Science.gov

Sample records for experimental configuration analysis

  1. Biomechanical behaviour of oesophageal tissues: material and structural configuration, experimental data and constitutive analysis.

    PubMed

    Natali, Arturo N; Carniel, Emanuele L; Gregersen, Hans

    2009-11-01

    The aim of the present work is to propose an approach to the biomechanical analysis of oesophagus by defining an appropriate constitutive model and the associated constitutive parameters. The configuration of the different tissues and layers that compose the oesophagus shows very complicated internal anatomy, geometry and mechanical properties. The coupling of these tissues adds to the complexity. The constitutive models must be capable of interpreting the highly non-linear mechanical response. This is done adopting a specific hyperelastic anisotropic formulation. Experimental data are essential for the investigation of the tissues' biomechanical behaviour and also represent the basis for the definition of constitutive parameters to be adopted within the constitutive formulation developed. This action is provided by using a specific stochastic optimization procedure, addressed to the minimization of a cost function that interprets the discrepancy between experimental data and results from the analytical models developed. Unfortunately, experimental data at disposal do not satisfy all requested information and a particular solution must be provided with regard to definition of the lateral contraction of soft tissues. The anisotropic properties of the tissues are investigated considering the configuration of embedded fibres, according to their mechanical characteristics, quantity and distribution. Collagen and muscular fibres must be considered. The formulation provided on the basis of axiomatic theory of constitutive relationships and the procedure for constitutive parameters identification are described. The evaluation of constitutive parameters requires the analysis of data from experimental tests, that are extracted from the literature. Result validation is performed by comparing the experimental data and model results. In this way a valid basis is provided for the investigation of biomechanical behaviour of oesophagus, looking at deeper information from the

  2. Configuration Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merwarth, P. D.

    1983-01-01

    Configuration Analysis Tool (CAT), is information storage and report generation system for aid of configuration management activities. Configuration management is discipline composed of many techniques selected to track and direct evolution of complex systems. CAT is interactive program that accepts, organizes and stores information pertinent to specific phases of project.

  3. Experimental verification of low sonic boom configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferri, A.; Wang, H. H.; Sorensen, H.

    1972-01-01

    A configuration designed to produce near field signature has been tested at M = 2.71 and the results are analyzed, by taking in account three-dimensional and second order effects. The configuration has an equivalent total area distribution that corresponds to an airplane flying at 60,000 ft. having a weight of 460,000 lbs, and 300 ft. length. A maximum overpressure of 0.95 lb/square foot has been obtained experimentally. The experimental results agree well with the analysis. The investigation indicates that the three-dimensional effects are very important when the measurements in wind tunnels are taken at small distances from the airplane.

  4. Experimental analysis of internal gas flow configurations for a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl, A.; Fraser, S. D.; Baumgartner, W. R.; Hacker, V.

    The internal gas distribution system utilised for supplying fresh reactants and removing reaction products from the individual cells of a fuel cell stack can be designed in a parallel, a serial or a mixture of parallel and serial gas flow configuration. In order to investigate the interdependence between the internal stack gas distribution configuration and single cell as well as overall stack performance, a small laboratory-scale fuel cell stack consisting of identical unit cells was subject to operation with different gas distribution configurations and different operating parameters. The current/voltage characteristics measured with the different gas distribution configurations are analysed and compared on unit cell- as well as on stack-level. The results show the significant impact of the internal stack gas distribution system on operation and performance of the individual unit cells and the overall stack.

  5. Experimental and numerical analysis of the wing rock characteristics of a 'wing-body-tail' configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, Carlos J.; Smith, Brooke C.; Malcolm, Gerald N.

    1993-01-01

    Free-to-roll wind tunnel tests were conducted and a computer simulation exercise was performed in an effort to investigate in detail the mechanism of wing rock on a configuration that consisted of a highly-slender forebody and a 78 deg swept delta wing. In the wind tunnel test, the roll angle and wing surface pressures were measured during the wing rock motion. A limit cycle oscillation was observed for angles of attack between 22 deg and 30 deg. In general, the wind tunnel test confirmed that the main flow phenomena responsible for the wing-body-tail wing rock are the interactions between the forebody and the wing vortices. The variation of roll acceleration (determined from the second derivative of the roll angle time history) with roll angle clearly showed the energy balance necessary to sustain the limit cycle oscillation. Pressure measurements on the wing revealed the hysteresis of the wing rock process. First, second and nth order models for the aerodynamic damping were developed and examined with a one degree of freedom computer simulation. Very good agreement with the observed behavior from the wind tunnel was obtained.

  6. Operational Dynamic Configuration Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, Chok Fung; Zelinski, Shannon

    2010-01-01

    Sectors may combine or split within areas of specialization in response to changing traffic patterns. This method of managing capacity and controller workload could be made more flexible by dynamically modifying sector boundaries. Much work has been done on methods for dynamically creating new sector boundaries [1-5]. Many assessments of dynamic configuration methods assume the current day baseline configuration remains fixed [6-7]. A challenging question is how to select a dynamic configuration baseline to assess potential benefits of proposed dynamic configuration concepts. Bloem used operational sector reconfigurations as a baseline [8]. The main difficulty is that operational reconfiguration data is noisy. Reconfigurations often occur frequently to accommodate staff training or breaks, or to complete a more complicated reconfiguration through a rapid sequence of simpler reconfigurations. Gupta quantified a few aspects of airspace boundary changes from this data [9]. Most of these metrics are unique to sector combining operations and not applicable to more flexible dynamic configuration concepts. To better understand what sort of reconfigurations are acceptable or beneficial, more configuration change metrics should be developed and their distribution in current practice should be computed. This paper proposes a method to select a simple sequence of configurations among operational configurations to serve as a dynamic configuration baseline for future dynamic configuration concept assessments. New configuration change metrics are applied to the operational data to establish current day thresholds for these metrics. These thresholds are then corroborated, refined, or dismissed based on airspace practitioner feedback. The dynamic configuration baseline selection method uses a k-means clustering algorithm to select the sequence of configurations and trigger times from a given day of operational sector combination data. The clustering algorithm selects a simplified

  7. Inferring unstable equilibrium configurations from experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virgin, L. N.; Wiebe, R.; Spottswood, S. M.; Beberniss, T.

    2016-09-01

    This research considers the structural behavior of slender, mechanically buckled beams and panels of the type commonly found in aerospace structures. The specimens were deflected and then clamped in a rigid frame in order to exhibit snap-through. That is, the initial equilibrium and the buckled (snapped-through) equilibrium configurations both co-existed for the given clamped conditions. In order to transit between these two stable equilibrium configurations (for example, under the action of an externally applied load), it is necessary for the structural component to pass through an intermediate unstable equilibrium configuration. A sequence of sudden impacts was imparted to the system, of various strengths and at various locations. The goal of this impact force was to induce relatively intermediate-sized transients that effectively slowed-down in the vicinity of the unstable equilibrium configuration. Thus, monitoring the velocity of the motion, and specifically its slowing down, should give an indication of the presence of an equilibrium configuration, even though it is unstable and not amenable to direct experimental observation. A digital image correlation (DIC) system was used in conjunction with an instrumented impact hammer to track trajectories and statistical methods used to infer the presence of unstable equilibria in both a beam and a panel.

  8. An experimental and theoretical analysis of the aerodynamic characteristics of a biplane-winglet configuration. M.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gall, P. D.

    1984-01-01

    Improving the aerodynamic characteristics of an airplane with respect to maximizing lift and minimizing induced and parasite drag are of primary importance in designing lighter, faster, and more efficient aircraft. Previous research has shown that a properly designed biplane wing system can perform superiorly to an equivalent monoplane system with regard to maximizing the lift-to-drag ratio and efficiency factor. Biplanes offer several potential advantages over equivalent monoplanes, such as a 60-percent reduction in weight, greater structural integrity, and increased roll response. The purpose of this research is to examine, both theoretically and experimentally, the possibility of further improving the aerodynamic characteristics of the biplanes configuration by adding winglets. Theoretical predictions were carried out utilizing vortex-lattice theory, which is a numerical method based on potential flow theory. Experimental data were obtained by testing a model in the Pennsylvania State University's subsonic wind tunnel at a Reynolds number of 510,000. The results showed that the addition of winglets improved the performance of the biplane with respect to increasing the lift-curve slope, increasing the maximum lift coefficient, increasing the efficiency factor, and decreasing the induced drag. A listing of the program is included in the Appendix.

  9. Analysis of Advanced Rotorcraft Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne

    2000-01-01

    Advanced rotorcraft configurations are being investigated with the objectives of identifying vehicles that are larger, quieter, and faster than current-generation rotorcraft. A large rotorcraft, carrying perhaps 150 passengers, could do much to alleviate airport capacity limitations, and a quiet rotorcraft is essential for community acceptance of the benefits of VTOL operations. A fast, long-range, long-endurance rotorcraft, notably the tilt-rotor configuration, will improve rotorcraft economics through productivity increases. A major part of the investigation of advanced rotorcraft configurations consists of conducting comprehensive analyses of vehicle behavior for the purpose of assessing vehicle potential and feasibility, as well as to establish the analytical models required to support the vehicle development. The analytical work of FY99 included applications to tilt-rotor aircraft. Tilt Rotor Aeroacoustic Model (TRAM) wind tunnel measurements are being compared with calculations performed by using the comprehensive analysis tool (Comprehensive Analytical Model of Rotorcraft Aerodynamics and Dynamics (CAMRAD 11)). The objective is to establish the wing and wake aerodynamic models that are required for tilt-rotor analysis and design. The TRAM test in the German-Dutch Wind Tunnel (DNW) produced extensive measurements. This is the first test to encompass air loads, performance, and structural load measurements on tilt rotors, as well as acoustic and flow visualization data. The correlation of measurements and calculations includes helicopter-mode operation (performance, air loads, and blade structural loads), hover (performance and air loads), and airplane-mode operation (performance).

  10. International Space Station Configuration Analysis and Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anchondo, Rebekah

    2016-01-01

    Ambitious engineering projects, such as NASA's International Space Station (ISS), require dependable modeling, analysis, visualization, and robotics to ensure that complex mission strategies are carried out cost effectively, sustainably, and safely. Learn how Booz Allen Hamilton's Modeling, Analysis, Visualization, and Robotics Integration Center (MAVRIC) team performs engineering analysis of the ISS Configuration based primarily on the use of 3D CAD models. To support mission planning and execution, the team tracks the configuration of ISS and maintains configuration requirements to ensure operational goals are met. The MAVRIC team performs multi-disciplinary integration and trade studies to ensure future configurations meet stakeholder needs.

  11. MATISSE-v2.0 infrared sea images: sensitivity analysis and experimental validation using MIRAMER campaign measurements in solar glint configurations.

    PubMed

    Fauqueux, Sandrine

    2013-08-20

    The validation of the multiresolution model of sea radiance in the infrared, developed at Onera, is investigated by comparison with measurements obtained during the MIRAMER campaign that took place in May 2008 in the Mediterranean Sea. The sea radiance model and optical properties are expressed and the experimental setup of the campaign is briefly presented. We focus on solar glint measurements collected on the 22nd of May at 5 h 59 m 50 s in the mid-wave IR (3.93-4.14 μm) band and the long-wave IR (8.19-8.96 μm) band onboard the research vessel (R/V) Atalante at a grazing observational angle. A sensitivity analysis of glitter radiance on atmospheric and aerosol profiles, as well as sea temperature and wind speed in the vicinity of the measured contextual parameters, is presented. Modeled and measured images are compared and results are delved into further by comparisons of histograms, averaged vertical and horizontal profiles. Errors in the 3.93-4.14 μm band are under those potentially due to calibration, whereas discrepancies are noticed in the 8.19-8.96 μm band, where the deepest analysis has to be performed.

  12. Experimental and theoretical analysis of organic dyes having a double D-π-A configurations for dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balanay, Mannix P.; Choi, Kyu-Seok; Lee, Sang Hee; Kim, Dong Hee

    2017-02-01

    Two spiro-like organic dyes linked at the thiophene bridge (KS-11 and KS-12) together with the original rod-shaped D-π-A configuration (C1) were designed, synthesized, and characterized based on their electronic structure, and determine the photophysical and photovoltaic properties for its application in dye-sensitized solar cells. Compared to C1, the double D-π-A spiro-like configuration, which consists of two separated light-harvesting moieties, was found to be beneficial to photocurrent generation provided that they are separated properly to prevent intramolecular exciton annihilation. This was observed when KS-11, which is linked at the β-position of the thiophene moiety of D-π-A, was compared with KS-12, where the two D-π-A are linked with an additional thiophene using a α-β linkage. The results show that KS-12 produced a 20% and 17% increase in photovoltaic efficiency under simulated AM 1.5G solar irradiation compared to KS-11 and C1, respectively. This increase in photovoltaic performance is credited mostly to the reduction of recombination effects and the increase in the density of states at the semiconductor surface due to high dye loading and better charge-transfer properties.

  13. An experimental study of several wind tunnel wall configurations using two V/STOL model configurations. [low speed wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binion, T. W., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in the low speed wind tunnel using two V/STOL models, a jet-flap and a jet-in-fuselage configuration, to search for a wind tunnel wall configuration to minimize wall interference on V/STOL models. Data were also obtained on the jet-flap model with a uniform slotted wall configuration to provide comparisons between theoretical and experimental wall interference. A test section configuration was found which provided some data in reasonable agreement with interference-free results over a wide range of momentum coefficients.

  14. Contaminant plume configuration and movement: an experimental model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alencoao, A.; Reis, A.; Pereira, M. G.; Liberato, M. L. R.; Caramelo, L.; Amraoui, M.; Amorim, V.

    2009-04-01

    The relevance of Science and Technology in our daily routines makes it compulsory to educate citizens who have both scientific literacy and scientific knowledge. These will allow them to be intervening citizens in a constantly changing society. Thus, physical and natural sciences are included in school curricula, both in primary and secondary education, with the fundamental aim of developing in the students the skills, attitudes and knowledge needed for the understanding of the planet Earth and its real problems. On the other hand, teaching in Geosciences is more and more based on practical methodologies which use didactic material, sustaining teachers' pedagogical practices and facilitating students' learning tasks suggested on the syllabus defined for each school level. Themes related to exploring the different components of the Hydrological Cycle and themes related to natural environment protection and preservation, namely water resources and soil contamination by industrial and urban sewage are examples of subject matters included on the Portuguese syllabus. These topics motivated the conception and construction of experimental models for the study of the propagation of pollutants on a porous medium. The experimental models allow inducing a horizontal flux of water though different kinds of permeable substances (e.g. sand, silt), with contamination spots on its surface. These experimental activities facilitate the student to understand the flow path of contaminating substances on the saturated zone and to observe the contaminant plume configuration and movement. The activities are explored in a teaching and learning process perspective where the student builds its own knowledge through real question- problem based learning which relate Science, Technology and Society. These activities have been developed in the framework of project ‘Water in the Environment' (CV/PVI/0854) of the POCTI Program (Programa Operacional "Ciência, Tecnologia, Inovação") financed

  15. Transonic Flow Field Analysis for Wing-Fuselage Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boppe, C. W.

    1980-01-01

    A computational method for simulating the aerodynamics of wing-fuselage configurations at transonic speeds is developed. The finite difference scheme is characterized by a multiple embedded mesh system coupled with a modified or extended small disturbance flow equation. This approach permits a high degree of computational resolution in addition to coordinate system flexibility for treating complex realistic aircraft shapes. To augment the analysis method and permit applications to a wide range of practical engineering design problems, an arbitrary fuselage geometry modeling system is incorporated as well as methodology for computing wing viscous effects. Configuration drag is broken down into its friction, wave, and lift induced components. Typical computed results for isolated bodies, isolated wings, and wing-body combinations are presented. The results are correlated with experimental data. A computer code which employs this methodology is described.

  16. Experimental transonic flutter characteristics of supersonic cruise configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, Michael H.; Cole, Stanley R.; Cazier, F. W., Jr.; Keller, Donald F.; Parker, Ellen C.; Wilkie, W. Keats

    1990-01-01

    The flutter characteristics of a generic arrow-wing supersonic transport configuration are studied. The wing configuration has a 3 percent biconvex airfoil and a leading-edge sweep of 73 deg out to a cranked tip with a 60 deg leading-edge sweep. The ground vibration tests and flutter test procedure are described. The effects of flutter on engine nacelles, fuel loading, wing-mounted vertical fin, wing angle-of-attack, and wing tip mass and stiffness distributions are analyzed. The data reveal that engine nacelles reduce the transonic flutter dynamic pressure by 25-30 percent; fuel loadings decrease dynamic pressures by 25 percent; 4-6 deg wing angles-of-attack cause steep transonic boundaries; and 5-10 percent changes in flutter dynamic pressures are the result of the wing-mounted vertical fin and wing-tip mass and stiffness distributions.

  17. An Analysis of Naval Aviation Configuration Status Accounting.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    R -A41O 473 AN ANALYSIS OF NAVAL AVIATION CONFIGURATION STATUS 1/2 ACCOUNTING (U) NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CR M A SNYDER ET AL. DEC 83...THESIS "S AN ANALYSIS OF NAVAL AVIATION CONFIGURATION STATUS ACCOUNTING by ____ Marlene A. Snyder -... ,and C..) Thomas F. Snyder 4/ December 1983 Thesis...NUMBER 4. TITLE (and Aejt11a) 5. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED An Analysis of Naval Aviation Master’s Thesis Configuration Status Accounting December

  18. Experimental beta limits of symmetric linear heliac configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Spanjers, G.G.; Nelson, B.A.; Ribe, F.L.; Jarboe, T.R. )

    1994-08-01

    Helically symmetric heliac equilibria [H. P. Furth, [ital Plasma] [ital Physics] [ital and] [ital Controlled] [ital Fusion] [ital Research] (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1966), Vol. 1, p. 103] are formed on the High Beta Q Machine (HBQM) [C. M. Greenfield, Phys. Fluids B [bold 2], 133 (1990)] by using a fast-rising central conductor (hardcore) current in conjunction with a shock-heated [ital l]=1 stellarator configuration. The equilibria are found to possess a high global beta and the plasma pressure is approximately a flux-surface quantity. Under the effects of plasma, the magnetic well is found to deepen and the rotational transform is greatly increased and becomes highly sheared, owing to plasma currents induced by the fast-rising hardcore current. In the second phase of the experiment, the equilibrium fields of the symmetric heliac are lowered while maintaining the same shock heating in an attempt to raise the global beta. No substantial change in global beta is seen, indicating that the configuration forms at the beta limit in the shock-heated HBQM, and that the plasma beta seen in the first phase of the experiment is the symmetric heliac beta limit.

  19. CRANS - CONFIGURABLE REAL-TIME ANALYSIS SYSTEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccluney, K.

    1994-01-01

    In a real-time environment, the results of changes or failures in a complex, interconnected system need evaluation quickly. Tabulations showing the effects of changes and/or failures of a given item in the system are generally only useful for a single input, and only with regard to that item. Subsequent changes become harder to evaluate as combinations of failures produce a cascade effect. When confronted by multiple indicated failures in the system, it becomes necessary to determine a single cause. In this case, failure tables are not very helpful. CRANS, the Configurable Real-time ANalysis System, can interpret a logic tree, constructed by the user, describing a complex system and determine the effects of changes and failures in it. Items in the tree are related to each other by Boolean operators. The user is then able to change the state of these items (ON/OFF FAILED/UNFAILED). The program then evaluates the logic tree based on these changes and determines any resultant changes to other items in the tree. CRANS can also search for a common cause for multiple item failures, and allow the user to explore the logic tree from within the program. A "help" mode and a reference check provide the user with a means of exploring an item's underlying logic from within the program. A commonality check determines single point failures for an item or group of items. Output is in the form of a user-defined matrix or matrices of colored boxes, each box representing an item or set of items from the logic tree. Input is via mouse selection of the matrix boxes, using the mouse buttons to toggle the state of the item. CRANS is written in C-language and requires the MIT X Window System, Version 11 Revision 4 or Revision 5. It requires 78K of RAM for execution and a three button mouse. It has been successfully implemented on Sun4 workstations running SunOS, HP9000 workstations running HP-UX, and DECstations running ULTRIX. No executable is provided on the distribution medium; however

  20. Experimental evidence of skyrmion-like configurations in bilayer nanodisks with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Stebliy, Maxim E. Kolesnikov, Alexander G.; Davydenko, Alexander V.; Ognev, Alexey V.; Samardak, Alexander S.; Chebotkevich, Ludmila A.

    2015-05-07

    Formation and existence of magnetic skyrmion-like configurations in bilayer nanodisks (Ta(3 nm)/[Co(0.37 nm)/Ni(0.58 nm)]{sub 10}){sub 2} with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy are shown experimentally at room temperature. Magnetization reversal through the skyrmion state is studied using magnetic hysteresis measurements. An evolution of skyrmion configurations in the nanodisk structure is analyzed. Experimental methods and micromagnetic simulations help to understand the magnetization reversal processes occurring through the stable skyrmion-like configurations. Formation of the intermediate C-states during magnetization reversal is demonstrated. The skyrmion number for all possible spin configurations is calculated.

  1. CMS Configuration Editor: GUI based application for user analysis job

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Cosa, A.

    2011-12-01

    We present the user interface and the software architecture of the Configuration Editor for the CMS experiment. The analysis workflow is organized in a modular way integrated within the CMS framework that organizes in a flexible way user analysis code. The Python scripting language is adopted to define the job configuration that drives the analysis workflow. It could be a challenging task for users, especially for newcomers, to develop analysis jobs managing the configuration of many required modules. For this reason a graphical tool has been conceived in order to edit and inspect configuration files. A set of common analysis tools defined in the CMS Physics Analysis Toolkit (PAT) can be steered and configured using the Config Editor. A user-defined analysis workflow can be produced starting from a standard configuration file, applying and configuring PAT tools according to the specific user requirements. CMS users can adopt this tool, the Config Editor, to create their analysis visualizing in real time which are the effects of their actions. They can visualize the structure of their configuration, look at the modules included in the workflow, inspect the dependences existing among the modules and check the data flow. They can visualize at which values parameters are set and change them according to what is required by their analysis task. The integration of common tools in the GUI needed to adopt an object-oriented structure in the Python definition of the PAT tools and the definition of a layer of abstraction from which all PAT tools inherit.

  2. Experimental and analytical investigations of sleeved pipeline configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, J.D.; Powell, G.H.; Rinawi, A.K.

    1995-12-31

    A series of buckling experiments has been conducted on 60 foot long 48-inch diameter sleeved pipe specimens at Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio, Texas. The tests included the application of internal pressure and axial force to simulate fully restrained conditions, followed by the application of four-point bending loads up to and beyond wrinkling of the specimens. The results from the first two of these tests are presented together with results from analytical correlation studies in which the tests were simulated using beam bending models. The comparisons show close agreement between the analyses and the experiments, provided that (a) anisotropy of the steel properties is accounted for and (b) a special wrinkling segment is included in the bending models. It is concluded that the analytical approach can be used with a substantial degree of confidence to analyze pipeline configurations up to the point of incipient wrinkling.

  3. USM3D Analysis of Low Boom Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Melissa B.; Campbell, Richard L.; Nayani, Sudheer N.

    2011-01-01

    In the past few years considerable improvement was made in NASA's in house boom prediction capability. As part of this improved capability, the USM3D Navier-Stokes flow solver, when combined with a suitable unstructured grid, went from accurately predicting boom signatures at 1 body length to 10 body lengths. Since that time, the research emphasis has shifted from analysis to the design of supersonic configurations with boom signature mitigation In order to design an aircraft, the techniques for accurately predicting boom and drag need to be determined. This paper compares CFD results with the wind tunnel experimental results conducted on a Gulfstream reduced boom and drag configuration. Two different wind-tunnel models were designed and tested for drag and boom data. The goal of this study was to assess USM3D capability for predicting both boom and drag characteristics. Overall, USM3D coupled with a grid that was sheared and stretched was able to reasonably predict boom signature. The computational drag polar matched the experimental results for a lift coefficient above 0.1 despite some mismatch in the predicted lift-curve slope.

  4. Flammability Configuration Analysis for Spacecraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedley, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Fire is one of the many potentially catastrophic hazards associated with the operation of crewed spacecraft. A major lesson learned by NASA from the Apollo 204 fire in 1966 was that ignition sources in an electrically powered vehicle should and can be minimized, but can never be eliminated completely. For this reason, spacecraft fire control is based on minimizing potential ignition sources and eliminating materials that can propagate fire. Fire extinguishers are always provided on crewed spacecraft, but are not considered as part of the fire control process. "Eliminating materials that can propagate fire" does not mean eliminating all flammable materials - the cost of designing and building spacecraft using only nonflammable materials is extraordinary and unnecessary. It means controlling the quantity and configuration of such materials to eliminate potential fire propagation paths and thus ensure that any fire would be small, localized, and isolated, and would self-extinguish without harm to the crew. Over the years, NASA has developed many solutions for controlling the configuration of flammable materials (and potentially flammable materials in commercial "off-the-shelf" hardware) so that they can be used safely in air and oxygen-enriched environments in crewed spacecraft. This document describes and explains these design solutions so payload customers and other organizations can use them in designing safe and cost-effective flight hardware. Proper application of these guidelines will produce acceptable flammability configurations for hardware located in any compartment of the International Space Station or other program crewed vehicles and habitats. However, use of these guidelines does not exempt hardware organizations of the responsibility for safety of the hardware under their control.

  5. Comparative analysis of alternate MHS configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabrera-Mercader, Carlos R.; Staelin, David H.

    1995-01-01

    Given the possibility that the passive Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) for NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) may have to be replaced, two alternate configurations are analyzed in this document. One option mirrors AMSU-B, the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) moisture sounder; which consists of five channels at 89, 150, 183 +/- 1, 183 +/- 3, and 183 +/- 7 GHz. The second option contains an additional channel at 183 +/- 14 GHz and replaces the channels at 89 and 150 GHz with three channels at 118 +/- 0.5, 118 +/- 1.4, and 118 +/- 3 GHz. The latter configuration is considered to be superior due to its greater scientific benefits and reduced cost and complexity -- it would require only two local oscillators and a smaller antenna size for a given resolution on the ground. As shown by means of simulations, humidity profile retrieval accuracy for the second option is superior in most cases and only slightly degraded relative to the first option in the worst-case scenario. The results are summarized. Including the 118-GHz channels also offers the possibility of cell-top altitude retrievals and improved temperature profile retrievals when used in conjunction with a temperature sounder such as the 15-channel AMSU-A.

  6. Experimental studies of linear high-beta heliac plasma configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Greenfield, C.M.; Koepke, M.E.; Ribe, F.L. )

    1990-01-01

    The formation and quasi-equilibrium of a high-beta heliac plasma are investigated in the High-Beta Q Machine (Phys. Fluids {bold 30}, 2885 (1987)), a linear high-beta {ital l}=1 stellarator with an internal current carrying conductor (hardcore). The hardcore current rise time is varied from 9 {mu}sec to smaller values comparable with that of the main compression field (450 nsec). Flux contours and plasma pressure calculated from internal magnetic-probe measurements are used to distinguish between nearly axisymmetric plasma confined near the hardcore and the heliac plasma confined near the magnetic axis. For the shorter hardcore rise times, the axisymmetric plasma pressure becomes small compared to that of the heliac. Further analysis of the data allows calculation of the currents flowing in the plasma, the rotational transform, and the magnetic well depth. Appreciable axial current is observed, consistent with induction by the changing magnetic fields during the heliac formation. The observed relationship between the axial current and rotational transform is confirmed by computer modeling using the HASE magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium code (Nucl. Fusion {bold 23}, 1061 (1983)).

  7. The MIRTE Experimental Program: An Opportunity to Test Structural Materials in Various Configurations in Thermal Energy Spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Leclaire, Nicolas; Le Dauphin, Francois-Xavier; Duhamel, Isabelle; Briggs, Blair; Piot, Jerome; Rennesson, Malvina; Laville, Arnaud

    2014-11-04

    The MIRTE (Materials in Interacting and Reflecting configurations, all Thicknesses) program was established to answer the needs of criticality safety practitioners in terms of experimental validation of structural materials and to possibly contribute to nuclear data improvement, which ultimately supports reactor safety analysis as well. MIRTE took the shape of a collaboration between the AREVA and ANDRA French industrialists and a noncommercial international funding partner such as the U.S. Department of Energy. The aim of this paper is to present the configurations of the MIRTE 1 and MIRTE 2 programs and to highlight the results of the titanium experiments recently published in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments.

  8. Selectivity evaluation for two experimental gill-net configurations used to sample Lake Erie walleyes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vandergoot, Christopher S.; Kocovsky, Patrick M.; Brenden, Travis O.; Liu, Weihai

    2011-01-01

    We used length frequencies of captured walleyes Sander vitreus to indirectly estimate and compare selectivity between two experimental gill-net configurations used to sample fish in Lake Erie: (1) a multifilament configuration currently used by the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) with stretched-measure mesh sizes ranging from 51 to 127 mm and a constant filament diameter (0.37 mm); and (2) a monofilament configuration with mesh sizes ranging from 38 to 178 mm and varying filament diameter (range = 0.20–0.33 mm). Paired sampling with the two configurations revealed that the catch of walleyes smaller than 250 mm and larger than 600 mm was greater in the monofilament configuration than in the multifilament configuration, but the catch of 250–600-mm fish was greater in the multifilament configuration. Binormal selectivity functions yielded the best fit to observed walleye catches for both gill-net configurations based on model deviances. Incorporation of deviation terms in the binormal selectivity functions (i.e., to relax the assumption of geometric similarity) further improved the fit to observed catches. The final fitted selectivity functions produced results similar to those from the length-based catch comparisons: the monofilament configuration had greater selectivity for small and large walleyes and the multifilament configuration had greater selectivity for mid-sized walleyes. Computer simulations that incorporated the fitted binormal selectivity functions indicated that both nets were likely to result in some bias in age composition estimates and that the degree of bias would ultimately be determined by the underlying condition, mortality rate, and growth rate of the Lake Erie walleye population. Before the ODNR switches its survey gear, additional comparisons of the different gill-net configurations, such as fishing the net pairs across a greater range of depths and at more locations in the lake, should be conducted to maintain congruence in

  9. Experimental and numerical study of a dual configuration for a flapping tidal current generator.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jihoon; Quang Le, Tuyen; Hwan Ko, Jin; Ebenezer Sitorus, Patar; Hartarto Tambunan, Indra; Kang, Taesam

    2015-07-30

    In this study, we conduct experimental and consecutive numerical analyses of a flapping tidal current generator with a mirror-type dual configuration with front-swing and rear-swing flappers. An experimental analysis of a small-scale prototype is conducted in a towing tank, and a numerical analysis is conducted by means of two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations with an in-house code. An experimental study with a controller to determine the target arm angle shows that the resultant arm angle is dependent on the input arm angle, the frequency, and the applied load, while a high pitch is obtained simply with a high input arm angle. Through a parametric analysis conducted while varying these factors, a high applied load and a high input arm angle were found to be advantageous. Moreover, the optimal reduced frequency was found to be 0.125 in terms of the power extraction. In consecutive numerical investigations with the kinematics selected from the experiments, it was found that a rear-swing flapper contributes to the total amount of power more than a front-swing flapper with a distance of two times the chord length and with a 90° phase difference between the two. The high contribution stems from the high power generated by the rear-swing flapper, which mimics the tail fin movement of a dolphin along a flow, compared to a plunge system or a front-swing system, which mimics the tail fin movement of a dolphin against a flow. It is also due to the fact that the shed vorticities of the front-swing flapper slightly affect negatively or even positively the power performance of the rear-swing system at a given distance and phase angle.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulation of configurational ensembles compatible with experimental FRET efficiency data through a restraint on instantaneous FRET efficiencies.

    PubMed

    Reif, Maria M; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2014-12-15

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements are widely used to investigate (bio)molecular interactions or/and association. FRET efficiencies, the primary data obtained from this method, give, in combination with the common assumption of isotropic chromophore orientation, detailed insight into the lengthscale of molecular phenomena. This study illustrates the application of a FRET efficiency restraint during classical atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of a mutant mastoparan X peptide in either water or 7 M aqueous urea. The restraint forces acting on the donor and acceptor chromophores ensure that the sampled peptide configurational ensemble satisfies the experimental primary data by modifying interchromophore separation and chromophore transition dipole moment orientations. By means of a conformational cluster analysis, it is seen that indeed different configurational ensembles may be sampled without and with application of the restraint. In particular, while the FRET efficiency and interchromophore distances monitored in an unrestrained simulation may differ from the experimentally-determined values, they can be brought in agreement with experimental data through usage of the FRET efficiency restraining potential. Furthermore, the present results suggest that the assumption of isotropic chromophore orientation is not always justified. The FRET efficiency restraint allows the generation of configurational ensembles that may not be accessible with unrestrained simulations, and thereby supports a meaningful interpretation of experimental FRET results in terms of the underlying molecular degrees of freedom. Thus, it offers an additional tool to connect the realms of computer and wet-lab experimentation.

  11. Experimental Sonic Boom Measurements on a Mach 1.6 Cruise Low-Boom Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr.; Elmiligui, Alaa, A.; Wayman, Thomas R.; Waithe, Kenrick A.; Howe, Donald C.; Bangert, Linda S.

    2012-01-01

    A wind tunnel test has been conducted by Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation (GAC) to measure the sonic boom pressure signature of a low boom Mach 1.6 cruise business jet in the Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel at Mach numbers 1.60 and 1.80. Through a cooperative agreement between GAC and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), GAC provided NASA access to some of the experimental data and NASA is publishing these data for the sonic boom research community. On-track and off-track near field sonic boom pressure signatures were acquired at three separation distances (0.5, 1.2, and 1.7 reference body lengths) and three angles of attack (-0.26deg, 0.26deg, and 0.68deg). The model was blade mounted to minimize the sting effects on the sonic boom signatures. Although no extensive data analysis is provided, selected data are plotted to illustrate salient features of the data. All of the experimental sonic boom pressure data are tabulated. Schlieren images of the configuration are also included.

  12. An Experimental Investigation of the Flow Over the Rear End of a Notchback Automobile Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Luther N.

    2000-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the flow over the rear end of a 0.16 scale notchback automobile configuration has been conducted in the NASA Langley Basic Aerodynamics Research Tunnel (BART). The objective of this work was to investigate the flow separation that occurs behind the backlight and obtain experimental data that can be used to understand the physics and time-averaged structure of the flow field. A three-component laser velocimeter was used to make non-intrusive, velocity measurements in the center plane and in a single cross-flow plane over the decklid. In addition to off-body measurements, flow conditions on the car surface were documented via surface flow visualization, boundary layer measurements, and surface pressures. The experimental data show several features previously identified by other researchers, but also reveal differences between the flow field associated with this particular configuration and the generally accepted models for the flow over a notchback rear end.

  13. Structural Configuration Systems Analysis for Advanced Aircraft Fuselage Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Welstead, Jason R.; Quinlan, Jesse R.; Guynn, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Structural configuration analysis of an advanced aircraft fuselage concept is investigated. This concept is characterized by a double-bubble section fuselage with rear mounted engines. Based on lessons learned from structural systems analysis of unconventional aircraft, high-fidelity finite-element models (FEM) are developed for evaluating structural performance of three double-bubble section configurations. Structural sizing and stress analysis are applied for design improvement and weight reduction. Among the three double-bubble configurations, the double-D cross-section fuselage design was found to have a relatively lower structural weight. The structural FEM weights of these three double-bubble fuselage section concepts are also compared with several cylindrical fuselage models. Since these fuselage concepts are different in size, shape and material, the fuselage structural FEM weights are normalized by the corresponding passenger floor area for a relative comparison. This structural systems analysis indicates that an advanced composite double-D section fuselage may have a relative structural weight ratio advantage over a conventional aluminum fuselage. Ten commercial and conceptual aircraft fuselage structural weight estimates, which are empirically derived from the corresponding maximum takeoff gross weight, are also presented and compared with the FEM- based estimates for possible correlation. A conceptual full vehicle FEM model with a double-D fuselage is also developed for preliminary structural analysis and weight estimation.

  14. Structural Configuration Analysis of Crew Exploration Vehicle Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, V.

    2006-01-01

    Structural configuration modeling and finite element analysis of crew exploration vehicle (CEV) concepts are presented. In the structural configuration design approach, parametric solid models of the pressurized shell and tanks are developed. The CEV internal cabin pressure is same as in the International Space Station (ISS) to enable docking with the ISS without an intermediate airlock. Effects of this internal pressure load on the stress distribution, factor of safety, mass and deflections are investigated. Uniform 7 mm thick skin shell, 5 mm thick shell with ribs and frames, and isogrid skin construction options are investigated. From this limited study, the isogrid construction appears to provide most strength/mass ratio. Initial finite element analysis results on the service module tanks are also presented. These rapid finite element analyses, stress and factor of safety distribution results are presented as a part of lessons learned and to build up a structural mass estimation and sizing database for future technology support. This rapid structural analysis process may also facilitate better definition of the vehicles and components for rapid prototyping. However, these structural analysis results are highly conceptual and exploratory in nature and do not reflect current configuration designs being conducted at the program level by NASA and industry.

  15. Granger causality--statistical analysis under a configural perspective.

    PubMed

    von Eye, Alexander; Wiedermann, Wolfgang; Mun, Eun-Young

    2014-03-01

    The concept of Granger causality can be used to examine putative causal relations between two series of scores. Based on regression models, it is asked whether one series can be considered the cause for the second series. In this article, we propose extending the pool of methods available for testing hypotheses that are compatible with Granger causation by adopting a configural perspective. This perspective allows researchers to assume that effects exist for specific categories only or for specific sectors of the data space, but not for other categories or sectors. Configural Frequency Analysis (CFA) is proposed as the method of analysis from a configural perspective. CFA base models are derived for the exploratory analysis of Granger causation. These models are specified so that they parallel the regression models used for variable-oriented analysis of hypotheses of Granger causation. An example from the development of aggression in adolescence is used. The example shows that only one pattern of change in aggressive impulses over time Granger-causes change in physical aggression against peers.

  16. Analysis of transonic flow about lifting wing-body configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnwell, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    An analytical solution was obtained for the perturbation velocity potential for transonic flow about lifting wing-body configurations with order-one span-length ratios and small reduced-span-length ratios and equivalent-thickness-length ratios. The analysis is performed with the method of matched asymptotic expansions. The angles of attack which are considered are small but are large enough to insure that the effects of lift in the region far from the configuration are either dominant or comparable with the effects of thickness. The modification to the equivalence rule which accounts for these lift effects is determined. An analysis of transonic flow about lifting wings with large aspect ratios is also presented.

  17. Transonic analysis of complex configurations using TRANAIR program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saaris, G. R.; Gilkey, R. D.; Smit, K. L.; Tinoco, E. N.

    1989-01-01

    The application of a three-dimensional transonic flow analysis method, TRANAIR, is explored from the point of view of a user. Detailed features of the program are outlined to give a better understanding of capability. Numerous results are presented to show some of the complex configurations which have been analyzed. In particular, examples are provided which show the application to turbofan engine installation on transport aircraft.

  18. Analysis of conventional and asymmetric aircraft configurations using CEASIOM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Thomas S.; McFarlane, Cormac; Isikveren, Askin; Badcock, Ken; Da Ronch, Andrea

    2011-11-01

    One of the main drivers behind the SimSAC project and the CEASIOM software is to bring stability analysis and control system design earlier into the aircraft conceptual design process. Within this paper two very different aircraft are considered, a conventional T-tail based on the existing EA500 Very Light Jet and the second, a novel Z-wing configuration known as the GAV or general aviation vehicle. The first aircraft serves as a baseline comparison for the second, and the cruise case is considered as a benchmark for identifying potential drag reductions and aircraft stability characteristics. CEASIOM, the Computerised Environment for Aircraft Synthesis and Integrated Optimisation Methods, is used to generate aerodynamic data sets for both aircraft, create trim conditions and the associated linear models for classical stability analysis. The open-loop Z-wing configuration is shown to display both highly unstable and coupled modes before a multivariable Stability Augmentation System (SAS) is applied both to decouple and stabilise the aircraft. Within this paper, these two aircraft provide a test case with which to demonstrate the capabilities of the CEASIOM environment and the tools which have been developed during the SimSAC project. This new software suite is shown to allow conceptual development of unconventional novel configurations from mass properties through adaptive-fidelity aerodynamics to linear analysis and control system design.

  19. Numerical analysis of the dynamics of distributed vortex configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govorukhin, V. N.

    2016-08-01

    A numerical algorithm is proposed for analyzing the dynamics of distributed plane vortex configurations in an inviscid incompressible fluid. At every time step, the algorithm involves the computation of unsteady vortex flows, an analysis of the configuration structure with the help of heuristic criteria, the visualization of the distribution of marked particles and vorticity, the construction of streamlines of fluid particles, and the computation of the field of local Lyapunov exponents. The inviscid incompressible fluid dynamic equations are solved by applying a meshless vortex method. The algorithm is used to investigate the interaction of two and three identical distributed vortices with various initial positions in the flow region with and without the Coriolis force.

  20. A comparative study of behaviors of ventilated supercavities between experimental models with different mounting configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Jae; Kawakami, Ellison; Karn, Ashish; Arndt, Roger E. A.

    2016-08-01

    Small-scale water tunnel experiments of the phenomenon of supercavitation can be carried out broadly using two different kinds of experimental models-in the first model (forward facing model, or FFM), the incoming flow first interacts with the cavitator at front, which is connected to the strut through a ventilation pipe. The second model could have the strut and the ventilation pipe preceding the cavitator (backward facing model, or BFM). This is the continuation of a water tunnel study of the effects of unsteady flows on axisymmetric supercavities. In this study, the unwanted effect of test model configuration on supercavity shape in periodic flows was explored through a comparison of FFM and BFM models. In our experiments, it was found that periodic gust flows have only a minimal effect on the maximum diameter and the cavity length can be shortened above a certain vertical velocity of periodic flows. These findings appear to be robust regardless of the model configuration.

  1. Experimental investigation on the characteristics of supersonic fuel spray and configurations of induced shock waves

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Yu, Yu-song; Li, Guo-xiu; Jia, Tao-ming

    2017-01-01

    The macro characteristics and configurations of induced shock waves of the supersonic sprays are investigated by experimental methods. Visualization study of spray shape is carried out with the high-speed camera. The macro characteristics including spray tip penetration, velocity of spray tip and spray angle are analyzed. The configurations of shock waves are investigated by Schlieren technique. For supersonic sprays, the concept of spray front angle is presented. Effects of Mach number of spray on the spray front angle are investigated. The results show that the shape of spray tip is similar to blunt body when fuel spray is at transonic region. If spray entered the supersonic region, the oblique shock waves are induced instead of normal shock wave. With the velocity of spray increasing, the spray front angle and shock wave angle are increased. The tip region of the supersonic fuel spray is commonly formed a cone. Mean droplet diameter of fuel spray is measured using Malvern’s Spraytec. Then the mean droplet diameter results are compared with three popular empirical models (Hiroyasu’s, Varde’s and Merrigton’s model). It is found that the Merrigton’s model shows a relative good correlation between models and experimental results. Finally, exponent of injection velocity in the Merrigton’s model is fitted with experimental results. PMID:28054555

  2. Experimental investigation on the characteristics of supersonic fuel spray and configurations of induced shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Yu, Yu-Song; Li, Guo-Xiu; Jia, Tao-Ming

    2017-01-01

    The macro characteristics and configurations of induced shock waves of the supersonic sprays are investigated by experimental methods. Visualization study of spray shape is carried out with the high-speed camera. The macro characteristics including spray tip penetration, velocity of spray tip and spray angle are analyzed. The configurations of shock waves are investigated by Schlieren technique. For supersonic sprays, the concept of spray front angle is presented. Effects of Mach number of spray on the spray front angle are investigated. The results show that the shape of spray tip is similar to blunt body when fuel spray is at transonic region. If spray entered the supersonic region, the oblique shock waves are induced instead of normal shock wave. With the velocity of spray increasing, the spray front angle and shock wave angle are increased. The tip region of the supersonic fuel spray is commonly formed a cone. Mean droplet diameter of fuel spray is measured using Malvern’s Spraytec. Then the mean droplet diameter results are compared with three popular empirical models (Hiroyasu’s, Varde’s and Merrigton’s model). It is found that the Merrigton’s model shows a relative good correlation between models and experimental results. Finally, exponent of injection velocity in the Merrigton’s model is fitted with experimental results.

  3. Direct experimental evidence for a multiparticle-hole ground state configuration of deformed 33Mg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Ushasi; Rahaman, A.; Aumann, T.; Beceiro-Novo, S.; Boretzky, K.; Caesar, C.; Carlson, B. V.; Catford, W. N.; Chakraborty, S.; Chartier, M.; Cortina-Gil, D.; de Angelis, G.; Diaz Fernandez, P.; Emling, H.; Ershova, O.; Fraile, L. M.; Geissel, H.; Gonzalez-Diaz, D.; Jonson, B.; Johansson, H.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kröll, T.; Krücken, R.; Kurcewicz, J.; Langer, C.; Le Bleis, T.; Leifels, Y.; Marganiec, J.; Münzenberg, G.; Najafi, M. A.; Nilsson, T.; Nociforo, C.; Panin, V.; Paschalis, S.; Plag, R.; Reifarth, R.; Ricciardi, V.; Rossi, D.; Scheit, H.; Scheidenberger, C.; Simon, H.; Taylor, J. T.; Togano, Y.; Typel, S.; Volkov, V.; Wagner, A.; Wamers, F.; Weick, H.; Weigand, M.; Winfield, J. S.; Yakorev, D.; Zoric, M.

    2016-09-01

    The first direct experimental evidence of a multiparticle-hole ground state configuration of the neutron-rich 33Mg isotope has been obtained via intermediate energy (400 A MeV) Coulomb dissociation measurement. The major part ˜(70 ±13 )% of the cross section is observed to populate the excited states of 32Mg after the Coulomb breakup of 33Mg. The shapes of the differential Coulomb dissociation cross sections in coincidence with different core excited states favor that the valence neutron occupies both the s1 /2 and p3 /2 orbitals. These experimental findings suggest a significant reduction and merging of s d -p f shell gaps at N ˜20 and 28. The ground state configuration of 33Mg is predominantly a combination of 32Mg(3.0 ,3.5 MeV ;2-,1-) ⨂νs1/2 , 32Mg(2.5 MeV ;2+) ⨂νp3/2 , and 32Mg(0 ;0+) ⨂νp3/2 . The experimentally obtained quantitative spectroscopic information for the valence neutron occupation of the s and p orbitals, coupled with different core states, is in agreement with Monte Carlo shell model (MCSM) calculation using 3 MeV as the shell gap at N =20 .

  4. Flow Field Analysis of a Future Launcher Configuration during Start

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozic, O.; Otto, H.

    2005-02-01

    Within the German Future Space Launcher Technology Research Program ASTRA several reusable concepts have been investigated. Particularly one dedicated for near-term application consists of an Ariane 5-type expendable core stage and two liquid fly back boosters (LFBB). The present investigation focused on the interaction between the booster and the core stage during ascent phase. The analysis is carried out numerically by means of the DLR unstructured code TAU. The numerical results allow a compressive study of the complicate flow pattern between the boosters and the central core and address the changes on aerodynamic drag between the three configurations considered. Key words: launcher, ASTRA, LFBB, flow simulation, CFD simulation, unstructured grid

  5. Comparative analysis of imaging configurations and objectives for Fourier microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kurvits, Jonathan A; Jiang, Mingming; Zia, Rashid

    2015-11-01

    Fourier microscopy is becoming an increasingly important tool for the analysis of optical nanostructures and quantum emitters. However, achieving quantitative Fourier space measurements requires a thorough understanding of the impact of aberrations introduced by optical microscopes that have been optimized for conventional real-space imaging. Here we present a detailed framework for analyzing the performance of microscope objectives for several common Fourier imaging configurations. To this end, we model objectives from Nikon, Olympus, and Zeiss using parameters that were inferred from patent literature and confirmed, where possible, by physical disassembly. We then examine the aberrations most relevant to Fourier microscopy, including the alignment tolerances of apodization factors for different objective classes, the effect of magnification on the modulation transfer function, and vignetting-induced reductions of the effective numerical aperture for wide-field measurements. Based on this analysis, we identify an optimal objective class and imaging configuration for Fourier microscopy. In addition, the Zemax files for the objectives and setups used in this analysis have been made publicly available as a resource for future studies.

  6. Monosaccharide-NAIM derivatives for D-, L-configurational analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chunchi; Kuo, Chien-Yuan; Liao, Kuo-Shiang; Yang, Wen-Bin

    2011-01-17

    The D-, L-enantiomeric pairs of common monosaccharides (xylose, ribose, rhamnose, arabinose, fucose, glucose, mannose, galactose, N-acetylgalactosamine, glucuronic acid and galacturonic acid) were derivatized with 2,3-naphthalenediamine to form the corresponding D-, L-aldo-NAIM derivatives. A simple and facile capillary electrophoretic method was established for sugar composition analysis by simultaneously determining the migration times of these aldo-NAIMs using borate buffer at high pH (100 mM, pH 9.0). The methodology is also applicable to sialic acid (ketose monosaccharides). The quantitation level of the proposed method was in the 10~500 ppm range and the LOD was 1 ppm. The enantioseparation of D, L pairs of aldo-NAIMs were also achieved by using modified sulfated-α-cyclodextrin as the chiral selector in phosphate buffer (300 mM, pH 3.0). In addition, the combination by reductive amination of amino-aldo-NAIM agent and D-, L-enantiomeric pairs of monosaccharides formed a diastereomeric pair for saccharide configuration analysis. Aldo-NAIM derivatives are thus shown to be rapid and efficient agents for analyzing saccharide compositions and configurations with good linearity and short analysis times via capillary electrophoresis.

  7. Unstructured CFD Aerodynamic Analysis of a Generic UCAV Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frink, Neal T.; Tormalm, Magnus; Schmidt, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Three independent studies from the United States (NASA), Sweden (FOI), and Australia (DSTO) are analyzed to assess the state of current unstructured-grid computational fluid dynamic tools and practices for predicting the complex static and dynamic aerodynamic and stability characteristics of a generic 53-degree swept, round-leading-edge uninhabited combat air vehicle configuration, called SACCON. NASA exercised the USM3D tetrahedral cell-centered flow solver, while FOI and DSTO applied the FOI/EDGE general-cell vertex-based solver. The authors primarily employ the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) assumption, with a limited assessment of the EDGE Detached Eddy Simulation (DES) extension, to explore sensitivities to grids and turbulence models. Correlations with experimental data are provided for force and moments, surface pressure, and off-body flow measurements. The vortical flow field over SACCON proved extremely difficult to model adequately. As a general rule, the prospect of obtaining reasonable correlations of SACCON pitching moment characteristics with the RANS formulation is not promising, even for static cases. Yet, dynamic pitch oscillation results seem to produce a promising characterization of shapes for the lift and pitching moment hysteresis curves. Future studies of this configuration should include more investigation with higher-fidelity turbulence models, such as DES.

  8. Nonlinear potential analysis techniques for supersonic-hypersonic configuration design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clever, W. C.; Shankar, V.

    1983-01-01

    Approximate nonlinear inviscid theoretical techniques for predicting aerodynamic characteristics and surface pressures for relatively slender vehicles at moderate hypersonic speeds were developed. Emphasis was placed on approaches that would be responsive to preliminary configuration design level of effort. Second order small disturbance and full potential theory was utilized to meet this objective. Numerical pilot codes were developed for relatively general three dimensional geometries to evaluate the capability of the approximate equations of motion considered. Results from the computations indicate good agreement with higher order solutions and experimental results for a variety of wing, body and wing-body shapes for values of the hypersonic similarity parameter M delta approaching one. Case computational times of a minute were achieved for practical aircraft arrangements.

  9. Experimental investigation on the effect of slat geometrical configurations on aerodynamic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagani, Carlos C.; Souza, Daniel S.; Medeiros, Marcello A. F.

    2017-04-01

    Relatively few studies have addressed the slat noise dependence on gap, overlap and deflection angle, although slat noise level and spectral content are topics of increasing concern in the aeronautical industry. This paper presents new experimental data on the subject. An array of microphones placed in a closed-section wind tunnel was used in the experiments. Beamforming signal processing enhanced by DAMAS (Deconvolution Approach for the Mapping of Acoustic Sources) was applied to the data. The experimental data covered a range of angles of attack and Mach numbers, for which the typical slat noise signature features high-level narrow-band peaks, broadband noise and a single broad tone. The narrow-band peaks often dominate the slat noise spectra and arise at Strouhal numbers up to approximately 5. The broadband noise is well characterized for Strouhal numbers between 5 and 20, whereas the broad tone arises for Strouhal above 20. A total of 10 different slat configurations, including variations in gap, overlap and deflection angle were tested. The slat noise dependence on gap, overlap and slat deflection angle was assessed by letting each of them vary separately. The slat configuration exerted a substantial effect on all slat noise components, with variations of up to 20 dB/Hz in the level of the narrow-band peaks. In general, the level of the narrow-band peaks reduced and the high frequency content increased as the gap, overlap, angle of attack and slat deflection increased separately or in combination. The aerodynamically optimized baseline configuration is very distinct from the lowest noise one.

  10. Disposal criticality analysis for immobilized Pu: External configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Gottlieb, P.; Goluoglu, S.; Cloke, P.L.

    1998-03-01

    The problem of potential external criticality is defined according to the following features and issues: The environment outside the waste package is most conveniently divided into 3 zones: (1) Near-field, in the drift, external to the waste package; (2) Near far-field, several meters into the host rock immediately adjacent to the drift; (3) Far far-field, everything beyond the near far-field. These zones have different mechanisms for accumulating a critical mass from the passing waste package outflow. Fissile material can be transported outside of the waste package thereby becoming separated from the neutron absorber. Descriptions of uranium mineral deposits imply that concentrations sufficient for criticality can be accumulated by natural processes, particularly if the uranium is highly enriched. Some configurations of fissile material in the external environment have been identified as having the potential for autocatalytic criticality behavior, but without examining the likelihood of the processes necessary to achieve such configurations. The following factors limit the possibility of external criticality: absence of geologic formations in Yucca Mountain which can cause sufficient concentration, and length of time required to form the typical geologic mineral deposit. The paper summarizes the approach used to analyze criticality and gives results and conclusions of the analysis.

  11. Experimental and Computational Studies of the Flow Over a Sting Mounted Planetary Probe Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Michael S.; Harvey, John K.; Boyd, Iain D.; George, Jyothish; Horvath, Thomas J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a series of experimental studies in the LENS shock tunnel and computations with DSMC and Navier Stokes codes which have been made to examine the aerothermal and flowfield characteristics of the flow over a sting-supported planetary probe configuration in hypervelocity air and nitrogen flows. The experimental program was conducted in the LENS hypervelocity shock tunnel at total enthalpies of 5and 10 MJkg for a range of reservoir pressure conditions from 70 to 500 bars. Heat transfer and pressure measurements were made on the front and rear face of the probe and along the supporting sting. High-speed and single shot schlieren photography were also employed to examine the flow over the model and the time to establish the flow in the base recirculation region. Predictions of the flowfield characteristics and the distributions of heat transfer and pressure were made with DSMC codes for rarefied flow conditions and with the Navier-Stokes solvers for the higher pressure conditions where the flows were assumed to be laminar. Analysis of the time history records from the heat transfer and pressure instrumentation on the face of the probe and in the base region indicated that the base flow was fully established in under 4 milliseconds from flow initiation or between 35 and 50 flow lengths based on base height. The measurements made in three different tunnel entries with two models of identical geometries but with different instrumentation packages, one prepared by NASA Langley and the second prepared by CUBRC, demonstrated good agreement between heat transfer measurements made with two different types of thin film and coaxial gage instrumentation. The measurements of heat transfer and pressure to the front face of the probe were in good agreement with theoretical predictions from both the DSMC and Navier Stokes codes. For the measurements made in low density flows, computations with the DSMC code were found to compare well with the

  12. Experimental Investigation of the DLR-F6 Transport Configuration in the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatlin, Gregory M.; Rivers, Melissa B.; Goodliff, Scott L.; Rudnik, Ralf; Sitzmann, Martin

    2008-01-01

    An experimental aerodynamic investigation of the DLR (German Aerospace Center) F6 generic transport configuration has been conducted in the NASA NTF (National Transonic Facility) for CFD validation within the framework of the AIAA Drag Prediction Workshop. Force and moment, surface pressure, model deformation, and surface flow visualization data have been obtained at Reynolds numbers of both 3 million and 5 million. Flow-through nacelles and a side-of-body fairing were also investigated on this wing-body configuration. Reynolds number effects on trailing edge separation have been assessed, and the effectiveness of the side-of-body fairing in eliminating a known region of separated flow has been determined. Data obtained at a Reynolds number of 3 million are presented together for comparison with data from a previous wind tunnel investigation in the ONERA S2MA facility. New surface flow visualization capabilities have also been successfully explored and demonstrated in the NTF for the high pressure and moderately low temperature conditions required in this investigation. Images detailing wing surface flow characteristics are presented.

  13. Experimental and numerical validation for the novel configuration of an arthroscopic indentation instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, Rami K.; Saarakkala, Simo; Töyräs, Juha; Laasanen, Mikko S.; Kiviranta, Ilkka; Jurvelin, Jukka S.

    2003-06-01

    Softening of articular cartilage, mainly attributable to deterioration of superficial collagen network and depletion of proteoglycans, is a sign of incipient osteoarthrosis. Early diagnosis of osteoarthrosis is essential to prevent the further destruction of the tissue. During the past decade, a few arthroscopic instruments have been introduced for the measurement of cartilage stiffness; these can be used to provide a sensitive measure of cartilage status. Ease of use, accuracy and reproducibility of the measurements as well as a low risk of damaging cartilage are the main qualities needed in any clinically applicable instrument. In this study, we have modified a commercially available arthroscopic indentation instrument to better fulfil these requirements when measuring cartilage stiffness in joints with thin cartilage. Our novel configuration was validated by experimental testing as well as by finite element (FE) modelling. Experimental and numerical tests indicated that it would be better to use a smaller reference plate and a lower pressing force (3 N) than those used in the original instrument (7-10 N). The reproducibility (CV = 5.0%) of the in situ indentation measurements was improved over that of the original instrument (CV = 7.6%), and the effect of material thickness on the indentation response was smaller than that obtained with the original instrument. The novel configuration showed a significant linear correlation between the indenter force and the reference dynamic modulus of cartilage in unconfined compression, especially in soft tissue (r = 0.893, p < 0.001, n = 16). FE analyses with a transversely isotropic poroelastic model indicated that the instrument was suitable for detecting the degeneration of superficial cartilage. In summary, the instrument presented in this study allows easy and reproducible measurement of cartilage stiffness, also in thin cartilage, and therefore represents a technical improvement for the early diagnosis of

  14. Experimental Investigation of a Point Design Optimized Arrow Wing HSCT Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narducci, Robert P.; Sundaram, P.; Agrawal, Shreekant; Cheung, S.; Arslan, A. E.; Martin, G. L.

    1999-01-01

    The M2.4-7A Arrow Wing HSCT configuration was optimized for straight and level cruise at a Mach number of 2.4 and a lift coefficient of 0.10. A quasi-Newton optimization scheme maximized the lift-to-drag ratio (by minimizing drag-to-lift) using Euler solutions from FL067 to estimate the lift and drag forces. A 1.675% wind-tunnel model of the Opt5 HSCT configuration was built to validate the design methodology. Experimental data gathered at the NASA Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) section #2 facility verified CFL3D Euler and Navier-Stokes predictions of the Opt5 performance at the design point. In turn, CFL3D confirmed the improvement in the lift-to-drag ratio obtained during the optimization, thus validating the design procedure. A data base at off-design conditions was obtained during three wind-tunnel tests. The entry into NASA Langley UPWT section #2 obtained data at a free stream Mach number, M(sub infinity), of 2.55 as well as the design Mach number, M(sub infinity)=2.4. Data from a Mach number range of 1.8 to 2.4 was taken at UPWT section #1. Transonic and low supersonic Mach numbers, M(sub infinity)=0.6 to 1.2, was gathered at the NASA Langley 16 ft. Transonic Wind Tunnel (TWT). In addition to good agreement between CFD and experimental data, highlights from the wind-tunnel tests include a trip dot study suggesting a linear relationship between trip dot drag and Mach number, an aeroelastic study that measured the outboard wing deflection and twist, and a flap scheduling study that identifies the possibility of only one leading-edge and trailing-edge flap setting for transonic cruise and another for low supersonic acceleration.

  15. Criticality Benchmark Analysis of the HTTR Annular Startup Core Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess

    2009-11-01

    One of the high priority benchmarking activities for corroborating the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project and Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Program is evaluation of Japan's existing High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). The HTTR is a 30 MWt engineering test reactor utilizing graphite moderation, helium coolant, and prismatic TRISO fuel. A large amount of critical reactor physics data is available for validation efforts of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs). Previous international reactor physics benchmarking activities provided a collation of mixed results that inaccurately predicted actual experimental performance.1 Reevaluations were performed by the Japanese to reduce the discrepancy between actual and computationally-determined critical configurations.2-3 Current efforts at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) involve development of reactor physics benchmark models in conjunction with the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) for use with verification and validation methods in the VHTR Program. Annular cores demonstrate inherent safety characteristics that are of interest in developing future HTGRs.

  16. Nonlinear Aeroelastic Analysis of Joined-Wing Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavallaro, Rauno

    Aeroelastic design of joined-wing configurations is yet a relatively unexplored topic which poses several difficulties. Due to the overconstrained nature of the system combined with structural geometric nonlinearities, the behavior of Joined Wings is often counterintuitive and presents challenges not seen in standard layouts. In particular, instability observed on detailed aircraft models but never thoroughly investigated, is here studied with the aid of a theoretical/computational framework. Snap-type of instabilities are shown for both pure structural and aeroelastic cases. The concept of snap-divergence is introduced to clearly identify the true aeroelastic instability, as opposed to the usual aeroelastic divergence evaluated through eigenvalue approach. Multi-stable regions and isola-type of bifurcations are possible characterizations of the nonlinear response of Joined Wings, and may lead to branch-jumping phenomena well below nominal critical load condition. Within this picture, sensitivity to (unavoidable) manufacturing defects could have potential catastrophic effects. The phenomena studied in this work suggest that the design process for Joined Wings needs to be revisited and should focus, when instability is concerned, on nonlinear post-critical analysis since linear methods may provide wrong trend indications and also hide potentially catastrophical situations. Dynamic aeroelastic analyses are also performed. Flutter occurrence is critically analyzed with frequency and time-domain capabilities. Sensitivity to different-fidelity aeroelastic modeling (fluid-structure interface algorithm, aerodynamic solvers) is assessed showing that, for some configurations, wake modeling (rigid versus free) has a strong impact on the results. Post-flutter regimes are also explored. Limit cycle oscillations are observed, followed, in some cases, by flip bifurcations (period doubling) and loss of periodicity of the solution. Aeroelastic analyses are then carried out on a

  17. Multi-Body Analysis of a Tiltrotor Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghiringhelli, G. L.; Masarati, P.; Mantegazza, P.; Nixon, M. W.

    1997-01-01

    The paper describes the aeroelastic analysis of a tiltrotor configuration. The 1/5 scale wind tunnel semispan model of the V-22 tiltrotor aircraft is considered. The analysis is performed by means of a multi-body code, based on an original formulation. The differential equilibrium problem is stated in terms of first order differential equations. The equilibrium equations of every rigid body are written, together with the definitions of the momenta. The bodies are connected by kinematic constraints, applied in form of Lagrangian multipliers. Deformable components are mainly modelled by means of beam elements, based on an original finite volume formulation. Multi-disciplinar problems can be solved by adding user-defined differential equations. In the presented analysis the equations related to the control of the swash-plate of the model are considered. Advantages of a multi-body aeroelastic code over existing comprehensive rotorcraft codes include the exact modelling of the kinematics of the hub, the detailed modelling of the flexibility of critical hub components, and the possibility to simulate steady flight conditions as well as wind-up and maneuvers. The simulations described in the paper include: 1) the analysis of the aeroelastic stability, with particular regard to the proprotor/pylon instability that is peculiar to tiltrotors, 2) the determination of the dynamic behavior of the system and of the loads due to typical maneuvers, with particular regard to the conversion from helicopter to airplane mode, and 3) the stress evaluation in critical components, such as the pitch links and the conversion downstop spring.

  18. An experimental investigation of supersonic flow past a wedge-cylinder configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnette, D. W.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental investigation of supersonic flow past double-wedge configurations was conducted. Over the range of geometries tested, it was found that, while theoretical solutions both for a Type V pattern and for a Type VI pattern could be generated for a particular flow condition (as defined by the geometry and the free-stream conditions), the weaker, Type VI pattern was observed experimentally. More rigorous flow-field solutions were developed for the flow along the wing leading-edge. Solutions were developed for the three-dimensional flow in the plane of symmetry of a swept cylinder (which represented the wing leading-edge) which was mounted on a wedge (which generated the "bow" shock wave). A numerical code was developed using integral techniques to calculate the flow in the shock layer upstream of the interaction region (i.e., near the wing root). Heat transfer rates were calculated for various free stream conditions. The present investigation was undertaken to examine the effects of crossflow on the resultant flow-field and to verify the flow model used in theoretical calculations.

  19. Global ideal magnetohydrodynamic stability analysis for the configurational space of Wendelstein 7-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nührenberg, Carolin

    1996-06-01

    A survey of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability properties of three-dimensional (3-D) MHD configurations representing the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) stellarator experiment [ G. Grieger et al., Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, 1990 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1991), Vol. 3, p. 525] was performed with the Code for the Analysis for the Stability of 3-D Equilibria (CAS3D) [C. Schwab, Phys. Fluids B 5, 3195 (1993)] . This study confirms and elaborates previous indications on the structural characteristics of global MHD modes in stellarators. In particular these characteristics pertain to the compressibility of these modes, the equivalence of the decoupled stability problems for the modes with different parities, and the separability of global from fine-scale perturbations within the same mode family. As to the W7-X stellarator experiment, the envisaged configurational class—providing the intended experimental flexibility—appears to offer scenarios of safely stable operation.

  20. Experimental Investigation of the Low-Speed Aerodynamic Characteristics of a 5.8-Percent Scale Hybrid Wing Body Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatlin, Gregory M.; Vicroy, Dan D.; Carter, Melissa B.

    2012-01-01

    A low-speed experimental investigation has been conducted on a 5.8-percent scale Hybrid Wing Body configuration in the NASA Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. This Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) configuration was designed with specific intention to support the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project goals of reduced noise, emissions, and fuel burn. This HWB configuration incorporates twin, podded nacelles mounted on the vehicle upper surface between twin vertical tails. Low-speed aerodynamic characteristics were assessed through the acquisition of force and moment, surface pressure, and flow visualization data. Longitudinal and lateral-directional characteristics were investigated on this multi-component model. The effects of a drooped leading edge, longitudinal flow-through nacelle location, vertical tail shape and position, elevon deflection, and rudder deflection have been studied. The basic configuration aerodynamics, as well as the effects of these configuration variations, are presented in this paper.

  1. An experimental study of the lift, drag and static longitudinal stability for a three lifting surface configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostowari, C.; Naik, D.

    1986-01-01

    The experimental procedure and aerodynamic force and moment measurements for wind tunnel testing of the three lifting surface configuration (TLC) are described. The influence of nonelliptical lift distributions on lift, drag, and static longitudinal stability are examined; graphs of the lift coefficient versus angle of attack, the pitching moment coefficient, drag coefficient, and lift to drag ratio versus lift coefficient are provided. The TLC data are compared with the conventional tail-aft configuration and the canard-wing configuration; it is concluded that the TLC has better lift and high-lift drag characteristics, lift to drag ratio, and zero-lift moments than the other two configurations. The effects of variations in forward and tail wind incidence angles, gap, stagger, and forward wind span on the drag, lift, longitudinal stability, and zero-lift moments of the configuration are studied.

  2. Configurational salience of landmarks: an analysis of sketch maps using Space Syntax.

    PubMed

    von Stülpnagel, Rul; Frankenstein, Julia

    2015-09-01

    We conducted a visibility graph analysis (a Space Syntax method) of a virtual environment to examine how the configurational salience of global and local landmarks (i.e., their relative positions in the environment) as compared to their visual salience affects the probability of their depiction on sketch maps. Participants of two experimental conditions produced sketch maps from memory after exploration with a layout map or without a map, respectively. Participants of a third condition produced sketch maps in parallel to exploration. More detailed sketch maps were produced in the third condition, but landmarks with higher configurational salience were depicted more frequently across all experimental conditions. Whereas the inclusion of global landmarks onto sketch maps was best predicted by their size, both visual salience and isovist size (i.e., the area a landmark was visible from) predicted the frequency of depiction for local landmarks. Our findings imply that people determine the relevance of landmarks not only by their visual, but even more by their configurational salience.

  3. Unsteady loads due to propulsive lift configurations. Part D: The development of an experimental facility for the investigation of scaling effects on propulsive lift configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haviland, J. K.; Herling, W. W.

    1978-01-01

    The design and construction of an experimental facility for the investigation of scaling effects in propulsive lift configurations are described. The facility was modeled after an existing full size NASA facility which consisted of a coaxial turbofan jet engine with a rectangular nozzle in a blown surface configuration. The flow field of the model facility was examined with and without a simulated wing surface in place at several locations downstream of the nozzle exit plane. Emphasis was placed on obtaining pressure measurements which were made with static probes and surface pressure ports connected via plastic tubing to condenser microphones for fluctuating measurements. Several pressure spectra were compared with those obtained from the NASA facility, and were used in a preliminary evaluation of scaling laws.

  4. Experimental and numerical investigation of the turbulent wake flow of a generic space launcher configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Statnikov, V.; Saile, D.; Meiß, J.-H.; Henckels, A.; Meinke, M.; Gülhan, A.; Schröder, W.

    2015-06-01

    The turbulent wake of a generic space launcher at cold hypersonic freestream conditions is investigated experimentally and numerically to gain detailed insight into the intricate base flow phenomena of space vehicles at upper stages of the flight trajectory. The experiments are done at Ma∞ = 6 and ReD = 1.7 · 106 m-1 by the German Aerospace Center (DLR) and the corresponding computations are performed by the Institute of Aerodynamics Aachen using a zonal Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes / Large-Eddy Simulation (RANS/LES) approach. Two different aft-body geometries consisting of a blunt base and an attached cylindrical nozzle dummy are considered. It is found that the wind tunnel model support attached to the upper side of the main body has a nonnegligible impact on the wake along the whole circumference, albeit on the opposite side, the effects are minimal compared to an axisymmetric configuration. In the blunt-base case, the turbulent supersonic boundary layer undergoes a strong aftexpansion on the model shoulder leading to the formation of a confined low-pressure (p/p∞ ≈ 0.2) recirculation region. Adding a nozzle dummy causes the shear layer to reattach on the its wall at x/D ˜ 0.6 and the base pressure level to increase (p/p∞ ≈ 0.25) compared to the blunt-base case. For both configurations, the pressure fluctuations on the base wall feature dominant frequencies at SrD ≈ 0.05 and SrD ≈ 0.2-0.27, but are of small amplitudes (prms/p∞ = 0.02-0.025) compared to the main body boundary layer. For the nozzle dummy configuration, when moving downstream along the nozzle extension, the wall pressure is increasingly influenced by the reattaching shear layer and the periodic low-frequency behavior becomes less pronounced. Directly behind the reattachment point, the wall pressure reaches maximum mean and root-mean-square (rms) values of about p/p∞ = 1 and p'rms/p∞ = 0.1 and features a broadband specrms trum without distinct frequencies determined by the

  5. Steady and unsteady transonic small disturbance analysis of realistic aircraft configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, John T.; Seidel, David A.; Bennett, Robert M.; Cunningham, Herbert J.; Bland, Samuel R.

    1989-01-01

    A transonic unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic code called CAP-TSD (Computational Aeroelasticity Program - Transonic Small Disturbance) was developed for application to realistic aircraft configurations. It permits the calculation of steady and unsteady flows about complete aircraft configurations for aeroelastic analysis of the flutter critical transonic speed range. The CAP-TSD code uses a time accurate approximate factorization algorithm for solution of the unsteady transonic small disturbance potential equation. An overview is given of the CAP-TSD code development effort along with recent algorithm modifications which are listed and discussed. Calculations are presented for several configurations including the General Dynamics 1/9th scale F-16C aircraft model to evaluate the algorithm and hence the reliability of the CAP-TSD code in general. Calculations are also presented for a flutter analysis of a 45 deg sweptback wing which agree well with the experimental data. Descriptions are presented of the CAP-TSD code and algorithm details along with results and comparisons which demonstrate the stability, accuracy, efficiency, and utility of CAP-TSD.

  6. Experimental study of showerhead cooling on a cylinder comparing several configurations using cylindrical and shaped holes

    SciTech Connect

    Reiss, H.; Boelcs, A.

    2000-01-01

    Film cooling and heat transfer measurements on a cylinder model have been conducted using the transient thermochromic liquid crystal technique. Three showerhead cooling configurations adapted to leading edge film cooling of gas turbine blades were directly compared: classical cylindrical holes versus two types of shaped hole exits. The experiments were carried out in a free jet test facility at two different flow conditions, Mach numbers M = 0.14 and M = 0.26, yielding Reynolds numbers based on the cylinder diameter of 8.6e4 and 1.55e5, respectively, All experiments were done at a mainstream turbulence level of Tu = 7% with an integral length scale of L{sub x} = 9.1 mm (M = 0.14), or L{sub x} = 10.5 mm (M = 0.26), respectively. Foreign gas injection (CO{sub 2}) was used, yielding an engine-near density ratio of 1.6, with blowing ratios ranging from 0.6 to 1.5. Detailed experimental results are shown, including surface distributions of film cooling effectiveness and local heat transfer coefficients. Additionally, heat transfer and heat load augmentation due to injection with respect to the uncooled cylinder are reported. For a given cooling gas consumption, the laid-back shaped hole exits lead to a clear enhancement of the cooling performance compared to cylindrical exits, whereas laterally expanded holes give only slight performance enhancement.

  7. Experimental Investigation on Stirling Type Thermally Coupled Three Stage Pulse Tube Cryocoolers with 'U' Type Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badgujar, A. D.; Naik, H. B.; Atrey, M. D.

    Research on Stirling type Pulse Tube Cryocooler (PTC) is focused on achieving lower temperatures by cascading the stages or by multi-staging. Multi-staging can be done either by gas coupling or by thermal coupling of the stages. In the thermal coupling option, either a two stage cooler can pre-cool a single stage PTC to reach lower temperatures or a single stage PTC can cool a two stage PTC. In the present work, both these configurations are tested experimentally keeping the same two stage PTC. In case-1, the two stage PTC is used as a pre-cooling stage while in case-2, the single stage PTC is used as a pre-cooling stage. Length of the single stage is required and to be increased to match the two stages PTC for effective thermal coupling in case-1. The lowest temperature achieved in case-1 is 50.07 K where as in case-2 the lowest temperature achieved is 19.61 K at 17 bar charge pressure and 68 Hz frequency. The pressure drop in both the PTCs is compared to analyze the difference in performance.

  8. Analysis of computational modeling techniques for complete rotorcraft configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, David M., Jr.

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) provides the helicopter designer with a powerful tool for identifying problematic aerodynamics. Through the use of CFD, design concepts can be analyzed in a virtual wind tunnel long before a physical model is ever created. Traditional CFD analysis tends to be a time consuming process, where much of the effort is spent generating a high quality computational grid. Recent increases in computing power and memory have created renewed interest in alternative grid schemes such as unstructured grids, which facilitate rapid grid generation by relaxing restrictions on grid structure. Three rotor models have been incorporated into a popular fixed-wing unstructured CFD solver to increase its capability and facilitate availability to the rotorcraft community. The benefit of unstructured grid methods is demonstrated through rapid generation of high fidelity configuration models. The simplest rotor model is the steady state actuator disk approximation. By transforming the unsteady rotor problem into a steady state one, the actuator disk can provide rapid predictions of performance parameters such as lift and drag. The actuator blade and overset blade models provide a depiction of the unsteady rotor wake, but incur a larger computational cost than the actuator disk. The actuator blade model is convenient when the unsteady aerodynamic behavior needs to be investigated, but the computational cost of the overset approach is too large. The overset or chimera method allows the blades loads to be computed from first-principles and therefore provides the most accurate prediction of the rotor wake for the models investigated. The physics of the flow fields generated by these models for rotor/fuselage interactions are explored, along with efficiencies and limitations of each method.

  9. High-Speed Research: 1994 Sonic Boom Workshop. Configuration, Design, Analysis and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCurdy, David A. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The third High-Speed Research Sonic Boom Workshop was held at NASA Langley Research Center on June 1-3, 1994. The purpose of this workshop was to provide a forum for Government, industry, and university participants to present and discuss progress in their research. The workshop was organized into sessions dealing with atmospheric propagation; acceptability studies; and configuration design, and testing. Attendance at the workshop was by invitation only. The workshop proceedings include papers on design, analysis, and testing of low-boom high-speed civil transport configurations and experimental techniques for measuring sonic booms. Significant progress is noted in these areas in the time since the previous workshop a year earlier. The papers include preliminary results of sonic boom wind tunnel tests conducted during 1993 and 1994 on several low-boom designs. Results of a mission performance analysis of all low-boom designs are also included. Two experimental methods for measuring near-field signatures of airplanes in flight are reported.

  10. Aerodynamic configuration design using response surface methodology analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelund, Walter C.; Stanley, Douglas O.; Lepsch, Roger A.; McMillin, Mark M.; Unal, Resit

    1993-08-01

    An investigation has been conducted to determine a set of optimal design parameters for a single-stage-to-orbit reentry vehicle. Several configuration geometry parameters which had a large impact on the entry vehicle flying characteristics were selected as design variables: the fuselage fineness ratio, the nose to body length ratio, the nose camber value, the wing planform area scale factor, and the wing location. The optimal geometry parameter values were chosen using a response surface methodology (RSM) technique which allowed for a minimum dry weight configuration design that met a set of aerodynamic performance constraints on the landing speed, and on the subsonic, supersonic, and hypersonic trim and stability levels. The RSM technique utilized, specifically the central composite design method, is presented, along with the general vehicle conceptual design process. Results are presented for an optimized configuration along with several design trade cases.

  11. Aerodynamic configuration design using response surface methodology analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelund, Walter C.; Stanley, Douglas O.; Lepsch, Roger A.; Mcmillin, Mark M.; Unal, Resit

    1993-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted to determine a set of optimal design parameters for a single-stage-to-orbit reentry vehicle. Several configuration geometry parameters which had a large impact on the entry vehicle flying characteristics were selected as design variables: the fuselage fineness ratio, the nose to body length ratio, the nose camber value, the wing planform area scale factor, and the wing location. The optimal geometry parameter values were chosen using a response surface methodology (RSM) technique which allowed for a minimum dry weight configuration design that met a set of aerodynamic performance constraints on the landing speed, and on the subsonic, supersonic, and hypersonic trim and stability levels. The RSM technique utilized, specifically the central composite design method, is presented, along with the general vehicle conceptual design process. Results are presented for an optimized configuration along with several design trade cases.

  12. Safety analysis of the MYRRHA facility with different core configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Arien, B.; Heusdains, S.; Alt Abderrahim, H.; Malambu, E.

    2006-07-01

    In the framework of the IAEA Coordinated Research Project on 'Studies of Innovative Reactor Technology Options for Effective Incineration of Radioactive Waste', a benchmark exercise was undertaken to analyse the behaviour of the MYRRHA facility in various accidental conditions. The transients were simulated by means of the RELAP and SITHER codes and the following set of accident scenarios was considered: loss of flow, loss of heat sink, overpower transient, overcooling and partial blockage of a subassembly. In addition, those accidents were simulated in two different situations depending on whether the proton beam is cut off (protected case) or not (unprotected case). In the IAEA benchmark two subcritical core configurations are considered: a typical core configuration composed only of (U-Pu)O{sub 2} MOX fuel assemblies and another one including additional U-free minor actinides fuel assemblies. The present paper summarized the main results obtained with the first core configuration. (authors)

  13. Configurational analysis of uranium-doped thorium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, A. E.; Ruiz-Hernandez, S. E.; de Leeuw, N. H.

    2015-04-01

    While thorium dioxide is already used industrially in high temperature applications, more insight is needed about the behaviour of the material as part of a mixed-oxide (MOX) nuclear fuel, incorporating uranium. We have developed a new interatomic potential model, commensurate with a prominent existing UO2 potential, to conduct configurational analyses of uranium-doped ThO2 supercells. Using the GULP and Site Occupancy Disorder (SOD) computational codes, we have analysed the distribution of low concentrations of uranium in the bulk material, but have not observed the formation of uranium clusters or a single dominant configuration.

  14. VENUS-2 Experimental Benchmark Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovichev, A.M.

    2001-09-28

    The VENUS critical facility is a zero power reactor located at SCK-CEN, Mol, Belgium, which for the VENUS-2 experiment utilized a mixed-oxide core with near-weapons-grade plutonium. In addition to the VENUS-2 Core, additional computational variants based on each type of fuel cycle VENUS-2 core (3.3 wt. % UO{sub 2}, 4.0 wt. % UO{sub 2}, and 2.0/2.7 wt.% MOX) were also calculated. The VENUS-2 critical configuration and cell variants have been calculated with MCU-REA, which is a continuous energy Monte Carlo code system developed at Russian Research Center ''Kurchatov Institute'' and is used extensively in the Fissile Materials Disposition Program. The calculations resulted in a k{sub eff} of 0.99652 {+-} 0.00025 and relative pin powers within 2% for UO{sub 2} pins and 3% for MOX pins of the experimental values.

  15. Indoor experimental facility for airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) configurations - rail-SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirose, Getachew; Phelan, Brian R.; Sherbondy, Kelly D.; Ranney, Kenneth I.; Koenig, Francois; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2014-05-01

    The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) is developing an indoor experimental facility to evaluate and assess airborne synthetic-aperture-radar-(SAR)-based detection capabilities. The rail-SAR is located in a multi-use facility that also provides a base for research and development in the area of autonomous robotic navigation. Radar explosive hazard detection is one key sensordevelopment area to be investigated at this indoor facility. In particular, the mostly wooden, multi-story building houses a two (2) story housing structure and an open area built over a large sandbox. The housing structure includes reconfigurable indoor walls which enable the realization of multiple See-Through-The-Wall (STTW) scenarios. The open sandbox, on the other hand, allows for surface and buried explosive hazard scenarios. The indoor facility is not rated for true explosive hazard materials so all targets will need to be inert and contain surrogate explosive fills. In this paper we discuss the current system status and describe data collection exercises conducted using canonical targets and frequencies that may be of interest to designers of ultra-wideband (UWB) airborne, ground penetrating SAR systems. A bi-static antenna configuration will be used to investigate the effects of varying airborne SAR parameters such as depression angle, bandwidth, and integration angle, for various target types and deployment scenarios. Canonical targets data were used to evaluate overall facility capabilities and limitations. These data is analyzed and summarized for future evaluations. Finally, processing techniques for dealing with RF multi-path and RFI due to operating inside the indoor facility are described in detail. Discussion of this facility and its capabilities and limitations will provide the explosive hazard community with a great airborne platform asset for sensor to target assessment.

  16. Sensitivity Analysis and Optimization of Aerodynamic Configurations with Blend Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, A. M.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1997-01-01

    A novel (geometrical) parametrization procedure using solutions to a suitably chosen fourth order partial differential equation is used to define a class of airplane configurations. Inclusive in this definition are surface grids, volume grids, and grid sensitivity. The general airplane configuration has wing, fuselage, vertical tail and horizontal tail. The design variables are incorporated into the boundary conditions, and the solution is expressed as a Fourier series. The fuselage has circular cross section, and the radius is an algebraic function of four design parameters and an independent computational variable. Volume grids are obtained through an application of the Control Point Form method. A graphic interface software is developed which dynamically changes the surface of the airplane configuration with the change in input design variable. The software is made user friendly and is targeted towards the initial conceptual development of any aerodynamic configurations. Grid sensitivity with respect to surface design parameters and aerodynamic sensitivity coefficients based on potential flow is obtained using an Automatic Differentiation precompiler software tool ADIFOR. Aerodynamic shape optimization of the complete aircraft with twenty four design variables is performed. Unstructured and structured volume grids and Euler solutions are obtained with standard software to demonstrate the feasibility of the new surface definition.

  17. Extended analysis of the system of even configurations of Ta II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachowska, E.; Dembczyński, J.; Windholz, L.; Ruczkowski, J.; Elantkowska, M.

    2017-01-01

    We performed a parametric study of the fine (fs) and hyperfine structure (hfs) for the even parity configurations of ionized tantalum (Ta II) using improved experimental fs and hfs data for 88 levels. A multi-configuration fitting procedure was performed for 47 configurations taking into account second-order perturbation theory including the effects of closed to open shell excitations. The fs and hfs parameters were calculated. Predicted values of level energies up to 86 000cm-1 are given, as well as gJ-Landé factors, magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole hyperfine structure constants A and B, when no experimental values are available.

  18. Configuration analysis and optimization on multipolar Galatea trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, W. M.; Tao, B. Q.; Jin, X. J.; Li, Z. W.

    2016-10-01

    Multipolar Galatea magnetic trap simulation model was established with the finite element simulation software COMSOL Multiphysics. Analyses about the magnetic section configuration show that better magnetic configuration should make more plasma stay in the weak magnetic field rather than the annular magnetic shell field. Then an optimization model was established with axial electromagnetic force, weak magnetic field area and average magnetic mirror ratio as the optimization goals and with the currents of myxines as design variables. Select appropriate weight coefficients and get optimization results by applying genetic algorithm. Results show that the superiority of the target value of typical application parameters, including the average magnetic mirror can reduce more than 5%, the weak magnetic field area can increase at least 65%, at the same time, axial electromagnetic force acting on the outer myxines can be reduced to less than 50 N. Finally, the results were proved by COMSOL Multiphysics and the results proved the optimized magnetic trap configuration with more plasma in the weak magnetic field can reduce the plasma diffusion velocity and is more conducive for the constraint of plasma.

  19. Scale-4 Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Critical Configurations: Volume 3-Surry Unit 1 Cycle 2

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    The requirements of ANSI/ANS 8.1 specify that calculational methods for away-from-reactor criticality safety analyses be validated against experimental measurements. If credit for the negative reactivity of the depleted (or spent) fuel isotopics is desired, it is necessary to benchmark computational methods against spent fuel critical configurations. This report summarizes a portion of the ongoing effort to benchmark away-from-reactor criticality analysis methods using selected critical configurations from commercial pressurized-water reactors. The analysis methodology selected for all the calculations in this report is based on the codes and data provided in the SCALE-4 code system. The isotopic densities for the spent fuel assemblies in the critical configurations were calculated using the SAS2H analytical sequence of the SCALE-4 system. The sources of data and the procedures for deriving SAS2H input parameters are described in detail. The SNIKR code module was used to extract the necessary isotopic densities from the SAS2H results and to provide the data in the format required by the SCALE criticality analysis modules. The CSASN analytical sequence in SCALE-4 was used to perform resonance processing of the cross sections. The KENO V.a module of SCALE-4 was used to calculate the effective multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) of each case. The SCALE-4 27-group burnup library containing ENDF/B-IV (actinides) and ENDF/B-V (fission products) data was used for all the calculations. This volume of the report documents the SCALE system analysis of two reactor critical configurations for Surry Unit 1 Cycle 2. This unit and cycle were chosen for a previous analysis using a different methodology because detailed isotopics from multidimensional reactor calculations were available from the Virginia Power Company. These data permitted a direct comparison of criticality calculations using the utility-calculated isotopics with those using the isotopics generated by the SCALE-4

  20. Scale-4 Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Critical Configurations: Volume 2-Sequoyah Unit 2 Cycle 3

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    The requirements of ANSI/ANS 8.1 specify that calculational methods for away-from-reactor criticality safety analyses be validated against experimental measurements. If credit for the negative reactivity of the depleted (or spent) fuel isotopics is desired, it is necessary to benchmark computational methods against spent fuel critical configurations. This report summarizes a portion of the ongoing effort to benchmark away-from-reactor criticality analysis methods using critical configurations from commercial pressurized-water reactors. The analysis methodology selected for all the calculations reported herein is based on the codes and data provided in the SCALE-4 code system. The isotopic densities for the spent fuel assemblies in the critical configurations were calculated using the SAS2H analytical sequence of the SCALE-4 system. The sources of data and the procedures for deriving SAS2H input parameters are described in detail. The SNIKR code module was used to extract the necessary isotopic densities from the SAS2H results and provide the data in the format required by the SCALE criticality analysis modules. The CSASN analytical sequence in SCALE-4 was used to perform resonance processing of the cross sections. The KENO V.a module of SCALE-4 was used to calculate the effective multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) of each case. The SCALE-4 27-group burnup library containing ENDF/B-IV (actinides) and ENDF/B-V (fission products) data was used for all the calculations. This volume of the report documents the SCALE system analysis of three reactor critical configurations for the Sequoyah Unit 2 Cycle 3. This unit and cycle were chosen because of the relevance in spent fuel benchmark applications: (1) the unit had a significantly long downtime of 2.7 years during the middle of cycle (MOC) 3, and (2) the core consisted entirely of burned fuel at the MOC restart. The first benchmark critical calculation was the MOC restart at hot, full-power (HFP) critical conditions. The

  1. Experimental evaluation of sound produced by two cylinders in a cross flow in various configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilka, Michael; Kerrian, Peter; Morris, Scott

    2012-11-01

    Cylinders in a cross flow is a canonical test case that is considered representative of industrial fluid flow problems, such as heat exchangers and aircraft landing gear. The general configurations are cylinders in tandem, parallel or staggered, which lead to several interesting flow phenomena such as wake cavity/wake interaction effects (tandem), symmetric/asymmetric wake behavior (parallel) or wake interaction/coanda effects (staggered), depending on relative location of the cylinders. In many cases, it is important to not only understand the flow interaction between the cylinders but also the acoustic consequence of such configurations. However, information on the acoustical behavior based on these configurations is relatively small compared to that of the steady aerodynamic and flow interaction behavior. The present work investigates the acoustic spectral properties of these configurations in order to characterize the sound produced by cylinder proximity and wake effects. The spectra are measured using an acoustic beam-forming technique to identify the sources and remove spurious content from the spectra.

  2. Conformation, optical properties, and absolute configuration of 2‧,3‧-isopropylideneadenosines: Theoretical vs. experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, Bojidarka; Spiteller, Michael

    2011-10-01

    The conformational analysis, determination of absolute configurations (ACs) as well as elucidation of the electronic absorption and CD spectra of chiral molecules 2',3'-O-isopropylideneadenosine ( 1), 5'-carboxy-2',3'-O-isopropylidene-D-adenosine ( 2), 2-chloro-2',3'-O-isopropylideneadenosine-5'-N- ethylcarboxamide ( 3) and 1-[6-(6-Amino-2-methyl-purin-9-yl)-2,2-dimethyl-tetrahydro-furo[3,4-d][1,3]dioxol-4-ylmethyl]-3-carbamoyl-pyridinium chloride ( 4), 9-(6-aminomethyl-2,2-dimethyl-tetrahydro-furo[3,4-d][1,3]dioxol-4-yl)-9H-purin-6-ylamine ( 5) and acetic acid 6-(6-amino-purin-9-yl)-2,2-dimethyl-tetrahydro-furo[3,4-d][1,3]dioxol-4-ylmethyl ester ( 6) are performer. The methods such as electronic absorption (EAs), diffuse reflectance (DSs) spectroscopy as well as electronic circular dichroism (ECD) are applied. The theoretical density functional theory (DFT) calculations are carried out to evaluate the optical phenomena of isolated molecules as well as dimeric associates. We are demonstrated the significance and the advances of the stereo chemical experimental and theoretical characterization of natural products and their functional synthetic derivatives, vitha a view to further elucidation of unknown extracts of same chemical class. Special attention is devoted to the role of intermolecular interactions in condense phases on the theoretical and experimental optical properties, studying the corresponding dimeric associates. These results are a key in the drug discovery, and structure-based design of functionalized nucleosides. The methods as single crystal X-ray diffraction and MALDI Orbitrap mass spectrometric imaging (MALDI Orbitrap MSI) are also applied.

  3. Multirole cargo aircraft options and configurations. [economic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conner, D. W.; Vaughan, J. C., III

    1979-01-01

    A future requirements and advanced market evaluation study indicates derivatives of current wide-body aircraft, using 1980 advanced technology, would be economically attractive through 2008, but new dedicated airfreighters incorporating 1990 technology, would offer little or no economic incentive. They would be economically attractive for all payload sizes, however, if RD and T costs could be shared in a joint civil/military arrangement. For the 1994-2008 cargo market, option studies indicate Mach 0.7 propfans would be economically attractive in trip cost, aircraft price and airline ROI. Spanloaders would have an even lower price and higher ROI but would have a relatively high trip cost because of aerodynamic inefficiencies. Dedicated airfreighters using propfans at Mach 0.8 cruise, laminar flow control, or cryofuels, would not provide any great economic benefits. Air cushion landing gear configurations are identified as an option for avoiding runway constraints on airport requirements and/or operational constraints are noted.

  4. Comparative analysis of different configurations of PLC-based safety systems from reliability point of view

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapia, Moiez A.

    1993-01-01

    The study of a comparative analysis of distinct multiplex and fault-tolerant configurations for a PLC-based safety system from a reliability point of view is presented. It considers simplex, duplex and fault-tolerant triple redundancy configurations. The standby unit in case of a duplex configuration has a failure rate which is k times the failure rate of the standby unit, the value of k varying from 0 to 1. For distinct values of MTTR and MTTF of the main unit, MTBF and availability for these configurations are calculated. The effect of duplexing only the PLC module or only the sensors and the actuators module, on the MTBF of the configuration, is also presented. The results are summarized and merits and demerits of various configurations under distinct environments are discussed.

  5. Experimental Data for Two Different Alternator Configurations in a Solar Brayton Power System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Lee S.; Shaltens, Richard K.; Espinosa, William D.

    1997-01-01

    A solar dynamic (SD) space power system has been under test at the NASA Lewis Research Center since 1994. The SD Ground Test Demonstration (GTD) system includes a solar concentrator, heat receiver with thermal energy storage, Brayton power conversion unit, and radiator installed in a thermal-vacuum chamber with a solar simulator. The Brayton unit has been operated with two different turboalternator compressor (TAC) assemblies, one which included a Rice Lundell alternator and another which incorporated a permanent magnet (PM) alternator. The Rice alternator was part of the mini-Brayton rotating unit, designed and built during the 1970's and refurbished for the GTD. The PM TAC was a development unit from the Joint US/Russian SD Flight Project. This paper highlights the operational differences (and similarities) between the Rice and PM TAC configurations including a comparative evaluation of startup characteristics and operating performance. The two alternator configurations were tested under similar thermal conditions, as an interchangeable component within the SD system. The electrical characteristics of the two units, however, dictated the use of significantly different power conditioning and control strategies. The electrical control architectures are described and compared. Test data are presented on TAC startup and system operating performance for both configurations.

  6. Lunar lander configuration study and parametric performance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donahue, Benjamin B.; Fowler, C. R.

    1993-06-01

    Future Lunar exploration plans will call for delivery of significant mounts or cargo to provide for crew habitation, surface tansportation, and scientific exploration activities. Minimization of costly surface based infrastructure is in large part directly related to the design of the cargo delivery/landing craft. This study focused on evaluating Lunar lander concepts from a logistics oriented perspective, and outlines the approach used in the development of a preferred configuration, sets forth the benefits derived from its utilization and describes the missions and system considered. Results indicate that only direct-to-surface downloading of payloads provides for unassisted cargo removal operations imperative to efficient and low risk site buildup, including the emplacement of Space Station derivative surface habitat modules, immediate cargo jettison for both descent abort and emergency surface ascent essential to piloted missions carrying cargo, and short habitat egress/ingress paths necessary to productive surface work tours for crew members carrying hand held experiments, tools and other bulky articles. Accommodating cargo in a position underneath the vehicles structural frame, landing craft described herein eliminate altogether the necessity for dedicated surface based off-loading vehicles, the operations and maintenance associated with their operation, and the precipitous ladder climbs to and from the surface that are inherent to traditional designs. Parametric evaluations illustrate performance and mass variation with respect to mission requirements.

  7. Finite Element Method of Stress Analysis of Nonaxisymmetric Configurations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    30 Axisymmetric Perfectly Plastic Problem 30 Nonaxisymmetric Perfectly Plastic Problems 30 Hardening Cases, Nearly Elastic Examples 31 VI...NUMERICAL RESULTS OF ELASTIC-PLASTIC ANALYSIS Axisymmetric Perfectly Plastic Problem The first test of the elastic-plastic numerical analysis is...Nonaxisymmetric Perfectly Plastic Problems In doing the numerical solution in the axisymmetric example two segments were used in the 0 direction

  8. Revised Analysis and Configuration Interaction in Mo VI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reader, Joseph

    2007-06-01

    Mo vi, with ground term 4p^64d ^2D, has a simple one-electron spectrum 4p^6nl-4p^6n^'l^' as well as a more complex spectrum arising from inner-shell excitations 4p^54d^2 and^ 4p^54d5s. A few years ago we observed the spectrum of Mo vi from 200 to 5300 å with a sliding-spark and the 10.7-m normal- and grazing-incidence spectrographs at NIST. We revised a number of the known even levels of the one-electron spectrum [1] and confirmed the ionization limit [1],^ which was based largely on the Penning discharge observations of Romanov and Striganov [2]. A number of Romanov and Striganov's line identifications were also revised. Our results have not yet been published. More recently, we revisited the 4p^6(4d+5s)-4p^5(4d^2+4d5s) transitions and revised several of the core-excited levels [3]. Some levels of 4p^54d^2 are highly mixed with one-electron levels, resulting in transitions at longer wavelengths between 4p^54d^2 and one-electron levels. This provides accurate connections between the ground term and some highly-excited levels and thus highly accurate Ritz-type wavelength predictions for resonance transitions. Improved values have been obtained for all of the energy levels and a new least-squares fit for the odd configurations carried out. [1] B. Edl'en, et al., Phys. Scr. 32, 215 (1985). [2] N. P. Romanov and A. R. Striganov, Opt. Spectrosc. (USSR) 27, 8 (1969). [3] A. Kancerevicius et al., Lith. Phys. J. 31,143 (1991). Supported by Office of Fusion Energy Sciences of D.O.E.

  9. Exploratory studies of the cruise performance of upper surface blown configurations: Experimental program, high-speed pressure tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braden, J. A.; Hancock, J. P.; Burdges, K. P.; Hackett, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    Basic pressure data are presented which was obtained from an experimental study of upper-surface blown configurations at cruise. The high-speed (subsonic) experimental work, studying the aerodynamic effects of wing-nacelle geometric variations, was conducted around semi-span model configurations composed of diversified, interchangeable components. Power simulation was provided by high-pressure air ducted through closed forebody nacelles. Nozzle geometry was varied across size, exit aspect ratio, exit position and boattail angle. Both 3-D force and 2-D pressure measurements were obtained at cruise Mach numbers from 0.5 to 0.8 and at nozzle pressure ratios up to about 3.0. The experimental investigation was supported by an analytical synthesis of the system using a vortex lattice representation with first-order power effects. Results are also presented from a compatibility study in which a short-haul transport is designed on the basis of the aerodynamic findings in the experimental study as well as acoustical data obtained in a concurrent program. High-lift test data are used to substantiate the projected performance of the selected transport design.

  10. Transonic pressure measurements and comparison of theory to experiment for an arrow-wing configuration. Volume 1: Experimental data report, base configuration and effects of wing twist and leading-edge configuration. [wind tunnel tests, aircraft models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manro, M. E.; Manning, K. J. R.; Hallstaff, T. H.; Rogers, J. T.

    1975-01-01

    A wind tunnel test of an arrow-wing-body configuration consisting of flat and twisted wings, as well as a variety of leading- and trailing-edge control surface deflections, was conducted at Mach numbers from 0.4 to 1.1 to provide an experimental pressure data base for comparison with theoretical methods. Theory-to-experiment comparisons of detailed pressure distributions were made using current state-of-the-art attached and separated flow methods. The purpose of these comparisons was to delineate conditions under which these theories are valid for both flat and twisted wings and to explore the use of empirical methods to correct the theoretical methods where theory is deficient.

  11. Experimental investigation of wing fin configurations for alleviation of vortex wakes of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, V. J.

    1978-01-01

    A variety of fin configurations were tested on a model of the Boeing B747 in 40 by 80 foot wind tunnels. The test results confirmed that a reduction in wake rolling moment was brought about by the vortex shed by the fins so that a wide range of designs can be used to achieve wake alleviation. It was also found that the reduction in wake-induced rolling moments was especially sensitive to the location of the smaller fins on the wing and that the penalties in lift and drag can probably be made negligible by proper fin design.

  12. Optimization of the circuit configuration of a pulsatile ECLs: an in vivo experimental study.

    PubMed

    Lim, Choon Hak; Son, Ho Sung; Lee, Jung Joo; Fang, Yong Hu; Moon, Ki Chul; Ahn, Chi Bum; Kim, Kyung Hyun; Lee, Hye Won; Sun, Kyung

    2005-01-01

    An extracorporeal life support system (ECLS) with a conventional membrane oxygenator requires a driving force for the blood to pass through hollow fiber membranes. We hypothesized that if a gravity-flow hollow fiber membrane oxygenator is installed in the circuit, the twin blood sacs of a pulsatile ECLS (the Twin-Pulse Life Support, T-PLS) can be placed downstream of the membrane oxygenator. This would increase pump output by doubling pulse rate at a given pumpsetting rate while maintaining effective pulsatility. The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal circuit configuration for T-PLS with respect to energy and pump output. Animals were randomly assigned to 2 groups in a total cardiopulmonary bypass model. In the serial group, a conventional membrane oxygenator was located between the twin blood sacs of the T-PLS. In the parallel group, the twin blood sacs were placed downstream of the gravity-flow membrane oxygenator. Energy equivalent pressure (EEP), surplus hemodynamic energy (SHE) and pump output were collected at the different pump-setting rates of 30, 40, and 50 beats per minute (BPM). At a given pump-setting rate the pulse rate doubled in the parallel group. Percent changes of mean arterial pressure to EEP were 13.0 +/- 1.7, 12.0 +/- 1.9, and 7.6 +/- 0.9% in the parallel group, while 22.5 +/- 2.4, 23.2 +/- 1.9, and 21.8 +/- 1.4 in the serial group at 30, 40, and 50 BPM of pump-setting rates. SHE at each pump setting rate was 20,131 +/- 1408, 21,739 +/- 2470, and 15,048 +/- 2108 erg/ cm3 in the parallel group, while 33,968 +/- 3001, 38,232 +/- 3281, 37,964 +/- 2693 erg/cm3 in the serial group. Pump output was higher in the parallel circuit at 40, and 50 BPM pump-setting rates (3.1 +/- 0.2, 3.7 +/- 0.2 L/min vs. 2.2 +/- 0.1 and 2.5 +/- 0.1 L/min, respectively, p =0.01). Either parallel or serial circuit configuration of T-PLS generates effective pulsatility. As for the pump out, the parallel circuit configuration provides higher flow than the

  13. Experimental investigation of the natural divertor configuration in Heliotron-E

    SciTech Connect

    Hillis, D.L.; Mioduszewski, P.K.; Fowler, R.H.; Rome, J.A.; Motojima, O.; Mizuuchi, T.; Noda, N.; Mutoh, T.; Zushi, H.; Takahashi, R.; Obiki, T.; Iiyoshi, A.; Uo, K.

    1988-01-01

    Particle control with pump limiters and divertors has been successfully demonstrated in a number of present-day tokamaks. In a heliotron/stellarator configuration, plasma flows to the wall in distinct flux bundles, often called ''divertor stripes''. This complicated three-dimensional characteristic of the plasma edge presents a new challenge for active particle control systems such as pump limiters and divertors. The experiment described here has obtained data with an instrumented pump particle collector that is located in the ''natural'' magnetic divertor stripe of Heliotron-E. The particle collector consists of a moveable graphite assembly with single-sided particle collection and active pumping. By scanning the particle collector assembly through the plasma edge of Heliotron-E, the divertor stripe is observed to be about 2-3 cm (FWHM) in width, and pressure rises of 0.01-0.01 mTorr are observed in the particle collector pumping chamber. These measurements have demonstrated that particles leaving the bulk plasma via the divertor stripes can be collected and provide a basis for developing a divertor scheme for particle control in helical systems. Modelling of the Heliotron-E magnetic configuration at the plasma edge is used to determine the collection efficiency of the particle collector in the divertor stripes. The modeling is further extended to describe a helical divertor concept. 18 refs., 6 figs.

  14. Stability Analysis of the Slowed-Rotor Compound Helicopter Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Floros, Matthew W.; Johnson, Wayne

    2007-01-01

    The stability and control of rotors at high advance ratio are considered. Teetering, articulated, gimbaled, and rigid hub types are considered for a compound helicopter (rotor and fixed wing). Stability predictions obtained using an analytical rigid flapping blade analysis, a rigid blade CAMRAD II model, and an elastic blade CAMRAD II model are compared. For the flapping blade analysis, the teetering rotor is the most stable, showing no instabilities up to an advance ratio of 3 and a Lock number of 18. A notional elastic blade model of a teetering rotor is unstable at an advance ratio of 1.5, independent of pitch frequency. Analysis of the trim controls and blade flapping shows that for small positive collective pitch, trim can be maintained without excessive control input or flapping angles.

  15. Stability Analysis of the Slowed-Rotor Compound Helicopter Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne; Floros, Matthew W.

    2004-01-01

    The stability and control of rotors at high advance ratio are considered. Teetering, articulated, gimbaled, and rigid hub types are considered for a compound helicopter (rotor and fixed wing). Stability predictions obtained using an analytical rigid flapping blade analysis, a rigid blade CAMRAD II model, and an elastic blade CAMRAD II model are compared. For the flapping blade analysis, the teetering rotor is the most stable, 5howing no instabilities up to an advance ratio of 3 and a Lock number of 18. With an elastic blade model, the teetering rotor is unstable at an advance ratio of 1.5. Analysis of the trim controls and blade flapping shows that for small positive collective pitch, trim can be maintained without excessive control input or flapping angles.

  16. Systems design analysis applied to launch vehicle configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, R.; Verderaime, V.

    1993-01-01

    As emphasis shifts from optimum-performance aerospace systems to least lift-cycle costs, systems designs must seek, adapt, and innovate cost improvement techniques in design through operations. The systems design process of concept, definition, and design was assessed for the types and flow of total quality management techniques that may be applicable in a launch vehicle systems design analysis. Techniques discussed are task ordering, quality leverage, concurrent engineering, Pareto's principle, robustness, quality function deployment, criteria, and others. These cost oriented techniques are as applicable to aerospace systems design analysis as to any large commercial system.

  17. Experimental investigation of the aerodynamic effects of distributed spanwise blowing on a fighter configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, J. K.; Hahne, D. E.; Johnson, T. D., Jr.

    1948-01-01

    The results of wind tunnel tests at NASA Langley targeted at the performance and configurational characteristics of 0.1 and 0.13 scale model spanwise blowing (SWB) jet wing concepts are reported. The concept involves redirection of engine compressor bleed air to provide SWB at the fuselage-wing juncture near the wing leading edge. The tests covered the orientation of the outer panel nozzles, the effects of SWB operation on the performance of leading and trailing edge flaps and the effects of SWB on lateral stability. The trials were run at low speeds and angles of attack from 24-45 deg (landing). Both lift and longitudinal stability improved with the SWB, stall and leading edge vortex breakdown were delayed and performance increased with the SWB rate. Lateral stability was degraded below 20 deg angle of attack while instabilities were delayed above 20 deg due to roll damping.

  18. Experimental aerodynamic characteristics at Mach numbers from 0.60 to 2.70 of two supersonic cruise fighter configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dollyhigh, S. M.

    1979-01-01

    Two 0.085-scale full span wind-tunnel models of a Mach 1.60 design supercruiser configuration were tested at Mach numbers from 0.60 to 2.70. One model incorporated a varying dihedral (swept-up) wing to obtain the desired lateral-directional characteristics; the other incorporated more conventional twin vertical tails. The data from the wind-tunnel tests are presented without analysis.

  19. Comparison of Theoretical and Experimental Level Values of the n = 2 Configurations in the Nitrogen Isoelectronic Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edlén, Bengt

    1984-08-01

    Observed level intervals within and between the configurations 2s2 2p3, 2s2p4 and 2p5 of the nitrogen sequence are compared with the corresponding theoretical values derived from the tables of Cheng, Kim and Desclaux. The differences are expressed by suitable functions of Z which give the systematic correction to the theoretical values and reveal the accidental errors in the experimental values. The technique is the same as was used in previous examinations of the Li, Be, B, O and F sequences. The results are summarized in tables of recommended level values (Z = 10-36) and recalculated wavelengths.

  20. Load support system analysis high speed input pinion configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gassel, S. S.; Pirvics, J.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis and a series of computerized calculations were carried out to explore competing prototype design concepts of a shaft and two taper-roller bearings systems to support the high-speed input pinion of an advanced commercial helicopter transmission. The results were used to evaluate designs both for a straddle arrangement where the pinion gear is located between the bearings and for a cantilever arrangement where the pinion is outboard of the two bearings. Effects of varying parameters including applied gear load, preload, wall thickness, interference fits, bearing spacing and pinion gear location on system rigidity, load distribution and bearing rating life were assessed. A comparison of the bearing load distributions for these designs demonstrated that the straddle more equally distributes both radial and axial loads. The performance of these designs over a range of shaft rotational speeds, with lubrication and friction effects included, is also discussed.

  1. Configuration Analysis Tool (CAT). System Description and users guide (revision 1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, W.; Taylor, W.; Mcgarry, F. E.; Merwarth, P.

    1982-01-01

    A system description of, and user's guide for, the Configuration Analysis Tool (CAT) are presented. As a configuration management tool, CAT enhances the control of large software systems by providing a repository for information describing the current status of a project. CAT provides an editing capability to update the information and a reporting capability to present the information. CAT is an interactive program available in versions for the PDP-11/70 and VAX-11/780 computers.

  2. The expanding universe of mass analyzer configurations for biological analysis.

    PubMed

    Calvete, Juan J

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is an analytical technique that measures the mass-to-charge ratio of electrically charged gas-phase particles. All mass spectrometers combine ion formation, mass analysis, and ion detection. Although mass analyzers can be regarded as sophisticated devices that manipulate ions in space and time, the rich diversity of possible ways to combine ion separation, focusing, and detection in dynamic mass spectrometers accounts for the large number of instrument designs. A historical perspective of the progress in mass spectrometry that since 1965 until today have contributed to position this technique as an indispensable tool for biological research has been recently addressed by a privileged witness of this golden age of MS (Gelpí J. Mass Spectrom 43:419-435, 2008; Gelpí J. Mass Spectrom 44:1137-1161, 2008). The aim of this chapter is to highlight the view that the operational principles of mass spectrometry can be understood by a simple mathematical language, and that an understanding of the basic concepts of mass spectrometry is necessary to take the most out of this versatile technique.

  3. Computational fluid dynamics analysis in microbial fuel cells with different anode configurations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyeon; Kim, Hongsuck; Kim, Byunggoon; Yu, Jaecheul

    2014-01-01

    A key criterion in microbial fuel cell (MFC) design is that the bio-electrochemical reaction between bacteria and the bulk solution should occur evenly on the electrode surface in order to improve electricity generation. However, experimental optimization of MFC design over a wide range of conditions is limited. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technology makes it possible to evaluate physicochemical phenomena such as fluid flows, mass transfer and chemical reaction, which can assist in system optimization. Twelve MFCs (M1-M12) with different internal structures were subjected to CFD analysis. The dead (DS) and working spaces (WS) of the anode compartment were calculated. The flow patterns of the anodic fluid varied according to the internal structures. The WS where the bio-electrochemical reaction can actually occur varied over the range of 0.14-0.57 m(2). Based on the above results, the power densities were estimated under the assumption that a monolayer biofilm was formed on the electrode. M11, with 18 rectangular-type internal structures, showed the largest WS of 0.57 m(2) and a theoretical maximum power density of 0.54 W/m(2). Although the optimization of the MFC configuration with only CFD analysis remains limited, the present study results are expected to provide fundamental data for MFC optimization.

  4. An Experimental and Analytical Evaluation of Wall And Window Retrofit Configurations: Supporting the Residential Retrofit Best Practices Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Stovall, Therese K; Petrie, Thomas; Kosny, Jan; Childs, Phillip W; Atchley, Jerald Allen; Hulvey, Kimberly D

    2007-11-01

    A Retrofit Best Practices Guide was developed to encourage homeowners to consider energy conservation issues whenever they modify their siding or windows. In support of this guide, an experimental program was implemented to measure the performance of a number of possible wall siding and window retrofit configurations. Both thermal and air-leakage measurements were made for a 2.4 x 2.4 m (8 x 8 ft) wall section with and without a 0.9 x 1.2 m (3 x 4 ft) window. The windows tested were previously well-characterized at a dedicated window test facility. A computer model was also used to provide information for the Best Practices Guide. The experimental data for walls and windows were used in conjunction with this model to estimate the total annual energy savings for several typical houses in a number of different locations.

  5. Evaluation of different synchrotron beamline configurations for X-ray fluorescence analysis of environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Barberie, Sean R; Iceman, Christopher R; Cahill, Catherine F; Cahill, Thomas M

    2014-08-19

    Synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF) is a powerful elemental analysis tool, yet synchrotrons are large, multiuser facilities that are generally not amenable to modification. However, the X-ray beamlines from synchrotrons can be modified by simply including X-ray filters or removing monochromators to improve the SR-XRF analysis. In this study, we evaluated four easily applied beamline configurations for the analysis of three representative environmental samples, namely a thin aerosol sample, an intermediate thickness biological sample, and a thick rare earth mineral specimen. The results showed that the "white beam" configuration, which was simply the full, polychromatic output of the synchrotron, was the optimal configuration for the analysis of thin samples with little mass. The "filtered white beam" configuration removed the lower energy X-rays from the excitation beam so it gave better sensitivity for elements emitting more energetic X-rays. The "filtered white beam-filtered detector" configuration sacrifices the lower energy part of the spectrum (<15 keV) for improved sensitivity in the higher end (∼26 to 48 keV range). The use of a monochromatic beam, which tends to be the standard mode of operation for most SR-XRF analyses reported in the literature, gave the least sensitive analysis.

  6. Comparison of Theoretical and Experimental Level Values of the n = 2 Configurations in the Boron Isoelectronic Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edlén, Bengt

    1983-10-01

    The examination of the level values of the n = 2 configurations, which was recently carried through for ions iso-electronic with Li, Be, O and F, has now been extended to the configurations 2s22p, 2s2p2 and 2p3 of the boron sequence. In this study, expressions of the form A + B(Z - C)-1 + a(Z - s)x are derived for the difference between observed and theoretical values of selected level intervals, the theoretical values being based on the calculations of Cheng, Kim and Desclaux. By this procedure, accidental errors in the experimental data are smoothed out and missing data are interpolated or extrapolated beyond the range of observations. In the case of the two strongly interacting levels 2s2p2 2S1/2, 2P1/2, however, the theory fails to reproduce the effects of the "avoided crossing" well enough to provide a useful frame of reference, and a more primitive method of extrapolation had to be used. The results of the examination are summarized in a table of recommended values for the 14 excited levels of the n = 2 complex, covering the range from Z = 7 to Z = 36, and a corresponding table of recalculated wavelengths, including intersystem combinations. Some experimental data reported in the literature are found to need revision.

  7. Concept report: Experimental vector magnetograph (EXVM) operational configuration balloon flight assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The observational limitations of earth bound solar studies has prompted a great deal of interest in recent months in being able to gain new scientific perspectives through, what should prove to be, relatively low cost flight of the magnetograph system. The ground work done by TBE for the solar balloon missions (originally planned for SOUP and GRID) as well as the rather advanced state of assembly of the EXVM has allowed the quick formulation of a mission concept for the 30 cm system currently being assembled. The flight system operational configuration will be discussed as it is proposed for short duration flight (on the order of one day) over the continental United States. Balloon hardware design requirements used in formulation of the concept are those set by the National Science Balloon Facility (NSBF), the support agency under NASA contract for flight services. The concept assumes that the flight hardware assembly would come together from three development sources: the scientific investigator package, the integration contractor package, and the NSBF support system. The majority of these three separate packages can be independently developed; however, the computer control interfaces and telemetry links would require extensive preplanning and coordination. A special section of this study deals with definition of a dedicated telemetry link to be provided by the integration contractor for video image data for pointing system performance verification. In this study the approach has been to capitalize to the maximum extent possible on existing hardware and system design. This is the most prudent step that can be taken to reduce eventual program cost for long duration flights. By fielding the existing EXVM as quickly as possible, experience could be gained from several short duration flight tests before it became necessary to commit to major upgrades for long duration flights of this system or of the larger 60 cm version being considered for eventual development.

  8. Parametric study and performance analysis of hybrid rocket motors with double-tube configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Nanjia; Zhao, Bo; Lorente, Arnau Pons; Wang, Jue

    2017-03-01

    The practical implementation of hybrid rocket motors has historically been hampered by the slow regression rate of the solid fuel. In recent years, the research on advanced injector designs has achieved notable results in the enhancement of the regression rate and combustion efficiency of hybrid rockets. Following this path, this work studies a new configuration called double-tube characterized by injecting the gaseous oxidizer through a head end injector and an inner tube with injector holes distributed along the motor longitudinal axis. This design has demonstrated a significant potential for improving the performance of hybrid rockets by means of a better mixing of the species achieved through a customized injection of the oxidizer. Indeed, the CFD analysis of the double-tube configuration has revealed that this design may increase the regression rate over 50% with respect to the same motor with a conventional axial showerhead injector. However, in order to fully exploit the advantages of the double-tube concept, it is necessary to acquire a deeper understanding of the influence of the different design parameters in the overall performance. In this way, a parametric study is carried out taking into account the variation of the oxidizer mass flux rate, the ratio of oxidizer mass flow rate injected through the inner tube to the total oxidizer mass flow rate, and injection angle. The data for the analysis have been gathered from a large series of three-dimensional numerical simulations that considered the changes in the design parameters. The propellant combination adopted consists of gaseous oxygen as oxidizer and high-density polyethylene as solid fuel. Furthermore, the numerical model comprises Navier-Stokes equations, k-ε turbulence model, eddy-dissipation combustion model and solid-fuel pyrolysis, which is computed through user-defined functions. This numerical model was previously validated by analyzing the computational and experimental results obtained for

  9. An Analysis of Spatial Configuration and its Application to Research in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Nancy S.; Cole, James W. L.

    This paper presents an analysis of the spatial configuration of variables in a multivariate system. The purpose of the analysis is to make clearer the relationships among the variables by locating them in a minimally-dimensioned space. Similarly, individuals are located in the smaller space and related to each other on the basis of the variables…

  10. Experimental investigation of microwave interaction with magnetoplasma in miniature multipolar configuration using impedance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Indranuj Toyoda, Yuji; Yamamoto, Naoji; Nakashima, Hideki

    2014-09-15

    A miniature microwave plasma source employing both radial and axial magnetic fields for plasma confinement has been developed for micro-propulsion applications. Plasma is initiated by launching microwaves via a short monopole antenna to circumvent geometrical cutoff limitations. The amplitude and phase of the forward and reflected microwave power is measured to obtain the complex reflection coefficient from which the equivalent impedance of the plasma source is determined. Effect of critical plasma density condition is reflected in the measurements and provides insight into the working of the miniature plasma source. A basic impedance calculation model is developed to help in understanding the experimental observations. From experiment and theory, it is seen that the equivalent impedance magnitude is controlled by the coaxial discharge boundary conditions, and the phase is influenced primarily by the plasma immersed antenna impedance.

  11. Noise characteristics of upper surface blown configurations. Experimental program and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. H.; Searle, N.; Blakney, D. F.; Pennock, A. P.; Gibson, J. S.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental data base was developed from the model upper surface blowing (USB) propulsive lift system hardware. While the emphasis was on far field noise data, a considerable amount of relevant flow field data were also obtained. The data were derived from experiments in four different facilities resulting in: (1) small scale static flow field data; (2) small scale static noise data; (3) small scale simulated forward speed noise and load data; and (4) limited larger-scale static noise flow field and load data. All of the small scale tests used the same USB flap parts. Operational and geometrical variables covered in the test program included jet velocity, nozzle shape, nozzle area, nozzle impingement angle, nozzle vertical and horizontal location, flap length, flap deflection angle, and flap radius of curvature.

  12. Analysis of hydrogen adsorption and surface binding configuration on tungsten using direct recoil spectrometry

    DOE PAGES

    Kolasinski, R. D.; Hammond, K. D.; Whaley, J. A.; ...

    2014-12-03

    In our work, we apply low energy ion beam analysis to examine directly how the adsorbed hydrogen concentration and binding configuration on W(1 0 0) depend on temperature. We exposed the tungsten surface to fluxes of both atomic and molecular H and D. We then probed the H isotopes adsorbed along different crystal directions using 1–2 keV Ne+ ions. At saturation coverage, H occupies two-fold bridge sites on W(1 0 0) at 25 °C. Moreover, the H coverage dramatically changes the behavior of channeled ions, as does reconstruction of the surface W atoms. For the exposure conditions examined here, wemore » find that surface sites remain populated with H until the surface temperature reaches 200 °C. Then, we observe H rapidly desorbing until only a residual concentration remains at 450 °C. Development of an efficient atomistic model that accurately reproduces the experimental ion energy spectra and azimuthal variation of recoiled H is underway.« less

  13. Analysis of hydrogen adsorption and surface binding configuration on tungsten using direct recoil spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolasinski, R. D.; Hammond, K. D.; Whaley, J. A.; Buchenauer, D. A.; Wirth, B. D.

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we apply low energy ion beam analysis to examine directly how the adsorbed hydrogen concentration and binding configuration on W(1 0 0) depend on temperature. We exposed the tungsten surface to fluxes of both atomic and molecular H and D. We then probed the H isotopes adsorbed along different crystal directions using 1-2 keV Ne+ ions. At saturation coverage, H occupies two-fold bridge sites on W(1 0 0) at 25 °C. The H coverage dramatically changes the behavior of channeled ions, as does reconstruction of the surface W atoms. For the exposure conditions examined here, we find that surface sites remain populated with H until the surface temperature reaches 200 °C. After this point, we observe H rapidly desorbing until only a residual concentration remains at 450 °C. Development of an efficient atomistic model that accurately reproduces the experimental ion energy spectra and azimuthal variation of recoiled H is underway.

  14. Overview of HATP Experimental Aerodynamics Data for the Baseline F/A-18 Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Robert M.; Murri, Daniel G.; Erickson, Gary E.; Fisher, David F.; Banks, Daniel W.; Lanser, Wendy, R.

    1996-01-01

    Determining the baseline aerodynamics of the F/A-18 was one of the major objectives of the High-Angle-of-Attack Technology Program (HATP). This paper will review the key data bases that have contributed to our knowledge of the baseline aerodynamics and the improvements in test techniques that have resulted from the experimental program. Photographs are given highlighting the forebody and leading-edge-extension (LEX) vortices. Other data representing the impact of Mach and Reynolds numbers on the forebody and LEX vortices will also be detailed. The level of agreement between different tunnels and between tunnels and flight will be illustrated using pressures, forces, and moments measured on a 0.06-scale model tested in the Langley 7- by 10-Foot High Speed Tunnel, a 0.16-scale model in the Langley 30- by 60-Foot Tunnel, a full-scale vehicle in the Ames 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel, and the flight F/A-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). Next, creative use of wind tunnel resources that accelerated the validation of the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes will be described. Lastly, lessons learned, deliverables, and program conclusions are presented.

  15. Magnetic configuration flexibility of snowflake divertor for HL-2M [Analysis of snowflake divertor configurations for HL-2M

    DOE PAGES

    Zheng, G. Y.; Xu, X. Q.; Ryutov, D. D.; ...

    2014-07-09

    HL-2M (Li, 2013 [1]) is a tokamak device that is under construction. Based on the magnetic coils design of HL-2M, four kinds of divertor configurations are calculated by CORSICA code (Pearlstein et al., 2001 [2]) with the same main plasma parameters, which are standard divertor, exact snowflake divertor, snowflake-plus divertor and snowflake-minus divertor configurations. The potential properties of these divertors are analyzed and presented in this paper: low poloidal field area around X-point, connection length from outside mid-plane to the primary X-point, target plate design and magnetic field shear. The results show that the snowflake configurations not only can reducemore » the heat load at divertor target plates, but also may improve the magneto-hydrodynamic stability by stronger magnetic shear at the edge. Furthermore, a new divertor configuration, named “tripod divertor”, is designed by adjusting the positions of the two X-points according to plasma parameters and magnetic coils current of HL-2M.« less

  16. Magnetic configuration flexibility of snowflake divertor for HL-2M [Analysis of snowflake divertor configurations for HL-2M

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, G. Y.; Xu, X. Q.; Ryutov, D. D.; Pan, Y. D.; Xia, T. Y.

    2014-07-09

    HL-2M (Li, 2013 [1]) is a tokamak device that is under construction. Based on the magnetic coils design of HL-2M, four kinds of divertor configurations are calculated by CORSICA code (Pearlstein et al., 2001 [2]) with the same main plasma parameters, which are standard divertor, exact snowflake divertor, snowflake-plus divertor and snowflake-minus divertor configurations. The potential properties of these divertors are analyzed and presented in this paper: low poloidal field area around X-point, connection length from outside mid-plane to the primary X-point, target plate design and magnetic field shear. The results show that the snowflake configurations not only can reduce the heat load at divertor target plates, but also may improve the magneto-hydrodynamic stability by stronger magnetic shear at the edge. Furthermore, a new divertor configuration, named “tripod divertor”, is designed by adjusting the positions of the two X-points according to plasma parameters and magnetic coils current of HL-2M.

  17. C-2U Experimental Transport Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trask, Erik; Beall, M.; Bolte, N.; Deng, B.; Douglass, J.; Gota, H.; Granstedt, E.; Gupta, D.; Osin, D.; Roche, T.; Zhai, K.; TAE Team

    2016-10-01

    Upgrades of the experimental facility at Tri Alpha Energy have led to record Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) performance on the C-2U device. Modifications to magnetic field characteristics and increases in neutral beam power were critical drivers in achieving sustained plasma targets for greater than 5ms. 0D power balance calculations detailing loss channel characteristics and plasma timescales will be presented demonstrating substantial improvements in equilibrium and transport parameters. Tri Alpha Energy, Inc.

  18. Shielding Characteristics Using an Ultrasonic Configurable Fan Artificial Noise Source to Generate Modes - Experimental Measurements and Analytical Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.; Walker, Bruce E.

    2014-01-01

    An Ultrasonic Configurable Fan Artificial Noise Source (UCFANS) was designed, built, and tested in support of the NASA Langley Research Center's 14x22 wind tunnel test of the Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) full 3-D 5.8% scale model. The UCFANS is a 5.8% rapid prototype scale model of a high-bypass turbofan engine that can generate the tonal signature of proposed engines using artificial sources (no flow). The purpose of the program was to provide an estimate of the acoustic shielding benefits possible from mounting an engine on the upper surface of a wing; a flat plate model was used as the shielding surface. Simple analytical simulations were used to preview the radiation patterns - Fresnel knife-edge diffraction was coupled with a dense phased array of point sources to compute shielded and unshielded sound pressure distributions for potential test geometries and excitation modes. Contour plots of sound pressure levels, and integrated power levels, from nacelle alone and shielded configurations for both the experimental measurements and the analytical predictions are presented in this paper.

  19. Interpretation of discrepancies in mass spectroscopy data obtained from different experimental configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, John M.

    1993-01-01

    Many helium mass spectrometer leak detectors at KSC employ sampling systems that feature hand held sniffer probes. Authors of general leakage-testing literature recommend sniffer probes for leak location but not for quantitative leakage measurement. Their use in the latter application at KSC involves assumptions that may be subtle. The purpose of the research effort reported herein was to establish the significance of indicated leak rates displayed by sniffer-probe equipped leak detectors and to determine whether the use of alternative hardware or testing procedures may reduce the uncertainty of leakage measurements made with them. The report classifies probe-type sampling systems for helium leak detectors according to their internal plumbing (direct or branched), presents a basic analysis of the fluid dynamics in the sampling system in the branched-conduit case, describes the usual test method for measuring the internal supply-to-sample flowrate ratio (a.k.a permeation ratio), and describes a concept for a sponge-tipped probe whose external supply-to-sample flowrate ratio promises to be lower than that of a simple-ended probe. One conclusion is that the main source of uncertainty in the use of probe-type sampling systems for leakage measurement is uncertainty in the external supply-to-sample flowrate ratio. In contrast, the present method for measuring the internal supply-to-sample flowrate ratio is quantitative and satisfactory. The implication is that probes of lower external supply-to-sample flowrate ratio must be developed before this uncertainty may be reduced significantly.

  20. Experimental Thermo-Magnetic Convection Analysis in Tall Rectangular Enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyrda, L.; Kraszewska, A.

    2016-09-01

    Rectangular enclosure with aspect ratio (AR=height/width) 2 was investigated in experimental thermo-magnetic convection analysis. Experimental enclosure was placed inside superconducting magnet in Rayleigh-Bénard configuration, in position, where magnetic field gradient was enhancing natural convection. Two types of paramagnetic fluid behaviour were identified at different magnetic induction values. It was possible by utilization of Fast Fourier Transform of recorded temperature signals inside experimental enclosure. Presented results shown augmented heat transfer in rectangular enclosure at high magnetic field gradient up to 300%. Transition zone of fluid behaviour for presented experimental setup was observed from RaTM·4-107 to RaTM·1.3·108.

  1. Change of Ratings and Ratings of Change as Identified by Configural Frequency Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lienert, Gustav A.; Oeveste, Hans Zur

    1988-01-01

    Configurational frequency analysis is suggested as a technique for longitudinal research in educational psychology. Testing for types of change of ratings (grades) and for ratings of change is illustrated by data from three courses in statistics from a cohort of 128 students at Marburg University in West Germany. (TJH)

  2. Analysis of the Flight Motions of a Small Deployable Glider Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, Paul L., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was conducted at the request of the U.S. Air Force Avionics Laboratory to analyze the flight characteristics of a small uncontrolled glider with folding wings. The study consisted of wind-tunnel tests of an actual glider and a theoretical analysis of the performance, stability, and trimmability of the configuration.

  3. Experimental investigation of the inlet detector configuration variation in the flow field at Mach 1.9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Kyu C.; Tiwari, Surrendra N.; Miley, Stanley J.

    1995-01-01

    In recent years, active research has been conducted to study the technological feasibility of supersonic laminar flow control on the wing of the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). For this study, the F-16XL has been chosen due to its highly swept crank wing planform that closely resembles the HSCT configurations. During flights, it is discovered that the shock wave generated from the aircraft inlet introduces disturbances on the wing where the data acquisition is conducted. The flow field about a supersonic inlet is characterized by a complex three dimensional pattern of shock waves generated by the geometrical configuration of a deflector and a cowl lip. Hence, in this study, experimental method is employed to investigate the effects of the variation of deflector configuration on the flow field, and consequently, the possibility of diverting the incoming shock-disturbances away from the test section. In the present experiments, a model composed of a simple circular tube with a triangular deflector is designed to study the deflector length and the deflector base width variation in the flow field. Experimental results indicate that the lowest external pressure ratio is observed at the junction where the deflector lip and the inlet cowl lip merge. Also, it is noted that the external pressure ratio, the internal pressure ratio, the coefficient of spillage drag, and the shock standoff distance decrease as the deflector length increases. In addition, the Redefined Total Pressure Recovery Ratio (RTPRR) increases with an increase in the deflector length. Results from the study of the effect of the deflector's base width variation on the flow field indicate that the lowest external pressure ratio is observed at the junction between the inlet cowl lip and the deflector lip. As the base width of the deflector increases, the external pressure ratio at 0 rotation increases, whereas the external pressure ratio at 180 rotation decreases. In addition, the internal pressure ratio

  4. Analysis and optimization of preliminary aircraft configurations in relationship to emerging agility metrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandlin, Doral R.; Bauer, Brent Alan

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a FORTRAN computer code to perform agility analysis on aircraft configurations. This code is to be part of the NASA-Ames ACSYNT (AirCraft SYNThesis) design code. This paper begins with a discussion of contemporary agility research in the aircraft industry and a survey of a few agility metrics. The methodology, techniques and models developed for the code are then presented. Finally, example trade studies using the agility module along with ACSYNT are illustrated. These trade studies were conducted using a Northrop F-20 Tigershark aircraft model. The studies show that the agility module is effective in analyzing the influence of common parameters such as thrust-to-weight ratio and wing loading on agility criteria. The module can compare the agility potential between different configurations. In addition one study illustrates the module's ability to optimize a configuration's agility performance.

  5. Validating Network Security Policies via Static Analysis of Router ACL Configuration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    ordering were not always effective. They developed a system based on adding new filters that could be applied in all cases. The paper uses the concept...first begin with the development of a tool that can automatically perform static analysis of a network based on packet filters, since packet filter use...was developed , and the algorithm is based on static analysis of router configuration files. Packet filters are seen as the easiest way to control

  6. Nonlinear dynamics behavior analysis of the spatial configuration of a tendril-bearing plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jingjing; Zhang, Qichang; Wang, Wei; Hao, Shuying

    2017-03-01

    Tendril-bearing plants appear to have a spiraling shape when tendrils climb along a support during growth. The growth characteristics of a tendril-bearer can be simplified to a model of a thin elastic rod with a cylindrical constraint. In this paper, the connection between some typical configuration characteristics of tendrils and complex nonlinear dynamic behavior are qualitatively analyzed. The space configuration problem of tendrils can be explained through the study of the nonlinear dynamic behavior of the thin elastic rod system equation. In this study, the complex non-Z2 symmetric critical orbits in the system equation under critical parameters were presented. A new function transformation method that can effectively maintain the critical orbit properties was proposed, and a new nonlinear differential equations system containing complex nonlinear terms can been obtained to describe the cross section position and direction of a rod during climbing. Numerical simulation revealed that the new system can describe the configuration of a rod with reasonable accuracy. To adequately explain the growing regulation of the rod shape, the critical orbit and configuration of rod are connected in a direct way. The high precision analytical expressions of these complex non-Z2 symmetric critical orbits are obtained by introducing a suitable analytical method, and then these expressions are used to draw the corresponding three-dimensional configuration figures of an elastic thin rod. Combined with actual tendrils on a live plant, the space configuration of the winding knots of tendril is explained by the concept of heteroclinic orbit from the perspective of nonlinear dynamics, and correctness of the theoretical analysis was verified. This theoretical analysis method could also be effectively applied to other similar slender structures.

  7. Complementarity of DFT Calculations, NMR Anisotropy, and ECD for the Configurational Analysis of Brevipolides K-O from Hyptis brevipes.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Ortiz, G Alejandra; Cerda-García-Rojas, Carlos M; Fragoso-Serrano, Mabel; Pereda-Miranda, Rogelio

    2017-01-27

    Brevipolides K-O (1-5), five new cytotoxic 6-(6'-cinnamoyloxy-2',5'-epoxy-1'-hydroxyheptyl)-5,6-dihydro-2H-pyran-2-ones (IC50 values against six cancer cell lines, 1.7-10 μM), were purified by recycling HPLC from Hyptis brevipes. The structures, containing a distinctive tetrahydrofuran ring, were established by comprehensive quantum mechanical calculations and experimental spectroscopic analysis of their NMR and ECD data. Detailed analysis of the experimental NMR (1)H-(1)H vicinal coupling constants in comparison with the corresponding DFT-calculated values at the B3LYP/DGDZVP level confirmed the absolute configuration of 3 and revealed its conformational preferences, which were further strengthened by NOESY correlations. NMR anisotropy experiments by the application of Mosher's ester methodology and chemical correlations were also used to conclude that this novel brevipolide series (1-5) share the same absolute configuration corresponding to C-6(R), C-1'(S), C-2'(R), C-5'(S), and C-6'(S).

  8. Superposed epoch analysis of pressure and magnetic field configuration changes in the plasma sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Kistler, L.M.; Moebius, E. ); Baumjohann, W. ); Nagai, T. )

    1993-06-01

    The authors report on an analysis of pressure and magnetic configuration within the plasma sheet following the initiation of substorm events. They have constructed this time dependent picture by using an epoch analysis of data from the AMPTE/IRM spacecraft. This analysis procedure can be used to construct a unified picture of events, provided they are reproducible, from a statistical analysis of a series of point measurements. The authors first determine the time dependent pressure changes in the plasma sheet. With some simplifying assumptions they then determine the z dependence of the pressure profiles, and from this distribution determine how field lines in the plasma sheet map to the neutral sheet.

  9. Overview of Sensitivity Analysis and Shape Optimization for Complex Aerodynamic Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, James C., III; Taylor, Arthur C., III; Barnwell, Richard W.; Newman, Perry A.; Hou, Gene J.-W.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of some of the more recent advances in steady aerodynamic shape-design sensitivity analysis and optimization, based on advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The focus here is on those methods particularly well-suited to the study of geometrically complex configurations and their potentially complex associated flow physics. When nonlinear state equations are considered in the optimization process, difficulties are found in the application of sensitivity analysis. Some techniques for circumventing such difficulties are currently being explored and are included here. Attention is directed to methods that utilize automatic differentiation to obtain aerodynamic sensitivity derivatives for both complex configurations and complex flow physics. Various examples of shape-design sensitivity analysis for unstructured-grid CFD algorithms are demonstrated for different formulations of the sensitivity equations. Finally, the use of advanced, unstructured-grid CFDs in multidisciplinary analyses and multidisciplinary sensitivity analyses within future optimization processes is recommended and encouraged.

  10. Overview of Sensitivity Analysis and Shape Optimization for Complex Aerodynamic Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Perry A.; Newman, James C., III; Barnwell, Richard W.; Taylor, Arthur C., III; Hou, Gene J.-W.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of some of the more recent advances in steady aerodynamic shape-design sensitivity analysis and optimization, based on advanced computational fluid dynamics. The focus here is on those methods particularly well- suited to the study of geometrically complex configurations and their potentially complex associated flow physics. When nonlinear state equations are considered in the optimization process, difficulties are found in the application of sensitivity analysis. Some techniques for circumventing such difficulties are currently being explored and are included here. Attention is directed to methods that utilize automatic differentiation to obtain aerodynamic sensitivity derivatives for both complex configurations and complex flow physics. Various examples of shape-design sensitivity analysis for unstructured-grid computational fluid dynamics algorithms are demonstrated for different formulations of the sensitivity equations. Finally, the use of advanced, unstructured-grid computational fluid dynamics in multidisciplinary analyses and multidisciplinary sensitivity analyses within future optimization processes is recommended and encouraged.

  11. A systems engineering analysis of three-point and four-point wind turbine drivetrain configurations

    DOE PAGES

    Guo, Yi; Parsons, Tyler; Dykes, Katherine; ...

    2016-08-24

    This study compares the impact of drivetrain configuration on the mass and capital cost of a series of wind turbines ranging from 1.5 MW to 5.0 MW power ratings for both land-based and offshore applications. The analysis is performed with a new physics-based drivetrain analysis and sizing tool, Drive Systems Engineering (DriveSE), which is part of the Wind-Plant Integrated System Design & Engineering Model. DriveSE uses physics-based relationships to size all major drivetrain components according to given rotor loads simulated based on International Electrotechnical Commission design load cases. The model's sensitivity to input loads that contain a high degree ofmore » variability was analyzed. Aeroelastic simulations are used to calculate the rotor forces and moments imposed on the drivetrain for each turbine design. DriveSE is then used to size all of the major drivetrain components for each turbine for both three-point and four-point configurations. The simulation results quantify the trade-offs in mass and component costs for the different configurations. On average, a 16.7% decrease in total nacelle mass can be achieved when using a three-point drivetrain configuration, resulting in a 3.5% reduction in turbine capital cost. This analysis is driven by extreme loads and does not consider fatigue. Thus, the effects of configuration choices on reliability and serviceability are not captured. Furthermore, a first order estimate of the sizing, dimensioning and costing of major drivetrain components are made which can be used in larger system studies which consider trade-offs between subsystems such as the rotor, drivetrain and tower.« less

  12. A systems engineering analysis of three-point and four-point wind turbine drivetrain configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Yi; Parsons, Tyler; Dykes, Katherine; King, Ryan N.

    2016-08-24

    This study compares the impact of drivetrain configuration on the mass and capital cost of a series of wind turbines ranging from 1.5 MW to 5.0 MW power ratings for both land-based and offshore applications. The analysis is performed with a new physics-based drivetrain analysis and sizing tool, Drive Systems Engineering (DriveSE), which is part of the Wind-Plant Integrated System Design & Engineering Model. DriveSE uses physics-based relationships to size all major drivetrain components according to given rotor loads simulated based on International Electrotechnical Commission design load cases. The model's sensitivity to input loads that contain a high degree of variability was analyzed. Aeroelastic simulations are used to calculate the rotor forces and moments imposed on the drivetrain for each turbine design. DriveSE is then used to size all of the major drivetrain components for each turbine for both three-point and four-point configurations. The simulation results quantify the trade-offs in mass and component costs for the different configurations. On average, a 16.7% decrease in total nacelle mass can be achieved when using a three-point drivetrain configuration, resulting in a 3.5% reduction in turbine capital cost. This analysis is driven by extreme loads and does not consider fatigue. Thus, the effects of configuration choices on reliability and serviceability are not captured. Furthermore, a first order estimate of the sizing, dimensioning and costing of major drivetrain components are made which can be used in larger system studies which consider trade-offs between subsystems such as the rotor, drivetrain and tower.

  13. Experimental Investigation of a Hypersonic Glider Configuration at a Mach Number of 6 and at Full-Scale Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiff, Alvin; Wilkins, Max E.

    1961-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of a hypersonic glider configuration, consisting of a slender ogive cylinder with three highly swept wings, spaced 120 apart, with the wing chord equal to the body length, were investigated experimentally at a Mach number of 6 and at Reynolds numbers from 6 to 16 million. The objectives were to evaluate the theoretical procedures which had been used to estimate the performance of the glider, and also to evaluate the characteristics of the glider itself. A principal question concerned the viscous drag at full-scale Reynolds number, there being a large difference between the total drags for laminar and turbulent boundary layers. It was found that the procedures which had been applied for estimating minimum drag, drag due to lift, lift curve slope, and center of pressure were generally accurate within 10 percent. An important exception was the non-linear contribution to the lift coefficient which had been represented by a Newtonian term. Experimentally, the lift curve was nearly linear within the angle-of-attack range up to 10 deg. This error affected the estimated lift-drag ratio. The minimum drag measurements indicated that substantial amounts of turbulent boundary layer were present on all models tested, over a range of surface roughness from 5 microinches maximum to 200 microinches maximum. In fact, the minimum drag coefficients were nearly independent of the surface smoothness and fell between the estimated values for turbulent and laminar boundary layers, but closer to the turbulent value. At the highest test Reynolds numbers and at large angles of attack, there was some indication that the skin friction of the rough models was being increased by the surface roughness. At full-scale Reynolds number, the maximum lift-drag ratio with a leading edge of practical diameter (from the standpoint of leading-edge heating) was 4.0. The configuration was statically and dynamically stable in pitch and yaw, and the center of pressure was less

  14. Sensitivity analysis of flexible joint nonholonomic wheeled mobile manipulator in singular configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korayem, A. H.; Azimirad, V.; Binabaji, H.; Korayem, M. H.

    2012-03-01

    This paper proposes a method for decreasing jerk and increasing Maximum Allowable Load (MAL) of nonholonomic Wheeled Mobile Manipulator (WMM) considering flexibility of joints in singular conditions. The full dynamic model of nonholonomic WMM contains simultaneous operation of mobile base and manipulator with joint flexibility (in wheels and manipulator) which is presented here. The problem is formulated in terms of the optimal control which leads to a two point boundary value problem. Then Sobol's sensitivity analysis method is applied to determine the optimal values of flexible joint constants subject to the jerk minimization. To illustrate the proposed method, two categories of conditions are considered: conditions containing non-singular configuration and the singular conditions. An example is explained for non-singular condition of nonholonomic WMM in presence of obstacle in which a complex path is generated but there is no singularity in robot configuration. Some examples of occurring singular configuration in final point and moving boundary condition is also presented. The results show that flexibility of the joints near to singular configuration normalizes the sudden movement and jerk implied to actuators. That is why using a rotational spring with a low stiffness coefficient could be helpful to decrease the high jerk and increase the maximum allowable load in mobile robots.

  15. Dumbbell-type fullerene-steroid hybrids: a join experimental and theoretical investigation for conformational, configurational, and circular dichroism assignments.

    PubMed

    Ruíz, Alberto; Morera-Boado, Cercis; Almagro, Luis; Coro, Julieta; Maroto, Enrique E; Herranz, María Ángeles; Filippone, Salvatore; Molero, Dolores; Martínez-Álvarez, Roberto; Garcia de la Vega, José M; Suárez, Margarita; Martín, Nazario

    2014-04-18

    New [60]fullerene-steroid conjugates (4-6) have been synthesized by 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition and Bingel-Hirsch cyclopropanation reactions from suitably functionalized epiandrosterone and [60]fullerene. Since a new stereocenter is created in the formation of the Prato monoaduct, two different diastereomers were isolated by HPLC (4, 5) whose absolute configurations were assigned according to the highly reliable "sector rule" on fullerenes. A further reaction of the malonate-containing diastereomer 5 with a second C60 molecule has afforded dumbbell fullerene 6 in which the two fullerene units are covalently connected through an epiandrosterone moiety. The new compounds have been spectroscopically characterized and their redox potentials, determined by cyclic voltametry, reveal three reversible reduction waves for hybrids 4 and 5, whereas these signals are split in dumbbell 6. Theoretical calculations at semiempirical (AM1) and single point B3LYP/6-31G(d) levels have predicted the most stable conformations for the hybrid compounds (4-6), showing the importance of the chlorine atom on the D ring of the steroid. Furthermore, TDDFT calculations have allowed assignments of the experimentally determined circular dichroism (CD) of the [60]fullerene-steroid hybrids based on the sign and position of the Cotton effects, despite the exceptionally large systems under study.

  16. Overview of the C-2 Field-Reversed Configuration Experimental Program and Future Plan on C-2 Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaokang; Gota, Hiroshi; Binderbauer, Michl; Tuszewski, Michel; Guo, Houyang; Garate, Eusebio; Barnes, Dan; Putvinski, Sergei; Tajima, Toshiki; Sevier, Leigh

    2014-10-01

    C-2 is the world's largest compact-toroid (CT) device at Tri Alpha Energy that produces field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas by colliding/merging oppositely-directed CTs and seeks to study the evolution, heating and sustainment effects of neutral-beam (NB) injection into FRCs. Recently, significant progress has been made in C-2 on both technology and physics fronts, achieving ~ 5 ms stable plasmas with a dramatic improvement in confinement. FRCs are stabilized with an edge biasing using end-on plasma-guns and/or electrodes, and are partially sustained with NB injection (20 keV Hydrogen, ~ 4 MW). Recent work to reduce scrape-off layer and radiative losses has succeeded in reducing the average power balance deficit to ~ 1.5 MW. Increasing plasma pressure and electron temperature are now observed during brief periods of the discharge, which indicate a sign of NB injection effect such as accumulating fast-ions as well as heating core/edge plasmas. Highlights of these advances, broader C-2 experimental program, and future plan on upgrading the C-2 device with new NBs (15 keV, up to 10 MW injection power, selectable beam injection angle) will be presented.

  17. Transonic aeroelastic analysis of launch vehicle configurations. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filgueirasdeazevedo, Joao Luiz

    1988-01-01

    A numerical study of the aeroelastic stability of typical launch vehicle configurations in transonic flight is performed. Recent computational fluid dynamics techniques are used to simulate the transonic aerodynamic flow fields, as opposed to relying on experimental data for the unsteady aerodynamic pressures. The flow solver is coupled to an appropriate structural representation of the vehicle. The aerodynamic formulation is based on the thin layer approximation to the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations, where the account for turbulent mixing is done by the two-layer Baldwin and Lomax algebraic eddy viscosity model. The structural-dynamic equations are developed considering free-free flexural vibration of an elongated beam with variable properties and are cast in modal form. Aeroelastic analyses are performed by integrating simultaneously in the two sets of equations. By tracing the growth or decay of a perturbed oscillation, the aeroelastic stability of a given constant configuration can be ascertained. The method is described in detail, and results that indicate its application are presented. Applications include some validation cases for the algorithm developed, as well as the study of configurations known to have presented flutter programs in the past.

  18. Shock unsteadiness creation and propagation: experimental analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benay, R.; Alaphilippe, M.; Severac, N.

    2012-09-01

    The possibility of creating unsteady distortions of the tip shock by waves emitted from an aircraft is assessed experimentally. The model chosen is a cylindrical fore body equipped with a spike. This configuration is known for generating an important level of unsteadiness around the spike in supersonic regime. The wind tunnel Mach number is equal to 2. The experiments show that waves emitted from this source propagate along the tip shock and interact with it. It is then assessed that this interaction produces a periodic distortion of the shock that propagates to the external flow. Unsteady pressure sensors, high speed schlieren films, hot wire probing and laser Doppler velocimetry are used as complementary experimental means. The final result is a coherent representation of the complex mechanism of wave propagation that has been evidenced. The principle of creating unsteady shock deformation by onboard equipments could be examined as a possibly promising method of sonic boom control.

  19. Scale-4 Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Critical Configurations: Volume 5 - North Anna Unit 1 Cycle 5

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    The requirements of ANSI/ANS 8.1 specify that calculational methods for away-from-reactor (AFR) criticality safety analyses be validated against experimental measurements. If credit for the negative reactivity of the depleted (or spent) fuel isotopics is desired, it is necessary to benchmark computational methods against spent fuel critical configurations. This report summarizes a portion of the ongoing effort to benchmark AFR criticality analysis methods using selected critical configurations from commercial pressurized-water reactors (PWR). The analysis methodology selected for all calculations reported herein was the codes and data provided in the SCALE-4 code system. The isotopic densities for the spent fuel assemblies in the critical configurations were calculated using the SAS2H analytical sequence of the SCALE-4 system. The sources of data and the procedures for deriving SAS2H input parameters are described in detail. The SNIKR code module was used to extract the necessary isotopic densities from the SAS2H results and to provide the data in the format required by the SCALE criticality analysis modules. The CSASN analytical sequence in SCALE-4 was used to perform resonance processing of the cross sections. The KENO V.a module of SCALE-4 was used to calculate the effective multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) of each case. The SCALE-4 27-group burnup library containing ENDF/B-IV (actinides) and ENDF/B-V (fission products) data was used for all the calculations. This volume of the report documents the SCALE system analysis of one reactor critical configuration for North Anna Unit 1 Cycle 5. This unit and cycle were chosen for a previous analysis using a different methodology because detailed isotopics from multidimensional reactor calculations were available from the Virginia Power Company. These data permitted comparison of criticality calculations directly using the utility-calculated isotopics to those using the isotopics generated by the SCALE-4 SAS2H

  20. Optimizing grid computing configuration and scheduling for geospatial analysis: An example with interpolating DEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qunying; Yang, Chaowei

    2011-02-01

    Many geographic analyses are very time-consuming and do not scale well when large datasets are involved. For example, the interpolation of DEMs (digital evaluation model) for large geographic areas could become a problem in practical application, especially for web applications such as terrain visualization, where a fast response is required and computational demands exceed the capacity of a traditional single processing unit conducting serial processing. Therefore, high performance and parallel computing approaches, such as grid computing, were investigated to speed up the geographic analysis algorithms, such as DEM interpolation. The key for grid computing is to configure an optimized grid computing platform for the geospatial analysis and optimally schedule the geospatial tasks within a grid platform. However, there is no research focused on this. Using DEM interoperation as an example, we report our systematic research on configuring and scheduling a high performance grid computing platform to improve the performance of geographic analyses through a systematic study on how the number of cores, processors, grid nodes, different network connections and concurrent request impact the speedup of geospatial analyses. Condor, a grid middleware, is used to schedule the DEM interpolation tasks for different grid configurations. A Kansas raster-based DEM is used for a case study and an inverse distance weighting (IDW) algorithm is used in interpolation experiments.

  1. Bistatic radar configuration for soil moisture retrieval: analysis of the spatial coverage.

    PubMed

    Pierdicca, Nazzareno; De Titta, Ludovico; Pulvirenti, Luca; Della Pietra, Giuliano

    2009-01-01

    Some outcomes of a feasibility analysis of a spaceborne bistatic radar mission for soil moisture retrieval are presented in this paper. The study starts from the orbital design of the configuration suitable for soil moisture estimation identified in a previous study. This configuration is refined according to the results of an analysis of the spatial resolution. The paper focuses on the assessment of the spatial coverage i.e., on the verification that an adequate overlap between the footprints of the antennas is ensured and on the duty cycle, that is the fraction of orbital period during which the bistatic data are acquired. A non-cooperating system is considered, in which the transmitter is the C-band Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar aboard Envisat. The best performances in terms of duty cycle are achieved if the transmitter operates in Wide Swath Mode. The higher resolution Image Swath Modes that comply with the selected configuration have a duty cycle that is never less than 12% and can exceed 21%. When Envisat operates in Wide Swath Mode, the bistatic system covers a wide latitude range across the equator, while in some of the Image Swath Modes, the bistatic measurements, collected from the same orbit, cover mid-latitude areas. In the latter case, it might be possible to achieve full coverage in an Envisat orbit repeat cycle, while, for a very large latitude range such as that covered in Wide Swath Mode, bistatic acquisitions could be obtained over about 65% of the area.

  2. Bistatic Radar Configuration for Soil Moisture Retrieval: Analysis of the Spatial Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Pierdicca, Nazzareno; De Titta, Ludovico; Pulvirenti, Luca; della Pietra, Giuliano

    2009-01-01

    Some outcomes of a feasibility analysis of a spaceborne bistatic radar mission for soil moisture retrieval are presented in this paper. The study starts from the orbital design of the configuration suitable for soil moisture estimation identified in a previous study. This configuration is refined according to the results of an analysis of the spatial resolution. The paper focuses on the assessment of the spatial coverage i.e., on the verification that an adequate overlap between the footprints of the antennas is ensured and on the duty cycle, that is the fraction of orbital period during which the bistatic data are acquired. A non-cooperating system is considered, in which the transmitter is the C-band Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar aboard Envisat. The best performances in terms of duty cycle are achieved if the transmitter operates in Wide Swath Mode. The higher resolution Image Swath Modes that comply with the selected configuration have a duty cycle that is never less than 12% and can exceed 21%. When Envisat operates in Wide Swath Mode, the bistatic system covers a wide latitude range across the equator, while in some of the Image Swath Modes, the bistatic measurements, collected from the same orbit, cover mid-latitude areas. In the latter case, it might be possible to achieve full coverage in an Envisat orbit repeat cycle, while, for a very large latitude range such as that covered in Wide Swath Mode, bistatic acquisitions could be obtained over about 65% of the area. PMID:22399996

  3. Aero-thermal analysis of lifting body configurations in hypersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sachin; Mahulikar, Shripad P.

    2016-09-01

    The aero-thermal analysis of a hypersonic vehicle is of fundamental interest for designing its thermal protection system. The aero-thermal environment predictions over several critical regions of the hypothesized lifting body vehicle, including the stagnation region of the nose-cap, cylindrically swept leading edges, fuselage-upper, and fuselage-lower surfaces, are discussed. The drag (Λ=70°) and temperature (Λ=80°) minimized sweepback angles are considered in the configuration design of the two hypothesized lifting body shape hypersonic vehicles. The main aim of the present study is to analyze and compare the aero-thermal characteristics of these two lifting body configurations at same heat capacity. Accordingly, a Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation has been carried out at Mach number (M∞=7), H=35 km altitude with zero Angle of Attack. Finally, the material selection for thermal protection system based on these predictions and current methodology is described.

  4. Transonic perturbation analysis of wing-fuselage-nacelle-pylon configurations with powered jet exhausts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wai, J. C.; Yoshihara, H.; Abeyounis, W. K.

    1982-01-01

    A transonic small perturbation method has been developed for the analysis of general wing-fuselage-nacelle-pylon configurations with powered jet exhausts. Finite difference successive line relaxation algorithm is used to solve the small disturbance potential equation in conservative form. The nacelle tangency condition and the jet exhaust plume contact conditions are fulfilled in a quasi-cylindrical fashion on a surface fitting the Cartesian grid. The pylon tangency condition is treated in a quasi-planar manner as for the wing. Viscous displacement effects on the wing are modeled by suitable shape changes including the placement of a viscous ramp at the base of the shock. Computed results of a transport configuration show satisfactory correlation with test data.

  5. Debris prevention analysis for DFI/OFI/OEI (STS-26 configuration only)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richi, Glen A.

    1988-01-01

    The first 3 shuttle flights to use the Redesigned Solid Rocket Motors (RSRMs) will utilize Development Flight Instrumentation (DFI), as well as Operational Flight Instrumentation (OFI), and Operational Environment Instrumentation (OEI). The OFI consists of high pressure transducers used on both RSRMs to monitor the igniter and motor chamber pressure. DFI consists of assorted strain gages, temperature sensors, accelerometers, girth gages, and low level pressure transducers. The latter are installed on the left hand booster to measure post-separation aerodynamic loading. OEI consistes of temperature sensors. After Flight 3, all DFI gages are to be deleted, and only OFI and OEI will be used for subsequent flights. This report deals specifically with debris prevention and hazards concernig the STS-26 flight DFI configuration only. Continued analysis is being done that will adequately address the debris hazards associated with the STS-27 and subsequent flight DFI configurations.

  6. Optomechanical analysis of the flexure mounting configuration of large-aperture laser transport mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zheng; Quan, Xusong; Wang, Hui; Liu, Tianye; Xiong, Zhao; Yuan, Xiaodong; Rong, Yiming

    2017-02-01

    Motivated by the demand to minimize the mount-induced wavefront aberration of the large-aperture laser transport mirror, a low-stress flexure mounting configuration is proposed. Specific optomechanical analyses, including theoretical modeling, numerical analysis and field experiment, are presented. The mechanical properties of the flexure support were studied specifically. Besides, the relation between the mounting forces and the root-mean-square of the gradients (GRMS) value of the mirror surface is studied. Then, the appropriate value of the bolt preload is set to 500N, with which the GRMS value is just 5.35 nm/cm. The results indicate that the flexure mounting configuration is indeed a feasible and promising method to solve the mount-induced distortion problem of large-aperture optics.

  7. Transient analysis and energy optimization of solar heating and cooling systems in various configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Calise, F.; Dentice d'Accadia, M.; Palombo, A.

    2010-03-15

    In this paper, a transient simulation model of solar-assisted heating and cooling systems (SHC) is presented. A detailed case study is also discussed, in which three different configurations are considered. In all cases, the SHC system is based on the coupling of evacuated solar collectors with a single-stage LiBr-H{sub 2}O absorption chiller, and a gas-fired boiler is also included for auxiliary heating, only during the winter season. In the first configuration, the cooling capacity of the absorption chiller and the solar collector area are designed on the basis of the maximum cooling load, and an electric chiller is used as the auxiliary cooling system. The second layout is similar to the first one, but, in this case, the absorption chiller and the solar collector area are sized in order to balance only a fraction of the maximum cooling load. Finally, in the third configuration, there is no electric chiller, and the auxiliary gas-fired boiler is also used in summer to feed the absorption chiller, in case of scarce solar irradiation. The simulation model was developed using the TRNSYS software, and included the analysis of the dynamic behaviour of the building in which the SHC systems were supposed to be installed. The building was simulated using a single-lumped capacitance model. An economic model was also developed, in order to assess the operating and capital costs of the systems under analysis. Furthermore, a mixed heuristic-deterministic optimization algorithm was implemented, in order to determine the set of the synthesis/design variables that maximize the energy efficiency of each configuration under analysis. The results of the case study were analyzed on monthly and weekly basis, paying special attention to the energy and monetary flows of the standard and optimized configurations. The results are encouraging as for the potential of energy saving. On the contrary, the SHC systems appear still far from the economic profitability: however, this is

  8. 1995 NASA High-Speed Research Program Sonic Boom Workshop. Volume 2; Configuration Design, Analysis, and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baize, Daniel G. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The High-Speed Research Program and NASA Langley Research Center sponsored the NASA High-Speed Research Program Sonic Boom Workshop on September 12-13, 1995. The workshop was designed to bring together NASAs scientists and engineers and their counterparts in industry, other Government agencies, and academia working together in the sonic boom element of NASAs High-Speed Research Program. Specific objectives of this workshop were to: (1) report the progress and status of research in sonic boom propagation, acceptability, and design; (2) promote and disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; (3) help promote synergy among the scientists working in the Program; and (4) identify technology pacing, the development C, of viable reduced-boom High-Speed Civil Transport concepts. The Workshop was organized in four sessions: Sessions 1 Sonic Boom Propagation (Theoretical); Session 2 Sonic Boom Propagation (Experimental); Session 3 Acceptability Studies-Human and Animal; and Session 4 - Configuration Design, Analysis, and Testing.

  9. Exploratory studies of the cruise performance of upper surface blown configuration: Experimental program, high-speed force tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braden, J. A.; Hancock, J. P.; Burdges, K. P.; Hackett, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    The work to develop a wing-nacelle arrangement to accommodate a wide range of upper surface blown configuration is reported. Pertinent model and installation details are described. Data of the effects of a wide range of nozzle geometric variations are presented. Nozzle aspect ratio, boattail angle, and chordwise position are among the parameters investigated. Straight and swept wing configurations were tested across a range of nozzle pressure ratios, lift coefficients, and Mach numbers.

  10. Experimental design method to the weld bead geometry optimization for hybrid laser-MAG welding in a narrow chamfer configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidi, Lyes; Le Masson, Philippe; Cicala, Eugen; Primault, Christophe

    2017-03-01

    The work presented in this paper relates to the optimization of operating parameters of the welding by the experimental design approach. The welding process used is the hybrid laser-MAG welding, which consists in combining a laser beam with an MAG torch, to increase the productivity and reliability of the chamfer filling operation in several passes over the entire height of the chamfer. Each pass, providing 2 mm deposited metal and must provide sufficient lateral penetration of about 0.2 mm. The experimental design method has been used in order to estimate the operating parameters effects and their interactions on the lateral penetration on one hand, and to provide a mathematical model that relates the welding parameters of welding to the objective function lateral penetration on the other hand. Furthermore, in this study, we sought to the identification of the set of optimum parameters sufficient to comply with a constraint on the quality of weld bead. This constraint is to simultaneously obtain a total lateral penetration greater than 0.4 mm and an H/L ratio less than 0.6. In order to obtain this condition, the multi-objective optimization (for both response functions) of a weld bead by the implementation of the plans method using two categories of Experiments Plans, on two levels has been used: the first is a complete experimental design (CED) with 32 tests and the second a fractional experimental design (FED) with 8 tests. A comparative analysis of the implementation of both types of experiments plans identified the advantages and disadvantages for each type of plan.

  11. CFD Analysis of Flexible Thermal Protection System Shear Configuration Testing in the LCAT Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferlemann, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper documents results of computational analysis performed after flexible thermal protection system shear configuration testing in the LCAT facility. The primary objectives were to predict the shear force on the sample and the sensitivity of all surface properties to the shape of the sample. Bumps of 0.05, 0.10,and 0.15 inches were created to approximate the shape of some fabric samples during testing. A large amount of information was extracted from the CFD solutions for comparison between runs and also current or future flight simulations.

  12. A finite-element analysis for steady and oscillatory subsonic flow around complex configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, L. T.; Suciu, E. O.; Morino, L.

    1974-01-01

    The problem of potential subsonic flow around complex configurations is considered. The solution is given of an integral equation relating the values of the potential on the surface of the body to the values of the normal derivative, which is known from the boundary conditions. The surface of the body is divided into small (hyperboloidal quadrilateral) surface elements, which are described in terms of the Cartesian components of the four corner points. The values of the potential (and its normal derivative) within each element is assumed to be constant and equal to its value at the centroid of the element. The coefficients of the equation are given by source and doublet integrals over the surface elements. Closed form evaluations of the integrals are presented. The results obtained with the above formulation are compared with existing analytical and experimental results.

  13. A finite-element analysis for steady and oscillatory supersonic flows around complex configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morino, L.; Chen, L. T.

    1974-01-01

    The problem of small perturbation potential supersonic flow around complex configurations is considered. This problem requires the solution of an integral equation relating the values of the potential on the surface of the body to the values of the normal derivative, which is known from the small perturbation boundary conditions. The surface of the body is divided into small (hyperboloidal quadrilateral) surface elements, sigma sub i, which are described in terms of the Cartesian components of the four corner points. The values of the potential (and its normal derivative) within each element is assumed to be constant and equal to its value at the centroid of the element, and this yields a set of linear algebraic equations. The coefficients of the equation are given by source and doublet integrals over the surface elements, sigma sub i. The results obtained using the above formulation are compared with existing analytical and experimental results.

  14. Women in the experimental analysis of behavior

    PubMed Central

    McSweeney, Frances K.; Swindell, Samantha

    1998-01-01

    We examined the status of women in the experimental analysis of behavior by comparing authorship by women in the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior (JEAB) to authorship by women in three similar journals. For all journals, the percentage of articles with at least one female author, the percentage of authors who are female, and the percentage of articles with a female first author increased from 1978 to 1997. However, the participation by women in JEAB lagged behind participation in the other journals on each measure. Female membership on the editorial board of JEAB also failed to increase from 1978 to 1997. Suggestions are made that may increase the participation of women in the experimental analysis of behavior. ImagesFigure 5 PMID:22478307

  15. Aerodynamic Shape Sensitivity Analysis and Design Optimization of Complex Configurations Using Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Arthur C., III; Newman, James C., III; Barnwell, Richard W.

    1997-01-01

    A three-dimensional unstructured grid approach to aerodynamic shape sensitivity analysis and design optimization has been developed and is extended to model geometrically complex configurations. The advantage of unstructured grids (when compared with a structured-grid approach) is their inherent ability to discretize irregularly shaped domains with greater efficiency and less effort. Hence, this approach is ideally suited for geometrically complex configurations of practical interest. In this work the nonlinear Euler equations are solved using an upwind, cell-centered, finite-volume scheme. The discrete, linearized systems which result from this scheme are solved iteratively by a preconditioned conjugate-gradient-like algorithm known as GMRES for the two-dimensional geometry and a Gauss-Seidel algorithm for the three-dimensional; similar procedures are used to solve the accompanying linear aerodynamic sensitivity equations in incremental iterative form. As shown, this particular form of the sensitivity equation makes large-scale gradient-based aerodynamic optimization possible by taking advantage of memory efficient methods to construct exact Jacobian matrix-vector products. Simple parameterization techniques are utilized for demonstrative purposes. Once the surface has been deformed, the unstructured grid is adapted by considering the mesh as a system of interconnected springs. Grid sensitivities are obtained by differentiating the surface parameterization and the grid adaptation algorithms with ADIFOR (which is an advanced automatic-differentiation software tool). To demonstrate the ability of this procedure to analyze and design complex configurations of practical interest, the sensitivity analysis and shape optimization has been performed for a two-dimensional high-lift multielement airfoil and for a three-dimensional Boeing 747-200 aircraft.

  16. On the use of symmetry in configurational analysis for the simulation of disordered solids.

    PubMed

    Mustapha, Sami; D'Arco, Philippe; De La Pierre, Marco; Noël, Yves; Ferrabone, Matteo; Dovesi, Roberto

    2013-03-13

    The starting point for a quantum mechanical investigation of disordered systems usually implies calculations on a limited subset of configurations, generated by defining either the composition of interest or a set of compositions ranging from one end member to another, within an appropriate supercell of the primitive cell of the pure compound. The way in which symmetry can be used in the identification of symmetry independent configurations (SICs) is discussed here. First, Pólya's enumeration theory is adopted to determine the number of SICs, in the case of both varying and fixed composition, for colors numbering two or higher. Then, De Bruijn's generalization is presented, which allows analysis of the case where the colors are symmetry related, e.g. spin up and down in magnetic systems. In spite of their efficiency in counting SICs, neither Pólya's nor De Bruijn's theory helps in solving the difficult problem of identifying the complete list of SICs. Representative SICs are obtained by adopting an orderly generation approach, based on lexicographic ordering, which offers the advantage of avoiding the (computationally expensive) analysis and storage of all the possible configurations. When the number of colors increases, this strategy can be combined with the surjective resolution principle, which permits the efficient generation of SICs of a problem in |R| colors starting from the ones obtained for the (|R| - 1)-colors case. The whole scheme is documented by means of three examples: the abstract case of a square with C(4v) symmetry and the real cases of the garnet and olivine mineral families.

  17. On the use of symmetry in configurational analysis for the simulation of disordered solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustapha, Sami; D'Arco, Philippe; De La Pierre, Marco; Noël, Yves; Ferrabone, Matteo; Dovesi, Roberto

    2013-03-01

    The starting point for a quantum mechanical investigation of disordered systems usually implies calculations on a limited subset of configurations, generated by defining either the composition of interest or a set of compositions ranging from one end member to another, within an appropriate supercell of the primitive cell of the pure compound. The way in which symmetry can be used in the identification of symmetry independent configurations (SICs) is discussed here. First, Pólya’s enumeration theory is adopted to determine the number of SICs, in the case of both varying and fixed composition, for colors numbering two or higher. Then, De Bruijn’s generalization is presented, which allows analysis of the case where the colors are symmetry related, e.g. spin up and down in magnetic systems. In spite of their efficiency in counting SICs, neither Pólya’s nor De Bruijn’s theory helps in solving the difficult problem of identifying the complete list of SICs. Representative SICs are obtained by adopting an orderly generation approach, based on lexicographic ordering, which offers the advantage of avoiding the (computationally expensive) analysis and storage of all the possible configurations. When the number of colors increases, this strategy can be combined with the surjective resolution principle, which permits the efficient generation of SICs of a problem in |R| colors starting from the ones obtained for the (|R| - 1)-colors case. The whole scheme is documented by means of three examples: the abstract case of a square with C4v symmetry and the real cases of the garnet and olivine mineral families.

  18. Modeling of advanced divertor configuration on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak by SOLPS5.0/B2.5-Eirene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, H.; Guo, H. Y.; Xu, G. S.; Xiao, B. J.; Luo, Z. P.; Guo, Y.; Wang, L.; Ding, R.

    2016-03-01

    Heat exhaust is one of the most challenging issues to be addressed for tokamak magnetic confinement fusion research. Detailed modeling with SOLPS5.0/B2.5-Eirene code package is carried out to examine an alternative advanced divertor configuration, i.e., quasi snowflake (QSF), for long pulse operation in EAST. Comparison is also made with the lower single null (LSN) divertor configuration. SOLPS predicts that the quasi snowflake configuration significantly reduces the peak heat flux at the lower divertor outer target, by a factor of 2-3, owing to the magnetic flux expansion. Furthermore, the density threshold for detachment is much lower for QSF, compared to LSN under the same upstream conditions. This indicates that QSF provides a promising tool for controlling heat flux at divertor target while maintaining a lower separatrix density, which is highly desirable for current drive, thus greatly facilitating long-pulse operation in EAST.

  19. Analysis of the structure, configuration, and sizing of Cu and Cu oxide nanoparticles generated by fs laser ablation of solid target in liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Santillan, J. M. J.; Videla, F. A.; Schinca, D. C.; Scaffardi, L. B.; Fernandez van Raap, M. B.

    2013-04-07

    We report on the analysis of structure, configuration, and sizing of Cu and Cu oxide nanoparticles (Nps) produced by femtosecond (fs) laser ablation of solid copper target in liquids. Laser pulse energy ranged between 500 {mu}J and 50 {mu}J. Water and acetone were used to produce the colloidal suspensions. The study was performed through optical extinction spectroscopy using Mie theory to fit the full experimental spectra, considering free and bound electrons size dependent contributions to the metal dielectric function. Raman spectroscopy and AFM technique were also used to characterize the sample. Considering the possible oxidation of copper during the fabrication process, two species (Cu and Cu{sub 2}O) arranged in two structures (bare core or core-shell) and in two configuration types (Cu-Cu{sub 2}O or Cu{sub 2}O-Cu) were considered for the fitting depending on the laser pulse energy and the surrounding media. For water at high energy, it can be observed that a Cu-Cu{sub 2}O configuration fits the experimental spectra of the colloidal suspension, while for decreasing energy and below a certain threshold, a Cu{sub 2}O-Cu configuration needs to be included for the optimum fit. Both species coexist for energies below 170 {mu}J for water. On the other hand, for acetone at high energy, optimum fit of the full spectrum suggests the presence a bimodal Cu-Cu{sub 2}O core-shell Nps distribution while for decreasing energy and below a 70 {mu}J threshold energy value, Cu{sub 2}O-Cu core-shell Nps must be included, together with the former configuration, for the fit of the full spectrum. We discuss possible reasons for the changes in the structural configuration of the core-shell Nps.

  20. Low Speed Analysis of Mission Adaptive Flaps on a High Speed Civil Transport Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lessard, Victor R.

    1999-01-01

    Thin-layer Navier-Stokes analyses were done on a high speed civil transport configuration with mission adaptive leading-edge flaps. The flow conditions simulated were Mach = 0.22 and Reynolds number of 4.27 million for angles-of-attack ranging from 0 to 18 degrees. Two turbulence closure models were used. Analyses were done exclusively with the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model at low angle-of-attack conditions. At high angles-of-attack where considerable flow separation and vortices occurred the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model was also considered. The effects of flow transition were studied. Predicted aerodynamic forces, moment, and pressure are compared to experimental data obtained in the 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel at NASA Langley. The forces and moments correlated well with experimental data in terms of trends. Drag and pitching moment were consistently underpredicted. Predicted surface pressures compared well with experiment at low angles-of-attack. Above 10 angle-of-attack the pressure comparisons were not as favorable. The two turbulent models affected the pressures on the flap considerably and neither produced correct results at the high angles-of-attack.

  1. Comparisons Between Experimental Transport Analysis and Theoretical Modeling on LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Kozo; LHD Group

    2000-10-01

    Helical plasma confinement system has a great advantage in producing steady-state high performance plasmas with built-in divertor. For the experimental analysis and predictive simulation of helical and tokamak plasmas, a simulation code TOTAL (TOroidal Transport Analysis Linkage) has been developed and is applied to the Large Helical Device (LHD, R=3.6 ~3.9m, B<3.0T ) experiments. In the LHD experiment, the global plasma confinement is ~1.5-2 times better than the well-known confinement scaling laws, and effective transport diffusivity is same order of magnitude of neoclassical ion transport with the assumption of Ti=Te. The radial electric field has been measured and roughly agrees with theoretical neoclassical values. The simple drift wave transport models are also compared with experimental values. The impurity dynamics are calculated using predictive part of the TOTAL code, and compared with the "breathing plasma" dynamics, and the role of high-Z impurity are clarified. For the analysis of high beta plasmas, local ballooning mode analysis will be added in this TOTAL code, and optimized configurations for the future MHR reactor will be searched.

  2. Engineering Analysis of Intermediate Loop and Process Heat Exchanger Requirements to Include Configuration Analysis and Materials Needs

    SciTech Connect

    T.M. Lillo; R.L. Williamson; T.R. Reed; C.B. Davis; D.M. Ginosar

    2005-09-01

    The need to locate advanced hydrogen production facilities a finite distance away from a nuclear power source necessitates the need for an intermediate heat transport loop (IHTL). This IHTL must not only efficiently transport energy over distances up to 500 meters but must also be capable of operating at high temperatures (>850oC) for many years. High temperature, long term operation raises concerns of material strength, creep resistance and general material stability (corrosion resistance). IHTL design is currently in the initial stages. Many questions remain to be answered before intelligent design can begin. The report begins to look at some of the issues surrounding the main components of an IHTL. Specifically, a stress analysis of a compact heat exchanger design under expected operating conditions is reported. Also the results of a thermal analysis performed on two ITHL pipe configurations for different heat transport fluids are presented. The configurations consist of separate hot supply and cold return legs as well as annular design in which the hot fluid is carried in an inner pipe and the cold return fluids travels in the opposite direction in the annular space around the hot pipe. The effects of insulation configurations on pipe configuration performance are also reported. Finally, a simple analysis of two different process heat exchanger designs, one a tube in shell type and the other a compact or microchannel reactor are evaluated in light of catalyst requirements. Important insights into the critical areas of research and development are gained from these analyses, guiding the direction of future areas of research.

  3. Transition Documentation on a Three-Element High-Lift Configuration at High Reynolds Numbers: Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertelrud, Arild; Anders, J. B. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A 2-D high-lift system experiment was conducted in August of 1996 in the Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA. The purpose of the experiment was to obtain transition measurements on a three element high-lift system for CFD code validation studies. A transition database has been created using the data from this experiment. The present report contains the analysis of the surface hot film data in terms of the transition locations on the three elements. It also includes relevant information regarding the pressure loads and distributions and the wakes behind the model to aid in the interpretation of the transition data. For some of the configurations the current pressure data has been compared with previous wind tunnel entries of the same model. The methodology used to determine the regions of transitional flow is outlined and each configuration tested has been analyzed. A discussion of interference effects, repeatability, and three-dimensional effects on the data is included.

  4. Superposed epoch analysis of pressure and magnetic field configuration changes in the plasma sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kistler, L. M.; Baumjohann, W.; Nagai, T.; Mobius, E.

    1993-01-01

    Using data from 41 substorm events in the near-Earth magnetotail, we have combined plasma, energetic ion, and magnetic field data from the AMPTE/IRM spacecraft to perform a superposed epoch analysis of changes in the total pressure and in the magnetic field configuration as a function of time relative to substorm onset. Unloading is evident in the total pressure profile; the pressure decreases by about 20 percent. Pressure changes during the growth phase are not as uniform for the different substorms as the pressure changes during the expansion phase. To study changes in the magnetic field configuration, we have determined the development of the plasma pressure profiles in z for an average of data from 15 to 19 R(E). At substorm onset, the field line dipolarization begins on the innermost field lines and then progresses to the outer field lines. The field lines map the closest to the Earth about 45 min after substorm onset, and then begin to stretch out again during the recovery phase of the substorm.

  5. Fluid-thermal analysis of aerodynamic heating over spiked blunt body configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Qihao; Xu, Jinglei; Guo, Shuai

    2017-03-01

    When flying at hypersonic speeds, the spiked blunt body is constantly subjected to severe aerodynamic heating. To illustrate the thermal response of different configurations and the relevant flow field variation, a loosely-coupled fluid-thermal analysis is performed in this paper. The Mesh-based parallel Code Coupling Interface (MpCCI) is adopted to implement the data exchange between the fluid solver and the thermal solver. The results indicate that increases in spike diameter and length will result in a sharp decline of the wall temperature along the spike, and the overall heat flux is remarkably reduced to less than 300 W/cm2 with the aerodome mounted at the spike tip. Moreover, the presence and evolution of small vortices within the recirculation zone are observed and proved to be induced by the stagnation effect of reattachment points on the spike. In addition, the drag coefficient of the configuration with a doubled spike length presents a maximum drop of 4.59% due to the elevated wall temperature. And the growing difference of the drag coefficient is further increased during the accelerating process.

  6. A grid-embedding transonic flow analysis computer program for wing/nacelle configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atta, E. H.; Vadyak, J.

    1983-01-01

    An efficient grid-interfacing zonal algorithm was developed for computing the three-dimensional transonic flow field about wing/nacelle configurations. the algorithm uses the full-potential formulation and the AF2 approximate factorization scheme. The flow field solution is computed using a component-adaptive grid approach in which separate grids are employed for the individual components in the multi-component configuration, where each component grid is optimized for a particular geometry such as the wing or nacelle. The wing and nacelle component grids are allowed to overlap, and flow field information is transmitted from one grid to another through the overlap region using trivariate interpolation. This report represents a discussion of the computational methods used to generate both the wing and nacelle component grids, the technique used to interface the component grids, and the method used to obtain the inviscid flow solution. Computed results and correlations with experiment are presented. also presented are discussions on the organization of the wing grid generation (GRGEN3) and nacelle grid generation (NGRIDA) computer programs, the grid interface (LK) computer program, and the wing/nacelle flow solution (TWN) computer program. Descriptions of the respective subroutines, definitions of the required input parameters, a discussion on interpretation of the output, and the sample cases illustrating application of the analysis are provided for each of the four computer programs.

  7. Utilization of an agility assessment module in analysis and optimization of preliminary fighter configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ngan, Angelen; Biezad, Daniel

    1996-01-01

    A study has been conducted to develop and to analyze a FORTRAN computer code for performing agility analysis on fighter aircraft configurations. This program is one of the modules of the NASA Ames ACSYNT (AirCraft SYNThesis) design code. The background of the agility research in the aircraft industry and a survey of a few agility metrics are discussed. The methodology, techniques, and models developed for the code are presented. The validity of the existing code was evaluated by comparing with existing flight test data. A FORTRAN program was developed for a specific metric, PM (Pointing Margin), as part of the agility module. Example trade studies using the agility module along with ACSYNT were conducted using a McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 Hornet aircraft model. Tile sensitivity of thrust loading, wing loading, and thrust vectoring on agility criteria were investigated. The module can compare the agility potential between different configurations and has capability to optimize agility performance in the preliminary design process. This research provides a new and useful design tool for analyzing fighter performance during air combat engagements in the preliminary design.

  8. Investigation of advanced counterrotation blade configuration concepts for high speed turboprop systems. Task 5: Unsteady counterrotation ducted propfan analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Edward J.; Delaney, Robert A.

    1993-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was the development of a time-marching three-dimensional Euler/Navier-Stokes aerodynamic analysis to predict steady and unsteady compressible transonic flows about ducted and unducted propfan propulsion systems employing multiple blade rows. The computer codes resulting from this study are referred to as ADPAC-AOAR\\CR (Advanced Ducted Propfan Analysis Codes-Angle of Attack Coupled Row). This document is the final report describing the theoretical basis and analytical results from the ADPAC-AOACR codes developed under task 5 of NASA Contract NAS3-25270, Unsteady Counterrotating Ducted Propfan Analysis. The ADPAC-AOACR Program is based on a flexible multiple blocked grid discretization scheme permitting coupled 2-D/3-D mesh block solutions with application to a wide variety of geometries. For convenience, several standard mesh block structures are described for turbomachinery applications. Aerodynamic calculations are based on a four-stage Runge-Kutta time-marching finite volume solution technique with added numerical dissipation. Steady flow predictions are accelerated by a multigrid procedure. Numerical calculations are compared with experimental data for several test cases to demonstrate the utility of this approach for predicting the aerodynamics of modern turbomachinery configurations employing multiple blade rows.

  9. GAS CURTAIN EXPERIMENTAL TECHNIQUE AND ANALYSIS METHODOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect

    J. R. KAMM; ET AL

    2001-01-01

    The qualitative and quantitative relationship of numerical simulation to the physical phenomena being modeled is of paramount importance in computational physics. If the phenomena are dominated by irregular (i. e., nonsmooth or disordered) behavior, then pointwise comparisons cannot be made and statistical measures are required. The problem we consider is the gas curtain Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability experiments of Rightley et al. (13), which exhibit complicated, disordered motion. We examine four spectral analysis methods for quantifying the experimental data and computed results: Fourier analysis, structure functions, fractal analysis, and continuous wavelet transforms. We investigate the applicability of these methods for quantifying the details of fluid mixing.

  10. GAS CURTAIN EXPERIMENTAL TECHNIQUE AND ANALYSIS METHODOLOGIES.

    SciTech Connect

    Kamm, J. R.; Rider, William; Rightley, P. M.; Prestridge, K. P.; Benjamin, R. F.; Vorobieff, P. V.

    2001-01-01

    The qualitative and quantitative relationship of numerical simulation to the physical phenomena being modeled is of paramount importance in computational physics. If the phenomena are dominated by irregular (i.e., nonsmooth or disordered) behavior, then pointwise comparisons cannot be made and statistical measures are required. The problem we consider is the gas curtain Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability experiments of Rightley et al. [13], which exhibit complicated, disordered motion. We examine four spectral analysis methods for quantifying the experimental data and computed results: Fourier analysis, structure functions, fractal analysis, and continuous wavelet transforms. We investigate the applicability of these methods for quantifying the details of fluid mixing.

  11. Low-Speed Dynamic Wind Tunnel Test Analysis of a Generic 53 Degree Swept UCAV Configuration With Controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicroy, Dan D.; Huber, Kerstin C.; Rohlf, Detlef; Loser, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Several static and dynamic forced-motion wind tunnel tests have been conducted on a generic unmanned combat air vehicle (UCAV) configuration with a 53deg swept leading edge. These tests are part of an international research effort to assess and advance the state-of-art of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods to predict the static and dynamic stability and control characteristics for this type of configuration. This paper describes the dynamic forced motion data collected from two different models of this UCAV configuration as well as analysis of the control surface deflections on the dynamic forces and moments.

  12. Analysis of three idealized reactor configurations: plate, pin, and homogeneous. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    McKnight, R.D.

    1983-01-01

    Detailed Monte Carlo calculations have been performed for three distinct configurations of an idealized fast critical assembly. This idealized assembly was based on the LMFBR benchmark critical assembly ZPR-6/7. In the first configuration, the entire core was loaded with the plate unit cell of ZPR-6/7. In the second configuration, the entire core was loaded with the ZPR sodium-filled pin calandria. The actual ZPR pin calandria are loaded with mixed (U,Pu) oxide pins which closely match the composition of the ZPR-6/7 plate unit cell. For the present study, slight adjustments were made in the atom concentrations and the length of the pin calandria in order to make the core boundaries and average composition for the pin-cell configuration identical to those of the plate-cell configuration. In the third configuration, the core was homogeneous, again with identical core boundaries and average composition as the plate and pin configurations.

  13. Unsteady aerodynamic flow field analysis of the space shuttle configuration. Part 4: 747/orbiter aeroelastic stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reding, J. P.; Ericsson, L. E.

    1976-01-01

    A quasi-steady analysis of the aeroelastic stability of the lateral (antisymmetric) modes of the 747/orbiter vehicle was accomplished. The interference effect of the orbiter wake on the 747 tail furnishes an aerodynamic undamping contribution to the elastic modes. Likewise, the upstream influence of the 747 tail and aft fuselage on the orbiter beaver-tail rail fairing also is undamping. Fortunately these undamping effects cannot overpower the large damping contribution of the 747 tail and the modes are damped for the configurations analyzed. However, significant interference effects of the orbiter on the 747 tail have been observed in the pitch plane. The high response of the 747 vertical tail in the orbiter wave was also considered. Wind tunnel data points to flapping of the OMS pod wakes as the source of the wake resonance phenomenon.

  14. Self-mixing grating interferometer: theoretical analysis and experimental observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Dongmei; Wang, Ming; Hao, Hui

    2016-08-01

    By combining self-mixing interferometer (SMI) and grating interferometer (GI), a self-mixing grating interferometer (SMGI) is proposed in this paper. Self-mixing interference occurs when light emitted from a laser diode is diffracted by the doublediffraction system and re-enters the laser active cavity, thus generating a modulation of both the amplitude and the frequency of the lasing field. Theoretical analysis and experimental observations show that the SMGI has the same phase sensitivity as that of the conventional GI and the direction of the phase movement can be obtained from inclination of the interference signal. Compared with the traditional SMI, the phase change of interference signal in SMGI is independent of laser wavelength, providing better immunity against environmental disturbances such as temperature, pressure, and humidity variation. Compared with the traditional GI, the SMGI provides a potential displacement sensor with directional discrimination and quite compact configuration.

  15. Analysis and experimental studies of the control of hang gliders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the longitudinal and lateral characteristics of hang gliders in straight flight, pullups, and turns is presented. Some examples of the characteristics of a straight-wing configuration and a Rogallo-wing configuration are given. A means for improving the control of hang gliders while retaining the same basic control feel is proposed.

  16. The Analysis and Design of Low Boom Configurations Using CFD and Numerical Optimization Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siclari, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    The use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for the analysis of sonic booms generated by aircraft has been shown to increase the accuracy and reliability of predictions. CFD takes into account important three-dimensional and nonlinear effects that are generally neglected by modified linear theory (MLT) methods. Up to the present time, CFD methods have been primarily used for analysis or prediction. Some investigators have used CFD to impact the design of low boom configurations using trial and error methods. One investigator developed a hybrid design method using a combination of Modified Linear Theory (e.g. F-functions) and CFD to provide equivalent area due to lift driven by a numerical optimizer to redesign or modify an existing configuration to achieve a shaped sonic boom signature. A three-dimensional design methodology has not yet been developed that completely uses nonlinear methods or CFD. Constrained numerical optimization techniques have existed for some time. Many of these methods use gradients to search for the minimum of a specified objective function subject to a variety of design variable bounds, linear and nonlinear constraints. Gradient based design optimization methods require the determination of the objective function gradients with respect to each of the design variables. These optimization methods are efficient and work well if the gradients can be obtained analytically. If analytical gradients are not available, the objective gradients or derivatives with respect to the design variables must be obtained numerically. To obtain numerical gradients, say, for 10 design variables, might require anywhere from 10 to 20 objective function evaluations. Typically, 5-10 global iterations of the optimizer are required to minimize the objective function. In terms of using CFD as a design optimization tool, the numerical evaluation of gradients can require anywhere from 100 to 200 CFD computations per design for only 10 design variables. If one CFD

  17. CFD analysis on gas distribution for different scrubber redirection configurations in sump cut.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Y; Organiscak, J A; Zhou, L; Beck, T W; Rider, J P

    2015-01-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health's Office of Mine Safety and Health Research recently developed a series of models using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to study the gas distribution around a continuous mining machine with various fan-powered flooded bed scrubber discharge configurations. CFD models using Species Transport Model without reactions in FLUENT were constructed to evaluate the redirection of scrubber discharge toward the mining face rather than behind the return curtain. The following scenarios are considered in this study: 100 percent of the discharge redirected back toward the face on the off-curtain side of the continuous miner; 100 percent of the discharge redirected back toward the face, but divided equally to both sides of the machine; and 15 percent of the discharge redirected toward the face on the off-curtain side of the machine, with 85 percent directed into the return. These models were compared against a model with a conventional scrubber discharge, where air is directed away from the face into the return. The CFD models were calibrated and validated based on experimental data and accurately predicted sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) gas levels at four gas monitoring locations. One additional prediction model was simulated to consider a different scrubber discharge angle for the 100 percent redirected, equally divided case. These models identified relatively high gassy areas around the continuous miner, which may not warrant their use in coal mines with medium to high methane liberation rates. This paper describes the methodology used to develop the CFD models, and the validation of the models based on experimental data.

  18. CFD analysis on gas distribution for different scrubber redirection configurations in sump cut

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Y.; Organiscak, J.A.; Zhou, L.; Beck, T.W.; Rider, J.P.

    2016-01-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health’s Office of Mine Safety and Health Research recently developed a series of models using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to study the gas distribution around a continuous mining machine with various fan-powered flooded bed scrubber discharge configurations. CFD models using Species Transport Model without reactions in FLUENT were constructed to evaluate the redirection of scrubber discharge toward the mining face rather than behind the return curtain. The following scenarios are considered in this study: 100 percent of the discharge redirected back toward the face on the off-curtain side of the continuous miner; 100 percent of the discharge redirected back toward the face, but divided equally to both sides of the machine; and 15 percent of the discharge redirected toward the face on the off-curtain side of the machine, with 85 percent directed into the return. These models were compared against a model with a conventional scrubber discharge, where air is directed away from the face into the return. The CFD models were calibrated and validated based on experimental data and accurately predicted sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) gas levels at four gas monitoring locations. One additional prediction model was simulated to consider a different scrubber discharge angle for the 100 percent redirected, equally divided case. These models identified relatively high gassy areas around the continuous miner, which may not warrant their use in coal mines with medium to high methane liberation rates. This paper describes the methodology used to develop the CFD models, and the validation of the models based on experimental data. PMID:28018125

  19. Exploratory studies of the cruise performance of upper surface blown configurations. Experimental program: Test facilities, model design instrumentation, and lowspeed, high-lift tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braden, J. A.; Hancock, J. P.; Burdges, K. P.; Hackett, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    The model hardware, test facilities and instrumentation utilized in an experimental study of upper surface blown configurations at cruise is described. The high speed (subsonic) experimental work, studying the aerodynamic effects of wing nacelle geometric variations, was conducted around semispan model configurations composed of diversified, interchangeable components. Power simulation was provided by high pressure air ducted through closed forebody nacelles. Nozzle geometry was varied across size, exit aspect ratio, exit position and boattail angle. Three dimensional force and two dimensional pressure measurements were obtained at cruise Mach numbers from 0.5 to 0.8 and at nozzle pressure ratios up to about 3.0. The experimental investigation was supported by an analytical synthesis of the system using a vortex lattice representation with first order power effects. Results are also presented from a compatibility study in which a short haul transport is designed on the basis of the aerodynamic findings in the experimental study as well as acoustical data obtained in a concurrent program. High lift test data are used to substantiate the projected performance of the selected transport design.

  20. An Overview of Modifications Applied to a Turbulence Response Analysis Method for Flexible Aircraft Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, Christie J.

    2013-01-01

    A software program and associated methodology to study gust loading on aircraft exists for a classification of geometrically simplified flexible configurations. This program consists of a simple aircraft response model with two rigid and three flexible symmetric degrees of freedom and allows for the calculation of various airplane responses due to a discrete one-minus-cosine gust as well as continuous turbulence. Simplifications, assumptions, and opportunities for potential improvements pertaining to the existing software program are first identified, then a revised version of the original software tool is developed with improved methodology to include more complex geometries, additional excitation cases, and output data so as to provide a more useful and accurate tool for gust load analysis. Revisions are made in the categories of aircraft geometry, computation of aerodynamic forces and moments, and implementation of horizontal tail mode shapes. In order to improve the original software program to enhance usefulness, a wing control surface and horizontal tail control surface is added, an extended application of the discrete one-minus-cosine gust input is employed, a supplemental continuous turbulence spectrum is implemented, and a capability to animate the total vehicle deformation response to gust inputs in included. These revisions and enhancements are implemented and an analysis of the results is used to validate the modifications.

  1. A Summary of Revisions Applied to a Turbulence Response Analysis Method for Flexible Aircraft Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, Christie J.; Perry, Boyd, III; Silva, Walter A.; Newman, Brett

    2014-01-01

    A software program and associated methodology to study gust loading on aircraft exists for a classification of geometrically simplified flexible configurations. This program consists of a simple aircraft response model with two rigid and three flexible symmetric degrees-of - freedom and allows for the calculation of various airplane responses due to a discrete one-minus- cosine gust as well as continuous turbulence. Simplifications, assumptions, and opportunities for potential improvements pertaining to the existing software program are first identified, then a revised version of the original software tool is developed with improved methodology to include more complex geometries, additional excitation cases, and additional output data so as to provide a more useful and precise tool for gust load analysis. In order to improve the original software program to enhance usefulness, a wing control surface and horizontal tail control surface is added, an extended application of the discrete one-minus-cosine gust input is employed, a supplemental continuous turbulence spectrum is implemented, and a capability to animate the total vehicle deformation response to gust inputs is included. These revisions and enhancements are implemented and an analysis of the results is used to validate the modifications.

  2. Preliminary Computational Analysis of the (HIRENASD) Configuration in Preparation for the Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chwalowski, Pawel; Florance, Jennifer P.; Heeg, Jennifer; Wieseman, Carol D.; Perry, Boyd P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary computational aeroelastic analysis results generated in preparation for the first Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop (AePW). These results were produced using FUN3D software developed at NASA Langley and are compared against the experimental data generated during the HIgh REynolds Number Aero- Structural Dynamics (HIRENASD) Project. The HIRENASD wind-tunnel model was tested in the European Transonic Windtunnel in 2006 by Aachen University0s Department of Mechanics with funding from the German Research Foundation. The computational effort discussed here was performed (1) to obtain a preliminary assessment of the ability of the FUN3D code to accurately compute physical quantities experimentally measured on the HIRENASD model and (2) to translate the lessons learned from the FUN3D analysis of HIRENASD into a set of initial guidelines for the first AePW, which includes test cases for the HIRENASD model and its experimental data set. This paper compares the computational and experimental results obtained at Mach 0.8 for a Reynolds number of 7 million based on chord, corresponding to the HIRENASD test conditions No. 132 and No. 159. Aerodynamic loads and static aeroelastic displacements are compared at two levels of the grid resolution. Harmonic perturbation numerical results are compared with the experimental data using the magnitude and phase relationship between pressure coefficients and displacement. A dynamic aeroelastic numerical calculation is presented at one wind-tunnel condition in the form of the time history of the generalized displacements. Additional FUN3D validation results are also presented for the AGARD 445.6 wing data set. This wing was tested in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel and is commonly used in the preliminary benchmarking of computational aeroelastic software.

  3. Analysis of Plume Effects on Sonic Boom Signature for Isolated Nozzle Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond S.

    2008-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis has been performed to study the plume effects on sonic boom signature for isolated nozzle configurations. The objectives of these analyses were to provide comparison to past work using modern CFD analysis tools, to investigate the differences of high aspect ratio nozzles to circular (axisymmetric) nozzles, and to report the effects of underexpanded nozzle operation on boom signature. CFD analysis was used to address the plume effects on sonic boom signature from a baseline exhaust nozzle. Near-field pressure signatures were collected for nozzle pressure ratios (NPRs) between 6 and 10. A computer code was used to extrapolate these signatures to a ground-observed sonic boom N-wave. Trends show that there is a reduction in sonic boom N-wave signature as NPR is increased from 6 to 10. The performance curve for this supersonic nozzle is flat, so there is not a significant loss in thrust coefficient as the NPR is increased. As a result, this benefit could be realized without significant loss of performance. Analyses were also collected for a high aspect ratio nozzle based on the baseline design for comparison. Pressure signatures were collected for nozzle pressure ratios from 8 to 12. Signatures were nearly twice as strong for the two-dimensional case, and trends also show a reduction in sonic boom signature as NPR is increased from 8 to 12. As low boom designs are developed and improved, there will be a need for understanding the interaction between the aircraft boat tail shocks and the exhaust nozzle plume. These CFD analyses will provide a baseline study for future analysis efforts.

  4. Biosynthesis, isolation, and NMR analysis of leukotriene A epoxides: substrate chirality as a determinant of the cis or trans epoxide configuration[S

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jing; Zheng, Yuxiang; Boeglin, William E.; Brash, Alan R.

    2013-01-01

    Leukotriene (LT)A4 and closely related allylic epoxides are pivotal intermediates in lipoxygenase (LOX) pathways to bioactive lipid mediators that include the leukotrienes, lipoxins, eoxins, resolvins, and protectins. Although the structure and stereochemistry of the 5-LOX product LTA4 is established through comparison to synthetic standards, this is the exception, and none of these highly unstable epoxides has been analyzed in detail from enzymatic synthesis. Understanding of the mechanistic basis of the cis or trans epoxide configuration is also limited. To address these issues, we developed methods involving biphasic reaction conditions for the LOX-catalyzed synthesis of LTA epoxides in quantities sufficient for NMR analysis. As proof of concept, human 15-LOX-1 was shown to convert 15S-hydroperoxy-eicosatetraenoic acid (15S-HPETE) to the LTA analog 14S,15S-trans-epoxy-eicosa-5Z,8Z,10E,12E-tetraenoate, confirming the proposed structure of eoxin A4. Using this methodology we then showed that recombinant Arabidopsis AtLOX1, an arachidonate 5-LOX, converts 5S-HPETE to the trans epoxide LTA4 and converts 5R-HPETE to the cis epoxide 5-epi-LTA4, establishing substrate chirality as a determinant of the cis or trans epoxide configuration. The results are reconciled with a mechanism based on a dual role of the LOX nonheme iron in LTA epoxide biosynthesis, providing a rational basis for understanding the stereochemistry of LTA epoxide intermediates in LOX-catalyzed transformations. PMID:23242647

  5. Analysis and moving base simulation of transition configuration management aspects of a powered lift aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. A.; Craig, S. J.; Ashkenas, I. L.

    1973-01-01

    A study aimed at the implementation of a configuration management flight control system is reported. The system is designed to take the guesswork out of, and improve the operational safety of, transition flight in the region from cruise to STOL. Potential improvements in the trim configuration management aspects of the transition process are described.

  6. Scale-4 analysis of pressurized water reactor critical configurations: Volume 5, North Anna Unit 1 Cycle 5

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, S.M.; Suto, T. |

    1996-10-01

    ANSI/ANS 8.1 requires that calculational methods for away-from- reactor (AFR) criticality safety analyses be validated against experiment. This report summarizes part of the ongoing effort to benchmark AFR criticality analysis methods using selected critical configurations from commercial PWRs. Codes and data in the SCALE-4 code system were used. This volume documents the SCALE system analysis of one reactor critical configuration for North Anna Unit 1 Cycle 5. The KENO V.a criticality calculations for the North Anna 1 Cycle 5 beginning-of-cycle model yielded a value for k{sub eff} of 1. 0040{+-}0.0005.

  7. Navier-Stokes Analysis of a High Wing Transport High-Lift Configuration with Externally Blown Flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slotnick, Jeffrey P.; An, Michael Y.; Mysko, Stephen J.; Yeh, David T.; Rogers, Stuart E.; Roth, Karlin; Baker, M.David; Nash, S.

    2000-01-01

    Insights and lessons learned from the aerodynamic analysis of the High Wing Transport (HWT) high-lift configuration are presented. Three-dimensional Navier-Stokes CFD simulations using the OVERFLOW flow solver are compared with high Reynolds test data obtained in the NASA Ames 12 Foot Pressure Wind Tunnel (PWT) facility. Computational analysis of the baseline HWT high-lift configuration with and without Externally Blown Flap (EBF) jet effects is highlighted. Several additional aerodynamic investigations, such as nacelle strake effectiveness and wake vortex studies, are presented. Technical capabilities and shortcomings of the computational method are discussed and summarized.

  8. Analysis and Inverse Design of the HSR Arrow Wing Configuration with Fuselage, Wing, and Flow Through Nacelles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krist, Steven E.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    1999-01-01

    The design process for developing the natural flow wing design on the HSR arrow wing configuration utilized several design tools and analysis methods. Initial fuselage/wing designs were generated with inviscid analysis and optimization methods in conjunction with the natural flow wing design philosophy. A number of designs were generated, satisfying different system constraints. Of the three natural flow wing designs developed, the NFWAc2 configuration is the design which satisfies the constraints utilized by McDonnell Douglas Aerospace (MDA) in developing a series of optimized configurations; a wind tunnel model of the MDA designed OPT5 configuration was constructed and tested. The present paper is concerned with the viscous analysis and inverse design of the arrow wing configurations, including the effects of the installed diverters/nacelles. Analyses were conducted with OVERFLOW, a Navier-Stokes flow solver for overset grids. Inverse designs were conducted with OVERDISC, which couples OVERFLOW with the CDISC inverse design method. An initial system of overset grids was generated for the OPT5 configuration with installed diverters/nacelles. An automated regridding process was then developed to use the OPT5 component grids to create grids for the natural flow wing designs. The inverse design process was initiated using the NFWAc2 configuration as a starting point, eventually culminating in the NFWAc4 design-for which a wind tunnel model was constructed. Due to the time constraints on the design effort, initial analyses and designs were conducted with a fairly coarse grid; subsequent analyses have been conducted on a refined system of grids. Comparisons of the computational results to experiment are provided at the end of this paper.

  9. Pressure loads and aerodynamic force information for the -89A space shuttle orbiter configuration, volume 2. [for structural strength analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennell, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations were conducted on an 0.0405 scale representation of the Rockwell -89A Light Weight Space Shuttle Orbiter. The test purpose was to obtain pressure loads data in the presence of the ground for orbiter structural strength analysis. Aerodynamic force data was also recorded to allow correlation with all pressure loads information. Angles of attack from minus 3 deg to 18 deg and angles of sideslip of 0 deg, plus or minus 50 deg, and plus or minus 10 deg were tested in the presence of the NAAL ground plane. Static pressure bugs were used to obtain a pressure loads survey of the basic configuration, elevon deflections of 5 deg, 10 deg, 15 deg, and minus 20 deg and a rudder deflection of minus 15 deg, at a tunnel dynamic pressure of 40 psi. The test procedure was to locate a maximum of 30 static pressure bugs on the model surface at various locations calculated to prevent aerodynamic and physical interference. Then by various combinations of location the pressure bugs output was to define a complete pressure survey for the fuselages, wing, vertical tail, and main landing gear door.

  10. Identifying the causes of water crises: A configurational frequency analysis of 22 basins world wide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, V.; Gorelick, S.; Lambin, E.; Rozelle, S.; Thompson, B.

    2010-12-01

    Freshwater "scarcity" has been identified as being a major problem world-wide, but it is surprisingly hard to assess if water is truly scarce at a global or even regional scale. Most empirical water research remains location specific. Characterizing water problems, transferring lessons across regions, to develop a synthesized global view of water issues remains a challenge. In this study we attempt a systematic understanding of water problems across regions. We compared case studies of basins across different regions of the world using configurational frequency analysis. Because water crises are multi-symptom and multi-causal, a major challenge was to categorize water problems so as to make comparisons across cases meaningful. In this study, we focused strictly on water unsustainability, viz. the inability to sustain current levels of the anthropogenic (drinking water, food, power, livelihood) and natural (aquatic species, wetlands) into the future. For each case, the causes of three outcome variables, groundwater declines, surface water declines and aquatic ecosystem declines, were classified and coded. We conducted a meta-analysis in which clusters of peer-reviewed papers by interdisciplinary teams were considered to ensure that the results were not biased towards factors privileged by any one discipline. Based on our final sample of 22 case study river basins, some clear patterns emerged. The meta-analysis suggests that water resources managers have long overemphasized the factors governing supply of water resources and while insufficient attention has been paid to the factors driving demand. Overall, uncontrolled increase in demand was twice as frequent as declines in availability due to climate change or decreased recharge. Moreover, groundwater and surface water declines showed distinct causal pathways. Uncontrolled increases in demand due to lack of credible enforcement were a key factor driving groundwater declines; while increased upstream abstractions

  11. Human Factors Experimental Design and Analysis Reference

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    and R2Adj – PRESS Statistic – Mallows C(p) A linear regression model that includes all predictors investigated may not be the best model in terms of...as the Adjusted Coefficient of Determination, R2Adj, the PRESS statistic, and Mallows C(p) value. Human Factors Experimental Design and Analysis...equations with highest R2 using R2Adj, PRESS, and Mallows C(p) • Evaluation – Cumbersome as number of X’s increase 10 X’s = (210-1) = 1,023 Regression

  12. Tests of strain analysis by experimental deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borradaile, G. J.; McArthur, J.

    1991-01-01

    The linearisation method and Robin's method of strain analysis of granular materials yield accurate strain estimates for a variety of materials deformed experimentally in pure shear. The breakdown of continuum behaviour at high pore fluid pressures causes the methods to overestimate the strain because they do not take added rigid-body rotation into account. Both methods tolerate some variation in initial shape ratio and some degree of initial preferred orientation at modest strains. Results of tests on polymict sandstone indicate that the lower than average ductility of competent clasts may be balanced against an unfavourable degree of preferred orientation to yield an improved strain estimate.

  13. CFD Analysis and Design of Detailed Target Configurations for an Accelerator-Driven Subcritical System

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, Adam; Merzari, Elia; Sofu, Tanju; Zhong, Zhaopeng; Gohar, Yousry

    2016-08-01

    High-fidelity analysis has been utilized in the design of beam target options for an accelerator driven subcritical system. Designs featuring stacks of plates with square cross section have been investigated for both tungsten and uranium target materials. The presented work includes the first thermal-hydraulic simulations of the full, detailed target geometry. The innovative target cooling manifold design features many regions with complex flow features, including 90 bends and merging jets, which necessitate three-dimensional fluid simulations. These were performed using the commercial computational fluid dynamics code STAR-CCM+. Conjugate heat transfer was modeled between the plates, cladding, manifold structure, and fluid. Steady-state simulations were performed but lacked good residual convergence. Unsteady simulations were then performed, which converged well and demonstrated that flow instability existed in the lower portion of the manifold. It was established that the flow instability had little effect on the peak plate temperatures, which were well below the melting point. The estimated plate surface temperatures and target region pressure were shown to provide sufficient margin to subcooled boiling for standard operating conditions. This demonstrated the safety of both potential target configurations during normal operation.

  14. Detection and Analysis of X Ray Emission from the Princeton-Field-Reversed Configuration (PFRC-2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosh, Alexandra; Swanson, Charles; Jandovitz, Peter; Cohen, Samuel

    2016-10-01

    The PFRC is an odd-parity rotating-magnetic-field-driven field-reversed-configuration magnetic confinement experiment. Studying X rays produced via electron Bremsstrahlung with neutral particles is crucial to the further understanding of the energy and particle confinement of the PFRC. The data on the x rays are collected using a detector system comprised of two, spatially scannable Amptek XR-100 CR detectors and a Amptek XR-100 SDD detector that view the plasma column at two axial locations, one in the divertor and one near the axial midplane. These provide X-ray energy and arrival-time information. (Data analysis requires measurement of each detector's efficiency, a parameter that is modified by window transmission. Detector calibrations were performed with a custom-made X-ray tube that impinged 1-microamp 1-5 kV electron beams onto a carbon target.) From the analyzed data, the average electron energy, effective temperature, and electron density can be extracted. Spatial scans then allow the FRC's internal energy to be measured. We present recent measurements of the Bremsstrahlung spectrum from 0.8 to 6 keV and the inferred electron temperature in the PFRC device as functions of heating power, magnetic field and fill gas pressure. This work was supported, in part, by DOE Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  15. Analysis of the characteristics of slot design affecting resistance to sliding during active archwire configurations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background During orthodontic treatment, a low resistance to slide (RS) is desirable when sliding mechanics are used. Many studies showed that several variables affect the RS at the bracket-wire interface; among these, the design of the bracket slot has not been deeply investigated yet. This study aimed to clarify the effect of different slot designs on the RS expressed by five types of low-friction brackets in vertical and horizontal active configurations of the wire. Methods Five low-friction brackets (Damon SL II, Ormco, Orange, CA, USA; In-Ovation, GAC International, Bohemia, NY, USA; Quick, Forestadent, Pforzheim, Germany; Time 2, AO, Sheboygan, WI, USA; Synergy, RMO, Denver, CO, USA) coupled with an 0.014-in NiTi thermal wire (Therma-Lite, AO) were tested in two three-bracket experimental models simulating vertical and horizontal bracket displacements. A custom-made machine was used to measure frictional resistance with tests repeated on ten occasions for each bracket-wire combination. Design characteristics such as the mesio-distal slot width, slot depth, and presence of chamfered edges at the extremities of the slot were evaluated on SEM images (SUPRA, Carl Zeiss, Oberkochen, Germany) and analyzed in relation to the data of RS recorded. Results Time 2 was found to show the higher frictional forces (1.50 and 1.35 N) in both experimental models (p < 0.05), while Quick and Synergy brackets showed the lower frictional values in the vertical (0.66 N) and in the horizontal (0.68 N) bracket displacements, respectively. With vertically displaced brackets, the increased mesio-distal slot width and the presence of clear angle at mesial and distal slot edges increase the values of RS. With brackets horizontally displaced, the RS expressed by the wire is influenced simultaneously by the depth of the slot, the mesio-distal slot width, and the presence of clear angle at the extremities of the slot base, the clip, or the slide. Conclusion In order to select the proper low

  16. Experimental analysis of computer system dependability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyer, Ravishankar, K.; Tang, Dong

    1993-01-01

    This paper reviews an area which has evolved over the past 15 years: experimental analysis of computer system dependability. Methodologies and advances are discussed for three basic approaches used in the area: simulated fault injection, physical fault injection, and measurement-based analysis. The three approaches are suited, respectively, to dependability evaluation in the three phases of a system's life: design phase, prototype phase, and operational phase. Before the discussion of these phases, several statistical techniques used in the area are introduced. For each phase, a classification of research methods or study topics is outlined, followed by discussion of these methods or topics as well as representative studies. The statistical techniques introduced include the estimation of parameters and confidence intervals, probability distribution characterization, and several multivariate analysis methods. Importance sampling, a statistical technique used to accelerate Monte Carlo simulation, is also introduced. The discussion of simulated fault injection covers electrical-level, logic-level, and function-level fault injection methods as well as representative simulation environments such as FOCUS and DEPEND. The discussion of physical fault injection covers hardware, software, and radiation fault injection methods as well as several software and hybrid tools including FIAT, FERARI, HYBRID, and FINE. The discussion of measurement-based analysis covers measurement and data processing techniques, basic error characterization, dependency analysis, Markov reward modeling, software-dependability, and fault diagnosis. The discussion involves several important issues studies in the area, including fault models, fast simulation techniques, workload/failure dependency, correlated failures, and software fault tolerance.

  17. Space transportation booster engine configuration study. Volume 2: Design definition document and environmental analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The objective of the Space Transportation Booster Engine (STBE) Configuration Study is to contribute to the Advanced Launch System (ALS) development effort by providing highly reliable, low cost booster engine concepts for both expendable and reusable rocket engines. The objectives of the space Transportation Booster Engine (STBE) Configuration Study were: (1) to identify engine configurations which enhance vehicle performance and provide operational flexibility at low cost, and (2) to explore innovative approaches to the follow-on Full-Scale Development (FSD) phase for the STBE.

  18. Sensitivity analysis and optimization of the COSMO-CLM configuration over Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montesarchio, M.; Manzi, M.; Mercogliano, P.; Bucchignani, E.

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze the sensitivity of the precipitation and the 2-meters mean temperature in response to the variation of some physical, numerical and tuning parameters in COSMO-CLM, a non-hydrostatic model for the simulation of atmospheric processes. The model has been developed by the DWD-Germany for weather forecast services; successively, the model has been updated by the CLM-Community, in order to develop also climatic applications. It is the only documented numerical model system in Europe designed for spatial resolutions down to 1km with a range of applicability encompassing operational numerical weather prediction, regional climate modelling the dispersion of trace gases and aerosol and idealised studies and applicable in all regions of the world for a wide range of available climate simulations from global climate and NWP models. The main goal is to adjust the configuration of COSMO-CLM over Italy in order to better reproduce the climate of the last thirty years of the XX century. Moreover, the crucial point of this analysis is the reduction of the precipitation bias on Alps and the understanding and improvement of the strong local temperature bias registered in specific areas such as Po Valley. In the present work, a precise sensitivity analysis has been performed on the domain 4.7-16.7°E; 40.8-48.3°N, considering the time period 1996-2000. The choice of this domain is mainly due to the availability of different observational dataset to perform the result validation: E-OBS (a European land only daily high resolution gridded dataset for precipitation and mean surface temperature covering the period 1960-2006), ETH (Alpine Precipitation Analyses from High-Resolution Rain-Gauge Observations) and ARPA EMR (high-density in situ station network of daily temperature and precipitation). More than twenty simulations have been performed, all driven by ERA40, with an update of the boundary conditions every 6 hours. In order to avoid spin

  19. Nonlinear particle dynamics in the magnetotail: A laboratory study 1. The experimental configuration and numerical simulation. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.; Bowles, J.; Holland, D.; Chen, J.; Siefring, C.

    1995-09-25

    The authors have performed the initial stages of an experiment designed to investigate particle dynamics in the magnetotail. The results of this experiment lend support to the idea that particle scattering from the magnetotail neutral sheet is not random but that there exist resonances in the number and direction of scattered particles as a function of energy. The effort began with construction and testing of the magnetic field configuration necessary to simulate the quitetime magnetotail field: a neutral sheet magnetic field profile B0(z)x with a superimposed normal field B(2)z. Once complete, electrons of variable energy were injected into the field region created and the scattered current collected by back-scattered and forward-scattered collection plates was analyzed as a function of electron energy. The experiment was used to test the hypothesis that single particle scattering from a neutral sheet type profile as described can be coherent and can, at times, demonstrate resonance effects as a function of energy.

  20. Aerodynamic design and analysis of the AST-204, AST-205, and AST-206 blended wing-fuse large supersonic transport configuration concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, G. L.; Walkley, K. B.

    1980-01-01

    The aerodynamic design and analysis of three blended wing-fuselage supersonic cruise configurations providing four, five, and six abreast seating was conducted using a previously designed supersonic cruise configuration as the baseline. The five abreast configuration was optimized for wave drag at a Mach number of 2.7. The four and six abreast configurations were also optimized at Mach 2.7, but with the added constraint that the majority of their structure be common with the five abreast configuration. Analysis of the three configurations indicated an improvement of 6.0, 7.5, and 7.7 percent in cruise lift-to-drag ratio over the baseline configuration for the four, five, and six abreast configurations, respectively.

  1. Numerical Analysis of Neutral Entrainment Effect on Field-Reversed Configuration Thruster Efficiency

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    The flow conditions include neon gas and plasma with densities on the order of 1018 molecule⁄m3, plasma temperatures between 5 and 10 eV, and relative...configuration thrusters. The flow conditions include neon gas and plasma with densities on the order of 1018 molecule∕m3, plasma temperatures between 5...includes a planar flow between a field- reversed configuration plasmoid initially at a Schmid–Burgk equilibrium and neutral gas with varying relative

  2. Constructing Flexible, Configurable, ETL Pipelines for the Analysis of "Big Data" with Apache OODT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, A. F.; Mattmann, C. A.; Ramirez, P.; Verma, R.; Zimdars, P. A.; Park, S.; Estrada, A.; Sumarlidason, A.; Gil, Y.; Ratnakar, V.; Krum, D.; Phan, T.; Meena, A.

    2013-12-01

    A plethora of open source technologies for manipulating, transforming, querying, and visualizing 'big data' have blossomed and matured in the last few years, driven in large part by recognition of the tremendous value that can be derived by leveraging data mining and visualization techniques on large data sets. One facet of many of these tools is that input data must often be prepared into a particular format (e.g.: JSON, CSV), or loaded into a particular storage technology (e.g.: HDFS) before analysis can take place. This process, commonly known as Extract-Transform-Load, or ETL, often involves multiple well-defined steps that must be executed in a particular order, and the approach taken for a particular data set is generally sensitive to the quantity and quality of the input data, as well as the structure and complexity of the desired output. When working with very large, heterogeneous, unstructured or semi-structured data sets, automating the ETL process and monitoring its progress becomes increasingly important. Apache Object Oriented Data Technology (OODT) provides a suite of complementary data management components called the Process Control System (PCS) that can be connected together to form flexible ETL pipelines as well as browser-based user interfaces for monitoring and control of ongoing operations. The lightweight, metadata driven middleware layer can be wrapped around custom ETL workflow steps, which themselves can be implemented in any language. Once configured, it facilitates communication between workflow steps and supports execution of ETL pipelines across a distributed cluster of compute resources. As participants in a DARPA-funded effort to develop open source tools for large-scale data analysis, we utilized Apache OODT to rapidly construct custom ETL pipelines for a variety of very large data sets to prepare them for analysis and visualization applications. We feel that OODT, which is free and open source software available through the Apache

  3. Finite element analysis of balloon-expandable coronary stent deployment: influence of angioplasty balloon configuration.

    PubMed

    Martin, David; Boyle, Fergal

    2013-11-01

    Today, the majority of coronary stents are balloon-expandable and are deployed using a balloon-tipped catheter. To improve deliverability, the membrane of the angioplasty balloon is typically folded about the catheter in a pleated configuration. As such, the deployment of the angioplasty balloon is governed by the material properties of the balloon membrane, its folded configuration and its attachment to the catheter. Despite this observation, however, an optimum strategy for modelling the configuration of the angioplasty balloon in finite element studies of coronary stent deployment has not been identified, and idealised models of the angioplasty balloon are commonly employed in the literature. These idealised models often neglect complex geometrical features, such as the folded configuration of the balloon membrane and its attachment to the catheter, which may have a significant influence on the deployment of a stent. In this study, three increasingly sophisticated models of a typical semi-compliant angioplasty balloon were employed to determine the influence of angioplasty balloon configuration on the deployment of a stent. The results of this study indicate that angioplasty balloon configuration has a significant influence on both the transient behaviour of the stent and its impact on the mechanical environment of the coronary artery.

  4. An Experimental Test of How Different Community Configurations and Environmental Pressures Influence the Susceptibility of Ponds to a Critical Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory-Eaves, I.; Iacarella, J.; Giani, A.; Beisner, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past two centuries, humans have been modifying the planet at an accelerating rate and, in some cases, ecosystems have been observed to experience critical transitions. For example, shallow lakes and ponds may change abruptly from a clear-water, macrophyte-dominated state to a turbid state when exposed to minor increases in stress (e.g., nutrient loading). Yet, abrupt changes in shallow lakes and ponds are not consistently observed and considerable uncertainty remains regarding the ecological and environmental conditions that render these systems susceptible to sudden changes. To address this knowledge gap, we are conducting a mesocosm experiment to quantify how different community configurations and environmental pressures influence the susceptibility of ponds to critical transitions. This research tests the hypothesis that macrophyte density and the rate of external nutrient loading alter the trajectory of phytoplankton dynamics, thus influencing the transition to a turbid state. We supplied 18 mesocosms with field-collected sediment, phytoplankton, zooplankton and fish, and exposed them to three levels of macrophyte densities and two external nutrient loading regimes. Based on daily measurements of phytoplankton biomass (measured as chlorophyll a), we will apply early warning metrics for identifying critical transitions (e.g., http://www.early-warning-signals.org). Our preliminary results indicate that ponds with no macrophytes and the faster nutrient loading rate yield the greatest rate of increase in chlorophyll a. Key goals of this experiment are to enhance the mechanistic understanding of shallow lake and pond dynamics, and aid in the interpretation of lake sediment records as archives of historical critical transitions.

  5. Intelligent self-configuring client-server analysis software for high-resolution X and gamma-ray spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, W.M.; Carlson, J.

    1995-07-01

    The Safeguards Technology Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is developing isotopic analysis software that is constructed to be adaptable to a wide variety of applications and requirements. The MGA++ project will develop an analysis capability based on an architecture consisting of a set of tools that can be configured by an executive to perform a specific task. The software will check the results or progress of an analysis and change assumptions and methodology as required to arrive at an optimum analysis. The software is intended to address analysis needs that arise from material control and accountability, treaty verification, complex reconfiguration and environmental clean-up applications.

  6. Experimental study on the effects of blast-cap configurations and charge patterns on coke descending in CDQ cooling shaft

    SciTech Connect

    Y.H. Feng; X.X. Zhang; M.L. Wu

    2008-08-15

    The coke descending behavior in a CDQ cooling shaft is studied experimentally by means of a tracing method with a digital camera. For three different blast-caps, the law of coke flow is studied under five conditions of coke charge. The experimental results show that, for the sake of the uniformity of the coke burden descending, a blast-cap with elliptical cross-section is a better choice than that with circular cross-section regardless of high or low placement. A coke charge pattern with a flat top burden surface is preferable to that with peak-valley surface, a double-peak superior to a one-peak. Trajectory and average velocity distribution of coke behavior depend weakly on whether the coke is continuously fed or not as the discharging began. The blast-caps have local effects on the descending coke and hardly affect whether the cokes flow smoothly or not in the case of coke burden with enough depth.

  7. Experimental and analysis methods in radiochemical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattadori, C. M.; Pandola, L.

    2016-04-01

    Radiochemical experiments made the history of neutrino physics by achieving the first observation of solar neutrinos (Cl experiment) and the first detection of the fundamental pp solar neutrinos component (Ga experiments). They measured along decades the integral νe charged current interaction rate in the exposed target. The basic operation principle is the chemical separation of the few atoms of the new chemical species produced by the neutrino interactions from the rest of the target, and their individual counting in a low-background counter. The smallness of the expected interaction rate (1 event per day in a ˜ 100 ton target) poses severe experimental challenges on the chemical and on the counting procedures. The main aspects related to the analysis techniques employed in solar neutrino experiments are reviewed and described, with a special focus given to the event selection and the statistical data treatment.

  8. Experimental analysis of direct current corona discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    lagăr, A.; Diniş, C. M.; Popa, G. N.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the experimental analysis of current-voltage characteristic of DC corona discharge. In experiments were used an electrostatic discharge system, consists of an active brass electrode, and a passive copper electrode (plane). A high-voltage source has been used to produce the positive or negative DC discharge. To analyse the influence of active electrode surface were used a conical and a spherical electrode, with small radius of curvature. The gap between the electrodes was varied by moving the passive electrode. Current-voltage characteristics of DC corona discharge were obtained at a constant distance between the discharge electrodes, by changing the amplitude of supply voltage. Corona current and voltage were acquired using a digital oscilloscope. Experiments allowed the study of the effects due to the active electrode and the air gap between the electrodes, on the onset voltage and the current of corona discharge.

  9. Euler/Navier-Stokes flow computations on flexible configurations for stability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, G.; Tu, E.

    1995-01-01

    Longitudinal dynamic stability derivatives required for design of aircraft are computed by using the state-of-the-art numerical methods for wing-body configurations. The flow is modeled using the Euler/Navier-Stokes equations with turbulence models and solved using an efficient finite-difference scheme suitable for patched structured grids. Computations are made at a flow regime that is beyond the limits of the current linear methods mostly used for computing stability derivatives. Flow conditions include shockwaves and viscous dominated vortical flows. Effect of Mach number and angle-of-attack on stability derivatives are demonstrated for a typical wing-body configuration. For the same configuration the effects of wing flexibility on the magnitude and phase angles of stability derivatives are also demonstrated.

  10. Unsteady aerodynamic flow field analysis of the space shuttle configuration. Part 1: Orbiter aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericsson, L. E.; Reding, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    An analysis of the steady and unsteady aerodynamics of the space shuttle orbiter has been performed. It is shown that slender wing theory can be modified to account for the effect of Mach number and leading edge roundness on both attached and separated flow loads. The orbiter unsteady aerodynamics can be computed by defining two equivalent slender wings, one for attached flow loads and another for the vortex-induced loads. It is found that the orbiter is in the transonic speed region subject to vortex-shock-boundary layer interactions that cause highly nonlinear or discontinuous load changes which can endanger the structural integrity of the orbiter wing and possibly cause snap roll problems. It is presently impossible to simulate these interactions in a wind tunnel test even in the static case. Thus, a well planned combined analytic and experimental approach is needed to solve the problem.

  11. Determination and analysis of an analytical potential for ions in excited configurations in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Perez, Rafael

    The main objective in this Thesis is to propose an analytical expression, within the context of the Independent Particle Model in a central field, for the effective potential that a bound electron feels when it belongs to an ion which is in an excited configuration. It is also an objective that this potential will be obtained as a correction to the effective potential corresponding to the ion in ground state. The potential proposed not only allows to include the effects that the excited configurations introduce on atomic magnitudes but also allows to broach, in a simple and fast way, how to determine the ionic populations and the optical properties of plasmas. The great advantage of the analytical potentials is that they avoid the iterative procedures, which are characteristic in the self-consistent methods, in the calculations of atomic magnitudes and plasma properties. This fact allow a considerable diminution in calculation time. Moreover, the analytical potential proposed in this Thesis has the advantage with respect other analytical potentials that it does not need to fit its parameters when we consider different excited configurations. This fact implies a considerable diminution in the complexity of the problem and in the calculation time and allows to include more excited configurations to model the ions present in the plasma, which improves the results. With the potential proposed in this Thesis we have studied the influence of the excited configurations on atomic magnitudes. Those results have been checked satisfactorily with others obtained by self-consistent methods and by using analytical potentials. We have also used the potential proposed to determine which excited configurations have more probability of presence in a plasma in Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium.

  12. On the scaling analysis of the solute boundary layer in idealized growth configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garandet, J. P.; Duffar, T.; Favier, J. J.

    1990-11-01

    A scaling procedure is applied to the equation governing chemical transport in idealized Czochralski and horizontal Bridgman growth experiments. Our purpose is to get a fair estimate of the solute boundary layer in front of the solidification interface. The results are very good in the Czochralski type configuration, the maximum error with respect to the semi-analytical solution of Burton, Prim and Schlichter being of the order of 20%. In the Bridgman type configuration, our predictions compare well with the values of the numerical simulations; however, more data would be needed for a definite conclusion to be drawn.

  13. Analysis of Post-Support and Wind-Tunnel Wall Interference on Flow Field About Subsonic High-Lift High-Speed Research Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lessard, Wendy B.

    2000-01-01

    The present study was performed to determine how significant the interference effects of the wind-tunnel model support system and tunnel walls can be for a high-speed configuration during takeoff and landing conditions. A 5-percent scale model of the Technology Concept Airplane was recently tested in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Sub-sonic Tunnel. The model was numerically modeled with and without the support and tunnel walls and compared with experimental data. Detailed analysis of the flow provided additional insight concerning what effects the post support and tunnel walls had on the flow field. This study revealed that although the overall forces and moments could be experimentally accounted for, the detailed flow features, such as the surface pressure distributions, could not be accurately simulated without including the post support in the computations.

  14. Analysis and in-simulator evaluation of display and control concepts for a terminal configured vehicle in final approach in a windshear environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levison, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    Display Control configurations for the Terminal configured Vehicle in approach to landing situations were analyzed. A pilot/vehicle model was used to compare with a real time simulation study. Model results are presented and extended for the approach task during wind shear and random turbulence environments. In general, model results of performance trends matched those obtained experimentally.

  15. Multi-Scale Creep Analysis of Plain-Woven Laminates Using Time-Dependent Homogenization Theory:. Effects of Laminate Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, K.; Matsuda, T.; Kawai, M.

    In this study, multi-scale creep analysis of plain-woven GFRP laminates is performed using the time-dependent homogenization theory developed by the present authors. First, point-symmetry of internal structures of plain-woven laminates is utilized for a boundary condition of unit cell problems, reducing the domain of analysis to 1/4 and 1/8 for in-phase and out-of-phase laminate configurations, respectively. The time-dependent homogenization theory is then reconstructed for these domains of analysis. Using the present method, in-plane creep behavior of plain-woven glass fiber/epoxy laminates subjected to a constant stress is analyzed. The results are summarized as follows: (1) The in-plane creep behavior of the plain-woven GFRP laminates exhibits marked anisotropy. (2) The laminate configurations considerably affect the creep behavior of the laminates.

  16. Optimization of Simplex Atomizer Inlet Port Configuration through Computational Fluid Dynamics and Experimental Study for Aero-Gas Turbine Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marudhappan, Raja; Chandrasekhar, Udayagiri; Hemachandra Reddy, Koni

    2016-06-01

    The design of plain orifice simplex atomizer for use in the annular combustion system of 1100 kW turbo shaft engine is optimized. The discrete flow field of jet fuel inside the swirl chamber of the atomizer and up to 1.0 mm downstream of the atomizer exit are simulated using commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software. The Euler-Euler multiphase model is used to solve two sets of momentum equations for liquid and gaseous phases and the volume fraction of each phase is tracked throughout the computational domain. The atomizer design is optimized after performing several 2D axis symmetric analyses with swirl and the optimized inlet port design parameters are used for 3D simulation. The Volume Of Fluid (VOF) multiphase model is used in the simulation. The orifice exit diameter is 0.6 mm. The atomizer is fabricated with the optimized geometric parameters. The performance of the atomizer is tested in the laboratory. The experimental observations are compared with the results obtained from 2D and 3D CFD simulations. The simulated velocity components, pressure field, streamlines and air core dynamics along the atomizer axis are compared to previous research works and found satisfactory. The work has led to a novel approach in the design of pressure swirl atomizer.

  17. Aerodynamic analysis of three advanced configurations using the TranAir full-potential code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madson, M. D.; Carmichael, R. L.; Mendoza, J. P.

    1989-01-01

    Computational results are presented for three advanced configurations: the F-16A with wing tip missiles and under wing fuel tanks, the Oblique Wing Research Aircraft, and an Advanced Turboprop research model. These results were generated by the latest version of the TranAir full potential code, which solves for transonic flow over complex configurations. TranAir embeds a surface paneled geometry definition in a uniform rectangular flow field grid, thus avoiding the use of surface conforming grids, and decoupling the grid generation process from the definition of the configuration. The new version of the code locally refines the uniform grid near the surface of the geometry, based on local panel size and/or user input. This method distributes the flow field grid points much more efficiently than the previous version of the code, which solved for a grid that was uniform everywhere in the flow field. TranAir results are presented for the three configurations and are compared with wind tunnel data.

  18. An Empirical Analysis of an Alternative Configuration of the Academic Motivation Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Kenneth J.; Davy, Jeanette A.; Rosenberg, Donald L.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine an alternative configuration of the Academic Motivation Scale (AMS), a psychometric instrument used as a measure of academic motivation in various academic environments. The analyses utilised data from a convenience sample of 2354 business students, broken into two random subsamples of 1177 cases.…

  19. Heat Transfer Retardation at Elevated Temperatures. Phase I. Analysis of Heat Transfer Retardation Configurations and Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    aluminum foil (0.002 in. thick). The other configuration tested was formed with alternate layers of an insulating paper (" Fiberfrax " paper, which has...because " Fiberfrax " has a density of about 15 Ibm/ft3 , as compared to the Dynaquartz density of 4 to 7 lbm/ft 3 depending on the compaction. Thus the

  20. Analysis of high-speed growth of silicon sheet in inclined-meniscus configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, P. D.; Brown, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    The study of high speed growth of silicon sheet in inclined-meniscus configurations is discussed. It was concluded that the maximum growth rates in vertical and inclined growth are set by thermal-capillary limits. Also, the melt/crystal interface was determined to be flat. And, vertical growth is qualitatively modelled by one dimensional heat transfer.

  1. Transonic perturbation analysis of wing-fuselage-nacelle-pylon configurations with powered jet exhausts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wai, J. C.; Sun, C. C.; Yoshihara, H.

    1982-01-01

    A method using a transonic small disturbance code with successive line over-relaxation is described for treating wing/fuselage configurations with a nacelle/pylon/powered jet. Examples illustrating its use for the NASA transport research model are given. Reasonable test/theory comparisons were obtained.

  2. Analysis of HIF-1 inhibition by manassantin A and analogues with modified tetrahydrofuran configurations

    PubMed Central

    Kasper, Amanda C.; Moon, Eui Jung; Hu, Xiangqian; Park, Yongho; Wooten, Ceshea M.; Kim, Hyoungsu; Yang, Weitao; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Hong, Jiyong

    2009-01-01

    We have shown that manassantin A downregulated the HIF-1α expression and inhibited the secretion of VEGF. We have also demonstrated that the 2,3-cis-3,4-trans-4,5-cis-configuration of the tetrahydrofuran is critical to the HIF-1 inhibition of manassantin A. PMID:19423348

  3. Analysis of HIF-1 inhibition by manassantin A and analogues with modified tetrahydrofuran configurations.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Amanda C; Moon, Eui Jung; Hu, Xiangqian; Park, Yongho; Wooten, Ceshea M; Kim, Hyoungsu; Yang, Weitao; Dewhirst, Mark W; Hong, Jiyong

    2009-07-15

    We have shown that manassantin A downregulated the HIF-1alpha expression and inhibited the secretion of VEGF. We have also demonstrated that the 2,3-cis-3,4-trans-4,5-cis-configuration of the tetrahydrofuran is critical to the HIF-1 inhibition of manassantin A.

  4. Experimental study of the lift and drag characteristics of a cascade of flat plates in a configuration of interest for tidal energy converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedoul, Faical; Parras, Luis; Del Pino, Carlos; Fernandez-Feria, Ramon

    2012-11-01

    Wind tunnel experiments are conducted for the flow around both a single flat plate and a cascade of three parallel flat plates at different angles of incidence to compare their lift and drag coefficients in a range of Reynolds number about 105, and for two values of the aspect ratio of the flat plates. The selected cascade configuration is of interest for a particular type of tidal energy converter. The lift and drag characteristics of the central plate in the cascade are compared to those of the isolated plate, finding that there exist an angle of incidence, which depends on the Reynolds number and the aspect ratio, above which the effective lift of the plate in the cascade becomes larger than that of an isolated plate. These experimental results, which are also analyzed in the light of theoretical predictions, are used as a guide for the design of the optimum configuration of the cascade which extracts the maximum power from a tidal current for a given value of the Reynolds number. Supported by the Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovacion (Spain) Grant no. ENE2010-16851.

  5. Critical assessment of precracked specimen configuration and experimental test variables for stress corrosion testing of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domack, M. S.

    1985-01-01

    A research program was conducted to critically assess the effects of precracked specimen configuration, stress intensity solutions, compliance relationships and other experimental test variables for stress corrosion testing of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy plate. Modified compact and double beam wedge-loaded specimens were tested and analyzed to determine the threshold stress intensity factor and stress corrosion crack growth rate. Stress intensity solutions and experimentally determined compliance relationships were developed and compared with other solutions available in the literature. Crack growth data suggests that more effective crack length measurement techniques are necessary to better characterize stress corrosion crack growth. Final load determined by specimen reloading and by compliance did not correlate well, and was considered a major source of interlaboratory variability. Test duration must be determined systematically, accounting for crack length measurement resolution, time for crack arrest, and experimental interferences. This work was conducted as part of a round robin program sponsored by ASTM committees G1.06 and E24.04 to develop a standard test method for stress corrosion testing using precracked specimens.

  6. Theoretical and experimental pressure distributions for a 71.2 degree swept arrow-wing configuration at subsonic, transonic, and supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bobbitt, P. J.; Manro, M. E.

    1976-01-01

    A wind-tunnel test of an arrow-wing body configuration consisting of flat and twisted wings, as well as a variety of leading- and trailing-edge control-surface deflections, was conducted at Mach numbers from 0.40 to 2.50 to provide an experimental data base for comparison with theoretical methods. Theory-to-experiment comparisons of detailed pressure distributions were made using current state-of-the-art and newly developed attached- and separated-flow methods. Conditions were delineated under which these theories provide accurate basic and incremental aeroelastic loads predictions. Current state-of-the-art linear and nonlinear attached-flow methods were adequate only at small-angle-of-attack cruise conditions. Of the several separated-vortex methods evaluated, only the one utilizing a combination of linear source and quadratically varying doublet panels showed promise of yielding accurate loads distributions at moderate to large angles of attack.

  7. NREL Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Experimental Data Overview and Analysis: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Oyague, F.; Gorman, D.; Sheng, S.

    2010-05-01

    Most turbines in the market today follow a modular configuration comprised of a main shaft, gearbox, high speed shaft, and generator. The gearbox has the important task of increasing the slow rotor speeds to meet the electromechanical requirements of the electromechanical. These gearboxes are commonly composed of a planetary stage and several parallel shaft stages. The planetary, or epicyclical, design of the gearbox is a feature of the design that has many advantages compared to the traditional parallel shaft arrangement. Among these are that higher gear ratios can be achieved in a single stage, they are capable to carrying higher loads, and they require less space than the traditional parallel shaft arrangement. For this reason, planetary gearboxes they are commonly used in the first stage of the wind turbine gearboxes. However, planetary stages are more complex than the typical parallel shaft arrangement, and can be affected by deflection in the planet carrier, annulus deformations and bearing clearances. Unanticipated levels of these motions can reduce their life expectancy. This paper gives a brief overview of a subset of the experimental efforts, data, and analysis of the GRC project focusing on the planet carrier deformation.

  8. Module Configuration

    DOEpatents

    Oweis, Salah; D'Ussel, Louis; Chagnon, Guy; Zuhowski, Michael; Sack, Tim; Laucournet, Gaullume; Jackson, Edward J.

    2002-06-04

    A stand alone battery module including: (a) a mechanical configuration; (b) a thermal management configuration; (c) an electrical connection configuration; and (d) an electronics configuration. Such a module is fully interchangeable in a battery pack assembly, mechanically, from the thermal management point of view, and electrically. With the same hardware, the module can accommodate different cell sizes and, therefore, can easily have different capacities. The module structure is designed to accommodate the electronics monitoring, protection, and printed wiring assembly boards (PWAs), as well as to allow airflow through the module. A plurality of modules may easily be connected together to form a battery pack. The parts of the module are designed to facilitate their manufacture and assembly.

  9. Aerothermal loads analysis for high speed flow over a quilted surface configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, G. C.; Smith, R. E.

    1984-08-01

    Attention is given to hypersonic laminar flow over a quilted surface configuration that simulates an array of Space Shuttle Thermal Protection System panels bowed in a spherical shape as a result of thermal gradient through the panel thickness. Pressure and heating loads to the surface are determined. The flow field over the configuration was mathematically modeled by means of time-dependent, three-dimensional conservation of mass, momentum, and energy equations. A boundary mapping technique was then used to obtain a rectangular, parallel piped computational domain, and an explicit MacCormack (1972) explicit time-split predictor corrector finite difference algorithm was used to obtain steady state solutions. Total integrated heating loads vary linearly with bowed height when this value does not exceed the local boundary layer thickness.

  10. Pitch difference and belt tooth configuration effect on load distribution of timing belt using FEM analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, Takanao; Furukawa, Yoshihisa; Tomono, Kiyohisa; Takahashi, Hideaki

    1996-09-01

    A timing belt used for an automotive engine`s camshaft consists of a facing fabric, elastoeric body and glass fiber cords. These materials show significant non-linear characteristics. Therefore, a model of the timing belt was analyzed using ABAQUS (a general non-linear finite element program). As a result, the mechanism that generates the belt load distribution was successfully confirmed by calculation. It was found that the pitch difference existing between the timing belt and pulley, and belt tooth configuration both have a large affect on load distribution of toothed belts. This paper reports the development of an analytical model which shows the effects of pitch difference and pulley tooth configuration on belt contact pressure.

  11. Radiation analysis of various vehicle and payload configurations for the reusable nuclear shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preeg, W. E.

    1972-01-01

    Radiation analyses were performed and shielding weight requirements were estimated for various candidate vehicle and payload configurations for use with the reusable nuclear shuttle. The analyses included both point kernel and Monte Carlo approaches. The effects on reduced shield weight were determined for propellant ranks with pointed conical tank bottoms and for one case of a cluster of small tanks. This later case, however, had an arrangement which had no center tank in the upper tier of tanks. This effect negated most of the gain of going to the smaller tanks. A range of shield weights is presented for various light and heavy manned payload configurations when used in conjunction with a single liquid hydrogen propellant tank, 33 ft in diameter with a 15 deg conical tank bottom.

  12. Analysis of Radiant Cooling System Configurations Integrated with Cooling Tower for Different Indian Climatic Zones

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, Jyotirmay; Bhandari, Mahabir S; Jain, Robin; Srivastava, Prateek

    2016-01-01

    Radiant cooling system has proven to be a low energy consumption system for building cooling needs. This study describes the use of cooling tower in radiant cooling system to improve the overall system efficiency. A comprehensive simulation feasibility study of the application of cooling tower in radiant cooling system was performed for the fifteen cities in different climatic zones of India. It was found that in summer, the wet bulb temperature (WBT) of the different climatic zones except warm-humid is suitable for the integration of cooling tower with radiant cooling system. In these climates, cooling tower can provide on average 24 C to 27 C water In order to achieve the energy saving potential, three different configurations of radiant cooling system have been compared in terms of energy consumption. The different configurations of the radiant cooling system integrated with cooling tower are: (1) provide chilled water to the floor, wall and ceiling mounted tubular installation. (2) provide chilled water to the wall and ceiling mounted tabular installation. In this arrangement a separate chiller has also been used to provide chilled water at 16 C to the floor mounted tubular installation. (3) provide chilled water to the wall mounted tabular installation and a separate chiller is used to provide chilled water at 16 C to the floor and ceiling mounted tabular installation. A dedicated outdoor air system is also coupled for dehumidification and ventilation in all three configurations. A conventional all-air system was simulated as a baseline to compare these configurations for assessing the energy saving potential.

  13. Configuration Analysis of the ERS Points in Large-Volume Metrology System.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhangjun; Yu, Cijun; Li, Jiangxiong; Ke, Yinglin

    2015-09-22

    In aircraft assembly, multiple laser trackers are used simultaneously to measure large-scale aircraft components. To combine the independent measurements, the transformation matrices between the laser trackers' coordinate systems and the assembly coordinate system are calculated, by measuring the enhanced referring system (ERS) points. This article aims to understand the influence of the configuration of the ERS points that affect the transformation matrix errors, and then optimize the deployment of the ERS points to reduce the transformation matrix errors. To optimize the deployment of the ERS points, an explicit model is derived to estimate the transformation matrix errors. The estimation model is verified by the experiment implemented in the factory floor. Based on the proposed model, a group of sensitivity coefficients are derived to evaluate the quality of the configuration of the ERS points, and then several typical configurations of the ERS points are analyzed in detail with the sensitivity coefficients. Finally general guidance is established to instruct the deployment of the ERS points in the aspects of the layout, the volume size and the number of the ERS points, as well as the position and orientation of the assembly coordinate system.

  14. A finite element analysis of configurational stability and finite growth of buckling driven delamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Karl-Fredrik; Giannakopoulos, Antonios E.

    1995-12-01

    A theoretical study of a budding-driven, initially circular, delaminated thin film loaded in equal bi-axial compression is presented. The main objective of this investigation is to study the configurational instability phenomena frequently observed for thin debonded coatings loaded in compression. The analyses are done with the aid of a kinematically non-linear finite element formulation of the plate problem to model the film, supplemented with a method to account automatically for the redistribution of the stress field as the shape of the advancing delamination is changing. By this procedure, not only the shape of the delaminated film but also the stability properties of the growth follow automatically. The configurational stability properties of the initially circular delamination are assessed by slightly perturbing the delamination front. The configurational instability is strongly related to the fracture mode dependence in the crack growth law. Finite growth of the buckling-driven thin film was also investigated. A load perturbation was employed as well as a front perturbation. It was found that the two perturbation methods can result in quite different shapes of the advancing buckled thin film. A few examples of extensive growth are also presented, and in some cases it was observed that a part of the delamination front may start tunnelling in the interface.

  15. Parametric Flutter Analysis of the TCA Configuration and Recommendation for FFM Design and Scaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Myles; Lenkey, Peter

    1997-01-01

    The current HSR Aeroelasticity plan to design, build, and test a full span, free flying transonic flutter model in the TDT has many technical obstacles that must be overcome for a successful program. One technical obstacle is the determination of a suitable configuration and point in the sky to use in setting the scaling point for the ASE models program. Determining this configuration and point in the sky requires balancing several conflicting requirements, including model buildability, tunnel test safety, and the ability of the model to represent the flutter mechanisms of interest. As will be discussed in detail in subsequent sections, the current TCA design exhibits several flutter mechanisms of interest. It has been decided that the ASE models program will focus on the low frequency symmetric flutter mechanism, and will make no attempt to investigate high frequency flutter mechanisms. There are several reasons for this choice. First, it is believed that the high frequency flutter mechanisms are similar in nature to classical wing bending/torsion flutter, and therefore there is more confidence that this mechanism can be predicted using current techniques. The low frequency mode, on the other hand, is a highly coupled mechanism involving wing, body, tail, and engine motion which may be very difficult to predict. Second, the high frequency flutter modes result in very small weight penalties (several hundred pounds), while suppression of the low frequency mechanism inside the flight envelope causes thousands of pounds to be added to the structure. In order to successfully test the low frequency flutter mode of interest, a suitable starting configuration and point in the sky must be identified. The configuration and point in the sky must result in a wind tunnel model that (1) represents the low-frequency wing/body/engine/empennage flutter mechanisms that are unique to HSCT configurations, (2) flutters at an acceptably low frequency in the tunnel, (3) flutters at an

  16. Biomechanical Analysis of a Pedicle Screw-Rod System with a Novel Cross-Link Configuration

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Masahito; Umebayashi, Daisuke; Haimoto, Shoichi; Yamamoto, Yu; Nishimura, Yusuke; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Study Design The strength effects of a pedicle screw-rod system supplemented with a novel cross-link configuration were biomechanically evaluated in porcine spines. Purpose To assess the biomechanical differences between a conventional cross-link pedicle screw-rod system versus a novel cross-link instrumentation, and to determine the effect of the cross-links. Overview of Literature Transverse cross-link systems affect torsional rigidity, but are thought to have little impact on the sagittal motion of spinal constructs. We tested the strength effects in pullout and flexion-compression tests of novel cross-link pedicle screw constructs using porcine thoracic and lumbar vertebrae. Methods Five matched thoracic and lumbar vertebral segments from 15 porcine spines were instrumented with 5.0-mm pedicle screws, which were then connected with 6.0-mm rods after partial corpectomy in the middle vertebral body. The forces required for construct failure in pullout and flexion-compression tests were examined in a randomized manner for three different cross-link configurations: un-cross-link control, conventional cross-link, and cross-link passing through the base of the spinous process. Statistical comparisons of strength data were analyzed using Student's t-tests. Results The spinous process group required a significantly greater pullout force for construct failure than the control group (p=0.036). No difference was found between the control and cross-link groups, or the cross-link and spinous process groups in pullout testing. In flexion-compression testing, the spinous processes group required significantly greater forces for construct failure than the control and cross-link groups (p<0.001 and p=0.003, respectively). However, there was no difference between the control and cross-link groups. Conclusions A novel cross-link configuration that features cross-link devices passing through the base of the spinous processes increased the mechanical resistance in pullout and

  17. Comparison of Experimental Data and Computations Fluid Dynamics Analysis for a Three Dimensional Linear Plug Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, J. H.; Hagemann, G.; Immich, H.

    2003-01-01

    A three dimensional linear plug nozzle of area ratio 12.79 was designed by EADS Space Transportation (former Astrium Space Infrastructure). The nozzle was tested within the German National Technology Program 'LION' in a cold air wind tunnel by TU Dresden. The experimental hardware and test conditions are described. Experimental data was obtained for the nozzle without plug side wall fences at a nozzle pressure ratio of 116 and then with plug side wall fences at NPR 110. Schlieren images were recorded and axial profiles of plug wall static pressures were measured at several spanwise locations and on the plug base. Detailed CFD analysis was performed for these nozzle configurations at NPR 116 by NASA MSFC. The CFD exhibits good agreement with the experimental data. A detailed comparison of the CFD results and the experimental plug wall pressure data are given. Comparisons are made for both the without and with plug side wall fence configurations. Numerical results for density gradient are compared to experimental Schlieren images. Experimental nozzle thrust efficiencies are calculated based on the CFD results. The CFD results are used to illustrate the plug nozzle fluid dynamics. The effect of the plug side wall is emphasized.

  18. Comparison of Experimental Data and Computations Fluid Dynamics Analysis for a Three Dimensional Linear Plug Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, J. H.; Hagemann, G.; Immich, H.

    2003-01-01

    A three dimensional linear plug nozzle of area ratio 12.79 was designed by Astrium. The nozzle was tested within the German National Technology Program LION in a cold air wind tunnel by TU Dresden. The experimental hardware and test conditions are described. Experimental data was obtained for the nozzle without plug side wall fences and then with plug side wall fences. Experimental data for two nozzle pressure ratios (NPR), 116 and 45, are presented for the without fence and with fence configurations. Schlieren images of both NPR were recorded. Axial profiles of plug wall static pressures were measured at several spanwise locations and on the plug base. Detailed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed for these nozzle configurations by NASA MSFC. The CFD exhibits good agreement with the experimental data. A detailed comparison of the CFD results and the experimental plug wall pressure data is given for four test conditions; at both NPRs, without and with plug side wall fences. Numerical schlieren images are compared to experimental schlieren images. Nozzle thrust efficiencies are calculated from the CFD results. The CFD results are used to illustrate the plug nozzle fluid dynamics for all four test conditions. The effect of the plug side wall fences at both NPRs is emphasized.

  19. The Analysis and Design of Two-Element Airfoil Configurations in Transonic Flow.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    Experimental Surface Pressure Distribution: NACA 64A010 Airfoil With 18A Slat; M_,z 0.7, a = 6", Re = 7.8 x 106• 26 14 Computed and Experimental Surface...separated flow. In Fig. 13, the computed pressure distribution and the experimental data (Ref 17) for an NACA 64A010 airfoil with a slat at M = 0.7, 0 60 and...T) Fig. 13 Computed and Experimental Surface Pressure Distributions: NACA 64A010 Airfoil With 18A Slat; M = 0.7. c = 60, Re = 7.8 x 10 26 II The

  20. Transonic Free-To-Roll Analysis of the F/A-18E and F-35 Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, D. Bruce; McConnell, Jeffrey K.; Brandon, Jay M.; Hall, Robert M.

    2004-01-01

    The free-to-roll technique is used as a tool for predicting areas of uncommanded lateral motions. Recently, the NASA/Navy/Air Force Abrupt Wing Stall Program extended the use of this technique to the transonic speed regime. Using this technique, this paper evaluates various wing configurations on the pre-production F/A-18E aircraft and the Joint Strike Fighter (F-35) aircraft. The configurations investigated include leading and trailing edge flap deflections, fences, leading edge flap gap seals, and vortex generators. These tests were conducted in the NASA Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel. The analysis used a modification of a figure-of-merit developed during the Abrupt Wing Stall Program to discern configuration effects. The results showed how the figure-of-merit can be used to schedule wing flap deflections to avoid areas of uncommanded lateral motion. The analysis also used both static and dynamic wind tunnel data to provide insight into the uncommanded lateral behavior. The dynamic data was extracted from the time history data using parameter identification techniques. In general, modifications to the pre-production F/A-18E resulted in shifts in angle-of-attack where uncommanded lateral activity occurred. Sealing the gap between the inboard and outboard leading-edge flaps on the Navy version of the F-35 eliminated uncommanded lateral activity or delayed the activity to a higher angle-of-attack.

  1. Performance Analysis of Two Early NACA High Speed Propellers with Application to Civil Tiltrotor Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Franklin D.

    1996-01-01

    The helicopter industry is vigorously pursuing development of civil tiltrotors. One key to efficient high speed performance of this rotorcraft is prop-rotor performance. Of equal, if not greater, importance is assurance that the flight envelope is free of aeroelastic instabilities well beyond currently envisioned cuise speeds. This later condition requires study at helical tip Match numbers well in excess of 1.0. Two 1940's 'supersonic' propeller experiments conducted by NACA have provided an immensely valuable data bank with which to study prop-rotor behavior at transonic and supersonic helical tip Mach numbers. Very accurate 'blades alone' data were obtained by using nearly an infinite hub. Tabulated data were recreated from the many thrust and power figures and are included in two Appendices to this report. This data set is exceptionally well suited to re-evaluating classical blade element theories as well as evolving computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analyses. A limited comparison of one propeller's experimental results to a modem rotorcraft CFD code is made. This code, referred to as TURNS, gives very encouraging results. Detailed analysis of the performance data from both propellers is provided in Appendix A. This appendix quantifies the minimum power required to produce usable prop-rotor thrust. The dependence of minimum profile power on Reynolds number is quantified. First order compressibility power losses are quantified as well and a first approximation to design air-foil thickness ratio to avoid compressibility losses is provided. Appendix A's results are applied to study high speed civil tiltrotor cruise performance. Predicted tiltrotor performance is compared to two turboprop commercial transports. The comparison shows that there is no fundamental aerodynamic reason why the rotorcraft industry could not develop civil tiltrotor aircraft which have competitive cruise performance with today's regional, turboprop airlines. Recommendations for future study

  2. An arbitrary grid CFD algorithm for configuration aerodynamics analysis. Volume 1: Theory and validations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.; Iannelli, G. S.; Manhardt, Paul D.; Orzechowski, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    This report documents the user input and output data requirements for the FEMNAS finite element Navier-Stokes code for real-gas simulations of external aerodynamics flowfields. This code was developed for the configuration aerodynamics branch of NASA ARC, under SBIR Phase 2 contract NAS2-124568 by Computational Mechanics Corporation (COMCO). This report is in two volumes. Volume 1 contains the theory for the derived finite element algorithm and describes the test cases used to validate the computer program described in the Volume 2 user guide.

  3. Development and benefit analysis of a sector design algorithm for terminal dynamic airspace configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciandra, Vincent

    The National Airspace System (NAS) is the vast network of systems enabling safe and efficient air travel in the United States. It consists of a set of static sectors, each controlled by one or more air traffic controllers. Air traffic control is tasked with ensuring that all flights can depart and arrive on time and in a safe and efficient matter. However, skyrocketing demand will only increase the stress on an already inefficient system, causing massive delays. The current, static configuration of the NAS cannot possibly handle the future demand on the system safely and efficiently, especially since it is projected to triple by 2025. To overcome these issues, the Next Generation of Air Transportation System (NextGen) is being enacted to increase the flexibility of the NAS. A major objective of NextGen is to implement Adaptable Dynamic Airspace Configuration (ADAC) which will dynamically allocate the sectors to best fit the traffic in the area. Dynamically allocating sectors will allow resources such as controllers to be better distributed to meet traffic demands. Currently, most DAC research has involved the en route airspace. This leaves the terminal airspace, which accounts for a large amount of the overall NAS complexity, in need of work. Using a combination of methods used in en route sectorization, this thesis has developed an algorithm for the dynamic allocation of sectors in the terminal airspace. This algorithm will be evaluated using metrics common in the evaluation of dynamic density, which is adapted for the unique challenges of the terminal airspace, and used to measure workload on air traffic controllers. These metrics give a better view of the controller workload than the number of aircraft alone. By comparing the test results with sectors currently used in the NAS using real traffic data, the algorithm xv generated sectors can be quantitatively evaluated for improvement of the current sectorizations. This will be accomplished by testing the

  4. An arbitrary grid CFD algorithm for configuration aerodynamics analysis. Volume 2: FEMNAS user guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manhardt, Paul D.; Orzechowski, J. A.; Baker, A. J.

    1992-01-01

    This report documents the user input and output data requirements for the FEMNAS finite element Navier-Stokes code for real-gas simulations of external aerodynamics flowfields. This code was developed for the configuration aerodynamics branch of NASA ARC, under SBIR Phase 2 contract NAS2-124568 by Computational Mechanics Corporation (COMCO). This report is in two volumes. Volume 1 contains the theory for the derived finite element algorithm and describes the test cases used to validate the computer program described in the Volume 2 user guide.

  5. Experimental aerodynamic characteristics of a generic hypersonic accelerator configuration at Mach numbers 1.5 and 2.0. [conducted in the Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Ira J.; Covell, Peter F.; Forrest, Dana K.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the static longitudinal and lateral-directional aerodynamic characteristics of a generic hypersonic research vehicle was conducted in the Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT). A parametric study was performed to determine the interference effects of various model components. Configuration variables included delta and trapezoidal canards; large and small centerline-mounted vertical tails, along with a set of wing-mounted vertical tails; and a set of model noses with different degrees of bluntness. Wing position was varied by changing the longitudinal location and the incidence angle. The test Mach numbers were 1.5 and 2.0 at Reynolds numbers of 1 x 10(exp 6) per foot, 2 x 10(exp 6) per foot, and 4 x 10(exp 6) per foot. Angle of attack was varied from -4 degrees to 27 degrees, and sideslip angle was varied from -8 degrees to 8 degrees. Generally, the effect of Reynolds number did not deviate from conventional trends. The longitudinal stability and lift-curve slope decreased with increasing Mach number. As the wing was shifted rearward, the lift-curve slope decreased and the longitudinal stability increased. Also, the wing-mounted vertical tails resulted in a more longitudinally stable configuration. In general, the lift-drag ratio was not significantly affected by vertical-tail arrangement. The best lateral-directional stability was achieved with the large centerline-mounted tail, although the wing-mounted vertical tails exhibited the most favorable characteristics at the higher angles of attack.

  6. Numerical and Experimental Study of Mixing Properties of Gaseous Fuels Jets Including Hydrogen and Methane Into the non-Swirl Main Flow in a Premixer Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, Amin

    The mixing of fuel and air has a significant impact on overall operation efficiency and emissions performance of combustion systems, especially in lean combustion applications. As a result, developing an understanding of the processes associated with the fuel/air mixing is important. In parallel with the evolution of lean combustion, a new generation of fuels is emerging as an alternative to conventional fuels. Thus, it is desirable to study the mixing properties of different fuels from conventional resources, such as methane, as well as from renewable resources, such as hydrogen. One tool that is available to study mixing in complex (e.g., turbulent and elliptic) flows is computational fluid dynamics (CFD). In the present work, mixing of hydrogen and methane into air, for example, is simulated using various CFD approaches. Fuel is injected either co-flowing to the air flow ("axial injection") or perpendicular to the air flow ("radial injection"). The quality of the simulations is evaluated by comparing the numerical results with experimental measurements. Qualitative and quantitative comparisons are used to evaluate the relative accuracy of different CFD approaches to simulate the mixing characteristics. Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulent models are utilized to model all the cases as steady turbulent models. Moreover, unsteady turbulent models, such as Unsteady RANS, and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) are used to provide information about unsteady features in selected cases. The sensitivity of numerical predictions to different RANS turbulence models as well as to different turbulent Schmidt numbers are explored. The results indicate more sensitivity to turbulence models for radial injection configurations. However, for the axial configuration, more sensitivity to Sct is observed. In general, the RSM turbulence model with Sc t=0.7 provides the most promising predictions for various combination of different fuels and injection types.

  7. Determination of the absolute configuration of (+)-neopentyl-1-d alcohol by neutron and x-ray diffraction analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, H.S.H.; Stevens, R.C.; Bau, R. ); Mosher, H.S. ); Koetzle, T.F. )

    1994-12-20

    The absolute configuration of (+)-neopentyl-1-d alcohol, prepared by the reduction of 2,2-dimethylpropanol-1-d by actively fermenting yeast, has been determined to be S by neutron diffraction. The neutron study was carried out on the phthalate half ester of neopentyl-1-d alcohol, crystallized as its strychnine salt. The absolute configuration of the (-)-strychninium cation was first determined by an x-ray anomalous dispersion study of its iodide salt. The chiral skeleton of strychnine then served as a reference from which the absolute configuration of the -O-CHD-C(CH[sub 3])[sub 3] group of neopentyl phthalate was determined. Difference Fourier maps calculated from the neutron data showed unambiguously that the -O-CHD-C(CH[sub 3])[sub 3] groups of both independent molecules in the unit cell had the S configuration. This work proves conclusively that the yeast system reduces aldehydes by delivering hydrogen to the re face of the carbonyl group. Crystallographic details: (-)-strychninium (+)-neopentyl-1-d phthalate, space group P2[sub 1] (monoclinic), a = 18.564(6) [angstrom], b = 7.713(2) [angstrom], c = 23.361(8) [angstrom], [beta] = 94.18(4)[degrees], V = 3336.0(5) [angstrom][sup 3], Z = 2 (T = 100 K). Final agreement factors are R(F) = 0.073 for 2768 reflections collected at room temperature (x-ray analysis) and R(F) = 0.144 for 960 reflections collected at 100 K (neutron analysis). 49 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. An Experimental Analysis of Another Privacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okouchi, Hiroto

    2006-01-01

    The present article discusses how events outside a subject's skin and not accessible to another subject but to an experimenter may contribute to experimental analyses of private events. Of 16 undergraduates, 8, referred to as instructors, first learned conditional discriminations (i.e., B1C1, B2C2, B3C3, and B4C4) in a standard matching-to-sample…

  9. Highly Efficient Design-of-Experiments Methods for Combining CFD Analysis and Experimental Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Bernhard H.; Haller, Harold S.

    2009-01-01

    It is the purpose of this study to examine the impact of "highly efficient" Design-of-Experiments (DOE) methods for combining sets of CFD generated analysis data with smaller sets of Experimental test data in order to accurately predict performance results where experimental test data were not obtained. The study examines the impact of micro-ramp flow control on the shock wave boundary layer (SWBL) interaction where a complete paired set of data exist from both CFD analysis and Experimental measurements By combining the complete set of CFD analysis data composed of fifteen (15) cases with a smaller subset of experimental test data containing four/five (4/5) cases, compound data sets (CFD/EXP) were generated which allows the prediction of the complete set of Experimental results No statistical difference were found to exist between the combined (CFD/EXP) generated data sets and the complete Experimental data set composed of fifteen (15) cases. The same optimal micro-ramp configuration was obtained using the (CFD/EXP) generated data as obtained with the complete set of Experimental data, and the DOE response surfaces generated by the two data sets were also not statistically different.

  10. Geometric analysis characterizes molecular rigidity in generic and non-generic protein configurations

    PubMed Central

    Budday, Dominik; Leyendecker, Sigrid; van den Bedem, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Proteins operate and interact with partners by dynamically exchanging between functional substates of a conformational ensemble on a rugged free energy landscape. Understanding how these substates are linked by coordinated, collective motions requires exploring a high-dimensional space, which remains a tremendous challenge. While molecular dynamics simulations can provide atomically detailed insight into the dynamics, computational demands to adequately sample conformational ensembles of large biomolecules and their complexes often require tremendous resources. Kinematic models can provide high-level insights into conformational ensembles and molecular rigidity beyond the reach of molecular dynamics by reducing the dimensionality of the search space. Here, we model a protein as a kinematic linkage and present a new geometric method to characterize molecular rigidity from the constraint manifold Q and its tangent space Q at the current configuration q. In contrast to methods based on combinatorial constraint counting, our method is valid for both generic and non-generic, e.g., singular configurations. Importantly, our geometric approach provides an explicit basis for collective motions along floppy modes, resulting in an efficient procedure to probe conformational space. An atomically detailed structural characterization of coordinated, collective motions would allow us to engineer or allosterically modulate biomolecules by selectively stabilizing conformations that enhance or inhibit function with broad implications for human health. PMID:26213417

  11. Geometric analysis characterizes molecular rigidity in generic and non-generic protein configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budday, Dominik; Leyendecker, Sigrid; van den Bedem, Henry

    2015-10-01

    Proteins operate and interact with partners by dynamically exchanging between functional substates of a conformational ensemble on a rugged free energy landscape. Understanding how these substates are linked by coordinated, collective motions requires exploring a high-dimensional space, which remains a tremendous challenge. While molecular dynamics simulations can provide atomically detailed insight into the dynamics, computational demands to adequately sample conformational ensembles of large biomolecules and their complexes often require tremendous resources. Kinematic models can provide high-level insights into conformational ensembles and molecular rigidity beyond the reach of molecular dynamics by reducing the dimensionality of the search space. Here, we model a protein as a kinematic linkage and present a new geometric method to characterize molecular rigidity from the constraint manifold Q and its tangent space Tq Q at the current configuration q. In contrast to methods based on combinatorial constraint counting, our method is valid for both generic and non-generic, e.g., singular configurations. Importantly, our geometric approach provides an explicit basis for collective motions along floppy modes, resulting in an efficient procedure to probe conformational space. An atomically detailed structural characterization of coordinated, collective motions would allow us to engineer or allosterically modulate biomolecules by selectively stabilizing conformations that enhance or inhibit function with broad implications for human health.

  12. SCALE-4 Analysis of LaSalle Unit 1 BWR Commercial Reactor Critical Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Gauld, I.C.

    2000-03-01

    Five commercial reactor criticals (CRCs) for the LaSalle Unit 1 boiling-water reactor have been analyzed using KENO V.a, the Monte Carlo criticality code of the SCALE 4 code system. The irradiated fuel assembly isotopics for the criticality analyses were provided by the Waste Package Design team at the Yucca Mountain Project in the US, who performed the depletion calculations using the SAS2H sequence of SCALE 4. The reactor critical measurements involved two beginning-of-cycle and three middle-of-cycle configurations. The CRCs involved relatively low-cycle burnups, and therefore contained a relatively high gadolinium poison content in the reactor assemblies. This report summarizes the data and methods used in analyzing the critical configurations and assesses the sensitivity of the results to some of the modeling approximations used to represent the gadolinium poison distribution within the assemblies. The KENO V.a calculations, performed using the SCALE 44GROUPNDF5 ENDF/B-V cross-section library, yield predicted k{sub eff} values within about 1% {Delta}k/k relative to reactor measurements for the five CRCs using general 8-pin and 9-pin heterogeneous gadolinium poison pin assembly models.

  13. SCALE-4 Analysis of LaSalle Unit 1 BWR Commercial Reactor Critical Configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Gauld, I.C.

    2000-03-16

    Five commercial reactor criticals (CRCs) for the LaSalle Unit 1 boiling-water reactor have been analyzed using KENO V.a, the Monte Carlo criticality code of the SCALE 4 code system. The irradiated fuel assembly isotopics for the criticality analyses were provided by the Waste Package Design team at the Yucca Mountain Project in the United States, who performed the depletion calculations using the SAS2H sequence of SCALE 4. The reactor critical measurements involved two beginning-of-cycle and three middle-of-cycle configurations. The CRCs involved relatively low-cycle burnups, and therefore contained a relatively high gadolinium poison content in the reactor assemblies. This report summarizes the data and methods used in analyzing the critical configurations and assesses the sensitivity of the results to some of the modeling approximations used to represent the gadolinium poison distribution within the assemblies. The KENO V.a calculations, performed using the SCALE 44GROUPNDF5 ENDF/B-V cross-section library, yield predicted k{sub eff} values within about 1% {Delta}k/k relative to reactor measurements for the five CRCs using general 8-pin and 9-pin heterogeneous gadolinium poison pin assembly models.

  14. Finite Element Analysis of Composite Joint Configurations with Gaps and Overlaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the current study is to identify scenarios for which thermal and moisture effects become significant in the loading of a composite structure. In the current work, a simple configuration was defined, and material properties were selected. A Fortran routine was created to automate the mesh generation process. The routine was used to create the models for the initial mesh refinement study. A combination of element length and width suitable for further studies was identified. Also, the effect of the overlap length and gap length on computed shear and through-thickness stresses along the bondline of the joints was studied for the mechanical load case. Further, the influence of neighboring gaps and overlaps on these joint stresses was studied and was found to be negligible. The results suggest that for an initial study it is sufficient to focus on one configuration with fixed overlap and gap lengths to study the effects of mechanical, thermal and moisture loading and combinations thereof on computed joint stresses

  15. Thermomechanical analysis of solid breeders in sphere-pac, plate, and pellet configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, J.P.; Ghoniem, N.M.

    1986-02-01

    The first configuration studied is called sphere-pac. It features small breeder spheres of three different diameters, thus allowing efficient packing and minimal void fraction. The concept originated as an attempt to minimize thermal stresses in the breeder and improve the predictability of the breeder-structure interface heat conduction. In general the breeder is made as thin as possible, to maximize the breeding ratio, so the cladding's integrity will likely be the life-limiting issue of this concept. The third breeder configuration is in the form of pellets cladded by steel tubes. The major thermomechanical issue of the pin-type designs is cracking, which would impair the thermal performance of the blanket. Fortunately, the pins can be sized to prevent cracking under normal operation. In this report we have treated each blanket generically, dealing with basic issues rather than design specifics. Our basic philosophy is to avoid cracking of the breeder if at all possible. It can be argued that cracking could be allowed, but this would sacrifice predictability of the blanket thermal performance and tritium release characteristics. Proper design can and should minimize breeder cracking.

  16. Analysis of the Capacity Potential of Current Day and Novel Configurations for New York's John F. Kennedy Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaab, Patricia; Tamburro, Ralph; Lee, Paul

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, a series of systems analysis studies were conducted on John F. Kennedy Airport in New York (NY) in a collaborative effort between NASA and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey (PANYNJ). This work was performed to build a deeper understanding of NY airspace and operations to determine the improvements possible through operational changes with tools currently available, and where new technology is required for additional improvement. The analysis was conducted using tool-based mathematical analyses, video inspection and evaluation using recorded arrival/departure/surface traffic captured by the Aerobahn tool (used by Kennedy Airport for surface metering), and aural data archives available publically through the web to inform the video segments. A discussion of impacts of trajectory and operational choices on capacity is presented, including runway configuration and usage (parallel, converging, crossing, shared, independent, staggered), arrival and departure route characteristics (fix sharing, merges, splits), and how compression of traffic is staged. The authorization in March of 2015 for New York to use reduced spacing under the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Wake Turbulence Recategorization (RECAT) also offers significant capacity benefit for New York airports when fully transitioned to the new spacing requirements, and the impact of these changes for New York is discussed. Arrival and departure capacity results are presented for each of the current day Kennedy Airport configurations. While the tools allow many variations of user-selected conditions, the analysis for these studies used arrival-priority, no-winds, additional safety buffer of 5% to the required minimum spacing, and a mix of traffic typical for Kennedy. Two additional "novel" configurations were evaluated. These configurations are of interest to Port Authority and to their airline customers, and are believed to offer near-term capacity benefit with minimal operational and

  17. Exploratory studies of the cruise performance of upper surface blown configurations: Program analysis and conclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braden, J. A.; Hancock, J. P.; Hackett, J. E.; Lyman, V.

    1979-01-01

    The experimental data encompassing surface pressure measurements, and wake surveys at static and wind-on conditions are analyzed. Cruise performance trends reflecting nacelle geometric variations, and nozzle operating conditions are presented. Details of the modeling process are included.

  18. Theoretical analysis of south-staring Beampark configurations for the TIRA system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flegel, S.; Letsch, K.; Krag, H.

    2015-09-01

    The tracking and imaging radar (TIRA) L-band radar of the Fraunhofer Institute for High Frequency Physics and Radar Techniques (FHR) in Wachtberg has been used since 1993 for the conduction of space debris measurement campaigns, called Beampark experiments (BPE). The results from BPEs are used for the regular validation of statistical debris models such as ESA's MASTER model. It is an experimental radar system which is employed among other things in the frame of BPEs. In these experiments, the line-of-sight (LOS) of the radar is fixed at a defined direction and measurements are taken for 24 h. The aim of these campaigns is to obtain statistical information on the state of the space debris environment in Low Earth Orbit. BPEs are typically conducted in mono-static east-staring mode. The aim of the current paper is to gain an overview of how the measurement results of mono-static BPEs using TIRA are influenced by the direction of the LOS with a focus on south-staring BPEs. The analysis is purely theoretical and employs ESA's Program for Radar and Optical Observation Forecasting (PROOF-2009). The paper starts out with a look at the range window as a function of the LOS elevation which is required to cover LEO altitudes up to 2000 km. This information is required to determine the minimum allowed pulse repetition interval necessary to obtain unambiguous range information. In a next step, 24 h BPEs are simulated covering azimuth angles between 0° and 360° and elevation angles between 10° and 90°. Looking at the number of crossings and detections at various object sizes, orbit types and debris sources allows an assessment of specific LOS orientations. Due to the relatively high latitude of the sensor at about 50° north, debris at low inclinations can only be detected if the radar's LOS is directed due south. The lower the LOS elevation is, the more objects on low inclination orbits will cross TIRA's beam. A low LOS elevation however requires an extended range window

  19. A High-Order Method Using Unstructured Grids for the Aeroacoustic Analysis of Realistic Aircraft Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkins, Harold L.; Lockard, David P.

    1999-01-01

    A method for the prediction of acoustic scatter from complex geometries is presented. The discontinuous Galerkin method provides a framework for the development of a high-order method using unstructured grids. The method's compact form contributes to its accuracy and efficiency, and makes the method well suited for distributed memory parallel computing platforms. Mesh refinement studies are presented to validate the expected convergence properties of the method, and to establish the absolute levels of a error one can expect at a given level of resolution. For a two-dimensional shear layer instability wave and for three-dimensional wave propagation, the method is demonstrated to be insensitive to mesh smoothness. Simulations of scatter from a two-dimensional slat configuration and a three-dimensional blended-wing-body demonstrate the capability of the method to efficiently treat realistic geometries.

  20. Electromagnetic Analysis in Time Domain in Various Configurations for Identification of Hydrocarbon Reservoirs: Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar Rodriguez, J. M.; Vargas Jiménez, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this research, various configurations of reservoirs were simulated using finite elements in 3D, in order to analyze the subsoil electromagnetic responses in the time domain. Apparent resistivity curves both early and late time and their respective sensitivities in detecting hydrocarbon reservoirs are found. The maximum sensitivity obtained in the early and late times was 55.72% and 49.32% respectively. The separation of 1km between the transmitter and receiver was used in the simulations, because at shorter distances problems were encountered in in determining the resistivity curves. In addition, it was determined that the current dipole transmitter must be over 800A • m to overcome the level of noise instrumental of the receptor coil.

  1. Performance analysis of dye solar cells with various nanoparticles-aggregates mesoscopic multilayer configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsudin, Adel Eskandar; Mohamed, Norani Muti

    2012-11-01

    Multilayers of different TiO2 aggregate-nanoparticles compositions were utilized to improve the sensitized TiO2 dye solar cells (DSC) by light confinement in the layer. Four different TiO2 aggregate-nanoparticle composite were integrated as the photoelectrode material of DSCs and their performance and physics were investigated. TiO2 pastes of different composition ratios films were screen-printed onto transparent conducting oxide (TCO) glass and assembled into test cells. I-V characterization was conducted using solar simulator. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was utilized in order to measure electron transport properties. Measurement for the quantum efficiency and spectral response of the DSCs were performed using incident photon-to-electron conversion efficiency (IPCE). DSC test cell with an optimized configuration recorded the highest overall power conversion efficiency of 4.22% under the irradiation of 100 mW/cm2 of AM 1.5 simulated sunlight.

  2. Computational optimization of the configuration of a spatially resolved spectroscopy sensor for milk analysis.

    PubMed

    Watté, Rodrigo; Aernouts, Ben; Van Beers, Robbe; Postelmans, Annelies; Saeys, Wouter

    2016-04-21

    A global optimizer has been developed, capable of computing the optimal configuration in a probe for spatially resolved reflectance spectroscopy (SRS). The main objective is to minimize the number of detection fibers, while maintaining an accurate estimation of both absorption and scattering profiles. Multiple fibers are necessary to robustify the estimation of optical properties against noise, which is typically present in the measured signals and influences the accuracy of the inverse estimation. The optimizer is based on a robust metamodel-based inverse estimation of the absorption coefficient and a reduced scattering coefficient from the acquired SRS signals. A genetic algorithm is used to evaluate the effect of the fiber placement on the performance of the inverse estimator to find the bulk optical properties of raw milk. The algorithm to find the optimal fiber placement was repeatedly executed for cases with a different number of detection fibers, ranging from 3 to 30. Afterwards, the optimal designs for each considered number of fibers were compared based on their performance in separating the absorption and scattering properties, and the significance of the differences was tested. A sensor configuration with 13 detection fibers was found to be the combination with the lowest number of fibers which provided an estimation performance which was not significantly worse than the one obtained with the best design (30 detection fibers). This design resulted in the root mean squared error of prediction (RMSEP) of 1.411 cm(-1) (R(2) = 0.965) for the estimation of the bulk absorption coefficient values, and 0.382 cm(-1) (R(2) = 0.996) for the reduced scattering coefficient values.

  3. Experimental Analysis of Team Performance: Methodological Developments and Research Results.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-06

    The effects of a cooperation contingency on behavior in a continuous three-person environment. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior , 25...J.V. Effects of a pairing contingency on behavior in a three-person programmed environment. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior , 1978

  4. CHALLENGES IN DATA INTENSIVE ANALYSIS AT SCIENTIFIC EXPERIMENTAL USER FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kleese van Dam, Kerstin; Li, Dongsheng; Miller, Stephen D.; Cobb, John W.; Green, Mark L.; Ruby, Catherine L.

    2011-12-31

    This chapter will discuss the critical data intensive analysis and visualiza-tion challenges faced by the experimental science community at large scale and laboratory based facilities. The chapter will further highlight initial solutions under development through community efforts and lay out perspectives for the future, such as the potential of more closely linked experimental and computational science approaches, methods to achieve real time analysis capabilities and the challenges and opportunities of data integration across experimental scales, levels of theory and varying techniques.

  5. Experimental and CFD-PBM Study of Oxygen Mass Transfer Coefficient in Different Impeller Configurations and Operational Conditions of a Two-Phase Partitioning Bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Moradkhani, Hamed; Izadkhah, Mir-Shahabeddin; Anarjan, Navideh

    2017-02-01

    In this work, gas dispersion in a two-phase partitioning bioreactor is analyzed by calculating volumetric oxygen mass transfer coefficient which is modeled using a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD), code FLUENT 6.2. Dispersed oxygen bubbles dynamics is based on standard "k-ε" Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) model. This paper describes a three-dimensional CFD model coupled with population balance equations (PBE) in order to get more confirming results of experimental measurements. Values of k L a are obtained using dynamic gassing-out method. Using the CFD simulation, the volumetric mass transfer coefficient is calculated based on Higbie's penetration theory. Characteristics of mass transfer coefficient are investigated for five configurations of impeller and three different aeration flow rates. The pitched six blade type, due to the creation of downward flow direction, leads to higher dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations, thereby, higher values of k L a compared with other impeller compositions. The magnitude of dissolved oxygen percentage in the aqueous phase has direct correlation with impeller speed and any increase of the aeration magnitude leads to faster saturation in shorter periods of time. Agitation speeds of 300 to 800 rpm are found to be the most effective rotational speeds for the mass transfer of oxygen in two-phase partitioning bioreactors (TPPB).

  6. Numerical and experimental study of the mesa configuration in high-voltage 4H-SiC PiN rectifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xiao-Chuan; Chen, Xi-Xi; Li, Cheng-Zhan; Shen, Hua-Jun; Zhang, Jin-Ping

    2016-08-01

    The effect of the mesa configuration on the reverse breakdown characteristic of a SiC PiN rectifier for high-voltage applications is analyzed in this study. Three geometrical parameters, i.e., mesa height, mesa angle and mesa bottom corner, are investigated by numerical simulation. The simulation results show that a deep mesa height, a small mesa angle and a smooth mesa bottom (without sub-trench) could contribute to a high breakdown voltage due to a smooth and uniform surface electric field distribution. Moreover, an optimized mesa structure without sub-trench (mesa height of 2.2 μm and mesa angle of 20°) is experimentally demonstrated. A maximum reverse blocking voltage of 4 kV and a forward voltage drop of 3.7 V at 100 A/cm2 are obtained from the fabricated diode with a 30-μm thick N- epi-layer, corresponding to 85% of the ideal parallel-plane value. The blocking characteristic as a function of the JTE dose is also discussed for the PiN rectifiers with and without interface charge. Project supported by the State Key Program of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61234006), the Open Foundation of the State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, China (Grant No. KFJJ201301), and the National Science and Technology Major Project of the Ministry of Science and Technology, China (Grant No. 2013ZX02305-003).

  7. Design, performance, and analysis of an aquifer thermal-energy-storage experiment using the doublet-well configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Molz, F.J.; Melville, J.G.; Gueven, O.; Parr, A.D.

    1983-09-01

    In March 1980 Auburn University began series of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) experiments using the doublet well configuration. The test site was in Mobile, Alabama. The objectives of the three experimental cycles were to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the ATES concept, to identify and resolve operational problems, and to acquire a data base for developing and testing mathematical models. Pre-injection tests were performed and analyses of hydraulic, geochemical, and thermodynamic data were completed. Three injection-storage-recovery cycles had injection volumes of 25,402 m/sup 3/, 58,010 m/sup 3/, and 58,680 m/sup 3/ and average injection temperatures of 58.5/sup 0/C, 81.0/sup 0/C, and 79.0/sup 0/C, respectively. The first cycle injection began in February 1981 and the third cycle recovery was completed in November 1982. Attributable to the doublet well configuration no clogging of injection wells occurred. Energy recovery percentages based on recovery volumes equal to the injection volumes were 56, 45, and 42%. Thermal convection effects were observed. Aquifer nonhomogeneity, not detectable using standard aquifer testing procedures, was shown to reduce recovery efficiency.

  8. Analysis of a high speed civil transport configuration at subsonic flow conditions using a Navier-Stokes solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lessard, Victor R.

    1993-01-01

    Computations of three dimensional vortical flows over a generic High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) configuration with an aspect ratio of 3.04 are performed using a thin-layer Navier-Stokes solver. The HSCT cruise configuration is modeled without leading or trailing edge flap deflections and without engine nacelles. The flow conditions, which correspond to tests done in the NASA Langley 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel (TPT), are a subsonic Mach number of 0.3 and Reynolds number of 4.4 million for a range-of-attack (-.23 deg to 17.78 deg). The effects of the farfield boundary location with respect to the body are investigated. The boundary layer is assumed turbulent and simulated using an algebraic turbulence model. The key features of the vortices and their interactions are captured. Grid distribution in the vortex regions is critical for predicting the correct induced lift. Computed forces and surface pressures compare reasonably well with the experimental TPT data.

  9. Experimental system and component performance analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Peterman, K.

    1984-10-01

    A prototype dye laser flow loop was constructed to flow test large power amplifiers in Building 169. The flow loop is designed to operate at supply pressures up to 900 psig and flow rates up to 250 GPM. During the initial startup of the flow loop experimental measurements were made to evaluate component and system performance. Three candidate dye flow loop pumps and three different pulsation dampeners were tested.

  10. Two MIS Analysis Methods: An Experimental Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Shouhong

    1996-01-01

    In China, 24 undergraduate business students applied data flow diagrams (DFD) to a mini-case, and 20 used object-oriented analysis (OOA). DFD seemed easier to learn, but after training, those using the OOA method for systems analysis made fewer errors. (SK)

  11. Low Boom Configuration Analysis with FUN3D Adjoint Simulation Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Off-body pressure, forces, and moments for the Gulfstream Low Boom Model are computed with a Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes solver coupled with the Spalart-Allmaras (SA) turbulence model. This is the first application of viscous output-based adaptation to reduce estimated discretization errors in off-body pressure for a wing body configuration. The output adaptation approach is compared to an a priori grid adaptation technique designed to resolve the signature on the centerline by stretching and aligning the grid to the freestream Mach angle. The output-based approach produced good predictions of centerline and off-centerline measurements. Eddy viscosity predicted by the SA turbulence model increased significantly with grid adaptation. Computed lift as a function of drag compares well with wind tunnel measurements for positive lift, but predicted lift, drag, and pitching moment as a function of angle of attack has significant differences from the measured data. The sensitivity of longitudinal forces and moment to grid refinement is much smaller than the differences between the computed and measured data.

  12. Mixed Waste Treatment Cost Analysis for a Range of GeoMelt Vitrification Process Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L. E.

    2002-02-27

    GeoMelt is a batch vitrification process used for contaminated site remediation and waste treatment. GeoMelt can be applied in several different configurations ranging from deep subsurface in situ treatment to aboveground batch plants. The process has been successfully used to treat a wide range of contaminated wastes and debris including: mixed low-level radioactive wastes; mixed transuranic wastes; polychlorinated biphenyls; pesticides; dioxins; and a range of heavy metals. Hypothetical cost estimates for the treatment of mixed low-level radioactive waste were prepared for the GeoMelt subsurface planar and in-container vitrification methods. The subsurface planar method involves in situ treatment and the in-container vitrification method involves treatment in an aboveground batch plant. The projected costs for the subsurface planar method range from $355-$461 per ton. These costs equate to 18-20 cents per pound. The projected cost for the in-container method is $1585 per ton. This cost equates to 80 cents per pound. These treatment costs are ten or more times lower than the treatment costs for alternative mixed waste treatment technologies according to a 1996 study by the US Department of Energy.

  13. Validation and Analysis of Numerical Results for a Two-Pass Trapezoidal Channel With Different Cooling Configurations of Trailing Edge.

    PubMed

    Siddique, Waseem; El-Gabry, Lamyaa; Shevchuk, Igor V; Fransson, Torsten H

    2013-01-01

    experimental data. Using the same turbulence model shows that the height of ribs used in the study is not suitable for inducing secondary flow. Also, the orthogonal rib does not strengthen the secondary flow rotational momentum. The comparison between the new designs for trailing edge shows that if pressure drop is acceptable, staggered arrangement is suitable for the outlet pass heat transfer. For the trailing edge wall, the thermal performance for the ribbed trailing edge only was found about 8% better than other configurations.

  14. A cost-benefit analysis of alternative device configurations for aviation-checked baggage security screening.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Sheldon H; Karnani, Tamana; Kobza, John E; Ritchie, Lynsey

    2006-04-01

    The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 have resulted in dramatic changes in aviation security. As of early 2003, an estimated 1,100 explosive detection systems (EDS) and 6,000 explosive trace detection machines (ETD) have been deployed to ensure 100% checked baggage screening at all commercial airports throughout the United States. The prohibitive costs associated with deploying and operating such devices is a serious issue for the Transportation Security Administration. This article evaluates the cost effectiveness of the explosive detection technologies currently deployed to screen checked baggage as well as new technologies that could be used in the future. Both single-device and two-device systems are considered. In particular, the expected annual direct cost of using these devices for 100% checked baggage screening under various scenarios is obtained and the tradeoffs between using single- and two-device strategies are studied. The expected number of successful threats under the different checked baggage screening scenarios with 100% checked baggage screening is also obtained. Lastly, a risk-based screening strategy proposed in the literature is analyzed. The results reported suggest that for the existing security setup, with current device costs and probability parameters, single-device systems are less costly and have fewer expected number of successful threats than two-device systems due to the way the second device affects the alarm or clear decision. The risk-based approach is found to have the potential to significantly improve security. The cost model introduced provides an effective tool for the execution of cost-benefit analyses of alternative device configurations for aviation-checked baggage security screening.

  15. Analysis of fuel options for the breakeven core configuration of the Advanced Recycling Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Stauff, N.E.; Klim, T.K.; Taiwo, T.A.; Fiorina, C.; Franceschini, F.

    2013-07-01

    A trade-off study is performed to determine the impacts of various fuel forms on the core design and core physics characteristics of the sodium-cooled Toshiba- Westinghouse Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR). The fuel forms include oxide, nitride, and metallic forms of U and Th. The ARR core configuration is redesigned with driver and blanket regions in order to achieve breakeven fissile breeding performance with the various fuel types. State-of-the-art core physics tools are used for the analyses. In addition, a quasi-static reactivity balance approach is used for a preliminary comparison of the inherent safety performances of the various fuel options. Thorium-fueled cores exhibit lower breeding ratios and require larger blankets compared to the U-fueled cores, which is detrimental to core compactness and increases reprocessing and manufacturing requirements. The Th cores also exhibit higher reactivity swings through each cycle, which penalizes reactivity control and increases the number of control rods required. On the other hand, using Th leads to drastic reductions in void and coolant expansion coefficients of reactivity, with the potential for enhancing inherent core safety. Among the U-fueled ARR cores, metallic and nitride fuels result in higher breeding ratios due to their higher heavy metal densities. On the other hand, oxide fuels provide a softer spectrum, which increases the Doppler effect and reduces the positive sodium void worth. A lower fuel temperature is obtained with the metallic and nitride fuels due to their higher thermal conductivities and compatibility with sodium bonds. This is especially beneficial from an inherent safety point of view since it facilitates the reactor cool-down during loss of power removal transients. The advantages in terms of inherent safety of nitride and metallic fuels are maintained when using Th fuel. However, there is a lower relative increase in heavy metal density and in breeding ratio going from oxide to metallic

  16. Comparison of NASTRAN analysis with ground vibration results of UH-60A NASA/AEFA test configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Idosor, Florentino; Seible, Frieder

    1990-01-01

    Preceding program flight tests, a ground vibration test and modal test analysis of a UH-60A Black Hawk helicopter was conducted by Sikorsky Aircraft to complement the UH-60A test plan and NASA/ARMY Modern Technology Rotor Airloads Program. The 'NASA/AEFA' shake test configuration was tested for modal frequencies and shapes and compared with its NASTRAN finite element model counterpart to give correlative results. Based upon previous findings, significant differences in modal data existed and were attributed to assumptions regarding the influence of secondary structure contributions in the preliminary NASTRAN modeling. An analysis of an updated finite element model including several secondary structural additions has confirmed that the inclusion of specific secondary components produces a significant effect on modal frequency and free-response shapes and improves correlations at lower frequencies with shake test data.

  17. Evaluation of the influences of various force magnitudes and configurations on scoliotic curve correction using finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Mohammad Taghi; Ebrahimi, Mohammad Hossein; Mohammadi, Ali; McGarry, Anthony

    2017-03-01

    Scoliosis is a lateral curvature in the normally straight vertical line of the spine, and the curvature can be moderate to severe. Different treatment can be used based on severity and age of subjects, but most common treatment for this disease is using orthosis. To design orthosis types of force arrangement can be varied, from transverse loads to vertical loads or combination of them. But it is not well introduced how orthoses control scoliotic curve and how to achieve the maximum correction based on force configurations and magnitude. Therefore, it was aimed to determine the effect of various loads configurations and magnitudes on curve correction of a degenerative scoliotic subject. A scoliotic subject participated in this study. The CT-Scan of the subject was used to produce 3D model of spine. The 3D model of spine was produced by Mimics software and the finite element analysis and deformation of scoliotic curve of the spine under seven different forces and in three different conditions was determined by ABAQUS software. The Cobb angle in scoliosis curve decreased significantly by applying forces. In each condition depends on different forces, different corrections have been achieved. It can be concluded that the configurations of the force application mentioned in this study is effective to decrease the scoliosis curve. Although it is a case study, it can be used for a vast number of subjects to predict the correction of scoliosis curve before orthotic treatment. Moreover, it is recommended that this method and the outputs can be compared with clinical findings.

  18. Hybrid Experimental-Numerical Stress Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-01

    components# biomechanics and fracture mechanics. .4 ELASTIC ANALYSIS OF STRUCTURAL COMPONENTS The numerical techniques used In modern hybrid technique for...measured E24] relations of probe force versus probe area under applanation tonametry. ELASTIC-PASTIC FRACTURE MECHANICS Fracture parameters governing...models of the crack. Strain energy release rate and stress intensity factor in linear elastic fracture mechanics, which is a well established analog

  19. Experimental analysis of nature-nurture interactions.

    PubMed

    Wyman, Robert J

    2005-06-01

    The presumed opposition of nature and nurture has been a major concern of western civilization since its beginnings. Christian theologians interpreted Adam and Eve's eating of the forbidden fruit as the origin of an inherited 'original sin'. Saint Augustine explicitly applied the concept to human mental development, arguing that, because of original sin, children are inclined toward evil and education requires physical punishment. For centuries, it was considered parents' moral and religious obligation, not to nurture their children, in our current sense of that word, but to beat the willfulness out of them. 16thC humanists fought back, arguing that "schools have become torture chambers" while it is adults "who corrupt young minds with evil". Locke's (1690) statement that children are born as a 'white paper' was crucial in rejecting the dogma of an inborn (and sinful) nature. The original sin vs. white paper argument merged with another ancient dichotomy: inborn instinct (which controls animal behavior) vs. the reason and free will which humans have. Darwin made the concept of inherited instinct, common to both man and animals, one cornerstone of his theory of evolution. The 20(th)C saw scientists recast the debate as instinct vs. learning, bitterly argued between behaviorists and ethologists. Laboratory experimentation and field observation showed that behavior could develop without learning but also that conditioning paradigms could powerfully mold behavior. The progress of genetics and neurobiology has led to the modern synthesis that neural development, and hence behavior, results from the interdependent action of both heredity and environment.

  20. Analytical and experimental analysis of magnetorheological elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trabia, Sarah

    Many engineering applications ranging from robotic joints to shock and vibration mitigation can benefit by incorporating components with variable stiffness. In addition, variable stiffness structures can provide haptic feedback (the sense of touch) to the user. In this work, it is proposed to study Magnetorheological Elastomers (MRE), where iron particles within the elastomer compound develop a dipole interaction energy, to be used in a device for haptic feedback. A novel feature of this MRE device is to introduce a field-induced variable shear modulus bias via a permanent magnet and using a current input to the electromagnetic control coil to change the modulus of the elastomer in both directions (softer or harder). In this preliminary work, both computational and experimental results of the proposed MRE design are presented. The design is created in COMSOL to verify that the magnetic field is in the desired direction. MRE was fabricated and characterized using a Bose Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer for the shear modulus. Using this information, it is possible to know how the MRE will react in magnetic fields within the haptic feedback device. Additionally, a model for an MRE is developed in a multi-physics COMSOL program that is linked to a MATLAB function that predicts the shear modulus and incorporates it into the material properties to best simulate the MRE's ability to change shear modulus.

  1. Effects of sprayer configuration on efficacy for the control of scab on crabapple using electron beam analysis.

    PubMed

    Krause, Charles R; Derksen, Richard C; Horst, Leona E; Zhu, Heping; Zondag, Randall

    2009-01-01

    Foliar diseases like apple scab result in significant economic losses to growers each year. Assessment in past studies involved only macroscopic disease ratings. More complete knowledge of the fate and behavior of fungicide has been needed to reduce pesticide use with less off-target contamination. Field studies were conducted in a production nursery for over 4 years. A moderately susceptible cultivar of ornamental crabapple, Malus spp. cv "Candied Apple", was sprayed with a fungicide using two sprayer/nozzle configurations. The fungicide used in this study was Mankocide, combination of Cu(OH)2 and mancozeb that permitted electron beam analysis (EBA) identification based on the presence of Cu, MN and Zn in the molecule and formulation. EBA was conducted using a cold field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray microanalyzer. Fresh leaf samples were placed on sticky stubs after each fungicide treatment. The presence or absence of fungal conidia and fungicide residue were measured. EBA permitted direct visualization and identification of the pathogens, morphologically, and chemical characterization of fungicide present. EBA was useful to quantify disease control related to fungicide coverage, sprayer configuration and treatment efficacy.

  2. Numerical and experimental analysis of spallation phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Alexandre; Bailey, Sean C. C.; Panerai, Francesco; Davuluri, Raghava S. C.; Zhang, Huaibao; Vazsonyi, Alexander R.; Lippay, Zachary S.; Mansour, Nagi N.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Bathel, Brett F.; Splinter, Scott C.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2016-12-01

    The spallation phenomenon was studied through numerical analysis using a coupled Lagrangian particle tracking code and a hypersonic aerothermodynamics computational fluid dynamics solver. The results show that carbon emission from spalled particles results in a significant modification of the gas composition of the post-shock layer. Results from a test campaign at the NASA Langley HYMETS facility are presented. Using an automated image processing of short exposure images, two-dimensional velocity vectors of the spalled particles were calculated. In a 30-s test at 100 W/cm2 of cold-wall heat flux, more than 722 particles were detected, with an average velocity of 110 m/s.

  3. Investigation of advanced counterrotation blade configuration concepts for high speed turboprop systems. Task 5: Unsteady counterrotation ducted propfan analysis. Computer program user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Edward J.; Delaney, Robert A.; Adamczyk, John J.; Miller, Christopher J.; Arnone, Andrea; Swanson, Charles

    1993-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was the development of a time-marching three-dimensional Euler/Navier-Stokes aerodynamic analysis to predict steady and unsteady compressible transonic flows about ducted and unducted propfan propulsion systems employing multiple blade rows. The computer codes resulting from this study are referred to as ADPAC-AOACR (Advanced Ducted Propfan Analysis Codes-Angle of Attack Coupled Row). This report is intended to serve as a computer program user's manual for the ADPAC-AOACR codes developed under Task 5 of NASA Contract NAS3-25270, Unsteady Counterrotating Ducted Propfan Analysis. The ADPAC-AOACR program is based on a flexible multiple blocked grid discretization scheme permitting coupled 2-D/3-D mesh block solutions with application to a wide variety of geometries. For convenience, several standard mesh block structures are described for turbomachinery applications. Aerodynamic calculations are based on a four-stage Runge-Kutta time-marching finite volume solution technique with added numerical dissipation. Steady flow predictions are accelerated by a multigrid procedure. Numerical calculations are compared with experimental data for several test cases to demonstrate the utility of this approach for predicting the aerodynamics of modern turbomachinery configurations employing multiple blade rows.

  4. Analysis and composition of a new microwave filter configuration with inhomogeneous dielectric medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukasawa, A.

    1982-09-01

    A theoretical study has been undertaken to solve inter-resonator coupling problems, and to design a new structure of microwave bandpass filter. This filter is composed of quarter-wavelength resonators arranged in a housing with the same ends short-circuited. This arrangement of resonators has never been utilized to compose bandpass filters because of the small inter-resonator coupling. The coupling coefficient of TEM resonant lines has been derived theoretically and expressed with capacitive parameters of the coupled lines. The accurate values of capacitances of the lines were obtained by the numerical analysis of the TEM field. By a simple method to make the medium inhomogeneous through removing the dielectric partially, a simplified structure of filter has first been realized based on this theory. Through numerical analysis by the finite difference method, this structure is also shown to have higher unloaded Q of resonator than conventional dielectric-filled coaxial filters to minimize the volume of filters.

  5. Numerical analysis of the performance of rock weirs: Effects of structure configuration on local hydraulics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holmquist-Johnson, C. L.

    2009-01-01

    River spanning rock structures are being constructed for water delivery as well as to enable fish passage at barriers and provide or improve the aquatic habitat for endangered fish species. Current design methods are based upon anecdotal information applicable to a narrow range of channel conditions. The complex flow patterns and performance of rock weirs is not well understood. Without accurate understanding of their hydraulics, designers cannot address the failure mechanisms of these structures. Flow characteristics such as jets, near bed velocities, recirculation, eddies, and plunging flow govern scour pool development. These detailed flow patterns can be replicated using a 3D numerical model. Numerical studies inexpensively simulate a large number of cases resulting in an increased range of applicability in order to develop design tools and predictive capability for analysis and design. The analysis and results of the numerical modeling, laboratory modeling, and field data provide a process-based method for understanding how structure geometry affects flow characteristics, scour development, fish passage, water delivery, and overall structure stability. Results of the numerical modeling allow designers to utilize results of the analysis to determine the appropriate geometry for generating desirable flow parameters. The end product of this research will develop tools and guidelines for more robust structure design or retrofits based upon predictable engineering and hydraulic performance criteria. ?? 2009 ASCE.

  6. 3-D Experimental Fracture Analysis at High Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    John H. Jackson; Albert S. Kobayashi

    2001-09-14

    T*e, which is an elastic-plastic fracture parameter based on incremental theory of plasticity, was determined numerically and experimentally. The T*e integral of a tunneling crack in 2024-T3 aluminum, three point bend specimen was obtained through a hybrid analysis of moire interferometry and 3-D elastic-plastic finite element analysis. The results were verified by the good agreement between the experimentally and numerically determined T*e on the specimen surface.

  7. Interpolating dynamical systems: Applications to experimental data analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ecke, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental data from Rayleigh-Benard convection is used to demonstrate new techniques in data analysis. The data, in the form of Poincare sections, are fit to a map of the plane as a function of a system control parameter. This provides a very useful method for interpolating experimental low-dimensional dynamical systems. The fitted map can then be studied using numerical bifurcation methods or other nonlinear dynamics analysis techniques. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Aero-acoustic experimental verification of optimum configuration of variable-pitch fans for 40 x 80 foot subsonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lown, H.

    1977-01-01

    The aerodynamic and acoustic performance of two drive fan configurations (low-speed and high-speed variable pitch design) for a 40 x 80 foot wind tunnel were monitored. A 1/7-scale model was utilized. The necessary aero-acoustic data reduction computer program logic was supplied. Test results were evaluated, and the optimum configuration to be employed in the 40 foot full scale fan was recommended.

  9. The analysis of experimental data obtained from automotives tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoica, R. M.; Radulescu, V. J.; Neagu, D.; Trocan, C.; Copae, I.

    2016-08-01

    The paper highlights the three important and inseparably aspects of the systemic approach of automotives dynamics: taking into account the human-vehicle-field interaction, dealing movement with algorithms specific to system theory and analysis of experimental data with algorithms specific to signals theory.Within the paper, the systemic approach regarding vehicles dynamics is based on experimental data obtained from tests, whereby it is analyzed the movement and there are obtained movement mathematical models through algorithms of systems identification.Likewise, there are shown main analysis methods for experimental data, which uses probability theory, information theory, correlation analysis and variance analysis;in addition, there are highlighted possibilities given by time analysis, frequency analysis and data time-frequency analysis. Identification algorithms and highlighted analysis procedures assure the study of automotives dynamics and fuel saving,by directly using experimental data, or by using mathematical models and applying concepts and algorithms specific to systems theory. Experimental data were obtained by testing automotives with electronic control devices and by using acquisition and storage equipmentsfor data given by the on-board computer and taken from embedded sensors.

  10. Fault Wear and Friction Evolution: Experimental Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boneh, Y.; Chang, J. C.; Lockner, D. A.; Reches, Z.

    2011-12-01

    Wear is an inevitable product of frictional sliding of brittle rocks as evidenced by the ubiquitous occurrence of fault gouge and slickenside striations. We present here experimental observations designed to demonstrate the relationship between wear and friction and their governing mechanisms. The experiments were conducted with a rotary shear apparatus on solid, ring-shaped rock samples that slipped for displacements up to tens of meters. Stresses, wear and temperature were continuously monitored. We analyzed 86 experiments of Kasota dolomite, Sierra White granite, Pennsylvania quartzite, Karoo gabbro, and Tennessee sandstone at slip velocities ranging from 0.002 to 0.97 m/s, and normal stress from 0.25 to 6.9 MPa. We conducted two types of runs: short slip experiments (slip distance < 25 mm) primarily on fresh, surface-ground samples, designed to analyze initial wear mechanisms; and long slip experiments (slip distance > 3 m) designed to achieve mature wear conditions and to observe the evolution of wear and friction as the fault surfaces evolved. The experiments reveal three wear stages: initial, running-in, and steady-state. The initial stage is characterized by (1) discrete damage striations, the length of which is comparable to total slip , and local pits or plow features; (2) timing and magnitude of fault-normal dilation corresponds to transient changes of normal and shear stresses; and (3) surface roughness increasing with the applied normal stress. We interpret these observations as wear mechanisms of (a) plowing into the fresh rock surfaces; (b) asperity breakage; and (c) asperity climb. The running-in stage is characterized by (1) intense wear-rate over a critical wear distance of Rd = 0.3-2 m; (2) drop of friction coefficient over a weakening distance of Dc = 0.2-4 m; (3) Rd and Dc display positive, quasi-linear relation with each other. We interpret these observations as indicating the organizing of newly-created wear particles into a 'three

  11. Combined linear theory/impact theory method for analysis and design of high speed configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooke, D.; Vondrasek, D. V.

    1980-01-01

    Pressure distributions on a wing body at Mach 4.63 are calculated. The combined theory is shown to give improved predictions over either linear theory or impact theory alone. The combined theory is also applied in the inverse design mode to calculate optimum camber slopes at Mach 4.63. Comparisons with optimum camber slopes obtained from unmodified linear theory show large differences. Analysis of the results indicate that the combined theory correctly predicts the effect of thickness on the loading distributions at high Mach numbers, and that finite thickness wings optimized at high Mach numbers using unmodified linear theory will not achieve the minimum drag characteristics for which they are designed.

  12. BUMPERII - DESIGN ANALYSIS CODE FOR OPTIMIZING SPACECRAFT SHIELDING AND WALL CONFIGURATION FOR ORBITAL DEBRIS AND METEOROID IMPACTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, S. A.

    1994-01-01

    BUMPERII is a modular program package employing a numerical solution technique to calculate a spacecraft's probability of no penetration (PNP) from man-made orbital debris or meteoroid impacts. The solution equation used to calculate the PNP is based on the Poisson distribution model for similar analysis of smaller craft, but reflects the more rigorous mathematical modeling of spacecraft geometry, orientation, and impact characteristics necessary for treatment of larger structures such as space station components. The technique considers the spacecraft surface in terms of a series of flat plate elements. It divides the threat environment into a number of finite cases, then evaluates each element of each threat. The code allows for impact shielding (shadowing) of one element by another in various configurations over the spacecraft exterior, and also allows for the effects of changing spacecraft flight orientation and attitude. Four main modules comprise the overall BUMPERII package: GEOMETRY, RESPONSE, SHIELD, and CONTOUR. The GEOMETRY module accepts user-generated finite element model (FEM) representations of the spacecraft geometry and creates geometry databases for both meteoroid and debris analysis. The GEOMETRY module expects input to be in either SUPERTAB Universal File Format or PATRAN Neutral File Format. The RESPONSE module creates wall penetration response databases, one for meteoroid analysis and one for debris analysis, for up to 100 unique wall configurations. This module also creates a file containing critical diameter as a function of impact velocity and impact angle for each wall configuration. The SHIELD module calculates the PNP for the modeled structure given exposure time, operating altitude, element ID ranges, and the data from the RESPONSE and GEOMETRY databases. The results appear in a summary file. SHIELD will also determine the effective area of the components and the overall model, and it can produce a data file containing the probability

  13. Dynamic analysis of Space Shuttle/RMS configuration using continuum approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramakrishnan, Jayant; Taylor, Lawrence W., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The initial assembly of Space Station Freedom involves the Space Shuttle, its Remote Manipulation System (RMS) and the evolving Space Station Freedom. The dynamics of this coupled system involves both the structural and the control system dynamics of each of these components. The modeling and analysis of such an assembly is made even more formidable by kinematic and joint nonlinearities. The current practice of modeling such flexible structures is to use finite element modeling in which the mass and interior dynamics is ignored between thousands of nodes, for each major component. The model characteristics of only tens of modes are kept out of thousands which are calculated. The components are then connected by approximating the boundary conditions and inserting the control system dynamics. In this paper continuum models are used instead of finite element models because of the improved accuracy, reduced number of model parameters, the avoidance of model order reduction, and the ability to represent the structural and control system dynamics in the same system of equations. Dynamic analysis of linear versions of the model is performed and compared with finite element model results. Additionally, the transfer matrix to continuum modeling is presented.

  14. Vibration analysis of a 1/15 scale dynamic model of a space shuttle configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.

    1971-01-01

    The natural frequencies and mode shapes of a 1/15 scale space shuttle dynamics model are analytically determined. The model, a parallel beam type structure with delta wings, is dynamically representative of the stiffness and mass properties of an early space shuttle design. Important characteristics of the model are elastic interfaces with adjustable spring rates. Normal mode computations are made using the finite element modeling technique as implemented in the NASTRAN (NASA Structural Analysis) computer program. The feasibility of neglecting elastic deformations in the lower modes was investigated using a rigid body model. Using NASTRAN, natural frequencies and mode shapes were first calculated for the booster fuselage, orbiter fuselage, and both delta wings in a free-free condition. Next, the fuselages were connected for various spring rates. Then the wings were attached to each fuselage, and the booster and orbiter were analyzed as separate airplanes. Finally, the two airplanes were elastically joined, and the complete model was analyzed.

  15. An Operational Configuration of the ARPS Data Analysis System to Initialize WRF in the NM'S Environmental Modeling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Jonathan; Blottman, Pete; Hoeth, Brian; Oram, Timothy

    2006-01-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is the next generation community mesoscale model designed to enhance collaboration between the research and operational sectors. The NM'S as a whole has begun a transition toward WRF as the mesoscale model of choice to use as a tool in making local forecasts. Currently, both the National Weather Service in Melbourne, FL (NWS MLB) and the Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) are running the Advanced Regional Prediction System (AIRPS) Data Analysis System (ADAS) every 15 minutes over the Florida peninsula to produce high-resolution diagnostics supporting their daily operations. In addition, the NWS MLB and SMG have used ADAS to provide initial conditions for short-range forecasts from the ARPS numerical weather prediction (NWP) model. Both NM'S MLB and SMG have derived great benefit from the maturity of ADAS, and would like to use ADAS for providing initial conditions to WRF. In order to assist in this WRF transition effort, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) was tasked to configure and implement an operational version of WRF that uses output from ADAS for the model initial conditions. Both agencies asked the AMU to develop a framework that allows the ADAS initial conditions to be incorporated into the WRF Environmental Modeling System (EMS) software. Developed by the NM'S Science Operations Officer (S00) Science and Training Resource Center (STRC), the EMS is a complete, full physics, NWP package that incorporates dynamical cores from both the National Center for Atmospheric Research's Advanced Research WRF (ARW) and the National Centers for Environmental Prediction's Non-Hydrostatic Mesoscale Model (NMM) into a single end-to-end forecasting system. The EMS performs nearly all pre- and postprocessing and can be run automatically to obtain external grid data for WRF boundary conditions, run the model, and convert the data into a format that can be readily viewed within the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System

  16. Experimental and numerical studies on the issues in laser welding of light-weight alloys in a zero-gap lap joint configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harooni, Masoud

    It is advantageous for the transportation industry to use lightweight components in the structure in order to save mass and reduce CO2 emissions. One of the lightest structural metals, magnesium, fulfills the need for mass reduction within the automotive industry. Many of the body structure components in the automotive industry are assembled using joining processes such as fusion welding. Furthermore, laser welding offers a low heat impact, high process rate, joining method which is becoming increasingly popular as the cost for laser systems continues to decrease. However, there is a limited body of work investigating the laser welding of magnesium and therefore, in the current study, different techniques and methods for laser welding of magnesium alloys are numerically and experimentally studied in order to optimize process parameters to achieve high quality welds. A feasibility study was designed in order to study the effect of various laser welding process parameters (such as laser power levels and welding speeds) on weld quality. Three regression models were developed to find the best fit model that relates process parameters to the shear load of the weld. Furthermore, to understand the effect of laser welding parameters on temperature distribution in laser welding of AZ31B magnesium alloy, a numerical model was developed. A rotary Gaussian volumetric body heat source was applied in this study to obtain the temperature history during the laser welding process. Cross-sectional views of the weld beads, temperature history recorded by thermocouples, and temperature history recorded by infrared camera were used to validate the numerical model. In order to study the real-time dynamic behavior of the molten pool and the keyhole during the welding process, a high speed charge-coupled device (CCD) assisted with a green laser as an illumination source was used. In order to observe the presence of pores, prior studies destructively evaluated the weld bead however; in the

  17. Comparative analysis of various CO2 configurations in supermarket refrigeration systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Vishaldeep; Fricke, Brian; Bansal, Pradeep

    2014-07-09

    Our paper presents an analysis of various CO2 transcritical and cascade/secondary loop refrigeration systems that are becoming popular in supermarket applications with the objective of optimizing the operating parameters of these systems. In addition, the performance of selected CO2-based refrigeration systems is compared to the baseline R404A multiplex direct expansion system using bin analyses in the eight climate zones of the United States. Moreover, for the refrigeration systems investigated, it was found that the Transcritical Booster System with Bypass Compressor (TBS-BC) had the lowest energy consumption for ambient temperatures (Tamb) less than 8 °C, and for higher ambient temperatures the R404A direct expansion system was found to have the lowest energy consumption. Finally, the TBS-BC performs equivalent to or better than the R404A direct expansion system in the northern two-thirds of the US. For the southern portion of the US, the R404A multiplex DX system performs better than CO2 systems.

  18. Comparative analysis of various CO2 configurations in supermarket refrigeration systems

    DOE PAGES

    Sharma, Vishaldeep; Fricke, Brian; Bansal, Pradeep

    2014-07-09

    Our paper presents an analysis of various CO2 transcritical and cascade/secondary loop refrigeration systems that are becoming popular in supermarket applications with the objective of optimizing the operating parameters of these systems. In addition, the performance of selected CO2-based refrigeration systems is compared to the baseline R404A multiplex direct expansion system using bin analyses in the eight climate zones of the United States. Moreover, for the refrigeration systems investigated, it was found that the Transcritical Booster System with Bypass Compressor (TBS-BC) had the lowest energy consumption for ambient temperatures (Tamb) less than 8 °C, and for higher ambient temperatures themore » R404A direct expansion system was found to have the lowest energy consumption. Finally, the TBS-BC performs equivalent to or better than the R404A direct expansion system in the northern two-thirds of the US. For the southern portion of the US, the R404A multiplex DX system performs better than CO2 systems.« less

  19. Nonlinear visco-elastic finite element analysis of different porcelain veneers configuration.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, Roberto; Apicella, Davide; Riccio, Carlo; Gherlone, Enrico; Zarone, Fernando; Aversa, Raffaella; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Ferrari, Marco; Apicella, Antonio

    2009-11-01

    This study is aimed at evaluating the biomechanical behavior of feldspathic versus alumina porcelain veneers. A 3D numerical model of a maxillary central incisor, with the periodontal ligament (PDL) and the alveolar bone was generated. Such model was made up of four main volumes: dentin, enamel, cement layer and veneer. Incisors restored with alumina and feldspathic porcelain veneers were compared with a natural sound tooth (control). Enamel, cementum, cancellous and cortical bone were considered as isotropic elastic materials; on the contrary, the tubular structure of dentin was designed as elastic orthotropic. The nonlinear visco-elatic behavior of the PDL was considered. The veneer volumes were coupled with alumina and feldspathic porcelain mechanical properties. The adhesive layers were modeled in the FE environment using spring elements. A 50N load applied at 60 degrees angle with tooth longitudinal axis was applied and validated. Compressive stresses were concentrated on the external surface of the buccal side of the veneer close to the incisal margin; such phenomenon was more evident in the presence of alumina. Tensile stresses were negligible when compared to compressive ones. Alumina and feldspathic ceramic were characterized by a different biomechanical behavior in terms of elastic deformations and stress distributions. The ultimate strength of both materials was not overcome in the performed analysis.

  20. Unsteady aerodynamic flow field analysis of the space shuttle configuration. Part 3: Unsteady aerodynamics of bodies with concave nose geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericsson, L. E.; Reding, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    An analysis of the unsteady aerodynamics of bodies with concave nose geometries was performed. The results show that the experimentally observed pulsating flow on spiked bodies and in forward facing cavities can be described by the developed simple mathematical model of the phenomenon. Static experimental data is used as a basis for determination of the oscillatory frequency of spike-induced flow pulsations. The agreement between predicted and measured reduced frequencies is generally very good. The spiked-body mathematical model is extended to describe the pulsations observed in forward facing cavities and it is shown that not only the frequency but also the pressure time history can be described with the accuracy needed to predict the experimentally observed time average effects. This implies that it should be possible to determine analytically the impact of the flow pulsation on the structural integrity of the nozzles for the jettisoned empty SRM-shells.

  1. TAL Performance and Mission Analysis in a CDL Capacitor Powered Direct-Drive Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hrbud, Ivana; Rose, M. Frank; Oleson, Steve R.; Jenkins, Rhonald M.

    1999-01-01

    The goals of this research are (1) to prove the concept feasibility of a direct-drive electric propulsion system, and (2) to evaluate the performance and characteristics of a Russian TAL (Thruster with Anode Layer) operating in a long-pulse mode, powered by a capacitor-based power source developed at Space Power Institute. The TAL, designated D-55, is characterized by an external acceleration zone and is powered by a unique chemical double layer (CDL) capacitor bank with a capacitance of 4 F at a charge voltage of 400 V. Performance testing of this power supply on the TAL was conducted at NASA Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, OH. Direct thrust measurements of the TAL were obtained at CDL power levels ranging from 450 to 1750 W. The specific impulse encompassed a range from 1150 s to 2200 s, yielding thruster system efficiencies between 50 and 60%. Preliminary mission analysis of the CDL direct-drive concept and other electric propulsion options was performed for the ORACLE spacecraft in 6am/6pm and 12am/12pm, 300 km sun-synchronous orbits. The direct-drive option was competitive with the other systems by increasing available net mass between 5 and 42% and reducing two-year system wet mass between 18 and 63%. Overall, the electric propulsion power requirements for the satellite solar array were reduced between 57 and 91% depending oil the orbit evaluated The direct-drive, CDL capacitor-based concept in electric propulsion thus promises to be a highly-efficient, viable alternative for satellite operations in specific near-Earth missions.

  2. One to one imagery using single hololens configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Abhijit; Nirala, A. K.

    2014-11-01

    The present study proposes a novel technique for one to one imagery using a single hololens imaging configuration for the first time to the best of our information. Detailed theoretical analysis and experimental realization of a single hololens imaging configuration has been presented. In order to substantiate the one to one imaging capacity of the system, experiments have been performed in both transmissions as well as reflection mode.

  3. Tandem configurations of variably duplicated segments of 22q11.2 confirmed by fiber-FISH analysis.

    PubMed

    Shimojima, Keiko; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Inazu, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2011-11-01

    22q11.2 duplication syndrome has recently been established as a new syndrome manifesting broad clinical phenotypes including mental retardation. It is reciprocal to DiGeorge (DGS)/velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS), in which the same portion of the chromosome is hemizygously deleted. Deletions and duplications of the 22q11.2 region are facilitated by the low-copy repeats (LCRs) flanking this region. In this study, we aimed to identify the directions of the duplicated segments of 22q11.2 to better understand the mechanism of chromosomal duplication. To achieve this aim, we accumulated samples from four patients with 22q11.2 duplications. One of the patients had an atypically small (741 kb) duplication of 22q11.2. The centromeric end of the breakpoint was on LCR22A, but the telomeric end was between LCR22A and B. Therefore, the duplicated segment did not include T-box 1 gene (TBX1), the gene primarily responsible for the DGS/VCFS. As this duplication was shared by the patient's healthy mother, this appears to be a benign copy-number variation rather than a disease-causing alteration. The other three patients showed 3.0 or 4.0 Mb duplications flanked by LCRs. The directions of the duplicated segments were investigated by fiber-fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. All samples showed tandem configurations. These results support the hypothesized mechanism of non-allelic homologous recombination with flanking LCRs and add additional evidence that many interstitial duplications are aligned as tandem configurations.

  4. Experimental analysis of green roof substrate detention characteristics.

    PubMed

    Yio, Marcus H N; Stovin, Virginia; Werdin, Jörg; Vesuviano, Gianni

    2013-01-01

    Green roofs may make an important contribution to urban stormwater management. Rainfall-runoff models are required to evaluate green roof responses to specific rainfall inputs. The roof's hydrological response is a function of its configuration, with the substrate - or growing media - providing both retention and detention of rainfall. The objective of the research described here is to quantify the detention effects due to green roof substrates, and to propose a suitable hydrological modelling approach. Laboratory results from experimental detention tests on green roof substrates are presented. It is shown that detention increases with substrate depth and as a result of increasing substrate organic content. Model structures based on reservoir routing are evaluated, and it is found that a one-parameter reservoir routing model coupled with a parameter that describes the delay to start of runoff best fits the observed data. Preliminary findings support the hypothesis that the reservoir routing parameter values can be defined from the substrate's physical characteristics.

  5. An integrated platform for directly widely-targeted quantitative analysis of feces part I: Platform configuration and method validation.

    PubMed

    Song, Yuelin; Song, Qingqing; Li, Jun; Zheng, Jiao; Li, Chun; Zhang, Yuan; Zhang, Lingling; Jiang, Yong; Tu, Pengfei

    2016-07-08

    Direct analysis is of great importance to understand the real chemical profile of a given sample, notably biological materials, because either chemical degradation or diverse errors and uncertainties might be resulted from sophisticated protocols. In comparison with biofluids, it is still challenging for direct analysis of solid biological samples using high performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Herein, a new analytical platform was configured by online hyphenating pressurized liquid extraction (PLE), turbulent flow chromatography (TFC), and LC-MS/MS. A facile, but robust PLE module was constructed based on the phenomenon that noticeable back-pressure can be generated during rapid fluid passing through a narrow tube. TFC column that is advantageous at extracting low molecular analytes from rushing fluid was employed to link at the outlet of the PLE module to capture constituents-of-interest. An electronic 6-port/2-position valve was introduced between TFC column and LC-MS/MS to fragment each measurement into extraction and elution phases, whereas LC-MS/MS took the charge of analyte separation and monitoring. As a proof of concept, simultaneous determination of 24 endogenous substances including eighteen steroids, five eicosanoids, and one porphyrin in feces was carried out in this paper. Method validation assays demonstrated the analytical platform to be qualified for directly simultaneous measurement of diverse endogenous analytes in fecal matrices. Application of this integrated platform on homolog-focused profiling of feces is discussed in a companion paper.

  6. Morphofunctional analysis of experimental model of esophageal achalasia in rats.

    PubMed

    Sabirov, A G; Raginov, I S; Burmistrov, M V; Chelyshev, Y A; Khasanov, R Sh; Moroshek, A A; Grigoriev, P N; Zefirov, A L; Mukhamedyarov, M A

    2010-10-01

    We carried out a detailed analysis of rat model of esophageal achalasia previously developed by us. Manifest morphological and functional disorders were observed in experimental achalasia: hyperplasia of the squamous epithelium, reduced number of nerve fibers, excessive growth of fibrous connective tissue in the esophageal wall, high contractile activity of the lower esophageal sphincter, and reduced motility of the longitudinal muscle layer. Changes in rat esophagus observed in experimental achalasia largely correlate with those in esophageal achalasia in humans. Hence, our experimental model can be used for the development of new methods of disease treatment.

  7. Statistical inference in behavior analysis: Experimental control is better

    PubMed Central

    Perone, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Statistical inference promises automatic, objective, reliable assessments of data, independent of the skills or biases of the investigator, whereas the single-subject methods favored by behavior analysts often are said to rely too much on the investigator's subjective impressions, particularly in the visual analysis of data. In fact, conventional statistical methods are difficult to apply correctly, even by experts, and the underlying logic of null-hypothesis testing has drawn criticism since its inception. By comparison, single-subject methods foster direct, continuous interaction between investigator and subject and development of strong forms of experimental control that obviate the need for statistical inference. Treatment effects are demonstrated in experimental designs that incorporate replication within and between subjects, and the visual analysis of data is adequate when integrated into such designs. Thus, single-subject methods are ideal for shaping—and maintaining—the kind of experimental practices that will ensure the continued success of behavior analysis. PMID:22478328

  8. Investigation of advanced counterrotation blade configuration concepts for high speed turboprop systems. Task 4: Advanced fan section aerodynamic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crook, Andrew J.; Delaney, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study is the development of a three-dimensional Euler/Navier-Stokes flow analysis for fan section/engine geometries containing multiple blade rows and multiple spanwise flow splitters. An existing procedure developed by Dr. J. J. Adamczyk and associates and the NASA Lewis Research Center was modified to accept multiple spanwise splitter geometries and simulate engine core conditions. The procedure was also modified to allow coarse parallelization of the solution algorithm. This document is a final report outlining the development and techniques used in the procedure. The numerical solution is based upon a finite volume technique with a four stage Runge-Kutta time marching procedure. Numerical dissipation is used to gain solution stability but is reduced in viscous dominated flow regions. Local time stepping and implicit residual smoothing are used to increase the rate of convergence. Multiple blade row solutions are based upon the average-passage system of equations. The numerical solutions are performed on an H-type grid system, with meshes being generated by the system (TIGG3D) developed earlier under this contract. The grid generation scheme meets the average-passage requirement of maintaining a common axisymmetric mesh for each blade row grid. The analysis was run on several geometry configurations ranging from one to five blade rows and from one to four radial flow splitters. Pure internal flow solutions were obtained as well as solutions with flow about the cowl/nacelle and various engine core flow conditions. The efficiency of the solution procedure was shown to be the same as the original analysis.

  9. Experimental Identification of Spin-Parities and Single-Particle Configurations in {sup 257}No and Its {alpha}-Decay Daughter {sup 253}Fm

    SciTech Connect

    Asai, M.; Tsukada, K.; Ichikawa, S.; Nagame, Y.; Nishinaka, I.; Akiyama, K.; Sakama, M.; Ishii, T.; Osa, A.; Oura, Y.; Sueki, K.; Shibata, M.

    2005-09-02

    {alpha}-{gamma} and {alpha}-electron coincidence spectroscopy for a short-lived heavy actinide nucleus {sup 257}No (T{sub 1/2}=24.5 s) has been performed using a gas-jet transport system and an on-line isotope separator. Spin-parities of excited states in {sup 253}Fm fed by the {alpha} decay of {sup 257}No have been identified on the basis of the measured internal conversion coefficients. The {nu}3/2{sup +}[622] configuration has been assigned to the ground state of {sup 257}No as well as to the 124.1 keV level in {sup 253}Fm. It was found that the ground-state configuration of {sup 257}No is different from that of lighter N=155 isotones.

  10. Sheet Hydroforming Process Numerical Model Improvement Through Experimental Results Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriele, Papadia; Antonio, Del Prete; Alfredo, Anglani

    2010-06-01

    The increasing application of numerical simulation in metal forming field has helped engineers to solve problems one after another to manufacture a qualified formed product reducing the required time [1]. Accurate simulation results are fundamental for the tooling and the product designs. The wide application of numerical simulation is encouraging the development of highly accurate simulation procedures to meet industrial requirements. Many factors can influence the final simulation results and many studies have been carried out about materials [2], yield criteria [3] and plastic deformation [4,5], process parameters [6] and their optimization. In order to develop a reliable hydromechanical deep drawing (HDD) numerical model the authors have been worked out specific activities based on the evaluation of the effective stiffness of the blankholder structure [7]. In this paper after an appropriate tuning phase of the blankholder force distribution, the experimental activity has been taken into account to improve the accuracy of the numerical model. In the first phase, the effective capability of the blankholder structure to transfer the applied load given by hydraulic actuators to the blank has been explored. This phase ended with the definition of an appropriate subdivision of the blankholder active surface in order to take into account the effective pressure map obtained for the given loads configuration. In the second phase the numerical results obtained with the developed subdivision have been compared with the experimental data of the studied model. The numerical model has been then improved, finding the best solution for the blankholder force distribution.

  11. Viscoplastic analysis of an experimental cylindrical thrust chamber liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arya, Vinod K.; Arnold, Steven M.

    1991-01-01

    A viscoplastic stress-strain analysis of an experimental cylindrical thrust chamber is presented. A viscoelastic constitutive model incorporating a single internal state variable that represents kinematic hardening was employed to investigate whether such a viscoplastic model could predict the experimentally observed behavior of the thrust chamber. Two types of loading cycles were considered: a short cycle of 3.5 sec. duration that corresponded to the experiments, and an extended loading cycle of 485.1 sec. duration that is typical of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) operating cycle. The analysis qualitatively replicated the deformation behavior of the component as observed in experiments designed to simulate SSME operating conditions. The analysis also showed that the mode and location in the component may depend on the loading cycle. The results indicate that using viscoplastic models for structural analysis can lead to a more realistic life assessment of thrust chambers.

  12. Performance analysis of different ORC configurations for thermal energy and LNG cold energy hybrid power generation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhixin; Wang, Feng; Wang, Shujia; Xu, Fuquan; Lin, Kui

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a thermal energy and Liquefied natural gas (LNG) cold energy hybrid power generation system. Performances of four different Organic Rankine cycle (ORC) configurations (the basic, the regenerative, the reheat and the regenerative-reheat ORCs) are studied based on the first and the second law of thermodynamics. Dry organic fluid R245fa is selected as the typical working fluid. Parameter analysis is also conducted in this paper. The results show that regeneration could not increase the thermal efficiency of the thermal and cold energy hybrid power generation system. ORC with the reheat process could produce more specific net power output but it may also reduce the system thermal efficiency. The basic and the regenerative ORCs produce higher thermal efficiency while the regenerative-reheat ORC performs best in the exergy efficiency. A preheater is necessary for the thermal and cold energy hybrid power generation system. And due to the presence of the preheater, there will be a step change of the system performance as the turbine inlet pressure rises.

  13. Thermo-mechanical analysis of an internal cooling system with various configurations of a combustion liner after shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Hokyu; Kim, Kyung Min; Park, Jun Su; Kim, Beom Seok; Cho, Hyung Hee

    2015-12-01

    The after-shell section, which is part of the gas turbine combustion liner, is exposed to the hottest combustion gas. Various cooling schemes have been applied to protect against severe thermal load. However, there is a significant discrepancy in the thermal expansion with large temperature differences, resulting in thermo-mechanical crack formation. In this study, to reduce combustion liner damage, thermo-mechanical analysis was conducted on three after-shell section configurations: inline-discrete divider wall, staggered divider wall, and swirler wall arrays. These array components are well-known heat-transfer enhancement structures in the duct. In the numerical analyses, the heat transfer characteristics, temperature and thermo-mechanical stress distribution were evaluated using finite volume method and finite element method commercial codes. As a result, we demonstrated that the temperature and the thermo-mechanical stress distribution were readily dependent on the structural array for cooling effectiveness and structural support in each modified cooling system. Compared with the reference model, the swirler wall array was most effective in diminishing the thermo-mechanical stress concentration, especially on the inner ring that is vulnerable to crack formation.

  14. Versatile composite amplifier configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gift, Stephan J. G.; Maundy, Brent

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes a versatile composite amplifier in which a current feedback amplifier (CFA) drives an operational amplifier (OPA). In the conventional OPA-CFA composite amplifier, an OPA drives a CFA resulting in a composite structure that combines the DC input stability of the OPA and the high speed capability of the CFA. The proposed composite configuration combines different features of the CFA and OPA, specifically the constant bandwidth property of the CFA and the high power and high current output capacity of the OPA. The new circuit is easily implemented in the standard inverting and non-inverting configurations using commercially available devices, and the accuracy and constant bandwidth features were experimentally verified. Local feedback around the associated CFA ensures that the proposed composite amplifier possesses a higher level of bandwidth constancy than a single CFA.

  15. Analysis of the interaction between experimental and applied behavior analysis.

    PubMed

    Virues-Ortega, Javier; Hurtado-Parrado, Camilo; Cox, Alison D; Pear, Joseph J

    2014-01-01

    To study the influences between basic and applied research in behavior analysis, we analyzed the coauthorship interactions of authors who published in JABA and JEAB from 1980 to 2010. We paid particular attention to authors who published in both JABA and JEAB (dual authors) as potential agents of cross-field interactions. We present a comprehensive analysis of dual authors' coauthorship interactions using social networks methodology and key word analysis. The number of dual authors more than doubled (26 to 67) and their productivity tripled (7% to 26% of JABA and JEAB articles) between 1980 and 2010. Dual authors stood out in terms of number of collaborators, number of publications, and ability to interact with multiple groups within the field. The steady increase in JEAB and JABA interactions through coauthors and the increasing range of topics covered by dual authors provide a basis for optimism regarding the progressive integration of basic and applied behavior analysis.

  16. Mathematical Models and the Experimental Analysis of Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazur, James E.

    2006-01-01

    The use of mathematical models in the experimental analysis of behavior has increased over the years, and they offer several advantages. Mathematical models require theorists to be precise and unambiguous, often allowing comparisons of competing theories that sound similar when stated in words. Sometimes different mathematical models may make…

  17. Analyzing Math-to-Mastery through Brief Experimental Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everett, Gregory E.; Swift, Honora S.; McKenney, Elizabeth L. W.; Jewell, Jeremy D.

    2016-01-01

    The current study evaluated the effectiveness of individualized math-to-mastery (MTM) interventions, selected though brief experimental analysis (BEA), at increasing math fluency skills for three elementary-aged females. As MTM has only been investigated as a multicomponent intervention, the present study utilized BEA to identify those specific…

  18. The "Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior" at Fifty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laties, Victor G.

    2008-01-01

    The "Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior" was founded in 1958 by a group of male psychologists, mainly from the northeastern USA and connected with either Harvard or Columbia. Fifty years later about 20% of both editors and authors reside outside this country and almost the same proportion is women. Other changes in the…

  19. A Realistic Experimental Design and Statistical Analysis Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muske, Kenneth R.; Myers, John A.

    2007-01-01

    A realistic applied chemical engineering experimental design and statistical analysis project is documented in this article. This project has been implemented as part of the professional development and applied statistics courses at Villanova University over the past five years. The novel aspects of this project are that the students are given a…

  20. Theoretical and Experimental Investigation of Random Gust Loads Part I : Aerodynamic Transfer Function of a Simple Wing Configuration in Incompressible Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakkinen, Raimo J; Richardson, A S , Jr

    1957-01-01

    Sinusoidally oscillating downwash and lift produced on a simple rigid airfoil were measured and compared with calculated values. Statistically stationary random downwash and the corresponding lift on a simple rigid airfoil were also measured and the transfer functions between their power spectra determined. The random experimental values are compared with theoretically approximated values. Limitations of the experimental technique and the need for more extensive experimental data are discussed.

  1. Math and Reading Differences between 6-8 and K-8 Grade Span Configurations: A Multiyear, Statewide Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, David M.; Slate, John R.; Combs, Julie P.; Moore, George W.

    2013-01-01

    We analyzed the effect of grade span configurations (i.e., 6-8 versus K-8) on reading and math performance in Texas public schools for the last 5 school years. Participants in this study were 628 Texas schools (i.e., 314 middle schools and 314 K-8 schools) distributed across the 5 school years examined. Schools configured as K-8 schools were…

  2. Experimental analysis of optical limiting properties of Cu nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. H.; Wang, Y. M.; Han, C. J.; Lu, J. D.; Ji, L. L.

    2010-06-01

    Optical nonlinearities of Cu nanoclusters prepared by implanting Cu ions into silica at 180 keV with dose of 1×10 17 ions/cm 2 have been studied. The third-order nonlinear optical properties of the nanoclusters were measured at 1064 nm excitations using Z-scan technique. Results of the investigation of nonlinear refraction by the off-axis Z-scan configuration were presented and the mechanisms responsible for the nonlinear response were discussed. Innovative point of this paper is that we carried out curve fitting analysis, which is based on MATLAB features, for Cu optical limiting experiment. Our results showed that Cu nanoclusters have refractive optical limiting effect at 1064 nm.

  3. An Experimental Metagenome Data Management and AnalysisSystem

    SciTech Connect

    Markowitz, Victor M.; Korzeniewski, Frank; Palaniappan, Krishna; Szeto, Ernest; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2006-03-01

    The application of shotgun sequencing to environmental samples has revealed a new universe of microbial community genomes (metagenomes) involving previously uncultured organisms. Metagenome analysis, which is expected to provide a comprehensive picture of the gene functions and metabolic capacity of microbial community, needs to be conducted in the context of a comprehensive data management and analysis system. We present in this paper IMG/M, an experimental metagenome data management and analysis system that is based on the Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) system. IMG/M provides tools and viewers for analyzing both metagenomes and isolate genomes individually or in a comparative context.

  4. Theoretical Analysis of the F1-ATPase Experimental Data

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Carrasco, Ruben; Sancho, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract F1-ATPase is a rotatory molecular motor fueled by ATP nucleotides. Different loads can be attached to the motor axis to show that it rotates in main discrete steps of 120° with substeps of ∼80° and 40°. Experimental data show the dependence on the mean rotational velocity ω with respect to the external control parameters: the nucleotide concentration [ATP] and the friction of the load γL. In this work we present a theoretical analysis of the experimental data whose main results are: 1), A derivation of a simple analytical formula for ω([ATP], γL) that compares favorably with experiments; 2), The introduction of a two-state flashing ratchet model that exhibits experimental phenomenology of a greater specificity than has been, to our knowledge, previously available; 3), The derivation of an argument to obtain the values of the substep sizes; 4), An analysis of the energy constraints of the model; and 5), The theoretical analysis of the coupling ratio between the ATP consumed and the success of a forward step. We also discuss the compatibility of our approach with recent experimental observations. PMID:20513403

  5. Analytical and experimental analysis of tube coil heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smusz, R.

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents the analytical and experimental analysis of heat transfer for the finned tube coil heat exchanger immersed in thermal storage tank. The tank is equipped with three helical-shaped heating coils and cylindrical- shaped stratification device. Two coils, upper and lower, use the water as a heating medium. The third, double wall heat exchanger coil, located at the bottom head on the tank is filled by the refrigerant (freon). Calculations of thermal power of water coil were made. Correlations of heat transfer coefficients in curved tubes were applied. In order to verify the analytical calculations the experimental studies of heat transfer characteristic for coil heat exchanger were performed.

  6. Refining the Experimental Analysis of Academic Skills Deficits: Part II. Use of Brief Experimental Analysis to Evaluate Reading Fluency Treatments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly, Edward J., III; Bonfiglio, Christine M.; Mattson, Tara; Persampieri, Michael; Foreman-Yates, Kristin

    2006-01-01

    The technology of brief experimental analysis is just beginning to be used for identification of effective treatments for individual students who experience difficulty with oral reading fluency. In this study, the effect of a reading fluency treatment package was examined on easy and hard passages, and generalization was assessed on passages with…

  7. Experimental analysis of a joint free space cryptosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez, John Fredy Barrera; Osorio, Alexis Jaramillo; Zea, Alejandro Vélez; Torroba, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we analyze a joint free space cryptosystem scheme implemented in an actual laboratory environment. In this encrypting architecture, the object to be encoded and the security key are placed side by side in the input plane without optical elements between the input and the output planes. In order to get the encrypted information, the joint Fresnel power distribution JFPD coming from the input plane is registered in a CMOS camera. The information of the encrypting key is registered with an off axis Fresnel holographic setup. The data registered with the experimental setup is digitally filtered to obtain the encrypted object and the encryption key. In addition, we explore the performance of the experimental system as a function of the object-camera and key-camera distances, which are two new parameters of interest. These parameters become available as a result of developing this encrypting scheme. The theoretical and experimental analysis shows the validity and applicability of the cryptosystem.

  8. Unstructured Grid Euler Method Assessment for Longitudinal and Lateral/Directional Stability Analysis of the HSR Reference H Configuration at Transonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffari, Farhad

    1999-01-01

    Transonic Euler computations, based on unstructured grid methodology, are performed for a proposed High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) configuration, designated as the Reference H configuration within the High Speed Research (HSR) Program. The predicted results are correlated with appropriate experimental wind-tunnel data for the baseline configuration with and without control surface deflections for a range of angle of attack at M(sub infinity) = 0.95. Good correlations between the predictions and measured data have been obtained for the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of the baseline configuration. The incremental effects in the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics due to horizontal rail deflections as well as wing leading-edge and trailing-edge flap deflections have also been predicted reasonably well. Computational results and correlations with data are also presented for the lateral and directional stability characteristics for a range of angle of attack at a constant sideslip angle as well as a range of sideslip angles at a constant angle of attack. In addition, the results are presented to assess the computational method performance and convergence characteristics.

  9. Spectral Analysis and Experimental Modeling of Ice Accretion Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, D. J.; Breuer, K. S.; Torres, B. E.; Hansman, R. J., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    A self-consistent scheme for relating wind tunnel ice accretion roughness to the resulting enhancement of heat transfer is described. First, a spectral technique of quantitative analysis of early ice roughness images is reviewed. The image processing scheme uses a spectral estimation technique (SET) which extracts physically descriptive parameters by comparing scan lines from the experimentally-obtained accretion images to a prescribed test function. Analysis using this technique for both streamwise and spanwise directions of data from the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) are presented. An experimental technique is then presented for constructing physical roughness models suitable for wind tunnel testing that match the SET parameters extracted from the IRT images. The icing castings and modeled roughness are tested for enhancement of boundary layer heat transfer using infrared techniques in a "dry" wind tunnel.

  10. A Simple Synthesis of Alliin and allo-Alliin: X-ray Diffraction Analysis and Determination of Their Absolute Configurations.

    PubMed

    Hakamata, Wataru; Koyama, Ryosuke; Tanida, Mizuki; Haga, Tomomi; Hirano, Takako; Akao, Makoto; Kumagai, Hitomi; Nishio, Toshiyuki

    2015-12-23

    A simple method for the isolation of the bioactive compound alliin from garlic, as well as a method for the synthesis of diastereomerically pure alliin and allo-alliin on a preparative laboratory scale, was developed. The absolute configuration of the sulfur atom in alliin and allo-alliin was assigned on the basis of enzyme reactivity, optical rotatory dispersion, and circular dichroism analyses. A comparison of the results from these analyses, in combination with an X-ray diffraction study on a protected allo-alliin derivative, revealed S and R configurations of the sulfur atoms in alliin and allo-alliin, respectively. In addition, the same (1)H NMR spectrum was observed for synthetic and natural alliin. The absolute configuration of natural alliin was assigned for the first time on the basis of the NMR spectrum and X-ray coordinates.

  11. Static and dynamic experimental analysis of the galloping stability of porous H-section beams.

    PubMed

    Gandia, F; Meseguer, J; Sanz-Andrés, A

    2014-01-01

    The phenomenon of self-induced vibrations of prismatic beams in a cross-flow has been studied for decades, but it is still of great interest due to their important effects in many different industrial applications. This paper presents the experimental study developed on a prismatic beam with H-section. The aim of this analysis is to add some additional insight into the behaviour of the flow around this type of bodies, in order to reduce galloping and even to avoid it. The influence of some relevant geometrical parameters that define the H-section on the translational galloping behaviour of these beams has been analysed. Wind loads coefficients have been measured through static wind tunnel tests and the Den Hartog criterion applied to elucidate the influence of geometrical parameters on the galloping properties of the bodies under consideration. These results have been completed with surface pressure distribution measurements and, besides, dynamic tests have been also performed to verify the static criterion. Finally, the morphology of the flow past the tested bodies has been visualised by using smoke visualization techniques. Since the rectangular section beam is a limiting case of the H-section configuration, the results here obtained are compared with the ones published in the literature concerning rectangular configurations; the agreement is satisfactory.

  12. A novel self-powered MR damper: theoretical and experimental analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xinchun, Guan; Yonghu, Huang; Yi, Ru; Hui, Li; Jinping, Ou

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a novel magnetorheological (MR) damper with a self-powered capability, which is proposed to have energy harvesting and MR damping technologies integrated into a single device. Vibration energy harvesting mechanisms were adopted, based on ball-screw mechanisms and a rotary permanent magnet dc generator, to convert the external vibration energy into electrical energy to power the MR damping unit. The configuration and operating principles of the proposed self-powered MR damper were presented. Considering the core loss effect on the magnetic field, a theoretical analysis of the proposed MR damper was carried out and a mechanical model was developed. Finally, a prototype with a capacity of 10 kN was fabricated and experimentally investigated in both the direct-supply mode and the supply-with-rectifier mode. The results indicated that the proposed configuration is feasible and that both modes can realize good self-adaptability of the MR damping force. However, the direct-supply mode has a sag effect in the force-displacement curve and provides a lower energy-dissipating capacity than the direct-supply mode does under the same conditions.

  13. Static and Dynamic Experimental Analysis of the Galloping Stability of Porous H-Section Beams

    PubMed Central

    Gandia, F.; Meseguer, J.; Sanz-Andrés, A.

    2014-01-01

    The phenomenon of self-induced vibrations of prismatic beams in a cross-flow has been studied for decades, but it is still of great interest due to their important effects in many different industrial applications. This paper presents the experimental study developed on a prismatic beam with H-section. The aim of this analysis is to add some additional insight into the behaviour of the flow around this type of bodies, in order to reduce galloping and even to avoid it. The influence of some relevant geometrical parameters that define the H-section on the translational galloping behaviour of these beams has been analysed. Wind loads coefficients have been measured through static wind tunnel tests and the Den Hartog criterion applied to elucidate the influence of geometrical parameters on the galloping properties of the bodies under consideration. These results have been completed with surface pressure distribution measurements and, besides, dynamic tests have been also performed to verify the static criterion. Finally, the morphology of the flow past the tested bodies has been visualised by using smoke visualization techniques. Since the rectangular section beam is a limiting case of the H-section configuration, the results here obtained are compared with the ones published in the literature concerning rectangular configurations; the agreement is satisfactory. PMID:25541626

  14. Theoretical and experimental analysis of double-pass ytterbium-doped fiber amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Su, Rongtao; Huang, Long; Du, Daiyan; Yang, Lijia

    2016-11-01

    We theoretically and experimentally demonstrate a double-pass ytterbium-doped fiber amplifier. First, we numerically analyze the impact of fiber length on the amplifier. In our experiment, a laser seed with output power of 100 μW and wavelength of 1064 nm is amplified to 51.2 mW with a signal gain of 27.1 dB. With this double-pass configuration, amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) is effectively suppressed to more than 30 dB. Compared with single pass configuration, it is found that double-pass amplification configuration enhances the gain coefficient and improves the signal-to-noise ratio.

  15. The experimental analysis of human sexual arousal: Some recent developments

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Bryan; Barnes, Dermot

    1998-01-01

    Experimental analyses of human sexual arousal have been decidedly sparse. Recent developments in the analysis of derived relational responding, however, have opened the way for a modern behavior-analytic treatment of complex or “novel” human behavior, including specific instances of human sexual arousal. The current article examines some of these developments and their relevance to the analysis of emotional behavior, with a focus on sexual arousal. Recent research that has examined the acquisition of sexual stimulus functions within a relational frame paradigm is then outlined. Finally, a series of relational frame interpretations of a variety of human sexual arousal phenomena is offered. PMID:22478296

  16. Feasibility of combining linear theory and impact theory methods for the analysis and design of high speed configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooke, D.; Vondrasek, D. V.

    1978-01-01

    The aerodynamic influence coefficients calculated using an existing linear theory program were used to modify the pressures calculated using impact theory. Application of the combined approach to several wing-alone configurations shows that the combined approach gives improved predictions of the local pressure and loadings over either linear theory alone or impact theory alone. The approach not only removes most of the short-comings of the individual methods, as applied in the Mach 4 to 8 range, but also provides the basis for an inverse design procedure applicable to high speed configurations.

  17. Regression Model Optimization for the Analysis of Experimental Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulbrich, N.

    2009-01-01

    A candidate math model search algorithm was developed at Ames Research Center that determines a recommended math model for the multivariate regression analysis of experimental data. The search algorithm is applicable to classical regression analysis problems as well as wind tunnel strain gage balance calibration analysis applications. The algorithm compares the predictive capability of different regression models using the standard deviation of the PRESS residuals of the responses as a search metric. This search metric is minimized during the search. Singular value decomposition is used during the search to reject math models that lead to a singular solution of the regression analysis problem. Two threshold dependent constraints are also applied. The first constraint rejects math models with insignificant terms. The second constraint rejects math models with near-linear dependencies between terms. The math term hierarchy rule may also be applied as an optional constraint during or after the candidate math model search. The final term selection of the recommended math model depends on the regressor and response values of the data set, the user s function class combination choice, the user s constraint selections, and the result of the search metric minimization. A frequently used regression analysis example from the literature is used to illustrate the application of the search algorithm to experimental data.

  18. Investigation of Advanced Counterrotation Blade Configuration Concepts for High Speed Turboprop Systems. Task 2: Unsteady Ducted Propfan Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Edward J.; Delaney, Robert A.; Bettner, James L.

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective was the development of a time dependent 3-D Euler/Navier-Stokes aerodynamic analysis to predict unsteady compressible transonic flows about ducted and unducted propfan propulsion systems at angle of attack. The resulting computer codes are referred to as Advanced Ducted Propfan Analysis Codes (ADPAC). A computer program user's manual is presented for the ADPAC. Aerodynamic calculations were based on a four stage Runge-Kutta time marching finite volume solution technique with added numerical dissipation. A time accurate implicit residual smoothing operator was used for unsteady flow predictions. For unducted propfans, a single H-type grid was used to discretize each blade passage of the complete propeller. For ducted propfans, a coupled system of five grid blocks utilizing an embedded C grid about the cowl leading edge was used to discretize each blade passage. Grid systems were generated by a combined algebraic/elliptic algorithm developed specifically for ducted propfans. Numerical calculations were compared with experimental data for both ducted and unducted flows.

  19. Experimental analysis of 7.62 mm hydrodynamic ram in containers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deletombe, E.; Fabis, J.; Dupas, J.; Mortier, J. M.

    2013-02-01

    The design of fuel tanks with a reduced vulnerability with respect to hydrodynamic ram pressure (HRAM) effects is of an increasing need in the Civil (e.g. the Concorde accident), and Defence (military aircraft, unmanned vehicle systems) aircraft industries. The presented work concerns experimental research which aims at observing two hydraulic ram events - both induced by a 7.62 mm bullet shot in very different containers - throughout their various steps until the final collapse of the generated cavity, in order to study the nature of HRAM, the influence of the containers geometry, and to measure original dynamic data for numerical modelling developments and validation. For that purpose, test configurations and experimental results are described, documented and discussed. They concern two types of firing tests that were performed at ONERA using the NATO 7.62 mm projectile, respectively in the frame of ONERA (pool) and EUCLID (caisson) funded research projects. The authors concentrate on two topics: on the one hand, digital image analysis to measure the cavity geometry during its growth and collapse phases and, on the other hand, pressure measurements that catch the transient shock wave. The originality of the work consists in the fact that - compared with other published works - the phenomenon is studied up to tens of milliseconds in a very large pool for theoretical analysis of the bullet/liquid interactions only, and in a realistic fuel tank specimen to consider influence of boundary conditions onto the cavity characteristics (geometry, dynamics).

  20. Radiant-interchange Configuration Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, D C :; Morgan, W R

    1952-01-01

    A study is presented of the geometric configuration factors required for computing radiant heat transfer between opaque surfaces separated by a nonabsorbing medium and various methods of determining the configuration factors are discussed. Configuration-factor solutions available in the literature have been checked and the more complicated equations are presented as families of curves. Cases for point, line, and finite-area sources are worked out over a wide range of geometric proportions. These cases include several new configurations involving rectangles, triangles, and cylinders of finite length which are integrated and tabulated. An analysis is presented, in which configuration factors are employed of the radiant heat transfer to the rotor blades of a typical gas turbine under different conditions of temperature and pressure. (author)

  1. Experimental aerodynamic characteristics of two V/STOL fighter/attack aircraft configurations at Mach numbers from 0.4 to 1.4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelms, W. P.; Durston, D. A.; Lummus, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    A wind tunnel test was conducted to measure the aerodynamic characteristics of two horizontal attitude takeoff and landing V/STOL fighter/attack aircraft concepts. In one concept, a jet diffuser ejector was used for the vertical lift system; the other used a remote augmentation lift system (RALS). Wind tunnel tests to investigate the aerodynamic uncertainties and to establish a data base for these types of concepts were conducted over a Mach number range from 0.2 to 2.0. The present report covers tests, conducted in the 11 foot transonic wind tunnel, for Mach numbers from 0.4 to 1.4. Detailed effects of varying the angle of attack (up to 27 deg), angle of sideslip (-4 deg to +8 deg), Mach number, Reynolds number, and configuration buildup were investigated. In addition, the effects of wing trailing edge flap deflections, canard incidence, and vertical tail deflections were explored. Variable canard longitudinal location and different shapes of the inboard nacelle body strakes were also investigated.

  2. Experimental validation of the direct transmissibility approach to classical transfer path analysis on a mechanical setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasch, Oriol; García, Carlos; Jové, Jordi; Artís, Pere

    2013-05-01

    Transmissibility functions have received renewed interest given the important role they play in operational modal analysis and operational transfer path analysis. However, transmissibilities can also be used in the framework of classical transmission path analysis. This avoids some of the problems associated to the latter, such as the measurement of operational loads, or the need to remove the active parts of the system to measure frequency response functions. The key of the transmissibility approach to classical transfer path analysis relies on the notion of direct or blocked transmissibilities, which can be computed from standard measurable transmissibilities. The response at any degree of freedom to a system external load can then be decomposed in terms of the remaining degrees of freedom responses and the system direct transmissibilities. Although the theory supporting this approach has been known for long, no experimental validation test has been reported to date. It is the purpose of this paper to provide such a test by applying the method to a simple mechanical system for which an analytical solution can be derived. For different configurations, it will be shown that direct transmissibilities computed from measured transmissibilities compare fairly well with analytical results. This opens the door to apply the method to more complex situations of practical interest with confidence.

  3. Ethological and experimental approaches to behavior analysis: implications for ecotoxicology.

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, J; MacPhail, R C

    1996-01-01

    Laboratory research in toxicology has progressed far beyond reliance on measures of mortality to make use of sophisticated behavioral preparations that can evaluate the consequences of sublethal toxicant exposure. In contrast, field studies have not evolved as rapidly. Approaches developed by experimental psychologists and ethologists provide powerful and complementary methodologies to the study of environmental pollutants and behavior. Observational data collection techniques can easily be used to broaden the number of questions addressed regarding sublethal exposure to toxic agents in both field and laboratory environments. This paper provides a background in such techniques, including construction of ethograms and observational methodologies, and the use of laboratory analogues to naturally occurring activities such as social behavior, predation, and foraging. Combining ethological and experimental approaches in behavior analysis can result in a more comprehensive evaluation of the effects of environmental contaminants on behavior. PMID:9182036

  4. Single photon laser altimeter data processing, analysis and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacek, Michael; Peca, Marek; Michalek, Vojtech; Prochazka, Ivan

    2015-10-01

    Spaceborne laser altimeters are common instruments on-board the rendezvous spacecraft. This manuscript deals with the altimeters using a single photon approach, which belongs to the family of time-of-flight range measurements. Moreover, the single photon receiver part of the altimeter may be utilized as an Earth-to-spacecraft link enabling one-way ranging, time transfer and data transfer. The single photon altimeters evaluate actual altitude through the repetitive detections of single photons of the reflected laser pulses. We propose the single photon altimeter signal processing and data mining algorithm based on the Poisson statistic filter (histogram method) and the modified Kalman filter, providing all common altimetry products (altitude, slope, background photon flux and albedo). The Kalman filter is extended for the background noise filtering, the varying slope adaptation and the non-causal extension for an abrupt slope change. Moreover, the algorithm partially removes the major drawback of a single photon altitude reading, namely that the photon detection measurement statistics must be gathered. The developed algorithm deduces the actual altitude on the basis of a single photon detection; thus, being optimal in the sense that each detected signal photon carrying altitude information is tracked and no altitude information is lost. The algorithm was tested on the simulated datasets and partially cross-probed with the experimental data collected using the developed single photon altimeter breadboard based on the microchip laser with the pulse energy on the order of microjoule and the repetition rate of several kilohertz. We demonstrated that such an altimeter configuration may be utilized for landing or hovering a small body (asteroid, comet).

  5. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Notched Composites Under Tension Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aidi, Bilel; Case, Scott W.

    2015-12-01

    Experimental quasi-static tests were performed on center notched carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites having different stacking sequences made of G40-600/5245C prepreg. The three-dimensional Digital Image Correlation (DIC) technique was used during quasi-static tests conducted on quasi-isotropic notched samples to obtain the distribution of strains as a function of applied stress. A finite element model was built within Abaqus to predict the notched strength and the strain profiles for comparison with measured results. A user-material subroutine using the multi-continuum theory (MCT) as a failure initiation criterion and an energy-based damage evolution law as implemented by Autodesk Simulation Composite Analysis (ASCA) was used to conduct a quantitative comparison of strain components predicted by the analysis and obtained in the experiments. Good agreement between experimental data and numerical analyses results are observed. Modal analysis was carried out to investigate the effect of static damage on the dominant frequencies of the notched structure using the resulted degraded material elements. The first in-plane mode was found to be a good candidate for tracking the level of damage.

  6. Finite-element analysis and in vitro experiments of placement configurations using triple antennas in microwave hepatic ablation.

    PubMed

    Phasukkit, Pattarapong; Tungjitkusolmun, Supan; Sangworasil, Manas

    2009-11-01

    This study presents analyses of triple-antenna configurations and designs for microwave (MW) hepatic ablation using 3-D finite-element (FE) analyses verified by in vitro experiments. Treatment of hepatic cancer often requires removal or destruction of large volume lesions. Using multiple antennas offers a potential solution for creating ablation zones with larger dimensions, as well as varied geometrical shapes. We performed both 3-D FE analyses and in vitro experiments using three identical open-tip MW antennas simultaneously, placing them in three types of configurations-"linear array," "triangular," and "T-shaped" arrangements. We compared coagulation volumes created, as well as temperature distribution characteristics, from the three-antenna arrangements after power delivery of 50 W for 60 s. We also performed additional tests using nonidentical antennas (open tip, slot, and slot with insulating jacket) for the three configurations. The results illustrate that arranging antennas in the "T-shaped" pattern destroyed more unwanted tissues than those found when using "linear array" and "triangular" arrangements, with maximum coagulation width and depth of 46 and 81 mm, respectively, and coagulation volume of 30.7 cm(3) . In addition, using nonidentical triple antennas caused variations in coagulation zone characteristics, and thus, the technique could be applied to treatment situations where nonsymmetric coagulation zones are required.

  7. The Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior at fifty.

    PubMed

    Laties, Victor G

    2008-01-01

    The Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior was founded in 1958 by a group of male psychologists, mainly from the northeastern USA and connected with either Harvard or Columbia. Fifty years later about 20% of both editors and authors reside outside this country and almost the same proportion is made up of women. Other changes in the journal include having its own website for more than a decade and now publishing online as well as on paper. A recent connection with PubMed Central of the National Library of Medicine has made possible the completely free electronic presentation of the entire archive of about 3,800 articles.

  8. The Journal of The Experimental Analysis of Behavior at Fifty

    PubMed Central

    Laties, Victor G

    2008-01-01

    The Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior was founded in 1958 by a group of male psychologists, mainly from the northeastern USA and connected with either Harvard or Columbia. Fifty years later about 20% of both editors and authors reside outside this country and almost the same proportion is made up of women. Other changes in the journal include having its own website for more than a decade and now publishing online as well as on paper. A recent connection with PubMed Central of the National Library of Medicine has made possible the completely free electronic presentation of the entire archive of about 3,800 articles. PMID:18338677

  9. Elementary polarization properties in the backscattering configuration.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, Oriol; Garcia-Caurel, Enric; Ossikovski, Razvigor

    2014-10-15

    In the normal incidence backscattering configuration, a polarimetric measurement always preserves the reciprocal symmetry. For a reciprocal Jones matrix, the number of elementary polarization properties is reduced from six to four. In this work, the physical interpretation of these properties is examined and they are compared with the equivalent polarization properties in transmission. It is found that, with the exception of natural optical activity, a polarimetric backreflection experiment can essentially provide the same type of information about the anisotropy of a medium as a transmission analysis, although transmission and backreflection information comes in a completely different form. Experimental examples are provided to illustrate the discussion.

  10. Sound propagation through a turbulent atmosphere: Experimental techniques and data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, Henry E.; Bolen, Lee N.; Noble, John

    1987-10-01

    Propagation of sound waves close to the ground is a complex problem involving many interesting mechanisms. In addition to geometrical spreading and molecular absorption, which are reasonably well understood, the three main mechanisms which influence the acoustic field are reflection with phase change due to the finite impedence of the ground, refraction by wind and temperature gradients, and scattering by atmospheric turbulence. Outdoor sound propagation in a turbulent medium is not a well understood process and has only recently begun to receive serious attention. This report is the first of a series of reports on sound propagation through a turbulent atmosphere. It documents the experimental configuration and describes data analysis. The data analysis includes plots of the real and imaginary parts of the acoustic pressure as a function of time (scatter plots), probability of observing a particular amplitude, and the more familiar structure functions. A preliminary analysis of data suggests reasonable agreement in structure functions at frequencies of 500 Hz and above. At lower frequencies, phase and log amplitude structure functions are both larger than predicted from theory. A tentative explanation for this difference is under development and will be presented in the third of the three volume series. The second volume will be devoted to refractive effects.

  11. Experimental investigations of an 0.0405 scale Space Shuttle Configuration 3 orbiter to determine subsonic stability characteristics. Volume 1: OA21A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, B. W.; Ritschel, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations were conducted in a low speed wind tunnel from May 21 through June 4 and from June 18 through June 25, 1973 on a 0.0405 scale -139B model Space Shuttle Vehicle (SSV) orbiter. The purpose of the test was to investigate the longitudinal and lateral-directional subsonic aerodynamic characteristics of the proposed PRR Space Shuttle orbiter. Emphasis was placed on component buildup effects, elevon, rudder, body flaps, rudder flare effectiveness, and canard and speed brake development. Angles of attack from -4 deg. to 24 deg. and angles of sideslip of -10 deg. to 10 deg. were tested. Static pressures were recorded on the base. The aerodynamic force balance results are presented in plotted and tabular form.

  12. Experimental effects of fuselage camber on longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a series of wing-fuselage configurations at a Mach number of 1.41

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dollyhigh, S. M.; Morris, O. A.; Adams, M. S.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to evaluate a method for the integration of a fighter-type fuselage with a theoretical wing to preserve desirable wing aerodynamic characteristics for efficient maneuvering. The investigation was conducted by using semispan wing fuselage models mounted on a splitter plate. The models were tested through an angle of attack range at a Mach number of 1.41. The wing had a leading edge sweep angle of 50 deg and an aspect ratio of 2.76; the wing camber surface was designed for minimum drag due to lift and was to be self trimming at a lift coefficient of 0.2 and at a Mach number of 1.40. A series of five fuselages of various camber was tested on the wing.

  13. The structural configurations of Ethylene Trithiocarbonate in the binary mixture (SCS2CH2CH2+CHCl3) investigated by polarized Raman: Experimental and quantum chemical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ran; Wu, Fengqi; Zhou, Xiaoshun; Wang, Huigang; Zheng, Xuming

    2017-02-01

    The isotropic and anisotropic components of the Raman spectra of Cdbnd S stretching in Ethylene Trithiocarbonate (SCS2CH2CH2, ET) shows noncoincidence effect (NCE). The calculated absolute Raman cross-section (ARCS) of Cdbnd S stretching initially increases with the dilution of concentration to a maximum and then decreases. This unusual behavior indicates the existence of self-association. Thus we proposed aggregated model and the dimer structure were optimized with DFT/PCM to explain the NCE and ARCS behaviors. Vibrational spectra and depolarization-ratio were calculated for monomer and dimer individually, the dimer is in good accordance with the experimental data. The strong antiparallel Cdbnd S vibrational coupling in neighboring molecules accounts for the frequency shifts of the Cdbnd S stretching.

  14. Experimental and analytical study of the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of analytically and empirically designed Strake-wing configurations at subcritical speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, J. E.; Frink, N. T.

    1981-01-01

    Sixteen analytically and empirically designed strakes have been tested experimentally on a wing-body at three subcritical speeds in such a way as to isolate the strake-forebody loads from the wing-afterbody loads. Analytical estimates for these longitudinal results are made using the suction analogy and the augmented vortex lift concepts. The synergistic data are reasonably well estimated or bracketed by the high- and low-angle-of-attack vortex lift theories over the Mach number range and up to maximum lift or strake-vortex breakdown over the wing. Also, the strake geometry is very important in the maximum lift value generated and the lift efficiency of a given additional area. Increasing size and slenderness ratios are important is generating lift efficiently, but similar efficiency can also be achieved by designing a strake with approximately half the area of the largest gothic strake tested. These results correlate well with strake-vortex-breakdown observations in the water tunnel.

  15. Experimental and operational modal analysis of a laboratory scale model of a tripod support structure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luczak, M. M.; Mucchi, E.; Telega, J.

    2016-09-01

    The goal of the research is to develop a vibration-based procedure for the identification of structural failures in a laboratory scale model of a tripod supporting structure of an offshore wind turbine. In particular, this paper presents an experimental campaign on the scale model tested in two stages. Stage one encompassed the model tripod structure tested in air. The second stage was done in water. The tripod model structure allows to investigate the propagation of a circumferential representative crack of a cylindrical upper brace. The in-water test configuration included the tower with three bladed rotor. The response of the structure to the different waves loads were measured with accelerometers. Experimental and operational modal analysis was applied to identify the dynamic properties of the investigated scale model for intact and damaged state with different excitations and wave patterns. A comprehensive test matrix allows to assess the differences in estimated modal parameters due to damage or as potentially introduced by nonlinear structural response. The presented technique proves to be effective for detecting and assessing the presence of representative cracks.

  16. A uniform GTD analysis of the EM diffraction by a thin dielectric/ferrite half-plane and related configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojas, Roberto G.

    1985-01-01

    A uniform geometrical theory of diffraction (UTD) solution is developed for the problem of the diffraction by a thin dielectric/ferrite half plane when it is excited by a plane, cylindrical, or surface wave field. Both transverse electric and transverse magnetic cases are considered. The solution of this problem is synthesized from the solutions to the related problems of EM diffraction by configurations involving perfectly conducting electric and magnetic walls covered by a dielectric/ferrite half-plane of one half the thickness of the original half-plane.

  17. Unsteady loads due to propulsive lift configurations. Part C: Development of experimental techniques for investigation of unsteady pressures behind a cold model jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haviland, J. K.; Schroeder, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    As part of an overall study of the scaling laws for the fluctuating pressures induced on the wings and flaps of STOL aircraft by jet engine impingement, an experimental investigation was made of the near field fluctuating pressures behind a cold circular jet, both when it was free and when it was impinging on a flat plate. Miniature static pressure probes were developed for measurements in the free jet and on the flat plate which were connected by plastic tubing to 1/8 inch microphones and acted as pressure transducers. Using a digital correlator together with an FFT program on the CDC 6400 computer, spectral densities, relative amplitudes, phase lags, and coherences were also obtained for the signals from pairs of these probes, and were used to calibrate these probes directly against microphones. This system of instrumentation was employed to obtain single point rms and third octave surveys of the static pressures in the free jet and on the surface of the plate.

  18. Identifying Effective Spelling Interventions Using a Brief Experimental Analysis and Extended Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCurdy, Merilee; Clure, Lynne F.; Bleck, Amanda A.; Schmitz, Stephanie L.

    2016-01-01

    Spelling is an important skill that is crucial to effective written communication. In this study, brief experimental analysis procedures were used to examine spelling instruction strategies (e.g., whole word correction; word study strategy; positive practice; and cover, copy, and compare) for four students. In addition, an extended analysis was…

  19. EBR-2 (Experimental Breeder Reactor-2) containment seismic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gale, J.G.; Lehto, W.K.

    1990-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor-2 (EBR-2) is a liquid metal reactor located at the Argonne National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho. At the time the EBR-2 was designed and constructed, there were no engineering society or federal guide lines specifically directed toward the seismic design of reactor containment structures; hence, static analysis techniques were used in the design. With the increased focus on safety of reactor and fuel reprocessing facilities, Argonne has initiated a program to analyze its existing facilities for seismic integrity using current Department of Energy guidelines and industry consensus standards. A seismic analysis of the EBR-2 containment building has been performed using finite-element analysis techniques. The containment building is essentially a vertical right cylindrical steel shell with heads on both ends. The structure is unique in that the interior of the steel shell is lined with reinforced concrete. The actual containment function of the building is served by the steel shell; whereas the function of the concrete liner is to serve as a missile shield and a thermal insulating shield to protect the steel containment shell from internally generated missiles and fires. Model development and structural evaluation of the EBR-2 containment building are discussed in this paper. 7 refs., 8 figs.

  20. Composite flexible skin with large negative Poisson’s ratio range: numerical and experimental analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. J.; Scarpa, F.; Farrow, I. R.; Liu, Y. J.; Leng, J. S.

    2013-04-01

    This paper describes the manufacturing, characterization and parametric modeling of a novel fiber-reinforced composite flexible skin with in-plane negative Poisson’s ratio (auxetic) behavior. The elastic mechanical performance of the auxetic skin is evaluated using a three-dimensional analytical model based on the classical laminate theory (CLT) and Sun’s thick laminate theory. Good agreement is observed between in-plane Poisson’s ratios and Young’s moduli of the composite skin obtained by the theoretical model and the experimental results. A parametric analysis carried out with the validated model shows that significant changes in the in-plane negative Poisson’s ratio can be achieved through different combinations of matrix and fiber materials and stacking sequences. It is also possible to identify fiber-reinforced composite skin configurations with the same in-plane auxeticity but different orthotropic stiffness performance, or the same orthotropic stiffness performance but different in-plane auxeticity. The analysis presented in this work provides useful guidelines to develop and manufacture flexible skins with negative Poisson’s ratio for applications focused on morphing aircraft wing designs.

  1. Experimental analysis of natural convection within a thermosyphon

    SciTech Connect

    Clarksean, R.

    1993-09-01

    The heat transfer characteristics of a thermosyphon designed to passively cool cylindrical heat sources are experimentally studied. The analysis is based on recognizing the physics of the flow within different regions of the thermosyphon to develop empirical heat transfer correlations. The basic system consists of three concentric cylinders, with an outer channel between the outer two cylinders, and an inner channel between the inner two cylinders. Tests were conducted. with two different process material container diameters, representing the inner cylinder, and several different power levels. The experimentally determined local and average Nu numbers for the inner channel are in good agreement with previous work for natural convection between vertical parallel plates, one uniformly heated and the other thermally insulated. The implication is that the heat transfer off of each surface is independent of the adjacent surface for sufficiently high Ra numbers. The heat transfer is independent because of limited interaction between the boundary layers at sufficiently high Ra numbers. As a result of the limited interaction, the maximum temperature within the system remained constant, or decreased slightly when the radii of the inner cylinders increased for the same amount of heat removal.

  2. Experimental analysis of the resolution in shallow GPR survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Gracia, V.; González-Drigo, R.; Di Capua, D.; Pujades, L. G.

    2007-10-01

    Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) is a high resolution surveying method applied to civil engineering, surface geology, archaeology and other disciplines. Today, GPR is an effective technique for investigating the integrity of concrete structures. As a non destructive technique, it is particularly suited for the assessment of large structures such as prestressed concrete bridges, highways, railway tracks and tunnels. A significant parameter in GPR high frequency surveys is the horizontal resolution. This parameter indicates the capability of the method to detect anomalies and to discriminate between adjacent elements. In concrete structures analysis the horizontal resolution lead to determine the exact position of reinforcing elements. This paper presents the basics of GPR, its limits, and the experimental measurements and the signals post-processing performed in order to determine the horizontal resolution of a 1.6 GHz antenna in concrete structures assessments.

  3. Modeling and experimental vibration analysis of nanomechanical cantilever active probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi-Khojin, Amin; Bashash, Saeid; Jalili, Nader

    2008-08-01

    Nanomechanical cantilever (NMC) active probes have recently received increased attention in a variety of nanoscale sensing and measurement applications. Current modeling practices call for a uniform cantilever beam without considering the intentional jump discontinuities associated with the piezoelectric layer attachment and the NMC cross-sectional step. This paper presents a comprehensive modeling framework for modal characterization and dynamic response analysis of NMC active probes with geometrical discontinuities. The entire length of the NMC is divided into three segments of uniform beams followed by applying appropriate continuity conditions. The characteristics matrix equation is then used to solve for system natural frequencies and mode shapes. Using an equivalent electromechanical moment of a piezoelectric layer, forced motion analysis of the system is carried out. An experimental setup consisting of a commercial NMC active probe from Veeco and a state-of-the-art microsystem analyzer, the MSA-400 from Polytec, is developed to verify the theoretical developments proposed here. Using a parameter estimation technique based on minimizing the modeling error, optimal values of system parameters are identified. Mode shapes and the modal frequency response of the system for the first three modes determined from the proposed model are compared with those obtained from the experiment and commonly used theory for uniform beams. Results indicate that the uniform beam model fails to accurately predict the actual system response, especially in multiple-mode operation, while the proposed discontinuous beam model demonstrates good agreement with the experimental data. Such detailed and accurate modeling framework can lead to significant enhancement in the sensitivity of piezoelectric-based NMC sensors for use in variety of sensing and imaging applications.

  4. Configuration Management Policy

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Policy establishes an Agency-wide Configuration Management Program and to provide responsibilities, compliance requirements, and overall principles for Configuration and Change Management processes to support information technology management.

  5. Analysis the configuration of earthing system based on high-low and low-high soil structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramani, A. N.; Ahmad, Abdul Rahman; Sulaima, M. F.; Nasir, M. N. M.; Ahmad, Arfah

    2015-05-01

    Each TNB transmission tower requires a tower footing resistance (TFR) with a lower grounding resistance value that depends on the transmission line voltage. For 132kV and 275kV tower, the TFR must less than 10Ω and 500kV tower must less than 5Ω. The TFR is changeable with variable factors such as soil resistivity. Low TFR provides essential protection to the fault such as lightning strike that may occur at any time. The fault current flow to the lowest resistance path and easily disperses to earth. Back flashover voltage across the insulator of transmission lines may occur when the TFR is high. The TFR is influenced by soil resistivity. There are three parameters affecting the soil resistivity; moisture content, salt content and temperature of the soil. High moisture content in soil will reduce the soil resistivity and resultant low TFR. Small scale moisture control by using Micro Reservoir (MR) irrigation with semi-permeable membranes have the power to offer the stable moisture in soil. By using osmosis concept, it is the process of net movement of water molecules from high potential water to lower potential water though a semi permeable membrane. The MR can withstand for 3 to 5 days without continuous water supply. The MR installed in the centre of the tower that contains a multiple parallel of electrode rods. The concentrated of electrode rods grounding configuration with a combination of MR will improve the TFR even at multilayer soil. As a result, MR gives a little improvement to TFR. The MR in area of concentrated electrode rod configuration to ensure the soil always wet and moist at all times. The changes in soil affect the tower-footing-resistance. The tower-footing-resistance measurement at afternoon is higher than at evening because of the temperature and moisture content in soil is change due to sun radiation.

  6. Analysis the configuration of earthing system based on high-low and low-high soil structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ramani, A. N.; Ahmad, Abdul Rahman; Sulaima, M. F.; Nasir, M. N. M.; Ahmad, Arfah

    2015-05-15

    Each TNB transmission tower requires a tower footing resistance (TFR) with a lower grounding resistance value that depends on the transmission line voltage. For 132kV and 275kV tower, the TFR must less than 10Ω and 500kV tower must less than 5Ω. The TFR is changeable with variable factors such as soil resistivity. Low TFR provides essential protection to the fault such as lightning strike that may occur at any time. The fault current flow to the lowest resistance path and easily disperses to earth. Back flashover voltage across the insulator of transmission lines may occur when the TFR is high. The TFR is influenced by soil resistivity. There are three parameters affecting the soil resistivity; moisture content, salt content and temperature of the soil. High moisture content in soil will reduce the soil resistivity and resultant low TFR. Small scale moisture control by using Micro Reservoir (MR) irrigation with semi-permeable membranes have the power to offer the stable moisture in soil. By using osmosis concept, it is the process of net movement of water molecules from high potential water to lower potential water though a semi permeable membrane. The MR can withstand for 3 to 5 days without continuous water supply. The MR installed in the centre of the tower that contains a multiple parallel of electrode rods. The concentrated of electrode rods grounding configuration with a combination of MR will improve the TFR even at multilayer soil. As a result, MR gives a little improvement to TFR. The MR in area of concentrated electrode rod configuration to ensure the soil always wet and moist at all times. The changes in soil affect the tower-footing-resistance. The tower-footing-resistance measurement at afternoon is higher than at evening because of the temperature and moisture content in soil is change due to sun radiation.

  7. Reproducibility of 3D chromatin configuration reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Mark R.; Xiong, Hao; Capurso, Daniel; Vazquez, Mariel; Arsuaga, Javier

    2014-01-01

    It is widely recognized that the three-dimensional (3D) architecture of eukaryotic chromatin plays an important role in processes such as gene regulation and cancer-driving gene fusions. Observing or inferring this 3D structure at even modest resolutions had been problematic, since genomes are highly condensed and traditional assays are coarse. However, recently devised high-throughput molecular techniques have changed this situation. Notably, the development of a suite of chromatin conformation capture (CCC) assays has enabled elicitation of contacts—spatially close chromosomal loci—which have provided insights into chromatin architecture. Most analysis of CCC data has focused on the contact level, with less effort directed toward obtaining 3D reconstructions and evaluating the accuracy and reproducibility thereof. While questions of accuracy must be addressed experimentally, questions of reproducibility can be addressed statistically—the purpose of this paper. We use a constrained optimization technique to reconstruct chromatin configurations for a number of closely related yeast datasets and assess reproducibility using four metrics that measure the distance between 3D configurations. The first of these, Procrustes fitting, measures configuration closeness after applying reflection, rotation, translation, and scaling-based alignment of the structures. The others base comparisons on the within-configuration inter-point distance matrix. Inferential results for these metrics rely on suitable permutation approaches. Results indicate that distance matrix-based approaches are preferable to Procrustes analysis, not because of the metrics per se but rather on account of the ability to customize permutation schemes to handle within-chromosome contiguity. It has recently been emphasized that the use of constrained optimization approaches to 3D architecture reconstruction are prone to being trapped in local minima. Our methods of reproducibility assessment provide a

  8. Experimental measurements and noise analysis of a cryogenic radiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, S. M.; Woods, S. I.; Jung, T. M.; Carter, A. C.; Datla, R. U.

    2014-07-15

    A cryogenic radiometer device, intended for use as part of an electrical-substitution radiometer, was measured at low temperature. The device consists of a receiver cavity mechanically and thermally connected to a temperature-controlled stage through a thin-walled polyimide tube which serves as a weak thermal link. With the temperature difference between the receiver and the stage measured in millikelvin and the electrical power measured in picowatts, the measured responsivity was 4700 K/mW and the measured thermal time constant was 14 s at a stage temperature of 1.885 K. Noise analysis in terms of Noise Equivalent Power (NEP) was used to quantify the various fundamental and technical noise contributions, including phonon noise and Johnson-Nyquist noise. The noise analysis clarifies the path toward a cryogenic radiometer with a noise floor limited by fundamental phonon noise, where the magnitude of the phonon NEP is 6.5 fW/√(Hz) for the measured experimental parameters.

  9. Morphometric analysis of T lymphocyte compartmentation in experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, E C; Kasp, E; Dumonde, D C

    1989-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU) in the Lewis rat is characterized by extensive infiltration of inflammatory cells into all compartments of the eye, only some of which become irreversibly damaged. The apparent differences in the pathogenic impact of inflammatory cells within different ocular compartments may suggest that different mechanisms underlie cellular infiltration and selective tissue destruction. In order to investigate the importance of T lymphocyte infiltration, we carried out a precise topographical and temporal analysis of T cell infiltration into five compartments of the eye using an improved method for the fixation of ocular tissue. Our study showed that T cell infiltration began in the ciliary body and was most numerous and sustained in this area during EAU. The peak of T cell infiltration into the retina was comparatively delayed and was of lesser magnitude. Analysis of T cell subsets revealed a tendency for the helper phenotype to predominant during the course of disease in all ocular compartments except the retina where both helper and cytotoxic/suppressor T cells were equally represented at the height of inflammation. We suggest that the pathogenetic impact of autoreactive lymphocytes in EAU depends on the accessibility of relevant tissue antigen and on local microenvironmental features of lymphocytic traffic within different ocular compartments. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:2805411

  10. Acoustic analysis in Mudejar-Gothic churches: Experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo, Miguel; Zamarreño, Teófilo; Girón, Sara

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes the preliminary results of research work in acoustics, conducted in a set of 12 Mudejar-Gothic churches in the city of Seville in the south of Spain. Despite common architectural style, the churches feature individual characteristics and have volumes ranging from 3947 to 10 708 m3. Acoustic parameters were measured in unoccupied churches according to the ISO-3382 standard. An extensive experimental study was carried out using impulse response analysis through a maximum length sequence measurement system in each church. It covered aspects such as reverberation (reverberation times, early decay times), distribution of sound levels (sound strength); early to late sound energy parameters derived from the impulse responses (center time, clarity for speech, clarity, definition, lateral energy fraction), and speech intelligibility (rapid speech transmission index), which all take both spectral and spatial distribution into account. Background noise was also measured to obtain the NR indices. The study describes the acoustic field inside each temple and establishes a discussion for each one of the acoustic descriptors mentioned by using the theoretical models available and the principles of architectural acoustics. Analysis of the quality of the spaces for music and speech is carried out according to the most widespread criteria for auditoria. .

  11. Acoustic analysis in Mudejar-Gothic churches: experimental results.

    PubMed

    Galindo, Miguel; Zamarreño, Teófilo; Girón, Sara

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes the preliminary results of research work in acoustics, conducted in a set of 12 Mudejar-Gothic churches in the city of Seville in the south of Spain. Despite common architectural style, the churches feature individual characteristics and have volumes ranging from 3947 to 10 708 m3. Acoustic parameters were measured in unoccupied churches according to the ISO-3382 standard. An extensive experimental study was carried out using impulse response analysis through a maximum length sequence measurement system in each church. It covered aspects such as reverberation (reverberation times, early decay times), distribution of sound levels (sound strength); early to late sound energy parameters derived from the impulse responses (center time, clarity for speech, clarity, definition, lateral energy fraction), and speech intelligibility (rapid speech transmission index), which all take both spectral and spatial distribution into account. Background noise was also measured to obtain the NR indices. The study describes the acoustic field inside each temple and establishes a discussion for each one of the acoustic descriptors mentioned by using the theoretical models available and the principles of architectural acoustics. Analysis of the quality of the spaces for music and speech is carried out according to the most widespread criteria for auditoria.

  12. Performance Trade-Off Analysis Comparing Different Front-End Configurations for a Digital X-ray Imager.

    PubMed

    Kuhls-Gilcrist, Andrew; Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R; Rudin, Stephen

    2010-10-30

    Performance of indirect digital x-ray imagers is typically limited by the front-end components. Present x-ray-to-light converting phosphors significantly reduce detector resolution due to stochastic blurring and k-fluorescent x-ray reabsorption. Thinner phosphors improve resolution at the cost of lowering quantum detection efficiency (QDE) and increasing Swank noise. Magnifying fiber optic tapers (FOTs) are commonly used to increase the field-of-view of small sensor imagers, such as CMOS, CCD, or electron-multiplying CCD (EMCCD) based detectors, which results in a reduction in detector sensitivity and further reduces the MTF. We investigate performance trade-offs for different front-end configurations coupled to an EMCCD sensor with 8 μm pixels. Six different columnar structured CsI(Tl) scintillators with thicknesses of 100, 200, 350, 500, and 1000 μm type high-light (HL) and a 350 μm type high-resolution (HR) (Hamamatsu) and four different FOTs with magnification ratios (M) of 1, 2.5, 3.3, and 4 were studied using the RQA5 x-ray spectrum. The relative signal of the different scintillators largely followed the relative QDE, indicating their light output per absorbed x-ray was similar, with the type HR CsI emitting 57% of the type HL. The efficiency of the FOTs was inversely proportional to M(2) with the M = 1 FOT transmitting 87% of the incident light. At 5 (10) cycles/mm, the CsI MTF was 0.38 (0.22), 0.33 (0.17), 0.37 (0.19), 0.23 (0.09), 0.19 (0.08), and 0.09 (0.03) for the 100, 200, 350HR, 350, 500, and 1000 μm CsI, respectively and the FOT MTF was 0.89 (0.84), 0.80 (0.72), 0.70 (0.60), and 0.69 (0.37) for M = 1, 2.5, 3.3, and 4, respectively. The 1000, 500, and 350HR μm CsI had the highest DQE for low, medium, and high spatial frequency ranges of 0 to 1.6, 1.6 to 4.5, and 4.5 to 10 cycles/mm, respectively. Larger FOT M resulted in a reduction in DQE. Quantifying performance of different front-end configurations will enable optimal selection of components

  13. Configuration Aerodynamics: Past - Present - Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Agrawal, Shreekant; Bencze, Daniel P.; Kulfan, Robert M.; Wilson, Douglas L.

    1999-01-01

    The Configuration Aerodynamics (CA) element of the High Speed Research (HSR) program is managed by a joint NASA and Industry team, referred to as the Technology Integration Development (ITD) team. This team is responsible for the development of a broad range of technologies for improved aerodynamic performance and stability and control characteristics at subsonic to supersonic flight conditions. These objectives are pursued through the aggressive use of advanced experimental test techniques and state of the art computational methods. As the HSR program matures and transitions into the next phase the objectives of the Configuration Aerodynamics ITD are being refined to address the drag reduction needs and stability and control requirements of High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) aircraft. In addition, the experimental and computational tools are being refined and improved to meet these challenges. The presentation will review the work performed within the Configuration Aerodynamics element in 1994 and 1995 and then discuss the plans for the 1996-1998 time period. The final portion of the presentation will review several observations of the HSR program and the design activity within Configuration Aerodynamics.

  14. Multivariate Analysis for Animal Selection in Experimental Research

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Renan Mercuri; de Campos, Dijon Henrique Salomé; Tomasi, Loreta Casquel; Cicogna, Antonio Carlos; Okoshi, Katashi; Padovani, Carlos Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Background Several researchers seek methods for the selection of homogeneous groups of animals in experimental studies, a fact justified because homogeneity is an indispensable prerequisite for casualization of treatments. The lack of robust methods that comply with statistical and biological principles is the reason why researchers use empirical or subjective methods, influencing their results. Objective To develop a multivariate statistical model for the selection of a homogeneous group of animals for experimental research and to elaborate a computational package to use it. Methods The set of echocardiographic data of 115 male Wistar rats with supravalvular aortic stenosis (AoS) was used as an example of model development. Initially, the data were standardized, and became dimensionless. Then, the variance matrix of the set was submitted to principal components analysis (PCA), aiming at reducing the parametric space and at retaining the relevant variability. That technique established a new Cartesian system into which the animals were allocated, and finally the confidence region (ellipsoid) was built for the profile of the animals’ homogeneous responses. The animals located inside the ellipsoid were considered as belonging to the homogeneous batch; those outside the ellipsoid were considered spurious. Results The PCA established eight descriptive axes that represented the accumulated variance of the data set in 88.71%. The allocation of the animals in the new system and the construction of the confidence region revealed six spurious animals as compared to the homogeneous batch of 109 animals. Conclusion The biometric criterion presented proved to be effective, because it considers the animal as a whole, analyzing jointly all parameters measured, in addition to having a small discard rate. PMID:25651342

  15. Leader Positivity and Follower Creativity: An Experimental Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avey, James B.; Richmond, F. Lynn; Nixon, Don R.

    2012-01-01

    Using an experimental research design, 191 working adults were randomly assigned to two experimental conditions in order to test a theoretical model linking leader and follower positive psychological capital (PsyCap). Multiple methods were used to gather information from the participants. We found when leader PsyCap was manipulated experimentally,…

  16. Pathway analysis of super-exchange electronic couplings in electron transfer reactions using a multi-configuration self-consistent field method.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, Hirotaka; Ando, Koji

    2011-04-21

    We present a novel pathway analysis of super-exchange electronic couplings in electron transfer reactions using localized molecular orbitals from multi-configuration self-consistent field (MCSCF) calculations. In our analysis, the electronic coupling and the tunneling pathways can be calculated in terms of the configuration interaction (CI) Hamiltonian matrix obtained from the localized MCSCF wave function. Making use of the occupation restricted multiple active spaces (ORMAS) method can effectively produce the donor, acceptor, and intermediate configuration state functions (CSFs) and CIs among these CSFs. In order to express the electronic coupling as a sum of individual tunneling pathways contributions, we employed two perturbative methods: Löwdin projection-iteration method and higher-order super-exchange method. We applied them to anion couplings of butane-1,4-diyl and pentane-1,5-diyl. The results were (1) the electronic couplings calculated from the two perturbative methods were in reasonable agreement with those from a non-perturbative method (one-half value of the energy difference between the ground and first excited states), (2) the main tunneling pathways consisted of a small number of lower-order super-exchange pathways where bonding, anti-bonding, or extra-valence-shell orbitals were used once or twice, and (3) the interference among a huge number of higher-order super-exchange pathways significantly contributed to the overall electronic coupling, whereas each of them contributed only fractionally. Our method can adequately take into account both effects of non-dynamical electron correlation and orbital relaxation. Comparing with the analyses based on the Koopmans' theorem (ignoring both effects) and the ORMAS-CIs from frozen localized reference orbitals (ignoring the effect of orbital relaxation), we discuss these effects.

  17. Experimental study of surface pressures induced on a flat plate and a body of revolution by various dual jet configurations. [wind tunnel tudies of a jet in a cross flow for V/STOL applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schetz, J. A.; Jakubowski, A. K.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of the angle of a jet to a crossflow, the performance of dual jet configurations, and a jet injected from a body of revolution as opposed to a flat plate were investigated during experiments conducted in the 7x10 tunnel at NASA Ames at Velocities from 14.5 m/sec to 35.8 m/sec (47.6 to 117.4 ft/sec.). Pressure distributions are presented for single and dual jets over a range of velocity ratios from 2 to 10, spacings from 2 to 6 diameters and injection angles of 90, 75, 60, and 105 degrees. For the body of revolution tests, the ratio of the jet to body diameters was set as large (1/2) in order to be more representative of V/STOL aircraft applications. Flat plate tests involved dual jets both aligned and in side by side configurations. The effects of the various parameters and the differences between the axisymmetric and planar body geometrics on the nature, size, shape, and strength of the interaction regions on the body surfaces are shown. Some flowfield measurements are also presented, and it is shown that a simple analysis is capable of predicting the trajectories of the jets.

  18. Experimental impact testing and analysis of composite fan cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vander Klok, Andrew Joe

    For aircraft engine certification, one of the requirements is to demonstrate the ability of the engine to withstand a fan blade-out (FBO) event. A FBO event may be caused by fatigue failure of the fan blade itself or by impact damage of foreign objects such as bird strike. An un-contained blade can damage flight critical engine components or even the fuselage. The design of a containment structure is related to numerous parameters such as the blade tip speed; blade material, size and shape; hub/tip diameter; fan case material, configuration, rigidity, etc. To investigate all parameters by spin experiments with a full size rotor assembly can be prohibitively expensive. Gas gun experiments can generate useful data for the design of engine containment cases at much lower costs. To replicate the damage modes similar to that on a fan case in FBO testing, the gas gun experiment has to be carefully designed. To investigate the experimental procedure and data acquisition techniques for FBO test, a low cost, small spin rig was first constructed. FBO tests were carried out with the small rig. The observed blade-to-fan case interactions were similar to those reported using larger spin rigs. The small rig has the potential in a variety of applications from investigating FBO events, verifying concept designs of rotors, to developing spin testing techniques. This rig was used in the developments of the notched blade releasing mechanism, a wire trigger method for synchronized data acquisition, high speed video imaging and etc. A relationship between the notch depth and the release speed was developed and verified. Next, an original custom designed spin testing facility was constructed. Driven by a 40HP, 40,000rpm air turbine, the spin rig is housed in a vacuum chamber of phi72inx40in (1829mmx1016mm). The heavily armored chamber is furnished with 9 viewports. This facility enables unprecedented investigations of FBO events. In parallel, a 15.4ft (4.7m) long phi4.1inch (105mm

  19. Simultaneous analysis of matter radii, transition probabilities, and excitation energies of Mg isotopes by angular-momentum-projected configuration-mixing calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Mitsuhiro; Watanabe, Shin; Tagami, Shingo; Matsumoto, Takuma; Shimizu, Yoshifumi R.; Yahiro, Masanobu

    2016-06-01

    We perform simultaneous analysis of (1) matter radii, (2) B (E 2 ;0+→2+) transition probabilities, and (3) excitation energies, E (2+) and E (4+) , for Mg-4024 by using the beyond-mean-field (BMF) framework with angular-momentum-projected configuration mixing with respect to the axially symmetric β2 deformation with infinitesimal cranking. The BMF calculations successfully reproduce all of the data for rm,B (E 2 ) , and E (2+) and E (4+) , indicating that it is quite useful for data analysis; particularly for low-lying states. We also discuss the absolute value of the deformation parameter β2 deduced from measured values of B (E 2 ) and rm. This framework makes it possible to investigate the effects of β2 deformation, the change in β2 due to restoration of rotational symmetry, β2 configuration mixing, and the inclusion of time-odd components by infinitesimal cranking. Under the assumption of axial deformation and parity conservation, we clarify which effect is important for each of the three measurements and propose the kinds of BMF calculations that are practical for each of the three kinds of observables.

  20. How Do Pseudocapacitors Store Energy? Theoretical Analysis and Experimental Illustration.

    PubMed

    Costentin, Cyrille; Porter, Thomas R; Savéant, Jean-Michel

    2017-03-15

    Batteries and electrochemical double layer charging capacitors are two classical means of storing electrical energy. These two types of charge storage can be unambiguously distinguished from one another by the shape and scan-rate dependence of their cyclic voltammetric (CV) current-potential responses. The former shows peak-shaped current-potential responses, proportional to the scan rate v or to v(1/2), whereas the latter displays a quasi-rectangular response proportional to the scan rate. On the contrary, the notion of pseudocapacitance, popularized in the 1980s and 1990s for metal oxide systems, has been used to describe a charge storage process that is faradaic in nature yet displays capacitive CV signatures. It has been speculated that a quasi-rectangular CV response resembling that of a truly capacitive response arises from a series of faradaic redox couples with a distribution of potentials, yet this idea has never been justified theoretically. We address this problem by first showing theoretically that this distribution-of-potentials approach is closely equivalent to the more physically meaningful consideration of concentration-dependent activity coefficients resulting from interactions between reactants. The result of the ensuing analysis is that, in either case, the CV responses never yield a quasi-rectangular response ∝ ν, identical to that of double layer charging. Instead, broadened peak-shaped responses are obtained. It follows that whenever a quasi-rectangular CV response proportional to scan rate is observed, such reputed pseudocapacitive behaviors should in fact be ascribed to truly capacitive double layer charging. We compare these results qualitatively with pseudocapacitor reports taken from the literature, including the classic RuO2 and MnO2 examples, and we present a quantitative analysis with phosphate cobalt oxide films. Our conclusions do not invalidate the numerous experimental studies carried out under the pseudocapacitance banner but

  1. The experimental investigation and thermodynamic analysis of vortex tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Adem; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Kaya, Mehmet; Karagoz, Sendogan

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, it was aimed to produce a fundamental i nformation and to investigate the effects of various design parameters on tube performance characteristics by setting up vortex tube experimental system in order to study the parameters predetermined for the design of vortex tubes and by conducting thermodynamic analysis. According to the findings of experiments, as the mass flow rate of cold flow increases (yc) temperature of cold flow also increases, while the temperature of warm flow increases approximately to yc = 0.6 and then decreases. Increases in inlet pressure, inlet nozzle surface and diameter of the cold outlet orifice increased temperature differences between cold and warm flows. Tube with L/D = 10 showed better performance than with L/D = 20. The finding that irreversibility parameter is very close to critical threshold of irreversibility proved that process in vortex tube is considerably irreversible. Coefficient of performance (COP) values in vortex tube were much lower than other heating and cooling systems. This situation may show that vortex tubes are convenient in the processes where productivity is at the second rate compared to other factors.

  2. Analysis of experimental studies on gully erosion: a global review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Carlos; Gómez, Jose A.

    2015-04-01

    Research on gully erosion has increased significantly in the last decades. Despite the growing interest on the topic, relevant knowledge gaps still remain a challenge for gully erosion researchers (Poesen, 2011). Moreover, many of these studies are mainly descriptive, with little quantitative data allowing a comparison of the severity of the processes among different environments and conditions. The aim of this communication is to analyse the available experimental data in gully erosion literature involving quantitative information from the Web of Science datasets. Our objective is to investigate relevant trends of this type of erosion on the world scale. We have evaluated the role of gully erosion in the overall soil losses as well as the magnitude of the morphological variables. Also, we analysed the characteristics of image-based and field surveys regarding the technique employed, duration and data collection frequency. In this communication, we intend to provide insights on the evolution of gully erosion research up to the present moment in order to gain perspectives on the design of future efforts in the topic. References Poesen, J. 2011. Challenges in gully erosion research. Landform Analysis, Vol. 17: 5-9.

  3. Genetic analysis of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.; Rosenwasser, O.A.; O`Neill, J.K.; Turk, J.L.

    1995-10-15

    Experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that exhibits many pathologic similarities with multiple sclerosis. While products of the MHC are known to control the development of EAE, it is clear that non-MHC products also influence susceptibility. The chromosomal locations of these were investigated in selective crosses between MHC class II-compatible, EAE-susceptible Biozzi ABH, and low responder nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. The disease was dominant and highly influenced by gender in the backcross one (BC{sub 1}) generation. Female mice were significantly more susceptible than male mice. Segregation of disease frequency of female animals in this cross suggested that EAE was controlled by a major locus. Although microsatellite-based exclusion mapping indicated that a number of regions on chromosomes 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, and 18 showed evidence of linkage (p<0.05) compared with expected random distributions of alleles, disease susceptibility was most strongly linked (p<0.05) to chromosome 7. However, by selectively analyzing animals that were either severely affected or almost normal, additional susceptibility loci were mapped on chromosomes 18 and 11 that were linked (p<0.001) to resistance and the development of severe disease, respectively. The data indicate a major locus on chromosome 7, affecting initiation and severity of EAE that is probably modified by several other unlinked loci. These localizations may provide candidate loci for the analysis of human autoimmune-demyelinating disease. 30 refs., 5 tabs.

  4. Experimental sensitivity analysis of oxygen transfer in the capillary fringe.

    PubMed

    Haberer, Christina M; Cirpka, Olaf A; Rolle, Massimo; Grathwohl, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen transfer in the capillary fringe (CF) is of primary importance for a wide variety of biogeochemical processes occurring in shallow groundwater systems. In case of a fluctuating groundwater table two distinct mechanisms of oxygen transfer within the capillary zone can be identified: vertical predominantly diffusive mass flux of oxygen, and mass transfer between entrapped gas and groundwater. In this study, we perform a systematic experimental sensitivity analysis in order to assess the influence of different parameters on oxygen transfer from entrapped air within the CF to underlying anoxic groundwater. We carry out quasi two-dimensional flow-through experiments focusing on the transient phase following imbibition to investigate the influence of the horizontal flow velocity, the average grain diameter of the porous medium, as well as the magnitude and the speed of the water table rise. We present a numerical flow and transport model that quantitatively represents the main mechanisms governing oxygen transfer. Assuming local equilibrium between the aqueous and the gaseous phase, the partitioning process from entrapped air can be satisfactorily simulated. The different experiments are monitored by measuring vertical oxygen concentration profiles at high spatial resolution with a noninvasive optode technique as well as by determining oxygen fluxes at the outlet of the flow-through chamber. The results show that all parameters investigated have a significant effect and determine different amounts of oxygen transferred to the oxygen-depleted groundwater. Particularly relevant are the magnitude of the water table rise and the grain size of the porous medium.

  5. Meta-analysis on brain representation of experimental dental pain.

    PubMed

    Lin, C-S; Niddam, D M; Hsu, M-L

    2014-02-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been widely used for investigating the brain representation associated with dental pain evoked by pulpal electrical stimulation. However, because of the heterogeneity of experimental designs and the small sample size of individual studies, the common brain representation regarding dental pain has remained elusive. We used imaging meta-analysis to investigate six dental pain-related fMRI studies (n = 87) and tested 3 hypotheses: (1) Dental pain is associated with the 'core' pain-related network; (2) pain-related brain activation is somatotopically organized in the somatosensory cortex; and (3) dental pain is associated with the cognitive-affective network related to pain. Qualitative and quantitative meta-analyses revealed: (1) common activation of the core pain-related network, including the somatosensory cortex, the insula, and the cingulate cortex; (2) inconsistency in somatotopically organized activation of the primary somatosensory cortex; and (3) common activation in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, suggesting a role of re-appraisal and coping in the experience of dental pain. In conclusion, fMRI combined with pulpal stimulation can effectively evoke activity in the pain-related network. The dental pain-related brain representation disclosed the mechanisms of how sensory and cognitive-affective factors shape dental pain, which will help in the development of more effective customized methods for central pain control.

  6. Experimental and numerical analysis of automotive gearbox rattle noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadmiri, Younes; Rigaud, Emmanuel; Perret-Liaudet, Joël; Vary, Laurence

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this work is to characterize the rattle noise of automotive gearboxes, resulting from impacts between toothed wheels of unselected gear ratios. These stereo-mechanical impacts are modeled by a coefficient of restitution which describes damping during the squeezing of the lubricant film for approaching surfaces, and the elastic deformation of impacting bodies. The dynamic response of the loose gear first depends on the design parameters and the engine operating conditions. The unknown parameters are the drag torque and the coefficient of restitution. They are identified experimentally through implementation of two optical encoders in an actual automotive gearbox and the operation of a specific test bench which replicates the automotive power train. Models of the different drag torque sources are validated from analysis of the free damped response of the driveline. The coefficient of restitution and its probability density function are measured from experiments under stationary operating conditions. A nonlinear model is built. The dynamic response of the loose gear depends on the dimensionless backlash, the coefficient of restitution and a dimensionless parameter proposed to describe the rattle excitation level. Experiments under controlled excitation are performed to validate the assumptions, to confirm the ability of the parameter proposed to describe the rattle noise threshold, and to characterize the dynamic response. The nonlinear model predictions are fitted with the drag torque and coefficient of restitution previously identified. They are compared with measurements to demonstrate the ability of the model to predict gear rattle for any loose gear, any gearbox and any operating condition.

  7. The role of configurational disorder on plastic and dynamic deformation in Cu64Zr36 metallic glasses: A molecular dynamics analysis

    PubMed Central

    Feng, S. D.; Chan, K. C.; Chen, S. H.; Zhao, L.; Liu, R. P.

    2017-01-01

    The varying degrees of configurational disorder in metallic glasses are investigated quantitatively by molecular dynamics studies. A parameter, the quasi-nearest atom, is used to characterize the configurational disorder in metallic glasses. Our observations suggest configurational disorder play a role in structural heterogeneity, plasticity and dynamic relaxations in metallic glasses. The broad configurational disorder regions distribution is the indicator of abundant potential deformation units and relaxations. Plastic flow, as well as relaxation, is believed to start at configurational disorder regions. The width of the shear bands and dynamic relaxations can then be regulated by the degree of configurational disorder regions in metallic glasses. PMID:28102359

  8. Investigation of Advanced Counterrotation Blade Configuration Concepts for High Speed Turboprop Systems. Task 8: Cooling Flow/heat Transfer Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Edward J.; Topp, David A.; Heidegger, Nathan J.; Delaney, Robert A.

    1994-01-01

    The focus of this task was to validate the ADPAC code for heat transfer calculations. To accomplish this goal, the ADPAC code was modified to allow for a Cartesian coordinate system capability and to add boundary conditions to handle spanwise periodicity and transpiration boundaries. The primary validation case was the film cooled C3X vane. The cooling hole modeling included both a porous region and grid in each discrete hold. Predictions for these models as well as smooth wall compared well with the experimental data.

  9. Space shuttle engineering and operations support. ALT separation reference trajectories for tailcone on orbiter forward and aft CG configurations. Mission planning, mission analysis and software formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glenn, G. M.

    1977-01-01

    A preflight analysis of the ALT separation reference trajectories for the tailcone on, forward, and aft cg orbiter configurations is documented. The ALT separation reference trajectories encompass the time from physical separation of the orbiter from the carrier to orbiter attainment of the maximum ALT interface airspeed. The trajectories include post separation roll maneuvers by both vehicles and are generated using the final preflight data base. The trajectories so generated satisfy all known separation design criteria and violate no known constraints. The requirement for this analysis is given along with the specifications, assumptions, and analytical approach used to generate the separation trajectories. The results of the analytical approach are evaluated, and conclusions and recommendations are summarized.

  10. MAGE (M-file/Mif Automatic GEnerator): A graphical interface tool for automatic generation of Object Oriented Micromagnetic Framework configuration files and Matlab scripts for results analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chęciński, Jakub; Frankowski, Marek

    2016-10-01

    We present a tool for fully-automated generation of both simulations configuration files (Mif) and Matlab scripts for automated data analysis, dedicated for Object Oriented Micromagnetic Framework (OOMMF). We introduce extended graphical user interface (GUI) that allows for fast, error-proof and easy creation of Mifs, without any programming skills usually required for manual Mif writing necessary. With MAGE we provide OOMMF extensions for complementing it by mangetoresistance and spin-transfer-torque calculations, as well as local magnetization data selection for output. Our software allows for creation of advanced simulations conditions like simultaneous parameters sweeps and synchronic excitation application. Furthermore, since output of such simulation could be long and complicated we provide another GUI allowing for automated creation of Matlab scripts suitable for analysis of such data with Fourier and wavelet transforms as well as user-defined operations.

  11. Qualitative analysis of the helical electronic energy of inherently chiral calix[4]arenes: an approach to effectively assign their absolute configuration.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shuang; Chang, Ming-Liang; Zhou, Jing; Fu, Jing-Wei; Zhang, Qing-Wei; Li, Shao-Yong; Qiao, Wei; Liu, Jun-Min

    2014-06-03

    For all microhelices on aromatic rings of inherently chiral calix[4]arene, an expression was derived from one approximation and one hypothesis on the basis of the electron-on-a-helix model of Tinoco and Woody as follows: 1/E = μ(H - KΔα2), where μ = 1 for the right-handed microhelix and μ = -1 for the left-handed microhelix; and H and K are constant and greater than zero. The expression correlates microhelical electronic energy (E) with the atom polarizability difference (Δα) on both microhelix ends, which intuitively and clearly shows the impact of helical substituent polarizability on helical electronic energy. The case analysis almost entirely proves that the qualitative analysis of the helical electronic energy of inherently chiral calix[4]arenes with the expression is scientific and can be used to effectively assign their absolute configuration.

  12. Metrics for measuring distances in configuration spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sadeghi, Ali Ghasemi, S. Alireza; Schaefer, Bastian; Mohr, Stephan; Goedecker, Stefan; Lill, Markus A.

    2013-11-14

    In order to characterize molecular structures we introduce configurational fingerprint vectors which are counterparts of quantities used experimentally to identify structures. The Euclidean distance between the configurational fingerprint vectors satisfies the properties of a metric and can therefore safely be used to measure dissimilarities between configurations in the high dimensional configuration space. In particular we show that these metrics are a perfect and computationally cheap replacement for the root-mean-square distance (RMSD) when one has to decide whether two noise contaminated configurations are identical or not. We introduce a Monte Carlo approach to obtain the global minimum of the RMSD between configurations, which is obtained from a global minimization over all translations, rotations, and permutations of atomic indices.

  13. Computer Lab Configuration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wodarz, Nan

    2003-01-01

    Describes the layout and elements of an effective school computer lab. Includes configuration, storage spaces, cabling and electrical requirements, lighting, furniture, and computer hardware and peripherals. (PKP)

  14. Analysis of ultra-high sensitivity configuration in chip-integrated photonic crystal microcavity bio-sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarty, Swapnajit Hosseini, Amir; Xu, Xiaochuan; Zhu, Liang; Zou, Yi; Chen, Ray T.

    2014-05-12

    We analyze the contributions of quality factor, fill fraction, and group index of chip-integrated resonance microcavity devices, to the detection limit for bulk chemical sensing and the minimum detectable biomolecule concentration in biosensing. We analyze the contributions from analyte absorbance, as well as from temperature and spectral noise. Slow light in two-dimensional photonic crystals provide opportunities for significant reduction of the detection limit below 1 × 10{sup −7} RIU (refractive index unit) which can enable highly sensitive sensors in diverse application areas. We demonstrate experimentally detected concentration of 1 fM (67 fg/ml) for the binding between biotin and avidin, the lowest reported till date.

  15. Experimental heatstroke in baboon: analysis of the systemic inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Bouchama, Abderrezak; Ollivier, Véronique; Roberts, George; Al Mohanna, Falah; de Prost, Dominique; Eldali, Abdelmoneim; Saussereau, Elodie; El-Sayed, Raafat; Chollet-Martin, Sylvie

    2005-10-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the pattern of the inflammatory response to heatstroke in an experimental baboon model with a view to identifying potential target for therapeutic interventions. Blinded analysis of plasma collected from 12 juvenile baboons (Papio hamadryas) in heatstroke was used. Eight anesthetized animals were heat-stressed in an incubator at 44 degrees C to 47 degrees C until rectal temperature was 42.5 degrees C (moderate heatstroke; n = 4) or systolic arterial pressure fell to <90 mmHg (severe heatstroke; n = 4) and were allowed to recover at room temperature. Four sham-heated animals served as a control group. We performed sequential measurement of cytokines. The rectal temperature on completion of heat stress was 42.5 degrees C +/- 0.0 degrees C and 43.3 degrees C +/- 0.1 degrees C in moderate and severe heatstroke, respectively. Heat stress elicited early, simultaneous release of anti-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines (IL-10, IL-1ra, sTNFr I and II, and IL-8). Circulating levels of IL-12p40 were significantly decreased, whereas TNFalpha, IL-1beta, and IL-4 were below the detection limit in all animals. No baboon survived severe heatstroke; there was neurological morbidity without mortality in moderate heatstroke. Nonsurvivors displayed significantly greater activity/alterations in inflammation markers than survivors. Sham-heated animals had no evidence of inflammation activation. These results show that heatstroke activates complex systemic inflammatory and regulatory responses associated with outcome. Further definition of this ambivalent response is needed before identification of target of successful modulation may become possible.

  16. Towards experimental validation of an analysis framework for morphing radiators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertagne, Christopher L.; Erickson, Lisa R.; Sheth, Rubik B.; Whitcomb, John D.; Hartl, Darren J.

    2016-04-01

    Thermal control is an important aspect of spacecraft design, particularly in the case of crewed vehicles, which must maintain a precise internal temperature at all times in spite of sometimes drastic variations in the external thermal environment and internal heat loads. The successes of the Space Shuttle and International Space Station programs have shown that this can be accomplished in Low Earth Orbit (LEO), however, crewed spacecraft traveling beyond LEO are expected to encounter more challenging thermal conditions with significant variations in both the heat rejection requirements and environment temperature. Such missions will require radiator systems with high turndown ratios, defined as the ratio between the maximum and minimum heat rejection rates achievable by the radiator system. Current radiators are only able to achieve turndown ratios of 3:1, far less than the 12:1 turndown ratio which is expected to be required on future missions. An innovative radiator concept, known as a morphing radiator, uses the temperature-induced shape change of shape memory alloy (SMA) materials to achieve a turndown ratio of at least 12:1. Predicting the thermal and structural behavior of SMA-based morphing radiators is challenging due to the presence of two-way thermomechanical coupling that has not been widely considered in the literature. Previous work has demonstrated the application of a technique known as a partitioned analysis procedure which can be used to simulate the behavior of morphing radiators. This work describes ongoing efforts to evaluate the physical accuracy of this approach by conducting validation studies. A detailed finite element model of a morphing radiator is developed and executed using the framework. Preliminary results show close agreement between the experimental data and model predictions, giving additional confidence in the partitioned approach.

  17. Experimental investigations for uncertainty quantification in brake squeal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renault, A.; Massa, F.; Lallemand, B.; Tison, T.

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to improve the correlation between the experimental and the numerical prediction of unstable frequencies for automotive brake systems considering uncertainty. First, an experimental quantification of uncertainty and a discussion analysing the contributions of uncertainty to a numerical squeal simulation are proposed. Frequency and transient simulations are performed considering nominal values of model parameters, determined experimentally. The obtained results are compared with those derived from experimental tests to highlight the limitation of deterministic simulations. The effects of the different kinds of uncertainty detected in working conditions of brake system, the pad boundary condition, the brake system material properties and the pad surface topography are discussed by defining different unstable mode classes. Finally, a correlation between experimental and numerical results considering uncertainty is successfully proposed for an industrial brake system. Results from the different comparisons reveal also a major influence of the pad topography and consequently the contact distribution.

  18. Euler Technology Assessment for Preliminary Aircraft Design-Unstructured/Structured Grid NASTD Application for Aerodynamic Analysis of an Advanced Fighter/Tailless Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michal, Todd R.

    1998-01-01

    This study supports the NASA Langley sponsored project aimed at determining the viability of using Euler technology for preliminary design use. The primary objective of this study was to assess the accuracy and efficiency of the Boeing, St. Louis unstructured grid flow field analysis system, consisting of the MACGS grid generation and NASTD flow solver codes. Euler solutions about the Aero Configuration/Weapons Fighter Technology (ACWFT) 1204 aircraft configuration were generated. Several variations of the geometry were investigated including a standard wing, cambered wing, deflected elevon, and deflected body flap. A wide range of flow conditions, most of which were in the non-linear regimes of the flight envelope, including variations in speed (subsonic, transonic, supersonic), angles of attack, and sideslip were investigated. Several flowfield non-linearities were present in these solutions including shock waves, vortical flows and the resulting interactions. The accuracy of this method was evaluated by comparing solutions with test data and Navier-Stokes solutions. The ability to accurately predict lateral-directional characteristics and control effectiveness was investigated by computing solutions with sideslip, and with deflected control surfaces. Problem set up times and computational resource requirements were documented and used to evaluate the efficiency of this approach for use in the fast paced preliminary design environment.

  19. PIV Logon Configuration Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Glen Alan

    2016-03-04

    This document details the configurations and enhancements implemented to support the usage of federal Personal Identity Verification (PIV) Card for logon on unclassified networks. The guidance is a reference implementation of the configurations and enhancements deployed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) by Network and Infrastructure Engineering – Core Services (NIE-CS).

  20. Investigation of advanced counterrotation blade configuration concepts for high speed turboprop systems, task 1: Ducted propfan analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Edward J.; Delaney, Robert A.; Bettner, James L.

    1990-01-01

    The time-dependent three-dimensional Euler equations of gas dynamics were solved numerically to study the steady compressible transonic flow about ducted propfan propulsion systems. Aerodynamic calculations were based on a four-stage Runge-Kutta time-marching finite volume solution technique with added numerical dissipation. An implicit residual smoothing operator was used to aid convergence. Two calculation grids were employed in this study. The first grid utilized an H-type mesh network with a branch cut opening to represent the axisymmetric cowl. The second grid utilized a multiple-block mesh system with a C-type grid about the cowl. The individual blocks were numerically coupled in the Euler solver. Grid systems were generated by a combined algebraic/elliptic algortihm developed specifically for ducted propfans. Numerical calculations were initially performed for unducted propfans to verify the accuracy of the three-dimensional Euler formulation. The Euler analyses were then applied for the calculation of ducted propfan flows, and predicted results were compared with experimental data for two cases. The three-dimensional Euler analyses displayed exceptional accuracy, although certain parameters were observed to be very sensitive to geometric deflections. Both solution schemes were found to be very robust and demonstrated nearly equal efficiency and accuracy, although it was observed that the multi-block C-grid formulation provided somewhat better resolution of the cowl leading edge region.

  1. CFD Predictions for Transonic Performance of the ERA Hybrid Wing-Body Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deere, Karen A.; Luckring, James M.; McMillin, S. Naomi; Flamm, Jeffrey D.; Roman, Dino

    2016-01-01

    A computational study was performed for a Hybrid Wing Body configuration that was focused at transonic cruise performance conditions. In the absence of experimental data, two fully independent computational fluid dynamics analyses were conducted to add confidence to the estimated transonic performance predictions. The primary analysis was performed by Boeing with the structured overset-mesh code OVERFLOW. The secondary analysis was performed by NASA Langley Research Center with the unstructured-mesh code USM3D. Both analyses were performed at full-scale flight conditions and included three configurations customary to drag buildup and interference analysis: a powered complete configuration, the configuration with the nacelle/pylon removed, and the powered nacelle in isolation. The results in this paper are focused primarily on transonic performance up to cruise and through drag rise. Comparisons between the CFD results were very good despite some minor geometric differences in the two analyses.

  2. A general panel method for the analysis and design of arbitrary configurations in incompressible flows. [boundary value problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, F. T.

    1980-01-01

    A method for solving the linear integral equations of incompressible potential flow in three dimensions is presented. Both analysis (Neumann) and design (Dirichlet) boundary conditions are treated in a unified approach to the general flow problem. The method is an influence coefficient scheme which employs source and doublet panels as boundary surfaces. Curved panels possessing singularity strengths, which vary as polynomials are used, and all influence coefficients are derived in closed form. These and other features combine to produce an efficient scheme which is not only versatile but eminently suited to the practical realities of a user-oriented environment. A wide variety of numerical results demonstrating the method is presented.

  3. Subsonic-to-Hypersonic Aerodynamic Characteristics for a Winged, Circular-Body, Single-Stage-to-Orbit Spacecraft Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, W. P.; Engelund, W. C.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic characteristics were obtained for a generic, winged, circular-body, single-stage-to-orbit spacecraft configuration. The baseline configuration was longitudinally stable and trimmable at almost all Mach numbers from 0.15 to 10.0--with the exception occurring at low supersonic speeds. Landing speed and subsonic-to-hypersonic longitudinal stability and control appear to be within design guidelines. Lateral-directional instabilities found over the entire speed range, however, create a problem area for this configuration. Longitudinal aerodynamic predictions made utilizing the Aerodynamic Preliminary Analysis System (APAS) were in qualitative, often quantitative agreement with experimental values.

  4. Structural Analysis of Human and Macaque Monoclonal Antibodies 2909 and 2.5B: Implications for the Configuration of the Quaternary Neutralizing Epitope of HIV-1 gp120

    SciTech Connect

    B Spurrier; J Sampson; M Totrov; H Li; T ONeal; C Williams; J Robinson; M Gorny; S Zolla-Pazner; X Kong

    2011-12-31

    The quaternary neutralizing epitope (QNE) of HIV-1 gp120 is preferentially expressed on the trimeric envelope spikes of intact HIV virions, and QNE-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) potently neutralize HIV-1. Here, we present the crystal structures of the Fabs of human mAb 2909 and macaque mAb 2.5B. Both mAbs have long beta hairpin CDR H3 regions >20 {angstrom} in length that are each situated at the center of their respective antigen-binding sites. Computational analysis showed that the paratopes include the whole CDR H3, while additional CDR residues form shallow binding pockets. Structural modeling suggests a way to understand the configuration of QNEs and the antigen-antibody interaction for QNE mAbs. Our data will be useful in designing immunogens that may elicit potent neutralizing QNE Abs.

  5. Independent Peer Review of Communications, Navigation, and Networking re-Configurable Testbed (CoNNeCT) Project Antenna Pointing Subsystem (APS) Integrated Gimbal Assembly (IGA) Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Ivatury S.; Larsen, Curtis E.; Pellicciotti, Joseph W.

    2010-01-01

    Glenn Research Center Chief Engineer's Office requested an independent review of the structural analysis and modeling of the Communications, Navigation, and Networking re-Configurable Testbed (CoNNeCT) Project Antenna Pointing Subsystem (APS) Integrated Gimbal Assembly (IGA) to be conducted by the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC). At this time, the IGA had completed its critical design review (CDR). The assessment was to be a peer review of the NEi-NASTRAN1 model of the APS Antenna, and not a peer review of the design and the analysis that had been completed by the GRC team for CDR. Thus, only a limited amount of information was provided on the structural analysis. However, the NESC team had difficulty separating analysis concerns from modeling issues. The team studied the NASTRAN model, but did not fully investigate how the model was used by the CoNNeCT Project and how the Project was interpreting the results. The team's findings, observations, and NESC recommendations are contained in this report.

  6. Investigation of advanced counterrotation blade configuration concepts for high speed turboprop systems. Task 4: Advanced fan section aerodynamic analysis computer program user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crook, Andrew J.; Delaney, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    The computer program user's manual for the ADPACAPES (Advanced Ducted Propfan Analysis Code-Average Passage Engine Simulation) program is included. The objective of the computer program is development of a three-dimensional Euler/Navier-Stokes flow analysis for fan section/engine geometries containing multiple blade rows and multiple spanwise flow splitters. An existing procedure developed by Dr. J. J. Adamczyk and associates at the NASA Lewis Research Center was modified to accept multiple spanwise splitter geometries and simulate engine core conditions. The numerical solution is based upon a finite volume technique with a four stage Runge-Kutta time marching procedure. Multiple blade row solutions are based upon the average-passage system of equations. The numerical solutions are performed on an H-type grid system, with meshes meeting the requirement of maintaining a common axisymmetric mesh for each blade row grid. The analysis was run on several geometry configurations ranging from one to five blade rows and from one to four radial flow splitters. The efficiency of the solution procedure was shown to be the same as the original analysis.

  7. Incompressible boundary-layer stability analysis of LFC experimental data for sub-critical Mach numbers. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, S. A.

    1986-01-01

    An incompressible boundary-layer stability analysis of Laminar Flow Control (LFC) experimental data was completed and the results are presented. This analysis was undertaken for three reasons: to study laminar boundary-layer stability on a modern swept LFC airfoil; to calculate incompressible design limits of linear stability theory as applied to a modern airfoil at high subsonic speeds; and to verify the use of linear stability theory as a design tool. The experimental data were taken from the slotted LFC experiment recently completed in the NASA Langley 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel. Linear stability theory was applied and the results were compared with transition data to arrive at correlated n-factors. Results of the analysis showed that for the configuration and cases studied, Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) amplification was the dominating disturbance influencing transition. For these cases, incompressible linear stability theory correlated with an n-factor for TS waves of approximately 10 at transition. The n-factor method correlated rather consistently to this value despite a number of non-ideal conditions which indicates the method is useful as a design tool for advanced laminar flow airfoils.

  8. Preliminary design of an auxiliary power unit for the space shuttle: Component and system configuration screening analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binsley, R. L.; Maddox, J. P.; Marcy, R. D.; Siegler, R. S.; Spies, R.

    1971-01-01

    The auxiliary power unit (APU) for the space shuttle is required to provide hydraulic and electrical power on board the booster and orbiter vehicles. Five systems and their associated components, which utilize hot gas turbines to supply horsepower at gearbox output pads, were studied. Hydrogen-oxygen and storable propellants were considered for the hot gas supply. All APU's were required to be self-contained with respect to dissipating internally generated heat. These five systems were evaluated relative to a consistent criteria. The system supplied with high pressure gaseous hydrogen and oxygen was recommended as the best approach. It included a two-stage pressure-compounded partial-admission turbine, a propellant conditioning system with recuperation, a control system, and a gearbox. The gearbox output used was 240 hp. At the close of the study a 400 hp level was considered more appropriate for meeting the prime shuttle vehicle needs, and an in-depth analysis of the system at the 400 hp output level was recommended.

  9. An historical analysis of the California Current circulation using ROMS 4D-Var: System configuration and diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neveu, Emilie; Moore, Andrew M.; Edwards, Christopher A.; Fiechter, Jérôme; Drake, Patrick; Crawford, William J.; Jacox, Michael G.; Nuss, Emma

    2016-03-01

    The Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) 4-dimensional variational (4D-Var) data assimilation tool has been used to compute two sequences of circulation analyses for the U.S. west coast. One sequence of analyses spans the period 1980-2010 and is subject to surface forcing derived from relatively low resolution atmospheric products from the Cross-Calibrated Multi-Platform wind product (CCMP) and the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) reanalysis project. The second sequence spans the shorter period 1999-2012 and is subject to forcing derived from a high resolution product from the Naval Research Laboratory Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS). The two analysis periods are divided into eight day windows, and all available satellite observations of sea surface temperature and sea surface height, as well as in situhydrographic profiles are assimilated into ROMS using 4D-Var. The performance of the system is monitored in terms of the cost function and the statistics of the innovations, and the impact of data assimilated on the circulation is assessed by comparing the posterior circulation estimates with the prior circulation and the circulation from a run of the model without data assimilation, with particular emphasis on eddy kinetic energy. This is part I of a two part series, and the circulation variability of the 4D-Var analyses will be documented in part II.

  10. Nickel(II) in chelate N2O2 environment. DFT approach and in-depth molecular orbital and configurational analysis.

    PubMed

    Trifunović, Srećko R; Miletić, Vesna D; Jevtić, Verica V; Meetsma, Auke; Matović, Zoran D

    2013-10-07

    The O-N-N-O-type tetradentate ligands H2S,S-eddp (H2S,S-eddp stands for S,S-ethylenediamine-N,N'-di-2-propionic acid) and H2edap (H2edap stands for ethylenediamine-N-acetic-N'-3-propionic acid) and the corresponding novel octahedral nickel(II) complexes have been prepared and characterized. N2O2 ligands coordinate to the nickel(II) ion via four donor atoms (two deprotonated carboxylate atoms and two amine nitrogens) affording octahedral geometry in the case of all investigated Ni(II) complexes. A six coordinate, octahedral geometry has been verified crystallographically for the s-cis-[Ni(S,S-eddp)(H2O)2] complex. Structural data correlating similarly chelated Ni(II) complexes have been used to carry out an extensive configuration analysis. Molecular mechanics and Density Functional Theory (DFT) have been used to model the most stable geometric isomer, yielding, at the same time, significant structural and spectroscopic (TDDFT) data. The results from density functional studies have been compared to X-ray data. Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) and Natural Energetic Decomposition Analysis (NEDA) have been done for the [Ni(edda-type)(H2O)(2-n)] and nH2O fragments. Molecular orbital analysis (MPA) is given as well. The infra-red and electronic absorption spectra of the complexes are discussed in comparison to the related complexes of known geometries.

  11. CFD Simulations of Tiltrotor Configurations in Hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potsdam, Mark a.; Strawn, Roger C.

    2002-01-01

    Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics calculations are presented for isolated, half-span, and full-span V-22 tiltrotor hover configurations. These computational results extend the validity of CFD hover methodology beyond conventional rotorcraft applications to tiltrotor configurations. Computed steady-state, isolated rotor performance agrees well with experimental measurements, showing little sensitivity to grid resolution. However, blade-vortex interaction flowfield details are sensitive to numerical dissipation and are more difficult to model accurately. Time-dependent, dynamic, half- and full-span installed configurations show sensitivities in performance to the tiltrotor fountain flow. As such, the full-span configuration exhibits higher rotor performance and lower airframe download than the half-span configuration. Half-span rotor installation trends match available half-span data, and airframe downloads are reasonably well predicted. Overall, the CFD solutions provide a wealth of flowfield details that can be used to analyze and improve tiltrotor aerodynamic performance.

  12. Experimental Modal Analysis of Rectangular and Circular Beams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emory, Benjamin H.; Zhu, Wei Dong

    2006-01-01

    Analytical and experimental methods are used to determine the natural frequencies and mode shapes of Aluminum 6061-T651 beams with rectangular and circular cross-sections. A unique test stand is developed to provide the rectangular beam with different boundary conditions including clamped-free, clamped-clamped, clamped-pinned, and pinned-pinned.…

  13. Analytical and Experimental Vibration Analysis of a Faulty Gear System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choy, F. K.; Braun, M. J.; Polyshchuk, V.; Zakrajsek, J. J.; Townsend, D. P.; Handschuh, R. F.

    1994-01-01

    A comprehensive analytical procedure was developed for predicting faults in gear transmission systems under normal operating conditions. A gear tooth fault model is developed to simulate the effects of pitting and wear on the vibration signal under normal operating conditions. The model uses changes in the gear mesh stiffness to simulate the effects of gear tooth faults. The overall dynamics of the gear transmission system is evaluated by coupling the dynamics of each individual gear-rotor system through gear mesh forces generated between each gear-rotor system and the bearing forces generated between the rotor and the gearbox structure. The predicted results were compared with experimental results obtained from a spiral bevel gear fatigue test rig at NASA Lewis Research Center. The Wigner-Ville distribution (WVD) was used to give a comprehensive comparison of the predicted and experimental results. The WVD method applied to the experimental results were also compared to other fault detection techniques to verify the WVD's ability to detect the pitting damage, and to determine its relative performance. Overall results show good correlation between the experimental vibration data of the damaged test gear and the predicted vibration from the model with simulated gear tooth pitting damage. Results also verified that the WVD method can successfully detect and locate gear tooth wear and pitting damage.

  14. A Vertical Differential Configuration in GPR prospecting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persico, Raffaele; Pochanin, Gennadiy; Varianytsia-Roshchupkina, Liudmyla; Catapano, Ilaria; Gennarelli, Gianluca; Soldovieri, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    small objects and interfaces. This configuration can be labeled as a vertical differential configuration. At the conference, the reconstruction capabilities of this differential GPR configuration system will be discussed by means of an analysis of the problem based on a properly designed microwave tomographic inversion approach. The proposed approach exploits the Born approximation and faces the imaging as the solution of a linear inverse scattering problem. In this way, the problem of the local minima is avoided [7] and it is possible to impose some regularization to the problem in an easy way problem [8-9]. At the conference, a theoretical analysis of the mathematical propserties of the scattering operator under the vertical differential configuration will be presented showing that, with respect to the horizontal differential configuration, the vertical one allows to reject the direct coupling between the antennas but not the coupling of the antennas occurring through the air-soil interface. On the other hand, the filtering properties of the operator at hand con be considered, let say, less severe in some cases. At the conference, both some numerical and experimental results will be shown. References [1] R. Persico, F. Soldovieri, "Effects of the background removal in linear inverse scattering", IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens, vol. 46, pp. 1104-1114, April 2008. [2] L. Gurel, U. Oguz, "Three-Dimensional FDTD modeling of a ground penetrating radar", IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens, vol. 38, pp. 1513-1521, July 2000. [3] L. Gurel, U. Oguz, "Optimization of the transmitter-receiver separation in the ground penetrating radar", IEEE Trans. Antennas and Propag., vol. 51, no 3, pp. 362-370, March 2003. [4] R. Persico, F. Soldovieri, "A microwave tomography approach for a differential configuration in GPR prospecting", IEEE Trans. Antennas and Propag., vol. 54, pp. 3541 - 3548, 2006. [5] Y.A. Kopylov, S.A. Masalov, G.P. Pochanin, "The way of isolation between transmitting

  15. Compact Torsatron configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Carreras, B. A.; Dominguez, N.; Garcia, L.; Lynch, V. E.; Lyon, J. F.; Cary, J. R.; Hanson, J. D.; Navarro, A. P.

    1987-09-01

    Low-aspect-ratio stellarator configurations can be realized by using torsatron winding. Plasmas with aspect ratios in the range of 3.5 to 5 can be confined by these Compact Torsatron configurations. Stable operation at high BETA should be possible in these devices, if a vertical field coil system is adequately designed to avoid breaking of the magnetic surfaces at finite BETA. 17 refs., 21 figs., 1 tab.

  16. The "Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior" at Zero, Fifty, and One Hundred

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catania, A. Charles

    2008-01-01

    The experimental content areas represented in "JEAB" in its first volume (1958) and fifty 50 years later in Volume 87 are in many ways similar with regard to research on schedules of reinforcement, research with human subjects, and several other topics. Experimental analysis has not been displaced by quantitative analysis. Much less research on…

  17. ION Configuration Editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borgen, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    The configuration of ION (Inter - planetary Overlay Network) network nodes is a manual task that is complex, time-consuming, and error-prone. This program seeks to accelerate this job and produce reliable configurations. The ION Configuration Editor is a model-based smart editor based on Eclipse Modeling Framework technology. An ION network designer uses this Eclipse-based GUI to construct a data model of the complete target network and then generate configurations. The data model is captured in an XML file. Intrinsic editor features aid in achieving model correctness, such as field fill-in, type-checking, lists of valid values, and suitable default values. Additionally, an explicit "validation" feature executes custom rules to catch more subtle model errors. A "survey" feature provides a set of reports providing an overview of the entire network, enabling a quick assessment of the model s completeness and correctness. The "configuration" feature produces the main final result, a complete set of ION configuration files (eight distinct file types) for each ION node in the network.

  18. Effect of the supersonic transport configuration on the sonic boom parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, V. M.; Chirkashenko, V. F.; Volkov, V. F.; Kharitonov, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    Results of numerical and experimental investigations of the sonic boom parameters for two configurations of civil supersonic transport are presented. Numerical modelling is performed by a combined method based on calculating the spatial flow in the near zone of the aircraft configuration and subsequent determination of disturbed flow parameters at large distances from the examined model. Numerical results are compared with experimental sonic boom parameters measured in the near zone and with results of their recalculation to large distances within the framework of the quasi-linear theory. This validation allows the degree of adequacy of the inviscid Euler model for solving the posed problem to be determined. Reasons for certain disagreement between the calculated and experimental data are discussed. The analysis confirms the possibility of attenuating the sonic boom generated by supersonic transport with an unconventional configuration based on a tandem arrangement of two wings on the fuselage.

  19. Experimental 3-D SAR Human Target Signature Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-21

    through the wall structure that the radar signal must travel to get to the target, such as through and around studs . The different features from the...drywall made of wood stud , gypsum, insulating material, and vinyl coating. The second wall structure is made of cinder blocks and is a more challenging... wall synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging from an experimental L-band through- wall SAR prototype. Tools and algorithms for 3-D visualization are

  20. Experimental nuclear cross sections for spacecraft shield analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peelle, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to validate and to supplement the intranuclear cascade model as a method for estimating cross sections of importance to spacecraft shield design. The experimental situation is inconclusive particularly for neutron-producing reactions, but is relatively sound for reaction cross sections and for proton spectra at several hundred MeV at medium forward angles. Secondary photon contributions are imprecisely known.

  1. [Experimental analysis of finishing lines in ceramometal restorations].

    PubMed

    Gascón, F; Gil, J A; Fons, A; Badal, R

    1990-11-01

    The preparation is the first step of any tooth reconstruction. The biological integration of the protesis is depending on the marginal adaptation (finish line of the preparation), occlusal adaptation (occlusal reduction), longevity of the restoration (retention and luting) and esthetics. The effect the two finish line of the preparation is studied using experimental design. In porcelain-fused-to-metal the finish line of the preparation in chanfer is superior at the beveled shoulder, because proportioning better marginal adaptation.

  2. Mission-based Scenario Research: Experimental Design And Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    loudspeakers. One of the pre-recorded voices was a simulated tactical operating commander ( TOC ) who provided the mission directives a Commander would...expect on a patrol mission. One of the experimenters also operated a soundboard with controls to activate pre-recorded TOC responses, facilitating...simulated interactions between the TOC and Commander; for example, one button allowed the TOC to respond “Roger” when the Commander called in mission

  3. Experimental modal analysis of an aluminum rectangular plate by use of the slope-assisted BOTDA method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minardo, A.; Coscetta, A.; Pirozzi, S.; Bernini, R.; Zeni, L.

    2013-12-01

    We report an experimental modal analysis of an aluminum rectangular plate (50 cm×30 cm×0.3 cm), carried out by use of a Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (BOTDA) sensor operating in the slope-assisted configuration, i.e. at a fixed pump-probe frequency shift. Strain measurements were acquired along an optical fiber attached to the structure, at a maximum acquisition rate of 250 Hz, a spatial resolution of 30 cm and a sampling distance of 5 cm in both x- and y-directions. A sequence of dynamic tests, aimed to evaluate the resonant frequencies and strain modal shapes of the structure, were performed on the plate for various boundary conditions (plate clamped with four, three or two bolts). Comparison with finite element method (FEM) analysis and dynamic strain measurements with strain gauges shows that Brillouin based distributed sensors can be usefully employed to perform the modal analysis of a vibrating structure, even if the spatial resolution is comparable with the plate dimensions.

  4. Restructured Freedom configuration characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troutman, Patrick A.; Heck, Michael L.; Kumar, Renjith R.; Mazanek, Daniel D.

    1991-01-01

    In Jan. 1991, the LaRc SSFO performed an assessment of the configuration characteristics of the proposed pre-integrated Space Station Freedom (SSF) concept. Of particular concern was the relationship of solar array operation and orientation with respect to spacecraft controllability. For the man-tended configuration (MTC), it was determined that torque equilibrium attitude (TEA) seeking Control Moment Gyroscope (CMG) control laws could not always maintain attitude. The control problems occurred when the solar arrays were tracking the sun to produce full power while flying in an arrow or gravity gradient flight mode. The large solar array articulations that sometimes result from having the functions of the alpha and beta joints reversed on MTC induced large product of inertia changes that can invalidate the control system gains during an orbit. Several modified sun tracking techniques were evaluated with respect to producing a controllable configuration requiring no modifications to the CMG control algorithms. Another assessment involved the permanently manned configuration (PMC) which has a third asymmetric PV unit on one side of the transverse boom. Recommendations include constraining alpha rotations for MTC in the arrow and gravity gradient flight modes and perhaps developing new non-TEA seeking control laws. Recommendations for PMC include raising the operational altitude and moving to a symmetric configuration as soon as possible.

  5. The role of dynamic experimentation for computation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, L.C.; Trucano, T.G.

    1995-03-01

    In this paper a brief description of dynamic techniques commonly available for determining material property studies is presented. For many impact applications, the material generally experiences a complex loading path. In most cases, the initial loading conditions can be represented by the shock commonly referred to as the Hugoniot state. Subsequent loading or release structure, i.e., off-Hugoniot states would however be dependent on the physical processes dominating the material behavior. The credibility of the material model is tested by the accuracy of predictions of off-Hugoniot states. Experimental techniques commonly used to determine off-Hugoniot states are discussed in this survey.

  6. Fibre mapping analysis in composite forming: Experimental and numerical comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colmars, J.; Rusanov, A.; Ta, A. T.; Naouar, N.; Boisse, P.

    2016-10-01

    The work presented here is part of European project "FibreMap", which aims at the development of an automatic quality control and feedback mechanism to improve draping of carbon fibres on complex parts. The technology that is being developed in the project include a sensor system for robust detection of fibre orientation combined with a robotic system to scan complex parts. This paper focus on a comparison procedure made to compare experimental fibre orientation with finite element simulations results. First comparison results will be shown on a complex part chosen for the project.

  7. A survey and analysis of experimental hydrogen sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.

    1992-01-01

    In order to ascertain the applicability of hydrogen sensors to aerospace applications, a survey was conducted of promising experimental point-contact hydrogen sensors and their operation was analyzed. The techniques discussed are metal-oxide-semiconductor or MOS based sensors, catalytic resistor sensors, acoustic wave detectors, and pyroelectric detectors. All of these sensors depend on the interaction of hydrogen with Pd or a Pd-alloy. It is concluded that no single technique will meet the needs of aerospace applications but a combination of approaches is necessary. The most promising combination is an MOS based sensor with a catalytic resistor.

  8. Experimental modal analysis of lithium-ion pouch cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, James Michael; Marco, James

    2015-07-01

    If future electric and hybrid electric vehicle batteries are to be designed such that the impact of vibration induced resonance is minimized, engineers tasked with the design of the vehicle's energy storage system must have a rigorous understanding of key system attributes such as the natural frequencies of the cell, the level of damping present and the mode shapes induced within the battery under mechanical load. This paper describes the underpinning theory and experimental method employed when using the impulse excitation technique to quantify the natural frequencies and mode shapes of a commercially available 25 Ah Nickel Manganese Cobalt Oxide (NMC) Laminate Pouch Cell. Experimental results are presented for fifteen cells at five different values of state of charge (SOC). The results indicate that irrespective of the energy content within the cell, the same four modes of vibration (torsion and bending) exist within a frequency range of 191 Hz-360 Hz. This is above the frequency range (0-150 Hz) typically associated with road-induced vibration. The results also indicate that the cell's natural frequencies of vibration and damping do not vary with changing values of SOC.

  9. [Experimental Conditions and Reliability Analysis of Results of COD components].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-hua; Zhang, Yin; Han, Xing; Yu, Ke; Li, Ru-jia

    2015-10-01

    The present study attempts to use SF( OUR(max)/OUR(en)) instead of S(0)/X(0) as an index of optimal initial conditions for determination of COD components by means of respirometry, thereby simplifying the measuring process and the operation can be automated. Further, the ratio of COD consumed by the growth of biomass can be used for the reliability assessment of results. Experimental results show that, experimental conditions for obtaining good results as follows: (1) for samples that composed of a large amount of easily biodegradable components (e. g., synthetic wastewater made by sodium acetate), SF should be in the range of 2.8 to 5.3, and the ratio of COD consumed by growth of biomass should be less than 30%; (2) for samples that composed of both readily biodegradable and slowly biodegradable components (i. e., typical domestic wastewater), SF should be in the range of 5.8 to 6.4, and the ratio of COD consumed by growth of biomass should be less than 30%; (3) and for samples that composed of a large amount of slowly biodegradable industrial wastewater (i. e., landfill leachate), SF should be 15 or less, and the ratio of COD consumed by growth of biomass should be approximately 40%. Therefore, when respirometry is used for the determination of COD components, the optimal conditions in terms of SF increase with the complexity of carbon source.

  10. Laser Brazing with Beam Scanning: Experimental and Simulative Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitmanek, M.; Dobler, M.; Graudenz, M.; Perret, W.; Göbel, G.; Schmidt, M.; Beyer, E.

    Laser beam brazing with copper based filler wire is a widely established technology for joining zinc-coated steel plates in the body-shop. Successful applications are the divided tailgate or the zero-gap joint, which represents the joint between the side panel and the roof-top of the body-in-white. These joints are in direct view to the customer, and therefore have to fulfil highest optical quality requirements. For this reason a stable and efficient laser brazing process is essential. In this paper the current results on quality improvement due to one dimensional laser beam deflections in feed direction are presented. Additionally to the experimental results a transient three-dimensional simulation model for the laser beam brazing process is taken into account. With this model the influence of scanning parameters on filler wire temperature and melt pool characteristics is analyzed. The theoretical predictions are in good accordance with the experimental results. They show that the beam scanning approach is a very promising method to increase process stability and seam quality.

  11. Magnetic field profile analysis for gyrotron experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagonakis, Ioannis Gr.; Avramidis, Konstantinos A.; Gantenbein, Gerd; Rzesnicki, Tomasz; Samartsev, Andrey; Jelonnek, John

    2017-03-01

    The external applied magnetic field plays a main role on the gyrotron operation. Even if the gyrotron design is optimized for the nominal magnetic profile, it is possible the performance to be better for an alternative one. This unexpected result can happen for several reasons, such as the manufacturing imperfections, the misalignment issues, and several unknown factors in gyrotron theory and design. The systematic experimental investigation of the gyrotron in different magnetic profiles is very important for the optimization of the gyrotron operation and for the better understanding of the gyrotron behavior. In this sense, an analytical approach for the definition of the appropriate magnetic profiles based on the beam characteristics instead of the coil currents definition is proposed for a systematic experimental study. Using this technique, operational maps in the space of the important magnetic profile parameters are developed, which are very useful for the characterization of the gyrotron performance. For the demonstration of this idea, the operational maps of the short-pulse prototype of the 170 GHz, 1 MW European ITER gyrotron project are presented.

  12. Experimental Investigation and Analysis of an Annular Pogo Accumulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peugeot, John; Schwarz, Jordan; Yang, H. Q.; Zoladz, Tom

    2011-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted on a scaled annular pogo accumulator for the Ares I Upper Stage. The test article was representative of the LO2 feedline and preliminary accumulator design, and included multiple designs of a perforated ring connecting the accumulator to the core feedline flow. The system was pulse tested in water over a range of pulse frequency and flow rates. Time dependent measurements of pressure at various locations in the test article were used to extract system compliance, inertance, and resistance. Preliminary results indicated a significant deviation from standard orifice flow theory and suggest a strong dependence on feedline average velocity. In addition, several CFD analyses were conducted to investigate the details of the time variant flow field. Both two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulations were performed with time varying boundary conditions used to represent system pulsing. The CFD results compared well with the sub-scale results and demonstrated the influence of feedline average velocity on the flow into and out of the accumulator. This paper presents updated results of the investigation including a parametric design space for determining resistance characteristics. Using the updated experimental results a new scaling relationship has been defined for shear flow over a cavity. A comparison of sub-scale and full scale CFD simulations provided early verification of the scaling of the fluid flowfield and resistance characteristics.

  13. Software Configuration Management Guidebook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The growth in cost and importance of software to NASA has caused NASA to address the improvement of software development across the agency. One of the products of this program is a series of guidebooks that define a NASA concept of the assurance processes which are used in software development. The Software Assurance Guidebook, SMAP-GB-A201, issued in September, 1989, provides an overall picture of the concepts and practices of NASA in software assurance. Lower level guidebooks focus on specific activities that fall within the software assurance discipline, and provide more detailed information for the manager and/or practitioner. This is the Software Configuration Management Guidebook which describes software configuration management in a way that is compatible with practices in industry and at NASA Centers. Software configuration management is a key software development process, and is essential for doing software assurance.

  14. Electronically configured battery pack

    SciTech Connect

    Kemper, D.

    1997-03-01

    Battery packs for portable equipment must sometimes accommodate conflicting requirements to meet application needs. An electronically configurable battery pack was developed to support two highly different operating modes, one requiring very low power consumption at a low voltage and the other requiring high power consumption at a higher voltage. The configurable battery pack optimizes the lifetime and performance of the system by making the best use of all available energy thus enabling the system to meet its goals of operation, volume, and lifetime. This paper describes the cell chemistry chosen, the battery pack electronics, and tradeoffs made during the evolution of its design.

  15. Normal mode and experimental analysis of TNT Raman spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuemin; Perkins, Richard; Liu, Yucheng; Tzeng, Nianfeng

    2017-04-01

    In this study, a Raman spectrum of TNT was characterized through experiments and simulated using 22 hybrid density functional theory (DFT) methods. Among the different hybrid DFT methods, it was found that the most accurate simulation results of the Raman shift frequency were calculated by the O3LYP method. However, the deviations of the calculated Raman frequencies from the experimental value showed no dependency on the abilities of the DFT methods in recovering the correlation energy. The accuracies of the DFT methods in predicting the Raman bands are probably determined by the numerical grid and convergence criteria for optimizations of each DFT method. It was also decided that the prominent Raman shift 1362 cm-1 is mainly caused by symmetric stretching of the 4-nitro groups. Findings of this study can facilitate futuristic development of more effective surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy/scattering (SERS) substrates for explosive characterization and detection.

  16. Computational and Experimental Efforts in Gravity Probe B Microthruster Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Droege, Alan; Smith, Andrew; Carter, James

    1996-01-01

    Gravity Probe B, an experiment to test the theory of relativity, will be launched near the turn of the millennium. Due to the precise pointing requirements need to successfully carry out this experiment, the satellite will use sixteen proportionally controlled microthrusters as a main component of the attitude control system. These microthrusters use the helium boil-off from the on-board dewar as propellant. Marshall Space Flight Center, verified the design of the thruster flow path by both computational and experimental methods. The flow performance of the thruster has been adequately characterized. Graphs show specific impulse, thrust coefficient, discharge coefficient, and mass flow rate trends. Value was added to the program through gained confidence in the design of the thruster and through valuation of some design trade-offs.

  17. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Structural Acousticcontrol Interior Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh; Bevan, Jeffrey S.

    1999-01-01

    The research results contained in this technical report were performed under the NASA grant entitled "Experimental and Numerical Structural Acoustic Control for Interior Noise Reduction". The report is based essentially on partial progress of the Ph.D. dissertation prepared by Jeffrey S. Bevan under direct guidance of Dr. Chuh Mei. The document presents a finite element formulation and control of sound radiated from cylindrical panels embedded with piezoceramic actuators. The extended MIN6 shallow shell element is fully electrical-structural coupled. A piezoelectric modal actuator participation (PMAP) is defined which indicates the actuator performance to each of the offending modes. Genetic algorithm is also employed to validate the sensor and actuator locations determined by the PMAP criteria. The work was conducted at the Department of Aerospace Engineering, Old Dominion University. Mr. Travis L. Turner, Structural Acoustics Branch, NASA Langley Research Center is the technical monitor.

  18. Fundamental Mistuning Model for Probabilistic Analysis Studied Experimentally

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Jerry H.

    2005-01-01

    The Fundamental Mistuning Model (FMM) is a reduced-order model for efficiently calculating the forced response of a mistuned bladed disk. FMM ID is a companion program that determines the mistuning in a particular rotor. Together, these methods provide a way to acquire mistuning data in a population of bladed disks and then simulate the forced response of the fleet. This process was tested experimentally at the NASA Glenn Research Center, and the simulated results were compared with laboratory measurements of a "fleet" of test rotors. The method was shown to work quite well. It was found that the accuracy of the results depends on two factors: (1) the quality of the statistical model used to characterize mistuning and (2) how sensitive the system is to errors in the statistical modeling.

  19. Analysis of contaminant movement at different experimental scales

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, E.P.; Newman, B.D. ); Stauffer, T.B.; Antworth, C.A. ); MacIntyre, W.G. . School of Marine Science)

    1990-01-01

    Two experimental approaches were used to examine transport in saturated porous media. One design, the box experiment, allowed two-dimensional sampling of the solute plume. The more traditional column design was one-dimensional with sample collection only at the effluent end. A total of three box and two column experiments were conducted. The method of moments was used to analyze plume behavior in both experiments. Comparison between the experiments were made using the moments. For similar porous materials the same retardation was observed despite an order of magnitude different in velocities. Data from the one-dimensional column experiments were used to estimate dispersivities that were used to predict the behavior in the multidimensional box experiment. Results indicated that velocity information from the box experiment was needed in order to attain an adequate prediction of its response. 8 refs., 9 figs., 12 tabs.

  20. Experimental analysis to utilize the solid wastes in brick production.

    PubMed

    Varadarajan, Rajagopalan; Govindan, Venkatesan

    2013-07-01

    Utilization of industrial, municipal, agricultural and other waste products in the industry has been the focus of research for economical, environmental, and technical reasons. Two solid wastes, i.e. Sugar-cane bagasse--is a fibrous waste-product of the sugar refining industry and granite processing industry generates a large amount of wastes mainly in the form of powder during sawing and polishing processes, which pollute and damage the environment, have been taken to experimental study. The objective of this study is to utilize the bagasse ash and granite waste for the manufacturing of bricks. Mixtures were prepared with 0, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50% wastes of total weight of clay. The produced bricks are tested for mechanical properties, such as water absorption and compressive strength, according to Indian Standard Code. The result showed that 20% of bagasse ash and granite waste is optimum percentage to be used in the manufacturing of conventional bricks.

  1. Experimental vibration level analysis of a Francis turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucur, D. M.; Dunca, G.; Cǎlinoiu, C.

    2012-11-01

    In this study the vibration level of a Francis turbine is investigated by experimental work in site. Measurements are carried out for different power output values, in order to highlight the influence of the operation regimes on the turbine behavior. The study focuses on the turbine shaft to identify the mechanical vibration sources and on the draft tube in order to identify the hydraulic vibration sources. Analyzing the vibration results, recommendations regarding the operation of the turbine, at partial load close to minimum values, in the middle of the operating domain or close to maximum values of electric power, can be made in order to keep relatively low levels of vibration. Finally, conclusions are drawn in order to present the real sources of the vibrations.

  2. Demystifying Introductory Chemistry. Part 1: Electron Configurations from Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Ronald J.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Presents suggestions for alternative presentations of some of the material that usually forms part of the introductory chemistry course. Emphasizes development of concepts from experimental results. Discusses electronic configurations and quantum numbers, experimental evidence for electron configurations, deducing the shell model from the periodic…

  3. Experimental and CFD Analysis of Advanced Convective Cooling Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, Yassin A; Ugaz, Victor M

    2012-06-27

    The objective of this project is to study the fundamental physical phenomena in the reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) of very high-temperature reactors (VHTRs). One of the primary design objectives is to assure that RCCS acts as an ultimate heat sink capable of maintaining thermal integrity of the fuel, vessel, and equipment within the reactor cavity for the entire spectrum of postulated accident scenarios. Since construction of full-scale experimental test facilities to study these phenomena is impractical, it is logical to expect that computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations will play a key role in the RCCS design process. An important question then arises: To what extent are conventional CFD codes able to accurately capture the most important flow phenomena, and how can they be modified to improve their quantitative predictions? Researchers are working to tackle this problem in two ways. First, in the experimental phase, the research team plans to design and construct an innovative platform that will provide a standard test setting for validating CFD codes proposed for the RCCS design. This capability will significantly advance the state of knowledge in both liquid-cooled and gas-cooled (e.g., sodium fast reactor) reactor technology. This work will also extend flow measurements to micro-scale levels not obtainable in large-scale test facilities, thereby revealing previously undetectable phenomena that will complement the existing infrastructure. Second, in the computational phase of this work, numerical simulation of the flow and temperature profiles will be performed using advanced turbulence models to simulate the complex conditions of flows in critical zones of the cavity. These models will be validated and verified so that they can be implemented into commercially available CFD codes. Ultimately, the results of these validation studies can then be used to enable a more accurate design and safety evaluation of systems in actual nuclear power

  4. Factor Configurations with Governance as Conditions for Low HIV/AIDS Prevalence in HIV/AIDS Recipient Countries: Fuzzy-set Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwa-Young; Yang, Bong-Min; Kang, Minah

    2015-11-01

    This paper aims to investigate whether good governance of a recipient country is a necessary condition and what combinations of factors including governance factor are sufficient for low prevalence of HIV/AIDS in HIV/AIDS aid recipient countries during the period of 2002-2010. For this, Fuzzy-set Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) was used. Nine potential attributes for a causal configuration for low HIV/AIDS prevalence were identified through a review of previous studies. For each factor, full membership, full non-membership, and crossover point were specified using both author's knowledge and statistical information of the variables. Calibration and conversion to a fuzzy-set score were conducted using Fs/QCA 2.0 and probabilistic tests for necessary and sufficiency were performed by STATA 11. The result suggested that governance is the necessary condition for low prevalence of HIV/AIDS in a recipient country. From sufficiency test, two pathways were resulted. The low level of governance can lead to low level of HIV/AIDS prevalence when it is combined with other favorable factors, especially, low economic inequality, high economic development and high health expenditure. However, strengthening governance is a more practical measure to keep low prevalence of HIV/AIDS because it is hard to achieve both economic development and economic quality. This study highlights that a comprehensive policy measure is the key for achieving low prevalence of HIV/AIDS in recipient country.

  5. Factor Configurations with Governance as Conditions for Low HIV/AIDS Prevalence in HIV/AIDS Recipient Countries: Fuzzy-set Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hwa-Young; Kang, Minah

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate whether good governance of a recipient country is a necessary condition and what combinations of factors including governance factor are sufficient for low prevalence of HIV/AIDS in HIV/AIDS aid recipient countries during the period of 2002-2010. For this, Fuzzy-set Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) was used. Nine potential attributes for a causal configuration for low HIV/AIDS prevalence were identified through a review of previous studies. For each factor, full membership, full non-membership, and crossover point were specified using both author's knowledge and statistical information of the variables. Calibration and conversion to a fuzzy-set score were conducted using Fs/QCA 2.0 and probabilistic tests for necessary and sufficiency were performed by STATA 11. The result suggested that governance is the necessary condition for low prevalence of HIV/AIDS in a recipient country. From sufficiency test, two pathways were resulted. The low level of governance can lead to low level of HIV/AIDS prevalence when it is combined with other favorable factors, especially, low economic inequality, high economic development and high health expenditure. However, strengthening governance is a more practical measure to keep low prevalence of HIV/AIDS because it is hard to achieve both economic development and economic quality. This study highlights that a comprehensive policy measure is the key for achieving low prevalence of HIV/AIDS in recipient country. PMID:26617451

  6. Generalizability Theory and Experimental Design: Incongruity between Analysis and Inference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Kenneth D.

    1984-01-01

    In behavior research using cognitive and affective measures, there is often incongruity between the statistical analysis employed and the intended inference. This paper argues that incorporating items as levels of a random facet via generalizability theory allows the statistical examination of the inferential question in the desired universe of…

  7. A Short Guide to Experimental Design and Analysis for Engineers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    measures and the single group design. The relevant statistical techniques are also discussed to help identify key quantitative methods for data...authors gain a basic understanding of design, measurement and statistical analysis to support military experiments. RELEASE LIMITATION Approved...designs including the simple experiment, matched-pairs, repeated- measures and the single group design. The relevant statistical techniques are also

  8. Experimental analysis of thread movement in bolted connections due to vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, G. ED; Jenkins, Robert C.

    1995-01-01

    This is the final report of research project NAS8-39131 #33 sponsored by NASA's George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and carried out by the Civil Engineering Department of Auburn University (Auburn, Alabama) and personnel of MSFC. The objective of this study was to identify the main design parameters contributing to the loosening of bolts due to vibration and to identify their relative importance and degree of contribution to bolt loosening. Vibration testing was conducted on a shaketable with a controlled-random input in the dynamic testing laboratory of the Structural Test Division of MSFC. Test specimens which contained one test bolt were vibrated for a fixed amount of time and a percentage of pre-load loss was measured. Each specimen tested implemented some combination of eleven design parameters as dictated by the design of experiment methodology employed. The eleven design parameters were: bolt size (diameter), lubrication on bolt, hole tolerance, initial pre-load, nut locking device, grip length, thread pitch, lubrication between mating materials, class of fit, joint configuration, and mass of configuration. These parameters were chosen for this experiment because they are believed to be the design parameters having the greatest impact on bolt loosening. Two values of each design parameter were used and each combination of parameters tested was subjected to two different directions of vibration and two different g-levels of vibration. One replication was made for each test to gain some indication of experimental error and repeatability and to give some degree of statistical credibility to the data, resulting in a total of 96 tests being performed. The results of the investigation indicated that nut locking devices, joint configuration, fastener size, and mass of configuration were significant in bolt loosening due to vibration. The results of this test can be utilized to further research the complex problem of bolt loosening due to vibration.

  9. Experimental analysis of thread movement in bolted connections due to vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramey, G. ED; Jenkins, Robert C.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the main design parameters contributing to loosening of bolts due to vibration and to identify their relative importance and degree of contribution to bolt loosening. Vibration testing was conducted on a shaketable with a controlled-random input in the dynamic testing laboratory of the Structural Test Division of MSFC. Test specimens which contained one test bolt were vibrated for a fixed amount of time and percentage of pre-load loss was measured. Each specimen tested implemented some combination of eleven design parameters as dictated by the design of experiment methodology employed. The eleven design parameters were: bolt size (diameter), lubrication on bolt, hole tolerance, initial pre-load, nut locking device, grip length, thread pitch, lubrication between mating materials, class of fit, joint configuration and mass of configuration. These parameters were chosen for this experiment because they are believed to be the design parameters having the greatest impact on bolt loosening. Two values of each design parameter were used and each combination of parameters tested was subjected to two different directions of vibration and two different g-levels of vibration. One replication was made for each test to gain some indication of experimental error and repeatability and to give some degree of statistical credibility to the data, resulting in a total of 96 tests being performed. The results of the investigation indicated that nut locking devices, joint configuration, fastener size, and mass of configuration were significant in bolt loosening due to vibration. The results of this test can be utilized to further research the complex problem of bolt loosening due to vibration.

  10. Analysis of the Effects of Compositional and Configurational Assumptions on Product Costs for the Thermochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Mixed Alcohols -- FY 2007 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yunhua; Gerber, Mark A.; Jones, Susanne B.; Stevens, Don J.

    2008-12-05

    The purpose of this study was to examine alternative biomass-to-ethanol conversion process assumptions and configuration options to determine their relative effects on overall process economics. A process-flow-sheet computer model was used to determine the heat and material balance for each configuration that was studied. The heat and material balance was then fed to a costing spreadsheet to determine the impact on the ethanol selling price. By examining a number of operational and configuration alternatives and comparing the results to the base flow sheet, alternatives having the greatest impact the performance and cost of the overall system were identified and used to make decisions on research priorities.

  11. Saturn IB Vehicle Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    This 1968 chart depicts the various mission configurations for the Saturn IB launch vehicle. Developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) as an interim vehicle in MSFC's 'building block' approach to the Saturn rocket development, the Saturn IB utilized Saturn I technology to further develop and refine the larger boosters and the Apollo spacecraft capabilities required for the marned lunar missions.

  12. Inclusive Services Innovation Configuration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holdheide, Lynn R.; Reschly, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Teacher preparation to deliver inclusive services to students with disabilities is increasingly important because of changes in law and policy emphasizing student access to, and achievement in, the general education curriculum. This innovation configuration identifies the components of inclusive services that should be incorporated in teacher…

  13. Nuclear Shuttle Logistics Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    This 1971 artist's concept shows the Nuclear Shuttle in both its lunar logistics configuraton and geosynchronous station configuration. As envisioned by Marshall Space Flight Center Program Development persornel, the Nuclear Shuttle would deliver payloads to lunar orbits or other destinations then return to Earth orbit for refueling and additional missions.

  14. Modular tokamak configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, S.L.

    1985-01-01

    This report is concerned with the modular tokamak configuration, and presents information on the following topics: modularity; external vacuum boundary; vertical maintenance; combined reactor building/biological shield with totally remote maintenance; independent TF coils; minimum TF coil bore; saddle PF coils; and heat transport system in bore.

  15. An experimental analysis on OSPF-TE convergence time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, S.; Kitayama, K.; Cugini, F.; Paolucci, F.; Giorgetti, A.; Valcarenghi, L.; Castoldi, P.

    2008-11-01

    Open shortest path first (OSPF) protocol is commonly used as an interior gateway protocol (IGP) in MPLS and generalized MPLS (GMPLS) networks to determine the topology over which label-switched paths (LSPs) can be established. Traffic-engineering extensions (network states such as link bandwidth information, available wavelengths, signal quality, etc) have been recently enabled in OSPF (henceforth, called OSPF-TE) to support shortest path first (SPF) tree calculation upon different purposes, thus possibly achieving optimal path computation and helping improve resource utilization efficiency. Adding these features into routing phase can exploit the OSPF robustness, and no additional network component is required to manage the traffic-engineering information. However, this traffic-engineering enhancement also complicates OSPF behavior. Since network states change frequently upon the dynamic trafficengineered LSP setup and release, the network is easily driven from a stable state to unstable operating regimes. In this paper, we focus on studying the OSPF-TE stability in terms of convergence time. Convergence time is referred to the time spent by the network to go back to steady states upon any network state change. An external observation method (based on black-box method) is employed to estimate the convergence time. Several experimental test-beds are developed to emulate dynamic LSP setup/release, re-routing upon single-link failure. The experimental results show that with OSPF-TE the network requires more time to converge compared to the conventional OSPF protocol without TE extension. Especially, in case of wavelength-routed optical network (WRON), introducing per wavelength availability and wavelength continuity constraint to OSPF-TE suffers severe convergence time and a large number of advertised link state advertisements (LSAs). Our study implies that long convergence time and large number of LSAs flooded in the network might cause scalability problems in OSPF

  16. Fracture mechanics analysis of composite microcracking - Experimental results in fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nairn, J. A.; Liu, S.

    1990-01-01

    The Nairn (1989) variational mechanics analysis, which yields the energy release rate of a microcrack's formation between two existing microcracks, has proven useful in the fracture mechanics interpretation of cross-ply laminates' microcracking. Attention is presently given to the application of this energy release rate analysis to a fracture mechanics-based interpretation of microcrack formation during fatigue loading, for the case of fatigue experiments on three layups of Avimid K/IM6 laminates and four layups of Fiberite 934/T300 laminates. The single master Paris-law plot onto which the data from all layups of a given material system fall is claimed to offer a complete characterization of that system's microcrack-formation resistance during fatigue loading.

  17. High speed spherical roller-bearing analysis and comparison with experimental performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleckner, R. J.; Dyba, G.

    1983-01-01

    The capabilities of a spherical roller bearing analysis/design tool, Spherbean (spherical bearing analysis) are described. Capabilities of the analysis are demonstrated and verified by comparison with experimental data. A practical design problem is presented where the computer program is used to improve a particular bearing's performance.

  18. Experimental analysis of drilling process in cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wendong; Shi, Yikai; Yang, Ning; Yuan, Xiaoqing

    2014-02-01

    Bone drilling is an essential part in orthopaedics, traumatology and bone biopsy. Prediction and control of drilling forces and torque are critical to the success of operations involving bone drilling. This paper studied the drilling force, torque and drilling process with automatic and manual drill penetrating into bovine cortical bone. The tests were performed on a drilling system which is used to drill and measure forces and torque during drilling. The effects of drilling speed, feed rate and drill bit diameter on force and torque were discussed separately. The experimental results were proven to be in accordance with the mathematic expressions introduced in this paper. The automatic drilling saved drilling time by 30-60% in the tested range and created less vibration, compared to manual drilling. The deviation between maximum and average force of the automatic drilling was 5N but 25N for manual drilling. To conclude, using the automatic method has significant advantages in control drilling force, torque and drilling process in bone drilling.

  19. Experimental analysis of response covariation among compliant and inappropriate behaviors.

    PubMed Central

    Parrish, J M; Cataldo, M F; Kolko, D J; Neef, N A; Egel, A L

    1986-01-01

    Reliable changes in a variety of behaviors, or classes of behaviors, when only one is manipulated experimentally, have demonstrated that even topographically dissimilar responses can be functionally related. We investigated such a relationship between topographically different child behaviors (compliance and inappropriate activities) by using a methodology that tests for response covariation. Five conditions were provided to sequentially increase and decrease first one and then the other of these behaviors, with the degree of covariation between the two behaviors (i.e., the relationship between changes in the targeted and nontargeted behaviors) being the finding of interest. Results showed that, regardless of the intervention used, the behavior targeted, or the direction manipulated, the nontargeted behavior reliably covaried inversely with the targeted one. The findings have immediate relevance to the clinical treatment of multiple behavior problems exhibited by children. Furthermore, the study of relationships between responses and the processes underlying these relationships can have important implications for understanding the complexity characteristic of human behavior not yet analyzed by behavioral research. PMID:3771417

  20. Containment steam blowdown analysis : experimental and numerical comparisons.

    SciTech Connect

    NguyenLe, Q.; Ishii, M.; Reactor Analysis; Purdue Univ.

    1999-01-01

    This paper compares the numerical simulation with the experimental data of a steam blowdown event in a light water reactor containment building. A three step approach was used to analyze the steam jet behavior. First, the temperature and pressure data of a steam blowdown event was measured at the Purdue University Multi-Dimensional Integrated Test Assembly (PUMA), a scaled model of the General Electric Simplified Boiling Water Reactor. Second, a 1-dimensonial, system level RELAP5/Mod3.2 model of the steam blowdown event was created and the results used to set the initial conditions for the PUMA blowdown experiments. Finally, 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional CFD models of the discharged steam jets were computed using PHOENICS, a commercially available CFD package. It was found that RELAP5 is reasonably capable in predicting the general temperature and pressure trends in the RPV. However, due to modeling compromises and the code's built-in capabilities, RELAP5 1-dimensional predictions of containment temperature and pressure did not compare well with measured data. On the other hand, with minor modfications to the k-{var_epsilon} turbulence model, the 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional PHOENICS CFD solutions compared extremely well with the measured data.

  1. Flight Analysis of an Autonomously Navigated Experimental Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Jeffrey; Niehaus, Justin; Goodenow, Debra; Dunker, Storm; Montague, David

    2016-01-01

    First steps have been taken to qualify a family of parafoil systems capable of increasing the survivability and reusability of high-altitude balloon payloads. The research is motivated by the common risk facing balloon payloads where expensive flight hardware can often land in inaccessible areas that make them difficult or impossible to recover. The Autonomously Navigated Experimental Lander (ANGEL) flight test introduced a commercial Guided Parachute Aerial Delivery System (GPADS) to a previously untested environment at 108,000 feet Mean Sea Level (MSL) to determine its high-altitude survivability and capabilities. Following release, ANGEL descended under a drogue until approximately 25,000 feet, at which point the drogue was jettisoned and the main parachute was deployed, commencing navigation. Multiple data acquisition platforms were used to characterize the return-to-point technology performance and help determine its suitability for returning future scientific payloads ranging from 180 to 10,000 pounds to safer and more convenient landing locations. This report describes the test vehicle design, and summarizes the captured sensor data. Various post-flight analyses are used to quantify the systems performance, gondola load data, and serve as a reference point for subsequent missions.

  2. Recency, repeatability, and reinforcer retrenchment: an experimental analysis of resurgence.

    PubMed

    Lieving, Gregory A; Lattal, Kennon A

    2003-09-01

    Four experiments were conducted with pigeons to assess the experimental conditions necessary for the occurrence of resurgence. The general procedure consisted of the following conditions: Condition 1--reinforcement of key pecking; Condition 2--reinforcement of treadle pressing and concurrent extinction of key pecking; and Condition 3--the resurgence condition wherein resurgence was defined as the recovery of key pecking. In Experiments 1 and 2, the resurgence condition was conventional extinction. The effect of recency on resurgence magnitude was examined in Experiment 1 by manipulating the number of sessions of Condition 2, above. Resurgence was not a function of recency with the parameters used. Repeating the three conditions revealed resurgence to be a repeatable effect in Experiment 2. In Experiment 3, a variable-time schedule was in effect for the resurgence condition. Resurgence was not produced by response-independent food delivery. In Experiment 4, the resurgence condition was a variable-interval schedule for treadle pressing that arranged a lower reinforcement rate than in Condition 2 (92% reduction in reinforcers per minute). Resurgence was lower in magnitude relative to conventional extinction, although resurgence was obtained with 2 out of 3 pigeons. The results are discussed in terms of the variables controlling resurgence and the relations between behavioral history, resurgence, and other forms of response recovery.

  3. Experimental and Computational Analysis of Shuttle Orbiter Hypersonic Trim Anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brauckmann, Gregory J.; Paulson, John W., Jr.; Weilmuenster, K. James

    1995-01-01

    During the high-Mach-number, high-altitude portion of the first entry of the Shuttle Orbiter, the vehicle exhibited a nose-up pitching moment relative to preflight prediction of approximately Delta Cm = 0.03. This trim anomaly has been postulated to be due to compressibility, viscous, and/or real-gas (lowered specific heat ratio gamma) effects on basic body pitching moment, body-flap effectiveness, or both. In order to assess the relative contribution of each of these effects, an experimental study was undertaken to examine the effects of Mach number, Reynolds number, and ratio of specific heats. Complementary computational solutions were obtained for wind-tunnel and flight conditions. The primary cause of the anomaly was determined to be lower pressures on the aft windward surface of the Orbiter than deduced from hypersonic wind-tunnel tests with ideal- or near-ideal-gas test flow. The lower pressure levels are a result of the lowering of the flowfield gamma due to high-temperature effects. This phenomenon was accurately simulated in a hypersonic wind tunnel using a heavy gas, which provided a lower, gamma, and was correctly predicted by Navier-Stokes computations using nonequilibrium chemistry.

  4. Simulation and Analysis of Magnetic Reconnection in an Experimental Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Nicholas Arnold; Sovinec, C. R.; Cassak, P. A.

    2009-01-01

    The process of magnetic reconnection is important in space, laboratory, and astrophysical plasmas. The Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX) is designed to study controlled reconnection in collisional and marginally collisionless plasmas (Yamada et al. 1997). We present single and two-fluid simulations of MRX using the NIMROD extended MHD code (Sovinec et al. 2004). These simulations highlight the interrelationship between the small-scale physics of the reconnection layer and the global magnetic field geometry. The communication between small and large scales is dominated by pressure gradients that result from a pileup of reconnection outflow. Toroidicity leads to asymmetry in either the inflow direction or the outflow direction, depending on the experimental mode of operation. To explain effects observed during reconnection with asymmetry in the outflow direction, we present an extension of the Sweet-Parker model that takes into account asymmetric downstream pressure. This model is applicable to reconnection in coronal mass ejections, the Earth's magnetotail, and in circumstellar disks present in hot star winds. This research is supported by the NSF Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas.

  5. Experimental stability analysis of different water-based nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele, Laura; Colla, Laura; Bobbo, Sergio; Barison, Simona; Agresti, Filippo

    2011-12-01

    In the recent years, great interest has been devoted to the unique properties of nanofluids. The dispersion process and the nanoparticle suspension stability have been found to be critical points in the development of these new fluids. For this reason, an experimental study on the stability of water-based dispersions containing different nanoparticles, i.e. single wall carbon nanohorns (SWCNHs), titanium dioxide (TiO2) and copper oxide (CuO), has been developed in this study. The aim of this study is to provide stable nanofluids for selecting suitable fluids with enhanced thermal characteristics. Different dispersion techniques were considered in this study, including sonication, ball milling and high-pressure homogenization. Both the dispersion process and the use of some dispersants were investigated as a function of the nanoparticle concentration. The high-pressure homogenization was found to be the best method, and the addition of n-dodecyl sulphate and polyethylene glycol as dispersants, respectively in SWCNHs-water and TiO2-water nanofluids, improved the nanofluid stability.

  6. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of the Friction Drilling Process

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Scott F; Li, Rui; Wang, Hsin; McSpadden Jr, Samuel Boyce; Shih, Albert J.

    2006-01-01

    Friction drilling is a nontraditional hole-making process. A rotating conical tool is applied to penetrate a hole and create a bushing in a single step without generating chips. Friction drilling relies on the heat generated from the frictional force between the tool and sheet metal workpiece to soften, penetrate, and deform the work-material into a bushing shape. The mechanical and thermal aspects of friction drilling are studied in this research. Under the constant tool feed rate, the experimentally measured thrust force and torque were analyzed. An infrared camera is applied to measure the temperature of the tool and workpiece. Two models are developed for friction drilling. One is the thermal finite element model to predict the distance of tool travel before the workpiece reaches the 250 C threshold temperature that is detectable by an infrared camera. Another is a force model to predict the thrust force and torque in friction drilling based on the measured temperature, material properties, and estimated area of contact. The results of this study are used to identify research needs and build the foundation for future friction drilling process optimization.

  7. Design of the experimental system of digital off-axis holography and analysis of zero-order image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L', Qieni; Ge, Baozhen; Jiang, Junfeng; Zhang, Yimo

    2005-02-01

    The simple hologram recording system of digital off-axis holography is designed. Holographic diffraction grating of low spatial frequency is introduced to digital holography, acting as a beam splitter, illuminated by the monochrome plane parallel light wave, and the three different plane parallel light waves, namely, the zero-order and the +/-1order diffraction waves, are generated. An off-axis holography system is configurated between the +1/-1order diffraction waves and the zero-order wave. The theoretical analysis has been done in detail and the zero-order diffraction in the reconstructed image of digital off-axis holography is also analyzed theoretically. The experimental results are given. The feasibility of the experimental system presented in this paper was confirmed, simple in optical structure and easy in operation. In addition, the zero-order image can be eliminated by numerically processing the holograms of object with different recording parameters obtained by adjusting the reflecting mirror in the recording optical system to vary the incidence beam orientation in CCD to introduce a phase shift.

  8. An experimental analysis of a doped lithium fluoride direct absorption solar receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kesseli, James; Pollak, Tom; Lacy, Dovie

    1988-01-01

    An experimental analysis of two key elements of a direct absorption solar receiver for use with Brayton solar dynamic systems was conducted. Experimental data are presented on LiF crystals doped with dysprosium, samarium, and cobalt fluorides. In addition, a simulation of the cavity/window environment was performed and a posttest inspection was conducted to evaluate chemical reactivity, transmissivity, and condensation rate.

  9. Critical Discourse Analysis and Critical Thinking: An Experimental Study in an EFL Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hashemi, Mohammad Reza; Ghanizadeh, Afsaneh

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the impact of critical discourse analysis (CDA) on TEFL students' critical thinking (CT) ability in "Reading Journalistic Texts" classes. In so doing, the study utilized an experimental design with 24 participants in the control group and 29 participants in the experimental group. The results of a pretest indicated…

  10. DFT STUDY REVISES INTERSTITIAL CONFIGURATIONS IN HCP Zr

    SciTech Connect

    Samolyuk, German D; Golubov, Stanislav I; Osetskiy, Yury N; Stoller, Roger E

    2012-06-01

    Analysis of experimental result on microstructure evolution in irradiated Zr and alloys has demonstrated that available knowledge on self-interstitial defects in Zr is in contradiction. We therefore have initiated an extensive theoretical and modeling program to clarify this issue. In this report we present first ab initio calculations results of single SIA configurations in Zr. We demonstrate importance of simulations cell size, applied exchange-correlation functional and simulated c/a ratio. The results obtained demonstrate clearly that the most stable configurations are in basal plane and provide some evidences for enhanced interstitial transport along basal planes. The results obtained will be used in generation a new interatomic potential for Zr to be used in large-scale atomistic modeling of mechanisms relevant for radiation-induced microstructure evolution.

  11. Evaluation of experimental and finite element models of synthetic and cadaveric femora for pre-clinical design-analysis.

    PubMed

    McNamara, B P; Cristofolini, L; Toni, A; Taylor, D

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the validity with which the finite element method could model synthetic bone and thereby determine the appropriateness of such femur analogues for application in pre-clinical tests. The performance of these synthetic femora was compared with cadaveric bone when employing the same geometric and material definition protocols. A four-point bend loading configuration was selected for this analysis. Four synthetic femurs and an embalmed cadaveric bone were tested experimentally to determine the structural bending stiffness (k) for the diaphysis of these bones. A finite element (FE) model was generated and an analysis performed for each bone type to estimate the Young's modulus (E) required to obtain a model stiffness equivalent to that obtained experimentally. The estimated material elastic modulus in the FE model for the synthetic femur was found to be very similar to available data for this bone analogue. The estimated cadaveric bone modulus however was found to differ significantly from documented values for cortical bone. A theoretical analysis demonstrated the great sensitivity of the estimated modulus value to the accuracy of the geometric definition. The very low variability found in the experimental test on the synthetic bones together with their more regular geometry and the possibility of achieving greater accuracy in geometric definition was shown to enable the production of a valid FE model of this bone for an isotropic homogeneous material description. Conversely, the greater irregularity of geometry, together with the less obvious differentiation between the cortical and cancellous bone in the cadaveric specimen makes accurate geometric description of this bone very difficult. This fact, together with the uncertainty concerning the quality of the cadaveric bone and its viscoelastic response during mechanical testing, makes reproduction of its behaviour in a FE model a much more demanding task. It is suggested that

  12. RINGED ACCRETION DISKS: EQUILIBRIUM CONFIGURATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pugliese, D.; Stuchlík, Z. E-mail: zdenek.stuchlik@physics.cz

    2015-12-15

    We investigate a model of a ringed accretion disk, made up by several rings rotating around a supermassive Kerr black hole attractor. Each toroid of the ringed disk is governed by the general relativity hydrodynamic Boyer condition of equilibrium configurations of rotating perfect fluids. Properties of the tori can then be determined by an appropriately defined effective potential reflecting the background Kerr geometry and the centrifugal effects. The ringed disks could be created in various regimes during the evolution of matter configurations around supermassive black holes. Therefore, both corotating and counterrotating rings have to be considered as being a constituent of the ringed disk. We provide constraints on the model parameters for the existence and stability of various ringed configurations and discuss occurrence of accretion onto the Kerr black hole and possible launching of jets from the ringed disk. We demonstrate that various ringed disks can be characterized by a maximum number of rings. We present also a perturbation analysis based on evolution of the oscillating components of the ringed disk. The dynamics of the unstable phases of the ringed disk evolution seems to be promising in relation to high-energy phenomena demonstrated in active galactic nuclei.

  13. Experimental Analysis of Bisbenzocyclobutene Bonded Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducers

    PubMed Central

    Manwar, Rayyan; Chowdhury, Sazzadur

    2016-01-01

    Experimental measurement results of a 1.75 mm × 1.75 mm footprint area Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducer (CMUT) planar array fabricated using a bisbenzocyclobutene (BCB)-based adhesive wafer bonding technique has been presented. The array consists of 40 × 40 square diaphragm CMUT cells with a cavity thickness of 900 nm and supported by 10 µm wide dielectric spacers patterned on a thin layer of BCB. A 150 µm wide one µm thick gold strip has been used as the contact pad for gold wire bonding. The measured resonant frequency of 19.3 MHz using a Polytec™ laser Doppler vibrometer (Polytec™ MSA-500) is in excellent agreement with the 3-D FEA simulation result using IntelliSuite™. An Agilent ENA5061B vector network analyzer (VNA) has been used for impedance measurement and the resonance and anti-resonance values from the imaginary impedance curve were used to determine the electromechanical coupling co-efficient. The measured coupling coefficient of 0.294 at 20 V DC bias exhibits 40% higher transduction efficiency as compared to a measured value published elsewhere for a silicon nitride based CMUT. A white light interferometry method was used to measure the diaphragm deflection profiles at different DC bias. The diaphragm center velocity was measured for different sub-resonant frequencies using a Polytec™ laser Doppler vibrometer that confirms vibration of the diaphragm at different excitation frequencies and bias voltages. Transmit and receive operations of CMUT cells were characterized using a pitch-catch method and a −6 dB fractional bandwidth of 23% was extracted from the received signal in frequency domain. From the measurement, it appears that BCB-based CMUTs offer superior transduction efficiency as compared to silicon nitride or silicon dioxide insulator-based CMUTs, and provide a very uniform deflection profile thus making them a suitable candidate to fabricate highly energy efficient CMUTs. PMID:27347955

  14. Merit and Justice: An Experimental Analysis of Attitude to Inequality

    PubMed Central

    Rustichini, Aldo; Vostroknutov, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Merit and justice play a crucial role in ethical theory and political philosophy. Some theories view justice as allocation according to merit; others view justice as based on criteria of its own, and take merit and justice as two independent values. We study experimentally how these views are perceived. In our experiment subjects played two games (both against the computer): a game of skill and a game of luck. After each game they observed the earnings of all the subjects in the session, and thus the differences in outcomes. Each subject could reduce the winnings of one other person at a cost. The majority of the subjects used the option to subtract. The decision to subtract and the amount subtracted depended on whether the game was one of skill or luck, and on the distance between the earnings of the subject and those of others. Everything else being equal, subjects subtracted more in luck than in skill. In skill game, but not in luck, the subtraction becomes more likely, and the amount larger, as the distance increases. The results show that individuals considered favorable outcomes in luck to be undeserved, and thus felt more justified in subtracting. In the skill game instead, they considered more favorable outcomes (their own as well as others') as signal of ability and perhaps effort, which thus deserved merit; hence, they felt less motivated to subtract. However, a larger size of the unfavorable gap from the others increased the unpleasantness of poor performance, which in turn motivated larger subtraction. In conclusion, merit is attributed if and only if effort or skill significantly affect the outcome. An inequality of outcomes is viewed differently depending on whether merit causes the difference or not. Thus, merit and justice are strongly linked in the human perception of social order. PMID:25490094

  15. Experimental Analysis of Bisbenzocyclobutene Bonded Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducers.

    PubMed

    Manwar, Rayyan; Chowdhury, Sazzadur

    2016-06-24

    Experimental measurement results of a 1.75 mm × 1.75 mm footprint area Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducer (CMUT) planar array fabricated using a bisbenzocyclobutene (BCB)-based adhesive wafer bonding technique has been presented. The array consists of 40 × 40 square diaphragm CMUT cells with a cavity thickness of 900 nm and supported by 10 µm wide dielectric spacers patterned on a thin layer of BCB. A 150 µm wide one µm thick gold strip has been used as the contact pad for gold wire bonding. The measured resonant frequency of 19.3 MHz using a Polytec™ laser Doppler vibrometer (Polytec™ MSA-500) is in excellent agreement with the 3-D FEA simulation result using IntelliSuite™. An Agilent ENA5061B vector network analyzer (VNA) has been used for impedance measurement and the resonance and anti-resonance values from the imaginary impedance curve were used to determine the electromechanical coupling co-efficient. The measured coupling coefficient of 0.294 at 20 V DC bias exhibits 40% higher transduction efficiency as compared to a measured value published elsewhere for a silicon nitride based CMUT. A white light interferometry method was used to measure the diaphragm deflection profiles at different DC bias. The diaphragm center velocity was measured for different sub-resonant frequencies using a Polytec™ laser Doppler vibrometer that confirms vibration of the diaphragm at different excitation frequencies and bias voltages. Transmit and receive operations of CMUT cells were characterized using a pitch-catch method and a -6 dB fractional bandwidth of 23% was extracted from the received signal in frequency domain. From the measurement, it appears that BCB-based CMUTs offer superior transduction efficiency as compared to silicon nitride or silicon dioxide insulator-based CMUTs, and provide a very uniform deflection profile thus making them a suitable candidate to fabricate highly energy efficient CMUTs.

  16. Automated Experimental Data Analysis at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Azevedo, S G; Bettenhausen, R C; Beeler, R G; Bond, E J; Edwards, P W; Glenn, S M; Liebman, J A; Tappero, J D; Warrick, A L; Williams, W H

    2009-09-24

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a 192-beam 1.8 MJ ultraviolet laser system designed to support high-energy-density science, including demonstration of inertial confinement fusion ignition. After each target shot lasting {approx}20 ns, scientists require data acquisition, analysis and display within 30 minutes from more than 20 specialized high-speed diagnostic instruments. These diagnostics measure critical x-ray, optical and nuclear phenomena during target burn to quantify ignition results and compare to computational models. All diagnostic data (hundreds of Gbytes) are automatically transferred to an Oracle database that triggers the NIF Shot Data Analysis (SDA) Engine, which distributes the signal and image processing tasks to a Linux cluster. The SDA Engine integrates commercial workflow tools and messaging technologies into a scientific software architecture that is highly parallel, scalable, and flexible. Results are archived in the database for scientist approval and displayed using a web-based tool. The unique architecture and functionality of the SDA Engine will be presented along with an example.

  17. RADIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF EXPERIMENTAL DISC DEGENERATION IN RABBITS

    PubMed Central

    Vialle, Emiliano; Vialle, Luiz Roberto; Arruda, André de Oliveira; Riet, Ricardo Nascimento; Krieger, Antônio Bernardo de Queiroz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To validate radiographic evaluation of a rabbit model for disc degeneration. Methods: Lumbar intervertebral discs of New Zealand rabbits were stabbed three times with a 18G needle at a limited depth of 5mm, through lateral approach. Serial radiographic images were taken on the early pre-and postoperative periods, and after four, eight and 12 weeks of the procedure, with subsequent analysis of disc height, osteophyte formation, endplate sclerosis, and presence of disc degeneration. The statistical analysis of data was validated by the Kappa coefficient, with a confidence interval (CI) of 95%. Results: A significant reduction of disc space was found on AP X-ray images after 12 postoperative weeks, with Kappa = 0.489 for CI 95% (0.25-0.72) with p < 0.001. X-ray signs of disc degeneration also presented Kappa = 0.63 for CI 95% (0.39-0.86) with p < 0.001. The remaining assessed criteria showed positive results, but with a lower Kappa value. Conclusion: The disc degeneration model using rabbits as proposed in this study was shown to be feasible, with positive X-ray correlation between pre- and postoperative images, validating the potential to induce disc degeneration in this animal model for future studies. PMID:27022512

  18. Inlet spillage drag tests and numerical flow-field analysis at subsonic and transonic speeds of a 1/8-scale, two-dimensional, external-compression, variable-geometry, supersonic inlet configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, J. E.; Kirkland, F. P.; Turner, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    Accurate spillage drag and pressure data are presented for a realistic supersonic inlet configuration. Results are compared with predictions from a finite-differencing, inviscid analysis computer procedure. The analytical technique shows good promise for the evaluation of inlet drag, but necessary refinements were identified. A detailed description of the analytical procedure is contained in the Appendix.

  19. Experimental and numerical analysis of Al6063 duralumin using Taylor impact test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruszka, L.; Anaszewicz, Ł.; Janiszewski, J.; Grązka, M.

    2012-08-01

    The paper presents results of experimental and numerical analysis of dynamic behaviour Al6063 duralumin. Dynamical experiments were made using Taylor impact test. Experimental results at next step of study were used in numerical analyses of dynamic yield stress of tested material and model parameters of the Johnson-Cook constitutive equation. The main aim of this analysis is to find out dynamical properties of Al6063 duralumin tested in Taylor impact test.

  20. The Differential Phase Experiment: experimental concept, design analysis, and data reduction analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, Glenn A.; Brennan, Terry J.; Browne, Stephen L.; Dueck, Robert H.; Lodin, Michael S.; Roberts, Phillip H.; Vaughn, Jeffrey L.

    1997-08-01

    This paper describes the differential phase experiment (DPE) which formed a major part of the ABLE ACE suite of experiments conducted by the Air Force. The work described covers the rationale for the experiment, the basic experimental concept, the analysis of the differential phase, the optical and software design analysis, a discussion of the polarization scrambling characteristics of the optics, calibration of the equipment and a presentation of some of the major results of the data reduction effort to date. The DPE was a propagation experiment conducted between two aircraft flying at an altitude of 40,000 feet whose purpose was to measure the phase difference between two beams propagating at slightly different angels through the atmosphere. A four bin polarization interferometer was used to measure the differential phase. Due to the high level of scintillation that was presented branch points were present in the phase function. Rytov theory, wave optics simulation and the experimental measurements are in general agreement. Self consistency checks that were performed on the data indicate a high level of confidence in the results. Values of Cn2 that are consistent with the measurements of the differential phase agree with simultaneous scintillometer measurement taken long the same path in levels of turbulence where the scintillometer is not saturated. These differential phase based Cn2 estimates do not appear to saturate as is typical of scintillometer measurements and appear to extend the range over which high levels of Cn2 can be estimated. In addition the differential phase and anisoplanatic Strehl computed from the data is consistent with Rytov theory and wave optics simulations.

  1. Experimental and computational analysis of monkey smooth pursuit eye movements.

    PubMed

    Churchland, M M; Lisberger, S G

    2001-08-01

    Smooth pursuit eye movements are guided by visual feedback and are surprisingly accurate despite the time delay between visual input and motor output. Previous models have reproduced the accuracy of pursuit either by using elaborate visual signals or by adding sources of motor feedback. Our goal was to constrain what types of signals drive pursuit by obtaining data that would discriminate between these two modeling approaches, represented by the "image motion model" and the "tachometer feedback" model. Our first set of experiments probed the visual properties of pursuit with brief square-pulse and sine-wave perturbations of target velocity. Responses to pulse perturbations increased almost linearly with pulse amplitude, while responses to sine wave perturbations showed strong saturation with increasing stimulus amplitude. The response to sine wave perturbations was strongly dependent on the baseline image velocity at the time of the perturbation. Responses were much smaller if baseline image velocity was naturally large, or was artificially increased by superimposing sine waves on pulse perturbations. The image motion model, but not the tachometer feedback model, could reproduce these features of pursuit. We used a revision of the image motion model that was, like the original, sensitive to both image velocity and image acceleration. Due to a saturating nonlinearity, the sensitivity to image acceleration declined with increasing image velocity. Inclusion of this nonlinearity was motivated by our experimental results, was critical in accounting for the responses to perturbations, and provided an explanation for the unexpected stability of pursuit in the presence of perturbations near the resonant frequency. As an emergent property, the revised image motion model was able to reproduce the frequency and damping of oscillations recorded during artificial feedback delays. Our second set of experiments replicated prior recordings of pursuit responses to multiple

  2. An Ultrastructural Analysis of Nocardia During Experimental Infections in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Beaman, Blaine L.

    1973-01-01

    Several strains of Nocardia that varied from virulent to avirulent were injected intraperitoneally into young mice. Histological and ultrastructural analysis of the resultant infections revealed that the bacteria and the lesions they induced were different depending upon the strain of organism used. Further, the morphological and tinctorial characteristics of the bacteria grown in vitro changes during growth in vivo. These observations strongly suggested that chemical and physical alterations occurred in the cell envelope of the Nocardia when grown in mice. Electron microscopy confirmed that significant structural modification occurred, especially in the cell envelope, when the nocardial cells established themselves within the host tissue. It was shown that the least virulent strain exhibited the most dramatic changes whereas the most virulent organism appeared to be affected the least. Images PMID:4584055

  3. Preliminary Numerical and Experimental Analysis of the Spallation Phenomenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Alexandre; Bailey, Sean C. C.; Panerai, Francesco; Davuluri, Raghava S. C.; Vazsonyi, Alexander R.; Zhang, Huaibao; Lippay, Zachary S.; Mansour, Nagi N.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Bathel, Brett F.; Splinter, Scott C.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    The spallation phenomenon was studied through numerical analysis using a coupled Lagrangian particle tracking code and a hypersonic aerothermodynamics computational fluid dynamics solver. The results show that carbon emission from spalled particles results in a significant modification of the gas composition of the post shock layer. Preliminary results from a test-campaign at the NASA Langley HYMETS facility are presented. Using an automated image processing of high-speed images, two-dimensional velocity vectors of the spalled particles were calculated. In a 30 second test at 100 W/cm2 of cold-wall heat-flux, more than 1300 particles were detected, with an average velocity of 102 m/s, and most frequent observed velocity of 60 m/s.

  4. Translational Contributions of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Critchfield, Thomas S

    2011-01-01

    It has been argued that to increase societal impact behavioral researchers must do more to address problems of obvious practical importance. The basic science wing of behavior analysis has been described as especially detached from this goal, but is it really necessary that basic science demonstrate social relevance? If so, why hasn't this occurred more often, and what can be done to improve the status quo? To address these questions and to stimulate discussion about the future of basic behavior science, I describe two widely embraced arguments in favor of pure basic science (that which is undertaken without concern for practical applications); explain why a translational research agenda is likely to better recruit tangible support for basic science; propose that addressing practical problems does not require basic science to abandon its focus on fundamental principles; and identify some possible impediments to translational innovation that may need to be addressed for basic behavior science to increase its translational footprint. PMID:22532723

  5. Dynamic Airspace Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloem, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    In air traffic management systems, airspace is partitioned into regions in part to distribute the tasks associated with managing air traffic among different systems and people. These regions, as well as the systems and people allocated to each, are changed dynamically so that air traffic can be safely and efficiently managed. It is expected that new air traffic control systems will enable greater flexibility in how airspace is partitioned and how resources are allocated to airspace regions. In this talk, I will begin by providing an overview of some previous work and open questions in Dynamic Airspace Configuration research, which is concerned with how to partition airspace and assign resources to regions of airspace. For example, I will introduce airspace partitioning algorithms based on clustering, integer programming optimization, and computational geometry. I will conclude by discussing the development of a tablet-based tool that is intended to help air traffic controller supervisors configure airspace and controllers in current operations.

  6. Modular small hydro configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-09-01

    Smaller sites (those under 750 kilowatts) which previously were not attractive to develop using equipment intended for application at larger scale sites, were the focal point in the conception of a system which utilizes standard industrial components which are generally available within short procurement times. Such components were integrated into a development scheme for sites having 20 feet to 150 feet of head. The modular small hydro configuration maximizes the use of available components and minimizes modification of existing civil works. A key aspect of the development concept is the use of a vertical turbine multistage pump, used in the reverse mode as a hydraulic turbine. The configuration allows for automated operation and control of the hydroelectric facilities with sufficient flexibility for inclusion of potential hydroelectric sites into dispersed storage and generation (DSG) utility grid systems.

  7. Spherical mechanism analysis of a surgical robot for minimally invasive surgery -- analytical and experimental approaches.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Jacob; Lum, Mitch; Trimble, Denny; Hannaford, Blake; Sinanan, Mika

    2005-01-01

    Recent advances in technology have led to the fusion of MIS techniques and robot devices. However, current systems are large and cumbersome. Optimizing the surgical robot mechanism will eventually lead to its integration into the operating room (OR) of the future becoming the extended presence of the surgeon and nurses in a room occupied by the patient alone. By optimizing a spherical mechanism using data collected in-vivo during MIS procedures, this study is focused on a bottom-up approach to developing a new class of surgical robotic arms while maximizing their performance and minimizing their size. The spherical mechanism is a rotational manipulator with all axes intersecting at the center of the sphere. Locating the rotation center of the mechanism at the MIS port makes this class of mechanism a suitable candidate for the first two links of a surgical robot for MIS. The required dexterous workspace (DWS) is defined as the region in which 95% of the tool motions are contained based on in-vivo measurements. The extended dexterous workspace (EDWS) is defined as the entire abdominal cavity reachable by a MIS instruments. The DWS is defined by a right circular cone with a vertex angle of 60 degrees and the EDWS is defined by a cone with an elliptical cross section created by two orthogonal vertex angles of 60 degrees and 90 degrees. A compound function based on the mechanism's isotropy and the mechanism stiffness was considered as the performance metric cost function. Optimization across both the DWS and the EDWS lead to a serial mechanism configuration with link length angles of 74 degrees and 60 degrees for a serial configuration. This mechanism configuration maximized the kinematic performance in the DWS while keeping the EDWS as its reachable workspace. Surgeons, using a mockup of two mechanisms in a MIS setup, validated these results experimentally. From these experiments the serial configuration was deemed most applicable for MIS robotic applications compared

  8. Bayesian latent variable models for the analysis of experimental psychology data.

    PubMed

    Merkle, Edgar C; Wang, Ting

    2016-03-18

    In this paper, we address the use of Bayesian factor analysis and structural equation models to draw inferences from experimental psychology data. While such application is non-standard, the models are generally useful for the unified analysis of multivariate data that stem from, e.g., subjects' responses to multiple experimental stimuli. We first review the models and the parameter identification issues inherent in the models. We then provide details on model estimation via JAGS and on Bayes factor estimation. Finally, we use the models to re-analyze experimental data on risky choice, comparing the approach to simpler, alternative methods.

  9. SSF growth concepts and configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cirillo, William M.

    1991-01-01

    There are three primary objectives for the Space Station Freedom (SSF) Growth concepts and configuration study task. The first objective is the development of evolutionary SSF concept consistent with user requirements and program constraints. The second primary objective is to ensure the feasibility of the proposed SSF evolution concepts as the systems level. This includes an assessment of SSF evolution flight control analysis, logistics assessment, maintainability, and operational considerations. The final objective is to ensure compatibility of the baseline SSF design with the derived evolution requirements at both the system and element (habitat modules, power generation equipment, etc.) levels.

  10. Quasistatic formation of the spheromak plasma configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, M.; Furth, H.P.; Hsu, W.; Jardin, S.; Janos, A.; Okabayashi, M.; Sinnis, J.; Stix, T.H.; Yamazaki, K.

    1980-10-01

    A novel method for creating the spheromak configuration has been proposed and verified experimentally. The scheme is based on a transfer of poloidal and toroidal magnetic fluxes into a plasma from a flux core. In this paper we present the first experimental verification of this quasistatic (tau/sub Alf/ much less than tau/sub form/ < tau/sub diff/) formation scheme, which is suitable for future scale-up to fusion-reactor parameters.

  11. Fuel cell system configurations

    DOEpatents

    Kothmann, Richard E.; Cyphers, Joseph A.

    1981-01-01

    Fuel cell stack configurations having elongated polygonal cross-sectional shapes and gaskets at the peripheral faces to which flow manifolds are sealingly affixed. Process channels convey a fuel and an oxidant through longer channels, and a cooling fluid is conveyed through relatively shorter cooling passages. The polygonal structure preferably includes at least two right angles, and the faces of the stack are arranged in opposite parallel pairs.

  12. Flexible heliac configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.H.; Cantrell, J.L.; Hender, T.C.; Carreras, B.A.; Morris, R.N.

    1985-04-01

    The addition of an l = 1 helical winding to the heliac central conductor adds a significant degree of flexibility to the configuration by making it possible to control the rotational transform and shear. Such control is essential for an experiment because the presence of low-order resonances in the rotational transform profile can cause breakup of the equilibrium magnetic surfaces. The use of the additional winding also permits reduction of the total central conductor current and can deepen the magnetic well.

  13. Characterization of the isomeric configuration and impurities of (Z)-endoxifen by 2D NMR, high resolution LC⬜MS, and quantitative HPLC analysis.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Phyllis; Coleman, Donna; Burgess, Jason; Gardner, Michael; Hines, John; Scott, Brendan; Kroenke, Michelle; Larson, Jami; Lightner, Melissa; Turner, Gregory; White, Jonathan; Liu, Paul

    2014-01-01

    (Z)-Endoxifen (4-hydroxy-N-desmethyltamoxifen), an active metabolite generated via actions of CYP3A4/5 and CYP2D6, is a more potent selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) than tamoxifen. In the MCF-7 human mammary tumor xenograft model with female athymic mice, (Z)-endoxifen, at an oral dose of 4⬜8 mg/kg, significantly inhibits tumor growth. (Z)-Endoxifen's potential as an alternative therapeutic agent independent of CYP2D6 activities, which can vary widely in ER+ breast cancer patients, is being actively evaluated. This paper describes confirmation of the configuration of the active (Z)-isomer through 2D NMR experiments, including NOE (ROESY) to establish spatial proton⬜proton correlations, and identification of the major impurity as the (E)-isomer in endoxifen drug substance by HPLC/HRMS (HPLC/MS-TOF). Stability of NMR solutions was confirmed by HPLC/UV analysis. For pre-clinical studies, a reverse-phase HPLC⬜UV method, with methanol/water mobile phases containing 10 mM ammonium formate at pH 4.3, was developed and validated for the accurate quantitation and impurity profiling of drug substance and drug product. Validation included demonstration of linearity, method precision, accuracy, and specificity in the presence of impurities, excipients (for the drug product), and degradation products. Ruggedness and reproducibility of the method were confirmed by collaborative studies between two independent laboratories. The method is being applied for quality control of the API and oral drug product. Kinetic parameters of Z- to E-isomerization were also delineated in drug substance and in aqueous formulation, showing conversion at temperatures above 25 °C.

  14. Life-Cycle Cost and Risk Analysis of Alternative Configurations for Shipping Low-Level Radioactive Waste to the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    PM Daling; SB Ross; BM Biwer

    1999-12-17

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is a major receiver of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) for disposal. Currently, all LLW received at NTS is shipped by truck. The trucks use highway routes to NTS that pass through the Las Vegas Valley and over Hoover Dam, which is a concern of local stakeholder groups in the State of Nevada. Rail service offers the opportunity to reduce transportation risks and costs, according to the Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM-PEIS). However, NTS and some DOE LLW generator sites are not served with direct rail service so intermodal transport is under consideration. Intermodal transport involves transport via two modes, in this case truck and rail, from the generator sites to NTS. LLW shipping containers would be transferred between trucks and railcars at intermodal transfer points near the LLW generator sites, NTS, or both. An Environmental Assessment (EA)for Intermodal Transportation of Low-Level Radioactive Waste to the Nevada Test Site (referred to as the NTSIntermodal -M) has been prepared to determine whether there are environmental impacts to alterations to the current truck routing or use of intermodal facilities within the State of Nevada. However, an analysis of the potential impacts outside the State of Nevada are not addressed in the NTS Intermodal EA. This study examines the rest of the transportation network between LLW generator sites and the NTS and evaluates the costs, risks, and feasibility of integrating intermodal shipments into the LLW transportation system. This study evaluates alternative transportation system configurations for NTS approved and potential generators based on complex-wide LLW load information. Technical judgments relative to the availability of DOE LLW generators to ship from their sites by rail were developed. Public and worker risk and life-cycle cost components are quantified. The study identifies and evaluates alternative scenarios that increase the use of rail (intermodal

  15. Characterization of the isomeric configuration and impurities of (Z)-endoxifen by 2D NMR, high resolution LC–MS, and quantitative HPLC analysis

    PubMed Central

    Elkins, Phyllis; Coleman, Donna; Burgess, Jason; Gardner, Michael; Hines, John; Scott, Brendan; Kroenke, Michelle; Larson, Jami; Lightner, Melissa; Turner, Gregory; White, Jonathan; Liu, Paul

    2014-01-01

    (Z)-Endoxifen (4-hydroxy-N-desmethyltamoxifen), an active metabolite generated via actions of CYP3A4/5 and CYP2D6, is a more potent selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) than tamoxifen. In the MCF-7 human mammary tumor xenograft model with female athymic mice, (Z)-endoxifen, at an oral dose of 4– 8 mg/kg, significantly inhibits tumor growth. (Z)-Endoxifen's potential as an alternative therapeutic agent independent of CYP2D6 activities, which can vary widely in ER+ breast cancer patients, is being actively evaluated. This paper describes confirmation of the configuration of the active (Z)-isomer through 2D NMR experiments, including NOE (ROESY) to establish spatial proton–proton correlations, and identification of the major impurity as the (E)-isomer in endoxifen drug substance by HPLC/HRMS (HPLC/MS-TOF). Stability of NMR solutions was confirmed by HPLC/UV analysis. For pre-clinical studies, a reverse-phase HPLC–UV method, with methanol/water mobile phases containing 10 mM ammonium formate at pH 4.3, was developed and validated for the accurate quantitation and impurity profiling of drug substance and drug product. Validation included demonstration of linearity, method precision, accuracy, and specificity in the presence of impurities, excipients (for the drug product), and degradation products. Ruggedness and reproducibility of the method were confirmed by collaborative studies between two independent laboratories. The method is being applied for quality control of the API and oral drug product. Kinetic parameters of Z- to E-isomerization were also delineated in drug substance and in aqueous formulation, showing conversion at temperatures above 25 °C. PMID:24055701

  16. Theoretical and experimental analysis of the physics of water rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrio-Perotti, R.; Blanco-Marigorta, E.; Fernández-Francos, J.; Galdo-Vega, M.

    2010-09-01

    A simple rocket can be made using a plastic bottle filled with a volume of water and pressurized air. When opened, the air pressure pushes the water out of the bottle. This causes an increase in the bottle momentum so that it can be propelled to fairly long distances or heights. Water rockets are widely used as an educational activity, and several mathematical models have been proposed to investigate and predict their physics. However, the real equations that describe the physics of the rockets are so complicated that certain assumptions are usually made to obtain models that are easier to use. These models provide relatively good predictions but fail in describing the complex physics of the flow. This paper presents a detailed theoretical analysis of the physics of water rockets that concludes with the proposal of a physical model. The validity of the model is checked by a series of field tests. The tests showed maximum differences with predictions of about 6%. The proposed model is finally used to investigate the temporal evolution of some significant variables during the propulsion and flight of the rocket. The experience and procedure described in this paper can be proposed to graduate students and also at undergraduate level if certain simplifications are assumed in the general equations.

  17. An Analysis of Excavation Support Safety Based on Experimental Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorska, Karolina; Wyjadłowski, Marek

    2015-09-01

    The article presents the results of inclinometric measurements and numerical analyses of soldier-pile wall displacements. The excavation under investigation was made in cohesive soils. The measurements were conducted at points located at the edge of the cantilever excavation support system. The displacements of the excavation support observed over the period of three years demonstrated the pattern of steady growth over the first two months, followed by a gradual levelling out to a final plateau. The numerical analyses were conducted based on 3D FEM models. The numerical analysis of the problem comprise calculations of the global structural safety factor depending on the displacement of the chosen points in the lagging and conducted by means of the φ/c reduction procedure. The adopted graphical method of safety estimation is very conservative in the sense that it recognizes stability loss quite early, when one could further load the medium or weaken it by further strength reduction. The values of the Msf factor are relatively high. This is caused by the fact that the structure was designed for excavation twice as deep. Nevertheless, the structure is treated as a temporary one.

  18. Experimental and computational analysis of composite ankle-foot orthosis.

    PubMed

    Zou, Dequan; He, Tao; Dailey, Michael; Smith, Kirk E; Silva, Matthew J; Sinacore, David R; Mueller, Michael J; Hastings, Mary K

    2014-01-01

    Carbon fiber (CF) ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs) can improve gait by increasing ankle plantar-flexor power and improving plantar-flexor ankle joint moment and energy efficiency compared with posterior leaf spring AFOs made of thermoplastic. However, fabricating a CF AFO to optimize the performance of the individual user may require multiple AFOs and expensive fabrication costs. Finite element analysis (FEA) models were developed to predict the mechanical behavior of AFOs in this study. Three AFOs, two made of CF composite material and one made of thermoplastic material, were fabricated and then mechanically tested to produce force-displacement data. The FEA models were validated by comparing model predictions with mechanical testing data performed under the same loading and boundary conditions. The actual mechanical testing demonstrated that CF performs better than thermoplastic. The simulation results showed that FEA models produced accurate predictions for both types of orthoses. The relative error of the energy return ratio predicted by the CF AFO FEA model developed in this study is less than 3%. We conclude that highly accurate FEA models will allow orthotists to improve CF AFO fabrication without wasting resources (time and money) on trial and error fabrications that are expensive and do not consistently improve AFO and user performance.

  19. Aquarius Main Structure Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eremenko, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The Aquarius/SAC-D Observatory is a joint US-Argentine mission to map the salinity at the ocean surface. This information is critical to improving our understanding of two major components of Earth's climate system - the water cycle and ocean circulation. By measuring ocean salinity from space, the Aquarius/SAC-D Mission will provide new insights into how the massive natural exchange of freshwater between the ocean, atmosphere and sea ice influences ocean circulation, weather and climate. Aquarius is the primary instrument on the SAC-D spacecraft. It consists of a Passive Microwave Radiometer to detect the surface emission that is used to obtain salinity and an Active Scatterometer to measure the ocean waves that affect the precision of the salinity measurement. The Aquarius Primary Structure houses instrument electronics, feed assemblies, and supports a deployable boom with a 2.5 m Reflector, and provides the structural interface to the SAC-D Spacecraft. The key challenge for the Aquarius main structure configuration is to satisfy the needs of component accommodations, ensuring that the instrument can meet all operational, pointing, environmental, and launch vehicle requirements. This paper describes the evolution of the Aquarius main structure configuration, the challenges of balancing the conflicting requirements, and the major configuration driving decisions and compromises.

  20. A detailed analysis of the energy levels configuration existing in the band gap of supersaturated silicon with titanium for photovoltaic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pérez, E.; Dueñas, S.; Castán, H.; García, H.; Bailón, L.; Montero, D.; García-Hernansanz, R.; García-Hemme, E.; González-Díaz, G.; Olea, J.

    2015-12-28

    The energy levels created in supersaturated n-type silicon substrates with titanium implantation in the attempt to create an intermediate band in their band-gap are studied in detail. Two titanium ion implantation doses (10{sup 13 }cm{sup -2} and 10{sup 14 }cm{sup -2}) are studied in this work by conductance transient technique and admittance spectroscopy. Conductance transients have been measured at temperatures of around 100 K. The particular shape of these transients is due to the formation of energy barriers in the conduction band, as a consequence of the band-gap narrowing induced by the high titanium concentration. Moreover, stationary admittance spectroscopy results suggest the existence of different energy level configuration, depending on the local titanium concentration. A continuum energy level band is formed when titanium concentration is over the Mott limit. On the other hand, when titanium concentration is lower than the Mott limit, but much higher than the donor impurity density, a quasi-continuum energy level distribution appears. Finally, a single deep center appears for low titanium concentration. At the n-type substrate, the experimental results obtained by means of thermal admittance spectroscopy at high reverse bias reveal the presence of single levels located at around E{sub c}-425 and E{sub c}-275 meV for implantation doses of 10{sup 13 }cm{sup −2} and 10{sup 14 }cm{sup −2}, respectively. At low reverse bias voltage, quasi-continuously distributed energy levels between the minimum of the conduction bands, E{sub c} and E{sub c}-450 meV, are obtained for both doses. Conductance transients detected at low temperatures reveal that the high impurity concentration induces a band gap narrowing which leads to the formation of a barrier in the conduction band. Besides, the relationship between the activation energy and the capture cross section values of all the energy levels fits very well to the Meyer-Neldel rule. As it is known