present an overview of the basic information on NAFLD, particularly GTs and glycosylation modification of certain molecules and their association with NAFLD pathogenesis. In addition, the effects and mechanisms of some GTs in the development of NAFLD are summarized. PMID:26937136

  16. Malnutrition and Nutritional Support in Alcoholic Liver Disease: a Review.

    PubMed

    Chao, Andrew; Waitzberg, Dan; de Jesus, Rosangela Passos; Bueno, Allain A; Kha, Victor; Allen, Karen; Kappus, Matthew; Medici, Valentina

    2016-12-01

    Malnutrition is associated with alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and related complications such as hepatic encephalopathy and increased rate of infections. Avoidance of prolonged fasting and overly restrictive diets is important to avoid poor nutrition. Adequate intake of calories, protein, and micronutrients via frequent small meals and evening supplements and/or enteral and parenteral nutrition when indicated has been associated with reduced mortality and morbidity in patients with ALD. Modification of protein/fat sources and composition in addition to probiotic supplementation are promising interventions for decreased progression of ALD and its complications.

  17. Contribution of liver alcohol dehydrogenase to metabolism of alcohols in rats.

    PubMed

    Plapp, Bryce V; Leidal, Kevin G; Murch, Bruce P; Green, David W

    2015-06-05

    The kinetics of oxidation of various alcohols by purified rat liver alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) were compared with the kinetics of elimination of the alcohols in rats in order to investigate the roles of ADH and other factors that contribute to the rates of metabolism of alcohols. Primary alcohols (ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, 2-methyl-1-propanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol) and diols (1,3-propanediol, 1,3-butanediol, 1,4-butanediol, 1,5-pentanediol) were eliminated in rats with zero-order kinetics at doses of 5-20 mmol/kg. Ethanol was eliminated most rapidly, at 7.9 mmol/kgh. Secondary alcohols (2-propanol-d7, 2-propanol, 2-butanol, 3-pentanol, cyclopentanol, cyclohexanol) were eliminated with first order kinetics at doses of 5-10 mmol/kg, and the corresponding ketones were formed and slowly eliminated with zero or first order kinetics. The rates of elimination of various alcohols were inhibited on average 73% (55% for 2-propanol to 90% for ethanol) by 1 mmol/kg of 4-methylpyrazole, a good inhibitor of ADH, indicating a major role for ADH in the metabolism of the alcohols. The Michaelis kinetic constants from in vitro studies (pH 7.3, 37 °C) with isolated rat liver enzyme were used to calculate the expected relative rates of metabolism in rats. The rates of elimination generally increased with increased activity of ADH, but a maximum rate of 6±1 mmol/kg h was observed for the best substrates, suggesting that ADH activity is not solely rate-limiting. Because secondary alcohols only require one NAD(+) for the conversion to ketones whereas primary alcohols require two equivalents of NAD(+) for oxidation to the carboxylic acids, it appears that the rate of oxidation of NADH to NAD(+) is not a major limiting factor for metabolism of these alcohols, but the rate-limiting factors are yet to be identified. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Contribution of Liver Alcohol Dehydrogenase to Metabolism of Alcohols in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Plapp, Bryce V.; Leidal, Kevin G.; Murch, Bruce P.; Green, David W.

    2015-01-01

    The kinetics of oxidation of various alcohols by purified rat liver alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) were compared with the kinetics of elimination of the alcohols in rats in order to investigate the roles of ADH and other factors that contribute to the rates of metabolism of alcohols. Primary alcohols (ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, 2-methyl-1-propanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol) and diols (1,3-propanediol, 1,3-butanediol, 1,4-butanediol, 1,5-pentanediol) were eliminated in rats with zero-order kinetics at doses of 5–20 mmole/kg. Ethanol was eliminated most rapidly, at 7.9 mmole/kg•h. Secondary alcohols (2-propanol-d7, 2-propanol, 2-butanol, 3-pentanol, cyclopentanol, cyclohexanol) were eliminated with first order kinetics at doses of 5–10 mmole/kg, and the corresponding ketones were formed and slowly eliminated with zero or first order kinetics. The rates of elimination of various alcohols were inhibited on average 73% (55% for 2-propanol to 90% for ethanol) by 1 mmole/kg of 4-methylpyrazole, a good inhibitor of ADH, indicating a major role for ADH in the metabolism of the alcohols. The Michaelis kinetic constants from in vitro studies (pH 7.3, 37 °C) with isolated rat liver enzyme were used to calculate the expected relative rates of metabolism in rats. The rates of elimination generally increased with increased activity of ADH, but a maximum rate of 6 ± 1 mmole/kg•h was observed for the best substrates, suggesting that ADH activity is not solely rate-limiting. Because secondary alcohols only require one NAD+ for the conversion to ketones whereas primary alcohols require two equivalents of NAD+ for oxidation to the carboxylic acids, it appears that the rate of oxidation of NADH to NAD+ is not a major limiting factor for metabolism of these alcohols, but the rate-limiting factors are yet to be identified. PMID:25641189

  19. Molecular pathways in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Berlanga, Alba; Guiu-Jurado, Esther; Porras, José Antonio; Auguet, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a clinicopathological change characterized by the accumulation of triglycerides in hepatocytes and has frequently been associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and insulin resistance. It is an increasingly recognized condition that has become the most common liver disorder in developed countries, affecting over one-third of the population and is associated with increased cardiovascular- and liver-related mortality. NAFLD is a spectrum of disorders, beginning as simple steatosis. In about 15% of all NAFLD cases, simple steatosis can evolve into non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, a medley of inflammation, hepatocellular injury, and fibrosis, often resulting in cirrhosis and even hepatocellular cancer. However, the molecular mechanism underlying NAFLD progression is not completely understood. Its pathogenesis has often been interpreted by the “double-hit” hypothesis. The primary insult or the “first hit” includes lipid accumulation in the liver, followed by a “second hit” in which proinflammatory mediators induce inflammation, hepatocellular injury, and fibrosis. Nowadays, a more complex model suggests that fatty acids (FAs) and their metabolites may be the true lipotoxic agents that contribute to NAFLD progression; a multiple parallel hits hypothesis has also been suggested. In NAFLD patients, insulin resistance leads to hepatic steatosis via multiple mechanisms. Despite the excess hepatic accumulation of FAs in NAFLD, it has been described that not only de novo FA synthesis is increased, but FAs are also taken up from the serum. Furthermore, a decrease in mitochondrial FA oxidation and secretion of very-low-density lipoproteins has been reported. This review discusses the molecular mechanisms that underlie the pathophysiological changes of hepatic lipid metabolism that contribute to NAFLD. PMID:25045276

  20. The intestinal microbiome and the leaky gut as therapeutic targets in alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Phillipp; Chen, Wei-Chung; Schnabl, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) encompasses hepatic steatosis, which may progress to alcoholic hepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis. It remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the US and worldwide. The severity of liver disease correlates with plasma levels of bacterial products in patients, and experimental ALD depends on the level of gut derived bacterial products in rodents. Since intestinal decontamination and deficiency of bacterial product receptors or their downstream signaling molecules protect from alcohol-induced liver disease, bacterial translocation (BT), qualitative, and quantitative changes of the enteric microbiome are considered as being of fundamental importance in the pathogenesis of ALD. Recent enhancements in diagnostic technologies provide a better insight into these shifts. This review highlights vital events in ALD such as BT, the importance of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, intestinal bacterial overgrowth (IBO), and changes in the intestinal microbiome. Furthermore, a treatment trial section of patients reviews possible future options of therapy for ALD modifying the enteric microbiome. PMID:23087650

  1. Multicausality in fatty liver disease: Is there a rationale to distinguish between alcoholic and non-alcoholic origin?

    PubMed Central

    Völzke, Henry

    2012-01-01

    Apart from alcohol, there are other factors that may induce complications, which resemble alcohol-related liver disorders. In particular, obesity has been brought into focus as a risk factor for fatty liver disease. The term “non-alcoholic” fatty liver disease is commonly used to distinguish between obesity-related and alcohol-related hepatic steatosis. This review uses the epidemiological perspective to critically assess whether it is necessary and useful to differentiate between alcoholic and “non-alcoholic” fatty liver disease. The MEDLINE database was searched using the PubMed search engine, and a review of reference lists from original research and review articles was conducted. The concept to distinguish between alcoholic and “non-alcoholic” fatty liver disease is mainly based on specific pathomechanisms. This concept has, however, several limitations including the common overlap between alcohol misuse and obesity-related metabolic disorders and the non-consideration of additional causal factors. Both entities share similar histopathological patterns. Studies demonstrating differences in clinical presentation and outcome are often biased by selection. Risk factor reduction is the main principle of prevention and treatment of both disease forms. In conclusion, alcoholic and “non-alcoholic” fatty liver diseases are one and the same disease caused by different risk factors. A shift from artificial categories to a more general approach to fatty liver disease as a multicausal disorder may optimize preventive strategies and help clinicians more effectively treat patients at the individual level. PMID:22826613

  2. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Protects against Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ritze, Yvonne; Bárdos, Gyöngyi; Claus, Anke; Ehrmann, Veronika; Bergheim, Ina; Schwiertz, Andreas; Bischoff, Stephan C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Experimental evidence revealed that obesity-associated non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is linked to changes in intestinal permeability and translocation of bacterial products to the liver. Hitherto, no reliable therapy is available except for weight reduction. Within this study, we examined the possible effect of the probiotic bacterial strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) as protective agent against experimental NAFLD in a mouse model. Methods Experimental NAFLD was induced by a high-fructose diet over eight weeks in C57BL/J6 mice. Fructose was administered via the drinking water containing 30% fructose with or without LGG at a concentration resulting in approximately 5×107 colony forming units/g body weight. Mice were examined for changes in small intestinal microbiota, gut barrier function, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) concentrations in the portal vein, liver inflammation and fat accumulation in the liver. Results LGG increased beneficial bacteria in the distal small intestine. Moreover, LGG reduced duodenal IκB protein levels and restored the duodenal tight junction protein concentration. Portal LPS (P≤0.05) was reduced and tended to attenuate TNF-α, IL-8R and IL-1β mRNA expression in the liver feeding a high-fructose diet supplemented with LGG. Furthermore liver fat accumulation and portal alanine-aminotransferase concentrations (P≤0.05) were attenuated in mice fed the high-fructose diet and LGG. Conclusions We show for the first time that LGG protects mice from NAFLD induced by a high-fructose diet. The underlying mechanisms of protection likely involve an increase of beneficial bacteria, restoration of gut barrier function and subsequent attenuation of liver inflammation and steatosis. PMID:24475018

  3. Oral Probiotic Microcapsule Formulation Ameliorates Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Bio F1B Golden Syrian Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Bhathena, Jasmine; Martoni, Christopher; Kulamarva, Arun; Tomaro-Duchesneau, Catherine; Malhotra, Meenakshi; Paul, Arghya; Urbanska, Aleksandra Malgorzata; Prakash, Satya

    2013-01-01

    The beneficial effect of a microencapsulated feruloyl esterase producing Lactobacillus fermentum ATCC 11976 formulation for use in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) was investigated. For which Bio F1B Golden Syrian hamsters were fed a methionine deficient/choline devoid diet to induce non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Results, for the first time, show significant clinical benefits in experimental animals. Examination of lipids show that concentrations of hepatic free cholesterol, esterified cholesterol, triglycerides and phospholipids were significantly lowered in treated animals. In addition, serum total cholesterol, triglycerides, uric acid and insulin resistance were found to decrease in treated animals. Liver histology evaluations showed reduced fat deposits. Western blot analysis shows significant differences in expression levels of key liver enzymes in treated animals. In conclusion, these findings suggest the excellent potential of using an oral probiotic formulation to ameliorate NAFLD. PMID:23554890

  4. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging for the assessment of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease severity.

    PubMed

    Pavlides, Michael; Banerjee, Rajarshi; Tunnicliffe, Elizabeth M; Kelly, Catherine; Collier, Jane; Wang, Lai Mun; Fleming, Kenneth A; Cobbold, Jeremy F; Robson, Matthew D; Neubauer, Stefan; Barnes, Eleanor

    2017-07-01

    The diagnosis of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and fibrosis staging are central to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease assessment. We evaluated multiparametric magnetic resonance in the assessment of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and fibrosis using histology as standard in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Seventy-one patients with suspected non-alcoholic fatty liver disease were recruited within 1 month of liver biopsy. Magnetic resonance data were used to define the liver inflammation and fibrosis score (LIF 0-4). Biopsies were assessed for steatosis, lobular inflammation, ballooning and fibrosis and classified as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis or simple steatosis, and mild or significant (Activity ≥2 and/or Fibrosis ≥2 as defined by the Fatty Liver Inhibition of Progression consortium) non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Transient elastography was also performed. Magnetic resonance success rate was 95% vs 59% for transient elastography (P<.0001). Fibrosis stage on biopsy correlated with liver inflammation and fibrosis (r s =.51, P<.0001). The area under the receiver operating curve using liver inflammation and fibrosis for the diagnosis of cirrhosis was 0.85. Liver inflammation and fibrosis score for ballooning grades 0, 1 and 2 was 1.2, 2.7 and 3.5 respectively (P<.05) with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.83 for the diagnosis of ballooning. Patients with steatosis had lower liver inflammation and fibrosis (1.3) compared to patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (3.0) (P<.0001); area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the diagnosis of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis was 0.80. Liver inflammation and fibrosis scores for patients with mild and significant non-alcoholic fatty liver disease were 1.2 and 2.9 respectively (P<.0001). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of liver inflammation and fibrosis for the diagnosis of significant non-alcoholic fatty liver disease was 0

  5. Factors predicting non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and advanced fibrosis in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

    PubMed

    Tasneem, Abbas Ali; Luck, Nasir Hassan; Majid, Zain

    2018-04-01

    Introduction To determine the factors predicting non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and advanced fibrosis in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Methodology All patients aged >18 years and having a fatty liver on abdominal ultrasound (US), presenting from January 2011 to January 2017, were included. A liver biopsy was performed on all the patients. Results Of 96 patients undergoing liver biopsy for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), 76 (79.2%) were men. On liver US, diffuse fatty liver (DFL) was noted in 68 (70.8%) patients. Liver biopsy showed non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in 78 (81.3%) patients. Factors associated with NASH were male gender, body mass index (BMI) > 27 kg/m 2 , DFL and raised alanine aminotransferase (ALT). A GULAB score (based on gender, US liver findings, lipid (fasting) levels, ALT level and BMI) of ≥5 predicted NASH with 82.05% sensitivity. Factors associated with advanced fibrosis in NAFLD were age >40 years, diabetes mellitus, AST/ALT ratio > 1 and raised GGT. Conclusion NASH is common in patients with male gender, high BMI, DFL on liver US, raised ALT and GULAB score ≥5.

  6. Echocardiography and NAFLD (non-alcoholic fatty liver disease).

    PubMed

    Trovato, Francesca M; Martines, Giuseppe F; Catalano, Daniela; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Pirri, Clara; Trovato, Guglielmo M

    2016-10-15

    Non-alcoholic-fatty-liver-disease (NAFLD) is associated with atherosclerosis, increased cardiovascular risks and mortality. We investigated if, independently of insulin resistance, diet, physical activity and obesity, fatty liver involvement has any relationship with echocardiographic measurements in NAFLD. 660 NAFLD and 791 non-NAFLD subjects, referred to the same out-patients medical unit for lifestyle-nutritional prescription, were studied. Congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, malignancies, diabetes mellitus, extreme obesity, underweight-bad-nourished subjects and renal insufficiency were exclusion criteria. Liver steatosis was assessed by Ultrasound-Bright-Liver-Score (BLS), left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), trans-mitral E/A doppler ratio (diastolic relaxation) and left ventricular myocardial mass (LVMM/m(2)) by echocardiography. Doppler Renal artery Resistive Index (RRI), insulin resistance (HOMA) and lifestyle profile were also included in the clinical assessment. LVMM/m(2) is significantly greater in NAFLD, 101.62±34.48 vs. 88.22±25.61, p<0.0001 both in men and in women. Ejection fraction is slightly smaller only in men with NAFLD; no significant difference was observed for the E/A ratio. BMI (30.42±5.49 vs. 24.87±3.81; p<0.0001) and HOMA (2.90±1.70 vs. 1.85±1.25; p: 0.0001) were significantly greater in NAFLD patients. By Multiple-Linear-Regression, NAFLD and unhealthy dietary profile are associated also in lean non-diabetic subjects with lower systolic function, independently of BMI, dietary profile, physical activity, RRI and insulin resistance. NAFLD may be a meaningful early clue suggestive of diminishing heart function, with similar determining factors. NAFLD is amenable to management and improvement by lifestyle change counseling, addressing a dual target: reducing fatty liver, which is easily monitored by ultrasound, and, independently, maintaining a normal heart function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  7. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, diet and gut microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Finelli, Carmine; Tarantino, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a severe liver disease that is increasing in prevalence with the worldwide epidemic of obesity and its related insulin-resistance state. Evidence for the role of the gut microbiota in energy storage and the subsequent development of obesity and some of its related diseases is now well established. More recently, a new role of gut microbiota has emerged in NAFLD. The gut microbiota is involved in gut permeability, low-grade inflammation and immune balance, it modulates dietary choline metabolism, regulates bile acid metabolism and produces endogenous ethanol. All of these factors are molecular mechanisms by which the microbiota can induce NAFLD or its progression toward overt non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Modification of the gut microbiota composition and/or its biochemical capacity by specific dietary or pharmacological interventions may advantageously affect host metabolism. Large-scale intervention trials, investigating the potential benefit of prebiotics and probiotics in improving cardiometabolic health in high-risk populations, are fervently awaited. PMID:26417275

  8. Relationships among alcoholic liver disease, antioxidants, and antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Han, Kyu-Ho; Hashimoto, Naoto; Fukushima, Michihiro

    2016-01-07

    Excessive consumption of alcoholic beverages is a serious cause of liver disease worldwide. The metabolism of ethanol generates reactive oxygen species, which play a significant role in the deterioration of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Antioxidant phytochemicals, such as polyphenols, regulate the expression of ALD-associated proteins and peptides, namely, catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase. These plant antioxidants have electrophilic activity and may induce antioxidant enzymes via the Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1-NF-E2-related factor-2 pathway and antioxidant responsive elements. Furthermore, these antioxidants are reported to alleviate cell injury caused by oxidants or inflammatory cytokines. These phenomena are likely induced via the regulation of mitogen-activating protein kinase (MAPK) pathways by plant antioxidants, similar to preconditioning in ischemia-reperfusion models. Although the relationship between plant antioxidants and ALD has not been adequately investigated, plant antioxidants may be preventive for ALD because of their electrophilic and regulatory activities in the MAPK pathway.

  9. Relationships among alcoholic liver disease, antioxidants, and antioxidant enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kyu-Ho; Hashimoto, Naoto; Fukushima, Michihiro

    2016-01-01

    Excessive consumption of alcoholic beverages is a serious cause of liver disease worldwide. The metabolism of ethanol generates reactive oxygen species, which play a significant role in the deterioration of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Antioxidant phytochemicals, such as polyphenols, regulate the expression of ALD-associated proteins and peptides, namely, catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase. These plant antioxidants have electrophilic activity and may induce antioxidant enzymes via the Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1-NF-E2-related factor-2 pathway and antioxidant responsive elements. Furthermore, these antioxidants are reported to alleviate cell injury caused by oxidants or inflammatory cytokines. These phenomena are likely induced via the regulation of mitogen-activating protein kinase (MAPK) pathways by plant antioxidants, similar to preconditioning in ischemia-reperfusion models. Although the relationship between plant antioxidants and ALD has not been adequately investigated, plant antioxidants may be preventive for ALD because of their electrophilic and regulatory activities in the MAPK pathway. PMID:26755859

  10. Curcumin improves alcoholic fatty liver by inhibiting fatty acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chang; Ma, Jingfan; Zhong, Qionghong; Zhao, Mengyuan; Hu, Tianxing; Chen, Tong; Qiu, Longxin; Wen, Longping

    2017-08-01

    Alcoholic fatty liver is a threat to human health. It has been long known that abstinence from alcohol is the most effective therapy, other effective therapies are not available for the treatment in humans. Curcumin has a great potential for anti-oxidation and anti-inflammation, but the effect on metabolic reconstruction remains little known. Here we performed metabolomic analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and explored ethanol pathogenic insight as well as curcumin action pattern. We identified seventy-one metabolites in mouse liver. Carbohydrates and lipids were characteristic categories. Pathway analysis results revealed that ethanol-induced pathways including biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids, fatty acid biosynthesis and pentose and glucuronate interconversions were suppressed by curcumin. Additionally, ethanol enhanced galactose metabolism and pentose phosphate pathway. Glyoxylate and dicarboxylate metabolism and pyruvate metabolism were inhibited in mice fed ethanol diet plus curcumin. Stearic acid, oleic acid and linoleic acid were disease biomarkers and therapical biomarkers. These results reflect the landscape of hepatic metabolism regulation. Our findings illustrate ethanol pathological pathway and metabolic mechanism of curcumin therapy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Fructose Consumption, Lipogenesis, and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Ter Horst, Kasper W; Serlie, Mireille J

    2017-09-06

    Increased fructose consumption has been suggested to contribute to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance, but a causal role of fructose in these metabolic diseases remains debated. Mechanistically, hepatic fructose metabolism yields precursors that can be used for gluconeogenesis and de novo lipogenesis (DNL). Fructose-derived precursors also act as nutritional regulators of the transcription factors, including ChREBP and SREBP1c, that regulate the expression of hepatic gluconeogenesis and DNL genes. In support of these mechanisms, fructose intake increases hepatic gluconeogenesis and DNL and raises plasma glucose and triglyceride levels in humans. However, epidemiological and fructose-intervention studies have had inconclusive results with respect to liver fat, and there is currently no good human evidence that fructose, when consumed in isocaloric amounts, causes more liver fat accumulation than other energy-dense nutrients. In this review, we aim to provide an overview of the seemingly contradicting literature on fructose and NAFLD. We outline fructose physiology, the mechanisms that link fructose to NAFLD, and the available evidence from human studies. From this framework, we conclude that the cellular mechanisms underlying hepatic fructose metabolism will likely reveal novel targets for the treatment of NAFLD, dyslipidemia, and hepatic insulin resistance. Finally, fructose-containing sugars are a major source of excess calories, suggesting that a reduction of their intake has potential for the prevention of NAFLD and other obesity-related diseases.

  12. Animal Models of Alcoholic Liver Disease: Pathogenesis and Clinical Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Bin; Xu, Ming-Jiang; Bertola, Adeline; Wang, Hua; Zhou, Zhou; Liangpunsakul, Suthat

    2017-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD), a leading cause of chronic liver injury worldwide, comprises a range of disorders including simple steatosis, steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Over the last five decades, many animal models for the study of ALD pathogenesis have been developed. Recently, a chronic-plus-binge ethanol feeding model was reported. This model induces significant steatosis, hepatic neutrophil infiltration, and liver injury. A clinically relevant model of high-fat diet feeding plus binge ethanol was also developed, which highlights the risk of excessive binge drinking in obese/overweight individuals. All of these models recapitulate some features of the different stages of ALD and have been widely used by many investigators to study the pathogenesis of ALD and to test for therapeutic drugs/components. However, these models are somewhat variable, depending on mouse genetic background, ethanol dose, and animal facility environment. This review focuses on these models and discusses these variations and some methods to improve the feeding protocol. The pathogenesis, clinical relevance, and translational studies of these models are also discussed. PMID:28411363

  13. Pharmacological promotion of autophagy alleviates steatosis and injury in alcoholic and non-alcoholic fatty liver conditions in mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Wen; Zhang, Hao; Li, Min; Xiong, Xiwen; Chen, Xi; Chen, Xiaoyun; Dong, Xiaocheng C; Yin, Xiao-Ming

    2013-05-01

    Pharmacological approaches can potentially improve fatty liver condition in alcoholic and non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases. The salutary effects of reducing lipid synthesis or promoting lipid oxidation have been well reported, but the benefits of increasing lipid degradation have yet to be well explored. Macroautophagy is a cellular degradation process that can remove subcellular organelles including lipid droplets. We thus investigated whether pharmacological modulation of macroautophagy could be an effective approach to alleviate fatty liver condition and liver injury. C57BL/6 mice were given ethanol via intraperitoneal injection (acute) or by a 4-week oral feeding regime (chronic), or high fat diet for 12 weeks. An autophagy enhancer, carbamazepine or rapamycin, or an autophagy inhibitor, chloroquine, was given before sacrifice. Activation of autophagy, level of hepatic steatosis, and blood levels of triglycerides, liver enzyme, glucose and insulin were measured. In both acute and chronic ethanol condition, macroautophagy was activated. Carbamazepine, as well as rapamycin, enhanced ethanol-induced macroautophagy in hepatocytes in vitro and in vivo. Hepatic steatosis and liver injury were exacerbated by chloroquine, but alleviated by carbamazepine. The protective effects of carbamazepine and rapamycin in reducing steatosis and in improving insulin sensitivity were also demonstrated in high fat diet-induced non-alcoholic fatty liver condition. These findings indicate that pharmacological modulation of macroautophagy in the liver can be an effective strategy for reducing fatty liver condition and liver injury. Copyright © 2013 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Dynamic Adaptation of Liver Mitochondria to Chronic Alcohol Feeding in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Han, Derick; Ybanez, Maria D.; Johnson, Heather S.; McDonald, Jeniece N.; Mesropyan, Lusine; Sancheti, Harsh; Martin, Gary; Martin, Alanna; Lim, Atalie M; Dara, Lily; Cadenas, Enrique; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu; Kaplowitz, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Liver mitochondria undergo dynamic alterations following chronic alcohol feeding to mice. Intragastric alcohol feeding to mice resulted in 1) increased state III respiration (109% compared with control) in isolated liver mitochondria, probably due to increased levels of complexes I, IV, and V being incorporated into the respiratory chain; 2) increased mitochondrial NAD+ and NADH levels (∼2-fold), with no change in the redox status; 3) alteration in mitochondrial morphology, with increased numbers of elongated mitochondria; and 4) enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis in the liver, which corresponded with an up-regulation of PGC-1α (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α). Oral alcohol feeding to mice, which is associated with less liver injury and steatosis, slightly enhanced respiration in isolated liver mitochondria (30.8% compared with control), lower than the striking increase caused by intragastric alcohol feeding. Mitochondrial respiration increased with both oral and intragastric alcohol feeding despite extensive N-acetylation of mitochondrial proteins. The alcohol-induced mitochondrial alterations are probably an adaptive response to enhance alcohol metabolism in the liver. Isolated liver mitochondria from alcohol-treated mice had a greater rate of acetaldehyde metabolism and respiration when treated with acetaldehyde than control. Aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 levels were unaltered in response to alcohol, suggesting that the greater acetaldehyde metabolism by isolated mitochondria from alcohol-treated mice was due to increased mitochondrial respiration that regenerated NAD+, the rate-limiting substrate in alcohol/acetaldehyde metabolism. Overall, our work suggests that mitochondrial plasticity in the liver may be an important adaptive response to the metabolic stress caused by alcohol intake and could potentially play a role in many other vital functions performed by the liver. PMID:23086958

  15. Protective effect of oligomeric proanthocyanidins against alcohol-induced liver steatosis and injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiguo; Su, Bo; Fan, Sumei; Fei, Haixia; Zhao, Wei

    2015-03-20

    The long-term consumption of alcohol has been associated with multiple pathologies at all levels, such as alcoholism, chronic pancreatitis, malnutrition, alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and cancer. In the current study, we investigated the protective effect of oligomeric proanthocyanidins (OPC) against alcohol-induced liver steatosis and injury and the possible mechanisms using ethanol-induced chronic liver damage mouse models. The results showed that OPC significantly improved alcohol-induced dyslipidemia and alleviated liver steatosis by reducing levels of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), total triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), low-density cholesterol (LDL-c) and liver malondialdehyde (MDA), and increasing levels of serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL-c), liver superoxide dismutase (SOD). Further investigation indicated that OPC markedly decreased the expressions of lipid synthesis genes and inflammation genes such as sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (Srebp-1c), protein-2 (Srebp2), interleukin IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α. Furthermore, AML-12 cells line was used to investigate the possible mechanisms which indicated that OPC might alleviate liver steatosis and damage through AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation involving oxidative stress. In conclusion, our study demonstrated excellent protective effect of OPC against alcohol-induced liver steatosis and injury, which could a potential drug for the treatment of alcohol-induced liver injury in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Increased liver-specific proteins in circulating extracellular vesicles as potential biomarkers for drug- and alcohol-induced liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Young-Eun; Im, Eun-Ju; Moon, Pyong-Gon; Mezey, Esteban; Song, Byoung-Joon; Baek, Moon-Chang

    2017-01-01

    Drug- and alcohol-induced liver injury are a leading cause of liver failure and transplantation. Emerging evidence suggests that extracellular vesicles (EVs) are a source of biomarkers because they contain unique proteins reflecting the identity and tissue-specific origin of the EV proteins. This study aimed to determine whether potentially hepatotoxic agents, such as acetaminophen (APAP) and binge alcohol, can increase the amounts of circulating EVs and evaluate liver-specific EV proteins as potential biomarkers for liver injury. The circulating EVs, isolated from plasma of APAP-exposed, ethanol-fed mice, or alcoholic hepatitis patients versus normal control counterparts, were characterized by proteomics and biochemical methods. Liver specific EV proteins were analyzed by immunoblots and ELISA. The amounts of total and liver-specific proteins in circulating EVs from APAP-treated mice significantly increased in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Proteomic analysis of EVs from APAP-exposed mice revealed that the amounts of liver-specific and/or hepatotoxic proteins were increased compared to those of controls. Additionally, the increased protein amounts in EVs following APAP exposure returned to basal levels when mice were treated with N-acetylcysteine or glutathione. Similar results of increased amounts and liver-specific proteins in circulating EVs were also observed in mice exposed to hepatotoxic doses of thioacetamide or d-galactosamine but not by non-hepatotoxic penicillin or myotoxic bupivacaine. Additionally, binge ethanol exposure significantly elevated liver-specific proteins in circulating EVs from mice and alcoholics with alcoholic hepatitis, compared to control counterparts. These results indicate that circulating EVs in drug- and alcohol-mediated hepatic injury contain liver-specific proteins that could serve as specific biomarkers for hepatotoxicity. PMID:28225807

  17. Ameliorative Effects of 5-Hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (5-HMF) from Schisandra chinensis on Alcoholic Liver Oxidative Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Qu, Xin-Nan; Han, Ye; Zheng, Si-Wen; Wang, Jia; Wang, Ying-Ping

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the protective effect of 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (5-HMF) on acute alcohol-induced liver oxidative injury in mice. 5-HMF, a maillard reaction product, was isolated from the fruits of Schisandra chinensis for animal experiments. Experimental ICR mice were pretreated with different doses of 5-HMF (7.5, 15, and 30 mg/kg) for seven days by gavage feeding. Biochemical markers and enzymatic antioxidants from serum and liver tissue were examined. Our results showed that the activities of ALT (alanine aminotransferase), AST (aspartate transaminase), TC (total cholesterol), TG (triglyceride), L-DLC (low density lipoprotein) in serum and the levels of MDA (malondialdehyde) in liver tissue, decreased significantly (p < 0.05) in the 5-HMF-treated group compared with the alcohol group. On the contrary, enzymatic antioxidants CAT (catalase), GSH-Px (glutathione peroxidase), and GSH SOD (superoxide dismutase) were markedly elevated in liver tissue treated with 5-HMF (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the hepatic levels of pro-inflammatory response marker tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) were significantly suppressed (p < 0.05). Histopathological examination revealed that 5-HMF (30 mg/kg) pretreatment noticeably prevented alcohol-induced hepatocyte apoptosis and fatty degeneration. It is suggested that the hepatoprotective effects exhibited by 5-HMF on alcohol-induced liver oxidative injury may be due to its potent antioxidant properties. PMID:25622257

  18. Ameliorative effects of 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (5-HMF) from Schisandra chinensis on alcoholic liver oxidative injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Qu, Xin-Nan; Han, Ye; Zheng, Si-Wen; Wang, Jia; Wang, Ying-Ping

    2015-01-22

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the protective effect of 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (5-HMF) on acute alcohol-induced liver oxidative injury in mice. 5-HMF, a maillard reaction product, was isolated from the fruits of Schisandra chinensis for animal experiments. Experimental ICR mice were pretreated with different doses of 5-HMF (7.5, 15, and 30 mg/kg) for seven days by gavage feeding. Biochemical markers and enzymatic antioxidants from serum and liver tissue were examined. Our results showed that the activities of ALT (alanine aminotransferase), AST (aspartate transaminase), TC (total cholesterol), TG (triglyceride), L-DLC (low density lipoprotein) in serum and the levels of MDA (malondialdehyde) in liver tissue, decreased significantly (p < 0.05) in the 5-HMF-treated group compared with the alcohol group. On the contrary, enzymatic antioxidants CAT (catalase), GSH-Px (glutathione peroxidase), and GSH SOD (superoxide dismutase) were markedly elevated in liver tissue treated with 5-HMF (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the hepatic levels of pro-inflammatory response marker tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) were significantly suppressed (p < 0.05). Histopathological examination revealed that 5-HMF (30 mg/kg) pretreatment noticeably prevented alcohol-induced hepatocyte apoptosis and fatty degeneration. It is suggested that the hepatoprotective effects exhibited by 5-HMF on alcohol-induced liver oxidative injury may be due to its potent antioxidant properties.

  19. Socioeconomic impact of alcohol in patients with alcoholic liver disease in eastern India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shivaram Prasad; Padhi, Pradeep Kumar; Narayan, Jimmy; Singh, Ayaskanta; Pati, Girish Kumar; Nath, Preetam; Parida, Prasant Kumar; Mishra, Sunil

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study is to estimate the socioeconomic impact of alcohol use on patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and their families. The demographic and socioeconomic data were collected from hospitalized ALD patients and attendants using a self designed non validated questionnaire and analyzed. Study subjects included 100 consecutive ALD patients (all males). Sixty percent were between 30 and 50 years. Most were married (96 %), literate (63 %), either businessmen (37 %) or employed (30 %) and belonged to middle socioeconomic class. Ninety percent started alcohol use before age 30 years and half during teenage. Mean alcohol intake was 190 mL/day (mean duration 23 years); 60 % consumed alcohol daily. Concomitant tobacco abuse was noted in 79 %. Average expenditure on alcohol was Rs 3800/month. Average hospitalizations for ALD related problems was 2.6 times/year with average expenditure of INR 30,000 (~440 US$) during each hospitalization. For treatment expenses, 86 % of patients borrowed money from friends/relatives, 36 % used saving deposits, and 4 % sold personal belongings. Eleven percent lost their job, and 7 % sold immovable property. In 43 % of cases, children were deprived of education. Besides, 52 % had disturbed social and family life, 34 % abused their spouse, 20 % suffered accidents, and 37 % indulged in physical violence. Majority of ALD patients and their families had disturbed social and family life and incurred severe financial loss arising of alcohol use.

  20. The Alcohol Relapse Risk Assessment: a scoring system to predict the risk of relapse to any alcohol use after liver transplant.

    PubMed

    Rodrigue, James R; Hanto, Douglas W; Curry, Michael P

    2013-12-01

    Alcohol relapse after liver transplant heightens concern about recurrent disease, nonadherence to the immunosuppression regimen, and death. To develop a scoring system to stratify risk of alcohol relapse after liver transplant. Retrospective medical record review. All adult liver transplants performed from May 2002 to February 2011 at a single center in the United States. The incidence of return to any alcohol consumption after liver transplant. Thirty-four percent (40/118) of patients with a history of alcohol abuse/dependency relapsed to use of any alcohol after liver transplant. Nine of 25 hypothesized risk factors were predictive of alcohol relapse after liver transplant: absence of hepatocellular carcinoma, tobacco dependence, continued alcohol use after liver disease diagnosis, low motivation for alcohol treatment, poor stress management skills, no rehabilitation relationship, limited social support, lack of nonmedical behavioral consequences, and continued engagement in social activities with alcohol present. Each independent predictor was assigned an Alcohol Relapse Risk Assessment (ARRA) risk value of 1 point, and patients were classified into 1 of 4 groups by ARRA score: ARRA I = 0, ARRA II = 1 to 3, ARRA III = 4 to 6, and ARRA IV = 7 to 9. Patients in the 2 higher ARRA classifications had significantly higher rates of alcohol relapse and were more likely to return to pretransplant levels of drinking. Alcohol relapse rates are moderately high after liver transplant. The ARRA is a valid and practical tool for identifying pretransplant patients with alcohol abuse or dependency at elevated risk of any alcohol use after liver transplant.

  1. Mitochondrial remodeling in the liver following chronic alcohol feeding to rats.

    PubMed

    Han, Derick; Johnson, Heather S; Rao, Madhuri P; Martin, Gary; Sancheti, Harsh; Silkwood, Kai H; Decker, Carl W; Nguyen, Kim Tho; Casian, Joseph G; Cadenas, Enrique; Kaplowitz, Neil

    2017-01-01

    The feeding of alcohol orally (Lieber-DeCarli diet) to rats has been shown to cause declines in mitochondrial respiration (state III), decreased expression of respiratory complexes, and decreased respiratory control ratios (RCR) in liver mitochondria. These declines and other mitochondrial alterations have led to the hypothesis that alcohol feeding causes "mitochondrial dysfunction" in the liver. If oral alcohol feeding leads to mitochondrial dysfunction, one would predict that increasing alcohol delivery by intragastric (IG) alcohol feeding to rats would cause greater declines in mitochondrial bioenergetics in the liver. In this study, we examined the mitochondrial alterations that occur in rats fed alcohol both orally and intragastrically. Oral alcohol feeding decreased glutamate/malate-, acetaldehyde- and succinate-driven state III respiration, RCR, and expression of respiratory complexes (I, III, IV, V) in liver mitochondria, in agreement with previous results. IG alcohol feeding, on the other hand, caused a slight increase in glutamate/malate-driven respiration, and significantly increased acetaldehyde-driven respiration in liver mitochondria. IG feeding also caused liver mitochondria to experience a decline in succinate-driven respiration, but these decreases were smaller than those observed with oral alcohol feeding. Surprisingly, oral and IG alcohol feeding to rats increased mitochondrial respiration using other substrates, including glycerol-3-phosphate (which delivers electrons from cytoplasmic NADH to mitochondria) and octanoate (a substrate for beta-oxidation). The enhancement of glycerol-3-phosphate- and octanoate-driven respiration suggests that liver mitochondria remodeled in response to alcohol feeding. In support of this notion, we observed that IG alcohol feeding also increased expression of mitochondrial glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase-2 (GPD2), transcription factor A (TFAM), and increased mitochondrial NAD + -NADH and NADP + -NADPH levels in

  2. An extended fatty liver index to predict non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Kantartzis, K; Rettig, I; Staiger, H; Machann, J; Schick, F; Scheja, L; Gastaldelli, A; Bugianesi, E; Peter, A; Schulze, M B; Fritsche, A; Häring, H-U; Stefan, N

    2017-06-01

    In clinical practice, there is a strong interest in non-invasive markers of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Our hypothesis was that the fold-change in plasma triglycerides (TG) during a 2-h oral glucose tolerance test (fold-change TG OGTT ) in concert with blood glucose and lipid parameters, and the rs738409 C>G single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in PNPLA3 might improve the power of the widely used fatty liver index (FLI) to predict NAFLD. The liver fat content of 330 subjects was quantified by 1 H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Blood parameters were measured during fasting and after a 2-h OGTT. A subgroup of 213 subjects underwent these measurements before and after 9 months of a lifestyle intervention. The fold-change TG OGTT was closely associated with liver fat content (r=0.51, P<0.0001), but had less power to predict NAFLD (AUROC=0.75) than the FLI (AUROC=0.79). Not only was the fold-change TG OGTT independently associated with liver fat content and NAFLD, but so also were the 2-h blood glucose level and rs738409 C>G SNP in PNPLA3. In fact, a novel index (extended FLI) generated from these and the usual FLI parameters considerably increased its power to predict NAFLD (AUROC=0.79-0.86). The extended FLI also increased the power to predict changes in liver fat content with a lifestyle intervention (n=213; standardized beta coefficient: 0.23-0.29). This study has provided novel data confirming that the OGTT-derived fold-change TG OGTT and 2-h glucose level, together with the rs738409 C>G SNP in PNPLA3, allow calculation of an extended FLI that considerably improves its power to predict NAFLD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Inorganic arsenic causes fatty liver and interacts with ethanol to cause alcoholic liver disease in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Bambino, Kathryn; Zhang, Chi; Austin, Christine; Amarasiriwardena, Chitra; Arora, Manish; Chu, Jaime; Sadler, Kirsten C

    2018-02-26

    The rapid increase in fatty liver disease (FLD) incidence is attributed largely to genetic and lifestyle factors; however, environmental toxicants are a frequently overlooked factor that can modify the effects of more common causes of FLD. Chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) is associated with liver disease in humans and animal models, but neither the mechanism of action nor the combinatorial interaction with other disease-causing factors has been fully investigated. Here, we examined the contribution of iAs to FLD using zebrafish and tested the interaction with ethanol to cause alcoholic liver disease (ALD). We report that zebrafish exposed to iAs throughout development developed specific phenotypes beginning at 4 days post-fertilization (dpf), including the development of FLD in over 50% of larvae by 5 dpf. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of livers from larvae exposed to either iAs or ethanol revealed the oxidative stress response and the unfolded protein response (UPR) caused by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress as common pathways in both these models of FLD, suggesting that they target similar cellular processes. This was confirmed by our finding that arsenic is synthetically lethal with both ethanol and a well-characterized ER-stress-inducing agent (tunicamycin), suggesting that these exposures work together through UPR activation to cause iAs toxicity. Most significantly, combined exposure to sub-toxic concentrations of iAs and ethanol potentiated the expression of UPR-associated genes, cooperated to induce FLD, reduced the expression of as3mt , which encodes an arsenic-metabolizing enzyme, and significantly increased the concentration of iAs in the liver. This demonstrates that iAs exposure is sufficient to cause FLD and that low doses of iAs can potentiate the effects of ethanol to cause liver disease.This article has an associated First Person interview with the first author of the paper. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. Inorganic arsenic causes fatty liver and interacts with ethanol to cause alcoholic liver disease in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chi; Austin, Christine; Amarasiriwardena, Chitra; Arora, Manish

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT The rapid increase in fatty liver disease (FLD) incidence is attributed largely to genetic and lifestyle factors; however, environmental toxicants are a frequently overlooked factor that can modify the effects of more common causes of FLD. Chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) is associated with liver disease in humans and animal models, but neither the mechanism of action nor the combinatorial interaction with other disease-causing factors has been fully investigated. Here, we examined the contribution of iAs to FLD using zebrafish and tested the interaction with ethanol to cause alcoholic liver disease (ALD). We report that zebrafish exposed to iAs throughout development developed specific phenotypes beginning at 4 days post-fertilization (dpf), including the development of FLD in over 50% of larvae by 5 dpf. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of livers from larvae exposed to either iAs or ethanol revealed the oxidative stress response and the unfolded protein response (UPR) caused by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress as common pathways in both these models of FLD, suggesting that they target similar cellular processes. This was confirmed by our finding that arsenic is synthetically lethal with both ethanol and a well-characterized ER-stress-inducing agent (tunicamycin), suggesting that these exposures work together through UPR activation to cause iAs toxicity. Most significantly, combined exposure to sub-toxic concentrations of iAs and ethanol potentiated the expression of UPR-associated genes, cooperated to induce FLD, reduced the expression of as3mt, which encodes an arsenic-metabolizing enzyme, and significantly increased the concentration of iAs in the liver. This demonstrates that iAs exposure is sufficient to cause FLD and that low doses of iAs can potentiate the effects of ethanol to cause liver disease. This article has an associated First Person interview with the first author of the paper. PMID:29361514

  5. NHE1 deficiency in liver: Implications for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Vikram, E-mail: prasadvm@ucmail.uc.edu; Chirra, Shivani; Kohli, Rohit

    Highlights: • FXR, PGC1α and PPARγ levels are upregulated in NHE1 deficient livers. • NHE1 deficiency downregulates expression of pro-lipogenic genes in liver. • Chronic exposure to high-fat diet upregulates hepatic NHE1 expression. • Loss of NHE1 better preserves hepatic insulin signaling in high-fat diet-fed mice. - Abstract: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease NAFLD is closely associated with the dysregulation of lipid homeostasis. Diet-induced hepatic steatosis, which can initiate NAFLD progression, has been shown to be dramatically reduced in mice lacking the electroneutral Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger NHE1 (Slc9a1). In this study, we investigated if NHE1 deficiency had effects in livermore » that could contribute to the apparent protection against aberrant lipid accumulation. RT-PCR and immunoblot analyses of wild-type and NHE1-null livers revealed an expression profile that strongly suggested attenuation of both de novo lipogenesis and hepatic stellate cell activation, which is implicated in liver fibrosis. This included upregulation of the farnesoid X receptor FXR, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor PPARγ, its co-activator PGC1α, and sestrin 2, an antioxidant protein involved in hepatic metabolic homeostasis. Furthermore, expression levels of the pro-lipogenic liver X receptor LXRα, and acetyl CoA carboxylases 1 and 2 were downregulated. These changes were associated with evidence of reduced cellular stress, which persisted even upon exposure to a high-fat diet, and the better preservation of insulin signaling, as evidenced by protein kinase B/Akt phosphorylation (Ser473). These results indicate that NHE1 deficiency may protect against NAFLD pathogenesis, which is significant given the availability of highly specific NHE1 inhibitors.« less

  6. Angiostatin inhibits experimental liver fibrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Vogten, J Mathys; Drixler, Tamas A; te Velde, Elisabeth A; Schipper, Marguerite E; van Vroonhoven, Theo J M V; Voest, Emile E; Borel Rinkes, Inne H M

    2004-07-01

    Liver fibrosis is a response to chronic hepatic damage, which ultimately leads to liver failure and necessitates liver transplantation. A characteristic of fibrosis is pathological vessel growth. This type of angiogenesis may contribute to the disturbance of hepatocyte perfusion dynamics and lead to aggravation of disease. We hypothesized that angiostatin can inhibit pathological vessel growth and, consequently, the development of hepatic fibrosis. Hepatic fibrosis was induced by injection of carbon tetrachloride for 5 weeks. Angiostatin mice received carbon tetrachloride for 5 weeks and angiostatin during weeks 4 and 5. After 5 weeks, immunohistochemistry for endothelial cell marker von Willebrand factor and for cell proliferation was performed. Angiogenesis was quantified by counting the number of immunopositive microvessels. Also, the relative fibrotic surface was determined using Sirius Red histostaining and computer image analysis. Immunohistochemistry revealed increased expression for von Willebrand factor in fibrotic livers. Immunopositive microvessels were localized in fibrotic areas surrounding larger vessels and in emerging fibrotic septa. Angiostatin reduced the number of immunopositive microvessels by 69% (p<0.001). In addition, angiostatin reduced the relative fibrotic area in the liver by 63+/-0.1% (p<0.001). Finally, angiostatin treatment was not associated with differences in cell proliferation. Angiostatin inhibits the development of pathological angiogenesis and liver fibrosis in mice. These results warrant further evaluation of angiostatin as an antifibrotic agent, potentially contributing to the deferment of liver transplantation and reduced recurrence of fibrotic disease in the transplanted liver.

  7. Fulminant liver failure: clinical and experimental study.

    PubMed Central

    Slapak, M.

    1975-01-01

    Clinical experience of some newer methods of hepatic support is described. The results are unpredictable and far from satisfactory. The need for an animal model in which potential therapeutic methods can be studied is emphasized. Such a model based on carefully imposed ischaemic insult to the liver in the absence of portacaval shunting is described. It is suggested that bacterial presence in the bowel together with a depression of the liver reticuloendothelial function plays an important part in the early and rapid mortality of acute liver failure. Temporary auxiliary liver transplantation using an allograft or a closely related primate heterograft seem to be the 2 best available methods of hepatic support for potentially reversible acute liver failure. Images Fig. 8 PMID:812415

  8. Risk factors for alcohol relapse following orthotopic liver transplantation: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rustad, James K; Stern, Theodore A; Prabhakar, Maithri; Musselman, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Each year, 5000-6000 individuals undergo orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) in the United States, and of these, nearly 18% have alcoholic liver disease. Relapse to alcohol occurs in more than 40% of patients with OLT for alcoholic liver disease. We sought to identify factors that predict relapse to alcohol or medication nonadherence following OLT in patients with alcoholic liver disease and to review what randomized clinical interventions have addressed these factors following OLT. Our hypothesis was that there would be factors before and after OLT that predict relapse to alcohol following OLT, and that these, if targeted, might improve sobriety and associated outcomes of adherence with medications and appointments. We performed a review (focusing on articles published since 2004) with PubMed and MEDLINE searches using the following search terms: liver transplantation, recidivism, alcohol relapse, and predictors of alcohol relapse. We supplemented the online searches with manual reviews of article reference lists and selected relevant articles for further review by author consensus. In largely white populations, prospective studies document that shorter length of pretransplantation sobriety is a significant predictor of time to first drink and time to binge use. Presence of psychiatric comorbidity, high score on standardized High-risk Alcoholism Relapse Scale, and diagnosis of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Fourth Edition) alcohol dependence are predictive of posttransplantation alcohol relapse. Pretransplantation alcohol use history variables (e.g., family history of alcoholism) reliably discriminate between complete abstainers and those who drink, while medical and psychosocial characteristics at early post-liver transplantation period (e.g., more bodily pain) maximally discriminate patterns of alcohol use. Alcoholic individuals with early-onset, rapidly accelerating moderate use and early-onset, continuously increasing heavy use have

  9. New Insights into the Pathogenesis of Alcohol-Induced ER Stress and Liver Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ji, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol-induced liver disease increasingly contributes to human mortality worldwide. Alcohol-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and disruption of cellular protein homeostasis have recently been established as a significant mechanism contributing to liver diseases. The alcohol-induced ER stress occurs not only in cultured hepatocytes but also  in vivo  in the livers of several species including mouse, rat, minipigs, zebrafish, and humans. Identified causes for the ER stress include acetaldehyde, oxidative stress, impaired one carbon metabolism, toxic lipid species, insulin resistance, disrupted calcium homeostasis, and aberrant epigenetic modifications. Importance of each of the causes in alcohol-induced liver injury depends on doses, duration and patterns of alcohol exposure, genetic disposition, environmental factors, cross-talks with other pathogenic pathways, and stages of liver disease. The ER stress may occur more or less all the time during alcohol consumption, which interferes with hepatic protein homeostasis, proliferation, and cell cycle progression promoting development of advanced liver diseases. Emerging evidence indicates that long-term alcohol consumption and ER stress may directly be involved in hepatocellular carcinogenesis (HCC). Dissecting ER stress signaling pathways leading to tumorigenesis will uncover potential therapeutic targets for intervention and treatment of human alcoholics with liver cancer.

  10. The effect of alcohol advertising on immediate alcohol consumption in college students: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Koordeman, Renske; Anschutz, Doeschka J; Engels, Rutger C M E

    2012-05-01

    Survey studies have emphasized a positive association between exposure to alcohol advertising on television (TV) and the onset and continuation of drinking among young people. Alcohol advertising might also directly influence viewers' consumption of alcohol while watching TV. The present study therefore tested the immediate effects of alcohol advertisements on the alcohol consumption of young adults while watching a movie. Weekly drinking, problem drinking, positive and arousal expectancies of alcohol, ad recall, attitude, and skepticism toward the ads were tested as moderators. An experimental design comparing 2 advertisement conditions (alcohol ads vs. nonalcohol ads) was used. A total of 80 men, young adult friendly dyads (ages 18 to 29) participated. The study examined actual alcohol consumption while watching a 1-hour movie with 3 advertising breaks. A multivariate regression analysis was used to examine the effects of advertisement condition on alcohol consumption. Assignment to the alcohol advertisement condition did not increase alcohol consumption. In addition, no moderating effects between advertisement condition and the individual factors on alcohol consumption were found. Viewing alcohol advertising did not lead to higher alcohol consumption in young men while watching a movie. However, replications of this study using other samples (e.g., different countries and cultures), other settings (e.g., movie theater, home), and with other designs (e.g., different movies and alcohol ads, cumulative exposure, extended exposure effects) are warranted. Copyright © 2011 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  11. Trends in European liver death rates: implications for alcohol policy.

    PubMed

    Jewell, Jo; Sheron, Nick

    2010-06-01

    Changing alcohol consumption has led to a three- to fivefold increase in liver deaths in the UK and Finland, and a three- to fivefold decrease in France and Italy. Increasing consumption from a low baseline has been driven by fiscal, marketing and commercial factors--some of which have occurred as a result of countries joining the EU. In contrast consumption has fallen from previously very high levels as a result of shifting social and cultural factors; a move from rural to urban lifestyles and increased health consciousness. The marketing drive in these countries has had to shift from a model based on quantity to one based on quality, which means that health gains have occurred alongside a steady improvement in the overall value of the wine industry. Fiscal incentives--minimum pricing, restricting cross border trade and more volumetric taxation could aid this shift. A healthier population and a healthy drinks industry are not incompatible.

  12. Pediatric Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Current Thinking.

    PubMed

    Nobili, Valerio; Socha, Piotr

    2017-10-31

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), an increasingly prevalent paediatric disorder is diagnosed and managed by both paediatric gastroenterologists / hepatologists but also frequently by the general paediatrician. This paper updates recent advances in diagnostic and therapeutic approach which may be applied to everyday practice. Diagnosis of NAFLD takes into account the risk factor profile and is a diagnosis of exclusion. Techniques such as transient elastography and specific biomarkers aimed at improving diagnosis and monitoring of NAFLD need further validation in the paediatric population. Defining the risk to develop cirrhosis seems to be of primary importance already in childhood and a combination of genetic, clinical and environmental factors can help in monitoring and making decisions on therapy. Weight reduction therapy should be the aim of treatment approach but the compliance is poor and pharmacological treatment would be helpful- DHA, some probiotics, vitamin E are to be considered but evidence is not sufficient to recommend widespread use.

  13. Hypogonadism and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Mintziori, Gesthimani; Poulakos, Pavlos; Tsametis, Christos; Goulis, Dimitrios G

    2017-06-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is more common in men than in women. Thus, it has been suggested that sex steroids do have a role in the development of NAFLD. The aim of the current paper is to illustrate the association between NAFLD and hypogonadism, by reviewing data derived from both human and animal studies. The prevalence of NAFLD is high in men with hypogonadism, including those with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH), as well as in women in post-menopause, those under estrogen receptor antagonist treatment or women with Turner syndrome. Estrogens seem to play a pivotal role in hepatic lipid homeostasis, as demonstrated in animal models with diminished ovarian estrogens (i.e., ovariectomized mice) and low serum testosterone (T) concentration is independently associated with NAFLD. The elucidation of the exact role of sex steroids in NAFLD pathogenesis would create a unique opportunity to develop novel therapies to tackle NAFLD disease.

  14. Feasibility of detection and intervention for alcohol-related liver disease in the community: the Alcohol and Liver Disease Detection study (ALDDeS).

    PubMed

    Sheron, Nick; Moore, Michael; O'Brien, Wendy; Harris, Scott; Roderick, Paul

    2013-10-01

    In the past 15 years mortality rates from liver disease have doubled in the UK. Brief alcohol advice is cost effective, but clinically meaningful reductions in alcohol consumption only occur in around 1 in 10 individuals. To provide evidence that detecting early liver disease in the community is feasible, practical, and that feedback of liver risk can increase the proportion of subjects reducing alcohol consumption. A community feasibility study in nine general practice sites in Hampshire. Hazardous and harmful drinkers were identified by WHO AUDIT questionnaire and offered screening for liver fibrosis. In total, 4630 individuals responded, of whom 1128 (24%) hazardous or harmful drinkers were offered a liver fibrosis check using the Southampton Traffic Light (STL) test; 393 (38%) attended and test results were returned by post. The STL has a low threshold for liver fibrosis with 45 (11%) red, 157 (40%) amber, and 191 (49%) green results. Follow-up AUDIT data was obtained for 303/393 (77%) and 76/153 (50%) subjects with evidence of liver damage reduced drinking by at least one AUDIT category (harmful to hazardous, or hazardous to low risk) compared with 52/150 (35%, P<0.011) subjects without this evidence; in the subset of harmful drinkers patterns (AUDIT >15), 22/34 (65%) of STL positives, reduced drinking compared with 10/29 (35%, P<0.017) STL negatives. Detection of liver disease in the community is feasible, and feedback of liver risk may reduce harmful drinking.

  15. Α₁-antitrypsin PiMZ heterozygosity has an independent aggravating effect on liver fibrosis in alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Goltz, Diane; Hittetiya, Kanishka; Vössing, Lena Marie; Kirfel, Jutta; Spengler, Ulrich; Fischer, Hans-Peter

    2014-11-01

    Heterozygous α1-antitrypsin deficiency type PiZ (PiMZ) results in chronic liver injury and predisposes to hepatocellular carcinoma. Gene frequency of the PiZ allele ranges from 0.005 to 0.027 in Western and Central Europe; therefore, there is a substantial risk of coincidence with chronic alcohol abuse. This retrospective case-control study evaluates the impact of PiMZ genotype on the development of chronic liver disease in alcohol consuming patients. Six thousand eight hundred eighty-six consecutive liver specimens were immunohistochemically tested for PiZ-deposits. From 254 PiZ-positive patients, the liver biopsies of 30 PiMZ adults without concomitant liver disease other than alcoholic liver disease (ALD) were selected and matched to PiMM (wild type) patients with respect to age, gender and lifetime daily alcohol ingestion (LDAI). Histomorphological changes were assessed using the SAF score and by digital image analysis. Liver cirrhosis was significantly more frequent in PIMZ patients than in matched PiMM patients (PiMM 9/30 vs. PiMZ 14/30, p = 0.04). Comparison of the extent of fibrosis in PiMZ and PiMM livers by two-way ANOVA indicated that the amount of LDAI has a major effect in PiMZ and PiMM patients (30.04 % of total variation, p < 0.0001), whereas PIMZ genotype has a minor but independent effect on liver fibrosis as assessed by digital planimetric evaluation (9.27 % of total variation, p = 0.005). Semiquantitative assessment was in agreement with this finding. Histomorphological findings support that PiMZ heterozygosity has an independent aggravating effect on liver fibrosis, even though the pathogenic effect of alcohol consumption is much stronger.

  16. Fungal colonization of the esophagus in alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Péter, Z; Zala, J; Szabó, O; Telegdy, L; Horváth, Z; Makara, M; Schuller, J

    2000-10-01

    Little is known about the fungal colonization of the esophagus. Since alcoholic liver disease (ALD) patients are prone to fungal esophagitis, we have investigated the esophageal fungal colonization of this patient group. One hundred consecutive ALD patients were enrolled in this prospective study. 22 patients with dyspeptic symptoms acted as controls. After taking an oropharyngeal swab, patients underwent an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and surface material was obtained from the esophagus for direct smears and culture. In the ALD group pseudohyphae were found in 21.5% and yeast forms in 6.4% of the direct smears. The culture was positive in 40.8% of the ALD patients, the isolated strains were: 30 C. albicans, 2 C. kefyr, 2 C. krusei, 1 C. zeylanoides and in 3 cases the species could not be identified. 41.9% of ALD patients and 13.6% of control patients (p = 0.013) had fungi in their esophagus. Significantly more ALD patients had fungal esophagitis than in the control group (19.3% vs. 0%, p = 0.021), the rate of fungal colonization was also higher, but the difference was not significant (22.5% vs. 13.6%). A significantly higher rate of fungal esophagitis and esophageal colonization was found in patients with fungi in their oropharyngeal swabs (p = 0.00001). Fungal colonization of the esophagus is frequent in ALD patients. Its presence might have clinical significance in the case of liver transplantation.

  17. The Osteopontin Level in Liver, Adipose Tissue and Serum Is Correlated with Fibrosis in Patients with Alcoholic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Voican, Cosmin S.; Anty, Rodolphe; Saint-Paul, Marie-Christine; Rosenthal-Allieri, Maria-Alessandra; Agostini, Hélène; Njike, Micheline; Barri-Ova, Nadége; Naveau, Sylvie; Le Marchand-Brustel, Yannick; Veillon, Pascal; Calès, Paul; Perlemuter, Gabriel; Tran, Albert; Gual, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Background Osteopontin (OPN) plays an important role in the progression of chronic liver diseases. We aimed to quantify the liver, adipose tissue and serum levels of OPN in heavy alcohol drinkers and to compare them with the histological severity of hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. Methodology/Principal Findings OPN was evaluated in the serum of a retrospective and prospective group of 109 and 95 heavy alcohol drinkers, respectively, in the liver of 34 patients from the retrospective group, and in the liver and adipose tissue from an additional group of 38 heavy alcohol drinkers. Serum levels of OPN increased slightly with hepatic inflammation and progressively with the severity of hepatic fibrosis. Hepatic OPN expression correlated with hepatic inflammation, fibrosis, TGFβ expression, neutrophils accumulation and with the serum OPN level. Interestingly, adipose tissue OPN expression also correlated with hepatic fibrosis even after 7 days of alcohol abstinence. The elevated serum OPN level was an independent risk factor in estimating significant (F≥2) fibrosis in a model combining alkaline phosphatase, albumin, hemoglobin, OPN and FibroMeter® levels. OPN had an area under the receiving operator curve that estimated significant fibrosis of 0.89 and 0.88 in the retrospective and prospective groups, respectively. OPN, Hyaluronate (AUROC: 0.88), total Cytokeratin 18 (AUROC: 0.83) and FibroMeter® (AUROC: 0.90) estimated significance to the same extent in the retrospective group. Finally, the serum OPN levels also correlated with hepatic fibrosis and estimated significant (F≥2) fibrosis in 86 patients with chronic hepatitis C, which suggested that its elevated level could be a general response to chronic liver injury. Conclusion/Significance OPN increased in the liver, adipose tissue and serum with liver fibrosis in alcoholic patients. Further, OPN is a new relevant biomarker for significant liver fibrosis. OPN could thus be an important actor in the

  18. Induction of CYP2E1 in non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Aljomah, Ghanim; Baker, Susan S.; Liu, Wensheng; Kozielski, Rafal; Oluwole, Janet; Lupu, Benita; Baker, Robert D.; Zhu, Lixin

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence supports a contribution of endogenous alcohol metabolism in the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). However, it is not known whether the expression of alcohol metabolism genes is altered in the livers of simple steatosis. There is also a current debate on whether fatty acids induce CYP2E1 in fatty livers. In this study, expression of alcohol metabolizing genes in the liver biopsies of simple steatosis patients was examined by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), in comparison to biopsies of NASH livers and normal controls. Induction of alcohol metabolizing genes was also examined in cultured HepG2 cells treated with ethanol or oleic acid, by qRT-PCR and Western blots. We found that the mRNA expression of alcohol metabolizing genes including ADH1C, ADH4, ADH6, catalase and CYP2E1 were elevated in the livers of simple steatosis, to similar levels found in NASH livers. In cultured HepG2 cells, ethanol induced the expression of CYP2E1 mRNA and protein, but not ADH4 or ADH6; oleic acid did not induce any of these genes. These results suggest that elevated alcohol metabolism may contribute to the pathogenesis of NAFLD at the stage of simple steatosis as well as more severe stages. Our in vitro data support that CYP2E1 is induced by endogenous alcohol but not by fatty acids. PMID:26551085

  19. Gut-liver axis and probiotics: Their role in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Paolella, Giulia; Mandato, Claudia; Pierri, Luca; Poeta, Marco; Di Stasi, Martina; Vajro, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of obesity and its related conditions, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), has dramatically increased in all age groups worldwide. Given the health consequences of these conditions, and the subsequent economic burden on healthcare systems, their prevention and treatment have become major priorities. Because standard dietary and lifestyle changes and pathogenically-oriented therapies (e.g., antioxidants, oral hypoglycemic agents, and lipid-lowering agents) often fail due to poor compliance and/or lack of efficacy, novel approaches directed toward other pathomechanisms are needed. Here we present several lines of evidence indicating that, by increasing energy extraction in some dysbiosis conditions or small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, specific gut microbiota and/or a “low bacterial richness” may play a role in obesity, metabolic syndrome, and fatty liver. Under conditions involving a damaged intestinal barrier (“leaky gut”), the gut-liver axis may enhance the natural interactions between intestinal bacteria/bacterial products and hepatic receptors (e.g., toll-like receptors), thus promoting the following cascade of events: oxidative stress, insulin-resistance, hepatic inflammation, and fibrosis. We also discuss the possible modulation of gut microbiota by probiotics, as attempted in NAFLD animal model studies and in several pilot pediatric and adult human studies. Globally, this approach appears to be a promising and innovative add-on therapeutic tool for NAFLD in the context of multi-target therapy. PMID:25400436

  20. Hepatoprotective effects of Spirulina maxima in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: a case series

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases range from simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. The "two hits" hypothesis is widely accepted for its pathogenesis: the first hit is an increased fat flux to the liver, which predisposes our patient to a second hit where increasing free fatty acid oxidation into the mitochondria leads to oxidative stress, lipoperoxidation and a chain reaction with increased ROS. Clinical indications include abdominal cramps, meteorism and fatigue. Most patients, however, are asymptomatic, and diagnosis is based on aminotransferase elevation and ultrasonography (or "brilliant liver"). Spirulina maxima has been experimentally proven to possess in vivo and in vitro hepatoprotective properties by maintaining the liver lipid profile. This case report evaluates the hepatoprotective effects of orally supplied Spirulina maxima. Case presentation Three Hispanic Mexican patients (a 43-year-old man, a 77-year-old man and a 44-year-old woman) underwent ultrasonography and were treated with 4.5 g/day of Spirulina maxima for three months. Their blood samples before and after the treatment determined triacylglycerols, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, alanine aminotransferase and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. The results were assessed using ultrasound. Conclusion Treatment had therapeutic effects as evidenced by ultrasonography and the aminotransferase data. Hypolipidemic effects were also shown. We conclude that Spirulina maxima may be considered an alternative treatment for patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases and dyslipidemic disorder. PMID:20370930

  1. From the liver to the heart: Cardiac dysfunction in obese children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Di Sessa, Anna; Umano, Giuseppina Rosaria; Miraglia del Giudice, Emanuele; Santoro, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    In the last decades the prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has increased as a consequence of the childhood obesity world epidemic. The liver damage occurring in NAFLD ranges from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis, fibrosis and cirrhosis. Recent findings reported that fatty liver disease is related to early atherosclerosis and cardiac dysfunction even in the pediatric population. Moreover, some authors have shown an association between liver steatosis and cardiac abnormalities, including rise in left ventricular mass, systolic and diastolic dysfunction and epicardial adipose tissue thickness. In this editorial, we provide a brief overview of the current knowledge concerning the association between NAFLD and cardiac dysfunction. PMID:28144387

  2. From the liver to the heart: Cardiac dysfunction in obese children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Di Sessa, Anna; Umano, Giuseppina Rosaria; Miraglia Del Giudice, Emanuele; Santoro, Nicola

    2017-01-18

    In the last decades the prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has increased as a consequence of the childhood obesity world epidemic. The liver damage occurring in NAFLD ranges from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis, fibrosis and cirrhosis. Recent findings reported that fatty liver disease is related to early atherosclerosis and cardiac dysfunction even in the pediatric population. Moreover, some authors have shown an association between liver steatosis and cardiac abnormalities, including rise in left ventricular mass, systolic and diastolic dysfunction and epicardial adipose tissue thickness. In this editorial, we provide a brief overview of the current knowledge concerning the association between NAFLD and cardiac dysfunction.

  3. An update on non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in Asia.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ching-Sheng; Kao, Jia-Horng

    2017-08-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the most overwhelming liver disease in Asia. In consideration of its increasing medical and economic impact on Asian people, it is time for us to review the update data in Asian countries and formulate strategies to cope with this emerging health problem in Asia. Moreover, growing data indicates that NAFLD may be a systemic disease, not just confined to liver-specific morbidity and mortality, but also associated with several extra-hepatic manifestations, such as cardiovascular diseases, chronic renal diseases, and malignancy. As the co-occurrence of NAFLD and viral hepatitis is common in Asia, issues related to the impact of NAFLD on the clinical outcomes and management of viral hepatitis remain to be elucidated. Areas covered: In this article, a narrative review was conducted, searching for literature from PubMed, Ovid MEDLINE, and the Cochrane Library database till August 2016. Studies relevant to the emerging data of NAFLD in Asia, including the diagnosis, risk factors, the assessment and management of Asian NAFLD patients were examined and discussed. Expert commentary: Collaboration in Asian countries to develop an effective and practical measurement to assess the severity of NAFLD is urgently required.

  4. Choline and Fructooligosaccharide: Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, Cardiac Fat Deposition, and Oxidative Stress Markers

    PubMed Central

    Borges Haubert, Nadia Juliana Beraldo Goulart; Marchini, Julio Sergio; Carvalho Cunha, Selma Freire; Suen, Vivian Marques Miguel; Padovan, Gilberto Joao; Jordao, Alceu Afonso; Marchini Alves, Claudia Maria Meirelles; Marchini, Julio Flavio Meirelles; Vannucchi, Helio

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in rats with choline and fructooligosaccharide (FOS). The healthy control group received standard diet. The other three groups consisted of animals with NAFLD. Group Estr received standard diet; group Echo received standard diet plus choline (3 g/100 g diet); and group Efos received standard diet plus FOS (10 g/100 g diet). Food intake, weight, urinary nitrogen, urinary ammonia, total cholesterol, serum triacylglyceride, liver and heart weights, tissue nitrogen, tissue fat, vitamin E, TBARS, and reduced glutathione (GSH) were measured in hepatic and heart tissue. Choline and FOS treatments resulted in total mean fat reduction in liver and heart tissue of 0.2 and 1.7 g, respectively. Both treatments were equally effective in reducing hepatic and cardiac steatosis. There were no differences in the TBARS level among experimental and control groups, indicating that the proposed treatments had no added protection against free radicals. While all experimental groups had increased vitamin E and GSH levels, choline treatment led to a significant increase compared to control. PMID:25987847

  5. Cajanus cajan Linn. (Leguminosae) prevents alcohol-induced rat liver damage and augments cytoprotective function.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Rakesh; Dasgupta, Suman; Biswas, Anindita; Bhattacharya, Anirban; Pal, Bikas C; Bandyopadhyay, Debashis; Bhattacharya, Shelley; Bhattacharya, Samir

    2008-08-13

    Cajanus cajan Linn. (Leguminosae) is a nontoxic edible herb, widely used in Indian folk medicine for the prevention of various liver disorders. In the present study we have demonstrated that methanol-aqueous fraction (MAF2) of Cajanus cajan leaf extract could prevent the chronically treated alcohol induced rat liver damage. Chronic doses of alcohol (3.7 g/ kg) orally administered to rats for 28 days and liver function marker enzymes such as GPT, GOT, ALP and anti-oxidant enzyme activities were determined. Effect of MAF2 at a dose of 50mg/kg body weight on alcohol treated rats was noted. Alcohol effected significant increase in liver marker enzyme activities and reduced the activities of anti-oxidant enzymes. Co-administration of MAF2 reversed the liver damage due to alcohol; it decreased the activities of liver marker enzymes and augmented antioxidant enzyme activities. We also demonstrate significant decrease of the phase II detoxifying enzyme, UDP-glucuronosyl transferase (UGT) activity along with a three- and two-fold decrease of UGT2B gene and protein expression respectively. MAF2 co-administration normalized UGT activity and revived the expression of UGT2B with a concomitant expression and nuclear translocation of Nrf2, a transcription factor that regulates the expression of many cytoprotective genes. Cajanus cajan extract therefore shows a promise in therapeutic use in alcohol induced liver dysfunction.

  6. Histocompatibility antigens in patients with alcoholic liver disease in Scotland and northeastern England: failure to show an association.

    PubMed Central

    Mills, P R; MacSween, R N; Dick, H M; Hislop, W S

    1988-01-01

    A study of HLA-A and B antigens in 248 patients with biopsy diagnosed alcoholic liver disease was conducted to examine for a genetic predisposition to alcohol related liver injury. No statistically significant differences were established for 8 HLA-A and 16 HLA-B antigens between normal healthy controls (n = 342) and patients with alcoholic fatty liver (n = 86), alcoholic hepatitis (n = 63), active alcoholic cirrhosis (n = 64) and inactive alcoholic cirrhosis (n = 35). It is concluded that no HLA-A or B locus genetic susceptibility to alcoholic related injury could be shown. PMID:3162222

  7. [Dietetary recommendation for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease].

    PubMed

    Jeznach-Steinhagen, Anna; Ostrowska, Joanna; Czerwonogrodzka-Senczyna, Aneta; Boniecka, Iwona; Gronostajska, Wioletta

    2017-12-22

    Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) is currently the most common chronic liver disease in the developed world. Nowadays, in the adult population of Europe it is estimated at 14% to 21%. Its most important risk factors are obesity and metabolic syndrome. Introducing lifestyle changes such as: dietary intervention and increased physical activity are the first-line treatment and are intended to support not only NAFLD but also associated diseases such as obesity, insulin resistance, diabetes and dyslipidemia. Dietary management focuses on weight reduction of overweight or obese people by decreasing energy in diet. It is recommended to limit the intake of saturated fats and trans fatty acids as well as cholesterol. Instead, it is important to increase the proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acid diets, mainly from the n-3 family, which exhibit anti-inflammatory activity. It is also beneficial to eat nuts, despite their high energy value, as a source of alpha linolenic acid, which lowers LDL cholesterol. It is important to increase the share of vegetable protein (eg. soya) and limit the intake of fat meat, milk and the dairy products. A key role in the treatment and prevention of NAFLD is also a reduction of simple sugars and total exclusion of added sugar in the diet. The rise of NAFLD in developed countries is analogous to the increase of fructose consumption, which high intake is directly indicated as the main cause of the disease. Choosing foods with high fiber content, low glycemic index and meals composed with low glycemic load, is conducive to weight reduction. An important role in supporting NAFLD treatment is also attributed to vitamin D, C and E supplementation and some probiotic bacteria, as well as cinnamon and turmeric, which improve insulin sensitivity. Daily physical activity is strongly recommended as the supplement of healthy lifestyle.

  8. Weight reduction for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lijun; Wang, Jiyao; Li, Feng

    2011-06-15

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is becoming a wide spread liver disease. The present recommendations for treatment are not evidence-based. Some of them are various weight reduction measures with diet, exercise, drug, or surgical therapy. To assess the benefits and harms of intended weight reduction for patients with NAFLD. We searched The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded, Chinese Biomedicine Database, and ClinicalTrials.gov until February 2011. We included randomised clinical trials evaluating weight reduction with different measures versus no intervention or placebo in NAFLD patients. We extracted data independently. We calculated the odds ratio (OR) for dichotomous data and calculated the mean difference (MD) for continuous data, both with 95% confidence intervals (CI). The review includes seven trials; five on aspects of lifestyle changes (eg, diet, physical exercise) and two on treatment with a weight reduction drug 'orlistat'. In total, 373 participants were enrolled, and the duration of the trials ranged from 1 month to 1 year. Only one trial on lifestyle programme was judged to be of low risk of bias. We could not perform meta-analyses for the main outcomes as they were either not reported or there were insufficient number of trials for each outcome to be meta-analysed. We could meta-analyse the available data for body weight and body mass index only. Adverse events were poorly reported. The sparse data and high risk of bias preclude us from drawing any definite conclusion on lifestyle programme or orlistat for treatment of NAFLD. Further randomised clinical trials with low risk of bias are needed to test the beneficial and harmful effects of weight reduction for NAFLD patients. The long-term prognosis of development of fibrosis, mortality, and quality of life should be studied.

  9. Horse Liver Alcohol Dehydrogenase: Zinc Coordination and Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Plapp, Bryce V.; Savarimuthu, Baskar Raj; Ferraro, Daniel J.

    During catalysis by liver alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), a water bound to the catalytic zinc is replaced by the oxygen of the substrates. The mechanism might involve a pentacoordinated zinc or a double-displacement reaction with participation by a nearby glutamate residue, as suggested by studies of human ADH3, yeast ADH1, and some other tetrameric ADHs. Zinc coordination and participation of water in the enzyme mechanism were investigated by X-ray crystallography. The apoenzyme and its complex with adenosine 5'-diphosphoribose have an open protein conformation with the catalytic zinc in one position, tetracoordinated by Cys-46, His-67, Cys-174, and a water molecule. The bidentatemore » chelators 2,2'-bipyridine and 1,10-phenanthroline displace the water and form a pentacoordinated zinc. The enzyme–NADH complex has a closed conformation similar to that of ternary complexes with coenzyme and substrate analogues; the coordination of the catalytic zinc is similar to that found in the apoenzyme, except that a minor, alternative position for the catalytic zinc is ~1.3 Å from the major position and closer to Glu-68, which could form the alternative coordination to the catalytic zinc. Complexes with NADH and N-1-methylhexylformamide or N-benzylformamide (or with NAD+ and fluoro alcohols) have the classical tetracoordinated zinc, and no water is bound to the zinc or the nicotinamide rings. The major forms of the enzyme in the mechanism have a tetracoordinated zinc, where the carboxylate group of Glu-68 could participate in the exchange of water and substrates on the zinc. Hydride transfer in the Michaelis complexes does not involve a nearby water.« less

  10. Horse Liver Alcohol Dehydrogenase: Zinc Coordination and Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    During catalysis by liver alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), a water bound to the catalytic zinc is replaced by the oxygen of the substrates. The mechanism might involve a pentacoordinated zinc or a double-displacement reaction with participation by a nearby glutamate residue, as suggested by studies of human ADH3, yeast ADH1, and some other tetrameric ADHs. Zinc coordination and participation of water in the enzyme mechanism were investigated by X-ray crystallography. The apoenzyme and its complex with adenosine 5′-diphosphoribose have an open protein conformation with the catalytic zinc in one position, tetracoordinated by Cys-46, His-67, Cys-174, and a water molecule. The bidentate chelators 2,2′-bipyridine and 1,10-phenanthroline displace the water and form a pentacoordinated zinc. The enzyme–NADH complex has a closed conformation similar to that of ternary complexes with coenzyme and substrate analogues; the coordination of the catalytic zinc is similar to that found in the apoenzyme, except that a minor, alternative position for the catalytic zinc is ∼1.3 Å from the major position and closer to Glu-68, which could form the alternative coordination to the catalytic zinc. Complexes with NADH and N-1-methylhexylformamide or N-benzylformamide (or with NAD+ and fluoro alcohols) have the classical tetracoordinated zinc, and no water is bound to the zinc or the nicotinamide rings. The major forms of the enzyme in the mechanism have a tetracoordinated zinc, where the carboxylate group of Glu-68 could participate in the exchange of water and substrates on the zinc. Hydride transfer in the Michaelis complexes does not involve a nearby water. PMID:28640600

  11. Alcohol and acute pancreatitis. An experimental study in the rat.

    PubMed

    Jalovaara, P; Apaja, M

    1978-01-01

    The effect of chronic alcohol pretreatment and various pancreatobiliary secretions on the severity of experimental pancreatitis was studied in the rat. 95 rats were pretreated with ethanol (20% w/v, 1.1 ml/100 g body weight) five times weekly for 10 to 12 weeks by gastric intubation. 88 rats served as controls. Pancreatic lesions were produced by retograde injection of different pancreatobiliary secretions into the pancreatic ducts. The secretions were collected from both normal and chronically alcohol-fed rats, and each was used for induction of experimental pancreatitis in the control and alcohol pretreated rats. Bile obtained from normal rats was no more toxic to the pancreas than 0.9% saline solution, while bile obtained from the chronically alcohol-fed rats caused significantly more serious lesions to the pancreas than did normal rat bile. Bile-pancreatic juice (mixture of secretions at papilla of Vater) of normal and chronically alcohol-fed rats was as toxic as the bile of the alcohol-fed rats. Alcohol pretreatment had no significant effect on the severity of pancreatitis when control and alcohol-fed groups separately or the whole material according to pretreatment was examined. These results suggest that the metabolic effects of ethanol on the pancreas as such do not sensitize the pancreas to acute pancreatitis. An exogenous mechanism is required. The reflux of toxic alcoholic bile into the pancreas might act as an induction factor in acute alcohol pancreatitis.

  12. Circulating lipocalin 2 is neither related to liver steatosis in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease nor to residual liver function in cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Meier, Elisabeth M; Pohl, Rebekka; Rein-Fischboeck, Lisa; Schacherer, Doris; Eisinger, Kristina; Wiest, Reiner; Krautbauer, Sabrina; Buechler, Christa

    2016-09-01

    Lipocalin 2 (LCN2) is induced in the injured liver and associated with inflammation. Aim of the present study was to evaluate whether serum LCN2 is a non-invasive marker to assess hepatic steatosis in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) or residual liver function in patients with liver cirrhosis. Therefore, LCN2 was measured by ELISA in serum of 32 randomly selected patients without fatty liver (controls), 24 patients with ultrasound diagnosed NAFLD and 42 patients with liver cirrhosis mainly due to alcohol. Systemic LCN2 was comparable in patients with liver steatosis, those with liver cirrhosis and controls. LCN2 negatively correlated with bilirubin in both cohorts. In cirrhosis, LCN2 was not associated with more advanced liver injury defined by the CHILD-PUGH score and model for end-stage liver disease score. Resistin but not C-reactive protein or chemerin positively correlated with LCN2. LCN2 levels were not increased in patients with ascites or patients with esophageal varices. Consequently, reduction of portal pressure by transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt did not affect LCN2 levels. Hepatic venous blood (HVS), portal venous blood and systemic venous blood levels of LCN2 were similar. HVS LCN2 was unchanged in patients with end-stage liver cirrhosis compared to those with well-compensated disease arguing against increased hepatic release. Current data exclude that serum LCN2 is of any value as steatosis marker in patients with NAFLD and indicator of liver function in patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A functional polymorphism of the NFKB1 gene increases the risk for alcoholic liver cirrhosis in patients with alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Miguel; Pastor, Isabel; González-Sarmiento, Rogelio; Laso, Francisco Javier

    2009-11-01

    The genetic basis for the predisposition to alcoholic liver cirrhosis (ALC) remains unknown. Increasing evidence supports a role for the nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB, the NF-kappaB inhibitor alpha (NFKBIA), and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease, raising the possibility that common polymorphisms in genes encoding these molecules may confer susceptibility to ALC. The objective of this study was to analyze the relationship between common polymorphisms in NFKB1, NFKBIA, and PPARG2 genes and the presence of ALC. A total of 258 male alcoholics (161 without liver disease and 97 with ALC) and 101 healthy controls were genotyped for the -94ins/delATTG NFKB1, 3'-UTR+126G>A NFKBIA, and 34C>G PPARG2 polymorphisms. The association of these genetic variants with ALC was tested in alcoholic patients with alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence. A logistic regression analysis was further performed to analyze the model of inheritance. We found an association between the presence of the deletion allele in NFKB1 polymorphism and ALC in patients with alcohol dependence. We found no association between NFKBIA and PPARG2 polymorphisms and the presence of ALC. The deletion allele of the -94ins/del NFKB1 polymorphism could be associated with a higher risk of developing ALC through an increase in inflammation, as supported by previous data.

  14. Protective effects of C-phycocyanin on alcohol-induced acute liver injury in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Dong; Liu, Bing; Luan, Xiying; Sun, Junyan; Liu, Nana; Qin, Song; Du, Zhenning

    2016-03-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption leads to liver disease. Extensive evidence suggests that C-phycocyanin (C-PC), a chromophore phycocyanobilin derived from Spirulina platensis, exerts protective effects against chemical-induced organ damage. In this study, we investigated whether C-PC could protect against ethanol-induced acute liver injury. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (CHOL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), liver homogenate malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) content were measured, and pathological examination of liver sections were examined. C-PC showed obvious inhibitory effects on serum ALT, AST, TG, CHOL, LDL and MDA, and SOD content significantly increased in the liver. The structure of hepatic lobules was clear, liver sinus returned to normal, and liver cell cords were arranged in neat rows. Cloudiness, swelling, inflammatory cell infiltration and spotty necrosis of liver cells were significantly reduced. Therefore, C-PC can significantly protect against ethanol-induced acute liver injury.

  15. Alcohol abuse and liver enzymes (AALE): results of an intercompany study of mortality.

    PubMed

    Titcomb, C; Braun, R; Roudebush, B; Mast, J; Woodman, H

    2001-01-01

    Evaluation of applicants for life insurance who have elevations of their liver function tests or an increased probability of alcohol abuse has always been difficult for underwriters. This paper reports the results of an intercompany study in which the pooled mortality experience of a group of insureds with evidence of alcohol abuse, an adverse driving record or elevations of the liver transaminases or gamma-glutamyl transferase is summarized.

  16. Serological markers of hepatitis B in patients with alcoholic liver disease: a multi-centre survey

    PubMed Central

    Hislop, WS; Follett, EAC; Bouchier, IAD; MacSween, RNM

    1981-01-01

    In a study of 195 patients derived from five centres in northern Britain and with histologically confirmed alcoholic liver disease we have found an increased prevalence of serological markers of hepatitis B. This increased prevalence was found in each of the five centres; the overall frequency ranged from 11% sero-positivity in fatty liver, 12% in alcoholic hepatitis and 27% in cirrhosis. PMID:7276216

  17. PNPLA3 Expression Is Related to Liver Steatosis in Morbidly Obese Women with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aragonès, Gemma; Auguet, Teresa; Armengol, Sandra; Berlanga, Alba; Guiu-Jurado, Esther; Aguilar, Carmen; Martínez, Salomé; Sabench, Fátima; Porras, José Antonio; Ruiz, Maikel Daniel; Hernández, Mercé; Sirvent, Joan Josep; Del Castillo, Daniel; Richart, Cristóbal

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports suggest a role for the Patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein 3 (PNPLA3) in the pathology of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Lipid deposition in the liver seems to be a critical process in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the association between the liver PNPLA3 expression, key genes of lipid metabolism, and the presence of NAFLD in morbidly obese women. We used real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis to analyze the hepatic expression of PNPLA3 and lipid metabolism-related genes in 55 morbidly obese subjects with normal liver histology (NL, n = 18), simple steatosis (SS, n = 20), and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, n = 17). Liver biopsies were collected during bariatric surgery. We observed that liver PNPLA3 expression was increased in NAFLD than in NL. It was also upregulated in SS than in NL. Interestingly, we found that the expression of PNPLA3 was significantly higher in severe than mild SS group. In addition, the expression of the transcription factors LXRα, PPARα, and SREBP2 was positively correlated with PNPLA3 liver expression. Regarding rs738409 polymorphism, GG genotype was positive correlated with the presence of NASH. In conclusion, our results show that PNPLA3 could be related to lipid accumulation in liver, mainly in the development and progression of simple steatosis. PMID:27128907

  18. PNPLA3 Expression Is Related to Liver Steatosis in Morbidly Obese Women with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Aragonès, Gemma; Auguet, Teresa; Armengol, Sandra; Berlanga, Alba; Guiu-Jurado, Esther; Aguilar, Carmen; Martínez, Salomé; Sabench, Fátima; Porras, José Antonio; Ruiz, Maikel Daniel; Hernández, Mercé; Sirvent, Joan Josep; Del Castillo, Daniel; Richart, Cristóbal

    2016-04-27

    Recent reports suggest a role for the Patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein 3 (PNPLA3) in the pathology of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Lipid deposition in the liver seems to be a critical process in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the association between the liver PNPLA3 expression, key genes of lipid metabolism, and the presence of NAFLD in morbidly obese women. We used real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis to analyze the hepatic expression of PNPLA3 and lipid metabolism-related genes in 55 morbidly obese subjects with normal liver histology (NL, n = 18), simple steatosis (SS, n = 20), and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, n = 17). Liver biopsies were collected during bariatric surgery. We observed that liver PNPLA3 expression was increased in NAFLD than in NL. It was also upregulated in SS than in NL. Interestingly, we found that the expression of PNPLA3 was significantly higher in severe than mild SS group. In addition, the expression of the transcription factors LXRα, PPARα, and SREBP2 was positively correlated with PNPLA3 liver expression. Regarding rs738409 polymorphism, GG genotype was positive correlated with the presence of NASH. In conclusion, our results show that PNPLA3 could be related to lipid accumulation in liver, mainly in the development and progression of simple steatosis.

  19. Effect of specific amino acids on hepatic lipid metabolism in fructose-induced non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Jegatheesan, Prasanthi; Beutheu, Stéphanie; Ventura, Gabrielle; Sarfati, Gilles; Nubret, Esther; Kapel, Nathalie; Waligora-Dupriet, Anne-Judith; Bergheim, Ina; Cynober, Luc; De-Bandt, Jean-Pascal

    2016-02-01

    Fructose diets have been shown to induce insulin resistance and to alter liver metabolism and gut barrier function, ultimately leading to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Citrulline, Glutamine and Arginine may improve insulin sensitivity and have beneficial effects on gut trophicity. Our aim was to evaluate their effects on liver and gut functions in a rat model of fructose-induced non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 58) received a 4-week fructose (60%) diet or standard chow with or without Citrulline (0.15 g/d) or an isomolar amount of Arginine or Glutamine. All diets were made isonitrogenous by addition of non-essential amino acids. At week 4, nutritional and metabolic status (plasma glucose, insulin, cholesterol, triglycerides and amino acids, net intestinal absorption) was determined; steatosis (hepatic triglycerides content, histological examination) and hepatic function (plasma aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, bilirubin) were assessed; and gut barrier integrity (myeloperoxidase activity, portal endotoxemia, tight junction protein expression and localization) and intestinal and hepatic inflammation were evaluated. We also assessed diets effects on caecal microbiota. In these experimental isonitrogenous fructose diet conditions, fructose led to steatosis with dyslipidemia but without altering glucose homeostasis, liver function or gut permeability. Fructose significantly decreased Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus and tended to increase endotoxemia. Arginine and Glutamine supplements were ineffective but Citrulline supplementation prevented hypertriglyceridemia and attenuated liver fat accumulation. While nitrogen supply alone can attenuate fructose-induced non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, Citrulline appears to act directly on hepatic lipid metabolism by partially preventing hypertriglyceridemia and steatosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition

  20. Interleukin-17 exacerbates hepatic steatosis and inflammation in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Tang, Y; Bian, Z; Zhao, L; Liu, Y; Liang, S; Wang, Q; Han, X; Peng, Y; Chen, X; Shen, L; Qiu, D; Li, Z; Ma, X

    2011-11-01

    Mechanisms associated with the progression of simple steatosis to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) remain undefined. Regulatory T cells (T(regs)) play a critical role in regulating inflammatory processes in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and because T helper type 17 (Th17) functionally oppose T(reg)-mediated responses, this study focused on characterizing the role of Th17 cells using a NAFLD mouse model. C57BL/6 mice were fed either a normal diet (ND) or high fat (HF) diet for 8 weeks. Mice in the HF group had a significantly higher frequency of liver Th17 cells compared to ND-fed mice. Neutralization of interleukin (IL)-17 in HF mice ameliorated lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced liver injury reflected by decreased serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels and reduced inflammatory cell infiltrates in the liver. In vitro, HepG2 cells cultured in the presence of free fatty acids (FFA; oleic acid and palmitic acid) for 24 h and IL-17 developed steatosis via insulin-signalling pathway interference. IL-17 and FFAs synergized to induce IL-6 production by HepG2 cells and murine primary hepatocytes which, in combination with transforming growth factor (TGF-β), expanded Th17 cells. It is likely that a similar process occurs in NASH patients, as there were significant levels of IL-17(+) cell infiltrates in NASH patient livers. The hepatic expression of Th17 cell-related genes [retinoid-related orphan receptor gamma (ROR)γt, IL-17, IL-21 and IL-23] was also increased significantly in NASH patients compared to healthy controls. Th17 cells and IL-17 were associated with hepatic steatosis and proinflammatory response in NAFLD and facilitated the transition from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis. Strategies designed to alter the balance between Th17 cells and T(regs) should be explored as a means of preventing progression to NASH and advanced liver diseases in NAFLD patients. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Immunology © 2011 British Society for

  1. Nutritional Modulation of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yki-Järvinen, Hannele

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) covers a spectrum of disorders ranging from simple steatosis (non-alcoholic fatty liver, NAFL) to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and cirrhosis. NAFL increases the risk of liver fibrosis. If the liver is fatty due to causes of insulin resistance such as obesity and physical inactivity, it overproduces glucose and triglycerides leading to hyperinsulinemia and a low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentration. The latter features predispose to type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Understanding the impact of nutritional modulation of liver fat content and insulin resistance is therefore of interest for prevention and treatment of NAFLD. Hypocaloric, especially low carbohydrate ketogenic diets rapidly decrease liver fat content and associated metabolic abnormalities. However, any type of caloric restriction seems effective long-term. Isocaloric diets containing 16%–23% fat and 57%–65% carbohydrate lower liver fat compared to diets with 43%–55% fat and 27%–38% carbohydrate. Diets rich in saturated (SFA) as compared to monounsaturated (MUFA) or polyunsaturated (PUFA) fatty acids appear particularly harmful as they increase both liver fat and insulin resistance. Overfeeding either saturated fat or carbohydrate increases liver fat content. Vitamin E supplementation decreases liver fat content as well as fibrosis but has no effect on features of insulin resistance. PMID:26556368

  2. PNPLA3 genetic variation in alcoholic steatosis and liver disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Hampe, Jochen; Trépo, Eric; Datz, Christian; Romeo, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) accounts for the majority of chronic liver diseases in Western countries, and alcoholic cirrhosis is among the premier causes of liver failure, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and liver-related mortality causes. Studies in different genders and ethnic groups, as well as in twins provide strong evidence for a significant contribution of host genetic factors to liver disease development in drinkers. The intense quest for genetic modifiers of alcohol-induced fibrosis progression have identified and repeatedly confirmed a genetic polymorphism in the gene coding for patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing 3 (PNPLA3; adiponutrin; rs738409 C/G, M148I) as a risk factor for alcoholic cirrhosis and its related complication, HCC, in different populations. Although carriership of one or both mutated PNPLA3 alleles does not explain the entire liver phenotypic variability in drinkers, it clearly represents one of the strongest single genetic modulators in a complex trait such as ALD. As more genetic data supporting its important role aggregates, novel insight as to PNPLA3’s function and that of its genetic variation in liver injury is unveiled pointing to an important novel pathway in alcohol-mediated hepatic lipid turnover with strong implications on inflammation, extra cellular matrix remodelling, and hepatocarcinogenesis. Future study shall decipher whether the gathered knowledge can be translated into therapeutic benefits of patients. PMID:26151055

  3. Feasibility of detection and intervention for alcohol-related liver disease in the community: the Alcohol and Liver Disease Detection study (ALDDeS)

    PubMed Central

    Sheron, Nick; Moore, Michael; O’Brien, Wendy; Harris, Scott; Roderick, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Background In the past 15 years mortality rates from liver disease have doubled in the UK. Brief alcohol advice is cost effective, but clinically meaningful reductions in alcohol consumption only occur in around 1 in 10 individuals. Aim To provide evidence that detecting early liver disease in the community is feasible, practical, and that feedback of liver risk can increase the proportion of subjects reducing alcohol consumption. Design and setting A community feasibility study in nine general practice sites in Hampshire. Method Hazardous and harmful drinkers were identified by WHO AUDIT questionnaire and offered screening for liver fibrosis. Results In total, 4630 individuals responded, of whom 1128 (24%) hazardous or harmful drinkers were offered a liver fibrosis check using the Southampton Traffic Light (STL) test; 393 (38%) attended and test results were returned by post. The STL has a low threshold for liver fibrosis with 45 (11%) red, 157 (40%) amber, and 191 (49%) green results. Follow-up AUDIT data was obtained for 303/393 (77%) and 76/153 (50%) subjects with evidence of liver damage reduced drinking by at least one AUDIT category (harmful to hazardous, or hazardous to low risk) compared with 52/150 (35%, P<0.011) subjects without this evidence; in the subset of harmful drinkers patterns (AUDIT >15), 22/34 (65%) of STL positives, reduced drinking compared with 10/29 (35%, P<0.017) STL negatives. Conclusion Detection of liver disease in the community is feasible, and feedback of liver risk may reduce harmful drinking. PMID:24152485

  4. Cannabidiol protects liver from binge alcohol-induced steatosis by mechanisms including inhibition of oxidative stress and increase in autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lili; Rozenfeld, Raphael; Wu, Defeng; Devi, Lakshmi A.; Zhang, Zhenfeng; Cederbaum, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    Acute alcohol drinking induces steatosis, and effective prevention of steatosis can protect liver from progressive damage caused by alcohol. Increased oxidative stress has been reported as one mechanism underlying alcohol-induced steatosis. We evaluated whether cannabidiol, which has been reported to function as an antioxidant, can protect the liver from alcohol-generated oxidative stress-induced steatosis. Cannabidiol can prevent acute alcohol-induced liver steatosis in mice, possibly by preventing the increase in oxidative stress and the activation of the JNK MAPK pathway. Cannabidiol per se can increase autophagy both in CYP2E1-expressing HepG2 cells and in mouse liver. Importantly, cannabidiol can prevent the decrease in autophagy induced by alcohol. In conclusion, these results show that cannabidiol protects mouse liver from acute alcohol-induced steatosis through multiple mechanisms including attenuation of alcohol-mediated oxidative stress, prevention of JNK MAPK activation, and increasing autophagy. PMID:24398069

  5. Relationship between hepatocellular carcinoma, metabolic syndrome and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: which clinical arguments?

    PubMed

    Rosmorduc, Olivier

    2013-05-01

    Obesity and the metabolic syndrome are growing epidemics associated with an increased risk for many types of cancer. In the liver, inflammatory and angiogenic changes due to insulin resistance and fatty liver disease are associated with an increased incidence of liver cancer. Regardless of underlying liver disease, cirrhosis remains the most important risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) although are cases of HCC arising without cirrhosis raise the possibility of a direct carcinogenesis secondary to Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD). Moreover, metabolic syndrome and its different features may also increase the risk of HCC in the setting of chronic liver diseases of other causes such as viral hepatitis or alcohol abuse. Taking into account all these data, it is necessary to better determine the risk of developing HCC in patients with metabolic syndrome to improve the screening guidelines and develop prophylactic treatments in this setting. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Potential Role of the Gut/Liver/Lung Axis in Alcohol-Induced Tissue Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Veronica L.; Beier, Juliane I.; Ritzenthaler, Jeffrey D.; Roman, Jesse; Arteel, Gavin E.

    2015-01-01

    Both Alcoholic Liver Disease (ALD) and alcohol-related susceptibility to acute lung injury are estimated to account for the highest morbidity and mortality related to chronic alcohol abuse and, thus, represent a focus of intense investigation. In general, alcohol-induced derangements to both organs are considered to be independent and are often evaluated separately. However, the liver and lung share many general responses to damage, and specific responses to alcohol exposure. For example, both organs possess resident macrophages that play key roles in mediating the immune/inflammatory response. Additionally, alcohol-induced damage to both organs appears to involve oxidative stress that favors tissue injury. Another mechanism that appears to be shared between the organs is that inflammatory injury to both organs is enhanced by alcohol exposure. Lastly, altered extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition appears to be a key step in disease progression in both organs. Indeed, recent studies suggest that early subtle changes in the ECM may predispose the target organ to an inflammatory insult. The purpose of this chapter is to review the parallel mechanisms of liver and lung injury in response to alcohol consumption. This chapter will also explore the potential that these mechanisms are interdependent, as part of a gut-liver-lung axis. PMID:26437442

  7. Animal models of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: current perspectives and recent advances.

    PubMed

    Lau, Jennie Ka Ching; Zhang, Xiang; Yu, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a continuous spectrum of diseases characterized by excessive lipid accumulation in hepatocytes. NAFLD progresses from simple liver steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and, in more severe cases, to liver fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Because of its growing worldwide prevalence, various animal models that mirror both the histopathology and the pathophysiology of each stage of human NAFLD have been developed. The selection of appropriate animal models continues to be one of the key questions faced in this field. This review presents a critical analysis of the histopathology and pathogenesis of NAFLD, the most frequently used and recently developed animal models for each stage of NAFLD and NAFLD-induced HCC, the main mechanisms involved in the experimental pathogenesis of NAFLD in different animal models, and a brief summary of recent therapeutic targets found by the use of animal models. Integrating the data from human disease with those from animal studies indicates that, although current animal models provide critical guidance in understanding specific stages of NAFLD pathogenesis and progression, further research is necessary to develop more accurate models that better mimic the disease spectrum, in order to provide both increased mechanistic understanding and identification/testing of novel therapeutic approaches. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  8. FT-IR imaging for quantitative determination of liver fat content in non-alcoholic fatty liver.

    PubMed

    Kochan, K; Maslak, E; Chlopicki, S; Baranska, M

    2015-08-07

    In this work we apply FT-IR imaging of large areas of liver tissue cross-section samples (∼5 cm × 5 cm) for quantitative assessment of steatosis in murine model of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver (NAFLD). We quantified the area of liver tissue occupied by lipid droplets (LDs) by FT-IR imaging and Oil Red O (ORO) staining for comparison. Two alternative FT-IR based approaches are presented. The first, straightforward method, was based on average spectra from tissues and provided values of the fat content by using a PLS regression model and the reference method. The second one – the chemometric-based method – enabled us to determine the values of the fat content, independently of the reference method by means of k-means cluster (KMC) analysis. In summary, FT-IR images of large size liver sections may prove to be useful for quantifying liver steatosis without the need of tissue staining.

  9. Increased risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease after diagnosis of celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Norelle R; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Hultcrantz, Rolf; Green, Peter H R; Ludvigsson, Jonas F

    2015-06-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is a common cause of chronic liver disease. Celiac disease alters intestinal permeability and treatment with a gluten-free diet often causes weight gain, but so far there are few reports of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in patients with celiac disease. Population-based cohort study. We compared the risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease diagnosed from 1997 to 2009 in individuals with celiac disease (n = 26,816) to matched reference individuals (n = 130,051). Patients with any liver disease prior to celiac disease were excluded, as were individuals with a lifetime diagnosis of alcohol-related disorder to minimize misclassification of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Cox regression estimated hazard ratios for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease were determined. During 246,559 person-years of follow-up, 53 individuals with celiac disease had a diagnosis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (21/100,000 person-years). In comparison, we identified 85 reference individuals diagnosed with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease during 1,488,413 person-years (6/100,000 person-years). This corresponded to a hazard ratio of 2.8 (95% CI 2.0-3.8), with the highest risk estimates seen in children (HR = 4.6; 95% CI 2.3-9.1). The risk increase in the first year after celiac disease diagnosis was 13.3 (95% CI 3.5-50.3) but remained significantly elevated even beyond 15 years after the diagnosis of celiac disease (HR = 2.5; 95% CI 1.0-5.9). Individuals with celiac disease are at increased risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease compared to the general population. Excess risks were highest in the first year after celiac disease diagnosis, but persisted through 15 years after diagnosis with celiac disease. Copyright © 2015 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Dietary Fisetin Supplementation Protects Against Alcohol-Induced Liver Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qian; Zhang, Wenliang; Zhong, Wei; Sun, Xinguo; Zhou, Zhanxiang

    2016-10-01

    Overproduction of reactive oxygen species is associated with the development of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Plant polyphenols have been used as dietary interventions for multiple diseases including ALD. The objective of this study was to determine whether dietary supplementation with fisetin, a novel flavonoid, exerts beneficial effect on alcohol-induced liver injury. C57BL/6J mice were pair-fed with the Lieber-DeCarli control or ethanol (EtOH) diet for 4 weeks with or without fisetin supplementation at 10 mg/kg/d. Alcohol feeding induced lipid accumulation in the liver and increased plasma alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activities, which were attenuated by fisetin supplementation. The EtOH concentrations in the plasma and liver were significantly elevated by alcohol exposure but were reduced by fisetin supplementation. Although fisetin did not affect the protein expression of alcohol metabolism enzymes, the aldehyde dehydrogenase activities were significantly increased by fisetin compared to the alcohol alone group. In addition, fisetin supplementation remarkably reduced hepatic NADPH oxidase 4 levels along with decreased plasma hydrogen peroxide and hepatic superoxide and 4-hydroxynonenal levels after alcohol exposure. Alcohol-induced apoptosis and up-regulation of Fas and cleaved caspase-3 in the liver were prevented by fisetin. Moreover, fisetin supplementation attenuated alcohol-induced hepatic steatosis through increasing plasma adiponectin levels and hepatic protein levels of p-AMPK, ACOX1, CYP4A, and MTTP. This study demonstrated that the protective effect of fisetin on ALD is achieved by accelerating EtOH clearance and inhibition of oxidative stress. The data suggest that fisetin has a therapeutical potential for treating ALD. Copyright © 2016 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  11. Liver steatosis is associated with insulin resistance in skeletal muscle rather than in the liver in Japanese patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Kato, Ken-Ichiro; Takeshita, Yumie; Misu, Hirofumi; Zen, Yoh; Kaneko, Shuichi; Takamura, Toshinari

    2015-03-01

    To examine the association between liver histological features and organ-specific insulin resistance indices calculated from 75-g oral glucose tolerance test data in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Liver biopsy specimens were obtained from 72 patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and were scored for steatosis, grade and stage. Hepatic and skeletal muscle insulin resistance indices (hepatic insulin resistance index and Matsuda index, respectively) were calculated from 75-g oral glucose tolerance test data, and metabolic clearance rate was measured using the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp method. The degree of hepatic steatosis, and grade and stage of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis were significantly correlated with Matsuda index (steatosis r = -0.45, P < 0.001; grade r = -0.54, P < 0.001; stage r = -0.37, P < 0.01), but not with hepatic insulin resistance index. Multiple regression analyses adjusted for age, sex, body mass index and each histological score showed that the degree of hepatic steatosis (coefficient = -0.22, P < 0.05) and grade (coefficient = -0.40, P < 0.01) were associated with Matsuda index, whereas the association between stage and Matsuda index (coefficient = -0.07, P = 0.593) was no longer significant. A similar trend was observed for the association between steatosis and metabolic clearance rate (coefficient = -0.62, P = 0.059). Liver steatosis is associated with insulin resistance in skeletal muscle rather than in the liver in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, suggesting a central role of fatty liver in the development of peripheral insulin resistance and the existence of a network between the liver and skeletal muscle.

  12. Interleukin-34 as a fibroblast-derived marker of liver fibrosis in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Hirotaka; Yoshio, Sachiyo; Mano, Yohei; Kumagai, Erina; Sugiyama, Masaya; Korenaga, Masaaki; Arai, Taeang; Itokawa, Norio; Atsukawa, Masanori; Aikata, Hiroshi; Hyogo, Hideyuki; Chayama, Kazuaki; Ohashi, Tomohiko; Ito, Kiyoaki; Yoneda, Masashi; Nozaki, Yuichi; Kawaguchi, Takumi; Torimura, Takuji; Abe, Masanori; Hiasa, Yoichi; Fukai, Moto; Kamiyama, Toshiya; Taketomi, Akinobu; Mizokami, Masashi; Kanto, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common cause of chronic non-viral liver disease. Activation of macrophages and hepatic stellate cells is a critical step that promotes liver fibrosis. We aimed to explore the feasibility of interleukin-34 (IL-34), a key regulator of macrophages, as a fibrosis marker in patients with NAFLD. We enrolled 197 liver biopsy-proven NAFLD patients. We evaluated the serum levels of IL-34, macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), soluble CD163 (sCD163), 40 cytokines/chemokines, hyaluronic acid, type IV collagen 7s, and clinically-approved fibrosis scores. IL-34 increased with the progression of fibrosis and was an independent marker for liver fibrosis. Immunostaining experiments, using resected liver specimens from NAFLD patients, revealed that IL-34 was mainly expressed on liver fibroblasts. IL-34 based fibrosis score (0.0387*IL-34 (pg/ml) + 0.3623*type IV collagen 7s (ng/ml) + 0.0184*age (year)–1.1850) was a practical predictive model of liver fibrosis. Using receiver-operating characteristic analyses, the area under the curve, sensitivity, and specificity of IL-34 based fibrosis score were superior or comparable to the other fibrosis biomarkers and scores. In conclusion, the IL-34 based fibrosis score, including serum IL-34, type IV collagen 7s and age, is a feasible diagnostic marker of liver fibrosis in NAFLD patients. PMID:27363523

  13. Medium chain triglycerides dose-dependently prevent liver pathology in a rat model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Metabolic syndrome is often accompanied by development of hepatic steatosis and less frequently by nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) leading to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Replacement of corn oil with medium chain triacylglycerols (MCT) in the diets of alcohol-fed rats has been show...

  14. [Prediction of histological liver damage in asymptomatic alcoholic patients by means of clinical and laboratory data].

    PubMed

    Iturriaga, H; Hirsch, S; Bunout, D; Díaz, M; Kelly, M; Silva, G; de la Maza, M P; Petermann, M; Ugarte, G

    1993-04-01

    Looking for a noninvasive method to predict liver histologic alterations in alcoholic patients without clinical signs of liver failure, we studied 187 chronic alcoholics recently abstinent, divided in 2 series. In the model series (n = 94) several clinical variables and results of common laboratory tests were confronted to the findings of liver biopsies. These were classified in 3 groups: 1. Normal liver; 2. Moderate alterations; 3. Marked alterations, including alcoholic hepatitis and cirrhosis. Multivariate methods used were logistic regression analysis and a classification and regression tree (CART). Both methods entered gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT), aspartate-aminotransferase (AST), weight and age as significant and independent variables. Univariate analysis with GGT and AST at different cutoffs were also performed. To predict the presence of any kind of damage (Groups 2 and 3), CART and AST > 30 IU showed the higher sensitivity, specificity and correct prediction, both in the model and validation series. For prediction of marked liver damage, a score based on logistic regression and GGT > 110 IU had the higher efficiencies. It is concluded that GGT and AST are good markers of alcoholic liver damage and that, using sample cutoffs, histologic diagnosis can be correctly predicted in 80% of recently abstinent asymptomatic alcoholics.

  15. Cannabidiol attenuates alcohol-induced liver steatosis, metabolic dysregulation, inflammation and neutrophil-mediated injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuping; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Cao, Zongxian; Wang, Hua; Feng, Dechun; Haskó, György; Mechoulam, Raphael; Gao, Bin; Pacher, Pal

    2017-09-21

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is a non-psychoactive component of marijuana, which has anti-inflammatory effects. It has also been approved by FDA for various orphan diseases for exploratory trials. Herein, we investigated the effects of CBD on liver injury induced by chronic plus binge alcohol feeding in mice. CBD or vehicle was administered daily throughout the alcohol feeding study. At the conclusion of the feeding protocol, serums samples, livers or isolated neutrophils were utilized for molecular biology, biochemistry and pathology analysis. CBD significantly attenuated the alcohol feeding-induced serum transaminase elevations, hepatic inflammation (mRNA expressions of TNFα, MCP1, IL1β, MIP2 and E-Selectin, and neutrophil accumulation), oxidative/nitrative stress (lipid peroxidation, 3-nitrotyrosine formation, and expression of reactive oxygen species generating enzyme NOX2). CBD treatment also attenuated the respiratory burst of neutrophils isolated from chronic plus binge alcohol fed mice or from human blood, and decreased the alcohol-induced increased liver triglyceride and fat droplet accumulation. Furthermore, CBD improved alcohol-induced hepatic metabolic dysregulation and steatosis by restoring changes in hepatic mRNA or protein expression of ACC-1, FASN, PPARα, MCAD, ADIPOR-1, and mCPT-1. Thus, CBD may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of alcoholic liver diseases associated with inflammation, oxidative stress and steatosis, which deserves exploration in human trials.

  16. Hepatocyte-mediated cytotoxicity and host defense mechanisms in the alcohol-injured liver.

    PubMed

    McVicker, Benita L; Thiele, Geoffrey M; Tuma, Dean J; Casey, Carol A

    2014-09-01

    The consumption of alcohol is associated with many health issues including alcoholic liver disease (ALD). The natural history of ALD involves the development of steatosis, inflammation (steatohepatitis), fibrosis and cirrhosis. During the stage of steatohepatitis, the combination of inflammation and cellular damage can progress to a severe condition termed alcoholic hepatitis (AH). Unfortunately, the pathogenesis of AH remains uncharacterized. Some modulations have been identified in host defense and liver immunity mechanisms during AH that highlight the role of intrahepatic lymphocyte accumulation and associated inflammatory cytokine responses. Also, it is hypothesized that alcohol-induced injury to liver cells may significantly contribute to the aberrant lymphocytic distribution that is seen in AH. In particular, the regulation of lymphocytes by hepatocytes may be disrupted in the alcoholic liver resulting in altered immunologic homeostasis and perpetuation of disease. In recent studies, it was demonstrated that the direct killing of activated T lymphocytes by hepatocytes is facilitated by the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR). The ASGPR is a well-characterized glycoprotein receptor that is exclusively expressed by hepatocytes. This hepatic receptor is known for its role in the clearance of desialylated glycoproteins or cells, yet neither its physiological function nor its role in disease states has been determined. Interestingly, alcohol markedly impairs ASGPR function; however, the effect alcohol has on ASGPR-mediated cytotoxicity of lymphocytes remains to be elucidated. This review discusses the contribution of hepatocytes in immunological regulation and, importantly, how pathological effects of ethanol disrupt hepatocellular-mediated defense mechanisms.

  17. Protective effect of artemisinin on chronic alcohol induced-liver damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoyan; Wang, Liqing; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Duoduo; Zhang, Zhihao; Zhang, Jie

    2017-06-01

    The liver disease related to chronic alcohol consumption is one of the leading causes of death for alcoholics. The efficient drug to ameliorate the alcoholic liver injury was needed urgently. The present study was performed to investigate whether artemisinin possessed the protective effect against chronic alcohol consumption. 50 male Kunming mice were divided into 5 groups: control group (C): 10ml/kg saline+10ml/kg saline, alcohol group (A): 10ml/kg 56%(v/v) alcohol+10ml/kg saline, low dose group of artemisinin (L): 10ml/kg 56%(v/v) alcohol+30mg/kg/day artemisinin, medium dose group of artemisinin (M): 10ml/kg 56%(v/v) alcohol+60mg/kg/day artemisinin, high dose group of artemisinin (H): 10ml/kg 56%(v/v) alcohol+120mg/kg/day artemisinin. Drugs were given orally every day. The general state of mice was observed and the levels of serum activities of AST and ALT were detected after treatment with drugs for 30days. Besides, the liver weight index was calculated and histopathological analysis was performed. We successfully demonstrated that treatment with high dose of artemisinin significantly decreased the elevated levels of AST (p<0.05) and ALT (p<0.01) in plasma, as well as the liver weight index (p<0.01). The loss of body weight, tissue injury, oedema and inflammatory cell infiltration in the hepatocytes were found in the A group. These symptoms were remarkably alleviated in animals treated with artemisinin. Artemisinin can inhibit the activation of NF-кB and the expression of inflammatory cytokines inducible nitric oxide synthase. Besides, it can also enhance the stability of liver cell membrane, and reduce the damage of liver cell membrane and liver cell. Artemisinin showed a protective effect against chronic alcohol poisoning and it has a great potential for the clinical application to treat the liver injury induced by alcohol. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Dietary fisetin supplementation protects against alcohol-induced liver injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qian; Zhang, Wenliang; Zhong, Wei; Sun, Xinguo; Zhou, Zhanxiang

    2016-01-01

    Background Overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is associated with the development of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Plant polyphenols have been used as dietary inverventions for multiple diseases including ALD. The objective of the present study was to determine whether dietary supplementation with fisetin, a novel flavonoid, exerts beneficial effect on alcohol-induced liver injury. Methods C57BL/6J mice were pair-fed with the Lieber-DeCarli control or ethanol diet for four weeks with or without fisetin supplementation at 10 mg/kg/d. Results Alcohol feeding induced lipid accumulation in the liver and increased plasma ALT and AST activities, which were attenuated by fisetin suplementation. The ethanol concentrations in the plasma and liver were significantly elevated by alcohol exposure but were reduced by fisetin suplementation. Although fisetin did not affect the protein expression of alcohol metabolism enzymes, the aldehyde dehydrogenase activities were significantly increased by fisetin compared to the alcohol alone group. In addition, fisetin suplementation remarkably reduced hepatic NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4) levels along with decreased plasma hydrogen peroxide and hepatic superoxide and 4-hydroxynonenal (4HNE) levels after alcohol exposure. Alcohol-induced apoptosis and upregulation of Fas and cleaved caspase-3 in the liver were prevented by fisetin. Moreover, fisetin suplementation attenuated alcohol-induced hepatic streatosis through increasing plasma adiponectin levels and hepatic protein levels of p-AMPK, ACOX1, CYP4A, and MTTP. Conclusion The present study demonstrated that the protective effect of fisetin on ALD is achieved by accelerating ethanol clearance and inhibition of oxidative stress. The data suggest that fisetin has a therapeutical potential for treating ALD. PMID:27575873

  19. Biochemical Effects on the Liver of 1 Month of Alcohol Abstinence in Moderate Alcohol Consumers.

    PubMed

    Munsterman, I D; Groefsema, M M; Weijers, G; Klein, W M; Swinkels, D W; Drenth, J P H; Schellekens, A F A; Tjwa, E T T L

    2018-05-03

    In this study in healthy moderate alcohol consumers, we observe that one month of alcohol abstinence results in decreased gamma-glutamyl transferase levels, which return to baseline levels after resumption of alcohol consumption.

  20. The methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine prevents liver hypoxia and dysregulation of mitochondrial bioenergetic function in a rat model of alcohol-induced fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    King, Adrienne L; Mantena, Sudheer K; Andringa, Kelly K; Millender-Swain, Telisha; Dunham-Snary, Kimberly J; Oliva, Claudia R; Griguer, Corinne E; Bailey, Shannon M

    2016-10-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and bioenergetic stress play an important role in the etiology of alcoholic liver disease. Previous studies from our laboratory show that the primary methyl donor S-Adenosylmethionine (SAM) minimizes alcohol-induced disruptions in several mitochondrial functions in the liver. Herein, we expand on these earlier observations to determine whether the beneficial actions of SAM against alcohol toxicity extend to changes in the responsiveness of mitochondrial respiration to inhibition by nitric oxide (NO), induction of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) pore, and the hypoxic state of the liver. For this, male Sprague-Dawley rats were pair-fed control and alcohol-containing liquid diets with and without SAM for 5 weeks and liver hypoxia, mitochondrial respiration, MPT pore induction, and NO-dependent control of respiration were examined. Chronic alcohol feeding significantly enhanced liver hypoxia, whereas SAM supplementation attenuated hypoxia in livers of alcohol-fed rats. SAM supplementation prevented alcohol-mediated decreases in mitochondrial state 3 respiration and cytochrome c oxidase activity. Mitochondria isolated from livers of alcohol-fed rats were more sensitive to calcium-mediated MPT pore induction (i.e., mitochondrial swelling) than mitochondria from pair-fed controls, whereas SAM treatment normalized sensitivity for calcium-induced swelling in mitochondria from alcohol-fed rats. Liver mitochondria from alcohol-fed rats showed increased sensitivity to NO-dependent inhibition of respiration compared with pair-fed controls. In contrast, mitochondria isolated from the livers of SAM treated alcohol-fed rats showed no change in the sensitivity to NO-mediated inhibition of respiration. Collectively, these findings indicate that the hepato-protective effects of SAM against alcohol toxicity are mediated, in part, through a mitochondrial mechanism involving preservation of key mitochondrial bioenergetic parameters and the

  1. Clinico-biochemical correlation to histological findings in alcoholic liver disease: a single centre study from eastern India.

    PubMed

    Ray, Sayantan; Khanra, Dibbendhu; Sonthalia, Nikhil; Kundu, Supratip; Biswas, Kaushik; Talukdar, Arunansu; Saha, Manjari; Bera, Himel

    2014-10-01

    Alcoholism is a health problem not only in developed countries but also in developing countries. Cirrhosis due to alcohol is a common cause of death among individuals abusing alcohol. A better knowledge of the spectrum of alcoholic liver diseases, its clinical, biochemical and histopathological features could result in early detection and prevention of alcoholic liver diseases before it's catastrophic and life threatening effects. A total of 200 patients with alcoholic liver diseases were studied with respect to alcohol consumption, clinical features, biochemical and histopathological changes. The clinical features, biochemical parameters, and histopathology of liver including Ishak's modified histological activity index (HAI) were correlated with the amount and duration of alcohol consumed. Majority of the patients were in the age group of 40-49 years and all the cases were males. Majority consumed alcohol of about 75-90 grams per day for a duration of 10-12 years. Anorexia and jaundice were the most common symptom and clinical finding respectively. Hyperbilirubinemia and hypoalbuminemia were the most common abnormalities observed in liver function tests. Advanced HAI stages with features of cirrhosis were most frequent histo-pathological finding noted in this study. Clinico-biochemical profile was significantly correlated with degree of alcohol ingestion as well as with liver histopathology. The wide prevalence of alcoholic liver disease including cirrhosis among Indian males was noted with significantly lower quantity and duration of alcohol ingestion. The severity of liver damage is directly proportional to the quantity and duration of alcohol consumed. Clinical features and biochemical changes may forecast the liver histopathology among the patients of alcoholic liver disease.

  2. Serum YKL-40 as a marker of liver fibrosis in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Erina; Mano, Yohei; Yoshio, Sachiyo; Shoji, Hirotaka; Sugiyama, Masaya; Korenaga, Masaaki; Ishida, Tsuyoshi; Arai, Taeang; Itokawa, Norio; Atsukawa, Masanori; Hyogo, Hideyuki; Chayama, Kazuaki; Ohashi, Tomohiko; Ito, Kiyoaki; Yoneda, Masashi; Kawaguchi, Takumi; Torimura, Takuji; Nozaki, Yuichi; Watanabe, Sumio; Mizokami, Masashi; Kanto, Tatsuya

    2016-10-14

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common cause of chronic non-viral liver disease. YKL-40, chitinase-like protein expressed in multiple tissues including liver, is involved in cell proliferation, inflammation and remodeling of the extracellular matrix. The aim of this study was to assess whether serum YKL-40 levels are associated with liver fibrosis in NAFLD patients. Serum YKL-40 levels were quantified in 111 NAFLD patients and 23 HCC patients with NAFLD. To identify the source of YKL-40, immunofluorescence staining of liver specimens from NAFLD patients was performed. Serum YKL-40 levels in NAFLD patients increased in accordance with the progression of liver fibrosis. Multivariate analysis revealed that YKL-40 was one of the independent factors significantly associated with severe fibrosis (F3-4). We established a new predictive model for fibrosis of NAFLD, using logistic regression analysis: YKL-40 based fibrosis score = -0.0545 + type IV collagen 7s * 0.3456 + YKL-40 * 0.0024. Serum YKL-40 levels of HCC patients with non-cirrhotic NAFLD were significantly higher than those without HCC. Immunofluorescence staining showed that YKL-40 was expressed by macrophages in liver tissue of NAFLD patients. In conclusion, macrophage-derived YKL-40 is a feasible biomarker of liver fibrosis in NAFLD patients.

  3. Correlation between hepatic blood flow and liver function in alcoholic liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hideaki; Shigefuku, Ryuta; Yoshida, Yoshihito; Ikeda, Hiroki; Matsunaga, Kotaro; Matsumoto, Nobuyuki; Okuse, Chiaki; Sase, Shigeru; Itoh, Fumio; Suzuki, Michihiro

    2014-12-07

    To elucidate the correlation between hepatic blood flow and liver function in alcoholic liver cirrhosis (AL-LC). The subjects included 35 patients with AL-LC (34 men, 1 woman; mean age, 58.9 ± 10.7 years; median age, 61 years; range: 37-76 years). All patients were enrolled in this study after obtaining written informed consent. Liver function was measured with tests measuring albumin (Alb), prothrombin time (PT), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), branched amino acid and tyrosine ratio (BTR), branched chain amino acid (BCAA), tyrosine, ammonia (NH3), cholinesterase (ChE), immunoreactive insulin (IRI), total bile acid (TBA), and the retention rate of indocyanine green 15 min after administration (ICG R15). Hepatic blood flow, hepatic arterial tissue blood flow (HATBF), portal venous tissue blood flow (PVTBF), and total hepatic tissue blood flow (THTBF) were simultaneously calculated using xenon computed tomography. PVTBF, HATBF and THTBF were 30.2 ± 10.4, 20.0 ± 10.7, and 50.3 ± 14.9 mL/100 mL/min, respectively. Alb, PT, BNP, BTR, BCAA, tyrosine, NH3, ChE, IRI, TBA, and ICG R15 were 3.50 ± 0.50 g/dL, 72.0% ± 11.5%, 63.2 ± 56.7 pg/mL, 4.06 ± 1.24, 437.5 ± 89.4 μmol/L, 117.7 ± 32.8 μmol/L, 59.4 ± 22.7 μg/dL, 161.0 ± 70.8 IU/L, 12.8 ± 5.0 μg/dL, 68.0 ± 51.8 μmol/L, and 28.6% ± 13.5%, respectively. PVTBF showed a significant negative correlation with ICG R15 (r = -0.468, P <0.01). No significant correlation was seen between ICG 15R, HATBF and THTBF. There was a significant correlation between PVTBF and Alb (r = 0.2499, P < 0.05), and NH₃ tended to have an inverse correlation with PVTBF (r = -0.2428, P = 0.0894). There were also many significant correlations between ICG R15 and liver function parameters, including Alb, NH3, PT, BNP, TBA, BCAA, and tyrosine (r = -0.2156, P < 0.05; r = 0.4318, P < 0.01; r = 0.4140, P < 0.01; r = 0.3610, P < 0.05; r = 0.5085, P < 0.001; r = 0.4496, P < 0.01; and r = 0.4740, P < 0.05, respectively). Our investigation

  4. Experimental models of hepatotoxicity related to acute liver failure

    SciTech Connect

    Maes, Michaël; Vinken, Mathieu, E-mail: mvinken@vub.ac.be; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    Acute liver failure can be the consequence of various etiologies, with most cases arising from drug-induced hepatotoxicity in Western countries. Despite advances in this field, the management of acute liver failure continues to be one of the most challenging problems in clinical medicine. The availability of adequate experimental models is of crucial importance to provide a better understanding of this condition and to allow identification of novel drug targets, testing the efficacy of new therapeutic interventions and acting as models for assessing mechanisms of toxicity. Experimental models of hepatotoxicity related to acute liver failure rely on surgical procedures, chemical exposuremore » or viral infection. Each of these models has a number of strengths and weaknesses. This paper specifically reviews commonly used chemical in vivo and in vitro models of hepatotoxicity associated with acute liver failure. - Highlights: • The murine APAP model is very close to what is observed in patients. • The Gal/ET model is useful to study TNFα-mediated apoptotic signaling mechanisms. • Fas receptor activation is an effective model of apoptosis and secondary necrosis. • The ConA model is a relevant model of auto-immune hepatitis and viral hepatitis. • Multiple time point evaluation needed in experimental models of acute liver injury.« less

  5. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG culture supernatant ameliorates acute alcohol-induced intestinal permeability and liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuhua; Liu, Yanlong; Sidhu, Anju; Ma, Zhenhua; McClain, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Endotoxemia is a contributing cofactor to alcoholic liver disease (ALD), and alcohol-induced increased intestinal permeability is one of the mechanisms of endotoxin absorption. Probiotic bacteria have been shown to promote intestinal epithelial integrity and protect barrier function in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and in ALD. Although it is highly possible that some common molecules secreted by probiotics contribute to this action in IBD, the effect of probiotic culture supernatant has not yet been studied in ALD. We examined the effects of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG culture supernatant (LGG-s) on the acute alcohol-induced intestinal integrity and liver injury in a mouse model. Mice on standard chow diet were supplemented with supernatant from LGG culture (109 colony-forming unit/mouse) for 5 days, and one dose of alcohol at 6 g/kg body wt was administered via gavage. Intestinal permeability was measured by FITC-FD-4 ex vivo. Alcohol-induced liver injury was examined by measuring the activity of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in plasma, and liver steatosis was evaluated by triglyceride content and Oil Red O staining of the liver sections. LGG-s pretreatment restored alcohol-induced reduction in ileum mRNA levels of claudin-1, intestine trefoil factor (ITF), P-glycoprotein (P-gp), and cathelin-related antimicrobial peptide (CRAMP), which play important roles on intestinal barrier integrity. As a result, LGG-s pretreatment significantly inhibited the alcohol-induced intestinal permeability, endotoxemia and subsequently liver injury. Interestingly, LGG-s pretreatment increased ileum mRNA expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2α, an important transcription factor of ITF, P-gp, and CRAMP. These results suggest that LGG-s ameliorates the acute alcohol-induced liver injury by promoting HIF signaling, leading to the suppression of alcohol-induced increased intestinal permeability and endotoxemia. The use of bacteria-free LGG culture supernatant provides a novel

  6. Case report : tuberculosis liver abscess in male alcoholism patient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siahaan, W. P.; Ginting, F.

    2018-03-01

    A liver abscess often occurs in low-middle income countries such as Indonesia. Two most common liver abscesses are amoebic and pyogenic liver abscess. Data that reported tuberculosis liver abscess (TLA) is extremely rare. A diagnostic criterion for tuberculosis liver abscess is rare and remains unclear. A 52-year-old man developed a TLA which was not associated with any pulmonary or gastrointestinal tract foci of tuberculosis. An ultrasonogram and abdominal scan showed an abscess in the right lobe. We performed paracentesis, and the pus from the lesion was positive tubercular bacilli on acid-fast bacilli staining. The patient was started on systemic antitubercular therapy to which he responded favorably. This report emphasizes the fact that, although a TLA is a very rare entity, it should be included in the differential diagnosis of liver abscess especially in Indonesia where the prevalence of tuberculosis is extremely high.

  7. Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... their drinking causes distress and harm. It includes alcoholism and alcohol abuse. Alcoholism, or alcohol dependence, is a disease that causes ... the liver, brain, and other organs. Drinking during pregnancy can harm your baby. Alcohol also increases the ...

  8. Marine collagen peptides protect against early alcoholic liver injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bing; Zhang, Feng; Yu, Yongchao; Jiang, Qinghao; Zhang, Zhaofeng; Wang, Junbo; Li, Yong

    2012-04-01

    Marine collagen peptides (MCP) have been reported to exhibit antioxidative activity, which is the common property of numerous hepatoprotective agents. Previous studies have shown that MCP have biological functions including anti-hypertension, anti-ulcer, anti-skin ageing and extending the life span. However, its role in alcoholic liver injury remains unknown. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of MCP on early alcoholic liver injury in rats. Rats were administered with alcohol at a dose of 6 g/kg body weight intragastrically per d to induce early liver injury, which was then evaluated by serum markers and histopathological examination. Treatment with MCP could reverse the increased level of serum aminotransferase and reduce hepatic histological damage. In addition, MCP attenuated the alteration in serum superoxide dismutase and malondialdehyde levels. MCP also counteracted the increased levels of total cholesterol and TAG. However, no significant difference was observed in the contents of alcohol dehydrogenase both in liver and serum protein of rats. These findings suggest that MCP have a protective effect on early alcoholic liver injury in rats by their antioxidative activity and improving lipid metabolism.

  9. Review article: coffee consumption, the metabolic syndrome and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Yesil, A; Yilmaz, Y

    2013-11-01

    Coffee consumption may modulate the risk of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). To review the experimental, epidemiological and clinical studies investigating the association between coffee consumption and the risk of MetS and NAFLD. A literature search was conducted with the aim of finding original experimental, epidemiological and clinical articles on the association between coffee consumption, MetS and NAFLD. The following databases were used: PubMed, Embase, Scopus and Science Direct. We included articles written in English and published up to July 2013. Three experimental animal studies investigated the effects of coffee in the MetS, whereas five examined whether experimental coffee intake may modulate the risk of fatty liver infiltration. All of the animal studies showed a protective effect of coffee towards the development of MetS and NAFLD. Moreover, we identified eleven epidemiological and clinical studies that met the inclusion criteria. Of them, six were carried out on the risk of the MetS and five on the risk of NAFLD. Four of the six studies reported an inverse association between coffee consumption and the risk of MetS. The two studies showing negative results were from the same study cohort consisting of young persons with a low prevalence of the MetS. All of the epidemiological and clinical studies on NAFLD reported a protective effect of coffee intake. Coffee intake can reduce the risk of NAFLD. Whether this effect may be mediated by certain components of the MetS deserves further investigation. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Pathogenesis of hepatic steatosis: the link between hypercortisolism and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Tarantino, Giovanni; Finelli, Carmine

    2013-10-28

    Based on the available literature, non alcoholic fatty liver disease or generally speaking, hepatic steatosis, is more frequent among people with diabetes and obesity, and is almost universally present amongst morbidly obese diabetic patients. Non alcoholic fatty liver disease is being increasingly recognized as a common liver condition in the developed world, with non alcoholic steatohepatitis projected to be the leading cause of liver transplantation. Previous data report that only 20% of patients with Cushing's syndrome have hepatic steatosis. Aiming at clarifying the reasons whereby patients suffering from Cushing's syndrome - a condition characterized by profound metabolic changes - present low prevalence of hepatic steatosis, the Authors reviewed the current concepts on the link between hypercortisolism and obesity/metabolic syndrome. They hypothesize that this low prevalence of fat accumulation in the liver of patients with Cushing's syndrome could result from the inhibition of the so-called low-grade chronic-inflammation, mainly mediated by Interleukin 6, due to an excess of cortisol, a hormone characterized by an anti-inflammatory effect. The Cushing's syndrome, speculatively considered as an in vivo model of the hepatic steatosis, could also help clarify the mechanisms of non alcoholic fatty liver disease.

  11. A disease-specific quality of life instrument for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis: CLDQ-NAFLD.

    PubMed

    Younossi, Zobair M; Stepanova, Maria; Henry, Linda; Racila, Andrei; Lam, Brian; Pham, Huong T; Hunt, Sharon

    2017-08-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis are the most common causes of chronic liver disease with known negative impact on patients' health-related quality of life. Our aim was to validate a disease-specific health-related quality of life instrument useful for efficacy trials involving patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. From a long item selection questionnaire, we selected relevant items which, by factor analysis, were grouped into domains constituting Chronic Liver Disease Questionnaire-Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease version. The developed instrument was subjected to internal validity, test-retest reliability and construct validity assessment using standard methods. For development of the Chronic Liver Disease Questionnaire-Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease version instrument, a 75-item-long item selection questionnaire was administered to 25 patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. After item reduction, factor analysis found that 98.7% of variance in the remaining items would be explained by six factors. Thus, the resulting Chronic Liver Disease Questionnaire-Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease version instrument had 36 items grouped into six domains: Abdominal Symptoms, Activity, Emotional, Fatigue, Systemic Symptoms, and Worry. The independent validation group included another 104 patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. The Cronbach's alphas of 0.74-0.90 suggested good to excellent internal consistency of the domains. Furthermore, the presence of obesity and history of depression were discriminated best by Chronic Liver Disease Questionnaire-Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease version scores (P<.05). The domains' correlations with the most relevant domains of Short Form-36 exceeded 0.70. Test-retest reliability in a subgroup of patients (N=27) demonstrated no significant within-patient variability with multiple administrations (all median differences were zero, all P>.15

  12. Monounsaturated fat decreases hepatic lipid content in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Osamah; Grosovski, Masha; Lasri, Etti; Svalb, Sergio; Ravid, Uzi; Assy, Nimer

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effects of different types of dietary fats on the hepatic lipid content and oxidative stress parameters in rat liver with experimental non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). METHODS: A total of 32 Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups. The rats in the control group (n = 8) were on chow diet (Group 1), rats (n = 6) on methionine choline-deficient diet (MCDD) (Group 2), rats (n = 6) on MCDD enriched with olive oil (Group 3), rats (n = 6) on MCDD with fish oil (Group 4) and rats (n = 6) on MCDD with butter fat (Group 5). After 2 mo, blood and liver sections were examined for lipids composition and oxidative stress parameters. RESULTS: The liver weight/rat weight ratio increased in all treatment groups as compared with the control group. Severe fatty liver was seen in MCDD + fish oil and in MCDD + butter fat groups, but not in MCDD and MCDD + olive oil groups. The increase in hepatic triglycerides (TG) levels was blunted by 30% in MCDD + olive oil group (0.59 ± 0.09) compared with MCDD group (0.85 ± 0.04, p < 0.004), by 37% compared with MCDD + fish oil group (0.95 ± 0.07, p < 0.001), and by 33% compared with MCDD + butter group (0.09 ± 0.1, p < 0.01). The increase in serum TG was lowered by 10% in MCDD + olive oil group (0.9 ± 0.07) compared with MCDD group (1.05 ± 0.06). Hepatic cholesterol increased by 15-fold in MCDD group [(0.08 ± 0.02, this increment was blunted by 21% in MCDD + fish oil group (0.09 ± 0.02)]. In comparison with the control group, ratio of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids omega-6/omega-3 increased in MCDD + olive oil, MCDD + fish oil and MCDD + butter fat groups by 345-, 30- and 397-fold, respectively. In comparison to MCDD group (1.58 ± 0.08), hepatic MDA contents in MCDD + olive oil (3.3 ± 0.6), MCDD + fish oil (3.0 ± 0.4), and MCDD + butter group (2.9 ± 0.36) were increased by 108%, 91% and 87%, respectively (p < 0.004). Hepatic paraoxonase activity decreased significantly in all

  13. Cannabis use is associated with reduced prevalence of progressive stages of alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Adejumo, Adeyinka C; Ajayi, Tokunbo O; Adegbala, Oluwole M; Adejumo, Kelechi L; Alliu, Samson; Akinjero, Akintunde M; Onyeakusi, Nnaemeka E; Ojelabi, Ogooluwa; Bukong, Terence N

    2018-01-17

    Abusive alcohol use has well-established health risks including causing liver disease (ALD) characterized by alcoholic steatosis (AS), steatohepatitis (AH), fibrosis, cirrhosis (AC) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Strikingly, a significant number of individuals who abuse alcohol also use Cannabis, which has seen increased legalization globally. While cannabis has demonstrated anti-inflammatory properties, its combined use with alcohol and the development of liver disease remain unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of cannabis use on the incidence of liver disease in individuals who abuse alcohol. We analysed the 2014 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project-Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) discharge records of patients 18 years and older, who had a past or current history of abusive alcohol use (n = 319 514). Using the International Classification of Disease, Ninth Edition codes, we studied the four distinct phases of progressive ALD with respect to three cannabis exposure groups: non-cannabis users (90.39%), non-dependent cannabis users (8.26%) and dependent cannabis users (1.36%). We accounted for the complex survey sampling methodology and estimated the adjusted odds ratio (AOR) for developing AS, AH, AC and HCC with respect to cannabis use (SAS 9.4). Our study revealed that among alcohol users, individuals who additionally use cannabis (dependent and non-dependent cannabis use) showed significantly lower odds of developing AS, AH, AC and HCC (AOR: 0.55 [0.48-0.64], 0.57 [0.53-0.61], 0.45 [0.43-0.48] and 0.62 [0.51-0.76]). Furthermore, dependent users had significantly lower odds than non-dependent users for developing liver disease. Our findings suggest that cannabis use is associated with a reduced incidence of liver disease in alcoholics. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Mechanism for Prevention of Alcohol-Induced Liver Injury by Dietary Methyl Donors

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Christine L.; Bradford, Blair U.; Craig, Christopher Patrick; Tsuchiya, Masato; Uehara, Takeki; O’Connell, Thomas M.; Pogribny, Igor P.; Melnyk, Stepan; Koop, Dennis R.; Bleyle, Lisa; Threadgill, David W.; Rusyn, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol-induced liver injury (ALI) has been associated with, among other molecular changes, abnormal hepatic methionine metabolism, resulting in decreased levels of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). Dietary methyl donor supplements such as SAM and betaine mitigate ALI in animal models; however, the mechanisms of protection remain elusive. It has been suggested that methyl donors may act via attenuation of alcohol-induced oxidative stress. We hypothesized that the protective action of methyl donors is mediated by an effect on the oxidative metabolism of alcohol in the liver. Male C57BL/6J mice were administered a control high-fat diet or diet enriched in methyl donors with or without alcohol for 4 weeks using the enteral alcohol feeding model. As expected, attenuation of ALI and an increase in reduced glutathione:oxidized glutathione ratio were achieved with methyl donor supplementation. Interestingly, methyl donors led to a 35% increase in blood alcohol elimination rate, and while there was no effect on alcohol metabolism in the stomach, a profound effect on liver alcohol metabolism was observed. The catalase-dependent pathway of alcohol metabolism was induced, yet the increase in CYP2E1 activity by alcohol was blunted, which may be mitigating production of oxidants. Additional factors contributing to the protective effects of methyl donors in ALI were increased activity of low- and high-Km aldehyde dehydrogenases leading to lower hepatic acetaldehyde, maintenance of the efficient mitochondrial energy metabolism, and promotion of peroxisomal β-oxidation. Profound changes in alcohol metabolism represent additional important mechanism of the protective effect of methyl donors in ALI. PMID:20118189

  15. Non-invasive Diagnosis of Fibrosis in Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Anil; Sharma, Praveen

    2012-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in developed as well as in developing countries. Its prevalence continues to rise currently affecting approximately 20-30% of adults and 10% of children in the United States. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease represents a wide spectrum of conditions ranging from fatty liver, which in general follows a benign non-progressive clinical course, to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a more serious form of NAFLD that may progress to cirrhosis and end-stage liver disease. Liver biopsy remains the gold standard for evaluating the degree of hepatic necroinflammation and fibrosis; however, several non-invasive investigations, such as serum biomarkers, have been developed to establish the diagnosis and also to evaluate treatment response. There has been a substantial development of non-invasive risk scores, biomarker panels, and radiological modalities to identify at risk patients with NAFLD without recourse to liver biopsy on a routine basis. Examples include combination of serum markers like NAFLD fibrosis score (NFS), BARD score, fibrometer, FIB4, and non-invasive tools like fibroscan which assess fibrosis in patients with NAFLD. Other markers of fibrosis that have been evaluated include high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, plasma pentraxin 3, interleukin-6, and cytokeratin-18. This review focuses on the methods currently available in daily clinical practice in hepatology and touches briefly on the potential future markers under investigation. PMID:25755423

  16. Phosphatase and tensin homolog is a differential diagnostic marker between nonalcoholic and alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Pareja, Andrea; Clément, Sophie; Peyrou, Marion; Spahr, Laurent; Negro, Francesco; Rubbia-Brandt, Laura; Foti, Michelangelo

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the protein expression of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) in human liver biopsies of patients with alcoholic and non-alcoholic liver disease. METHODS: PTEN protein expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded liver sections of patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) (n = 44) or alcoholic liver disease (ALD) (n = 25). Liver resections obtained from 3 healthy subjects candidate for partial liver donation served as controls. Histological evaluations were performed by two experienced pathologists, and diagnoses established based on international criteria. The intensity of the PTEN staining in nuclei was compared between steatotic and non-steatotic areas of each liver fragment analyzed. For each liver specimen, the antibody-stained sections were examined and scored blindly by three independent observers, who were unaware of the patients’ clinical history. RESULTS: In healthy individuals, PTEN immunostaining was intense in both the cytoplasm and nuclei of all hepatocytes. However, PTEN was strongly downregulated in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm of hepatocytes from steatotic areas in patients with NAFLD, independently of the disease stage. In contrast, no changes in PTEN protein expression were observed in patients with ALD, regardless of the presence of steatosis or the stage of the disease. The degree of PTEN downregulation in hepatocytes of patients with NAFLD correlated with the percentage of steatosis (r = 0.3061, P = 0.0459) and the BMI (r = 0.4268, P = 0.0043). Hovewer, in patients with ALD, PTEN expression was not correlated with the percentage of steatosis with or without obesity as a confounding factor (P = 0.5574). Finally, PTEN expression level in steatotic areas of ALD patients was significantly different from that seen in steatotic areas of NAFLD patients (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: PTEN protein expression is downregulated early in NAFLD, but not in ALD. PTEN

  17. Risk of cardiovascular, cardiac and arrhythmic complications in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Ballestri, Stefano; Lonardo, Amedeo; Bonapace, Stefano; Byrne, Christopher D; Loria, Paola; Targher, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has emerged as a public health problem of epidemic proportions worldwide. Accumulating clinical and epidemiological evidence indicates that NAFLD is not only associated with liver-related morbidity and mortality but also with an increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), abnormalities of cardiac function and structure (e.g., left ventricular dysfunction and hypertrophy, and heart failure), valvular heart disease (e.g., aortic valve sclerosis) and arrhythmias (e.g., atrial fibrillation). Experimental evidence suggests that NAFLD itself, especially in its more severe forms, exacerbates systemic/hepatic insulin resistance, causes atherogenic dyslipidemia, and releases a variety of pro-inflammatory, pro-coagulant and pro-fibrogenic mediators that may play important roles in the pathophysiology of cardiac and arrhythmic complications. Collectively, these findings suggest that patients with NAFLD may benefit from more intensive surveillance and early treatment interventions to decrease the risk for CHD and other cardiac/arrhythmic complications. The purpose of this clinical review is to summarize the rapidly expanding body of evidence that supports a strong association between NAFLD and cardiovascular, cardiac and arrhythmic complications, to briefly examine the putative biological mechanisms underlying this association, and to discuss some of the current treatment options that may influence both NAFLD and its related cardiac and arrhythmic complications. PMID:24587651

  18. IL-17A, MCP-1, CCR-2, and ABCA1 polymorphisms in children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Akbulut, Ulas Emre; Emeksiz, Hamdi Cihan; Citli, Senol; Cebi, Alper Han; Korkmaz, Hatice Ayca Ata; Baki, Gaye

    2018-05-05

    The prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in children has risen significantly, owing to the worldwide childhood obesity epidemic in the last two decades. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is closely linked to sedentary lifestyle, increased body mass index, and visceral adiposity. In addition, individual genetic variations also have a role in the development and progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the gene polymorphisms of MCP-1 (-2518 A/G) (rs1024611), CCR-2 (190 G/A) (rs1799864), ABCA1 (883 G/A) (rs4149313), and IL-17A (-197 G/A) (rs2275913) in obese Turkish children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. The study recruited 186 obese children aged 10-17 years, including 101 children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and 85 children without non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Anthropometric measurements, insulin resistance, a liver panel, a lipid profile, liver ultrasound examination, and genotyping of the four variants were performed. No difference was found between the groups in respect to age and gender, body mass index, waist/hip ratio, or body fat ratio. In addition to the elevated ALT levels, AST and GGT levels were found significantly higher in the non-alcoholic fatty liver disease group compared to the non non-alcoholic fatty liver disease group (p<0.05). The A-allele of IL-17A (-197 G/A) (rs2275913) was associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (odds ratio 2.05, 95% confidence interval: 1.12-3.77, p=0.02). The findings of this study suggest that there may be an association between IL-17A (-197 G/A) (rs2275913) polymorphism and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease development in obese Turkish children. Copyright © 2018 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Diagnosis of different liver fibrosis characteristics by blood tests in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Calès, Paul; Boursier, Jérôme; Chaigneau, Julien; Lainé, Fabrice; Sandrini, Jeremy; Michalak, Sophie; Hubert, Isabelle; Dib, Nina; Oberti, Frédéric; Bertrais, Sandrine; Hunault, Gilles; Cavaro-Ménard, Christine; Gallois, Yves; Deugnier, Yves; Rousselet, Marie C

    2010-10-01

    Our aim was to develop an accurate, non-invasive, blood-test-based method for identifying the main characteristics of liver fibrosis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Fibrosis was staged according to NASH-CRN and Metavir systems in 226 patients with NAFLD. A fully automated algorithm measured the fractal dimension (FD) and the area of fibrosis (AOF). Independent predictors of diagnostic targets were determined using bootstrap methods. (i) Development. Significant fibrosis defined by NASH-CRN F ≥2 was diagnosed by weight, glycaemia, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and prothrombin index [area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC)=0.867]; significant fibrosis defined by Metavir F ≥2 was diagnosed by weight, age, glycaemia, AST, ALT, ferritin and platelets (FibroMeter AUROC=0.941, P<0.005). AOF was estimated by the combination of hyaluronic acid, glycaemia, AST, ALT, platelets and prothrombin index ((a) R(2) =0.530), while FD was estimated by hyaluronic acid, glycaemia, AST/ALT, weight and platelets ((a) R(2) =0.529). (ii) Evaluation. Although NASH-CRN was a better system for fibrosis staging, Metavir staging was a better reference for blood test. Thus, the patient rate with predictive values ≥90% by tests was 97.3% with Metavir reference vs. 66.5% with NASH-CRN reference (P<10(-3)). FibroMeter showed a significantly higher AUROC than the NAFLD fibrosis score for significant fibrosis, but not for severe fibrosis or cirrhosis, with both staging systems. Relationships between fibrosis lesions were well reflected by blood tests, e.g., the correlation between histological area and FD of fibrosis (r(s) =0.971, P<10(-3)) was well reflected by the relationship between respective blood tests (r(s) =0.852, P<10(-3)). Different characteristics of fibrosis in NAFLD can be diagnosed and quantified by blood tests with excellent accuracy. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Fatty liver index vs waist circumference for predicting non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Motamed, Nima; Sohrabi, Masoudreza; Ajdarkosh, Hossein; Hemmasi, Gholamreza; Maadi, Mansooreh; Sayeedian, Fatemeh Sima; Pirzad, Reza; Abedi, Khadijeh; Aghapour, Sivil; Fallahnezhad, Mojtaba; Zamani, Farhad

    2016-03-14

    To determine the discriminatory performance of fatty liver index (FLI) for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The data of 5052 subjects aged over 18 years were analyzed. FLI was calculated from body mass index, waist circumference (WC), triglyceride, and gamma glutamyl transferase data. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to determine the association between FLI and NAFLD. The discriminatory performance of FLI in the diagnosis of NAFLD was evaluated by receiver operating characteristic analysis. Area under the curves (AUCs) and related confidence intervals were estimated. Optimal cutoff points of FLI in the diagnosis of NAFLD were determined based on the maximum values of Youden's index. The mean age of men and women in the study population were 44.8 ± 16.8 and 43.78 ± 15.43, respectively (P = 0.0216). The prevalence of NAFLD was 40.1% in men and 44.2% in women (P < 0.0017). FLI was strongly associated with NAFLD, so that even a one unit increase in FLI increased the chance of developing NAFLD by 5.8% (OR = 1.058, 95%CI: 1.054-1.063, P < 0.0001). Although FLI showed good performance in the diagnosis of NAFLD (AUC = 0.8656 (95%CI: 0.8548-0.8764), there was no significant difference with regards to WC (AUC = 0.8533, 95%CI: 0.8419-0.8646). The performance of FLI was not significantly different between men (AUC = 0.8648, 95%CI: 0.8505-0.8791) and women (AUC = 0.8682, 95%CI: 0.8513-0.8851). The highest performance with regards to age was related to the 18-39 age group (AUC = 0.8930, 95%CI: 0.8766-0.9093). The optimal cutoff points of FLI were 46.9 in men (sensitivity = 0.8242, specificity = 0.7687, Youden's index = 0.5929) and 53.8 in women (sensitivity = 0.8233, specificity = 0.7655, Youden's index = 0.5888). Although FLI had acceptable discriminatory power in the diagnosis of NAFLD, WC was a simpler and more accessible index with a similar performance.

  1. Alcohol and liver disease in Europe--Simple measures have the potential to prevent tens of thousands of premature deaths.

    PubMed

    Sheron, Nick

    2016-04-01

    In the World Health Organisation European Region, more than 2,370,000 years of life are lost from liver disease before the age of 50; more than lung cancer, trachea, bronchus, oesophageal, stomach, colon, rectum and pancreatic cancer combined. Between 60-80% of these deaths are alcohol related, a disease for which no pharmaceutical therapy has yet been shown to improve long-term survival. The toxicity of alcohol is dose related at an individual level, and is dose related at a population level; overall liver mortality is largely determined by population alcohol consumption. Trends in alcohol consumption correlate closely with trends in overall liver mortality, with 3-5-fold decreases or increases in liver mortality in different European countries over the last few decades. The evidence base for alcohol control measures aimed at reducing population alcohol consumption has been subjected to rigorous evaluation; most recently by the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD). Effective alcohol policy measures reduce alcohol mortality, including mortality from liver disease. The most effective and cost effective measures have been summarised by the OECD and the World Health Organisation: regular incremental above inflation tax increases, a minimum price for alcohol, effective protection of children from alcohol marketing and low level interventions from clinicians. Simple, cheap and effective changes to alcohol policy by European Institutions and member states have the potential to dramatically reduce liver mortality in Europe. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. The role of oxidative stress in the development of alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Galicia-Moreno, M; Gutiérrez-Reyes, G

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol is the most accepted addictive substance worldwide and its consumption is related to multiple health, economic, and social problems. The liver is the organ in charge of ethanol metabolism and it is susceptible to alcohol's toxic effects. To provide a detailed review of the role of oxidative stress in alcoholic liver disease and the mechanisms of damage involved, along with current information on the hepatoprotective effectiveness of the molecules that have been studied. A search of the PubMed database was conducted using the following keywords oxidative stress, alcoholic liver damage, alcoholic cirrhosis, and antioxidants. There was no time limit for gathering all available information on the subject at hand. According to the literature reviewed, oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver damage. Molecules such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), formed during ethanol metabolism, structurally and functionally modify organic molecules. Consequently, biologic processes are altered and hepatocytes are sensitized to the action of cytokines like tumor necrosis factor-α, as well as to the action of endotoxins, activating signaling pathways such as those controlled by nuclear factor kappa B, extracellular signal regulated kinases, and mitogen activated protein kinase. Oxidative stress plays an important role in the development of liver damage resulting from alcohol consumption. The molecules that have currently displayed a hepatoprotective effect in preclinical and clinical trials must be studied further so that their effectiveness can be confirmed and they can possibly be used as adjuvant treatments for this disease. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  3. Bacterial infections in alcoholic and nonalcoholic liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Sargenti, Konstantina; Prytz, Hanne; Nilsson, Emma; Bertilsson, Sara; Kalaitzakis, Evangelos

    2015-09-01

    Longitudinal, population-based data on the occurrence, localization, and severity of bacterial infections over time in patients with alcoholic compared with nonalcoholic cirrhosis are limited. All patients with incident cirrhosis diagnosed in 2001-2010 (area of 600,000 inhabitants) were retrospectively identified. All bacterial infections resulting in or occurring during an inpatient hospital episode during this period were registered. The etiology of cirrhosis (alcoholic vs. nonalcoholic), infection localization, and outcome as well as bacterial resistance patterns were analyzed. Patients were followed until death, transplant, or the end of 2011. In all, 633 cirrhotics (363 alcoholic, 270 nonalcoholic) experienced a total of 398 infections (2276 patient-years). Among patients diagnosed with cirrhosis each year from 2001 to 2010, increasing trends were noted in the occurrence of infection (from 13 to 27%, P<0.001) and infection-related in-hospital mortality (from 2 to 7%, P=0.05), the latter mainly in the alcoholic group. Although alcoholic etiology was related to the occurrence of more frequent infection (Kaplan-Meier, P<0.001), this relationship was not significant after adjustment for confounders in Cox regression analysis (P=0.056). Resistance to piperacilin-tazobactam and carbapenems was more common in infections occurring in alcoholic versus nonalcoholic cirrhosis (13 vs. 5%, P=0.057 and 12 vs. 2%, P=0.009). Alcoholic etiology predicted pneumonia and infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria in multivariate analysis (P<0.05 for both). In a population-based cirrhotic cohort, bacterial infections increased over time, which, in the case of alcoholic cirrhosis, was associated with pneumonia and bacterial resistance to antibiotics. However, alcoholic etiology was not related indepedently to the occurrence of bacterial infections.

  4. The benefits of exercise for patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Keating, Shelley E; George, Jacob; Johnson, Nathan A

    2015-01-01

    As exercise is now an established therapy for the management of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), recent investigations have sought to identify the optimal dose (type, intensity and amount) of exercise for hepatic benefit. Here, the authors discuss the following: the role of aerobic exercise for the modulation of hepatic steatosis; the limited evidence for the role of resistance training in reducing liver fat; the lack of evidence from clinical trials on the role of exercise in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis; and the benefits of exercise for patients with NAFLD, beyond steatosis. Based on current evidence, the authors provide recommendations for exercise prescription for patients with NAFLD.

  5. Histological scoring and associated risk factors of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Majid, N; Ali, Z; Rahman, M R; Akhter, A; Rajib, R C; Ahmad, F; Sharmin, S; Akond, A K; Huq, N

    2013-10-01

    Non alcoholic steatohepatitis is a hepatic disorder with histological features of alcohol induced liver disease that occurs in individual who do not consume significant alcohol. Liver biopsy is an important part of the evaluation in term of both grade & stage. A cross sectional study was carried out in the department of Pathology, Dhaka Medical College, Dhaka & department of Hepatology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU) from July 2007 to June 2009. Total 55 adult subjects of both sex were included on the basis of predefined inclusion & exclusion criteria in this study to evaluate the histological pattern of non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and its correlation with risk factors. Liver biopsy was done and H & E and Masson's Trichrome stain slides were examined to evaluate the grade and stage of NAFLD. Scoring and semiquantitative assessment of steatosis and NAFLD severity was done according to Kleiner scale known as NAFLD activity score (NAS). The results of Pearson correlation showed only BMI and triglyceride level significantly correlated with NAS score. The results of Spearman's rank correlation showed that BMI, central obesity, triglyceridaemia and age significantly correlated with staging of fibrosis. The results of multiple regression analysis showed that variation of NAS depend on BMI and triglyceride level. The study also revealed that risk factors contributed about 29% risk for the occurrence of non alcoholic steatohepatitis.

  6. Hepatic NAD+ deficiency as a therapeutic target for non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease in ageing

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Can‐Can; Yang, Xi; Hua, Xia; Liu, Jian; Fan, Mao‐Bing; Li, Guo‐Qiang; Song, Jie; Xu, Tian‐Ying; Li, Zhi‐Yong; Guan, Yun‐Feng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background and Purpose Ageing is an important risk factor of non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Here, we investigated whether the deficiency of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+), a ubiquitous coenzyme, links ageing with NAFLD. Experimental Approach Hepatic concentrations of NAD+, protein levels of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) and several other critical enzymes regulating NAD+ biosynthesis, were compared in middle‐aged and aged mice or patients. The influences of NAD+ decline on the steatosis and steatohepatitis were evaluated in wild‐type and H247A dominant‐negative, enzymically‐inactive NAMPT transgenic mice (DN‐NAMPT) given normal or high‐fat diet (HFD). Key Results Hepatic NAD+ level decreased in aged mice and humans. NAMPT‐controlled NAD+ salvage, but not de novo biosynthesis pathway, was compromised in liver of elderly mice and humans. Given normal chow, middle‐age DN‐NAMPT mice displayed systemic NAD+ reduction and had moderate NAFLD phenotypes, including lipid accumulation, enhanced oxidative stress, triggered inflammation and impaired insulin sensitivity in liver. All these NAFLD phenotypes, especially release of pro‐inflammatory factors, Kupffer cell accumulation, monocytes infiltration, NLRP3 inflammasome pathway and hepatic fibrosis (Masson's staining and α‐SMA staining), deteriorated further under HFD challenge. Oral administration of nicotinamide riboside, a natural NAD+ precursor, completely corrected these NAFLD phenotypes induced by NAD+ deficiency alone or HFD, whereas adenovirus‐mediated SIRT1 overexpression only partially rescued these phenotypes. Conclusions and Implications These results provide the first evidence that ageing‐associated NAD+ deficiency is a critical risk factor for NAFLD, and suggest that supplementation with NAD+ substrates may be a promising therapeutic strategy to prevent and treat NAFLD. PMID:27174364

  7. Modulatory role of Pterocarpus santalinus against alcohol-induced liver oxidative/nitrosative damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Bulle, Saradamma; Reddy, Vaddi Damodara; Padmavathi, Pannuru; Maturu, Paramahamsa; N Ch, Varadacharyulu

    2016-10-01

    Pterocarpus santalinus, a traditional medicinal plant has shown protective mechanisms against various complications. The aim of the present study is to evaluate therapeutic efficacy of P. santalinus heartwood methanolic extract (PSE) against alcohol-induced oxidative/nitrosative stress leading to hepatotoxicity. In-vitro studies revealed that PSE possess strong DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl) and nitric oxide radical scavenging activity. For in vivo studies male albino Wistar rats were treated with 20% alcohol (5g/kg b.wt/day) and PSE (250mg/kg b.wt/day) for 60days. Results showed that alcohol administration significantly altered plasma lipid profile with marked increase in the levels of plasma transaminases (ALT and AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and gamma glutamyl transferase (γGT). Moreover, lipid peroxides, nitric oxide (NOx) levels in plasma and liver were increased with increased iNOS protein expression in liver was noticed in alcohol administered rats and these levels were significantly brought back close to normal level by PSE administration except iNOS protein expression. Alcohol administration also decreased the content of reduced glutathione (GSH) and activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione-s transferase (GST), glutathione reductase (GR), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) in liver, which were significantly enhanced by administration of PSE. The active compounds pterostilbene, lignan and lupeols present in PSE might have shown protection against alcohol-induced hepatic damage by possibly reducing the rate of lipid peroxidation, NOx levels and increasing the antioxidant defence mechanism in alcohol administered rats. Both biochemical and histopathological results in the alcohol-induced liver damage model emphasize beneficial action of PSE as a hepatoprotective agent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Rising Rates of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Leading to Liver Transplantation in Baby Boomer Generation with Chronic Hepatitis C, Alcohol Liver Disease, and Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis-Related Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cholankeril, George; Perumpail, Ryan B.; Liu, Andy; Sandhu, Jeevin S.; Nair, Satheesh; Hu, Menghan; Ahmed, Aijaz

    2017-01-01

    We aim to study the impact of the baby boomer (BB) generation, a birth-specific cohort (born 1945–1965) on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)-related liver transplantation (LT) in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV), alcoholic liver disease (ALD), and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). We performed a retrospective analysis using the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS)/Organ Procurement Transplant Network (OPTN) database from 2003 to 2014 to compare HCC-related liver transplant surgery trends between two cohorts—the BB and non-BB—with a secondary diagnosis of HCV, ALD, or NASH. From 2003–2014, there were a total of 8313 liver transplant recipients for the indication of HCC secondary to HCV, ALD, or NASH. Of the total, 6658 (80.1%) HCC-related liver transplant recipients were BB. The number of liver transplant surgeries for the indication of HCC increased significantly in NASH (+1327%), HCV (+382%), and ALD (+286%) during the study period. The proportion of BB who underwent LT for HCC was the highest in HCV (84.7%), followed by NASH (70.3%) and ALD (64.7%). The recommendations for birth-cohort specific HCV screening stemmed from a greater understanding of the high prevalence of chronic HCV and HCV-related HCC within BB. The rising number of HCC-related LT among BB with ALD and NASH suggests the need for increased awareness and improved preventative screening/surveillance measures within NASH and ALD cohorts as well. PMID:28954412

  9. Rising Rates of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Leading to Liver Transplantation in Baby Boomer Generation with Chronic Hepatitis C, Alcohol Liver Disease, and Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis-Related Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Cholankeril, George; Yoo, Eric R; Perumpail, Ryan B; Liu, Andy; Sandhu, Jeevin S; Nair, Satheesh; Hu, Menghan; Ahmed, Aijaz

    2017-09-26

    We aim to study the impact of the baby boomer (BB) generation, a birth-specific cohort (born 1945-1965) on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)-related liver transplantation (LT) in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV), alcoholic liver disease (ALD), and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). We performed a retrospective analysis using the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS)/Organ Procurement Transplant Network (OPTN) database from 2003 to 2014 to compare HCC-related liver transplant surgery trends between two cohorts-the BB and non-BB-with a secondary diagnosis of HCV, ALD, or NASH. From 2003-2014, there were a total of 8313 liver transplant recipients for the indication of HCC secondary to HCV, ALD, or NASH. Of the total, 6658 (80.1%) HCC-related liver transplant recipients were BB. The number of liver transplant surgeries for the indication of HCC increased significantly in NASH (+1327%), HCV (+382%), and ALD (+286%) during the study period. The proportion of BB who underwent LT for HCC was the highest in HCV (84.7%), followed by NASH (70.3%) and ALD (64.7%). The recommendations for birth-cohort specific HCV screening stemmed from a greater understanding of the high prevalence of chronic HCV and HCV-related HCC within BB. The rising number of HCC-related LT among BB with ALD and NASH suggests the need for increased awareness and improved preventative screening/surveillance measures within NASH and ALD cohorts as well.

  10. Milk thistle for alcoholic and/or hepatitis B or C virus liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Rambaldi, A; Jacobs, B P; Iaquinto, G; Gluud, C

    2005-04-18

    Alcohol and hepatotoxic viruses cause the majority of liver diseases. Randomised clinical trials have assessed whether extracts of milk thistle, Silybum marianum (L) Gaertneri, have any effect in patients with alcoholic and/or hepatitis B or C virus liver diseases. To assess the beneficial and harmful effects of milk thistle or milk thistle constituents versus placebo or no intervention in patients with alcoholic liver disease and/or viral liver diseases (hepatitis B and hepatitis C). The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and full text searches were combined (December 2003). Manufacturers and researchers in the field were contacted. Only randomised clinical trials in patients with alcoholic and/or hepatitis B or C virus liver diseases (acute and chronic) were included. Interventions encompassed milk thistle at any dose or duration versus placebo or no intervention. The trials could be double blind, single blind, or unblinded. The trials could be unpublished or published and no language limitations were applied. The primary outcome measure was mortality. Binary outcomes are reported as relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI). Subgroup analyses were performed with regard to methodological quality. Thirteen randomised clinical trials assessed milk thistle in 915 patients with alcoholic and/or hepatitis B or C virus liver diseases. The methodological quality was low: only 23% of the trials reported adequate allocation concealment and only 46% were considered adequately double-blinded. Milk thistle versus placebo or no intervention had no significant effect on mortality (RR 0.78, 95% CI 0.53 to 1.15), complications of liver disease (RR 0.95, 95% CI 0.83 to 1.09), or liver histology. Liver-related mortality was significantly reduced by milk thistle in all trials (RR 0.50, 95% CI 0.29 to 0.88), but not in high-quality trials (RR 0.57, 95% CI 0.28 to 1.19). Milk

  11. Milk thistle for alcoholic and/or hepatitis B or C virus liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Rambaldi, A; Jacobs, B P; Gluud, C

    2007-10-17

    Alcohol and hepatotoxic viruses cause the majority of liver diseases. Randomised clinical trials have assessed whether extracts of milk thistle, Silybum marianum (L) Gaertneri, have any effect in patients with alcoholic and/or hepatitis B or C virus liver diseases. To assess the beneficial and harmful effects of milk thistle or milk thistle constituents versus placebo or no intervention in patients with alcoholic liver disease and/or viral liver diseases (hepatitis B and hepatitis C). The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and full text searches were combined (July 2007). Manufacturers and researchers in the field were contacted. Only randomised clinical trials in patients with alcoholic and/or hepatitis B or C virus liver diseases (acute and chronic) were included. Interventions encompassed milk thistle at any dose or duration versus placebo or no intervention. The trials could be double blind, single blind, or unblinded. The trials could be unpublished or published and no language limitations were applied. The primary outcome measure was mortality. Binary outcomes are reported as relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI). Subgroup analyses were performed with regard to methodological quality. Eighteen randomised clinical trials assessed milk thistle in 1088 patients with alcoholic and/or hepatitis B or C virus liver diseases. The methodological quality was low: only 28.6% of the trials reported high methodological quality characteristics. Milk thistle versus placebo or no intervention had no significant effect on mortality (RR 0.78, 95% CI 0.53 to 1.15), complications of liver disease (RR 0.95, 95% CI 0.83 to 1.09), or liver histology. Liver-related mortality was significantly reduced by milk thistle in all trials (RR 0.50, 95% CI 0.29 to 0.88), but not in high-quality trials (RR 0.57, 95% CI 0.28 to 1.19). Milk thistle was not associated with a significantly

  12. Genetics Home Reference: non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... different populations of microorganisms in the intestines (gut microbiota) on the breakdown and absorption of nutrients are ... Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Interplay between Diet, Gut Microbiota, and Genetic Background. Gastroenterol Res Pract. 2016;2016: ...

  13. Alcohol-Attributable Fraction in Liver Disease: Does GDP Per Capita Matter?

    PubMed

    Kröner, Paul T; Mankal, Pavan Kumar; Dalapathi, Vijay; Shroff, Kavin; Abed, Jean; Kotler, Donald P

    2015-01-01

    The alcohol-attributable fraction (AAF) quantifies alcohol's disease burden. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is influenced by alcohol consumption per capita, duration, gender, ethnicity, and other comorbidities. In this study, we investigated the association between AAF/alcohol-related liver mortality and alcohol consumption per capita, while stratifying to per-capita gross domestic product (GDP). Data obtained from the World Health Organization and World Bank for both genders on AAF on liver disease, per-capita alcohol consumption (L/y), and per-capita GDP (USD/y) were used to conduct a cross-sectional study. Countries were classified as "high-income" and "very low income" if their respective per-capita GDP was greater than $30,000 or less than $1,000. Differences in total alcohol consumption per capita and AAF were calculated using a 2-sample t test. Scatterplots were generated to supplement the Pearson correlation coefficients, and F test was conducted to assess for differences in variance of ALD between high-income and very low income countries. Twenty-six and 27 countries met the criteria for high-income and very low income countries, respectively. Alcohol consumption per capita was higher in high-income countries. AAF and alcohol consumption per capita for both genders in high-income and very low income countries had a positive correlation. The F test yielded an F value of 1.44 with P = .357. No statistically significant correlation was found among alcohol types and AAF. Significantly higher mortality from ALD was found in very low income countries relative to high-income countries. Previous studies had noted a decreased AAF in low-income countries as compared to higher-income countries. However, the non-statistically significant difference between AAF variances of low-income and high-income countries was found by this study. A possible explanation is that both high-income and low-income populations will consume sufficient amount of alcohol, irrespective of its

  14. Medium chain triglycerides dose-dependently prevent liver pathology in a rat model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Ronis, Martin J J; Baumgardner, January N; Sharma, Neha; Vantrease, Jamie; Ferguson, Matthew; Tong, Yudong; Wu, Xianli; Cleves, Mario A; Badger, Thomas M

    2013-02-01

    Metabolic syndrome is often accompanied by development of hepatic steatosis and less frequently by non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) leading to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Replacement of corn oil with medium chain triacylglycerols (MCT) in the diets of alcohol-fed rats has been shown to protect against steatosis and alcoholic liver injury. The current study was designed to determine if a similar beneficial effect of MCT occurs in a rat model of NAFLD. Groups of male rats were isocalorically overfed diets containing 10%, 35% or 70% total energy as corn oil or a 70% fat diet in which corn oil was replaced with increasing concentrations of saturated fat (18:82, beef tallow:MCT oil) from 20% to 65% for 21 days using total enteral nutrition (TEN). As dietary content of corn oil increased, hepatic steatosis and serum alanine amino transferases were elevated (P < 0.05). This was accompanied by greater expression of cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP2E1 (P < 0.05) and higher concentrations of polyunsaturated 18:2 and 20:4 fatty acids (FA) in the hepatic lipid fractions (P < 0.05). Keeping the total dietary fat at 70%, but increasing the proportion of MCT-enriched saturated fat resulted in a dose-dependent reduction in steatosis and necrosis without affecting CYP2E1 induction. There was no incorporation of C8-C10 FAs into liver lipids, but increasing the ratio of MCT to corn oil: reduced liver lipid 18:2 and 20:4 concentrations; reduced membrane susceptibility to radical attack; stimulated FA β- and ω-oxidation as a result of activation of peroxisomal proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)α, and appeared to increase mitochondrial respiration through complex III. These data suggest that replacing unsaturated fats like corn oil with MCT oil in the diet could be utilized as a potential treatment for NAFLD.

  15. Alcoholic liver disease confers a worse prognosis than HCV infection and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease among patients with cirrhosis: An observational study

    PubMed Central

    Marot, Astrid; Henrion, Jean; Knebel, Jean-François; Moreno, Christophe

    2017-01-01

    Background Cirrhosis is a heterogeneous clinical condition that includes patients at wide-ranging stages of severity. The role of the underlying liver disease on patient prognosis remains unclear. Aim To assess the impact of the underlying liver disease on the occurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and death. Methods Data related to the occurrence of HCC and death were collected during a 21-year period among patients with cirrhosis related to alcoholic liver disease (ALD) (n = 529), chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection (n = 145) or non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) (n = 78). Results At inclusion, ALD patients were younger than HCV and NAFLD patients (56 vs. 67 vs. 63 years; p<0.001) and had worse liver function (percent of patients with Child-Pugh stages B or C: 48% vs. 8% vs. 17%; p<0.001). During follow-up, 85 patients developed HCC and 379 died. The 10-year cumulative incidence rate of HCC was lower in ALD patients than in HCV and NAFLD patients (8.4% vs. 22.0% vs. 23.7%; p<0.001). The 10-year cumulative incidence rates of mortality were not statistically different between ALD, HCV and NAFLD patients (58.1% vs. 47.7% vs. 49.9%; p = 0.078). Alcohol abstinence and viral eradication were associated with reduced mortality among ALD and HCV patients, respectively. In multivariate analyses, ALD was associated with a reduced risk of HCC (0.39; 95% CI, 0.20–0.76; p = 0.005) but with a higher risk of mortality (1.53; 95% CI, 1.20–1.95; p<0.001). ALD patients died more frequently from decompensation of cirrhosis. Conclusion Despite a lower incidence of HCC, patients with ALD-related cirrhosis have a worse outcome than those with chronic HCV infection or NAFLD-related cirrhosis. PMID:29077714

  16. Isocaloric Dietary Changes and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in High Cardiometabolic Risk Individuals.

    PubMed

    Della Pepa, Giuseppe; Vetrani, Claudia; Lombardi, Gianluca; Bozzetto, Lutgarda; Annuzzi, Giovanni; Rivellese, Angela Albarosa

    2017-09-26

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) incorporates an extensive spectrum of histologic liver abnormalities, varying from simple triglyceride accumulation in hepatocytes non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), and it is the most frequent chronic liver disease in the industrialized world. Beyond liver related complications such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, NAFLD is also an emerging risk factor for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Currently, lifestyle intervention including strategies to reduce body weight and to increase regular physical activity represents the mainstay of NAFLD management. Total caloric intake plays a very important role in both the development and the treatment of NAFLD; however, apart from the caloric restriction alone, modifying the quality of the diet and modulating either the macro- or micronutrient composition can also markedly affect the clinical evolution of NAFLD, offering a more realistic and feasible treatment alternative. The aim of the present review is to summarize currently available evidence from randomized controlled trials on the effects of different nutrients including carbohydrates, lipids, protein and other dietary components, in isocaloric conditions, on NAFLD in people at high cardiometabolic risk. We also describe the plausible mechanisms by which different dietary components could modulate liver fat content.

  17. Isocaloric Dietary Changes and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in High Cardiometabolic Risk Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Della Pepa, Giuseppe; Vetrani, Claudia; Lombardi, Gianluca; Bozzetto, Lutgarda; Annuzzi, Giovanni; Rivellese, Angela Albarosa

    2017-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) incorporates an extensive spectrum of histologic liver abnormalities, varying from simple triglyceride accumulation in hepatocytes non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), and it is the most frequent chronic liver disease in the industrialized world. Beyond liver related complications such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, NAFLD is also an emerging risk factor for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Currently, lifestyle intervention including strategies to reduce body weight and to increase regular physical activity represents the mainstay of NAFLD management. Total caloric intake plays a very important role in both the development and the treatment of NAFLD; however, apart from the caloric restriction alone, modifying the quality of the diet and modulating either the macro- or micronutrient composition can also markedly affect the clinical evolution of NAFLD, offering a more realistic and feasible treatment alternative. The aim of the present review is to summarize currently available evidence from randomized controlled trials on the effects of different nutrients including carbohydrates, lipids, protein and other dietary components, in isocaloric conditions, on NAFLD in people at high cardiometabolic risk. We also describe the plausible mechanisms by which different dietary components could modulate liver fat content. PMID:28954437

  18. Activation of farnesoid X receptor attenuates hepatic injury in a murine model of alcoholic liver disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Weibin; Institutes of Biomedical Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032; Zhu, Bo

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •FXR activity was impaired by chronic ethanol ingestion in a murine model of ALD. •Activation of FXR attenuated alcohol-induced liver injury and steatosis. •Activation of FXR attenuated cholestasis and oxidative stress in mouse liver. -- Abstract: Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a common cause of advanced liver disease, and considered as a major risk factor of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Hepatic cholestasis is a pathophysiological feature observed in all stages of ALD. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily, and plays an essential role in the regulation of bile acid, lipid andmore » glucose homeostasis. However, the role of FXR in the pathogenesis and progression of ALD remains largely unknown. Mice were fed Lieber-DeCarli ethanol diet or an isocaloric control diet. We used a specific agonist of FXR WAY-362450 to study the effect of pharmacological activation of FXR in alcoholic liver disease. In this study, we demonstrated that FXR activity was impaired by chronic ethanol ingestion in a murine model of ALD. Activation of FXR by specific agonist WAY-362450 protected mice from the development of ALD. We also found that WAY-362450 treatment rescued FXR activity, suppressed ethanol-induced Cyp2e1 up-regulation and attenuated oxidative stress in liver. Our results highlight a key role of FXR in the modulation of ALD development, and propose specific FXR agonists for the treatment of ALD patients.« less

  19. A mouse model of alcoholic liver fibrosis-associated acute kidney injury identifies key molecular pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Furuya, Shinji; Chappell, Grace A.; Iwata, Yasuhir

    Clinical data strongly indicate that acute kidney injury (AKI) is a critical complication in alcoholic hepatitis, an acute-on-chronic form of liver failure in patients with advanced alcoholic fibrosis. Development of targeted therapies for AKI in this setting is hampered by the lack of an animal model. To enable research into molecular drivers and novel therapies for fibrosis- and alcohol-associated AKI, we aimed to combine carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4})-induced fibrosis with chronic intra-gastric alcohol feeding. Male C57BL/6J mice were administered a low dose of CCl{sub 4} (0.2 ml/kg 2 × week/6 weeks) followed by alcohol intragastrically (up to 25 g/kg/day formore » 3 weeks) and with continued CCl{sub 4}. We observed that combined treatment with CCl{sub 4} and alcohol resulted in severe liver injury, more pronounced than using each treatment alone. Importantly, severe kidney injury was evident only in the combined treatment group. This mouse model reproduced distinct pathological features consistent with AKI in human alcoholic hepatitis. Transcriptomic analysis of kidneys revealed profound effects in the combined treatment group, with enrichment for damage-associated pathways, such as apoptosis, inflammation, immune-response and hypoxia. Interestingly, Havcr1 and Lcn2, biomarkers of AKI, were markedly up-regulated. Overall, this study established a novel mouse model of fibrosis- and alcohol-associated AKI and identified key mechanistic pathways. - Highlights: • Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a critical complication in alcoholic hepatitis • We developed a novel mouse model of fibrosis- and alcohol-associated AKI • This model reproduces key molecular and pathological features of human AKI • This animal model can help identify new targeted therapies for alcoholic hepatitis.« less

  20. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus: the liver disease of our age?

    PubMed

    Firneisz, Gábor

    2014-07-21

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver disease that might affect up to one-third of the adult population in industrialised countries. NAFLD incorporates histologically and clinically different non-alcoholic entities; fatty liver (NAFL, steatosis hepatis) and steatohepatitis (NASH-characterised by hepatocyte ballooning and lobular inflammation ± fibrosis) might progress to cirrhosis and rarely to hepatocellular cancer. NAFL increasingly affects children (paediatric prevalence is 4.2%-9.6%). Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), insulin resistance (IR), obesity, metabolic syndrome and NAFLD are particularly closely related. Increased hepatic lipid storage is an early abnormality in insulin resistant women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus. The accumulation of triacylglycerols in hepatocytes is predominantly derived from the plasma nonesterified fatty acid pool supplied largely by the adipose tissue. A few NAFLD susceptibility gene variants are associated with progressive liver disease, IR, T2DM and a higher risk for hepatocellular carcinoma. Although not approved, pharmacological approaches might be considered in NASH patients.

  1. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus: The liver disease of our age?

    PubMed Central

    Firneisz, Gábor

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver disease that might affect up to one-third of the adult population in industrialised countries. NAFLD incorporates histologically and clinically different non-alcoholic entities; fatty liver (NAFL, steatosis hepatis) and steatohepatitis (NASH-characterised by hepatocyte ballooning and lobular inflammation ± fibrosis) might progress to cirrhosis and rarely to hepatocellular cancer. NAFL increasingly affects children (paediatric prevalence is 4.2%-9.6%). Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), insulin resistance (IR), obesity, metabolic syndrome and NAFLD are particularly closely related. Increased hepatic lipid storage is an early abnormality in insulin resistant women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus. The accumulation of triacylglycerols in hepatocytes is predominantly derived from the plasma nonesterified fatty acid pool supplied largely by the adipose tissue. A few NAFLD susceptibility gene variants are associated with progressive liver disease, IR, T2DM and a higher risk for hepatocellular carcinoma. Although not approved, pharmacological approaches might be considered in NASH patients. PMID:25083080

  2. Effect of Pelargonium reniforme roots on alcohol-induced liver damage and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Adewusi, Emmanuel Adekanmi; Afolayan, Anthony Jide

    2010-09-01

    Ethnobotanical surveys conducted on Pelargonium reniforme Curtis (Geraniaceae) have shown that the aqueous root extracts are used to treat alcohol-induced liver damage. We evaluated the antioxidant properties of the extract and its effects on alcohol-induced hepatotoxicity using Wistar rats. Alcohol-induced hepatotoxicity studies were carried out by observing the effect of the aqueous root extract on some liver marker enzymes, bilirubin, and total protein after liver damage. The levels of some phenolic compounds were determined by standard methods. Also, the reducing power of the plant extract and its ability to scavenge 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH*) and 2,2'-azinobis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS*+) radicals were determined to evaluate its antioxidant activity. The results obtained show that the plant extract possessed significant antioxidant activity. It had a significant level of phenolic compounds, scavenged DPPH* and ABTS*+ radicals effectively, and demonstrated good reducing power. This may indicate that the plant contained compounds which can remove toxic metabolites following alcohol abuse. Serum analysis of animals treated with only ethanol showed a significant increase in the levels of liver marker enzymes and total and unconjugated bilirubin, while a significant decrease was observed in the levels of conjugated bilirubin and total proteins. Administration of the plant extract restored the levels of these markers to normal levels, and this indicates the ability of the plant extract to restore normal functioning of a damaged liver. The study shows that P. reniforme is a potential source of antioxidants and compounds which are useful in treating alcoholic liver damage.

  3. Optimal management for alcoholic liver disease: Conventional medications, natural therapy or combination?

    PubMed

    Kim, Moon-Sun; Ong, Madeleine; Qu, Xianqin

    2016-01-07

    Alcohol consumption is the principal factor in the pathogenesis of chronic liver diseases. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is defined by histological lesions on the liver that can range from simple hepatic steatosis to more advanced stages such as alcoholic steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and liver failure. As one of the oldest forms of liver injury known to humans, ALD is still a leading cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality and the burden is exerting on medical systems with hospitalization and management costs rising constantly worldwide. Although the biological mechanisms, including increasing of acetaldehyde, oxidative stress with induction of cytochrome p450 2E1, inflammatory cytokine release, abnormal lipid metabolism and induction of hepatocyte apoptosis, by which chronic alcohol consumption triggers serious complex progression of ALD is well established, there is no universally accepted therapy to prevent or reverse. In this article, we have briefly reviewed the pathogenesis of ALD and the molecular targets for development of novel therapies. This review is focused on current therapeutic strategies for ALD, including lifestyle modification with nutrition supplements, available pharmacological drugs and new agents that are under development, liver transplantation, application of complementary medicines, and their combination. The relevant molecular mechanisms of each conventional medication and natural agent have been reviewed according to current available knowledge in the literature. We also summarized efficacy vs safety on conventional and herbal medicines which are specifically used for the prevention and treatment of ALD. Through a system review, this article highlighted that the combination of pharmaceutical drugs with naturally occurring agents may offer an optimal management for ALD and its complications. It is worthwhile to conduct large-scale, multiple centre clinical trials to further prove the safety and benefits for

  4. Alcohol abuse in deceased liver donors: impact on post-transplant outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mangus, Richard S; Kubal, Chandrashekhar A; Fridell, Jonathan A; Pena, Jose M; Frost, Evan M; Joseph Tector, A

    2015-01-01

    Many deceased liver donors with a history of alcohol abuse are excluded based upon medical history alone. This paper summarizes the transplant outcomes for a large number of deceased liver donors with a documented history of alcohol abuse. The records for 1478 consecutive deceased liver donors were reviewed (2001-2012). As per the United Network for Organ Sharing criteria, heavy alcohol use by an organ donor is defined as chronic intake of two or more drinks per day. Donors with a documented history of alcohol abuse were divided into three groups according to duration of abuse (<10 years, 10-24 years and 25 + years). Reperfusion biopsies are reported. Outcomes include biopsy appearance, early graft function and early and late graft survival. There were 161 donors with alcohol abuse: <10 years (29%); 10-24 years (42%); and ≥25 years (29%). Risk of 90-day graft loss for these three groups was: 0%, 3% and 2%, compared to 3% for all other donors (P = 0.62). Graft survival at 1 year for donor grafts with and without alcohol abuse was 89% and 87% (P = 0.52). There was no difference in early graft function. Cox proportional hazards modelling for graft survival demonstrates no statistically significant difference in survival up to 10 years post-transplant. This study demonstrates successful transplantation of a large number of deceased donor liver grafts from donors with a documented history of alcohol abuse (n = 161; 11% of all grafts). These extended criteria donor allografts may, therefore, be utilized successfully with similar outcomes. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Parkin regulates mitophagy and mitochondrial function to protect against alcohol-induced liver injury and steatosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jessica A.; Ni, Hong-Min; Ding, Yifeng

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease claims two million lives per year. We previously reported that autophagy protected against alcohol-induced liver injury and steatosis by removing damaged mitochondria. However, the mechanisms for removal of these mitochondria are unknown. Parkin is an evolutionarily conserved E3 ligase that is recruited to damaged mitochondria to initiate ubiquitination of mitochondrial outer membrane proteins and subsequent mitochondrial degradation by mitophagy. In addition to its role in mitophagy, Parkin has been shown to have other roles in maintaining mitochondrial function. We investigated whether Parkin protected against alcohol-induced liver injury and steatosis using wild-type (WT) and Parkin knockout (KO) mice treated with alcohol by the acute-binge and Gao-binge (chronic plus acute-binge) models. We found that Parkin protected against liver injury in both alcohol models, likely because of Parkin's role in maintaining a population of healthy mitochondria. Alcohol caused greater mitochondrial damage and oxidative stress in Parkin KO livers compared with WT livers. After alcohol treatment, Parkin KO mice had severely swollen and damaged mitochondria that lacked cristae, which were not seen in WT mice. Furthermore, Parkin KO mice had decreased mitophagy, β-oxidation, mitochondrial respiration, and cytochrome c oxidase activity after acute alcohol treatment compared with WT mice. Interestingly, liver mitochondria seemed able to adapt to alcohol treatment, but Parkin KO mouse liver mitochondria had less capacity to adapt to Gao-binge treatment compared with WT mouse liver mitochondria. Overall, our findings indicate that Parkin is an important mediator of protection against alcohol-induced mitochondrial damage, steatosis, and liver injury. PMID:26159696

  6. Parkin regulates mitophagy and mitochondrial function to protect against alcohol-induced liver injury and steatosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jessica A; Ni, Hong-Min; Ding, Yifeng; Ding, Wen-Xing

    2015-09-01

    Alcoholic liver disease claims two million lives per year. We previously reported that autophagy protected against alcohol-induced liver injury and steatosis by removing damaged mitochondria. However, the mechanisms for removal of these mitochondria are unknown. Parkin is an evolutionarily conserved E3 ligase that is recruited to damaged mitochondria to initiate ubiquitination of mitochondrial outer membrane proteins and subsequent mitochondrial degradation by mitophagy. In addition to its role in mitophagy, Parkin has been shown to have other roles in maintaining mitochondrial function. We investigated whether Parkin protected against alcohol-induced liver injury and steatosis using wild-type (WT) and Parkin knockout (KO) mice treated with alcohol by the acute-binge and Gao-binge (chronic plus acute-binge) models. We found that Parkin protected against liver injury in both alcohol models, likely because of Parkin's role in maintaining a population of healthy mitochondria. Alcohol caused greater mitochondrial damage and oxidative stress in Parkin KO livers compared with WT livers. After alcohol treatment, Parkin KO mice had severely swollen and damaged mitochondria that lacked cristae, which were not seen in WT mice. Furthermore, Parkin KO mice had decreased mitophagy, β-oxidation, mitochondrial respiration, and cytochrome c oxidase activity after acute alcohol treatment compared with WT mice. Interestingly, liver mitochondria seemed able to adapt to alcohol treatment, but Parkin KO mouse liver mitochondria had less capacity to adapt to Gao-binge treatment compared with WT mouse liver mitochondria. Overall, our findings indicate that Parkin is an important mediator of protection against alcohol-induced mitochondrial damage, steatosis, and liver injury. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Genetic variation in PNPLA3 but not APOC3 influences liver fat in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Hyysalo, Jenni; Stojkovic, Ivana; Kotronen, Anna; Hakkarainen, Antti; Sevastianova, Ksenia; Makkonen, Janne; Lundbom, Nina; Rissanen, Aila; Krauss, Ronald M; Melander, Olle; Orho-Melander, Marju; Yki-Järvinen, Hannele

    2012-05-01

    A recent study in Indian subjects suggested common variants in apolipoprotein C3 (APOC3) (T-455C at rs2854116 and C-482T at rs2854117) to contribute to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), plasma apoC3 and triglyceride concentrations. Our aim was to determine the contribution of genetic variation in APOC3 on liver fat content and plasma triglyceride and apoC3 concentrations in a larger European cohort. A total of 417 Finnish individuals were genotyped for rs2854116 and rs2854117 in APOC3 and the known rs738409 in patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein 3 (PNPLA3) influencing liver fat. Plasma apoC3 concentration was measured enzymatically, and liver fat by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. APOC3 wild-type homozygotes and variant allele (T-455C or C-482T or both) carriers did not differ with regard to liver fat, apoC3 concentrations, triglyceride-, high density lipoprotein-, fasting plasma glucose, insulin-, alanine aminotransferase- and aspartate aminotransferase-concentrations, nor was there a difference in prevalence of NAFLD. In contrast, carriers of the PNPLA3 GG genotype at rs738409 had a 2.7-fold (median 11.3%) higher liver fat than those with the CC (median 4.2%) genotype. The PNPLA3 rs738409 was also an independent predictor of liver fat, together with age, gender, and body mass index. Genetic variants in PNPLA3 but not APOC3 contribute to the variance in liver fat content due to NAFLD. © 2011 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. Coping and rehabilitation in alcoholic liver disease patients after hepatic encephalopathy--in interaction with professionals and relatives.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, Maria Rudkjær; Hendriksen, Carsten; Schiødt, Frank Vinholt; Rydahl-Hansen, Susan

    2015-12-01

    To identify and describe conditions that limit or support patients, with alcoholic liver disease after surviving alcohol-induced hepatic encephalopathy, ability to cope with current and potential physical and psychosocial problems--in interaction with professionals and relatives--and to recommend appropriate interventions. Alcoholic liver disease patients surviving alcohol-induced hepatic encephalopathy have significantly impaired quality of life. Internationally, there is a lack of knowledge about the conditions that affect alcoholic liver disease patients' coping and rehabilitation. A grounded theory study. Semi-structured interviews, conducted with 11 alcoholic liver disease patients who were diagnosed with hepatic encephalopathy. The interview guide was inspired by Richard S. Lazarus's theory of stress and coping. The elements that support or limit alcoholic liver disease patients' ability to cope with physical and psychosocial problems in interaction with professionals and relatives were represented by the core category 'Struggle for preservation of identity as a significant individual'. It was characterised by three categories, which are interrelated and impact upon each other: 'Acknowledgement', 'Struggle to maintain control' and 'Achieving a sense of security'. Alcoholic liver disease patients experience a struggle to preserve their identity as a significant individual. It can be assumed that professionals and relatives in their interaction with, and support of, patients should focus on strengthening and preserving patients' identity in the form of acknowledgement, helping alcoholic liver disease patients maintain self-control and providing a safety net so patients feel a sense of security. It can be assumed that professionals should support alcoholic liver disease patients' appraisal of, and coping with, physical and psychosocial problems based on acknowledgment, understanding and a sympathetic attitude. Professionals should proactively approach patients

  9. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: Pathophysiology and management

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Rotonya M.; Oranu, Amanke; Khungar, Vandana

    2016-01-01

    Abstract/Summary NAFLD is an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide both because of cardiovascular, hepatic and oncologic sequelae as well as because it is rapidly becoming the leading cause of end stage liver disease and liver transplant. With a prevalence of 30% in the US, it has reached epidemic proportions. While the metabolic syndrome is a common risk factor, there are differences among racial and ethnic groups, suggesting the complex interaction between hormonal, nutritional and genetic factors at play in disease pathogenesis. The clinical syndrome of NAFLD spans from bland steatosis to steatohepatitis which can progress to fibrosis and cirrhosis. The pathogenesis including roles of hormones, nutritional and intestinal dysbiosis, insulin resistance, lipotoxicity, and hepatic inflammation, and genes are examined. Non-invasive testing and liver biopsy indications are reviewed. Approved and investigational therapies for NAFLD and NASH are outlined in this review of a disease that is currently an area of great interest to the hepatology community. PMID:27837778

  10. Histopathological aspects of liver under variable food restriction: has the intense one-week food restriction a protective effect on non-alcoholic-fatty-liver-disease (NAFLD) development?

    PubMed

    Makovicky, Peter; Tumova, Eva; Volek, Zdenek; Makovicky, Pavol; Vodickova, Ludmila; Slyskova, Jana; Svoboda, Miroslav; Rejhova, Alexandra; Vodicka, Pavel; Samasca, Gabriel; Kralova, Alena; Nagy, Melinda; Mydlarova-Blascakova, Marta; Poracova, Jana

    2014-12-01

    Non-alcoholic-fatty-liver-disease (NAFLD) is a clinicopathologic entity characterized by a variety of hepatic injury patterns without significant alcohol use. It has a close association with obesity, so treatment includes weight loss, control of insulin sensitivity, interventions directed at inflammation and fibrosis. There is a certain relationship between the grade and duration of food restriction and hepatic function. The objective of this work was to describe the relationship between biochemistry, autoantibodies, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3), and liver morphology in experimental rabbit groups with food restriction as compared to controls with ad libitum food (ADL) income. The experiment was performed on a total of 24 rabbits of a weaning age of 25-81 days. The first group (R1) was restricted between 32 and 39 days of age to 50 g of food per rabbit a day. The second group (R2) was also restricted between 32 and 39 days, but the rabbits received 65 g of food per rabbit a day. At the end of the experiment, the blood and liver samples were collected at necropsy. NAFLD has developed in all three groups. There was any autoantibody positivity in all three groups. IGF-I is moderately higher in R1 and R2 group, as compared to the control group (P > 0.05). IGFBP-3 is without statistical significance in all three groups. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) is the only liver biochemical parameter that has significantly increased following food restriction (P > 0.039). Single one-week restriction has any protective effect on NAFLD development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Epidemiology and Natural History of Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Alita; Younossi, Zobair M

    2012-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an important cause of liver disease burden across the world. By definition, although the histopathologic features of NAFLD are identical to that of alcoholic liver disease, its diagnosis requires absence of significant alcohol use and absence of other causes of chronic liver disease. We now know that NAFLD is not simply a disease of the Western world. It is manifested across the world, in varying rates, across gender, across varying ethnicities, and in its association with other host factors. In this review article, the definition of NAFLD, its spectrum, ranging from mild steatosis to hepatocellular injury and inflammation defined as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is discussed. Mild steatosis is generally a stable disease whereas NASH can be progressive. Based on current published literature, current incidence and prevalence of NAFLD and NASH are discussed. It is also accepted that these processes will continue to increase in prevalence with the rise of obesity, type II diabetes, and associated metabolic syndrome. Some of the risk factors have been well-established and are discussed. In addition, this review also presents emerging associations with other risk factors for NAFLD. Natural history of NAFLD is variable depending upon the histologic subtypes and other underlying comorbidities and is discussed in this review as well. PMID:25755422

  12. Kupffer Cells Undergo Fundamental Changes during the Development of Experimental NASH and Are Critical in Initiating Liver Damage and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Reid, D. T.; Reyes, J. L.; McDonald, B. A.; Vo, T.; Reimer, R. A.; Eksteen, B.

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease has become the leading liver disease in North America and is associated with the progressive inflammatory liver disease non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Considerable effort has been made to understand the role of resident and recruited macrophage populations in NASH however numerous questions remain. Our goal was to characterize the dynamic changes in liver macrophages during the initiation of NASH in a murine model. Using the methionine-choline deficient diet we found that liver-resident macrophages, Kupffer cells were lost early in disease onset followed by a robust infiltration of Ly-6C+ monocyte-derived macrophages that retained a dynamic phenotype. Genetic profiling revealed distinct patterns of inflammatory gene expression between macrophage subsets. Only early depletion of liver macrophages using liposomal clodronate prevented the development of NASH in mice suggesting that Kupffer cells are critical for the orchestration of inflammation during experimental NASH. Increased understanding of these dynamics may allow us to target potentially harmful populations whilst promoting anti-inflammatory or restorative populations to ultimately guide the development of effective treatment strategies. PMID:27454866

  13. Binge alcohol alters PNPLA3 levels in liver through epigenetic mechanism involving histone H3 acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo, Ricardo J.; Lim, Robert W.; Korthuis, Ronald J.; Shukla, Shivendra D.

    2017-01-01

    The human PNPLA3 (patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing 3) gene codes for a protein which is highly expressed in adipose tissue and liver, and is implicated in lipid homeostasis. While PNPLA3 protein contains regions homologous to functional lipolytic proteins, the regulation of its tissue expression is reflective of lipogenic genes. A naturally occurring genetic variant of PNPLA3 in humans has been linked to increased susceptibility to alcoholic liver disease. We have examined the modulatory effect of alcohol on PNPLA3 protein and mRNA expression as well as the association of its gene promoter with acetylated histone H3K9 by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay in rat hepatocytes in vitro, and in vivo in mouse and rat models of acute binge, chronic, and chronic followed by acute binge ethanol administration. Protein expression of PNPLA3 was significantly increased by alcohol in all three models used. PNPLA3 mRNA also increased, albeit to a varying degree. ChIP assay using H3AcK9 antibody showed increased association with the promoter of PNPLA3 in hepatocytes and in mouse liver. This was less evident in rat livers in vivo except under chronic treatment. It is concluded for the first time that histone acetylation plays a role in the modulation of PNPLA3 levels in the liver exposed to binge ethanol both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:28433418

  14. Protective Effects of Lemon Juice on Alcohol-Induced Liver Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-Jie; Xu, Dong-Ping; Wang, Fang; Zhou, Yue; Zheng, Jie; Li, Ya; Zhang, Jiao-Jiao

    2017-01-01

    Chronic excessive alcohol consumption (more than 40–80 g/day for males and more than 20–40 g/day for females) could induce serious liver injury. In this study, effects of lemon juice on chronic alcohol-induced liver injury in mice were evaluated. The serum biochemical profiles and hepatic lipid peroxidation levels, triacylglycerol (TG) contents, antioxidant enzyme activities, and histopathological changes were examined for evaluating the hepatoprotective effects of lemon juice in mice. In addition, the in vitro antioxidant capacities of lemon juice were determined. The results showed that lemon juice significantly inhibited alcohol-induced increase of alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), hepatic TG, and lipid peroxidation levels in a dose-dependent manner. Histopathological changes induced by alcohol were also remarkably improved by lemon juice treatment. These findings suggest that lemon juice has protective effects on alcohol-induced liver injury in mice. The protective effects might be related to the antioxidant capacity of lemon juice because lemon juice showed in vitro antioxidant capacity. PMID:28567423

  15. Protective Effects of Lemon Juice on Alcohol-Induced Liver Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tong; Zhang, Yu-Jie; Xu, Dong-Ping; Wang, Fang; Zhou, Yue; Zheng, Jie; Li, Ya; Zhang, Jiao-Jiao; Li, Hua-Bin

    2017-01-01

    Chronic excessive alcohol consumption (more than 40-80 g/day for males and more than 20-40 g/day for females) could induce serious liver injury. In this study, effects of lemon juice on chronic alcohol-induced liver injury in mice were evaluated. The serum biochemical profiles and hepatic lipid peroxidation levels, triacylglycerol (TG) contents, antioxidant enzyme activities, and histopathological changes were examined for evaluating the hepatoprotective effects of lemon juice in mice. In addition, the in vitro antioxidant capacities of lemon juice were determined. The results showed that lemon juice significantly inhibited alcohol-induced increase of alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), hepatic TG, and lipid peroxidation levels in a dose-dependent manner. Histopathological changes induced by alcohol were also remarkably improved by lemon juice treatment. These findings suggest that lemon juice has protective effects on alcohol-induced liver injury in mice. The protective effects might be related to the antioxidant capacity of lemon juice because lemon juice showed in vitro antioxidant capacity.

  16. [Ecological correlation between consumption of alcoholic beverages and liver cirrhosis mortality in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Narro-Robles, J; Gutiérrez-Avila, J H

    1997-01-01

    To determine the correlation between alcohol consumption and mortality from liver cirrhosis in Mexico. Analysis of the ecological correlation between the patterns of alcohol consumption determined by the National Addiction Survey in 1993 and mortality by liver cirrhosis, in the period between 1971-1993, in the eight regions in which the country was divided. To determine level of correlation, the Pearson and Spearman coefficients were calculated. Significant correlations were only found with the prevalence of spirits and pulque drinkers; with beer drinkers the correlation was negative. The correlation with pulque is interesting, since pulque consumption is considered to be low scale in some rural areas. The negative correlation with beer may indicate that beer drinking is nor a good indicator of alcoholism. Results, though limited to the possibilities of an ecological study, reveal the necessity of effective actions in the regions where spirits and pulque are consumed in excess.

  17. Lactobacillus GG treatment ameliorates alcohol-induced intestinal oxidative stress, gut leakiness, and liver injury in a rat model of alcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, Christopher B; Farhadi, Ashkan; Jakate, Shriram M; Tang, Yueming; Shaikh, Maliha; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2009-03-01

    Because only 30% of alcoholics develop alcoholic liver disease (ALD), a factor other than heavy alcohol consumption must be involved in the development of alcohol-induced liver injury. Animal and human studies suggest that bacterial products, such as endotoxins, are the second key co-factors, and oxidant-mediated gut leakiness is one of the sources of endotoxemia. Probiotics have been used to prevent and treat diseases associated with gut-derived bacterial products and disorders associated with gut leakiness. Indeed, "probiotic"Lactobacillus rhamnosus has been successfully used to treat alcohol-induced liver injury in rats. However, the mechanism of action involved in the potential beneficial effects of L. rhamnosus in alcohol liver injury is not known. We hypothesized that probiotics could preserve normal barrier function in an animal model of ALD by preventing alcohol-induced oxidative stress and thus prevent the development of hyperpermeability and subsequent alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were gavaged with alcohol twice daily (8 gm/kg) for 10 weeks. In addition, alcoholic rats were also treated with once daily gavage of either 2.5 x 10(7) live L. rhamnosus Gorbach-Goldin (LGG) or vehicle (V). Intestinal permeability (baseline and at 10 weeks) was determined using a sugar bolus and GC analysis of urinary sugars. Intestinal and liver tissues were analyzed for markers of oxidative stress and inflammation. In addition, livers were assessed histologically for severity of ASH and total fat (steatosis). Alcohol+LGG (ALC+LGG)-fed rats had significantly (P< or =.05) less severe ASH than ALC+V-fed rats. L. rhamnosus Gorbach-Goldin also reduced alcohol-induced gut leakiness and significantly blunted alcohol-induced oxidative stress and inflammation in both intestine and the liver. L. rhamnosus Gorbach-Goldin probiotic gavage significantly ameliorated ASH in rats. This improvement was associated with reduced markers of intestinal and liver

  18. Evaluation of coagulation parameters and liver enzymes among alcohol drinkers in Port Harcourt, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Adias, Teddy Charles; Egerton, Everton; Erhabor, Osaro

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol is a major contributor to the global burden of disease, disability, and death in high, middle, and low-income countries. Harmful use of alcohol is one of the main factors contributing to premature deaths and avoidable disease burden worldwide and has a major impact on public health. The aim of this present cross-sectional study was to investigate the effect of alcohol consumption on coagulation parameters and liver enzymes of subjects in Port Harcourt, Nigeria. Two hundred adults consisting of 120 alcohol dependent subjects and 80 age, gender-matched nondrinkers aged 25-65 years (mean age 45.25 ± 11.50 years) were enrolled in this study. Of the 120 chronic alcohol drinkers, 37 were dependent on local dry gin, while 83 were dependent on other alcoholic beverages. The mean values of the liver enzymes, aspartate aminotransferase and gamma glutamyl transferase, were significantly higher (P = 0.002 and P = 0.02 respectively) among the chronic alcohol consumers compared with their nondrinker counterparts. Although the value of alanine aminotransferase was higher in the chronic drinkers, it did not reveal any significant difference (P = 0.11). The coagulation parameters, prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time were investigated among chronic drinkers and nondrinkers. The mean value of prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time was significantly higher in the chronic alcohol drinkers compared to the nondrinkers (P = 0.04 and P = 0.02 respectively). We observed a positive and significant correlation between values of liver enzymes, serum gamma glutamyl transferase and aspartate aminotransferase, and values of prothrombin time among alcohol consumers (r = 0.72 and r = 0.68 respectively). The implementation of policies to target harm reduction strategies among alcoholics is urgently needed, alongside the building of a strong base of public awareness and community support required for the continuity and sustainability of alcohol

  19. Evaluation of coagulation parameters and liver enzymes among alcohol drinkers in Port Harcourt, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Adias, Teddy Charles; Egerton, Everton; Erhabor, Osaro

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol is a major contributor to the global burden of disease, disability, and death in high, middle, and low-income countries. Harmful use of alcohol is one of the main factors contributing to premature deaths and avoidable disease burden worldwide and has a major impact on public health. The aim of this present cross-sectional study was to investigate the effect of alcohol consumption on coagulation parameters and liver enzymes of subjects in Port Harcourt, Nigeria. Two hundred adults consisting of 120 alcohol dependent subjects and 80 age, gender-matched nondrinkers aged 25–65 years (mean age 45.25 ± 11.50 years) were enrolled in this study. Of the 120 chronic alcohol drinkers, 37 were dependent on local dry gin, while 83 were dependent on other alcoholic beverages. The mean values of the liver enzymes, aspartate aminotransferase and gamma glutamyl transferase, were significantly higher (P = 0.002 and P = 0.02 respectively) among the chronic alcohol consumers compared with their nondrinker counterparts. Although the value of alanine aminotransferase was higher in the chronic drinkers, it did not reveal any significant difference (P = 0.11). The coagulation parameters, prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time were investigated among chronic drinkers and nondrinkers. The mean value of prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time was significantly higher in the chronic alcohol drinkers compared to the nondrinkers (P = 0.04 and P = 0.02 respectively). We observed a positive and significant correlation between values of liver enzymes, serum gamma glutamyl transferase and aspartate aminotransferase, and values of prothrombin time among alcohol consumers (r = 0.72 and r = 0.68 respectively). The implementation of policies to target harm reduction strategies among alcoholics is urgently needed, alongside the building of a strong base of public awareness and community support required for the continuity and sustainability of alcohol

  20. Polyenylphosphatidylcholine attenuates alcohol-induced fatty liver and hyperlipemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Navder, K P; Baraona, E; Lieber, C S

    1997-09-01

    Chronic administration of a soybean-derived polyenylphosphatidylcholine (PPC) extract prevents the development of cirrhosis in alcohol-fed baboons. To assess whether this phospholipid also affects earlier changes induced by alcohol consumption (such as fatty liver and hyperlipemia), 28 male rat littermates were pair-fed liquid diets containing 36% of energy either as ethanol or as additional carbohydrate for 21 d, and killed 90 min after intragastric administration of the corresponding diets. Half of the rats were given PPC (3 g/l), whereas the other half received the same amount of linoleate (as safflower oil) and choline (as bitartrate salt). PPC did not affect diet or alcohol consumption [15.4 +/- 0.5 G/(kg.d)], but the ethanol-induced hepatomegaly and the hepatic accumulation of lipids (principally triglycerides and cholesterol esters) and proteins were about half those in rats not given PPC. The ethanol-induced postprandial hyperlipemia was lower with PPC than without, despite an enhanced fat absorption and no difference in the level of plasma free fatty acids. The attenuation of fatty liver and hyperlipemia was associated with correction of the ethanol-induced inhibition of mitochondrial oxidation of palmitoyl-1-carnitine and the depression of cytochrome oxidase activity, as well as the increases in activity of serum glutamate dehydrogenase and aminotransferases. Thus, PPC attenuates early manifestations of alcohol toxicity, at least in part, by improving mitochondrial injury. These beneficial effects of PPC at the initial stages of alcoholic liver injury may prevent or delay the progression to more advanced forms of alcoholic liver disease.

  1. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, to struggle with the strangle: Oxygen availability in fatty livers.

    PubMed

    Anavi, Sarit; Madar, Zecharia; Tirosh, Oren

    2017-10-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases (NAFLD) is one of the most common chronic liver disease in Western countries. Oxygen is a central component of the cellular microenvironment, which participate in the regulation of cell survival, differentiation, functions and energy metabolism. Accordingly, sufficient oxygen supply is an important factor for tissue durability, mainly in highly metabolic tissues, such as the liver. Accumulating evidence from the past few decades provides strong support for the existence of interruptions in oxygen availability in fatty livers. This outcome may be the consequence of both, impaired systemic microcirculation and cellular membrane modifications which occur under steatotic conditions. This review summarizes current knowledge regarding the main factors which can affect oxygen supply in fatty liver. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Resolution of donor non-alcoholic fatty liver disease following liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Posner, Andrew D; Sultan, Samuel T; Zaghloul, Norann A; Twaddell, William S; Bruno, David A; Hanish, Steven I; Hutson, William R; Hebert, Laci; Barth, Rolf N; LaMattina, John C

    2017-09-01

    Transplant surgeons conventionally select against livers displaying high degrees (>30%) of macrosteatosis (MaS), out of concern for primary non-function or severe graft dysfunction. As such, there is relatively limited experience with such livers, and the natural history remains incompletely characterized. We present our experience of transplanted livers with high degrees of MaS and microsteatosis (MiS), with a focus on the histopathologic and clinical outcomes. Twenty-nine cases were identified with liver biopsies available from both the donor and the corresponding liver transplant recipient. Donor liver biopsies displayed either MaS or MiS ≥15%, while all recipients received postoperative liver biopsies for cause. The mean donor MaS and MiS were 15.6% (range 0%-60%) and 41.3% (7.5%-97.5%), respectively. MaS decreased significantly from donor (M=15.6%) to recipient postoperative biopsies (M=0.86%), P<.001. Similarly, MiS decreased significantly from donor biopsies (M=41.3%) to recipient postoperative biopsies (M=1.8%), P<.001. At a median of 68 days postoperatively (range 4-384), full resolution of MaS and MiS was observed in 27 of 29 recipients. High degrees of MaS and MiS in donor livers resolve in recipients following liver transplantation. Further insight into the mechanisms responsible for treating fatty liver diseases could translate into therapeutic targets. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Alteration in substrate specificity of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase by an acyclic nicotinamide analog of NAD(+).

    PubMed

    Malver, Olaf; Sebastian, Mina J; Oppenheimer, Norman J

    2014-11-01

    A new, acyclic NAD-analog, acycloNAD(+) has been synthesized where the nicotinamide ribosyl moiety has been replaced by the nicotinamide (2-hydroxyethoxy)methyl moiety. The chemical properties of this analog are comparable to those of β-NAD(+) with a redox potential of -324mV and a 341nm λmax for the reduced form. Both yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) and horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (HLADH) catalyze the reduction of acycloNAD(+) by primary alcohols. With HLADH 1-butanol has the highest Vmax at 49% that of β-NAD(+). The primary deuterium kinetic isotope effect is greater than 3 indicating a significant contribution to the rate limiting step from cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bond. The stereochemistry of the hydride transfer in the oxidation of stereospecifically deuterium labeled n-butanol is identical to that for the reaction with β-NAD(+). In contrast to the activity toward primary alcohols there is no detectable reduction of acycloNAD(+) by secondary alcohols with HLADH although these alcohols serve as competitive inhibitors. The net effect is that acycloNAD(+) has converted horse liver ADH from a broad spectrum alcohol dehydrogenase, capable of utilizing either primary or secondary alcohols, into an exclusively primary alcohol dehydrogenase. This is the first example of an NAD analog that alters the substrate specificity of a dehydrogenase and, like site-directed mutagenesis of proteins, establishes that modifications of the coenzyme distance from the active site can be used to alter enzyme function and substrate specificity. These and other results, including the activity with α-NADH, clearly demonstrate the promiscuity of the binding interactions between dehydrogenases and the riboside phosphate of the nicotinamide moiety, thus greatly expanding the possibilities for the design of analogs and inhibitors of specific dehydrogenases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Successful Transplantation of Reduced Sized Rat Alcoholic Fatty Livers Made Possible by Mobilization of Host Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hisada, Masayuki; Ota, Yoshihiro; Zhang, Xiuying; Cameron, Andrew M; Gao, Bin; Montgomery, Robert A; Williams, George Melville; Sun, Zhaoli

    2015-01-01

    Livers from Lewis rats fed with 7% alcohol for 5 weeks were used for transplantation. Reduced sized (50%) livers or whole livers were transplanted into normal DA recipients, which, in this strain combination, survive indefinitely when the donor has not been fed alcohol. However, none of the rats survived a whole fatty liver transplant while six of seven recipients of reduced sized alcoholic liver grafts survived long term. SDF-1 and HGF were significantly increased in reduced size liver grafts compared to whole liver grafts. Lineage-negative Thy-1+CXCR4+CD133+ stem cells were significantly increased in the peripheral blood and in allografts after reduced size fatty liver transplantation. In contrast, there were meager increases in cells reactive with anti Thy-1, CXCR4 and CD133 in peripheral blood and allografts in whole alcoholic liver recipients. The provision of plerixafor, a stem cell mobilizer, salvaged 5 of 10 whole fatty liver grafts. Conversely, blocking SDF-1 activity with neutralizing antibodies diminished stem cell recruitment and four of five reduced sized fatty liver recipients died. Thus chemokine insuficiency was associated with transplant failure of whole grafts which was overcome by the increased regenerative requirements promoted by the small grafts and mediated by SDF-1 resulting in stem cell influx. PMID:22994609

  5. Th17 involvement in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease progression to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Chackelevicius, Carla Melisa; Gambaro, Sabrina Eliana; Tiribelli, Claudio; Rosso, Natalia

    2016-11-07

    The nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. NAFLD encompasses a wide histological spectrum ranging from benign simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Sustained inflammation in the liver is critical in this process. Hepatic macrophages, including liver resident macropaghes (Kupffer cells), monocytes infiltrating the injured liver, as well as specific lymphocytes subsets play a pivotal role in the initiation and perpetuation of the inflammatory response, with a major deleterious impact on the progression of fatty liver to fibrosis. During the last years, Th17 cells have been involved in the development of inflammation not only in liver but also in other organs, such as adipose tissue or lung. Differentiation of a naïve T cell into a Th17 cell leads to pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine production with subsequent myeloid cell recruitment to the inflamed tissue. Th17 response can be mitigated by T regulatory cells that secrete anti-inflammatory cytokines. Both T cell subsets need TGF-β for their differentiation and a characteristic plasticity in their phenotype may render them new therapeutic targets. In this review, we discuss the role of the Th17 pathway in NAFLD progression to NASH and to liver fibrosis analyzing different animal models of liver injury and human studies.

  6. Interleukin-1 inhibition facilitates recovery from liver injury and promotes regeneration of hepatocytes in alcoholic hepatitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Iracheta-Vellve, Arvin; Petrasek, Jan; Gyogyosi, Benedek; Bala, Shashi; Csak, Timea; Kodys, Karen; Szabo, Gyongyi

    2017-07-01

    Inflammation and impaired hepatocyte regeneration contribute to liver failure in alcoholic hepatitis (AH). Interleukin (IL)-1 is a key inflammatory cytokine in the pathobiology of AH. The role of IL-1 in liver regeneration in the recovery phase of alcohol-induced liver injury is unknown. In this study, we tested IL-1 receptor antagonist to block IL-1 signalling in a mouse model of acute-on-chronic liver injury on liver inflammation and hepatocyte regeneration in AH. We observed that inhibition of IL-1 signalling decreased liver inflammation and neutrophil infiltration, and resulted in enhanced regeneration of hepatocytes and increased rate of recovery from liver injury in AH. Our novel findings suggest that IL-1 drives sustained liver inflammation and impaired hepatocyte regeneration even after cessation of ethanol exposure. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. [Alcohol].

    PubMed

    Zima, T

    1996-07-14

    Alcohol is one of the most widely used addictive substances. It can be assumed that everybody encounters alcohol--ethanol in various forms and concentrations in the course of their lives. A global and social problem of our civilization is alcohol consumption which has a rising trend. Since 1989 the consumption of alcoholic beverages is rising and the mean annual consumption of concentrated ethanol per head is cea 10 litres. In ethanol abuse the organism is damaged not only by ethanol alone but in particular by substances formed during its metabolism. Its detailed knowledge is essential for the knowledge and investigations of the metabolic and toxic effect of ethanol on the organism. Ingested alcohol is in 90-98% eliminated from the organism by three known metabolic pathways: 1-alcohol dehydrogenase, 2-the microsomal ethanol oxidizing system and 3-catalase. Alcohol is a frequent important risk factor of serious "diseases of civilization" such as IHD, hypertension, osteoporosis, neoplastic diseases. Cirrhosis of the liver and chronic pancreatitis are the well known diseases associated with alcohol ingestion and also their most frequent cause. It is impossible to list all organs and diseases which develop as a result of alcohol consumption. It is important to realize that regular and "relatively" small amounts in the long run damage the organism and may be even fatal.

  8. Liver Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver Function Tests Clinical Trials Liver Transplant FAQs Medical Terminology Diseases of the Liver Alagille Syndrome Alcohol-Related ... the Liver The Progression of Liver Disease FAQs Medical Terminology HOW YOU CAN HELP Sponsorship Ways to Give ...

  9. Novel interactions of mitochondria and reactive oxygen/nitrogen species in alcohol mediated liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Mantena, Sudheer K; King, Adrienne L; Andringa, Kelly K; Landar, Aimee; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Bailey, Shannon M

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is known to be a contributing factor to a number of diseases including chronic alcohol induced liver injury. While there is a detailed understanding of the metabolic pathways and proteins of the liver mitochondrion, little is known regarding how changes in the mitochondrial proteome may contribute to the development of hepatic pathologies. Emerging evidence indicates that reactive oxygen and nitrogen species disrupt mitochondrial function through post-translational modifications to the mitochondrial proteome. Indeed, various new affinity labeling reagents are available to test the hypothesis that post-translational modification of proteins by reactive species contributes to mitochondrial dysfunction and alcoholic fatty liver disease. Specialized proteomic techniques are also now available, which allow for identification of defects in the assembly of multi-protein complexes in mitochondria and the resolution of the highly hydrophobic proteins of the inner membrane. In this review knowledge gained from the study of changes to the mitochondrial proteome in alcoholic hepatotoxicity will be described and placed into a mechanistic framework to increase understanding of the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in liver disease. PMID:17854139

  10. Common polymorphisms in interleukin genes (IL4, IL6, IL8 and IL12) are not associated with alcoholic liver disease or alcoholism in Spanish men.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Miguel; Pastor, Isabel; González-Sarmiento, Rogelio; Laso, Francisco-Javier

    2009-03-01

    Preliminary data suggest that polymorphisms in cytokine genes may be involved in the genetic predisposition to alcoholic liver cirrhosis or alcohol use disorders. We thus analyze the association between these diseases and the following polymorphisms: -33T>C IL4, -174 G>C IL6, -251 T>A IL8 and 1188 A>C IL12B. 258 male alcoholics (161 without liver disease and 97 with liver cirrhosis) and 101 healthy controls were genotyped for the above mentioned polymorphisms. We examined the relationship between genotype and allele frequencies and the presence of disease, as well as the correlation with combinations of putative pro-inflammatory genotypes. Haplotypes were inferred using the expectation-maximization algorithm and haplotype frequencies were compared. We found no statistically significant association between any of these polymorphisms or the combinations of pro-inflammatory polymorphisms and the risk of alcoholic liver cirrhosis or alcohol abuse or dependence. Haplotype analysis of the IL4 and IL12B polymorphisms did not show any statistical relationship either. Our results do not support the hypothesis that the analyzed polymorphisms confer differences in alcoholic liver cirrhosis or alcohol use disorders susceptibility.

  11. Abnormality of autophagic function and cathepsin expression in the liver from patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Fukuo, Yuka; Yamashina, Shunhei; Sonoue, Hiroshi; Arakawa, Atsushi; Nakadera, Eisuke; Aoyama, Tomonori; Uchiyama, Akira; Kon, Kazuyoshi; Ikejima, Kenichi; Watanabe, Sumio

    2014-09-01

    Recent evidences indicate that hepatic steatosis suppresses autophagic proteolysis. The present study evaluated the correlation between autophagic function and cathepsin expression in the liver from patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Liver biopsy specimens were obtained from patients with chronic liver diseases (chronic hepatitis C [CHC; n = 20], chronic hepatitis B [CHB; n = 16], primary biliary cirrhosis [PBC; n = 23], NAFLD [n = 22] and control [n = 14]). The number of autophagic vesicles in hepatocytes was counted by using transmission electron microscopy. Expression of cathepsin B, D, L and p62 in the liver section was analyzed by immunohistochemical staining. The histological severity of NAFLD is assessed by NAFLD activity score (NAS). The number of autophagic vesicles in hepatocytes was significantly increased in both CHC and NAFLD groups, but not CHB and PBC, more than control. Although hepatocytes with aggregation of p62 were observed in less than 15% of CHC, p62 aggregation was detected in approximately 65% of NAFLD. Cathepsin B, D and L expression was significantly suppressed in the liver from NAFLD patients. Suppression of cathepsin B, D and L expression was not observed in CHB, CHC and PBC. In NAFLD patients, p62 aggregation was correlated with serum alanine aminotransferase value and inflammatory activity by NAS. These results indicate that a decrease in hepatic cathepsin expression in NAFLD is associated with autophagic dysfunction. Hepatic inflammation correlates with autophagic dysfunction in NAFLD. These findings indicate that the suppression of autophagic proteolysis by hepatic steatosis is involved in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. © 2013 The Japan Society of Hepatology.

  12. Viewpoint: "Alcohol Consumption in Late Adolescence is Associated with an Increased Risk of Severe Liver Disease Later in Life".

    PubMed

    Tamburello, Adriana; Marando, Marco; Bellentani, Stefano

    2018-04-09

    Drinking alcohol during adolescence predispose to severe liver disease in the adult phase. This is the main message of this prospective study. Each daily gram of alcohol men consumed in their youth was linked with a two percent increase in the risk of severe liver disease. No threshold level emerged for liver damage and this is a warning for all the sociologists and politics. New legiferation and educational campaigns addressed to young people, with particular attention to the access to alcohol, prices and advertising are necessary.

  13. Protective effect of Xingnaojia formulation on rats with brain and liver damage caused by chronic alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuang; Wang, S U; Guo, Zhi-Gang; Huang, Ning; Zhao, Fan-Rong; Zhu, Mo-Li; Ma, Li-Juan; Liang, Jin-Ying; Zhang, Yu-Lin; Huang, Zhong-Lin; Wan, Guang-Rui

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the effect of a formulation of traditional Chinese medicine extracts known as Xingnaojia (XNJ) on the liver function, learning ability and memory of rats with chronic alcoholism and to verify the mechanism by which it protects the brain and liver. A rat model of chronic alcoholism was used in the study. The spatial learning ability and memory of the rats were tested. The rats were then sacrificed and their brains and hepatic tissues were isolated. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and levels of glutamate (Glu), N-methyl D-aspartate receptor subtype 2B (NR2B), cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) and cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) in the hippocampus were analyzed. The ultrastructure of the hepatic tissue was observed by electron microscopy. In addition, the activities of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) in serum were tested and the levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), triglycerides (TG) and total cholesterol (TCHOL) were analyzed. XNJ enhanced the learning and memory of rats with chronic alcoholism. Treatment with XNJ increased the activity of SOD, and decreased the expression levels of NR2B mRNA and NR2B, CB1 and CDK5 proteins in the brain tissues compared with those in the model rats. It also increased the activity of ALDH in the serum and liver, decreased the serum levels of LDL, TG and TCHOL and increased the serum level of HDL. These results indicate that XNJ exhibited a protective effect against brain and liver damage in rats with chronic alcoholism.

  14. Negative outcomes after liver transplantation in patients with alcoholic liver disease beyond the fifth post-transplant year.

    PubMed

    Grąt, Michał; Lewandowski, Zbigniew; Grąt, Karolina; Wronka, Karolina Maria; Krasnodębski, Maciej; Barski, Krzysztof; Zborowska, Hanna; Patkowski, Waldemar; Zieniewicz, Krzysztof; Krawczyk, Marek

    2014-10-01

    Although up to 50% of patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD) resume alcohol consumption after liver transplantation (LT), numerous studies indicate that long-term results are not compromised. This study focused on evaluating the impact of ALD on outcomes up to and beyond the fifth year after LT. Among the 432 primary LT recipients included in this study, 97 underwent transplantation for ALD. Alcohol relapse rate at 10 yr was 33.5%, with younger recipient age being the only independent predictor (p = 0.019). Survival of patients with ALD (77.0%) was similar to those without (79.0%) up to the fifth post-transplant year (p = 0.655) but worse during the five subsequent years among the five-yr survivors (70.6% vs. 92.9%; p = 0.002). ALD was an independent risk factor for poorer survival beyond the fifth post-transplant year (p = 0.049), but not earlier (p = 0.717). Conversely, alcohol relapse increased the risk of death only during the first five post-transplant years (p = 0.039). There were no significant differences regarding graft failure incidence between ALD and non-ALD recipients up to the fifth post-transplant year (7.3% vs. 11.6%; p = 0.255) and beyond (12.9% vs. 5.0%; p = 0.126). In conclusion, pre-transplant diagnosis of ALD yields negative effects on post-transplant outcomes beyond the fifth post-transplant year, not attributable to recidivism. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. A Nutrigenomic Approach to Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Dongiovanni, Paola; Valenti, Luca

    2017-07-16

    Following the epidemics of obesity due to the consumption of high-calorie diet and sedentary lifestyle, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is now the leading cause of liver disease in Western countries. NAFLD is epidemiologically associated with metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance, and in susceptible individuals it may progress to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Genetic factors play a key role in NAFLD predisposition by interacting with nutritional and other environmental factors. To date, there is no drug therapy for the treatment of NAFLD, and the main clinical recommendation is lifestyle modification. In the last years, nutrigenomics is promoting an increased understanding of how nutrition affects the switch from health to disease by altering the expression of an individual's genetic makeup. The present review tries to summarize the most recent data evidencing how the interactions between nutrients and genetic factors can influence NAFLD development. The final goal should be to develop tools to quantify these complex interactions. The definition of a "nutrigenomic risk score" for each individual may represent a novel therapeutic approach for the management of NAFLD patients.

  16. The impact of alcohol taxation on liver cirrhosis mortality.

    PubMed

    Ponicki, William R; Gruenewald, Paul J

    2006-11-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the impact of distilled spirits, wine, and beer taxes on cirrhosis mortality using a large-panel data set and statistical models that control for various other factors that may affect that mortality. The analyses were performed on a panel of 30 U.S. license states during the period 1971-1998 (N = 840 state-by-year observations). Exogenous measures included current and lagged versions of beverage taxes and income, as well as controls for states' age distribution, religion, race, health care availability, urbanity, tourism, and local bans on alcohol sales. Regression analyses were performed using random-effects models with corrections for serial autocorrelation and heteroscedasticity among states. Cirrhosis rates were found to be significantly related to taxes on distilled spirits but not to taxation of wine and beer. Consistent results were found using different statistical models and model specifications. Consistent with prior research, cirrhosis mortality in the United States appears more closely linked to consumption of distilled spirits than to that of other alcoholic beverages.

  17. Hemolytic anemia in alcoholic liver disease: Zieve syndrome: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Liu, Miao-Xia; Wen, Xiao-Yu; Leung, Ying-Kit; Zheng, Yi-Jie; Jin, Mei-Shan; Jin, Qing-Long; Niu, Jun-Qi

    2017-11-01

    Zieve syndrome, a rarely reported disease resulting from alcohol abuse, consists of a triad of symptoms: hemolytic anemia, cholestatic jaundice, and transient hyperlipidemia. It is largely under-recognized and under-reported, possibly because of unawareness of the condition by physicians. Here, we report a case of Zieve syndrome managed at the Jilin University First Bethune Hospital. A 30-year-old Chinese woman presented with a 4-month history of fatigue, yellowish discoloration of the eyes, and tea-colored urine. She had been a heavy drinker for 2 years prior to onset of the disease with an average daily alcohol intake of 60 g/d and more than 80 g/d for the previous 6 months. The diagnosis of Zieve syndrome was confirmed based on hemolysis and cholestatic jaundice secondary to alcoholic liver disease and heavy drinking. Bone marrow biopsy and liver biopsy both supported the diagnosis. We treated her with abstinence from alcohol and supportive therapy. The patient was discharged 14 days after admission with an improvement in symptoms, which continued to subside during the 2-month follow-up period. Doctors confronted with hemolysis in a patient with alcoholic liver disease should be aware of the under-reported Zieve syndrome. Recognition of this syndrome could help doctors avoid unnecessary invasive procedures and emphasize the importance of alcohol abstinence as the mainstay of management. Glucocorticoids may not be useful in treating hemolytic anemia in Zieve syndrome. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Alcoholic Liver Disease: A Mouse Model Reveals Protection by Lactobacillus fermentum

    PubMed Central

    Barone, Rosario; Rappa, Francesca; Macaluso, Filippo; Caruso Bavisotto, Celeste; Sangiorgi, Claudia; Di Paola, Gaia; Tomasello, Giovanni; Di Felice, Valentina; Marcianò, Vito; Farina, Felicia; Zummo, Giovanni; Conway de Macario, Everly; J.L. Macario, Alberto; Cocchi, Massimo; Cappello, MD, Francesco; Marino Gammazza, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Alcoholism is one of the most devastating diseases with high incidence, but knowledge of its pathology and treatment is still plagued with gaps mostly because of the inherent limitations of research with patients. We developed an animal model for studying liver histopathology, Hsp (heat-shock protein)-chaperones involvement, and response to treatment. Methods: The system was standardized using mice to which ethanol was orally administered alone or in combination with Lactobacillus fermentum following a precise schedule over time and applying, at predetermined intervals, a battery of techniques (histology, immunohistochemistry, western blotting, real-time PCR, immunoprecipitation, 3-nitrotyrosine labeling) to assess liver pathology (e.g., steatosis, fibrosis), and Hsp60 and iNOS (inducible form of nitric oxide synthase) gene expression and protein levels, and post-translational modifications. Results: Typical ethanol-induced liver pathology occurred and the effect of the probiotic could be reliably monitored. Steatosis score, iNOS levels, and nitrated proteins (e.g., Hsp60) decreased after probiotic intake. Conclusions: We describe a mouse model useful for studying liver disease induced by chronic ethanol intake and for testing pertinent therapeutic agents, e.g., probiotics. We tested L. fermentum, which reduced considerably ethanol-induced tissue damage and deleterious post-translational modifications of the chaperone Hsp60. The model is available to test other agents and probiotics with therapeutic potential in alcoholic liver disease. PMID:26795070

  19. Focus on emerging drugs for the treatment of patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Federico, Alessandro; Zulli, Claudio; de Sio, Ilario; Del Prete, Anna; Dallio, Marcello; Masarone, Mario; Loguercio, Carmela

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the most common liver disorder in Western countries and is increasingly being recognized in developing nations. Fatty liver disease encompasses a spectrum of hepatic pathology, ranging from simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and end-stage liver disease. Moreover, NAFLD is often associated with other metabolic conditions, such as diabetes mellitus type 2, dyslipidemia and visceral obesity. The most recent guidelines suggest the management and treatment of patients with NAFLD considering both the liver disease and the associated metabolic co-morbidities. Diet and physical exercise are considered the first line of treatment for patients with NAFLD, but their results on therapeutic efficacy are often contrasting. Behavior therapy is necessary most of the time to achieve a sufficient result. Pharmacological therapy includes a wide variety of classes of molecules with different therapeutic targets and, often, little evidence supporting the real efficacy. Despite the abundance of clinical trials, NAFLD therapy remains a challenge for the scientific community, and there are no licensed therapies for NAFLD. Urgently, new pharmacological approaches are needed. Here, we will focus on the challenges facing actual therapeutic strategies and the most recent investigated molecules. PMID:25492998

  20. Neglected features of lifestyle: Their relevance in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Trovato, Francesca M; Martines, Giuseppe Fabio; Brischetto, Daniela; Trovato, Guglielmo; Catalano, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigated in non-alcoholic-fatty-liver-disease (NAFLD), with ultrasound (US)-detected fatty liver, and in a group of non-alcoholic and otherwise healthy subjects, relationship of neglected features of lifestyle with NAFLD and obesity. METHODS Five hundred and thirty-two NAFLD and 667 non-NAFLD healthy subjects, age 21-60 years were studied. Severity of liver steatosis was assessed by US bright liver score. The adherence to mediterranean diet score (AMDS) was assessed on the basis of a 1-wk recall computerized questionnaire which included a detailed physical activity reports (Baecke questionnaire). The western dietary profile score, as a simplified paradigm of unhealthy diet, a questionnaire quantifying sun exposure score and a sleep habits questionnaires provided a further comprehensive lifestyle assessment. RESULTS Body mass index (BMI), insulin resistance (HOMA), and triglycerides, poorer adherence to a mediterranean diet profile, sedentary habits, minor sun exposure and use of “western diet” foods are greater in NAFLD. Multiple linear regression analysis, weighted by years of age, displays BMI, HOMA and AMDS as the most powerful independent predictors of fatty liver severity; however, also the physical activity score, the western diet habit and the sun exposure score are acting inside the model with significant independent effects. CONCLUSION Articulated clinical intervention, according to our results, are justified in NAFLD and can be pursued addressing by focused intervention nutritional profile, physical exercise mainly in open-air subsets for enhancing sun exposure and healthier sleep duration and rhythm. PMID:27957244

  1. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: What the clinician needs to know

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Mariana Verdelho; Cortez-Pinto, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most frequent cause of liver disease in the Western world. Furthermore, it is increasing worldwide, paralleling the obesity pandemic. Though highly frequent, only about one fifth of affected subjects are at risk of developing the progressive form of the disease, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis with fibrosis. Even in the latter, liver disease is slowly progressive, though, since it is so prevalent, it is already the third cause of liver transplantation in the United States, and it is predicted to get to the top of the ranking in few years. Of relevance, fatty liver is also associated with increased overall mortality and particularly increased cardiovascular mortality. The literature and amount of published papers on NAFLD is increasing as fast as its prevalence, which makes it difficult to keep updated in this topic. This review aims to summarize the latest knowledge on NAFLD, in order to help clinicians understanding its pathogenesis and advances on diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25278691

  2. Increased expression of Zinc finger protein 267 in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Schnabl, Bernd; Czech, Barbara; Valletta, Daniela; Weiss, Thomas S; Kirovski, Georgi; Hellerbrand, Claus

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular lipid accumulation is a hallmark of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which encompasses a spectrum ranging from simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and ultimately cirrhosis. Zinc finger protein 267 (ZNF267) belongs to the family of Kruppel-like transcription factors, which regulate diverse biological processes that include development, proliferation, and differentiation. We have previously demonstrated that ZNF267 expression is up-regulated in liver cirrhosis and is further increased in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we analyzed the expression of ZNF267 in tissue specimens of NAFLD patients and found a significant up-regulation compared to normal liver tissue. Noteworthy, ZNF267 mRNA was already significantly increased in steatotic liver tissue without inflammation. In line with this, incubation of primary human hepatocytes with palmitic acid induced a dose-dependent lipid accumulation and corresponding dose-dependent ZNF267 induction in vitro. Furthermore, hepatocellular lipid accumulation induced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and also chemically induced ROS formation increased ZNF267 mRNA expression. In summary with previous findings, which revealed ZNF267 as pro-fibrogenic and pro-cancerogenic factor in chronic liver disease, the present study further suggests ZNF267 as promising therapeutic target particularly for NAFLD patients. In addition, it further indicates that hepatic steatosis per se has pathophysiological relevance and should not be considered as benign. PMID:22076166

  3. Choline Metabolism Provides Novel Insights into Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and its Progression

    PubMed Central

    Corbin, Karen D.; Zeisel, Steven H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Choline is an essential nutrient and the liver is a central organ responsible for choline metabolism. Hepatosteatosis and liver cell death occur when humans are deprived of choline. In the last few years there have been significant advances in our understanding of the mechanisms that influence choline requirements in humans and in our understanding of choline’s effects on liver function. These advances are useful in elucidating why non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) occurs and progresses sometimes to hepatocarcinogenesis. Recent findings Humans eating low choline diets develop fatty liver and liver damage,. This dietary requirement for choline is modulated by estrogen and by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in specific genes of choline and folate metabolism. The spectrum of choline’s effects on liver range from steatosis to development of hepatocarcinomas, and several mechanisms for these effects have been identified. They include abnormal phospholipid synthesis, defects in lipoprotein secretion, oxidative damage caused by mitochondrial dysfunction, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Furthermore, the hepatic steatosis phenotype and can be characterized more fully via metabolomic signatures and is influenced by the gut microbiome. Importantly, the intricate connection between liver function, one carbon metabolism, and energy metabolism is just beginning to be elucidated. Summary Choline influences liver function, and the dietary requirement for this nutrient varies depending on an individual’s genotype and estrogen status. Understanding these individual differences is important for gastroenterologists seeking to understand why some individuals develop NAFLD and others do not, and why some patients tolerate total parenteral nutrition and others develop liver dysfunction. PMID:22134222

  4. Insulin resistance and oxidative stress interdependency in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Videla, Luis A; Rodrigo, Ramón; Araya, Julia; Poniachik, Jaime

    2006-12-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is emerging as a major cause of chronic liver disease in association with the rising prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes in the population. Oxidative stress and insulin resistance (IR) are major contributors in the pathogenesis of NAFLD and in the progression from steatosis to steatohepatitis. Recently, Houstis and colleagues reported that reactive oxygen species have a causal role in multiple forms of IR, a phenomenon that can further promote exacerbation of oxidative stress. The improvement of the knowledge of these interrelationships should contribute to elucidate pathogenic pathways and design effective treatments for NAFLD.

  5. The Association between Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Cardiovascular Risk in Children.

    PubMed

    Di Sessa, Anna; Umano, Giuseppina Rosaria; Miraglia Del Giudice, Emanuele

    2017-07-07

    The rising prevalence of childhood obesity in the past decades has made Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) the most common cause of pediatric chronic liver disease worldwide. Currently, a growing body of evidence links NAFLD with cardiovascular disease (CVD) even at an early age. Data on the pediatric population have shown that NAFLD could represent an independent risk factor not only for cardiovascular events but also for early subclinical abnormalities in myocardial structure and function. Briefly, we review the current knowledge regarding the relationship between pediatric NAFLD and cardiovascular risk in an attempt to clarify our understanding of NAFLD as a possible cardiovascular risk factor in childhood.

  6. Attenuation of alcohol-induced apoptosis of hepatocytes in rat livers by polyenylphosphatidylcholine (PPC).

    PubMed

    Mi, L J; Mak, K M; Lieber, C S

    2000-02-01

    Alcohol consumption increases apoptosis of hepatocytes. This effect appears to be mediated by the induction of hepatic cytochrome P-4502E1(CYP2E1) and its generation of free radicals, which results in an enhanced lipid peroxidation that initiates apoptosis. Because polyenylphosphatidylcholine (PPC), a soybean extract rich in polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholines, decreases the induction of ethanol-specific CYP2E1 and opposes oxidative stress, we hypothesized that PPC supplementation may attenuate hepatocyte apoptosis caused by ethanol ingestion. Twenty-eight male Sprague Dawley rats were pair-fed Lieber-DeCarli liquid diets containing 36% of energy as alcohol or an isocaloric amount of carbohydrate for 28 days. Half of the rats were given PPC (3 g/liter), whereas the other half received the same amount of linoleate (as safflower oil) and of choline as the bitartrate. An additional dose of alcohol (3 g/kg) was given intragastrically 90 min before the livers were removed. We assessed apoptosis in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded liver sections by using the TUNEL (terminal transferase dUTP nick end labeling) assay. Apoptotic hepatocytes were identified by positive TUNEL staining in conjunction with condensation of nucleoplasm or margination of chromatin. In each rat, 20,000 to 60,000 hepatocytes were counted by light microscopy by using Image-Pro Plus computer software, and the incidence of apoptosis was expressed as the percentage of total hepatocytes. Alcohol feeding resulted in a 4.5-fold increase in apoptosis of hepatocytes compared to pair-fed control rats; PPC supplementation decreased the alcohol-induced apoptosis to less than half. No difference in the incidence of apoptosis between the control and PPC-supplemented rats was found in the absence of alcohol. Apoptosis was distributed randomly in the liver lobules of the rats fed the control diet, whereas the alcohol-induced apoptosis was significantly increased in the perivenular area. PPC supplementation

  7. Single non-invasive model to diagnose non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH).

    PubMed

    Otgonsuren, Munkhzul; Estep, Michael J; Hossain, Nayeem; Younossi, Elena; Frost, Spencer; Henry, Linda; Hunt, Sharon; Fang, Yun; Goodman, Zachary; Younossi, Zobair M

    2014-12-01

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is the progressive form of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). A liver biopsy is considered the "gold standard" for diagnosing/staging NASH. Identification of NAFLD/NASH using non-invasive tools is important for intervention. The study aims were to: develop/validate the predictive performance of a non-invasive model (index of NASH [ION]); assess the performance of a recognized non-invasive model (fatty liver index [FLI]) compared with ION for NAFLD diagnosis; determine which non-invasive model (FLI, ION, or NAFLD fibrosis score [NFS]) performed best in predicting age-adjusted mortality. From the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III database, anthropometric, clinical, ultrasound, laboratory, and mortality data were obtained (n = 4458; n = 861 [19.3%] NAFLD by ultrasound) and used to develop the ION model, and then to compare the ION and FLI models for NAFLD diagnosis. For validation and diagnosis of NASH, liver biopsy data were used (n = 152). Age-adjusted Cox proportional hazard modeling estimated the association among the three non-invasive tests (FLI, ION, and NFS) and mortality. FLI's threshold score > 60 and ION's threshold score > 22 had similar specificity (FLI = 80% vs ION = 82%) for NAFLD diagnosis; FLI < 30 (80% sensitivity) and ION < 11 (81% sensitivity) excluded NAFLD. An ION score > 50 predicted histological NASH (92% specificity); the FLI model did not predict NASH or mortality. The ION model was best in predicting cardiovascular/diabetes-related mortality; NFS predicted overall or diabetes-related mortality. The ION model was superior in predicting NASH and mortality compared with the FLI model. Studies are needed to validate ION. © 2014 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. Pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: Recent solutions, unresolved issues, and future research directions

    PubMed Central

    Clemente, Maria Grazia; Mandato, Claudia; Poeta, Marco; Vajro, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in children is becoming a major health concern. A “multiple-hit” pathogenetic model has been suggested to explain the progressive liver damage that occurs among children with NAFLD. In addition to the accumulation of fat in the liver, insulin resistance (IR) and oxidative stress due to genetic/epigenetic background, unfavorable lifestyles, gut microbiota and gut-liver axis dysfunction, and perturbations of trace element homeostasis have been shown to be critical for disease progression and the development of more severe inflammatory and fibrotic stages [non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)]. Simple clinical and laboratory parameters, such as age, history, anthropometrical data (BMI and waist circumference percentiles), blood pressure, surrogate clinical markers of IR (acanthosis nigricans), abdominal ultrasounds, and serum transaminases, lipids and glucose/insulin profiles, allow a clinician to identify children with obesity and obesity-related conditions, including NAFLD and cardiovascular and metabolic risks. A liver biopsy (the “imperfect” gold standard) is required for a definitive NAFLD/NASH diagnosis, particularly to exclude other treatable conditions or when advanced liver disease is expected on clinical and laboratory grounds and preferably prior to any controlled trial of pharmacological/surgical treatments. However, a biopsy clearly cannot represent a screening procedure. Advancements in diagnostic serum and imaging tools, especially for the non-invasive differentiation between NAFLD and NASH, have shown promising results, e.g., magnetic resonance elastography. Weight loss and physical activity should be the first option of intervention. Effective pharmacological treatments are still under development; however, drugs targeting IR, oxidative stress, proinflammatory pathways, dyslipidemia, gut microbiota and gut liver axis dysfunction are an option for patients who are unable to comply with the recommended

  9. Background of the FIB-4 index in Japanese non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Wada, Takashi; Zeniya, Mikio

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the distribution and characteristics of the FIB-4 index of liver fibrosis in 1,441 Japanese men (age 50.7±10.2 years) and 304 women (age 53.9±10.3 years) who underwent comprehensive general health checkups and were identified as having non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. With respect to the FIB-4 index, differences according to sex, metabolic indices, and ultrasonic findings were investigated. Among 9,255 individuals who underwent comprehensive general health checkups, 2,750 (29.8%) were found to have mild fatty liver or fatty liver based on ultrasound findings. After excluding patients who consumed ≥150 g alcohol/week (818 individuals), those testing positive for hepatitis B surface antigens or hepatitis C virus antibody (184 individuals), and those for whom data were insufficient (three individuals), we investigated the FIB-4 indices in the remaining 1,745 subjects. There were no sex differences in the FIB-4 index. A total of 1,370 patients (78.5%) exhibited a low cut-off index (COI) (<1.30), 357 (20.5%), exhibited an indeterminate COI (1.30-2.67), and 18 (1.0%) exhibited a high COI (>2.67). There were no associations between the FIB-4 index and the constituent factors of metabolic syndrome. In contrast, there was a significant difference in the ln FIB-4 index between the patients with and without mild fatty liver or fatty liver on ultrasound among men (0.006±0.43 and -0.092±0.39, p<0.001), but not women. The FIB-4 index was is significantly lower in men, but not women, with fatty liver. The FIB-4 index must be calculated separately during medical checkups and evaluated in conjunction with ultrasound findings.

  10. Impaired Insulin/IGF Signaling in Experimental Alcohol-Related Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Van Anh; Le, Tran; Tong, Ming; Silbermann, Elizabeth; Gundogan, Fusun; de la Monte, Suzanne M.

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol-related myopathy (Alc-M) is highly prevalent among heavy drinkers, although its pathogenesis is not well understood. We hypothesize that Alc-M is mediated by combined effects of insulin/IGF resistance and oxidative stress, similar to the effects of ethanol on liver and brain. We tested this hypothesis using an established model in which adult rats were pair-fed for 8 weeks with isocaloric diets containing 0% (N = 8) or 35.5% (N = 13) ethanol by caloric content. Gastrocnemius muscles were examined by histology, morphometrics, qRT-PCR analysis, and ELISAs. Chronic ethanol feeding reduced myofiber size and mRNA expression of IGF-1 polypeptide, insulin, IGF-1, and IGF-2 receptors, IRS-1, and IRS-2. Multiplex ELISAs demonstrated ethanol-associated inhibition of insulin, IRS-1, Akt, and p70S6K signaling, and increased activation of GSK-3β. In addition, ethanol-exposed muscles had increased 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal immunoreactivity, reflecting lipid peroxidation, and reduced levels of mitochondrial Complex IV, Complex V, and acetylcholinesterase. These results demonstrate that experimental Alc-M is associated with inhibition of insulin/IGF/IRS and downstream signaling that mediates metabolism and cell survival, similar to findings in alcoholic liver and brain degeneration. Moreover, the increased oxidative stress, which could be mediated by mitochondrial dysfunction, may have led to inhibition of acetylcholinesterase, which itself is sufficient to cause myofiber atrophy and degeneration. PMID:23016132

  11. Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells: A promising strategy to manage alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Ezquer, Fernando; Bruna, Flavia; Calligaris, Sebastián; Conget, Paulette; Ezquer, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption is a major cause of liver disease. The term alcoholic liver disease (ALD) refers to a spectrum of mild to severe disorders including steatosis, steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. With limited therapeutic options, stem cell therapy offers significant potential for these patients. In this article, we review the pathophysiologic features of ALD and the therapeutic mechanisms of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells, also referred to as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), based on their potential to differentiate into hepatocytes, their immunomodulatory properties, their potential to promote residual hepatocyte regeneration, and their capacity to inhibit hepatic stellate cells. The perfect match between ALD pathogenesis and MSC therapeutic mechanisms, together with encouraging, available preclinical data, allow us to support the notion that MSC transplantation is a promising therapeutic strategy to manage ALD onset and progression. PMID:26755858

  12. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: The Emerging Burden in Cardiometabolic and Renal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Han, Eugene; Lee, Yong Ho

    2017-12-01

    As the number of individuals with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has increased, the influence of NAFLD on other metabolic diseases has been highlighted. Accumulating epidemiologic evidence indicates that NAFLD not only affects the liver but also increases the risk of extra-hepatic diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, dyslipidemia, hypertension, cardiovascular or cerebrovascular diseases, and chronic kidney disease. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, an advanced type of NAFLD, can aggravate these inter-organ relationships and lead to poorer outcomes. NAFLD induces insulin resistance and exacerbates systemic chronic inflammation and oxidative stress, which leads to organ dysfunction in extra-hepatic tissues. Although more research is needed to identify the pathophysiological mechanisms and causal relationship between NAFLD and cardiometabolic and renal diseases, screening for heart, brain, and kidney diseases, risk assessment for diabetes, and a multidisciplinary approach for managing these patients should be highly encouraged. Copyright © 2017 Korean Diabetes Association.

  13. Experimental obstructive cholestasis: the wound-like inflammatory liver response

    PubMed Central

    Aller, María-Angeles; Arias, Jorge-Luis; García-Domínguez, Jose; Arias, Jose-Ignacio; Durán, Manuel; Arias, Jaime

    2008-01-01

    Obstructive cholestasis causes hepatic cirrhosis and portal hypertension. The pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the development of liver disease are multiple and linked. We propose grouping these mechanisms according to the three phenotypes mainly expressed in the interstitial space in order to integrate them. Experimental extrahepatic cholestasis is the model most frequently used to study obstructive cholestasis. The early liver interstitial alterations described in these experimental models would produce an ischemia/reperfusion phenotype with oxidative and nitrosative stress. Then, the hyperexpression of a leukocytic phenotype, in which Kupffer cells and neutrophils participate, would induce enzymatic stress. And finally, an angiogenic phenotype, responsible for peribiliary plexus development with sinusoidal arterialization, occurs. In addition, an intense cholangiocyte proliferation, which acquires neuroendocrine abilities, stands out. This histopathological finding is also associated with fibrosis. It is proposed that the sequence of these inflammatory phenotypes, perhaps with a trophic meaning, ultimately produces a benign tumoral biliary process – although it poses severe hepatocytic insufficiency. Moreover, the persistence of this benign tumor disease would induce a higher degree of dedifferentiation and autonomy and, therefore, its malign degeneration. PMID:19014418

  14. Necroptosis is a key pathogenic event in human and experimental murine models of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Afonso, Marta B; Rodrigues, Pedro M; Carvalho, Tânia; Caridade, Marta; Borralho, Paula; Cortez-Pinto, Helena; Castro, Rui E; Rodrigues, Cecília M P

    2015-10-01

    Hepatocyte cell death, inflammation and oxidative stress constitute key pathogenic mechanisms underlying non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We aimed to investigate the role of necroptosis in human and experimental NAFLD and its association with tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and oxidative stress. Serum markers of necrosis, liver receptor-interacting protein 3 (RIP3) and phosphorylated mixed lineage kinase domain-like (MLKL) were evaluated in control individuals and patients with NAFLD. C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) or RIP3-deficient (RIP3(-/-)) mice were fed a high-fat choline-deficient (HFCD) or methionine and choline-deficient (MCD) diet, with subsequent histological and biochemical analysis of hepatic damage. In primary murine hepatocytes, necroptosis and oxidative stress were also assessed after necrostatin-1 (Nec-1) treatment or RIP3 silencing. We show that circulating markers of necrosis and TNF-α, as well as liver RIP3 and MLKL phosphorylation were increased in NAFLD. Likewise, RIP3 and MLKL protein levels and TNF-α expression were increased in the liver of HFCD and MCD diet-fed mice. Moreover, RIP3 and MLKL sequestration in the insoluble protein fraction of NASH (non-alcoholic steatohepatitis) mice liver lysates represented an early event during stetatohepatitis progression. Functional studies in primary murine hepatocytes established the association between TNF-α-induced RIP3 expression, activation of necroptosis and oxidative stress. Strikingly, RIP3 deficiency attenuated MCD diet-induced liver injury, steatosis, inflammation, fibrosis and oxidative stress. In conclusion, necroptosis is increased in the liver of NAFLD patients and in experimental models of NASH. Further, TNF-α triggers RIP3-dependent oxidative stress during hepatocyte necroptosis. As such, targeting necroptosis appears to arrest or at least impair NAFLD progression. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  15. Transporter Expression in Liver Tissue from Subjects with Alcoholic or Hepatitis C Cirrhosis Quantified by Targeted Quantitative Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Collins, Carol; Kelly, Edward J.; Chu, Xiaoyan; Ray, Adrian S.; Salphati, Laurent; Xiao, Guangqing; Lee, Caroline; Lai, Yurong; Liao, Mingxiang; Mathias, Anita; Evers, Raymond; Humphreys, William; Hop, Cornelis E. C. A.; Kumer, Sean C.

    2016-01-01

    Although data are available on the change of expression/activity of drug-metabolizing enzymes in liver cirrhosis patients, corresponding data on transporter protein expression are not available. Therefore, using quantitative targeted proteomics, we compared our previous data on noncirrhotic control livers (n = 36) with the protein expression of major hepatobiliary transporters, breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), bile salt export pump (BSEP), multidrug and toxin extrusion protein 1 (MATE1), multidrug resistance–associated protein (MRP)2, MRP3, MRP4, sodium taurocholate–cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP), organic anion–transporting polypeptides (OATP)1B1, 1B3, 2B1, organic cation transporter 1 (OCT1), and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in alcoholic (n = 27) and hepatitis C cirrhosis (n = 30) livers. Compared with control livers, the yield of membrane protein from alcoholic and hepatitis C cirrhosis livers was significantly reduced by 56 and 67%, respectively. The impact of liver cirrhosis on transporter protein expression was transporter-dependent. Generally, reduced protein expression (per gram of liver) was found in alcoholic cirrhosis livers versus control livers, with the exception that the expression of MRP3 was increased, whereas no change was observed for MATE1, MRP2, OATP2B1, and P-gp. In contrast, the impact of hepatitis C cirrhosis on protein expression of transporters (per gram of liver) was diverse, showing an increase (MATE1), decrease (BSEP, MRP2, NTCP, OATP1B3, OCT1, and P-gp), or no change (BCRP, MRP3, OATP1B1, and 2B1). The expression of hepatobiliary transporter protein differed in different diseases (alcoholic versus hepatitis C cirrhosis). Finally, incorporation of protein expression of OATP1B1 in alcoholic cirrhosis into the Simcyp physiologically based pharmacokinetics cirrhosis module improved prediction of the disposition of repaglinide in liver cirrhosis patients. These transporter expression data will be useful in the future to predict

  16. Gut-Liver Axis, Nutrition, and Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kirpich, Irina A.; Marsano, Luis S.; McClain, Craig J.

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents a spectrum of diseases involving hepatic fat accumulation, inflammation with the potential progression to fibrosis and cirrhosis over time. NAFLD is often associated with obesity, insulin resistance, and diabetes. The interactions between the liver and the gut, the so-called ”gut-liver axis”, play a critical role in NAFLD onset and progression. Compelling evidence links the gut microbiome, intestinal barrier integrity, and NAFLD. The dietary factors may alter the gut microbiota and intestinal barrier function, favoring the occurrence of metabolic endotoxemia and low grade inflammation, thereby contributing to the development of obesity and obesity-associated fatty liver disease. Therapeutic manipulations with prebiotics and probiotics to modulate the gut microbiota and maintain intestinal barrier integrity are potential agents for NAFLD management. This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding the complex interplay between the gut microbiota, intestinal barrier, and dietary factors in NAFLD pathogenesis. The concepts addressed in this review have important clinical implications, although more work needs to be done to understand how dietary factors affect the gut barrier and microbiota, and to comprehend how microbe-derived components may interfere with the host’s metabolism contributing to NAFLD development. PMID:26151226

  17. Binge alcohol alters PNPLA3 levels in liver through epigenetic mechanism involving histone H3 acetylation.

    PubMed

    Restrepo, Ricardo J; Lim, Robert W; Korthuis, Ronald J; Shukla, Shivendra D

    2017-05-01

    The human PNPLA3 (patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing 3) gene codes for a protein which is highly expressed in adipose tissue and liver, and is implicated in lipid homeostasis. While PNPLA3 protein contains regions homologous to functional lipolytic proteins, the regulation of its tissue expression is reflective of lipogenic genes. A naturally occurring genetic variant of PNPLA3 in humans has been linked to increased susceptibility to alcoholic liver disease. We have examined the modulatory effect of alcohol on PNPLA3 protein and mRNA expression as well as the association of its gene promoter with acetylated histone H3K9 by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay in rat hepatocytes in vitro, and in vivo in mouse and rat models of acute binge, chronic, and chronic followed by acute binge ethanol administration. Protein expression of PNPLA3 was significantly increased by alcohol in all three models used. PNPLA3 mRNA also increased, albeit to a varying degree. ChIP assay using H3AcK9 antibody showed increased association with the promoter of PNPLA3 in hepatocytes and in mouse liver. This was less evident in rat livers in vivo except under chronic treatment. It is concluded for the first time that histone acetylation plays a role in the modulation of PNPLA3 levels in the liver exposed to binge ethanol both in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Pathology and biopsy assessment of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Straub, Beate Katharina; Schirmacher, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most prevalent liver diseases in Western industrialized countries with dramatically rising incidence. The diagnosis of NAFLD requires the existence of steatosis in the absence of significant alcohol consumption. In cases of relevant inflammation pathogenetically linked to steatosis, it is termed non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). While pure steatosis represents a relatively harmless and rapidly reversible condition without a significant tendency to progression, NASH carries a significant morbidity and progression risk. Noninvasive methods neither reliably establish the diagnosis nor define the extent of disease in NASH, making histopathology the diagnostic gold standard. Since current therapeutic options in NASH are limited, indication for biopsy is made in the clinical context, predominantly in unclear clinical constellations, prior to invasive measures, for follow-up purposes and in the context of clinical studies. Histological hallmarks of NASH are steatosis, hepatocellular ballooning (with and without Mallory-Denk bodies), necroinflammation, and progressing disease a characteristic with perisinusoidal fibrosis. For semiquantitative assessment of necroinflammation (grading) and fibrosis (staging), a score has recently been implemented. Although histology does not reliably distinguish alcoholic steatohepatitis/alcoholic fatty liver disease from NASH/NAFLD, it may give valuable hints. NASH has a tendency for more steatosis, the so-called glycogenated nuclei, and less necroinflammatory activity. Future development of biopsy diagnosis will be coupled to the development of differential systemic therapeutic approaches. Especially in the context of clinical studies, detailed histological evaluation should be considered for the detection of predictive parameters. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Fatty acid composition in serum correlates with that in the liver and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease activity scores in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xing-He; Li, Chun-Yan; Muhammad, Ishfaq; Zhang, Xiu-Ying

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the correlation between the serum fatty acid composition and hepatic steatosis, inflammation, hepatocellular ballooning scores, and liver fatty acids composition in mice fed a high-fat diet. Livers were collected for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease score analysis. Fatty acid compositions were analysed by gas chromatography. Correlations were determined by Pearson correlation coefficient. Exposed to a high-fat diet, mice developed fatty liver disease with varying severity without fibrosis. The serum fatty acid variation became more severe with prolonged exposure to a high-fat diet. This variation also correlated significantly with the variation in livers, with the types of fatty acids corresponding to liver steatosis, inflammation, and hepatocellular ballooning scores. Results of this study lead to the following hypothesis: the extent of serum fatty acid variation may be a preliminary biomarker of fatty liver disease caused by high-fat intake. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Epigenetic Mechanisms Underlying the Link between Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Diseases and Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joo Ho; Friso, Simonetta; Choi, Sang-Woon

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is defined as a pathologic accumulation of fat in the form of triglycerides (TG) in the liver (steatosis) that is not caused by alcohol. A subgroup of NAFLD patients shows liver cell injury and inflammation coupled with the excessive fat accumulation (steatohepatitis), which is referred to as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Patients with NASH may develop cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). NAFLD shares the key features of metabolic syndrome including obesity, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and insulin resistance. The pathogenesis of NAFLD is multi-factorial, however the oxidative stress seems to plays a major role in the development and progression of the disease. The emerging field of epigenetics provides a new perspective on the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Epigenetics is an inheritable but reversible phenomenon that affects gene expression without altering the DNA sequence and refers to DNA methylation, histone modifications and microRNAs. Epigenetic manipulation through metabolic pathways such as one-carbon metabolism has been proposed as a promising approach to retard the progression of NAFLD. Investigating the epigenetic modifiers in NAFLD may also lead to the development of preventive or therapeutic strategies for NASH-associated complications. PMID:25195642

  1. Alcoholic liver disease patients' perspective of a coping and physical activity-oriented rehabilitation intervention after hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, Maria Rudkjaer; Hendriksen, Carsten; Schiødt, Frank Vinholt; Rydahl-Hansen, Susan

    2016-09-01

    To identify and describe the impact of a coping and physical activity-oriented rehabilitation intervention on alcoholic liver disease patients after hepatic encephalopathy in terms of their interaction with professionals and relatives. Patients who have experienced alcohol-induced hepatic encephalopathy have reduced quality of life, multiple complications, and social problems, and rehabilitation opportunities for these patients are limited. A grounded theory study and an evaluation study of a controlled intervention study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 alcoholic liver disease patients who were diagnosed with hepatic encephalopathy and participated in a coping and physical activity-oriented rehabilitation intervention. Richard S. Lazarus's theory of stress and coping inspired the interview guide. The significance of a coping and physical activity-oriented rehabilitation intervention on alcoholic liver disease patients' ability to cope with problems after surviving alcohol-induced hepatic encephalopathy in terms of their interaction with professionals and relatives was characterised by the core category 'regain control over the diseased body'. This is subdivided into three separate categories: 'the experience of being physically strong', 'togetherness' and 'self-control', and they impact each other and are mutually interdependent. Alcoholic liver disease patients described the strength of the rehabilitation as regaining control over the diseased body. Professionals and relatives of patients with alcoholic liver disease may need to focus on strengthening and preserving patients' control of their diseased body by facilitating the experience of togetherness, self-control and physical strength when interacting with and supporting patients with alcoholic liver disease. A coping and physical activity-oriented rehabilitation intervention may help alcoholic liver disease patients to regain control over their diseased body and give patients the experience

  2. Effects of coffee, smoking, and alcohol on liver function tests: a comprehensive cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Liver function tests (LFTs) can be affected by many factors and the proposed effects of coffee on LFT require a comprehensive evaluation. The aim of this study was to elucidate whether drinking coffee, smoking, or drinking alcohol have independent effects on LFTs in Korean health-check examinees. Methods We used the responses of 500 health-check examinees, who had participated in a self-administered questionnaire survey about coffee, alcohol drinking, and smoking habits. Results Coffee consumption was closely related to male gender, high body mass index (BMI), alcohol drinking, and smoking. On univariable and multivariable analyses, drinking coffee lowered serum levels of total protein, albumin, and aspartate aminotransferases (AST). On multivariable analyses, smoking raised serum γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) level and decreased serum protein and albumin levels, while alcohol drinking raised GGT level after adjustment for age, gender, regular medication, BMI, coffee and alcohol drinking amounts, and smoking. Conclusions Coffee consumption, smoking, and alcohol drinking affect the individual components of LFT in different ways, and the above 3 habits each have an impact on LFTs. Therefore, their effects on LFTs should be carefully interpreted, and further study on the mechanism of the effects is warranted. PMID:23075166

  3. Gene Expression in Brain and Liver Produced by Three Different Regimens of Alcohol Consumption in Mice: Comparison with Immune Activation

    PubMed Central

    Osterndorff-Kahanek, Elizabeth; Ponomarev, Igor; Blednov, Yuri A.; Harris, R. Adron

    2013-01-01

    Chronically available alcohol escalates drinking in mice and a single injection of the immune activator lipopolysaccharide can mimic this effect and result in a persistent increase in alcohol consumption. We hypothesized that chronic alcohol drinking and lipopolysaccharide injections will produce some similar molecular changes that play a role in regulation of alcohol intake. We investigated the molecular mechanisms of chronic alcohol consumption or lipopolysaccharide insult by gene expression profiling in prefrontal cortex and liver of C57BL/6J mice. We identified similar patterns of transcriptional changes among four groups of animals, three consuming alcohol (vs water) in different consumption tests and one injected with lipopolysaccharide (vs. vehicle). The three tests of alcohol consumption are the continuous chronic two bottle choice (Chronic), two bottle choice available every other day (Chronic Intermittent) and limited access to one bottle of ethanol (Drinking in the Dark). Gene expression changes were more numerous and marked in liver than in prefrontal cortex for the alcohol treatments and similar in the two tissues for lipopolysaccharide. Many of the changes were unique to each treatment, but there was significant overlap in prefrontal cortex for Chronic-Chronic Intermittent and for Chronic Intermittent-lipopolysaccharide and in liver all pairs showed overlap. In silico cell-type analysis indicated that lipopolysaccharide had strongest effects on brain microglia and liver Kupffer cells. Pathway analysis detected a prefrontal cortex-based dopamine-related (PPP1R1B, DRD1, DRD2, FOSB, PDNY) network that was highly over-represented in the Chronic Intermittent group, with several genes from the network being also regulated in the Chronic and lipopolysaccharide (but not Drinking in the Dark) groups. Liver showed a CYP and GST centered metabolic network shared in part by all four treatments. We demonstrate common consequences of chronic alcohol consumption and

  4. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis pathogenesis: sublethal hepatocyte injury as a driver of liver inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Samar H; Hirsova, Petra; Gores, Gregory J

    2018-01-01

    A subset of patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease develop an inflammatory condition, termed nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). NASH is characterised by hepatocellular injury, innate immune cell-mediated inflammation and progressive liver fibrosis. The mechanisms whereby hepatic inflammation occurs in NASH remain incompletely understood, but appear to be linked to the proinflammatory microenvironment created by toxic lipid-induced hepatocyte injury, termed lipotoxicity. In this review, we discuss the signalling pathways induced by sublethal hepatocyte lipid overload that contribute to the pathogenesis of NASH. Furthermore, we will review the role of proinflammatory, proangiogenic and profibrotic hepatocyte-derived extracellular vesicles as disease biomarkers and pathogenic mediators during lipotoxicity. We also review the potential therapeutic strategies to block the feed-forward loop between sublethal hepatocyte injury and liver inflammation. PMID:29367207

  5. Early life programming and the risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Lynch, C; Chan, C S; Drake, A J

    2017-06-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease and can be considered the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. NAFLD represents a spectrum of disease, from the relatively benign simple steatosis to the more serious non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, which can progress to liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and end-stage liver failure, necessitating liver transplantation. Although the increasing prevalence of NAFLD in developed countries has substantial implications for public health, many of the precise mechanisms accounting for the development and progression of NAFLD are unclear. The environment in early life is an important determinant of cardiovascular disease risk in later life and studies suggest this also extends to NAFLD. Here we review data from animal models and human studies which suggest that fetal and early life exposure to maternal under- and overnutrition, excess glucocorticoids and environmental pollutants may confer an increased susceptibility to NAFLD development and progression in offspring and that such effects may be sex-specific. We also consider studies aimed at identifying potential dietary and pharmacological interventions aimed at reducing this risk. We suggest that further human epidemiological studies are needed to ensure that data from animal models are relevant to human health.

  6. Proteomic and genomic studies of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease - clues in the pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jun Wei; Dillon, John; Miller, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a widely prevalent hepatic disorder that covers wide spectrum of liver pathology. NAFLD is strongly associated with liver inflammation, metabolic hyperlipidaemia and insulin resistance. Frequently, NAFLD has been considered as the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. The pathophysiology of NAFLD has not been fully elucidated. Some patients can remain in the stage of simple steatosis, which generally is a benign condition; whereas others can develop liver inflammation and progress into non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The mechanism behind the progression is still not fully understood. Much ongoing proteomic researches have focused on discovering the unbiased circulating biochemical markers to allow early detection and treatment of NAFLD. Comprehensive genomic studies have also begun to provide new insights into the gene polymorphism to understand patient-disease variations. Therefore, NAFLD is considered a complex and mutifactorial disease phenotype resulting from environmental exposures acting on a susceptible polygenic background. This paper reviewed the current status of proteomic and genomic studies that have contributed to the understanding of NAFLD pathogenesis. For proteomics section, this review highlighted functional proteins that involved in: (1) transportation; (2) metabolic pathway; (3) acute phase reaction; (4) anti-inflammatory; (5) extracellular matrix; and (6) immune system. In the genomic studies, this review will discuss genes which involved in: (1) lipolysis; (2) adipokines; and (3) cytokines production. PMID:25024592

  7. Gut microbiota in alcoholic liver disease: Pathogenetic role and therapeutic perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Malaguarnera, Giulia; Giordano, Maria; Nunnari, Giuseppe; Bertino, Gaetano; Malaguarnera, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is the commonest cause of cirrhosis in many Western countries and it has a high rate of morbidity and mortality. The pathogenesis is characterized by complex interactions between metabolic intermediates of alcohol. Bacterial intestinal flora is itself responsible for production of endogenous ethanol through the fermentation of carbohydrates. The intestinal metabolism of alcohol produces a high concentration of toxic acetaldehyde that modifies gut permeability and microbiota equilibrium. Furthermore it causes direct hepatocyte damage. In patients who consume alcohol over a long period, there is a modification of gut microbiota and, in particular, an increment of Gram negative bacteria. This causes endotoxemia and hyperactivation of the immune system. Endotoxin is a constituent of Gram negative bacteria cell walls. Two types of receptors, cluster of differentiation 14 and Toll-like receptors-4, present on Kupffer cells, recognize endotoxins. Several studies have demonstrated the importance of gut-liver axis and new treatments have been studied in recent years to reduce progression of ALD modifying gut microbiota. It has focused attention on antibiotics, prebiotics, probiotics and synbiotics. PMID:25469033

  8. Gut microbiota in alcoholic liver disease: pathogenetic role and therapeutic perspectives.

    PubMed

    Malaguarnera, Giulia; Giordano, Maria; Nunnari, Giuseppe; Bertino, Gaetano; Malaguarnera, Michele

    2014-11-28

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is the commonest cause of cirrhosis in many Western countries and it has a high rate of morbidity and mortality. The pathogenesis is characterized by complex interactions between metabolic intermediates of alcohol. Bacterial intestinal flora is itself responsible for production of endogenous ethanol through the fermentation of carbohydrates. The intestinal metabolism of alcohol produces a high concentration of toxic acetaldehyde that modifies gut permeability and microbiota equilibrium. Furthermore it causes direct hepatocyte damage. In patients who consume alcohol over a long period, there is a modification of gut microbiota and, in particular, an increment of Gram negative bacteria. This causes endotoxemia and hyperactivation of the immune system. Endotoxin is a constituent of Gram negative bacteria cell walls. Two types of receptors, cluster of differentiation 14 and Toll-like receptors-4, present on Kupffer cells, recognize endotoxins. Several studies have demonstrated the importance of gut-liver axis and new treatments have been studied in recent years to reduce progression of ALD modifying gut microbiota. It has focused attention on antibiotics, prebiotics, probiotics and synbiotics.

  9. Effects of D-002, a mixture of high molecular weight beeswax alcohols, on patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Illnait, José; Rodríguez, Iván; Mendoza, Sarahí; Fernández, Yolanda; Mas, Rosa; Miranda, Mirtha; Piñera, Jesús; Fernández, Julio César; Mesa, Meilis; Fernández, Lilia; Carbajal, Daisy; Gámez, Rafael

    2013-07-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is intimately related to insulin resistance and ranges from a benign course to liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. NAFLD management mainly involves dietary modification and weight loss. Although no fully successful pharmacological intervention is available, alternative therapies to treat NAFLD have shown promising results. Experimental studies have shown that D-002, a mixture of beeswax alcohols with antioxidant effects, is hepatoprotective. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of D-002 in patients with NALFD. Fifty patients with NAFLD were randomized to receive a placebo or D-002 (100 mg/day) for 24 weeks. The primary endpoint was a significant ultrasonography-detected reduction of liver fat infiltration versus a placebo. Secondary endpoints were decreases in the homeostatic model assessment (HOMA) index, insulin levels, serum liver enzymes, increases in plasma total antioxidant status (TAS) and improved clinical symptoms versus the placebo recipients. At randomization, all indicators were comparable in both groups. At study completion, seven (28.0%) D-002-patients, but none of the placebo recipients, exhibited a normal liver echo pattern on ultrasonography (p < 0.01). Also, D-002 significantly reduced (p < 0.01 vs. baseline and placebo) the HOMA index and insulin levels and increased the TAS, but did not affect other parameters. The proportion of D-002-patients (12/25, 48.0%) showing symptom improvement was higher (p < 0.001) than that of the placebo group (1/25, 4.0%). The treatment was safe and well tolerated. Three patients in each group withdrew from the study. D-002 (100 mg/day) improved ultrasonographic findings, indicators of insulin resistance, plasma TAS and clinical evolution on NAFLD patients. Further studies, however, are needed to confirm these results.

  10. Review article: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in morbidly obese patients and the effect of bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    De Ridder, R J J; Schoon, E J; Smulders, J F; van Hout, G C M; Stockbrügger, R W; Koek, G H

    2007-12-01

    Morbid obesity is strongly associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. The effects of bariatric surgery on liver tests an histological abnormalities after weight loss are controversial. To review the literature on the prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in patients with morbid obesity with respect to laboratory and histopathological parameters and the effect of weight loss on these parameters after bariatric surgery. Standard liver tests do not seem to be a sensitive tool for the assessment and follow-up of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in obesity. In nearly all patients with morbid obesity, histological abnormalities reflecting non-alcoholic fatty liver disease are present. Bariatric surgery in these patients will decrease the grade of steatosis. However, there are some concerns about the effect of bariatric surgery on hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. In particular, older follow-up studies reported negative results as opposed to more recent studies, which also showed improvement in hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. Unfortunately, most studies had limitations because of the selection of patients. Despite limitations in many studies, bariatric surgery seems to be a promising treatment in patients with obesity presenting with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

  11. The let-7/Lin28 axis regulates activation of hepatic stellate cells in alcoholic liver injury.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, Kelly; Huang, Li; Sato, Keisaku; Wu, Nan; Annable, Tami; Zhou, Tianhao; Ramos-Lorenzo, Sugeily; Wan, Ying; Huang, Qiaobing; Francis, Heather; Glaser, Shannon; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu; Alpini, Gianfranco; Meng, Fanyin

    2017-07-07

    The let-7/Lin28 axis is associated with the regulation of key cellular regulatory genes known as microRNAs in various human disorders and cancer development. This study evaluated the role of the let-7/Lin28 axis in regulating a mesenchymal phenotype of hepatic stellate cells in alcoholic liver injury. We identified that ethanol feeding significantly down-regulated several members of the let-7 family in mouse liver, including let-7a and let-7b. Similarly, the treatment of human hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) significantly decreased the expressions of let-7a and let-7b. Conversely, overexpression of let-7a and let-7b suppressed the myofibroblastic activation of cultured human HSCs induced by LPS and TGF-β, as evidenced by repressed ACTA2 (α-actin 2), COL1A1 (collagen 1A1), TIMP1 (TIMP metallopeptidase inhibitor 1), and FN1 (fibronectin 1); this supports the notion that HSC activation is controlled by let-7. A combination of bioinformatics, dual-luciferase reporter assay, and Western blot analysis revealed that Lin28B and high-mobility group AT-hook (HMGA2) were the direct targets of let-7a and let-7b. Furthermore, Lin28B deficiency increased the expression of let-7a/let-7b as well as reduced HSC activation and liver fibrosis in mice with alcoholic liver injury. This feedback regulation of let-7 by Lin28B is verified in hepatic stellate cells isolated by laser capture microdissection from the model. The identification of the let-7/Lin28 axis as an important regulator of HSC activation as well as its upstream modulators and down-stream targets will provide insights into the involvement of altered microRNA expression in contributing to the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver fibrosis and novel therapeutic approaches for human alcoholic liver diseases. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Coffee Intake Is Associated with a Lower Liver Stiffness in Patients with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, Hepatitis C, and Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Hodge, Alexander; Lim, Sarah; Goh, Evan; Wong, Ophelia; Marsh, Philip; Knight, Virginia; Sievert, William; de Courten, Barbora

    2017-01-01

    There is emerging evidence for the positive effects or benefits of coffee in patients with liver disease. We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study on patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection to determine the effects of coffee intake on a non-invasive marker of liver fibrosis: liver stiffness assessed by transient elastography (TE). We assessed coffee and tea intake and measured TE in 1018 patients with NAFLD, HCV, and HBV (155 with NAFLD, 378 with HCV and 485 with HBV). Univariate and multivariate regression models were performed taking into account potential confounders. Liver stiffness was higher in males compared to females (p < 0.05). Patients with HBV had lower liver stiffness than those with HCV and NAFLD. After adjustment for age, gender, smoking, alcohol consumption, M or XL probe, and disease state (NAFLD, HCV, and HBV status), those who drank 2 or more cups of coffee per day had a lower liver stiffness (p = 0.044). Tea consumption had no effect (p = 0.9). Coffee consumption decreases liver stiffness, which may indicate less fibrosis and inflammation, independent of disease state. This study adds further evidence to the notion of coffee maybe beneficial in patients with liver disease. PMID:28075394

  13. Coffee Intake Is Associated with a Lower Liver Stiffness in Patients with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, Hepatitis C, and Hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Hodge, Alexander; Lim, Sarah; Goh, Evan; Wong, Ophelia; Marsh, Philip; Knight, Virginia; Sievert, William; de Courten, Barbora

    2017-01-10

    There is emerging evidence for the positive effects or benefits of coffee in patients with liver disease. We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study on patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection to determine the effects of coffee intake on a non-invasive marker of liver fibrosis: liver stiffness assessed by transient elastography (TE). We assessed coffee and tea intake and measured TE in 1018 patients with NAFLD, HCV, and HBV (155 with NAFLD, 378 with HCV and 485 with HBV). Univariate and multivariate regression models were performed taking into account potential confounders. Liver stiffness was higher in males compared to females ( p < 0.05). Patients with HBV had lower liver stiffness than those with HCV and NAFLD. After adjustment for age, gender, smoking, alcohol consumption, M or XL probe, and disease state (NAFLD, HCV, and HBV status), those who drank 2 or more cups of coffee per day had a lower liver stiffness ( p = 0.044). Tea consumption had no effect ( p = 0.9). Coffee consumption decreases liver stiffness, which may indicate less fibrosis and inflammation, independent of disease state. This study adds further evidence to the notion of coffee maybe beneficial in patients with liver disease.

  14. Effect of baicalin on toll-like receptor 4-mediated ischemia/reperfusion inflammatory responses in alcoholic fatty liver condition

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seok-Joo; Lee, Sun-Mee, E-mail: sunmee@skku.edu

    Alcoholic fatty liver is susceptible to secondary stresses such as ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Baicalin is an active component extracted from Scutellaria baicalensis, which is widely used in herbal preparations for treatment of hepatic diseases and inflammatory disorders. This study evaluated the potential beneficial effect of baicalin on I/R injury in alcoholic fatty liver. Rats were fed an alcohol liquid diet or a control isocaloric diet for 5 weeks, and then subjected to 60 min of hepatic ischemia and 5 h of reperfusion. Baicalin (200 mg/kg) was intraperitoneally administered 24 and 1 h before ischemia. After reperfusion, baicalin attenuated the increases inmore » serum alanine aminotransferase activity, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels in alcoholic fatty liver. The increased levels of TNF-α and IL-6 mRNA expression and inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 protein and mRNA expressions increased after reperfusion, which were higher in ethanol-fed animals, were attenuated by baicalin. In ethanol-fed animals, baicalin attenuated the increases in toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and myeloid differentiation factor 88 protein expressions and the nuclear translocation of NF-κB after reperfusion. In conclusion, our findings suggest that baicalin ameliorates I/R-induced hepatocellular damage by suppressing TLR4-mediated inflammatory responses in alcoholic fatty liver. -- Highlights: ► Baicalin attenuates hepatic I/R-induced inflammation in alcoholic fatty liver. ► Baicalin downregulates TLR4, MyD88 expression during I/R in alcoholic fatty liver. ► Baicalin attenuates NF-κB nuclear translocation during I/R in alcoholic fatty liver.« less

  15. Prevention of alcoholic fatty liver and mitochondrial dysfunction in the rat by long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Song, Byoung-Joon; Moon, Kwan-Hoon; Olsson, Nils U.; Salem, Norman

    2008-01-01

    Background/Aims We reported that reduced dietary intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) such as arachidonic (AA,20:4n6, omega-6) and docosahexaenoic (DHA,22:6n3, omega-3) acids led to alcohol-induced fatty liver and fibrosis. This study was aimed at studying the mechanisms by which a DHA/AA-supplemented diet prevents alcohol-induced fatty liver. Methods Male Long-Evans rats were fed an ethanol or control liquid-diet with or without DHA/AA for 9 weeks. Plasma transaminase levels, liver histology, oxidative/nitrosative stress markers, and activities of oxidatively-modified mitochondrial proteins were evaluated. Results Chronic alcohol administration increased the degree of fatty liver but fatty liver decreased significantly in rats fed the alcohol-DHA/AA-supplemented diet. Alcohol exposure increased oxidative/nitrosative stress with elevated levels of ethanol-inducible CYP2E1, nitric oxide synthase, nitrite and mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide. However, these increments were normalized in rats fed the alcohol-DHA/AA-supplemented diet. The number of oxidatively-modified mitochondrial proteins was markedly increased following alcohol exposure but significantly reduced in rats fed the alcohol-DHA/AA-supplemented diet. The suppressed activities of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase, ATP synthase, and 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase in ethanol-exposed rats were also recovered in animals fed the ethanol-DHA/AA-supplemented diet. Conclusions Addition of DHA/AA prevents alcohol-induced fatty liver and mitochondrial dysfunction in an animal model by protecting various mitochondrial enzymes most likely through reducing oxidative/nitrosative stress. PMID:18571270

  16. Etiology of liver cirrhosis in Brazil: chronic alcoholism and hepatitis viruses in liver cirrhosis diagnosed in the state of Espírito Santo.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Patricia Lofego; Zago-Gomes, Maria da Penha; Marques, Carla Couzi; Mendonça, Ana Tereza; Gonçalves, Carlos Sandoval; Pereira, Fausto Edmundo Lima

    2013-01-01

    To report the etiology of liver cirrhosis cases diagnosed at the University Hospital in Vitoria, Espirito Santo, Brazil. The medical charts of patients with liver cirrhosis who presented to the University Hospital in Vitoria were reviewed. Chronic alcoholism and the presence of hepatitis B or C infections (HBV and HCV, respectively) were pursued in all cases. The sample consisted of 1,516 cases (male:female ratio 3.5:1, aged 53.2 ± 12.6 years). The following main etiological factors were observed: chronic alcoholism alone (39.7%), chronic alcoholism in association with HBV or HCV (16.1 %), HCV alone (14.5%) and in association with alcoholism (8.6%) (total, 23.1 %), and HBV alone (13.1%) and in association with alcoholism (7.5%, total 20.6%). The remaining etiologies included cryptogenic cases (9.8%) and other causes (6.0%). The mean patient age was lower and the male-to-female ratio was higher in the cirrhosis cases that were associated with alcoholism or HBV compared with other causes. Intravenous drug abuse and a history of surgery or blood transfusion were significantly associated with HCV infection. Hepatocellular carcinoma was present at the time of diagnosis in 15.4% of cases. Chronic alcoholism associated with HCV infection was significantly associated (p<0.001) with reduced age (at the time of cirrhosis diagnosis) and increased prevalence of hepatocellular carcinoma (p = 0.052). Alcoholism, HCV and HBV are the main factors associated with liver cirrhosis in the state of Espirito Santo. Chronic alcoholism associated with HCV infection reduced the age of patients at the time of liver cirrhosis diagnosis.

  17. DEP domain-containing mTOR-interacting protein suppresses lipogenesis and ameliorates hepatic steatosis and acute-on-chronic liver injury in alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hanqing; Shen, Feng; Sherban, Alex; Nocon, Allison; Li, Yu; Wang, Hua; Xu, Ming-Jiang; Rui, Xianliang; Han, Jinyan; Jiang, Bingbing; Lee, Donghwan; Li, Na; Keyhani-Nejad, Farnaz; Fan, Jian-Gao; Liu, Feng; Kamat, Amrita; Musi, Nicolas; Guarente, Leonard; Pacher, Pal; Gao, Bin; Zang, Mengwei

    2018-02-19

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is characterized by lipid accumulation and liver injury. However, how chronic alcohol consumption causes hepatic lipid accumulation remains elusive. The present study demonstrates that activation of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) plays a causal role in alcoholic steatosis, inflammation, and liver injury. Chronic-plus-binge ethanol feeding led to hyperactivation of mTORC1, as evidenced by increased phosphorylation of mTOR and its downstream kinase S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) in hepatocytes. Aberrant activation of mTORC1 was likely attributed to the defects of the DEP domain-containing mTOR-interacting protein (DEPTOR) and the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent deacetylase sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) in the liver of chronic-plus-binge ethanol-fed mice and in the liver of patients with ALD. Conversely, adenoviral overexpression of hepatic DEPTOR suppressed mTORC1 signaling and ameliorated alcoholic hepatosteatosis, inflammation, and acute-on-chronic liver injury. Mechanistically, the lipid-lowering effect of hepatic DEPTOR was attributable to decreased proteolytic processing, nuclear translocation, and transcriptional activity of the lipogenic transcription factor sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1). DEPTOR-dependent inhibition of mTORC1 also attenuated alcohol-induced cytoplasmic accumulation of the lipogenic regulator lipin 1 and prevented alcohol-mediated inhibition of fatty acid oxidation. Pharmacological intervention with rapamycin alleviated the ability of alcohol to up-regulate lipogenesis, to down-regulate fatty acid oxidation, and to induce steatogenic phenotypes. Chronic-plus-binge ethanol feeding led to activation of SREBP-1 and lipin 1 through S6K1-dependent and independent mechanisms. Furthermore, hepatocyte-specific deletion of SIRT1 disrupted DEPTOR function, enhanced mTORC1 activity, and exacerbated alcoholic fatty liver, inflammation, and liver injury in mice. The dysregulation of SIRT1

  18. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors as targets to treat non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Souza-Mello, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    Lately, the world has faced tremendous progress in the understanding of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) pathogenesis due to rising obesity rates. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are transcription factors that modulate the expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism, energy homeostasis and inflammation, being altered in diet-induced obesity. Experimental evidences show that PPAR-alpha is the master regulator of hepatic beta-oxidation (mitochondrial and peroxisomal) and microsomal omega-oxidation, being markedly decreased by high-fat (HF) intake. PPAR-beta/delta is crucial to the regulation of forkhead box-containing protein O subfamily-1 expression and, hence, the modulation of enzymes that trigger hepatic gluconeogenesis. In addition, PPAR-beta/delta can activate hepatic stellate cells aiming to the hepatic recovery from chronic insult. On the contrary, PPAR-gamma upregulation by HF diets maximizes NAFLD through the induction of lipogenic factors, which are implicated in the fatty acid synthesis. Excessive dietary sugars also upregulate PPAR-gamma, triggering de novo lipogenesis and the consequent lipid droplets deposition within hepatocytes. Targeting PPARs to treat NAFLD seems a fruitful approach as PPAR-alpha agonist elicits expressive decrease in hepatic steatosis by increasing mitochondrial beta-oxidation, besides reduced lipogenesis. PPAR-beta/delta ameliorates hepatic insulin resistance by decreasing hepatic gluconeogenesis at postprandial stage. Total PPAR-gamma activation can exert noxious effects by stimulating hepatic lipogenesis. However, partial PPAR-gamma activation leads to benefits, mainly mediated by increased adiponectin expression and decreased insulin resistance. Further studies are necessary aiming at translational approaches useful to treat NAFLD in humans worldwide by targeting PPARs. PMID:26052390

  19. Neutrophil depletion improves diet-induced non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Ou, Rongying; Liu, Jia; Lv, Mingfen; Wang, Jingying; Wang, Jinmeng; Zhu, Li; Zhao, Liang; Xu, Yunsheng

    2017-07-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is highly associated with morbidity and mortality in population. Although studies have already demonstrated that the immune response plays a pivotal role in the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, the comprehensive regulation is unclear. Therefore, present study was carried out to investigate the non-alcoholic fatty liver disease development under neutrophil depletion. To achieve the aim of the study, C57BL/6 J mice were fed with high fat diet for 6 weeks before treated with neutrophil deplete antibody 1A8 or isotype control (200 μg/ mouse every week) for another 4 weeks. Treated with 1A8 antibody, obese mice exhibited better whole body metabolic parameters, including reduction of body weight gain and fasting blood glucose levels. Neutrophil depletion also effectively reduced hepatic structural disorders, dysfunction and lipid accumulation. Lipid β-oxidative markers, phosphorylated-AMP-activated protein kinase α and phosphorylated-acetyl-CoA carboxylase levels were increased in 1A8 antibody-treated obese mouse group. The mitochondrial number and function were also reversed after 1A8 antibody treatment, including increased mitochondrial number, reduced lipid oxidative damage and enhanced mitochondrial activity. Furthermore, the expression of inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 were obviously reduced after neutrophil depletion, accompanied with decreased F4/80 mRNA level and macrophage percentage in liver. The decreased NF-κB signaling activity was also involved in the beneficial effect of neutrophil depletion. Taken together, neutrophil depletion could attenuate metabolic syndromes and hepatic dysfunction.

  20. Models of non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Potential Translational Value: the Effects of 3,5-L-diiodothyronine.

    PubMed

    Grasselli, Elena; Canesi, Laura; Portincasa, Piero; Voci, Adriana; Vergani, Laura; Demori, Ilaria

    2017-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disorder in industrialized countries and is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular, hepatic and metabolic diseases. Molecular mechanisms on the root of the disrupted lipid homeostasis in NAFLD and potential therapeutic strategies can benefit of in vivo and in vitro experimental models of fatty liver. Here, we describe the high fat diet (HFD)-fed rat in vivo model, and two in vitro models, the primary cultured rat fatty hepatocytes or the FaO rat hepatoma fatty cells, mimicking human NAFLD. Liver steatosis was invariably associated with increased number/size of lipid droplets (LDs) and modulation of expression of genes coding for key genes of lipid metabolism such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (Ppars) and perilipins (Plins). In these models, we tested the anti-steatotic effects of 3,5-L-diiodothyronine (T2), a metabolite of thyroid hormones. T2 markedly reduced triglyceride content and LD size acting on mRNA expression of both Ppars and Plins. T2 also stimulated mitochondrial oxidative metabolism of fatty acids. We conclude that in vivo and especially in vitro models of NAFLD are valuable tools to screen a large number of compounds counteracting the deleterious effect of liver steatosis. Because of the high and negative impact of liver steatosis on human health, ongoing experimental studies from our group are unravelling the ultimate translational value of such cellular models of NAFLD.

  1. Rectification of impaired adipose tissue methylation status and lipolytic response contributes to hepatoprotective effect of betaine in a mouse model of alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Xiaobing; Xia, Yongliang; Chen, Jing; Qian, Ying; Li, Songtao; Zhang, Ximei; Song, Zhenyuan

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Overactive lipolysis in adipose tissue contributes to the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD); however, the mechanisms involved have not been elucidated. We previously reported that chronic alcohol consumption produces a hypomethylation state in adipose tissue. In this study we investigated the role of hypomethylation in adipose tissue in alcohol-induced lipolysis and whether its correction contributes to the well-established hepatoprotective effect of betaine in ALD. Experimental Approach Male C57BL/6 mice were divided into four groups and started on one of four treatments for 5 weeks: isocaloric pair-fed (PF), alcohol-fed (AF), PF supplemented with betaine (BT/AF) and AF supplemented with betaine (BT/AF). Betaine, 0.5% (w v−1), was added to the liquid diet. Both primary adipocytes and mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes were exposed to demethylation reagents and their lipolytic responses determined. Key Results Betaine alleviated alcohol-induced pathological changes in the liver and rectified the impaired methylation status in adipose tissue, concomitant with attenuating lipolysis. In adipocytes, inducing hypomethylation activated lipolysis through a mechanism involving suppression of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), due to hypomethylation of its catalytic subunit, leading to increased activation of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL). In line with in vitro observations, reduced PP2A catalytic subunit methylation and activity, and enhanced HSL activation, were observed in adipose tissue of alcohol-fed mice. Betaine attenuated this alcohol-induced PP2A suppression and HSL activation. Conclusions and Implications In adipose tissue, a hypomethylation state contributes to its alcohol-induced dysfunction and an improvement in its function may contribute to the hepatoprotective effects of betaine in ALD. PMID:24819676

  2. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: an emerging driving force in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Targher, Giovanni; Byrne, Christopher D

    2017-05-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is caused by an accumulation of fat in the liver; the condition can progress over time to increase the risk of developing cirrhosis, end-stage liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma. The prevalence of NAFLD is increasing rapidly owing to the global epidemics of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and NAFLD has been predicted to become the most important indication for liver transplantation over the next decade. It is now increasingly clear that NAFLD not only affects the liver but can also increase the risk of developing extra-hepatic diseases, including T2DM, cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease (CKD), which have a considerable impact on health-care resources. Accumulating evidence indicates that NAFLD exacerbates insulin resistance, predisposes to atherogenic dyslipidaemia and releases a variety of proinflammatory factors, prothrombotic factors and profibrogenic molecules that can promote vascular and renal damage. Furthermore, communication or 'crosstalk' between affected organs or tissues in these diseases has the potential to further harm function and worsen patient outcomes, and increasing amounts of evidence point to a strong association between NAFLD and CKD. Whether a causal relationship between NAFLD and CKD exists remains to be definitively established.

  3. Non-invasive diagnosis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. A critical appraisal.

    PubMed

    Machado, Mariana V; Cortez-Pinto, Helena

    2013-05-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) affects one in every three subjects in the occidental world. The vast majority will not progress, but a relevant minority will develop liver cirrhosis and its complications. The classical gold standard for diagnosing and staging NAFLD and assessing fibrosis is liver biopsy (LB). However, it has important sample error issues and subjectivity in the interpretation, apart from a small but real risk of complications. The decision to perform an LB is even harder in a condition so prevalent such as NAFLD, in which the probability of finding severe liver injury is low. In an attempt to overcome LB and to subcategorize patients with NAFLD in different prognoses allowing better management decisions, several non-invasive methods have been studied in the last decade. The literature is vast and confusing. This review will summarize which methods have been tested and how they perform, which tests are adequate for clinical practice and how they can change the management of these patients. Copyright © 2012 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Sorafenib prevents liver fibrosis in a non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) rodent model

    PubMed Central

    Stefano, J.T.; Pereira, I.V.A.; Torres, M.M.; Bida, P.M.; Coelho, A.M.M.; Xerfan, M.P.; Cogliati, B.; Barbeiro, D.F.; Mazo, D.F.C.; Kubrusly, M.S.; D'Albuquerque, L.A.C.; Souza, H.P.; Carrilho, F.J.; Oliveira, C.P.

    2015-01-01

    Liver fibrosis occurring as an outcome of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) can precede the development of cirrhosis. We investigated the effects of sorafenib in preventing liver fibrosis in a rodent model of NASH. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a choline-deficient high-fat diet and exposed to diethylnitrosamine for 6 weeks. The NASH group (n=10) received vehicle and the sorafenib group (n=10) received 2.5 mg·kg-1·day-1 by gavage. A control group (n=4) received only standard diet and vehicle. Following treatment, animals were sacrificed and liver tissue was collected for histologic examination, mRNA isolation, and analysis of mitochondrial function. Genes related to fibrosis (MMP9, TIMP1, TIMP2), oxidative stress (HSP60, HSP90, GST), and mitochondrial biogenesis (PGC1α) were evaluated by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Liver mitochondrial oxidation activity was measured by a polarographic method, and cytokines by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Sorafenib treatment restored mitochondrial function and reduced collagen deposition by nearly 63% compared to the NASH group. Sorafenib upregulated PGC1α and MMP9 and reduced TIMP1 and TIMP2 mRNA and IL-6 and IL-10 protein expression. There were no differences in HSP60, HSP90 and GST expression. Sorafenib modulated PGC1α expression, improved mitochondrial respiration and prevented collagen deposition. It may, therefore, be useful in the treatment of liver fibrosis in NASH. PMID:25714891

  5. A Guide to Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Childhood and Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Temple, Jonathan L.; Cordero, Paul; Li, Jiawei; Nguyen, Vi; Oben, Jude A.

    2016-01-01

    Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) is now the most prevalent form of chronic liver disease, affecting 10%–20% of the general paediatric population. Within the next 10 years it is expected to become the leading cause of liver pathology, liver failure and indication for liver transplantation in childhood and adolescence in the Western world. While our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this disease remains limited, it is thought to be the hepatic manifestation of more widespread metabolic dysfunction and is strongly associated with a number of metabolic risk factors, including insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia, cardiovascular disease and, most significantly, obesity. Despite this, ”paediatric” NAFLD remains under-studied, under-recognised and, potentially, undermanaged. This article will explore and evaluate our current understanding of NAFLD in childhood and adolescence and how it differs from adult NAFLD, in terms of its epidemiology, pathophysiology, natural history, diagnosis and clinical management. Given the current absence of definitive radiological and histopathological diagnostic tests, maintenance of a high clinical suspicion by all members of the multidisciplinary team in primary and specialist care settings remains the most potent of diagnostic tools, enabling early diagnosis and appropriate therapeutic intervention. PMID:27314342

  6. Increased expression of zinc finger protein 267 in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Schnabl, Bernd; Czech, Barbara; Valletta, Daniela; Weiss, Thomas S; Kirovski, Georgi; Hellerbrand, Claus

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular lipid accumulation is a hallmark of non-alcoholicfatty liver disease (NAFLD), which encompasses a spectrum ranging from simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and ultimately cirrhosis. Zinc finger protein 267 (ZNF267) belongs to the family of Kruppel-like transcription factors, which regulate diverse biological processes that include development, proliferation, and differentiation. We have previously demonstrated that ZNF267 expression is up-regulated in liver cirrhosis and is further increased in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we analyzed the expression of ZNF267 in tissue specimens of NAFLD patients and found a significant up-regulation compared to normal liver tissue. Noteworthy, ZNF267 mRNA was already significantly increased in steatotic liver tissue without inflammation. In line with this, incubation of primary human hepatocytes with palmitic acid induced a dose-dependent lipid accumulation and corresponding dose-dependent ZNF267 induction in vitro. Furthermore, hepatocellular lipid accumulation induced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and also chemically induced ROS formation increased ZNF267 mRNA expression. In summary with previous findings, which revealed ZNF267 as pro-fibrogenic and pro-cancerogenic factor in chronic liver disease, the present study further suggests ZNF267 as promising therapeutic target particularly for NAFLD patients. In addition, it further indicates that hepatic steatosis per se has pathophysiological relevance and should not be considered as benign.

  7. Expression of alcoholism-relevant genes in the liver are differently correlated to different parts of the brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lishi; Huang, Yue; Jiao, Yan; Chen, Hong; Cao, Yanhong; Bennett, Beth; Wang, Yongjun; Gu, Weikuan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether expression profiles of alcoholism-relevant genes in different parts of the brain are correlated differently with those in the liver. Four experiments were conducted. First, we used gene expression profiles from five parts of the brain (striatum, prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, hippocampus, and cerebellum) and from liver in a population of recombinant inbred mouse strains to examine the expression association of 10 alcoholism-relevant genes. Second, we conducted the same association analysis between brain structures and the lung. Third, using five randomly selected, nonalcoholism-relevant genes, we conducted the association analysis between brain and liver. Finally, we compared the expression of 10 alcoholism-relevant genes in hippocampus and cerebellum between an alcohol preference strain and a wild-type control. We observed a difference in correlation patterns in expression levels of 10 alcoholism-relevant genes between different parts of the brain with those of liver. We then examined the association of gene expression between alcohol dehydrogenases (Adh1, Adh2, Adh5, and Adh7) and different parts of the brain. The results were similar to those of the 10 genes. Then, we found that the association of those genes between brain structures and lung was different from that of liver. Next, we found that the association patterns of five alcoholism-nonrelevant genes were different from those of 10 alcoholism-relevant genes. Finally, we found that the expression level of 10 alcohol-relevant genes is influenced more in hippocampus than in cerebellum in the alcohol preference strain. Our results show that the expression of alcoholism-relevant genes in liver is differently associated with the expression of genes in different parts of the brain. Because different structural changes in different parts of the brain in alcoholism have been reported, it is important to investigate whether those structural differences in

  8. Dietary fructose as a risk factor for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

    PubMed

    Alwahsh, Salamah Mohammad; Gebhardt, Rolf

    2017-04-01

    Glucose is a major energy source for the entire body, while fructose metabolism occurs mainly in the liver. Fructose consumption has increased over the last decade globally and is suspected to contribute to the increased incidence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD is a manifestation of metabolic syndrome affecting about one-third of the population worldwide and has progressive pathological potential for liver cirrhosis and cancer through non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Here we have reviewed the possible contribution of fructose to the pathophysiology of NAFLD. We critically summarize the current findings about several regulators, and their potential mechanisms, that have been studied in humans and animal models in response to fructose exposure. A novel hypothesis on fructose-dependent perturbation of liver regeneration and metabolism is advanced. Fructose intake could affect inflammatory and metabolic processes, liver function, gut microbiota, and portal endotoxin influx. The role of the brain in controlling fructose ingestion and the subsequent development of NAFLD is highlighted. Although the importance for fructose (over)consumption for NAFLD in humans is still debated and comprehensive intervention studies are invited, understanding of how fructose intake can favor these pathological processes is crucial for the development of appropriate noninvasive diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to detect and treat these metabolic effects. Still, lifestyle modification, to lessen the consumption of fructose-containing products, and physical exercise are major measures against NAFLD. Finally, promising drugs against fructose-induced insulin resistance and hepatic dysfunction that are emerging from studies in rodents are reviewed, but need further validation in human patients.

  9. Predictive value of liver and spleen stiffness in advanced alcoholic cirrhosis with refractory ascites.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Franziska; Mühlberg, Reinhard; Wiegand, Johannes; Tröltzsch, Michael; Hoffmeister, Albrecht; Keim, Volker; Karlas, Thomas

    2018-06-01

     Recurrent ascitic decompensation is a frequent complication of advanced alcoholic liver disease. Ascites can be controlled by transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) implantation, but specific pre-procedural outcome predictors are not well established. Liver and spleen stiffness measurement (LSM, SSM) correlate with outcome of compensated liver disease, but data for decompensated cirrhosis disease are scarce. Therefore, the predictive value of LSM and SSM was evaluated in patients with refractory ascites treated with TIPS insertion or receiving conservative therapy.  Patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis and recurrent or refractory ascites were stratified according to TIPS eligibility. LSM was prospectively assessed by transient elastography (TE, XL probe) and point shear wave elastography (pSWE). pSWE was also used for SSM. The primary study endpoint was transplant-free survival after 12 months. In addition, correlation of LSM and SSM with TIPS complications was analyzed.  43 patients (16 % female, age 55.5 [28.6 - 79.6] years) were recruited, n = 20 underwent TIPS and n = 23 were treated with repeated paracenteses only. 15 patients died and five underwent liver transplantation during follow-up. LSM and SSM at baseline did not predict the patients' outcome in the TIPS cohort and in patients with conservative therapy. SSM was increased in two cases with spontaneous TIPS occlusion and declined after revision.  LSM and SSM cannot be recommended for risk stratification in cirrhotic patients with refractory ascites. SSM may be useful in monitoring TIPS function during follow-up. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. [Predictive value of liver enzymes and alcohol consumption for risk of type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaokun; Wang, Qingzhu; Qin, Guijun; Zhao, Yanyan; Zhang, Yinghui; Ma, Xiaojun; Li, Zhizhen; Wang, Zhimin; Ren, Gaofei; Bi, Yufang; Wang, Weiqing; Ning, Guang

    2015-01-01

    To compare the predictive value of liver enzymes and alcohol consumption for determining risk of type 2 diabetes (T2DM). A cross-sectional study was conducted in Zhengzhou with a total of 2, 693 men.Participants' height, weight, and histories of smoking and drinking were recorded. Levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) and blood glucose, as well as related metabolic indexes were detected. Moderate daily alcohol consumption (more than 35 g ethanol/week and less than 140 g ethanol/week) decreased the risk of type 2 diabetes (OR =0.376, 95% CI:0.306 -0.463, P less than 0.05) but increased risk for higher levels of GGT and ALT (OR GGT =3.012, 95% CI:2.357-3.849, Pless than 0.01; ORALT =1.473, 95% CI:1.043-2.081, Pless than 0.05). In joint analyses of alcohol consumption and liver enzymes, the group of nondrinkers/light drinkers (less than or equal to 35 g ethanol/week) in the fourth quartile of GGT levels had the highest risk for type 2 diabetes (OR =12.219, 95% CI:6.217-24.016, P less than 0.01). The relationship of ALT and daily alcohol consumption with the risk of type 2 diabetes was almost the same as that of GGT (nondrinkers/light drinkers in the fourth quartile of ALT levels (OR =5.357, 95% CI:3.070-9.350, P less than 0.0 1). GGT, ALT and daily alcohol consumption were independently associated with risk of type 2 diabetes. Nondrinkers/light drinkers with the highest levels ofGGT orALT were at high risk of type 2 diabetes.

  11. A specific amino acid formula prevents alcoholic liver disease in rodents.

    PubMed

    Tedesco, Laura; Corsetti, Giovanni; Ruocco, Chiara; Ragni, Maurizio; Rossi, Fabio; Carruba, Michele O; Valerio, Alessandra; Nisoli, Enzo

    2018-05-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption promotes mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, defective protein metabolism, and fat accumulation in hepatocytes (liver steatosis). Inadequate amino acid metabolism is worsened by protein malnutrition, frequently present in alcohol-consuming patients, with reduced circulating branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs). Here we asked whether dietary supplementation with a specific amino acid mixture, enriched in BCAAs (BCAAem) and able to promote mitochondrial function in muscle of middle-aged rodents, would prevent mitochondrial dysfunction and liver steatosis in Wistar rats fed on a Lieber-DeCarli ethanol (EtOH)-containing liquid diet. Supplementation of BCAAem, unlike a mixture based on the amino acid profile of casein, abrogated the EtOH-induced fat accumulation, mitochondrial impairment, and oxidative stress in liver. These effects of BCAAem were accompanied by normalization of leucine, arginine, and tryptophan levels, which were reduced in liver of EtOH-consuming rats. Moreover, although the EtOH exposure of HepG2 cells reduced mitochondrial DNA, mitochondrial transcription factors, and respiratory chain proteins, the BCAAem but not casein-derived amino acid supplementation halted this mitochondrial toxicity. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide levels and sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) expression, as well as endothelial nitric oxide (eNOS) and mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathways, were downregulated in the EtOH-exposed HepG2 cells. BCAAem reverted these molecular defects and the mitochondrial dysfunction, suggesting that the mitochondrial integrity obtained with the amino acid supplementation could be mediated through a Sirt1-eNOS-mTOR pathway. Thus a dietary activation of the mitochondrial biogenesis and function by a specific amino acid supplement protects against the EtOH toxicity and preserves the liver integrity in mammals. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Dietary supplementation of a specific amino acid formula prevents both

  12. PNPLA3 Gene Polymorphism Is Associated With Predisposition to and Severity of Alcoholic Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Salameh, Habeeb; Raff, Evan; Erwin, Angelika; Seth, Devanshi; Nischalke, Hans Dieter; Falleti, Edmondo; Burza, Maria Antonella; Leathert, Julian; Romeo, Stefano; Molinaro, Antonio; Corradini, Stefano Ginanni; Toniutto, Pierluigi; Spengler, Ulrich; Ulrich, Spengler; Daly, Ann; Day, Christopher P; Kuo, Yong-Fang; Singal, Ashwani K

    2015-06-01

    The genetic polymorphism with an isoleucine-to-methionine substitution at position 148 (rs738409 C>G) in the patatin-like phospholipase domain protein 3 (PNPLA3) gene confers risk of steatosis. PNPLA3 polymorphism is shown to be associated with alcoholic liver disease (ALD). We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to examine association of this genetic polymorphism with ALD spectrum and its severity. Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Library were searched for studies on association of PNPLA3 polymorphism and ALD spectrum: alcoholic fatty liver (AFL), alcoholic liver injury (ALI), alcoholic cirrhosis (AC), and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Pooled data are reported as odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval. Heterogeneity was assessed using the I(2) statistics and publication bias using Egger's test and Begg and Mazumdar's test. Individual participant data obtained from five studies were used for subgroup analyses. Among 10 studies included in this pooled analysis, compared with controls, OR for rs738409 CG and GG among ALI patients was 1.45 (1.24-1.69) and 2.22 (1.50-3.28), respectively, compared with CC. Respective OR among AC patients was 2.09 (1.79-2.44) and 3.37 (2.49-4.58) and among AC patients with HCC was 2.87 (1.61-5.10) and 12.41 (6.99-22.03). Data for AFL were inconsistent. Among ALD patients, OR of CG and GG genotypes was 2.62 (1.73-3.97) and 8.45 (2.52-28.37), respectively, for AC compared with fatty liver (FL) patients. Similar OR for AC compared with ALI was 1.98 (1.24-3.17) and 3.86 (1.18-12.60). The OR for CG and GG genotypes among AC patients for HCC occurrence was 1.43 (0.76-2.72) and 2.81 (1.57-5.01), respectively. Individual participant data analysis showed age to predispose to AC among ALI patients. PNPLA3 genetic polymorphism (rs738409 C>G) is associated with increased risk for the entire spectrum of ALD among drinkers including ALI, AC, and HCC. Studies are needed to clarify association of PNPLA3 polymorphism and steatosis in

  13. The Cognitive and Behavioural Impact of Alcohol Promoting and Alcohol Warning Advertisements: An Experimental Study.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kyle G; Stautz, Kaidy; Hollands, Gareth J; Winpenny, Eleanor M; Marteau, Theresa M

    2016-05-01

    To assess the immediate effect of alcohol promoting and alcohol warning advertisements on implicit and explicit attitudes towards alcohol and on alcohol seeking behaviour. We conducted a between-participants online experiment in which participants were randomly assigned to view one of three sets of advertisements: (a) alcohol promoting, (b) alcohol warning, or (c) unrelated to alcohol. A total of 373 participants (59.5% female) aged 18-40 (M = 28.03) living in the UK were recruited online through a research agency. Positive and negative implicit attitudes and explicit attitudes towards alcohol were assessed before and after advertisements were viewed. Alcohol seeking behaviour was measured by participants' choice of either an alcohol-related or non-alcohol-related voucher offered ostensibly as a reward for participation. Self-reported past week alcohol consumption was also recorded. There were no main effects on any of the outcome measures. In heavier drinkers, viewing alcohol promoting advertisements increased positive implicit attitudes (standardized beta = 0.15, P = 0.04) and decreased negative implicit attitudes (standardized beta = -0.17, P = 0.02). In heavier drinkers, viewing alcohol warning advertisements decreased negative implicit attitudes (standardized beta = -0.19, P = 0.01). Viewing alcohol promoting advertisements has a cognitive impact on heavier drinkers, increasing positive and reducing negative implicit attitudes towards alcohol. Viewing alcohol warning advertisements reduces negative implicit attitudes towards alcohol in heavier drinkers, suggestive of a reactance effect. © The Author 2015. Medical Council on Alcohol and Oxford University Press.

  14. Epigenetic mechanisms in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: An emerging field.

    PubMed

    Gallego-Durán, Rocío; Romero-Gómez, Manuel

    2015-10-28

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an emerging health concern in both developed and non-developed world, encompassing from simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), cirrhosis and liver cancer. Incidence and prevalence of this disease are increasing due to the socioeconomic transition and change to harmful diet. Currently, gold standard method in NAFLD diagnosis is liver biopsy, despite complications and lack of accuracy due to sampling error. Further, pathogenesis of NAFLD is not fully understood, but is well-known that obesity, diabetes and metabolic derangements played a major role in disease development and progression. Besides, gut microbioma and host genetic and epigenetic background could explain considerable interindividual variability. Knowledge that epigenetics, heritable events not caused by changes in DNA sequence, contribute to development of diseases has been a revolution in the last few years. Recently, evidences are accumulating revealing the important role of epigenetics in NAFLD pathogenesis and in NASH genesis. Histone modifications, changes in DNA methylation and aberrant profiles or microRNAs could boost development of NAFLD and transition into clinical relevant status. PNPLA3 genotype GG has been associated with a more progressive disease and epigenetics could modulate this effect. The impact of epigenetic on NAFLD progression could deserve further applications on therapeutic targets together with future non-invasive methods useful for the diagnosis and staging of NAFLD.

  15. Chlorogenic acid ameliorates alcohol-induced liver injuries through scavenging reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunjin; Pan, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Sung Hwan; Lee, Jin Hyup; Park, Jeen-Woo

    2018-05-19

    The key role of oxidative stress in alcoholic liver disease (ALD) has been established by the large body of evidence from previous studies. Excessive consumption of ethanol induces the production of a variety of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the liver, such as superoxide, H 2 O 2 , and hydroxyl radical. These products activate oxidant-sensitive signaling cascades and modulators of apoptosis. Because ROS accumulation is closely related to ALD, a number of studies have investigated the benefits of antioxidants. Recent studies demonstrated that polyphenol chlorogenic acid (CGA) has antioxidant properties and health benefits, such as reduction of relative risk of cardiovascular diseases and hepatoprotective effects against acetaminophen toxicity. However, the protective effects of CGA against ALD have not been studied in detail. We hypothesize that CGA plays a role in preventing ALD through its antioxidant properties. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of CGA against liver injuries in vivo. Reduced alcohol-induced-steatosis, apoptotic cell death, and fibrosis due to reduced levels of oxidative stress were observed. These findings suggest that CGA treatment can be an effective approach to attenuate ALD through the suppression of oxidative stress. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and diabetes: From physiopathological interplay to diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Nathalie C; Villela-Nogueira, Cristiane A; Cardoso, Claudia R L; Salles, Gil F

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is highly prevalent in patients with diabetes mellitus and increasing evidence suggests that patients with type 2 diabetes are at a particularly high risk for developing the progressive forms of NAFLD, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and associated advanced liver fibrosis. Moreover, diabetes is an independent risk factor for NAFLD progression, and for hepatocellular carcinoma development and liver-related mortality in prospective studies. Notwithstanding, patients with NAFLD have an elevated prevalence of prediabetes. Recent studies have shown that NAFLD presence predicts the development of type 2 diabetes. Diabetes and NAFLD have mutual pathogenetic mechanisms and it is possible that genetic and environmental factors interact with metabolic derangements to accelerate NAFLD progression in diabetic patients. The diagnosis of the more advanced stages of NAFLD in diabetic patients shares the same challenges as in non-diabetic patients and it includes imaging and serological methods, although histopathological evaluation is still considered the gold standard diagnostic method. An effective established treatment is not yet available for patients with steatohepatitis and fibrosis and randomized clinical trials including only diabetic patients are lacking. We sought to outline the published data including epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of NAFLD in diabetic patients, in order to better understand the interplay between these two prevalent diseases and identify the gaps that still need to be fulfilled in the management of NAFLD in patients with diabetes mellitus. PMID:25024596

  17. Impact of miR-140 Deficiency on Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Wolfson, Benjamin; Lo, Pang-Kuo; Yao, Yuan; Li, Linhao; Wang, Hongbing; Zhou, Qun

    2018-04-27

    Loss of miR-140 has a pro-fibrotic effect in the mammary gland. This study aimed to investigate whether miR-140 loss and obesity act synergistically to promote non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and to identify the underlying mechanisms. Liver tissues were isolated from lean-fat diet and high-fat diet fed wild-type and miR-140 knockout mice. Using molecular staining and immunohistochemistry techniques we identified increased development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and fibrotic indicators in miR-140 knockout mice. Utilizing an in vitro model system, we demonstrated that miR-140 targets TLR-4, and that miR-140 overexpression is sufficient to inhibit palmitic acid signaling through the TLR-4/NFκB pathway. Our findings demonstrate that loss of miR-140 results in increased expression of TLR-4, sensitizing cells to palmitic acid signaling and resulting in increased inflammatory activity through the TLR4/NFκB pathway. This signaling axis promotes NAFLD development in a high-fat diet context and indicates the potential utility of miR-140 rescue as a therapeutic strategy in NAFLD. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Beneficial mechanisms of aerobic exercise on hepatic lipid metabolism in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Guo, Rui; Liong, Emily C; So, Kwok Fai; Fung, Man-Lung; Tipoe, George L

    2015-04-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) refers to any fatty liver disease that is not due to excessive use of alcohol. NAFLD probably results from abnormal hepatic lipid metabolism and insulin resistance. Aerobic exercise is shown to improve NAFLD. This review aimed to evaluate the molecular mechanisms involved in the beneficial effects of aerobic exercise on NAFLD. We searched articles in English on the role of aerobic exercise in NAFLD therapy in PubMed. The mechanisms of chronic aerobic exercise in regulating the outcome of NAFLD include: (i) reducing intrahepatic fat content by down-regulating sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c and up-regulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma expression levels; (ii) decreasing hepatic oxidative stress through modulating the reactive oxygen species, and enhancing antioxidant enzymes such as catalase and glutathione peroxidase; (iii) ameliorating hepatic inflammation via the inhibition of pro-inflammatory mediators such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1 beta; (iv) attenuating mitochondrial dependent apoptosis by reducing cytochrome C released from the mitochondria to the cytosol; and (v) inducing hepato-protective autophagy. Aerobic exercise, via different mechanisms, significantly decreases the fat content of the liver and improves the outcomes of patients with NAFLD.

  19. Protective Action of Se-Supplement Against Acute Alcoholism Is Regulated by Selenoprotein P (SelP) in the Liver.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenbiao; Guo, Yingfang; Qiu, Changwei; Deng, Ganzhen; Guo, Mengyao

    2017-02-01

    Acute alcoholism is a major cause of cirrhosis and liver failure around the world. Selenium (Se) is an essential micronutrient promoting liver health in humans and animals. Selenoprotein P (SelP) is a glycoprotein secreted within the liver, which interacts with cytokines and the growth factor pathway to provide protection for hepatic cells. The present study was conducted to confirm the effect and mechanism of Se and SelP action in livers affected by acute alcoholism. In this study, a mouse model of acute alcoholism, as well as a hepatocyte model, was successfully established. The Se content of the liver was detected by atomic fluorescence spectrophotometry. The expression of messenger RNA (mRNA) was analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The protein expression of inflammatory factors was detected by ELISA. The other proteins were analyzed by western blotting. The results showed that pathological damage to the liver was gradually weakened by Se-supplementation, which was evaluated by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and TUNEL staining. Se-supplementation inhibited expression of pro-inflammatory factors TNF-α and IL-1β and promoted production of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in the liver with acute alcoholism. Se-supplementation also prevented the apoptosis of hepatocytes by suppressing the cleavage of caspases-9, 3, 6, 7, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Through correlational analysis, it was determined that the effects of Se-supplement were closely related to SelP expression, inflammatory cytokines, and apoptosis molecule production. The sienna of SelP further confirmed the protective action of Se-supplementation on the liver and that the mechanism of SelP involves the regulation of inflammatory cytokines and apoptosis molecules in acute alcoholism. These findings provide information regarding a new potential target for the treatment of acute alcoholism.

  20. The Cognitive and Behavioural Impact of Alcohol Promoting and Alcohol Warning Advertisements: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Kyle G.; Stautz, Kaidy; Hollands, Gareth J.; Winpenny, Eleanor M.; Marteau, Theresa M.

    2016-01-01

    Aims To assess the immediate effect of alcohol promoting and alcohol warning advertisements on implicit and explicit attitudes towards alcohol and on alcohol seeking behaviour. Methods We conducted a between-participants online experiment in which participants were randomly assigned to view one of three sets of advertisements: (a) alcohol promoting, (b) alcohol warning, or (c) unrelated to alcohol. A total of 373 participants (59.5% female) aged 18–40 (M = 28.03) living in the UK were recruited online through a research agency. Positive and negative implicit attitudes and explicit attitudes towards alcohol were assessed before and after advertisements were viewed. Alcohol seeking behaviour was measured by participants' choice of either an alcohol-related or non-alcohol-related voucher offered ostensibly as a reward for participation. Self-reported past week alcohol consumption was also recorded. Results There were no main effects on any of the outcome measures. In heavier drinkers, viewing alcohol promoting advertisements increased positive implicit attitudes (standardized beta = 0.15, P = 0.04) and decreased negative implicit attitudes (standardized beta = −0.17, P = 0.02). In heavier drinkers, viewing alcohol warning advertisements decreased negative implicit attitudes (standardized beta = −0.19, P = 0.01). Conclusions Viewing alcohol promoting advertisements has a cognitive impact on heavier drinkers, increasing positive and reducing negative implicit attitudes towards alcohol. Viewing alcohol warning advertisements reduces negative implicit attitudes towards alcohol in heavier drinkers, suggestive of a reactance effect. PMID:26391367

  1. [Cinnamon rolls are not associated with admission for toxic or alcoholic hepatitis in a Danish liver referral centre].

    PubMed

    Gr Ønbæk, Henning; Borre, Mette

    2014-12-08

    Cinnamon contains cumarin, which may be toxic to the liver. EU-regulations standardardize the amount of cinnamon in pastry including cinnamon rolls. The aim of the study was to investigate if cinnamon intake from pastry was associated with toxic or alcoholic hepatitis. We registered 58 patients with toxic hepatitis, 38 (66%) women and 20 (34%) men with a median age of 51 (range: 32-80) and 53 (range: 18-78) years, respectively. A total of 22 patients had primarily cholestasis and 36 had hepatitis biochemically. The duration of toxic liver disease from admission to normalization of liver enzymes was similar in the two groups (3.5 ± 3.5 vs 3.6 ± 3.5 months). Toxic hepatitis was most often caused by drugs e.g. NSAID (n = 15; 26%), antibiotics (n = 9; 16%), alternative medicine (n = 7; 12%) and Antabuse (n = 5; 9%). We registered eight patients admitted with severe alcoholic hepatitis, five men and three women, median age of 60 (range: 34-67) years. Alcoholic hepatitis was associated with high alcohol intake. None of the patients with toxic or alcoholic hepatitis reported of excessive intake of cinnamon rolls and there was no evidence of cinnamon added to alcohol of alternative medicine products. Intake of cinnamon from cinnamon rolls is not associated with admission for toxic or alcoholic hepatitis. However, for the diagnosis of toxic liver diseases including alcohol it is very important to have patient information regarding any new drugs, alternative medicine and alcohol intake. Further, other causes of liver diseases should be excluded. not relevant. not relevant.

  2. [Effect of total alkaloids of Rubus alceaefolius on oxidative stress in rats with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Haiyin; Zhao, Jinyan; Liu, Yan; Zheng, Yuqing; Wu, Juan; Hong, Zhenfeng

    2011-09-01

    To study the effects of total alkaloids of Rubus alceaefolius (RAP) on non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) rats and explore its possible mechanisms. Sixty SD rats were randomly divided into six groups: control group, model group, compound methionine and choline bitartrate tablets (CMCB)group and three RAP groups treated respectively with low, middle and high dose of RAP. The NAFLD model was induced by feeding fat-rich food. NAFLD rats were administrated with 0.35 g x kg(-1) CMCB and 0.36, 0.72, 1.44 g x kg(-1) RAP for 4 weeks respectively. The weight index of liver was measured. Hepatic histolog ical changes were observed. The concentration in serum of aspartate amino transferase (AST), alanine amino tranferase (ALT), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were determined. The mRNA expressions of SOD, MDA, TNF-alpha and IL-6 in hepatic tissue were detected. Compared with the model group, degree of steatosis of hepatic lobule was improved, the weight index of liver was decreased, serum levels of ALT, AST, TNF-alpha and IL-6 were significantly lower in the high and middle dose RAP group (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). The levels of SOD and MDA in hepatic tissue were lower in the high dose RAP group (P < 0.05). The mRNA expressions of TNF-alpha and IL-6 in hepatic tissue were decreased (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). RAP can protect liver in experimental NAFLD, and its possible mechanisms may be concerned with clearing the oxygen free radical, reducing the product of lipid peroxidation, inhibiting the release of inflammatory cytokines and reducing nflammatory response.

  3. PNPLA3 I148M variant affects non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in liver transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng-Tao; Chen, Tian-Chi; Lu, Xiao-Xiao; Cheng, Jun; Xie, Hai-Yang; Zhou, Lin; Zheng, Shu-Sen

    2015-09-14

    De novo non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common late complication for long-term survivors after liver transplantation. Genomic studies confirmed that PNPLA3 I148M and TM6SF2 E167K polymorphisms affected NAFLD susceptibility in the general population. However, this association was not validated in survivors after liver transplantation (LT). We performed a cross-sectional survey to investigate this relationship. A comprehensive survey, including anthropometric measurements, fasting venous blood sampling, ultrasound, and questionnaires was performed in the short-term. The clinical indications and patient's steatosis status before LT were collected from inpatient medical records. Sixty-five long-term recipients with a survival exceeding 10 years were enrolled in the final analysis. De novo NAFLD was more frequent in PNPLA3 GG carriers (0.33 vs 0.10 for GG vs CC + CG carriers, P = 0.018), while the genetic impact on NAFLD susceptibility was insignificant when categorized by the TM6SF2 polymorphism (0.19 in CC vs 0.14 in CT + TT carriers, P = 0.883). Multi-covariate analysis revealed that PNPLA3 exerted a significant genetic effect on de novo NAFLD following a recessive model (GG vs CC + CG, OR = 14.2, 95%CI: 1.78-113, P = 0.012). Compared to recipients with only the PNPLA3 GG allele or obesity (defined as body mass index > 25 kg/m(2)), steatosis was highly prevalent (71.4%) in PNPLA3 GG carriers with obesity. In conclusion, PNPLA3 I148M, but not TM6SF2 E167K, affects de novo NAFLD occurrence with a prominent interaction with obesity. Weight control might be a meaningful method to reduce the genetic susceptibility to NAFLD exerted by PNPLA3 variants.

  4. [Nutritional assessment of alcoholic liver cirrhotic patients treated in the liver Clinic of the Mexico's General Hospital].

    PubMed

    Landa-Galván, H V; Milke-García, Ma P; León-Oviedo, C; Gutiérrez-Reyes, G; Higuera-de la Tijera, F; Pérez-Hernández, J L; Serralde-Zúñiga, A E

    2012-01-01

    Malnutrition in the cirrhotic patient is associated to a higher morbidity and mortality rate; however, the diagnosis is complex, so the study objective was to assess the nutritional status using different methods. Adult patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis treated in the Liver Clinic of the Mexico's General Hospital were evaluated. Anthropometric measurements and a 24 hours recall were made; screening tools (Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool, Nutritional Risk Screening-2002) and a method for assessing nutritional status specifically in cirrhotic patients (Royal Free Hospital Global Assessment) were used. We included 62 patients, 51.6% of them were men. Malnutrition by arm muscle area was 31.3% in men and 10% in women, and by arm fat area was 23.3% in women and 3.1% in men (p < 0.05). With the screening tools the percentages of malnutrition risk were 43.5% and 54.8% respectively, vs. 1.6% identified as "low weight" with the Body Mass Index. With the Royal Free Hospital Global Assessment tool the percentage of malnutrition was 45.2%. Patients with malnutrition had an energy and protein intake significantly lower than the well-nourished: 19.7 kcal/kg and 0.89 g/kg vs 30 kcal/kg and 1.25 g/kg (p < 0.005). Malnutrition is a common complication in patients with liver cirrhosis. Men have higher depletion of muscle mass and women a higher loss of body fat. The Body Mass Index is not a reliable tool for assessing malnutrition. It's advisable to use tools with indicators of body composition such as the Royal Free Hospital Global Assessment.

  5. Intrahepatic vascular changes in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: Potential role of insulin-resistance and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Pasarín, Marcos; Abraldes, Juan G; Liguori, Eleonora; Kok, Beverley; La Mura, Vincenzo

    2017-10-07

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of several clinical conditions characterized by insulin-resistance and high cardiovascular risk. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the liver expression of the metabolic syndrome, and insulin resistance can be a frequent comorbidity in several chronic liver diseases, in particular hepatitis C virus infection and/or cirrhosis. Several studies have demonstrated that insulin action is not only relevant for glucose control, but also for vascular homeostasis. Insulin regulates nitric oxide production, which mediates to a large degree the vasodilating, anti-inflammatory and antithrombotic properties of a healthy endothelium, guaranteeing organ perfusion. The effects of insulin on the liver microvasculature and the effects of IR on sinusoidal endothelial cells have been studied in animal models of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. The hypotheses derived from these studies and the potential translation of these results into humans are critically discussed in this review.

  6. An Evaluation of the Usefulness of Extracorporeal Liver Support Techniques in Patients Hospitalized in the ICU for Severe Liver Dysfunction Secondary to Alcoholic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Piechota, Mariusz; Piechota, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Background The mortality rate in patients with severe liver dysfunction secondary to alcoholic liver disease (ALD) who do not respond to the standard treatment is exceptionally high. Objectives The main aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of applying extracorporeal liver support techniques to treat this group of patients. Patients and Methods The data from 23 hospital admissions of 21 patients with ALD who were admitted to the department of anesthesiology and intensive therapy (A&IT) at the Dr Wł. Biegański Regional Specialist Hospital in Łódź between March 2013 and July 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. Results A total of 111 liver dialysis procedures were performed during the 23 hospitalizations, including 13 dialyses using fractionated plasma separation and adsorption (FPSA) with the Prometheus® system, and 98 procedures using the single pass albumin dialysis (SPAD) system. Upon admission to the intensive care unit (ICU), the median (interquartile range [IQR]) Glasgow coma scale (GCS), sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA), acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) II, and simplified acute physiology score (SAPS) II scores were 15 (14 - 15), 9 (7 - 13), 17 (14 - 24), and 32 (22 - 50), respectively. The ICU, 30-day, and three-month mortality rates were 43.48%, 39.13%, and 73.91%, respectively. As determined by the receiver operative characteristic (ROC) analysis for single-factor models, the significant predictors of death in the ICU included the patients’ SOFA, APACHE II, SAPS II, and model of end-stage liver disease modified by the united network for organ sharing (MELD UNOS Modification) scores; the duration of stay (in days) in the A&IT Department; and bile acid, creatinine and albumin levels upon ICU admission. The ROC analysis indicated the significant discriminating power of the SOFA, APACHE II, SAPS II, and MELD UNOS modification scores on the three-month mortality rate. Conclusions The application of

  7. Identification of Noninvasive Biomarkers for Alcohol-Induced Liver Disease Using Urinary Metabolomics and the Ppara-null Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Manna, Soumen K.; Patterson, Andrew D.; Yang, Qian; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Li, Henghong; Idle, Jeffrey R.; Fornace, Albert J.; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol-induced liver disease (ALD) is a leading cause of non-accident-related deaths in the United States. Although liver damage caused by ALD is reversible when discovered at the earlier stages, current risk assessment tools are relatively non-specific. Identification of an early specific signature of ALD would aid in therapeutic intervention and recovery. In this study the metabolic changes associated with alcohol-induced liver disease were examined using alcohol-fed male Ppara-null mouse as a model of ALD. Principal components analysis of the mass spectrometry-based urinary metabolic profile showed that alcohol-treated wild-type and Ppara-null mice could be distinguished from control animals without information on history of alcohol consumption. The urinary excretion of ethyl-sulfate, ethyl-β-D-glucuronide, 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, and 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid sulfate was elevated and that of the 2-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, adipic acid, and pimelic acid was depleted during alcohol treatment in both wild-type and the Ppara-null mice albeit to different extents. However, indole-3-lactic acid was exclusively elevated by alcohol exposure in Ppara-null mice. The elevation of indole-3-lactic acid is mechanistically related to the molecular events associated with development of ALD in alcohol-treated Ppara-null mice. This study demonstrated the ability of metabolomics approach to identify early, noninvasive biomarkers of ALD pathogenesis in Ppara-null mouse model. PMID:20540569

  8. Relative effects of heavy alcohol use and hepatitis C in decompensated chronic liver disease in a hospital inpatient population.

    PubMed

    Mankal, Pavan Kumar; Abed, Jean; Aristy, Jose David; Munot, Khushboo; Suneja, Upma; Engelson, Ellen S; Kotler, Donald P

    2015-03-01

    Heavy alcohol use has been hypothesized to accelerate disease progression to end-stage liver disease in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. In this study, we estimated the relative influences of heavy alcohol use and HCV in decompensated chronic liver disease (CLD). Retrospectively, 904 patients with cirrhotic disease admitted to our hospitals during January 2010-December 2012 were identified based on ICD9 codes. A thorough chart review captured information on demographics, viral hepatitis status, alcohol use and progression of liver disease (i.e. decompensation). Decompensation was defined as the presence of ascites due to portal hypertension, bleeding esophageal varices, hepatic encephalopathy or hepatorenal syndrome. Heavy alcohol use was defined as a chart entry of greater than six daily units of alcohol or its equivalent. 347 patients were included based on our selection criteria of documented heavy alcohol use (n = 215; 62.0%), hepatitis titers (HCV: n = 182; 52.5%) and radiological evidence of CLD with or without decompensation (decompensation: n = 225; 64.8%). Independent of HCV infection, heavy alcohol use significantly increased the risk of decompensation (OR = 1.75, 95% CI 1.11-2.75, p < 0.02) relative to no heavy alcohol use. No significance was seen with age, sex, race, HIV, viral hepatitis and moderate alcohol use for risk for decompensation. Additionally, dose-relationship regression analysis revealed that heavy, but not moderate alcohol use, resulted in a three-fold increase (p = 0.013) in the risk of decompensation relative to abstinence. While both heavy alcohol use and HCV infection are associated with risk of developing CLD, our data suggest that heavy, but not moderate, alcohol consumption is associated with a greater risk for hepatic decompensation in patients with cirrhosis than does HCV infection.

  9. Effectiveness of exercise in hepatic fat mobilization in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: Systematic review.

    PubMed

    Golabi, Pegah; Locklear, Cameron T; Austin, Patrick; Afdhal, Sophie; Byrns, Melinda; Gerber, Lynn; Younossi, Zobair M

    2016-07-21

    To investigate the efficacy of exercise interventions on hepatic fat mobilization in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) patients. Ovid-Medline, PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane database were searched for randomized trials and prospective cohort studies in adults aged ≥ 18 which investigated the effects of at least 8 wk of exercise only or combination with diet on NAFLD from 2010 to 2016. The search terms used to identify articles, in which exercise was clearly described by type, duration, intensity and frequency were: "NASH", "NAFLD", "non-alcoholic steatohepatitis", "non-alcoholic fatty liver disease", "fat", "steatosis", "diet", "exercise", "MR spectroscopy" and "liver biopsy". NAFLD diagnosis, as well as the outcome measures, was confirmed by either hydrogen-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (H-MRS) or biopsy. Trials that included dietary interventions along with exercise were accepted if they met all criteria. Eight studies met selection criteria (6 with exercise only, 2 with diet and exercise with a total of 433 adult participants). Training interventions ranged between 8 and 48 wk in duration with a prescribed exercise frequency of 3 to 7 d per week, at intensities between 45% and 75% of VO2 peak. The most commonly used imaging modality was H-MRS and one study utilized biopsy. The effect of intervention on fat mobilization was 30.2% in the exercise only group and 49.8% in diet and exercise group. There was no difference between aerobic and resistance exercise intervention, although only one study compared the two interventions. The beneficial effects of exercise on intrahepatic triglyceride (IHTG) were seen even in the absence of significant weight loss. Although combining an exercise program with dietary interventions augmented the reduction in IHTG, as well as improved measures of glucose control and/or insulin sensitivity, exercise only significantly decreased hepatic lipid contents. Prescribed exercise in subjects with NAFLD reduces IHTG independent of

  10. Alcohol consumption in late adolescence is associated with an increased risk of severe liver disease later in life.

    PubMed

    Hagström, Hannes; Hemmingsson, Tomas; Discacciati, Andrea; Andreasson, Anna

    2018-03-01

    High alcohol consumption is associated with an increased risk of severe liver disease. Current recommendations suggest it is safe for men to consume 30 grams of alcohol per day. We investigated the association between alcohol consumption early in life and later development of severe liver disease. We used data on alcohol consumption at conscription to military service from 43,296 men (18-20 years) in Sweden between 1969 and 1970. Outcomes were defined as incident diagnoses of severe liver disease from systematic national registration of clinical events until the end of 2009. A Cox regression model adjusted for body mass index, smoking, use of narcotics, cognitive ability and cardiovascular capacity was applied. During a mean follow-up of 37.8 years, 383 men developed severe liver disease. Alcohol consumption was associated with an increased risk of development of severe liver disease in a dose-response pattern (adjusted hazard ratio for every one gram/day increase 1.02; 95% CI 1.01-1.02). No evidence of a threshold effect was found. Importantly, a clear trend pointed towards an increased risk of severe liver disease in men who consumed less than 30 grams of alcohol per day. Alcohol consumption in young men is associated with an increased risk of severe liver disease, up to 39 years later in life. The risk was dose-dependent, with no sign of a threshold effect. Current guidelines for safe alcohol intake in men might have to be revised. We investigated more than 43,000 Swedish men in their late teens enlisted for conscription in 1969-1970. After almost 40 years of follow-up, we found that alcohol consumption was a significant risk factor for developing severe liver disease, independent of confounders. This risk was dose-dependent, and was most pronounced in men consuming two drinks per day or more. Copyright © 2017 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Alimentary regimen in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: Mediterranean diet

    PubMed Central

    Abenavoli, Ludovico; Milic, Natasa; Peta, Valentina; Alfieri, Francesco; De Lorenzo, Antonino; Bellentani, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease worldwide. The mechanisms of the underlying disease development and progression are awaiting clarification. Insulin resistance and obesity-related inflammation status, among other possible genetic, dietary, and lifestyle factors, are thought to play the key role. There is no consensus concerning the pharmacological treatment. However, the dietary nutritional management to achieve weight loss is an essential component of any treatment strategy. On the basis of its components, the literature reports on the effectiveness of the Mediterranean diet in reducing cardiovascular risk and in preventing major chronic diseases, including obesity and diabetes. New evidence supports the idea that the Mediterranean diet, associated with physical activity and cognitive behaviour therapy, may have an important role in the prevention and the treatment of NAFLD. PMID:25492997

  12. Imaging of non alcoholic fatty liver disease: A road less travelled.

    PubMed

    Singh, Divya; Das, Chandan J; Baruah, Manas P

    2013-11-01

    Non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a spectrum that includes simple steatosis, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. It is increasingly emerging as a cause of elevated liver enzymes, cryptogenic cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The morbidity and mortality related to NAFLD is expected to rise with the upsurge of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The need of the hour is to devise techniques to estimate and then accurately follow-up hepatic fat content in patients with NAFLD. There are lots of imaging modalities in the radiological armamentarium, namely, ultrasonography with the extra edge of elastography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging with chemical shift imaging and spectroscopy to provide an estimation of hepatic fat content.

  13. Global Epidemiology of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Perspectives on US Minority Populations

    PubMed Central

    Sherif, Zaki A.; Saeed, Armana; Ghavimi, Shima; Nouraie, Seyed-Mehdi; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O.; Brim, Hassan; Ashktorab, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a clinical syndrome that is predicted to affect millions of people worldwide, will become the next global epidemic. The natural course of this disease, including its subtype, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), is not clearly defined, especially in the US minority populations. The aim of this review is to report the global epidemiology of NAFLD, with emphasis on US minority populations on the basis of database searches using using Pubmed and other online databases. The US Hispanic population is the most disproportionately affected ethnic group with hepatic steatosis whereas African-Americans are the least affected. Genetic disparities involved in lipid metabolism seem to be the leading explanation for the lowest incidence and prevalence of both NAFLD and NASH in African-Americans. PMID:27038448

  14. Correlation between non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and dyslipidemia in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Krishan, Saini

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver means the presence of hepatosteatosis without significant alcohol consumption; it is strongly associated with obesity and metabolic disorder like type 2 diabetes and dyslipideamia. NASH may progress to advanced stages of hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis. Increased body mass index and viral genotype contribute to steatosis in chronic hepatitis. The sonographic features of NAFLD include the presence of bright hepatic echotexture deep attenuation, and vascular blurring either singly or in combination. Dyslipidemia in patients with NAFLD is atherogenic in nature and it is characterized by increased levels of serum triglycerides and decreased levels of HDL cholesterol. Statins are potent lipid-lowering agents which decrease LDL cholesterol by 20-60%, decrease triglycerides by 10-33% and increase HDL cholesterol by 5-10% for the patients with NAFLD. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. β-Hydroxybutyrate protects from alcohol-induced liver injury via a Hcar2-cAMP dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yonglin; Ouyang, Xinshou; Hoque, Rafaz; Garcia-Martinez, Irma; Yousaf, Muhammad Nadeem; Tonack, Sarah; Offermanns, Stefan; Dubuquoy, Laurent; Louvet, Alexandre; Mathurin, Philippe; Massey, Veronica; Schnabl, Bernd; Bataller, Ramon Alberola; Mehal, Wajahat Zafar

    2018-04-27

    Sterile inflammation resulting in alcoholic hepatitis (AH) occurs unpredictably after many years of excess alcohol intake. The factors responsible for the development of AH are not known but mitochondrial damage with loss of mitochondrial function are common features. Hcar2 is a G-protein coupled receptor which is activated by β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB). We aimed to determine the relevance of the BHB-Hcar2 pathway in alcoholic liver disease. We tested if loss of BHB production can result in increased liver inflammation. We further tested if BHB supplementation is protective in AH through interaction with Hcar2, and analyzed the immune and cellular basis for protection. Humans with AH have reduced hepatic BHB, and inhibition of BHB production in mice aggravated ethanol-induced AH, with higher plasma alanine aminotransferase levels, increased steatosis and greater neutrophil influx. Conversely supplementation of BHB had the opposite effects with reduced alanine aminotransferase levels, reduced steatosis and neutrophil influx. This therapeutic effect of BHB is dependent on the receptor Hcar2. BHB treatment increased liver Il10 transcripts, and promoted the M2 phenotype of intrahepatic macrophages. BHB also increased the transcriptional level of M2 related genes in vitro bone marrow derived macrophages. This skewing towards M2 related genes is dependent on lower mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ) induced by BHB. Collectively, our data shows that BHB production during excess alcohol consumption has an anti-inflammatory and hepatoprotective role through an Hcar2 dependent pathway. This introduces the concept of metabolite-based therapy for AH. Alcoholic hepatitis is a life-threatening condition with no approved therapy that occurs unexpectedly in people who consume excess alcohol. The liver makes many metabolites, and we demonstrate that loss of one such metabolite β-hydroxybutyrate occurs in patients with alcoholic hepatitis. This loss can increase alcohol

  16. Novel circulating biomarkers for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Sancho, Elena; Abelló, David; Camps, Jordi; Joven, Jorge

    2018-02-01

    Currently, a liver biopsy remains the only reliable way to precisely diagnose non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and establish the severity of liver injury, presence of fibrosis, and architecture remodeling. However, the cost and the intrinsic invasive procedure of a liver biopsy rules it out as a gold standard diagnostic test, and the imaging test are not the best choice due to the price, and currently is being refined. The lack of a biomarker of NAFLD pushes to develop this new line of research. The aim of the present systematic review is to clarify and update all the NAFLD biomarkers described in the literature until recently. We highlight α-ketoglutarate and CK18-F as currently the best potential biomarker of NAFLD. However, due to methodological differences, we propose the implementation of international, multicenter, multiethnic studies with larger population size, and biopsy proven NAFLD diagnosis to analyze and compare α-ketoglutarate and CK18-F as potential biomarkers of the silent evolution of NAFLD. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Omic studies reveal the pathogenic lipid droplet proteins in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuelin; Wang, Yang; Liu, Pingsheng

    2017-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an epidemic metabolic condition driven by an underlying lipid homeostasis disorder. The lipid droplet (LD), the main organelle involved in neutral lipid storage and hydrolysis, is a potential target for NAFLD therapeutic treatment. In this review, we summarize recent progress elucidating the connections between LD-associated proteins and NAFLD found by genome-wide association studies (GWAS), genomic and proteomic studies. Finally, we discuss a possible mechanism by which the protein 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 13 (17β-HSD13) may promote the development of NAFLD.

  18. Increased risk of pyogenic liver abscess in patients with alcohol intoxication: A population-based retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao-Chien; Yang, Kai-Wei; Lee, Tien-Ying Peter; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liaw, Geng-Wang; Hung, Dong-Zong; Kao, Chia-Hung; Chen, Wei-Kung; Yang, Tse-Yen

    2017-11-01

    We designed a population-based retrospective cohort study to investigate the association between the event of alcohol intoxication and the risk of pyogenic liver abscess. The present study enrolled 245,076 patients with a history of alcohol intoxication from 2000 to 2010 and matched each of them with four comparison patients, with similar mean age and sex ratios. We determined the cumulative incidences and adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs) of liver abscess. A significant association was observed between alcohol intoxication and liver abscess. The incidence density rate of liver abscess was 3.47-fold greater in the alcohol intoxication (AI) cohort than in the non-AI cohort (12.2 vs. 3.43 per 10,000 person-years), with an adjusted HR (aHR) of 2.64 (95% CI = 2.26 to 3.08). This population-based study positively associated the event of alcohol intoxication with increased risk of liver abscess. Our findings warrant further large-scale and in-depth investigations in this area. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Balneotherapeutics of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease with the use of the Essentuki-type drinking mineral waters].

    PubMed

    Fedorova, T E; Efimenko, N V; Kaĭsinova, A S

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to estimate the effectiveness of combined spa-and-resort treatment with the use of the Essentuki-type drinking mineral waters for the patients presenting with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. A total of 40 patients presening with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NOFLD) were available for the examination. The study has demonstrated positive dynamics of clinical symptoms and results of liver functional tests, characteristics of intrahepatic dynamics, lipid metabolism, antioxidant hemostais, and the hormonal status of the patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. The intake of the Essentuki-type drinking mineral waters promoted normalization of adiponectin and leptin levels in conjunction with the reduction in the degree of insulin resistance, i.e., the key pathogenetic factors responsible for hepatic steatosis and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. It is concluded that the Essentuki-type drinking mineral waters may be recommended for the inclusion in the combined treatment and prevention of the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

  20. The role of nutraceuticals for the treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Del Ben, Maria; Polimeni, Licia; Baratta, Francesco; Pastori, Daniele; Angelico, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents the most common chronic liver disease. It is characterized by a wide spectrum of hepatic changes, which may progress to liver fibrosis and to cirrhosis. NAFLD is considered as the hepatic component of the metabolic syndrome but mechanisms underlying the onset and progression of NAFLD are still under investigation. The traditional 'two hit hypothesis' has been developed within a more complex 'multiple parallel hit hypothesis' which comprises a wide spectrum of parallel hits. Many therapeutic approaches have been proposed so far and several types of nutraceuticals have been suggested for the treatment of NAFLD and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), the most promising of which are those with antioxidant effects. In particular, vitamin E appears to be effective for the treatment of nondiabetic subjects with more advanced NASH, although the high suggested daily dosages are a matter of concern. Moreover, polyphenols reduce liver fat accumulation, mainly by inhibiting lipogenesis. At present, there are insufficient data to support the use of vitamin C supplements in patients with NAFLD. Data on polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) supplementation are heterogeneous, and no well-designed randomized controlled studies (RCTs) of adequate size, with histological assessment of steatosis, have been conducted. Based on the available data, silymarin supplementation for the treatment of NAFLD seems to have a favourable effect. The results with anti-inflammatory agents, such as vitamin D and carnitine are uncertain. In conclusion, there are insufficient data either to support or refute the use of nutraceuticals for subjects with NAFLD. Further RTCs, with histological changes as an outcome measure, are needed. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  1. Potential strategies to improve uptake of exercise interventions in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Frith, James; Day, Christopher P; Robinson, Lisa; Elliott, Chris; Jones, David E J; Newton, Julia L

    2010-01-01

    The management of non-alcoholic liver disease (NAFLD) concerns lifestyle modification and exercise; however, adherence is poor. Factors such as lack of confidence to exercise, poor understanding of the benefits of exercise, and a fear of falling all influence engagement in physical activity. To increase exercise in NAFLD it is important to understand the barriers to performing it. Three chronic liver disease cohorts were identified from the Newcastle Liver Database: NAFLD (n=230), alcoholic liver disease (ALD, n=110) and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC, n=97). Assessment tools were completed by all subjects: Outcome Expectation for Exercise Scale (OEES, understanding the benefits of exercise, lower scores indicate greater understanding), Self-Efficacy for Exercise Scale (SEES, confidence to exercise), Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I, higher scores indicate greater fear of falling). Activity was analysed from a functional perspective using the PROMIS-HAQ. Understanding the benefits of exercise was similar across each group [median OEES scores: NAFLD 2.38 (range 0.0-5.0), ALD 2.25 (0.0-5.0), PBC 2.28 (1.0-5.0), p=0.6]. In NAFLD confidence to exercise was significantly lower [median SEES score 0.0 (0.0-10.0), PBC 4.5 (0.0-10.0), p<0.001]. Fear of falling was similar in NAFLD and PBC, and greatest in ALD [22 (0-64), 22 (3-64), 30 (0-64), p=0.044]. In NAFLD, fear of falling was independently associated with increasing difficulty performing activity. NAFLD patients understand the benefits of exercise but lack confidence to perform it. Fear of falling was independently associated with more difficulty performing activity. Fear of falling and confidence are modifiable and potential targets to improve uptake and adherence for exercise intervention.

  2. Procoagulant imbalance in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Tripodi, Armando; Fracanzani, Anna L; Primignani, Massimo; Chantarangkul, Veena; Clerici, Marigrazia; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio; Peyvandi, Flora; Bertelli, Cristina; Valenti, Luca; Fargion, Silvia

    2014-07-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by increased risk of cardiovascular events and liver-fibrosis. Both could be explained by a procoagulant-imbalance that was surmised but never directly demonstrated. We investigated 113 patients with varying histological liver damage [steatosis (n=32), steatohepatitis (n=51), metabolic-cirrhosis (n=30)], 54 with alcoholic/viral-cirrhosis and 179 controls. Plasma was evaluated for levels of pro- and anti-coagulants, and for thrombin-generation assessed as endogenous-thrombin-potential (ETP) with and without thrombomodulin or Protac® as protein C activators. The procoagulant-imbalance was defined as ETP-ratio (with-to-without thrombomodulin) or as Protac®-induced-coagulation-inhibition (PICI%). High ETP-ratios or low PICI% indicate resistance to thrombomodulin or Protac® and hence a procoagulant-imbalance. ETP-ratio increased from controls [0.57 (0.11-0.89)] to steatosis [0.72 (0.33-0.86)] and metabolic-cirrhosis [0.80 (0.57-0.95)], (p<0.001), the latter being comparable to that for alcoholic/viral-cirrhosis [0.80 (0.57-0.95) vs. 0.80 (0.44-0.96)]. Factor VIII (a potent procoagulant for thrombin-generation) increased from steatosis [99% (71-150)] to metabolic-cirrhosis [157% (64-232)], p<0.001. Protein C (a powerful anticoagulant) decreased from steatosis [103% (77-228)] to metabolic-cirrhosis [77 (17-146)], p<0.001. As a consequence, factor VIII-to-protein C ratio increased from steatosis [0.96 (0.36-1.60)] to metabolic-cirrhosis [2.05 (0.81-12.1)], p<0.001 and was correlated with the ETP-ratio (rho=0.543, p<0.001). Similar results were obtained for PICI%. Patients with procoagulant-imbalance detected as ETP-ratio greater or PICI% lower than the median value of controls tended to have a higher risk of metabolic-syndrome, higher intima-media thickness, fibrosis, steatosis or lobular inflammation, all considered clinical manifestations of NAFLD. NAFLD is characterized by a procoagulant-imbalance progressing

  3. Inhibition of p53 attenuates steatosis and liver injury in a mouse model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Derdak, Zoltan; Villegas, Kristine A; Harb, Ragheb; Wu, Annie M; Sousa, Aryanna; Wands, Jack R

    2013-04-01

    p53 and its transcriptional target miRNA34a have been implicated in the pathogenesis of fatty liver. We tested the efficacy of a p53 inhibitor, pifithrin-α p-nitro (PFT) in attenuating steatosis, associated oxidative stress and apoptosis in a murine model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). C57BL/6 mice were fed a high-fat (HFD) or control diet for 8 weeks; PFT or DMSO (vehicle) was administered three times per week. Markers of oxidative stress and apoptosis as well as mediators of hepatic fatty acid metabolism were assessed by immunohistochemistry, Western blot, real-time PCR, and biochemical assays. PFT administration suppressed HFD-induced weight gain, ALT elevation, steatosis, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. PFT treatment blunted the HFD-induced upregulation of miRNA34a and increased SIRT1 expression. In the livers of HFD-fed, PFT-treated mice, activation of the SIRT1/PGC1α/PPARα axis increased the expression of malonyl-CoA decarboxylase (MLYCD), an enzyme responsible for malonyl-CoA (mCoA) degradation. Additionally, the SIRT1/LKB1/AMPK pathway (upstream activator of MLYCD) was promoted by PFT. Thus, induction of these two pathways by PFT diminished the hepatic mCoA content by enhancing MLYCD expression and function. Since mCoA inhibits carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1), the decrease of hepatic mCoA in the PFT-treated, HFD-fed mice increased CPT1 activity, favored fatty acid oxidation, and decreased steatosis. Additionally, we demonstrated that PFT abrogated steatosis and promoted MLYCD expression in palmitoleic acid-treated human HepaRG cells. The p53 inhibitor PFT diminished hepatic triglyceride accumulation and lipotoxicity in mice fed a HFD, by depleting mCoA and favoring the β-oxidation of fatty acids. Copyright © 2012 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Development of experimental fibrotic liver diseases animal model by Carbon Tetracholoride.

    PubMed

    Gitiara, Atoosa; Tokhanbigli, Samaneh; Mazhari, Sogol; Baghaei, Kaveh; Hatami, Behzad; Hashemi, Seyed Mahmoud; Asadi Rad, Ali; Moradi, Afshin; Nasiri, Meyam; Zarrabi Ahrabi, Nakisa; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2017-01-01

    This study is presenting an effective method of inducing liver fibrosis by CCL4 as a toxin in two different breeds of rat models. Liver fibrosis is a result of inflammation and liver injury caused by wound healing responses which ultimately lead to liver failure. Consequently, after liver fibrosis, the progression will be continued to liver cirrhosis and at the end stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Many studies have demonstrated that one of the most important causes of liver fibrosis is Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Fibrotic Liver is affected by an excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins like collagen and α-SMA. In two different experiments, male Vistar, and Sprague Dawley Rat models ranging from 200±60, corresponding to an age of approximately 10 weeks were utilized in order to induce CCL4 treated liver fibrosis. After 6 weeks of CCL4 injection, different tests have been carried out to verify the liver fibrosis including serum markers such as Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and Alanine aminotransferase (ALT), molecular tests containing, laminin and α-SMA and also pathological observation by Hematoxylin and eosin staining in both fibrosis and control group. The results of Pathology and Real-time PCR showed that fibrosis was induced much more effectively in Sprague Dawley rat model compared with Wistar rats.

  5. Development of experimental fibrotic liver diseases animal model by Carbon Tetracholoride

    PubMed Central

    Gitiara, Atoosa; Tokhanbigli, Samaneh; Mazhari, Sogol; Baghaei, Kaveh; Hatami, Behzad; Hashemi, Seyed Mahmoud; Asadi Rad, Ali; Moradi, Afshin; Nasiri, Meyam; Zarrabi Ahrabi, Nakisa; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2017-01-01

    Aim: This study is presenting an effective method of inducing liver fibrosis by CCL4 as a toxin in two different breeds of rat models. Background: Liver fibrosis is a result of inflammation and liver injury caused by wound healing responses which ultimately lead to liver failure. Consequently, after liver fibrosis, the progression will be continued to liver cirrhosis and at the end stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Many studies have demonstrated that one of the most important causes of liver fibrosis is Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Fibrotic Liver is affected by an excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins like collagen and α-SMA. Methods: In two different experiments, male Vistar, and Sprague Dawley Rat models ranging from 200±60, corresponding to an age of approximately 10 weeks were utilized in order to induce CCL4 treated liver fibrosis. Results: After 6 weeks of CCL4 injection, different tests have been carried out to verify the liver fibrosis including serum markers such as Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and Alanine aminotransferase (ALT), molecular tests containing, laminin and α-SMA and also pathological observation by Hematoxylin and eosin staining in both fibrosis and control group. Conclusion: The results of Pathology and Real-time PCR showed that fibrosis was induced much more effectively in Sprague Dawley rat model compared with Wistar rats. PMID:29511482

  6. Relationship between in vivo chlorzoxazone hydroxylation, hepatic cytochrome P450 2E1 content and liver injury in obese non-alcoholic fatty liver disease patients.

    PubMed

    Orellana, Myriam; Rodrigo, Ramón; Varela, Nelson; Araya, Julia; Poniachik, Jaime; Csendes, Attila; Smok, Gladys; Videla, Luis A

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that induction of cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) in the liver of patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is correlated both with the in vivo activity of the cytochrome and with the development of liver injury. For this purpose, the liver content of CYP2E1 was determined by Western blot and the CYP2E1 activity by the in vivo hydroxylation of chlorzoxazone (CLZ). The study groups were obese women with an average body mass index (BMI) of 40.3kg/m(2), who underwent therapeutic gastroplasty or gastrectomy with a gastro-jejunal anastomosis. Further, the hepatic histology was determined to establish the pathological score grouping the subjects into three categories: control, steatosis and steatohepatitis. The liver CYP2E1 content and the CLZ hydroxylation of obese patients with steatosis and, particularly, with steatohepatitis were significantly higher than controls and correlated positively with both the severity of the liver damage. These data provide evidence that CYP2E1 would be involved in the mechanism of liver injury found in obese NAFLD patients. Also, the correlation between liver CYP2E1 content and in vivo CLZ hydroxylation would validate the latter as a reliable indicator of liver injury in NAFLD, thus providing a simple and not invasive method to study these patients.

  7. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Treatment Potentiates Intestinal Hypoxia-Inducible Factor, Promotes Intestinal Integrity and Ameliorates Alcohol-Induced Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuhua; Kirpich, Irina; Liu, Yanlong; Ma, Zhenhua; Barve, Shirish; McClain, Craig J.; Feng, Wenke

    2012-01-01

    Gut-derived endotoxin is a critical factor in the development and progression of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Probiotics can treat alcohol-induced liver injury associated with gut leakiness and endotoxemia in animal models, as well as in human ALD; however, the mechanism or mechanisms of their beneficial action are not well defined. We hypothesized that alcohol impairs the adaptive response-induced hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) and that probiotic supplementation could attenuate this impairment, restoring barrier function in a mouse model of ALD by increasing HIF-responsive proteins (eg, intestinal trefoil factor) and reversing established ALD. C57BJ/6N mice were fed the Lieber DeCarli diet containing 5% alcohol for 8 weeks. Animals received Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) supplementation in the last 2 weeks. LGG supplementation significantly reduced alcohol-induced endotoxemia and hepatic steatosis and improved liver function. LGG restored alcohol-induced reduction of HIF-2α and intestinal trefoil factor levels. In vitro studies using the Caco-2 cell culture model showed that the addition of LGG supernatant prevented alcohol-induced epithelial monolayer barrier dysfunction. Furthermore, gene silencing of HIF-1α/2α abolished the LGG effects, indicating that the protective effect of LGG is HIF-dependent. The present study provides a mechanistic insight for utilization of probiotics for the treatment of ALD, and suggests a critical role for intestinal hypoxia and decreased trefoil factor in the development of ALD. PMID:22093263

  8. Production of inflammatory cytokines by peripheral blood monocytes in chronic alcoholism: relationship with ethanol intake and liver disease.

    PubMed

    Laso, Francisco Javier; Vaquero, José Miguel; Almeida, Julia; Marcos, Miguel; Orfao, Alberto

    2007-09-01

    Controversial results have been reported about the effects of alcoholism on the functionality of monocytes. In the present study we analyze the effects of chronic alcoholism on the intracellular production of inflammatory cytokines by peripheral blood (PB) monocytes. Spontaneous and in vitro-stimulated production of interleukin (IL) 1alpha (TNFalpha) by PB monocytes was analyzed at the single level by flow cytometry in chronic alcoholics without liver disease and active ethanol (EtOH) intake (AWLD group), as well as in patients with alcohol liver cirrhosis (ALC group), who were either actively drinking (ALCET group) or with alcohol withdrawal (ALCAW group). A significantly increased spontaneous production of IL1beta, IL6, IL12, and TNFalpha was observed on PB monocytes among AWLD individuals. Conversely, circulating monocytes form ALCET patients showed an abnormally low spontaneous and stimulated production of inflammatory cytokines. No significant changes were observed in ALCAW group as regards production of IL1beta, IL6, IL12, and TNFalpha. Our results show an altered pattern of production of inflammatory cytokines in PB monocytes from chronic alcoholic patients, the exact abnormalities observed depending on both the status of EtOH intake and the existence of alcoholic liver disease. Copyright 2007 Clinical Cytometry Society.

  9. Intestinal flora imbalance promotes alcohol-induced liver fibrosis by the TGFβ/smad signaling pathway in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dong; Hao, Xiuxian; Xu, Lili; Cui, Jing; Xue, Li; Tian, Zibin

    2017-10-01

    Intestinal flora performs a crucial role in human health and its imbalance may cause numerous pathological changes. The liver can also affect the intestinal function through bile secretion via the enterohepatic cycle. The pathophysiological association between the gut and the liver is described as the gut-liver axis. The present study investigated the role of intestinal flora in alcohol-induced liver fibrosis. A total of 36 C57 mice were randomly and equally divided into 3 different dietary regimes: Group I (alcohol injury; received alcohol); group II (alcohol injury with flora imbalance; received alcohol plus lincomycin hydrochloride) and group III (alcohol injury with corrected flora imbalance; received alcohol, lincomycin hydrochloride and extra probiotics). The present study then investigated several indicators of liver damage. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels in mice serum were studied. Masson staining and Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide double staining was also performed, and the expression of mothers against decapentaplegic homolog (smad) 3 and smad4 proteins in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) of the mice was examined using western blot analysis. The levels of serum ALP, AST and ALT were the highest in group II mice, and all 3 levels decreased in group III mice compared with those from group II. The degree of liver fibrosis was aggravated in group II mice compared with group I mice. The apoptosis of HSCs was significantly inhibited in group II mice, but was increased in group III mice. The HSCs in group II mice exhibited higher expression of smad3 and smad4, whilst group III mice (with corrected intestinal flora imbalance) exhibited downregulated expression of smad3 and smad4. The present data indicates that the intestinal flora perform a significant role in maintaining liver homeostasis. Furthermore, an imbalance of intestinal flora can exacerbate alcohol

  10. Alcohol consumers' attention to warning labels and brand information on alcohol packaging: Findings from cross-sectional and experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Kersbergen, Inge; Field, Matt

    2017-01-26

    Alcohol warning labels have a limited effect on drinking behavior, potentially because people devote minimal attention to them. We report findings from two studies in which we measured the extent to which alcohol consumers attend to warning labels on alcohol packaging, and aimed to identify if increased attention to warning labels is associated with motivation to change drinking behavior. Study 1 (N = 60) was an exploratory cross-sectional study in which we used eye-tracking to measure visual attention to brand and health information on alcohol and soda containers. In study 2 (N = 120) we manipulated motivation to reduce drinking using an alcohol brief intervention (vs control intervention) and measured heavy drinkers' attention to branding and warning labels with the same eye-tracking paradigm as in study 1. Then, in a separate task we experimentally manipulated attention by drawing a brightly colored border around health (or brand) information before measuring participants' self-reported drinking intentions for the subsequent week. Study 1 showed that participants paid minimal attention to warning labels (7% of viewing time). Participants who were motivated to reduce drinking paid less attention to alcohol branding and alcohol warning labels. Results from study 2 showed that the alcohol brief intervention decreased attention to branding compared to the control condition, but it did not affect attention to warning labels. Furthermore, the experimental manipulation of attention to health or brand information did not influence drinking intentions for the subsequent week. Alcohol consumers allocate minimal attention to warning labels on alcohol packaging and even if their attention is directed to these warning labels, this has no impact on their drinking intentions. The lack of attention to warning labels, even among people who actively want to cut down, suggests that there is room for improvement in the content of health warnings on alcohol packaging.

  11. Lychee (Litchi chinensis Sonn.) Pulp Phenolic Extract Provides Protection against Alcoholic Liver Injury in Mice by Alleviating Intestinal Microbiota Dysbiosis, Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction, and Liver Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Juan; Zhang, Ruifen; Zhou, Qiuyun; Liu, Lei; Huang, Fei; Deng, Yuanyuan; Ma, Yongxuan; Wei, Zhencheng; Tang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Mingwei

    2017-11-08

    Liver injury is the most common consequence of alcohol abuse, which is promoted by the inflammatory response triggered by gut-derived endotoxins produced as a consequence of intestinal microbiota dysbiosis and barrier dysfunction. The aim of this study was to investigate whether modulation of intestinal microbiota and barrier function, and liver inflammation contributes to the hepatoprotective effect of lychee pulp phenolic extract (LPPE) in alcohol-fed mice. Mice were treated with an ethanol-containing liquid diet alone or in combination with LPPE for 8 weeks. LPPE supplementation alleviated ethanol-induced liver injury and downregulated key markers of inflammation. Moreover, LPPE supplementation reversed the ethanol-induced alteration of intestinal microbiota composition and increased the expression of intestinal tight junction proteins, mucus protecting proteins, and antimicrobial proteins. Furthermore, in addition to decreasing serum endotoxin level, LPPE supplementation suppressed CD14 and toll-like receptor 4 expression, and repressed the activation of nuclear factor-κB p65 in the liver. These data suggest that intestinal microbiota dysbiosis, intestinal barrier dysfunction, and liver inflammation are improved by LPPE, and therefore, the intake of LPPE or Litchi pulp may be an effective strategy to alleviate the susceptibility to alcohol-induced hepatic diseases.

  12. Thermoneutral housing exacerbates non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in mice and allows for sex-independent disease modeling

    PubMed Central

    Giles, Daniel A; Moreno-Fernandez, Maria E; Stankiewicz, Traci E; Graspeuntner, Simon; Cappelletti, Monica; Wu, David; Mukherjee, Rajib; Chan, Calvin C; Lawson, Matthew J; Klarquist, Jared; Sünderhauf, Annika; Softic, Samir; Kahn, C Ronald; Stemmer, Kerstin; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Aronow, Bruce J; Karns, Rebekah; Steinbrecher, Kris A; Karp, Christopher L; Sheridan, Rachel; Shanmukhappa, Shiva K; Reynaud, Damien; Haslam, David B; Sina, Christian; Rupp, Jan; Hogan, Simon P; Divanovic, Senad

    2017-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a common prelude to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, is the most common chronic liver disease worldwide. Defining the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of NAFLD has been hampered by a lack of animal models that closely recapitulate the severe end of the human disease spectrum, including bridging hepatic fibrosis. Here, we demonstrate that a novel experimental model employing thermoneutral housing, as opposed to standard housing, resulted in lower stress-driven production of corticosterone, augmented mouse proinflammatory immune responses and markedly exacerbated high fat diet (HFD)-induced NAFLD pathogenesis. Disease exacerbation at thermoneutrality was conserved across multiple mouse strains and was associated with augmented intestinal permeability, an altered microbiome and activation of inflammatory pathways associated with human disease. Depletion of Gram-negative microbiota, hematopoietic cell deletion of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and inactivation of the interleukin-17 (IL-17) axis resulted in altered immune responsiveness and protection from thermoneutral housing-driven NAFLD amplification. Finally, female mice, typically resistant to HFD-induced obesity and NAFLD, develop full-blown disease at thermoneutrality. Thus, thermoneutral housing provides a sex-independent model of exacerbated NAFLD in mice and represents a novel approach for interrogation of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying disease pathogenesis. PMID:28604704

  13. Using Digital Interventions to Support Individuals with Alcohol Use Disorder and Advanced Liver Disease: A Bridge over Troubled Waters.

    PubMed

    Suffoletto, Brian; Scaglione, Steve

    2018-05-11

    Alcohol abstinence is the most important therapeutic goal for individuals with advanced liver disease (ALD), but commonly co-occurring alcohol use disorders (AUD) make it difficult to achieve (DiMartini et a, 2004). This challenge is perhaps best documented in the pre- and post-liver transplant period: around 30% of patients on a liver transplant list relapse with alcohol (Carboneau et al., 2010), and up to 50% can relapse in the first 10 years post-transplant (DiMartini et al., 2010). Tools to assist patients with ALD and AUD in initiating and maintaining abstinence have been limited: safe, tolerable, and effective pharmacotherapies for AUD are not widely used and treatment is often complicated by medical issues including malnourishment, physically debility, covert or overt hepatic encephalopathy, sleep and fatigue disorders, comorbid depression, and anxiety disorders. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Fatty Liver Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... fatty liver disease that is not related to heavy alcohol use. There are two kinds: Simple fatty ... disease? Alcoholic fatty liver disease is due to heavy alcohol use. Your liver breaks down most of ...

  15. Modelling non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in human hepatocyte-like cells.

    PubMed

    Lyall, Marcus J; Cartier, Jessy; Thomson, John P; Cameron, Kate; Meseguer-Ripolles, Jose; O'Duibhir, Eoghan; Szkolnicka, Dagmara; Villarin, Baltasar Lucendo; Wang, Yu; Blanco, Giovanny Rodriguez; Dunn, Warwick B; Meehan, Richard R; Hay, David C; Drake, Amanda J

    2018-07-05

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of liver disease in developed countries. An in vitro NAFLD model would permit mechanistic studies and enable high-throughput therapeutic screening. While hepatic cancer-derived cell lines are a convenient, renewable resource, their genomic, epigenomic and functional alterations mean their utility in NAFLD modelling is unclear. Additionally, the epigenetic mark 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), a cell lineage identifier, is rapidly lost during cell culture, alongside expression of the Ten-eleven-translocation ( TET ) methylcytosine dioxygenase enzymes, restricting meaningful epigenetic analysis. Hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) derived from human embryonic stem cells can provide a non-neoplastic, renewable model for liver research. Here, we have developed a model of NAFLD using HLCs exposed to lactate, pyruvate and octanoic acid (LPO) that bear all the hallmarks, including 5hmC profiles, of liver functionality. We exposed HLCs to LPO for 48 h to induce lipid accumulation. We characterized the transcriptome using RNA-seq, the metabolome using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and the epigenome using 5-hydroxymethylation DNA immunoprecipitation (hmeDIP) sequencing. LPO exposure induced an NAFLD phenotype in HLCs with transcriptional and metabolomic dysregulation consistent with those present in human NAFLD. HLCs maintain expression of the TET enzymes and have a liver-like epigenome. LPO exposure-induced 5hmC enrichment at lipid synthesis and transport genes. HLCs treated with LPO recapitulate the transcriptional and metabolic dysregulation seen in NAFLD and additionally retain TET expression and 5hmC. This in vitro model of NAFLD will be useful for future mechanistic and therapeutic studies.This article is part of the theme issue 'Designer human tissue: coming to a lab near you'. © 2018 The Authors.

  16. Dietary advanced glycation end-products aggravate non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Christopher; Herath, Chandana B; Jia, Zhiyuan; Andrikopoulos, Sof; Brown, Bronwyn E; Davies, Michael J; Rivera, Leni R; Furness, John B; Forbes, Josephine M; Angus, Peter W

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine if manipulation of dietary advanced glycation end product (AGE), intake affects non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) progression and whether these effects are mediated via RAGE. METHODS Male C57Bl6 mice were fed a high fat, high fructose, high cholesterol (HFHC) diet for 33 wk and compared with animals on normal chow. A third group were given a HFHC diet that was high in AGEs. Another group was given a HFHC diet that was marinated in vinegar to prevent the formation of AGEs. In a second experiment, RAGE KO animals were fed a HFHC diet or a high AGE HFHC diet and compared with wildtype controls. Hepatic biochemistry, histology, picrosirius red morphometry and hepatic mRNA were determined. RESULTS Long-term consumption of the HFHC diet generated significant steatohepatitis and fibrosis after 33 wk. In this model, hepatic 4-hydroxynonenal content (a marker of chronic oxidative stress), hepatocyte ballooning, picrosirius red staining, α-smooth muscle actin and collagen type 1A gene expression were all significantly increased. Increasing the AGE content of the HFHC diet by baking further increased these markers of liver damage, but this was abrogated by pre-marination in acetic acid. In response to the HFHC diet, RAGE-/- animals developed NASH of similar severity to RAGE+/+ animals but were protected from the additional harmful effects of the high AGE containing diet. Studies in isolated Kupffer cells showed that AGEs increase cell proliferation and oxidative stress, providing a likely mechanism through which these compounds contribute to liver injury. CONCLUSION In the HFHC model of NAFLD, manipulation of dietary AGEs modulates liver injury, inflammation, and liver fibrosis via a RAGE dependent pathway. This suggests that pharmacological and dietary strategies targeting the AGE/RAGE pathway could slow the progression of NAFLD. PMID:27672297

  17. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease–From the cardiologist perspective

    PubMed Central

    Sîrbu, Oana; Floria, Mariana; Dăscălița, Petru; Şorodoc, Victorița; Şorodoc, Laurențiu

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) includes a range of disorders characterized by excess accumulation of triglycerides within the liver. While simple steatosis may be clinically stable, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) can be progressive. Inflammation is believed to be the driving force behind NASH and the progression to fibrosis and subsequent cirrhosis. NAFLD is globally considered a significant health concern not only because of its incidence but also because of its economic impact. The fact that NAFLD is associated with cardiovascular disease is widely recognized, as well as the fact that NAFLD patient mortality rises when such an association is present. In particular, NAFLD is associated with coronary and carotid atherosclerosis, endothelial dysfunction and arterial rigidity, ventricles function, valves morphology, congestive heart failure, and arrhythmias (especially atrial fibrillation). Additionally, the hypercoagulability status in NAFLD patient may be suggested by the presence of inflammatory and coagulation markers. In order to differentiate between milder forms and the more severe ones that necessitate aggressive therapy, individualized risk scores may be used. This narrative review will analyze and interpret the papers published in PubMed in the last 16 years, in an attempt to expand our understanding of the NASH as a possible cardiovascular risk factor. PMID:27389154

  18. Esculetin prevents non-alcoholic fatty liver in diabetic mice fed high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ra-Yeong; Ham, Ju Ri; Lee, Mi-Kyung

    2016-12-25

    This study investigated the effects and mechanism of esculetin (6,7-dihydroxycoumarin) on non-alcoholic fatty liver in diabetic mice fed high-fat diet (HFD). The diabetic mice model was induced by injection of streptozotocin, after which they were fed HFD diet with or without esculetin for 11 weeks. Non-diabetic mice were provided a normal diet. Diabetes induced hepatic hypertrophy, lipid accumulation and droplets; however, esculetin reversed these changes. Esculetin treatment in diabetic mice fed HFD significantly down-regulated expression of lipid synthesis genes (Fasn, Dgat2 and Plpp2) and inflammation genes (Tlr4, Myd88, Nfkb, Tnfα and Il6). Moreover, the activities of hepatic lipid synthesis enzymes (fatty acid synthase and phosphatidate phosphohydrolase) and gluconeogenesis enzyme (glucose-6-phosphatase) in the esculetin group were decreased compared with the diabetic group. In addition, esculetin significantly reduced blood HbA 1c , serum cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6) and chemokine (MCP-1) levels compared with the diabetic group without changing the insulin content in serum and the pancreas. Hepatic SOD activity was lower and lipid peroxidation level was higher in the diabetic group than in the normal group; however, esculetin attenuates these differences. Overall, these results demonstrated that esculetin supplementation could protect against development of non-alcoholic fatty liver in diabetes via regulation of lipids, glucose and inflammation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Diabetes mellitus and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: the thread of Ariadne.

    PubMed

    Kosmidou, Maria; Milionis, Haralampos

    2017-06-01

    Non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, the hepatic fat accumulation) and non alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, the aggressive form of liver steatosis plus inflammation and hepatocyte necrosis) are reaching epidemic dimensions in subjects with diabetes mellitus (DM). Taking into account that the incidence of DM increases worldwide, these entities represent major health problems. There is accumulating evidence that diabetic subjects with NASH are at increased risk not only for cardiovascular disease compications but also for cirrhosis and hepatocellular cancer. On the other hand, the presence of NAFLD correlates with an increased risk for the development of DM. The most-widely accepted pathophysiological mechanisms relating DM and NAFLD include central obesity and insulin resistanc, but new insights are under scrutiny. Therapeutic modalities used for the management of diabetes have been studied for their impact on NAFLD/NASH and both neutral and beneficial effects have been reported. In this review, we discuss issues regarding the epidemiology, the pathophysiological pathways relating NAFLD with DM and consider strategies that may be useful in the management of NAFLD in the diabetic population.

  20. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) models in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Cole, Banumathi K; Feaver, Ryan E; Wamhoff, Brian R; Dash, Ajit

    2018-02-01

    The progressive disease spectrum of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which includes non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), is a rapidly emerging public health crisis with no approved therapy. The diversity of various therapies under development highlights the lack of consensus around the most effective target, underscoring the need for better translatable preclinical models to study the complex progressive disease and effective therapies. Areas covered: This article reviews published literature of various mouse models of NASH used in preclinical studies, as well as complex organotypic in vitro and ex vivo liver models being developed. It discusses translational challenges associated with both kinds of models, and describes some of the studies that validate their application in NAFLD. Expert opinion: Animal models offer advantages of understanding drug distribution and effects in a whole body context, but are limited by important species differences. Human organotypic in vitro and ex vivo models with physiological relevance and translatability need to be used in a tiered manner with simpler screens. Leveraging newer technologies, like metabolomics, proteomics, and transcriptomics, and the future development of validated disease biomarkers will allow us to fully utilize the value of these models to understand disease and evaluate novel drugs in isolation or combination.

  1. Coffee and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: brewing evidence for hepatoprotection?

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaohua; Teoh, Narci C; Chitturi, Shiv; Farrell, Geoffrey C

    2014-03-01

    Coffee is one of the most popular beverages in the world. Several studies consistently show that coffee drinkers with chronic liver disease have a reduced risk of cirrhosis and a lower incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma regardless of primary etiology. With the increasing prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) worldwide, there is renewed interest in the effect of coffee intake on NAFLD severity and positive clinical outcomes. This review gives an overview of growing epidemiological and clinical evidence which indicate that coffee consumption reduces severity of NAFLD. These studies vary in methodology, and potential confounding factors have not always been completely excluded. However, it does appear that coffee, and particular components other than caffeine, reduce NAFLD prevalence and inflammation of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Several possible mechanisms underlying coffee's hepatoprotective effects in NAFLD include antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and antifibrotic effects, while a chemopreventive effect against hepatocarcinogenesis seems likely. The so-far limited data supporting such effects will be discussed, and the need for further study is highlighted. © 2013 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. [Parenteral S-adenosylmethionine compared to placebos in the treatment of alcoholic liver diseases].

    PubMed

    Diaz Belmont, A; Dominguez Henkel, R; Uribe Ancira, F

    1996-01-01

    The improvements in the knowledge of the action of ethanol over the hepatic cell, its direct action over the cell, and the intracytoplasmatic structures membranes, point out the possibilities of use of sulfo-adenosil-L-metionina (SAMe); as an util drug inn the treatment of the altered metilation reactions, that take place in those membranes, facilitating their physiological functions. The primary end point in this study was to demonstrate the therapeutic worth os SAMe, by parenteral route in 45 patients with alcoholic liver disease, which were determined by clinical laboratory and hepatic function test, label qith 32 points or more of the discriminatory function index. Divided into two groups, placebo-SAMe, randomized, double blind. As well as total plasmatic and reduced glutation and lipoperoxidation index, indirect form as malondehaldehyde. Were determined at the first visit anf after 8 and 15 days of treatment. Comparing the results of both groups there were a significative favorable results for the group treatment with SAMe and this confirms the utility of this drug in the treatment of patients with alcoholic liver disease with a discriminatory function index (Maddrey index), of 32 points or more.

  3. Elevated whole blood viscosity is associated with insulin resistance and non-alcoholic fatty liver.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong-yan; Li, Jing; Xu, Min; Wang, Tian-ge; Sun, Wan-wan; Chen, Ying; Bi, Yu-fang; Wang, Wei-qing; Ning, Guang

    2015-12-01

    Accumulating evidences demonstrate that abnormalities in whole blood viscosity (WBV) have been implicated in insulin resistance which may lead to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, epidemiological studies exploring the association between WBV and NAFLD were not available. Our objective was to evaluate the association between WBV levels and risk of prevalent NAFLD. This was a cross-sectional population-based study performed in Shanghai, China. A total of 8673 participants aged 40 years or older were included. WBV was calculated from haematocrit and plasma protein concentration, at a shear rate of 208(-1) s, by a validated equation. NAFLD was diagnosed by hepatic ultrasound after the exclusion of alcohol abuse and other liver diseases. Insulin resistance (IR) was assessed by homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR). The overall prevalence of NAFLD was 30·2% in this population. With the increase of WBV level, participants have larger waist circumference (WC), more severe insulin resistance and the prevalence of NAFLD increased significantly with elevated WBV quartiles. Compared with those in the lowest quartiles, adults in the highest quartile of WBV levels have higher prevalence of NAFLD (adjusted odds ratio 1·77, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1·48-2·13) and IR (2·72, 95% CI 2·26-3·27). Elevated WBV is associated with prevalence of NAFLD and IR in middle-aged and elderly Chinese population. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Osteoporosis and bone fractures in alcoholic liver disease: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bang, Chang Seok; Shin, In Soo; Lee, Sung Wha; Kim, Jin Bong; Baik, Gwang Ho; Suk, Ki Tae; Yoon, Jai Hoon; Kim, Yeon Soo; Kim, Dong Joon

    2015-04-07

    To evaluate the association between alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and bone fractures or osteoporosis. Non-randomized studies were identified from databases (PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library). The search was conducted using Boolean operators and keywords, which included "alcoholic liver diseases", "osteoporosis", or "bone fractures". The prevalence of any fractures or osteoporosis, and bone mineral density (BMD) were extracted and analyzed using risk ratios and standardized mean difference (SMD). A random effects model was applied. In total, 15 studies were identified and analyzed. Overall, ALD demonstrated a RR of 1.944 (95%CI: 1.354-2.791) for the development of bone fractures. However, ALD showed a RR of 0.849 (95%CI: 0.523-1.380) for the development of osteoporosis. BMD was not significantly different between the ALD and control groups, although there was a trend toward lower BMD in patients with ALD (SMD in femur-BMD: -0.172, 95%CI: -0.453-0.110; SMD in spine-BMD: -0.169, 95%CI: -0.476-0.138). Sensitivity analyses showed consistent results. Current publications indicate significant associations between bone fractures and ALD, independent of BMD or the presence of osteoporosis.

  5. Osteoporosis and bone fractures in alcoholic liver disease: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Chang Seok; Shin, In Soo; Lee, Sung Wha; Kim, Jin Bong; Baik, Gwang Ho; Suk, Ki Tae; Yoon, Jai Hoon; Kim, Yeon Soo; Kim, Dong Joon

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the association between alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and bone fractures or osteoporosis. METHODS: Non-randomized studies were identified from databases (PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library). The search was conducted using Boolean operators and keywords, which included “alcoholic liver diseases”, “osteoporosis”, or “bone fractures”. The prevalence of any fractures or osteoporosis, and bone mineral density (BMD) were extracted and analyzed using risk ratios and standardized mean difference (SMD). A random effects model was applied. RESULTS: In total, 15 studies were identified and analyzed. Overall, ALD demonstrated a RR of 1.944 (95%CI: 1.354-2.791) for the development of bone fractures. However, ALD showed a RR of 0.849 (95%CI: 0.523-1.380) for the development of osteoporosis. BMD was not significantly different between the ALD and control groups, although there was a trend toward lower BMD in patients with ALD (SMD in femur-BMD: -0.172, 95%CI: -0.453-0.110; SMD in spine-BMD: -0.169, 95%CI: -0.476-0.138). Sensitivity analyses showed consistent results. CONCLUSION: Current publications indicate significant associations between bone fractures and ALD, independent of BMD or the presence of osteoporosis. PMID:25852292

  6. MitoNEET Deficiency Alleviates Experimental Alcoholic Steatohepatitis in Mice by Stimulating Endocrine Adiponectin-Fgf15 Axis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xudong; Jogasuria, Alvin; Wang, Jiayou; Kim, Chunki; Han, Yoonhee; Shen, Hong; Wu, Jiashin; You, Min

    2016-10-21

    MitoNEET (mNT) (CDGSH iron-sulfur domain-containing protein 1 or CISD1) is an outer mitochondrial membrane protein that donates 2Fe-2S clusters to apo-acceptor proteins. In the present study, using a global mNT knock-out (mNTKO) mouse model, we investigated the in vivo functional role of mNT in the development of alcoholic steatohepatitis. Experimental alcoholic steatohepatitis was achieved by pair feeding wild-type (WT) and mNTKO mice with Lieber-DeCarli ethanol-containing diets for 4 weeks. Strikingly, chronically ethanol-fed mNTKO mice were completely resistant to ethanol-induced steatohepatitis as revealed by dramatically reduced hepatic triglycerides, decreased hepatic cholesterol level, diminished liver inflammatory response, and normalized serum ALT levels. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that ethanol administration to mNTKO mice induced two pivotal endocrine hormones, namely, adipose-derived adiponectin and gut-derived fibroblast growth factor 15 (Fgf15). The elevation in circulating levels of adiponectin and Fgf15 led to normalized hepatic and serum levels of bile acids, limited hepatic accumulation of toxic bile, attenuated inflammation, and amelioration of liver injury in the ethanol-fed mNTKO mice. Other potential mechanisms such as reduced oxidative stress, activated Sirt1 signaling, and diminished NF-κB activity also contribute to hepatic improvement in the ethanol-fed mNTKO mice. In conclusion, the present study identified adiponectin and Fgf15 as pivotal adipose-gut-liver metabolic coordinators in mediating the protective action of mNT deficiency against development of alcoholic steatohepatitis in mice. Our findings may help to establish mNT as a novel therapeutic target and pharmacological inhibition of mNT may be beneficial for the prevention and treatment of human alcoholic steatohepatitis. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Characterization of acute-on-chronic liver failure and prediction of mortality in Asian patients with active alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hwi Young; Chang, Young; Park, Jae Yong; Ahn, Hongkeun; Cho, Hyeki; Han, Seung Jun; Oh, Sohee; Kim, Donghee; Jung, Yong Jin; Kim, Byeong Gwan; Lee, Kook Lae; Kim, Won

    2016-02-01

    Alcoholic liver diseases often evolve to acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF), which increases the risk of (multi-)organ failure and death. We investigated the development and characteristics of alcohol-related ACLF and evaluated prognostic scores for prediction of mortality in Asian patients with active alcoholism. A total of 205 patients who were hospitalized with severe alcoholic liver disease were included in this retrospective cohort study, after excluding those with serious cardiovascular diseases, malignancy, or co-existing viral hepatitis. The Chronic Liver Failure (CLIF) Consortium Organ Failure score was used in the diagnosis and grading of ACLF, and the CLIF Consortium ACLF score (CLIF-C ACLFs) was used to predict mortality. Patients with ACLF had higher Maddrey discriminant function, model for end-stage liver disease (MELD), and MELD-sodium scores than those without ACLF. Infections were more frequently documented in patients with ACLF (33.3% vs 53.0%; P = 0.004). Predictive factors for ACLF development were systemic inflammatory response syndrome (odds ratio [OR], 2.239; P < 0.001), serum sodium level (OR, 0.939; P = 0.029), and neutrophil count (OR, 1.000; P = 0.021). For prediction of mortality at predefined time points (28-day and 90-day) in patients with ACLF, areas under the receiver-operating characteristic were significantly greater for the CLIF-C ACLFs than for Child-Pugh, MELD, and MELD-sodium scores. Infection and systemic inflammatory response syndrome play an important role in the development of alcohol-related ACLF in Asian patients with active alcoholism. The CLIF-C ACLFs may be more useful for predicting mortality in ACLF cases than liver-specific scoring systems. © 2015 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 polymorphism for development to hepatocellular carcinoma in East Asian alcoholic liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Abe, Hiroshi; Aida, Yuta; Seki, Nobuyoshi; Sugita, Tomonori; Tomita, Yoichi; Nagano, Tomohisa; Itagaki, Munenori; Sutoh, Satoshi; Nagatsuma, Keisuke; Itoh, Kyoko; Matsuura, Tomokazu; Aizawa, Yoshio

    2015-09-01

    We aimed to clarify the influences of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), alcohol dehydrogenase 1B (ADH1B) polymorphisms, and ethanol consumption profile to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development in alcoholic liver cirrhosis without chronic hepatitis B and C virus infection (non-B non-C). Of 236 freshly diagnosed non-B non-C alcoholic liver cirrhosis patients, 67 were diagnosed as HCC and the remaining 169 as not having HCC. The relationship between the genetic polymorphisms and development to HCC were evaluated in well-matched patients with HCC (HCC group, n = 67) and without HCC (non-HCC group, n = 67) using propensity scores in age, sex, and prevalence of diabetes mellitus. Daily amount of ethanol consumption was significantly lower (P = 0.005), and consumptive period was significantly longer (P = 0.003) in HCC group than non-HCC group. Of 134 well-matched patients, 113 (84.3%) had ALDH2*1/*1 genotype and 21 (15.7%) had ALDH2*1/*2 genotype. In HCC development, consumptive long period (P = 0.007) and carrying ALDH2*1/*2 genotype (P = 0.026) were identified as significant factors independently participated, while there was no relation to ADH1B polymorphism. In addition, consumptive period was significantly longer in HCC group than non-HCC group in ALDH2*1/*1 genotype patients (P = 0.0005), while there was no difference in profile of ethanol consumption in ALDH2*1/*2 genotype patients. Among HCC group, daily (P = 3.78 × 10(-6) ) and cumulative amount (P = 4.89 × 10(-6) ) of ethanol consumption were significantly higher in ALDH2*1/*1 genotype patients than ALDH2*1/*2 genotype patients. In alcoholic liver cirrhosis, investigations of ALDH2 polymorphism and ethanol consumption profile are useful for prediction of HCC development. © 2015 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Liver damage, proliferation, and progenitor cell markers in experimental necrotizing enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Hiromu; Li, Bo; Lee, Carol; Koike, Yuhki; Chen, Yong; Seo, Shogo; Pierro, Agostino

    2018-05-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a disease known to cause injury to multiple organs including the liver. Liver regeneration is essential for the recovery after NEC-induced liver injury. Our aim was to investigate hepatic proliferation and progenitor cell marker expression in experimental NEC. Following ethical approval (#32238), NEC was induced in mice by hypoxia, gavage feeding of hyperosmolar formula, and lipopolysaccharide. Breastfed pups were used as control. We analyzed serum ALT level, liver inflammatory cytokines, liver proliferation markers, and progenitor cell marker expression. Comparison was made between NEC and controls. Serum ALT level was higher in NEC (p<0.05). The mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines in the liver was also higher in NEC (IL6: p<0.05, TNF-α: p<0.01). Conversely, mRNA expression of proliferation markers in the liver was lower in NEC (Ki67; p<0.01, PCNA: p<0.01). LGR5 expression was also significantly decreased in NEC as demonstrated by mRNA (p<0.05) and protein (p<0.01) levels. Inflammatory injury was present in the liver during experimental NEC. Proliferation and LGR5 expression were impaired in the NEC liver. Modulation of progenitor cell expressing LGR5 may result in stimulation of liver regeneration in NEC-induced liver injury and improved clinical outcome. Level IV. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. An experimental examination of alcohol consumption, alcohol expectancy, and self‐blame on willingness to report a hypothetical rape

    PubMed Central

    Maltby, John

    2017-01-01

    This study experimentally examined the role of victim alcohol intoxication, and self‐blame in perceiving and reporting rape to the police using a hypothetical interactive rape scenario. Participants (N = 79) were randomly assigned to consume alcohol (mean BAC = 0.07%) or tonic water before they engaged in the scenario. Alcohol expectancy was manipulated, and participant beliefs about the beverage they thought they had consumed and their feelings of intoxication were measured. Alcohol consumption and expectancy did not affect the likelihood that the nonconsensual intercourse depicted in the scenario was perceived and would be reported as rape. Participants with higher levels of self‐blame were less likely to say they would report the hypothetical rape. Self‐blame levels were higher for participants who believed they had consumed alcohol, and were associated with increased feelings of intoxication. The implications are discussed. PMID:29243270

  11. Transient and 2-Dimensional Shear-Wave Elastography Provide Comparable Assessment of Alcoholic Liver Fibrosis and Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Maja; Detlefsen, Sönke; Sevelsted Møller, Linda; Madsen, Bjørn Stæhr; Fuglsang Hansen, Janne; Fialla, Annette Dam; Trebicka, Jonel; Krag, Aleksander

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol abuse causes half of all deaths from cirrhosis in the West, but few tools are available for noninvasive diagnosis of alcoholic liver disease. We evaluated 2 elastography techniques for diagnosis of alcoholic fibrosis and cirrhosis; liver biopsy with Ishak score and collagen-proportionate area were used as reference. We performed a prospective study of 199 consecutive patients with ongoing or prior alcohol abuse, but without known liver disease. One group of patients had a high pretest probability of cirrhosis because they were identified at hospital liver clinics (in Southern Denmark). The second, lower-risk group, was recruited from municipal alcohol rehabilitation centers and the Danish national public health portal. All subjects underwent same-day transient elastography (FibroScan), 2-dimensional shear wave elastography (Supersonic Aixplorer), and liver biopsy after an overnight fast. Transient elastography and 2-dimensional shear wave elastography identified subjects in each group with significant fibrosis (Ishak score ≥3) and cirrhosis (Ishak score ≥5) with high accuracy (area under the curve ≥0.92). There was no difference in diagnostic accuracy between techniques. The cutoff values for optimal identification of significant fibrosis by transient elastography and 2-dimensional shear wave elastography were 9.6 kPa and 10.2 kPa, and for cirrhosis 19.7 kPa and 16.4 kPa. Negative predictive values were high for both groups, but the positive predictive value for cirrhosis was >66% in the high-risk group vs approximately 50% in the low-risk group. Evidence of alcohol-induced damage to cholangiocytes, but not ongoing alcohol abuse, affected liver stiffness. The collagen-proportionate area correlated with Ishak grades and accurately identified individuals with significant fibrosis and cirrhosis. In a prospective study of individuals at risk for liver fibrosis due to alcohol consumption, we found elastography to be an excellent tool for diagnosing liver

  12. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is not associated with a lower health perception.

    PubMed

    Mlynarsky, Liat; Schlesinger, Dalit; Lotan, Roni; Webb, Muriel; Halpern, Zamir; Santo, Erwin; Shibolet, Oren; Zelber-Sagi, Shira

    2016-05-07

    To examine the association between non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and general health perception. This cross sectional and prospective follow-up study was performed on a cohort of a sub-sample of the first Israeli national health and nutrition examination survey, with no secondary liver disease or history of alcohol abuse. On the first survey, in 2003-2004, 349 participants were included. In 2009-2010 participants from the baseline survey were invited to participate in a follow-up survey. On both baseline and follow-up surveys the data collected included: self-reported general health perception, physical activity habits, frequency of physician's visits, fatigue impact scale and abdominal ultrasound. Fatty liver was diagnosed by abdominal ultrasonography using standardized criteria and the ratio between the median brightness level of the liver and the right kidney was calculated to determine the Hepato-Renal Index. Out of 349 eligible participants in the first survey, 213 volunteers participated in the follow-up cohort and were included in the current analysis, NAFLD was diagnosed in 70/213 (32.9%). The prevalence of "very good" self-reported health perception was lower among participants diagnosed with NAFLD compared to those without NAFLD. However, adjustment for BMI attenuated the association (OR = 0.73, 95%CI: 0.36-1.50, P = 0.392). Similar results were observed for the hepato-renal index; it was inversely associated with "very good" health perception but adjustment for BMI attenuated the association. In a full model of multivariate analysis, that included all potential predictors for health perception, NAFLD was not associated with the self-reported general health perception (OR = 0.86, 95%CI: 0.40-1.86, P = 0.704). The odds for "very good" self-reported general health perception (compared to "else") increased among men (OR = 2.42, 95%CI: 1.26-4.66, P = 0.008) and those with higher performance of leisure time physical activity (OR = 1.01, 95%CI: 1

  13. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is not associated with a lower health perception

    PubMed Central

    Mlynarsky, Liat; Schlesinger, Dalit; Lotan, Roni; Webb, Muriel; Halpern, Zamir; Santo, Erwin; Shibolet, Oren; Zelber-Sagi, Shira

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To examine the association between non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and general health perception. METHODS: This cross sectional and prospective follow-up study was performed on a cohort of a sub-sample of the first Israeli national health and nutrition examination survey, with no secondary liver disease or history of alcohol abuse. On the first survey, in 2003-2004, 349 participants were included. In 2009-2010 participants from the baseline survey were invited to participate in a follow-up survey. On both baseline and follow-up surveys the data collected included: self-reported general health perception, physical activity habits, frequency of physician's visits, fatigue impact scale and abdominal ultrasound. Fatty liver was diagnosed by abdominal ultrasonography using standardized criteria and the ratio between the median brightness level of the liver and the right kidney was calculated to determine the Hepato-Renal Index. RESULTS: Out of 349 eligible participants in the first survey, 213 volunteers participated in the follow-up cohort and were included in the current analysis, NAFLD was diagnosed in 70/213 (32.9%). The prevalence of "very good" self-reported health perception was lower among participants diagnosed with NAFLD compared to those without NAFLD. However, adjustment for BMI attenuated the association (OR = 0.73, 95%CI: 0.36-1.50, P = 0.392). Similar results were observed for the hepato-renal index; it was inversely associated with "very good" health perception but adjustment for BMI attenuated the association. In a full model of multivariate analysis, that included all potential predictors for health perception, NAFLD was not associated with the self-reported general health perception (OR = 0.86, 95%CI: 0.40-1.86, P = 0.704). The odds for "very good" self-reported general health perception (compared to "else") increased among men (OR = 2.42, 95%CI: 1.26-4.66, P = 0.008) and those with higher performance of leisure time physical activity

  14. The Protective Effect of Agaricus blazei Murrill, Submerged Culture Using the Optimized Medium Composition, on Alcohol-Induced Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hang; Li, Gang; Zhang, Wenyu; Han, Chunchao; Xu, Xin; Li, Yong-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Agaricus blazei Murrill (ABM), an edible mushroom native to Brazil, is widely used for nonprescript and medicinal purposes. Alcohol liver disease (ALD) is considered as a leading cause for a liver injury in modern dietary life, which can be developed by a prolonged or large intake of alcohol. In this study, the medium composition of ABM was optimized using response surface methodology for maximum mycelial biomass and extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) production. The model predicts to gain a maximal mycelial biomass and extracellular polysaccharide at 1.047 g/100 mL, and 0.367 g/100 mL, respectively, when the potato is 29.88 g/100 mL, the glucose is 1.01 g/100 mL, and the bran is 1.02 g/100 mL. The verified experiments showed that the model was significantly consistent with the model prediction and that the trends of mycelial biomass and extracellular polysaccharide were predicted by artificial neural network. After that, the optimized medium was used for the submerged culture of ABM. Then, alcohol-induced liver injury in mice model was used to examine the protective effect of ABM cultured using the optimized medium on the liver. And the hepatic histopathological observations showed that ABM had a relatively significant role in mice model, which had alcoholic liver damage. PMID:25114908

  15. The protective effect of Agaricus blazei Murrill, submerged culture using the optimized medium composition, on alcohol-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hang; Li, Gang; Zhang, Wenyu; Han, Chunchao; Xu, Xin; Li, Yong-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Agaricus blazei Murrill (ABM), an edible mushroom native to Brazil, is widely used for nonprescript and medicinal purposes. Alcohol liver disease (ALD) is considered as a leading cause for a liver injury in modern dietary life, which can be developed by a prolonged or large intake of alcohol. In this study, the medium composition of ABM was optimized using response surface methodology for maximum mycelial biomass and extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) production. The model predicts to gain a maximal mycelial biomass and extracellular polysaccharide at 1.047 g/100 mL, and 0.367 g/100 mL, respectively, when the potato is 29.88 g/100 mL, the glucose is 1.01 g/100 mL, and the bran is 1.02 g/100 mL. The verified experiments showed that the model was significantly consistent with the model prediction and that the trends of mycelial biomass and extracellular polysaccharide were predicted by artificial neural network. After that, the optimized medium was used for the submerged culture of ABM. Then, alcohol-induced liver injury in mice model was used to examine the protective effect of ABM cultured using the optimized medium on the liver. And the hepatic histopathological observations showed that ABM had a relatively significant role in mice model, which had alcoholic liver damage.

  16. Dietary sodium and potassium intake in relation to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yuni; Lee, Jung Eun; Chang, Yoosoo; Kim, Mi Kyung; Sung, Eunju; Shin, Hocheol; Ryu, Seungho

    2016-10-01

    A few epidemiological data are available assessing the associations of intakes of sodium (Na) and potassium (K) with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We aimed to examine the associations of dietary intake of Na and K with the prevalence of ultrasound-diagnosed NAFLD. We performed a cross-sectional study of 100 177 participants (46 596 men and 53 581 women) who underwent a health screening examination and completed a FFQ at the Kangbuk Samsung Hospital Total Healthcare Centers, South Korea, between 2011 and 2013. NAFLD was defined by ultrasonographic detection of fatty liver in the absence of excessive alcohol intake or other known causes of liver disease. The proportion of NAFLD was 35·6 % for men and 9·8 % for women. Increasing prevalence of NAFLD was observed with increasing Na intake. The multivariable-adjusted prevalence ratios (PR) of NAFLD comparing the highest with the lowest quintile of energy-adjusted Na intake were 1·25 (95 % CI 1·18, 1·32; P trend<0·001) in men and 1·32 (95 % CI 1·18, 1·47; P trend <0·001) in women. However, when we additionally adjusted for body fat percentage, the association became attenuated; the corresponding PR of NAFLD were 1·15 (95 % CI 1·09, 1·21) in men and 1·06 (95 % CI 0·95, 1·17) in women. No inverse association was observed for energy-adjusted K intake. Our findings suggest that higher Na intake is associated with a greater prevalence of NAFLD in young and middle-aged asymptomatic adults, which might be partly mediated by adiposity.

  17. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is associated with left ventricular diastolic dysfunction in essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Fallo, F; Dalla Pozza, A; Sonino, N; Lupia, M; Tona, F; Federspil, G; Ermani, M; Catena, C; Soardo, G; Di Piazza, L; Bernardi, S; Bertolotto, M; Pinamonti, B; Fabris, B; Sechi, L A

    2009-11-01

    Insulin resistance is recognized as the pathophysiological hallmark of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). A relation between insulin sensitivity and left ventricular morphology and function has been reported in essential hypertension, where a high prevalence of NAFLD has been recently found. We investigated the inter-relationship between left ventricular morphology/function, metabolic parameters and NAFLD in 86 never-treated essential hypertensive patients subdivided in two subgroups according to the presence (n = 48) or absence (n = 38) of NAFLD at ultrasonography. The two groups were similar as to sex, age and blood pressure levels. No patient had diabetes mellitus, obesity, hyperlipidemia, or other risk factors for liver disease. Body mass index, waist circumference, triglycerides, glucose, insulin, homeostasis model of assessment index for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase were higher and adiponectin levels were lower in patients with NAFLD than in patients without NAFLD, and were associated with NAFLD at univariate analysis. Patients with NAFLD had similar prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy compared to patients without NAFLD, but a higher prevalence of diastolic dysfunction (62.5 vs 21.1%, P < 0.001), as defined by E/A ratio <1 and E-wave deceleration time >220 ms. Diastolic dysfunction (P = 0.040) and HOMA-IR (P = 0.012) remained independently associated with NAFLD at backward multivariate analysis. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease was associated with insulin resistance and abnormalities of left ventricular diastolic function in a cohort of patients with essential hypertension, suggesting a concomitant increase of metabolic and cardiac risk in this condition.

  18. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and the development of reflux esophagitis: A cohort study.

    PubMed

    Min, Yang Won; Kim, Youngha; Gwak, Geum-Youn; Gu, Seonhye; Kang, Danbee; Cho, Soo Jin; Guallar, Eliseo; Cho, Juhee; Sinn, Dong Hyun

    2018-05-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome, is associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease in cross-sectional studies, but a prospective association has not been evaluated. The current study aimed to determine whether NAFLD increases the risk of incident reflux esophagitis in a large cohort study. We conducted a cohort study of 34 063 men and women without reflux esophagitis or other upper gastrointestinal disease at baseline who underwent health checkup examinations between January 2003 and December 2013. Fatty liver was diagnosed by ultrasound based on standard criteria. Reflux esophagitis was defined by the presence of at least grade A mucosal break on esophagogastroduodenoscopy. The prevalence of NAFLD at baseline was 33.2%. During 153 520.2 person-years of follow-up, the cumulative incidences of reflux esophagitis for participants without and with NAFLD were 9.6% and 13.8%, respectively (P < 0.001). The age-adjusted and sex-adjusted hazard ratio for the risk of reflux esophagitis development in participants with NAFLD compared with those without NAFLD was 1.15 (95% confidence interval 1.07-1.23; P < 0.001). However, this association disappeared after adjusting for body mass index and other metabolic factors (hazard ratio 1.01, 95% confidence interval 0.94-1.09; P = 0.79). Similarly, in multivariable-adjusted models, there was no significant association between NAFLD severity and the risk of developing reflux esophagitis. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is not independently associated with the risk of the development of reflux esophagitis, but rather, reflux esophagitis is primarily the consequence of increased body mass index commonly associated with NAFLD. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  19. Increased activity of the complement system in the liver of patients with alcoholic hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong; French, Barbara A; Liu, Hui; Tillman, Brittany C; French, Samuel W

    2014-12-01

    Inflammation has been suggested as a mechanism underlying the development of alcoholic hepatitis (AH). The activation of the complement system plays an important role in inflammation. Although it has been shown that ethanol-induced activation of the complement system contributes to the pathophysiology of ethanol-induced liver injury in mice, whether ethanol consumption activates the complement system in the human liver has not been investigated. Using antibodies against C1q, C3, and C5, the immunoreactivity of the complement system in patients with AH was examined by immunohistochemistry and quantified by morphometric image analysis. The immunoreactivity intensity of C1q, C3, and C5 in patients with AH was significantly higher than that seen in normal controls. Further, the gene expression of C1q, C3, and C5 was examined using real-time PCR. There were increases in the levels of C1q and C5, but not C3 mRNA in AH. Moreover, the immunoreactivity of C5a receptor (C5aR) also increased in AH. To explore the functional implication of the activation of the complement system in AH, we examined the colocalization of C5aR in Mallory-Denk bodies (MDBs) forming balloon hepatocytes. C5aR was focally overexpressed in the MDB forming cells. Collectively, our study suggests that alcohol consumption increases the activity of the complement system in the liver cells, which contributes to the inflammation-associated pathogenesis of AH. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. New Discriminant Method for Identifying the Aggressive Disease Phenotype of Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Yusuke; Ikeda, Kenji; Arase, Yasuji; Fujiyama, Shunichiro; Hosaka, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Masahiro; Saitoh, Satoshi; Sezaki, Hitomi; Akuta, Norio; Suzuki, Fumitaka; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Kumada, Hiromitsu

    2017-01-01

    Objective To detect the aggressive phenotype (AP) of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) based on the initial laboratory data and clinical characteristics. Methods We enrolled 144 patients with histologically proven NAFLD. For the first analysis, 24 NAFLD patients underwent repeat biopsy to establish a discriminant formula for predicting the AP of NAFLD (D-APN). The AP was defined by NAFLD that had been maintained or progressed to a fibrotic stage beyond stage 2. In the second analysis, we analyzed the distribution of the AP in each stage of disease and the incidence of the PNPLA3 rs738409 GG genotype in AP in 120 other patients. Results After the analysis, the following function was found to discriminate the disease phenotype: z=0.150×body mass index (kg/m 2 )+0.085×age (years)+1.112×ln (AST) (IU/L)+0.127×ln (m-AST)-12.96. A positive result indicates the AP of NAFLD. The discriminant functions had a positive predictive value of 94% and a negative predictive value of 71%. The distribution of the AP and the incidence of the PNPLA3 GG genotype in the AP in each stage of the disease among the 120 patients were as follows: non-alcoholic fatty liver, 30%/33%; non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) stage 1, 53%/26%; stage 2, 71%/70%; stage 3, 92%/57%; and stage 4, 93%/64%; there was a significant increase in the incidence of the AP as the disease progressed (p<0.001). Conclusion The new discriminant formula was useful for predicting disease progression potential in NAFLD patients and the incidence of the PNPLA3 GG genotype was elevated according to the distribution of AP.

  1. Dysregulation of hepatic zinc transporters in a mouse model of alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qian; Li, Qiong; Zhong, Wei; Zhang, Jiayang; Sun, Xiuhua; Tan, Xiaobing; Yin, Xinmin; Sun, Xinguo; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Zinc deficiency is a consistent phenomenon observed in patients with alcoholic liver disease, but the mechanisms have not been well defined. The objective of this study was to determine if alcohol alters hepatic zinc transporters in association with reduction of hepatic zinc levels and if oxidative stress mediates the alterations of zinc transporters. C57BL/6 mice were pair-fed with the Lieber-DeCarli control or ethanol diets for 2, 4, or 8 wk. Chronic alcohol exposure reduced hepatic zinc levels, but increased plasma and urine zinc levels, at all time points. Hepatic zinc finger proteins, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α) and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF-4α), were downregulated in ethanol-fed mice. Four hepatic zinc transporter proteins showed significant alterations in ethanol-fed mice compared with the controls. ZIP5 and ZIP14 proteins were downregulated, while ZIP7 and ZnT7 proteins were upregulated, by ethanol exposure at all time points. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that chronic ethanol exposure upregulated cytochrome P-450 2E1 and caused 4-hydroxynonenal accumulation in the liver. For the in vitro study, murine FL-83B hepatocytes were treated with 5 μM 4-hydroxynonenal or 100 μM hydrogen peroxide for 72 h. The results from in vitro studies demonstrated that 4-hydroxynonenal treatment altered ZIP5 and ZIP7 protein abundance, and hydrogen peroxide treatment changed ZIP7, ZIP14, and ZnT7 protein abundance. These results suggest that chronic ethanol exposure alters hepatic zinc transporters via oxidative stress, which might account for ethanol-induced hepatic zinc deficiency. PMID:24924749

  2. Sex-specific metabolic interactions between liver and adipose tissue in MCD diet-induced non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yun-Hee; Kim, Sou Hyun; Kim, Sang-Nam; Kwon, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Jeong-Dong; Oh, Ji Youn; Jung, Young-Suk

    2016-01-01

    Higher susceptibility to metabolic disease in male exemplifies the importance of sexual dimorphism in pathogenesis. We hypothesized that the higher incidence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in males involves sex-specific metabolic interactions between liver and adipose tissue. In the present study, we used a methionine-choline deficient (MCD) diet-induced fatty liver mouse model to investigate sex differences in the metabolic response of the liver and adipose tissue. After 2 weeks on an MCD-diet, fatty liver was induced in a sex-specific manner, affecting male mice more severely than females. The MCD-diet increased lipolytic enzymes in the gonadal white adipose tissue (gWAT) of male mice, whereas it increased expression of uncoupling protein 1 and other brown adipocyte markers in the gWAT of female mice. Moreover, gWAT from female mice demonstrated higher levels of oxygen consumption and mitochondrial content compared to gWAT from male mice. FGF21 expression was increased in liver tissue by the MCD diet, and the degree of upregulation was significantly higher in the livers of female mice. The endocrine effect of FGF21 was responsible, in part, for the sex-specific browning of gonadal white adipose tissue. Collectively, these data demonstrated that distinctively female-specific browning of white adipose tissue aids in protecting female mice against MCD diet-induced fatty liver disease. PMID:27409675

  3. Sevelamer Improves Steatohepatitis, Inhibits Liver and Intestinal Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR), and Reverses Innate Immune Dysregulation in a Mouse Model of Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    McGettigan, Brett M; McMahan, Rachel H; Luo, Yuhuan; Wang, Xiaoxin X; Orlicky, David J; Porsche, Cara; Levi, Moshe; Rosen, Hugo R

    2016-10-28

    Bile acid sequestrants are synthetic polymers that bind bile acids in the gut and are used to treat dyslipidemia and hyperphosphatemia. Recently, these agents have been reported to lower blood glucose and increase insulin sensitivity by altering bile acid signaling pathways. In this study, we assessed the efficacy of sevelamer in treating mice with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We also analyzed how sevelamer alters inflammation and bile acid signaling in NAFLD livers. Mice were fed a low-fat or Western diet for 12 weeks followed by a diet-plus-sevelamer regimen for 2 or 12 weeks. At the end of treatment, disease severity was assessed, hepatic leukocyte populations were examined, and expression of genes involved in farnesoid X receptor (FXR) signaling in the liver and intestine was analyzed. Sevelamer treatment significantly reduced liver steatosis and lobular inflammation. Sevelamer-treated NAFLD livers had notably fewer pro-inflammatory infiltrating macrophages and a significantly greater fraction of alternatively activated Kupffer cells compared with controls. Expression of genes involved in FXR signaling in the liver and intestine was significantly altered in mice with NAFLD as well as in those treated with sevelamer. In a mouse model of NAFLD, sevelamer improved disease and counteracted innate immune cell dysregulation in the liver. This study also revealed a dysregulation of FXR signaling in the liver and intestine of NAFLD mice that was counteracted by sevelamer treatment. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Sex-specific metabolic interactions between liver and adipose tissue in MCD diet-induced non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun-Hee; Kim, Sou Hyun; Kim, Sang-Nam; Kwon, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Jeong-Dong; Oh, Ji Youn; Jung, Young-Suk

    2016-07-26

    Higher susceptibility to metabolic disease in male exemplifies the importance of sexual dimorphism in pathogenesis. We hypothesized that the higher incidence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in males involves sex-specific metabolic interactions between liver and adipose tissue. In the present study, we used a methionine-choline deficient (MCD) diet-induced fatty liver mouse model to investigate sex differences in the metabolic response of the liver and adipose tissue. After 2 weeks on an MCD-diet, fatty liver was induced in a sex-specific manner, affecting male mice more severely than females. The MCD-diet increased lipolytic enzymes in the gonadal white adipose tissue (gWAT) of male mice, whereas it increased expression of uncoupling protein 1 and other brown adipocyte markers in the gWAT of female mice. Moreover, gWAT from female mice demonstrated higher levels of oxygen consumption and mitochondrial content compared to gWAT from male mice. FGF21 expression was increased in liver tissue by the MCD diet, and the degree of upregulation was significantly higher in the livers of female mice. The endocrine effect of FGF21 was responsible, in part, for the sex-specific browning of gonadal white adipose tissue. Collectively, these data demonstrated that distinctively female-specific browning of white adipose tissue aids in protecting female mice against MCD diet-induced fatty liver disease.

  5. A Relative Deficiency of Lysosomal Acid Lypase Activity Characterizes Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Tovoli, Francesco; Napoli, Lucia; Negrini, Giulia; D'Addato, Sergio; Tozzi, Giulia; D'Amico, Jessica; Piscaglia, Fabio; Bolondi, Luigi

    2017-05-25

    Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) is a key enzyme in lipid metabolism. Initial reports have suggested a role for a relative acquired LAL deficiency in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)-however, it is still unclear whether this mechanism is specific for NAFLD. We aimed to determine LAL activity in a cohort of NAFLD subjects and in a control group of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients, investigating the role of liver cirrhosis. A total of 81 patients with a diagnosis of NAFLD, and 78 matched controls with HCV-related liver disease were enrolled. For each patient, LAL activity was determined on peripheral dried blood spots (DBS) and correlated with clinical and laboratory data. A subgroup analysis among cirrhotic patients was also performed. LAL activity is significantly reduced in NAFLD, compared to that in HCV patients. This finding is particularly evident in the pre-cirrhotic stage of disease. LAL activity is also correlated with platelet and white blood cell count, suggesting an analytic interference of portal-hypertension-induced pancytopenia on DBS-determined LAL activity. NAFLD is characterized by a specific deficit in LAL activity, suggesting a pathogenetic role of LAL. We propose that future studies on this topic should rely on tissue specific analyses, as peripheral blood tests are also influenced by confounding factors.

  6. Relationship between Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Nseir, William; Abu-Rahmeh, Zuhair; Tsipis, Alex; Mograbi, Julnar; Mahamid, Mahmud

    2017-04-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver disease which refers to the presence of hepatic steatosis. Breast cancer is now the most common cancer in women and is the leading cause of death from cancer among women. To assess the relationship between NAFLD and newly diagnosed cases of breast cancer. The results of mammography screening examinations in women referred to the Breast Center, Holy Family Hospital, Nazareth during a 4 year period were collected. We identified cases of women who were newly diagnosed with breast cancer and who underwent abdominal computed tomography (CT) within 1 month of the diagnosis. The control group comprised 73 women with normal mammography and breast ultrasonography who underwent abdominal CT within 3 months from the date of the breast cancer screening during the same study period. The control cases were matched by age and body mass index (BMI). We compared the cases with the controls in terms of the presence of diffuse hepatic fatty liver and other known risk factors for breast cancer. Of the 133 women who were screened, 73 with new diagnosis of breast cancer were eligible for the study. NAFLD was found in 33 of the women with breast cancer and in 12 in the control group (45.2% vs.16.4%, respectively, P = 0.002). Multivariate analysis showed NAFLD (odds ratio 2.82, 95% confidence interval 1.2-5.5, P = 0.016) to be associated with breast cancer. NAFLD is associated with breast cancer.

  7. Relevant Aspects of Nutritional and Dietary Interventions in Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Rodas, Maria Catalina; Valenzuela, Rodrigo; Videla, Luis A.

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the main cause of liver disease worldwide. NAFLD is linked to circumstances such as type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance, obesity, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension. Since the obesity figures and related comorbidities are increasing, NAFLD has turned into a liver problem that has become progressively more common. Currently, there is no effective drug therapy for NAFLD; therefore, interventions in lifestyles remain the first line of treatment. Bearing in mind that adherence rates to this type of treatment are poor, great efforts are currently focused on finding novel therapeutic agents for the prevention in the development of hepatic steatosis and its progression to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. This review presents a compilation of the scientific evidence found in the last years showing the results of interventions in lifestyle, diet, and behavioral therapies and research results in human, animal and cell models. Possible therapeutic agents ranging from supplementation with vitamins, amino acids, prebiotics, probiotics, symbiotics, polyunsaturated fatty acids and polyphenols to interventions with medicinal plants are analyzed. PMID:26512643

  8. Mediterranean diet and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: New therapeutic option around the corner?

    PubMed Central

    Sofi, Francesco; Casini, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents the most common chronic liver disease in Western countries, being considered as the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. NAFLD has a common pathogenic background to that of metabolic syndrome, and shares many risk factors such as obesity, hypertension, insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. Although there is no currently available evidence-based established treatment for NAFLD, all the recommendations from the medical associations indicate that the most effective treatment is to reduce weight through lifestyle modifications. Diet, indeed, plays a key role in the management of NAFLD patients, as both the quantity and quality of the diet have been reported to have a beneficial role in the onset and severity of the liver disease. Among all the diets that have been proposed, a Mediterranean diet was the most effective dietary option for inducing weight loss together with beneficial effects on all the risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome and NAFLD. Over the last few years, research has demonstrated a beneficial effect of a Mediterranean diet in NAFLD. In this review, we will examine all the available data on the association between diet, nutrients and the Mediterranean diet in association with onset and severity of NAFLD. PMID:24966604

  9. Imaging evaluation of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: focused on quantification.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Ho

    2017-12-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has been an emerging major health problem, and the most common cause of chronic liver disease in Western countries. Traditionally, liver biopsy has been gold standard method for quantification of hepatic steatosis. However, its invasive nature with potential complication as well as measurement variability are major problem. Thus, various imaging studies have been used for evaluation of hepatic steatosis. Ultrasonography provides fairly good accuracy to detect moderate-to-severe degree hepatic steatosis, but limited accuracy for mild steatosis. Operator-dependency and subjective/qualitative nature of examination are another major drawbacks of ultrasonography. Computed tomography can be considered as an unsuitable imaging modality for evaluation of NAFLD due to potential risk of radiation exposure and limited accuracy in detecting mild steatosis. Both magnetic resonance spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging using chemical shift technique provide highly accurate and reproducible diagnostic performance for evaluating NAFLD, and therefore, have been used in many clinical trials as a non-invasive reference of standard method.

  10. Protective effects of glycyrrhizic acid against non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xue; Duan, Xingping; Wang, Changyuan; Liu, Zhihao; Sun, Pengyuan; Huo, Xiaokui; Ma, Xiaodong; Sun, Huijun; Liu, Kexin; Meng, Qiang

    2017-07-05

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become a predictive factor of death from many diseases. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the protective effect of glycyrrhizic acid (GA), a natural triterpene glycoside, on NAFLD induced by a high-fat diet (HFD) in mice, and further to elucidate the mechanisms underlying GA protection. GA treatment significantly reduced the relative liver weight, serum ALT, AST activities, levels of serum lipid, blood glucose and insulin. GA suppressed lipid accumulation in liver. Further mechanism investigation indicated that GA reduced hepatic lipogenesis via downregulating SREBP-1c, FAS and SCD1 expression, increased fatty acids β-oxidation via an increase in PPARα, CPT1α and ACADS, and promoted triglyceride metabolism through inducing LPL activity. Furthermore, GA reduced gluconeogenesis through repressing PEPCK and G6Pase, and increased glycogen synthesis through an induction in gene expression of PDase and GSK3β. In addition, GA increased insulin sensitivity through upregulating phosphorylation of IRS-1 and IRS-2. In conclusion, GA produces protective effect against NAFLD, due to regulation of genes involved in lipid, glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of iron overload in a rat nutritional model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, Richard; Sijtsema, Helene P; Tlali, Mpho; Marais, Adrian D; Hall, Pauline de la M

    2006-12-01

    This study sought to determine whether excess hepatic iron potentiates liver injury in the methionine choline-deficient (MCD) model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Iron-loaded rats were fed either MCD or control diets [MCD diet plus choline bitartrate (2 g/kg) and DL-methionine (3 g/kg)] for 4 and 12 weeks, after which liver pathology, hepatic iron, triglyceride, lipid peroxidation products and hydroxyproline (HYP) levels and serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels were evaluated. Iron supplementation in MCD animals resulted in histologic evidence of hepatic iron overload at 4 and 12 weeks and a 14-fold increase in hepatic iron concentration at 12 weeks (P < 0.001). Iron supplementation in these animals was associated with increased lobular necroinflammation at 4 weeks (P < 0.02) and decreased hepatic steatosis (P < 0.01), hepatic triglyceride levels (P < 0.01), hepatic-conjugated dienes (CD; P < 0.02) and serum ALT levels (P < 0.002) at 12 weeks. Reduced hepatic steatosis (P < 0.005) and CD (P < 0.01) were apparent by 4 weeks. Iron supplementation was associated with a trend towards increased perivenular fibrosis not hepatic HYP content. Hepatic iron overload in the MCD model of NAFLD is associated with decreased hepatic lipid, decreased early lipid peroxidation products, increased necroinflammation and a trend towards increased perivenular fibrosis.

  12. Imaging evaluation of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: focused on quantification

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has been an emerging major health problem, and the most common cause of chronic liver disease in Western countries. Traditionally, liver biopsy has been gold standard method for quantification of hepatic steatosis. However, its invasive nature with potential complication as well as measurement variability are major problem. Thus, various imaging studies have been used for evaluation of hepatic steatosis. Ultrasonography provides fairly good accuracy to detect moderate-to-severe degree hepatic steatosis, but limited accuracy for mild steatosis. Operator-dependency and subjective/qualitative nature of examination are another major drawbacks of ultrasonography. Computed tomography can be considered as an unsuitable imaging modality for evaluation of NAFLD due to potential risk of radiation exposure and limited accuracy in detecting mild steatosis. Both magnetic resonance spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging using chemical shift technique provide highly accurate and reproducible diagnostic performance for evaluating NAFLD, and therefore, have been used in many clinical trials as a non-invasive reference of standard method. PMID:28994271

  13. Consensus document. Management of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Clinical practice guideline.

    PubMed

    Aller, Rocío; Fernández-Rodríguez, Conrado; Lo Iacono, Oreste; Bañares, Rafael; Abad, Javier; Carrión, José Antonio; García-Monzón, Carmelo; Caballería, Joan; Berenguer, Marina; Rodríguez-Perálvarez, Manuel; Miranda, José López; Vilar-Gómez, Eduardo; Crespo, Javier; García-Cortés, Miren; Reig, María; Navarro, José María; Gallego, Rocío; Genescà, Joan; Arias-Loste, María Teresa; Pareja, María Jesús; Albillos, Agustín; Muntané, Jordi; Jorquera, Francisco; Solà, Elsa; Hernández-Guerra, Manuel; Rojo, Miguel Ángel; Salmerón, Javier; Caballería, Llorenc; Diago, Moisés; Molina, Esther; Bataller, Ramón; Romero-Gómez, Manuel

    2018-05-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the main cause of liver diseases in Spain and the incidence is raising due to the outbreak of type 2 diabetes and obesity. This CPG suggests recommendation about diagnosis, mainly non-invasive biomarkers, and clinical management of this entity. Life-style modifications to achieve weight loss is the main target in the management of NAFLD. Low caloric Mediterranean diet and 200 minutes/week of aerobic exercise are encouraged. In non-responders patients with morbid obesity, bariatric surgery or metabolic endoscopy could be indicated. Pharmacological therapy is indicated in patients with NASH and fibrosis and non-responders to weight loss measures. NAFLD could influence liver transplantation, as a growing indication, the impact of steatosis in the graft viability, de novo NAFLD rate after OLT and a raised cardiovascular risk that modify the management of this entity. The current CPG was the result of the First Spanish NAFLD meeting in Seville. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. The Biological Clock: A Pivotal Hub in Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; De Cosmo, Salvatore; Mazza, Tommaso

    2018-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most frequent hepatic pathology in the Western world and may evolve into steatohepatitis (NASH), increasing the risk of cirrhosis, portal hypertension and hepatocellular carcinoma. NAFLD derives from the accumulation of hepatic fat due to discrepant free fatty acid metabolism. Other factors contributing to this are deranged nutrients and bile acids fluxes as well as alterations in nuclear receptors, hormones, and intermediary metabolites, which impact on signaling pathways involved in metabolism and inflammation. Autophagy and host gut-microbiota interplay are also relevant to NAFLD pathogenesis. Notably, liver metabolic pathways and bile acid synthesis as well as autophagic and immune/inflammatory processes all show circadian patterns driven by the biological clock. Gut microbiota impacts on the biological clock, at the same time as the appropriate timing of metabolic fluxes, hormone secretion, bile acid turnover, autophagy and inflammation with behavioural cycles of fasting/feeding and sleeping/waking is required to circumvent hepatosteatosis, indicating significant interactions of the gut and circadian processes in NAFLD pathophysiology. Several time-related factors and processes interplay in NAFLD development, with the biological clock proposed to act as a network level hub. Deranged physiological rhythms (chronodisruption) may also play a role in liver steatosis pathogenesis. The current article reviews how the circadian clock circuitry intimately interacts with several mechanisms involved in the onset of hepatosteatosis and its progression to NASH, thereby contributing to the global NAFLD epidemic. PMID:29662454

  15. The intake of high fat diet with different trans fatty acid levels differentially induces oxidative stress and non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Trans-fatty acids (TFA) are known as a risk factor for coronary artery diseases, insulin resistance and obesity accompanied by systemic inflammation, the features of metabolic syndrome. Little is known about the effects on the liver induced by lipids and also few studies are focused on the effect of foods rich in TFAs on hepatic functions and oxidative stress. This study investigates whether high-fat diets with different TFA levels induce oxidative stress and liver dysfunction in rats. Methods Male Wistar rats were divided randomly into four groups (n = 12/group): C receiving standard-chow; Experimental groups that were fed high-fat diet included 20% fresh soybean oil diet (FSO), 20% oxidized soybean oil diet (OSO) and 20% margarine diet (MG). Each group was kept on the treatment for 4 weeks. Results A liver damage was observed in rats fed with high-fat diet via increase of liver lipid peroxidation and decreased hepatic antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase). The intake of oxidized oil led to higher levels of lipid peroxidation and a lower concentration of plasma antioxidants in comparison to rats fed with FSO. The higher inflammatory response in the liver was induced by MG diet. Liver histopathology from OSO and MG groups showed respectively moderate to severe cytoplasm vacuolation, hypatocyte hypertrophy, hepatocyte ballooning, and necroinflammation. Conclusion It seems that a strong relationship exists between the consumption of TFA in the oxidized oils and lipid peroxidation and non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The extent of the peroxidative events in liver was also different depending on the fat source suggesting that feeding margarine with higher TFA levels may represent a direct source of oxidative stress for the organism. The present study provides evidence for a direct effect of TFA on NAFLD. PMID:21943357

  16. Prophylactic effects of humic acid-glucan combination against experimental liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Vetvicka, Vaclav; Garcia-Mina, Jose Maria; Yvin, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Despite intensive research, liver diseases represent a significant health problem and current medicine does not offer a substance able to significantly inhibit the hepatotoxicity leading to various stages of liver disease. Based on our previously published studies showing the protective effects of a glucan-humic acid (HA) combination, we focused on the hypothesis that the combination of these two natural molecules can offer prophylactic protection against experimentally induced hepatotoxicity. Materials and Methods: Lipopolysaccharide, carbon tetrachloride, and ethanol were used to experimentally damage the liver. Levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, glutathione, superoxide dismutase, and malondialdehyde, known to correspond to the liver damage, were assayed. Results: Using three different hepatotoxins, we found that in all cases, some samples of HA and most of all the glucan-HA combination, offer strong protection against liver damage. Conclusion: Glucan-HA combination is a promising agent for use in liver protection. PMID:26401416

  17. Gas-chromatographic resolution of enantiomeric secondary alcohols. Stereoselective reductive metabolism of ketones in rabbit-liver cytosol.

    PubMed

    Gal, J; DeVito, D; Harper, T W

    1981-01-01

    Chiral secondary alcohols were treated with (S)-(-)-1-phenylethyl isocyanate. For each racemic alcohol, the resulting diastereomeric urethane derivatives were resolved on flexible fused-silica capillary GLC columns with retention times of 15 min or less. Derivatization of individual enantiomers showed that the urethane derivatives of (R)-(-)-2-octanol, (R)-(+)-1-phenylethyl alcohol, and (S)-(+)-2,2,2-trifluoro-1-phenylethanol are eluted before the corresponding diastereomers. The procedure is simple and rapid, and is suitable for the determination of the enantiomeric composition of chiral alcohols extracted from biological media. A series of aliphatic alcohols, aryl alkyl carbinols, and arylalkyl alkyl carbinols were resolved with the procedure, and the degree of resolution varied from good to excellent. Eight achiral ketones were incubated, individually, with rabbit-liver 90,000 g supernatant fractions, and the enantiomeric composition of the alcohol metabolites was determined with the GLC procedure. The reductions proceeded with high stereoselectivity to give alcohol products of 90% or greater enantiomeric purity. The reduction of 2-octanone and acetophenone gave predominant alcohols of (S)-configuration, in agreement with the Baumann-Prelog rule. The configuration of the predominant alcohols arising in the reduction of the remainder of the ketones could not be firmly established, but the evidence suggests that they are also of the (S)-configuration. Fluorine or methyl substitution in the ortho position of acetophenone produced an increase in the stereoselectivity, and the alcohol produced from ortho-methylacetophenone was enantiomerically greater than 99% pure.

  18. [Prevalence of no alcohol fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in a population of obese children in Valencia, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Pontiles de Sánchez, Milagros; Morón de Salim, Alba; Rodríguez de Perdomo, Henny; Perdomo Oramas, Germán

    2014-06-01

    No Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) is characterized by an abnormal accumulation of fat in hepatocytes, without alcohol, where overweight and obesity are determinants. Ecosonografia evaluated the prevalence of fatty liver in obese pediatric patients and its relation to nutritional assessment. The sample consisted of 85 children (51 females, 34 males), age 3-17. The abdominal ecosonography, BMI, waist circumference were performed; Godard Test for physical activity, history of diabetes, dyslipidemia, obesity and cardiovascular disease were questioned. Lipid profile, glucose and insulin resistance were determined. Data analyzed from descriptive and comparative tables. We obtained: mean age 9.8 ± 2.7 females and males 9.6 ± 2.7 years. The ecosonography indicated 50% and 50% fatty liver-pancreas fatty liver in children aged 3-6 years; 7-11 years 39.7% fatty liver-pancreas; 12-17yrs 31.6% fatty liver-pancreas (p > 0.05); BMI > 26 kg/m2 42.9% fatty liver-pancreas; 21 to 25 kg/m2 44.7% fatty liver; 15 to 20 kg/m2 60%fatty liver-pancreas (p> 0.05). 97.6% with high CC; 68.2% with inadequate physical activity; high frequency of history of chronic non-communicable diseases. We concluded that this population had predominantly fatty liver fatty replacement of the pancreas (HG-RGP) in the groups with higher BMI, CC and high male unrelated insulin resistance, altered lipid profile and diagnosis HG. We inferred that the anthropometric assessment of waist circumference and abdominal ecosonography indicate the presence of visceral obesity, a condition that predisposes to hepatic steatosis, pancreas and/or liver-pancreas.

  19. Epigallocatechin gallate attenuates experimental non-alcoholic steatohepatitis induced by high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Kuzu, Nalan; Bahcecioglu, Ibrahim Halil; Dagli, Adile Ferda; Ozercan, Ibrahim Hanifi; Ustündag, Bilal; Sahin, Kazim

    2008-08-01

    In the present study, we examined the preventive role of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) in an experimental non-alcoholic steatohepatitis model induced by a high fat diet. The study included 21 male Sprague-Dawley rats, which were equally divided into three groups. The first group was fed on a standard rat diet, the second group on a high fat diet (HFD), and the third group on a HFD + EGCG. The study concluded after 6 weeks. Histopathological examination was performed. Plasma and tissue MDA levels, glucose, insulin, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase, gamma glutamyltransferase, alkaline phosphatase, triglyceride, and cholesterol levels were studied. Insulin resistance was calculated by the homeostasis model of insulin resistance method. Steatosis, inflammation, ballooning degeneration, and necrosis increased significantly in the HFD group, compared to the control group (P < 0.01). Steatosis and inflammation decreased in the HFD + EGCG group, in comparison to the HFD group (P < 0.05, for each). There was a significant decline in ALT (P < 0.01), triglyceride (P < 0.01), insulin (P < 0.05), and glucose (P < 0.05) levels in the HFD + EGCG group, when compared to the HFD group. Plasma and liver MDA levels in the HFD + EGCG group were lower than those of the HFD group; the difference was significant (P < 0.01 for each). Glutathione levels in the HFD + EGCG group was significantly higher those in the HFD group. CYP 2E1 and alpha-smooth muscle actin expression decreased in the HFD + EGCG group, in comparison to the HFD group (P < 0.01, P < 0.05, respectively). EGCG reduces the development of experimental non-alcoholic steatohepatitis induced by a high fat diet. It seems to exercise this effect through its effect on lipid metabolism and antioxidant characteristics.

  20. A comparative study on the hepatoprotective action of bear bile and Coptidis Rhizoma aqueous extract on experimental liver fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Feng, Yibin; Cheung, Fan; Chow, Oi-Yee; Wang, Xuanbin; Su, Weiwei; Tong, Yao

    2012-11-29

    Bear bile and Coptidis Rhizoma have been used in Chinese medicine with a long tradition in treating heat-diseases. Both bear bile and Coptidis Rhizoma are used to treat liver diseases in clinical practice of Chinese Medicine. Since bears are currently endangered, it raises the question whether the use of bear bile is ethical. To look for substitute for bear bile, the aim of this study is to compare the anti-fibrotic effects of Coptidis Rhizoma and its major component berberine with the actions of bear bile and its major compound tauroursodeoxycholic acid on experimental liver fibrosis in rats. Quality assessment was conducted with high performance liquid chromatography. The experimental liver fibrosis in rats was induced by carbon tetrachloride, alcohol, and bile duct ligation respectively. The biochemical criteria in the blood and tissue samples were measured to evaluate the anti-fibrotic properties and underlying mechanisms of the drugs. Coptidis Rhizoma Aqueous Extract (CRAE), berberine, and bear bile exerted anti-fibrotic properties on various liver fibrosis models in rats. CRAE and berberine significantly reduced the peroxidative stress in liver through increasing the superoxide dismutase enzyme activity. CRAE and berberine were able to excrete bilirubin products from the liver and protect hepatocytes from cholestatic damage. The effect of CRAE and berberine are comparable to that of bear bile. Instead of using bear bile, CRAE and berberine can be potential substitutes in treating liver fibrosis.

  1. A comparative study on the hepatoprotective action of bear bile and coptidis rhizoma aqueous extract on experimental liver fibrosis in rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study Bear bile and Coptidis Rhizoma have been used in Chinese medicine with a long tradition in treating heat-diseases. Both bear bile and Coptidis Rhizoma are used to treat liver diseases in clinical practice of Chinese Medicine. Since bears are currently endangered, it raises the question whether the use of bear bile is ethical. To look for substitute for bear bile, the aim of this study is to compare the anti-fibrotic effects of Coptidis Rhizoma and its major component berberine with the actions of bear bile and its major compound tauroursodeoxycholic acid on experimental liver fibrosis in rats. Method Quality assessment was conducted with high performance liquid chromatography. The experimental liver fibrosis in rats was induced by carbon tetrachloride, alcohol, and bile duct ligation respectively. The biochemical criteria in the blood and tissue samples were measured to evaluate the anti-fibrotic properties and underlying mechanisms of the drugs. Results Coptidis Rhizoma Aqueous Extract (CRAE), berberine, and bear bile exerted anti-fibrotic properties on various liver fibrosis models in rats. CRAE and berberine significantly reduced the peroxidative stress in liver through increasing the superoxide dismutase enzyme activity. CRAE and berberine were able to excrete bilirubin products from the liver and protect hepatocytes from cholestatic damage. The effect of CRAE and berberine are comparable to that of bear bile. Conclusion Instead of using bear bile, CRAE and berberine can be potential substitutes in treating liver fibrosis. PMID:23190573

  2. Assessing alcohol intake & its dose-dependent effects on liver enzymes by 24-h recall and questionnaire using NHANES 2001-2010 data

    DOE PAGES

    Agarwal, Sanjiv; Fulgoni, III, Victor L.; Lieberman, Harris R.

    2016-06-22

    Alcohol is a significant component of the diet with dose-dependent risks and benefits. High doses of alcohol damage the liver and early symptoms of liver disease include changes in routinely assessed liver enzymes. Less is known regarding the mechanisms responsible for the benefits of moderate alcohol consumption, including their effects on the liver. The objectives of this study were to examine alcohol’s dose-dependent effects on markers of liver function (alkaline phosphatase (ALP), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT), and bilirubin), as well as to compare the different methods of assessing alcohol intake using NHANES 2001–2010 adultmore » data (N =24,807). Three methods were used to estimate alcohol intake from all volunteers: 24-h recall; the National Cancer Institute (NCI) method of usual intake; and a specific alcohol intake questionnaire. Mean alcohol intake by 24-h recall, NCI method and questionnaire was 41.0 ± 0.8 g/d, 10.9 ± 0.2 g/d and 11.0 ± 0.2 g/d, respectively. Alcohol consumers had significantly lower levels of ALP and higher levels of AST, GGT and bilirubin compared to non-consumers (P < 0.01) and activities of ALT, AST, and GGT increased and of ALP decreased as alcohol intake increased, regardless of intake assessment method used. The most sensitive measure of alcohol consumption was GGT. Since alcohol had a graded linear effect on several liver enzymes, including at low and moderate doses, benefits as well as risks of alcohol intake may be related to liver function. In conclusion, since the NCI method and alcohol questionnaire yielded very similar alcohol intake estimates, this study cross-validated these methods and demonstrated the robustness of the NCI method for estimating intake of irregularly consumed foods.« less

  3. Assessing alcohol intake & its dose-dependent effects on liver enzymes by 24-h recall and questionnaire using NHANES 2001-2010 data

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Sanjiv; Fulgoni, III, Victor L.; Lieberman, Harris R.

    Alcohol is a significant component of the diet with dose-dependent risks and benefits. High doses of alcohol damage the liver and early symptoms of liver disease include changes in routinely assessed liver enzymes. Less is known regarding the mechanisms responsible for the benefits of moderate alcohol consumption, including their effects on the liver. The objectives of this study were to examine alcohol’s dose-dependent effects on markers of liver function (alkaline phosphatase (ALP), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT), and bilirubin), as well as to compare the different methods of assessing alcohol intake using NHANES 2001–2010 adultmore » data (N =24,807). Three methods were used to estimate alcohol intake from all volunteers: 24-h recall; the National Cancer Institute (NCI) method of usual intake; and a specific alcohol intake questionnaire. Mean alcohol intake by 24-h recall, NCI method and questionnaire was 41.0 ± 0.8 g/d, 10.9 ± 0.2 g/d and 11.0 ± 0.2 g/d, respectively. Alcohol consumers had significantly lower levels of ALP and higher levels of AST, GGT and bilirubin compared to non-consumers (P < 0.01) and activities of ALT, AST, and GGT increased and of ALP decreased as alcohol intake increased, regardless of intake assessment method used. The most sensitive measure of alcohol consumption was GGT. Since alcohol had a graded linear effect on several liver enzymes, including at low and moderate doses, benefits as well as risks of alcohol intake may be related to liver function. In conclusion, since the NCI method and alcohol questionnaire yielded very similar alcohol intake estimates, this study cross-validated these methods and demonstrated the robustness of the NCI method for estimating intake of irregularly consumed foods.« less

  4. Assessment of the relationship between non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Yan, Li-Hui; Mu, Biao; Guan, Yue; Liu, Xinyu; Zhao, Nan; Pan, Da; Wang, Shao-Zhen

    2016-11-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a metabolic disorder of the liver. The relationship between NAFLD and type 2 diabetes remains largely unknown. The aim of the present study was to determine the incidence of complications arising from the interaction between NAFLD and type 2 diabetes. A total of 212 individuals with type 2 diabetes were included in the study. The presence of NAFLD was determined in individuals using abdominal ultrasonography for the diagnosis of fatty liver disease. Patients were divided into three groups based on the duration of diabetes and NAFLD diagnosis. Type 2 diabetes patients were placed in group A; patients with type 2 diabetes longer than NAFLD were placed in group B; and patients with NAFLD longer than type 2 diabetes were placed in group C. All individuals had undergone electrocardiogram, blood pressure measurements, and thorough medical history and physical examinations (Doppler ultrasound, electrophysiology, fundoscopy, cardiac computed tomography). Laboratory measurements included fasting blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin, oral glucose tolerance test, liver and renal function, lipid profile, and urinary albumin excretion. Compared with groups A and B, the patients of group C showed a higher prevalence of significant coronary artery disease and hypertension (P < 0.05). Compared with groups A and B, the patients of group C showed a lower prevalence of diabetic retinopathy and diabetic peripheral neuropathy (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the prevalence of diabetic nephropathy among the three groups (P > 0.05). NAFLD combined with type 2 diabetes is associated with the presence of significant coronary artery disease and hypertension. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. Ethanol Extract of Crataegus Oxyacantha L. Ameliorate Dietary Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Rat.

    PubMed

    Saeedi, Golbahar; Jeivad, Fereshteh; Goharbari, Mohammadhadi; Gheshlaghi, Gholamreza Hassanzadeh; Sabzevari, Omid

    2018-05-02

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFLD) is one the most prevalent disease worldwide which characterized by fat accumulation in liver with no established efficient therapy. We designed this study to investigate protective and therapeutic effect of Crataegus oxyacantha L. (C. oxyacantha) on NAFLD induced by high fat diet in rat models. NAFLD was induced by High Fat Diet+fructose (HFD), 45 Wistar rats were divided to 8 groups including control, HFD, HFD+diet change, HFD+diet change+C. oxyacantha 20 mg/kg, co treatment of HFD+C. oxyacantha 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg, and normal diet+C. oxyacantha 40 mg. C. oxyacantha was administered orally. Effectiveness of the C. oxyacantha was assessed through measuring the biochemical factors, and oxidative stress marker (FRAP, GSH, and MDA). Histopathological study was performed using H & E staining. The diet change from high fat to low fat ameliorated liver damage. However, consumption of C. oxyacantha (10 & 20 mg/kg) caused significant reduction in the level of all examined liver biomarkers specially LDH, that showed C. oxyacantha can restore the hepatocyte damage due to HFD. The C. oxyacantha showed a protective effect which was more prominent in the animals treated with the 20 mg/kg C. oxyacantha. The administration of C. oxyacantha caused increased antioxidant status (GSH and FRAP levels) and decreased lipid peroxidation in treated animals. Accordingly, C. oxyacantha have both therapeutic and protective effect for NAFLD and may be a potential candidate for further assessments in clinical studies. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Chronic fructose intake accelerates non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in the presence of essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lírio, Layla Mendonça; Forechi, Ludimila; Zanardo, Tadeu Caliman; Batista, Hiago Martins; Meira, Eduardo Frizera; Nogueira, Breno Valentim; Mill, José Geraldo; Baldo, Marcelo Perim

    2016-01-01

    The growing epidemic of metabolic syndrome has been related to the increased use of fructose by the food industry. In fact, the use of fructose as an ingredient has increased in sweetened beverages, such as sodas and juices. We thus hypothesized that fructose intake by hypertensive rats would have a worse prognosis in developing metabolic disorder and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Male Wistar and SHR rats aged 6weeks were given water or fructose (10%) for 6weeks. Blood glucose was measured every two weeks, and insulin and glucose sensitivity tests were assessed at the end of the follow-up. Systolic blood pressure was measure by plethysmography. Lean mass and abdominal fat mass were collected and weighed. Liver tissue was analyzed to determine interstitial fat deposition and fibrosis. Fasting glucose increased in animals that underwent a high fructose intake, independent of blood pressure levels. Also, insulin resistance was observed in normotensive and mostly in hypertensive rats after fructose intake. Fructose intake caused a 2.5-fold increase in triglycerides levels in both groups. Fructose intake did not change lean mass. However, we found that fructose intake significantly increased abdominal fat mass deposition in normotensive but not in hypertensive rats. Nevertheless, chronic fructose intake only increased fat deposition and fibrosis in the liver in hypertensive rats. We demonstrated that, in normotensive and hypertensive rats, fructose intake increased triglycerides and abdominal fat deposition, and caused insulin resistance. However, hypertensive rats that underwent fructose intake also developed interstitial fat deposition and fibrosis in liver. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Metronidazole-Induced Encephalopathy in Alcoholic Liver Disease: A Diagnostic and Therapeutic Challenge.

    PubMed

    Sonthalia, Nikhil; Pawar, Sun