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Sample records for experimental brain edema

  1. Intraventricular albumin: an optional agent in experimental post-traumatic brain edema.

    PubMed

    Is, Merih; Uzan, Mustafa; Unal, Faruk; Kiris, Talat; Tanriverdi, Taner; Mengi, Murat; Kilic, Nurten

    2005-01-01

    Human albumin may be effective in the treatment of posttraumatic brain edema due to its hyperoncotic features. Therefore, the aim of the experimental study presented in this paper has two points: the first is to evaluate the efficacy of intraventricular hyperoncotic human albumin on post-traumatic brain edema and the second is to try to show the appropriate posttraumatic time window for albumin administration. Traumatic brain injury and subsequent edema was formed by a model of impact acceleration injury in rats. Human albumin was administered via intraventricular route by using a stereotactic head holder. All animals in each group were decapitated 24 hours after the procedure and the effect of albumin was evaluated by measurement of tissue specific gravity. Tissue specific gravity decreased in edematous tissue (trauma indicator), increased after albumin administration at the 12th (p < 0.001), and both at the 1st and 12th hour of the trauma (edema treatment; p < 0.001). On the other hand, albumin administered at the 12th, and at both the 1st and 12th hours in the rats without trauma has caused the formation of the brain edema. We conclude that human albumin is effective in cytotoxic, but not in vasogenic edema and exerts its best anti-edematous effect at the 12th hour of severe head trauma and this study may help future studies that will try to show the effects of albumin with different time modalities after severe head injury.

  2. Inductive phase shift spectroscopy for volumetric brain edema detection: an experimental simulation.

    PubMed

    González, César A; Rojas, Rafael; Villanueva, Cleva; Rubinsky, Boris

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluates experimentally an induction based non-invasive technique for detection of changes of fluid volume through phase shift measurements as a possible method for volumetric brain edema monitoring. An induction coil - spherical head model was build and tested. The model involves two different diameter coils coaxially centered on a two-compartment glass sphere head model centrally placed with respect to the coils. Three different fluid volumes of physiological saline in 20 ml increments were used to simulate different edema levels. Phase shift of the impedance coils as a function of relative fluid volume was measured at five frequencies (40, 50, 100, 200 and 300 MHz) by a commercial vector network analyzer. The results show significant phase shift increase as a function of frequency and fluid volume. The experiments with the coil-spherical head system suggest that the tested technique has the potential to become a practical configuration for non-invasive volumetric brain edema monitoring.

  3. Imaging experimental cerebral malaria in vivo: significant role of ischemic brain edema.

    PubMed

    Penet, Marie-France; Viola, Angèle; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Le Fur, Yann; Duhamel, Guillaume; Kober, Frank; Ibarrola, Danielle; Izquierdo, Marguerite; Coltel, Nicolas; Gharib, Bouchra; Grau, Georges E; Cozzone, Patrick J

    2005-08-10

    The first in vivo magnetic resonance study of experimental cerebral malaria is presented. Cerebral involvement is a lethal complication of malaria. To explore the brain of susceptible mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA, multimodal magnetic resonance techniques were applied (imaging, diffusion, perfusion, angiography, spectroscopy). They reveal vascular damage including blood-brain barrier disruption and hemorrhages attributable to inflammatory processes. We provide the first in vivo demonstration for blood-brain barrier breakdown in cerebral malaria. Major edema formation as well as reduced brain perfusion was detected and is accompanied by an ischemic metabolic profile with reduction of high-energy phosphates and elevated brain lactate. In addition, angiography supplies compelling evidence for major hemodynamics dysfunction. Actually, edema further worsens ischemia by compressing cerebral arteries, which subsequently leads to a collapse of the blood flow that ultimately represents the cause of death. These findings demonstrate the coexistence of inflammatory and ischemic lesions and prove the preponderant role of edema in the fatal outcome of experimental cerebral malaria. They improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of cerebral malaria and may provide the necessary noninvasive surrogate markers for quantitative monitoring of treatment.

  4. Effects of magnesium administration on brain edema and blood-brain barrier breakdown after experimental traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Esen, Figen; Erdem, Tulin; Aktan, Damla; Kalayci, Rivaze; Cakar, Nahit; Kaya, Mehmet; Telci, Lutfi

    2003-04-01

    In this study, we examined the effects of magnesium sulfate administration on brain edema and blood-brain barrier breakdown after experimental traumatic brain injury in rats. Seventy-one adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized, and experimental closed head trauma was induced by allowing a 450-g weight to fall from a 2-m height onto a metallic disk fixed to the intact skull. Sixty-eight surviving rats were randomly assigned to receive an intraperitoneal bolus of either 750 micromol/kg magnesium sulfate (group 4; n = 30) or 1 mL of saline (group 2; n = 30) 30 minutes after induction of traumatic brain injury; 39 nontraumatized animals received saline (group 1; n = 21) or magnesium sulfate (group 3; n = 18) with an identical protocol of administration. Brain water content and brain tissue specific gravity, as indicators of brain edema, were measured 24 hours after traumatic brain injury. Blood-brain barrier integrity was evaluated quantitatively 24 hours after injury by spectrophotometric assay of Evans blue dye extravasations. In the magnesium-treated injured group, brain water content was significantly reduced (left hemisphere: group 2, 83.2 +/- 0.8; group 4, 78.4 +/- 0.7 [P <.05]; right hemisphere: group 2, 83.1 +/- 0.7; group 4, 78.4 +/- 0.5. [P <.05]) and brain tissue specific gravity was significantly increased (left hemisphere: group 2, 1.0391 +/- 0.0008; group 4, 1.0437 +/- 0.001 [P <.05]; right hemisphere, group 2, 1.0384 +/- 0.001; group 4, 1.0442 +/- 0.005 [P <.05]) compared with the saline-treated injured group. Evans blue dye content in the brain tissue was significantly decreased in the magnesium-treated injured group (left hemisphere: group 2, 0.0204 +/- 0.03; group 4, 0.0013 +/- 0.0002 [P <.05]; right hemisphere: group 2, 0.0064 +/- 0.0009; group 4, 0.0013 +/- 0.0003 [P <.05]) compared with the saline-treated injured group. The findings of the present study support that beneficial effects of magnesium sulfate exist after severe traumatic brain

  5. Perforin Expression by CD8 T Cells Is Sufficient To Cause Fatal Brain Edema during Experimental Cerebral Malaria.

    PubMed

    Huggins, Matthew A; Johnson, Holly L; Jin, Fang; N Songo, Aurelie; Hanson, Lisa M; LaFrance, Stephanie J; Butler, Noah S; Harty, John T; Johnson, Aaron J

    2017-05-01

    Human cerebral malaria (HCM) is a serious complication of Plasmodium falciparum infection. The most severe outcomes for patients include coma, permanent neurological deficits, and death. Recently, a large-scale magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study in humans identified brain swelling as the most prominent predictor of fatal HCM. Therefore, in this study, we sought to define the mechanism controlling brain edema through the use of the murine experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) model. Specifically, we investigated the ability of CD8 T cells to initiate brain edema during ECM. We determined that areas of blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability colocalized with a reduction of the cerebral endothelial cell tight-junction proteins claudin-5 and occludin. Furthermore, through small-animal MRI, we analyzed edema and vascular leakage. Using gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted MRI, we determined that vascular permeability is not homogeneous but rather confined to specific regions of the brain. Our findings show that BBB permeability was localized within the brainstem, olfactory bulb, and lateral ventricle. Concurrently with the initiation of vascular permeability, T2-weighted MRI revealed edema and brain swelling. Importantly, ablation of the cytolytic effector molecule perforin fully protected against vascular permeability and edema. Furthermore, perforin production specifically by CD8 T cells was required to cause fatal edema during ECM. We propose that CD8 T cells initiate BBB breakdown through perforin-mediated disruption of tight junctions. In turn, leakage from the vasculature into the parenchyma causes brain swelling and edema. This results in a breakdown of homeostatic maintenance that likely contributes to ECM pathology. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  6. Aquaporin-4 Deletion in Mice Reduces Encephalopathy and Brain Edema in Experimental Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Rama Rao, Kakulavarapu V.; Verkman, A. S.; Curtis, Kevin M.; Norenberg, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Brain edema and associated astrocyte swelling leading to increased intracranial pressure are hallmarks of acute liver failure (ALF). Elevated blood and brain levels of ammonia have been implicated in the development of brain edema in ALF. Cultured astrocytes treated with ammonia have been shown to undergo cell swelling and such swelling was associated with an increase in the plasma membrane expression of aquaporin-4 (AQP4) protein. Further, silencing the AQP4 gene in cultured astrocytes was shown to prevent the ammonia-induced cell swelling. Here, we examined the evolution of brain edema in AQP4-null mice and their wild type counterparts (WT-mice) in different models of ALF induced by thioacetamide (TAA) or acetaminophen (APAP). Induction of ALF with TAA or APAP significantly increased brain water content in WT mice (by 1.6 ± 0.3 and 2.3 ± 0.4 %, respectively). AQP4 protein was significantly increased in brain plasma membranes of WT mice with ALF induced by either TAA or APAP. In contrast to WT-mice, brain water content did not increase in AQP4-null mice. Additionally, AQP4-null mice treated with either TAA or APAP showed a remarkably lesser degree of neurological deficits as compared to WT mice; the latter displayed an inability to maintain proper gait, and demonstrated a markedly reduced exploratory behavior, with the mice remaining in one corner of the cage with its head tilted downwards. These results support a central role of AQP4 in the brain edema associated with ALF. PMID:24321433

  7. Lycium barbarum Extracts Protect the Brain from Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption and Cerebral Edema in Experimental Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Di; Li, Suk-Yee; Yeung, Chung-Man; Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung; So, Kwok-Fai; Wong, David; Lo, Amy C. Y.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose Ischemic stroke is a destructive cerebrovascular disease and a leading cause of death. Yet, no ideal neuroprotective agents are available, leaving prevention an attractive alternative. The extracts from the fruits of Lycium barbarum (LBP), a Chinese anti-aging medicine and food supplement, showed neuroprotective function in the retina when given prophylactically. We aim to evaluate the protective effects of LBP pre-treatment in an experimental stroke model. Methods C57BL/6N male mice were first fed with either vehicle (PBS) or LBP (1 or 10 mg/kg) daily for 7 days. Mice were then subjected to 2-hour transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) by the intraluminal method followed by 22-hour reperfusion upon filament removal. Mice were evaluated for neurological deficits just before sacrifice. Brains were harvested for infarct size estimation, water content measurement, immunohistochemical analysis, and Western blot experiments. Evans blue (EB) extravasation was determined to assess blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption after MCAO. Results LBP pre-treatment significantly improved neurological deficits as well as decreased infarct size, hemispheric swelling, and water content. Fewer apoptotic cells were identified in LBP-treated brains by TUNEL assay. Reduced EB extravasation, fewer IgG-leaky vessels, and up-regulation of occludin expression were also observed in LBP-treated brains. Moreover, immunoreactivity for aquaporin-4 and glial fibrillary acidic protein were significantly decreased in LBP-treated brains. Conclusions Seven-day oral LBP pre-treatment effectively improved neurological deficits, decreased infarct size and cerebral edema as well as protected the brain from BBB disruption, aquaporin-4 up-regulation, and glial activation. The present study suggests that LBP may be used as a prophylactic neuroprotectant in patients at high risk for ischemic stroke. PMID:22438957

  8. Brain Edema After Ischaemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Dostovic, Zikrija; Dostovic, Ernestina; Smajlovic, Dzevdet; Ibrahimagic, Omer C.; Avdic, Leila

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the incidence of brain edema after ischaemic stroke and its impact on the outcome of patients in the acute phase of ischaemic stroke. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 114 patients. Ischaemic stroke and brain edema are verified by computed tomography. The severity of stroke was determined by National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale. Laboratory findings were made during the first four days of hospitalization, and complications were verified by clinical examination and additional tests. Results: In 9 (7.9%) patients developed brain edema. Pneumonia was the most common complication (12.3%). Brain edema had a higher incidence in women, patients with hypertension and elevated serum creatinine values, and patients who are suffering from diabetes. There was no significant correlation between brain edema and survival in patients after acute ischaemic stroke. Patients with brain edema had a significantly higher degree of neurological deficit as at admission, and at discharge (p = 0.04, p = 0.004). Conclusion: The cerebral edema is common after acute ischaemic stroke and no effect on survival in the acute phase. The existence of brain edema in acute ischaemic stroke significantly influence the degree of neurological deficit. PMID:27994292

  9. Quantitation of brain edema and localisation of aquaporin 4 expression in relation to susceptibility to experimental cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Ampawong, Sumate; Combes, Valéry; Hunt, Nicholas H; Radford, Jane; Chan-Ling, Tailoi; Pongponratn, Emsri; Grau, Georges E R

    2011-08-15

    The pathogenic mechanisms underlying the occurrence of cerebral malaria (CM) are still incompletely understood but, clearly, cerebral complications may result from concomitant microvessel obstruction and inflammation. The extent to which brain edema contributes to pathology has not been investigated. Using the model of P. berghei ANKA infection, we compared brain microvessel morphology of CM-susceptible and CM-resistant mice. By quantitative planimetry, we provide evidence that CM is characterized by enlarged perivascular spaces (PVS). We show a dramatic aquaporin 4 (AQP4) upregulation, selectively at the level of astrocytic foot processes, in both CM and non-CM disease, but significantly more pronounced in mice with malarial-induced neurological syndrome. This suggests that a threshold of AQP4 expression is needed to lead to neurovascular pathology, a view that is supported by significantly higher levels in mice with clinically overt CM. Numbers of intravascular leukocytes significantly correlated with both PVS enlargement and AQP4 overexpression. Thus, brain edema could be a contributing factor in CM pathogenesis and AQP4, specifically in its astrocytic location, a key molecule in this mechanism. Since experimental CM is associated with substantial brain edema, it models paediatric CM better than the adult syndrome and it is tempting to evaluate AQP4 in the former context. If AQP4 changes are confirmed in human CM, it may represent a novel target for therapeutic intervention.

  10. Pathogenesis of Brain Edema and Investigation into Anti-Edema Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Michinaga, Shotaro; Koyama, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Brain edema is a potentially fatal pathological state that occurs after brain injuries such as stroke and head trauma. In the edematous brain, excess accumulation of extracellular fluid results in elevation of intracranial pressure, leading to impaired nerve function. Despite the seriousness of brain edema, only symptomatic treatments to remove edema fluid are currently available. Thus, the development of novel anti-edema drugs is required. The pathogenesis of brain edema is classified as vasogenic or cytotoxic edema. Vasogenic edema is defined as extracellular accumulation of fluid resulting from disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and extravasations of serum proteins, while cytotoxic edema is characterized by cell swelling caused by intracellular accumulation of fluid. Various experimental animal models are often used to investigate mechanisms underlying brain edema. Many soluble factors and functional molecules have been confirmed to induce BBB disruption or cell swelling and drugs targeted to these factors are expected to have anti-edema effects. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms and involvement of factors that induce brain edema formation, and the possibility of anti-edema drugs targeting them. PMID:25941935

  11. Protective Effect of Quercetin against Oxidative Stress and Brain Edema in an Experimental Rat Model of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yu-shu; Wang, Ju-lei; Feng, Da-yun; Qin, Huai-zhou; Wen, Hua; Yin, Zhong-min; Gao, Guo-dong; Li, Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Quercetin has been demonstrated to play an important role in altering the progression of ischemic brain injuries and neurodegenerative diseases by protecting against oxidative stress. The effects of quercetin on brain damage after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), however, have not been investigated. This study was designed to explore the effects of quercetin on oxidative stress and brain edema after experimental SAH using four equal groups (n = 16) of adult male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, including a sham group, an SAH + vehicle group, an SAH + quercetin10 group, and an SAH + quercetin50 group. The rat SAH model was induced by injection of 0.3 ml of non-heparinised arterial blood into the prechiasmatic cistern. In the SAH + quercetin10 and SAH + quercetin50 groups, doses of 10 mg/kg and 50 mg/kg quercetin, respectively, were directly administered by intraperitoneal injection at 30 min, 12 h, and 24 h after SAH induction. Cerebral tissue samples were extracted for enzymatic antioxidant determination, lipid peroxidation assay, caspase-3 activity and water content testing 48 h after SAH. Treatment with a high dose (50 mg/kg) of quercetin markedly enhanced the activities of copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and treatment with this dose significantly reduced the level of malondialdehyde (MDA). Caspase-3 and brain edema was ameliorated and neurobehavioral deficits improved in rats that received the high dose of quercetin. The findings suggest that the early administration of optimal dose of quercetin may ameliorate brain damage and provide neuroprotection in the SAH model, potentially by enhancing the activity of endogenous antioxidant enzymes and inhibiting free radical generation. PMID:24516353

  12. [The effects of a benzopyrone derivative in experimental brain edema due to cold in the rabbit].

    PubMed

    Góngora Castillo, C; Gómez de Segura, I A; López Bravo, A; de Miguel del Campo, E

    1993-01-01

    On this study, parenchymal changes during a cerebral edema caused by thermic injury (cool) on the rabbit, are analyzed. The work was based on the ultrastructural findings obtained by transmission electronic microscopy and on the effects produced by a benzopironic derived (F-117 Hydrosmina). The injury was produced with solid CO2, previous a craniectomy, on the dura mater of the left hemisphere. Forty rabbits were included into the study, the animals were distributed into five groups (n = 8): a control group and 4 treatment groups. One of the groups received treatment without previous cerebral injury. The group of rabbits with doses of 50 mg/Kg of weight showed focal and diffuse areas of edema alternating with less damaged areas, the edema was evident on the white substance. This group also showed a dissociation of the myelinic fibers and an intracytoplasmatic tumefaction into the glial cells. These findings contrast with the histopathological findings obtained from the rabbits (V), the extracellular edema was poor, the myelinic fiber disorganization was minimal with no vacuolar degeneration and no structural mitochondrial changes had been showed. The discontinuance of the hematoencephalic barrier caused by the cool could be a possible mechanism that causes the opening of the endothelial unions from the capillary vessels, changing their membranes and resulting in a free penetration of the molecule into the cerebral parenchyma.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Radiosurgery for brain metastases and cerebral edema.

    PubMed

    Gazit, Inbal; Har-Nof, Sagi; Cohen, Zvi R; Zibly, Zion; Nissim, Uzi; Spiegelmann, Roberto

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess reduction in cerebral edema following linear accelerator radiosurgery (LINAC) as first line therapy for brain metastasis. We reviewed the medical records of all patients who underwent LINAC radiosurgery for brain metastasis at our institution during 2010-2012, and who had not previously undergone either surgery or whole brain radiotherapy. Data were analyzed for 55 brain metastases from 46 patients (24 males), mean age 59.9 years. During the 2 months following LINAC radiosurgery, the mean steroid dose decreased from 4.8 to 2.6 mg/day, the mean metastasis volume decreased from 3.79±4.12 cc to 2.8±4.48 cc (p=0.001), and the mean edema volume decreased from 16.91±30.15 cc to 12.85±24.47 cc (p=0.23). The 17 patients with reductions of more than 50% in brain edema volume had single metastases. Edema volume in the nine patients with two brain metastases remained stable in five patients (volume change <10%, 0-2 cc) and increased in four patients (by >10%, 2-14 cc). In a subanalysis of eight metastases with baseline edema volume greater than 40 cc, edema volume decreased from 77.27±37.21 cc to 24.84±35.6 cc (p=0.034). Reductions in brain edema were greater in metastases for which non-small-cell lung carcinoma and breast cancers were the primary diseases. Overall, symptoms improved in most patients. No patients who were without symptoms or who had no signs of increased intracranial pressure at baseline developed signs of intracranial pressure following LINAC radiosurgery. In this series, LINAC stereotactic radiosurgery for metastatic brain lesions resulted in early reduction in brain edema volume in single metastasis patients and those with large edema volumes, and reduced the need for steroids.

  14. Evaluation of brain edema using magnetic resonance proton relaxation times

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Nishimura, S. )

    1990-01-01

    Experimental and clinical studies on the evaluation of water content in cases of brain edema were performed in vivo, using MR proton relaxation times (longitudinal relaxation time, T1; transverse relaxation time, T2). Brain edema was produced in the white matter of cats by the direct infusion method. The correlations between proton relaxation times obtained from MR images and the water content of white matter were studied both in autoserum-infused cats and in saline-infused cats. The correlations between T1 as well as T2 and the water content in human vasogenic brain edema were also examined and compared with the data obtained from the serum group. T1 and T2 showed good correlations with the water content of white matter not only in the experimental animals but also in the clinical cases. The quality of the edema fluid did not influence relaxation time and T1 seemed to represent almost solely the water content of the tissue. T2, however, was affected by the nature of existence of water and was more sensitive than T1 in detecting extravasated edema fluid. It seems feasible therefore to evaluate the water content of brain edema on the basis of T1 values.

  15. Onion (Allium cepa) extract attenuates brain edema.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Soo-Wang; Jang, Mi; Park, Se Won; Kim, Eun Joo; Jung, Yi-Sook

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the potential beneficial effects of onion extract on brain ischemia-induced edema and blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction. The possible underlying mechanisms are investigated, especially those linked to the antioxidant effects of the onion extract. Brain ischemia was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) for 2 h followed by reperfusion in mice. Mice were treated intravenously with onion extract 30 min before MCAO. Brain edema and BBB hyperpermeability were evaluated by the measurement of the brain water content and Evans blue extravasation, respectively. The disruption of tight junction proteins was examined by immunohistochemical staining. The level of malondialdehyde was determined using the thiobarbituric acid method. The activities of glutathione peroxidase and catalase were determined by spectrophotometric assay. Brain water content in the ischemic hemisphere was significantly reduced by treatment with onion extract. Onion extract also had a significant effect on both the decrease in Evans blue extravasation and the inhibition of zonula occludens-1 and occludin disruption caused by brain ischemia. In addition, onion extract significantly prevented brain ischemia-induced reduction in catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities and elevation of malondialdehyde level in the brain tissue. The results from this study demonstrate that onion extract prevents brain edema, BBB hyperpermeability, and tight junction proteins disruption, possibly through its antioxidant effects in the mouse MCAO model. This study suggests that onion extract may be a beneficial nutrient for the prevention of BBB function during brain ischemia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The neuroprotective effect of olive leaf extract is related to improved blood-brain barrier permeability and brain edema in rat with experimental focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Mohagheghi, Fatemeh; Bigdeli, Mohammad Reza; Rasoulian, Bahram; Hashemi, Payman; Pour, Marzyeh Rashidi

    2011-01-15

    Recent studies suggest that olive extracts suppress inflammation and reduce stress oxidative injury. We sought to extend these observations in an in vivo study of rat cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. Four groups, each of 18 Wister rats, were studied. One (control) group received distilled water, while three treatment groups received oral olive leaf extract (50, 75 and 100mg/kg/day respectively). After 30 days, blood lipid profiles were determined, before a 60 min period of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). After 24h reperfusion, neurological deficit scores, infarct volume, brain edema, and blood-brain barrier permeability were each assessed in subgroups of six animals drawn from each main group. Olive leaf extract reduced the LDL/HDL ratio in doses 50, 75, and 100mg/kg/day in comparison to the control group (P<0.001), and offered cerebroprotection from ischemia-reperfusion. For controls vs. doses of 50mg/kg/day vs. 75 mg/kg/day vs. 100mg/kg/day, attenuated corrected infarct volumes were 209.79 ± 33.05 mm(3) vs. 164.36 ± 13.44 mm(3) vs. 123.06 ± 28.83 mm(3) vs. 94.71 ± 33.03 mm(3); brain water content of the infarcted hemisphere 82.33 ± 0.33% vs. 81.33 ± 0.66% vs. 80.75 ± 0.6% vs. 80.16 ± 0.47%, and blood-brain barrier permeability of the infarcted hemisphere 11.22 ± 2.19 μg/g vs. 9.56 ± 1.74 μg/g vs. 6.99 ± 1.48 μg/g vs. 5.94 ± 1.73 μg/g tissue (P<0.05 and P<0.01 for measures in doses 75 and 100mg/kg/day vs. controls respectively). Oral administration of olive leaf extract reduces infarct volume, brain edema, blood-brain barrier permeability, and improves neurologic deficit scores after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats.

  17. HEPES prevents edema in rat brain slices.

    PubMed

    MacGregor, D G; Chesler, M; Rice, M E

    2001-05-11

    Brain slices gain water when maintained in bicarbonate-buffered artificial cerebro-spinal fluid (ACSF) at 35 degrees C. We previously showed that this edema is linked to glutamate receptor activation and oxidative stress. An additional factor that may contribute to swelling is acidosis, which arises from high CO2 tension in brain slices. To examine the role of acidosis in slice edema, we added N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES) to osmotically balanced ACSF (HEPES-ACSF), thereby increasing buffering capacity beyond that provided by bicarbonate/CO2. Water gain was markedly inhibited in HEPES-ACSF. After 3 h incubation in HEPES-ACSF at 35 degrees C, water gain was limited to that of fresh slices after 1 h recovery in ACSF at room temperature. The effect of HEPES in decreasing slice water gain was concentration dependent from 0.3 to 20 mM. The inhibition of water gain by HEPES suggests that tissue acidosis is a contributing factor in brain slice edema.

  18. Acute therapeutic modalities for experimental vasogenic edema.

    PubMed

    Harbaugh, R D; James, H E; Marshall, L F; Shapiro, H M; Laurin, R

    1979-12-01

    Experimental vasogenic cerebral edema was created in rabbits with a cold-induced left occipital cortical lesions. Intracranial pressure (ICP), intracranial elastance (Em), water content, hemispheric brain tissue volume, electrolytes, electroencephalograms, behavior, and gross pathology were studied. Various therapeutic modalities were employed alone or in combination to reduce ICP acutely: acetazolamide, furosemide, mannitol, pentobarbital, lorazepam, and dexamethasone. All therapies except dexamethasone were effective in reducing ICP. Peak ICP reduction occurred at 27 +/- 9.8 (SD) minutes with mannitol and at 71.4 +/- 15.5 minutes with acetazolamide, with the remaining agents and combinations falling between these two extreme values. Em improved by 31.7 +/- 17.02% in all therapuetic trials except those employing acetazolamide and lorazepam. With therapy, there was a reduction in the water content of the hemispheres, but the difference from that in the untreated, lesioned animals was not statistically significant. In the lesioned left hemisphere, sodium content was increased by acetazolamide (p less than 0.005), furosemide (p less than 0.025), pentobarbital (p less than 0.05), and the combination of dexamethasone, pentobarbital, and mannitol (p less than 0.005). Significant reduction was noted in the lesioned group for the potassium content of the left hemisphere in the dexamethasone (p less than 0.05), pentobarbital (p less than 0.025), and combination groups containing these agents (p less than 0.005 to 0.025). (Neurosurgery, 5: 656--665, 1979).

  19. [Brain edema--historical aspects and contemporary suggestions].

    PubMed

    Meskheli, M K; Gereshidze, M M

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this article was to show the historical aspects of elaboration of the brain edema study. To draft the main stages of study development from naive medievals suggestions till the creation of modern technologies and the possibility of the brain edema neurovisualization. The possibility to watch and control these processes grants the real perspective to enhance the effectiveness of the brain edema therapy.

  20. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies on brain edema

    SciTech Connect

    Naruse, S.; Horikawa, Y.; Tanaka, C.; Hirakawa, K.; Nishikawa, H.; Yoshizaki, K.

    1982-06-01

    The water in normal and edematous brain tissues of rats was studied by the pulse nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, measuring the longitudinal relaxation time (T1) and the transverse relaxation time (T2). In the normal brain, T1 and T2 were single components, both shorter than in pure water. Prolongation and separation of T2 into two components, one fast and one slow, were the characteristic findings in brain edema induced by both cold injury and triethyl tin (TET), although some differences between the two types of edema existed in the content of the lesion and in the degree of changes in T1 and T2 values. Quantitative analysis of T1 and T2 values in their time course relating to water content demonstrated that prolongation of T1 referred to the volume of increased water in tissues examined, and that two phases of T2 reflected the distribution and the content of the edema fluid. From the analysis of the slow component of T2 versus water content during edema formation, it was demonstrated that the increase in edema fluid was steady, and its content was constant during formation of TET-induced edema. On the contrary, during the formation of cold-injury edema, water-rich edema fluid increased during the initial few hours, and protein-rich edema fluid increased thereafter. It was concluded that proton NMR relaxation time measurements may provide new understanding in the field of brain edema research.

  1. Mathematical modelling of blood-brain barrier failure and edema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, Sarah; Lang, Georgina; Vella, Dominic; Goriely, Alain

    2015-11-01

    Injuries such as traumatic brain injury and stroke can result in increased blood-brain barrier permeability. This increase may lead to water accumulation in the brain tissue resulting in vasogenic edema. Although the initial injury may be localised, the resulting edema causes mechanical damage and compression of the vasculature beyond the original injury site. We employ a biphasic mixture model to investigate the consequences of blood-brain barrier permeability changes within a region of brain tissue and the onset of vasogenic edema. We find that such localised changes can indeed result in brain tissue swelling and that the type of damage that results (stress damage or strain damage) depends on the ability of the brain to clear edema fluid.

  2. Hypertensive encephalopathy presenting with isolated brain stem and cerebellar edema.

    PubMed

    Bhagavati, Satyakam; Chum, Florence; Choi, Jai

    2008-10-01

    Hypertensive encephalopathy typically presents with headache and confusion and bilateral parietooccipital vasogenic edema. Brain stem and cerebellar edema in hypertensive encephalopathy usually occurs in association with these typical supratentorial changes and is usually asymptomatic. We report here an uncommon hypertensive patient with isolated, severe, and symptomatic brain stem and cerebellar edema with fourth ventricular obstruction and mild hydrocephalus. Rapid treatment of hypertension resulted in clinical and radiological improvement. Prompt recognition of the cause and aggressive treatment of hypertension in such patients are crucial to relieve edema and prevent life-threatening progression.

  3. Drowning stars: Reassessing the role of astrocytes in brain edema

    PubMed Central

    Thrane, Alexander S.; Thrane, Vinita Rangroo; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2014-01-01

    Edema formation frequently complicates brain infarction, tumors and trauma. Despite the significant mortality of this condition, current treatment options are often ineffective or incompletely understood. Recent studies have revealed the existence of a brain-wide paravascular pathway for cerebrospinal (CSF) and interstitial fluid (ISF) exchange. The current review critically examines the contribution of this ‘glymphatic’ system to the main types of brain edema. We propose that in cytotoxic edema, energy depletion enhances glymphatic CSF influx, whilst suppressing ISF efflux. We also argue that paravascular inflammation or ‘paravasculitis’ plays a critical role in vasogenic edema. Finally, recent advances in diagnostic imaging of glymphatic function may hold the key to defining the edema profile of individual patients and thus enable more targeted therapy. PMID:25236348

  4. Drowning stars: reassessing the role of astrocytes in brain edema.

    PubMed

    Thrane, Alexander S; Rangroo Thrane, Vinita; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2014-11-01

    Edema formation frequently complicates brain infarction, tumors, and trauma. Despite the significant mortality of this condition, current treatment options are often ineffective or incompletely understood. Recent studies have revealed the existence of a brain-wide paravascular pathway for cerebrospinal (CSF) and interstitial fluid (ISF) exchange. The current review critically examines the contribution of this 'glymphatic' system to the main types of brain edema. We propose that in cytotoxic edema, energy depletion enhances glymphatic CSF influx, whilst suppressing ISF efflux. We also argue that paravascular inflammation or 'paravasculitis' plays a critical role in vasogenic edema. Finally, recent advances in diagnostic imaging of glymphatic function may hold the key to defining the edema profile of individual patients, and thus enable more targeted therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Aquaporins in Brain Edema and Neuropathological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Filippidis, Aristotelis S.; Carozza, Richard B.; Rekate, Harold L.

    2016-01-01

    The aquaporin (AQP) family of water channels are a group of small, membrane-spanning proteins that are vital for the rapid transport of water across the plasma membrane. These proteins are widely expressed, from tissues such as the renal epithelium and erythrocytes to the various cells of the central nervous system. This review will elucidate the basic structure and distribution of aquaporins and discuss the role of aquaporins in various neuropathologies. AQP1 and AQP4, the two primary aquaporin molecules of the central nervous system, regulate brain water and CSF movement and contribute to cytotoxic and vasogenic edema, where they control the size of the intracellular and extracellular fluid volumes, respectively. AQP4 expression is vital to the cellular migration and angiogenesis at the heart of tumor growth; AQP4 is central to dysfunctions in glutamate metabolism, synaptogenesis, and memory consolidation; and AQP1 and AQP4 adaptations have been seen in obstructive and non-obstructive hydrocephalus and may be therapeutic targets. PMID:28036023

  6. Tissue hyperosmolality and brain edema in cerebral contusion.

    PubMed

    Kawamata, Tatsuro; Mori, Tatsuro; Sato, Shoshi; Katayama, Yoichi

    2007-05-15

    Severe cerebral contusion is often associated with nonhemorrhagic mass effect that progresses rapidly within 12 to 48 hours posttrauma. The mechanisms underlying such a rapid progression of mass effect cannot be fully explained by classic concepts of vasogenic and cytotoxic brain edema. Data from previous clinical trials, including diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging studies, have indicated that cells in the central (core) area of the contusion undergo shrinkage, disintegration, and homogenization, whereas cellular swelling is located predominately in the peripheral (rim) area during this period. The authors hypothesized that high osmolality within the contused brain tissue generates an osmotic potential across the central and peripheral areas or causes blood to accumulate a large amount of water. To elucidate the role of tissue osmolality in contusion edema, they investigated changes in tissue osmolality, specific gravity, and ion concentration in contused brain in both experimental and clinical settings. Their results demonstrated that cerebral contusion induced a rapid increase in tissue osmolality from a baseline level of 311.4 +/- 11.3 to 402.8 +/- 15.1 mOsm at 12 hours posttrauma (p < 0.0001). Specific gravity in tissue significantly decreased from 1.0425 +/- 0.0026 to 1.0308 +/- 0.0028 (p < 0.01), reflecting water accumulation in contused tissue. The total ionic concentration [Na+] + [K+] + [Cl-] did not change significantly at any time point. Inorganic ions do not primarily contribute to this elevation in osmolality, suggesting that the increase in colloid osmotic pressure through the metabolic production of osmoles or the release of idiogenic osmoles can be a main cause of contusion edema.

  7. Therapeutic time window for conivaptan treatment against stroke-evoked brain edema and blood-brain barrier disruption in mice.

    PubMed

    Zeynalov, Emil; Jones, Susan M; Elliott, J Paul

    2017-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is often complicated by brain edema, disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB), and uncontrolled release of arginine-vasopressin (AVP). Conivaptan, a V1a and V2 receptor antagonist, reduces brain edema and minimizes damage to the blood-brain barrier after stroke. Most stroke patients do not receive treatment immediately after the onset of brain ischemia. Delays in therapy initiation may worsen stroke outcomes. Therefore, we designed a translational study to explore the therapeutic time window for conivaptan administration. Mice were treated with conivaptan beginning 3, 5, or 20 hours after 60-minute focal middle cerebral artery occlusion. Treatments were administered by continuous IV infusion for a total of 48 hours. Brain edema and blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption were evaluated at endpoint. Conivaptan therapy initiated at 3 hours following ischemia reduced edema in the ipsilateral hemisphere, which corresponded with improvements in neurological deficits. Stroke-triggered BBB disruption was also reduced in mice when conivaptan treatments were initiated at 3 hours of reperfusion. However, 5 and 20-hour delays of conivaptan administration failed to reduce edema or protect BBB. Timing of conivaptan administration is important for successful reduction of brain edema and BBB disruption. Our experimental data open new possibilities to repurpose conivaptan, and make an important "bench-to-bedside translation" of the results into clinical practice.

  8. Critical Care Management of Cerebral Edema in Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Esquenazi, Yoshua; Lo, Victor P; Lee, Kiwon

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral edema associated with brain tumors is extremely common and can occur in both primary and metastatic tumors. The edema surrounding brain tumors results from leakage of plasma across the vessel wall into the parenchyma secondary to disruption of the blood-brain barrier. The clinical signs of brain tumor edema depend on the location of the tumor as well as the extent of the edema, which often exceeds the mass effect induced by the tumor itself. Uncontrolled cerebral edema may result in increased intracranial pressure and acute herniation syndromes that can result in permanent neurological dysfunction and potentially fatal herniation. Treatment strategies for elevated intracranial pressure consist of general measures, medical interventions, and surgery. Alhough the definitive treatment for the edema may ultimately be surgical resection of the tumor, the impact of the critical care management cannot be underestimated and thus patients must be vigilantly monitored in the intensive care unit. In this review, we discuss the pathology, pathophysiology, and clinical features of patients presenting with cerebral edema. Imaging findings and treatment modalities used in the intensive care unit are also discussed.

  9. Effects of metformin treatment on glioma-induced brain edema

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bin; Wang, Xiaoke; Zheng, Jun; Wang, Hailiang; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Considerable evidence has demonstrated that metformin can activate 5’-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathway, which plays a critical role in protection of endothelial cell permeability. Hence, the present study evaluated the effects of metformin on blood brain barrier permeability and AQP4 expression in vitro, and assessed the effects of metformin treatment on tumor-induced brain edema in vivo. Hypoxia or VEGF exposure enhanced bEnd3 endothelial cell monolayer permeability and attenuated the expression of tight junction proteins including Occludin, Claudin-5, ZO-1, and ZO-2. However, 0.5 mM metformin treatment protected bEnd3 endothelial cell monolayer from hypoxia or VEGF-induced permeability, which was correlated with increased expression of tight junction proteins. Furthermore, metformin treatment attenuated AQP4 protein expression in cultured astrocytes. Such an effect involved the activation of AMPK and inhibition of NF-κB. Finally, metformin treatment dose-dependently reduced glioma induced vascular permeability and cerebral edema in vivo in rats. Thus, our results suggested that metformin may protect endothelial cell tight junction, prevent damage to the blood brain barrier induced by brain tumor growth, and alleviate the formation of cerebral edema. Furthermore, since the formation of cytotoxic edema and AQP4 expression was positively correlated, our results indicated that metformin may reduce the formation of cytotoxic edema. However, given that AQP4 plays a key role in the elimination of cerebral edema, attenuation of AQP4 expression by metformin may reduce the elimination of cerebral edema. Hence, future studies will be necessary to dissect the specific mechanisms of metformin underlying the dynamics of tumor-induced brain edema in vivo. PMID:27648126

  10. Effects of metformin treatment on glioma-induced brain edema.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bin; Wang, Xiaoke; Zheng, Jun; Wang, Hailiang; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Considerable evidence has demonstrated that metformin can activate 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathway, which plays a critical role in protection of endothelial cell permeability. Hence, the present study evaluated the effects of metformin on blood brain barrier permeability and AQP4 expression in vitro, and assessed the effects of metformin treatment on tumor-induced brain edema in vivo. Hypoxia or VEGF exposure enhanced bEnd3 endothelial cell monolayer permeability and attenuated the expression of tight junction proteins including Occludin, Claudin-5, ZO-1, and ZO-2. However, 0.5 mM metformin treatment protected bEnd3 endothelial cell monolayer from hypoxia or VEGF-induced permeability, which was correlated with increased expression of tight junction proteins. Furthermore, metformin treatment attenuated AQP4 protein expression in cultured astrocytes. Such an effect involved the activation of AMPK and inhibition of NF-κB. Finally, metformin treatment dose-dependently reduced glioma induced vascular permeability and cerebral edema in vivo in rats. Thus, our results suggested that metformin may protect endothelial cell tight junction, prevent damage to the blood brain barrier induced by brain tumor growth, and alleviate the formation of cerebral edema. Furthermore, since the formation of cytotoxic edema and AQP4 expression was positively correlated, our results indicated that metformin may reduce the formation of cytotoxic edema. However, given that AQP4 plays a key role in the elimination of cerebral edema, attenuation of AQP4 expression by metformin may reduce the elimination of cerebral edema. Hence, future studies will be necessary to dissect the specific mechanisms of metformin underlying the dynamics of tumor-induced brain edema in vivo.

  11. Glycerol accumulation in edema formation following diffuse traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ahmer; Konakondla, Sanjay; Zwagerman, Nathan T; Peng, Changya; Schafer, Steven; Ding, Jamie Y; Dornbos, David; Sikharam, Chaitanya; Geng, Xiaokun; Guthikonda, Murali; Kreipke, Christian W; Rafols, José A; Ding, Yuchuan

    2012-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces brain edema via water and glycerol transport channels, called aquaporins (AQPs). The passage of glycerol across brain cellular compartments has been shown during edema. Using a modified impact/head acceleration rodent model of diffuse TBI, we assessed the role of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1alpha in regulating AQP9 expression and glycerol accumulation during the edema formation. Adult (400-425 g) male Sprague-Dawley rats received a closed head injury with a weight drop (450 g, 2-m height) and were allowed to survive up to 48 hours. Some rat groups were administered 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME2, a HIF-1alpha inhibitor) 30 minutes after injury and were euthanized at 4 and 24 hours after injury. Brain edema was measured directly by water content, and glycerol concentration was determined by the Cayman Glycerol Assay. HIF-1alpha and AQP9 protein levels were assessed by Western immunoblotting. This study demonstrated a significant (P<0·05) increase in brain water content at 4-48 hours following impact. Cerebral glycerol was significantly (P<0.05) up-regulated at as early as 1 hour and remained at high levels for up to 48 hours. Similarly, significant (P<0.05) increases in HIF-1alpha and AQP9 protein levels were found at 1 hour and up to 48 hours after injury. Compared to untreated but injured rats, inhibition of HIF-1alpha by 2ME2 significantly (P<0.05) reduced the TBI-induced AQP9 up-regulation. This reduction was temporally associated with significant (P<0.05) decreases in both edema and glycerol accumulation. The data suggested an associated induction of HIF-1alpha, AQP9, and extracellular glycerol accumulation in edema formation following diffuse TBI. The implication of HIF-1alpha and AQP9 underlying TBI-induced edema formation offers possibilities for novel TBI therapies.

  12. Edema

    MedlinePlus

    Edema means swelling caused by fluid in your body's tissues. It usually occurs in the feet, ankles ... it can involve your entire body. Causes of edema include Eating too much salt Sunburn Heart failure ...

  13. Effects of magnesium sulfate on traumatic brain edema in rats.

    PubMed

    Feng, Dong-fu; Zhu, Zhi-an; Lu, Yi-cheng

    2004-06-01

    To investigate the effects of magnesium sulfate on traumatic brain edema and explore its possible mechanism. Forty-eight Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into three groups: Control, Trauma and Treatment groups. In Treatment group, magnesium sulfate was intraperitoneally administered immediately after the induction of brain trauma. At 24 h after trauma, total tissue water content and Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+) contents were measured. Permeability of blood-brain barrier (BBB) was assessed quantitatively by Evans Blue (EB) dye technique. The pathological changes were also studied. Water, Na(+), Ca(2+) and EB contents in Treatment group were significantly lower than those in Trauma group (P<0.05). Results of light microscopy and electron microscopy confirmed that magnesium sulfate can attenuate traumatic brain injury and relieve BBB injury. Treatment with MgSO4 in the early stage can attenuate traumatic brain edema and prevent BBB injury.

  14. Ethanol-induced hyponatremia augments brain edema after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Katada, Ryuichi; Watanabe, Satoshi; Ishizaka, Atsushi; Mizuo, Keisuke; Okazaki, Shunichiro; Matsumoto, Hiroshi

    2012-04-01

    Alcohol consumption augments brain edema by expression of brain aquaporin-4 after traumatic brain injury. However, how ethanol induces brain aquaporin-4 expression remains unclear. Aquaporin-4 can operate with some of ion channels and transporters. Therefore, we hypothesized that ethanol may affect electrolytes through regulating ion channels, leading to express aquaporin-4. To clarify the hypothesis, we examined role of AQP4 expression in ethanol-induced brain edema and changes of electrolyte levels after traumatic brain injury in the rat. In the rat traumatic brain injury model, ethanol administration reduced sodium ion concentration in blood significantly 24 hr after injury. An aquaporin-4 inhibitor recovered sodium ion concentration in blood to normal. We observed low sodium ion concentration in blood and the increase of brain aquaporin-4 in cadaver with traumatic brain injury. Therefore, ethanol increases brain edema by the increase of aquaporin-4 expression with hyponatremia after traumatic brain injury.

  15. Ontogenetic aspects of traumatic brain edema--facts and suggestions.

    PubMed

    Bauer, R; Walter, B; Fritz, H; Zwiener, U

    1999-02-01

    Diffuse brain swelling (DBS) after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) occurs more commonly in children than adults. Most of the recent clinical studies suggest that young children are more negatively affected by DBS. Until now studies in young animals in which the pathophysiology of DBS was evaluated remained seldom. However, pathogenetic mechanisms of edema formation after TBI in the immature brain appeared to be different in comparison to adult brains. There are evidences that vasogenic as well as cytotoxic edema components may be responsible for the development of DBS. Besides mechanical disturbance, the blood-brain barrier seems to be strongly endangered by oxidative stress after TBI because regional antioxidative capacity is obviously diminished. In addition, cytotoxic components of DBS may be caused by at least two different mechanisms. First, it was shown that a sustained posttraumatic cerebral hypoperfusion occurs in the immature brain. Moreover, a transient increase of NMDA receptor expression at this period of life may be responsible for an increased threat of intracellular sodium ion accumulation in brain cells. Obviously, brain swelling can be detrimental because it can elevate intracranial pressure, impair CBF, and may represent ongoing secondary brain injury.

  16. [The role of BDNF in brain ischemia pulmonary edema].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun-Hui; Wang, Ting-Hua

    2012-11-01

    Brain ischemia pulmonary edema(BIPE)is a critical type of the neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE), with acute development and progression and high mortality. The study on mechanism of BIPE has important scientific significance and substantial practice values. NPE, as a complicated physiopathology condition, is not resulted from single factor but systemic events including the changes in nervous system, body fluid regulation and endocrine involved in central nervous system after the injury. The studies on this topic in this current issue suggested that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) could involve in the pathogenesis procedure of NPE following brain ischemia, which indicated that the crucial role of BDNF in the NPE after BIPE. The findings of these studies pave a way for the treatment of BIPE by using BDNF administration in future clinic trail.

  17. Edema

    MedlinePlus

    ... and symptoms Pregnancy Edema can be a side effect of some medications, including: High blood pressure medications Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs Steroid drugs Estrogens Certain diabetes medications called ...

  18. Ischemic Postconditioning Alleviates Brain Edema After Focal Cerebral Ischemia Reperfusion in Rats Through Down-Regulation of Aquaporin-4.

    PubMed

    Han, Dong; Sun, Miao; He, Ping-Ping; Wen, Lu-Lu; Zhang, Hong; Feng, Juan

    2015-07-01

    Cerebral edema is a serious complication associated with cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) plays a role in generating postischemic edema after reperfusion. Recently, ischemic postconditioning (Postcond) has been shown to produce neuroprotective effects and reduce brain edema in rats after cerebral I/R. It is unclear if ischemic Postcond alleviates brain edema injury through regulation of AQP4. In this study, middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) was induced in rats by filament insertion for 2 h following 24-h reperfusion: ischemic Postcond treatment was performed before reperfusion in the experimental group. We used the wet-dry weight ratio and transmission electron microscopy to evaluate brain edema after 24 h of reperfusion. We used immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses to evaluate the distribution and expression of AQP4. Ischemic Postcond significantly reduced the water content of the brain tissue and swelling of the astrocytic foot processes. AQP4 expression increased in the I/R and Postcond groups compared to the sham group, but it decreased in the Postcond group compared to the I/R group. The results of our study suggest that ischemic Postcond effectively reduces brain edema after reperfusion by inhibiting AQP4 expression. The data in this study support the use of ischemic Postcond for alleviating brain edema after cerebral I/R.

  19. Influence of age on brain edema formation, secondary brain damage and inflammatory response after brain trauma in mice.

    PubMed

    Timaru-Kast, Ralph; Luh, Clara; Gotthardt, Philipp; Huang, Changsheng; Schäfer, Michael K; Engelhard, Kristin; Thal, Serge C

    2012-01-01

    After traumatic brain injury (TBI) elderly patients suffer from higher mortality rate and worse functional outcome compared to young patients. However, experimental TBI research is primarily performed in young animals. Aim of the present study was to clarify whether age affects functional outcome, neuroinflammation and secondary brain damage after brain trauma in mice. Young (2 months) and old (21 months) male C57Bl6N mice were anesthetized and subjected to a controlled cortical impact injury (CCI) on the right parietal cortex. Animals of both ages were randomly assigned to 15 min, 24 h, and 72 h survival. At the end of the observation periods, contusion volume, brain water content, neurologic function, cerebral and systemic inflammation (CD3+ T cell migration, inflammatory cytokine expression in brain and lung, blood differential cell count) were determined. Old animals showed worse neurological function 72 h after CCI and a high mortality rate (19.2%) compared to young (0%). This did not correlate with histopathological damage, as contusion volumes were equal in both age groups. Although a more pronounced brain edema formation was detected in old mice 24 hours after TBI, lack of correlation between brain water content and neurological deficit indicated that brain edema formation is not solely responsible for age-dependent differences in neurological outcome. Brains of old naïve mice were about 8% smaller compared to young naïve brains, suggesting age-related brain atrophy with possible decline in plasticity. Onset of cerebral inflammation started earlier and primarily ipsilateral to damage in old mice, whereas in young mice inflammation was delayed and present in both hemispheres with a characteristic T cell migration pattern. Pulmonary interleukin 1β expression was up-regulated after cerebral injury only in young, not aged mice. The results therefore indicate that old animals are prone to functional deficits and strong ipsilateral cerebral inflammation

  20. Influence of Age on Brain Edema Formation, Secondary Brain Damage and Inflammatory Response after Brain Trauma in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Timaru-Kast, Ralph; Luh, Clara; Gotthardt, Philipp; Huang, Changsheng; Schäfer, Michael K.; Engelhard, Kristin; Thal, Serge C.

    2012-01-01

    After traumatic brain injury (TBI) elderly patients suffer from higher mortality rate and worse functional outcome compared to young patients. However, experimental TBI research is primarily performed in young animals. Aim of the present study was to clarify whether age affects functional outcome, neuroinflammation and secondary brain damage after brain trauma in mice. Young (2 months) and old (21 months) male C57Bl6N mice were anesthetized and subjected to a controlled cortical impact injury (CCI) on the right parietal cortex. Animals of both ages were randomly assigned to 15 min, 24 h, and 72 h survival. At the end of the observation periods, contusion volume, brain water content, neurologic function, cerebral and systemic inflammation (CD3+ T cell migration, inflammatory cytokine expression in brain and lung, blood differential cell count) were determined. Old animals showed worse neurological function 72 h after CCI and a high mortality rate (19.2%) compared to young (0%). This did not correlate with histopathological damage, as contusion volumes were equal in both age groups. Although a more pronounced brain edema formation was detected in old mice 24 hours after TBI, lack of correlation between brain water content and neurological deficit indicated that brain edema formation is not solely responsible for age-dependent differences in neurological outcome. Brains of old naïve mice were about 8% smaller compared to young naïve brains, suggesting age-related brain atrophy with possible decline in plasticity. Onset of cerebral inflammation started earlier and primarily ipsilateral to damage in old mice, whereas in young mice inflammation was delayed and present in both hemispheres with a characteristic T cell migration pattern. Pulmonary interleukin 1β expression was up-regulated after cerebral injury only in young, not aged mice. The results therefore indicate that old animals are prone to functional deficits and strong ipsilateral cerebral inflammation

  1. Synthesis and evaluation of the anti-inflammatory effects of niflumic acid lipophilic prodrugs in brain edema.

    PubMed

    el Kihel, L; Bourass, J; Richomme, P; Petit, J Y; Letourneux, Y

    1996-11-01

    Five new lipophilic prodrugs of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, niflumic acid (Nifluril, CAS 4394-00-7), were synthetized and evaluated on the experimental brain edema (injection of phospholipase A2). The effect of these drugs in comparison with dexamethasone which elicits a marked effect on clinical and experimental brain edema was evaluated. Niflumic acid was vectorised by cholesterol, hexadecanol and by three 1,3-diacylglycerols. The anti-inflammatory activity of these compounds on experimental brain edema was evaluated by determination of the prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) brain tissue concentration. Niflumic acid reduced the prostaglandin E2 production more significantly than dexamethasone. Niflumic acid prodrug forms (1,3-dihexadecanoyl-2-[2-[3-(trifluoromethyl)anilino]nicotinoyl] glycerol and 1,3-dihexadecanoyl-2-[2-[3-(trifluoromethyl)anilino]nicotinoyloxybuta noyl] glycerol also showed a marked anti-inflammatory activity at low concentrations.

  2. Opioid receptor agonists reduce brain edema in stroke.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Wang, Hezhen; Shah, Kaushik; Karamyan, Vardan T; Abbruscato, Thomas J

    2011-04-06

    Cerebral edema is a leading cause of mortality in stroke patients. The purpose of this study was to assess a non-selective opioid receptor agonist, biphalin, in decreasing reducing brain edema formation using both in vitro and in vivo models of stroke. For the in situ model of ischemia, hippocampal slices were exposed to oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) conditions and we observed that hippocampal water content was increased, compared to normoxia. Treatment with the mu agonist, Tyr-D-Ala', N-CH, -Phe4, Glyol-Enkephalin (DAMGO), delta opioid agonists, D-pen(2), D-phe(5) enkephalin (DPDPE), and kappa agonist, U50 488, all significantly decreased brain slice water gain. Interestingly, the non-selective agonist, biphalin, exhibited a statistically significant (P<0.01) greater effect in decreasing water content in OGD-exposed hippocampal slices, compared with mu, delta, and kappa selective opioid agonists. Moreover, biphalin exhibited anti-edematous effects in a dose responsive manner. The non-selective opioid antagonist, naloxone, returned the water content nearly back to original OGD values for all opioid agonist treatments, supporting that these effects were mediated by an opioid receptor pathway. Furthermore, biphalin significantly decreased edema (53%) and infarct (48%) ratios, and neuronal recovery from stroke, compared with the vehicle-treated groups in a 12h permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model of focal ischemia. Biphalin also significantly decreased the cell volume increase in primary neuronal cells exposed to OGD condition. These data suggest that opioid receptor activation may provide neuroprotection during stroke and further investigations are needed in the development of novel opioid agonist as efficacious treatments for brain ischemia.

  3. Acetazolamide Mitigates Astrocyte Cellular Edema Following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturdivant, Nasya M.; Smith, Sean G.; Ali, Syed F.; Wolchok, Jeffrey C.; Balachandran, Kartik

    2016-09-01

    Non-penetrating or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is commonly experienced in accidents, the battlefield and in full-contact sports. Astrocyte cellular edema is one of the major factors that leads to high morbidity post-mTBI. Various studies have reported an upregulation of aquaporin-4 (AQP4), a water channel protein, following brain injury. AZA is an antiepileptic drug that has been shown to inhibit AQP4 expression and in this study we investigate the drug as a therapeutic to mitigate the extent of mTBI induced cellular edema. We hypothesized that mTBI-mediated astrocyte dysfunction, initiated by increased intracellular volume, could be reduced when treated with AZA. We tested our hypothesis in a three-dimensional in vitro astrocyte model of mTBI. Samples were subject to no stretch (control) or one high-speed stretch (mTBI) injury. AQP4 expression was significantly increased 24 hours after mTBI. mTBI resulted in a significant increase in the cell swelling within 30 min of mTBI, which was significantly reduced in the presence of AZA. Cell death and expression of S100B was significantly reduced when AZA was added shortly before mTBI stretch. Overall, our data point to occurrence of astrocyte swelling immediately following mTBI, and AZA as a promising treatment to mitigate downstream cellular mortality.

  4. Acetazolamide Mitigates Astrocyte Cellular Edema Following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sturdivant, Nasya M.; Smith, Sean G.; Ali, Syed F.; Wolchok, Jeffrey C.; Balachandran, Kartik

    2016-01-01

    Non-penetrating or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is commonly experienced in accidents, the battlefield and in full-contact sports. Astrocyte cellular edema is one of the major factors that leads to high morbidity post-mTBI. Various studies have reported an upregulation of aquaporin-4 (AQP4), a water channel protein, following brain injury. AZA is an antiepileptic drug that has been shown to inhibit AQP4 expression and in this study we investigate the drug as a therapeutic to mitigate the extent of mTBI induced cellular edema. We hypothesized that mTBI-mediated astrocyte dysfunction, initiated by increased intracellular volume, could be reduced when treated with AZA. We tested our hypothesis in a three-dimensional in vitro astrocyte model of mTBI. Samples were subject to no stretch (control) or one high-speed stretch (mTBI) injury. AQP4 expression was significantly increased 24 hours after mTBI. mTBI resulted in a significant increase in the cell swelling within 30 min of mTBI, which was significantly reduced in the presence of AZA. Cell death and expression of S100B was significantly reduced when AZA was added shortly before mTBI stretch. Overall, our data point to occurrence of astrocyte swelling immediately following mTBI, and AZA as a promising treatment to mitigate downstream cellular mortality. PMID:27623738

  5. Proton-nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times in brain edema

    SciTech Connect

    Kamman, R.L.; Go, K.G.; Berendsen, H.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Proton relaxation times of protein solutions, bovine brain, and edematous feline brain tissue were studied as a function of water concentration, protein concentration, and temperature. In accordance with the fast proton exchange model for relaxation, a linear relation could be established between R1 and the inverse of the weight fraction of tissue water. This relation also applied to R2 of gray matter and of protein solutions. No straightforward relation with water content was found for R2 of white matter. Temperature-dependent studies indicated that in this case, the slow exchange model for relaxation had to be applied. The effect of macromolecules in physiological relevant concentrations on the total relaxation behavior of edematous tissue was weak. Total water content changes predominantly affected the relaxation rates. The linear relation may have high clinical potential for assessment of the status of cerebral edema on the basis of T1 and T2 readings from MR images.

  6. Transient receptor potential vanilloid type 4 channels mediate Na-K-Cl-co-transporter-induced brain edema after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kwok-Tung; Huang, Tai-Chun; Tsai, Ya-Hsin; Yang, Yi-Ling

    2017-03-01

    Na(+) -K(+) -2Cl(-) co-transporter (NKCC1) plays an important role in traumatic brain injury (TBI)-induced brain edema via the MAPK cascade. The transient receptor potential vanilloid type 4 (TRPV4) channel participates in neurogenic inflammation, pain transmission, and edema. In this study, we investigated the relationship between NKCC1 and TRPV4 and the related signaling pathways in TBI-induced brain edema and neuronal damage. TBI was induced by the calibrated weight-drop device. Adult male Wistar rats were randomly assigned into sham and experimental groups for time-course studies of TRPV4 expression after TBI. Hippocampal TRPV4, NKCC1, MAPK, and PI-3K cascades were analyzed by western blot, and brain edema was also evaluated among the different groups. Expression of hippocampal TRPV4 peaked at 8 h after TBI, and phosphorylation of the MAPK cascade and Akt was significantly elevated. Administration of either the TRPV4 antagonist, RN1734, or NKCC1 antagonist, bumetanide, significantly attenuated TBI-induced brain edema through decreasing the phosphorylation of MEK, ERK, and Akt proteins. Bumetanide injection inhibited TRPV4 expression, which suggests NKCC1 activation is critical to TRPV4 activation. Our results showed that hippocampal NKCC1 activation increased TRPV4 expression after TBI and then induced severe brain edema and neuronal damage through activation of the MAPK cascade and Akt-related signaling pathway.

  7. Cerebral Edema in Traumatic Brain Injury: Pathophysiology and Prospective Therapeutic Targets.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Ethan A; Minter, Daniel; Yue, John K; Manley, Geoffrey T

    2016-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a heterogeneous disorder resulting from an external force applied to the head. The development of cerebral edema plays a central role in the evolution of injury following brain trauma and is closely associated with neurologic outcomes. Recent advances in the understanding of the molecular and cellular pathways contributing to the posttraumatic development of cerebral edema have led to the identification of multiple prospective therapeutic targets. The authors summarize the pathogenic mechanisms underlying cerebral edema and highlight the molecular pathways that may be therapeutically targeted to mitigate cerebral edema and associated sequelae following traumatic brain injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Simulating vasogenic brain edema using chronic VEGF infusion.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Martin; Munasinghe, Jeeva; Murayi, Roger; Edwards, Nancy; Montgomery, Blake; Walbridge, Stuart; Merrill, Marsha; Chittiboina, Prashant

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To study peritumoral brain edema (PTBE), it is necessary to create a model that accurately simulates vasogenic brain edema (VBE) without introducing a complicated tumor environment. PTBE associated with brain tumors is predominantly a result of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secreted by brain tumors, and VEGF infusion alone can lead to histological blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown in the absence of tumor. VBE is intimately linked to BBB breakdown. The authors sought to establish a model for VBE with chronic infusion of VEGF that can be validated by serial in-vivo MRI and histological findings. METHODS Male Fischer rats (n = 182) underwent stereotactic striatal implantation of MRI-safe brain cannulas for chronic infusion of VEGF (2-20 µg/ml). Following a preinfusion phase (4-6 days), the rats were exposed to VEGF or control rat serum albumin (1.5 µl/hr) for as long as 144 hours. Serial MRI was performed during infusion on a high-field (9.4-T) machine at 12-24, 24-36, 48-72, and 120-144 hours. Rat brains were then collected and histological analysis was performed. RESULTS Control animals and animals infused with 2 µg/ml of VEGF experienced no neurological deficits, seizure activity, or abnormal behavior. Animals treated with VEGF demonstrated a significantly larger volume (42.90 ± 3.842 mm(3)) of T2 hyper-attenuation at 144 hours when compared with the volume (8.585 ± 1.664 mm(3)) in control animals (mean difference 34.31 ± 4.187 mm(3), p < 0.0001, 95% CI 25.74-42.89 mm(3)). Postcontrast T1 enhancement in the juxtacanalicular region indicating BBB breakdown was observed in rats undergoing infusion with VEGF. At the later time periods (120-144 hrs) the volume of T1 enhancement (34.97 ± 8.99 mm(3)) was significantly less compared with the region of edema (p < 0.0001). Histologically, no evidence of necrosis or inflammation was observed with VEGF or control infusion. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated astrocyte activation, vascular

  9. Simulating vasogenic brain edema using chronic VEGF infusion

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Martin; Munasinghe, Jeeva; Murayi, Roger; Edwards, Nancy; Montgomery, Blake; Walbridge, Stuart; Merrill, Marsha; Chittiboina, Prashant

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To study peritumoral brain edema (PTBE), it is necessary to create a model that accurately simulates vasogenic brain edema (VBE) without introducing a complicated tumor environment. PTBE associated with brain tumors is predominantly a result of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secreted by brain tumors, and VEGF infusion alone can lead to histological blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown in the absence of tumor. VBE is intimately linked to BBB breakdown. The authors sought to establish a model for VBE with chronic infusion of VEGF that can be validated by serial in-vivo MRI and histological findings. METHODS Male Fischer rats (n = 182) underwent stereotactic striatal implantation of MRI-safe brain cannulas for chronic infusion of VEGF (2–20 μg/ml). Following a preinfusion phase (4–6 days), the rats were exposed to VEGF or control rat serum albumin (1.5 μl/hr) for as long as 144 hours. Serial MRI was performed during infusion on a high-field (9.4-T) machine at 12–24, 24–36, 48–72, and 120–144 hours. Rat brains were then collected and histological analysis was performed. RESULTS Control animals and animals infused with 2 μg/ml of VEGF experienced no neurological deficits, seizure activity, or abnormal behavior. Animals treated with VEGF demonstrated a significantly larger volume (42.90 ± 3.842 mm3) of T2 hyper-attenuation at 144 hours when compared with the volume (8.585 ± 1.664 mm3) in control animals (mean difference 34.31 ± 4.187 mm3, p < 0.0001, 95% CI 25.74–42.89 mm3). Postcontrast T1 enhancement in the juxtacanalicular region indicating BBB breakdown was observed in rats undergoing infusion with VEGF. At the later time periods (120–144 hrs) the volume of T1 enhancement (34.97 ± 8.99 mm3) was significantly less compared with the region of edema (p < 0.0001). Histologically, no evidence of necrosis or inflammation was observed with VEGF or control infusion. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated astrocyte activation

  10. [Study of brain edema by an infusion edema Model--the method and characteristics of the model].

    PubMed

    Takagi, H; Marmarou, A; Lax, F; Horoupian, D S

    1983-09-01

    In this report, we have described the way of making the infusion edema model, physiological changes of various parameters during this procedure, distribution of water content in white and gray matter and the light and electron microscopic findings of this edema model, for the further understanding of vasogenic edema of the brain. To make the infusion edema model, 25-G needle was stereotaxically inserted into the left frontal white matter of the cat brain. Through the polyethylene catheter with three way stop cock, this catheter was connected to the pressure transducer and slow infusion pump. By this way, we can monitor the pressure of infusing fluid into the white matter. Normal saline was infused with initial rate of 0.75 microliter/min for the first 2 hours. The inflow rate was increased to 1.5 microliter/min for the next one hour, and then changed to 3.0 microliters/min for maintenance inflow rate. The total amount of infused volume was 0.5 ml in this study. During making the infusion edema model, blood pressure and PaCO2 changed little. Intracranial pressure slightly increased from 5.8 to 15.1 mmHg. Pressure volume index (PVI) changed from 0.74 to 0.64, suggesting the changes of intracranial compliance. The water content measured by specific gravimetric technique showed nearly the same water contents and distribution of edema fluid in the white matter of the cat as in the cryogenic injury model. Pathological findings of this infusion edema model demonstrated that the infused liquid was accumulated in the extracellular space of white matter without damaging the tight junction, and endothelial cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Brain edema predicts outcome after nonlacunar ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Battey, Thomas W K; Karki, Mahima; Singhal, Aneesh B; Wu, Ona; Sadaghiani, Saloomeh; Campbell, Bruce C V; Davis, Stephen M; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Sheth, Kevin N; Kimberly, W Taylor

    2014-12-01

    In malignant infarction, brain edema leads to secondary neurological deterioration and poor outcome. We sought to determine whether swelling is associated with outcome in smaller volume strokes. Two research cohorts of acute stroke subjects with serial brain MRI were analyzed. The categorical presence of swelling and infarct growth was assessed on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) by comparing baseline and follow-up scans. The increase in stroke volume (ΔDWI) was then subdivided into swelling and infarct growth volumes using region-of-interest analysis. The relationship of these imaging markers with outcome was evaluated in univariable and multivariable regression. The presence of swelling independently predicted worse outcome after adjustment for age, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, admission glucose, and baseline DWI volume (odds ratio, 4.55; 95% confidence interval, 1.21-18.9; P<0.02). Volumetric analysis confirmed that ΔDWI was associated with outcome (odds ratio, 4.29; 95% confidence interval, 2.00-11.5; P<0.001). After partitioning ΔDWI into swelling and infarct growth volumetrically, swelling remained an independent predictor of poor outcome (odds ratio, 1.09; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-1.17; P<0.005). Larger infarct growth was also associated with poor outcome (odds ratio, 7.05; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-143; P<0.045), although small infarct growth was not. The severity of cytotoxic injury measured on apparent diffusion coefficient maps was associated with swelling, whereas the perfusion deficit volume was associated with infarct growth. Swelling and infarct growth each contribute to total stroke lesion growth in the days after stroke. Swelling is an independent predictor of poor outcome, with a brain swelling volume of ≥11 mL identified as the threshold with greatest sensitivity and specificity for predicting poor outcome. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Differentiation of brain tumor-related edema based on 3D T1rho imaging.

    PubMed

    Villanueva-Meyer, J E; Barajas, R F; Mabray, M C; Chen, W; Shankaranarayanan, A; Koon, P; Barani, I J; Tihan, T; Cha, S

    2017-06-01

    Cerebral edema associated with brain tumors is an important source of morbidity. Its type depends largely on the capillary ultra-structures of the histopathologic subtype of underlying brain tumor. The purpose of our study was to differentiate vasogenic edema associated with brain metastases and infiltrative edema related to diffuse gliomas using quantitative 3D T1 rho (T1ρ) imaging. Preoperative MR examination including whole brain 3D T1ρ imaging was performed in 23 patients with newly diagnosed brain tumors (9 with metastasis, 8 with lower grade glioma, LGG, 6 with glioblastoma, GBM). Mean T1ρ values were measured in regions of peritumoral non-enhancing T2 signal hyperintensity, excluding both enhancing and necrotic or cystic component, and normal-appearing white matter. Mean T1ρ values were significantly elevated in the vasogenic edema surrounding intracranial metastases when compared to the infiltrative edema associated with either LGG or GBM (p=0.02 and <0.01, respectively). No significant difference was noted between T1ρ values of infiltrative edema between LGG and GBM (p=0.84 and 0.96, respectively). Our study demonstrates the feasibility and potential diagnostic role of T1ρ in the quantitative differentiation between edema related to intracranial metastases and gliomas and as a potentially complementary tool to standard MR techniques in further characterizing pathophysiology of vasogenic and infiltrative edema. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Rapamycin alleviates brain edema after focal cerebral ischemia reperfusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Feng, Guoying; Miao, Yanying; Liu, Guixiang; Xu, Chunsheng

    2014-06-01

    Brain edema is a major consequence of cerebral ischemia reperfusion. However, few effective therapeutic options are available for retarding the brain edema progression after cerebral ischemia. Recently, rapamycin has been shown to produce neuroprotective effects in rats after cerebral ischemia reperfusion. Whether rapamycin could alleviate this brain edema injury is still unclear. In this study, the rat stroke model was induced by a 1-h left transient middle cerebral artery occlusion using an intraluminal filament, followed by 48 h of reperfusion. The effects of rapamycin (250 μg/kg body weight, intraperitoneal; i.p.) on brain edema progression were evaluated. The results showed that rapamycin treatment significantly reduced the infarct volume, the water content of the brain tissue and the Evans blue extravasation through the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Rapamycin treatment could improve histological appearance of the brain tissue, increased the capillary lumen space and maintain the integrity of BBB. Rapamycin also inhibited matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) and aquaporin 4 (AQP4) expression. These data imply that rapamycin could improve brain edema progression after reperfusion injury through maintaining BBB integrity and inhibiting MMP9 and AQP4 expression. The data of this study provide a new possible approach for improving brain edema after cerebral ischemia reperfusion by administration of rapamycin.

  14. Brain edema predictsoutcome after non-lacunar ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Battey, Thomas W.K.; Karki, Mahima; Singhal, Aneesh B.; Wu, Ona; Sadaghiani, Saloomeh; Campbell, Bruce C.V.; Davis, Stephen M.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Sheth, Kevin N.; Kimberly, W. Taylor

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose In malignant infarction, brain edema leads to secondary neurological deterioration and poor outcome. We sought to determine whether swelling is associated with outcome in smaller volume strokes. Methods Two research cohorts of acute stroke subjects with serial brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were analyzed. The categorical presence of swelling and/or infarct growth was assessed on diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) by comparing baseline and follow-up scans. The increase in stroke volume (ΔDWI) was then subdivided into swelling and infarct growth volumes using region-of-interest analysis. The relationship of these imaging markers with outcome was evaluated in univariable and multivariable regression. Results The presence of swelling independently predicted worse outcome after adjustment for age, NIH stroke scale, admission glucose, and baseline DWI volume(OR4.55, 95%CI1.21-18.9, p < 0.02). Volumetric analysis confirmed ΔDWI was associated with outcome (OR4.29, 95%CI 2.00-11.5, p < 0.001). After partitioning ΔDWI into swelling and infarct growth volumetrically, swelling remained an independent predictor of poor outcome (OR1.09, 95%CI 1.03-1.17, p < 0.005). Larger infarct growth was also associated with poor outcome (OR7.05, 95%CI 1.04-143, p < 0.045), although small infarct growth was not. The severity of cytotoxic injury measured on apparent diffusion coefficient maps was associated with swelling, whereas the perfusion deficit volume was associated with infarct growth. Conclusions Swelling and infarct growth each contribute to total stroke lesion growth in the days following stroke. Swelling is an independent predictor of poor outcome, with abrain swelling volume of ≥11mL identified as the threshold with greatest sensitivity and specificity for predicting poor outcome. PMID:25336512

  15. Measurement of backscattered light from the cold-injured brain: feasibility study of noninvasive monitoring of brain edema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Yoshinori; Sato, Shunichi; Saitoh, Daizoh; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Ooigawa, Hidetoshi; Shima, Katsuji; Okada, Yoshiaki; Ashida, Hiroshi; Obara, Minoru

    2004-07-01

    Brain edema causes an increase in brain tissue volume which results from an accumulation of transudate due to the increased permeability of the brain capillaries. Assuming the transudate to be the material with a low scattering coefficient, brain edema would decrease scattering coefficient of the brain tissue, and diffuse reflectance from the brain may, therefore, be decreased. We examined whether brain edema can be detected or not by measuring the diffuse light reflected from the brain. We induced brain edema by cold injury in rats. The rat skull was irradiated with 633-nm HeNe laser through an optical fiber, and the diffuse light reflected from the brain was collected through another optical fiber. Intensity of the diffuse light reflectance was measured with a polychromator as functions of the time and position on the skull. We found that intensity of the detected diffuse light reflectance decreased at 24 h after injury in the surround area of the injury, suggesting that brain edema can be detected by measuring the diffuse light reflected from the brain.

  16. Application of Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability Imaging in Global Cerebral Edema.

    PubMed

    Ivanidze, J; Kallas, O N; Gupta, A; Weidman, E; Baradaran, H; Mir, D; Giambrone, A; Segal, A Z; Claassen, J; Sanelli, P C

    2016-09-01

    Blood-brain barrier permeability is not routinely evaluated in the clinical setting. Global cerebral edema occurs after SAH and is associated with BBB disruption. Detection of global cerebral edema using current imaging techniques is challenging. Our purpose was to apply blood-brain barrier permeability imaging in patients with global cerebral edema by using extended CT perfusion. Patients with SAH underwent CTP in the early phase after aneurysmal rupture (days 0-3) and were classified as having global cerebral edema or nonglobal cerebral edema using established noncontrast CT criteria. CTP data were postprocessed into blood-brain barrier permeability quantitative maps of PS (permeability surface-area product), K(trans) (volume transfer constant from blood plasma to extravascular extracellular space), Kep (washout rate constant of the contrast agent from extravascular extracellular space to intravascular space), VE (extravascular extracellular space volume per unit of tissue volume), VP (plasmatic volume per unit of tissue volume), and F (plasma flow) by using Olea Sphere software. Mean values were compared using t tests. Twenty-two patients were included in the analysis. Kep (1.32 versus 1.52, P < .0001), K(trans) (0.15 versus 0.19, P < .0001), VP (0.51 versus 0.57, P = .0007), and F (1176 versus 1329, P = .0001) were decreased in global cerebral edema compared with nonglobal cerebral edema while VE (0.81 versus 0.39, P < .0001) was increased. Extended CTP was used to evaluate blood-brain barrier permeability in patients with SAH with and without global cerebral edema. Kep is an important indicator of altered blood-brain barrier permeability in patients with decreased blood flow, as Kep is flow-independent. Further study of blood-brain barrier permeability is needed to improve diagnosis and monitoring of global cerebral edema. © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  17. Proton relaxation in acute and subacute ischemic brain edema

    SciTech Connect

    Boisvert, D.P.; Handa, Y.; Allen, P.S. )

    1990-01-01

    The relation between regional ischemic brain edema and tissue proton relaxation rates (R1 = 1/T1; R2 = 1/T2) were studied in 16 macaque monkeys subjected to MCA occlusion. In vivo R2 measurements were obtained from multiple spin-echo (eight echoes) images taken at 2-, 3-, 4-, and 72-hr postischemia. In vitro R1 and R2 values were determined for corresponding regions after sacrifice at 4 hr (n = 8) or at 72-hr postischemia in seven surviving animals. The water content of the white and gray matter tissue samples was measured by the wet/dry method. Four animals (25%) showed ipsilateral regions of increased signal intensity as early as 2 hr after MCA occlusion. All seven animals imaged at 72 hr displayed such regions. Despite the absence of measured changes in tissue water content, significant decreases in R2, but not in R1, occurred at 4 hr. At this stage, R2 values correlated more closely than R1 with individual variations in water content. At 72 hr, marked decreases in both R1 and R2 were measured in ischemic deep gray matter and white matter. Cortical gray matter was unchanged. In edematous gray and white matter, both R1 and R2 correlated closely with tissue water content, but R2 was consistently 10 to 20 times more sensitive than R1. Biexponential R2 decay was observed at 4 and 72 hr, but only in the white matter region that became severely edematous at 72 hr.

  18. Intracerebroventricular administration of chondroitinase ABC reduces acute edema after traumatic brain injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Finan, John D; Cho, Frances S; Kernie, Steven G; Morrison, Barclay

    2016-03-12

    Brain edema is a significant challenge facing clinicians managing severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the acute period. If edema reaches a critical point, it leads to runaway intracranial hypertension that, in turn, leads to severe morbidity or death if left untreated. Clinical data on the efficacy of standard interventions is mixed. The goal of this study was to validate a novel therapeutic strategy for reducing post-traumatic brain edema in a mouse model. Prior in vitro work reported that the brain swells due to coupled electrostatic and osmotic forces generated by large, negatively charged, immobile molecules in the matrix that comprises brain tissue. Chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) digests chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, a molecule that contributes to this negative charge. Therefore, we administered ChABC by intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection after controlled cortical impact TBI in the mouse and measured associated changes in edema. Almost half of the edema induced by injury was eliminated by ChABC treatment. ICV administration of ChABC may be a novel and effective method of treating post-traumatic brain edema in the acute period.

  19. Correlation between subacute sensorimotor deficits and brain edema in two mouse models of intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Krafft, Paul R.; McBride, Devin W.; Lekic, Tim; Rolland, William B.; Mansell, Charles E.; Ma, Qingyi; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Formation of brain edema after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is highly associated with its poor outcome, thus it is clinically important to understand the effect brain edema has on outcome. However, the relationship between cerebral edema and behavioral deficits has not been thoroughly examined in the preclinical setting. Hence, this study aimed to evaluate the ability of common sensorimotor tests to predict the extent of brain edema in two mouse models of ICH. One hundred male CD-1 mice were subjected to sham surgery or ICH induction via intrastriatal injection of either autologous blood (30 μL) or bacterial collagenase (0.0375 U or 0.075 U). At 24 and 72 hours after surgery, animals underwent a battery of behavioral tests, including the modified Garcia neuroscore (Neuroscore), corner turn test (CTT), forelimb placing test (FPT), wire hang task (WHT) and beam walking (BW). Brain edema was evaluated via the wet weight/dry weight method. Intrastriatal injection of autologous blood or bacterial collagenase resulted in a significant increase in brain water content and associated sensorimotor deficits (p<0.05). A significant correlation between brain edema and sensorimotor deficits was observed for all behavioral tests except for WHT and BW. Based on these findings, we recommend implementing the Neuroscore, CTT and/or FPT in preclinical studies of unilateral ICH in mice. PMID:24518201

  20. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α contributes to brain edema after stroke by regulating aquaporins and glycerol distribution in brain.

    PubMed

    Higashida, Tetsuhiro; Peng, Changya; Li, Jie; Dornbos, David; Teng, Kailing; Li, Xiaohua; Kinni, Harish; Guthikonda, Murali; Ding, Yuchuan

    2011-02-01

    Brain edema following stroke is a critical clinical problem due to its association with increased morbidity and mortality. Despite its significance, present treatment for brain edema simply provides symptomatic relief due to the fact that molecular mechanisms underlying brain edema remain poorly understood. The present study investigated the role of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and aquaporins (AQP-4 and -9) in regulating cerebral glycerol accumulation and inducing brain edema in a rodent model of stroke. Two-hours of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) followed by reperfusion was performed in male Sprague-Dawley rats (250-280 g). Anti-AQP-4 antibody, anti-AQP-9 antibody, or 2-Methoxyestradiol (2ME2, an inhibitor of HIF-1α) was given at the time of MCAO. The rats were sacrificed at 1 and 24 hours after reperfusion and their brains were examined. Extracellular and intracellular glycerol concentration of brain tissue was calculated with an enzymatic glycerol assay. The protein expressions of HIF-1α, AQP-4 and AQP-9 were determined by Western blotting. Brain edema was measured by brain water content. Compared to control, edema (p < 0.01), increased glycerol (p < 0.05), and enhanced expressions of HIF-1α, AQP-4, and AQP-9 (p < 0.05) were observed after stroke. With inhibition of AQP-4, AQP-9 or HIF-1α, edema and extracellular glycerol were significantly (p < 0.01) decreased while intracellular glycerol was increased (p < 0.01) 1 hour after stroke. Inhibition of HIF-1α with 2ME2 suppressed (p < 0.01) the expression of AQP-4 and AQP-9. These findings suggest that HIF-1α serves as an upstream regulator of cerebral glycerol concentrations and brain edema via a molecular pathway involving AQP-4 and AQP-9. Pharmacological blockade of this pathway in stroke patients may provide novel therapeutic strategies.

  1. TIMP-1/MMP-9 Imbalance in Brain Edema in Rats With Fulminant Hepatic Failure1

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Satoshi; Nguyen, Justin H.

    2009-01-01

    Background Fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) is a devastating disease. When coma sets in, brain edema develops, changing FHF into a lethal condition. Liver transplantation is the definitive treatment. However, a third of these patients die as the result of brain edema before a donor becomes available. Tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), or TIMP, and MMP-9 are implicated in ischemic brain edema. We thus hypothesized that an imbalance in TIMP-1/MMP-9 relationship plays a role in the development of increased brain extravasation and edema in FHF. Materials and methods FHF was induced with a single intraperitoneal injection of D-galactosamine (250 mg/kg). Control rats received saline. GM6001, a synthetic MMP inhibitor, was administered (30 mg/kg) every 12 h for 3 doses starting at 12 h after D-galactosamine injection. MMP-9 was assayed with standard gelatin zymography. Brain extravasation, a measurement of the blood–brain barrier permeability, was determined with Evans blue. Brain edema was determined using specific gravity method. Results The active MMP-9 in the systemic circulation was significantly increased in the comatose FHF as compared to the precoma FHF and control animals (6.5 ± 0.7 versus 4.6 ± 0.4 versus 2.6 ± 0.5 pg/µg, respectively; P < 0.05). Conversely, TIMP-1 was steadily decreased in precoma and coma FHF rats by 35% and 45%, respectively. Blocking MMP-9 activity with GM6001 significantly attenuated brain extravasation and edema in rats with FHF. Conclusions Our study strongly supports that the perturbation of decreased TIMP-1 and increased MMP-9 contributes to the pathogenesis of brain edema in FHF. Our findings present a potential therapeutic approach to effectively increase the window of opportunity for life-saving liver transplantation. PMID:16488444

  2. Prevention of status epilepticus-induced brain edema and neuronal cell loss by repeated treatment with high-dose levetiracetam.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Kouichi; Inamine, Moriyoshi; Oshima, Wataru; Kotani, Masaharu; Chiba, Yoichi; Ueno, Masaki; Ishihara, Yasuhiro

    2015-05-22

    The management of status epilepticus (SE) is important to prevent mortality and the development of post-SE symptomatic epilepsy. Acquired epilepsy after an initial brain insult by SE can be experimentally reproduced in the murine model of SE induced by pilocarpine. In the present study, we evaluated the possibility of treatment with a high-dose of levetiracetam in this model. Repeated treatment with high-dose levetiracetam after termination of SE by diazepam significantly prevented the incidence of spontaneous recurrent seizures and mortality for at least 28 days. To determine the brain alterations after SE, magnetic resonance imaging was performed. Both T2-weighted imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging showed changes in the limbic regions. These changes in the limbic regions demonstrated the development of cytotoxic edema three hours after SE, followed by the development of vasogenic edema two days after SE. In the pilocarpine-SE model, the incidence of spontaneous recurrent seizures after SE was strongly associated with neuronal damage within a few hours to days after SE by the development of vasogenic edema via the breakdown of the blood-brain barrier in the limbic regions. High-dose levetiracetam significantly suppressed the parameters in the limbic areas. These data indicate that repeated treatment with high-dose levetiracetam for at least two days after SE termination by diazepam is important for controlling the neuronal damage by preventing brain edema. Therefore, these findings suggest that early treatment with high-dose levetiracetam after SE termination by diazepam may protect against adverse sequelae via the inhibition of neurotoxicity induced by brain edema events.

  3. Failed First Craniotomy and Tumor Removal of Parasagittal Meningioma with Severe Peritumoral Brain Edema

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Youngbo

    2016-01-01

    Parasagittal meningioma often presents as peritumoral brain edema (PTBE). The risk of edema increases when the tumor occludes the superior sagittal sinus (SSS). Although PTBE may be expected based on the patient’s symptoms or radiologic findings, extensive brain swelling and extracranial herniation during elective surgery are rare. Herniation during surgery could lead to irreversible neurological damage and even brain rupture. We report a case of a failed routine craniotomy for a parasagittal meningioma with complete occlusion of the posterior third of the SSS in a 30-year-old male patient. The patient developed extensive brain swelling and extracranial herniation during surgery. PMID:27867923

  4. Electron microscopic features of brain edema in rodent cerebral malaria in relation to glial fibrillary acidic protein expression.

    PubMed

    Ampawong, Sumate; Chaisri, Urai; Viriyavejakul, Parnpen; Nontprasert, Apichart; Grau, Georges E; Pongponratn, Emsri

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms leading to cerebral malaria (CM) are not completely understood. Brain edema has been suggested as having an important role in experimental CM. In this study, CBA/CaH mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA blood-stage and when typical symptoms of CM developed on day 7, brain tissues were processed for electron-microscopic and immunohistochemical studies. The study demonstrated ultrastructural hallmarks of cerebral edema by perivascular edema and astroglial dilatation confirming existing evidence of vasogenic and cytogenic edema. This correlates closely with the clinical features of CM. An adaptive response of astrocytic activity, represented by increasing glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression in the perivascular area and increasing numbers of large astrocyte clusters were predominately found in the CM mice. The presence of multivesicular and lamellar bodies indicates the severity of cerebral damage in experimental CM. Congestion of the microvessels with occluded white blood cells (WBCs), parasitized red blood cells (PRBCs) and platelets is also a crucial covariate role for CM pathogenesis.

  5. Differential aquaporin 4 expression during edema build-up and resolution phases of brain inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Vasogenic edema dynamically accumulates in many brain disorders associated with brain inflammation, with the critical step of edema exacerbation feared in patient care. Water entrance through blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening is thought to have a role in edema formation. Nevertheless, the mechanisms of edema resolution remain poorly understood. Because the water channel aquaporin 4 (AQP4) provides an important route for vasogenic edema resolution, we studied the time course of AQP4 expression to better understand its potential effect in countering the exacerbation of vasogenic edema. Methods Focal inflammation was induced in the rat brain by a lysolecithin injection and was evaluated at 1, 3, 7, 14 and 20 days using a combination of in vivo MRI with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements used as a marker of water content, and molecular and histological approaches for the quantification of AQP4 expression. Markers of active inflammation (macrophages, BBB permeability, and interleukin-1β) and markers of scarring (gliosis) were also quantified. Results This animal model of brain inflammation demonstrated two phases of edema development: an initial edema build-up phase during active inflammation that peaked after 3 days (ADC increase) was followed by an edema resolution phase that lasted from 7 to 20 days post injection (ADC decrease) and was accompanied by glial scar formation. A moderate upregulation in AQP4 was observed during the build-up phase, but a much stronger transcriptional and translational level of AQP4 expression was observed during the secondary edema resolution phase. Conclusions We conclude that a time lag in AQP4 expression occurs such that the more significant upregulation was achieved only after a delay period. This change in AQP4 expression appears to act as an important determinant in the exacerbation of edema, considering that AQP4 expression is insufficient to counter the water influx during the build-up phase, while the

  6. Fluid Intake Related to Brain Edema in Acute Middle Cerebral Artery Infarction.

    PubMed

    Dharmasaroja, Pornpatr A

    2016-02-01

    Evidence of the appropriate amount of fluid intake during the first few days after acute stroke was scarce. Concerns were raised in patients with acute malignant middle cerebral infarction, who tended to have malignant brain edema later. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effect of fluid intake on the occurrence of malignant brain edema in patients with acute middle cerebral artery infarction. Patients with acute middle cerebral artery infarction who had National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score of at least 15 were included. Baseline characteristics and amount of fluid intake during the first few days were compared in patients with and without malignant brain edema. One hundred ninety-three patients were studied. Mean NIHSS score was 20. Malignant brain edema occurred in 69 patients (36%). Higher amount of fluid intake (>1650 ml or >28 ml/kg/day or >93% of daily maintenance fluid) showed a significant association with malignant brain edema (OR = 13.86, 95% CI 5.11-37.60, p value <0.001). Decompressive surgery was performed in 35 patients (18%). With mean follow-up of 12 months, 49 patients (49/184, 27%) had favorable outcomes (modified Rankin scale (mRS) 0-2) at final follow-up. Seventy-nine patients (79/184, 43%) died. In the subgroup of patients with malignant brain edema, 39 patients (39/65, 60%) died and only 11% (7/65 patients) had favorable outcome. High amount of fluid intake in the first few days of acute middle cerebral infarction was related to the occurrence of malignant brain edema.

  7. Overexpression of caveolin-1 attenuates brain edema by inhibiting tight junction degradation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kang-Ho; Lee, Eun-Bin; Lee, Jung-Kil; Kim, Joon-Tae; Kim, Ja-Hae; Lee, Min-Cheol; Lee, Hong-Joon; Cho, Ki-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral edema from the disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) after cerebral ischemia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality as well as a common event in patients with stroke. Caveolins (Cavs) are thought to regulate BBB functions. Here, we report for the first time that Cav-1 overexpression (OE) decreased brain edema from BBB disruption following ischemic insult. Edema volumes and Cav-1 expression levels were measured following photothrombosis and middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Endothelial cells that were transduced with a Cav-1 lentiviral expression vector were transplanted into rats. BBB permeability was quantified with Evans blue extravasation. Edema volume was determined from measures of the extravasation area, brain water content, and average fluorescence intensity after Cy5.5 injections. Tight junction (TJ) protein expression was measured with immunoblotting. Cav-1 expression levels and vasogenic brain edema correlated strongly after ischemic insult. Cav-1 expression and BBB disruption peaked 3 d after the MCAO. In addition, intravenous administration of endothelial cells expressing Cav-1 effectively increased the Cav-1 levels 3 d after the MCAO ischemic insult. Importantly, Cav-1 OE ameliorated the vasogenic edema by inhibiting the degradation of TJ protein expression in the acute phase of ischemic stroke. These results suggested that Cav-1 OE protected the integrity of the BBB mainly by preventing the degradation of TJ proteins in rats. These findings need to be confirmed in a clinical setting in human subjects. PMID:27708218

  8. Experimental traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury, a leading cause of death and disability, is a result of an outside force causing mechanical disruption of brain tissue and delayed pathogenic events which collectively exacerbate the injury. These pathogenic injury processes are poorly understood and accordingly no effective neuroprotective treatment is available so far. Experimental models are essential for further clarification of the highly complex pathology of traumatic brain injury towards the development of novel treatments. Among the rodent models of traumatic brain injury the most commonly used are the weight-drop, the fluid percussion, and the cortical contusion injury models. As the entire spectrum of events that might occur in traumatic brain injury cannot be covered by one single rodent model, the design and choice of a specific model represents a major challenge for neuroscientists. This review summarizes and evaluates the strengths and weaknesses of the currently available rodent models for traumatic brain injury. PMID:20707892

  9. Human neuronal changes in brain edema and increased intracranial pressure.

    PubMed

    Faragó, Nóra; Kocsis, Ágnes Katalin; Braskó, Csilla; Lovas, Sándor; Rózsa, Márton; Baka, Judith; Kovács, Balázs; Mikite, Katalin; Szemenyei, Viktor; Molnár, Gábor; Ozsvár, Attila; Oláh, Gáspár; Piszár, Ildikó; Zvara, Ágnes; Patócs, Attila; Barzó, Pál; Puskás, László G; Tamás, Gábor

    2016-08-04

    Functional and molecular changes associated with pathophysiological conditions are relatively easily detected based on tissue samples collected from patients. Population specific cellular responses to disease might remain undiscovered in samples taken from organs formed by a multitude of cell types. This is particularly apparent in the human cerebral cortex composed of a yet undefined number of neuron types with a potentially different involvement in disease processes. We combined cellular electrophysiology, anatomy and single cell digital PCR in human neurons identified in situ for the first time to assess mRNA expression and corresponding functional changes in response to edema and increased intracranial pressure. In single pyramidal cells, mRNA copy numbers of AQP1, AQP3, HMOX1, KCNN4, SCN3B and SOD2 increased, while CACNA1B, CRH decreased in edema. In addition, single pyramidal cells increased the copy number of AQP1, HTR5A and KCNS1 mRNAs in response to increased intracranial pressure. In contrast to pyramidal cells, AQP1, HMOX1and KCNN4 remained unchanged in single cell digital PCR performed on fast spiking cells in edema. Corroborating single cell digital PCR results, pharmacological and immunohistochemical results also suggested the presence of KCNN4 encoding the α-subunit of KCa3.1 channels in edema on pyramidal cells, but not on interneurons. We measured the frequency of spontaneous EPSPs on pyramidal cells in both pathophysiological conditions and on fast spiking interneurons in edema and found a significant decrease in each case, which was accompanied by an increase in input resistances on both cell types and by a drop in dendritic spine density on pyramidal cells consistent with a loss of excitatory synapses. Our results identify anatomical and/or physiological changes in human pyramidal and fast spiking cells in edema and increased intracranial pressure revealing cell type specific quantitative changes in gene expression. Some of the edema

  10. Sulfonylurea receptor 1 contributes to the astrocyte swelling and brain edema in acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, A R; Valdes, V; Tong, X Y; Shamaladevi, N; Gonzalez, W; Norenberg, M D

    2014-02-01

    Astrocyte swelling (cytotoxic brain edema) is the major neurological complication of acute liver failure (ALF), a condition in which ammonia has been strongly implicated in its etiology. Ion channels and transporters are known to be involved in cell volume regulation, and a disturbance in these systems may result in cell swelling. One ion channel known to contribute to astrocyte swelling/brain edema in other neurological disorders is the ATP-dependent, nonselective cation (NCCa-ATP) channel. We therefore examined its potential role in the astrocyte swelling/brain edema associated with ALF. Cultured astrocytes treated with 5 mM ammonia showed a threefold increase in the sulfonylurea receptor type 1 (SUR1) protein expression, a marker of NCCa-ATP channel activity. Blocking SUR1 with glibenclamide significantly reduced the ammonia-induced cell swelling in cultured astrocytes. Additionally, overexpression of SUR1 in ammonia-treated cultured astrocytes was significantly reduced by cotreatment of cells with BAY 11-7082, an inhibitor of NF-κB, indicating the involvement of an NF-κB-mediated SUR1 upregulation in the mechanism of ammonia-induced astrocyte swelling. Brain SUR1 mRNA level was also found to be increased in the thioacetamide (TAA) rat model of ALF. Additionally, we found a significant increase in SUR1 protein expression in rat brain cortical astrocytes in TAA-treated rats. Treatment with glibenclamide significantly reduced the brain edema in this model of ALF. These findings strongly suggest the involvement of NCCa-ATP channel in the astrocyte swelling/brain edema in ALF and that targeting this channel may represent a useful approach for the treatment of the brain edema associated with ALF.

  11. Dynamics of rabbit brain edema in focal lesion and perilesion area after traumatic brain injury: a MRI study.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiao-Er; Zhang, Yu-Zhen; Li, Yue-Hua; Li, Ming-Hua; Li, Wen-Bin

    2012-09-20

    To understand the dynamics of brain edema in different areas after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in rabbit, we used dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to monitor blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and cytotoxic brain edema after weight drop-induced TBI in rabbit. The dynamics of BBB permeability and brain edema were quantified using K(trans) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in the focal and perifocal lesion areas, as well as the area contralateral to the lesion. In the focal lesion area, K(trans) began to increase at 3 h post-TBI, peaked at 3 days, and decreased gradually while remaining higher than sham injury animals at 7 and 30 days. ADC was more variable, increased slightly at 3 h, decreased to its lowest value at 7 days, then increased to a peak at 30 days. In the perifocal lesion area, K(trans) began to increase at 1 day, peaked at 3-7 days, and returned to control level by 30 days. ADC showed a trend to increase at 1 day, followed by a continuous increase thereafter. In the contralateral area, no changes in K(trans) and ADC were observed at any time-point. These data demonstrate that different types of brain edema predominate in the focal and perifocal lesion areas. Specifically cytotoxic edema was predominant in the focal lesion area while vasogenic edema predominated in the perifocal area in acute phase. Furthermore, secondary opening of the BBB after TBI may appear if secondary injury is not controlled. BBB damage may be a driving force for cytotoxic brain edema and could be a new target for TBI intervention.

  12. MRI reveals edema in larynx (but not in brain) during anaphylactic hypotension in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Ichiro; Tanida, Mamoru; Shibamoto, Toshishige; Wang, Mofei; Kurata, Yasutaka; Tonami, Hisao

    2013-11-01

    Anaphylactic shock is sometimes accompanied by local interstitial edema due to increased vascular permeability. We performed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to compare edema in the larynx and brain of anesthetized rats during anaphylactic hypotension versus vasodilator-induced hypotension. Male Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to hypotension induced by the ovalbumin antigen (n=7) or a vasodilator sodium nitroprusside (SNP; n=7). Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and T2-relaxation time (T2RT) were quantified on MRI performed repeatedly for up to 68 min after the injection of either agent. The presence of laryngeal edema was also examined by histological examination. Separately, the occurrence of brain edema was assessed by measuring brain water content using the wet/dry method in rats with anaphylaxis (n=5) or SNP (n=5) and the non-hypotensive control rats (n=5). Mast cells in hypothalamus were morphologically examined. Mean arterial blood pressure similarly decreased to 35 mmHg after an injection of the antigen or SNP. Hyperintensity on T2-weighted images (as reflected by elevated T2RT) was found in the larynx as early as 13 min after an injection of the antigen, but not SNP. A postmortem histological examination revealed epiglottic edema in the rats with anaphylaxis, but not SNP. In contrast, no significant changes in T2RT or ADC were detectable in the brains of any rats studied. In separate experiments, the quantified brain water content did not increase in either anaphylaxis or SNP rats, as compared with the non-hypotensive control rats. The numbers of mast cells with metachromatic granules in the hypothalamus were not different between rats with anaphylaxis and SNP, suggesting the absence of anaphylactic reaction in hypothalamus. Edema was detected using the MRI technique in the larynx during rat anaphylaxis, but not in the brain.

  13. Apolipoprotein E-Mimetic COG1410 Reduces Acute Vasogenic Edema following Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Cao, Fang; Jiang, Yong; Wu, Yue; Zhong, Jianjun; Liu, Jieshi; Qin, Xinghu; Chen, Ligang; Vitek, Michael P; Li, Fengqiao; Xu, Lu; Sun, Xiaochuan

    2016-01-15

    The degree of post-traumatic brain edema and dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) influences the neurofunctional outcome after a traumatic brain injury (TBI). Previous studies have demonstrated that the administration of apolipoprotein E-mimetic peptide COG1410 reduces the brain water content after subarachnoid hemorrhage, intra-cerebral hemorrhage, and focal brain ischemia. However, the effects of COG1410 on vasogenic edema following TBI are not known. The current study evaluated the effects of 1 mg/kg daily COG1410 versus saline administered intravenously after a controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury on BBB dysfunction and vasogenic edema at an acute stage in mice. The results demonstrated that treatment with COG1410 suppressed the activity of matrix metalloproteinase-9, reduced the disruption of the BBB and Evans Blue dye extravasation, reduced the TBI lesion volume and vasogenic edema, and decreased the functional deficits compared with mice treated with vehicle, at an acute stage after CCI. These findings suggest that COG1410 is a promising preclinical therapeutic agent for the treatment of traumatic brain injury.

  14. Blockage of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 inhibits brain edema in middle cerebral artery occlusion mice.

    PubMed

    Jie, Pinghui; Tian, Yujing; Hong, Zhiwen; Li, Lin; Zhou, Libin; Chen, Lei; Chen, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Brain edema is an important pathological process during stroke. Activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) causes an up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in lung tissue. MMP can digest the endothelial basal lamina to destroy blood brain barrier, leading to vasogenic brain edema. Herein, we tested whether TRPV4-blockage could inhibit brain edema through inhibiting MMPs in middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) mice. We found that the brain water content and Evans blue extravasation at 48 h post-MCAO were reduced by a TRPV4 antagonist HC-067047. The increased MMP-2/9 protein expression in hippocampi of MCAO mice was attenuated by HC-067046, but only the increased MMP-9 activity was blocked by HC-067047. The loss of zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and occludin protein in MCAO mice was also attenuated by HC-067047. Moreover, MMP-2/9 protein expression increased in mice treated with a TRPV4 agonist GSK1016790A, but only MMP-9 activity was increased by GSK1016790A. Finally, ZO-1 and occludin protein expression was decreased by GSK1016790A, which was reversed by an MMP-9 inhibitor. We conclude that blockage of TRPV4 may inhibit brain edema in cerebral ischemia through inhibiting MMP-9 activation and the loss of tight junction protein.

  15. Apolipoprotein E-Mimetic COG1410 Reduces Acute Vasogenic Edema following Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Fang; Wu, Yue; Zhong, Jianjun; Liu, Jieshi; Qin, Xinghu; Chen, Ligang; Vitek, Michael P.; Li, Fengqiao; Xu, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The degree of post-traumatic brain edema and dysfunction of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) influences the neurofunctional outcome after a traumatic brain injury (TBI). Previous studies have demonstrated that the administration of apolipoprotein E-mimetic peptide COG1410 reduces the brain water content after subarachnoid hemorrhage, intra-cerebral hemorrhage, and focal brain ischemia. However, the effects of COG1410 on vasogenic edema following TBI are not known. The current study evaluated the effects of 1 mg/kg daily COG1410 versus saline administered intravenously after a controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury on BBB dysfunction and vasogenic edema at an acute stage in mice. The results demonstrated that treatment with COG1410 suppressed the activity of matrix metalloproteinase-9, reduced the disruption of the BBB and Evans Blue dye extravasation, reduced the TBI lesion volume and vasogenic edema, and decreased the functional deficits compared with mice treated with vehicle, at an acute stage after CCI. These findings suggest that COG1410 is a promising preclinical therapeutic agent for the treatment of traumatic brain injury. PMID:26192010

  16. Cerebral Taurine Levels are Associated with Brain Edema and Delayed Cerebral Infarction in Patients with Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Kofler, Mario; Schiefecker, Alois; Ferger, Boris; Beer, Ronny; Sohm, Florian; Broessner, Gregor; Hackl, Werner; Rhomberg, Paul; Lackner, Peter; Pfausler, Bettina; Thomé, Claudius; Schmutzhard, Erich; Helbok, Raimund

    2015-12-01

    Cerebral edema and delayed cerebral infarction (DCI) are common complications after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) and associated with poor functional outcome. Experimental data suggest that the amino acid taurine is released into the brain extracellular space secondary to cytotoxic edema and brain tissue hypoxia, and therefore may serve as a biomarker for secondary brain injury after aSAH. On the other hand, neuroprotective mechanisms of taurine treatment have been described in the experimental setting. We analyzed cerebral taurine levels using high-performance liquid chromatography in the brain extracellular fluid of 25 consecutive aSAH patients with multimodal neuromonitoring including cerebral microdialysis (CMD). Patient characteristics and clinical course were prospectively recorded. Associations with CMD-taurine levels were analyzed using generalized estimating equations with an autoregressive process to handle repeated observations within subjects. CMD-taurine levels were highest in the first days after aSAH (11.2 ± 3.2 µM/l) and significantly decreased over time (p < 0.001). Patients with brain edema on admission or during hospitalization (N = 20; 80 %) and patients developing DCI (N = 5; 20 %) had higher brain extracellular taurine levels compared to those without (Wald = 7.3, df = 1, p < 0.01; Wald = 10.1, df = 1, p = 0.001, respectively) even after adjusting for disease severity and CMD-probe location. There was no correlation between parenteral taurine supplementation and brain extracellular taurine (p = 0.6). Moreover, a significant correlation with brain extracellular glutamate (r = 0.82, p < 0.001), lactate (r = 0.56, p < 0.02), pyruvate (r = 0.39, p < 0.01), potassium (r = 0.37, p = 0.01), and lactate-to-pyruvate ratio (r = 0.24, p = 0.02) was found. Significantly higher CMD-taurine levels were found in patients with brain edema or DCI after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Its value as a

  17. Regional differences in cerebral edema after traumatic brain injury identified by impedance analysis.

    PubMed

    Harting, Matthew T; Smith, Carter T; Radhakrishnan, Ravi S; Aroom, Kevin R; Dash, Pramod K; Gill, Brijesh; Cox, Charles S

    2010-03-01

    Cerebral edema is a common and potentially devastating sequel of traumatic brain injury. We developed and validated a system capable of tissue impedance analysis, which was found to correlate with cerebral edema. Constant sinusoidal current (50 microA), at frequencies from 500 to 5000 Hz, was applied across a bipolar electrode unit superficially placed in a rat brain after traumatic brain injury. Rats were randomized to three groups: severe controlled cortical injury (CCI), mild CCI, or sham injury. At 60 h post-CCI, cerebral voltage and phase angle were measured at each frequency at the site of injury, at the penumbral region, at the ipsilateral frontal region, and in the contralateral hemisphere. Impedance measurements were also obtained in vivo. The electrical properties of varied injuries and specified locations were compared using a repeated measures analysis of variance (RMANOVA), were correlated with regional tissue water percentage using regression analyses, and were combined to generate polar coordinates. The measured voltage was significantly different at the site of injury (P<0.0001), in the penumbra (P=0.002), and in the contralateral hemisphere (P=0.005) when severe, mild, and sham CCI rats were compared. Severely injured rats had statistically different voltage measurements when the various sites were compared (P=0.002). The ex vivo measurements correlated with in vivo measurements. Further, the impedance measurements correlated with measured tissue water percentage at the site of injury (R2=0.69; P<0.0001). The creation of a polar coordinate graph, incorporating voltage and phase angle measurements, enabled the identification of impedance areas unique to normal, mild edema, and severe edema measurements in the rat brain. Electrical measurements and tissue water percentages quantified regional and severity differences in rat brain edema after CCI. Impedance was inversely proportional to the tissue water percentage. Thus, impedance measurement can be

  18. Dimethyl fumarate attenuates cerebral edema formation by protecting the blood-brain barrier integrity.

    PubMed

    Kunze, Reiner; Urrutia, Andrés; Hoffmann, Angelika; Liu, Hui; Helluy, Xavier; Pham, Mirko; Reischl, Stefan; Korff, Thomas; Marti, Hugo H

    2015-04-01

    Brain edema is a hallmark of various neuropathologies, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We aim to characterize how tissue hypoxia, together with oxidative stress and inflammation, leads to capillary dysfunction and breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In a mouse stroke model we show that systemic treatment with dimethyl fumarate (DMF), an antioxidant drug clinically used for psoriasis and multiple sclerosis, significantly prevented edema formation in vivo. Indeed, DMF stabilized the BBB by preventing disruption of interendothelial tight junctions and gap formation, and decreased matrix metalloproteinase activity in brain tissue. In vitro, DMF directly sustained endothelial tight junctions, inhibited inflammatory cytokine expression, and attenuated leukocyte transmigration. We also demonstrate that these effects are mediated via activation of the redox sensitive transcription factor NF-E2 related factor 2 (Nrf2). DMF activated the Nrf2 pathway as shown by up-regulation of several Nrf2 target genes in the brain in vivo, as well as in cerebral endothelial cells and astrocytes in vitro, where DMF also increased protein abundance of nuclear Nrf2. Finally, Nrf2 knockdown in endothelial cells aggravated subcellular delocalization of tight junction proteins during ischemic conditions, and attenuated the protective effect exerted by DMF. Overall, our data suggest that DMF protects from cerebral edema formation during ischemic stroke by targeting interendothelial junctions in an Nrf2-dependent manner, and provide the basis for a completely new approach to treat brain edema.

  19. Hypertonic saline reduces lipopolysaccharide-induced mouse brain edema through inhibiting aquaporin 4 expression

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Three percent sodium chloride (NaCl) treatment has been shown to reduce brain edema and inhibited brain aquaporin 4 (AQP4) expression in bacterial meningitis induced by Escherichia coli. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the main pathogenic component of E. coli. We aimed to explore the effect of 3% NaCl in mouse brain edema induced by LPS, as well as to elucidate the potential mechanisms of action. Methods Three percent NaCl was used to treat cerebral edema induced by LPS in mice in vivo. Brain water content, IL-1β, TNFα, immunoglobulin G (IgG), AQP4 mRNA and protein were measured in brain tissues. IL-1β, 3% NaCl and calphostin C (a specific inhibitor of protein kinase C) were used to treat the primary astrocytes in vitro. AQP4 mRNA and protein were measured in astrocytes. Differences in various groups were determined by one-way analysis of variance. Results Three percent NaCl attenuated the increase of brain water content, IL-1β, TNFα, IgG, AQP4 mRNA and protein in brain tissues induced by LPS. Three percent NaCl inhibited the increase of AQP4 mRNA and protein in astrocytes induced by IL-1β in vitro. Calphostin C blocked the decrease of AQP4 mRNA and protein in astrocytes induced by 3% NaCl in vitro. Conclusions Osmotherapy with 3% NaCl ameliorated LPS-induced cerebral edema in vivo. In addition to its osmotic force, 3% NaCl exerted anti-edema effects possibly through down-regulating the expression of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and TNFα) and inhibiting the expression of AQP4 induced by proinflammatory cytokines. Three percent NaCl attenuated the expression of AQP4 through activation of protein kinase C in astrocytes. PMID:23036239

  20. Telmisartan reduced cerebral edema by inhibiting NLRP3 inflammasome in mice with cold brain injury.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xin; Hu, Chen-Chen; Zhang, Ya-Li; Yao, Shang-Long; Mao, Wei-Ke

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible beneficial role of telmisartan in cerebral edema after traumatic brain injury (TBI) and the potential mechanisms related to the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor (NLR) pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome activation. TBI model was established by cold-induced brain injury. Male C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned into 3, 6, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h survival groups to investigate cerebral edema development with time and received 0, 5, 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg telmisartan by oral gavage, 1 h prior to TBI to determine the efficient anti-edemic dose. The therapeutic window was identified by post-treating 30 min, 1 h, 2 h and 4 h after TBI. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity, the neurological function and histological injury were assessed, at the same time, the mRNA and protein expression levels of NLRP3 inflammasome, IL-1β and IL-18 concentrations in peri-contused brain tissue were measured 24 h post TBI. The results showed that the traumatic cerebral edema occurred from 6 h, reached the peak at 24 h and recovered to the baseline 72 h after TBI. A single oral dose of 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg telmisartan could reduce cerebral edema. Post-treatment up to 2 h effectively limited the edema development. Furthermore, prophylactic administration of telmisartan markedly inhibited BBB impairment, NLRP3, apoptotic speck-containing protein (ASC) and Caspase-1 activation, as well as IL-1β and IL-18 maturation, subsequently improved the neurological outcomes. In conclusion, telmisartan can reduce traumatic cerebral edema by inhibiting the NLRP3 inflammasome-regulated IL-1β and IL-18 accumulation.

  1. Polynitroxylated-pegylated hemoglobin attenuates fluid requirements and brain edema in combined traumatic brain injury plus hemorrhagic shock in mice

    PubMed Central

    Brockman, Erik C; Bayır, Hülya; Blasiole, Brian; Shein, Steven L; Fink, Ericka L; Dixon, CEdward; Clark, Robert SB; Vagni, Vincent A; Ma, Li; Hsia, Carleton JC; Tisherman, Samuel A; Kochanek, Patrick M

    2013-01-01

    Polynitroxylated-pegylated hemoglobin (PNPH), a bovine hemoglobin decorated with nitroxide and polyethylene glycol moieties, showed neuroprotection vs. lactated Ringer's (LR) in experimental traumatic brain injury plus hemorrhagic shock (TBI+HS). Hypothesis: Resuscitation with PNPH will reduce intracranial pressure (ICP) and brain edema and improve cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) vs. LR in experimental TBI+HS. C57/BL6 mice (n=20) underwent controlled cortical impact followed by severe HS to mean arterial pressure (MAP) of 25 to 27 mm Hg for 35 minutes. Mice (n=10/group) were then resuscitated with a 20 mL/kg bolus of 4% PNPH or LR followed by 10 mL/kg boluses targeting MAP>70 mm Hg for 90 minutes. Shed blood was then reinfused. Intracranial pressure was monitored. Mice were killed and %brain water (%BW) was measured (wet/dry weight). Mice resuscitated with PNPH vs. LR required less fluid (26.0±0.0 vs. 167.0±10.7 mL/kg, P<0.001) and had a higher MAP (79.4±0.40 vs. 59.7±0.83 mm Hg, P<0.001). The PNPH-treated mice required only 20 mL/kg while LR-resuscitated mice required multiple boluses. The PNPH-treated mice had a lower peak ICP (14.5±0.97 vs. 19.7±1.12 mm Hg, P=0.002), higher CPP during resuscitation (69.2±0.46 vs. 45.5±0.68 mm Hg, P<0.001), and lower %BW vs. LR (80.3±0.12 vs. 80.9±0.12%, P=0.003). After TBI+HS, resuscitation with PNPH lowers fluid requirements, improves ICP and CPP, and reduces brain edema vs. LR, supporting its development. PMID:23801241

  2. Effects of Aquaporin 4 Knockdown on Brain Edema of the Uninjured Side After Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian-Qiang; Zhang, Cheng-Cheng; Jiang, Sheng-Nan; Lu, Hong; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background Traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces edema on the uninjured side (i.e., contralateral brain tissue; CBT). We evaluated the role of AQP4 in CBT edema formation following TBI. Material/Methods Mild or severe TBI was induced using a controlled cortical impact model in rats, immediately followed by intraventricular siRNA infusions. The effects of AQP4 siRNA on CBT edema were assessed at up to 168 h. Results Mild or severe TBI induced different patterns of CBT edema. Furthermore, following mild TBI, brain water content (BWC) was increased at 72 h thereafter and AQP4 expression was increased after 168 h, relative to non-injured rats (i.e., sham). AQP4 interference reduced AQP4 expression 48 h thereafter and BWC 72 h thereafter, relative to control siRNA. In contrast, following severe TBI, BWC was increased 1 h thereafter and AQP4 expression was transiently enhanced after 1 h, relative to sham. However, AQP4 interference reduced AQP4 expression after 1 h and BWC 24 h thereafter, relative to control siRNA. Finally, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value in CBT was positively correlated with AQP4 expression level following severe, but not mild, TBI. AQP4 interference disrupted this correlation. Conclusions AQP4 interference reduces CBT edema formation, and ADC value may predict TBI severity. PMID:27930615

  3. Therapeutic implications of melatonin in cerebral edema.

    PubMed

    Rathnasamy, Gurugirijha; Ling, Eng-Ang; Kaur, Charanjit

    2014-12-01

    Cerebral edema/brain edema refers to the accumulation of fluid in the brain and is one of the fatal conditions that require immediate medical attention. Cerebral edema develops as a consequence of cerebral trauma, cerebral infarction, hemorrhages, abscess, tumor, hypoxia, and other toxic or metabolic factors. Based on the causative factors cerebral edema is differentiated into cytotoxic cerebral edema, vasogenic cerebral edema, osmotic and interstitial cerebral edema. Treatment of cerebral edema depends on timely diagnosis and medical assistance. Pragmatic treatment strategies such as antihypertensive medications, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, barbiturates, steroids, glutamate and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists and trometamol are used in clinical practice. Although the above mentioned treatment approaches are being used, owing to the complexity of the mechanisms involved in cerebral edema, a single therapeutic strategy which could ameliorate cerebral edema is yet to be identified. However, recent experimental studies have suggested that melatonin, a neurohormone produced by the pineal gland, could be an effective alternative for treating cerebral edema. In animal models of stroke, melatonin was not only shown to reduce cerebral edema but also preserved the blood brain barrier. Melatonin's beneficial effects were attributed to its properties, such as being a potent anti-oxidant, and its ability to cross the blood brain barrier within minutes after its administration. This review summarizes the beneficial effects of melatonin when used for treating cerebral edema.

  4. [The effect of fenibut on the ultrastructure of the brain mitochondria in traumatic edema and swelling].

    PubMed

    Novikov, V E; Naperstnikov, V V

    1994-01-01

    Rat experiments using electron microscopy have established that profound destructive changes occur in the mitochondria in the intra- and perifocal traumatic area in dynamics of traumatic edema-swelling. With phenibut, 50 mg/kg, there is an increase in the number of mitochondria in the brain tissue of the perifocal area, their destructive changes are less pronounced. It is assumed that the positive effect of phenibut on brain bioenergetic processes in the posttraumatic period is associated with the changes.

  5. Increased brain edema following 5-aminolevulinic acid mediated photodynamic in normal and tumor bearing rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschberg, Henry; Angell-Petersen, Even; Spetalen, Signe; Mathews, Marlon; Madsen, Steen J.

    2007-02-01

    Introduction: Failure of treatment for high grade gliomas is usually due to local recurrence at the site of surgical resection indicating that a more aggressive form of local therapy, such as PDT, could be of benefit. PDT causes damage to both tumor cells as well as cerebral blood vessels leading to degradation of the blood brain barrier with subsequent increase of brain edema. The increase in brain edema following ALA-PDT was evaluated in terms of animal survival, histopatological changes in normal brain and tumor tissue and MRI scanning. The effect of steroid treatment, to reduce post-treatment PDT induced edema, was also examined. Methods:Tumors were established in the brains of inbred BD-IX and Fisher rats. At various times following tumor induction the animals were injected with ALA ip. and four hours later light treatment at escalating fluences and fluence rates were given. Nontumor bearing control animals were also exposed to ALA-PDT in a similar manner to evaluate damage to normal brain and degree of blood brain barrier (BBB) disruption. Results: Despite a very low level of PpIX production in normal brain, with a 200:1 tumor to normal tissue selectivity ratio measured at a distance of 2 mm from the tumor border, many animals succumbed shortly after treatment. A total radiant energy of 54 J to non-tumor bearing animals resulted in 50% mortality within 5 days of treatment. Treatment of tumor bearing animals with moderate fluence levels produced similar brain edema compared to higher fluence levels. ALA PDT in nontumor bearing animals produced edema that was light dose dependent. PDT appeared to open the BBB for a period of 24-48 hrs after which it was restored. The addition of post operative steroid treatment reduced the incident of post treatment morbidity and mortality. Conclusions: T2 and contrast enhanced T1 MRI scanning proved to be a highly effective and non-evasive modality in following the development of the edema reaction and the degree and time

  6. Introducing the concept of "CSF-shift edema" in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Cherian, Iype; Beltran, Margarita; Landi, Alessandro; Alafaci, Concetta; Torregrossa, Fabio; Grasso, Giovanni

    2017-08-24

    Brain edema after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) plays an important role in the outcome and survival of injured patients. It is also one of the main targets in the therapeutic approach in the current clinical practice. To date, the pathophysiology of traumatic brain swelling is complex and, being that it is thought to be mainly cytotoxic and vasogenic in origin, not yet entirely understood. However, based on new understandings of the hydrodynamic aspects of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), an additional mechanism of brain swelling can be considered. An increase in pressure into the subarachnoid space, secondary to traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage, would result in a rapid shift of CSF from the cisterns, through the paravascular spaces, into the brain, resulting in an increase of brain water content. This mechanism of brain swelling would be termed as "CSF-shift edema." This "CSF-shift," promoted by a pressure gradient, leads to increased pressure inside the paravascular spaces and the interstitium of the brain, disturbing the functions of the paravascular system, with implications of secondary brain injury. Cisternostomy, an emerging surgical treatment, would reverse the direction of the CSF-shift, allowing for a decrease in brain swelling. In addition, this technique would reduce the pressure in the paravascular spaces and interstitium, leading to a recovery of the functionality of the paravascular system. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. [Conductivity reconstruction of edema in human brain based on modified genetic algorithm].

    PubMed

    Liun, Jicheng; Huang, Kama; Hu, Yayi

    2007-04-01

    It is the intent of this study to estimate the progression or regression of edema at the bedside continuously. Based on the theoretic model, the Adaptive Genetic Algorithm (AGA) has been applied in the calculation of conductivity reconstruction. Dynamic crossover and mutation operators which are based on Haiming Distance are brought forward in this paper to maintain generation's diversity. Then, both AGA and Standard GA (SGA) have been applied in the conductivity reconstruction of edema in human brain. It is shown that AGA not only has attained a higher degree of efficiency but also has enhanced the capability to converge to the best answer.

  8. Reduction of Cerebral Edema after Traumatic Brain Injury Using an Osmotic Transport Device

    PubMed Central

    McBride, Devin W.; Szu, Jenny I.; Hale, Chris; Hsu, Mike S.; Rodgers, Victor G.J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is significant, from a public health standpoint, because it is a major cause of the morbidity and mortality of young people. Cerebral edema after a TBI, if untreated, can lead to devastating damage of the remaining tissue. The current therapies of severe TBI (sTBI), as outlined by the Brain Trauma Foundation, are often ineffective, thus a new method for the treatment of sTBI is necessary. Herein, the reduction of cerebral edema, after TBI, using an osmotic transport device (OTD) was evaluated. Controlled cortical impact (CCI) was performed on adult female CD-1 mice, and cerebral edema was allowed to form for 3 h, followed by 2 h of treatment. The treatment groups were craniectomy only, craniectomy with a hydrogel, OTD without bovine serum albumin (BSA), and OTD. After CCI, brain water content was significantly higher for animals treated with a craniectomy only, craniectomy with a hydrogel, and OTD without BSA, compared to that of control animals. However, when TBI animals were treated with an OTD, brain water content was not significantly higher than that of controls. Further, brain water content of TBI animals treated with an OTD was significantly reduced, compared to that of untreated TBI animals, TBI animals treated with a craniectomy and a hydrogel, and TBI animals treated with an OTD without BSA. Here, we demonstrate the successful reduction of cerebral edema, as determined by brain water content, after TBI using an OTD. These results demonstrate proof of principle for direct water extraction from edematous brain tissue by direct osmotherapy using an OTD. PMID:24959845

  9. Reduction of cerebral edema after traumatic brain injury using an osmotic transport device.

    PubMed

    McBride, Devin W; Szu, Jenny I; Hale, Chris; Hsu, Mike S; Rodgers, Victor G J; Binder, Devin K

    2014-12-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is significant, from a public health standpoint, because it is a major cause of the morbidity and mortality of young people. Cerebral edema after a TBI, if untreated, can lead to devastating damage of the remaining tissue. The current therapies of severe TBI (sTBI), as outlined by the Brain Trauma Foundation, are often ineffective, thus a new method for the treatment of sTBI is necessary. Herein, the reduction of cerebral edema, after TBI, using an osmotic transport device (OTD) was evaluated. Controlled cortical impact (CCI) was performed on adult female CD-1 mice, and cerebral edema was allowed to form for 3 h, followed by 2 h of treatment. The treatment groups were craniectomy only, craniectomy with a hydrogel, OTD without bovine serum albumin (BSA), and OTD. After CCI, brain water content was significantly higher for animals treated with a craniectomy only, craniectomy with a hydrogel, and OTD without BSA, compared to that of control animals. However, when TBI animals were treated with an OTD, brain water content was not significantly higher than that of controls. Further, brain water content of TBI animals treated with an OTD was significantly reduced, compared to that of untreated TBI animals, TBI animals treated with a craniectomy and a hydrogel, and TBI animals treated with an OTD without BSA. Here, we demonstrate the successful reduction of cerebral edema, as determined by brain water content, after TBI using an OTD. These results demonstrate proof of principle for direct water extraction from edematous brain tissue by direct osmotherapy using an OTD.

  10. Acute ethanol-induced changes in edema and metabolite concentrations in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huimin; Zheng, Wenbin; Yan, Gen; Liu, Baoguo; Kong, Lingmei; Ding, Yan; Shen, Zhiwei; Tan, Hui; Zhang, Guishan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the acute effects of EtOH on brain edema and cerebral metabolites, using diffusion weight imaging (DWI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) at a 7.0T MR and to define changes in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values and the concentration of metabolites in the rat brain after acute EtOH intoxication. ADC values in each ROI decreased significantly at 1 h and 3 h after ethanol administration. ADC values in frontal lobe were decreased significantly compared with other regions at 3 h. For EtOH/Cr+PCr and cerebral metabolites (Cho, Tau, and Glu) differing over time, no significant differences for Ins, NAA, and Cr were observed in frontal lobes. Regression analysis revealed a significant association between TSEtOH/Cr+PCr and TSCho, TSTau, TSGlu, and TSADC. The changes of ADC values in different brain regions reflect the process of the cytotoxic edema in vivo. The characterization of frontal lobes metabolites changes and the correlations between TSEtOH/Cr+PCr and TSCho, TSTau, and TSGlu provide a better understanding for the biological mechanisms in neurotoxic effects of EtOH on the brain. In addition, the correlations between TSEtOH/Cr+PCr and TSADC will help us to understand development of the ethanol-induced brain cytotoxic edema.

  11. Serine protease inhibitor attenuates intracerebral hemorrhage-induced brain injury and edema formation in rat.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takehiro; Kuroda, Yasuhiro; Hosomi, Naohisa; Okabe, Naohiko; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Tamiya, Takashi; Xi, Guohua; Keep, Richard F; Itano, Toshifumi

    2010-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that thrombin plays an important role in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH)-induced brain injury and edema formation. We, therefore, examined whether nafamostat mesilate (FUT), a serine protease inhibitor, can reduce ICH-induced brain injury. Anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats received an infusion of autologous whole blood (100 microL), thrombin (5U/50 microL) or type VII collagenase (0.4 U/2 microL) into the right basal ganglia, the three ICH models used in the present study. FUT (10 mg/kg) or vehicle was administered intraperitoneally 6 h after ICH (or immediately after thrombin infusion) and then at 12-h intervals (six treatments in total, n = 5 in each group). All rats were sacrificed 72 h later. We also examined whether FUT promotes rebleeding in a model in which ICH was induced by intracerebral injection of collagenase. Systemic administration of FUT starting 6 h after ICH reduced brain water content in the ipsilateral basal ganglia 72 h after ICH compared with vehicle. FUT attenuated ICH-induced changes in 8-OHdG and thrombin-reduced brain edema. FUT did not increase collagenase-induced hematoma volume. FUT attenuates ICH-induced brain edema and DNA injury suggesting that serine protease inhibitor may be potential therapeutic agent for ICH.

  12. Cerebral edema following iodine-131 therapy for thyroid carcinoma metastatic to the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Datz, F.L.

    1986-05-01

    Brain metastases are rare in well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma but when present they can lead to the patient's death. Iodine-131 therapy for intracerebral thyroid carcinoma metastases causes radiation-induced acute cerebral edema that can lead to CNS complications and even death. We present a case in which a patient with intracerebral /sup 131/I uptake developed seizures, slurred speech, and muscle weakness 12 hr following /sup 131/I therapy. The patient's CT scan, post-therapy, confirmed an intracranial metastasis with a significant amount of surrounding edema. Radiotherapists, when using external beam radiation to treat intracerebral metastases, commonly place these patients on steroids, glycerol, or mannitol prior to instituting therapy, to prevent complications from radiation-induced cerebral edema. This technique could be applied to /sup 131/I therapy of intracranial thyroid carcinoma metastases as well.

  13. Transcranial measurement of diffuse light reflectance from brain edema in rats: effect of change in the blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Yoshinori; Sato, Shunichi; Ooigawa, Hidetoshi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Saitoh, Daizoh; Shima, Katsuji; Okada, Yoshiaki; Ashida, Hiroshi; Obara, Minoru

    2005-04-01

    We assumed that edema causes a decrease in the scattering coefficient of brain tissue and hence a decrease in the intensity of diffuse reflectance from the brain. On the basis of this assumption, we attempted to transcranially detect a formation of brain edema by measuring diffuse light reflectance. In rats, edema was induced by making a cold injury in the brain. The skull was irradiated with 633-nm and 532-nm laser light delivered through an optical fiber, and the diffuse light reflectance from the brain was collected with another optical fiber. We observed that reflectance intensities were significantly decreased around the cold injury both at 633 nm and 532 nm, suggesting that scattering coefficient of brain tissue was reduced due to a formation of edema in this area. In the injury, reflectance intensity was increased at 532 nm, indicating that cerebral blood volume was decreased in this region.

  14. Perilesional edema in brain metastasis from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as predictor of response to radiosurgery (SRS).

    PubMed

    Tini, Paolo; Nardone, Valerio; Pastina, Pierpaolo; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Vinciguerra, Claudia; Carfagno, Tommaso; Rubino, Giovanni; Carbone, Salvatore Francesco; Sebaste, Lucio; Cerase, Alfonso; Federico, Antonio; Pirtoli, Luigi

    2017-06-01

    Radiosurgery (SRS) is widely used in the treatment of brain oligo-metastases from NSCLC. The aim of present study is to evaluate the extent of perilesional edema in brain metastases as predictive factor of treatment response. This single center retrospective study included 42 consecutive patients (January 2011-December 2014) with 1-2 brain metastasis from NSCLC treated with Radiosurgery (SRS). Extent of perilesional edema was measured as maximal extension from the edge of lesion and classified as minor (<10 mm) or major (≥10 mm). We analyzed Modality of Brain Recurrence (MBR), classified as in-field or out-of- field, and Brain Progression Free-Survival (BPFS) after treatment stratified according to extent of perilesional edema. Analyzing modality of brain recurrence and BPFS, after a median follow-up of 6 months, we found that patients with minor edema had a better radiological response to SRS with none in-field recurrences and a lower risk of the onset of new brain lesions (out-of-field recurrence). Instead, patients group with major edema had a worse response rate of lesions treated, further, a higher risk of out-of-field brain relapse. Extent of perilesional edema in brain metastasis from NSCLC could be a predictive factor of response and brain progression after SRS treatment alone.

  15. Stereotactic Aspiration-Thrombolysis of Intracerebral Hemorrhage and its Impact on Perihematoma Brain Edema

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Ryan J.; Keyl, Penelope M.; Hanley, Daniel F.; Johnson, Robert R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent reports suggest that when thrombolytic agents are administered within the clot, lysis rate accelerates at the expense of increased risk of worsening edema. To test this hypothesis, we report on the volumetric analysis of (1) the intraparenchymal hematoma and, (2) perihematomal edema in a cohort of ICH patients treated with intraclot rtPA. Methods A convenience sample of highly selected ICH patients underwent frameless stereotactic aspiration and thrombolysis (FAST) of the clot. Two milligrams of rtPA were administered every 12 h until ICH volume ≤10 cc, or catheter fenestrations were no longer in continuity with the clot. ICH and perihematomal edema volumes were calculated from CT scans. Using random effects linear regression we estimated the rate of hematoma and edema volume resolution as well as their relationship during the first 8 days of lytic therapy. Results Fifteen patients were treated, mean age: 60.7 years, median time from ictus to FAST: 1 (range 0–3) day. Using a random effects model that considered volume resolution over the first 8 days following lytic therapy we found that the both percentage hematoma and percentage perihematoma edema resolution per day were quadratic with respect to time. Percentage residual hematoma volume on day K = 97.7% − [24.36%*K] + [1.89%*K2]; P < 0.001 for both terms. Percentage residual edema on day K = 97.4% − [13.94%*K] + [1.30%*K2]; P < 0.001 for K and P = 0.01 for K2. Examination of each patient’s volume data suggests that there exists a strong direct relationship between perihematoma edema volume and same day hematoma volume. Conclusions In this cohort of ICH patients treated using FAST, volumetric analysis of ICH and perihematomal edema seems to suggest that local use of rtPA does not exacerbate brain edema formation. Furthermore, there seems to be a strong association between reduction in ICH volume and reduction in edema volume, as would be expected following the concept of

  16. Dexamethasone exacerbates cerebral edema and brain injury following lithium-pilocarpine induced status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Duffy, B A; Chun, K P; Ma, D; Lythgoe, M F; Scott, R C

    2014-03-01

    Anti-inflammatory therapies are the current most plausible drug candidates for anti-epileptogenesis and neuroprotection following prolonged seizures. Given that vasogenic edema is widely considered to be detrimental for outcome following status epilepticus, the anti-inflammatory agent dexamethasone is sometimes used in clinic for alleviating cerebral edema. In this study we perform longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging in order to assess the contribution of dexamethasone on cerebral edema and subsequent neuroprotection following status epilepticus. Lithium-pilocarpine was used to induce status epilepticus in rats. Following status epilepticus, rats were either post-treated with saline or with dexamethasone sodium phosphate (10mg/kg or 2mg/kg). Brain edema was assessed by means of magnetic resonance imaging (T2 relaxometry) and hippocampal volumetry was used as a marker of neuronal injury. T2 relaxometry was performed prior to, 48 h and 96 h following status epilepticus. Volume measurements were performed between 18 and 21 days after status epilepticus. Unexpectedly, cerebral edema was worse in rats that were treated with dexamethasone compared to controls. Furthermore, dexamethasone treated rats had lower hippocampal volumes compared to controls 3 weeks after the initial insult. The T2 measurements at 2 days and 4 days in the hippocampus correlated with hippocampal volumes at 3 weeks. Finally, the mortality rate in the first week following status epilepticus increased from 14% in untreated rats to 33% and 46% in rats treated with 2mg/kg and 10mg/kg dexamethasone respectively. These findings suggest that dexamethasone can exacerbate the acute cerebral edema and brain injury associated with status epilepticus.

  17. Increased calcineurin expression after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus is associated with brain focal edema and astrogliosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinzhi; Li, Xiaolin; Chen, Liguang; Xue, Ping; Yang, Qianqian; Wang, Aihua

    2015-07-28

    Calcineurin plays an important role in the development of neuronal excitability, modulation of receptor's function and induction of apoptosis in neurons. It has been established in kindling models that status epilepticus induces brain focal edema and astrocyte activation. However, the role of calcineurin in brain focal edema and astrocyte activation in status epilepticus has not been fully understood. In this study, we employed a model of lithium-pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus and detected calcineurin expression in hippocampus by immunoblotting, brain focal edema by non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-7T) and astrocyte expression by immunohistochemistry. We found that the brain focal edema was seen at 24 h after status epilepticus, and astrocyte expression was obviously seen at 7 d after status epilepticus. Meanwhile, calcineurin expression was seen at24 h and retained to 7 d after status epilepticus. A FK506, a calcineurin inhibitor, remarkably suppressed the status epilepticus-induced brain focal edema and astrocyte expression. Our data suggested that calcineurin overexpression plays a very important role in brain focal edema and astrocyte expression. Therefore, calcineurin may be a novel candidate for brain focal edema occurring and intracellular trigger of astrogliosis in status epilepticus.

  18. Fast axonal transport in early experimental disc edema.

    PubMed

    Radius, R L; Anderson, D R

    1980-02-01

    Previous work has documented impairment of slow axonal transport in papilledema, but the abnormalities in rapid transport were less certain. Therefore fast axonal transport was studied in 19 primate eyes subjected to ocular hypotony for 6 to 72 hr following surgical fistulization of the anterior chamber. Mild, irregular alterations in fast axonal transport were detected only after nerve head swelling was apparent. These changes in fast transport mechanisms in cases of nerve head edema occur after, and may be secondary to, impaired slow axoplasmic flow and the resultant axonal swelling. Furthermore, since prolonged complete interruption of axonal transport is theoretically inconsistent with the continued normal neuron function characteristic of papilledema and, moreover, since previous data shows a "slowdown" rather than complete blockade of axonal transport in papilledema, it is likely that in eyes with papilledema there does not exist a complete flock of axonal transport. Therefore we hypothesize that the swelling results when slow axoplasmic flow is locally slowed down but not totally stopped, with the axon distention producing secondary mild, irregular changes in fast axonal transport.

  19. Significance of Primary Tumor Location and Histology for Brain Metastasis Development and Peritumoral Brain Edema in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Fábián, Katalin; Gyulai, Márton; Furák, József; Várallyay, Péter; Jäckel, Márta; Bogos, Krisztina; Döme, Balázs; Pápay, Judit; Tímár, József; Szállási, Zoltán; Moldvay, Judit

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastasis of lung cancer adversely affects overall survival (OS) and quality of life, while peritumoral brain edema is responsible for life-threatening complications. We retrospectively analyzed the clinicopathological and cerebral radiological data of 575 consecutive lung cancer patients with brain metastases. In adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, peritumoral brain edema was more pronounced than in small-cell lung cancer (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). There was a positive correlation between the size of metastasis and the thickness of peritumoral brain edema (p < 0.001). It was thicker in supratentorial tumors (p = 0.019), in younger patients (≤50 years) (p = 0.042), and in females (p = 0.016). The time to development of brain metastasis was shorter in central than in peripheral lung cancer (5.3 vs. 9.0 months, p = 0.035). Early brain metastasis was characteristic for adenocarcinomas. A total of 135 patients had brain only metastases (N0 disease) characterized by peripheral lung cancer predominance (p < 0.001) and a longer time to development of brain metastasis (9.2 vs. 4.4 months, p < 0.001). OS was longer in the brain only subgroup than in patients with N1-3 diseases (p < 0.001). The clinicopathological characteristics of lung cancer are related to the development and radiographic features of brain metastases. Our results might be helpful in selecting patients who might benefit from prophylactic cranial irradiation. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Delayed Brain Edema and Swelling following Craniectomy for Evacuation of an Epidural Abscess that Improved by Cranioplasty: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Sugii, Narushi; Matsuda, Masahide; Sekine, Tomokazu; Matsumura, Hideaki; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Matsumura, Akira

    2017-07-01

    We report a unique case of delayed brain swelling following craniectomy that improved rapidly after cranioplasty, and discuss the potential mechanism underlying this delayed and reversible brain swelling. A 22-year-old woman developed surgical site infection after removal of a convexity meningioma. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an epidural abscess around the surgical site. Subsequently, the abscess was evacuated, and the bone flap was removed. Later, brain edema around the skull defect emerged and progressed gradually, despite resolution of the infection. The edematous brain developed focal swelling outward through the bone defect without ventricle dilatation. Because we suspected that the edema and swelling were caused by the state of the bone defect, we performed a cranioplasty 10 weeks after the bone flap removal, and brain edema improved rapidly. We hypothesized that the brain edema was initially caused by surgical stress and inflammation, followed by compression of cortical veins between the dural edge and brain tissue, leading to disruption of venous return and exacerbation of brain edema. When delayed focal brain edema and external swelling progress gradually after bone flap removal, after excluding other pathological conditions, cranioplasty should be considered to improve cortical venous congestion caused by postsurgical adhesion.

  1. Potassium Aspartate Attenuates Brain Injury Induced by Controlled Cortical Impact in Rats Through Increasing Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) Levels, Na+/K+-ATPase Activity and Reducing Brain Edema.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yi; Zhang, Jie; Zhao, Yumei; Su, Yujin; Zhang, Yazhuo

    2016-12-13

    BACKGROUND Potassium aspartate (PA), as an electrolyte supplement, is widely used in clinical practice. In our previous study, we found PA had neuroprotective effects against apoptosis after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion in rats. In this study, we examine whether PA has protective effects on traumatic brain injury (TBI). MATERIAL AND METHODS TBI was induced by controlled cortical impact (CCI) in rats. Vehicle treatment (control) or PA treatment was administered intraperitoneally at 30 minutes after CCI. The modified neurological severity score (mNSS) and cortical lesion volume were examined. Brain edema and blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity were measured, as well as brain ATP contents, lactic acid levels, and Na+/K+-ATPase activities. RESULTS We found that CCI induced cortical injury in rats. Acute PA treatment at the dose of 62.5 mg/kg and 125 mg/kg significantly improved neurological deficits (p<0.05 and p<0.001, respectively) and decreased the cortical lesion volume (p<0.05 and p<0.001, respectively) compared with vehicle-only treatment. PA treatment at the dose of 125 mg/kg attenuated brain edema and ameliorated BBB integrity. In addition, PA treatment significantly reduced the loss of ATP (p<0.01), reduced lactic acid levels (p<0.001), and increased the activity of Na+/K+-ATPase (p<0.01). CONCLUSIONS Our results indicate PA has neuroprotective effects on TBI through increasing ATP levels, Na+/K+-ATPase activity, and reducing brain edema. It provides experimental evidence for the clinical application of PA.

  2. Potassium Aspartate Attenuates Brain Injury Induced by Controlled Cortical Impact in Rats Through Increasing Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) Levels, Na+/K+-ATPase Activity and Reducing Brain Edema

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yi; Zhang, Jie; Zhao, Yumei; Su, Yujin; Zhang, Yazhuo

    2016-01-01

    Background Potassium aspartate (PA), as an electrolyte supplement, is widely used in clinical practice. In our previous study, we found PA had neuroprotective effects against apoptosis after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion in rats. In this study, we examine whether PA has protective effects on traumatic brain injury (TBI). Material/Methods TBI was induced by controlled cortical impact (CCI) in rats. Vehicle treatment (control) or PA treatment was administered intraperitoneally at 30 minutes after CCI. The modified neurological severity score (mNSS) and cortical lesion volume were examined. Brain edema and blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity were measured, as well as brain ATP contents, lactic acid levels, and Na+/K+-ATPase activities. Results We found that CCI induced cortical injury in rats. Acute PA treatment at the dose of 62.5 mg/kg and 125 mg/kg significantly improved neurological deficits (p<0.05 and p<0.001, respectively) and decreased the cortical lesion volume (p<0.05 and p<0.001, respectively) compared with vehicle-only treatment. PA treatment at the dose of 125 mg/kg attenuated brain edema and ameliorated BBB integrity. In addition, PA treatment significantly reduced the loss of ATP (p<0.01), reduced lactic acid levels (p<0.001), and increased the activity of Na+/K+-ATPase (p<0.01). Conclusions Our results indicate PA has neuroprotective effects on TBI through increasing ATP levels, Na+/K+-ATPase activity, and reducing brain edema. It provides experimental evidence for the clinical application of PA. PMID:27959885

  3. Segmentation of tumor and edema along with healthy tissues of brain using wavelets and neural networks.

    PubMed

    Demirhan, Ayşe; Toru, Mustafa; Guler, Inan

    2015-07-01

    Robust brain magnetic resonance (MR) segmentation algorithms are critical to analyze tissues and diagnose tumor and edema in a quantitative way. In this study, we present a new tissue segmentation algorithm that segments brain MR images into tumor, edema, white matter (WM), gray matter (GM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The detection of the healthy tissues is performed simultaneously with the diseased tissues because examining the change caused by the spread of tumor and edema on healthy tissues is very important for treatment planning. We used T1, T2, and FLAIR MR images of 20 subjects suffering from glial tumor. We developed an algorithm for stripping the skull before the segmentation process. The segmentation is performed using self-organizing map (SOM) that is trained with unsupervised learning algorithm and fine-tuned with learning vector quantization (LVQ). Unlike other studies, we developed an algorithm for clustering the SOM instead of using an additional network. Input feature vector is constructed with the features obtained from stationary wavelet transform (SWT) coefficients. The results showed that average dice similarity indexes are 91% for WM, 87% for GM, 96% for CSF, 61% for tumor, and 77% for edema.

  4. Nicotinamide reduces acute cortical neuronal death and edema in the traumatically injured brain.

    PubMed

    Hoane, Michael R; Gilbert, David R; Holland, Michael A; Pierce, Jeremy L

    2006-11-06

    Previous studies have shown that administration of nicotinamide (Vitamin B(3)) in animal models of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and ischemia significantly reduced the size of infarction or injury and improved functional recovery. The present study evaluated the ability of nicotinamide to provide acute neuroprotection and edema reduction following TBI. Groups of rats were assigned to nicotinamide (500mg/kg) or saline (1.0ml/kg) treatment conditions and received contusion injuries or sham surgeries. Drug treatment was administered 15min following injury. Brains were harvested 24h later and either processed for histology or water content. Frozen sections were stained with the degenerating neuron stain (Fluoro-Jade B) (FJ) and cell counts were performed at the site of injury. Additional brains were processed for water content (a measure of injury-induced edema). Results of this study showed that administration of nicotinamide following TBI significantly reduced the number of FJ(+) neurons in the injured cortex compared to saline-treated animals. Examination of the water content of the brains also revealed that administration of nicotinamide significantly attenuated the amount of water compared to saline-treated animals in the injured cortex. These results indicate that nicotinamide administration significantly reduced neuronal death and attenuated cerebral edema following injury. The current findings suggest that nicotinamide significantly modulates acute pathophysiological processes following injury and that this may account for its beneficial effects on recovery of function following injury.

  5. Central Role of Maladapted Astrocytic Plasticity in Ischemic Brain Edema Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Feng; Parpura, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Brain edema formation and the ensuing brain damages are the major cause of high mortality and long term disability following the occurrence of ischemic stroke. In this process, oxygen and glucose deprivation and the resulting reperfusion injury play primary roles. In response to the ischemic insult, the neurovascular unit experiences both intracellular and extracellular edemas, associated with maladapted astrocytic plasticity. The astrocytic plasticity includes both morphological and functional plasticity. The former involves a reactive gliosis and the subsequent glial retraction. It relates to the capacity of astrocytes to buffer changes in extracellular chemical levels, particularly K+ and glutamate, as well as the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The latter involves the expression and activity of a series of ion and water transport proteins. These molecules are grouped together around glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and water channel protein aquaporin 4 (AQP4) to form functional networks, regulate hydromineral balance across cell membranes and maintain the integrity of the BBB. Intense ischemic challenges can disrupt these capacities of astrocytes and result in their maladaptation. The maladapted astrocytic plasticity in ischemic stroke cannot only disrupt the hydromineral homeostasis across astrocyte membrane and the BBB, but also leads to disorders of the whole neurovascular unit. This review focuses on how the maladapted astrocytic plasticity in ischemic stroke plays the central role in the brain edema formation. PMID:27242440

  6. Effect of lavender oil (Lavandula angustifolia) on cerebral edema and its possible mechanisms in an experimental model of stroke.

    PubMed

    Vakili, Abedin; Sharifat, Shaghayegh; Akhavan, Maziar Mohammad; Bandegi, Ahmad Reza

    2014-02-22

    Lavender belongs to the family Labiatae and has a variety of cosmetic uses as well as therapeutic purposes in herbal medicine. The present study was conducted to evaluate the protective effect of lavender oil against brain edema and its possible mechanisms in an experimental model of stroke. Under Laser-Doppler Flowmetry, focal cerebral ischemia was induced by the transient occlusion of the middle cerebral artery for 1h in rats. Lavender oil (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg ip (and/or vehicle was injected at the onset of ischemia. Infarct size, cerebral edema, functional outcome, and oxidative stress biomarkers were evaluated using standard methods. Western blotting was used to determine the protein expression of VEGF, Bax, and Bcl-2. Treatment with lavender oil at doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg significantly diminished infarct size, brain edema, and improved functional outcome after cerebral ischemia (P<0.001). Lavender oil (200 mg/kg) also reduced the content of malondialdehyde and increased the activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and total antioxidant capacity (P<0.001). Although lavender oil enhanced VEGF expression (P=0.026), it could not decrease the Bax-to-Bcl-2 ratio (pro- to anti-apoptotic proteins) in the rat brain (P>0.05). The results indicated that lavender oil has neuroprotective activity against cerebral ischemia and alleviated neurological function in rats, and the mechanism may be related to augmentation in endogenous antioxidant defense, inhibiting oxidative stress, and increasing VEGF expression in the rat brain. However, lavender oil could not suppress the apoptosis pathway.

  7. Glucocorticoids in the management of peritumoral brain edema: a review of molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Murayi, Roger; Chittiboina, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    Peritumoral brain edema (PTBE) is mediated by blood-brain barrier breakdown. PTBE results from interstitial vasogenic brain edema due to vascular endothelial growth factor and other inflammatory products of brain tumors. Glucocorticoids (GCs) are the mainstay for treatment of PTBE despite significant systemic side effects. GCs are thought to affect multiple cell types in the edematous brain. Here, we review preclinical studies of GC effects on edematous brain and review mechanisms underlying GC action on tumor cells, endothelial cells, and astrocytes. GCs may reduce tumor cell viability and suppress vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production in tumor cells. Modulation of expression and distribution of tight junction proteins occludin, claudin-5, and ZO-1 in endothelial cells likely plays a central role in GC action on endothelial cells. GCs may also have an effect on astrocyte angiopoietin production and limited effect on astrocyte aquaporin. A better understanding of these molecular mechanisms may lead to the development of novel therapeutics for management of PTBE with a better side effect profile. PMID:27613642

  8. Feasibility of using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for the quantification of brain edema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Juan G.; Sisson, Cynthia; Hendricks, Chad; Pattillo, Chris; McWaters, Megan; Hardjasudarma, Mardjohan; Quarles, Chad; Yaroslavsky, Anna N.; Yaroslavsky, Ilya V.; Battarbee, Harold

    2001-05-01

    Many diseased states of the brain can result in the displacement of brain tissues and restrict cerebral blood flow, disrupting function in a life-threatening manner. Clinical examples where displacements are observed include venous thromboses, hematomas, strokes, tumors, abscesses, and, particularly, brain edema. For the latter, the brain tissue swells, displacing the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) layer that surrounds it, eventually pressing itself against the skull. Under such conditions, catheters are often inserted into the brain's ventricles or the subarachnoid space to monitor increased pressure. These are invasive procedures that incur increased risk of infection and consequently are used reluctantly by clinicians. Recent studies in the field of biomedical optics have suggested that the presence or absence of the CSF layer can lead to dramatic changes in NIR signals obtained from diffuse reflectance measurements around the head. In this study, we consider how this sensitivity of NIR signals to CSF might be exploited to non-invasively monitor the onset and resolution of brain edema.

  9. The apparent diffusion coefficient does not reflect cytotoxic edema on the uninjured side after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hong; Lei, Xiaoyan

    2014-05-01

    After traumatic brain injury, vasogenic and cytotoxic edema appear sequentially on the involved side. Neuroimaging investigations of edema on the injured side have employed apparent diffusion coefficient measurements in diffusion tensor imaging. We investigated the changes occurring on the injured and uninjured sides using diffusion tensor imaging/apparent diffusion coefficient and histological samples in rats. We found that, on the injured side, that vasogenic edema appeared at 1 hour and intracellular edema appeared at 3 hours. Mixed edema was observed at 6 hours, worsening until 12-24 hours post-injury. Simultaneously, microglial cells proliferated at the trauma site. Apparent diffusion coefficient values increased at 1 hour, decreased at 6 hours, and increased at 12 hours. The uninjured side showed no significant pathological change at 1 hour after injury. Cytotoxic edema appeared at 3 hours, and vasogenic edema was visible at 6 hours. Cytotoxic edema persisted, but vasogenic edema tended to decrease after 12-24 hours. Despite this complex edema pattern on the uninjured side with associated pathologic changes, no significant change in apparent diffusion coefficient values was detected over the first 24 hours. Apparent diffusion coefficient values accurately detected the changes on the injured side, but did not detect the changes on the uninjured side, giving a false-negative result.

  10. Perilesional brain edema and seizure activity in patients with calcified neurocysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Theodore E.; Pretell, E. Javier; Lescano, Andres. G.; Bustos, Javier A.; Gilman, Robert H.; Gonzalez, Armando E.; Garcia, Héctor H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Cysticercosis due to Taenia solium is a leading cause of adult acquired seizures and epilepsy that frequently occurs in patients with only calcified larval cysts. Transient episodes of perilesional brain edema occur around calcified foci but its importance, association with seizures, incidence, and pathophysiology are unknown. Methods One hundred and ten persons with only calcified lesions and a history of seizures or severe headaches were followed prospectively in a cohort design to assess the incidence of seizure relapses. In a nested case-control sub study, perilesional edema was assessed by MRI at the time a seizure occurred in the symptomatic patient and in a matched asymptomatic control, amongst the 110 followed. Results Median follow up was 32.33 months (SD 19.99). Twenty-nine people had an incident seizure with an estimated 5 year seizure incidence of 36%. Twenty-four patients of the 29 with seizure relapse had an MRI evaluation within five days of the event. Perilesional edema was found in 12 (50.0%) compared to 2 of 23 asymptomatic matched controls (8.7%). Conclusions Perilesional edema occurs frequently and is associated with episodic seizure activity in calcified neurocysticercosis. Our findings are likely representative of symptomatic patients in endemic regions and suggest a unique and possibly preventable cause of seizures in this population. PMID:18986841

  11. Extent of perilesional edema differentiates radionecrosis from tumor recurrence following stereotactic radiosurgery for brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Leeman, Jonathan E; Clump, David A; Flickinger, John C; Mintz, Arlan H; Burton, Steven A; Heron, Dwight E

    2013-12-01

    Differentiation of tumor recurrence from radionecrosis is a critical step in the follow-up management of patients treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for brain metastases. A method that can reliably differentiate tumor recurrence from radiation necrosis using standard MR sequences would be of significant value. We analyzed the records of 49 patients with 52 brain metastases treated with SRS who subsequently underwent surgical resection of the same lesion. Forty-seven of the lesions had preoperative MRI available for review (90%), including T1 postcontrast, T2, and fluid attenuated inversion recovery sequences. Pre-SRS and preoperative lesion and edema volumes were manually contoured and measured in a blinded fashion using radiation treatment planning software. A neuropathologist analyzed samples for the presence of tumor and/or radiation necrosis. Longer time between SRS and resection (P < .001) and a larger edema/lesion volume ratio (high T2/T1c, P = .002) were found to be predictive of radionecrosis as opposed to tumor recurrence. Using a cutoff value of 10 for the edema/lesion volume ratio, we were able to predict the presence of tumor with a positive predictive value of 92%, which increased to 100% when looking only at patients who underwent resection <18 months following SRS. On follow-up imaging, lesions with a high edema/lesion volume ratio and lesions that progress later after SRS are more likely to contain radionecrosis. These indices may help guide clinical decision making in the context of evolving lesions after SRS for brain metastases and thereby avoid unnecessary interventions.

  12. Histochemical characterization of cytotoxic brain edema. Potassium concentrations after cerebral ischemia and during the postmortem interval.

    PubMed

    Oehmichen, M; Ochs, U; Meissner, C

    2000-08-01

    Cytotoxic edema is a phenomenon of the ischemically damaged brain. In the present study we tested a histochemical method that detects this phenomenon based on potassium (K+) levels in the brain. In a first series focal cerebral ischemia was induced by arterial occlusion in 23 gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus). After survival times of 30, 60 and 120 min, the animals were killed and brain section histochemically stained for potassium and quantitatively evaluated with a morphometric method. The results were compared with those using physicochemical techniques. A distinct K+ depletion could be demonstrated in the area of the focal ischemia within a survival time of 30 min, the depletion growing thereafter with increasing survival time. In a second series histochemical and chemical methods were used to study the stability of K+ levels in undamaged brains of 15 healthy rats during postmortem intervals of 2.5 and 5 h. Within these intervals K+ levels were clearly depleted, apparently as a result of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) diffusion. Even if neuronal injury can be demonstrated histochemically after very brief survival times of about 30 min, postmortem storage of the cadavers rendered detection impossible due to electrolyte and water diffusion. In autoptic human cases, therefore, this technique is of no practical utility in detecting cytotoxic brain edema in postmortem tissue.

  13. Curcumin attenuates cerebral edema following traumatic brain injury in mice: a possible role for aquaporin-4?

    PubMed Central

    Laird, Melissa D.; SR, Sangeetha; Swift, Andrew E.B.; Meiler, Steffen E.; Vender, John R.; Dhandapani, Krishnan M.

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a devastating neurological injury associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Medical therapies to limit cerebral edema, a cause of increased intracranial hypertension and poor clinical outcome, are largely ineffective, emphasizing the need for novel therapeutic approaches. In the present study, pre-treatment with curcumin (75, 150 mg/kg) or 30 minute post-treatment with 300 mg/kg significantly reduced brain water content and improved neurological outcome following a moderate controlled cortical impact in mice. The protective effect of curcumin was associated with a significant attenuation in the acute pericontusional expression of interleukin-1β, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, after injury. Curcumin also reversed the induction of aquaporin-4, an astrocytic water channel implicated in the development of cellular edema following head trauma. Notably, curcumin blocked IL-1β-induced aquaporin-4 expression in cultured astrocytes, an effect mediated, at least in part, by reduced activation of the p50 and p65 subunits of NFκB. Consistent with this notion, curcumin preferentially attenuated phosphorylated p65 immunoreactivity in pericontusional astrocytes and decreased the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein, a reactive astrocyte marker. As a whole, these data suggest clinically-achievable concentrations of curcumin reduce glial activation and cerebral edema following neurotrauma, a finding which warrants further investigation. PMID:20132469

  14. Curcumin attenuates cerebral edema following traumatic brain injury in mice: a possible role for aquaporin-4?

    PubMed

    Laird, Melissa D; Sukumari-Ramesh, Sangeetha; Swift, Andrew E B; Meiler, Steffen E; Vender, John R; Dhandapani, Krishnan M

    2010-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a devastating neurological injury associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Medical therapies to limit cerebral edema, a cause of increased intracranial hypertension and poor clinical outcome, are largely ineffective, emphasizing the need for novel therapeutic approaches. In the present study, pre-treatment with curcumin (75, 150 mg/kg) or 30 min post-treatment with 300 mg/kg significantly reduced brain water content and improved neurological outcome following a moderate controlled cortical impact in mice. The protective effect of curcumin was associated with a significant attenuation in the acute pericontusional expression of interleukin-1beta, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, after injury. Curcumin also reversed the induction of aquaporin-4, an astrocytic water channel implicated in the development of cellular edema following head trauma. Notably, curcumin blocked IL-1beta-induced aquaporin-4 expression in cultured astrocytes, an effect mediated, at least in part, by reduced activation of the p50 and p65 subunits of nuclear factor kappaB. Consistent with this notion, curcumin preferentially attenuated phosphorylated p65 immunoreactivity in pericontusional astrocytes and decreased the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein, a reactive astrocyte marker. As a whole, these data suggest clinically achievable concentrations of curcumin reduce glial activation and cerebral edema following neurotrauma, a finding which warrants further investigation.

  15. Multi-fractal texture features for brain tumor and edema segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reza, S.; Iftekharuddin, K. M.

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we propose a fully automatic brain tumor and edema segmentation technique in brain magnetic resonance (MR) images. Different brain tissues are characterized using the novel texture features such as piece-wise triangular prism surface area (PTPSA), multi-fractional Brownian motion (mBm) and Gabor-like textons, along with regular intensity and intensity difference features. Classical Random Forest (RF) classifier is used to formulate the segmentation task as classification of these features in multi-modal MRIs. The segmentation performance is compared with other state-of-art works using a publicly available dataset known as Brain Tumor Segmentation (BRATS) 2012 [1]. Quantitative evaluation is done using the online evaluation tool from Kitware/MIDAS website [2]. The results show that our segmentation performance is more consistent and, on the average, outperforms other state-of-the art works in both training and challenge cases in the BRATS competition.

  16. Pentoxifylline attenuates TNF-α protein levels and brain edema following temporary focal cerebral ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Vakili, Abedin; Mojarrad, Somye; Akhavan, Maziar Mohammad; Rashidy-Pour, Ali

    2011-03-04

    Cerebral edema is the most common cause of neurological deterioration and mortality during acute ischemic stroke. Despite the clinical importance of cerebral ischemia, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Recent studies suggest a role for TNF-α in the brain edema formation. To further investigate whether TNF-α would play a role in brain edema formation, we examined the effects of pentoxifylline (PTX, an inhibitor of TNF-α synthesis) on the brain edema and TNF-α levels in a model of transient focal cerebral ischemia. The right middle cerebral artery (MCA) of rats was occluded for 60 min using the intraluminal filament method. The animals received PTX (60 mg/kg) immediately, 1, 3, or 6h post-ischemic induction. Twenty-four hours after induction of ischemic injury, permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and brain edema were determined by in situ brain perfusion of Evans Blue (EB) and wet-to-dry weight ratio, respectively. TNF-α protein levels in ischemic cortex were also measured at 1, 4, and 24h after the beginning of an ischemic stroke by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. The administration of PTX up to 6h after occlusion of the MCA significantly reduced the brain edema. Moreover, PTX significantly reduced the concentration of TNF-α in ischemic brain cortex up to 4h post-transient focal stroke (P<0.002). Finally, treatment by PTX led to a significant decrease in EB extravasations (P<0.001). Our data demonstrate that PTX administration up to 6h after ischemia can reduce brain edema in a model of transient focal cerebral ischemia. The beneficial effects of PTX may be mediated, at least in part, through a decline in TNF-α production and BBB breakdown.

  17. The effects of Tanshinone IIA on blood-brain barrier and brain edema after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chao; Xue, Hongli; Bai, Changlin; Fu, Rong; Wu, Anhua

    2010-12-01

    Disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB) and edema formation play a key role in the development of neurological dysfunction after cerebral ischemia. In this study, the effects of Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA), one of the active ingredients of Salvia miltiorrhiza root, on the BBB and brain edema after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats were examined. Our study demonstrated that Tan IIA reduced brain infarct area, water content in the ischemic hemisphere. Furthermore, Tan IIA significantly decreased BBB permeability to Evans blue, suppressed the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), inhibited the degradation of tight junction proteins zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and Occludin. These results demonstrated that Tan IIA was effective for attenuating the extent of brain edema formation in response to ischemia injury in rats, partly by Tan IIA's protective effect on the BBB. Our results may have implications in the treatment of brain edema in cerebral ischemia.

  18. Rifaximin, but not growth factor 1, reduces brain edema in cirrhotic rats

    PubMed Central

    Òdena, Gemma; Miquel, Mireia; Serafín, Anna; Galan, Amparo; Morillas, Rosa; Planas, Ramon; Bartolí, Ramon

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To compare rifaximin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 treatment of hyperammonemia and brain edema in cirrhotic rats with portal occlusion. METHODS: Rats with CCl4-induced cirrhosis with ascites plus portal vein occlusion and controls were randomized into six groups: Cirrhosis; Cirrhosis + IGF-1; Cirrhosis + rifaximin; Controls; Controls + IGF-1; and Controls + rifaximin. An oral glutamine-challenge test was performed, and plasma and cerebral ammonia, glucose, bilirubin, transaminases, endotoxemia, brain water content and ileocecal cultures were measured and liver histology was assessed. RESULTS: Rifaximin treatment significantly reduced bacterial overgrowth and endotoxemia compared with cirrhosis groups, and improved some liver function parameters (bilirubin, alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase). These effects were associated with a significant reduction in cerebral water content. Blood and cerebral ammonia levels, and area-under-the-curve values for oral glutamine-challenge tests were similar in rifaximin-treated cirrhotic rats and control group animals. By contrast, IGF-1 administration failed to improve most alterations observed in cirrhosis. CONCLUSION: By reducing gut bacterial overgrowth, only rifaximin was capable of normalizing plasma and brain ammonia and thereby abolishing low-grade brain edema, alterations associated with hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:22563196

  19. Rifaximin, but not growth factor 1, reduces brain edema in cirrhotic rats.

    PubMed

    Odena, Gemma; Miquel, Mireia; Serafín, Anna; Galan, Amparo; Morillas, Rosa; Planas, Ramon; Bartolí, Ramon

    2012-05-07

    To compare rifaximin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 treatment of hyperammonemia and brain edema in cirrhotic rats with portal occlusion. Rats with CCl₄-induced cirrhosis with ascites plus portal vein occlusion and controls were randomized into six groups: Cirrhosis; Cirrhosis + IGF-1; Cirrhosis + rifaximin; Controls; Controls + IGF-1; and Controls + rifaximin. An oral glutamine-challenge test was performed, and plasma and cerebral ammonia, glucose, bilirubin, transaminases, endotoxemia, brain water content and ileocecal cultures were measured and liver histology was assessed. Rifaximin treatment significantly reduced bacterial overgrowth and endotoxemia compared with cirrhosis groups, and improved some liver function parameters (bilirubin, alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase). These effects were associated with a significant reduction in cerebral water content. Blood and cerebral ammonia levels, and area-under-the-curve values for oral glutamine-challenge tests were similar in rifaximin-treated cirrhotic rats and control group animals. By contrast, IGF-1 administration failed to improve most alterations observed in cirrhosis. By reducing gut bacterial overgrowth, only rifaximin was capable of normalizing plasma and brain ammonia and thereby abolishing low-grade brain edema, alterations associated with hepatic encephalopathy.

  20. Predictors of malignant brain edema in middle cerebral artery infarction observed on CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hoon; Jin, Seon Tak; Kim, Young Woo; Kim, Seong Rim; Park, Ik Seong; Jo, Kwang Wook

    2015-03-01

    Patients with middle cerebral artery (MCA) infarction accompanied by MCA occlusion with or without internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion have a poor prognosis, as a result of brain cell damage caused by both the infarction and by space-occupying and life-threatening edema formation. Multiple treatments can reduce the likelihood of edema formation, but tend to show limited efficacy. Decompressive hemicraniectomy with duroplasty has been promising for improving functional outcomes and reducing mortality, particularly improved functional outcomes can be achieved with early decompressive surgery. Therefore, identifying patients at risk for developing fatal edema is important and should be performed as early as possible. Sixty-four patients diagnosed with major MCA infarction with MCA occlusion within 8 hours of symptom onset were retrospectively reviewed. Early clinical, laboratory, and computed tomography angiography (CTA) parameters were analyzed for malignant brain edema (MBE). Twenty of the 64 patients (31%) had MBE, and the clinical outcome was poor (3month modified Rankin Scale >2) in 95% of them. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score, Alberta Stroke Program Early Computed Tomography Score, Clot Burden Score, and Collateral Score (CS) showed statically significant differences in both groups. Multivariable analyses adjusted for age and sex identified the independent predictors of MBE: NIHSS score >18 (odds ratio [OR]: 4.4, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.2-16.0, p=0.023) and CS on CTA <2 (OR: 7.28, 95% CI: 1.7-30.3,p=0.006). Our results provide useful information for selecting patients in need of aggressive treatment such as decompressive surgery. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Volumetric electromagnetic phase-shift spectroscopy of brain edema and hematoma.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Cesar A; Valencia, Jose A; Mora, Alfredo; Gonzalez, Fernando; Velasco, Beatriz; Porras, Martin A; Salgado, Javier; Polo, Salvador M; Hevia-Montiel, Nidiyare; Cordero, Sergio; Rubinsky, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by the need of poor and rural Mexico, where the population has limited access to advanced medical technology and services, we have developed a new paradigm for medical diagnostic based on the technology of "Volumetric Electromagnetic Phase Shift Spectroscopy" (VEPS), as an inexpensive partial substitute to medical imaging. VEPS, can detect changes in tissue properties inside the body through non-contact, multi-frequency electromagnetic measurements from the exterior of the body, and thereby provide rapid and inexpensive diagnostics in a way that is amenable for use in economically disadvantaged parts of the world. We describe the technology and report results from a limited pilot study with 46 healthy volunteers and eight patients with CT radiology confirmed brain edema and brain hematoma. Data analysis with a non-parametric statistical Mann-Whitney U test, shows that in the frequency range of from 26 MHz to 39 MHz, VEPS can distinguish non-invasively and without contact, with a statistical significance of p<0.05, between healthy subjects and those with a medical conditions in the brain. In the frequency range of between 153 MHz to 166 MHz it can distinguish with a statistical significance of p<0.05 between subjects with brain edema and those with a hematoma in the brain. A classifier build from measurements in these two frequency ranges can provide instantaneous diagnostic of the medical condition of the brain of a patient, from a single set of measurements. While this is a small-scale pilot study, it illustrates the potential of VEPS to change the paradigm of medical diagnostic of brain injury through a VEPS classifier-based technology. Obviously substantially larger-scale studies are needed to verify and expand on the findings in this small pilot study.

  2. Volumetric Electromagnetic Phase-Shift Spectroscopy of Brain Edema and Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Cesar A.; Valencia, Jose A.; Mora, Alfredo; Gonzalez, Fernando; Velasco, Beatriz; Porras, Martin A.; Salgado, Javier; Polo, Salvador M.; Hevia-Montiel, Nidiyare; Cordero, Sergio; Rubinsky, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by the need of poor and rural Mexico, where the population has limited access to advanced medical technology and services, we have developed a new paradigm for medical diagnostic based on the technology of “Volumetric Electromagnetic Phase Shift Spectroscopy” (VEPS), as an inexpensive partial substitute to medical imaging. VEPS, can detect changes in tissue properties inside the body through non-contact, multi-frequency electromagnetic measurements from the exterior of the body, and thereby provide rapid and inexpensive diagnostics in a way that is amenable for use in economically disadvantaged parts of the world. We describe the technology and report results from a limited pilot study with 46 healthy volunteers and eight patients with CT radiology confirmed brain edema and brain hematoma. Data analysis with a non-parametric statistical Mann-Whitney U test, shows that in the frequency range of from 26 MHz to 39 MHz, VEPS can distinguish non-invasively and without contact, with a statistical significance of p<0.05, between healthy subjects and those with a medical conditions in the brain. In the frequency range of between 153 MHz to 166 MHz it can distinguish with a statistical significance of p<0.05 between subjects with brain edema and those with a hematoma in the brain. A classifier build from measurements in these two frequency ranges can provide instantaneous diagnostic of the medical condition of the brain of a patient, from a single set of measurements. While this is a small-scale pilot study, it illustrates the potential of VEPS to change the paradigm of medical diagnostic of brain injury through a VEPS classifier-based technology. Obviously substantially larger-scale studies are needed to verify and expand on the findings in this small pilot study. PMID:23691001

  3. Minocycline-induced hypersensitivity syndrome presenting with meningitis and brain edema: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, Nicolas; Forestier, Emmanuel; Farhi, David; Mahsa, Mohseni Zadeh; Remy, Véronique; Lesens, Olivier; Christmann, Daniel; Hansmann, Yves

    2007-01-01

    Background Hypersentivity Syndrome (HS) may be a life-threatening condition. It frequently presents with fever, rash, eosinophilia and systemic manifestations. Mortality can be as high as 10% and is primarily due to hepatic failure. We describe what we believe to be the first case of minocycline-induced HS with accompanying lymphocytic meningitis and cerebral edema reported in the literature. Case presentation A 31-year-old HIV-positive female of African origin presented with acute fever, lymphocytic meningitis, brain edema, rash, eosinophilia, and cytolytic hepatitis. She had been started on minocycline for inflammatory acne 21 days prior to the onset of symptoms. HS was diagnosed clinically and after exclusion of infectious causes. Minocycline was withdrawn and steroids were administered from the second day after presentation because of the severity of the symptoms. All signs resolved by the seventh day and steroids were tailed off over a period of 8 months. Conclusion Clinicians should maintain a high index of suspicion for serious adverse reactions to minocycline including lymphocytic meningitis and cerebral edema among HIV-positive patients, especially if they are of African origin. Safer alternatives should be considered for treatment of acne vulgaris. Early recognition of the symptoms and prompt withdrawal of the drug are important to improve the outcome. PMID:17511865

  4. Intranasal delivery of nerve growth factor attenuates aquaporins-4-induced edema following traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Lv, Qiushi; Fan, Xinying; Xu, Gelin; Liu, Qian; Tian, Lili; Cai, Xiaoyi; Sun, Wenshan; Wang, Xiaomeng; Cai, Qiankun; Bao, Yuanfei; Zhou, Lulu; Zhang, Yao; Ge, Liang; Guo, Ruibing; Liu, Xinfeng

    2013-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains the leading cause of injury-related death and disability. Brain edema, one of the most major complications of TBI, contributes to elevated intracranial pressure, and poor prognosis following TBI. Nerve growth factor (NGF) appears to be a viable strategy to treat brain edema and TBI. Unfortunately, due to its poor blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, the clinical application of NGF has been greatly limited. We previously demonstrated that intranasal NGF could bypass the BBB and distribute throughout the brain. Here we further studied whether intranasal NGF could attenuate TBI-induced brain edema and its putative mechanisms. TBI was produced by a modified weight-drop model. We found that intranasal administration of NGF (5μg/d) attenuated the brain edema, as assayed by hemisphere water content, at 12h, 24h and 72h after TBI induction. This attenuation was associated with a prominent decrease of the content of aquaporin-4, which plays a pivotal role in the formation of brain edema. By the use of RT-PCR and ELISA, we showed that intranasal NGF markedly inhibited the transcription and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-1β and TNF-α. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) displayed a significant activation of nuclear factor-κB following TBI, which was, however, much lowered in the NGF-treated rats. Furthermore, upon intranasal NGF supplementation, mitochondria-mediated apoptosis following TBI was minimized, as indicated by upregulation of Bcl-2 and downregulation of caspase-3. Collectively, our findings suggested that intranasal NGF may be a promising strategy to treat brain edema and TBI.

  5. Quantitative MRI study of the permeability of peritumoral brain edema in lung cancer patients with brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Wang, Ming-Liang; Li, Yue-Hua

    2017-08-15

    To use Ktrans to evaluate the aggressiveness and vascular permeability of peritumoral edema in cases of lung cancer brain metastases. A total of 68 lung cancer patients with 92 metastatic brain lesions were enrolled (20 metastatic lesions only in the gray matter - group 1; and 72 metastatic lesions located in the gray and white matter junction - group 2). All patients underwent MRI examination, which involved a dual angle (2° and 15°) enhanced T1W-VIBE (volume interpolated breath-hold examination) sequence to calculate the T1 parameter map. We used the enhanced T1-3D sequence to measure the tumor volume. The vascular permeability coefficient (Ktrans) was calculated using the single-compartment Tofts model, motion registration, and quick input mode. We examined the correlations of Ktrans with the edema index (EI), Ktrans with the tumor volume, and Ktrans with the histological expression of MMP-9 or VEGF in the original lung tumor using Pearson's' correlation analysis. Ktrans and EI were highly correlated in group 2 (r=0.66687; P<0.001) and not correlated in group 1 (r=0.33096; P=0.15405). Ktrans was also moderately related to the positive expression of MMP-9 (r=0.50912; P<0.001) and VEGF (r=0.36995; P=0.00138) There is statistical correlation between Ktrans and EI for group 2, and no statistical correlation between Ktrans and EI for group 1. The Ktrans of the peritumoral brain edema may be used to indicate the aggressiveness and vascular permeability of brain metastases in patients with lung cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The protective effect of HET0016 on brain edema and blood-brain barrier dysfunction after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Wang, Di; Wang, Huan; Qu, Youyang; Xiao, Xingjun; Zhu, Yulan

    2014-01-28

    N-hydroxy-N-(4-butyl-2-methylphenyl) formamidine (HET0016) is a specific 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) inhibitor which was first synthesized in 2001. It has been demonstrated that HET0016 reduces cerebral infarction volume in rat middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) models. However, little is known about the role of HET0016 in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. The present study was designed to examine the effect of HET0016 in a MCAO and reperfusion rat model to determine whether it protects against brain edema and BBB disruption. Rats were subjected to 90 min MCAO, followed by 4, 24, 48, and 72 h reperfusion. Brain edema was measured according to the wet and dry weight method. BBB permeability based on the extravasation of Evans blue and sodium fluorescein was detected. BBB ultrastructure alterations were presented through transmission electron microscope. Superoxide production in ischemic tissue was also measured by dihydroethidium fluorescent probe. Western blot was used to analyze the expression of Claudin-5, ZO-1, MMP-9, and JNK pathway. At 24h after reperfusion, HET0016 reduced brain edema and BBB leakage. Ultrastructural damage of BBB and the increase of superoxide production were attenuated by HET0016 treatment. Western blot showed that HET0016 suppressed the activation of MMP-9 and JNK pathway but restored the expression of Claudin-5 and ZO-1. In conclusion, these results suggest that HET0016 protects BBB dysfunction after I/R by regulating the expression of MMP-9 and tight junction proteins. Furthermore, inhibition of oxidative stress and JNK pathway may be involved in this protecting effect.

  7. Amelioration of cold injury-induced cortical brain edema formation by selective endothelin ETB receptor antagonists in mice.

    PubMed

    Michinaga, Shotaro; Nagase, Marina; Matsuyama, Emi; Yamanaka, Daisuke; Seno, Naoki; Fuka, Mayu; Yamamoto, Yui; Koyama, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Brain edema is a potentially fatal pathological condition that often occurs in stroke and head trauma. Following brain insults, endothelins (ETs) are increased and promote several pathophysiological responses. This study examined the effects of ETB antagonists on brain edema formation and disruption of the blood-brain barrier in a mouse cold injury model (Five- to six-week-old male ddY mice). Cold injury increased the water content of the injured cerebrum, and promoted extravasation of both Evans blue and endogenous albumin. In the injury area, expression of prepro-ET-1 mRNA and ET-1 peptide increased. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of BQ788 (ETB antagonist), IRL-2500 (ETB antagonist), or FR139317 (ETA antagonist) prior to cold injury significantly attenuated the increase in brain water content. Bolus administration of BQ788, IRL-2500, or FR139317 also inhibited the cold injury-induced extravasation of Evans blue and albumin. Repeated administration of BQ788 and IRL-2500 beginning at 24 h after cold injury attenuated both the increase in brain water content and extravasation of markers. In contrast, FR139317 had no effect on edema formation when administrated after cold injury. Cold injury stimulated induction of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive reactive astrocytes in the injured cerebrum. Induction of reactive astrocytes after cold injury was attenuated by ICV administration of BQ788 or IRL-2500. These results suggest that ETB receptor antagonists may be an effective approach to ameliorate brain edema formation following brain insults.

  8. Amelioration of Cold Injury-Induced Cortical Brain Edema Formation by Selective Endothelin ETB Receptor Antagonists in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Michinaga, Shotaro; Nagase, Marina; Matsuyama, Emi; Yamanaka, Daisuke; Seno, Naoki; Fuka, Mayu; Yamamoto, Yui; Koyama, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Brain edema is a potentially fatal pathological condition that often occurs in stroke and head trauma. Following brain insults, endothelins (ETs) are increased and promote several pathophysiological responses. This study examined the effects of ETB antagonists on brain edema formation and disruption of the blood-brain barrier in a mouse cold injury model (Five- to six-week-old male ddY mice). Cold injury increased the water content of the injured cerebrum, and promoted extravasation of both Evans blue and endogenous albumin. In the injury area, expression of prepro-ET-1 mRNA and ET-1 peptide increased. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of BQ788 (ETB antagonist), IRL-2500 (ETB antagonist), or FR139317 (ETA antagonist) prior to cold injury significantly attenuated the increase in brain water content. Bolus administration of BQ788, IRL-2500, or FR139317 also inhibited the cold injury-induced extravasation of Evans blue and albumin. Repeated administration of BQ788 and IRL-2500 beginning at 24 h after cold injury attenuated both the increase in brain water content and extravasation of markers. In contrast, FR139317 had no effect on edema formation when administrated after cold injury. Cold injury stimulated induction of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive reactive astrocytes in the injured cerebrum. Induction of reactive astrocytes after cold injury was attenuated by ICV administration of BQ788 or IRL-2500. These results suggest that ETB receptor antagonists may be an effective approach to ameliorate brain edema formation following brain insults. PMID:25000290

  9. Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy for detection of water content in two in-vitro models of brain edema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Lee J.; Thakor, Nitish V.; Hanley, Daniel F.

    1997-08-01

    Currently, methods for the detection of brain edema in patients or laboratory experiments are invasive or inconvenient for continuous monitoring. We have performed experiments on two models of brain edema to determine the validity of differential near infrared spectroscopy (NIR) as a real-time, low cost and noninvasive method of monitoring brain edema. As a chemical in-vitro model, we prepared serial dilutions of Liposyn III, a fat emulsion, to simulate varying degrees of brain water content. NIR light at two wavelengths (703 nm and 957 nm) was used to assess water content of Liposyn solutions. We demonstrated a strong relation between wavelength specific light interactance and water content, for (n equals 4) serial dilutions from 97.6% to 80.0% water, R2 equals 0.985 plus or minus 0.017. Secondly an in vitro brain tissue model was developed to test the NIR method against wet-to-dry water content measurements. A total brain water content range of from 83.5 to 67.6 water was investigated (n equals 4). Using 695 nm and 957 nm NIR light, a correlation between NIR interactance and brain water content was again obtained, R2 equals 0.957 plus or minus 0.027. Our preliminary results suggest differential NIR spectroscopy may serve as an accurate and useful technique for monitoring surface brain edema in clinical and laboratory settings.

  10. Sulfasalazine impacts on ferroptotic cell death and alleviates the tumor microenvironment and glioma-induced brain edema

    PubMed Central

    Sehm, Tina; Fan, Zheng; Ghoochani, Ali; Rauh, Manfred; Engelhorn, Tobias; Minakaki, Georgia; Dörfler, Arnd; Klucken, Jochen; Buchfelder, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The glutamate transporter xCT (SCL7a11, system Xc-, SXC) is an emerging key player in glutamate/cysteine/glutathione homeostasis in the brain and in cancer. xCT expression correlates with the grade of malignancy. Here, we report on the use of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and EMA-approved xCT inhibitor, sulfasalazine (SAS) in gliomas. SAS does not affect cell viability in gliomas at concentrations below 200 μM. At higher concentrations SAS becomes gliomatoxic. Mechanistically SAS inhibits xCT and induces ferroptotic cell death in glioma cells. There is no evidence for impact on autophagic flux following SAS application. However, SAS can potentiate the efficacy of the standard chemotherapeutic and autophagy-inducing agent temozolomide (Temcat, Temodal or Temodar®). We also investigated SAS in non-transformed cellular constituents of the brain. Neurons and brain tissue are almost non-responding to SAS whereas isolated astrocytes are less sensitive towards SAS toxicity compared to gliomas. In vivo SAS treatment does not affect experimental tumor growth and treated animals revealed comparable tumor volume as untreated controls. However, SAS treatment resulted in reduced glioma-derived edema and, hence, total tumor volume burden as revealed by T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Altogether, we show that SAS can be utilized for targeting the glutamate antiporter xCT activity as a tumor microenvironment-normalizing drug, while crucial cytotoxic effects in brain tumors are minor. PMID:27074570

  11. Near-infrared spectroscopy technique to evaluate the effects of drugs in treating traumatic brain edema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, J.; Qian, Z.; Yang, T.; Li, W.; Hu, G.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of several drugs in treating traumatic brain edema (TBE) following traumatic brain injury (TBI) using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRs) technology. Rats with TBE models were given hypertonic saline (HS), mannitol and mannitol+HS respectively for different groups. Light scattering properties of rat's local cortex was measured by NIRs within the wavelength range from 700 to 850 nm. TBE models were built in rats' left brains. The scattering properties of the right and left target corresponding to the position of normal and TBE tissue were measured and recorded in vivo and real-time by a bifurcated needle probe. The brain water contents (BWC) were measured by the wet and dry weight method after injury and treatment hours 1, 6, 24, 72 and 120. A marked linear relationship was observed between reduced scattering coefficient (μs') and BWC. By recording μs' of rats' brains, the entire progressions of effects of several drugs were observed. The result may suggest that the NIRs techniques have a potential for assessing effects in vivo and real-time on treatment of the brain injury.

  12. Computer aided detection of tumor and edema in brain FLAIR magnetic resonance image using ANN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Nandita; Sinha, A. K.

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents an efficient region based segmentation technique for detecting pathological tissues (Tumor & Edema) of brain using fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) magnetic resonance (MR) images. This work segments FLAIR brain images for normal and pathological tissues based on statistical features and wavelet transform coefficients using k-means algorithm. The image is divided into small blocks of 4×4 pixels. The k-means algorithm is used to cluster the image based on the feature vectors of blocks forming different classes representing different regions in the whole image. With the knowledge of the feature vectors of different segmented regions, supervised technique is used to train Artificial Neural Network using fuzzy back propagation algorithm (FBPA). Segmentation for detecting healthy tissues and tumors has been reported by several researchers by using conventional MRI sequences like T1, T2 and PD weighted sequences. This work successfully presents segmentation of healthy and pathological tissues (both Tumors and Edema) using FLAIR images. At the end pseudo coloring of segmented and classified regions are done for better human visualization.

  13. Partial IGF-1 deficiency induces brain oxidative damage and edema, which are ameliorated by replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Puche, Juan E; Muñoz, Úrsula; García-Magariño, Mariano; Sádaba, María C; Castilla-Cortázar, Inma

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) induces multiple cytoprotective effects on every tissue, including the brain. Since the mechanisms by which IGF-1 produces neuroprotection are not fully understood, the aim of this work was to delve into the underlying mechanisms. IGF-1 deficient mice (Hz) were compared with wild type (WT) and Hz mice treated with low doses of IGF-1 (2 µg/100 g body weight/day) for 10 days (Hz + IGF). Gene expression, quantitative PCR, histology, and magnetic resonance imaging were performed in the three groups. IGF-1 deficiency induced increased oxidative damage determined by markers of lipid peroxidation and hypoxia, as well as gene expression of heat shock proteins, antioxidant enzymes, and molecules involved in inflammation, apoptosis, and mitochondrial protection. These changes correlated with edema and learning impairment in Hz mice. IGF-1 therapy improved all these alterations. In conclusion, IGF-1 deficiency is responsible for increased brain oxidative damage, edema, and impaired learning and memory capabilities which are rescued by IGF-1 replacement therapy. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  14. Estrogen provides neuroprotection against brain edema and blood brain barrier disruption through both estrogen receptors α and β following traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Naderi, Vida; Khaksari, Mohammad; Abbasi, Reza; Maghool, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Estrogen (E2) has neuroprotective effects on blood-brain-barrier (BBB) after traumatic brain injury (TBI). In order to investigate the roles of estrogen receptors (ERs) in these effects, ER-α antagonist (MPP) and, ER-β antagonist (PHTPP), or non-selective estrogen receptors antagonist (ICI 182780) were administered. Materials and Methods: Ovariectomized rats were divided into 10 groups, as follows: Sham, TBI, E2, oil, MPP+E2, PHTPP+E2, MPP+PHTPP+E2, ICI+E2, MPP, and DMSO. E2 (33.3 µg/Kg) or oil were administered 30 min after TBI. 1 dose (150 µg/Kg) of each of MPP, PHTPP, and (4 mg/kg) ICI182780 was injected two times, 24 hr apart, before TBI and estrogen treatment. BBB disruption (Evans blue content) and brain edema (brain water content) evaluated 5 hr and 24 hr after the TBI were evaluated, respectively. Results: The results showed that E2 reduced brain edema after TBI compared to vehicle (P<0.01). The brain edema in the MPP+E2 and PHTPP+E2 groups decreased compared to the vehicle (P<0.001). There was no significant difference in MPP+PHTPP+E2 and ICI+E2 compared to TBI. This parameter in MPP was similar to vehicle. Evans blue content in E2 group was lower than vehicle (P<0.05). The inhibitory effect of E2 on Evans blue was not reduced by MPP+E2 and PHTPP+E2 groups, but decreased by treatment with MPP+PHTPP or ICI. MPP had no effect on Evans blue content. Conclusion: A combined administration of MPP and PHTPP or ICI inhibited the E2-induced decrease in brain edema and BBB disruption; this may suggest that these effects were mediated via both receptors. PMID:25810887

  15. MYELIN IN THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM AS OBSERVED IN EXPERIMENTALLY INDUCED EDEMA IN THE RAT

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Asao; Zimmerman, H. M.; Levine, Seymour

    1966-01-01

    The compact arrangement of cells in the normal white matter of the brain makes an analysis of cellular architecture difficult. To overcome this difficulty, cerebral edema was induced in rats by means of the unilateral intracerebral implantation of silver nitrate. Within 48 hr, the brains were fixed by perfusion with glutaraldehyde followed by immersion in Dalton's chrome-osmium. Sections of the callosal radiations were studied in the electron microscope. The untreated hemisphere appeared entirely unaltered, whereas in the edematous hemisphere the edema fluid separated individual cell processes and small groups of them. The myelin sheaths and their relationships to the axons appeared essentially unaltered. In this material, analysis of cellular architecture was relatively easy, and the widely held theory of spiral wrapping could be confirmed. In addition, several other aspects of the myelin and myelin-forming cell relationships became apparent in the edematous tissue. Most of these were later confirmed by extensive and careful study of the nonedematous tissue. These included the presence of occasional isolated cytoplasmic areas in myelin and the presence of two complete sheaths around a single axon. Other observations, such as the appearance of mitochondria and dense bodies within the outer loop and the separation of myelin lamellae, are apparently limited to the edematous tissue. PMID:5971641

  16. Myelin in the central nervous system as observed in experimentally induced edema in the rat.

    PubMed

    Hirano, A; Zimmerman, H M; Levine, S

    1966-12-01

    The compact arrangement of cells in the normal white matter of the brain makes an analysis of cellular architecture difficult. To overcome this difficulty, cerebral edema was induced in rats by means of the unilateral intracerebral implantation of silver nitrate. Within 48 hr, the brains were fixed by perfusion with glutaraldehyde followed by immersion in Dalton's chrome-osmium. Sections of the callosal radiations were studied in the electron microscope. The untreated hemisphere appeared entirely unaltered, whereas in the edematous hemisphere the edema fluid separated individual cell processes and small groups of them. The myelin sheaths and their relationships to the axons appeared essentially unaltered. In this material, analysis of cellular architecture was relatively easy, and the widely held theory of spiral wrapping could be confirmed. In addition, several other aspects of the myelin and myelin-forming cell relationships became apparent in the edematous tissue. Most of these were later confirmed by extensive and careful study of the nonedematous tissue. These included the presence of occasional isolated cytoplasmic areas in myelin and the presence of two complete sheaths around a single axon. Other observations, such as the appearance of mitochondria and dense bodies within the outer loop and the separation of myelin lamellae, are apparently limited to the edematous tissue.

  17. Lack of sex-linked differences in cerebral edema and aquaporin-4 expression after experimental stroke

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Wenri; Alkayed, Nabil J; Froehner, Stanley C; Adams, Marvin E; Amiry-Moghaddam, Mahmood; Ottersen, Ole Petter; Hurn, Patricia D; Bhardwaj, Anish

    2009-01-01

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) has been shown to be important in the evolution of stroke-associated cerebral edema. However, the role of AQP4 in stroke-associated cerebral edema as it pertains to sex has not been previously studied. The perivascular pool of AQP4 is important in the influx and efflux of water during focal cerebral ischemia. We used mice with targeted disruption of the gene encoding α-syntrophin (α-Syn−/−) that lack the perivascular AQP4 pool but retain the endothelial pool of this protein. Infarct volume at 72h after transient focal ischemia (90 mins) in isoflurane-anesthetized mice was attenuated in both sexes with α-Syn deletion as compared with their wild-type (WT) counterparts. There were no sex differences in hemispheric water content in WT and α-Syn−/− mice or regional AQP4 expression in WT mice. In neither sex did α-Syn deletion lead to alterations in end-ischemic regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). These data suggest that after experimental stroke: (1) there is no difference in stroke-associated cerebral edema based on sex, (2) AQP4 does not involve in sex-based differences in stroke volume, and (3) perivascular pool of AQP4 has no significant role in end-ischemic rCBF. PMID:18648381

  18. Receptor for advanced glycation end products and neuronal deficit in the fatal brain edema of diabetic ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, William H; Artlett, Carol M; Zhang, Weixian; Kreipke, Christian W; Passmore, Gregory G; Rafols, Jose A; Sima, Anders A F

    2008-10-31

    Radiologic and neuropsychologic studies suggest that diabetes mellitus causes structural changes in the brain and adversely effects cognitive development. Experimental animal models of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) have advanced these findings by demonstrating duration-related neuronal and cognitive deficits in T1DM BB/Wor rats. We studied the expression of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and neuronal densities in the brains of two patients who died as the result of clinical brain edema(BE)that developed during the treatment of severe diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). RAGE was markedly and diffusely expressed in blood vessels, neurons, and the choroid plexus and co-localized with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in astrocytes. Significant neuronal loss was seen in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Astrocytosis was present and white matter was atrophied in both cases when compared to age-matched controls. Our data supports that a neuroinflammatory response occurs in the BE associated with DKA, and that even after a relatively short duration of poorly controlled T1DM, the pathogenesis of primary diabetic encephalopathy can be initiated.

  19. L-histidine but not D-histidine attenuates brain edema following cryogenic injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Y; Mochizuki, Y; Matsumoto, H; Nakamura, Y; Dohi, K; Jimbo, H; Shimazu, M; Hayashi, M; Matsumoto, K

    2000-01-01

    Oxygen free radicals have been implicated in the genesis of traumatic brain injury and brain edema (BE). Recent studies have suggested that hydroxyl radical can initiate lipid peroxidation, thus producing lipid-free radicals that may become important sources of singlet oxygen. L-histidine, a singlet oxygen scavenger, potentially can be used to treat BE. In this study we investigated the effects of L-histidine and D-histidine on BE following cryogenic injury in rats. Male Wistar rats were anaesthetized with chloral hydrate. Vasogenic BE was produced by a cortical freezing lesion. Generation of singlet oxygen from photoactivation of rose bengal was studied by electron spin resonance (ESR). Animals were separated into four groups: sham rats (n = 5), saline-treated rats (n = 10), L-histidine treated rats (n = 6) and D-histidine treated rats (n = 7). Each agent (100 mg/kg) was administered intravenously at 30 minutes before lesion production. Animals were sacrificed at 24 hours after lesion production and the brain water content was determined by the dry-wet weight method. L-histidine had no effect on rectal and brain temperature. Election Spin Resonance studies demonstrated that L-histidine is a singlet oxygen scavenger. L-histidine but not D-histidine significantly attenuated BE following cryogenic injury (p < 0.05). In conclusion, L-histidine is useful in the treatment of traumatic BE.

  20. Depot delivery of dexamethasone and cediranib for the treatment of brain tumor associated edema in an intracranial rat glioma model.

    PubMed

    Ong, Qunya; Hochberg, Fred H; Cima, Michael J

    2015-11-10

    Treatments of brain tumor associated edema with systemically delivered dexamethasone, the standard of care, and cediranib, a novel anti-edema agent, are associated with systemic toxicities in brain tumor patients. A tunable, reservoir-based drug delivery device was developed to investigate the effects of delivering dexamethasone and cediranib locally in the brain in an intracranial 9L gliosarcoma rat model. Reproducible, sustained releases of both dexamethasone and solid dispersion of cediranib in polyvinylpyrrolidone (AZD/PVP) from these devices were achieved. The water-soluble AZD/PVP, which exhibited similar bioactivity as cediranib, was developed to enhance the release of cediranib from the device. Local and systemic administration of both dexamethasone and cediranib was equally efficacious in alleviating edema but had no effect on tumor growth. Edema reduction led to modest but significant improvement in survival. Local delivery of dexamethasone prevented dexamethasone-induced weight loss, an adverse effect seen in animals treated with systemic dexamethasone. Local deliveries of dexamethasone and cediranib via these devices used only 2.36% and 0.21% of the systemic doses respectively, but achieved similar efficacy as systemic drug deliveries without the side effects associated with systemic administration. Other therapeutic agents targeting brain tumor can be delivered locally in the brain to provide similar improved treatment outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Absence of Glial α-Dystrobrevin Causes Abnormalities of the Blood-Brain Barrier and Progressive Brain Edema*

    PubMed Central

    Lien, Chun Fu; Mohanta, Sarajo Kumar; Frontczak-Baniewicz, Malgorzata; Swinny, Jerome D.; Zablocka, Barbara; Górecki, Dariusz C.

    2012-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays a key role in maintaining brain functionality. Although mammalian BBB is formed by endothelial cells, its function requires interactions between endotheliocytes and glia. To understand the molecular mechanisms involved in these interactions is currently a major challenge. We show here that α-dystrobrevin (α-DB), a protein contributing to dystrophin-associated protein scaffolds in astrocytic endfeet, is essential for the formation and functioning of BBB. The absence of α-DB in null brains resulted in abnormal brain capillary permeability, progressively escalating brain edema, and damage of the neurovascular unit. Analyses in situ and in two-dimensional and three-dimensional in vitro models of BBB containing α-DB-null astrocytes demonstrated these abnormalities to be associated with loss of aquaporin-4 water and Kir4.1 potassium channels from glial endfeet, formation of intracellular vacuoles in α-DB-null astrocytes, and defects of the astrocyte-endothelial interactions. These caused deregulation of tight junction proteins in the endothelia. Importantly, α-DB but not dystrophins showed continuous expression throughout development in BBB models. Thus, α-DB emerges as a central organizer of dystrophin-associated protein in glial endfeet and a rare example of a glial protein with a role in maintaining BBB function. Its abnormalities might therefore lead to BBB dysfunction. PMID:23043099

  2. Bilateral sphenoid wing metastases of prostate cancer presenting with extensive brain edema.

    PubMed

    Lindsberg, P J; Tatlisumak, T; Tienari, J; Brander, A

    1999-05-01

    A 76-year-old man insidiously developed diffuse neurological symptoms: cognitive decline, dysphagia, dysphasia and mental disturbance. Computed tomography of the cranium revealed widespread bilateral brain edema and symmetrical bilateral sphenoid wing hyperostosis. Adjacent to the hyperostosis that resembled skull base meningiomas, two separate parenchymatous temporal lobe lesions enhancing with contrast medium were observed. The patient had earlier been diagnosed to have prostatic carcinoma. Dexamethasone therapy resulted in discontinuation of the neurological symptoms. The diagnosis of metastasized adenocarcinoma of the prostate was confirmed histologically on autopsy after a sudden death from pneumonia. Intracranial metastases of prostate cancer may have a predilection site at the sphenoid wing, and can mimic a skull base meningioma. Intracranial spread of prostatic adenocarcinoma should be considered in elderly men as a treatable cause of gradual neurological deterioration, especially if cranial malignancy or hyperostosis is found.

  3. Intranasal Administration of the Antisecretory Peptide AF-16 Reduces Edema and Improves Cognitive Function Following Diffuse Traumatic Brain Injury in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Clausen, Fredrik; Hansson, Hans-Arne; Raud, Johan; Marklund, Niklas

    2017-01-01

    A synthetic peptide with antisecretory activity, antisecretory factor (AF)-16, improves injury-related deficits in water and ion transport and decreases intracranial pressure after experimental cold lesion injury and encephalitis although its role in traumatic brain injury (TBI) is unknown. AF-16 or an inactive reference peptide was administrated intranasally 30 min following midline fluid percussion injury (mFPI; n = 52), a model of diffuse mild-moderate TBI in rats. Sham-injured (n = 14) or naïve (n = 24) animals were used as controls. The rats survived for either 48 h or 15 days post-injury. At 48 h, the animals were tested in the Morris water maze (MWM) for memory function and their brains analyzed for cerebral edema. Here, mFPI-induced brain edema compared to sham or naïve controls that was significantly reduced by AF-16 treatment (p < 0.05) although MWM performance was not altered. In the 15-day survival groups, the MWM learning and memory abilities as well as histological changes were analyzed. AF-16-treated brain-injured animals shortened both MWM latency and swim path in the learning trials (p < 0.05) and improved probe trial performance compared to brain-injured controls treated with the inactive reference peptide. A modest decrease by AF-16 on TBI-induced changes in hippocampal glial acidic fibrillary protein (GFAP) staining (p = 0.11) was observed. AF-16 treatment did not alter any other immunohistochemical analyses (degenerating neurons, beta-amyloid precursor protein (β-APP), and Olig2). In conclusion, intranasal AF-16-attenuated brain edema and enhanced visuospatial learning and memory following diffuse TBI in the rat. Intranasal administration early post-injury of a promising neuroprotective substance offers a novel treatment approach for TBI. PMID:28261150

  4. Application of non-invasive cerebral electrical impedance measurement on brain edema in patients with cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    He, Lan Ying; Wang, Jian; Luo, Yong; Dong, Wei Wei; Liu, Li Xu

    2010-09-01

    To investigate the change of brain edema in patients with cerebral infarction by non-invasive cerebral electrical impedance (CEI) measurements. An invariable secure current at a frequency of 50 kHz and an intensity of 0.1 mA was given into a person's brain. CEI values of the bilateral hemisphere of 200 healthy volunteers and 107 patients with cerebral infarction were measured by non-invasive brain edema monitor. The results of perturbative index (PI) converted from CEI were compared with the volumes of brain edema, which were calculated by an image analysing system according to magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography. (1) In the healthy volunteers, PI values in the left and right hemisphere were 7.98 +/- 0.95 and 8.02 +/- 0.71 respectively, and there was no significant difference between the two sides (p>0.05). Age, gender and different measuring times did not obviously affect PI values (p>0.05). (2) In the cerebral infarction group, CEI measurements were more sensitive to the volumes of lesion, which were more than 20 ml. The positive ratio of PI was higher when the volumes of infarction were >20 ml (80.0%): the ratio of PI was 75.9% when the volumes of infarction were 20-50 ml and it was 83.3% when the volumes of lesion were more than 50 ml. PI was lower when the volumes were less than 20 ml. (3) PI of the infarction side increased obviously 3-5 days after onset; the difference of two sides was the most significant. There was a positive correlation between PI of the infarction side and volume of infarction. PI may be a sensitive parameter for non-invasive monitoring of the change of brain edema in patients with cerebral infarction. CEI is a valuable method for the early detection of brain edema.

  5. Effects on brain edema of crystalloid and albumin fluid resuscitation after brain trauma and hemorrhage in the rat.

    PubMed

    Jungner, Mårten; Grände, Per-Olof; Mattiasson, Gustav; Bentzer, Peter

    2010-05-01

    It has been hypothesized that resuscitation with crystalloids after brain trauma increases brain edema compared with colloids, but previous studies on the subject have been inconclusive. To test this hypothesis, the authors compared groups resuscitated with either colloid or crystalloid. After fluid percussion injury, rats were subjected to a controlled hemorrhage of 20 ml/kg and were randomized to 5% albumin at 20 ml/kg (A20), isotonic Ringer's acetate at 50 ml/kg (C50), or 90 ml/kg (C90). After 3 or 24 h, water content in the injured cortex was determined using a wet/dry weight method. Blood volume was calculated from plasma volume, measured by 125I-albumin dilution, and hematocrit. Oncotic pressure and osmolality were measured with osmometers. At 3 h, blood volume was equal in the A20 and C90 groups and lower in the C50 group. Oncotic pressure was reduced by 35-40% in the crystalloid groups and unchanged in the albumin group. Cortical water content in the A20 group was lower than in the C90 group (81.3 +/- 0.5% vs. 82.1 +/- 1.1%, P < 0.05), but it was not different from the C50 group (81.8 +/- 1.1%). At 24 h, oncotic pressure and blood volume were normalized in all groups, and cortical water content was significantly lower in the albumin group than in the crystalloid groups. Osmolality and arterial pressure were equal in all groups throughout the experiment. When given to the same intravascular volume expansion, isotonic crystalloids caused greater posttraumatic brain edema than 5% albumin at 3 and 24 h after trauma.

  6. Differential upregulation of aquaporin-4 mRNA expression in reactive astrocytes after brain injury: potential role in brain edema.

    PubMed

    Vizuete, M L; Venero, J L; Vargas, C; Ilundáin, A A; Echevarría, M; Machado, A; Cano, J

    1999-08-01

    Astrocytes and aquaporin-4 (AQP4) play a significant role in brain ion homeostasis. Consequently the regulation of AQP4 mRNA in the CNS after different neurological insults was of interest. A single intrastriatal injection of ringer or quinolinic acid strongly induced AQP4 mRNA in the striatum, specially at the core of the lesion. Colocalization studies demonstrated that AQP4 mRNA induction was restricted to hypertrophic astrocytes. The extent of striatal AQP4 mRNA induction did not correlate with neuronal degeneration, but it did with extravasation of Evans blue dye as a marker of BBB disruption. Distant lesions were additionally induced by either 6-OHDA or a knife cut in the medial forebrain bundle (MFB). The former, but not the latter, induced a high AQP4 mRNA expression in the lesioned substantia nigra. However, axotomy of the MFB induced a high AQP4 mRNA expression at the lesion site. We conclude that the induction of AQP4 mRNA expression is related to disruption of the blood-brain barrier and under brain edema conditions this water channel plays a key role in the reestablishment of the brain osmotic equilibrium. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  7. Protection of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor to Brain Edema Following Intracerebral Hemorrhage and Its Involved Mechanisms: Effect of Aquaporin-4

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has protective effects on many neurological diseases. However, whether VEGF acts on brain edema following intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is largely unknown. Our previous study has shown aquaporin-4 (AQP4) plays an important role in brain edema elimination following ICH. Meanwhile, there is close relationship between VEGF and AQP4. In this study, we aimed to test effects of VEGF on brain edema following ICH and examine whether they were AQP4 dependent. Recombinant human VEGF165 (rhVEGF165) was injected intracerebroventricularly 1 d after ICH induced by microinjecting autologous whole blood into striatum. We detected perihemotomal AQP4 protein expression, then examined the effects of rhVEGF165 on perihemotomal brain edema at 1 d, 3 d, and 7 d after injection in wild type (AQP4+/+) and AQP4 knock-out (AQP4−/−) mice. Furthermore, we assessed the possible signal transduction pathways activated by VEGF to regulate AQP4 expression via astrocyte cultures. We found perihemotomal AQP4 protein expression was highly increased by rhVEGF165. RhVEGF165 alleviated perihemotomal brain edema in AQP4+/+ mice at each time point, but had no effect on AQP4−/− mice. Perihemotomal EB extravasation was increased by rhVEGF165 in AQP4−/− mice, but not AQP4+/+ mice. RhVEGF165 reduced neurological deficits and increased Nissl’s staining cells surrounding hemotoma in both types of mice and these effects were related to AQP4. RhVEGF165 up-regulated phospharylation of C-Jun amino-terminal kinase (p-JNK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) and AQP4 protein in cultured astrocytes. The latter was inhibited by JNK and ERK inhibitors. In conclusion, VEGF reduces neurological deficits, brain edema, and neuronal death surrounding hemotoma but has no influence on BBB permeability. These effects are closely related to AQP4 up-regulation, possibly through activating JNK and ERK pathways. The current study may present new insights to

  8. A simple prediction score system for malignant brain edema progression in large hemispheric infarction

    PubMed Central

    Jo, KwangWook; Bajgur, Suhas S.; Kim, Hoon; Choi, Huimahn A.; Huh, Pil-Woo; Lee, Kiwon

    2017-01-01

    Malignant brain edema (MBE) due to hemispheric infarction can result in brain herniation, poor outcomes, and death; outcome may be improved if certain interventions, such as decompressive craniectomy, are performed early. We sought to generate a prediction score to easily identify those patients at high risk for MBE. 121 patients with large hemispheric infarction (LHI) (2011 to 2014) were included. Patients were divided into two groups: those who developed MBE and those who did not. Independent predictors of MBE were identified by logistic regression and a score was developed. Four factors were independently associated with MBE: baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score (p = 0.048), Alberta Stroke Program Early Computed Tomography Score (ASPECTS) (p = 0.007), collateral score (CS) (p<0.001) and revascularization failure (p = 0.013). Points were assigned for each factor as follows: NIHSS ≤ 8 (= 0), 9–17 (= 1), ≥ 18 (= 2); ASPECTS≤ 7 (= 1), >8 (= 0); CS<2 (= 1), ≥2 (= 0); revascularization failure (= 1),success (= 0). The MBE Score (MBES) represents the sum of these individual points. Of 26 patients with a MBES of 0 to 1, none developed MBE. All patients with a MBES of 6 developed MBE. Both MBE development and functional outcomes were strongly associated with the MBES (p = 0.007 and 0.002, respectively). The MBE score is a simple reliable tool for the prediction of MBE. PMID:28178299

  9. Serum B-Type Natriuretic Peptide is Affected by Neoplastic Edema in Patients with a Brain Tumor.

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, Francesco; Noris, Alice; Beretta, Luigi; Mortini, Pietro; Gemma, Marco

    2016-01-01

    A positive correlation between serum B-type natriuretic peptide levels and the amount of dislodgement of intracranial structures (mass effect) produced by brain tumors has been demonstrated previously. The aim of our prospective observational study was to evaluate a possible relationship between serum B-type natriuretic peptide levels and the amount of neoplastic edema in patients affected by brain tumor. We prospectively studied 110 patients with a supratentorial brain tumor. Serum N-terminal-pro B-type natriuretic peptide was measured and brain magnetic resonance images were analyzed to discriminate between neoplastic tissue and perilesional edema. A multivariate linear regression model predictive for serum N-terminal-pro B-type natriuretic peptide levels was generated. The radiologic diagnoses were meningioma in 45 patients (40.9%), glioma in 33 (30%), and metastasis in 32 (29.1%). A mass effect was present in 29 (26.4%) patients. Serum N-terminal-pro B-type natriuretic peptide was 125.61 ± 174.14 pg/mL (median 60 pg/mL, interquartile range 28-139 pg/mL). Four variables were entered into a multivariate linear regression model predictive for serum N-terminal-pro B-type natriuretic peptide values: age, neoplastic edema volume, metastatic lesion, and the presence of a mass effect (whole model P < 0.0001; R(2) = 0.5555; adjusted R(2) = 0.5294). Our data demonstrate that serum B-type natriuretic peptide levels are positively correlated to neoplastic brain edema in patients with a brain tumor and suggest a possible cerebral source for this phenomenon. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Curcumin attenuates brain edema in mice with intracerebral hemorrhage through inhibition of AQP4 and AQP9 expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bao-feng; Cui, Zhen-wen; Zhong, Zhi-hong; Sun, Yu-hao; Sun, Qing-fang; Yang, Guo-yuan; Bian, Liu-guan

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Aquaporins (AQPs) are the water-channels that play important roles in brain water homeostasis and in cerebral edema induced by brain injury. In this study we investigated the relationship between AQPs and a neuroprotective agent curcumin that was effective in the treatment of brain edema in mice with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Methods: ICH was induced in mice by autologous blood infusion. The mice immediately received curcumin (75, 150, 300 mg/kg, ip). The Rotarod test scores, brain water content and brain expression of AQPs were measured post ICH. Cultured primary mouse astrocytes were used for in vitro experiments. The expression of AQP1, AQP4 and AQP9 and NF-κB p65 were detected using Western blotting or immunochemistry staining. Results: Curcumin administration dose-dependently reduced the cerebral edema at d 3 post ICH, and significantly attenuated the neurological deficits at d 5 post ICH. Furthermore, curcumin dose-dependently decreased the gene and protein expression of AQP4 and AQP9, but not AQP1 post ICH. Treatment of the cultured astrocytes with Fe2+ (10–100 μmol/L) dose-dependently increased the expression and nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 and the expression of AQP4 and AQP9, which were partly blocked by co-treatment with curcumin (20 μmol/L) or the NF-κB inhibitor PDTC (10 μmol/L). Conclusion: Curcumin effectively attenuates brain edema in mice with ICH through inhibition of the NF-κB pathway and subsequently the expression of AQP4 and AQP9. Curcumin may serve as a potential therapeutic agent for ICH. PMID:26119880

  11. Curcumin attenuates brain edema in mice with intracerebral hemorrhage through inhibition of AQP4 and AQP9 expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bao-feng; Cui, Zhen-wen; Zhong, Zhi-hong; Sun, Yu-hao; Sun, Qing-fang; Yang, Guo-yuan; Bian, Liu-guan

    2015-08-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are the water-channels that play important roles in brain water homeostasis and in cerebral edema induced by brain injury. In this study we investigated the relationship between AQPs and a neuroprotective agent curcumin that was effective in the treatment of brain edema in mice with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). ICH was induced in mice by autologous blood infusion. The mice immediately received curcumin (75, 150, 300 mg/kg, ip). The Rotarod test scores, brain water content and brain expression of AQPs were measured post ICH. Cultured primary mouse astrocytes were used for in vitro experiments. The expression of AQP1, AQP4 and AQP9 and NF-κB p65 were detected using Western blotting or immunochemistry staining. Curcumin administration dose-dependently reduced the cerebral edema at d 3 post ICH, and significantly attenuated the neurological deficits at d 5 post ICH. Furthermore, curcumin dose-dependently decreased the gene and protein expression of AQP4 and AQP9, but not AQP1 post ICH. Treatment of the cultured astrocytes with Fe(2+) (10-100 μmol/L) dose-dependently increased the expression and nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 and the expression of AQP4 and AQP9, which were partly blocked by co-treatment with curcumin (20 μmol/L) or the NF-κB inhibitor PDTC (10 μmol/L). Curcumin effectively attenuates brain edema in mice with ICH through inhibition of the NF-κB pathway and subsequently the expression of AQP4 and AQP9. Curcumin may serve as a potential therapeutic agent for ICH.

  12. Role of Cerebral Endothelial Cells in the Astrocyte Swelling and Brain Edema Associated with Acute Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jayakumar, A.R.; Tong, X.Y.; Ospel, J.; Norenberg, M.D.

    2012-01-01

    Brain edema is an important complication of acute hepatic encephalopathy (AHE), and astrocyte swelling is largely responsible for its development. Elevated blood and brain ammonia levels have been considered as major etiological factors in this edema. In addition to ammonia, recent studies have suggested that systemic infection, inflammation (and associated cytokines), as well as endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) are also involved in AHE-associated brain edema. As endothelial cells (ECs) are the first resident brain cells exposed to blood-borne “noxious agents” (i.e., ammonia, cytokines, LPS) that are present in AHE, these cells may be in a critical position to react to these agents and trigger a process resulting in astrocyte swelling/brain edema. We therefore examined the effect of conditioned media (CM) from ammonia, LPS and cytokine-treated cultured brain ECs on cell swelling in cultured astrocytes. CM from ammonia-treated ECs when added to astrocytes caused significant cell swelling, and such swelling was potentiated when astrocytes were exposed to CM from ECs-treated with a combination of ammonia, LPS and CKs. We also found an additive effect when astrocytes were exposed to ammonia along with CM from ammonia-treated ECs. Additionally, ECs treated with ammonia showed a significant increase in the production of oxy-radicals, nitric oxide, as well as evidence of oxidative/nitrative stress and activation of the transcription factor NF-κ B. CM derived from ECs treated with ammonia, along with antioxidants or the NF-κB inhibitor BAY 11-7082, when added to astrocytes resulted in a significant reduction in cell swelling, as compared to the effect of CM from ECs-treated only with ammonia. We also identified increased nuclear NF-κB expression in rat brain cortical ECs in the thioacetamide model of AHE. These studies suggest that endothelial cells significantly contribute to the astrocyte swelling/brain edema in AHE, likely as a consequence of oxidative

  13. Reduced brain edema and infarct volume in aquaporin-4 deficient mice after transient focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiaoming; Derugin, Nikita; Manley, Geoffrey T; Verkman, A S

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is a water channel expressed in astrocyte end-feet lining the blood-brain barrier. AQP4 deletion in mice is associated with improved outcomes in global cerebral ischemia produced by transient carotid artery occlusion, and focal cerebral ischemia produced by permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Here, we investigated the consequences of 1-h transient MCAO produced by intraluminal suture blockade followed by 23 h of reperfusion. In nine AQP4(+/+) and nine AQP4(-/-) mice, infarct volume was significantly reduced by an average of 39 ± 4% at 24h in AQP4(-/-) mice, cerebral hemispheric edema was reduced by 23 ± 3%, and Evans Blue extravasation was reduced by 31 ± 2% (mean ± SEM). Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging showed greatest reduction in apparent diffusion coefficient around the occlusion site after reperfusion, with remarkably lesser reduction in AQP4(-/-) mice. The reduced infarct volume in AQP4(-/-) mice following transient MCAO supports the potential utility of therapeutic AQP4 inhibition in stroke.

  14. Improvement of cold injury-induced mouse brain edema by endothelin ETB antagonists is accompanied by decreases in matrixmetalloproteinase 9 and vascular endothelial growth factor-A.

    PubMed

    Michinaga, Shotaro; Seno, Naoki; Fuka, Mayu; Yamamoto, Yui; Minami, Shizuho; Kimura, Akimasa; Hatanaka, Shunichi; Nagase, Marina; Matsuyama, Emi; Yamanaka, Daisuke; Koyama, Yutaka

    2015-09-01

    Brain edema is a potentially fatal pathological state that often occurs after brain injuries such as ischemia and trauma. However, therapeutic agents that fundamentally treat brain edema have not yet been established. We previously found that endothelin ETB receptor antagonists attenuate the formation and maintenance of vasogenic brain edema after cold injury in mice. In this study, the effects of ETB antagonists on matrixmetalloproteinase (MMP)9 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A expression were examined in the cold injury model. Cold injury was performed in the left brain of male ddY mice (5-6 weeks old) for the induction of vasogenic edema. Expression of MMP9 and VEGF-A mRNA in the mouse cerebrum was increased by cold injury. Immunohistochemical observations showed that the MMP9 and VEGF-A were mainly produced in reactive astrocytes in the damaged cerebrum. Intracerebroventricular administration of BQ788 (10 μg) or IRL-2500 (10 μg) (selective ETB antagonists) attenuated brain edema and disruption of the blood-brain barrier after cold injury. BQ788 and IRL-2500 reversed the cold injury-induced increases in MMP9 and VEGF-A expression. The induction of reactive astrocytes producing MMP9 and VEGF-A in the damaged cerebrum was attenuated by BQ788 and IRL-2500. These results suggest that attenuations of astrocytic MMP9 and VEGF-A expression by ETB antagonists may be involved in the amelioration of vasogenic brain edema.

  15. Attenuation of Acute Phase Injury in Rat Intracranial Hemorrhage by Cerebrolysin that Inhibits Brain Edema and Inflammatory Response.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Zhaotao; Wang, Shanshan; Gao, Mou; Xu, Ruxiang; Liang, Chunyang; Zhang, Hongtian

    2016-04-01

    The outcome of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is mainly determined by the volume of the hemorrhage core and the secondary brain damage to penumbral tissues due to brain swelling, microcirculation disturbance and inflammation. The present study aims to investigate the protective effects of cerebrolysin on brain edema and inhibition of the inflammation response surrounding the hematoma core in the acute stage after ICH. The ICH model was induced by administration of type VII bacterial collagenase into the stratum of adult rats, which were then randomly divided into three groups: ICH + saline; ICH + Cerebrolysin (5 ml/kg) and sham. Cerebrolysin or saline was administered intraperitoneally 1 h post surgery. Neurological scores, extent of brain edema content and Evans blue dye extravasation were recorded. The levels of pro-inflammatory factors (IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6) were assayed by Real-time PCR and Elisa kits. Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and tight junction proteins (TJPs; claudin-5, occludin and zonula occluden-1) expression were measured at multiple time points. The morphological and intercellular changes were characterized by Electron microscopy. It is found that cerebrolysin (5 ml/kg) improved the neurological behavior and reduced the ipsilateral brain water content and Evans blue dye extravasation. After cerebrolysin treated, the levels of pro-inflammatory factors and AQP4 in the peri-hematomal areas were markedly reduced and were accompanied with higher expression of TJPs. Electron microscopy showed the astrocytic swelling and concentrated chromatin in the ICH group and confirmed the cell junction changes. Thus, early cerebrolysin treatment ameliorates secondary injury after ICH and promotes behavioral performance during the acute phase by reducing brain edema, inflammatory response, and blood-brain barrier permeability.

  16. Minocycline effects on cerebral edema: relations with inflammatory and oxidative stress markers following traumatic brain injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Homsi, Shadi; Federico, Fabiola; Croci, Nicole; Palmier, Bruno; Plotkine, Michel; Marchand-Leroux, Catherine; Jafarian-Tehrani, Mehrnaz

    2009-09-29

    One of the severe complications following traumatic brain injury (TBI) is cerebral edema and its effective treatment is of great interest to prevent further brain damage. This study investigated the effects of minocycline, known for its anti-inflammatory properties, on cerebral edema and its respective inflammatory markers by comparing different dose regimens, on oxidative stress and on neurological dysfunction following TBI. The weight drop model was used to induce TBI in mice. The brain water content was measured to evaluate cerebral edema. Inflammatory markers were detected by ELISA (IL-1beta), zymography and Western blot (MMP-9). The oxidative stress marker (glutathione levels) and neurological function were measured by Griffith technique and string test, respectively. Minocycline was administered i.p. once (5 min), twice (5 min and 3 h) or triple (5 min, 3 h and 9 h) following TBI. The first dose of minocycline only varied (45 or 90 mg/kg), whereas the following doses were all at 45 mg/kg. The single and double administrations of minocycline reduced the increase of inflammatory markers at 6 h post-TBI. Minocycline also reduced cerebral edema at this time point, only after double administration and at the high dose regimen, although with no effect on the TBI-induced oxidized glutathione increase. The anti-edematous effect of minocycline persisted up to 24 h, upon a triple administration, and accompanied by a neurological recovery. In conclusion, we reported an anti-edematous effect of minocycline after TBI in mice according to a specific treatment regimen. These findings emphasize that the beneficial effects of minocycline depend on the treatment regimen following a brain injury.

  17. Inhibition of Myosin light-chain kinase attenuates cerebral edema after traumatic brain injury in postnatal mice.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Janet L; Todd, Tracey; Bazan, Nicolas G; Belayev, Ludmila

    2013-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children less than 8 years of age leads to decline in intelligence and executive functioning. Neurological outcomes after TBI correlate to development of cerebral edema, which affect survival rates after TBI. It has been shown that myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK) increases cerebral edema and that pretreatment with an MLCK inhibitor (ML-7) reduces cerebral edema. The aim of this study was to determine whether inhibition of MLCK after TBI in postnatal day 24 (PND-24) mice would prevent breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and development of cerebral edema and improve neurological outcome. We used a closed head injury model of TBI. ML-7 or saline treatment was administered at 4 h and every 24 h until sacrifice or 5 days after TBI. Mice were sacrificed at 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h and 7 days after impact. Mice treated with ML-7 after TBI had decreased levels of MLCK-expressing cells (20.7±4.8 vs. 149.3±40.6), less albumin extravasation (28.3±11.2 vs. 116.2±60.7 mm(2)) into surrounding parenchymal tissue, less Evans Blue extravasation (339±314 vs. 4017±560 ng/g), and showed a significant difference in wet/dry weight ratio (1.9±0.07 vs. 2.2±0.05 g), compared to saline-treated groups. Treatment with ML-7 also resulted in preserved neurological function measured by the wire hang test (57 vs. 21 sec) and two-object novel recognition test (old vs. new, 10.5 touches). We concluded that inhibition of MLCK reduces cerebral edema and preserves neurological function in PND-24 mice.

  18. Inhibition of HIF prolyl-4-hydroxylases by FG-4497 reduces brain tissue injury and edema formation during ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Reischl, Stefan; Li, Lexiao; Walkinshaw, Gail; Flippin, Lee A; Marti, Hugo H; Kunze, Reiner

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic stroke results in disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), edema formation and neuronal cell loss. Some neuroprotective factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) favor edema formation, while others such as erythropoietin (Epo) can mitigate it. Both factors are controlled by hypoxia inducible transcription factors (HIF) and the activity of prolyl hydroxylase domain proteins (PHD). We hypothesize that activation of the adaptive hypoxic response by inhibition of PHD results in neuroprotection and prevention of vascular leakage. Mice, subjected to cerebral ischemia, were pre- or post-treated with the novel PHD inhibitor FG-4497. Inhibition of PHD activity resulted in HIF-1α stabilization, increased expression of VEGF and Epo, improved outcome from ischemic stroke and reduced edema formation by maintaining BBB integrity. Additional in vitro studies using brain endothelial cells and primary astrocytes confirmed that FG-4497 induces the HIF signaling pathway, leading to increased VEGF and Epo expression. In an in vitro ischemia model, using combined oxygen and glucose deprivation, FG-4497 promoted the survival of neurons. Furthermore, FG-4497 prevented the ischemia-induced rearrangement and gap formation of the tight junction proteins zonula occludens 1 and occludin, both in cultured endothelial cells and in infarcted brain tissue in vivo. These results indicate that FG-4497 has the potential to prevent cerebral ischemic damage by neuroprotection and prevention of vascular leakage.

  19. Effects of Different Doses of Levetiracetam on Aquaporin 4 Expression in Rats with Brain Edema Following Fluid Percussion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hongbo; Li, Wenling; Dong, Changzheng; Ma, Li; Wu, Jiang; Zhao, Wenqing

    2016-01-01

    Background This study was designed to investigate the effects of different doses of levetiracetam on aquaporin 4 (AQP4) expression in rats after fluid percussion injury. Material/Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: sham operation group, traumatic brain injury group, low-dose levetiracetam group, and high-dose levetiracetam group. Brain edema models were established by fluid percussion injury, and intervened by the administration of levetiracetam. Samples from the 4 groups were collected at 2, 6, 12, and 24 h, and at 3 and 7 days after injury. Histological observation was performed using hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunohistochemical staining. AQP4 and AQP4 mRNA expression was detected using Western blot assay and RT-PCR. Brain water content was measured by the dry-wet method. Results Compared with the traumatic brain injury group, brain water content, AQP4 expression, and AQP4 mRNA expression were lower in the levetiracetam groups at each time point and the differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). The intervention effects of high-dose levetiracetam were more apparent. Conclusions Levetiracetam can lessen brain edema from fluid percussion injury by down-regulating AQP4 and AQP4 mRNA expression. There is a dose-effect relationship in the preventive effect of levetiracetam within a certain extent. PMID:26927633

  20. Effects of Different Doses of Levetiracetam on Aquaporin 4 Expression in Rats with Brain Edema Following Fluid Percussion Injury.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hongbo; Li, Wenling; Dong, Changzheng; Ma, Li; Wu, Jiang; Zhao, Wenqing

    2016-02-29

    BACKGROUND This study was designed to investigate the effects of different doses of levetiracetam on aquaporin 4 (AQP4) expression in rats after fluid percussion injury. MATERIAL AND METHODS Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: sham operation group, traumatic brain injury group, low-dose levetiracetam group, and high-dose levetiracetam group. Brain edema models were established by fluid percussion injury, and intervened by the administration of levetiracetam. Samples from the 4 groups were collected at 2, 6, 12, and 24 h, and at 3 and 7 days after injury. Histological observation was performed using hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunohistochemical staining. AQP4 and AQP4 mRNA expression was detected using Western blot assay and RT-PCR. Brain water content was measured by the dry-wet method. RESULTS Compared with the traumatic brain injury group, brain water content, AQP4 expression, and AQP4 mRNA expression were lower in the levetiracetam groups at each time point and the differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). The intervention effects of high-dose levetiracetam were more apparent. CONCLUSIONS Levetiracetam can lessen brain edema from fluid percussion injury by down-regulating AQP4 and AQP4 mRNA expression. There is a dose-effect relationship in the preventive effect of levetiracetam within a certain extent.

  1. Effect of barrier opening on brain edema in human brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Sato, S; Suga, S; Yunoki, K; Mihara, B

    1994-01-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening was carried out in 10 patients with cerebral lesions, and the MRI findings were evaluated following the barrier opening. An intra-arterial injection of 10% glycerol (4 ml/kg, 1 approximately 2 ml/s) was given as a hyperosmotic solution. T2-weighted MRI was undertaken using a TOSHIBA 22A at 30 minutes after BBB opening. Barrier-opening MRI was performed 10 times in 10 patients, including 5 cases of glioblastoma multiforme, 2 cases of astrocytoma, 1 case of malignant lymphoma, 1 case of cerebral contusion and 1 case of neurinoma. The high-intensity area (HIA) was compared with that in MRI without barrier opening. Three types of changes of HIA in MRI were observed after BBB opening as follows. Type 1: Expansion of the HIA was noted in 4 of 5 cases of glioblastoma multiforme, the 1 case of malignant lymphoma and the 1 case of cerebral contusion. Type 2: Almost no change was observed in the 1 case of neuronoma. Type 3: A decrease in HIA was noted in the 2 cases of astrocytoma and in 1 case of glioblastoma multiforme. The MRI following BBB opening evidently showed 3 types of changes according to the degree of BBB disruption. Glioblastoma multiforme or contusion with a severely disrupted BBB revealed an increase in HIA following barrier opening. Benign posterior fossa neurinoma showed no change in HIA after barrier opening. Moderate malignant tumors exhibited a decrease in HIA on barrier-opening MRI. It was concluded that malignant tumors have a severely damaged BBB, which is readily disrupted by osmotic barrier opening.

  2. Effects of propranolol and clonidine on brain edema, blood-brain barrier permeability and endothelial glycocalyx disruption following fluid-percussion brain injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Genét, Gustav Folmer; Bentzer, Peter; Hansen, Morten Bagge; Ostrowski, Sisse Rye; Johansson, Pär Ingemar

    2017-09-20

    Traumatic brain injury causes a disruption of the vascular endothelial glycocalyx layer that is associated with an overactivation of the sympathoadrenal system. We hypothesized that early and unselective beta-blockade with propranolol alone or in combination with the alfa2-agonist clonidine would decrease brain edema, blood-brain-barrier permeability and glycocalyx disruption at 24 hours after trauma. We subjected fifty-three adult male Sprague-Dawley rats to lateral fluid-percussion brain injury and randomized infusion with propranolol (n=16), propranolol+clonidine (n=16), vehicle (n=16) or sham (n=5) for 24 hours. Primary outcome was brain water content at 24 hours. Secondary outcomes were blood-brain barrier permeability and plasma levels of syndecan-1 (glycocalyx disruption), cell damage (histone-complexed DNA fragments), epinephrine, norepinephrine, and animal motor function. We found no difference in brain water content (mean±SD) between propranolol (80.8±0.3%; 95% CI: 80.7-81.0) and vehicle (81.1±0.6%; 95% CI: 80.8-81.4) (p=0.668) or between propranolol/clonidine (80.8±0.3%; 95% CI: 80.7-81.0) and vehicle (p=0.555). We found no effect of propranolol and propranolol/clonidine on blood-brain barrier permeability and animal motor scores. Unexpectedly, propranolol and propranolol/clonidine caused an increase in epinephrine and syndecan-1 levels. This study does not provide any support for unselective beta-blockade with propranolol or the combination of propranolol and the alfa2-agonist clonidine on brain water content. The novel finding of an increase in plasma concentrations of epinephrine and syndecan-1 after propranolol treatment in traumatic brain injury is of unclear significance and should be investigated further.

  3. Application of Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability Imaging in Global Cerebral Edema

    PubMed Central

    Ivanidze, Jana; Kallas, Omar N.; Gupta, Ajay; Weidman, Elizabeth; Baradaran, Hediyeh; Mir, Danial; Giambrone, Ashley; Segal, Alan Z.; Claassen, Jan; Sanelli, Pina C.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Blood brain barrier permeability (BBBP) is not presently routinely evaluated in the clinical setting. Global cerebral edema (GCE) occurs after SAH and is associated with BBB disruption. Detection of GCE is challenging using current imaging techniques. Our purpose was to apply BBBP imaging in patients with GCE using extended pass CT Perfusion (CTP). Methods SAH patients underwent CTP in the early phase after aneurysmal rupture (days 0-3) and were classified as GCE or non-GCE using established non-contrast CT criteria. CTP were post-processed into BBBP quantitative maps of PS (permeability surface area product), K-trans (volume transfer constant from blood plasma to extravascular extracellular space, EES), Kep (washout rate constant of the contrast agent from EES to intravascular space), VE (EES volume per unit of tissue volume), VP (plasmatic volume per unit of tissue volume) and F (plasma flow) using Olea Sphere software. Mean values were compared using t-tests. Results 22 patients were included in the analysis. Kep (1.32 versus 1.52, p < 0.0001), K-trans (0.15 versus 0.19, p < 0.0001), VP (0.51 versus 0.57, p = 0.0007) and F (1176 versus 1329, p = 0.0001) were decreased in GCE compared to non-GCE while VE (0.81 versus 0.39, p < 0.0001) was increased. Conclusion Extended CTP was utilized to evaluate BBBP in SAH patients with and without GCE. Kep is an important indicator of altered BBBP in patients with decreased blood flow, as Kep is flow-independent. Further study of BBBP is needed to improve diagnosis and monitoring of GCE. PMID:27127002

  4. Purinergic 2Y1 receptor stimulation decreases cerebral edema and reactive gliosis in a traumatic brain injury model.

    PubMed

    Talley Watts, Lora; Sprague, Shane; Zheng, Wei; Garling, R Justin; Jimenez, David; Digicaylioglu, Murat; Lechleiter, James

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability in children and young adults. Neuroprotective agents that may promote repair or counteract damage after injury do not currently exist. We recently reported that stimulation of the purinergic receptor subtype P2Y(1)R using 2-methylthioladenosine 5' diphosphate (2MeSADP) significantly reduced cytotoxic edema induced by photothrombosis. Here, we tested whether P2Y(1)R stimulation was neuroprotective after TBI. A controlled closed head injury model was established for mice using a pneumatic impact device. Brains were harvested at 1, 3, or 7 days post-injury and assayed for morphological changes by immunocytochemistry, Western blot analysis, and wet/dry weight. Cerebral edema and expression of both aquaporin type 4 and glial fibrillary acidic protein were increased at all time points examined. Immunocytochemical measurements in both cortical and hippocampal slices also revealed significant neuronal swelling and reactive gliosis. Treatment of mice with 2MeSADP (100 μM) or MRS2365 (100 μM) 30 min after trauma significantly reduced all post-injury symptoms of TBI including edema, neuronal swelling, reactive gliosis, and AQ4 expression. The neuroprotective effect was lost in IP(3)R2-/- mice treated with 2MeSADP. Immunocytochemical labeling of brain slices confirmed that P2Y(1)R expression was defined to cortical and hippocampal astrocytes, but not neurons. Taken together, the data show that stimulation of astrocytic P2Y(1)Rs significantly reduces brain injury after acute trauma and is mediated by the IP(3)-signaling pathway. We suggest that enhancing astrocyte mitochondrial metabolism offers a promising neuroprotective strategy for a broad range of brain injuries.

  5. Roles of changes in active glutamine transport in brain edema development during hepatic encephalopathy: an emerging concept.

    PubMed

    Zielińska, Magdalena; Popek, Mariusz; Albrecht, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Excessive glutamine (Gln) synthesis in ammonia-overloaded astrocytes contributes to astrocytic swelling and brain edema, the major complication of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Much of the newly formed Gln is believed to enter mitochondria, where it is recycled to ammonia, which causes mitochondrial dysfunction (a "Trojan horse" mode of action). A portion of Gln may increase osmotic pressure in astrocytes and the interstitial space, directly and independently contributing to brain tissue swelling. Here we discuss the possibility that altered functioning of Gln transport proteins located in the cellular or mitochondrial membranes, modulates the effects of increased Gln synthesis. Accumulation of excess Gln in mitochondria involves a carrier-mediated transport which is activated by ammonia. Studies on the expression of the cell membrane N-system transporters SN1 (SNAT3) and SN2 (SNAT5), which mediate Gln efflux from astrocytes rendered HE model-dependent effects. HE lowered the expression of SN1 at the RNA and protein level in the cerebral cortex (cc) in the thioacetamide (TAA) model of HE and the effect paralleled induction of cerebral cortical edema. Neither SN1 nor SN2 expression was affected by simple hyperammonemia, which produces no cc edema. TAA-induced HE is also associated with decreased expression of mRNA coding for the system A carriers SAT1 and SAT2, which stimulate Gln influx to neurons. Taken together, changes in the expression of Gln transporters during HE appear to favor retention of Gln in astrocytes and/or the interstitial space of the brain. HE may also affect arginine (Arg)/Gln exchange across the astrocytic cell membrane due to changes in the expression of the hybrid Arg/Gln transporter y(+)LAT2. Gln export from brain across the blood-brain barrier may be stimulated by HE via its increased exchange with peripheral tryptophan.

  6. Activation of P2X7 promotes cerebral edema and neurological injury after traumatic brain injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Kimbler, Donald E; Shields, Jessica; Yanasak, Nathan; Vender, John R; Dhandapani, Krishnan M

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Cerebral edema, the abnormal accumulation of fluid within the brain parenchyma, contributes to elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) and is a common life-threatening neurological complication following TBI. Unfortunately, neurosurgical approaches to alleviate increased ICP remain controversial and medical therapies are lacking due in part to the absence of viable drug targets. In the present study, genetic inhibition (P2X7-/- mice) of the purinergic P2x7 receptor attenuated the expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and reduced cerebral edema following controlled cortical impact, as compared to wild-type mice. Similarly, brilliant blue G (BBG), a clinically non-toxic P2X7 inhibitor, inhibited IL-1β expression, limited edemic development, and improved neurobehavioral outcomes after TBI. The beneficial effects of BBG followed either prophylactic administration via the drinking water for one week prior to injury or via an intravenous bolus administration up to four hours after TBI, suggesting a clinically-implementable therapeutic window. Notably, P2X7 localized within astrocytic end feet and administration of BBG decreased the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a reactive astrocyte marker, and attenuated the expression of aquaporin-4 (AQP4), an astrocytic water channel that promotes cellular edema. Together, these data implicate P2X7 as a novel therapeutic target to prevent secondary neurological injury after TBI, a finding that warrants further investigation.

  7. Effect of Polyphenols on Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Neuronal Death and Brain Edema in Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Panickar, Kiran S.; Anderson, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    Polyphenols are natural substances with variable phenolic structures and are elevated in vegetables, fruits, grains, bark, roots, tea, and wine. There are over 8000 polyphenolic structures identified in plants, but edible plants contain only several hundred polyphenolic structures. In addition to their well-known antioxidant effects, select polyphenols also have insulin-potentiating, anti-inflammatory, anti-carcinogenic, anti-viral, anti-ulcer, and anti-apoptotic properties. One important consequence of ischemia is neuronal death and oxidative stress plays a key role in neuronal viability. In addition, neuronal death may be initiated by the activation of mitochondria-associated cell death pathways. Another consequence of ischemia that is possibly mediated by oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction is glial swelling, a component of cytotoxic brain edema. The purpose of this article is to review the current literature on the contribution of oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction to neuronal death, cell swelling, and brain edema in ischemia. A review of currently known mechanisms underlying neuronal death and edema/cell swelling will be undertaken and the potential of dietary polyphenols to reduce such neural damage will be critically reviewed. PMID:22174658

  8. Effect of siRNA‑induced inhibition of IL‑6 expression in rat cerebral gliocytes on cerebral edema following traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Yu, Dong-Ming; Liu, Fu-Sheng

    2014-10-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of RNA interference (RNAi) on the inhibition of interleukin (IL)‑6 expression in rat cerebral gliocytes in vitro and rat cerebral traumatic tissues in vivo, as well as the effect of RNAi on cerebral edema. pSUPER vectors containing IL‑6 small hairpin RNA (pSUPER‑IL‑6 1‑5) were designed, constructed and transfected into C6 rat glioma cells using cationic liposomes. ELISA was used to select the plasmid with the strongest interference effect. A freefall method was used to generate a rat brain injury model and rats were randomly divided into treatment, empty plasmid and control groups (n=14/group). IL‑6 levels, water content and sodium content were determined in the brain tissues at 24 and 72 h post‑injury. pSUPER‑IL‑6 was effectively transfected into C6 cells and was found to inhibit the expression of IL‑6 rather than IL‑8. The pSUPER‑IL‑6 1 vector was most effective in inducing RNAi. In vivo, IL‑6 levels were observed to be lowest in the interference group and there were statistically significant differences in water and sodium content among the experimental groups (P<0.05). RNAi was found to inhibit IL‑6 expression in vivo and in vitro in rat cerebral gliocytes, and the reduction of the IL‑6 levels was found to reduce post‑traumatic cerebral edema.

  9. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy ameliorates local brain metabolism, brain edema and inflammatory response in a blast-induced traumatic brain injury model in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongming; Yang, Yanyan; Tang, Hong; Sun, Wenjiang; Xiong, Xiaoxing; Smerin, Daniel; Liu, Jiachuan

    2014-05-01

    Many studies suggest that hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) can provide some clinically curative effects on blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI). The specific mechanism by which this occurs still remains unknown, and no standardized time or course of hyperbaric oxygen treatment is currently used. In this study, bTBI was produced by paper detonators equivalent to 600 mg of TNT exploding at 6.5 cm vertical to the rabbit's head. HBO (100% O2 at 2.0 absolute atmospheres) was used once, 12 h after injury. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy was performed to investigate the impact of HBOT on the metabolism of local injured nerves in brain tissue. We also examined blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity, brain water content, apoptotic factors, and some inflammatory mediators. Our results demonstrate that hyperbaric oxygen could confer neuroprotection and improve prognosis after explosive injury by promoting the metabolism of local neurons, inhibiting brain edema, protecting BBB integrity, decreasing cell apoptosis, and inhibiting the inflammatory response. Furthermore, timely intervention within 1 week after injury might be more conducive to improving the prognosis of patients with bTBI.

  10. Intracranial and systemic effects of osmotic and oncotic therapy in experimental cerebral edema.

    PubMed

    Albright, A L; Latchaw, R E; Robinson, A G

    1984-03-01

    Experiments were carried out to compare the effectiveness of oncotic and osmotic therapy in dogs with experimental cerebral edema caused by a left parietal cold lesion. Animals were divided into five groups and treated for 6 hours with either crystalloid (control group), or mannitol, albumin, furosemide, or albumin/furosemide (treatment groups). The cerebral effects of therapy were evaluated by intracranial pressure (ICP) measurements and by postmortem evaluations of water content, using computerized tomography (CT) density measurements and wet-dry weight measurements. The ICP was significantly reduced by all treatments except albumin alone, and was reduced equally by mannitol, furosemide, and albumin/furosemide. The CT density of the lesion area was significantly increased by all treatments. The density of the contralateral nonlesioned hemisphere was significantly increased by all treatments except albumin. The water content of the lesion area was significantly decreased by all treatments; water content of the opposite hemisphere was not significantly reduced. The systemic effects of therapy were evaluated by measuring net fluid balance, wedge pressures, hematocrits, free water clearance, and vasopressin. Negative fluid balance without an increase in hematocrit or in vasopressin secretion occurred only in dogs treated with albumin/furosemide. Such oncodiuretic therapy seems to cause normovolemic dehydration and to have cerebral effects similar to mannitol and furosemide, without their undesirable systemic effects.

  11. Interferon-Stimulated Gene 15 Upregulation Precedes the Development of Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption and Cerebral Edema after Traumatic Brain Injury in Young Mice.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Janet L; Todd, Tracey; Daniels, Zachary; Bazan, Nicolas G; Belayev, Ludmila

    2015-07-15

    Recent studies show that myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) plays a pivotal role in development of cerebral edema, a known complication following traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children and a contributing factor to worsened neurologic recovery. Interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) is upregulated after cerebral ischemia and is neuroprotective. The significant role of ISG15 after TBI has not been studied. Postnatal Day (PND) 21 and PND24 mice were subjected to lateral closed-skull injury with impact depth of 2.0 or 2.25 mm. Behavior was examined at 7 d using two-object novel recognition and Wire Hang tests. Mice were sacrificed at 6 h, 12 h, 24 h, 48 h, 72 h, and 7 d. ISG15 and MLCK were analyzed by Western blot and immunohistochemistry, blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption with Evans Blue (EB), and cerebral edema with wet/dry weights. EB extravasation and edema peaked at 72 h in both ages. PND21 mice had more severe neurological deficits, compared with PND24 mice. PND24 mice showed peak ISG15 expression at 6 h, and PND21 mice at 72 h. MLCK peaked in both age groups at 12 h and co-localized with ISG15 on immunohistochemistry and co-immunoprecipitation. These studies provide evidence, ISG15 is elevated following TBI in mice, preceding MLCK elevation, development of BBB disruption, and cerebral edema.

  12. Cannabinoid type 2 receptor stimulation attenuates brain edema by reducing cerebral leukocyte infiltration following subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Mutsumi; Sherchan, Prativa; Krafft, Paul R; Rolland, William B; Soejima, Yoshiteru; Zhang, John H

    2014-07-15

    Early brain injury (EBI), following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), comprises blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption and consequent edema formation. Peripheral leukocytes can infiltrate the injured brain, thereby aggravating BBB leakage and neuroinflammation. Thus, anti-inflammatory pharmacotherapies may ameliorate EBI and provide neuroprotection after SAH. Cannabinoid type 2 receptor (CB2R) agonism has been shown to reduce neuroinflammation; however, the precise protective mechanisms remain to be elucidated. This study aimed to evaluate whether the selective CB2R agonist, JWH133 can ameliorate EBI by reducing brain-infiltrated leukocytes after SAH. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to the following groups: sham-operated, SAH with vehicle, SAH with JWH133 (1.0mg/kg), or SAH with a co-administration of JWH133 and selective CB2R antagonist SR144528 (3.0mg/kg). SAH was induced by endovascular perforation, and JWH133 was administered 1h after surgery. Neurological deficits, brain water content, Evans blue dye extravasation, and Western blot assays were evaluated at 24h after surgery. JWH133 improved neurological scores and reduced brain water content; however, SR144528 reversed these treatment effects. JWH133 reduced Evans blue dye extravasation after SAH. Furthermore, JWH133 treatment significantly increased TGF-β1 expression and prevented an SAH-induced increase in E-selectin and myeloperoxidase. Lastly, SAH resulted in a decreased expression of the tight junction protein zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1); however, JWH133 treatment increased the ZO-1 expression. We suggest that CB2R stimulation attenuates neurological outcome and brain edema, by suppressing leukocyte infiltration into the brain through TGF-β1 up-regulation and E-selectin reduction, resulting in protection of the BBB after SAH.

  13. Activation of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ in brain inhibits inflammatory pain, dorsal horn expression of Fos, and local edema

    PubMed Central

    Morgenweck, J.; Abdel-aleem, O.S.; McNamara, K.C.; Donahue, R.R.; Badr, M.Z.; Taylor, B.K.

    2009-01-01

    Systemic administration of thiazolidinediones reduces peripheral inflammation in vivo, presumably by acting at peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) in peripheral tissues. Based on a rapidly growing body of literature indicating the CNS as a functional target of PPARγ actions, we postulated that brain PPARγ modulates peripheral edema and the processing of inflammatory pain signals in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. To test this in the plantar carrageenan model of inflammatory pain, we measured paw edema, heat hyperalgesia, and dorsal horn expression of the immediate-early gene c-fos after intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of PPARγ ligands or vehicle. We found that ICV rosiglitazone (0.5–50 µg) or 15d-PGJ2 (50–200 µg), but not vehicle, dose-dependently reduced paw thickness, paw volume and behavioral withdrawal responses to noxious heat. These anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperalgesia effects result from direct actions in the brain and not diffusion to other sites, because intraperitoneal and intrathecal administration of rosiglitazone (50 µg) and 15d-PGJ2 (200 µg) had no effect. PPARγ agonists changed neither overt behavior nor motor coordination, indicating that non-specific behavioral effects do not contribute to PPAR ligand-induced anti-hyperalgesia. ICV administration of structurally dissimilar PPARγ antagonists (either GW9662 or BADGE) reversed the anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperalgesic actions of both rosiglitazone and 15d-PGJ2. To evaluate the effects of PPARγ agonists on a classic marker of noxious stimulus-evoked gene expression, we quantified Fos protein expression in the dorsal horn. The number of carrageenan-induced Fos-like immunoreactive profiles was less in rosiglitazone-treated rats as compared to vehicle controls. We conclude that pharmacological activation of PPARγ in the brain rapidly inhibits local edema and the spinal transmission of noxious inflammatory signals. PMID:19891980

  14. Quantitative analysis of brain edema and swelling on early postmortem computed tomography: comparison with antemortem computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Naoya; Satou, Chihiro; Higuchi, Takeshi; Shiotani, Motoi; Maeda, Haruo; Hirose, Yasuo

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was quantitatively to analyze brain edema and swelling due to early postmortem changes using computed tomography (CT) scans of the head. Review board approval was obtained, and informed consent was waived. A total of 41 patients who underwent head CT before and shortly after death were enrolled. Hounsfield units (HUs) of gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) were measured at the levels of the basal ganglia, centrum semiovale, and high convexity area on both antemortem and postmortem CT. The length of the minor axis of the third ventricle at the level of the basal ganglia and the width of the central sulcus at the level of high convexity were measured. At each level tested, the HUs of GM and the GM/WM ratios on postmortem CT were significantly lower than those on antemortem CT (P < 0.001). HUs of WM on postmortem CT were slightly higher than those on antemortem CT but without significant difference (P > 0.1). Postmortem CT showed subtle loss of distinction between GM and WM. The size of the third ventricle and the width of the central sulcus did not vary before and after death (P > 0.1). Early postmortem CT shows mild brain edema but does not show brain swelling.

  15. Intralipid Vehicle Does Not Interfere with the Efficacy of Progesterone in Attenuating Edema following Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Wali, Bushra; Stein, Donald G; Sayeed, Iqbal

    2017-02-27

    The recent disappointing results of phase III trials for progesterone (PROG) in traumatic brain injury (TBI) have triggered speculation about reasons for the negative outcomes. One confounding factor may have been the vehicle used to administer PROG. Virtually all of the many pre-clinical experiments informing the clinical trials and reporting beneficial PROG effects used more soluble 2-hydroxypropyl-b-cyclodextrin as a vehicle given intraperitoneally or subcutaneously rather than a lipid formulation given intravenously (IV). The present investigation compared the effect of PROG infusion with that of lipid emulsion (Intralipid(®)) as a carrier/vehicle on edema following TBI in rats. Eight-mg/kg doses of PROG with 20% Intralipid were given IV via central venous catheter beginning 1 h post-injury over a 1 h duration (1.2 mL/h). Animals were killed and brains removed at 24 h post-injury. All the brain-injured groups showed more edema compared with the control group. However, PROG+Intralipid significantly attenuated cerebral swelling compared with Intralipid alone. No difference was observed between the TBI-alone and Intralipid groups. Although this study used much a smaller volume and shorter duration of Intralipid infusion than the clinical trials (up to 5 days of continuous infusion), our results suggest that the use of Intralipid in rats did not prevent or mask the beneficial effect of PROG.

  16. Astaxanthin alleviates cerebral edema by modulating NKCC1 and AQP4 expression after traumatic brain injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingkun; Cui, Zhenwen; Cui, Hua; Cao, Yang; Zhong, Chunlong; Wang, Yong

    2016-08-31

    Astaxanthin is a carotenoid pigment that possesses potent antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, antitumor, and immunomodulatory activities. Previous studies have demonstrated that astaxanthin displays potential neuroprotective properties for the treatment of central nervous system diseases, such as ischemic brain injury and subarachnoid hemorrhage. This study explored whether astaxanthin is neuroprotective and ameliorates neurological deficits following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Our results showed that, following CCI, treatment with astaxanthin compared to vehicle ameliorated neurologic dysfunctions after day 3 and alleviated cerebral edema and Evans blue extravasation at 24 h (p < 0.05). Astaxanthin treatment decreased AQP4 and NKCC1 mRNA levels in a dose-dependent manner at 24 h. AQP4 and NKCC1 protein expressions in the peri-contusional cortex were significantly reduced by astaxanthin at 24 h (p < 0.05). Furthermore, we also found that bumetanide (BU), an inhibitor of NKCC1, inhibited trauma-induced AQP4 upregulation (p < 0.05). Our data suggest that astaxanthin reduces TBI-related injury in brain tissue by ameliorating AQP4/NKCC1-mediated cerebral edema and that NKCC1 contributes to the upregulation of AQP4 after TBI.

  17. Modeling the Presence of Myelin and Edema in the Brain Based on Multi-Parametric Quantitative MRI.

    PubMed

    Warntjes, Marcel; Engström, Maria; Tisell, Anders; Lundberg, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present a model that uses multi-parametric quantitative MRI to estimate the presence of myelin and edema in the brain. The model relates simultaneous measurement of R1 and R2 relaxation rates and proton density to four partial volume compartments, consisting of myelin partial volume, cellular partial volume, free water partial volume, and excess parenchymal water partial volume. The model parameters were obtained using spatially normalized brain images of a group of 20 healthy controls. The pathological brain was modeled in terms of the reduction of myelin content and presence of excess parenchymal water, which indicates the degree of edema. The method was tested on spatially normalized brain images of a group of 20 age-matched multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Clear differences were observed with respect to the healthy controls: the MS group had a 79 mL smaller brain volume (1069 vs. 1148 mL), a 38 mL smaller myelin volume (119 vs. 157 mL), and a 21 mL larger excess parenchymal water volume (78 vs. 57 mL). Template regions of interest of various brain structures indicated that the myelin partial volume in the MS group was 1.6 ± 1.5% lower for gray matter (GM) structures and 2.8 ± 1.0% lower for white matter (WM) structures. The excess parenchymal water partial volume was 9 ± 10% larger for GM and 5 ± 2% larger for WM. Manually placed ROIs indicated that the results using the template ROIs may have suffered from loss of anatomical detail due to the spatial normalization process. Examples of the application of the method on high-resolution images are provided for three individual subjects: a 45-year-old healthy subject, a 72-year-old healthy subject, and a 45-year-old MS patient. The observed results agreed with the expected behavior considering both age and disease. In conclusion, the proposed model may provide clinically important parameters, such as the total brain volume, degree of myelination, and

  18. The roles of MMP-9/TIMP-1 in cerebral edema following experimental acute cerebral infarction in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan-Dong; Song, Jin-Ning; Huang, Huan; Guo, Xiao-Ye; An, Ji-Yang; Zhang, Ming; Li, Yu; Sun, Peng; Pang, Hong-Gang; Zhao, Yong-Lin; Wang, Jun-Feng

    2013-08-29

    Matrix metalloproteinases 9 (MMP-9) and its endogenous inhibitor, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1 (TIMP-1), regulate homeostasis and turnover of the extra cellular matrix (ECM). They play important roles in acute cerebral infarction (ACI). The contributions of MMP-9 and TIMP-1 to the early stages of ACI are not completely understood. This study investigates the time course of MMP-9 and TIMP-1 and their relations to edema after ACI in rats. Serum concentrations of MMP-9 and TIMP-1 protein were measured using ELISA and mRNA level were measured using real-time PCR. Brain samples were harvested and the brain water content (BWC) was measured. Results revealed that MMP-9 concentration increased fast during the first 12 h after ACI, while after 12 h the increase was much slower. The MMP-9 protein concentration was elevated earlier than the mRNA level. BWC increased starting at 6 h after ACI to reach a peak at 12 h and decreased back to normal levels at 72 h. Both the MMP-9 protein and its mRNA were positively correlated with BWC, however no correlation was found between TIMP-1 levels and BWC. The MMP-9/TIMP-1 protein ratio was more closely correlated with BWC than the MMP-9 concentration. These results indicate that brain edema induced by ACI is associated with increased MMP-9 levels and MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio in serum. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Inhaled nitric oxide for the brain dead donor with neurogenic pulmonary edema during anesthesia for organ donation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun Sun; Lee, A-Ran; Lee, Sang Hyun; Kim, An Suk; Park, Soon Eun; Cho, Young Woo

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) in brain dead organ donors occurring after an acute central nervous system insult threatens organ preservation of potential organ donors and the outcome of organ donation. Hence the active and immediate management of NPE is critical. In this case, a 50-year-old male was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) for organ donation. He was hypoxic due to NPE induced by spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage and intraventricular hemorrhage. Protective ventilatory management, intermittent recruitment maneuvers, and supportive treatment were maintained in the ICU and the operating room (OR). Despite this management, the hypoxemia worsened after the OR admission. So inhaled nitric oxide (NO) therapy was performed during the operation, and the hypoxic phenomena showed remarkable improvement. The organ retrieval was successfully completed. Therefore, NO inhalation can be helpful in the improvement of hypoxemia caused by NPE in brain dead organ donors during anesthesia for the organ donation. PMID:25237451

  20. Effect of acute poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibition by 3-AB on blood-brain barrier permeability and edema formation after focal traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Lescot, Thomas; Fulla-Oller, Laurence; Palmier, Bruno; Po, Christelle; Beziaud, Tiphaine; Puybasset, Louis; Plotkine, Michel; Gillet, Brigitte; Meric, Philippe; Marchand-Leroux, Catherine

    2010-06-01

    Recent evidence supports a crucial role for matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption and vasogenic edema formation after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Although the exact causes of MMP-9 upregulation after TBI are not fully understood, several arguments suggest a contribution of the enzyme poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP) in the neuroinflammatory response leading to MMP-9 activation. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of PARP inhibition by 3-aminobenzamide (3-AB) (1) on MMP-9 upregulation and BBB integrity, (2) on edema formation as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), (3) on neuron survival as assessed by (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS), and (4) on neurological deficits at the acute phase of TBI. Western blots and zymograms showed blunting of MMP-9 upregulation 6 h after TBI. BBB permeability was decreased at the same time point in 3-AB-treated rats compared to vehicle-treated rats. Cerebral MRI showed less "free" water in 3-AB-treated than in vehicle-treated rats 6 h after TBI. MRI findings 24 h after TBI indicated predominant cytotoxic edema, and at this time point no significant differences were found between 3-AB- and vehicle-treated rats with regard to MMP-9 upregulation, BBB permeability, or MRI changes. At both 6 and 24 h, neurological function was better in the 3-AB-treated than in the vehicle-treated rats. These data suggest that PARP inhibition by 3-AB protected the BBB against hyperpermeability induced by MMP-9 upregulation, thereby decreasing vasogenic edema formation 6 h after TBI. Furthermore, our data confirm the neuroprotective effect of 3-AB at the very acute phase of TBI.

  1. Effect of estrogen and/or progesterone administration on traumatic brain injury-caused brain edema: the changes of aquaporin-4 and interleukin-6.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Zahra; Khaksari, Mohammad; Shahrokhi, Nader; Mohammadi, Gholamabbas; Mofid, Behshad; Vaziri, Ali; Amiresmaili, Sedigheh

    2016-03-01

    The role of aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the development of brain edema post-traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been indicated. The present study was designed to investigate the effect(s) of administration of progesterone (P) and/or estrogen (E) on brain water content, AQP4 expression, and IL-6 levels post-TBI. The ovariectomized rats were divided into 11 groups: sham, one vehicle, two vehicles, E1, E2, P1, P2, E1 + P1, E1 + P2, E2 + P1, and E2 + P2. The brain AQP4 expression, IL-6 levels, and water content were evaluated 24 h after TBI induced by Marmarou's method. The low (E1 and P1) and high (E2 and P2) doses of estrogen and progesterone were administered 30 min post-TBI. The results showed that brain water content and AQP4 expression decreased in the E1, E2, P1, and P2-treated groups. The administration of E1 decreased IL-6 levels. Addition of progesterone decreased the inhibitory effect of E1 and E2 on the accumulation of water in the brain. Administration of E1 + P1 and E1 + P2 decreased the inhibitory effect of E1 on the IL-6 levels and AQP4 protein expression. Our findings suggest that estrogen or progesterone by itself has more effective roles in decrease of brain edema than combination of both. Possible mechanism may be mediated by the alteration of AQP4 and IL-6 expression. However, further studies are required to verify the exact mechanism.

  2. Intravenous HOE-642 reduces brain edema and Na uptake in the rat permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion model of stroke: evidence for participation of the blood-brain barrier Na/H exchanger.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Martha E; Chen, Yi-Je; Lam, Tina I; Taylor, Kelleen C; Walton, Jeffrey H; Anderson, Steven E

    2013-02-01

    Cerebral edema forms in the early hours of ischemic stroke by processes involving increased transport of Na and Cl from blood into brain across an intact blood-brain barrier (BBB). Our previous studies provided evidence that the BBB Na-K-Cl cotransporter is stimulated by the ischemic factors hypoxia, aglycemia, and arginine vasopressin (AVP), and that inhibition of the cotransporter by intravenous bumetanide greatly reduces edema and infarct in rats subjected to permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO). More recently, we showed that BBB Na/H exchanger activity is also stimulated by hypoxia, aglycemia, and AVP. The present study was conducted to further investigate the possibility that a BBB Na/H exchanger also participates in edema formation during ischemic stroke. Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to pMCAO and then brain edema and Na content assessed by magnetic resonance imaging diffusion-weighed imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy Na spectroscopy, respectively, for up to 210 minutes. We found that intravenous administration of the specific Na/H exchange inhibitor HOE-642 significantly decreased brain Na uptake and reduced cerebral edema, brain swelling, and infarct volume. These findings support the hypothesis that edema formation and brain Na uptake during the early hours of cerebral ischemia involve BBB Na/H exchanger activity as well as Na-K-Cl cotransporter activity.

  3. Delayed cytokine expression in rat brain following experimental contusion.

    PubMed

    Holmin, S; Schalling, M; Höjeberg, B; Nordqvist, A C; Skeftruna, A K; Mathiesen, T

    1997-03-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines mediate brain injury in experimental studies. This study was undertaken to analyze the production of proinflammatory cytokines in experimental contusion. A brain contusion causing delayed edema was mimicked experimentally in rats using a weight-drop model. Intracerebral expression of the cytokines interleukin (IL)-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha), IL-6, and interferon-gamma (IFN gamma) was studied by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. The animals were killed at 6 hours or 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, or 16 days postinjury. In the injured area, no messenger (m)RNA expression was seen during the first 2 days after the trauma. On Days 4 to 6 posttrauma, however, strong IL-1 beta, TNF alpha, and IL-6 mRNA expression was detected in mononuclear cells surrounding the contusion. Expression of IFN gamma was not detected. Immunohistochemical double labeling confirmed the in situ hybridization results and demonstrated that mononuclear phagocytes and astrocytes produced IL-1 beta and that mainly astrocytes produced TNF alpha. The findings showed, somewhat unexpectedly, a late peak of intracerebral cytokine production in the injured area and in the contralateral corpus callosum, allowing for both local and global effects on the brain. An unexpected difference in the cellular sources of TNF alpha and IL-1 beta was detected. The cytokine pattern differs from that seen in other central nervous system inflammatory diseases and trauma models, suggesting that the intracerebral immune response is not a uniform event. The dominance of late cytokine production indicates that many cytokine effects are late events in an experimental contusion: Different pathogenic mechanisms may thus be operative at different times after brain injury.

  4. High mobility group box protein-1 promotes cerebral edema after traumatic brain injury via activation of toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Laird, Melissa D; Shields, Jessica S; Sukumari-Ramesh, Sangeetha; Kimbler, Donald E; Fessler, R David; Shakir, Basheer; Youssef, Patrick; Yanasak, Nathan; Vender, John R; Dhandapani, Krishnan M

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Cerebral edema, a life-threatening medical complication, contributes to elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) and a poor clinical prognosis after TBI. Unfortunately, treatment options to reduce post-traumatic edema remain suboptimal, due in part, to a dearth of viable therapeutic targets. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that cerebral innate immune responses contribute to edema development after TBI. Our results demonstrate that high-mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1) was released from necrotic neurons via a NR2B-mediated mechanism. HMGB1 was clinically associated with elevated ICP in patients and functionally promoted cerebral edema after TBI in mice. The detrimental effects of HMGB1 were mediated, at least in part, via activation of microglial toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and the subsequent expression of the astrocytic water channel, aquaporin-4 (AQP4). Genetic or pharmacological (VGX-1027) TLR4 inhibition attenuated the neuroinflammatory response and limited post-traumatic edema with a delayed, clinically implementable therapeutic window. Human and rodent tissue culture studies further defined the cellular mechanisms demonstrating neuronal HMGB1 initiates the microglial release of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in a TLR4 dependent mechanism. In turn, microglial IL-6 increased the astrocytic expression of AQP4. Taken together, these data implicate microglia as key mediators of post-traumatic brain edema and suggest HMGB1-TLR4 signaling promotes neurovascular dysfunction after TBI.

  5. Local transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TENS) effects in experimental inflammatory edema and pain.

    PubMed

    Resende, Marcos A; Sabino, George G; Cândido, Claudia R M; Pereira, Leani S M; Francischi, Janetti N

    2004-11-19

    Few studies in the literature associated transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TENS) use with an antiinflammatory activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of low (10 Hz)- and high (130 Hz)-frequency TENS on hyperalgesia and edema that occur after injection of carrageenan in rat paw. After induction of inflammation, either low- or high-frequency TENS was applied in the rat paw for 20 min, and the effect of TENS treatment on escape or paw withdrawal and edema was measured. Both low- and high-frequency TENS inhibited by 100% the hyperalgesia but not the edema response. However, low-frequency TENS presented longer lasting effect as compared with high-frequency TENS. Naltrexone-treated animals showed a complete reversion of the analgesic effect induced by low- but not high-frequency TENS. Thus, our data demonstrated absence of an antiinflammatory effect associated to TENS use and confirmed the participation of endogenous opioids on low TENS-induced analgesia.

  6. Higher impact energy in traumatic brain injury interferes with noncovalent and covalent bonds resulting in cytotoxic brain tissue edema as measured with computational simulation.

    PubMed

    von Holst, Hans; Li, Xiaogai

    2015-04-01

    Cytotoxic brain tissue edema is a complicated secondary consequence of ischemic injury following cerebral diseases such as traumatic brain injury and stroke. To some extent the pathophysiological mechanisms are known, but far from completely. In this study, a hypothesis is proposed in which protein unfolding and perturbation of nucleotide structures participate in the development of cytotoxic edema following traumatic brain injury (TBI). An advanced computational simulation model of the human head was used to simulate TBI. The consequences of kinetic energy transfer following an external dynamic impact were analyzed including the intracranial pressure (ICP), strain level, and their potential influences on the noncovalent and covalent bonds in folded protein structures. The result shows that although most of the transferred kinetic energy is absorbed in the skin and three bone layers, there is a substantial amount of energy reaching the gray and white matter. The kinetic energy from an external dynamic impact has the theoretical potential to interfere not only with noncovalent but also covalent bonds when high enough. The induced mechanical strain and pressure may further interfere with the proteins, which accumulate water molecules into the interior of the hydrophobic structures of unfolded proteins. Simultaneously, the noncovalent energy-rich bonds in nucleotide adenosine-triphosphates may be perturbed as well. Based on the analysis of the numerical simulation data, the kinetic energy from an external dynamic impact has the theoretical potential to interfere not only with noncovalent, but also with covalent bonds when high enough. The subsequent attraction of increased water molecules into the unfolded protein structures and disruption of adenosine-triphosphate bonds could to some extent explain the etiology to cytotoxic edema.

  7. A Randomized Trial of the Effects of Nebulized Albuterol on Pulmonary Edema in Brain Dead Organ Donors

    PubMed Central

    Ware, Lorraine B.; Landeck, Megan; Koyama, Tatsuki; Zhao, Zhiguo; Singer, Jonathan; Kern, Ryan; Neidlinger, Nikole; Nguyen, John; Johnson, Elizabeth; Janz, David R.; Bernard, Gordon R.; Lee, Jae W.; Matthay, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Donor lung utilization rates are persistently low primarily due to donor lung dysfunction. We hypothesized that a treatment that enhances the resolution of pulmonary edema by stimulating the rate of alveolar fluid clearance would improve donor oxygenation and increase donor lung utilization. We conducted a randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled trial of aerosolized albuterol (5 mg q4h) versus saline placebo during active donor management in 506 organ donors. The primary outcome was change in oxygenation (PaO2/FiO2) from enrollment to organ procurement. The albuterol (n=260) and placebo (n=246) groups were well matched for age, gender, ethnicity, smoking, and cause of brain death. The change in PaO2/FiO2 from enrollment to organ procurement did not differ between treatment groups (p=0.54) nor did donor lung utilization (albuterol 29% vs. placebo 32%, p=0.44). Donors in the albuterol vs. placebo group were more likely to have the study drug dose reduced (13% vs. 1%, p<0.001) or stopped (8% vs. 0%, p<0.001) for tachycardia. In summary, treatment with high dose inhaled albuterol during the donor management period did not improve donor oxygenation or increase donor lung utilization but did cause tachycardia. High dose aerosolized albuterol should not be used in donors to enhance the resolution of pulmonary edema. PMID:24730050

  8. Estradiol reduces activity of the blood-brain barrier Na-K-Cl cotransporter and decreases edema formation in permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Martha E; Lam, Tina I; Tran, Lien Q; Foroutan, Shahin; Anderson, Steven E

    2006-10-01

    Estrogen has been shown to protect against stroke-induced brain damage, yet the mechanism is unknown. During the early hours of stroke, cerebral edema forms as increased transport of Na and Cl from blood into brain occurs across an intact blood-brain barrier (BBB). We showed previously that a luminal BBB Na-K-Cl cotransporter is stimulated by hypoxia and arginine vasopressin (AVP), factors present during cerebral ischemia, and that inhibition of the cotransporter by intravenous bumetanide greatly reduces edema in rats subjected to permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). The present study was conducted to determine whether estrogen protects in stroke at least in part by reducing activity of the BBB cotransporter, thereby decreasing edema formation. Ovariectomized rats were subjected to 210 mins of permanent MCAO after 7-day or 30-min pretreatment with 17beta-estradiol and then brain swelling and 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining were assessed as measures of brain edema and lesion volume, respectively. Diffusion-weighed imaging was used to monitor permanent MCAO-induced decreases in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values, an index of changes in brain water distribution and mobility. Na-K-Cl cotransporter activity of cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (CMECs) was assessed as bumetanide-sensitive K influx and cotransporter abundance by Western blot analysis after estradiol treatment. Estradiol significantly decreased brain swelling and lesion volume and attenuated the decrease in ADC values during permanent MCAO. Estradiol also abolished CMEC cotransporter stimulation by chemical hypoxia or AVP and decreased cotransporter abundance. These findings support the hypothesis that estrogen attenuates stimulation of BBB Na-K-Cl cotransporter activity, reducing edema formation during stroke.

  9. β-Dystroglycan cleavage by matrix metalloproteinase-2/-9 disturbs aquaporin-4 polarization and influences brain edema in acute cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Yan, W; Zhao, X; Chen, H; Zhong, D; Jin, J; Qin, Q; Zhang, H; Ma, S; Li, G

    2016-06-21

    Dystroglycan (DG) is widely expressed in various tissues, and throughout the cerebral microvasculature. It consists of two subunits, α-DG and β-DG, and the cleavage of the latter by matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 underlies a number of physiological and pathological processes. However, the involvement of MMP-2/-9-mediated β-DG cleavage in cerebral ischemia remains uncertain. In astrocytes, DG is crucial for maintaining the polarization of aquaporin-4 (AQP4), which plays a role in the regulation of cytotoxic and vasogenic edema. The present study aimed to explore the effects of MMP-2/-9-mediated β-DG cleavage on AQP4 polarization and brain edema in acute cerebral ischemia. A model of cerebral ischemia was established via permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) in male C57BL/6 mice. Western blotting, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), immunohistochemical staining, immunofluorescent staining, electron microscopy, and light microscopy were used. Captopril was applied as a selective MMP-2/-9 inhibitor. Recombinant mouse MMP (rmMMP)-2 and -9 were used in an in vitro cleavage experiment. The present study demonstrated evidence of β-DG cleavage by MMP-2/-9 in pMCAO mouse brains; this cleavage was implicated in AQP4 redistribution and brain edema in cerebral ischemia. In addition, captopril exacerbated cytotoxic edema and ameliorated vasogenic edema at 24h after pMCAO, and alleviated brain edema and neurological deficit at 48h and 72h. In conclusion, this study provides novel insight into the effects of MMP-2/-9-mediated β-DG cleavage in acute cerebral ischemia. Such findings might facilitate the development of a therapeutic strategy for the optimization of MMP-2/-9 targeted treatment in cerebral ischemia. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Minocycline Attenuates Neonatal Germinal-Matrix-Hemorrhage-Induced Neuroinflammation and Brain Edema by Activating Cannabinoid Receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jun; Chen, Qianwei; Guo, Jing; Yang, Liming; Tao, Yihao; Li, Lin; Miao, Hongping; Feng, Hua; Chen, Zhi; Zhu, Gang

    2016-04-01

    Germinal matrix hemorrhage (GMH) is the most common neurological disease of premature newborns leading to detrimental neurological sequelae. Minocycline has been reported to play a key role in neurological inflammatory diseases by controlling some mechanisms that involve cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2R). The current study investigated whether minocycline reduces neuroinflammation and protects the brain from injury in a rat model of collagenase-induced GMH by regulating CB2R activity. To test this hypothesis, the effects of minocycline and a CB2R antagonist (AM630) were evaluated in male rat pups that were post-natal day 7 (P7) after GMH. We found that minocycline can lead to increased CB2R mRNA expression and protein expression in microglia. Minocycline significantly reduced GMH-induced brain edema, microglial activation, and lateral ventricular volume. Additionally, minocycline enhanced cortical thickness after injury. All of these neuroprotective effects of minocycline were prevented by AM630. A cannabinoid CB2 agonist (JWH133) was used to strengthen the hypothesis, which showed the identical neuroprotective effects of minocycline. Our study demonstrates, for the first time, that minocycline attenuates neuroinflammation and brain injury in a rat model of GMH, and activation of CBR2 was partially involved in these processes.

  11. Cannabinoid CB2 receptor stimulation attenuates brain edema and neurological deficits in a germinal matrix hemorrhage rat model.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yihao; Tang, Jun; Chen, Qianwei; Guo, Jing; Li, Lin; Yang, Liming; Feng, Hua; Zhu, Gang; Chen, Zhi

    2015-03-30

    Germinal matrix hemorrhage (GMH) is one of the most common and devastating cerebrovascular events that affect premature infants, resulting in a significant socioeconomic burden. However, GMH has been largely unpreventable, and clinical treatments are mostly inadequate. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that JWH133, a selective CB2 receptor agonist, could attenuate brain injury and neurological deficits in a clostridial collagenase VII induced GMH model in seven-day-old (P7) S-D rat pups. Up to 1h post-injury, the administration of JWH133 (1mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection) significantly attenuated brain edema at 24h post-GMH, which was reversed by a selective CB2R antagonist, SR144528 (3mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection). Long-term brain morphology and neurofunctional outcomes were also improved. In contrast, JWH133 did not have a noticeable effect on the hematoma volume during the acute phase. These data also showed that microglia activation and inflammatory cytokine (TNF-α) release were significantly inhibited by JWH133 after GMH. This current study suggests a potential clinical utility for CB2R agonists as a potential therapy to reduce neurological injury and improve patient outcomes after GMH. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Tissue-type transglutaminase and the effects of cystamine on intracerebral hemorrhage-induced brain edema and neurological deficits

    PubMed Central

    Okauchi, Masanobu; Xi, Guohua; Keep, Richard F.; Hua, Ya

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Neurodegeneration occurs after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and tissue-type transglutaminase (tTG) has a role in neurodegenerative disorders. The present study investigated tTG expression after ICH and the effects of a tTG inhibitor, cystamine, on ICH-induced brain edema and neurological deficits. Methods This study had two parts. In the first, male Sprague-Dawley rats received an intracaudate injection of 100 µL autologous whole blood or a needle insertion (sham). Rats were killed 3 days later and the brains used for immunohistochemistry, Western blots and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. In the second set, ICH rats were treated intraperitoneally with either a tTG inhibitor, cystamine, or vehicle. Rats underwent behavioral testing and were killed at day-3 for measurement of brain swelling. Results tTG positive cells were found in the ipsilateral basal ganglia after ICH and most of those cells were neuron-like. Western blot analysis showed a 3-fold increase in tTG in the ipsilateral basal ganglia (p<0.01 vs. sham) after ICH. tTG mRNA levels were also significantly higher (8.5-fold increase vs. sham). Cystamine treatment attenuated ICH-induced brain swelling (day 3: 14.4±3.2 vs. 21.4±4.0% in vehicle-treated rats, p<0.01), neuronal death and improved functional outcome (forelimb placing score: 47±23 vs. 17±16% in vehicle-treated rats, p<0.05). Conclusions ICH induces perihematomal tTG upregulation and cystamine, a tTG inhibitor, reduces ICH-induced brain swelling and neurological deficits. PMID:19007756

  13. Reduced grey matter metabolism due to white matter edema allows optimal assessment of brain tumors on 18F-FDG-PET.

    PubMed

    Pourdehnad, Michael; Basu, Sandip; Duarte, Paulo; Okpaku, Aubrey S; Saboury, Babak; Hustinx, Roland; Alavi, Abass

    2011-01-01

    The main aim of this research was to demonstrate that the cortical and subcortical grey matter hypometabolism as revealed by fluorine-18 fluorodesoxyglucose-positron emission tomography ((18)F-FDG-PET) imaging in brain tumors is related to associated edema as demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This in turn enhances the ability to assess disease activity in the tumor and the degree of loss of cerebral function in the adjacent and distant structures. We evaluated brain T1 and T2 weighted MRI and (18)F-FDG-PET scans of 29 patients (19 adult, 10 pediatric) with history of brain tumor. Tumor histology types included 21 gliomas, 1 melanoma, 1 primitive neuroectodermal tumor, 3 medulloblastomas and 3 ependymomas. The majority of scans were performed within the same week (94% <1 month. The extent of hypo and hypermetabolism was assessed on the (18)F-FDG-PET scans. A template of 12 regions of interest (ROI) was applied and the laterality indices of the regional counts (signal intensity) were computed. Extent of edema, enhancement, and anatomical change were assessed on the MRI scans. Extent of edema in the same ROI was evaluated by a 6-point semiquantitative scale and laterality indices were generated. Metabolic activity of the grey matter was correlated with the extent of edema using these indices. In all cases where edema was present, significant hypometabolism was observed in the adjacent structures. Overall, there was a strong correlation between the extent of edema and severity of hypometabolism (r=0.92, P=0.01). This was true regardless of the location of edema, whether there was history of radiation treatment (r=0.91, P=0.03), or not (r=0.97, P=0.17). In conclusion, edema independent of underlying variables appeared to contribute significantly to cortical and sub-cortical grey matter hypometabolism observed in patients with brain tumors. This would indicate that brain tumors can be successfully assessed by (18)F-FDG-PET and therefore the efforts for

  14. Neuroinflammatory pathways in binge alcohol-induced neuronal degeneration: oxidative stress cascade involving aquaporin, brain edema, and phospholipase A2 activation.

    PubMed

    Collins, Michael A; Neafsey, Edward J

    2012-01-01

    Chronic binge alcohol exposure in adult rat models causes neuronal degeneration in the cortex and hippocampus that is not reduced by excitotoxic receptor antagonists, but is prevented by antioxidants. Neuroinflammatory (glial-neuronal) signaling pathways are believed to underlie the oxidative stress and brain damage. Based on our experimental results as well as increased knowledge about the pro-neuroinflammatory potential of glial water channels, we propose that induction of aquaporin-4 can be a critical initiating factor in alcohol's neurotoxic effects, through the instigation of cellular edema-based neuroinflammatory cascades involving increased phospholipase A2 activities, polyunsaturated fatty acid release/membrane depletion, decreased prosurvival signaling, and oxidative stress. A testable scheme for this pathway is presented that incorporates recent findings in the alcohol-brain literature indicating a role for neuroimmune activation (upregulation of NF-kappaB, proinflammatory cytokines, and toll-like receptors). We present the argument that such neuroimmune activation could be associated with or even dependent on increased aquaporin-4 and glial swelling as well.

  15. Early heparin administration after traumatic brain injury: Prolonged cognitive recovery associated with reduced cerebral edema and neutrophil sequestration.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Katsuhiro; Browne, Kevin D; Suto, Yujin; Kumasaka, Kenichiro; Cognetti, John; Johnson, Victoria E; Marks, Joshua; Smith, Douglas H; Pascual, Jose L

    2017-09-01

    Early administration of unfractionated heparin (UFH) after traumatic brain injury (TBI) reduces early in vivo circulating leukocytes (LEUs) in peri-injury penumbral brain tissue, enhancing cognitive recovery 2 days after injury. It remains unclear how long this effect lasts and if this is related to persistently accumulating LEUs in penumbral brain tissue. We hypothesized that UFH reduces LEU brain tissue sequestration resulting in prolonged cognitive recovery. CD1 male mice underwent either TBI by controlled cortical impact (CCI) or sham craniotomy. Unfractionated heparin (75 or 225 U/kg) or vehicle was repeatedly administered after TBI. Neurologic function (Garcia Neurological Test [maximum score = 18]) and body weight loss ratios were evaluated at 24 hours to 96 hours after TBI. Brain and lung wet-to-dry ratios, hemoglobin levels, and brain LEU sequestration (Ly6G immunohistochemistry) were evaluated 96 hours postmortem. Analysis of variance with Bonferroni correction determined significance (p < 0.05). Compared with untreated CCI animals (24 hours, 14.7 ± 1.0; 48 hours, 15.5 ± 0.7; 72 hours, 15.0 ± 0.8; 96 hours, 16.5 ± 0.9), UFH75 (24 hours, 16.0 ± 1.0, p < 0.01; 48 hours, 16.5 ± 0.7, p < 0.05; 72 hours, 17.1 ± 0.6, p < 0.01; 96 hours, 17.4 ± 0.7, p < 0.05) increased cognitive recovery throughout the entire observation period after TBI. At 48 hours, UFH225 significantly worsened body weight loss (10.2 ± 4.7%) as compared with uninjured animals (5.5 ± 2.9%, p < 0.05). Both UFH75 (60.8 ± 40.9 PMNs per high-power field [HPF], p < 0.05) and UFH225 (36.0 ± 17.6 PMNs/HPF, p < 0.01) significantly decreased brain neutrophil sequestration found in untreated CCI animals (124.2 ± 44.1 PMNs/HPF) 96 hours after TBI. Compared with untreated CCI animals (78.8 ± 0.8%), UFH75 (77.3 ± 0.6%, p = 0.04) reduced cerebral edema to uninjured levels (77.4 ± 0.6%, p = 0.04 vs. CCI). Only UFH225 (10.6 ± 1.2 g/dL) resulted in lower hemoglobin than in uninjured animals

  16. Ischemic Postconditioning Decreases Cerebral Edema and Brain Blood Barrier Disruption Caused by Relief of Carotid Stenosis in a Rat Model of Cerebral Hypoperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fuwei; Zhang, Xiaojie; Sun, Ying; Wang, Boyu; Zhou, Chuibing; Luo, Yinan; Ge, Pengfei

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Complications due to brain edema and breakdown of blood brain barrier are an important factor affecting the treatment effects of patients with severe carotid stenosis. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of ischemic postconditioning on brain edema and disruption of blood brain barrier via establishing rat model of hypoperfusion due to severe carotid stenosis. Methods Wistar rat model of hypoperfusion due to severe carotid stenosis was established by binding a stainless microtube to both carotid arteries. Ischemic postconditioning procedure consisted of three cycles of 30 seconds ischemia and 30 seconds reperfusion. Brain edema was evaluated by measuring cerebral water content, and blood brain barrier permeability was assayed by examining cerebral concentration of Evans' Blue (EB) and fluorescein sodium (NaF). ELISA was used to analyze the expression of MMP-9, claudin-5 and occludin. The activity and location of MMP-9 was analyzed by gelatin zymography and in situ zymography, respectively. The distribution of tight junction proteins claudin-5 and occludin was observed by immunohistochemistry. Results The increased brain water content and cerebral concentration of EB and NaF were suppressed by administration of ischemic postconditioning prior to relief of carotid stenosis. Zymographic studies showed that MMP-9 was mainly located in the cortex and its activity was significantly improved by relief of carotid stenosis and, but the elevated MMP-9 activity was inhibited markedly by ischemic postconditioning. Immunohistochemistry revealed that ischemic postconditioning improved the discontinuous distribution of claudin-5 and occludin. ELISA detected that the expression of up-regulated MMP-9 and down-regulated claudin-5 and occludin caused by carotid relief were all attenuated by ischemic postconditioning. Conclusions Ischemic postconditioning is an effective method to prevent brain edema and improve BBB permeability and could be

  17. Mechanism of brain protection by nitroxide radicals in experimental model of closed-head injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, R; Shohami, E; Beit-Yannai, E; Bass, R; Trembovler, V; Samuni, A

    1998-01-15

    Reactive oxygen-derived species were previously implicated in mediation of post-traumatic brain damage; however, the efficacy of traditional antioxidants in preventing/reversing the damage is sometimes limited. The present work focused on the mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective activity of cell permeable, nontoxic, antioxidants, namely stable nitroxide radicals in an experimental model of rat closed-head injury. Brain damage was induced by the weight-drop method and the clinical status was evaluated according to a neurological severity score at 1 h and 24 h, where the difference between these scores reflects the extent of recovery. The metal chelator deferoxamine as well as three nitroxide derivatives, differing in hydrophilicity and charge, and one hydroxylamine (a reduced nitroxide) facilitated the clinical recovery and decreased the brain edema. The nitroxides, but neither the hydroxylamine nor deferoxamine, protected the integrity of the blood-brain barrier. Superoxide dismutase also improved the clinical recovery but did not affect brain edema or the blood-brain barrier. The results suggest that by switching back and forth between themselves, the nitroxide and hydroxylamine act catalytically as self-replenishing antioxidants, and protect brain tissue by terminating radical-chain reactions, oxidizing deleterious metal ions, and by removal of intracellular superoxide.

  18. Human brain mapping: Experimental and computational approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, C.C.; George, J.S.; Schmidt, D.M.; Aine, C.J.; Sanders, J.; Belliveau, J.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This program developed project combined Los Alamos' and collaborators' strengths in noninvasive brain imaging and high performance computing to develop potential contributions to the multi-agency Human Brain Project led by the National Institute of Mental Health. The experimental component of the project emphasized the optimization of spatial and temporal resolution of functional brain imaging by combining: (a) structural MRI measurements of brain anatomy; (b) functional MRI measurements of blood flow and oxygenation; and (c) MEG measurements of time-resolved neuronal population currents. The computational component of the project emphasized development of a high-resolution 3-D volumetric model of the brain based on anatomical MRI, in which structural and functional information from multiple imaging modalities can be integrated into a single computational framework for modeling, visualization, and database representation.

  19. The effect of butylphthalide on the brain edema, blood-brain barrier of rats after focal cerebral infarction and the expression of Rho A.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinyang; Wen, Qingping; Wu, Yue; Li, Baozhu; Gao, Peng

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the effect of butylphthalide on the brain edema, blood-brain barrier of rats of rats after focal cerebral infarction and the expression of Rho A. A total of 195 sprague-dawley male rats were randomly divided into control group, model group, and butylphthalide group (40 mg/kg, once a day, by gavage). The model was made by photochemical method. After surgery 3, 12, 24, 72, and 144 h, brain water content was done to see the effect of butylphthalide for the cerebral edema. Evans blue extravasation method was done to see the changes in blood-brain barrier immunohistochemistry, and Western blot was done to see the expression of Rho A around the infarction. Compared with the control group, the brain water content of model group and butylphthalide group rats was increased, the permeability of blood-brain barrier of model group and butylphthalide group rats was increased, and the Rho A protein of model group and butylphthalide group rats was increased. Compared with the model group, the brain water content of butylphthalide group rats was induced (73.67 ± 0.67 vs 74.14 ± 0.46; 74.89 ± 0.57 vs 75.61 ± 0.52; 77.49 ± 0.34 vs 79.33 ± 0.49; 76.31 ± 0.56 vs 78.01 ± 0.48; 72.36 ± 0.44 vs 73.12 ± 0.73; P < 0.05), the permeability of blood-brain barrier of butylphthalide group rats was induced (319.20 ± 8.11 vs 394.60 ± 6.19; 210.40 ± 9.56 vs 266.40 ± 7.99; 188.00 ± 9.22 vs 232.40 ± 7.89; 288.40 ± 7.86 vs 336.00 ± 6.71; 166.60 ± 6.23 vs 213.60 ± 13.79; P < 0.05), and the Rho A protein of butylphthalide group rats was decreased (western blot result: 1.2230 ± 0.0254 vs 1.3970 ± 0.0276; 1.5985 ± 0.0206 vs 2.0368 ± 0.0179; 1.4229 ± 0.0167 vs 1.7930 ± 0.0158;1.3126 ± 0.0236 vs 1.5471 ± 0.0158; P < 0.05). The butylphthalide could reduce the brain edema, protect the blood-brain barrier, and decrease the expression of Rho A around the infarction.

  20. YiQiFuMai powder injection ameliorates blood-brain barrier dysfunction and brain edema after focal cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Cao, Guosheng; Ye, Xinyi; Xu, Yingqiong; Yin, Mingzhu; Chen, Honglin; Kou, Junping; Yu, Boyang

    2016-01-01

    YiQiFuMai powder injection (YQFM) is a modern preparation derived from the traditional Chinese medicine Sheng-Mai-San. YQFM is widely used in clinical practice in the People's Republic of China, mainly for the treatment of microcirculatory disturbance-related diseases. However, little is known about its role in animals with ischemic stroke. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of YQFM on brain edema and blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction induced by cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. Male C57BL/6J mice underwent right middle cerebral artery occlusion for 1 hour with a subsequent 24-hour reperfusion to produce I/R injury. YQFM (three doses: 0.336, 0.671, and 1.342 g/kg) was then given intraperitoneally (IP). The results demonstrated that YQFM significantly decreased infarct size, improved neurological deficits, reduced brain water content, and increased cerebral blood flow after I/R injury. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose micro-positron emission tomography imaging and hematoxylin and eosin staining results indicated that YQFM is able to ameliorate brain metabolism and histopathological damage after I/R. Moreover, YQFM administration reduced BBB leakage and upregulated the expression of zona occludens-1 (ZO-1) and occludin, which was confirmed by Evans Blue extravasation, Western blotting, and immunofluorescence assay. Our findings suggest that YQFM provides protection against focal cerebral I/R injury in mice, possibly by improving BBB dysfunction via upregulation of the expression of tight junction proteins.

  1. Symmetrical Curvilinear Cytotoxic Edema Along the Surface of the Brain Stem: A Probable New Magnetic Resonance Imaging Finding of Leptomeningeal Carcinomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Khil, Eun Kyung; Lee, A Leum; Chang, Kee-Hyun; Yun, Tae Jin; Hong, Hyun Sook

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Lung cancer is one of the most common neoplasms to appear leptomeningeal metastasis (LM). Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is better diagnostic choice for LM and usually shows focal nodular or diffuse linear enhancement on the leptomeninges along the sulci and tentorium in the brain. We experienced atypical 2 cases of lung cancer in patients who showed unusual brain MRI finding of symmetrical curvilinear or band-like, nonenhancing cytotoxic edema along the surface of the brain stem. This finding is unique and different from the general findings of leptomeningeal metastasis. This unique imaging finding of symmetric curvilinear nonenhancing cytotoxic edema along the brainstem is extremely rare and represents a new presentation of leptomeningeal carcinomatosis. PMID:26200611

  2. Effect of partial liquid ventilation on pulmonary vascular permeability and edema after experimental acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Lange, N R; Kozlowski, J K; Gust, R; Shapiro, S D; Schuster, D P

    2000-07-01

    We evaluated the effects of partial liquid ventilation (PLV) with two different dosages of the perfluorocarbon LiquiVent (perflubron) on pulmonary vascular permeability and edema formation after oleic acid (OA)-induced acute lung injury in dogs. We used imaging with positron emission tomography to measure fractional pulmonary blood flow, lung water concentration (LWC), and the pulmonary transcapillary escape rate (PTCER) of (68)Ga-labeled transferrin at 5 and 21 h after lung injury in five dogs undergoing conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV), five dogs undergoing low-dose PLV (perflubron at 10 ml/kg), and four dogs undergoing high dose PLV (perflubron at 30 ml/kg). A positive end-expiratory pressure of 7.5 cm H(2)O was used in all dogs. After OA (0.08 ml/kg)- induced lung injury, there were no significant differences or trends for PTCER or LWC at any time when the PLV groups were compared with the CMV group. However, lung tissue myeloperoxidase activity was significantly lower in the combined PLV group than in the CMV group (p = 0.016). We conclude that after OA-induced lung injury, the addition of PLV to CMV does not directly attenuate pulmonary vascular leak or lung water accumulation. Rather, the benefits of such treatment may be due to modifications of the inflammatory response.

  3. Dietary Docosahexaenoic Acid Improves Cognitive Function, Tissue Sparing, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Indices of Edema and White Matter Injury in the Immature Rat after Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Requena, Daniela F.; Abdullah, Osama M.; Casper, T. Charles; Beachy, Joanna; Malleske, Daniel; Pauly, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of acquired neurologic disability in children. Specific therapies to treat acute TBI are lacking. Cognitive impairment from TBI may be blunted by decreasing inflammation and oxidative damage after injury. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) decreases cognitive impairment, oxidative stress, and white matter injury in adult rats after TBI. Effects of DHA on cognitive outcome, oxidative stress, and white matter injury in the developing rat after experimental TBI are unknown. We hypothesized that DHA would decrease early inflammatory markers and oxidative stress, and improve cognitive, imaging and histologic outcomes in rat pups after controlled cortical impact (CCI). CCI or sham surgery was delivered to 17 d old male rat pups exposed to DHA or standard diet for the duration of the experiments. DHA was introduced into the dam diet the day before CCI to allow timely DHA delivery to the pre-weanling pups. Inflammatory cytokines and nitrates/nitrites were measured in the injured brains at post-injury Day (PID) 1 and PID2. Morris water maze (MWM) testing was performed at PID41-PID47. T2-weighted and diffusion tensor imaging studies were obtained at PID12 and PID28. Tissue sparing was calculated histologically at PID3 and PID50. DHA did not adversely affect rat survival or weight gain. DHA acutely decreased oxidative stress and increased anti-inflammatory interleukin 10 in CCI brains. DHA improved MWM performance and lesion volume late after injury. At PID12, DHA decreased T2-imaging measures of cerebral edema and decreased radial diffusivity, an index of white matter injury. DHA improved short- and long-term neurologic outcomes after CCI in the rat pup. Given its favorable safety profile, DHA is a promising candidate therapy for pediatric TBI. Further studies are needed to explore neuroprotective mechanisms of DHA after developmental TBI. PMID:26247583

  4. Dietary Docosahexaenoic Acid Improves Cognitive Function, Tissue Sparing, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Indices of Edema and White Matter Injury in the Immature Rat after Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Schober, Michelle E; Requena, Daniela F; Abdullah, Osama M; Casper, T Charles; Beachy, Joanna; Malleske, Daniel; Pauly, James R

    2016-02-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of acquired neurologic disability in children. Specific therapies to treat acute TBI are lacking. Cognitive impairment from TBI may be blunted by decreasing inflammation and oxidative damage after injury. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) decreases cognitive impairment, oxidative stress, and white matter injury in adult rats after TBI. Effects of DHA on cognitive outcome, oxidative stress, and white matter injury in the developing rat after experimental TBI are unknown. We hypothesized that DHA would decrease early inflammatory markers and oxidative stress, and improve cognitive, imaging and histologic outcomes in rat pups after controlled cortical impact (CCI). CCI or sham surgery was delivered to 17 d old male rat pups exposed to DHA or standard diet for the duration of the experiments. DHA was introduced into the dam diet the day before CCI to allow timely DHA delivery to the pre-weanling pups. Inflammatory cytokines and nitrates/nitrites were measured in the injured brains at post-injury Day (PID) 1 and PID2. Morris water maze (MWM) testing was performed at PID41-PID47. T2-weighted and diffusion tensor imaging studies were obtained at PID12 and PID28. Tissue sparing was calculated histologically at PID3 and PID50. DHA did not adversely affect rat survival or weight gain. DHA acutely decreased oxidative stress and increased anti-inflammatory interleukin 10 in CCI brains. DHA improved MWM performance and lesion volume late after injury. At PID12, DHA decreased T2-imaging measures of cerebral edema and decreased radial diffusivity, an index of white matter injury. DHA improved short- and long-term neurologic outcomes after CCI in the rat pup. Given its favorable safety profile, DHA is a promising candidate therapy for pediatric TBI. Further studies are needed to explore neuroprotective mechanisms of DHA after developmental TBI.

  5. Plasma kallikrein mediates brain hemorrhage and edema caused by tissue plasminogen activator therapy in mice after stroke.

    PubMed

    Simão, Fabrício; Ustunkaya, Tuna; Clermont, Allen C; Feener, Edward P

    2017-04-20

    Thrombolytic therapy using tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in acute stroke is associated with increased risks of cerebral hemorrhagic transformation and angioedema. Although plasma kallikrein (PKal) has been implicated in contributing to both hematoma expansion and thrombosis in stroke, its role in the complications associated with the therapeutic use of tPA in stroke is not yet available. We investigated the effects of tPA on plasma prekallikrein (PPK) activation and the role of PKal on cerebral outcomes in a murine thrombotic stroke model treated with tPA. We show that tPA increases PKal activity in vitro in both murine and human plasma, via a factor XII (FXII)-dependent mechanism. Intravenous administration of tPA increased circulating PKal activity in mice. In mice with thrombotic occlusion of the middle cerebral artery, tPA administration increased brain hemorrhage transformation, infarct volume, and edema. These adverse effects of tPA were ameliorated in PPK (Klkb1)-deficient and FXII-deficient mice and in wild-type (WT) mice pretreated with a PKal inhibitor prior to tPA. tPA-induced brain hemisphere reperfusion after photothrombolic middle cerebral artery occlusion was increased in Klkb1(-/-) mice compared with WT mice. In addition, PKal inhibition reduced matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity in brain following stroke and tPA therapy. These data demonstrate that tPA activates PPK in plasma and PKal inhibition reduces cerebral complications associated with tPA-mediated thrombolysis in stroke. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  6. A new strategy of CyberKnife treatment system based radiosurgery followed by early use of adjuvant bevacizumab treatment for brain metastasis with extensive cerebral edema.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Wang, Enmin; Pan, Li; Dai, Jiazhong; Zhang, Nan; Wang, Xin; Liu, Xiaoxia; Mei, Guanghai; Sheng, Xiaofang

    2014-09-01

    Bevacizumab blocks the effects of vascular endothelial growth factor in leakage-prone capillaries and has been suggested as a new treatment for cerebral radiation edema and necrosis. CyberKnife is a new, frameless stereotactic radiosurgery system. This work investigated the safety and efficacy of CyberKnife followed by early bevacizumab treatment for brain metastasis with extensive cerebral edema. The eligibility criteria of the patients selected for radiosurgery followed by early use of adjuvant bevacizumab treatment were: (1) brain tumors from metastasis with one solitary brain lesion and symptomatic extensive cerebral edema; (2) >18 years of age; (3) the patient refused surgery due to the physical conditions and the risk of surgery; (4) no contraindications for bevacizumab. (5) bevacizumab was applied for a minimum of 2 injections and a maximum of 6 injections with a 2-week interval between treatments, beginning within 2 weeks of the CyberKnife therapy; (6) Karnofsky performance status (KPS) ≥30. Tumor size and edema were monitored by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Dexamethasone dosage, KPS, adverse event occurrence and associated clinical outcomes were also recorded. Eight patients were accrued for this new treatment. Radiation dose ranged from 20 to 33 Gy in one to five sessions, prescribed to the 61-71 % isodose line. Bevacizumab therapy was administered 3-10 days after completion of CyberKnife treatment for a minimum of two cycles (5 mg/kg, at 2-week intervals). MRI revealed average reductions of 55.8 % (post-gadolinium) and 63.4 % (T2/FLAIR). Seven patients showed significant clinical neurological improvements. Dexamethasone was reduced in all patients, with five successfully discontinuing dexamethasone treatment 4 weeks after bevacizumab initiation. Hypertension, a bevacizumab-related adverse event, occurred in one patient. After 3-8 months, all patients studied were alive and primary brain metastases were under control, 2 developed new brain

  7. Experimental missile wound to the brain.

    PubMed

    Carey, M E; Sarna, G S; Farrell, J B; Happel, L T

    1989-11-01

    Among civilians in the United States, 33,000 gunshot wound deaths occur each year; probably half of these involve the head. In combat, head wounds account for approximately half of the immediate mortality when death can be attributed to a single wound. No significant reduction in the neurosurgical mortality associated with these wounds has occurred between World War II and the Vietnam conflict, and very little research into missile wounds of the brain has been undertaken. An experimental model has been developed in the anesthetized cat whereby a ballistic injury to the brain may be painlessly reproduced in order that the pathophysiological effects of brain wounding may be studied and better treatments may be designed to lower the mortality and morbidity rates associated with gunshot wounds. Prominent among physiological effects observed in this model was respiratory arrest even though the missile did not injure the brain stem directly. The incidence of prolonged respiratory arrest increased with increasing missile energy, but arrest was often reversible provided respiratory support was given. It is possible that humans who receive a brain wound die from missile-induced apnea instead of brain damage per se. The mortality rate in humans with brain wounding might be reduced by prompt respiratory support. Brain wounding was associated with persistently increased intracranial pressure and reduced cerebral perfusion pressure not entirely attributable to intracranial bleeding. The magnitude of these derangements appeared to be missile energy-dependent and approached dangerous levels in higher-energy wounds. All wounded cats exhibited postwounding increases in blood glucose concentrations consistent with a generalized stress reaction. A transient rise in hematocrit also occurred immediately after wounding. Both of these phenomena could prove deleterious to optimal brain function after injury.

  8. Treadmill Pre-Training Ameliorates Brain Edema in Ischemic Stroke via Down-Regulation of Aquaporin-4: An MRI Study in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yi; Jia, Jie; Hu, Yongshan; Yang, Xiaojiao; Li, Jianqi; Fan, Mingxia; Zhang, Li; Guo, Jinchun; Leung, Mason C. P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Treadmill pre-training can ameliorate blood brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction in ischemia-reperfusion injury, however, its role in ischemic brain edema remains unclear. This study assessed the neuroprotective effects induced by treadmill pre-training, particularly on brain edema in transient middle cerebral artery occluded model. Methods Transient middle cerebral artery occlusion to induce stroke was performed on rats after 2 weeks of treadmill pre-training. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to evaluate the dynamic impairment of cerebral edema after ischemia-reperfusion injury. In addition, measurements of wet and dry brain weight, Evans Blue assay and Garcia scores were performed to investigate the cerebral water content, BBB permeability and neurologic deficit, respectively. Moreover, during ischemia-reperfusion injury, the expression of Aquaporin 4 (AQP4) was detected using immunofluorescence and Western bloting analyses. Results Treadmill pre-training improved the relative apparent diffusion coefficient (rADC) loss in the ipsilateral cortex and striatum at 1 hour and 2.5 hours after cerebral ischemia. In the treadmill pre-training group, T2W1 values of the ipsilateral cortex and striatum increased less at 7.5 hours, 1 day, and 2 days after stroke while the brain water content decreased at 2 days after ischemia. Regarding the BBB permeability, the semi-quantitative amount of contrast agent leakage of treadmill pre-training group significantly decreased. Less Evans Blue exudation was also observed in treadmill pre-training group at 2 days after stroke. In addition, treadmill pre-training mitigated the Garcia score deficits at 2 days after stroke. Immunofluorescence staining and Western blotting results showed a significant decrease in the expression of AQP4 after treadmill ischemia following pre-training. Conclusions Treadmill pre-training may reduce cerebral edema and BBB dysfunction during cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury via the down

  9. Deficiency of tenascin-C and attenuation of blood-brain barrier disruption following experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage in mice.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Masashi; Shiba, Masato; Kawakita, Fumihiro; Liu, Lei; Shimojo, Naoshi; Imanaka-Yoshida, Kyoko; Yoshida, Toshimichi; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT Tenascin-C (TNC), a matricellular protein, is induced in the brain following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The authors investigated if TNC causes brain edema and blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption following experimental SAH. METHODS C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) or TNC knockout (TNKO) mice were subjected to SAH by endovascular puncture. Ninety-seven mice were randomly allocated to WT sham-operated (n = 16), TNKO sham-operated (n = 16), WT SAH (n = 34), and TNKO SAH (n = 31) groups. Mice were examined by means of neuroscore and brain water content 24-48 hours post-SAH; and Evans blue dye extravasation and Western blotting of TNC, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, and zona occludens (ZO)-1 at 24 hours post-SAH. As a separate study, 16 mice were randomized to WT sham-operated, TNKO sham-operated, WT SAH, and TNKO SAH groups (n = 4 in each group), and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) was immunohistochemically evaluated at 24 hours post-SAH. Moreover, 40 TNKO mice randomly received an intracerebroventricular injection of TNC or phosphate-buffered saline, and effects of exogenous TNC on brain edema and BBB disruption following SAH were studied. RESULTS Deficiency of endogenous TNC prevented neurological impairments, brain edema formation, and BBB disruption following SAH; it was also associated with the inhibition of both MMP-9 induction and ZO-1 degradation. Endogenous TNC deficiency also inhibited post-SAH MAPK activation in brain capillary endothelial cells. Exogenous TNC treatment abolished the neuroprotective effects shown in TNKO mice with SAH. CONCLUSIONS Tenascin-C may be an important mediator in the development of brain edema and BBB disruption following SAH, mechanisms for which may involve MAPK-mediated MMP-9 induction and ZO-1 degradation. TNC could be a molecular target against which to develop new therapies for SAH-induced brain injuries.

  10. Reexpansion pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Tarver, R D; Broderick, L S; Conces, D J

    1996-01-01

    Reexpansion pulmonary edema is a rare complication attending the rapid reexpansion of a chronically collapsed lung, such as occurs after evacuation of a large amount of air or fluid from the pleural space. The condition usually appears unexpectedly and dramatically-immediately or within 1 h in 64% of patients and within 24 h in the remainder. The clinical manifestations are varied; they range from roentgenographic findings alone in asymptomatic patients to severe cardiorespiratory insufficiency. The radiographic evidence of reexpansion pulmonary edema is a unilateral alveolar filling pattern, seen within a few hours of reexpansion of the lung. The edema may progress for 24-48 h and persist for 4-5 days. Human data on the pathophysiology of reexpansion pulmonary edema derive from small series of patients, case reports, and reviews of the literature. On the other hand, a larger body of data exists on experimental reexpansion pulmonary edema in cats, monkeys, rabbits, sheep, and goats. This review examines the clinical and experimental evidence for reexpansion pulmonary edema. In addition, we detail the historical background, clinical setting, treatment, and outcome of reexpansion pulmonary edema.

  11. Non-Infectious Peri-Electrode Edema and Contrast Enhancement Following Deep Brain Stimulation Surgery.

    PubMed

    Arocho-Quinones, Elsa V; Pahapill, Peter A

    2016-12-01

    Dramatic radiographic abnormalities seen after electrode placement (DRAAEP) in deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery is rare and it has not been associated with infection or hemorrhage. It has consisted of peri-electrode low-attenuation signals on CT scans and extensive T2-hyperintense signals without associated contrast enhancement (CE) on MRI scans. Report on the management of a patient with Parkinson's disease (PD) presenting with a seizure and findings of DRAAEP with positive CE 12 days after the placement of a subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS electrode. Head CT and contrasted brain MRI scans were completed on presentation. Standard laboratory work up was obtained to evaluate for infection. Operative exploration deep to the burr-hole site surrounding the electrode was performed and cultures were obtained. Serial contrasted MRI scans were completed to determine the abnormal signal duration. A MRI revealed extensive T2-hyperintensity and positive CE concentrated around the burr-hole site surrounding the electrode. Intraoperative exploration revealed no evidence of infection and electrode revision was avoided. There was near resolution of the abnormal T2 signal and CE at six weeks from detection. The patient remained without signs of intracranial infection and responded well to DBS. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of DRAAEP with positive gadolinium enhancement. Despite the extensive contrast enhancement, these DRAAEP appear to remain benign transient events that, in the absence of clinical signs of infection or neurologic decline, may warrant no further aggressive intervention such as hardware removal. © 2016 International Neuromodulation Society.

  12. Boswellia serrata acts on cerebral edema in patients irradiated for brain tumors: a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Kirste, Simon; Treier, Markus; Wehrle, Sabine Jolie; Becker, Gerhild; Abdel-Tawab, Mona; Gerbeth, Kathleen; Hug, Martin Johannes; Lubrich, Beate; Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Momm, Felix

    2011-08-15

    Patients irradiated for brain tumors often suffer from cerebral edema and are usually treated with dexamethasone, which has various side effects. To investigate the activity of Boswellia serrata (BS) in radiotherapy-related edema, we conducted a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, pilot trial. Forty-four patients with primary or secondary malignant cerebral tumors were randomly assigned to radiotherapy plus either BS 4200 mg/day or placebo. The volume of cerebral edema in the T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence was analyzed as a primary endpoint. Secondary endpoints were toxicity, cognitive function, quality of life, and the need for antiedematous (dexamethasone) medication. Blood samples were taken to analyze the serum concentration of boswellic acids (AKBA and KBA). Compared with baseline and if measured immediately after the end of radiotherapy and BS/placebo treatment, a reduction of cerebral edema of >75% was found in 60% of patients receiving BS and in 26% of patients receiving placebo (P = .023). These findings may be based on an additional antitumor effect. There were no severe adverse events in either group. In the BS group, 6 patients reported minor gastrointestinal discomfort. BS did not have a significant impact on quality of life or cognitive function. The dexamethasone dose during radiotherapy in both groups was not statistically different. Boswellic acids could be detected in patients' serum. BS significantly reduced cerebral edema measured by MRI in the study population. BS could potentially be steroid-sparing for patients receiving brain irradiation. Our findings will need to be further validated in larger studies. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  13. The effect of saponification on the mucopolysaccharides of the ground substance of the human brain: the relation to focal edema and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Feigin, I

    1981-03-01

    The acid mucopolysaccharides of brain tissues are disclosed by their metachromatic staining with toluidine blue following saponification with potassium hydroxide, presumably as a result of the liberation of acid groups previously esterified. Earlier histochemical studies had disclosed the presence of neutral mucopolysaccharides by staining with the periodic acid-Schiff technique, and such staining is intensified by prior saponification. Many biochemical studies have reported the presence of both acid and neutral mucopolysaccharides in brain tissues. Within the white matter following brain edema, the quantity of stained mucopolysaccharides is decreased in the plaques of multiple sclerosis and pontine myelinolysis, and in the lesions of diffuse sclerosis. All of these are characterized by myelin loss with relative preservation of axons. The known physiological effects of the mucopolysaccharides on the water content of normal tissues, and on the properties and diffusability of the increments of fluid that constitute edema, lead to the suggestion that edema may play a major role in the pathogenesis of the demyelinating diseases, including multiple sclerosis.

  14. Endothelin-1 overexpression leads to further water accumulation and brain edema after middle cerebral artery occlusion via aquaporin 4 expression in astrocytic end-feet.

    PubMed

    Lo, Amy C Y; Chen, Ann Y S; Hung, Victor K L; Yaw, Lai Ping; Fung, Maggie K L; Ho, Maggie C Y; Tsang, Margaret C S; Chung, Stephen S M; Chung, Sookja K

    2005-08-01

    Stroke patients have increased levels of endothelin-1 (ET-1), a strong vasoconstrictor, in their plasma or cerebrospinal fluid. Previously, we showed high level of ET-1 mRNA expression in astrocytes after hypoxia/ischemia. It is unclear whether the contribution of ET-1 induction in astrocytes is protective or destructive in cerebral ischemia. Here, we generated a transgenic mouse model that overexpress ET-1 in astrocytes (GET-1) using the glial fibrillary acidic protein promoter to examine the role of astrocytic ET-1 in ischemic stroke by challenging these mice with transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Under normal condition, GET-1 mice showed no abnormality in brain morphology, cerebrovasculature, absolute cerebral blood flow, blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity, and mean arterial blood pressure. Yet, GET-1 mice subjected to transient MCAO showed more severe neurologic deficits and increased infarct, which were partially normalized by administration of ABT-627 (ET(A) antagonist) 5 mins after MCAO. In addition, GET-1 brains exhibited more Evans blue extravasation and showed decreased endothelial occludin expression after MCAO, correlating with higher brain water content and increased cerebral edema. Aquaporin 4 expression was also more pronounced in astrocytic end-feet on blood vessels in GET-1 ipsilateral brains. Our current data suggest that astrocytic ET-1 has deleterious effects on water homeostasis, cerebral edema and BBB integrity, which contribute to more severe ischemic brain injury.

  15. YiQiFuMai powder injection ameliorates blood–brain barrier dysfunction and brain edema after focal cerebral ischemia–reperfusion injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Guosheng; Ye, Xinyi; Xu, Yingqiong; Yin, Mingzhu; Chen, Honglin; Kou, Junping; Yu, Boyang

    2016-01-01

    YiQiFuMai powder injection (YQFM) is a modern preparation derived from the traditional Chinese medicine Sheng-Mai-San. YQFM is widely used in clinical practice in the People’s Republic of China, mainly for the treatment of microcirculatory disturbance-related diseases. However, little is known about its role in animals with ischemic stroke. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of YQFM on brain edema and blood–brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction induced by cerebral ischemia–reperfusion (I/R) injury. Male C57BL/6J mice underwent right middle cerebral artery occlusion for 1 hour with a subsequent 24-hour reperfusion to produce I/R injury. YQFM (three doses: 0.336, 0.671, and 1.342 g/kg) was then given intraperitoneally (IP). The results demonstrated that YQFM significantly decreased infarct size, improved neurological deficits, reduced brain water content, and increased cerebral blood flow after I/R injury. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose micro-positron emission tomography imaging and hematoxylin and eosin staining results indicated that YQFM is able to ameliorate brain metabolism and histopathological damage after I/R. Moreover, YQFM administration reduced BBB leakage and upregulated the expression of zona occludens-1 (ZO-1) and occludin, which was confirmed by Evans Blue extravasation, Western blotting, and immunofluorescence assay. Our findings suggest that YQFM provides protection against focal cerebral I/R injury in mice, possibly by improving BBB dysfunction via upregulation of the expression of tight junction proteins. PMID:26834461

  16. Role of PiCCO monitoring for the integrated management of neurogenic pulmonary edema following traumatic brain injury: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaoping; Xu, Zhijun; Wang, Pengfei; Xu, Yan; Zhang, Gensheng

    2016-10-01

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) is occasionally observed in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI); however, this condition is often underappreciated. NPE is frequently misdiagnosed due to its atypical clinical performance, thus delaying appropriate treatment. A comprehensive management protocol of NPE in patients with TBI has yet to be established. The current study reported the case of a 67-year-old man with severe TBI who was transferred to our intensive care unit (ICU). On day 7 after hospitalization, the patient suddenly suffered tachypnea, tachycardia, systemic hypertension and hypoxemia during lumbar cistern drainage. Intravenous diuretics, tranquilizer and glucocorticoid were administered due to suspected left heart failure attack. Chest radiography examination supported the diagnosis of pulmonary edema; however, hypotension and hypovolemia were subsequently observed. Pulse index continuous cardiac output (PiCCO) hemodynamic monitoring and bedside echocardiography were performed, which excluded the diagnosis of cardiac pulmonary edema, and thus the diagnosis of NPE was confirmed. Goal-directed therapy by dynamic PiCCO monitoring was then implemented. In addition, levosimendan, an inotropic agent, was introduced to improve cardiac output. The patient had complete recovered from pulmonary edema and regained consciousness on day 11 of hospitalization. The current case demonstrated that PiCCO monitoring may serve a central role in the integrated management of NPE in patients with TBI. Levosimendan may be a potential medicine in treating cardiac dysfunction, along with its benefit from improving neurological function in NPE patients.

  17. Role of PiCCO monitoring for the integrated management of neurogenic pulmonary edema following traumatic brain injury: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiaoping; Xu, Zhijun; Wang, Pengfei; Xu, Yan; Zhang, Gensheng

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) is occasionally observed in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI); however, this condition is often underappreciated. NPE is frequently misdiagnosed due to its atypical clinical performance, thus delaying appropriate treatment. A comprehensive management protocol of NPE in patients with TBI has yet to be established. The current study reported the case of a 67-year-old man with severe TBI who was transferred to our intensive care unit (ICU). On day 7 after hospitalization, the patient suddenly suffered tachypnea, tachycardia, systemic hypertension and hypoxemia during lumbar cistern drainage. Intravenous diuretics, tranquilizer and glucocorticoid were administered due to suspected left heart failure attack. Chest radiography examination supported the diagnosis of pulmonary edema; however, hypotension and hypovolemia were subsequently observed. Pulse index continuous cardiac output (PiCCO) hemodynamic monitoring and bedside echocardiography were performed, which excluded the diagnosis of cardiac pulmonary edema, and thus the diagnosis of NPE was confirmed. Goal-directed therapy by dynamic PiCCO monitoring was then implemented. In addition, levosimendan, an inotropic agent, was introduced to improve cardiac output. The patient had complete recovered from pulmonary edema and regained consciousness on day 11 of hospitalization. The current case demonstrated that PiCCO monitoring may serve a central role in the integrated management of NPE in patients with TBI. Levosimendan may be a potential medicine in treating cardiac dysfunction, along with its benefit from improving neurological function in NPE patients. PMID:27698733

  18. Molecular pathophysiology of cerebral edema

    PubMed Central

    Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in molecular biology have led to a greater understanding of the individual proteins responsible for generating cerebral edema. In large part, the study of cerebral edema is the study of maladaptive ion transport. Following acute CNS injury, cells of the neurovascular unit, particularly brain endothelial cells and astrocytes, undergo a program of pre- and post-transcriptional changes in the activity of ion channels and transporters. These changes can result in maladaptive ion transport and the generation of abnormal osmotic forces that, ultimately, manifest as cerebral edema. This review discusses past models and current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of cerebral edema. PMID:26661240

  19. Molecular pathophysiology of cerebral edema.

    PubMed

    Stokum, Jesse A; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2016-03-01

    Advancements in molecular biology have led to a greater understanding of the individual proteins responsible for generating cerebral edema. In large part, the study of cerebral edema is the study of maladaptive ion transport. Following acute CNS injury, cells of the neurovascular unit, particularly brain endothelial cells and astrocytes, undergo a program of pre- and post-transcriptional changes in the activity of ion channels and transporters. These changes can result in maladaptive ion transport and the generation of abnormal osmotic forces that, ultimately, manifest as cerebral edema. This review discusses past models and current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of cerebral edema.

  20. Increased Toll-Like Receptor 4 in Cerebral Endothelial Cells Contributes to the Astrocyte Swelling and Brain Edema in Acute Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jayakumar, A.R.; Tong, X.Y.; Curtis, K.M.; Ruiz-Cordero, R.; Abreu, M.T.; Norenberg, M.D.

    2013-01-01

    Astrocyte swelling and the subsequent increase in intracranial pressure and brain herniation are major clinical consequences in patients with acute hepatic encephalopathy (AHE). We recently reported that conditioned media (CM) from brain endothelial cells (ECs) exposed to ammonia, a mixture of cytokines (CKs) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS), when added to astrocytes caused cell swelling. In the present study we investigated the possibility that ammonia and inflammatory agents activate the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in ECs, resulting in the release of factors that ultimately cause astrocyte swelling. We found a significant increase in TLR4 protein expression when ECs were exposed to ammonia, CKs or LPS alone, while exposure of ECs to a combination of these agents potentiated such effects. Additionally, astrocytes exposed to CM from TLR4-silenced ECs that were treated with ammonia, CKs or LPS, resulted in a significant reduction in astrocyte swelling. TLR4 protein upregulation was also detected in rat brain ECs after treatment with the liver toxin thioacetamide (TAA), and that TAA-treated TLR4 knock-out mice exhibited a reduction in brain edema. These studies strongly suggest that ECs significantly contribute to the astrocyte swelling/brain edema in AHE, likely as a consequence of increased TLR4 protein expression by blood-borne noxious agents. PMID:24261962

  1. Increased toll-like receptor 4 in cerebral endothelial cells contributes to the astrocyte swelling and brain edema in acute hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, Arumugam R; Tong, Xiao Y; Curtis, Kevin M; Ruiz-Cordero, Roberto; Abreu, Maria T; Norenberg, Michael D

    2014-03-01

    Astrocyte swelling and the subsequent increase in intracranial pressure and brain herniation are major clinical consequences in patients with acute hepatic encephalopathy. We recently reported that conditioned media from brain endothelial cells (ECs) exposed to ammonia, a mixture of cytokines (CKs) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS), when added to astrocytes caused cell swelling. In this study, we investigated the possibility that ammonia and inflammatory agents activate the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in ECs, resulting in the release of factors that ultimately cause astrocyte swelling. We found a significant increase in TLR4 protein expression when ECs were exposed to ammonia, CKs or LPS alone, while exposure of ECs to a combination of these agents potentiate such effects. In addition, astrocytes exposed to conditioned media from TLR4-silenced ECs that were treated with ammonia, CKs or LPS, resulted in a significant reduction in astrocyte swelling. TLR4 protein up-regulation was also detected in rat brain ECs after treatment with the liver toxin thioacetamide, and that thioacetamide-treated TLR4 knock-out mice exhibited a reduction in brain edema. These studies strongly suggest that ECs significantly contribute to the astrocyte swelling/brain edema in acute hepatic encephalopathy, likely as a consequence of increased TLR4 protein expression by blood-borne noxious agents.

  2. Pulmonary edema

    MedlinePlus

    ... Saunders; 2015:chap 23. Matthay MA, Martin TR, Murray JF. Pulmonary edema. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray & Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  3. Brain Natriuretic Peptide Levels and the Occurrence of Subclinical Pulmonary Edema in Healthy Lowlanders at High Altitude.

    PubMed

    Pagé, Maude; Henri, Christine; Pagé, Pierre; Sauvé, Claude; Schampaert, Erick

    2015-08-01

    High altitude (HA) pulmonary edema (PE) results from complex and misunderstood interactions between adaptation mechanisms. We assessed the occurrence of subclinical PE and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels among nonacclimatized individuals during an expedition on Mount Elbrus (5642 m). Seven subjects underwent assessment of vital signs, Lake Louise Score, ultrasound lung comets using handheld echography and circulating BNP using capillary testing at different stages of ascension, in addition to baseline echocardiography. Friedman tests were used to compare serial measurements. Heart rate, Lake Louise Score (P < 0.0001) and blood pressure (P = 0.037) increased during ascension; oxygen saturation decreased (P < 0.0001). BNP increased (40.7 ± 16.8 vs 19.7 ± 3.04 pg/mL; P < 0.01) after the summit, as did ultrasound lung comet count throughout ascension (P < 0.0001), but both parameters were not correlated (r = 0.36; P = 0.42). Post-summit peak BNP correlated with baseline left ventricular mass index (r = -0.79; P = 0.033). This study confirms the high incidence of subclinical PE during subacute exposure to hypobaric hypoxia and enhancement of this phenomenon after exertion. Although not correlated with the degree of PE, BNP levels increased after sustained effort at HA, but not at rest. Further investigation is needed to determine the mechanisms underlying the BNP response at HA and its usefulness as a monitoring tool during expeditions. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Elevated pulmonary artery pressure and brain natriuretic peptide in high altitude pulmonary edema susceptible non-mountaineers

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rajinder K.; Himashree, G.; Singh, Krishan; Soree, Poonam; Desiraju, Koundinya; Agrawal, Anurag; Ghosh, Dishari; Dass, Deepak; Reddy, Prassana K.; Panjwani, Usha; Singh, Shashi Bala

    2016-01-01

    Exaggerated pulmonary pressor response to hypoxia is a pathgonomic feature observed in high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) susceptible mountaineers. It was investigated whether measurement of basal pulmonary artery pressure (Ppa) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) could improve identification of HAPE susceptible subjects in a non-mountaineer population. We studied BNP levels, baseline hemodynamics and the response to hypoxia (FIo2 = 0.12 for 30 min duration at sea level) in 11 HAPE resistant (no past history of HAPE, Control) and 11 HAPE susceptible (past history of HAPE, HAPE-S) subjects. Baseline Ppa (19.31 ± 3.63 vs 15.68 ± 2.79 mm Hg, p < 0.05) and plasma BNP levels (52.39 ± 32.9 vs 15.05 ± 9.6 pg/ml, p < 0.05) were high and stroke volume was less (p < 0.05) in HAPE-S subjects compared to control. Acute hypoxia produced an exaggerated increase in heart rate (p < 0.05), mean arterial pressure (p < 0.05) and Ppa (28.2 ± 5.8 vs 19.33 ± 3.74 mm Hg, p < 0.05) and fall in peripheral oxygen saturation (p < 0.05) in HAPE-S compared to control. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves showed that Ppa response to acute hypoxia was the best variable to identify HAPE susceptibility (AUC 0.92) but BNP levels provided comparable information (AUC 0.85). BNP levels are easy to determine and may represent an important marker for the determination of HAPE susceptibility. PMID:26892302

  5. Clinical Outcomes of Wulingsan Subtraction Decoction Treatment of Postoperative Brain Edema and Fever as a Complication of Glioma Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Wei-rong; Zhang, Feng-e; Diao, Bao-zhong; Zhang, Yue-ying

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the efficacy of Wulingsan subtraction (五苓散加减 WLSS) decoction in the treatment of postoperative brain edema and fever as a complication of glioma neurosurgery. Methods. This retrospective study was conducted at the Department of Neurosurgery of Liaocheng People's Hospital. Patients hospitalized between March 2011 and December 2014 were divided into three groups: Group A received WLSS oral liquid (50 mL), twice a day; Group B received an intravenous infusion of mannitol; and Group C received WLSS combined with mannitol (n = 30 patients per group). All patients were treated for 10 days continuously. Therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by measuring body temperature and indicators of renal function before and 3, 5, and 10 days after treatment. Results. Compared to the other two groups, significantly greater clinical efficacy was observed in the patients treated with mannitol (Group B; P < 0.05), although marked clinical efficacy was also observed over time in patients treated with WLSS (Group A). After 5 days, the quantifiable effects of the WLSS and mannitol combination group (Group C) were substantial (P < 0.05). The renal damage in Group B was more obvious after 5 days and 10 days. Conclusion. Compared with mannitol treatment alone, WLSS combined with mannitol induced a more rapid reduction in body temperature. Our findings suggest that patients should be started on mannitol for 3 days and then switched to WLSS to achieve obvious antipyretic effects and protect renal function. This method of treatment should be considered for clinical applications. PMID:27019661

  6. Effect of propofol post-treatment on blood-brain barrier integrity and cerebral edema after transient cerebral ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Hoon; Cui, Hui Song; Shin, Seo Kyung; Kim, Jeong Min; Kim, So Yeon; Lee, Jong Eun; Koo, Bon-Nyeo

    2013-11-01

    Although propofol has been reported to offer neuroprotection against cerebral ischemia injury, its impact on cerebral edema following ischemia is not clear. The objective of this investigation is to evaluate the effects of propofol post-treatment on blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity and cerebral edema after transient cerebral ischemia and its mechanism of action, focusing on modulation of aquaporins (AQPs), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α. Cerebral ischemia was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 78) by occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery for 1 h. For post-treatment with propofol, 1 mg kg(-1) min(-1) of propofol was administered for 1 h from the start of reperfusion. Nineteen rats undergoing sham surgery were also included in the investigation. Edema and BBB integrity were assessed by quantification of cerebral water content and extravasation of Evans blue, respectively, following 24 h of reperfusion. In addition, the expression of AQP-1, AQP-4, MMP-2, and MMP-9 was determined 24 h after reperfusion and the expression of HIF-1α was determined 8 h after reperfusion. Propofol post-treatment significantly reduced cerebral edema (P < 0.05) and BBB disruption (P < 0.05) compared with the saline-treated control. The expression of AQP-1, AQP-4, MMP-2, and MMP-9 at 24 h and of HIF-1α at 8 h following ischemia/reperfusion was significantly suppressed in the propofol post-treatment group (P < 0.05). Propofol post-treatment attenuated cerebral edema after transient cerebral ischemia, in association with reduced expression of AQP-1, AQP-4, MMP-2, and MMP-9. The decreased expression of AQPs and MMPs after propofol post-treatment might result from suppression of HIF-1α expression.

  7. Experimental models of repetitive brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Weber, John T

    2007-01-01

    Repetitive traumatic brain injury (TBI) occurs in a significant portion of trauma patients, especially in specific populations, such as child abuse victims or athletes involved in contact sports (e.g. boxing, football, hockey, and soccer). A continually emerging hypothesis is that repeated mild injuries may cause cumulative damage to the brain, resulting in long-term cognitive dysfunction. The growing attention to this hypothesis is reflected in several recent experimental studies of repeated mild TBI in vivo. These reports generally demonstrate cellular and cognitive dysfunction after repetitive injury using rodent TBI models. In some cases, data suggests that the effects of a second mild TBI may be synergistic, rather than additive. In addition, some studies have found increases in cellular markers associated with Alzheimer's disease after repeated mild injuries, which demonstrates a direct experimental link between repetitive TBI and neurodegenerative disease. To complement the findings from humans and in vivo experimentation, my laboratory group has investigated the effects of repeated trauma in cultured brain cells using a model of stretch-induced mechanical injury in vitro. In these studies, hippocampal cells exhibited cumulative damage when mild stretch injuries were repeated at either 1-h or 24-h intervals. Interestingly, the extent of damage to the cells was dependent on the time between repeated injuries. Also, a very low level of stretch, which produced no cell damage on its own, induced cell damage when it was repeated several times at a short interval (every 2 min). Although direct comparisons to the clinical situation are difficult, these types of repetitive, low-level, mechanical stresses may be similar to the insults received by certain athletes, such as boxers, or hockey and soccer players. This type of in vitro model could provide a reliable system in which to study the mechanisms underlying cellular dysfunction following repeated injuries. As

  8. Selective vasopressin-1a receptor antagonist prevents brain edema, reduces astrocytic cell swelling and GFAP, V1aR and AQP4 expression after focal traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Marmarou, Christina R; Liang, Xiuyin; Abidi, Naqeeb H; Parveen, Shanaz; Taya, Keisuke; Henderson, Scott C; Young, Harold F; Filippidis, Aristotelis S; Baumgarten, Clive M

    2014-09-18

    A secondary and often lethal consequence of traumatic brain injury is cellular edema that we posit is due to astrocytic swelling caused by transmembrane water fluxes augmented by vasopressin-regulated aquaporin-4 (AQP4). We therefore tested whether vasopressin 1a receptor (V1aR) inhibition would suppress astrocyte AQP4, reduce astrocytic edema, and thereby diminish TBI-induced edematous changes. V1aR inhibition by SR49059 significantly reduced brain edema after cortical contusion injury (CCI) in rat 5h post-injury. Injured-hemisphere brain water content (n=6 animals/group) and astrocytic area (n=3/group) were significantly higher in CCI-vehicle (80.5±0.3%; 18.0±1.4 µm(2)) versus sham groups (78.3±0.1%; 9.5±0.9 µm(2)), and SR49059 blunted CCI-induced increases in brain edema (79.0±0.2%; 9.4±0.8µm(2)). CCI significantly up-regulated GFAP, V1aR and AQP4 protein levels and SR49059 suppressed injury induced up regulation (n=6/group). In CCI-vehicle, sham and CCI-SR49059 groups, GFAP was 1.58±0.04, 0.47±0.02, and 0.81±0.03, respectively; V1aR was 1.00±0.06, 0.45±0.05, and 0.46±0.09; and AQP4 was 2.03±0.34, 0.49±0.04, and 0.92±0.22. Confocal immunohistochemistry gave analogous results. In CCI-vehicle, sham and CCI-SR49059 groups, fluorescence intensity of GFAP was 349±38, 56±5, and 244±30, respectively, V1aR was 601±71, 117.8±14, and 390±76, and AQP4 was 818±117, 158±5, and 458±55 (n=3/group). The results support that edema was predominantly cellular following CCI and documented that V1aR inhibition with SR49059 suppressed injury-induced up regulation of GFAP, V1A and AQP4, blunting edematous changes. Our findings suggest V1aR inhibitors may be potential therapeutic tools to prevent cellular swelling and provide treatment for post-traumatic brain edema.

  9. Molecular pathology of brain edema after severe burns in forensic autopsy cases with special regard to the importance of reference gene selection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Ishikawa, Takaki; Michiue, Tomomi; Zhu, Bao-Li; Guan, Da-Wei; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2013-09-01

    Brain edema is believed to be linked to high mortality incidence after severe burns. The present study investigated the molecular pathology of brain damage and responses involving brain edema in forensic autopsy cases of fire fatality (n = 55) compared with sudden cardiac death (n = 11), mechanical asphyxia (n = 13), and non-brain injury cases (n = 22). Postmortem mRNA and immunohistochemical expressions of aquaporins (AQPs), claudin5 (CLDN5), and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were examined. Prolonged deaths due to severe burns showed an increase in brain water content, but relative mRNA quantification, using different normalization methods, showed inconsistent results: in prolonged deaths due to severe burns, higher expression levels were detected for all markers when three previously validated reference genes, PES1, POLR2A, and IPO8, were used for normalization, higher for AQP1 and MMP9 when GAPDH alone was used for normalization and higher for MMP9, but lower for MMP2 when B2M alone was used for normalization. Additionally, when B2M alone was used for normalization, higher expression of AQP4 was detected in acute fire deaths. Furthermore, the expression stability values of these five reference genes calculated by geNorm demonstrated that B2M was the least stable one, followed by GAPDH. In immunostaining, only AQP1 and MMP9 showed differences among the causes of death: they were evident in most prolonged deaths due to severe burns. These findings suggest that systematic analysis of gene expressions using real-time PCR might be a useful procedure in forensic death investigation, and validation of reference genes is crucial.

  10. Pharmacological reduction of brain edema induced by intracarotid infusion of protamine sulphate: a comparison between a free radical scavenger and an AMPA receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Johansson, B B; Westergren, I

    1994-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) of rats was opened by infusing 10 mg protamine sulphate (200 microliters in 30 s) into the right internal carotid artery. Ten minutes later, tirilazad, a 21-aminosteroid (3 mg/kg): NBQX, an AMPA receptor antagonist (5 mg/kg); or dixyrazine, a phenotiazine derivate (10 mg/kg), was administered intravenously and the rats were killed 2 h after protamine infusion. Brain specific gravity was determined in the frontal, parietal and occipital cortex and in the striatum. In separate experiments, serum albumin content was determined in the brain of rats by immunoelectrophoresis 2 h after protamine infusion with or without tirilazad pretreatment. Specific gravity was significantly higher in all of the studied brain regions in rats given tirilazad or NBQX than in those given vehicle or dixyrazine (p < 0.001). A combination of tirilazad and NBQX was significantly more efficient than either drug alone in reducing edema in the occipital cortex (p < 0.05) and more efficient than NBQX alone in the frontal and parietal cortex (p < 0.05). None of the drugs reduced the albumin content in CSF; in addition, tirilazad failed to reduce albumin extravasation in the brain and CSF when given before protamine infusion. We conclude that the anti-edematous effect of tirilazad and NBQX is related to cellular events within the brain and not to a reduction of leakage over the BBB.

  11. Anti-inflammatory effect of the latex from Calotropis procera in three different experimental models: peritonitis, paw edema and hemorrhagic cystitis.

    PubMed

    Alencar, N M N; Figueiredo, I S T; Vale, M R; Bitencurt, F S; Oliveira, J S; Ribeiro, R A; Ramos, M V

    2004-12-01

    Latex from Calotropis procera is widely used in folk medicine as a rich source of biologically active compounds capable of promoting diverse benefits such as control of dermal fungal infections, antimicrobial activities and pain relief among other useful properties. The aim of this work was to characterize the anti-inflammatory effect of a non-dialysable protein fraction recovered from the rubber-free latex using three different experimental models when administrated intravenously. In vivo neutrophil migration induced by carrageenin (500 microg) was severely inhibited by doses of latex proteins reaching maximum inhibition (80%) at 100 mg/kg. Paw edema exacerbated by the effect of carrageenin was almost completely suppressed after 4 hours and was controlled within the first hour following latex protein administration. However, the same latex fraction was completely unable to control the paw edema invoked with dextran stimulation (400 microg), suggesting that the inhibitory effect of the latex is likely to be cell-mediated. Iphosphamide-induced vesical edema in mice was also largely prevented by the latex protein fraction. These results indicate that an effect similar to that of mesna, the classical drug used for this purpose, is operative. Our findings suggest that the sample tested seems to act over a wide spectrum as a novel anti-inflammatory agent. The results also suggest that the active molecules are of a proteinaceous nature despite the presence of numerous secondary metabolites naturally occurring in the C. procera latex.

  12. Progress in Drug Treatment of Cerebral Edema.

    PubMed

    Deng, Y Y; Shen, F C; Xie, D; Han, Q P; Fang, M; Chen, C B; Zeng, H K

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral edema causes intracranial hypertension (ICH) which leads to severe outcome of patients in the clinical setting. Effective anti-edema therapy may significantly decrease the mortality in a variety of neurological conditions. At present drug treatment is a cornerstone in the management of cerebral edema. Osmotherapy has been the mainstay of pharmacologic therapy. Mannitol and hypertonic saline (HS) are the most commonly used osmotic agents. The relative safety and efficacy of HS and mannitol in the treatment of cerebral edema and reduction of enhanced ICP have been demonstrated in the past decades. Apart from its osmotic force, HS exerts anti-edema effects partly through inhibition of Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) Cotransporter-1 (NKCC1) and aquaporin 4 (AQP4) expression in astrocytes. Melatonin may also reduce brain edema and exert neuroprotective effect on several central nervous system diseases through inhibition of inflammatory response. The inhibitors of Na/H exchanger, NKCC and AQP4 may attenuate brain edema formation through inhibition of excessive transportation of ion and water from blood into the cerebral tissue. In this review we survey some of the most recent findings in the drug treatment of brain edema focusing on the use of osmotherapy, melatonin and inhibitors of ion cotransporters and water channels. A better understanding of the molecular mechanism of these agents would help to improve in the clinical management of patients with brain edema.

  13. Vitamins and nutrients as primary treatments in experimental brain injury: Clinical implications for nutraceutical therapies.

    PubMed

    Vonder Haar, Cole; Peterson, Todd C; Martens, Kris M; Hoane, Michael R

    2016-06-01

    With the numerous failures of pharmaceuticals to treat traumatic brain injury in humans, more researchers have become interested in combination therapies. This is largely due to the multimodal nature of damage from injury, which causes excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, edema, neuroinflammation and cell death. Polydrug treatments have the potential to target multiple aspects of the secondary injury cascade, while many previous therapies focused on one particular aspect. Of specific note are vitamins, minerals and nutrients that can be utilized to supplement other therapies. Many of these have low toxicity, are already FDA approved and have minimal interactions with other drugs, making them attractive targets for therapeutics. Over the past 20 years, interest in supplementation and supraphysiologic dosing of nutrients for brain injury has increased and indeed many vitamins and nutrients now have a considerable body of the literature backing their use. Here, we review several of the prominent therapies in the category of nutraceutical treatment for brain injury in experimental models, including vitamins (B2, B3, B6, B9, C, D, E), herbs and traditional medicines (ginseng, Gingko biloba), flavonoids, and other nutrients (magnesium, zinc, carnitine, omega-3 fatty acids). While there is still much work to be done, several of these have strong potential for clinical therapies, particularly with regard to polydrug regimens. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:Brain injury and recovery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Numerical impact simulation of gradually increased kinetic energy transfer has the potential to break up folded protein structures resulting in cytotoxic brain tissue edema.

    PubMed

    von Holst, Hans; Li, Xiaogai

    2013-07-01

    Although the consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and its treatment have been improved, there is still a substantial lack of understanding the mechanisms. Numerical simulation of the impact can throw further lights on site and mechanism of action. A finite element model of the human head and brain tissue was used to simulate TBI. The consequences of gradually increased kinetic energy transfer was analyzed by evaluating the impact intracranial pressure (ICP), strain level, and their potential influences on binding forces in folded protein structures. The gradually increased kinetic energy was found to have the potential to break apart bonds of Van der Waals in all impacts and hydrogen bonds at simulated impacts from 6 m/s and higher, thereby superseding the energy in folded protein structures. Further, impacts below 6 m/s showed none or very slight increase in impact ICP and strain levels, whereas impacts of 6 m/s or higher showed a gradual increase of the impact ICP and strain levels reaching over 1000 KPa and over 30%, respectively. The present simulation study shows that the free kinetic energy transfer, impact ICP, and strain levels all have the potential to initiate cytotoxic brain tissue edema by unfolding protein structures. The definition of mild, moderate, and severe TBI should thus be looked upon as the same condition and separated only by a gradual severity of impact.

  15. Reperfusion pulmonary edema

    SciTech Connect

    Klausner, J.M.; Paterson, I.S.; Mannick, J.A.; Valeri, C.R.; Shepro, D.; Hechtman, H.B. )

    1989-02-17

    Reperfusion following lower-torso ischemia in humans leads to respiratory failure manifest by pulmonary hypertension, hypoxemia, and noncardiogenic pulmonary edema. The mechanism of injury has been studied in the sheep lung lymph preparation, where it has been demonstrated that the reperfusion resulting in pulmonary edema is due to an increase in microvascular permeability of the lung to protein. This respiratory failure caused by reperfusion appears to be an inflammatory reaction associated with intravascular release of the chemoattractants leukotriene B{sub 4} and thromboxane. Histological studies of the lung in experimental animals revealed significant accumulation of neutrophils but not platelets in alveolar capillaries. The authors conclude that thromboxane generated and released from the ischemic tissue is responsible for the transient pulmonary hypertension. Second, it is likely that the chemoattractants are responsible for leukosequestration, and third, neutrophils, oxygen-derived free radicals, and thromboxane moderate the altered lung permeability.

  16. Brain schistosomiasis in mice experimentally infected with Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Lambertucci, José Roberto; Fidelis, Thiago André; Pereira, Thiago Almeida; Coelho, Paulo Marcos Zech; Araujo, Neuza; Souza, Márcia Maria de; Brasileiro Filho, Geraldo; Pereira, Fausto Edmundo Lima; Antunes, Carlos Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    Human neuroschistosomiasis has been reported in the literature, but the possibility of modeling neuroschistosomiasis in mice is controversial. In two research laboratories in Brazil that maintain the Schistosoma mansoni life cycle in rodents, two mice developed signs of brain disease (hemiplegia and spinning), and both were autopsied. S. mansoni eggs, both with and without granuloma formation, were observed in the brain and meninges of both mice by optical microscopy. This is the first description of eggs in the brains of symptomatic mice that were experimentally infected with S. mansoni. An investigation of experimental neuroschistosomiasis is now feasible.

  17. Vitamins and Nutrients as Primary Treatments in Experimental Brain Injury: Clinical Implications for Nutraceutical Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Haar, Cole Vonder; Peterson, Todd C.; Martens, Kris M.; Hoane, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    With the numerous failures of pharmaceuticals to treat traumatic brain injury in humans, more researchers have become interested in combination therapies. This is largely due to the multimodal nature of damage from injury, which causes excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, edema, neuroinflammation and cell death. Polydrug treatments have the potential to target multiple aspects of the secondary injury cascade, while many previous therapies focused on one particular aspect. Of specific note are vitamins, minerals and nutrients that can be utilized to supplement other therapies. Many of these have low toxicity, are already FDA approved and have minimal interactions with other drugs, making them attractive targets for therapeutics. Over the past 20 years, interest in supplementation and supraphysiologic dosing of nutrients for brain injury has increased and indeed many vitamins and nutrients now have a considerable body of literature backing their use. Here, we review several of the prominent therapies in the category of nutraceutical treatment for brain injury in experimental models, including vitamins (B2, B3, B6, B9, C, D, E), herbs and traditional medicines (ginseng, gingko biloba), flavonoids, and other nutrients (magnesium, zinc, carnitine, omega-3 fatty acids). While there is still much work to be done, several of these have strong potential for clinical therapies, particularly with regard to polydrug regimens. PMID:26723564

  18. Immediate, but Not Delayed, Microsurgical Skull Reconstruction Exacerbates Brain Damage in Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Tsz; Kaneko, Yuji; van Loveren, Harry; Borlongan, Cesario V.

    2012-01-01

    Moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) often results in malformations to the skull. Aesthetic surgical maneuvers may offer normalized skull structure, but inconsistent surgical closure of the skull area accompanies TBI. We examined whether wound closure by replacement of skull flap and bone wax would allow aesthetic reconstruction of the TBI-induced skull damage without causing any detrimental effects to the cortical tissue. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to TBI using the controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury model. Immediately after the TBI surgery, animals were randomly assigned to skull flap replacement with or without bone wax or no bone reconstruction, then were euthanized at five days post-TBI for pathological analyses. The skull reconstruction provided normalized gross bone architecture, but 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride and hematoxylin and eosin staining results revealed larger cortical damage in these animals compared to those that underwent no surgical maneuver at all. Brain swelling accompanied TBI, especially the severe model, that could have relieved the intracranial pressure in those animals with no skull reconstruction. In contrast, the immediate skull reconstruction produced an upregulation of the edema marker aquaporin-4 staining, which likely prevented the therapeutic benefits of brain swelling and resulted in larger cortical infarcts. Interestingly, TBI animals introduced to a delay in skull reconstruction (i.e., 2 days post-TBI) showed significantly reduced edema and infarcts compared to those exposed to immediate skull reconstruction. That immediate, but not delayed, skull reconstruction may exacerbate TBI-induced cortical tissue damage warrants a careful consideration of aesthetic repair of the skull in TBI. PMID:22438975

  19. Ursolic Acid Ameliorates Early Brain Injury After Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury in Mice by Activating the Nrf2 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hui; Wang, Handong; Zhu, Lin; Wei, Wuting

    2017-02-01

    Previous studies have indicated oxidative stress and inflammatory injury as significant contributors to the secondary damage associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Ursolic acid (UA) has been demonstrated to exert anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects on cerebral ischemia by activating the nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway. However, the effects of UA on TBI remain unclear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential roles of UA in the activation of the Nrf2 pathway using an experimental TBI model and the underlying mechanism. Wild-type (WT) and Nrf2((-/-)) mice were divided into eight groups: (1) sham; (2) TBI; (3) TBI + vehicle; (4) TBI + 50 mg/kg UA; (5) TBI + 100 mg/kg UA; (6) TBI + 150 mg/kg UA; (7) TBI + Nrf2((-/-)) + vehicle; (8) TBI + Nrf2((-/-)) + UA. All mice underwent the TBI with the exception of the sham group. The neurologic outcomes of the mice were evaluated at 24 h after TBI, as well as the expression of Nrf2, NQO1, HO1,SOD, GPx, and MDA. Treatment of UA significantly ameliorated brain edema and the neurological insufficiencies after TBI. In addition, UA treatment markedly strengthened the nuclear translocation of Nrf2 protein and increased the expression of NQO1 and HO1. Moreover, UA significantly increased the expression of AKT, an Nrf2 upstream factor, suggesting that UA play a neuroprotective role through the activation of the Nrf2-ARE signal pathway. On the contrary, UA showed no neuroprotective effect on the Nrf2((-/-)) mice. These data indicated that UA increases the activity of antioxidant enzymes and attenuated brain injury via Nrf2 factor.

  20. Sesamin alleviates blood-brain barrier disruption in mice with experimental traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying-Liang; Xu, Zhi-Ming; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Yang, Dian-Xu; Ding, Jun; Chen, Hao; Yuan, Fang; Tian, Heng-Li

    2017-08-03

    Sesamin, a major lignan of sesame oil, was reported to have neuroprotective effects in several brain injury models. However, its protective action in maintaining blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity has not been studied. In this study we investigated the effects of sesamin on the BBB in a mouse model of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and explored the underlying mechanisms. Adult male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to a controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury and then received sesamin (30 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1), ip). The mice were euthanized on the 1(st) and 3(rd) days after CCI injury and samples were collected for analysis. Sesamin treatment significantly attenuated CCI-induced brain edema on the 1(st) and 3(rd) days after the injury, evidenced by the decreases in water content, tissue hemoglobin levels, Evans blue extravasation and AQP4 expression levels in the ipsilateral cortical tissue compared with the vehicle-treated group. Furthermore, sesamin treatment significantly alleviated CCI-induced loss of the tight junction proteins ZO-1 and occludin in the brain tissues. The neuroprotective mechanisms of sesamin were further explored in cultured mouse brain microvascular bEnd.3 cells subjected to biaxial stretch injury (SI). Pretreatment with sesamin (50 μmol/L) significantly alleviated SI-induced loss of ZO-1 in bEnd.3 cells. Furthermore, we revealed that pretreatment with sesamin significantly attenuated SI-induced oxidative stress and early-stage apoptosis in bEnd.3 cells by decreasing the activation of ERK, p-38 and caspase-3. In conclusion, sesamin alleviates BBB disruption at least partly through its anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic effects on endothelial cells in CCI injury. These findings suggest that sesamin may be a promising potential therapeutic intervention for preventing disruption of the BBB after TBI.

  1. Sustained (S)-roscovitine delivery promotes neuroprotection associated with functional recovery and decrease in brain edema in a randomized blind focal cerebral ischemia study.

    PubMed

    Rousselet, Estelle; Létondor, Anne; Menn, Bénédicte; Courbebaisse, Yann; Quillé, Marie-Lise; Timsit, Serge

    2017-01-01

    Stroke is a devastating disorder that significantly contributes to death, disability and healthcare costs. In ischemic stroke, the only current acute therapy is recanalization, but the narrow therapeutic window less than 6 h limits its application. The current challenge is to prevent late cell death, with concomitant therapy targeting the ischemic cascade to widen the therapeutic window. Among potential neuroprotective drugs, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors such as (S)-roscovitine are of particular relevance. We previously showed that (S)-roscovitine crossed the blood-brain barrier and was neuroprotective in a dose-dependent manner in two models of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). According to the Stroke Therapy Academic Industry Roundtable guidelines, the pharmacokinetics of (S)-roscovitine and the optimal mode of delivery and therapeutic dose in rats were investigated. Combination of intravenous (IV) and continuous sub-cutaneous (SC) infusion led to early and sustained delivery of (S)-roscovitine. Furthermore, in a randomized blind study on a transient MCAo rat model, we showed that this mode of delivery reduced both infarct and edema volume and was beneficial to neurological outcome. Within the framework of preclinical studies for stroke therapy development, we here provide data to improve translation of pre-clinical studies into successful clinical human trials.

  2. [Effects of alcohol consumption on traumatic brain injury].

    PubMed

    Katada, Ryuichi

    2011-10-01

    It has been well known that alcohol consumption affects traumatic brain injury. The mechanism of detrimental effect of ethanol on traumatic brain injury has not been clarified. This review focused on the relationship among traumatic brain injury, ethanol and aquaporin-4. We have reported that ethanol increased brain edema after brain contusion and decreased survival rates in rats. It was suggested that increasing brain edema by ethanol after brain contusion may be caused by oxidative stress. Brain edema consists of cytotoxic brain edema, vasogenic brain edema, interstitial brain edema and osmotic edema. Ethanol mainly increases cytotoxic brain edema. Both alcohol consumption and brain contusion cause oxidative stress. Antioxidant treatment decreases cytotoxic brain edema. Aquaporin-4, an water channel, was increased by ethanol 24 hr after traumatic brain injury in rat. The aquaporin-4 inhibitor decreased brain edema after brain contusion and increased survival rates under ethanol consumption. Aquaporin-4 may have strict relation between ethanol and brain edema increasing after brain contusion.

  3. Novel treatment targets for cerebral edema.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Brian P; Kahle, Kristopher T; Simard, J Marc

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral edema is a common finding in a variety of neurological conditions, including ischemic stroke, traumatic brain injury, ruptured cerebral aneurysm, and neoplasia. With the possible exception of neoplasia, most pathological processes leading to edema seem to share similar molecular mechanisms of edema formation. Challenges to brain-cell volume homeostasis can have dramatic consequences, given the fixed volume of the rigid skull and the effect of swelling on secondary neuronal injury. With even small changes in cellular and extracellular volume, cerebral edema can compromise regional or global cerebral blood flow and metabolism or result in compression of vital brain structures. Osmotherapy has been the mainstay of pharmacologic therapy and is typically administered as part of an escalating medical treatment algorithm that can include corticosteroids, diuretics, and pharmacological cerebral metabolic suppression. Novel treatment targets for cerebral edema include the Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) co-transporter (NKCC1) and the SUR1-regulated NC(Ca-ATP) (SUR1/TRPM4) channel. These two ion channels have been demonstrated to be critical mediators of edema formation in brain-injured states. Their specific inhibitors, bumetanide and glibenclamide, respectively, are well-characterized Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs with excellent safety profiles. Directed inhibition of these ion transporters has the potential to reduce the development of cerebral edema and is currently being investigated in human clinical trials. Another class of treatment agents for cerebral edema is vasopressin receptor antagonists. Euvolemic hyponatremia is present in a myriad of neurological conditions resulting in cerebral edema. A specific antagonist of the vasopressin V1A- and V2-receptor, conivaptan, promotes water excretion while sparing electrolytes through a process known as aquaresis.

  4. ANAEROBIC GLYCOLYSIS OF THE BRAIN IN EXPERIMENTAL POLIOMYELITIS

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Harland G.; Rusoff, Irving I.; Reiner, John M.

    1945-01-01

    The rate of anaerobic glycolysis of brain tissue was compared for normal animals and animals with experimentally induced poliomyelitis, using two different strains of mice and two different procedures. The report of interference of poliomyelitis with anaerobic glycolysis of brain was not confirmed. In one series there was a small increase and in the other series a small decrease in the brain QCOCO2N2 calculated for infected animals as compared to normal animals. When the calculations were made on the basis of wet weight of brain there was no difference in glycolysis. It is considered that the methods so far used for study of the enzymes may be inadequate, and that no decision is as yet possible on the effect of poliomyelitis on anaerobic glycolysis. PMID:19871449

  5. Cytotoxic edema: mechanisms of pathological cell swelling

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Danny; Bhatta, Sergei; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J. Marc

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral edema is caused by a variety of pathological conditions that affect the brain. It is associated with two separate pathophysiological processes with distinct molecular and physiological antecedents: those related to cytotoxic (cellular) edema of neurons and astrocytes, and those related to transcapillary flux of Na+ and other ions, water, and serum macromolecules. In this review, the authors focus exclusively on the first of these two processes. Cytotoxic edema results from unchecked or uncompensated influx of cations, mainly Na+, through cation channels. The authors review the different cation channels that have been implicated in the formation of cytotoxic edema of astrocytes and neurons in different pathological states. A better understanding of these molecular mechanisms holds the promise of improved treatments of cerebral edema and of the secondary injury produced by this pathological process. PMID:17613233

  6. Effect of carnosine on rats under experimental brain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Gallant, S; Kukley, M; Stvolinsky, S; Bulygina, E; Boldyrev, A

    2000-06-01

    The effect of dietary carnosine on the behavioral and biochemical characteristics of rats under experimental ischemia was studied. Carnosine was shown to improve the animals orientation and learning in "Open Field" and "T-Maze" tests, and this effect was accompanied with an increase in glutamate binding to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in brain synaptosomes. Long-term brain ischemia induced by both sides' occlusion of common carotid arteries resulted in 55% mortality of experimental rats, and those who survived were characterized by partial suppression of orientation in T-maze. In the group of rats treated with carnosine, mortality after ischemic attack was decreased (from 55% to 17%) and most of the learning parameters were kept at the pre-ischemic level. Monoamine oxidase B (MAO B) activity in brain of the carnosine treated rats was not changed by ischemia significantly (compared to that of ischemic untreated rats) but NMDA binding to brain synaptosomal membranes being increased by ischemic attack was significantly suppressed and reached the level characteristic of normal brain. The suggestion was made that carnosine possesses a dual effect on NMDA receptors resulting in increase in their amount after long-term treatment but decrease the capacity to bind NMDA after ischemic attack.

  7. Salidroside improves behavioral and histological outcomes and reduces apoptosis via PI3K/Akt signaling after experimental traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Szu-Fu; Tsai, Hsin-Ju; Hung, Tai-Ho; Chen, Chien-Cheng; Lee, Chao Yu; Wu, Chun-Hu; Wang, Pei-Yi; Liao, Nien-Chieh

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces a complex sequence of apopototic cascades that contribute to secondary tissue damage. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of salidroside, a phenolic glycoside with potent anti-apoptotic properties, on behavioral and histological outcomes, brain edema, and apoptosis following experimental TBI and the possible involvement of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway. Mice subjected to controlled cortical impact injury received intraperitoneal salidroside (20, or 50 mg/kg) or vehicle injection 10 min after injury. Behavioral studies, histology analysis and brain water content assessment were performed. Levels of PI3K/Akt signaling-related molecules, apoptosis-related proteins, cytochrome C (CytoC), and Smac/DIABLO were also analyzed. LY294002, a PI3K inhibitor, was administered to examine the mechanism of protection. The protective effect of salidroside was also investigated in primary cultured neurons subjected to stretch injury. Treatment with 20 mg/kg salidroside significantly improved functional recovery and reduced brain tissue damage up to post-injury day 28. Salidroside also significantly reduced neuronal death, apoptosis, and brain edema at day 1. These changes were associated with significant decreases in cleaved caspase-3, CytoC, and Smac/DIABLO at days 1 and 3. Salidroside increased phosphorylation of Akt on Ser473 and the mitochondrial Bcl-2/Bax ratio at day 1, and enhanced phosphorylation of Akt on Thr308 at day 3. This beneficial effect was abolished by pre-injection of LY294002. Moreover, delayed administration of salidroside at 3 or 6 h post-injury reduced neuronal damage at day 1. Salidroside treatment also decreased neuronal vulnerability to stretch-induced injury in vitro. Post-injury salidroside improved long-term behavioral and histological outcomes and reduced brain edema and apoptosis following TBI, at least partially via the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  8. Diffuse Interstitial Brain Edema in Patients With End-Stage Renal Disease Undergoing Hemodialysis: A Tract-Based Spatial Statistics Study

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiang; Wen, Ji-qiu; Qi, Rong-feng; Luo, Song; Zhong, Jian-hui; Chen, Hui-juan; Ji, Gong-jun; Lu, Guang Ming; Zhang, Long Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Abstract To investigate white matter (WM) alterations and their correlation with cognition function in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) approach. This prospective HIPAA-complaint study was approved by our institutional review board. Eighty HD ESRD patients and 80 sex- and age-matched healthy controls were included. Neuropsychological (NP) tests and laboratory tests, including serum creatinine and urea, were performed. DTI data were processed to obtain fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) maps with TBSS. FA and MD difference between the 2 groups were compared. We also explored the associations of FA values in WM regions of lower FA with ages, NP tests, disease, and dialysis durations, serum creatinine and urea levels of ESRD patients. Compared with controls, HD ESRD patients had lower FA value in the corpus callosum, bilateral corona radiate, posterior thalamic radiation, left superior longitudinal fasciculus, and right cingulum (P < 0.05, FWE corrected). Almost all WM regions had increased MD in HD ESRD patients compared with controls (P < 0.05, FWE corrected). In some regions with lower FA, FA values showed moderate correlations with ages, NP tests, and serum urea levels. There was no correlation between FA values and HD durations, disease durations, and serum creatinine levels of ESRD patients (all P > 0.05). Diffuse interstitial brain edema and moderate WM integrity disruption occurring in HD ESRD patients, which correlated with cognitive dysfunction, and serum urea levels might be a risk factor for these WM changes. PMID:25526483

  9. Protective effects of intraperitoneal vitamin C, aprotinin and melatonin administration on retinal edema during experimental uveitis in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Kükner, A Sahap; Kükner, Aysel; Naziroğlu, Mustafa; Colakoğlu, Neriman; Celebi, Serdal; Yilmaz, Turgut; Aydemir, Orhan

    2004-01-01

    A considerable amount of clinical and experimental evidence exists suggesting the involvement of reactive oxygen substances (ROS) in the aetiology of uveitis. The activated phagocytic system of polymorphonuclear leucocytes in uveitis is involved in the generation of ROS. In addition to their direct free radical scavenging action, aprotinin, melatonin and vitamin C are known to protect against oedema formation and can preserve plasma membrane fluidity and free radical production. Histological changes in the retina that occur during uveitis are not well explained. The purpose of this study was to determine whether vitamin C, aprotinin and melatonin can protect the retina from damage accompanying experimental uveitis (EU). Thirty adult male guinea pigs were divided into five groups of six animals each. The first group was used as control. The right eyes of groups 2, 3, 4 and 5 received an intravitreal injection of bovine serum albumin for induction of experimental uveitis. At the same time and also on the consecutive third day, groups 3, 4 and 5 received intraperitoneal injections of vitamin C (ascorbic acid, 100 mg kg(-1) body wt), aprotinin (20,000 kIU kg(-1) body wt) and melatonin (10 mg kg(-1) body wt), respectively. The animals were killed on the sixth day. The average thickness of the retina and inner plexiform layer for each eye was measured in sagittal section near the optic nerve and expressed in microns. The thickness of the retina and inner plexiform layer in the control group was significantly (p < 0.01) lower than in the group EU as compared with the group EU plus vitamin C, group EU plus aprotinin, group EU plus melatonin (p < 0.05). The thicknesses of the retina and inner plexiform layer in group EU plus vitamin C, group EU plus aprotinin and group EU plus melatonin were significantly (p < 0.01) lower than that in the group EU. The difference in thickness of the retina and inner plexiform layer among the groups 3, 4 and 5 was not significant (p > 0

  10. PATHOGENESIS OF OPTIC DISC EDEMA IN RAISED INTRACRANIAL PRESSURE

    PubMed Central

    Hayreh, Sohan Singh

    2015-01-01

    Optic disc edema in raised intracranial pressure was first described in 1853. Ever since, there has been a plethora of controversial hypotheses to explain its pathogenesis. I have explored the subject comprehensively by doing basic, experimental and clinical studies. My objective was to investigate the fundamentals of the subject, to test the validity of the previous theories, and finally, based on all these studies, to find a logical explanation for the pathogenesis. My studies included the following issues pertinent to the pathogenesis of optic disc edema in raised intracranial pressure: the anatomy and blood supply of the optic nerve, the roles of the sheath of the optic nerve, of the centripetal flow of fluids along the optic nerve, of compression of the central retinal vein, and of acute intracranial hypertension and its associated effects. I found that, contrary to some previous claims, an acute rise of intracranial pressure was not quickly followed by production of optic disc edema. Then, in rhesus monkeys, I produced experimentally chronic intracranial hypertension by slowly increasing in size space-occupying lesions, in different parts of the brain. Those produced raised cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP) and optic disc edema, identical to those seen in patients with elevated CSFP. Having achieved that, I investigated various aspects of optic disc edema by ophthalmoscopy, stereoscopic color fundus photography and fluorescein fundus angiography, and light microscopic, electron microscopic, horseradish peroxidase and axoplasmic transport studies, and evaluated the effect of opening the sheath of the optic nerve on the optic disc edema. This latter study showed that opening the sheath resulted in resolution of optic disc edema on the side of the sheath fenestration, in spite of high intracranial CSFP, proving that a rise of CSFP in the sheath was the essential pre-requisite for the development of optic disc edema. I also investigated optic disc edema with

  11. Pathogenesis of optic disc edema in raised intracranial pressure.

    PubMed

    Hayreh, Sohan Singh

    2016-01-01

    Optic disc edema in raised intracranial pressure was first described in 1853. Ever since, there has been a plethora of controversial hypotheses to explain its pathogenesis. I have explored the subject comprehensively by doing basic, experimental and clinical studies. My objective was to investigate the fundamentals of the subject, to test the validity of the previous theories, and finally, based on all these studies, to find a logical explanation for the pathogenesis. My studies included the following issues pertinent to the pathogenesis of optic disc edema in raised intracranial pressure: the anatomy and blood supply of the optic nerve, the roles of the sheath of the optic nerve, of the centripetal flow of fluids along the optic nerve, of compression of the central retinal vein, and of acute intracranial hypertension and its associated effects. I found that, contrary to some previous claims, an acute rise of intracranial pressure was not quickly followed by production of optic disc edema. Then, in rhesus monkeys, I produced experimentally chronic intracranial hypertension by slowly increasing in size space-occupying lesions, in different parts of the brain. Those produced raised cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP) and optic disc edema, identical to those seen in patients with elevated CSFP. Having achieved that, I investigated various aspects of optic disc edema by ophthalmoscopy, stereoscopic color fundus photography and fluorescein fundus angiography, and light microscopic, electron microscopic, horseradish peroxidase and axoplasmic transport studies, and evaluated the effect of opening the sheath of the optic nerve on the optic disc edema. This latter study showed that opening the sheath resulted in resolution of optic disc edema on the side of the sheath fenestration, in spite of high intracranial CSFP, proving that a rise of CSFP in the sheath was the essential pre-requisite for the development of optic disc edema. I also investigated optic disc edema with

  12. TiO2-Nanowired Delivery of DL-3-n-butylphthalide (DL-NBP) Attenuates Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption, Brain Edema Formation, and Neuronal Damages Following Concussive Head Injury.

    PubMed

    Feng, Lianyuan; Sharma, Aruna; Niu, Feng; Huang, Yin; Lafuente, José Vicente; Muresanu, Dafin Fior; Ozkizilcik, Asya; Tian, Z Ryan; Sharma, Hari Shanker

    2017-08-30

    DL-3-n-butylphthalide (DL-NBP) is one of the constituents of Chinese celery extract that is used to treat stroke, dementia, and ischemic diseases. However, its role in traumatic brain injury is less well known. In this investigation, neuroprotective effects of DL-NBP in concussive head injury (CHI) on brain pathology were explored in a rat model. CHI was inflicted in anesthetized rats by dropping a weight of 114.6 g from a height of 20 cm through a guide tube on the exposed right parietal bone inducing an impact of 0.224 N and allowed them to survive 4 to 24 h after the primary insult. DL-NBP was administered (40 or 60 mg/kg, i.p.) 2 and 4 h after injury in 8-h survival group and 8 and 12 h after trauma in 24-h survival group. In addition, TiO2-nanowired delivery of DL-NBP (20 or 40 mg/kg, i.p.) in 8 and 24 h CHI rats was also examined. Untreated CHI showed a progressive increase in blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown to Evans blue albumin (EBA) and radioiodine (([131]-)I), edema formation, and neuronal injuries. The magnitude and intensity of these pathological changes were most marked in the left hemisphere. Treatment with DL-NBP significantly reduced brain pathology in CHI following 8 to 12 h at 40-mg dose. However, 60-mg dose is needed to thwart brain pathology at 24 h following CHI. On the other hand, TiO2-DL-NBP was effective in reducing brain damage up to 8 or 12 h using a 20-mg dose and only 40-mg dose was needed for neuroprotection in CHI at 24 h. These observations are the first to suggest that (i) DL-NBP is quite effective in reducing brain pathology and (ii) nanodelivery of DL-NBP has far more superior effects in CHI, not reported earlier.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qiang; Watts, Lora Tally; Li, Wei; Duong, Timothy Q

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability in the USA. Common causes of TBI include falls, violence, injuries from wars, and vehicular and sporting accidents. The initial direct mechanical damage in TBI is followed by progressive secondary injuries such as brain swelling, perturbed cerebral blood flow (CBF), abnormal cerebrovascular reactivity (CR), metabolic dysfunction, blood-brain-barrier disruption, inflammation, oxidative stress, and excitotoxicity, among others. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers the means to noninvasively probe many of these secondary injuries. MRI has been used to image anatomical, physiological, and functional changes associated with TBI in a longitudinal manner. This chapter describes controlled cortical impact (CCI) TBI surgical procedures, a few common MRI protocols used in TBI imaging, and, finally, image analysis pertaining to experimental TBI imaging in rats.

  14. Effect of volume replacement during combined experimental hemorrhagic shock and traumatic brain injury in prostanoids, brain pathology and pupil status.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Fernando Campos Gomes; Oliveira, Matheus Fernandes de; Prist, Ricardo; Silva, Maurício Rocha E; Silva, Luiz Fernando Ferraz da; Capone Neto, Antonio

    2015-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the main cause of trauma-related deaths. Systemic hypotension and intracranial hypertension causes cerebral ischemia by altering metabolism of prostanoids. We describe prostanoid, pupilar and pathological response during resuscitation with hypertonic saline solution (HSS) in TBI. Method Fifteen dogs were randomized in three groups according to resuscitation after TBI (control group; lactated Ringer's (LR) group and HSS group), with measurement of thromboxane, prostaglandin, macroscopic and microscopic pathological evaluation and pupil evaluation.Result Concentration of prostaglandin is greater in the cerebral venous blood than in plasma and the opposite happens with concentration of thromboxane. Pathology revealed edema in groups with the exception of group treated with HSS.Discussion and conclusion There is a balance between the concentrations of prostaglandin and thromboxane. HSS prevented the formation of cerebral edema macroscopically detectable. Pupillary reversal occurred earlier in HSS group than in LR group.

  15. Optimizing Experimental Design for Comparing Models of Brain Function

    PubMed Central

    Daunizeau, Jean; Preuschoff, Kerstin; Friston, Karl; Stephan, Klaas

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the first attempt to formalize the optimization of experimental design with the aim of comparing models of brain function based on neuroimaging data. We demonstrate our approach in the context of Dynamic Causal Modelling (DCM), which relates experimental manipulations to observed network dynamics (via hidden neuronal states) and provides an inference framework for selecting among candidate models. Here, we show how to optimize the sensitivity of model selection by choosing among experimental designs according to their respective model selection accuracy. Using Bayesian decision theory, we (i) derive the Laplace-Chernoff risk for model selection, (ii) disclose its relationship with classical design optimality criteria and (iii) assess its sensitivity to basic modelling assumptions. We then evaluate the approach when identifying brain networks using DCM. Monte-Carlo simulations and empirical analyses of fMRI data from a simple bimanual motor task in humans serve to demonstrate the relationship between network identification and the optimal experimental design. For example, we show that deciding whether there is a feedback connection requires shorter epoch durations, relative to asking whether there is experimentally induced change in a connection that is known to be present. Finally, we discuss limitations and potential extensions of this work. PMID:22125485

  16. Quantitative evaluation of hyperbaric oxygen efficacy in experimental traumatic brain injury: an MRI study.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiao-Er; Li, Yue-Hua; Zhao, Hui; Li, Ming-Hua; Fu, Min; Li, Wen-Bin

    2014-02-01

    To use DCE-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion-weighted imaging to evaluate the hyperbaric oxygen efficacy (HBO) in experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI). Forty-two rabbits were randomly divided into four groups: TBI, TBI + HBO, sham group, sham + HBO. The TBI + HBO and sham + HBO received a total of 10 HBO treatments within 7 days following TBI, and MRI was performed within a month after TBI. Functional assessments were performed pre-TBI, and at 1 and 30 days. In focal lesion area, K(trans) in TBI + HBO group was lower than TBI group at both acute and subacute phase (p < 0.05). ADC was higher in TBI + HBO group than TBI group at acute phase (p < 0.01), but lower at subacute phase (p < 0.05). In perifocal area, K(trans) were lower in TBI + HBO group than TBI group at acute phase (p < 0.01) after TBI. ADC was lower in the TBI + HBO group than in the TBI group at both acute and subacute phase (p < 0.01).The VCS was higher in TBI + HBO group than TBI group at 30 days (p < 0.05). HBO could improve the impaired BBB and cytotoxic edema after TBI and promote the recovery of neurofunction.

  17. Tert-butylhydroquinone Ameliorates Early Brain Injury After Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Mice by Enhancing Nrf2-Independent Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Sun, Kang-jian; Wang, Han-Dong; Zhou, Meng-Liang; Ding, Ke; Lu, Xin-Yu; Wei, Wu-Ting; Wang, Chun-Xi; Zhou, Xiao-Ming

    2015-09-01

    Evidence has shown that the activation of the autophagy pathway after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) protects against neuronal damage. Tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ), a commonly used nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) activator, was found to significantly enhance autophagy activation. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of tBHQ treatment on early stage brain injury at 24 h after SAH. The results showed that tBHQ treatment failed to stimulate an effective anti-oxidative effect at 24 h after the SAH operation, but succeeded in ameliorating early brain injury, including alleviated brain edema, BBB disruption, neuronal degeneration and neurological deficits. Further exploration found that tBHQ treatment significantly increased the expression of Beclin-1 and the ratio of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3)-II to LC3-I, suggesting that autophagy was enhanced after tBHQ treatment. Moreover, tBHQ treatment restored Bcl-2 and Bax expression and reduced caspase-3 cleavage, suggesting the protective effect of tBHQ treatment in ameliorating brain injury after SAH. Furthermore, tBHQ enhanced autophagy activation, decreased neuronal degeneration and improved the neurological score after SAH in Nrf2-deficient mice. Taken together, these findings suggest that tBHQ treatment exerts neuro-protective effects against EBI following SAH by enhancing Nrf2-independent autophagy. Therefore, tBHQ is a promising therapeutic agent against EBI following SAH.

  18. Neurodegeneration in the somatosensory cortex after experimental diffuse brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Lisembee, Amanda M.

    2012-01-01

    Disruption and consequent reorganization of central nervous system circuits following traumatic brain injury may manifest as functional deficits and behavioral morbidities. We previously reported axotomy and neuronal atrophy in the ventral basal (VB) complex of the thalamus, without gross degeneration after experimental diffuse brain injury in adult rats. Pathology in VB coincided with the development of late-onset aberrant behavioral responses to whisker stimulation, which lead to the current hypothesis that neurodegeneration after experimental diffuse brain injury includes the primary somatosensory barrel cortex (S1BF), which receives projection of VB neurons and mediates whisker somatosensation. Over 28 days after midline fluid percussion brain injury, argyrophilic reaction product within superficial layers and layer IV barrels at 1 day progresses into the cortex to subcortical white matter by 7 days, and selective inter-barrel septa and subcortical white matter labeling at 28 days. Cellular consequences were determined by stereological estimates of neuronal nuclear volumes and number. In all cortical layers, neuronal nuclear volumes significantly atrophied by 42–49% at 7 days compared to sham, which marginally attenuated by 28 days. Concomitantly, the number of healthy neurons was reduced by 34–45% at 7 days compared to sham, returning to control levels by 28 days. Progressive neurodegeneration, including argyrophilic reaction product and neuronal nuclear atrophy, indicates injury-induced damage and reorganization of the reciprocal thalamocortical projections that mediate whisker somatosensation. The rodent whisker barrel circuit may serve as a discrete model to evaluate the causes and consequences of circuit reorganization after diffuse brain injury. PMID:21597967

  19. Mechanisms of Astrocyte-Mediated Cerebral Edema

    PubMed Central

    Stokum, Jesse A.; Kurland, David B.; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J. Marc

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral edema formation stems from disruption of blood brain barrier (BBB) integrity and occurs after injury to the CNS. Due to the restrictive skull, relatively small increases in brain volume can translate into impaired tissue perfusion and brain herniation. In excess, cerebral edema can be gravely harmful. Astrocytes are key participants in cerebral edema by virtue of their relationship with the cerebral vasculature, their unique compliment of solute and water transport proteins, and their general role in brain volume homeostasis. Following the discovery of aquaporins, passive conduits of water flow, aquaporin 4 (AQP4) was identified as the predominant astrocyte water channel. Normally, AQP4 is highly enriched at perivascular endfeet, the outermost layer of the BBB, whereas after injury, AQP4 expression disseminates to the entire astrocytic plasmalemma, a phenomenon termed dysregulation. Arguably, the most important role of AQP4 is to rapidly neutralize osmotic gradients generated by ionic transporters. In pathological conditions, AQP4 is believed to be intimately involved in the formation and clearance of cerebral edema. In this review, we discuss aquaporin function and localization in the BBB during health and injury, and we examine post-injury ionic events that modulate AQP4- dependent edema formation. PMID:24996934

  20. Meta-analysis on brain representation of experimental dental pain.

    PubMed

    Lin, C-S; Niddam, D M; Hsu, M-L

    2014-02-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been widely used for investigating the brain representation associated with dental pain evoked by pulpal electrical stimulation. However, because of the heterogeneity of experimental designs and the small sample size of individual studies, the common brain representation regarding dental pain has remained elusive. We used imaging meta-analysis to investigate six dental pain-related fMRI studies (n = 87) and tested 3 hypotheses: (1) Dental pain is associated with the 'core' pain-related network; (2) pain-related brain activation is somatotopically organized in the somatosensory cortex; and (3) dental pain is associated with the cognitive-affective network related to pain. Qualitative and quantitative meta-analyses revealed: (1) common activation of the core pain-related network, including the somatosensory cortex, the insula, and the cingulate cortex; (2) inconsistency in somatotopically organized activation of the primary somatosensory cortex; and (3) common activation in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, suggesting a role of re-appraisal and coping in the experience of dental pain. In conclusion, fMRI combined with pulpal stimulation can effectively evoke activity in the pain-related network. The dental pain-related brain representation disclosed the mechanisms of how sensory and cognitive-affective factors shape dental pain, which will help in the development of more effective customized methods for central pain control.

  1. Distribution of opiate alkaloids in brain tissue of experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Djurendic-Brenesel, Maja; Pilija, Vladimir; Mimica-Dukic, Neda; Budakov, Branislav; Cvjeticanin, Stanko

    2012-12-01

    The present study examined regional distribution of opiate alkaloids from seized heroin in brain regions of experimental animals in order to select parts with the highest content of opiates. Their analysis should contribute to resolve causes of death due to heroin intake. The tests were performed at different time periods (5, 15, 45 and 120 min) after male and female Wistar rats were treated with seized heroin. Opiate alkaloids (codeine, morphine, acetylcodeine, 6-acetylmorphine and 3,6-diacetylmorphine) were quantitatively determined in brain regions known for their high concentration of µ-opiate receptors: cortex, brainstem, amygdala and basal ganglia, by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The highest content of opiate alkaloids in the brain tissue of female animals was found 15 min and in male animals 45 min after treatment. The highest content of opiates was determined in the basal ganglia of the animals of both genders, indicating that this part of brain tissue presents a reliable sample for identifying and assessing contents of opiates after heroin intake.

  2. Experimental brain hyperthermia: techniques for heat delivery and thermometry.

    PubMed

    Ryan, T P; Hoopes, P J; Taylor, J H; Strohbehn, J W; Roberts, D W; Douple, E B; Coughlin, C T

    1991-04-01

    An experimental canine brain model was developed to assess the effects of hyperthermia for a range of time and temperature endpoints, delivered within a specified distance of an interstitial microwave antenna in normal brain. The target temperature location was defined radially at 5.0 or 7.5 mm from the microwave source at the longitudinal location of maximum heating along the antenna in the left cerebral cortex. Temperatures were measured with fiberoptic probes in a coronal plane at this location in an orthogonal catheter at 1.0 mm intervals. Six antennas were evaluated, including dipole, modified dipole, and four shorted helical antennas with coil lengths from 0.5 to 3.9 cm. Antenna performance evaluated in tissue equivalent phantom by adjusting frequency at a fixed insertion depth of 7.8 cm or adjusting insertion depth at 915 MHz showed dipoles to be much more sensitive to insertion depth and frequency change than helical antennas. Specific absorption rate (SAR) was measured in a brain/skull phantom and isoSAR contours were plotted. In vivo temperature studies were also used to evaluate antenna performance in large and small canine brain tissues. A helical antenna with a 2.0 cm coil length driven at 915 MHz was chosen for the beagle experiments because of tip heating characteristics, well-localized heating along the coil length, and heating pattern appropriate to the smaller beagle cranial vault. Verification of lesion dimensions in 3-D was obtained by orthogonal MRI scans and histology to document the desired heat effect, which was to obtain an imagable lesion with well-defined blood-brain-barrier breakdown and necrotic zones. The desired lesion size was between 1.5 to 2.5 cm diameter radially, in the coronal plane with the greatest diameter.

  3. Involvement of aberrant cyclin-dependent kinase 5/p25 activity in experimental traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Yousuf, Mohammad A; Tan, Chunfeng; Torres-Altoro, Melissa I; Lu, Fang-Min; Plautz, Erik; Zhang, Shanrong; Takahashi, Masaya; Hernandez, Adan; Kernie, Steven G; Plattner, Florian; Bibb, James A

    2016-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with adverse effects on brain functions, including sensation, language, emotions and/or cognition. Therapies for improving outcomes following TBI are limited. A better understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of TBI may suggest novel treatment strategies to facilitate recovery and improve treatment outcome. Aberrant activation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) has been implicated in neuronal injury and neurodegeneration. Cdk5 is a neuronal protein kinase activated via interaction with its cofactor p35 that regulates numerous neuronal functions, including synaptic remodeling and cognition. However, conversion of p35 to p25 via Ca(2+) -dependent activation of calpain results in an aberrantly active Cdk5/p25 complex that is associated with neuronal damage and cell death. Here, we show that mice subjected to controlled cortical impact (CCI), a well-established experimental TBI model, exhibit increased p25 levels and consistently elevated Cdk5-dependent phosphorylation of microtubule-associated protein tau and retinoblastoma (Rb) protein in hippocampal lysates. Moreover, CCI-induced neuroinflammation as indicated by increased astrocytic activation and number of reactive microglia. Brain-wide conditional Cdk5 knockout mice (Cdk5 cKO) subjected to CCI exhibited significantly reduced edema, ventricular dilation, and injury area. Finally, neurophysiological recordings revealed that CCI attenuated excitatory post-synaptic potential field responses in the hippocampal CA3-CA1 pathway 24 h after injury. This neurophysiological deficit was attenuated in Cdk5 cKO mice. Thus, TBI induces increased levels of p25 generation and aberrant Cdk5 activity, which contributes to pathophysiological processes underlying TBI progression. Hence, selectively preventing aberrant Cdk5 activity may be an effective acute strategy to improve recovery from TBI. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) increases astrogliosis and microglial activation

  4. Side Effects: Edema

    Cancer.gov

    Edema, a condition in which fluid builds up in your body’s tissues, may be caused by chemotherapy, cancer, and conditions not related to cancer. Learn about signs of edema, including swelling in your feet, ankles, and legs. Learn how prevent swelling.

  5. Experimental model for civilian ballistic brain injury biomechanics quantification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiangyue; Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A; Guan, Yabo; Gennarelli, Thomas A

    2007-01-01

    Biomechanical quantification of projectile penetration using experimental head models can enhance the understanding of civilian ballistic brain injury and advance treatment. Two of the most commonly used handgun projectiles (25-cal, 275 m/s and 9 mm, 395 m/s) were discharged to spherical head models with gelatin and Sylgard simulants. Four ballistic pressure transducers recorded temporal pressure distributions at 308kHz, and temporal cavity dynamics were captured at 20,000 frames/second (fps) using high-speed digital video images. Pressures ranged from 644.6 to -92.8 kPa. Entry pressures in gelatin models were higher than exit pressures, whereas in Sylgard models entry pressures were lower or equivalent to exit pressures. Gelatin responded with brittle-type failure, while Sylgard demonstrated a ductile pattern through formation of micro-bubbles along projectile path. Temporary cavities in Sylgard models were 1.5-2x larger than gelatin models. Pressures in Sylgard models were more sensitive to projectile velocity and diameter increase, indicating Sylgard was more rate sensitive than gelatin. Based on failure patterns and brain tissue rate-sensitive characteristics, Sylgard was found to be an appropriate simulant. Compared with spherical projectile data, full-metal jacket (FMJ) projectiles produced different temporary cavity and pressures, demonstrating shape effects. Models using Sylgard gel and FMJ projectiles are appropriate to enhance understanding and mechanisms of ballistic brain injury.

  6. Neuroprotective effects of geranylgeranylacetone in experimental traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zaorui; Faden, Alan I; Loane, David J; Lipinski, Marta M; Sabirzhanov, Boris; Stoica, Bogdan A

    2013-01-01

    Geranylgeranylacetone (GGA) is an inducer of heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70) that has been used clinically for many years as an antiulcer treatment. It is centrally active after oral administration and is neuroprotective in experimental brain ischemia/stroke models. We examined the effects of single oral GGA before treatment (800 mg/kg, 48 hours before trauma) or after treatment (800 mg/kg, 3 hours after trauma) on long-term functional recovery and histologic outcomes after moderate-level controlled cortical impact, an experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI) model in mice. The GGA pretreatment increased the number of HSP70+ cells and attenuated posttraumatic α-fodrin cleavage, a marker of apoptotic cell death. It also improved sensorimotor performance on a beam walk task; enhanced recovery of cognitive/affective function in the Morris water maze, novel object recognition, and tail-suspension tests; and improved outcomes using a composite neuroscore. Furthermore, GGA pretreatment reduced the lesion size and neuronal loss in the hippocampus, cortex, and thalamus, and decreased microglial activation in the cortex when compared with vehicle-treated TBI controls. Notably, GGA was also effective in a posttreatment paradigm, showing significant improvements in sensorimotor function, and reducing cortical neuronal loss. Given these neuroprotective actions and considering its longstanding clinical use, GGA should be considered for the clinical treatment of TBI. PMID:23942364

  7. Neuroprotective effects of geranylgeranylacetone in experimental traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zaorui; Faden, Alan I; Loane, David J; Lipinski, Marta M; Sabirzhanov, Boris; Stoica, Bogdan A

    2013-12-01

    Geranylgeranylacetone (GGA) is an inducer of heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70) that has been used clinically for many years as an antiulcer treatment. It is centrally active after oral administration and is neuroprotective in experimental brain ischemia/stroke models. We examined the effects of single oral GGA before treatment (800 mg/kg, 48 hours before trauma) or after treatment (800 mg/kg, 3 hours after trauma) on long-term functional recovery and histologic outcomes after moderate-level controlled cortical impact, an experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI) model in mice. The GGA pretreatment increased the number of HSP70(+) cells and attenuated posttraumatic α-fodrin cleavage, a marker of apoptotic cell death. It also improved sensorimotor performance on a beam walk task; enhanced recovery of cognitive/affective function in the Morris water maze, novel object recognition, and tail-suspension tests; and improved outcomes using a composite neuroscore. Furthermore, GGA pretreatment reduced the lesion size and neuronal loss in the hippocampus, cortex, and thalamus, and decreased microglial activation in the cortex when compared with vehicle-treated TBI controls. Notably, GGA was also effective in a posttreatment paradigm, showing significant improvements in sensorimotor function, and reducing cortical neuronal loss. Given these neuroprotective actions and considering its longstanding clinical use, GGA should be considered for the clinical treatment of TBI.

  8. Correlations between Blood–Brain Barrier Disruption and Neuroinflammation in an Experimental Model of Penetrating Ballistic-Like Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cartagena, Casandra M.; Lu, Xi-Chun M.; Konopko, Melissa; Dave, Jitendra R.; Tortella, Frank C.; Shear, Deborah A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Blood–brain barrier (BBB) disruption is a pathological hallmark of severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and is associated with neuroinflammatory events contributing to brain edema and cell death. The goal of this study was to elucidate the profile of BBB disruption after penetrating ballistic-like brain injury (PBBI) in conjunction with changes in neuroinflammatory markers. Brain uptake of biotin-dextran amine (BDA; 3 kDa) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP; 44 kDa) was evaluated in rats at 4 h, 24 h, 48 h, 72 h, and 7 days post-PBBI and compared with the histopathologic and molecular profiles for inflammatory markers. BDA and HRP both displayed a uniphasic profile of extravasation, greatest at 24 h post-injury and which remained evident out to 48 h for HRP and 7 days for BDA. This profile was most closely associated with markers for adhesion (mRNA for intercellular adhesion molecule-1) and infiltration of peripheral granulocytes (mRNA for matrix metalloproteinase-9 [MMP-9] and myeloperoxidase staining). Improvement of BBB dysfunction coincided with increased expression of markers implicated in tissue remodeling and repair. The results of this study reveal a uniphasic and gradient opening of the BBB after PBBI and suggest MMP-9 and resident inflammatory cell activation as candidates for future neurotherapeutic intervention after PBBI. PMID:24138024

  9. Anesthetics and analgesics in experimental traumatic brain injury: Selection based on experimental objectives

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Rachel K.; Harrison, Jordan L.; Thomas, Theresa C.; Pauly, James R.; Adelson, P. David; Lifshitz, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    The use of animal modeling in traumatic brain injury (TBI) research is justified by the lack of sufficiently comprehensive in vitro and computer modeling that incorporates all components of the neurovascular unit. Valid animal modeling of TBI requires accurate replication of both the mechanical forces and secondary injury conditions observed in human patients. Regulatory requirements for animal modeling emphasize the administration of appropriate anesthetics and analgesics unless withholding these drugs is scientifically justified. The objective of this review is to present scientific justification for standardizing the use of anesthetics and analgesics, within a study, when modeling TBI in order to preserve study validity. Evidence for the interference of anesthetics and analgesics in the natural course of brain injury calls for consistent consideration of pain management regimens when conducting TBI research. Anesthetics administered at the time of or shortly after induction of brain injury can alter cognitive, motor, and histological outcomes following TBI. A consistent anesthesia protocol based on experimental objectives within each individual study is imperative when conducting TBI studies to control for the confounding effects of anesthesia on outcome parameters. Experimental studies that replicate the clinical condition are essential to gain further understanding and evaluate possible treatments for TBI. However, with animal models of TBI it is essential that investigators assure a uniform drug delivery protocol that minimizes confounding variables, while minimizing pain and suffering. PMID:23877609

  10. A quantitative brain map of experimental cerebral malaria pathology

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Jean-Marc; Greig, Rachel; Mironov, Aleksandr; de Souza, J. Brian; Cruickshank, Sheena M.; Craig, Alister G.; Milner, Danny A.; Allan, Stuart M.

    2017-01-01

    The murine model of experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) has been utilised extensively in recent years to study the pathogenesis of human cerebral malaria (HCM). However, it has been proposed that the aetiologies of ECM and HCM are distinct, and, consequently, no useful mechanistic insights into the pathogenesis of HCM can be obtained from studying the ECM model. Therefore, in order to determine the similarities and differences in the pathology of ECM and HCM, we have performed the first spatial and quantitative histopathological assessment of the ECM syndrome. We demonstrate that the accumulation of parasitised red blood cells (pRBCs) in brain capillaries is a specific feature of ECM that is not observed during mild murine malaria infections. Critically, we show that individual pRBCs appear to occlude murine brain capillaries during ECM. As pRBC-mediated congestion of brain microvessels is a hallmark of HCM, this suggests that the impact of parasite accumulation on cerebral blood flow may ultimately be similar in mice and humans during ECM and HCM, respectively. Additionally, we demonstrate that cerebrovascular CD8+ T-cells appear to co-localise with accumulated pRBCs, an event that corresponds with development of widespread vascular leakage. As in HCM, we show that vascular leakage is not dependent on extensive vascular destruction. Instead, we show that vascular leakage is associated with alterations in transcellular and paracellular transport mechanisms. Finally, as in HCM, we observed axonal injury and demyelination in ECM adjacent to diverse vasculopathies. Collectively, our data therefore shows that, despite very different presentation, and apparently distinct mechanisms, of parasite accumulation, there appear to be a number of comparable features of cerebral pathology in mice and in humans during ECM and HCM, respectively. Thus, when used appropriately, the ECM model may be useful for studying specific pathological features of HCM. PMID:28273147

  11. A quantitative brain map of experimental cerebral malaria pathology.

    PubMed

    Strangward, Patrick; Haley, Michael J; Shaw, Tovah N; Schwartz, Jean-Marc; Greig, Rachel; Mironov, Aleksandr; de Souza, J Brian; Cruickshank, Sheena M; Craig, Alister G; Milner, Danny A; Allan, Stuart M; Couper, Kevin N

    2017-03-01

    The murine model of experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) has been utilised extensively in recent years to study the pathogenesis of human cerebral malaria (HCM). However, it has been proposed that the aetiologies of ECM and HCM are distinct, and, consequently, no useful mechanistic insights into the pathogenesis of HCM can be obtained from studying the ECM model. Therefore, in order to determine the similarities and differences in the pathology of ECM and HCM, we have performed the first spatial and quantitative histopathological assessment of the ECM syndrome. We demonstrate that the accumulation of parasitised red blood cells (pRBCs) in brain capillaries is a specific feature of ECM that is not observed during mild murine malaria infections. Critically, we show that individual pRBCs appear to occlude murine brain capillaries during ECM. As pRBC-mediated congestion of brain microvessels is a hallmark of HCM, this suggests that the impact of parasite accumulation on cerebral blood flow may ultimately be similar in mice and humans during ECM and HCM, respectively. Additionally, we demonstrate that cerebrovascular CD8+ T-cells appear to co-localise with accumulated pRBCs, an event that corresponds with development of widespread vascular leakage. As in HCM, we show that vascular leakage is not dependent on extensive vascular destruction. Instead, we show that vascular leakage is associated with alterations in transcellular and paracellular transport mechanisms. Finally, as in HCM, we observed axonal injury and demyelination in ECM adjacent to diverse vasculopathies. Collectively, our data therefore shows that, despite very different presentation, and apparently distinct mechanisms, of parasite accumulation, there appear to be a number of comparable features of cerebral pathology in mice and in humans during ECM and HCM, respectively. Thus, when used appropriately, the ECM model may be useful for studying specific pathological features of HCM.

  12. Experimental models of perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

    PubMed

    Vannucci, R C

    1993-01-01

    Animal research has provided important information on the pathogenesis of and neuropathologic responses to perinatal cerebral hypoxia-ischemia. In experimental animals, structural brain damage from hypoxia-ischemia has been produced in immature rats, rabbits, guinea pigs, sheep and monkeys (18, 20, 24, 25, 38). Of the several available animal models, the fetal and newborn rhesus monkey and immature rat have been studied most extensively because of their similarities to humans in respect to the physiology of reproduction and their neuroanatomy at or shortly following birth. Given the frequency of occurrence of human perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage and the multiple, often severe neurologic handicaps which ensue in infants and children, it is not surprising that the above described animal models have been developed. These models have provided the basis for investigations to clarify not only physiologic and biochemical mechanisms of tissue injury but also the efficacy of specific management strategies. Hopefully, such animal research will continue to provide important information regarding how best to prevent or minimize the devastating consequences of perinatal cerebral hypoxia-ischemia.

  13. Registration of multimodal brain images: some experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hua-mei; Varshney, Pramod K.

    2002-03-01

    Joint histogram of two images is required to uniquely determine the mutual information between the two images. It has been pointed out that, under certain conditions, existing joint histogram estimation algorithms like partial volume interpolation (PVI) and linear interpolation may result in different types of artifact patterns in the MI based registration function by introducing spurious maxima. As a result, the artifacts may hamper the global optimization process and limit registration accuracy. In this paper we present an extensive study of interpolation-induced artifacts using simulated brain images and show that similar artifact patterns also exist when other intensity interpolation algorithms like cubic convolution interpolation and cubic B-spline interpolation are used. A new joint histogram estimation scheme named generalized partial volume estimation (GPVE) is proposed to eliminate the artifacts. A kernel function is involved in the proposed scheme and when the 1st order B-spline is chosen as the kernel function, it is equivalent to the PVI. A clinical brain image database furnished by Vanderbilt University is used to compare the accuracy of our algorithm with that of PVI. Our experimental results show that the use of higher order kernels can effectively remove the artifacts and, in cases when MI based registration result suffers from the artifacts, registration accuracy can be improved significantly.

  14. Epileptogenesis following experimentally induced traumatic brain injury - a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chandel, Shammy; Gupta, Sunil Kumar; Medhi, Bikash

    2016-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a complex neurotrauma in civilian life and the battlefield with a broad spectrum of symptoms, long-term neuropsychological disability, as well as mortality worldwide. Posttraumatic epilepsy (PTE) is a common outcome of TBI with unknown mechanisms, followed by posttraumatic epileptogenesis. There are numerous rodent models of TBI available with varying pathomechanisms of head injury similar to human TBI, but there is no evidence for an adequate TBI model that can properly mimic all aspects of clinical TBI and the first successive spontaneous focal seizures follow a single episode of neurotrauma with respect to epileptogenesis. This review aims to provide current information regarding the various experimental animal models of TBI relevant to clinical TBI. Mossy fiber sprouting, loss of dentate hilar neurons along with recurrent seizures, and epileptic discharge similar to human PTE have been studied in fluid percussion injury, weight-drop injury, and cortical impact models, but further refinement of animal models and functional test is warranted to better understand the underlying pathophysiology of posttraumatic epileptogenesis. A multifaceted research approach in TBI model may lead to exploration of the potential treatment measures, which are a major challenge to the research community and drug developers. With respect to clinical setting, proper patient data collection, improved clinical trials with advancement in drug delivery strategies, blood-brain barrier permeability, and proper monitoring of level and effects of target drug are also important.

  15. [Cardiogenic and non cardiogenic pulmonary edema: pathomechanisms and causes].

    PubMed

    Glaus, T; Schellenberg, S; Lang, J

    2010-07-01

    The development of pulmonary edema is divided in cardiogenic and non-cardiogenic. Cardiogenic edema pathogenically is caused by elevated hydrostatic pressure in the pulmonary capillaries due to left sided congestive heart failure. Non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema is categorized depending on the underlying pathogenesis in low-alveolar pressure, elevated permeability or neurogenic edema. Some important examples of causes are upper airway obstruction like in laryngeal paralysis or strangulation for low alveolar pressure, leptospirosis and ARDS for elevated permeability, and epilepsy, brain trauma and electrocution for neurogenic edema. The differentiation between cardiogenic versus non-cardiogenic genesis is not always straightforward, but most relevant, because treatment markedly differs between the two. Of further importance is the identification of the specific underlying cause in non-cardiogenic edema, not only for therapeutic but particularly for prognostic reasons. Depending on the cause the prognosis ranges from very poor to good chance of complete recovery.

  16. Treatment window for hypothermia in brain injury.

    PubMed

    Markgraf, C G; Clifton, G L; Moody, M R

    2001-12-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic window for hypothermia treatment following experimental brain injury by measuring edema formation and functional outcome. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) was produced in anesthetized rats by using cortical impact injury. Edema was measured in the ipsilateral and contralateral hemispheres by subtracting dry weight from wet weight, and neurological function was assessed using a battery of behavioral tests 24 hours after TBI. In injured rats, it was found that brain water levels were elevated at I hour postinjury, compared with those in sham-injured control animals, and that edema peaked at 24 hours and remained elevated for 4 days. Hypothermia (3 hours at 30 degrees C) induced either immediately after TBI or 60 minutes after TBI significantly reduced early neurological deficits. Delay of treatment by 90 or 120 minutes postinjury did not result in this neurological protection. Immediate administration of hypothermia also significantly decreased the peak magnitude of edema at 24 hours and 48 hours postinjury, compared with that in normothermic injured control animals. When delayed by 90 minutes, hypothermia did not affect the pattern of edema formation. When hypothermia was administered immediately or 60 minutes after TBI, injured rats showed an improvement in functional outcome and a decrease in edema. Delayed hypothermia treatment had no effect on functional outcome or on edema.

  17. [Autoradiographic investigations in repeated experimental brain concussion (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Weitbrecht, W U; Noetzel, H

    1976-12-31

    Single brain concussion in rabbits causes an increased proliferation of glial and mesenchymal cells. Repeated experimental concussions in rabbits (3 times at intervals of 24 h) led to an increased incorporation of H3-thymidine in glial and mesenchymal cells with a maximum at 48 h after the third concussion. This is interpreted as an indication of increased cell proliferation. The first and the second concussion did not cause a comparable reaction, thus suggesting that concussions may inhibit DNA synthesis under the conditions of our experimental setup. When the concussions were induced at an interval of 48 h the result was different: 48 h after each concussion we found an increase of labeled cells compared with the controls. After the second concussion the reaction was still more enhanced compared with the reaction following the first concussion. In contrast to this the number of labeled cells after the third concussion was significantly decreased compared with those after the second one. Parallels with pugilistic encephalopathy are discussed.

  18. Differential permeability of the blood-brain barrier in experimental brain metastases produced by human neoplasms implanted into nude mice.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, R. D.; Price, J. E.; Fujimaki, T.; Bucana, C. D.; Fidler, I. J.

    1992-01-01

    This study clarified whether and when the blood-brain barrier in experimental brain metastases is impaired by using hydrosoluble sodium fluorescein (MW 376) as a blood-brain barrier function indicator. Cells from eight human tumor lines (four melanomas, two breast carcinomas, one colon carcinoma, and one renal carcinoma) were inoculated into the internal carotid artery of nude mice. Brain metastases at different stages of development were sampled and the permeability of the blood-brain barrier around the metastases determined. Histologic examination showed two patterns of tumor growth. In the first, tumor cells formed isolated, well-defined nodules in the parenchyma of the brain. In lesions smaller than 0.2 mm2, the blood-brain barrier was intact. In the second, small diffuse nests of tumor cells were distributed throughout the brain parenchyma. The blood-brain barrier was intact until the small tumor cell colonies coalesced to form large tumor masses. These results suggest that the permeability of the blood-brain barrier varies among different experimental brain metastases and that its function is related to the growth pattern and size of the lesions. Images Figure 1 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:1443046

  19. Diabetic macular edema.

    PubMed

    Stefánsson, Einar

    2009-07-01

    A variety of treatment options are available for the treatment of diabetic macular edema. They include laser photocoagulation, anti-VEGF drugs, intravitreal steroids, and vitrectomy with or without release of vitreoretinal traction. A full understanding of the physiological mechanisms of these treatment modalities allows sensible combination of treatment options. Retinal photocoagulation has repeatedly been shown to improve retinal oxygenation, as does vitrectomy. Oxygen naturally reduces VEGF production and thereby decreases leakage of plasma proteins from capillaries into the tissue. In addition, vitrectomy allows faster clearance of cytokines, such as VEGF, from the retina into the vitreous cavity. The VEGF-lowering effect of photocoagulation and vitrectomy can be augmented with anti-VEGF drugs and corticosteroids reduce the effect of VEGF on capillary permeability. Starling's law explains vasogenic edema, which is controlled by osmotic and hydrostatic gradients between vessel and tissue. It explains how VEGF-induced vascular permeability causes plasma protein to leak into the tissue interstitial space, thus decreasing the osmotic pressure gradient between vessel and tissue, resulting in water accumulation, i.e. edema. This is reversed by reducing VEGF production, which is achieved with laser treatment; or by removing VEGF with antibodies or vitrectomy; or by reducing the permeability effect with steroids. At the same time, Starling's law takes into account hemodynamic changes that affect the hydrostatic gradient. High arterial blood pressure and hypoxic vasodilatation increase the hydrostatic pressure in the microcirculation, which increases water flux from vessel to tissue and induce edema. Treatment of arterial hypertension or reversal of retinal hypoxia with laser reverses this pathophysiology and reduces edema. Newton's third law explains, that vitreoretinal traction decreases hydrostatic tissue pressure in the retina, increases the pressure gradient

  20. von-Willebrand factor influences blood brain barrier permeability and brain inflammation in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Noubade, Rajkumar; del Rio, Roxana; McElvany, Benjamin; Zachary, James F; Millward, Jason M; Wagner, Denisa D; Offner, Halina; Blankenhorn, Elizabeth P; Teuscher, Cory

    2008-09-01

    Weibel-Palade bodies within endothelial cells are secretory granules known to release von Willebrand Factor (VWF), P-selectin, chemokines, and other stored molecules following histamine exposure. Mice with a disrupted VWF gene (VWFKO) have endothelial cells that are deficient in Weibel-Palade bodies. These mice were used to evaluate the role of VWF and/or Weibel-Palade bodies in Bordetella pertussis toxin-induced hypersensitivity to histamine, a subphenotype of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis, the principal autoimmune model of multiple sclerosis. No significant differences in susceptibility to histamine between wild-type and VWFKO mice were detected after 3 days; however, histamine sensitivity persisted significantly longer in VWFKO mice. Correspondingly, encephalomyelitis onset was earlier, disease was more severe, and blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability was significantly increased in VWFKO mice, as compared with wild-type mice. Moreover, inflammation was selectively increased in the brains, but not spinal cords, of VWFKO mice as compared with wild-type mice. Early increases in BBB permeability in VWFKO mice were not due to increased encephalitogenic T-cell activity since BBB permeability did not differ in adjuvant-treated VWFKO mice as compared with littermates immunized with encephalitogenic peptide plus adjuvant. Taken together, these data indicate that VWF and/or Weibel-Palade bodies negatively regulate BBB permeability changes and autoimmune inflammatory lesion formation within the brain elicited by peripheral inflammatory stimuli.

  1. Experimental and clinical evidence of differential effects of magnesium sulfate on neuroprotection and angiogenesis in the fetal brain.

    PubMed

    Lecuyer, Matthieu; Rubio, Marina; Chollat, Clément; Lecointre, Maryline; Jégou, Sylvie; Leroux, Philippe; Cleren, Carine; Leroux-Nicollet, Isabelle; Marpeau, Loic; Vivien, Denis; Marret, Stéphane; Gonzalez, Bruno J

    2017-08-01

    Clinical studies showed beneficial effects of magnesium sulfate regarding the risk of cerebral palsy. However, regimen protocols fluctuate worldwide and risks of adverse effects impacting the vascular system have been reported for human neonates, keeping open the question of the optimal dosing. Using clinically relevant concentrations and doses of magnesium sulfate, experiments consisted of characterizing, respectively, ex vivo and in vivo, the effects of magnesium sulfate on the nervous and vascular systems of mouse neonates by targeting neuroprotection, angiogenesis, and hemodynamic factors and in measuring, in human fetuses, the impact of a 4-g neuroprotective loading dose of magnesium sulfate on brain hemodynamic parameters. Preclinical experiments using cultured cortical slices from mouse neonates showed that the lowest and highest tested concentrations of magnesium sulfate were equally potent to prevent excitotoxic-induced cell death, cell edema, cell burst, and intracellular calcium increase, whereas no side effects were found regarding apoptosis. In contrast, in vivo data revealed that magnesium sulfate exerted dose-dependent vascular effects on the fetal brain. In particular, it induced brain hypoperfusion, stabilization of Hif-1α, long-term upregulation of VEGF-R2 expression, impaired endothelial viability, and altered cortical angiogenesis. Clinically, in contrast to 6-g loading doses used in some protocols, a 4-g bolus of magnesium sulfate did not altered fetal brain hemodynamic parameters. In conclusion, these data provide the first mechanistic evidence of double-sword and dose-dependent actions of magnesium sulfate on nervous and vascular systems. They strongly support the clinical use of neuroprotection protocols validated for the lowest (4-g) loading dose of magnesium sulfate. © 2017 The Authors. Pharmacology Research & Perspectives published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd, British Pharmacological Society and American Society for Pharmacology and

  2. Nimesulide as a promising neuroprotectant in brain ischemia: new experimental evidences.

    PubMed

    Candelario-Jalil, Eduardo

    2008-04-01

    Nimesulide is a preferential inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and it is one of the most prescribed non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) worldwide. Nimesulide was recently shown to have neuroprotective properties in animal models of acute neurologic injury. In particular, nimesulide is highly effective in reducing ischemic brain injury. This neuroprotective efficacy has been demonstrated in animal models of transient and permanent focal cerebral ischemia, global brain ischemia, embolic stroke, and chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. Nimesulide has been shown to reduce infarction, improve neurological function, attenuate blood-brain barrier disruption and edema, and reduce leukocyte infiltration into the ischemic brain. These beneficial effects have been observed even when the first treatment is given several hours after the onset of ischemia, demonstrating the wide therapeutic time window for nimesulide's neuroprotection. This is of great relevance since most stroke patients reach the emergency room several hours after the onset of symptoms, a time at which most medical interventions are not effective. In addition, nimesulide produces a long-lasting neuroprotection. This is of importance since some 'neuroprotective' compounds only produce a delay in cell death, and not a permanent protection. Its several mechanisms of action in neuroprotection make nimesulide a desirable and promising candidate as therapy for acute brain ischemia. This article reviews recent knowledge on the effects of nimesulide against brain injury, with particular emphasis in cerebral ischemia, and makes a critical appraisal of its therapeutic potential in the management of patients with brain ischemia.

  3. Experimental cerebral malaria pathogenesis--hemodynamics at the blood brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Nacer, Adéla; Movila, Alexandru; Sohet, Fabien; Girgis, Natasha M; Gundra, Uma Mahesh; Loke, P'ng; Daneman, Richard; Frevert, Ute

    2014-12-01

    Cerebral malaria claims the lives of over 600,000 African children every year. To better understand the pathogenesis of this devastating disease, we compared the cellular dynamics in the cortical microvasculature between two infection models, Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA) infected CBA/CaJ mice, which develop experimental cerebral malaria (ECM), and P. yoelii 17XL (PyXL) infected mice, which succumb to malarial hyperparasitemia without neurological impairment. Using a combination of intravital imaging and flow cytometry, we show that significantly more CD8(+) T cells, neutrophils, and macrophages are recruited to postcapillary venules during ECM compared to hyperparasitemia. ECM correlated with ICAM-1 upregulation on macrophages, while vascular endothelia upregulated ICAM-1 during ECM and hyperparasitemia. The arrest of large numbers of leukocytes in postcapillary and larger venules caused microrheological alterations that significantly restricted the venous blood flow. Treatment with FTY720, which inhibits vascular leakage, neurological signs, and death from ECM, prevented the recruitment of a subpopulation of CD45(hi) CD8(+) T cells, ICAM-1(+) macrophages, and neutrophils to postcapillary venules. FTY720 had no effect on the ECM-associated expression of the pattern recognition receptor CD14 in postcapillary venules suggesting that endothelial activation is insufficient to cause vascular pathology. Expression of the endothelial tight junction proteins claudin-5, occludin, and ZO-1 in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of PbA-infected mice with ECM was unaltered compared to FTY720-treated PbA-infected mice or PyXL-infected mice with hyperparasitemia. Thus, blood brain barrier opening does not involve endothelial injury and is likely reversible, consistent with the rapid recovery of many patients with CM. We conclude that the ECM-associated recruitment of large numbers of activated leukocytes, in particular CD8(+) T cells and ICAM(+) macrophages, causes a severe

  4. Experimental Cerebral Malaria Pathogenesis—Hemodynamics at the Blood Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Nacer, Adéla; Movila, Alexandru; Sohet, Fabien; Girgis, Natasha M.; Gundra, Uma Mahesh; Loke, P'ng; Daneman, Richard; Frevert, Ute

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral malaria claims the lives of over 600,000 African children every year. To better understand the pathogenesis of this devastating disease, we compared the cellular dynamics in the cortical microvasculature between two infection models, Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA) infected CBA/CaJ mice, which develop experimental cerebral malaria (ECM), and P. yoelii 17XL (PyXL) infected mice, which succumb to malarial hyperparasitemia without neurological impairment. Using a combination of intravital imaging and flow cytometry, we show that significantly more CD8+ T cells, neutrophils, and macrophages are recruited to postcapillary venules during ECM compared to hyperparasitemia. ECM correlated with ICAM-1 upregulation on macrophages, while vascular endothelia upregulated ICAM-1 during ECM and hyperparasitemia. The arrest of large numbers of leukocytes in postcapillary and larger venules caused microrheological alterations that significantly restricted the venous blood flow. Treatment with FTY720, which inhibits vascular leakage, neurological signs, and death from ECM, prevented the recruitment of a subpopulation of CD45hi CD8+ T cells, ICAM-1+ macrophages, and neutrophils to postcapillary venules. FTY720 had no effect on the ECM-associated expression of the pattern recognition receptor CD14 in postcapillary venules suggesting that endothelial activation is insufficient to cause vascular pathology. Expression of the endothelial tight junction proteins claudin-5, occludin, and ZO-1 in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of PbA-infected mice with ECM was unaltered compared to FTY720-treated PbA-infected mice or PyXL-infected mice with hyperparasitemia. Thus, blood brain barrier opening does not involve endothelial injury and is likely reversible, consistent with the rapid recovery of many patients with CM. We conclude that the ECM-associated recruitment of large numbers of activated leukocytes, in particular CD8+ T cells and ICAM+ macrophages, causes a severe restriction in

  5. Salidroside Improves Behavioral and Histological Outcomes and Reduces Apoptosis via PI3K/Akt Signaling after Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Szu-Fu; Tsai, Hsin-Ju; Hung, Tai-Ho; Chen, Chien-Cheng; Lee, Chao Yu; Wu, Chun-Hu; Wang, Pei-Yi; Liao, Nien-Chieh

    2012-01-01

    Background Traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces a complex sequence of apopototic cascades that contribute to secondary tissue damage. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of salidroside, a phenolic glycoside with potent anti-apoptotic properties, on behavioral and histological outcomes, brain edema, and apoptosis following experimental TBI and the possible involvement of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway. Methodology/Principal Findings Mice subjected to controlled cortical impact injury received intraperitoneal salidroside (20, or 50 mg/kg) or vehicle injection 10 min after injury. Behavioral studies, histology analysis and brain water content assessment were performed. Levels of PI3K/Akt signaling-related molecules, apoptosis-related proteins, cytochrome C (CytoC), and Smac/DIABLO were also analyzed. LY294002, a PI3K inhibitor, was administered to examine the mechanism of protection. The protective effect of salidroside was also investigated in primary cultured neurons subjected to stretch injury. Treatment with 20 mg/kg salidroside_significantly improved functional recovery and reduced brain tissue damage up to post-injury day 28. Salidroside_also significantly reduced neuronal death, apoptosis, and brain edema at day 1. These changes were associated with significant decreases in cleaved caspase-3, CytoC, and Smac/DIABLO at days 1 and 3. Salidroside increased phosphorylation of Akt on Ser473 and the mitochondrial Bcl-2/Bax ratio at day 1, and enhanced phosphorylation of Akt on Thr308 at day 3. This beneficial effect was abolished by pre-injection of LY294002. Moreover, delayed administration of salidroside at 3 or 6 h post-injury reduced neuronal damage at day 1. Salidroside treatment also decreased neuronal vulnerability to stretch-induced injury in vitro. Conclusions/Significance Post-injury salidroside improved long-term behavioral and histological outcomes and reduced brain edema and apoptosis

  6. Neuroimmunological Blood Brain Barrier Opening in Experimental Cerebral Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Baer, Kerstin; Mikolajczak, Sebastian A.; Kappe, Stefan H. I.; Frevert, Ute

    2012-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria is responsible for nearly one million annual deaths worldwide. Because of the difficulty in monitoring the pathogenesis of cerebral malaria in humans, we conducted a study in various mouse models to better understand disease progression in experimental cerebral malaria (ECM). We compared the effect on the integrity of the blood brain barrier (BBB) and the histopathology of the brain of P. berghei ANKA, a known ECM model, P. berghei NK65, generally thought not to induce ECM, P. yoelii 17XL, originally reported to induce human cerebral malaria-like histopathology, and P. yoelii YM. As expected, P. berghei ANKA infection caused neurological signs, cerebral hemorrhages, and BBB dysfunction in CBA/CaJ and Swiss Webster mice, while Balb/c and A/J mice were resistant. Surprisingly, PbNK induced ECM in CBA/CaJ mice, while all other mice were resistant. P. yoelii 17XL and P. yoelii YM caused lethal hyperparasitemia in all mouse strains; histopathological alterations, BBB dysfunction, or neurological signs were not observed. Intravital imaging revealed that infected erythrocytes containing mature parasites passed slowly through capillaries making intimate contact with the endothelium, but did not arrest. Except for relatively rare microhemorrhages, mice with ECM presented no obvious histopathological alterations that would explain the widespread disruption of the BBB. Intravital imaging did reveal, however, that postcapillary venules, but not capillaries or arterioles, from mice with ECM, but not hyperparasitemia, exhibit platelet marginalization, extravascular fibrin deposition, CD14 expression, and extensive vascular leakage. Blockage of LFA-1 mediated cellular interactions prevented leukocyte adhesion, vascular leakage, neurological signs, and death from ECM. The endothelial barrier-stabilizing mediators imatinib and FTY720 inhibited vascular leakage and neurological signs and prolonged survival to ECM. Thus, it appears that neurological

  7. Neuroimmunological blood brain barrier opening in experimental cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Nacer, Adela; Movila, Alexandru; Baer, Kerstin; Mikolajczak, Sebastian A; Kappe, Stefan H I; Frevert, Ute

    2012-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria is responsible for nearly one million annual deaths worldwide. Because of the difficulty in monitoring the pathogenesis of cerebral malaria in humans, we conducted a study in various mouse models to better understand disease progression in experimental cerebral malaria (ECM). We compared the effect on the integrity of the blood brain barrier (BBB) and the histopathology of the brain of P. berghei ANKA, a known ECM model, P. berghei NK65, generally thought not to induce ECM, P. yoelii 17XL, originally reported to induce human cerebral malaria-like histopathology, and P. yoelii YM. As expected, P. berghei ANKA infection caused neurological signs, cerebral hemorrhages, and BBB dysfunction in CBA/CaJ and Swiss Webster mice, while Balb/c and A/J mice were resistant. Surprisingly, PbNK induced ECM in CBA/CaJ mice, while all other mice were resistant. P. yoelii 17XL and P. yoelii YM caused lethal hyperparasitemia in all mouse strains; histopathological alterations, BBB dysfunction, or neurological signs were not observed. Intravital imaging revealed that infected erythrocytes containing mature parasites passed slowly through capillaries making intimate contact with the endothelium, but did not arrest. Except for relatively rare microhemorrhages, mice with ECM presented no obvious histopathological alterations that would explain the widespread disruption of the BBB. Intravital imaging did reveal, however, that postcapillary venules, but not capillaries or arterioles, from mice with ECM, but not hyperparasitemia, exhibit platelet marginalization, extravascular fibrin deposition, CD14 expression, and extensive vascular leakage. Blockage of LFA-1 mediated cellular interactions prevented leukocyte adhesion, vascular leakage, neurological signs, and death from ECM. The endothelial barrier-stabilizing mediators imatinib and FTY720 inhibited vascular leakage and neurological signs and prolonged survival to ECM. Thus, it appears that neurological

  8. Postobstructive pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Udeshi, Ashish; Cantie, Shawn Michael; Pierre, Edgar

    2010-09-01

    Postobstructive pulmonary edema (POPE; also known as negative pressure pulmonary edema) is a potentially life-threatening complication in which pulmonary edema occurs shortly after the relief of an upper airway obstruction. The incidence of POPE has been reported to be as high as 1 in 1000 general anesthetic cases and commonly presents as acute respiratory distress that requires immediate intervention. This review examines the 2 subclasses of POPE and describes the etiologic factors, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, diagnostic criteria, and treatment strategies associated with each. The aim of this review was to equip clinicians with the knowledge base necessary to identify patients at increased risk for POPE and to expeditiously diagnose and treat this potentially catastrophic complication.

  9. Kinetics of tumor size and peritumoral brain edema before, during, and after systemic therapy in recurrent WHO grade II or III meningioma.

    PubMed

    Furtner, Julia; Schöpf, Veronika; Seystahl, Katharina; Le Rhun, Emilie; Rudà, Roberta; Roelcke, Ulrich; Koeppen, Susanne; Berghoff, Anna Sophie; Marosi, Christine; Clement, Paul; Faedi, Marina; Watts, Colin; Wick, Wolfgang; Soffietti, Riccardo; Weller, Michael; Preusser, Matthias

    2016-03-01

    The efficacy of systemic antineoplastic therapy on recurrent World Health Organization (WHO) grades II and III meningiomas is unclear. We performed a retrospective multicenter analysis of serial cranial MRI in patients with recurrent WHO II and III meningiomas treated with antineoplastic systemic therapies. Growth rates for tumor volume and diameter, as well as change rates for edema size, were calculated for all lesions. We identified a total of 34 patients (23 atypical, 11 anaplastic meningiomas) with a total of 57 meningioma lesions who had been treated at 6 European institutions. Systemic therapies included bevacizumab, cytotoxic chemotherapy, somatostatin analogues, and tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Overall, tumor growth rates decreased during systemic therapy by 51% for tumor diameter and 14% for tumor volume growth rates compared with the period before initiation of systemic therapy. The most pronounced decrease in meningioma growth rates during systemic therapy was evident in patients treated with bevacizumab, with a reduction of 80% in diameter and 59% in volume growth. Furthermore, a decrease in size of peritumoral edema after initiation of systemic therapy was exclusively observed in patients treated with bevacizumab (-107%). Our data indicate that systemic therapy may inhibit growth of recurrent WHO grades II and III meningiomas to some extent. In our small cohort, bevacizumab had the most pronounced inhibitory effect on tumor growth, as well as some anti-edematous activity. Prospective studies are needed to better define the role of medical therapies in this tumor type. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. [Limb edema and lymphoscintigraphy].

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, P; Munck, D; Belgrado, J P; Leduc, O; Leduc, A

    2003-02-01

    Lymphoscintigraphic investigations represent techniques of nuclear medicine very contributive for the management and treatment of the limb edemas, either primary or secundary. Their principle is presented and methodologies proposed in the literature are reviewed. Their diagnostic contributions are detailed. The sensitivities and specificities of several protocols of investigation are reported. Some limitations of these examinations are analyzed and discussed. Clinical indications for their use are proposed and their interest with regard to the various treatments that can be applied to these limb edemas is discussed.

  11. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis inhibits apoptosis and preserves the blood-brain barrier after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Cheng; Yu, Hongwei; Yan, Cong; Zhao, Wenyang; Liu, Yao; Zhang, Dongdong; Li, Jingwei; Liu, Nan

    2017-01-01

    Early brain injury following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) strongly determines the prognosis of patients suffering from an aneurysm rupture, and apoptosis is associated with early brain injury after SAH. This study was designed to explore the role of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) in early brain injury following SAH. The expression of XIAP was detected using western blotting and real-time RT-PCR in an autologous blood injection model of SAH. We also studied the role of XIAP in early brain injury and detected apoptosis-related proteins. The results showed that XIAP was significantly up-regulated in the cortex and hippocampus and that XIAP was mainly expressed in neuronal cells following SAH. The inhibition of endogenous XIAP aggravated blood-brain barrier disruption, neurological deficits and brain edema. Recombinant XIAP preserved the blood-brain barrier, improved the neurological scores and ameliorated brain edema. Recombinant XIAP treatment also decreased the expression of cleaved caspase-3, caspase-8 and caspase-9, whereas there was no effect on the expression of p53, apoptosis-inducing factor or cytochrome c. These results show that XIAP acts as an endogenous neuroprotective and anti-apoptotic agent following SAH. The effects of XIAP on early brain injury was associated with the inhibition of the caspase-dependent apoptosis pathway. PMID:28327595

  12. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis inhibits apoptosis and preserves the blood-brain barrier after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Gao, Cheng; Yu, Hongwei; Yan, Cong; Zhao, Wenyang; Liu, Yao; Zhang, Dongdong; Li, Jingwei; Liu, Nan

    2017-03-22

    Early brain injury following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) strongly determines the prognosis of patients suffering from an aneurysm rupture, and apoptosis is associated with early brain injury after SAH. This study was designed to explore the role of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) in early brain injury following SAH. The expression of XIAP was detected using western blotting and real-time RT-PCR in an autologous blood injection model of SAH. We also studied the role of XIAP in early brain injury and detected apoptosis-related proteins. The results showed that XIAP was significantly up-regulated in the cortex and hippocampus and that XIAP was mainly expressed in neuronal cells following SAH. The inhibition of endogenous XIAP aggravated blood-brain barrier disruption, neurological deficits and brain edema. Recombinant XIAP preserved the blood-brain barrier, improved the neurological scores and ameliorated brain edema. Recombinant XIAP treatment also decreased the expression of cleaved caspase-3, caspase-8 and caspase-9, whereas there was no effect on the expression of p53, apoptosis-inducing factor or cytochrome c. These results show that XIAP acts as an endogenous neuroprotective and anti-apoptotic agent following SAH. The effects of XIAP on early brain injury was associated with the inhibition of the caspase-dependent apoptosis pathway.

  13. Experimental human endotoxemia enhances brain activity during social cognition.

    PubMed

    Kullmann, Jennifer S; Grigoleit, Jan-Sebastian; Wolf, Oliver T; Engler, Harald; Oberbeck, Reiner; Elsenbruch, Sigrid; Forsting, Michael; Schedlowski, Manfred; Gizewski, Elke R

    2014-06-01

    Acute peripheral inflammation with corresponding increases in peripheral cytokines affects neuropsychological functions and induces depression-like symptoms. However, possible effects of increased immune responses on social cognition remain unknown. Therefore, this study investigated the effects of experimentally induced acute inflammation on performance and neural responses during a social cognition task assessing Theory of Mind (ToM) ability. In this double-blind randomized crossover functional magnetic resonance imaging study, 18 healthy right-handed male volunteers received an injection of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 0.4 ng/kg) or saline, respectively. Plasma levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines as well as mood ratings were analyzed together with brain activation during a validated ToM task (i.e. Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test). LPS administration induced pronounced transient increases in pro- (IL-6, TNF-α) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10, IL-1ra) cytokines as well as decreases in mood. Social cognition performance was not affected by acute inflammation. However, altered neural activity was observed during the ToM task after LPS administration, reflected by increased responses in the fusiform gyrus, temporo-parietal junction, superior temporal gyrus and precuneus. The increased task-related neural responses in the LPS condition may reflect a compensatory strategy or a greater social cognitive processing as a function of sickness.

  14. Twenty-Four-Hour Real-Time Continuous Monitoring of Cerebral Edema in Rabbits Based on a Noninvasive and Noncontact System of Magnetic Induction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gen; Ma, Ke; Sun, Jian; Jin, Gui; Qin, Mingxin; Feng, Hua

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral edema is a common disease, secondary to craniocerebral injury, and real-time continuous monitoring of cerebral edema is crucial for treating patients after traumatic brain injury. This work established a noninvasive and noncontact system by monitoring the magnetic induction phase shift (MIPS) which is associated with brain tissue conductivity. Sixteen rabbits (experimental group n = 10, control group, n = 6) were used to perform a 24 h MIPS and intracranial pressure (ICP) simultaneously monitored experimental study. For the experimental group, after the establishment of epidural freeze-induced cerebral edema models, the MIPS presented a downward trend within 24 h, with a change magnitude of −13.1121 ± 2.3953°; the ICP presented an upward trend within 24 h, with a change magnitude of 12–41 mmHg. The ICP was negatively correlated with the MIPS. In the control group, the MIPS change amplitude was −0.87795 ± 1.5146 without obvious changes; the ICP fluctuated only slightly at the initial value of 12 mmHg. MIPS had a more sensitive performance than ICP in the early stage of cerebral edema. These results showed that this system is basically capable of monitoring gradual increases in the cerebral edema solution volume. To some extent, the MIPS has the potential to reflect the ICP changes. PMID:28282851

  15. Effect of magnesium sulfate administration on blood-brain barrier in a rat model of intraperitoneal sepsis: a randomized controlled experimental study.

    PubMed

    Esen, Figen; Erdem, Tulin; Aktan, Damla; Orhan, Mukadder; Kaya, Mehmet; Eraksoy, Haluk; Cakar, Nahit; Telci, Lutfi

    2005-02-01

    Permeability changes in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and their possible contribution to brain edema formation have a crucial role in the pathophysiology of septic encephalopathy. Magnesium sulfate has been shown to have a protective effect on BBB integrity in multiple experimental models. In this study we determine whether magnesium sulfate administration could have any protective effects on BBB derangement in a rat model of sepsis. This randomized controlled experimental study was performed on adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Intraperitoneal sepsis was induced by using the infected fibrin-thrombin clot model. To examine the effect of magnesium in septic and sham-operated rats, a dose of 750 micromol/kg magnesium sulfate was given intramuscularly immediately after surgery. Control groups for both infected and sham-operated rats were injected with equal volume of saline. Those rats surviving for 24 hours were anesthetized and decapitated for the investigation of brain tissue specific gravity and BBB integrity by the spectrophotometric assay of Evans blue dye extravasations. Another set of experiments was performed for hemodynamic measurements and plasma magnesium level analysis. Rats were allocated into four parallel groups undergoing identical procedures. Sepsis significantly increased BBB permeability to Evans blue. The dye content of each hemisphere was significantly lower in the magnesium-treated septic rats (left hemisphere, 0.00218 +/- 0.0005; right hemisphere, 0.00199 +/- 0.0007 [all results are means +/- standard deviation]) than in control septic animals (left hemisphere, 0.00466 +/- 0.0002; right hemisphere, 0.00641 +/- 0.0003). In septic animals treated with magnesium sulfate, specific gravity was higher (left hemisphere, 1.0438 +/- 0.0007; right hemisphere, 1.0439 +/- 0.0004) than in the untreated septic animals (left hemisphere, 1.0429 +/- 0.0009; right hemisphere, 1.0424 +/- 0.0012), indicating less edema formation with the administration of magnesium

  16. Effect of magnesium sulfate administration on blood–brain barrier in a rat model of intraperitoneal sepsis: a randomized controlled experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Esen, Figen; Erdem, Tulin; Aktan, Damla; Orhan, Mukadder; Kaya, Mehmet; Eraksoy, Haluk; Cakar, Nahit; Telci, Lutfi

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Permeability changes in the blood–brain barrier (BBB) and their possible contribution to brain edema formation have a crucial role in the pathophysiology of septic encephalopathy. Magnesium sulfate has been shown to have a protective effect on BBB integrity in multiple experimental models. In this study we determine whether magnesium sulfate administration could have any protective effects on BBB derangement in a rat model of sepsis. Methods This randomized controlled experimental study was performed on adult male Sprague–Dawley rats. Intraperitoneal sepsis was induced by using the infected fibrin–thrombin clot model. To examine the effect of magnesium in septic and sham-operated rats, a dose of 750 μmol/kg magnesium sulfate was given intramuscularly immediately after surgery. Control groups for both infected and sham-operated rats were injected with equal volume of saline. Those rats surviving for 24 hours were anesthetized and decapitated for the investigation of brain tissue specific gravity and BBB integrity by the spectrophotometric assay of Evans blue dye extravasations. Another set of experiments was performed for hemodynamic measurements and plasma magnesium level analysis. Rats were allocated into four parallel groups undergoing identical procedures. Results Sepsis significantly increased BBB permeability to Evans blue. The dye content of each hemisphere was significantly lower in the magnesium-treated septic rats (left hemisphere, 0.00218 ± 0.0005; right hemisphere, 0.00199 ± 0.0007 [all results are means ± standard deviation]) than in control septic animals (left hemisphere, 0.00466 ± 0.0002; right hemisphere, 0.00641 ± 0.0003). In septic animals treated with magnesium sulfate, specific gravity was higher (left hemisphere, 1.0438 ± 0.0007; right hemisphere, 1.0439 ± 0.0004) than in the untreated septic animals (left hemisphere, 1.0429 ± 0.0009; right hemisphere, 1.0424 ± 0.0012), indicating less edema formation with the

  17. Treatment of Edema Associated With Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Leasure, Audrey; Kimberly, W Taylor; Sansing, Lauren H; Kahle, Kristopher T; Kronenberg, Golo; Kunte, Hagen; Simard, J Marc; Sheth, Kevin N

    2016-02-01

    Cerebral edema (i.e., "brain swelling") is a common complication following intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and is associated with worse clinical outcomes. Perihematomal edema (PHE) accumulates during the first 72 h after hemorrhage, and during this period, patients are at risk of clinical deterioration due to the resulting tissue shifts and brain herniation. First-line medical therapies for patients symptomatic of PHE include osmotic agents, such as mannitol in low- or high-dose bolus form, or boluses of hypertonic saline (HTS) at varied concentrations with or without subsequent continuous infusion. Decompressive craniectomy may be required for symptomatic edema refractory to osmotherapy. Other strategies that reduce PHE such as hypothermia and minimally invasive surgery have shown promise in pilot studies and are currently being evaluated in larger clinical trials. Ongoing basic, translational, and clinical research seek to better elucidate the pathophysiology of PHE to identify novel strategies to prevent edema formation as a next major advance in the treatment of ICH.

  18. Edema and pain reduction using transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation treatment

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yeong-Deok; Lee, Jung-Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact on the edema and pain when applying transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. [Subjects and Methods] Eleven patients who were diagnosed with lymphedema were selected as the subjects of the study. The experimental group received transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation treatment on edema regions three times per week for four weeks. Surface tape measurement was used to measure changes in lower extremity edema. Pain intensity was measured using the visual analog scale. [Results] The edema decrements in the experimental group were significantly larger than those in the control group. The pain decrements in the experimental group were significantly larger than those in the control group. [Conclusion] In conclusion, application of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation was confirmed to be effective in reducing edema and pain. PMID:27942125

  19. Latest advances in edema

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villavicencio, J. L.; Hargens, A. R.; Pikoulicz, E.

    1996-01-01

    Basic concepts in the physiopathology of edema are reviewed. The mechanisms of fluid exchange across the capillary endothelium are explained. Interstitial flow and lymph formation are examined. Clinical disorders of tissue and lymphatic transport, microcirculatory derangements in venous disorders, protein disorders, and lymphatic system disorders are explored. Techniques for investigational imaging of the lymphatic system are explained.

  20. BRAIN DAMAGE AND BEHAVIOR, A CLINICAL-EXPERIMENTAL STUDY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SCHULMAN, JEROME L.; AND OTHERS

    THIS MONOGRAPH RELATES RESULTS OF A STUDY WHICH WAS UNDERTAKEN TO ATTEMPT TO ANSWER THREE QUESTIONS--TO WHAT EXTENT DO EIGHT TECHNIQUES COMMONLY USED TO DIAGNOSE BRAIN DAMAGE CO-VARY, TO WHAT EXTENT DO THE VARIOUS BEHAVIORAL SYMPTOMS THAT OCCUR WITH BRAIN DAMAGE CO-VARY, AND TO WHAT EXTENT DO THE DIAGNOSTIC MEASURES, SINGLY OR IN GROUPS, PREDICT…

  1. Novel Nitroxide Resuscitation Strategies in Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    peroxidase activity after traumatic brain injury. J Neurotrauma 2003;20:437–445. 68. Mavelli I, Rigo A, Federico R, et al. Superoxide dismutase, glu... Engel , C.C., and Castro, C.A. (2008). Mild traumatic brain injury in U.S. soldiers returning from Iraq. N. Engl. J. Med. 358, 453–463. Ling, G., Bandak

  2. Characterization and quantification of cerebral edema induced by synchrotron x-ray microbeam radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serduc, Raphaël; van de Looij, Yohan; Francony, Gilles; Verdonck, Olivier; van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Laissue, Jean; Farion, Régine; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Siegbahn, Erik Albert; Bravin, Alberto; Prezado, Yolanda; Segebarth, Christoph; Rémy, Chantal; Lahrech, Hana

    2008-03-01

    Cerebral edema is one of the main acute complications arising after irradiation of brain tumors. Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT), an innovative experimental radiotherapy technique using spatially fractionated synchrotron x-rays, has been shown to spare radiosensitive tissues such as mammal brains. The aim of this study was to determine if cerebral edema occurs after MRT using diffusion-weighted MRI and microgravimetry. Prone Swiss nude mice's heads were positioned horizontally in the synchrotron x-ray beam and the upper part of the left hemisphere was irradiated in the antero-posterior direction by an array of 18 planar microbeams (25 mm wide, on-center spacing 211 mm, height 4 mm, entrance dose 312 Gy or 1000 Gy). An apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was measured at 7 T 1, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days after irradiation. Eventually, the cerebral water content (CWC) was determined by microgravimetry. The ADC and CWC in the irradiated (312 Gy or 1000 Gy) and in the contralateral non-irradiated hemispheres were not significantly different at all measurement times, with two exceptions: (1) a 9% ADC decrease (p < 0.05) was observed in the irradiated cortex 1 day after exposure to 312 Gy, (2) a 0.7% increase (p < 0.05) in the CWC was measured in the irradiated hemispheres 1 day after exposure to 1000 Gy. The results demonstrate the presence of a minor and transient cellular edema (ADC decrease) at 1 day after a 312 Gy exposure, without a significant CWC increase. One day after a 1000 Gy exposure, the CWC increased, while the ADC remained unchanged and may reflect the simultaneous presence of cellular and vasogenic edema. Both types of edema disappear within a week after microbeam exposure which may confirm the normal tissue sparing effect of MRT. For more information on this article, see medicalphysicsweb.org

  3. Delivery of anti-platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule single-chain variable fragment-urokinase fusion protein to the cerebral vasculature lyses arterial clots and attenuates postischemic brain edema.

    PubMed

    Danielyan, Kristina; Ding, Bi-Sen; Gottstein, Claudia; Cines, Douglas B; Muzykantov, Vladimir R

    2007-06-01

    Efficacy and safety of current means to prevent cerebrovascular thrombosis in patients at high risk of stroke are suboptimal. In theory, anchoring fibrinolytic plasminogen activators to the luminal surface of the cerebral endothelium might arrest formation of occlusive clots in this setting. We tested this approach using the recombinant construct antiplatelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM) single-chain variable fragment (scFv)-urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), fusing low-molecular-weight single-chain urokinase-type plasminogen activator with a scFv of an antibody directed to the stably expressed endothelial surface determinant PECAM-1, implicated in inflammation and thrombosis. Studies in mice showed that scFv-uPA, but not unconjugated uPA 1) accumulates in the brain after intravascular injection, 2) lyses clots lodged in the cerebral arterial vasculature without hemorrhagic complications, 3) provides rapid and stable cerebral reperfusion, and 4) alleviates post-thrombotic brain edema. Effective and safe thromboprophylaxis in the cerebral arterial circulation by anti-PECAM scFv-uPA represents a prototype of a new paradigm to prevent recurrent cerebrovascular thrombosis.

  4. Intraneural edema following exposure to vibration.

    PubMed

    Lundborg, G; Dahlin, L B; Danielsen, N; Hansson, H A; Necking, L E; Pyykkö, I

    1987-08-01

    Peripheral neuropathy represents a well-known complication from long-term exposure to vibration. In the present study an experimental model is presented with the purpose of analyzing the formation of intraneural edema following vibration exposure. Vibration (82 Hz, peak-to-peak amplitude 0.21 mm) was induced in the hind limb of rats by the use of vibrating electric motors during 4 h/d for 5 d. Tracer techniques (with albumin Evans blue and horseradish peroxidase) were used to study the permeability of intraneural microvessels after the vibration exposure on day 5. It was found that the vibration trauma in this model induced epineurial edema in the sciatic nerve. It is hypothesized that the formation of intraneural edema may be an important pathophysiological factor in the occurrence of vibration-induced neuropathy.

  5. Transient Idiopathic Primary Penoscrotal Edema

    PubMed Central

    Namir, Sody A; Trattner, Akiva

    2013-01-01

    We present the case of a male born prematurely at 32 weeks gestation by cesarean section following overt symptoms of maternal preeclampsia. He developed severe penoscrotal edema anew one month from birth. No remarkable exposure or trauma was identified. This unexplained swelling remained uniform till 4 months of age, while the penile edema resolved spontaneously. A small benign hydrocele remained unchanged, since onset of the edema and continued after the edema subsided. This is the first report of persistent, but transient penoscrotal edema resolving in a 3 months course, without any apparent explanation, a possible pathogenetic mechanism was suggested. PMID:24082210

  6. Development and experimentation of an eye/brain/task testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, Nora; Villarreal, James

    1987-01-01

    The principal objective is to develop a laboratory testbed that will provide a unique capability to elicit, control, record, and analyze the relationship of operator task loading, operator eye movement, and operator brain wave data in a computer system environment. The ramifications of an integrated eye/brain monitor to the man machine interface are staggering. The success of such a system would benefit users of space and defense, paraplegics, and the monitoring of boring screens (nuclear power plants, air defense, etc.)

  7. Sumoylation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α ameliorates failure of brain stem cardiovascular regulation in experimental brain death.

    PubMed

    Chan, Julie Y H; Tsai, Ching-Yi; Wu, Carol H Y; Li, Faith C H; Dai, Kuang-Yu; Sun, Enya Y H; Chan, Samuel H H; Chang, Alice Y W

    2011-03-03

    One aspect of brain death is cardiovascular deregulation because asystole invariably occurs shortly after its diagnosis. A suitable neural substrate for mechanistic delineation of this aspect of brain death resides in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). RVLM is the origin of a life-and-death signal that our laboratory detected from blood pressure of comatose patients that disappears before brain death ensues. At the same time, transcriptional upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 in RVLM by hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) plays a pro-life role in experimental brain death, and HIF-1α is subject to sumoylation activated by transient cerebral ischemia. It follows that sumoylation of HIF-1α in RVLM in response to hypoxia may play a modulatory role on brain stem cardiovascular regulation during experimental brain death. A clinically relevant animal model that employed mevinphos as the experimental insult in Sprague-Dawley rat was used. Biochemical changes in RVLM during distinct phenotypes in systemic arterial pressure spectrum that reflect maintained or defunct brain stem cardiovascular regulation were studied. Western blot analysis, EMSA, ELISA, confocal microscopy and immunoprecipitation demonstrated that drastic tissue hypoxia, elevated levels of proteins conjugated by small ubiquitin-related modifier-1 (SUMO-1), Ubc9 (the only known conjugating enzyme for the sumoylation pathway) or HIF-1α, augmented sumoylation of HIF-1α, nucleus-bound translocation and enhanced transcriptional activity of HIF-1α in RVLM neurons took place preferentially during the pro-life phase of experimental brain death. Furthermore, loss-of-function manipulations by immunoneutralization of SUMO-1, Ubc9 or HIF-1α in RVLM blunted the upregulated nitric oxide synthase I/protein kinase G signaling cascade, which sustains the brain stem cardiovascular regulatory machinery during the pro-life phase. We conclude that sumoylation of HIF-1α in RVLM ameliorates brain stem cardiovascular

  8. Sumoylation of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α Ameliorates Failure of Brain Stem Cardiovascular Regulation in Experimental Brain Death

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Julie Y. H.; Tsai, Ching-Yi; Wu, Carol H. Y.; Li, Faith C. H.; Dai, Kuang-Yu; Sun, Enya Y. H.; Chan, Samuel H. H.; Chang, Alice Y. W.

    2011-01-01

    Background One aspect of brain death is cardiovascular deregulation because asystole invariably occurs shortly after its diagnosis. A suitable neural substrate for mechanistic delineation of this aspect of brain death resides in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). RVLM is the origin of a life-and-death signal that our laboratory detected from blood pressure of comatose patients that disappears before brain death ensues. At the same time, transcriptional upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 in RVLM by hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) plays a pro-life role in experimental brain death, and HIF-1α is subject to sumoylation activated by transient cerebral ischemia. It follows that sumoylation of HIF-1α in RVLM in response to hypoxia may play a modulatory role on brain stem cardiovascular regulation during experimental brain death. Methodology/Principal Findings A clinically relevant animal model that employed mevinphos as the experimental insult in Sprague-Dawley rat was used. Biochemical changes in RVLM during distinct phenotypes in systemic arterial pressure spectrum that reflect maintained or defunct brain stem cardiovascular regulation were studied. Western blot analysis, EMSA, ELISA, confocal microscopy and immunoprecipitation demonstrated that drastic tissue hypoxia, elevated levels of proteins conjugated by small ubiquitin-related modifier-1 (SUMO-1), Ubc9 (the only known conjugating enzyme for the sumoylation pathway) or HIF-1α, augmented sumoylation of HIF-1α, nucleus-bound translocation and enhanced transcriptional activity of HIF-1α in RVLM neurons took place preferentially during the pro-life phase of experimental brain death. Furthermore, loss-of-function manipulations by immunoneutralization of SUMO-1, Ubc9 or HIF-1α in RVLM blunted the upregulated nitric oxide synthase I/protein kinase G signaling cascade, which sustains the brain stem cardiovascular regulatory machinery during the pro-life phase. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that

  9. Rapid Morphological Brain Abnormalities during Acute Methamphetamine Intoxication in the Rat. An Experimental study using Light and Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Hari S.; Kiyatkin, Eugene A.

    2009-01-01

    This study describes morphological abnormalities of brain cells during acute methamphetamine (METH) intoxication in the rat and demonstrates the role of hyperthermia, disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and edema in their development. Rats with chronically implanted brain, muscle and skin temperature probes and an intravenous (iv) catheter were exposed to METH (9 mg/kg) at standard (23°C) and warm (29°C) ambient temperatures, allowing for the observation of hyperthermia ranging from mild to pathological levels (38–42°C). When brain temperature peaked or reached a level suggestive of possible lethality (>41.5°C), rats were injected with Evans blue (EB), rapidly anesthetized, perfused, and their brains were taken for further analyses. Four brain areas (cortex, hippocampus, thalamus and hypothalamus) were analyzed for EB extravasation, water and electrolyte (Na+, K+, Cl−) contents, immunostained for albumin and glial fibrillary acidic protein, and examined for neuronal, glial and axonal alterations using standard light and electron microscopy. These examinations revealed profound abnormalities in neuronal, glial, and endothelial cells, which were stronger with METH administered at 29°C than 23°C and tightly correlated with brain and body hyperthermia. These changes had some structural specificity, but in each structure they tightly correlated with increases in EB levels, the numbers of albumin-positive cells, and water and ion contents, suggesting leakage of the BBB, acutely developing brain edema, and serious shifts in brain ion homeostasis as leading factors underlying brain abnormalities. While most of these acute structural and functional abnormalities appear to be reversible, they could trigger subsequent cellular alterations in the brain and accelerate neurodegeneration—the most dangerous complication of chronic amphetamine-like drug abuse. PMID:18773954

  10. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging of acute experimental brain ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Kauppinen, Risto A

    2014-07-01

    Ischaemia is a condition in which blood flow either drops to zero or proceeds at severely decreased levels that cannot supply sufficient oxidizable substrates to maintain energy metabolism in vivo. Brain, a highly oxidative organ, is particularly susceptible to ischaemia. Ischaemia leads to loss of consciousness in seconds and, if prolonged, permanent tissue damage is inevitable. Ischaemia primarily results in a collapse of cerebral energy state, followed by a series of subtle changes in anaerobic metabolism, ion and water homeostasis that eventually initiate destructive internal and external processes in brain tissue. (31)P and (1)H NMR spectroscopy were initially used to evaluate anaerobic metabolism in brain. However, since the early 1990s (1)H Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), exploiting the nuclear magnetism of tissue water, has become the key method for assessment of ischaemic brain tissue. This article summarises multi-parametric (1)H MRI work that has exploited diffusion, relaxation and magnetisation transfer as 'contrasts' to image ischaemic brain in preclinical models for the first few hours, with a view to assessing evolution of ischaemia and tissue viability in a non-invasive manner.

  11. [Evaluation of brain ischemia by mitochondrial respiration: experimental model].

    PubMed

    Carlotti, C G; Colli, B O; Kazuo, J Y

    2001-06-01

    Brain ischemia occurs in several diseases. One of the critical factors for recovery of patients is the duration of the ischemic process. Brain activity depends on the energetic supply, it suggests that the study of mitochondrial function can be useful for evaluation of neuronal damage. The purpose of the present research was to study the mitochondrial respiration by occlusion of the left middle cerebral artery by intraluminal suture technique. Adults Wistar rats were subdivided in 4 groups: control, 15, 30 and 60 minutes of occlusion. Results showed that there was no significant difference between the group of 15 minutes and the control group. The group of 30 minutes had significant decrease of state III of mitochondrial respiration compared with control group. The group of 60 minutes had significant decrease in state III and IV of mitochondrial respiration compared with control group. Mitochondrial respiration allowed an early and effective evaluation of focal ischemic process of the rat brain.

  12. Cysteamine alleviates early brain injury via reducing oxidative stress and apoptosis in a rat experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zong-Yong; Yang, Ming-Feng; Wang, Tao; Li, Da-Wei; Liu, Yun-Lin; Zhang, Jin-Hui; Sun, Bao-Liang

    2015-05-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of early brain injury (EBI) following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The aim of this study was to assess whether cysteamine prevents post-SAH oxidative stress injury via its antioxidative and anti-apoptotic effects. It was observed that intraperitoneal administration of cysteamine (20 mg/kg/day) could significantly alleviate EBI (including neurobehavioral deficits, brain edema, blood-brain barrier permeability, and cortical neuron apoptosis) after SAH in rats. Meanwhile, cysteamine treatment reduced post-SAH elevated the reactive oxygen species level, the concentration of malondialdehyde, 3-nitrotyrosine, and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine and increased the glutathione peroxidase enzymatic activity, the concentration of glutathione and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in brain cortex at 48 h after SAH. These results indicated that administration of cysteamine may ameliorate EBI and provide neuroprotection after SAH in rat models.

  13. Effects of sex steroid hormones on neuromedin S and neuromedin U2 receptor expression following experimental traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Khaksari, Mohammad; Maghool, Fatemeh; Asadikaram, Gholamreza; Hajializadeh, Zahra

    2016-10-01

    Neuroprotective effects of female gonadal steroids are mediated through several pathways involving multiple peptides and receptors after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Two of these peptides are including the regulatory peptides neuromedin U (NMU) and neuromedin S (NMS), and their common receptor neuromedin U2 receptor (NMUR2). This study investigates the effects of physiological doses of estradiol and progesterone on brain edema, NMS and NMU as well as NMUR2 expression following TBI. Ovariectomized female rats were given high-and low-dose of female sex steroid hormones through implantation of capsules for a week before trauma. The brain NMUR2 expression, prepro-NMS expression, NMU content, and water content (brain edema) were evaluated 24 hr after TBI induced by Marmarou's method. Percentage of brain water content in high- and low-dose estradiol, and in high- and low- dose progesterone was less than vehicle (P<0.01). Results show high expression of prepro-NMS in high dose progesterone (TBI-HP) rats compared to the high dose estrogen (TBI-HE), as well as vehicle (P<0.01). NMU content in low-dose progesterone (TBI-LP) group was more than that of vehicle group (P<0.001). Furthermore a difference in NMU content observed between TBI-HP compared to TBI-HE, and vehicle (P<0.05). The NMUR2 mRNA expression revealed an upregulation in TBI-HP rats compared to the TBI-HE group (P<0.001). Findings indicate that progesterone attenuates brain edema and induces an increase in NMS and its receptor which may mediate the anti-edematous effect of progesterone after TBI.

  14. Effects of sex steroid hormones on neuromedin S and neuromedin U2 receptor expression following experimental traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Khaksari, Mohammad; Maghool, Fatemeh; Asadikaram, Gholamreza; Hajializadeh, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Neuroprotective effects of female gonadal steroids are mediated through several pathways involving multiple peptides and receptors after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Two of these peptides are including the regulatory peptides neuromedin U (NMU) and neuromedin S (NMS), and their common receptor neuromedin U2 receptor (NMUR2). This study investigates the effects of physiological doses of estradiol and progesterone on brain edema, NMS and NMU as well as NMUR2 expression following TBI. Materials and Methods: Ovariectomized female rats were given high-and low-dose of female sex steroid hormones through implantation of capsules for a week before trauma. The brain NMUR2 expression, prepro-NMS expression, NMU content, and water content (brain edema) were evaluated 24 hr after TBI induced by Marmarou’s method. Results: Percentage of brain water content in high- and low-dose estradiol, and in high- and low- dose progesterone was less than vehicle (P<0.01). Results show high expression of prepro-NMS in high dose progesterone (TBI-HP) rats compared to the high dose estrogen (TBI-HE), as well as vehicle (P<0.01). NMU content in low-dose progesterone (TBI-LP) group was more than that of vehicle group (P<0.001). Furthermore a difference in NMU content observed between TBI-HP compared to TBI-HE, and vehicle (P<0.05). The NMUR2 mRNA expression revealed an upregulation in TBI-HP rats compared to the TBI-HE group (P<0.001). Conclusion: Findings indicate that progesterone attenuates brain edema and induces an increase in NMS and its receptor which may mediate the anti-edematous effect of progesterone after TBI. PMID:27872704

  15. Experimental induction of corpora amylacea in adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Schipper, H M

    1998-10-01

    Corpora amylacea (CA) are glycoproteinaceous inclusions that accumulate in astroglia and other brain cells as a function of advancing age and, to an even greater extent, in several human neurodegenerative conditions. The mechanisms responsible for their biogenesis and their subcellular origin(s) remain unclear. We previously demonstrated that the sulfhydryl agent, cysteamine (CSH), promotes the accumulation of CA-like inclusions in cultured rat astroglia. In the present study, we show that subcutaneous administration of CSH to adult rats (150 mg/kg for 6 weeks followed by a 5-week drug-washout period) elicits the accumulation of CA in many cortical and subcortical brain regions. As in the aging human brain and in CSH-treated rat astrocyte cultures, the inclusions are periodic acid-Schiff -positive and are consistently immunostained with antibodies directed against mitochondrial epitopes and ubiquitin. Our findings support our contention that mitochondria are important structural precursors of CA, and that CSH accelerates aging-like processes in rat astroglia both in vitro and in the intact brain.

  16. Aquaporin and brain diseases.

    PubMed

    Badaut, Jérôme; Fukuda, Andrew M; Jullienne, Amandine; Petry, Klaus G

    2014-05-01

    The presence of water channel proteins, aquaporins (AQPs), in the brain led to intense research in understanding the underlying roles of each of them under normal conditions and pathological conditions. In this review, we summarize some of the recent knowledge on the 3 main AQPs (AQP1, AQP4 and AQP9), with a special focus on AQP4, the most abundant AQP in the central nervous system. AQP4 was most studied in several brain pathological conditions ranging from acute brain injuries (stroke, traumatic brain injury) to the chronic brain disease with autoimmune neurodegenerative diseases. To date, no specific therapeutic agents have been developed to either inhibit or enhance water flux through these channels. However, experimental results strongly underline the importance of this topic for future investigation. Early inhibition of water channels may have positive effects in prevention of edema formation in brain injuries but at later time points during the course of a disease, AQP is critical for clearance of water from the brain into blood vessels. Thus, AQPs, and in particular AQP4, have important roles both in the formation and resolution of edema after brain injury. The dual, complex function of these water channel proteins makes them an excellent therapeutic target. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Aquaporins. © 2013.

  17. Clinical and radiologic features of pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Gluecker, T; Capasso, P; Schnyder, P; Gudinchet, F; Schaller, M D; Revelly, J P; Chiolero, R; Vock, P; Wicky, S

    1999-01-01

    Pulmonary edema may be classified as increased hydrostatic pressure edema, permeability edema with diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), permeability edema without DAD, or mixed edema. Pulmonary edema has variable manifestations. Postobstructive pulmonary edema typically manifests radiologically as septal lines, peribronchial cuffing, and, in more severe cases, central alveolar edema. Pulmonary edema with chronic pulmonary embolism manifests as sharply demarcated areas of increased ground-glass attenuation. Pulmonary edema with veno-occlusive disease manifests as large pulmonary arteries, diffuse interstitial edema with numerous Kerley lines, peribronchial cuffing, and a dilated right ventricle. Stage 1 near drowning pulmonary edema manifests as Kerley lines, peribronchial cuffing, and patchy, perihilar alveolar areas of airspace consolidation; stage 2 and 3 lesions are radiologically nonspecific. Pulmonary edema following administration of cytokines demonstrates bilateral, symmetric interstitial edema with thickened septal lines. High-altitude pulmonary edema usually manifests as central interstitial edema associated with peribronchial cuffing, ill-defined vessels, and patchy airspace consolidation. Neurogenic pulmonary edema manifests as bilateral, rather homogeneous airspace consolidations that predominate at the apices in about 50% of cases. Reperfusion pulmonary edema usually demonstrates heterogeneous airspace consolidations that predominate in the areas distal to the recanalized vessels. Postreduction pulmonary edema manifests as mild airspace consolidation involving the ipsilateral lung, whereas pulmonary edema due to air embolism initially demonstrates interstitial edema followed by bilateral, peripheral alveolar areas of increased opacity that predominate at the lung bases. Familiarity with the spectrum of radiologic findings in pulmonary edema from various causes will often help narrow the differential diagnosis.

  18. Diabetic Macular Edema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Conceição; Pires, Isabel; Cunha-Vaz, José

    The optical coherence tomography (OCT), a noninvasive and noncontact diagnostic method, was introduced in 1995 for imaging macular diseases. In diabetic macular edema (DME), OCT scans show hyporeflectivity, due to intraretinal and/or subretinal fluid accumulation, related to inner and/or outer blood-retinal barrier breakdown. OCT tomograms may also reveal the presence of hard exudates, as hyperreflective spots with a shadow, in the outer retinal layers, among others. In conclusion, OCT is a particularly valuable diagnostic tool in DME, helpful both in the diagnosis and follow-up procedure.

  19. Negative-Pressure Pulmonary Edema.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Mallar; Kallet, Richard H; Ware, Lorraine B; Matthay, Michael A

    2016-10-01

    Negative-pressure pulmonary edema (NPPE) or postobstructive pulmonary edema is a well-described cause of acute respiratory failure that occurs after intense inspiratory effort against an obstructed airway, usually from upper airway infection, tumor, or laryngospasm. Patients with NPPE generate very negative airway pressures, which augment transvascular fluid filtration and precipitate interstitial and alveolar edema. Pulmonary edema fluid collected from most patients with NPPE has a low protein concentration, suggesting hydrostatic forces as the primary mechanism for the pathogenesis of NPPE. Supportive care should be directed at relieving the upper airway obstruction by endotracheal intubation or cricothyroidotomy, institution of lung-protective positive-pressure ventilation, and diuresis unless the patient is in shock. Resolution of the pulmonary edema is usually rapid, in part because alveolar fluid clearance mechanisms are intact. In this review, we discuss the clinical presentation, pathophysiology, and management of negative-pressure or postobstructive pulmonary edema.

  20. Glyburide is associated with attenuated vasogenic edema in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Kimberly, W Taylor; Battey, Thomas W K; Pham, Ly; Wu, Ona; Yoo, Albert J; Furie, Karen L; Singhal, Aneesh B; Elm, Jordan J; Stern, Barney J; Sheth, Kevin N

    2014-04-01

    Brain edema is a serious complication of ischemic stroke that can lead to secondary neurological deterioration and death. Glyburide is reported to prevent brain swelling in preclinical rodent models of ischemic stroke through inhibition of a non-selective channel composed of sulfonylurea receptor 1 and transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily M member 4. However, the relevance of this pathway to the development of cerebral edema in stroke patients is not known. Using a case-control design, we retrospectively assessed neuroimaging and blood markers of cytotoxic and vasogenic edema in subjects who were enrolled in the glyburide advantage in malignant edema and stroke-pilot (GAMES-Pilot) trial. We compared serial brain magnetic resonance images (MRIs) to a cohort with similar large volume infarctions. We also compared matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) plasma level in large hemispheric stroke. We report that IV glyburide was associated with T2 fluid-attenuated inversion recovery signal intensity ratio on brain MRI, diminished the lesional water diffusivity between days 1 and 2 (pseudo-normalization), and reduced blood MMP-9 level. Several surrogate markers of vasogenic edema appear to be reduced in the setting of IV glyburide treatment in human stroke. Verification of these potential imaging and blood biomarkers is warranted in the context of a randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

  1. The Effect of an Experimental Missile Wound to the Brain on Brain Electrolytes, Regional Cerebral Blood Flow and Blood Brain Barrier Permeability.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-02-10

    In animals that we planned to measure intracranial pressure, we extended the scalp incision posteriorly and made a 5mm left occipital trephine to...with monitoring include trephination (even though the skull hole was sealed Vith dental acrylic) and the volume of the air-filled monitor itself. The...from these findings: 1) Brain wounds have been made through skull trephine openings in several prior experimental studies.(7- 15) Quite possibly brain

  2. [Pathopshysiological mechanisms in macular edema].

    PubMed

    Turlea, Cristian; Zolog, Ileana; Blăjan, Codruta; Roşca, C; Turlea, Magdalena; Munteanu, Mihnea; Boruga, Ovidiu

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of diabetic macular edema has known a fast development in the last 5 years where the transition from laser monotherapy to intravitreal pharmacotherapy is becoming standard practice. Intravitreal injections therapy is in a continuous development with promising positive results. The use of intratvitreal devices in the treatment of macular edema of vascular cause has become a viable alternative also in treating diabetic macular edema. Several clinical studies have revealed the superiority of intravitreal treatment versus laser monotherapy. This article is evaluating and reviewing present and future treatments used to combat diabetic macular edema. [corrected].

  3. Heterogeneous Blood-Tumor Barrier Permeability Determines Drug Efficacy in Experimental Brain Metastases of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lockman, Paul R.; Mittapalli, Rajendar K.; Taskar, Kunal S.; Rudraraju, Vinay; Gril, Brunilde; Bohn, Kaci A.; Adkins, Chris E.; Roberts, Amanda; Thorsheim, Helen R.; Gaasch, Julie A.; Huang, Suyun; Palmieri, Diane; Steeg, Patricia S.; Smith, Quentin R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Brain metastases of breast cancer appear to be increasing in incidence, confer significant morbidity, and threaten to compromise gains made in systemic chemotherapy. The blood-tumor barrier (BTB) is compromised in many brain metastases, however, the extent to which this influences chemotherapeutic delivery and efficacy is unknown. Herein, we answer this question by measuring BTB passive integrity, chemotherapeutic drug uptake, and anticancer efficacy in vivo in two breast cancer models that metastasize preferentially to brain. Experimental Design Experimental brain metastasis drug uptake and BTB permeability were simultaneously measured using novel fluorescent and phosphorescent imaging techniques in immune compromised mice. Drug-induced apoptosis and vascular characteristics were assessed using immunofluorescent microscopy. Results Analysis of >2000 brain metastases from two models (human 231-BR-Her2 and murine 4T1-BR5) demonstrated partial BTB permeability compromise in >89% lesions, varying in magnitude within and between metastases. Brain metastasis uptake of 14C- paclitaxel and 14C- doxorubicin was generally greater than normal brain but <15% of that of other tissues or peripheral metastases, and only reached cytotoxic concentrations in a small subset (~10%) of the most permeable metastases. Neither drug significantly decreased the experimental brain metastatic ability of 231-BR-Her2 tumor cells. BTB permeability was associated with vascular remodeling and correlated with over expression of the pericyte protein, desmin. Conclusions This work demonstrates that the BTB remains a significant impediment to standard chemotherapeutic delivery and efficacy in experimental brain metastases of breast cancer. New brain permeable drugs will be needed. Evidence is presented for vascular remodeling in BTB permeability alterations. PMID:20829328

  4. Volatile Anesthetics Influence Blood-Brain Barrier Integrity by Modulation of Tight Junction Protein Expression in Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Schaible, Eva-Verena; Timaru-Kast, Ralph; Hedrich, Jana; Luhmann, Heiko J.; Engelhard, Kristin

    2012-01-01

    Disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) results in cerebral edema formation, which is a major cause for high mortality after traumatic brain injury (TBI). As anesthetic care is mandatory in patients suffering from severe TBI it may be important to elucidate the effect of different anesthetics on cerebral edema formation. Tight junction proteins (TJ) such as zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and claudin-5 (cl5) play a central role for BBB stability. First, the influence of the volatile anesthetics sevoflurane and isoflurane on in-vitro BBB integrity was investigated by quantification of the electrical resistance (TEER) in murine brain endothelial monolayers and neurovascular co-cultures of the BBB. Secondly brain edema and TJ expression of ZO-1 and cl5 were measured in-vivo after exposure towards volatile anesthetics in native mice and after controlled cortical impact (CCI). In in-vitro endothelial monocultures, both anesthetics significantly reduced TEER within 24 hours after exposure. In BBB co-cultures mimicking the neurovascular unit (NVU) volatile anesthetics had no impact on TEER. In healthy mice, anesthesia did not influence brain water content and TJ expression, while 24 hours after CCI brain water content increased significantly stronger with isoflurane compared to sevoflurane. In line with the brain edema data, ZO-1 expression was significantly higher in sevoflurane compared to isoflurane exposed CCI animals. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed disruption of ZO-1 at the cerebrovascular level, while cl5 was less affected in the pericontusional area. The study demonstrates that anesthetics influence brain edema formation after experimental TBI. This effect may be attributed to modulation of BBB permeability by differential TJ protein expression. Therefore, selection of anesthetics may influence the barrier function and introduce a strong bias in experimental research on pathophysiology of BBB dysfunction. Future research is required to investigate adverse or

  5. Neurogenic pulmonary edema following Cryptococcal meningoencephalitis associated with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Reiichiro; Sugita, Yasuo; Arakawa, Kenji; Nakashima, Shinji; Umeno, Yumi; Todoroki, Keita; Yoshida, Tomoko; Takase, Yorihiko; Kage, Masayoshi; Oshima, Koichi; Yano, Hirohisa

    2015-08-01

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) is a clinical syndrome characterized by the acute onset of pulmonary edema following a significant central nervous system insult. Only a few cases of NPE after Cryptococcal meningitis have been reported. We report a case of NPE following Cryptococcal meningoencephalitis. A 40-year-old man with no medical history was hospitalized for disturbance of consciousness. Blood glucose level was 124 mg/dL. Non-contrast head computed tomography showed no abnormalities. Lumbar puncture revealed a pressure of over 300 mm H2 O and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) confirmed a white blood cell count of 65/mm(3) . The CSF glucose level was 0 mg/dL. The patient was empirically started on treatment for presumptive bacterial and viral meningitis. Four days after, the patient died in a sudden severe pulmonary edema. Autopsy was performed. We found at autopsy a brain edema with small hemorrhage of the right basal ganglia, severe pulmonary edema and mild cardiomegaly. Histologically, dilated Virchow-Robin spaces, crowded with Cryptococci were observed. In the right basal ganglia, Virchow-Robin spaces were destroyed with hemorrhage and Cryptococci spread to parenchyma of the brain. No inflammatory reaction of the lung was seen. Finally, acute pulmonary edema in this case was diagnosed as NPE following Cryptococcal meningoencephalitis. After autopsy, we found that he was positive for serum antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus. © 2015 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  6. The role of the sonic hedgehog signaling pathway in early brain injury after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Rong-Yao; Lian, Zhi-Gang; Chen, Xiao-Lin; Ma, Li; Sun, Hao-Min; Zhao, Yuan-Li

    2013-09-27

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway plays a neuro-protective role. However, whether the Shh pathway is induced by subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) has not been investigated. We sought to investigate Shh activation in the cortex in the early stage of SAH, and assessed the effect of cyclopamine (a specific inhibitor of the Shh pathway) on Shh pathway regulation and evaluated the impact of cyclopamine on SAH. We found that the Shh pathway was up-regulated in the cortex after SAH, and that blocking the Shh pathway increased cell apoptosis. Early brain damages, including brain edema, blood-brain barrier impairment, and cortical apoptosis were significantly aggravated following with cyclopamine treatment compared with vehicle treatment. Our results suggest that the Shh pathway should be activated in the brain after SAH, and plays a beneficial role in SAH development, possibly by inhibiting cerebral oxidative stress through induction of antioxidant and detoxifying enzymes.

  7. Experimental Injury Biomechanics of the Pediatric Head and Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulies, Susan; Coats, Brittany

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability among children and young adults in the United States and results in over 2,500 childhood deaths, 37,000 hospitalizations, and 435,000 emergency department visits each year (Langlois et al. 2004). Computational models of the head have proven to be powerful tools to help us understand mechanisms of adult TBI and to determine load thresholds for injuries specific to adult TBI. Similar models need to be developed for children and young adults to identify age-specific mechanisms and injury tolerances appropriate for children and young adults. The reliability of these tools, however, depends heavily on the availability of pediatric tissue material property data. To date the majority of material and structural properties used in pediatric computer models have been scaled from adult human data. Studies have shown significant age-related differences in brain and skull properties (Prange and Margulies 2002; Coats and Margulies 2006a, b), indicating that the pediatric head cannot be modeled as a miniature adult head, and pediatric computer models incorporating age-specific data are necessary to accurately mimic the pediatric head response to impact or rotation. This chapter details the developmental changes of the pediatric head and summarizes human pediatric properties currently available in the literature. Because there is a paucity of human pediatric data, material properties derived from animal tissue are also presented to demonstrate possible age-related differences in the heterogeneity and rate dependence of tissue properties. The chapter is divided into three main sections: (1) brain, meninges, and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF); (2) skull; and (3) scalp.

  8. Mesenchymal stromal cell therapy attenuated lung and kidney injury but not brain damage in experimental cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Souza, Mariana C; Silva, Johnatas D; Pádua, Tatiana A; Torres, Natália D; Antunes, Mariana A; Xisto, Debora G; Abreu, Thiago P; Capelozzi, Vera L; Morales, Marcelo M; Sá Pinheiro, Ana A; Caruso-Neves, Celso; Henriques, Maria G; Rocco, Patricia R M

    2015-05-22

    Malaria is the most relevant parasitic disease worldwide, and still accounts for 1 million deaths each year. Since current antimalarial drugs are unable to prevent death in severe cases, new therapeutic strategies have been developed. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) confer host resistance against malaria; however, thus far, no study has evaluated the therapeutic effects of MSC therapy on brain and distal organ damage in experimental cerebral malaria. Forty C57BL/6 mice were injected intraperitoneally with 5 × 10(6) Plasmodium berghei-infected erythrocytes or saline. After 24 h, mice received saline or bone marrow (BM)-derived MSC (1x10(5)) intravenously and were housed individually in metabolic cages. After 4 days, lung and kidney morphofunction; cerebrum, spleen, and liver histology; and markers associated with inflammation, fibrogenesis, and epithelial and endothelial cell damage in lung tissue were analyzed. In P. berghei-infected mice, BM-MSCs: 1) reduced parasitemia and mortality; 2) increased phagocytic neutrophil content in brain, even though BM-MSCs did not affect the inflammatory process; 3) decreased malaria pigment detection in spleen, liver, and kidney; 4) reduced hepatocyte derangement, with an increased number of Kupffer cells; 5) decreased kidney damage, without effecting significant changes in serum creatinine levels or urinary flow; and 6) reduced neutrophil infiltration, interstitial edema, number of myofibroblasts within interstitial tissue, and collagen deposition in lungs, resulting in decreased lung static elastance. These morphological and functional changes were not associated with changes in levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC, a mouse analog of interleukin-8), or interferon-γ, which remained increased and similar to those of P. berghei animals treated with saline. BM-MSCs increased hepatocyte growth factor but decreased VEGF in the P. berghei group. BM-MSC treatment increased survival and reduced

  9. Experimental observation of phase-flip transitions in the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dotson, Nicholas M.; Gray, Charles M.

    2016-10-01

    The phase-flip transition has been demonstrated in a host of coupled nonlinear oscillator models, many pertaining directly to understanding neural dynamics. However, there is little evidence that this phenomenon occurs in the brain. Using simultaneous microelectrode recordings in the nonhuman primate cerebral cortex, we demonstrate the presence of phase-flip transitions between oscillatory narrow-band local field potential signals separated by several centimeters. Specifically, we show that sharp transitions between in-phase and antiphase synchronization are accompanied by a jump in synchronization frequency. These findings are significant for two reasons. First, they validate predictions made by model systems. Second, they have potentially far reaching implications for our understanding of the mechanisms underlying corticocortical communication, which are thought to rely on narrow-band oscillatory synchronization with specific relative phase relationships.

  10. The pulsating brain: A review of experimental and clinical studies of intracranial pulsatility

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The maintenance of adequate blood flow to the brain is critical for normal brain function; cerebral blood flow, its regulation and the effect of alteration in this flow with disease have been studied extensively and are very well understood. This flow is not steady, however; the systolic increase in blood pressure over the cardiac cycle causes regular variations in blood flow into and throughout the brain that are synchronous with the heart beat. Because the brain is contained within the fixed skull, these pulsations in flow and pressure are in turn transferred into brain tissue and all of the fluids contained therein including cerebrospinal fluid. While intracranial pulsatility has not been a primary focus of the clinical community, considerable data have accrued over the last sixty years and new applications are emerging to this day. Investigators have found it a useful marker in certain diseases, particularly in hydrocephalus and traumatic brain injury where large changes in intracranial pressure and in the biomechanical properties of the brain can lead to significant changes in pressure and flow pulsatility. In this work, we review the history of intracranial pulsatility beginning with its discovery and early characterization, consider the specific technologies such as transcranial Doppler and phase contrast MRI used to assess various aspects of brain pulsations, and examine the experimental and clinical studies which have used pulsatility to better understand brain function in health and with disease. PMID:21349153

  11. High-dosage granulocyte colony stimulating factor treatment alters monocyte trafficking to the brain after experimental stroke.

    PubMed

    Weise, Gesa; Pösel, Claudia; Möller, Karoline; Kranz, Alexander; Didwischus, Nadine; Boltze, Johannes; Wagner, Daniel-Christoph

    2017-02-01

    Ischemic stroke elicits a prompt inflammatory response that is characterized by a well-timed recruitment of peripheral immune cells to the brain. Among these, monocytes play a particularly important, but multifaceted role and have been increasingly recognized to affect stroke outcome. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF) is known for its immunosuppressive actions on mononuclear cells, but previous studies in the stroke field were mainly confined to its neuroprotective actions. Herein, we investigated whether GCSF affects post-stroke inflammation in a mouse model of focal brain ischemia by modulating monocyte responses. Treatment with GCSF was controlled by vehicle injection, sham surgery and naive animals. Despite a significant monocytosis, high-dosage GCSF reduced the number of brain-infiltrating monocytes/macrophages four days after stroke. Lower numbers of mononuclear phagocytes in the brain were associated with smaller cerebral edema and improved motor outcome after stroke. GCSF treatment over 72h, but not 24h diminished integrin expression on circulating Ly6C+ inflammatory monocytes. In vitro experiments further revealed that GCSF strongly promotes interleukin (IL)-10 secretion by activated mononuclear cells. Blockade of the IL-10 receptor partly reversed GCSF-induced downregulation of integrin surface expression. Overall, our results suggest that high-dosage GCSF mitigates monocyte infiltration after stroke, likely by attenuating integrin-mediated adhesion to the brain endothelium in an IL-10-dependent manner. Lower amounts of mononuclear cells in the brain translate to less severe brain edema and functional impairment and thus support a harmful role of Ly6C+ inflammatory monocytes in the acute stage of stroke. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Experimental traumatic brain injury alters ethanol consumption and sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Lowing, Jennifer L; Susick, Laura L; Caruso, James P; Provenzano, Anthony M; Raghupathi, Ramesh; Conti, Alana C

    2014-10-15

    Altered alcohol consumption patterns after traumatic brain injury (TBI) can lead to significant impairments in TBI recovery. Few preclinical models have been used to examine alcohol use across distinct phases of the post-injury period, leaving mechanistic questions unanswered. To address this, the aim of this study was to describe the histological and behavioral outcomes of a noncontusive closed-head TBI in the mouse, after which sensitivity to and consumption of alcohol were quantified, in addition to dopaminergic signaling markers. We hypothesized that TBI would alter alcohol consumption patterns and related signal transduction pathways that were congruent to clinical observations. After midline impact to the skull, latency to right after injury, motor deficits, traumatic axonal injury, and reactive astrogliosis were evaluated in C57BL/6J mice. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) accumulation was observed in white matter tracts at 6, 24, and 72 h post-TBI. Increased intensity of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunoreactivity was observed by 24 h, primarily under the impact site and in the nucleus accumbens, a striatal subregion, as early as 72 h, persisting to 7 days, after TBI. At 14 days post-TBI, when mice were tested for ethanol sensitivity after acute high-dose ethanol (4 g/kg, intraperitoneally), brain-injured mice exhibited increased sedation time compared with uninjured mice, which was accompanied by deficits in striatal dopamine- and cAMP-regulated neuronal phosphoprotein, 32 kDa (DARPP-32) phosphorylation. At 17 days post-TBI, ethanol intake was assessed using the Drinking-in-the-Dark paradigm. Intake across 7 days of consumption was significantly reduced in TBI mice compared with sham controls, paralleling the reduction in alcohol consumption observed clinically in the initial post-injury period. These data demonstrate that TBI increases sensitivity to ethanol-induced sedation and affects downstream signaling mediators of striatal

  13. Activation of Alpha 7 Cholinergic Nicotinic Receptors Reduce Blood–Brain Barrier Permeability following Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Kobori, Nobuhide; Redell, John B.; Hylin, Michael J.; Hood, Kimberly N.; Moore, Anthony N.

    2016-01-01

    ) allows for the accumulation of circulating fluids and proinflammatory cells in the injured brain. These processes can exacerbate TBI pathology and outcome. While the role of inflammation in the injured tissue has been examined in some detail, the contribution of peripheral inflammation in BBB breakdown and ensuing pathology has not been well defined. We present experimental evidence to indicate that the stimulation of nicotinic acetylcholine α7 receptors (nAChRa7s) can reduce peripheral inflammation and BBB breakdown after TBI. These results suggest that activators of nAChRa7 may have therapeutic utility for the treatment of TBI. PMID:26937017

  14. A brief report on MRI investigation of experimental traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Timothy Q.; Watts, Lora T.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a major cause of death and disability. This is a brief report based on a symposium presentation to the 2014 Chinese Neurotrauma Association Meeting in San Francisco, USA. It covers the work from our laboratory in applying multimodal MRI to study experimental traumatic brain injury in rats with comparisons made to behavioral tests and histology. MRI protocols include structural, perfusion, manganese-enhanced, diffusion-tensor MRI, and MRI of blood-brain barrier integrity and cerebrovascular reactivity. PMID:26981069

  15. Dynamics of the brain: Mathematical models and non-invasive experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toronov, V.; Myllylä, T.; Kiviniemi, V.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2013-10-01

    Dynamics is an essential aspect of the brain function. In this article we review theoretical models of neural and haemodynamic processes in the human brain and experimental non-invasive techniques developed to study brain functions and to measure dynamic characteristics, such as neurodynamics, neurovascular coupling, haemodynamic changes due to brain activity and autoregulation, and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen. We focus on emerging theoretical biophysical models and experimental functional neuroimaging results, obtained mostly by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). We also included our current results on the effects of blood pressure variations on cerebral haemodynamics and simultaneous measurements of fast processes in the brain by near-infrared spectroscopy and a very novel functional MRI technique called magnetic resonance encephalography. Based on a rapid progress in theoretical and experimental techniques and due to the growing computational capacities and combined use of rapidly improving and emerging neuroimaging techniques we anticipate during next decade great achievements in the overall knowledge of the human brain.

  16. Stem cell transplantation enhances endogenous brain repair after experimental stroke.

    PubMed

    Horie, Nobutaka; Hiu, Takeshi; Nagata, Izumi

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation for stroke treatment has been a promising therapy in small and large animal models, and many clinical trials are ongoing to establish this strategy in a clinical setting. However, the mechanism underlying functional recovery after stem cell transplantation has not been fully established and there is still a need to determine the ideal subset of stem cells for such therapy. We herein reviewed the recent evidences showing the underlying mechanism of functional recovery after cell transplantation, focusing on endogenous brain repair. First, angiogenesis/neovascularization is promoted by trophic factors including vascular endothelial growth factor secreted from stem cells, and stem cells migrated to the lesion along with the vessels. Second, axonal sprouting, dendritic branching, and synaptogenesis were enhanced altogether in the both ipsilateral and contralateral hemisphere remapping the pyramidal tract across the board. Finally, endogenous neurogenesis was also enhanced although little is known how much these neurogenesis contribute to the functional recovery. Taken together, it is clear that stem cell transplantation provides functional recovery via endogenous repair enhancement from multiple ways. This is important to maximize the effect of stem cell therapy after stroke, although it is still undetermined which repair mechanism is mostly contributed.

  17. Experimental infections of different carp strains with the carp edema virus (CEV) give insights into the infection biology of the virus and indicate possible solutions to problems caused by koi sleepy disease (KSD) in carp aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Adamek, Mikolaj; Oschilewski, Anna; Wohlsein, Peter; Jung-Schroers, Verena; Teitge, Felix; Dawson, Andy; Gela, David; Piackova, Veronika; Kocour, Martin; Adamek, Jerzy; Bergmann, Sven M; Steinhagen, Dieter

    2017-02-21

    Outbreaks of koi sleepy disease (KSD) caused by carp edema virus (CEV) may seriously affect populations of farmed common carp, one of the most important fish species for global food production. The present study shows further evidence for the involvement of CEV in outbreaks of KSD among carp and koi populations: in a series of infection experiments, CEV from two different genogroups could be transmitted to several strains of naïve common carp via cohabitation with fish infected with CEV. In recipient fish, clinical signs of KSD were induced. The virus load and viral gene expression results confirm gills as the target organ for CEV replication. Gill explants also allowed for a limited virus replication in vitro. The in vivo infection experiments revealed differences in the virulence of the two CEV genogroups which were associated with infections in koi or in common carp, with higher virulence towards the same fish variety as the donor fish. When the susceptibility of different carp strains to a CEV infection and the development of KSD were experimentally investigated, Amur wild carp showed to be relatively more resistant to the infection and did not develop clinical signs for KSD. However, the resistance could not be related to a higher magnitude of type I IFN responses of affected tissues. Despite not having a mechanistic explanation for the resistance of Amur wild carp to KSD, we recommend using this carp strain in breeding programs to limit potential losses caused by CEV in aquaculture.

  18. A double-edged sword role for ubiquitin-proteasome system in brain stem cardiovascular regulation during experimental brain death.

    PubMed

    Wu, Carol H Y; Chan, Julie Y H; Chan, Samuel H H; Chang, Alice Y W

    2011-01-01

    Brain stem cardiovascular regulatory dysfunction during brain death is underpinned by an upregulation of nitric oxide synthase II (NOS II) in rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), the origin of a life-and-death signal detected from blood pressure of comatose patients that disappears before brain death ensues. Furthermore, the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) may be involved in the synthesis and degradation of NOS II. We assessed the hypothesis that the UPS participates in brain stem cardiovascular regulation during brain death by engaging in both synthesis and degradation of NOS II in RVLM. In a clinically relevant experimental model of brain death using Sprague-Dawley rats, pretreatment by microinjection into the bilateral RVLM of proteasome inhibitors (lactacystin or proteasome inhibitor II) antagonized the hypotension and reduction in the life-and-death signal elicited by intravenous administration of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS). On the other hand, pretreatment with an inhibitor of ubiquitin-recycling (ubiquitin aldehyde) or ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase isozyme L1 (UCH-L1) potentiated the elicited hypotension and blunted the prevalence of the life-and-death signal. Real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, electrophoresis mobility shift assay, chromatin immunoprecipitation and co-immunoprecipitation experiments further showed that the proteasome inhibitors antagonized the augmented nuclear presence of NF-κB or binding between NF-κB and nos II promoter and blunted the reduced cytosolic presence of phosphorylated IκB. The already impeded NOS II protein expression by proteasome inhibitor II was further reduced after gene-knockdown of NF-κB in RVLM. In animals pretreated with UCH-L1 inhibitor and died before significant increase in nos II mRNA occurred, NOS II protein expression in RVLM was considerably elevated. We conclude that UPS participates in the defunct and maintained brain stem cardiovascular regulation during experimental

  19. A Double-Edged Sword Role for Ubiquitin-Proteasome System in Brain Stem Cardiovascular Regulation During Experimental Brain Death

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Carol H. Y.; Chan, Julie Y. H.; Chan, Samuel H. H.; Chang, Alice Y. W.

    2011-01-01

    Background Brain stem cardiovascular regulatory dysfunction during brain death is underpinned by an upregulation of nitric oxide synthase II (NOS II) in rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), the origin of a life-and-death signal detected from blood pressure of comatose patients that disappears before brain death ensues. Furthermore, the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) may be involved in the synthesis and degradation of NOS II. We assessed the hypothesis that the UPS participates in brain stem cardiovascular regulation during brain death by engaging in both synthesis and degradation of NOS II in RVLM. Methodology/Principal Findings In a clinically relevant experimental model of brain death using Sprague-Dawley rats, pretreatment by microinjection into the bilateral RVLM of proteasome inhibitors (lactacystin or proteasome inhibitor II) antagonized the hypotension and reduction in the life-and-death signal elicited by intravenous administration of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS). On the other hand, pretreatment with an inhibitor of ubiquitin-recycling (ubiquitin aldehyde) or ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase isozyme L1 (UCH-L1) potentiated the elicited hypotension and blunted the prevalence of the life-and-death signal. Real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, electrophoresis mobility shift assay, chromatin immunoprecipitation and co-immunoprecipitation experiments further showed that the proteasome inhibitors antagonized the augmented nuclear presence of NF-κB or binding between NF-κB and nos II promoter and blunted the reduced cytosolic presence of phosphorylated IκB. The already impeded NOS II protein expression by proteasome inhibitor II was further reduced after gene-knockdown of NF-κB in RVLM. In animals pretreated with UCH-L1 inhibitor and died before significant increase in nos II mRNA occurred, NOS II protein expression in RVLM was considerably elevated. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that UPS participates in the defunct and

  20. Experimental research of mechanical behavior of porcine brain tissue under rotational shear stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Zhang, Jianhua; Wang, Kan; Wang, Mingyu; Gao, Changqing; Ma, Chao

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate mechanical behavior of porcine brain tissue with a series of rotational shear stress control experiments. To this end, several experiments including stress sweep tests, frequency sweep tests and quasi-static creep tests were designed and conducted with a standard rheometer (HAAKE RheoStress6000). The effects of the loading stress rates to mechanical properties of brain tissue were also studied in stress sweep tests. The results of stress sweep tests performed on the same brain showed that brain tissue had an obvious regional inhomogeneity and the mechanical damage occurred at the rotational shear stress of 10-15Pa. The experimental data from three different loading stress rates demonstrated that the mechanical behavior of porcine brain tissue was loading stress rate dependent. With the decrease of loading stress rate, a stiffer mechanical characteristic of brain tissue was observed and the occurrence of mechanical damage can be delayed to a higher stress. From the results of frequency sweep tests we found that brain tissue had almost completely elastic properties at high frequency area. The nonlinear creep response under the rotational shear stress of 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9Pa was shown in results of creep tests. A new nonlinear viscoelastic solid model was proposed for creep tests and matched well with the test data. Considering the regional differences, loading stress rates and test conditions effects, loss tangent tan δ in porcine brain tissue showed a high uniformity of 0.25-0.45.

  1. TURN Score Predicts 24-Hour Cerebral Edema After IV Thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Asuzu, David; Nyström, Karin; Sreekrishnan, Anirudh; Schindler, Joseph; Wira, Charles; Greer, David; Halliday, Janet; Kimberly, W Taylor; Sheth, Kevin N

    2016-06-01

    Cerebral edema is associated with poor outcome after IV thrombolysis. We recently described the TURN score (Thrombolysis risk Using mRS and NIHSS), a predictor of severe outcome after IV thrombolysis. Our purpose was to evaluate its ability to predict 24-h cerebral edema. We retrospectively analyzed data from 303 patients who received IV rt-PA during the NINDS rt-PA trial. Measures of brain swelling included edema, mass effect and midline shift assessed at baseline, at 24 h and new onset at 24 h. Outcome was assessed using intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH), 90-day severe outcome, and 90-day mortality. Statistical associations were assessed by logistic regression reporting odds ratios (OR) and by areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUROC). Baseline brain swelling did not predict poor outcome; however, 24-h brain swelling predicted ICH (OR 5.69, P < 0.001), sICH (OR 9.50, P = 0.01), 90-day severe outcome (OR 7.10, P < 0.001), and 90-day mortality (OR 5.65, P = 0.01). Similar results were seen for new brain swelling at 24 h. TURN predicted 24-hour brain swelling (OR 2.5, P < 0.001; AUROC 0.69, 95 % CI 0.63-0.75) and new brain swelling at 24 h (OR 2.1, P < 0.001; AUROC 0.67, 95 % CI 0.61-0.73). Cerebral edema at 24 h is associated with poor outcome and 90-day mortality. TURN predicts ischemic stroke patients who will develop 24-h cerebral edema after IV thrombolysis.

  2. Experimental determination of constitutive equations for human and bovine brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takhounts, Erik Grigorievich

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine experimentally the constitutive equations for brain tissue. Three series of experiments were performed in which the brain tissue was treated as a linear, quasi-linear and nonlinear isotropic viscoelastic material. Finite element analysis was performed and verified that simplifying assumptions made for developing constitutive equations were reasonable. Human and bovine brain samples were used to characterize linear behavior of brain tissue in the first series of tests. Single step tests with shear strains of up to 40% were performed to obtain stress-relaxation material functions for human and bovine brain tissue. The second series of experiments determined shear properties of bovine brain material by performing a set of single step loading stress-relaxation tests at the strain levels of up to 100%. For these tests, the theory of quasi-linear viscoelasticity (QLV) was employed to determine material properties. The third series of experiments involved nonlinear testing using single, two and three step loading stress-relaxation tests. The integral polynomial form of the third order Green-Rivlin constitutive equation was applied to model nonlinear behavior of the brain tissue. This representation describes the material behavior of brain tissue for the shear strains of up to 100%. The range of applicability for each viscoelastic theory was determined for brain material. It was found that for the strains of up to 40% a linear viscoelastic model is sufficient to describe material behavior. For the strains of up to 60% a quasi-linear model may be employed to describe the nonlinear behavior of brain tissue. At the strains of 60% and greater a time nonlinearity of brain material becomes significant and a nonlinear theory of viscoelasticity must be employed.

  3. Approach to Lower Extremity Edema.

    PubMed

    Ratchford, Elizabeth V; Evans, Natalie S

    2017-03-01

    Lower extremity edema is extremely common among patients seen across multiple specialties. The differential diagnosis is broad and ranges from simple dependent edema to more complex conditions such as chronic venous disease and lymphedema. Several key features from the history and physical exam can assist with the diagnosis. Imaging is rarely necessary at the initial visit unless venous thromboembolism is suspected. Treatment is specific to the etiology of the edema, but compression stockings, elevation, exercise, and weight loss remain the cornerstone in most cases.

  4. Pathologic electrographic changes after experimental traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Bragin, Anatol; Li, Lin; Almajano, Joyel; Alvarado-Rojas, Catalina; Reid, Aylin Y; Staba, Richard J; Engel, Jerome

    2016-05-01

    To investigate possible electroencephalography (EEG) correlates of epileptogenesis after traumatic brain injury (TBI) using the fluid percussion model. Experiments were conducted on adult 2- to 4-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats. Two groups of animals were studied: (1) the TBI group with depth and screw electrodes implanted immediately after the fluid percussion injury (FPI) procedure, and (2) a naive age-matched control group with the same electrode implantation montage. Pairs of tungsten microelectrodes (50 μm outer diameter) and screw electrodes were implanted in neocortex inside the TBI core, areas adjacent to TBI, and remote areas. EEG activity, recorded on the day of FPI, and continuously for 2 weeks, was analyzed for possible electrographic biomarkers of epileptogenesis. Video-EEG monitoring was also performed continuously in the TBI group to capture electrographic and behavioral seizures until the caps came off (28-189 days), and for 1 week, at 2, 3, and 6 months of age, in the control group. Pathologic high-frequency oscillations (pHFOs) with a central frequency between 100 and 600 Hz, were recorded from microelectrodes, beginning during the first two post-FPI weeks, in 7 of 12 animals in the TBI group (58%) and never in the controls. pHFOs only occurred in cortical areas within or adjacent to the TBI core. These were associated with synchronous multiunit discharges and popSpikes, duration 15-40 msec. Repetitive pHFOs and EEG spikes (rHFOSs) formed paroxysmal activity, with a unique arcuate pattern, in the frequency band 10-16 Hz in the same areas as isolated pHFOs, and these events were also recorded by screw electrodes. Although loss of caps prevented long-term recordings from all rats, pHFOs and rHFOSs occurred during the first 2 weeks in all four animals that later developed seizures, and none of the rats without these events developed late seizures. pHFOs, similar to those associated with epileptogenesis in the status rat model of epilepsy, may

  5. Pathologic electrographic changes after experimental traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Bragin, Anatol; Li, Lin; Almajano, Joyel; Alvarado-Rojas, Catalina; Reid, Aylin Y.; Staba, Richard J.; Engel, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective To investigate possible electroencephalography (EEG) correlates of epileptogenesis after traumatic brain injury (TBI) using the fluid percussion model. Methods Experiments were conducted on adult 2- to 4-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats. Two groups of animals were studied: (1) the TBI group with depth and screw electrodes implanted immediately after the fluid percussion injury (FPI) procedure, and (2) a naive age-matched control group with the same electrode implantation montage. Pairs of tungsten microelectrodes (50 µm outer diameter) and screw electrodes were implanted in neocortex inside the TBI core, areas adjacent to TBI, and remote areas. EEG activity, recorded on the day of FPI, and continuously for 2 weeks, was analyzed for possible electrographic biomarkers of epileptogenesis. Video-EEG monitoring was also performed continuously in the TBI group to capture electrographic and behavioral seizures until the caps came off (28–189 days), and for 1 week, at 2, 3, and 6 months of age, in the control group. Results Pathologic high-frequency oscillations (pHFOs) with a central frequency between 100 and 600 Hz, were recorded from microelectrodes, beginning during the first two post-FPI weeks, in 7 of 12 animals in the TBI group (58%) and never in the controls. pHFOs only occurred in cortical areas within or adjacent to the TBI core. These were associated with synchronous multiunit discharges and popSpikes, duration 15–40 msec. Repetitive pHFOs and EEG spikes (rHFOSs) formed paroxysmal activity, with a unique arcuate pattern, in the frequency band 10–16 Hz in the same areas as isolated pHFOs, and these events were also recorded by screw electrodes. Although loss of caps prevented long-term recordings from all rats, pHFOs and rHFOSs occurred during the first 2 weeks in all four animals that later developed seizures, and none of the rats without these events developed late seizures. Significance pHFOs, similar to those associated with

  6. Escin attenuates cerebral edema induced by acute omethoate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tian; Jiang, Na; Han, Bing; Liu, Wenbo; Liu, Tongshen; Fu, Fenghua; Zhao, Delu

    2011-06-01

    Organophosphorus exposure affects different organs such as skeletal muscles, the gastrointestinal tract, liver, lung, and brain. The present experiment aimed to evaluate the effect of escin on cerebral edema induced by acute omethoate poisoning. Sprague-Dawley rats were administered subcutaneously with omethoate at a single dose of 60 mg/kg followed by escin treatment. The results showed that escin reduced the brain water content and the amount of Evans blue in omethoate-poisoned animals. Treatment with escin decreased the levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) in the brain. Escin also alleviated the histopathological change induced by acute omethoate poisoning. The findings demonstrated that escin can attenuate cerebral edema induced by acute omethoate poisoning, and the underlying mechanism was associated with ameliorating the permeability of the blood-brain barrier.

  7. Successful delivery of docetaxel to rat brain using experimentally developed nanoliposome: a treatment strategy for brain tumor.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Tapan Kumar; Mandal, Dipika; Dey, Goutam; Pal, Murari Mohan; Paul, Paramita; Chakraborty, Samrat; Ali, Kazi Asraf; Mukherjee, Biswajit; Bandyopadhyay, Amal Kumar; Mandal, Mahitosh

    2017-11-01

    Docetaxel (DTX) is found to be very effective against glioma cell in vitro. However, in vivo passage of DTX through BBB is extremely difficult due to the physicochemical and pharmacological characteristics of the drug. No existing formulation is successful in this aspect. Hence, in this study, effort was made to send DTX through blood-brain barrier (BBB) to brain to treat diseases such as solid tumor of brain (glioma) by developing DTX-loaded nanoliposomes. Primarily drug-excipients interaction was evaluated by FTIR spectroscopy. The DTX-loaded nanoliposomes (L-DTX) were prepared by lipid layer hydration technique and characterized physicochemically. In vitro cellular uptake in C6 glioma cells was investigated. FTIR data show that the selected drug and excipients were chemically compatible. The unilamellar vesicle size was less than 50 nm with smooth surface. Drug released slowly from L-DTX in vitro in a sustained manner. The pharmacokinetic data shows more extended action of DTX from L-DTX in experimental rats than the free-drug and Taxotere®. DTX from L-DTX enhanced 100% drug concentration in brain as compared with Taxotere® in 4 h. Thus, nanoliposomes as vehicle may be an encouraging strategy to treat glioma with DTX.

  8. [Effect of brain death on hemodynamics and cardiac function: an experimental study].

    PubMed

    Beppu, S; Nakatani, H; Izumi, S; Sasaki, H; Sada, M; Amamiya, H; Sakakibara, H; Nimura, Y

    1987-12-01

    An experimental model was designed to study hemodynamic and left ventricular functional changes in the course of and after brain death in 13 mongrel dogs. Brain death was induced by creating intracranial hypertension by inflating a balloon inserted into the subdural space. Hemodynamic parameters and left ventricular systolic function as assessed by echocardiography were measured before and during intracranial hypertension and 30 min and 1, 2, 3, 5 and 8 hrs after brain death. During intracranial hypertension, heart rate, systemic and pulmonary blood pressures, cardiac output and systemic vascular resistance raised significantly. After brain death, all parameters decreased rapidly and significantly, and then stabilized. On comparison with values obtained before intracranial hypertension, systemic blood pressure decreased markedly following brain death, while no marked change was noted in cardiac output. This result is attributable to a marked reduction in peripheral vascular resistance following the induction of intracranial hypertension. The left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic diameters did not change; consequently, fractional shortening did not change, either. The Weissler's index improved after brain death, reflecting a marked reduction in systemic vascular resistance. This indicates limited usefulness of afterload-dependent cardiac indices. At the agonal period of brain death, three of 13 dogs died because of ventricular fibrillation or a marked decline in systemic blood pressure. Within five to eight hours after brain death, seven dogs died because of intractable acidosis. These results represent the specific hemodynamic features occurring after brain death. It is thought that recognition of these features is useful in managing cases of brain death and in selecting donors for heart transplants.

  9. Diuretics in cardiac edema--1969.

    PubMed

    Shanoff, H M

    1969-10-04

    New and powerful diuretics have made it possible for the physician to control cardiac edema in most patients. At the same time their potentially dangerous side effects make it mandatory for the physician to be knowledgeable and judicious in their use. The appreciation of a few simplified facts about cardiac edema and renal reabsorption of sodium makes the clinical pharmacology of the diuretics much easier to understand, remember and apply.

  10. Pulmonary Edema in Myasthenic Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Uttara Swati; Arulneyam, Jayanthi

    2013-01-01

    We report a previously asymptomatic 50-year-old lady who came with myasthenic crisis as initial presentation of myasthenia gravis. She developed pulmonary edema following intravenous immunoglobulin administration and had ischemic changes in ECG and left ventricular dysfunction on echocardiography. She improved with diuretics, dobutamine, and fluid restriction alone. This is the first report in English-language medical literature describing the association between myasthenic crisis and likely takotsubo cardiomyopathy-related pulmonary edema following intravenous immunoglobulin administration. PMID:24829832

  11. Neural tissue regeneration in experimental brain injury model with channeled scaffolds of acrylate copolymers.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ramos, Cristina; Gómez-Pinedo, Ulises; Esparza, Maria Angeles Garcia; Soria, José Miguel; Barcia, Juan A; Monleón Pradas, Manuel

    2015-06-26

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the biocompatibility and cell hosting ability of a copolymer scaffold based on ethyl acrylate (EA) and hydroxyl ethyl acrylate (HEA) in vivo after an experimental brain injury. Wistar rats were subjected to cryogenic traumatic brain injury. We evaluated the tissue response to the implanted materials after 8 weeks. The materials were implanted devoid of cells; they provoked a minimal scar response by the host tissue and permitted the invasion of neurons and glia inside them. We also found new blood vessels surrounding and inside the implant. Thus, the copolymer scaffold proves to offer a suitable environment producing a cellular network potentially useful in brain repair after brain injury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Experimental methods and transport models for drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Fu, Bingmei M

    2012-06-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a dynamic barrier essential for maintaining the micro-environment of the brain. Although the special anatomical features of the BBB determine its protective role for the central nervous system (CNS) from blood-born neurotoxins, however, the BBB extremely limits the therapeutic efficacy of drugs into the CNS, which greatly hinders the treatment of major brain diseases. This review summarized the unique structures of the BBB, described a variety of in vivo and in vitro experimental methods for determining the transport properties of the BBB, e.g., the permeability of the BBB to water, ions, and solutes including nutrients, therapeutic agents and drug carriers, and presented newly developed mathematical models which quantitatively correlate the anatomical structures of the BBB with its barrier functions. Finally, on the basis of the experimental observations and the quantitative models, several strategies for drug delivery through the BBB were proposed.

  13. Experimental Methods and Transport Models for Drug Delivery across the Blood-Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Bingmei M

    2017-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a dynamic barrier essential for maintaining the micro-environment of the brain. Although the special anatomical features of the BBB determine its protective role for the central nervous system (CNS) from blood-born neurotoxins, however, the BBB extremely limits the therapeutic efficacy of drugs into the CNS, which greatly hinders the treatment of major brain diseases. This review summarized the unique structures of the BBB, described a variety of in vivo and in vitro experimental methods for determining the transport properties of the BBB, e.g., the permeability of the BBB to water, ions, and solutes including nutrients, therapeutic agents and drug carriers, and presented newly developed mathematical models which quantitatively correlate the anatomical structures of the BBB with its barrier functions. Finally, on the basis of the experimental observations and the quantitative models, several strategies for drug delivery through the BBB were proposed. PMID:22201587

  14. Technical and experimental features of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of brain glycogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Soares, Ana Francisca; Gruetter, Rolf; Lei, Hongxia

    2016-12-26

    In the brain, glycogen is a source of glucose not only in emergency situations but also during normal brain activity. Altered brain glycogen metabolism is associated with energetic dysregulation in pathological conditions, such as diabetes or epilepsy. Both in humans and animals, brain glycogen levels have been assessed non-invasively by Carbon-13 Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy ((13)C-MRS) in vivo. With this approach, glycogen synthesis and degradation may be followed in real time, thereby providing valuable insights into brain glycogen dynamics. However, compared to the liver and muscle, where glycogen is abundant, the sensitivity for detection of brain glycogen by (13)C-MRS is inherently low. In this review we focus on strategies used to optimize the sensitivity for (13)C-MRS detection of glycogen. Namely, we explore several technical perspectives, such as magnetic field strength, field homogeneity, coil design, decoupling, and localization methods. Furthermore, we also address basic principles underlying the use of (13)C-labeled precursors to enhance the detectable glycogen signal, emphasizing specific experimental aspects relevant for obtaining kinetic information on brain glycogen.

  15. A comprehensive experimental study on material properties of human brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xin; Zhu, Feng; Mao, Haojie; Shen, Ming; Yang, King H

    2013-11-15

    A comprehensive study on the biomechanical response of human brain tissue is necessary to investigate traumatic brain injury mechanisms. Published brain material property studies have been mostly performed under a specific type of loading, which is insufficient to develop accurate brain tissue constitutive equations. In addition, inconsistent or contradictory data in the literature made it impossible for computational model developers to create a single brain material model that can fit most, if not all, experimental results. In the current study, a total of 240 brain tissue specimens were tested under tension (n=72), compression (n=72), and shear (n=96) loading modes at varying strain rates. Gray-white matter difference, regional difference, and directional difference within white matter were also investigated. Stress-strain relationships of human brain tissue were obtained up to 50% of engineering strain. Strain rate dependency was observed under all three loading modes. White matter was stiffer than gray matter in compression and shear. Corona radiata was found to be stiffer than cortex, thalamus, and corpus callosum in tension and compression. Directional dependency of white matter was observed under shear loading.

  16. Neuronal and glial changes in the brain resulting from explosive blast in an experimental model.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, James A; Kim, Jung H; Situ, Robert; Taylor, Wesley; Westmoreland, Ted; Du, Fu; Parks, Steven; Ling, Geoffrey; Hwang, Jung Y; Rapuano, Amedeo; Bandak, Faris A; de Lanerolle, Nihal C

    2016-11-24

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is the signature injury in warfighters exposed to explosive blasts. The pathology underlying mTBI is poorly understood, as this condition is rarely fatal and thus postmortem brains are difficult to obtain for neuropathological studies. Here we report on studies of an experimental model with a gyrencephalic brain that is exposed to single and multiple explosive blast pressure waves. To determine injuries to the brain resulting from the primary blast, experimental conditions were controlled to eliminate any secondary or tertiary injury from blasts. We found small but significant levels of neuronal loss in the hippocampus, a brain area that is important for cognitive functions. Furthermore, neuronal loss increased with multiple blasts and the degree of neuronal injury worsened with time post-blast. This is consistent with our findings in the blast-exposed human brain based on magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. The studies on this experimental model thus confirm what has been presumed to be the case with the warfighter, namely that exposure to multiple blasts causes increased brain injury. Additionally, as in other studies of both explosive blast as well as closed head mTBI, we found astrocyte activation. Activated microglia were also prominent in white matter tracts, particularly in animals exposed to multiple blasts and at long post-blast intervals, even though injured axons (i.e. β-APP positive) were not found in these areas. Microglial activation appears to be a delayed response, though whether they may contribute to inflammation related injury mechanism at even longer post-blast times than we tested here, remains to be explored. Petechial hemorrhages or other gross signs of vascular injury were not observed in our study. These findings confirm the development of neuropathological changes due to blast exposure. The activation of astrocytes and microglia, cell types potentially involved in inflammatory processes, suggest an

  17. Hypertensive brain stem encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Liao, Pen-Yuan; Lee, Chien-Chang; Chen, Cheng-Yu

    2015-01-01

    A 48-year-old man presented with headache and extreme hypertension. Computed tomography showed diffuse brain stem hypodensity. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed diffuse brain stem vasogenic edema. Hypertensive brain stem encephalopathy is an uncommon manifestation of hypertensive encephalopathy, which classically occurs at parietooccipital white matter. Because of its atypical location, the diagnosis can be challenging. Moreover, the coexistence of hypertension and brain stem edema could also direct clinicians toward a diagnosis of ischemic infarction, leading to a completely contradictory treatment goal.

  18. Dosimetric Predictors of Laryngeal Edema

    SciTech Connect

    Sanguineti, Giuseppe . E-mail: gisangui@utmb.edu; Adapala, Prashanth; Endres, Eugene J. C; Brack, Collin; Fiorino, Claudio; Sormani, Maria Pia; Parker, Brent

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate dosimetric predictors of laryngeal edema after radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A total of 66 patients were selected who had squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck with grossly uninvolved larynx at the time of RT, no prior major surgical operation except for neck dissection and tonsillectomy, treatment planning data available for analysis, and at least one fiberoptic examination of the larynx within 2 years from RT performed by a single observer. Both the biologically equivalent mean dose at 2 Gy per fraction and the cumulative biologic dose-volume histogram of the larynx were extracted for each patient. Laryngeal edema was prospectively scored after treatment. Time to endpoint, moderate or worse laryngeal edema (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 2+), was calculated with log rank test from the date of treatment end. Results: At a median follow-up of 17.1 months (range, 0.4- 50.0 months), the risk of Grade 2+ edema was 58.9% {+-} 7%. Mean dose to the larynx, V30, V40, V50, V60, and V70 were significantly correlated with Grade 2+ edema at univariate analysis. At multivariate analysis, mean laryngeal dose (continuum, hazard ratio, 1.11; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.15; p < 0.001), and positive neck stage at RT (N0-x vs. N +, hazard ratio, 3.66; 95% confidence interval, 1.40-9.58; p = 0.008) were the only independent predictors. Further stratification showed that, to minimize the risk of Grade 2+ edema, the mean dose to the larynx has to be kept {<=}43.5 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction. Conclusion: Laryngeal edema is strictly correlated with various dosimetric parameters; mean dose to the larynx should be kept {<=}43.5 Gy.

  19. Protection of the Blood-Brain Barrier as a Therapeutic Strategy for Brain Damage.

    PubMed

    Michinaga, Shotaro; Koyama, Yutaka

    2017-01-01

    Severe brain damage by trauma, ischemia, and hemorrhage lead to fatal conditions including sudden death, subsequent complications of the extremities and cognitive dysfunctions. Despite the urgent need for treatments for these complications, currently available therapeutic drugs are limited. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption is a common pathogenic feature in many types of brain damage. The characteristic pathophysiological conditions caused by BBB disruption are brain edema resulting from an excessive increase of brain water content, inflammatory damage caused by infiltrating immune cells, and hemorrhage caused by the breakdown of microvessel structures. Because these pathogenic features induced by BBB disruption cause fatal conditions, their improvement is a desirable strategy. Many studies using experimental animal models have focused on molecules involved in BBB disruption, including vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and endothelins (ETs). The inhibition of these factors in several experimental animals was protective against BBB disruption caused by several types of brain damage, and ameliorated brain edema, inflammatory damage, and hemorrhagic transformation. In patients with brain damage, the up-regulation of these factors was observed and was related to brain damage severity. Thus, BBB protection by targeting VEGFs, MMPs, and ETs might be a novel strategy for the treatment of brain damage.

  20. Functional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging of brain reorganization after experimental stroke.

    PubMed

    Dijkhuizen, Rick M; van der Marel, Kajo; Otte, Willem M; Hoff, Erik I; van der Zijden, Jet P; van der Toorn, Annette; van Meer, Maurits P A

    2012-03-01

    The potential of the adult brain to reorganize after ischemic injury is critical for functional recovery and provides a significant target for therapeutic strategies to promote brain repair. Despite the accumulating evidence of brain plasticity, the interaction and significance of morphological and physiological modifications in post-stroke brain tissue remain mostly unclear. Neuroimaging techniques such as functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) enable in vivo assessment of the spatial and temporal pattern of functional and structural changes inside and outside ischemic lesion areas. This can contribute to the elucidation of critical aspects in post-stroke brain remodeling. Task/stimulus-related fMRI, resting-state fMRI, or pharmacological MRI enables direct or indirect measurement of neuronal activation, functional connectivity, or neurotransmitter system responses, respectively. DTI allows estimation of the structural integrity and connectivity of white matter tracts. Together, these MRI methods provide an unprecedented means to (a) measure longitudinal changes in tissue structure and function close by and remote from ischemic lesion areas, (b) evaluate the organizational profile of neural networks after stroke, and (c) identify degenerative and restorative processes that affect post-stroke functional outcome. Besides, the availability of MRI in clinical institutions as well as research laboratories provides an optimal basis for translational research on stroke recovery. This review gives an overview of the current status and perspectives of fMRI and DTI applications to study brain reorganization in experimental stroke models.

  1. A rapid and transient peripheral inflammatory response precedes brain inflammation after experimental stroke.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Katie Z; Dale, Verity Q; Dénes, Adám; Bennett, Gavin; Rothwell, Nancy J; Allan, Stuart M; McColl, Barry W

    2009-11-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that peripheral inflammatory responses to stroke and other brain injuries have an important role in determining neurological outcome. The mediators of this response and the temporal relationships between peripheral and central inflammatory alterations are poorly understood. In this study, we show that experimental stroke in mice induces a peripheral inflammatory response that peaks 4 h after stroke, and precedes the peak in brain inflammation 24 h after stroke. This peripheral response is dominated by the induction of the chemokine CXCL-1 and the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 and could serve as an accessible target for therapy and as a source of biomarkers predictive of prognosis.

  2. Repeated topical application of growth hormone attenuates blood-spinal cord barrier permeability and edema formation following spinal cord injury: an experimental study in the rat using Evans blue, ([125])I-sodium and lanthanum tracers.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, F; Sharma, H S

    2002-01-01

    The neuroprotective efficacy of growth hormone on a focal spinal cord trauma induced alteration in the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) and edema formation was examined in a rat model. Under Equithesin anaesthesia, one segment laminectomy was done over the T10-11 segments. Spinal cord injury was produced by making an incision into the right dorsal horn of the T10-11 segments (2 mm deep and 4 mm long). The animals were allowed to survive 5 h after injury. Highly purified rat growth hormone [rGH, 25 microl of a 1microg/ml solution) was applied over 10 sec topically on the exposed surface of the spinal cord 30 min before injury. The identical doses of the rGH were repeated 0 min, 30 min, 60 min, 120 min, 180 min and 240 min following injury. Saline (0.9% NaCl) treated traumatised rats at identical intervals served as controls. Traumatised rats treated with saline exhibited marked edema formation and extravasation of Evans blue and ([125])Iodine tracers in the spinal cord. At the ultrastructural level, perivascular edema and exudation of lanthanum across the endothelial cells was quite frequent in the spinal cord. Pretreatment with rGH significantly attenuated the edema formation and the extravasation of tracers in the spinal cord. In these rats, perivascular edema and infiltration of lanthanum across the endothelial cells was not much evident. These observations show that the rGH has the capacity to reduce the early manifestations of microvascular permeability disturbances and edema formation following trauma and further suggest a possible therapeutic potential of the hormone for the treatment of spinal cord injuries.

  3. Quantitative MRI for analysis of peritumoral edema in malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Warntjes, J. B. Marcel; Smedby, Örjan; Lundberg, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose Damage to the blood-brain barrier with subsequent contrast enhancement is a hallmark of glioblastoma. Non-enhancing tumor invasion into the peritumoral edema is, however, not usually visible on conventional magnetic resonance imaging. New quantitative techniques using relaxometry offer additional information about tissue properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate longitudinal relaxation R1, transverse relaxation R2, and proton density in the peritumoral edema in a group of patients with malignant glioma before surgery to assess whether relaxometry can detect changes not visible on conventional images. Methods In a prospective study, 24 patients with suspected malignant glioma were examined before surgery. A standard MRI protocol was used with the addition of a quantitative MR method (MAGIC), which measured R1, R2, and proton density. The diagnosis of malignant glioma was confirmed after biopsy/surgery. In 19 patients synthetic MR images were then created from the MAGIC scan, and ROIs were placed in the peritumoral edema to obtain the quantitative values. Dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion was used to obtain cerebral blood volume (rCBV) data of the peritumoral edema. Voxel-based statistical analysis was performed using a mixed linear model. Results R1, R2, and rCBV decrease with increasing distance from the contrast-enhancing part of the tumor. There is a significant increase in R1 gradient after contrast agent injection (P < .0001). There is a heterogeneous pattern of relaxation values in the peritumoral edema adjacent to the contrast-enhancing part of the tumor. Conclusion Quantitative analysis with relaxometry of peritumoral edema in malignant gliomas detects tissue changes not visualized on conventional MR images. The finding of decreasing R1 and R2 means shorter relaxation times closer to the tumor, which could reflect tumor invasion into the peritumoral edema. However, these findings need to be validated in the future. PMID

  4. Effects of experimentally-induced maternal hypothyroidism on crucial offspring rat brain enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Koromilas, Christos; Liapi, Charis; Zarros, Apostolos; Stolakis, Vasileios; Tsagianni, Anastasia; Skandali, Nikolina; Al-Humadi, Hussam; Tsakiris, Stylianos

    2014-06-01

    Hypothyroidism is known to exert significant structural and functional changes to the developing central nervous system, and can lead to the establishment of serious mental retardation and neurological problems. The aim of the present study was to shed more light on the effects of gestational and/or lactational maternal exposure to propylthiouracil-induced experimental hypothyroidism on crucial brain enzyme activities of Wistar rat offspring, at two time-points of their lives: at birth (day-1) and at 21 days of age (end of lactation). Under all studied experimental conditions, offspring brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was found to be significantly decreased due to maternal hypothyroidism, in contrast to the two studied adenosinetriphosphatase (Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and Mg(2+)-ATPase) activities that were only found to be significantly altered right after birth (increased and decreased, respectively, following an exposure to gestational maternal hypothyroidism) and were restored to control levels by the end of lactation. As our findings regarding the pattern of effects that maternal hypothyroidism has on the above-mentioned crucial offspring brain enzyme activities are compared to those reported in the literature, several differences are revealed that could be attributed to both the mode of the experimental simulation approach followed as well as to the time-frames examined. These findings could provide the basis for a debate on the need of a more consistent experimental approach to hypothyroidism during neurodevelopment as well as for a further evaluation of the herein presented and discussed neurochemical (and, ultimately, neurodevelopmental) effects of experimentally-induced maternal hypothyroidism, in a brain region-specific manner.

  5. Acute Hemorrhagic Edema of Infancy.

    PubMed

    Serra E Moura Garcia, C; Sokolova, A; Torre, M L; Amaro, C

    2016-01-01

    Acute Hemorrhagic Edema of Infancy is a small vessel leucocytoclastic vasculitis affecting young infants. It is characterized by large, target-like, macular to purpuric plaques predominantly affecting the face, ear lobes and extremities. Non-pitting edema of the distal extremities and low-grade fever may also be present. Extra-cutaneous involvement is very rare. Although the lesions have a dramatic onset in a twenty-four to forty-eight hour period, usually the child has a non-toxic appearance. In most cases there are no changes in laboratory parameters. The cutaneous biopsy reveals an inflammatory perivascular infiltrate. It is a benign and auto-limited disease, with complete resolution within two to three weeks leaving no sequelae in the majority of cases. No recurrences are described. We report a case of a 42-day old girl admitted at our hospital with Acute Hemorrhagic Edema of Infancy.

  6. Effect of interferon-β on neuroinflammation, brain injury and neurological outcome after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tiebosch, Ivo A C W; Dijkhuizen, Rick M; Cobelens, Pieter M; Bouts, Mark J R J; Zwartbol, René; van der Meide, Peter H; van den Bergh, Walter M

    2013-02-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) has a poor outcome, particularly attributed to progressive injury after the initial incident. Several studies suggest a critical role for inflammation in lesion progression after SAH. Our goal was to test whether treatment with anti-inflammatory interferon-β, which has shown promise as a therapeutic agent in experimental ischaemic stroke, can protect the brain after SAH. SAH was induced in adult male Wistar rats by puncturing the intracranial bifurcation of the right internal carotid artery. Treatment effects of daily interferon-β (n = 16) or vehicle (n = 14) injections were serially evaluated with multiparametric MRI and behavioral tests from day 0 to 7, in compliance with recent recommendations for pre-clinical drug testing. Outcome measures included neurological status, brain lesion volume, blood-brain barrier (BBB) leakage, and levels of inflammatory markers. In animals that survived up to 7 days post-SAH, we found no significant differences between vehicle- and interferon-β-treated animals with respect to final neurological score (14.3 ± 1.0 vs. 13.0 ± 2.2), brain lesion size on T(2)-weighted MR images (59 ± 83 vs. 124 ± 99 mm(3)), BBB leakage (0.26 ± 0.05 vs. 0.22 ± 0.08 contrast-induced relative MR signal change), upregulation of brain RNA for cytokines, chemokines and cell adhesion molecules, and increased neutrophil activation. In contrast to previously published findings in experimental ischemic stroke models, interferon-β has no clear efficacy to protect the brain after SAH. In line with recent highlighting of the significance of negative findings, our data currently do not recommend clinical testing of interferon-β to prevent neurological damage in SAH patients.

  7. Sympathetic crashing acute pulmonary edema

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Naman; Kumar, Akshay; Aggarwal, Praveen; Jamshed, Nayer

    2016-01-01

    Sympathetic crashing acute pulmonary edema (SCAPE) is the extreme end of the spectrum of acute pulmonary edema. It is important to understand this disease as it is relatively common in the emergency department (ED) and has better outcomes when managed appropriately. The patients have an abrupt redistribution of fluid in the lungs, and when treated promptly and effectively, these patients will rapidly recover. Noninvasive ventilation and intravenous nitrates are the mainstay of treatment which should be started within minutes of the patient's arrival to the ED. Use of morphine and intravenous loop diuretics, although popular, has poor scientific evidence. PMID:28149030

  8. Sympathetic crashing acute pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Naman; Kumar, Akshay; Aggarwal, Praveen; Jamshed, Nayer

    2016-12-01

    Sympathetic crashing acute pulmonary edema (SCAPE) is the extreme end of the spectrum of acute pulmonary edema. It is important to understand this disease as it is relatively common in the emergency department (ED) and has better outcomes when managed appropriately. The patients have an abrupt redistribution of fluid in the lungs, and when treated promptly and effectively, these patients will rapidly recover. Noninvasive ventilation and intravenous nitrates are the mainstay of treatment which should be started within minutes of the patient's arrival to the ED. Use of morphine and intravenous loop diuretics, although popular, has poor scientific evidence.

  9. Brain microvessel cross-presentation is a hallmark of experimental cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Howland, Shanshan W; Poh, Chek Meng; Gun, Sin Yee; Claser, Carla; Malleret, Benoit; Shastri, Nilabh; Ginhoux, Florent; Grotenbreg, Gijsbert M; Rénia, Laurent

    2013-07-01

    Cerebral malaria is a devastating complication of Plasmodium falciparum infection. Its pathogenesis is complex, involving both parasite- and immune-mediated events. CD8(+) T cells play an effector role in murine experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) induced by Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA) infection. We have identified a highly immunogenic CD8 epitope in glideosome-associated protein 50 that is conserved across rodent malaria species. Epitope-specific CD8(+) T cells are induced during PbA infection, migrating to the brain just before neurological signs manifest. They are functional, cytotoxic and can damage the blood-brain barrier in vivo. Such CD8(+) T cells are also found in the brain during infection with parasite strains/species that do not induce neuropathology. We demonstrate here that PbA infection causes brain microvessels to cross-present parasite antigen, while non-ECM-causing parasites do not. Further, treatment with fast-acting anti-malarial drugs before the onset of ECM reduces parasite load and thus antigen presentation in the brain, preventing ECM death. Thus our data suggest that combined therapies targeting both the parasite and host antigen-presenting cells may improve the outcome of CM patients. © 2013 The Authors. Published by John Wiley and Sons, Ltd on behalf of EMBO.

  10. Early and Persistent Dendritic Hypertrophy in the Basolateral Amygdala following Experimental Diffuse Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Ann N; Paode, Pooja R; May, Hazel G; Ortiz, J Bryce; Kemmou, Salma; Lifshitz, Jonathan; Conrad, Cheryl D; Currier Thomas, Theresa

    2017-01-01

    In the pathophysiology of traumatic brain injury (TBI), the amygdala remains understudied, despite involvement in processing emotional and stressful stimuli associated with anxiety disorders, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Because the basolateral amygdala (BLA) integrates inputs from sensory and other limbic structures coordinating emotional learning and memory, injury-induced changes in circuitry may contribute to psychiatric sequelae of TBI. This study quantified temporal changes in dendritic complexity of BLA neurons after experimental diffuse TBI, modeled by midline fluid percussion injury. At post-injury days (PIDs) 1, 7, and 28, brain tissue from sham and brain-injured adult, male rats was processed for Golgi, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), or silver stain and analyzed to quantify BLA dendritic branch intersections, activated astrocytes, and regional neuropathology, respectively. Compared to sham, brain-injured rats at all PIDs showed enhanced dendritic branch intersections in both pyramidal and stellate BLA neuronal types, as evidenced by Sholl analysis. GFAP staining in the BLA was significantly increased at PID1 and 7 in comparison to sham. However, the BLA was relatively spared from neuropathology, demonstrated by an absence of argyrophilic accumulation over time, in contrast to other brain regions. These data suggest an early and persistent enhancement of dendritic complexity within the BLA after a single diffuse TBI. Increased dendritic complexity would alter information processing into and through the amygdala, contributing to emotional symptoms post-TBI, including PTSD.

  11. Brain microvessel cross-presentation is a hallmark of experimental cerebral malaria

    PubMed Central

    Howland, Shanshan W; Poh, Chek Meng; Gun, Sin Yee; Claser, Carla; Malleret, Benoit; Shastri, Nilabh; Ginhoux, Florent; Grotenbreg, Gijsbert M; Rénia, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is a devastating complication of Plasmodium falciparum infection. Its pathogenesis is complex, involving both parasite- and immune-mediated events. CD8+ T cells play an effector role in murine experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) induced by Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA) infection. We have identified a highly immunogenic CD8 epitope in glideosome-associated protein 50 that is conserved across rodent malaria species. Epitope-specific CD8+ T cells are induced during PbA infection, migrating to the brain just before neurological signs manifest. They are functional, cytotoxic and can damage the blood–brain barrier in vivo. Such CD8+ T cells are also found in the brain during infection with parasite strains/species that do not induce neuropathology. We demonstrate here that PbA infection causes brain microvessels to cross-present parasite antigen, while non-ECM-causing parasites do not. Further, treatment with fast-acting anti-malarial drugs before the onset of ECM reduces parasite load and thus antigen presentation in the brain, preventing ECM death. Thus our data suggest that combined therapies targeting both the parasite and host antigen-presenting cells may improve the outcome of CM patients. PMID:23681698

  12. Blood flow in an experimental rat brain tumor by tissue equilibration and indicator fractionation.

    PubMed

    Graham, M M; Spence, A M; Abbott, G L; O'Gorman, L; Muzi, M

    1987-01-01

    The tissue equilibration technique (Kety) was compared with the indicator fractionation technique for the measurement of blood flow to normal brain and an experimental brain tumor in the rat. The tumor was a cloned astrocytic glioma implanted in the cerebral hemisphere of F-344 rats. I-125 Iodoantipyrine, using a rising infusion for one minute, was used for the tissue equilibration technique. C-14 butanol, injected as a bolus 8 seconds before sacrifice, was used for the indicator fractionation technique. Samples were assayed using liquid scintillation counting and the iodoantipyrine results were regressed against the butanol results. For normal tissue R = 0.832, SEE = 0.115 ml/g/min, and Slope = 0.626. For tumor R = 0.796, SEE = 0.070 ml/g/min, and Slope = 0.441. The iodoantipyrine tissue/blood partition coefficient for normal hemisphere (gray and white matter) was 0.861 +/-0.037 (SD) and for tumor was 0.876 +/-0.042. The indicator fractionation technique with C-14 butanol underestimated blood flow in a consistent manner, probably because of incomplete extraction, early washout of activity from tissue and from evaporation of butanol during processing. Our experiments revealed no differences between tumor and normal brain tissue that might invalidate the comparison of iodoantipyrine blood flow results in brain tumors and surrounding normal brain.

  13. Anatomical landmarks for registration of experimental image data to volumetric rodent brain atlasing templates.

    PubMed

    Sergejeva, Marina; Papp, Eszter A; Bakker, Rembrandt; Gaudnek, Manuel A; Okamura-Oho, Yuko; Boline, Jyl; Bjaalie, Jan G; Hess, Andreas

    2015-01-30

    Assignment of anatomical reference is a key step in integration of the rapidly expanding collection of rodent brain data. Landmark-based registration facilitates spatial anchoring of diverse types of data not suitable for automated methods operating on voxel-based image information. Here we propose a standardized set of anatomical landmarks for registration of whole brain imaging datasets from the mouse and rat brain, and in particular for integration of experimental image data in Waxholm Space (WHS). Sixteen internal landmarks of the C57BL/6J mouse brain have been reliably identified: by different individuals, independent of their experience in anatomy; across different MRI contrasts (T1, T2, T2(*)) and other modalities (Nissl histology and block-face anatomy); in different specimens; in different slice acquisition angles; and in different image resolutions. We present a registration example between T1-weighted MRI and the mouse WHS template using these landmarks and reaching fairly high accuracy. Landmark positions identified in the mouse WHS template are shared through the Scalable Brain Atlas, accompanied by graphical and textual guidelines for locating each landmark. We identified 14 of the 16 landmarks in the WHS template for the Sprague Dawley rat. This landmark set can withstand substantial differences in acquisition angle, imaging modality, and is less vulnerable to subjectivity. This facilitates registration of multimodal 3D brain data to standard coordinate spaces for mouse and rat brain taking a step toward the creation of a common rodent reference system; raising data sharing to a qualitatively higher level. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of alprazolam on the benzodiazepine receptors in brain of experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Tyutyulkova, N; Gorancheva, Y u; Stefanova, S

    1988-08-01

    We studied the effect of the benzodiazepine derivative alprazolam on [3H]-flunitrazepam binding with a brain synaptosomal fraction of experimental animals in vitro and in vivo. The in vivo experiments were carried out in intact cats and mice with social isolation. Alprazolam did not change the density of benzodiazepine receptors in intact animals, but restored their number, strongly reduced in a model of social aggression.

  15. Edema: a silent but important factor.

    PubMed

    Villeco, June P

    2012-01-01

    Edema is a normal response to injury. Even the smallest injury is associated with some inflammation, and initial edema is part of the normal inflammatory process. However, edema becomes a concern when it persists beyond the inflammatory phase. Once we have progressed into the rebuilding, or fibroplastic phase of healing, edema will delay healing and contribute to complications such as pain and stiffness. Early prevention and management to prevent this progression are therefore critical. This article discusses edema in relation to stages of healing and presents the research behind techniques available to the clinician to manage localized extracellular upper extremity edema in the patient with an intact lymphatic system.

  16. Dexamethasone and colchicine reduce inflammation and delayed oedema following experimental brain contusion.

    PubMed

    Holmin, S; Mathiesen, T

    1996-01-01

    The effect of anti-inflammatory treatment on monocyte/macrophage infiltration, major histocompatibility complex molecules (MHC) class II expression and delayed oedema following experimental brain contusion was studied by immunohistochemistry and tissue-specific gravity measurement in 44 rats. Colchicine, chloroquine and dexamethasone administered once daily for five days after the trauma reduced inflammation and oedema. The difference was statistically significant with colchicine and dexamethasone. The findings comprise further evidence of a pathogenetically important inflammation after experimental contusion. It is probable that anti-inflammatory agents may prevent secondary neurological damage due to elevated intracranial pressure and cell to cell- or cytokine-mediated neuronal degeneration and demyelination.

  17. Azadirachta indica ethanolic extract protects neurons from apoptosis and mitigates brain swelling in experimental cerebral malaria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cerebral malaria is a rapidly developing encephalopathy caused by the apicomplexan parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Drugs currently in use are associated with poor outcome in an increasing number of cases and new drugs are urgently needed. The potential of the medicinal plant Azadirachta indica (Neem) for the treatment of experimental cerebral malaria was evaluated in mice. Methods Experimental cerebral malaria was induced in mice by infection with Plasmodium berghei ANKA. Infected mice were administered with Azadirachta indica ethanolic extract at doses of 300, 500, or 1000 mg/kg intraperitoneally (i.p.) in experimental groups, or with the anti-malarial drugs chloroquine (12 mg/kg, i.p.) or artemether (1.6 mg/kg, i.p.), in the positive control groups. Treatment was initiated at the onset of signs of brain involvement and pursued for five days on a daily basis. Mice brains were dissected out and processed for the study of the effects of the extract on pyramidal cells’ fate and on markers of neuroinflammation and apoptosis, in the medial temporal lobe. Results Azadirachta indica ethanolic extract mitigated neuroinflammation, decreased the severity of brain oedema, and protected pyramidal neurons from apoptosis, particularly at the highest dose used, comparable to chloroquine and artemether. Conclusions The present findings suggest that Azadirachta indica ethanolic extract has protective effects on neuronal populations in the inflamed central nervous system, and justify at least in part its use in African and Asian folk medicine and practices. PMID:23984986

  18. Azadirachta indica ethanolic extract protects neurons from apoptosis and mitigates brain swelling in experimental cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Bedri, Selma; Khalil, Eltahir A; Khalid, Sami A; Alzohairy, Mohammad A; Mohieldein, Abdlmarouf; Aldebasi, Yousef H; Seke Etet, Paul Faustin; Farahna, Mohammed

    2013-08-29

    Cerebral malaria is a rapidly developing encephalopathy caused by the apicomplexan parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Drugs currently in use are associated with poor outcome in an increasing number of cases and new drugs are urgently needed. The potential of the medicinal plant Azadirachta indica (Neem) for the treatment of experimental cerebral malaria was evaluated in mice. Experimental cerebral malaria was induced in mice by infection with Plasmodium berghei ANKA. Infected mice were administered with Azadirachta indica ethanolic extract at doses of 300, 500, or 1000 mg/kg intraperitoneally (i.p.) in experimental groups, or with the anti-malarial drugs chloroquine (12 mg/kg, i.p.) or artemether (1.6 mg/kg, i.p.), in the positive control groups. Treatment was initiated at the onset of signs of brain involvement and pursued for five days on a daily basis. Mice brains were dissected out and processed for the study of the effects of the extract on pyramidal cells' fate and on markers of neuroinflammation and apoptosis, in the medial temporal lobe. Azadirachta indica ethanolic extract mitigated neuroinflammation, decreased the severity of brain oedema, and protected pyramidal neurons from apoptosis, particularly at the highest dose used, comparable to chloroquine and artemether. The present findings suggest that Azadirachta indica ethanolic extract has protective effects on neuronal populations in the inflamed central nervous system, and justify at least in part its use in African and Asian folk medicine and practices.

  19. Effect of arginine vasopressin on the cortex edema in the ischemic stroke of Mongolian gerbils.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xue-Yan; Wu, Chun-Fang; Yang, Jun; Gao, Yang; Sun, Fang-Jie; Wang, Da-Xin; Wang, Chang-Hong; Lin, Bao-Cheng

    2015-06-01

    Brain edema formation is one of the most important mechanisms of ischemia-evoked cerebral edema. It has been demonstrated that arginine vasopressin (AVP) receptors are involved in the pathophysiology of secondary brain damage after focal cerebral ischemia. In a well-characterized animal model of ischemic stroke of Mongolian gerbils, the present study was undertaken to clear the effect of AVP on cortex edema in cerebral ischemia. The results showed that (1) occluding the left carotid artery of Mongolian gerbils not only decreased the cortex specific gravity (cortex edema) but also increased AVP levels in the ipsilateral cortex (ischemic area) including left prefrontal lobe, left parietal lobe, left temporal lobe, left occipital lobe and left hippocampus for the first 6 hours, and did not change of the cortex specific gravity and AVP concentration in the right cortex (non-ischemic area); (2) there were many negative relationships between the specific gravity and AVP levels in the ischemic cortex; (3) intranasal AVP (50 ng or 200 ng), which could pass through the blood-brain barrier to the brain, aggravated the focal cortex edema, whereas intranasal AVP receptor antagonist-D(CH2)5Tyr(ET)DAVP (2 µg) mitigated the cortex edema in the ischemic area after occluding the left carotid artery of Mongolian gerbils; and (4) either intranasal AVP or AVP receptor antagonist did not evoke that edema in the non-ischemic cortex. The data indicated that AVP participated in the process of ischemia-evoked cortex edema, and the cerebral AVP receptor might serve as an important therapeutic target for the ischemia-evoked cortex edema.

  20. The pathophysiology of repetitive concussive traumatic brain injury in experimental models; new developments and open questions.

    PubMed

    Brody, David L; Benetatos, Joseph; Bennett, Rachel E; Klemenhagen, Kristen C; Mac Donald, Christine L

    2015-05-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in the pathophysiology of repetitive concussive traumatic brain injury (rcTBI) in large part due to the association with dramatic cases of progressive neurological deterioration in professional athletes, military personnel, and others. However, our understanding of the pathophysiology of rcTBI is less advanced than for more severe brain injuries. Most prominently, the mechanisms underlying traumatic axonal injury, microglial activation, amyloid-beta accumulation, and progressive tau pathology are not yet known. In addition, the role of injury to dendritic spine cytoskeletal structures, vascular reactivity impairments, and microthrombi are intriguing and subjects of ongoing inquiry. Methods for quantitative analysis of axonal injury, dendritic injury, and synaptic loss need to be refined for the field to move forward in a rigorous fashion. We and others are attempting to develop translational approaches to assess these specific pathophysiological events in both animals and humans to facilitate clinically relevant pharmacodynamic assessments of candidate therapeutics. In this article, we review and discuss several of the recent experimental results from our lab and others. We include new initial data describing the difficulty in modeling progressive tau pathology in experimental rcTBI, and results demonstrating that sertraline can alleviate social interaction deficits and depressive-like behaviors following experimental rcTBI plus foot shock stress. Furthermore, we propose a discrete set of open, experimentally tractable questions that may serve as a framework for future investigations. In addition, we also raise several important questions that are less experimentally tractable at this time, in hopes that they may stimulate future methodological developments to address them. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Traumatic Brain Injury".

  1. Uveitic Macular Edema: Treatment Update

    PubMed Central

    Goldhardt, Raquel; Rosen, Bradley Simon

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize recent developments in the treatment of uveitic macular edema (ME). ME represent a major cause of visual loss in uveitis and adequate management is crucial for the maintenance of useful vision in patients with chronic uveitis. PMID:27347446

  2. Carnosine attenuates early brain injury through its antioxidative and anti-apoptotic effects in a rat experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zong-yong; Sun, Bao-liang; Yang, Ming-feng; Li, Da-wei; Fang, Jie; Zhang, Shuai

    2015-03-01

    Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) has been demonstrated to provide antioxidative and anti-apoptotic roles in the animal of ischemic brain injuries and neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of this study was to examine whether carnosine prevents subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)-induced early brain injury (EBI) in rats. We found that intraperitoneal administration of carnosine improved neurobehavioral deficits, attenuated brain edema and blood-brain barrier permeability, and decreased reactive oxygen species level at 48 h following SAH in rat models. Carnosine treatment increased tissue copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) enzymatic activities, and reduced post-SAH elevated lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, the concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA), 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT), 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHDG), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in rats. Furthermore, carnosine treatment attenuated SAH-induced microglia activation and cortical neuron apoptosis. These results indicated that administration of carnosine may provide neuroprotection in EBI following SAH in rat models.

  3. Connecting clinical and experimental investigations of awareness in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Dockree, Paul M; O'Connell, Redmond G; Robertson, Ian H

    2015-01-01

    Questionnaire-based demonstrations of impaired self-awareness (SA) after traumatic brain injury (TBI) are not always supported by experimental studies of in-the-moment or online awareness. This chapter begins by describing the clinical phenomenon of impaired SA, how it is measured, and why its interdependency with mechanisms of online awareness may provide the scaffolding from which appraisals of cognitive functioning can be accurately revised following a brain injury. We review research that has measured unawareness of errors in routine action in TBI patients and propose more rigorous methodological approaches to studying the emergent properties of awareness with greater clarity in the laboratory. We discuss how neuropsychological and electrophysiologic studies are beginning to inform our understanding of impaired error processing in TBI patients and we highlight recent theory proposing that online metacognitive processes accumulate evidence of erroneous responses in a graded fashion. Neural signals with amplitudes that scale with the strength of accruing evidence and peak latencies that mark the threshold at which awareness emerges represent important neural mechanisms to examine the breakdown of error awareness after brain injury. We also discuss how errors can be investigated in relation to different sources of evidence that contribute to aware experiences after brain injury. Finally, we explore conditions beyond error signaling, and how different "objects of insight" that require retrospective and prospective judgments of confidence need to be examined in relation to the clinical phenomenon of impaired SA.

  4. Effect of Experimental Thyrotoxicosis on Brain Gray Matter: A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Göbel, Anna; Heldmann, Marcus; Göttlich, Martin; Dirk, Anna-Luise; Brabant, Georg; Münte, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hyper-as well hypothyroidism have an effect on behavior and brain function. Moreover, during development thyroid hormones influence brain structure. Objectives This study aimed to demonstrate an effect of experimentally induced hyperthyroidism on brain gray matter in healthy adult humans. Methods High-resolution 3D T1-weighted images were acquired in 29 healthy young subjects prior to as well as after receiving 250 µg of T4 per day for 8 weeks. Voxel-based morphometry analysis was performed using Statistical Parametric Mapping 8 (SPM8). Results Laboratory testing confirmed the induction of hyperthyroidism. In the hyperthyroid condition, gray matter volumes were increased in the right posterior cerebellum (lobule VI) and decreased in the bilateral visual cortex and anterior cerebellum (lobules I-IV) compared to the euthyroid condition. Conclusions Our study provides evidence that short periods of hyperthyroidism induce distinct alterations in brain structures of cerebellar regions that have been associated with sensorimotor functions as well as working memory in the literature. PMID:26601082

  5. Distribution of anionic sites on the capillary endothelium in an experimental brain tumor model.

    PubMed

    Vincent, S; DePace, D; Finkelstein, S

    1988-02-01

    The distribution of anionic domains on the capillary endothelium of experimental brain tumors was determined using cationic ferritin (CF) in order to ascertain whether the pattern of these domains is different from that on normal cerebral capillaries. Tumors were induced by stereotaxic injection of cultured neoplastic glial cells, A15A5, into the caudate nucleus of Sprague-Dawley rats. Following a 14-21 day growth period tumors appeared as vascularized, sharply circumscribed masses which caused compression of the surrounding brain tissue. Anionic domains were distributed in a patchy and irregular pattern on the luminal plasma membrane of the endothelia of blood vessels in the tumors. Some variability in this pattern was observed infrequently in limited regions of the tumor where there was either a continuous layer of CF or an absence of CF binding. Plasmalemmal vesicles, coated vesicles, coated pits, multivesicular bodies, and some junctional complexes showed varying degrees of labeling with the probe. Capillaries in the tumor periphery and normal cerebral vessels showed a uniform distribution of anionic groups. These results indicate that there is an altered surface charge on the endothelial luminal plasma membrane of blood vessels in brain tumors. A correlation may exist between the altered surface charge and the degree to which the blood-brain barrier is impaired in these vessels.

  6. Piezosurgery prevents brain tissue damage: an experimental study on a new rat model.

    PubMed

    Pavlíková, G; Foltán, R; Burian, M; Horká, E; Adámek, S; Hejčl, A; Hanzelka, T; Sedý, J

    2011-08-01

    Piezosurgery is a promising meticulous system for bone cutting, based on ultrasound microvibrations. It is thought that the impact of piezosurgery on the integrity of soft tissue is generally low, but it has not been examined critically. The authors undertook an experimental study to evaluate the brain tissue response to skull bone removal using piezosurgery compared with a conventional drilling method. In Wistar male rats, a circular bone window was drilled to the parietal bone using piezosurgery on one side and a conventional bone drill on the other side. The behavioural performance of animals was evaluated using the motor BBB test and sensory plantar test. The brains of animals were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histology. The results of MRI showed significantly increased depth and width of the brain lesion in the region of conventional drilling compared with the region where piezosurgery was used. Cresylviolet and NF 160 staining confirmed these findings. There was no significant difference in any of the behavioural tests between the two groups. In conclusion, piezosurgery is a safe method for the performance of osteotomy in close relation to soft tissue, including an extremely injury-sensitive tissue such as brain. Copyright © 2011 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Found in translation: understanding the biology and behavior of experimental traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Bondi, Corina O.; Semple, Bridgette D.; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J.; Osier, Nicole D.; Carlson, Shaun W.; Dixon, C. Edward; Giza, Christopher C.; Kline, Anthony E.

    2014-01-01

    BONDI, C.O., B.D. Semple, L.J. Noble-Haeusslein, N.D. Osier, S.W. Carlson, C.E. Dixon, C.C. Giza and A.E. Kline. Found in translation: understanding the biology and behavior of experimental traumatic brain injury. NEUROSCI BIOBEHAV REV. The aim of this review is to discuss in greater detail the topics covered in the recent symposium entitled “Traumatic brain injury: laboratory and clinical perspectives,” presented at the 2014 International Behavioral Neuroscience Society annual meeting. Herein we review contemporary laboratory models of traumatic brain injury (TBI) including common assays for sensorimotor and cognitive behavior. New modalities to evaluate social behavior after injury to the developing brain, as well as the attentional set-shifting test (AST) as a measure of executive function in TBI, will be highlighted. Environmental enrichment (EE) will be discussed as a preclinical model of neurorehabilitation, and finally, an evidence-based approach to sports-related concussion will be considered. The review consists predominantly of published data, but some discussion of ongoing or future directions is provided. PMID:25496906

  8. GM-CSF is not essential for experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis but promotes brain-targeted disease

    PubMed Central

    Pierson, Emily R.; Goverman, Joan M.

    2017-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) has been used as an animal model of multiple sclerosis to identify pathogenic cytokines that could be therapeutic targets. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is the only cytokine reported to be essential for EAE. We investigated the role of GM-CSF in EAE in C3HeB/FeJ mice that uniquely exhibit extensive brain and spinal cord inflammation. Unexpectedly, GM-CSF–deficient C3HeB/FeJ mice were fully susceptible to EAE because IL-17 activity compensated for the loss of GM-CSF during induction of spinal cord–targeted disease. In contrast, both GM-CSF and IL-17 were needed to fully overcome the inhibitory influence of IFN-γ on the induction of inflammation in the brain. Both GM-CSF and IL-17 independently promoted neutrophil accumulation in the brain, which was essential for brain-targeted disease. These results identify a GM-CSF/IL-17/IFN-γ axis that regulates inflammation in the central nervous system and suggest that a combination of cytokine-neutralizing therapies may be needed to dampen central nervous system autoimmunity. PMID:28405624

  9. MyD88-Dependent Signals Are Essential for the Host Immune Response in Experimental Brain Abscess1

    PubMed Central

    Kielian, Tammy; Phulwani, Nirmal K.; Esen, Nilufer; Syed, Mohsin Md.; Haney, Anessa C.; McCastlain, Kelly; Johnson, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    Brain abscesses form in response to a parenchymal infection by pyogenic bacteria, with Staphylococcus aureus representing a common etiologic agent of human disease. Numerous receptors that participate in immune responses to bacteria, including the majority of TLRs, the IL-1R, and the IL-18R, use a common adaptor molecule, MyD88, for transducing activation signals leading to proinflammatory mediator expression and immune effector functions. To delineate the importance of MyD88-dependent signals in brain abscesses, we compared disease pathogenesis using MyD88 knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice. Mortality rates were significantly higher in MyD88 KO mice, which correlated with a significant reduction in the expression of several proinflammatory mediators, including but not limited to IL-1β, TNF-α, and MIP-2/CXCL2. These changes were associated with a significant reduction in neutrophil and macrophage recruitment into brain abscesses of MyD88 KO animals. In addition, microglia, macrophages, and neutrophils isolated from the brain abscesses of MyD88 KO mice produced significantly less TNF-α, IL-6, MIP-1α/CCL3, and IFN-γ-induced protein 10/CXCL10 compared with WT cells. The lack of MyD88-dependent signals had a dramatic effect on the extent of tissue injury, with significantly larger brain abscesses typified by exaggerated edema and necrosis in MyD88 KO animals. Interestingly, despite these striking changes in MyD88 KO mice, bacterial burdens did not significantly differ between the two strains at the early time points examined. Collectively, these findings indicate that MyD88 plays an essential role in establishing a protective CNS host response during the early stages of brain abscess development, whereas MyD88-independent pathway(s) are responsible for pathogen containment. PMID:17372011

  10. Resolution of increased permeability pulmonary edema in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Havill, A. M.; Gee, M. H.

    1987-01-01

    The rate and sequence of interstitial and alveolar fluid removal from the lung after the occurrence of pulmonary edema were examined. Rats were given intraperitoneal injections of 20 mg/kg alpha-naphthylthiourea (ANTU), resulting in an increased permeability edema with alveolar flooding. Animals were killed at intervals between 2 and 48 hours after ANTU for the gravimetric determination of extravascular lung water (Qwl/dQl) and histologic study of the lung. Interstitial fluid volume was quantified by a morphometric technique. The assumptions were made that edema fluid equaled the experimental Qwl/dQl minus the normal Qwl/dQl, and that the edema fluid volume equaled the sum of interstitial and alveolar fluid volume. It was found that between 2 and 4 hours after the induction of pulmonary edema, fluid was removed from the alveolar space faster than it was removed from the interstitial space. Between 4 and 48 hours after ANTU, the fluid removal rate from both compartments was much slower, and interstitial fluid was removed at a faster rate than alveolar fluid. It is hypothesized that the later phase of fluid removal from the lung is dependent on the removal of protein. Images Figure 1 PMID:3109247

  11. Increased KPI containing amyloid precursor protein in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis brains.

    PubMed

    Beilin, Orit; Karussis, Dimitrios M; Korczyn, Amos D; Gurwitz, David; Aronovich, Ramona; Mizrachi-Kol, Rachel; Chapman, Joab

    2007-04-16

    Amyloid precursor protein can be translated from three alternatively spliced mRNAs. We measured levels of amyloid precursor protein isoforms containing the Kunitz protease inhibitor domain (KPIAPP), and amyloid precursor protein without the Kunitz protease inhibitor domain (KPIAPP) in brain homogenates of acute experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice. At the preclinical phase of the disease, both KPIAPP and KPIAPP levels were significantly higher in homogenates from brains of autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice, whereas at the acute phase of the disease only KPIAPP remained significantly elevated compared with controls. At the recovery phase, no differences were observed between the groups. The early and isoform-specific elevation of KPIAPP in autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice suggests a possible role for amyloid precursor protein in the immune response mediating the disease.

  12. Changes in brain metabolites in experimental cerebral malaria infection with plasmodium berghei ANKA: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Ali Sibtain Farooq; Sheikh, Saman Ali; Mohamed, Mona Adel

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we have collected the findings of available literature focusing on brain metabolites by spectroscopy in the murine model of cerebral malaria disease. The literature search for experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) and spectroscopy using National Institute of Health's PubMed database provided us with 9 peer-reviewed publications. These publications have used mice infected with Plasmodium Berghei (PbA) Antwerpen-Kasapa (ANKA) strain to mimic the human infection with Plasmodium falciparum. Brain ischaemia, as depicted by increased lactate and alanine concentrations, as well as decreased aspartate and adenosine triphosphate levels, play a key role in ECM. Lowering the lactate levels by using dichloroacetate has been shown to improve survival. Significant cellular injury has also been documented through decreased N-acetylaspartate and glycerophosphocholine levels. The advantage of using spectroscopic technique provide important functional information which helps determine the aetiology, pathogenesis, progression, and monitoring of treatment as well as predicting prognosis in the clinical setting of cerebral malaria.

  13. Cell-based delivery of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Makar, Tapas K; Nimmagadda, Vamshi K C; Trisler, David; Bever, Christopher T

    2014-08-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a pleiotropic cytokine with neuroprotective properties that has been identified as a potential therapeutic agent for diseases of the central nervous system (CNS). The use of BDNF has been limited by a short serum half-life and poor penetration of the blood-brain barrier. To address this limitation we have explored cell-based approaches to delivery. We have used experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), an inflammatory disease of the CNS, as a model system. We engineered hematopoietic stem cells to produce BDNF to determine the feasibility and effectiveness of cell-based delivery of BDNF into the CNS in EAE. We review those studies here.

  14. Evaluation of Peritumoral Edema in the Delineation of Radiotherapy Clinical Target Volumes for Glioblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Eric L. . E-mail: echang@mdanderson.org; Akyurek, Serap; Avalos, Tedde C; Rebueno, Neal C; Spicer, Chris C; Garcia, John C; Famiglietti, Robin; Allen, Pamela K.; Chao, K.S. Clifford; Mahajan, Anita; Woo, Shiao Y.; Maor, Moshe H.

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the spatial relationship between peritumoral edema and recurrence pattern in patients with glioblastoma (GBM). Methods and Materials: Forty-eight primary GBM patients received three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy that did not intentionally include peritumoral edema within the clinical target volume between July 2000 and June 2001. All 48 patients have subsequently recurred, and their original treatment planning parameters were used for this study. New theoretical radiation treatment plans were created for the same 48 patients, based on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) target delineation guidelines that specify inclusion of peritumoral edema. Target volume and recurrent tumor coverage, as well as percent volume of normal brain irradiated, were assessed for both methods of target delineation using dose-volume histograms. Results: A comparison between the location of recurrent tumor and peritumoral edema volumes from all 48 cases failed to show correlation by linear regression modeling (r {sup 2} 0.0007; p = 0.3). For patients with edema >75 cm{sup 3}, the percent volume of brain irradiated to 46 Gy was significantly greater in treatment plans that intentionally included peritumoral edema compared with those that did not (38% vs. 31%; p = 0.003). The pattern of failure was identical between the two sets of plans (40 central, 3 in-field, 3 marginal, and 2 distant recurrence). Conclusion: Clinical target volume delineation based on a 2-cm margin rather than on peritumoral edema did not seem to alter the central pattern of failure for patients with GBM. For patients with peritumoral edema >75 cm{sup 3}, using a constant 2-cm margin resulted in a smaller median percent volume of brain being irradiated to 30 Gy, 46 Gy, and 50 Gy compared with corresponding theoretical RTOG plans that deliberately included peritumoral edema.

  15. Proteomic profiling of the brain of mice with experimental cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Moussa, Ehab; Huang, Honglei; Ahras, Malika; Lall, Amar; Thezenas, Marie L; Fischer, Roman; Kessler, Benedikt M; Pain, Arnab; Billker, Oliver; Casals-Pascual, Climent

    2017-06-05

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is a severe neurological complication of malaria infection in both adults and children. In pursuit of effective treatment of CM, clinical studies, postmortem analysis and animal models have been employed to understand the pathology and identify effective interventions. In this study, a shotgun proteomics analysis was conducted to profile the proteomic signature of the brain tissue of mice with experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) in order to further understand the underlying pathology. To identify CM-associated response, proteomic signatures of the brains of C57/Bl6N mice infected with P. berghei ANKA that developed neurological syndrome were compared to those of mice infected with P. berghei NK65 that developed equally high parasite burdens without neurological signs, and to those of non-infected mice. The results show that the CM-associated response in mice that developed neurological signs comprise mainly acute-phase reaction and coagulation cascade activation, and indicate the leakage of plasma proteins into the brain parenchyma. Cerebral malaria (CM) remains a major cause of death in children. The majority of these deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa. Even with adequate access to treatment, mortality remains high and neurological sequelae can be found in up to 20% of survivors. No adjuvant treatment to date has been shown to reduce mortality and the pathophysiology of CM is largely unknown. Experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) is a well-established model that may contribute to identify and test druggable targets. In this study we have identified the disruption of the blood-brain barrier following inflammatory and vascular injury as a mechanism of disease. In this study we report a number of proteins that could be validated as potential biomarkers of ECM. Further studies, will be required to validate the clinical relevance of these biomarkers in human CM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Following experimental stroke, the recovering brain is vulnerable to lipoxygenase-dependent semaphorin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Pekcec, Anton; Yigitkanli, Kazim; Jung, Joo Eun; Pallast, Stefanie; Xing, Changhong; Antipenko, Alexander; Minchenko, Maria; Nikolov, Dimitar B.; Holman, Theodore R.; Lo, Eng H.; van Leyen, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Recovery from stroke is limited, in part, by an inhibitory environment in the postischemic brain, but factors preventing successful remodeling are not well known. Using cultured cortical neurons from mice, brain endothelial cells, and a mouse model of ischemic stroke, we show that signaling from the axon guidance molecule Sema3A via eicosanoid second messengers can contribute to this inhibitory environment. Either 90 nM recombinant Sema3A, or the 12/15-lipoxygenase (12/15-LOX) metabolites 12-HETE and 12-HPETE at 300 nM, block axon extension in neurons compared to solvent controls, and decrease tube formation in endothelial cells. The Sema3A effect is reversed by inhibiting 12/15-LOX, and neurons derived from 12/15-LOX-knockout mice are insensitive to Sema3A. Following middle cerebral artery occlusion to induce stroke in mice, immunohistochemistry shows both Sema3A and 12/15-LOX are increased in the cortex up to 2 wk. To determine whether a Sema3A-dependent damage pathway is activated following ischemia, we injected recombinant Sema3A into the striatum. Sema3A alone did not cause injury in normal brains. But when injected into postischemic brains, Sema3A increased cortical damage by 79%, and again, this effect was reversed by 12/15-LOX inhibition. Our findings suggest that blocking the semaphorin pathway should be investigated as a therapeutic strategy to improve stroke recovery.—Pekcec, A., Yigitkanli, K., Jung, J. E., Pallast, S., Xing, C., Antipenko, A., Minchenko, M., Nikolov, D. B., Holman, T. R., Lo, E. H.,van Leyen, K. Following experimental stroke, the recovering brain is vulnerable to lipoxygenase-dependent semaphorin signaling. PMID:23070608

  17. Expression of aquaporin-4 and pathological characteristics of brain injury in a rat model of traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, CHENGCHENG; CHEN, JIANQIANG; LU, HONG

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporin 4 (AQP4) is a widely distributed membrane protein, which is found in glial cells, ependymocytes and capillary endothelial cells in the brain, and particularly in the choroid plexus. AQP4 is a key regulator of water metabolism, and changes in its expression following brain injury are associated with pathological changes in the damaged side of the brain; however, the effects of brain injury on AQP4 and injury-induced pathological changes in the contralateral non-damaged side of the brain remain to be fully elucidated. In the present study, male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to traumatic brain injury (TBI) and changes in brain water content, the expression of AQP4 expression and pathological characteristics in the damaged and contralateral non-damaged sides of the brain were examined. In the damaged side of the brain, vasogenic edema appeared first, followed by cellular edema. The aggravated cellular edema in the damaged side of the brain resulted in two periods of peak edema severity. Pathological changes in the contralateral non-damaged side of the brain occurred later than those in the damaged side; cellular edema appeared first, followed by vasogenic edema, which was alleviated earlier than the cellular edema. AQP4 was downregulated during vasogenic edema, and upregulated during cellular edema. Taken together, these results suggested that the downregulation of AQP4 was a result of vasogenic edema and that the upregulation of AQP4 may have induced cellular edema. PMID:26459070

  18. Over-expression of laminin correlates to recovery of vasogenic edema following status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y-J; Kim, J-Y; Ko, A-R; Kang, T-C

    2014-09-05

    In the present study, we addressed the question of whether the up-regulation of laminin expression represents the astroglio-vascular responses to status epilepticus (SE) in the rat brain to better understand the role of vasogenic edema in epileptogenic insult. In the hippocampus, vasogenic edema was observed in the hippocampus 12h after SE when astroglial degeneration was undetected. Vasogenic edema in the hippocampus was more severe in the CA1 region where astroglial loss was absent than in the dentate gyrus showing astroglial degeneration. In the piriform cortex (PC), vasogenic edema was accompanied by appearance of astroglial degeneration 12h after SE. Laminin expression in the hippocampus and the PC was increased 3 days and 4 days after SE, respectively. Laminin expression was up-regulated in the hippocampus and the PC with concomitant reduction of SMI-71 (the endothelial barrier antigen) expression. Four weeks after SE, laminin expression was reduced in vessels showing strong SMI-71 expression within vasogenic edema lesion. Inhibition of SE-induced vasogenic edema formation by BQ788 effectively prevented laminin over-expression. Therefore, our findings indicate that laminin over-expression may be one of consequences from vasogenic edema rather than astroglial loss, and that laminin over-expression may promote migration of astrocytes to damaged or newly generated vessels to repair brain-blood barrier (BBB) disruption accompanied by the reconstruction of endothelial barrier. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Protective effects of melatonin and vitamin E in brain damage due to gamma radiation: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Erol, Fatih S; Topsakal, Cahide; Ozveren, M Faik; Kaplan, Metin; Ilhan, Nevin; Ozercan, I Hanifi; Yildiz, Oguz G

    2004-01-01

    Gamma radiation is known to cause serious damage in the brain, and many agents have been used for neuroprotection. In this study, lipid peroxidation levels and histopathological changes in brain tissues of whole-body irradiated rats with likely radiation injury were compared to those with melatonin and vitamin E protection. Forty rats in four equal groups were used. The control group received neither radiation nor medication. The remaining groups received doses of 720 cGy in two equal fractions 12 h apart. The second group received radiation but no medication, the third received radiation plus 100 mg/kg per day of vitamin E i.p., and the fourth received radiation plus 100 mg/kg per day of melatonin i.p. over 5 days. On the 10th postoperative day, all the rats were decapitated and specimens from parietal cortices were analyzed for tissue malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and histopathological changes. Increases in MDA were relatively well prevented by melatonin treatment but less so with vitamin E therapy. On histopathological examination, melatonin significantly reduced the rates of edema, necrosis, and neuronal degeneration, whereas vitamin E reduced only necrosis. Neither substance was capable of preventing vasodilatation. In conclusion, melatonin may be useful in preventing the pathological changes of secondary brain damage as a result of free oxygen radicals generated by irradiation.

  20. Experimental carbon dioxide laser brain lesions and intracranial dynamics. Part 2. Effect on brain water content and its response to acute therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tiznado, E.G.; James, H.E.; Moore, S.

    1985-04-01

    Experimental brain lesions were created over the left parietooccipital cortex of the albino rabbit through the intact dura mater with high radiating carbon dioxide laser energy. The brain water content was studied 2, 6, and 24 hours after the insult. Another two groups of animals received acute therapy with either dexamethasone (1 mg/kg) or furosemide (1 mg/kg). In all groups, Evans blue extravasation uniformly extended from the impact crater into the surrounding white matter. The brain water content in the gray matter was elevated from the control value by 2 hours after impact and remained elevated at 6 and 24 hours. The white matter brain water content did not increase until 6 hours after impact and remained elevated in the 24-hour group. After dexamethasone treatment, there was a significant decrease of water in the gray matter, but not in the white matter. With furosemide therapy, there was no reduction of gray or white matter brain water.

  1. C5a alters blood-brain barrier integrity in experimental lupus

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Alexander; Hack, Bradley; Chiang, Eddie; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Quigg, Richard J.; Alexander, Jessy J.

    2010-01-01

    .—Jacob, A., Hack, B., Chiang, E., Garcia, J. G. N., Quigg, R. J., Alexander, J. J. C5a alters blood-brain barrier integrity in experimental lupus. PMID:20065106

  2. Surgical brain injury: prevention is better than cure.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Vikram; Zhang, John H

    2008-05-01

    Neurosurgical procedures can cause inevitable brain damage resulting from the procedure itself. Unavoidable cortical and parenchymal incisions, intraoperative hemorrhage, brain lobe retraction and thermal injuries from electrocautery can cause brain injuries attributable exclusively to the neurosurgical operations and collectively referred to as surgical brain injury (SBI). This particular brain damage cannot be demarcated from the underlying brain pathology and has not been studied previously. Recently, we developed rat and mouse models to study SBI and the underlying cellular mechanisms. The animal modeling mimics a neurosurgical operation and causes commonly encountered postoperative complications such as brain edema following blood brain barrier (BBB) disruption, and neuronal cell death. Furthermore, the SBI animal model allows screening of known experimental neuroprotective agents and therapeutic agents being tried in clinical trials as possible pretreatments before neurosurgical procedures. In the present review, we elaborate on SBI and its clinical impact, the SBI animal models and their clinical relevance, and the importance of blanket neuroprotection before neurosurgical procedures.

  3. Progressive decrease in N-acetylaspartate/Creatine ratio in a teenager with type 1 diabetes and repeated episodes of ketoacidosis without clinically apparent cerebral edema: Evidence for permanent brain injury.

    PubMed

    Wootton-Gorges, S L; Buonocore, M H; Caltagirone, R A; Kuppermann, N; Glaser, N S

    2010-04-01

    Recent data suggest that DKA may contribute to cognitive impairment in children with type 1 DM. We measured the NAA/Cr ratio in a teenager during and following 2 separate episodes of DKA without clinically apparent cerebral edema. The NAA/Cr ratio decreased during DKA and improved following recovery. However, the NAA/Cr value was lower after the second episode of DKA (1.76) than after the first (1.97). These findings provide support for the hypothesis that neuronal injury may result from DKA.

  4. Chronic Histopathological and Behavioral Outcomes of Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury in Adult Male Animals

    PubMed Central

    Osier, Nicole D.; Carlson, Shaun W.; DeSana, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this review is to survey the use of experimental animal models for studying the chronic histopathological and behavioral consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The strategies employed to study the long-term consequences of TBI are described, along with a summary of the evidence available to date from common experimental TBI models: fluid percussion injury; controlled cortical impact; blast TBI; and closed-head injury. For each model, evidence is organized according to outcome. Histopathological outcomes included are gross changes in morphology/histology, ventricular enlargement, gray/white matter shrinkage, axonal injury, cerebrovascular histopathology, inflammation, and neurogenesis. Behavioral outcomes included are overall neurological function, motor function, cognitive function, frontal lobe function, and stress-related outcomes. A brief discussion is provided comparing the most common experimental models of TBI and highlighting the utility of each model in understanding specific aspects of TBI pathology. The majority of experimental TBI studies collect data in the acute postinjury period, but few continue into the chronic period. Available evidence from long-term studies suggests that many of the experimental TBI models can lead to progressive changes in histopathology and behavior. The studies described in this review contribute to our understanding of chronic TBI pathology. PMID:25490251

  5. Cerebral Edema in Chronic Mountain Sickness: a New Finding

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Haihua; Wang, Duoyao; Zhao, Xipeng; Wu, Youshen; Yin, Guixiu; Meng, Li; Wang, Fangfang; Ma, Lan; Hackett, Peter; Ge, Ri-Li

    2017-01-01

    We observed patients with chronic mountain sickness (CMS) in our clinic who developed progressive neurological deterioration (encephalopathy) and we wished to investigate this. We studied nine such CMS patients, and compared them to 21 CMS patients without encephalopathy, and to 15 healthy control subjects without CMS. All 45 subjects lived permanently at 3200–4000 m. Measurements at 2260 m included CMS symptom score, multi-slice CT, perfusion CT, pulse oximetry (SpO2%), and hemoglobin concentration (Hb). One patient had MRI imaging but not CT; 5 had CSF pressure measurements. CMS subjects had lower SpO2, higher Hb, higher brain blood density, lower mean cerebral blood flow (CBF), and significant cerebral circulatory delay compared to controls. The nine CMS subjects with neurological deterioration showed diffuse cerebral edema on imaging and more deranged cerebral hemodynamics. CSF pressure was elevated in those with edema. We conclude that cerebral edema, a previously unrecognized complication, may develop in CMS patients and cause encephalopathy. Contributing factors appear to be exaggerated polycythemia and hypoxemia, and lower and sluggish CBF compared to CMS patients without cerebral edema; but what triggers this complication is unknown. Recognition and treatment of this serious complication will help reduce morbidity and mortality from CMS. PMID:28233815

  6. Integrating mind and brain: Warren S. McCulloch, cerebral localization, and experimental epistemology.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Tara H

    2003-03-01

    Recently, historians have focused on Warren S. McCulloch's role in the cybernetics movement during the 1940s and 1950s, and his contributions to the development of computer science and communication theory. What has received less attention is McCulloch's early work in neurophysiology, and its relationship to his philosophical quest for an 'experimental epistemology' - a physiological theory of knowledge. McCulloch's early laboratory work during the 1930s addressed the problem of cerebral localization: localizing aspects of behaviour in the cerebral cortex of the brain. Most of this research was done with the Dutch neurophysiologist J.G. Dusser de Barenne at Yale University. The connection between McCulloch's philosophical interests and his experimental work can be expressed as a search for a physiological a priori, an integrated mechanism of sensation.

  7. Learning in closed-loop brain-machine interfaces: modeling and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Héliot, Rodolphe; Ganguly, Karunesh; Jimenez, Jessica; Carmena, Jose M

    2010-10-01

    Closed-loop operation of a brain-machine interface (BMI) relies on the subject's ability to learn an inverse transformation of the plant to be controlled. In this paper, we propose a model of the learning process that undergoes closed-loop BMI operation. We first explore the properties of the model and show that it is able to learn an inverse model of the controlled plant. Then, we compare the model predictions to actual experimental neural and behavioral data from nonhuman primates operating a BMI, which demonstrate high accordance of the model with the experimental data. Applying tools from control theory to this learning model will help in the design of a new generation of neural information decoders which will maximize learning speed for BMI users.

  8. Waterjet dissection of the brain: experimental and first clinical results. Technical note.

    PubMed

    Piek, J; Wille, C; Warzok, R; Gaab, M R

    1998-11-01

    Control of bleeding during dissection is a problem that is still not completely resolved in neurosurgical procedures. To overcome this problem in some settings, the authors, in close collaboration with their institution, developed a new device for blunt dissection of brain tumors that is based on a waterjet technique. This report describes their first experimental and clinical experience with this new method. Numerous cutting experiments were performed in porcine cadaver brains. The best results were obtained using pressures from 4 to 6 bars with a 100-microm tip, which produced very small, precise cuts. Histological evaluation showed no disruption or vacuolization of the surrounding tissue. The authors have used the new device in nine patients (seven with gliomas and two undergoing temporal lobe resections for epilepsy), and no complications have been observed. The waterjet device allowed dissection of the brain tissue while even small exposed vessels were spared injury. The instrument was found to be easy to use. Future investigations will concentrate on adapting this new method to endoscopic surgery and evaluating fluids with low surface tension to avoid foaming and bubbling during open surgery.

  9. Simultaneously targeting inflammatory response and parasite sequestration in brain to treat Experimental Cerebral Malaria.

    PubMed

    Dende, Chaitanya; Meena, Jairam; Nagarajan, Perumal; Panda, Amulya K; Rangarajan, Pundi N; Padmanaban, Govindarajan

    2015-07-31

    Malaria afflicts around 200 million people annually, with a mortality number close to 600,000. The mortality rate in Human Cerebral Malaria (HCM) is unacceptably high (15-20%), despite the availability of artemisinin-based therapy. An effective adjunct therapy is urgently needed. Experimental Cerebral Malaria (ECM) in mice manifests many of the neurological features of HCM. Migration of T cells and parasite-infected RBCs (pRBCs) into the brain are both necessary to precipitate the disease. We have been able to simultaneously target both these parameters of ECM. Curcumin alone was able to reverse all the parameters investigated in this study that govern inflammatory responses, CD8(+) T cell and pRBC sequestration into the brain and blood brain barrier (BBB) breakdown. But the animals eventually died of anemia due to parasite build-up in blood. However, arteether-curcumin (AC) combination therapy even after the onset of symptoms provided complete cure. AC treatment is a promising therapeutic option for HCM.

  10. Simultaneously targeting inflammatory response and parasite sequestration in brain to treat Experimental Cerebral Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Dende, Chaitanya; Meena, Jairam; Nagarajan, Perumal; Panda, Amulya K.; Rangarajan, Pundi N.; Padmanaban, Govindarajan

    2015-01-01

    Malaria afflicts around 200 million people annually, with a mortality number close to 600,000. The mortality rate in Human Cerebral Malaria (HCM) is unacceptably high (15–20%), despite the availability of artemisinin-based therapy. An effective adjunct therapy is urgently needed. Experimental Cerebral Malaria (ECM) in mice manifests many of the neurological features of HCM. Migration of T cells and parasite-infected RBCs (pRBCs) into the brain are both necessary to precipitate the disease. We have been able to simultaneously target both these parameters of ECM. Curcumin alone was able to reverse all the parameters investigated in this study that govern inflammatory responses, CD8+ T cell and pRBC sequestration into the brain and blood brain barrier (BBB) breakdown. But the animals eventually died of anemia due to parasite build-up in blood. However, arteether-curcumin (AC) combination therapy even after the onset of symptoms provided complete cure. AC treatment is a promising therapeutic option for HCM. PMID:26227888

  11. Voluntary Exercise Preconditioning Activates Multiple Antiapoptotic Mechanisms and Improves Neurological Recovery after Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zaorui; Sabirzhanov, Boris; Wu, Junfang; Faden, Alan I.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Physical activity can attenuate neuronal loss, reduce neuroinflammation, and facilitate recovery after brain injury. However, little is known about the mechanisms of exercise-induced neuroprotection after traumatic brain injury (TBI) or its modulation of post-traumatic neuronal cell death. Voluntary exercise, using a running wheel, was conducted for 4 weeks immediately preceding (preconditioning) moderate-level controlled cortical impact (CCI), a well-established experimental TBI model in mice. Compared to nonexercised controls, exercise preconditioning (pre-exercise) improved recovery of sensorimotor performance in the beam walk task, as well as cognitive/affective functions in the Morris water maze, novel object recognition, and tail-suspension tests. Further, pre-exercise reduced lesion size, attenuated neuronal loss in the hippocampus, cortex, and thalamus, and decreased microglial activation in the cortex. In addition, exercise preconditioning activated the brain-derived neurotrophic factor pathway before trauma and amplified the injury-dependent increase in heat shock protein 70 expression, thus attenuating key apoptotic pathways. The latter include reduction in CCI-induced up-regulation of proapoptotic B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)-homology 3–only Bcl-2 family molecules (Bid, Puma), decreased mitochondria permeabilization with attenuated release of cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), reduced AIF translocation to the nucleus, and attenuated caspase activation. Given these neuroprotective actions, voluntary physical exercise may serve to limit the consequences of TBI. PMID:25419789

  12. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor is neuroprotective in experimental traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Shultz, Sandy R; Tan, Xin L; Wright, David K; Liu, Shijie J; Semple, Bridgette D; Johnston, Leigh; Jones, Nigel C; Cook, Andrew D; Hamilton, John A; O'Brien, Terence J

    2014-05-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an international health concern with a complex pathogenesis resulting in major long-term neurological, neurocognitive, and neuropsychiatric outcomes. Although neuroinflammation has been identified as an important pathophysiological process resulting from TBI, the function of specific inflammatory mediators in the aftermath of TBI remains poorly understood. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is an inflammatory cytokine that has been reported to have neuroprotective effects in various animal models of neurodegenerative disease that share pathological similarities with TBI. The importance of GM-CSF in TBI has yet to be studied, however. We examined the role of GM-CSF in TBI by comparing the effects of a lateral fluid percussion (LFP) injury or sham injury in GM-CSF gene deficient (GM-CSF(-/-)) versus wild-type (WT) mice. After a 3-month recovery interval, mice were assessed using neuroimaging and behavioral outcomes. All mice given a LFP injury displayed significant brain atrophy and behavioral impairments compared with those given sham-injuries; however, this was significantly worse in the GM-CSF(-/-) mice compared with the WT mice. GM-CSF(-/-) mice given LFP injury also had reduced astrogliosis compared with their WT counterparts. These novel findings indicate that the inflammatory mediator, GM-CSF, may have significant protective properties in the chronic sequelae of experimental TBI and suggest that further research investigating GM-CSF and its potential benefits in the injured brain is warranted.

  13. On high b diffusion imaging in the human brain: ruminations and experimental insights.

    PubMed

    Mulkern, Robert V; Haker, Steven J; Maier, Stephan E

    2009-10-01

    Interest in the manner in which brain tissue signal decays with b factor in diffusion imaging schemes has grown in recent years following the observation that the decay curves depart from purely monoexponential decay behavior. Regardless of the model or fitting function proposed for characterizing sufficiently sampled decay curves (vide infra), the departure from monoexponentiality spells increased tissue characterization potential. The degree to which this potential can be harnessed to improve specificity, sensitivity and spatial localization of diseases in brain, and other tissues, largely remains to be explored. Furthermore, the degree to which currently popular diffusion tensor imaging methods, including visually impressive white matter fiber "tractography" results, have almost completely ignored the nonmonoexponential nature of the basic signal decay with b factor is worthy of communal introspection. Here we limit our attention to a review of the basic experimental features associated with brain water signal diffusion decay curves as measured over extended b-factor ranges, the simple few parameter fitting functions that have been proposed to characterize these decays and the more involved models, e.g.,"ruminations," which have been proposed to account for the nonmonoexponentiality to date.

  14. On high b diffusion imaging in the human brain: ruminations and experimental insights✩

    PubMed Central

    Mulkern, Robert V.; Haker, Steven J.; Maier, Stephan E.

    2010-01-01

    Interest in the manner in which brain tissue signal decays with b factor in diffusion imaging schemes has grown in recent years following the observation that the decay curves depart from purely monoexponential decay behavior. Regardless of the model or fitting function proposed for characterizing sufficiently sampled decay curves (vide infra), the departure from monoexponentiality spells increased tissue characterization potential. The degree to which this potential can be harnessed to improve specificity, sensitivity and spatial localization of diseases in brain, and other tissues, largely remains to be explored. Furthermore, the degree to which currently popular diffusion tensor imaging methods, including visually impressive white matter fiber “tractography” results, have almost completely ignored the nonmonoexponential nature of the basic signal decay with b factor is worthy of communal introspection. Here we limit our attention to a review of the basic experimental features associated with brain water signal diffusion decay curves as measured over extended b-factor ranges, the simple few parameter fitting functions that have been proposed to characterize these decays and the more involved models, e.g.,“ruminations,” which have been proposed to account for the nonmonoexponentiality to date. PMID:19520535

  15. Voluntary Exercise Preconditioning Activates Multiple Antiapoptotic Mechanisms and Improves Neurological Recovery after Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zaorui; Sabirzhanov, Boris; Wu, Junfang; Faden, Alan I; Stoica, Bogdan A

    2015-09-01

    Physical activity can attenuate neuronal loss, reduce neuroinflammation, and facilitate recovery after brain injury. However, little is known about the mechanisms of exercise-induced neuroprotection after traumatic brain injury (TBI) or its modulation of post-traumatic neuronal cell death. Voluntary exercise, using a running wheel, was conducted for 4 weeks immediately preceding (preconditioning) moderate-level controlled cortical impact (CCI), a well-established experimental TBI model in mice. Compared to nonexercised controls, exercise preconditioning (pre-exercise) improved recovery of sensorimotor performance in the beam walk task, as well as cognitive/affective functions in the Morris water maze, novel object recognition, and tail-suspension tests. Further, pre-exercise reduced lesion size, attenuated neuronal loss in the hippocampus, cortex, and thalamus, and decreased microglial activation in the cortex. In addition, exercise preconditioning activated the brain-derived neurotrophic factor pathway before trauma and amplified the injury-dependent increase in heat shock protein 70 expression, thus attenuating key apoptotic pathways. The latter include reduction in CCI-induced up-regulation of proapoptotic B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)-homology 3-only Bcl-2 family molecules (Bid, Puma), decreased mitochondria permeabilization with attenuated release of cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), reduced AIF translocation to the nucleus, and attenuated caspase activation. Given these neuroprotective actions, voluntary physical exercise may serve to limit the consequences of TBI.

  16. Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Is Neuroprotective in Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xin L.; Wright, David K.; Liu, Shijie J.; Semple, Bridgette D.; Johnston, Leigh; Jones, Nigel C.; Cook, Andrew D.; Hamilton, John A.; O'Brien, Terence J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an international health concern with a complex pathogenesis resulting in major long-term neurological, neurocognitive, and neuropsychiatric outcomes. Although neuroinflammation has been identified as an important pathophysiological process resulting from TBI, the function of specific inflammatory mediators in the aftermath of TBI remains poorly understood. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is an inflammatory cytokine that has been reported to have neuroprotective effects in various animal models of neurodegenerative disease that share pathological similarities with TBI. The importance of GM-CSF in TBI has yet to be studied, however. We examined the role of GM-CSF in TBI by comparing the effects of a lateral fluid percussion (LFP) injury or sham injury in GM-CSF gene deficient (GM-CSF-/-) versus wild-type (WT) mice. After a 3-month recovery interval, mice were assessed using neuroimaging and behavioral outcomes. All mice given a LFP injury displayed significant brain atrophy and behavioral impairments compared with those given sham-injuries; however, this was significantly worse in the GM-CSF-/- mice compared with the WT mice. GM-CSF-/- mice given LFP injury also had reduced astrogliosis compared with their WT counterparts. These novel findings indicate that the inflammatory mediator, GM-CSF, may have significant protective properties in the chronic sequelae of experimental TBI and suggest that further research investigating GM-CSF and its potential benefits in the injured brain is warranted. PMID:24392832

  17. Pulmonary edema after resection of a fourth ventricle tumor: possible evidence for a medulla-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Keegan, M T; Lanier, W L

    1999-03-01

    A well-recognized fact is that some patients may have development of pulmonary edema in association with disorders of the central nervous system. The origin of this phenomenon, known as neurogenic pulmonary edema, is unclear but may result, in part, from select pulmonary venoconstriction modulated by autonomic outflow from the medulla oblongata. We describe a 21-year-old man who had development of pulmonary edema in association with surgical resection of a brain tumor that was close to the medulla. Other than the possibility of medullary dysfunction, which could have occurred after surgical manipulation, no other risk factor for pulmonary edema was identified. Of note, the patient's blood pressure remained normal throughout the perioperative period, and no fluid overload or primary cardiac dysfunction was evident. This case supports the theory that the medulla is an important anatomic site of origin for neurogenic pulmonary edema and that alterations in medullary function can induce pulmonary edema in humans, independent of systemic hypertension.

  18. Profound prevention of experimental brain metastases of breast cancer by temozolomide in an MGMT-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, Diane; Duchnowska, Renata; Woditschka, Stephan; Hua, Emily; Qian, Yongzhen; Biernat, Wojciech; Sosińska-Mielcarek, Katarzyna; Gril, Brunilde; Stark, Andreas M; Hewitt, Stephen M; Liewehr, David J; Steinberg, Seth M; Jassem, Jacek; Steeg, Patricia S

    2014-05-15

    Brain metastases of breast cancer cause neurocognitive damage and are incurable. We evaluated a role for temozolomide in the prevention of brain metastases of breast cancer in experimental brain metastasis models. Temozolomide was administered in mice following earlier injection of brain-tropic HER2-positive JIMT-1-BR3 and triple-negative 231-BR-EGFP sublines, the latter with and without expression of O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT). In addition, the percentage of MGMT-positive tumor cells in 62 patient-matched sets of breast cancer primary tumors and resected brain metastases was determined immunohistochemically. Temozolomide, when dosed at 50, 25, 10, or 5 mg/kg, 5 days per week, beginning 3 days after inoculation, completely prevented the formation of experimental brain metastases from MGMT-negative 231-BR-EGFP cells. At a 1 mg/kg dose, temozolomide prevented 68% of large brain metastases, and was ineffective at a dose of 0.5 mg/kg. When the 50 mg/kg dose was administered beginning on days 18 or 24, temozolomide efficacy was reduced or absent. Temozolomide was ineffective at preventing brain metastases in MGMT-transduced 231-BR-EGFP and MGMT-expressing JIMT-1-BR3 sublines. In 62 patient-matched sets of primary breast tumors and resected brain metastases, 43.5% of the specimens had concordant low MGMT expression, whereas in another 14.5% of sets high MGMT staining in the primary tumor corresponded with low staining in the brain metastasis. Temozolomide profoundly prevented the outgrowth of experimental brain metastases of breast cancer in an MGMT-dependent manner. These data provide compelling rationale for investigating the preventive efficacy of temozolomide in a clinical setting. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. High-resolution ultrasound evaluation of experimental brain abscess evolution: comparison with computed tomography and neuropathology

    SciTech Connect

    Enzmann, D.R.; Britt, R.H.; Lyons, B.; Carroll, B.; Wilson, D.A.; Buxton, J.

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) and high-resolution ultrasound (HRUS) imaging of experimental brain abscess were correlated with neuropathologic findings in nine mongrel dogs. The HRUS scan was more sensitive to different histologic features than the CT scan but both accurately delineated the evolution of the experimental brain abscess. All stages of abscess evolution were characterized by an appearance of an echogenic rim with a hypoechoic center. In the early stages the echogenicity of the abscess was related primarily to marked cellular infiltration while in the late stages extensive collagen deposition correlated closely with the echo pattern. The size of the abscess in the cerebritis stages appeared smaller on the HRUS scan than on the CT scan because the latter modality detected the extensive cerebritis around the developing necrotic center whereas the HRUS scan did not. This discrepancy disappeared in the capsule stages. The HRUS scan provided a more accurate depiction of the neuropathologic characteristics of the necrotic center than did the CT scan. Healing of the abscess, indicated by a decrease in size of the hypoechoic center, was accurately detected by the HRUS scan.

  20. Reliable and durable Golgi staining of brain tissue from human autopsies and experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Rosoklija, Gorazd B; Petrushevski, Vladimir M; Stankov, Aleksandar; Dika, Ani; Jakovski, Zlatko; Pavlovski, Goran; Davcheva, Natasha; Lipkin, Richard; Schnieder, Tatiana; Scobie, Kimberley; Duma, Aleksej; Dwork, Andrew J

    2014-06-15

    Golgi stains are notoriously capricious, particularly when applied to human brain. The well-known difficulties, which include complete failure of impregnation, patchy staining, unstable staining, and extensive crystalline deposits in superficial sections, have discouraged many from attempting to use these techniques. A reliable method that produces uniform impregnation in tissue from human autopsies and experimental animals is needed. The method described, "NeoGolgi", modifies previous Golgi-Cox protocols (Glaser and Van der Loos, 1981). Changes include: much longer time (>10 weeks) in Golgi solution, agitation on a slowly rocking platform, more gradual infiltration with Parlodion, more thorough removal of excess staining solution during embedding, and shorter exposure to ammonia after infiltration. The procedure has successfully stained over 220 consecutive frontal or hippocampal blocks from more than 175 consecutive human autopsy cases. Dendritic spines are easily recognized, and background is clear, allowing examination of very thick (200 μm) sections. Stained neurons are evenly distributed within cortical regions. The stain is stable for at least eight years. Most importantly, all stained neurons are apparently well-impregnated, eliminating ambiguity between pathology and poor impregnation that is inherent to other methods. Most methods of Golgi staining are poorly predictable. They often fail completely, staining is patchy, and abnormal morphology is often indistinguishable from poor impregnation. "NeoGolgi" overcomes these problems. Starting with unfixed tissue, it is possible to obtain Golgi staining of predictably high quality in brains from human autopsies and experimental animals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Experimental study of blast-induced traumatic brain injury using a physical head model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiangyue; Pintar, Frank A; Yoganandan, Narayan; Gennarelli, Thomas A; Son, Steven F

    2009-11-01

    This study was conducted to quantify intracranial biomechanical responses and external blast overpressures using physical head model to understand the biomechanics of blast traumatic brain injury and to provide experimental data for computer simulation of blast-induced brain trauma. Ellipsoidal-shaped physical head models, made from 3-mm polycarbonate shell filled with Sylgard 527 silicon gel, were used. Six blast tests were conducted in frontal, side, and 45 degrees oblique orientations. External blast overpressures and internal pressures were quantified with ballistic pressure sensors. Blast overpressures, ranging from 129.5 kPa to 769.3 kPa, were generated using a rigid cannon and 1.3 to 3.0 grams of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) plastic sheet explosive (explosive yield of 13.24 kJ and TNT equivalent mass of 2.87 grams for 3 grams of material). The PETN plastic sheet explosive consisted of 63% PETN powder, 29% plasticizer, and 8% nitrocellulose with a density of 1.48 g/cm3 and detonation velocity of 6.8 km/s. Propagation and reflection of the shockwave was captured using a shadowgraph technique. Shockwave speeds ranging from 423.3 m/s to 680.3 m/s were recorded. The model demonstrated a two-stage response: a pressure dominant (overpressure) stage followed by kinematic dominant (blast wind) stage. Positive pressures in the brain simulant ranged from 75.1 kPa to 1095 kPa, and negative pressures ranged from -43.6 kPa to -646.0 kPa. High- and normal-speed videos did not reveal observable deformations in the brain simulant from the neutral density markers embedded in the midsagittal plane of the head model. Amplitudes of the internal positive and negative pressures were found to linearly correlate with external overpressure. Results from the current study suggested a pressure-dominant brain injury mechanism instead of strain injury mechanism under the blast severity of the current study. These quantitative results also served as the validation and calibration

  2. Clinical correlates in an experimental model of repetitive mild brain injury.

    PubMed

    Mannix, Rebekah; Meehan, William P; Mandeville, Joseph; Grant, Patricia E; Gray, Tory; Berglass, Jacqueline; Zhang, Jimmy; Bryant, John; Rezaie, Shervin; Chung, Joon Yong; Peters, Nicholas V; Lee, Christopher; Tien, Lee W; Kaplan, David L; Feany, Mel; Whalen, Michael

    2013-07-01

    Although there is growing awareness of the long-term cognitive effects of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (rmTBI; eg, sports concussions), whether repeated concussions cause long-term cognitive deficits remains controversial. Moreover, whether cognitive deficits depend on increased amyloid β deposition and tau phosphorylation or are worsened by the apolipoprotein E4 allele remains unknown. Here, we use an experimental model of rmTBI to address these clinical controversies. A weight drop rmTBI model was used that results in cognitive deficits without loss of consciousness, seizures, or gross or microscopic evidence of brain damage. Cognitive function was assessed using a Morris water maze (MWM) paradigm. Immunostaining and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were used to assess amyloid β deposition and tau hyperphosphorylation. Brain volume and white matter integrity were assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Mice subjected to rmTBI daily or weekly but not biweekly or monthly had persistent cognitive deficits as long as 1 year after injuries. Long-term cognitive deficits were associated with increased astrocytosis but not tau phosphorylation or amyloid β (by ELISA); plaques or tangles (by immunohistochemistry); or brain volume loss or changes in white matter integrity (by MRI). APOE4 was not associated with worse MWM performance after rmTBI. Within the vulnerable time period between injuries, rmTBI produces long-term cognitive deficits independent of increased amyloid β or tau phosphorylation. In this model, cognitive outcome is not influenced by APOE4 status. The data have implications for the long-term mental health of athletes who suffer multiple concussions. Copyright © 2013 American Neurological Association.

  3. Prevention or Modification of Epileptogenesis after Brain Insults: Experimental Approaches and Translational Research

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Diverse brain insults, including traumatic brain injury, stroke, infections, tumors, neurodegenerative diseases, and prolonged acute symptomatic seizures, such as complex febrile seizures or status epilepticus (SE), can induce “epileptogenesis,” a process by which normal brain tissue is transformed into tissue capable of generating spontaneous recurrent seizures. Furthermore, epileptogenesis operates in cryptogenic causes of epilepsy. In view of the accumulating information about cellular and molecular mechanisms of epileptogenesis, it should be possible to intervene in this process before the onset of seizures and thereby either prevent the development of epilepsy in patients at risk or increase the potential for better long-term outcome, which constitutes a major clinical need. For identifying pharmacological interventions that prevent, interrupt or reverse the epileptogenic process in people at risk, two groups of animal models, kindling and SE-induced recurrent seizures, have been recommended as potentially useful tools. Furthermore, genetic rodent models of epileptogenesis are increasingly used in assessing antiepileptogenic treatments. Two approaches have been used in these different model categories: screening of clinically established antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) for antiepileptogenic or disease-modifying potential, and targeting the key causal mechanisms that underlie epileptogenesis. The first approach indicated that among various AEDs, topiramate, levetiracetam, carisbamate, and valproate may be the most promising. On the basis of these experimental findings, two ongoing clinical trials will address the antiepileptogenic potential of topiramate and levetiracetam in patients with traumatic brain injury, hopefully translating laboratory discoveries into successful therapies. The second approach has highlighted neurodegeneration, inflammation and up-regulation of immune responses, and neuronal hyperexcitability as potential targets for antiepileptogenesis

  4. Neuroprotective effects of erythropoietin against oxidant injury following brain irradiation: an experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Cebi, Aysegul; Mert, Handan; Mert, Nihat; Serin, Meltem; Erkal, Haldun Sukru

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Radiation therapy (RT) is a major treatment modality, and the central nervous system is a dose-limiting organ in clinical RT. This experimental study aims to present the evaluation of the neuroprotective effects of erythropoietin (EPO) against oxidant injury following brain irradiation in rats. Material and methods Forty Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups (n = 10 each). In group 1 the rats received no EPO and underwent sham RT. The rats in groups 2 and 3 received EPO. In group 2 rats underwent sham RT, while in group 3 rats received RT. The rats in group 4 received no EPO and underwent RT. Rats were irradiated using a Cobalt-60 teletherapy machine using a single fraction of 20 Gy covering the whole brain. Cervical dislocation euthanasia was performed. The nitrite and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSHPX) activities were evaluated in dissected brain tissues. Results The nitrite and MDA levels were higher in the RT group (2.10 ±0.62 ppm, 26.02 ±2.16 nmol/ml; p < 0.05) and lower in the EPO + RT group (1.45 ±0.12 ppm, 25.49 ±1.90 nmol/ml; p < 0.05). The SOD and GSHPX activity was higher in the EPO + RT group (2.62 ±0.49 U/mg, 1.75 ±0.25 U/mg, p < 0.05). Conclusions This study supports the probable neuroprotective effects of EPO against oxidant injury following brain irradiation in a rat model, presumably through decreasing free radical production and increasing expression of antioxidant enzymes. PMID:27904528

  5. Dual-porosity poroviscoelasticity and quantitative hydromechanical characterization of the brain tissue with experimental hydrocephalus data.

    PubMed

    Mehrabian, Amin; Abousleiman, Younane N; Mapstone, Timothy B; El-Amm, Christian A

    2015-11-07

    Hydromechanical brain models often involve constitutive relations which must account for soft tissue deformation and creep, together with the interstitial fluid movement and exchange through capillaries. The interaction of rather unknown mechanisms which produce, absorb, and circulate the cerebrospinal fluid within the central nervous system can further add to their complexity. Once proper models for these phenomena or processes are selected, estimation of the associated parameters could be even more challenging. This paper presents the results of a consistent, coupled poroviscoelastic modeling and characterization of the brain tissue as a dual-porosity system. The model draws from Biot's theory of poroviscoelasticity, and adopts the generalized Kelvin's rheological description of the viscoelastic tissue behavior. While the interstitial space serves as the primary porosity through which the bulk flow of the interstitial fluid occurs, a secondary porosity network comprising the capillaries and venous system allows for its partial absorption into the blood. The correspondence principle is used in deriving a time-dependent analytical solution to the proposed model. It allows for identical poroelastic formulation of the original poroviscoelastic problem in the Laplace transform space. Hydrocephalus generally refers to a class of medical conditions which share the ventricles enlargement as a common feature. A set of published data from induced hydrocephalus and follow-up perfusion of cats' brains is used for quantitative characterization of the proposed model. A selected portion of these data including the ventricular volume and rate of fluid absorption from the perfused brain, together with the forward model solution, is utilized via an inverse problem technique to find proper estimations of the model parameters. Results show significant improvement in model predictions of the experimental data. The convoluted and coupled solution results are presented through the time

  6. Environmental Enrichment as a Viable Neurorehabilitation Strategy for Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bondi, Corina O.; Klitsch, Kyle C.; Leary, Jacob B.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Environmental enrichment (EE) emerged as a robust independent variable capable of influencing behavioral outcome in experimental studies after the fortuitous observation by renowned neuropsychologist Donald O. Hebb that rats raised as pets in his home performed markedly better on problem-solving tasks than those kept in the laboratory. In the subsequent years, numerous studies ensued demonstrating that EE was also capable of inducing neuroplasticity in normal (i.e., noninjured) rats. These behavioral and neural alterations provided the impetus for investigating EE as a potential therapy for traumatic brain injury (TBI), which, over the past two decades, has resulted in several reports. Hence, the aim of this review is to integrate the findings and present the current state of EE as a viable neurorehabilitation strategy for TBI. Using the specific key term searches “traumatic brain injury” and “environmental enrichment” or “enriched environment,” 30 and 30 experimental TBI articles were identified by PubMed and Scopus, respectively. Of these, 27 articles were common to both search engines. An additional article was found on PubMed using the key terms “enriched environment” and “fluid percussion.” A review of the bibliographies in the 34 articles did not yield additional citations. The overwhelming consensus of the 34 publications is that EE benefits behavioral and histological outcome after brain injury produced by various models. Further, the enhancements are observed in male and female as well as adult and pediatric rats and mice. Taken together, these cumulative findings provide strong support for EE as a generalized and robust preclinical model of neurorehabilitation. However, to further enhance the model and to more accurately mimic the clinic, future studies should continue to evaluate EE during more rehabilitation-relevant conditions, such as delayed and shorter time periods, as well as in combination with other therapeutic

  7. Edema

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mental Health Sex and Birth Control Sex and Sexuality Birth Control Family HealthInfants and Toddlers Kids and ... Mental Health Sex and Birth Control Sex and Sexuality Birth Control Family HealthInfants and Toddlers Kids and ...

  8. Gender and environmental effects on regional brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression after experimental traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Li, Y; Kline, A E; Dixon, C E; Zafonte, R D; Wagner, A K

    2005-01-01

    Alterations in brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression have been reported in multiple brain regions acutely after traumatic brain injury, however neither injury nor post-injury environmental enrichment has been shown to affect hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene expression in male rats chronically post-injury. Studies have demonstrated hormone-related neuroprotection for female rats after traumatic brain injury, and estrogen and exercise both influence