Science.gov

Sample records for experimental facility located

  1. Site survey for optimum location of Optical Communication Experimental Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Site survey was made to determine the optimum location for an Optical Communication Experimental Facility /OCEF/ and to recommend several sites, graded according to preference. A site was desired which could perform two-way laser communication with a spacecraft and laser tracking with a minimum of interruption by weather effects.

  2. Optimal Facility-Location.

    PubMed

    Goldman, A J

    2006-01-01

    Dr. Christoph Witzgall, the honoree of this Symposium, can count among his many contributions to applied mathematics and mathematical operations research a body of widely-recognized work on the optimal location of facilities. The present paper offers to non-specialists a sketch of that field and its evolution, with emphasis on areas most closely related to Witzgall's research at NBS/NIST.

  3. Optimal Facility-Location

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, A. J.

    2006-01-01

    Dr. Christoph Witzgall, the honoree of this Symposium, can count among his many contributions to applied mathematics and mathematical operations research a body of widely-recognized work on the optimal location of facilities. The present paper offers to non-specialists a sketch of that field and its evolution, with emphasis on areas most closely related to Witzgall’s research at NBS/NIST. PMID:27274920

  4. Reliable Facility Location Problem with Facility Protection

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Luohao; Zhu, Cheng; Lin, Zaili; Shi, Jianmai; Zhang, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies a reliable facility location problem with facility protection that aims to hedge against random facility disruptions by both strategically protecting some facilities and using backup facilities for the demands. An Integer Programming model is proposed for this problem, in which the failure probabilities of facilities are site-specific. A solution approach combining Lagrangian Relaxation and local search is proposed and is demonstrated to be both effective and efficient based on computational experiments on random numerical examples with 49, 88, 150 and 263 nodes in the network. A real case study for a 100-city network in Hunan province, China, is presented, based on which the properties of the model are discussed and some managerial insights are analyzed. PMID:27583542

  5. Reliable Facility Location Problem with Facility Protection.

    PubMed

    Tang, Luohao; Zhu, Cheng; Lin, Zaili; Shi, Jianmai; Zhang, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies a reliable facility location problem with facility protection that aims to hedge against random facility disruptions by both strategically protecting some facilities and using backup facilities for the demands. An Integer Programming model is proposed for this problem, in which the failure probabilities of facilities are site-specific. A solution approach combining Lagrangian Relaxation and local search is proposed and is demonstrated to be both effective and efficient based on computational experiments on random numerical examples with 49, 88, 150 and 263 nodes in the network. A real case study for a 100-city network in Hunan province, China, is presented, based on which the properties of the model are discussed and some managerial insights are analyzed.

  6. VA Health Care Facilities Locator

    MedlinePlus

    ... VA » Locations » Find Locations Locations Find Locations The javascript used here is for validation purpose only. Your browser doesn't seem to support javascript or has it disabled. This site is a ...

  7. VA Health Care Facilities Locator

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vet Centers Regional Benefits Offices Regional Loan Centers Cemetery Locations Search Enter your search text Button to ... Survivor Benefits Home Loans Life Insurance Burials & Memorials Cemetery Services Burials Headstones Markers & Medallions Presidential Memorial Certificates ...

  8. Competitive Facility Location with Random Demands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Takeshi; Katagiri, Hideki; Kato, Kosuke

    2009-10-01

    This paper proposes a new location problem of competitive facilities, e.g. shops and stores, with uncertain demands in the plane. By representing the demands for facilities as random variables, the location problem is formulated to a stochastic programming problem, and for finding its solution, three deterministic programming problems: expectation maximizing problem, probability maximizing problem, and satisfying level maximizing problem are considered. After showing that one of their optimal solutions can be found by solving 0-1 programming problems, their solution method is proposed by improving the tabu search algorithm with strategic vibration. Efficiency of the solution method is shown by applying to numerical examples of the facility location problems.

  9. Competitive Facility Location with Fuzzy Random Demands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Takeshi; Katagiri, Hideki; Kato, Kosuke

    2010-10-01

    This paper proposes a new location problem of competitive facilities, e.g. shops, with uncertainty and vagueness including demands for the facilities in a plane. By representing the demands for facilities as fuzzy random variables, the location problem can be formulated as a fuzzy random programming problem. For solving the fuzzy random programming problem, first the α-level sets for fuzzy numbers are used for transforming it to a stochastic programming problem, and secondly, by using their expectations and variances, it can be reformulated to a deterministic programming problem. After showing that one of their optimal solutions can be found by solving 0-1 programming problems, their solution method is proposed by improving the tabu search algorithm with strategic oscillation. The efficiency of the proposed method is shown by applying it to numerical examples of the facility location problems.

  10. Facility location selection for global manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalantari, Amir Hossein

    The selection of a facility location for operations is an important decision in strategic planning of manufacturing corporations. As globalization is transcending national borders, the whole world is becoming the domain of site selection problem. This, in turn, significantly changes the nature of facility location problem. The change is, particularly, paramount in the consideration of attributes impacting the selection decision. Many recent studies have considered the global dimensions of manufacturing site selections and have cited economic, social, and political factors impacting manufacturing operations. The complexity of facility location problem combined with the emerging global factors impacting site selection for manufacturing operations poses challenging research topics including the selection of critical attributes and the development of a methodology for data analysis for manufacturing facility selection. In this thesis I have reviewed the academic as well as industrial literature on recent developments on global facility location problem and have identified the most frequently cited/used attributes for the selection suitable manufacturing sites. Furthermore, I have developed a new similarity coefficient for cluster analysis for the formation of groups of prospective sites. Finally, I have employed an average clustering algorithm to identify these groups. In addition, I have demonstrated my methodology by a numerical example.

  11. A Decision Model for Locating Controversial Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mumphrey, Anthony J.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Locating controversial public facilities, such as highways or airports, that generate significant public opposition requires a more sophisticated methodology than the traditional least cost" procedures for minimizing physical costs. Two models--a short-run political placation" model and a long-run welfare distribution" model--evaluate the…

  12. Optimization of preventive health care facility locations

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Preventive health care programs can save lives and contribute to a better quality of life by diagnosing serious medical conditions early. The Preventive Health Care Facility Location (PHCFL) problem is to identify optimal locations for preventive health care facilities so as to maximize participation. When identifying locations for preventive health care facilities, we need to consider the characteristics of the preventive health care services. First, people should have more flexibility to select service locations. Second, each preventive health care facility needs to have a minimum number of clients in order to retain accreditation. Results This paper presents a new methodology for solving the PHCFL problem. In order to capture the characteristics of preventive health care services, we define a new accessibility measurement that combines the two-step floating catchment area method, distance factor, and the Huff-based competitive model. We assume that the accessibility of preventive health care services is a major determinant for participation in the service. Based on the new accessibility measurement, the PHCFL problem is formalized as a bi-objective model based on efficiency and coverage. The bi-objective model is solved using the Interchange algorithm. In order to accelerate the solving process, we implement the Interchange algorithm by building two new data structures, which captures the spatial structure of the PHCFL problem. In addition, in order to measure the spatial barrier between clients and preventive health care facilities accurately and dynamically, this paper estimates travelling distance and travelling time by calling the Google Maps Application Programming Interface (API). Conclusions Experiments based on a real application for the Alberta breast cancer screening program show that our work can increase the accessibility of breast cancer screening services in the province. PMID:20298608

  13. Big Explosives Experimental Facility - BEEF

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The Big Explosives Experimental Facility or BEEF is a ten acre fenced high explosive testing facility that provides data to support stockpile stewardship and other national security programs. At BEEF conventional high explosives experiments are safely conducted providing sophisticated diagnostics such as high speed optics and x-ray radiography.

  14. Big Explosives Experimental Facility - BEEF

    SciTech Connect

    2014-10-31

    The Big Explosives Experimental Facility or BEEF is a ten acre fenced high explosive testing facility that provides data to support stockpile stewardship and other national security programs. At BEEF conventional high explosives experiments are safely conducted providing sophisticated diagnostics such as high speed optics and x-ray radiography.

  15. 30 CFR 71.401 - Location of facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Bathing Facilities, Change Rooms, and Sanitary Flush Toilet Facilities at Surface Coal Mines § 71.401 Location of facilities. Bathhouses, change rooms, and sanitary flush toilet facilities shall be in a...

  16. 30 CFR 71.401 - Location of facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Bathing Facilities, Change Rooms, and Sanitary Flush Toilet Facilities at Surface Coal Mines § 71.401 Location of facilities. Bathhouses, change rooms, and sanitary flush toilet facilities shall be in a...

  17. 30 CFR 71.401 - Location of facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Bathing Facilities, Change Rooms, and Sanitary Flush Toilet Facilities at Surface Coal Mines § 71.401 Location of facilities. Bathhouses, change rooms, and sanitary flush toilet facilities shall be in a...

  18. 30 CFR 71.401 - Location of facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Bathing Facilities, Change Rooms, and Sanitary Flush Toilet Facilities at Surface Coal Mines § 71.401 Location of facilities. Bathhouses, change rooms, and sanitary flush toilet facilities shall be in a...

  19. 7 CFR 1738.12 - Location of facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Location of facilities. 1738.12 Section 1738.12... Location of facilities. RUS will make broadband loans for facilities which RUS determines are necessary to... facilities financed with loan funds to be located outside of eligible rural communities. ...

  20. 30 CFR 71.401 - Location of facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Location of facilities. 71.401 Section 71.401... Location of facilities. Bathhouses, change rooms, and sanitary flush toilet facilities shall be in a location convenient for the use of the miners. Where these facilities are designed to serve more than...

  1. 10 CFR 75.6 - Facility and location reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Facility and location reporting. 75.6 Section 75.6 Energy... AGREEMENT General Provisions § 75.6 Facility and location reporting. (a) Except where otherwise specified... that its facility or location is required to report under the Safeguards Agreement shall make its...

  2. 7 CFR 1735.91 - Location of facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Location of facilities. 1735.91 Section 1735.91 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... All Acquisitions and Mergers § 1735.91 Location of facilities. Telephone facilities to be acquired...

  3. 30 CFR 75.1712-2 - Location of surface facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Location of surface facilities. 75.1712-2... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1712-2 Location of surface facilities. Bathhouses, change rooms, and sanitary toilet facilities shall be in a...

  4. 30 CFR 75.1712-2 - Location of surface facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Location of surface facilities. 75.1712-2 Section 75.1712-2 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE... surface facilities. Bathhouses, change rooms, and sanitary toilet facilities shall be in a location...

  5. 30 CFR 75.1712-2 - Location of surface facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Location of surface facilities. 75.1712-2 Section 75.1712-2 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE... surface facilities. Bathhouses, change rooms, and sanitary toilet facilities shall be in a location...

  6. 30 CFR 75.1712-2 - Location of surface facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Location of surface facilities. 75.1712-2 Section 75.1712-2 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE... surface facilities. Bathhouses, change rooms, and sanitary toilet facilities shall be in a location...

  7. 30 CFR 75.1712-2 - Location of surface facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Location of surface facilities. 75.1712-2 Section 75.1712-2 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE... surface facilities. Bathhouses, change rooms, and sanitary toilet facilities shall be in a location...

  8. National Ignition Facility: Experimental plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-05-01

    As part of the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE), and EG&G formed an NIF Target Diagnostics Working Group. The purpose of the Target Diagnostics Working Group is to prepare conceptual designs of target diagnostics for inclusion in the facility CDR and to determine how these specifications impact the CDR. To accomplish this, a subgroup has directed its efforts at constructing an approximate experimental plan for the ignition campaign of the NIF CDR. The results of this effort are contained in this document, the Experimental Plan for achieving fusion ignition in the NIF. This group initially concentrated on the flow-down requirements of the experimental campaign leading to ignition, which will dominate the initial efforts of the NIF. It is envisaged, however, that before ignition, there will be parallel campaigns supporting weapons physics, weapons effects, and other research. This plan was developed by analyzing the sequence of activities required to finally fire the laser at the level of power and precision necessary to achieve the conditions of an ignition hohlraum target, and to then use our experience in activating and running Nova experiments to estimate the rate of completing these activities.

  9. Improving Healthcare Facility Locations in Bamyan, Afghanistan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    including: diagnosis and treatment of malaria, diarrhea and acute respiratory infection; distribution of condoms and oral contraceptives ; and...operating cost, and accessibility of the existing and future healthcare facilities. We also look into the ethnicity problem that would affect the...cost, and accessibility of the existing and future healthcare facilities. We also look into the ethnicity problem that would affect the selection of

  10. Experimental Fuels Facility Re-categorization Based on Facility Segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Reiss, Troy P.; Andrus, Jason

    2016-07-01

    The Experimental Fuels Facility (EFF) (MFC-794) at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) located on the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site was originally constructed to provide controlled-access, indoor storage for radiological contaminated equipment. Use of the facility was expanded to provide a controlled environment for repairing contaminated equipment and characterizing, repackaging, and treating waste. The EFF facility is also used for research and development services, including fuel fabrication. EFF was originally categorized as a LTHC-3 radiological facility based on facility operations and facility radiological inventories. Newly planned program activities identified the need to receive quantities of fissionable materials in excess of the single parameter subcritical limit in ANSI/ANS-8.1, “Nuclear Criticality Safety in Operations with Fissionable Materials Outside Reactors” (identified as “criticality list” quantities in DOE-STD-1027-92, “Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports,” Attachment 1, Table A.1). Since the proposed inventory of fissionable materials inside EFF may be greater than the single parameter sub-critical limit of 700 g of U-235 equivalent, the initial re-categorization is Hazard Category (HC) 2 based upon a potential criticality hazard. This paper details the facility hazard categorization performed for the EFF. The categorization was necessary to determine (a) the need for further safety analysis in accordance with LWP-10802, “INL Facility Categorization,” and (b) compliance with 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 830, Subpart B, “Safety Basis Requirements.” Based on the segmentation argument presented in this paper, the final hazard categorization for the facility is LTHC-3. Department of Energy Idaho (DOE-ID) approval of the final hazard categorization determined by this hazard assessment document (HAD) was required per the

  11. Public-Facilities Locator For The Blind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Kevin D.

    1988-01-01

    Proposed optoelectronic system guides blind people to important locations in public buildings, With system, sightless person easily determines directions and distances of restrooms, water fountains, stairways, emergency exits, and elevators. Circuitry uncomplicated and inexpensive, in both transmitter and receiver. Readily-available light-emitting diodes, photodiodes, and integrated-circuit chips used to build locator aid for the blind.

  12. 14 CFR 21.43 - Location of manufacturing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Location of manufacturing facilities. 21.43... CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS Type Certificates § 21.43 Location of manufacturing facilities. Except as provided in § 21.29, the Administrator does not issue a type certificate if the...

  13. 14 CFR 21.43 - Location of manufacturing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Location of manufacturing facilities. 21.43... CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS Type Certificates § 21.43 Location of manufacturing facilities. Except as provided in § 21.29, the Administrator does not issue a type certificate if the...

  14. 14 CFR 21.43 - Location of manufacturing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Location of manufacturing facilities. 21.43... CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS Type Certificates § 21.43 Location of manufacturing facilities. Except as provided in § 21.29, the FAA does not issue a type certificate if the manufacturing...

  15. 14 CFR 21.43 - Location of manufacturing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Location of manufacturing facilities. 21.43... CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS Type Certificates § 21.43 Location of manufacturing facilities. Except as provided in § 21.29, the FAA does not issue a type certificate if the manufacturing...

  16. 14 CFR 21.43 - Location of manufacturing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Location of manufacturing facilities. 21.43... CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS Type Certificates § 21.43 Location of manufacturing facilities. Except as provided in § 21.29, the FAA does not issue a type certificate if the manufacturing...

  17. A Capacitated Facility Location Approach for the Tanker Employment Problem

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    build a complete tanker scheduling tool. 69 Appendix A. TET Tool VBA Coding ’Module: Assign ’Author: Lt. Jeffrey R. Miller, USAF...A CAPACITATED FACILITY LOCATION APPROACH FOR THE TANKER EMPLOYMENT PROBLEM...FACILITY LOCATION APPROACH FOR THE TANKER EMPLOYMENT PROBLEM THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Operational Sciences

  18. 47 CFR 3.42 - Location of processing facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Location of processing facility. 3.42 Section 3.42 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL AUTHORIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF... Location of processing facility. Settlement of maritime mobile and maritime mobile-satellite service...

  19. 47 CFR 3.42 - Location of processing facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ACCOUNTING AUTHORITIES IN MARITIME AND MARITIME MOBILE-SATELLITE RADIO SERVICES Settlement Operations § 3.42 Location of processing facility. Settlement of maritime mobile and maritime mobile-satellite service... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Location of processing facility. 3.42 Section 3...

  20. 47 CFR 3.42 - Location of processing facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ACCOUNTING AUTHORITIES IN MARITIME AND MARITIME MOBILE-SATELLITE RADIO SERVICES Settlement Operations § 3.42 Location of processing facility. Settlement of maritime mobile and maritime mobile-satellite service... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Location of processing facility. 3.42 Section 3...

  1. 47 CFR 3.42 - Location of processing facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ACCOUNTING AUTHORITIES IN MARITIME AND MARITIME MOBILE-SATELLITE RADIO SERVICES Settlement Operations § 3.42 Location of processing facility. Settlement of maritime mobile and maritime mobile-satellite service... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Location of processing facility. 3.42 Section 3...

  2. 47 CFR 3.42 - Location of processing facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ACCOUNTING AUTHORITIES IN MARITIME AND MARITIME MOBILE-SATELLITE RADIO SERVICES Settlement Operations § 3.42 Location of processing facility. Settlement of maritime mobile and maritime mobile-satellite service... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Location of processing facility. 3.42 Section 3...

  3. 29. CROSSCUT FACILITY PROPERTY AND POWER LINE LOCATION, SHOWING INDIAN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. CROSSCUT FACILITY PROPERTY AND POWER LINE LOCATION, SHOWING INDIAN BEND POND LABELLED 'SETTLING BASIN,' STEAM/DIESEL PLANT AND OTHER FEATURES. 1951 - Crosscut Steam Plant, North side Salt River near Mill Avenue & Washington Street, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  4. 14 CFR 21.137 - Location of manufacturing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Location of manufacturing facilities. 21.137 Section 21.137 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... manufacturing facilities. The Administrator does not issue a production certificate if the...

  5. 14 CFR 21.137 - Location of manufacturing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Location of manufacturing facilities. 21.137 Section 21.137 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... manufacturing facilities. The Administrator does not issue a production certificate if the...

  6. Solving the Quadratic Capacitated Facilities Location Problem by Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cote, Leon C.; Smith, Wayland P.

    Several computer programs were developed to solve various versions of the quadratic capacitated facilities location problem. Matrices, which represent various business costs, are defined for the factors of sites, facilities, customers, commodities, and production units. The objective of the program is to find an optimization matrix for the lowest…

  7. 28. MAP SHOWING LOCATION OF ARVFS FACILITY AS BUILT. SHOWS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. MAP SHOWING LOCATION OF ARVFS FACILITY AS BUILT. SHOWS LINCOLN BOULEVARD, BIG LOST RIVER, AND NAVAL REACTORS FACILITY. F.C. TORKELSON DRAWING NUMBER 842-ARVFS-101-2. DATED OCTOBER 12, 1965. INEL INDEX CODE NUMBER: 075 0101 851 151969. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  8. Combined simulated annealing algorithm for the discrete facility location problem.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jin; Ni, Ling-Lin; Shi, Feng

    2012-01-01

    The combined simulated annealing (CSA) algorithm was developed for the discrete facility location problem (DFLP) in the paper. The method is a two-layer algorithm, in which the external subalgorithm optimizes the decision of the facility location decision while the internal subalgorithm optimizes the decision of the allocation of customer's demand under the determined location decision. The performance of the CSA is tested by 30 instances with different sizes. The computational results show that CSA works much better than the previous algorithm on DFLP and offers a new reasonable alternative solution method to it.

  9. Hot Experimental Facility reference flowsheet

    SciTech Connect

    North, E.D.

    1982-01-01

    This paper is a useful set of background information of HEF flowsheets, although many changes have been made in the past three years. The HEF reference flowsheet is a modified high-acid PUREX flowsheet capable of operating in the coprocessing mode or with full partitioning of U and Pu. Adequate decontamination factors are provided to purify high-burnup, fast breeder-reactor fuels to levels required for recycle back to a fuel fabrication facility. Product streams are mixed U-Pu oxide and uranium oxide. No contaminated liquid wastes are intentionally discharged to the environment. All wastes are solidified and packaged for appropriate disposal. Acid and water are recovered for internal recycle. Excess water is treated and discharged from the plant stack. Several changes have been made in the reference flowsheet since that time, and these are noted briefly.

  10. 86. VIEW OF LIQUID NITROGEN STORAGE FACILITY LOCATED DIRECTLY WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    86. VIEW OF LIQUID NITROGEN STORAGE FACILITY LOCATED DIRECTLY WEST OF THE SLC-3W FUEL APRON. NOTE HEAT EXCHANGER IN BACKGROUND. CAMERA TOWER LOCATED DIRECTLY IN FRONT OF LIQUID NITROGEN STORAGE TANK. NITROGEN AND HELIUM GAS STORAGE TANKS AT SOUTH END OF FUEL APRON IN LOWER RIGHT CORNER. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  11. A Probabilistic, Facility-Centric Approach to Lightning Strike Location

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huddleston, Lisa L.; Roeder, William p.; Merceret, Francis J.

    2012-01-01

    A new probabilistic facility-centric approach to lightning strike location has been developed. This process uses the bivariate Gaussian distribution of probability density provided by the current lightning location error ellipse for the most likely location of a lightning stroke and integrates it to determine the probability that the stroke is inside any specified radius of any location, even if that location is not centered on or even with the location error ellipse. This technique is adapted from a method of calculating the probability of debris collisionith spacecraft. Such a technique is important in spaceport processing activities because it allows engineers to quantify the risk of induced current damage to critical electronics due to nearby lightning strokes. This technique was tested extensively and is now in use by space launch organizations at Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Future applications could include forensic meteorology.

  12. NORTH ELEVATION OF IRRADIATED FUEL STORAGE FACILITY LOCATED IN FUEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTH ELEVATION OF IRRADIATED FUEL STORAGE FACILITY LOCATED IN FUEL STORAGE BUILDING (CPP-603). PHOTO TAKEN LOOKING SOUTH. INL PHOTO NUMBER HD-54-16-1. Mike Crane, Photographer, 8/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  13. SOUTH ELEVATION OF IRRADIATED FUEL STORAGE FACILITY LOCATED IN FUEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SOUTH ELEVATION OF IRRADIATED FUEL STORAGE FACILITY LOCATED IN FUEL STORAGE BUILDING (CPP-603). PHOTO TAKEN LOOKING NORTH. INL PHOTO NUMBER HD-54-15-2. Mike Crane, Photographer, 8/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  14. Predicting site locations for biomass using facilities with Bayesian methods

    Treesearch

    Timothy M. Young; James H. Perdue; Xia Huang

    2017-01-01

    Logistic regression models combined with Bayesian inference were developed to predict locations and quantify factors that influence the siting of biomass-using facilities that use woody biomass in the Southeastern United States. Predictions were developed for two groups of mills, one representing larger capacity mills similar to pulp and paper mills (Group II...

  15. Fast Flux Test Facility Asbestos Location Tracking Program

    SciTech Connect

    REYNOLDS, J.A.

    1999-04-13

    Procedure Number HNF-PRO-408, revision 0, paragraph 1.0, ''Purpose,'' and paragraph 2.0, ''Requirements for Facility Management of Asbestos,'' relate building inspection and requirements for documentation of existing asbestos-containing building material (ACBM) per each building assessment. This documentation shall be available to all personnel (including contractor personnel) entering the facility at their request. Corrective action was required by 400 Area Integrated Annual Appraisal/Audit for Fiscal Year 1992 (IAA-92-0007) to provide this notification documentation. No formal method had been developed to communicate the location and nature of ACBM to maintenance personnel in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) 400 Area. The scope of this Data Package Document is to locate and evaluate any ACBM found at FFTF which constitutes a baseline. This includes all buildings within the protected area. These findings are compiled from earlier reports, numerous work packages and engineering evaluations of employee findings.

  16. 40. View of dual projector system located in MWOC facility ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. View of dual projector system located in MWOC facility in transmitter building no. 102 by Bessler Company. System used to project images in MWOC on backlit screen system with fiber optic electro/mechanical system linked to computer output to indicate information on screen linked with display from projector system. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  17. 40 CFR 267.18 - What are the standards for selecting the location of my facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the location of my facility? 267.18 Section 267.18 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... FACILITIES OPERATING UNDER A STANDARDIZED PERMIT General Facility Standards § 267.18 What are the standards for selecting the location of my facility? (a) You may not locate portions of new facilities where...

  18. Description of Liquid Nitrogen Experimental Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurns, John M.; Jacobs, Richard E.; Saiyed, Naseem H.

    1991-01-01

    The Liquid Nitrogen Test Facility is a unique test facility for ground-based liquid nitrogen experimentation. The test rig consists of an insulated tank of approximately 12.5 cubic ft in volume, which is supplied with liquid nitrogen from a 300 gal dewar via a vacuum jacketed piping system. The test tank is fitted with pressure and temperature measuring instrumentation, and with two view ports which allow visual observation of test conditions. To demonstrate the capabilities of the facility, the initial test program is briefly described. The objective of the test program is to measure the condensation rate by injecting liquid nitrogen as a subcooled spray into the ullage of a tank 50 percent full of liquid nitrogen at saturated conditions. The condensation rate of the nitrogen vapor on the subcooled spray can be analytically modeled, and results validated and corrected by experimentally measuring the vapor condensation on liquid sprays.

  19. Experimental Stream Facility: Design and Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Experimental Stream Facility (ESF) is a valuable research tool for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Office of Research and Development’s (ORD) laboratories in Cincinnati, Ohio. This brochure describes the ESF, which is one of only a handful of research facilit...

  20. The National Ignition Facility: Experimental Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G H

    2003-09-22

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility containing a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system together with a 10-meter diameter target chamber with room for nearly 100 experimental diagnostics. NIF will be the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system, providing a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's energetic laser beams will compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than required to initiate the fusion reactions. Other NIF experiments will study physical processes at temperatures approaching 10{sup 8} K and 10{sup 11} bar, conditions that exist naturally only in the interior of stars, planets and in nuclear weapons. NIF has completed the first phases of its laser commissioning program. The first four beams of NIF have generated 106 kilojoules of infrared light and over 16 kJ at the third harmonic (351 nm). NIF's target experimental systems are being commissioned and experiments have begun. This paper discusses NIF's current and future experimental capability, plans for facility diagnostics, cryogenic target systems, specialized optics for experiments, and potential enhancements to NIF such as green laser operation and high-energy short pulse operation.

  1. Geothermal Loop Experimental Facility. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-04-01

    Research at the Geothermal Loop Experimental Facility was successfully concluded in September 1979. In 13,000 hours of operation over a three and one half year period, the nominal 10 megawatt electrical equivalent GLEF provided the opportunity to identify problems in working with highly saline geothermal fluids and to develop solutions that could be applied to a commercial geothermal power plant producing electricity. A seven and one half year period beginning in April 1972, with early well flow testing and ending in September 1979, with the completion of extensive facility and reservoir operations is covered. During this period, the facility was designed, constructed and operated in several configurations. A comprehensive reference document, addressing or referencing documentation of all the key areas investigated is presented.

  2. Location-Based Infrastructure Inspection for Sabo Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Tanaka, S.; Noda, Y.; Hashimoto, K.; Ito, M.; Miyo, M.

    2015-08-01

    Infrastructure asset management is a framework for achieving sustainable infrastructure. Based on this framework, although we often generate a three-dimensional (3D) geometrical model as a base map in management, it is not easy to acquire details of asset attributes in 3D measurement. Therefore, we focus on field-based investigation and inspection using mobile devices, and aim at assisting investigators in infrastructure asset monitoring with location-based applications. In this paper, we propose and evaluate our location-based investigation application as follows. First, we propose an inspection flow suitable for field-based monitoring. Second, we develop a Web GIS application for field-based investigation with mobile devices. Third, we propose base map generation suitable for sabo facilities using UAV and terrestrial laser scanner. We conduct an experiment in a sediment-retarding basin consisting of dikes, bridges, and debris barriers, and explore some issues in infrastructure asset monitoring using mobile devices.

  3. National Ignition Facility and Managing Location, Component, and State

    SciTech Connect

    Foxworthy, C; Fung, T; Beeler, R; Li, J; Dugorepec, J; Chang, C

    2011-07-25

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility that contains a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system coupled with a 10-meter diameter target chamber. There are over 6,200 Line Replaceable Units (LRUs) comprised of more than 104,000 serialized parts that make up the NIF. Each LRU is a modular unit typically composed of a mechanical housing, laser optics (glass, lenses, or mirrors), and utilities. To date, there are more than 120,000 data sets created to characterize the attributes of these parts. Greater than 51,000 Work Permits have been issued to install, maintain, and troubleshoot the components. One integrated system is used to manage these data, and more. The Location Component and State (LoCoS) system is a web application built using Java Enterprise Edition technologies and is accessed by over 1,200 users. It is either directly or indirectly involved with each aspect of NIF work activity, and interfaces with ten external systems including the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) and the Laser Performance Operations Model (LPOM). Besides providing business functionality, LoCoS also acts as the NIF enterprise service bus. In this role, numerous integration approaches had to be adopted including: file exchange, database sharing, queuing, and web services in order to accommodate various business, technical, and security requirements. Architecture and implementation decisions are discussed.

  4. Compressed Gas Safety for Experimental Fusion Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Lee C. Cadwallader

    2004-09-01

    Experimental fusion facilities present a variety of hazards to the operators and staff. There are unique or specialized hazards, including magnetic fields, cryogens, radio frequency emissions, and vacuum reservoirs. There are also more general industrial hazards, such as a wide variety of electrical power, pressurized air, and cooling water systems in use, there are crane and hoist loads, working at height, and handling compressed gas cylinders. This paper outlines the projectile hazard assoicated with compressed gas cylinders and mthods of treatment to provide for compressed gas safety. This information should be of interest to personnel at both magnetic and inertial fusion experiments.

  5. Hazards assessment for the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Calley, M.B.; Jones, J.L. Jr.

    1994-09-19

    This report documents the hazards assessment for the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, which is operated by EG&G Idaho, Inc., for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The hazards assessment was performed to ensure that this facility complies with DOE and company requirements pertaining to emergency planning and preparedness for operational emergencies. DOE Order 5500.3A requires that a facility-specific hazards assessment be performed to provide the technical basis for facility emergency planning efforts. This hazards assessment was conducted in accordance with DOE Headquarters and DOE Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) guidance to comply with DOE Order 5500.3A. The hazards assessment identifies and analyzes hazards that are significant enough to warrant consideration in a facility`s operational emergency management program. This hazards assessment describes the WERF, the area surrounding WERF, associated buildings and structures at WERF, and the processes performed at WERF. All radiological and nonradiological hazardous materials stored, used, or produced at WERF were identified and screened. Even though the screening process indicated that the hazardous materials could be screened from further analysis because the inventory of radiological and nonradiological hazardous materials were below the screening thresholds specified by DOE and DOE-ID guidance for DOE Order 5500.3A, the nonradiological hazardous materials were analyzed further because it was felt that the nonradiological hazardous material screening thresholds were too high.

  6. Solution of facility location problem in Turkey by using fuzzy C-means method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocakaya, Mustafa Nabi; Türkakın, Osman Hürol

    2013-10-01

    Facility location problem is one of most frequent problems, which is encountered while deciding facility places such as factories, warehouses. There are various techniques developed to solve facility location problems. Fuzzy c-means method is one of the most usable techniques between them. In this study, optimum warehouse location for natural stone mines is found by using fuzzy c-means method.

  7. 7 CFR 1735.13 - Location of facilities and service for nonrural subscribers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Location of facilities and service for nonrural...-TELECOMMUNICATIONS PROGRAM Loan Purposes and Basic Policies § 1735.13 Location of facilities and service for nonrural... location. (b) To the greatest extent practical, loans are limited to providing telephone facilities that...

  8. 41 CFR 301-74.5 - How should we select a location and a facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... location and a facility? 301-74.5 Section 301-74.5 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel... Agency Responsibilities § 301-74.5 How should we select a location and a facility? Site selection is a... location and the specific facility(ies) selected. In determining the best site in the interest of the...

  9. A Benders based rolling horizon algorithm for a dynamic facility location problem

    DOE PAGES

    Marufuzzaman,, Mohammad; Gedik, Ridvan; Roni, Mohammad S.

    2016-06-28

    This study presents a well-known capacitated dynamic facility location problem (DFLP) that satisfies the customer demand at a minimum cost by determining the time period for opening, closing, or retaining an existing facility in a given location. To solve this challenging NP-hard problem, this paper develops a unique hybrid solution algorithm that combines a rolling horizon algorithm with an accelerated Benders decomposition algorithm. Extensive computational experiments are performed on benchmark test instances to evaluate the hybrid algorithm’s efficiency and robustness in solving the DFLP problem. Computational results indicate that the hybrid Benders based rolling horizon algorithm consistently offers high qualitymore » feasible solutions in a much shorter computational time period than the standalone rolling horizon and accelerated Benders decomposition algorithms in the experimental range.« less

  10. A Benders based rolling horizon algorithm for a dynamic facility location problem

    SciTech Connect

    Marufuzzaman,, Mohammad; Gedik, Ridvan; Roni, Mohammad S.

    2016-06-28

    This study presents a well-known capacitated dynamic facility location problem (DFLP) that satisfies the customer demand at a minimum cost by determining the time period for opening, closing, or retaining an existing facility in a given location. To solve this challenging NP-hard problem, this paper develops a unique hybrid solution algorithm that combines a rolling horizon algorithm with an accelerated Benders decomposition algorithm. Extensive computational experiments are performed on benchmark test instances to evaluate the hybrid algorithm’s efficiency and robustness in solving the DFLP problem. Computational results indicate that the hybrid Benders based rolling horizon algorithm consistently offers high quality feasible solutions in a much shorter computational time period than the standalone rolling horizon and accelerated Benders decomposition algorithms in the experimental range.

  11. 14 CFR 21.122 - Location of or change to manufacturing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Location of or change to manufacturing....122 Location of or change to manufacturing facilities. (a) A type certificate holder may utilize manufacturing facilities located outside of the United States if the FAA finds no undue burden in...

  12. 14 CFR 21.309 - Location of or change to manufacturing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Location of or change to manufacturing... Location of or change to manufacturing facilities. (a) An applicant may obtain a PMA for manufacturing... before making any changes to the location of any of its manufacturing facilities. (c) The PMA holder...

  13. 14 CFR 21.122 - Location of or change to manufacturing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Location of or change to manufacturing... § 21.122 Location of or change to manufacturing facilities. (a) An applicant may obtain a production certificate for manufacturing facilities located outside of the United States if the FAA finds no undue...

  14. 14 CFR 21.609 - Location of or change to manufacturing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Location of or change to manufacturing....609 Location of or change to manufacturing facilities. (a) An applicant may obtain a TSO authorization for manufacturing facilities located outside of the United States if the FAA finds no undue burden...

  15. 14 CFR 21.122 - Location of or change to manufacturing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Location of or change to manufacturing... § 21.122 Location of or change to manufacturing facilities. (a) An applicant may obtain a production certificate for manufacturing facilities located outside of the United States if the FAA finds no undue...

  16. 14 CFR 21.122 - Location of or change to manufacturing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Location of or change to manufacturing....122 Location of or change to manufacturing facilities. (a) A type certificate holder may utilize manufacturing facilities located outside of the United States if the FAA finds no undue burden in...

  17. 14 CFR 21.609 - Location of or change to manufacturing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Location of or change to manufacturing....609 Location of or change to manufacturing facilities. (a) An applicant may obtain a TSO authorization for manufacturing facilities located outside of the United States if the FAA finds no undue burden...

  18. 14 CFR 21.309 - Location of or change to manufacturing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Location of or change to manufacturing... Location of or change to manufacturing facilities. (a) An applicant may obtain a PMA for manufacturing... before making any changes to the location of any of its manufacturing facilities. (c) The PMA holder...

  19. 14 CFR 21.122 - Location of or change to manufacturing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Location of or change to manufacturing....122 Location of or change to manufacturing facilities. (a) A type certificate holder may utilize manufacturing facilities located outside of the United States if the FAA finds no undue burden in...

  20. 14 CFR 21.309 - Location of or change to manufacturing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Location of or change to manufacturing... Location of or change to manufacturing facilities. (a) An applicant may obtain a PMA for manufacturing... before making any changes to the location of any of its manufacturing facilities. (c) The PMA holder...

  1. 14 CFR 21.309 - Location of or change to manufacturing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Location of or change to manufacturing..., and Appliances § 21.309 Location of or change to manufacturing facilities. (a) An applicant may obtain a PMA for manufacturing facilities located outside of the United States if the FAA finds no...

  2. 14 CFR 21.609 - Location of or change to manufacturing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Location of or change to manufacturing....609 Location of or change to manufacturing facilities. (a) An applicant may obtain a TSO authorization for manufacturing facilities located outside of the United States if the FAA finds no undue burden...

  3. Experimental digester facility modifications and digester gas upgrading research

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, V.J.; Biljetina, R.; Akin, C.

    1989-01-01

    The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) has been participating in an experimental program at the Community Waste Research Facility (CWRF) located at the Walt Disney World Resort Complex, Orlando, Florida. Four institutions have formed a team to provide solutions to community waste treatment and disposal programs. Of primary importance to this research effort is the implementation of low-cost, energy-efficient waste treatment and recovery technologies and the net production of energy (methane) from biomass and waste resources. The production of methane is being studied in a novel, high-rate digester. During 1988, we were responsible for modifying the Experimental Test Unit (ETU) to permit dry solids feeding of refuse-derived fuel (RDF) and for conducting bench-scale experiments to evaluate techniques for efficient removal of carbon dioxide produced during anaerobic digestion.

  4. National Ignition Facility Beamline Pupil Relay Plane Location and Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Korniski, R J; Lawson, J K

    2002-01-29

    Axial astigmatism can be introduced into the nominal design of an optical system by tilted and tilted-wedged plates. The pupil images in the National Ignition Facility experience many such components. Some ramifications will be explored.

  5. A simulation based research on chance constrained programming in robust facility location problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaijun, Leng; Wen, Shi; Guanghua, Song; Lin, Pan

    2017-03-01

    Since facility location decisions problem include long-term character and potential parameter variations, it is important to consider uncertainty in its modeling. This paper examines robust facility location problem considering supply uncertainty, in which we assume the supply of the facility in the actual operation is not equal to the supply initially established, the supply is subject to random fluctuation. The chance constraints are introduced when formulating the robust facility location model to make sure the system operate properly with a certain probability while the supply fluctuates. The chance constraints are approximated safely by using Hoeffding's inequality and the problem is transformed to a general deterministic linear programming. Furthermore, how the facility location cost change with confidence level is investigated through a numerical example. The sensitivity analysis is conducted for important parameters of the model and we get the main factors that affect the facility location cost.

  6. Locating hazardous waste facilities: The influence of NIMBY beliefs

    SciTech Connect

    Groothuis, P.A.; Miller, G. )

    1994-07-01

    The [open quote]Not-In-My-Backyard[close quote] (NIMBY) syndrome is analyzed in economic decision making. Belief statements that reflect specific NIMBY concerns are subjected to factor analysis and the structure reveals two dimensions: tolerance and avoidance. Tolerance reflects an acceptance of rational economic arguments regarding the siting of a hazardous waste facility and avoidance reflects a more personal fear-of-consequences. Analysis identifies demographic characteristics of individuals likely to exhibit these two beliefs. These beliefs also are shown to influence the acceptance of a hazardous waste disposal facility in ones neighborhood when compensation is offered.

  7. 75 FR 19555 - NARA Facility Locations and Hours

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-15

    ... 19555-19558] [FR Doc No: 2010-8567] NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION 36 CFR Parts 1200, 1253... Archives and Records Administration (NARA). ACTION: Direct final rule. SUMMARY: NARA is amending several of... new logo for NARA's regional records service office, and the addition of facility information for...

  8. 14 CFR 145.105 - Change of location, housing, or facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Change of location, housing, or facilities. 145.105 Section 145.105 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF..., Materials, and Data § 145.105 Change of location, housing, or facilities. (a) A certificated repair...

  9. 14 CFR 145.105 - Change of location, housing, or facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Change of location, housing, or facilities. 145.105 Section 145.105 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF..., Materials, and Data § 145.105 Change of location, housing, or facilities. (a) A certificated repair...

  10. 14 CFR 145.105 - Change of location, housing, or facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Change of location, housing, or facilities. 145.105 Section 145.105 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF..., Materials, and Data § 145.105 Change of location, housing, or facilities. (a) A certificated repair...

  11. 14 CFR 145.105 - Change of location, housing, or facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Change of location, housing, or facilities. 145.105 Section 145.105 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF..., Materials, and Data § 145.105 Change of location, housing, or facilities. (a) A certificated repair...

  12. 14 CFR 21.139 - Location of or change to manufacturing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Location of or change to manufacturing... of or change to manufacturing facilities. (a) An applicant may obtain a production certificate for manufacturing facilities located outside of the United States if the FAA finds no undue burden in...

  13. 14 CFR 21.139 - Location of or change to manufacturing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Location of or change to manufacturing... of or change to manufacturing facilities. (a) An applicant may obtain a production certificate for manufacturing facilities located outside of the United States if the FAA finds no undue burden in...

  14. 14 CFR 21.139 - Location of or change to manufacturing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Location of or change to manufacturing... of or change to manufacturing facilities. (a) An applicant may obtain a production certificate for manufacturing facilities located outside of the United States if the FAA finds no undue burden in...

  15. 41 CFR 301-74.5 - How should we select a location and a facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... location and a facility? 301-74.5 Section 301-74.5 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 74-CONFERENCE PLANNING Agency Responsibilities § 301-74.5 How should we select a location and a facility? Site selection is...

  16. 41 CFR 301-74.5 - How should we select a location and a facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... location and a facility? 301-74.5 Section 301-74.5 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 74-CONFERENCE PLANNING Agency Responsibilities § 301-74.5 How should we select a location and a facility? Site selection is...

  17. 30 CFR 57.6131 - Location of explosive material storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... NONMETAL MINES Explosives Storage-Surface Only § 57.6131 Location of explosive material storage facilities... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Location of explosive material storage facilities. 57.6131 Section 57.6131 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...

  18. 30 CFR 56.6131 - Location of explosive material storage facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... MINES Explosives Storage § 56.6131 Location of explosive material storage facilities. (a) Storage... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Location of explosive material storage facilities. 56.6131 Section 56.6131 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...

  19. 77 FR 33479 - Information Collection Activities: Oil-Spill Response Requirements for Facilities Located Seaward...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-06

    ... Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement Information Collection Activities: Oil-Spill Response... requirements in the regulations under Part 254, ``Oil-Spill Response Requirements for Facilities Located... 254, Oil-Spill Response Requirements for Facilities Located Seaward of the Coast Line. OMB...

  20. 10 CFR 75.6 - Facility and location reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... preparation of DOC/NRC Form AP-A and associated forms. (d) Locations—Specific information regarding locations... development information 75.11(c)(1) As specified by printed instructions for preparation of DOC/NRC Form AP-1... specified by printed instructions for preparation of DOC/NRC Form AP-1 and associated forms. Mines...

  1. 10 CFR 75.6 - Facility and location reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... preparation of DOC/NRC Form AP-A and associated forms. (d) Locations—Specific information regarding locations... development information 75.11(c)(1) As specified by printed instructions for preparation of DOC/NRC Form AP-1... specified by printed instructions for preparation of DOC/NRC Form AP-1 and associated forms. Mines...

  2. 10 CFR 75.6 - Facility and location reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... preparation of DOC/NRC Form AP-A and associated forms. (d) Locations—Specific information regarding locations... development information 75.11(c)(1) As specified by printed instructions for preparation of DOC/NRC Form AP-1... specified by printed instructions for preparation of DOC/NRC Form AP-1 and associated forms. Mines...

  3. 10 CFR 75.6 - Facility and location reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... preparation of DOC/NRC Form AP-A and associated forms. (d) Locations—Specific information regarding locations... development information 75.11(c)(1) As specified by printed instructions for preparation of DOC/NRC Form AP-1... specified by printed instructions for preparation of DOC/NRC Form AP-1 and associated forms. Mines...

  4. Overview of the Neutron experimental facilities at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Mocko, Michal

    2016-06-30

    This presentation gives an overview of the neutron experimental facilities at LANSCE. The layout is mentioned in detail, with a map of the south-side experimental facilities, information on Target-4 and the Lujan Center. Then it goes into detail about neutron sources, specifically continuous versus pulsed. Target 4 is then discussed. In conclusion, we have introduced the south-side experimental facilities in operation at LANSCE. 1L target and Target 4 provide complementary neutron energy spectra. Two spallation neutron sources taken together cover more than 11 orders of magnitude in neutron energy.

  5. 34 CFR 395.30 - The location and operation of vending facilities for blind vendors on Federal property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false The location and operation of vending facilities for... § 395.30 The location and operation of vending facilities for blind vendors on Federal property. (a... facilities on any Federal property. (b) Any limitation on the location or operation of a vending facility for...

  6. Comparison of optimized algorithms in facility location allocation problems with different distance measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rakesh; Chandrawat, Rajesh Kumar; Garg, B. P.; Joshi, Varun

    2017-07-01

    Opening the new firm or branch with desired execution is very relevant to facility location problem. Along the lines to locate the new ambulances and firehouses, the government desires to minimize average response time for emergencies from all residents of cities. So finding the best location is biggest challenge in day to day life. These type of problems were named as facility location problems. A lot of algorithms have been developed to handle these problems. In this paper, we review five algorithms that were applied to facility location problems. The significance of clustering in facility location problems is also presented. First we compare Fuzzy c-means clustering (FCM) algorithm with alternating heuristic (AH) algorithm, then with Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithms using different type of distance function. The data was clustered with the help of FCM and then we apply median model and min-max problem model on that data. After finding optimized locations using these algorithms we find the distance from optimized location point to the demanded point with different distance techniques and compare the results. At last, we design a general example to validate the feasibility of the five algorithms for facilities location optimization, and authenticate the advantages and drawbacks of them.

  7. RAON experimental facilities for nuclear science

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Y. K.; Kim, Y. K.; Komatsubara, T.; Moon, J. Y.; Park, J. S.; Shin, T. S.; Kim, Y. J.

    2014-05-02

    The Rare Isotope Science Project (RISP) was established in December 2011 and has put quite an effort to carry out the design and construction of the accelerator complex facility named “RAON”. RAON is a rare isotope (RI) beam facility that aims to provide various RI beams of proton-and neutron-rich nuclei as well as variety of stable ion beams of wide ranges of energies up to a few hundreds MeV/nucleon for the researches in basic science and application. Proposed research programs for nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics at RAON include studies of the properties of exotic nuclei, the equation of state of nuclear matter, the origin of the universe, process of nucleosynthesis, super heavy elements, etc. Various high performance magnetic spectrometers for nuclear science have been designed, which are KOBRA (KOrea Broad acceptance Recoil spectrometer and Apparatus), LAMPS (Large Acceptance Multi-Purpose Spectrometer), and ZDS (Zero Degree Spectrometer). The status of those spectrometers for nuclear science will be presented with a brief report on the RAON.

  8. [The acquisition of schemata about location of urban facilities in public space].

    PubMed

    Kawai, Miho; Murakoshi, Shin

    2003-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate acquisition of schemata about location of urban facilities. Materials were photos of public space, in which one of three urban facilities (a mailbox, a public-telephone, and a coin--operated locker) were removed by photo-retouching software. The task was to choose the most suitable urban facility for each corrected-photo and to locate it at the most suitable position on the photo. Among three participant groups (primary school 3rd grade: n = 153, primary school 5th grade: n = 118, undergraduate: n = 250), undergraduates chose the most suitable urban facility, and their located position was more concentrated. The results suggest that participants acquire the schemata and use them for inference. Although even 3rd grade children have acquired the schema to some extent, the adults have more detailed schemata of urban facilities in public space.

  9. 77 FR 23409 - Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) Reporting for Facilities Located in Indian Country and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-19

    ..., because tribal governmental structures may vary, EPA is updating its terminology to refer to the principal..., so as to avoid any confusing overlap in terminology for facilities located in Indian country....

  10. 14 CFR 145.105 - Change of location, housing, or facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Change of location, housing, or facilities. 145.105 Section 145.105 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES REPAIR STATIONS Housing, Facilities,...

  11. Library Facility Siting and Location Handbook. The Greenwood Library Management Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koontz, Christine M.

    This handbook is a guide to the complex process of library facility siting and location. It includes relevant research and professionals' siting experiences, as well as actual case studies of closures, openings, mergers, and relocations of library facilities. While the bulk of the volume provides practical information, the work also presents an…

  12. A Hybrid Tabu Search Heuristic for a Bilevel Competitive Facility Location Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küçükaydın, Hande; Aras, Necati; Altınel, I. Kuban

    We consider a problem in which a firm or franchise enters a market by locating new facilities where there are existing facilities belonging to a competitor. The firm aims at finding the location and attractiveness of each facility to be opened so as to maximize its profit. The competitor, on the other hand, can react by adjusting the attractiveness of its existing facilities, opening new facilities and/or closing existing ones with the objective of maximizing its own profit. The demand is assumed to be aggregated at certain points in the plane and the facilities of the firm can be located at prespecified candidate sites. We employ Huff's gravity-based rule in modeling the behavior of the customers where the fraction of customers at a demand point that visit a certain facility is proportional to the facility attractiveness and inversely proportional to the distance between the facility site and demand point. We formulate a bilevel mixed-integer nonlinear programming model where the firm entering the market is the leader and the competitor is the follower. In order to find a feasible solution of this model, we develop a hybrid tabu search heuristic which makes use of two exact methods as subroutines: a gradient ascent method and a branch-and-bound algorithm with nonlinear programming relaxation.

  13. A reliable facility location design model with site-dependent disruption in the imperfect information context.

    PubMed

    Yun, Lifen; Wang, Xifu; Fan, Hongqiang; Li, Xiaopeng

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a reliable facility location design model under imperfect information with site-dependent disruptions; i.e., each facility is subject to a unique disruption probability that varies across the space. In the imperfect information contexts, customers adopt a realistic "trial-and-error" strategy to visit facilities; i.e., they visit a number of pre-assigned facilities sequentially until they arrive at the first operational facility or give up looking for the service. This proposed model aims to balance initial facility investment and expected long-term operational cost by finding the optimal facility locations. A nonlinear integer programming model is proposed to describe this problem. We apply a linearization technique to reduce the difficulty of solving the proposed model. A number of problem instances are studied to illustrate the performance of the proposed model. The results indicate that our proposed model can reveal a number of interesting insights into the facility location design with site-dependent disruptions, including the benefit of backup facilities and system robustness against variation of the loss-of-service penalty.

  14. A reliable facility location design model with site-dependent disruption in the imperfect information context

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Lifen; Wang, Xifu; Fan, Hongqiang; Li, Xiaopeng

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a reliable facility location design model under imperfect information with site-dependent disruptions; i.e., each facility is subject to a unique disruption probability that varies across the space. In the imperfect information contexts, customers adopt a realistic “trial-and-error” strategy to visit facilities; i.e., they visit a number of pre-assigned facilities sequentially until they arrive at the first operational facility or give up looking for the service. This proposed model aims to balance initial facility investment and expected long-term operational cost by finding the optimal facility locations. A nonlinear integer programming model is proposed to describe this problem. We apply a linearization technique to reduce the difficulty of solving the proposed model. A number of problem instances are studied to illustrate the performance of the proposed model. The results indicate that our proposed model can reveal a number of interesting insights into the facility location design with site-dependent disruptions, including the benefit of backup facilities and system robustness against variation of the loss-of-service penalty. PMID:28486564

  15. New spatial clustering-based models for optimal urban facility location considering geographical obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javadi, Maryam; Shahrabi, Jamal

    2014-03-01

    The problems of facility location and the allocation of demand points to facilities are crucial research issues in spatial data analysis and urban planning. It is very important for an organization or governments to best locate its resources and facilities and efficiently manage resources to ensure that all demand points are covered and all the needs are met. Most of the recent studies, which focused on solving facility location problems by performing spatial clustering, have used the Euclidean distance between two points as the dissimilarity function. Natural obstacles, such as mountains and rivers, can have drastic impacts on the distance that needs to be traveled between two geographical locations. While calculating the distance between various supply chain entities (including facilities and demand points), it is necessary to take such obstacles into account to obtain better and more realistic results regarding location-allocation. In this article, new models were presented for location of urban facilities while considering geographical obstacles at the same time. In these models, three new distance functions were proposed. The first function was based on the analysis of shortest path in linear network, which was called SPD function. The other two functions, namely PD and P2D, were based on the algorithms that deal with robot geometry and route-based robot navigation in the presence of obstacles. The models were implemented in ArcGIS Desktop 9.2 software using the visual basic programming language. These models were evaluated using synthetic and real data sets. The overall performance was evaluated based on the sum of distance from demand points to their corresponding facilities. Because of the distance between the demand points and facilities becoming more realistic in the proposed functions, results indicated desired quality of the proposed models in terms of quality of allocating points to centers and logistic cost. Obtained results show promising

  16. The adequacy of the facility and the location of waste collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich-Supovec, Marjana

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to summarise some provisions of the legislation applicable in the territory of the Republic of Slovenia that have to be complied with when selecting facilities intended for waste collection. In addition to equipment, the adequacy of such facility also depends on its site. Not only waste management legislation and environment protection legislation, but also legislation governing water, nature preservation and conservation, natural and cultural heritage and mining legislation stipulate the possibility of using facilities where collectors can sort and store waste before depositing it for subsequent management. This paper presents location examples where various factors exclude the possibility of using facilities as waste collection centres.

  17. Planning of public healthcare facility using a location allocation modelling: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shariff, S. Sarifah Radiah; Moin, Noor Hasnah; Omar, Mohd

    2014-09-01

    Finding the correct location of any facility and determining the demands which are to be assigned to it is very crucial in public health service. This is to ensure that the public gain maximum benefits. This article analyzes the previous location decisions of public primary healthcare (PHC) facilities in the district of Kuala Langat, Malaysia. With total population of 220214 (in 2010), the PHC in the district is currently served by 28 facilities. The percentages of total population covered (in 2007) within the maximum allowable distance of 3km and 5km are 69.7 percent and 77.8 percent respectively. This is very low compared to the Malaysian National Health Policy of Health for All or 100 percent coverage. The determination of health facility location should be planned carefully to further increase effective primary health service to the nation that is required for economic sustainability.

  18. CHALLENGES IN DATA INTENSIVE ANALYSIS AT SCIENTIFIC EXPERIMENTAL USER FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kleese van Dam, Kerstin; Li, Dongsheng; Miller, Stephen D.; Cobb, John W.; Green, Mark L.; Ruby, Catherine L.

    2011-12-31

    This chapter will discuss the critical data intensive analysis and visualiza-tion challenges faced by the experimental science community at large scale and laboratory based facilities. The chapter will further highlight initial solutions under development through community efforts and lay out perspectives for the future, such as the potential of more closely linked experimental and computational science approaches, methods to achieve real time analysis capabilities and the challenges and opportunities of data integration across experimental scales, levels of theory and varying techniques.

  19. 30 CFR 947.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... plants and support facilities not located at or near the minesite or not within the permit area for a... § 947.827 Special performance standards—coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or... Program Performance Standards—Coal Processing Plants and Support Facilities Not Located at or Near...

  20. 30 CFR 910.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... plants and support facilities not located at or near the minesite or not within the permit area for a... § 910.827 Special performance standards—coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or... Program Performance Standards—Coal Processing Plants and Support Facilities Not Located at or Near...

  1. 30 CFR 922.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... plants and support facilities not located at or near the minesite or not within the permit area for a... § 922.827 Special performance standards—coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or... Program Performance Standards—Coal Processing Plants and Support Facilities not Located at or near...

  2. 30 CFR 921.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... plants and support facilities not located at or near the minesite or not within the permit area for a... MASSACHUSETTS § 921.827 Special performance standards—coal processing plants and support facilities not located... Permanent Program Performance Standards—Coal Processing Plants and Support Facilities Not Located at or...

  3. 30 CFR 939.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... plants and support facilities not located at or near the minesite or not within the permit area for a... ISLAND § 939.827 Special performance standards—coal processing plants and support facilities not located... Permanent Program Performance Standards—Coal Processing Plants and Support Facilities Not Located at or...

  4. 30 CFR 910.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... plants and support facilities not located at or near the minesite or not within the permit area for a... § 910.827 Special performance standards—coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or... Program Performance Standards—Coal Processing Plants and Support Facilities Not Located at or Near...

  5. 30 CFR 941.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... plants and support facilities not located at or near the minesite or not within the permit area for a... DAKOTA § 941.827 Special performance standards—coal processing plants and support facilities not located... Permanent Program Performance Standards—Coal Processing Plants and Support Facilities Not Located at or...

  6. 30 CFR 912.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... plants and support facilities not located at or near the minesite or not within the permit area for a... § 912.827 Special performance standards—coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or... Program Performance Standards—Coal Processing Plants and Support Facilities Not Located at or Near...

  7. 41 CFR 102-73.25 - What policies must Executive agencies comply with in locating Federal facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Executive agencies comply with in locating Federal facilities? 102-73.25 Section 102-73.25 Public Contracts... REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 73-REAL ESTATE ACQUISITION General Provisions Locating Federal Facilities § 102-73.25 What policies must Executive agencies comply with in locating Federal facilities?...

  8. 30 CFR 933.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... plants and support facilities not located at or near the minesite or not within the permit area for a... CAROLINA § 933.827 Special performance standards—coal processing plants and support facilities not located... Permanent Program Performance Standards—Coal Processing Plants and Support Facilities Not Located at or...

  9. 30 CFR 921.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... plants and support facilities not located at or near the minesite or not within the permit area for a... MASSACHUSETTS § 921.827 Special performance standards—coal processing plants and support facilities not located... Permanent Program Performance Standards—Coal Processing Plants and Support Facilities Not Located at or...

  10. 30 CFR 937.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... plants and support facilities not located at or near the minesite or not within the permit area for a... § 937.827 Special performance standards—coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or... Program Performance Standards—Coal Processing plants and Support Facilities Not Located at or Near...

  11. 41 CFR 102-73.25 - What policies must Executive agencies comply with in locating Federal facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Executive agencies comply with in locating Federal facilities? 102-73.25 Section 102-73.25 Public Contracts... REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 73-REAL ESTATE ACQUISITION General Provisions Locating Federal Facilities § 102-73.25 What policies must Executive agencies comply with in locating Federal facilities?...

  12. 30 CFR 922.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... plants and support facilities not located at or near the minesite or not within the permit area for a... § 922.827 Special performance standards—coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or... Program Performance Standards—Coal Processing Plants and Support Facilities not Located at or near...

  13. 30 CFR 912.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... plants and support facilities not located at or near the minesite or not within the permit area for a... § 912.827 Special performance standards—coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or... Program Performance Standards—Coal Processing Plants and Support Facilities Not Located at or Near...

  14. 30 CFR 254.50 - Spill response plans for facilities located in State waters seaward of the coast line.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL-SPILL RESPONSE REQUIREMENTS FOR FACILITIES LOCATED SEAWARD OF THE COAST LINE Oil-Spill Response Requirements for Facilities Located in State Waters Seaward... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Spill response plans for facilities located...

  15. 30 CFR 254.50 - Spill response plans for facilities located in State waters seaward of the coast line.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL-SPILL RESPONSE REQUIREMENTS FOR FACILITIES LOCATED SEAWARD OF THE COAST LINE Oil-Spill Response Requirements for Facilities Located in State Waters... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Spill response plans for facilities located...

  16. 30 CFR 254.50 - Spill response plans for facilities located in State waters seaward of the coast line.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL-SPILL RESPONSE REQUIREMENTS FOR FACILITIES LOCATED SEAWARD OF THE COAST LINE Oil-Spill Response Requirements for Facilities Located in State Waters... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Spill response plans for facilities located...

  17. 30 CFR 254.50 - Spill response plans for facilities located in State waters seaward of the coast line.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL-SPILL RESPONSE REQUIREMENTS FOR FACILITIES LOCATED SEAWARD OF THE COAST LINE Oil-Spill Response Requirements for Facilities Located in State Waters... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Spill response plans for facilities located...

  18. Development of orbital experimental equipment for JEM exposed facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Masakazu; Morioka, Mikio; Katoh, Toshio; Fusegi, Katsumi; Nakao, Keizou; Ban, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Tomoaki; Amagata, Raita; Arafune, Kuniyuki

    1993-05-01

    The Exposed Facility Flyer Unit (EFFU) is an orbital experimental facility to be mounted on the free flyer Space Flyer Unit (SFU). The SFU is scheduled to be launched by an H-11 launch vehicle in early 1995. After several months in orbit, the SFU will be retrieved by the Space Shuttle. The EFFU will provide experience in developing the key technology of the Exposed Facility of Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), which will be attached to the Space Station Freedom in the late 1990's. The EFFU proto-flight model test was concluded. This paper describes the development of the EFFU.

  19. Scaling and entropy in p-median facility location along a line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastner, Michael T.

    2011-09-01

    The p-median problem is a common model for optimal facility location. The task is to place p facilities (e.g., warehouses or schools) in a heterogeneously populated space such that the average distance from a person's home to the nearest facility is minimized. Here we study the special case where the population lives along a line (e.g., a road or a river). If facilities are optimally placed, the length of the line segment served by a facility is inversely proportional to the square root of the population density. This scaling law is derived analytically and confirmed for concrete numerical examples of three US interstate highways and the Mississippi River. If facility locations are permitted to deviate from the optimum, the number of possible solutions increases dramatically. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we compute how scaling is affected by an increase in the average distance to the nearest facility. We find that the scaling exponents change and are most sensitive near the optimum facility distribution.

  20. Characteristics of Mammography Facility Locations and Stage of Breast Cancer at Diagnosis in Chicago

    PubMed Central

    Zenk, Shannon N.; Campbell, Richard T.; Warnecke, Richard B.; Block, Richard

    2008-01-01

    In the United States, despite substantial investment in public health initiatives to promote early detection of breast cancer through screening mammography, the proportion of female breast cancers that have advanced beyond the localized stage by the time of diagnosis remains high. Our objective in this exploratory study was to investigate whether stage of breast cancer at diagnosis among Chicago residents is associated with characteristics of the neighborhoods in which proximate mammography facilities are located. Those characteristics may influence likelihood of utilizing the service routinely and partly explain differences in stage at diagnosis. We used a retrospective cohort design and combined 3 years of data from the Illinois State Cancer Registry (ISCR) with information on locations of mammography facilities, public transportation service, crime, and area demographic and economic characteristics. Using a Geographic Information System (GIS), we identified the five facilities located nearest to each case’s residence. Estimates of the association between characteristics of mammography facility locations and breast cancer stage at diagnosis were obtained using the partial proportional odds regression model. We found that the number of homicides in areas in which the nearest mammography facilities were located was associated with increased odds of later stage diagnosis. This effect was independent of age, race, and residential area education and income. We found no effect on stage of distance, public transportation service, or measures of neighborhood social similarity. The “spatial dynamics” of health may involve geographies beyond the immediate neighborhood. The results of our study suggest that areas in which the nearest mammography facilities are located may be one such geography. We hope that this study will spark research interest in the impact of health service locations on utilization. PMID:18972211

  1. Facility location: a review of context-free and EMS models.

    PubMed Central

    ReVelle, C; Bigman, D; Schilling, D; Cohon, J; Church, R

    1977-01-01

    EMS location models are those formulated to address specific problems of emergency medical services systems; context-free location models are those developed without reference to particular applications. The literature on these two types of public facility location models is reviewed, and the development of the maximal covering model from several earlier context-free models is described, with emphasis on problem statements and articulation of service objectives. An application of the maximal covering model to fire truck location points up the ability of this model to handle multiple objectives; its ability to compare alternative solutions gives it great utility for planning and evaluating EMS systems of a wide range of complexity. Potential applications of the maximal covering model are discussed regarding EMS problems involving multiple time standards and service objectives, location of special equipment, and siting of fixed facilities. PMID:885725

  2. Solving the multiple competitive facilities location and design problem on the plane.

    PubMed

    Redondo, Juana López; Fernández, José; García, Inmaculada; Ortigosa, Pilar M

    2009-01-01

    A continuous location problem in which a firm wants to set up two or more new facilities in a competitive environment is considered. Other facilities offering the same product or service already exist in the area. Both the locations and the qualities of the new facilities are to be found so as to maximize the profit obtained by the firm. This is a global optimization problem, with many local optima. In this paper we analyze several approaches to solve it, namely, three multistart local search heuristics, a multistart simulated annealing algorithm, and two variants of an evolutionary algorithm. Through a comprehensive computational study it is shown that the evolutionary algorithms are the heuristics that provide the best solutions. Furthermore, using a set of problems for which the optimal solutions are known, only the evolutionary algorithms were able to find the optimal solutions for all the instances. The evolutionary strategies presented in this paper can be easily adapted to handle other continuous location problems.

  3. MIP models for connected facility location: A theoretical and computational study☆

    PubMed Central

    Gollowitzer, Stefan; Ljubić, Ivana

    2011-01-01

    This article comprises the first theoretical and computational study on mixed integer programming (MIP) models for the connected facility location problem (ConFL). ConFL combines facility location and Steiner trees: given a set of customers, a set of potential facility locations and some inter-connection nodes, ConFL searches for the minimum-cost way of assigning each customer to exactly one open facility, and connecting the open facilities via a Steiner tree. The costs needed for building the Steiner tree, facility opening costs and the assignment costs need to be minimized. We model ConFL using seven compact and three mixed integer programming formulations of exponential size. We also show how to transform ConFL into the Steiner arborescence problem. A full hierarchy between the models is provided. For two exponential size models we develop a branch-and-cut algorithm. An extensive computational study is based on two benchmark sets of randomly generated instances with up to 1300 nodes and 115,000 edges. We empirically compare the presented models with respect to the quality of obtained bounds and the corresponding running time. We report optimal values for all but 16 instances for which the obtained gaps are below 0.6%. PMID:25009366

  4. MIP models for connected facility location: A theoretical and computational study.

    PubMed

    Gollowitzer, Stefan; Ljubić, Ivana

    2011-02-01

    This article comprises the first theoretical and computational study on mixed integer programming (MIP) models for the connected facility location problem (ConFL). ConFL combines facility location and Steiner trees: given a set of customers, a set of potential facility locations and some inter-connection nodes, ConFL searches for the minimum-cost way of assigning each customer to exactly one open facility, and connecting the open facilities via a Steiner tree. The costs needed for building the Steiner tree, facility opening costs and the assignment costs need to be minimized. We model ConFL using seven compact and three mixed integer programming formulations of exponential size. We also show how to transform ConFL into the Steiner arborescence problem. A full hierarchy between the models is provided. For two exponential size models we develop a branch-and-cut algorithm. An extensive computational study is based on two benchmark sets of randomly generated instances with up to 1300 nodes and 115,000 edges. We empirically compare the presented models with respect to the quality of obtained bounds and the corresponding running time. We report optimal values for all but 16 instances for which the obtained gaps are below 0.6%.

  5. A game theoretical model for location of terror response facilities under capacitated resources.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lingpeng; Kang, Qi; Han, Chuanfeng; Xu, Weisheng; Wu, Qidi

    2013-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the effect of capacity constraints on the locations of terror response facilities. We assume that the state has limited resources, and multiple facilities may be involved in the response until the demand is satisfied consequently. We formulate a leader-follower game model between the state and the terrorist and prove the existence and uniqueness of the Nash equilibrium. An integer linear programming is proposed to obtain the equilibrium results when the facility number is fixed. The problem is demonstrated by a case study of the 19 districts of Shanghai, China.

  6. A Game Theoretical Model for Location of Terror Response Facilities under Capacitated Resources

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Qi; Xu, Weisheng; Wu, Qidi

    2013-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the effect of capacity constraints on the locations of terror response facilities. We assume that the state has limited resources, and multiple facilities may be involved in the response until the demand is satisfied consequently. We formulate a leader-follower game model between the state and the terrorist and prove the existence and uniqueness of the Nash equilibrium. An integer linear programming is proposed to obtain the equilibrium results when the facility number is fixed. The problem is demonstrated by a case study of the 19 districts of Shanghai, China. PMID:24459446

  7. A simulated annealing methodology to multiproduct capacitated facility location with stochastic demand.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jin; Xiang, Hui; Ye, Yong; Ni, Linglin

    2015-01-01

    A stochastic multiproduct capacitated facility location problem involving a single supplier and multiple customers is investigated. Due to the stochastic demands, a reasonable amount of safety stock must be kept in the facilities to achieve suitable service levels, which results in increased inventory cost. Based on the assumption of normal distributed for all the stochastic demands, a nonlinear mixed-integer programming model is proposed, whose objective is to minimize the total cost, including transportation cost, inventory cost, operation cost, and setup cost. A combined simulated annealing (CSA) algorithm is presented to solve the model, in which the outer layer subalgorithm optimizes the facility location decision and the inner layer subalgorithm optimizes the demand allocation based on the determined facility location decision. The results obtained with this approach shown that the CSA is a robust and practical approach for solving a multiple product problem, which generates the suboptimal facility location decision and inventory policies. Meanwhile, we also found that the transportation cost and the demand deviation have the strongest influence on the optimal decision compared to the others.

  8. A Simulated Annealing Methodology to Multiproduct Capacitated Facility Location with Stochastic Demand

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Hui; Ye, Yong; Ni, Linglin

    2015-01-01

    A stochastic multiproduct capacitated facility location problem involving a single supplier and multiple customers is investigated. Due to the stochastic demands, a reasonable amount of safety stock must be kept in the facilities to achieve suitable service levels, which results in increased inventory cost. Based on the assumption of normal distributed for all the stochastic demands, a nonlinear mixed-integer programming model is proposed, whose objective is to minimize the total cost, including transportation cost, inventory cost, operation cost, and setup cost. A combined simulated annealing (CSA) algorithm is presented to solve the model, in which the outer layer subalgorithm optimizes the facility location decision and the inner layer subalgorithm optimizes the demand allocation based on the determined facility location decision. The results obtained with this approach shown that the CSA is a robust and practical approach for solving a multiple product problem, which generates the suboptimal facility location decision and inventory policies. Meanwhile, we also found that the transportation cost and the demand deviation have the strongest influence on the optimal decision compared to the others. PMID:25834839

  9. Making regional facility location decisions: the example of Hospital do Oeste Norte, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Jorge; Antunes Ferreira, J; Condessa, Beatriz

    2014-11-01

    This paper seeks to contribute to the debate on the decision-making process for the location of large public facilities, responding to the growing demand for greater rationality in public investment whilst still offering services of quality and addressing the problem of spatial friction. The specific problem analysed in this paper is the need to define the best location for a public hospital in a particular region of Portugal. The singularity of the approach adopted lies above all in the segmentation into macro-location and micro-location.

  10. Analysis of selected materials flown on interior locations of the Long Duration Exposure Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, H. A.; Nelson, K. M.; Eash, D.; Pippin, H. G.

    1994-01-01

    This report documents the post-flight condition of selected hardware taken from interior locations on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). This hardware was generally in excellent condition. Outgassing data is presented for heat shrink tubing and fiberglass composite shims. Variation in total mass loss (TML) values for heat shrink tubing were correlated with location. Nylon grommets were evaluated for mechanical integrity; slight embrittlement was observed for flight specimens. Multi-layer insulation blankets, wire bundles, and paints in non-exposed interior locations were all in visibly good condition. Silicon-containing contaminant films were observed on silver-coated hex nuts at the space- and Earth-end interior locations.

  11. Planetary entry aerothermodynamics. I - Technology requirements and experimental facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olstad, W. B.

    1974-01-01

    Consideration has been given to the entry of vehicles into the atmospheres of all planets with the exception of Pluto and to missions for returning samples to Earth from all the planets (excepting Pluto), the satellites of Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn, the Moon, the asteroids, and certain comets. The efficient planning of the space missions including the appropriate design of the spacecraft requires that operational and environmental parameter values for the large range of mission options included be adequately known. The need to obtain the data required as a basis for the computational studies involved makes it necessary to conduct a comprehensive experimental research program. Details concerning the experimental facilities employed in this program are discussed, giving attention to shock tubes, the planetary-entry radiation facility, ballistic ranges, an expansion tube, a hypersonic tetrafluoromethane tunnel, and arcjet facilities.

  12. TRANSFLOW: An experimental facility for vacuum gas flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varoutis, S.; Giegerich, T.; Hauer, V.; Day, Chr

    2012-05-01

    The TRANSFLOW experimental facility represents a reliable tool for measuring the conductance of 1:1 scale components as typically used in vacuum systems in a wide range of the Knudsen number (e.g. 10-4<=Kn<=103). The main principle of this facility is the dynamic measurement of the pressure difference upstream and downstream of the duct by setting a constant mass flow rate through the test channel. Many experiments on fully developed and developing flows, based on long and short channels respectively, have been already completed and comparisons with corresponding numerical results have been successfully performed. It has been clearly proven that the TRANSFLOW experimental setup provides conductance results with overall uncertainty between 1 to 10% and it could be used as a benchmark facility for any new proposed scientific numerical method in rarefied gas dynamics and in the whole range of gas rarefaction.

  13. Locations and attributes of utility-scale solar power facilities in Colorado and New Mexico, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ignizio, Drew A.; Carr, Natasha B.

    2012-01-01

    The data series consists of polygonal boundaries for utility-scale solar power facilities (both photovoltaic and concentrating solar power) located within Colorado and New Mexico as of December 2011. Attributes captured for each facility include the following: facility name, size/production capacity (in MW), type of solar technology employed, location, state, operational status, year the facility came online, and source identification information. Facility locations and perimeters were derived from 1-meter true-color aerial photographs (2011) produced by the National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP); the photographs have a positional accuracy of about ±5 meters (accessed from the NAIP GIS service: http://gis.apfo.usda.gov/arcgis/services). Solar facility perimeters represent the full extent of each solar facility site, unless otherwise noted. When visible, linear features such as fences or road lines were used to delineate the full extent of the solar facility. All related equipment including buildings, power substations, and other associated infrastructure were included within the solar facility. If solar infrastructure was indistinguishable from adjacent infrastructure, or if solar panels were installed on existing building tops, only the solar collecting equipment was digitized. The "Polygon" field indicates whether the "equipment footprint" or the full "site outline" was digitized. The spatial accuracy of features that represent site perimeters or an equipment footprint is estimated at +/- 10 meters. Facilities under construction or not fully visible in the NAIP imagery at the time of digitization (December 2011) are represented by an approximate site outline based on the best available information and documenting materials. The spatial accuracy of these facilities cannot be estimated without more up-to-date imagery – users are advised to consult more recent imagery as it becomes available. The "Status" field provides information about the operational

  14. Review of the Physical Science Facility Stack Air Sampling Probe Locations

    SciTech Connect

    Glissmeyer, John A.

    2007-09-30

    This letter report reviews compliance of the current design of the Physical Science Facility (PSF) stack air sampling locations with the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 standard. The review was based on performance criteria used for locating air sampling probes, the design documents provided and available information on systems previously tested for compliance with the criteria. Recommendations are presented for ways to bring the design into compliance with the requirements for the sampling probe placement.

  15. 30 CFR 254.50 - Spill response plans for facilities located in State waters seaward of the coast line.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL-SPILL RESPONSE REQUIREMENTS FOR FACILITIES LOCATED SEAWARD OF THE COAST LINE Oil-Spill Response Requirements for Facilities... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Spill response plans for facilities located...

  16. 76 FR 68170 - Instructions for Implementing Sustainable Locations for Federal Facilities in Accordance With...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-03

    ... Doc No: 2011-28474] COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY Instructions for Implementing Sustainable Locations for Federal Facilities in Accordance With Executive Order 13514 AGENCY: Council on Environmental... instructions. SUMMARY: The Chair of the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) has issued instructions...

  17. Comparison of Calculated and Experimental Results for a Boiling/Condensing Experimental Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Carbajo, Juan J; McDuffee, Joel Lee; Felde, David K

    2016-01-01

    A new experimental facility for materials irradiation and testing at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is being developed. Details of this facility have been presented before [1, 2]. A prototype of this facility, the Thermo-Syphon Test Loop (TSTL) has been built and experimental data have been obtained and analyzed [3, 4]. Pre-test calculations for this facility with the RELAP5-3D code [5] have been presented previously [6] as well as other calculations [7, 8] with the TRACE code [9]. The results of both codes were very different [7]. RELAP5-3D predicted much higher pressures and temperatures than TRACE. This paper compares calculated results with the TSTL experimental data.

  18. 18 CFR 292.209 - Exceptions from requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or diversion. 292.209... Exceptions from requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or... license or exemption is filed for a project located at a Government dam, as defined in section 3(10)...

  19. 18 CFR 292.209 - Exceptions from requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or diversion. 292.209... Exceptions from requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or... license or exemption is filed for a project located at a Government dam, as defined in section 3(10)...

  20. 18 CFR 292.209 - Exceptions from requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or diversion. 292.209... Exceptions from requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or... license or exemption is filed for a project located at a Government dam, as defined in section 3(10)...

  1. Experimental Validation: Subscale Aircraft Ground Facilities and Integrated Test Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Roger M.; Hostetler, Robert W., Jr.; Barnes, Kevin N.; Belcastro, Celeste M.; Belcastro, Christine M.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental testing is an important aspect of validating complex integrated safety critical aircraft technologies. The Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research (AirSTAR) Testbed is being developed at NASA Langley to validate technologies under conditions that cannot be flight validated with full-scale vehicles. The AirSTAR capability comprises a series of flying sub-scale models, associated ground-support equipment, and a base research station at NASA Langley. The subscale model capability utilizes a generic 5.5% scaled transport class vehicle known as the Generic Transport Model (GTM). The AirSTAR Ground Facilities encompass the hardware and software infrastructure necessary to provide comprehensive support services for the GTM testbed. The ground facilities support remote piloting of the GTM aircraft, and include all subsystems required for data/video telemetry, experimental flight control algorithm implementation and evaluation, GTM simulation, data recording/archiving, and audio communications. The ground facilities include a self-contained, motorized vehicle serving as a mobile research command/operations center, capable of deployment to remote sites when conducting GTM flight experiments. The ground facilities also include a laboratory based at NASA LaRC providing near identical capabilities as the mobile command/operations center, as well as the capability to receive data/video/audio from, and send data/audio to the mobile command/operations center during GTM flight experiments.

  2. Experimental equipment for an advanced ISOL facility[Isotope Separation On-Line Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Baktash, C.; Lee, I.Y.; Rehm, K.E.

    1999-03-01

    This report summarizes the proceedings and recommendations of the Workshop on the Experimental Equipment for an Advanced ISOL Facility which was held at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory on July 22--25, 1998. The purpose of this workshop was to discuss the performance requirements, manpower and cost estimates, as well as a schedule of the experimental equipment needed to fully exploit the new physics which can be studied at an advanced ISOL facility. An overview of the new physics opportunities that would be provided by such a facility has been presented in the White Paper that was issued following the Columbus Meeting. The reactions and experimental techniques discussed in the Columbus White Paper served as a guideline for the formulation of the detector needs at the Berkeley Workshop. As outlined a new ISOL facility with intense, high-quality beams of radioactive nuclei would provide exciting new research opportunities in the areas of: the nature of nucleonic matter; the origin of the elements; and tests of the Standard Model. After an introductory section, the following equipment is discussed: gamma-ray detectors; recoil separators; magnetic spectrographs; particle detectors; targets; and apparatus using non-accelerated beams.

  3. Verified centers, nonverified centers, or other facilities: a national analysis of burn patient treatment location.

    PubMed

    Zonies, David; Mack, Christopher; Kramer, Bradley; Rivara, Frederick; Klein, Matthew

    2010-03-01

    Although comprehensive burn care requires significant resources, patients may be treated at verified burn centers, nonverified burn centers, or other facilities due to a variety of factors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between patient and injury characteristics and treatment location using a national database. We performed an analysis of all burn patients admitted to United States hospitals participating in the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project over 2 years. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify patient and injury factors associated with the likelihood of treatment at designated burn care facilities. Definitive care facilities were categorized as American Burn Association-verified centers, nonverified burn centers, or other facilities. During the 2 years of the study, 29,971 burn patients were treated in 1,376 hospitals located in 19 participating states. A total of 6,712 (22%) patients were treated at verified centers, with 26% and 52% treated at nonverified or other facilities, respectively. Patients treated at verified centers were younger than those treated at nonverified or other facilities (33.1 years versus 33.7 years versus 41.9 years; p < 0.001) and had a higher rate of inhalation injury (3.4% versus 3.2% versus 2.2%; p < 0.001). Independent factors associated with treatment at verified centers include burns to the head or neck (relative risk [RR], 2.4; CI, 2.1 to 2.7), hand (RR, 1.8; CI, 1.6 to 1.9), electrical injury (RR, 1.4; CI, 1.2 to 1.7), and fewer comorbidities (RR, 0.55; CI, 0.5 to 0.6). More than two-thirds of significantly burned patients are treated at nonverified burn centers in the United States. Many patients meeting American Burn Association criteria for transfer to a burn center are being treated at nonburn center facilities. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Icing simulation: A survey of computer models and experimental facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potapczuk, M. G.; Reinmann, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    A survey of the current methods for simulation of the response of an aircraft or aircraft subsystem to an icing encounter is presented. The topics discussed include a computer code modeling of aircraft icing and performance degradation, an evaluation of experimental facility simulation capabilities, and ice protection system evaluation tests in simulated icing conditions. Current research focussed on upgrading simulation fidelity of both experimental and computational methods is discussed. The need for increased understanding of the physical processes governing ice accretion, ice shedding, and iced airfoil aerodynamics is examined.

  5. Solid waste facilities location using of analytical network process and data envelopment analysis approaches.

    PubMed

    Khadivi, M R; Fatemi Ghomi, S M T

    2012-06-01

    Selection of the appropriate site for solid waste facilities is a complex problem and requires an extensive evaluation process, because it is very difficult to develop a selection criterion that can precisely describe the preference of one location over another. Therefore selection of these sites can be viewed as a multiple criteria decision-making or multiple attributes decision-making problem. For this purpose, we propose a technique that can effectively take managerial preferences and subjective data into consideration, along with quantitative factors. The tool proposed here relies on the use of the analytical network process (ANP) and to help integrate managerial evaluations into a more quantitatively based decision tool, data envelopment analysis (DEA) is applied. In this paper, a location selection procedure is presented to construct an undesirable facility applying ANP and DEA approaches in two stages. In the first stage ANP approach is used, results of this stage are inputs for the second stage. In this stage, DEA is applied to select the best location. Finally, to illustrate the proposed framework, at "Results and discussion" section, a total of four undesirable facility locations are evaluated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A Novel Technique to Optimize Facility Locations of New Nephrology Services for Remote Areas

    PubMed Central

    Ayyalasomayajula, Bharati; Wiebe, Natasha; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R.; Bello, Aminu; Manns, Braden; Klarenbach, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Travel distance to healthcare facilities affects healthcare access and utilization. Using the example of patients with kidney disease and nephrology services, we investigated the feasibility and utility of using geographic information system (GIS) techniques to identify the ideal location for new clinics to improve care for patients with kidney disease, on the basis of systematically minimizing travel time for remote dwellers. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Using a provincial laboratory database to identify patients with kidney disease and where they lived, we used GIS techniques of buffer and network analysis to determine ideal locations for up to four new nephrology clinics. Service-area polygons for different travel-time intervals were generated and used to determine the best locations for the four new facilities that would minimize the number of patients with kidney disease who were traveling >2 hours. Results We studied 31,452 adults with living in Alberta, Canada. Adding the four new facilities would increase the number of patients living <30 minutes from a clinic by 2.2% and reduce the number living >120 minutes away by 72.5%. Different two- and three-clinic scenarios reduced the number of people living >120 minutes away by as much as 65% or as little as 32%, emphasizing the importance of systematic evaluation. Conclusions GIS techniques are an attractive alternative to the current practice of arbitrarily locating new facilities on the basis of perceptions about patient demand. Optimal location of new clinical services to minimize travel time might facilitate better patient care. PMID:21817130

  7. [Development of an experimental facility for waste treatment by microorganism].

    PubMed

    Guo, S S; Hou, W H; Ai, W D; Wang, P X

    2000-10-01

    Objective. To construct an experimental facility for microorganism waste processing, which will be used to recover plant nutrient liquids from plant inedible biomass essential for growth and development of plants. Method. After technical parameters and performance requirements were defined, plan demonstration, drawing design, fabrication, debug and preliminary plant inedible residue-biodegradation tests of microorganisms were conducted. Result. The temperature, stirring speed and gas-supplying flow of bioreactor of the facility were controlled automatically, as well as the pH and dissolved oxygen concentration were measured automatically and controlled manually, testifying that its performance reached the requirements of predetermined technical indexes. The 15-d test showed that the facility ran smoothly, its above-mentioned parameters could be measured and controlled precisely, and the biodegradation rate of lettuce's inedible biomass approximately attained 90%. Conclusion. The facility holding reasonable technical indexes, smooth and dependable performances, is capable of being utilized to biodegrade plant inedible biomass. It is expected that if the above-mentioned parameter combinations are optimized further, the results should be better.

  8. Experimental Neutron Source Facility Based on Accelerator Driven System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohar, Yousry

    2010-06-01

    An experimental neutron source facility has been developed for producing medical isotopes, training young nuclear professionals, providing capability for performing reactor physics, material research, and basic science experiments. It uses a driven subcritical assembly with an electron accelerator. The neutrons driving the subcritical assembly were generated from the electron interactions with a target assembly. Tungsten or uranium target material is used for the neutron production through photonuclear reactions. The neutron source intensity, spectrum, and spatial distribution have been studied to maximize the neutron yield and satisfy different engineering requirements. The subcritical assembly is designed to obtain the highest possible neutron flux intensity with a subcriticality of 0.98. Low enrichment uranium is used for the fuel material because it enhances the neutron source performance. Safety, reliability, and environmental considerations are included in the facility conceptual design. Horizontal neutron channels are incorporated for performing basic research including cold neutron source. This paper describes the conceptual design and summarizes some of the related analyses.

  9. Experimental Facilities Division progress report 1996--97

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the activities of the Experimental Facilities Division (XFD) in support of the users of the Advanced Photon Source (APS), primarily focusing on the past year of operations. In September 1996, the APS began operations as a national user facility serving the US community of x-ray researchers from private industry, academic institutions, and other research organizations. The start of operations was about three months ahead of the baseline date established in 1988. This report is divided into the following sections: (1) overview; (2) user operations; (3) user administration and technical support; (4) R and D in support of view operations; (5) collaborative research; and (6) long-term strategic plans for XFD.

  10. Impact of the HEU/LEU conversion on experimental facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Marek, M.; Kysela, J.; Ernest, J.; Flibor, S.; Broz, V.

    2008-07-15

    The LVR-15 reactor is a multipurpose research facility used for basic research on horizontal channels, material and corrosion studies in loops and irradiation rigs, and for the isotope production. A conversion from HEU (IRT-2M 36%, so far used) to LEU (IRT-3M 19.5%, IRT- 4M 19.5%) is planned till 2010. The influence of the new type of fuel on the performance of the experimental facilities operated at the reactor has been studied. The comparison of the calculated neutron fluence rates and spectra using NODER operational code (3D nodal diffusion) and MCNP code for both the fresh and depleted cores was performed. Results of the analyses and future plans are presented in the article. (author)

  11. OPTIMIZATION OF EXPERIMENTAL DESIGNS BY INCORPORATING NIF FACILITY IMPACTS

    SciTech Connect

    Eder, D C; Whitman, P K; Koniges, A E; Anderson, R W; Wang, P; Gunney, B T; Parham, T G; Koerner, J G; Dixit, S N; . Suratwala, T I; Blue, B E; Hansen, J F; Tobin, M T; Robey, H F; Spaeth, M L; MacGowan, B J

    2005-08-31

    For experimental campaigns on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to be successful, they must obtain useful data without causing unacceptable impact on the facility. Of particular concern is excessive damage to optics and diagnostic components. There are 192 fused silica main debris shields (MDS) exposed to the potentially hostile target chamber environment on each shot. Damage in these optics results either from the interaction of laser light with contamination and pre-existing imperfections on the optic surface or from the impact of shrapnel fragments. Mitigation of this second damage source is possible by identifying shrapnel sources and shielding optics from them. It was recently demonstrated that the addition of 1.1-mm thick borosilicate disposable debris shields (DDS) block the majority of debris and shrapnel fragments from reaching the relatively expensive MDS's. However, DDS's cannot stop large, faster moving fragments. We have experimentally demonstrated one shrapnel mitigation technique showing that it is possible to direct fast moving fragments by changing the source orientation, in this case a Ta pinhole array. Another mitigation method is to change the source material to one that produces smaller fragments. Simulations and validating experiments are necessary to determine which fragments can penetrate or break 1-3 mm thick DDS's. Three-dimensional modeling of complex target-diagnostic configurations is necessary to predict the size, velocity, and spatial distribution of shrapnel fragments. The tools we are developing will be used to set the allowed level of debris and shrapnel generation for all NIF experimental campaigns.

  12. 18 CFR 292.209 - Exceptions from requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or diversion. 292.209... Exceptions from requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or... the Federal Power Act, at which non-Federal hydroelectric development is permissible; or (2) An...

  13. 18 CFR 292.209 - Exceptions from requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or diversion. 292.209... Exceptions from requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or... the Federal Power Act, at which non-Federal hydroelectric development is permissible; or (2) An...

  14. 30 CFR 254.54 - Spill prevention for facilities located in State waters seaward of the coast line.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL-SPILL RESPONSE REQUIREMENTS FOR FACILITIES LOCATED SEAWARD OF THE COAST LINE Oil-Spill Response Requirements for Facilities Located in State Waters Seaward... of the steps you are taking to prevent spills of oil or mitigate a substantial threat of such...

  15. 34 CFR 395.30 - The location and operation of vending facilities for blind vendors on Federal property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false The location and operation of vending facilities for... Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF... § 395.30 The location and operation of vending facilities for blind vendors on Federal property....

  16. 34 CFR 395.30 - The location and operation of vending facilities for blind vendors on Federal property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true The location and operation of vending facilities for... Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF... § 395.30 The location and operation of vending facilities for blind vendors on Federal property....

  17. A facility location model for municipal solid waste management system under uncertain environment.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Vinay; Bhurjee, A K; Karmakar, Subhankar; Dikshit, A K

    2017-12-15

    In municipal solid waste management system, decision makers have to develop an insight into the processes namely, waste generation, collection, transportation, processing, and disposal methods. Many parameters (e.g., waste generation rate, functioning costs of facilities, transportation cost, and revenues) in this system are associated with uncertainties. Often, these uncertainties of parameters need to be modeled under a situation of data scarcity for generating probability distribution function or membership function for stochastic mathematical programming or fuzzy mathematical programming respectively, with only information of extreme variations. Moreover, if uncertainties are ignored, then the problems like insufficient capacities of waste management facilities or improper utilization of available funds may be raised. To tackle uncertainties of these parameters in a more efficient manner an algorithm, based on interval analysis, has been developed. This algorithm is applied to find optimal solutions for a facility location model, which is formulated to select economically best locations of transfer stations in a hypothetical urban center. Transfer stations are an integral part of contemporary municipal solid waste management systems, and economic siting of transfer stations ensures financial sustainability of this system. The model is written in a mathematical programming language AMPL with KNITRO as a solver. The developed model selects five economically best locations out of ten potential locations with an optimum overall cost of [394,836, 757,440] Rs.(1) /day ([5906, 11,331] USD/day) approximately. Further, the requirement of uncertainty modeling is explained based on the results of sensitivity analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Accreditation status and geographic location of outpatient vascular testing facilities among Medicare beneficiaries: the VALUE (Vascular Accreditation, Location & Utilization Evaluation) study.

    PubMed

    Rundek, Tatjana; Brown, Scott C; Wang, Kefeng; Dong, Chuanhui; Farrell, Mary Beth; Heller, Gary V; Gornik, Heather L; Hutchisson, Marge; Needleman, Laurence; Benenati, James F; Jaff, Michael R; Meier, George H; Perese, Susana; Bendick, Phillip; Hamburg, Naomi M; Lohr, Joann M; LaPerna, Lucy; Leers, Steven A; Lilly, Michael P; Tegeler, Charles; Alexandrov, Andrei V; Katanick, Sandra L

    2014-10-01

    There is limited information on the accreditation status and geographic distribution of vascular testing facilities in the US. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) provide reimbursement to facilities regardless of accreditation status. The aims were to: (1) identify the proportion of Intersocietal Accreditation Commission (IAC) accredited vascular testing facilities in a 5% random national sample of Medicare beneficiaries receiving outpatient vascular testing services; (2) describe the geographic distribution of these facilities. The VALUE (Vascular Accreditation, Location & Utilization Evaluation) Study examines the proportion of IAC accredited facilities providing vascular testing procedures nationally, and the geographic distribution and utilization of these facilities. The data set containing all facilities that billed Medicare for outpatient vascular testing services in 2011 (5% CMS Outpatient Limited Data Set (LDS) file) was examined, and locations of outpatient vascular testing facilities were obtained from the 2011 CMS/Medicare Provider of Services (POS) file. Of 13,462 total vascular testing facilities billing Medicare for vascular testing procedures in a 5% random Outpatient LDS for the US in 2011, 13% (n=1730) of facilities were IAC accredited. The percentage of IAC accredited vascular testing facilities in the LDS file varied significantly by US region, p<0.0001: 26%, 12%, 11%, and 7% for the Northeast, South, Midwest, and Western regions, respectively. Findings suggest that the proportion of outpatient vascular testing facilities that are IAC accredited is low and varies by region. Increasing the number of accredited vascular testing facilities to improve test quality is a hypothesis that should be tested in future research. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Verified Centers, Nonverified Centers or Other Facilities: A National Analysis of Burn Patient Treatment Location

    PubMed Central

    Zonies, David; Mack, Christopher; Kramer, Bradley; Rivara, Frederick; Klein, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Background Although comprehensive burn care requires significant resources, patients may be treated at verified burn centers, non-verified burn centers, or other facilities due to a variety of factors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between patient and injury characteristics and treatment location using a national database. Study Design We performed an analysis of all burn patients admitted to United States hospitals participating in the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project over 2 years. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify patient and injury factors associated with the likelihood of treatment at designated burn care facilities. Definitve care facilities were categorized as American Burn Association verified centers, non-verified burn centers, or other facilities. Results Over the two years, 29,971 burn patients were treated in 1,376 hospitals located in 19 participating states. A total of 6,712 (22%) patients were treated at verified centers, with 26% and 52% treated at non-verified or other facilities, respectively. Patients treated at verified centers were younger than those at non-verified or other facilities (33.1 years vs. 33.7 years vs. 41.9 years, p<0.001) and had a higher rate of inhalation injury (3.4% vs. 3.2% vs. 2.2%, p<0.001). Independent factors associated with treatment at verified centers include burns to the head/neck (RR 2.4, CI 2.1-2.7), hand (RR 1.8, CI 1.6-1.9), electrical injury (RR 1.4, CI 1.4, CI 1.2-1.7), and fewer co-morbidities (RR 0.55, CI 0.5-0.6). Conclusions More than two-thirds of significantly burned patients are treated at non-verified burn centers in the U.S. Many patients meeting ABA criteria for transfer to a burn center are being treated at non-burn center facilities. PMID:20193892

  20. Ecological Realism of US EPA Experimental Stream Facility ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The USEPA’s Experimental Stream Facility (ESF) conducts meso-scale ecotoxicology studies that account for both structural and functional responses of whole stream communities to contaminants or other stressors. The 16 mesocosms of ESF are indoors and consist of a tiled run section (0.152 m W x 4.268 m L x 0.105 m D) that widens to a gravel riffle section (0.305 m W x 4.268 m L x 0.19 m D). They are intermediate size among studies reporting stream mesocosm results. Their set-up is unique for their size, with a high degree of engineering controls for continuous flow-through dose-response designs, yet fixed, chronic exposures to contaminants under conditions that quantifiably mimic real stream riffle/run habitat with consistent upstream renewal. With fifty standard operating procedures serving ESF studies, the background and boundary condition information is collected to determine the realism critical to the field relevance of the results. Parallel ex situ and in situ single species exposure formats including fish survival and fecundity metrics are also included. With this framework studies at ESF provide scientifically defensible evaluation of proposed aquatic life criteria. This presentation discusses the relevance and realism of USEPA's mesocosms studies conducted using the Experimental Stream Facility in Milford, OH within the context of understanding the role meso-scale results can play in validating aquatic life criteria for streams and, more generally, man

  1. New lower bounds for the facility location problem with clients' preferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'Ev, I. L.; Klimentova, K. B.; Kochetov, Yu. A.

    2009-06-01

    A bilevel facility location problem in which the clients choose suppliers based on their own preferences is studied. It is shown that the coopertative and anticooperative statements can be reduced to a particular case in which every client has a linear preference order on the set of facilities to be opened. For this case, various reductions of the bilevel problem to integer linear programs are considered. A new statement of the problem is proposed that is based on a family of valid inequalities that are related to the problem on a pair of matrices and the set packing problem. It is shown that this formulation is stronger than the other known formulations from the viewpoint of the linear relaxation and the integrality gap.

  2. Recourse-based facility-location problems in hybrid uncertain environment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuming; Watada, Junzo; Pedrycz, Witold

    2010-08-01

    The objective of this paper is to study facility-location problems in the presence of a hybrid uncertain environment involving both randomness and fuzziness. A two-stage fuzzy-random facility-location model with recourse (FR-FLMR) is developed in which both the demands and costs are assumed to be fuzzy-random variables. The bounds of the optimal objective value of the two-stage FR-FLMR are derived. As, in general, the fuzzy-random parameters of the FR-FLMR can be regarded as continuous fuzzy-random variables with an infinite number of realizations, the computation of the recourse requires solving infinite second-stage programming problems. Owing to this requirement, the recourse function cannot be determined analytically, and, hence, the model cannot benefit from the use of techniques of classical mathematical programming. In order to solve the location problems of this nature, we first develop a technique of fuzzy-random simulation to compute the recourse function. The convergence of such simulation scenarios is discussed. In the sequel, we propose a hybrid mutation-based binary ant-colony optimization (MBACO) approach to the two-stage FR-FLMR, which comprises the fuzzy-random simulation and the simplex algorithm. A numerical experiment illustrates the application of the hybrid MBACO algorithm. The comparison shows that the hybrid MBACO finds better solutions than the one using other discrete metaheuristic algorithms, such as binary particle-swarm optimization, genetic algorithm, and tabu search.

  3. ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLING USING LOCATION SPECIFIC AIR MONITORING IN BULK HANDLING FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, L.; Hanks, D.; Degange, J.; Brant, H.; Hall, G.; Cable-Dunlap, P.; Anderson, B.

    2011-06-07

    Since the introduction of safeguards strengthening measures approved by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Board of Governors (1992-1997), international nuclear safeguards inspectors have been able to utilize environmental sampling (ES) (e.g. deposited particulates, air, water, vegetation, sediments, soil and biota) in their safeguarding approaches at bulk uranium/plutonium handling facilities. Enhancements of environmental sampling techniques used by the IAEA in drawing conclusions concerning the absence of undeclared nuclear materials or activities will soon be able to take advantage of a recent step change improvement in the gathering and analysis of air samples at these facilities. Location specific air monitoring feasibility tests have been performed with excellent results in determining attribute and isotopic composition of chemical elements present in an actual test-bed sample. Isotopic analysis of collected particles from an Aerosol Contaminant Extractor (ACE) collection, was performed with the standard bulk sampling protocol used throughout the IAEA network of analytical laboratories (NWAL). The results yielded bulk isotopic values expected for the operations. Advanced designs of air monitoring instruments such as the ACE may be used in gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEP) to detect the production of highly enriched uranium (HEU) or enrichments not declared by a State. Researchers at Savannah River National Laboratory in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory are developing the next generation of ES equipment for air grab and constant samples that could become an important addition to the international nuclear safeguards inspector's toolkit. Location specific air monitoring to be used to establish a baseline environmental signature of a particular facility employed for comparison of consistencies in declared operations will be described in this paper. Implementation of air monitoring will be contrasted against the use of smear ES

  4. GIS based location optimization for mobile produced water treatment facilities in shale gas operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitwadkar, Amol Hanmant

    Over 60% of the nation's total energy is supplied by oil and natural gas together and this demand for energy will continue to grow in the future (Radler et al. 2012). The growing demand is pushing the exploration and exploitation of onshore oil and natural gas reservoirs. Hydraulic fracturing has proven to not only create jobs and achieve economic growth, but also has proven to exert a lot of stress on natural resources---such as water. As water is one of the most important factors in the world of hydraulic fracturing, proper fluids management during the development of a field of operation is perhaps the key element to address a lot of these issues. Almost 30% of the water used during hydraulic fracturing comes out of the well in the form of flowback water during the first month after the well is fractured (Bai et. al. 2012). Handling this large amount of water coming out of the newly fractured wells is one of the major issues as the volume of the water after this period drops off and remains constant for a long time (Bai et. al. 2012) and permanent facilities can be constructed to take care of the water over a longer period. This paper illustrates development of a GIS based tool for optimizing the location of a mobile produced water treatment facility while development is still occurring. A methodology was developed based on a multi criteria decision analysis (MCDA) to optimize the location of the mobile treatment facilities. The criteria for MCDA include well density, ease of access (from roads considering truck hauls) and piping minimization if piping is used and water volume produced. The area of study is 72 square miles east of Greeley, CO in the Wattenberg Field in northeastern Colorado that will be developed for oil and gas production starting in the year 2014. A quarterly analysis is done so that we can observe the effect of future development plans and current circumstances on the location as we move from quarter to quarter. This will help the operators to

  5. Technical Report for Calculations of Atmospheric Dispersion at Onsite Locations for Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, Alan; Chaves, Chris

    2015-04-04

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has performed an evaluation of the technical bases for the default value for the atmospheric dispersion parameter χ/Q. This parameter appears in the calculation of radiological dose at the onsite receptor location (co-located worker at 100 meters) in safety analysis of DOE nuclear facilities. The results of the calculation are then used to determine whether safety significant engineered controls should be established to prevent and/or mitigate the event causing the release of hazardous material. An evaluation of methods for calculation of the dispersion of potential chemical releases for the purpose of estimating the chemical exposure at the co-located worker location was also performed. DOE’s evaluation consisted of: (a) a review of the regulatory basis for the default χ/Q dispersion parameter; (b) an analysis of this parameter’s sensitivity to various factors that affect the dispersion of radioactive material; and (c) performance of additional independent calculations to assess the appropriate use of the default χ/Q value.

  6. Experimental facility for testing nuclear instruments for planetary landing missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, Dmitry; Mitrofanov, Igor; Litvak, Maxim; Kozyrev, Alexander; Sanin, Anton; Vostrukhin, Andrey

    2017-04-01

    The experimental facility for testing and calibration of nuclear planetology instruments has been built in the frame of JINR and Space Research Institute (Moscow) cooperation. The Martian soil model from silicate glass with dimensions 3.82 x 3.21 m and total weight near 30 tons has been assembled in the facility. The glass material was chosen for imitation of dry Martian regolith. The heterogeneous model has been proposed and developed to achieve the most possible similarity with Martian soil in part of the average elemental composition by adding layers of necessary materials, such as iron, aluminum, and chlorine. The presence of subsurface water ice is simulated by adding layers of polyethylene at different depths inside glass model assembly. Neutron generator was used as a neutron source to induce characteristic gamma rays for testing active neutron and gamma spectrometers to define elements composition of the model. The instrumentation was able to detect gamma lines attributed to H, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Cl, K, Ca and Fe. The identified elements compose up to 95 wt % of total mass of the planetary soil model. This results will be used for designing scientific instruments to performing experiments of active neutron and gamma ray spectroscopy on the surface of the planets during Russian and international missions Luna-Glob, Luna-Resource and ExoMars-2020.

  7. Performance history of the WERF (Waste Experimental Reduction Facility) incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Dalton, J.D.; Bohrer, H.A.; Smolik, G.R.

    1988-01-01

    As society's environmental conscience grows, diverse political, economical, and social contentions cloud the issue of proper waste management. However, experience at the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) demonstrates clearly that incineration is an effective component in responsible, long-term waste management. Using a simple but safe design, the WERF incinerator has successfully reduced the volume of low-level beta/gamma waste. As of the end of March, 1988, this incinerator, a 180-kg/h (400-lb/h) controlled-air unit with a completely dry off-gas treatment system, has accumulated approximately 4500 hours of operation, processing over 4250 M/sup 3/ (150,000 ft/sup 3/) of waste, and achieving volume reduction ratios of approximately 300:1. This paper discusses some of the achievements and problems experienced during operation of the WERF incinerator. 1 ref., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Indoor experimental facility for airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) configurations - rail-SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirose, Getachew; Phelan, Brian R.; Sherbondy, Kelly D.; Ranney, Kenneth I.; Koenig, Francois; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2014-05-01

    The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) is developing an indoor experimental facility to evaluate and assess airborne synthetic-aperture-radar-(SAR)-based detection capabilities. The rail-SAR is located in a multi-use facility that also provides a base for research and development in the area of autonomous robotic navigation. Radar explosive hazard detection is one key sensordevelopment area to be investigated at this indoor facility. In particular, the mostly wooden, multi-story building houses a two (2) story housing structure and an open area built over a large sandbox. The housing structure includes reconfigurable indoor walls which enable the realization of multiple See-Through-The-Wall (STTW) scenarios. The open sandbox, on the other hand, allows for surface and buried explosive hazard scenarios. The indoor facility is not rated for true explosive hazard materials so all targets will need to be inert and contain surrogate explosive fills. In this paper we discuss the current system status and describe data collection exercises conducted using canonical targets and frequencies that may be of interest to designers of ultra-wideband (UWB) airborne, ground penetrating SAR systems. A bi-static antenna configuration will be used to investigate the effects of varying airborne SAR parameters such as depression angle, bandwidth, and integration angle, for various target types and deployment scenarios. Canonical targets data were used to evaluate overall facility capabilities and limitations. These data is analyzed and summarized for future evaluations. Finally, processing techniques for dealing with RF multi-path and RFI due to operating inside the indoor facility are described in detail. Discussion of this facility and its capabilities and limitations will provide the explosive hazard community with a great airborne platform asset for sensor to target assessment.

  9. 30 CFR 254.54 - Spill prevention for facilities located in State waters seaward of the coast line.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL-SPILL RESPONSE REQUIREMENTS FOR FACILITIES LOCATED SEAWARD OF THE COAST LINE Oil-Spill Response Requirements for Facilities... Regional Supervisor a description of the steps you are taking to prevent spills of oil or mitigate...

  10. Experimental characterization of HOTNES: A new thermal neutron facility with large homogeneity area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedogni, R.; Sperduti, A.; Pietropaolo, A.; Pillon, M.; Pola, A.; Gómez-Ros, J. M.

    2017-01-01

    A new thermal neutron irradiation facility, called HOTNES (HOmogeneous Thermal NEutron Source), was established in the framework of a collaboration between INFN-LNF and ENEA-Frascati. HOTNES is a polyethylene assembly, with about 70 cmx70 cm square section and 100 cm height, including a large, cylindrical cavity with diameter 30 cm and height 70 cm. The facility is supplied by a 241Am-B source located at the bottom of this cavity. The facility was designed in such a way that the iso-thermal-fluence surfaces, characterizing the irradiation volume, coincide with planes parallel to the cavity bottom. The thermal fluence rate across a given isofluence plane is as uniform as 1% on a disk with 30 cm diameter. Thermal fluence rate values from about 700 cm-2 s-1 to 1000 cm-2 s-1 can be achieved. The facility design, previously optimized by Monte Carlo simulation, was experimentally verified. The following techniques were used: gold activation foils to assess the thermal fluence rate, semiconductor-based active detector for mapping the irradiation volume, and Bonner Sphere Spectrometer to determine the complete neutron spectrum. HOTNES is expected to be attractive for the scientific community involved in neutron metrology, neutron dosimetry and neutron detector testing.

  11. Structures and Materials Experimental Facilities and Capabilities Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G. (Compiler); Kurtz-Husch, Jeanette D. (Compiler)

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Center of Excellent for Structures and Materials at Langley Research Center is responsible for conducting research and developing useable technology in the areas of advanced materials and processing technologies, durability, damage tolerance, structural concepts, advanced sensors, intelligent systems, aircraft ground operations, reliability, prediction tools, performance validation, aeroelastic response, and structural dynamics behavior for aerospace vehicles. Supporting the research activities is a complementary set of facilities and capabilities documented in this report. Because of the volume of information, the information collected was restricted in most cases to one page. Specific questions from potential customers or partners should be directed to the points of contacts provided with the various capabilities. Grouping of the equipment is by location as opposed to function. Geographical information of the various buildings housing the equipment is also provided. Since this is the first time that such an inventory is ever collected at Langley it is by no means complete. It is estimated that over 90 percent of the equipment capabilities at hand are included but equipment is continuously being updated and will be reported in the future.

  12. 41 CFR 102-73.250 - Are agencies required to adhere to the policies for locating Federal facilities when purchasing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Are agencies required to adhere to the policies for locating Federal facilities when purchasing buildings? 102-73.250 Section 102... Condemnation Buildings § 102-73.250 Are agencies required to adhere to the policies for locating...

  13. 41 CFR 102-73.250 - Are agencies required to adhere to the policies for locating Federal facilities when purchasing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Are agencies required to adhere to the policies for locating Federal facilities when purchasing buildings? 102-73.250 Section 102... Condemnation Buildings § 102-73.250 Are agencies required to adhere to the policies for locating...

  14. 18 CFR 292.208 - Special requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... attributes which would be adversely affected by hydroelectric development; and (3) The project meets the... hydroelectric development. (d) If the project is located on any segment of a natural watercourse that meets any... for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or diversion. 292.208...

  15. 18 CFR 292.208 - Special requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... attributes which would be adversely affected by hydroelectric development; and (3) The project meets the... hydroelectric development. (d) If the project is located on any segment of a natural watercourse that meets any... for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or diversion. 292.208...

  16. 18 CFR 292.208 - Special requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... attributes which would be adversely affected by hydroelectric development; and (3) The project meets the... hydroelectric development. (d) If the project is located on any segment of a natural watercourse that meets any... for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or diversion. 292.208...

  17. Selection of facility location under environmental damage priority and using ELECTRE method.

    PubMed

    Gundogdu, Ceren Erdin

    2011-03-01

    In the recent years, the environmental problems have reached to a vital extent, which is pushing the boundaries and far beyond daily evaluations. Industrial plants, the energy sources and uncontrolled release of pollutant gases (SO2, CO2 etc.) in the production stage have the greatest share in the occurrence of unfavorable environmental conditions. For this reason, the dimension of the problems that may arise in the production stage of industrial plants is directly related to the selection of facility location. In this study, geographical regions (a total of 7 regions) of our country have been analyzed in terms of environmental values based on their basins and the unfavorable environmental problems that are currently being experienced. Considered as such, with the directives of an expert group composed of nature scientists, the criteria and alternative areas are determined using the data gathered on ecosystem, basin characteristics, and land types. Since the primary goal is to keep the environmental damages at the minimum level, comprehensive definition of the problem is constructed by consultation of the expert group and the criteria are determined. Considering the fact that it will prevent the drawbacks generated by making decisions depending on certain stereotypes toa great extent, ELECTRE (Elimination and Choice Translating Reality English - Elimination Et Choix Traduisant la Realite) method is used to determine in which geographic region our country's industrial plants should be located.

  18. Theoretical and experimental investigations of sensor location for optimal aeroelastic system state estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, G.

    1985-01-01

    One of the major concerns in the design of an active control system is obtaining the information needed for effective feedback. This involves the combination of sensing and estimation. A sensor location index is defined as the weighted sum of the mean square estimation errors in which the sensor locations can be regarded as estimator design parameters. The design goal is to choose these locations to minimize the sensor location index. The choice of the number of sensors is a tradeoff between the estimation quality based upon the same performance index and the total costs of installing and maintaining extra sensors. An experimental study for choosing the sensor location was conducted on an aeroelastic system. The system modeling which includes the unsteady aerodynamics model developed by Stephen Rock was improved. Experimental results verify the trend of the theoretical predictions of the sensor location index for different sensor locations at various wind speeds.

  19. Methods for detecting and locating leaks in containment facilities using electrical potential data and electrical resistance tomographic imaging techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, William D.; Laine, Daren L.; Laine, Edwin F.

    2001-01-01

    Methods are provided for detecting and locating leaks in liners used as barriers in the construction of landfills, surface impoundments, water reservoirs, tanks, and the like. Electrodes are placed in the ground around the periphery of the facility, in the leak detection zone located between two liners if present, and/or within the containment facility. Electrical resistivity data is collected using these electrodes. This data is used to map the electrical resistivity distribution beneath the containment liner or between two liners in a double-lined facility. In an alternative embodiment, an electrode placed within the lined facility is driven to an electrical potential with respect to another electrode placed at a distance from the lined facility (mise-a-la-masse). Voltage differences are then measured between various combinations of additional electrodes placed in the soil on the periphery of the facility, the leak detection zone, or within the facility. A leak of liquid through the liner material will result in an electrical potential distribution that can be measured at the electrodes. The leak position is located by determining the coordinates of an electrical current source pole that best fits the measured potentials with the constraints of the known or assumed resistivity distribution.

  20. Methods for detecting and locating leaks in containment facilities using electrical potential data and electrical resistance tomographic imaging techniques

    DOEpatents

    Daily, W.D.; Laine, D.L.; Laine, E.F.

    1997-08-26

    Methods are provided for detecting and locating leaks in liners used as barriers in the construction of landfills, surface impoundments, water reservoirs, tanks, and the like. Electrodes are placed in the ground around the periphery of the facility, in the leak detection zone located between two liners if present, and/or within the containment facility. Electrical resistivity data is collected using these electrodes. This data is used to map the electrical resistivity distribution beneath the containment liner between two liners in a double-lined facility. In an alternative embodiment, an electrode placed within the lined facility is driven to an electrical potential with respect to another electrode placed at a distance from the lined facility (mise-a-la-masse). Voltage differences are then measured between various combinations of additional electrodes placed in the soil on the periphery of the facility, the leak detection zone, or within the facility. A leak of liquid though the liner material will result in an electrical potential distribution that can be measured at the electrodes. The leak position is located by determining the coordinates of an electrical current source pole that best fits the measured potentials with the constraints of the known or assumed resistivity distribution. 6 figs.

  1. Methods for detecting and locating leaks in containment facilities using electrical potential data and electrical resistance tomographic imaging techniques

    DOEpatents

    Daily, William D.; Laine, Daren L.; Laine, Edwin F.

    1997-01-01

    Methods are provided for detecting and locating leaks in liners used as barriers in the construction of landfills, surface impoundments, water reservoirs, tanks, and the like. Electrodes are placed in the ground around the periphery of the facility, in the leak detection zone located between two liners if present, and/or within the containment facility. Electrical resistivity data is collected using these electrodes. This data is used to map the electrical resistivity distribution beneath the containment liner between two liners in a double-lined facility. In an alternative embodiment, an electrode placed within the lined facility is driven to an electrical potential with respect to another electrode placed at a distance from the lined facility (mise-a-la-masse). Voltage differences are then measured between various combinations of additional electrodes placed in the soil on the periphery of the facility, the leak detection zone, or within the facility. A leak of liquid though the liner material will result in an electrical potential distribution that can be measured at the electrodes. The leak position is located by determining the coordinates of an electrical current source pole that best fits the measured potentials with the constraints of the known or assumed resistivity distribution.

  2. Variation in Hospice Services by Location of Care: Nursing Home Versus Assisted Living Facility Versus Home.

    PubMed

    Unroe, Kathleen T; Bernard, Brittany; Stump, Timothy E; Tu, Wanzhu; Callahan, Christopher M

    2017-07-01

    To describe differences in hospice services for patients living at home, in nursing homes or in assisted living facilities, including the overall number and duration of visits by different hospice care providers across varying lengths of stay. Retrospective cohort study using hospice patient electronic medical record data. Large, national hospice provider. Data from 32,605 hospice patients who received routine hospice care from 2009 to 2014 were analyzed. Descriptive statistics were calculated for utilization measures for each type of provider and by location of care. Frequency and duration of service contacts were standardized to a 1 week period and pairwise comparisons were used to detect differences in care provided between the three settings. Minimal differences were found in overall intensity of service contacts across settings, however, the mix of services were different for patients living at home versus nursing home versus assisted living facility. Overall, more nurse care was provided at the beginning and end of the hospice episode; intensity of aide care services was higher in the middle portion of the hospice episode. Nearly 43% of the sample had hospice stays less than 2 weeks and up to 20% had stays greater than 6 months. There are significant differences between characteristics of hospice patients in different settings, as well as the mix of services they receive. Medicare hospice payment methodology was revised starting in 2016. While the new payment structure is in greater alignment with the U shape distribution of services, it will be important to evaluate the impact of the new payment methodology on length of stay and mix of services by different providers across settings of care. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  3. Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research (JASPER) Facility Update

    SciTech Connect

    C. H. Conrad; J. Miller; M. Cowan; M. Martinez; B. Whitcomb

    2003-10-01

    The JASPER Facility utilizes a Two-Stage Light Gas Gun to conduct equation-of-state(EOS) experiments on plutonium and other special nuclear materials. The overall facility will be discussed with emphasis on the Two-Stage Light Gas Gun characteristics and control interfaces and containment. The containment systems that were developed for this project will be presented.

  4. Characterization of the Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) waste tanks located at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, J.M.; Giaquinto, J.M.; Meeks, A.M.

    1997-04-01

    The Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) is located in Melton Valley within Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5 and includes five underground storage tanks (T1, T2, T3, T4, and T9) ranging from 13,000 to 25,000 gal. capacity. During the period of 1996--97 there was a major effort to re-sample and characterize the contents of these inactive waste tanks. The characterization data summarized in this report was needed to address waste processing options, examine concerns dealing with the performance assessment (PA) data for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), evaluate the waste characteristics with respect to the waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for WIPP and Nevada Test Site (NTS), address criticality concerns, and to provide the data needed to meet DOT requirements for transporting the waste. This report discusses the analytical characterization data collected on both the supernatant and sludge samples taken from three different locations in each of the OHF tanks. The isotopic data presented in this report supports the position that fissile isotopes of uranium ({sup 233}U and {sup 235}U) do not satisfy the denature ratios required by the administrative controls stated in the ORNL LLLW waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The fissile isotope of plutonium ({sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Pu) are diluted with thorium far above the WAC requirements. In general, the OHF sludge was found to be hazardous (RCRA) based on total metal content and the transuranic alpha activity was well above the 100 nCi/g limit for TRU waste. The characteristics of the OHF sludge relative to the WIPP WAC limits for fissile gram equivalent, plutonium equivalent activity, and thermal power from decay heat were estimated from the data in this report and found to be far below the upper boundary for any of the remote-handled transuranic waste (RH-TRU) requirements for disposal of the waste in WIPP.

  5. Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research (JASPER) Facility Overview

    SciTech Connect

    C.H. Konrad; R.W. Braddy; Mark Martinez

    2001-09-01

    The JASPER Facility will utilize a Two-Stage Light Gas Gun to conduct equation-of-state (EOS) experiments of plutonium and other special nuclear materials. The overall facility will be discussed with emphasis on the Two-Stage Light Gas Gun characteristics and mission. The primary and secondary containment systems that were developed for this project will be presented. Primary gun diagnostics and timing will also be discussed.

  6. Accreditation Status and Geographic Location of Outpatient Echocardiographic Testing Facilities Among Medicare Beneficiaries: The VALUE-ECHO Study.

    PubMed

    Brown, Scott C; Wang, Kefeng; Dong, Chuanhui; Yi, Li; Marinovic Gutierrez, Carolina; Di Tullio, Marco R; Farrell, Mary Beth; Burgess, Pamela; Gornik, Heather L; Hamburg, Naomi M; Needleman, Laurence; Orsinelli, David; Robison, Susana; Rundek, Tatjana

    2017-08-08

    Accreditation of echocardiographic testing facilities by the Intersocietal Accreditation Commission (IAC) is supported by the American College of Cardiology and American Society of Echocardiography. However, limited information exists on the accreditation status and geographic distribution of echocardiographic facilities in the United States. Our study aimed to identify (1) the proportion of outpatient echocardiography facilities used by Medicare beneficiaries that are IAC accredited, (2) their geographic distribution, and (3) variations in procedure type and volume by accreditation status. As part of the VALUE-ECHO (Value of Accreditation, Location, and Utilization Evaluation-Echocardiography) study, we examined the proportion of IAC-accredited echocardiographic facilities performing outpatient echocardiography in the 2013 Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services outpatient limited data set (100% sample) and their geographic distribution using geocoding in ArcGIS (ESRI, Redlands, CA). Among 4573 outpatient facilities billing Medicare for echocardiographic testing in 2013, 99.6% (n = 4554) were IAC accredited (99.7% in the 50 US states and 86.2% in Puerto Rico). The proportion IAC-accredited echocardiographic facilities varied by region, with 98.7%, 99.9%, 99.9%, 99.5%, and 86.2% of facilities accredited in the Northeast, South, Midwest, West, and Puerto Rico, respectively (P < .01, Fisher exact test). Of all echocardiographic outpatient procedures conducted (n = 1,890,156), 99.8% (n = 1,885,382) were performed in IAC-accredited echocardiographic facilities. Most procedures (90.9%) were transthoracic echocardiograms, of which 99.7% were conducted in IAC-accredited echocardiographic facilities. Almost all outpatient echocardiographic facilities billed by Medicare are IAC accredited. This accreditation rate is substantially higher than previously reported for US outpatient vascular testing facilities (13% IAC accredited). The uniformity of imaging

  7. Optimizations of transverse projected emittance at the photo-injector test facility at DESY, location Zeuthen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimjaem, S.; Stephan, F.; Krasilnikov, M.; Ackermann, W.; Asova, G.; Bähr, J.; Gjonaj, E.; Grabosch, H. J.; Hakobyan, L.; Hänel, M.; Ivanisenko, Y.; Khojoyan, M.; Klemz, G.; Lederer, S.; Mahgoub, M.; Michelato, P.; Monaco, L.; Nozdrin, M.; O'Shea, B.; Otevrel, M.; Petrosyan, B.; Richter, D.; Rönsch-Schulenburg, J.; Sertore, D.; Schreiber, S.; Schnepp, S.; Shapovalov, A.; Spesyvtsev, R.; Staykov, L.; Vashchenko, G.; Weiland, T.; Will, I.

    2012-04-01

    High brightness electron sources for linac based short-wavelength free-electron lasers are developed and optimized for small transverse projected emittance at the photo-injector test facility at DESY, location Zeuthen (PITZ). A major part of the measurement program at PITZ is dedicated to transverse phase space optimization in order to fulfill the requirements of the European X-ray free-electron laser (European XFEL). A laser-driven RF-gun, treated with a dry-ice sublimation-impulse cleaning technique, a new photocathode laser system allowing short rise and fall times of the flat-top temporal distribution as well as several new diagnostic components have been installed at PITZ in 2008. The electrons generated via the photo-effect at a cesium telluride (Cs2Te) cathode are accelerated by a 1.6 cell L-band RF-gun cavity with a maximum accelerating gradient at the cathode of about 60 MV/m. The transverse projected emittance is measured using a single slit scan technique. In the 2008-2009 run period, a detailed characterization of the projected transverse emittance was performed at different operating conditions. Optimizations and measurement results as well as simulation predictions of the transverse projected emittance for bunch charges of 1, 0.5, 0.25 and 0.1 nC are presented and discussed in this paper. The geometric mean of the normalized projected rms emittance in both transverse directions for an electron bunch charge of 1 nC was measured to be 0.89±0.01 mm mrad for a 100% rms phase-space distribution.

  8. Results of operation and current safety performance of nuclear facilities located in the Russian Federation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, V. M.; Khvostova, M. S.

    2016-12-01

    After the NPP radiation accidents in Russia and Japan, a safety statu of Russian nuclear power plants causes concern. A repeated life time extension of power unit reactor plants, designed at the dawn of the nuclear power engineering in the Soviet Union, power augmentation of the plants to 104-109%, operation of power units in a daily power mode in the range of 100-70-100%, the use of untypical for NPP remixed nuclear fuel without a careful study of the results of its application (at least after two operating periods of the research nuclear installations), the aging of operating personnel, and many other management actions of the State Corporation "Rosatom", should attract the attention of the Federal Service for Ecological, Technical and Atomic Supervision (RosTekhNadzor), but this doesn't happen. The paper considers safety issues of nuclear power plants operating in the Russian Federation. The authors collected statistical information on violations in NPP operation over the past 25 years, which shows that even after repeated relaxation over this period of time of safety regulation requirements in nuclear industry and highly expensive NPP modernization, the latter have not become more safe, and the statistics confirms this. At a lower utilization factor high-power pressure-tube reactors RBMK-1000, compared to light water reactors VVER-440 and 1000, have a greater number of violations and that after annual overhauls. A number of direct and root causes of NPP mulfunctions is still high and remains stable for decades. The paper reveals bottlenecks in ensuring nuclear and radiation safety of nuclear facilities. Main outstanding issues on the storage of spent nuclear fuel are defined. Information on emissions and discharges of radioactive substances, as well as fullness of storages of solid and liquid radioactive waste, located at the NPP sites are presented. Russian NPPs stress test results are submitted, as well as data on the coming removal from operation of NPP

  9. Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests at SLAC (FACET) Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Amann, J.; Bane, K.; /SLAC

    2009-10-30

    This Conceptual Design Report (CDR) describes the design of FACET. It will be updated to stay current with the developing design of the facility. This CDR begins as the baseline conceptual design and will evolve into an 'as-built' manual for the completed facility. The Executive Summary, Chapter 1, gives an introduction to the FACET project and describes the salient features of its design. Chapter 2 gives an overview of FACET. It describes the general parameters of the machine and the basic approaches to implementation. The FACET project does not include the implementation of specific scientific experiments either for plasma wake-field acceleration for other applications. Nonetheless, enough work has been done to define potential experiments to assure that the facility can meet the requirements of the experimental community. Chapter 3, Scientific Case, describes the planned plasma wakefield and other experiments. Chapter 4, Technical Description of FACET, describes the parameters and design of all technical systems of FACET. FACET uses the first two thirds of the existing SLAC linac to accelerate the beam to about 20GeV, and compress it with the aid of two chicanes, located in Sector 10 and Sector 20. The Sector 20 area will include a focusing system, the generic experimental area and the beam dump. Chapter 5, Management of Scientific Program, describes the management of the scientific program at FACET. Chapter 6, Environment, Safety and Health and Quality Assurance, describes the existing programs at SLAC and their application to the FACET project. It includes a preliminary analysis of safety hazards and the planned mitigation. Chapter 7, Work Breakdown Structure, describes the structure used for developing the cost estimates, which will also be used to manage the project. The chapter defines the scope of work of each element down to level 3.

  10. The electrodeless Lorentz force (ELF) thruster experimental facility.

    PubMed

    Weber, T E; Slough, J T; Kirtley, D

    2012-11-01

    An innovative facility for testing high-power, pulsed plasmoid thrusters has been constructed to develop the electrodeless Lorentz force (ELF) thruster concept. It is equipped with a suite of diagnostics optimized to study the physical processes taking place within ELF and evaluate its propulsive utility including magnetic field, neutral gas, and plasma flux diagnostics, a method to determine energy flow into the plasma from the pulsed power systems, and a new type of ballistic pendulum, which enables thrust to be measured without the need for installing the entire propulsion system on a thrust stand. Variable magnetic fields allow controlled studies of plume expansion in a small-scale experiment and dielectric chamber walls reduce electromagnetic influences on plasma behavior and thruster operation. The unique capabilities of this facility enable novel concept development to take place at greatly reduced cost and increased accessibility compared to testing at large user-facilities.

  11. 30 CFR 254.54 - Spill prevention for facilities located in State waters seaward of the coast line.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of the steps you are taking to prevent spills of oil or mitigate a substantial threat of such a... prevention if it is determined that your efforts to prevent spills do not reflect good industry practices. ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Spill prevention for facilities located...

  12. 30 CFR 254.54 - Spill prevention for facilities located in State waters seaward of the coast line.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... of the steps you are taking to prevent spills of oil or mitigate a substantial threat of such a... prevention if it is determined that your efforts to prevent spills do not reflect good industry practices. ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Spill prevention for facilities located...

  13. 30 CFR 254.54 - Spill prevention for facilities located in State waters seaward of the coast line.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of the steps you are taking to prevent spills of oil or mitigate a substantial threat of such a... prevention if it is determined that your efforts to prevent spills do not reflect good industry practices. ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Spill prevention for facilities located...

  14. The 50-horsepower solar-powered irrigation facility located near Gila Bend, Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. A.; Alexander, G.; Busch, D. F.

    1980-01-01

    The 50 horsepower solar powered irrigation facility near Gila Bend, Arizona which includes a Rankine cycle demonstrates the technical feasibility of solar powered pumping. The design of a facility specifically for the irrigation farmer using the technology that has been developed over the last four years is proposed.

  15. Classifying substance use disorder treatment facilities with co-located mental health services: A latent class analysis approach.

    PubMed

    Mauro, Pia M; Furr-Holden, C Debra; Strain, Eric C; Crum, Rosa M; Mojtabai, Ramin

    2016-06-01

    The Affordable Care Act calls for increased integration and coordination of behavioral health services, as people with co-occurring disorders (CODs), meeting criteria for both substance use and psychiatric disorders, are overrepresented in treatment samples. Nationwide estimates of mental health (MH) service co-location in substance use disorder (SUD) treatment facilities are needed. We empirically derived a multiple-indicator categorization of services for CODs in SUD treatment facilities. We used latent class analysis to categorize 14,037 SUD treatment facilities in the United States and territories included in the 2012 National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services. Latent class indicators included MH screening and diagnosis, MH support services, psychiatric medications, groups for CODs, and psychosocial approaches. Multinomial logistic regression compared facility-identified primary focus (i.e., SUD, MH, mix of SUD-MH, and general/other) and other facility characteristics across classes. A four-class solution was chosen with the following classes: Comprehensive MH/COD Services (25%), MH without COD Services (25%), MH Screening Services (21%), and Limited MH Services (29%). The former two classes with co-located MH services were less likely to report a SUD-primary focus than the latter classes reporting only MH screening or Limited MH Services. Only the Comprehensive MH/COD Services class also had a high probability of providing special groups for CODs. Approximately half of SUD treatment facilities were in classes with co-located mental health services, but only a quarter provided comprehensive COD services. Future studies should assess differences in patient experiences and treatment outcomes across facilities with and without COD services. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Development of an Experimental Facility for Analysis of Rotordynamic Phenomena

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    was developed to investigate the rotordynamic phenomena of rotating machinery during subcritical, resonant and supercritical operation. The facility...the rotordynamic phenomena of rotating machinery during subcritical. resonant and supercritical operation. The behavior of the rotor was...Supercritical Speed of 5560 RPM. The Rotor is Experiencing Synchronous and Subsynchronous Forward Whirl. The Rotor Assembly is in a Simply Supported, Single

  17. First experimental data of the cryogenic safety test facility PICARD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidt, C.; Henriques, A.; Stamm, M.; Grohmann, S.

    2017-02-01

    The test facility PICARD, which stands for Pressure Increase in Cryostats and Analysis of Relief Devices, has been designed and constructed for cryogenic safety experiments. With a cryogenic liquid volume of 100 L, a nominal design pressure of 16 bar(g) and the capacity of measuring helium mass flow rates through safety relief devices up to 4 kg/s, the test facility allows the systematic investigation of hazardous incidents in cryostats under realistic conditions. In the course of experiments, the insulating vacuum is vented with atmospheric air or gaseous nitrogen at ambient temperature under variation of the venting diameter, the thermal insulation, the cryogenic fluid, the liquid level and the set pressure in order to analyze the impact on the heat flux and hence on the process dynamics. A special focus will be on the occurrence and implications of two-phase flow during expansion and on measuring the flow coefficients of safety devices at cryogenic temperatures. This paper describes the commissioning and the general performance of the test facility at liquid helium temperatures. Furthermore, the results of first venting experiments are presented.

  18. The capacitated multi-facility location-allocation problem with probabilistic customer location and demand: two hybrid meta-heuristic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohsen Mousavi, Seyed; Niaki, Seyed Taghi Akhavan; Mehdizadeh, Esmaeil; Tavarroth, Mohammad Reza

    2013-10-01

    A new mathematical model for the capacitated multi-facility location-allocation problem with probabilistic customers' locations and demands is developed in this article. The model is formulated into the frameworks of the expected value model (EVM) and the chance-constrained programming (CCP) based on two different distance measures. In order to solve the model, two hybrid intelligent algorithms are proposed, where the simplex algorithm and stochastic simulation are the bases for both algorithms. However, in the first algorithm, named SSGA, a special type of genetic algorithm is combined and in the second, SSVDO, a vibration-damping optimisation (VDO) algorithm is united. The Taguchi method is employed to tune the parameters of the two proposed algorithms. Finally, some numerical examples are given to illustrate the applications of the proposed methodologies and to compare their performances.

  19. Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) Experimenters' Operations Facility (EOF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larduinat, Eliane; Potter, William

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the SOHO Instrumenters' Operations Facility (EOF) project. The EOF is the element of the SOHO ground system at the Goddard Space Flight Center that provides the interface between the SOHO scientists and the other ground system elements. This paper first describes the development context of the SOHO EOF. It provides an overview of the SOHO mission within the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) project, and discusses the SOHO scientific objectives. The second part of this paper presents the implementation of the SOHO EOF, its innovative features, its possible applications to other missions, and its potential for use as part of a fully integrated ground control system.

  20. Developing a plan for primary health care facilities in Soweto, South Africa. Part II: Applying locational criteria.

    PubMed

    Doherty, J; Rispel, L; Webb, N

    1996-12-01

    This article is the second of a two-part series describing the development of a ten-year plan for primary health care facility development in Soweto. The first article concentrated on the political problems and general methodological approach of the project. This second article describes how the technical problem of planning in the context of scanty information was overcome. The reasoning behind the various assumptions and criteria which were used to assist the planning of the location of facilities is explained, as well as the process by which they were applied. The merits and limitations of this planning approach are discussed, and it is suggested that the approach may be useful to other facility planners, particularly in the developing world.

  1. Cell Locating with the Image Analysis System of the CAS-LIBB Single-Particle Microbeam Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaohua; Wang, Shaohu; Yu, Zengliang

    2005-06-01

    A single-particle microbeam facility has been constructed at the Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering (LIBB), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). At the CAS-LIBB microbeam facility, we have developed protocols to place exact numbers of charged particles through nuclear centroids of cells, at defined positions in the cytoplasm relative to the nucleus, and through defined fractions of cells in a population. In this paper, we address the methods for nucleus, cytoplasm and bystander (either a single or an exact number of ions is delivered to a certain percentage of cells in a population to study the bystander effects of radiation) irradiation in detail from the precision of target finding and cell locating in the image analysis system. Moreover, for cells touching slightly in an image, a watershed method is used to separate these touching objects; after that, the number of objects in an image is counted accurately and the irradiation points are located precisely.

  2. Sports Facilities, Shopping Centers or Homes: What Locations are Important for Adults’ Physical Activity? A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Marijke; Ettema, Dick; Pierik, Frank; Dijst, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) is influenced by the built environment. However, little is known about the types of built environment where adults spend their time, and at what levels of PA they engage in those environments. Understanding the effect of the built environment on PA requires insight into PA behavior at different types of locations (e.g., home, work, shopping centers, and sports facilities). Therefore, this study describes where adults aged 45–65 years were active with moderate-to-vigorous intensity (MVPA), and examines associations of socio-demographic factors and neighborhood with MVPA at these locations. Participants’ (N = 308) PA was measured for seven days using accelerometers and GPS-devices. Adults spent most minutes of MVPA at home and work. Highest MVPA-ratios of total time spent at a location were achieved in sports facilities and during transport. Neighborhood characteristics and socio-demographic factors such as work status, health status and household structure, had significant effects on MVPA at various locations and on total MVPA. Understanding PA behavior at various locations may provide insights that allow professionals in different domains (e.g., health, landscaping, urban planning) to develop strategies to stimulate PA. PMID:26959041

  3. Sports Facilities, Shopping Centers or Homes: What Locations are Important for Adults' Physical Activity? A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Marijke; Ettema, Dick; Pierik, Frank; Dijst, Martin

    2016-03-04

    Physical activity (PA) is influenced by the built environment. However, little is known about the types of built environment where adults spend their time, and at what levels of PA they engage in those environments. Understanding the effect of the built environment on PA requires insight into PA behavior at different types of locations (e.g., home, work, shopping centers, and sports facilities). Therefore, this study describes where adults aged 45-65 years were active with moderate-to-vigorous intensity (MVPA), and examines associations of socio-demographic factors and neighborhood with MVPA at these locations. Participants' (N = 308) PA was measured for seven days using accelerometers and GPS-devices. Adults spent most minutes of MVPA at home and work. Highest MVPA-ratios of total time spent at a location were achieved in sports facilities and during transport. Neighborhood characteristics and socio-demographic factors such as work status, health status and household structure, had significant effects on MVPA at various locations and on total MVPA. Understanding PA behavior at various locations may provide insights that allow professionals in different domains (e.g., health, landscaping, urban planning) to develop strategies to stimulate PA.

  4. Primary proton beam line at the J-PARC hadron experimental facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agari, Keizo; Hirose, Erina; Ieiri, Masaharu; Iio, Masami; Katoh, Yoji; Kiyomichi, Akio; Minakawa, Michifumi; Muto, Ryotaro; Naruki, Megumi; Noumi, Hiroyuki; Sato, Yoshinori; Sawada, Shin'ya; Shirakabe, Yoshihisa; Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Takasaki, Minoru; Tanaka, Kazuhiro H.; Toyoda, Akihisa; Watanabe, Hiroaki; Yamanoi, Yutaka

    2012-10-01

    A brief description of the primary beam line at the hadron experimental facility at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) is presented. The facility has been constructed in Tokai, Japan, and the first beam was successfully introduced into the experimental hall in January 2009. The facility utilizes a high-intensity proton beam with an energy of 50 GeV and a power of 750 kW and provides various secondary beams such as pions, kaons, and antiprotons for nuclear and particle physics experiments. We have developed beam-line components with sufficient radiation hardness and heat resistance to handle the high-power proton beam.

  5. Experimental uncertainty and drag measurements in the national transonic facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batill, Stephen M.

    1994-01-01

    This report documents the results of a study which was conducted in order to establish a framework for the quantitative description of the uncertainty in measurements conducted in the National Transonic Facility (NTF). The importance of uncertainty analysis in both experiment planning and reporting results has grown significantly in the past few years. Various methodologies have been proposed and the engineering community appears to be 'converging' on certain accepted practices. The practical application of these methods to the complex wind tunnel testing environment at the NASA Langley Research Center was based upon terminology and methods established in the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) standards. The report overviews this methodology.

  6. Department of Energy’s ARM Climate Research Facility External Data Center Operations Plan Located At Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Cialella, A.; Gregory, L.; Lazar, K.; Liang, M.; Ma, L.; Tilp, A.; Wagener, R.

    2015-05-01

    The External Data Center (XDC) Operations Plan describes the activities performed to manage the XDC, located at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), for the Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility. It includes all ARM infrastructure activities performed by the Data Management and Software Engineering Group (DMSE) at BNL. This plan establishes a baseline of expectation within the ARM Operations Management for the group managing the XDC.

  7. Fuze Experimentation Facility and Fuze Industrial Facility (FEF/FIF) Construction. Final Environmental Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    D construction and demolition CAA Clean Air Act CEQ Council on Environmental Quality CFR Code of Federal Regulations CO carbon monoxide CO2 ...facility would house cannon maintenance, rapid prototyping machinery, welding , wood fabrication, and a shock dynamics laboratory. 2.1.3 Associated...exhibiting greenhouse properties come from both natural and man-made sources. Water vapor, carbon dioxide ( CO2 ), methane, and nitrous oxide are

  8. An integrated assessment of location-dependent scaling for microalgae biofuel production facilities

    DOE PAGES

    Coleman, André M.; Abodeely, Jared M.; Skaggs, Richard L.; ...

    2014-06-19

    Successful development of a large-scale microalgae-based biofuels industry requires comprehensive analysis and understanding of the feedstock supply chain—from facility siting and design through processing and upgrading of the feedstock to a fuel product. The evolution from pilot-scale production facilities to energy-scale operations presents many multi-disciplinary challenges, including a sustainable supply of water and nutrients, operational and infrastructure logistics, and economic competitiveness with petroleum-based fuels. These challenges are partially addressed by applying the Integrated Assessment Framework (IAF) – an integrated multi-scale modeling, analysis, and data management suite – to address key issues in developing and operating an open-pond microalgae production facility.more » This is done by analyzing how variability and uncertainty over space and through time affect feedstock production rates, and determining the site-specific “optimum” facility scale to minimize capital and operational expenses. This approach explicitly and systematically assesses the interdependence of biofuel production potential, associated resource requirements, and production system design trade-offs. To provide a baseline analysis, the IAF was applied in this paper to a set of sites in the southeastern U.S. with the potential to cumulatively produce 5 billion gallons per year. Finally, the results indicate costs can be reduced by scaling downstream processing capabilities to fit site-specific growing conditions, available and economically viable resources, and specific microalgal strains.« less

  9. An Integrated Assessment of Location-Dependent Scaling for Microalgae Biofuel Production Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Andre M.; Abodeely, Jared; Skaggs, Richard; Moeglein, William AM; Newby, Deborah T.; Venteris, Erik R.; Wigmosta, Mark S.

    2014-07-01

    Successful development of a large-scale microalgae-based biofuels industry requires comprehensive analysis and understanding of the feedstock supply chain—from facility siting/design through processing/upgrading of the feedstock to a fuel product. The evolution from pilot-scale production facilities to energy-scale operations presents many multi-disciplinary challenges, including a sustainable supply of water and nutrients, operational and infrastructure logistics, and economic competitiveness with petroleum-based fuels. These challenges are addressed in part by applying the Integrated Assessment Framework (IAF)—an integrated multi-scale modeling, analysis, and data management suite—to address key issues in developing and operating an open-pond facility by analyzing how variability and uncertainty in space and time affect algal feedstock production rates, and determining the site-specific “optimum” facility scale to minimize capital and operational expenses. This approach explicitly and systematically assesses the interdependence of biofuel production potential, associated resource requirements, and production system design trade-offs. The IAF was applied to a set of sites previously identified as having the potential to cumulatively produce 5 billion-gallons/year in the southeastern U.S. and results indicate costs can be reduced by selecting the most effective processing technology pathway and scaling downstream processing capabilities to fit site-specific growing conditions, available resources, and algal strains.

  10. MRS/IS facility co-located with a repository: preconceptual design and life-cycle cost estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.I.; Nesbitt, J.F.

    1982-11-01

    A program is described to examine the various alternatives for monitored retrievable storage (MRS) and interim storage (IS) of spent nuclear fuel, solidified high-level waste (HLW), and transuranic (TRU) waste until appropriate geologic repository/repositories are available. The objectives of this study are: (1) to develop a preconceptual design for an MRS/IS facility that would become the principal surface facility for a deep geologic repository when the repository is opened, (2) to examine various issues such as transportation of wastes, licensing of the facility, and environmental concerns associated with operation of such a facility, and (3) to estimate the life cycle costs of the facility when operated in response to a set of scenarios which define the quantities and types of waste requiring storage in specific time periods, which generally span the years from 1990 until 2016. The life cycle costs estimated in this study include: the capital expenditures for structures, casks and/or drywells, storage areas and pads, and transfer equipment; the cost of staff labor, supplies, and services; and the incremental cost of transporting the waste materials from the site of origin to the MRS/IS facility. Three scenarios are examined to develop estimates of life cycle costs of the MRS/IS facility. In the first scenario, HLW canisters are stored, starting in 1990, until the co-located repository is opened in the year 1998. Additional reprocessing plants and repositories are placed in service at various intervals. In the second scenario, spent fuel is stored, starting in 1990, because the reprocessing plants are delayed in starting operations by 10 years, but no HLW is stored because the repositories open on schedule. In the third scenario, HLW is stored, starting in 1990, because the repositories are delayed 10 years, but the reprocessing plants open on schedule.

  11. Pegasus Experimental Facility: Magnets, Power Systems, and Vacuum Vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewicki, B. T.; White, B.; Fonck, R.; Intrator, T.; Thorson, T.; Tritz, K. L.; Winz, G.

    1996-11-01

    The Pegasus Toroidal Experiment facility will study the characteristics of Extremely-Low- Aspect Ratio Tokamak (ELART) plasmas accessing high- β plasmas. The program is phased for progress with minimal budget requirements. The Pegasus vacuum vessel is a can-shaped, resistive wall vessel with generous port access. The top and bottom plates are resistive honeycomb structures for high structural rigidity and minimal eddy currents. This ELART design requires a high stress ohmic solenoid, operating at peak fields of 13-20T to achieve a flux swing of 120-190mV-sec over 60msec. We take advantage of the high physical strength and good electrical properties of GlidCop (alumina dispersion strengthened copper). All other coils are constructed from Cu bus bar. The toroidal field power is driven by a 3MVA AC/DC converter at 600VDC @ 5kA. The ohmic power system uses 2MJ of capacitance at 10kV impedance-matched through a step-down transformer to the solenoid at 5kV and 110kA. The equilibrium and shaping field magnets are powered by commutated capacitor banks plus a 0.5 MVA programmable switching supply.

  12. Automated Experimental Data Analysis at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Azevedo, S G; Bettenhausen, R C; Beeler, R G; Bond, E J; Edwards, P W; Glenn, S M; Liebman, J A; Tappero, J D; Warrick, A L; Williams, W H

    2009-09-24

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a 192-beam 1.8 MJ ultraviolet laser system designed to support high-energy-density science, including demonstration of inertial confinement fusion ignition. After each target shot lasting {approx}20 ns, scientists require data acquisition, analysis and display within 30 minutes from more than 20 specialized high-speed diagnostic instruments. These diagnostics measure critical x-ray, optical and nuclear phenomena during target burn to quantify ignition results and compare to computational models. All diagnostic data (hundreds of Gbytes) are automatically transferred to an Oracle database that triggers the NIF Shot Data Analysis (SDA) Engine, which distributes the signal and image processing tasks to a Linux cluster. The SDA Engine integrates commercial workflow tools and messaging technologies into a scientific software architecture that is highly parallel, scalable, and flexible. Results are archived in the database for scientist approval and displayed using a web-based tool. The unique architecture and functionality of the SDA Engine will be presented along with an example.

  13. Precipitate hydrolysis experimental facility (PHEF): Run 64 report

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D.P.; Edwards, R.E.; Shah, H.B.; Young, S.R.

    1994-07-29

    The significant findings of Run 64 are: (a) Carbon dioxide was demonstrated to be an acceptable inertant for the actual hydrolysis process. However, based on the severe degradation of the tetraphenylborate (TPB) precipitate slurry stored in the Precipitate Hold Tank (PHT) at PHEF following Run 65, further evaluation of the suitability of carbon dioxide as an inertant for the long term storage of precipitate slurries is warranted. (b) Phenylboronic acid (PBA) reaction kinetics were excellent with no detectable PBA in Precipitate Hydrolysis Aqueous (PHA) product. (c) PHA product was low in biphenyl (6 mg/l), diphenylamine (13 mg/l), and total high boiling organics (22 mg/l). (d) Reproduced vacuum collapse problems encountered in DWPF (Defense Waste Processing Facility) water runs and demonstrated that the high vacuums experience during water runs could not be reproduced under normal operating conditions. (e) High benzene losses through stack and fugitive emissions were noted during Run 64. This may lead to poor decanter extraction performance long term and may be problem in DWPF, especially during long lay-ups or at low attainments. Approximately 69% of the benzene produced during Run 64 was released as benzene emissions.

  14. Numerical and experimental analysis of a retrievable offshore loading facility

    SciTech Connect

    Sterndorff, M.J.; O`Brien, P.

    1995-12-31

    ROLF (Retrievable Offshore Loading Facility) has been proposed as an alternative offshore oil export tanker loading system for the North Sea. The system consists of a flexible riser ascending from the seabed in a lazy wave configuration to the bow of a dynamically positioned tanker. In order to supplant and support the numerical analyses performed to design the system, an extensive model test program was carried out in a 3D offshore basin at scale 1:50. A model riser with properties equivalent to the properties of the oil filled prototype riser installed in seawater was tested in several combinations of waves and current. During the tests the forces at the bow of the tanker and at the pipeline end manifold were measured together with the motions of the tanker and the riser. The riser motions were measured by means of a video based 3D motion monitoring system. Of special importance was accurate determination of the minimum bending radius for the riser. This was derived based on the measured riser motions. The results of the model tests were compared to numerical analyses by an MCS proprietary riser analysis program.

  15. Experimental Analysis of a Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) Engine in a Direct-Connect Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, K.; Hawk, Clark W.

    1997-01-01

    The object of this study is to investigate the operation of a RBCC at ramjet and scramjet flight conditions using a direct-connect test facility. The apparatus being tested is a single strut-rocket within a dual-mode ram/scramjet combustor. The gaseous hydrogen/oxygen, linear strut-rocket was supplied by Aerojet Propulsion Company. The hardware is being tested in the Direct Connect Supersonic Combustion Test Facility at NASA Langley Research Center. The test facilities hydrogen/oxygen vitiated heater is capable of flight total enthalpies to Mach 8. A Mach 2.5 facility nozzle mates the heater to the combustor duct. The rocket ejector will ordinarily operate in a fuel-rich mode. Additional fuel injection is provided by a pair of parallel injectors located at the base of the strut body. Instrumentation on the test apparatus includes a unique, direct thrust measurement system. Performance predictions for the anticipated test conditions have been made using a one-dimensional, thermodynamic analysis code. Results from the code show the dependence of overall thrust and specific impulse on rocket chamber pressure, rocket fuel equivalence ratio, and overall fuel equivalence ratio. Once the experimental test series begins, the inferred combustion efficiency as a function of axial location and the thermal choke region (where applicable) can also be determined using this code. Upon completion of the experimental test series, measurements will be used to calculate thrust, specific impulse, etc. Measured and calculated values will be compared to those found analytically. If appropriate, the code will be tailored to better predict hardware operation. Conclusions will be drawn as to the fuel-rich rocket's overall effect on ramjet and scramjet performance. Also, comparisons will be made between the integrated thrust calculated from the static pressure taps located along the duct and the thrust measured by the direct thrust measurement system.

  16. Experimental Analysis of a Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) Engine in a Direct-Connect Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, K.; Hawk, Clark W.

    1997-01-01

    The object of this study is to investigate the operation of a RBCC at ramjet and scramjet flight conditions using a direct-connect test facility. The apparatus being tested is a single strut-rocket within a dual-mode ram/scramjet combustor. The gaseous hydrogen/oxygen, linear strut-rocket was supplied by Aerojet Propulsion Company. The hardware is being tested in the Direct Connect Supersonic Combustion Test Facility at NASA Langley Research Center. The test facilities hydrogen/oxygen vitiated heater is capable of flight total enthalpies to Mach 8. A Mach 2.5 facility nozzle mates the heater to the combustor duct. The rocket ejector will ordinarily operate in a fuel-rich mode. Additional fuel injection is provided by a pair of parallel injectors located at the base of the strut body. Instrumentation on the test apparatus includes a unique, direct thrust measurement system. Performance predictions for the anticipated test conditions have been made using a one-dimensional, thermodynamic analysis code. Results from the code show the dependence of overall thrust and specific impulse on rocket chamber pressure, rocket fuel equivalence ratio, and overall fuel equivalence ratio. Once the experimental test series begins, the inferred combustion efficiency as a function of axial location and the thermal choke region (where applicable) can also be determined using this code. Upon completion of the experimental test series, measurements will be used to calculate thrust, specific impulse, etc. Measured and calculated values will be compared to those found analytically. If appropriate, the code will be tailored to better predict hardware operation. Conclusions will be drawn as to the fuel-rich rocket's overall effect on ramjet and scramjet performance. Also, comparisons will be made between the integrated thrust calculated from the static pressure taps located along the duct and the thrust measured by the direct thrust measurement system.

  17. A facility location model for analysis of current and future demand for sexual health services

    PubMed Central

    Meskarian, Rudabeh; Penn, Marion L.; Williams, Sarah; Monks, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we address the clinic location selection problem for a fully integrated Sexual Health Service across Hampshire. The service provides outpatient services for Genito-Urinary Medicine, contraceptive and reproductive health, sexual health promotion and a sexual assault referral centre. We aim to assist the planning of sexual health service provision in Hampshire by conducting a location analysis using both current and predicted patient need. We identify the number of clinic locations required and their optimal geographic location that minimise patient travel time. To maximise the chances of uptake of results we validate the developed simple algorithm with an exact method as well as three well-known, but complex meta-heuristics. The analysis was conducted using car travel and public transport times. Two scenarios were considered: current clinic locations only; and anywhere within Hampshire. The results show that the clinic locations could be reduced from 28 to 20 and still keep 90% of all patient journeys by public transport (e.g. by bus or train) to a clinic within 30 minutes. The number of clinics could be further reduced to 8 if the travel time is based on car travel times within 15 minutes. Results from our simple solution method compared favourably to the exact solution as well as the complex meta-heuristics. PMID:28850627

  18. EPA Facility Locations and Regional Boundaries - National Geospatial Data Asset (NGDA)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This downloadable package contains the following layers: EPA facility points, EPA region boundary polygons and EPA region boundary polygons extended to the 200nm Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). Included in this package are a file geodatabase (v. 10.0), Esri ArcMap map document (v. 10.0) and XML files for this record and the layer level metadata. This dataset was produced by EPA Office of Environmental Information (OEI).

  19. An integrated assessment of location-dependent scaling for microalgae biofuel production facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, André M.; Abodeely, Jared M.; Skaggs, Richard L.; Moeglein, William A.; Newby, Deborah T.; Venteris, Erik R.; Wigmosta, Mark S.

    2014-07-01

    Successful development of a large-scalemicroalgae-based biofuels industry requires comprehensive analysis and understanding of the feedstock supply chain—fromfacility siting and design through processing and upgrading of the feedstock to a fuel product. The evolution from pilot-scale production facilities to energy-scale operations presents many multi-disciplinary challenges, including a sustainable supply of water and nutrients, operational and infrastructure logistics, and economic competitiveness with petroleum-based fuels. These challenges are partially addressed by applying the Integrated Assessment Framework (IAF) – an integrated multi-scale modeling, analysis, and data management suite – to address key issues in developing and operating an open-pond microalgae production facility. This is done by analyzing howvariability and uncertainty over space and through time affect feedstock production rates, and determining the site-specific “optimum” facility scale to minimize capital and operational expenses. This approach explicitly and systematically assesses the interdependence of biofuel production potential, associated resource requirements, and production system design trade-offs. To provide a baseline analysis, the IAF was applied to a set of sites in the southeastern U.S. with the potential to cumulatively produce 5 billion gallons per year. The results indicate costs can be reduced by scaling downstream processing capabilities to fit site-specific growing conditions, available and economically viable resources, and specific microalgal strains.

  20. 43 CFR 2806.38 - Can I combine multiple grants or leases for facilities located on one site into a single grant or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Can I combine multiple grants or leases for facilities located on one site into a single grant or lease? 2806.38 Section 2806.38 Public Lands... Communication Site Rights-Of-Way § 2806.38 Can I combine multiple grants or leases for facilities located on...

  1. 43 CFR 3271.14 - What do I need to do to start building and testing a utilization facility if it is not located on...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... testing a utilization facility if it is not located on Federal lands leased for geothermal resources? 3271... LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE LEASING... utilization facility if it is not located on Federal lands leased for geothermal resources? (a) You do...

  2. 43 CFR 3271.14 - What do I need to do to start building and testing a utilization facility if it is not located on...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... testing a utilization facility if it is not located on Federal lands leased for geothermal resources? 3271... LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE LEASING... utilization facility if it is not located on Federal lands leased for geothermal resources? (a) You do...

  3. 43 CFR 3271.14 - What do I need to do to start building and testing a utilization facility if it is not located on...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... testing a utilization facility if it is not located on Federal lands leased for geothermal resources? 3271... LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE LEASING... utilization facility if it is not located on Federal lands leased for geothermal resources? (a) You do...

  4. 43 CFR 3271.14 - What do I need to do to start building and testing a utilization facility if it is not located on...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... testing a utilization facility if it is not located on Federal lands leased for geothermal resources? 3271... LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE LEASING... utilization facility if it is not located on Federal lands leased for geothermal resources? (a) You do...

  5. Assessing the impacts of regional characteristics on the location of manufacturing facilities: A review of recent methods and findings

    SciTech Connect

    Calzonetti, F.J. . Dept. of Geology and Geography); Hemphill, R.C. . Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.)

    1992-01-01

    This report gives federal agencies background information to help them assess the impacts that siting a nuclear-waste storage facility could have on industries making location decisions in various regions of influence. It reviews two major research methods used to analyze reasons for location choices: economic-based or econometric methods and survey-based factor-ranking methods. It summarizes the results of studies that have used these methods, identifying and ranking factors shown to be important to industries making location decisions throughout the nation and in western states. Neither economic-based nor survey-based studies have shown the public's perceptions of a region to be an important determinant in the selection of new manufacturing sites, although consideration of the level of amenities is gaining importance in the West. In general, available studies are inconclusive with respect to the extent to which perceptions about hazards play a role in the location of manufacturing facilities in any region of the nation.

  6. Assessing the impacts of regional characteristics on the location of manufacturing facilities: A review of recent methods and findings

    SciTech Connect

    Calzonetti, F.J.; Hemphill, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    This report gives federal agencies background information to help them assess the impacts that siting a nuclear-waste storage facility could have on industries making location decisions in various regions of influence. It reviews two major research methods used to analyze reasons for location choices: economic-based or econometric methods and survey-based factor-ranking methods. It summarizes the results of studies that have used these methods, identifying and ranking factors shown to be important to industries making location decisions throughout the nation and in western states. Neither economic-based nor survey-based studies have shown the public`s perceptions of a region to be an important determinant in the selection of new manufacturing sites, although consideration of the level of amenities is gaining importance in the West. In general, available studies are inconclusive with respect to the extent to which perceptions about hazards play a role in the location of manufacturing facilities in any region of the nation.

  7. Discrete optimization of isolator locations for vibration isolation systems: An analytical and experimental investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Ponslet, E.R.; Eldred, M.S.

    1996-05-17

    An analytical and experimental study is conducted to investigate the effect of isolator locations on the effectiveness of vibration isolation systems. The study uses isolators with fixed properties and evaluates potential improvements to the isolation system that can be achieved by optimizing isolator locations. Because the available locations for the isolators are discrete in this application, a Genetic Algorithm (GA) is used as the optimization method. The system is modeled in MATLAB{trademark} and coupled with the GA available in the DAKOTA optimization toolkit under development at Sandia National Laboratories. Design constraints dictated by hardware and experimental limitations are implemented through penalty function techniques. A series of GA runs reveal difficulties in the search on this heavily constrained, multimodal, discrete problem. However, the GA runs provide a variety of optimized designs with predicted performance from 30 to 70 times better than a baseline configuration. An alternate approach is also tested on this problem: it uses continuous optimization, followed by rounding of the solution to neighboring discrete configurations. Results show that this approach leads to either infeasible or poor designs. Finally, a number of optimized designs obtained from the GA searches are tested in the laboratory and compared to the baseline design. These experimental results show a 7 to 46 times improvement in vibration isolation from the baseline configuration.

  8. An experimental facility for the visual study of turbulent flows.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodkey, R. S.; Hershey, H. C.; Corino, E. R.

    1971-01-01

    An experimental technique which allows visual observations of the wall area in turbulent pipe flow is described in detail. It requires neither the introduction of any injection or measuring device into the flow nor the presence of a two-phase flow or of a non-Newtonian fluid. The technique involves suspending solid MgO particles of colloidal size in trichloroethylene and photographing their motions near the wall with a high speed movie camera moving with the flow. Trichloroethylene was chosen in order to eliminate the index of refraction problem in a curved wall. Evaluation of the technique including a discussion of limitations is included. Also the technique is compared with previous methods of visual observations of turbulent flow.

  9. Port Sivad: A Locational Decision Game for a Noxious Public Facility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jakubs, John F.; And Others

    The project presented here provides a role-playing game simulation that points out the complexities of locational decision and indicates ways in which those decisions might be influences by various public and private citizens groups. It focuses on the bargaining, citizen reaction, and possible side payments. Designed as a heuristic devise, the…

  10. Port Sivad: A Locational Decision Game for a Noxious Public Facility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jakubs, John F.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Described is a simulation game concerned with the expeditious location of a sewage plant in a hypothetical urban area. Over 15 college or high school students can play the game, which involves government bargaining, citizen reaction, and side payments. (Author/AV)

  11. Multi-criteria Decision Support System (DSS) for optimal locations of Soil Aquifer Treatment (SAT) facilities.

    PubMed

    Tsangaratos, P; Kallioras, A; Pizpikis, Th; Vasileiou, E; Ilia, I; Pliakas, F

    2017-12-15

    Managed Aquifer Recharge is a wide-spread well-established groundwater engineering method which is largely seen as sound and sustainable solution to water scarcity hydrologically sensitive areas, such as the Circum Mediterranean. The process of site selection for the installation of a MAR facility is of paramount importance for the feasibility and effectiveness of the project itself, especially when the facility will include the use of waters of impaired quality as a recharge source, as in the case of Soil-Aquifer-Treatment systems. The main objective of this study is to present the developed framework of a multi-criteria Decision Support System (DSS) that integrates within a dynamic platform the main groundwater engineering parameters associated with MAR applications together with the general geographical features which determine the effectiveness of such a project. The proposed system will provide an advanced coupled DSS-GIS tool capable of handling local MAR-related issues -such as hydrogeology, topography, soil, climate etc., and spatially distributed variables -such as societal, economic, administrative, legislative etc., with special reference to Soil-Aquifer-Treatment technologies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Texas Experimental Tokamak, a plasma research facility: Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Wootton, A.J.

    1995-08-01

    In the year just past, the authors made major progress in understanding turbulence and transport in both core and edge. Development of the capability for turbulence measurements throughout the poloidal cross section and intelligent consideration of the observed asymmetries, played a critical role in this work. In their confinement studies, a limited plasma with strong, H-mode-like characteristics serendipitously appeared and received extensive study though a diverted H-mode remains elusive. In the plasma edge, they appear to be close to isolating a turbulence drive mechanism. These are major advances of benefit to the community at large, and they followed from incremental improvements in diagnostics, in the interpretation of the diagnostics, and in TEXT itself. Their general philosophy is that the understanding of plasma physics must be part of any intelligent fusion program, and that basic experimental research is the most important part of any such program. The work here demonstrates a continuing dedication to the problems of plasma transport which continue to plague the community and are an impediment to the design of future devices. They expect to show here that they approach this problem consistently, systematically, and effectively.

  13. Prevalence of Bordetella hinzii in mice in experimental facilities in Japan.

    PubMed

    Hayashimoto, Nobuhito; Morita, Hanako; Yasuda, Masahiko; Ishida, Tomoko; Kameda, Shuko; Takakura, Akira; Itoh, Toshio

    2012-10-01

    To reveal the current status of the prevalence of Bordetella hinzii in mice in experimental facilities in Japan, a survey of this agent was performed by culture of tracheal swabs from a total of 12,923 mice from 1699 facilities (12,192 mice from 1572 facilities in universities and research institutes and 731 mice from 127 facilities in pharmaceutical companies) in total. In the results, 195 out of 12,192 mice (1.6%) from 44 out of 1572 facilities (2.8%) in universities and research institutes were positive for B. hinzii. No B. hinzii-positive mice were found in 127 pharmaceutical companies surveyed. Gross lesions in the lungs with isolation of B. hinzii were observed in seven mice from four universities, and the lesions were identified as bronchopneumonia histopathologically. To our knowledge, this is the first report to reveal the prevalence of B. hinzii in laboratory mice.

  14. Test program element II blanket and shield thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing, experimental facility survey

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, A.G.; Longhurst, G.R.

    1981-12-01

    This report presents results of a survey conducted by EG and G Idaho to determine facilities available to conduct thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing for the Department of Energy Office of Fusion Energy First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Test Program. In response to EG and G queries, twelve organizations (in addition to EG and G and General Atomic) expressed interest in providing experimental facilities. A variety of methods of supplying heat is available.

  15. Experimental performance evaluation of two stack sampling systems in a plutonium facility

    SciTech Connect

    Glissmeyer, J.A.

    1992-04-01

    The evaluation of two routine stack sampling systems at the Z-Plant plutonium facility operated by Rockwell International for USERDA is part of a larger study, sponsored by Rockwell and conducted by Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, of gaseous effluent sampling systems. The gaseous effluent sampling systems evaluated are located at the main plant ventilation stack (291-Z-1) and at a vessel vent stack (296-Z-3). A preliminary report, which was a paper study issued in April 1976, identified many deficiencies in the existing sampling systems and made recommendations for corrective action. The objectives of this experimental evaluation of those sampling systems were as follows: Characterize the radioactive aerosols in the stack effluents; Develop a tracer aerosol technique for validating particulate effluent sampling system performance; Evaluate the performance of the existing routine sampling systems and their compliance with the sponsor`s criteria; and Recommend corrective action where required. The tracer aerosol approach to sampler evaluation was chosen because the low concentrations of radioactive particulates in the effluents would otherwise require much longer sampling times and thus more time to complete this evaluation. The following report describes the sampling systems that are the subject of this study and then details the experiments performed. The results are then presented and discussed. Much of the raw and finished data are included in the appendices.

  16. Vast Area Detection for Experimental Radiochemistry (VADER) at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galbraith, Justin; Bettencourt, Ron; Shaughnessy, Dawn; Gharibyan, Narek; Talison, Bahram; Morris, Kevin; Smith, Cal

    2015-08-01

    At the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the flux of neutrons and charged particles at peak burn in an inertial confinement fusion capsule induces measureable concentrations of nuclear reaction products in the target material. Radiochemical analysis of post-shot debris can be used to determine diagnostic parameters associated with implosion of the capsule, including fuel areal density and ablator-fuel mixing. Additionally, analysis of debris from specially doped targets can support nuclear forensic research. We have developed and are deploying the Vast Area Detection for Experimental Radiochemistry (VADER) diagnostic to collect shot debris and interact with post-shot reaction products at the NIF. VADER uses quick release collectors that are easily reconfigured for different materials and geometries. Collectors are located ~50 cm from the NIF target; each of up to 9 collectors views ~0.005-0.0125 steradians solid angle, dependent upon configuration. Dynamic loading of the NIF target vaporized mass was modelled using LS-DYNA. 3-dimensional printing was utilized to expedite the design process. Model-based manufacturing was used throughout. We will describe the design and operation of this diagnostic as well as some initial results.

  17. Evaluation of the location and recency of faulting near prospective surface facilities in Midway Valley, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Swan, F.H.; Wesling, J.R.; Angell, M.M.; Thomas, A.P.; Whitney, J.W.; Gibson, J.D.

    2002-01-17

    Evaluation of surface faulting that may pose a hazard to prospective surface facilities is an important element of the tectonic studies for the potential Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository in southwestern Nevada. For this purpose, a program of detailed geologic mapping and trenching was done to obtain surface and near-surface geologic data that are essential for determining the location and recency of faults at a prospective surface-facilities site located east of Exile Hill in Midway Valley, near the eastern base of Yucca Mountain. The dominant tectonic features in the Midway Valley area are the north- to northeast-trending, west-dipping normal faults that bound the Midway Valley structural block-the Bow Ridge fault on the west side of Exile Hill and the Paint-brush Canyon fault on the east side of the valley. Trenching of Quaternary sediments has exposed evidence of displacements, which demonstrate that these block-bounding faults repeatedly ruptured the surface during the middle to late Quaternary. Geologic mapping, subsurface borehole and geophysical data, and the results of trenching activities indicate the presence of north- to northeast-trending faults and northwest-trending faults in Tertiary volcanic rocks beneath alluvial and colluvial sediments near the prospective surface-facilities site. North to northeast-trending faults include the Exile Hill fault along the eastern base of Exile Hill and faults to the east beneath the surficial deposits of Midway Valley. These faults have no geomorphic expression, but two north- to northeast-trending zones of fractures exposed in excavated profiles of middle to late Pleistocene deposits at the prospective surface-facilities site appear to be associated with these faults. Northwest-trending faults include the West Portal and East Portal faults, but no disruption of Quaternary deposits by these faults is evident. The western zone of fractures is associated with the Exile Hill fault. The eastern

  18. Evaluation of the Location and Recency of Faulting Near Prospective Surface Facilities in Midway Valley, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swan, F.H.; Wesling, J.R.; Angell, M.M.; Thomas, A.P.; Whitney, J.W.; Gibson, J.D.

    2001-01-01

    Evaluation of surface faulting that may pose a hazard to prospective surface facilities is an important element of the tectonic studies for the potential Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository in southwestern Nevada. For this purpose, a program of detailed geologic mapping and trenching was done to obtain surface and near-surface geologic data that are essential for determining the location and recency of faults at a prospective surface-facilities site located east of Exile Hill in Midway Valley, near the eastern base of Yucca Mountain. The dominant tectonic features in the Midway Valley area are the north- to northeast-trending, west-dipping normal faults that bound the Midway Valley structural block-the Bow Ridge fault on the west side of Exile Hill and the Paint-brush Canyon fault on the east side of the valley. Trenching of Quaternary sediments has exposed evidence of displacements, which demonstrate that these block-bounding faults repeatedly ruptured the surface during the middle to late Quaternary. Geologic mapping, subsurface borehole and geophysical data, and the results of trenching activities indicate the presence of north- to northeast-trending faults and northwest-trending faults in Tertiary volcanic rocks beneath alluvial and colluvial sediments near the prospective surface-facilities site. North to northeast-trending faults include the Exile Hill fault along the eastern base of Exile Hill and faults to the east beneath the surficial deposits of Midway Valley. These faults have no geomorphic expression, but two north- to northeast-trending zones of fractures exposed in excavated profiles of middle to late Pleistocene deposits at the prospective surface-facilities site appear to be associated with these faults. Northwest-trending faults include the West Portal and East Portal faults, but no disruption of Quaternary deposits by these faults is evident. The western zone of fractures is associated with the Exile Hill fault. The eastern

  19. Analytical and Experimental Studies of Leak Location and Environment Characterization for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woronowicz, Michael S.; Abel, Joshua C.; Autrey, David; Blackmon, Rebecca; Bond, Tim; Brown, Martin; Buffington, Jesse; Cheng, Edward; DeLatte, Danielle; Garcia, Kelvin; hide

    2014-01-01

    The International Space Station program is developing a robotically-operated leak locator tool to be used externally. The tool would consist of a Residual Gas Analyzer for partial pressure measurements and a full range pressure gauge for total pressure measurements. The primary application is to detect NH3 coolant leaks in the ISS thermal control system.An analytical model of leak plume physics is presented that can account for effusive flow as well as plumes produced by sonic orifices and thruster operations. This model is used along with knowledge of typical RGA and full range gauge performance to analyze the expected instrument sensitivity to ISS leaks of various sizes and relative locations (directionality).The paper also presents experimental results of leak simulation testing in a large thermal vacuum chamber at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. This test characterized instrument sensitivity as a function of leak rates ranging from 1 lbmyr. to about 1 lbmday. This data may represent the first measurements collected by an RGA or ion gauge system monitoring off-axis point sources as a function of location and orientation. Test results are compared to the analytical model and used to propose strategies for on-orbit leak location and environment characterization using the proposed instrument while taking into account local ISS conditions and the effects of ramwake flows and structural shadowing within low Earth orbit.

  20. Analytical and experimental studies of leak location and environment characterization for the international space station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woronowicz, Michael; Abel, Joshua; Autrey, David; Blackmon, Rebecca; Bond, Tim; Brown, Martin; Buffington, Jesse; Cheng, Edward; DeLatte, Danielle; Garcia, Kelvin; Glenn, Jodie; Hawk, Doug; Ma, Jonathan; Mohammed, Jelila; de Garcia, Kristina Montt; Perry, Radford; Rossetti, Dino; Tull, Kimathi; Warren, Eric

    2014-12-01

    The International Space Station program is developing a robotically-operated leak locator tool to be used externally. The tool would consist of a Residual Gas Analyzer for partial pressure measurements and a full range pressure gauge for total pressure measurements. The primary application is to demonstrate the ability to detect NH3 coolant leaks in the ISS thermal control system. An analytical model of leak plume physics is presented that can account for effusive flow as well as plumes produced by sonic orifices and thruster operations. This model is used along with knowledge of typical RGA and full range gauge performance to analyze the expected instrument sensitivity to ISS leaks of various sizes and relative locations ("directionality"). The paper also presents experimental results of leak simulation testing in a large thermal vacuum chamber at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. This test characterized instrument sensitivity as a function of leak rates ranging from 1 lbm//yr. to about 1 lbm/day. This data may represent the first measurements collected by an RGA or ion gauge system monitoring off-axis point sources as a function of location and orientation. Test results are compared to the analytical model and used to propose strategies for on-orbit leak location and environment characterization using the proposed instrument while taking into account local ISS conditions and the effects of ram/wake flows and structural shadowing within low Earth orbit.

  1. Analytical and Experimental Studies of Leak Location and Environment Characterization for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woronowicz, Michael; Abel, Joshua; Autrey, David; Blackmon, Rebecca; Bond, Tim; Brown, Martin; Buffington, Jesse; Cheng, Edward; DeLatte, Danielle; Garcia, Kelvin; hide

    2014-01-01

    The International Space Station program is developing a robotically-operated leak locator tool to be used externally. The tool would consist of a Residual Gas Analyzer for partial pressure measurements and a full range pressure gauge for total pressure measurements. The primary application is to detect NH3 coolant leaks in the ISS thermal control system. An analytical model of leak plume physics is presented that can account for effusive flow as well as plumes produced by sonic orifices and thruster operations. This model is used along with knowledge of typical RGA and full range gauge performance to analyze the expected instrument sensitivity to ISS leaks of various sizes and relative locations ("directionality"). The paper also presents experimental results of leak simulation testing in a large thermal vacuum chamber at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. This test characterized instrument sensitivity as a function of leak rates ranging from 1 lb-mass/yr. to about 1 lb-mass/day. This data may represent the first measurements collected by an RGA or ion gauge system monitoring off-axis point sources as a function of location and orientation. Test results are compared to the analytical model and used to propose strategies for on-orbit leak location and environment characterization using the proposed instrument while taking into account local ISS conditions and the effects of ram/wake flows and structural shadowing within low Earth orbit.

  2. Analytical and experimental studies of leak location and environment characterization for the international space station

    SciTech Connect

    Woronowicz, Michael; Blackmon, Rebecca; Brown, Martin; Abel, Joshua; Hawk, Doug; Autrey, David; Glenn, Jodie; Bond, Tim; Buffington, Jesse; Cheng, Edward; Ma, Jonathan; Rossetti, Dino; DeLatte, Danielle; Garcia, Kelvin; Mohammed, Jelila; Montt de Garcia, Kristina; Perry, Radford; Tull, Kimathi; Warren, Eric

    2014-12-09

    The International Space Station program is developing a robotically-operated leak locator tool to be used externally. The tool would consist of a Residual Gas Analyzer for partial pressure measurements and a full range pressure gauge for total pressure measurements. The primary application is to demonstrate the ability to detect NH{sub 3} coolant leaks in the ISS thermal control system. An analytical model of leak plume physics is presented that can account for effusive flow as well as plumes produced by sonic orifices and thruster operations. This model is used along with knowledge of typical RGA and full range gauge performance to analyze the expected instrument sensitivity to ISS leaks of various sizes and relative locations (“directionality”). The paper also presents experimental results of leak simulation testing in a large thermal vacuum chamber at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. This test characterized instrument sensitivity as a function of leak rates ranging from 1 lb{sub m/}/yr. to about 1 lb{sub m}/day. This data may represent the first measurements collected by an RGA or ion gauge system monitoring off-axis point sources as a function of location and orientation. Test results are compared to the analytical model and used to propose strategies for on-orbit leak location and environment characterization using the proposed instrument while taking into account local ISS conditions and the effects of ram/wake flows and structural shadowing within low Earth orbit.

  3. Unsteady loads due to propulsive lift configurations. Part D: The development of an experimental facility for the investigation of scaling effects on propulsive lift configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haviland, J. K.; Herling, W. W.

    1978-01-01

    The design and construction of an experimental facility for the investigation of scaling effects in propulsive lift configurations are described. The facility was modeled after an existing full size NASA facility which consisted of a coaxial turbofan jet engine with a rectangular nozzle in a blown surface configuration. The flow field of the model facility was examined with and without a simulated wing surface in place at several locations downstream of the nozzle exit plane. Emphasis was placed on obtaining pressure measurements which were made with static probes and surface pressure ports connected via plastic tubing to condenser microphones for fluctuating measurements. Several pressure spectra were compared with those obtained from the NASA facility, and were used in a preliminary evaluation of scaling laws.

  4. Experimental effects of wing location on wing-body pressures at supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Jerry M.; Watson, Carolyn B.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental study was performed at supersonic speeds to measure wing and body spanwise pressure distributions on an axisymmetric-body delta wing model on which the wing vertical location on the body was systematically varied from low- to high-mounted positions. In addition, for two of these positions both horizontal and radial wing angular orientations relative to the body were tested, and roll angle effects were investigated for one of the positions. Seven different wing-body configurations and a body-alone configuration were studied. The test was conducted at Mach numbers from 1.70 to 2.86 at angles of attack from about -4 deg to 24 deg. Pressure orifices were located at three longitudinal stations on each wing-body model, and at each station the orifices were located completely around the body, along the lower surface of the right wing (looking upstream), and along the upper surface of the left wing. All pressure coefficient data are tabulated and selected samples are shown graphically to illustrate the effects of the test variables. The effects of angle of attack, roll angle, Mach number, longitudinal station, wing vertical location, wing angular orientation, and wing-body juncture are analyzed. The vertical location of the wing on the body had a very strong effect on the body pressures. For a given angle of attack at a roll angle of 0 deg, the pressures were virtually constant in the spanwise direction across the windward surfaces of the wing-body combination. Pressure-relieving, channeling, and vortex effects were noted in the data.

  5. [Improving experimental teaching facilities and opening up of laboratories in order to raise experimental teaching quality of genetics].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jian-Fu; Wu, Jian-Guo; Shi, Chun-Hai

    2011-12-01

    Advanced teaching facilities and the policy of opening laboratories to students play an important role in raising the quality in the experimental teaching of Genetics. This article introduces the superiority of some advanced instruments and equipment (such as digital microscope mutual laboratory system, flow cytometry, and NIRSystems) in the experimental teaching of genetics, and illustrates with examples the significance of exposing students to experiments in developing their creative consciousness and creative ability. This article also offers some new concepts on the further improvement upon teaching in the laboratory.

  6. A constant volume diesel spray combustion facility and the corresponding experimental diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labs, J. E.; Filley, J.; Jepsen, E.; Parker, T. E.

    2005-03-01

    A facility was built to examine the diesel spray/combustion process. The facility centers around a constant volume vessel, which consists of a visible and infrared optically accessible cold-wall, heated-interior pressure vessel coupled to an injection system. The combustion vessel is capable of operation at 50atm and 1000K (before injection), was used to simulate preinjection diesel in-cylinder conditions, and was coupled to a repeatable (for each fuel type), single shot, high pressure, metering fuel injection system. A number of experimental diagnostics have been applied to the facility and will be briefly discussed and examples of typical results offered. These diagnostics include: extractive post-combustion gas concentration experiments, droplet sizing measurements, and emission/absorption temperature measurements. Results from this facility capture the critical aspects of diesel spray combustion but do not include the change in pressure associated with heat release in a small volume and volume expansion due to piston motion.

  7. Experimental study on the dam-break hydrographs at the gate location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Liu, Haijiang; Guo, Liheng; Lu, Senxun

    2017-08-01

    When studying the dam-break flow phenomenon, the basic hydrodynamic features of the dam-break flow at the gate location should be verified primarily. In this study, laboratory experiments were performed in a rectangular and horizontal flume with the same initial water head setting on the dry and wet downstream bed conditions. Water surface elevation was extracted through image analysis and validated by comparing with the data measured using a wave gauge. Temporal variation of the water surface elevation at the gate location, quantified in terms of high-speed video recorded images, can be divided into three stages, the sharp decreasing stage, the relatively steady stage, and the gradually decreasing stage. Applicability of several classic analytical solutions of the dam-break problem at the gate location was validated using present experimental data. Ritter's solution is effective for the dry bed condition while Stoker's solution could be applied to the wet bed case, and both are only applicable during the steady stage. Lin' solution reproduces the gate-site hydrographs well during both the relatively steady and the gradually decreasing stages, especially for the condition under which the down-upstream water depth ratio is smaller than 0.138.

  8. Upgrade of U.S. EPA's Experimental Stream Facility Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition System

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system for the U.S. EPA’s Experimental Stream Facility (ESF) was upgraded using Camile hardware and software in 2015. The upgrade added additional hardwired connections, new wireless capabilities, and included a complete rewrit...

  9. Upgrade of U.S. EPA's Experimental Stream Facility Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition System

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system for the U.S. EPA’s Experimental Stream Facility (ESF) was upgraded using Camile hardware and software in 2015. The upgrade added additional hardwired connections, new wireless capabilities, and included a complete rewrit...

  10. Keldysh research center's experimental facility for studying of thermal control systems with two-phase coolant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednov, Sergey M.; Vezhnevets, Petr D.; Desyatov, Andrey V.; Tsikhotsky, Yury M.; Prokhorov, Yury. M.; Kopiatkevich, R.; Gorbenko, Gennady; Diev, M.

    1997-01-01

    This Paper presents a brief description of the experimental facility which was developed in the Keldysh Research Center (KeRC) for studying and working out the thermal control system (TCS) for the Russian segment of the International space station ``Alpha'' (ISSA). The list of scientific and design problems which will be studied during ground testing is given.

  11. EPA’s Experimental Stream Facility: Design and Research Supporting Watershed Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA’s Experimental Stream Facility (ESF) represents an important tool in research that is underway to further understanding of the relative importance of stream ecosystems and the services they provide for effective watershed management. The ESF is operated under the goal of ...

  12. Experimental forests and ranges. Field research facilities of the Pacific Southwest Research Station.

    Treesearch

    Neil H. Berg

    1990-01-01

    The 10 experimental forests and ranges in California administered by the Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, are described. The purposes of these facilities, and how to request their use for approved scientific study are given, and the natural resource base, data bases, studies, and general features of each are also...

  13. Ecological Realism of U.S. EPA Experimental Stream Facility Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA’s Experimental Stream Facility (ESF) conducts meso-scale ecotoxicology studies that account for both structural and functional responses of whole stream communities to contaminants or other stressors. The 16 mesocosms of ESF are indoors and consist of a tiled run sectio...

  14. EPA’s Experimental Stream Facility: Design and Research Supporting Watershed Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA’s Experimental Stream Facility (ESF) represents an important tool in research that is underway to further understanding of the relative importance of stream ecosystems and the services they provide for effective watershed management. The ESF is operated under the goal of ...

  15. Overview of the North Appalachian Experimental Watershed Facility in the Ohio River Basin

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The presentation will give an overview of the capabilities, infrastructure, and current and past research of the unique 1050-ac experimental watershed facility (NAEW) operated by the USDA-Agricultural Research Service near Coshocton, Ohio. The NAEW drains into tributaries of the Ohio River. The re...

  16. Executive Order 12898 and Social, Economic, and Sociopolitical Factors Influencing Toxic Release Inventory Facility Location in EPA Region 6: A Multi-Scale Spatial Assessment of Environmental Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Andrea Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Toxic Release Inventory facilities are among the many environmental hazards shown to create environmental inequities in the United States. This project examined four factors associated with Toxic Release Inventory, specifically, manufacturing facility location at multiple spatial scales using spatial analysis techniques (i.e., O-ring statistic and…

  17. Executive Order 12898 and Social, Economic, and Sociopolitical Factors Influencing Toxic Release Inventory Facility Location in EPA Region 6: A Multi-Scale Spatial Assessment of Environmental Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Andrea Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Toxic Release Inventory facilities are among the many environmental hazards shown to create environmental inequities in the United States. This project examined four factors associated with Toxic Release Inventory, specifically, manufacturing facility location at multiple spatial scales using spatial analysis techniques (i.e., O-ring statistic and…

  18. MaRIE: an experimental facility concept revolutionizing materials in extremes

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Cris W

    2011-01-07

    The Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes (MaRIE) project intends to create an experimental facility that will revolutionize the control of materials in extremes. That control extends to extreme regimes where solid material has failed and begins to flow - the regimes of fluid dynamics and turbulent mixing. This presentation introduces the MaRIE facility concept, demonstrates examples of the science case that determine its functional requirements, and kicks-off the discussion of the decadal scientific challenges of mixing in extremes, including those MaRIE might address.

  19. Experimental determination of magnetohydrodynamic seawater thruster performance in a two Tesla test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picologlou, B.; Doss, E.; Black, D.; Sikes, W. C.

    1992-08-01

    A two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated to investigate the performance of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) seawater thrusters. The results of this investigation are used to validate MHD thruster performance computer models. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented in detail. Additionally, the test matrix and its rational are discussed. Finally, representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to pretest computer model predictions. Good agreement between predicted and measured data has served to validate the thruster performance computer models.

  20. Experimental determination of magnetohydrodynamic seawater thruster performance in a two Tesla test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Picologlou, B.; Doss, E.; Black, D.; Sikes, W.C.

    1992-09-01

    A two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated to investigate the performance of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) seawater thrusters. The results of this investigation are used to validate MHD thruster performance computer models. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented in detail. Additionally, the test matrix and its rational are discussed. finally, representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to pretest computer model predictions. Good agreement between predicted and measured data has served to validate the thruster performance computer models.

  1. Experimental determination of magnetohydrodynamic seawater thruster performance in a two Tesla test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Picologlou, B.; Doss, E.; Black, D. ); Sikes, W.C. )

    1992-01-01

    A two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated to investigate the performance of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) seawater thrusters. The results of this investigation are used to validate MHD thruster performance computer models. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented in detail. Additionally, the test matrix and its rational are discussed. finally, representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to pretest computer model predictions. Good agreement between predicted and measured data has served to validate the thruster performance computer models.

  2. Comparison of location, depth, quality, and intensity of experimentally induced pain in 6 low back muscles.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Kylie J; Fels, Matthew; Walker, Scott R; Hodges, Paul W

    2014-09-01

    The pattern of pain originating from experimentally induced low back pain appears diffuse. This may be because sensory information from low back muscles converges, sensory innervation extends over multiple vertebral levels, or people have difficulty accurately representing the painful location on standardized pain maps. The aim of this study was to provide insight into the perception of pain from noxious stimulation of a range of low back muscles using novel depth and location measures. Hypertonic saline (1 mL, 7% NaCl) was injected into bellies of longissimus (LO), quadratus lumborum (QL), superficial multifidus (SM), and deep multifidus (DM) at the level of the fourth lumbar vertebrae (L4) and in SM and DM at L5 using ultrasound guidance over 6 sessions. Fifteen participants reported depth, location, intensity, size, and descriptive quality of pain throughout the painful period (∼14 min). Pain was reported deeper (P<0.04) for DML4/L5 compared with SML4/L5, LO and QL; more cranial for LO compared with DML4 and QL (P<0.01); more lateral for LO compared with DML4 (P<0.02); and more lateral for QL compared with all other muscles at L4 (P<0.0001). Pain intensity was higher in DML4/L5 than all other muscles (P<0.04) for ∼3 minutes. Descriptive qualities varied slightly between muscles. Depth and lateral position may be the most critical descriptors to determine the source of acute lumbar muscular pain. Overlapping regions of pain may be explained by convergence of receptive fields, innervation of multifidus fascicles at multiple lumbar segments, and convergence of sensory input from different muscles to the same sensory cell bodies as demonstrated in the lumbar spine of animal preparations.

  3. Solving the competitive facility location problem considering the reactions of competitor with a hybrid algorithm including Tabu Search and exact method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagherinejad, Jafar; Niknam, Azar

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, a leader-follower competitive facility location problem considering the reactions of the competitors is studied. A model for locating new facilities and determining levels of quality for the facilities of the leader firm is proposed. Moreover, changes in the location and quality of existing facilities in a competitive market where a competitor offers the same goods or services are taken into account. The competitor could react by opening new facilities, closing existing ones, and adjusting the quality levels of its existing facilities. The market share, captured by each facility, depends on its distance to customer and its quality that is calculated based on the probabilistic Huff's model. Each firm aims to maximize its profit subject to constraints on quality levels and budget of setting up new facilities. This problem is formulated as a bi-level mixed integer non-linear model. The model is solved using a combination of Tabu Search with an exact method. The performance of the proposed algorithm is compared with an upper bound that is achieved by applying Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions. Computational results show that our algorithm finds near the upper bound solutions in a reasonable time.

  4. [Development of a ground-based experimental facility for space waste material processing with microorganism].

    PubMed

    Ai, Wei-dang; Guo, Shuang-sheng; Wang, Xiao-xia; Fu, Lan

    2004-06-01

    To develop a ground-based experimental facility for microorganism waste processing, which will be used to recover nutrient from plant inedible biomass essential for growth and development of plants. After technical parameters and performance requirements were defined, planning demonstration, drawing design, fabrication, debug and plant inedible residue-biodegradation tests by microorganisms were conducted. The facility worked well, and the parameters, such as energy consumption, volume and weight, met the design requirement. The water-treated quality and the ability of treating plant residual by microorganism were better than the demands. The ground-based results demonstrated that total organic carbon (TOC) degradation above 92.1%, and chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction over 95.5% could be maintained. The facility has reasonable technical indexes, and smooth and reliable performances. Its major working principle is suitable for the demand of space conditions. It is capable of being utilized for biodegradation of plant inedible biomass in space.

  5. Preliminary numerical studies of an experimental facility for heat removal in natural circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertani, C.; De Salve, M.; Caramello, M.; Falcone, N.; Bersano, A.; Panella, B.

    2017-01-01

    In recent years particular attention has been dedicated to passive safety systems for heat removal in nuclear power plants. Passive safety systems can achieve a high level of safety, as they carry out their mission relying solely on physical principles like natural circulation, without any need of operators or energy sources. To qualify these systems and components experimental activities are necessary to study and to understand the governing physical phenomena. The present paper shows the design of an experimental facility to be installed in the laboratories of the Energy Department of Politecnico di Torino. The facility is inspired by the decay heat removal system for ALFRED reactor and comprehends a heated bayonet tube and a heat sink for the heat removal (a heat exchanger inside a pool). The thermal power is in the order of 1 kW. A RELAP5-3D model of the facility has been developed and sensitivity analyses were performed to highlight the geometry of the heat exchanger, the final heat sink, and the mass of water inside the loop. The results of this phase serve to understand the physical limits of the facility, to demonstrate a preliminary feasibility and to optimize the geometry for the desired operating conditions.

  6. Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) at SLAC and its Radiological Considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, X.S.; Leitner, M.Santana; Vollaire, J.

    2011-08-22

    Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) in SLAC will be used to study plasma wakefield acceleration. FLUKA Monte Carlo code was used to design a maze wall to separate FACET project and LCLS project to allow persons working in FACET side during LCLS operation. Also FLUKA Monte Carlo code was used to design the shielding for FACET dump to get optimum design for shielding both prompt and residual doses, as well as reducing environmental impact. FACET will be an experimental facility that provides short, intense pulses of electrons and positrons to excite plasma wakefields and study a variety of critical issues associated with plasma wakefield acceleration [1]. This paper describes the FACET beam parameters, the lay-out and its radiological issues.

  7. A digital computer propulsion control facility: Description of capabilities and summary of experimental program results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeller, J. R.; Arpasi, D. J.; Lehtinen, B.

    1976-01-01

    Flight weight digital computers are being used today to carry out many of the propulsion system control functions previously delegated exclusively to hydromechanical controllers. An operational digital computer facility for propulsion control mode studies has been used successfully in several experimental programs. This paper describes the system and some of the results concerned with engine control, inlet control, and inlet engine integrated control. Analytical designs for the digital propulsion control modes include both classical and modern/optimal techniques.

  8. Jefferson Lab: experimental facilities, upgrade plans and potential for research related to neutrino-nucleus interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Wood

    2002-11-01

    The electron accelerator at Jefferson Lab (JLab) presently produces 100% duty factor beams at energies up to 6 GeV for use in 3 endstations with a variety of detectors. Plans are presently being made for an energy upgrade to 12 GeV along with new and upgraded experimental equipment. Possibilities of using Jlab facilities to make measurements of relevance to neutrino-nucleus interactions are discussed.

  9. Experimental basis for laser-plasma interactions in ignition hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Froula, D H; Divol, L; London, R A; Berger, R L; Doeppner, T; Meezan, N B; Ralph, J; Ross, J S; Suter, L J; Glenzer, S H

    2009-11-12

    A series of laser plasma interaction experiments at OMEGA (LLE, Rochester) using gas-filled hohlraums shed light on the behavior of stimulated Raman scattering and stimulated Brillouin scattering at various plasma conditions encountered in indirect drive ignition designs. We present detailed experimental results that quantify the density, temperature, and intensity thresholds for both of these instabilities. In addition to controlling plasma parameters, the National Ignition Campaign relies on optical beam smoothing techniques to mitigate backscatter. We show that polarization smoothing is effective at controlling backscatter. These results provide an experimental basis for forthcoming experiments on National Ignition Facility.

  10. Location | FNLCR

    Cancer.gov

    The Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research campus is located 50 miles northwest of Washington, D.C., and 50 miles west of Baltimore, Maryland, in Frederick, Maryland. Satellite locations include leased and government facilities extending s

  11. An Experimental Test Facility to Support Development of the Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Yoder Jr, Graydon L; Aaron, Adam M; Cunningham, Richard Burns; Fugate, David L; Holcomb, David Eugene; Kisner, Roger A; Peretz, Fred J; Robb, Kevin R; Wilgen, John B; Wilson, Dane F

    2014-01-01

    The need for high-temperature (greater than 600 C) energy exchange and delivery systems is significantly increasing as the world strives to improve energy efficiency and develop alternatives to petroleum-based fuels. Liquid fluoride salts are one of the few energy transport fluids that have the capability of operating at high temperatures in combination with low system pressures. The Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor design uses fluoride salt to remove core heat and interface with a power conversion system. Although a significant amount of experimentation has been performed with these salts, specific aspects of this reactor concept will require experimental confirmation during the development process. The experimental facility described here has been constructed to support the development of the Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor concept. The facility is capable of operating at up to 700 C and incorporates a centrifugal pump to circulate FLiNaK salt through a removable test section. A unique inductive heating technique is used to apply heat to the test section, allowing heat transfer testing to be performed. An air-cooled heat exchanger removes added heat. Supporting loop infrastructure includes a pressure control system; trace heating system; and a complement of instrumentation to measure salt flow, temperatures, and pressures around the loop. The initial experiment is aimed at measuring fluoride salt heat transfer inside a heated pebble bed similar to that used for the core of the pebble bed advanced high-temperature reactor. This document describes the details of the loop design, auxiliary systems used to support the facility, the inductive heating system, and facility capabilities.

  12. Location, Location, Location!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsdell, Kristin

    2004-01-01

    Of prime importance in real estate, location is also a key element in the appeal of romances. Popular geographic settings and historical periods sell, unpopular ones do not--not always with a logical explanation, as the author discovered when she conducted a survey on this topic last year. (Why, for example, are the French Revolution and the…

  13. Location, Location, Location!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsdell, Kristin

    2004-01-01

    Of prime importance in real estate, location is also a key element in the appeal of romances. Popular geographic settings and historical periods sell, unpopular ones do not--not always with a logical explanation, as the author discovered when she conducted a survey on this topic last year. (Why, for example, are the French Revolution and the…

  14. An Experimental Study of Upward Burning Over Long Solid Fuels: Facility Development and Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinhenz, Julie; Yuan, Zeng-Guang

    2011-01-01

    As NASA's mission evolves, new spacecraft and habitat environments necessitate expanded study of materials flammability. Most of the upward burning tests to date, including the NASA standard material screening method NASA-STD-6001, have been conducted in small chambers where the flame often terminates before a steady state flame is established. In real environments, the same limitations may not be present. The use of long fuel samples would allow the flames to proceed in an unhindered manner. In order to explore sample size and chamber size effects, two large chambers were developed at NASA GRC under the Flame Prevention, Detection and Suppression (FPDS) project. The first was an existing vacuum facility, VF-13, located at NASA John Glenn Research Center. This 6350 liter chamber could accommodate fuels sample lengths up to 2 m. However, operational costs and restricted accessibility limited the test program, so a second laboratory scale facility was developed in parallel. By stacking additional two chambers on top of an existing combustion chamber facility, this 81 liter Stacked-chamber facility could accommodate a 1.5 m sample length. The larger volume, more ideal environment of VF-13 was used to obtain baseline data for comparison with the stacked chamber facility. In this way, the stacked chamber facility was intended for long term testing, with VF-13 as the proving ground. Four different solid fuels (adding machine paper, poster paper, PMMA plates, and Nomex fabric) were tested with fuel sample lengths up to 2 m. For thin samples (papers) with widths up to 5 cm, the flame reached a steady state length, which demonstrates that flame length may be stabilized even when the edge effects are reduced. For the thick PMMA plates, flames reached lengths up to 70 cm but were highly energetic and restricted by oxygen depletion. Tests with the Nomex fabric confirmed that the cyclic flame phenomena, observed in small facility tests, continued over longer sample. New

  15. Notice of Public Comment Period for Proposed Remedies at the ERP Compliant Coke facility located in Birmingham, Alabama

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is using information from the RCRA Facility Investigation and the Corrective Measure Studies to propose remedies for the Former Chemical Plant and the Former Pig Iron Foundry, two of five areas being investigated at the ERP Compliant Coke facility.

  16. The National Ignition Facility: Status and Plans for the Experimental Program

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, Edward I.

    2003-07-15

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), currently under construction at University of California's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is a stadium-sized facility containing a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, 351-nm laser system and a 10-meter diameter target chamber with room for nearly 100 experimental diagnostics. NIF is being built by the National Nuclear Security Administration and when completed will be the world's largest laser experimental system, providing a national center to study inertial confinement fusion and the physics of matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's 192 energetic laser beams will compress fusion targets to conditions where they will ignite and burn, liberating more energy than required to initiate the fusion reactions. NIF experiments will allow the study of physical processes at temperatures approaching 100 million K and 100 billion times atmospheric pressure. These conditions exist naturally only in the interior of stars and in nuclear weapons explosions. In the course of designing the world's most energetic laser system, a number of significant technology breakthroughs have been achieved. NIF is now entering the first phases of its laser commissioning program. Low-energy preamplifier rod laser shots have been successfully propagated through the entire laser chain. Higher energy shots are planned through the end of 2002. NIF's target experimental systems are also being installed in preparation for laser performance and experimental capability commissioning starting in 2003.

  17. The National Ignition Facility: Status and Plans for the Experimental Program

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, E I

    2002-11-12

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), currently under construction at the University of California's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is a stadium-sized facility containing a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, 351-nm laser system and a 10-meter diameter target chamber with room for nearly 100 experimental diagnostics. NIF is being built by the National Nuclear Security Administration and when completed will be the world's largest laser experimental system, providing a national center to study inertial confinement fusion and the physics of matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's 192 energetic laser beams will compress fusion targets to conditions where they will ignite and burn, liberating more energy than required to initiate the fusion reactions. NIF experiments will allow the study of physical processes at temperatures approaching 100 million K and 100 billion times atmospheric pressure. These conditions exist naturally only in the interior of stars and in nuclear weapons explosions. In the course of designing the world's most energetic laser system, a number of significant technology breakthroughs have been achieved. NIF is now entering the first phases of its laser commissioning program. Low-energy preamplifier rod laser shots have been successfully propagated through the entire laser chain. Higher energy shots are planned through the end of 2002. NIF's target experimental systems are also being installed in preparation for laser performance and experimental capability commissioning starting in 2003.

  18. Feasibility study for a biomedical experimental facility based on LEIR at CERN

    PubMed Central

    Abler, Daniel; Garonna, Adriano; Carli, Christian; Dosanjh, Manjit; Peach, Ken

    2013-01-01

    In light of the recent European developments in ion beam therapy, there is a strong interest from the biomedical research community to have more access to clinically relevant beams. Beamtime for pre-clinical studies is currently very limited and a new dedicated facility would allow extensive research into the radiobiological mechanisms of ion beam radiation and the development of more refined techniques of dosimetry and imaging. This basic research would support the current clinical efforts of the new treatment centres in Europe (for example HIT, CNAO and MedAustron). This paper presents first investigations on the feasibility of an experimental biomedical facility based on the CERN Low Energy Ion Ring LEIR accelerator. Such a new facility could provide beams of light ions (from protons to neon ions) in a collaborative and cost-effective way, since it would rely partly on CERN's competences and infrastructure. The main technical challenges linked to the implementation of a slow extraction scheme for LEIR and to the design of the experimental beamlines are described and first solutions presented. These include introducing new extraction septa into one of the straight sections of the synchrotron, changing the power supply configuration of the magnets, and designing a new horizontal beamline suitable for clinical beam energies, and a low-energy vertical beamline for particular radiobiological experiments. PMID:23824122

  19. Feasibility study for a biomedical experimental facility based on LEIR at CERN.

    PubMed

    Abler, Daniel; Garonna, Adriano; Carli, Christian; Dosanjh, Manjit; Peach, Ken

    2013-07-01

    In light of the recent European developments in ion beam therapy, there is a strong interest from the biomedical research community to have more access to clinically relevant beams. Beamtime for pre-clinical studies is currently very limited and a new dedicated facility would allow extensive research into the radiobiological mechanisms of ion beam radiation and the development of more refined techniques of dosimetry and imaging. This basic research would support the current clinical efforts of the new treatment centres in Europe (for example HIT, CNAO and MedAustron). This paper presents first investigations on the feasibility of an experimental biomedical facility based on the CERN Low Energy Ion Ring LEIR accelerator. Such a new facility could provide beams of light ions (from protons to neon ions) in a collaborative and cost-effective way, since it would rely partly on CERN's competences and infrastructure. The main technical challenges linked to the implementation of a slow extraction scheme for LEIR and to the design of the experimental beamlines are described and first solutions presented. These include introducing new extraction septa into one of the straight sections of the synchrotron, changing the power supply configuration of the magnets, and designing a new horizontal beamline suitable for clinical beam energies, and a low-energy vertical beamline for particular radiobiological experiments.

  20. An Analysis of Background Factors Influencing Selection of Residency Facility for Dental Students in Universities Located in Rural Areas in Japan

    PubMed Central

    H, Kono; H, Sasahara; S, Furukawa; N, Taguchi

    2015-01-01

    Background: In Japan, since 2006, participation in a 1-year residency programme by all dentists who have passed the National Board Dental Examination has been mandatory. Therefore, a ‘matching system’ has become necessary for dental students in their final year to decide their desired residency facility, but the rate of matching in dental schools located in rural areas is still low. Aim : The principal aim of this study was to elucidate the background factors influencing the selection of residency facilities by dental students in rural areas to facilitate the training of dentists working in local communities. Methods : Using the matching results from 554 final-year students of Kagoshima University Faculty of Dentistry from 2005 to 2013, multiple logistic regression analysis was performed on the background factors of the subjects. Results : Concerning the selection of the residency facility, it was verified that there were strong background factors for subjects to select residency facilities in their hometown, but compared with subjects from other regions, those from Kinki and Kanto regions did not select residency facilities in their hometown. Compared with males, a significantly higher number of females selected residency facilities in their hometown. A significantly higher number of subjects who repeated a school year selected the residency facility of their alma mater. Conclusion : In dental schools of national universities located in provinces, the establishment of a quota system for students from the region, where possible, is one of the most effective steps for securing future dental trainees. PMID:26140061

  1. RIFLE: regional impact of facility location on the economy. User's guide, volume 2. Maryland economic, fiscal, and social impact assessment model

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, P.D.; Harms, P.L.

    1983-02-01

    This user's guide describes the non-computerized models in the RIFLE (Regional Impact of Facility Location on the Economy) system. The RIFLE system consists of seven computerized models and three non-computerized models which can be used to analyze the economic, demographic, and fiscal impacts of major facilities upon the counties in which they are located and adjacent counties. Volume II describes the non-computerized models in the RIFLE system. These models represent an alternative approach to estimating costs of providing government services to in-migrating households.

  2. Screening of ecotoxicological, qualitative and reproductive variables in male European sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax (L.) reared in three different fish farms: Facility location and typology.

    PubMed

    Cangialosi, Maria Vittoria; Corsi, Ilaria; Bonacci, Stefano; Sensini, Cristiana; Cicero, Nicola; Focardi, Silvano; Mazzola, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of both facility location and typology of fish farm on some ecotoxicological, qualitative and reproductive variables in European sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax L. Several variables were investigated: gonado-somatic index (GSI), liver-somatic index (LSI); 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD), benzo(a)pyrene monooxygenase and acetylcholinesterase activities; glutathione (GSH), testosterone, 17β-estradiol, total lipid, phospholipid (PL) and triglyceride contents. In addition, the histological sections of gonads were examined. Results suggest that LSI, EROD activity, GSI, GSH, PL, hormone levels and gonad morphology were influenced by different facility locations and typologies of fish farm.

  3. A new laboratory-scale experimental facility for detailed aerothermal characterizations of volumetric absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Garcia, Fabrisio; Santiago, Sergio; Luque, Salvador; Romero, Manuel; Gonzalez-Aguilar, Jose

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes a new modular laboratory-scale experimental facility that was designed to conduct detailed aerothermal characterizations of volumetric absorbers for use in concentrating solar power plants. Absorbers are generally considered to be the element with the highest potential for efficiency gains in solar thermal energy systems. The configu-ration of volumetric absorbers enables concentrated solar radiation to penetrate deep into their solid structure, where it is progressively absorbed, prior to being transferred by convection to a working fluid flowing through the structure. Current design trends towards higher absorber outlet temperatures have led to the use of complex intricate geometries in novel ceramic and metallic elements to maximize the temperature deep inside the structure (thus reducing thermal emission losses at the front surface and increasing efficiency). Although numerical models simulate the conjugate heat transfer mechanisms along volumetric absorbers, they lack, in many cases, the accuracy that is required for precise aerothermal validations. The present work aims to aid this objective by the design, development, commissioning and operation of a new experimental facility which consists of a 7 kWe (1.2 kWth) high flux solar simulator, a radiation homogenizer, inlet and outlet collector modules and a working section that can accommodate volumetric absorbers up to 80 mm × 80 mm in cross-sectional area. Experimental measurements conducted in the facility include absorber solid temperature distributions along its depth, inlet and outlet air temperatures, air mass flow rate and pressure drop, incident radiative heat flux, and overall thermal efficiency. In addition, two windows allow for the direct visualization of the front and rear absorber surfaces, thus enabling full-coverage surface temperature measurements by thermal imaging cameras. This paper presents the results from the aerothermal characterization of a siliconized silicon

  4. Operational readiness review for the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    An Operational Readiness Review (ORR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s (INEL`s) Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) was conducted by EG&G Idaho, Inc., to verify the readiness of WERF to resume operations following a shutdown and modification period of more than two years. It is the conclusion of the ORR Team that, pending satisfactory resolution of all pre-startup findings, WERF has achieved readiness to resume unrestricted operations within the approved safety basis. ORR appraisal forms are included in this report.

  5. Source term evaluation for accident transients in the experimental fusion facility ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Virot, F.; Barrachin, M.; Cousin, F.

    2015-03-15

    We have studied the transport and chemical speciation of radio-toxic and toxic species for an event of water ingress in the vacuum vessel of experimental fusion facility ITER with the ASTEC code. In particular our evaluation takes into account an assessed thermodynamic data for the beryllium gaseous species. This study shows that deposited beryllium dusts of atomic Be and Be(OH){sub 2} are formed. It also shows that Be(OT){sub 2} could exist in some conditions in the drain tank. (authors)

  6. FELIX: an experimental facility to study electromagnetic effects for first wall, blanket, and shield systems

    SciTech Connect

    Praeg, W.F.; Turner, L.R.; Biggs, J.; Bywater, J.; Fuja, R.; Knott, M.; Lari, R.J.; McGhee, D.G.; Wehrle, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    As part of the DOE First Wall/Blanket/Shield (FW/B/S) Engineering Test Program, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is carrying out an experimental program to study electromagnetic effects. Electromagnetic effect in a FW/B/S system include time delay of equilibrium field penetration to the plasma, forces and torques, eddy current heating, and electrical arcing. Such effects can arise in a fusion reactor from plasma disruption and normal and abnormal charge and discharge of the magnets. The facility will consist primarily of a solenoid magnet, a surrounding pulsed dipole magnet, and associated power supplies and support structure.

  7. Fermilab D-0 Experimental Facility: Energy conservation report and mechanical systems design optimization and cost analysis study

    SciTech Connect

    Krstulovich, S.F.

    1987-10-31

    This report is developed as part of the Fermilab D-0 Experimental Facility Project Title II Design Documentation Update. As such, it concentrates primarily on HVAC mechanical systems design optimization and cost analysis.

  8. Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    An expansion of medical data collection facilities was necessary to implement the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP). The primary objective of the EDOMP was to ensure the capability of crew members to reenter the Earth's atmosphere, land, and egress safely following a 16-day flight. Therefore, access to crew members as soon as possible after landing was crucial for most data collection activities. Also, with the advent of EDOMP, the quantity of investigations increased such that the landing day maximum data collection time increased accordingly from two hours to four hours. The preflight and postflight testing facilities at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) required only some additional testing equipment and minor modifications to the existing laboratories in order to fulfill EDOMP requirements. Necessary modifications at the landing sites were much more extensive.

  9. Advanced system experimental facility: solid waste to methane gas. Background and process description

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacson, R.; Pfeffer, J.

    1981-03-01

    The Refuse Conversion to Methane Facility in Pompano Beach, Florida, a 100-ton/day experimental plant to convert municipal solid waste (MSW) to methane for fuel, has been built and is being tested. The facility has been designed to assess the technical merit of anaerobic digestion of the MSW process. Approximately 40 ton/day of volatile solids are fed to the digesters; of this, about 25 ton/day will be converted to gases. For each pound of volatile solids destroyed, 6.6 std. ft/sup 3/ of methane gas and 6.6 std. ft/sup 3/ of CO/sub 2/ will be produced. Thus, the plant will yield approximately 330,000 std. ft/sup 3//day each of methane and CO/sub 2/. This project provides a critical test of the most important process variables, thus allowing judgments to be made on scale-up considerations. The successful operation of this facility will yield information with a significant impact on potential commercial-scale plant developments. The background and theory involved in applying this technology to MSW, as well as details of the specific process line, are presented.

  10. Development and testing of the ACT-1 experimental facility for hypersonic combustion research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baccarella, D.; Liu, Q.; Passaro, A.; Lee, T.; Do, H.

    2016-04-01

    A new pulsed-arc-heated hypersonic wind tunnel facility, designated as ACT-1 (Arc-heated Combustion Test-rig 1), has been developed and built at the University of Notre Dame in collaboration with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Alta S.p.A. The aim of the design is to provide a suitable test platform for experimental studies on supersonic and hypersonic turbulent combustion phenomena. ACT-1 is composed of a high temperature gas-generator system and a model scramjet combustor that is installed in an open-type vacuum test section of the wind tunnel facility. The gas-generator is designed to produce high-enthalpy (stagnation temperature  =  2000 K-3500 K) hypersonic flows for a run time up to 1 s. The supersonic combustor section is composed of a compression ramp (scramjet inlet), an internal flow channel of constant cross-section, a fuel jet nozzle, and a flame holder (wall cavity). The facility allows three-way optical accesses (top and sides) into the supersonic combustor to enable various advanced optical and laser diagnostics. In particular, planar laser Rayleigh scattering (PLRS), high-speed schlieren imaging and OH-planar laser induced fluorescence (OH-PLIF) have successfully been implemented to visualize the turbulent flows and flame structures at high speed flight conditions.

  11. 47 CFR 17.58 - Facilities to be located on land under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Forest Service or the Bureau...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... jurisdiction of the U.S. Forest Service or the Bureau of Land Management. 17.58 Section 17.58 Telecommunication... land under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Forest Service or the Bureau of Land Management. Link to an... facilities to be located on land under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Forest Service or the Bureau of Land...

  12. The relationship between the location of pediatric intensive care unit facilities and child death from trauma: a county-level ecologic study.

    PubMed

    Odetola, Folafoluwa O; Miller, William C; Davis, Matthew M; Bratton, Susan L

    2005-07-01

    To describe the relationship between the location of Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) facilities and county-level child death from trauma in the contiguous USA. We conducted a cross-sectional ecologic study using county-level data on death due to trauma in children 0 to 14 years of age from 1996 to 1998. These data were linked to 1997 county-level data on availability of PICU facilities. In 1997, PICU facilities were present in 9% of USA counties. There were 18,337 childhood deaths from trauma in the study period. The presence of PICU facilities in a county was associated with lower mortality from trauma (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 0.72; 95% CI 0.67-0.78) compared to counties without PICU facilities. After controlling for residence in rural and low-income counties, and the presence of adult medicosurgical intensive care units, the presence of PICU facilities in a county remained associated with lower rates of death from trauma (IRR = 0.82; 95% CI 0.75-0.89). The presence of PICU facilities is related to lower mortality rates due to traumatic injuries at the county level. This finding may reflect the concentration of pediatric subspecialty care in counties with PICUs. This association merits further study with individual-level observations.

  13. Experimental study on the location of an acoustic emission source considering refraction in different media.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zi-Long; Zhou, Jing; Dong, Long-Jun; Cai, Xin; Rui, Yi-Chao; Ke, Chang-Tao

    2017-08-07

    The existing acoustic emission (AE) source location methods assume that acoustic waves propagate along straight lines, and the source location is determined by average wave velocity. Because of the heterogeneity of materials, location results often fail to meet the accuracy requirement. For this reason, an AE source location method considering refraction in different media was proposed in this paper. According to sensor coordinates, the arrival time of acoustic waves, the velocities of acoustic waves in two kinds of media, the space-time relation equations of the AE source point and the measuring point were established by the precise coordinates of the AE source based on Snell's law. The feasibility of the algorithm was verified by experiments, and the factors influencing location accuracy were also analysed. The results show that the algorithm proposed in this paper is applicable for both the same medium and different media, and the accuracy of localization is not affected by the ratio of wave velocities in two media or the distance from the AE source to the refraction surface.

  14. Locating animals from their sounds and tomography of the atmosphere: experimental demonstration.

    PubMed

    Spiesberger, J L

    1999-08-01

    Calling animals are located using widely distributed receivers, and the sounds from the animals are used to map the sound speed and wind fields by means of tomography. In particular, two Red-Winged Blackbirds Agelaius phoeniceus are correctly located within a meter using recordings from five receivers spread over a 20 by 30 m region. The demonstration hinges on two new developments. First, a new algorithm for blindly estimating the impulse response of the channel is shown capable of estimating the differences in the time of first arrivals at two receivers. Since it is known that the first arrivals travel along nearly straight paths, the difference in time constrains the animal's location to a hyperboloid, and the animal is located by intersecting hyperboloids from many pairs of receivers. Second, in order to accurately find the intersection point and map the sound speed and wind fields using tomography, a nonlinear equation is solved. The new algorithm for blindly estimating the impulse response of a channel offers a new way for locating sounds and making tomographic maps of the environment without any requirement for a model for the propagation of sound such as is needed for focalization and matched field processing.

  15. The experimental set-up of the RIB in-flight facility EXOTIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierroutsakou, D.; Boiano, A.; Boiano, C.; Di Meo, P.; La Commara, M.; Manea, C.; Mazzocco, M.; Nicoletto, M.; Parascandolo, C.; Signorini, C.; Soramel, F.; Strano, E.; Toniolo, N.; Torresi, D.; Tortone, G.; Anastasio, A.; Bettini, M.; Cassese, C.; Castellani, L.; Corti, D.; Costa, L.; De Fazio, B.; Galet, G.; Glodariu, T.; Grebosz, J.; Guglielmetti, A.; Molini, P.; Pontoriere, G.; Rocco, R.; Romoli, M.; Roscilli, L.; Sandoli, M.; Stroe, L.; Tessaro, M.; Zatti, P. G.

    2016-10-01

    We describe the experimental set-up of the Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) in-flight facility EXOTIC consisting of: (a) two position-sensitive Parallel Plate Avalanche Counters (PPACs), dedicated to the event-by-event tracking of the produced RIBs and to time of flight measurements and (b) the new high-granularity compact telescope array EXPADES (EXotic PArticle DEtection System), designed for nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics experiments employing low-energy light RIBs. EXPADES consists of eight ΔE -Eres telescopes arranged in a cylindrical configuration around the target. Each telescope is made up of two Double Sided Silicon Strip Detectors (DSSSDs) with a thickness of 40/60 μm and 300 μm for the ΔE and Eres layer, respectively. Additionally, eight ionization chambers were constructed to be used as an alternative ΔE stage or, in conjunction with the entire DSSSD array, to build up more complex triple telescopes. New low-noise multi-channel charge-sensitive preamplifiers and spectroscopy amplifiers, associated with constant fraction discriminators, peak-and-hold and Time to Amplitude Converter circuits were developed for the electronic readout of the ΔE stage. Application Specific Integrated Circuit-based electronics was employed for the treatment of the Eres signals. An 8-channel, 12-bit multi-sampling 50 MHz Analog to Digital Converter, a Trigger Supervisor Board for handling the trigger signals of the whole experimental set-up and an ad hoc data acquisition system were also developed. The performance of the PPACs, EXPADES and of the associated electronics was obtained offline with standard α calibration sources and in-beam by measuring the scattering process for the systems 17O+58Ni and 17O+208Pb at incident energies around their respective Coulomb barriers and, successively, during the first experimental runs with the RIBs of the EXOTIC facility.

  16. LUCI: A facility at DUSEL for large-scale experimental study of geologic carbon sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, C. A.; Dobson, P.F.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Wang, J. S. Y.; Onstott, T.C.; Scherer, G.W.; Freifeld, B.M.; Ramakrishnan, T.S.; Stabinski, E.L.; Liang, K.; Verma, S.

    2010-10-01

    LUCI, the Laboratory for Underground CO{sub 2} Investigations, is an experimental facility being planned for the DUSEL underground laboratory in South Dakota, USA. It is designed to study vertical flow of CO{sub 2} in porous media over length scales representative of leakage scenarios in geologic carbon sequestration. The plan for LUCI is a set of three vertical column pressure vessels, each of which is {approx}500 m long and {approx}1 m in diameter. The vessels will be filled with brine and sand or sedimentary rock. Each vessel will have an inner column to simulate a well for deployment of down-hole logging tools. The experiments are configured to simulate CO{sub 2} leakage by releasing CO{sub 2} into the bottoms of the columns. The scale of the LUCI facility will permit measurements to study CO{sub 2} flow over pressure and temperature variations that span supercritical to subcritical gas conditions. It will enable observation or inference of a variety of relevant processes such as buoyancy-driven flow in porous media, Joule-Thomson cooling, thermal exchange, viscous fingering, residual trapping, and CO{sub 2} dissolution. Experiments are also planned for reactive flow of CO{sub 2} and acidified brines in caprock sediments and well cements, and for CO{sub 2}-enhanced methanogenesis in organic-rich shales. A comprehensive suite of geophysical logging instruments will be deployed to monitor experimental conditions as well as provide data to quantify vertical resolution of sensor technologies. The experimental observations from LUCI will generate fundamental new understanding of the processes governing CO{sub 2} trapping and vertical migration, and will provide valuable data to calibrate and validate large-scale model simulations.

  17. NIMBY, CLAMP, and the location of new nuclear-related facilities: U.S. national and 11 site-specific surveys.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Michael R

    2009-09-01

    Public and political opposition have made finding locations for new nuclear power plants, waste management, and nuclear research and development facilities a challenge for the U.S. government and the nuclear industry. U.S. government-owned properties that already have nuclear-related activities and commercial nuclear power generating stations are logical locations. Several studies and utility applications to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission suggest that concentrating locations at major plants (CLAMP) has become an implicit siting policy. We surveyed 2,101 people who lived within 50 miles of 11 existing major nuclear sites and 600 who lived elsewhere in the United States. Thirty-four percent favored CLAMP for new nuclear power plants, 52% for waste management facilities, and 50% for new nuclear laboratories. College educated, relatively affluent male whites were the strongest CLAMP supporters. They disproportionately trusted those responsible for the facilities and were not worried about existing nuclear facilities or other local environmental issues. Notably, they were concerned about continuing coal use. Not surprisingly, CLAMP proponents tended to be familiar with their existing local nuclear site. In short, likely CLAMP sites have a large and politically powerful core group to support a CLAMP policy. The challenge to proponents of nuclear technologies will be to sustain this support and expand the base among those who clearly are less connected and receptive to new nearby sites.

  18. Scientific Basis for a Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical-Biological Experimental Facility at DUSEL Homestake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenthal, E. L.; Elsworth, D.; Lowell, R. P.; Maher, K.; Mailloux, B. J.; Uzunlar, N.; Freifeld, B. M.; Keimowitz, A. R.; Wang, J. S.

    2009-12-01

    Most natural and engineered earth system processes involve strong coupling of thermal, mechanical, chemical, and sometimes biological processes in rocks that are heterogeneous at a wide range of spatial scales. One of the most pervasive processes in the Earth’s crust is that of fluids (primarily water, but also CO2, hydrocarbons, volcanic gases, etc.) flowing through fractured heated rock under stress. A preliminary design is being formulated for a large-scale subsurface experimental facility to investigate coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical-Biological (THMCB) processes in fractured rock at depth. The experiment would be part of the proposed Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL) in the Homestake Mine, South Dakota. Fundamental geochemical, isotopic, microbiological, laboratory THMC experiments, and numerical modeling will be used to guide the experimental design and evaluation of the time and spatial scales of the coupled THMCB processes. Although we sometimes analyze rocks and fluids for physical and chemical properties, it is difficult to create quantitative numerical models based on fundamental physics and chemistry that can capture the dynamic changes that have occurred or may yet take place. Initial conditions and history are only known roughly at best, and the boundary conditions have likely varied over time as well. Processes such as multicomponent chemical and thermal diffusion, multiphase flow, advection, and thermal expansion/contraction, are taking place simultaneously in rocks that are structurally and chemically complex—heterogeneous assemblages of mineral grains, pores, and fractures—and visually opaque. The only way to fully understand such processes is to carry out well-controlled experiments at a range of scales (grain/pore-scale to decimeter-scale) that can be interrogated and modeled. The THMCB experimental facility is also intended to be a unique laboratory for testing hypotheses regarding effects of

  19. HILL: The High-Intensity Laser Laboratory Core Team's Reply to Questions from the NNSA Experimental Facilities Panel

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, B J

    2012-08-02

    Question 1 - The type of physics regimes that HILL can access for weapons studies is quite interesting. The question that arises for the proposal team is what priority does this type of experimental data have versus data that can be obtained with NIF, and Z. How does HILL rank in priority compared to MARIE 1.0 in terms of the experimental data it will provide? We reiterate that isochoric heating experiments to be conducted with HILL are complementary to the high energy density physics experiments at NIF and Z and uniquely access states of matter that neither other facility can access. It is our belief that HILL will enable several important questions, e.g., as related to mix morphology, radiation transfer from corrugated surfaces, and equations of state, to be run to ground through carefully diagnosed, 'unit-physics' experiments. Such experiments will substantially improve confidence in our computer models and provide a rigorous science basis for certification. Question 2 - A secondary question relates to the interests of LLNL and SNL in the physics that HILL can address. This should be spelled out clearly. I would like to see the other labs be part of the discussion regarding how important this capability would be if built. Both sister Labs have a keen interest in the physics enabled by high-intensity, high-energy lasers, as evinced by the Z Petawatt and NIF ARC upgrades to their signature facilities. LANL scientists have teamed with scientists from both Laboratories in high-intensity laser 'first experiments' envisioned for HILL and we fully intend to continue these profitable discussions going forward. In the preparation of the HILL proposal, feedback was solicited from the broader HEDP and weapons science communities. The consensus view was that HILL filled a critical gap and that there was a need for a facility like HILL to address outstanding questions in weapons science. It was recognized that co-location of HILL with a facility such as MaRIE 1.0, Z, NIF, or

  20. Validation of PHITS Spallation Models from the Perspective of the Shielding Design of Transmutation Experimental Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Hiroki; Meigo, Shin-ichiro

    2017-09-01

    The impact of different spallation models implemented in the particle transport code PHITS on the shielding design of Transmutation Experimental Facility is investigated. For 400-MeV proton incident on a lead-bismuth eutectic target, an effective dose rate at the end of a thick radiation shield (3-m-thick iron and 3-m-thick concrete) calculated by the Liège intranuclear cascade (INC) model version 4.6 (INCL4.6) coupled with the GEMcode (INCL4.6/GEM) yields about twice as high as the Bertini INC model (Bertini/GEM). A comparison with experimental data for 500-MeV proton incident on a thick lead target suggest that the prediction accuracy of INCL4.6/GEM would be better than that of Bertini/GEM. In contrast, it is found that the dose rates in beam ducts in front of targets calculated by the INCL4.6/GEMare lower than those by the Bertini/GEM. Since both models underestimate the experimental results for neutron-production doubledifferential cross sections at 180° for 140-MeV proton incident on carbon, iron, and gold targets, it is concluded that it is necessary to allow a margin for uncertainty caused by the spallation models, which is a factor of two, in estimating the dose rate induced by neutron streaming through a beam duct.

  1. The National Ignition Facility Status and Plans for Laser Fusion and High Energy Density Experimental Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuest, Craig R.

    2001-03-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) currently under construction at the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is 192-beam, 1.8 Megajoule, 500 Terawatt, 351 nm laser for inertial confinement fusion and high energy density experimental studies. NIF is being built by the Department of Energy and the National Nuclear Security Agency to provide an experimental test bed for the US Stockpile Stewardship Program to ensure the country’s nuclear deterrent without underground nuclear testing. The experimental program for NIF will encompass a wide range of physical phenomena from fusion energy production to materials science. Of the roughly 700 shots available per year, about 10% of the shots will be dedicated to basic science research. Additionally, most of the shots on NIF will be conducted in unclassified configurations that will allow participation from the greater scientific community in planned applied physics experiments. This presentation will provide a look at the status of the construction project as well as a description of the scientific uses of NIF. NIF is currently scheduled to provide first light in 2004 and will be completed in 2008. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  2. Experimental Investigation of the DLR-F6 Transport Configuration in the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatlin, Gregory M.; Rivers, Melissa B.; Goodliff, Scott L.; Rudnik, Ralf; Sitzmann, Martin

    2008-01-01

    An experimental aerodynamic investigation of the DLR (German Aerospace Center) F6 generic transport configuration has been conducted in the NASA NTF (National Transonic Facility) for CFD validation within the framework of the AIAA Drag Prediction Workshop. Force and moment, surface pressure, model deformation, and surface flow visualization data have been obtained at Reynolds numbers of both 3 million and 5 million. Flow-through nacelles and a side-of-body fairing were also investigated on this wing-body configuration. Reynolds number effects on trailing edge separation have been assessed, and the effectiveness of the side-of-body fairing in eliminating a known region of separated flow has been determined. Data obtained at a Reynolds number of 3 million are presented together for comparison with data from a previous wind tunnel investigation in the ONERA S2MA facility. New surface flow visualization capabilities have also been successfully explored and demonstrated in the NTF for the high pressure and moderately low temperature conditions required in this investigation. Images detailing wing surface flow characteristics are presented.

  3. Node 2 and Japanese Experimental Module (JEM) In Space Station Processing Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Lining the walls of the Space Station Processing Facility at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) are the launch awaiting U.S. Node 2 (lower left). and the first pressurized module of the Japanese Experimental Module (JEM) (upper right), named 'Kibo' (Hope). Node 2, the 'utility hub' and second of three connectors between International Space Station (ISS) modules, was built in the Torino, Italy facility of Alenia Spazio, an International contractor based in Rome. Japan's major contribution to the station, the JEM, was built by the Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) at the Tsukuba Space Center near Tokyo and will expand research capabilities aboard the station. Both were part of an agreement between NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA). The Node 2 will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. Once the Japanese and European laboratories are attached to it, the resulting roomier Station will expand from the equivalent space of a 3-bedroom house to a 5-bedroom house. The Marshall Space Center in Huntsville, Alabama manages the Node program for NASA.

  4. NASA HRP Plans for Collaboration at the IBMP Ground-Based Experimental Facility (NEK)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, Ronita L.

    2016-01-01

    NASA and IBMP are planning research collaborations using the IBMP Ground-based Experimental Facility (NEK). The NEK offers unique capabilities to study the effects of isolation on behavioral health and performance as it relates to spaceflight. The NEK is comprised of multiple interconnected modules that range in size from 50-250m(sup3). Modules can be included or excluded in a given mission allowing for flexibility of platform design. The NEK complex includes a Mission Control Center for communications and monitoring of crew members. In an effort to begin these collaborations, a 2-week mission is planned for 2017. In this mission, scientific studies will be conducted to assess facility capabilities in preparation for longer duration missions. A second follow-on 2-week mission may be planned for early in 2018. In future years, long duration missions of 4, 8 and 12 months are being considered. Missions will include scenarios that simulate for example, transit to and from asteroids, the moon, or other interplanetary travel. Mission operations will be structured to include stressors such as, high workloads, communication delays, and sleep deprivation. Studies completed at the NEK will support International Space Station expeditions, and future exploration missions. Topics studied will include communication, crew autonomy, cultural diversity, human factors, and medical capabilities.

  5. Node 2 and Japanese Experimental Module (JEM) In Space Station Processing Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Lining the walls of the Space Station Processing Facility at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) are the launch awaiting U.S. Node 2 (lower left). and the first pressurized module of the Japanese Experimental Module (JEM) (upper right), named 'Kibo' (Hope). Node 2, the 'utility hub' and second of three connectors between International Space Station (ISS) modules, was built in the Torino, Italy facility of Alenia Spazio, an International contractor based in Rome. Japan's major contribution to the station, the JEM, was built by the Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) at the Tsukuba Space Center near Tokyo and will expand research capabilities aboard the station. Both were part of an agreement between NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA). The Node 2 will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. Once the Japanese and European laboratories are attached to it, the resulting roomier Station will expand from the equivalent space of a 3-bedroom house to a 5-bedroom house. The Marshall Space Center in Huntsville, Alabama manages the Node program for NASA.

  6. Survey of existing underground openings for in-situ experimental facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Wollenberg, H.; Graf, A.; Strisower, B.; Korbin, G.

    1981-07-01

    In an earlier project, a literature search identified 60 underground openings in crystalline rock capable of providing access for an in-situ experimental facility to develop geochemical and hydrological techniques for evaluating sites for radioactive waste isolation. As part of the current project, discussions with state geologists, owners, and operators narrowed the original group to 14. Three additional sites in volcanic rock and one site in granite were also identified. Site visits and application of technical criteria, including the geologic and hydrologic settings and depth, extent of the rock unit, condition, and accessibility of underground workings, determined four primary candidate sites: the Helms Pumped Storage Project in grandiodorite of the Sierra Nevada, California; the Tungsten Queen Mine in Precambrian granodiorite of the North Carolina Piedmont; the Mount Hope Mine in Precambrian granite and gneiss of northern New Jersey; and the Minnamax Project in the Duluth gabbro complex of northern Minnesota.

  7. An Experimental Investigation of Damaged Arresting Gear Tapes for the Langley Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Angela J.

    1999-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed on damaged arresting gear tapes at the Langley Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility. The arrestment system uses five pairs of tapes to bring the test carriage to a halt. The procedure used to determine when to replace the tapes consists of a close evaluation of each of the 10 tapes after each run. During this evaluation, each tape is examined thoroughly and any damage observed on the tape is recorded. If the damaged tape does not pass the inspection, the tape is replaced with a new one. For the past 13 years, the most commonly seen damage types are edge fray damage and transverse damage. Tests were conducted to determine the maximum tensile strength of a damaged arresting gear tape specimen. The data indicate that tapes exhibiting transverse damage can withstand higher loads than tapes with edge fray damage.

  8. Experimental techniques for evaluating steady-state jet engine performance in an altitude facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. M.; Young, C. Y.; Antl, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    Jet engine calibration tests were conducted in an altitude facility using a contoured bellmouth inlet duct, four fixed-area water-cooled exhaust nozzles, and an accurately calibrated thrust measuring system. Accurate determination of the airflow measuring station flow coefficient, the flow and thrust coefficients of the exhaust nozzles, and the experimental and theoretical terms in the nozzle gross thrust equation were some of the objectives of the tests. A primary objective was to develop a technique to determine gross thrust for the turbojet engine used in this test that could also be used for future engine and nozzle evaluation tests. The probable error in airflow measurement was found to be approximately 0.6 percent at the bellmouth throat design Mach number of 0.6. The probable error in nozzle gross thrust measurement was approximated 0.6 percent at the load cell full-scale reading.

  9. An experimental test of the weak equivalence principle for antihydrogen at the future FLAIR facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaum, Klaus; Raizen, Mark G.; Quint, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    We present new experimental ideas to investigate the gravitational interaction of antihydrogen. The experiment can first be performed in an off-line mirror measurement on hydrogen atoms, as a testing ground for our methods, before the implementation with antihydrogen atoms. A beam of hydrogen atoms is formed by launching a cold beam of protons through a cloud of trapped electrons in a nested Penning trap arrangement. In the next step, the atoms are stopped in a series of pulsed electromagnetic coils — so-called atomic coilgun. The stopped atoms are confined in a magnetic quadrupole trap and cooled by single-photon laser cooling. We intend to employ the method of Raman interferometry to study the gravitational interaction of atomic hydrogen — and later on antihydrogen at the FLAIR facility — with high sensitivity.

  10. Comparison between experimental and theoretical conjugate points locations in the Araks experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izhovkina, N. I.; Zhulin, I. A.; Kosik, J. C.; Piatsi, A. Kh.; Sverdlov, Iu. L.; Uspenskii, M. V.; Zarnitskii, Iu. F.; Reme, H.; Saint-Marc, A.; Vigo, J. M.

    1980-09-01

    In this paper the results of the conjugate point experiments conducted with the Araks rockets are presented. These results are compared to conjugate point calculations using experimental and theoretical models of the magnetosphere. For the first flight good agreement is found in latitude. The agreement is not as good for the second flight when the local geomagnetic conditions were disturbed.

  11. Definition of a facility for experimental studies of two-phase flows and heat transfer in porous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Reda, D.C.; Eaton, R.R.

    1981-12-31

    A facility-development effort is currently underway at Sandia National Laboratories in order to create an experimental capability for the study of two-phase, steam/water flows through a variety of porous media. The facility definition phase of this project is described. Equations are derived for the steady, adiabatic, macroscopically-linear two-phase flow of a single-component fluid through a porous medium, including energy transfer both by convection and conduction. These equations are then solved to give relative permeabilities for the steam and water phases as functions of known and/or measurable quantities. A viable experimental approach was thereby formulated, leading to the definition of facility components and instrumentation requirements, including the application of gamma-beam densitometry for the measurement of liquid-saturation distributions in porous media. Finally, a state-of-the-art computer code was utilized to numerically simulate the proposed experiments, providing an estimate of the facility operating envelope.

  12. Early laboratories c.1600 - c.1800 and the location of experimental science.

    PubMed

    Crosland, Maurice

    2005-04-01

    Surprisingly little attention has been given hitherto to the definition of the laboratory. A space has to be specially adapted to deserve that title. It would be easy to assume that the two leading experimental sciences, physics and chemistry, have historically depended in a similar way on access to a laboratory. But while chemistry, through its alchemical ancestry with batteries of stills, had many fully fledged laboratories by the seventeenth century, physics was discovering the value of mathematics. Even experimental physics was content to make use of almost any indoor space, if not outdoors, ignoring the possible value of a laboratory. The development of the physics laboratory had to wait until the nineteenth century.

  13. The NASA Ames Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility: Experimental Simulation of the Atmospheric Break-Up of Meteors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilder, M. C.; Bogdanoff, D. W.

    2015-01-01

    The Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility at NASA Ames Research Center provides a potential platform for the experimental simulation of meteor breakup at conditions that closely match full-scale entry condition for select parameters. The poster describes the entry environment simulation capabilities of the Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility (HFFAF) at NASA Ames Research Center and provides example images of the fragmentation of a hypersonic projectile for which break-up was initiated by mechanical forces (impact with a thin polymer diaphragm).

  14. Locating, quantifying and characterising radiation hazards in contaminated nuclear facilities using a novel passive non-electrical polymer based radiation imaging device.

    PubMed

    Stanley, S J; Lennox, K; Farfán, E B; Coleman, J R; Adamovics, J; Thomas, A; Oldham, M

    2012-06-01

    This paper provides a summary of recent trials which took place at the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during December 2010. The overall objective for the trials was to demonstrate that a newly developed technology could be used to locate, quantify and characterise the radiological hazards within two separate ORNL hot cells (B and C). The technology used, known as RadBall(®), is a novel, passive, non-electrical polymer based radiation detection device which provides a 3D visualisation of radiation from areas where effective measurements have not been previously possible due to lack of access. This is particularly useful in the nuclear industry prior to the decommissioning of facilities where the quantity, location and type of contamination are often unknown. For hot cell B, the primary objective of demonstrating that the technology could be used to locate, quantify and characterise three radiological sources was met with 100% success. Despite more challenging conditions in hot cell C, two sources were detected and accurately located. To summarise, the technology performed extremely well with regards to detecting and locating radiation sources and, despite the challenging conditions, moderately well when assessing the relative energy and intensity of those sources. Due to the technology's unique deployability, non-electrical nature and its directional awareness the technology shows significant promise for the future characterisation of radiation hazards prior to and during the decommissioning of contaminated nuclear facilities.

  15. Methods for detecting seismic events at known locations using NORESS (Norwegian Experimental Seismic System) data

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.O.; Stearns, S.D.; Wayland, J.R. Jr.

    1989-03-01

    The difficulty of detecting, locating and identifying low-magnitude seismic events has been an ongoing problem. In this note, we describe processing methods that help us to find low-magnitude seismic events. A series of algorithms with beamforming has been developed and has proven effective in helping to discover very low yield events. The beamforming technique consists of determining the array element time delays for the specific source region using previously established events. This allows us to concentrate the array to look at the specified source location. Examples of this type of analysis are provided. In the analysis of seismic data one may be in possession of other information, e.g., newspaper reports of an earthquake. Using this information to concentrate the search for an event will often identify an otherwise overlooked signal. The algorithms for this type of search are incorporated into computer software that includes capabilities for plotting, spectral and signal-to-noise estimation, direction finding, and other functions. 2 refs., 25 figs.

  16. The development of an experimental facility and investigation of rapidly maneuvering Micro-Air-Vehicle wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Lee Alexander

    Vertical Takeoff-and-Landing (VTOL) Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) provide a versatile operational platform which combines the capabilities of fixed wing and rotary wing MAVs. In order to improve performance of these vehicles, a better understanding of the rapid transition between horizontal and vertical flight is required. This study examines the flow structures around the Mini-Vertigo VTOL MAV using flow visualization techniques. This will gives an understanding of the flow structures which dominate the flight dynamics of rapid pitching maneuvers. This study consists of three objectives: develop an experimental facility, use flow visualization to investigate the flow around the experimental subject during pitching, and analyze the results. The flow around the Mini-Vertigo VTOL MAV is dominated by the slipstream from its propellers. The slipstream delays LE separation and causes drastic deflection in the flow. While the frequency of the vortices shed from the LE and TE varies with flow speed, the non-dimensional frequency does not. It does, however, vary slightly with the pitching rate. These results are applicable across a wide range of flight conditions. The results correlate to previous research done to examine the aerodynamic forces on the MAV.

  17. Velo and REXAN - Integrated Data Management and High Speed Analysis for Experimental Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Kleese van Dam, Kerstin; Carson, James P.; Corrigan, Abigail L.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Guillen, Zoe C.; Heath, Brandi S.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Lansing, Carina S.; Laskin, Julia; Li, Dongsheng; Liu, Yan; Marshall, Matthew J.; Miller, Erin A.; Orr, Galya; Pinheiro da Silva, Paulo; Ryu, Seun; Szymanski, Craig J.; Thomas, Mathew

    2013-01-10

    The Chemical Imaging Initiative at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is creating a ‘Rapid Experimental Analysis’ (REXAN) Framework, based on the concept of reusable component libraries. REXAN allows developers to quickly compose and customize high throughput analysis pipelines for a range of experiments, as well as supporting the creation of multi-modal analysis pipelines. In addition, PNNL has coupled REXAN with its collaborative data management and analysis environment Velo to create an easy to use data management and analysis environments for experimental facilities. This paper will discuss the benefits of Velo and REXAN in the context of three examples: PNNL High Resolution Mass Spectrometry - reducing analysis times from hours to seconds, and enabling the analysis of much larger data samples (100KB to 40GB) at the same time · ALS X-Ray tomography - reducing analysis times of combined STXM and EM data collected at the ALS from weeks to minutes, decreasing manual work and increasing data volumes that can be analysed in a single step ·Multi-modal nano-scale analysis of STXM and TEM data - providing a semi automated process for particle detection The creation of REXAN has significantly shortened the development time for these analysis pipelines. The integration of Velo and REXAN has significantly increased the scientific productivity of the instruments and their users by creating easy to use data management and analysis environments with greatly reduced analysis times and improved analysis capabilities.

  18. System integration of RF based negative ion experimental facility at IPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, G.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Singh, M. J.; Gahlaut, A.; Soni, J.; Pandya, K.; Parmar, K. G.; Sonara, J.; Chakraborty, A.

    2010-02-01

    The setting up of RF based negative ion experimental facility shall witness the beginning of experiments on the negative ion source fusion applications in India. A 1 MHz RF generator shall launch 100 kW RF power into a single driver on the plasma source to produce a plasma of density ~5 × 1012 cm-3. The source can deliver a negative ion beam of ~10 A with a current density of ~30 mA/cm2 and accelerated to 35 kV through an electrostatic ion accelerator. The experimental system is similar to a RF based negative ion source, BATMAN, presently operating at IPP. The subsystems for source operation are designed and procured principally from indigenous resources, keeping the IPP configuration as a base line. The operation of negative ion source is supported by many subsystems e.g. vacuum pumping system with gate valves, cooling water system, gas feed system, cesium delivery system, RF generator, high voltage power supplies, data acquisition and control system, and different diagnostics. The first experiments of negative ion source are expected to start at IPR from the middle of 2009.

  19. Proton beam characterization in the experimental room of the Trento Proton Therapy facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tommasino, F.; Rovituso, M.; Fabiano, S.; Piffer, S.; Manea, C.; Lorentini, S.; Lanzone, S.; Wang, Z.; Pasini, M.; Burger, W. J.; La Tessa, C.; Scifoni, E.; Schwarz, M.; Durante, M.

    2017-10-01

    As proton therapy is becoming an established treatment methodology for cancer patients, the number of proton centres is gradually growing worldwide. The economical effort for building these facilities is motivated by the clinical aspects, but might be also supported by the potential relevance for the research community. Experiments with high-energy protons are needed not only for medical physics applications, but represent also an essential part of activities dedicated to detector development, space research, radiation hardness tests, as well as of fundamental research in nuclear and particle physics. Here we present the characterization of the beam line installed in the experimental room of the Trento Proton Therapy Centre (Italy). Measurements of beam spot size and envelope, range verification and proton flux were performed in the energy range between 70 and 228 MeV. Methods for reducing the proton flux from typical treatments values of 106-109 particles/s down to 101-105 particles/s were also investigated. These data confirm that a proton beam produced in a clinical centre build by a commercial company can be exploited for a broad spectrum of experimental activities. The results presented here will be used as a reference for future experiments.

  20. Delivery in a tertiary Center with co-located surgical facilities makes the difference among neonates with prenatally diagnosed major abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Calisti, Alessandro; Oriolo, Lucia; Giannino, Giuseppina; Spagnol, Lorna; Molle, Philippe; Buffone, Elsa Laura; Donadio, Claudio

    2012-09-01

    Impact of prenatal diagnosis (PD) of major abnormalities on neonatal outcome is matter of debate. Unfortunately cases with and without PD may sometimes not be comparable. This is generally related to a lower maturity (GA) and weight (BW) secondary to a high rate of preterm cesarean sections (CSs) for clinical convenience. Present study tried to find out if in utero transfer to a Center with co-located surgical facilities reduces these potential risk factors. 152 cases with prenatally detectable conditions were studied and divided according to PD; the following data were compared: GA, BW, obstetrical complications, associated malformations, mode and site of delivery, outcome. Cases with PD delivered in our Center (Inborn, IB) or transferred after birth (Outborn, OB) were compared. 61 cases had a PD (IB/OB ratio 34/27); GA and BW were lower respect to no-PD cases and a higher CS rate was found among OB cases, not justified by complicated pregnancies. No differences in outcome were observed. Elective preterm CS is still largely practiced for fetuses with PD of a major congenital anomaly in Centers without co-located surgical facilities either in the presumption of safer delivery or to facilitate postnatal transfer. This leads to a lower GA and BW and may spoil potential impact of PD on outcome. This may be avoided promoting prenatal transfer to a Center with co-located surgical facilities.

  1. Biodegradation of petroleum products in experimental plots in Antarctic marine sediments is location dependent.

    PubMed

    Powell, Shane M; Harvey, Paul McA; Stark, Jonathan S; Snape, Ian; Riddle, Martin J

    2007-04-01

    Clean sediment collected from O'Brien Bay, East Antarctica, was artificially contaminated with a mix of Special Antarctic Blend diesel fuel and lubricating oil and deployed in two uncontaminated locations (O'Brien and Sparkes Bays) and a previously contaminated bay (Brown Bay) to evaluate whether a history of prior contamination would influence the biodegradation process. Detailed analysis of the hydrocarbon composition in the sediment after 11 weeks revealed different patterns of degradation in each bay. Biodegradation indices showed that hydrocarbon biodegradation occurred in all three bays but was most extensive in Brown Bay. This study shows that even within a relatively small geographical area, the longevity of hydrocarbons in Antarctic marine sediments can be variable. Our results are consistent with faster natural attenuation of spilt oil at sites with previous exposure to oil but further work is needed to confirm this. Such information would be useful when evaluating the true risk and longevity of oils spills.

  2. Shielding analysis and design of the KIPT experimental neutron source facility of Ukraine.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Z.; Gohar, M. Y. A.; Naberezhnev, D.; Duo, J.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-10-31

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the conceptual design development of an experimental neutron source facility based on the use of an electron accelerator driven subcritical (ADS) facility [1]. The facility uses the existing electron accelerators of KIPT in Ukraine. The neutron source of the sub-critical assembly is generated from the interaction of 100 KW electron beam with a natural uranium target. The electron beam has a uniform spatial distribution and the electron energy in the range of 100 to 200 MeV, [2]. The main functions of the facility are the production of medical isotopes and the support of the Ukraine nuclear power industry. Reactor physics experiments and material performance characterization will also be carried out. The subcritical assembly is driven by neutrons generated by the electron beam interactions with the target material. A fraction of these neutrons has an energy above 50 MeV generated through the photo nuclear interactions. This neutron fraction is very small and it has an insignificant contribution to the subcritical assembly performance. However, these high energy neutrons are difficult to shield and they can be slowed down only through the inelastic scattering with heavy isotopes. Therefore the shielding design of this facility is more challenging relative to fission reactors. To attenuate these high energy neutrons, heavy metals (tungsten, iron, etc.) should be used. To reduce the construction cost, heavy concrete with 4.8 g/cm{sup 3} density is selected as a shielding material. The iron weight fraction in this concrete is about 0.6. The shape and thickness of the heavy concrete shield are defined to reduce the biological dose equivalent outside the shield to an acceptable level during operation. At the same time, special attention was give to reduce the total shield mass to reduce the construction cost. The shield design is configured

  3. Epiphyseal distraction and centrally located bone bar: an experimental study in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Cottalorda, J; Jouve, J L; Bollini, G; Panuel, M; Guisiano, B; Jimeno, M T

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the force required for an epiphysiolysis in vitro in the distal femoral growth plate of rabbits with different sized central physeal bone bars. The bars were operatively induced by drilling through the physis. An epiphyseal distraction was then performed, and the response was evaluated. Forty rabbits (67 femurs) divided into five groups were used for experimentation. Group A had not been operated on and manifested no physeal bone bridge. Groups B, C, D, and E manifested some bone bridges obtained surgically by drills 2, 2.5, 3.5, and 4.5 mm in diameter, respectively. The average force required to obtain an epiphysiolysis is not statistically significant in the different groups. However, we noted that the epiphysiolysis differed depending on the diameter of the surgically performed bridge. Group E was Salter-Harris type II fractures, whereas groups A, B, and C were type I fractures. Group D comprised both types.

  4. Injury crashes with bicyclists at roundabouts: influence of some location characteristics and the design of cycle facilities.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Stijn; Brijs, Tom; Nuyts, Erik; Wets, Geert

    2009-01-01

    Previous research indicated that conversions of intersections into roundabouts appear to increase the number of injury crashes with bicyclists. However, it was assumed that the effectiveness of roundabouts could vary according to some differences in design types of cycle, facilities and other geometrical factors. Regression analyses on effectiveness-indices resulting from a before-and-after study of injury crashes with bicyclists at 90 roundabouts in Flanders, Belgium. Regarding all injury crashes with bicyclists, roundabouts with cycle lanes appear to perform significantly worse compared to three other design types (mixed traffic, separate cycle paths, and grade-separated cycle paths). Nevertheless, an increase of the severest crashes was noticed, regardless of the design type of the cycle facilities. Roundabouts that are replacing signal-controlled intersections seem to have had a worse evolution compared to roundabouts on other types of intersections. The results might affect design guidelines for roundabouts, particularly for the accommodation of bicyclists.

  5. The National Ignition Facility: an experimental platform for studying behavior of matter under extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, Edward

    2011-11-01

    also been conducted on NIF. This paper describes the unprecedented experimental capabilities of NIF and the results achieved so far on the path toward ignition, for stockpile stewardship, and the beginning of frontier science experiments. The paper will also address our plans to transition NIF to a national user facility, providing access to NIF for researchers from the DOE laboratories, as well as the national and international academic and fusion energy communities.

  6. Investigation on experimental techniques to detect, locate and quantify gear noise in helicopter transmissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flanagan, P. M.; Atherton, W. J.

    1985-01-01

    A robotic system to automate the detection, location, and quantification of gear noise using acoustic intensity measurement techniques has been successfully developed. Major system components fabricated under this grant include an instrumentation robot arm, a robot digital control unit and system software. A commercial, desktop computer, spectrum analyzer and two microphone probe complete the equipment required for the Robotic Acoustic Intensity Measurement System (RAIMS). Large-scale acoustic studies of gear noise in helicopter transmissions cannot be performed accurately and reliably using presently available instrumentation and techniques. Operator safety is a major concern in certain gear noise studies due to the operating environment. The man-hours needed to document a noise field in situ is another shortcoming of present techniques. RAIMS was designed to reduce the labor and hazard in collecting data and to improve the accuracy and repeatability of characterizing the acoustic field by automating the measurement process. Using RAIMS a system operator can remotely control the instrumentation robot to scan surface areas and volumes generating acoustic intensity information using the two microphone technique. Acoustic intensity studies requiring hours of scan time can be performed automatically without operator assistance. During a scan sequence, the acoustic intensity probe is positioned by the robot and acoustic intensity data is collected, processed, and stored.

  7. Three-dimensional simulations of National Ignition Facility implosions: Insight into experimental observables

    SciTech Connect

    Spears, Brian K. Munro, David H.; Sepke, Scott; Caggiano, Joseph; Clark, Daniel; Hatarik, Robert; Kritcher, Andrea; Sayre, Daniel; Yeamans, Charles; Knauer, James; Hilsabeck, Terry; Kilkenny, Joe

    2015-05-15

    We simulate in 3D both the hydrodynamics and, simultaneously, the X-ray and neutron diagnostic signatures of National Ignition Facility (NIF) implosions. We apply asymmetric radiation drive to study the impact of low mode asymmetry on diagnostic observables. We examine X-ray and neutron images as well as neutron spectra for these perturbed implosions. The X-ray images show hot spot evolution on small length scales and short time scales, reflecting the incomplete stagnation seen in the simulation. The neutron images show surprising differences from the X-ray images. The neutron spectra provide additional measures of implosion asymmetry. Flow in the hot spot alters the neutron spectral peak, namely, the peak location and width. The changes in the width lead to a variation in the apparent temperature with viewing angle that signals underlying hot spot asymmetry. We compare our new expectations based on the simulated data with NIF data. We find that some recent cryogenic layered experiments show appreciable temperature anisotropy indicating residual flow in the hot spot. We also find some trends in the data that do not reflect our simulation and theoretical understanding.

  8. Experimental observations of turbulent mixing due to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability on the OMEGA Laser Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Hansen, J. F.; Hurricane, O. A.; Langstaff, G.; Martinez, D.; Park, H.-S.; Raman, K.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Schilling, O.; Wallace, R.; Elbaz, Y.; Shimony, A.; Shvarts, D.; Di Stefano, C.; Drake, R. P.; Marion, D.; Krauland, C. M.; Kuranz, C. C.

    2012-09-15

    Shear-flow, Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) turbulent mixing experiments were performed on the OMEGA Laser Facility [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] in which laser-driven shock waves propagated through a low-density plastic foam placed on top of a higher-density plastic foil. The plastic foil was comprised a thin iodine-doped plastic tracer layer bonded on each side to an undoped density-matched polyamide-imide plastic. Behind the shock front, lower-density foam plasma flowed over the higher-density plastic plasma, such that the interface between the foam and plastic was KH unstable. The initial perturbations consisted of pre-imposed, sinusoidal 2D perturbations, and broadband 3D perturbations due to surface roughness at the interface between the plastic and foam. KH instability growth was measured using side-on radiography with a point-projection 5-keV vanadium backlighter. Time-integrated images were captured on D-8 x-ray film. Spatial density profiles of iodine-doped plastic mixed with foam were inferred using x-ray radiographs. The mixing layer ensuing from the KH instability with layer width up to {approx}100 {mu}m was observed at a location {approx}1 mm behind the shock front. The measured mixing layer width was in good agreement with predictions based on a simple self-similar model of KH instability growth using an estimate of the shear velocity obtained from numerical simulations of the experiments.

  9. The LMOP Locator

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page contains the LMOP Locator, a tool that allows a user to geographically search for facilities that can potentially utilize LFG, or for landfills located near a facility that is interested in utilizing LFG.

  10. Radiative Transfer Model in the Atmosphere and Experimental Solar Data of Yaounde Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dountio, E. G.; Njomo, D.; Fouda, E.; Simo, A.

    2006-11-01

    showed that this non-homogeneity has significant impacts on the transmitted radiation, calculated either for the thick and continuous clouds [3] or for dispersed clouds [4, 5]. Such structures must be studied with a multidimensional radiative transfer model, as for example the one of Stephens [6] judiciously exploited recently by Evans [7], which breaks up the angular part of brightness into spherical harmonics while the space part is simply discretizised by finite differences. We intend here to make a comparison between results of this model and the experimental data collected in Yaounde [8-13]. This is in order to detect its forces, weaknesses and the possible improvements that could be done to guarantee a prediction free from any significant variation with reality. The first part is devoted to the description of the model. In the second part, we present the results of the model as well as the values resulting from experimental measurements. The last part discusses these results.

  11. Experimental investigation of inclined liquid water jet flow onto vertically located superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibar, Ali; Karabay, Hasan; Yiğit, K. Süleyman; Ucar, Ikrime O.; Erbil, H. Yıldırım

    2010-11-01

    In this study, the behaviour of an inclined water jet, which is impinged onto hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces, has been investigated experimentally. Water jet was impinged with different inclination angles (15°-45°) onto five different hydrophobic surfaces made of rough polymer, which were held vertically. The water contact angles on these surfaces were measured as 102°, 112°, 123°, 145° and 167° showing that the last surface was superhydrophobic. Two different nozzles with 1.75 and 4 mm in diameters were used to create the water jet. Water jet velocity was within the range of 0.5-5 m/s, thus the Weber number varied from 5 to 650 and Reynolds number from 500 to 8,000 during the experiments. Hydrophobic surfaces reflected the liquid jet depending on the surface contact angle, jet inclination angle and the Weber number. The variation of the reflection angle with the Weber number showed a maximum value for a constant jet angle. The maximum value of the reflection angle was nearly equal to half of the jet angle. It was determined that the viscous drag decreases as the contact angle of the hydrophobic surface increases. The drag force on the wall is reduced dramatically with superhydrophobic surfaces. The amount of reduction of the average shear stress on the wall was about 40%, when the contact angle of the surface was increased from 145° to 167°. The area of the spreading water layer decreased as the contact angle of the surface increased and as the jet inclination angle, Weber number and Reynolds number decreased.

  12. Experimental measurement and Monte Carlo assessment of Argon-41 production in a PET cyclotron facility.

    PubMed

    Infantino, Angelo; Valtieri, Lorenzo; Cicoria, Gianfranco; Pancaldi, Davide; Mostacci, Domiziano; Marengo, Mario

    2015-12-01

    In a medical cyclotron facility, (41)Ar (t1/2 = 109.34 m) is produced by the activation of air due to the neutron flux during irradiation, according to the (40)Ar(n,γ)(41)Ar reaction; this is particularly relevant in widely diffused high beam current cyclotrons for the production of PET radionuclides. While theoretical estimations of the (41)Ar production have been published, no data are available on direct experimental measurements for a biomedical cyclotron. In this work, we describe a sampling methodology and report the results of an extensive measurement campaign. Furthermore, the experimental results are compared with Monte Carlo simulations performed with the FLUKA code. To measure (41)Ar activity, air samples were taken inside the cyclotron bunker in sealed Marinelli beakers, during the routine production of (18)F with a 16.5 MeV GE-PETtrace cyclotron; this sampling thus reproduces a situation of absence of air changes. Samples analysis was performed in a gamma-ray spectrometry system equipped with HPGe detector. Monte Carlo assessment of the (41)Ar saturation yield was performed directly using the standard FLUKA score RESNUCLE, and off-line by the convolution of neutron fluence with cross section data. The average (41)Ar saturation yield per one liter of air of (41)Ar, measured in gamma-ray spectrometry, resulted to be 3.0 ± 0.6 Bq/µA*dm(3) while simulations gave a result of 6.9 ± 0.3 Bq/µA*dm(3) in the direct assessment and 6.92 ± 0.22 Bq/µA*dm(3) by the convolution neutron fluence-to-cross section. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Experimental characterization of the ITER TF structure cooling in HELIOS test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoa, C.; Rousset, B.; Lacroix, B.; Nicollet, S.; Vallcorba, R.; Bessette, D.; Vostner, A.; Gauthier, F.

    2015-12-01

    During ITER plasma operation, large thermal loads are generated in the stainless steel Toroidal Field (TF) coil casing. To minimize the impact on the temperature of the TF Cable in Conduit Conductor (CICC), these heat loads are intercepted by case cooling channels which are implemented at the interface to the winding pack. One of the design options for the case cooling channels consists of a stainless steel pipe inserted in a rectangular groove which is machined in the casing and filled by a charged resin of high thermal conductivity. A higher number of cooling pipes is arranged at the plasma facing wall of the case, thus providing a better shielding to the TF conductor at high field. To assess the efficiency of the cooling pipes and their thermal coupling with the charged resin, experimental characterizations have been performed. First of all, the thermal resistance vs temperature of some of the individual components of a TF coil has been measured on representative samples in a cryogenic bench. Further characterizations have been performed on an integrated mock-up of the TF cooling scheme at cryogenic temperature in HELIOS test facility at CEA Grenoble. The mock-up consists of a piece of TF casing that can be heated uniformly on its surface, one cooling channel implemented in the groove which is filled with the charged resin, the filler, the ground insulation, the radial plate and one insulated CICC. The cooling pipe and the CICC are cooled by supercritical helium at 4.4 K and 5 bar; the instrumentation consists of temperature, pressure and mass flow sensors. Both stationary and transient operating modes have been investigated to assess the thermal efficiency of the case cooling design. The experimental tests are presented and the first results are discussed and analyzed in this document.

  14. Interpretation and Modelling of Data from Site Investigations for a Geological Disposal facility located in the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, H.; Bailey, L.; Parkes, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Radioactive Waste Management Directorate (RWMD) of the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) has been given the responsibility for implementing geological disposal in the United Kingdom. The implementation process envisaged is that once a candidate site or sites for a geological disposal facility have been identified, NDA-RWMD will undertake surface-based investigations at the site or sites. The information acquired through these investigations would be used as an input to the development of the safety case, for engineering design of the disposal facility and to demonstrate confidence to the key stakeholders that the potential disposal facility site is adequately understood. NDA-RWMD proposes to develop and present the information derived from site characterisation activities in the form of a single integrated Site Descriptive Model, i.e. a description of the geometry, properties of the bedrock and water, and the associated interacting processes and mechanisms, which will be used to address the information requirements of all the end users (including the safety case). It is anticipated that, in a similar way to the approach adopted by international radioactive waste programmes led by SKB (Sweden) and Posiva (Finland), the integrated Site Descriptive Model will be divided into parts comprising clearly defined disciplines which may form either chapters or discipline-based models such as: • Geology; • Hydrogeology; • Hydrochemistry; • Geotechnical; • Radionuclide Transport Properties; • Thermal Properties; and • Biosphere. The integrated Site Descriptive Model will evolve as understanding of the particular site advances and will describe the current understanding of a specific site and, where relevant, the historical development of conditions at the site where this supports the conceptual understanding. The Site Descriptive Model will not include prediction of the future evolution of the conditions at the site: this will be an important component

  15. CFD analysis and experimental investigation associated with the design of the Los Alamos nuclear materials storage facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardin, J.D.; Hopkins, S.; Gregory, W.S.; Martin, R.A.

    1997-06-01

    The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is being renovated for long-term storage of canisters designed to hold heat-generating nuclear materials, such as powders, ingots, and other components. The continual heat generation within the canisters necessitates a reliable cooling scheme of sufficient magnitude which maintains the stored material temperatures within acceptable limits. The primary goal of this study was to develop both an experimental facility and a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of a subsection of the NMSF which could be used to observe general performance trends of a proposed passive cooling scheme and serve as a design tool for canister holding fixtures. Comparisons of numerical temperature and velocity predictions with empirical data indicate that the CFD model provides an accurate representation of the NMSF experimental facility. Minor modifications in the model geometry and boundary conditions are needed to enhance its accuracy, however, the various fluid and thermal models correctly capture the basic physics.

  16. Parameter estimation of the vibrational model for the SCOLE experimental facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crotts, B. D.; Kakad, Y. P.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this study is to experimentally determine an empirical model of the vibrational dynamics of the Spacecraft COntrol Laboratory Experiment (SCOLE) facility. The first two flexible modes of this test article are identified using a linear least-square identification procedure and the data utilized for this procedure are obtained by exciting the structure from a quiescent state with torque wheels. The time history data of rate gyro sensors and accelerometers due to excitation and after excitation in terms of free-decay are used in the parameter estimation of the vibrational model. The free-decay portion of the data is analyzed using the Discrete Fourier transform to determine the optimal model order to use in modelling the response. Linear least-square analysis is then used to select the parameters that best fit the output of an Autoregressive (AR) model to the data. The control effectiveness of the torque wheels is then determined using the excitation portion of the test data, again using linear least squares.

  17. On Using Shaped Honeycombs for Experimental Generation of Arbitrary Velocity Profiles in Test Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safaripour, Alireza; Olson, David; Naguib, Ahmed; Koochesfahani, Manoochehr

    2016-11-01

    It is common to use a uniform approach flow in the study of most problems in aerodynamics. Motivated by situations where the approach flow is not uniform, the focus of the current work is on the experimental generation of arbitrary velocity profiles in a flow facility (water tunnel) using the shaped honeycomb technique originally proposed by Kotansky (1966). Employing further refinement of this approach, multiple honeycomb devices are designed and fabricated to produce prescribed velocity profiles. The performance of these devices is assessed in terms of their agreement with the desired velocity profiles and the level of turbulence they produce. Single-component molecular tagging velocimetry (1c-MTV) is used to characterize the resulting mean and fluctuating streamwise velocity profiles and their streamwise development. The shaped honeycomb technique is shown to be effective in producing the desired velocity profiles with high fidelity while maintaining velocity fluctuations level at or below that of the freestream prior to installation of the devices. This work was supported by AFOSR Award Number FA9550-15-1-0224.

  18. A Proof-of-Concept for Semantically Interoperable Federation of IoT Experimentation Facilities.

    PubMed

    Lanza, Jorge; Sanchez, Luis; Gomez, David; Elsaleh, Tarek; Steinke, Ronald; Cirillo, Flavio

    2016-06-29

    The Internet-of-Things (IoT) is unanimously identified as one of the main pillars of future smart scenarios. The potential of IoT technologies and deployments has been already demonstrated in a number of different application areas, including transport, energy, safety and healthcare. However, despite the growing number of IoT deployments, the majority of IoT applications tend to be self-contained, thereby forming application silos. A lightweight data centric integration and combination of these silos presents several challenges that still need to be addressed. Indeed, the ability to combine and synthesize data streams and services from diverse IoT platforms and testbeds, holds the promise to increase the potentiality of smart applications in terms of size, scope and targeted business context. In this article, a proof-of-concept implementation that federates two different IoT experimentation facilities by means of semantic-based technologies will be described. The specification and design of the implemented system and information models will be described together with the practical details of the developments carried out and its integration with the existing IoT platforms supporting the aforementioned testbeds. Overall, the system described in this paper demonstrates that it is possible to open new horizons in the development of IoT applications and experiments at a global scale, that transcend the (silo) boundaries of individual deployments, based on the semantic interconnection and interoperability of diverse IoT platforms and testbeds.

  19. A Proof-of-Concept for Semantically Interoperable Federation of IoT Experimentation Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Lanza, Jorge; Sanchez, Luis; Gomez, David; Elsaleh, Tarek; Steinke, Ronald; Cirillo, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    The Internet-of-Things (IoT) is unanimously identified as one of the main pillars of future smart scenarios. The potential of IoT technologies and deployments has been already demonstrated in a number of different application areas, including transport, energy, safety and healthcare. However, despite the growing number of IoT deployments, the majority of IoT applications tend to be self-contained, thereby forming application silos. A lightweight data centric integration and combination of these silos presents several challenges that still need to be addressed. Indeed, the ability to combine and synthesize data streams and services from diverse IoT platforms and testbeds, holds the promise to increase the potentiality of smart applications in terms of size, scope and targeted business context. In this article, a proof-of-concept implementation that federates two different IoT experimentation facilities by means of semantic-based technologies will be described. The specification and design of the implemented system and information models will be described together with the practical details of the developments carried out and its integration with the existing IoT platforms supporting the aforementioned testbeds. Overall, the system described in this paper demonstrates that it is possible to open new horizons in the development of IoT applications and experiments at a global scale, that transcend the (silo) boundaries of individual deployments, based on the semantic interconnection and interoperability of diverse IoT platforms and testbeds. PMID:27367695

  20. High-Resolution Melting Curve Analysis for Identification of Pasteurellaceae Species in Experimental Animal Facilities.

    PubMed

    Miller, Manuel; Zorn, Julia; Brielmeier, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Pasteurellaceae are among the most prevalent bacterial pathogens isolated from mice housed in experimental animal facilities. Reliable detection and differentiation of Pasteurellaceae are essential for high-quality health monitoring. In this study, we combined a real-time PCR assay amplifying a variable region in the 16S rRNA sequence with high-resolution melting curve analysis (HRM) to identify and differentiate among the commonly isolated species Pasteurella pneumotropica biotypes "Jawetz" and "Heyl", Actinobacillus muris, and Haemophilus influenzaemurium. We used a set of six reference strains for assay development, with the melting profiles of these strains clearly distinguishable due to DNA sequence variations in the amplicon. For evaluation, we used real-time PCR/HRM to test 25 unknown Pasteurellaceae isolates obtained from an external diagnostic laboratory and found the results to be consistent with those of partial 16S rRNA sequencing. The real-time PCR/HRM method provides a sensitive, rapid, and closed-tube approach for Pasteurellaceae species identification for health monitoring of laboratory mice.

  1. High-Resolution Melting Curve Analysis for Identification of Pasteurellaceae Species in Experimental Animal Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Manuel; Zorn, Julia; Brielmeier, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Pasteurellaceae are among the most prevalent bacterial pathogens isolated from mice housed in experimental animal facilities. Reliable detection and differentiation of Pasteurellaceae are essential for high-quality health monitoring. In this study, we combined a real-time PCR assay amplifying a variable region in the 16S rRNA sequence with high-resolution melting curve analysis (HRM) to identify and differentiate among the commonly isolated species Pasteurella pneumotropica biotypes “Jawetz” and “Heyl”, Actinobacillus muris, and Haemophilus influenzaemurium. We used a set of six reference strains for assay development, with the melting profiles of these strains clearly distinguishable due to DNA sequence variations in the amplicon. For evaluation, we used real-time PCR/HRM to test 25 unknown Pasteurellaceae isolates obtained from an external diagnostic laboratory and found the results to be consistent with those of partial 16S rRNA sequencing. The real-time PCR/HRM method provides a sensitive, rapid, and closed-tube approach for Pasteurellaceae species identification for health monitoring of laboratory mice. PMID:26556281

  2. Target experimental area and systems of the U.S. National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, M; Van Wonterghem, B; MacGowan, B J; Hibbard, W; Kalantar, D; Lee, F D; Pittenger, L; Wong, K

    1999-12-17

    One of the major goals of the US National Ignition Facility is the demonstration of laser driven fusion ignition and burn of targets by inertial confinement and provide capability for a wide variety of high energy density physics experiments. The NIF target area houses the optical systems required to focus the 192 beamlets to a target precisely positioned at the center of the 10 meter diameter, 10-cm thick aluminum target chamber. The chamber serves as mounting surface for the 48 final optics assemblies, the target alignment and positioning equipment, and the target diagnostics. The internal surfaces of the chamber are protected by louvered steel beam dumps. The target area also provides the necessary shielding against target emission and environmental protection equipment. Despite its complexity, the design provides the flexibility to accommodate the needs of the various NIF user groups, such as direct and indirect drive irradiation geometries, modular final optics design, capability to handle cryogenic targets, and easily re-configurable diagnostic instruments. Efficient target area operations are ensured by using line-replaceable designs for systems requiring frequent inspection, maintenance and reconfiguration, such as the final optics, debris shields, phase plates and the diagnostic instruments. A precision diagnostic instrument manipulator (DIMS) allows fast removal and precise repositioning of diagnostic instruments. In addition the authors describe several activities to enhance the target chamber availability, such as the target debris mitigation, the use of standard experimental configurations and the development of smart shot operations planning tools.

  3. Procedure for Surveying a Station in the U.S. Army Research Laboratory Transonic Experimental Facility Spark Shadowgraph Range

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    indoor instrumented spark range at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory Transonic Experimental Facility was designed for firing various- caliber ...Tables iv Acknowledgments v 1. Introduction 1 2. Survey Procedure 4 3. Summary 16 Appendix. Fiducial Wire Dimensions 17 Distribution List 20...List of Tables Table 1. Reference elevations for spark stations. ............................................................................5 v

  4. Integrating multi-criteria techniques with geographical information systems in waste facility location to enhance public participation.

    PubMed

    Higgs, Gary

    2006-04-01

    Despite recent U.K. Government commitments' to encourage public participation in environmental decision making, those exercises conducted to date have been largely confined to 'traditional' modes of participation such as the dissemination of information and in encouraging feedback on proposals through, for example, questionnaires or surveys. It is the premise of this paper that participative approaches that use IT-based methods, based on combined geographical information systems (GIS) and multi-criteria evaluation techniques that could involve the public in the decision-making process, have the potential to build consensus and reduce disputes and conflicts such as those arising from the siting of different types of waste facilities. The potential of these techniques are documented through a review of the existing literature in order to highlight the opportunities and challenges facing decision makers in increasing the involvement of the public at different stages of the waste facility management process. It is concluded that there are important lessons to be learned by researchers, consultants, managers and decision makers if barriers hindering the wider use of such techniques are to be overcome.

  5. Experimental Investigation of the Thermal Upset and Recovery of the National Ignition Facility's Optics Module

    SciTech Connect

    J. D. Bernardin

    1999-05-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is being constructed as the latest in a series of high-power laser facilities to study inertial confinement fusion. In particular, the NIF will generate and amplify 192 laser beams and focus them onto a fusion fuel capsule the size of a BB. The energy deposited by the laser beams will raise the core temperature of the target to 100,OOO,OOO C, which will ignite the fusion fuel and produce a fusion energy output that is several times greater than the energy input. The ability to generate, condition, and focus 192 laser beams onto a target the size of a BB, requires precision optical hardware and instrumentation. One of the most critical pieces of optical hardware within the NIF is the Optics Module (OM), a mechanical apparatus which is responsible for optical focusing and frequency conversion of the laser beam to optimize the energy deposition at the fusion target. The OM contains two potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP), frequency conversion crystals and a focusing lens. The functionality of the KDP crystals is extremely temperature sensitive. Small temperature changes on the order of 0.1 C can significantly alter the performance of these components. Consequently, to maximize NIF system availability and minimize beam conditioning problems, accurate temperature control of the OM optical components was deemed a necessity. In this study, an experimental OM prototype, containing mock frequency conversion crystals and a focusing lens, was used determine the thermal stability provided by a prototype water temperature control system. More importantly, the OM prototype was used to identify and characterize potential thermal upsets and corresponding recovery times of the KDP crystals. The results of this study indicate that the water temperature control system is adequate in maintaining uniform steady-state temperatures within the OM. Vacuum pump-down and venting of the OM generated significant

  6. A survey of experiments and experimental facilities for active control of flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, Dean W., Jr.; Horner, Garnett C.; Juang, Jer-Nan; Klose, Gerhard

    1989-01-01

    A brief survey of large space structure control related experiments and facilities was presented. This survey covered experiments performed before and up to 1982, and those of the present period (1982-...). Finally, the future planned experiments and facilities in support of the control-structure interaction (CSI) program were reported. It was stated that new, improved ground test facilities are needed to verify the new CSI design techniques that will allow future space structures to perform planned NASA missions.

  7. Bioregenerative Life Support Experiment for 90-days in a Closed Integrative Experimental Facility LUNAR PALACE 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hong

    A 90-day bioregenerative life support experiment with three-member crew was carried out in the closed integrative experimental facility, LUNAR PALACE 1 regenerating basic living necessities and disposing wastes to provide life support for crew. It was composed of higher plant module, animal module, and waste treatment module. The higher plant module included wheat, chufa, pea, carrot and green leafy vegetables, with aim to satisfy requirement of 60% plant food and 100% O2 and water for crew. The yellow mealworm was selected as animal module to provide partial animal protein for crew, and reared on plant inedible biomass. The higher plant and yellow mealworm were both cultivated and harvested in the conveyor-type manner. The partial plant inedible biomass and human feces were mixed and co- fermented in the waste treatment module for preparation of soil-like substrate by bioconversion, maintaining gas balance and increasing closure degree. Meanwhile, in the waste treatment module, the water and partial nitrogen from human urine were recovered by physical-chemical means. Circulation of O2 and water as well as food supply from crops cultivated in the LUNAR PALACE 1 were investigated and calculated, and simultaneously gas exchange, mass flow among different components and system closure degree were also analyzed, respectively. Furthermore, the system robustness with respect to internal variation was tested and evaluated by sensitivity analysis of the aggregative index consisting of key performance indicators like crop yield, gaseous equilibrium concentration, microbial community composition, biogenic elements dynamics, etc., and comprehensively evaluating the operating state, to number change of crew from 2 to 4 during the 90-day closed experiment period.

  8. Characterization of a Thermo Scientific D711 D-T neutron generator located in a low-scatter facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, John W.; Finn, Erin; Greenwood, Larry; Wittman, Rick

    2014-03-01

    A dosimetry experiment used to measure the neutron flux and spectrum of a D-T neutron generator is presented. The D-T generator at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is installed in the middle of a large room to minimize scatter of neutrons back to the sample. The efficacy of maintaining a pure fast neutron field for the sample is investigated. Twenty-one positions within 13 cm of the neutron source contained foils or wires of Fe, Ni, Al with additional Au, and In monitors at some locations. Spectral adjustment of the neutron flux at each position based on measured reaction rates and theoretical Monte Carlo calculations show that at least 99.1% of the spectrum lies above 110 keV for all measured positions, and neutrons above 14 MeV can account for as much as 91% at locations along the axis of the generator and close to the source. The 14 MeV component drops to 77% in radial positions far from the source. The largest total flux observed was 8.29E+08 n/cm2-s (±1.4%) in the center of the cooling cap, although additional experiments have shown this value could be as high as 1.20E+09 n/cm2-s.

  9. Scaling and design analyses of a scaled-down, high-temperature test facility for experimental investigation of the initial stages of a VHTR air-ingress accident

    SciTech Connect

    Arcilesi, David J.; Ham, Tae Kyu; Kim, In Hun; Sun, Xiaodong; Christensen, Richard N.; Oh, Chang H.

    2015-07-01

    A critical event in the safety analysis of the very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) is an air-ingress accident. This accident is initiated, in its worst case scenario, by a double-ended guillotine break of the coaxial cross vessel, which leads to a rapid reactor vessel depressurization. In a VHTR, the reactor vessel is located within a reactor cavity that is filled with air during normal operating conditions. Following the vessel depressurization, the dominant mode of ingress of an air–helium mixture into the reactor vessel will either be molecular diffusion or density-driven stratified flow. The mode of ingress is hypothesized to depend largely on the break conditions of the cross vessel. Since the time scales of these two ingress phenomena differ by orders of magnitude, it is imperative to understand under which conditions each of these mechanisms will dominate in the air ingress process. Computer models have been developed to analyze this type of accident scenario. There are, however, limited experimental data available to understand the phenomenology of the air-ingress accident and to validate these models. Therefore, there is a need to design and construct a scaled-down experimental test facility to simulate the air-ingress accident scenarios and to collect experimental data. The current paper focuses on the analyses performed for the design and operation of a 1/8th geometric scale (by height and diameter), high-temperature test facility. A geometric scaling analysis for the VHTR, a time scale analysis of the air-ingress phenomenon, a transient depressurization analysis of the reactor vessel, a hydraulic similarity analysis of the test facility, a heat transfer characterization of the hot plenum, a power scaling analysis for the reactor system, and a design analysis of the containment vessel are discussed.

  10. Materials Research Conducted Aboard the International Space Station: Facilities Overview, Operational Procedures, and Experimental Outcomes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Luz, Paul; Smith, Guy; Spivey, Reggie; Jeter, Linda; Gillies, Donald; Hua, Fay; Anikumar, A. V.

    2007-01-01

    The Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) and Maintenance Work Area (MWA) are facilities aboard the International Space Station (ISS) that were used to successfully conduct experiments in support of, respectively, the Pore Formation and Mobility Investigation (PFMI) and the In-Space Soldering Investigation (ISSI). The capabilities of these facilities are briefly discussed and then demonstrated by presenting "real-time" and subsequently down-linked video-taped examples from the abovementioned experiments. Data interpretation, ISS telescience, some lessons learned, and the need of such facilities for conducting work in support of understanding materials behavior, particularly fluid processing and transport scenarios, in low-gravity environments is discussed.

  11. Materials Research Conducted Aboard the International Space Station: Facilities Overview, Operational Procedures, and Experimental Outcomes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.; Luz, P.; Smith, G. A.; Spivey, R.; Jeter, L.; Gillies, D. C.; Hua, F.; Anilkumar, A. V.

    2006-01-01

    The Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) and Maintenance Work Area (MWA) are facilities aboard the International Space Station (ISS) that were used to successfully conduct experiments in support of, respectively, the Pore Formation and Mobility Investigation (PFMI) and the In-Space Soldering Investigation (ISSI). The capabilities of these facilities are briefly discussed and then demonstrated by presenting real-time and subsequently down-linked video-taped examples from the abovementioned experiments. Data interpretation, ISS telescience, some lessons learned, and the need of such facilities for conducting work in support of understanding materials behavior, particularly fluid processing and transport scenarios, in low-gravity environments is discussed.

  12. Materials Research Conducted Aboard the International Space Station: Facilities Overview, Operational Procedures, and Experimental Outcomes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Luz, Paul; Smith, Guy; Spivey, Reggie; Jeter, Linda; Gillies, Donald; Hua, Fay; Anikumar, A. V.

    2007-01-01

    The Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) and Maintenance Work Area (MWA) are facilities aboard the International Space Station (ISS) that were used to successfully conduct experiments in support of, respectively, the Pore Formation and Mobility Investigation (PFMI) and the In-Space Soldering Investigation (ISSI). The capabilities of these facilities are briefly discussed and then demonstrated by presenting "real-time" and subsequently down-linked video-taped examples from the abovementioned experiments. Data interpretation, ISS telescience, some lessons learned, and the need of such facilities for conducting work in support of understanding materials behavior, particularly fluid processing and transport scenarios, in low-gravity environments is discussed.

  13. Materials Research Conducted Aboard the International Space Station: Facilities Overview, Operational Procedures, and Experimental Outcomes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.; Luz, P.; Smith, G. A.; Spivey, R.; Jeter, L.; Gillies, D. C.; Hua, F.; Anilkumar, A. V.

    2006-01-01

    The Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) and Maintenance Work Area (MWA) are facilities aboard the International Space Station (ISS) that were used to successfully conduct experiments in support of, respectively, the Pore Formation and Mobility Investigation (PFMI) and the In-Space Soldering Investigation (ISSI). The capabilities of these facilities are briefly discussed and then demonstrated by presenting real-time and subsequently down-linked video-taped examples from the abovementioned experiments. Data interpretation, ISS telescience, some lessons learned, and the need of such facilities for conducting work in support of understanding materials behavior, particularly fluid processing and transport scenarios, in low-gravity environments is discussed.

  14. Methodology for optimising location of new primary health care facilities in rural communities: a case study in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Tanser, Frank

    2006-10-01

    To develop a quantitative methodology to optimally site new primary health care facilities so as to achieve the maximum population level increase in accessibility to care. The study aims to test the methodology in a rural community characterised by considerable heterogeneity in population distribution and health care access. A geographical information system was used to estimate travel time to the nearest primary health care facility for each of the 26 000 homesteads in the subdistrict. The homestead's travel time estimate was then converted into an impedance to care estimate using distance decay (in clinic use) data obtained from the subdistrict. A map of total person impedance/km(2) was then produced using a 3 km standard Gaussian filter. The resulting map was used to site a test clinic in the largest contiguous area of high person impedance. Hlabisa health subdistrict, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The population level increase in accessibility that would be achieved by the construction of the test clinic would be 3.6 times the increase in accessibility achieved by the construction of the newest clinic in the subdistrict. The corresponding ratio for increasing clinic coverage (% of the population within 60 minutes of care) would be 4.7. The methodology successfully identifies a locality for a new facility that would maximise the population level increase in accessibility to care. The same principles used in this research could also be applied in other settings. The methodology is of practical value in health research and practice and provides a framework for optimising location of new primary health care facilities.

  15. A survey of experiments and experimental facilities for control of flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, Dean W., Jr.; Juang, Jer-Nan; Klose, Gerhard J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a survey of U.S. ground experiments and facilities dedicated to the study of active control of flexible structures. The facilities will be briefly described in terms of capability, configuration, size and instrumentation. Topics on the experiments include vibration suppression, slewing and system identification. Future research directions, particularly of the NASA Langley Research Center's Controls/Structures Interaction (CSI) ground test program, will be discussed.

  16. Earth Systems Questions in Experimental Climate Change Science: Pressing Questions and Necessary Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Osmond, B.

    2002-05-20

    Sixty-four scientists from universities, national laboratories, and other research institutions worldwide met to evaluate the feasibility and potential of the Biosphere2 Laboratory (B2L) as an inclusive multi-user scientific facility (i.e., a facility open to researchers from all institutions, according to agreed principles of access) for earth system studies and engineering research, education, and training relevant to the mission of the United States Department of Energy (DOE).

  17. Experimental room temperature hohlraum performance study on the National Ignition Facility [Experimental evidence for improved performance in room temperature hohlraums on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ralph, J. E.; Strozzi, D.; Ma, T.; Moody, J. D.; Hinkel, D. E.; Callahan, D. A.; MacGowan, B. J.; Michel, P.; Kline, J. L.; Glenzer, S. H.; Albert, F.; Benedetti, L. R.; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Pak, A.; Rygg, J. R.; Schneider, M. B.; Town, R. P. J.; Widmann, K.; Hsing, W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2016-12-29

    Room temperature or “warm” (273 K) indirect drive hohlraum experiments have been conducted on the National Ignition Facility with laser energies up to 1.26 MJ and compared to similar cryogenic or “cryo” (~20 K) experiments. Warm experiments use neopentane (C5H12) as the low pressure hohlraum fill gas instead of helium, and propane (C3H8) to replace the cryogenic DT or DHe3 capsule fill. The increased average Z of the hohlraum fill leads to increased inverse bremsstrahlung absorption and an overall hotter hohlraum plasma in simulations. The cross beam energy transfer (CBET) from outer laser beams (pointed toward the laser entrance hole) to inner beams (pointed at the equator) was inferred indirectly from measurements of Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS). These experiments show that a similar hot spot self-emission shape can be produced with less CBET in warm hohlraums. The measured inner cone SRS reflectivity (as a fraction of incident power neglecting CBET) is ~2.5× less in warm than cryo shots with similar hot spot shapes, due to a less need for CBET. The measured outer-beam stimulated the Brillouin scattering power that was higher in the warm shots, leading to a ceiling on power to avoid the optics damage. These measurements also show that the CBET induced by the flow where the beams cross can be effectively mitigated by a 1.5 Å wavelength shift between the inner and outer beams. A smaller scale direct comparison indicates that warm shots give a more prolate implosion than cryo shots with the same wavelength shift and pulse shape. Lastly, the peak radiation temperature was found to be between 5 and 7 eV higher in the warm than the corresponding cryo experiments after accounting for differences in backscatter.

  18. Experimental room temperature hohlraum performance study on the National Ignition Facility [Experimental evidence for improved performance in room temperature hohlraums on the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Ralph, J. E.; Strozzi, D.; Ma, T.; ...

    2016-12-29

    Room temperature or “warm” (273 K) indirect drive hohlraum experiments have been conducted on the National Ignition Facility with laser energies up to 1.26 MJ and compared to similar cryogenic or “cryo” (~20 K) experiments. Warm experiments use neopentane (C5H12) as the low pressure hohlraum fill gas instead of helium, and propane (C3H8) to replace the cryogenic DT or DHe3 capsule fill. The increased average Z of the hohlraum fill leads to increased inverse bremsstrahlung absorption and an overall hotter hohlraum plasma in simulations. The cross beam energy transfer (CBET) from outer laser beams (pointed toward the laser entrance hole)more » to inner beams (pointed at the equator) was inferred indirectly from measurements of Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS). These experiments show that a similar hot spot self-emission shape can be produced with less CBET in warm hohlraums. The measured inner cone SRS reflectivity (as a fraction of incident power neglecting CBET) is ~2.5× less in warm than cryo shots with similar hot spot shapes, due to a less need for CBET. The measured outer-beam stimulated the Brillouin scattering power that was higher in the warm shots, leading to a ceiling on power to avoid the optics damage. These measurements also show that the CBET induced by the flow where the beams cross can be effectively mitigated by a 1.5 Å wavelength shift between the inner and outer beams. A smaller scale direct comparison indicates that warm shots give a more prolate implosion than cryo shots with the same wavelength shift and pulse shape. Lastly, the peak radiation temperature was found to be between 5 and 7 eV higher in the warm than the corresponding cryo experiments after accounting for differences in backscatter.« less

  19. A method for development of efficient 3D models for neutronic calculations of ASTRA critical facility using experimental information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balanin, A. L.; Boyarinov, V. F.; Glushkov, E. S.; Zimin, A. A.; Kompaniets, G. V.; Nevinitsa, V. A.; Moroz, N. P.; Fomichenko, P. A.; Timoshinov, A. V.; Volkov, Yu. N.

    2016-12-01

    The application of experimental information on measured axial distributions of fission reaction rates for development of 3D numerical models of the ASTRA critical facility taking into account azimuthal asymmetry of the assembly simulating a HTGR with annular core is substantiated. Owing to the presence of the bottom reflector and the absence of the top reflector, the application of 2D models based on experimentally determined buckling is impossible for calculation of critical assemblies of the ASTRA facility; therefore, an alternative approach based on the application of the extrapolated assembly height is proposed. This approach is exemplified by the numerical analysis of experiments on measurement of efficiency of control rods mockups and protection system (CPS).

  20. A method for development of efficient 3D models for neutronic calculations of ASTRA critical facility using experimental information

    SciTech Connect

    Balanin, A. L.; Boyarinov, V. F.; Glushkov, E. S.; Zimin, A. A.; Kompaniets, G. V.; Nevinitsa, V. A. Moroz, N. P.; Fomichenko, P. A.; Timoshinov, A. V.; Volkov, Yu. N.

    2016-12-15

    The application of experimental information on measured axial distributions of fission reaction rates for development of 3D numerical models of the ASTRA critical facility taking into account azimuthal asymmetry of the assembly simulating a HTGR with annular core is substantiated. Owing to the presence of the bottom reflector and the absence of the top reflector, the application of 2D models based on experimentally determined buckling is impossible for calculation of critical assemblies of the ASTRA facility; therefore, an alternative approach based on the application of the extrapolated assembly height is proposed. This approach is exemplified by the numerical analysis of experiments on measurement of efficiency of control rods mockups and protection system (CPS).

  1. Characterization and Modeling of a Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical-Biological Experimental Facility at DUSEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenthal, E. L.; Elsworth, D.; Lowell, R. P.; Maher, K.; Mailloux, B. J.; Uzunlar, N.; Conrad, M. E.; Jones, T. L.; Olsen, N. J.

    2010-12-01

    A design is being formulated for a large-scale subsurface experimental facility at the 4850 foot level of the Homestake Mine in South Dakota. The purpose of the experiment is to investigate coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical-Biological (THMCB) processes in fractured rock under stress and would be part of the proposed Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL). Key questions we propose to answer are: 1) What are the effective reaction rates for mineral-fluid interaction in fractured rock under stress?; 2) How does mineral and fluid chemistry affect fracture mechanical behavior and permeability changes under stress at elevated temperatures?; and 3) How do microbial communities evolve in fractured rock under a thermal gradient and under changing stress conditions? In addition to the experiment as an in-situ laboratory for studying crustal processes, it has significant benefits for evaluating stimulation and production in Enhanced Geothermal Systems. Design and planning of the experiment included characterization of the geological, chemical, and isotopic characteristics of the rock and seeping fluids, thermal-hydrological and reactive transport modeling. During a reconnaissance study, strong heterogeneity in fracture fluxes and permeability were observed at the block site with some open boreholes continuously flowing at up to 1 liter/minute, and locally elevated fluid temperatures. A two-dimensional thermal-hydrological model was developed to evaluate fluid fluxes and temperatures as a function of heat input and borehole heater configuration. The dual permeability model considers fluid flow and heat transfer between an array of fractures and rock matrix, both having permeability anisotropy. A horizontal rock matrix permeability of 10-18 m2 was based on recent lab measurements, with a vertical matrix permeability estimated to be one order-of-magnitude higher to account for the strong nearly vertical foliation in the Homestake and Poorman

  2. Systems Design and Experimental Evaluation of a High-Altitude Relight Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paxton, Brendan

    Novel advances in gas turbine engine combustor technology, led by endeavors into fuel efficiency and demanding environmental regulations, have been fraught with performance and safety concerns. While the majority of low emissions gas turbine engine combustor technology has been necessary for power generation applications, the push for ultra-low NOx combustion in aircraft jet engines has been ever present. Recent state-of-the-art combustor designs notably tackle historic emissions challenges by operating at fuel-lean conditions, which are characterized by an increase in the amount of air flow sent to the primary combustion zone. While beneficial in reducing NOx emissions, the fuel-lean mechanisms that characterize these combustor designs rely heavily upon high-energy and high-velocity air flows to sufficiently mix and atomize fuel droplets, ultimately leading to flame stability concerns during low-power operation. When operating at high-altitude conditions, these issues are further exacerbated by the presence of low ambient air pressures and temperatures, which can lead to engine flame-out situations and hamper engine relight attempts. To aid academic and industrial research ventures into improving the high-altitude lean blow-out and relight performance of modern gas turbine engine combustor technologies, the High-Altitude Relight Test Facility (HARTF) was designed and constructed at the University of Cincinnati (UC) Combustion and Fire Research Laboratory (CFRL). Following its construction, an experimental evaluation of its abilities to facilitate optically-accessible ignition, combustion, and spray testing for gas turbine engine combustor hardware at simulated high-altitude conditions was performed. In its evaluation, performance limit references were established through testing of the HARTF vacuum and cryogenic air-chilling capabilities. These tests were conducted with regard to end-user control---the creation and the maintenance of a realistic high

  3. Lease Approval and Building Aid for Leased School Buildings and Facilities Located Off School Property (Pursuant to CR 155.8). Instruction Guide for Public School Districts Outside of New York City.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of Facilities Planning.

    State regulations allow public school districts outside of New York City to apply for Building Aid on leasing costs involving instructional facilities for grades Pre-K through 12 located off school district property. This guide explains how the districts should proceed when applying for Building Aid on leased facilities. Attached is the…

  4. PACTEL, an experimental facility for modelling VVER-440 type nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Faussi, P.; Ritonummi, T.; Kervinen, T.

    1993-12-31

    Experiments conducted with thermal-hydraulic testing facilities are of fundamental importance in nuclear power plant safety research. In this field Technical Research Centre of Finland has co-operated with Lappeenranta University of Technology for 15 years. The latest tests facility is called PACTEL (Parallel Channel Test Loop). PACTEL is a large and multifaceted test facility for simulating the behaviour of VVER-type reactors under abnormal conditions. VVER-reactors are Soviet designed Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) with some major differences compared with western PWRs (e.g. horizontal steam generators). Finland has two VVER-440 reactors at the Loviisa power plant. The PACTEL facility aids in the search for the best methods of returning nuclear powe rplants to a safe status following various operational malfunctions and process breakdowns. The information received will be utilized in developing and evaluating nuclear power plant safety systems, in improving safety directives and in developing and assessing the computer codes, specially for VVER analyses. The facility can also be used for training nuclear power plant personnel.

  5. Dosimetry and radiobiology at the new RA-3 reactor boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) facility: application to the treatment of experimental oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, E; Nigg, D W; Miller, M; Thorp, S I; Heber, E M; Zarza, L; Estryk, G; Monti Hughes, A; Molinari, A J; Garabalino, M; Itoiz, M E; Aromando, R F; Quintana, J; Trivillin, V A; Schwint, A E

    2009-07-01

    The National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina (CNEA) constructed a novel thermal neutron source for use in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) applications at the RA-3 research reactor facility located in Buenos Aires. The aim of the present study was to perform a dosimetric characterization of the facility and undertake radiobiological studies of BNCT in an experimental model of oral cancer in the hamster cheek pouch. The free-field thermal flux was 7.1 x 10(9) n cm(-2)s(-1) and the fast neutron flux was 2.5 x 10(6) n cm(-2)s(-1), indicating a very well-thermalized neutron field with negligible fast neutron dose. For radiobiological studies it was necessary to shield the body of the hamster from the neutron flux while exposing the everted cheek pouch bearing the tumors. To that end we developed a lithium (enriched to 95% in (6)Li) carbonate enclosure. Groups of tumor-bearing hamsters were submitted to BPA-BNCT, GB-10-BNCT, (GB-10+BPA)-BNCT or beam only treatments. Normal (non-cancerized) hamsters were treated similarly to evaluate normal tissue radiotoxicity. The total physical dose delivered to tumor with the BNCT treatments ranged from 6 to 8.5 Gy. Tumor control at 30 days ranged from 73% to 85%, with no normal tissue radiotoxicity. Significant but reversible mucositis in precancerous tissue surrounding tumors was associated to BPA-BNCT. The therapeutic success of different BNCT protocols in treating experimental oral cancer at this novel facility was unequivocally demonstrated.

  6. Influence of computational fluid dynamics on experimental aerospace facilities: A fifteen year projection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    An assessment was made of the impact of developments in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) on the traditional role of aerospace ground test facilities over the next fifteen years. With improvements in CFD and more powerful scientific computers projected over this period it is expected to have the capability to compute the flow over a complete aircraft at a unit cost three orders of magnitude lower than presently possible. Over the same period improvements in ground test facilities will progress by application of computational techniques including CFD to data acquisition, facility operational efficiency, and simulation of the light envelope; however, no dramatic change in unit cost is expected as greater efficiency will be countered by higher energy and labor costs.

  7. Safety of transport and hyperbaric oxygen treatment in critically-ill patients from Padua hospitals into a centrally-located, stand-alone hyperbaric facility.

    PubMed

    Bosco, Gerardo; Garetto, Giacomo; Rubini, Alessandro; Paoli, Antonio; Dalvi, Prachiti; Mangar, Devanand; Camporesi, Enrico M

    2016-09-01

    Some patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) might require repetitive hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBOT) while receiving critical care. In such cases, the presence of a hyperbaric chamber located inside or near an ICU is preferable; however, this set-up is not always possible. In Padua, the "Associazione Tecnici IPerbarici" hyperbaric centre is a stand-alone facility outside of a hospital. Despite this, selected ICU patients receive HBOT at this facility. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records from 2003 to 2013 of 75 consecutive, critically-ill patients, 28 of whom were initially intubated and mechanically ventilated whilst undergoing HBOT. We evaluated the methods adopted in Padua to guarantee the safety and continuity of care during transfer for and during HBOT in this specially-equipped multiplace chamber. The 75 patients collectively received 315 HBOT sessions, 192 of which were with the patients intubated and mechanically ventilated. The diagnoses ranged from necrotizing fasciitis to post-surgical sepsis and intracranial abscess. We obtained full recovery for 73 patients. Two deaths were recorded not in close time relation to HBOT. With meticulous monitoring, efficient transport and well-trained personnel, the risks associated with transportation and HBOT can be acceptable for the referring physician.

  8. Training a Neural Network Via Large-Eddy Simulation for Autonomous Location and Quantification of CH4 Leaks at Natural Gas Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, J.; Travis, B. J.; Munoz-Esparza, D.; Dubey, M. K.

    2015-12-01

    Fugitive methane (CH4) leaks from oil and gas production fields are a potential significant source of atmospheric methane. US DOE's ARPA-E MONITOR program is supporting research to locate and quantify fugitive methane leaks at natural gas facilities in order to achieve a 90% reduction in CH4 emissions. LANL, Aeris and Rice University are developing an LDS (leak detection system) that employs a compact laser absorption methane sensor and sonic anemometer coupled to an artificial neural network (ANN)-based source attribution algorithm. LANL's large-eddy simulation model, HIGRAD, provides high-fidelity simulated wind fields and turbulent CH4 plume dispersion data for various scenarios used in training the ANN. Numerous inverse solution methodologies have been applied over the last decade to assessment of greenhouse gas emissions. ANN learning is well suited to problems in which the training and observed data are noisy, or correspond to complex sensor data as is typical of meteorological and sensor data over a site. ANNs have been shown to achieve higher accuracy with more efficiency than other inverse modeling approaches in studies at larger scales, in urban environments, over short time scales, and even at small spatial scales for efficient source localization of indoor airborne contaminants. Our ANN is intended to characterize fugitive leaks rapidly, given site-specific, real-time, wind and CH4 concentration time-series data at multiple sensor locations, leading to a minimum time-to-detection and providing a first order improvement with respect to overall minimization of methane loss. Initial studies with the ANN on a variety of source location, sensor location, and meteorological condition scenarios are presented and discussed.

  9. Visible and near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy of planetary analog materials. Experimental facility at Laboratoire de Planetologie de Grenoble.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommerol, A.; Brissaud, O.; Schmitt, B.; Quirico, E.; Doute, S.

    2007-08-01

    We have developed an original experimental facility designed to measure the bidirectional reflectance spectra of planetary analog materials. These measurements are helpful to interpret the observations of the spectrometers on board space probes in orbit around various Solar System bodies. The central part of the facility is the LPG spectrogonio- radiometer (Brissaud et al., 2004). This instrument provides measurements of samples BRDF (Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function) with high photometric and spectrometric accuracy in the spectral range of visible and near-infrared (0.3 - 4.8 microns). Measurements can be made at any value of incidence and emergence angle up to 80°. Azimuth angle is allowed to vary between 0 and 180°. The instrument was recently installed in a cold room allowing ambient temperatures as low as -20°C. This makes possible the measurements on different kinds of water ice samples (slab ice, frost, snow...) and mixtures of minerals and water ice with unprecedented accuracy. We also have designed and built a simulation chamber to measure spectra of samples (water ice and/or minerals) under an atmosphere with perfectly controlled temperature, pressure and composition. The main objective of this last improvement is the study of water exchange between planetary regolith analogs and atmosphere (adsorption/ desorption, condensation/sublimation). Experimental results will mainly apply to Martian water cycle and hydrated mineralogy. This simulation chamber also provides an efficient way to obtain bidirectional reflectance spectra of dry materials (removal of adsorbed water) with implications for planetary bodies without atmospheric or surface water (Titan, asteroids...). The reflectance spectroscopy facility is part of a large panel of instruments and techniques available at Laboratoire de Planetologie de Grenoble that provide complementary measurements on the same samples: infrared transmission spectroscopy of thin ice films, thick liquid and

  10. MHD seawater thruster performance: A comparison of predictions with experimental results from a two Tesla test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Picologlou, B. F.; Doss, E. D.; Geyer, H. K.; Sikes, W. C.; Ranellone, R. F.

    1992-01-01

    A two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated to investigate the performance of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) seawater thrusters. The results of this investigation are used to validate a design oriented MHD thruster performance computer code. The thruster performance code consists of a one-dimensional MHD hydrodynamic model coupled to a two-dimensional electrical model. The code includes major loss mechanisms affecting the performance of the thruster. Among these losses are the joule dissipation losses, frictional losses, electrical end losses, and single electrode potential losses. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented in detail. Additionally, the test matrix and its rationale are discussed. Representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to pretest computer model predictions. Good agreement between predicted and measured data has served to validate the thruster performance computer models.

  11. Substance Abuse Treatment Facility Locator

    MedlinePlus

    ... Phone number Apply Clear Cancel Show per page Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Emergency Mental Health Services All / ... Reverse   Persons with co-occurring mental and substance abuse disorders   Lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) ...

  12. Experimental facility for studying MHD effects in liquid metal cooled blankets

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, C.B.; Dauzvardis, P.V.; Picologiou, B.F.

    1985-07-01

    The capabilities of a facility, brought into service to collect data on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects pertinent to liquid-metal-cooled fusion reactor blankets, are presented. The facility, designed to extend significantly the existing data base on liquid metal MHD, employs eutectic NaK as the working fluid in a room temperature closed loop. The instrumentation system is capable of collecting detailed data on pressure, voltage, and velocity distributions at any axial position within the bore of a 2 Tesla conventional electromagnet. The axial distribution of the magnetic field can be uniform or varying with either rapid or slow spatial variations. The magnet gap dimensions, for the uniform field of 2T, are 15.3 cm high x 0.76 m wide x 1.83 m long. NaK was circulated in December 1984 and the magnet was energized in March 1985. Shakedown tests in a round pipe test section are currently underway.

  13. Validation of raw experimental data during shoting at the LIL facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Olivier; Domin, Vincent; Romary, Philippe; Raffestin, Didier

    2012-10-01

    The LIL (Laser Integration Line) facility at CESTA (Aquitaine, France) is a facility allowing the delivery of 20 kJ at 3φ. The experiment system includes 13 diagnostics. The facility must be able to deliver, within one hour following shoting, all the results of the plasma diagnostics, alignment images and laser diagnostic measurements. These results have to be guaranteed in terms of conformity to the request and quality of measurement. The LIL has developed a tool for the visualisation, analysis and validation of the data. The software is written in the Delphi language for the main body. The configuration is based on XML files. It is thus possible to re-read the external analysis modules in Python (the language used on the future LMJ). The software is built on three pillars: definition of a validation model prior to the campaign, basic physical models to qualify the signal as compliant and exploitable, and inter-comparison of the shoting and signals over a given campaign or period. Validation of the raw plasma data must serve to validate and guarantee performances, assure the conformity of the PD configuration to the request from the client, check the consistency of measurements, trigger corrective maintenance if necessary.

  14. Deconstructing energy use in microelectronics manufacturing: an experimental case study of a MEMS fabrication facility.

    PubMed

    Branham, Matthew S; Gutowski, Timothy G

    2010-06-01

    Semiconductors are quite energy intensive to manufacture on the basis of energy required per mass of material processed. This analysis draws on original data from a case study of the Analog Devices Micromachined Products Division MEMS fabrication facility to examine the consequence of process rate on the energy intensity of semiconductor manufacturing. We trace the impact of process rate on energy intensity at different length scales, first presenting top-down data, then results of a bottom-up study, and concluding with individual process analyses. Interestingly, while production increased by almost a factor of 2 over the course of the study, energy demand remained virtually constant. At its most efficient, 270 kWh of electricity were required per six inch wafer in the manufacture of the MEMS devices produced at the fabrication facility. In part, the large amount of energy required per unit output is a function of the preponderance of energy used by support equipment; our data show that the facility support equipment is responsible for 58% of total energy requirements.

  15. The National Ignition Facility: Status and Plans for Laser Fusion and High-Energy-Density Experimental Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Wuest, C

    2001-10-29

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) currently under construction at the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a 192-beam, 1.8-megajoule, 500-terawatt, 351-nm laser for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high-energy-density experimental studies. NIF is being built by the Department of Energy and the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) to provide an experimental test bed for the U.S. Stockpile Stewardship Program to ensure the country's nuclear deterrent without underground nuclear testing. The experimental program will encompass a wide range of physical phenomena from fusion energy production to materials science. Of the roughly 700 shots available per year, about 10% will be dedicated to basic science research. Laser hardware is modularized into line replaceable units (LRUs) such as deformable mirrors, amplifiers, and multi-function sensor packages that are operated by a distributed computer control system of nearly 60,000 control points. The supervisory control room presents facility-wide status and orchestrates experiments using operating parameters predicted by physics models. A network of several hundred front-end processors (FEPs) implements device control. The object-oriented software system is implemented in the Ada and Java languages and emphasizes CORBA distribution of reusable software objects. NIF is currently scheduled to provide first light in 2004 and will be completed in 2008.

  16. Making of the NSTX Facility

    SciTech Connect

    C. Neumeyer; M. Ono; S.M. Kaye; Y.-K.M. Peng; et al

    1999-11-01

    The NSTX (National Spherical Torus Experiment) facility located at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory is the newest national fusion science experimental facility for the restructured US Fusion Energy Science Program. The NSTX project was approved in FY 97 as the first proof-of-principle national fusion facility dedicated to the spherical torus research. On Feb. 15, 1999, the first plasma was achieved 10 weeks ahead of schedule. The project was completed on budget and with an outstanding safety record. This paper gives an overview of the NSTX facility construction and the initial plasma operations.

  17. Modeling of the charge-state separation at ITEP experimental facility for material science based on a Bernas ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Barminova, H. Y. Saratovskyh, M. S.

    2016-02-15

    The experiment automation system is supposed to be developed for experimental facility for material science at ITEP, based on a Bernas ion source. The program CAMFT is assumed to be involved into the program of the experiment automation. CAMFT is developed to simulate the intense charged particle bunch motion in the external magnetic fields with arbitrary geometry by means of the accurate solution of the particle motion equation. Program allows the consideration of the bunch intensity up to 10{sup 10} ppb. Preliminary calculations are performed at ITEP supercomputer. The results of the simulation of the beam pre-acceleration and following turn in magnetic field are presented for different initial conditions.

  18. Tests of the space gamma spectrometer prototype at the JINR experimental facility with different types of neutron generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvak, M. L.; Vostrukhin, A. A.; Golovin, D. V.; Dubasov, P. V.; Zontikov, A. O.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Krylov, A. R.; Krylov, V. A.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Mokrousov, M. I.; Repkin, A. N.; Timoshenko, G. N.; Udovichenko, K. V.; Shvetsov, V. N.

    2017-07-01

    The results of the tests of the HPGe gamma spectrometer performed with a planetary soil model and different types of pulse neutron generators are presented. All measurements have been performed at the experimental nuclear planetary science facility (Joint Institute for Nuclear Research) for the physical calibration of active gamma and neutron spectrometers. The aim of the study is to model a space experiment on determining the elemental composition of Martian planetary matter by neutron-induced gamma spectroscopy. The advantages and disadvantages of a gas-filled neutron generator in comparison with a vacuum-tube neutron generator are examined.

  19. Modeling of the charge-state separation at ITEP experimental facility for material science based on a Bernas ion source.

    PubMed

    Barminova, H Y; Saratovskyh, M S

    2016-02-01

    The experiment automation system is supposed to be developed for experimental facility for material science at ITEP, based on a Bernas ion source. The program CAMFT is assumed to be involved into the program of the experiment automation. CAMFT is developed to simulate the intense charged particle bunch motion in the external magnetic fields with arbitrary geometry by means of the accurate solution of the particle motion equation. Program allows the consideration of the bunch intensity up to 10(10) ppb. Preliminary calculations are performed at ITEP supercomputer. The results of the simulation of the beam pre-acceleration and following turn in magnetic field are presented for different initial conditions.

  20. Experimental investigation of high mach number 3D hydrodynamic jets at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, B E; Weber, S; Glendinning, S; Lanier, N; Woods, D; Bono, M; Dixit, S; Haynam, C; Holder, J; Kalantar, D; MacGowan, B; Nikitin, A; Rekow, V; Van Wonterghem, B; Moses, E; Stry, P; Wilde, B; Hsing, W; Robey, H

    2004-09-24

    The first hydrodynamics experiments were performed on the National Ignition Facility. A supersonic jet was formed via the interaction of a laser driven shock ({approx}40 Mbars) with 2D and 3D density perturbations. The temporal evolution of the jet's spatial scales and ejected mass were measured with point projection x-ray radiography. Measurements of the large-scale features and mass are in good agreement with 2D and 3D numerical simulations. These experiments are the first quantitative measurements of the evolution of 3D supersonic jets and provide insight into their 3D behavior.

  1. Experimental research facility for creep-rupture testing of tantalum alloy T-111

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, W.A.; Schoeneman, B.D.; Korellis, J.S.

    1984-05-01

    We have developed a research facility for computer-controlled elevated temperature tensile testing of refractory metallic alloys in an inert enviroment. In an application to tantalum alloy T-111, we have determined that a two-hour creep rupture life can be achieved at 1204/sup 0/C (0.45 T/sub m/) and 1300/sup 0/C (0.48 T/sub m/) if the applied true stresses are maintained below 46 ksi (317 MPa) and 36 ksi (248 MPa), respectively.

  2. Experimental investigation of X-ray spectral absorption coefficients in heated Al and Ge on the Iskra-5 laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bondarenko, S V; Garanin, Sergey G; Zhidkov, N V; Pinegin, A V; Suslov, N A

    2012-01-31

    We set forth the data of experimental investigation of X-ray spectral absorption coefficients in the 1.1 - 1.6 keV photon energy range for Al and Ge specimens bulk heated by soft X-ray radiation. Two experimental techniques are described: with the use of one facility channel and the heating of specimens by the X-ray radiation from a plane burnthrough target, as well as with the use of four channels and the heating by the radiation from two cylindrical targets with internal input of laser radiation. The X-ray radiation absorption coefficients were studied by way of transmission absorption spectroscopy using backlighting X-ray radiation from a point source. The results of investigation of X-ray spectral absorption coefficients on the 1s - 2p transitions in Al atoms and the 2p - 3d transitions in Ge atoms are presented.

  3. Program for upgrading nuclear materials protection, control, and accounting at all facilities within the All-Russian Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF)

    SciTech Connect

    Yuferev, V.; Zhikharev, S.; Yakimov, Y.

    1998-12-31

    As part of the Department of Energy-Russian program for strengthening nuclear material protection, control, and accounting (MPC and A), plans have now been formulated to install an integrated MPC and A system at all facilities containing large quantities of weapons-usable nuclear material within the All-Russian Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF, Arzamas-16) complex. In addition to storage facilities, the complex houses a number of critical facilities used to conduct nuclear physics research and facilities for developing procedures for disassembly of nuclear weapons.

  4. Experimental investigation of coherent structures in turbulent pipe flow using a large-scale pipe flow facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, David

    2012-11-01

    In recent years it has been shown by various researchers, using either experimental techniques or direct numerical simulations, that coherent structures (i.e. features of the flow that persist in space and time) such as hairpin vortices, vortex packets, and very large scale motions (or superstructures) play an important role in wall-bounded turbulent flows (boundary layers, pipes and channel flows). A large-scale recirculating pipe flow facility at the University of Liverpool has been developed to enable the investigation of large and very large scale coherent motions in turbulent pipe flow. The facility includes a 100mm-diameter working section, consisting of individual modules of precision-bore borosilicate glass tubes each 1.027m long, totalling 22 metres in length. Experimental measurements using high-speed stereoscopic particle image velocimetry at approximately 210 pipe diameters downstream of the inlet are made possible using a unique mechanical arrangement for performing the calibration. Reynolds numbers of up to ReD =105 can be reached when the working fluid is water.

  5. The National Ignition Facility: Status and Plans for Laser Fusion and High-Energy-Density Experimental Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, Edward I.; Wuest, Craig R.

    2003-05-15

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), currently under construction at the University of California's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is a stadium-sized facility containing a 192-beam, 1.8-MJ, 500-TW, 351-nm laser system and a 10-m-diam target chamber with room for nearly 100 experimental diagnostics. NIF is being built by the National Nuclear Security Administration and when completed will be the world's largest laser experimental system, providing a national center to study inertial confinement fusion and the physics of matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF will provide 192 energetic laser beams that will compress small fusion targets to conditions where they will ignite and burn, liberating more energy than is required to initiate the fusion reactions. NIF experiments will allow the study of physical processes at temperatures approaching 100 million K and 100 billion times atmospheric pressure. These conditions exist naturally only in the interior of stars and in nuclear weapons explosions. In the course of designing the world's most energetic laser system, a number of significant technology breakthroughs have been achieved. Research is also underway to develop a shorter pulse capability on NIF for very high power and extreme electromagnetic field research and applications. We discuss here the technology challenges and solutions that have made NIF possible, along with enhancements to NIF's design that could lead to near-exawatt power levels.

  6. The National Ignition Facility: Status and Plans for Laser Fusion and High-Energy-Density Experimental Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, E I; Wuest, C R

    2002-10-16

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), currently under construction at the University of California's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is a stadium-sized facility containing a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, 351-nm laser system and a 10-meter diameter target chamber with room for nearly 100 experimental diagnostics. NIF is being built by the National Nuclear Security Administration and when completed will be the world's largest laser experimental system, providing a national center to study inertial confinement fusion and the physics of matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF will provide 192 energetic laser beams that will compress small fusion targets to conditions where they will ignite and burn, liberating more energy than is required to initiate the fusion reactions. NIF experiments will allow the study of physical processes at temperatures approaching 100 million K and 100 billion times atmospheric pressure. These conditions exist naturally only in the interior of stars and in nuclear weapons explosions. In the course of designing the world's most energetic laser system, a number of significant technology breakthroughs have been achieved. Research is also underway to develop a shorter pulse capability on NIF for very high power and extreme electromagnetic field research and applications. We discuss here the technology challenges and solutions that have made NIF possible, along with enhancements to NIF's design that could lead to near-exawatt power levels.

  7. Initial design for an experimental investigation of strongly coupled plasma behavior in the Atlas facility

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, C.P.; Benage, J.F. Jr.; Taylor, A.J.; Trainor, R.J. Jr.; Wood, B.P.; Wysocki, F.J.

    1999-07-01

    Atlas is a high current ({approximately} 30 MA peak, with a current risetime {approximately} 4.5 {micro}sec), high energy (E{sub stored} = 24 MJ, E{sub load} = 3--6 MJ), pulsed power facility which is being constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory with a scheduled completion date in the year 2000. When operational, this facility will provide a platform for experiments in high pressure shocks (> 20 Mbar), adiabatic compression ({rho}/{rho}{sub 0} > 5, P > 10 Mbar), high magnetic fields ({approximately} 2,000 T), high strain and strain rates ({var_epsilon} > 200%, d{var_epsilon}/dt {approximately} 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 6} s{sup {minus}1}), hydrodynamic instabilities of materials in turbulent regimes, magnetized target fusion, equation of state, and strongly coupled plasmas. For the strongly coupled plasma experiments, an auxiliary capacitor bank will be used to generate a moderate density (< 0.1 solid), relatively cold ({approximately} 1 eV) plasma by ohmic heating of a conducting material of interest such as titanium. This stargate plasma will be compressed against a central column containing diagnostic instrumentation by a cylindrical conducting liner that is driven radially inward by current from the main Atlas capacitor bank. The plasma is predicted to reach densities of {approximately} 1.1 times solid, achieve ion and electron temperatures of {approximately} 10 eV, and pressures of {approximately} 4--5 Mbar. This is a density/temperature regime which is expected to experience strong coupling, but only partial degeneracy. X-ray radiography is planned for measurements of the material density at discrete times during the experiments; diamond Raman measurements are anticipated for determination of the pressure. In addition, a neutron resonance spectroscopic technique is being evaluated for possible determination of the temperature (through low percentage doping of the titanium with a suitable resonant material). Initial target plasma formation experiments are

  8. Location | FNLCR Staging

    Cancer.gov

    The Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research campus is located 50 miles northwest of Washington, D.C., and 50 miles west of Baltimore, Maryland, in Frederick, Maryland. Satellite locations include leased and government facilities extending s

  9. Summaries of FY16 LANL experimental campaigns at the OMEGA and EP Laser Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, Eric Nicholas; Merritt, Elizabeth Catherine; Montgomery, David; Kim, Yong Ho; Murphy, Thomas Joseph; Johns, Heather Marie; Kline, John L.; Shah, Rahul C.; Zylstra, Alex; Herrmann, Hans W.; Schmitt, Mark J.; Flippo, Kirk Adler; Rasmus, Alexander Martin

    2016-10-25

    In FY16, Los Alamos National Laboratory carried out 22 shot days on the OMEGA and OMEGA- EP laser facilities in the areas of High Energy Density (HED) Science and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). In HED our focus areas were on radiation flow, hydrodynamic turbulent mix and burn, warm dense matter equations of state, and coupled Kelvin-­Helmholtz (KH)/Richtmyer-­ Meshkov (RM) instability growth. For ICF our campaigns focused on the Priority Research Directions (PRD) of implosion phase mix and stagnation and burn, specifically as they pertain to Laser Direct Drive (LDD). We also had several focused shot days on transport properties in the kinetic regime. We continue to develop advanced diagnostics such as Neutron Imaging, Gamma Reaction History, and Gas Cherenkov Detectors. Below are a summary of our campaigns, their motivation, and main results from this year.

  10. Experimental results from magnetized-jet experiments executed at the Jupiter Laser Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Manuel, M. J. -E.; Kuranz, C. C.; Rasmus, A. M.; ...

    2014-08-20

    Recent experiments at the Jupiter Laser Facility investigated magnetization effects on collimated plasma jets. Laser-irradiated plastic-cone-targets produced collimated, millimeter-scale plasma flows as indicated by optical interferometry. Proton radiography of these jets showed no indication of strong, self-generated magnetic fields, suggesting a dominantly hydrodynamic collimating mechanism. Targets were placed in a custom-designed solenoid capable of generating field strengths up to 5 T. Proton radiographs of the well-characterized B-field, without a plasma jet, suggested an external source of trapped electrons that affects proton trajectories. The background magnetic field was aligned with the jet propagation direction, as is the case in many astrophysicalmore » systems. Optical interferometry showed that magnetization of the plasma results in disruption of the collimated flow and instead produces a hollow cavity. Furthermore, this result is a topic of ongoing investigation.« less

  11. IOTA (Integrable Optics Test Accelerator): Facility and experimental beam physics program

    DOE PAGES

    Antipov, Sergei; Broemmelsiek, Daniel; Bruhwiler, David; ...

    2017-03-06

    The Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) is a storage ring for advanced beam physics research currently being built and commissioned at Fermilab. It will operate with protons and electrons using injectors with momenta of 70 and 150 MeV/c, respectively. The research program includes the study of nonlinear focusing integrable optical beam lattices based on special magnets and electron lenses, beam dynamics of space-charge effects and their compensation, optical stochastic cooling, and several other experiments. In this article, we present the design and main parameters of the facility, outline progress to date and provide the timeline of the construction, commissioning andmore » research. Finally, the physical principles, design, and hardware implementation plans for the major IOTA experiments are also discussed.« less

  12. Design and construction of the ATEFA facility for experimental investigations of AMTEC test modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diez de los Rios Ramos, N.; Hering, W.; Weisenburger, A.; Stüber, M.; Onea, A.; Lux, M.; Ulrich, S.; Stieglitz, R.

    2017-07-01

    The Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC) is an electrochemical cell that requires a high temperature heat source to generate electricity. At KIT the AMTEC technology is being investigated focusing on the use of concentrating solar energy as heat source. First a review on AMTEC technology is given. Further, the design and realization phases of the AMTEC Test Facility (ATEFA) and AMTEC test cell are presented, including the data acquisition and control system and two key technology developments: a ceramic to metal joint for high temperatures (800 - 1000 °C) and the magnetron sputtering of cathode layers on the ceramic electrolyte. The sheet resistance of several electrode samples has been analyzed using the 4-point probe technique and the microstructure of the cathode layer has been examined using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  13. Towards an Experimental Testbed Facility for Cyber-Physical Security Research

    SciTech Connect

    Edgar, Thomas W.; Manz, David O.; Carroll, Thomas E.

    2012-01-07

    Cyber-Physical Systems (CPSs) are under great scrutiny due to large Smart Grid investments and recent high profile security vulnerabilities and attacks. Research into improved security technologies, communication models, and emergent behavior is necessary to protect these systems from sophisticated adversaries and new risks posed by the convergence of CPSs with IT equipment. However, cyber-physical security research is limited by the lack of access to universal cyber-physical testbed facilities that permit flexible, high-fidelity experiments. This paper presents a remotely-configurable and community-accessible testbed design that integrates elements from the virtual, simulated, and physical environments. Fusing data between the three environments enables the creation of realistic and scalable environments where new functionality and ideas can be exercised. This novel design will enable the research community to analyze and evaluate the security of current environments and design future, secure, cyber-physical technologies.

  14. Texas Experimental Tokamak: A plasma research facility. Technical progress report, November 1, 1993--October 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Wootton, A.J.

    1994-07-01

    The purpose is to operate and maintain TEXT Upgrade as a complete facility for applied tokamak physics in order to elucidate the mechanisms of working gas, impurity, and thermal transport in tokamaks and in particular to understand the role of turbulence. So that they can continue to study the physics that is most relevant to the fusion program, TEXT completed a significant device upgrade this year. The new capabilities of the device and new and innovative diagnostics were exploited in all main program areas including: (1) configuration studies; (2) electron cyclotron heating physics; (3) improved confinement modes; (4) edge physics/impurity studies; (5) central turbulence and transport; and (6) transient transport. Details of the progress in each of the research areas are described.

  15. Experimental results from magnetized-jet experiments executed at the Jupiter Laser Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Manuel, M. J. -E.; Kuranz, C. C.; Rasmus, A. M.; Klein, S. R.; MacDonald, M. J.; Trantham, M. R.; Fein, J. R.; Belancourt, P. X.; Young, R. P.; Keiter, P. A.; Drake, R. P.; Pollock, B. B.; Park, J.; Hazi, A. U.; Williams, G. J.; Chen, H.

    2014-08-20

    Recent experiments at the Jupiter Laser Facility investigated magnetization effects on collimated plasma jets. Laser-irradiated plastic-cone-targets produced collimated, millimeter-scale plasma flows as indicated by optical interferometry. Proton radiography of these jets showed no indication of strong, self-generated magnetic fields, suggesting a dominantly hydrodynamic collimating mechanism. Targets were placed in a custom-designed solenoid capable of generating field strengths up to 5 T. Proton radiographs of the well-characterized B-field, without a plasma jet, suggested an external source of trapped electrons that affects proton trajectories. The background magnetic field was aligned with the jet propagation direction, as is the case in many astrophysical systems. Optical interferometry showed that magnetization of the plasma results in disruption of the collimated flow and instead produces a hollow cavity. Furthermore, this result is a topic of ongoing investigation.

  16. IOTA (Integrable Optics Test Accelerator): facility and experimental beam physics program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipov, S.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Bruhwiler, D.; Edstrom, D.; Harms, E.; Lebedev, V.; Leibfritz, J.; Nagaitsev, S.; Park, C. S.; Piekarz, H.; Piot, P.; Prebys, E.; Romanov, A.; Ruan, J.; Sen, T.; Stancari, G.; Thangaraj, C.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Valishev, A.; Shiltsev, V.

    2017-03-01

    The Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) is a storage ring for advanced beam physics research currently being built and commissioned at Fermilab. It will operate with protons and electrons using injectors with momenta of 70 and 150 MeV/c, respectively. The research program includes the study of nonlinear focusing integrable optical beam lattices based on special magnets and electron lenses, beam dynamics of space-charge effects and their compensation, optical stochastic cooling, and several other experiments. In this article, we present the design and main parameters of the facility, outline progress to date and provide the timeline of the construction, commissioning and research. The physical principles, design, and hardware implementation plans for the major IOTA experiments are also discussed.

  17. Experimental results from magnetized-jet experiments executed at the Jupiter Laser Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuel, M. J.-E.; Kuranz, C. C.; Rasmus, A. M.; Klein, S. R.; MacDonald, M. J.; Trantham, M. R.; Fein, J. R.; Belancourt, P. X.; Young, R. P.; Keiter, P. A.; Drake, R. P.; Pollock, B. B.; Park, J.; Hazi, A. U.; Williams, G. J.; Chen, H.

    2015-12-01

    Recent experiments at the Jupiter Laser Facility investigated magnetization effects on collimated plasma jets. Laser-irradiated plastic-cone-targets produced collimated, millimeter-scale plasma flows as indicated by optical interferometry. Proton radiography of these jets showed no indication of strong, self-generated magnetic fields, suggesting a dominantly hydrodynamic collimating mechanism. Targets were placed in a custom-designed solenoid capable of generating field strengths up to 5 T. Proton radiographs of the well-characterized B-field, without a plasma jet, suggested an external source of trapped electrons that affects proton trajectories. The background magnetic field was aligned with the jet propagation direction, as is the case in many astrophysical systems. Optical interferometry showed that magnetization of the plasma results in disruption of the collimated flow and instead produces a hollow cavity. This result is a topic of ongoing investigation.

  18. Initial experimental results from the Laboratory Biosphere closed ecological system facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alling, A.; Allen, J.; Dempster, W.; Nelson, M.; Silverstone, S.; van Thillo, M.

    Results from the closure and initial closed ecological system research in the "Laboratory Biosphere" facility in Santa Fe, New Mexico (USA) will be presented. The facility was initially sealed in April 2002; and the first crop experiments with soybeans commenced in May 2002. The Laboratory Biosphere was created by the team which invented, built and operated Biosphere 2 during its years of closed ecological system functioning (1991-94) and is a testbed to build upon the lessons learned. It is an opportunity to continue experiments with a sustainable soil based agriculture system unlike most bioregenerative systems which use hydroponic systems dependent on a supply of nutrient solution. Because of the small volume of the system (34-45 m3), developing mechanisms to keep parameters like carbon dioxide within acceptable limits will be critical. Recycle of nutrients within the system to maintain soil fertility; and the ability of the inherent complex ecology of soils and a soil bed reactor to handle trace gas buildups are primary research goals. Other research goals are determination of short and long-term exchanges between soil, plants and atmosphere, especially for carbon dioxide, oxygen, nitrogen, NOX, and methane, impact of cultivation (tillage) on soil/atmospheric exchanges., investigation and development of strategies to return nutrients to the soil to maintain fertility, e.g. shredding biomass vs. composting, impact on soil chemistry of returning leachate water to the soil as irrigation water. The microbiological status of soils prior to experiments and over time will allow measurement of changes in microbial diversity and the determination of the role of soil microbes in biogeochemical cycles. Integration of automated sensor and control in the system with real-time modeling has importance for operation, research and educational outreach programs. The Laboratory Biosphere is intended to test and develop a "cybersphere" (network of shared intelligence) that may be

  19. Cold Climate Foundation Retrofit Experimental Hygrothermal Performance. Cloquet Residential Research Facility Laboratory Results

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Louise F.; Harmon, Anna C.

    2015-04-09

    This project was funded jointly by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ORNL focused on developing a full basement wall system experimental database to enable others to validate hygrothermal simulation codes. NREL focused on testing the moisture durability of practical basement wall interior insulation retrofit solutions for cold climates. The project has produced a physically credible and reliable long-term hygrothermal performance database for retrofit foundation wall insulation systems in zone 6 and 7 climates that are fully compliant with the performance criteria in the 2009 Minnesota Energy Code. These data currently span the period from November 10, 2012 through May 31, 2014 and are anticipated to be extended through November 2014. The experimental data were configured into a standard format that can be published online and that is compatible with standard commercially available spreadsheet and database software.

  20. Index of National Aviation Facilities Experimental Center Technical Reports 1972-1977.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    provided effective shielding at both VHF and UHF. 55 - - - -, . I NA-74-14 TEST AND EVALUATION OF A REMOTE CONTROL AND RADIOFREQUENCY REPEATER SYSTEM...systems with potential for continuous sensing of ambient atmospheric pressure and subsequent conversion to altimeter setting values and remoting to...experimental conditions, (2) the effects on measures of ATC system performance, (3) the number and kind of the CAS output com- mands, and the concentration of

  1. Experimental facility for the study of acoustic emission registered in the primary circuit components of WWER power units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosyan, V. G.; Hovakimyan, T. H.; Yeghoyan, E. A.; Hovhannisyan, H. T.; Mayilyan, D. G.; Petrosyan, A. P.

    2017-01-01

    This paper is dedicated to the creation of a facility for the experimental study of a phenomenon of background acoustic emission (AE), which is detected in the main circulation loop (MCL) of WWER power units. The analysis of the operating principle and the design of a primary feed-and-blow down system (FB) deaerator of NPP as the most likely source of continuous acoustic emission is carried out. The experimental facility for the systematic study of a phenomenon of continuous AE is developed. A physical model of a thermal deaerator is designed and constructed. A thermal monitoring system is introduced. An automatic system providing acoustic signal registration in a low frequency (0.03-30 kHz) and high frequency (30-300 kHz) bands and study of its spectral characteristics is designed. Special software for recording and processing of digitized electrical sensor signals is developed. A separate and independent principle of study of the most probable processes responsible for the generation of acoustic emission signals in the deaerator is applied. Trial series of experiments and prechecks of acoustic signals in different modes of the deaerator model are conducted. Compliance of basic technological parameters with operating range of the real deaerator was provided. It is shown that the acoustic signal time-intensity curve has several typical regions. The pilot research showed an impact of various processes that come about during the operation of the deaerator physical model on the intensity of the AE signal. The experimental results suggest that the main sources of generation of the AE signals are the processes of steam condensation, turbulent flow of gas-vapor medium, and water boiling.

  2. Calculations and experimental investigation of pulse transmission system in the typical module of the facility “Gamma”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavyalov, N. V.; Punin, V. T.; Gordeev, V. S.; Grishin, A. V.; Nazarenko, S. T.; Balakin, V. A.; Glushkov, S. L.; Demanov, V. A.; Kozachek, A. V.; Pavlov, V. S.; Puchagin, S. Yu.; Strabykin, K. V.; Moiseevskikh, M. A.; Kalashnikov, D. A.; Spirin, D. P.; Mansurov, D. O.

    2014-08-01

    For the last few years in INRP RFNC-VNIIEF the works on development of a multi-module «Gamma» facility have been conducted. An important part of each module is a pulse transmission system (PTS), providing transportation of a high-volt electromagnetic pulse ( 2.3 MV, 60 ns) to a diode load, positioned at an angle of 80° to the axis of a module's forming system. Basic PTS units: a water-insulated transmission line (WTL), having a bended section, a vacuum insulator stack and a magnetically-insulated transmission line (MITL). At the first stage an experimental sample of PTS with diameter 0.65 m was studied. Performed studies allowed a conclusion that the given experimental PTS sample did not possess enough electric strength, what was a reason for electric breakdowns in the bended section of WTL. Reasons for breakdown occurrence were analyzed; conclusions were made on the necessity for increasing PTS diameter. As a result a PTS version with diameter 1 m was developed. This paper presents results of the experimental studies as a part of the facility module. Totally 200 shots of the module were performed with given PTS at different charge voltage of its forming lines. Reliable and steady operation of all PTS units, as well as correspondence between output module parameters and their calculated values were proved. When using PTS, without MITL in the module diode load, with impedance 3 Ohm the pulses with power 1.5 TW and total electron energy in a pulse 80 kJ were obtained. When using PTS with cylindrical MITL of 1.6 m length, the pulse power was 1.4 TW.

  3. Status and Plans for the National Spherical Torus Experimental Research Facility

    SciTech Connect

    M. Ono; M.G. Bell; R.E. Bell; J.M. Bialek; T. Bigelow; M. Bitter; plus 148 additional authors

    2005-07-27

    An overview of the research capabilities and the future plans on the MA-class National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton is presented. NSTX research is exploring the scientific benefits of modifying the field line structure from that in more conventional aspect ratio devices, such as the tokamak. The relevant scientific issues pursued on NSTX include energy confinement, MHD stability at high beta, non-inductive sustainment, solenoid-free start-up, and power and particle handling. In support of the NSTX research goal, research tools are being developed by the NSTX team. In the context of the fusion energy development path being formulated in the US, an ST-based Component Test Facility (CTF) and, ultimately a high beta Demo device based on the ST, are being considered. For these, it is essential to develop high performance (high beta and high confinement), steady-state (non-inductively driven) ST operational scenarios and an efficient solenoid-free start-up concept. We will also briefly describe the Next-Step-ST (NSST) device being designed to address these issues in fusion-relevant plasma conditions.

  4. A neutron activation spectrometer and neutronic experimental platform for the National Ignition Facility (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeamans, C. B.; Gharibyan, N.

    2016-11-01

    At the National Ignition Facility, the diagnostic instrument manipulator-based neutron activation spectrometer is used as a diagnostic of implosion performance for inertial confinement fusion experiments. Additionally, it serves as a platform for independent neutronic experiments and may be connected to fast recording systems for neutron effect tests on active electronics. As an implosion diagnostic, the neutron activation spectrometers are used to quantify fluence of primary DT neutrons, downscattered neutrons, and neutrons above the primary DT neutron energy created by reactions of upscattered D and T in flight. At a primary neutron yield of 1015 and a downscattered fraction of neutrons in the 10-12 MeV energy range of 0.04, the downscattered neutron fraction can be measured to a relative uncertainty of 8%. Significant asymmetries in downscattered neutrons have been observed. Spectrometers have been designed and fielded to measure the tritium-tritium and deuterium-tritium neutron outputs simultaneously in experiments using DT/TT fusion ratio as a direct measure of mix of ablator into the gas.

  5. An Experimental Program in Neutrinos, Nucleon Decay and Astroparticle Physics Enabled by the Fermilab Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diwan, Milind; Elbnf Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    A Letter of Intent has been submitted by a new International Team to pursue an accelerator-based long-baseline neutrino experiment, as well as neutrino astrophysics and nucleon decay, with an approximately 40-kt (fiducial) modular liquid argon TPC (LAr-TPC) detector located deep underground and a high-resolution near detector. Several independent worldwide efforts, developed through years of detailed studies, are converging around the opportunity provided by the megawatt neutrino beam facility planned at Fermilab and by the new significant expansion with improved access at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in South Dakota, 1,300 km from Fermilab. The principle goals of this experiment are: a comprehensive investigation of neutrino oscillations to test CP violation in the lepton sector, determine the ordering of the neutrino masses, and test the three-neutrino paradigm; to perform a broad set of neutrino scattering measurements with the near detector; and to exploit the large, high-resolution, underground far detector for non-accelerator physics topics including atmospheric neutrino measurements, searches for nucleon decay, and measurement of astrophysical neutrinos especially those from a core-collapse supernova.

  6. Online optimal experimental re-design in robotic parallel fed-batch cultivation facilities.

    PubMed

    Cruz Bournazou, M N; Barz, T; Nickel, D B; Lopez Cárdenas, D C; Glauche, F; Knepper, A; Neubauer, P

    2017-03-01

    We present an integrated framework for the online optimal experimental re-design applied to parallel nonlinear dynamic processes that aims to precisely estimate the parameter set of macro kinetic growth models with minimal experimental effort. This provides a systematic solution for rapid validation of a specific model to new strains, mutants, or products. In biosciences, this is especially important as model identification is a long and laborious process which is continuing to limit the use of mathematical modeling in this field. The strength of this approach is demonstrated by fitting a macro-kinetic differential equation model for Escherichia coli fed-batch processes after 6 h of cultivation. The system includes two fully-automated liquid handling robots; one containing eight mini-bioreactors and another used for automated at-line analyses, which allows for the immediate use of the available data in the modeling environment. As a result, the experiment can be continually re-designed while the cultivations are running using the information generated by periodical parameter estimations. The advantages of an online re-computation of the optimal experiment are proven by a 50-fold lower average coefficient of variation on the parameter estimates compared to the sequential method (4.83% instead of 235.86%). The success obtained in such a complex system is a further step towards a more efficient computer aided bioprocess development. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 610-619. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Cold Climate Foundation Retrofit Experimental Hygrothermal Performance: Cloquet Residential Research Facility Laboratory Results

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Louise F.; Harmon, Anna C.

    2015-04-01

    Thermal and moisture problems in existing basements create a unique challenge because the exterior face of the wall is not easily or inexpensively accessible. This approach addresses thermal and moisture management from the interior face of the wall without disturbing the exterior soil and landscaping. the interior and exterior environments. This approach has the potential for improving durability, comfort, and indoor air quality. This project was funded jointly by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ORNL focused on developing a full basement wall system experimental database to enable others to validate hygrothermal simulation codes. NREL focused on testing the moisture durability of practical basement wall interior insulation retrofit solutions for cold climates. The project has produced a physically credible and reliable long-term hygrothermal performance database for retrofit foundation wall insulation systems in zone 6 and 7 climates that are fully compliant with the performance criteria in the 2009 Minnesota Energy Code. The experimental data were configured into a standard format that can be published online and that is compatible with standard commercially available spreadsheet and database software.

  8. Initial experimental results from the laboratory biosphere closed ecological system facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, M.; Dempster, W. F.; Alling, A.; Allen, J. P.; Rasmussen, R.; Silverstone, S.; Van Thillo, M.

    An initial experiment in the Laboratory Biosphere facility, Santa Fe, New Mexico, was conducted May-August 2002 using a soil-based system with light levels (at 12 h per day) of 58-mol m -2 d -1. The crop tested was soybean, cultivar Hoyt, which produced an aboveground biomass of 2510 grams. Dynamics of a number of trace gases showed that methane, nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen gas had initial increases that were substantially reduced in concentration by the end of the experiment. Methane was reduced from 209 ppm to 11 ppm, and nitrous oxide from 5 ppm to 1.4 ppm in the last 40 days of the closure experiment. Ethylene was at elevated levels compared to ambient during the flowering/fruiting phase of the crop. Soil respiration from the 5.37m 2 (1.46m 3) soil component was estimated at 23.4 ppm h -1 or 1.28 g CO 2 h -1 or 5.7 g CO 2 m -2 d -1. Phytorespiration peaked near the time of fruiting at about 160 ppm h -1. At the height of plant growth, photosynthesis CO 2 draw down was as high as 3950 ppm d -1, and averaged 265 ppm h -1 (whole day averages) during lighted hours with a range of 156 - 390 ppm h -1. During this period, the chamber required injections of CO 2 to continue plant growth. Oxygen levels rose along with the injections of carbon dioxide. Upon several occasions, CO 2 was allowed to be drawn down to severely limiting levels, bottoming at around 150 ppm. A strong positive correlation (about 0.05 ppm h -1 ppm -1 with r 2 about 0.9 for the range 1000 - 5000 ppm) was observed between atmospheric CO 2 concentration and the rate of fixation up to concentrations of around 8800 ppm CO 2.

  9. Experimental room temperature hohlraum performance study on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralph, J. E.; Strozzi, D.; Ma, T.; Moody, J. D.; Hinkel, D. E.; Callahan, D. A.; MacGowan, B. J.; Michel, P.; Kline, J. L.; Glenzer, S. H.; Albert, F.; Benedetti, L. R.; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Pak, A.; Rygg, J. R.; Schneider, M. B.; Town, R. P. J.; Widmann, K.; Hsing, W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2016-12-01

    Room temperature or "warm" (273 K) indirect drive hohlraum experiments have been conducted on the National Ignition Facility with laser energies up to 1.26 MJ and compared to similar cryogenic or "cryo" (˜20 K) experiments. Warm experiments use neopentane (C5H12) as the low pressure hohlraum fill gas instead of helium, and propane (C3H8) to replace the cryogenic DT or DHe3 capsule fill. The increased average Z of the hohlraum fill leads to increased inverse bremsstrahlung absorption and an overall hotter hohlraum plasma in simulations. The cross beam energy transfer (CBET) from outer laser beams (pointed toward the laser entrance hole) to inner beams (pointed at the equator) was inferred indirectly from measurements of Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS). These experiments show that a similar hot spot self-emission shape can be produced with less CBET in warm hohlraums. The measured inner cone SRS reflectivity (as a fraction of incident power neglecting CBET) is ˜2.5 × less in warm than cryo shots with similar hot spot shapes, due to a less need for CBET. The measured outer-beam stimulated the Brillouin scattering power that was higher in the warm shots, leading to a ceiling on power to avoid the optics damage. These measurements also show that the CBET induced by the flow where the beams cross can be effectively mitigated by a 1.5 Å wavelength shift between the inner and outer beams. A smaller scale direct comparison indicates that warm shots give a more prolate implosion than cryo shots with the same wavelength shift and pulse shape. Finally, the peak radiation temperature was found to be between 5 and 7 eV higher in the warm than the corresponding cryo experiments after accounting for differences in backscatter.

  10. Design and construction of a low-level waste shallow land burial experimental facility

    SciTech Connect

    Boegly, W.J. Jr.; Davis, E.C.

    1983-11-01

    The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been investigating improved shallow land burial (SLB) practices for disposing of low-level radioactive wastes in humid environments. Two improvements currently being studied are the use of a cement-bentonite grout applied to waste trenches before they are covered and the use of an impermeable Hypalon fabric liner, which completely surrounds the waste in a trench. A field-scale demonstration site, known as the Engineered Test Facility (ETF), has been established for these studies in the complex geologic setting typical of the Oak Ridge area. Design of the ETF was initiated in 1980 for purposes of (1) evaluating the ability of the grouted and lined trench treatments to minimize water contact and concurrent waste leaching, (2) evaluating selected waste disposal site characterization criteria, (3) integrating site characterization data into model development, and (4) validating the ETF site model and using it to predict long-term site performance. A total of nine trenches (six treated and three control) were excavated at the site in June of 1981. Bales of ORNL compacted waste were used to fill the 3m x 3m x 3m trenches, and, after treatment, all trenches were closed (backfilled and covered) according to current practice. Evaluation of the trench treatments is in progress using a series of inorganic and organic tracer tests designed to monitor water movement in three regions of interest: the trenches, the unsaturated zone around the trenches, and the saturated zone below the site. A successful demonstration of reduced waste leaching resulting from either of these two trench modifications described in this design and construction report will have immediate application to larger disposal sites having similar water-related problems. 9 references, 14 figures, 3 tables.

  11. Effects assessment of 10 functioning years on the main components of the molten salt PCS experimental facility of ENEA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaggioli, Walter; Di Ascenzi, Primo; Rinaldi, Luca; Tarquini, Pietro; Fabrizi, Fabrizio

    2016-05-01

    In the frame of the Solar Thermodynamic Laboratory, ENEA has improved CSP Parabolic Trough technologies by adopting new advanced solutions for linear tube receivers and by implementing a binary mixture of molten salt (60% NaNO3 and 40% KNO3) [1] as both heat transfer fluid and heat storage medium in solar field and in storage tanks, thus allowing the solar plants to operate at high temperatures up to 550°C. Further improvements have regarded parabolic mirror collectors, piping and process instrumentation. All the innovative components developed by ENEA, together with other standard parts of the plant, have been tested and qualified under actual solar operating conditions on the PCS experimental facility at the ENEA Casaccia Research Center in Rome (Italy). The PCS (Prova Collettori Solari, i.e. Test of Solar Collectors) facility is the main testing loop built by ENEA and it is unique in the world for what concerns the high operating temperature and the fluid used (mixture of molten salt). It consists in one line of parabolic trough collectors (test section of 100 m long life-size solar collectors) using, as heat transfer fluid, the aforesaid binary mixture of molten salt up to 10 bar, at high temperature in the range 270° and 550°C and a flow rate up to 6.5 kg/s. It has been working since early 2004 [2] till now; it consists in a unique closed loop, and it is totally instrumented. In this paper the effects of over ten years qualification tests on the pressurized tank will be presented, together with the characterization of the thermal losses of the piping of the molten salt circuit, and some observations performed on the PCS facility during its first ten years of operation.

  12. Design-development and operation of the Experimental Boiling-Water Reactor (EBWR) facility, 1955--1967

    SciTech Connect

    Boing, L.E.; Wimunc, E.A.; Whittington, G.A.

    1990-11-01

    The Experimental Boiling-Water Reactor (EBWR) was designed, built, and operated to provide experience and engineering data that would demonstrate the feasibility of the direct-cycle, boiling-water reactor and be applicable to improved, larger nuclear power stations; and was based on information obtained in the first test boiling-water reactors, the BORAX series. EBWR initially produced 20 MW(t), 5 MW(e); later modified and upgraded, as described and illustrated, it was operated at up to 100 MW(t). The facility fulfilled its primary mission -- demonstrating the practicality of the direct-boiling concept -- and, in fact, was the prototype of some of the first commercial plants and of reactor programs in some other countries. After successful completion of the Water-Cooled Reactor Program, EBWR was utilized in the joint Argonne-Hanford Plutonium Recycle Program to develop data for the utilization of plutonium as a fuel in light- water thermal systems. Final shutdown of the EBWR facility followed the termination of the latter program. 13 refs., 12 figs.

  13. RELAP5-3D thermal hydraulic analysis of the target cooling system in the SPES experimental facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giardina, M.; Castiglia, F.; Buffa, P.; Palermo, G.; Prete, G.

    2014-11-01

    The SPES (Selective Production of Exotic Species) experimental facility, under construction at the Italian National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN) Laboratories of Legnaro, Italy, is a second generation Isotope Separation On Line (ISOL) plant for advanced nuclear physic studies. The UCx target-ion source system works at temperature of about 2273 K, producing a high level of radiation (105 Sv/h), for this reason a careful risk analysis for the target chamber is among the major safety issues. In this paper, the obtained results of thermofluid-dynamics simulations of accidental transients in the SPES target cooling system are reported. The analysis, performed by using the RELAP5-3D 2.4.2 qualified thermal-hydraulic system code, proves good safety performance of this system during different accidental conditions.

  14. Monitoring System for the Gold Target by Radiation Detectors in Hadron Experimental Facility at J-PARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muto, Ryotaro; Agari, Keizo; Aoki, Kazuya; Bessho, Kotaro; Hagiwara, Masayuki; Hirose, Erina; Ieiri, Masaharu; Iwasaki, Ruri; Katoh, Yohji; Kitagawa, Jun-ichi; Minakawa, Michifumi; Morino, Yuhei; Saito, Kiwamu; Sato, Yoshinori; Sawada, Shin'ya; Shirakabe, Yoshihisa; Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Kazuhiro; Toyoda, Akihisa; Watanabe, Hiroaki; Yamanoi, Yutaka

    2017-09-01

    At the Hadron Experimental Facility in J-PARC, we inject a 30-GeV proton beam into a gold target to produce secondary particle beams required for various particle and nuclear physics experiments. The gold target is placed in a hermetic chamber, and helium gas is circulated in the chamber to monitor the soundness of the target. The radioactivity in helium gas is continuously monitored by gamma-ray detectors such as a germanium detector and a NaI(Tl) detector. Beam operations with those target-monitoring systems were successfully performed from April to June and October to December 2015, and from May to June 2016. In this paper, the details of the helium gas circulation system and gamma-ray detectors and the analysis results of the obtained gamma-ray spectra are reported.

  15. Experimental Investigation of the Flow about a 65 deg Delta Wing in the NASA Langley National Transonic Facility. Chapter 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, James M.

    2009-01-01

    An experimental investigation for the flow about a 65 deg. delta wing has been conducted in the NASA Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF). The tests were conducted at Reynolds numbers, based on the mean aerodynamic chord, ranging from 6 million to 120 million and at Mach numbers ranging from 0.4 to 0.9. The model incorporated four different leading-edge bluntness values. The data include detailed static surfacepressure distributions as well as normal-force and pitching-moment coefficients. The test program was designed to quantify the effects of Mach number, Reynolds number, and leading-edge bluntness on the onset and progression of leading-edge vortex separation.

  16. Calibration of a new experimental chamber for PIXE analysis at the Accelerator Facilities Division of Atomic Energy Centre Dhaka (AECD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Md. Taufique; Shariff, Md. Asad; Hossein, Amzad; Abedin, Md. Joynal; Fazlul Hoque, A. K. M.; Chowdhuri, M. S.

    2015-05-01

    A new experimental chamber has been installed at the 3 MV Van de Graaff Accelerator Facilities Division in the Atomic Energy Centre, Dhaka, to perform different Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) techniques. The calibration of this new setup for Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) technique has been done using a set of thin MicroMatter standards and GUPIX (PIXE spectrum analysis software), which is explicated in this paper. The effective thicknesses of the beryllium window of the X-ray detector and of the different absorbers used were determined. For standardization, the so called instrumental constant H (product of detector solid angle and the correction factor for the setup) as function of X-ray energy were determined and stored inside the GUPIX library for further PIXE analysis.

  17. Neutron and photon shielding benchmark calculations by MCNP on the LR-0 experimental facility.

    PubMed

    Hordósy, G

    2005-01-01

    In the framework of the REDOS project, the space-energy distribution of the neutron and photon flux has been calculated over the pressure vessel simulator thickness of the LR-0 experimental reactor, Rez, Czech Republic. The results calculated by the Monte Carlo code MCNP4C are compared with the measurements performed in the Nuclear Research Institute, Rez. The spectra have been measured at the barrel, in front of, inside and behind the pressure vessel in different configurations. The neutron measurements were performed in the energy range 0.1-10 MeV. This work has been done in the frame of the 5th Frame Work Programme of the European Community 1998-2002.

  18. Inlet Flow Test Calibration for a Small Axial Compressor Facility. Part 1: Design and Experimental Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. P.; Prahst, P. S.

    1994-01-01

    An axial compressor test rig has been designed for the operation of small turbomachines. The inlet region consisted of a long flowpath region with two series of support struts and a flapped inlet guide vane. A flow test was run to calibrate and determine the source and magnitudes of the loss mechanisms in the inlet for a highly loaded two-stage axial compressor test. Several flow conditions and IGV angle settings were established in which detailed surveys were completed. Boundary layer bleed was also provided along the casing of the inlet behind the support struts and ahead of the IGV. A detailed discussion of the flowpath design along with a summary of the experimental results are provided in Part 1.

  19. Deployment of RFID in healthcare facilities-experimental design in MRI department.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chen-Yang; Chai, Jyh-Wen

    2012-12-01

    Patient safety has become an important issue due to medical errors. Some health care systems use Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) to identify patients during medical procedures. However, the RFID data readability especially depends upon the environment, an investigation of data reliability and signal loss is essential to making an effective deployment plan. The operation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is the major source of electromagnetic interference in the hospital. Therefore, this research conducts an experimental design of reading performance considering various notable factors in the MRI department. In addition to the readability experiment, this paper also measures the efficiency and reliability of implementing RFID technology in the MRI department using a simulation approach and helps hospitals by providing the measured outcomes.

  20. Design and development of experimental facilities for short duration, low-gravity combustion and fire experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motevalli, Vahid

    1994-01-01

    This report contains the results of three projects conducted by undergraduate students from Worcester Polytechnic Institute at the NASA's Lewis Research Center under a NASA Award NCC3-312. The students involved in these projects spent part of the summer of 1993 at the Lewis Research Center (LeRC) under the direction of Dr. Howard Ross, head of the Combustion group and other NASA engineers and scientists. The Principal Investigator at Worcester Polytechnic Institute was Professor Vahid Motevalli. Professor Motevalli served as the principal project advisor for two of the three projects which were in Mechanical Engineering. The third project was advised by Professor Duckworth of Electrical and Computer Engineering, while Professor Motevalli acted as the co-advisor. These projects provided an excellent opportunity for the students to participate in the cutting edge research and engineering design, interact with NASA engineers and gain valuable exposure to a real working environment. Furthermore, the combustion group at LeRC was able to forward their goals by employing students to work on topics of immediate use and interest such as experimental research projects planned for the space shuttle, the future space station, or to develop demonstration tools to educate the public about LeRC activities.

  1. Design of the Grimethorpe Experimental Facility as of March 1981: a technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    The Experimental Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustor, which has been built as an extension to the National Coal Board Power Station, which is adjacent to Grimethorpe Colliery, Yorkshire, England, is described in this report. The Governments of the United Kingdom, the United States of America and the Federal Republic of Germany, under the auspices of the International Energy Agency, have agreed to share equally between them the costs of building and operating the plant. Control of the project was vested in an Executive Committee consisting of one representative of each Government with all decisions requiring unanimity. The actual operation of the project was vested in an Operating Agent, NCB (IEA Services) Ltd., a wholly owned subsidiary of the National Coal Board. The Implementing Agreement envisages a seven year project to be executed in four stages: (1) Procurement of Design Study with accompanying tender documents. (2) Tendering for construction of the Plant; study of appraisal of tenders. (3) Construction and acceptance of the Plant. (4) Operation of the Plant. The project is now towards the end of Stage 3. Construction has been completed and commissioning is in progress to prepare the plant for the start of the operational phase in Autumn 1981. Because of the confidentiality of much of the design information, for the purposes of this report technical descriptions have been confined to that of a general appraisal.

  2. Installation and first experimental results with the CLAMSUD spectrometer using the new proton beam facility of the Moscow Meson Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Riggi, F.

    1994-12-31

    During 1993 the proton beam from the linac of the INR Moscow Meson Factory reached the energy of 420 MeV. The final goal of this facility is to inject the high intensity 600 MeV proton beam into a storage ring to produce secondary pions, muons and neutrons beams. Since the main experimental hall for the storage ring and secondary beams is not yet completed, in addition to the isotope production activity, the main proton beam with a reduced intensity is also used at the end of the linac tunnel for a physics program on charged pion production at energies 200-420 MeV. Two detection systems are now installed: a range telescope to measure pions with energies down to a few MeV and the CLAMSUD magnetic spectrometer developed by INFN, Italy and presently used by the joint INFN-INR collaboration. This contribution is mainly devoted to a discussion of the first experimental results obtained with the CLAMSUD spectrometer by this collaboration and to the planned physics program.

  3. Comparisons of RELAP5-3D Analyses to Experimental Data from the Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bucknor, Matthew; Hu, Rui; Lisowski, Darius; Kraus, Adam

    2016-04-17

    The Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) is an important passive safety system being incorporated into the overall safety strategy for high temperature advanced reactor concepts such as the High Temperature Gas- Cooled Reactors (HTGR). The Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility (NSTF) at Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) reflects a 1/2-scale model of the primary features of one conceptual air-cooled RCCS design. The project conducts ex-vessel, passive heat removal experiments in support of Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Advanced Reactor Technology (ART) program, while also generating data for code validation purposes. While experiments are being conducted at the NSTF to evaluate the feasibility of the passive RCCS, parallel modeling and simulation efforts are ongoing to support the design, fabrication, and operation of these natural convection systems. Both system-level and high fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses were performed to gain a complete understanding of the complex flow and heat transfer phenomena in natural convection systems. This paper provides a summary of the RELAP5-3D NSTF model development efforts and provides comparisons between simulation results and experimental data from the NSTF. Overall, the simulation results compared favorably to the experimental data, however, further analyses need to be conducted to investigate any identified differences.

  4. LUGH an experimental facility for preferential flow-colloidal transport in heterogeneous unsaturated soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angulo-Jaramillo, R.; Bien, L.; Hehn, V.; Winiarski, T.

    2011-12-01

    with detachment efficiency depending upon the history of the detachment process. A relationship between the outflow and both solute and colloid transfer is established on the separate analysis of the 15 breakthrough curves, leading to the estimation of 15 darcian velocities. Velocity variability witnesses the flow heterogeneity and spatial variability of local capillary barriers. Numerical modeling shows actual flow field and travel length that can be related to each breakthrourgh curve. The spatial distribution of concentrations on some hydrofacies shows that both solute and colloids are predominantly transported through those preferential pathways. The use of a suitable lysimeter allows coupling a good simulation of the heterogeneity of the medium with a precise analysis of the 3D distribution of water, solute and colloids. It allows, experimentally and by modeling to point out the lithofacies that are predominant in the unsaturated zone regarding colloid transport.

  5. Comparing solute and particulate transport in streams using Notre Dame Linked Experimental Ecosystem Facility (ND-LEEF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shogren, A.; Tank, J. L.; Aubeneau, A. F.; Bolster, D.

    2016-12-01

    in streams and rivers. These processes co-vary across systems and are thus difficult to isolate. Therefore, to improve our understanding of drivers of fine-scale transport and retention of particles and solutes in streams, we experimentally compared transport and retention dynamics of two different particles (brewers yeast, 7μm; corn pollen, 70μm), a non-reactive solute (RhodamineWT), and a biologically reactive solute, nitrate (NO3-). We conducted experiments in four semi-natural constructed streams at the Notre Dame Linked Ecosystem Experimental Facility (ND-LEEF) in South Bend, Indiana. Each of the four 50 m replicate stream was lined with a unique configuration of substrate: pea gravel (PG, D50 = 0.5cm) and cobble (COB, D50 = 5cm) and structural complexity: alternating 2m sections of PG and COB substrates (ALT) and a random 50/50 mix (MIX). We allowed the experimental streams to naturally colonize with biofilm and periphyton throughout the summer sampling season. For particles, we estimated transport distance (Sp) and deposition velocity (vdep) and for solutes, we estimated uptake lengths (Sw) and uptake velocity (vf) using a short-term pulse addition technique. Sp and vdep were variable for particles, and were most strongly predicted by biofilm colonization on substrata in each stream. Biofilm accumulation also increased uptake of the reactive solute, though in contrast to particles, there were no significant differences in Sw or vf among streams suggesting that substrate type was not the main driver of reactive solute retention. These results emphasize the dynamic relationship between the physical and biological drivers influencing particle and solute retention in streams. Differential uptake of particles and solutes highlights the non stationarity of controlling variables along spatial or temporal continua. Even in highly controlled systems like those at ND-LEEF, physical vs. biological drivers are difficult to isolate.

  6. Western Canada study of animal health effects associated with exposure to emissions from oil and natural gas field facilities. Study design and data collection II. Location of study herds relative to the oil and gas industry in Western Canada.

    PubMed

    Waldner, Cheryl L

    2008-01-01

    During the late part of 2000 and early months of 2001, project veterinarians recruited 205 beef herds to participate in a study of the effects of emissions from the upstream oil and gas industry on cattle reproduction and health. Researchers developed herd-selection criteria to optimize the range of exposure to facilities, including oil and gas wells, battery sites, and gas-gathering and gas-processing facilities across the major cattle-producing areas of Western Canada. Herds were initially selected on the basis of a ranking system of exposure potential on the basis of herd-owner reports of the locations of their operations in relation to oil and gas industry facilities. At the end of the study, researchers summarized data obtained from provincial regulatory agencies on facility location and reported flaring and venting volumes for each herd and compared these data to the original rankings of herd-exposure potential. Through this selection process, the researchers were successful in obtaining statistically significant differences in exposure to various types of oil and gas facility types and reported emissions among herds recruited for the study.

  7. A Synchrotron-based Facility for Location and In-situ Chemical and Mineralogical Analysis of ~10 mm Particles From Comets and Asteroids Returned to Earth in Aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, G. J.; Lanzirotti, A.; Sutton, S. R.

    In January 2006, NASA's Stardust spacecraft is expected to deliver to Earth more than 1,000 dust particles collected in aerogel capture cells from the coma of Comet Wild-2. These dust particles, which impacted the aerogel surface at ˜ 6 km/sec, are expected to produce cone-shaped entry tracks, each about 100 to 200 times as long as the particle diameter, with the particle at the end of the track. However, weak particles may fragment during capture, leaving debris along the sides of the entry track. In addition, the impact of numerous sub-micron, carbon-rich particles (like the CHON particles identified by the Giotto and VEGA spacecraft at Comet Halley) may discolor the surface of the aerogel, interfering with the visual location/identification of the captured particles. Extraction of these particles from the aerogel will, eventually, be required in order to perform analyses that cannot be performed in-situ. However, extraction involves the risk of particle contamination or particle loss. For this reason, we have developed techniques to employ a synchrotron-based x-ray microprobe and x-ray diffraction facility on Beamline X26A of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory for the in-situ chemical and mineralogical characterization of the Wild-2 particles and particles returned in aerogel capture cells on future space missions. This facility is designed to perform: 3-D particle location by detection of Fe-fluorescence from ˜ 10 μ m particles, in case carbon-rich debris reduces the optical transparency of the aerogel, semi-quantitative x-ray fluorescence chemical analysis on particles ˜ 10 μ m in size for the elements from Ca to Sr, mineral identification by x-ray diffraction on particles ˜ 10 μ m in size, oxidation state characterization by X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy of Fe, Cr, etc. in ˜ 10 μ m particles, chemical analysis of fragments and vapor deposited along the entry track, to reconstruct

  8. Experimental study on the location of neurons associated with the first sacral sympathetic trunk ganglion of the pig.

    PubMed

    Ragionieri, L; Botti, M; Gazza, F; Minelli, L Bo; Panu, R

    2012-10-01

    The neurons associated with the left first sacral sympathetic trunk ganglion (STG S1), an autonomic ganglion particularly concerned in the innervation of the smooth and striated musculature associated with pelvic organs, were identified in the pig, using the non-trans-synaptic fluorescent retrograde neuronal tracer Fast Blue. The labelled neurons were located mostly ipsilaterally, in the intermediolateral nucleus of the spinal cord segments T10-L5, in the sympathetic trunk ganglia L3-Co1, in the caudal mesenteric ganglia, in the pelvic ganglia, and in the spinal ganglia T13-S4. Our results could indicate the existence of visceral neuronal circuits concerning the ganglia of the sympathetic trunk and the caudal mesenteric, pelvic and spinal ganglia with or without the intervention of the central nervous system, whose identification and preservation during surgical treatments could be helpful in reducing the risk of subsequent urinary and sexual disfunctions. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  9. Experimental study of the effect of a passive porous coating on disturbances in a hypersonic boundary layer 2. Effect of the porous coating location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukashevich, S. V.; Morozov, S. O.; Shiplyuk, A. N.

    2016-09-01

    The effect of the location of a passive porous coating on natural disturbances in a hypersonic boundary layer is studied experimentally. The experiments are performed in the flow around a sharp cone aligned at a zero angle of attack with the free-stream Mach number M∞ = 5.8, stagnation temperature T 0 = 370 ± 5 K, and unit Reynolds numbers Re1∞ = 2.6 · 106, 4.6 · 106, 6.6 · 106, and 107 m-1. The wave characteristics of the boundary layer are calculated with the use of the linear stability theory for flow parameters corresponding to experimental values. A comparison of experimental and predicted results shows that the presence of a porous coating in the region where the second mode is unstable leads to reduction of its amplitude at the measurement point, whereas the presence of a porous coating in the region of second mode stability leads to enhancement of the amplitude.

  10. Two-dimensional air exfiltration and heat transfer through fiberglass insulation. Part 1: Numerical model and experimental facility

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.; Besant, R.W.; Tao, Y.X.

    1998-10-01

    A numerical model, employing a local-averaging formulation, was developed for heat transfer and water vapor deposition within fiberglass insulation under air exfiltration and frosting conditions.Frost growth on the cold surface was modeled using special frost growth boundary conditions. Non-isotropic permeability effects that occur in fiberglass boards were included in the model for porous medium flow because tests showed that the permeability for flow parallel to the plane of the boards was 69% higher than perpendicular to the insulation boards. Transient heat and moisture transfer processes within a thick layer of fiberglass insulation were modeled for steady exfiltration of humid air (60--84% rh) with a two-dimensional airflow during winter temperature conditions. In order to validate the numerical model, laboratory apparatus was constructed with a test cell 135 mm high, 600 mm wide and 275 mm deep. This allowed a two-dimensional moist air exfiltration [0.5 to 1.5 L/(m{sup 2}{center_dot}s)] through a fiberglass insulation slab for a temperature range {minus}20 C to 21.5 C from the cold outside surface to the warm inside surface. Using this apparatus, the transient temperature profiles, moisture accumulation profiles, and heat-flux at the cold side of the fiberglass insulation were measured during the air exfiltration process. Part 1 outlines the theoretical/numerical model and describe the experimental test facilities and the properties of the fiberglass insulation tested. Part 2 of this paper presents the comparisons of experimental data and corresponding simulation results.

  11. Experimental investigation for an isolation technique on conducting the electromechanical impedance method in high-temperature pipeline facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Wongi S.; Lee, Hyeonseok

    2016-11-01

    In general, the pipelines within a nuclear power plant facility may experience high temperatures up to several hundred degrees. Thus it is absolutely vital to monitor these pipes to prevent leakage of radioactive substances which may lead to a catastrophic outcome of the surrounding environment. Over the years, one of the structural health monitoring technique known as the electromechanical impedance (EMI) technique has been of great interests in various fields including civil infrastructures, mechanical and aerospace structures. Although it has one of the best advantages to be able for a single piezoelectric transducer to act as a sensor and an actuator, simultaneously, its low curie temperature makes it difficult for the EMI technique to be conducted at high temperature environment. To overcome this problem, this study shows a method to avoid attaching the piezoelectric transducer directly onto the target structure using a metal wire for damage detection at high temperature. By shifting the frequency to compensate the signature changes subjected to the variations in temperature, the experimental results indicate that damage identification is more successful above 200 oC, making the metal wire method suitable for the EMI technique at high temperature environment.

  12. 47 CFR 17.58 - Facilities to be located on land under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Forest Service or the Bureau...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... jurisdiction of the U.S. Forest Service or the Bureau of Land Management. 17.58 Section 17.58 Telecommunication... land under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Forest Service or the Bureau of Land Management. Any... the U.S. Forest Service or the Bureau of Land Management shall include a statement that the facilities...

  13. 47 CFR 17.58 - Facilities to be located on land under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Forest Service or the Bureau...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... jurisdiction of the U.S. Forest Service or the Bureau of Land Management. 17.58 Section 17.58 Telecommunication... land under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Forest Service or the Bureau of Land Management. Any... the U.S. Forest Service or the Bureau of Land Management shall include a statement that the facilities...

  14. 47 CFR 17.58 - Facilities to be located on land under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Forest Service or the Bureau...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... jurisdiction of the U.S. Forest Service or the Bureau of Land Management. 17.58 Section 17.58 Telecommunication... land under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Forest Service or the Bureau of Land Management. Any... the U.S. Forest Service or the Bureau of Land Management shall include a statement that the facilities...

  15. 47 CFR 17.58 - Facilities to be located on land under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Forest Service or the Bureau...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... jurisdiction of the U.S. Forest Service or the Bureau of Land Management. 17.58 Section 17.58 Telecommunication... land under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Forest Service or the Bureau of Land Management. Any... the U.S. Forest Service or the Bureau of Land Management shall include a statement that the facilities...

  16. Study--The Feasibility, Practicability and Cost of the Soundproofing of Schools, Hospitals, and Public Health Facilities Located Near Airports. Report to Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This report fulfills the requirement of Public Law 94-353 that requires the Secretary of Transportation to report to the Congress with respect to the feasibility, practicability, and cost of soundproofing noise-impacted schools, hospitals, and public health facilities, in order to reduce the possible adverse effects of aircraft noise. A survey of…

  17. Effect of Abdominal Loading Location on Liver Motion: Experimental Assessment using Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging and Simulation with a Human Body Model.

    PubMed

    Le Ruyet, Anicet; Berthet, Fabien; Rongiéras, Frédéric; Beillas, Philippe

    2016-11-01

    A protocol based on ultrafast ultrasound imaging was applied to study the in situ motion of the liver while the abdomen was subjected to compressive loading at 3 m/s by a hemispherical impactor or a seatbelt. The loading was applied to various locations between the lower abdomen and the mid thorax while feature points inside the liver were followed on the ultrasound movie (2000 frames per second). Based on tests performed on five post mortem human surrogates (including four tested in the current study), trends were found between the loading location and feature point trajectory parameters such as the initial angle of motion or the peak displacement in the direction of impact. The impactor tests were then simulated using the GHBMC M50 human body model that was globally scaled to the dimensions of each surrogate. Some of the experimental trends observed could be reproduced in the simulations (e.g. initial angle) while others differed more widely (e.g. final caudal motion). The causes for the discrepancies need to be further investigated. The liver strain energy density predicted by the model was also widely affected by the impact location. Experimental and simulation results both highlight the importance of the liver position with respect to the impactor when studying its response in situ.

  18. Full-scale experimental facility for the development technologies for the reprocessing of tritium contaminated light and heavy water wastes by CECE process and cryogenic distillation

    SciTech Connect

    Trenin, V.D.; Alekseev, I.A.; Karpov, S.P.; Bondarenko, S.D.; Vasyanina, T.V.; Konoplev, K.A.; Fedorchenko, O.A.; Uborski, V.V.; Voronina, T.

    1995-10-01

    The problem of the formation and accumulation of the tritiated heavy and light water wastes produced under operation of the various nuclear facilities is considered. It is shown that the tritium contaminated wastes may have a wide spectrum of isotope concentrations of H:D:T and correlation one with other. Reprocessing of these wastes is expensive matter due to the small tritium concentration respectfully to other hydrogen isotopes and as well as the small value of separation factor. It requires the development of the versatile technology. The description of the full scale experimental facility constructed at PNPI is given. 18 refs., 1 fig.

  19. A Synchrotron-Based Facility for the in-situ Location, Chemical and Mineralogical Characterization of ~10 um Particles Captured in Aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, G.; Sutton, S; Lanzirotti, A

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Stardust mission collected dust from the coma of Comet Wild-2 on January 2nd, 2004, by direct capture into aerogel cells that flew through the dust coma at 6 km/s. Stardust collected several hundred comet particles >10 {mu}m in size. These comet samples were delivered to Earth on January 15th, 2006. We developed a facility at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Upton, NY, USA) for the in-situ characterization of 10 {mu}m particles collected in aerogel. These analytical instruments allow us to perform extensive chemical, mineralogical, and size-frequency characterization of particles captured in aerogel. These analyses are conducted without any invasive extraction, minimizing the possibility of contamination or particle loss during preparation. This facility was used to determine the chemical composition, the oxidation state, the mineralogy and to provide an indication of the grain size of the Wild-2 particles before they were removed from the aerogel. This information provides a catalog of particle types, allowing a more reasoned allocation of the particles to subsequent investigators based on a relatively detailed knowledge of the chemical composition and mineralogy of each particle. These measurements allowed a comparison of the chemical and mineralogical properties of the Wild-2 particles with other types of extraterrestrial materials, including interplanetary dust particles and meteorites. The success of in-situ analysis for Wild 2 particles demonstrates that synchrotron-based facilities will be important for the analysis of particles collected in aerogel on future earth-orbiting satellites and spacecraft.

  20. XTOD to Conventional Facilities Interface Control Document

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, D

    2005-09-29

    This document describes the interface between the LCLS X-ray Transport and Diagnostics (XTOD) (WBS 1.5) and the LCLS Conventional Facilities (CF) (WBS 1.1). The interface locations ranging from the beam dump to the far experimental hall are identified. Conventional Facilities provides x-ray, beamline and equipment enclosures, mounting surfaces, conventional utilities, compressed (clean, dry) air, process and purge gases, exhaust systems, power, and environmental conditions for the XTOD components and controls.

  1. Risk assessment of soil-based exposures to plutonium at experimental sites located on the Nevada Test Site and adjoining areas

    SciTech Connect

    Layton, D.W.; Anspaugh, L.R.; Bogen, K.T.; Straume, T.

    1993-06-01

    In the late 1950s and early 1960s, a series of tests was conducted at or near the Nevada Test Site to study issues involving plutonium-bearing devices. These tests resulted in the dispersal of about 5 TBq of {sup 239,240}Pu on the surficial soils at the test locations. Access to the sites is strictly controlled; therefore, it does not constitute a threat to human health at the present time. However, because the residual {sup 239} Pu decays slowly (half-life of 24,110 y), the sites could indeed represent a long-term hazard if they are not remediated and if institutional controls are lost. To investigate the magnitude of the potential health risks for this no-remediation case, we defined three basic exposure scenarios that could bring individuals in contact with {sup 239,240}Pu at the sites: (1) a resident living in a subdivision located at a test site, (2) a resident farmer, and (3) a worker at a commercial facility. Our screening analyses indicated that doses to organs are dominated by the intemal deposition of Pu via the inhalation pathway, and thus our risk assessment focused on those factors that affect inhalation exposures and associated doses, including inhalation rates, activity patterns, tenure at a residence or occupation, indoor/outdoor air relationships, and resuspension outdoors. Cancer risks were calculated as a function of lifetime cumulative doses to the key target organs (i.e., bone surface, liver, and lungs) and risk factors for those organs. Uncertainties in the predicted cancer risks were analyzed using Monte-Carlo simulations of the probability distributions used to represent assessment parameters. The principal sources of uncertainty in the estimated risks were population mobility, the relationship between indoor and outdoor contaminant levels, and the dose and risk factors for bone, liver, and lung.

  2. A location-specific spreadsheet for estimating Zika risk and timing for Zika vector surveillance, using US military facilities as an example.

    PubMed

    Foley, Desmond H; Pecor, David B

    2017-01-01

    Local Zika virus transmission in the United States involving one or both of the known vector species, Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus, is of major concern. To assist efforts to anticipate the risks of transmission, we developed an Excel spreadsheet tool that uses vector and virus temperature thresholds, remotely sensed maximum temperature, and habitat suitability models to answer the questions: "is Zika transmission likely here?" and "when should we conduct vector surveillance?" An example spreadsheet, updated regularly and freely available, uses near real-time and forecast temperature data to generate guidance, based on a novel four level Zika risk code, for 733 US military facilities in the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and the territories of Guam and Puerto Rico.

  3. Surplus Facilities Management Program. Post-remedial-action survey report for SNAP-8 Experimental Reactor Facility, Building 010 site, Santa Susana Field Laboratories, Rockwell International, Ventura County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Mayes, C.B.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

    1984-04-01

    Based on the results of the radiological assessment, the Argonne National Laboratory Radiological Survey Group arrived at the following conclusions: (1) soil contaminated with the radionuclides /sup 60/Co and /sup 152/Eu of undetermined origin was detected in the southwest quadrant of the Building 010 site. /sup 60/Co was also detected in one environmental sample taken from an area northwest of the site and in a borehole sample taken from the area that previously held the radioactive gas hold-up tanks. Uranium was detected in soil from a hole in the center of the building site and in a second hole southwest of the building site. In all cases, the radionuclide levels encountered in the soil were well below the criteria set by DOE for this site; and (2) the direct instrument readings at the surface of the site were probably the result of natural radiation (terrestrial and celestial), as well as shine from the material being stored at the nearby RMDF facility. There was no evidence that the contaminated soil under the asphalt pad contributed detectable levels to the total background readings.

  4. Large coil test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Nelms, L.W.; Thompson, P.B.

    1980-01-01

    Final design of the facility is nearing completion, and 20% of the construction has been accomplished. A large vacuum chamber, houses the test assembly which is coupled to appropriate cryogenic, electrical, instrumentation, diagnostc systems. Adequate assembly/disassembly areas, shop space, test control center, offices, and test support laboratories are located in the same building. Assembly and installation operations are accomplished with an overhead crane. The major subsystems are the vacuum system, the test stand assembly, the cryogenic system, the experimental electric power system, the instrumentation and control system, and the data aquisition system.

  5. The conductive hearing loss due to an experimentally induced middle ear effusion alters the interaural level and time difference cues to sound location.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Jennifer L; Chevallier, Keely M; Koka, Kanthaiah; Lupo, J Eric; Tollin, Daniel J

    2012-10-01

    Otitis media with effusion (OME) is a pathologic condition of the middle ear that leads to a mild to moderate conductive hearing loss as a result of fluid in the middle ear. Recurring OME in children during the first few years of life has been shown to be associated with poor detection and recognition of sounds in noisy environments, hypothesized to result due to altered sound localization cues. To explore this hypothesis, we simulated a middle ear effusion by filling the middle ear space of chinchillas with different viscosities and volumes of silicone oil to simulate varying degrees of OME. While the effects of middle ear effusions on the interaural level difference (ILD) cue to location are known, little is known about whether and how middle ear effusions affect interaural time differences (ITDs). Cochlear microphonic amplitudes and phases were measured in response to sounds delivered from several locations in azimuth before and after filling the middle ear with fluid. Significant attenuations (20-40 dB) of sound were observed when the middle ear was filled with at least 1.0 ml of fluid with a viscosity of 3.5 Poise (P) or greater. As expected, ILDs were altered by ~30 dB. Additionally, ITDs were shifted by ~600 μs for low frequency stimuli (<4 kHz) due to a delay in the transmission of sound to the inner ear. The data show that in an experimental model of OME, ILDs and ITDs are shifted in the spatial direction of the ear without the experimental effusion.

  6. Effects of small-scale, home-like facilities in dementia care on residents' behavior, and use of physical restraints and psychotropic drugs: a quasi-experimental study.

    PubMed

    Verbeek, Hilde; Zwakhalen, Sandra M G; van Rossum, Erik; Ambergen, Ton; Kempen, Gertrudis I J M; Hamers, Jan P H

    2014-04-01

    Small-scale, home-like care environments are increasingly implemented in institutional nursing care as a model to promote resident-directed care, although evidence on its effects is sparse. This study focuses on the effects of small-scale living facilities on the behavior of residents with dementia and use of physical restraints and psychotropic drugs. A quasi-experimental study was conducted comparing residents in two types of long-term institutional nursing care (i.e., small-scale living facilities and traditional psychogeriatric wards) on three time points: at baseline and follow-ups after six and 12 months. Residents were matched at baseline on cognitive and functional status to increase comparability of groups at baseline. Nurses assessed neuropsychiatric and depressive symptoms, agitation, social engagement, and use of physical restraints using questionnaires. Psychotropic drug use was derived from residents' medical records. In total, 259 residents were included: 124 in small-scale living facilities and 135 controls. Significantly fewer physical restraints and psychotropic drugs were used in small-scale living facilities compared with traditional wards. Residents in small-scale living facilities were significantly more socially engaged, at baseline and after six months follow-up, and displayed more physically non-aggressive behavior after 12 months than residents in traditional wards. No other differences were found. This study suggests positive effects of small-scale living facilities on the use of physical restraints and psychotropic drugs. However, the results for behavior were mixed. More research is needed to gain an insight on the relationship between dementia care environment and other residents' outcomes.

  7. Measurement of the 240Pu(n,f) cross-section at the CERN n_TOF facility: First results from experimental area II (EAR-2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamatopoulos, A.; Tsinganis, A.; Colonna, N.; Vlastou, R.; Kokkoris, M.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Plompen, A.; Heyse, J.; Žugec, P.; Barbagallo, M.; Calviani, M.; Berthoumieux, E.; Chiaveri, E.; Aberle, O.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Bécares, V.; Bacak, M.; Balibrea, J.; Barros, S.; Bečvář, F.; Beinrucker, C.; Belloni, F.; Billowes, J.; Boccone, V.; Bosnar, D.; Brugger, M.; Caamaño, M.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Cerutti, F.; Cortés, G.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Cosentino, L.; Damone, L. A.; Deo, K.; Diakaki, M.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dressler, R.; Dupont, E.; Durán, I.; Fernández-Domínguez, B.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira, P.; Finocchiaro, P.; Frost, R. J. W.; Furman, V.; Göbel, K.; Gómez-Hornillos, M. B.; García, A. R.; Gheorghe, I.; Glodariu, T.; Gonçalves, I. F.; González, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Harada, H.; Heftrich, T.; Heinitz, S.; Hernández-Prieto, A.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Katabuchi, T.; Kavrigin, P.; Ketlerov, V.; Khryachkov, V.; Kimura, A.; Kivel, N.; Krtička, M.; Leal-Cidoncha, E.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Lerendegui-Marco, J.; Licata, M.; Meo, S. Lo; Losito, R.; Macina, D.; Marganiec, J.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mastromarco, M.; Matteucci, F.; Mendoza, E.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mingrone, F.; Mirea, M.; Montesano, S.; Musumarra, A.; Nolte, R.; Palomo-Pinto, F. R.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Porras, J. I.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J. M.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Riego-Perez, A.; Robles, M.; Rubbia, C.; Ryan, J. A.; Sabaté-Gilarte, M.; Saxena, A.; Schmidt, S.; Schumann, D.; Sedyshev, P.; Smith, A. G.; Suryanarayana, S. V.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tarifeño-Saldivia, A.; Tassan-Got, L.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Vlachoudis, V.; Wallner, A.; Warren, S.; Weigand, M.; Weiss, C.; Wright, T.

    2017-09-01

    The accurate knowledge of the neutron-induced fission cross-sections of actinides and other isotopes involved in the nuclear fuel cycle is essential for the design of advanced nuclear systems, such as Generation-IV nuclear reactors. Such experimental data can also provide the necessary feedback for the adjustment of nuclear model parameters used in the evaluation process, resulting in the further development of nuclear fission models. In the present work, the 240Pu(n,f) cross-section was measured at CERN's n_TOF facility relative to the well-known 235U(n,f) cross section, over a wide range of neutron energies, from meV to almost MeV, using the time-of-flight technique and a set-up based on Micromegas detectors. This measurement was the first experiment to be performed at n_TOF's new experimental area (EAR-2), which offers a significantly higher neutron flux compared to the already existing experimental area (EAR-1). Preliminary results as well as the experimental procedure, including a description of the facility and the data handling and analysis, are presented.

  8. Experimental Facilities in Water Resources Education. A Contribution to the International Hydrological Programme. UNESCO Technical Papers in Hydrology No. 24.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

    This monograph is intended to guide teachers of water resources, technicians and university students in establishing physical facilities which can introduce learners to methods, techniques, and instruments used in water resources management and assessment. It is not intended to serve as an exhaustive list of equipment and their descriptions or as…

  9. Computational and Experimental Characterization of the Mach 6 Facility Nozzle Flow for the Enhanced Injection and Mixing Project at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drozda, Tomasz G.; Cabell, Karen F.; Passe, Bradley J.; Baurle, Robert A.

    2017-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics analyses and experimental data are presented for the Mach 6 facility nozzle used in the Arc-Heated Scramjet Test Facility for the Enhanced Injection and Mixing Project (EIMP). This project, conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center, aims to investigate supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) fuel injection and mixing physics relevant to flight Mach numbers greater than 8. The EIMP experiments use a two-dimensional Mach 6 facility nozzle to provide the high-speed air simulating the combustor entrance flow of a scramjet engine. Of interest are the physical extent and the thermodynamic properties of the core flow at the nozzle exit plane. The detailed characterization of this flow is obtained from three-dimensional, viscous, Reynolds-averaged simulations. Thermodynamic nonequilibrium effects are also investigated. The simulations are compared with the available experimental data, which includes wall static pressures as well as in-stream static pressure, pitot pressure and total temperature obtained via in-stream probes positioned just downstream of the nozzle exit plane.

  10. The fast-spectrum transmutation experimental facility FASTEF: Main design achievements (Part 1: Core and primary system) within the FP7-CDT collaborative project of the European Commission

    SciTech Connect

    De Bruyn, D.; Fernandez, R.; Mansani, L.; Woaye-Hune, A.; Sarotto, M.; Bubelis, E.

    2012-07-01

    MYRRHA (Multi-purpose hybrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications) is the flexible experimental accelerator-driven system (ADS) in development at SCK CEN in replacement of its material testing reactor BR2. SCK CEN in association with 17 European partners from industry, research centres and academia, responded to the FP7 (Seventh Framework Programme) call from the European Commission to establish a Central Design Team (CDT) for the design of a Fast Spectrum Transmutation Experimental Facility (FASTEF) able to demonstrate efficient transmutation and associated technology through a system working in subcritical and/or critical mode. The project has started on April 01, 2009 for a period of three years. In this paper, we present the latest configuration of the reactor core and primary system. The FASTEF facility has evolved quite a lot since the intermediate reporting done at the ICAPP'10 and ICAPP'11 conferences 1 2. If it remains a small-scale facility, the core power amounts now up to 100 MWth in critical mode. In a companion paper 3, we present the concept of the reactor building and the plant layout. (authors)

  11. Nuclear Heating Measurement in Critical Facilities and Experimental Validation of Code and Libraries - An Application to Prompt and Delayed γ Nuclear Data Needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaise, P.; Di Salvo, J.; Vaglio-Gaudard, C.; Bernard, D.; Amharrak, H.; Lemaire, M.; Ravaux, S.

    Energy from prompt and delayed gammas in actual and future nuclear systems are more and more taken into account into design studies as they play an important role in the assessment of performance and safety concerns. Their incomplete knowledge (both prompt and delayed) require to take conservative design margins on local dimensioning parameters, thus reducing the awaited performances or flexibility of these facilities, with costs that are far from being negligible. The local energy photon deposit must be accurately known for Generation-III (Gen-III), Generation-IV (Gen-IV) or the new MTR Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR). The last 2 decades has seen the realization, in Zero Power Reactors (ZPR), of several programs partially devoted to γ-heating measurements. Experimental programs were and are still conducted in different Cadarache facilities such as MASURCA (for SFR), and later in MINERVE and EOLE (for JHR and Gen-III reactors). The adequacy of the γ-heating calculation was compared to experimental data using thermo-luminescent (TL) detectors and γ-fission chambers. Inconsistencies in C/E and associated uncertainties led to improvement of both libraries and experimental techniques. For these last one, characterization for TL and optically stimulated (OSL) detectors (calibration, individual response), and Monte Carlo calculation of charge repartition in those detectors and their environment were carefully checked and optimized. This step enabled to reduce the associated experimental uncertainty by a factor of 2 (8% at 2σ). Nevertheless, interpretation of integral experiment with updated calculation schemes and improved experimental techniques still tend to prove that there are some nuclei for which there are missing or erroneous data, mainly in structural and absorbing materials. New integral and differential measurements are needed to guide new evaluation efforts, which could benefit from consolidated theoretical and experimental modeling techniques.

  12. First experimental evidence of hydrodynamic tunneling of ultra–relativistic protons in extended solid copper target at the CERN HiRadMat facility

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, R.; Grenier, D.; Wollmann, D.; Blanco Sancho, J.; Burkart, F.; Tahir, N. A.; Shutov, A.; Piriz, A. R.

    2014-08-15

    A novel experiment has been performed at the CERN HiRadMat test facility to study the impact of the 440 GeV proton beam generated by the Super Proton Synchrotron on extended solid copper cylindrical targets. Substantial hydrodynamic tunneling of the protons in the target material has been observed that leads to significant lengthening of the projectile range, which confirms our previous theoretical predictions [N. A. Tahir et al., Phys. Rev. Spec. Top.-Accel. Beams 15, 051003 (2012)]. Simulation results show very good agreement with the experimental measurements. These results have very important implications on the machine protection design for powerful machines like the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the future High Luminosity LHC, and the proposed huge 80 km circumference Future Circular Collider, which is currently being discussed at CERN. Another very interesting outcome of this work is that one may also study the field of High Energy Density Physics at this test facility.

  13. Estimating Groundwater Concentrations from Mass Releases to the Aquifer at Integrated Disposal Facility and Tank Farm Locations Within the Central Plateau of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Bergeron, Marcel P.; Freeman, Eugene J.

    2005-06-09

    This report summarizes groundwater-related numerical calculations that will support groundwater flow and transport analyses associated with the scheduled 2005 performance assessment of the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) at the Hanford Site. The report also provides potential supporting information to other ongoing Hanford Site risk analyses associated with the closure of single-shell tank farms and related actions. The IDF 2005 performance assessment analysis is using well intercept factors (WIFs), as outlined in the 2001 performance assessment of the IDF. The flow and transport analyses applied to these calculations use both a site-wide regional-scale model and a local-scale model of the area near the IDF. The regional-scale model is used to evaluate flow conditions, groundwater transport, and impacts from the IDF in the central part of the Hanford Site, at the core zone boundary around the 200 East and 200 West Areas, and along the Columbia River. The local-scale model is used to evaluate impacts from transport of contaminants to a hypothetical well 100 m downgradient from the IDF boundaries. Analyses similar to the regional-scale analysis of IDF releases are also provided at individual tank farm areas as additional information. To gain insight on how the WIF approach compares with other approaches for estimating groundwater concentrations from mass releases to the unconfined aquifer, groundwater concentrations were estimated with the WIF approach for two hypothetical release scenarios and compared with similar results using a calculational approach (the convolution approach). One release scenario evaluated with both approaches (WIF and convolution) involved a long-term source release from immobilized low-activity waste glass containing 25,550 Ci of technetium-99 near the IDF; another involved a hypothetical shorter-term release of {approx}0.7 Ci of technetium over 600 years from the S-SX tank farm area. In addition, direct simulation results for both release

  14. Experimental Polyurethane Foam (PUF) Roofing Systems. III. Naval Station, Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico, and Naval Facility, Cape Hatteras, North Carolina.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    other sources of energy loss must be investigated. The units had jalousie windows that permitted a moderate degree of air infiltration and resultant...units with jalousie windows, optimum energy conservation is obtained with 1-1/2 to 3 inches of foam. Naval Facility, Cape Hatteras, N.C. 1. A 25- to...replacing jalousie windows with a closed window. Two to 3 inches of foam should be used to provide maximum energy conservation in semitropical

  15. Location-dependent RF geotags for positioning and security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Di; Lynch, Robert; Yang, Chun

    2011-06-01

    Geo-security service, which refers to the authorization of persons or facilities based on their distinctive location information, is an application of the fields of position, navigation and time (PNT). Location features from radio navigation signals are mapped into a precise verification tag or geotag to block or allow certain action or access. A device that integrates a location sensor and geotag generation algorithm is tamper-resistant, that is, one cannot spoof the device to bypass the location validation. This paper develops a theoretical framework of the geotag-based positioning and security systems, and evaluates the system performance analytically and experimentally by using Loran signals as a case study.

  16. Final closure plan for the high-explosives open burn treatment facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Experimental Test Site 300

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, S.

    1997-04-01

    This document addresses the interim status closure of the HE Open Bum Treatment Facility, as detailed by Title 22, Division 4.5, Chapter 15, Article 7 of the Califonia Code of Regulations (CCR) and by Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 265, Subpart G, ``Closure and Post Closure.`` The Closure Plan (Chapter 1) and the Post- Closure Plan (Chapter 2) address the concept of long-term hazard elimination. The Closure Plan provides for capping and grading the HE Open Bum Treatment Facility and revegetating the immediate area in accordance with applicable requirements. The Closure Plan also reflects careful consideration of site location and topography, geologic and hydrologic factors, climate, cover characteristics, type and amount of wastes, and the potential for contaminant migration. The Post-Closure Plan is designed to allow LLNL to monitor the movement, if any, of pollutants from the treatment area. In addition, quarterly inspections will ensure that all surfaces of the closed facility, including the cover and diversion ditches, remain in good repair, thus precluding the potential for contaminant migration.

  17. Performance and safety assessment of the co-location of the near surface radioactive waste disposal facilities and borehole disposal concept in the Philippines

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Edmundo; Reyes, Rolando; Palattao, Maria Visitacion; Nohay, Carl; Singayan, Alfonso; Aurelio, Mario; Gedeon, Matej; Luna, Roy Anthony C.

    2013-07-01

    The Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) in collaboration with the interagency technical committee on radioactive waste has been undertaking a national project to find a final solution to the country's low to intermediate level radioactive waste. The strategy adopted was to co-locate 2 disposal concepts that will address the types of radioactive waste generated from the use of radioactive materials. This strategy is expected to compensate for the small volumes of waste generated in the Philippines as compared to countries with big nuclear energy programs. It will also take advantage of the benefits of a shared infrastructure and R and D work that accompany such project. The preferred site selected from previous site selection and investigations is underlain by highly fractured 'andesitic volcaniclastics' mantled by residual clayey soil which act as the aquifer or water bearing layer. Results of investigation show that the groundwater in the area is relatively dilute and acidic. Springs at the lower elevations of the footprint also indicate acidic waters. The relatively acidic water is attributed to the formation of sulfuric acid by the oxidation of the pyrite in the andesite. A preliminary post closure safety assessment was carried out using the GMS MODFLOW and HYDRUS softwares purchased through the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) technical assistance. Results from MODFLOW modeling show that the radionuclide transport follows the natural gradient from the top of the hill down to the natural discharge zones. The vault dispersion model shows a circular direction from the vaults towards the faults and eventually to the creeks. The contaminant transport from borehole shows at least one confined plume from the borehole towards the creek designated as Repo1 and eventually follows downstream. The influx of surface water and rainfall to the disposal vault was modeled using the HYDRUS software. The pressure head and water content at the base of the

  18. Experimental study of emission Z-pinch spectra in the axial and radial directions at the Angara-5-1 facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, V. V.; Volkov, G. S.; Grabovsky, E. V.; Gritsuk, A. N.; Mitrofanov, K. N.; Oleinik, G. M.; Shevelko, A. P.

    2016-12-01

    Data on the energy, power and spectra composition of the soft x-ray pulse of powerful Z-pinch plasmas in the axial and radial directions in the photon energy range of 0.02 - 2 keV are presented. The data are obtained from the analysis of experimental results on the implosion of cylindrical arrays with a diameter of 1.2 cm and a height of 1.6 cm of tungsten wires diameter of 6 μm, the linear mass of 220 μg/cm at a current in the range of 2.2 - 3.5 MA at the Angara-5-1 facility.

  19. The experimental facility and results of removal of SO 2 and NO x in flue gases by the electron beam process at SINR Academia Sinica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gen-Li, Li; Yougan, Wang; Busheng, Li; Mingjuan, Xu; Lanping, Yang; Fugen, Bao; Qi, Zhang; Zhongqun, Sheng; Xingsheng, Ma; Yibo, Huang; Zhoulei, Mei; Yunlong, Qian

    An experimental facility for electron beam treatment of simulating flue gas has been constructed at SINR Academia Sinica. The process for removal of SO 2 and NO x in flue gas was investigated. In particular, several important parameters, such as the irradiating dose absorbed, temperature of reaction and stoichiometry of ammonia, were studied. A by-product, a compound of ammonium sulphate and ammonium sulphate-nitrate, that can be used as agricultural fertilizer was checked and measured. The removals of SO 2 and NO x were 92 and 77.5%, respectively, with an absorbed irradiating dose of 17 kGy.

  20. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Studies of timing properties for a TOF counter at an external target facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yu-Hong; Xu, Hua-Gen; Xu, Hu-Shan; Zhan, Wen-Long; Sun, Zhi-Yu; Guo, Zhong-Yan; Hu, Zheng-Guo; Chen, Jun-Ling; Tang, Shu-Wen

    2009-09-01

    Timing and amplitude properties of a prototype scintillator TOF counter at an external target facility are studied with a cosmic rays test. The dependence of signal pulse height and time resolution on the coordinate along the scintillator TOF counter is investigated with two different discriminators. A time resolution of 165 ps can be achieved at the center of the counter with a constant fraction discriminator. Time resolution better than 150 ps is obtained at the center with a leading edge discriminator after time walk correction is applied for off-line analysis.

  1. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Studies of a scintillator-bar detector for a neutron wall at an external target facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yu-Hong; Xu, Hua-Gen; Xu, Hu-Shan; Zhan, Wen-Long; Sun, Zhi-Yu; Guo, Zhong-Yan; Hu, Zheng-Guo; Wang, Jian-Song; Chen, Jun-Ling; Zheng, Chuan

    2009-07-01

    To achieve a better time resolution of a scintillator-bar detector for a neutron wall at the external target facility of HIRFL-CSR, we have carried out a detailed study of the photomultiplier, the wrapping material and the coupling media. The timing properties of a scintillator-bar detector have been studied in detail with cosmic rays using a high and low level signal coincidence. A time resolution of 80 ps has been achieved in the center of the scintillator-bar detector.

  2. Location Privacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiaofeng; Chen, Jidong

    With rapid development of sensor and wireless mobile devices, it is easy to access mobile users' location information anytime and anywhere. On one hand, LBS is becoming more and more valuable and important. On the other hand, location privacy issues raised by such applications have also gained more attention. However, due to the specificity of location information, traditional privacy-preserving techniques in data publishing cannot be used. In this chapter, we will introduce location privacy, and analyze the challenges of location privacy-preserving, and give a survey of existing work including the system architecture, location anonymity and query processing.

  3. Development of experimental platform for high energy density sciences using high-intensity optical lasers at the SACLA x-ray free electron laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabuuchi, Toshinori; Yabashi, Makina; Inubushi, Yuichi; Kon, Akira; Togashi, Tadashi; Tomizawa, Hiromitsu

    2016-10-01

    Combinations of high intensity optical laser and x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) open new frontiers in high energy density (HED) sciences. An experimental platform equipped with high-power Ti:Sapphire laser systems is under commissioning for HED sciences at the XFEL facility, SACLA. The Ti:Sapphire laser system is designed to deliver two laser beams with a maximum power of 500 TW in each to the sample chamber. A hard x-ray beamline of SACLA is also transported to the chamber with a beam focusing capability down to a few microns using sets of compound refractive lenses. The second optical laser pulse or the energetic particles and photons generated by the laser pulse can provide additional flexibilities for HED-related pump-probe experiments, which have been generally performed using single optical laser and XFEL. The development status and future perspectives of the experimental platform will be presented.

  4. The National Ignition Facility: Status and Plans for Laser Fusion and High-Energy-Density Experimental Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, E I

    2002-01-11

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), currently under construction at the University of California's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a $2.25B stadium-sized facility containing a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, 351-nm laser system. NIF is being built by the National Nuclear Security Agency and when completed will be the world's largest laser system, providing a national center to study inertial confinement fusion and the physics of extreme energy densities and pressures. In NIF up to 192 energetic laser beams will compress small fusion targets to conditions where they will ignite and burn, liberating more energy than is required to initiate the fusion reactions. NIF experiments will allow the study of physical processes at temperatures approaching 100 million K and 100 billion times atmospheric pressure. These conditions exist naturally only in the interior of stars and in nuclear weapons explosions. In the course of designing the world's most energetic laser system, a number of significant technology breakthroughs have been achieved. Research is also underway to develop a shorter pulse capability on NIF for high power applications. We discuss here the technology challenges and solutions that have made NIF possible along with enhancements to NIF's design that could lead to exawatt power levels.

  5. A step by step selection method for the location and the size of a waste-to-energy facility targeting the maximum output energy and minimization of gate fee.

    PubMed

    Kyriakis, Efstathios; Psomopoulos, Constantinos; Kokkotis, Panagiotis; Bourtsalas, Athanasios; Themelis, Nikolaos

    2017-06-23

    This study attempts the development of an algorithm in order to present a step by step selection method for the location and the size of a waste-to-energy facility targeting the maximum output energy, also considering the basic obstacle which is in many cases, the gate fee. Various parameters identified and evaluated in order to formulate the proposed decision making method in the form of an algorithm. The principle simulation input is the amount of municipal solid wastes (MSW) available for incineration and along with its net calorific value are the most important factors for the feasibility of the plant. Moreover, the research is focused both on the parameters that could increase the energy production and those that affect the R1 energy efficiency factor. Estimation of the final gate fee is achieved through the economic analysis of the entire project by investigating both expenses and revenues which are expected according to the selected site and outputs of the facility. In this point, a number of commonly revenue methods were included in the algorithm. The developed algorithm has been validated using three case studies in Greece-Athens, Thessaloniki, and Central Greece, where the cities of Larisa and Volos have been selected for the application of the proposed decision making tool. These case studies were selected based on a previous publication made by two of the authors, in which these areas where examined. Results reveal that the development of a «solid» methodological approach in selecting the site and the size of waste-to-energy (WtE) facility can be feasible. However, the maximization of the energy efficiency factor R1 requires high utilization factors while the minimization of the final gate fee requires high R1 and high metals recovery from the bottom ash as well as economic exploitation of recovered raw materials if any.

  6. A new experimental facility for investigating the formation and properties of gas hydrates under simulated seafloor conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, Tommy J.; Peters, David J.; Marshall, Simon L.; West, Olivia R.; Liang, Liyuan; Blencoe, James G.; Alexiades, Vasilios; Jacobs, Gary K.; Naney, Michael T.; Heck, Jack L.

    2001-02-01

    A seafloor process simulator (SPS) has been developed for experimental investigations of the physical, geochemical, and microbiological processes affecting the formation and stability of methane and carbon dioxide hydrates at temperatures and pressures corresponding to ocean depths of 2 km. The SPS is a corrosion-resistant pressure vessel whose salient characteristics are: (i) an operating range suitable for study of methane and carbon dioxide hydrates; (ii) numerous access and observation ports, and (iii) a large (0.0722 m3) internal volume. Initial experiments have shown that the SPS can be used to produce large amounts of high-purity methane hydrate over a wide range of experimental conditions.

  7. Instrumentation report 1: specification, design, calibration, and installation of instrumentation for an experimental, high-level, nuclear waste storage facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brough, W.G.; Patrick, W.C.

    1982-01-01

    The Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C) is being conducted 420 m underground at the Nevada Test Site under the auspices of the US Department of Energy. The test facility houses 11 spent fuel assemblies from an operating commercial nuclear reactor and numerous other thermal sources used to simulate the near-field effects of a large repository. We developed a large-scale instrumentation plan to ensure that a sufficient quality and quantity of data were acquired during the three- to five-year test. These data help satisfy scientific, operational, and radiation safety objectives. Over 800 data channels are being scanned to measure temperature, electrical power, radiation, air flow, dew point, stress, displacement, and equipment operation status (on/off). This document details the criteria, design, specifications, installation, calibration, and current performance of the entire instrumentation package.

  8. Exploratory studies of the cruise performance of upper surface blown configurations. Experimental program: Test facilities, model design instrumentation, and lowspeed, high-lift tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braden, J. A.; Hancock, J. P.; Burdges, K. P.; Hackett, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    The model hardware, test facilities and instrumentation utilized in an experimental study of upper surface blown configurations at cruise is described. The high speed (subsonic) experimental work, studying the aerodynamic effects of wing nacelle geometric variations, was conducted around semispan model configurations composed of diversified, interchangeable components. Power simulation was provided by high pressure air ducted through closed forebody nacelles. Nozzle geometry was varied across size, exit aspect ratio, exit position and boattail angle. Three dimensional force and two dimensional pressure measurements were obtained at cruise Mach numbers from 0.5 to 0.8 and at nozzle pressure ratios up to about 3.0. The experimental investigation was supported by an analytical synthesis of the system using a vortex lattice representation with first order power effects. Results are also presented from a compatibility study in which a short haul transport is designed on the basis of the aerodynamic findings in the experimental study as well as acoustical data obtained in a concurrent program. High lift test data are used to substantiate the projected performance of the selected transport design.

  9. Experimental capabilities of 0.4 PW, 1 shot/min Scarlet laser facility for high energy density science.

    PubMed

    Poole, P L; Willis, C; Daskalova, R L; George, K M; Feister, S; Jiang, S; Snyder, J; Marketon, J; Schumacher, D W; Akli, K U; Van Woerkom, L; Freeman, R R; Chowdhury, E A

    2016-06-10

    We report on the recently completed 400 TW upgrade to the Scarlet laser at The Ohio State University. Scarlet is a Ti:sapphire-based ultrashort pulse system that delivers >10  J in 30 fs pulses to a 2 μm full width at half-maximum focal spot, resulting in intensities exceeding 5×1021  W/cm2. The laser fires at a repetition rate of once per minute and is equipped with a suite of on-demand and on-shot diagnostics detailed here, allowing for rapid collection of experimental statistics. As part of the upgrade, the entire laser system has been redesigned to facilitate consistent, characterized high intensity data collection at high repetition rates. The design and functionality of the laser and target chambers are described along with initial data from commissioning experimental shots.

  10. A 1 GeV Laser Wakefield Accelerator: Experimental Progress at the l'OASIS Facility of LBNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leemans, W. P.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Toth, C. S.; van Tilborg, J.; Nagler, B.; Michel, P.; Nakamura, K.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; Gonsalves, A.; Spence, D. J.; Hooker, S. M.; Filip, C.; Cowan, T.

    2004-11-01

    Experimental progress towards a 1 GeV laser-driven plasma-based accelerator will be discussed. The design of the 1 GeV accelerator module consists of two components: (1) an all-optical electron injector and (2) a plasma channel for laser guiding and electron acceleration to high energy via the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) mechanism. Experimental results on the injector development include the demonstration of laser guiding at relativistic intensities in preformed plasmas and production of quasi-monochromatic electron beams with energy around 100 MeV. Progress on guiding 100 TW laser pulses in capillary-discharge-based plasma channels will be discussed and integration of these channels with the all-optical injector will be reported.

  11. Starkey experimental forest and range.

    Treesearch

    Valerie. Rapp

    2004-01-01

    The Starkey Experimental Forest and Range. (Starkey) is a one-of-a-kind, world class research facility, located in the Blue Mountains of northeastern Oregon. Starkey is the primary field location for scientific study of the effects of deer, elk, and cattle on ecosystems. Most of the 28,000-acre forest and range is enclosed by a game-proof fence.The research...

  12. Design, operation, and monitoring capability of an experimental artificial-recharge facility at East Meadow, Long Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schneider, B.J.; Oaksford, E.T.

    1986-01-01

    Artificial recharge with tertiary-treated sewage is being tested at East Meadow to evaluate the physical and chemical effects on the groundwater system. The recharge facility contains 11 recharge basins and 5 injection wells and is designed to accept 4 million gallons of reclaimed water per day. Of the 11 basins, 7 are recently constructed and will accept 0.5 million gallons per day each. An observation manhole (12-foot inside diameter and extending 16 feet below the basin floor) was installed in each of two basins to enable monitoring and sampling of percolating reclaimed water in the unsaturated zone with instruments such as tensiometers, gravity lysimeters, thermocouples, and soil-gas samplers. Five shallow (100-feet deep) injection wells will each return 0.5 million gallons per day to the groundwater reservoir. Three types of injection-well design are being tested; the differences are in the type of gravel pack around the well screen. When clogging at the well screen occurs, redevelopment should restore the injection capability. Flow to the basins and wells is regulated by automatic flow controllers in which a desired flow rate is maintained by electronic sensors. Basins can also operate in a constant-head mode in which a specified head is maintained in the basin automatically. An observation-well network consisting of 2-inch- and 6-inch-diameter wells was installed within a 1-square-mile area at the recharge facility to monitor aquifer response and recharge. During 48 days of operation within a 17-week period (October 1982 through January 1983), 88.5 million gallons of reclaimed water was applied to the shallow water table aquifer through the recharge basins. A 4.29-foot-high groundwater mound developed during a 14-day test; some water level increase associated with the mound was detected 1,000 ft from the basins. Preliminary water quality data from wells affected by reclaimed water show evidence that mechanisms of mixing, dilution, and dispersion are

  13. [The access of independent midwives to maternity ward technical facilities: the experimentation of a level-1 department].

    PubMed

    Nohuz, E; Brunel, A; Tarraga, E; Albaut, M; Paganelli, C; Gillot, V; Julien, G; Larregain, N; Tarrit, V; Allegre, G; Gerbaud, L

    2015-04-01

    The first aim of this study was to evaluate the access of independent midwives to the technical facilities of a level-1 maternity hospital, with a follow-up of 2 years. The second aim was to evaluate the transfer of clinical responsibility, when a patient stops being managed by the independent midwife to be taken care of by the hospital team. A retrospective study including 51 patients. Analysis of maternal and perinatal data. Of the 51 births, there were 42 vaginal deliveries without intervention (82.35%), 3 instrumental deliveries (5.88%), 6 caesarean sections (11.76%). The midwife-led care was completed in 70.59% of cases. The rate of transfer of clinical responsibility during labor was 25.49%. We conducted a neonatal transfer due to a respiratory distress syndrome. The access to technical support appears as an opportunity for independent midwives to establish a special relationship with their patients. However, this device preserves the possibility of a traditional hospital care when needed. This way, access to the technical support is a safe alternative that has the consent of the users (patients and midwives) as well as of the entire hospital team. Moreover, such device allowed an increase of 5% per year of our obstetrical activity with an estimated increase of 10% per year. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Experimental investigations on active cooling thermal protection structure of hydrocarbon-fueled scramjet combustor in arc heated facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jianqiang, Tu; Jinlong, Peng; Xianning, Yang; Lianzhong, Chen

    2016-10-01

    The active cooling thermal protection technology is the efficient method to resolve the long-duration work and reusable problems of hydrocarbon-fueled scramjet combustor, where worst thermo-mechanical loads occur. The fuel is passed through coolant channels adjacent to the heated surfaces to absorb heat from the heating exchanger panels, prior to injection into the combustor. The heating exchanger both cooled down the wall temperature of the combustor wall and heats and cracks the hydrocarbon fuel inside the panel to permit an easier combustion and satisfying combustion efficiency. The subscale active cooling metallic panels, with dimensions of 100×100 mm and different coolant channel sizes, have been tested under typical combustion thermal environment produced by arc heated Turbulent Flow Duct (TFD). The heat exchange ability of different coolant channel sizes has been obtained. The big-scale active cooling metallic panel, with dimensions of 100 × 750 mm and the coolant channel sizes of better heating exchange performance, has been made and tested in the big-scale arc heated TFD facility. The test results show that the local superheated ablation is easy to happen for the cooling fuel assigned asymmetrically in the bigscale active cooling metallic panel, and the cooling fuel rate can reduce 8%˜10% after spraying the Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) in the heating surface.

  15. Directory of Environmental Education Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Audubon Society, New York, NY.

    The location and character of environmental education facilities and sanctuaries in the United States and Canada are outlined in a directory which is designed to help guide anyone interested in visiting the facilities or learning about preservation and the conservation of natural resources. A description of each facility includes its location by…

  16. Experimental Investigations of the NASA Common Research Model in the NASA Langley National Transonic Facility and NASA Ames 11-Ft Transonic Wind Tunnel (Invited)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, S. M.; Dittberner, Ashley

    2011-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations of the NASA Common Research Model have been conducted in the NASA Langley National Transonic Facility and the NASA Ames 11-ft wind tunnel. Data have been obtained at chord Reynolds numbers of 5 million for five different configurations at both wind tunnels. Force and moment, surface pressure and surface flow visualization data were obtained in both facilities but only the force and moment data are presented herein. Nacelle/pylon, tail effects and tunnel to tunnel variations have been assessed. The data from both wind tunnels show that an addition of a nacelle/pylon gave an increase in drag, decrease in lift and a less nose down pitching moment around the design lift condition of 0.5 and that the tail effects also follow the expected trends. Also, all of the data shown fall within the 2-sigma limits for repeatability. The tunnel to tunnel differences are negligible for lift and pitching moment, while the drag shows a difference of less than ten counts for all of the configurations. These differences in drag may be due to the variation in the sting mounting systems at the two tunnels.

  17. Introduction of a terrestrial free-space optical communications network facility: IN-orbit and Networked Optical ground stations experimental Verification Advanced testbed (INNOVA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoshima, Morio; Munemasa, Yasushi; Takenaka, Hideki; Takayama, Yoshihisa; Koyama, Yoshisada; Kunimori, Hiroo; Kubooka, Toshihiro; Suzuki, Kenji; Yamamoto, Shinichi; Taira, Shinichi; Tsuji, Hiroyuki; Nakazawa, Isao; Akioka, Maki

    2014-03-01

    A terrestrial free-space optical communications network facility, named IN-orbit and Networked Optical ground stations experimental Verification Advanced testbed (INNOVA) is introduced. Many demonstrations have been conducted to verify the usability of sophisticated optical communications equipment in orbit. However, the influence of terrestrial weather conditions remains as an issue to be solved. One potential solution is site diversity, where several ground stations are used. In such systems, implementing direct high-speed optical communications links for transmission of data from satellites to terrestrial sites requires that links can be established even in the presence of clouds and rain. NICT is developing a terrestrial free-space optical communications network called INNOVA for future airborne and satellitebased optical communications projects. Several ground stations and environmental monitoring stations around Japan are being used to explore the site diversity concept. This paper describes the terrestrial free-space optical communications network facility, the monitoring stations around Japan for free-space laser communications, and potential research at NICT.

  18. Experimental Demonstration of Longitudinal Beam Phase-Space Linearizer in a Free-Electron Laser Facility by Corrugated Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Haixiao; Zhang, Meng; Feng, Chao; Zhang, Tong; Wang, Xingtao; Lan, Taihe; Feng, Lie; Zhang, Wenyan; Liu, Xiaoqing; Yao, Haifeng; Shen, Lei; Li, Bin; Zhang, Junqiang; Li, Xuan; Fang, Wencheng; Wang, Dan; Couprie, Marie-emmanuelle; Lin, Guoqiang; Liu, Bo; Gu, Qiang; Wang, Dong; Zhao, Zhentang

    2014-12-01

    Removal of the undesired time-energy correlations in the electron beam is of paramount importance for efficient lasing of a high-gain free-electron laser. Recently, it has been theoretically and experimentally demonstrated that the longitudinal wakefield excited by the electrons themselves in a corrugated structure allows for precise control of the electron beam phase space. In this Letter, we report the first utilization of a corrugated structure as a beam linearizer in the operation of a seeded free-electron laser driven by a 140 MeV linear accelerator, where a gain of ˜10 000 over spontaneous emission was achieved at the second harmonic of the 1047 nm seed laser, and a free-electron laser bandwidth narrowing by 50% was observed, in good agreement with the theoretical expectations.

  19. Experimental investigation of bright spots in broadband, gated x-ray images of ignition-scale implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Barrios, M. A.; Suter, L. J.; Glenn, S.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Collins, G. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Izumi, N.; Ma, T.; Scott, H.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Regan, S. P.; Epstein, R.; Kyrala, G. A.

    2013-07-15

    Bright spots in the hot spot intensity profile of gated x-ray images of ignition-scale implosions at the National Ignition Facility [G. H. Miller et al., Opt. Eng. 443, (2004)] are observed. X-ray images of cryogenically layered deuterium-tritium (DT) and tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) ice capsules, and gas filled plastic shell capsules (Symcap) were recorded along the hohlraum symmetry axis. Heterogeneous mixing of ablator material and fuel into the hot spot (i.e., hot-spot mix) by hydrodynamic instabilities causes the bright spots. Hot-spot mix increases the radiative cooling of the hot spot. Fourier analysis of the x-ray images is used to quantify the evolution of bright spots in both x- and k-space. Bright spot images were azimuthally binned to characterize bright spot location relative to known isolated defects on the capsule surface. A strong correlation is observed between bright spot location and the fill tube for both Symcap and cryogenically layered DT and THD ice targets, indicating the fill tube is a significant seed for the ablation front instability causing hot-spot mix. The fill tube is the predominant seed for Symcaps, while other capsule non-uniformities are dominant seeds for the cryogenically layered DT and THD ice targets. A comparison of the bright spot power observed for Si- and Ge-doped ablator targets shows heterogeneous mix in Symcap targets is mostly material from the doped ablator layer.

  20. Can performance-based incentives improve motivation of nurses and midwives in primary facilities in northern Ghana? A quasi-experimental study.

    PubMed

    Aninanya, Gifty Apiung; Howard, Natasha; Williams, John E; Apam, Benjamin; Prytherch, Helen; Loukanova, Svetla; Kamara, Eunice Karanja; Otupiri, Easmon

    2016-01-01

    Background Lack of an adequate and well-performing health workforce has emerged as the biggest barrier to scaling up health services provision in sub-Saharan Africa. As the global community commits to the Sustainable Development Goals and universal health coverage, health workforce challenges are critical. In northern Ghana, performance-based incentives (PBIs) were introduced to improve health worker motivation and service quality. Objective The goal of this study was to determine the impact of PBIs on maternal health worker motivation in two districts in northern Ghana. Design A quasi-experimental study design with pre- and post-intervention measurement was used. PBIs were implemented for 2 years in six health facilities in Kassena-Nankana District with six health facilities in Builsa District serving as comparison sites. Fifty pre- and post-intervention structured interviews and 66 post-intervention in-depth interviews were conducted with health workers. Motivation was assessed using constructs for job satisfaction, pride, intrinsic motivation, timelines/attendance, and organisational commitment. Quantitative data were analysed to determine changes in motivation between intervention and comparison facilities pre- and post-intervention using STATA™ version 13. Qualitative data were analysed thematically using NVivo 10 to explore possible reasons for quantitative findings. Results PBIs were associated with slightly improved maternal health worker motivation. Mean values for overall motivation between intervention and comparison health workers were 0.6 versus 0.7 at baseline and 0.8 versus 0.7 at end line, respectively. Differences at baseline and end line were 0.1 (p=0.40 and p=0.50 respectively), with an overall 0.01 difference in difference (p=0.90). Qualitative interviews indicated that PBIs encouraged health workers to work harder and be more punctual, increasing reported pride and job satisfaction. Conclusions The results contribute evidence on the effects