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Sample records for experimental colon inflammation

  1. Colonic eosinophilic inflammation in experimental colitis is mediated by Ly6Chigh CCR2+ inflammatory monocyte/macrophage-derived CCL11

    PubMed Central

    Waddell, Amanda; Ahrens, Richard; Steinbrecher, Kris; Donovan, Burke; Rothenberg, Marc E.; Munitz, Ariel; Hogan, Simon P.

    2011-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies of pediatric IBD have implicated the 17q12 loci, which contains the eosinophil specific chemokine gene CCL11, with early-onset IBD susceptibility. In the present study, we employed a murine model of experimental colitis to define the molecular pathways that regulate CCL11 expression in the chronic intestinal inflammation and pathophysiology of experimental colitis. Bone marrow chimera experiments showed that hematopoietic cell-derived CCL11 is sufficient for CCL11-mediated colonic eosinophilic inflammation. We show that DSS treatment promotes the recruitment of F4/80+CD11b+CCR2+Ly6Chigh inflammatory monocytes into the colon. F4/80+CD11b+CCR2+Ly6Chigh monocytes express CCL11, and their recruitment positively correlated with colonic eosinophilic inflammation. Phenotypic analysis of purified Ly6Chigh intestinal inflammatory MΦs revealed that these cells express both M1- and M2-associated genes, including Il6, Ccl4 and Cxcl2, and Arg1, Chi3l3, Ccl11 and IL-10, respectively. Attenuation of DSS-induced F4/80+CD11b+CCR2+Ly6Chigh monocyte recruitment to the colon in CCR2−/− mice was associated with decreased colonic CCL11 expression, eosinophilic inflammation and DSS-induced histopathology. These studies identify a mechanism for DSS-induced colonic eosinophilia mediated by Ly6ChighCCR2+ inflammatory monocyte/MΦ-derived CCL11. PMID:21498668

  2. CYTOKINES, INFLAMMATION AND COLON CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Klampfer, Lidija

    2012-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel diseases, such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, are at increased risk of developing colon cancer, confirming that chronic inflammation predisposes to development of tumors. Moreover, it appears that colon cancers that do not develop as a complication of inflammatory bowel disease are also driven by inflammation, because it has been shown that regular use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) lowers the mortality from sporadic colon cancer and results in regression of adenomas in familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) patients, who inherit a mutation in the Apc gene. Colorectal cancer therefore represents a paradigm for the link between inflammation and cancer. Inflammation is driven by soluble factors, cytokines and chemokines, which can be produced by tumor cells themselves or, more often, by the cells recruited to the tumor microenvironment. Inflammatory cytokines and chemokines promote growth of tumor cells, perturb their differentiation, and support the survival of cancer cells. Tumor cells become addicted to inflammatory stroma, suggesting that the tumor microenvironment represents an attractive target for preventive and therapeutic strategies. Proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNFα, IL-6 and IL-1β, or transcription factors that are required for signaling by these cytokines, including NF-κB and STATs, are indeed emerging as potential targets for anticancer therapy. TNFα antagonists are in phase I/II clinical trials and have been shown to be well tolerated in patients with solid tumors, and IL-1β antagonists that ameliorate several inflammatory disorders characterized by excessive IL-1β production, will likely follow. Therefore, development of drugs that normalize the tumor microenvironment or interrupt the crosstalk between the tumor and the tumor microenvironment is an important approach to the management of cancer. PMID:21247378

  3. EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES ON INFLAMMATION

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Elizabeth Pauline

    1921-01-01

    acute inflammation, such as cantharidin, histamine, or turpentine, are found to be positively chemotactic by this method, but substances, such as mustard gas, which produce a marked necrotizing effect are found to be negatively chemotactic, or neutral, though physiologically they would appear to be positively chemotactic. 9. All amino-acids and amines are positively chemotactic to a certain extent. It seems that the longer the carbon chain, the greater the degree of chemotaxis, though this is not absolute. Tyramine is one exception to this, for it causes a peculiar clumping of the cells, so that it is impossible to count the number adhering, and thus determine whether or not tyramine is positively chemotactic. 10. The time that the blood of animals is examined after eating makes a marked difference in the number of cells adhering, for shortly after eating, within 30 minutes, very many more cells will adhere to the agar than at a later time. 11. The blood of different species of animals reacts differently towards different reagents. The chemical composition of these agents seems to have nothing to do with this difference in reaction as far as we could determine. 12. With frozen serial sections it has been found that the depth of penetration of the leucocytes into the agar is proportional to the positive chemotaxis produced by the substance combined with the agar, as demonstrated by the number of leucocytes adherent to the walls of the test chambers. PMID:19868564

  4. The influence of experimental inflammation and axotomy on leucine enkephalin (leuENK) distribution in intramural nervous structures of the porcine descending colon.

    PubMed

    Gonkowski, Slawomir; Makowska, Krystyna; Calka, Jaroslaw

    2018-05-24

    The enteric nervous system (ENS), located in the intestinal wall and characterized by considerable independence from the central nervous system, consists of millions of cells. Enteric neurons control the majority of functions of the gastrointestinal tract using a wide range of substances, which are neuromediators and/or neuromodulators. One of them is leucine-enkephalin (leuENK), which belongs to the endogenous opioid family. It is known that opioids in the gastrointestinal tract have various functions, including visceral pain conduction, intestinal motility and secretion and immune processes, but many aspects of distribution and function of leuENK in the ENS, especially during pathological states, remain unknown. During this experiment, the distribution of leuENK - like immunoreactive (leuENK-LI) nervous structures using the immunofluorescence technique were studied in the porcine colon in physiological conditions, during chemically-induced inflammation and after axotomy. The study included the circular muscle layer, myenteric (MP), outer submucous (OSP) and inner submucous plexus (ISP) and the mucosal layer. In control animals, the number of leuENK-LI neurons amounted to 4.86 ± 0.17%, 2.86 ± 0.28% and 1.07 ± 0.08% in the MP, OSP and ISP, respectively. Generally, both pathological stimuli caused an increase in the number of detected leuENK-LI cells, but the intensity of the observed changes depended on the factor studied and part of the ENS. The percentage of leuENK-LI perikarya amounted to 11.48 ± 0.96%, 8.71 ± 0.13% and 9.40 ± 0.76% during colitis, and 6.90 ± 0.52% 8.46 ± 12% and 4.48 ± 0.44% after axotomy in MP, OSP and ISP, respectively. Both processes also resulted in an increase in the number of leuENK-LI nerves in the circular muscle layer, whereas changes were less visible in the mucosa during inflammation and axotomy did not change the number of leuENK-LI mucosal fibers. LeuENK in the ENS takes part in

  5. Colonic macrophage polarization in homeostasis, inflammation, and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Appleyard, Caroline B.

    2016-01-01

    Our review focuses on the colonic macrophage, a monocyte-derived, tissue-resident macrophage, and the role it plays in health and disease, specifically in inflammatory conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease and cancer of the colon and rectum. We give special emphasis to macrophage polarization, or phenotype, in these different states. We focus on macrophages because they are one of the most numerous leukocytes in the colon, and because they normally contribute to homeostasis through an anti-inflammatory phenotype. However, in conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, proinflammatory macrophages are increased in the colon and have been linked to disease severity and progression. In colorectal cancer, tumor cells may employ anti-inflammatory macrophages to promote tumor growth and dissemination, whereas proinflammatory macrophages may antagonize tumor growth. Given the key roles that this cell type plays in homeostasis, inflammation, and cancer, the colonic macrophage is an intriguing therapeutic target. As such, potential macrophage-targeting strategies are discussed. PMID:27229123

  6. Exercise reduces inflammation and cell proliferation in rat colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Demarzo, Marcelo Marcos Piva; Martins, Lisandra Vanessa; Fernandes, Cleverson Rodrigues; Herrero, Fábio Augusto; Perez, Sérgio Eduardo de Andrade; Turatti, Aline; Garcia, Sérgio Britto

    2008-04-01

    There is evidence that the risk of colon cancer is reduced by appropriate levels of physical exercise. Nevertheless, the mechanisms involved in this protective effect of exercise remain largely unknown. Inflammation is emerging as a unifying link between a range of environment exposures and neoplastic risk. The carcinogen dimethyl-hydrazine (DMH) induces an increase in epithelial cell proliferation and in the expression of the inflammation-related enzyme cyclooxigenase-2 (COX-2) in the colon of rats. Our aim was to verify whether these events could be attenuated by exercise. Four groups of eight Wistar rats were used in the experiment. The groups G1 and G3 were sedentary (controls), and the groups G2 and G4 were submitted to 8 wk of swimming training, 5 d.wk. The groups G3 and G4 were given subcutaneous injections of DMH immediately after the exercise protocols. Fifteen days after the neoplasic induction, the rats were sacrificed and the colon was processed for histological examination and immunohistochemistry staining of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and COX-2. We found a significant increase in the PCNA-labeling index in both DMH-treated groups of rats. However, this increase was significantly attenuated in the training group G4 (P < 0.01). Similar results were observed in relation to the COX-2 expression. From our findings, we conclude that exercise training exerts remarkable antiproliferative and antiinflammatory effects in the rat colonic mucosa, suggesting that this may be an important mechanism to explain how exercise protects against colonic cancer.

  7. Relationship between methylation and colonic inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Lobatón, Triana; Azuara, Daniel; Rodríguez-Moranta, Francisco; Loayza, Carolina; Sanjuan, Xavier; de Oca, Javier; Fernández-Robles, Ana; Guardiola, Jordi; Capellá, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between the methylation status in the SLIT2 and TGFB2 promoters and colonic inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease patients. METHODS: We evaluated the methylation status of 2 genes (SLIT2 and TGFB2) in 226 biopsies taken from 62 colonoscopies of 38 patients (29 ulcerative colitis and 9 Crohn’s colitis) using methylation-specific melting curve analysis. The relationships between methylation status and clinical, biological, endoscopic and histological activities were evaluated. Twenty-three of the 38 patients had a second colonoscopy and were included in a longitudinal analysis. Numerical results were given as the means ± SD of the sample and range, except when specified. Student t analysis, U Mann Whitney and ANOVA factor were used to compare the means. Qualitative results were based on the χ2 test. RESULTS: SLIT2 methylation was more frequent in samples with endoscopic activity than with endoscopic remission (55% vs 18%, P < 0.001). SLIT2 methylation was also higher in samples with acute inflammation (56.5%) than in samples with chronic (24%) or absent inflammation (15%) (P < 0.001). For TGFB2 methylation, the correlation was only significant with endoscopic activity. Methylation was higher in the distal colon for both genes (P < 0.001 for SLIT2 and P = 0.022 for TGFB2). In the multivariate analysis, only inflammation status (and not disease duration or extension) was independently associated with SLIT2 methylation [OR = 6.6 (95%CI: 1.65-27.36), P = 0.009]. In the longitudinal analysis, the maintenance of endoscopic remission was protective for methylation. CONCLUSION: Endoscopic and histological inflammation are predictive for SLIT2 methylation. PMID:25132780

  8. Relationship between airway colonization, inflammation and exacerbation frequency in COPD.

    PubMed

    Tumkaya, Munir; Atis, Sibel; Ozge, Cengiz; Delialioglu, Nuran; Polat, Gurbuz; Kanik, Arzu

    2007-04-01

    To evaluate bacterial colonization and the airway inflammatory response, and its relationship to the frequency of exacerbation in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Quantitative bacteriologic cultures, neutrophil elastase, myeloperoxidase (MPO), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin (IL)-8 were measured in bronchoalveoler lavage (BAL) in 39 patients with stable COPD [19 with frequent exacerbation (> or = 3/year), and 20 with infrequent] and in 18 healthy controls (10 smokers and 8 non-smokers). BAL revealed the microorganisms with potential pathogenicity above the established threshold (> or = 10(3)cfu/ml) in 68.4% of patients with frequent exacerbation, 55% of infrequent exacerbation, 40% of smokers and 12.5% of non-smokers controls (P=0.05). BAL MPO, IL-8 and TNF-alpha levels were found to be significantly higher in COPD as compared to controls (P=0.001). However, only IL-8 level was significantly higher in COPD patients with frequent exacerbation as compared to infrequent (P=0.001). Airway bacterial load correlated with levels of airway inflammation markers in COPD (P<0.05). The bacterial load and airway inflammation contributes to each other in stable COPD. However, there is a link only between interleukine (IL)-8 and frequent exacerbations. Clearly, the relationship between bacterial colonization, airway inflammation and frequent exacerbations is of major importance in understanding of the COPD pathogenesis.

  9. Dysbiosis and Staphylococcus aureus colonization drives inflammation in atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Glatz, Martin; Horiuchi, Keisuke; Kawasaki, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Kaplan, Daniel H.; Kong, Heidi H.; Amagai, Masayuki; Nagao, Keisuke

    2015-01-01

    Summary Staphylococcus aureus skin colonization is universal in atopic dermatitis and common in cancer patients treated with epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors. However, the causal relationship of dysbiosis and eczema has yet to be clarified. Herein, we demonstrate that Adam17fl/flSox9-Cre mice, generated to model ADAM17-deficiency in human, developed eczematous dermatitis with naturally occurring dysbiosis, similar to that observed in atopic dermatitis. Corynebacterium mastitidis, S. aureus, and Corynebacterium bovis sequentially emerged during the onset of eczematous dermatitis, and antibiotic specific for these bacterial species almost completely reversed dysbiosis and eliminated skin inflammation. Whereas S. aureus prominently drove eczema formation, C. bovis induced robust T helper 2 cell responses. Langerhans cells were required for eliciting immune responses against S. aureus inoculation. These results characterize differential contributions of dysbiotic flora during eczema formation, and highlight the microbiota-host immunity axis as a possible target for future therapeutics in eczematous dermatitis. PMID:25902485

  10. Dietary supplementation with fresh pineapple juice decreases inflammation and colonic neoplasia in IL-10-deficient mice with colitis.

    PubMed

    Hale, Laura P; Chichlowski, Maciej; Trinh, Chau T; Greer, Paula K

    2010-12-01

    Bromelain, a mixture of proteolytic enzymes typically derived from pineapple stem, decreases production of proinflammatory cytokines and leukocyte homing to sites of inflammation. We previously showed that short-term oral treatment with bromelain purified from pineapple stem decreased the severity of colonic inflammation in C57BL/6 Il10(-/-) mice with chronic colitis. Since fresh pineapple fruit contains similar bromelain enzymes but at different proportions, this study aimed to determine whether long-term dietary supplementation with pineapple (supplied as juice) could decrease colon inflammation and neoplasia in Il10(-/-) mice with chronic colitis as compared with bromelain derived from stem. Colitis was triggered in Il10(-/-) mice by exposure to the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug piroxicam. Mice with colitis were supplemented with fresh vs. boiled pineapple juice or bromelain purified from stem for up to 6 months. Experimental mice readily consumed fresh pineapple juice at a level that generated mean stool proteolytic activities equivalent to 14 mg bromelain purified from stem, while control mice received boiled juice with inactive enzymes. Survival was increased in the group supplemented with fresh rather than boiled juice (P = 0.01). Mice that received fresh juice also had decreased histologic colon inflammation scores and a lower incidence of inflammation-associated colonic neoplasia (35% versus 66%; P < 0.02), with fewer neoplastic lesions/colon (P = 0.05). Flow cytometric analysis of murine splenocytes exposed to fresh pineapple juice in vitro demonstrated proteolytic removal of cell surface molecules that can affect leukocyte trafficking and activation. These results demonstrate that long-term dietary supplementation with fresh or unpasteurized frozen pineapple juice with proteolytically active bromelain enzymes is safe and decreases inflammation severity and the incidence and multiplicity of inflammation-associated colonic neoplasia in this commonly

  11. Dietary Supplementation with Fresh Pineapple Juice Decreases Inflammation and Colonic Neoplasia in IL-10-deficient Mice with Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Laura P.; Chichlowski, Maciej; Trinh, Chau T.; Greer, Paula K.

    2010-01-01

    Background Bromelain, a mixture of proteolytic enzymes typically derived from pineapple stem, decreases production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and leukocyte homing to sites of inflammation. We previously showed that short-term oral treatment with bromelain purified from pineapple stem decreased the severity of colonic inflammation in C57BL/6 Il10−/− mice with chronic colitis. Since fresh pineapple fruit contains similar bromelain enzymes but at different proportions, this study aimed to determine whether long-term dietary supplementation with pineapple (supplied as juice) could decrease colon inflammation and neoplasia in Il10−/− mice with chronic colitis as compared with bromelain derived from stem. Results Experimental mice readily consumed fresh pineapple juice at a level that generated mean stool proteolytic activities equivalent to 16 mg bromelain purified from stem, while control mice received boiled juice with inactive enzymes. Survival was increased in the group supplemented with fresh rather than boiled juice (p = 0.01). Mice that received fresh juice also had decreased histologic colon inflammation scores and a lower incidence of inflammation-associated colonic neoplasia (35% vs. 66%; p< 0.02), with fewer neoplastic lesions/colon (p = 0.05). Flow cytometric analysis of murine splenocytes exposed to fresh pineapple juice in vitro demonstrated proteolytic removal of cell surface molecules that can affect leukocyte trafficking and activation. Conclusions These results demonstrate that long-term dietary supplementation with fresh or unpasteurized frozen pineapple juice with proteolytically active bromelain enzymes is safe and decreases inflammation severity and the incidence and multiplicity of inflammation-associated colonic neoplasia in this commonly used murine model of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:20848493

  12. Dysbiosis and Staphylococcus aureus Colonization Drives Inflammation in Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Glatz, Martin; Horiuchi, Keisuke; Kawasaki, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Kaplan, Daniel H; Kong, Heidi H; Amagai, Masayuki; Nagao, Keisuke

    2015-04-21

    Staphylococcus aureus skin colonization is universal in atopic dermatitis and common in cancer patients treated with epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors. However, the causal relationship of dysbiosis and eczema has yet to be clarified. Herein, we demonstrate that Adam17(fl/fl)Sox9-(Cre) mice, generated to model ADAM17-deficiency in human, developed eczematous dermatitis with naturally occurring dysbiosis, similar to that observed in atopic dermatitis. Corynebacterium mastitidis, S. aureus, and Corynebacterium bovis sequentially emerged during the onset of eczematous dermatitis, and antibiotics specific for these bacterial species almost completely reversed dysbiosis and eliminated skin inflammation. Whereas S. aureus prominently drove eczema formation, C. bovis induced robust T helper 2 cell responses. Langerhans cells were required for eliciting immune responses against S. aureus inoculation. These results characterize differential contributions of dysbiotic flora during eczema formation, and highlight the microbiota-host immunity axis as a possible target for future therapeutics in eczematous dermatitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Angiopoietin-like 4 Mediates Colonic Inflammation by Regulating Chemokine Transcript Stability via Tristetraprolin

    PubMed Central

    Phua, Terri; Sng, Ming Keat; Tan, Eddie Han Pin; Chee, Dickson Shao Liang; Li, Yinliang; Wee, Jonathan Wei Kiat; Teo, Ziqiang; Chan, Jeremy Soon Kiat; Lim, Maegan Miang Kee; Tan, Chek Kun; Zhu, Pengcheng; Arulampalam, Velmurugesan; Tan, Nguan Soon

    2017-01-01

    Many gastrointestinal diseases exhibit a protracted and aggravated inflammatory response that can lead to hypercytokinaemia, culminating in extensive tissue damage. Recently, angiopoietin-like 4 (ANGPTL4) has been implicated in many inflammation-associated diseases. However, how ANGPTL4 regulates colonic inflammation remains unclear. Herein, we show that ANGPTL4 deficiency in mice (ANGPTL4−/−) exacerbated colonic inflammation induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) or stearic acid. Microbiota was similar between the two genotypes prior DSS challenge. A microarray gene expression profile of the colon from DSS-treated ANGPTL4−/− mice was enriched for genes involved in leukocyte migration and infiltration, and showed a close association to inflamed ulcerative colitis (UC), whereas the profile from ANGPTL4+/+ littermates resembled that of non-inflamed UC biopsies. Bone marrow transplantation demonstrates the intrinsic role of colonic ANGPTL4 in regulating leukocyte infiltration during DSS-induced inflammation. Using immortalized human colon epithelial cells, we revealed that the ANGPTL4-mediated upregulation of tristetraprolin expression operates through CREB and NF-κB transcription factors, which in turn, regulates the stability of chemokines. Together, our findings suggest that ANGPTL4 protects against acute colonic inflammation and that its absence exacerbates the severity of inflammation. Our findings emphasize the importance of ANGPTL4 as a novel target for therapy in regulating and attenuating inflammation. PMID:28287161

  14. Resistin-like molecule β regulates innate colonic function: Barrier integrity and inflammation susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Simon P.; Seidu, Luqman; Blanchard, Carine; Groschwitz, Katherine; Mishra, Anil; Karow, Margaret L.; Ahrens, Richard; Artis, David; Murphy, Andrew J.; Valenzuela, David M.; Yancopoulos, George D.; Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Resistin-like molecule (RELM) β is a cysteine-rich cytokine expressed in the gastrointestinal tract and implicated in insulin resistance and gastrointestinal nematode immunity; however, its function primarily remains an enigma. Objective: We sought to elucidate the function of RELM-β in the gastrointestinal tract. Methods: We generated RELM-β gene-targeted mice and examined colonic epithelial barrier function, gene expression profiles, and susceptibility to acute colonic inflammation. Results: We show that RELM-β is constitutively expressed in the colon by goblet cells and enterocytes and has a role in homeostasis, as assessed by alterations in colon mRNA transcripts and epithelial barrier function in the absence of RELM-β. Using acute colonic inflammatory models, we demonstrate that RELM-β has a central role in the regulation of susceptibility to colonic inflammation. Mechanistic studies identify that RELM-β regulates expression of type III regenerating gene (REG) (REG3β and γ), molecules known to influence nuclear factor κB signaling. Conclusions: These data define a critical role for RELM-β in the maintenance of colonic barrier function and gastrointestinal innate immunity. Clinical implications: These findings identify RELM-β as an important molecule in homeostatic gastrointestinal function and colonic inflammation, and as such, these results have implications for a variety of human inflammatory gastrointestinal conditions, including allergic gastroenteropathies. PMID:16815164

  15. Experimental evaluation of clinical colon anastomotic leakage.

    PubMed

    Pommergaard, Hans-Christian

    2014-03-01

    Colorectal anastomotic leakage remains a frequent and serious complication in gastrointestinal surgery. Patient and procedure related risk factors for anastomotic leakage have been identified. However, the responsible pathophysiological mechanisms are still unknown. Among these, ischemia and insufficient surgical technique have been suggested to play a central role. Animal models are valuable means to evaluate pathophysiological mechanisms and may be used to test preventive measures aiming at reducing the risk of anastomotic leakage, such as external anastomotic coating. The aim of this thesis was to: Clarify the best suited animal to model clinical anastomotic leakage in humans; Create animal models mimicking anastomotic leakage in humans induced by insufficient surgical technique and tissue ischemia; Determine the best suited coating materials to prevent anastomotic leakage. This study is a systematic review using the databases MEDLINE and Rex. MEDLINE was searched up to October 2010 to identify studies on experimental animal models of clinical colon anastomotic leakage. From the Rex database, textbooks on surgical aspects as well as gastrointestinal physiology and anatomy of experimental animals were identified. The results indicated that the mouse and the pig are the best suited animals to evaluate clinical anastomotic leakage. However, the pig model is less validated and more costly to use compared with the mouse. Most frequently, rats are used as models. However, extreme interventions are needed to create clinical leakage in these animals. The knowledge from this study formed the basis for selecting the animal species most suited for the models in the next studies. STUDY 2: In this experimental study, technically insufficient colonic anastomoses were performed in 110 C57BL/6 mice. The number of sutures in the intervention group was reduced to produce a suitable leakage rate. Moreover, the analgesia and suture material were changed in order to optimize the

  16. ErbB4 signaling stimulates pro-inflammatory macrophage apoptosis and limits colonic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Michael A; Hedl, Matija; Abraham, Clara; Bernard, Jessica K; Lozano, Patricia R; Hsieh, Jonathan J; Almohazey, Dana; Bucar, Edie B; Punit, Shivesh; Dempsey, Peter J; Frey, Mark R

    2017-01-01

    Efficient clearance of pro-inflammatory macrophages from tissues after resolution of a challenge is critical to prevent prolonged inflammation. Defects in clearance can contribute to conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, and thus may be therapeutically targetable. However, the signaling pathways that induce termination of pro-inflammatory macrophages are incompletely defined. We tested whether the ErbB4 receptor tyrosine kinase, previously not known to have role in macrophage biology, is involved in this process. In vitro, pro-inflammatory activation of cultured murine and human macrophages induced ErbB4 expression; in contrast, other ErbB family members were not induced in pro-inflammatory cells, and other innate immune lineages (dendritic cells, neutrophils) did not express detectable ErbB4 levels. Treatment of activated pro-inflammatory macrophages with the ErbB4 ligand neuregulin-4 (NRG4) induced apoptosis. ErbB4 localized to the mitochondria in these cells. Apoptosis was accompanied by loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and was dependent upon the proteases that generate the cleaved ErbB4 intracellular domain fragment, suggesting a requirement for this fragment and mitochondrial pathway apoptosis. In vivo, ErbB4 was highly expressed on pro-inflammatory macrophages but not neutrophils during experimental DSS colitis in C57Bl/6 mice. Active inflammation in this model suppressed NRG4 expression, which may allow for macrophage persistence and ongoing inflammation. Consistent with this notion, NRG4 levels rebounded during the recovery phase, and administration of exogenous NRG4 during colitis reduced colonic macrophage numbers and ameliorated inflammation. These data define a novel role for ErbB4 in macrophage apoptosis, and outline a mechanism of feedback inhibition that may promote resolution of colitis. PMID:28230865

  17. Bardoxolone Methyl Prevents High-Fat Diet-Induced Colon Inflammation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dinh, Chi H. L.; Yu, Yinghua; Szabo, Alexander; Zhang, Qingsheng; Zhang, Peng; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Obesity induces chronic, low-grade inflammation, which increases the risk of colon cancer. We investigated the preventive effects of Bardoxolone methyl (BARD) on high-fat diet (HFD)-induced inflammation in a mouse colon. Male C57BL/6J mice (n=7) were fed a HFD (HFD group), HFD plus BARD (10 mg/kg) in drinking water (HFD/BARD group), or normal laboratory chow diet (LFD group) for 21 weeks. In HFD mice, BARD reduced colon thickness and decreased colon weight per length. This was associated with an increase in colon crypt depth and the number of goblet cells per crypt. BARD reduced the expression of F4/80 and CD11c but increased CD206 and IL-10, indicating an anti-inflammatory effect. BARD prevented an increase of the intracellular pro-inflammatory biomarkers (NF-қB, p NF-қB, IL-6, TNF-α) and cell proliferation markers (Cox2 and Ki67). BARD prevented fat deposition in the colon wall and prevented microbial population changes. Overall, we report the preventive effects of BARD on colon inflammation in HFD-fed mice through its regulation of macrophages, NF-қB, cytokines, Cox2 and Ki67, fat deposition and microflora. PMID:26920068

  18. Bardoxolone Methyl Prevents High-Fat Diet-Induced Colon Inflammation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Chi H L; Yu, Yinghua; Szabo, Alexander; Zhang, Qingsheng; Zhang, Peng; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2016-04-01

    Obesity induces chronic, low-grade inflammation, which increases the risk of colon cancer. We investigated the preventive effects of Bardoxolone methyl (BARD) on high-fat diet (HFD)-induced inflammation in a mouse colon. Male C57BL/6J mice (n=7) were fed a HFD (HFD group), HFD plus BARD (10 mg/kg) in drinking water (HFD/BARD group), or normal laboratory chow diet (LFD group) for 21 weeks. In HFD mice, BARD reduced colon thickness and decreased colon weight per length. This was associated with an increase in colon crypt depth and the number of goblet cells per crypt. BARD reduced the expression of F4/80 and CD11c but increased CD206 and IL-10, indicating an anti-inflammatory effect. BARD prevented an increase of the intracellular pro-inflammatory biomarkers (NF-қB, p NF-қB, IL-6, TNF-α) and cell proliferation markers (Cox2 and Ki67). BARD prevented fat deposition in the colon wall and prevented microbial population changes. Overall, we report the preventive effects of BARD on colon inflammation in HFD-fed mice through its regulation of macrophages, NF-қB, cytokines, Cox2 and Ki67, fat deposition and microflora. © 2016 The Histochemical Society.

  19. Neurological and cellular regulation of visceral hypersensitivity induced by chronic stress and colonic inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Winston, J H; Sarna, S K

    2013-09-17

    The role of inflammation in inducing visceral hypersensitivity (VHS) in ulcerative colitis patients remains unknown. We tested the hypothesis that acute ulcerative colitis-like inflammation does not induce VHS. However, it sets up molecular conditions such that chronic stress following inflammation exaggerates single-unit afferent discharges to colorectal distension. We used dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) to induce ulcerative colitis-like inflammation and a 9-day heterotypic chronic stress protocol in rats. DSS upregulated Nav1.8 mRNA in colon-responsive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, TRPV1 in colonic muscularis externae (ME) and BDNF in spinal cord without affecting the spike frequency in spinal afferents or VMR to CRD. By contrast, chronic stress did not induce inflammation but it downregulated Kv1.1 and Kv1.4 mRNA in DRG neurons, and upregulated TRPA1 and nerve growth factor in ME, which mediated the increase of spike frequency and VMR to CRD. Chronic stress following inflammation exacerbated spike frequency in spinal afferent neurons. TRPA1 antagonist suppressed the sensitization of afferent neurons. DSS-inflammation did not affect the composition or excitation thresholds of low-threshold and high-threshold fibers. Chronic stress following inflammation increased the percent composition of high-threshold fibers and lowered the excitation threshold of both types of fibers. We conclude that not all types of inflammation induce VHS, whereas chronic stress induces VHS in the absence of inflammation. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Role of TRPV1 in high-threshold rat colonic splanchnic afferents is revealed by inflammation.

    PubMed

    Phillis, Benjamin D; Martin, Chris M; Kang, Daiwu; Larsson, Håkan; Lindström, Erik A; Martinez, Vicente; Blackshaw, L Ashley

    2009-08-07

    The vanilloid-1 receptor TRPV1 is known to play a role in extrinsic gastrointestinal afferent function. We investigated the role of TRPV1 in mechanosensitivity in afferents from normal and inflamed tissue. Colonic mechanosensitivity was determined in an in vitro rat colon preparation by recording from attached splanchnic nerves. Recordings were made from serosal/mesenteric afferents responding only at high thresholds to graded mechanical stimulation with von Frey probes. Colonic inflammation was induced by adding 5% dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) to the drinking water for 5 days, and was confirmed by histopathology. The selective TRPV1 antagonist, SB-750364 (10(-8) to 10(-6)M), was tested on mechanosensory stimulus response functions of afferents from normal and inflamed preparations (N=7 each). Mechanosensory responses had thresholds of 1-2g, and maximal responses were observed at 12 g. The stimulus response function was not affected by DSS-induced colitis. SB-750364 had no effect on stimulus response functions in normal preparations, but reduced (up to 60%) in a concentration-dependent manner those in inflammation (2-way ANOVA, p<0.05). Moreover, in inflamed tissue, spontaneous afferent activity showed a dose-dependent trend toward reduction with SB-750364. We conclude that mechanosensitivity of high-threshold serosal colonic splanchnic afferents to graded stimuli is unaffected during DSS colitis. However, there is a positive influence of TRPV1 in mechanosensitivity in inflammation, suggesting up-regulation of excitatory TRPV1-mediated mechanisms.

  1. Ionizing radiation, inflammation, and their interactions in colon carcinogenesis in Mlh1-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Morioka, Takamitsu; Miyoshi-Imamura, Tomoko; Blyth, Benjamin J; Kaminishi, Mutsumi; Kokubo, Toshiaki; Nishimura, Mayumi; Kito, Seiji; Tokairin, Yutaka; Tani, Shusuke; Murakami-Murofushi, Kimiko; Yoshimi, Naoki; Shimada, Yoshiya; Kakinuma, Shizuko

    2015-01-01

    Genetic, physiological and environmental factors are implicated in colorectal carcinogenesis. Mutations in the mutL homolog 1 (MLH1) gene, one of the DNA mismatch repair genes, are a main cause of hereditary colon cancer syndromes such as Lynch syndrome. Long-term chronic inflammation is also a key risk factor, responsible for colitis-associated colorectal cancer; radiation exposure is also known to increase colorectal cancer risk. Here, we studied the effects of radiation exposure on inflammation-induced colon carcinogenesis in DNA mismatch repair-proficient and repair-deficient mice. Male and female Mlh1−/− and Mlh1+/+ mice were irradiated with 2 Gy X-rays when aged 2 weeks or 7 weeks and/or were treated with 1% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) in drinking water for 7 days at 10 weeks old to induce mild inflammatory colitis. No colon tumors developed after X-rays and/or DSS treatment in Mlh1+/+ mice. Colon tumors developed after DSS treatment alone in Mlh1−/− mice, and exposure to radiation prior to DSS treatment increased the number of tumors. Histologically, colon tumors in the mice resembled the subtype of well-to-moderately differentiated adenocarcinomas with tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes of human Lynch syndrome. Immunohistochemistry revealed that expression of both p53 and β-catenin and loss of p21 and adenomatosis polyposis coli proteins were observed at the later stages of carcinogenesis, suggesting a course of molecular pathogenesis distinct from typical sporadic or colitis-associated colon cancer in humans. In conclusion, radiation exposure could further increase the risk of colorectal carcinogenesis induced by inflammation under the conditions of Mlh1 deficiency. PMID:25529563

  2. Ionizing radiation, inflammation, and their interactions in colon carcinogenesis in Mlh1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Morioka, Takamitsu; Miyoshi-Imamura, Tomoko; Blyth, Benjamin J; Kaminishi, Mutsumi; Kokubo, Toshiaki; Nishimura, Mayumi; Kito, Seiji; Tokairin, Yutaka; Tani, Shusuke; Murakami-Murofushi, Kimiko; Yoshimi, Naoki; Shimada, Yoshiya; Kakinuma, Shizuko

    2015-03-01

    Genetic, physiological and environmental factors are implicated in colorectal carcinogenesis. Mutations in the mutL homolog 1 (MLH1) gene, one of the DNA mismatch repair genes, are a main cause of hereditary colon cancer syndromes such as Lynch syndrome. Long-term chronic inflammation is also a key risk factor, responsible for colitis-associated colorectal cancer; radiation exposure is also known to increase colorectal cancer risk. Here, we studied the effects of radiation exposure on inflammation-induced colon carcinogenesis in DNA mismatch repair-proficient and repair-deficient mice. Male and female Mlh1(-/-) and Mlh1(+/+) mice were irradiated with 2 Gy X-rays when aged 2 weeks or 7 weeks and/or were treated with 1% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) in drinking water for 7 days at 10 weeks old to induce mild inflammatory colitis. No colon tumors developed after X-rays and/or DSS treatment in Mlh1(+/+) mice. Colon tumors developed after DSS treatment alone in Mlh1(-/-) mice, and exposure to radiation prior to DSS treatment increased the number of tumors. Histologically, colon tumors in the mice resembled the subtype of well-to-moderately differentiated adenocarcinomas with tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes of human Lynch syndrome. Immunohistochemistry revealed that expression of both p53 and β-catenin and loss of p21 and adenomatosis polyposis coli proteins were observed at the later stages of carcinogenesis, suggesting a course of molecular pathogenesis distinct from typical sporadic or colitis-associated colon cancer in humans. In conclusion, radiation exposure could further increase the risk of colorectal carcinogenesis induced by inflammation under the conditions of Mlh1 deficiency. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Science published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  3. Dietary selenium protects adiponectin knockout mice against chronic inflammation induced colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Arpit; Fayad, Raja; Kaur, Kamaljeet; Truman, Samantha; Greer, Julian; Carson, James A; Chanda, Anindya

    2017-04-03

    Selenium (Se) is an essential dietary micronutrient that has been examined for protection against different types of cancers including colon cancer. Despite an established inverse association between Se and chronic inflammation induced colon cancer (CICC), the mechanistic understanding of Se's protective effects requires additional in-vivo studies using preclinical animal models of CICC. Adiponectin (APN) is an adipocytokine that is protective against CICC as well. However, its role in the anti-mutagenic effects of the Se-diet remains unknown. To address this knowledge gap, here we examine the ability of dietary Se in reducing CICC in APN knockout mice (KO) and its wild-type C57BL/6. CICC was induced with the colon cancer agent 1,2 dimethyl hydrazine (DMH) along with dextran sodium sulfate (DSS). Se-enhanced diet increased selenoproteins, Gpx-1 and Gpx-2, in the colon tissues, thereby reducing oxidative stress. Se-mediated reduction of CICC was evident from the histopathological studies in both mouse models. In both mice, reduction in inflammation and tumorigenesis associated well with reduced p65 phosphorylation and elevated 53 phosphorylation. Finally, we show that in both models Se-administration promotes goblet cell differentiation with a concomitant increase in the levels of associated proteins, Muc-2 and Math-1. Our findings suggest that Se's protection against CICC involves both colonic epithelial protection and anti-tumor effects that are independent of APN.

  4. Effects of indigo naturalis on colonic mucosal injuries and inflammation in rats with dextran sodium sulphate-induced ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunliang; Liu, Lijuan; Guo, Yi; Mao, Tangyou; Shi, Rui; Li, Junxiang

    2017-08-01

    The effects of indigo naturalis (IN), which is a traditional Chinese herbal formulation, have been clinically demonstrated in treating refractory ulcerative colitis (UC). The present study aimed to verify the effects and mechanisms of IN in experimental UC rats. A total of 48 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into six groups: Chow, model, high-dose IN, medium-dose IN, low-dose IN and mesalazine (a bowel-specific aminosalicylate drug) groups. The models were administered 3.5% dextran sodium sulphate solution for 7 days. The treatment groups were administered IN or mesalazine and then sacrificed and sampled on day 8. Disease activity index (DAI), histological damage score (HDS) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were used to evaluate the severity of UC. Colon and serum cytokines were detected using liquid-phase chip technology and the expression of occludin protein in colonic mucosa was assessed by immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. The results indicated that the oral administration of IN may reduce DAI, HDS and MPO activity. IN also reduced the expression of inflammatory cytokines and increased the expression of colonic mucosal repair-related cytokines and occludin protein. These results highlight the potential of IN as a therapeutic agent for treating UC through its action of inflammation control and colonic mucosal damage repair.

  5. Effects of indigo naturalis on colonic mucosal injuries and inflammation in rats with dextran sodium sulphate-induced ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunliang; Liu, Lijuan; Guo, Yi; Mao, Tangyou; Shi, Rui; Li, Junxiang

    2017-01-01

    The effects of indigo naturalis (IN), which is a traditional Chinese herbal formulation, have been clinically demonstrated in treating refractory ulcerative colitis (UC). The present study aimed to verify the effects and mechanisms of IN in experimental UC rats. A total of 48 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into six groups: Chow, model, high-dose IN, medium-dose IN, low-dose IN and mesalazine (a bowel-specific aminosalicylate drug) groups. The models were administered 3.5% dextran sodium sulphate solution for 7 days. The treatment groups were administered IN or mesalazine and then sacrificed and sampled on day 8. Disease activity index (DAI), histological damage score (HDS) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were used to evaluate the severity of UC. Colon and serum cytokines were detected using liquid-phase chip technology and the expression of occludin protein in colonic mucosa was assessed by immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. The results indicated that the oral administration of IN may reduce DAI, HDS and MPO activity. IN also reduced the expression of inflammatory cytokines and increased the expression of colonic mucosal repair-related cytokines and occludin protein. These results highlight the potential of IN as a therapeutic agent for treating UC through its action of inflammation control and colonic mucosal damage repair. PMID:28781623

  6. Gut microbial diversity is reduced and is associated with colonic inflammation in a piglet model of short bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lapthorne, Susan; Pereira-Fantini, Prue M.; Fouhy, Fiona; Wilson, Guineva; Thomas, Sarah L.; Dellios, Nicole L.; Scurr, Michelle; O’Sullivan, Orla; Ross, R. Paul; Stanton, Catherine; Fitzgerald, Gerald F.; Cotter, Paul D.; Bines, Julie E.

    2013-01-01

    Background and objectives Following small bowel resection (SBR), the luminal environment is altered, which contributes to clinical manifestations of short bowel syndrome (SBS) including malabsorption, mucosal inflammation and bacterial overgrowth. However, the impact of SBR on the colon has not been well-defined. The aims of this study were to characterize the colonic microbiota following SBR and to assess the impact of SBR on mucosal inflammation in the colon. Results Analysis of the colonic microbiota demonstrated that there was a significant level of dysbiosis both two and six weeks post-SBR, particularly in the phylum Firmicutes, coupled with a decrease in overall bacterial diversity in the colon. This decrease in diversity was associated with an increase in colonic inflammation six weeks post-surgery. Methods Female (4-week old) piglets (5−6/group) received a 75% SBR, a transection (sham) or no surgery. Compositional analysis of the colonic microbiota was performed by high-throughput sequencing, two- and six-weeks post-surgery. The gene expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-18 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in the colonic mucosa was assessed by qRT-PCR and the number of macrophages and percentage inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) staining in the colonic epithelium were quantified by immunohistochemistry. Conclusions SBR significantly decreased the diversity of the colonic microbiota and this was associated with an increase in colonic mucosal inflammation. This study supports the hypothesis that SBR has a significant impact on the colon and that this may play an important role in defining clinical outcome. PMID:23549027

  7. Involvement of the P2X7 purinergic receptor in colonic motor dysfunction associated with bowel inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Antonioli, Luca; Giron, Maria Cecilia; Colucci, Rocchina; Pellegrini, Carolina; Sacco, Deborah; Caputi, Valentina; Orso, Genny; Tuccori, Marco; Scarpignato, Carmelo; Blandizzi, Corrado; Fornai, Matteo

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates an involvement of P2X7 purinergic receptor (P2X7R) in the fine tuning of immune functions, as well as in driving enteric neuron apoptosis under intestinal inflammation. However, the participation of this receptor in the regulation of enteric neuromuscular functions remains undetermined. This study was aimed at investigating the role of P2X7Rs in the control of colonic motility in experimental colitis. Colitis was induced in rats by 2,4-dinitrobenzenesulfonic acid. P2X7R distribution was examined by immunofluorescence analysis. The effects of A804598 (selective P2X7R antagonist) and BzATP (P2X7R agonist) were tested on contractions of longitudinal smooth muscle evoked by electrical stimulation or by carbachol in the presence of tetrodotoxin. P2X7Rs were predominantly located in myenteric neurons, but, in the presence of colitis, their expression increased in the neuromuscular layer. In normal preparations, A804598 elicited a negligible increase in electrically induced contractions, while a significant enhancement was recorded in inflamed tissues. In the presence of Nω-propyl-L-arginine (NPA, neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor) the A804598 effects were lost. P2X7R stimulation with BzATP did not significantly affect electrical-induced contractions in normal colon, while a marked reduction was recorded under inflammation. The inhibitory effect of BzATP was antagonized by A804598, and it was also markedly blunted by NPA. Both P2X7R ligands did not affect carbachol-induced contractions. The purinergic system contributes to functional neuromuscular changes associated with bowel inflammation via P2X7Rs, which modulate the activity of excitatory cholinergic nerves through a facilitatory control on inhibitory nitrergic pathways.

  8. Imaging inflammation in mouse colon using a rapid stage-scanning confocal fluorescence microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saldua, Meagan A.; Olsovsky, Cory A.; Callaway, Evelyn S.; Chapkin, Robert S.; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2012-01-01

    Large area confocal microscopy may provide fast, high-resolution image acquisition for evaluation of tissue in pre-clinical studies with reduced tissue processing in comparison to histology. We present a rapid beam and stage-scanning confocal fluorescence microscope to image cellular and tissue features along the length of the entire excised mouse colon. The beam is scanned at 8,333 lines/sec by a polygon scanning mirror while the specimen is scanned in the orthogonal axis by a motorized translation stage with a maximum speed of 7 mm/sec. A single 1×60 mm2 field of view image spanning the length of the mouse colon is acquired in 10 s. Z-projection images generated from axial image stacks allow high resolution imaging of the surface of non-flat specimens. In contrast to the uniform size, shape, and distribution of colon crypts in confocal images of normal colon, confocal images of chronic bowel inflammation exhibit heterogeneous tissue structure with localized severe crypt distortion.

  9. Salvia miltiorrhiza (Dan Shen) Significantly Ameliorates Colon Inflammation in Dextran Sulfate Sodium Induced Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Chong-Zhi; Yu, Chunhao; Zhang, Zhiyu; Calway, Tyler; Wang, Yunwei; Li, Ping; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease increases the risks of human colorectal cancer. In this study, the effects of Salvia miltiorrhiza extract (SME) on chemically-induced colitis in a mouse model were evaluated. Chemical composition of SME was determined by HPLC analysis. A/J mice received a single injection of AOM 7.5 mg/kg. After one week, these mice received 2.5% DSS for 8 days, or DSS plus SME (25 or 50 mg/kg). DSS-induced colitis was scored with the disease activity index (DAI). Body weight and colon length were also measured. The severity of inflammatory lesions was further evaluated by colon tissue histological assessment. HPLC assay showed that the major constituents in the tested SME were danshensu, protocatechuic aldehyde, salvianolic acid D and salvianolic acid B. In the model group, the DAI score reached its highest level on Day 8, while the SME group on both doses showed a significantly reduced DAI score (both P < 0.01). As an objective index of the severity of inflammation, colon length was reduced significantly from the vehicle group to model group. Treatment with 25 and 50 mg/kg of SME inhibited the reduction of colon in a dose-related manner (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively). SME groups also significantly reduced weight reduction (P < 0.05). Colitis histological data supported the pharmacological observations. Thus, Salvia miltiorrhiza could be a promising candidate in preventing and treating colitis and in reducing the risks of inflammation-associated colorectal cancer. PMID:24117071

  10. Salvia miltiorrhiza (dan shen) significantly ameliorates colon inflammation in dextran sulfate sodium induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Chong-Zhi; Yu, Chunhao; Zhang, Zhiyu; Calway, Tyler; Wang, Yunwei; Li, Ping; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease increases the risks of human colorectal cancer. In this study, the effects of Salvia miltiorrhiza extract (SME) on chemically-induced colitis in a mouse model were evaluated. Chemical composition of SME was determined by HPLC analysis. A/J mice received a single injection of AOM 7.5 mg/kg. After one week, these mice received 2.5% DSS for eight days, or DSS plus SME (25 or 50 mg/kg). DSS-induced colitis was scored with the disease activity index (DAI). Body weight and colon length were also measured. The severity of inflammatory lesions was further evaluated by colon tissue histological assessment. HPLC assay showed that the major constituents in the tested SME were danshensu, protocatechuic aldehyde, salvianolic acid D, and salvianolic acid B. In the model group, the DAI score reached its highest level on Day 8, while the SME group on both doses showed a significantly reduced DAI score (both p < 0.01). As an objective index of the severity of inflammation, colon length was significantly shorter in the model group than the vehicle group. Treatment with 25 and 50 mg/kg of SME inhibited the shortening of colon in a dose-related manner (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). SME groups also significantly reduced weight reduction (p < 0.05). Colitis histological data supported the pharmacological observations. Thus, Salvia miltiorrhiza could be a promising candidate in preventing and treating colitis and in reducing the risks of inflammation-associated colorectal cancer.

  11. Glucosinolates from pak choi and broccoli induce enzymes and inhibit inflammation and colon cancer differently.

    PubMed

    Lippmann, Doris; Lehmann, Carsten; Florian, Simone; Barknowitz, Gitte; Haack, Michael; Mewis, Inga; Wiesner, Melanie; Schreiner, Monika; Glatt, Hansruedi; Brigelius-Flohé, Regina; Kipp, Anna P

    2014-06-01

    High consumption of Brassica vegetables is considered to prevent especially colon carcinogenesis. The content and pattern of glucosinolates (GSLs) can highly vary among different Brassica vegetables and may, thus, affect the outcome of Brassica intervention studies. Therefore, we aimed to feed mice with diets containing plant materials of the Brassica vegetables broccoli and pak choi. Further enrichment of the diets by adding GSL extracts allowed us to analyze the impact of different amounts (GSL-poor versus GSL-rich) and different patterns (broccoli versus pak choi) of GSLs on inflammation and tumor development in a model of inflammation-triggered colon carcinogenesis (AOM/DSS model). Serum albumin adducts were analyzed to confirm the up-take and bioactivation of GSLs after feeding the Brassica diets for four weeks. In agreement with their high glucoraphanin content, broccoli diets induced the formation of sulforaphane-lysine adducts. Levels of 1-methoxyindolyl-3-methyl-histidine adducts derived from neoglucobrassicin were the highest in the GSL-rich pak choi group. In the colon, the GSL-rich broccoli and the GSL-rich pak choi diet up-regulated the expression of different sets of typical Nrf2 target genes like Nqo1, Gstm1, Srxn1, and GPx2. GSL-rich pak choi induced the AhR target gene Cyp1a1 but did not affect Ugt1a1 expression. Both colitis and tumor number were drastically reduced after feeding the GSL-rich pak choi diet while the other three diets had no effect. GSLs can act anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic but both effects depend on the specific amount and pattern of GSLs within a vegetable. Thus, a high Brassica consumption cannot be generally considered to be cancer-preventive.

  12. Oral imazalil exposure induces gut microbiota dysbiosis and colonic inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Jin, Cuiyuan; Zeng, Zhaoyang; Fu, Zhengwei; Jin, Yuanxiang

    2016-10-01

    The fungicide imazalil (IMZ) is used extensively in vegetable and fruit plantations and as a post-harvest treatment to avoid rot. Here, we revealed that ingestion of 25, 50 and 100 mg IMZ kg(-1) body weight for 28 d induced gut microbiota dysbiosis and colonic inflammation in mice. The relative abundance of Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and Actinobacteria in the cecal contents decreased significantly after exposure to 100 mg kg(-1) IMZ for 28 d. In feces, the relative abundance in Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and Actinobacteria decreased significantly after being exposed to 100 mg kg(-1) IMZ for 1, 14 and 7 d, respectively. High throughput sequencing of the V3-V4 region of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene revealed a significant reduction in the richness and diversity of microbiota in cecal contents and feces of IMZ-treated mice. Operational taxonomic units (OTUs) analysis identified 49.3% of OTUs changed in cecal contents, while 55.6% of OTUs changed in the feces after IMZ exposure. Overall, at the phylum level, the relative abundance of Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria increased and that of Bacteroidetes decreased in IMZ-treated groups. At the genus level, the abundance of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium decreased while those of Deltaproteobacteria and Desulfovibrio increased in response to IMZ exposure. In addition, it was observed that IMZ exposure could induce colonic inflammation characterized by infiltration of inflammatory cells, elevated levels of lipocalin-2 (lcn-2) in the feces, and increased mRNA levels of Tnf-α, IL-1β, IL-22 and IFN-γ in the colon. Our findings strongly suggest that ingestion of IMZ has some risks to human health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Circulating tumor cells promote the metastatic colonization of disseminated carcinoma cells by inducing systemic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Chao; Shu, Yu; Luo, Jing; Qin, Jian; Wang, Yu; Li, Dong; Wang, Shan-Shan; Chi, Gang; Guo, Fang; Zhang, Gui-Mei; Feng, Zuo-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have been studied well in the prognosis for malignant diseases as liquid biopsy, but their contribution to tumor metastasis is not clearly defined. Here we report that CTCs could promote the metastatic colonization of disseminated carcinoma cells by inducing systemic inflammation and neutrophil recruitment to pre-metastatic organs. Depletion of neutrophils in vivo could effectively abrogate the promoting effect of CTCs on tumor cell metastasis. In the presence of CTCs, the pro-tumor function of neutrophils was augmented, whereas the antitumor function of neutrophils was suppressed. Mechanically, CTC-derived ligands for TLR2 and TLR4 (TLR2/4) induced the systemic inflammation, thus increasing the production of proinflammatory cytokines such as G-CSF and IL-6 that could induce the conversion of neutrophil function from tumor-suppressing to tumor-promoting. Moreover, CTCs induced the production of endogenous TLR2/4 ligands such as S100A8, S100A9, and SAA3, which may amplify the stimulating effect that induces the expression of proinflammatory cytokines. The promoting effect of CTCs on tumor cell metastasis could be abrogated by suppressing inflammatory response with IL-37, an anti-inflammatory cytokine, or blocking CTC-derived ligands for TLR2/4. Identification of the metastatic axis of CTCs/systemic inflammation/neutrophils may provide potential targets for preventing tumor cell metastasis. PMID:28415700

  14. Curcumin combined with turmerones, essential oil components of turmeric, abolishes inflammation-associated mouse colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Akira; Furukawa, Ikuyo; Miyamoto, Shingo; Tanaka, Takuji; Ohigashi, Hajime

    2013-01-01

    Curcumin (CUR), a yellow pigment in turmeric, has marked potential for preventing colon cancer. We recently reported that ar-turmerone (ATM) suppressed nitric oxide (NO) generation in macrophages. In the present study, we explored the molecular mechanisms by which ATM attenuates NO generation and examined the anti-carcinogenesis activity of turmerones (TUR, a mixture of 5 sesquiterpenes including ATM). Both CUR and ATM inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced expression of inducible forms of both nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase (iNOS and COX-2, respectively). A chase experiment using actinomycin D revealed that ATM accelerated the decay of iNOS and COX-2 mRNA, suggesting a post-transcriptional mechanism. ATM prevented LPS-induced translocation of HuR, an AU-rich element-binding protein that determines mRNA stability of certain inflammatory genes. In a colitis model, oral administration of TUR significantly suppressed 2% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced shortening of the large bowel by 52-58%. We also evaluated the chemopreventive effects of oral feeding of TUR, CUR, and their combinations using a model of dimethylhydradine-initiated and DSS-promoted mouse colon carcinogenesis. At the low dose, TUR markedly suppressed adenoma multiplicity by 73%, while CUR at both doses suppressed adenocarcinoma multiplicity by 63-69%. Interestingly, the combination of CUR and TUR at both low and high doses abolished tumor formation. Collectively, our results led to our hypothesis that TUR is a novel candidate for colon cancer prevention. Furthermore, we consider that its use in combination with CUR may become a powerful method for prevention of inflammation-associated colon carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2012 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Colon-specific delivery of a probiotic-derived soluble protein ameliorates intestinal inflammation in mice through an EGFR-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Fang; Cao, Hanwei; Cover, Timothy L.; Washington, M. Kay; Shi, Yan; Liu, LinShu; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Peek, Richard M.; Wilson, Keith T.; Polk, D. Brent

    2011-01-01

    Probiotic bacteria can potentially have beneficial effects on the clinical course of several intestinal disorders, but our understanding of probiotic action is limited. We have identified a probiotic bacteria–derived soluble protein, p40, from Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG), which prevents cytokine-induced apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells. In the current study, we analyzed the mechanisms by which p40 regulates cellular responses in intestinal epithelial cells and p40’s effects on experimental colitis using mouse models. We show that the recombinant p40 protein activated EGFR, leading to Akt activation. Activation of EGFR by p40 was required for inhibition of cytokine-induced apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells in vitro and ex vivo. Furthermore, we developed a pectin/zein hydrogel bead system to specifically deliver p40 to the mouse colon, which activated EGFR in colon epithelial cells. Administration of p40-containing beads reduced intestinal epithelial apoptosis and disruption of barrier function in the colon epithelium in an EGFR-dependent manner, thereby preventing and treating DSS-induced intestinal injury and acute colitis. Furthermore, p40 activation of EGFR was required for ameliorating colon epithelial cell apoptosis and chronic inflammation in oxazolone-induced colitis. These data define what we believe to be a previously unrecognized mechanism of probiotic-derived soluble proteins in protecting the intestine from injury and inflammation. PMID:21606592

  16. Effects of diosmine-hesperidine on experimental colonic anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Cengiz, A; Tabak, S; Kuru, S; Demirel, A H; Barlas, A M; Altun, T; Gonultas, M; Celepli, S; Kilicoglu, S S; Aydogan, A; Kilicoglu, B

    2012-01-01

    Our goal was to determine the effects of a diosmine-hesperidine combination on wound healing in a rat model of colonic anastomosis. In this study, 20 Wistar Albino female rats were randomized into four experimental groups containing five rats in each group. A segment of 1 cm of colon was excised 4 cm proximally to the peritoneal reflection in all rats without carrying out any mechanical or antibacterial bowel preparation. Colonic anastomosis was performed with interrupted, inverting sutures of 6/0 polypropylene. Beginning from the first postoperative day, the rats in Groups II and IV received 100 mg/kg per day of diosmine-hesperidine via orogastic route by 4F fine feeding catheter. A significant difference was detected between groups in terms of their hydroxyproline levels (p<0.05); the hydroxyproline level of Group I was significantly lower than that of the other groups while no significant difference was noted between Groups II and III. The administration of diosmine-hesperidine increased the amount of collagen and bursting pressures at the anastomotic site and thus had favorable influences on the healing of colonic anastomosis (Tab. 1, Fig. 3, Ref. 33).

  17. Prolonged restraint stressor exposure in outbred CD-1 mice impacts microbiota, colonic inflammation, and short chain fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Maltz, Ross M; Keirsey, Jeremy; Kim, Sandra C; Mackos, Amy R; Gharaibeh, Raad Z; Moore, Cathy C; Xu, Jinyu; Bakthavatchalu, Vasudevan; Somogyi, Arpad; Bailey, Michael T

    2018-01-01

    Stressor-exposure has been shown to exacerbate inflammation and change the composition of the gastrointestinal microbiota; however stressor-induced effects on microbiota-derived metabolites and their receptors are unknown. Thus, bacterial-produced short chain fatty acids (SCFAs), as well as microbial community composition, were assessed in the colons of mice exposed to stress during infection with Citrobacter rodentium. Mice were exposed to overnight restraint on 7 consecutive nights, or left undisturbed as a control. After the first exposure of restraint, mice were orally challenged with C. rodentium or with vehicle. Microbial community composition was assessed using 16S rRNA gene sequencing and SCFA levels measured using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Pathogen levels and colonic inflammation were also assessed 6 days post-infection. Results demonstrated that the microbial community structure and SCFA production were significantly affected by both stressor exposure and C. rodentium-infection. Exposure to prolonged restraint in the absence of infection significantly reduced SCFAs (acetic acid, butyric acid, and propionic acid). Multiple bacterial taxa were affected by stressor exposure, with the relative abundance of Lactobacillus being significantly reduced and directly correlated with propionic acid. Lactobacillus abundances were inversely correlated with colonic inflammation, supporting the contention that Lactobacillus helps to regulate mucosal inflammatory responses. Our data indicates that restraint stressor can have significant effects on pathogen-induced colonic inflammation and suggest that stressor-induced changes in the microbiota, microbial-produced SCFAs and their receptors may be involved.

  18. Curcumin and salsalate suppresses colonic inflammation and procarcinogenic signaling in high-fat-fed, azoxymethane-treated mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    High-fat diets (HFDs) and excess adiposity increase proinflammatory cytokines in the colon, altering gene expression in a manner that promotes the development of colorectal cancer (CRC). Thus, compounds that reduce this biochemical inflammation are potential chemopreventive agents. Curcumin (CUR), a...

  19. Inflammation-induced preterm lung maturation: lessons from animal experimentation.

    PubMed

    Moss, Timothy J M; Westover, Alana J

    2017-06-01

    Intrauterine inflammation, or chorioamnionitis, is a major contributor to preterm birth. Prematurity per se is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality resulting from lung immaturity but exposure to chorioamnionitis reduces the risk of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in preterm infants. Animal experiments have identified that an increase in pulmonary surfactant production by the preterm lungs likely underlies this decreased risk of RDS in infants exposed to chorioamnionitis. Further animal experimentation has shown that infectious or inflammatory agents in amniotic fluid exert their effects on lung development by direct effects within the developing respiratory tract, and probably not by systemic pathways. Differences in the effects of intrauterine inflammation and glucocorticoids demonstrate that canonical glucocorticoid-mediated lung maturation is not responsible for inflammation-induced changes in lung development. Animal experimentation is identifying alternative lung maturational pathways, and transgenic animals and cell culture techniques will allow identification of novel mechanisms of lung maturation that may lead to new treatments for the prevention of RDS. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Pre-treatment with Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003 modulates Citrobacter rodentium-induced colonic inflammation and organ specificity.

    PubMed

    Collins, James W; Akin, Ali R; Kosta, Artemis; Zhang, Ning; Tangney, Mark; Francis, Kevin P; Frankel, Gad

    2012-11-01

    Citrobacter rodentium, which colonizes the gut mucosa via formation of attaching and effacing (A/E) lesions, causes transmissible colonic hyperplasia. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether prophylactic treatment with Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003 can improve the outcome of C. rodentium infection. Six-week-old albino C57BL/6 mice were pre-treated for 3 days with B. breve, challenged with bioluminescent C. rodentium and administered B. breve or PBS-C for 8 days post-infection; control mice were either administered B. breve and mock-infected with PBS, or mock-treated with PBS-C and mock-infected with PBS. C. rodentium colonization was monitored by bacterial enumeration from faeces and by a combination of both 2D bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and composite 3D diffuse light imaging tomography with µCT imaging (DLIT-µCT). At day 8 post-infection, colons were removed and assessed for crypt hyperplasia, histology by light microscopy, bacterial colonization by immunofluorescence, and A/E lesion formation by electron microscopy. Prophylactic administration of B. breve did not prevent C. rodentium colonization or A/E lesion formation. However, this treatment did alter C. rodentium distribution within the large intestine and significantly reduced colonic crypt hyperplasia at the peak of bacterial infection. These results show that B. breve could not competitively exclude C. rodentium, but reduced pathogen-induced colonic inflammation.

  1. Diets That Promote Colon Inflammation Associate With Risk of Colorectal Carcinomas That Contain Fusobacterium nucleatum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Tabung, Fred K; Zhang, Xuehong; Nowak, Jonathan A; Qian, Zhi Rong; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Nevo, Daniel; Bullman, Susan; Mima, Kosuke; Kosumi, Keisuke; da Silva, Annacarolina; Song, Mingyang; Cao, Yin; Twombly, Tyler S; Shi, Yan; Liu, Hongli; Gu, Mancang; Koh, Hideo; Li, Wanwan; Du, Chunxia; Chen, Yang; Li, Chenxi; Li, Wenbin; Mehta, Raaj S; Wu, Kana; Wang, Molin; Kostic, Aleksander D; Giannakis, Marios; Garrett, Wendy S; Hutthenhower, Curtis; Chan, Andrew T; Fuchs, Charles S; Nishihara, Reiko; Ogino, Shuji; Giovannucci, Edward L

    2018-04-24

    Specific nutritional components are likely to induce intestinal inflammation, which is characterized by increased levels of interleukin 6 (IL6), C-reactive protein (CRP), and tumor necrosis factor-receptor superfamily member 1B (TNFRSF1B) in the circulation and promotes colorectal carcinogenesis. The inflammatory effects of a diet can be estimated based on an empiric dietary inflammatory pattern (EDIP) score, calculated based on intake of 18 foods associated with plasma levels of IL6, CRP, and TNFRSF1B. An inflammatory environment in the colon (based on increased levels of IL6, CRP, and TNFRSF1B in peripheral blood) contributes to impairment of the mucosal barrier and altered immune cell responses, affecting the composition of the intestinal microbiota. Colonization by Fusobacterium nucleatum has been associated with the presence and features of colorectal adenocarcinoma. We investigated the association between diets that promote inflammation (based on EDIP score) and colorectal cancer subtypes classified by level of F nucleatum in the tumor microenvironment. We calculated EDIP scores based on answers to questionnaires collected from participants in the Nurses' Health Study (through June 1, 2012) and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (through January 31, 2012). Participants in both cohorts reported diagnoses of rectal or colon cancer in biennial questionnaires; deaths from unreported colorectal cancer cases were identified through the National Death Index and next of kin. Colorectal tumor tissues were collected from hospitals where the patients underwent tumor resection and F nucleatum DNA was quantified by a polymerase chain reaction assay. We used multivariable duplication-method Cox proportional hazard regression to assess the associations of EDIP scores with risks of colorectal cancer subclassified by F nucleatum status. During 28 years of follow-up evaluation of 124,433 participants, we documented 951 incident cases of colorectal carcinoma with tissue F

  2. Gpr109a Limits Microbiota-Induced IL-23 Production To Constrain ILC3-Mediated Colonic Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Brinda; Zeng, Peng; Zhu, Huabin; Sivaprakasam, Sathish; Li, Siyi; Xiao, Haiyan; Dong, Lixin; Shiao, Pamela; Kolhe, Ravindra; Patel, Nikhil; Li, Honglin; Levy-Bercowski, Daniel; Ganapathy, Vadivel; Singh, Nagendra

    2018-04-15

    A set of coordinated interactions between gut microbiota and the immune cells surveilling the intestine play a key role in shaping local immune responses and intestinal health. Gpr109a is a G protein-coupled receptor expressed at a very high level on innate immune cells and previously shown to play a key role in the induction of colonic regulatory T cells. In this study, we show that Gpr109a -/- Rag1 -/- mice exhibit spontaneous rectal prolapse and colonic inflammation, characterized by the presence of an elevated number of IL-17-producing Rorγt + innate lymphoid cells (ILCs; ILC3). Genetic deletion of Rorγt alleviated the spontaneous colonic inflammation in Gpr109a -/- Rag1 -/- mice. Gpr109a-deficient colonic dendritic cells produce higher amounts of IL-23 and thereby promote ILC3. Moreover, the depletion of gut microbiota by antibiotics treatment decreased IL-23 production, ILC3, and colonic inflammation in Gpr109a -/- Rag1 -/- mice. The ceca of Gpr109a -/- Rag1 -/- mice showed significantly increased colonization by members of Bacteroidaceae , Porphyromonadaceae , Prevotellaceae, Streptococcaceae , Christensenellaceae , and Mogibacteriaceae , as well as IBD-associated microbiota such as Enterobacteriaceae and Mycoplasmataceae , compared with Rag1 -/- mice, housed in a facility positive for Helicobacter and murine norovirus. Niacin, a Gpr109a agonist, suppressed both IL-23 production by colonic DCs and ILC3 number in a Gpr109a-dependent manner. Collectively, our data present a model suggesting that targeting Gpr109a will be potentially beneficial in the suppression of IL-23-mediated immunopathologies. Copyright © 2018 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  3. Synthetic triterpenoid induces 15-PGDH expression and suppresses inflammation-driven colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sung Hee; Kim, Byung-Gyu; Robinson, Janet; Fink, Steve; Yan, Min; Sporn, Michael B; Markowitz, Sanford D; Letterio, John J

    2014-06-01

    Colitis-associated colon cancer (CAC) develops as a result of inflammation-induced epithelial transformation, which occurs in response to inflammatory cytokine-dependent downregulation of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH) and subsequent suppression of prostaglandin metabolism. Agents that both enhance 15-PGDH expression and suppress cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) production may more effectively prevent CAC. Synthetic triterpenoids are a class of small molecules that suppress COX-2 as well as inflammatory cytokine signaling. Here, we found that administration of the synthetic triterpenoid 2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9(11)-dien-C28-methyl ester (CDDO-Me) suppresses CAC in mice. In a spontaneous, inflammation-driven intestinal neoplasia model, deletion of Smad4 specifically in T cells led to progressive production of inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α, IFN-γ, iNOS, IL-6, IL-1β; as well as activation of STAT1 and STAT3; along with suppression of 15-PGDH expression. Oral administration of CDDO-Me to mice with SMAD4-deficient T cells increased survival and suppressed intestinal epithelial neoplasia by decreasing production of inflammatory mediators and increasing expression of 15-PGDH. Induction of 15-PGDH by CDDO-Me was dose dependent in epithelial cells and was abrogated following treatment with TGF-β signaling inhibitors in vitro. Furthermore, CDDO-Me-dependent 15-PGDH induction was not observed in Smad3-/- mice. Similarly, CDDO-Me suppressed azoxymethane plus dextran sodium sulfate-induced carcinogenesis in wild-type animals, highlighting the potential of small molecules of the triterpenoid family as effective agents for the chemoprevention of CAC in humans.

  4. The flavonoid compound apigenin prevents colonic inflammation and motor dysfunctions associated with high fat diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Daniela; Fornai, Matteo; Colucci, Rocchina; Pellegrini, Carolina; Tirotta, Erika; Benvenuti, Laura; Segnani, Cristina; Ippolito, Chiara; Duranti, Emiliano; Virdis, Agostino; Carpi, Sara; Nieri, Paola; Németh, Zoltán H; Pistelli, Laura; Bernardini, Nunzia; Blandizzi, Corrado; Antonioli, Luca

    2018-01-01

    , counteracts enteric inflammation and normalizes colonic dysmotility associated with obesity.

  5. Use of butyrate or glutamine in enema solution reduces inflammation and fibrosis in experimental diversion colitis

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Rodrigo Goulart; Esposito, Christiano Costa; Müller, Lucas CM; Castelo-Branco, Morgana TL; Quintella, Leonardo Pereira; Chagas, Vera Lucia A; de Souza, Heitor Siffert P; Schanaider, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether butyrate or glutamine enemas could diminish inflammation in experimental diversion colitis. METHODS: Wistar specific pathogen-free rats were submitted to a Hartmann’s end colostomy and treated with enemas containing glutamine, butyrate, or saline. Enemas were administered twice a week in the excluded segment of the colon from 4 to 12 wk after the surgical procedure. Follow-up colonoscopy was performed every 4 wk for 12 wk. The effect of treatment was evaluated using video-endoscopic and histologic scores and measuring interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and transforming growth factor beta production in organ cultures by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: Colonoscopies of the diverted segment showed mucosa with hyperemia, increased number of vessels, bleeding and mucus discharge. Treatment with either glutamine or butyrate induced significant reductions in both colonoscopic (P < 0.02) and histological scores (P < 0.01) and restored the densities of collagen fibers in tissue (P = 0.015; P = 0.001), the number of goblet cells (P = 0.021; P = 0.029), and the rate of apoptosis within the epithelium (P = 0.043; P = 0.011) to normal values. The high levels of cytokines in colon explants from rats with diversion colitis significantly decreased to normal values after treatment with butyrate or glutamine. CONCLUSION: The improvement of experimental diversion colitis following glutamine or butyrate enemas highlights the importance of specific luminal nutrients in the homeostasis of the colonic mucosa and supports their utilization for the treatment of human diversion colitis. PMID:22969190

  6. Activation of NF-κB: bridging the gap between inflammation and cancer in colitis-mediated colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Setia, Shruti; Nehru, Bimla; Sanyal, Sankar Nath

    2014-02-01

    Several studies have shown the anti-neoplastic effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colon carcinogenesis, but how these drugs act in case of inflammation-augmented tumorigenesis is still not clear. The present study therefore designs an animal model of colitis-associated colon cancer where 3% Dextran sufate sodium (DSS) is used to develop ulcerative colitis and DMH treatment leads to colon carcinogenesis as early as in six weeks. Clinical symptoms for ulcerative colitis were studied using Disease Activity Index (DAI) while myeloperoxidase assay marked the neutrophil infiltration in DSS and DMH treated groups. The present results indicated the upregulation of the activity of inflammatory marker enzyme, cyclooxygenase-2 (cox-2) and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-4 and IFN-γ with the treatment of DSS as well as DMH. The presence of cytokines in the inflammatory milieu might lead to the transformation of cytoplasmic inactive NF-κB (Nuclear Factor κB) to its active nuclear form, thereby leading to tumorigenesis. The administration of celecoxib along with DSS and DMH, revealed its chemopreventive efficacy in colitis as well as colon cancer. The effect of different doses of DMH on mouse colon was also investigated to obtain a minimum dose of DMH which can induce visible lesions in mice colons at a high incidence. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Distinct Signature of Oxylipid Mediators of Inflammation during Infection and Asymptomatic Colonization by E. coli in the Urinary Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Packiriswamy, Nandakumar; Gandy, Jeff; Smith, Sara N.; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2017-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is an extremely common infectious disease. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the predominant etiological agent of UTI. Asymptomatic bacteriuric E. coli (ABEC) strains successfully colonize the urinary tract resulting in asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) and do not induce symptoms associated with UTI. Oxylipids are key signaling molecules involved in inflammation. Based on the distinct clinical outcomes of E. coli colonization, we hypothesized that UPEC triggers the production of predominantly proinflammatory oxylipids and ABEC leads to production of primarily anti-inflammatory or proresolving oxylipids in the urinary tract. We performed quantitative detection of 39 oxylipid mediators with proinflammatory, anti-inflammatory, and proresolving properties, during UTI and ABU caused by genetically distinct E. coli strains in the murine urinary bladder. Our results reveal that infection with UPEC causes an increased accumulation of proinflammatory oxylipids as early as 6 h postinoculation, compared to controls. To the contrary, ABEC colonization leads to decreased accumulation of proinflammatory oxylipids at the early time point compared to UPEC infection but does not affect the level of proresolving oxylipids. This report represents the first comprehensive investigation on the oxylipidome during benign ABEC colonization observed in ABU and acute inflammation triggered by UPEC leading to UTI. PMID:29445256

  8. Colonic inflammation increases the contribution of muscarinic M2 receptors to carbachol-induced contraction of the rat colon.

    PubMed

    Jragh, Dina M; Khan, Islam; Oriowo, Mabayoje A

    2011-01-01

    Carbachol-induced contraction of the rat colon is impaired in rats with trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis. The main objective of this study was to examine the effect of colitis on the expression and function of muscarinic (M) receptor subtypes in the rat colon. Rats (n = 80) were treated with TNBS and used 5 days later for measurement of contractility, myeloperoxidase activity, histology and expression of muscarinic receptor isoforms using Western blot analysis. Carbachol produced concentration-dependent contractions of colonic segments from control (n = 40) and TNBS-treated (n = 40) rats with no significant difference in potency. However, the maximum response to carbachol was significantly reduced in colon segments of TNBS-treated rats. The selective muscarinic receptor antagonists 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methyl piperidine (4-DAMP, M(3)), pirenzepine (M(1)) and methoctramine (M(2)) antagonized carbachol-induced contraction in control (9.1 ± 0.1, 6.7 ± 0.3 and 6.0 ± 0.1, respectively) and TNBS-treated rats (9.2 ± 0.2, 6.9 ± 0.2, 6.7 ± 0.2). The -logK(B) values in control rats are consistent with an action of carbachol on muscarinic M(3) receptors. There was no significant difference in -logK(B) values for 4-DAMP and pirenzepine in control and TNBS-treated rats, but methoctramine was fivefold more potent in TNBS-treated rats, possibly indicating an increased contribution of muscarinic M(2) receptors to carbachol-induced contraction in the inflamed colon. The expression of M(2) receptors was also significantly increased in colon segments from TNBS-treated rats, confirming the increased role of muscarinic M(2) receptors in the inflamed colon. The data show that while only M(3) receptors appeared to mediate carbachol-induced contraction in control segments, expression of both M(2) and M(3) receptors was increased in the inflamed rat colon. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Initiation of antiretroviral therapy before detection of colonic infiltration by HIV reduces viral reservoirs, inflammation and immune activation

    PubMed Central

    Crowell, Trevor A; Fletcher, James LK; Sereti, Irini; Pinyakorn, Suteeraporn; Dewar, Robin; Krebs, Shelly J; Chomchey, Nitiya; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Schuetz, Alexandra; Michael, Nelson L; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Chomont, Nicolas; Ananworanich, Jintanat

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Colonic infiltration by HIV occurs soon after infection, establishing a persistent viral reservoir and a barrier to cure. We investigated virologic and immunologic correlates of detectable colonic HIV RNA during acute HIV infection (AHI) and their response to antiretroviral treatment (ART). Methods From 49,458 samples screened for HIV, 74 participants were enrolled during AHI and 41 consented to optional sigmoidoscopy, HIV RNA was categorized as detectable (≥50 copies/mg) or undetectable in homogenized colon biopsy specimens. Biomarkers and HIV burden in blood, colon and cerebrospinal fluid were compared between groups and after 24 weeks of ART. Results Colonic HIV RNA was detectable in 31 participants (76%) and was associated with longer duration since HIV exposure (median 16 vs. 11 days, p=0.02), higher median plasma levels of cytokines and inflammatory markers (CXCL10 476 vs. 148 pg/mL, p=0.02; TNF-RII 1036 vs. 649 pg/mL, p<0.01; neopterin 2405 vs. 1368 pg/mL, p=0.01) and higher levels of CD8+ T cell activation in the blood (human leukocyte antigen - antigen D related (HLA-DR)/CD38 expression 14.4% vs. 7.6%, p <0.01) and colon (8.9% vs. 4.5%, p=0.01). After 24 weeks of ART, participants with baseline detectable colonic HIV RNA demonstrated persistent elevations in total HIV DNA in colonic mucosal mononuclear cells (CMMCs) (median 61 vs. 0 copies/106 CMMCs, p=0.03) and a trend towards higher total HIV DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) (41 vs. 1.5 copies/106 PBMCs, p=0.06). There were no persistent differences in immune activation and inflammation. Conclusions The presence of detectable colonic HIV RNA at the time of ART initiation during AHI is associated with higher levels of proviral DNA after 24 weeks of treatment. Seeding of HIV in the gut may have long-lasting effects on the size of persistent viral reservoirs and may represent an important therapeutic target in eradication strategies. PMID:27637172

  10. Interleukin-10 is differentially expressed in the small intestine and the colon experiencing chronic inflammation and ulcerative colitis induced by dextran sodium sulfate in young pigs.

    PubMed

    Lackeyram, D; Young, D; Kim, C J; Yang, C; Archbold, T L; Mine, Y; Fan, M Z

    2017-03-31

    Intestinal inflammation induced with dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) is used to study acute or chronic ulcerative colitis in animal models. Decreased gut tissue anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 concentration and mRNA abundance are associated with the development of chronic bowel inflammation. Twelve piglets of 3 days old were fitted with an intragastric catheter and randomly allocated into control and DSS groups by administrating either sterile saline or 1.25 g of DSS/kg body weight (BW) in saline per day, respectively, for 10 days. Growth rate and food conversion efficiency were reduced (p<0.05) in the DSS piglets compared with the control group. Quantitative histopathological grading of inflammation in the jejunum and colon collectively showed that the DSS treatment resulted in 12 fold greater (p<0.05) inflammation severity scoring in the colon than in the jejunum, indicative of chronic ulcerative colitis in the colon. Upper gut permeability endpoint was 27.4 fold higher (p<0.05) in the DSS group compared with the control group. The DSS group had higher concentrations and mRNA abundances (p<0.05) of TNF-alpha and IL-6 in the jejunal and colonic tissues compared with the control group. Colonic concentration and mRNA abundance of IL-10 were reduced (p<0.05), however, jejunal IL-10 mRNA abundance was increased (p<0.05) in the DSS group compared with the control group. In conclusion, administration of DSS at 1.25 g/kg BW for 10 days respectively induced acute inflammation in the jejunum and chronic inflammation and ulcerative colitis in the colon with substantially decreased colonic concentration and mRNA abundance of IL-10 in the young pigs, mimicking the IL-10 expression pattern in humans Associated with chronic bowel inflammation.

  11. Enhanced sympathetic nerve activity induced by neonatal colon inflammation induces gastric hypersensitivity and anxiety-like behavior in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Winston, John H; Sarna, Sushil K

    2016-07-01

    Gastric hypersensitivity (GHS) and anxiety are prevalent in functional dyspepsia patients; their underlying mechanisms remain unknown largely because of lack of availability of live visceral tissues from human subjects. Recently, we demonstrated in a preclinical model that rats subjected to neonatal colon inflammation show increased basal plasma norepinephrine (NE), which contributes to GHS through the upregulation of nerve growth factor (NGF) expression in the gastric fundus. We tested the hypothesis that neonatal colon inflammation increases anxiety-like behavior and sympathetic nervous system activity, which upregulates the expression of NGF to induce GHS in adult life. Chemical sympathectomy, but not adrenalectomy, suppressed the elevated NGF expression in the fundus muscularis externa and GHS. The measurement of heart rate variability showed a significant increase in the low frequency-to-high frequency ratio in GHS vs. the control rats. Stimulus-evoked release of NE from the fundus muscularis externa strips was significantly greater in GHS than in the control rats. Tyrosine hydroxylase expression was increased in the celiac ganglia of the GHS vs. the control rats. We found an increase in trait but not stress-induced anxiety-like behavior in GHS rats in an elevated plus maze. We concluded that neonatal programming triggered by colon inflammation upregulates tyrosine hydroxylase in the celiac ganglia, which upregulates the release of NE in the gastric fundus muscularis externa. The increase of NE release from the sympathetic nerve terminals concentration dependently upregulates NGF, which proportionately increases the visceromotor response to gastric distention. Neonatal programming concurrently increases anxiety-like behavior in GHS rats. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Voluntary exercise prevents colonic inflammation in high-fat diet-induced obese mice by up-regulating PPAR-γ activity

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei-Xin, E-mail: weixinliu@yahoo.com; Wang, Ting; Zhou, Feng

    Obesity is associated with increased colonic inflammation, which elevates the risk of colon cancer. Although exercise exerts anti-inflammatory actions in multiple chronic diseases associated with inflammation, it is unknown whether this strategy prevents colonic inflammation in obesity. We hypothesized that voluntary exercise would suppress colonic inflammation in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity by modulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ. Male C57Bl/6J mice fed either a control diet (6.5% fat, CON) or a high-fat diet (24% fat, HFD) were divided into sedentary, voluntary exercise or voluntary exercise with PPAR-γ antagonist GW9662 (10 mg/kg/day). All interventions took place for 12 weeks. Compared with CON-sedentarymore » group, HFD-sedentary mice gained significantly more body weight and exhibited metabolic disorders. Molecular studies revealed that HFD-sedentary mice had increased expression of inflammatory mediators and activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB in the colons, which were associated with decreased expression and activity of PPAR-γ. Voluntary exercise markedly attenuated body weight gain, improved metabolic disorders, and normalized the expression of inflammatory mediators and activation of NF-κB in the colons in HFD-mice while having no effects in CON-animals. Moreover, voluntary exercise significantly increased expression and activity of PPAR-γ in the colons in both HFD- and CON-animals. However, all of these beneficial effects induced by voluntary exercise were abolished by GW9662, which inhibited expression and activity of PPAR-γ. The results suggest that decreased PPAR-γ activity in the colon of HFD-induced obesity may facilitate the inflammatory response and colon carcinogenesis. Voluntary exercise prevents colonic inflammation in HFD-induced obesity by up-regulating PPAR-γ activity. - Highlights: • Obesity down-regulates PPAR-γ in the colon. • Down-regulated colonic PPAR-γ may facilitate inflammatory

  13. Phosalone-induced inflammation and oxidative stress in the colon: Evaluation and treatment.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi-Niri, Seyedeh Farnaz; Maqbool, Faheem; Baeeri, Maryam; Gholami, Mahdi; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2016-06-07

    To investigate the side effects of phosalone on intestinal cells and to evaluate benefits of ellagic acid (EA) as a remedy. In order to conduct an in vivo study, a rat model was used. The rats were divided into ten groups based on the materials used in the experiment and their dosage. The first group was fed normally. The second group was administered EA through gavage. Next Four groups were given (1/3, 1/5, 1/10, 1/20) LD50 phosalone; an organophosphorus compound. The last four groups received (1/3, 1/5, 1/10, 1/20) LD50 phosalone and of EA. After one month, the rats were sacrificed and their colon cells were examined to evaluate the level of inflammation, proteins and oxidative stress markers. The results of this research show that phosalone elevates oxidative stress and changes the level of tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-α), interlukin-6β (IL-6β) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB proteins. EA administration reduced phosalone toxicity and changed oxidative stress and inflammatory markers for all phosalone doses. Overall changes in reduction of TNF-α (230.47 ± 16.55 pg/mg protein vs 546.43 ± 45.24 pg/mg protein, P < 0.001), IL-6β (15.85 ± 1.03 pg/mg protein vs 21.55 ± 1.3 pg/mg protein, P < 0.05), and NF-κB (32.47 ± 4.85 pg/mg protein vs 51.41 ± 0.71 pg/mg protein, P < 0.05) manifest that the efficacy of EA is more viable for 1/3 LD50 dose of phosalone. Furthermore, EA is effective to counteract the negative outcomes of oxidative stress. When EA was used to treat 1/3 LD50 of phosalone's side effects, it improved the level of AChE activity (48.5% ± 6% vs 25% ± 7%, P < 0.05), TTM (0.391 ± 0.008 mmol/L vs 0.249 ± 0.032 mmol/L, P < 0.05), FRAP (46.04 ± 5.005 μmol/L vs 18.22 ± 1.9 μmol/L, P < 0.01) and MPO (0.222 ± 0.019 U/mg protein vs 0.387 ± 0.04 U/mg protein, P < 0.05). This research highlights that EA is effective to alleviate the side effects of phosalone by reducing the level of oxidative stress and inflammatory proteins.

  14. Phosalone-induced inflammation and oxidative stress in the colon: Evaluation and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi-Niri, Seyedeh Farnaz; Maqbool, Faheem; Baeeri, Maryam; Gholami, Mahdi; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the side effects of phosalone on intestinal cells and to evaluate benefits of ellagic acid (EA) as a remedy. METHODS: In order to conduct an in vivo study, a rat model was used. The rats were divided into ten groups based on the materials used in the experiment and their dosage. The first group was fed normally. The second group was administered EA through gavage. Next Four groups were given (1/3, 1/5, 1/10, 1/20) LD50 phosalone; an organophosphorus compound. The last four groups received (1/3, 1/5, 1/10, 1/20) LD50 phosalone and of EA. After one month, the rats were sacrificed and their colon cells were examined to evaluate the level of inflammation, proteins and oxidative stress markers. RESULTS: The results of this research show that phosalone elevates oxidative stress and changes the level of tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-α), interlukin-6β (IL-6β) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB proteins. EA administration reduced phosalone toxicity and changed oxidative stress and inflammatory markers for all phosalone doses. Overall changes in reduction of TNF-α (230.47 ± 16.55 pg/mg protein vs 546.43 ± 45.24 pg/mg protein, P < 0.001), IL-6β (15.85 ± 1.03 pg/mg protein vs 21.55 ± 1.3 pg/mg protein, P < 0.05), and NF-κB (32.47 ± 4.85 pg/mg protein vs 51.41 ± 0.71 pg/mg protein, P < 0.05) manifest that the efficacy of EA is more viable for 1/3 LD50 dose of phosalone. Furthermore, EA is effective to counteract the negative outcomes of oxidative stress. When EA was used to treat 1/3 LD50 of phosalone’s side effects, it improved the level of AChE activity (48.5% ± 6% vs 25% ± 7%, P < 0.05), TTM (0.391 ± 0.008 mmol/L vs 0.249 ± 0.032 mmol/L, P < 0.05), FRAP (46.04 ± 5.005 μmol/L vs 18.22 ± 1.9 μmol/L, P < 0.01) and MPO (0.222 ± 0.019 U/mg protein vs 0.387 ± 0.04 U/mg protein, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: This research highlights that EA is effective to alleviate the side effects of phosalone by reducing the level of oxidative stress and inflammatory

  15. Attenuation of colonic inflammation by partial replacement of dietary linoleic acid with α-linolenic acid in a rat model of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Anupama; Kumar, Uday; Reddy, Suryam; Santosh, Vadakattu S; Mohammed, Saazida B; Ehtesham, Nasreen Z; Ibrahim, Ahamed

    2012-11-14

    Increasing prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease may be due to imbalance in the intake of n-6 and n-3 PUFA in the diet. This study investigates the impact of varying ratios of dietary linoleic acid (LA, 18 : 2n-6) to α-linolenic acid (ALA, 18 : 3n-3) on the inflammatory response in dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. Weanling male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into five groups: a non-colitic group with a LA:ALA ratio of 215 (CON-215), and colitic groups with LA:ALA ratios of 215 (DSS-215), 50 (DSS-50), 10 (DSS-10) and 2 (DSS-2). Blends of groundnut, palmolein and linseed oils were used to provide varying LA:ALA ratios. All the rats were fed the respective experimental isoenergetic diets containing 10 % fat for 90 d and DSS was administered during the last 11 d. Colonic inflammation was evaluated by clinical, biochemical and histological parameters. The results showed attenuation of colitis in the DSS-2 group as evidenced by significant reductions in disease activity index, mucosal myeloperoxidase activity (P < 0·05), alkaline phosphatase activity (P < 0·01) and increase in colon length (P < 0·01) compared to the groups fed with higher ratios (DSS-215). This was accompanied by significant reductions in mucosal proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α (P < 0·01) and IL-1β (P < 0·01) and improvement in the histological score. Further, ALA supplementation increased long-chain (LC) n-3 PUFA and decreased LC n-6 PUFA in colon structural lipids. These data suggest that substitution of one-third of LA with ALA (LA:ALA ratio 2) mitigates experimental colitis by down-regulating proinflammatory mediators.

  16. Apple flavonoid phloretin inhibits Escherichia coli O157:H7 biofilm formation and ameliorates colon inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Hyung; Regmi, Sushil Chandra; Kim, Jung-Ae; Cho, Moo Hwan; Yun, Hyungdon; Lee, Chang-Soo; Lee, Jintae

    2011-12-01

    Pathogenic biofilms have been associated with persistent infections due to their high resistance to antimicrobial agents, while commensal biofilms often fortify the host's immune system. Hence, controlling biofilm formation of both pathogenic bacteria and commensal bacteria is important in bacterium-related diseases. We investigated the effect of plant flavonoids on biofilm formation of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7. The antioxidant phloretin, which is abundant in apples, markedly reduced E. coli O157:H7 biofilm formation without affecting the growth of planktonic cells, while phloretin did not harm commensal E. coli K-12 biofilms. Also, phloretin reduced E. coli O157:H7 attachment to human colon epithelial cells. Global transcriptome analyses revealed that phloretin repressed toxin genes (hlyE and stx(2)), autoinducer-2 importer genes (lsrACDBF), curli genes (csgA and csgB), and dozens of prophage genes in E. coli O157:H7 biofilm cells. Electron microscopy confirmed that phloretin reduced fimbria production in E. coli O157:H7. Also, phloretin suppressed the tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced inflammatory response in vitro using human colonic epithelial cells. Moreover, in the rat model of colitis induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS), phloretin significantly ameliorated colon inflammation and body weight loss. Taken together, our results suggest that the antioxidant phloretin also acts as an inhibitor of E. coli O157:H7 biofilm formation as well as an anti-inflammatory agent in inflammatory bowel diseases without harming beneficial commensal E. coli biofilms.

  17. Carvacrol exhibits anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects against 1, 2-dimethyl hydrazine plus dextran sodium sulfate induced inflammation associated carcinogenicity in the colon of Fischer 344 rats.

    PubMed

    Arigesavan, Kaninathan; Sudhandiran, Ganapasam

    2015-05-29

    Chronic inflammation is one of the remarkable etiologic factors for various human ailments including cancer. The well known hypothesis is that persistent inflammation in colon can increase the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). In this study, a pharmacological evaluation of carvacrol, a phenolic monoterpene constituent of essential oils produced from aromatic plant Oreganum vulgarea sp. on colitis associated colon cancer (CACC) induced by 1,2 Dimethylhydrazine (DMH) and dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) in male Fischer 344 rat model was studied. F344 rats were given three subcutaneous injections of DMH (40 mg/kg body wt) in the first week and were given free access to drinking water containing 1% DSS for the next one week followed by 7-14 days of water as three cycles. Carvacrol was administrated before and after tumor induction at a concentration of 50 mg/kg body weight (o.p). Carvacrol treated groups promotes the endogenous antioxidant system and suppress the inflammation in DMH/DSS induced animals. An increased antioxidant status and restoration of histological lesions in the inflamed colonic mucosa was observed in carvacrol treated rats. This effect was confirmed biochemically by reducing free-radical accumulation and suppressing expression of pro-inflammatory mediators. In this study, Carvacrol significantly increased the anti-oxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) glutathione (GSH) levels and reduced lipid peroxides (LPO), myeloperoxidase (MPO) and nitric oxide (NO) as compared to DMH/DSS induced rats. These dramatic changes facilitate the suppression of pro-inflammatory mediators such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) in CACC induced rats. Taken together, these findings suggest that Carvacrol may play a beneficial role in DMH/DSS induced experimental rat model and serve as an excellent dietary antioxidant as well as anti-inflammatory agent. It may represent novel therapeutic interventions

  18. SMAD4 haploinsufficiency associates with augmented colonic inflammation in select humans and mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    SMAD4 is a common mediator of the TGF-beta signaling pathway. One of the members of this pathway, TGF-beta 1, has an important role in controlling gut inflammation in relation to the continuous stimulation of the intestinal microbiota. SMAD4 haploinsufficiency in humans has been linked to juvenile p...

  19. Radioimmunotoxin Therapy of Experimental Colon and Ovarian Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Buchsbaum, Donald J.; Vallera, Daniel A.

    2006-02-09

    To pursue the development of radiolabeled immunotoxins (RIT) for colon cancer, it was first necessary to identify an immunotoxin (IT) that could selectively kill colon cancer cell lines. Recently, our collaborators in the Vallera laboratory have observed that potent recombinant IT can be synthesized using recombinant single chain antibodies (sFv) spliced to truncated diphtheria toxin (DT) consisting of the first 390 amino acids of native DT. DT was chosen as a toxin because it is a catalytic bacterial toxin that is easily manipulated in genetic engineering studies. Also, the Vallera lab has developed new procedures for preparing the sFv fusionmore » toxins from bacterial inclusion bodies such as DT and another good genetic engineering toxin pseudomonas exotoxin (PE) based on detergent refolding. This allows for enhanced yields and higher purity that is essential for generating the protein that will be needed for preparation of larger amounts of RIT for therapy. Many potential sFvs were considered for targeting colon cancer. The best results have been obtained with an sFv recognizing EpCam. EpCam, also known as ESA or EGP40, is a 40 kDa epithelial transmembrane glycoprotein found on the basolateral surface of simple, pseudostratified, and transitional epithelia. It has been found overexpressed on 81% of adenocarcinomas of the colon (Went et al. Human pathology 35:122, 2004). EpCam sliced to DT (DTEpCam) was highly potent in studies in which we measured its ability to inhibit the proliferation of the HT-29 and COLO 205 colon cancer cell lines since we measured its IC50 at 1-2 x 10-2 nM. Potency is important, but is also critical that DTEpCam is selective in its cytotoxicity against EpCam-expressing target colon cancer cells. The activity of DTEpCam was highly selective since irrelevant control IT that did not recognize any markers on cancer cells, did not show any activity against the same colon cancer cell lines. Also, blocking studies were performed in which DTEp

  20. Human colonic myocytes are involved in postischemic inflammation through ADAM17-dependent TNFα production

    PubMed Central

    Jarry, Anne; Bach-Ngohou, Kalyane; Masson, Damien; Dejoie, Thomas; Lehur, Paul-Antoine; Mosnier, Jean-François; Denis, Marc G; Laboisse, Christian L

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify human colonic resident cells able to initiate an inflammatory response in postischemic injury. Postischemic colonic injury, a condition relevant to various clinical settings, involves an inflammatory cascade in intestinal tissues through the recruitment of circulating inflammatory cells. However, there is no information on the nature of resident cells of the different intestinal layers able to initiate a postischemic inflammatory response. It is however an important issue in the context of a pharmacological approach of the early phase of intestinal ischemia. We reasoned that maintaining the different colonic layers as explant cultures in an oxygenated medium immediately after colonic resection, that is, after an ischemic period, would allow one to identify the resident cells able to initiate an inflammatory cascade, without interference of recruited inflammatory/immune cells. To this end, we designed an explant culture system that operationally defines three compartments in surgical specimens of the human colon, based on the microdissected layers, that is, mucosa, submucosa (containing muscularis mucosae) and muscularis propria. To validate the results obtained in explant cultures in the clinical setting of ischemic colitis, eight cases of sigmoid volvulus were examined. Only the myocytes-containing explants produced tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), via an ADAM17 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase-17)-dependent pathway, as shown by the abrogation of TNFα production by the inhibitor Tapi-2. Immunofluorescence studies identified nonvascular and vascular myocytes as resident cells coexpressing TNFα and ADAM17, both in our postischemic explant system and in surgical specimens from ischemic colitis patients. Finally, time-course experiments on explanted tissues showed that TNFα production by myocytes was an early event triggered by a postischemic oxidative stress involving nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB). In conclusion

  1. Caspase Activation in Fetal Rat Brain Following Experimental Intrauterine Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sharangpani, Aditi; Takanohashi, Asako; Bell, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Intrauterine inflammation has been implicated in developmental brain injuries, including the development of periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) and cerebral palsy (CP). Previous studies in our rat model of intrauterine inflammation demonstrated apoptotic cell death in fetal brains within the first 5 days after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration to mothers and eventual dysmyelination. Cysteine-containing, aspartate-specific proteases, or caspases, are proteins involved with apoptosis through both intracellular (intrinsic pathway) and extracellular (extrinsic pathway) mechanisms. We hypothesized that cell death in our model would occur mainly via activation of the extrinsic pathway. We further hypothesized that Fas, a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily, would be increased and the death inducing signaling complex (DISC) would be detectable. Pregnant rats were injected intracervically with LPS at E15 and immunoblotting, immunohistochemical and immunoprecipitation analyses were performed. The presence of the activated form of the effector caspase (caspase-3) was observed 24 h after LPS administration. Caspase activity assays demonstrated rapid increases in (i) caspases-9 and -10 within 1 h, (ii) caspase-8 at 2 h and (iii) caspase-3 at 4 h. At 24 h after LPS, activated caspase-3+/Fas+ cells were observed within the developing white matter. Lastly, the DISC complex (caspase-8, Fas and Fas-associated Death Domain (FADD)) was observed within 30 min by immunoprecipitation. Apoptosis in our model occurs via both extrinsic and intrinsic pathways, and activation of Fas may play a role. Understanding the mechanisms of cell death in models of intrauterine inflammation may affect development of future strategies to mitigate these injuries in children. PMID:18289516

  2. A Ketogenic Formula Prevents Tumor Progression and Cancer Cachexia by Attenuating Systemic Inflammation in Colon 26 Tumor-Bearing Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tonouchi, Hidekazu; Sasayama, Akina

    2018-01-01

    Low-carbohydrate, high-fat diets (ketogenic diets) might prevent tumor progression and could be used as supportive therapy; however, few studies have addressed the effect of such diets on colorectal cancer. An infant formula with a ketogenic composition (ketogenic formula; KF) is used to treat patients with refractory epilepsy. We investigated the effect of KF on cancer and cancer cachexia in colon tumor-bearing mice. Mice were randomized into normal (NR), tumor-bearing (TB), and ketogenic formula (KF) groups. Colon 26 cells were inoculated subcutaneously into TB and KF mice. The NR and TB groups received a standard diet, and the KF mice received KF ad libitum. KF mice preserved their body, muscle, and carcass weights. Tumor weight and plasma IL-6 levels were significantly lower in KF mice than in TB mice. In the KF group, energy intake was significantly higher than that in the other two groups. Blood ketone body concentrations in KF mice were significantly elevated, and there was a significant negative correlation between blood ketone body concentration and tumor weight. Therefore, KF may suppress the progression of cancer and the accompanying systemic inflammation without adverse effects on weight gain, or muscle mass, which might help to prevent cancer cachexia. PMID:29443873

  3. GEN-27, a Newly Synthetic Isoflavonoid, Inhibits the Proliferation of Colon Cancer Cells in Inflammation Microenvironment by Suppressing NF-κB Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yajing; Lu, Ping; Zhang, Weifeng; Du, Qianming; Tang, Jingjing; Wang, Hong; Lu, Jinrong; Hu, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Nonresolving inflammation is one of the consistent features of the tumor microenvironment in the intestine and plays a critical role in the initiation and development of colon cancer. Here we reported the inhibitory effects of GEN-27, a new derivative of genistein, on the inflammation-related colon cancer cell proliferation and delineated the mechanism of its action. The results indicated that GEN-27 inhibited the proliferation of human colon tumor HCT116 cells stimulated by culture supernatants of LPS-induced human monocytes THP-1 cells and significantly decreased LPS-induced secretion of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 and interleukin-1β in THP-1 cells. The HCT116 cell proliferation elicited by THP-1-conditioned medium could be blocked by the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA). Further mechanistic study revealed that GEN-27 remarkably inhibited the nuclear translocation of NF-κB and phosphorylation of IκB and IKKα/β in both HCT116 and THP-1 cells. In addition, GEN-27 markedly suppressed the HCT116 cell proliferation stimulated by IL-1β treatment, which was dependent on the inhibition of NF-κB/p65 nuclear localization, as verified by p65 overexpression and BAY 11-7082, an NF-κB inhibitor. Taken together, our findings established that GEN-27 modulated NF-κB signaling pathway involved in inflammation-induced cancer cells proliferation and therefore could be a potential chemopreventive agent against inflammation-associated colon cancer. PMID:27057094

  4. Colonic inflammation and enhanced-beta-catenin signaling accompany an increase of the Lachnospiraceae/Streptococcaceae in the hind gut of high-fat diet-fed mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Consumption of an obesigenic / high-fat (HF) diet is associated with an increase of inflammation-related colon cancer risk and may alter the gut microbiota. To test the hypothesis that a HF feeding accelerates inflammatory processes and changes gut microbiome composition, C57BL/6 mice were fed a HF ...

  5. Apple Flavonoid Phloretin Inhibits Escherichia coli O157:H7 Biofilm Formation and Ameliorates Colon Inflammation in Rats ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-Hyung; Regmi, Sushil Chandra; Kim, Jung-Ae; Cho, Moo Hwan; Yun, Hyungdon; Lee, Chang-Soo; Lee, Jintae

    2011-01-01

    Pathogenic biofilms have been associated with persistent infections due to their high resistance to antimicrobial agents, while commensal biofilms often fortify the host's immune system. Hence, controlling biofilm formation of both pathogenic bacteria and commensal bacteria is important in bacterium-related diseases. We investigated the effect of plant flavonoids on biofilm formation of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7. The antioxidant phloretin, which is abundant in apples, markedly reduced E. coli O157:H7 biofilm formation without affecting the growth of planktonic cells, while phloretin did not harm commensal E. coli K-12 biofilms. Also, phloretin reduced E. coli O157:H7 attachment to human colon epithelial cells. Global transcriptome analyses revealed that phloretin repressed toxin genes (hlyE and stx2), autoinducer-2 importer genes (lsrACDBF), curli genes (csgA and csgB), and dozens of prophage genes in E. coli O157:H7 biofilm cells. Electron microscopy confirmed that phloretin reduced fimbria production in E. coli O157:H7. Also, phloretin suppressed the tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced inflammatory response in vitro using human colonic epithelial cells. Moreover, in the rat model of colitis induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS), phloretin significantly ameliorated colon inflammation and body weight loss. Taken together, our results suggest that the antioxidant phloretin also acts as an inhibitor of E. coli O157:H7 biofilm formation as well as an anti-inflammatory agent in inflammatory bowel diseases without harming beneficial commensal E. coli biofilms. PMID:21930760

  6. Expression of Abelson Interactor 1 (Abi1) Correlates with Inflammation, KRAS Mutation and Adenomatous Change during Colonic Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Steinestel, Konrad; Brüderlein, Silke; Steinestel, Julie; Märkl, Bruno; Schwerer, Michael J.; Arndt, Annette; Kraft, Klaus; Pröpper, Christian; Möller, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background Abelson interactor 1 (Abi1) is an important regulator of actin dynamics during cytoskeletal reorganization. In this study, our aim was to investigate the expression of Abi1 in colonic mucosa with and without inflammation, colonic polyps, colorectal carcinomas (CRC) and metastases as well as in CRC cell lines with respect to BRAF/KRAS mutation status and to find out whether introduction of KRAS mutation or stimulation with TNFalpha enhances Abi1 protein expression in CRC cells. Methodology/Principal Findings We immunohistochemically analyzed Abi1 protein expression in 126 tissue specimens from 95 patients and in 5 colorectal carcinoma cell lines with different mutation status by western immunoblotting. We found that Abi1 expression correlated positively with KRAS, but not BRAF mutation status in the examined tissue samples. Furthermore, Abi1 is overexpressed in inflammatory mucosa, sessile serrated polyps and adenomas, tubular adenomas, invasive CRC and CRC metastasis when compared to healthy mucosa and BRAF-mutated as well as KRAS wild-type hyperplastic polyps. Abi1 expression in carcinoma was independent of microsatellite stability of the tumor. Abi1 protein expression correlated with KRAS mutation in the analyzed CRC cell lines, and upregulation of Abi1 could be induced by TNFalpha treatment as well as transfection of wild-type CRC cells with mutant KRAS. The overexpression of Abi1 could be abolished by treatment with the PI3K-inhibitor Wortmannin after KRAS transfection. Conclusions/Significance Our results support a role for Abi1 as a downstream target of inflammatory response and adenomatous change as well as oncogenic KRAS mutation via PI3K, but not BRAF activation. Furthermore, they highlight a possible role for Abi1 as a marker for early KRAS mutation in hyperplastic polyps. Since the protein is a key player in actin dynamics, our data encourages further studies concerning the exact role of Abi1 in actin reorganization upon enhanced KRAS/PI3K

  7. The effect of Saccharomyces boulardii on human colon cells and inflammation in rats with trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Kil; Kim, Youn Wha; Chi, Sung-Gil; Joo, Yeong-Shil; Kim, Hyo Jong

    2009-02-01

    Saccharomyces boulardii (S. boulardii) has beneficial effects in the treatment of intestinal inflammation; however, little is known about the mechanisms by which these effects occur. We investigated the effects of S. boulardii on the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma) and interleukin-8 (IL-8), using human HT-29 colonocytes and a rat model of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis. The effect of S. boulardii on gene expression was assessed by semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and Northern blot and Western blot assays. Pharmacological inhibitors for various signaling pathways were used to determine the signaling pathways implicated in the S. boulardii regulation of PPAR-gamma and IL-8. We found that S. boulardii up-regulated and down-regulated PPAR-gamma and IL-8 expression at the transcription level, both in vitro and in vivo (P < 0.05, respectively). Saccharomyces boulardii blocked tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) regulation of PPAR-gamma and IL-8 through disruption of TNF-alpha-mediated nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) activation. Furthermore, S. boulardii suppressed colitis and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes in vivo (P < 0.05, respectively). Our study demonstrated that S. boulardii reduces colonic inflammation and regulates inflammatory gene expression.

  8. Effect of Aging on Periodontal Inflammation, Microbial Colonization, and Disease Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Y.; Dong, G.; Xiao, W.; Xiao, E.; Miao, F.; Syverson, A.; Missaghian, N.; Vafa, R.; Cabrera-Ortega, A.A.; Rossa, C.; Graves, D.T.

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease induced by a biofilm that forms on the tooth surface. Increased periodontal disease is associated with aging. We investigated the effect of aging on challenge by oral pathogens, examining the host response, colonization, and osteoclast numbers in aged versus young mice. We also compared the results with mice with lineage-specific deletion of the transcription factor FOXO1, which reduces dendritic cell (DC) function. Periodontitis was induced by oral inoculation of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum in young (4 to 5 mo) and aged (14 to 15 mo) mice. Aged mice as well as mice with reduced DC function had decreased numbers of DCs in lymph nodes, indicative of a diminished host response. In vitro studies suggest that reduced DC numbers in lymph nodes of aged mice may involve the effect of advanced glycation end products on DC migration. Surprisingly, aged mice but not mice with genetically altered DC function had greater production of antibody to P. gingivalis, greater IL-12 expression, and more plasma cells in lymph nodes following oral inoculation as compared with young mice. The greater adaptive immune response in aged versus young mice was linked to enhanced levels of P. gingivalis and reduced bacterial diversity. Thus, reduced bacterial diversity in aged mice may contribute to increased P. gingivalis colonization following inoculation and increased periodontal disease susceptibility, reflected by higher TNF levels and osteoclast numbers in the periodontium of aged versus young mice. PMID:26762510

  9. Effect of Aging on Periodontal Inflammation, Microbial Colonization, and Disease Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y; Dong, G; Xiao, W; Xiao, E; Miao, F; Syverson, A; Missaghian, N; Vafa, R; Cabrera-Ortega, A A; Rossa, C; Graves, D T

    2016-04-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease induced by a biofilm that forms on the tooth surface. Increased periodontal disease is associated with aging. We investigated the effect of aging on challenge by oral pathogens, examining the host response, colonization, and osteoclast numbers in aged versus young mice. We also compared the results with mice with lineage-specific deletion of the transcription factor FOXO1, which reduces dendritic cell (DC) function. Periodontitis was induced by oral inoculation of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum in young (4 to 5 mo) and aged (14 to 15 mo) mice. Aged mice as well as mice with reduced DC function had decreased numbers of DCs in lymph nodes, indicative of a diminished host response. In vitro studies suggest that reduced DC numbers in lymph nodes of aged mice may involve the effect of advanced glycation end products on DC migration. Surprisingly, aged mice but not mice with genetically altered DC function had greater production of antibody to P. gingivalis, greater IL-12 expression, and more plasma cells in lymph nodes following oral inoculation as compared with young mice. The greater adaptive immune response in aged versus young mice was linked to enhanced levels of P. gingivalis and reduced bacterial diversity. Thus, reduced bacterial diversity in aged mice may contribute to increased P. gingivalis colonization following inoculation and increased periodontal disease susceptibility, reflected by higher TNF levels and osteoclast numbers in the periodontium of aged versus young mice. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2016.

  10. Computed tomography of adult colonic intussusception: clinical and experimental studies

    SciTech Connect

    Iko, B.O.; Teal, J.S.; Siram, S.M.

    1984-10-01

    The CT features of a case of adult ileocolic intussusception and of experimentally induced ileocolic, cecocolic, and colocolic intussusceptions are presented. Both the clinical and experimental cases demonstrated (1) target masses with enveloped, eccentrically located areas of low density and (2) interspersed low- and high-density stripes within the intussusception producing a layered or stratified pattern. This layered pattern of abdominal masses may be characteristic of intussusceptions regardless of location.

  11. Inflammation increases NOTCH1 activity via MMP9 and is counteracted by Eicosapentaenoic Acid-free fatty acid in colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Fazio, Chiara; Piazzi, Giulia; Vitaglione, Paola; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Munarini, Alessandra; Prossomariti, Anna; Milazzo, Maddalena; D’Angelo, Leonarda; Napolitano, Manuela; Chieco, Pasquale; Belluzzi, Andrea; Bazzoli, Franco; Ricciardiello, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant NOTCH1 signalling is critically involved in multiple models of colorectal cancer (CRC) and a prominent role of NOTCH1 activity during inflammation has emerged. Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition (EMT), a crucial event promoting malignant transformation, is regulated by inflammation and Metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) plays an important role in this process. Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA), an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, was shown to prevent colonic tumors in different settings. We recently found that an extra-pure formulation of EPA as Free Fatty Acid (EPA-FFA) protects from colon cancer development in a mouse model of Colitis-Associated Cancer (CAC) through modulation of NOTCH1 signalling. In this study, we exposed colon cancer cells to an inflammatory stimulus represented by a cytokine-enriched Conditioned Medium (CM), obtained from THP1-differentiated macrophages. We found, for the first time, that CM strongly up-regulated NOTCH1 signalling and EMT markers, leading to increased invasiveness. Importantly, NOTCH1 signalling was dependent on MMP9 activity, upon CM exposure. We show that a non-cytotoxic pre-treatment with EPA-FFA antagonizes the effect of inflammation on NOTCH1 signalling, with reduction of MMP9 activity and invasiveness. In conclusion, our data suggest that, in CRC cells, inflammation induces NOTCH1 activity through MMP9 up-regulation and that this mechanism can be counteracted by EPA-FFA. PMID:26864323

  12. Inflammation increases NOTCH1 activity via MMP9 and is counteracted by Eicosapentaenoic Acid-free fatty acid in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fazio, Chiara; Piazzi, Giulia; Vitaglione, Paola; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Munarini, Alessandra; Prossomariti, Anna; Milazzo, Maddalena; D'Angelo, Leonarda; Napolitano, Manuela; Chieco, Pasquale; Belluzzi, Andrea; Bazzoli, Franco; Ricciardiello, Luigi

    2016-02-11

    Aberrant NOTCH1 signalling is critically involved in multiple models of colorectal cancer (CRC) and a prominent role of NOTCH1 activity during inflammation has emerged. Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition (EMT), a crucial event promoting malignant transformation, is regulated by inflammation and Metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) plays an important role in this process. Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA), an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, was shown to prevent colonic tumors in different settings. We recently found that an extra-pure formulation of EPA as Free Fatty Acid (EPA-FFA) protects from colon cancer development in a mouse model of Colitis-Associated Cancer (CAC) through modulation of NOTCH1 signalling. In this study, we exposed colon cancer cells to an inflammatory stimulus represented by a cytokine-enriched Conditioned Medium (CM), obtained from THP1-differentiated macrophages. We found, for the first time, that CM strongly up-regulated NOTCH1 signalling and EMT markers, leading to increased invasiveness. Importantly, NOTCH1 signalling was dependent on MMP9 activity, upon CM exposure. We show that a non-cytotoxic pre-treatment with EPA-FFA antagonizes the effect of inflammation on NOTCH1 signalling, with reduction of MMP9 activity and invasiveness. In conclusion, our data suggest that, in CRC cells, inflammation induces NOTCH1 activity through MMP9 up-regulation and that this mechanism can be counteracted by EPA-FFA.

  13. Microsatellite instable vs stable colon carcinomas: analysis of tumour heterogeneity, inflammation and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    De Smedt, L; Lemahieu, J; Palmans, S; Govaere, O; Tousseyn, T; Van Cutsem, E; Prenen, H; Tejpar, S; Spaepen, M; Matthijs, G; Decaestecker, C; Moles Lopez, X; Demetter, P; Salmon, I; Sagaert, X

    2015-07-28

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) accounts for 15% of all colorectal tumours. Several specific clinicopathologicals (e.g., preference for the proximal colon over the distal colon, improved prognosis and altered response to chemotherapeutics) are described for this subset of tumours. This study aimed to analyse morphological, inflammatory and angiogenic features of MSI vs microsatellite stable (MSS) tumours. Twenty-seven MSS and 29 MSI, TNM stage matched, colorectal tumours were selected from the archive of the Department of Pathology, UZ Leuven. Morphology was analysed on haematoxylin-eosin sections. Immunohistochemistry for CD3, CD4, CD8, CD20 and CD68 was used to map tumour infiltration in both a digital and traditional microscope-based manner for all distinct morphological components of the tumour. CD31 immunostains were performed to assess angiogenesis. Morphological tumour heterogeneity was a marked feature of MSI tumours, occurring in 53% of the cases as compared with 11% of the MSS tumours (P<0.001). Digital immune quantification showed an increased number of tumour-infiltrating cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CD8+) in MSI compared with MSS tumours for both the tumour (P=0.02) and peritumoural area (P=0.03). Traditional microscope-based quantification confirmed these results (P<0.001 for both) and, in addition, revealed large numbers of CD68+ macrophages in the peritumoural area of MSI cancers (P=0.001). Moreover, traditional microscope-based analysis was able to distinguish between lymphocytes directly infiltrating the tumoural glands (intra-epithelial) and those infiltrating only the neoplastic stroma around the glands (intratumoural). Quantification showed high numbers of intra-epithelial CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD20+ and CD68+ cells in MSI compared with MSS cancers (P<0.001, P=0.01, P<0.001, P<0.001 and P=0.006, respectively). Higher microvessel density (MVD) was observed in MSI tumours compared with their MSS counterpart. Mixed morphology, reflecting tumour

  14. High Fat Diets Induce Colonic Epithelial Cell Stress and Inflammation that is Reversed by IL-22

    PubMed Central

    Gulhane, Max; Murray, Lydia; Lourie, Rohan; Tong, Hui; Sheng, Yong H.; Wang, Ran; Kang, Alicia; Schreiber, Veronika; Wong, Kuan Yau; Magor, Graham; Denman, Stuart; Begun, Jakob; Florin, Timothy H.; Perkins, Andrew; Cuív, Páraic Ó.; McGuckin, Michael A.; Hasnain, Sumaira Z.

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged high fat diets (HFD) induce low-grade chronic intestinal inflammation in mice, and diets high in saturated fat are a risk factor for the development of human inflammatory bowel diseases. We hypothesized that HFD-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER)/oxidative stress occur in intestinal secretory goblet cells, triggering inflammatory signaling and reducing synthesis/secretion of proteins that form the protective mucus barrier. In cultured intestinal cells non-esterified long-chain saturated fatty acids directly increased oxidative/ER stress leading to protein misfolding. A prolonged HFD elevated the intestinal inflammatory cytokine signature, alongside compromised mucosal barrier integrity with a decrease in goblet cell differentiation and Muc2, a loss in the tight junction protein, claudin-1 and increased serum endotoxin levels. In Winnie mice, that develop spontaneous colitis, HFD-feeding increased ER stress, further compromised the mucosal barrier and increased the severity of colitis. In obese mice IL-22 reduced ER/oxidative stress and improved the integrity of the mucosal barrier, and reversed microbial changes associated with obesity with an increase in Akkermansia muciniphila. Consistent with epidemiological studies, our experiments suggest that HFDs are likely to impair intestinal barrier function, particularly in early life, which partially involves direct effects of free-fatty acids on intestinal cells, and this can be reversed by IL-22 therapy. PMID:27350069

  15. An Immune-Modulating Diet in Combination with Chemotherapy Prevents Cancer Cachexia by Attenuating Systemic Inflammation in Colon 26 Tumor-Bearing Mice.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kentaro; Sasayama, Akina; Takahashi, Takeshi; Yamaji, Taketo

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cachexia is characterized by muscle wasting caused partly by systemic inflammation. We previously demonstrated an immune-modulating diet (IMD), an enteral diet enriched with immunonutrition and whey-hydrolyzed peptides, to have antiinflammatory effects in some experimental models. Here, we investigated whether the IMD in combination with chemotherapy could prevent cancer cachexia in colon 26 tumor-bearing mice. Forty tumor-bearing mice were randomized into 5 groups: tumor-bearing control (TB), low dose 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and standard diet (LF/ST), low dose 5-FU and IMD (LF/IMD), high dose 5-FU and standard diet (HF/ST) and high dose 5-FU and IMD (HF/IMD). The ST and IMD mice received a standard diet or the IMD ad libitum for 21 days. Muscle mass in the IMD mice was significantly higher than that in the ST mice. The LF/IMD in addition to the HF/ST and HF/IMD mice preserved their body and carcass weights. Plasma prostaglandin E2 levels were significantly lower in the IMD mice than in the ST mice. A combined effect was also observed in plasma interleukin-6, glucose, and vascular endothelial growth factor levels. Tumor weight was not affected by different diets. In conclusion, the IMD in combination with chemotherapy prevented cancer cachexia without suppressing chemotherapeutic efficacy.

  16. Inflammation Subverts Hippocampal Synaptic Plasticity in Experimental Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mandolesi, Georgia; Piccinin, Sonia; Berretta, Nicola; Pignatelli, Marco; Feligioni, Marco; Musella, Alessandra; Gentile, Antonietta; Mori, Francesco; Bernardi, Giorgio; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Mercuri, Nicola B.; Centonze, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Abnormal use-dependent synaptic plasticity is universally accepted as the main physiological correlate of memory deficits in neurodegenerative disorders. It is unclear whether synaptic plasticity deficits take place during neuroinflammatory diseases, such as multiple sclerosis (MS) and its mouse model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). In EAE mice, we found significant alterations of synaptic plasticity rules in the hippocampus. When compared to control mice, in fact, hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) induction was favored over long-term depression (LTD) in EAE, as shown by a significant rightward shift in the frequency–synaptic response function. Notably, LTP induction was also enhanced in hippocampal slices from control mice following interleukin-1β (IL-1β) perfusion, and both EAE and IL-1β inhibited GABAergic spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSC) without affecting glutamatergic transmission and AMPA/NMDA ratio. EAE was also associated with selective loss of GABAergic interneurons and with reduced gamma-frequency oscillations in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. Finally, we provided evidence that microglial activation in the EAE hippocampus was associated with IL-1β expression, and hippocampal slices from control mice incubated with activated microglia displayed alterations of GABAergic transmission similar to those seen in EAE brains, through a mechanism dependent on enhanced IL-1β signaling. These data may yield novel insights into the basis of cognitive deficits in EAE and possibly of MS. PMID:23355887

  17. Mast Cells and Serotonin Synthesis Modulate Chagas Disease in the Colon: Clinical and Experimental Evidence.

    PubMed

    Kannen, Vinicius; Sakita, Juliana Y; Carneiro, Zumira A; Bader, Michael; Alenina, Natalia; Teixeira, Regina R; de Oliveira, Enio C; Brunaldi, Mariângela O; Gasparotto, Bianca; Sartori, Daniela C; Fernandes, Cleverson R; Silva, João S; Andrade, Marcus V; Silva, Wilson A; Uyemura, Sergio A; Garcia, Sérgio B

    2018-06-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) infects millions of Latin Americans each year and can induce chagasic megacolon. Little is known about how serotonin (5-HT) modulates this condition. Aim We investigated whether 5-HT synthesis alters T. cruzi infection in the colon. Forty-eight paraffin-embedded samples from normal colon and chagasic megacolon were histopathologically analyzed (173/2009). Tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (Tph1) knockout (KO) mice and c-Kit W-sh mice underwent T. cruzi infection together with their wild-type counterparts. Also, mice underwent different drug treatments (16.1.1064.60.3). In both humans and experimental mouse models, the serotonergic system was activated by T. cruzi infection (p < 0.05). While treating Tph1KO mice with 5-HT did not significantly increase parasitemia in the colon (p > 0.05), rescuing its synthesis promoted trypanosomiasis (p < 0.01). T. cruzi-related 5-HT release (p < 0.05) seemed not only to increase inflammatory signaling, but also to enlarge the pericryptal macrophage and mast cell populations (p < 0.01). Knocking out mast cells reduced trypanosomiasis (p < 0.01), although it did not further alter the neuroendocrine cell number and Tph1 expression (p > 0.05). Further experimentation revealed that pharmacologically inhibiting mast cell activity reduced colonic infection (p < 0.01). A similar finding was achieved when 5-HT synthesis was blocked in c-Kit W-sh mice (p > 0.05). However, inhibiting mast cell activity in Tph1KO mice increased colonic trypanosomiasis (p < 0.01). We show that mast cells may modulate the T. cruzi-related increase of 5-HT synthesis in the intestinal colon.

  18. Optimization of chitosan nanoparticles for colon tumors using experimental design methodology.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anekant; Jain, Sanjay K

    2016-12-01

    Purpose Colon-specific drug delivery systems (CDDS) can improve the bio-availability of drugs through the oral route. A novel formulation for oral administration using ligand coupled chitosan nanoparticles bearing 5-Flurouracil (5FU) encapsulated in enteric coated pellets has been investigated for CDDS. Method The effect of polymer concentration, drug concentration, stirring time and stirring speed on the encapsulation efficiency, and size of nanoparticles were evaluated. The best (or optimum) formulation was obtained by response surface methodology. Using the experimental data, analysis of variance has been carried out to evolve linear empirical models. Using a new methodology, polynomial models have been evolved and the parametric analysis has been carried out. In order to target nanoparticles to the hyaluronic acid (HA) receptors present on colon tumors, HA coupled nanoparticles were tested for their efficacy in vivo. The HA coupled nanoparticles were encapsulated in pellets and were enteric coated to release the drug in the colon. Results Drug release studies under conditions of mimicking stomach to colon transit have shown that the drug was protected from being released in the physiological environment of the stomach and small intestine. The relatively high local drug concentration with prolonged exposure time provides a potential to enhance anti-tumor efficacy with low systemic toxicity for the treatment of colon cancer. Conclusions Conclusively, HA coupled nanoparticles can be considered as the potential candidate for targeted drug delivery and are anticipated to be promising in the treatment of colorectal cancer.

  19. Aluminum enhances inflammation and decreases mucosal healing in experimental colitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Pineton de Chambrun, G; Body-Malapel, M; Frey-Wagner, I; Djouina, M; Deknuydt, F; Atrott, K; Esquerre, N; Altare, F; Neut, C; Arrieta, M C; Kanneganti, T-D; Rogler, G; Colombel, J-F; Cortot, A; Desreumaux, P; Vignal, C

    2014-01-01

    The increasing incidence of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) in developing countries has highlighted the critical role of environmental pollutants as causative factors in their pathophysiology. Despite its ubiquity and immune toxicity, the impact of aluminum in the gut is not known. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of environmentally relevant intoxication with aluminum in murine models of colitis and to explore the underlying mechanisms. Oral administration of aluminum worsened intestinal inflammation in mice with 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid- and dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis and chronic colitis in interleukin 10-negative (IL10−/−) mice. Aluminum increased the intensity and duration of macroscopic and histologic inflammation, colonic myeloperoxidase activity, inflammatory cytokines expression, and decreased the epithelial cell renewal compared with control animals. Under basal conditions, aluminum impaired intestinal barrier function. In vitro, aluminum induced granuloma formation and synergized with lipopolysaccharide to stimulate inflammatory cytokines expression by epithelial cells. Deleterious effects of aluminum on intestinal inflammation and mucosal repair strongly suggest that aluminum might be an environmental IBD risk factor. PMID:24129165

  20. Long-Term Vitamin D3 Supplementation Does Not Prevent Colonic Inflammation or Modulate Bone Health in IL-10 Knockout Mice at Young Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, Andrea J.; Fielding, Kristina A.; Chen, Jianmin; Comelli, Elena M.; Ward, Wendy E.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an idiopathic disease that can impair bone metabolism. Low vitamin D status has been implicated in its progress. This study used interleukin (IL)-10 knockout (KO) mice, that develop an intestinal inflammation when housed in a non-sterile environment, to determine if supplementation with vitamin D3 throughout life could mitigate inflammation and attenuate the lower bone mineral content (BMC) and density (BMD), and bone strength. Female IL-10 KO mice were randomized 25 or 5000 IU vitamin D3/kg diet throughout pregnancy and lactation. At weaning, offspring received the same or opposite diet as their mother until age three months. Body weight growth was similar among groups within a sex. At three months of age, there were no differences in inflammation and gene expression in the colon of offspring. Male offspring exposed to continuous 25 IU vitamin D3/kg diet had lower (p < 0.001) colonic VDR expression and those exposed only to low vitamin D3 until weaning had higher serum IL-6. There were no differences in femur or vertebral BMC, BMD or bone strength. In summary, long-term exposure to vitamin D3 did not attenuate intestinal inflammation or preserve bone mineral or bone strength. Thus, supplementation with vitamin D3 does not exert anti-inflammatory effects in this mouse model that mimics human inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25247786

  1. Exogenous alkaline phosphatase treatment complements endogenous enzyme protection in colonic inflammation and reduces bacterial translocation in rats.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Moya, P; Ortega-González, M; González, R; Anzola, A; Ocón, B; Hernández-Chirlaque, C; López-Posadas, R; Suárez, M D; Zarzuelo, A; Martínez-Augustin, O; Sánchez de Medina, F

    2012-08-01

    Alkaline phosphatase (AP) inactivates bacterial lipopolysaccharide and may therefore be protective. The small intestine and colon express intestinal (IAP) and tissue nonspecific enzyme (TNAP), respectively. The aim of this study was to assess the therapeutic potential of exogenous AP and its complementarity with endogenous enzyme protection in the intestine, as evidenced recently. IAP was given to rats by the oral or intrarectal route (700U/kgday). Oral budesonide (1mg/kgday) was used as a reference treatment. Treatment with intrarectal AP resulted in a 54.5% and 38.0% lower colonic weight and damage score, respectively, and an almost complete normalization of the expression of S100A8, LCN2 and IL-1β (p<0.05). Oral AP was less efficacious, while budesonide had a more pronounced effect on most parameters. Both oral and intrarectal AP counteracted bacterial translocation effectively (78 and 100%, respectively, p<0.05 for the latter), while budesonide failed to exert a positive effect. AP activity was increased in the feces of TNBS colitic animals, associated with augmented sensitivity to the inhibitor levamisole, suggesting enhanced luminal release of this enzyme. This was also observed in the mouse lymphocyte transfer model of chronic colitis. In a separate time course study, TNAP was shown to increase 2-3 days after colitis induction, while dextran sulfate sodium was a much weaker inducer of this isoform. We conclude that exogenous AP exerts beneficial effects on experimental colitis, which includes protection against bacterial translocation. AP of the tissue-nonspecific isoform is shed in higher amounts to the intestinal lumen in experimental colitis, possibly aiding in intestinal protection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of Moderate Alcohol Consumption on Gene Expression Related to Colonic Inflammation and Antioxidant Enzymes in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Klarich, DawnKylee S.; Penprase, Jerrold; Cintora, Patricia; Medrano, Octavio; Erwin, Danielle; Brasser, Susan M.; Hong, Mee Young

    2017-01-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption is a risk factor associated with colorectal cancer; however, some studies have reported that moderate alcohol consumption may not contribute additional risk for developing colorectal cancer while others suggest that moderate alcohol consumption provides a protective effect that reduces colorectal cancer risk. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of moderate voluntary alcohol (20% ethanol) intake on alternate days for 3 months in outbred Wistar rats on risk factors associated with colorectal cancer development. Colonic gene expression of cyclooxygenase-2, RelA, 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glutathione-S-transferase M1, and aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 were determined. Blood alcohol content, liver function enzyme activities, and 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine DNA adducts were also assessed. Alcohol-treated rats were found to have significantly lower 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine levels in blood, a marker of DNA damage. Alanine aminotransferase and lactate dehydrogenase were both significantly lower in the alcohol group. Moderate alcohol significantly decreased cyclooxygenase-2 gene expression, an inflammatory marker associated with colorectal cancer risk. The alcohol group had significantly increased glutathione-S-transferase M1 expression, an antioxidant enzyme that helps detoxify carcinogens, such as acetaldehyde, and significantly increased aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 expression, which allows for greater acetaldehyde clearance. Increased expression of glutathione-S-transferase M1 and aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 likely contributed to reduce mucosal damage that is caused by acetaldehyde accumulation. These results indicate that moderate alcohol may reduce the risk for colorectal cancer development, which was evidenced by reduced inflammation activity and lower DNA damage after alcohol exposure. PMID:28599714

  3. The COX-2 inhibitor nimesulide suppresses superoxide and 8-hydroxy-deoxyguanosine formation, and stimulates apoptosis in mucosa during early colonic inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Tardieu, D; Jaeg, J P; Deloly, A; Corpet, D E; Cadet, J; Petit, C R

    2000-05-01

    As we have shown previously [Tardieu,D., Jaeg,J.P., Cadet,J., Embvani,E., Corpet,D.E. and Petit,C. (1998) Cancer Lett, 134, 1-5], a 48-h treatment of 6% dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) in drinking water led to a reproducible 2-fold increase of the mutagenic oxidative lesion 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo) in colonic mucosa DNA of rats in vivo. The aim of this study was to test the effect of nimesulide, a preferential COX-2 inhibitor, on the DSS-induced 8-oxodGuo increase. We show that nimesulide when administered orally, simultaneously with DSS at 5 mg/kg/day, not only totally prevents 8-oxodGuo formation but also suppresses the 5-fold increase of superoxide induced by DSS in the colonic mucosa. This was measured by in vivo formazan blue precipitation (P < 0.01 in the Wilcoxon test). Moreover, nimesulide enhances apoptosis by approximately 30% as compared with the already high level induced by DSS treatment (P < 0.01). It is suggested that the significant increase in mutagenic oxidative DNA damage, produced by mild acute colonic inflammation, could be important in the initiation of colon cancer in both animals and man. These effects may explain at least partly the well-documented protective action towards colon cancer by preferential COX-2 inhibitors, either xenobiotics such as nimesulide or natural nutrients.

  4. Rosmarinic acid suppresses colonic inflammation in dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-induced mice via dual inhibition of NF-κB and STAT3 activation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Bo-Ram; Chung, Kyung-Sook; Cheon, Se-Yun; Lee, Minho; Hwang, Soonjae; Noh Hwang, Sam; Rhee, Ki-Jong; An, Hyo-Jin

    2017-04-06

    Ulcerative colitis (UC), a type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the colon. Although UC is generally treated with anti-inflammatory drugs or immunosuppressants, most of these treatments often prove to be inadequate. Rosmarinic acid (RA) is a phenolic ester included in various medicinal herbs such as Salvia miltiorrhiz and Perilla frutescens. Although RA has many biological and pharmacological activities, the anti-inflammatory effect of RA in colonic tissue remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects and underlying molecular mechanism of RA in mice with dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. In the DSS-induced colitis model, RA significantly reduced the severity of colitis, as assessed by disease activity index (DAI) scores, colonic damage, and colon length. In addition, RA resulted in the reduction of the inflammatory-related cytokines, such as IL-6, IL-1β, and IL-22, and protein levels of COX-2 and iNOS in mice with DSS-induced colitis. Furthermore, RA effectively and pleiotropically inhibited nuclear factor-kappa B and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activation, and subsequently reduced the activity of pro-survival genes that depend on these transcription factors. These results demonstrate that RA has an ameliorative effect on colonic inflammation and thus a potential therapeutic role in colitis.

  5. Alterations in biomechanical properties and microstructure of colon wall in early-stage experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiaohui; Xu, Xiaojuan; Lin, Sisi; Cheng, Yu; Tong, Jianhua; Li, Yongyu

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of early-stage dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced mouse colitis on the biomechanical properties and microstructure of colon walls. In the present study, colitis was induced in 8-week-old mice by the oral administration of DSS, and then 10 control and 10 experimental colitis samples were harvested. Uniaxial tensile tests were performed to measure the ultimate tensile strength and ultimate stretches of colon tissues. In addition, histological investigations were performed to characterize changes in the microstructure of the colon wall following treatment. The results revealed that the ultimate tensile stresses were 232±33 and 183±25 kPa for the control and DSS groups, respectively (P=0.001). Ultimate stretches at rupture for the control and DSS groups were 1.43±0.04 and 1.51±0.06, respectively (P=0.006). However, there was no statistically significant difference in tissue stiffness between the two groups. Histological analysis demonstrated high numbers of inflammatory cells infiltrated into the stroma in the DSS group, leading to significant submucosa edema. Hyperplasia was also identified in the DSS-treated submucosa, causing a disorganized microstructure within the colon wall. Furthermore, a large number of collagen fibers in the DSS-treated muscular layer were disrupted, and fiber bundles were thinner when compared with the control group. In conclusion, early-stage experimental colitis alters the mechanical properties and microstructural characteristics of the colon walls, further contributing to tissue remodeling in the pathological process.

  6. Colonic inflammation accompanies an increase of β-catenin signaling and Lachnospiraceae/Streptococcaceae bacteria in the hind gut of high-fat diet-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huawei; Ishaq, Suzanne L; Zhao, Feng-Qi; Wright, André-Denis G

    2016-09-01

    Consumption of an obesigenic/high-fat diet (HFD) is associated with a high colon cancer risk and may alter the gut microbiota. To test the hypothesis that long-term high-fat (HF) feeding accelerates inflammatory process and changes gut microbiome composition, C57BL/6 mice were fed HFD (45% energy) or a low-fat (LF) diet (10% energy) for 36 weeks. At the end of the study, body weights in the HF group were 35% greater than those in the LF group. These changes were associated with dramatic increases in body fat composition, inflammatory cell infiltration, inducible nitric oxide synthase protein concentration and cell proliferation marker (Ki67) in ileum and colon. Similarly, β-catenin expression was increased in colon (but not ileum). Consistent with gut inflammation phenotype, we also found that plasma leptin, interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α concentrations were also elevated in mice fed the HFD, indicative of chronic inflammation. Fecal DNA was extracted and the V1-V3 hypervariable region of the microbial 16S rRNA gene was amplified using primers suitable for 454 pyrosequencing. Compared to the LF group, the HF group had high proportions of bacteria from the family Lachnospiraceae/Streptococcaceae, which is known to be involved in the development of metabolic disorders, diabetes and colon cancer. Taken together, our data demonstrate, for the first time, that long-term HF consumption not only increases inflammatory status but also accompanies an increase of colonic β-catenin signaling and Lachnospiraceae/Streptococcaceae bacteria in the hind gut of C57BL/6 mice. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Noninvasive Longitudinal Study of a Magnetic Resonance Imaging Biomarker for the Quantification of Colon Inflammation in a Mouse Model of Colitis.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Andrea; Bluhmki, Teresa; Schönberger, Tanja; Kaaru, Eric; Beltzer, Anne; Raymond, Ernest; Wunder, Andreas; Thakker, Paresh; Stierstorfer, Birgit; Stiller, Detlef

    2016-06-01

    Colonoscopy is the gold standard to diagnose and follow up the evolution of inflammatory bowel diseases. However, this technique can still present a risk of severe complications, a general discomfort in patients, and its diagnostic value is limited to the visualization of the colon mucosal changes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is emerging as a noninvasive imaging technique of choice to overcome these limitations. The aim of this work was to evaluate the potential of colon wall thickness measured using MRI as an in vivo imaging biomarker of inflammation for inflammatory bowel disease in an animal model of this disease. On day 0, 2% or 3% Dextran sodium sulfate was added to the drinking water of mice (n = 10/group) for 5 days. Six mice were left as controls. Animals were imaged with colonoscopy and MRI on days 7, 11, and 21 to study the colitis progression. Histology was performed at the end of the protocol. The colon wall thickness measured in Dextran sodium sulfate-treated animals was shown to be significantly and dose dependently increased compared to controls. Colonoscopy showed similar results and excellently correlated with MRI measurements and histology. The proposed protocol showed high robustness, with negligible interoperator and intraoperator variability. The findings of this investigation suggest the feasibility of using MRI for the noninvasive assessment of colon wall thickness as a robust surrogate biomarker for colon inflammation detection and follow-up. The data presented show the potential of MRI in in vivo preclinical longitudinal studies, including testing of new drugs or investigation of inflammatory bowel disease development mechanisms.

  8. Experimental warming decreases arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal colonization in prairie plants along a Mediterranean climate gradient.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Hannah; Johnson, Bart R; Bohannan, Brendan; Pfeifer-Meister, Laurel; Mueller, Rebecca; Bridgham, Scott D

    2016-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) provide numerous services to their plant symbionts. Understanding climate change effects on AMF, and the resulting plant responses, is crucial for predicting ecosystem responses at regional and global scales. We investigated how the effects of climate change on AMF-plant symbioses are mediated by soil water availability, soil nutrient availability, and vegetation dynamics. We used a combination of a greenhouse experiment and a manipulative climate change experiment embedded within a Mediterranean climate gradient in the Pacific Northwest, USA to examine this question. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to determine the direct and indirect effects of experimental warming on AMF colonization. Warming directly decreased AMF colonization across plant species and across the climate gradient of the study region. Other positive and negative indirect effects of warming, mediated by soil water availability, soil nutrient availability, and vegetation dynamics, canceled each other out. A warming-induced decrease in AMF colonization would likely have substantial consequences for plant communities and ecosystem function. Moreover, predicted increases in more intense droughts and heavier rains for this region could shift the balance among indirect causal pathways, and either exacerbate or mitigate the negative, direct effect of increased temperature on AMF colonization.

  9. A Review of Experimental Evidence Linking Neurotoxic Organophosphorus Compounds and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Banks, Christopher N.; Lein, Pamela J.

    2012-01-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) nerve agents and pesticides inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE), and this is thought to be a primary mechanism mediating the neurotoxicity of these compounds. However, a number of observations suggest that mechanisms other than or in addition to AChE inhibition contribute to OP neurotoxicity. There is significant experimental evidence that acute OP intoxication elicits a robust inflammatory response, and emerging evidence suggests that chronic repeated low-level OP exposure also upregulates inflammatory mediators. A critical question that is just beginning to be addressed experimentally is the pathophysiologic relevance of inflammation in either acute or chronic OP intoxication. The goal of this article is to provide a brief review of the current status of our knowledge linking inflammation to OP intoxication, and to discuss the implications of these findings in the context of therapeutic and diagnostic approaches to OP neurotoxicity. PMID:22342984

  10. The combination of high-fat diet-induced obesity and chronic ulcerative colitis reciprocally exacerbates adipose tissue and colon inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This study evaluated the relationship between ulcerative colitis and obesity, which are both chronic diseases characterized by inflammation and increases in immune cells and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Methods Mice with chronic ulcerative colitis induced by 2 cycles of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) in the first and fourth week of the experiment were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) to induce obesity by 8 weeks. The animals were divided into 4 \\ groups (control, colitis, HFD and colitis + HFD). Results Obesity alone did not raise histopathology scores, but the combination of obesity and colitis worsened the scores in the colon compared to colitis group. Despite the reduction in weight gain, there was increased inflammatory infiltrate in both the colon and visceral adipose tissue of colitis + HFD mice due to increased infiltration of macrophages, neutrophils and lymphocytes. Intravital microscopy of VAT microvasculature showed an increase in leukocyte adhesion and rolling and overexpression of adhesion molecules compared to other groups. Moreover, circulating lymphocytes, monocytes and neutrophils in the spleen and cecal lymph nodes were increased in the colitis + HFD group. Conclusion Our results demonstrated the relationship between ulcerative colitis and obesity as aggravating factors for each disease, with increased inflammation in the colon and adipose tissue and systemic alterations observed in the spleen, lymph nodes and bloodstream. PMID:22073943

  11. Inflammation and Disintegration of Intestinal Villi in an Experimental Model for Vibrio parahaemolyticus-Induced Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, Jennifer M.; Rui, Haopeng; Zhou, Xiaohui; Iida, Tetsuya; Kodoma, Toshio; Ito, Susuma; Davis, Brigid M.; Bronson, Roderick T.; Waldor, Matthew K.

    2012-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a leading cause of seafood-borne gastroenteritis in many parts of the world, but there is limited knowledge of the pathogenesis of V. parahaemolyticus-induced diarrhea. The absence of an oral infection-based small animal model to study V. parahaemolyticus intestinal colonization and disease has constrained analyses of the course of infection and the factors that mediate it. Here, we demonstrate that infant rabbits oro-gastrically inoculated with V. parahaemolyticus develop severe diarrhea and enteritis, the main clinical and pathologic manifestations of disease in infected individuals. The pathogen principally colonizes the distal small intestine, and this colonization is dependent upon type III secretion system 2. The distal small intestine is also the major site of V. parahaemolyticus-induced tissue damage, reduced epithelial barrier function, and inflammation, suggesting that disease in this region of the gastrointestinal tract accounts for most of the diarrhea that accompanies V. parahaemolyticus infection. Infection appears to proceed through a characteristic sequence of steps that includes remarkable elongation of microvilli and the formation of V. parahaemolyticus-filled cavities within the epithelial surface, and culminates in villus disruption. Both depletion of epithelial cell cytoplasm and epithelial cell extrusion contribute to formation of the cavities in the epithelial surface. V. parahaemolyticus also induces proliferation of epithelial cells and recruitment of inflammatory cells, both of which occur before wide-spread damage to the epithelium is evident. Collectively, our findings suggest that V. parahaemolyticus damages the host intestine and elicits disease via previously undescribed processes and mechanisms. PMID:22438811

  12. NLRP12 Suppresses Colon Inflammation and Tumorigenesis through the Negative Regulation of Non-canonical NF-κB Signaling and MAP Kinase Activation

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Irving C.; Wilson, Justin E.; Schneider, Monika; Lich, John D.; Roberts, Reid A.; Arthur, Janelle C.; Woodford, Rita-Marie T.; Davis, Beckley K.; Uronis, Joshua M.; Herfarth, Hans H.; Jobin, Christian; Rogers, Arlin B.; Ting, Jenny P.-Y.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY In vitro data suggest that a subgroup of NLR proteins, including NLRP12, inhibits the transcription factor NF-κB, although physiologic and disease-relevant evidence is largely missing. Dysregulated NF-κB activity is associated with colonic inflammation and cancer, and we found Nlrp12-/- mice were highly susceptible to colitis and colitis-associated colon cancer. Polyps isolated from Nlrp12-/- mice showed elevated non-canonical NF-κB activation and increased expression of target genes that were associated with cancer, including Cxcl13 and Cxcl12. NLRP12 negatively regulated ERK and AKT signaling pathways in affected tumor tissues. Both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic-derived NLRP12 contributed to inflammation, but the latter dominantly contributed to tumorigenesis. The non-canonical NF-κB pathway was regulated upon degradation of TRAF3 and activation of NIK. NLRP12 interacted with both NIK and TRAF3, and Nlrp12-/- cells have constitutively elevated NIK, p100 processing to p52 and reduced TRAF3. Thus, NLRP12 is a checkpoint of noncanonical NF-κB, inflammation and tumorigenesis. PMID:22503542

  13. Increased Skin Inflammation and Blood Vessel Density in Human and Experimental Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Tellechea, Ana; Kafanas, Antonios; Leal, Ermelindo C; Tecilazich, Francesco; Kuchibhotla, Sarada; Auster, Michael E; Kontoes, Iraklis; Paolino, Jacqueline; Carvalho, Eugenia; Nabzdyk, Leena Pradhan; Veves, Aristidis

    2013-01-01

    Systemic inflammation is associated with impaired wound healing in diabetic patients. Using immunohistochemistry techniques, the authors investigated changes in skin inflammation and skin blood vessels in human and experimental diabetes. Comparing to the non-DM human subjects, the total number of inflammatory cells per biopsy and the number of inflammatory cells around blood vessels, a strong indication of inflammation, were higher in DM subjects irrespective of their risk for developing diabetic foot ulcer. Inflammatory cell infiltration was robustly increased in all diabetic animal models compared to their non-diabetic controls. The number and density of blood vessels and CD31 positive proliferating endothelial cells around pre-existing skin vessels was also higher in the DM patients. However, there were no differences in the skin blood flow between the non-DM and DM subjects. The number of skin blood vessels was also increased in the DM animals; however, these differences were less obvious than the ones observed for inflammatory cells. We conclude that skin inflammation and skin blood vessel density is increased in diabetic human subjects and in rodent and rabbit models of diabetes. PMID:23446362

  14. Infrared (810-nm) low-level laser therapy on rat experimental knee inflammation.

    PubMed

    Pallotta, Rodney Capp; Bjordal, Jan Magnus; Frigo, Lúcio; Leal Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; Teixeira, Simone; Marcos, Rodrigo Labat; Ramos, Luciano; Messias, Felipe de Moura; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Alvaro Brandão

    2012-01-01

    Arthritis of the knee is the most common type of joint inflammatory disorder and it is associated with pain and inflammation of the joint capsule. Few studies address the effects of the 810-nm laser in such conditions. Here we investigated the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT; infrared, 810-nm) in experimentally induced rat knee inflammation. Thirty male Wistar rats (230-250 g) were anesthetized and injected with carrageenan by an intra-articular route. After 6 and 12 h, all animals were killed by CO(2) inhalation and the articular cavity was washed for cellular and biochemical analysis. Articular tissue was carefully removed for real-time PCR analysis in order to evaluate COX-1 and COX-2 expression. LLLT was able to significantly inhibit the total number of leukocytes, as well as the myeloperoxidase activity with 1, 3, and 6 J (Joules) of energy. This result was corroborated by cell counting showing the reduction of polymorphonuclear cells at the inflammatory site. Vascular extravasation was significantly inhibited at the higher dose of energy of 10 J. Both COX-1 and 2 gene expression were significantly enhanced by laser irradiation while PGE(2) production was inhibited. Low-level laser therapy operating at 810 nm markedly reduced inflammatory signs of inflammation but increased COX-1 and 2 gene expression. Further studies are necessary to investigate the possible production of antiinflammatory mediators by COX enzymes induced by laser irradiation in knee inflammation.

  15. Successional colonization of temporary streams: An experimental approach using aquatic insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godoy, Bruno Spacek; Queiroz, Luciano Lopes; Lodi, Sara; Nascimento de Jesus, Jhonathan Diego; Oliveira, Leandro Gonçalves

    2016-11-01

    The metacommunity concept studies the processes that structure communities on local and regional scales. This concept is useful to assess spatial variability. However, temporal patterns (e.g., ecological succession and colonization) are neglected in metacommunity studies, since such patterns require temporally extensive, and hard to execute studies. We used experimental habitats in temporary streams located within the Brazilian Cerrado to evaluate the importance of succession for the aquatic insect metacommunity. Five artificial habitats consisting of wrapped crushed rock were set transversally to the water flow in five streams. The habitats were sampled weekly to assess community composition, and replaced after sampling to identify new potential colonizers. We analyzed the accumulation of new colonizers after each week using a logistic model. We selected pairs of experimental habitats and estimated the Bray-Curtis dissimilarity index to assess the community composition trajectory during the experiment. We used the dissimilarity values in ANOVA tests, identifying the importance of time and space for the community. The number of new taxa stabilized in the third week, and we estimated a weekly increase of 1.61 new taxa in the community after stabilization. The overall pattern was a small change on community composition, but one stream had a higher weekly turnover. Our results showed a relevant influence of time in the initial communities of aquatic insects of temporary streams. However, we must observe the temporal pattern in a spatial context, once different streams have different successional history regarding number of taxa and community turnover. We highlight the importance of aerial dispersal and movement to seek oviposition sites as an important factor in determining colonization patterns.

  16. Evaluating Darwin’s Naturalization Hypothesis in Experimental Plant Assemblages: Phylogenetic Relationships Do Not Determine Colonization Success

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Sergio A.; Escobedo, Victor M.; Aranda, Jorge; Carvallo, Gastón O.

    2014-01-01

    Darwin’s naturalization hypothesis (DNH) proposes that colonization is less likely when the colonizing species is related to members of the invaded community, because evolutionary closeness intensifies competition among species that share similar resources. Studies that have evaluated DNH from correlational evidence have yielded controversial results with respect to its occurrence and generality. In the present study we carried out a set of manipulative experiments in which we controlled the phylogenetic relatedness of one colonizing species (Lactuca sativa) with five assemblages of plants (the recipient communities), and evaluated the colonizing success using five indicators (germination, growth, flowering, survival, and recruitment). The evolutionary relatedness was calculated as the mean phylogenetic distance between Lactuca and the members of each assemblage (MPD) and by the mean phylogenetic distance to the nearest neighbor (MNND). The results showed that the colonization success of Lactuca was not affected by MPD or MNND values, findings that do not support DNH. These results disagree with experimental studies made with communities of microorganisms, which show an inverse relation between colonization success and phylogenetic distances. We suggest that these discrepancies may be due to the high phylogenetic distance used, since in our experiments the colonizing species (Lactuca) was a distant relative of the assemblage members, while in the other studies the colonizing taxa have been related at the congeneric and conspecific levels. We suggest that under field conditions the phylogenetic distance is a weak predictor of competition, and it has a limited role in determining colonization success, contrary to prediction of the DNH. More experimental studies are needed to establish the importance of phylogenetic distance between colonizing species and invaded community on colonization success. PMID:25141013

  17. The hallucinogenic diterpene salvinorin A inhibits leukotriene synthesis in experimental models of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Antonietta; Pace, Simona; Tedesco, Federica; Pagano, Ester; Guerra, Germano; Troisi, Fabiana; Werner, Markus; Roviezzo, Fiorentina; Zjawiony, Jordan K; Werz, Oliver; Izzo, Angelo A; Capasso, Raffaele

    2016-04-01

    Leukotrienes (LTs) are lipid mediators derived from arachidonic acid (AA) involved in a number of autoimmune/inflammatory disorders including asthma, allergic rhinitis and cardiovascular diseases. Salvinorin A (SA), a diterpene isolated from the hallucinogenic plant Salvia divinorum, is a well-established analgesic compound, but its anti-inflammatory properties are under-researched and its effects on LT production is unknown to date. Here, we studied the possible effect of SA on LT production and verified its actions on experimental models of inflammation in which LTs play a prominent role. Peritoneal macrophages (PM) stimulated by calcium ionophore A23187 were chosen as in vitro system to evaluate the effect of SA on LT production. Zymosan-induced peritonitis in mice and carrageenan-induced pleurisy in rats were selected as LT-related models to evaluate the effect of SA on inflammation as well as on LT biosynthesis. SA inhibited, in a concentration-dependent manner, A23187-induced LTB4 biosynthesis in isolated PM. In zymosan-induced peritonitis, SA inhibited cell infiltration, myeloperoxidase activity, vascular permeability and LTC4 production in the peritoneal cavity without decreasing the production of prostaglandin E2. In carrageenan-induced pleurisy in rats, a more sophisticated model of acute inflammation related to LTs, SA significantly inhibited LTB4 production in the inflammatory exudates, along with reducing the phlogistic process in the lung. In conclusion, SA inhibited LT production and it was effective in experimental models of inflammation in which LTs play a pivotal role. SA might be considered as a lead compound for the development of drugs useful in LTs-related diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Schistosoma mansoni Tegument (Smteg) Induces IL-10 and Modulates Experimental Airway Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Marinho, Fábio Vitarelli; Alves, Clarice Carvalho; de Souza, Sara C; da Silva, Cintia M G; Cassali, Geovanni D; Oliveira, Sergio C; Pacifico, Lucila G G; Fonseca, Cristina T

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that S. mansoni infection and inoculation of the parasite eggs and antigens are able to modulate airways inflammation induced by OVA in mice. This modulation was associated to an enhanced production of interleukin-10 and to an increased number of regulatory T cells. The S. mansoni schistosomulum is the first stage to come into contact with the host immune system and its tegument represents the host-parasite interface. The schistosomula tegument (Smteg) has never been studied in the context of modulation of inflammatory disorders, although immune evasion mechanisms take place in this phase of infection to guarantee the persistence of the parasite in the host. The aim of this study was to evaluate the Smteg ability to modulate inflammation in an experimental airway inflammation model induced by OVA and to characterize the immune factors involved in this modulation. To achieve the objective, BALB/c mice were sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) and then challenged with OVA aerosol after Smteg intraperitoneal inoculation. Protein extravasation and inflammatory cells were assessed in bronchoalveolar lavage and IgE levels were measured in serum. Additionally, lungs were excised for histopathological analyses, cytokine measurement and characterization of the cell populations. Inoculation with Smteg led to a reduction in the protein levels in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and eosinophils in both BAL and lung tissue. In the lung tissue there was a reduction in inflammatory cells and collagen deposition as well as in IL-5, IL-13, IL-25 and CCL11 levels. Additionally, a decrease in specific anti-OVA IgE levels was observed. The reduction observed in these inflammatory parameters was associated with increased levels of IL-10 in lung tissues. Furthermore, Smteg/asthma mice showed high percentage of CD11b+F4/80+IL-10+ and CD11c+CD11b+IL-10+ cells in lungs. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that S. mansoni schistosomula tegument can modulates

  19. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Human Gingiva Are Capable of Immunomodulatory Functions and Ameliorate Inflammation-Related Tissue Destruction in Experimental Colitis1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qunzhou; Shi, Shihong; Liu, Yi; Uyanne, Jettie; Shi, Yufang; Shi, Songtao; Le, Anh D.

    2010-01-01

    Aside from the well-established self-renewal and multipotent differentiation properties, mesenchymal stem cells exhibit both immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory roles in several experimental autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. In this study, we isolated a new population of stem cells from human gingiva, a tissue source easily accessible from the oral cavity, namely, gingiva-derived mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs), which exhibited clonogenicity, self-renewal, and multipotent differentiation capacities. Most importantly, GMSCs were capable of immunomodulatory functions, specifically suppressed peripheral blood lymphocyte proliferation, induced expression of a wide panel of immunosuppressive factors including IL-10, IDO, inducible NO synthase (iNOS), and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) in response to the inflammatory cytokine, IFN-γ. Cell-based therapy using systemic infusion of GMSCs in experimental colitis significantly ameliorated both clinical and histopathological severity of the colonic inflammation, restored the injured gastrointestinal mucosal tissues, reversed diarrhea and weight loss, and suppressed the overall disease activity in mice. The therapeutic effect of GMSCs was mediated, in part, by the suppression of inflammatory infiltrates and inflammatory cytokines/mediators and the increased infiltration of regulatory T cells and the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 at the colonic sites. Taken together, GMSCs can function as an immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory component of the immune system in vivo and is a promising cell source for cell-based treatment in experimental inflammatory diseases. PMID:19923445

  20. Worm Proteins of Schistosoma mansoni Reduce the Severity of Experimental Chronic Colitis in Mice by Suppressing Colonic Proinflammatory Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Heylen, Marthe; Ruyssers, Nathalie E.; De Man, Joris G.; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre; Pelckmans, Paul A.; Moreels, Tom G.; De Winter, Benedicte Y.

    2014-01-01

    Although helminthic therapy as a possible new option to treat inflammatory bowel disease is a well-established concept by now, the search for immunomodulatory helminth-derived compounds and their mechanisms of action is still ongoing. We investigated the therapeutic potential and the underlying immunological mechanisms of Schistosoma mansoni soluble worm proteins (SmSWP) in an adoptive T cell transfer mouse model of chronic colitis. Both a curative and a preventive treatment protocol were included in this study. The curative administration of SmSWP (started when colitis was established), resulted in a significant improvement of the clinical disease score, colonoscopy, macroscopic and microscopic inflammation score, colon length and myeloperoxidase activity. The therapeutic potential of the preventive SmSWP treatment (started before colitis was established), was less pronounced compared with the curative SmSWP treatment but still resulted in an improved clinical disease score, body weight loss, colon length and microscopic inflammation score. Both the curative and preventive SmSWP treatment downregulated the mRNA expression of the proinflammatory cytokines IFN-γ and IL-17A and upregulated the mRNA expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-4 in the colon at the end of the experiment. This colonic immunomodulatory effect of SmSWP could not be confirmed at the protein level. Moreover, the effect of SmSWP appeared to be a local colonic phenomenon, since the flow cytometric T cell characterization of the mesenteric lymph nodes and the cytokine measurements in the serum did not reveal any effect of SmSWP treatment. In conclusion, SmSWP treatment reduced the severity of colitis in the adoptive transfer mouse model via the suppression of proinflammatory cytokines and the induction of an anti-inflammatory response in the colon. PMID:25313594

  1. Immunoregulatory actions of epithelial cell PPAR gamma at the colonic mucosa of mice with experimental inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, Saroj K; Guri, Amir J; Climent, Montse; Vives, Cristina; Carbo, Adria; Horne, William T; Hontecillas, Raquel; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep

    2010-04-20

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors are nuclear receptors highly expressed in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) and immune cells within the gut mucosa and are implicated in modulating inflammation and immune responses. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of targeted deletion of PPAR gamma in IEC on progression of experimental inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In the first phase, PPAR gamma flfl; Villin Cre- (VC-) and PPAR gamma flfl; Villin Cre+ (VC+) mice in a mixed FVB/C57BL/6 background were challenged with 2.5% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) in drinking water for 0, 2, or 7 days. VC+ mice express a transgenic recombinase under the control of the Villin-Cre promoter that causes an IEC-specific deletion of PPAR gamma. In the second phase, we generated VC- and VC+ mice in a C57BL/6 background that were challenged with 2.5% DSS. Mice were scored on disease severity both clinically and histopathologically. Flow cytometry was used to phenotypically characterize lymphocyte and macrophage populations in blood, spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes. Global gene expression analysis was profiled using Affymetrix microarrays. The IEC-specific deficiency of PPAR gamma in mice with a mixed background worsened colonic inflammatory lesions, but had no effect on disease activity (DAI) or weight loss. In contrast, the IEC-specific PPAR gamma null mice in C57BL/6 background exhibited more severe inflammatory lesions, DAI and weight loss in comparison to their littermates expressing PPAR gamma in IEC. Global gene expression profiling revealed significantly down-regulated expression of lysosomal pathway genes and flow cytometry results demonstrated suppressed production of IL-10 by CD4+ T cells in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) of IEC-specific PPAR gamma null mice. Our results demonstrate that adequate expression of PPAR gamma in IEC is required for the regulation of mucosal immune responses and prevention of experimental IBD, possibly by modulation of

  2. Intravital endoscopic technology for real-time monitoring of inflammation caused in experimental periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Movila, Alexandru; Kajiya, Mikihito; Wisitrasameewong, Wichaya; Stashenko, Philip; Vardar-Sengul, Saynur; Hernandez, Maria; Thomas Temple, H; Kawai, Toshihisa

    2018-06-01

    We report a novel method for in situ imaging of microvascular permeability in inflamed gingival tissue, using state-of-the-art Cellvizio™ intravital endoscopic technology and a mouse model of ligature-induced periodontitis. The silk ligature was first placed at the upper left second molar. Seven days later, the ligature was removed, and the animals were intravenously injected with Evans blue. Evans blue dye, which selectively binds to blood albumin, was used to monitor the level of inflammation by monitoring vascular permeability in control non-diseased and ligature-induced experimental periodontitis tissue. More specifically, leakage of Evans blue-bound albumin from the micro-capillary to connective tissue indicates the state of inflammation occurring in the specific site. Evans blue leakage from blood vessels was imaged in situ by directly attaching the endoscope (mini Z tip) of the Cellvizio™ system to the gingival tissue without any surgical incision. Evans blue emission intensity was significantly elevated in gingiva of periodontitis lesions, but not control non-ligature placed gingiva, indicating that this technology can be used as a potential minimally invasive diagnostic tool to monitor the level of inflammation at the periodontal disease site. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Copper toxicology, oxidative stress and inflammation using zebrafish as experimental model.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Talita Carneiro Brandão; Campos, Maria Martha; Bogo, Maurício Reis

    2016-07-01

    Copper is an essential micronutrient and a key catalytic cofactor in a wide range of enzymes. As a trace element, copper levels are tightly regulated and both its deficit and excess are deleterious to the organism. Under inflammatory conditions, serum copper levels are increased and trigger oxidative stress responses that activate inflammatory responses. Interestingly, copper dyshomeostasis, oxidative stress and inflammation are commonly present in several chronic diseases. Copper exposure can be easily modeled in zebrafish; a consolidated model in toxicology with increasing interest in immunity-related research. As a result of developmental, economical and genetic advantages, this freshwater teleost is uniquely suitable for chemical and genetic large-scale screenings, representing a powerful experimental tool for a whole-organism approach, mechanistic studies, disease modeling and beyond. Copper toxicological and more recently pro-inflammatory effects have been investigated in both larval and adult zebrafish with breakthrough findings. Here, we provide an overview of copper metabolism in health and disease and its effects on oxidative stress and inflammation responses in zebrafish models. Copper-induced inflammation is highlighted owing to its potential to easily mimic pro-oxidative and pro-inflammatory features that combined with zebrafish genetic tractability could help further in the understanding of copper metabolism, inflammatory responses and related diseases. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Caloric Restriction and Formalin-Induced Inflammation: An Experimental Study in Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Nozad, Aisan; Safari, Mir Bahram; Saboory, Ehsan; Derafshpoor, Leila; Mohseni Moghaddam, Parvaneh; Ghaffari, Farzaneh; Naseri, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute and chronic inflammations are difficult to control. Using chemical anti-inflammatory medications along with their complications considerably limit their use. According to Traditional Iranian Medicine (TIM), there is an important relation between inflammation and Imtila (food and blood accumulation in the body); food reduction or its more modern equivalent Caloric Restriction (CR) may act against both Imtila and inflammation. Objectives: This experimental study aimed to investigate the effect of 30% reduction in daily calorie intake on inflammation in rats. Materials and Methods: A total of 18 male rats (Rattus rattus) weighing 220 to 270 g were obtained. Then, the inflammation was induced by injecting formalin in their paws. Next, the rats were randomized by generating random numbers into two equal groups (9 + 9) putting on either normal diet (controls) or a similar diet with 30% reduction of calorie (cases). Paw volume changes were recorded twice per day by one observer in both groups using a standard plethysmometer for 8 consecutive days. Serum C-reactive protein (CRP), Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR), complete blood count (erythrocyte, platelet, and white blood cell) and hemoglobin were compared between the groups. Results: Decline of both body weight and paw volume was significantly more prominent in the case than in the control rats within the study period (P < 0.001 and < 0.001, respectively). Paw volume decrease was more prominent after day 3. On day 8, serum CRP-positive (1 or 2 +) rats were more frequent in ad libitum fed group comparing with those received CR (33.3% vs. 11.1%). This difference, however, was insignificant (P = 0.58). At the same time, mean ESR was significantly higher in the control rats comparing with that in the case group (29.00 ± 2.89 h vs. 14.00 ± 1.55 h; P = 0.001). Other serum parameters were not significantly different between the two groups at endpoint. Conclusions: Rats fed with a 30% calorie

  5. Effects in the use of a genetically engineered strain of Lactococcus lactis delivering in situ IL-10 as a therapy to treat low-grade colon inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Rebeca; Martín, Rebeca; Chain, Florian; Chain, Florian; Miquel, Sylvie; Miquel, Sylvie; Natividad, Jane M; Natividad, Jane M; Sokol, Harry; Sokol, Harry; Verdu, Elena F; Verdu, Elena F; Langella, Philippe; Langella, Philippe; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a gastrointestinal disorder characterized by chronic abdominal pain, discomfort, and bloating. Interestingly, there is now evidence of the presence of a low-grade inflammatory status in many IBS patients, including histopathological and mucosal cytokine levels in the colon, as well as the presence of IBS-like symptoms in quiescent inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The use of a genetically engineered food-grade bacterium, such as Lactococcus lactis, secreting the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 has been proven by many pre-clinical studies to be a successful therapy to treat colon inflammation. In this study, we first reproduced the recovery-recurrence periods observed in IBS-patients in a new chronic model characterized by 2 episodes of DiNitro-BenzeneSulfonic-acid (DNBS)-challenge and we tested the effects of a recombinant strain of L. lactis secreting IL-10 under a Stress-Inducible Controlled Expression (SICE) system. In vivo gut permeability, colonic serotonin levels, cytokine profiles, and spleen cell populations were then measured as readouts of a low-grade inflammation. In addition, since there is increasing evidence that gut microbiota tightly regulates gut barrier function, tight junction proteins were also measured by qRT-PCR after administration of recombinant L. lactis in DNBS-treated mice. Strikingly, oral administration of L. lactis secreting active IL-10 in mice resulted in significant protective effects in terms of permeability, immune activation, and gut-function parameters. Although genetically engineered bacteria are, for now, used only as a “proof-of-concept,” our study validates the interest in the use of the novel SICE system in L. lactis to express therapeutic molecules, such as IL-10, locally at mucosal surfaces. PMID:24732667

  6. Effects in the use of a genetically engineered strain of Lactococcus lactis delivering in situ IL-10 as a therapy to treat low-grade colon inflammation.

    PubMed

    Martín, Rebeca; Chain, Florian; Miquel, Sylvie; Natividad, Jane M; Sokol, Harry; Verdu, Elena F; Langella, Philippe; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a gastrointestinal disorder characterized by chronic abdominal pain, discomfort, and bloating. Interestingly, there is now evidence of the presence of a low-grade inflammatory status in many IBS patients, including histopathological and mucosal cytokine levels in the colon, as well as the presence of IBS-like symptoms in quiescent inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The use of a genetically engineered food-grade bacterium, such as Lactococcus lactis, secreting the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 has been proven by many pre-clinical studies to be a successful therapy to treat colon inflammation. In this study, we first reproduced the recovery-recurrence periods observed in IBS-patients in a new chronic model characterized by 2 episodes of DiNitro-BenzeneSulfonic-acid (DNBS)-challenge and we tested the effects of a recombinant strain of L. lactis secreting IL-10 under a Stress-Inducible Controlled Expression (SICE) system. In vivo gut permeability, colonic serotonin levels, cytokine profiles, and spleen cell populations were then measured as readouts of a low-grade inflammation. In addition, since there is increasing evidence that gut microbiota tightly regulates gut barrier function, tight junction proteins were also measured by qRT-PCR after administration of recombinant L. lactis in DNBS-treated mice. Strikingly, oral administration of L. lactis secreting active IL-10 in mice resulted in significant protective effects in terms of permeability, immune activation, and gut-function parameters. Although genetically engineered bacteria are, for now, used only as a "proof-of-concept," our study validates the interest in the use of the novel SICE system in L. lactis to express therapeutic molecules, such as IL-10, locally at mucosal surfaces.

  7. LZ-207, a Newly Synthesized Flavonoid, Induces Apoptosis and Suppresses Inflammation-Related Colon Cancer by Inhibiting the NF-κB Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jie; Li, Fanni; Zhao, Yue; Zhao, Li; Qiao, Chen; Li, Zhiyu; Guo, Qinglong; Lu, Na

    2015-01-01

    Flavonoids and flavonoid derivatives, which have significant biological and pharmacological activities, including antitumor and anti-inflammatory activities, have been widely used in human healthcare. To design a more effective flavonoid antitumor agent, we altered the flavonoid backbone with substitutions of piperazine and methoxy groups to synthesize a novel flavonoid derivative, LZ-207. The anticancer effect of LZ-207 against HCT116 colon cancer cells and the underlying mechanism of this effect were explored in this study. Specifically, LZ-207 exhibited inhibitory effects on growth and viability in several human colon cancer cell lines and induced apoptosis in HCT116 cells both in vitro and in vivo. LZ-207 treatment also suppressed the nuclear translocation of NF-κB and the phosphorylation of IκB and IKKα/β in a dose-dependent manner in both HCT116 cells and human acute monocytic leukemia THP-1 cells. Moreover, LZ-207 also reduced the secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) in LPS-induced THP-1 cells, and this effect was confirmed at the transcriptional level. Furthermore, LZ-207 significantly inhibited HCT116 cell proliferation that was elicited by LPS-induced THP-1 cells in a co-culture system. These findings elucidated some potential molecular mechanisms for preventing inflammation-driven colon cancer using the newly synthesized flavonoid LZ-207 and suggested the possibility of further developing novel therapeutic agents derived from flavonoids.

  8. Anti-inflammatory effects of Brazilian ginseng (Pfaffia paniculata) on TNBS-induced intestinal inflammation: Experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Costa, C A R A; Tanimoto, A; Quaglio, A E V; Almeida, L D; Severi, J A; Di Stasi, L C

    2015-09-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic, relapsing, idiopathic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. Clinical studies suggest that the initiation of IBD is multifactorial, involving genetics, the immune system and environmental factors, such as diet, drugs and stress. Pfaffia paniculata is an adaptogenic medicinal plant used in Brazilian folk medicine as an "anti-stress" agent. Thus, we hypothesised that the P. paniculata enhances the response of animals subjected to colonic inflammation. Our aim was to investigate the intestinal anti-inflammatory activity of P. paniculata in rats before or after induction of intestinal inflammation using trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS). The animals were divided into groups that received the vehicle, prednisolone or P. paniculata extract daily starting 14 days before or 7 days after TNBS induction. At the end of the procedure, the animals were killed and their colons were assessed for the macroscopic damage score (MDS), extent of the lesion (EL) and weight/length ratio, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and glutathione (GSH), cytokines and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. Histological evaluation and ultrastructural analysis of the colonic samples were performed. Treatment with the 200mg/kg dose on the curative schedule was able to reduce the MDS and the EL. In addition, MPO activity was reduced, GSH levels were maintained, and the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and CRP were decreased. In conclusion, the protective effect of P. paniculata was related to reduced oxidative stress and CRP colonic levels, and due to immunomodulatory activity as evidenced by reduced levels of IL-1β, INF-γ, TNF-α and IL-6. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Intraperitoneal but not intravenous cryopreserved mesenchymal stromal cells home to the inflamed colon and ameliorate experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Castelo-Branco, Morgana T L; Soares, Igor D P; Lopes, Daiana V; Buongusto, Fernanda; Martinusso, Cesonia A; do Rosario, Alyson; Souza, Sergio A L; Gutfilen, Bianca; Fonseca, Lea Mirian B; Elia, Celeste; Madi, Kalil; Schanaider, Alberto; Rossi, Maria Isabel D; Souza, Heitor S P

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) were shown to have immunomodulatory activity and have been applied for treating immune-mediated disorders. We compared the homing and therapeutic action of cryopreserved subcutaneous adipose tissue (AT-MSCs) and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) in rats with trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis. After colonoscopic detection of inflammation AT-MSCs or BM-MSCs were injected intraperitoneally. Colonoscopic and histologic scores were obtained. Density of collagen fibres and apoptotic rates were evaluated. Cytokine levels were measured in supernatants of colon explants. For cell migration studies MSCs and skin fibroblasts were labelled with Tc-99m or CM-DiI and injected intraperitonealy or intravenously. Intraperitoneal injection of AT-MSCs or BM-MSCs reduced the endoscopic and histopathologic severity of colitis, the collagen deposition, and the epithelial apoptosis. Levels of TNF-α and interleukin-1β decreased, while VEGF and TGF-β did not change following cell-therapy. Scintigraphy showed that MSCs migrated towards the inflamed colon and the uptake increased from 0.5 to 24 h. Tc-99m-MSCs injected intravenously distributed into various organs, but not the colon. Cm-DiI-positive MSCs were detected throughout the colon wall 72 h after inoculation, predominantly in the submucosa and muscular layer of inflamed areas. Intraperitoneally injected cryopreserved MSCs home to and engraft into the inflamed colon and ameliorate TNBS-colitis.

  10. Role of Chronic Inflammation in Myopia Progression: Clinical Evidence and Experimental Validation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui-Ju; Wei, Chang-Ching; Chang, Ching-Yao; Chen, Ter-Hsin; Hsu, Yu-An; Hsieh, Yi-Ching; Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Wan, Lei

    2016-08-01

    Prevention and treatment of myopia is an important public problem worldwide. We found a higher incidence of myopia among patients with inflammatory diseases such as type 1 diabetes mellitus (7.9%), uveitis (3.7%), or systemic lupus erythematosus (3.5%) compared to those without inflammatory diseases (p<0.001) using data from children (<18years old) in the National Health Insurance Research database. We then examined the inhibition of myopia by atropine in Syrian hamsters with monocular form deprivation (MFD), an experimental myopia model. We found atropine downregulated inflammation in MFD eyes. The expression levels of c-Fos, nuclear factor κB (NFκB), interleukin (IL)-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were upregulated in myopic eyes and downregulated upon treatment with atropine. The relationship between the inflammatory response and myopia was investigated by treating MFD hamsters with the immunosuppressive agent cyclosporine A (CSA) or the inflammatory stimulators lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or peptidoglycan (PGN). Myopia progression was slowed by CSA application but was enhanced by LPS and PGN administration. The levels of c-Fos, NF-κB, IL-6, and TNF-α were upregulated in LPS- and PGN-treated eyes and downregulated by CSA treatment. These findings provide clinical and experimental evidence that inflammation plays a crucial role in the development of myopia. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Advantages of the experimental animal hollow organ mechanical testing system for the rat colon rupture pressure test.

    PubMed

    Ji, Chengdong; Guo, Xuan; Li, Zhen; Qian, Shuwen; Zheng, Feng; Qin, Haiqing

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have been conducted on colorectal anastomotic leakage to reduce the incidence of anastomotic leakage. However, how to precisely determine if the bowel can withstand the pressure of a colorectal anastomosis experiment, which is called anastomotic bursting pressure, has not been determined. A task force developed the experimental animal hollow organ mechanical testing system to provide precise measurement of the maximum pressure that an anastomotic colon can withstand, and to compare it with the commonly used method such as the mercury and air bag pressure manometer in a rat colon rupture pressure test. Forty-five male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into the manual ball manometry (H) group, the tracing machine manometry pressure gauge head (MP) group, and the experimental animal hollow organ mechanical testing system (ME) group. The rats in each group were subjected to a cut colon rupture pressure test after injecting anesthesia in the tail vein. Colonic end-to-end anastomosis was performed, and the rats were rested for 1 week before anastomotic bursting pressure was determined by one of the three methods. No differences were observed between the normal colon rupture pressure and colonic anastomotic bursting pressure, which were determined using the three manometry methods. However, several advantages, such as reduction in errors, were identified in the ME group. Different types of manometry methods can be applied to the normal rat colon, but the colonic anastomotic bursting pressure test using the experimental animal hollow organ mechanical testing system is superior to traditional methods. Copyright © 2013 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Experimental Infections with Mycoplasma agalactiae Identify Key Factors Involved in Host-Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Baranowski, Eric; Bergonier, Dominique; Sagné, Eveline; Hygonenq, Marie-Claude; Ronsin, Patricia; Berthelot, Xavier; Citti, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying pathogenic processes in mycoplasma infections are poorly understood, mainly because of limited sequence similarities with classical, bacterial virulence factors. Recently, large-scale transposon mutagenesis in the ruminant pathogen Mycoplasma agalactiae identified the NIF locus, including nifS and nifU, as essential for mycoplasma growth in cell culture, while dispensable in axenic media. To evaluate the importance of this locus in vivo, the infectivity of two knock-out mutants was tested upon experimental infection in the natural host. In this model, the parental PG2 strain was able to establish a systemic infection in lactating ewes, colonizing various body sites such as lymph nodes and the mammary gland, even when inoculated at low doses. In these PG2-infected ewes, we observed over the course of infection (i) the development of a specific antibody response and (ii) dynamic changes in expression of M. agalactiae surface variable proteins (Vpma), with multiple Vpma profiles co-existing in the same animal. In contrast and despite a sensitive model, none of the knock-out mutants were able to survive and colonize the host. The extreme avirulent phenotype of the two mutants was further supported by the absence of an IgG response in inoculated animals. The exact role of the NIF locus remains to be elucidated but these data demonstrate that it plays a key role in the infectious process of M. agalactiae and most likely of other pathogenic mycoplasma species as many carry closely related homologs. PMID:24699671

  13. Beneficial influence of ellagic acid on biochemical indexes associated with experimentally induced colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Syed, Umesalma; Ganapasam, Sudhandiran

    2017-01-01

    To elucidate the key biochemical indexes associated with 1, 2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colon carcinogenesis and the modulatory efficacy of a dietary polyphenol, ellagic acid (EA). Wistar rats were chosen to study objective, and were divided into 4 groups; Group 1-control rats; Group 2-rats received EA (60 mg/kg body weight/day, orally); rats in Group 3-induced with DMH (20 mg/kg body weight) subcutaneously for 15 weeks; DMH-induced Group 4 rats were initiated with EA treatment. We examined key citric acid cycle enzymes such as isocitrate dehydrogenase, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase and the activities of respiratory chain enzymes NADH dehydrogenase and Cytochrome-C-oxidase and membrane-bound enzyme profiles (Na +/K + ATPase, Ca 2+ ATPase and Mg 2+ ATPase), activities of lysosomal proteases such as β-D-glucuronidase, β-galactosidase and N-acety-β-D-glucosaminidase and cellular thiols (oxidized glutathione, protein thiols, and total thiols). It was found that administration of DMH to rats decreased both mitochondrial and membrane-bound enzymes activities, increased activities of lysosomal enzymes and further modulates cellular thiols levels. Treatment with EA significantly restored the mitochondrial and ATPases levels and further reduced lysosomal enzymes to near normalcy thereby restoring harmful effects induced by DMH. EA treatment was able to effectively restore the detrimental effects induced by DMH, which proves the chemoprotective function of EA against DMH-induced experimental colon carcinogenesis.

  14. Comparative analysis of inflamed and non-inflamed colon biopsies reveals strong proteomic inflammation profile in patients with ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Accurate diagnostic and monitoring tools for ulcerative colitis (UC) are missing. Our aim was to describe the proteomic profile of UC and search for markers associated with disease exacerbation. Therefore, we aimed to characterize specific proteins associated with inflamed colon mucosa from patients with acute UC using mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis. Methods Biopsies were sampled from rectum, sigmoid colon and left colonic flexure from twenty patients with active proctosigmoiditis and from four healthy controls for proteomics and histology. Proteomic profiles of whole colonic biopsies were characterized using 2D-gel electrophoresis, and peptide mass fingerprinting using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) was applied for identification of differently expressed protein spots. Results A total of 597 spots were annotated by image analysis and 222 of these had a statistically different protein level between inflamed and non-inflamed tissue in the patient group. Principal component analysis clearly grouped non-inflamed samples separately from the inflamed samples indicating that the proteomic signature of colon mucosa with acute UC is strong. Totally, 43 individual protein spots were identified, including proteins involved in energy metabolism (triosephosphate isomerase, glycerol-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase, alpha enolase and L-lactate dehydrogenase B-chain) and in oxidative stress (superoxide dismutase, thioredoxins and selenium binding protein). Conclusions A distinct proteomic profile of inflamed tissue in UC patients was found. Specific proteins involved in energy metabolism and oxidative stress were identified as potential candidate markers for UC. PMID:22726388

  15. Association between red meat consumption and colon cancer: A systematic review of experimental results.

    PubMed

    Turner, Nancy D; Lloyd, Shannon K

    2017-04-01

    A role for red and processed meat in the development of colorectal cancer has been proposed based largely on evidence from observational studies in humans, especially in those populations consuming a westernized diet. Determination of causation specifically by red or processed meat is contingent upon identification of plausible mechanisms that lead to colorectal cancer. We conducted a systematic review of the available evidence to determine the availability of plausible mechanistic data linking red and processed meat consumption to colorectal cancer risk. Forty studies using animal models or cell cultures met specified inclusion criteria, most of which were designed to examine the role of heme iron or heterocyclic amines in relation to colon carcinogenesis. Most studies used levels of meat or meat components well in excess of those found in human diets. Although many of the experiments used semi-purified diets designed to mimic the nutrient loads in current westernized diets, most did not include potential biologically active protective compounds present in whole foods. Because of these limitations in the existing literature, there is currently insufficient evidence to confirm a mechanistic link between the intake of red meat as part of a healthy dietary pattern and colorectal cancer risk. Impact statement Current recommendations to reduce colon cancer include the reduction or elimination of red or processed meats. These recommendations are based on data from epidemiological studies conducted among cultures where meat consumption is elevated and consumption of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains are reduced. This review evaluated experimental data exploring the putative mechanisms whereby red or processed meats may contribute to colon cancer. Most studies used levels of meat or meat-derived compounds that were in excess of those in human diets, even in cultures where meat intake is elevated. Experiments where protective dietary compounds were used to mitigate the

  16. Association between red meat consumption and colon cancer: A systematic review of experimental results

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Shannon K

    2017-01-01

    A role for red and processed meat in the development of colorectal cancer has been proposed based largely on evidence from observational studies in humans, especially in those populations consuming a westernized diet. Determination of causation specifically by red or processed meat is contingent upon identification of plausible mechanisms that lead to colorectal cancer. We conducted a systematic review of the available evidence to determine the availability of plausible mechanistic data linking red and processed meat consumption to colorectal cancer risk. Forty studies using animal models or cell cultures met specified inclusion criteria, most of which were designed to examine the role of heme iron or heterocyclic amines in relation to colon carcinogenesis. Most studies used levels of meat or meat components well in excess of those found in human diets. Although many of the experiments used semi-purified diets designed to mimic the nutrient loads in current westernized diets, most did not include potential biologically active protective compounds present in whole foods. Because of these limitations in the existing literature, there is currently insufficient evidence to confirm a mechanistic link between the intake of red meat as part of a healthy dietary pattern and colorectal cancer risk. Impact statement Current recommendations to reduce colon cancer include the reduction or elimination of red or processed meats. These recommendations are based on data from epidemiological studies conducted among cultures where meat consumption is elevated and consumption of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains are reduced. This review evaluated experimental data exploring the putative mechanisms whereby red or processed meats may contribute to colon cancer. Most studies used levels of meat or meat-derived compounds that were in excess of those in human diets, even in cultures where meat intake is elevated. Experiments where protective dietary compounds were used to mitigate the

  17. Parabacteroides distasonis attenuates colonic inflammation and prevents tumor formation in azoxymethane-treated high-fat diet-fed mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Obesity is a major risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC) and inflammation is thought to constitute one of the underlying mechanisms. We previously observed a depletion of Parabacteroides distasonis (PD) in the stool of tumor-bearing mice that was inversely related to the abundance of the pro-infla...

  18. Serum paraoxonase type-1 activity in pigs: assay validation and evolution after an induced experimental inflammation.

    PubMed

    Escribano, Damián; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Tecles, Fernando; Cerón, José J

    2015-02-15

    Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is a serum enzyme synthesised and secreted primarily by the liver. It possesses anti-inflammatory properties limiting the production of pro-inflammatory mediators. The objectives of this study were to validate three spectrophotometric assays for the quantification of PON1 activity in pig serum, and to determine if PON1 activity in porcine behaves as a negative acute phase protein (APP), decreasing in inflammatory conditions. An analytical validation using three different substrates - 5-thiobutil butyrolactone (TBBL), phenylacetate (PA) and 4-(p)-nitrophenyl acetate (pNA) - was performed. In addition, inflammation was experimentally induced in five pigs by subcutaneous injection of turpentine oil, while five control pigs were left untreated. The treated pigs showed significant increases in CRP and decreases in albumin, indicating an inflammatory condition. The three substrates used would be suitable for PON1 activity measurements in serum samples, since they offer adequate precision (coefficients of variation<10%), sensitivity (0.01, 0.15, 0.02 U/mL for TBBL, pNA and PA respectively) and accuracy (r=0.99). In addition, PON1 behaves as a negative APP in pigs since a significant decrease (P<0.05) in its activity after 72 h of the induction of the inflammation was observed with all substrates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of an inflammation-based prognostic score (GPS) in patients undergoing resection for colon and rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Donald C; Crozier, Joseph E M; Canna, Khalid; Angerson, Wilson J; McArdle, Colin S

    2007-08-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the value of the combination of an elevated C-reactive protein and hypoalbuminaemia (GPS) in predicting cancer-specific survival after resection for colon and rectal cancer. The GPS was constructed as follows: Patients with both an elevated C-reactive protein (>10 mg/l) and hypoalbuminaemia (<35 g/l) were allocated a score of 2. Patients in whom only one or none of these biochemical abnormalities was present were allocated a score of 1 or 0, respectively. A GPS of 1 (n = 109) was mainly due to an elevated C-reactive protein concentration and the remainder due to hypoalbuminaemia. In those patients with a GPS of 1 due to hypoalbuminaemia (n = 16), the 3-year overall survival rate was 94% compared with 62% in those patients with a GPS of 1 due to an elevated C-reactive protein concentration (n = 93, p = 0.0094). Therefore, the GPS was modified such that patients with hypoalbuminaemia were assigned a score of 0 in the absence of an elevated C-reactive protein. On univariate analysis of those patients with colon and rectal cancer, the modified GPS (p < 0.0001) was significantly associated with overall and cancer specific survival. On univariate survival analysis of those patients with Dukes B colon and rectal cancer, the modified GPS (p < 0.01) was significantly associated with overall and cancer specific survival. The results of the present study indicate that the GPS, before surgery, predicts overall and cancer-specific survival after resection of colon and rectal cancer.

  20. Elevated O-GlcNAcylation promotes colonic inflammation and tumorigenesis by modulating NF-κB signaling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong Ryoul; Kim, Dae Hyun; Seo, Young-Kyo; Park, Dohyun; Jang, Hyun-Jun; Choi, Soo Youn; Lee, Yong Hwa; Lee, Gyun Hui; Nakajima, Kazuki; Taniguchi, Naoyuki; Kim, Jung-Min; Choi, Eun-Jeong; Moon, Hyo Youl; Kim, Il Shin; Choi, Jang Hyun; Lee, Ho; Ryu, Sung Ho; Cocco, Lucio; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2015-05-20

    O-GlcNAcylation is a reversible post-translational modification. O-GlcNAc addition and removal is catalyzed by O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) and O-GlcNAcase (OGA), respectively. More recent evidence indicates that regulation of O-GlcNAcylation is important for inflammatory diseases and tumorigenesis. In this study, we revealed that O-GlcNAcylation was increased in the colonic tissues of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis and azoxymethane (AOM)/DSS-induced colitis-associated cancer (CAC) animal models. Moreover, the O-GlcNAcylation level was elevated in human CAC tissues compared with matched normal counterparts. To investigate the functional role of O-GlcNAcylation in colitis, we used OGA heterozygote mice, which have an increased level of O-GlcNAcylation. OGA(+/-) mice have higher susceptibility to DSS-induced colitis than OGA(+/+) mice. OGA(+/-) mice exhibited a higher incidence of colon tumors than OGA(+/+) mice. In molecular studies, elevated O-GlcNAc levels were shown to enhance the activation of NF-κB signaling through increasing the binding of RelA/p65 to its target promoters. We also found that Thr-322 and Thr352 in the p65-O-GlcNAcylation sites are critical for p65 promoter binding. These results suggest that the elevated O-GlcNAcylation level in colonic tissues contributes to the development of colitis and CAC by disrupting regulation of NF-κB-dependent transcriptional activity.

  1. Dietary emulsifiers from milk and soybean differently impact adiposity and inflammation in association with modulation of colonic goblet cells in high-fat fed mice.

    PubMed

    Lecomte, Manon; Couëdelo, Leslie; Meugnier, Emmanuelle; Plaisancié, Pascale; Létisse, Marion; Benoit, Bérengère; Gabert, Laure; Penhoat, Armelle; Durand, Annie; Pineau, Gaëlle; Joffre, Florent; Géloën, Alain; Vaysse, Carole; Laugerette, Fabienne; Michalski, Marie-Caroline

    2016-03-01

    Enhanced adiposity and metabolic inflammation are major features of obesity that could be impacted by dietary emulsifiers. We investigated in high-fat fed mice the effects of using a new polar lipid (PL) emulsifier from milk (MPL) instead of soybean lecithin (soybean PL [SPL]) on adipose tissue and intestinal mucosa function. Four groups of C57BL6 mice received for 8 wks a low-fat (LF) diet or a high-fat diet devoid of PLs or an high-fat diet including MPL (high-fat-MPL) or SPL (high-fat-SPL). Compared with high-fat diet, high-fat-SPL diet increased white adipose tissue (WAT) mass (p < 0.05), with larger adipocytes (p < 0.05) and increased expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha, monochemoattractant protein-1, LPS-binding protein, and leptin (p < 0.05). This was not observed with high-fat-MPL diet despite similar dietary intakes and increased expression of fatty acid transport protein 4 and microsomal TG transfer protein, involved in lipid absorption, in upper intestine (p < 0.05). High-fat-MPL mice had a lower expression in WAT of cluster of differentiation 68, marker of macrophage infiltration, versus high-fat and high-fat-SPL mice (p < 0.05), and more goblet cells in the colon (p < 0.05). Unlike SPL, MPL in the high-fat diet did not induce WAT hypertrophy and inflammation but increased colonic goblet cells. This supports further clinical exploration of different sources of dietary emulsifiers in the frame of obesity outbreak. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Increased collagen maturity with sildenafil citrate: experimental high risk colonic anastomosis model.

    PubMed

    Cakir, Tebessum; Ozer, Ilter; Bostanci, Erdal Birol; Keklik, Tulay Timucin; Ercin, Ugur; Bilgihan, Ayse; Akoglu, Musa

    2015-01-01

    Inadequate healing and high anastomosis leak rates at rectal anastomosis may be due to lack of supportive serosal layer and technical difficulty of low anterior resections. Positive effects of sildenafil on wound healing were observed. The aim of this study was to simulate rectal anastomosis as a technical insufficient anastomosis and investigate the effects of sildenafil on anastomosis healing. Colonic anastomoses were carried out in 64 rats and randomized into four groups, CA-S, complete anastomoses without sildenafil (10 mg/kg for 5 days); CA+S, complete anastomoses with sildenafil; IA-S, incomplete anastomoses without sildenafil; IA+S, incomplete anastomoses with sildenafil. Half of the rats in every group were sacrificed on post-operative day (POD) 3, half of them sacrificed on POD 7. Tissues from the anastomoses were used for functional, histochemical, biochemical investigations. Sildenafil treatment resulted in increased bursting pressures in IA+S on POD 7 (p=0.010). Collagen maturity was higher in IA+S on POD 3 and POD 7, CA+S on POD 7 (p=0.010; p=0.010; p<0.007). Collagen content was higher in IA+S on POD 7 (p<0.001). Glutathione, hydroxyproline levels were similar. Malondialdehyde levels were lower in IA+S on POD 3 (p<0.001). Epithelization score was higher in IA+S on POD 7 (p=0.007). Inflammation score was higher in CA-S group on POD 3 and POD 7 (p<0.001; p<0.001). Neutrophil score was lower in CA+S on POD 3 (p=0.005). An increase in collagen content, maturity, and epithelization, a decrease in neutrophil infiltration, oxidative stress and better mechanical strength were observed with the administration of sildenafil. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Inflammation-induced pain sensitization in men and women: does sex matter in experimental endotoxemia?

    PubMed Central

    Wegner, Alexander; Elsenbruch, Sigrid; Rebernik, Laura; Roderigo, Till; Engelbrecht, Elisa; Jäger, Marcus; Engler, Harald; Schedlowski, Manfred; Benson, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A role of the innate immune system is increasingly recognized as a mechanism contributing to pain sensitization. Experimental administration of the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) constitutes a model to study inflammation-induced pain sensitization, but all existing human evidence comes from male participants. We assessed visceral and musculoskeletal pain sensitivity after low-dose LPS administration in healthy men and women to test the hypothesis that women show greater LPS-induced hyperalgesia compared with men. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study, healthy men (n = 20) and healthy women using oral contraceptives (n = 20) received an intravenous injection of 0.4 ng/kg body weight LPS or placebo. Pain sensitivity was assessed with established visceral and musculoskeletal pain models (ie, rectal pain thresholds; pressure pain thresholds for different muscle groups), together with a heartbeat perception (interoceptive accuracy) task. Plasma cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6) were measured along with state anxiety at baseline and up to 6-hour postinjection. Lipopolysaccharide application led to significant increases in plasma cytokines and state anxiety and decreased interoceptive awareness in men and women (P < 0.001, condition effects), with more pronounced LPS-induced cytokine increases in women (P < 0.05, interaction effects). Although both rectal and pressure pain thresholds were significantly decreased in the LPS condition (all P < 0.05, condition effect), no sex differences in endotoxin-induced sensitization were observed. In summary, LPS-induced systemic immune activation leads to visceral and musculoskeletal hyperalgesia, irrespective of biological sex. These findings support the broad applicability of experimental endotoxin administration as a translational preclinical model of inflammation-induced pain sensitization in both sexes. PMID:26058036

  4. Oxysterol Sensing through the Receptor GPR183 Promotes the Lymphoid-Tissue-Inducing Function of Innate Lymphoid Cells and Colonic Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Emgård, Johanna; Kammoun, Hana; García-Cassani, Bethania; Chesné, Julie; Parigi, Sara M; Jacob, Jean-Marie; Cheng, Hung-Wei; Evren, Elza; Das, Srustidhar; Czarnewski, Paulo; Sleiers, Natalie; Melo-Gonzalez, Felipe; Kvedaraite, Egle; Svensson, Mattias; Scandella, Elke; Hepworth, Matthew R; Huber, Samuel; Ludewig, Burkhard; Peduto, Lucie; Villablanca, Eduardo J; Veiga-Fernandes, Henrique; Pereira, João P; Flavell, Richard A; Willinger, Tim

    2018-01-16

    Group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3s) sense environmental signals and are critical for tissue integrity in the intestine. Yet, which signals are sensed and what receptors control ILC3 function remain poorly understood. Here, we show that ILC3s with a lymphoid-tissue-inducer (LTi) phenotype expressed G-protein-coupled receptor 183 (GPR183) and migrated to its oxysterol ligand 7α,25-hydroxycholesterol (7α,25-OHC). In mice lacking Gpr183 or 7α,25-OHC, ILC3s failed to localize to cryptopatches (CPs) and isolated lymphoid follicles (ILFs). Gpr183 deficiency in ILC3s caused a defect in CP and ILF formation in the colon, but not in the small intestine. Localized oxysterol production by fibroblastic stromal cells provided an essential signal for colonic lymphoid tissue development, and inflammation-induced increased oxysterol production caused colitis through GPR183-mediated cell recruitment. Our findings show that GPR183 promotes lymphoid organ development and indicate that oxysterol-GPR183-dependent positioning within tissues controls ILC3 activity and intestinal homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Yerba mate tea and mate saponins prevented azoxymethane-induced inflammation of rat colon through suppression of NF-kB p65ser(311) signaling via IkB-a and GSK-3ß reduced phosphorylation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Yerba mate tea (YMT) has a chemopreventive role in a variety of inflammatory diseases. The objective was to determine the capability of YMT and mate saponins to prevent azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colonic inflammation in rats. YMT (2% dry leaves, w/v, as a source of drinking fluid) (n = 15) and mat...

  6. Colonization of the cervicovaginal space with Gardnerella vaginalis leads to local inflammation and cervical remodeling in pregnant mice.

    PubMed

    Sierra, Luz-Jeannette; Brown, Amy G; Barilá, Guillermo O; Anton, Lauren; Barnum, Carrie E; Shetye, Snehal S; Soslowsky, Louis J; Elovitz, Michal A

    2018-01-01

    The role of the cervicovaginal (CV) microbiome in regulating cervical function during pregnancy is poorly understood. Gardnerella vaginalis (G. vaginalis) is the most common bacteria associated with the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis (BV). While BV has been associated with preterm birth (PTB), clinical trials targeting BV do not decrease PTB rates. It remains unknown if G. vaginalis is capable of triggering molecular, biomechanical and cellular events that could lead to PTB. The objective of this study was to determine if cervicovaginal colonization with G. vaginalis, in pregnant mice, induced cervical remodeling and modified cervical function. CD-1 timed-pregnant mice received a 5X108 CFU/mL intravaginal inoculation of G. vaginalis or control on embryonic day 12 (E12) and E13. On E15, the mice were sacrificed and cervicovaginal fluid (CVF), amniotic fluid (AF), cervix, uterus, placentas and fetal membranes (FM) were collected. Genomic DNA was isolated from the CVF, placenta, uterus and FM and QPCR was performed to confirm colonization. IL-6 was measured in the CVF and AF and soluble e-cadherin (seCAD) was assessed in the CVF by ELISA. RNA was extracted from the cervices to evaluate IL-10, IL-8, IL-1β, TNF-α, Tff-1, SPINK-5, HAS-1 and LOX expression via QPCR. Mucicarmine and trichrome staining was used to assess cervical mucin and collagen. Biomechanical properties of the cervix were studied using quasi-static tensile load-to-failure biomechanical tests. G. vaginalis successfully colonized the CV space. This colonization induced immune responses (increased IL-6 levels in CVF and AF, increased mRNA expression of cervical cytokines), altered the epithelial barrier (increased seCAD in the CVF), induced cervical remodeling (increased mucin production, altered collagen) and altered cervical biomechanical properties (a decrease in biomechanical modulus and an increase in maximum strain). The ability of G. vaginalis to induce these molecular, immune, cellular and

  7. Colonization of the cervicovaginal space with Gardnerella vaginalis leads to local inflammation and cervical remodeling in pregnant mice

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Amy G.; Barilá, Guillermo O.; Anton, Lauren; Barnum, Carrie E.; Shetye, Snehal S.; Soslowsky, Louis J.; Elovitz, Michal A.

    2018-01-01

    The role of the cervicovaginal (CV) microbiome in regulating cervical function during pregnancy is poorly understood. Gardnerella vaginalis (G. vaginalis) is the most common bacteria associated with the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis (BV). While BV has been associated with preterm birth (PTB), clinical trials targeting BV do not decrease PTB rates. It remains unknown if G. vaginalis is capable of triggering molecular, biomechanical and cellular events that could lead to PTB. The objective of this study was to determine if cervicovaginal colonization with G. vaginalis, in pregnant mice, induced cervical remodeling and modified cervical function. CD-1 timed-pregnant mice received a 5X108 CFU/mL intravaginal inoculation of G. vaginalis or control on embryonic day 12 (E12) and E13. On E15, the mice were sacrificed and cervicovaginal fluid (CVF), amniotic fluid (AF), cervix, uterus, placentas and fetal membranes (FM) were collected. Genomic DNA was isolated from the CVF, placenta, uterus and FM and QPCR was performed to confirm colonization. IL-6 was measured in the CVF and AF and soluble e-cadherin (seCAD) was assessed in the CVF by ELISA. RNA was extracted from the cervices to evaluate IL-10, IL-8, IL-1β, TNF-α, Tff-1, SPINK-5, HAS-1 and LOX expression via QPCR. Mucicarmine and trichrome staining was used to assess cervical mucin and collagen. Biomechanical properties of the cervix were studied using quasi-static tensile load-to-failure biomechanical tests. G. vaginalis successfully colonized the CV space. This colonization induced immune responses (increased IL-6 levels in CVF and AF, increased mRNA expression of cervical cytokines), altered the epithelial barrier (increased seCAD in the CVF), induced cervical remodeling (increased mucin production, altered collagen) and altered cervical biomechanical properties (a decrease in biomechanical modulus and an increase in maximum strain). The ability of G. vaginalis to induce these molecular, immune, cellular and

  8. Immunoregulatory Actions of Epithelial Cell PPAR γ at the Colonic Mucosa of Mice with Experimental Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mohapatra, Saroj K.; Guri, Amir J.; Climent, Montse; Vives, Cristina; Carbo, Adria; Horne, William T.; Hontecillas, Raquel; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep

    2010-01-01

    Background Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors are nuclear receptors highly expressed in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) and immune cells within the gut mucosa and are implicated in modulating inflammation and immune responses. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of targeted deletion of PPAR γ in IEC on progression of experimental inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Methodology/Principal Findings In the first phase, PPAR γ flfl; Villin Cre- (VC-) and PPAR γ flfl; Villin Cre+ (VC+) mice in a mixed FVB/C57BL/6 background were challenged with 2.5% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) in drinking water for 0, 2, or 7 days. VC+ mice express a transgenic recombinase under the control of the Villin-Cre promoter that causes an IEC-specific deletion of PPAR γ. In the second phase, we generated VC- and VC+ mice in a C57BL/6 background that were challenged with 2.5% DSS. Mice were scored on disease severity both clinically and histopathologically. Flow cytometry was used to phenotypically characterize lymphocyte and macrophage populations in blood, spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes. Global gene expression analysis was profiled using Affymetrix microarrays. The IEC-specific deficiency of PPAR γ in mice with a mixed background worsened colonic inflammatory lesions, but had no effect on disease activity (DAI) or weight loss. In contrast, the IEC-specific PPAR γ null mice in C57BL/6 background exhibited more severe inflammatory lesions, DAI and weight loss in comparison to their littermates expressing PPAR γ in IEC. Global gene expression profiling revealed significantly down-regulated expression of lysosomal pathway genes and flow cytometry results demonstrated suppressed production of IL-10 by CD4+ T cells in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) of IEC-specific PPAR γ null mice. Conclusions/Significance Our results demonstrate that adequate expression of PPAR γ in IEC is required for the regulation of mucosal immune responses and prevention of

  9. Comparative Effects of Volutrauma and Atelectrauma on Lung Inflammation in Experimental Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Güldner, Andreas; Braune, Anja; Ball, Lorenzo; Silva, Pedro L.; Samary, Cynthia; Insorsi, Angelo; Huhle, Robert; Rentzsch, Ines; Becker, Claudia; Oehme, Liane; Andreeff, Michael; Vidal Melo, Marcos F.; Winkler, Tilo; Pelosi, Paolo; Rocco, Patricia R. M.; Kotzerke, Jörg; de Abreu, Marcelo Gama

    2016-01-01

    Objective Volutrauma and atelectrauma promote ventilator-induced lung injury, but their relative contribution to inflammation in ventilator-induced lung injury is not well established. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of volutrauma and atelectrauma on the distribution of lung inflammation in experimental acute respiratory distress syndrome. Design Laboratory investigation. Setting University-hospital research facility. Subjects Ten pigs (five per group; 34.7–49.9 kg) Interventions Animals were anesthetized and intubated, and saline lung lavage was performed. Lungs were separated with a double-lumen tube. Following lung recruitment and decremental positive end-expiratory pressure trial, animals were randomly assigned to 4 hours of ventilation of the left (ventilator-induced lung injury) lung with tidal volume of approximately 3 mL/kg and 1) high positive end-expiratory pressure set above the level where dynamic compliance increased more than 5% during positive end-expiratory pressure trial (volutrauma); or 2) low positive end-expiratory pressure to achieve driving pressure comparable with volutrauma (atelectrauma). The right (control) lung was kept on continuous positive airway pressure of 20 cm H2O, and Co2 was partially removed extracorporeally. Measurements and Main Results Regional lung aeration, specific [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose uptake rate, and perfusion were assessed using computed and positron emission tomography. Volutrauma yielded higher [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose uptake rate in the ventilated lung compared with atelectrauma (median [interquartile range], 0.017 [0.014–0.025] vs 0.013 min−1 [0.010–0.014min−1]; p < 0.01), mainly in central lung regions. Volutrauma yielded higher [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose uptake rate in ventilator-induced lung injury versus control lung (0.017 [0.014–0.025] vs 0.011 min−1 [0.010–0.016min−1]; p < 0.05), whereas atelectrauma did not. Volutrauma decreased blood fraction at similar perfusion and

  10. Differential cholinoceptor modulation of nitric oxide isoforms in experimentally-induced inflammation of dental pulp tissue.

    PubMed

    De Couto Pita, A; Passafaro, D; Ganzinelli, S; Borda, E; Sterin-Borda, L

    2009-06-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the role of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) activity in the regulation of endothelial (e), neuronal (n) and inducible (i) nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity and expression in experimentally induced inflammation of rat dental pulp tissue. Inflammation was induced by application of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to the pulp. Extirpated pulp-tissue samples were incubated in saline solution until the various experiments were performed. Saline-treated pulp and healthy pulp tissues were used as controls. NOS activity was measured by the production of [U-(14)C]-citrulline from [U-(14)C]-arginine. Nitrite/nitrate assay was evaluated by the conversion of nitrate to nitrite in the presence of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate. i-nos, e-nos and n-nos mRNA levels were measured using reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction by co-amplification of target cDNA with a single set of primers. Application of LPS to the pulp increased NOS activity and nitrate production (P < 0.001), generated by iNOS over-activity and expression. Pilocarpine acting on mAChRs triggered a biphasic action on NOS activity and NO accumulation. At low concentrations, pilocarpine induced a negative effect associated with a decrease in i-nos mRNA level, whilst at high concentration, it produced a positive effect associated with increased e-nos and n-nos mRNA levels. In control pulp tissue, only the positive effect of pilocarpine was observed. Irreversible pulpitis changes mAChR conformation increasing its efficiency of coupling to transducing molecules that in turn induce activate iNOS. The capacity of pilocarpine to prevent NO accumulation and iNOS activity, by acting on mAChR mutation induced by pulpitis, might be useful therapeutically as a local treatment.

  11. A nanomedicine to treat ocular surface inflammation: performance on an experimental dry eye murine model.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Ruiz, L; Zorzi, G K; Hileeto, D; López-García, A; Calonge, M; Seijo, B; Sánchez, A; Diebold, Y

    2013-05-01

    MUC5AC is a glycoprotein with gel-forming properties, whose altered expression has been implicated in the pathogenesis of dry eye disease. The aim of our study was to achieve an efficient in vivo transfection of MUC5AC, restore its normal levels in an inflamed ocular surface and determine whether restored MUC5AC levels improve ocular surface inflammation. Cationized gelatin-based nanoparticles (NPs) loaded with a plasmid coding a modified MUC5AC protein (pMUC5AC) were instilled in healthy and experimental dry eye (EDE) mice. MUC5AC expression, clinical signs, corneal fluorescein staining and tear production were evaluated. Ocular specimens were processed for histopathologic evaluation, including goblet cell count and CD4 immunostaining. Neither ocular discomfort nor irritation was observed in vivo after NP treatment. Expression of modified MUC5AC was significantly higher in ocular surface tissue of pMUC5AC-NP-treated animals than that of controls. In healthy mice, pMUC5AC-NPs had no effect on fluorescein staining or tear production. In EDE mice, both parameters significantly improved after pMUC5AC-NP treatment. Anterior eye segment of treated mice showed normal architecture and morphology with lack of remarkable inflammatory changes, and a decrease in CD4+ T-cell infiltration. Thus, pMUC5AC-NPs were well tolerated and able to induce the expression of modified MUC5A in ocular surface tissue, leading to reduction of the inflammation and, consequently improving the associated clinical parameters, such as tear production and fluorescein staining. These results identify a potential application of pMUC5AC-NPs as a new therapeutic modality for the treatment of dry eye disease.

  12. Chemopreventive effect of Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers. extract against DMH-induced colon carcinogenesis in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Albert-Baskar, Arul; Ignacimuthu, Savarimuthu

    2010-07-01

    The present study was aimed at evaluating the chemopreventive property of Cynodon dactylon. The antioxidant, antiproliferative and apoptotic potentials of the plant were investigated by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay, nitric oxide radical scavenging activity (NO(-)) and MTT assay on four cancer cell lines (COLO 320 DM, MCH-7, AGS, A549) and a normal cell line (VERO). In vivo chemopreventive property of the plant extract was studied in DMH-induced colon carcinogenesis. The methanolic extract of C. dactylon was found to be antiproliferative and antioxidative at lower concentrations and induced apoptotic cell death in COLO 320 DM cells. Treatment with methanolic extract of C. dactylon increased the levels of antioxidant enzymes and reduced the number of dysplastic crypts in DMH-induced colon of albino rats. The present investigation revealed the anticancer potential of methanolic extract of C. dactylon in COLO 320 DM cells and experimentally induced colon carcinogenesis in rats.

  13. Effects of compound K, an enteric microbiome metabolite of ginseng, in the treatment of inflammation associated colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Yao, Haiqiang; Wan, Jin-Yi; Zeng, Jinxiang; Huang, Wei-Hua; Sava-Segal, Clara; Li, Lingru; Niu, Xin; Wang, Qi; Wang, Chong-Zhi; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2018-06-01

    Ginsenoside Rb1, a major component of different ginseng species, can be bioconverted into compound K by gut microbiota, and the latter possess much stronger cancer chemopreventive potential. However, while the initiation and progression of colorectal cancer is closely associated with gut inflammation, to date, the effects of compound K on inflammation-linked cancer chemoprevention have not been reported. In the present study, liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis was applied to evaluate the biotransformation of Rb1 in American ginseng by human enteric microflora. The in vitro inhibitory effects of Rb1 and compound K were compared using the HCT-116 and HT-19 human colorectal cancer cell lines by a MTS assay. Cell cycle and cell apoptosis were assayed using flow cytometry. Using ELISA, the anti-inflammatory effects of Rb1 and compound K were compared for their inhibition of interleukin-8 secretion in HT-29 cells, induced by lipopolysaccharide. The results revealed that compound K is the major intestinal microbiome metabolite of Rb1. When compared with Rb1, compound K had significantly stronger anti-proliferative effects in HCT-116 and HT-29 cell lines (P<0.01). Compound K significantly arrested HCT-116 and HT-29 cells in the G1 phase, and induced cell apoptosis (P<0.01). By contrast, Rb1 did not markedly influence the cell cycle or apoptosis. Furthermore, compound K exerted significant anti-inflammatory effects even at low concentrations (P<0.05), while Rb1 did not have any distinct effects. The data obtained from the present study demonstrated that compound K, an intestinal microbiome metabolite of Rb1, may have a potential clinical value in the prevention of inflammatory-associated colorectal cancer.

  14. The effects of acute inflammation on cognitive functioning and emotional processing in humans: A systematic review of experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Bollen, Jessica; Trick, Leanne; Llewellyn, David; Dickens, Chris

    2017-03-01

    The cognitive neuropsychological model of depression proposes that negative biases in the processing of emotionally salient information have a central role in the development and maintenance of depression. We have conducted a systematic review to determine whether acute experimental inflammation is associated with changes to cognitive and emotional processing that are thought to cause and maintain depression. We identified experimental studies in which healthy individuals were administered an acute inflammatory challenge (bacterial endotoxin/vaccination) and standardised tests of cognitive function were performed. Fourteen references were identified, reporting findings from 12 independent studies on 345 participants. Methodological quality was rated strong or moderate for 11 studies. Acute experimental inflammation was triggered using a variety of agents (including endotoxin from E. coli, S. typhi, S. abortus Equi and Hepatitis B vaccine) and cognition was assessed over hours to months, using cognitive tests of i) attention/executive functioning, ii) memory and iii) social/emotional processing. Studies found mixed evidence that acute experimental inflammation caused changes to attention/executive functioning (2 of 6 studies showed improvements in attention executive function compared to control), changes in memory (3 of 5 studies; improved reaction time: reduced memory for object proximity: poorer immediate and delayed memory) and changes to social/emotional processing (4 of 5 studies; reduced perception of emotions, increased avoidance of punishment/loss experiences, and increased social disconnectedness). Acute experimental inflammation causes negative biases in social and emotional processing that could explain observed associations between inflammation and depression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Neonatal Colonic Inflammation Increases Spinal Transmission and Cystathionine β-Synthetase Expression in Spinal Dorsal Horn of Rats with Visceral Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liting; Xiao, Ying; Weng, Rui-Xia; Liu, Xuelian; Zhang, Ping-An; Hu, Chuang-Ying; Yu, Shan P.; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2017-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal disorder characterized by chronic abdominal pain and alteration of bowel movements. The pathogenesis of visceral hypersensitivity in IBS patients remains largely unknown. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is reported to play an important role in development of visceral hyperalgesia. However, the role of H2S at spinal dorsal horn level remains elusive in visceral hypersensitivity. The aim of this study is designed to investigate how H2S takes part in visceral hypersensitivity of adult rats with neonatal colonic inflammation (NCI). Visceral hypersensitivity was induced by neonatal colonic injection of diluted acetic acid. Expression of an endogenous H2S synthesizing enzyme cystathionine β-synthetase (CBS) was determined by Western blot. Excitability and synaptic transmission of neurons in the substantia gelatinosa (SG) of spinal cord was recorded by patch clamping. Here, we showed that expression of CBS in the spinal dorsal horn was significantly upregulated in NCI rats. The frequency of glutamatergic synaptic activities in SG was markedly enhanced in NCI rats when compared with control rats. Application of NaHS increased the frequency of both spontaneous and miniature excitatory post-synaptic currents of SG neurons in control rats through a presynaptic mechanism. In contrast, application of AOAA, an inhibitor of CBS, dramatically suppressed the frequency of glutamatergic synaptic activities of SG neurons of NCI rats. Importantly, intrathecal injection of AOAA remarkably attenuated visceral hypersensitivity of NCI rats. These results suggest that H2S modulates pain signaling likely through a presynaptic mechanism in SG of spinal dorsal horn, thus providing a potential therapeutic strategy for treatment for chronic visceral pain in patients with IBS. PMID:29046639

  16. Nigella sativa amliorates inflammation and demyelination in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis-induced Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Noor, Neveen A; Fahmy, Heba M; Mohammed, Faten F; Elsayed, Anwar A; Radwan, Nasr M

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the major, immune-mediated, demyelinating neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a well-established animal model of MS. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective and ameliorative effects of N. sativa seeds (2.8 g/kg body weight) in EAE-induced Wistar rats. EAE-induced rats were divided into: 1- EAE-induced rats (“EAE” group). 2- “N. sativa + EAE” group received daily oral administration of N. sativa 2 weeks prior EAE induction until the end of the experiment. 3- “EAE + N. sativa” group received daily oral administration of N. sativa after the appearance of first clinical signs until the end of the experiment. All animals were decapitated at the 28th day post EAE-induction. EAE was investigated using histopathological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural examinations in addition to determination of some oxidative stress parameters in the cerebellum and medulla. N. sativa suppressed inflammation observed in EAE-induced rats. In addition, N. sativa enhanced remyelination in the cerebellum. Moreover, N. sativa reduced the expression of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF β1). N. sativa seeds could provide a promising agent effective in both the protection and treatment of EAE. PMID:26261504

  17. Colon Necrosis Due to Sodium Polystyrene Sulfonate with and without Sorbitol: An Experimental Study in Rats.

    PubMed

    Ayoub, Isabelle; Oh, Man S; Gupta, Raavi; McFarlane, Michael; Babinska, Anna; Salifu, Moro O

    2015-01-01

    Based on a single rat study by Lillemoe et al, the consensus has been formed to implicate sorbitol rather than sodium polystyrene sulfonate (SPS) as the culprit for colon necrosis in humans treated with SPS and sorbitol. We tested the hypothesis that colon necrosis by sorbitol in the experiment was due to the high osmolality and volume of sorbitol rather than its chemical nature. 26 rats underwent 5/6 nephrectomy. They were divided into 6 groups and given enema solutions under anesthesia (normal saline, 33% sorbitol, 33% mannitol, SPS in 33% sorbitol, SPS in normal saline, and SPS in distilled water). They were sacrificed after 48 hours of enema administration or earlier if they were very sick. The gross appearance of the colon was visually inspected, and then sliced colon tissues were examined under light microscopy. 1 rat from the sorbitol and 1 from the mannitol group had foci of ischemic colonic changes. The rats receiving SPS enema, in sorbitol, normal saline, distilled water, had crystal deposition with colonic necrosis and mucosal erosion. All the rats not given SPS survived until sacrificed at 48 h whereas 11 of 13 rats that received SPS in sorbitol, normal saline or distilled water died or were clearly dying and sacrificed sooner. There was no difference between sorbitol and mannitol when given without SPS. In a surgical uremic rat model, SPS enema given alone or with sorbitol or mannitol seemed to cause colon necrosis and high mortality rate, whereas 33% sorbitol without SPS did not.

  18. Type 1 fimbriae are important factors limiting the dissemination and colonization of mice by Salmonella Enteritidis and contribute to the induction of intestinal inflammation during Salmonella invasion

    PubMed Central

    Kuźmińska-Bajor, Marta; Grzymajło, Krzysztof; Ugorski, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    We have recently shown that Salmonella Gallinarum type 1 fimbriae with endogenous mannose-resistant (MR) variant of the FimH protein increase systemic dissemination of S. Gallinarum and colonization of internal organs in comparison to the S. Gallinarum fimH knockout strain or the mutant expressing mannose-sensitive (MS) FimH variant from S. Enteritidis. Elaborating from these studies, we proposed that MS variants of FimH are advantageous in gastrointestinal infections, in contrast to MR FimH variants which decrease intestinal colonization and promote their systemic spreading. To support our hypothesis, we carried out in vivo studies using mice infected with wild-type S. Enteritidis and its fimH knockout strain (S. Enteritidis), which was characterized by significantly lower adhesion and invasiveness of murine ICE-1 intestinal cells. Using bioluminescence imaging, we observed that the loss of MS FimH adhesin correlates well with the highly increased colonization of mice by these bacteria. The appearance of the mutant strain was observed much earlier than wild-type Salmonella, and mice infected with 104–107 S. Enteritidis fimH::kan CFUs had significantly (P < 0.05) shorter infection-free time than animals inoculated with wild-type S. Enteritidis. Infections caused by non-typhoid Salmonella, such as S. Enteritidis, are associated with massive inflammation of the lamina propria and lymph nodes in the intestinal tract. Therefore, we evaluated the role of MS type 1 fimbriae in the induction of cytokine expression and secretion, using murine ICE-1 intestinal cells. We showed that the expression, as well as secretion, of Il-1b, Il-6, Il-10, and Il-12b was significantly higher in cells infected with wild-type S. Enteritidis compared to cells infected with the mutant strain. Based on our results, we propose that type 1 fimbriae may play an important role in the pathogenicity of S. Enteritidis and may contribute to an intestinal inflammatory response. PMID:25914682

  19. Chemopreventive potential of β-Sitosterol in experimental colon cancer model - an In vitro and In vivo study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Asclepias curassavica Linn. is a traditional medicinal plant used by tribal people in the western ghats, India, to treat piles, gonorrhoea, roundworm infestation and abdominal tumours. We have determined the protective effect of β-sitosterol isolated from A. curassavica in colon cancer, using in vitro and in vivo models. Methods The active molecule was isolated, based upon bioassay guided fractionation, and identified as β-sitosterol on spectral evidence. The ability to induce apoptosis was determined by its in vitro antiradical activity, cytotoxic studies using human colon adenocarcinoma and normal monkey kidney cell lines, and the expression of β-catenin and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in human colon cancer cell lines (COLO 320 DM). The chemopreventive potential of β-sitosterol in colon carcinogenesis was assessed by injecting 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH, 20 mg/kg b.w.) into male Wistar rats and supplementing this with β-sitosterol throughout the experimental period of 16 weeks at 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg b.w. Results β-sitosterol induced significant dose-dependent growth inhibition of COLO 320 DM cells (IC50 266.2 μM), induced apoptosis by scavenging reactive oxygen species, and suppressed the expression of β-catenin and PCNA antigens in human colon cancer cells. β-sitosterol supplementation reduced the number of aberrant crypt and crypt multiplicity in DMH-initiated rats in a dose-dependent manner with no toxic effects. Conclusion We found doses of 10-20 mg/kg b.w. β-sitosterol to be effective for future in vivo studies. β-sitosterol had chemopreventive potential by virtue of its radical quenching ability in vitro, with minimal toxicity to normal cells. It also attenuated β-catenin and PCNA expression, making it a potential anticancer drug for colon carcinogenesis. PMID:20525330

  20. Central activation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway reduces surgical inflammation in experimental post-operative ileus

    PubMed Central

    The, FO; Cailotto, C; van der Vliet, J; de Jonge, WJ; Bennink, RJ; Buijs, RM; Boeckxstaens, GE

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve reduces intestinal inflammation following mechanical handling, thereby shortening post-operative ileus in mice. Previous studies in a sepsis model showed that this cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway can be activated pharmacologically by central administration of semapimod, an inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. We therefore evaluated the effect of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) semapimod on intestinal inflammation and post-operative ileus in mice. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Mice underwent a laparotomy or intestinal manipulation 1 h after i.c.v. pre-treatment with semapimod (1 µg·kg−1) or saline. Drugs were administered through a cannula placed in the left lateral ventricle 1 week prior to experimentation. Twenty-four hours after surgery, gastric emptying was measured using scintigraphy, and the degree of intestinal inflammation was assessed. Finally, activation of brain regions was assessed using quantitative immunohistochemistry for c-fos. KEY RESULTS Intestinal manipulation induced inflammation of the manipulated intestine and significantly delayed gastric emptying, 24 h after surgery in saline-treated animals. Semapimod significantly reduced this inflammation and improved gastric emptying. Vagotomy enhanced the inflammatory response induced by intestinal manipulation and abolished the anti-inflammatory effect of semapimod. Semapimod but not saline induced a significant increase in c-fos expression in the paraventricular nucleus, the nucleus of the solitary tract and the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our findings show that i.c.v. semapimod reduces manipulation-induced intestinal inflammation and prevented post-operative ileus. This anti-inflammatory effect depends on central activation of the vagus nerve. PMID:21371006

  1. Complementary cereals and legumes for health: Synergistic interaction of sorghum flavones and cowpea flavonols against LPS-induced inflammation in colonic myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Agah, Shima; Kim, Hyemee; Mertens-Talcott, Susanne U; Awika, Joseph M

    2017-07-01

    Cereals and legumes are traditionally consumed together in many cultures, and may provide complementary health benefits beyond what is known about improved indispensable amino acid intake. Here, we use an in vitro model of inflammatory pathways to investigate whether the different flavonoids in sorghum and cowpea could synergistically reduce inflammation. Interactive effect of combining apigenin and quercetin, as well as extracts (70% acetone, v/v) from a flavone-dominated white sorghum and flavonol-dominated white cowpea, against LPS-induced NF-κB and downstream cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8) gene and protein expression was evaluated using the CCD18Co colon myofibroblasts. Combination of apigenin and quercetin, and sorghum and cowpea extracts synergistically downregulated LPS-induced NF-κB gene and protein expression in a dose-dependent manner, with additive effect producing IC 50 values that were 14.6 and 14.0 times, respectively, higher than 1:1 combined treatments. Similar strong synergistic interactions were observed for the downstream cytokines (IC 50 values for additive effect 8.3-21 times higher than combined treatments). Furthermore, the ratios of the different combined treatments significantly affected the magnitude of synergy. Combining the structurally related cereal flavones and legume flavonols elicit strong synergistic anti-inflammatory response in LPS-stimulated nonmalignant colonocytes, likely by targeting interdependent mechanisms. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Effect of pentoxifylline and vinpocetine on the healing of ischemic colon anastomosis: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Sümer, Aziz; Altınlı, Ediz; Senger, Serkan; Köksal, Neşet; Onur, Ender; Eroğlu, Ersan; Güneş, Pembegül

    2011-11-01

    In the current study, we aimed to investigate the influences of pentoxifylline, which increases the flexibility, deformability and viscosity of the erythrocytes while reducing the aggregation abilities of the platelets, and vinpocetine, which has neuroprotective and antioxidant effects, on healing of colonic anastomoses. We used 30 Albino Wistar rats. Subjects were divided into three groups of 10 rats each. Colonic ischemia was established in all the groups. Following colonic transection, anastomosis was performed. Group A received intraperitoneal saline, whereas Group B and Group C received pentoxifylline and vinpocetine, respectively. The subjects were sacrificed on the postoperative 5th day by ether anesthesia, and their colonic bursting pressures were measured. The anastomotic area was excised for hydroxyproline assay and histopathologic examination. According to intergroup comparisons, colonic bursting pressure was found to be higher in the treatment groups than in the control group; however, the difference was not statistically significant. Intergroup comparisons regarding tissue hydroxyproline levels showed statistically significant differences between Groups A and B, Groups A and C and Groups B and C. Similar to pentoxifylline, vinpocetine was also shown to have a beneficial effect over ischemic colon anastomoses.

  3. Orally administered Taenia solium Calreticulin prevents experimental intestinal inflammation and is associated with a type 2 immune response

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Rivera, Mayra; Diaz-Gandarilla, Jose Alfredo; Flores-Torres, Marco Antonio; Avila, Guillermina; Perfiliev, Maria; Salazar, Ana Maria; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia; Flisser, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal helminth antigens are inducers of type 2 responses and can elicit regulatory immune responses, resulting in dampened inflammation. Several platyhelminth proteins with anti-inflammatory activity have been reported. We have identified, cloned and expressed the Taenia solium calreticulin (rTsCRT) and shown that it predominantly induces a type 2 response characterized by IgG1, IL-4 and IL-5 production in mice. Here, we report the rTsCRT anti-inflammatory activity in a well-known experimental colitis murine model. Mice were orally immunized with purified rTsCRT and colitis was induced with trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). Clinical signs of disease, macroscopic and microscopic tissue inflammation, cytokine production and micronuclei formation, as a marker of genotoxicity, were measured in order to assess the effect of rTsCRT immunization on experimentally induced colitis. rTsCRT administration prior to TNBS instillation significantly reduced the inflammatory parameters, including the acute phase cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6. Dampened inflammation was associated with increased local expression of IL-13 and systemic IL-10 and TGF-β production. Genotoxic damage produced by the inflammatory response was also precluded. Our results show that oral treatment with rTsCRT prevents excessive TNBS-induced inflammation in mice and suggest that rTsCRT has immunomodulatory properties associated with the expression of type 2 and regulatory cytokines commonly observed in other helminths. PMID:29036211

  4. Dietary α-linolenic acid diminishes experimental atherogenesis and restricts T cell-driven inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Winnik, Stephan; Lohmann, Christine; Richter, Eva K.; Schäfer, Nicola; Song, Wen-Liang; Leiber, Florian; Mocharla, Pavani; Hofmann, Janin; Klingenberg, Roland; Borén, Jan; Becher, Burkhard; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Lüscher, Thomas F.; Matter, Christian M.; Beer, Jürg H.

    2011-01-01

    Aims Epidemiological studies report an inverse association between plant-derived dietary α-linolenic acid (ALA) and cardiovascular events. However, little is known about the mechanism of this protection. We assessed the cellular and molecular mechanisms of dietary ALA (flaxseed) on atherosclerosis in a mouse model. Methods and results Eight-week-old male apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE−/−) mice were fed a 0.21 % (w/w) cholesterol diet for 16 weeks containing either a high ALA [7.3 % (w/w); n = 10] or low ALA content [0.03 % (w/w); n = 10]. Bioavailability, chain elongation, and fatty acid metabolism were measured by gas chromatography of tissue lysates and urine. Plaques were assessed using immunohistochemistry. T cell proliferation was investigated in primary murine CD3-positive lymphocytes. T cell differentiation and activation was assessed by expression analyses of interferon-γ, interleukin-4, and tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) using quantitative PCR and ELISA. Dietary ALA increased aortic tissue levels of ALA as well as of the n−3 long chain fatty acids (LC n−3 FA) eicosapentaenoic acid, docosapentaenoic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid. The high ALA diet reduced plaque area by 50% and decreased plaque T cell content as well as expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and TNFα. Both dietary ALA and direct ALA exposure restricted T cell proliferation, differentiation, and inflammatory activity. Dietary ALA shifted prostaglandin and isoprostane formation towards 3-series compounds, potentially contributing to the atheroprotective effects of ALA. Conclusion Dietary ALA diminishes experimental atherogenesis and restricts T cell-driven inflammation, thus providing the proof-of-principle that plant-derived ALA may provide a valuable alternative to marine LC n−3 FA. PMID:21285075

  5. [6]-gingerol dampens hepatic steatosis and inflammation in experimental nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Thing-Fong; Liou, Shorong-Shii; Chang, Chia Ju; Liu, I-Min

    2015-04-15

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of [6]-gingerol ((S)-5-hydroxy-1-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-3-decanone) in experimental models of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. HepG2 cells were exposed to 500 µmol/l oleic acid (OA) for 24 h and preincubated for an additional 24 h with [6]-gingerol (25, 50 or 100 µmol/l). [6]-Gingerol (100 µmol/l) inhibited OA-induced triglyceride and inflammatory marker accumulation in HepG2 cells. After being fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for 2 weeks, male golden hamsters were dosed orally with [6]-gingerol (25, 50 or 100 mg/kg/day) once daily for 8 weeks while maintained on HFD. [6]-Gingerol (100 mg/kg/day) alleviated liver steatosis, inflammation, and reversed plasma markers of metabolic syndrome in HFD-fed hamsters. The expression of inflammatory cytokine genes and nuclear transcription factor-κB (NF-κB) were increased in the HFD group; these effects were attenuated by [6]-gingerol. The hepatic mRNA expression of lipogenic genes such as liver X receptor-α, sterol regulating element binding protein-1c and its target genes including acetyl-CoA carboxylase, fatty acid synthase, stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1, and acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 in HFD-fed hamsters was also blocked by [6]-gingerol. [6]-Gingerol may attenuate HFD-induced steatohepatitis by downregulating NF-κB-mediated inflammatory responses and reducing hepatic lipogenic gene expression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Colon Necrosis Due to Sodium Polystyrene Sulfonate with and without Sorbitol: An Experimental Study in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ayoub, Isabelle; Oh, Man S.; Gupta, Raavi; McFarlane, Michael; Babinska, Anna; Salifu, Moro O.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Based on a single rat study by Lillemoe et al, the consensus has been formed to implicate sorbitol rather than sodium polystyrene sulfonate (SPS) as the culprit for colon necrosis in humans treated with SPS and sorbitol. We tested the hypothesis that colon necrosis by sorbitol in the experiment was due to the high osmolality and volume of sorbitol rather than its chemical nature. Methods 26 rats underwent 5/6 nephrectomy. They were divided into 6 groups and given enema solutions under anesthesia (normal saline, 33% sorbitol, 33% mannitol, SPS in 33% sorbitol, SPS in normal saline, and SPS in distilled water). They were sacrificed after 48 hours of enema administration or earlier if they were very sick. The gross appearance of the colon was visually inspected, and then sliced colon tissues were examined under light microscopy. Results 1 rat from the sorbitol and 1 from the mannitol group had foci of ischemic colonic changes. The rats receiving SPS enema, in sorbitol, normal saline, distilled water, had crystal deposition with colonic necrosis and mucosal erosion. All the rats not given SPS survived until sacrificed at 48 h whereas 11 of 13 rats that received SPS in sorbitol, normal saline or distilled water died or were clearly dying and sacrificed sooner. There was no difference between sorbitol and mannitol when given without SPS. Conclusions In a surgical uremic rat model, SPS enema given alone or with sorbitol or mannitol seemed to cause colon necrosis and high mortality rate, whereas 33% sorbitol without SPS did not. PMID:26413782

  7. Airway Inflammation and Illness Severity in Response to Experimental Rhinovirus Infection in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jie; Message, Simon D.; Qiu, Yusheng; Mallia, Patrick; Kebadze, Tatiana; Contoli, Marco; Ward, Christine K.; Barnathan, Elliot S.; Mascelli, Mary Ann; Kon, Onn M.; Papi, Alberto; Stanciu, Luminita A.; Jeffery, Peter K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The nature of bronchial mucosal inflammation and its physiologic and clinical significance in rhinovirus-induced asthma exacerbations is unclear. We investigated bronchial mucosal inflammatory response and its association with physiologic and clinical outcomes in an experimental model of rhinovirus-induced asthma exacerbations. Methods: We used immunohistochemistry methods to detect phenotypes of inflammatory cells infiltrating the bronchial mucosa before and after experimental rhinovirus infection in 10 subjects with asthma and 15 normal subjects. Results: Compared with baseline, rhinovirus infection significantly increased the number of epithelial (P = .005) and subepithelial (P = .017) neutrophils in subjects with asthma only and subepithelial CD68+ macrophages in both subjects with asthma (P = .009) and normal subjects (P = .018) but more so in those with asthma (P = .021). Numbers of CD45+, CD68+, and CD20+ cells; neutrophils; and eosinophils at day 4 postinfection were positively associated with virus load (r = 0.50-0.72, P = .016-0.03). At acute infection in subjects with asthma, CD4+ cells correlated with chest symptom scores (r = 0.69, P = .029), the fall in the 10% fall in FEV1 (PC10) correlated with neutrophils (r = −0.89, P = .029), the PC10 correlated inversely with CD4+ (r = −0.67, P = .023) and CD8+ cells (r = −0.65, P = .03), the 20% fall in FEV1 was inversely associated with CD20+ cells (r = −0.65, P = .03), and higher epithelial CD8+ cell counts were significantly associated with a greater maximum fall in FEV1 (r = −0.72, P = .03), whereas higher subepithelial mast cell counts were significantly associated with a lower maximum percent fall in peak expiratory flow (r = 0.8, P = .024). Conclusions: In subjects with asthma, rhinovirus infection induces bronchial mucosal neutrophilia and more severe monocyte/macrophage infiltration than in normal subjects. Airway neutrophils, eosinophils, and T and B lymphocytes during infection

  8. Should colon-penetrating small missiles be removed? An experimental study of retrocolic wound tracks.

    PubMed

    Edwards, D P; Brown, D; Watkins, P E

    1999-01-01

    Small-fragment injury to the colon may occur in approximately 5% of battlefield casualties. The surgical management aims to reduce the risk of retrocolic infection and provide optimal conditions for colonic wound healing. This study aimed to quantify the risk of retrocolic infection. Steel fragments were fired through exteriorized porcine colon and caught in 20% gelatin. The fragments, and resultant tracks, were extracted and subjected to quantitative bacteriological examination to determine the extent of contamination. The median bacterial count for complete tracks was 1.2 x 10(4) CFU/g (interquartile range 1.8 x 10(3) to 2.7 x 10(4)). Counts were highest in the initial 1 cm of the track and reduced along its length. This study does not support wound track excision or missile fragment removal in cases of retrocolic trauma following penetrating colonic injury. Either or both procedures will increase local trauma and are likely to prejudice colonic wound repair.

  9. Experimental evaluation of ileal patch in delayed primary repair of penetrating colon injuries: An animal study.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Hamid Reza; Bolandparvaz, Shahram; Yarmohammadi, Hooman; Geramizadeh, Bita; Tanideh, Nader; Paydar, Shahram; Hosseini, Seyed Vahid

    2006-10-01

    Primary repair of traumatic colonic perforation is progressively gaining acceptance as the best method of management. However, when delayed, the risk of infection-related complications may increase. Here, we present a new method of repairing colon perforation in the presence of peritonitis. Acute colon injury was simulated in 22 German shepherd dogs. The dogs were randomly divided into two groups of 11 and after 24 hours they were operated on. The perforations were repaired by subserosal suture technique. In the first group (group A), ileal patch was used. In the other group (group B), the colon was closed by debridement and anastomosis. After 6 weeks, the repairs were assessed on the basis of survival, gross and histological assessments. Nine (82%) dogs in group A and six (56%) in group B survived. Ileal patch utilization significantly decreased the mortality rate (p < 0.05). The cause of death in two group A dogs and five group B dogs was peritonitis and intra-abdominal abscess formation. None of the surviving dogs showed evidence of anastomotic leakage or breakdown. Small bowel patch used in primary repair of colon injury in the presence of peritonitis may decrease the risk of postoperative infection-related complications and the mortality rate.

  10. Role of diclofenac sodium and paracetamol on colonic anastomosis: An experimental rodent model.

    PubMed

    Gulcicek, Osman Bilgin; Solmaz, Ali; Yigitbas, Hakan; Ercetin, Candas; Yavuz, Erkan; Ozdogan, Kamil; Biricik, Aytac; Akkalp, Asli Kahraman; Uzun, Hafize; Kutnu, Muge; Celebi, Fatih; Celik, Atilla

    2018-05-01

    Despite many advances in surgery and technology, colonic anastomosis remains a challenge after colonic resection. The purpose of this study is to compare the safety of using diclofenac sodium and paracetamol for analgesia in colonic anastomosis on rats. Wistar-Hannover rats were randomly allocated to four groups: Group 1, sham-operated group; Group 2, control group; Group 3, diclofenac sodium group; Group 4, paracetamol group. After laparotomy, the left colon was transected and a single-layer anastomosis was made with 5/0 vicryl in Groups 2, 3, and 4. Only laparotomy was performed in Group 1. After anastomosis, we administered saline to Group 2, diclofenac sodium to Group 3, and paracetamol to Group 4 for 7 days. Then, all animals were decapitated. The anastomotic region was resected, and bursting pressure was measured. Then, the specimen was sent to the laboratory for histological examination and hydroxyproline analysis. Bursting pressure and hydroxyproline level were significantly higher in the paracetamol group (p<0.05). When we looked at the fibrosis levels of these groups, it was also higher in paracetamol group. Bursting pressure, hydroxyproline levels, and fibrosis levels indicate that the perioperative use of paracetamol for analgesia when undergoing colonic anastomosis is safer than diclofenac sodium. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  11. Central activation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway reduces surgical inflammation in experimental post-operative ileus.

    PubMed

    The, Fo; Cailotto, C; van der Vliet, J; de Jonge, W J; Bennink, R J; Buijs, R M; Boeckxstaens, G E

    2011-07-01

    Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve reduces intestinal inflammation following mechanical handling, thereby shortening post-operative ileus in mice. Previous studies in a sepsis model showed that this cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway can be activated pharmacologically by central administration of semapimod, an inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. We therefore evaluated the effect of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) semapimod on intestinal inflammation and post-operative ileus in mice. Mice underwent a laparotomy or intestinal manipulation 1 h after i.c.v. pre-treatment with semapimod (1 µg·kg(-1) ) or saline. Drugs were administered through a cannula placed in the left lateral ventricle 1 week prior to experimentation. Twenty-four hours after surgery, gastric emptying was measured using scintigraphy, and the degree of intestinal inflammation was assessed. Finally, activation of brain regions was assessed using quantitative immunohistochemistry for c-fos. Intestinal manipulation induced inflammation of the manipulated intestine and significantly delayed gastric emptying, 24 h after surgery in saline-treated animals. Semapimod significantly reduced this inflammation and improved gastric emptying. Vagotomy enhanced the inflammatory response induced by intestinal manipulation and abolished the anti-inflammatory effect of semapimod. Semapimod but not saline induced a significant increase in c-fos expression in the paraventricular nucleus, the nucleus of the solitary tract and the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve. Our findings show that i.c.v. semapimod reduces manipulation-induced intestinal inflammation and prevented post-operative ileus. This anti-inflammatory effect depends on central activation of the vagus nerve. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  12. Effects of Alprazolam, Zolpidem and Zopiclone, and of chronic inflammation on peripheral experimental algesia in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Zdrîncă, Mihaela; Muţiu, Gabriela; Bogdan, Maria; Dobjanschi, Luciana; Antonescu, Angela; Moş, Ioana; Mureşan, Mariana; Zdrîncă, M; Antonescu, Andreea

    2011-01-01

    In the literature, there are some data which indicate that benzodiazepines and other chemical compounds with the same mechanism of action (Diazepam, Chlordiazepoxide, Lorazepam, Zopiclone, etc.) also have other effects. We investigated the effects of experimental chronic inflammation under the administration of some tranquilizers and hypnotics on peripheral algesia induced in rats by "writhing test". Chronic inflammation was induced by "cotton wool granuloma" technique. The "writhing test" consisted in intraperitoneal injection of an irritant agent (acetic acid 0.0025%, 0.4 mL). The animal reacts with a characteristic stretching behavior called writhing. A writhe is indicated by stretching of the abdomen with simultaneous stretching of at least one hind limb. Then, the animals were placed individually into glass beakers and 5 minutes were allowed to elapse. The rats were then observed for a period of 10 minutes and the number of writhes is recorded for each animal. Three drugs were administered by gastric probe: Alprazolam 1 mg/kg, Zolpidem 10 mg/kg and Zopiclone 10 mg/kg. Alprazolam is a triazolobenzodiazepine derivative used as a tranquilizer. Zolpidem is an imidazopyridine with marked sedative-hypnotic effect and it has the same mechanism of action like benzodiazepines. Zopiclone is a cyclopyrrolone with sedative-hypnotic effect used as hypnotic and acts like benzodiazepines. After that, the animals were sacrificed and the weight of cotton wool granuloma was determined. In the same time, the histopatological aspect of granulomatous inflammation was studied. It was found that experimental proliferative inflammation under the action of these drugs was accompanied by a peripheral analgesic activity in "writhing test". The mechanisms of these effects are not fully elucidated. Some explanations are: they act as agonists or antagonists on algesia and inflammation mediators and they have a stimulating effect on peripheral ω3-benzodiazepine receptors ("peripheral

  13. Changes in Peripheral Serum Creatine Phosphokinase (CPK) and Lactic Dehydrogenase (LDH) in Acute Experimental Colonic Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Graeber, Geoffrey M.; Wukich, Dane K.; Cafferty, Patrick J.; O'Neill, John F.; Wolf, Robert E.; Ackerman, Norman B.; Harmon, John W.

    1981-01-01

    No satisfactory laboratory test for the early diagnosis of bowel infarction exists at this time. We have delineated changes in serum CPK levels after acute superior mesenteric artery infarction; whether or not comparable changes occur with inferior mesenteric artery infarction has not yet been determined. Furthermore, the changes in LDH associated with acute bowel infarction have not been documented. To determine the changes in serum CPK and LDH in acute colonic infarction, laparotomies were performed on dogs after peripheral baseline blood samples were drawn and each subject was randomly placed in one of three groups: laparotomy alone, acute colonic obstruction, and acute colonic infarction by ligation of the inferior mesenteric artery. The marginal artery of the colon was ligated at the peritoneal reflection and at the cecum to interrupt arterial collaterals. Blood samples were taken from each subject at intervals of three hours for 48 hours after injury. Serum from each sample was analyzed for total CPK and LDH by automated spectrophotometry. Isoenzymes were determined by agarose gel electrophoresis. Necropsies were conducted on all the dogs to confirm that the intended condition had been produced and that no intercurrent disease was present. The data support the conclusion that total CPK, total LDH and their isoenzymes become elevated in the peripheral serum after colonic infarction. The maximal elevations were all seen within the first 12 hours after acute colonic infarction. Total LDH and LDH3, the most prevalent isoenzyme of LDH in bowel, do not become elevated in the serum to as high a level as CPK, but the combination of serum elevations in both enzyme systems may prove to be of diagnostic significance. PMID:7305484

  14. 3,5-Dicaffeoyl-4-malonylquinic acid reduced oxidative stress and inflammation in a experimental model of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    di Paola, Rosanna; Esposito, Emanuela; Mazzon, Emanuela; Caminiti, Rocco; Toso, Roberto Dal; Pressi, Giovanna; Cozzocrea, Salvatore

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of 3,5-dicaffeoyl-4-malonylquinic acid (CA1), extract from Centella Asiatica, in rats subjected to experimental colitis. Colitis was induced in rats by intracolonic instillation of dinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (DNBS). CA1 was administered daily orally (0.2 or 2 mg/kg). Four days after DNBS administration, treatment with CA1 significantly reduced the appearance of diarrhoea and the loss of body weight. This was associated with a significant reduction in colonic MPO activity. CA1 also reduced NF-kappaB activation, the pro-inflammatory cytokines release, the appearance of I-NOS, nitrotyrosine, PARP and proMMP-9 and -2 activity in the colon and reduced the up-regulation of ICAM-1 and the expression of P-Selectin. The results of this study suggested that administration of CA1 may be beneficial for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

  15. Histological effects of He-Ne laser on the healing of experimental colon anastomoses in the rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asencio-Arana, Francisco; Torres-Gil, Vicente; Martinez-Soriano, Francisco; Perez-Sarrio, R.

    1990-06-01

    Despite technical advances, the incidence of anastomotic leaks in elective colorectal surgery remains around 14%, Recent studies suggest that the use of low energy lasers may enhance wound healing in different tissues in a selective, nondestructive manner. Based on these findings we have attempted to provide experimental background on the histological effects of He-Ne laser during the early stages of healing in 70 colonic anastornoses performed on rats, The irradiation of the anastomoses by two doses of 3.6 J/cm produces an increase in the populations of round cells and fibroblasts of the scar tissue, an increase in new vessel formation and a significant improvement in epithelialization. This suggests that the irradiation of colonic wounds with He-Ne lasers can result in an enhancement of healing.

  16. Volatile Organic Compounds Enhance Allergic Airway Inflammation in an Experimental Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Bönisch, Ulrike; Böhme, Alexander; Kohajda, Tibor; Mögel, Iljana; Schütze, Nicole; von Bergen, Martin; Simon, Jan C.; Lehmann, Irina; Polte, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies suggest an association between exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and adverse allergic and respiratory symptoms. However, whether VOCs exhibit a causal role as adjuvants in asthma development remains unclear. Methods To investigate the effect of VOC exposure on the development of allergic airway inflammation Balb/c mice were exposed to VOCs emitted by new polyvinylchloride (PVC) flooring, sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) and characterized in acute and chronic murine asthma models. Furthermore, prevalent evaporated VOCs were analyzed and mice were exposed to selected single VOCs. Results Exposure of mice to PVC flooring increased eosinophilic lung inflammation and OVA-specific IgE serum levels compared to un-exposed control mice. The increased inflammation was associated with elevated levels of Th2-cytokines. Long-term exposure to PVC flooring exacerbated chronic airway inflammation. VOCs with the highest concentrations emitted by new PVC flooring were N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) and 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,3-pentanediol diisobutyrate (TXIB). Exposure to NMP or TXIB also increased the allergic immune response in OVA-sensitized mice. In vitro or in vivo exposure to NMP or TXIB reduced IL-12 production in maturing dendritic cells (DCs) and enhanced airway inflammation after adoptive DC transfer into Balb/c mice. At higher concentrations both VOCs induced oxidative stress demonstrated by increased isoprostane and glutathione-S-transferase-pi1 protein levels in the lung of non-sensitized mice. Treatment of PVC flooring-exposed mice with N-acetylcysteine prevented the VOC-induced increase of airway inflammation. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that exposure to VOCs may increase the allergic immune response by interfering with DC function and by inducing oxidative stress and has therefore to be considerate as risk factor for the development of allergic diseases. PMID:22802943

  17. Volatile organic compounds enhance allergic airway inflammation in an experimental mouse model.

    PubMed

    Bönisch, Ulrike; Böhme, Alexander; Kohajda, Tibor; Mögel, Iljana; Schütze, Nicole; von Bergen, Martin; Simon, Jan C; Lehmann, Irina; Polte, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest an association between exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and adverse allergic and respiratory symptoms. However, whether VOCs exhibit a causal role as adjuvants in asthma development remains unclear. To investigate the effect of VOC exposure on the development of allergic airway inflammation Balb/c mice were exposed to VOCs emitted by new polyvinylchloride (PVC) flooring, sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) and characterized in acute and chronic murine asthma models. Furthermore, prevalent evaporated VOCs were analyzed and mice were exposed to selected single VOCs. Exposure of mice to PVC flooring increased eosinophilic lung inflammation and OVA-specific IgE serum levels compared to un-exposed control mice. The increased inflammation was associated with elevated levels of Th2-cytokines. Long-term exposure to PVC flooring exacerbated chronic airway inflammation. VOCs with the highest concentrations emitted by new PVC flooring were N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) and 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,3-pentanediol diisobutyrate (TXIB). Exposure to NMP or TXIB also increased the allergic immune response in OVA-sensitized mice. In vitro or in vivo exposure to NMP or TXIB reduced IL-12 production in maturing dendritic cells (DCs) and enhanced airway inflammation after adoptive DC transfer into Balb/c mice. At higher concentrations both VOCs induced oxidative stress demonstrated by increased isoprostane and glutathione-S-transferase-pi1 protein levels in the lung of non-sensitized mice. Treatment of PVC flooring-exposed mice with N-acetylcysteine prevented the VOC-induced increase of airway inflammation. Our results demonstrate that exposure to VOCs may increase the allergic immune response by interfering with DC function and by inducing oxidative stress and has therefore to be considerate as risk factor for the development of allergic diseases.

  18. Saccharomyces boulardii and Candida albicans experimental colonization of the murine gut.

    PubMed

    Samonis, G; Falagas, M E; Lionakis, S; Ntaoukakis, M; Kofteridis, D P; Ntalas, I; Maraki, S

    2011-05-01

    Saccharomyces boulardii has been and continues to be extensively used as a probiotic, with only rare associations with fungemia. This study evaluated the virulence of this yeast when given as a probiotic, and its role in preventing gastrointestinal (GI) colonization by Candida. Adult male Crl:CD1 (ICR) BR mice were given S. boulardii orally in three different doses or normal saline for 14 days. Stool cultures were performed at the time of discontinuation of yeast administration, as well as 1 and 2 weeks later. Gut colonization was proportional to the given dose but lasted only 1 week and no dissemination of the yeast was detected. S. boulardii was also given for 2 and 4 weeks to mice fed chow containing Candida albicans. S. boulardii in the gut did not affect Candida GI colonization. These findings suggest that oral administration of S. boulardii induces a substantial but short term increase of this yeast in the intestinal lumen and administration of the probiotic does not prevent subsequent GI colonization by C. albicans.

  19. Analysis of the structural behaviour of colonic segments by inflation tests: Experimental activity and physio-mechanical model.

    PubMed

    Carniel, Emanuele L; Mencattelli, Margherita; Bonsignori, Gabriella; Fontanella, Chiara G; Frigo, Alessandro; Rubini, Alessandro; Stefanini, Cesare; Natali, Arturo N

    2015-11-01

    A coupled experimental and computational approach is provided for the identification of the structural behaviour of gastrointestinal regions, accounting for both elastic and visco-elastic properties. The developed procedure is applied to characterize the mechanics of gastrointestinal samples from pig colons. Experimental data about the structural behaviour of colonic segments are provided by inflation tests. Different inflation processes are performed according to progressively increasing top pressure conditions. Each inflation test consists of an air in-flow, according to an almost constant increasing pressure rate, such as 3.5 mmHg/s, up to a prescribed top pressure, which is held constant for about 300 s to allow the development of creep phenomena. Different tests are interspersed by 600 s of rest to allow the recovery of the tissues' mechanical condition. Data from structural tests are post-processed by a physio-mechanical model in order to identify the mechanical parameters that interpret both the non-linear elastic behaviour of the sample, as the instantaneous pressure-stretch trend, and the time-dependent response, as the stretch increase during the creep processes. The parameters are identified by minimizing the discrepancy between experimental and model results. Different sets of parameters are evaluated for different specimens from different pigs. A statistical analysis is performed to evaluate the distribution of the parameters and to assess the reliability of the experimental and computational activities. © IMechE 2015.

  20. The novel compound Sul-121 inhibits airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness in experimental models of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Han, Bing; Poppinga, Wilfred J.; Zuo, Haoxiao; Zuidhof, Annet B.; Bos, I. Sophie T.; Smit, Marieke; Vogelaar, Pieter; Krenning, Guido; Henning, Robert H.; Maarsingh, Harm; Halayko, Andrew J.; van Vliet, Bernard; Stienstra, Stef; Graaf, Adrianus Cornelis van der; Meurs, Herman; Schmidt, Martina

    2016-01-01

    COPD is characterized by persistent airflow limitation, neutrophilia and oxidative stress from endogenous and exogenous insults. Current COPD therapy involving anticholinergics, β2-adrenoceptor agonists and/or corticosteroids, do not specifically target oxidative stress, nor do they reduce chronic pulmonary inflammation and disease progression in all patients. Here, we explore the effects of Sul-121, a novel compound with anti-oxidative capacity, on hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and inflammation in experimental models of COPD. Using a guinea pig model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced neutrophilia, we demonstrated that Sul-121 inhalation dose-dependently prevented LPS-induced airway neutrophilia (up to ~60%) and AHR (up to ~90%). Non-cartilaginous airways neutrophilia was inversely correlated with blood H2S, and LPS-induced attenuation of blood H2S (~60%) was prevented by Sul-121. Concomitantly, Sul-121 prevented LPS-induced production of the oxidative stress marker, malondialdehyde by ~80%. In immortalized human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells, Sul-121 dose-dependently prevented cigarette smoke extract-induced IL-8 release parallel with inhibition of nuclear translocation of the NF-κB subunit, p65 (each ~90%). Sul-121 also diminished cellular reactive oxygen species production in ASM cells, and inhibited nuclear translocation of the anti-oxidative response regulator, Nrf2. Our data show that Sul-121 effectively inhibits airway inflammation and AHR in experimental COPD models, prospectively through inhibition of oxidative stress. PMID:27229886

  1. Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Redirected Regulatory T Cells Suppress Experimental Allergic Airway Inflammation, a Model of Asthma.

    PubMed

    Skuljec, Jelena; Chmielewski, Markus; Happle, Christine; Habener, Anika; Busse, Mandy; Abken, Hinrich; Hansen, Gesine

    2017-01-01

    Cellular therapy with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-redirected cytotoxic T cells has shown impressive efficacy in the treatment of hematologic malignancies. We explored a regulatory T cell (Treg)-based therapy in the treatment of allergic airway inflammation, a model for asthma, which is characterized by an airway hyper-reactivity (AHR) and a chronic, T helper-2 (Th2) cell-dominated immune response to allergen. To restore the immune balance in the lung, we redirected Tregs by a CAR toward lung epithelia in mice upon experimentally induced allergic asthma, closely mimicking the clinical situation. Adoptively transferred CAR Tregs accumulated in the lung and in tracheobronchial lymph nodes, reduced AHR and diminished eosinophilic airway inflammation, indicated by lower cell numbers in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and decreased cell infiltrates in the lung. CAR Treg cells furthermore prevented excessive pulmonary mucus production as well as increase in allergen-specific IgE and Th2 cytokine levels in exposed animals. CAR Tregs were more efficient in controlling asthma than non-modified Tregs, indicating the pivotal role of specific Treg cell activation in the affected organ. Data demonstrate that lung targeting CAR Treg cells ameliorate key features of experimental airway inflammation, paving the way for cell therapy of severe allergic asthma.

  2. Prevention of arthritis markers in experimental animal and inflammation signalling in macrophage by Karanjin isolated from Pongamia pinnata seed extract.

    PubMed

    Bose, Madhura; Chakraborty, Mousumi; Bhattacharya, Sourav; Mukherjee, Debarati; Mandal, Suvra; Mishra, Roshnara

    2014-08-01

    Karanjin, the furanoflavonoid reported to possess gastroprotective and anti-diabetic properties, was investigated against experimental arthritis and its molecular signalling in inflammation was explored in macrophages. Karanjin was isolated from hexane extract of Pongamia pinnata seeds and was evaluated on arthritis markers in adjuvant induced arthritis model (AIA) in two doses (per oral; 10 mg/kg/day and 20 mg/kg/day). Karanjin dose dependently reduced collagen and cartilage breakdown markers viz. urinary hydroxyproline and glucosamine, respectively, serum lysosomal enzymes responsible for articular cartilage damage, and major proinflammatory cytokine TNFα, secreted by macrophages involved in articular inflammation and destruction. Karanjin also prevented joint damage as evidenced from arthritis score, radiographic and histopathological analysis. To delineate the molecular target of Karanjin, in vitro study on LPS induced macrophages were performed at calibrated non toxic doses (4 µg/mL and 6 µg/mL). Karanjin reduced TNFα production and also showed potent inhibitory effect on nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species production which is generally induced by TNFα from activated macrophages. NF-κB, the key regulator of TNFα signalling during inflammation was significantly suppressed by Karanjin. Our study for the first time highlights the anti-inflammatory role of Karanjin in experimental arthritis model as well as on macrophage signalling, thereby depicting its probable mechanism of action. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Fractalkine (CX3CL1) is involved in the early activation of hypothalamic inflammation in experimental obesity.

    PubMed

    Morari, Joseane; Anhe, Gabriel F; Nascimento, Lucas F; de Moura, Rodrigo F; Razolli, Daniela; Solon, Carina; Guadagnini, Dioze; Souza, Gabriela; Mattos, Alexandre H; Tobar, Natalia; Ramos, Celso D; Pascoal, Vinicius D; Saad, Mario J; Lopes-Cendes, Iscia; Moraes, Juliana C; Velloso, Licio A

    2014-11-01

    Hypothalamic inflammation is a common feature of experimental obesity. Dietary fats are important triggers of this process, inducing the activation of toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) signaling and endoplasmic reticulum stress. Microglia cells, which are the cellular components of the innate immune system in the brain, are expected to play a role in the early activation of diet-induced hypothalamic inflammation. Here, we use bone marrow transplants to generate mice chimeras that express a functional TLR4 in the entire body except in bone marrow-derived cells or only in bone marrow-derived cells. We show that a functional TLR4 in bone marrow-derived cells is required for the complete expression of the diet-induced obese phenotype and for the perpetuation of inflammation in the hypothalamus. In an obesity-prone mouse strain, the chemokine CX3CL1 (fractalkine) is rapidly induced in the neurons of the hypothalamus after the introduction of a high-fat diet. The inhibition of hypothalamic fractalkine reduces diet-induced hypothalamic inflammation and the recruitment of bone marrow-derived monocytic cells to the hypothalamus; in addition, this inhibition reduces obesity and protects against diet-induced glucose intolerance. Thus, fractalkine is an important player in the early induction of diet-induced hypothalamic inflammation, and its inhibition impairs the induction of the obese and glucose intolerance phenotypes. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  4. Yerba mate tea and mate saponins prevented azoxymethane-induced inflammation of rat colon through suppression of NF-κB p65ser(311) signaling via IκB-α and GSK-3β reduced phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Puangpraphant, Sirima; Dia, Vermont P; de Mejia, Elvira Gonzalez; Garcia, Guadalupe; Berhow, Mark A; Wallig, Matthew A

    2013-01-01

    Yerba mate tea (YMT) has a chemopreventive role in a variety of inflammatory diseases. The objective was to determine the capability of YMT and mate saponins to prevent azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colonic inflammation in rats. YMT (2% dry leaves, w/v, as a source of drinking fluid) (n = 15) and mate saponins (0.01% in the diet, at a concentration present in one cup of YMT) (n = 15) were given ad libitum to rats 2 weeks prior to AOM-injection until the end of the study; while control rats (n = 15) received a basal diet and drinking water. After 8-weeks of study, total colonic mucosa was scraped (n = 3 rats/group) and the remaining colons (n =12 rats/group) were cut into three equal sections and aberrant crypt foci (ACF) were analyzed. YMT reduced ACF formation from 113 (control group) to 89 (P < 0.05). YMT and mate saponins reduced the expression of proinflammatory molecules COX-2 and iNOS with concomitant reduction in p-p65 (P < 0.05). Immunohistochemical analysis of the formalin-fixed middle colons showed that YMT and mate saponins reduced the expression of p-p65(ser311) by 45.7% and 43.1%, respectively, in comparison to the control (P < 0.05). In addition, the expression of molecules upstream of NF-κB such as p-IκB-α and p-GSK-3β(Y216) was downregulated by YMT 24.7% and 24.4%, respectively (P < 0.05). Results suggest the mechanism involved in the chemopreventive effect of YMT and mate saponin consumption in AOM induced-colonic inflammation in rats is through inhibition of NF-κB. Copyright © 2012 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Influence of proximal end diverting colostomy on the healing of left-sided colonic anastomosis: an experimental study in rats.

    PubMed

    Bielecki, K; Grotowski, M; Kalczak, M

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the healing of an experimental left-sided colonic anastomosis in rats protected by an end diverting proimal colostomy. The anastomoses were studied by radiological and biochemical examination and breaking strength was estimated. The results were compared with a non-operated group and with a group of rats having a non-defunctional anastomosis constructed in the same manner. In animals with an end diverting colostomy, anastomotic protein levels and enzymic activity were lower than in those with a colostomy, and the development of anastomotic strength was delayed compared with those not defunctioned.

  6. Jussara (Euterpe edulis Mart.) Supplementation during Pregnancy and Lactation Modulates the Gene and Protein Expression of Inflammation Biomarkers Induced by trans-Fatty Acids in the Colon of Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Almeida Morais, Carina; Oyama, Lila Missae; de Oliveira, Juliana Lopez; Carvalho Garcia, Márcia; de Rosso, Veridiana Vera; Sousa Mendes Amigo, Laís; do Nascimento, Claudia Maria Oller; Pisani, Luciana Pellegrini

    2014-01-01

    Maternal intake of trans-fatty acids (TFAs) in the perinatal period triggers a proinflammatory state in offspring. Anthocyanins contained in fruit are promising modulators of inflammation. This study investigated the effect of Jussara supplementation in the maternal diet on the proinflammatory state of the colon in offspring exposed to perinatal TFAs. On the first day of pregnancy rats were divided into four groups: control diet (C), control diet with 0.5% Jussara supplementation (CJ), diet enriched with hydrogenated vegetable fat, rich in TFAs (T), or T diet supplemented with 0.5% Jussara (TJ) during pregnancy and lactation. We showed that Jussara supplementation in maternal diet (CJ and TJ groups) reduced carcass lipid/protein ratios, serum lipids, glucose, IL-6, TNF-α, gene expression of IL-6R, TNF-αR (P < 0.05), TLR-4 (P < 0.01), and increase Lactobacillus spp. (P < 0.05) in the colon of offspring compared to the T group. The IL-10 (P = 0.035) and IL-10/TNF-α ratio (P < 0.01) was higher in the CJ group than in the T group. The 0.5% Jussara supplementation reverses the adverse effects of perinatal TFAs, improving lipid profiles, glucose levels, body composition, and gut microbiota and reducing low-grade inflammation in the colon of 21-day-old offspring, and could contribute to reducing chronic disease development. PMID:25276060

  7. Olive oil bioactives protect pigs against experimentally-induced chronic inflammation independently of alterations in gut microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Liehr, Martin; Mereu, Alessandro; Pastor, Jose Javier; Quintela, Jose Carlos; Staats, Stefanie; Rimbach, Gerald; Ipharraguerre, Ignacio Rodolfo

    2017-01-01

    Subclinical chronic inflammation (SCI) is associated with impaired animal growth. Previous work has demonstrated that olive-derived plant bioactives exhibit anti-inflammatory properties that could possibly counteract the growth-depressing effects of SCI. To test this hypothesis and define the underlying mechanism, we conducted a 30-day study in which piglets fed an olive-oil bioactive extract (OBE) and their control counterparts (C+) were injected repeatedly during the last 10 days of the study with increasing doses of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharides (LPS) to induce SCI. A third group of piglets remained untreated throughout the study and served as a negative control (C-). In C+ pigs, SCI increased the circulating concentration of interleukin 1 beta (p < 0.001) and decreased feed ingestion (p < 0.05) and weight gain (p < 0.05). These responses were not observed in OBE animals. Although intestinal inflammation and colonic microbial ecology was not altered by treatments, OBE enhanced ileal mRNA abundance of tight and adherens junctional proteins (p < 0.05) and plasma recovery of mannitol (p < 0.05) compared with C+ and C-. In line with these findings, OBE improved transepithelial electrical resistance (p < 0.01) in TNF-α-challenged Caco-2/TC-7 cells, and repressed the production of inflammatory cytokines (p < 0.05) in LPS-stimulated macrophages. In summary, this work demonstrates that OBE attenuates the suppressing effect of SCI on animal growth through a mechanism that appears to involve improvements in intestinal integrity unrelated to alterations in gut microbial ecology and function. PMID:28346507

  8. Intra-uterine experimental infection by Ureaplasma diversum induces TNF-α mediated womb inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Silva, Jamile R; Ferreira, Lício F A A; Oliveira, Percíllia V S; Nunes, Ivanéia V; Pereira, Ítalo S; Timenetsky, Jorge; Marques, Lucas M; Figueiredo, Tiana B; Silva, Robson A A

    2016-01-01

    Ureaplasma diversum is an opportunistic pathogen associated with uterine inflammation, impaired embryo implantation, infertility, abortions, premature birth of calves and neonatal pneumonia in cattle. It has been suggested that the intra-uterine infection by Ureaplasma diversum can cause vascular changes that hinder the success of pregnancy. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the changes of intrauterine site of A/J mice in estrus or proestrus phase inoculated with Ureaplasma diversum. The infection was monitored at 24, 48 and 72 hours by the PCR methodology to detect the Ureaplasma in the inoculation site and the profile of circulating blood cells. Morphological changes, intensity of inflammation and the production of cytokines were compared. The infected mice showed local inflammation through the production of IFN-γ and TNF-α. Ureaplasma diversum infections in the reproductive tract of studied mice seemed to be associated with the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in uterine parenchyma. The levels of TNF-α of infected mice were dependent on the bacterial load of inoculated Ureaplasma. Uterine experimental infections by Ureaplasma diversum have not been mentioned yet and herein we presented the first report of an intrauterine infection model in mice.

  9. Local administration of curcumin-loaded nanoparticles effectively inhibits inflammation and bone resorption associated with experimental periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Zambrano, Laura M G; Brandao, Dayane A; Rocha, Fernanda R G; Marsiglio, Raquel P; Longo, Ieda B; Primo, Fernando L; Tedesco, Antonio C; Guimaraes-Stabili, Morgana R; Rossa Junior, Carlos

    2018-04-27

    There is evidence indicating that curcumin has multiple biological activities, including anti-inflammatory properties. In vitro and in vivo studies demonstrate that curcumin may attenuate inflammation and the connective tissue destruction associated with periodontal disease. Most of these studies use systemic administration, and considering the site-specific nature of periodontal disease and also the poor pharmacodynamic properties of curcumin, we conducted this proof of principle study to assess the biological effect of the local administration of curcumin in a nanoparticle vehicle on experimental periodontal disease. We used 16 rats divided into two groups of 8 animals according to the induction of experimental periodontal disease by bilateral injections of LPS or of the vehicle control directly into the gingival tissues 3×/week for 4 weeks. The same volume of curcumin-loaded nanoparticles or of nanoparticle vehicle was injected into the same sites 2×/week. µCT analysis showed that local administration of curcumin resulted in a complete inhibition of inflammatory bone resorption and in a significant decrease of both osteoclast counts and of the inflammatory infiltrate; as well as a marked attenuation of p38 MAPK and NF-kB activation. We conclude that local administration of curcumin-loaded nanoparticles effectively inhibited inflammation and bone resorption associated with experimental periodontal disease.

  10. Effects of bromopride on expression of metalloproteinases and interleukins in left colonic anastomoses: an experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Silva, S.M.; Jerônimo, M.S.; Silva-Pereira, I.; Bocca, A.L.; Sousa, J.B.

    2014-01-01

    Anastomotic dehiscence is the most severe complication of colorectal surgery. Metalloproteinases (MMPs) and interleukins (ILs) can be used to analyze the healing process of anastomosis. To evaluate the effects of bromopride on MMP and cytokine gene expression in left colonic anastomoses in rats with or without induced abdominal sepsis, 80 rats were divided into two groups for euthanasia on the third or seventh postoperative day (POD). They were then divided into subgroups of 20 rats for sepsis induction or not, and then into subgroups of 10 rats for administration of bromopride or saline. Left colonic anastomosis was performed and abdominal sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture. A colonic segment containing the anastomosis was removed for analysis of gene expression of MMP-1α, MMP-8, MMP-13, IL-β, IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interferon-γ (IFN-γ). On the third POD, bromopride was associated with increased MMP-1α, MMP-13, IL-6, IFN-γ, and IL-10 gene expression. On the seventh POD, all MMP transcripts became negatively modulated and all IL transcripts became positively modulated. In the presence of sepsis, bromopride administration increased MMP-8 and IFN-γ gene expression and decreased MMP-1, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 gene expression on the third POD. On the seventh POD, we observed increased expression of MMP-13 and all cytokines, except for TNF-α. In conclusion, bromopride interferes with MMP and IL gene expression during anastomotic healing. Further studies are needed to correlate these changes with the healing process. PMID:25140813

  11. Effects of bromopride on expression of metalloproteinases and interleukins in left colonic anastomoses: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Silva, S M; Jerônimo, M S; Silva-Pereira, I; Bocca, A L; Sousa, J B

    2014-10-01

    Anastomotic dehiscence is the most severe complication of colorectal surgery. Metalloproteinases (MMPs) and interleukins (ILs) can be used to analyze the healing process of anastomosis. To evaluate the effects of bromopride on MMP and cytokine gene expression in left colonic anastomoses in rats with or without induced abdominal sepsis, 80 rats were divided into two groups for euthanasia on the third or seventh postoperative day (POD). They were then divided into subgroups of 20 rats for sepsis induction or not, and then into subgroups of 10 rats for administration of bromopride or saline. Left colonic anastomosis was performed and abdominal sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture. A colonic segment containing the anastomosis was removed for analysis of gene expression of MMP-1α, MMP-8, MMP-13, IL-β, IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interferon-γ (IFN-γ). On the third POD, bromopride was associated with increased MMP-1α, MMP-13, IL-6, IFN-γ, and IL-10 gene expression. On the seventh POD, all MMP transcripts became negatively modulated and all IL transcripts became positively modulated. In the presence of sepsis, bromopride administration increased MMP-8 and IFN-γ gene expression and decreased MMP-1, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 gene expression on the third POD. On the seventh POD, we observed increased expression of MMP-13 and all cytokines, except for TNF-α. In conclusion, bromopride interferes with MMP and IL gene expression during anastomotic healing. Further studies are needed to correlate these changes with the healing process.

  12. Predictive value of the Diverticular Inflammation and Complication Assessment (DICA) endoscopic classification on the outcome of diverticular disease of the colon: An international study.

    PubMed

    Tursi, Antonio; Brandimarte, Giovanni; Di Mario, Francesco; Annunziata, Maria L; Bafutto, Mauro; Bianco, Maria A; Colucci, Raffaele; Conigliaro, Rita; Danese, Silvio; De Bastiani, Rudi; Elisei, Walter; Escalante, Ricardo; Faggiani, Roberto; Ferrini, Luciano; Forti, Giacomo; Latella, Giovanni; Graziani, Maria G; Oliveira, Enio C; Papa, Alfredo; Penna, Antonio; Portincasa, Piero; Søreide, Kjetil; Spadaccini, Antonio; Usai, Paolo; Bonovas, Stefanos; Scarpignato, Carmelo; Picchio, Marcello; Lecca, Piera G; Zampaletta, Costantino; Cassieri, Claudio; Damiani, Alberto; Desserud, Kari F; Fiorella, Serafina; Landi, Rosario; Goni, Elisabetta; Lai, Maria A; Pigò, Flavia; Rotondano, Gianluca; Schiaccianoce, Giuseppe

    2016-08-01

    Diverticular Inflammation and Complication Assessment (DICA) endoscopic classification has been recently developed for patients suffering from diverticulosis and diverticular disease. We assessed retrospectively the predictive value of DICA in patients for whom endoscopic data and clinical follow-up were available. For each patient, we recorded: age, severity of DICA, presence of abdominal pain, C-reactive protein and faecal calprotectin test (if available) at the time of diagnosis; months of follow-up; therapy taken during the follow-up to maintain remission (if any); occurrence/recurrence of diverticulitis; need of surgery. We enrolled 1651 patients (793 M, 858 F, mean age 66.6 ± 11.1 years): 939 (56.9%) patients were classified as DICA 1, 501 (30.3%) patients as DICA 2 and 211 (12.8%) patients as DICA 3. The median follow-up was 24 (9-38) months. Acute diverticulitis (AD) occurred/recurred in 263 (15.9%) patients; surgery was necessary in 57 (21.7%) cases. DICA was the only factor significantly associated to the occurrence/recurrence of diverticulitis and surgery either at univariate (χ(2 )= 405.029; p < 0.0001) or multivariate analysis (hazard ratio = 4.319, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.639-5.126; p < 0.0001). Only in DICA 2 patients was therapy effective for prevention of AD occurrence/recurrence with a hazard ratio (95% CI) of 0.598 (0.391-0.914) (p = 0.006, log rank test). Mesalazine-based therapies reduced the risk of AD occurrence/recurrence and needs of surgery with a hazard ratio (95% CI) of 0.2103 (0.122-0.364) and 0.459 (0.258-0.818), respectively. DICA classification is a valid parameter to predict the risk of diverticulitis occurrence/recurrence in patients suffering from diverticular disease of the colon.

  13. Experimental inflammation following dural application of complete Freund's adjuvant or inflammatory soup does not alter brain and trigeminal microvascular passage.

    PubMed

    Lundblad, Cornelia; Haanes, Kristian A; Grände, Gustaf; Edvinsson, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is a paroxysmal, disabling primary headache that affects 16 % of the adult population. In spite of decades of intense research, the origin and the pathophysiology mechanisms involved are still not fully known. Although triptans and gepants provide effective relief from acute migraine for many patients, their site of action remains unidentified. It has been suggested that during migraine attacks the leakiness of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is altered, increasing the passage of anti-migraine drugs. This study aimed to investigate the effect of experimental inflammation, following dural application of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) or inflammatory soup (IS) on brain and trigeminal microvascular passage. In order to address this issue, we induced local inflammation in male Sprague-Dawley-rats dura mater by the addition of CFA or IS directly on the dural surface. Following 2, 24 or 48 h of inflammation we calculated permeability-surface area product (PS) for [(51)Cr]-EDTA in the trigeminal ganglion (TG), spinal trigeminal nucleus, cortex, periaqueductal grey and cerebellum. We observed that [(51)Cr]-EDTA did not pass into the central nervous system (CNS) in a major way. However, [(51)Cr]-EDTA readily passed the TG by >30 times compared to the CNS. Application of CFA or IS did not show altered transfer constants. With these experiments we show that dural IS/CFA triggered TG inflammation, did not increase the BBB passage, and that the TG is readily exposed to circulating molecules. The TG could provide a site of anti-migraine drug interaction with effect on the trigeminal system.

  14. Development and Validation of an in vitro Experimental GastroIntestinal Dialysis Model with Colon Phase to Study the Availability and Colonic Metabolisation of Polyphenolic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Breynaert, Annelies; Bosscher, Douwina; Kahnt, Ariane; Claeys, Magda; Cos, Paul; Pieters, Luc; Hermans, Nina

    2015-08-01

    The biological effects of polyphenols depend on their mechanism of action in the body. This is affected by bioconversion by colon microbiota and absorption of colonic metabolites. We developed and validated an in vitro continuous flow dialysis model with colon phase (GastroIntestinal dialysis model with colon phase) to study the gastrointestinal metabolism and absorption of phenolic food constituents. Chlorogenic acid was used as model compound. The physiological conditions during gastrointestinal digestion were mimicked. A continuous flow dialysis system simulated the one-way absorption by passive diffusion from lumen to mucosa. The colon phase was developed using pooled faecal suspensions. Several methodological aspects including implementation of an anaerobic environment, adapted Wilkins Chalgren broth medium, 1.10(8) CFU/mL bacteria suspension as inoculum, pH adaptation to 5.8 and implementation of the dialysis system were conducted. Validation of the GastroIntestinal dialysis model with colon phase system showed a good recovery and precision (CV < 16 %). Availability of chlorogenic acid in the small intestinal phase (37 ± 3 %) of the GastroIntestinal dialysis model with colon phase is comparable with in vivo studies on ileostomy patients. In the colon phase, the human faecal microbiota deconjugated chlorogenic acid to caffeic acid, 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl propionic acid, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, 3- or 4-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid, 2-methoxy-4-methylphenol and 3-phenylpropionic acid. The GastroIntestinal dialysis model with colon phase is a new, reliable gastrointestinal simulation system. It permits a fast and easy way to predict the availability of complex secondary metabolites, and to detect metabolites in an early stage after digestion. Isolation and identification of these metabolites may be used as references for in vivo bioavailability experiments and for investigating their bioactivity in in vitro experiments. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New

  15. Gait Analysis in Rats with Single Joint Inflammation: Influence of Experimental Factors

    PubMed Central

    Ängeby Möller, Kristina; Kinert, Susanne; Størkson, Rolf; Berge, Odd-Geir

    2012-01-01

    Disability and movement-related pain are major symptoms of joint disease, motivating the development of methods to quantify motor behaviour in rodent joint pain models. We used observational scoring and automated methods to compare weight bearing during locomotion and during standing after single joint inflammation induced by Freund's complete adjuvant (0.12–8.0 mg/mL) or carrageenan (0.47–30 mg/mL). Automated gait analysis was based on video capture of prints generated by light projected into the long edge of the floor of a walkway, producing an illuminated image of the contact area of each paw with light intensity reflecting the contact pressure. Weight bearing was calculated as an area-integrated paw pressure, that is, the light intensity of all pixels activated during the contact phase of a paw placement. Automated static weight bearing was measured with the Incapacitance tester. Pharmacological sensitivity of weight-bearing during locomotion was tested in carrageenan-induced monoarthritis by administration of the commonly used analgesics diclofenac, ibuprofen, and naproxen, as well as oxycodone and paracetamol. Observational scoring and automated quantification yielded similar results. We found that the window between control rats and monoarthritic rats was greater during locomotion. The response was more pronounced for inflammation in the ankle as compared to the knee, suggesting a methodological advantage of using this injection site. The effects of both Freund's complete adjuvant and carrageenan were concentration related, but Freund's incomplete adjuvant was found to be as effective as lower, commonly used concentrations of the complete adjuvant. The results show that gait analysis can be an effective method to quantify behavioural effects of single joint inflammation in the rat, sensitive to analgesic treatment. PMID:23071540

  16. Exploring the effect and mechanism of Hibiscus sabdariffa on urinary tract infection and experimental renal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chou, Shun-Ting; Lo, Hsin-Yi; Li, Chia-Cheng; Cheng, Lu-Chen; Chou, Pei-Chi; Lee, Yu-Chen; Ho, Tin-Yun; Hsiang, Chien-Yun

    2016-12-24

    Hibiscus sabdariffa Linn., also known as roselle, is used in folk medicine as an anti-inflammatory agent. Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common problem in long-term care facilities. However, effects of roselle on UTI and renal inflammation remained to be analyzed. Here we surveyed the effect of roselle drink on the prevention of UTI in long-term care facilities and analyzed the anti-inflammatory potential of roselle on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced renal inflammation in mice. Survey questionnaires and clinical observation were applied to evaluate the use of roselle and the incidence of UTI in long-term care facilities. Mice were administrated roselle orally for 7 consecutive days and then challenged with LPS. Anti-renal inflammatory effects of roselle were analyzed by microarray and immunohistochemical staining. Clinical observation showed that taking roselle drink in residents with urinary catheters reduced the incidence of UTI in long-term care facilities. Renal inflammation is a key event of UTI. Roselle suppressed LPS-induced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation in cells and LPS-induced interleukin-1β production in mice a dose-dependent manner. Immunohistochemical staining showed that roselle inhibited LPS-induced NF-κB activation and inflammatory cell infiltration in kidney. Gene expression profiling further showed that roselle suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes and enzyme genes involved in the production of prostaglandin and nitric oxide. In addition, NF-κB was the main transcription factor involved in the regulation of roselle-regulated gene expression in kidney. This is the first report applying clinical observation-guided transcriptomic study to explore the application and mechanism of roselle on UTI. Our findings suggested that roselle drink ameliorated LPS-induced renal inflammation via downregulation of cytokine network, pro-inflammatory product production, and NF-κB pathway. Moreover, this report suggested the

  17. NOD2 Down-Regulates Colonic Inflammation by IRF4-Mediated Inhibition of K63-Linked Polyubiquitination of RICK and TRAF6

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Tomohiro; Asano, Naoki; Meng, Guangxun; Yamashita, Kouhei; Arai, Yasuyuki; Sakurai, Toshiharu; Kudo, Masatoshi; Fuss, Ivan J; Kitani, Atsushi; Shimosegawa, Tooru; Chiba, Tsutomu; Strober, Warren

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that polymorphisms of the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2) gene, a major risk factor in Crohn's disease (CD), lead to loss of NOD2 function. However, a molecular explanation of how such loss of function leads to increased susceptibility to CD has remained unclear. In a previous study exploring this question we reported that activation of NOD2 in human dendritic cells by its ligand, muramyl dipeptide (MDP) negatively regulates Toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated inflammatory responses. Here we show that NOD2 activation results in increased interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) expression and binding to TNF receptor associated factor 6 (TRAF6) and receptor interacting serine-threonine kinase (RICK). We then show that such binding leads to IRF4-mediated inhibition of Lys63-linked polyubiquitination of TRAF6 and RICK and thus to down-regulation of NF-κB activation. Finally, we demonstrate that protection of mice from the development of experimental colitis by MDP or IRF4 administration is accompanied by similar IRF4-mediated effects on polyubiquitination of TRAF6 and RICK in colonic lamina propria mononuclear cells. These findings thus define a mechanism of NOD2-mediated regulation of innate immune responses to intestinal microflora that could explain the relation of NOD2 polymorphisms and resultant NOD2 dysfunction to CD. PMID:24670424

  18. Experimental manipulation of leaf litter colonization by aquatic invertebrates in a third order tropical stream.

    PubMed

    Uieda, V S; Carvalho, E M

    2015-05-01

    Through a manipulative experiment, the colonization of leaf litter by invertebrates was investigated in two sections of a tropical stream (spatial scale) that differed in function of the canopy cover, one with the presence (closed area) and another without riparian vegetation (open area), during one month of the dry and one of the wet season (temporal scale). The work aimed to verify differences related to four variables: season, canopy cover, leaf type and leaf condition. Litter bags containing arboreal and herbaceous leaves (leaf type variable), non-conditioned and preconditioned (leaf condition variable) were placed at the bottom of the stream in each area (canopy cover variable) and season (dry and wet), and removed after 13-day colonization. The analysis of the remaining litter dry mass per leaf bag emphasizes differences related mainly to seasonality, canopy cover and leaf type, although leaf condition was also important when combined with those three factors. Comparing the abundance of invertebrates per treatment, there was a tendency of high predominance of Chironomidae during the dry season and greater taxa diversity and evenness during the wet season, when the water flow increase could alter the availability of microhabitats for local fauna. Even though canopy cover alone was not a significant source of variation in the abundance of invertebrates, the results showed a tendency of a combined effect of canopy cover with seasonality and leaf condition.

  19. An apple oligogalactan prevents against inflammation and carcinogenesis by targeting LPS/TLR4/NF-κB pathway in a mouse model of colitis-associated colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Li, Yu H; Niu, Yin B; Sun, Yang; Guo, Zhen J; Li, Qian; Li, Chen; Feng, Juan; Cao, Shou S; Mei, Qi B

    2010-10-01

    Evidence strongly supported a link between inflammation and cancer. Patients with colitis have high risk for development of colon cancer. Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), partially induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binding to Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4, is a vital molecule in supervising the transformation of colitis to colon cancer. It could be a good strategy to prevent colitis carcinogenesis for targeting LPS/TLR4/NF-κB pathway. In the present study, we obtained an oligogalactan composed of five galacturonic acids from apple pectin and evaluated its protective efficacy on intestinal toxicities and carcinogenesis in a mouse model of colitis-associated colon cancer induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine and dextran sodium sulfate (DSS). The apple oligogalactan (AOG) was highly effective against intestinal toxicities and carcinogenesis and decreased the elevated levels of TLR4 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) induced by inflammation in vivo in this model system. In vitro studies, AOG alone only slightly increased the levels of protein expression and messenger RNA of TLR4, phosphorylation of IκBα and production of TNF-α in HT-29 cells. However, AOG significantly decreased the elevation of all the biomarkers induced by LPS when it was combined with LPS. The effect of AOG may be related to membrane internalization and redistribution of TLR4 from cell membrane to cytoplasm. AOG is active against inflammation and carcinogenesis through targeting LPS/TLR4/NF-κB pathway. Both AOG and LPS are agonists of TLR4 for sharing the same ligand but AOG has a much lower intrinsic activity than that of LPS. AOG may be useful for treatment of colitis and prevention of carcinogenesis in the clinics.

  20. Sleep Disturbance, Sleep Duration, and Inflammation: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies and Experimental Sleep Deprivation.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Michael R; Olmstead, Richard; Carroll, Judith E

    2016-07-01

    Sleep disturbance is associated with inflammatory disease risk and all-cause mortality. Here, we assess global evidence linking sleep disturbance, sleep duration, and inflammation in adult humans. A systematic search of English language publications was performed, with inclusion of primary research articles that characterized sleep disturbance and/or sleep duration or performed experimental sleep deprivation and assessed inflammation by levels of circulating markers. Effect sizes (ES) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were extracted and pooled using a random effect model. A total of 72 studies (n > 50,000) were analyzed with assessment of C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα). Sleep disturbance was associated with higher levels of CRP (ES .12; 95% CI = .05-.19) and IL-6 (ES .20; 95% CI = .08-.31). Shorter sleep duration, but not the extreme of short sleep, was associated with higher levels of CRP (ES .09; 95% CI = .01-.17) but not IL-6 (ES .03; 95% CI: -.09 to .14). The extreme of long sleep duration was associated with higher levels of CRP (ES .17; 95% CI = .01-.34) and IL-6 (ES .11; 95% CI = .02-20). Neither sleep disturbances nor sleep duration was associated with TNFα. Neither experimental sleep deprivation nor sleep restriction was associated with CRP, IL-6, or TNFα. Some heterogeneity among studies was found, but there was no evidence of publication bias. Sleep disturbance and long sleep duration, but not short sleep duration, are associated with increases in markers of systemic inflammation. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Determination of the mitigating effect of colon-specific bioreversible codrugs of mycophenolic acid and aminosugars in an experimental colitis model in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Chopade, Shakuntala Santosh; Dhaneshwar, Suneela Sunil

    2018-01-01

    AIM To design colon-targeted codrugs of mycophenolic acid (MPA) and aminosugars as a safer option to mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) in the management of inflammatory bowel disease. METHODS Codrugs were synthesized by coupling MPA with aminosugars (D-glucosamine and D-galactosamine) using EDCI coupling. The structures were confirmed by infrared radiation, nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectroscopy and elemental analysis. The release profile of codrugs was extensively studied in aqueous buffers, upper gastrointestinal homogenates, faecal matter and caecal homogenates (in vitro) and rat blood (in vitro). Anti-colitic activity was assessed in 2,4,6-trinitrobezenesulfonic acid-induced colitis in Wistar rats by the estimation of various demarcating parameters. Statistical evaluation was performed by applying one-way and two-way ANOVA when compared with the disease control. RESULTS The prodrugs resisted activation in HCl buffer (pH 1.2) and stomach homogenates of rats with negligible hydrolysis in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) and intestinal homogenates. Incubation with colon homogenates (in vitro) produced 76% to 89% release of MPA emphasizing colon-specific activation of codrugs and the release of MPA and aminosugars at the site of action. In the in vitro studies, the prodrug of MPA with D-glucosamine (MGLS) was selected which resulted in 68% release of MPA in blood. in vitro studies on MGLS revealed its colon-specific activation after a lag time of 8 h which could be ascribed to the hydrolytic action of N-acyl amidases found in the colon. The synthesized codrugs markedly diminished disease activity score and revived the disrupted architecture of the colon that was comparable to MMF but superior to MPA. CONCLUSION The significant attenuating effect of prodrugs and individual aminosugars on colonic inflammation proved that the rationale of the codrug approach is valid. PMID:29563754

  2. Penicillin treatment accelerates middle ear inflammation in experimental pneumococcal otitis media.

    PubMed Central

    Kawana, M; Kawana, C; Giebink, G S

    1992-01-01

    Most Streptococcus pneumoniae strains are killed by very low concentrations of penicillin and other beta-lactam antibiotics, yet middle ear inflammation and effusion persist for days to weeks after treatment in most cases of pneumococcal otitis media. To study the effect of beta-lactam antibiotic treatment on pneumococci and the middle ear inflammatory response during pneumococcal otitis media, we measured concentrations of pneumococci, inflammatory cells, and lysozyme in middle ear fluid (MEF) by using the chinchilla model. Procaine penicillin G given intramuscularly 12 and 36 h after inoculation of pneumococci into the middle ear caused a significant acceleration in the MEF inflammatory cell concentration compared with that in untreated controls, with a significant peak in the inflammatory cell concentration 24 h after pneumococcal inoculation. The lysozyme concentration in MEF also increased more rapidly in treated than in control animals. Viable pneumococci were not detected in MEF after the second dose of penicillin, but the total pneumococcal cell concentration remained unchanged for at least 45 days. Therefore, penicillin treatment accelerated middle ear inflammation while killing pneumococci, but treatment did not accelerate clearance of the nonviable pneumococcal cells from MEF. Further studies will need to define the contribution of these responses to acute and chronic tissue injury. PMID:1563782

  3. Antileukotriene Reverts the Early Effects of Inflammatory Response of Distal Parenchyma in Experimental Chronic Allergic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Gobbato, Nathália Brandão; de Souza, Flávia Castro Ribas; Fumagalli, Stella Bruna Napolitano; Lopes, Fernanda Degobbi Tenório Quirino dos Santos; Prado, Carla Máximo; Martins, Milton Arruda; Tibério, Iolanda de Fátima Lopes Calvo; Leick, Edna Aparecida

    2013-01-01

    Aims. Compare the effects of montelukast or dexamethasone in distal lung parenchyma and airway walls of guinea pigs (GP) with chronic allergic inflammation. Methods. GP have inhaled ovalbumin (OVA group-2x/week/4weeks). After the 4th inhalation, GP were treated with montelukast or dexamethasone. After 72 hours of the 7th inhalation, GP were anesthetised, and lungs were removed and submitted to histopathological evaluation. Results. Montelukast and dexamethasone treatments reduced the number of eosinophils in airway wall and distal lung parenchyma compared to OVA group (P < 0.05). On distal parenchyma, both treatments were effective in reducing RANTES, NF-κB, and fibronectin positive cells compared to OVA group (P < 0.001). Montelukast was more effective in reducing eotaxin positive cells on distal parenchyma compared to dexamethasone treatment (P < 0.001), while there was a more expressive reduction of IGF-I positive cells in OVA-D group (P < 0.001). On airway walls, montelukast and dexamethasone were effective in reducing IGF-I, RANTES, and fibronectin positive cells compared to OVA group (P < 0.05). Dexamethasone was more effective in reducing the number of eotaxin and NF-κB positive cells than Montelukast (P < 0.05). Conclusions. In this animal model, both treatments were effective in modulating allergic inflammation and remodeling distal lung parenchyma and airway wall, contributing to a better control of the inflammatory response. PMID:24151607

  4. Baicalin Ameliorates Experimental Liver Cholestasis in Mice by Modulation of Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and NRF2 Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiaowen; Zhang, Feng; Xie, Haiyang

    2017-01-01

    Experimental cholestatic liver fibrosis was performed by bile duct ligation (BDL) in mice, and significant liver injury was observed in 15 days. Administration of baicalin in mice significantly ameliorates liver fibrosis. Experimental cholestatic liver fibrosis was associated with induced gene expression of fibrotic markers such as collagen I, fibronectin, alpha smooth muscle actin (SMA), and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF); increased inflammatory cytokines (TNFα, MIP1α, IL1β, and MIP2); increased oxidative stress and reactive oxygen species- (ROS-) inducing enzymes (NOX2 and iNOS); dysfunctional mitochondrial electron chain complexes; and apoptotic/necrotic cell death markers (DNA fragmentation, caspase 3 activity, and PARP activity). Baicalin administration on alternate day reduced fibrosis along with profibrotic gene expression, proinflammatory cytokines, oxidative stress, and cell death whereas improving the function of mitochondrial electron transport chain. We observed baicalin enhanced NRF2 activation by nuclear translocation and induced its target genes HO-1 and GCLM, thus enhancing antioxidant defense. Interplay of oxidative stress/inflammation and NRF2 were key players for baicalin-mediated protection. Stellate cell activation is crucial for initiation of fibrosis. Baicalin alleviated stellate cell activation and modulated TIMP1, SMA, collagen 1, and fibronectin in vitro. This study indicates that baicalin might be beneficial for reducing inflammation and fibrosis in liver injury models. PMID:28757911

  5. NLRP3 inflammasome blockade reduces liver inflammation and fibrosis in experimental NASH in mice.

    PubMed

    Mridha, Auvro R; Wree, Alexander; Robertson, Avril A B; Yeh, Matthew M; Johnson, Casey D; Van Rooyen, Derrick M; Haczeyni, Fahrettin; Teoh, Narci C-H; Savard, Christopher; Ioannou, George N; Masters, Seth L; Schroder, Kate; Cooper, Matthew A; Feldstein, Ariel E; Farrell, Geoffrey C

    2017-05-01

    NOD-like receptor protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome activation occurs in Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We used the first small molecule NLRP3 inhibitor, MCC950, to test whether inflammasome blockade alters inflammatory recruitment and liver fibrosis in two murine models of steatohepatitis. We fed foz/foz and wild-type mice an atherogenic diet for 16weeks, gavaged MCC950 or vehicle until 24weeks, then determined NAFLD phenotype. In mice fed an methionine/choline deficient (MCD) diet, we gavaged MCC950 or vehicle for 6weeks and determined the effects on liver fibrosis. In vehicle-treated foz/foz mice, hepatic expression of NLRP3, pro-IL-1β, active caspase-1 and IL-1β increased at 24weeks, in association with cholesterol crystal formation and NASH pathology; plasma IL-1β, IL-6, MCP-1, ALT/AST all increased. MCC950 treatment normalized hepatic caspase 1 and IL-1β expression, plasma IL-1β, MCP-1 and IL-6, lowered ALT/AST, and reduced the severity of liver inflammation including designation as NASH pathology, and liver fibrosis. In vitro, cholesterol crystals activated Kupffer cells and macrophages to release IL-1β; MCC950 abolished this, and the associated neutrophil migration. MCD diet-fed mice developed fibrotic steatohepatitis; MCC950 suppressed the increase in hepatic caspase 1 and IL-1β, lowered numbers of macrophages and neutrophils in the liver, and improved liver fibrosis. MCC950, an NLRP3 selective inhibitor, improved NAFLD pathology and fibrosis in obese diabetic mice. This is potentially attributable to the blockade of cholesterol crystal-mediated NLRP3 activation in myeloid cells. MCC950 reduced liver fibrosis in MCD-fed mice. Targeting NLRP3 is a logical direction in pharmacotherapy of NASH. Fatty liver disease caused by being overweight with diabetes and a high risk of heart attack, termed non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), is the most common serious liver disease with no current treatment. There could be several causes of inflammation

  6. Effect of cutaneous and digestive colonization in the induction of anti-Candida albicans antibodies: experimental study.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, J M; Garcia-de-Lomas, J; Buesa, F J; Prat, J; Mir, A; Camarena, J J

    1985-10-01

    Candida albicans colonization induces antibodies, which must be taken into account in the serological diagnosis of candidiasis. In order to determine the degree of this effect, an experimental study in rabbits free of specific anti-Candida antibodies by cutaneous and digestive inoculation has been carried out. The evolution of humoral response was studied over 8 weeks by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF), direct agglutination (DA), counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIE) and double diffusion (DD). The cutaneous colonization detectable by culture was maintained until the second week in 70% of the animals and the presence of antibodies detectable by IIF and DA was observed after the 2nd week. The highest antibody titre by IFF and DA was 1/64, and was reached in the 5th week, with a tendency to drop in the following weeks. Precipitins were only detected by CIE in 15% of the animals in the 7th week. Elimination of yeast in stools continued only in 20% of the animals in the 2nd week of the experiment. Antibodies were detected by IIF and DA after the 2nd week, with the highest titres detectable by IFF in the 5th week. Precipitant antibodies detectable by CIE appeared in 15% of the animals in the 8th week.

  7. Enzyme-Sensitive MR Imaging Targeting Myeloperoxidase Identifies Active Inflammation in Experimental Rabbit Atherosclerotic Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Ronald, John A.; Chen, John W.; Chen, Yuanxin; Hamilton, Amanda M.; Rodriguez, Elisenda; Reynolds, Fred; Hegele, Robert A.; Rogers, Kem A.; Querol, Manel; Bogdanov, Alexei; Weissleder, Ralph; Rutt, Brian K.

    2009-01-01

    Background Inflammation undermines the stability of atherosclerotic plaques, rendering them susceptible to acute rupture, the cataclysmic event that underlies clinical expression of this disease. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a central inflammatory enzyme secreted by activated macrophages, and is involved in multiple stages of plaque destabilization and patient outcome. We report here that a unique functional in vivo magnetic resonance (MR) agent can visualize MPO activity in atherosclerotic plaques in a rabbit model. Methods and Results We performed MR imaging of the thoracic aorta of New Zealand white (NZW) rabbits fed a cholesterol (n=11) or normal (n=4) diet up to 2 hours after injection of the MPO sensor bis-5HT-DTPA(Gd) (MPO(Gd)), the conventional agent, DTPA(Gd), or an MPO (Gd) analog, bis-tyr-DTPA(Gd), as controls. Delayed MPO(Gd) images (2 hour post injection) showed focal areas of increased contrast (>2-fold) in diseased wall, but not in normal wall (p=0.84), compared to both DTPA(Gd) (n=11; p<0.001) and bis-tyr-DTPA(Gd) (n=3; p<0.05). Biochemical assays confirmed that diseased wall possessed three-fold elevated MPO activity compared to normal wall (p<0.01). Areas detected by MPO(Gd) imaging co-localized and correlated with MPO-rich areas infiltrated by macrophages on histopathological evaluations (r=0.91, p<0.0001). While macrophages were the main source of MPO, not all macrophages secreted MPO, suggesting that distinct subpopulations contribute differently to atherogenesis and supporting our functional approach. Conclusions Our study represents a unique approach in the detection of inflammation in atherosclerotic plaques by examining macrophage function and the activity of an effector enzyme, to noninvasively provide both anatomic and functional information in vivo. PMID:19652086

  8. IL-10-producing B-cells limit CNS inflammation and infarct volume in experimental stroke

    PubMed Central

    Bodhankar, Sheetal; Chen, Yingxin; Vandenbark, Arthur A.; Murphy, Stephanie J.; Offner, Halina

    2013-01-01

    Clinical stroke induces inflammatory processes leading to cerebral injury. IL-10 expression is elevated during major CNS diseases and limits inflammation in the brain. Recent evidence demonstrated that absence of B-cells led to larger infarct volumes and increased numbers of activated T-cells, monocytes and microglial cells in the brain, thus implicating a regulatory role of B-cell subpopulations in limiting CNS damage from stroke. The aim of this study was to determine whether the IL-10-producing regulatory B-cell subset can limit CNS inflammation and reduce infarct volume following ischemic stroke in B-cell deficient (µMT−/−) mice. Five million IL-10-producing B-cells were obtained from IL-10-GFP reporter mice and transferred i.v. to µMT−/− mice. After 24 h following this transfer, recipients were subjected to 60 min of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) followed by 48 hours of reperfusion. Compared to vehicle-treated controls, the IL-10+ B-cell-replenished µMT−/− mice had reduced infarct volume and fewer infiltrating activated T-cells and monocytes in the affected brain hemisphere. These effects in CNS were accompanied by significant increases in regulatory T-cells and expression of the co-inhibitory receptor, PD-1, with a significant reduction in the proinflammatory milieu in the periphery. These novel observations provide the first proof of both immunoregulatory and protective functions of IL-10-secreting B-cells in MCAO that potentially could impart significant benefit for stroke patients in the clinic. PMID:23640015

  9. Roles of inflammation and apoptosis in experimental brain death-induced right ventricular failure.

    PubMed

    Belhaj, Asmae; Dewachter, Laurence; Rorive, Sandrine; Remmelink, Myriam; Weynand, Birgit; Melot, Christian; Galanti, Laurence; Hupkens, Emeline; Sprockeels, Thomas; Dewachter, Céline; Creteur, Jacques; McEntee, Kathleen; Naeije, Robert; Rondelet, Benoît

    2016-12-01

    Right ventricular (RV) dysfunction remains the leading cause of early death after cardiac transplantation. Methylprednisolone is used to improve graft quality; however, evidence for that remains empirical. We sought to determine whether methylprednisolone, acting on inflammation and apoptosis, might prevent brain death-induced RV dysfunction. After randomization to placebo (n = 11) or to methylprednisolone (n = 8; 15 mg/kg), 19 pigs were assigned to a brain-death procedure. The animals underwent hemodynamic evaluation at 1 and 5 hours after Cushing reflex (i.e., hypertension and bradycardia). The animals euthanized, and myocardial tissue was sampled. This was repeated in a control group (n = 8). At 5 hours after the Cushing reflex, brain death resulted in increased pulmonary artery pressure (27 ± 2 vs 18 ± 1 mm Hg) and in a 30% decreased ratio of end-systolic to pulmonary arterial elastances (Ees/Ea). Cardiac output and right atrial pressure did not change. This was prevented by methylprednisolone. Brain death-induced RV dysfunction was associated with increased RV expression of heme oxygenase-1, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-1 receptor-like (ST)-2, signal transducer and activator of transcription-3, intercellular adhesion molecules-1 and -2, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and neutrophil infiltration, whereas IL-33 expression decreased. RV apoptosis was confirmed by terminal deoxynucleotide transferase-mediated deoxy uridine triphosphate nick-end labeling staining. Methylprednisolone pre-treatment prevented RV-arterial uncoupling and decreased RV expression of TNF-α, IL-1 receptor-like-2, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and neutrophil infiltration. RV Ees/Ea was inversely correlated to RV TNF-α and IL-6 expression. Brain death-induced RV dysfunction is associated with RV activation of inflammation and apoptosis and is partly limited by methylprednisolone. Copyright © 2016

  10. Walnut phenolic extract inhibits nuclear factor kappaB signaling in intestinal epithelial cells, and ameliorates experimental colitis and colitis-associated colon cancer in mice.

    PubMed

    Koh, Seong-Joon; Choi, Youn-I; Kim, Yuri; Kim, Yoo-Sun; Choi, Sang Woon; Kim, Ji Won; Kim, Byeong Gwan; Lee, Kook Lae

    2018-05-09

    Walnuts (Juglans regia) are known to have anti-cancer and immunomodulatory effects. However, little information is available on the effects of walnut phenolic extract (WPE) on intestinal inflammation and colitis-associated colon cancer. COLO205 cells were pretreated with WPE and then stimulated with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. In the acute colitis model, wild type mice (C57BL/6) were administered 4% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) for 5 days. In the chronic colitis model, interleukin (IL)-10 -/- mice were administered with either the vehicle or WPE (20 mg/kg) by oral gavage daily for 2 weeks. In an inflammation-associated tumor model, wild type mice were administered a single intraperitoneal injection of azoxymethane followed by three cycles of 2% DSS for 5 days and 2 weeks of free water consumption. WPE significantly inhibited IL-8 and IL-1α expression in COLO205 cells. WPE attenuated both the TNF-α-induced IκB phosphorylation/degradation and NF-κB DNA binding activity. The administration of oral WPE significantly reduced the severity of colitis in both acute and chronic colitis models, including the IL-10 -/- mice. In immunohistochemical staining, WPE attenuated NF-κB signaling in the colons of both colitis models. Finally, WPE also significantly reduced tumor development in a murine model of colitis-associated colon cancer (CAC). WPE ameliorates acute and chronic colitis and CAC in mice, suggesting that WPE may have potentials for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

  11. Bovine milk-derived α-lactalbumin inhibits colon inflammation and carcinogenesis in azoxymethane and dextran sodium sulfate-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Makoto; Takai, Shoko; Hosono, Akira; Seki, Taiichiro

    2014-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 is expressed early in colon carcinogenesis and plays crucial role in the progress of the disease. Recently, we found that α-lactalbumin had anti-inflammatory activity by inhibiting cyclooxygenase-2. In experiment 1, we investigated the effects of α-lactalbumin on the colon carcinogenesis initiated with azoxymethane (AOM) followed by promotion with dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) in mice. Dietary treatment with α-lactalbumin decreased fecal occult blood score at 3 days after DSS intake. α-Lactalbumin also decreased the colon tumor at week 9. In experiment 2, AOM-treated mice were sacrificed at 7 days after DSS intake. The plasma and colon prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels in AOM/DSS-treated mice were higher than those in the DSS-treated mice without initiation by AOM. α-Lactalbumin decreased PGE2 in both plasma and colon. These results suggest that α-lactalbumin effectively inhibited colon carcinogenesis, and the inhibition may be due to the decreased PGE2 by inhibiting cyclooxygenase-2 at cancer promotion stages.

  12. Effects of drug treatment on inflammation and hyperreactivity of airways and on immune variables in cats with experimentally induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Reinero, Carol R; Decile, Kendra C; Byerly, Jenni R; Berghaus, Roy D; Walby, William E; Berghaus, Londa J; Hyde, Dallas M; Schelegle, Edward S; Gershwin, Laurel J

    2005-07-01

    To compare the effects of an orally administered corticosteroid (prednisone), an inhaled corticosteroid (flunisolide), a leukotriene-receptor antagonist (zafirlukast), an antiserotonergic drug (cyproheptadine), and a control substance on the asthmatic phenotype in cats with experimentally induced asthma. 6 cats with asthma experimentally induced by the use of Bermuda grass allergen (BGA). A randomized, crossover design was used to assess changes in the percentage of eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF); airway hyperresponsiveness; blood lymphocyte phenotype determined by use of flow cytometry; and serum and BALF content of BGA-specific IgE, IgG, and IgA determined by use of ELISAs. Mean +/- SE eosinophil percentages in BALF when cats were administered prednisone (5.0 +/- 2.3%) and flunisolide (2.5 +/- 1.7%) were significantly lower than for the control treatment (33.7 +/- 11.1%). We did not detect significant differences in airway hyperresponsiveness or lymphocyte surface markers among treatments. Content of BGA-specific IgE in serum was significantly lower when cats were treated with prednisone (25.5 +/- 5.4%), compared with values for the control treatment (63.6 +/- 12.9%); no other significant differences were observed in content of BGA-specific immunoglobulins among treatments. Orally administered and inhaled corticosteroids decreased eosinophilic inflammation in airways of cats with experimentally induced asthma. Only oral administration of prednisone decreased the content of BGA-specific IgE in serum; no other significant local or systemic immunologic effects were detected among treatments. Inhaled corticosteroids can be considered as an alternate method for decreasing airway inflammation in cats with asthma.

  13. Increased lung inflammation with oxygen supplementation in tracheotomized spontaneously breathing rabbits: an experimental prospective randomized study.

    PubMed

    Machado, Humberto S; Nunes, Catarina S; Sá, Paula; Couceiro, Antonio; da Silva, Álvaro Moreira; Águas, Artur

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation is a well-known trigger for lung inflammation. Research focuses on tidal volume reduction to prevent ventilator-induced lung injury. Mechanical ventilation is usually applied with higher than physiological oxygen fractions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the after effect of oxygen supplementation during a spontaneous ventilation set up, in order to avoid the inflammatory response linked to mechanical ventilation. A prospective randomised study using New Zealand rabbits in a university research laboratory was carried out. Rabbits (n = 20) were randomly assigned to 4 groups (n = 5 each group). Groups 1 and 2 were submitted to 0.5 L/min oxygen supplementation, for 20 or 75 minutes, respectively; groups 3 and 4 were left at room air for 20 or 75 minutes. Ketamine/xylazine was administered for induction and maintenance of anaesthesia. Lungs were obtained for histological examination in light microscopy. All animals survived the complete experiment. Procedure duration did not influence the degree of inflammatory response. The hyperoxic environment was confirmed by blood gas analyses in animals that were subjected to oxygen supplementation, and was accompanied with lower mean respiratory rates. The non-oxygen supplemented group had lower mean oxygen arterial partial pressures and higher mean respiratory rates during the procedure. All animals showed some inflammatory lung response. However, rabbits submitted to oxygen supplementation showed significant more lung inflammation (Odds ratio = 16), characterized by more infiltrates and with higher cell counts; the acute inflammatory response cells was mainly constituted by eosinophils and neutrophils, with a relative proportion of 80 to 20% respectively. This cellular observation in lung tissue did not correlate with a similar increase in peripheral blood analysis. Oxygen supplementation in spontaneous breathing is associated with an increased inflammatory response when compared

  14. Omega 3 fatty acids supplementation has an ameliorative effect in experimental ulcerative colitis despite increased colonic neutrophil infiltration.

    PubMed

    Varnalidis, Ioannis; Ioannidis, Orestis; Karamanavi, Elisavet; Ampas, Zafeiris; Poutahidis, Theofilos; Taitzoglou, Ioannis; Paraskevas, George; Botsios, Dimitrios

    2011-10-01

    omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids have anti-inflammatory properties and can be beneficial in the treatment of inflammatory diseases, such as ulcerative colitis. Dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) colitis in rats appears to mimic nearly all of the morphological characteristics and lesion distributions of ulcerative colitis. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the efficacy of omega 3 fatty acids in the treatment of experimental ulcerative colitis. thirty-six Wistar rats were randomly assigned to group A or group B receiving 5% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in their drinking water for eight days. For the next eight days post-DSS, group A animals received tap-water, and group B animals were fed a nutritional solution containing high levels of omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ProSure®, Abbott Laboratories, Zwolle, Netherlands) once per day, administrated with a orogastric feeding tube. animals fed an omega 3 rich diet exhibited a statistically significant increase in hematocrit and hemoglobin levels, compared to animals drinking tap water, and a trend towards histopathological and clinical improvement, with the administration of omega 3 fatty acids ameliorating epithelial erosion by day 8 post-DSS, but no statistically significant difference was observed between group A and group B animals at 4 or 8 days post-DSS. Also, a statistically significant increase in neutrophil infiltration was observed, as depicted by myelohyperoxidase activity. our findings support a positive role of omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids supplementation in an experimental model of ulcerative colitis despite the increased colonic neutrophil infiltration. Further studies are needed in order to investigate the role of increased neutrophils in colonic mucosa.

  15. Topical HPMC/S-Nitrosoglutathione Solution Decreases Inflammation and Bone Resorption in Experimental Periodontal Disease in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Conceição S.; Leitão, Renata F. C.; Costa, Deiziane V. S.; Melo, Iracema M.; Santos, Glaylton S.; Lima, Vilma; Baldim, Victor; Wong, Deysi V. T.; Bonfim, Luana E.; Melo, Cíntia B.; Brito, Gerly A. C.

    2016-01-01

    S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) is a nitric oxide (NO) donor, which exerts antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and microbicidal actions. Intragingival application of GSNO was already shown to decrease alveolar bone loss, inflammation and oxidative stress in an experimental periodontal disease (EPD) model. In the present study, we evaluated the potential therapeutic effect of topical applications of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC)/GSNO solutions on EPD in Wistar rats. EPD was induced by placing a sterilized nylon (3.0) thread ligature around the cervix of the second left upper molar of the animals, which received topical applications of a HPMC solutions containing GSNO 2 or 10 mM or vehicle (HPMC solution), 1 h prior to the placement of the ligature and then twice daily until sacrifice on day 11. Treatment with HPMC/GSNO 10 mM solution significantly reduced alveolar bone loss, oxidative stress and TNF-α e IL-1β levels in the surrounding gingival tissue, and led to a decreased transcription of RANK and TNF-α genes and elevated bone alkaline phosphatase, compared to the HPMC group. In conclusion, topical application of HPMC/GSNO solution is a potential treatment to reduce inflammation and bone loss in periodontal disease. PMID:27116554

  16. Topical HPMC/S-Nitrosoglutathione Solution Decreases Inflammation and Bone Resorption in Experimental Periodontal Disease in Rats.

    PubMed

    Martins, Conceição S; Leitão, Renata F C; Costa, Deiziane V S; Melo, Iracema M; Santos, Glaylton S; Lima, Vilma; Baldim, Victor; Wong, Deysi V T; Bonfim, Luana E; Melo, Cíntia B; G de Oliveira, Marcelo; Brito, Gerly A C

    2016-01-01

    S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) is a nitric oxide (NO) donor, which exerts antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and microbicidal actions. Intragingival application of GSNO was already shown to decrease alveolar bone loss, inflammation and oxidative stress in an experimental periodontal disease (EPD) model. In the present study, we evaluated the potential therapeutic effect of topical applications of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC)/GSNO solutions on EPD in Wistar rats. EPD was induced by placing a sterilized nylon (3.0) thread ligature around the cervix of the second left upper molar of the animals, which received topical applications of a HPMC solutions containing GSNO 2 or 10 mM or vehicle (HPMC solution), 1 h prior to the placement of the ligature and then twice daily until sacrifice on day 11. Treatment with HPMC/GSNO 10 mM solution significantly reduced alveolar bone loss, oxidative stress and TNF-α e IL-1β levels in the surrounding gingival tissue, and led to a decreased transcription of RANK and TNF-α genes and elevated bone alkaline phosphatase, compared to the HPMC group. In conclusion, topical application of HPMC/GSNO solution is a potential treatment to reduce inflammation and bone loss in periodontal disease.

  17. Sulforaphane ameliorates the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by antagonizing oxidative stress and Th17-related inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Cui, Wei; Liu, Jia; Li, Ru; Liu, Qian; Xie, Xiao-Hua; Ge, Xiao-Li; Zhang, Jing; Song, Xiu-Juan; Wang, Ying; Guo, Li

    2013-12-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is an organosulfur compound present in vegetables and has potent anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. This study was aimed at investigating the effect of treatment with SFN on inflammation and oxidative stress, and the potential mechanisms underlying the action of SFN in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in C57BL/6 mice. Treatment with SFN significantly inhibited the development and severity of EAE in mice, accompanied by mitigating inflammatory infiltration and demyelination in the spinal cord of mice. The protective effect of SFN was associated with significantly improved distribution of claudin-5 and occludin, and decreased levels of MMP-9 expression, preserving the blood-brain barrier. Furthermore, the protection of SFN was also related to decreased levels of oxidative stress in the brains of mice by enhanced activation of the Nrf2/ARE pathway and increased levels of anti-oxidant HO-1 and NQO1 expression. In addition, treatment with SFN inhibited antigen-specific Th17 responses and enhanced IL-10 responses. Our data indicated that treatment with SFN inhibited EAE development and severity in mice by its anti-oxidant activity and antagonizing autoimmune inflammation. Our findings suggest that SFN and its analogues may be promising reagents for intervention of multiple sclerosis and other autoimmune diseases. © 2013.

  18. Inflammation-associated alterations to the intestinal microbiota reduce colonization resistance against non-typhoidal Salmonella during concurrent malaria parasite infection.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Jason P; Lokken, Kristen L; Byndloss, Mariana X; George, Michael D; Velazquez, Eric M; Faber, Franziska; Butler, Brian P; Walker, Gregory T; Ali, Mohamed M; Potts, Rashaun; Tiffany, Caitlin; Ahmer, Brian M M; Luckhart, Shirley; Tsolis, Renée M

    2015-10-05

    Childhood malaria is a risk factor for disseminated infections with non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) in sub-Saharan Africa. While hemolytic anemia and an altered cytokine environment have been implicated in increased susceptibility to NTS, it is not known whether malaria affects resistance to intestinal colonization with NTS. To address this question, we utilized a murine model of co-infection. Infection of mice with Plasmodium yoelii elicited infiltration of inflammatory macrophages and T cells into the intestinal mucosa and increased expression of inflammatory cytokines. These mucosal responses were also observed in germ-free mice, showing that they are independent of the resident microbiota. Remarkably, P. yoelii infection reduced colonization resistance of mice against S. enterica serotype Typhimurium. Further, 16S rRNA sequence analysis of the intestinal microbiota revealed marked changes in the community structure. Shifts in the microbiota increased susceptibility to intestinal colonization by S. Typhimurium, as demonstrated by microbiota reconstitution of germ-free mice. These results show that P. yoelii infection, via alterations to the microbial community in the intestine, decreases resistance to intestinal colonization with NTS. Further they raise the possibility that decreased colonization resistance may synergize with effects of malaria on systemic immunity to increase susceptibility to disseminated NTS infections.

  19. Inflammation-associated alterations to the intestinal microbiota reduce colonization resistance against non-typhoidal Salmonella during concurrent malaria parasite infection

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Jason P.; Lokken, Kristen L.; Byndloss, Mariana X.; George, Michael D.; Velazquez, Eric M.; Faber, Franziska; Butler, Brian P.; Walker, Gregory T.; Ali, Mohamed M.; Potts, Rashaun; Tiffany, Caitlin; Ahmer, Brian M. M.; Luckhart, Shirley; Tsolis, Renée M.

    2015-01-01

    Childhood malaria is a risk factor for disseminated infections with non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) in sub-Saharan Africa. While hemolytic anemia and an altered cytokine environment have been implicated in increased susceptibility to NTS, it is not known whether malaria affects resistance to intestinal colonization with NTS. To address this question, we utilized a murine model of co-infection. Infection of mice with Plasmodium yoelii elicited infiltration of inflammatory macrophages and T cells into the intestinal mucosa and increased expression of inflammatory cytokines. These mucosal responses were also observed in germ-free mice, showing that they are independent of the resident microbiota. Remarkably, P. yoelii infection reduced colonization resistance of mice against S. enterica serotype Typhimurium. Further, 16S rRNA sequence analysis of the intestinal microbiota revealed marked changes in the community structure. Shifts in the microbiota increased susceptibility to intestinal colonization by S. Typhimurium, as demonstrated by microbiota reconstitution of germ-free mice. These results show that P. yoelii infection, via alterations to the microbial community in the intestine, decreases resistance to intestinal colonization with NTS. Further they raise the possibility that decreased colonization resistance may synergize with effects of malaria on systemic immunity to increase susceptibility to disseminated NTS infections. PMID:26434367

  20. Recombinant apolipoprotein A-I Milano rapidly reverses aortic valve stenosis and decreases leaflet inflammation in an experimental rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Speidl, Walter S; Cimmino, Giovanni; Ibanez, Borja; Elmariah, Sammy; Hutter, Randolph; Garcia, Mario J; Fuster, Valentin; Goldman, Martin E; Badimon, Juan J

    2010-08-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Recombinant apolipoprotein A-I Milano (rApoA-I(M)) induces atherosclerotic plaque regression. The aims of this study were to determine the effects of rApoA-I(M) on experimental aortic valve degeneration and its mechanisms of action. New Zealand White rabbits (n = 20) were fed an atherogenic diet for 9 months and then randomized to either placebo or rApoA-I(M). Echocardiography was used to assess the effect of the treatments on AS. Porcine aortic valve myofibroblasts (PAVMF) treated with oxidized low-density lipoprotein served to define the effects of rApoA-I(M) on the expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB, and alkaline phosphatase (AP). Recombinant apolipoprotein A-I Milano increased aortic valve area (AVA) by 32% (0.25 +/- 0.05 to 0.34 +/- 0.07 cm(2), P < 0.01); whereas AVA remained unchanged in the placebo group (0.24 +/- 0.05 to 0.26 +/- 0.04 cm(2), P = 0.58). Histopathological examination of aortic valves in the rApoA-I(M) animals showed significantly less leaflet thickening, inflammation, and calcification vs. the placebo group. In vitro, rApoA-I(M) significantly inhibited MCP-1, AP, and NF-kappaB and decreased intracellular cholesterol content in PAVMF. Recombinant apolipoprotein A-I Milano treatment reverses AS in this experimental rabbit model. The beneficial effects seem to be mediated by enhanced cholesterol removal and by reduced inflammation and calcification.

  1. Dabigatran Etexilate Reduces Thrombin-Induced Inflammation and Thrombus Formation in Experimental Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Dittmeier, Melanie; Wassmuth, Kathrin; Schuhmann, Michael K; Kraft, Peter; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Fluri, Felix

    2016-01-01

    Dabigatran etexilate (DE), a direct-acting, oral inhibitor of thrombin, significantly reduces the risk of stroke compared with traditional anticoagulants, without increasing the risk of major bleeding. However, studies on the fate of cerebral tissue after ischemic stroke in patients receiving DE are sparse and the role of dabigatran-mediated reduction of thrombin in this context has not yet been investigated. Here, we investigated whether pretreatment with DE reduces thrombin-mediated pro-inflammatory mechanisms and leakage of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) following ischemic stroke in rats. Male Wistar rats received DE (15 mg/kg) or a vehicle solution 1 hour before transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) for 90 minutes. Infarct volume, neurologic outcome and intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) were determined after tMCAO. Thrombin generation was indirectly assessed by measuring thrombin/antithrombin III complex. Microvascular patency was evaluated histologically. Cytokine expression and immunoreactivity of cluster of differentiation (CD) 68 were examined to characterize inflammatory processes after pretreatment with DE. BBB integrity was examined by quantifying brain edema. Rats given DE revealed a significant reduction in infarct size without an increase in ICH and significant recovery of neurologic deficits compared to controls. Administration of DE decreased thrombin generation and thrombus formation, dampened the CD68-immunoreactivity and attenuated pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in the cerebral parenchyma ipsilateral to the ischemic lesion. BBB permeability was unaltered following treatment with DE. In summary, prophylactic anticoagulation with DE improves stroke outcome by reducing thrombin-induced inflammation and thrombus formation without increasing the rate of ICH.

  2. Salvianolic acid B attenuates apoptosis and inflammation via SIRT1 activation in experimental stroke rats.

    PubMed

    Lv, Hongdi; Wang, Ling; Shen, Jinchang; Hao, Shaojun; Ming, Aimin; Wang, Xidong; Su, Feng; Zhang, Zhengchen

    2015-06-01

    Silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1), a histone deacetylase, has been suggested to be effective in ischemic brain diseases. Salvianolic acid B (SalB) is a polyphenolic and one of the active components of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge. Previous studies suggested that SalB is protective against ischemic stroke. However, the role of SIRT1 in the protective effect of SalB against cerebral ischemia has not been explored. In this study, the rat brain was subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Before this surgery, rats were intraperitoneally administrated SalB with or without EX527, a specific SIRT1 inhibitor. The infarct volume, neurological score and brain water content were assessed. In addition, levels of TNF-α and IL-1β in the brain tissues were detected by commercial ELISA kits. And the expression levels of SIRT, Ac-FOXO1, Bcl-2 and Bax were detected by Western blot. The results suggested that SalB exerted a cerebral-protective effect, as shown by reduced infarct volume, lowered brain edema and increased neurological scores. SalB also exerted anti-inflammatory effects as indicated by the decreased TNF-α and IL-1β levels in the brain tissue. Moreover, SalB upregulated the expression of SIRT1 and Bcl-2 and downregulated the expression of Ac-FOXO1 and Bax. These effects of SalB were abolished by EX527 treatment. In summary, our results demonstrate that SalB treatment attenuates brain injury induced by ischemic stoke via reducing apoptosis and inflammation through the activation of SIRT1 signaling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Colonic inflammation and enhanced-beta-catenin signaling accompany an increase of the Lachnospiraceae/Streptococcaceae in the hind gut of high-fat diet-fed mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Consumption of an obesigenic / high-fat (HF) diet is associated with a high colon cancer risk, and may alter the gut microbiota. To test the hypothesis that a HF feeding accelerates inflammatory process and changes gut microbiome composition, C57BL/6 mice were fed a HF (45% energy) or low-fat (LF) (...

  4. EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES ON INFLAMMATION : I. THE INFLUENCE OF CHEMICALS UPON THE CHEMOTAXIS OF LEUCOCYTES IN VITRO.

    PubMed

    Wolf, E P

    1921-09-30

    acute inflammation, such as cantharidin, histamine, or turpentine, are found to be positively chemotactic by this method, but substances, such as mustard gas, which produce a marked necrotizing effect are found to be negatively chemotactic, or neutral, though physiologically they would appear to be positively chemotactic. 9. All amino-acids and amines are positively chemotactic to a certain extent. It seems that the longer the carbon chain, the greater the degree of chemotaxis, though this is not absolute. Tyramine is one exception to this, for it causes a peculiar clumping of the cells, so that it is impossible to count the number adhering, and thus determine whether or not tyramine is positively chemotactic. 10. The time that the blood of animals is examined after eating makes a marked difference in the number of cells adhering, for shortly after eating, within 30 minutes, very many more cells will adhere to the agar than at a later time. 11. The blood of different species of animals reacts differently towards different reagents. The chemical composition of these agents seems to have nothing to do with this difference in reaction as far as we could determine. 12. With frozen serial sections it has been found that the depth of penetration of the leucocytes into the agar is proportional to the positive chemotaxis produced by the substance combined with the agar, as demonstrated by the number of leucocytes adherent to the walls of the test chambers.

  5. Human intravenous immunoglobulin for experimental streptococcal toxic shock: bacterial clearance and modulation of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sriskandan, Shiranee; Ferguson, Melissa; Elliot, Victoria; Faulkner, Lee; Cohen, Jonathan

    2006-07-01

    Polyclonal human intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) has been advocated as an adjunct to therapy in severe invasive streptococcal toxic shock because of its ability to neutralize superantigen toxins. The aim of this study was to assess IVIG therapeutic efficacy in an experimental model of streptococcal toxic shock. To confirm the in vitro activity of IVIG against the Streptococcus pyogenes strain used in the study, IVIG was tested for superantigen neutralizing and bacterial opsonizing activity prior to in vivo studies. To evaluate the in vivo effects of IVIG in terms of microbiological outcome and disease severity in a superantigen-sensitive transgenic model of streptococcal shock, HLA-DQ transgenic mice were treated with IVIG either at the time of infection or after infection with S. pyogenes. Antibiotics were included in some studies. The IVIG preparation neutralized superantigenicity of S. pyogenes in vitro and enhanced bacterial killing in a whole blood assay. When given to mice at the time of S. pyogenes infection, IVIG neutralized circulating superantigens and reduced systemic inflammatory response. Remarkably, IVIG-enhanced systemic clearance of bacteria and enhanced neutrophil infiltrate into the infected tissues. However, when used in combination with penicillin and clindamycin in a delayed treatment setting, IVIG did not confer additional therapeutic benefit, in terms of inflammatory response, bacterial clearance or survival. IVIG monotherapy can confer benefit in experimental streptococcal shock, but extension of these findings to the clinical situation will require further evaluation.

  6. Does Regional Lung Strain Correlate With Regional Inflammation in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome During Nonprotective Ventilation? An Experimental Porcine Study.

    PubMed

    Retamal, Jaime; Hurtado, Daniel; Villarroel, Nicolás; Bruhn, Alejandro; Bugedo, Guillermo; Amato, Marcelo Britto Passos; Costa, Eduardo Leite Vieira; Hedenstierna, Göran; Larsson, Anders; Borges, João Batista

    2018-06-01

    It is known that ventilator-induced lung injury causes increased pulmonary inflammation. It has been suggested that one of the underlying mechanisms may be strain. The aim of this study was to investigate whether lung regional strain correlates with regional inflammation in a porcine model of acute respiratory distress syndrome. Retrospective analysis of CT images and positron emission tomography images using [F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose. University animal research laboratory. Seven piglets subjected to experimental acute respiratory distress syndrome and five ventilated controls. Acute respiratory distress syndrome was induced by repeated lung lavages, followed by 210 minutes of injurious mechanical ventilation using low positive end-expiratory pressures (mean, 4 cm H2O) and high inspiratory pressures (mean plateau pressure, 45 cm H2O). All animals were subsequently studied with CT scans acquired at end-expiration and end-inspiration, to obtain maps of volumetric strain (inspiratory volume - expiratory volume)/expiratory volume, and dynamic positron emission tomography imaging. Strain maps and positron emission tomography images were divided into 10 isogravitational horizontal regions-of-interest, from which spatial correlation was calculated for each animal. The acute respiratory distress syndrome model resulted in a decrease in respiratory system compliance (20.3 ± 3.4 to 14.0 ± 4.9 mL/cm H2O; p < 0.05) and oxygenation (PaO2/FIO2, 489 ± 80 to 92 ± 59; p < 0.05), whereas the control animals did not exhibit changes. In the acute respiratory distress syndrome group, strain maps showed a heterogeneous distribution with a greater concentration in the intermediate gravitational regions, which was similar to the distribution of [F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose uptake observed in the positron emission tomography images, resulting in a positive spatial correlation between both variables (median R = 0.71 [0.02-0.84]; p < 0.05 in five of seven animals

  7. Colon cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Colorectal cancer; Cancer - colon; Rectal cancer; Cancer - rectum; Adenocarcinoma - colon; Colon - adenocarcinoma; Colon carcinoma ... In the United States, colorectal cancer is one of the leading ... to cancer. Early diagnosis can often lead to a complete cure. ...

  8. A preferential p110alpha/gamma PI3K inhibitor attenuates experimental inflammation by suppressing the production of proinflammatory mediators in a NF-kappaB-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Dagia, Nilesh M; Agarwal, Gautam; Kamath, Divya V; Chetrapal-Kunwar, Anshu; Gupte, Ravindra D; Jadhav, Mahesh G; Dadarkar, Shruta S; Trivedi, Jacqueline; Kulkarni-Almeida, Asha A; Kharas, Firuza; Fonseca, Lyle C; Kumar, Sanjay; Bhonde, Mandar R

    2010-04-01

    A promising therapeutic approach to diminish pathological inflammation is to inhibit the increased production and/or biological activity of proinflammatory cytokines (e.g., TNF-alpha, IL-6). The production of proinflammatory cytokines is controlled at the gene level by the activity of transcription factors, such as NF-kappaB. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), a lipid kinase, is known to induce the activation of NF-kappaB. Given this, we hypothesized that inhibitors of PI3K activation would demonstrate anti-inflammatory potential. Accordingly, we studied the effects of a preferential p110alpha/gamma PI3K inhibitor (compound 8C; PIK-75) in inflammation-based assays. Mechanism-based assays utilizing human cells revealed that PIK-75-mediated inhibition of PI3K activation is associated with dramatic suppression of downstream signaling events, including AKT phosphorylation, IKK activation, and NF-kappaB transcription. Cell-based assays revealed that PIK-75 potently and dose dependently inhibits in vitro and in vivo production of TNF-alpha and IL-6, diminishes the induced expression of human endothelial cell adhesion molecules (E-selectin, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1), and blocks human monocyte-endothelial cell adhesion. Most importantly, PIK-75, when administered orally in a therapeutic regimen, significantly suppresses the macroscopic and histological abnormalities associated with dextran sulfate sodium-induced murine colitis. The efficacy of PIK-75 in attenuating experimental inflammation is mediated, at least in part, due to the downregulation of pertinent inflammatory mediators in the colon. Collectively, these results provide first evidence that PIK-75 possesses anti-inflammatory potential. Given that PIK-75 is known to exhibit anti-cancer activity, the findings from this study thus reinforce the cross-therapeutic functionality of potential drugs.

  9. Apigenin Attenuates Inflammation in Experimentally Induced Acute Pancreatitis-Associated Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Basios, Neofitos; Lampropoulos, Pavlos; Papalois, Apostolos; Lambropoulou, Maria; Pitiakoudis, Michael K; Kotini, Athanasia; Simopoulos, Constantinos; Tsaroucha, Alexandra K

    2016-06-01

    Acute pancreatitis is associated with acute lung injury. The aim of the present study is to evaluate alterations of lungs in an experimental model of acute pancreatitis (AP) following both bilio-pancreatic duct obstruction close to the duodenum. Acute pancreatitis is a common disease with significant mortality. This situation makes the need of finding protective factors for the lung parenchyma, imperative. In the present study there is an effort to clarify the role of apigenin, a substance which is well known for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, on lung injury, following acute pancreatitis in rats. In the present study, 126 male Wistar-type rats 3-4 months old and 220-350 g weight were used. At time 0 we randomly assigned the following groups: Group Sham: Rats were subjected to virtual surgery. Group Control: Rats were subjected to surgery for induction of acute pancreatitis. Group Apigenin: Rats were subjected to surgery for induction of acute pancreatitis and enteral feeding with apigenin. Immunochemistry for TNF-α and IL-6 as well as MPO activity were measured at predetermined time intervals 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h, in order to evaluate architectural disturbances of the lung tissue. From the pathological reports we realized that comparing the control group with the apigenin group, there is an improvement of lung tissue damage following apigenin administration, with statistical significance. Apigenin reduces most histopathological alterations of the pulmonary tissue, reduces MPO and TNF-α activity at 48 hours and, furthermore, reduces IL-6 activity at 72 hours post-administration. Oral Apigenin administration in rats, following experimental induced acute pancreatitis, seems to be protective on the lung tissue. Apigenin administration to humans could potentially ameliorate acute lung injuries. However, special caution is required for humans' use, as more detailed studies are needed.

  10. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor reduces inflammation and hippocampal apoptosis in experimental Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Danfeng; Lian, Di; Wu, Jing; Liu, Ying; Zhu, Mingjie; Sun, Jiaming; He, Dake; Li, Ling

    2017-08-04

    Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis is a serious inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS) and is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. The inflammatory processes initiated by recognition of bacterial components contribute to apoptosis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has long been recommended for the treatment of CNS diseases due to its powerful neuro-survival properties, as well as its recently reported anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we investigated the effects of BDNF-related signaling on the inflammatory response and hippocampal apoptosis in experimental models of pneumococcal meningitis. Pretreatment with exogenous BDNF or the tropomyosin-receptor kinase B (TrkB) inhibitor k252a was performed to assess the activation or inhibition of the BDNF/TrkB-signaling axis prior to intracisternal infection with live S. pneumoniae. At 24 h post-infection, rats were assessed for clinical severity and sacrificed to harvest the brains. Paraffin-embedded brain sections underwent hematoxylin and eosin staining to evaluate pathological severity, and cytokine and chemokine levels in the hippocampus and cortex were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Additionally, apoptotic neurons were detected in the hippocampal dentate gyrus by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP-nick-end labeling, key molecules associated with the related signaling pathway were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blot, and the DNA-binding activity of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) was measured by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Rats administered BDNF exhibited reduced clinical impairment, pathological severity, and hippocampal apoptosis. Furthermore, BDNF pretreatment suppressed the expression of inflammatory factors, including tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6, and increased the expression of the anti

  11. Trehalose treatment suppresses inflammation, oxidative stress, and vasospasm induced by experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) frequently results in several complications, including cerebral vasospasm, associated with high mortality. Although cerebral vasospasm is a major cause of brain damages after SAH, other factors such as inflammatory responses and oxidative stress also contribute to high mortality after SAH. Trehalose is a non-reducing disaccharide in which two glucose units are linked by α,α-1,1-glycosidic bond, and has been shown to induce tolerance to a variety of stressors in numerous organisms. In the present study, we investigated the effect of trehalose on cerebral vasospasm, inflammatory responses, and oxidative stress induced by blood in vitro and in vivo. Methods Enzyme immunoassay for eicosanoids, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and endothelin-1, and western blotting analysis for cyclooxygenase-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and inhibitor of NF-κB were examined in macrophage-like cells treated with hemolysate. After treatment with hemolysate and hydrogen peroxide, the levels of lipid peroxide and amounts of arachidonic acid release were also analyzed. Three hours after the onset of experimental SAH, 18 Japanese White rabbits received an injection of saline, trehalose, or maltose into the cisterna magna. Angiographic and histological analyses of the basilar arteries were performed. In a separate study, the femoral arteries from 60 rats were exposed to fresh autologous blood. At 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, and 20 days after treatment, cryosections prepared from the femoral arteries were histologically analyzed. Results When cells were treated with hemolysate, trehalose inhibited the production of several inflammatory mediators and degradation of the inhibitor of NF-κB and also suppressed the lipid peroxidation, the reactive oxygen species-induced arachidonic acid release in vitro. In the rabbit model, trehalose produced an inhibitory effect on vasospasm after the onset of experimental SAH, while maltose had only a moderate effect. When the

  12. Hippocampal neurodegeneration in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE): potential role of inflammation activated myeloperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Sajad, Mir; Zargan, Jamil; Chawla, Raman; Umar, Sadiq; Sadaqat, Mir; Khan, Haider A

    2009-08-01

    Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a well-established animal model of human multiple sclerosis (MS). The effect of this inflammatory disease on hippocampus has not been addressed. Keeping in view the above consideration an attempt was made to delineate the effect of EAE on the hippocampus of Wistar rats. The assessment of the damage to the hippocampus was done 16 days post induction by the immunolocalization of ChAT (choline acetyl transferase). ChAT decreased remarkably after induction that revealed cholinergic neuronal degeneration in the hippocampus. Subsequently, many biochemical parameters were assessed to ascertain inflammatory activation of nitric oxide and associated oxidative damage as a putative mechanism of the cholinergic degeneration. Nitric oxide metabolites increased significantly (P < 0.05) with enhancement of MPO (Myeloperoxidase activity) (P < 0.001) in the MOG (myelin oligodendrocyte protein) group as compared to the controls. Peroxidation of biomembranes increased (P < 0.001), while reduced glutathione depleted (P < 0.001) with parallel decrease in catalase (P < 0.01) and superoxide dismutase enzyme activity (P < 0.001) in the MOG group. Our results show a strong role of peroxidase dependent oxidation of nitrite and oxidative stress in cholinergic degeneration in EAE.

  13. Effects of oral administration of tilmicosin on pulmonary inflammation in piglets experimentally infected with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Nerland, Erin M; LeBlanc, Justin M; Fedwick, Jason P; Morck, Douglas W; Merrill, John K; Dick, Paul; Paradis, Marie-Anne; Buret, Andre G

    2005-01-01

    To determine the effects of oral administration of tilmicosin in piglets experimentally infected with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. Forty 3-week-old specific-pathogen free piglets. Piglets were assigned to 1 of 4 groups as follows: 1) uninfected sham-treated control piglets; 2) infected untreated piglets that were intratracheally inoculated with 10(7) CFUs of A pleuropneumoniae; 3) infected treated piglets that were intratracheally inoculated with A pleuropneumoniae and received tilmicosin in feed (400 ppm [microg/g]) for 7 days prior to inoculation; or 4) infected treated piglets that were intratracheally inoculated with A pleuropneumoniae and received chlortetracycline (CTC) in feed (1100 ppm [microg/gl) for 7 days prior to inoculation. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissue specimens of piglets for each group were evaluated at 3 or 24 hours after inoculation. For each time point, 4 to 6 piglets/group were studied. Feeding of CTC and tilmicosin decreased bacterial load in lungs of infected piglets. Tilmicosin delivered in feed, but not CTC, enhanced apoptosis in porcine BAL fluid leukocytes. This was associated with a decrease in LTB4 concentrations in BAL fluid of tilmicosin-treated piglets, compared with untreated and CTC-treated piglets, and also with a significant decrease in the number of pulmonary lesions. Tilmicosin inhibited infection-induced increases in rectal temperatures, as measured in untreated and CTC-treated piglets. Pulmonary neutrophil infiltration and prostaglandin E2 concentrations in the BAL fluid were not significantly different among groups at any time. Oral administration of tilmicosin to infected piglets induces apoptosis in BAL fluid leukocytes and decreases BAL fluid LTB4 concentrations and inflammatory lung lesions.

  14. The susceptibility of bovine udder quarters colonized with Corynebacterium bovis to experimental infection with Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, B W; Barnum, D A

    1984-01-01

    Twenty bovine udder quarters colonized with Corynebacterium bovis SR6 and 20 uncolonized quarters were challenged by inoculation of Staphylococcus aureus Newbould 305 (ATCC 29740) into the teat cistern. The percentage of infection in quarters colonized with C. bovis (50%) was significantly lower than that in controls (100%). By similar challenge no significant difference was observed between the percentage of infection with Streptococcus agalactiae ATCC 27956 in 33 quarters colonized with C. bovis (70%) compared to 33 controls (87.9%). A total of 37 quarters colonized with C. bovis and 37 control quarters were challenged with Staph. aureus Newbould 305 (ATCC 29740) and Maxi (ATCC 27543) and Strep. agalactiae (ATCC 27956) by exposure of the teat orifice. The percentage of teat ducts colonized with C. bovis which became infected with either pathogen was not different from that for controls. PMID:6372969

  15. Resveratrol protects from lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in the uterus and prevents experimental preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Bariani, María Victoria; Correa, Fernando; Leishman, Emma; Domínguez Rubio, Ana Paula; Arias, Andreína; Stern, Aníbal; Bradshaw, Heather B; Franchi, Ana María

    2017-08-01

    pregnant BALB/c mice with resveratrol prevented the LPS-induced preterm birth in 64% of the cases, whereas only 15% of mice with LPS alone escaped preterm birth. Treatment with resveratrol resulted in a reduced NOS activity (P < 0.05) in the uterus of LPS-treated mice. Similarly, resveratrol reduced the expression of LPS-induced pro-inflammatory agents such as iNOS (P < 0.05), COX-2 (P < 0.05), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) (P < 0.05) and anandamide (AEA) (P < 0.05). Moreover, resveratrol administration resulted in changes in the uterine endocannabinoid profiling altered by LPS. N/A. Since our experimental design involves the use of mice, the extrapolation of the results presented here to humans is limited. Our findings provide evidence for the tocolytic effects of resveratrol. Dr Ana María Franchi was funded by Agencia Nacional para la Promoción Científica y Tecnológica (PICT 2013/0097) and by Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (PIP 2012/0061). Dr Heather B. Bradshaw was funded by NIH (DA006668). The authors have no competing interests. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  16. Selective increase of cerebrospinal fluid IL-6 during experimental systemic inflammation in humans: association with depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Engler, H; Brendt, P; Wischermann, J; Wegner, A; Röhling, R; Schoemberg, T; Meyer, U; Gold, R; Peters, J; Benson, S; Schedlowski, M

    2017-10-01

    Systemic inflammation is accompanied by profound behavioral and mood changes that resemble symptoms of depression. Findings in animals suggest that pro-inflammatory cytokines released by activated immune cells in the periphery evoke these behavioral symptoms by driving inflammatory changes in the brain. However, experimental data in humans are lacking. Here we demonstrate in healthy male volunteers (10 endotoxin treated, 8 placebo treated) that intravenous administration of low-dose endotoxin (0.8 ng/kg body weight), a prototypical pathogen-associated molecular pattern that activates the innate immune system, not only induces a significant increase in peripheral blood cytokine concentrations (that is, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10) but also results, with some latency, in a robust and selective increase of IL-6 in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Moreover, we found a strong association between the endotoxin-induced increase of IL-6 in the CSF and the severity of mood impairment, with larger increases in CSF IL-6 concentration followed by a greater deterioration in mood. Taken together, these findings suggest that the appearance of depressive symptoms in inflammatory conditions might be primarily linked to an increase in central IL-6 concentration, identifying IL-6 as a potential therapeutic target in mood disorders.

  17. Kupffer Cells Undergo Fundamental Changes during the Development of Experimental NASH and Are Critical in Initiating Liver Damage and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Reid, D. T.; Reyes, J. L.; McDonald, B. A.; Vo, T.; Reimer, R. A.; Eksteen, B.

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease has become the leading liver disease in North America and is associated with the progressive inflammatory liver disease non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Considerable effort has been made to understand the role of resident and recruited macrophage populations in NASH however numerous questions remain. Our goal was to characterize the dynamic changes in liver macrophages during the initiation of NASH in a murine model. Using the methionine-choline deficient diet we found that liver-resident macrophages, Kupffer cells were lost early in disease onset followed by a robust infiltration of Ly-6C+ monocyte-derived macrophages that retained a dynamic phenotype. Genetic profiling revealed distinct patterns of inflammatory gene expression between macrophage subsets. Only early depletion of liver macrophages using liposomal clodronate prevented the development of NASH in mice suggesting that Kupffer cells are critical for the orchestration of inflammation during experimental NASH. Increased understanding of these dynamics may allow us to target potentially harmful populations whilst promoting anti-inflammatory or restorative populations to ultimately guide the development of effective treatment strategies. PMID:27454866

  18. Chronic Pelvic Pain Development and Prostate Inflammation in Strains of Mice With Different Susceptibility to Experimental Autoimmune Prostatitis.

    PubMed

    Breser, Maria L; Motrich, Ruben D; Sanchez, Leonardo R; Rivero, Virginia E

    2017-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune prostatitis (EAP) is an autoimmune inflammatory disease of the prostate characterized by peripheral prostate-specific autoimmune responses associated with prostate inflammation. EAP is induced in rodents upon immunization with prostate antigens (PAg) plus adjuvants and shares important clinical and immunological features with the human disease chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS). EAP was induced in young NOD, C57BL/6, and BALB/c male mice by immunization with PAg plus complete Freund́s adjuvant. Tactile allodynia was assessed using Von Frey fibers as a measure of pelvic pain at baseline and at different time points after immunization. Using conventional histology, immunohistochemistry, FACS analysis, and protein arrays, an interstrain comparative study of prostate cell infiltration and inflammation was performed. Chronic pelvic pain development was similar between immunized NOD and C57BL/6 mice, although the severity of leukocyte infiltration was greater in the first case. Coversely, minimal prostate cell infiltration was observed in immunized BALB/c mice, who showed no pelvic pain development. Increased numbers of mast cells, mostly degranulated, were detected in prostate samples from NOD and C57BL/6 mice, while lower total counts and resting were observed in BALB/c mice. Prostate tissue from NOD mice revealed markedly increased expression levels of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, adhesion molecules, vascular endothelial growth factor, and metalloproteinases. Similar results, but to a lesser extent, were observed when analyzing prostate tissue from C57BL/6 mice. On the contrary, the expression of the above mediators was very low in prostate tissue from immunized BALB/c mice, showing significantly slight increments only for CXCL1 and IL4. Our results provide new evidence indicating that NOD, C57BL/6, and BALB/c mice develop different degrees of chronic pelvic pain, type, and amount of prostate cell infiltration

  19. Assessment of blood flow with 68Ga-DOTA PET in experimental inflammation: a validation study using 15O-water

    PubMed Central

    Autio, Anu; Saraste, Antti; Kudomi, Nobuyuki; Saanijoki, Tiina; Johansson, Jarkko; Liljenbäck, Heidi; Tarkia, Miikka; Oikonen, Vesa; Sipilä, Hannu T; Roivainen, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Increased blood flow and vascular permeability are key events in inflammation. Based on the fact that Gadolinium-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N‘,N‘‘,N‘‘‘-tetraacetic acid (Gd-DOTA) is commonly used in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of blood flow (perfusion), we evaluated the feasibility of its Gallium-68 labeled DOTA analog (68Ga-DOTA) for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of blood flow in experimental inflammation. Adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats with turpentine oil induced sterile skin/muscle inflammation were anesthetized with isoflurane, and imaged under rest and adenosine-induced hyperemia by means of dynamic 2-min Oxygen-15 labeled water (H2 15O) and 30-min 68Ga-DOTA PET. For the quantification of PET data, regions of interest (ROIs) were defined in the focus of inflammation, healthy muscle, myocardium and heart left ventricle. Radioactivity concentration in the ROIs versus time after injection was determined for both tracers and blood flow was calculated using image-derived input. According to the H2 15O PET, blood flow was 0.69 ± 0.15 ml/min/g for inflammation and 0.15 ± 0.03 ml/min/g for muscle during rest. The blood flow remained unchanged during adenosine-induced hyperemia 0.67 ± 0.11 and 0.12 ± 0.03 ml/min/g for inflammation and muscle, respectively, indicating that adenosine has little effect on blood flow in peripheral tissues in rats. High focal uptake of 68Ga-DOTA was seen at the site of inflammation throughout the 30-min PET imaging. According to the 68Ga-DOTA PET, blood flow measured as the blood-to-tissue transport rate (K1) was 0.60 ± 0.07 ml/min/g for inflammation and 0.14 ± 0.06 ml/min/g for muscle during rest and 0.63 ± 0.08 ml/min/g for inflammation and 0.09 ± 0.04 ml/min/g for muscle during adenosine-induced hyperemia. The H2 15O-based blood flow and 68Ga-DOTA-based K1 values correlated well (r = 0.94, P < 0.0001). These results show that 68Ga-DOTA PET imaging is useful for the quantification of increased

  20. Assessment of blood flow with (68)Ga-DOTA PET in experimental inflammation: a validation study using (15)O-water.

    PubMed

    Autio, Anu; Saraste, Antti; Kudomi, Nobuyuki; Saanijoki, Tiina; Johansson, Jarkko; Liljenbäck, Heidi; Tarkia, Miikka; Oikonen, Vesa; Sipilä, Hannu T; Roivainen, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Increased blood flow and vascular permeability are key events in inflammation. Based on the fact that Gadolinium-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid (Gd-DOTA) is commonly used in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of blood flow (perfusion), we evaluated the feasibility of its Gallium-68 labeled DOTA analog ((68)Ga-DOTA) for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of blood flow in experimental inflammation. Adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats with turpentine oil induced sterile skin/muscle inflammation were anesthetized with isoflurane, and imaged under rest and adenosine-induced hyperemia by means of dynamic 2-min Oxygen-15 labeled water (H2 (15)O) and 30-min (68)Ga-DOTA PET. For the quantification of PET data, regions of interest (ROIs) were defined in the focus of inflammation, healthy muscle, myocardium and heart left ventricle. Radioactivity concentration in the ROIs versus time after injection was determined for both tracers and blood flow was calculated using image-derived input. According to the H2 (15)O PET, blood flow was 0.69 ± 0.15 ml/min/g for inflammation and 0.15 ± 0.03 ml/min/g for muscle during rest. The blood flow remained unchanged during adenosine-induced hyperemia 0.67 ± 0.11 and 0.12 ± 0.03 ml/min/g for inflammation and muscle, respectively, indicating that adenosine has little effect on blood flow in peripheral tissues in rats. High focal uptake of (68)Ga-DOTA was seen at the site of inflammation throughout the 30-min PET imaging. According to the (68)Ga-DOTA PET, blood flow measured as the blood-to-tissue transport rate (K1) was 0.60 ± 0.07 ml/min/g for inflammation and 0.14 ± 0.06 ml/min/g for muscle during rest and 0.63 ± 0.08 ml/min/g for inflammation and 0.09 ± 0.04 ml/min/g for muscle during adenosine-induced hyperemia. The H2 (15)O-based blood flow and (68)Ga-DOTA-based K1 values correlated well (r = 0.94, P < 0.0001). These results show that (68)Ga-DOTA PET imaging is useful for the quantification of

  1. Bioluminescent imaging reveals novel patterns of colonization and invasion in systemic Escherichia coli K1 experimental infection in the neonatal rat.

    PubMed

    Witcomb, Luci A; Collins, James W; McCarthy, Alex J; Frankel, Gadi; Taylor, Peter W

    2015-12-01

    Key features of Escherichia coli K1-mediated neonatal sepsis and meningitis, such as a strong age dependency and development along the gut-mesentery-blood-brain course of infection, can be replicated in the newborn rat. We examined temporal and spatial aspects of E. coli K1 infection following initiation of gastrointestinal colonization in 2-day-old (P2) rats after oral administration of E. coli K1 strain A192PP and a virulent bioluminescent derivative, E. coli A192PP-lux2. A combination of bacterial enumeration in the major organs, two-dimensional bioluminescence imaging, and three-dimensional diffuse light imaging tomography with integrated micro-computed tomography indicated multiple sites of colonization within the alimentary canal; these included the tongue, esophagus, and stomach in addition to the small intestine and colon. After invasion of the blood compartment, the bacteria entered the central nervous system, with restricted colonization of the brain, and also invaded the major organs, in line with increases in the severity of symptoms of infection. Both keratinized and nonkeratinized surfaces of esophagi were colonized to a considerably greater extent in susceptible P2 neonates than in corresponding tissues from infection-resistant 9-day-old rat pups; the bacteria appeared to damage and penetrate the nonkeratinized esophageal epithelium of infection-susceptible P2 animals, suggesting the esophagus represents a portal of entry for E. coli K1 into the systemic circulation. Thus, multimodality imaging of experimental systemic infections in real time indicates complex dynamic patterns of colonization and dissemination that provide new insights into the E. coli K1 infection of the neonatal rat. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Bioluminescent Imaging Reveals Novel Patterns of Colonization and Invasion in Systemic Escherichia coli K1 Experimental Infection in the Neonatal Rat

    PubMed Central

    Witcomb, Luci A.; Collins, James W.; McCarthy, Alex J.; Frankel, Gadi

    2015-01-01

    Key features of Escherichia coli K1-mediated neonatal sepsis and meningitis, such as a strong age dependency and development along the gut-mesentery-blood-brain course of infection, can be replicated in the newborn rat. We examined temporal and spatial aspects of E. coli K1 infection following initiation of gastrointestinal colonization in 2-day-old (P2) rats after oral administration of E. coli K1 strain A192PP and a virulent bioluminescent derivative, E. coli A192PP-lux2. A combination of bacterial enumeration in the major organs, two-dimensional bioluminescence imaging, and three-dimensional diffuse light imaging tomography with integrated micro-computed tomography indicated multiple sites of colonization within the alimentary canal; these included the tongue, esophagus, and stomach in addition to the small intestine and colon. After invasion of the blood compartment, the bacteria entered the central nervous system, with restricted colonization of the brain, and also invaded the major organs, in line with increases in the severity of symptoms of infection. Both keratinized and nonkeratinized surfaces of esophagi were colonized to a considerably greater extent in susceptible P2 neonates than in corresponding tissues from infection-resistant 9-day-old rat pups; the bacteria appeared to damage and penetrate the nonkeratinized esophageal epithelium of infection-susceptible P2 animals, suggesting the esophagus represents a portal of entry for E. coli K1 into the systemic circulation. Thus, multimodality imaging of experimental systemic infections in real time indicates complex dynamic patterns of colonization and dissemination that provide new insights into the E. coli K1 infection of the neonatal rat. PMID:26351276

  3. IL-17 is not essential for inflammation and chronic pelvic pain development in an experimental model of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Motrich, Ruben D; Breser, María L; Sánchez, Leonardo R; Godoy, Gloria J; Prinz, Immo; Rivero, Virginia E

    2016-03-01

    Pain and inflammation in the absence of infection are hallmarks in chronic prostatitis and chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) patients. The etiology of CP/CPPS is unclear, and autoimmunity has been proposed as a cause. Experimental autoimmune prostatitis (EAP) models have long been used for studying CP/CPPS. Herein, we studied prostate inflammation induction and chronic pelvic pain development in EAP using IL-12p40-KO, IL-4-KO, IL-17-KO, and wild-type (C57BL/6) mice. Prostate antigen (PAg) immunization in C57BL/6 mice induced specific Th1 and Th17 immune responses and severe prostate inflammation and cell infiltration, mainly composed of CD4 T cells and macrophages. Moreover, chronic pelvic pain was evidenced by increased allodynia responses. In immunized IL-17-KO mice, the presence of a prominent PAg-specific Th1 immune response caused similar prostate inflammation and chronic pelvic pain. Furthermore, markedly high PAg-specific Th1 immune responses, exacerbated prostate inflammation, and chronic pelvic pain were detected in immunized IL-4-KO mice. Conversely, immunized IL-12p40-KO mice developed PAg-specific Th2 immune responses, characterized by high IL-4 secretion and neither infiltration nor damage in the prostate. As observed in wild-type control animals, IL12p40-KO mice did not evidence tactile allodynia responses. Our results suggest that, as in patients, chronic pelvic pain is a consequence of prostate inflammation. After PAg immunization, a Th1-associated immune response develops and induces prostate inflammation and chronic pelvic pain. The absence of Th1 or Th2 cytokines, respectively, diminishes or enhances EAP susceptibility. In addition, IL-17 showed not to be essential for pathology induction and chronic pelvic pain development.

  4. Neutrophilic inflammation in asthma: mechanisms and therapeutic considerations.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hun Soo; Lee, Tae-Hyeong; Jun, Ji Ae; Baek, Ae Rin; Park, Jong-Sook; Koo, So-My; Kim, Yang-Ki; Lee, Ho Sung; Park, Choon-Sik

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophilic airway inflammation represents a pathologically distinct form of asthma and frequently appears in symptomatic adulthood asthmatics. However, clinical impacts and mechanisms of the neutrophilic inflammation have not been thoroughly evaluated up to date. Areas covered: Currently, distinct clinical manifestations, triggers, and molecular mechanisms of the neutrophilic inflammation (namely Toll-like receptor, Th1, Th17, inflammasome) are under investigation in asthma. Furthermore, possible role of the neutrophilic inflammation is being investigated in respect to the airway remodeling. We searched the related literatures published during the past 10 years on the website of Pub Med under the title of asthma and neutrophilic inflammation in human. Expert commentary: Epidemiologic and experimental studies have revealed that the neutrophilic airway inflammation is induced by a wide variety of stimuli including ozone, particulate matters, cigarette smoke, occupational irritants, endotoxins, microbial infection and colonization, and aeroallergens. These triggers provoke diverse immune and inflammatory responses leading to progressive and sometimes irreversible airway obstruction. Clinically, neutrophilic airway inflammation is frequently associated with severe asthma and poor response to glucocorticoid therapy, indicating the need for other treatment strategies. Accordingly, therapeutics will be targeted against the main mediators behind the underlying molecular mechanisms of the neutrophilic inflammation.

  5. Inflammation, Impaired Motility, and Permeability in a Guinea Pig Model of Postoperative Ileus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoo Jin; Hussain, Zahid; Huh, Cheal Wung; Lee, Young Ju; Park, Hyojin

    2018-01-01

    Background/Aims Postoperative ileus (POI) is characterized by impaired propulsive function of the gastrointestinal tract after surgery. Although inflammation is considered to be an important pathogenesis of POI, significant data are lacking. We aim to correlate the recovery time of postoperative dysmotility with that of inflammation and mucosal permeability. Methods An experimental POI model of guinea pig was used. Contractile activity of the circular muscle of the stomach, jejunum, ileum, and proximal colon was measured through a tissue bath study. Inflammatory cells were counted, and the expression of calprotectin and tryptase were analyzed. The expression of protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2), claudin-1, and claudin-2 were analyzed with immunofluorescence. Results The small bowel and colon showed decreased contractile amplitude in the POI groups compared to control. In contrast to the colon, the contractile amplitude of the small bowel significantly recovered in the POI group at 6 hours after the operation compared to the control group. Inflammation was highly significant in the POI groups compared to the control and sham groups, especially in the colon. Immunofluorescence showed increased PAR-2 expression in the POI groups compared to sham. The decreased claudin-1 expression and increased claudin-2 expression may suggest increased mucosal permeability of the small bowel and colon in the POI groups. Conclusions Increased inflammation and mucosal permeability may play an important role in the differential recovery stages in POI. These data may provide further insights into the pathophysiology and potential new therapeutic prospects of POI. PMID:29291615

  6. Inflammation, Impaired Motility, and Permeability in a Guinea Pig Model of Postoperative Ileus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoo Jin; Hussain, Zahid; Huh, Cheal Wung; Lee, Young Ju; Park, Hyojin

    2018-01-30

    Postoperative ileus (POI) is characterized by impaired propulsive function of the gastrointestinal tract after surgery. Although inflammation is considered to be an important pathogenesis of POI, significant data are lacking. We aim to correlate the recovery time of postoperative dysmotility with that of inflammation and mucosal permeability. An experimental POI model of guinea pig was used. Contractile activity of the circular muscle of the stomach, jejunum, ileum, and proximal colon was measured through a tissue bath study. Inflammatory cells were counted, and the expression of calprotectin and tryptase were analyzed. The expression of protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2), claudin-1, and claudin-2 were analyzed with immunofluorescence. The small bowel and colon showed decreased contractile amplitude in the POI groups compared to control. In contrast to the colon, the contractile amplitude of the small bowel significantly recovered in the POI group at 6 hours after the operation compared to the control group. Inflammation was highly significant in the POI groups compared to the control and sham groups, especially in the colon. Immunofluorescence showed increased PAR-2 expression in the POI groups compared to sham. The decreased claudin-1 expression and increased claudin-2 expression may suggest increased mucosal permeability of the small bowel and colon in the POI groups. Increased inflammation and mucosal permeability may play an important role in the differential recovery stages in POI. These data may provide further insights into the pathophysiology and potential new therapeutic prospects of POI.

  7. Eosinophils Contribute to Intestinal Inflammation via Chemoattractant Receptor-homologous Molecule Expressed on Th2 Cells, CRTH2, in Experimental Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Radnai, Balázs; Sturm, Eva M; Stančić, Angela; Jandl, Katharina; Labocha, Sandra; Ferreirós, Nerea; Grill, Magdalena; Hasenoehrl, Carina; Gorkiewicz, Gregor; Marsche, Gunther; Heinemann, Ákos; Högenauer, Christoph; Schicho, Rudolf

    2016-09-01

    Prostaglandin [PG] D2 activates two receptors, DP and CRTH2. Antagonism of CRTH2 has been shown to promote anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory effects. We investigated whether CRTH2 may play a role in Crohn's disease [CD], focusing on eosinophils which are widely present in the inflamed mucosa of CD patients and express both receptors. Using the 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid [TNBS]-induced colitis model, involvement of CRTH2 in colitis was investigated by pharmacological antagonism, immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, immunoassay, and leukocyte recruitment. Chemotactic assays were performed with isolated human eosinophils. Biopsies and serum samples of CD patients were examined for presence of CRTH2 and ligands, respectively. High amounts of CRTH2-positive cells, including eosinophils, are present in the colonic mucosa of mice with TNBS colitis and in human CD. The CRTH2 antagonist OC-459, but not the DP antagonist MK0524, reduced inflammation scores and decreased TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 as compared with control mice. OC-459 inhibited recruitment of eosinophils into the colon and also inhibited CRTH2-induced chemotaxis of human eosinophils in vitro. Eosinophil-depleted ΔdblGATA knockout mice were less sensitive to TNBS-induced colitis, whereas IL-5 transgenic mice with lifelong eosinophilia were more severely affected than wild types. In addition, we show that serum levels of PGD2 and Δ(12)-PGJ2 were increased in CD patients as compared with control individuals. CRTH2 plays a pro-inflammatory role in TNBS-induced colitis. Eosinophils contribute to the severity of the inflammation, which is improved by a selective CRTH2 antagonist. CRTH2 may, therefore, represent an important target in the pharmacotherapy of CD. Copyright © 2016 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and vitamin E on colonic mucosal leukotriene generation, lipid peroxidation, and microcirculation in rats with experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, T; Igarashi, J; Ohtuka, Y; Oguchi, S; Kaneko, K; Yamashiro, Y

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the effect of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) on mucosal levels of leukotrienes (LTs) and lipid peroxide (LPO), and on mucosal microcirculation, in rats with experimental colitis induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). We fed Wistar rats a perilla oil-enriched diet containing alpha-linolenic acid (63.2% of total fatty acids) with various doses of vitamin E for 4 weeks, with 4% DSS added to the drinking water during the last week. Control rats were fed a diet produced from soybean oil containing alpha-linolenic acid (5.1% of total fatty acids). Colonic mucosal blood flow was measured with a laser Doppler flowmeter. The mucosal level of arachidonic acid was significantly lower and that of eicosapentaenoic acid was significantly higher in the experimental group. The mucosal level of LPO in the experimental group fed a trace or ordinary dose of vitamin E was significantly higher than that of the controls. The production of LTB(4) and LTC(4) from the colonic mucosa in the experimental group was significantly lower than that in controls. However, only the experimental group fed a vitamin E dose 4-fold higher than that given to the controls showed a significant increase in mucosal blood flow. These results suggest that n-3 PUFAs increase mucosal blood flow by inhibiting LT production when there is sufficient vitamin E to inhibit lipid peroxidation in rats with experimental colitis. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  9. Extracellular Matrix Remodeling and Modulation of Inflammation and Oxidative Stress by Sulforaphane in Experimental Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Passant E; Abdelkader, Noha F; El Awdan, Sally A; El-Shabrawy, Osama A; Zaki, Hala F

    2018-04-27

    The peripheral nervous system is one of many organ systems that can be profoundly impacted in diabetes mellitus. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy has a significant negative effect on patients' quality of life as it begins with loss of limbs' sensation and may result in lower limb amputation. This investigation aimed at exploring the effect of sulforaphane on peripheral neuropathy in diabetic rats. Experimental diabetes was induced through single intraperitoneal injections of nicotinamide (50 mg/kg) and streptozotocin (52.5 mg/kg). Rats were divided into five groups. Two groups were treated with saline or sulforaphane (1 mg/kg, p.o.). Three diabetic groups were either untreated or given sulforaphane (1 mg/kg, p.o.) or pregabalin (10 mg/kg, i.p.). Two weeks after drugs' administration, biochemical, behavioral, histopathological, and immunohistochemical investigations were carried out. Treatment with sulforaphane restored animals' body weight, reduced blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin, and increased insulin levels. In parallel, it normalized motor coordination and the latency withdrawal time of tail flick test, increased the latency withdrawal time of cold allodynia test, and ameliorated histopathological changes. Treatment of sulforaphane, likewise, decreased sciatic nerve malondialdehyde, nitric oxide, interleukin-6, and matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 contents. Similarly, it reduced sciatic nerve DNA fragmentation and expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and nuclear factor kappa-B p65. Meanwhile, it increased sciatic nerve superoxide dismutase and interleukin-10 contents. These results reveal the neuroprotective effect of sulforaphane against peripheral neuropathy in diabetic rats possibly through modulating oxidative stress, inflammation, and extracellular matrix remodeling. Graphical Abstract Diagram that illustrates the effects of sulforaphane in treating experimental diabetic peripheral neuropathy. In NA-STZ model of diabetes mellitus, sulforaphane, restored

  10. Regulation of biokinetics of (65)Zn by curcumin and zinc in experimentally induced colon carcinogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Jain, Kinnri; Dhawan, Devinder K

    2014-10-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the role of curcumin and zinc on the biokinetics and biodistribution of (65)Zn during colon carcinogenesis. Male wistar rats were divided into five groups, namely normal control, 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) treated, DMH + curcumin treated, DMH + zinc treated, and DMH + curcumin + zinc treated. Weekly subcutaneous injections of DMH (30 mg/kg body weight) for 16 weeks initiated colon carcinogenesis. Curcumin (100 mg/kg body weight orally) and ZnSO4 (227 mg/L in drinking water) were supplemented for 16 weeks. This study revealed a significant depression in the fast (Tb1) and slow component (Tb2) of biological half-life of (65)Zn in the whole body of DMH-treated rats, whereas liver showed a significant elevation in these components. Further, DMH treatment showed a significant increase in the uptake values of (65)Zn in colon, small intestine, and kidneys. Subcellular distribution depicted a significant increase in (65)Zn uptake values in mitochondrial, microsomal, and postmicrosomal fractions of colon. However, curcumin and zinc supplementation when given separately or in combination reversed the trends and restored the uptake values close to normal range. Our study concludes that curcumin and zinc supplementation during colon carcinogenesis shall prove to be efficacious in regulating the altered zinc metabolism.

  11. The protective role of Lychnophora ericoides Mart. (Brazilian arnica) in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced experimental colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Cleverson Rodrigues; Turatti, Aline; Gouvea, Dayana Rubio; Gobbo-Neto, Leonardo; Diniz, Andrea; Ribeiro-Silva, Alfredo; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; Garcia, Sérgio Britto

    2011-01-01

    Aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and colon rectal mucosal epithelial cell proliferation have been shown to be increased in patients with colon cancer and have been largely used for early detection of factors that influence colorectal carcinogenesis in rats. Fifty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 5 groups. The groups G1 to G4 were given 4 injections of the carcinogen 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH). The G2 group received Lychnophora ericoides (LE) extracts for 6 wk. The groups G3 and G4 received LE for 4 wk and 2 wk, respectively, at the postinitiation and initiation phases of colonic carcinogenesis. The group G5 was the control. Forty-two days after the first injections of DMH for the neoplasic induction, we observed a statistically significant decrease in the number of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and an attenuation of the increase in cell proliferation induced by DMH in all the LE-treated groups. Thus, we concluded that Lychnophora ericoides extracts were effective against the development of cancer. These data suggest that LE has a protective influence on the process of colon carcinogenesis, suppressing both the initiation and the promotion of colonic carcinogenesis.

  12. Fab’-bearing siRNA TNFα-loaded nanoparticles targeted to colonic macrophages offer an effective therapy for experimental colitis

    PubMed Central

    Hamed, Laroui; Emilie, Viennois; Xiao, Bo; Canup, Brandon S.; Duke, Geem; Denning, Timothy L.; Didier, Merlin

    2014-01-01

    Patients suffering from Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) are currently treated by systemic drugs that can have significant side effects. Thus, it would be highly desirable to target TNFα siRNA (a therapeutic molecule) to the inflamed tissue. Here, we demonstrate that TNFα siRNA can be efficiently loaded into nanoparticles (NPs) made of poly (lactic acid) poly (ethylene glycol) block copolymer (PLA-PEG), and that grafting of the Fab’ portion of the F4/80 Ab (Fab’-bearing) onto the NP surface via maleimide/thiol group-mediated covalent bonding improves the macrophage (MP)-targeting kinetics of the NPs to RAW264.7 cells in vitro. Direct binding was shown between MPs and the Fab’-bearing NPs. Next, we orally administered hydrogel (chitosan/alginate)-encapsulated Fab’-bearing TNFα-siRNA-loaded NPs to 3% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-treated mice and investigated the therapeutic effect on colitis. In vivo, the release of TNFα-siRNA-loaded NPs into the mouse colon attenuated colitis more efficiently when the NPs were covered with Fab’-bearing, compared to uncovered NPs. All DSS-induced parameters of colonic inflammation (e.g., weight loss, myeloperoxidase activity, and Iκbα accumulation) were more attenuated Fab’-bearing NPs loaded with TNFα siRNA than without the Fab’-bearing. Grafting the Fab’-bearing onto the NPs improved the kinetics of endocytosis as well as the MP-targeting ability, as indicated by flow cytometry. Collectively, our results show that Fab’-bearing PLA-PEG NPs are powerful and efficient nanosized tools for delivering siRNAs into colonic macrophages. PMID:24810114

  13. Experimental Feeding of Hydrilla verticillata Colonized by Stigonematales Cyanobacteria Induces Vacuolar Myelinopathy in Painted Turtles (Chrysemys picta)

    PubMed Central

    Mercurio, Albert D.; Hernandez, Sonia M.; Maerz, John C.; Yabsley, Michael J.; Ellis, Angela E.; Coleman, Amanda L.; Shelnutt, Leslie M.; Fischer, John R.; Wilde, Susan B.

    2014-01-01

    Vacuolar myelinopathy (VM) is a neurologic disease primarily found in birds that occurs when wildlife ingest submerged aquatic vegetation colonized by an uncharacterized toxin-producing cyanobacterium (hereafter “UCB” for “uncharacterized cyanobacterium”). Turtles are among the closest extant relatives of birds and many species directly and/or indirectly consume aquatic vegetation. However, it is unknown whether turtles can develop VM. We conducted a feeding trial to determine whether painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) would develop VM after feeding on Hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata), colonized by the UCB (Hydrilla is the most common “host” of UCB). We hypothesized turtles fed Hydrilla colonized by the UCB would exhibit neurologic impairment and vacuolation of nervous tissues, whereas turtles fed Hydrilla free of the UCB would not. The ability of Hydrilla colonized by the UCB to cause VM (hereafter, “toxicity”) was verified by feeding it to domestic chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) or necropsy of field collected American coots (Fulica americana) captured at the site of Hydrilla collections. We randomly assigned ten wild-caught turtles into toxic or non-toxic Hydrilla feeding groups and delivered the diets for up to 97 days. Between days 82 and 89, all turtles fed toxic Hydrilla displayed physical and/or neurologic impairment. Histologic examination of the brain and spinal cord revealed vacuolations in all treatment turtles. None of the control turtles exhibited neurologic impairment or had detectable brain or spinal cord vacuolations. This is the first evidence that freshwater turtles can become neurologically impaired and develop vacuolations after consuming toxic Hydrilla colonized with the UCB. The southeastern United States, where outbreaks of VM occur regularly and where vegetation colonized by the UCB is common, is also a global hotspot of freshwater turtle diversity. Our results suggest that further investigations into the effect of the

  14. The relationship between right-sided tumour location, tumour microenvironment, systemic inflammation, adjuvant therapy and survival in patients undergoing surgery for colon and rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Patel, Meera; McSorley, Stephen T; Park, James H; Roxburgh, Campbell S D; Edwards, Joann; Horgan, Paul G; McMillan, Donald C

    2018-03-06

    There has been an increasing interest in the role of tumour location in the treatment and prognosis of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC), specifically in the adjuvant setting. Together with genomic data, this has led to the proposal that right-sided and left-sided tumours should be considered as distinct biological and clinical entities. The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between tumour location, tumour microenvironment, systemic inflammatory response (SIR), adjuvant chemotherapy and survival in patients undergoing potentially curative surgery for stage I-III colon and rectal cancer. Clinicopathological characteristics were extracted from a prospective database. MMR and BRAF status was determined using immunohistochemistry. The tumour microenvironment was assessed using routine H&E pathological sections. SIR was assessed using modified Glasgow Prognostic Score (mGPS), neutrophil:lymphocyte ratio (NLR), neutrophil:platelet score (NPS) and lymphocyte:monocyte ratio (LMR). Overall, 972 patients were included. The majority were over 65 years (68%), male (55%), TNM stage II/III (82%). In all, 40% of patients had right-sided tumours and 31% had rectal cancers. Right-sided tumour location was associated with older age (P=0.001), deficient MMR (P=0.005), higher T stage (P<0.001), poor tumour differentiation (P<0.001), venous invasion (P=0.021), and high CD3 + within cancer cell nests (P=0.048). Right-sided location was consistently associated with a high SIR, mGPS (P<0.001) and NPS (P<0.001). There was no relationship between tumour location, adjuvant chemotherapy (P=0.632) or cancer-specific survival (CSS; P=0.377). In those 275 patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy, right-sided location was not associated with the MMR status (P=0.509) but was associated with higher T stage (P=0.001), venous invasion (P=0.036), CD3 + at the invasive margin (P=0.033) and CD3 + within cancer nests (P=0.012). There was no relationship between tumour

  15. Polyphenolic extracts from cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) protect colonic myofibroblasts (CCD18Co cells) from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation--modulation of microRNA 126.

    PubMed

    Ojwang, Leonnard O; Banerjee, Nivedita; Noratto, Giuliana D; Angel-Morales, Gabriela; Hachibamba, Twambo; Awika, Joseph M; Mertens-Talcott, Susanne U

    2015-01-01

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) is a drought tolerant crop with several agronomic advantages over other legumes. This study evaluated varieties from four major cowpea phenotypes (black, red, light brown and white) containing different phenolic profiles for their anti-inflammatory property on non-malignant colonic myofibroblasts (CCD18Co) cells challenged with an endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS). Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) assay on the LPS-stimulated cells revealed antioxidative potential of black and red cowpea varieties. Real-time qRT-PCR analysis in LPS-stimulated cells revealed down-regulation of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-8, TNF-α, VCAM-1), transcription factor NF-κB and modulation of microRNA-126 (specific post-transcriptional regulator of VCAM-1) by cowpea polyphenolics. The ability of cowpea polyphenols to modulate miR-126 signaling and its target gene VCAM-1 were studied in LPS-stimulated endothelial cells transfected with a specific inhibitor of miR-126, and treated with 10 mg GAE/L black cowpea extract where the extract in part reversed the effect of the miR-126 inhibitor. This suggests that cowpea may exert their anti-inflammatory activities at least in part through induction of miR-126 that then down-regulate VCAM-1 mRNA and protein expressions. Overall, Cowpea therefore is promising as an anti-inflammatory dietary component.

  16. A Low Concentration of Tacrolimus/Semifluorinated Alkane (SFA) Eyedrop Suppresses Intraocular Inflammation in Experimental Models of Uveitis.

    PubMed

    De Majumdar, S; Subinya, M; Korward, J; Pettigrew, A; Scherer, D; Xu, H

    2017-01-01

    Corticosteroids remain the mainstay therapy for uveitis, a major cause of blindness in the working age population. However, a substantial number of patients cannot benefit from the therapy due to steroids resistance or intolerance. Tacrolimus has been used to treat refractory uveitis through systemic administration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of 0.03% tacrolimus eyedrop in mouse models of uveitis. 0.03% tacrolimus in perfluorobutylpentane (F4H5) (0.03% Tacrolimus/SFA) was formulated using a previously published protocol. Tacrolimus suspended in PBS (0.03% Tacrolimus/PBS) was used as a control. In addition, 0.1% dexamethasone (0.1% DXM) was used as a standard therapy control. Endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU) and experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU) were induced in adult C57BL/6 mice using protocols described previously. Mice were treated with eyedrops three times/day immediately after EIU induction for 48 h or from day 14 to day 25 post-immunization (for EAU). Clinical and histological examinations were conducted at the end of the experiment. Pharmacokinetics study was conducted in mice with and without EIU. At different times after eyedrop treatment, ocular tissues were collected for tacrolimus measurement. The 0.03% Tacrolimus/SFA eyedrop treatment reduced the clinical scores and histological scores of intraocular inflammation in both EIU and EAU to the levels similar to 0.1% DXM eyedrop treatment. The 0.03% Tacrolimus/PBS did not show any suppressive effect in EIU and EAU. Pharmacokinetic studies showed that 15 min after topical administration of 0.03% Tacrolimus/SFA, low levels of tacrolimus were detected in the retina (48 ng/g tissue) and vitreous (2.5 ng/ml) in normal mouse eyes, and the levels were significantly higher in EIU eyes (102 ng/g tissue in the retina and 24 ng/ml in the vitreous). Tacrolimus remained detectable in intraocular tissues of EIU eyes 6 h after topical administration (68 ng/g retinal tissue, 10

  17. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG treatment improves intestinal permeability and modulates inflammatory response and homeostasis of spleen and colon in experimental model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Khailova, Ludmila; Baird, Christine H; Rush, Aubri A; Barnes, Christopher; Wischmeyer, Paul E

    2017-12-01

    Recent clinical trials and in vivo models demonstrate probiotic administration can reduce occurrence and improve outcome of pneumonia and sepsis, both major clinical challenges worldwide. Potential probiotic benefits include maintenance of gut epithelial barrier homeostasis and prevention of downstream organ dysfunction due to systemic inflammation. However, mechanism(s) of probiotic-mediated protection against pneumonia remain poorly understood. This study evaluated potential mechanistic targets in the maintenance of gut barrier homeostasis following Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) treatment in a mouse model of pneumonia. Studies were performed in 6-8 week old FVB/N mice treated (o.g.) with or without LGG (10 9  CFU/ml) and intratracheally injected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa or saline. At 4, 12, and 24 h post-bacterial treatment spleen and colonic tissue were collected for analysis. Pneumonia significantly increased intestinal permeability and gut claudin-2. LGG significantly attenuated increased gut permeability and claudin-2 following pneumonia back to sham control levels. As mucin expression is key to gut barrier homeostasis we demonstrate that LGG can enhance goblet cell expression and mucin barrier formation versus control pneumonia animals. Further as Muc2 is a key gut mucin, we show LGG corrected deficient Muc2 expression post-pneumonia. Apoptosis increased in both colon and spleen post-pneumonia, and this increase was significantly attenuated by LGG. Concomitantly, LGG corrected pneumonia-mediated loss of cell proliferation in colon and significantly enhanced cell proliferation in spleen. Finally, LGG significantly reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression in colon and spleen post-pneumonia. These data demonstrate LGG can maintain intestinal barrier homeostasis by enhancing gut mucin expression/barrier formation, reducing apoptosis, and improving cell proliferation. This was accompanied by reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in the

  18. The impact of L5 dorsal root ganglion degeneration and Adamkiewicz artery vasospasm on descending colon dilatation following spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage: An experimental study; first report.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Cengiz; Kanat, Ayhan; Aydin, Mehmet Dumlu; Yolas, Coskun; Kabalar, Mehmet Esref; Gundogdu, Betul; Duman, Aslihan; Kanat, Ilyas Ferit; Gundogdu, Cemal

    2015-01-01

    Somato-sensitive innervation of bowels are maintained by lower segments of spinal cord and the blood supply of the lower spinal cord is heavily dependent on Adamkiewicz artery. Although bowel problems are sometimes seen in subarachnoid hemorrhage neither Adamkiewicz artery spasm nor spinal cord ischemia has not been elucidated as a cause of bowel dilatation so far. The goal of this study was to study the effects Adamkiewicz artery (AKA) vasospasm in lumbar subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) on bowel dilatation severity. An experimental rabbit study. The study was conducted on 25 rabbits, which were randomly divided into three groups: Spinal SAH (N = 13), serum saline (SS) (SS; N = 7) and control (N = 5) groups. Experimental spinal SAH was performed. After 21 days, volume values of descending parts of large bowels and degenerated neuron density of L5DRG were analyzed. Statistical analysis was performed using the PASW Statistics 18.0 for Windows (SPSS Inc., Chicago, Illinois). Two-tailed t-test and Mann-Whitney U-tests were used. The statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. The mean volume of imaginary descending colons was estimated as 93 ± 12 cm(3) in the control group and 121 ± 26 cm(3) in the SS group and 176 ± 49 cm(3) in SAH group. Volume augmentations of the descending colons and degenerated neuron density L5DRG were significantly different between the SAH and other two groups (P < 0.05). An inverse relationship between the living neuronal density of the L5DRG and the volume of imaginary descending colon values was occurred. Our findings will aid in the planning of future experimental studies and determining the clinical relevance on such studies.

  19. The impact of L5 dorsal root ganglion degeneration and Adamkiewicz artery vasospasm on descending colon dilatation following spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage: An experimental study; first report

    PubMed Central

    Ozturk, Cengiz; Kanat, Ayhan; Aydin, Mehmet Dumlu; Yolas, Coskun; Kabalar, Mehmet Esref; Gundogdu, Betul; Duman, Aslihan; Kanat, Ilyas Ferit; Gundogdu, Cemal

    2015-01-01

    Context: Somato-sensitive innervation of bowels are maintained by lower segments of spinal cord and the blood supply of the lower spinal cord is heavily dependent on Adamkiewicz artery. Although bowel problems are sometimes seen in subarachnoid hemorrhage neither Adamkiewicz artery spasm nor spinal cord ischemia has not been elucidated as a cause of bowel dilatation so far. Aims: The goal of this study was to study the effects Adamkiewicz artery (AKA) vasospasm in lumbar subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) on bowel dilatation severity. Settings and Design: An experimental rabbit study. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 25 rabbits, which were randomly divided into three groups: Spinal SAH (N = 13), serum saline (SS) (SS; N = 7) and control (N = 5) groups. Experimental spinal SAH was performed. After 21 days, volume values of descending parts of large bowels and degenerated neuron density of L5DRG were analyzed. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was performed using the PASW Statistics 18.0 for Windows (SPSS Inc., Chicago, Illinois). Two-tailed t-test and Mann-Whitney U-tests were used. The statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: The mean volume of imaginary descending colons was estimated as 93 ± 12 cm3 in the control group and 121 ± 26 cm3 in the SS group and 176 ± 49 cm3 in SAH group. Volume augmentations of the descending colons and degenerated neuron density L5DRG were significantly different between the SAH and other two groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion: An inverse relationship between the living neuronal density of the L5DRG and the volume of imaginary descending colon values was occurred. Our findings will aid in the planning of future experimental studies and determining the clinical relevance on such studies. PMID:25972712

  20. Magnolol treatment attenuates dextran sulphate sodium-induced murine experimental colitis by regulating inflammation and mucosal damage.

    PubMed

    Shen, Peng; Zhang, Zecai; He, Yue; Gu, Cong; Zhu, Kunpeng; Li, Shan; Li, Yanxin; Lu, Xiaojie; Liu, Jiuxi; Zhang, Naisheng; Cao, Yongguo

    2018-03-01

    Magnolol, the main and active ingredient of the Magnolia officinalis, has been widely used in traditional prescription to the human disorders. Magnolol has been proved to have several pharmacological properties including anti-bacterial, anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the effects of magnolol on ulcerative colitis (UC) have not been reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effects and mechanisms of magnolol on dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis in mice. The results showed that magnolol significantly alleviated DSS-induced body weight loss, disease activities index (DAI), colon length shortening and colonic pathological damage. In addition, magnolol restrained the expression of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-12 via the regulation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) pathways. Magnolol also enhanced the expression of ZO-1 and occludin in DSS-induced mice colonic tissues. These results showed that magnolol played protective effects on DSS-induced colitis and may be an alternative therapeutic reagent for colitis treatment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Partial replacement of ω-6 fatty acids with medium-chain triglycerides, but not olive oil, improves colon cytokine response and damage in experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Bertevello, Pedro L; De Nardi, Leticia; Torrinhas, Raquel S; Logullo, Angela F; Waitzberg, Dan L

    2012-07-01

    Soybean oil is rich in ω-6 fatty acids, which are associated with higher incidence and more severe cases of inflammatory bowel diseases. The authors evaluated whether partial replacement of soybean oil by medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) or olive oil influenced the incidence and severity of experimental ulcerative colitis by using different parenteral lipid emulsions (LEs). Wistar rats (n = 40) were randomized to receive parenteral infusion of the following LE: 100% soybean oil (SO), 50% MCT mixed with 50% soybean oil (MCT/SO), 80% olive oil mixed with 20% soybean oil (OO/SO), or saline (CC). After 72 hours of infusion, acetic acid experimental colitis was induced. After 24 hours, colon histology and cytokine expression were analyzed. SO was not significantly associated with overall tissue damage. MCT/SO was not associated with necrosis (P < .005), whereas OO/SO had higher frequencies of ulcer and necrosis (P < .005). SO was associated with increased expression of interferon-γ (P = .005) and OO/SO with increased interleukin (IL)-6 and decreased tumor necrosis factor-α expression (P < .05). MCT/SO appeared to decrease IL-1 (P < .05) and increase IL-4 (P < .001) expression. Parenteral SO with high concentration of ω-6 fatty acids was not associated with greater tissue damage in experimental colitis. SO partial replacement with MCT/SO decreased the frequency of histological necrosis and favorably modulated cytokine expression in the colon; however, replacement with OO/SO had unfavorable effects.

  2. Azithromycin-Ciprofloxacin-Impregnated Urinary Catheters Avert Bacterial Colonization, Biofilm Formation, and Inflammation in a Murine Model of Foreign-Body-Associated Urinary Tract Infections Caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Saini, Hina; Vadekeetil, Anitha; Chhibber, Sanjay; Harjai, Kusum

    2017-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a multifaceted pathogen causing a variety of biofilm-mediated infections, including catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs). The high prevalence of CAUTIs in hospitals, their clinical manifestations, such as urethritis, cystitis, pyelonephritis, meningitis, urosepsis, and death, and the associated economic challenges underscore the need for management of these infections. Biomaterial modification of urinary catheters with two drugs seems an interesting approach to combat CAUTIs by inhibiting biofilm. Previously, we demonstrated the in vitro efficacy of urinary catheters impregnated with azithromycin (AZM) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) against P. aeruginosa Here, we report how these coated catheters impact the course of CAUTI induced by P. aeruginosa in a murine model. CAUTI was established in female LACA mice with uncoated or AZM-CIP-coated silicone implants in the bladder, followed by transurethral inoculation of 10 8 CFU/ml of biofilm cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1. AZM-CIP-coated implants (i) prevented biofilm formation on the implant's surface ( P ≤ 0.01), (ii) restricted bacterial colonization in the bladder and kidney ( P < 0.0001), (iii) averted bacteriuria ( P < 0.0001), and (iv) exhibited no major histopathological changes for 28 days in comparison to uncoated implants, which showed persistent CAUTI. Antibiotic implants also overcame implant-mediated inflammation, as characterized by trivial levels of inflammatory markers such as malondialdehyde ( P < 0.001), myeloperoxidase ( P < 0.05), reactive oxygen species ( P ≤ 0.001), and reactive nitrogen intermediates ( P < 0.01) in comparison to those in uncoated implants. Further, AZM-CIP-coated implants showed immunomodulation by manipulating the release of inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and IL-10 to the benefit of the host. Overall, the study demonstrates long-term in vivo effectiveness of AZM-CIP-impregnated catheters

  3. The relationship between the numbers of Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Heidelberg, or Salmonella Hadar colonizing reproductive tissues of experimentally infected laying hens and deposition inside eggs.

    PubMed

    Gast, Richard K; Guraya, Rupa; Guard, Jean; Holt, Peter S

    2011-06-01

    Contamination of eggs by Salmonella Enteritidis has been a prominent cause of human illness for several decades and is the focus of a recently implemented national regulatory plan for egg-producing flocks in the United States. Salmonella Heidelberg has also been identified as an egg-transmitted pathogen. The deposition of Salmonella strains inside eggs is a consequence of reproductive tract colonization in infected laying hens, but prior research has not determined the relationship between the numbers of Salmonella that colonize reproductive organs and the associated frequency of egg contamination. In the present study, groups of laying hens in two trials were experimentally infected with large oral doses of strains of Salmonella Enteritidis (phage type 13a), Salmonella Heidelberg, or Salmonella Hadar. Reproductive tissues of selected hens were cultured to detect and enumerate Salmonella at 5 days postinoculation, and the interior contents of eggs laid between 6 and 25 days postinoculation were tested for contamination. Significantly more internally contaminated eggs were laid by hens infected with Salmonella Enteritidis (3.58%) than with strains of either Salmonella Heidelberg (0.47%) or Salmonella Hadar (0%). However, no significant differences were observed between Salmonella strains in either isolation frequency or the number of colony-forming units (CFU) isolated from ovaries or oviducts. Salmonella isolation frequencies ranged from 20.8% to 41.7% for ovaries and from 8.3% to 33.3% for oviducts. Mean Salmonella colonization levels ranged from 0.10 to 0.51 log CFU/g for ovaries and from 0.25 to 0.46 log CFU/g for oviducts. Although parallel rank-orders were observed for Salmonella enumeration (in both ovaries and oviducts) and egg contamination frequency, a statistically significant relationship could not be established between these two parameters of infection.

  4. S100A8/A9, a potent serum and molecular imaging biomarker for synovial inflammation and joint destruction in seronegative experimental arthritis.

    PubMed

    Geven, Edwin J W; van den Bosch, Martijn H J; Di Ceglie, Irene; Ascone, Giuliana; Abdollahi-Roodsaz, Shahla; Sloetjes, Annet W; Hermann, Sven; Schäfers, Michael; van de Loo, Fons A J; van der Kraan, Peter M; Koenders, Marije I; Foell, Dirk; Roth, Johannes; Vogl, Thomas; van Lent, Peter L E M

    2016-10-24

    Seronegative joint diseases are characterized by a lack of well-defined biomarkers since autoantibodies are not elevated. Calprotectin (S100A8/A9) is a damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) which is released by activated phagocytes, and high levels are found in seronegative arthritides. In this study, we investigated the biomarker potential of systemic and local levels of these S100 proteins to assess joint inflammation and joint destruction in an experimental model for seronegative arthritis. Serum levels of S100A8/A9 and various cytokines were monitored during disease development in interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) -/- mice using ELISA and multiplex bead-based immunoassay, and were correlated to macroscopic and microscopic parameters for joint inflammation, bone erosion, and cartilage damage. Local expression of S100A8 and S100A9 and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-mediated cartilage damage in the ankle joints were investigated by immunohistochemistry. In addition, local S100A8 and activated MMPs were monitored in vivo by optical imaging using anti-S100A8-Cy7 and AF489-Cy5.5, a specific tracer for activated MMPs. Serum levels of S100A8/A9 were significantly increased in IL-1Ra -/- mice and correlated with macroscopic joint swelling and histological inflammation, while serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines did not correlate with joint swelling. In addition, early serum S100A8/A9 levels were prognostic for disease outcome at a later stage. The increased serum S100A8/A9 levels were reflected by an increased expression of S100A8 and S100A9 within the ankle joint, as visualized by molecular imaging. Next to inflammatory processes, serum S100A8/A9 also correlated with histological parameters for bone erosion and cartilage damage. In addition, arthritic IL-1Ra -/- mice with increased synovial S100A8 and S100A9 expression showed increased cartilage damage that coincided with MMP-mediated neoepitope expression and in vivo imaging of activated MMPs

  5. Colonization of reproductive organs and internal contamination of eggs after experimental infection of laying hens with Salmonella heidelberg and Salmonella enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Gast, Richard K; Guard-Bouldin, Jean; Holt, Peter S

    2004-12-01

    Internal contamination of eggs laid by hens infected with Salmonella enteritidis has been a prominent international public health issue since the mid-1980s. Considerable resources have been committed to detecting and controlling S. enteritidis infections in commercial laying flocks. Recently, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also reported a significant association between eggs or egg-containing foods and S. heidelberg infections in humans. The present study sought to determine whether several S. heidelberg isolates obtained from egg-associated human disease outbreaks were able to colonize reproductive tissues and be deposited inside eggs laid by experimentally infected hens in a manner similar to the previously documented behavior of S. enteritidis. In two trials, groups of laying hens were orally inoculated with large doses of four S. heidelberg strains and an S. enteritidis strain that consistently caused egg contamination in previous studies. All five Salmonella strains (of both serotypes) colonized the intestinal tracts and invaded the livers, spleens, ovaries, and oviducts of inoculated hens, with no significant differences observed between the strains for any of these parameters. All four S. heidelberg strains were recovered from the interior liquid contents of eggs laid by infected hens, although at lower frequencies (between 1.1% and 4.5%) than the S. enteritidis strain (7.0%).

  6. Inflammation, atrophy, and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fox, James G.; Wang, Timothy C.

    2006-01-01

    The association between chronic inflammation and cancer is now well established. This association has recently received renewed interest with the recognition that microbial pathogens can be responsible for the chronic inflammation observed in many cancers, particularly those originating in the gastrointestinal system. A prime example is Helicobacter pylori, which infects 50% of the world’s population and is now known to be responsible for inducing chronic gastric inflammation that progresses to atrophy, metaplasia, dysplasia, and gastric cancer. This Review provides an overview of recent progress in elucidating the bacterial properties responsible for colonization of the stomach, persistence in the stomach, and triggering of inflammation, as well as the host factors that have a role in determining whether gastritis progresses to gastric cancer. We also discuss how the increased understanding of the relationship between inflammation and gastric cancer still leaves many questions unanswered regarding recommendations for prevention and treatment. PMID:17200707

  7. Plecanatide and dolcanatide, novel guanylate cyclase-C agonists, ameliorate gastrointestinal inflammation in experimental models of murine colitis.

    PubMed

    Shailubhai, Kunwar; Palejwala, Vaseem; Arjunan, Krishna Priya; Saykhedkar, Sayali; Nefsky, Bradley; Foss, John A; Comiskey, Stephen; Jacob, Gary S; Plevy, Scott E

    2015-11-06

    To evaluate the effect of orally administered plecanatide or dolcanatide, analogs of uroguanylin, on amelioration of colitis in murine models. The cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) stimulatory potency of plecanatide and dolcanatide was measured using a human colon carcinoma T84 cell-based assay. For animal studies all test agents were formulated in phosphate buffered saline. Sulfasalazine or 5-amino salicylic acid (5-ASA) served as positive controls. Effect of oral treatment with test agents on amelioration of acute colitis induced either by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in drinking water or by rectal instillation of trinitrobenzene sulfonic (TNBS) acid, was examined in BALB/c and/or BDF1 mice. Additionally, the effect of orally administered plecanatide on the spontaneous colitis in T-cell receptor alpha knockout (TCRα(-/-)) mice was also examined. Amelioration of colitis was assessed by monitoring severity of colitis, disease activity index and by histopathology. Frozen colon tissues were used to measure myeloperoxidase activity. Plecanatide and dolcanatide are structurally related analogs of uroguanylin, which is an endogenous ligand of guanylate cyclase-C (GC-C). As expected from the agonists of GC-C, both plecanatide and dolcanatide exhibited potent cGMP-stimulatory activity in T84 cells. Once-daily treatment by oral gavage with either of these analogs (0.05-0.5 mg/kg) ameliorated colitis in both DSS and TNBS-induced models of acute colitis, as assessed by body weight, reduction in colitis severity (P < 0.05) and disease activity index (P < 0.05). Amelioration of colitis by either of the drug candidates was comparable to that achieved by orally administered sulfasalazine or 5-ASA. Plecanatide also effectively ameliorated colitis in TCRα(-/-) mice, a model of spontaneous colitis. As dolcanatide exhibited higher resistance to proteolysis in simulated gastric and intestinal juices, it was selected for further studies. This is the first-ever study reporting

  8. Plecanatide and dolcanatide, novel guanylate cyclase-C agonists, ameliorate gastrointestinal inflammation in experimental models of murine colitis

    PubMed Central

    Shailubhai, Kunwar; Palejwala, Vaseem; Arjunan, Krishna Priya; Saykhedkar, Sayali; Nefsky, Bradley; Foss, John A; Comiskey, Stephen; Jacob, Gary S; Plevy, Scott E

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of orally administered plecanatide or dolcanatide, analogs of uroguanylin, on amelioration of colitis in murine models. METHODS: The cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) stimulatory potency of plecanatide and dolcanatide was measured using a human colon carcinoma T84 cell-based assay. For animal studies all test agents were formulated in phosphate buffered saline. Sulfasalazine or 5-amino salicylic acid (5-ASA) served as positive controls. Effect of oral treatment with test agents on amelioration of acute colitis induced either by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in drinking water or by rectal instillation of trinitrobenzene sulfonic (TNBS) acid, was examined in BALB/c and/or BDF1 mice. Additionally, the effect of orally administered plecanatide on the spontaneous colitis in T-cell receptor alpha knockout (TCRα-/-) mice was also examined. Amelioration of colitis was assessed by monitoring severity of colitis, disease activity index and by histopathology. Frozen colon tissues were used to measure myeloperoxidase activity. RESULTS: Plecanatide and dolcanatide are structurally related analogs of uroguanylin, which is an endogenous ligand of guanylate cyclase-C (GC-C). As expected from the agonists of GC-C, both plecanatide and dolcanatide exhibited potent cGMP-stimulatory activity in T84 cells. Once-daily treatment by oral gavage with either of these analogs (0.05-0.5 mg/kg) ameliorated colitis in both DSS and TNBS-induced models of acute colitis, as assessed by body weight, reduction in colitis severity (P < 0.05) and disease activity index (P < 0.05). Amelioration of colitis by either of the drug candidates was comparable to that achieved by orally administered sulfasalazine or 5-ASA. Plecanatide also effectively ameliorated colitis in TCRα-/- mice, a model of spontaneous colitis. As dolcanatide exhibited higher resistance to proteolysis in simulated gastric and intestinal juices, it was selected for further studies. CONCLUSION: This is

  9. Short-term effects of stored homologous red blood cell transfusion on cardiorespiratory function and inflammation: an experimental study in a hypovolemia model

    PubMed Central

    Biagini, S.; Dale, C.S.; Real, J.M.; Moreira, E.S.; Carvalho, C.R.R.; Schettino, G.P.P.; Wendel, S.; Azevedo, L.C.P.

    2017-01-01

    The pathophysiological mechanisms associated with the effects of red blood cell (RBC) transfusion on cardiopulmonary function and inflammation are unclear. We developed an experimental model of homologous 14-days stored RBC transfusion in hypovolemic swine to evaluate the short-term effects of transfusion on cardiopulmonary system and inflammation. Sixteen healthy male anesthetized swine (68±3.3 kg) were submitted to controlled hemorrhage (25% of blood volume). Two units of non-filtered RBC from each animal were stored under blood bank conditions for 14 days. After 30 min of hypovolemia, the control group (n=8) received an infusion of lactated Ringer's solution (three times the removed volume). The transfusion group (n=8) received two units of homologous 14-days stored RBC and lactated Ringer's solution in a volume that was three times the difference between blood removed and blood transfusion infused. Both groups were followed up for 6 h after resuscitation with collection of hemodynamic and respiratory data. Cytokines and RNA expression were measured in plasma and lung tissue. Stored RBC transfusion significantly increased mixed oxygen venous saturation and arterial oxygen content. Transfusion was not associated with alterations on pulmonary function. Pulmonary concentrations of cytokines were not different between groups. Gene expression for lung cytokines demonstrated a 2-fold increase in mRNA level for inducible nitric oxide synthase and a 0.5-fold decrease in mRNA content for IL-21 in the transfused group. Thus, stored homologous RBC transfusion in a hypovolemia model improved cardiovascular parameters but did not induce significant effects on microcirculation, pulmonary inflammation and respiratory function up to 6 h after transfusion. PMID:29185590

  10. Delayed increases in microvascular pathology after experimental traumatic brain injury are associated with prolonged inflammation, blood-brain barrier disruption, and progressive white matter damage.

    PubMed

    Glushakova, Olena Y; Johnson, Danny; Hayes, Ronald L

    2014-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant risk factor for chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and Parkinson's disease (PD). Cerebral microbleeds, focal inflammation, and white matter damage are associated with many neurological and neurodegenerative disorders including CTE, AD, PD, vascular dementia, stroke, and TBI. This study evaluates microvascular abnormalities observed at acute and chronic stages following TBI in rats, and examines pathological processes associated with these abnormalities. TBI in adult rats was induced by controlled cortical impact (CCI) of two magnitudes. Brain pathology was assessed in white matter of the corpus callosum for 24 h to 3 months following injury using immunohistochemistry (IHC). TBI resulted in focal microbleeds that were related to the magnitude of injury. At the lower magnitude of injury, microbleeds gradually increased over the 3 month duration of the study. IHC revealed TBI-induced focal abnormalities including blood-brain barrier (BBB) damage (IgG), endothelial damage (intercellular adhesion molecule 1 [ICAM-1]), activation of reactive microglia (ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 [Iba1]), gliosis (glial fibrillary acidic protein [GFAP]) and macrophage-mediated inflammation (cluster of differentiation 68 [CD68]), all showing different temporal profiles. At chronic stages (up to 3 months), apparent myelin loss (Luxol fast blue) and scattered deposition of microbleeds were observed. Microbleeds were surrounded by glial scars and co-localized with CD68 and IgG puncta stainings, suggesting that localized BBB breakdown and inflammation were associated with vascular damage. Our results indicate that evolving white matter degeneration following experimental TBI is associated with significantly delayed microvascular damage and focal microbleeds that are temporally and regionally associated with development of punctate BBB breakdown and progressive inflammatory responses. Increased

  11. Pathogenicity of Stable L-Phase Variants of Staphylococcus aureus: Failure to Colonize Experimental Endocarditis in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Linnemann, Calvin C.; Watanakunakorn, Chatrchai; Bakie, Cheryl

    1973-01-01

    Endocarditis was induced in the rabbit by the placement of a polyethylene catheter in the right heart. The catheter was filled with stable L-phase variants of Staphylococcus aureus to determine if the variant form would colonize the damaged endocardium and produce further tissue injury similar to that produced by the vegetative bacterial phase. No L-phase variants were recovered from cultures of blood or vegetations, although pure cultures of L-phase variants were obtained from all catheters, including one in place for 70 days. The vegetations were grossly similar in control animals with sterile media in the catheters and animals with catheters containing L-phase variants, although polymorphonuclear leukocytes and eosinophils were more frequently found in vegetations from animals inoculated with L-phase variants. Endocarditis was also induced in animals with vegetative S. aureus and then treated with penicillin G. Blood cultures in hypertonic media often grew vegetative S. aureus when there was no growth in routine media, but no L-phase variants were detected. Vegetative S. aureus, but not wall-defective variants, were isolated from vegetations of all treated animals. PMID:4587520

  12. Development of a quantitative PCR assay for monitoring Streptococcus agalactiae colonization and tissue tropism in experimentally infected tilapia.

    PubMed

    Su, Y-L; Feng, J; Li, Y-W; Bai, J-S; Li, A-X

    2016-02-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae has become one of the most important emerging pathogens in the aquaculture industry and has resulted in large economic losses for tilapia farms in China. In this study, three pairs of specific primers were designed and tested for their specificities and sensitivities in quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions (qPCRs) after optimization of the annealing temperature. The primer pair IGS-s/IGS-a, which targets the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region, was finally chosen, having a detection limit of 8.6 copies of S. agalactiae DNA in a 20 μL reaction mixture. Bacterial tissue tropism was demonstrated by qPCR in Oreochromis niloticus 5 days post-injection with a virulent S. agalactiae strain. Bacterial loads were detected at the highest level in brain, followed by moderately high levels in kidney, heart, spleen, intestines, and eye. Significantly lower bacterial loads were observed in muscle, gill and liver. In addition, significantly lower bacterial loads were observed in the brain of convalescent O. niloticus 14 days post-injection with several different S. agalactiae strains. The qPCR for the detection of S. agalactiae developed in this study provides a quantitative tool for investigating bacterial tissue tropism in infected fish, as well as for monitoring bacterial colonization in convalescent fish. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. [Orbital inflammation].

    PubMed

    Mouriaux, F; Coffin-Pichonnet, S; Robert, P-Y; Abad, S; Martin-Silva, N

    2014-12-01

    Orbital inflammation is a generic term encompassing inflammatory pathologies affecting all structures within the orbit : anterior (involvement up to the posterior aspect of the globe), diffuse (involvement of intra- and/or extraconal fat), apical (involvement of the posterior orbit), myositis (involvement of only the extraocular muscles), dacryoadenitis (involvement of the lacrimal gland). We distinguish between specific inflammation and non-specific inflammation, commonly referred to as idiopathic inflammation. Specific orbital inflammation corresponds to a secondary localization of a "generalized" disease (systemic or auto-immune). Idiopathic orbital inflammation corresponds to uniquely orbital inflammation without generalized disease, and thus an unknown etiology. At the top of the differential diagnosis for specific or idiopathic orbital inflammation are malignant tumors, represented most commonly in the adult by lympho-proliferative syndromes and metastases. Treatment of specific orbital inflammation begins with treatment of the underlying disease. For idiopathic orbital inflammation, treatment (most often corticosteroids) is indicated above all in cases of visual loss due to optic neuropathy, in the presence of pain or oculomotor palsy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Protective effect of Chlorogenic acid against methotrexate induced oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis in rat liver: An experimental approach.

    PubMed

    Ali, Nemat; Rashid, Summya; Nafees, Sana; Hasan, Syed Kazim; Shahid, Ayaz; Majed, Ferial; Sultana, Sarwat

    2017-06-25

    Methotrexate (MTX) is a drug which is used to treat different types of cancers but hepatotoxicity limits its clinical use. Chlorogenic acid (CGA) is one of the most abundant naturally occurring polyphenols in the human diet. Here, we assessed the effect of CGA against MTX-induced hepatotoxicity and investigated the underlying possible mechanisms in Wistar Rats. Rats were pre-treated with CGA (50 or 100 mg kg/b.w) and administered a single dose of MTX (20 mg/kg, b.w.). MTX caused hepatotoxicity as evidenced by significant increase in serum toxicity markers, histopathological changes. decreased activities of anti-oxidant armory (SOD, CAT, GPx, GR) and GSH content. MTX significantly causes upregulation of iNOS, Cox-2, Bax and downregulation of Bcl-2 expressions, it causes higher caspase 3, 9 activities. However CGA pretreatment alleviates the hepatotoxicity by decreasing the oxidative stress. CGA inhibited Cox-2, iNOS, Bax, Bcl-2 and Caspases 3, 9 mediated inflammation and apoptosis, and improve the histology induced by MTX. Thus, these findings demonstrated the hepatoprotective nature of CGA by attenuating the pro-inflammatory and apoptotic mediators and improving antioxidant competence in hepatic tissue. These results imply that CGA has perfective effect against MTX-induced liver injury. Hence CGA supplementation might be helpful in abrogation of MTX toxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Chemopreventive effect of dietary glutamine on colitis-associated colon tumorigenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yun; Wang, Keming; Wang, Zhaoxia; Li, Nan; Ji, Guozhong

    2013-07-01

    Chronic colonic inflammation is a known risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC). Glutamine (GLN) supplementation has shown its anti-inflammation benefit in experimental colitis. Whether GLN is effective in preventing colon carcinogenesis remains to be investigated. The chemopreventive activity of GLN was evaluated in the mouse model of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)/azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colitis-associated CRC in this study. Mice were treated with DSS/AOM and randomized to receive either a control diet or GLN-enriched diet intermittently of the study. The disease activity index was evaluated weekly. On day 80 of the experiment, the entire colon and rectum were processed for histopathologic examination and further evaluation. Pro-inflammatory mediators and cytokines were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, real-time-PCR and western blot analysis. Here, we show that after GLN-enriched diet, the colitis presented a statistical improvement and tumors burden decreased significantly. This was accompanied by lower activity of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), decreased expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase, lower expression of cytokines and chemokines as well as reduced proliferation and induced apoptosis in the colons of colitis-associated CRC mice. Our data demonstrate the protective/preventive effect of GLN in the progression of colitis-associated CRC, which was correlated with a dampening of inflammation and NF-κB activity and with a decrease of inflammatory protein overexpression.

  16. Associations Between Air Quality Changes and Biomarkers of Systemic Inflammation During the 2014 Nanjing Youth Olympics: A Quasi-Experimental Study.

    PubMed

    Li, Huichu; Zhou, Lian; Wang, Cuicui; Chen, Renjie; Ma, Xiaoying; Xu, Bin; Xiong, Lilin; Ding, Zhen; Chen, Xiaodong; Zhou, Yun; Xu, Yan; Kan, Haidong

    2017-06-15

    There is increasing interest in quasi-experimental research to evaluate whether actions taken to improve air quality will benefit public health. We conducted a quasi-experimental study to evaluate inflammatory response to changes in air quality during the 2014 Nanjing Youth Olympics in China. We repeatedly measured 8 biomarkers of systemic inflammation in 31 healthy adults and obtained hourly air pollutant concentrations from a nearby fixed-site monitoring station. We used linear mixed-effect models to examine the associations between air quality changes and blood biomarkers. Air pollutant concentrations decreased apparently during the Youth Olympics. Concomitantly, we observed significant decreases in levels of soluble cluster of differentiation 40 (CD40) ligand and interleukin 1β (geometric means ratios were 0.45 and 0.24, respectively) from the pre-Olympic period to the intra-Olympic period. Afterwards, levels of C-reactive protein and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 increased significantly (geometric means ratios were 2.22 and 1.29, respectively) in the post-Olympic period. Fine particulate matter and ozone were significantly associated with soluble CD40 ligand, P-selectin, interleukin 1β, intercellular adhesion molecule 1, and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1. Other pollutants showed positive but nonsignificant associations. Our study indicated that reduced air pollution, especially fine particulate matter and ozone, during the 2014 Nanjing Youth Olympics was associated with alleviated systemic inflammation in healthy adults. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Abscopal effect of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT): proof of principle in an experimental model of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Trivillin, Verónica A; Pozzi, Emiliano C C; Colombo, Lucas L; Thorp, Silvia I; Garabalino, Marcela A; Monti Hughes, Andrea; González, Sara J; Farías, Rubén O; Curotto, Paula; Santa Cruz, Gustavo A; Carando, Daniel G; Schwint, Amanda E

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate, for the first time, the abscopal effect of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Twenty-six BDIX rats were inoculated subcutaneously with 1 × 10 6 DHD/K12/TRb syngeneic colon cancer cells in the right hind flank. Three weeks post-inoculation, the right leg of 12 rats bearing the tumor nodule was treated with BPA-BNCT (BPA-Boronophenylalanine) at the RA-3 nuclear reactor located in Buenos Aires, Argentina, at an absorbed dose of 7.5 Gy to skin as the dose-limiting tissue. The remaining group of 14 tumor-bearing rats were left untreated and used as control. Two weeks post-BNCT, 1 × 10 6 DHD/K12/TRb cells were injected subcutaneously in the contralateral left hind flank of each of the 26 BDIX rats. Tumor volume in both legs was measured weekly for 7 weeks to determine response to BNCT in the right leg and to assess a potential influence of BNCT in the right leg on tumor development in the left leg. Within the BNCT group, a statistically significant reduction was observed in contralateral left tumor volume in animals whose right leg tumor responded to BNCT (post-treatment/pre-treatment tumor volume <1) versus animals who failed to respond (post/pre ≥1), i.e., 13 ± 15 vs 271 ± 128 mm 3 . In addition, a statistically significant reduction in contralateral left leg tumor volume was observed in BNCT-responsive animals (post/pre <1) vs untreated animals, i.e., 13 ± 15 vs 254 ± 251 mm 3 . The present study performed in a simple animal model provides proof of principle that the positive response of a tumor to BNCT is capable of inducing an abscopal effect.

  18. Human adipose tissue mesenchymal stromal cells and their extracellular vesicles act differentially on lung mechanics and inflammation in experimental allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Ligia Lins; Xisto, Debora Gonçalves; Kitoko, Jamil Zola; Cruz, Fernanda Ferreira; Olsen, Priscilla Christina; Redondo, Patricia Albuquerque Garcia; Ferreira, Tatiana Paula Teixeira; Weiss, Daniel Jay; Martins, Marco Aurélio; Morales, Marcelo Marcos; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macedo

    2017-06-24

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease that can be difficult to treat due to its complex pathophysiology. Most current drugs focus on controlling the inflammatory process, but are unable to revert the changes of tissue remodeling. Human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are effective at reducing inflammation and tissue remodeling; nevertheless, no study has evaluated the therapeutic effects of extracellular vesicles (EVs) obtained from human adipose tissue-derived MSCs (AD-MSC) on established airway remodeling in experimental allergic asthma. C57BL/6 female mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA). Control (CTRL) animals received saline solution using the same protocol. One day after the last challenge, each group received saline, 10 5 human AD-MSCs, or EVs (released by 10 5  AD-MSCs). Seven days after treatment, animals were anesthetized for lung function assessment and subsequently euthanized. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), lungs, thymus, and mediastinal lymph nodes were harvested for analysis of inflammation. Collagen fiber content of airways and lung parenchyma were also evaluated. In OVA animals, AD-MSCs and EVs acted differently on static lung elastance and on BALF regulatory T cells, CD3 + CD4 + T cells, and pro-inflammatory mediators (interleukin [IL]-4, IL-5, IL-13, and eotaxin), but similarly reduced eosinophils in lung tissue, collagen fiber content in airways and lung parenchyma, levels of transforming growth factor-β in lung tissue, and CD3 + CD4 + T cell counts in the thymus. No significant changes were observed in total cell count or percentage of CD3 + CD4 + T cells in the mediastinal lymph nodes. In this immunocompetent mouse model of allergic asthma, human AD-MSCs and EVs effectively reduced eosinophil counts in lung tissue and BALF and modulated airway remodeling, but their effects on T cells differed in lung and thymus. EVs may hold promise for asthma; however, further studies are required to elucidate the different

  19. Intravascular Inflammation Triggers Intracerebral Activated Microglia and Contributes to Secondary Brain Injury After Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage (eSAH).

    PubMed

    Atangana, Etienne; Schneider, Ulf C; Blecharz, Kinga; Magrini, Salima; Wagner, Josephin; Nieminen-Kelhä, Melina; Kremenetskaia, Irina; Heppner, Frank L; Engelhardt, Britta; Vajkoczy, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Activation of innate immunity contributes to secondary brain injury after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage (eSAH). Microglia accumulation and activation within the brain has recently been shown to induce neuronal cell death after eSAH. In isolated mouse brain capillaries after eSAH, we show a significantly increased gene expression for intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and P-selectin. Hence, we hypothesized that extracerebral intravascular inflammatory processes might initiate the previously reported microglia accumulation within the brain tissue. We therefore induced eSAH in knockout mice for ICAM-1 (ICAM-1 -/- ) and P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1 -/- ) to find a significant decrease in neutrophil-endothelial interaction within the first 7 days after the bleeding in a chronic cranial window model. This inhibition of neutrophil recruitment to the endothelium results in significantly ameliorated microglia accumulation and neuronal cell death in knockout animals in comparison to controls. Our results suggest an outside-in activation of the CNS innate immune system at the vessel/brain interface following eSAH. Microglia cells, as part of the brain's innate immune system, are triggered by an inflammatory reaction in the microvasculature after eSAH, thus contributing to neuronal cell death. This finding offers a whole range of new research targets, as well as possible therapy options for patients suffering from eSAH.

  20. Molecular Basis of Alcohol-Related Gastric and Colon Cancer.

    PubMed

    Na, Hye-Kyung; Lee, Ja Young

    2017-05-24

    Many meta-analysis, large cohort studies, and experimental studies suggest that chronic alcohol consumption increases the risk of gastric and colon cancer. Ethanol is metabolized by alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH), catalase or cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) to acetaldehyde, which is then further oxidized to acetate by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). Acetaldehyde has been classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) as a Group 1 carcinogen to humans. The acetaldehyde level in the stomach and colon is locally influenced by gastric colonization by Helicobacter pylori or colonic microbes, as well as polymorphisms in the genes encoding tissue alcohol metabolizing enzymes, especially ALDH2. Alcohol stimulates the uptake of carcinogens and their metabolism and also changes the composition of enteric microbes in a way to enhance the aldehyde level. Alcohol also undergoes chemical coupling to membrane phospholipids and disrupts organization of tight junctions, leading to nuclear translocation of β-catenin and ZONAB, which may contributes to regulation of genes involved in proliferation, invasion and metastasis. Alcohol also generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) by suppressing the expression of antioxidant and cytoprotective enzymes and inducing expression of CYP2E1 which contribute to the metabolic activation of chemical carcinogens. Besides exerting genotoxic effects by directly damaging DNA, ROS can activates signaling molecules involved in inflammation, metastasis and angiogenesis. In addition, alcohol consumption induces folate deficiency, which may result in aberrant DNA methylation profiles, thereby influencing cancer-related gene expression.

  1. Anti-inflammatory and anti-granuloma activity of Berberis aristata DC. in experimental models of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rohit; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar; Singh, Surender

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Berberis aristata (Berberidaceae) is an important medicinal plant used in traditional system of medicine for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory disorders. The aim of the present study is to scientifically validate the traditional use of BA in the treatment of inflammatory disorders. Materials and Methods: Anti-inflammatory and anti-granuloma activity of BA hydroalcoholic extract (BAHE) were evaluated in experimental models, viz., carrageenan-induced paw edema, cotton pellet-induced granuloma formation, and complete Freund's adjuvant-induced stimulation of peritoneal macrophages in rats. Expression of inflammatory mediators, viz., tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-10, TNF-R1, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) was carried out in serum and peritoneal macrophages to derive the plausible mechanism of BAHE in activated peritoneal macrophages. Results: Pretreatment with BAHE produced a dose-dependent reduction (P < 0.01) in carrageenan-induced paw edema and cotton pellet-induced granuloma model. BAHE treatment produced significant (P < 0.01) reduction in serum inflammatory cytokine levels as compared to control. Protein expression of pro-inflammatory markers, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-R1, and COX-2, was found to be reduced in stimulated macrophages whereas anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, was upregulated in peritoneal macrophages. Conclusion: The result of the present study thus demonstrates the anti-inflammatory and anti-granuloma activity of BAHE which may be attributed to its inhibitory activity on macrophage-derived cytokine and mediators. PMID:27114638

  2. Huperzine A ameliorates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis via the suppression of T cell-mediated neuronal inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Chen, Fu; Zheng, Peng; Deng, Weijuan; Yuan, Jia; Peng, Bo; Wang, Ruochen; Liu, Wenjun; Zhao, Hui; Wang, Yanqing; Wu, Gencheng

    2012-07-01

    Huperzine A (HupA), a sesquiterpene alkaloid and a potent and reversible inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase, possesses potential anti-inflammatory properties and is used for the treatment of certain neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. However, it is still unknown whether this chemical is beneficial in the treatment of multiple sclerosis, a progressive inflammatory disease of the central nervous system. In this study, we examined the immunomodulatory properties of HupA in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a T-cell mediated murine model of multiple sclerosis. The following results were obtained: (1) intraperitoneal injections of HupA significantly attenuate the neurological severity of EAE in mice. (2) HupA decreases the accumulation of inflammatory cells, autoimmune-related demyelination and axonal injury in the spinal cords of EAE mice. (3) HupA down-regulates mRNA levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-17) and chemokines (MCP-1, RANTES, and TWEAK) while enhancing levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10) in the spinal cords of EAE mice. (4) HupA inhibits MOG(35-55) stimulation-induced T-cell proliferation and IFN-γ and IL-17 secretion in cultured splenocytes. (5) HupA inhibition of T-cell proliferation is reversed by the nicotinic acetylcholinergic receptor antagonist mecamylamine. We conclude that HupA can ameliorate EAE by suppressing autoimmune responses, inflammatory reactions, subsequent demyelination and axonal injury in the spinal cord. Therefore, HupA may have a potential therapeutic value for the treatment of multiple sclerosis and as a neuroimmunomodulatory drug to control human CNS pathology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. TH17 cells mediate inflammation in a novel model of spontaneous experimental autoimmune lacrimal keratoconjunctivitis with neural damage.

    PubMed

    Seo, Kyoung Yul; Kitamura, Kazuya; Han, Soo Jung; Kelsall, Brian

    2017-09-27

    Dry eye disease (DED) affects one third of the population worldwide. In prior studies, experimental autoimmune lacrimal keratoconjunctivitis (EALK) induced by desiccating stress in mice has been used as a model of DED. This model is complicated by a requirement for exogenous epithelial cell injury and administration of anticholinergic agents with broad immunologic effects. We sought to develop a novel mouse model of EALK and to demonstrate the responsible pathogenic mechanisms. CD4 + CD45RB high naive T cells with and without CD4 + CD45RB low regulatory T cells were adoptively transferred to C57BL/10 recombination-activating gene 2 (Rag2) -/- mice. The eyes, draining lymph nodes, lacrimal glands, and surrounding tissues of mice with and without spontaneous keratoconjunctivitis were evaluated for histopathologic changes, cellular infiltration, and cytokine production in tissues and isolated cells. Furthermore, the integrity of the corneal nerves was evaluated using whole-tissue immunofluorescence imaging. Gene-deficient naive T cells or RAG2-deficient hosts were evaluated to assess the roles of IFN-γ, IL-17A, and IL-23 in disease pathogenesis. Finally, cytokine levels were determined in the tears of patients with DED. EALK developed spontaneously in C57BL/10 Rag2 -/- mice after adoptive transfer of CD4 + CD45RB high naive T cells and was characterized by infiltration of CD4 + T cells, macrophages, and neutrophils. In addition to lacrimal keratoconjunctivitis, mice had damage to the corneal nerve, which connects components of the lacrimal functional unit. Pathogenic T-cell differentiation was dependent on IL-23p40 and controlled by cotransferred CD4 + CD45RB low regulatory T cells. T H 17 rather than T H 1 CD4 + cells were primarily responsible for EALK, even though levels of both IL-17 and IFN-γ were increased in inflammatory tissues, likely because of their ability to drive expression of CXC chemokines within the cornea and the subsequent influx of myeloid cells

  4. Low-Level Laser Therapy Reduces Lung Inflammation in an Experimental Model of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Involving P2X7 Receptor.

    PubMed

    da Cunha Moraes, Gabriel; Vitoretti, Luana Beatriz; de Brito, Auriléia Aparecida; Alves, Cintia Estefano; de Oliveira, Nicole Cristine Rigonato; Dos Santos Dias, Alana; Matos, Yves Silva Teles; Oliveira-Junior, Manoel Carneiro; Oliveira, Luis Vicente Franco; da Palma, Renata Kelly; Candeo, Larissa Carbonera; Lino-Dos-Santos-Franco, Adriana; Horliana, Anna Carolina Ratto Tempestine; Gimenes Júnior, João Antonio; Aimbire, Flavio; Vieira, Rodolfo Paula; Ligeiro-de-Oliveira, Ana Paula

    2018-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive disease characterized by irreversible airflow limitation, airway inflammation and remodeling, and enlargement of alveolar spaces. COPD is in the top five leading causes of deaths worldwide and presents a high economic cost. However, there are some preventive measures to lower the risk of developing COPD. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is a new effective therapy, with very low cost and no side effects. So, our objective was to investigate if LLLT reduces pulmonary alterations in an experimental model of COPD. C57BL/6 mice were submitted to cigarette smoke for 75 days (2x/day). After 60 days to smoke exposure, the treated group was submitted to LLLT (diode laser, 660 nm, 30 mW, and 3 J/cm 2 ) for 15 days and euthanized for morphologic and functional analysis of the lungs. Our results showed that LLLT significantly reduced the number of inflammatory cells and the proinflammatory cytokine secretion such as IL-1 β , IL-6, and TNF- α in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). We also observed that LLLT decreased collagen deposition as well as the expression of purinergic P2X7 receptor. On the other hand, LLLT increased the IL-10 release. Thus, LLLT can be pointed as a promising therapeutic approach for lung inflammatory diseases as COPD.

  5. Space colonization.

    PubMed

    2002-12-01

    NASA interest in colonization encompasses space tourism; space exploration; space bases in orbit, at L1, on the Moon, or on Mars; in-situ resource utilization; and planetary terraforming. Activities progressed during 2002 in areas such as Mars colonies, hoppers, and biomass; space elevators and construction; and in-situ consumables.

  6. Effect of royal jelly on experimental colitis induced by acetic acid and alteration of mast cell distribution in the colon of rats

    PubMed Central

    Karaca, T.; Bayiroglu, F.; Yoruk, M.; Kaya, M.S.; Uslu, S.; Comba, B.; Mis, L.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of royal jelly (RJ) on acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Twenty adult female Wistar albino rats were divided into four treatment groups of 5 animals each, including a control group (Group I); Group II was treated orally with RJ (150 mg kg−1 body weight); Group III had acetic acid-induced colitis; and Group IV had acetic acid-induced colitis treated orally with RJ (150 mg kg−1 body weight) for 4 weeks. Colitis was induced by intracolonic instillation of 4% acetic acid; the control group received physiological saline (10 mL kg−1). Colon samples were obtained under deep anaesthesia from animals in all groups. Tissues were fixed in 10% formalin neutral buffer solution for 24 h and embedded in paraffin. Six-micrometre-thick sections were stained with Mallory’s triple stain and toluidine blue in 1% aqueous solution at pH 1.0 for 5 min (for Mast Cells). RJ was shown to protect the colonic mucosa against the injurious effect of acetic acid. Colitis (colonic damage) was confirmed histomorphometrically as significant increases in the number of mast cells (MC) and colonic erosions in rats with acetic acid-induced colitis. The RJ treatment significantly decreased the number of MC and reduced the area of colonic erosion in the colon of RJ-treated rats compared with rats with untreated colitis. The results suggest that oral treatment with RJ could be used to treat colitis. PMID:21263740

  7. Advancing nutritional therapy: A novel polymeric formulation attenuates intestinal inflammation in a murine colitis model and suppresses pro-inflammatory cytokine production in ex-vivo cultured inflamed colonic biopsies.

    PubMed

    Alhagamhmad, Moftah H; Lemberg, Daniel A; Day, Andrew S; Tan, Li-Zsa; Ooi, Chee Y; Krishnan, Usha; Gupta, Nitin; Munday, John S; Leach, Steven T

    2017-04-01

    Nutritional therapy is a viable therapeutic option for the treatment of Crohn disease (CD). Therefore improving nutritional therapy would greatly benefit CD patients. The aim of this study was to define the anti-inflammatory properties of a novel nutritional polymeric formula (PF) in comparison to a currently available standard PF. Dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) was utilized to induce colitis in C57BL/6 mice with mice randomized to receive either standard PF or novel PF in addition to control groups. Changes in body weight were recorded and colonic damage was assessed histologically and biochemically. Additional experiments were also included where the cytokine response of colonic biopsies from pediatric CD patients was measured following exposure to standard PF or novel PF. DSS induced significant body weight loss, morphological changes in the colon, increased myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and up-regulated colonic mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-12 and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, as well as associated histological changes. Other than histological damage, these inflammatory changes were reversed by both novel and standard PF. However, the novel PF, but not standard PF, completely suppressed TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8 levels from cultured biopsies. Newly developed nutritional formula reproducibly ameliorated DSS-induced colitis in a murine model, although this response was not measurably different to standard PF. However, the novel PF was significantly superior in suppressing inflammatory cytokine release from cultured colonic biopsies. Collectively, these findings support a possible role for novel PF in advancing nutritional therapy for CD patients. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Colon cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - colon cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on colon cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org/cancer/colon-rectal-cancer.html Colon Cancer Alliance -- www.ccalliance. ...

  9. Matrix metalloproteinase 9-induced increase in intestinal epithelial tight junction permeability contributes to the severity of experimental DSS colitis

    PubMed Central

    Nighot, Prashant; Al-Sadi, Rana; Guo, Shuhong; Watterson, D. Martin; Ma, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have implicated a pathogenic role for matrix metalloproteinases 9 (MMP-9) in inflammatory bowel disease. Although loss of epithelial barrier function has been shown to be a key pathogenic factor for the development of intestinal inflammation, the role of MMP-9 in intestinal barrier function remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of MMP-9 in intestinal barrier function and intestinal inflammation. Wild-type (WT) and MMP-9−/− mice were subjected to experimental dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) colitis by administration of 3% DSS in drinking water for 7 days. The mouse colonic permeability was measured in vivo by recycling perfusion of the entire colon using fluorescently labeled dextran. The DSS-induced increase in the colonic permeability was accompanied by an increase in intestinal epithelial cell MMP-9 expression in WT mice. The DSS-induced increase in intestinal permeability and the severity of DSS colitis was found to be attenuated in MMP-9−/− mice. The colonic protein expression of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and phospho-MLC was found to be significantly increased after DSS administration in WT mice but not in MMP-9−/− mice. The DSS-induced increase in colonic permeability and colonic inflammation was attenuated in MLCK−/− mice and MLCK inhibitor ML-7-treated WT mice. The DSS-induced increase in colonic surface epithelial cell MLCK mRNA was abolished in MMP-9−/− mice. Lastly, increased MMP-9 protein expression was detected within the colonic surface epithelial cells in ulcerative colitis cases. These data suggest a role of MMP-9 in modulation of colonic epithelial permeability and inflammation via MLCK. PMID:26514773

  10. Curcuma longa Extract Exerts a Myorelaxant Effect on the Ileum and Colon in a Mouse Experimental Colitis Model, Independent of the Anti-Inflammatory Effect

    PubMed Central

    Roda, Giulia; Micucci, Matteo; Ioan, Pierfranco; D’Errico-Grigioni, Antonia; Sartini, Alessandro; Guidetti, Elena; Marocchi, Margherita; Cevenini, Monica; Rosini, Francesca; Montagnani, Marco; Chiarini, Alberto; Mazzella, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Background Curcuma has long been used as an anti-inflammatory agent in inflammatory bowel disease. Since gastrointestinal motility is impaired in inflammatory states, the aim of this work was to evaluate if Curcuma Longa had any effect on intestinal motility. Methods The biological activity of Curcuma extract was evaluated against Carbachol induced contraction in isolated mice intestine. Acute and chronic colitis were induced in Balb/c mice by Dextran Sulphate Sodium administration (5% and 2.5% respectively) and either Curcuma extract (200 mg/kg/day) or placebo was thereafter administered for 7 and 21 days respectively. Spontaneous contractions and the response to Carbachol and Atropine of ileum and colon were studied after colitis induction and Curcuma administration. Results Curcuma extract reduced the spontaneous contractions in the ileum and colon; the maximal response to Carbachol was inhibited in a non-competitive and reversible manner. Similar results were obtained in ileum and colon from Curcuma fed mice. DSS administration decreased the motility, mainly in the colon and Curcuma almost restored both the spontaneous contractions and the response to Carbachol after 14 days assumption, compared to standard diet, but a prolonged assumption of Curcuma decreased the spontaneous and Carbachol-induced contractions. Conclusions Curcuma extract has a direct and indirect myorelaxant effect on mouse ileum and colon, independent of the anti-inflammatory effect. The indirect effect is reversible and non-competitive with the cholinergic agent. These results suggest the use of curcuma extract as a spasmolytic agent. PMID:22984538

  11. Curcuma longa extract exerts a myorelaxant effect on the ileum and colon in a mouse experimental colitis model, independent of the anti-inflammatory effect.

    PubMed

    Aldini, Rita; Budriesi, Roberta; Roda, Giulia; Micucci, Matteo; Ioan, Pierfranco; D'Errico-Grigioni, Antonia; Sartini, Alessandro; Guidetti, Elena; Marocchi, Margherita; Cevenini, Monica; Rosini, Francesca; Montagnani, Marco; Chiarini, Alberto; Mazzella, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Curcuma has long been used as an anti-inflammatory agent in inflammatory bowel disease. Since gastrointestinal motility is impaired in inflammatory states, the aim of this work was to evaluate if Curcuma Longa had any effect on intestinal motility. The biological activity of Curcuma extract was evaluated against Carbachol induced contraction in isolated mice intestine. Acute and chronic colitis were induced in Balb/c mice by Dextran Sulphate Sodium administration (5% and 2.5% respectively) and either Curcuma extract (200 mg/kg/day) or placebo was thereafter administered for 7 and 21 days respectively. Spontaneous contractions and the response to Carbachol and Atropine of ileum and colon were studied after colitis induction and Curcuma administration. Curcuma extract reduced the spontaneous contractions in the ileum and colon; the maximal response to Carbachol was inhibited in a non-competitive and reversible manner. Similar results were obtained in ileum and colon from Curcuma fed mice. DSS administration decreased the motility, mainly in the colon and Curcuma almost restored both the spontaneous contractions and the response to Carbachol after 14 days assumption, compared to standard diet, but a prolonged assumption of Curcuma decreased the spontaneous and Carbachol-induced contractions. Curcuma extract has a direct and indirect myorelaxant effect on mouse ileum and colon, independent of the anti-inflammatory effect. The indirect effect is reversible and non-competitive with the cholinergic agent. These results suggest the use of curcuma extract as a spasmolytic agent.

  12. Effects of positive end-expiratory pressure titration and recruitment maneuver on lung inflammation and hyperinflation in experimental acid aspiration-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Ambrosio, Aline M; Luo, Rubin; Fantoni, Denise T; Gutierres, Claudia; Lu, Qin; Gu, Wen-Jie; Otsuki, Denise A; Malbouisson, Luiz M S; Auler, Jose O C; Rouby, Jean-Jacques

    2012-12-01

    In acute lung injury positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and recruitment maneuver are proposed to optimize arterial oxygenation. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of such a strategy on lung histological inflammation and hyperinflation in pigs with acid aspiration-induced lung injury. Forty-seven pigs were randomly allocated in seven groups: (1) controls spontaneously breathing; (2) without lung injury, PEEP 5 cm H2O; (3) without lung injury, PEEP titration; (4) without lung injury, PEEP titration + recruitment maneuver; (5) with lung injury, PEEP 5 cm H2O; (6) with lung injury, PEEP titration; and (7) with lung injury, PEEP titration + recruitment maneuver. Acute lung injury was induced by intratracheal instillation of hydrochloric acid. PEEP titration was performed by incremental and decremental PEEP from 5 to 20 cm H2O for optimizing arterial oxygenation. Three recruitment maneuvers (pressure of 40 cm H2O maintained for 20 s) were applied to the assigned groups at each PEEP level. Proportion of lung inflammation, hemorrhage, edema, and alveolar wall disruption were recorded on each histological field. Mean alveolar area was measured in the aerated lung regions. Acid aspiration increased mean alveolar area and produced alveolar wall disruption, lung edema, alveolar hemorrhage, and lung inflammation. PEEP titration significantly improved arterial oxygenation but simultaneously increased lung inflammation in juxta-diaphragmatic lung regions. Recruitment maneuver during PEEP titration did not induce additional increase in lung inflammation and alveolar hyperinflation. In a porcine model of acid aspiration-induced lung injury, PEEP titration aimed at optimizing arterial oxygenation, substantially increased lung inflammation. Recruitment maneuvers further improved arterial oxygenation without additional effects on inflammation and hyperinflation.

  13. Colonization of internal organs by Salmonella Enteritidis in experimentally infected laying hens housed in enriched colony cages at different stocking densities.

    PubMed

    Gast, Richard K; Guraya, Rupa; Jones, Deana R; Anderson, Kenneth E; Karcher, Darrin M

    2016-06-01

    Epidemiologic analyses have linked the frequency of human infections with Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Enteritidis to the consumption of contaminated eggs and thus to the prevalence of this pathogen in commercial egg-laying flocks. Contamination of the edible contents of eggs by Salmonella Enteritidis is a consequence of the colonization of reproductive tissues in systemically infected hens. The animal welfare implications of laying hen housing systems have been widely debated, but no definitive consensus has yet emerged about the food safety significance of poultry housing options. The present study sought to determine the effects of two different bird stocking densities on the invasion of internal organs by Salmonella Enteritidis in groups of experimentally infected laying hens housed in colony cages enriched with perching and nesting areas. In two trials, groups of laying hens were distributed at two different stocking densities into colony cages and (along with a group housed in conventional cages) orally inoculated with doses of 1.0 × 10(7) cfu of Salmonella Enteritidis. At 5 to 6 d post-inoculation, hens were euthanized and samples of internal organs were removed for bacteriologic culturing. For both trials combined, Salmonella Enteritidis was recovered at a significantly (P < 0.05) greater frequency from hens in enriched colony cages at the higher stocking density than at the lower density from livers (75.0% vs. 51.4%) and ovaries (51.4% vs. 30.6%). However, spleens from hens in enriched colony cages at the higher stocking density were significantly less often positive for Salmonella Enteritidis than from hens in conventional cages at that same density (90.3% vs. 68.1%). These results suggest that stocking density can influence the susceptibility of hens to Salmonella Enteritidis, but other housing systems parameters may also contribute to the outcome of infections. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Poultry Science

  14. Divergent Roles of Interferon-γ and Innate Lymphoid Cells in Innate and Adaptive Immune Cell-Mediated Intestinal Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Brasseit, Jennifer; Kwong Chung, Cheong K C; Noti, Mario; Zysset, Daniel; Hoheisel-Dickgreber, Nina; Genitsch, Vera; Corazza, Nadia; Mueller, Christoph

    2018-01-01

    Aberrant interferon gamma (IFNγ) expression is associated with the pathogenesis of numerous autoimmune- and inflammatory disorders, including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). However, the requirement of IFNγ for the pathogenesis of chronic intestinal inflammation remains controversial. The aim of this study was thus to investigate the role of IFNγ in experimental mouse models of innate and adaptive immune cell-mediated intestinal inflammation using genetically and microbiota-stabilized hosts. While we find that IFNγ drives acute intestinal inflammation in the anti-CD40 colitis model in an innate lymphoid cell (ILC)-dependent manner, IFNγ secreted by both transferred CD4 T cells and/or cells of the lymphopenic Rag1 -/- recipient mice was dispensable for CD4 T cell-mediated colitis. In the absence of IFNγ, intestinal inflammation in CD4 T cell recipient mice was associated with enhanced IL17 responses; consequently, targeting IL17 signaling in IFNγ-deficient mice reduced T cell-mediated colitis. Intriguingly, in contrast to the anti-CD40 model of colitis, depletion of ILC in the Rag1 -/- recipients of colitogenic CD4 T cells did not prevent induction of colonic inflammation. Together, our findings demonstrate that IFNγ represents an essential, or a redundant, pro-inflammatory cytokine for the induction of intestinal inflammation, depending on the experimental mouse model used and on the nature of the critical disease inducing immune cell populations involved.

  15. Obesity-related colon cancer: dietary factors and their mechanisms of anticancer action.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huawei; Lazarova, Darina L

    2012-02-01

    Overweight/obesity is an epidemic in the US as well as in other developed countries, affecting two-thirds of Americans and an estimated 2.3 billion people worldwide. Obesity increases the risk for Type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer. For example, epidemiological studies have established a strong association between obesity and colon cancer. It is generally accepted that metabolic changes associated with overweight/obesity, particularly abdominal obesity and changes in adipocyte function, contribute to the increased risk of colon cancer. Understanding the mechanisms underlying this association is important for the development of preventive strategies for colon cancer. Part of these preventive strategies may be based on dietary factors, such as vitamins, minerals (e.g. selenium), fibre, phytochemicals and phenolic compounds. These anticancer nutrients may counteract the molecular changes associated with obesity. The present article reviews the evidence that inflammation and insulin resistance induced by obesity are the molecular mediators of the association between obesity and colon cancer. We also evaluate the evidence for the ability of dietary factors to target the obesity-induced changes and, thus, protect against colon cancer. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Impact of valve-less vs. standard insufflation on pneumoperitoneum volume, inflammation, and peritoneal physiology in a laparoscopic sigmoid resection experimental model.

    PubMed

    Diana, Michele; Noll, Eric; Legnèr, Andras; Kong, Seong-Ho; Liu, Yu-Yin; Schiraldi, Luigi; Marchegiani, Francesco; Bano, Jordan; Geny, Bernard; Charles, Anne-Laure; Dallemagne, Bernard; Lindner, Véronique; Mutter, Didier; Diemunsch, Pierre; Marescaux, Jacques

    2018-07-01

    Standard insufflators compensate for intra-abdominal pressure variations with pressure spikes. Our aim was to evaluate the impact of a stable, low-pressure pneumoperitoneum induced by a valve-less insufflator, on working space, hemodynamics, inflammation, and peritoneal physiology, in a model of laparoscopic sigmoid resection. Twelve pigs (47 ± 3.3 kg) were equipped for invasive hemodynamic monitoring and randomly assigned to Standard (n = 6) vs. valve-less (n = 6) insufflation. Animals were positioned in a 30° Trendelenburg on a CT scan bed. A low-pressure pneumoperitoneum (8 mmHg) was started and duration was set for 180 min. Abdominal CT scans were performed, under neuromuscular blockade, before, immediately after, and 1 and 3 h after insufflation. Pneumoperitoneum volumes were calculated on 3D reconstructed CT scans. After creation of a mesenteric window, capillary blood was obtained by puncturing the sigmoid serosa and local lactatemia (mmol/L) was measured using a handheld analyzer. Surgical resection was performed according to the level of lactates, in order to standardize bowel stump perfusion. IL-1 and IL-6 (ng/mL) were measured repeatedly. The peritoneum was sampled close to the surgical site and distantly for the oxygraphic assessment of mitochondrial respiration. A pathologist applied a semi-quantitative score to evaluate the anastomosis. Mean arterial pressure, pulse, body temperature, oximetry, systemic lactatemia, and local lactates were similar. IL-6 was lower in the valve-less group, reaching a statistically significant difference after 3 h of insufflation (64.85 ± 32.5 vs. 133.95 ± 59.73; p = 0.038) and 48 h (77.53 ± 68.4 vs. 190.74 ± 140.79; p = 0.029). Peritoneal mitochondrial respiration was significantly increased after the survival period, with no difference among the groups. The anastomoses in the valve-less group demonstrated a lower acute (p = 0.04) inflammatory infiltration. The mean

  17. Colonization of internal organs by Salmonella Enteritidis in experimentally infected laying hens housed in enriched colony cages at different stocking densities

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The frequency of human infections with Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) has been linked to contaminated eggs and thus to SE prevalence in commercial egg-laying flocks. Contamination of the edible contents of eggs is a consequence of SE colonization of reproductive tissues in systemically infected hens. T...

  18. Colon-targeted delivery of cyclosporine A using dual-functional Eudragit® FS30D/PLGA nanoparticles ameliorates murine experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Naeem, Muhammad; Bae, Junhwan; Oshi, Murtada A; Kim, Min-Soo; Moon, Hyung Ryong; Lee, Bok Luel; Im, Eunok; Jung, Yunjin; Yoo, Jin-Wook

    2018-01-01

    Colon-targeted oral nanoparticles (NPs) have emerged as an ideal, safe, and effective therapy for ulcerative colitis (UC) owing to their ability to selectively accumulate in inflamed colonic mucosa. Cyclosporine A (CSA), an immunosuppressive agent, has long been used as rescue therapy in severe steroid-refractory UC. In this study, we developed CSA-loaded dual-functional polymeric NPs composed of Eudragit ® FS30D as a pH-sensitive polymer for targeted delivery to the inflamed colon, and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) as a sustained-release polymer. CSA-loaded Eudragit FS30D nanoparticles (ENPs), PLGA nanoparticles (PNPs), and Eudragit FS30D/PLGA nanoparticles (E/PNPs) were prepared using the oil-in-water emulsion method. Scanning electron microscope images and zeta size data showed successful preparation of CSA-loaded NPs. PNPs exhibited a burst drug release of >60% at pH 1.2 (stomach pH) in 0.5 h, which can lead to unwanted systemic absorption and side effects. ENPs effectively inhibited the burst drug release at pH 1.2 and 6.8 (proximal small intestine pH); however, nearly 100% of the CSA in ENPs was released rapidly at pH 7.4 (ileum-colon pH) owing to complete NP dissolution. In contrast to single-functional PNPs and ENPs, the dual-functional E/PNPs minimized burst drug release (only 18%) at pH 1.2 and 6.8, and generated a sustained release at pH 7.4 thereafter. Importantly, in distribution studies in the gastrointestinal tracts of mice, E/PNPs significantly improved CSA distribution to the colon compared with PNPs or ENPs. In a mouse model of colitis, E/PNP treatment improved weight loss and colon length, and decreased rectal bleeding, spleen weight, histological scoring, myeloperoxidase activity, macrophage infiltration, and expression of proinflammatory cytokines compared with PNPs or ENPs. Overall, this work confirms the benefits of CSA-loaded E/PNPs for efficiently delivering CSA to the colon, suggesting their potential for UC therapy.

  19. Basophils and allergic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Siracusa, Mark C.; Kim, Brian S.; Spergel, Jonathan M.; Artis, David

    2013-01-01

    Basophils were discovered by Paul Ehrlich in 1879 and represent the least abundant granulocyte population in mammals. The relative rarity of basophils and their phenotypic similarities with mast cells resulted in this cell lineage being historically overlooked, both clinically and experimentally. However, recent studies in humans and murine systems have shown that basophils perform non-redundant effector functions and significantly contribute to the development and progression of TH2 cytokine-mediated inflammation. Although the potential functions of murine and human basophils have provoked some controversy, recent genetic approaches indicate that basophils can migrate into lymphoid tissues and, in some circumstances, cooperate with other immune cells to promote optimal TH2 cytokine responses in vivo. This article provides a brief historical perspective on basophil-related research and discusses recent studies that have identified previously unappreciated molecules and pathways that regulate basophil development, activation and function in the context of allergic inflammation. Further, we highlight the unique effector functions of basophils and discuss their contributions to the development and pathogenesis of allergic inflammation in human disease. Finally, we discuss the therapeutic potential of targeting basophils in preventing or alleviating the development and progression of allergic inflammation. PMID:24075190

  20. Ghrelin administration suppresses inflammation-associated colorectal carcinogenesis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Makiko; Kanemaru, Ai; Fukushima, Tsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Koji; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Haruyama, Yukihiro; Itoh, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Nobuhiro; Kangawa, Kenji; Nakazato, Masamitsu; Kataoka, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin is a 28-amino-acid peptide that stimulates the release of pituitary growth hormone. Because of its orexigenic effects, ghrelin is being developed as a therapeutic option for postoperative support and treatment of anorexia-cachexia syndrome of cancer patients. However, ghrelin has a multiplicity of physiological functions, and it also affects cell proliferation. Therefore, the effects of ghrelin administration on carcinogenesis and cancer progression in patients susceptible to cancer should be clarified. In this study, we examined the effects of ghrelin on cancer promotion in vivo using murine intestinal carcinogenesis models. Intestinal tumorigenesis was examined to determine the effects of either exogenous ghrelin administration or ghrelin deficiency following deletion of the Ghrl gene. Two murine intestinal tumorigenesis models were used. The first was the azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced inflammation-associated colon carcinogenesis model and the second was the ApcMin/+ genetic cancer susceptibility model. In AOM/DSS-treated mice, administration of ghrelin significantly suppressed tumor formation in the colon. In contrast, ghrelin administration did not affect the number of intestinal tumors formed in ApcMin/+ mice. The absence of endogenous ghrelin did not affect the incidence of intestinal tumors in either AOM/DSS-treated mice or ApcMin/+ mice, though tumor size tended to be larger in Ghrl−/− colons in the AOM/DSS model. No tumor-promoting effect was observed by ghrelin administration in either tumorigenesis model. In summary, this study provides in vivo experimental evidence for the usefulness of ghrelin administration in the chemoprevention of inflammation-associated colorectal carcinogenesis and may suggest its safety in patients under colitis-associated cancer susceptibility conditions. PMID:26094822

  1. Impact of bioresorbable versus permanent polymer on longterm vessel wall inflammation and healing: a comparative drug-eluting stent experimental study.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Gregory J; McGregor, Jennifer; Conditt, Gerard; Shibuya, Masahiko; Sushkova, Natalia; Eppihimer, Michael J; Hawley, Steven P; Rouselle, Serge D; Huibregtse, Barbara A; Dawkins, Keith D; Granada, Juan F

    2018-02-20

    Drug-eluting stents (DES) have evolved to using bioresorbable polymers as a method of drug delivery. The impact of bioresorbable polymer on long-term neointimal formation, inflammation, and healing has not been fully characterised. This study aimed to evaluate the biological effect of polymer resorption on vascular healing and inflammation. A comparative DES study was performed in the familial hypercholesterolaemic swine model of coronary stenosis. Permanent polymer DES (zotarolimus-eluting [ZES] or everolimus-eluting [EES]) were compared to bioresorbable polymer everolimus-eluting stents (BP-EES) and BMS. Post implantation in 29 swine, stents were explanted and analysed up to 180 days. Area stenosis was reduced in all DES compared to BMS at 30 days. At 180 days, BP-EES had significantly lower area stenosis than EES or ZES. Severe inflammatory activity persisted in permanent polymer DES at 180 days compared to BP-EES or BMS. Qualitative para-strut inflammation areas (graded as none to severe) were elevated but similar in all groups at 30 days, peaked at 90 days in DES compared to BMS (p<0.05) and, at 180 days, were similar between BMS and BP-EES but were significantly greater in DES. BP-EES resulted in a lower net long-term reduction in neointimal formation and inflammation compared to permanent polymer DES in an animal model. Further study of the long-term neointima formation deserves study in human clinical trials.

  2. Interleukin-17B Antagonizes Interleukin-25-Mediated Mucosal Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Joseph M; Lee, Young-Hee; Shi, Yun; Wang, Xiaohu; Angkasekwinai, Pornpimon; Nallaparaju, Kalyan C; Flaherty, Stephanie; Chang, Seon Hee; Watarai, Hiroshi; Dong, Chen

    2015-04-21

    The interleukin-17 (IL-17) family of cytokines has emerged as a critical player in inflammatory diseases. Among them, IL-25 has been shown to be important in allergic inflammation and protection against parasitic infection. Here we have demonstrated that IL-17B, a poorly understood cytokine, functions to inhibit IL-25-driven inflammation. IL-17B and IL-25, both binding to the interleukin-17 receptor B (IL-17RB), were upregulated in their expression after acute colonic inflammation. Individual inhibition of these cytokines revealed opposing functions in colon inflammation: IL-25 was pathogenic but IL-17B was protective. Similarly opposing phenotypes were observed in Citrobacter rodentium infection and allergic asthma. Moreover, IL-25 was found to promote IL-6 production from colon epithelial cells, which was inhibited by IL-17B. Therefore, our data demonstrate that IL-17B is an anti-inflammatory cytokine in the IL-17 family. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterization of Growth Hormone Resistance in Experimental and Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Soendergaard, Christoffer; Kvist, Peter Helding; Thygesen, Peter; Reslow, Mats; Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Kopchick, John Joseph; Holm, Thomas Lindebo

    2017-09-23

    Growth hormone (GH) resistance may develop as a consequence of inflammation during conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, encompassing ulcerative colitis (UC). However, the specific role of the GH-insulin growth factor (IGF)-1-axis and/or the functional consequences of GH resistance in this condition are unclear. In situ hybridization targeting the GH receptor (GHR) and relevant transcriptional analyses were performed in patients with UC and in IL-10 knock-out mice with piroxicam accelerated colitis (PAC). Using cultured primary epithelial cells, the effects of inflammation on the molecular mechanisms governing GH resistance was verified. Also, the therapeutic potential of GH on mucosal healing was tested in the PAC model. Inflammation induced intestinal GH resistance in UC and experimental colitis by down-regulating GHR expression and up-regulating suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS) proteins. These effects are driven by pro-inflammatory mediators (tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6) as confirmed using primary epithelial cells. Treatment of experimental colitis with GH increased IGF-1 and body weight of the mice, but had no effects on colonic inflammation or mucosal healing. The high transcriptional similarity between UC and experimental colitis accentuates the formation of intestinal GH resistance during inflammation. Inflammation-induced GH resistance not only impairs general growth but induces a state of local resistance, which potentially impairs the actions of GH on mucosal healing during colitis when using long-acting GH therapy.

  4. Characterization of Growth Hormone Resistance in Experimental and Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Kvist, Peter Helding; Thygesen, Peter; Reslow, Mats; Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Kopchick, John Joseph; Holm, Thomas Lindebo

    2017-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) resistance may develop as a consequence of inflammation during conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, encompassing ulcerative colitis (UC). However, the specific role of the GH–insulin growth factor (IGF)-1-axis and/or the functional consequences of GH resistance in this condition are unclear. In situ hybridization targeting the GH receptor (GHR) and relevant transcriptional analyses were performed in patients with UC and in IL-10 knock-out mice with piroxicam accelerated colitis (PAC). Using cultured primary epithelial cells, the effects of inflammation on the molecular mechanisms governing GH resistance was verified. Also, the therapeutic potential of GH on mucosal healing was tested in the PAC model. Inflammation induced intestinal GH resistance in UC and experimental colitis by down-regulating GHR expression and up-regulating suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS) proteins. These effects are driven by pro-inflammatory mediators (tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6) as confirmed using primary epithelial cells. Treatment of experimental colitis with GH increased IGF-1 and body weight of the mice, but had no effects on colonic inflammation or mucosal healing. The high transcriptional similarity between UC and experimental colitis accentuates the formation of intestinal GH resistance during inflammation. Inflammation-induced GH resistance not only impairs general growth but induces a state of local resistance, which potentially impairs the actions of GH on mucosal healing during colitis when using long-acting GH therapy. PMID:28946616

  5. Effect of Various Inoculum Levels of Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serovar Heidelberg (2011 Ground Turkey Outbreak Isolate) on Cecal Colonization, Dissemination to Internal Organs, and Deposition in Skeletal Muscles of Commercial Turkeys after Experimental Oral Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Divek V. T.; Vazhakkattu Thomas, Jijo; Noll, Sally; Porter, Robert; Kollanoor Johny, Anup

    2018-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg (S. Heidelberg) is a major foodborne pathogen colonizing poultry. The pathogen is associated with a significant number of foodborne outbreaks through contaminated poultry meat, including turkeys. Recently, multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains of S. Heidelberg have emerged as a threat to human public health in the United States. The objective of this study was to determine the cecal colonization, dissemination to internal organs, and the potential for skeletal muscle deposition of an MDR S. Heidelberg isolate from the 2011 ground turkey outbreak in the United States after the experimental oral challenge of poults (young turkeys) and adult turkey hens. In the poult study, two separate experiments using day-old, straight-run, commercial hybrid converter poults were randomly assigned to five challenge groups (0, 10∧2, 10∧4, 10∧6, 10∧8 CFU groups; 12 poults/group; N = 60/experiment) and a week after, treatment groups were challenged separately with 0-, 2-, 4-, 6-, and 8- log10 CFU of S. Heidelberg orally. After 14 days post-challenge, the poults were euthanized, and samples were collected to determine MDR S. Heidelberg colonization in the cecum, dissemination to liver and spleen, and deposition in the thigh, drumstick, and breast muscles. A similar experimental design was followed for the adult turkey hens. In two separate experiments, 11-week-old commercial Hybrid Converter turkey hens (4 hens/group; N = 20/experiment) were challenged with MDR S. Heidelberg and on day 16 post-challenge, birds were euthanized and samples were collected to determine Salmonella populations in the samples. The results indicated that, in turkey poults, the recovery of MDR S. Heidelberg was highest in the cecum followed by spleen, liver, thigh, drumstick, and breast. All tested inoculum levels resulted in more than 3.5 log10 CFU/g colonization in the poult cecum. The cecal colonization, dissemination to internal organs, and tissue deposition of MDR

  6. Effect of Various Inoculum Levels of Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serovar Heidelberg (2011 Ground Turkey Outbreak Isolate) on Cecal Colonization, Dissemination to Internal Organs, and Deposition in Skeletal Muscles of Commercial Turkeys after Experimental Oral Challenge.

    PubMed

    Nair, Divek V T; Vazhakkattu Thomas, Jijo; Noll, Sally; Porter, Robert; Kollanoor Johny, Anup

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg ( S . Heidelberg) is a major foodborne pathogen colonizing poultry. The pathogen is associated with a significant number of foodborne outbreaks through contaminated poultry meat, including turkeys. Recently, multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains of S . Heidelberg have emerged as a threat to human public health in the United States. The objective of this study was to determine the cecal colonization, dissemination to internal organs, and the potential for skeletal muscle deposition of an MDR S. Heidelberg isolate from the 2011 ground turkey outbreak in the United States after the experimental oral challenge of poults (young turkeys) and adult turkey hens. In the poult study, two separate experiments using day-old, straight-run, commercial hybrid converter poults were randomly assigned to five challenge groups (0, 10 ∧ 2, 10 ∧ 4, 10 ∧ 6, 10 ∧ 8 CFU groups; 12 poults/group; N = 60/experiment) and a week after, treatment groups were challenged separately with 0-, 2-, 4-, 6-, and 8- log 10 CFU of S. Heidelberg orally. After 14 days post-challenge, the poults were euthanized, and samples were collected to determine MDR S. Heidelberg colonization in the cecum, dissemination to liver and spleen, and deposition in the thigh, drumstick, and breast muscles. A similar experimental design was followed for the adult turkey hens. In two separate experiments, 11-week-old commercial Hybrid Converter turkey hens (4 hens/group; N = 20/experiment) were challenged with MDR S . Heidelberg and on day 16 post-challenge, birds were euthanized and samples were collected to determine Salmonella populations in the samples. The results indicated that, in turkey poults, the recovery of MDR S. Heidelberg was highest in the cecum followed by spleen, liver, thigh, drumstick, and breast. All tested inoculum levels resulted in more than 3.5 log 10 CFU/g colonization in the poult cecum. The cecal colonization, dissemination to internal organs, and tissue

  7. Gut Microbiota and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hakansson, Asa; Molin, Goran

    2011-01-01

    Systemic and local inflammation in relation to the resident microbiota of the human gastro-intestinal (GI) tract and administration of probiotics are the main themes of the present review. The dominating taxa of the human GI tract and their potential for aggravating or suppressing inflammation are described. The review focuses on human trials with probiotics and does not include in vitro studies and animal experimental models. The applications of probiotics considered are systemic immune-modulation, the metabolic syndrome, liver injury, inflammatory bowel disease, colorectal cancer and radiation-induced enteritis. When the major genomic differences between different types of probiotics are taken into account, it is to be expected that the human body can respond differently to the different species and strains of probiotics. This fact is often neglected in discussions of the outcome of clinical trials with probiotics. PMID:22254115

  8. Clostridium difficile suppresses colonic vasoactive intestinal peptide associated with altered motility

    PubMed Central

    Nassif, A.; Sexe, R.; Stratton, M.; Standeven, J.; Vernava, A. M.; Kaminski, D. L.

    1995-01-01

    We investigated whether Clostridium difficile toxin alters colonic tissue levels of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) at the expense of changes in colonic motility in the isolated perfused rabbit left colon. Colonic inflammation was induced by the intracolonic administration of 10−8 M C. difflcile toxin. Strain gauge transducers were sewn onto the serosal surface of the colon to evaluate colonic motility. C. difflcile administration produced histologic changes consistent with epithelial damage. This was associated with an increased production of prostaglandin E2 and thromboxane B2. Tissue levels of VIP but not substance P were significantly reduced. This was associated with an increased number of contractions per minute and an average force of each colonic contraction. These results suggest that tissue levels of VIP are suppressed by C. difflcile and may participate in colonic dysmotility during active inflammation. PMID:18475679

  9. Clostridium difficile suppresses colonic vasoactive intestinal peptide associated with altered motility.

    PubMed

    Nassif, A; Longo, W E; Sexe, R; Stratton, M; Standeven, J; Vernava, A M; Kaminski, D L

    1995-01-01

    We investigated whether Clostridium difficile toxin alters colonic tissue levels of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) at the expense of changes in colonic motility in the isolated perfused rabbit left colon. Colonic inflammation was induced by the intracolonic administration of 10(-8) M C. difflcile toxin. Strain gauge transducers were sewn onto the serosal surface of the colon to evaluate colonic motility. C. difflcile administration produced histologic changes consistent with epithelial damage. This was associated with an increased production of prostaglandin E(2) and thromboxane B(2). Tissue levels of VIP but not substance P were significantly reduced. This was associated with an increased number of contractions per minute and an average force of each colonic contraction. These results suggest that tissue levels of VIP are suppressed by C. difflcile and may participate in colonic dysmotility during active inflammation.

  10. Purinergic receptor X7 is a key modulator of metabolic oxidative stress-mediated autophagy and inflammation in experimental nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Das, Suvarthi; Seth, Ratanesh Kumar; Kumar, Ashutosh; Kadiiska, Maria B.; Michelotti, Gregory; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that metabolic oxidative stress, autophagy, and inflammation are hallmarks of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) progression. However, the molecular mechanisms that link these important events in NASH remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the mechanistic role of purinergic receptor X7 (P2X7) in modulating autophagy and resultant inflammation in NASH in response to metabolic oxidative stress. The study uses two rodent models of NASH. In one of them, a CYP2E1 substrate bromodichloromethane is used to induce metabolic oxidative stress and NASH. Methyl choline-deficient diet feeding is used for the other NASH model. CYP2E1 and P2X7 receptor gene-deleted mice are used to establish their roles in regulating metabolic oxidative stress and autophagy. Autophagy gene expression, protein levels, confocal microscopy based-immunolocalization of lysosome-associated membrane protein (LAMP)2A and histopathological analysis were performed. CYP2E1-dependent metabolic oxidative stress induced increases in P2X7 receptor expression and chaperone-mediated autophagy markers LAMP2A and heat shock cognate 70 but caused depletion of light chain 3 isoform B (LC3B) protein levels. P2X7 receptor gene deletion significantly decreased LAMP2A and inflammatory indicators while significantly increasing LC3B protein levels compared with wild-type mice treated with bromodichloromethane. P2X7 receptor-deleted mice were also protected from NASH pathology as evidenced by decreased inflammation and fibrosis. Our studies establish that P2X7 receptor is a key regulator of autophagy induced by metabolic oxidative stress in NASH, thereby modulating hepatic inflammation. Furthermore, our findings presented here form a basis for P2X7 receptor as a potential therapeutic target in the treatment for NASH. PMID:24157968

  11. A Nonerythropoietic Peptide that Mimics the 3D Structure of Erythropoietin Reduces Organ Injury/Dysfunction and Inflammation in Experimental Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nimesh SA; Nandra, Kiran K; Brines, Michael; Collino, Massimo; Wong, WS Fred; Kapoor, Amar; Benetti, Elisa; Goh, Fera Y; Fantozzi, Roberto; Cerami, Anthony; Thiemermann, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that erythropoietin, critical for the differentiation and survival of erythrocytes, has cytoprotective effects in a wide variety of tissues, including the kidney and lung. However, erythropoietin has been shown to have a serious side effect—an increase in thrombovascular effects. We investigated whether pyroglutamate helix B-surface peptide (pHBSP), a nonerythropoietic tissue-protective peptide mimicking the 3D structure of erythropoietin, protects against the organ injury/ dysfunction and inflammation in rats subjected to severe hemorrhagic shock (HS). Mean arterial blood pressure was reduced to 35 ± 5 mmHg for 90 min followed by resuscitation with 20 mL/kg Ringer Lactate for 10 min and 50% of the shed blood for 50 min. Rats were euthanized 4 h after the onset of resuscitation. pHBSP was administered 30 min or 60 min into resuscitation. HS resulted in significant organ injury/dysfunction (renal, hepatic, pancreas, neuromuscular, lung) and inflammation (lung). In rats subjected to HS, pHBSP significantly attenuated (i) organ injury/dysfunction (renal, hepatic, pancreas, neuromuscular, lung) and inflammation (lung), (ii) increased the phosphorylation of Akt, glycogen synthase kinase-3β and endothelial nitric oxide synthase, (iii) attenuated the activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB and (iv) attenuated the increase in p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 phosphorylation. pHBSP protects against multiple organ injury/dysfunction and inflammation caused by severe hemorrhagic shock by a mechanism that may involve activation of Akt and endothelial nitric oxide synthase, and inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3β and NF-κB. PMID:21607291

  12. Colon cancer-associated B2 Escherichia coli colonize gut mucosa and promote cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Raisch, Jennifer; Buc, Emmanuel; Bonnet, Mathilde; Sauvanet, Pierre; Vazeille, Emilie; de Vallée, Amélie; Déchelotte, Pierre; Darcha, Claude; Pezet, Denis; Bonnet, Richard; Bringer, Marie-Agnès; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To provide further insight into the characterization of mucosa-associated Escherichia coli (E. coli) isolated from the colonic mucosa of cancer patients. METHODS: Phylogroups and the presence of cyclomodulin-encoding genes of mucosa-associated E. coli from colon cancer and diverticulosis specimens were determined by PCR. Adhesion and invasion experiments were performed with I-407 intestinal epithelial cells using gentamicin protection assay. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6 (CEACAM6) expression in T84 intestinal epithelial cells was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and by Western Blot. Gut colonization, inflammation and pro-carcinogenic potential were assessed in a chronic infection model using CEABAC10 transgenic mice. Cell proliferation was analyzed by real-time mRNA quantification of PCNA and immunohistochemistry staining of Ki67. RESULTS: Analysis of mucosa-associated E. coli from colon cancer and diverticulosis specimens showed that whatever the origin of the E. coli strains, 86% of cyclomodulin-positive E. coli belonged to B2 phylogroup and most harbored polyketide synthase (pks) island, which encodes colibactin, and/or cytotoxic necrotizing factor (cnf) genes. In vitro assays using I-407 intestinal epithelial cells revealed that mucosa-associated B2 E. coli strains were poorly adherent and invasive. However, mucosa-associated B2 E. coli similarly to Crohn’s disease-associated E. coli are able to induce CEACAM6 expression in T84 intestinal epithelial cells. In addition, in vivo experiments using a chronic infection model of CEACAM6 expressing mice showed that B2 E. coli strain 11G5 isolated from colon cancer is able to highly persist in the gut, and to induce colon inflammation, epithelial damages and cell proliferation. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, these data bring new insights into the ability of E. coli isolated from patients with colon cancer to establish persistent colonization, exacerbate inflammation and

  13. Bradykinin regulates human colonic ion transport in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Baird, A W; Skelly, M M; O'Donoghue, D P; Barrett, K E; Keely, S J

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Kinins are acknowledged as important regulators of intestinal function during inflammation; however, their effects on human intestinal ion transport have not been reported. Here, we used muscle-stripped human colonic tissue and cultured T84-cell monolayers to study bradykinin (BK) actions on human intestinal ion transport. Experimental approach: Ion transport was measured as changes in short-circuit current (Isc) across colonic epithelia mounted in Ussing chambers. Key results: In intact tissue, there was a distinct polarity to BK-elicited Isc responses. Whereas basolateral BK stimulated sustained responses (EC50=0.5±0.1 μM), those to apical BK were more rapid and transient (EC50=4.1±1.2 nM). In T84 cells, responses to both apical and basolateral BK were similar to those seen upon apical addition to intact tissues. Cross-desensitization between apical and basolateral domains was not observed. BK-induced responses were largely due to Cl− secretion as shown by their sensitivity to bumetanide and removal of Cl− from the bathing solution. Studies using selective agonists and antagonists indicate responses to BK are mediated by B2 receptors. Finally, responses to basolateral BK in intact tissues were inhibited by tetrodotoxin (1 μM), atropine (1 μM), capsaicin (100 μM) and piroxicam (10 μM). BK-stimulated prostaglandin (PG)E2 release from colonic tissue. Conclusions: BK stimulates human colonic Cl− secretion by activation of apical and basolateral B2 receptors. Responses to apical BK reflect a direct action on epithelial cells, whereas those to basolateral BK are amplified by stimulation of enteric nerves and PG synthesis. PMID:18604228

  14. KLF6 contributes to myeloid cell plasticity in the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Wendy A.; Omenetti, Sara; Date, Dipali; Di Martino, Luca; De Salvo, Carlo; Kim, Gun-Dong; Chowdhry, Saleem; Bamias, Giorgos; Cominelli, Fabio; Pizarro, Theresa T.; Mahabeleshwar, Ganapati H.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is associated with dysregulated macrophage responses, such that quiescent macrophages acquire a pro-inflammatory activation state and contribute to chronic intestinal inflammation. The transcriptional events governing macrophage activation and gene expression in the context of chronic inflammation such as IBD remain incompletely understood. Here, we identify Kruppel-like transcription factor-6 (KLF6) as a critical regulator of pathogenic myeloid cell activation in human and experimental IBD. We found that KLF6 was significantly upregulated in myeloid cells and intestinal tissue from IBD patients and experimental models of IBD, particularly in actively inflamed regions of the colon. Using complementary gain- and loss-of-function studies, we observed that KLF6 promotes pro-inflammatory gene expression through enhancement of NFκB signaling, while simultaneously suppressing anti-inflammatory gene expression through repression of STAT3 signaling. To study the in vivo role of myeloid KLF6, we treated myeloid-specific KLF6-knockout mice (Mac-KLF6-KO) with dextran sulfate-sodium (DSS) and found that Mac-KLF6-KO mice were protected against chemically-induced colitis; this highlights the central role of myeloid KLF6 in promoting intestinal inflammation. Collectively, our results point to a novel gene regulatory program underlying pathogenic, pro-inflammatory macrophage activation in the setting of chronic intestinal inflammation. PMID:26838049

  15. Polyphenol-rich extract of Ocimum gratissimum leaves ameliorates colitis via attenuating colonic mucosa injury and regulating pro-inflammatory cytokines production and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Alabi, Quadri K; Akomolafe, Rufus O; Omole, Joseph G; Adefisayo, Modinat A; Ogundipe, Olaofe L; Aturamu, Ayodeji; Sanya, Joseph O

    2018-04-20

    Colitis is a chronic inflammation and ulcer on the inner lining of the large intestine. For many centuries Ocimum gratissimum (OG) leaves have been used in folk medicine in Nigeria to treat inflammatory bowel diseases, however, to date, the anti-colitis effects of OG have not been scientifically proven. In this study we investigated the effects of polyphenol rich extract of Ocimum gratissimum (PREOG) leaf on colonic mucosa injury in colitis, its mechanisms, initial administration time and dosage. Dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced rat colitis models was used. PREOG administration was initiated at 3 and 7 d after the model was established at doses of 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg for 7 d. 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) was used as a reference drug. The disease activity index (DAI), vascular permeability, markers of oxidative stress, granulocyte infiltration, inflammation and histopathological alteration were evaluated. Obvious colonic inflammation and mucosa injuries were observed in DSS-induced colitis groups. PREOG administration promoted repair of colonic mucosa injuries, attenuated inflammation, and decreased DAI scores in rats with colitis. PREOG also decreased the plasma concentrations of Interleukin-(IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and concentrations of myeloperoxidase, nitric oxide, cyclooxygenase-2 and malondialdehyde in the colon, and increased the plasma concentrations of IL-4 and IL-10 as well as the concentration of superoxide dismutase, catalase and reduced glutathione in the colon. The efficacy of PREOG was dosage dependent. In conclusion, OG repairs colonic mucosa injury in experimental colitis through its ant-inflammatory and ant-oxidant. Its efficacy related to initial administration time and dose. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Prevention of Colorectal Cancer by Targeting Obesity-Related Disorders and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Shirakami, Yohei; Ohnishi, Masaya; Sakai, Hiroyasu; Tanaka, Takuji; Shimizu, Masahito

    2017-04-26

    Colorectal cancer is a major healthcare concern worldwide. Many experimental and clinical studies have been conducted to date to discover agents that help in the prevention of this disease. Chronic inflammation in colonic mucosa and obesity, and its related metabolic abnormalities, are considered to increase the risk of colorectal cancer. Therefore, treatments targeting these factors might be a promising strategy to prevent the development of colorectal cancer. Among a number of functional foods, various phytochemicals, including tea catechins, which have anti-inflammatory and anti-obesity properties, and medicinal agents that ameliorate metabolic disorders, might also be beneficial in the prevention of colorectal cancer. In this review article, we summarize the strategies for preventing colorectal cancer by targeting obesity-related disorders and inflammation through nutraceutical and pharmaceutical approaches, and discuss the mechanisms of several phytochemicals and medicinal drugs used in basic and clinical research, especially focusing on the effects of green tea catechins.

  17. Prevention of Colorectal Cancer by Targeting Obesity-Related Disorders and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Shirakami, Yohei; Ohnishi, Masaya; Sakai, Hiroyasu; Tanaka, Takuji; Shimizu, Masahito

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a major healthcare concern worldwide. Many experimental and clinical studies have been conducted to date to discover agents that help in the prevention of this disease. Chronic inflammation in colonic mucosa and obesity, and its related metabolic abnormalities, are considered to increase the risk of colorectal cancer. Therefore, treatments targeting these factors might be a promising strategy to prevent the development of colorectal cancer. Among a number of functional foods, various phytochemicals, including tea catechins, which have anti-inflammatory and anti-obesity properties, and medicinal agents that ameliorate metabolic disorders, might also be beneficial in the prevention of colorectal cancer. In this review article, we summarize the strategies for preventing colorectal cancer by targeting obesity-related disorders and inflammation through nutraceutical and pharmaceutical approaches, and discuss the mechanisms of several phytochemicals and medicinal drugs used in basic and clinical research, especially focusing on the effects of green tea catechins. PMID:28445390

  18. Heme Oxygenase-1 Gene Therapy Provides Cardioprotection Via Control of Post-Ischemic Inflammation: An Experimental Study in a Pre-Clinical Pig Model.

    PubMed

    Hinkel, Rabea; Lange, Philipp; Petersen, Björn; Gottlieb, Elena; Ng, Judy King Man; Finger, Stefanie; Horstkotte, Jan; Lee, Seungmin; Thormann, Michael; Knorr, Maike; El-Aouni, Chiraz; Boekstegers, Peter; Reichart, Bruno; Wenzel, Philip; Niemann, Heiner; Kupatt, Christian

    2015-07-14

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an inducible stress-responsive enzyme converting heme to bilirubin, carbon monoxide, and free iron, which exerts anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic effects. Although efficient cardioprotection after HO-1 overexpression has been reported in rodents, its role in attenuating post-ischemic inflammation is unclear. This study assessed the efficacy of recombinant adenoassociated virus (rAAV)-encoding human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) in attenuating post-ischemic inflammation in a murine and a porcine ischemia/reperfusion model. Murine ischemia was induced by 45 min of left anterior descending occlusion, followed by 24 h of reperfusion and functional as well as fluorescent-activated cell sorting analysis. Porcine hearts were subjected to 60 min of ischemia and 24h of reperfusion before hemodynamic and histologic analyses were performed. Human microvascular endothelial cells transfected with hHO-1 displayed an attenuated interleukin-6 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 expression, resulting in reduced monocytic THP-1 cell recruitment in vitro. In murine left anterior descending occlusion and reperfusion, the post-ischemic influx of CD45(+) leukocytes, Ly-6G(+) neutrophils, and Ly-6C(high) monocytes was further exacerbated in HO-1-deficient hearts and reversed by rAAV.hHO-1 treatment. Conversely, in our porcine model of ischemia, the post-ischemic influx of myeloperoxidase-positive neutrophils and CD14(+) monocytes was reduced by 49% and 87% after rAAV.hHO-1 transduction, similar to hHO-1 transgenic pigs. Functionally, rAAV.hHO-1 and hHO-1 transgenic left ventricles displayed a smaller loss of ejection fraction than control animals. Whereas HO-1 deficiency exacerbates post-ischemic cardiac inflammation in mice, hHO-1 gene therapy attenuates inflammation after ischemia and reperfusion in murine and porcine hearts. Regional hHO-1 gene therapy provides cardioprotection in a pre-clinical porcine ischemia/reperfusion model. Copyright © 2015 American

  19. Anemia of Inflammation: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Fraenkel, Paula G.

    2016-01-01

    Impaired iron homeostasis and the suppressive effects of proinflammatory cytokines on erythropoiesis, together with alterations of the erythrocyte membrane that impair its survival, cause the anemia of inflammation. Recent epidemiologic studies have connected inflammatory anemia with critical illness, obesity, aging, and kidney failure, as well as with cancer, chronic infection, and autoimmune disease. The proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin-6, the iron regulatory hormone, hepcidin, and the iron exporter, ferroportin, interact to cause iron sequestration in the setting of inflammation. While severe anemia is associated with adverse outcomes in critical illness, experimental models suggest that iron sequestration is part of a natural defense against pathogens. In animal models and human patients, experimental therapeutic approaches targeting interleukin-6 or the ferroportin-hepcidin axis have shown efficacy in reversing anemia, although these agents have not yet been approved for the treatment of the anemia of inflammation. PMID:28189171

  20. Importance of neural mechanisms in colonic mucosal and muscular dysfunction in adult rats following neonatal colonic irritation.

    PubMed

    Chaloner, A; Rao, A; Al-Chaer, E D; Greenwood-Van Meerveld, B

    2010-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that early life trauma induced by maternal separation or colonic irritation leads to hypersensitivity to colorectal distension in adulthood. We tested the hypothesis that repetitive colorectal distension in neonates leads to abnormalities in colonic permeability and smooth muscle function in the adult rat. In neonatal rats, repetitive colorectal distension was performed on days 8, 10, and 12. As adults, stool consistency was graded from 0 (formed stool) to 3 (liquid stool). Colonic tissue was isolated for histology and myeloperoxidase levels. The colonic mucosa was placed in modified Ussing chambers for measurements of permeability and short-circuit current responses to forskolin, electrical field stimulation, and carbachol. Segments of colonic musculature were placed in organ baths and contractile response to potassium chloride, electrical field stimulation, and carbachol were determined. In adult rats that experienced neonatal colonic irritation, no significant changes in colonic histology or myeloperoxidase activity were observed; however, stool consistency scores were increased. Mucosal permeability, measured as an increase in basal conductance, was significantly increased but no changes in short-circuit current responses were observed. In adulthood, rats that underwent colorectal distension as neonates exhibited an elevated smooth muscle contractile response to potassium chloride, but no changes in response to electrical field stimulation or carbachol. In summary, neonatal colonic irritation, shown previously to produce colonic hypersensitivity, leads to significant alterations in colonic mucosal and smooth muscle function characterized by loose stools, increased mucosal permeability, and increased smooth muscle contractility in the absence of colon inflammation in adulthood. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Curcumin reverses attenuated carbachol-induced contraction of the colon in a rat model of colitis.

    PubMed

    Lubbad, Asmaa S; Oriowo, Mabayoje A; Khan, Islam

    2009-01-01

    Curcumin ameliorates colitis whether it reverses colitis-induced reduction in colonic contractility remains to be investigated. To investigate the effect of curcumin on colitis-induced reduction of carbachol-induced contraction in colon segments from rats treated with trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid. Colitis was induced in rats by intra rectal administration of trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid and followed for 5 days. A group of animals which received trinitobenzene sulphonic acids was treated with curcumin (100 mg/Kg and 200 mg/kg body weight) 2 hrs prior to induction of colitis. The controls received phosphate buffered saline in a similar fashion. Markers of inflammation and contractility of colon were assayed using standard procedures. Induction of colitis was associated with increased myeloperoxidase activity and malondialdehyde levels, gross histological changes characterized by infiltration of inflammatory cells. All these changes were prevented by treatment with curcumin (100 mg/kg). Treatment with curcumin also reduced the histological scores from 3.34+/-0.40 to 1.75+/-0.30 confirming an anti-inflammatory effect of curcumin in this experimental model of colitis. Colonic reactivity to carbachol was decreased in colitis affecting the maximum response but not sensitivity. Treatment with curcumin had no effect on sensitivity of the colon to carbachol in any of the preparations. Curcumin however reversed the decrease in carbachol-induced contraction associated with trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid treatment. The same dose of curcumin had no effect on either the potency of or the maximum response to carbachol in control rats. Tissue expression of NF-kB was increased in colon segments from trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid -treated rats and this was inhibited in rats treated with curcumin. Based on these findings it is concluded that curcumin prevented the reduction in carbachol-induced contraction in trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid -treated rats by modulating NF-kB signaling

  2. Submucosal injection of normal saline may prevent tissue damage from argon plasma coagulation: an experimental study using resected porcine esophagus, stomach, and colon.

    PubMed

    Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Yahagi, Naohisa; Nakamura, Masanori; Kakushima, Naomi; Kodashima, Shinya; Ono, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Katsuya; Hashimoto, Takuhei; Yamamichi, Nobutake; Tateishi, Ayako; Shimizu, Yasuhito; Oka, Masashi; Ichinose, Masao; Omata, Masao

    2006-10-01

    Argon plasma coagulation (APC) is considered to be a safe thermocoagulation technique, but some reports show perforation and deformity during and after APC. In this study, we investigated the usefulness of prior submucosal injection for APC. APC over the mucosa was performed on fresh resected porcine esophagus, stomach, and colon with prior submucosal injection of normal saline (injection group) and without it (control group). The depth of tissue damage increased linearly with pulse duration up to the shallower submucosal layer in both groups. After that, tissue damage in the injection group remained confined to the shallower submucosal layer under any condition, whereas that in the control group continued to extend. The tissue damages of the injection groups were significantly (P<0.05) shallower than those of the control groups that reached the deeper submucosal layer in all the organs. Submucosal injection of normal saline before the application of APC may limit tissue damage and prevent perforation and deformity.

  3. Cold ischemia with selective anterograde in situ pulmonary perfusion preserves gas exchange and mitochondrial homeostasis and curbs inflammation in an experimental model of donation after cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Pottecher, Julien; Santelmo, Nicola; Noll, Eric; Charles, Anne-Laure; Benahmed, Malika; Canuet, Matthieu; Frossard, Nelly; Namer, Izzie J; Geny, Bernard; Massard, Gilbert; Diemunsch, Pierre

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the functional preservation of the lung graft with anterograde lung perfusion in a model of donation after cardiac death. Thirty minutes after cardiac arrest, in situ anterograde selective pulmonary cold perfusion was started in six swine. The alveolo-capillary membrane was challenged at 3, 6, and 8 h with measurements of the mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP), the pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR), the PaO2 /FiO2 ratio, the transpulmonary oxygen output (tpVO2 ), and the transpulmonary CO2 clearance (tpCO2 ). Mitochondrial homeostasis was investigated by measuring maximal oxidative capacity (Vmax ) and the coupling of phosphorylation to oxidation (ACR, acceptor control ratio) in lung biopsies. Inflammation and induction of primary immune response were assessed by measurement of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), interleukine-6 (IL-6) and receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Data were compared using repeated measures Anova. Pulmonary hemodynamics (mPAP: P = 0.69; PVR: P = 0.46), oxygenation (PaO2 /FiO2 : P = 0.56; tpVO2 : P = 0.46), CO2 diffusion (tpCO2 : P = 0.24), mitochondrial homeostasis (Vmax : P = 0.42; ACR: P = 0.8), and RAGE concentrations (P = 0.24) did not significantly change up to 8 h after cardiac arrest. TNFα and IL-6 were undetectable. Unaffected pulmonary hemodynamics, sustained oxygen and carbon dioxide diffusion, preserved mitochondrial homeostasis, and lack of inflammation suggest a long-lasting functional preservation of the graft with selective anterograde in situ pulmonary perfusion. © 2013 Steunstichting ESOT. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Porous Gelatin Particles for Uterine Artery Embolization: An Experimental Study of Intra-Arterial Distribution, Uterine Necrosis, and Inflammation in a Porcine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Sone, Miyuki, E-mail: msone@athena.ocn.ne.j; Osuga, Keigo; Shimazu, Kohki

    PurposeWe evaluated the location of porous gelatin particles (GP; Gelpart; Nippon Kayaku/Astellas, Tokyo, Japan) within the arterial vasculature and their acute effects on uterine necrosis and inflammation after uterine artery embolization (UAE) in swine.Materials and MethodsAdult nonpregnant pigs (n = 6) were allocated to either 1- (n = 3) or 2-mm GP (n = 3). Superselective and bilateral embolization of the uterine arteries was performed. All animals were killed 1 week after UAE. Macroscopic and microscopic findings, including the level of arterial occlusion and their effect on uterine necrosis and inflammation, were analyzed.ResultsAll UAE procedures were completed without severe complications.more » The macroscopic necrosis was seen in two animals in the 2-mm group with an extent of <50%. The location of the occluded arteries did not differ significantly between groups. The median diameters of the occluded arteries were 449 {mu}m (95% confidence interval [CI] 417-538 {mu}m) in the 1-mm GP group and 484 {mu}m (95% CI 370-560 {mu}m) in the 2-mm GP group. As for microscopic necrosis, no statistically significant difference was observed. The qualitative inflammatory reaction was significantly greater in the 2-mm GP group than in the 1-mm group (p < 0.001).ConclusionsBoth 1- and 2-mm GP occluded the arteries relevant to the target diameter for UAE in porcine uterus, presumably due to the plastic deformity. Both sizes of GP were associated with limited areas of necrosis; however, evaluation of inflammatory reaction was preliminary. Further study with adequate evaluation of inflammatory reactions is suggested.« less

  5. Treatment of experimental stroke with IL-10-producing B-cells reduces infarct size and peripheral and CNS inflammation in wild-type B-cell-sufficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Bodhankar, Sheetal; Chen, Yingxin; Vandenbark, Arthur A.; Murphy, Stephanie J.; Offner, Halina

    2014-01-01

    Clinical stroke induces inflammatory processes leading to cerebral and splenic injury and profound peripheral immunosuppression. IL-10 expression is elevated during major CNS diseases and limits inflammation in the brain. Recent evidence demonstrated that absence of B-cells led to larger infarct volumes and CNS damage after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) that could be prevented by transfer of IL-10+ B-cells. The purpose of this study was to determine if the beneficial immunoregulatory effects on MCAO of the IL-10+ B-cell subpopulation also extends to B-cell-sufficient mice that would better represent stroke subjects. CNS inflammation and infarct volumes were evaluated in male C57BL/6J (WT) mice that received either RPMI or IL-10+ B-cells and underwent 60 min of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) followed by 96 hours of reperfusion. Transfer of IL-10+ B-cells markedly reduced infarct volume in WT recipient mice when given 24 hours prior to or 4 hours after MCAO. B-cell protected MCAO mice had increased regulatory subpopulations in the periphery, reduced numbers of activated, inflammatory T-cells, decreased infiltration of T-cells and a less inflammatory milieu in the ischemic hemispheres of the IL-10+ B-cell-treated group. Moreover, transfer of IL-10+ B-cells 24 hours before MCAO led to a significant preservation of regulatory immune subsets in the IL-10+ B-cell protected group presumably indicating their role in immunomodulatory mechanisms, post-stroke. Our studies are the first to demonstrate a major immunoregulatory role for IL-10+ regulatory B-cells in preventing and treating MCAO in WT mice and also implicating their potential role in attenuating complications due to post-stroke immunosuppression. PMID:24374817

  6. Cyclosporine A normalizes mitochondrial coupling, reactive oxygen species production, and inflammation and partially restores skeletal muscle maximal oxidative capacity in experimental aortic cross-clamping.

    PubMed

    Pottecher, Julien; Guillot, Max; Belaidi, Elise; Charles, Anne-Laure; Lejay, Anne; Gharib, Abdallah; Diemunsch, Pierre; Geny, Bernard

    2013-04-01

    By binding to cyclophilin D, cyclosporine A (CsA) inhibits mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening and prevents mitochondrial dysfunction and ultimately cell death after ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury in cardiac muscle. This study tested whether CsA would decrease skeletal muscle oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunctions after aortic cross-clamping related IR. Forty-five Wistar rats were investigated. The sham group (n = 8) had aortic exposure but no ischemia, the IR group (n = 10) had aortic cross-clamping for 3 hours followed by 2 hours of reperfusion, and the IR+CsA group (n = 9) had two intraperitoneal injections of 10 mg of CsA at 90 and 150 minutes of ischemia before reperfusion. Mitochondrial coupling (acceptor control ratio) and mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes' activities were measured. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, cyclophilin D expression, and muscle inflammation were determined using dihydroethidium staining, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry, respectively. An additional 18 sham rats were investigated to determine CsA blood levels and the effects of CsA on mitochondrial respiration and calcium retention capacity, a marker of mPTP opening, both in myocardium and gastrocnemius with and without CsA. Compared with sham, IR decreased mitochondrial coupling (1.38 ± 0.06 vs 1.98 ± 0.20; P = .0092), increased ROS production (3992 ± 706 arbitrary units [AU] vs 1812 ± 322 AU; P = .033), was associated with macrophage infiltration, and decreased maximal oxidative capacity (V(max): 4.08 ± 0.38 μmol O(2)/min/g vs 5.98 ± 0.56 μmol O(2)/min/g; P = .015). Despite IR, CsA treatment totally restored mitochondrial coupling (1.93 ± 0.12; P = .023 vs IR), normalized ROS (1569 ± 348 AU; P = .0098 vs IR), and decreased inflammation. The V(max) was slightly enhanced (5.02 ± 0.39 μmol O(2)/min/g; P = .33 vs IR; P = .35 vs sham). Compared with myocardium, gastrocnemius muscle was characterized by a decreased

  7. [Induction of uridine 5'-diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase gene expression by sulforaphane and its mechanism: experimental study in human colon cancel cells].

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Li, Yan-Qing; Zhong, Ning; Chen, Jian; Xu, Xiao-Qun; Yuan, Meng-Biao

    2005-03-30

    To study the induction of expression of uridine 5'-diphosphate (UDP)-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A in colon cancer cells by sulforaphane (SFN) and its possible mechanism. Human colon cancer cells of the line Caco-2 were cultured and added with SFN of different terminal concentrations, all below the concentration of IC(50). RT-PCR was used to examine the expression of UGT1A mRNA induced by SFN. Western blotting was used to detect the expression of UGT1A protein. The glucuronidation rate of N-hydroxy-PhIP was measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The nuclear localization of transcription factor Nrf2 was observed by confocal laser microscopy. (1) Expression of UGT1A mRNA was observed in the Cac0-2 cells induced by SFN of the concentrations of 10 micromol/L approximately 35 micromol/L in a dose-independent manner (P < 0.05). Sulforaphane of the concentration of 25 micromol/L induced the UGT1A mRNA expression time-dependently. The levels of UGT1A1, UGT1A8, and UGT1A10 mRNA expression were significantly increased in the cells treated with 25 micromol/L sulforaphane compared to that in the controls (P = 0.006, P = 0.017, and P = 0.008 respectively). (2) The UGT1A protein band intensity increased significantly in the Coco-2 cells treated with sulforaphane of the concentrations 10 micromol/L approximately 30 micromol/L for 24 h in comparison with the control cells. (3) When the microsomes from the untreated Caco-2 cells were incubated with N-hydroxy-PhIP there was a minor HPLC peak at the expected retention time for N-hydroxy-PhIP-N2-glucuronide. This peak was dramatically increased in the sulforaphane-treated cells, suggesting higher activities of glucuronidation of N-hydroxy-PhIP. (4) Cytoplasmic labeling of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a transcription factor, with no nuclear staining was observed in the non-stimulated cells, whereas an intense nuclear labeling was observed in the sulforaphane-treated cells, indicating the induction of nuclear

  8. The infiltration of experimentally induced lung metastases of colon carcinoma CC531 by adoptively transferred interleukin-2-activated natural killer cells in Wag rats.

    PubMed

    Kuppen, P J; Basse, P H; Goldfarb, R H; Van De Velde, C J; Fleuren, G J; Eggermont, A M

    1994-02-15

    The number of IL-2-activated natural killer (A-NK) cells reaching the tumor site in vivo may be crucial for their anti-tumor effect following adoptive immunotherapy. We investigated in a syngeneic rat model the infiltration of established lung metastases by adoptively transferred A-NK cells. The Wag rat colon carcinoma CC531 was injected via a tail vein to induce pulmonary metastases. Syngeneic A-NK cells were labeled with the fluorescent dye rhodamine (TRITC) and next injected via a tail vein in rats bearing day-12 lung tumors. The number of A-NK cells in tumor and in normal tissue per rat was counted in sections after administration of A-NK cells. At all time points tested, a significant linear relationship between the cross-section area of the tumor and the number of infiltrating cells was observed, but small tumor areas became fully infiltrated earlier than larger areas. At 24 hr after injection, approximately 10% of the injected cells were found in the tumor tissue and the average A-NK-cell-to-tumor-cell ratio was estimated to be 1:3. A-NK cells were found in the liver too, although the number of cells per mm2 tissue was low compared with the pulmonary tumor tissue. Very low numbers of A-NK cells were found in kidney, adrenal gland, spleen, and blood. We conclude that, in this syngeneic rat model, adoptively transferred A-NK cells are able to find and specifically infiltrate pulmonary metastases in a time-dependent fashion.

  9. The AOM/DSS murine model for the study of colon carcinogenesis: From pathways to diagnosis and therapy studies

    PubMed Central

    Robertis, Mariangela De; Massi, Emanuela; Poeta, Maria Luana; Carotti, Simone; Morini, Sergio; Cecchetelli, Loredana; Signori, Emanuela; Fazio, Vito Michele

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major health problem in industrialized countries. Although inflammation-linked carcinogenesis is a well accepted concept and is often observed within the gastrointestinal tract, the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Inflammation can indeed provide initiating and promoting stimuli and mediators, generating a tumour-prone microenvironment. Many murine models of sporadic and inflammation-related colon carcinogenesis have been developed in the last decade, including chemically induced CRC models, genetically engineered mouse models, and xenoplants. Among the chemically induced CRC models, the combination of a single hit of azoxymethane (AOM) with 1 week exposure to the inflammatory agent dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) in rodents has proven to dramatically shorten the latency time for induction of CRC and to rapidly recapitulate the aberrant crypt foci–adenoma–carcinoma sequence that occurs in human CRC. Because of its high reproducibility and potency, as well as the simple and affordable mode of application, the AOM/DSS has become an outstanding model for studying colon carcinogenesis and a powerful platform for chemopreventive intervention studies. In this article we highlight the histopathological and molecular features and describe the principal genetic and epigenetic alterations and inflammatory pathways involved in carcinogenesis in AOM/DSS–treated mice; we also present a general overview of recent experimental applications and preclinical testing of novel therapeutics in the AOM/DSS model. PMID:21483655

  10. Management of Colonic Volvulus

    PubMed Central

    Gingold, Daniel; Murrell, Zuri

    2012-01-01

    Colonic volvulus is a common cause of large bowel obstruction worldwide. It can affect all parts of the colon, but most commonly occurs in the sigmoid and cecal areas. This disease has been described for centuries, and was studied by Hippocrates himself. Currently, colonic volvulus is the third most common cause of large bowel obstruction worldwide, and is responsible for ∼15% of large bowel obstructions in the United States. This article will discuss the history of colonic volvulus, and the predisposing factors that lead to this disease. Moreover, the epidemiology and diagnosis of each type of colonic volvulus, along with the various treatment options will be reviewed. PMID:24294126

  11. Goat whey ameliorates intestinal inflammation on acetic acid-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Daline Fernandes de Souza; Guerra, Gerlane Coelho Bernardo; Júnior, Raimundo Fernandes de Araújo; Antunes de Araújo, Aurigena; Antonino de Assis, Paloma Oliveira; Nunes de Medeiros, Ariosvaldo; Formiga de Sousa, Yasmim Regis; Pintado, Maria Manuela Estevez; Gálvez, Julio; Queiroga, Rita de Cássia Ramos do Egypto

    2016-12-01

    Complementary or alternative medicine is of great interest for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease, with the aim of ameliorating the side effects of the drugs commonly used or improving their efficacy. In this study, we evaluated the ability of goat whey to prevent intestinal inflammation in the experimental model of acetic acid-induced rats and compared it to sulfasalazine. Pretreatment with goat whey (1, 2, and 4g/kg) and sulfasalazine (250mg/kg) on colitic rats improved colonic inflammatory markers, including myeloperoxidase activity, leukotriene B 4 levels, as well as the production of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α. Furthermore, the administration of goat whey significantly reduced the colonic oxidative stress by reducing malondialdehyde levels and increased total glutathione content, a potent antioxidant peptide. The histological evaluation of the colonic specimens from colitic rats confirmed these beneficial effects, as goat whey preserved the colonic tissue, especially in those rats treated with the highest dose of goat whey or with sulfasalazine. The immunohistochemistry analysis of the colonic tissue evaluation also revealed a reduction in the expression of cyclooxygenase-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and matrix metalloproteinase-9, together with an increased expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling-1. These results suggest that goat whey exerted a preventive effect against the intestinal damage induced by acetic acid, showing a similar efficacy to that shown by sulfasalazine, therefore making it a potential treatment for human inflammatory bowel disease. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of combination of thalidomide and sulfasalazine in experimentally induced inflammatory bowel disease in rats.

    PubMed

    Prakash, O; Medhi, B; Saikia, U N; Pandhi, P

    2011-09-01

    Thalidomide provided significant protection against tri nitro benzene sulfonic acid induced colitis. Combination therapy also reduced colonic inflammation and all the biochemical parameters (myeloperoxidase assay, malondialdehyde assay and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, estimation) were significant as compared to control as well as thalidomide alone treated group. Combination therapy showed additive effect of thalidomide which restored lipid peroxidation as well as reduced myeloperoxidase and TNF-a towards the normal levels. Morphological and histological scores were significantly reduced in combination groups. In experimental model of colitis, oral administration of thalidomide (150 mg/kg) alone as well as its combination with sulfasalazine (360 mg/kg) significantly reduced the colonic inflammation. The results indicate the additive effect of thalidomide with sulfasalazine in rat colitis model which requires further confirmation in human studies.

  13. Cross-talk between hydrogen sulfide and carbon monoxide in the mechanism of experimental gastric ulcers healing, regulation of gastric blood flow and accompanying inflammation.

    PubMed

    Magierowski, Marcin; Magierowska, Katarzyna; Hubalewska-Mazgaj, Magdalena; Surmiak, Marcin; Sliwowski, Zbigniew; Wierdak, Mateusz; Kwiecien, Slawomir; Chmura, Anna; Brzozowski, Tomasz

    2018-03-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) and carbon monoxide (CO) exert gastroprotection against acute gastric lesions. We determined the cross-talk between H 2 S and CO in gastric ulcer healing process and regulation of gastric blood flow (GBF) at ulcer margin. Male Wistar rats with acetic acid-induced gastric ulcers were treated i.g. throughout 9 days with vehicle (control), NaHS (0.1-10 mg/kg) +/- zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP, 10 mg/kg), d,l-propargylglycine (PAG, 30 mg/kg), CO-releasing CORM-2 (2.5 mg/kg) +/- PAG. GBF was assessed by laser flowmetry, ulcer area was determined by planimetry/histology. Gastric mucosal H 2 S production was analysed spectrophotometrically. Protein and/or mRNA expression at ulcer margin for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)A, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr), cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE), cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS), 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3-MST), heme oxygenases (HOs), nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf-2), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), IL-1β, TNF-α and hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α were determined by real-time PCR or western blot. IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, IFN-γ, TNF-α, GM-CSF plasma concentration was assessed using Luminex platform. NaHS dose-dependently decreased ulcer area and increased GBF but ZnPP attenuated these effects. PAG decreased H 2 S production but failed to affect CORM-2-mediated ulcer healing and vasodilation. NaHS increased Nrf-2, EGFr, VEGFA and decreased pro-inflammatory markers expression and IL-1β, IL-2, IL-13, TNF-α, GM-CSF plasma concentration. CORM-2 decreased IL-1β and GM-CSF plasma levels. We conclude that NaHS accelerates gastric ulcer healing increasing microcirculation and Nrf-2, EGFr, VEGFA expression. H 2 S-mediated ulcer healing involves endogenous CO activity while CO does not require H 2 S. NaHS decreases systemic inflammation more effectively than CORM-2. Copyright © 2017

  14. Avenanthramides inhibit proliferation of human colon cancer cell lines in vitro

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    High intake of whole grain food is associated with reduced risk of colon cancer, but the mechanism underlying this protection has yet to be elucidated. Chronic inflammation and associated cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in the colon epithelium are causally related to epithelial carcinogenesis, p...

  15. Mortality risk factor analysis in colonic perforation: would retroperitoneal contamination increase mortality in colonic perforation?

    PubMed

    Yoo, Ri Na; Kye, Bong-Hyeon; Kim, Gun; Kim, Hyung Jin; Cho, Hyeon-Min

    2017-10-01

    Colonic perforation is a lethal condition presenting high morbidity and mortality in spite of urgent surgical treatment. This study investigated the surgical outcome of patients with colonic perforation associated with retroperitoneal contamination. Retrospective analysis was performed for 30 patients diagnosed with colonic perforation caused by either inflammation or ischemia who underwent urgent surgical treatment in our facility from January 2005 to December 2014. Patient characteristics were analyzed to find risk factors correlated with increased postoperative mortality. Using the Physiological and Operative Severity Score for the Enumeration of Mortality and Morbidity (POSSUM) audit system, the mortality and morbidity rates were estimated to verify the surgical outcomes. Patients with retroperitoneal contamination, defined by the presence of retroperitoneal air in the preoperative abdominopelvic CT, were compared to those without retroperitoneal contamination. Eight out of 30 patients (26.7%) with colonic perforation had died after urgent surgical treatment. Factors associated with mortality included age, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status classification, and the ischemic cause of colonic perforation. Three out of 6 patients (50%) who presented retroperitoneal contamination were deceased. Although the patients with retroperitoneal contamination did not show significant increase in the mortality rate, they showed significantly higher ASA physical status classification than those without retroperitoneal contamination. The mortality rate predicted from Portsmouth POSSUM was higher in the patients with retroperitoneal contamination. Patients presenting colonic perforation along with retroperitoneal contamination demonstrated severe comorbidity. However, retroperitoneal contamination was not found to be correlated with the mortality rate.

  16. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation attenuates microglial-induced inflammation by inhibiting the HMGB1/TLR4/NF-κB pathway following experimental traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiangrong; Wu, Shukai; Chen, Chunnuan; Xie, Baoyuan; Fang, Zhongning; Hu, Weipeng; Chen, Junyan; Fu, Huangde; He, Hefan

    2017-07-24

    Microglial activation and the subsequent inflammatory response in the central nervous system play important roles in secondary damage after traumatic brain injury (TBI). High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein, an important mediator in late inflammatory responses, interacts with transmembrane receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and toll-like receptors (TLRs) to activate downstream signaling pathways, such as the nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathway, leading to a cascade amplification of inflammatory responses, which are related to neuronal damage after TBI. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (ω-3 PUFA) is a commonly used clinical immunonutrient, which has antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects. However, the effects of ω-3 PUFA on HMGB1 expression and HMGB1-mediated activation of the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway are not clear. The Feeney DM TBI model was adopted to induce brain injury in rats. Modified neurological severity scores, brain water content, and Nissl staining were employed to determine the neuroprotective effects of ω-3 PUFA supplementation. Assessment of microglial activation in lesioned sites and protein markers for proinflammatory, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, interferon (IFN)-γ, and HMGB1 were used to evaluate neuroinflammatory responses and anti-inflammation effects of ω-3 PUFA supplementation. Immunofluorescent staining and western blot analysis were used to detect HMGB1 nuclear translocation, secretion, and HMGB1-mediated activation of the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway to evaluate the effects of ω-3 PUFA supplementation and gain further insight into the mechanisms underlying the development of the neuroinflammatory response after TBI. It was found that ω-3 PUFA supplementation inhibited TBI-induced microglial activation and expression of inflammatory factors (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IFN-γ), reduced brain edema, decreased neuronal apoptosis, and improved neurological

  17. Increased permeability to polyethylene glycol 4000 in rabbits with experimental colitis

    SciTech Connect

    Seidman, E.G.; Hanson, D.G.; Walker, W.A.

    1986-01-01

    Little information is available regarding colonic permeability to macromolecules in health or disease states. In vivo permeability of rabbit colon to (/sup 14/C)polyethylene glycol 4000 (/sup 14/C-PEG) was examined in the presence of immune complex-mediated experimental colitis and compared with that of partially treated (control) and normal rabbits. Permeability was assessed by urinary /sup 14/C-PEG excretion after intrarectal administration of 0.1 mM solution of /sup 14/C-PEG (1 ml/kg, 7.5 X 10(6) cpm/ml). Experimental colitis greatly increased colonic permeability (p less than 0.001 in two-way analysis of variance) compared with control and normal groups (2.06% +/- 0.19%, 0.14% +/- 0.04%, andmore » 0.01% +/- 0.004%, respectively, of rectally administered counts). Gel diffusion chromatography showed that absorbed /sup 14/C-PEG was excreted into urine unchanged, demonstrating its applicability as an inert, nonmetabolizable macromolecular probe. Urinary clearance after mesenteric vein administration of /sup 14/C-PEG was similar in normal animals and animals with colitis, implicating colonic absorption as the source of the group differences. Postmortem histology confirmed the acute colitis lesions in the experimental group. These findings support the hypothesis that nonspecific colonic inflammation is associated with significant alterations of mucosal permeability.« less

  18. Pirfenidone vs. sodium hyaluronate/carboxymethylcellulose as prevention of the formation of intra-abdominal adhesions after colonic surgery. A randomized study in an experimental model.

    PubMed

    Bello-Guerrero, Jorge Alberto; Cruz-Santiago, César Alberto; Luna-Martínez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Up to 93% of patients undergoing abdominal surgery will develop intra-abdominal adhesions with the subsequent morbidity that they represent. Various substances have been tested for the prevention of adhesions with controversial results; the aim of our study is to compare the capability of pirfenidone in adhesion prevention against sodium hyaluronate/carboxymethylcellulose. A randomized, prospective, longitudinal experimental study with Winstar rats. They were divided into 3 groups. The subjects underwent an exploratory laparotomy and they had a 4cm(2) cecal abrasion. The first group received saline on the cecal abrasion, and groups 2 and 3 received pirfenidone and sodium hyaluronate/carboxymethylcellulose respectively. All rats were sacrificed on the 21st day after surgery and the presence of adhesions was evaluated with the modified Granat scale. Simple frequency, central tendency and dispersion measures were recorded. For the statistical analysis we used Fisher's test. To evaluate adhesions we used the Granat's modified scale. The control group had a median adhesion formation of 3 (range 0-4). The pirfenidone group had 1.5 (range 0-3), and the sodium hyaluronate/carboxymethylcellulose group had 0 (range 0-1). There was a statistically significant difference to favor sodium hyaluronate/carboxymethylcellulose against saline and pirfenidone (P<0.009 and P<.022 respectively). The use of sodium hyaluronate/carboxymethylcellulose is effective for the prevention of intra-abdominal adhesions. More experimental studies are needed in search for the optimal adhesion prevention drug. Copyright © 2015 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Lactobacillus paracasei and Lactobacillus plantarum strains downregulate proinflammatory genes in an ex vivo system of cultured human colonic mucosa.

    PubMed

    Bäuerl, Christine; Llopis, Marta; Antolín, María; Monedero, Vicente; Mata, Manuel; Zúñiga, Manuel; Guarner, Francisco; Pérez Martínez, Gaspar

    2013-03-01

    Significant health benefits have been demonstrated for certain probiotic strains through intervention studies; however, there is a shortage of experimental evidence relative to the mechanisms of action. Here, noninvasive experimental procedure based on a colon organ culture system has been used that, in contrast to most experimental in vitro models reported, can preserve natural immunohistochemical features of the human mucosa. This system has been used to test whether commensal lactobacilli (Lactobacillus paracasei BL23, Lactobacillus plantarum 299v and L. plantarum 299v (A(-))) were able to hinder inflammation-like signals induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)/ionomycin (IO). Whole genome microarrays have been applied to analyze expression differences, from which mRNA markers could be inferred to monitor the effect of putative probiotic strains under such conditions. Regarding the gene expression, PMA/IO treatment induced not only interleukin (IL)-2 and interferon gamma (IFN-γ), as expected, but also other relevant genes related to immune response and inflammation, such as IL-17A, chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL) 9 and CXCL11. The ex vivo culturing did not modify the pattern of expression of those genes or others related to inflammation. Interestingly, this study demonstrated that lactobacilli downregulated those genes and triggered a global change of the transcriptional profile that indicated a clear homeostasis restoring effect and a decrease in signals produced by activated T cells.

  20. Infections, inflammation and epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Vezzani, Annamaria; Fujinami, Robert S.; White, H. Steve; Preux, Pierre-Marie; Blümcke, Ingmar; Sander, Josemir W.; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is the tendency to have unprovoked epileptic seizures. Anything causing structural or functional derangement of brain physiology may lead to seizures, and different conditions may express themselves solely by recurrent seizures and thus be labelled “epilepsy.” Worldwide, epilepsy is the most common serious neurological condition. The range of risk factors for the development of epilepsy varies with age and geographic location. Congenital, developmental and genetic conditions are mostly associated with the development of epilepsy in childhood, adolescence and early adulthood. Head trauma, infections of the central nervous system (CNS) and tumours may occur at any age and may lead to the development of epilepsy. Infections of the CNS are a major risk factor for epilepsy. The reported risk of unprovoked seizures in population-based cohorts of survivors of CNS infections from developed countries is between 6.8 and 8.3 %, and is much higher in resource-poor countries. In this review, the various viral, bacterial, fungal and parasitic infectious diseases of the CNS which result in seizures and epilepsy are discussed. The pathogenesis of epilepsy due to brain infections, as well as the role of experimental models to study mechanisms of epileptogenesis induced by infectious agents, is reviewed. The sterile (non-infectious) inflammatory response that occurs following brain insults is also discussed, as well as its overlap with inflammation due to infections, and the potential role in epileptogenesis. Furthermore, autoimmune encephalitis as a cause of seizures is reviewed. Potential strategies to prevent epilepsy resulting from brain infections and non-infectious inflammation are also considered. PMID:26423537

  1. Colon cancer screening

    MedlinePlus

    Screening for colon cancer; Colonoscopy - screening; Sigmoidoscopy - screening; Virtual colonoscopy - screening; Fecal immunochemical test; Stool DNA test; sDNA test; Colorectal cancer - screening; Rectal ...

  2. Small molecule modulator of sigma 2 receptor is neuroprotective and reduces cognitive deficits and neuro-inflammation in experimental models of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Bitna; Sahn, James J.; Ardestani, Pooneh Memar; Evans, Andrew K.; Scott, Luisa; Chan, Jessica Z.; Iyer, Sangeetha; Crisp, Ashley; Zuniga, Gabriella; Pierce-Shimomura, Jonathan; Martin, Stephen F.; Shamloo, Mehrdad

    2017-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that modulating the sigma 2 receptor (Sig2R) can provide beneficial effects for neurodegenerative diseases. Herein, we report the identification of a novel class of Sig2R binding ligands and their cellular and in vivo activity in experimental models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We report that SAS-0132 and DKR-1051, selective ligands of Sig2R, modulate intracellular Ca2+ levels in human SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells. The Sig2R antagonists SAS-0132 and JVW-1009 are neuroprotective in a C. elegans model of amyloid precursor protein-mediated neurodegeneration. Since this neuroprotective effect is replicated by genetic knockdown and knockout of vem-1, the ortholog of progesterone receptor membrane component-1 (PGRMC1), it indicates that Sig2R ligands modulate a PGRMC1-related pathway. Last, we demonstrate that SAS-0132 improves cognitive performance both in the Thy-1 hAPPLond/Swe+ transgenic mouse model of AD and in healthy wild-type mice. These results demonstrate that Sig2R is a promising therapeutic target for neurocognitive disorders including AD. PMID:27926996

  3. Surfactant protein A is expressed in the central nervous system of rats with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, and suppresses inflammation in human astrocytes and microglia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue; Yan, Jun; Feng, Juan

    2017-01-01

    The collectin surfactant protein-A (SP-A), a potent host defense molecule, is well recognized for its role in the maintenance of pulmonary homeostasis and the modulation of inflammatory responses. While previous studies have detected SP-A in numerous extrapulmonary tissues, there is still a lack of information regarding its expression in central nervous system (CNS) and potential effects in neuroinflammatory diseases, such as multiple sclerosis (MS). The present study used experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the most commonly used animal model of MS, to investigate the expression of SP-A in the CNS at different stages of disease progression. In addition, in vitro experiments with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human astrocytes and microglia were performed to investigate the potential role of SP-A in the modulation of CNS inflammatory responses. The results of the present study demonstrated widespread distribution of SP-A in the rat CNS, and also identified specific expression patterns of SP-A at different stages of EAE. In vitro, the current study revealed that treatment of human astrocytes and microglia with LPS promoted SP-A expression in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, exogenous SP-A protein significantly decreased Toll-like receptor 4 and nuclear factor-κB expression, and reduced interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α levels. The results of the current study indicate a potential role for SP-A in the modulation of CNS inflammatory responses. PMID:28393255

  4. Effect of drinking-water administration of experimental chlorate ion preparations on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium colonization in weaned and finished pigs.

    PubMed

    Anderson, R C; Hume, M E; Genovese, K J; Callaway, T R; Jung, Y S; Edrington, T S; Poole, T L; Harvey, R B; Bischoff, K M; Nisbet, D J

    2004-04-01

    Foodborne disease caused by Salmonella is of public health and economic significance. In order to assess the practical effectiveness of a new intervention strategy, experimental chlorate preparations (ECP) were administered via the drinking water to weaned and finished pigs that had been orally challenged the previous day with 10(9)-10(10) colony-forming units of Salmonella serovar Typhimurium. After 24 or 36 h ad libitum access to 0X, 1X or 2X ECP treatment (where X is the concentration estimated to deliver a minimal daily effective dose), the pigs were euthanized and gut contents and lymph tissue collected at necropsy were cultured for the challenge Salmonella. Drinking water administration of ECP effectively reduced (p < 0.05) caecal Salmonella concentrations and, with the weaned pigs, tended (p < or = 0.10) to reduce rectal Salmonella concentrations. No negative effects of ECP treatment on water intake and animal wellbeing were observed and only marginal effects on gut fermentation characteristics occurred. The bactericidal effect of administering ECP in drinking water was relatively rapid, with reductions in caecal Salmonella concentrations occurring within 24 h. These results suggest that ECP administered to pigs just days before slaughter may reduce gut concentrations of Salmonella; however, the impacts of such reductions on slaughter hygiene have yet to be determined.

  5. Therapeutic effects of systemic vitamin k2 and vitamin d3 on gingival inflammation and alveolar bone in rats with experimentally induced periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Aral, Kübra; Alkan, Banu Arzu; Saraymen, Recep; Yay, Arzu; Şen, Ahmet; Önder, Gözde Özge

    2015-05-01

    The synergistic effects of vitamin D3 and vitamin K2 on bone loss prevention have been reported. This study evaluates the effects of vitamin D3 and vitamin K2 supplementation in conjunction with conventional periodontal therapy (scaling and root planing [SRP]) on gingival interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-10, serum bone alkaline phosphatase (B-ALP) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRAP-5b), and calcium and alveolar bone levels in rats with experimentally induced periodontitis. Seventy-two rats were divided into the following groups: 1) healthy; 2) periodontitis; 3) SRP; 4) SRP + vitamin D3; 5) SRP + vitamin K2; and 6) SRP + vitamins K2 and D3. Periodontitis was induced by ligature placement for 7 days, and vitamin K2 (30 mg/kg) and/or vitamin D3 (2 μg/kg) were administered for 10 days in the SRP + vitamin D3, SRP + vitamin K2, and SRP + vitamins K2 and D3 groups by oral gavage. On day 18, the animals were sacrificed, serum B-ALP, TRAP-5b, and calcium levels were measured, gingiva specimens were extracted for IL-1β and IL-10 analysis, and distances between the cemento-enamel junction and alveolar bone crest were evaluated. Alveolar bone levels in the periodontitis group were significantly greater than those in the other five groups. No significant differences were found in gingival IL-1β and IL-10, serum B-ALP and TRAP-5b, and calcium and alveolar bone levels between the groups receiving SRP and vitamins and the group receiving SRP alone. Within the limitations of this study, vitamin D3 and K2 alone or in combination did not affect gingival IL-1β and IL-10, serum B-ALP and TRAP-5b levels, or alveolar bone compared with conventional periodontal therapy alone.

  6. Analysis of the temporal expression of chemokines and chemokine receptors during experimental granulomatous inflammation: role and expression of MIP-1α and MCP-1

    PubMed Central

    Carollo, Maria; Hogaboam, Cory M; Kunkel, Stephen L; Delaney, Stephen; Christie, Mark I; Perretti, Mauro

    2001-01-01

    Chemokine expression and function was monitored in an experimental model of granulomatous tissue formation after injection of croton oil in complete Freund's adjuvant (CO/CFA) into mouse dorsal air-pouches up to 28 days. In the first week, mast cell degranulation and leukocyte influx (mononuclear cell, MNC, and polymorphonuclear cell, PMN) were associated with CXCR2, KC and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2 mRNA expression, as determined by TaqMan® reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. KC (∼400 pg mg protein−1, n=12) and MIP-2 (∼800 pg mg protein−1, n=12) proteins peaked at day 7, together with myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. Highest MIP-1α (>1 ng mg protein−1, n=12) levels were measured at day 3. After day 7, a gradual increase in CCR2 and CCR5 mRNA, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 mRNA and protein expression was measured. MCP-1 protein peaked at day 21 (∼150 pg mg protein−1, n=12) and was predominantly expressed by mast cells. A gradual increase in N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) activity (maximal at 28 days) was also measured. An antiserum against MIP-1α did not modify the inflammatory response measured at day 7 (except for a 50% reduction in MIP-1α levels), but provoked a significant increase in MPO, NAG and MCP-1 levels as measured at day 21 (n=6, P<0.05). An antiserum to MCP-1 reduced NAG activity at day 21 but increased MPO activity values (n=8, P<0.05). In conclusion, we have shown that CO/CFA initiates a complex inflammatory reaction in which initial expression of MIP-1α serves a protective role whereas delayed expression of MCP-1 seems to have a genuine pro-inflammatory role. PMID:11704636

  7. Side-Effects of Irinotecan (CPT-11), the Clinically Used Drug for Colon Cancer Therapy, Are Eliminated in Experimental Animals Treated with Latex Proteins from Calotropis procera (Apocynaceae).

    PubMed

    de Alencar, Nylane Maria Nunes; da Silveira Bitencourt, Flávio; de Figueiredo, Ingrid Samantha Tavares; Luz, Patrícia Bastos; Lima-Júnior, Roberto César P; Aragão, Karoline Sabóia; Magalhães, Pedro Jorge Caldas; de Castro Brito, Gerly Anne; Ribeiro, Ronaldo Albuquerque; de Freitas, Ana Paula Fragoso; Ramos, Marcio Viana

    2017-02-01

    Intestinal mucositis (IM) is the critical side effect of irinotecan (CPT-11), which is the front-line drug used for the treatment of colorectal cancer. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of latex proteins (LP) from Calotropis procera to prevent IM and diarrhea in animals. Swiss mice were treated daily with saline or LP (1, 5, or 50 mg/kg, i.v.) 24 h prior to CTP-11 (75 mg/kg/4 days, i.p) and for additional 6 days. Animal survival, body weight variation, and diarrhea were registered. After animal sacrifice (day 7 post first injection of CPT-11), intestinal samples were collected to study morphology and inflammatory parameters. Animals given LP exhibited improved parameters (survival, body weight, and absence of diarrhea) as compared with the CPT-11 control. The severity of IM observed in animals given CPT-11 was reduced in animals treated with LP. Treatment with LP also prevented the reduction in the villus/crypt ratio promoted by CPT-11. The rise in MPO activity and pro-inflammatory cytokines, over-contractility of the smooth muscle, and diarrhea were all abrogated in LP-treated mice. Markedly reduced immunostaining intensity for COX-2, TNF-α, IL-1β, iNOS, and NF-κB was observed in the intestinal tissue of animals treated with LP. The side-effects of CPT-11 were eliminated by LP treatment in experimental animals and improved clinical parameters characteristic of IM All known biochemical pathogenesis. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Characterization of colonic dendritic cells in normal and colitic mice.

    PubMed

    Cruickshank, Sheena M; English, Nicholas R; Felsburg, Peter J; Carding, Simon R

    2005-10-28

    Recent studies demonstrating the direct involvement of dendritic cells (DC) in the activation of pathogenic T cells in animal models of inflammatory bowel disease identify DC as important antigen presenting cells in the colon. However, very little is known about the properties of colonic DC. Using immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy and flow cytometry we have characterized and compared colonic DC in the colon of healthy animals and interleukin-2-deficient (IL2(-/-)) mice that develop colitis. In the healthy colon, DC resided within the lamina propria and in close association with the basement membrane of colonic villi. Type 1 myeloid (CD11c(+), CD11b(+), B220(-), CD8alpha(-)) DC made up the largest (40-45%) population and all DC expressed low levels of CD80, CD86, and CD40, and had high endocytic activity consistent with an immature phenotype. In colitic IL2(-/-) mice, colonic DC numbers increased four- to five-fold and were localized within the epithelial layer and within aggregates of T and B cells. They were also many more DC in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). The majority (>85%) of DC in the colon and MLN of IL2(-/-) mice were type 1 myeloid, and expressed high levels of MHC class II, CD80, CD86, CD40, DEC 205, and CCR5 molecules and were of low endocytic activity consistent with mature DC. These findings demonstrate striking changes in the number, distribution and phenotype of DC in the inflamed colon. Their intimate association with lymphocytes in the colon and draining lymph nodes suggest that they may contribute directly to the ongoing inflammation in the colon.

  9. Characterization of colonic dendritic cells in normal and colitic mice

    PubMed Central

    Cruickshank, Sheena M; English, Nicholas R; Felsburg, Peter J; Carding, Simon R

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Recent studies demonstrating the direct involvement of dendritic cells (DC) in the activation of pathogenic T cells in animal models of inflammatory bowel disease identify DC as important antigen presenting cells in the colon. However, very little is known about the properties of colonic DC. METHODS: Using immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy and flow cytometry we have characterized and compared colonic DC in the colon of healthy animals and interleukin-2-deficient (IL2-/-) mice that develop colitis. RESULTS: In the healthy colon, DC resided within the lamina propria and in close association with the basement membrane of colonic villi. Type 1 myeloid (CD11c+, CD11b+, B220-, CD8α-) DC made up the largest (40-45%) population and all DC expressed low levels of CD80, CD86, and CD40, and had high endocytic activity consistent with an immature phenotype. In colitic IL2-/- mice, colonic DC numbers increased four- to five-fold and were localized within the epithelial layer and within aggregates of T and B cells. They were also many more DC in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). The majority (>85%) of DC in the colon and MLN of IL2-/- mice were type 1 myeloid, and expressed high levels of MHC class II, CD80, CD86, CD40, DEC 205, and CCR5 molecules and were of low endocytic activity consistent with mature DC. CONCLUSION: These findings demonstrate striking changes in the number, distribution and phenotype of DC in the inflamed colon. Their intimate association with lymphocytes in the colon and draining lymph nodes suggest that they may contribute directly to the ongoing inflammation in the colon. PMID:16419163

  10. Autophagy and kidney inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Tomonori; Isaka, Yoshitaka; Yoshimori, Tamotsu

    2017-06-03

    Inflammation plays a pivotal role in pathophysiological processes of kidney diseases. Macroautophagy/autophagy plays multiple roles in inflammatory responses, and the regulation of inflammation by autophagy has great potential as a treatment for damaged kidneys. A growing body of evidence suggests autophagy protects kidney from versatile kidney inflammatory insults, including those that are acute, chronic, metabolic, and aging-related. It is noteworthy that, in kidney, mitophagy is active, and damaged lysosomes are removed by autophagy. In this mode, autophagy suppresses inflammation to protect the kidney. Systemic inflammation also affects the kidney via pro-inflammatory cytokines and infiltration of inflammatory cells, and autophagy also has a regulatory role in systemic inflammation. This review focuses on the roles of autophagy in kidney diseases and aging through inflammation, and discusses the potential usage of autophagy as an inflammatory modulator for the treatment of kidney diseases.

  11. Autophagy and kidney inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Tomonori; Isaka, Yoshitaka; Yoshimori, Tamotsu

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Inflammation plays a pivotal role in pathophysiological processes of kidney diseases. Macroautophagy/autophagy plays multiple roles in inflammatory responses, and the regulation of inflammation by autophagy has great potential as a treatment for damaged kidneys. A growing body of evidence suggests autophagy protects kidney from versatile kidney inflammatory insults, including those that are acute, chronic, metabolic, and aging-related. It is noteworthy that, in kidney, mitophagy is active, and damaged lysosomes are removed by autophagy. In this mode, autophagy suppresses inflammation to protect the kidney. Systemic inflammation also affects the kidney via pro-inflammatory cytokines and infiltration of inflammatory cells, and autophagy also has a regulatory role in systemic inflammation. This review focuses on the roles of autophagy in kidney diseases and aging through inflammation, and discusses the potential usage of autophagy as an inflammatory modulator for the treatment of kidney diseases. PMID:28441075

  12. Understanding your colon cancer risk

    MedlinePlus

    Colon cancer - prevention; Colon cancer - screening ... We do not know what causes colon cancer, but we do know some of the things that may increase the risk of getting it, such as: Age. Your risk increases after ...

  13. Colonic casts: unexpected complications of colonic ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Mantas, D; Damaskos, C; Bamias, G; Dimitroulis, D

    2016-09-01

    Introduction Extensive colonic ischaemia can result in passage of a colonic 'cast' (CC) through the rectum. Case Study We report a 69-year-old male who initially underwent surgery to remove a sessile polyp. On postoperative day (POD)15, he was febrile, suffering from diarrhoea, and was treated conservatively. On POD18, the patient returned to our hospital with a CC that presented after defaecation. Computed tomography of the abdomen revealed a CC extending from the descending colon to the anal orifice with presentation of air between the affected colonic wall and the CC. The patient was treated conservatively and discharged on POD20 without complications having passed the CC (≈80cm) completely and becoming afebrile. Conclusions In most cases, the cause of CC passage is surgery for colorectal cancer or repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. A mild-to-severe presentation is dependent upon the bowel-wall layers affected by ischaemia and which therefore are included in the CC.

  14. Inflammation and colorectal cancer: colitis-associated neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Grivennikov, Sergei I.

    2013-01-01

    Connection between inflammation and cancer is a rapidly developing field. Epidemiological data suggests that inflammation along with distinct arms of host immune system plays a very important role in development and progression of many different cancers. Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) is an important risk factor for the development of colon cancer, namely colitis-associated cancer (CAC). The molecular mechanisms by which inflammation promotes cancer development are still being uncovered and may differ between CAC and other forms of colorectal cancer. Recent work has shed light on the role of distinct immune cells, cytokines and other immune mediators in virtually all of the steps of colonic tumorigenesis, including tumor initiation and promotion as well as progression and metastasis. The close proximity of colonic tumors to the myriad of intestinal microbes, as well as instrumental role of microbiota in IBD, introduces microbes as new players capable of triggering inflammation and possibly promoting tumorigenesis. Various mechanisms of CAC tumorigenesis as well as new possible hints for the future approaches for prevention and therapy are discussed in this review. PMID:23161445

  15. Hypoxia and Mucosal Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Colgan, Sean P.; Campbell, Eric L.; Kominsky, Douglas J.

    2016-01-01

    Sites of inflammation are defined by significant changes in metabolic activity. Recent studies have suggested that O2 metabolism and hypoxia play a prominent role in inflammation so-called “inflammatory hypoxia,” which results from a combination of recruited inflammatory cells (e.g., neutrophils and monocytes), the local proliferation of multiple cell types, and the activation of multiple O2-consuming enzymes during inflammation. These shifts in energy supply and demand result in localized regions of hypoxia and have revealed the important function off the transcription factor HIF (hypoxia-inducible factor) in the regulation of key target genes that promote inflammatory resolution. Analysis of these pathways has provided multiple opportunities for understanding basic mechanisms of inflammation and has defined new targets for intervention. Here, we review recent work addressing tissue hypoxia and metabolic control of inflammation and immunity. PMID:27193451

  16. Salmonella induces prominent gene expression in the rat colon

    PubMed Central

    Rodenburg, Wendy; Keijer, Jaap; Kramer, Evelien; Roosing, Susanne; Vink, Carolien; Katan, Martijn B; van der Meer, Roelof; Bovee-Oudenhoven, Ingeborg MJ

    2007-01-01

    Background Salmonella enteritidis is suggested to translocate in the small intestine. In vivo it induces gene expression changes in the ileal mucosa and Peyer's patches. Stimulation of Salmonella translocation by dietary prebiotics fermented in colon suggests involvement of the colon as well. However, effects of Salmonella on colonic gene expression in vivo are largely unknown. We aimed to characterize time dependent Salmonella-induced changes of colonic mucosal gene expression in rats using whole genome microarrays. For this, rats were orally infected with Salmonella enteritidis to mimic a foodborne infection and colonic gene expression was determined at days 1, 3 and 6 post-infection (n = 8 rats per time-point). As fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) affect colonic physiology, we analyzed colonic mucosal gene expression of FOS-fed versus cellulose-fed rats infected with Salmonella in a separate experiment. Colonic mucosal samples were isolated at day 2 post-infection. Results Salmonella affected transport (e.g. Chloride channel calcium activated 6, H+/K+ transporting Atp-ase), antimicrobial defense (e.g. Lipopolysaccharide binding protein, Defensin 5 and phospholipase A2), inflammation (e.g. calprotectin), oxidative stress related genes (e.g. Dual oxidase 2 and Glutathione peroxidase 2) and Proteolysis (e.g. Ubiquitin D and Proteosome subunit beta type 9). Furthermore, Salmonella translocation increased serum IFNγ and many interferon-related genes in colonic mucosa. The gene most strongly induced by Salmonella infection was Pancreatitis Associated Protein (Pap), showing >100-fold induction at day 6 after oral infection. Results were confirmed by Q-PCR in individual rats. Stimulation of Salmonella translocation by dietary FOS was accompanied by enhancement of the Salmonella-induced mucosal processes, not by induction of other processes. Conclusion We conclude that the colon is a target tissue for Salmonella, considering the abundant changes in mucosal gene expression

  17. Salmonella induces prominent gene expression in the rat colon.

    PubMed

    Rodenburg, Wendy; Keijer, Jaap; Kramer, Evelien; Roosing, Susanne; Vink, Carolien; Katan, Martijn B; van der Meer, Roelof; Bovee-Oudenhoven, Ingeborg M J

    2007-09-12

    Salmonella enteritidis is suggested to translocate in the small intestine. In vivo it induces gene expression changes in the ileal mucosa and Peyer's patches. Stimulation of Salmonella translocation by dietary prebiotics fermented in colon suggests involvement of the colon as well. However, effects of Salmonella on colonic gene expression in vivo are largely unknown. We aimed to characterize time dependent Salmonella-induced changes of colonic mucosal gene expression in rats using whole genome microarrays. For this, rats were orally infected with Salmonella enteritidis to mimic a foodborne infection and colonic gene expression was determined at days 1, 3 and 6 post-infection (n = 8 rats per time-point). As fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) affect colonic physiology, we analyzed colonic mucosal gene expression of FOS-fed versus cellulose-fed rats infected with Salmonella in a separate experiment. Colonic mucosal samples were isolated at day 2 post-infection. Salmonella affected transport (e.g. Chloride channel calcium activated 6, H+/K+ transporting Atp-ase), antimicrobial defense (e.g. Lipopolysaccharide binding protein, Defensin 5 and phospholipase A2), inflammation (e.g. calprotectin), oxidative stress related genes (e.g. Dual oxidase 2 and Glutathione peroxidase 2) and Proteolysis (e.g. Ubiquitin D and Proteosome subunit beta type 9). Furthermore, Salmonella translocation increased serum IFN gamma and many interferon-related genes in colonic mucosa. The gene most strongly induced by Salmonella infection was Pancreatitis Associated Protein (Pap), showing >100-fold induction at day 6 after oral infection. Results were confirmed by Q-PCR in individual rats. Stimulation of Salmonella translocation by dietary FOS was accompanied by enhancement of the Salmonella-induced mucosal processes, not by induction of other processes. We conclude that the colon is a target tissue for Salmonella, considering the abundant changes in mucosal gene expression.

  18. Review article: uncomplicated diverticular disease of the colon.

    PubMed

    Petruzziello, L; Iacopini, F; Bulajic, M; Shah, S; Costamagna, G

    2006-05-15

    Diverticular disease of the colon is the fifth most important gastrointestinal disease in terms of direct and indirect health care costs in western countries. Uncomplicated diverticular disease is defined as the presence of diverticula in the absence of complications such as perforation, fistula, obstruction and/or bleeding. The distribution of diverticula along the colon varies worldwide being almost always left-sided and directly related to age in western countries and right-sided where diet is rich in fibre. The pathophysiology of diverticular disease is complex and relates to abnormal colonic motility, changes in the colonic wall, chronic mucosal low-grade inflammation, imbalance in colonic microflora and visceral hypersensitivity. Moreover, there can be genetic factors involved in the development of colonic diverticula. The use of non-absorbable antibiotics is the mainstay of therapy in patients with mild to moderate symptoms, and the effect of fibre-supplementation alone does not appear to be significantly different from placebo, although no definite data are available. More recently, alternative treatments have been reported. Mesalazine acts as a local mucosal immunomodulator and has been shown to improve symptoms and prevent recurrence of diverticulitis. In addition, probiotics have also been shown to be beneficial by re-establishing a normal gut microflora. In this study, the current literature on uncomplicated diverticular disease of the colon is reviewed.

  19. Colon diverticula - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the rectum. The colon absorbs water from liquid stool that is delivered to it from the small ... and Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Atlanta, GA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical ...

  20. Peritoneal solute transport and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Davies, Simon J

    2014-12-01

    The speed with which small solutes cross the peritoneal membrane, termed peritoneal solute transport rate (PSTR), is a key measure of individual membrane performance. PSTR can be quantified easily by using the 4-hour dialysate to plasma creatinine ratio, which, although only an approximation to the diffusive characteristics of the membrane, has been well validated clinically in terms of its relationship to patient survival and changes in longitudinal membrane function. This has led to changes in peritoneal dialysis modality use and dialysis prescription. An important determinant of PSTR is intraperitoneal inflammation, as exemplified by local interleukin 6 production, which is largely independent of systemic inflammation and its relationship to comorbid conditions and increased mortality. There is no strong evidence to support the contention that the peritoneal membrane in some individuals with high PSTR is qualitatively different at the start of treatment; rather, it represents a spectrum that is determined in part by genetic factors. Both clinical and experimental evidence support the view that persistent intraperitoneal inflammation, detected as a continuously high or increasing PSTR, may predispose the membrane to progressive fibrosis. Copyright © 2014 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Acute murine colitis reduces colonic 5-aminosalicylic acid metabolism by regulation of N-acetyltransferase-2

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Alcántara, Verónica

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacotherapy based on 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) is a preferred treatment for ulcerative colitis, but variable patient response to this therapy is observed. Inflammation can affect therapeutic outcomes by regulating the expression and activity of drug-metabolizing enzymes; its effect on 5-ASA metabolism by the colonic arylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT) enzyme isoforms is not firmly established. We examined if inflammation affects the capacity for colonic 5-ASA metabolism and NAT enzyme expression. 5-ASA metabolism by colonic mucosal homogenates was directly measured with a novel fluorimetric rate assay. 5-ASA metabolism reported by the assay was dependent on Ac-CoA, inhibited by alternative NAT substrates (isoniazid, p-aminobenzoylglutamate), and saturable with Km (5-ASA) = 5.8 μM. A mouse model of acute dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) colitis caused pronounced inflammation in central and distal colon, and modest inflammation of proximal colon, defined by myeloperoxidase activity and histology. DSS colitis reduced capacity for 5-ASA metabolism in central and distal colon segments by 52 and 51%, respectively. Use of selective substrates of NAT isoforms to inhibit 5-ASA metabolism suggested that mNAT2 mediated 5-ASA metabolism in normal and colitis conditions. Western blot and real-time RT-PCR identified that proximal and distal mucosa had a decreased mNAT2 protein-to-mRNA ratio after DSS. In conclusion, an acute colonic inflammation impairs the expression and function of mNAT2 enzyme, thereby diminishing the capacity for 5-ASA metabolism by colonic mucosa. PMID:24742986

  2. Carotenoids and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Slattery, M L; Benson, J; Curtin, K; Ma, K N; Schaeffer, D; Potter, J D

    2000-02-01

    Carotenoids have numerous biological properties that may underpin a role for them as chemopreventive agents. However, except for beta-carotene, little is known about how dietary carotenoids are associated with common cancers, including colon cancer. The objective of this study was to evaluate associations between dietary alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, lycopene, lutein, zeaxanthin, and beta-cryptoxanthin and the risk of colon cancer. Data were collected from 1993 case subjects with first primary incident adenocarcinoma of the colon and from 2410 population-based control subjects. Dietary data were collected from a detailed diet-history questionnaire and nutrient values for dietary carotenoids were obtained from the US Department of Agriculture-Nutrition Coordinating Center carotenoid database (1998 updated version). Lutein was inversely associated with colon cancer in both men and women [odds ratio (OR) for upper quintile of intake relative to lowest quintile of intake: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.66, 1.04; P = 0.04 for linear trend]. The greatest inverse association was observed among subjects in whom colon cancer was diagnosed when they were young (OR: 0.66; 95% CI: 0.48, 0.92; P = 0.02 for linear trend) and among those with tumors located in the proximal segment of the colon (OR: 0.65; 95% CI: 0.51, 0.91; P < 0.01 for linear trend). The associations with other carotenoids were unremarkable. The major dietary sources of lutein in subjects with colon cancer and in control subjects were spinach, broccoli, lettuce, tomatoes, oranges and orange juice, carrots, celery, and greens. These data suggest that incorporating these foods into the diet may help reduce the risk of developing colon cancer.

  3. MicroRNA-590-5p Inhibits Intestinal Inflammation by Targeting YAP.

    PubMed

    Yu, Minhao; Luo, Yang; Cong, Zhijie; Mu, Yifei; Qiu, Yier; Zhong, Ming

    2018-04-18

    Hippo signaling is an evolutionarily conserved pathway that controls organ size by regulating cell proliferation, survival, apoptosis, and stem cell self-renewal. In addition, Hippo signaling is profoundly implicated in intestinal regeneration and cancer. However, its roles in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD) remain largely unexplored. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed to identify the deregulated molecules in Hippo signaling. Expression of the highly upregulated Yes Associated Protein 1 (YAP) was subsequently examined by qRT-PCR, western blotting and immunohistochemistry in the intestinal tissues of CD patients and the colons of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis mice. The miRNAs predicted to target YAP were explored by transfection of miR-590-5p mimics or inhibitors and analyzed by luciferase reporter assay. The role of the miR-590-5p/YAP axis in CD and colorectal cancer were studied in experimental colitis mice and colorectal cancer cell lines. YAP mRNA was significantly upregulated in intestinal epithelial cells in CD patients and TNBS-induced colitis mice. MiR-590-5p suppressed YAP expression by directly targeting the YAP 3'-untranslated region in Caco-2 cells and SW620 cells. Upregulation of miR-590-5p in colon reduced YAP level and its downstream targets in IECs. Treatment of miR-590-5p or YAP inhibitor Verteporfin alleviated experimental colitis. Targeting the miR-590-5p/YAP axis inhibited cell proliferation and invasiveness of CRC cells in vitro. Our results suggest that miR-590-5p inhibits intestinal inflammation in mouse colon and tumorigenesis of colorectal cancer cells by inhibiting YAP. The miR-590-5p/YAP axis may be an important novel mechanism in the pathogenesis of CD and colorectal cancer.

  4. The Role of Chronic Inflammation in Obesity-Associated Cancers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    There is a strong relationship between metabolism and immunity, which can become deleterious under conditions of metabolic stress. Obesity, considered a chronic inflammatory disease, is one example of this link. Chronic inflammation is increasingly being recognized as an etiology in several cancers, particularly those of epithelial origin, and therefore a potential link between obesity and cancer. In this review, the connection between the different factors that can lead to the chronic inflammatory state in the obese individual, as well as their effect in tumorigenesis, is addressed. Furthermore, the association between obesity, inflammation, and esophageal, liver, colon, postmenopausal breast, and endometrial cancers is discussed. PMID:23819063

  5. Diverticular disease of the right colon.

    PubMed

    Radhi, Jasim M; Ramsay, Jennifer A; Boutross-Tadross, Odette

    2011-10-06

    The incidence of colonic diverticular disease varies with national origin, cultural background and diet. The frequency of this disease increases with advancing age. Right-sided diverticular disease is uncommon and reported to occur in 1-2% of surgical specimens in European and American series. In contrast the disease is more prevalent and reported in 43-50% of specimens in Asian series. Various lines of evidence suggest this variation may represent hereditary differences. The aim of the study is to report all cases of right sided diverticular disease underwent surgical resection or identified during pathological examination of right hemicoloectomy specimens A retrospective review of all surgical specimens with right sided colonic diverticular disease selected from a larger database of all colonic diverticulosis and diverticulitis surgical specimen reported between January 1993 and December 2010 at the Pathology Department McMaster University Medical Centre Canada. The clinical and pathological features of these cases were reviewed The review identified 15 cases of right colon diverticulosis. The clinical diagnoses of these cases were appendicitis, diverticulitis or adenocarcinoma. Eight cases of single congenital perforated diverticuli were identified and seven cases were incidental multiple acquired diverticuli found in specimen resected for right side colonic carcinomas/large adenomas. Laparotomy or laparoscopic assisted haemicolectomies were done for all cases. Pathological examination showed caecal wall thickening with inflammation associated with perforated diverticuli. Histology confirmed true solitary diverticuli that exhibited in two cases thick walled vessels in the submucosa and muscular layer indicating vascular malformation/angiodysplasia. Acquired diverticuli tend to be multiple and are mostly seen in specimens resected for neoplastic right colon diseases. Single true diverticular disease of the right colon is usually of congenital type and affects

  6. Murine Vaginal Colonization Model for Investigating Asymptomatic Mucosal Carriage of Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Michael E.; Nielsen, Hailyn V.; Hultgren, Scott J.

    2013-01-01

    While many virulence factors promoting Streptococcus pyogenes invasive disease have been described, specific streptococcal factors and host properties influencing asymptomatic mucosal carriage remain uncertain. To address the need for a refined model of prolonged S. pyogenes asymptomatic mucosal colonization, we have adapted a preestrogenized murine vaginal colonization model for S. pyogenes. In this model, derivatives of strains HSC5, SF370, JRS4, NZ131, and MEW123 established a reproducible, asymptomatic colonization of the vaginal mucosa over a period of typically 3 to 4 weeks' duration at a relatively high colonization efficiency. Prior treatment with estradiol prolonged streptococcal colonization and was associated with reduced inflammation in the colonized vaginal epithelium as well as a decreased leukocyte presence in vaginal fluid compared to the levels of inflammation and leukocyte presence in non-estradiol-treated control mice. The utility of our model for investigating S. pyogenes factors contributing to mucosal carriage was verified, as a mutant with a mutation in the transcriptional regulator catabolite control protein A (CcpA) demonstrated significant impairment in vaginal colonization. An assessment of in vivo transcriptional activity in the CcpA− strain for several known CcpA-regulated genes identified significantly elevated transcription of lactate oxidase (lctO) correlating with excessive generation of hydrogen peroxide to self-lethal levels. Deletion of lctO did not impair colonization, but deletion of lctO in a CcpA− strain prolonged carriage, exceeding even that of the wild-type strain. Thus, while LctO is not essential for vaginal colonization, its dysregulation is deleterious, highlighting the critical role of CcpA in promoting mucosal colonization. The vaginal colonization model should prove effective for future analyses of S. pyogenes mucosal colonization. PMID:23460515

  7. Colonic bacterial composition in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Keshavarzian, Ali; Green, Stefan J; Engen, Phillip A; Voigt, Robin M; Naqib, Ankur; Forsyth, Christopher B; Mutlu, Ece; Shannon, Kathleen M

    2015-09-01

    We showed that Parkinson's disease (PD) patients have alpha-synuclein (α-Syn) aggregation in their colon with evidence of colonic inflammation. If PD patients have altered colonic microbiota, dysbiosis might be the mechanism of neuroinflammation that leads to α-Syn misfolding and PD pathology. Sixty-six sigmoid mucosal biopsies and 65 fecal samples were collected from 38 PD patients and 34 healthy controls. Mucosal-associated and feces microbiota compositions were characterized using high-throughput ribosomal RNA gene amplicon sequencing. Data were correlated with clinical measures of PD, and a predictive assessment of microbial community functional potential was used to identify microbial functions. The mucosal and fecal microbial community of PD patients was significantly different than control subjects, with the fecal samples showing more marked differences than the sigmoid mucosa. At the taxonomic level of genus, putative, "anti-inflammatory" butyrate-producing bacteria from the genera Blautia, Coprococcus, and Roseburia were significantly more abundant in feces of controls than PD patients. Bacteria from the genus Faecalibacterium were significantly more abundant in the mucosa of controls than PD. Putative, "proinflammatory" Proteobacteria of the genus Ralstonia were significantly more abundant in mucosa of PD than controls. Predictive metagenomics indicated that a large number of genes involved in metabolism were significantly lower in the PD fecal microbiome, whereas genes involved in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis and type III bacterial secretion systems were significantly higher in PD patients. This report provides evidence that proinflammatory dysbiosis is present in PD patients and could trigger inflammation-induced misfolding of α-Syn and development of PD pathology. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  8. Colonization and community structure of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in maize roots at different depths in the soil profile respond differently to phosphorus inputs on a long-term experimental site.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; White, Philip J; Li, Chunjian

    2017-05-01

    Effects of soil depth and plant growth stages on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) colonization and community structure in maize roots and their potential contribution to host plant phosphorus (P) nutrition under different P-fertilizer inputs were studied. Research was conducted on a long-term field experiment over 3 years. AMF colonization was assessed by AM colonization rate and arbuscule abundances and their potential contribution to host P nutrition by intensity of fungal alkaline phosphatase (ALP)/acid phosphatase (ACP) activities and expressions of ZmPht1;6 and ZmCCD8a in roots from the topsoil and subsoil layer at different growth stages. AMF community structure was determined by specific amplification of 18S rDNA. Increasing P inputs up to 75-100 kg ha -1  yr -1 increased shoot biomass and P content but decreased AMF colonization and interactions between AMF and roots. AM colonization rate, intensity of fungal ACP/ALP activities, and expression of ZmPht1;6 in roots from the subsoil were greater than those from topsoil at elongation and silking but not at the dough stage when plants received adequate or excessive P inputs. Neither P input nor soil depth influenced the number of AMF operational taxonomic units (OTUs) present in roots, but P-fertilizer input, in particular, influenced community composition and relative AMF abundance. In conclusion, although increasing P inputs reduce AMF colonization and influence AMF community structure, AMF can potentially contribute to plant P nutrition even in well-fertilized soils, depending on the soil layer in which roots are located and the growth stage of host plants.

  9. Nickel remediation by AM-colonized sunflower.

    PubMed

    Ker, Keomany; Charest, Christiane

    2010-08-01

    This greenhouse study aimed to examine the contribution of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) colonization on the uptake of and tolerance to nickel (Ni) in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). We hypothesized that AM colonization increases Ni content and tolerance in sunflower grown under varying soil Ni concentrations. The combined effect of AM colonization and soil Ni input on the assimilation of nitrogen, in particular the activity of glutamine synthetase (GS), in sunflower plants was also investigated. A factorial experimental design was performed with sunflower cv. Lemon Queen, with or without the AM fungus, Glomus intraradices Schenck & Smith, and treated with 0, 100, 200, or 400 mg Ni kg(-1) dry soil (DS). The AM colonization significantly enhanced plant growth and Ni content, especially at the lower soil Ni treatments. Furthermore, the AM plants exposed to the highest soil Ni level of 400 mg Ni kg(-1) DS had a significantly higher shoot Ni extracted percentage than non-AM plants, suggesting that the AM symbiosis contributed to Ni uptake, then its translocation from roots to shoots. The AM colonization also significantly increased the GS activity in roots, this being likely an indicator of an enhanced Ni tolerance. These findings support the hypothesis that AM symbiosis contributes to an enhanced Ni plant uptake and tolerance and should be considered as part of phytoremediation strategies.

  10. Noni (Morinda citrifolia L.) Fruit Extracts Improve Colon Microflora and Exert Anti-Inflammatory Activities in Caco-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hsin-Lun; Liu, Cheng-Tzu; Chou, Ming-Chih; Ko, Chien-Hui; Wang, Chin-Kun

    2015-06-01

    Intestinal microflora and inflammation are associated with the risk of inflammatory bowel diseases. Noni (Morinda citrifolia L.) has various bioactivities, but its effect on colon health remains unknown. This study focused on the effects of fermented noni fruit extracts on colon microflora and inflammation of colon epithelial cells. The anti-inflammatory activities of ethanol and ethyl acetate extracts on Caco-2 cells were evaluated including interleukin-8 (IL-8) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). The growth of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species was promoted by ethanol extract. Ethyl acetate extract decreased intracellular reactive oxygen species and significantly suppressed COX-2, IL-8, and prostaglandin E2 production and neutrophil chemotaxis by suppressing the translocation of the p65 subunit. Quercetin was the main contributor to the anti-inflammatory activity. The fermented noni fruit promoted probiotic growths and downregulated the intracellular oxidation and inflammation in Caco-2 cells. These results suggest that fermented noni fruit might protect against inflammatory diseases of the colon.

  11. Colon and rectal injuries.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Robert K; Pomerantz, Richard A; Lampman, Richard M

    2006-08-01

    This study was designed to develop treatment algorithms for colon, rectal, and anal injuries based on the review of relevant literature. Information was obtained through a MEDLINE ( www.nobi.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi ) search, and additional references were obtained through cross-referencing key articles cited in these papers. A total of 203 articles were considered relevant. The management of penetrating and blunt colon, rectal, and anal injuries has evolved during the past 150 years. Since the World War II mandate to divert penetrating colon injuries, primary repair or resection and anastomosis have found an increasing role in patients with nondestructive injuries. A critical review of recent literature better defines the role of primary repair and fecal diversion for these injuries and allows for better algorithms for the management of these injuries.

  12. Where Does Inflammation Fit?

    PubMed

    Biasucci, Luigi M; La Rosa, Giulio; Pedicino, Daniela; D'Aiello, Alessia; Galli, Mattia; Liuzzo, Giovanna

    2017-09-01

    This review focuses on the complex relationship between inflammation and the onset of acute coronary syndrome and heart failure. In the last few years, two important lines of research brought new and essential information to light in the pathogenesis of acute coronary syndrome: a) the understanding of the immune mediate mechanisms of inflammation in Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD) and b) evidence that the inflammatory mechanisms associated with atherosclerosis and its complications can be modulated by anti-inflammatory molecules. A large amount of data also suggests that inflammation is a major component in the development and exacerbation of heart failure (HF), in a symbiotic relationship. In particular, recent evidence underlies peculiar aspects of the phenomenon: oxidative stress and autophagy; DAMPS and TLR-4 signaling activation; different macrophages lineage and the contribution of NLRP-3 inflammasome; adaptive immune system. A possible explanation that could unify the pathogenic mechanism of these different conditions is the rising evidence that increased bowel permeability may allow translation of gut microbioma product into the circulation. These findings clearly establish the role of inflammation as the great trigger for two of the major cardiovascular causes of death and morbidity. Further studies are needed, to better clarify the issue and to define more targeted approaches to reduce pathological inflammation while preserving the physiological one.

  13. [Connective tissue and inflammation].

    PubMed

    Jakab, Lajos

    2014-03-23

    The author summarizes the structure of the connective tissues, the increasing motion of the constituents, which determine the role in establishing the structure and function of that. The structure and function of the connective tissue are related to each other in the resting as well as inflammatory states. It is emphasized that cellular events in the connective tissue are part of the defence of the organism, the localisation of the damage and, if possible, the maintenance of restitutio ad integrum. The organism responds to damage with inflammation, the non specific immune response, as well as specific, adaptive immunity. These processes are located in the connective tissue. Sterile and pathogenic inflammation are relatively similar processes, but inevitable differences are present, too. Sialic acids and glycoproteins containing sialic acids have important roles, and the role of Siglecs is also highlighted. Also, similarities and differences in damages caused by pathogens and sterile agents are briefly summarized. In addition, the roles of adhesion molecules linked to each other, and the whole event of inflammatory processes are presented. When considering practical consequences it is stressed that the structure (building up) of the organism and the defending function of inflammation both have fundamental importance. Inflammation has a crucial role in maintaining the integrity and the unimpaired somato-psychological state of the organism. Thus, inflammation serves as a tool of organism identical with the natural immune response, inseparably connected with the specific, adaptive immune response. The main events of the inflammatory processes take place in the connective tissue.

  14. Diverticular Disease of the Colon: Neuromuscular Function Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Bassotti, Gabrio; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Bernardini, Nunzia; Dore, Maria P

    2016-10-01

    Colonic diverticular disease is a frequent finding in daily clinical practice. However, its pathophysiological mechanisms are largely unknown. This condition is likely the result of several concomitant factors occurring together to cause anatomic and functional abnormalities, leading as a result to the outpouching of the colonic mucosa. A pivotal role seems to be played by an abnormal colonic neuromuscular function, as shown repeatedly in these patients, and by an altered visceral perception. There is recent evidence that these abnormalities might be related to the derangement of the enteric innervation, to an abnormal distribution of mucosal neuropeptides, and to low-grade mucosal inflammation. The latter might be responsible for the development of visceral hypersensitivity, often causing abdominal pain in a subset of these patients.

  15. Astaxanthin inhibits tumor invasion by decreasing extracellular matrix production and induces apoptosis in experimental rat colon carcinogenesis by modulating the expressions of ERK-2, NFkB and COX-2.

    PubMed

    Nagendraprabhu, Ponnuraj; Sudhandiran, Ganapasam

    2011-04-01

    Colon cancer is the third most malignant neoplasm in the world and it remains an important cause of mortality in Asian and Western countries. Astaxanthin (AST), a major component of carotenoids possesses attractive remedial features. The purpose of this study is to investigate the possible mechanism of action of astaxanthin against 1, 2 dimethyl hydrazine (DMH)-induced rat colon carcinogenesis. Wistar male rats were randomized into five groups, group 1 were control rats, group 2 were rats that received AST (15 mg/kg body wt p.o. everyday), rats in group 3 were induced with DMH (40 mg/kg body wt, s.c.), DMH-induced rats in groups 4 and 5 were either pre or post initiated with AST, respectively as in group 2. DMH-induced rats exhibited elevated expressions of Nuclear factor kappa B-p65 (NF-κB-p65), Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), Matrixmetallo proteinases (MMP) 2/9, Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and Extracellular signal-regulated kinase-2 (ERK-2) as confirmed by immunofluorescence. Further, Westernblot analysis of MMPs-2/9, ERK-2 and Protein kinase B (Akt) revealed increased expressions of these proteins in DMH-induced groups of rats. AST-treatment decreased the expressions of all these vital proteins, involved in colon carcinogenesis. The ability of AST to induce apoptosis in the colon of DMH-induced rats was confirmed by Annexin-V/PI staining in a confocal microscopy, DNA fragmentation analysis and expression of caspase-3 by Western blotting. In conclusion, astaxanthin exhibits anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects by inducing apoptosis in DMH-induced rat colon carcinogenesis by modulating the expressions of NFkB, COX-2, MMPs-2/9, Akt and ERK-2.

  16. Extracellular cathepsin K exerts antimicrobial activity and is protective against chronic intestinal inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Sina, Christian; Lipinski, Simone; Gavrilova, Olga; Aden, Konrad; Rehman, Ateequr; Till, Andreas; Rittger, Andrea; Podschun, Rainer; Meyer-Hoffert, Ulf; Haesler, Robert; Midtling, Emilie; Pütsep, Katrin; McGuckin, Michael A; Schreiber, Stefan; Saftig, Paul; Rosenstiel, Philip

    2013-04-01

    Cathepsin K is a lysosomal cysteine protease that has pleiotropic roles in bone resorption, arthritis, atherosclerosis, blood pressure regulation, obesity and cancer. Recently, it was demonstrated that cathepsin K-deficient (Ctsk(-/-) ) mice are less susceptible to experimental autoimmune arthritis and encephalomyelitis, which implies a functional role for cathepsin K in chronic inflammatory responses. Here, the authors address the relevance of cathepsin K in the intestinal immune response during chronic intestinal inflammation. Chronic colitis was induced by administration of 2% dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) in distilled water. Mice were assessed for disease severity, histopathology and endoscopic appearance. Furthermore, DSS-exposed Ctsk(-/-) mice were treated by rectal administration of recombinant cathepsin K. Intestinal microflora was assessed by real-time PCR and 16srDNA molecular fingerprinting of ileal and colonic mucosal and faecal samples. Using Ctsk(-/-) mice, the authors demonstrate a protective role of cathepsin K against chronic DSS colitis. Dissecting the underlying mechanisms the authors found cathepsin K to be present in intestinal goblet cells and the mucin layer. Furthermore, a direct cathepsin K-mediated bactericidal activity against intestinal bacteria was demonstrated, which potentially explains the alteration of intestinal microbiota observed in Ctsk(-/-) mice. Rectal administration of recombinant cathepsin K in DSS-treated Ctsk(-/-) mice ameliorates the severity of intestinal inflammation. These data identify extracellular cathepsin K as an intestinal antibacterial factor with anti-inflammatory potential and suggest that topical administration of cathepsin K might provide a therapeutic option for patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

  17. T cell PPAR γ is required for the anti-inflammatory efficacy of abscisic acid against experimental IBD

    PubMed Central

    Guri, Amir J; Evans, Nicholas P.; Hontecillas, Raquel; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep

    2010-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) has been shown to be effective in ameliorating chronic and acute inflammation. The objective of this study was to investigate whether ABA’s anti-inflammatory efficacy in the gut is dependent on peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPAR γ) in T cells. PPAR γ-expressing and T cell-specific PPAR γ null mice were fed diets with or without ABA (100 mg/kg) for 35 days prior to challenge with 2.5% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS). The severity of clinical disease was assessed daily, and mice were euthanized on day 7 of the DSS challenge. Colonic inflammation was assessed through macroscopic and histopathological examination of inflammatory lesions and real-time quantitative RT-PCR-based quantification of inflammatory genes. Flow cytometry was used to phenotypically characterize leukocyte populations in the blood and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). Colonic sections were stained immunohistochemically to determine the effect of ABA on colonic regulatory T (Treg) cells. ABA’s beneficial effects on disease activity were completely abrogated in T cell-specific PPAR γ null mice. Additionally, ABA improved colon histopathology, reduced blood F4/80+CD11b+ monocytes, increased the percentage of CD4+ T cells expressing the inhibitory molecule cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA4) in blood, and enhanced the number of Treg cells in the MLN and colons of PPAR γ expressing but not T cell-specific PPAR γ null mice. We conclude that dietary ABA ameliorates experimental IBD by enhancing Treg accumulation in the colonic lamina propria through a PPAR γ-dependent mechanism. PMID:21109419

  18. T cell PPARγ is required for the anti-inflammatory efficacy of abscisic acid against experimental IBD.

    PubMed

    Guri, Amir J; Evans, Nicholas P; Hontecillas, Raquel; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep

    2011-09-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) has been shown to be effective in ameliorating chronic and acute inflammation. The objective of this study was to investigate whether ABA's anti-inflammatory efficacy in the gut is dependent on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) in T cells. PPARγ-expressing and T cell-specific PPARγ null mice were fed diets with or without ABA (100 mg/kg) for 35 days prior to challenge with 2.5% dextran sodium sulfate. The severity of clinical disease was assessed daily, and mice were euthanized on Day 7 of the dextran sodium sulfate challenge. Colonic inflammation was assessed through macroscopic and histopathological examination of inflammatory lesions and real-time quantitative RT-PCR-based quantification of inflammatory genes. Flow cytometry was used to phenotypically characterize leukocyte populations in the blood and mesenteric lymph nodes. Colonic sections were stained immunohistochemically to determine the effect of ABA on colonic regulatory T (T(reg)) cells. ABA's beneficial effects on disease activity were completely abrogated in T cell-specific PPARγ null mice. Additionally, ABA improved colon histopathology, reduced blood F4/80(+)CD11b(+) monocytes, increased the percentage of CD4(+) T cells expressing the inhibitory molecule cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 in blood and enhanced the number of T(reg) cells in the mesenteric lymph nodes and colons of PPARγ-expressing but not T cell-specific PPARγ null mice. We conclude that dietary ABA ameliorates experimental inflammatory bowel disease by enhancing T(reg) cell accumulation in the colonic lamina propria through a PPARγ-dependent mechanism. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Vancomycin pre-treatment impairs tissue healing in experimental colitis: Importance of innate lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Di; Cai, Chenwen; Zheng, Qing; Jin, Shuang; Song, Dongjuan; Shen, Jun; Ran, Zhihua

    2017-01-29

    The interplay between luminal microbes and innate immunity during colonic epithelial repair has been well noted. At the same time, antibiotic has widely been used during flare-ups of ulcerative colitis. The possible effects of luminal microbiota disruption caused by antibiotics usage on epithelial repairing have been scarcely discussed. Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) embedded in the lamina propria can be modulated by gut microbes, resulting in altered colonic IL-22/pSTAT3 levels, which is considered a prominent molecular axis in tissue repairing after epithelium damage. This study aimed to investigate whether antibiotics could interfere with ILCs-dependent tissue repair. Dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis was established in mice pre-treated with reagent of different antibiotic spectrum. Both morphological and molecular markers of tissue repair after DSS cessation were detected. ILCs population and function status were also recorded. Further attention was paid to the response of dendritic cells after antibiotics treatment, which were claimed to regulate colonic ILC3s in an IL-23 dependent way. Using of vancomycin resulted in delayed tissue repairing after experimental colitis. Both colonic IL-22/pSTAT3 axis and ILC3 population were found decreased in this situation. Vancomycin treatment diminished the upstream IL-23 and producer dendritic cell population. The reduced dendritic cell number may due to inadequate chemokines and colony-stimulating factors supply. Presence of vancomycin-sensitive microbiota is required for the maturation of ILC3-activating dendritic cells hence maintain the sufficient IL-22/pSTAT3 level in the colon during tissue healing. Manipulation of colonic microbiota may help achieve colonic mucosal healing post inflammation and injury. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. General Information about Colon Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Colon Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Colon Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  1. Systemic inflammation induces axon injury during brain inflammation.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Beatriz; Jukes, John-Paul; Vergara-Irigaray, Nuria; Errea, Oihana; Villoslada, Pablo; Perry, V Hugh; Newman, Tracey A

    2011-12-01

    Axon injury is a key contributor to the progression of disability in multiple sclerosis (MS). Systemic infections, which frequently precede relapses in MS, have been linked to clinical progression in Alzheimer's disease. There is evidence of a role for the innate immune system in MS lesions, as axonal injury is associated with macrophage activation. We hypothesize that systemic inflammation leads to enhanced axonal damage in MS as a consequence of innate immune system activation. Monophasic experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) was induced in a cohort of Lewis rats. The animals received a systemic challenge with either an inflammagen (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]) or saline as a control, at 1, 3, or 6 weeks into the remission phase of the disease. The clinical outcome, cellular recruitment to lesions, degree of tissue damage, and cytokine profiles were measured. We found that systemic inflammation activates the central nervous system (CNS) innate immune response and results in a switch in the macrophage/microglia phenotype. This switch was accompanied by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) expression and increased axon injury. This increased injury occurred independently of the re-emergence of overt clinical signs. Our evidence indicates that microglia/macrophages, associated with lesions, respond to circulating cytokines, produced in response to an inflammatory event outside the CNS, by producing immune mediators that lead to tissue damage. This has implications for people with MS, in which prevention and stringent management of systemic infectious diseases may slow disease progression. Copyright © 2011 American Neurological Association.

  2. Colonization, mouse-style

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Several recent papers, including one in BMC Evolutionary Biology, examine the colonization history of house mice. As well as background for the analysis of mouse adaptation, such studies offer a perspective on the history of movements of the humans that accidentally transported the mice. See research article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2148/10/325 PMID:20977781

  3. Inflammation in dry eye.

    PubMed

    Stern, Michael E; Pflugfelder, Stephen C

    2004-04-01

    Dry eye is a condition of altered tear composition that results from a diseased or dysfunctional lacrimal functional unit. Evidence suggests that inflammation causes structural alterations and/or functional paralysis of the tear-secreting glands. Changes in tear composition resulting from lacrimal dysfunction, increased evaporation and/or poor clearance have pro-inflammatory effects on the ocular surface. This inflammation is responsible in part for the irritation symptoms, ocular surface epithelial disease, and altered corneal epithelial barrier function in dry eye. Anti-inflammatory therapies for dry eye target one or more of the inflammatory mediators/pathways that have been identified in dry eye.

  4. Quercetin, Inflammation and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yao; Yao, Jiaying; Han, Chunyan; Yang, Jiaxin; Chaudhry, Maria Tabassum; Wang, Shengnan; Liu, Hongnan; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    In vitro and some animal models have shown that quercetin, a polyphenol derived from plants, has a wide range of biological actions including anti-carcinogenic, anti-inflammatory and antiviral activities; as well as attenuating lipid peroxidation, platelet aggregation and capillary permeability. This review focuses on the physicochemical properties, dietary sources, absorption, bioavailability and metabolism of quercetin, especially main effects of quercetin on inflammation and immune function. According to the results obtained both in vitro and in vivo, good perspectives have been opened for quercetin. Nevertheless, further studies are needed to better characterize the mechanisms of action underlying the beneficial effects of quercetin on inflammation and immunity. PMID:26999194

  5. Inflammation and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Coussens, Lisa M.; Werb, Zena

    2009-01-01

    Recent data have expanded the concept that inflammation is a critical component of tumour progression. Many cancers arise from sites of infection, chronic irritation and inflammation. It is now becoming clear that the tumour microenvironment, which is largely orchestrated by inflammatory cells, is an indispensable participant in the neoplastic process, fostering proliferation, survival and migration. In addition, tumour cells have co-opted some of the signalling molecules of the innate immune system, such as selectins, chemokines and their receptors for invasion, migration and metastasis. These insights are fostering new anti-inflammatory therapeutic approaches to cancer development. PMID:12490959

  6. Cryoglobulin-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Denko, C W

    1985-10-01

    Inflammation of the rat footpad followed injection of cryoglobulin in crystalline form (Type I) and injection of cryoglobulin in solution (Type II). Rats deficient in essential fatty acids responded with diminished swelling which corrected to normal levels by addition of prostaglandin E1 suggesting that this reaction is prostaglandin mediated. Addition of bradykinin produced no effect. Aggregated cryoglobulin proved more inflammogenic than non-aggregated cryoglobulin. Pre-treatment with choline salicylate and colchicine reduced swelling while pre-treatment with dipyridamole increased edema following cryoglobulin inoculation. Cryoglobulin is considered to be an acute phase reactant in inflammation.

  7. Dietary ZnO nanoparticles alters intestinal microbiota and inflammation response in weaned piglets

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Tian; Lai, Wenqing; Han, Miaomiao; Han, Meng; Ma, Xi; Zhang, Liying

    2017-01-01

    The present study was carried out to determine whether low dose of zinc oxide nanoparticles (Nano-ZnO) could serve as a potential substitute of pharmacological dose of traditional ZnO in weaned piglets. 180 crossbred weaning piglets were randomly assigned to 3 treatments. Experimental animals were fed basal diet supplemented with 0 mg Zn/kg (Control), 600 mg Zn/kg (Nano-ZnO) and 2000 mg Zn/kg (ZnO) for 14 days. On day 14 after weaning, the piglets fed Nano-ZnO did not differ from those fed traditional ZnO in growth performance and jejunal morphology, while Nano-ZnO treatment could significantly alleviate the incidence of diarrhea (P < 0.05). In jejunum, the mRNA expressions of intestinal antioxidant enzymes and tight junction proteins were increased (P < 0.05) in Nano-ZnO treatment. In ileum, the expression levels of IFN-γ, IL-1β, TNF-α and NF-κB were decreased (P < 0.05). Gene sequencing analysis of 16S rRNA revealed that dietary Nano-ZnO increased the bacterial richness and diversity in ileum, while decreased both of them in cecum and colon. Specifically, the relative abundances of Streptococcus in ileum, Lactobacillus in colon were increased, while the relative abundances of Lactobacillus in ileum, Oscillospira and Prevotella in colon were decreased (P < 0.05). In conclusion, our data reveal that low dose of Nano-ZnO (600 mg Zn/kg) can effectively reduce piglet diarrhea incidence, similar to high dose of traditional ZnO (2000 mg Zn/kg), which may be mediated by improving intestinal microbiota and inflammation response in piglets, and help to reduce zinc environmental pollution. PMID:29029398

  8. Streptococcus Adherence and Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Nobbs, Angela H.; Lamont, Richard J.; Jenkinson, Howard F.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Streptococci readily colonize mucosal tissues in the nasopharynx; the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary tracts; and the skin. Each ecological niche presents a series of challenges to successful colonization with which streptococci have to contend. Some species exist in equilibrium with their host, neither stimulating nor submitting to immune defenses mounted against them. Most are either opportunistic or true pathogens responsible for diseases such as pharyngitis, tooth decay, necrotizing fasciitis, infective endocarditis, and meningitis. Part of the success of streptococci as colonizers is attributable to the spectrum of proteins expressed on their surfaces. Adhesins enable interactions with salivary, serum, and extracellular matrix components; host cells; and other microbes. This is the essential first step to colonization, the development of complex communities, and possible invasion of host tissues. The majority of streptococcal adhesins are anchored to the cell wall via a C-terminal LPxTz motif. Other proteins may be surface anchored through N-terminal lipid modifications, while the mechanism of cell wall associations for others remains unclear. Collectively, these surface-bound proteins provide Streptococcus species with a “coat of many colors,” enabling multiple intimate contacts and interplays between the bacterial cell and the host. In vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated direct roles for many streptococcal adhesins as colonization or virulence factors, making them attractive targets for therapeutic and preventive strategies against streptococcal infections. There is, therefore, much focus on applying increasingly advanced molecular techniques to determine the precise structures and functions of these proteins, and their regulatory pathways, so that more targeted approaches can be developed. PMID:19721085

  9. The role of T cell PPAR gamma in mice with experimental inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Guri, Amir J; Mohapatra, Saroj K; Horne, William T; Hontecillas, Raquel; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep

    2010-06-10

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR gamma) is a nuclear receptor whose activation has been shown to modulate macrophage and T cell-mediated inflammation. The objective of this study was to investigate the mechanisms by which the deletion of PPAR gamma in T cells modulates immune cell distribution and colonic gene expression and the severity of experimental IBD. PPAR gamma flfl; CD4 Cre+ (CD4cre) or Cre- (WT) mice were challenged with 2.5% dextran sodium sulfate in their drinking water for 0, 2, or 7 days. Mice were scored on disease severity both clinically and histopathologically. Flow cytometry was used to assess lymphocyte and macrophage populations in the blood, spleen, and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). Global gene expression in colonic mucosa was profiled using Affymetrix microarrays. The deficiency of PPAR gamma in T cells accelerated the onset of disease and body weight loss. Examination of colon histopathology revealed significantly greater epithelial erosion, leukocyte infiltration, and mucosal thickening in the CD4cre mice on day 7. CD4cre mice had more CD8+ T cells than WT mice and fewer CD4+ FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Treg) and IL10+ CD4+ T cells in blood and MLN, respectively. Transcriptomic profiling revealed around 3000 genes being transcriptionally altered as a result of DSS challenge in CD4cre mice. These included up-regulated mRNA expression of adhesion molecules, proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-1beta, and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS-3) on day 7. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) showed that the ribosome and Krebs cycle pathways were downregulated while the apoptosis pathway was upregulated in colons of mice lacking PPAR gamma in T cells. The expression of PPAR gamma in T cells is involved in preventing gut inflammation by regulating colonic expression of adhesion molecules and inflammatory mediators at later stages of disease while favoring the recruitment of Treg to the mucosal inductive

  10. Giant colonic volvulus due to colonic pseudo-obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Karaman, Kerem; Tanoglu, Alpaslan; Beyazit, Yavuz; Han, Ismet

    2015-01-01

    Acute colonic pseudo-obstruction (ACPO), also known as Ogilvie’s syndrome, is a clinical syndrome characterised by gross dilation of the caecum and right hemicolon, which sometimes extends to the sigmoid colon and rectum in the absence of an anatomic lesion in the intestinal lumen. It is characterised by impaired propulsion of contents of the gastrointestinal tract, which results in a clinical picture of intestinal obstruction. A careful examination of the markedly distended colon can exclude several colonic pathologies, including mechanical obstruction and other causes of toxic megacolon. ACPO can sometimes predispose or mimic colonic volvulus, especially in geriatric patients. PMID:25716038

  11. Impaired Self-Renewal and Increased Colitis and Dysplastic Lesions in Colonic Mucosa of AKR1B8 Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yi; Ma, Jun; Yan, Ruilan; Ling, Hongyan; Li, Xiaoning; Yang, Wancai; Gao, John; Huang, Chenfei; Bu, Yiwen; Cao, Yu; He, Yingchun; Wan, Laxiang; Zu, Xuyu; Liu, Jianghua; Huang, Mei Chris; Stenson, William F; Liao, Duan-Fang; Cao, Deliang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Ulcerative colitis (UC) and colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC) is a serious health issue, but etiopathological factors remain unclear. Aldo-keto reductase 1B10 (AKR1B10) is specifically expressed in the colonic epithelium, but down-regulated in colorectal cancer. This study was aimed to investigate the etiopathogenic role of AKR1B10 in UC and CAC. Experimental design UC and CAC biopsies (paraffin-embedded sections) and frozen tissues were collected to examine AKR1B10 expression. Aldo-keto reductase 1B8 (the ortholog of human AKR1B10) knockout (AKR1B8 −/−) mice were produced to estimate its role in the susceptibility and severity of chronic colitis and associated dysplastic lesions, induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) at a low dose (2%). Genome-wide Exome sequencing was used to profile DNA damage in DSS-induced colitis and tumors. Results AKR1B10 expression was markedly diminished in over 90% of UC and CAC tissues. AKR1B8 deficiency led to reduced lipid synthesis from butyrate and diminished proliferation of colonic epithelial cells. The DSS-treated AKR1B8 −/− mice demonstrated impaired injury repair of colonic epithelium and more severe bleeding, inflammation, and ulceration. These AKR1B8 −/− mice had more severe oxidative stress and DNA damage, and dysplasias were more frequent and at a higher grade in the AKR1B8 −/− mice than in wild type mice. Palpable masses were seen in the AKR1B8 −/− mice only, not in wild type. Conclusion AKR1B8 is a critical protein in the proliferation and injury repair of the colonic epithelium and in the pathogenesis of UC and CAC, being a new etiopathogenic factor of these diseases. PMID:25538260

  12. Obesity, Inflammation, and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Deng, Tuo; Lyon, Christopher J; Bergin, Stephen; Caligiuri, Michael A; Hsueh, Willa A

    2016-05-23

    Obesity, a worldwide epidemic, confers increased risk for multiple serious conditions, including cancer, and is increasingly recognized as a growing cause of preventable cancer risk. Chronic inflammation, a well-known mediator of cancer, is a central characteristic of obesity, leading to many of its complications, and obesity-induced inflammation confers additional cancer risk beyond obesity itself. Multiple mechanisms facilitate this strong association between cancer and obesity. Adipose tissue is an important endocrine organ, secreting several hormones, including leptin and adiponectin, and chemokines that can regulate tumor behavior, inflammation, and the tumor microenvironment. Excessive adipose expansion during obesity causes adipose dysfunction and inflammation to increase systemic levels of proinflammatory factors. Cells from adipose tissue, such as cancer-associated adipocytes and adipose-derived stem cells, enter the cancer microenvironment to enhance protumoral effects. Dysregulated metabolism that stems from obesity, including insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, and dyslipidemia, can further impact tumor growth and development. This review describes how adipose tissue becomes inflamed in obesity, summarizes ways these mechanisms impact cancer development, and discusses their role in four adipose-associated cancers that demonstrate elevated incidence or mortality in obesity.

  13. Cannabinoids, inflammation, and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Zurier, Robert B; Burstein, Sumner H

    2016-11-01

    Cannabinoids apparently act on inflammation through mechanisms different from those of agents such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). As a class, the cannabinoids are generally free from the adverse effects associated with NSAIDs. Their clinical development thus provides a new approach to treatment of diseases characterized by acute and chronic inflammation and fibrosis. A concise survey of the anti-inflammatory actions of the phytocannabinoids Δ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol, cannabichromene, and cannabinol is presented. Mention is also made of the noncannabinoid plant components and pyrolysis products, followed by a discussion of 3 synthetic preparations-Cesamet (nabilone; Meda Pharmaceuticals, Somerset, NJ, USA), Marinol (dronabinol; THC; AbbVie, Inc., North Chicago, IL, USA), and Sativex (Cannabis extract; GW Pharmaceuticals, Cambridge United Kingdom)-that have anti-inflammatory effects. A fourth synthetic cannabinoid, ajulemic acid (AJA; CT-3; Resunab; Corbus Pharmaceuticals, Norwood, MA, USA), is discussed in greater detail because it represents the most recent advance in this area and is currently undergoing 3 phase 2 clinical trials by Corbus Pharmaceuticals. The endogenous cannabinoids, including the closely related lipoamino acids, are then discussed. The review concludes with a presentation of a possible mechanism for the anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic actions of these substances. Thus, several cannabinoids may be considered candidates for development as anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic agents. Of special interest is their possible use for treatment of chronic inflammation, a major unmet medical need.-Zurier, R. B., Burstein, S. H. Cannabinoids, inflammation, and fibrosis. © FASEB.

  14. Ion channels in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Eisenhut, Michael; Wallace, Helen

    2011-04-01

    Most physical illness in vertebrates involves inflammation. Inflammation causes disease by fluid shifts across cell membranes and cell layers, changes in muscle function and generation of pain. These disease processes can be explained by changes in numbers or function of ion channels. Changes in ion channels have been detected in diarrhoeal illnesses, pyelonephritis, allergy, acute lung injury and systemic inflammatory response syndromes involving septic shock. The key role played by changes in ion transport is directly evident in inflammation-induced pain. Expression or function of all major categories of ion channels like sodium, chloride, calcium, potassium, transient receptor potential, purinergic receptor and acid-sensing ion channels can be influenced by cyto- and chemokines, prostaglandins, leukotrienes, histamine, ATP, reactive oxygen species and protons released in inflammation. Key pathways in this interaction are cyclic nucleotide, phosphoinositide and mitogen-activated protein kinase-mediated signalling, direct modification by reactive oxygen species like nitric oxide, ATP or protons and disruption of the cytoskeleton. Therapeutic interventions to modulate the adverse and overlapping effects of the numerous different inflammatory mediators on each ion transport system need to target adversely affected ion transport systems directly and locally.

  15. Dietary modulation of inflammation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Inflammation is heightened innate immune response caused by infection or wound. It is a part of essential immune responses for host defense against invading pathogens and wound healing which are the key biological processes necessary for the survival of all multi-cellular organisms. In mammals, it i...

  16. Effect of low molecular weight heparin rectal suppository on experimental ulcerative colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Luo, Junyong; Cao, Jichao; Jiang, Xueliang; Cui, Huifei

    2010-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect and possible mechanism of rectally administered low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) on experimental ulcerative colitis. LMWH rectal suppository was prepared and its efficacy was studied by macroscopical and histological scoring systems as well as myeloperoxidase activity. Serum levels, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and a link factor of blood coagulation and inflammation factor Xa (FXa) were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The expression of Musashi-1 (as an intestinal stem cell marker) in the colons was assessed by immunohistochemical analysis. The results showed that LMWH rectal suppository significantly decreased serum levels of TNF-α, IL-6 as well as FXa, while increased the expression of Musashi-1 in colon compared with acetic acid induced ulcerative colitis model group. All these preliminary results indicate LMWH rectal suppository is promising for treatment of ulcerative colitis. 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. [Vaginal colonization of group B Streptococcus: a study in 267 cases of factory women].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y Z; Yang, Y H; Zhang, X L

    1996-02-01

    An epidemiologic study on vaginal colonization of group B streptococcus (GBS) from non-pregnancy women was carried out. Two hundred sixty seven female workers were studied. The carrier rate of GBS in vaginal specimens was 10.86%. Women aged 45 years old and above had more cases with genital tract GBS colonization. Women with vaginal colonization had more history of miscarriage and using IUD. We did not find the positive correlations between vaginal colonization and oral contraceptive, ovarian cyst, hysteromyoma in our study group. Women with gynecologic inflammation had more cases with vaginal GBS colonization. There is a significant increase for women with vaginitis and cervicitis. Serotyping study showed that types III and II were the most frequent GBS types isolated from the carriers. Antibiotic sensitivity test showed that more than half GBS strains were resistant to oxcillin and amikacin.

  18. Longitudinal analysis of the group A Streptococcus transcriptome in experimental pharyngitis in cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Virtaneva, Kimmo; Porcella, Stephen F; Graham, Morag R; Ireland, Robin M; Johnson, Claire A; Ricklefs, Stacy M; Babar, Imran; Parkins, Larye D; Romero, Romina A; Corn, G Judson; Gardner, Don J; Bailey, John R; Parnell, Michael J; Musser, James M

    2005-06-21

    Identification of the genetic events that contribute to host-pathogen interactions is important for understanding the natural history of infectious diseases and developing therapeutics. Transcriptome studies conducted on pathogens have been central to this goal in recent years. However, most of these investigations have focused on specific end points or disease phases, rather than analysis of the entire time course of infection. To gain a more complete understanding of how bacterial gene expression changes over time in a primate host, the transcriptome of group A Streptococcus (GAS) was analyzed during an 86-day infection protocol in 20 cynomolgus macaques with experimental pharyngitis. The study used 260 custom Affymetrix (Santa Clara, CA) chips, and data were confirmed by TaqMan analysis. Colonization, acute, and asymptomatic phases of disease were identified. Successful colonization and severe inflammation were significantly correlated with an early onset of superantigen gene expression. The differential expression of two-component regulators covR and spy0680 (M1_spy0874) was significantly associated with GAS colony-forming units, inflammation, and phases of disease. Prophage virulence gene expression and prophage induction occurred predominantly during high pathogen cell densities and acute inflammation. We discovered that temporal changes in the GAS transcriptome were integrally linked to the phase of clinical disease and host-defense response. Knowledge of the gene expression patterns characterizing each phase of pathogen-host interaction provides avenues for targeted investigation of proven and putative virulence factors and genes of unknown function and will assist vaccine research.

  19. Abscisic acid ameliorates experimental IBD by downregulating cellular adhesion molecule expression and suppressing immune cell infiltration.

    PubMed

    Guri, Amir J; Hontecillas, Raquel; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep

    2010-12-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) has shown effectiveness in ameliorating inflammation in obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease models. The objective of this study was to determine whether ABA prevents or ameliorates experimental inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). C57BL/6J mice were fed diets with or without ABA (100mg/kg) for 35 days prior to challenge with 2.5% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS). The severity of clinical disease was assessed daily. Colonic mucosal lesions were evaluated by histopathology, and cellular adhesion molecular and inflammatory markers were assayed by real-time quantitative PCR. Flow cytometry was used to quantify leukocyte populations in the blood, spleen, and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). The effect of ABA on cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) expression in splenocytes was also investigated. ABA significantly ameliorated disease activity, colitis and reduced colonic leukocyte infiltration and inflammation. These improvements were associated with downregulation in vascular cell adhesion marker-1 (VCAM-1), E-selectin, and mucosal addressin adhesion marker-1 (MAdCAM-1) expression. ABA also increased CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-lymphocytes in blood and MLN and regulatory T cells in blood. In vitro, ABA increased CTLA-4 expression through a PPAR γ-dependent mechanism. We conclude that ABA ameliorates gut inflammation by modulating T cell distribution and adhesion molecule expression. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  20. Abscisic acid ameliorates experimental IBD by downregulating cellular adhesion molecule expression and suppressing immune cell infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Guri, Amir J; Hontecillas, Raquel; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Abscisic acid (ABA) has shown effectiveness in ameliorating inflammation in obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease models. The objective of this study was to determine whether ABA prevents or ameliorates experimental inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Methods C57BL/6J mice were fed diets with or without ABA (100 mg/kg) for 35 days prior to challenge with 2.5% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS). The severity of clinical disease was assessed daily. Colonic mucosal lesions were evaluated by histopathology, and cellular adhesion molecular and inflammatory markers were assayed by real-time quantitative PCR. Flow cytometry was used to quantify leukocyte populations in the blood, spleen, and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). The effect of ABA on cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) expression in splenocytes was also investigated. Results ABA significantly ameliorated disease activity, colitis and reduced colonic leukocyte infiltration and inflammation. These improvements were associated with down-regulation in vascular cell adhesion marker-1 (VCAM-1), E-selectin, and mucosal addressin adhesion marker-1 (MAdCAM-1) expression. ABA also increased CD4+ and CD8+ T-lymphocytes in blood and MLN and regulatory T-cells in blood. In vitro, ABA increased CTLA-4 expression through a PPAR γ-dependent mechanism. Conclusions We conclude that ABA ameliorates gut inflammation by modulating T cell distribution and adhesion molecule expression. PMID:20236740

  1. Dietary α-mangostin, a xanthone from mangosteen fruit, exacerbates experimental colitis and promotes dysbiosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Orozco, Fabiola; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M; Berman-Booty, Lisa D; Galley, Jeffrey D; Chitchumroonchokchai, Chureeporn; Mace, Thomas; Suksamrarn, Sunit; Bailey, Michael T; Clinton, Steven K; Lesinski, Gregory B; Failla, Mark L

    2014-06-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the colon. α-Mangostin (α-MG), the most abundant xanthone in mangosteen fruit, exerts anti-inflammatory and antibacterial activities in vitro. We evaluated the impact of dietary α-MG on murine experimental colitis and on the gut microbiota of healthy mice. Colitis was induced in C57BL/6J mice by administration of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). Mice were fed control diet or diet with α-MG (0.1%). α-MG exacerbated the pathology of DSS-induced colitis. Mice fed diet with α-MG had greater colonic inflammation and injury, as well as greater infiltration of CD3(+) and F4/80(+) cells, and colonic myeloperoxidase, than controls. Serum levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, IL-6, and serum amyloid A were also greater in α-MG-fed animals than in controls. The colonic and cecal microbiota of healthy mice fed α-MG but no DSS shifted to an increased abundance of Proteobacteria and decreased abundance of Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, a profile similar to that found in human UC. α-MG exacerbated colonic pathology during DSS-induced colitis. These effects may be associated with an induction of intestinal dysbiosis by α-MG. Our results suggest that the use of α-MG-containing supplements by patients with UC may have unintentional risk. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Dietary α-mangostin, a xanthone from mangosteen fruit, exacerbates experimental colitis and promotes dysbiosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Orozco, Fabiola; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M.; Berman-Booty, Lisa D.; Galley, Jeffrey D.; Chitchumroonchokchai, Chureeporn; Mace, Thomas; Suksamrarn, Sunit; Bailey, Michael T.; Clinton, Steven K.; Lesinski, Gregory B.; Failla, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Scope Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the colon. α-Mangostin (α-MG), the most abundant xanthone in mangosteen fruit, exerts anti-inflammatory and antibacterial activities in vitro. We evaluated the impact of dietary α-MG on murine experimental colitis and on the gut microbiota of healthy mice. Methods and results Colitis was induced in C57BL/6J mice by administration of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). Mice were fed control diet or diet with α-MG (0.1%). α-MG exacerbated the pathology of DSS-induced colitis. Mice fed diet with α-MG had greater colonic inflammation and injury, as well as greater infiltration of CD3+ and F4/80+ cells, and colonic myeloperoxidase, than controls. Serum levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, IL-6, and serum amyloid A were also greater in α-MG-fed animals than in controls. The colonic and cecal microbiota of healthy mice fed α-MG but no DSS shifted to an increased abundance of Proteobacteria and decreased abundance of Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, a profile similar to that found in human UC. Conclusion α-MG exacerbated colonic pathology during DSS-induced colitis. These effects may be associated with an induction of intestinal dysbiosis by α-MG. Our results suggest that the use of α-MG-containing supplements by patients with UC may have unintentional risk. PMID:24668769

  3. NS6180, a new KCa3.1 channel inhibitor prevents T-cell activation and inflammation in a rat model of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Strøbæk, D; Brown, DT; Jenkins, DP; Chen, Y-J; Coleman, N; Ando, Y; Chiu, P; Jørgensen, S; Demnitz, J; Wulff, H; Christophersen, P

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose The KCa3.1 channel is a potential target for therapy of immune disease. We identified a compound from a new chemical class of KCa3.1 inhibitors and assessed in vitro and in vivo inhibition of immune responses. Experimental Approach We characterized the benzothiazinone NS6180 (4-[[3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]methyl]-2H-1,4-benzothiazin-3(4H)-one) with respect to potency and molecular site of action on KCa3.1 channels, selectivity towards other targets, effects on T-cell activation as well as pharmacokinetics and inflammation control in colitis induced by 2,4-dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid, a rat model of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Key Results NS6180 inhibited cloned human KCa3.1 channels (IC50 = 9 nM) via T250 and V275, the same amino acid residues conferring sensitivity to triarylmethanes such as like TRAM-34. NS6180 inhibited endogenously expressed KCa3.1 channels in human, mouse and rat erythrocytes, with similar potencies (15–20 nM). NS6180 suppressed rat and mouse splenocyte proliferation at submicrolar concentrations and potently inhibited IL-2 and IFN-γ production, while exerting smaller effects on IL-4 and TNF-α and no effect on IL-17 production. Antibody staining showed KCa3.1 channels in healthy colon and strong up-regulation in association with infiltrating immune cells after induction of colitis. Despite poor plasma exposure, NS6180 (3 and 10 mg·kg−1 b.i.d.) dampened colon inflammation and improved body weight gain as effectively as the standard IBD drug sulfasalazine (300 mg·kg−1 q.d.). Conclusions and Implications NS6180 represents a novel class of KCa3.1 channel inhibitors which inhibited experimental colitis, suggesting KCa3.1 channels as targets for pharmacological control of intestinal inflammation. PMID:22891655

  4. An Orally Active Cannabis Extract with High Content in Cannabidiol attenuates Chemically-induced Intestinal Inflammation and Hypermotility in the Mouse.

    PubMed

    Pagano, Ester; Capasso, Raffaele; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Romano, Barbara; Parisi, Olga A; Finizio, Stefania; Lauritano, Anna; Marzo, Vincenzo Di; Izzo, Angelo A; Borrelli, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Anecdotal and scientific evidence suggests that Cannabis use may be beneficial in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. Here, we have investigated the effect of a standardized Cannabis sativa extract with high content of cannabidiol (CBD), here named CBD BDS for "CBD botanical drug substance," on mucosal inflammation and hypermotility in mouse models of intestinal inflammation. Colitis was induced in mice by intracolonic administration of dinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (DNBS). Motility was evaluated in the experimental model of intestinal hypermotility induced by irritant croton oil. CBD BDS or pure CBD were given - either intraperitoneally or by oral gavage - after the inflammatory insult (curative protocol). The amounts of CBD in the colon, brain, and liver after the oral treatments were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to ion trap-time of flight mass spectrometry. CBD BDS, both when given intraperitoneally and by oral gavage, decreased the extent of the damage (as revealed by the decrease in the colon weight/length ratio and myeloperoxidase activity) in the DNBS model of colitis. It also reduced intestinal hypermotility (at doses lower than those required to affect transit in healthy mice) in the croton oil model of intestinal hypermotility. Under the same experimental conditions, pure CBD did not ameliorate colitis while it normalized croton oil-induced hypermotility when given intraperitoneally (in a dose-related fashion) or orally (only at one dose). In conclusion, CBD BDS, given after the inflammatory insult, attenuates injury and motility in intestinal models of inflammation. These findings sustain the rationale of combining CBD with other minor Cannabis constituents and support the clinical development of CBD BDS for IBD treatment.

  5. An Orally Active Cannabis Extract with High Content in Cannabidiol attenuates Chemically-induced Intestinal Inflammation and Hypermotility in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Pagano, Ester; Capasso, Raffaele; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Romano, Barbara; Parisi, Olga A.; Finizio, Stefania; Lauritano, Anna; Marzo, Vincenzo Di; Izzo, Angelo A.; Borrelli, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Anecdotal and scientific evidence suggests that Cannabis use may be beneficial in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. Here, we have investigated the effect of a standardized Cannabis sativa extract with high content of cannabidiol (CBD), here named CBD BDS for “CBD botanical drug substance,” on mucosal inflammation and hypermotility in mouse models of intestinal inflammation. Colitis was induced in mice by intracolonic administration of dinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (DNBS). Motility was evaluated in the experimental model of intestinal hypermotility induced by irritant croton oil. CBD BDS or pure CBD were given - either intraperitoneally or by oral gavage – after the inflammatory insult (curative protocol). The amounts of CBD in the colon, brain, and liver after the oral treatments were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to ion trap-time of flight mass spectrometry. CBD BDS, both when given intraperitoneally and by oral gavage, decreased the extent of the damage (as revealed by the decrease in the colon weight/length ratio and myeloperoxidase activity) in the DNBS model of colitis. It also reduced intestinal hypermotility (at doses lower than those required to affect transit in healthy mice) in the croton oil model of intestinal hypermotility. Under the same experimental conditions, pure CBD did not ameliorate colitis while it normalized croton oil-induced hypermotility when given intraperitoneally (in a dose-related fashion) or orally (only at one dose). In conclusion, CBD BDS, given after the inflammatory insult, attenuates injury and motility in intestinal models of inflammation. These findings sustain the rationale of combining CBD with other minor Cannabis constituents and support the clinical development of CBD BDS for IBD treatment. PMID:27757083

  6. Immunity and Inflammation in Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Vezzani, Annamaria; Lang, Bethan; Aronica, Eleonora

    2016-01-01

    This review reports the available evidence on the activation of the innate and adaptive branches of the immune system and the related inflammatory processes in epileptic disorders and the putative pathogenic role of inflammatory processes developing in the brain, as indicated by evidence from experimental and clinical research. Indeed, there is increasing knowledge supporting a role of specific inflammatory mediators and immune cells in the generation and recurrence of epileptic seizures, as well as in the associated neuropathology and comorbidities. Major challenges in this field remain: a better understanding of the key inflammatory pathogenic pathways activated in chronic epilepsy and during epileptogenesis, and how to counteract them efficiently without altering the homeostatic tissue repair function of inflammation. The relevance of this information for developing novel therapies will be highlighted. PMID:26684336

  7. Intestinal CCL11 and eosinophilic inflammation is regulated by myeloid cell-specific RelA/p65 in mice.

    PubMed

    Waddell, Amanda; Ahrens, Richard; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Sherrill, Joseph D; Denson, Lee A; Steinbrecher, Kris A; Hogan, Simon P

    2013-05-01

    In inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), particularly ulcerative colitis, intestinal macrophages (MΦs), eosinophils, and the eosinophil-selective chemokine CCL11, have been associated with disease pathogenesis. MΦs, a source of CCL11, have been reported to be of a mixed classical (NF-κB-mediated) and alternatively activated (STAT-6-mediated) phenotype. The importance of NF-κB and STAT-6 pathways to the intestinal MΦ/CCL11 response and eosinophilic inflammation in the histopathology of experimental colitis is not yet understood. Our gene array analyses demonstrated elevated STAT-6- and NF-κB-dependent genes in pediatric ulcerative colitis colonic biopsies. Dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) exposure induced STAT-6 and NF-κB activation in mouse intestinal F4/80(+)CD11b(+)Ly6C(hi) (inflammatory) MΦs. DSS-induced CCL11 expression, eosinophilic inflammation, and histopathology were attenuated in RelA/p65(Δmye) mice, but not in the absence of STAT-6. Deletion of p65 in myeloid cells did not affect inflammatory MΦ recruitment or alter apoptosis, but did attenuate LPS-induced cytokine production (IL-6) and Ccl11 expression in purified F4/80(+)CD11b(+)Ly6C(hi) inflammatory MΦs. Molecular and cellular analyses revealed a link between expression of calprotectin (S100a8/S100a9), Ccl11 expression, and eosinophil numbers in the DSS-treated colon. In vitro studies of bone marrow-derived MΦs showed calprotectin-induced CCL11 production via a p65-dependent mechanism. Our results indicate that myeloid cell-specific NF-κB-dependent pathways play an unexpected role in CCL11 expression and maintenance of eosinophilic inflammation in experimental colitis. These data indicate that targeting myeloid cells and NF-κB-dependent pathways may be of therapeutic benefit for the treatment of eosinophilic inflammation and histopathology in IBD.

  8. Intestinal CCL11 and eosinophilic inflammation is regulated by myeloid cell-specific RelA/p65 in mice

    PubMed Central

    Waddell, Amanda; Ahrens, Richard; Tsai, Yi Ting; Sherrill, Joseph D.; Denson, Lee A.; Steinbrecher, Kris A.; Hogan, Simon P.

    2014-01-01

    In inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), particularly ulcerative colitis (UC), intestinal macrophages (MΦs), eosinophils and the eosinophil-selective chemokine CCL11 have been associated with disease pathogenesis. MΦs, a source of CCL11, have been reported to be of a mixed classical (NF-κB-mediated) and alternatively activated (STAT-6-mediated) phenotype. The importance of NF-κB and STAT-6 pathways to the intestinal MΦ/CCL11 response and eosinophilic inflammation in the histopathology of experimental colitis is not yet understood. Our gene array analyses demonstrated elevated STAT-6- and NF-κB-dependent genes in pediatric UC colonic biopsies. Dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) exposure induced STAT-6 and NF-κB activation in mouse intestinal F4/80+CD11b+Ly6Chi (inflammatory) MΦs. DSS-induced CCL11 expression, eosinophilic inflammation and histopathology were attenuated in RelA/p65Δmye mice but not in the absence of STAT-6. Deletion of p65 in myeloid cells did not affect inflammatory MΦ recruitment or alter apoptosis, but did attenuate lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine production (IL-6) and Ccl11 expression in purified F4/80+CD11b+Ly6Chi inflammatory MΦs. Molecular and cellular analyses revealed a link between expression of calprotectin (S100a8/S100a9), Ccl11 expression and eosinophil numbers in the DSS-treated colon. In vitro studies of bone marrow-derived MΦs showed calprotectin-induced CCL11 production via a p65-dependent mechanism. Our results indicate that myeloid cell-specific NF-κB-dependent pathways play an unexpected role in CCL11 expression and maintenance of eosinophilic inflammation in experimental colitis. These data indicate that targeting myeloid cells and NF-κB-dependent pathways may be of therapeutic benefit for the treatment of eosinophilic inflammation and histopathology in IBD. PMID:23562811

  9. Ursodeoxycholic acid and lithocholic acid exert anti-inflammatory actions in the colon.

    PubMed

    Ward, Joseph B J; Lajczak, Natalia K; Kelly, Orlaith B; O'Dwyer, Aoife M; Giddam, Ashwini K; Ní Gabhann, Joan; Franco, Placido; Tambuwala, Murtaza M; Jefferies, Caroline A; Keely, Simon; Roda, Aldo; Keely, Stephen J

    2017-06-01

    Ward JB, Lajczak NK, Kelly OB, O'Dwyer AM, Giddam AK, Ní Gabhann J, Franco P, Tambuwala MM, Jefferies CA, Keely S, Roda A, Keely SJ. Ursodeoxycholic acid and lithocholic acid exert anti-inflammatory actions in the colon. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 312: G550-G558, 2017. First published March 30, 2017; doi:10.1152/ajpgi.00256.2016.-Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) comprise a group of common and debilitating chronic intestinal disorders for which currently available therapies are often unsatisfactory. The naturally occurring secondary bile acid, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), has well-established anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective actions and may therefore be effective in treating IBD. We aimed to investigate regulation of colonic inflammatory responses by UDCA and to determine the potential impact of bacterial metabolism on its therapeutic actions. The anti-inflammatory efficacy of UDCA, a nonmetabolizable analog, 6α-methyl-UDCA (6-MUDCA), and its primary colonic metabolite lithocholic acid (LCA) was assessed in the murine dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) model of mucosal injury. The effects of bile acids on cytokine (TNF-α, IL-6, Il-1β, and IFN-γ) release from cultured colonic epithelial cells and mouse colonic tissue in vivo were investigated. Luminal bile acids were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. UDCA attenuated release of proinflammatory cytokines from colonic epithelial cells in vitro and was protective against the development of colonic inflammation in vivo. In contrast, although 6-MUDCA mimicked the effects of UDCA on epithelial cytokine release in vitro, it was ineffective in preventing inflammation in the DSS model. In UDCA-treated mice, LCA became the most common colonic bile acid. Finally, LCA treatment more potently inhibited epithelial cytokine release and protected against DSS-induced mucosal inflammation than did UDCA. These studies identify a new role for the primary metabolite of UDCA, LCA, in preventing colonic

  10. NoxO1 Controls Proliferation of Colon Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Moll, Franziska; Walter, Maria; Rezende, Flávia; Helfinger, Valeska; Vasconez, Estefania; De Oliveira, Tiago; Greten, Florian R; Olesch, Catherine; Weigert, Andreas; Radeke, Heinfried H; Schröder, Katrin

    2018-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by enzymes of the NADPH oxidase family serve as second messengers for cellular signaling. Processes such as differentiation and proliferation are regulated by NADPH oxidases. In the intestine, due to the exceedingly fast and constant renewal of the epithelium both processes have to be highly controlled and balanced. Nox1 is the major NADPH oxidase expressed in the gut, and its function is regulated by cytosolic subunits such as NoxO1. We hypothesize that the NoxO1-controlled activity of Nox1 contributes to a proper epithelial homeostasis and renewal in the gut. NoxO1 is highly expressed in the colon. Knockout of NoxO1 reduces the production of superoxide in colon crypts and is not subsidized by an elevated expression of its homolog p47phox. Knockout of NoxO1 increases the proliferative capacity and prevents apoptosis of colon epithelial cells. In mouse models of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis and azoxymethane/DSS induced colon cancer, NoxO1 has a protective role and may influence the population of natural killer cells. NoxO1 affects colon epithelium homeostasis and prevents inflammation.

  11. Restoration of the anti-proliferative and anti-migratory effects of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D by silibinin in vitamin D-resistant colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Vandanajay; Falzon, Miriam

    2015-07-01

    Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is the third most common cancer in developed countries. A large fraction of cases are linked to chronic intestinal inflammation, with concomitant increased TNF-α release and elevated Snail1/Snail2 levels. These transcription factors in turn suppress vitamin D receptor (VDR) expression, resulting in loss of responsiveness to the protective anti-proliferative and anti-migratory effects of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25D). Experimental and epidemiologic evidence support the use of natural products to target CRC. Here we show that the flavonolignan silibinin reverses the TNF-α-induced upregulation of Snail1 and Snail2 in the 1,25D-resistant human colon carcinoma cells HT-29. These silibinin effects are accompanied by an increase in VDR levels; Snail1 overexpression reverses these silibinin effects. Silibinin also restores promoter activity from a vitamin D-response element (VDRE) reporter construct. While 1,25D had no significant effect on HT-29 and SW480-R cell proliferation and migration, co-treatment with silibinin restored 1,25D responsiveness. In addition, co-treatment with silibinin plus 1,25D decreased proliferation and migration at doses where silibinin alone had no effect. These findings demonstrate that this combination may present a novel approach to target CRC in conditions of chronic colonic inflammation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Restoration of the anti-proliferative and anti-migratory effects of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D by silibinin in vitamin D-resistant colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Vandanajay; Falzon, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is the third most common cancer in developed countries. A large fraction of cases are linked to chronic intestinal inflammation, with concomitant increased TNF-α release and elevated Snail1/Snail2 levels. These transcription factors in turn suppress vitamin D receptor (VDR) expression, resulting in loss of responsiveness to the protective anti-proliferative and anti-migratory effects of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25D). Experimental and epidemiologic evidence support the use of natural products to target CRC. Here we show that the flavonolignan silibinin reverses the TNF-α-induced upregulation of Snail1 and Snail2 in the 1,25D-resistant human colon carcinoma cells HT-29. These silibinin effects are accompanied by an increase in VDR levels; Snail1 overexpression reverses these silibinin effects. Silibinin also restores promoter activity from a vitamin D-response element (VDRE) reporter construct. While 1,25D had no significant effect on HT-29 and SW480-R cell proliferation and migration, co-treatment with silibinin restored 1,25D responsiveness. In addition, co-treatment with silibinin plus 1,25D decreased proliferation and migration at doses where silibinin alone had no effect. These findings demonstrate that this combination may present a novel approach to target CRC in conditions of chronic colonic inflammation. PMID:25846868

  13. Colonic Fermentation Promotes Decompression sickness in Rats

    PubMed Central

    de Maistre, Sébastien; Vallée, Nicolas; Gempp, Emmanuel; Lambrechts, Kate; Louge, Pierre; Duchamp, Claude; Blatteau, Jean-Eric

    2016-01-01

    Massive bubble formation after diving can lead to decompression sickness (DCS). During dives with hydrogen as a diluent for oxygen, decreasing the body’s H2 burden by inoculating hydrogen-metabolizing microbes into the gut reduces the risk of DCS. So we set out to investigate if colonic fermentation leading to endogenous hydrogen production promotes DCS in fasting rats. Four hours before an experimental dive, 93 fasting rats were force-fed, half of them with mannitol and the other half with water. Exhaled hydrogen was measured before and after force-feeding. Following the hyperbaric exposure, we looked for signs of DCS. A higher incidence of DCS was found in rats force-fed with mannitol than in those force-fed with water (80%, [95%CI 56, 94] versus 40%, [95%CI 19, 64], p < 0.01). In rats force-fed with mannitol, metronidazole pretreatment reduced the incidence of DCS (33%, [95%CI 15, 57], p = 0.005) at the same time as it inhibited colonic fermentation (14 ± 35 ppm versus 118 ± 90 ppm, p = 0.0001). Pre-diveingestion of mannitol increased the incidence of DCS in fasting rats when colonic fermentation peaked during the decompression phase. More generally, colonic fermentation in rats on a normal diet could promote DCS through endogenous hydrogen production. PMID:26853722

  14. Constitutive formulations for the mechanical investigation of colonic tissues.

    PubMed

    Carniel, Emanuele Luigi; Gramigna, Vera; Fontanella, Chiara Giulia; Stefanini, Cesare; Natali, Arturo N

    2014-05-01

    A constitutive framework is provided for the characterization of the mechanical behavior of colonic tissues, as a fundamental tool for the development of numerical models of the colonic structures. The constitutive analysis is performed by a multidisciplinary approach that requires the cooperation between experimental and computational competences. The preliminary investigation pertains to the review of the tissues histology. The complex structural configuration of the tissues and the specific distributions of fibrous elements entail the nonlinear mechanical behavior and the anisotropic response. The identification of the mechanical properties requires to perform mechanical tests according to different loading situations, as different loading directions. Because of the typical functionality of colon structures, the tissues mechanics is investigated by tensile tests, which are performed on taenia coli and haustra specimens from fresh pig colons. Accounting for the histological investigation and the results from the mechanical tests, a specific hyperelastic framework is provided within the theory of fiber-reinforced composite materials. Preliminary analytical formulations are defined to identify the constitutive parameters by the inverse analysis of the experimental tests. Finite element models of the specimens are developed accounting for the actual configuration of the colon structures to verify the quality of the results. The good agreement between experimental and numerical model results suggests the reliability of the constitutive formulations and parameters. Finally, the developed constitutive analysis makes it possible to identify the mechanical behavior and properties of the different colonic tissues. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Colonic intussusception in descending colon: An unusual presentation of colon lipoma

    PubMed Central

    Bagherzadeh Saba, Reza; Sadeghi, Amir; Rad, Neda; Safari, Mohammad Taghi; Barzegar, Farnoush

    2016-01-01

    Lipomas of the colon are relatively rare benign soft tissue tumors derived from mature adipocytes of mesenchymatic origin. During colonoscopy, surgery or autopsy they are generally discovered incidentally. Most cases are asymptomatic, with a small tumor size, and do not need any special treatment. However, in the cases with larger in size of tumor some symptoms such as anemia, abdominal pain, constipation, diarrhea, bleeding, or intussusception may be presented. We reported a 47-year-old woman with colonic intussusception in the descending colon caused by colonic lipoma and diagnosed after surgical exploration for obstructive colonic mass. PMID:28224035

  16. Low-grade inflammation decreases emotion recognition - Evidence from the vaccination model of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Balter, Leonie J T; Hulsken, Sasha; Aldred, Sarah; Drayson, Mark T; Higgs, Suzanne; Veldhuijzen van Zanten, Jet J C S; Raymond, Jane E; Bosch, Jos A

    2018-05-06

    The ability to adequately interpret the mental state of another person is key to complex human social interaction. Recent evidence suggests that this ability, considered a hallmark of 'theory of mind' (ToM), becomes impaired by inflammation. However, extant supportive empirical evidence is based on experiments that induce not only inflammation but also induce discomfort and sickness, factors that could also account for temporary social impairment. Hence, an experimental inflammation manipulation was applied that avoided this confound, isolating effects of inflammation and social interaction. Forty healthy male participants (mean age = 25, SD = 5 years) participated in this double-blind placebo-controlled crossover trial. Inflammation was induced using Salmonella Typhi vaccination (0.025 mg; Typhim Vi, Sanofi Pasteur, UK); saline-injection was used as a control. About 6 h 30 m after injection in each condition, participants completed the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test (RMET), a validated test for assessing how well the mental states of others can be inferred through observation of the eyes region of the face. Vaccination induced systemic inflammation, elevating IL-6 by +419% (p < .001), without fever, sickness symptoms (e.g., nausea, light-headedness), or mood changes (all p's > .21). Importantly, compared to placebo, vaccination significantly reduced RMET accuracy (p < .05). RMET stimuli selected on valence (positive, negative, neutral) provided no evidence of a selective impact of treatment. By utilizing an inflammation-induction procedure that avoided concurrent sicknesses or symptoms in a double-blinded design, the present study provides further support for the hypothesis that immune activation impairs ToM. Such impairment may provide a mechanistic link explaining social-cognitive deficits in psychopathologies that exhibit low-grade inflammation, such as major depression. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Vibrio cholerae Colonization of Soft-Shelled Turtles

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiazheng; Yan, Meiying; Gao, He; Lu, Xin

    2017-01-01

    epidemiological investigations, no experimental studies have demonstrated the colonization by V. cholerae on soft-shelled turtles. The present studies will benefit our understanding of the interaction between V. cholerae and the soft-shelled turtle. We demonstrated the colonization by V. cholerae on the soft-shelled turtle's body surface and in the intestine and revealed the different roles of major V. cholerae factors for colonization on the body surface and in the intestine. Our work provides experimental evidence for the role of soft-shelled turtles in cholera transmission. In addition, this study also shows the possibility for the soft-shelled turtle to serve as a new animal model for studying the interaction between V. cholerae and aquatic hosts. PMID:28600312

  18. Vibrio cholerae Colonization of Soft-Shelled Turtles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiazheng; Yan, Meiying; Gao, He; Lu, Xin; Kan, Biao

    2017-07-15

    investigations, no experimental studies have demonstrated the colonization by V. cholerae on soft-shelled turtles. The present studies will benefit our understanding of the interaction between V. cholerae and the soft-shelled turtle. We demonstrated the colonization by V. cholerae on the soft-shelled turtle's body surface and in the intestine and revealed the different roles of major V. cholerae factors for colonization on the body surface and in the intestine. Our work provides experimental evidence for the role of soft-shelled turtles in cholera transmission. In addition, this study also shows the possibility for the soft-shelled turtle to serve as a new animal model for studying the interaction between V. cholerae and aquatic hosts. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  19. Management of colon stents based on Bernoulli's principle.

    PubMed

    Uno, Yoshiharu

    2017-03-01

    The colonic self-expanding metal stent (SEMS) has been widely used for "bridge to surgery" and palliative therapy. However, if the spread of SEMS is insufficient, not only can a decompression effect not be obtained but also perforation and obstructive colitis can occur. The mechanism of occurrence of obstructive colitis and perforation was investigated by flow dynamics. Bernoulli's principle was applied, assuming that the cause of inflammation and perforation represented the pressure difference in the proximal lumen and stent. The variables considered were proximal lumen diameter, stent lumen diameter, flow rate into the proximal lumen, and fluid density. To model the right colon, the proximal lumen diameter was set at 50 mm. To model the left-side colon, the proximal lumen diameter was set at 30 mm. For both the right colon model and the left-side colon model, the difference in pressure between the proximal lumen and the stent was less than 20 mmHg, when the diameter of the stent lumen was 14 mm or more. Both the right colon model and the left-side colon model were 30 mmHg or more at 200 mL s -1 when the stent lumen was 10 mm or less. Even with an inflow rate of 90-110 mL s -1 , the pressure was 140 mmHg when the stent lumen diameter was 5 mm. In theory, in order to maintain the effectiveness of SEMS, it is necessary to keep the diameter of the stent lumen at 14 mm or more.

  20. Heterogeneity of Microbiota Dysbiosis in Chronic Rhinosinusitis: Potential Clinical Implications and Microbial Community Mechanisms Contributing to Sinonasal Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keehoon; Pletcher, Steven D; Lynch, Susan V; Goldberg, Andrew N; Cope, Emily K

    2018-01-01

    Recent studies leveraging next-generation sequencing and functional approaches to understand the human microbiota have demonstrated the presence of diverse, niche-specific microbial communities at nearly every mucosal surface. These microbes contribute to the development and function of physiologic and immunological features that are key to host health status. Not surprisingly, several chronic inflammatory diseases have been attributed to dysbiosis of microbiota composition or function, including chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). CRS is a heterogeneous disease characterized by inflammation of the sinonasal cavity and mucosal microbiota dysbiosis. Inflammatory phenotypes and bacterial community compositions vary considerably across individuals with CRS, complicating current studies that seek to address causality of a dysbiotic microbiome as a driver or initiator of persistent sinonasal inflammation. Murine models have provided some experimental evidence that alterations in local microbial communities and microbially-produced metabolites influence health status. In this perspective, we will discuss the clinical implications of distinct microbial compositions and community-level functions in CRS and how mucosal microbiota relate to the diverse inflammatory endotypes that are frequently observed. We will also describe specific microbial interactions that can deterministically shape the pattern of co-colonizers and the resulting metabolic products that drive or exacerbate host inflammation. These findings are discussed in the context of CRS-associated inflammation and in other chronic inflammatory diseases that share features observed in CRS. An improved understanding of CRS patient stratification offers the opportunity to personalize therapeutic regimens and to design novel treatments aimed at manipulation of the disease-associated microbiota to restore sinus health.

  1. Mast cells promote melanoma colonization of lungs.

    PubMed

    Öhrvik, Helena; Grujic, Mirjana; Waern, Ida; Gustafson, Ann-Marie; Ernst, Nancy; Roers, Axel; Hartmann, Karin; Pejler, Gunnar

    2016-10-18

    Mast cells have been implicated in malignant processes, mainly through clinical correlative studies and by experiments performed using animals lacking mast cells due to defective c-kit signaling. However, mast cell-deficient mouse models based on c-kit defects have recently been questioned for their relevance. Here we addressed the effect of mast cells in a tumor setting by using transgenic Mcpt5-Cre+ R-DTA+ mice, in which the deficiency of mast cells is independent of c-kit defects. Melanoma cells (B16.F10) were administered either subcutaneously or intravenously into Mcpt5-Cre+ R-DTA+ mice or Mcpt5-Cre- R-DTA+ littermate controls, followed by the assessment of formed tumors. In the subcutaneous model, mast cells were abundant in the tumor stroma of control mice but were absent in Mcpt5-Cre+ R-DTA+ mice. However, the absence of mast cells did not affect tumor size. In contrast, after intravenous administration of B16.F10 cells, melanoma colonization of the lungs was markedly reduced in Mcpt5-Cre+ R-DTA+ vs. Mcpt5-Cre- R-DTA+ animals. Decreased melanoma colonization of the lungs in Mcpt5-Cre+ R-DTA+ animals was accompanied by increased inflammatory cell recruitment into the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, suggesting that mast cells suppress inflammation in this setting. Further, qPCR analysis revealed significant alterations in the expression of Twist and E-cadherin in lungs of Mcpt5-Cre+ R-DTA+ vs. control Mcpt5-Cre- R-DTA+ animals, suggesting an impact of mast cells on epithelial-mesenchymal transition. In conclusion, this study reveals that mast cells promote melanoma colonization of the lung.

  2. Links between behavioral factors and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Mary-Frances; Irwin, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    This review focuses on those biobehavioral factors that show robust associations with markers of inflammation, including discussion of the following variables: diet, smoking, coffee, alcohol, exercise and sleep disruption. Each of these variables has been assessed in large-scale epidemiological studies, and many in clinical and experimental studies as well. Treatment strategies that target biobehavioral factors have the potential to complement and add to the benefit of anti-inflammatory medicines. PMID:20130566

  3. GLP-1 nanomedicine alleviates gut inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Anbazhagan, Arivarasu N.; Thaqi, Mentor; Priyamvada, Shubha; Jayawardena, Dulari; Kumar, Anoop; Gujral, Tarunmeet; Chatterjee, Ishita; Mugarza, Edurne; Saksena, Seema; Onyuksel, Hayat; Dudeja, Pradeep K.

    2017-01-01

    The gut hormone, glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) exerts anti-inflammatory effects. However, its clinical use is limited by its short half-life. Previously, we have shown that GLP-1 as a nanomedicine (GLP-1 in sterically stabilized phospholipid micelles, GLP-1-SSM) has increased in vivo stability. The current study was aimed at testing the efficacy of this GLP-1 nanomedicine in alleviating colonic inflammation and associated diarrhea in dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) induced mouse colitis model. Our results show that GLP-1-SSM treatment markedly alleviated the colitis phenotype by reducing the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β, increasing goblet cells and preserving intestinal epithelial architecture in colitis model. Further, GLP-1-SSM alleviated diarrhea (as assessed by luminal fluid) by increasing protein expression of intestinal chloride transporter DRA (down regulated in adenoma). Our results indicate thatGLP-1 nanomedicine may act as a novel therapeutic tool in alleviating gut inflammation and associated diarrhea in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). PMID:27553076

  4. Involvement of PPARγ in the protective action of tropisetron in an experimental model of ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Rahimian, Reza; Zirak, Mohammad Reza; Keshavarz, Mojtaba; Fakhraei, Nahid; Mohammadi-Farani, Ahmad; Hamdi, Hanan; Mousavizadeh, Kazem

    2016-09-20

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Tropisetron, a selective 5-HT 3 receptor antagonist, is highly used to counteract chemotherapy-induced emesis. Previous studies revealed the anti-inflammatory properties of this drug. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) receptor in the protective effect of tropisetron in an animal model of ulcerative colitis. Experimental colitis was induced by a single intra-colonic instillation of 4% (V/V) acetic acid in male rats. Tropisetron (3 mg/kg) and GW9662 (PPARγ antagonist) (5 mg/kg) were given twice daily for 2 days after colitis induction. Forty-eight hours after induction of colitis, colon was removed and macroscopic and microscopic features were given. Moreover, colonic concentrations of malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) levels, myeloperoxidase (MPO), and PPARγ activity were assessed. Both macroscopic and histopathological features of colonic injury were markedly ameliorated by tropisetron. Likewise, levels of NO, MDA, TNF-α, and IL-1β diminished significantly (p < .05). GW9662 reversed the effect of tropisetron on these markers partially or completely. In addition, tropisetron increased the PPARγ and decreased the MPO activity (p < .05). Tropisetron exerts notable anti-inflammatory effects in acetic acid-induced colitis in rats, which is probably mediated through PPARγ receptors.

  5. Biomarkers in diverticular diseases of the colon.

    PubMed

    Tursi, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Recent data found that diverticular disease (DD) of the colon shows similarities with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). In particular, the detection of microscopic inflammation and the clinical response to mesalazine seem to confirm the hypothesis that inflammation may be a key point for the appearance of symptoms and development of complications. In light of this hypothesis, several studies have recently focused their attention on the role of biomarkers in predicting and monitoring the course of the disease. C-reactive protein (CRP), white blood cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and fecal calprotectin (FC) have therefore been investigated. As in IBD, CRP seems to be the most effective marker of histological and clinical severity of the disease. In particular, CRP below 50 mg/l suggests an acute uncomplicated diverticulitis (AUD), whereas CRP higher than 200 mg/l is a strong indicator of DD complicated by perforation. As in IBD, FC seems to be a noninvasive sensitive marker of DD severity. In particular, FC may show slight increased valued already in symptomatic uncomplicated DD (SUDD) (FC value ≥15 μg/ml seems to be predictive of SUDD). As expected, FC shows higher values in AUD (FC value ≥60 μg/ml seems to be predictive of AUD). Finally, FC seems to be useful also in monitoring the therapeutic response in DD. In fact, FC values decreased significantly in patients responding to therapy, whereas they persisted to increase in patients who failed to obtain remission. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Intrauterine Candida albicans infection elicits severe inflammation in fetal sheep

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Matthew S.; Kemp, Matthew W.; Kallapur, Suhas G.; Kannan, Paranthaman Senthamarai; Saito, Masatoshi; Miura, Yuichiro; Newnham, John P.; Stock, Sarah; Ireland, Demelza J.; Kramer, Boris W.; Jobe, Alan H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Preventing preterm birth and subsequent adverse neonatal sequelae is among the greatest clinical challenges of our time. Recent studies suggest a role for Candida spp. in preterm birth and fetal injury, as a result of their colonization of either the vagina and/or the amniotic cavity. We hypothesised that intraamniotic C. albicans would cause a vigorous, acute fetal inflammatory response. Methods Sheep carrying singleton pregnancies received single intraamniotic (IA) injections of either saline (control) or 107 CFU C. albicans 1 or 2 d prior to surgical delivery and euthanasia at 124 ± 2 d gestation. Results Colonization of the amniotic cavity by C. albicans resulted in a modest inflammatory response at 1 d and florid inflammation at 2 d, characterised by fetal thrombocytopenia, lymphopenia and significant increases of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines in the fetal membranes skin, lung and the amniotic fluid. Conclusion Acute colonization of the amniotic cavity by C. albicans causes severe intrauterine inflammation and fetal injury. C. albicans is a potent fetal pathogen which can contribute to adverse pregnancy outcomes. PMID:24632681

  7. Characterization of intestinal inflammation and identification of related gene expression changes in mdr1a−/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Dommels, Y. E.M.; Zhu, S.; Davy, M.; Martell, S.; Hedderley, D.; Barnett, M. P.G.; McNabb, W. C.; Roy, N. C.

    2007-01-01

    Multidrug resistance targeted mutation (mdr1a−/−) mice spontaneously develop intestinal inflammation. The aim of this study was to further characterize the intestinal inflammation in mdr1a−/− mice. Intestinal samples were collected to measure inflammation and gene expression changes over time. The first signs of inflammation occurred around 16 weeks of age and most mdr1a−/− mice developed inflammation between 16 and 27 weeks of age. The total histological injury score was the highest in the colon. The inflammatory lesions were transmural and discontinuous, revealing similarities to human inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Genes involved in inflammatory response pathways were up-regulated whereas genes involved in biotransformation and transport were down-regulated in colonic epithelial cell scrapings of inflamed mdra1−/− mice at 25 weeks of age compared to non-inflamed FVB mice. These results show overlap to human IBD and strengthen the use of this in vivo model to study human IBD. The anti-inflammatory regenerating islet-derived genes were expressed at a lower level during inflammation initiation in non-inflamed colonic epithelial cell scrapings of mdr1a−/− mice at 12 weeks of age. This result suggests that an insufficiently suppressed immune response could be crucial to the initiation and development of intestinal inflammation in mdr1a−/− mice. PMID:18850176

  8. Colonic strictures: dilation and stents.

    PubMed

    Adler, Douglas G

    2015-04-01

    Colonic strictures, both benign and malignant, are commonly encountered in clinical practice. Benign strictures are most commonly treated by balloon dilation and less frequently with stents. Balloon dilation can help forestall or obviate surgery in some patients. Colonic strictures of malignant etiology generally need to be managed by stents and/or surgery. This article reviews endoscopic approaches to the management of colonic strictures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Purinergic signaling during intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Longhi, Maria Serena; Moss, Alan; Jiang, Zhenghui Gordon; Robson, Simon C

    2017-09-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a devastating disease that is associated with excessive inflammation in the intestinal tract in genetically susceptible individuals and potentially triggered by microbial dysbiosis. This illness markedly predisposes patients to thrombophilia and chronic debility as well as bowel, lymphatic, and liver cancers. Development of new therapies is needed to re-establish long-term immune tolerance in IBD patients without increasing the risk of opportunistic infections and cancer. Aberrant purinergic signaling pathways have been implicated in disordered thromboregulation and immune dysregulation, as noted in the pathogenesis of IBD and other gastrointestinal/hepatic autoimmune diseases. Expression of CD39 on endothelial or immune cells allows for homeostatic integration of hemostasis and immunity, which are disrupted in IBD. Our focus in this review is on novel aspects of the functions of CD39 and related NTPDases in IBD. Regulated CD39 activity allows for scavenging of extracellular nucleotides, the maintenance of P2-receptor integrity and coordination of adenosinergic signaling responses. CD39 together with CD73, serves as an integral component of the immunosuppressive machinery of dendritic cells, myeloid cells, T and B cells. Genetic inheritance and environental factors closely regulate the levels of expression and phosphohydrolytic activity of CD39, both on immune cells and released microparticles. Purinergic mechanisms associated with T regulatory and supressor T helper type 17 cells modulate disease activity in IBD, as can be modeled in experimental colitis. As a recent example, upregulation of CD39 is dependent upon ligation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), as with natural ligands such as bilirubin and 2-(1' H-indole-3'-carbonyl)-thiazole-4-carboxylic acid methyl ester (ITE). Decreased expression of CD39 and/or dysfunctional AHR signaling, however, abrogates the protective effects of immunosuppressive AHR ligands. These

  10. Colonic migrating motor complexes are inhibited in acute tri-nitro benzene sulphonic acid colitis.

    PubMed

    Hofma, Ben R; Wardill, Hannah R; Mavrangelos, Chris; Campaniello, Melissa A; Dimasi, David; Bowen, Joanne M; Smid, Scott D; Bonder, Claudine S; Beckett, Elizabeth A; Hughes, Patrick A

    2018-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is characterized by overt inflammation of the intestine and is typically accompanied by symptoms of bloody diarrhea, abdominal pain and cramping. The Colonic Migrating Motor Complex (CMMC) directs the movement of colonic luminal contents over long distances. The tri-nitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS) model of colitis causes inflammatory damage to enteric nerves, however it remains to be determined whether these changes translate to functional outcomes in CMMC activity. We aimed to visualize innate immune cell infiltration into the colon using two-photon laser scanning intra-vital microscopy, and to determine whether CMMC activity is altered in the tri-nitro benzene sulphonic (TNBS) model of colitis. Epithelial barrier permeability was compared between TNBS treated and healthy control mice in-vitro and in-vivo. Innate immune activation was determined by ELISA, flow cytometry and by 2-photon intravital microscopy. The effects of TNBS treatment and IL-1β on CMMC function were determined using a specialized organ bath. TNBS colitis increased epithelial barrier permeability in-vitro and in-vivo. Colonic IL-1β concentrations, colonic and systemic CD11b+ cell infiltration, and the number of migrating CD11b+ cells on colonic blood vessels were all increased in TNBS treated mice relative to controls. CMMC frequency and amplitude were inhibited in the distal and mid colon of TNBS treated mice. CMMC activity was not altered by superfusion with IL-1β. TNBS colitis damages the epithelial barrier and increases innate immune cell activation in the colon and systemically. Innate cell migration into the colon is readily identifiable by two-photon intra-vital microscopy. CMMC are inhibited by inflammation, but this is not due to direct effects of IL-1β.

  11. Modulatory effect of silymarin on nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor 2 regulated redox status, nuclear factor-κB mediated inflammation and apoptosis in experimental gastric ulcer.

    PubMed

    Arafa Keshk, Walaa; Zahran, Samer Mahmoud; Katary, Mohamed Alaa; Abd-Elaziz Ali, Darin

    2017-08-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) consumption has been commonly associated with gastric mucosal lesions including gastric ulcer. Silymarin (SM) is a flavonoid mixture with anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities which explain its protective role against hepatic and renal injuries. However, its impact on gastric ulcer has not yet been elucidated. Thus we went further to investigate the potential protective effects of SM against indomethacin-induced gastric injury in rats. Pretreatment with SM (50 mg/kg orally) attenuated the severity of gastric mucosal damage as evidenced by decreasing ulcer index (UI) and ulcer score, improvement of disturbed histopathologicl features to be insignificant with those induced by the reference anti-ulcer drug. Pretreatment with SM also suppressed gastric inflammation by decreasing myeloperoxidase activity, tumer necrosis factor-α (TNF- α) and interleukin 6 (IL6) levels along with nuclear factor kappa B p65 (NF-κB) expression. Meanwhile, SM prevent gastric oxidative stress via inhibition of lipid peroxides formation, enhancement of glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase activities and up-regulation of nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), the redox-sensitive master regulator of oxidative stress signaling. In conclusion, the results herein revealed that SM has a gastro-protective effect which is mediated via suppression of gastric inflammation, oxidative stress, increased the anti-oxidant and the cyto-protective defense mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Increased Obesity-Associated Circulating Levels of the Extracellular Matrix Proteins Osteopontin, Chitinase-3 Like-1 and Tenascin C Are Associated with Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Catalán, Victoria; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Rodríguez, Amaia; Ramírez, Beatriz; Izaguirre, Maitane; Hernández-Lizoain, José Luis; Baixauli, Jorge; Martí, Pablo; Valentí, Víctor; Moncada, Rafael; Silva, Camilo; Salvador, Javier; Frühbeck, Gema

    2016-01-01

    Background Excess adipose tissue represents a major risk factor for the development of colon cancer with inflammation and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling being proposed as plausible mechanisms. The aim of this study was to investigate whether obesity can influence circulating levels of inflammation-related extracellular matrix proteins in patients with colon cancer (CC), promoting a microenvironment favorable for tumor growth. Methods Serum samples obtained from 79 subjects [26 lean (LN) and 53 obese (OB)] were used in the study. Enrolled subjects were further subclassified according to the established diagnostic protocol for CC (44 without CC and 35 with CC). Anthropometric measurements as well as circulating metabolites and hormones were determined. Circulating concentrations of the ECM proteins osteopontin (OPN), chitinase-3-like protein 1 (YKL-40), tenascin C (TNC) and lipocalin-2 (LCN-2) were determined by ELISA. Results Significant differences in circulating OPN, YKL-40 and TNC concentrations between the experimental groups were observed, being significantly increased due to obesity (P<0.01) and colon cancer (P<0.05). LCN-2 levels were affected by obesity (P<0.05), but no differences were detected regarding the presence or not of CC. A positive association (P<0.05) with different inflammatory markers was also detected. Conclusions To our knowledge, we herein show for the first time that obese patients with CC exhibit increased circulating levels of OPN, YKL-40 and TNC providing further evidence for the influence of obesity on CC development via ECM proteins, representing promising diagnostic biomarkers or target molecules for therapeutics. PMID:27612200

  13. Staphylococcus aureus Colonization: Modulation of Host Immune Response and Impact on Human Vaccine Design

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Aisling F.; Leech, John M.; Rogers, Thomas R.; McLoughlin, Rachel M.

    2014-01-01

    In apparent contrast to its invasive potential Staphylococcus aureus colonizes the anterior nares of 20–80% of the human population. The relationship between host and microbe appears particularly individualized and colonization status seems somehow predetermined. After decolonization, persistent carriers often become re-colonized with their prior S. aureus strain, whereas non-carriers resist experimental colonization. Efforts to identify factors facilitating colonization have thus far largely focused on the microorganism rather than on the human host. The host responds to S. aureus nasal colonization via local expression of anti-microbial peptides, lipids, and cytokines. Interplay with the co-existing microbiota also influences colonization and immune regulation. Transient or persistent S. aureus colonization induces specific systemic immune responses. Humoral responses are the most studied of these and little is known of cellular responses induced by colonization. Intriguingly, colonized patients who develop bacteremia may have a lower S. aureus-attributable mor