Science.gov

Sample records for experimental field studies

  1. An Experimental Method for Semantic Field Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutler, Anne

    This paper emphasizes the need for empirical research and objective discovery procedures in semantics, and illustrates a method by which these goals may be obtained. The aim of the methodology described is to provide a description of the internal structure of a semantic field by eliciting the description--in an objective, standardized manner--from…

  2. Experimental and field studies with thiophanate in pigs.

    PubMed

    Baines, D M; Dalton, S E; Eichler, D A

    1976-08-14

    Thiophanate, administered at a dosage of 50 mg per kg to artifically infected pigs, removed 96 to 99 per cent of adult Oesophagostomum spp, Hyostrongylus rubidus and Trichuris suis. Activity was also high against larval stages of these nematodes, except for 26-day-old T suis. Thiophanate also showed ovicidal and larvicidal activity against H rubidus and Oesophagostomum spp. At 50 mg per kg thiophanate administered alone was inactive against Ascaris suum and Metastrongylus apri, the former species also being refractory at 200 mg per kg. Field trials confirmed these efficacy results in naturally infected animals. Pellet formulations providing mean dosages of 63 mg thiophanate per kg for adult pigs and 75 mg thiophanate per kg with 83 mg piperazine base per kg for growing pigs were highly effective in reducing the faecal output of Oesophagostomum spp, H rubidus and T suis eggs. In growing pigs, A suum was controlled by the thiophanate/piperazine product. No palatability or tolerance problems were observed when thiophanate or thiophanate/piperazine mixtures were administered at recommended dosage or multiples thereof in experimental or field studies.

  3. Phreatomagmatic explosive eruption processes informed by field and experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, Greg; Graettinger, Alison; Sonder, Ingo

    2015-04-01

    Phreatomagmatic explosive eruptions occur during the lifetime of nearly every volcano. Maar-diatremes form excellent case studies to understand such eruptions because most of these volcanoes are monogenetic so that the effects of the dominant phreatomagmatic activity are not overprinted by other processes as might occur at a polygenetic volcano. Diatremes preserve evidence of magma injection and explosions at various levels, in the form of irregularly shaped intrusions and vertical domains of country rock breccia and pyroclasts, and usually have subsidence features around the outer parts. Field data on intrusions in diatremes give analog information on the sizes of magma batches that might fuel phreatomagmatic explosions, and therefore the energies of individual explosions. Tephra rings often are dominated by country rock clasts, with progressively deeper-seated clasts appearing at progressively higher stratigraphic levels in the tephra. Scaled experiments with buried explosives show that only shallow explosions (<200 m) can deposit material onto tephra rings, and coarse ballistics are emplaced onto tephra rings mainly by explosions less than 100 m deep; therefore the presence of deep-seated lithics is related to mixing by multiple (non-erupting) explosions at various depths within the diatremes, not necessarily to progressive deepening of explosions. Excavation of experimental craters shows that mixing occurs through a combination of upward displacement and progressive disaggregation of host material domains, and marginal subsidence. Experimental explosion jets show a range of behaviors that depend on the scaled depth of explosions (physical depth scaled against explosion energy) and on the effects of pre-explosion crater morphology. Many scaled depth and pre-explosion crater combinations result in jets that collapse back into the crater and expel fine-grained density currents that travel radially outward. Field observations of fine-grained ash beds in tephra

  4. Review of Experimental Concepts for Studying the Quantum Vacuum Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, E. W.; Teofilo, V. L.; Haisch, B.; Puthoff, H. E.; Nickisch, L. J.; Rueda, A.; Cole, D. C.

    2006-01-01

    We review concepts that provide an experimental framework for exploring the possibility and limitations of accessing energy from the space vacuum environment. Quantum electrodynamics (QED) and stochastic electrodynamics (SED) are the theoretical approaches guiding this experimental investigation. This investigation explores the question of whether the quantum vacuum field contains useful energy that can be exploited for applications under the action of a catalyst, or cavity structure, so that energy conservation is not violated. This is similar to the same technical problem at about the same level of technology as that faced by early nuclear energy pioneers who searched for, and successfully discovered, the unique material structure that caused the release of nuclear energy via the neutron chain reaction.

  5. Review of Experimental Concepts for Studying the Quantum Vacuum Field

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, E. W.; Puthoff, H. E.; Teofilo, V. L.; Nickisch, L. J.; Rueda, A.; Cole, D. C.

    2006-01-20

    We review concepts that provide an experimental framework for exploring the possibility and limitations of accessing energy from the space vacuum environment. Quantum electrodynamics (QED) and stochastic electrodynamics (SED) are the theoretical approaches guiding this experimental investigation. This investigation explores the question of whether the quantum vacuum field contains useful energy that can be exploited for applications under the action of a catalyst, or cavity structure, so that energy conservation is not violated. This is similar to the same technical problem at about the same level of technology as that faced by early nuclear energy pioneers who searched for, and successfully discovered, the unique material structure that caused the release of nuclear energy via the neutron chain reaction.

  6. Feasibility Study for the Establishment of Experimental Field Study Centers (Beachhead Colleges). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antioch Coll., Yellow Springs, OH.

    The Union for Research and Experimentation in Higher Education, a consortium of 10 colleges, initiated an experimental study of a new model for off-campus education in selected problematic areas. The model places students and faculty members in Field Study Centers-- or Beachhead Colleges --to help solve local problems through interaction between…

  7. Experimental studies on near-field holographic antenna measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Yingxi; Xu, Linfen; An, Hongye; Sun, Jixian; Lou, Zheng; Yang, Ji; Zhang, Xuguo; Li, Zhenqiang; Lu, Dengrong; Pang, Xinghai; Li, Yang

    2016-07-01

    A near-field millimeter-wave holography system operating in the 3-mm waveband have been developed as a prototype for DATE5, a 5-m terahertz telescope proposed to be deployed at Dome A, Antarctica. Experimental measurements at 92 GHz have been made on a 1.45-m test antenna. During the night time at which the ambient temperature doesn't vary rapidly, a 75-minute repeatability (repeating measurement 3 times) of 2.3 μm rms has been achieved with an aperture resolution of 46 mm. A local surface change of known value is correctly detected. After long-time repeating measurements, thermal-induced feed displacement is also detected with an accuracy of approximately 20 μm. Random error factors of the experiment system are evaluated and their contributions to the derived surface error are also simulated, showing that relative poor pointing of the test antenna is the major factor limiting the measurement repeatability.

  8. Are Facilitated Mentoring Programs Beneficial? A Randomized Experimental Field Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egan, Toby Marshall; Song, Zhaoli

    2008-01-01

    Results from a pretest-posttest randomized field experiment study with a control group comparing the impact of high- and low-level-facilitated mentoring programs on new employees' performance and perceptions about their jobs and organization were reported in this paper. Results indicated increases in job satisfaction, organizational commitment,…

  9. Field experimental study of traffic-induced turbulence on highways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Estébanez, A.; Pascual-Muñoz, P.; Yagüe, C.; Laina, R.; Castro-Fresno, D.

    2012-12-01

    This paper is focused on traffic-induced turbulence (TIT) analysis from a field campaign performed in 2011, using ultrasonic anemometers deployed in the M-12 Highways, Madrid (Spain). The study attempts to improve knowledge about the influence of traffic-related parameters on turbulence. Linear relationships between vehicle speed and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) values are found with coefficients of determination (R2) of 0.75 and 0.55 for the lorry and van respectively. The vehicle-induced fluctuations in the wind components (u‧, v‧ and w‧) showed the highest values for the longitudinal component (v) because of the wake-passing effect. In the analysis of wake produced by moving vehicles it is indicated how the turbulence dissipates in relation to a distance d and height h. The TKE values were found to be higher at the measuring points closer to the surface during the wake analysis.

  10. An experimental field study of weight salience and food choice.

    PubMed

    Incollingo Rodriguez, Angela C; Finch, Laura E; Buss, Julia; Guardino, Christine M; Tomiyama, A Janet

    2015-06-01

    Laboratory research has found that individuals will consume more calories and make unhealthy food choices when in the presence of an overweight individual, sometimes even regardless of what that individual is eating. This study expanded these laboratory paradigms to the field to examine how weight salience influences eating in the real world. More specifically, we tested the threshold of the effect of weight salience of food choice to see if a more subtle weight cue (e.g., images) would be sufficient to affect food choice. Attendees (N = 262) at Obesity Week 2013, a weight-salient environment, viewed slideshows containing an image of an overweight individual, an image of a thin individual, or no image (text only), and then selected from complimentary snacks. Results of ordinal logistic regression analysis showed that participants who viewed the image of the overweight individual had higher odds of selecting the higher calorie snack compared to those who viewed the image of the thin individual (OR = 1.77, 95% CI = [1.04, 3.04]), or no image (OR = 2.42, 95% CI = [1.29, 4.54]). Perceiver BMI category did not moderate the influence of image on food choice, as these results occurred regardless of participant BMI. These findings suggest that in the context of societal weight salience, weight-related cues alone may promote unhealthy eating in the general public.

  11. Experimental study of flow field around a plunging flexible hydrofoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Alarcon, Leonardo; Yang, Tao; Shu, Fangjun; Wei, Mingjun

    2011-11-01

    Recent developments in micro air vehicles (MAVs) have led to the improvement of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations capable of simulating flexible flapping wing phenomena. For validation of these simulations, an experimental methodology is applied to characterize the flow physics involved with an immersed flexible flapping hydrofoil. Using a one-degree of freedom crank-shaft system, a silicone hydrofoil was actuated to flap under various kinematic conditions. The hydrofoil was subject to active plunging and passive pitching motion in both water and aqueous glycerin solutions. Phase-locked particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements were obtained around the flapping hydrofoil. These measurements, along with force measurements using a six-axis load cell, are used to compare the results with those of the numerical simulations. By comparing the hydrofoil deformation, vortex evolution and force generation, good agreements between CFD and experimental results were observed. Supported by Army High Performance Computing Research Center.

  12. Experimental Study of Impinging Jets Flow-Fields

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-27

    the jet plumes and outwash flow . Lift plate surface pressure measurements have also been made. The unsteady flow , known to have significant large...contributed to the identification and measurement of the major features of the flow -field generated by the two parallel impinging model jets. These...and outwash flow . 3 Laser Doppler Velocimeter Measurements Highlights of the LDV measurements are presented in the next two figures

  13. Use of field experimental studies to evaluate emergency response models

    SciTech Connect

    Gudiksen, P.H.; Lange, R.; Rodriguez, D.J.; Nasstrom, J.S.

    1985-07-16

    The three-dimensional diagnostic wind field model (MATHEW) and the particle-in-cell atmospheric transport and diffusion model (ADPIC) are used by the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability to estimate the environmental consequences of accidental releases of radioactivity into the atmosphere. These models have undergone extensive evaluations against field experiments conducted in a variety of environmental settings ranging from relatively flat to very complex terrain areas. Simulations of tracer experiments conducted in a complex mountain valley setting revealed that 35 to 50% of the comparisons between calculated and measured tracer concentrations were within a factor of 5. This may be compared with a factor of 2 for 50% of the comparisons for relatively flat terrain. This degradation of results in complex terrain is due to a variety of factors such as the limited representativeness of measurements in complex terrain, the limited spatial resolution afforded by the models, and the turbulence parameterization based on sigma/sub theta/ measurements to evaluate the eddy diffusivities. Measurements of sigma/sub theta/ in complex terrain exceed those measured over flat terrain by a factor of 2 to 3 leading to eddy diffusivities that are unrealistically high. The results of model evaluations are very sensitive to the quality and the representativeness of the meteorological data. This is particularly true for measurements near the source. The capability of the models to simulate the dispersion of an instantaneously produced cloud of particulates was illustrated to be generally within a factor of 2 over flat terrain. 19 refs., 16 figs.

  14. Experimental studies on ion acceleration and stream line detachment in a diverging magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Terasaka, K.; Yoshimura, S.; Ogiwara, K.; Aramaki, M.; Tanaka, M. Y.

    2010-01-01

    The flow structure of ions in a diverging magnetic field has been experimentally studied in an electron cyclotron resonance plasma. The flow velocity field of ions has been measured with directional Langmuir probes calibrated with the laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. For low ion-temperature plasmas, it is concluded that the ion acceleration due to the axial electric field is important compared with that of gas dynamic effect. It has also been found that the detachment of ion stream line from the magnetic field line takes place when the parameter |fciLB∕Vi| becomes order unity, where fci, LB, and Vi are the ion cyclotron frequency, the characteristic scale length of magnetic field inhomogeneity, and the ion flow velocity, respectively. In the detachment region, a radial electric field is generated in the plasma and the ions move straight with the E×B rotation driven by the radial electric field. PMID:20838424

  15. Experimental Study of Magnetic Field Effect on dc Corona Discharge in Low Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elabbas, K.

    2014-09-01

    In the present paper, an attempt was made to investigate the effect of applying a transverse magnetic field on the dc corona discharge behavior in low vacuum. In general, two experiments were carried out in this work: the first is the ionization-region magnetic field experiment, and the second was the drift region magnetic field experiment. In these experiments, permanent magnets were used to produce magnetic field. The degree of vacuum used in this test was 0.4×105 Pa. It is found that the effect of the magnetic field increases as the degree of vacuum increases. It is also seen from this study that the corona current values are higher with magnetic fields than without magnetic fields. The experimental results indicate that the enhancement of the magnetic field near the wire discharge electrode has a significant influence on the increment of the discharge current. The effect of the magnetic field on the discharge current is the most significant with the negative corona discharges rather than with positive corona discharge. In contrast to, the curves were demonstrated that the application of magnetic fields in drift region magnetic field does not significantly change the corona discharge current. Discharge characteristics of magnetically enhanced corona discharges, extracted from this study, can be applied to various industrial applications, such as, in an electrostatic enhancement filter for the purpose of capturing fine particles, and as effective method for production of high ozone concentrations in a generator as compared to the ultraviolet (UV) radiation method.

  16. Argand-plane vorticity singularities in complex scalar optical fields: an experimental study using optical speckle.

    PubMed

    Rothschild, Freda; Bishop, Alexis I; Kitchen, Marcus J; Paganin, David M

    2014-03-24

    The Cornu spiral is, in essence, the image resulting from an Argand-plane map associated with monochromatic complex scalar plane waves diffracting from an infinite edge. Argand-plane maps can be useful in the analysis of more general optical fields. We experimentally study particular features of Argand-plane mappings known as "vorticity singularities" that are associated with mapping continuous single-valued complex scalar speckle fields to the Argand plane. Vorticity singularities possess a hierarchy of Argand-plane catastrophes including the fold, cusp and elliptic umbilic. We also confirm their connection to vortices in two-dimensional complex scalar waves. The study of vorticity singularities may also have implications for higher-dimensional fields such as coherence functions and multi-component fields such as vector and spinor fields.

  17. Experimental studies of collective excitations of a BEC in light-induced gauge fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuan-Hsun; Niffenegger, Robert; Blasing, David; Olson, Abraham; Chen, Yong P.

    2015-05-01

    We present our experimental studies of collective modes including spin dipole mode and scissors mode of a 87Rb Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in the presence of Raman light-induced gauge fields and synthetic spin-orbit coupling (SOC). By Raman dressing the mf spin states within the F =1 manifold, we engineer atoms' energy-momentum dispersion to create synthetic SOC, and spin dependent synthetic electric and magnetic fields. We have used spin dependent synthetic electric fields to make two BECs with different spins oscillate and collide in the optical trap. We have studied the effects of SOC on both the momentum damping and thermalization behaviors of the BECs when undergoing such spin dipole oscillations. We have also used spatially dependent synthetic electric fields to excite the scissors mode, which has been used as a probe for superfluidity. We have investigated the effects of the synthetic gauge fields and SOC on the measured scissors mode.

  18. Experimental studies of zonal flow and field in compact helical system plasmaa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujisawa, A.; Itoh, K.; Shimizu, A.; Nakano, H.; Ohshima, S.; Iguchi, H.; Matsuoka, K.; Okamura, S.; Minami, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Nagaoka, K.; Ida, K.; Toi, K.; Takahashi, C.; Kojima, M.; Nishimura, S.; Isobe, M.; Suzuki, C.; Akiyama, T.; Ido, T.; Nagashima, Y.; Itoh, S.-I.; Diamond, P. H.

    2008-05-01

    The experimental studies on zonal flows and turbulence have been carried out in Compact Helical System [K. Matsuoka, S. Kubo, M. Hosokawa et al., in Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, Proc. 12th Int. Conf., Nice, 1988 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1989, Vol. 2, p. 411] using twin heavy ion beam probes. The paper presents the experimental observations of stationary zonal flow, nonlinear couplings between zonal flow and turbulence, and the role of zonal flow in the improved confinement, together with the recent discovery of zonal magnetic field. The presented experimental results strongly support the new paradigm that the plasma transport should be considered as a system of drift wave and zonal flows, and provides the first direct evidence for turbulence dynamo that the structured magnetic field can be really generated by turbulence.

  19. Experimental studies of excitations in a BEC in light-induced gauge fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuan-Hsun; Blasing, David; Olson, Abraham; Niffenegger, Robert; Chen, Yong P.

    2014-05-01

    We present our experimental studies of various excitation processes in a 87Rb Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in the presence of Raman light-induced gauge fields. We have systematically studied controllable inter-band excitations by modulating the strength of the Raman coupling, and probed the resultant decay from the upper dressed bands and heating of the BEC. We also present preliminary results probing the effects of synthetic spin-orbit coupling and gauge fields on collective excitations as well as photoassociation processes in the BEC.

  20. Combining experimental evolution and field population assays to study the evolution of host range breadth.

    PubMed

    Fellous, S; Angot, G; Orsucci, M; Migeon, A; Auger, P; Olivieri, I; Navajas, M

    2014-05-01

    Adapting to specific hosts often involves trade-offs that limit performance on other hosts. These constraints may either lead to narrow host ranges (i.e. specialists, able to exploit only one host type) or wide host ranges often leading to lower performance on each host (i.e. generalists). Here, we combined laboratory experiments on field populations with experimental evolution to investigate the impact of adaptation to the host on host range evolution and associated performance over this range. We used the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae, a model organism for studies on the evolution of specialization. Field mite populations were sampled on three host plant species: tomato, citrus tree and rosebay (Nerium oleander). Testing these populations in the laboratory revealed that tomato populations of mites could exploit tomato only, citrus populations could exploit citrus and tomato whereas Nerium populations could exploit all three hosts. Besides, the wider niche ranges of citrus and Nerium populations came at the cost of low performance on their non-native hosts. Experimental lines selected to live on the same three host species exhibited similar patterns of host range and relative performance. This result suggests that adaptation to a new host species may lead to wider host ranges but at the expense of decreased performance on other hosts. We conclude that experimental evolution may reliably inform on evolution in the field. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  1. An Experimental Study of the Effects of A Rotating Magnetic Field on Electrically Conducting Aqueous Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran Narayanan; Mazuruk, Konstantin

    1998-01-01

    The use of a rotating magnetic field for stirring metallic melts has been a commonly adopted practice for a fairly long period. The elegance of the technique stems from its non-intrusive nature and the intense stirring it can produce in an electrically conducting medium. A further application of the method in recent times has been in the area of crystal growth from melts (e.g. germanium). The latter experiments have been mainly research oriented in order to understand the basic physics of the process and to establish norms for optimizing such a technique for the commercial production of crystals. When adapted for crystal growth applications, the rotating magnetic field is used to induce a slow flow or rotation in the melt which in effect significantly curtails temperature field oscillations in the melt. These oscillations are known to cause dopant striations and thereby inhomogeneities in the grown crystal that essentially degrades the crystal quality. The applied field strength is typically of the order of milli-Teslas with a frequency range between 50-400 Hz. In this investigation, we report findings from experiments that explore the feasibility of applying a rotating magnetic field to aqueous salt solutions, that are characterized by conductivities that are several orders of magnitude smaller than semi-conductor melts. The aim is to study the induced magnetic field and consequently the induced flow in such in application. Detailed flow field description obtained through non-intrusive particle displacement tracking will be reported along with an analytical assessment of the results. It is anticipated that the obtained results will facilitate in establishing a parameter range over which the technique can be applied to obtain a desired flow field distribution. This method can find applicability in the growth of crystals from aqueous solutions and give an experimenter another controllable parameter towards improving the quality of the grown crystal.

  2. An experimental study of the structure and acoustic field of a jet in a cross stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camelier, I.; Karamcheti, K.; Hodder, B.

    1975-01-01

    The investigation reported is related to studies of the noise generated by a lifting jet in forward motion such as in the case of a V/STOL aircraft. The investigation involved experiments in a subsonic wind tunnel. The two-microphone cross-correlation method used for measuring the acoustic intensity provides data concerning the noise directly radiated from the source, practically free from any reflection effects. The theoretical basis of the two-microphone method is discussed along with the experimental apparatus, the characteristics of the flow inside the jet, and the features of the acoustic field.

  3. Experimental study of spatial coherence diffraction based on full-field coherence visualization.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Juan; Wang, Wei

    2014-10-01

    A novel optical geometry for direct visualization of the optical coherence function is proposed. The diffractions of partially coherent light by apertures with various forms are experimentally investigated, and the full-field spatial coherence functions have been observed by using the proposed interferometric system. Similar to the well-known Airy disk stemming from optical diffraction, we studied the spatial coherence function near the coherence focal plane on the analogy of the Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction integrals. Following the conventional definitions for the optical resolutions in the optical imaging system, the lateral and longitudinal resolutions for spatial coherence imaging have been proposed.

  4. Experimental Study on Flow Field behind Backward-Facing Step Using Detonation-Driven Shock Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae-Hwan; Obara, Tetsuro; Ohyagi, Shigeharu; Yoshikawa, Masato

    As a research to develop a SCRAM-jet engine is actively conducted, a necessity to produce a high-enthalpy flow in a laboratory is increasing. In order to develop the SCRAM-jet engine, stabilized combustion in a supersonic flow-field should be attained, in which a duration time of flow is extremely short. Therefore, a mixing process of breathed air and fuel, which is injected into supersonic flow-fields is one of the most important problem. Since, the flow inside SCRAM-jet engine has high-enthalpy, an experimental facility is required to produce such high-enthalpy flow-field. In this study, a detonation-driven shock tunnel was built and was used to produce high-enthalpy flow. At first, a performance of this facility was investigated in order to obtain a Tayloring condition. Furthermore, SCRAM-jet combustor model equipped backward-facing step was installed at test section and flow-fields were visualized using color-schlieren technique. The fuel was injected perpendicular to the flow of Mach number three behind step. The height of backward-facing step and injection pressure were changed to investigate effects of the step on a mixing characteristic between air and fuel. The schlieren photograph and pressure histories show that the fuel was ignited behind step and the height of step is important factor to ignite a fuel in a supersonic flow-field.

  5. Experimental Study of Soil Organic Matter Loss From Cultivated Field Plots In The Venezuelan Andes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellanger, B.; Huon, S.; Velasquez, F.; Vallès, V.; Girardin A, C.; Mariotti, A. B.

    The question of discriminating sources of organic matter in suspended particles of stream flows can be addressed by using total organic carbon (TOC) concentration and stable isotope (13C, 15N) measurements when constant fluxes of organic matter supply can be assumed. However, little is known on the dynamics of organic matter release during soil erosion and on the temporal stability of its isotopic signature. In this study, we have monitored soil organic carbon loss and water runoff using natural rainfall events on three experimental field plots with different vegetation cover (bare soil, maize and coffee fields), set up on natural slopes of a tropical mountainous watershed in NW Venezuela (09°13'32'' ­ 09°10'00''N, 70°13'49'' ­ 70°18'34''W). Runoff and soil loss are markedly superior for the bare field plot than for the coffee field plot: by a factor 15 ­ 36, respectively, for the five-month experiment, and by a factor 30 ­ 120, respectively, during a single rainfall event experiment. Since runoff and soil organic matter loss are closely linked during most of the flow (at the time scales of this study), TOC concentration in suspended matter is constant. Furthermore, stable isotope compositions reflect those of top-soil organic matter from which they originate.

  6. An experimental field study of delayed density dependence in natural populations of Aedes albopictus.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Rachael K; Bradley, Caitlin; Apperson, Charles S; Gould, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Aedes albopictus, a species known to transmit dengue and chikungunya viruses, is primarily a container-inhabiting mosquito. The potential for pathogen transmission by Ae. albopictus has increased our need to understand its ecology and population dynamics. Two parameters that we know little about are the impact of direct density-dependence and delayed density-dependence in the larval stage. The present study uses a manipulative experimental design, under field conditions, to understand the impact of delayed density dependence in a natural population of Ae. albopictus in Raleigh, North Carolina. Twenty liter buckets, divided in half prior to experimentation, placed in the field accumulated rainwater and detritus, providing oviposition and larval production sites for natural populations of Ae. albopictus. Two treatments, a larvae present and larvae absent treatment, were produced in each bucket. After five weeks all larvae were removed from both treatments and the buckets were covered with fine mesh cloth. Equal numbers of first instars were added to both treatments in every bucket. Pupae were collected daily and adults were frozen as they emerged. We found a significant impact of delayed density-dependence on larval survival, development time and adult body size in containers with high larval densities. Our results indicate that delayed density-dependence will have negative impacts on the mosquito population when larval densities are high enough to deplete accessible nutrients faster than the rate of natural food accumulation.

  7. Experimental study of the nonlinear diffusion of a magnetic field and skin explosion of cylindrical conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaikovsky, S. A.; Oreshkin, V. I.; Datsko, I. M.; Labetskaya, N. A.; Rybka, D. V.; Ratakhin, N. A.

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents the results of an experimental study of the skin explosion of cylindrical conductors of diameter 1-3 mm (copper, aluminum, titanium, steel 3, and stainless steel) at a peak magnetic field of 200-600 T. The experiments were carried out on the MIG pulsed power generator at a current of up to 2.5 MA and a current rise time of 100 ns. The surface explosion of a conductor was identified by the appearance of a flash of extreme ultraviolet radiation. A minimum magnetic induction has been determined below which no plasma is generated at the conductor surface. For copper, aluminum, steel 3, titanium, and stainless steel, the minimum magnetic induction has been estimated to be (to within 10%) 375, 270, 280, 220, and 245 T, respectively.

  8. Experimental study of the nonlinear diffusion of a magnetic field and skin explosion of cylindrical conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Chaikovsky, S. A.; Datsko, I. M.; Labetskaya, N. A.; Rybka, D. V.; Ratakhin, N. A.; Oreshkin, V. I.

    2015-11-15

    The paper presents the results of an experimental study of the skin explosion of cylindrical conductors of diameter 1–3 mm (copper, aluminum, titanium, steel 3, and stainless steel) at a peak magnetic field of 200–600 T. The experiments were carried out on the MIG pulsed power generator at a current of up to 2.5 MA and a current rise time of 100 ns. The surface explosion of a conductor was identified by the appearance of a flash of extreme ultraviolet radiation. A minimum magnetic induction has been determined below which no plasma is generated at the conductor surface. For copper, aluminum, steel 3, titanium, and stainless steel, the minimum magnetic induction has been estimated to be (to within 10%) 375, 270, 280, 220, and 245 T, respectively.

  9. Polyprenyl Immunostimulant in Feline Rhinotracheitis: Randomized Placebo-Controlled Experimental and Field Safety Studies

    PubMed Central

    Legendre, Alfred M.; Kuritz, Tanya; Heidel, Robert Eric; Baylor, Vivian M.

    2017-01-01

    Feline rhinotracheitis is a ubiquitous disease caused by feline herpesvirus type 1 (FHV-1). The disease is easily transmissible and common in multi-cat environments where even vaccinated cats can develop clinical signs of respiratory or ocular disease or both when exposed to the virus. Prior to the work reported here, there was no licensed treatment for the disease on the market. We hypothesized that polyprenyl immunostimulant (PI), an immunomodulatory veterinary biologic, would be useful in treating feline rhinotracheitis by reducing the severity of respiratory or/and ocular disease. We conducted double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials in experimentally infected cats to establish the efficacy of PI. Specific pathogen-free cats were administered a placebo (n = 20) or PI (n = 20) starting on the day of FHV-1 experimental challenge. Trained, masked observers applied a standardized scoring system daily in clinical examinations for 14 days after the FHV-1 challenge. The cats treated with PI had significantly lower disease severity scores over the course of the experiment compared to the cats in the placebo group (p = 0.05). The safety studies, including a field safety study involving 390 owned cats in 10 states, showed that PI was safe to use in cats as young as 8 weeks of age. PMID:28289684

  10. Experimental Study of Thermal Field Evolution in the Short-Impending Stage Before Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yaqiong; Ma, Jin; Liu, Peixun; Chen, Shunyun

    2017-08-01

    Phenomena at critical points are vital for identifying the short-impending stage prior to earthquakes. The peak stress is a critical point when stress is converted from predominantly accumulation to predominantly release. We call the duration between the peak stress and instability "the meta-instability stage", which refers to the short-impending stage of earthquakes. The meta-instability stage consists of a steady releasing quasi-static stage and an accelerated releasing quasi-dynamic stage. The turning point of the above two stages is the remaining critical point. To identify the two critical points in the field, it is necessary to study the characteristic phenomena of various physical fields in the meta-instability stage in the laboratory, and the strain and displacement variations were studied. Considering that stress and relative displacement can be detected by thermal variations and peculiarities in the full-field observations, we employed a cooled thermal infrared imaging system to record thermal variations in the meta-instability stage of stick slip events generated along a simulated, precut planer strike slip fault in a granodiorite block on a horizontally bilateral servo-controlled press machine. The experimental results demonstrate the following: (1) a large area of decreasing temperatures in wall rocks and increasing temperatures in sporadic sections of the fault indicate entrance into the meta-instability stage. (2) The rapid expansion of regions of increasing temperatures on the fault and the enhancement of temperature increase amplitude correspond to the turning point from the quasi-static stage to the quasi-dynamic stage. Our results reveal thermal indicators for the critical points prior to earthquakes that provide clues for identifying the short-impending stage of earthquakes.

  11. UAS imaging for automated crop lodging detection: a case study over an experimental maize field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Tianxing; Starek, Michael J.; Brewer, Michael J.; Masiane, Tiisetso; Murray, Seth C.

    2017-05-01

    Lodging has been recognized as one of the major destructive factors for crop quality and yield, particularly in corn. A variety of contributing causes, e.g. disease and/or pest, weather conditions, excessive nitrogen, and high plant density, may lead to lodging before harvesting season. Traditional lodging detection strategies mainly rely on ground data collection, which is insufficient in efficiency and accuracy. To address this problem, this research focuses on the use of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) for automated detection of crop lodging. The study was conducted over an experimental corn field at the Texas A and M AgriLife Research and Extension Center at Corpus Christi, Texas, during the growing season of 2016. Nadir-view images of the corn field were taken by small UAS platforms equipped with consumer grade RGB and NIR cameras on a per week basis, enabling a timely observation of the plant growth. 3D structural information of the plants was reconstructed using structure-from-motion photogrammetry. The structural information was then applied to calculate crop height, and rates of growth. A lodging index for detecting corn lodging was proposed afterwards. Ground truth data of lodging was collected on a per row basis and used for fair assessment and tuning of the detection algorithm. Results show the UAS-measured height correlates well with the ground-measured height. More importantly, the lodging index can effectively reflect severity of corn lodging and yield after harvesting.

  12. Analytical and experimental study of axisymmetric truncated plug nozzle flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, T. J.; Sule, W. P.; Fanning, A. E.; Giel, T. V.; Galanga, F. L.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental and analytical investigation of the flow field and base pressure of internal-external-expansion truncated plug nozzles are discussed. Experimental results for two axisymmetric, conical plug-cylindrical shroud, truncated plug nozzles are presented for both open and closed wake operations. These results include extensive optical and pressure data covering nozzle flow field and base pressure characteristics, diffuser effects, lip shock strength, Mach disc behaviour, and the recompression and reverse flow regions. Transonic experiments for a special planar transonic section are presented. An extension of the analytical method of Hall and Mueller to include the internal shock wave from the shroud exit is presented for closed wake operation. Results of this analysis include effects on the flow field and base pressure of ambient pressure ratio, nozzle geometry, and the ratio of specific heats. Static thrust is presented as a function of ambient pressure ratio and nozzle geometry. A new transonic solution method is also presented.

  13. A method to integrate descriptive and experimental field studies at the level of data and empirical concepts1

    PubMed Central

    Bijou, Sidney W.; Peterson, Robert F.; Ault, Marion H.

    1968-01-01

    It is the thesis of this paper that data from descriptive and experimental field studies can be interrelated at the level of data and empirical concepts if both sets are derived from frequency-of-occurrence measures. The methodology proposed for a descriptive field study is predicated on three assumptions: (1) The primary data of psychology are the observable interactions of a biological organism and environmental events, past and present. (2) Theoretical concepts and laws are derived from empirical concepts and laws, which in turn are derived from the raw data. (3) Descriptive field studies describe interactions between behavioral and environmental events; experimental field studies provide information on their functional relationships. The ingredients of a descriptive field investigation using frequency measures consist of: (1) specifying in objective terms the situation in which the study is conducted, (2) defining and recording behavioral and environmental events in observable terms, and (3) measuring observer reliability. Field descriptive studies following the procedures suggested here would reveal interesting new relationships in the usual ecological settings and would also provide provocative cues for experimental studies. On the other hand, field-experimental studies using frequency measures would probably yield findings that would suggest the need for describing new interactions in specific natural situations. PMID:16795175

  14. An Experimental Study of the Near Field Region of a Free Jet with Passive Mixing Tabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohl, D. G.; Foss, J. F.

    1997-01-01

    An experimental study was performed to determine the flow characteristics of a tabbed free jet. Results were acquired in the near field (nominally 2 tab widths upstream to 2 tab widths downstream of the exit plane) of a tabbed jet. Upstream pressure results showed static pressure distributions in both the x-and y-directions along the top surface of the tunnel. Hot-wire measurements showed rapid expansion of the core fluid into the ambient region. Two counter rotating regions of streamwise vorticity were shown on each side of the primary tab. An enhancement of the tabbed jet concept was proposed and tested. Specifically, two tabs, half the scale of the primary tab, were added to the primary tab to provide attachment surfaces for the normally occurring ejection of fluid. The secondary tabs caused a slight increase in the streamwise vorticity created from the upstream static pressure gradient while significantly increasing the re-oriented boundary layer vorticity. The combined pumping effect of the two counter rotating regions of vorticity caused a significant increase in the transport of the jet core fluid into the surrounding region.

  15. A Experimental Study of the Velocity Field of a Transverse Jet Injected Into a Supersonic Crossflow.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, Juan Gabriel

    The design of a supersonic combustor which uses transverse jet injection into a supersonic flow (TJISF) as a means of fuel injection and mixing requires a fundamental understanding of these flows. Such knowledge may also serve studies of the thrust vector control of rocket nozzles, the cooling of nozzle walls, and jet reaction force prediction. The present investigation is a quantitative, experimental study of a single, sonic, underexpanded, transverse jet injected into a Mach 1.6 crossflow. The motivation for this research program is to improve the fundamental understanding of the fluid dynamic mechanisms and mixing processes in this flow. Schlieren/shadowgraph photography, surface flow visualization, and two-component, frequency pre-shifted laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) data have been obtained. Four LDV optical arrangements have been used to measure all three mean velocity components, five of the six kinematic Reynolds stresses, and the turbulent kinetic energy. The LDV system is equipped with a computer-controlled traverse system and has been used to provide velocity measurements at over 4,000 locations throughout the TJISF flowfield. The study focuses on the transverse, midline plane and two crossflow planes. The majority of the measurements in these planes has been made in the high gradient regions of the jet plume. Measurements of the mean and turbulent velocity fields helped resolve important issues in the study of the TJISF flowfield. These issues include the size and orientation of the recirculation regions upstream and downstream of the jet (including the horseshoe vortex just upstream of the jet); the structure and strength of the bow shock, barrel shock, and Mach disk; the structure, strength, and development of the kidney-shaped, counter-rotating vortex pair; the growth of the annular shear layer between the jet plume and the crossflow; the growth of the boundary layer beneath the jet plume; the Reynolds stress fields of the flow; the production of

  16. The biomineralization and fossilization of magnetotactic bacteria: Insights from experimental and field studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Y.; LI, J.; Menguy, N.; Deng, C.; Kissel, C.; Liu, Q.; Zhu, R.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are widespread prokaryotes which can navigate along the Earth's magnetic field lines and produce tens to hundreds of nanocrystals of magnetite (Fe3O4) or/and greigite (Fe3S4) aligned in chain(s) within a cell. The remains of MTB (i.e. magnetofossils) within geological records have therefore been considered as potential recorders of paleomagnetic, paleoenvironmental and ancient-life signals. These intracellularly-formed nanocrystals, called magnetosomes, generally have distinctively physical, chemical and crystallographic features from those magnetic minerals produced by abiotic or extracellular mineralization processes, and therefore could be distinguished by rock magnetic and electron microscopic approaches. However, identification and quantification of magnetofossils from sediments or sedimentary rocks are nevertheless not straightforward not only due to their tiny sizes, relatively low concentration, always mixing with abiotic magnetic minerals, but also the chain collapse and crystal maghemization during post-depositional processes. Comprehensive studies on the biomineralization and fossilization of magnetosomes are therefore essential for unambiguously identifying and quantitating magnetofossils from geologic samples. In this presentation, we summarize the biomineralization processes and magnetic properties of magnetosome chains within modern cultured and uncultured MTB. Experimental studies on the effects of the chain aligning and collapsing on the magnetic properties of magnetosomes are discussed, which give useful clues to understand the possible occurrence of magnetofossils within natural materials and their corresponding magnetic changes. Recent findings in magnetofossils from marine and lake sediments, showing how to identify magnetofossils from sediments by using the comprehensive rock magnetism, ferromagnetic resonance, and transmission electron microscopy approaches, as well as their implications for sedimentary magnetism

  17. Driving Position Field Study, Differences with the Whiplash Protocol and Biomechanics Experimental Responses

    PubMed Central

    Arregui-Dalmases, Carlos; Pozo, Eduardo Del; Lessley, David; Barrios, Jose Manuel; Nombela, Mario; Cisneros, Oscar; de Miguel, Juan Luis; Seguí-Gómez, María

    2011-01-01

    Rear-impact collisions at low speed are a leading cause of economic costs among motor vehicle accidents. Recently, EuroNCAP has incorporated in its protocol the whiplash test, to reproduce a low-speed rear impact. This paper presents a field driving study to assess the potential differences between the EuroNCAP dummy tests and actual drivers in the field, focusing on occupant position and biomechanics experimental results. A total of 182 drivers were randomly selected in two geographical areas in Spain. The driving position of each driver was recorded with a focus on the most relevant measurements for rear impact. Statistical analysis was performed to obtain means, standard deviations and density functions to compare observational seating position with that of the EuroNCAP testing protocol. The observational data showed a similar seatback angle to that used in the EuroNCAP protocol (24° in front of 25° for the protocol), a greater distance between the head vertex and the top of the head restraint (53mm compared to 39.5mm), and less distance between the occipital bone of the head and the headrest (67.9 compared to 89.3mm). Based on these data, 4 dummy tests were conducted using the dummy BioRID IIg. The baseline test was designed to reproduce the dummy position according to EuroNCAP 3.0 whiplash protocol. Three different additional tests were defined to reproduce the actual observed driving position as well as to assess a “worst case” scenario in terms of reduced seatback angle. These variations in initial driver position, comparing the EuroNCAP protocol to the observational study results, were not observed to cause significant differences in the biomechanical values measured in the BioRID IIg, The T1 acceleration was reduced less than 8%, the NIC was increased about 8%, and the NKm presented a reduction of 20%. Reducing the seat angle was observed to be more harmful in terms of NIC. PMID:22105385

  18. Driving position field study, differences with the whiplash protocol and biomechanics experimental responses.

    PubMed

    Arregui-Dalmases, Carlos; Pozo, Eduardo Del; Lessley, David; Barrios, Jose Manuel; Nombela, Mario; Cisneros, Oscar; De Miguel, Juan Luis; Seguí-Gómez, María

    2011-01-01

    Rear-impact collisions at low speed are a leading cause of economic costs among motor vehicle accidents. Recently, EuroNCAP has incorporated in its protocol the whiplash test, to reproduce a low-speed rear impact. This paper presents a field driving study to assess the potential differences between the EuroNCAP dummy tests and actual drivers in the field, focusing on occupant position and biomechanics experimental results. A total of 182 drivers were randomly selected in two geographical areas in Spain. The driving position of each driver was recorded with a focus on the most relevant measurements for rear impact. Statistical analysis was performed to obtain means, standard deviations and density functions to compare observational seating position with that of the EuroNCAP testing protocol. The observational data showed a similar seatback angle to that used in the EuroNCAP protocol (24° in front of 25° for the protocol), a greater distance between the head vertex and the top of the head restraint (53mm compared to 39.5mm), and less distance between the occipital bone of the head and the headrest (67.9 compared to 89.3mm). Based on these data, 4 dummy tests were conducted using the dummy BioRID IIg. The baseline test was designed to reproduce the dummy position according to EuroNCAP 3.0 whiplash protocol. Three different additional tests were defined to reproduce the actual observed driving position as well as to assess a "worst case" scenario in terms of reduced seatback angle. These variations in initial driver position, comparing the EuroNCAP protocol to the observational study results, were not observed to cause significant differences in the biomechanical values measured in the BioRID IIg, The T1 acceleration was reduced less than 8%, the NIC was increased about 8%, and the NKm presented a reduction of 20%. Reducing the seat angle was observed to be more harmful in terms of NIC.

  19. Experimental study on viscosity of spinel-type manganese ferrite nanofluid in attendance of magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amani, Mohammad; Amani, Pouria; Kasaeian, Alibakhsh; Mahian, Omid; Kasaeian, Fazel; Wongwises, Somchai

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, an experimental evaluation on the viscosity of water-based manganese ferrite nanofluid with and without magnetic field with 100, 200, 300, and 400 G intensities has been conducted. The Brookfield DV-I PRIME viscometer is implemented to measure the MnFe2O4/water nanofluid viscosity and to evaluate the influence of different volume concentrations (from 0.25% to 3%) and various temperatures (from 20 to 60 °C) on the viscosity. According to the measurements, viscosity incrementally increases with the augmentation of nanoparticles concentration while it remarkably decreases at higher temperatures under absence and attendance of magnetic field. The maximum viscosity ratio of 1.14 is achieved at 3 vol% of nanoparticles and 20 °C under no magnetic field, whereas it increments to maximum viscosity ratio of 1.75 at 3 vol% of nanoparticles and 40 °C under 400 G magnetic field. Furthermore, new correlation is proposed for determination of viscosity of MnFe2O4/water nanofluids in terms of magnetic field intensity, volume concentration and temperature.

  20. Modeling and experimental study on near-field acoustic levitation by flexural mode.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pinkuan; Li, Jin; Ding, Han; Cao, Wenwu

    2009-12-01

    Near-field acoustic levitation (NFAL) has been used in noncontact handling and transportation of small objects to avoid contamination. We have performed a theoretical analysis based on nonuniform vibrating surface to quantify the levitation force produced by the air film and also conducted experimental tests to verify our model. Modal analysis was performed using ANSYS on the flexural plate radiator to obtain its natural frequency of desired mode, which is used to design the measurement system. Then, the levitation force was calculated as a function of levitation distance based on squeeze gas film theory using measured amplitude and phase distributions on the vibrator surface. Compared with previous fluid-structural analyses using a uniform piston motion, our model based on the nonuniform radiating surface of the vibrator is more realistic and fits better with experimentally measured levitation force.

  1. Simulation and experimental study of DC electric field distribution characteristics of rat hippocampal slices in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yu; Dong, Lei; Gao, Yang; Qiu, Qian; Li, Ze-yan; Zhao, Zhe; Chen, Rui-juan; Wang, Hui-quan

    2016-06-01

    Direct current (DC) electric field is a noninvasive neuromodulation tool that can inhibit or facilitate excitability of neurons. Despite its efficacy, the dielectric constant of artificial cerebrospinal fluid and the position and direction of brain slices and other factors can affect the field intensity and distribution acting on the surface of rat hippocampus slices, thus causing errors. In this study, we describe a new analytical method optimized for DC electric fields acting on brain slices, and the design of an external DC electric field stimulator to allow scientific evaluation of brain slices. We investigated parameters regarding the uniformity of electric field distribution and identified the maximal parameters using the finite element method. Then, we selected and simplified slice images using magnetic resonance imaging data and calculated the electric field intensity of the original and simplified models. The electric field simulator induced action potential and excitatory postsynaptic current with intensities of 1, 5, and 10 V/m. This study describes the development of a new electric field stimulator and successfully demonstrates its practicability for scientific evaluation of tissue slices.

  2. Experimental study of the mapping relationship based near-field acoustic holography with spherical fundamental solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Haijun; Jiang, Weikang

    2017-04-01

    This paper is a consequent work of the previously proposed mapping relationship based near-field acoustic holography (MRS-based NAH), [H.J.Wu W.K. Jiang and H.B. Zhang, JSV, 373:66-88, 2016]. It is devoted to the performance study of its practical application with error analysis and experimental validation. Two types of errors, the truncation errors due to the limited number of participant modes, and the inevitable measurement errors caused by uncertainties in the experiment, are considered in the analysis. The influences of the errors on the performance of MRS-based NAH are systematically investigated. First of all, expression of the relative reconstruction error of the pressure energy is derived based on the two types of errors. An approach is developed to estimate the lower and upper bounds of the relative error. It gives a guide to predict the error for a reconstruction under the condition that the truncation error and the signal-to-noise ratio are given. Then, the condition number of the inverse operator is investigated to measure the sensitivity of the reconstruction to the input errors. Asymptotic expressions of the condition number for a special case, conformal spherical model and hologram, are obtained, which indicates the condition number has a geometric growth with the number of participant modes. Numerical examples with different kinds of errors are elaborately designed to validate the stability as well as the correctness of the error analysis. At last, the MRS-based NAH is further examined and verified by a physical experiment, a vibrating cubic model reconstructed from measurement on a spherical hologram. A satisfied agreement with the directly measured pressure on a validation surface is observed for both quantity and distribution of the reconstructed pressure.

  3. Experimental analysis of a TEM plane transmission line for DNA studies at 900 MHz EM fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belloni, F.; Doria, D.; Lorusso, A.; Nassisi, V.; Velardi, L.; Alifano, P.; Monaco, C.; Talà, A.; Tredici, M.; Rainò, A.

    2006-07-01

    A suitable plane transmission line was developed and its behaviour analysed at 900 MHz radiofrequency fields to study DNA mutability and the repair of micro-organisms. In this work, utilizing such a device, we investigated the behaviour of DNA mutability and repair of Escherichia coli strains. The transmission line was very simple and versatile in changing its characteristic resistance and field intensity by varying its sizes. In the absence of cell samples inside the transmission line, the relative modulation of the electric and/or magnetic field was ±31% with respect to the mean values, allowing the processing of more samples at different exposure fields in a single run. A slight decrease in spontaneous mutability to rifampicin-resistance of the E. coli JC411 strain was demonstrated in mismatch-repair proficient samples exposed to the radio-frequency fields during their growth on solid medium.

  4. Experimental study of transport of relativistic electron beams in strong magnetic mirror field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Shohei; Kondo, Kotaro; Bailly-Grandvaux, Mathiu; Bellei, Claudio; Santos, Joao; Firex Project Team

    2015-11-01

    Relativistic electron beams REB produced by ultra high intense laser pulses have generally a large divergence angle that results in degradation of energy coupling between the REB and a fuel core in the fast ignition scheme. Guiding and focusing of the REB by a strong external magnetic field was proposed to achieve high efficiency. We investigated REB transport through 50 μm or 250 μm thick plastic foils CuI doped under external magnetic fields, in magnetic mirror configurations of 1.2 or 4 mirror ratio. The experiment was carried out at the GEKKO XII and LFEX laser facility. Spatial pattern of the REB was measured by coherent transition radiation and/or Cu Ka x ray emission from the rear surface of the foil targets. Strong collimation of the REB by the external magnetic field was observed with 50 μm thick plastic targets, while the REB scattered in 250 μm thick targets. The experimental results are compared with computer simulations to understand the physical mechanisms of the REB transport in the external magnetic field. This work is supported by NIFS (Japan), MEXT/JSPS KAKENHI (Japan), JSPS Fellowship (Japan), ANR (France) and COST (Europe).

  5. An Evaluation of Observer Bias in Experimental-Field Studies of Social Interaction. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skindrud, Karlton D.

    Twenty-eight mature women were recruited from the community and trained in a 21 category observation code of family interaction. Observers were assigned randomly to three experimental groups and given different expectancy rationales about the outcomes of the studies for which they would be collecting data. All groups were told they would be…

  6. Experimental studies of protozoan response to intense magnetic fields and forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevorkian, Karine

    Intense static magnetic fields of up to 31 Tesla were used as a novel tool to manipulate the swimming mechanics of unicellular organisms. It is shown that homogenous magnetic fields alter the swimming trajectories of the single cell protozoan Paramecium caudatum, by aligning them parallel to the applied field. Immobile neutrally buoyant paramecia also oriented in magnetic fields with similar rates as the motile ones. It was established that the magneto-orientation is mostly due to the magnetic torques acting on rigid structures in the cell body and therefore the response is a non-biological, passive response. From the orientation rate of paramecia in various magnetic field strengths, the average anisotropy of the diamagnetic susceptibility of the cell was estimated. It has also been demonstrated that magnetic forces can be used to create increased, decreased and even inverted simulated gravity environments for the investigation of the gravi-responses of single cells. Since the mechanisms by which Earth's gravity affects cell functioning are still not fully understood, a number of methods to simulate different strength gravity environments, such as centrifugation, have been employed. Exploiting the ability to exert magnetic forces on weakly diamagnetic constituents of the cells, we were able to vary the gravity from -8 g to 10 g, where g is Earth's gravity. Investigations of the swimming response of paramecia in these simulated gravities revealed that they actively regulate their swimming speed to oppose the external force. This result is in agreement with centrifugation experiments, confirming the credibility of the technique. Moreover, the Paramecium's swimming ceased in simulated gravity of 10 g, indicating a maximum possible propulsion force of 0.7 nN. The magnetic force technique to simulate gravity is the only earthbound technique that can create increased and decreased simulated gravities in the same experimental setup. These findings establish a general

  7. Theoretical and experimental study of meniscus behavior under AC electric field for Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) jetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Si Bui Quang; Byun, Doyoung

    2009-11-01

    The electrohydrodynamic (EHD) spraying technique has been utilized in applications such as inkjet printing and mass spectrometry technologies. In this paper, the role of electrical potential signals in jetting and on the oscillation of the meniscus is evaluated. The jetting and meniscus oscillation behavior are experimentally investigated under ac voltage, ac voltage superimposed on dc voltage, and pulsed dc voltage. Furthermore, the analytical simulation about the oscillation of an anchored edge hemispherical meniscus located on a conductive flat plate under a uniform ac electric field is presented. The mutual interaction between the electric field and the hydrodynamics is iteratively solved. As a result, the simulation can calculate the meniscus shapes, contours of voltage outside the meniscus and the velocity profile of liquid inside the meniscus during the period of the oscillation according to the applied frequency. Based on the present theory, one can predict the oscillation mode with a certain applied frequency. The present theory can also be applied to investigate the oscillation of a free conductive drop in a uniform ac electric field.

  8. Experimental study of the flow of ferrofluid in a porous media under a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurana, Muskaan

    This research presents results from a laboratory-scale experimental setup that was designed to visualize the behavior of ferrofluid percolation through a porous media. Ferrofluids are colloidal suspensions made of magnetic particles of a few nanometers and stabilized in carrier liquids like water or mineral oil. Ferrofluids get magnetized and align themselves in the direction of a magnetic field when a field gradient is applied. With the help of this experiment we investigate the viability of controlling fluid flow in porous medium by a magnetic field in vicinity. The experiments show that ferrofluids can be used as a transporting media to push the higher viscosity fluid out of the porous media when magnetic forces are acting on it. The magnetic force produces stronger attractive forces on the ferrofluid around the magnet which results in a predictable arrangement which is in- dependent of the heterogeneity of the medium. When capillary or viscous forces are predominant during the 2-dimensional drainage of immiscible fluids in a permeable medium, the injected fluid forms very thin finger like structure which then retains the fluid being displaced in them. No fingers due to varying viscosities are observed during displacement by ferrofluids in the medium. Displacement visualization experiments in an oil saturated porous medium shows that ferrofluids obtain a rectangular shaped final configuration around the magnet, irrespective of the initial arrangement and flow path. The aim of this research is to control the instabilities that occur during the displacement of a fluid with the help of ferrofluid and magnetic field in vicinity. While the applications of ferrofluids are promising in the field of engineering, the results obtained are particularly relevant to the laboratory scale experiments where the weakening of magnetic strength due to increasing distance is a smaller limitation. Ferrofluids may find an immediate application in areas like enhancing oil recovery, in

  9. Experimental study of near-field air entrainment by subsonic volcanic jets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solovitz, S.A.; Mastin, L.G.

    2009-01-01

    The flow structure in the developing region of a turbulent jet has been examined using particle image velocimetry methods, considering the flow at steady state conditions. The velocity fields were integrated to determine the ratio of the entrained air speed to the jet speed, which was approximately 0.03 for a range of Mach numbers up to 0.89 and. Reynolds numbers up to 217,000. This range of experimental Mach and Reynolds numbers is higher than previously considered for high-accuracy entrainment measures, particularly in the near-vent region. The entrainment values are below those commonly used for geophysical analyses of volcanic plumes, suggesting that existing 1-D models are likely to understate the tendency for column collapse. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Experimental studies of random-field effects in uniaxial random antiferromagnets

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, P.Z.; Cable, J.W.; von Molnar, S.; Dimon, P.

    1983-11-01

    We discuss how random fields (RFs) are generated in uniaxial random antiferromagnets (URAFs) by applied fields and review the experiments that have been performed on these systems. They include direct and indirect specific heat measurements, neutron scattering experiments and phase diagram studies. We compare the results of different experiments on different systems, discuss their implications on the theories, and suggest further experiments. A new explanation for the Lorentzian-squared (LSQ) structure factor observed in the neutron scattering experiments is also given. 47 references, 4 figures.

  11. Rock Abrasion and Ventifact Formation on Mars from Field Analog, Theoretical, and Experimental Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, N. T.; Laity, J. E.

    2001-01-01

    Rocks observed by the Viking Landers and Pathfinder Lander/Sojourner rover exhibit a suite of perplexing rock textures. Among these are pits, spongy textures, penetrative flutes, lineaments, crusts, and knobs Fluvial, impact, chemical alteration, and aeolian mechanisms have been proposed for many of these. In an effort to better understand the origin and characteristics of Martian rock textures, abraded rocks in the Mojave Desert and other regions have been studied. We find that most Martian rock textures, as opposed to just a few, bear close resemblance to terrestrial aeolian textures and can most easily be explained by wind, not other, processes. Flutes, grooves, and some pits on Mars are consistent with abrasion by saltating particles, as described previously. However, many other rock textures probably also have an aeolian origin. Sills at the base of rocks that generally lie at high elevations, such as Half Dome, are consistent with such features on Earth that are related to moats or soil ramps that shield the basal part of the rock from erosion. Crusts consisting of fluted fabrics, such as those on Stimpy and Chimp, are similar to fluted crusts on Earth that spall off over time. Knobby and lineated rocks are similar to terrestrial examples of heterogeneous rocks that differentially erode. The location of specific rock textures on Mars also gives insight into their origin. Many of the most diagnostic ventifacts found at the Pathfinder site are located on rocks that lie near the crests or the upper slopes of ridges. On Earth, the most active ventifact formation occurs on sloped or elevated topography, where windflow is accelerated and particle kinetic energy and flux are increased. Integrated 0 together, these observations point to significant aeolian 0 modification of rocks on Mars and cast doubt on whether many primary textures resulting from other processes are preserved. Experimental simulations of abrasion in the presence of abundant sand indicate that

  12. Rock Abrasion and Ventifact Formation on Mars from Field Analog, Theoretical, and Experimental Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, N. T.; Laity, J. E.

    2001-01-01

    Rocks observed by the Viking Landers and Pathfinder Lander/Sojourner rover exhibit a suite of perplexing rock textures. Among these are pits, spongy textures, penetrative flutes, lineaments, crusts, and knobs Fluvial, impact, chemical alteration, and aeolian mechanisms have been proposed for many of these. In an effort to better understand the origin and characteristics of Martian rock textures, abraded rocks in the Mojave Desert and other regions have been studied. We find that most Martian rock textures, as opposed to just a few, bear close resemblance to terrestrial aeolian textures and can most easily be explained by wind, not other, processes. Flutes, grooves, and some pits on Mars are consistent with abrasion by saltating particles, as described previously. However, many other rock textures probably also have an aeolian origin. Sills at the base of rocks that generally lie at high elevations, such as Half Dome, are consistent with such features on Earth that are related to moats or soil ramps that shield the basal part of the rock from erosion. Crusts consisting of fluted fabrics, such as those on Stimpy and Chimp, are similar to fluted crusts on Earth that spall off over time. Knobby and lineated rocks are similar to terrestrial examples of heterogeneous rocks that differentially erode. The location of specific rock textures on Mars also gives insight into their origin. Many of the most diagnostic ventifacts found at the Pathfinder site are located on rocks that lie near the crests or the upper slopes of ridges. On Earth, the most active ventifact formation occurs on sloped or elevated topography, where windflow is accelerated and particle kinetic energy and flux are increased. Integrated 0 together, these observations point to significant aeolian 0 modification of rocks on Mars and cast doubt on whether many primary textures resulting from other processes are preserved. Experimental simulations of abrasion in the presence of abundant sand indicate that

  13. Experimental study on the field emission properties of metal oxide nanoparticle-decorated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theres Baby, Tessy; Ramaprabhu, Sundara

    2012-02-01

    In the present study, electron field emission efficiency of metal oxide nanoparticle-decorated graphene has been investigated. Tin oxide and zinc oxide nanoparticle-decorated hydrogen exfoliated graphene (SnO2/HEG and ZnO/HEG) have been synthesized by chemical reduction and sol-gel techniques, respectively. The samples have been characterized by x ray diffraction, thermo-gravimetric analysis, Raman spectroscopy, and electron microscopy techniques. SnO2/HEG and ZnO/HEG-based field emitters have been fabricated by dispersing them in a suitable solvent, followed by spin coating onto a carbon cloth. The field emission measurement of these vacuum-dried thin films has been carried out under a vacuum of 10-6 mbar, as has their long-term stability. The obtained turn-on voltage for ZnO/HEG and SnO2/HEG is around 0.88 and 0.93 V/μm with field enhancement factors of 6535 and 6367, respectively.

  14. Experimental research on electric propulsion. Note 5: Experimental study of a magnetic field stabilized arc-jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robotti, A. C.; Oggero, M.

    1984-01-01

    The possibility of using an electric arc under the influence of a magnetic field in ambient air to transform the heat energy of the working fluid arc into the kinetic energy of the jet was investigated. A convergent-divergent type nozzle was used. Variation of specific thrust and chamber pressure are discussed. Nitrogen was the propellant used.

  15. Experimental Studies of W-Band Accelerator Structures at High Field

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Marc E

    2001-02-09

    A high-gradient electron accelerator is desired for high-energy physics research, where frequency scalings of breakdown and trapping of itinerant beamline particles dictates operation of the accelerator at short wavelengths. The first results of design and test of a high-gradient mm-wave linac with an operating frequency at 91.392 GHz (W-band) are presented. A novel approach to particle acceleration is presented employing a planar, dielectric lined waveguide used for particle acceleration. The traveling wave fields in the planar dielectric accelerator (PDA) are analyzed for an idealized structure, along with a circuit equivalent model used for understanding the structure as a microwave circuit. Along with the W-band accelerator structures, other components designed and tested are high power rf windows, high power attenuators, and a high power squeeze-type phase shifter. The design of the accelerator and its components where eased with the aide of numerical simulations using a finite-difference electromagnetic field solver. Manufacturing considerations of the small, delicate mm-wave components and the steps taken to reach a robust fabrication process are detailed. These devices were characterized under low power using a two-port vector network analyzer to verify tune and match, including measurements of the structures' fields using a bead-pull. The measurements are compared with theory throughout. Addition studies of the W-band structures were performed under high power utilizing a 11.424 GHz electron linac as a current source. Test results include W-band power levels of 200 kW, corresponding to fields in the PDA of over 20 MV/m, a higher gradient than any collider. Planar accelerator devices naturally have an rf quadrupole component of the accelerating field. Presented for the first time are the measurements of this effect.

  16. [Simulation analysis and experimental study of positioning signals in thorax electric field catheter].

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhongzhong; Wang, Pengbiao; Su, Zhijian; Xia, Zhenhong; Gao, Jingjing; Liu, Na

    2013-04-01

    In order to enhance the position accuracy of ablation catheter in heart electrophysiology operation, signals of respiration and heartbeat must be removed for subsequent data processing. Based on locating principle of electrical field with low frequency, synchronous detector with MC1496 has been developed in this study. In the present research, several methods are utilized to optimize the circuit performance, such as coupling and stopping direct current, low-pass filtering, as well as limiting ripple voltage etc. Through simulation results, it showed that the demodulation performance of the circuit was fine. Through simulation platform of thorax electric field and animal experiment, the circuit feasibility were further proved good for extracting signals of respiration and heartbeat.

  17. The movement of actin-myosin biomolecular linear motor under AC electric fields: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yongkuk; Famouri, Parviz

    2013-03-15

    The role of actin-myosin as a biomolecular linear motor is considered a transport system at nanoscale because of their size, efficiency and functionality. To utilize the ability to transport, it is essential to control the random movement of actin filaments (F-actin) on myosin coated substrate. In the presence of an alternating current (AC) electric field, the direction of F-actin movement is regulated by electro-orientation torque and, as a result, its movement is perpendicularly toward the electrode edges. Our data confirm such aligned movement is proportional to the strength of applied electric field. Interestingly, the aligned movement is found frequency-dependent and the electrothermal effect is observed by means of the velocity measurement of aligned F-actin movement. The findings in this study may provide constructive information for manipulating actin-myosin nanotransport system to build functional nanodevices in future work.

  18. Field experimental study of the Smagorinsky model and application to large eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleissl, Jan

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) has become an indispensable tool for prediction of turbulent atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) flow. In LES, a subgrid-scale (SGS) model accounts for the dynamics of the unresolved scales of motion. The most widely used SGS model is an eddy-viscosity closure, the Smagorinsky model, which includes a parameter that must be prescribed in some fashion, the Smagorinsky constant cs. In this dissertation, cs is measured in a specifically designed field experiment. And, the ability of so-called dynamic SGS models to predict c s is studied based on the data obtained, as well as in numerical simulations. In the field study, two vertically separated horizontal arrays of 3d-sonic anemometers are placed in the atmospheric surface layer. Results indicate that cs is reduced when the integral scale of turbulence is small compared to the grid or filter scale, such as near the ground and in stable atmospheric conditions. The field data are processed further to test whether dynamic SGS models can predict the correct coefficient values. In the scale-invariant dynamic model (Germano et al. 1991), the coefficient is derived from various data test-filtered at a larger scale assuming that cs is the same as at scale Delta. The results show that cs is significantly underpredicted whenever Delta is larger than the large-scale limit of the inertial range. The scale-dependent dynamic model (Porte-Agel et al. 2000b) uses a second test-filter to deduce the dependence of cs on filtering scale. This model provides excellent predictions of cs and its dependence upon stability and height. Large eddy simulations of flow over a homogeneous surface with a diurnal heat flux forcing are conducted to study the prediction of c s over a wide range of stabilities in a numerical framework. The scale-invariant and scale-dependent Lagrangian dynamic SGS model are tested and compared to the field data. Consistent with the field studies, the prediction of cs from the scale

  19. Experimental field study of spatial memory and learning in wild capuchin monkeys (Cebus capucinus).

    PubMed

    Garber, P A; Paciulli, L M

    1997-01-01

    Despite a large body of data on diet and ranging patterns in prosimians, monkeys and apes, little is known regarding the types of information that non-human primates use when making foraging decisions. In a series of controlled field experiments, we tested the ability of wild capuchins (Cebus capucinus) at La Suerte Biological Research Station in north-eastern Costa Rica to remember the spatial positions of 13 feeding platforms and use olfactory and visual cues to identify baited (real bananas) versus sham (plastic bananas) feeding sites. The results indicate that when 'place' was predictable, the capuchins learned the spatial locations of food and non-food sites rapidly (one-trial learning). In a second experiment, the positions of baited feeding sites were random. In the absence of other information, the capuchins used the presence of a local landmark cue (yellow block) placed at reward platforms to select feeding sites. In a final experiment, there was evidence that expectations regarding the amount of food available at a platform (2 bananas vs. 1/2 banana) had a significant influence on capuchin foraging decisions. Although the capuchins were sensitive to changes in experimental conditions, when they were given conflicting cues, spatial information was predominant over other information in selecting feeding sites.

  20. Low dose short duration pulsed electromagnetic field effects on cultured human chondrocytes: An experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Anbarasan, Selvam; Baraneedharan, Ulaganathan; Paul, Solomon FD; Kaur, Harpreet; Rangaswami, Subramoniam; Bhaskar, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) is used to treat bone and joint disorders for over 30 years. Recent studies demonstrate a significant effect of PEMF on bone and cartilage proliferation, differentiation, synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) and production of growth factors. The aim of this study is to assess if PEMF of low frequency, ultralow field strength and short time exposure have beneficial effects on in-vitro cultured human chondrocytes. Materials and Methods: Primary human chondrocytes cultures were established using articular cartilage obtained from knee joint during joint replacement surgery. Post characterization, the cells were exposed to PEMF at frequencies ranging from 0.1 to 10 Hz and field intensities ranging from 0.65 to 1.95 μT for 60 min/day for 3 consecutive days to analyze the viability, ECM component synthesis, proliferation and morphology related changes post exposure. Association between exposure doses and cellular effects were analyzed with paired't’ test. Results: In-vitro PEMF exposure of 0.1 Hz frequency, 1.95 μT and duration of 60 min/day for 3 consecutive days produced the most favorable response on chondrocytes viability (P < 0.001), ECM component production (P < 0.001) and multiplication. Exposure of identical chondrocyte cultures to PEMFs of 0.65 μT field intensity at 1 Hz frequency resulted in less significant response. Exposure to 1.3 μT PEMFs at 10 Hz frequency does not show any significant effects in different analytical parameters. Conclusions: Short duration PEMF exposure may represent a new therapy for patients with Osteoarthritis (OA). PMID:26955182

  1. Experimental study of the flow field induced by a resonating piezoelectric flapping wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidakhvidi, M. Ahmadi; Shirzadeh, R.; Steenackers, G.; Vanlanduit, S.

    2013-11-01

    Flexible plate structures with integrated piezoelectric patches offer interesting possibilities when considered as actuation mechanisms for energy harvesting devices, cooling devices and propulsion devices of micro-aerial vehicles. Most of the studies reported in literature are based on the assumption of a 2D aerodynamic flow. However, the flow behind a finite span wing is significantly more complex than that of an infinite span wing. In order to corroborate this statement, the present experimental study contains high-speed particle image velocimetry measurements performed on a piezoelectric finite span wing oscillating in air, at 84.8 Hz. The paper focuses on the situation of low Keulegan-Carpenter numbers (KC < 3). The dimensionless KC number describes the relative importance of the drag forces over inertia forces for objects that oscillate in a fluid flow at rest. The evolution of the unsteady vortex structures near the plate is characterized for different conditions. This allows a better understanding of the unsteady aerodynamics of flapping flight. The accomplished experimental data analysis has shown that the flow phenomena are strongly dependent on the KC values.

  2. Experimental study of the magnetic field enhanced Payne effect in magnetorheological elastomers.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Vladislav V; Ecker, Eva; Stepanov, Gennady V; Shamonin, Mikhail; Monkman, Gareth J; Kramarenko, Elena Yu; Khokhlov, Alexei R

    2014-11-21

    The dynamic modulus and the loss factor of magnetorheological elastomers (MREs) of various compositions and anisotropies are studied by dynamic torsion oscillations performed in the absence and in the presence of an external magnetic field. The emphasis is on the Payne effect, i.e. the dependence of the elastomer magnetorheological characteristics on the strain amplitude and their evolution with cyclically increasing and decreasing strain amplitudes. MREs are based on two silicone matrices differing in storage modulus (soft, G' ∼ 10(3) Pa, and hard, G' ∼ 10(4) Pa, matrices). For each matrix, the concentration of carbonyl iron particles with diameters of 3-5 μm was equal to 70 and 82 mass% (22 and 35 vol%, respectively) in the composite material. Samples for each filler content, isotropic and aligned-particles, are investigated. It is found that the Payne effect significantly increases in the presence of an external magnetic field and varies with the cyclical loading which reaches saturation after several cycles. The results are interpreted as the processes of formation-destruction-reformation of the internal filler structure under the simultaneously applied mechanical force and magnetic field. Impacts of matrix elasticity and magnetic interactions on the filler alignment are elucidated.

  3. Experimental study of integer resonance crossing in a nonscaling fixed field alternating gradient accelerator with a Paul ion trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriya, K.; Fukushima, K.; Ito, K.; Okano, T.; Okamoto, H.; Sheehy, S. L.; Kelliher, D. J.; Machida, S.; Prior, C. R.

    2015-03-01

    We present an experimental study aimed at exploring integer resonance crossing with a focus on nonscaling fixed field alternating gradient accelerators. The method uses the Simulator of Particle Orbit Dynamics system at Hiroshima University based on a compact ion trap known as a Paul trap. In a setup that mimics the Electron Model for Many Applications nonscaling fixed field alternating gradient accelerator, we have verified the theoretical prediction of the coherent excitation of dipole motion over a wide range of errors and crossing speeds. In addition, the cancellation of amplitude growth dependent on the relative betatron oscillation phase between two consecutive resonances is observed and studied. We also explore nonlinear effects and, in particular, the effects of amplitude-dependent tune shifts and find that these nonlinear effects are a key factor in understanding our experimental results.

  4. Mother-calf vocal communication in Atlantic walrus: a first field experimental study.

    PubMed

    Charrier, Isabelle; Aubin, Thierry; Mathevon, Nicolas

    2010-05-01

    In all colonial pinnipeds studied, mother-young vocal recognition exists and allows rapid and reliable meetings in spite of the confusing environment of the breeding colony. The efficiency of this recognition process guarantees pup survival, especially in species where females alternate foraging sea trips and lactation periods on land. The Atlantic Walrus (Odobenus rosmarus rosmarus) is a highly gregarious pinniped with females attending their calves for an extended period of time (2-3 years). Although we expect mother-calf vocal recognition to occur in this species due to the high density of individuals packed in herds, it has never been experimentally demonstrated. Here, we assessed the individual stereotypy of both mother and calf barks recorded in the wild by measuring frequency and temporal acoustic parameters. Both discriminant function and artificial neural network analyses resulted in high correct classification rates, underlying a well-defined individual stereotypy in parameters related to frequency modulation and frequency values. Playback experiments showed that mothers were more responsive to the barks of their own calf than to those of unrelated young. Finally, propagation experiments revealed that barks propagate at greater distances over water surface than over ice, acoustic features such as frequency modulation and frequency spectrum being highly resistant to degradation during propagation. Thus, acoustic analysis and propagation experiments suggest that these frequency parameters might be the key acoustic features involved in the individual identification process. This experimental study clearly demonstrates that Atlantic walrus has developed a highly reliable mother-calf vocal communication allowing such strong social bond.

  5. An Experimental Study of Boiling in Reduced and Zero Gravity Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usiskin, C. M.; Siegel, R.

    1961-01-01

    A pool boiling apparatus was mounted on a counterweighted platform which could be dropped a distance of nine feet. By varying the size of the counterweight, the effective gravity field on the equipment was adjusted between zero and unity. A study of boiling burnout in water indicated that a variation in the critical heat flux according to the one quarter power of gravity was reasonable. A consideration of the transient burnout process was necessary in order to properly interpret the data. A photographic study of nucleate boiling showed how the velocity of freely rising vapor bubbles decreased as gravity was reduced. The bubble diameters at the time of breakoff from the heated surface were found to vary inversely as gravity to the 1/3.5 power. Motion pictures were taken to illustrate both nucleate and film boiling in the low gravity range.

  6. Experimental and theoretical study on nonsequential double ionization of carbon disulfide in strong near-IR laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Wanlong; Ben, Shuai; Lv, Hang; Zhao, Lei; Guo, Jing; Liu, Xue-Shen; Xu, Haifeng; Jin, Mingxing; Ding, Dajun

    2016-05-01

    Nonsequential double ionization (NSDI) of carbon disulfide CS2 in strong 800-nm laser fields is studied experimentally and theoretically. A knee structure is observed in the intensity-dependent double ionization (DI) yield in linearly polarized laser fields, which exhibits a strong dependence on the laser ellipticity. The electron momentum distributions and energy trajectories after DI in both linearly and circularly polarized laser fields are investigated by employing the two-dimensional classical ensemble method. The results clearly show the evidence of NSDI in the strong-field DI of CS2 molecules. It is demonstrated that, similar to that of atoms, NSDI of CS2 molecules is produced via laser-driven electron recollision with the ion core and presents electron-electron correlations in the process. Analysis indicates that both mechanisms in atomic strong-field NSDI, i.e., recollision impact ionization and recollision excitation with subsequent ionization, may also be contributed to NSDI of CS2 in strong laser fields. Further studies are no doubt necessary for a full understanding of the underlying physical mechanism of molecular strong-field NSDI, due to the multicenter character of the molecular structure and the complex molecular excited states that could be involved in the ionization.

  7. Experimental study of the free surface velocity field in an asymmetrical confluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creelle, Stephan; Mignot, Emmanuel; Schindfessel, Laurent; De Mulder, Tom

    2017-04-01

    The hydrodynamic behavior of open channel confluences is highly complex because of the combination of different processes that interact with each other. To gain further insights in how the velocity uniformization between the upstream channels and the downstream channel is proceeding, experiments are performed in a large scale 90 degree angled concrete confluence flume with a chamfered rectangular cross-section and a width of 0.98m. The dimensions and lay-out of the flume are representative for a prototype scale confluence in e.g. drainage and irrigation systems. In this type of engineered channels with sharp corners the separation zone is very large and thus the velocity difference between the most contracted section and the separation zone is pronounced. With the help of surface particle tracking velocimetry the velocity field is recorded from upstream of the confluence to a significant distance downstream of the confluence. The resulting data allow to analyze the evolution of the incoming flows (with a developed velocity profile) that interact with the stagnation zone and each other, causing a shear layer between the two bulk flows. Close observation of the velocity field near the stagnation zone shows that there are actually two shear layers in the vicinity of the upstream corner. Furthermore, the data reveals that the shear layer observed more downstream between the two incoming flows is actually one of the two shear layers next to the stagnation zone that continues, while the other shear layer ceases to exist. The extensive measurement domain also allows to study the shear layer between the contracted section and the separation zone. The shear layers of the stagnation zone between the incoming flows and the one between the contracted flow and separation zone are localized and parameters such as the maximum gradient, velocity difference and width of the shear layer are calculated. Analysis of these data shows that the shear layer between the incoming flows

  8. The effects of electromagnetic fields on the number of ovarian primordial follicles: An experimental study.

    PubMed

    Bakacak, Murat; Bostancı, Mehmet Sühha; Attar, Rukset; Yıldırım, Özge Kizilkale; Yıldırım, Gazi; Bakacak, Zeyneb; Sayar, Hamide; Han, Agahan

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an electromagnetic field (EMF), generated close to the ovaries, on primordial follicles. A total of 16 rats were used in this study. The study group consisted of rats exposed to an EMF in the abdominal region for 15 min/d for 15 days. Both the study and control group were composed of eight rats. After the treatment period of 15 days, the ovaries of the rats were extracted, and sections of ovarian tissue were taken for histological evaluation. The independent samples t test was used to compare the two groups. In the study group, the means of the right and left ovarian follicle numbers were 34.00 ± 10.20 and 36.00 ± 10.53, respectively. The average total ovarian follicle number was 70.00 ± 19.03. In the control group, the means of the right and left ovarian follicle numbers were 78.50 ± 25.98 and 71.75 ± 29.66, respectively, and the average total ovarian follicle number was 150.25 ± 49.53. The comparisons of the means of the right and left ovarian follicle numbers and the means of the total ovarian follicle numbers between the study and control groups indicated that the study group had significantly fewer follicles (p < 0.001, p = 0.011, and p = 0.002, respectively). This study found a significant decrease in the number of ovarian follicles in rats exposed to an EMF. Further clinical studies are needed to reveal the effects of EMFs on ovarian reserve and infertility. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  9. Experimental and Field Studies of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in White-Tailed Deer

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, John R.; Zhao, Tong; Doyle, Michael P.; Goldberg, Martin R.; Brown, Cathy A.; Sewell, Christopher T.; Kavanaugh, Darrell M.; Bauman, Christopher D.

    2001-01-01

    Studies were conducted to evaluate fecal shedding of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in a small group of inoculated deer, determine the prevalence of the bacterium in free-ranging white-tailed deer, and elucidate relationships between E. coli O157:H7 in wild deer and domestic cattle at the same site. Six young, white-tailed deer were orally administered 108 CFU of E. coli O157:H7. Inoculated deer were shedding E. coli O157:H7 by 1 day postinoculation (DPI) and continued to shed decreasing numbers of the bacteria throughout the 26-day trial. Horizontal transmission to an uninoculated deer was demonstrated. Although E. coli O157:H7 bacteria were recovered from the gastrointestinal tracts of deer necropsied from 4 to 26 DPI, attaching and effacing lesions were not apparent in any deer. Results are similar to those of inoculation studies in calves and sheep. In field studies, E. coli O157 was not detected in 310 fresh deer fecal samples collected from the ground. It was detected in feces, but not in meat, from 3 of 469 free-ranging deer in 1997. In 1998, E. coli O157 was not detected in 140 deer at the single positive site found in 1997; however, it was recovered from 13 of 305 dairy and beef cattle at the same location. Isolates of E. coli O157:H7 from deer and cattle at this site differed with respect to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns and genes encoding Shiga toxins. The low overall prevalence of E. coli O157:H7 and the identification of only one site with positive deer suggest that wild deer are not a major reservoir of E. coli O157:H7 in the southeastern United States. However, there may be individual locations where deer sporadically harbor the bacterium, and venison should be handled with the same precautions recommended for beef, pork, and poultry. PMID:11229913

  10. An experimental correlation study between field-target overlap and sensitivity of surface plasmon resonance biosensors based on sandwiched immunoassays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Yeonsoo; Moon, Seyoung; Oh, Youngjin; Kim, Yonghwi; Kim, Donghyun

    2012-10-01

    In this report, we have studied the effectiveness of field-target overlap to evaluate detection sensitivity of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors. The investigation used theoretical analysis based on the transfer matrix method, which was experimentally confirmed by thin film-based detection in sandwich and reverse sandwich immunoglobulin G (IgG) assays. Both theoretical and experimental results show that strong correlation exists between the overlap and the sensitivity with the coefficient of correlation higher than 95% in all the cases that we have considered. We have also confirmed the correlation in diffraction grating-based SPR measurement of IgG/anti-IgG interactions. The correlation elucidates the mechanism behind the far-field detection sensitivity of SPR biosensors and can lead to the enhancement of SPR biosensing with molecular scale sensitivity.

  11. Experimental study of near-field entrainment of moderately overpressured jets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solovitz, S.A.; Mastin, L.G.; Saffaraval, F.

    2011-01-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiments have been conducted to study the velocity flow fields in the developing flow region of high-speed jets. These velocity distributions were examined to determine the entrained mass flow over a range of geometric and flow conditions, including overpressured cases up to an overpressure ratio of 2.83. In the region near the jet exit, all measured flows exhibited the same entrainment up until the location of the first shock when overpressured. Beyond this location, the entrainment was reduced with increasing overpressure ratio, falling to approximately 60 of the magnitudes seen when subsonic. Since entrainment ratios based on lower speed, subsonic results are typically used in one-dimensional volcanological models of plume development, the current analytical methods will underestimate the likelihood of column collapse. In addition, the concept of the entrainment ratio normalization is examined in detail, as several key assumptions in this methodology do not apply when overpressured.

  12. Plastic Responses of a Sessile Prey to Multiple Predators: A Field and Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Philipp Emanuel; Cayon, David; Svanbäck, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Background Theory predicts that prey facing a combination of predators with different feeding modes have two options: to express a response against the feeding mode of the most dangerous predator, or to express an intermediate response. Intermediate phenotypes protect equally well against several feeding modes, rather than providing specific protection against a single predator. Anti-predator traits that protect against a common feeding mode displayed by all predators should be expressed regardless of predator combination, as there is no need for trade-offs. Principal Findings We studied phenotypic anti-predator responses of zebra mussels to predation threat from a handling-time-limited (crayfish) and a gape-size-limited (roach) predator. Both predators dislodge mussels from the substrate but diverge in their further feeding modes. Mussels increased expression of a non-specific defense trait (attachment strength) against all combinations of predators relative to a control. In response to roach alone, mussels showed a tendency to develop a weaker and more elongated shell. In response to crayfish, mussels developed a harder and rounder shell. When exposed to either a combination of predators or no predator, mussels developed an intermediate phenotype. Mussel growth rate was positively correlated with an elongated weaker shell and negatively correlated with a round strong shell, indicating a trade-off between anti-predator responses. Field observations of prey phenotypes revealed the presence of both anti-predator phenotypes and the trade-off with growth, but intra-specific population density and bottom substrate had a greater influence than predator density. Conclusions Our results show that two different predators can exert both functionally equivalent and inverse selection pressures on a single prey. Our field study suggests that abiotic factors and prey population density should be considered when attempting to explain phenotypic diversity in the wild. PMID

  13. Experimental studies of field-reversed-configuration (FRC) confinement in FRX-C

    SciTech Connect

    Siemon, R.E.; Armstrong, W.T.; Bartsch, R.R.

    1982-01-01

    A primary purpose of the large bore (0.5 m dia.) FRX-C field-reversed theta pinch experiment is to study the scaling of plasma particle containment time, tau/sub N/, with major radius, R, of the field-reversed configuration (FRC). At 20 mtorr fill pressure the FRX-C plasma parameters, anti n approx. 4 x 10/sup 15/ c/sup -3/, T/sub e/ approx. 100 eV, T/sub i/ approx. 150 eV, are comparable to those obtained in the smaller bore (0.25 m dia.) FRX-B device. Under these conditions, the present measurement of particle confinement time in FRX-C is tau/sub N/ approx. 140 ..mu..s, consistent with the scaling tau/sub N/ ..cap alpha.. R/sup 2/, when compared with the earlier FRX-B results. This favorable scaling has been observed with R/rho/sub i/ approx. 30 (rho/sub i/ = ion gyro radius), twice as large as in FRX-B, despite theoretical indications that various MHD instabilities would appear as R/rho/sub i/ was increased. The characteristics of hotter, neutron generating FRC plasma produced at lower fill pressure (5 mtorr), where anti n approx. 2 x 10/sup 15/ cm/sup -3/, T/sub e/ approx. 170 eV, T/sub i/ approx. 600 eV, are also presented. In this plasma regime an accurate determination of tau/sub N/ is difficult because of the short stable period observed.

  14. Effects of Prompting in Reflective Learning Tools: Findings from Experimental Field, Lab, and Online Studies

    PubMed Central

    Renner, Bettina; Prilla, Michael; Cress, Ulrike; Kimmerle, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Reflective learning is an important type of learning both in formal and informal situations—in school, higher education, at the workplace, and in everyday life. People may benefit from technical support for reflective learning, in particular when supporting each other by reflecting not only upon their own but also upon other people’s problems. We refer to this collective approach where people come together to think about experiences and find solutions to problems as “collaborative reflection.” We present three empirical studies about the effects of prompting in reflective learning tools in such situations where people reflect on others’ issues. In Study 1 we applied a three-stage within-group design in a field experiment, where 39 participants from two organizations received different types of prompts while they used a reflection app. We found that prompts that invited employees to write down possible solutions led to more comprehensive comments on their colleagues’ experiences. In Study 2 we used a three-stage between-group design in a laboratory experiment, where 78 university students were invited to take part in an experiment about the discussion of problems at work or academic studies in online forums. Here we found that short, abstract prompts showed no superiority to a situation without any prompts with respect to quantity or quality of contributions. Finally, Study 3 featured a two-stage between-group design in an online experiment, where 60 participants received either general reflection instructions or detailed instructions about how to reflect on other people’s problems. We could show that detailed reflection instructions supported people in producing more comprehensive comments that included more general advice. The results demonstrate that to increase activity and to improve quality of comments with prompting tools require detailed instructions and specific wording of the prompts. PMID:27303361

  15. Experimental study of the response of CZT and CdTe detectors of various thicknesses in strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, J. W.; Cai, L.; Meng, L. J.

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, we used a combined experimental and Monte Carlo simulation approach to investigate the detailed charge collection process within thick CdTe/CZT detectors operated inside a strong magnetic field. As one of the key objectives, we quantitatively assessed the effect of the Lorenz force on the migration of charge carriers inside the detector bulk. This information would allow an accurate modeling of the detector's response to gamma ray interactions and therefore help to compensate for the event-positioning error induced by the strong magnetic field. In this study, a pixilated ERPC detector with 350 μm square pixels was set on a non-magnetic gantry and operated inside a 3 T Siemens MRI scanner. Multiple studies, with similar geometries, were performed using the same detector setup with and without the presence of the magnetic field to investigate the effect on the charge collection behavior from the strong magnetic field. The experimental results were used to validate the Monte Carlo simulation package that models both photon transportation and charge collection process inside the detector.

  16. The effectiveness of ethics education: a quasi-experimental field study.

    PubMed

    May, Douglas R; Luth, Matthew T

    2013-06-01

    Ethical conduct is the hallmark of excellence in engineering and scientific research, design, and practice. While undergraduate and graduate programs in these areas routinely emphasize ethical conduct, few receive formal ethics training as part of their curricula. The first purpose of this research study was to assess the relative effectiveness of ethics education in enhancing individuals' general knowledge of the responsible conduct of research practices and their level of moral reasoning. Secondly, we examined the effects of ethics education on the positive psychological outcomes of perspective-taking, moral efficacy, moral courage, and moral meaningfulness. To examine our research hypotheses, we utilized a pretest-posttest quasi-experimental design consisting of three ethics education groups (control, embedded modules, and stand-alone courses). Findings revealed that both embedded and stand alone courses were effective in enhancing participants' perspective-taking, moral efficacy, and moral courage. Moral meaningfulness was marginally enhanced for the embedded module condition. Moral judgment and knowledge of responsible conduct of research practices were not influenced by either ethics education condition. Contrary to expectations, stand alone courses were not superior to embedded modules in influencing the positive psychological outcomes investigated. Implications of these findings for future research and practice are discussed.

  17. An experimental study of electron acceleration with detuning of the bunch repetition frequency from that of an excited wake field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnik, A. F.; Onishchenko, I. N.; Pristupa, V. I.

    2017-02-01

    We have experimentally studied the excitation of wake fields in a dielectric structure by a train of relativistic electron bunches and the acceleration of subsequent bunches of the same train due to detuning of the bunch repetition frequency relative to that of the wake field excited in the dielectric structure at the Cherenkov resonance. Electron bunches of the first (leading) part of the train excite the wake wave, and bunches of the second (trailing) part of this train are shifted to the accelerating phase of the wake wave so as to gain additional energy. The possibility of controlling the number (repetition frequency) of bunches exciting the wake field in the dielectric structure and the number of subsequently accelerated bunches has been investigated by changing the value of detuning.

  18. Ergonomic office design and aging: a quasi-experimental field study of employee reactions to an ergonomics intervention program.

    PubMed

    May, Douglas R; Reed, Kendra; Schwoerer, Catherine E; Potter, Paul

    2004-04-01

    A naturally occurring quasi-experimental longitudinal field study of 87 municipal employees using pretest and posttest measures investigated the effects of an office workstation ergonomics intervention program on employees' perceptions of their workstation characteristics, levels of persistent pain, eyestrain, and workstation satisfaction. The study examined whether reactions differed between younger and older employees. Results revealed that workstation improvements were associated with enhanced perceptions of the workstation's ergonomic qualities, less upper back pain, and greater workstation satisfaction. Among those experiencing an improvement, the perceptions of workstation ergonomic qualities increased more for younger than older employees, supporting the "impressionable years" framework in the psychological literature on aging. Implications for human resources managers are discussed.

  19. Molecular dynamics study of nanoconfined water flow driven by rotating electric fields under realistic experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Sergio; Todd, B D; Hansen, J S; Daivis, Peter J

    2014-03-25

    In our recent work, J. Chem. Phys. 2013, 138, 154712, we demonstrated the feasibility of unidirectional pumping of water, exploiting translational-rotational momentum coupling using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. Flow can be sustained when the fluid is driven out of equilibrium by an external spatially uniform rotating electric field and confined between two planar surfaces exposing different degrees of hydrophobicity. The permanent dipole moment of water follows the rotating field, thus inducing the molecules to spin, and the torque exerted by the field is continuously injected into the fluid, enabling a steady conversion of spin angular momentum into linear momentum. The translational-rotational coupling is a sensitive function of the rotating electric field parameters. In this work, we have found that there exists a small energy dissipation region attainable when the frequency of the rotating electric field matches the inverse of the dielectric relaxation time of water and when its amplitude lies in a range just before dielectric saturation effects take place. In this region, that is, when the frequency lies in a small window of the microwave region around ∼20 GHz and amplitude ∼0.03 V Å(-1), the translational-rotational coupling is most effective, yielding fluid velocities of magnitudes of ∼2 ms(-1) with only moderate fluid heating. In this work, we also confine water to a realistic nanochannel made of graphene giving a hydrophobic surface on one side and β-cristobalite giving a hydrophilic surface on the other, reproducing slip-and-stick velocity boundary conditions, respectively. This enables us to demonstrate that in a realistic environment, the coupling can be effectively exploited to achieve noncontact pumping of water at the nanoscale. A quantitative comparison between nonequilibrium molecular dynamics and analytical solutions of the extended Navier-Stokes equations, including an external rotating electric field has been performed

  20. How accurately do current force fields predict experimental peptide conformations? An adiabatic free energy dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Tzanov, Alexandar T; Cuendet, Michel A; Tuckerman, Mark E

    2014-06-19

    The quality of classical biomolecular simulations is inevitably limited by two problems: the accuracy of the force field used and the comprehensiveness of configuration space sampling. In this work we tackle the sampling problem by carrying out driven adiabatic free energy dynamics to obtain converged free energy surfaces of dipeptides in the gas phase and in solution using selected dihedral angles as collective variables. To calculate populations of conformational macrostates observed in experiment, we introduce a fuzzy clustering algorithm in collective-variable space, which delineates macrostates without prior definition of arbitrary boundaries. With this approach, we calculate the conformational preferences of small peptides with six biomolecular force fields chosen from among the most recent and widely used. We assess the accuracy of each force field against recently published Raman or IR-UV spectroscopy measurements of conformer populations for the dipeptides in solution or in the gas phase.

  1. Impact of maintenance in the automotive field. Experimental study of mechanical vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vulcu, O. I.; Arghir, M.

    2016-08-01

    In order to determine the impact of maintenance for vehicles, by analyzing the vibrating behaviour, were performed experimental measurements using specific equipment for vibration determination. Two measures were performed for the same vehicle. The period between actions was by one year. The results of analysis obtained by experimental measurements performed in the three critical points of the two passenger vehicles from mechanical vibration point of view are followings: vibrating behaviour is different in each point of the vehicle structure; technical state of vehicles depends on the maintenance applied and not of the using time or running distance. It is important to note that it was not taken into account the quality of the running.

  2. Numerical and experimental study of unsteady flow field and vibration in radial inflow turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuz-Ihli, T.; Filsinger, D.; Schulz, A.; Wittig, S.

    2000-04-01

    The blades of turbocharger impellers are exposed to unsteady aerodynamic forces, which cause blade vibrations and may lead to failures. An indispensable requirement for a safe design of radial inflow turbines is a detailed knowledge of the exciting forces. Up to now, only a few investigations relating to unsteady aerodynamic forces in radial turbines have been presented. To give a detailed insight into the complex phenomena, a comprehensive research project was initiated at the Institut fuer Thermische Stroemungsmaschinen, at the University of Karlsruhe. A turbocharger test rig was installed in the high-pressure, high-temperature laboratory of the institute. The present paper gives a description of the test rig design and the measuring techniques. The flow field in a vaneless radial inflow turbine was analyzed using laser-Doppler anemometry. First results of unsteady flow field investigations in the turbine scroll and unsteady phase-resolved measurements of the flow field in the turbine rotor will be discussed. Moreover, results from finite element calculations analyzing frequencies and mode shapes are presented. As vibrations in turbines of turbochargers are assumed to be predominantly excited by unsteady aerodynamic forces, a method to predict the actual transient flow in a radial turbine utilizing the commercial Navier-Stokes solver TASCflow3d was developed. Results of the unsteady calculations are presented and comparisons with the measured unsteady flow field are made. As a major result, the excitation effect of the tongue region in a vaneless radial inflow turbine can be demonstrated.

  3. Validation of in situ networks via field sampling: case study in the South Fork Experimental Watershed

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The calibration and validation of soil moisture remote sensing products is complicated by the logistics of installing a soil moisture network for a long term period in an active landscape. Therefore, these stations are located along field boundaries or in non-representative sites with regards to so...

  4. Validation of in Situ Networks Via Field Sampling: Case Study in the South Fork Experimental Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosh, M. H.; McKee, L.; Bindlish, R.; Coopersmith, E. J.; Jackson, T. J.; Prueger, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    The calibration and validation of soil moisture remote sensing products is complicated by the logistics of installing a soil moisture network for a long term period in an active landscape. Therefore, these stations are located along field boundaries or in non-representative sites with regards to soil type or soil moisture. The representative character of this network can only be established by large scale field sampling to provide a calibration dataset. A team of samplers were deployed twice a week for the summer of 2014 to collect surface soil moisture data across a variety of land covers at 44 sites. These samples were compared and scaled to the domain to get a better understanding of the large scale soil moisture distributions and dynamics. In addition, comparisons are made to the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) soil moisture product for the length of the network installation.

  5. Experimental study on a Nb3Al insert coil under high magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guang; Dai, Yinming; Cheng, Junsheng; Chang, Kun; Liu, Jianhua; Wang, Qiuliang; Pan, Xifeng; Li, Chao

    2016-06-01

    Nb3Al is one of the most promising superconductors to replace Nb3Sn in large scale, high field superconducting magnet. Since the complicated conductor manufacturing process, long and stable Nb3Al conductor is difficult to acquire in a commercial scale. Based on a 70 m length of Nb-Al precursor conductor, we designed and fabricated a Nb3Al coil. The coil winding, low temperature diffusion heat treatment and epoxy impregnation are described in detail. The finished Nb3Al coil is tested as an insert in a background magnet. The test is performed at the background field from 7 T to 15 T. The test results are analyzed and presented in this paper.

  6. Primary experimental study on safety of deep brain stimulation in RF electromagnetic field.

    PubMed

    Jun, Xu; Luming, Li; Hongwei, Hao

    2009-01-01

    With the rapid growth of clinical application of Deep Brain Stimulation, its safety and functional concern in the electromagnetic field, another pollution becoming much more serious, has become more and more significant. Meanwhile, the measuring standards on Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) for DBS are still incomplete. Particularly, the knowledge of the electromagnetic field induced signals on the implanted lead is ignorant while some informal reports some side effects. This paper briefly surmised the status of EMC standards on implantable medical devices. Based on the EMC experiments of DBS device we developed, two experiments for measuring the induced voltage of the deep brain stimulator in RF electromagnetic field were reported. The measured data showed that the induced voltage in some frequency was prominent, for example over 2V. As a primary research, we think these results would be significant to cause researcher to pay more attention to the EMC safety problem and biological effects of the induced voltage in deep brain stimulation and other implantable devices.

  7. Studies of the Electric Field Distribution in Biological Bodies - Experimental Dosimetry at Radiofrequencies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-05

    Absorption Rate Distribution In Simple Geometrica ~l Bodies at Radio Frequencies", M.A.Sc. Thesis, University of Ottawa. 24. G.H. Wong, S.S. Stuchly, A...desigted for operaion in air 12,4,51 or in the dielectric media • C2.7] can be used 1: our eysteia lo s a they coo- _ Cl three L-doperdeot aote-ra...dielectric media is detetaled by masuring the output voltage of the electric field probe, placed at varils locacioc 160 me1 208 3.9 NA I= a sphere made of tht

  8. Automatic recognition of intermittent failures - An experimental study of field data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyer, Ravishankar K.; Young, Luke T.; Krishna Iyer, P. V.

    1990-01-01

    A methodology is proposed for recognizing the symptoms of persistent problems in large systems. The system error rate is used to identify the error states among which relationships may exist. Statistical techniques are used to validate and quantify the strength of the relationship among these error states. As input, the approach takes the raw error logs containing a single entry for each error that is detected as an isolated event. As output, it produces a list of symptoms that characterize persistent errors. Thus, given a failure, it is determined whether the failure is an intermittent manifestation of a common fault or whether it is an isolated (transient) incident. The technique is shown to work on two CYBER systems and an IBM 3081 multiprocessor system. Comparisons to real failure/repair information obtained from field engineers show that, in about 85 percent of the cases, the error symptoms recognized by this approach correspond to real problems. The remaining 15 percent of the cases, although not directly supported by field data, are confirmed as being valid problems.

  9. Effects on the nervous system by exposure to electromagnetic fields: experimental and clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Hansson, H A

    1988-01-01

    Exposure to electromagnetic fields may cause various types of effects on nervous tissue, in severe cases even irreversible damage. The exposure conditions, i.e. frequency including type and extent of modulation, time, intensity, wave form, as well as shape, size and position of exposed subject and possible treatment with drugs, are factors determining if damage, acute or chronic, ultimately result. Long term exposure of newborn rabbits, rats and mice to electromagnetic fields of power frequency (10-14 kV/m; 50 or 60 Hz; sinusoidal wave form; 21-24 h per day) may cause affection and even damage to the nervous system. Large nerve cells showed reactive changes such as lamellar bodies and cytoskeletal alteration to an extent varying with exposure conditions. Reactive neuroglial changes as well as increase in neuroglial marker proteins could concomitantly be demonstrated. The changes seemed to be reversible although we only have incomplete data available. Exposure in vitro of frog sciatic nerve to 16-60 Hz sinusoidal low current (50-1000 nA) for 17 h induced cytoskeletal changes. Exposure of rabbits to pulsed microwaves of moderate to high intensity (3.1 GHz; 300 Hz modulation; peak duration 1.4 usec with maximal peak intensity about 1000 times average; 55 mW/cm; SAR in the brain cortex about 20 W/kg; increase of temperature as measured by lightguide-equipped instruments in right brain hemisphere about 1-2 degrees C) during 1 h per day during three days resulted in no obvious initial changes in behaviour. Minimal acute dam- age could be demonstrated. However, after two to four months and later on both structural, immunohistochemical and biochemical changes could be documented. Radar technicians accidently and/or occupationally exposed to microwaves showed psychoneurological signs of affection as well as changes in cerebrospinal fluid protein pattern. No related changes have been noticed among matched controls. Exposure of nervous tissue to electromagnetic fields ranging

  10. Reducing narcissistic aggression by buttressing self-esteem: an experimental field study.

    PubMed

    Thomaes, Sander; Bushman, Brad J; Orobio de Castro, Bram; Cohen, Geoffrey L; Denissen, Jaap J A

    2009-12-01

    Narcissistic individuals are prone to become aggressive when their egos are threatened. We report a randomized field experiment that tested whether a social-psychological intervention designed to lessen the impact of ego threat reduces narcissistic aggression. A sample of 405 young adolescents (mean age = 13.9 years) were randomly assigned to complete either a short self-affirmation writing assignment (which allowed them to reflect on their personally important values) or a control writing assignment. We expected that the self-affirmation would temporarily attenuate the ego-protective motivations that normally drive narcissists' aggression. As expected, the self-affirmation writing assignment reduced narcissistic aggression for a period of a school week, that is, for a period up to 400 times the duration of the intervention itself. These results provide the first empirical demonstration that buttressing self-esteem (as opposed to boosting self-esteem) can be effective at reducing aggression in at-risk youth.

  11. Radar and ground measurements on wheat fields over the Matera site: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattia, Francesco; Gatti, Anna Maria; Posa, Franco; D'Alessio, Angelo; Notarnicola, Claudia; Sabatelli, Enzo; Rinaldi, Michele; Satalino, Giuseppe; Pasquariello, Guido; Le Toan, Thuy; Picard, Ghislain; Davidson, Malcolm

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes ground and radar measurements collected on wheat fields over the Matera site in Italy during the 2001 growing season. The objective of the paper is twofold. Firstly to investigate the relationship between the C-band backscatter with wheat biomass and with the underlying soil moisture content. Secondly to provide well documented data in order to validate electromagnetic scattering models for cereal crops. From March to June 2001 six ERS-2 overpasses of the site have been acquired. In addition, eight C-band ground-based scatterometer acquisitions, at HH and VV polarisation, with incidence angles ranging between 23° and 60° have been achieved. Coinciding with ERS-2 and scatterometer acquisitions ground data in terms of soil moisture, wheat biomass and canopy structure have been collected. This paper describes the experiments and presents the first data analysis.

  12. Effects on the nervous system by exposure to electromagnetic fields: experimental and clinical studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hansson, H.A.

    1988-01-01

    Exposure to electromagnetic fields may cause various types of effects on nervous tissue, in severe cases even irreversible damage. The exposure conditions, i.e. frequency including type and extent of modulation, time, intensity, wave form, as well as shape, size and position of exposed subject and possible treatment with drugs, are factors determining if damage, acute or chronic, ultimately result. Long term exposure of newborn rabbits, rats and mice to electromagnetic fields of power frequency (10-14 kV/m; 50 or 60 Hz; sinusoidal wave form; 21-24 h per day) may cause affection and even damage to the nervous system. Large nerve cells showed reactive changes such as lamellar bodies and cytoskeletal alteration to an extent varying with exposure conditions. Reactive neuroglial changes as well as increase in neuroglial marker proteins could concomitantly be demonstrated. The changes seemed to be reversible although we only have incomplete data available. Exposure in vitro of frog sciatic nerve to 16-60 Hz sinusoidal low current (50-1000 nA) for 17 h induced cytoskeletal changes. Exposure of rabbits to pulsed microwaves of moderate to high intensity during 1 h per day during three days resulted in no obvious initial changes in behavior. Minimal acute damage could be demonstrated. However, after two to four months and later on both structural, immunohistochemical and biochemical changes could be documented. Radar technicians accidently and/or occupationally exposed to microwaves showed psychoneurological signs of affection as well as changes in cerebrospinal fluid protein pattern. No related changes have been noticed among matched controls.

  13. Experimental and Numerical Study of Wind and Turbulence in a Near-Field Dispersion Campaign at an Inhomogeneous Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiao; Dupont, Eric; Gilbert, Eric; Musson-Genon, Luc; Carissimo, Bertrand

    2016-09-01

    We present a detailed experimental and numerical study of the local flow field for a pollutant dispersion experimental program conducted at SIRTA (Site Instrumental de Recherche par Télédétection Atmosphérique), a complex and intensively instrumented site in a southern suburb of Paris. Global analysis of continuous measurements over 2 years highlights the impact of terrain heterogeneity on wind and turbulence. It shows that the forest to the north of the experimental field induces strong directional shear and wind deceleration below the forest canopy height. This directional shear is stronger with decreasing height and decreasing distance from the forest edge. Numerical simulations are carried out using Code_Saturne, a computational fluid dynamics code, in Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes mode with a standard k{-}ɛ closure and a canopy model, in neutral and stable stratifications. These simulations are shown to reproduce globally well the characteristics of the mean flow, especially the directional wind shear in northeasterly and northwesterly cases and the turbulent kinetic energy increase induced by the forest. However, they slightly underestimate wind speed and the directional shear of the flow below the forest canopy height. Sensitivity studies are performed to investigate the influence of leaf area density, inlet stability condition, and roughness length. These studies show that the typical features of the canopy flow become more pronounced as canopy density increases. Performance statistics indicate that the impact of the forest and adequate inlet profiles are the most important factors in the accurate reproduction of flow at the site, especially under stable stratification.

  14. Experimental and theoretical study of the microwaves transmission through the plasma structures and layers in a constant magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocharov, A. N.; Bityurin, V. A.; Brovkin, V. G.; Vedenin, P. V.; Petrovskiy, V. P.; Balakirev, B. A.; Korneev, V. N.; Pashchina, A. S.; Shkatov, O. Yu; Pervov, A. Yu

    2016-11-01

    The possibility of significant improvement transmission conditions of microwave radiation passing through a homogeneous quasi-neutral plasma layer in the constant magnetic field B 0 is considered. The study based on 1D analysis was conducted for layers with concentration Np = 1017-1019 m-3 and collision frequency of electrons with molecules ν = 1010-1011 s-1 in the wavelength range λ = 1-10 cm. For different values of plasma parameters Np and ν the dependences of the magnetic induction values B 0(λ, α, |D|cr), reducing a transmitted wave amplitude attenuation to a specified level (in this case, |D|cr = 3 dB) were obtained. Analyzed the influence of the angle between vectors B 0 and k (wave vector) on the amplitude AT and, hence, on the value of B 0(λ, α, |D|cr), revealed the optimal conditions of the field B 0 orientation relative to the direction of electromagnetic waves propagation. Experimentally investigated the influence of a constant magnetic field B 0 on the attenuation degree of microwave radiation (f = 13 GHz) in a various types plasma structures and in the plasma layers. The experiments were carried out in air at pressures P = 70-500 Torr. A marked increase in the amplitude of the transmitted wave in presence of constant magnetic field was indicated.

  15. Experimental field study of problem-solving using tools in free-ranging capuchins (Sapajus nigritus, formerly Cebus nigritus).

    PubMed

    Garber, P A; Gomes, D F; Bicca-Marques, J C

    2012-04-01

    Some populations of capuchins are reported to use tools to solve foraging problems in the wild. In most cases, this involves the act of pounding and digging. The use of probing tools by wild capuchins is considerably less common. Here we report on the results of an experimental field study conducted in southern Brazil designed to examine the ability of wild black-horned capuchins (Sapajus nigritus) to use a wooden dowel as a lever or a probe to obtain an embedded food reward. A group of eight capuchins was presented with two experimental platforms, each housing a clear Plexiglas box containing two bananas on a shelf and four inserted dowels. Depending on the conditions of the experiment, the capuchins were required either to pull (Condition I) or push (Conditions II and III) the dowels, in order to dislodge the food reward from the shelf so that it could be manually retrieved. In Condition I, four individuals spontaneously solved the foraging problem by pulling the dowels in 25% (72/291) of visits. In Conditions II and III, however, no capuchin successfully pushed the dowels forward to obtain the food reward. During these latter two experimental conditions, the capuchins continued to pull the dowels (41/151 or 27% of visits), even though this behavior did not result in foraging success. The results of these field experiments are consistent with an identical study conducted on wild Cebus capucinus in Costa Rica, and suggest that when using an external object as a probe to solve a foraging problem, individual capuchins were able to rapidly learn an association between the tool and the food reward, but failed to understand exactly how the tool functioned in accomplishing the task. The results also suggest that once a capuchin learned to solve this tool-mediated foraging problem, the individual persisted in using the same solution even in the face of repeated failure (slow rate of learning extinction).

  16. An experimental study on the effects of temperature and magnetic field strength on the magnetorheological fluid stability and MR effect.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, Yahya; Ashtiani, Mahshid; Hashemabadi, Seyed Hassan

    2015-06-14

    In this study, the stability and rheological properties of a suspension of carbonyl iron microparticles (CIMs) in silicone oil were investigated within a temperature range of 10 to 85 °C. The effect of adding two hydrophobic (stearic and palmitic) acids on the stability and magnetorheological effect of a suspension of CIMs in silicone oil was studied. According to the results, for preparing a stable and efficient magnetorheological (MR) fluid, additives should be utilized. Therefore, 3 wt% of stearic acid was added to the MR fluid which led to an enhancement of the fluid stability over 92% at 25 °C. By investigating shear stress variation due to the changes in the shear rate for acid-based MR fluids, the maximum yield stress was obtained by fitting the Bingham plastic rheological model at high shear rates. Based on the existing correlations of yield stress and either temperature or magnetic field strength, a new model was fitted to the experimental data to monitor the simultaneous effect of magnetic field strength and temperature on the maximum yield stress. The results demonstrated that as the magnetic field intensified or the temperature decreased, the maximum yield stress increased dramatically. In addition, when the MR fluid reached its magnetic saturation, the viscosity of fluid depended only on the shear rate.

  17. Adult Career Counseling Using Possible Selves--A Quasi-Experimental Field Study in Naturalistic Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plimmer, Geoff

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of an adult career development program designed to reflect the diversity and demands of career choices, the low level of comfort many have with career choices, and the limited resources available to resolve complex adult career problems. A possible selves process was used, delivered through a blend of computer…

  18. An Experimental Study of the Interaction of Strain Fields between Coldworked Fastener Holes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    contrast. This focus procedure was rather tedious, but it did not need to be repeated as long as the photographic system was not disturbed. Agfa -Gavert...lOE56 Holotest film plates were used for the collection of specimen data throughout the study. The Agfa plates proved to be ex- cellent in quality

  19. Effects of a tattoo on men's behavior and attitudes towards women: An experimental field study.

    PubMed

    Guéguen, Nicolas

    2013-11-01

    Previous studies have indicated negative evaluations of women with tattoos. However, a study by Swami and Furnham (2007) showed that tattooed women were rated as less physically attractive but more sexually promiscuous. Given that men interpret women's sexual intent according to their physical appearance, we predicted that women with tattoos would be more favorably approached by men. A temporary tattoo was placed on confederates' lower back, or not, and all confederates were instructed to read a book while lying flat on their stomach on a well-known beach. Two experiments were conducted. The first experiment showed that more men (N = 220) approached the tattooed confederates and that the mean latency of their approach was quicker. A second experiment showed that men (N = 440) estimated to have more chances to have a date and to have sex on the first date with tattooed confederates. However, the level of physical attractiveness attributed to the confederate was not influenced by the tattoo condition. These results were discussed with respect to men's possible misinterpretation of women wearing tattoos and the risks associated with this misinterpretation.

  20. The impact of nutritional labels and socioeconomic status on energy intake. An experimental field study.

    PubMed

    Crockett, Rachel A; Jebb, Susan A; Hankins, Matthew; Marteau, Theresa M

    2014-10-01

    There is some evidence for paradoxical effects of nutritional labelling on energy intake particularly amongst restrained eaters and those with a higher body mass index (BMI) resulting in greater consumption of energy from foods with a positive health message (e.g. "low-fat") compared with the same foods, unlabelled. This study aimed to investigate, in a UK general population sample, the likelihood of paradoxical effects of nutritional labelling on energy intake. Participants (n = 287) attended a London cinema and were offered a large tub of salted or toffee popcorn. Participants were randomised to receive their selected flavour with one of three labels: a green low-fat label, a red high-fat label or no label. Participants watched two film clips while completing measures of demographic characteristics, emotional state and taste of the popcorn. Following the experiment, popcorn consumption was measured. There were no main effects of nutritional labelling on consumption. Contrary to predictions neither BMI nor weight concern moderated the effect of label on consumption. There was a three-way interaction between low-fat label, weight concern and socioeconomic status (SES) such that weight-concerned participants of higher SES who saw a low-fat label consumed more than weight unconcerned participants of similar SES (t = -2.7, P = .04). By contrast, weight-concerned participants of lower SES seeing either type of label, consumed less than those seeing no label (t = -2.04, P = .04). Nutritional labelling may have different effects in different socioeconomic groups. Further studies are required to understand fully the possible contribution of food labelling to health inequalities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. FUNDAMENTAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY (INCLUDING APPLICATIONS): Experimental Study on Coherence Time of a Light Field with Single Photon Counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Zhang, Yu-Chi; Zhang, Peng-Fei; Guo, Yan-Qiang; Li, Gang; Wang, Jun-Min; Zhang, Tian-Cai

    2009-07-01

    The second-order degree of coherence of pseudo-thermal light and coherence time are experimentally studied via the Hanbruy-Brown-Twiss (HBT) scheme. The system consists of two non-photon-number-resolving single- photon-counting modules (SPCMs) operating in the Geiger mode. We investigate the coherence time of the incident beam for different spot sizes on a ground glass and speeds of a rotating ground glass. The corresponding coherence time can be obtained from Gaussian fitting for the measured second-order degree of coherence. The results show that the coherence time of measured pseudo-thermal light depends on the spot sizes and the rotating speeds of the ground glass. The maximum value of the second-order degree of coherence is reduced as the rotating speed decreases. This result can be well explained by the model of mixed thermal and coherent fields with different ratios.

  2. Analytical and experimental study of the acoustics and the flow field characteristics of cavitating self-resonating water jets

    SciTech Connect

    Chahine, G.L.; Genoux, P.F.; Johnson, V.E. Jr.; Frederick, G.S.

    1984-09-01

    Waterjet nozzles (STRATOJETS) have been developed which achieve passive structuring of cavitating submerged jets into discrete ring vortices, and which possess cavitation incipient numbers six times higher than obtained with conventional cavitating jet nozzles. In this study we developed analytical and numerical techniques and conducted experimental work to gain an understanding of the basic phenomena involved. The achievements are: (1) a thorough analysis of the acoustic dynamics of the feed pipe to the nozzle; (2) a theory for bubble ring growth and collapse; (3) a numerical model for jet simulation; (4) an experimental observation and analysis of candidate second-generation low-sigma STRATOJETS. From this study we can conclude that intensification of bubble ring collapse and design of highly resonant feed tubes can lead to improved drilling rates. The models here described are excellent tools to analyze the various parameters needed for STRATOJET optimizations. Further analysis is needed to introduce such important factors as viscosity, nozzle-jet interaction, and ring-target interaction, and to develop the jet simulation model to describe the important fine details of the flow field at the nozzle exit.

  3. Effect of pulsed electromagnetic field therapy on experimental pain: A double-blind, randomized study in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Karen; Beland, Patricia; Pinard, Marilee; Handfield, Guilène; Handfield, Nicole; Goffaux, Philippe; Corriveau, Hélène; Léonard, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies suggested that pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) therapy can decrease pain. To date, however, it remains difficult to determine whether the analgesic effect observed in patients are attributable to a direct effect of PEMF on pain or to an indirect effect of PEMF on inflammation and healing. In the present study, we used an experimental pain paradigm to evaluate the direct effect of PEMF on pain intensity, pain unpleasantness, and temporal summation of pain. Twenty-four healthy subjects (mean age 22 ± 2 years; 9 males) participated in the experiment. Both real and sham PEMF were administered to every participant using a randomized, double-blind, cross-over design. For each visit, PEMF was applied for 10 minutes on the right forearm using a portable device. Experimental pain was evoked before (baseline) and after PEMF with a 9 cm(2) Pelletier-type thermode, applied on the right forearm (120 s stimulation; temperature individually adjusted to produce moderate baseline pain). Pain intensity and unpleasantness were evaluated using a 0-100 numerical pain rating scale. Temporal summation was evaluated by comparing pain intensity ratings obtained at the end of tonic nociceptive stimulation (120 s) with pain intensity ratings obtained after 60 s of stimulation. When compared to baseline, there was no change in pain intensity and unpleasantness following the application of real or sham PEMF. PEMF did not affect temporal summation. The present observations suggest that PEMF does not directly influence heat pain perception in healthy individuals.

  4. Experimental study on the flow field behind a backward-facing step using a detonation-driven shock tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T.-H.; Yoshikawa, M.; Obara, T.; Ohyagi, S.

    2006-03-01

    The supersonic combustion RAM jet (SCRAM jet) engine is expected to be used in next-generation space planes and hypersonic airliners. To develop the engine, stabilized combustion in a supersonic flow field must be attained even though the residence time of flow is extremely short. A mixing process for breathed air and fuel injected into the supersonic flow field is therefore one of the most important design problems. Because the flow inside the SCRAM jet engine has high enthalpy, an experimental facility is required to produce the high-enthalpy flow field. In this study, a detonation-driven shock tunnel was built to produce a high-enthalpy flow, and a model SCRAM jet engine equipped with a backward-facing step was installed in the test section of the facility to visualize flow fields using a color schlieren technique and high-speed video camera. The fuel was injected perpendicularly to a Mach 3 flow behind the backward-facing step. The height of the step, the injection distance and injection pressure were varied to investigate the effects of the step on air/fuel mixing characteristics. The results show that the recirculation region increases as the fuel injection pressure increases. For injection behind the backward-facing step, mixing efficiency is much higher than with a flat plate. Also, the injection position has a significant influence on the size of the recirculation region generated behind the backward-facing step. The schlieren photograph and pressure histories measured on the bottom wall of the SCRAM jet engine model show that the fuel was ignited behind the step.

  5. A field experimental study of lignin sand stabilizing material (LSSM) extracted from spent-liquor of straw pulping paper mills.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han-Jie; Li, Jing; Lu, Xiao-Zhen; Jin, Yong-Can

    2005-01-01

    A new technique was introduced for sand stabilization and re-vegetation by use of lignin sand stabilizing material (LSSM). LSSM is a reconstructed organic compound with lignin as the most dominant component from the extracts of black-liquor issued by straw pulp paper mills. Unlike the polyvinyl acetate or foamed asphalt commonly used for dune stabilization, the new material is plant-friendly and can be used with virescence actions simultaneously. The field experimental study was conducted since 2001 in China's Northwest Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region and has been proved that LSSM is effective in stabilizing the fugitive dunes, making the arenaceous plants survive and the bare dune vegetative. The advisable solution concentration is 2% and the optimal field spraying quantity is 2.5 L/m2. The soil nutrients of the stabilized and greened dune, such as organic matter, available phosphorous and total nitrogen are all increased compared with the control treatment, which is certainly helpful to the growth of arenaceous plants. The technique is worthwhile to be popularized because it is provided not only a new method for desertification control but also an outlet for cleaning contaminants issued from the straw paper mills.

  6. Effect of 900MHz electromagnetic fields emitted from cellular phones on fracture healing: an experimental study on rats.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Ahmet; Atay, Tolga; Gülle, Kanat; Kırdemir, Vecihi; Ozden, Ahmet; Çömlekçi, Selçuk; Aydoğan, Nevres Hürriyet

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) at 900 MHz frequencies on bone fracture healing. The study included 30 adult male Wistar albino rats (average weight: 256 g) divided into two equal groups. Transverse fracture was created manually by pressing a finger on the right tibias of all rats and fractures were fixed intramedullary using a K-wire. Rats in Group 1 were exposed to EMF at 900 MHz frequency 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week for 8 weeks. Group 2, the control group, was kept under the same experimental conditions without EMF exposure. Radiological, mechanical and histological examination of tibial fracture healing was performed. There was a significant difference between radiological, histological and manual biomechanical scores of the study and control groups (p=0.020, p=0.006 and p=0.032, respectively). All scores were lower in the study group than the control group. Results of this study demonstrate that EMF at 900 MHz of frequency emitted from cellular phones has a significantly negative effect on bone fracture healing in a rat tibia model.

  7. An experimental study using flow visualization on the effect of an acoustic field on heat transfer from spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, W. W.; Baroth, E. C.

    1986-01-01

    The physical mechanisms responsible for the heat transfer process in a thermal-acoustic field were investigated using the technique of holographic interferometry for flow visualization. Experimental results were obtained with sound pressure levels in the range of 120 to 150 decibels, relative to a pressure of 0.0002 dynes/sq cm. Steady state laminar flow was observed when the vibrational Reynolds number was below 400; separated flow was observed when it was above 400. In the presence of a horizontal sound field, the data indicate that the relation between the vibrational Nusselt number, Nu(v) and the vibrational Reynolds number, Re(v) is given by Nu(v) = Re(v) exp 0.22. In the presence of a vertical sound field, the corresponding relation is Nu(v) = Re(v) exp 0.15.

  8. Electronic structure of ytterbium-implanted GaN at ambient and high pressure: experimental and crystal field studies.

    PubMed

    Kaminska, A; Ma, C-G; Brik, M G; Kozanecki, A; Boćkowski, M; Alves, E; Suchocki, A

    2012-03-07

    The results of high-pressure low-temperature optical measurements in a diamond-anvil cell of bulk gallium nitride crystals implanted with ytterbium are reported in combination with crystal field calculations of the Yb(3+) energy levels. Crystal field analysis of splitting of the (2)F(7/2) and (2)F(5/2) states has been performed, with the aim of assigning all features of the experimental luminescence spectra. A thorough analysis of the pressure behavior of the Yb(3+) luminescence lines in GaN allowed the determination of the ambient-pressure positions and pressure dependence of the Yb(3+) energy levels in the trigonal crystal field as well as the pressure-induced changes of the spin-orbit coupling coefficient.

  9. Near-field effects in Green's function retrieval from cross-correlation of elastic fields: experimental study with application to elastography.

    PubMed

    Benech, N; Brum, J; Catheline, S; Gallot, T; Negreira, C

    2013-05-01

    In a lossless system, the causal and acausal Green's function for elastic waves can be retrieved by cross-correlating the elastic field at two positions. This field, composed of converging and diverging waves, is interpreted in the frame of a time-reversal process. In this work, the near-field effects on the spatio-temporal focusing of elastic waves are analyzed through the elastodynamic Green's function. Contrary to the scalar field case, the spatial focusing is not symmetric preserving the directivity pattern of a simple source. One important feature of the spatial asymmetry is its dependency on the Poisson ratio of the solid. Additionally, it is shown that the retrieval of the bulk wave speed values is affected by diffraction. The correction factor depends on the relative direction between the source and the observed field. Experimental verification of the analysis is carried out on the volume of a soft-solid. A low-frequency diffuse-like field is generated by random impacts at the sample's free surface. The displacement field is imaged using ultrasound by a standard speckle tracking technique. One important application of this work is in the estimation of the shear elastic modulus in soft biological tissues, whose quantification can be useful in non-invasive diagnosis of various diseases.

  10. Magnetic field distribution in the presence of paramagnetic plates in magnetic resonance imaging: a combined numerical and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Philipp; Machann, Juergen; Mueller-Bierl, Bernd; Steidle, Guenter; Bellemann, Matthias E; Schick, Fritz

    2008-05-01

    The amount and geometric distribution of paramagnetic components in tissue is considered as the basis of T2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Such techniques are routinely applied for assessment of iron in parenchymal organs such as the liver (hemosiderosis). Furthermore, susceptibility sensitive MRI is discussed as an alternative method to x-ray techniques for quantitative assessment of paramagnetic spongy bone components in patients with osteoporosis. The presented work is dedicated to systematically examining the possible influences of macroscopic arrangements of paramagnetic plates on the magnetic field. In a theoretical approach magnetic field distribution was simulated applying decomposition of the plates in single dipoles. Plate size and distances between parallel plates, as well as plate orientation with respect to the static field, were varied for these numerical simulations. Experiments on corresponding plate arrangements were carried out on a 3 T whole body MR scanner using the field-sensitive MR sequence technique for B0 field mapping. Further examinations were carried out on a bone preparation of the femur, where T2* maps were measured and analyzed on a pixel-by-pixel basis at two orientations with respect to the static field. A series of experiments were performed using isotropic and anisotropic volume elements in three-dimensional gradient echo sequences. Resulting magnetic field distributions in the experimentally recorded B0 field maps were in good agreement with the numerical simulations. Field distortions dominated in areas close to the plates and especially near the edges. Those areas showed strong local field gradients, leading to pronounced signal dephasing effects. The examination of the bone preparations revealed different T2* values for identical regions in the bone when the orientation of the bone or the pixel geometry was changed with respect to the magnetic field. Those effects amounted to nearly 70% (22.9 ms versus 13.6 ms in

  11. Experimental and theoretical study on effects of magnetic field topology on near wall conductivity in a Hall thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Daren; Li, Hong; Wu, Zhiwen; Ning, Zhongxi; Yan, Guojun

    2009-10-01

    An experiment has been made to investigate the effect of curved magnetic field topology on near wall conductivity in the ion acceleration region of Hall thrusters. The experimental results show that the electron current due to near wall conductivity is of the minimum in the case of focused topology and increases in the cases of both less-focus and over-focus topologies. This finding cannot be explained properly by the magnetic mirror effect, which is the one and only reported effect related to the magnetic field curvature so far. Based on the analysis of interaction between the plasma and the wall, a new physical effect is proposed. The difference of magnetic field topology causes different electric potential distribution, leads to different ion flux to the wall, results in the change of sheath property and secondary electron emission, and finally affects the electron current due to near wall conductivity. This effect is further justified by the agreement between the experiment and simulation which is performed with a particle-in-cell model. Therefore, we conclude that the ion flow injection is a significant effect to near wall conductivity in the scope of curved magnetic field topology besides the magnetic mirror effect. Moreover, we find that the focus topology of magnetic field is favorable to obtain a high thruster performance from both the ion acceleration aspect and the electron conduction aspect and so is useful practically for thruster optimization.

  12. Engineering of electric field distribution in GaN(cap)/AlGaN/GaN heterostructures: theoretical and experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladysiewicz, M.; Janicki, L.; Misiewicz, J.; Sobanska, M.; Klosek, K.; Zytkiewicz, Z. R.; Kudrawiec, R.

    2016-09-01

    Polarization engineering of GaN-based heterostructures opens a way to develop advanced transistor heterostructures, although measurement of the electric field in such heterostructures is not a simple task. In this work, contactless electroreflectance (CER) spectroscopy has been applied to measure the electric field in GaN-based heterostructures. For a set of GaN(d  =  0, 5, 15, and 30 nm)/AlGaN(20 nm)/GaN(buffer) heterostructures a decrease of electric field in the GaN(cap) layer from 0.66 MV cm-1 to 0.27 MV cm-1 and an increase of the electric field in the AlGaN layer from 0.57 MV cm-1 to 0.99 MV cm-1 have been observed with the increase in the GaN(cap) thickness from 5-30 nm. For a set of GaN(20 nm)/AlGaN(d  =  10, 20, 30, and 40 nm)/GaN(buffer) heterostructures a decrease of the electric field in the AlGaN layer from 1.77 MV cm-1 to 0.64 MV cm-1 and an increase of the electric field in the GaN layer from 0.57 MV cm-1 to 0.99 MV cm-1 were observed with the increase in the AlGaN thickness from 10-40 nm. To determine the distribution of the electric field in these heterostructures the Schrödinger and Poisson equations are solved in a self-consistent manner and matched with experimental data. It is shown that the built-in electric field in the GaN(cap) and AlGaN layers obtained from measurements does not reach values of electric field resulting only from polarization effects. The measured electric fields are smaller due to a screening of polarization effects by free carriers, which are inhomogeneously distributed across the heterostructure and accumulate at interfaces. The results clearly demonstrate that CER measurements supported by theoretical calculations are able to determine the electric field distribution in GaN-based heterostructures quantitatively, which is very important for polarization engineering in this material system.

  13. Experimental Smoke and Electromagnetic Analog Study of Induced Flow Field About a Model Rotor in Steady Flight Within Ground Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Robin B.

    1960-01-01

    Hovering and steady low-speed forward-flight tests were run on a 4-foot-diameter rotor at a ground height of 1 rotor radius. The two blades had a 2 to 1 taper ratio and were mounted in a see-saw hub. The solidity ratio was 0.05. Measurements were made of the rotor rpm, collective pitch, and forward-flight velocity. Smoke was introduced into the tip vortex and the resulting vortex pattern was photographed from two positions. Using the data obtained from these photographs, wire models of the tip vortex configurations were constructed and the distribution of the normal component of induced velocity at the blade feathering axis that is associated with these tip vortex configurations was experimentally determined at 450 increments in azimuth position from this electromagnetic analog. Three steady-state conditions were analyzed. The first was hovering flight; the second, a flight velocity just under the wake "tuck under" speed; and the third, a flight velocity just above this speed. These corresponded to advance ratios of 0, 0.022, and 0.030 (or ratios of forward velocity to calculated hovering induced velocity of approximately 0, 0.48, and 0.65), respectively, for the model test rotor. Cross sections of the wake at 450 intervals in azimuth angle as determined from the path of the tip vortex are presented graphically for all three cases. The nondimensional normal component of the induced velocity that is associated with the tip vortex as determined by an electromagnetic analog at 450 increments in azimuth position and at the blade feathering axis is presented graphically. It is shown that the mean value of this component of the induced velocity is appreciably less after tuck-under than before. It is concluded that this method yields results of engineering accuracy and is a very useful means of studying vortex fields.

  14. Numerical and experimental study of near-field scanning optical lithography using nanoscale bowtie apertures with ultrasmall gap size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Li; Qin, Jin; Chen, Yang; Wang, Liang

    2016-07-01

    Nanoscale ridge apertures have been demonstrated to be applied for high-resolution lithography. We performed a numerical study of nanoscale bowtie apertures with different outline dimensions and gap sizes to analyze their detailed field distribution for near-field scanning optical lithography (NSOL). It is found that the high image contrast, which is necessary for good quality lithography, is obtained in the near-field region and decays quickly with increasing distance. Furthermore, a smaller gap size achieves higher image contrast and deeper depth of focus. With the NSOL system, static and scanning lithography experiments are conducted. Combined with the passive flexure stage for contact control, we achieved 18-nm lithography resolution.

  15. Establishment of a large semi-field system for experimental study of African malaria vector ecology and control in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Heather M; Ng'habi, Kija R; Walder, Thomas; Kadungula, Demetrius; Moore, Sarah J; Lyimo, Issa; Russell, Tanya L; Urassa, Honorathy; Mshinda, Hassan; Killeen, Gerry F; Knols, Bart Gj

    2008-08-20

    Medical entomologists increasingly recognize that the ability to make inferences between laboratory experiments of vector biology and epidemiological trends observed in the field is hindered by a conceptual and methodological gap occurring between these approaches which prevents hypothesis-driven empirical research from being conducted on relatively large and environmentally realistic scales. The development of Semi-Field Systems (SFS) has been proposed as the best mechanism for bridging this gap. Semi-field systems are defined as enclosed environments, ideally situated within the natural ecosystem of a target disease vector and exposed to ambient environmental conditions, in which all features necessary for its life cycle completion are present. Although the value of SFS as a research tool for malaria vector biology is gaining recognition, only a few such facilities exist worldwide and are relatively small in size (< 100 m2). The establishment of a 625 m2 state-of-the-art SFS for large-scale experimentation on anopheline mosquito ecology and control within a rural area of southern Tanzania, where malaria transmission intensities are amongst the highest ever recorded, is described. A greenhouse frame with walls of mosquito netting and a polyethylene roof was mounted on a raised concrete platform at the Ifakara Health Institute. The interior of the SFS was divided into four separate work areas that have been set up for a variety of research activities including mass-rearing for African malaria vectors under natural conditions, high throughput evaluation of novel mosquito control and trapping techniques, short-term assays of host-seeking behaviour and olfaction, and longer-term experimental investigation of anopheline population dynamics and gene flow within a contained environment that simulates a local village domestic setting. The SFS at Ifakara was completed and ready for use in under two years. Preliminary observations indicate that realistic and repeatable

  16. Establishment of a large semi-field system for experimental study of African malaria vector ecology and control in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Heather M; Ng'habi, Kija R; Walder, Thomas; Kadungula, Demetrius; Moore, Sarah J; Lyimo, Issa; Russell, Tanya L; Urassa, Honorathy; Mshinda, Hassan; Killeen, Gerry F; Knols, Bart GJ

    2008-01-01

    Background Medical entomologists increasingly recognize that the ability to make inferences between laboratory experiments of vector biology and epidemiological trends observed in the field is hindered by a conceptual and methodological gap occurring between these approaches which prevents hypothesis-driven empirical research from being conducted on relatively large and environmentally realistic scales. The development of Semi-Field Systems (SFS) has been proposed as the best mechanism for bridging this gap. Semi-field systems are defined as enclosed environments, ideally situated within the natural ecosystem of a target disease vector and exposed to ambient environmental conditions, in which all features necessary for its life cycle completion are present. Although the value of SFS as a research tool for malaria vector biology is gaining recognition, only a few such facilities exist worldwide and are relatively small in size (< 100 m2). Methods The establishment of a 625 m2 state-of-the-art SFS for large-scale experimentation on anopheline mosquito ecology and control within a rural area of southern Tanzania, where malaria transmission intensities are amongst the highest ever recorded, is described. Results A greenhouse frame with walls of mosquito netting and a polyethylene roof was mounted on a raised concrete platform at the Ifakara Health Institute. The interior of the SFS was divided into four separate work areas that have been set up for a variety of research activities including mass-rearing for African malaria vectors under natural conditions, high throughput evaluation of novel mosquito control and trapping techniques, short-term assays of host-seeking behaviour and olfaction, and longer-term experimental investigation of anopheline population dynamics and gene flow within a contained environment that simulates a local village domestic setting. Conclusion The SFS at Ifakara was completed and ready for use in under two years. Preliminary observations

  17. The Blacktail Creek Tuff: an analytical and experimental study of rhyolites from the Heise volcanic field, Yellowstone hotspot system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolte, Torsten; Holtz, Francois; Almeev, Renat; Nash, Barbara

    2015-02-01

    The magma storage conditions of the 6.62 Ma Blacktail Creek Tuff eruption, belonging to the Heise volcanic field (6.62-4.45 Ma old) of the Yellowstone hotspot system, have been investigated by combining thermobarometric and experimental approaches. The results from different geothermometers (e.g., Fe-Ti oxides, feldspar pairs, apatite and zircon solubility, and Ti in quartz) indicate a pre-eruptive temperature in the range 825-875 °C. The temperature estimated using two-pyroxene pairs varies in a range of 810-950 °C, but the pyroxenes are probably not in equilibrium with each other, and the analytical results of melt inclusion in pyroxenes indicate a complex history for clinopyroxene, which hosts two compositionally different inclusion types. One natural Blacktail Creek Tuff rock sample has been used to determine experimentally the equilibrium phase assemblages in the pressure range 100-500 MPa and a water activity range 0.1-1.0. The experiments have been performed at fluid-present conditions, with a fluid phase composed of H2O and CO2, as well as at fluid-absent conditions. The stability of the quartzo-feldspathic phases is similar in both types of experiments, but the presence of mafic minerals such as biotite and clinopyroxene is strongly dependent on the experimental approach. Possible explanations are given for this discrepancy which may have strong impacts on the choice of appropriate experimental approaches for the determination of magma storage conditions. The comparison of the composition of natural phases and of experimentally synthesized phases confirms magma storage temperatures of 845-875 °C. Melt water contents of 1.5-2.5 wt% H2O are required to reproduce the natural Blacktail Creek Tuff mineral assemblage at these temperatures. Using the Ti-in-quartz barometer and the Qz-Ab-Or proportions of natural matrix glasses, coexisting with quartz, plagioclase and sanidine, the depth of magma storage is estimated to be in a pressure range between 130 and

  18. Theoretical and experimental studies of electric field distribution in N-polar GaN/AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Gladysiewicz, M. Janicki, L.; Kudrawiec, R.; Siekacz, M.; Cywinski, G.

    2015-12-28

    Electric field distribution in N-polar GaN(channel)/AlGaN/GaN(buffer) heterostructures was studied theoretically by solving Schrodinger and Poisson equations in a self-consistent manner for various boundary conditions and comparing results of these calculations with experimental data, i.e., measurements of electric field in GaN(channel) and AlGaN layers by electromodulation spectroscopy. A very good agreement between theoretical calculations and experimental data has been found for the Fermi-level located at ∼0.3 eV below the conduction band at N-polar GaN surface. With this surface boundary condition, the electric field distribution and two dimensional electron gas concentration are determined for GaN(channel)/AlGaN/GaN(buffer) heterostructures of various thicknesses of GaN(channel) and AlGaN layers.

  19. An experimental study of the effect of magnet length on the performance of a multi-cusped field thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Peng; Liu, Hui; Gao, Yuanyuan; Mao, Wei; Yu, Daren

    2016-07-01

    The multi-cusped field thruster is a novel concept in electric propulsion, which employs alternating permanent polarity magnets to create a periodic magnetic field. As an important factor for the optimal design, the magnet length of a low-power thruster is designed to be changeable. The effects of the ultimate stage length (L u) and the middle stage length (L m) on the performance characteristics are studied in a series of experiments. The results show that increasing L u could prolong the axial motion range of the electrons and promote the ionization process. In addition, it can enlarge the relative distance between the ionization and the acceleration regions. Both of these aspects can help improve the thrust and the anode efficiency. With regard to he reverse trend, wefound that the longer L m leads to a reduction of the thruster’s performance for the enhanced ion loss to the wall. Overall this study can provide some optimal design ideas on the magnet length to improve the total performance of the multi-cusped field thruster.

  20. Lethal effects of experimental warming approximating a future climate scenario on southern African quartz-field succulents: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Musil, Charles F; Schmiedel, Ute; Midgley, Guy F

    2005-02-01

    Here we examine the response of succulents in a global biodiversity hot spot to experimental warming consistent with a future African climate scenario. Passive daytime warming (averaging 5.5 degrees C above ambient) of the natural vegetation was achieved with 18 transparent hexagonal open-top chamber arrays randomized in three different quartz-field communities. After 4-months summer treatment, the specialized-dwarf and shrubby succulents displayed between 2.1 and 4.9 times greater plant and canopy mortalities in the open-top chambers than in the control plots. Those surviving in cooler ventilated areas and shaded refuges in the chambers had lower starch concentrations and water contents; the shrubby succulents also exhibited diminished chlorophyll concentrations. It is concluded that current thermal regimes are likely to be closely proximate to tolerable extremes for many endemic succulents in the region, and that anthropogenic warming could significantly exceed their thermal thresholds. Further investigation is required to elucidate the importance of associated moisture deficits in these warming experiments, a potential consequence of supplementary (fog and dew) precipitation interception by open-top chambers and higher evaporation therein, on plant mortalities.

  1. Collective Experimentation: Lessons from the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misiko, M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to document smallholder experiences during a participatory experimental initiative and draw useful lessons for field practitioners. The main methods used to collect data were participant observation, in-depth interviews among 40 farmers, and analyses of notes taken during participatory monitoring and evaluation. These…

  2. Magnetohydrodynamic generator experimental studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, E. S.

    1972-01-01

    The results for an experimental study of a one wavelength MHD induction generator operating on a liquid flow are presented. First the design philosophy and the experimental generator design are summarized, including a description of the flow loop and instrumentation. Next a Fourier series method of treating the fact that the magnetic flux density produced by the stator is not a pure traveling sinusoid is described and some results summarized. This approach appears to be of interest after revisions are made, but the initial results are not accurate. Finally, some of the experimental data is summarized for various methods of excitation.

  3. An experimental study of the flow field surrounding a subsonic jet in a cross flow. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Robert Foster

    1993-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the flow interaction of a 5.08 cm (2.00 in.) diameter round subsonic jet exhausting perpendicularly to a flat plate in a subsonic cross flow was conducted in the NASA Ames 7x1O ft. Wind Tunnel Number One. Flat plate surface pressures were measured at 400 locations in a 30.48 cm (12.0 in.) concentric circular array surrounding the jet exit. Results from these measurements are provided in tabular and graphical form for jet-to-crossflow velocity ratios ranging from 4 to 12, and for jet exit Mach numbers ranging from 0.50 to 0.93. Laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) three component velocity measurements were made in selected regions in the developed jet plume and near the flat plate surface, at a jet Mach number of 0.50 and jet-to-crossflow velocity ratios of 6 and 8. The results of both pressure and LDV measurements are compared with the results of previous experiments. In addition, pictures of the jet plume shape at jet velocity ratios ranging from 4 to 12 were obtained using schleiren photography. The LDV measurements are consistent with previous work, but more extensive measurements will be necessary to provide a detailed picture of the flow field. The surface pressure results compare closely with previous work and provide a useful characterization of jet induced surface pressures. The results demonstrate the primary influence of jet velocity ratio and the secondary influence of jet Mach number in determining such surface pressures.

  4. Geochemical and magnetic characteristics of aeolian transported materials under different near-surface wind fields: An experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xunming; Lang, Lili; Hua, Ting; Zhang, Caixia; Xia, Dunsheng

    2015-06-01

    By combining field investigations, field sampling, wind-tunnel experiments, and laboratory measurements, the relationships between near-surface winds and the geochemical and magnetic characteristics of wind-transported materials were statistically analyzed. Our study was conducted using bulk surface samples from a major potential dust source area in Central Asia (the Ala Shan Plateau). Under near-surface wind velocities ranging from 8 to 22 m/s, the coefficients of variation ranged between 1.6% and 14.9% for χlf, 1.4% and 11.0% for χARM, and 0.7% and 12.3% for SIRM of the transported materials. For the 26 elements and oxides investigated, the coefficients of variation of Ti, Cr, As, Zr, Ce, Pb, and Cu in the samples were greater than 10%. No consistent patterns were found between magnetic characteristics and elemental and iron oxide concentrations as a function of variations in near-surface wind velocities. In potential dust source areas under near-surface wind velocities, there are variations in the relationships between magnetic and geochemical characteristics in the fine fractions of transported materials with different particle sizes. Given the wide variation in magnetic and geochemical characteristics of aeolian-transported materials under different near-surface winds, their use as proxies for past climate reconstruction must be carefully appraised.

  5. Propagation of experimental uncertainties from the tunnel to the body coordinate system in 3-D LDV flow field studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuhart, Dan H.

    1994-01-01

    An analysis of experimental laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) data uncertainties that propagate from measurements in the tunnel coordinate system to results in the model system are provided. Calculations of uncertainties as functions of the variables that comprise the final result requires assessment of the contribution each variable makes. Such an analysis enables and necessitates the experimentalists to identify and address the contributing error sources in the experimental measurement system. This provides an opportunity to improve the quality of data derived from experimental systems. This is especially important in experiments where small changes in test conditions are expected to produce small, detectable changes in results. In addition, the need for high-quality experimental data for CFD method validation demands a thorough assessment of experimental uncertainty. Transforming from one Cartesian coordinate system to another by three sequential rotations, equations were developed to transform the variables initially obtained in the original coordinates into variables in the final coordinate system. Based on the transformation equations, propagation equations for errors in the experimentally-derived flow quantities were derived for a model at angle of attack. Experimental uncertainties were then propagated from the tunnel coordinate system into the model system.

  6. Strain localization along the Main Boundary Thrust (MBT) zone in the Eastern Himalaya: insights from field and experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Subhajit; Bose, Santanu; Mandal, Nibir

    2016-04-01

    The southward tapering Himalayan tectonic wedge is sliding over the upper boundary of the subducting Indian crust that act as the basal low angle detachment fault, known as the Main Himalayan Thrust (MHT). It is now established that at least four crustal-scale south verging thrust faults, such as Main Central Thrust (MCT), Daling Thrust (~ Ramgarh Thrust ~ Shumar Thrust) (DT), Main Boundary Thrust (MBT) and Main Frontal Thrust (MFT), have emerged from the MHT, striking the entire length of Himalayan mountain belts. These structures accommodated hundreds of kilometers of crustal shortening since India-Asia collision and eventually, juxtaposed different tectono-metamorphic rocks in their hanging wall. Field investigations reveal increased number of thrust faults towards the frontal Himalayan mountain belts and their spacing between the successive thrusts are relatively small in contrast to the hinterland part of the mountain belt. For example, in the Eastern Himalayan belt the MBT zone in the Lesser Himalayan Sequence is marked by several such closely spaced thrusts. The present work is aimed to delineate factors that likely to have influenced for the development of such high frequency thrusting. Employing the model of Coulomb Wedge Theory (CWT), several researchers have shown that spacing between two consecutive thrusts is a function of basal friction and pore fluid pressure ratio. However, this model does not explain the cause of closely spaced thrust localization towards the frontal mountain belts during the wedge growth. Our present study using field relations and physical modeling shows that relative strength difference between the basal low angle detachment fault and the interface-strength of the varying lithology of the cover rocks has a major role for such thrust localization with narrow thrust spacing. Moreover, our findings may become useful for structural interpretation for the localization of Main Boundary Thrust zone in the frontal Himalayan mountain

  7. Electric Field-Enhanced Catalytic Conversion of Methane: AN Experimental Study on the Effects of Corona Discharge on Methane Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marafee, Abdulathim M. J.

    The oxidative coupling of methane (OCM) is currently being actively studied for the production of higher hydrocarbons from natural gas. The present study concentrates on the oxidative conversion of methane in a high-pressure (one atmosphere), nonthermal plasma formed by corona discharge. Here, methyl radicals are formed by the reaction of methane with negatively-charged oxygen species created in the corona discharge. The results of methane conversion in the presence of both AC and DC corona discharges revealed that ethane and ethylene product selectivity is affected by electrode polarity, frequency, and oxygen partial pressure in the feed. Higher C_2 yields were obtained with the AC corona. All of the AC corona discharges specified here were initiated at room temperature (i.e., no oven or other heat source used), with temperature increases from 300 to 500^circC due to the exothermic gas discharge and exothermic reaction. A reaction mechanism is presented to explain the observed phenomena. The results suggest that AC and/or DC gas discharge techniques should be further studied for improved economics of methane conversion. The oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane in DC corona discharges was investigated. The atomic oxygen radicals initiated by corona discharges are thought to be active for the OXD of ethane. The selectivity to ethylene is affected by the reaction temperature, the DC applied voltage, voltage polarity, and the C_2H _6/O_2 ratio. The results of this study suggest the corona discharge process to be very efficient and selective in the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane. The effects of DC corona discharge were examined in the presence of a typical OCM catalyst, Sr/La _2O_3. Experimental investigations have correspondingly been conducted, in which all reactive gases passed through a catalyst bed situated within the corona-induced plasma zone. The methane conversion and C_2 yield increased (with O_2 partial pressure) during the corona-enhanced catalytic

  8. Impact of experimental design on Drosophila sexual isolation studies: direct effects and comparison to field hybridization data.

    PubMed

    Coyne, Jerry A; Elwyn, Susannah; Rolán-Alvarez, Emilio

    2005-12-01

    Many studies of speciation rely critically on estimates of sexual isolation obtained in the laboratory. Here we examine the sensitivity of sexual isolation to alterations in experimental design and mating environment in two sister species of Drosophila, D. santomea and D. yakuba. We use a newly devised measure of mating frequencies that is able to disentangle sexual isolation from species differences in mating propensity. Variation in fly density, presence or absence of a quasi-natural environment, degree of starvation, and relative frequency of species had little or no effect on sexual isolation, but one factor did have a significant effect: the possibility of choice. Designs that allowed flies to choose between conspecific and heterospecific mates showed significantly more sexual isolation than other designs that did not allow choice. These experiments suggest that sexual isolation between these species (whose ranges overlap on the island of São Tomé) is due largely to discrimination against D. yakuba males by D. santomea females. This suggestion was confirmed by direct observations of mating behavior. Drosophila santomea males also court D. yakuba females less ardently than conspecific females, whereas neither males nor females of D. yakuba show strong mate discrimination. Thus, sexual isolation appears to be a result of evolutionary changes in the derived island endemic D. santomea. Surprisingly, as reported in a companion paper (Llopart et al. 2005), the genotypes of hybrids found in nature do not accord with expectations from these laboratory studies: all F1 hybrids in nature come from matings between D. santomea females and D. yakuba males, matings that occur only rarely in the laboratory.

  9. Pulsed electromagnetic fields as adjuvant therapy in bone healing and peri-implant bone formation: an experimental study in rats.

    PubMed

    Grana, Daniel R; Marcos, Hernán J Aldana; Kokubu, Gabriel A

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether short exposure to pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) accelerates bone repair and peri-implant bone formation in a rat tibial model at different times. Sixty Wistar rats were employed. Sterile custom fabricated commercially pure cylinder threaded titanium implants were placed in the right tibial crest, and an osteotomy was performed in the left tibial crest of each animal. Thirty rats were treated with PEMF (72 mT 50Hz), twice a day in sessions of 30 minutes each, and 30 rats of the control group were sham-treated. Rats were sacrificed at 5, 10 and 20 days postsurgery (n = 10 per group). Tibias were fixed in formaldehyde and decalcified, embedded in paraffin, and stained with hematoxylin-eosin (half samples of left tibias), or they were included in methylmethacrylate, grinded and polished (right tibias and half samples of left tibias). Bone healing was evaluated by image analysis in terms of ossification area, and perimeter and diameter of the lesion. Peri-implant ossification was assessed in terms of ossification percentage. At day 10 the area of ossification index was higher in the PEMF group than in the control group (p = 0.012). At day 20 the osteotomies of the PEMF group were almost completely remodeled. The ossification percentage was higher in the PEMF group (p = 0.018). In conclusion, short daily electromagnetic stimulation appears to be a promising treatment for acceleration of both bone-healing and peri-implant bone formation.

  10. Experimental studies on power frequency breakdown voltage of CF3I/N2 mixed gas under different electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoxing; Xiao, Song; Han, Yefei; Cressault, Yann

    2016-02-01

    To verify the feasibility of replacing SF6 by CF3I/N2, we compared their power frequency breakdown performance with the influence of gas pressure, mixing ratio, and electric field utilization coefficient. Under different electric fields and mixing ratios, the power frequency breakdown voltage of CF3I/N2 increases linearly along with gas pressure. Besides, with the rise of the electric field utilization coefficient, the linear growth rate of breakdown voltage along with gas pressure gradually rises. The sensitivity of pure CF3I to electric field is particularly high and can be improved by the addition of N2. The mixture 30% CF3I/70% N2 at 0.3 MPa could replace pure SF6 in equipment requiring a low insulation, but the gas pressure or the content of CF3I need to be increased for higher insulation requirements.

  11. Effects of Experimental Learning--Outcomes of an Empirical Study in the Vocational Field of Structural Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bünning, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Pedagogic approaches to TVET offer a limited range of teaching strategies which make use of experimental learning. Thus experiments were developed for teachers of structural engineering and timber processing technologies and were subject to empirical evaluation by a researcher at the Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg and Kassel University.…

  12. Effects of Experimental Learning--Outcomes of an Empirical Study in the Vocational Field of Structural Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bünning, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Pedagogic approaches to TVET offer a limited range of teaching strategies which make use of experimental learning. Thus experiments were developed for teachers of structural engineering and timber processing technologies and were subject to empirical evaluation by a researcher at the Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg and Kassel University.…

  13. Divergent effects of urban particulate air pollution on allergic airway responses in experimental asthma: a comparison of field exposure studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Increases in ambient particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 μm (PM2.5) are associated with asthma morbidity and mortality. The overall objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that PM2.5 derived from two distinct urban U.S. communities would induce variable responses to aggravate airway symptoms during experimental asthma. Methods We used a mobile laboratory to conduct community-based inhalation exposures to laboratory rats with ovalbumin-induced allergic airways disease. In Grand Rapids exposures were conducted within 60 m of a major roadway, whereas the Detroit was located in an industrial area more than 400 m from roadways. Immediately after nasal allergen challenge, Brown Norway rats were exposed by whole body inhalation to either concentrated air particles (CAPs) or filtered air for 8 h (7:00 AM - 3:00 PM). Both ambient and concentrated PM2.5 was assessed for mass, size fractionation, and major component analyses, and trace element content. Sixteen hours after exposures, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung lobes were collected and evaluated for airway inflammatory and mucus responses. Results Similar CAPs mass concentrations were generated in Detroit (542 μg/m3) and Grand Rapids (519 μg/m3). Exposure to CAPs at either site had no effects in lungs of non-allergic rats. In contrast, asthmatic rats had 200% increases in airway mucus and had more BALF neutrophils (250% increase), eosinophils (90%), and total protein (300%) compared to controls. Exposure to Detroit CAPs enhanced all allergic inflammatory endpoints by 30-100%, whereas inhalation of Grand Rapids CAPs suppressed all allergic responses by 50%. Detroit CAPs were characterized by high sulfate, smaller sized particles and were derived from local combustion sources. Conversely Grand Rapids CAPs were derived primarily from motor vehicle sources. Conclusions Despite inhalation exposure to the same mass concentration of urban PM2.5, disparate health

  14. An experimental study on the effects of tip clearance on flow field and losses in an axial flow compressor rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Zhang, J.; Murthy, K. N. S.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed measurement of the flow field in the tip region of a compressor rotor was carried out using a Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV) and a Kiel probe at two different tip clearance heights. At both clearance sizes, the relative stagnation pressure and the axial and tangential components of relative velocities were measured upstream, inside the passage and downstream of the rotor, up to about 20 percent of the blade span from the annulus wall. The velocities, outlet angles, losses, momentum thickness, and force defect thickness are compared for the two clearances. A detailed interpretation of the effect of tip clearance on the flow field is given. There are substantial differences in flow field, on momentum thickness, and performance as the clearance is varied. The losses increase linearly within the passage and their values increase in direct proportion to tip clearance height. No discernable vortex (discrete) is observed downstream of the rotor.

  15. An experimental study on the effects of tip clearance on flow field and losses in an axial flow compressor rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Zhang, J.; Murthy, K. N. S.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed measurement of the flow field in the tip region of a compressor rotor was carried out using a Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV) and a Kiel probe at two different tip clearance heights. At both clearance sizes, the relative stagnation pressure and the axial and tangential components of relative velocities were measured upstream, inside the passage and downstream of the rotor, up to about 20 percent of the blade span from the annulus wall. The velocities, outlet angles, losses, momentum thickness, and force defect thickness are compared for the two clearances. A detailed interpretation of the effect of tip clearance on the flow field is given. There are substantial differences in flow field, on momentum thickness, and performance as the clearance is varied. The losses increase linearly within the passage and their values increase in direct proportion to tip clearance height. No discernable vortex (discrete) is observed downstream of the rotor.

  16. Spatial distribution of thorium fission rate in a fast spallation and fission neutron field: An experimental and Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borger, J. J.; Hashemi-Nezhad, S. R.; Alexiev, D.; Brandt, R.; Westmeier, W.; Thomauske, B.; Adam, J.; Kadykov, M.; Tiutiunnikov, S.

    2012-02-01

    The Energy plus Transmutation (EpT) set-up of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna, Russia is composed of a lead spallation target surrounded by a blanket of natural uranium. The resultant neutron spectrum is a combination of spallation and fission spectra, modified by a reflective external layer of polyethylene and an internal absorbing layer of cadmium. The EpT set-up was irradiated with a beam of 4 GeV deuterons from the Nuclotron Accelerator at JINR. The spatial distribution of thorium fission rate within the assembly was determined experimentally, using a fission track detector technique, and compared with Monte Carlo predictions of the MCNPX code. Contributions of neutrons, protons, deuterons, photons and pions to total fission were taken into account. Close agreement between the experimental and calculated results was found.

  17. Bio-Inspired Concepts: Studies of Biological Response to External Electric Fields for Cellular Manipulation and Diagnostics - Modeling and Experimentation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-03

    Dielectric Spectroscopy," IEEE trans. On Dielectrics and Electrical Insulation 8, 253 (2001). 8. M. Smoluchowski, "Drei vortrage uber diffusion...Intensity Electric Fields," IEEE Conf. On Dielectrics and Electrical Insulation (Bio- Electrics Workshop), Cancun, Mexico , Oct. 2002 (invited

  18. Papuan Ultramafic Belt (PUB) Ophiolite: Field Mapping, Petrology, Mineral chemistry, Geochemistry, Geochronology, And Experimental Studies Of The Metamorphic Sole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lus, W. Y.; Green, D.; McDougall, I.; Eggins, S.; Davies, H.

    2001-12-01

    The Papuan Ultramafic Belt (PUB) ophiolite in Papua New Guinea (PNG) is a large and well known section of former oceanic crust and upper mantle exposed in the western Pacific region. The PUB ophiolite was emplaced onto the southeast PNG continental crust possibly in the early Cenozoic . Detailed west-east transects during field mapping in the Musa-Kumusi divide area has shown that the Emo Metamorphics grade into amphibolites which grade up into the granulites which grade up into or are in contact with the ultramafic base of the PUB ophiolite. The ultramafics at the base of the PUB consist of harzburgites, and banded peridotites consisting of lherzolite, pyronenite and harzburgite layers. The harzburgites in the ultramafics have Fo92 olivine but there are small and correlated differences in Cr/Al ratio of both spinel and orthopyroxene and in CaO content. The pyroxenes in the lherzolite are very Ca-rich diopside and co-existing orthopyroxene with low CaO content, but higher than that of orthopyroxene in harzburgite. Temperature of equilibration by two pyroxene thermometry is 814-865oC, at 3 kbar. Hornblende is the dominant mineral phase in the granulites and amphibolites coexisting with olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, plagioclase, ilmenite, magnetite. Lower SiO2, CaO, Al2O3 and higher MgO, TiO2, (Na2O+K2O), P2O5 contents of the granulites and the high MgO content and normative olivine (10% ) suggest that the sole granulites are essentially picritic in composition and are similar or transitional to the basic rocks of the Emo Metamorphics, and differ from the gabbroic rocks of the PUB ophiolite in lower TiO2, lower Na2O, higher Al2O3, lower FeO and lower P2O5 of the PUB, at similar MgO contents. A conventional A K-Ar, 40Ar-39Ar total fusion and incremental step-heating 40Ar-39Ar geochronological study on the metamorphic sole using amphiboles from emplacement-related granulites and amphibolites have been concluded. Sandwich melting experiments have been conducted

  19. The Impact of Global Warming on the Carbon Cycle of Arctic Permafrost: An Experimental and Field Based Study

    SciTech Connect

    Onstott, Tullis C; Pffifner, Susan M; Chourey, Karuna

    2014-11-07

    Our results to date indicate that CO2 and CH4 fluxes from organic poor, Arctic cryosols on Axel Heiberg Island are net CH4 sinks and CO2 emitters in contrast to organic-rich peat deposits at sub-Arctic latitudes. This is based upon field observations and a 1.5 year long thawing experiment performed upon one meter long intact cores. The results of the core thawing experiments are in good agreement with field measurements. Metagenomic, metatranscriptomic and metaproteomic analyses indicate that high affinity aerobic methanotrophs belong to the uncultivated USCalpha are present in <1% abundance in these cryosols are are active in the field during the summer and in the core thawing experiments. The methanotrophs are 100 times more abundant than the methanogens. As a result mineral cryosols, which comprise 87% of Arctic tundra, are net methane sinks. Their presence and activity may account for the discrepancies observed between the atmospheric methane concentrations observed in the Arctic predicted by climate models and the observed seasonal fluctuations and decadal trends. This has not been done yet.

  20. An experimental study on the motion, deformation and electrical charging of water drops falling in oil in the presence of high voltage D.C. electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Jalaal, M.; Khorshidi, B.; Esmaeilzadeh, E.

    2010-11-15

    The motion, deformation and electrical charging of conducting water drops falling in an insulating liquid subjected to various electric fields strength were studied experimentally. The drop motion was recorded contentiously by high speed camera and their responses to deformation under the influence of electric field were digitally extracted by image processing of the sequential frames. Two parameters were defined for describing the deviation and deformation of the drops under the electric forces. Outcomes depicted that the deviation of the drops from the vertical line would be increased by adding to the applied electrical potential as well as reduction of drop size. Moreover, regarding to deformation diagram, the results revealed a dissimilar deformation manner between large and small drops, which can be helpful in describing the drop-drop electro coalescence phenomena and in design of electrically driven droplet-based systems. (author)

  1. Ant-App-DB: a smart solution for monitoring arthropods activities, experimental data management and solar calculations without GPS in behavioral field studies.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Zeeshan; Zeeshan, Saman; Fleischmann, Pauline; Rössler, Wolfgang; Dandekar, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Field studies on arthropod ecology and behaviour require simple and robust monitoring tools, preferably with direct access to an integrated database. We have developed and here present a database tool allowing smart-phone based monitoring of arthropods. This smart phone application provides an easy solution to collect, manage and process the data in the field which has been a very difficult task for field biologists using traditional methods. To monitor our example species, the desert ant Cataglyphis fortis, we considered behavior, nest search runs, feeding habits and path segmentations including detailed information on solar position and azimuth calculation, ant orientation and time of day. For this we established a user friendly database system integrating the Ant-App-DB with a smart phone and tablet application, combining experimental data manipulation with data management and providing solar position and timing estimations without any GPS or GIS system. Moreover, the new desktop application Dataplus allows efficient data extraction and conversion from smart phone application to personal computers, for further ecological data analysis and sharing. All features, software code and database as well as Dataplus application are made available completely free of charge and sufficiently generic to be easily adapted to other field monitoring studies on arthropods or other migratory organisms. The software applications Ant-App-DB and Dataplus described here are developed using the Android SDK, Java, XML, C# and SQLite Database.

  2. Ant-App-DB: a smart solution for monitoring arthropods activities, experimental data management and solar calculations without GPS in behavioral field studies

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Zeeshan; Zeeshan, Saman; Fleischmann, Pauline; Rössler, Wolfgang; Dandekar, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Field studies on arthropod ecology and behaviour require simple and robust monitoring tools, preferably with direct access to an integrated database. We have developed and here present a database tool allowing smart-phone based monitoring of arthropods. This smart phone application provides an easy solution to collect, manage and process the data in the field which has been a very difficult task for field biologists using traditional methods. To monitor our example species, the desert ant Cataglyphis fortis, we considered behavior, nest search runs, feeding habits and path segmentations including detailed information on solar position and azimuth calculation, ant orientation and time of day. For this we established a user friendly database system integrating the Ant-App-DB with a smart phone and tablet application, combining experimental data manipulation with data management and providing solar position and timing estimations without any GPS or GIS system. Moreover, the new desktop application Dataplus allows efficient data extraction and conversion from smart phone application to personal computers, for further ecological data analysis and sharing. All features, software code and database as well as Dataplus application are made available completely free of charge and sufficiently generic to be easily adapted to other field monitoring studies on arthropods or other migratory organisms. The software applications Ant-App-DB and Dataplus described here are developed using the Android SDK, Java, XML, C# and SQLite Database. PMID:25977753

  3. Theoretical and experimental study of a high-current vacuum arc in a uniform axial magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimiya, Osami

    1992-01-01

    Measurements of the electron temperature, floating potential, plasma density, and average plasma pressure in a magnetically confined high-current vacuum arc are described. A 40-mm-diam, 30-mm-long arc was initiated between OFCu copper electrodes in a uniform axial magnetic field by triggering the gap. The crest values of the arc current ranged from 3 to 20 kA. The electron temperature by Langmuir probe measurement was Te= 2.5-3.0 eV with a uniform space distribution and was independent of the arc current. The space distribution of the ion density was parabolic in the radial direction and with a zero derivative in the axial direction. The average plasma pressure by paramagnetic measurement increased with the square of the arc current. The experiment showed that the arc column could be considered as an infinitely long column in which the plasma parameters have zero axial derivatives. Theoretical analysis has been carried out under the following assumptions. An infinitely long cylindrical and fully ionized steady-state plasma in which all quantities varied in the r direction only was considered. The anisotropy factor σ∥/σ⊥ for electrical conductivities was taken into account in the theoretical analysis, where σ∥ and σ⊥ were electrical conductivities parallel to the magnetic field and perpendicular to it, respectively. The plasma parameters determined from the experiments and theoretical analysis agreed closely with each other when the factor σ∥/σ⊥ was equal to ˜2, which is the theoretical upper limit in a high magnetic field. Constant temperature characteristics independent of the arc current have been found to be clearly seen by using line radiation as the dominant power loss in the power balance equation.

  4. Experimental study of the ponderomotive effects of a large amplitude microwave field on a magnetized electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Hadjoudj, Y.; Pierre, T.; Heuraux, S.; Leclert, G.

    1995-11-01

    Charged particles propagating in an inhomogeneous large amplitude microwave field experience a nonlinear force called the ponderomotive force. This effect can be theoretically evaluated either from the single particle or the fluid theories. For magnetized particles, these two descriptions predict quite different behaviors. A previous experiment [J. Vaclavik {ital et} {ital al}., Phys. Fluids {bold 29}, 2034 (1986)] has shown results in agreement with the fluid theory. Here, an experiment with a magnetized electron beam is described, which brings out a ponderomotive deflection in agreement with the single particle theory. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  5. Experimental and field studies on the suitability of raccoons (Procyon lotor) as hosts for tick-borne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Yabsley, Michael J; Murphy, Staci M; Luttrell, M Page; Little, Susan E; Massung, Robert F; Stallknecht, David E; Conti, Lisa A; Blackmore, Carina G M; Durden, Lance A

    2008-08-01

    We investigated the experimental susceptibility and natural exposure of raccoons (Procyon lotor) to five tick-borne pathogens of human and veterinary importance, Ehrlichia canis, E. chaffeensis, E. ewingii, Anaplasma phagocytophilum (ApVariant 1 and Ap-ha HGE-1 strains), and Borrelia lonestari. Infections were assessed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) testing, and/or culture isolation methods for at least 30 days postinoculation (DPI). Two E. chaffeensis-inoculated raccoons seroconverted and were transiently PCR positive. One raccoon was culture positive. Laboratory raised Amblyomma americanum nymphs fed on a third infected raccoon failed to become infected. Two A. phagocytophilum (HGE-1)-inoculated raccoons became PCR positive and seroconverted. Both remained positive for at least 74 DPI. In contrast, raccoons inoculated with A. phagocytophilum (Ap-Variant 1) were only transiently PCR positive and only seroconverted with low titers. No evidence of infection was observed for E. ewingii- and B. lonestari-inoculated raccoons. Only one E. canis-inoculated raccoon was PCR positive 3 DPI. Serologic testing of wild raccoons from five populations (3 infested with ticks) in Georgia and Florida showed antibodies reactive with E. chaffeensis in the 3 tick-infested populations (range of 30%-46%), E. canis in the same three populations (8%-23%), A. phagocytophilum in a single raccoon from Florida (12%), and Borrelia spp. in all 5 populations (8%-53%). All raccoons were PCR negative for tick-borne pathogens. These data suggest that raccoons are likely not important reservoirs of E. canis, E. ewingii, or B. lonestari. However, raccoons are experimentally susceptible and naturally exposed to E. chaffeensis, and these data support the previous finding that raccoons may be involved in the natural history of A. phagocytophilum.

  6. Experimental study on vertical scaling of InAs-on-insulator metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, SangHyeon E-mail: sh-kim@kist.re.kr; Yokoyama, Masafumi; Nakane, Ryosho; Takenaka, Mitsuru; Takagi, Shinichi; Ichikawa, Osamu; Osada, Takenori; Hata, Masahiko

    2014-06-30

    We have investigated effects of the vertical scaling on electrical properties in extremely thin-body InAs-on-insulator (-OI) metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). It is found that the body thickness (T{sub body}) scaling provides better short channel effect (SCE) control, whereas the T{sub body} scaling also causes the reduction of the mobility limited by channel thickness fluctuation (δT{sub body}) scattering (μ{sub fluctuation}). Also, in order to achieve better SCEs control, the thickness of InAs channel layer (T{sub channel}) scaling is more favorable than the thickness of MOS interface buffer layer (T{sub buffer}) scaling from a viewpoint of a balance between SCEs control and μ{sub fluctuation} reduction. These results indicate necessity of quantum well channel structure in InAs-OI MOSFETs and these should be considered in future transistor design.

  7. Experimental and computational studies on the flow fields in aortic aneurysms associated with deployment of AAA stent-grafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiwen; Yao, Zhaohui; Zhang, Yan; Xu, Shangdong

    2007-10-01

    Pulsatile flow fields in rigid abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) models were investigated numerically, and the simulation results are found in good agreement with particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements. There are one or more vortexes in the AAA bulge, and a fairly high wall shear stress exists at the distal end, and thus the AAA is in danger of rupture. Medical treatment consists of inserting a vascular stent-graft in the AAA, which would decrease the blood impact to the inner walls and reduce wall shear stress so that the rupture could be prevented. A new computational model, based on porous medium model, was developed and results are documented. Therapeutic effect of the stent-graft was verified numerically with the new model.

  8. Experimental and Computational Studies of the Control of Convection of Non-Conducting Liquids During solidification by Means of a Magnetic Field Gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seybert, C. D.; Evans, J. W.; Leslie, F.; Jones, W. K., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    The elimination of convection is essential in experimental investigations of diffusive transport (of heat and matter) during solidification. One classical approach to damping convection in a conducting liquid is the application of a magnetic field. The damping phenomenon is the induction, by the motion of a conductor in a magnetic field, of currents which interact with the field to produce Lorentz forces that oppose the flow. However, there are many liquids which are not sufficiently conducting to exploit this phenomenon; examples include the transparent liquids (such as succinonitrile-acetone) that are used as "model alloys" in fundamental solidification studies. There have been several investigations of the solidification of these liquids that have been carried out in orbiting laboratories to eliminate natural convection. The paper describes an investigation of an alternative approach whereby a magnetic field gradient is applied to the liquid. A magnetic body force then arises which is dependent on the susceptibility of the liquid and thereby on the temperature and or concentration. With the field gradient aligned vertically and of correct magnitude, the variation of gravitational body force due to temperature/concentration dependent density can be counterbalanced by a variation in magnetic body force. Experiments have been carried out in a super-conducting magnet at Marshall Space Flight Center to measure velocities in an aqueous manganese chloride solution. The solution was contained in a chamber with temperature controlled end walls and glass side walls. Velocities were measured by particle image velocimetry. Starting from zero current in the magnet (zero field gradient) flow driven by the temperature difference between the end walls was measured. At a critical current the flow was halted. At higher currents the normal convection was reversed. The experiments included ones where the solution was solidified and were accompanied by solution of the flow

  9. Experimental and Computational Studies of the Control of Convection of Non-Conducting Liquids During solidification by Means of a Magnetic Field Gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seybert, C. D.; Evans, J. W.; Leslie, F.; Jones, W. K., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    The elimination of convection is essential in experimental investigations of diffusive transport (of heat and matter) during solidification. One classical approach to damping convection in a conducting liquid is the application of a magnetic field. The damping phenomenon is the induction, by the motion of a conductor in a magnetic field, of currents which interact with the field to produce Lorentz forces that oppose the flow. However, there are many liquids which are not sufficiently conducting to exploit this phenomenon; examples include the transparent liquids (such as succinonitrile-acetone) that are used as "model alloys" in fundamental solidification studies. There have been several investigations of the solidification of these liquids that have been carried out in orbiting laboratories to eliminate natural convection. The paper describes an investigation of an alternative approach whereby a magnetic field gradient is applied to the liquid. A magnetic body force then arises which is dependent on the susceptibility of the liquid and thereby on the temperature and or concentration. With the field gradient aligned vertically and of correct magnitude, the variation of gravitational body force due to temperature/concentration dependent density can be counterbalanced by a variation in magnetic body force. Experiments have been carried out in a super-conducting magnet at Marshall Space Flight Center to measure velocities in an aqueous manganese chloride solution. The solution was contained in a chamber with temperature controlled end walls and glass side walls. Velocities were measured by particle image velocimetry. Starting from zero current in the magnet (zero field gradient) flow driven by the temperature difference between the end walls was measured. At a critical current the flow was halted. At higher currents the normal convection was reversed. The experiments included ones where the solution was solidified and were accompanied by solution of the flow

  10. Theoretical and experimental studies of high-beta plasmas formed by odd-parity rotating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Samuel

    2007-11-01

    Hamiltonian simulations of ion and electron heating by odd-parity rotating magnetic fields applied to FRC plasmas have predicted rapid heating of both electrons and ions to multi-keV temperatures, even at low relative RMF strengths. Both the onset of heating and saturation of energy have been explained by perturbation analysis in stochastic theory. These simulations assumed full RMF penetration to the major axis and collisionless particle trajectories, the latter expected in fusion reactor. However, most present RMF/FRC experiments do not achieve full RMF penetration and operate in a low-temperature collisional regime, far from fusion-reactor conditions. Recent experiments at Princeton, which employ commercial off-the-shelf hardware and non-invasive diagnostics and which use, for the first time in FRC research, remote divertor chambers, have achieved a thousand-fold reduction in collisionality to below 0.001, volume-averaged beta above 0.5, electron temperatures above 200 eV, and full penetration of the RMF while avoiding the radiation barrier encountered by other RMF/FRC experiments. Comparisons between theory and experiment show the important role of infrequent collisions, particularly with neutrals. Motivations for a superconducting next-step FRC and design considerations for a car-sized practical FRC reactor will be described.

  11. Room acoustics analysis using circular arrays: an experimental study based on sound field plane-wave decomposition.

    PubMed

    Torres, Ana M; Lopez, Jose J; Pueo, Basilio; Cobos, Maximo

    2013-04-01

    Plane-wave decomposition (PWD) methods using microphone arrays have been shown to be a very useful tool within the applied acoustics community for their multiple applications in room acoustics analysis and synthesis. While many theoretical aspects of PWD have been previously addressed in the literature, the practical advantages of the PWD method to assess the acoustic behavior of real rooms have been barely explored so far. In this paper, the PWD method is employed to analyze the sound field inside a selected set of real rooms having a well-defined purpose. To this end, a circular microphone array is used to capture and process a number of impulse responses at different spatial positions, providing angle-dependent data for both direct and reflected wavefronts. The detection of reflected plane waves is performed by means of image processing techniques applied over the raw array response data and over the PWD data, showing the usefulness of image-processing-based methods for room acoustics analysis.

  12. Experimental study on an S-band near-field microwave magnetron power transmission system on hundred-watt level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Biao; Jiang, Wan; Yang, Yang; Yu, Chengyang; Huang, Kama; Liu, Changjun

    2015-11-01

    A multi-magnetron microwave source, a metamaterial transmitting antenna, and a large power rectenna array are presented to build a near-field 2.45 GHz microwave power transmission system. The square 1 m2 rectenna array consists of sixteen rectennas with 2048 Schottky diodes for large power microwave rectifying. It receives microwave power and converts them into DC power. The design, structure, and measured performance of a unit rectenna as well as the entail rectenna array are presented in detail. The multi-magnetron microwave power source switches between half and full output power levels, i.e. the half-wave and full-wave modes. The transmission antenna is formed by a double-layer metallic hole array, which is applied to combine the output power of each magnetron. The rectenna array DC output power reaches 67.3 W on a 1.2 Ω DC load at a distance of 5.5 m from the transmission antenna. DC output power is affected by the distance, DC load, and the mode of microwave power source. It shows that conventional low power Schottky diodes can be applied to a microwave power transmission system with simple magnetrons to realise large power microwave rectifying.

  13. An experimental study into the influence of aquatic plant motion characteristics on the generation of a fluvial turbulent flow field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, R. J.; Marjoribanks, T.; Parsons, D. R.; Thomas, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    Aquatic vegetation has a determining effect on flow and consequently sediment transport as it generates both skin friction and form drag. The measurement of flow above the vegetation canopy has received much attention and there is now a good process understanding of mean and turbulent flow, although, much of this research has focused on rigid vegetation with relatively simple morphology. However, vegetation immersed in a flow experiences several forces (buoyancy; drag; virtual mass; Basset; and Saffman) which are counteracted by the properties of the vegetation (flexural rigidity; modulus of elasticity; the plant area exposed to the flow and; the packing density of the stems). The ratio of these forces determines the plant motion characteristics which are generally classified as either i) erect with no movement; ii) gently swaying; iii) strong, coherent swaying or; iv) prone. Here we report on an investigation into the influence of plant motion on the turbulence structure in the mixing zone as vortices in this region have been shown to account for the majority of the momentum transport between the canopy and the open flow. We report on a series of flume experiments where flow over a canopy of surrogate aquatic vegetation was measured using PIV at a spatial resolution of ~1mm2 and at a temporal resolution of 100 Hz. This provided whole flow field measurements for all three components of flow over the vegetation canopy. Plant motion characteristics were altered by modifying the flow Reynolds number through both velocity and depth. The influences of plant stem length were also assessed. The measured flows were analysed by standard Reynolds decomposition approaches and Eulerian and Lagrangian coherent flow structure identification methods. Kelvin-Helmholtz and Görtler-type vortices were identified within the canopy shear layer that are generated close to the canopy top and evolve downstream into span-wise roller vortices, which expand with both distance and time. When

  14. Time since death and decomposition of the human body: variables and observations in case and experimental field studies.

    PubMed

    Mann, R W; Bass, W M; Meadows, L

    1990-01-01

    Much of the difficulty in determining the time since death stems from the lack of systematic observation and research on the decomposition rate of the human body. Continuing studies conducted at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, provide useful information on the impact of carrion insect activity, ambient temperature, rainfall, clothing, burial and depth, carnivores, bodily trauma, body weight, and the surface with which the body is in contact. This paper reports findings and observations accumulated during eight years of research and case studies that may clarify some of the questions concerning bodily decay.

  15. Experimental results for a hypersonic nozzle/afterbody flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaid, Frank W.; Keener, Earl R.; Hui, Frank C. L.

    1995-01-01

    This study was conducted to experimentally characterize the flow field created by the interaction of a single-expansion ramp-nozzle (SERN) flow with a hypersonic external stream. Data were obtained from a generic nozzle/afterbody model in the 3.5 Foot Hypersonic Wind Tunnel at the NASA Ames Research Center, in a cooperative experimental program involving Ames and McDonnell Douglas Aerospace. The model design and test planning were performed in close cooperation with members of the Ames computational fluid dynamics (CFD) team for the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) program. This paper presents experimental results consisting of oil-flow and shadow graph flow-visualization photographs, afterbody surface-pressure distributions, rake boundary-layer measurements, Preston-tube skin-friction measurements, and flow field surveys with five-hole and thermocouple probes. The probe data consist of impact pressure, flow direction, and total temperature profiles in the interaction flow field.

  16. Adrenal Chromaffin Cells Exposed to 5-ns Pulses Require Higher Electric Fields to Porate Intracellular Membranes than the Plasma Membrane: An Experimental and Modeling Study.

    PubMed

    Zaklit, Josette; Craviso, Gale L; Leblanc, Normand; Yang, Lisha; Vernier, P Thomas; Chatterjee, Indira

    2017-08-24

    Nanosecond-duration electric pulses (NEPs) can permeabilize the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), causing release of Ca(2+) into the cytoplasm. This study used experimentation coupled with numerical modeling to understand the lack of Ca(2+) mobilization from Ca(2+)-storing organelles in catecholamine-secreting adrenal chromaffin cells exposed to 5-ns pulses. Fluorescence imaging determined a threshold electric (E) field of 8 MV/m for mobilizing intracellular Ca(2+) whereas whole-cell recordings of membrane conductance determined a threshold E-field of 3 MV/m for causing plasma membrane permeabilization. In contrast, a 2D numerical model of a chromaffin cell, which was constructed with internal structures representing a nucleus, mitochondrion, ER, and secretory granule, predicted that exposing the cell to the same 5-ns pulse electroporated the plasma and ER membranes at the same E-field amplitude, 3-4 MV/m. Agreement of the numerical simulations with the experimental results was obtained only when the ER interior conductivity was 30-fold lower than that of the cytoplasm and the ER membrane permittivity was twice that of the plasma membrane. A more realistic intracellular geometry for chromaffin cells in which structures representing multiple secretory granules and an ER showed slight differences in the thresholds necessary to porate the membranes of the secretory granules. We conclude that more sophisticated cell models together with knowledge of accurate dielectric properties are needed to understand the effects of NEPs on intracellular membranes in chromaffin cells, information that will be important for elucidating how NEPs porate organelle membranes in other cell types having a similarly complex cytoplasmic ultrastructure.

  17. Experimental and theoretical studies of active control of resistive wall mode growth in the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, J. R.; Brunsell, P. R.; Yadikin, D.; Cecconello, M.; Malmberg, J. A.; Gregoratto, D.; Paccagnella, R.; Bolzonella, T.; Manduchi, G.; Marrelli, L.; Ortolani, S.; Spizzo, G.; Zanca, P.; Bondeson, A.; Liu, Y. Q.

    2005-07-01

    Active feedback control of resistive wall modes (RWMs) has been demonstrated in the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch experiment. The control system includes a sensor consisting of an array of magnetic coils (measuring mode harmonics) and an actuator consisting of a saddle coil array (producing control harmonics). Closed-loop (feedback) experiments using a digital controller based on a real time Fourier transform of sensor data have been studied for cases where the feedback gain was constant and real for all harmonics (corresponding to an intelligent-shell) and cases where the feedback gain could be set for selected harmonics, with both real and complex values (targeted harmonics). The growth of the dominant RWMs can be reduced by feedback for both the intelligent-shell and targeted-harmonic control systems. Because the number of toroidal positions of the saddle coils in the array is half the number of the sensors, it is predicted and observed experimentally that the control harmonic spectrum has sidebands. Individual unstable harmonics can be controlled with real gains. However if there are two unstable mode harmonics coupled by the sideband effect, control is much less effective with real gains. According to the theory, complex gains give better results for (slowly) rotating RWMs, and experiments support this prediction. In addition, open loop experiments have been used to observe the effects of resonant field errors applied to unstable, marginally stable and robustly stable modes. The observed effects of field errors are consistent with the thin-wall model, where mode growth is proportional to the resonant field error amplitude and the wall penetration time for that mode harmonic.

  18. Experimental design methodology applied to the study of channel dimensions on the elution of red blood cells in gravitational field flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Rasouli, S; Assidjo, E; Chianéa, T; Cardot, P J

    2001-04-15

    Field flow fractionation (FFF) separation techniques have gained considerable success with micron-sized species. Living red blood cells (RBCs) of any origin have emerged as ideal models for cell separation development. Their elution mode is now described as "Lift-Hyperlayer". Certain separator dimension parameters are known to play a key role in the separation and band spreading process. Systematic studies of channel dimensions effects on RBC retention, band spreading, peak capacity and on a novel parameter described as "Particle Selectivity" were set up by means of a two-level factorial experimental design. From experimental results and statistical calculations it is confirmed that channel thickness plays a major role in retention ratio, peak variance, peak capacity and particle selectivity. Channel breadth strongly influences plate height, with lower impact on peak capacity and particle selectivity. Retention ratio, peak variance and peak capacity observed results are modulated by second-order interactions between channel dimensions. Preliminary rules for channel configurations are therefore set up and depend on separation goals. It is shown that a very polydisperse population is best disentangled in a thin and narrow channel whatever its length. If a mixture of many different micron-sized species is considered (each of limited polydispersities); a thick and broad channel should be preferred, with length modulating peak capacity to disentangle this polymodal mixture.

  19. Simulation and Experimental Studies of a 2.45GHz Magnetron Source for an SRF Cavity with Field Amplitude and Phase Controls

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haipeng; Plawski, Tomasz E.; Rimmer, Robert A.; Dudas, A.; Neubauer, M. L.

    2016-06-01

    Phase lock to an SRF cavity by using injection signal through output waveguide of a magnetron has been demonstrated [1, 3]. Amplitude control using magnetic field trimming and anode voltage modulation has been studied using MATLAB/Simulink simulations [2]. Based on these, we are planning to use an FPGA based digital LLRF system, which allows applying various types of control algorithms in order to achieve the required accelerating field stability. Since the 1497 MHz magnetron is still in the design stage, the proof of principle measurements of a commercial 2450 MHz magnetron are carried out to characterize the anode I-V curve, output power (the tube electronic efficiency), frequency dependence on the anode current (frequency pushing) and the Rieke diagram (frequency pulling by the reactive load). Based on early Simulink simulation, experimental data and extension of the Adler equation governing injection phase stability by Chen’s model, the specification of the new LLRF control chassis for both 2450 and 1497MHz systems are presented in this paper.

  20. Health responses to a new high-voltage power line route: design of a quasi-experimental prospective field study in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background New high-voltage power transmission lines will be introduced due to increasing demand for reliable and renewable energy supplies. Some residents associate non-specific health complaints with exposure to electromagnetic fields from nearby power lines. This study protocol describes the design and rationale of a prospective study investigating whether the introduction of a new power line triggers health responses in residents living nearby. Methods/Design The study is designed as a quasi-experimental field study with two pretests during the construction of a new power line route, and two posttests after it has been put into operation. Key outcomes are self-reported non-specific somatic and cognitive health complaints, and attribution of these health complaints to a power line. The main determinant is proximity to the new power line route. One member of every household (n = 2379) residing in close proximity (0-500 meters) to the overhead parts of a new power line route in the Netherlands is invited to participate, as well as a sample of household members (n = 2382) residing farther away (500-2000 meters). Multilevel analysis will be employed to test whether an increase in key outcome measures is related to proximity to the line. Longitudinal structural equation models will be applied to test to what extent health responses are mediated by psychosocial health mechanisms and moderated by negative oriented personality traits. Discussion This is the first study to investigate health responses to a new power line route in a prospective manner. The results will provide theoretical insight into psychosocial mechanisms operating during the introduction of an environmental health risk, and may offer suggestions to policymakers and other stakeholders for minimizing adverse health responses when introducing new high-voltage power lines. PMID:24606914

  1. Experimental Studies on Rutile Solubility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, J. F.; Klemme, S.; Butler, I. B.; Harley, S. L.

    2007-12-01

    Rutile (TiO2) is an important high field strength element (HFSE) sequestering mineral, and has been implicated in the observed depletion of HFSE in arc magmas. It is thought that rutile is insoluble in slab-derived fluids, and remains residual in the subducted slab. Indeed, experimental data indicates a very low solubility of rutile in pure H2O (Tropper and Manning, 2005), and this low solubility may result in HFSE depleted fluids imparting a depleted signature to arc magmas. However, there is scant experimental data available on rutile solubility in fluids of more complex compositions (Ayers and Watson, 1993). We are carrying out a systematic experimental study into the effect of specific chemical components on rutile solubility in fluids and also silicate melts. This should further our understanding of HFSE mobility in metamorphic rocks within subduction zones. References: J. C. Ayers and E. B. Watson (1993) Rutile solubility in supercritical aqueous fluids and the high P-T mobility of elements it concentrates. Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 114, 321-330. P. Tropper and C. E. Manning (2005) Very low solubility of rutile in H2O at high pressure and temperature, and its implications for Ti mobility in subduction zones. American Mineralogist 90(2-3), 502-505.

  2. Experimental plasma wake-field acceleration project*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Militsyn, B. L.; Bechtenev, A. A.; Breizman, B. N.; Chebotaev, P. Z.; Koop, I. A.; Kudryavtsev, A. M.; Panasyuk, V. M.; Shatunov, Yu. M.; Skrinsky, A. N.

    1993-07-01

    A new experiment on plasma wake-field acceleration has been designed at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics in Novosibirsk. An intense modulated driving beam from the electron-positron booster (BEP), a storage ring, will be used to excite a nonlinear plasma wave in a dense plasma (n=1015 cm-3). Important advantages of this beam are its very low emittance (10-8 cmṡrad in the vertical direction), high energy (850 MeV), and high intensity (1012 particles). A new technique for modulating this beam at a submillimeter wavelength is proposed. A simple numerical code has been developed to simulate the plasma wave excitation with plasma nonlinearity and with three-dimensional effects taken into account. The code allows the calculation of the radial structure of the nonlinear wake field including the focusing force which was mostly neglected in previous studies but which is especially important for experiment. The present numerical simulations show that, in the proposed experiment, a 1 GeV/m accelerating gradient over a macroscopic distance is attainable.

  3. Do mobile phone base stations affect sleep of residents? Results from an experimental double-blind sham-controlled field study.

    PubMed

    Danker-Hopfe, Heidi; Dorn, Hans; Bornkessel, Christian; Sauter, Cornelia

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present double-blind, sham-controlled, balanced randomized cross-over study was to disentangle effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF) and non-EMF effects of mobile phone base stations on objective and subjective sleep quality. In total 397 residents aged 18-81 years (50.9% female) from 10 German sites, where no mobile phone service was available, were exposed to sham and GSM (Global System for Mobile Communications, 900 MHz and 1,800 MHz) base station signals by an experimental base station while their sleep was monitored at their homes during 12 nights. Participants were randomly exposed to real (GSM) or sham exposure for five nights each. Individual measurement of EMF exposure, questionnaires on sleep disorders, overall sleep quality, attitude towards mobile communication, and on subjective sleep quality (morning and evening protocols) as well as objective sleep data (frontal EEG and EOG recordings) were gathered. Analysis of the subjective and objective sleep data did not reveal any significant differences between the real and sham condition. During sham exposure nights, objective and subjective sleep efficiency, wake after sleep onset, and subjective sleep latency were significantly worse in participants with concerns about possible health risks resulting from base stations than in participants who were not concerned. The study did not provide any evidence for short-term physiological effects of EMF emitted by mobile phone base stations on objective and subjective sleep quality. However, the results indicate that mobile phone base stations as such (not the electromagnetic fields) may have a significant negative impact on sleep quality. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Theoretical and Experimental Studies of the Transonic Flow Field and Associated Boundary Conditions near a Longitudinally-Slotted Wind-Tunnel Wall. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everhart, Joel Lee

    1988-01-01

    A theoretical examination of the slotted-wall flow field is conducted to determine the appropriate wall pressure drop (or boundary condition) equation. This analysis improves the understanding of the fluid physics of these types of flow fields and helps in evaluating the uncertainties and limitations existing in previous mathematical developments. It is shown that the resulting slotted-wall boundary condition contains contributions from the airfoil-induced streamline curvature and the non-linear, quadratic, slot crossflow in addition to an often neglected linear term which results from viscous shearing in the slot. Existing and newly acquired experimental data are examined in the light of this formulation and theoretical developments.

  5. Experimental study on the responsivity enhancement of Mn1.56Co0.96Ni0.48O4 detector under moderate bias field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wei; Hou, Yun; Gao, Yan Qing; Zhang, Leibo; Huang, Zhi Ming

    2011-08-01

    As a typical thermal sensitive material, Mn1.56Co0.96Ni0.48O4 (MCN) has achieved widely applications in uncooled bolometer. In this paper, we report that a large increase in electrical conductivity of MCN is obtained with moderate electric-field strengths (E~103V/cm) applied at room temperature (about 300K). Great enhancement in the responsivity is observed when operating with a proper electric bias field, which corresponds to a threshold voltage VTh. MCN bulk materials are prepared by using the sintering method. Micro MCN detector is fabricated by scribing the bulk material into pieces sized 200×100×10μm. The detector is clinged to an Al2O3 substrate with some electrical insulated epoxy glue which is mounted onto a Cu sink. The surrounding temperature is controlled precisely by a temperature controller with a precision of 1mK. Voltage-current characteristics at 270-330K are carefully examined. Different sweeping speeds of the bias-voltage are applied in different orders so as to find out a proper scanning rate, in which the electrical measurement is proceeded in a state of quasi-thermal equilibrium. According to quasi-thermal equilibrium and the time dependent nominal D.C. power, the temperature increase during the measurement is estimated. The conduction mechanism can be well explained with small polaron theory. Empirical equations are used to describe the thermal dynamic process in the pulsed mode, and the process is also simply simulated via numerical calculations. The experimental results and simulation works will be of some referential value to future studies in uncooled microbolometer made in transition metal oxides.

  6. Inviscid Flow Field Effects: Experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otten, L. J., III; Gilbert, K. G.

    1980-04-01

    The aero-optical distortions due to invisid flow effects over airborne laser turrets is investigated. Optical path differences across laser turret apertures are estimated from two data sources. The first is a theoretical study of main flow effects for a spherical turret assembly for a Mach number (M) of 0.6. The second source is an actual wind tunnel density field measurement on a 0.3 scale laser turret/fairing assembly, with M = 0.75. A range of azimuthal angles from 0 to 90 deg was considered, while the elevation angle was always 0 deg (i.e., in the plane of the flow). The calculated optical path differences for these two markedly different geometries are of the same order. Scaling of results to sea level conditions and an aperture diameter of 50 cm indicated up to 0.0007 cm of phase variation across the aperture for certain forward look angles and a focal length of F = -11.1 km. These values are second order for a 10.6 micron system.

  7. Transient rheological behavior of natural polysaccharide xanthan gum solutions in start-up shear flow fields: An experimental study using a strain-controlled rheometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ji-Seok; Kim, Yong-Seok; Song, Ki-Won

    2015-08-01

    The objective of the present study is to experimentally investigate the transient rheological behavior of concentrated xanthan gum solutions in start-up shear flow fields. Using a strain-controlled rheometer, a number of constant shear rates were suddenly imposed to aqueous xanthan gum solutions with different concentrations and the resultant shear stress responses were measured with time. The main findings obtained from this study can be summarized as follows: (1) For all shear rates imposed, however low it may be, the shear stress is rapidly increased with time (stress overshoot) upon inception of steady shear flow before passing through the maximum stress value and then gradually decreased with time (stress decay) until reaching a steady state flow. (2) As the imposed shear rate is increased, a more pronounced stress overshoot takes place and the maximum stress value becomes larger, whereas both times at which the maximum stress is observed and needed to reach a steady state flow are shortened. (3) The maximum shear stress is linearly increased with shear rate in a double logarithmic scale and becomes larger with increasing concentration at equal shear rates. In addition, the time at which the maximum stress occurs exhibits a linear relationship with the inverse of shear rate in a double logarithmic scale for all xanthan gum solutions, regardless of their concentrations. (4) The shear stress is sharply increased with an increase in strain until reaching the maximum stress at small range of deformations. The maximum stress is observed at similar strain values, irrespective of the imposed shear rates lower than 10 1/s. (5) The Bird-Leider model can be successfully used with regard to quantitatively predicting the transient behavior of concentrated xanthan gum solutions. However, this model has a fatal weakness in terms of describing a decrease in shear stress (stress decay).

  8. Towards experimental quantum-field tomography with ultracold atoms.

    PubMed

    Steffens, A; Friesdorf, M; Langen, T; Rauer, B; Schweigler, T; Hübener, R; Schmiedmayer, J; Riofrío, C A; Eisert, J

    2015-07-03

    The experimental realization of large-scale many-body systems in atomic-optical architectures has seen immense progress in recent years, rendering full tomography tools for state identification inefficient, especially for continuous systems. To work with these emerging physical platforms, new technologies for state identification are required. Here we present first steps towards efficient experimental quantum-field tomography. Our procedure is based on the continuous analogues of matrix-product states, ubiquitous in condensed-matter theory. These states naturally incorporate the locality present in realistic physical settings and are thus prime candidates for describing the physics of locally interacting quantum fields. To experimentally demonstrate the power of our procedure, we quench a one-dimensional Bose gas by a transversal split and use our method for a partial quantum-field reconstruction of the far-from-equilibrium states of this system. We expect our technique to play an important role in future studies of continuous quantum many-body systems.

  9. Experimental study of loss mechanisms of AgAu/PbBi-2223 tapes with twisted filaments under perpendicular AC magnetic fields at power frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, E.; Yang, Y.; Beduz, C.; Huang, Y. B.

    2000-05-01

    AC losses under perpendicular AC fields have been measured at 77 K and power frequencies for multifilamentary AgAu (10 wt.%)/Bi-2223 tapes with filaments twisted at different pitches. Using simultaneous measurements of the first and higher harmonics of the voltage induced in the pick-up coil, the main loss contributions (superconductor and coupling current losses) have been obtained separately. At power frequencies, twisting produces the desired uncoupling of the filaments at fields lower than the coupling field, which has also been determined experimentally. In the uncoupled-filament regime, the superconductor losses are reduced strongly with respect to the untwisted tapes. The reduction of the total loss with twisting is also observed. However, due to the important contribution of the coupling current losses for this field orientation, a very small pitch (<5 mm) is necessary for a considerably lower loss than that of untwisted tapes. The dependence of the coupling field and coupling current losses on the twist pitch has been analysed and compared with the theoretical predictions.

  10. Longitudinal field study on the occurrence of Mycoplasma synoviae in Dutch turkey flocks with lameness and experimental induction of the condition.

    PubMed

    Landman, W J M; Feberwee, A

    2012-01-01

    Four meat turkey farms with a history of lameness were investigated for the presence of Mycoplasma synoviae by testing one flock per farm for antibodies with the rapid plate agglutination (RPA) test and/or for M. synoviae DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Flocks were sampled every 2 weeks from 6 weeks of age until slaughter. If PCR results were positive, tracheal swabs were taken for mycoplasma isolation and swollen joints were sampled for general bacteriology, mycoplasma culture and virology. In one flock, all M. synoviae diagnostic tests were negative but reovirus was isolated. In the other flocks, M. synoviae was the only pathogen associated with lameness due to joint disease. M. synoviae RPA tests became positive 6 to 8 weeks later than PCR. An experimental infection was then conducted in male meat turkeys in which a negative control group was sham inoculated at 8 weeks of age, while three other groups were inoculated intravenously with M. synoviae. Turkeys in group LCh were given 10(5) colony-forming units (CFU) of an arthropathic M. synoviae chicken strain at 8 weeks; group LHCh was given a low (10(5) CFU) dose at 8 weeks, followed by a high (10(8) CFU) dose at 12 weeks, of the same chicken strain; and group HTu was inoculated with 10(8) CFU of a M. synoviae turkey joint isolate from the field study. Post-mortem examination, histopathology, serology, bacteriology and mycoplasma culture were performed at 19 weeks of age. A dose effect was found after comparing the LCh and the LHCh groups. No significant difference was observed between the HTu (10(8) CFU/bird) and the LCh (10(5) CFU/bird) group regarding the number of turkeys with arthritis, the number of M. synoviae reisolations and the mean microscopic lesion scores of joints, indicating that the M. synoviae chicken strain has greater arthropathogenic potential and that infection of turkeys in the field with such a strain may possibly have a greater clinical and economic impact.

  11. EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES ON INFLAMMATION

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Elizabeth Pauline

    1921-01-01

    1. Wright's method for the study of chemotaxis of leucocytes in vitro, slightly modified, has been found to be most satisfactory in the estimation of the degree of chemotaxis of various substances, because it is possible to make an exact quantitative determination of the leucocytes that have migrated from the blood clot and adhere to the surfaces containing the tested substance. 2. The calcium ion is the only inorganic ion per se which is found to be positively chemotactic under the conditions of these experiments. It is markedly chemotactic in all concentrations and in all combinations, except the citrate. Here the negative chemotaxis of the citrate ion neutralizes the positive chemotaxis of the calcium ion, and neutrality of chemotactic effect results. 3. The sodium and magnesium ions themselves are neutral. Magnesium and sodium salts are dependent upon the negative ion with which the magnesium or sodium is combined for such positive or negative chemotaxis as is exhibited. All the phosphates of sodium, whether tri-, di-, or monobasic salts, are markedly positively chemotactic, and when combined with other reagents which are themselves neutral or negatively chemotactic, produce marked positive chemotaxis. The blood of a person who has taken phosphates either by mouth or intravenously shows a great increase in chemotaxis with sodium phosphate, with calcium chloride, and even with sodium chloride which is ordinarily neutral. 4. All potassium salts are negatively chemotactic. 5. Many substances act synergistically as regards chemotaxis; e.g., when strontium and magnesium salts are mixed there is a marked increase in chemotaxis. Sodium phosphate acts synergistically with calcium chloride. 6. Mercury salts fix the leucocytes in this method so that their influence on chemotaxis cannot be determined. 7. Morphine and morphine salts are positively chemotactic; this is contrary to the results obtained by others with different methods. 8. Substances which produce a very

  12. [Lessons from Field Studies].

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Takesumi

    2015-01-01

    During my academic career for more than 40 years, I was involved in 18 epidemiological field studies, partially or fully. Among these field studies, four (1. Medical services in remote rural areas in Okinawa, 2. Yusho episode, 3. JICA Onchocerciasis Control Project in Guatemala, and 4. Miyako cohort study in Fukuoka) are introduced in this paper, including the latest situation after the presentation. Through these field works experienced by the author, the following lessons were gained. 1. Strong human reliance between researchers and the targeted population is essential in carrying out epidemiological surveys successfully in the field. 2. Data obtained from the survey should be carefully examined and analyzed so that those data may reflect the real situation.

  13. Static magnetic fields: animal studies.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Various experimental studies carried out over the last 30-40 years have examined the effects of the chronic or acute exposure of laboratory animals to static magnetic fields. Many of the earlier studies have been adequately reviewed elsewhere; few adverse effects were identified. This review focuses on studies carried out more recently, mostly those using vertebrates, particularly mammals. Four main areas of investigation have been covered, viz., nervous system and behavioural studies, cardiovascular system responses, reproduction and development, and genotoxicity and cancer. Work on the role of the natural geomagnetic field in animal orientation and migration has been omitted. Generally, the acute responses found during exposure to static fields above about 4 T are consistent with those found in volunteer studies, namely the induction of flow potentials around the heart and the development of aversive/avoidance behaviour resulting from body movement in such fields. No consistently demonstrable effects of exposure to fields of approximately 1T and above have been seen on other behavioural or cardiovascular endpoints. In addition, no adverse effects of such fields on reproduction and development or on the growth and development of tumours have been firmly established. Overall, however, far too few animal studies have been carried out to reach any firm conclusions.

  14. Profiling of energy deposition fields in a modular HTHR with annular core: Computational/experimental studies at the ASTRA critical facility

    SciTech Connect

    Boyarinov, V. F.; Garin, V. P.; Glushkov, E. S.; Zimin, A. A.; Kompaniets, G. V.; Nevinitsa, V. A.; Polyakov, D. N.; Ponomarev, A. S.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N. N.; Smirnov, O. N.; Fomichenko, P. A.; Chunyaev, E. I.; Marova, E. V.; Sukharev, Yu. P.

    2010-12-15

    The paper presents the results obtained from the computational/experimental studies of the spatial distribution of the {sup 235}U fission reaction rate in a critical assembly with an annular core and poison profiling elements inserted into the inner graphite reflector. The computational analysis was carried out with the codes intended for design computation of an HTHR-type reactor.

  15. Experimental studies: randomized clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Gjorgov, A N

    1998-01-01

    There are two major approaches to medical investigations: observational studies and experimental trials. The classical application of the experimental design to studies of human populations is the randomized clinical trial of the efficacy of a new drug or treatment. A further application of the experimental studies is to the testing of hypotheses about the etiology of a disease, already tested and corroborated from various forms of observational studies. Ethical considerations and requirements for consent of the experimental subjects are of primary concern in the clinical trials, and those concerns set the first and final limits for implementing a trial. General moral principles in research with human and animal beings, defined by the "Nuremberg Code," deal with strict criteria for approval, endorsement and evaluation of a clinical trial.

  16. About soil cover heterogeneity of agricultural research stations' experimental fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rannik, Kaire; Kõlli, Raimo; Kukk, Liia

    2013-04-01

    Depending on local pedo-ecological conditions (topography, (geo) diversity of soil parent material, meteorological conditions) the patterns of soil cover and plant cover determined by soils are very diverse. Formed in the course of soil-plant mutual relationship, the natural ecosystems are always influenced to certain extent by the other local soil forming conditions or they are site specific. The agricultural land use or the formation of agro-ecosystems depends foremost on the suitability of soils for the cultivation of feed and food crops. As a rule, the most fertile or the best soils of the area, which do not present any or present as little as possible constraints for agricultural land use, are selected for this purpose. Compared with conventional field soils, the requirements for the experimental fields' soil cover quality are much higher. Experimental area soils and soil cover composition should correspond to local pedo-ecological conditions and, in addition to that, represent the soil types dominating in the region, whereas the fields should be as homogeneous as possible. The soil cover heterogeneity of seven arable land blocks of three research stations (Jõgeva, Kuusiku and Olustvere) was studied 1) by examining the large scale (1:10 000) digital soil map (available via the internet), and 2) by field researches using the transect method. The stages of soils litho-genetic and moisture heterogeneities were estimated by using the Estonian normal soils matrix, however, the heterogeneity of top- and subsoil texture by using the soil texture matrix. The quality and variability of experimental fields' soils humus status, was studied more thoroughly from the aspect of humus concentration (g kg-1), humus cover thickness (cm) and humus stocks (Mg ha-1). The soil cover of Jõgeva experimental area, which presents an accumulative drumlin landscape (formed during the last glacial period), consist from loamy Luvisols and associated to this Cambisols. In Kuusiku area

  17. Sensitivity and specificity of Norwegian optometrists' evaluation of diabetic retinopathy in single-field retinal images - a cross-sectional experimental study.

    PubMed

    Sundling, Vibeke; Gulbrandsen, Pål; Straand, Jørund

    2013-01-10

    In the working age group, diabetic retinopathy is a leading cause of visual impairment. Regular eye examinations and early treatment of retinopathy can prevent visual loss, so screening for diabetic retinopathy is cost-effective. Dilated retinal digital photography with the additional use of ophthalmoscopy is the most effective and robust method of diabetic retinopathy screening. The aim of this study was to estimate the sensitivity and specificity of diabetic retinopathy screening when performed by Norwegian optometrists. This study employed a cross-sectional experimental design. Seventy-four optometrists working in private optometric practice were asked to screen 14 single-field retinal images for possible diabetic retinopathy. The screening was undertaken using a web-based visual identification and management of ophthalmological conditions (VIMOC) examination. The images used in the VIMOC examination were selected from a population survey and had been previously examined by two independent ophthalmologists. In order to establish a "gold standard", images were only chosen for use in the VIMOC examination if they had elicited diagnostic agreement between the two independent ophthalmologists. To reduce the possibility of falsely high specificity occurring by chance, half the presented images were of retinas that were not affected by diabetic retinopathy. Sensitivity and specificity for diabetic retinopathy was calculated with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The mean (95%CI) sensitivity for identifying eyes with any diabetic retinopathy was 67% (62% to 72%). The mean (95%CI) specificity for identifying eyes without diabetic retinopathy was 84% (80% to 89%). The mean (95%CI) sensitivity for identifying eyes with mild non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy or moderate non-proliferative diabetes was 54% (47% to 61%) and 100%, respectively. Only four optometrists (5%) met the required standard of at least 80% sensitivity and 95% specificity that has been previously set

  18. Experimental Studies on Biosensing by SPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaochun; Shiokawa, Showko; Matsui, Yosikazu

    1989-09-01

    Biosensing using surface plasmon resonance is experimentally studied. The results obtained by detecting the bioresponse of the α-Feto protein system and cyclic experiments show that this technique has potential application in the field of biosensing. The effects of an organic layer on detecting sensitivity and restoration of sensors are also discussed.

  19. Correction: Miscibility studies of two twist-bend nematic liquid crystal dimers with different average molecular curvatures. A comparison between experimental data and predictions of a Landau mean-field theory for the NTB-N phase transition.

    PubMed

    López, D O; Robles-Hernández, B; Salud, J; de la Fuente, M R; Sebastián, N; Diez-Berart, S; Jaen, X; Dunmur, D A; Luckhurst, G R

    2016-03-07

    Correction for 'Miscibility studies of two twist-bend nematic liquid crystal dimers with different average molecular curvatures. A comparison between experimental data and predictions of a Landau mean-field theory for the NTB-N phase transition' by D. O. López et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2016, 18, 4394-4404.

  20. Pilot Field Test Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherriff, Abigail

    2015-01-01

    The Field Test study is currently in full swing, preceded by the successful completion of the Pilot Field Test study that paved the way for collecting data on the astronauts in the medical tent in Kazakhstan. Abigail Sherriff worked alongside Logan Dobbe on one Field Test aspect to determine foot clearance over obstacles (5cm, 10cm, and 15cm) using APDM Inc. Internal Measurement Units (IMU) worn by the astronauts. They created a program to accurately calculate foot clearance using the accelerometer, magnetometer, and gyroscope data with the IMUs attached to the top of the shoes. To validate the functionality of their program, they completed a successful study on test subjects performing various tasks in an optical motion studio, considered a gold standard in biomechanics research. Future work will include further validation and expanding the program to include other analyses.

  1. Unraveling The Origin of Enhanced Field Emission from Irradiated FeCo-SiO2 Nanocomposites: A Combined Experimental and First-Principles Based Study.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Debalaya; Bhattacharya, Saswata; Rodriguez, Raul D; Sheremet, Evgeniya; Kabiraj, D; Avasthi, D K; Zahn, Dietrich R T; Schmidt, H; Srivastava, P; Ghosh, S

    2016-02-01

    This work is driven by the vision of engineering planar field emitters with ferromagnetic metal-insulator nanocomposite thin films, using swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation method. FeCo nanoparticles inside SiO2 matrix, when subjected to SHI get elongated. Using this, we demonstrate here a planar field emitter with maximum current density of 550 μA/cm(2) at an applied field of 15 V/μm. The film, irradiated with 5 × 10(13) ions/cm(2) fluence (5e13) of 120 MeV Au(9+) ions, shows very high electron emitting quantum efficiency in comparison to its unirradiated counterpart. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy analysis of unirradiated and 5e13 films further confirms that the field emission (FE) enhancement is not only due to surface protrusions but also depends on the properties of entire matrix. We find experimental evidence of enhanced valence band density of states (VB DOS) for 5e13 film from XPS, which is verified in the electronic structure of a model FeCo cluster from first-principles based calculations combining density functional theory (DFT) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The MD temperature is selected from the lattice temperature profile inside nanoparticles as deduced from thermal spike model. Increasing the irradiation fluence beyond 5e13, results in reduced VB DOS and melting of surface protrusions, thus causing reduction of FE current density. We finally conclude from theoretical analysis that change in fluence alters the co-ordination chemistry followed by the charge distribution and spin alignment, which influence the VB DOS and concurrent FE as evident from our experiment.

  2. Field Experimental Research on Human Crowding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aiello, John R.; And Others

    Overcrowded residence halls at Rutgers University form the basis for this research study on the effects of overcrowding. Subjects were the occupants of 31 rooms (7 triple male rooms, 7 triple female rooms, 7 double male rooms, and 10 double female rooms). Two sets of measures were used to determine whether crowding caused arousal and stress. The…

  3. Acquisition of chemical remanent magnetization during experimental ferrihydrite-hematite conversion in Earth-like magnetic field-implications for paleomagnetic studies of red beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhaoxia; Liu, Qingsong; Dekkers, Mark J.; Tauxe, Lisa; Qin, Huafeng; Barrón, Vidal; Torrent, José

    2015-10-01

    Hematite-bearing red beds are renowned for their chemical remanent magnetization (CRM). If the CRM was acquired substantially later than the sediment was formed, this severely compromises paleomagnetic records. To improve our interpretation of the natural remanent magnetization, the intricacies of the CRM acquisition process must be understood. Here, we contribute to this issue by synthesizing hematite under controlled 'Earth-like' field conditions (≲ 100 μ T). CRM was imparted in 90 oriented samples with varying inclinations. The final synthesis product appeared to be dominated by hematite with traces of ferrimagnetic iron oxides. When the magnetic field intensity is ≳ 40 μ T, the CRM records the field direction faithfully. However, for field intensities ≲ 40 μ T, the CRM direction may deviate considerably from that of the applied field during synthesis. The CRM intensity normalized by the isothermal remanent magnetization (CRM/IRM@2.5 T) increases linearly with the intensity of growth field, implying that CRM could potentially be useful for relative paleointensity studies if hematite particles of chemical origins have consistent properties. CRM in hematite has a distributed unblocking temperature spectrum from ∼200 to ∼650 °C, while hematite with a depositional remanent magnetization (DRM) has a more confined spectrum from ∼ 600to 680 °C because it is usually coarser-grained and more stoichiometric. Therefore, the thermal decay curves of CRM with their concave shape are notably different from their DRM counterparts which are convex. These differences together are suggested to be a potential discriminator of CRM from DRM carried by hematite in natural red beds, and of significance for the interpretation of paleomagnetic studies on red beds.

  4. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.

    1991-12-06

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. During this quarter an additional tracer study was performed in the field to determine pre-treatment flow paths and the first nutrients were injected. 2 figs.

  5. Field studies courses open

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourteen month-long courses combining applied academics with training in field research methodology are being offered this summer by the School for Field Studies. The courses, held in eight countries during May, June, July, and August, provide unique opportunities for participants to work as a team under primitive conditions.‘Our courses bind together the academic challenge of the research problem, the physical challenge of the site itself, and the interpersonal challenge of the expedition team in a dynamic way so that both cognitive and affective learning are accelerated,’ according to Jim Elder, the school's director.

  6. Experimental Infrasound Studies in Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrin, E. T.; Negraru, P. T.; Golden, P.; Williams, A.

    2009-12-01

    An experimental propagation study was carried out in Nevada in June 2009 on Julian days 173-177. During this field experiment we deployed 16 single channel digital infrasound recorders to monitor the munitions disposal activities near Hawthorne, NV. The sensors were deployed in a single line and placed approximately 12 km apart at distances ranging from 2 to 177 km. A four element semi-permanent infrasound array named FNIAR was installed approximately 154 km north of the detonation site in line with the individual temporary recorders. Tropospheric arrivals were observed during all days of the experiment, but during day 176 the observed arrivals had very large amplitudes. A large signal was observed at 58 km from the detonation site with amplitude as large as 4 Pascals, while at 94 km no signal was observed. At FNIAR the amplitude of the tropospheric arrival was 1 Pascal. During this day meteorological data acquired in the propagation path showed a strong jet stream to the north. On day 177 we were not able to identify tropospheric arrivals beyond 34 km, but at stations beyond 152 km we observed stratospheric arrivals. Continuous monitoring of these signals at FNIAR shows that stratospheric arrivals are the most numerous. In a two month period, from 06/15/2009 to 08/15/2009 there were 35 operational days at the Hawthorne disposal facility resulting in 212 explosions with known origin times. Based on the celerity values there were 115 explosions that have only stratospheric arrivals (celerities of 300-275 m/s), 72 explosions with both tropospheric (celerities above 330 m/s) and stratospheric arrivals, 20 explosions that were not detected and five explosions that have only tropospheric arrivals.

  7. On the validity of modeling concepts for the simulation of groundwater flow in lowland peat areas - case study at the Zegveld experimental field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trambauer, P.; Nonner, J.; Heijkers, J.; Uhlenbrook, S.

    2011-09-01

    The groundwater flow models currently used in the western part of The Netherlands and in other similar peaty areas are thought to be a too simplified representation of the hydrological reality. One of the reasons is that, due to the schematization of the subsoil, its heterogeneity cannot be represented adequately. Moreover, the applicability of Darcy's law in these types of soils has been questioned, but this law forms the basis of most groundwater flow models. With the purpose of assessing the typical heterogeneity of the subsoil and to verify the applicability of Darcy's law, geo-hydrological fieldwork was completed at an experimental field within a research area in the western part of The Netherlands. The assessments were carried out for the so-called Complex Confining Layer (CCL), which is the Holocene peaty to clayey layer overlying Pleistocene sandy deposits. Borehole drilling through the CCL with a hand auger was completed and revealed the typical heterogeneous character of this layer, showing a dominance of muddy, humified peat which is alternated with fresher peat and clay. Slug tests were carried out to study the applicability of Darcy's law, given that previous studies suggested its non-validity for humified peat soils due to a variable horizontal hydraulic conductivity Kh with head differences. For higher humification degrees, the experiments indeed suggested a variable Kh, but this appeared to be the result of the inappropriate use of steady-state formulae for transient experiments in peaty environments. The muddy peat sampled has a rather plastic nature, and the high compressibility of this material leads to transient behavior. However, using transient formulae, the slug tests conducted for different initial groundwater heads showed that there was hardly any evidence of a variation of the hydraulic conductivity with the applied head differences. Therefore, Darcy's law can be used for typical peat soils present in The Netherlands. The heterogeneity of

  8. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m[sup 3]) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  9. Are media warnings about the adverse health effects of modern life self-fulfilling? An experimental study on idiopathic environmental intolerance attributed to electromagnetic fields (IEI-EMF).

    PubMed

    Witthöft, Michael; Rubin, G James

    2013-03-01

    Medically unsubstantiated 'intolerances' to foods, chemicals and environmental toxins are common and are frequently discussed in the media. Idiopathic environmental intolerance attributed to electromagnetic fields (IEI-EMF) is one such condition and is characterized by symptoms that are attributed to exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMF). In this experiment, we tested whether media reports promote the development of this condition. Participants (N=147) were randomly assigned to watch a television report about the adverse health effects of WiFi (n=76) or a control film (n=71). After watching their film, participants received a sham exposure to a WiFi signal (15 min). The principal outcome measure was symptom reports following the sham exposure. Secondary outcomes included worries about the health effects of EMF, attributing symptoms to the sham exposure and increases in perceived sensitivity to EMF. 82 (54%) of the 147 participants reported symptoms which they attributed to the sham exposure. The experimental film increased: EMF related worries (β=0.19; P=.019); post sham exposure symptoms among participants with high pre-existing anxiety (β=0.22; P=.008); the likelihood of symptoms being attributed to the sham exposure among people with high anxiety (β=.31; P=.001); and the likelihood of people who attributed their symptoms to the sham exposure believing themselves to be sensitive to EMF (β=0.16; P=.049). Media reports about the adverse effects of supposedly hazardous substances can increase the likelihood of experiencing symptoms following sham exposure and developing an apparent sensitivity to it. Greater engagement between journalists and scientists is required to counter these negative effects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The linear model and experimentally observed resonant field amplification in tokamaks and reversed field pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Pustovitov, V. D.

    2011-01-15

    A review is given of the experimentally observed effects related to the resonant field amplification (RFA) and the Resistive Wall Mode (RWM) instability in tokamaks and reversed field pinches (RFPs). This includes the feedback rotation of RWM in RFX-mod RFP, dependence of the RWM growth rate on the plasma-wall separation observed in JT-60U, appearance of the slowly growing RWM precursors in JT-60U and similar phenomena in other devices. The experimental results are compared with theoretical predictions based on the model comprising the Maxwell equations, Ohm's law for the conducting wall, the boundary conditions and assumption of linear plasma response to the external magnetic perturbations. The model describes the plasma reaction to the error field as essentially depending on two factors: the plasma proximity to the RWM stability threshold and the natural rotation frequency of the plasma mode. The linear response means that these characteristics are determined by the plasma equilibrium parameters only. It is shown that the mentioned effects in different devices under different conditions can be described on a common basis with only assumption that the plasma behaves as a linear system. To extend the range of the model validation, some predictions are derived with proposals for experimental studies of the RFA dynamics.

  11. Effects of Larval Density and Habitat Drying on Developmental Success of Ochlerotatus albifasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae) in Urban Rain Pools: Evidence From Field and Experimental Studies.

    PubMed

    Fischer, S; Sy, V; Campos, R E; Otero, M

    2014-11-01

    Ochlerotatus albifasciatus (Macquart) (Diptera: Culicidae) larvae develop synchronously after rainfall events in ephemeral or temporary pools, where they occasionally attain very high abundance. The aims of the current study were to analyze the response of life history parameters such as daily larval mortality, time to pupation, and adult size of Oc. albifasciatus to increasing larval density under controlled conditions, and to analyze the relationships of daily larval mortality with density and environmental variables (drying rate, temperature, and season) in urban rain pools in Buenos Aires, Argentina. An exponential increase in mortality was observed at high larval densities under controlled conditions. Development times and adult size (wing length) differed between males and females, and were also affected by density. Development times extended for 0.36 d for each order of magnitude of increase in larval density, and wing length decreased 0.0021 mm per additional larva in 600 cm(2). Larval density in the field varied from <1 larva per square meter to nearly 1100 larvae per square meter. Daily larval mortality values in the field were variable (0.02-0.91), positively related to the drying rate, and exhibited seasonal differences. No significant relation with larval density or temperature was found in the field. It remains to be established whether the density-independent mortality observed in this study is a generalized pattern of Oc. albifasciatus populations in Buenos Aires Province or a pattern restricted only to urban habitats.

  12. An experimental study of the structure and acoustic field of a jet in a cross stream. [Ames 7-ft by 10-ft wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camelier, I.; Karamcheti, K.

    1976-01-01

    The plane of symmetry of a high speed circular jet was surveyed to measure the mean and turbulent velocity fields by using constant temperature hot wire anemometry. The intensity of the noise radiated from the jet was determined in the tunnel test section by utilizing the cross-correlation at a particular time delay between the signals of two microphones suitably located along a given direction. Experimental results indicate that the turbulent intensity inside the crossflow jet increases by a factor of (1 + 1/2) as compared to the turbulent intensity of the same jet under free conditions, with r indicating the ratio of the jet velocity by the cross stream velocity. The peak observed in the turbulence spectra obtained inside the potential core of the jet has a frequency that increases by the same factor with respect to the corresponding frequency measured in the case of the free jet. The noise radiated by the jet becomes more intense as the crossflow velocity increases. The measured acoustic intensity of the crossflow jet is higher than the value which would be expected from the increase of the turbulent intensity only.

  13. Microbial Field Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1990-11-01

    This report covers progress made during the first year of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology and characterization, facility and treatment design, core experiments, bacterial mobility, and mathematical modeling are addressed. To facilitate an understanding of the ecology of the target reservoir analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. A preliminary design of facilities for the operation of the field pilot test was prepared. In addition, procedures for facilities installation and for injection treatments are described. The Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU), the site of the proposed field pilot study, is described physically, historically, and geologically. The fields current status is presented and the ongoing reservoir simulation is discussed. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. Two possible mechanisms, relative permeability effects and changes in the capillary number, are discussed and related to four Berea core experiments' results. The experiments were conducted at reservoir temperature using SEVVSU oil, brine, and bacteria. The movement and activity of bacteria in porous media were investigated by monitoring the growth of bacteria in sandpack cores under no flow conditions. The rate of bacteria advancement through the cores was determined. A mathematical model of the MEOR process has been developed. The model is a three phase, seven species, one dimensional model. Finite difference methods are used for solution. Advection terms in balance equations are represented with a third- order upwind differencing scheme to reduce numerical dispersion and oscillations. The model is applied to a batch fermentation example. 52 refs., 26 figs., 21 tabs.

  14. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year`s report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  15. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year's report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  16. Experimental study of superconductivity in single crystal few-layer NbSe2 and the effect of high electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staley, Neal; Li, Linjun; Xu, Zhuan; Liu, Ying

    2009-03-01

    There have been many studies on superconducting properties in two dimensional films. However, a detailed study of superconducting properties in the two-dimensional limit when crystallinity is still retained, which will allow the probing of band dependent superconductivity in 2D, has not been performed. Due to concerns over defects in ultra thin films deposited in the usual methods, we use the methods developed in preparing micromechanically exfoliated graphene devices. In these samples the band structure is present while maintaining extremely low defect density. Inspired by this simple process that created single crystal single sheet graphite we fabricated ultra thin single crystalline NbSe2 flakes ranging from single to many sheets as estimated using an optical technique correlated to AFM and Raman spectroscopy measurements. Transport and planar tunnel junction devices were fabricated using standard ebeam lithography techniques. We will also study the behavior of of these devices in high electric fields.

  17. Theoretical and Experimental Study of Thermoacoustic Engines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    61153N11 uri5005 11. TITLE (Include Security Classification) Theoretical and Experimental Study of Thermoacoustic Engines 12 . PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Richard...9/30 92/ 12 /31 16. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTATION 17. COSATI CODES 18. SUBJECT TERMS (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) FIELD...central portion. Copper rings of thickness 3.2 mm, inner radius 4.32 cm, and outer radius of 12 cm were supported between the ends of the ceramic piece

  18. Experimental Validation of Simulations Using Full-field Measurement Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hack, Erwin

    2010-05-28

    The calibration by reference materials of dynamic full-field measurement systems is discussed together with their use to validate numerical simulations of structural mechanics. The discussion addresses three challenges that are faced in these processes, i.e. how to calibrate a measuring instrument that (i) provides full-field data, and (ii) is dynamic; (iii) how to compare data from simulation and experimentation.

  19. Magnetic field profile analysis for gyrotron experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagonakis, Ioannis Gr.; Avramidis, Konstantinos A.; Gantenbein, Gerd; Rzesnicki, Tomasz; Samartsev, Andrey; Jelonnek, John

    2017-03-01

    The external applied magnetic field plays a main role on the gyrotron operation. Even if the gyrotron design is optimized for the nominal magnetic profile, it is possible the performance to be better for an alternative one. This unexpected result can happen for several reasons, such as the manufacturing imperfections, the misalignment issues, and several unknown factors in gyrotron theory and design. The systematic experimental investigation of the gyrotron in different magnetic profiles is very important for the optimization of the gyrotron operation and for the better understanding of the gyrotron behavior. In this sense, an analytical approach for the definition of the appropriate magnetic profiles based on the beam characteristics instead of the coil currents definition is proposed for a systematic experimental study. Using this technique, operational maps in the space of the important magnetic profile parameters are developed, which are very useful for the characterization of the gyrotron performance. For the demonstration of this idea, the operational maps of the short-pulse prototype of the 170 GHz, 1 MW European ITER gyrotron project are presented.

  20. [Histopathologic studies in experimental uveitis].

    PubMed

    Misiuk-Hojło, Marta; Woźniak, Zdzisław; Szymaniec, Stanisław; Lugowski, Czesław; Agopsowicz, Karolina

    2004-01-01

    Experimental uveitis is one of the main models in the diseases of autoimmunological background. The purpose of this paper was to analyze the quantitative histological changes in the experimental uveitis, induced by different types of homogenous endotoxin salts of Havnia alvei. We studied 74 eyes of Lewis rats (males) divided into 4 groups. Each group received a homogenous salt of Havnia alvei in a single subcutaneous injection. In the 1 group-LPS Ca++, in 2 group-LPS Na++, in 3 group-LPS 981, in 4 group physiological salt (control group). The histologic and immunocitochemical examinations were performed after 24, 48 hours, and after 4 and 7 days following the injection. The histologic changes were analyzed (he intensity of inflammatory reaction) using a Highly Optimazed Microscope Enviroment system. The most intensive inflammation was observed in experimental group after 24 hours (n the LPS 981D group in 5 rats out of 6, in LPS Ca++ group in 3 rats out of 6). After 48 hours the intensity of inflammatory reaction visibly decreased. On the fourth day the inflammation revealed a minimal intensity and after 7 days was practically absent. In the control group minimal inflammation was observed only in a few rats. Cilliary body hypermia was present for 48 hours in most of the experimental rats. Only a few of them had hyperemia on the fourth day. In the posterior segment minimal inflammation was noted at the end of the first day (I and II-nd group after 24 hours); this process continued until the fourth day, on the 7th day disappeared. The most intensive inflammation of the anterior and posterior choroidal segment is caused by homogenous salts of Havnia alvei 981.

  1. Experimental study of vortex diffusers

    SciTech Connect

    Shakerin, S.; Miller, P.L.

    1995-11-01

    This report documents experimental research performed on vortex diffusers used in ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The main objectives of the research were (1) to study the flow characteristics of isothermal jets issuing from vortex diffusers, (2) to compare the vortex diffuser`s performance with that of a conventional diffuser, and (3) to prepare a report that disseminates the results to the designers of ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The researchers considered three diffusers: a conventional round ceiling diffuser and two different styles of vortex diffusers. Overall, the vortex diffusers create slightly more induction of ambient air in comparison to the conventional diffuser.

  2. Experimental studies of glass refining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramanian, R. S.; Cole, R.; Kondos, P.

    1984-01-01

    The basic components of the experimental apparatus were selected and acquired. Techniques were developed for the fabrication of the special crucibles necessary for the experiments. Arrangements were made for the analysis of glass and gas bubble samples for composition information. Donations of major equipment were received for this project from Owens, Illinois where a similar study had been conducted a few year ago. Decisions were made regarding the actual glass composition to be used, the gas to be used in the first experiments, and the temperatures at which the experiments should be conducted. A microcomputer was acquired, and work was begun on interfacing the video analyzer to it.

  3. Utilization of proteomics in experimental field conditions--A case study of poplars growing on grassland affected by long-term starch wastewater irrigation.

    PubMed

    Szuba, Agnieszka; Lorenc-Plucińska, Gabriela

    2015-08-03

    The presented study verified the possibility of using proteomics as a tool for investigating poplars growing on obviously separate plots. The examination covered poplars planted on grassland irrigated for 40 years with potato industry wastewater and in a plot appropriate for poplar planting, spaced at a distance of 67 km from each other (hereinafter referred to as forest). The work aimed to compare the obtained proteomic results with data on biometric and biochemical parameters and mineral composition as well as to assess, at a molecular level, the usefulness of grasslands for planting. Proteome analysis showed that most of the stress-related proteins detected were less abundant on the irrigated grassland, confirming the viability of its revegetation with poplars. Proteomic data corresponded well with the other results, highlighting the probable reason for the proteome changes; i.e. deficiency of phosphate ions detected in the forest area. Moreover, proteome analysis revealed biotic stress symptoms in plants growing on the grassland, which were also well explained by other data but would not have been detected without performing the proteomic analysis. Therefore, environmental plant proteomics is a useful and valuable tool during field studies, even when samples are taken from plots some distance apart. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Experimental investigation of the critical magnetic fields of transition metal superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcevoy, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    The isothermal magnetic transitions of a type 2 superconductor have been studied by AC susceptibility techniques as a function of the amplitude and frequency of the exciting field. The field variation of the complex susceptibility was used to determine the critical fields. The research was planned to clarify the determination (both experimentally and theoretically) of the maximum field at which the superconductive phase spontaneously nucleates in the bulk and on the surface of the metal.

  5. A far-field radio-frequency experimental exposure system with unrestrained mice.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jared W; Asif, Sajid; Singelmann, Lauren; Khan, Muhammad Saeed; Ghosh, Sumit; Gustad, Tom; Doetkott, Curt; Braaten, Benjamin D; Ewert, Daniel L

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have been performed on exploring the effects of radio-frequency (RF) energy on biological function in vivo. In particular, gene expression results have been inconclusive due, in part, to a lack of a standardized experimental procedure. This research describes a new far field RF exposure system for unrestrained murine models that reduces experimental error. The experimental procedure includes the materials used, the creation of a patch antenna, the uncertainty analysis of the equipment, characterization of the test room, experimental equipment used and setup, power density and specific absorption rate experiment, and discussion. The result of this research is an experimental exposure system to be applied to future biological studies.

  6. Electromagnetic Field Penetration Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, M.D.

    2000-01-01

    A numerical method is presented to determine electromagnetic shielding effectiveness of rectangular enclosure with apertures on its wall used for input and output connections, control panels, visual-access windows, ventilation panels, etc. Expressing EM fields in terms of cavity Green's function inside the enclosure and the free space Green's function outside the enclosure, integral equations with aperture tangential electric fields as unknown variables are obtained by enforcing the continuity of tangential electric and magnetic fields across the apertures. Using the Method of Moments, the integral equations are solved for unknown aperture fields. From these aperture fields, the EM field inside a rectangular enclosure due to external electromagnetic sources are determined. Numerical results on electric field shielding of a rectangular cavity with a thin rectangular slot obtained using the present method are compared with the results obtained using simple transmission line technique for code validation. The present technique is applied to determine field penetration inside a Boeing-757 by approximating its passenger cabin as a rectangular cavity filled with a homogeneous medium and its passenger windows by rectangular apertures. Preliminary results for, two windows, one on each side of fuselage were considered. Numerical results for Boeing-757 at frequencies 26 MHz, 171-175 MHz, and 428-432 MHz are presented.

  7. Systematic Validation of Protein Force Fields against Experimental Data

    PubMed Central

    Eastwood, Michael P.; Dror, Ron O.; Shaw, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations provide a vehicle for capturing the structures, motions, and interactions of biological macromolecules in full atomic detail. The accuracy of such simulations, however, is critically dependent on the force field—the mathematical model used to approximate the atomic-level forces acting on the simulated molecular system. Here we present a systematic and extensive evaluation of eight different protein force fields based on comparisons of experimental data with molecular dynamics simulations that reach a previously inaccessible timescale. First, through extensive comparisons with experimental NMR data, we examined the force fields' abilities to describe the structure and fluctuations of folded proteins. Second, we quantified potential biases towards different secondary structure types by comparing experimental and simulation data for small peptides that preferentially populate either helical or sheet-like structures. Third, we tested the force fields' abilities to fold two small proteins—one α-helical, the other with β-sheet structure. The results suggest that force fields have improved over time, and that the most recent versions, while not perfect, provide an accurate description of many structural and dynamical properties of proteins. PMID:22384157

  8. Prospective risk analysis prior to retrospective incident reporting and analysis as a means to enhance incident reporting behaviour: a quasi-experimental field study.

    PubMed

    Kessels-Habraken, Marieke; De Jonge, Jan; Van der Schaaf, Tjerk; Rutte, Christel

    2010-05-01

    Hospitals can apply prospective and retrospective methods to reduce the large number of medical errors. Retrospective methods are used to identify errors after they occur and to facilitate learning. Prospective methods aim to determine, assess and minimise risks before incidents happen. This paper questions whether the order of implementation of those two methods influences the resultant impact on incident reporting behaviour. From November 2007 until June 2008, twelve wards of two Dutch general hospitals participated in a quasi-experimental reversed-treatment non-equivalent control group design. The six units of Hospital 1 first conducted a prospective analysis, after which a sophisticated incident reporting and analysis system was implemented. On the six units of Hospital 2 the two methods were implemented in reverse order. Data from the incident reporting and analysis system and from a questionnaire were used to assess between-hospital differences regarding the number of reported incidents, the spectrum of reported incident types, and the profession of reporters. The results show that carrying out a prospective analysis first can improve incident reporting behaviour in terms of a wider spectrum of reported incident types and a larger proportion of incidents reported by doctors. However, the proposed order does not necessarily yield a larger number of reported incidents. This study fills an important gap in safety management research regarding the order of the implementation of prospective and retrospective methods, and contributes to literature on incident reporting. This research also builds on the network theory of social contagion. The results might indicate that health care employees can disseminate their risk perceptions through communication with their direct colleagues. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Baja California: Field Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, John; Stewart, Jack

    1974-01-01

    Describes how to plan and execute an extended field trip which provides first hand observation of biological and cultural systems. Socialization of the participants was achieved through common planning and goal achievement. (BR)

  10. [Experimental study of vestibular neurectomy].

    PubMed

    Pech, A; Cannoni, M; Appaix, M; Cahier, S; Lacour, M; Roll, J P

    1976-06-01

    The authors describe an experimental study carried out on baboons. After unilateral vestibular neurectomy, the behaviour disorders on the one hand, and on the other, modifications and temporal development of reflex muotatic excitability of the spine using Hoffmann's reflex method are analyzed. As far as behaviour is concerned, a four-day period of motor restriction following the operation causes more marked residual disorders in comparison with controls. From the neurophysiological point of view, neurectomy results in seriously disordered spinal reflexes characterized by ipsilateral hypo-excitability developing in there stages: a tw-day initial critical phase during which the disorders are at their worst, a four-day recuperative stage with partial regression of the disorders, finally a chronic compensation stage in which spinal excitability returns to normal after several months.

  11. The excretion of 6-hydroxymelatonin sulfate in healthy young men exposed to electromagnetic fields emitted by cellular phone -- an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Bortkiewicz, Alicja; Pilacik, Bozena; Gadzicka, Elzbieta; Szymczak, Wieslaw

    2002-04-01

    It is quite likely that non-visible electromagnetic fields (EMF) may affect melatonin production. Some studies confirmed this hypothesis and showed that extremely low EMF altered pineal function in animals and humans. Thus, it is reasonable to suppose that EMF emitted by cellular phones may also influence secretion of melatonin. The present study sought to evaluate possible effect of the exposure to EMF emitted by cellular phone on 6-hydroxymelatonin sulfate (6-OHMS) excretion, which reflects melatonin levels in blood. The examined group consisted of 9 healthy males aged 19-29 years. The experiment was performed under controlled conditions (the light intensity-50 lx till midnight and 0 lx during night). Each person was examined twice: on a day without exposure (control day, C-day) and on a day with continuous exposure (60 min. exposure from cellular phone, frequency 900 MHz, pulsed with 217 Hz, pulse with 576 micros, SAR 1.23 W/kg, E-day). From 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. they used a cellular phone. The subjects did not know which day was E-day, and which was C-day. From 8 p.m. till midnight the subjects listened to music and than they slept till 7 a.m. next day. Urine samples were collected at 7 p.m., at midnight, and at 7 a.m. in the same way in C-day as in E-day. Sample were frozen for later ELISA analysis of 6-OHMS. The 6-OHMS ELISA kit from Immuno-Biological Laboratories (Hamburg) was used for measurement of 6-OHMS. The data were analysed using Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test for each subject and for the whole group. We compared 6-OHMS level on the E-day and on the C-day separately for 3 time-points - 7 p.m., midnight, 7 a.m. Mean 6-OHMS level in both experiments did not differ significantly for any of the respective time points. Circadian variations of 6-OHMS level were detected in all subjects. The results of our investigation has demonstrated that EMF emitted by cellular phones has no distinct influence on the melatonin level.

  12. Horse Manure and Other Fun Projects. Field Studies and Laboratory Experiences in Environmental Biology - A Book of Experimental Ideas for Secondary School Biology Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Robert T., Ed.; Clark, Barbara G., Ed.

    This guide contains a collection of laboratory and field inquiries designed to promote ecological awareness, sensitivity, and understanding. The activities compiled by 28 teachers are for use in teaching biology at the secondary level. They are presented in a "recipe" form to make it possible for teachers without prior experience or training to…

  13. Experimental study of double-cavity flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuerke, F.; Pastur, L. R.; Sciamarella, D.; Lusseyran, F.; Artana, G.

    2017-07-01

    The flow through two facing, identical cavities (double-cavity) is characterized experimentally, as the inflow velocity and the distance between the cavities is varied. Standard 2D2C particle image velocimetry measurements in the spanwise mid-plane provide information on the instantaneous and mean velocity flow fields. Laser Doppler velocimetry measurements at several points in the double-cavity domain reveal the global character of the streamwise fluctuating velocity spectra. The flow is characterized based on time series, recorded in the shear layer of one of the cavities, for a wide range of inflow velocities and intercavity distances. In a detailed spectral study, we show how the shear layer spectra get affected when the two cavities are brought closer together. Based on the experimental data, a temporal local linear stability analysis was carried out, which was able to explain why the frequency peaks for close intercavity distances broaden and move to higher Strouhal numbers.

  14. Experimental studies of transonic flow field near a longitudinally slotted wind tunnel wall. Ph.D. Thesis - George Washington Univ., 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everhart, Joel L.; Bobbitt, Percy J.

    1994-01-01

    The results of detailed parametric experiments are presented for the near-wall flow field of a longitudinally slotted transonic wind tunnel. Existing data are reevaluated and new data obtained in the Langley 6- by 19-inch Transonic Wind Tunnel are presented and analyzed. In the experiments, researchers systematically investigate many pertinent wall-geometry variables such as the wall openness and the number of slots along with the free stream Mach number and model angle of attack. Flow field surveys on the plane passing through the centerline of the slot were conducted and are presented. The effects of viscosity on the slot flow are considered in the analysis. The present experiments, combined with those of previous investigations, give a more complete physical characterization of the flow near and through the slotted wall of a transonic wind tunnel.

  15. Annual tendency of research papers used ICR mice as experimental animals in biomedical research fields.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Eun; Nam, Jung Hoon; Cho, Joon Young; Kim, Kil Soo; Hwang, Dae Youn

    2017-06-01

    Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) mice have been widely used in various research fields including toxicology, oncology, pharmacology, and pharmaceutical product safety testing for decades. However, annual tendency of research papers involving ICR mice in various biomedical fields has not been previously analyzed. In this study, we examined the numbers of papers that used ICR mice as experimental animals in the social science, natural science, engineering, medicine-pharmacy, marine agriculture-fishery, and art-kinesiology fields by analyzing big data. Numbers of ICR mouse-used papers gradually increased from 1961 to 2014, but small decreases were observed in 2015 and 2016. The largest number of ICR-used papers were published in the medicine-pharmacy field, followed by natural science and art-kinesiology fields. There were no ICR mouse-used papers in other fields. Furthermore, ICR mice have been widely employed in cell biology studies within the natural science field as well as in biochemistry and pathology in the medicine-pharmacy field. Few ICR mouse-used papers were published in exercise biochemistry and exercise nutrition in the art-kinesiology field. Regardless in most fields, the total numbers of published papers involving ICR mice were higher in 2014 than in other years, although the numbers in some fields including dentistry, veterinary science, and dermatology were high in 2016. Taken together, the present study shows that various ICR stocks, including Korl:ICR mice, are widely employed as experimental animals in various biomedical research fields.

  16. The three youngest Plinian eruptions of Mt Pelée, Martinique (P1, P2 and P3): Constraining the eruptive conditions from field and experimental studies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kueppers, Ulrich; Uhlig, Joan; Carazzo, Guillaume; Kaminski, Edouard; Perugini, Diego; Tait, Steve; Clouard, Valérie

    2015-04-01

    Mt Pelée on Martinique, French Lesser Indies, is infamous for the last big Pelean (i.e., dome forming) eruption in 1902 AD that destroyed agricultural land and the city of Saint Pierre by pyroclastic density currents. Beside such mostly valley-confined deposits, the geological record shows thick fall deposits of at least three Plinian eruptions during the past 2000 years. In an attempt to describe and understand systematic eruptive behaviours as well as the associated variability of eruptive scenarios of Plinian eruptions in Martinique, we have investigated approx. 50 outcrops belonging to the P1 (1315 AD), P2 (345 AD) and P3 (4 AD) eruptions (Traineau et al., JVGR 1989) and collected bulk samples as well as >100 mm pumiceous clasts. All samples are andesitic, contain plagioclase and pyroxene in a glassy matrix and range in porosity between 55 and 69 vol.% with individual bubbles rarely larger than 1 mm. Our approach was two-fold: 1) Loose bulk samples have been subject to dry mechanical sieving in order to quantively describe the grain-size distribution and the fractal dimension. 2) From large clasts, 60*25 mm cylinders have been drilled for fragmentation experiments following the sudden decompression of gas in the sample's pore space. The used experimental set-up allowed for precisely controllable and repeatable conditions (5, 10 and 15 MPa, 25 °C) and the complete sampling of the generated pyroclasts. These experimentally generated clasts were analysed for their grain-size distribution and fractal dimension. For both natural samples and experimental populations, we find we find that the grain-size distribution follows a power-law, with an exponent between 2,5 and 3,7. Deciphering eruption conditions from deposits alone is challenging because of the complex interplay of dynamic volcanic processes and transport-related sorting. We use the quantified values of fractal dimension for a comparison of the power law exponents among the three eruptions and the

  17. Experimental Characterization of Piezoelectric Radial Field Diaphragms for Fluidic Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, R. G.; Kavli, S. E.; Thomas, R. A., Jr.; Darji, K. J.; Mossi, K. M.

    2004-01-01

    NASA has recently developed a new piezoelectric actuator, the Radial Field Diaphragm or RFD. This actuator uses a radially-directed electric field to generate concentric out-of-plane (Z-axis) motion that allows this packaged device to be used as a pump or valve diaphragm. In order to efficiently use this new active device, experimental determination of pressure, flow rate, mechanical work, power consumption and overall efficiency needs to be determined by actually building a pump. However, without an optimized pump design, it is difficult to assess the quality of the data, as these results are inherent to the actual pump. Hence, separate experiments must be conducted in order to generate independent results to help guide the design criteria and pump quality. This paper focuses on the experiments used to generate the RFD's operational parameters and then compares these results to the experimentally determined results of several types of ball pumps. Also discussed are how errors are inherently introduced into the experiments, the pump design, experimental hardware and their effects on the overall system efficiency.

  18. Experimental study on the 4H-SiC-based VDMOSFETs with lightly doped P-well field-limiting rings termination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yan Jing; Lv, Hong Liang; Tang, Xiao Yan; Song, Qing Wen; Zhang, Yi Meng; Han, Chao; Zhang, Yi Men; Zhang, Yu Ming

    2017-03-01

    A lightly doped P-well field-limiting rings (FLRs) termination on 4H-SiC vertical double-implanted metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (VDMOSFETs) has been investigated. Based on the simulation, the proposed termination applied to 4H-SiC VDMOSFET could achieve an almost same breakdown voltage (BV) and have the advantage of lower ion-implantation damage comparing with P+ FLRs termination. Meanwhile, this kind of termination also reduces the difficulty and consumption of fabrication process. 4H-SiC VDMOSFETs with lightly doped P-well (FLRs) termination have been fabricated on 10 μm thick epi-layer with nitrogen doping concentration of 6.2 × 1015 cm-3. The maximum breakdown voltage of the 4H-SiC VDMOSFETs has achieved as high as 1610 V at a current of 15 μA, which is very close to the simulated result of 1643 V and about 90% of the plane parallel breakdown voltage of 1780 V. It is considered that P-well FLRs termination is an effective, robust and process-tolerant termination structure suitable for 4H-SiC VDMOSFET.

  19. Experimental Studies of Coaxial Jet Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrouzi, Parviz; McGuirk, James J.

    An experimental study was carried out to investigate the effect of coaxial nozzle operating conditions on near-field jet plume development. The study was conducted in a low speed water tunnel as well as in a high-speed airflow nozzle test facility. Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) and Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) techniques were employed to identify the flow structure as well as the mean velocity and turbulence structure of a coaxial nozzle under low speed flow conditions. Schlieren flow visualization, LDA and nozzle wall static pressure measurement surveys were performed in high speed flows. The effect of a nozzle shroud on jet development was studied and found very effective on suppression of the shock cells and on reduction of turbulence levels within the core region. The effect of the outer and inner Nozzle Pressure Ratios on shock cell structure and the nozzle internal wall pressure field were documented. LDA measurements in the water tunnel confirmed that the flow pattern produced of the Reynolds numbers and velocity ratios selected for this study was typical of practically occurring developing jet flow fields. Sufficient measured profiles of velocities, turbulence quantities and nozzle wall static pressures as well as jet plume images have been captured to serve as benchmark validation data for time-averaged turbulence-model-based RANS CFD predictions.

  20. Adaptive wave field synthesis for active sound field reproduction: experimental results.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Philippe-Aubert; Berry, Alain

    2008-04-01

    Sound field reproduction has applications in music reproduction, spatial audio, sound environment reproduction, and experimental acoustics. Sound field reproduction can be used to artificially reproduce the spatial character of natural hearing. The objective is then to reproduce a sound field in a real reproduction environment. Wave field synthesis (WFS) is a known open-loop technology which assumes that the reproduction environment is anechoic. The room response thus reduces the quality of the physical sound field reproduction by WFS. In recent research papers, adaptive wave field synthesis (AWFS) was defined as a potential solution to compensate for these quality reductions from which WFS objective performance suffers. In this paper, AWFS is experimentally investigated as an active sound field reproduction system with a limited number of reproduction error sensors to compensate for the response of the listening environment. Two digital signal processing algorithms for AWFS are used for comparison purposes, one of which is based on independent radiation mode control. AWFS performed propagating sound field reproduction better than WFS in three tested reproduction spaces (hemianechoic chamber, standard laboratory space, and reverberation chamber).

  1. Experimental Study of RF Pulsed Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Laurent, Lisa; Tantawi, Sami; Dolgashev, Valery; Nantista, Christopher; Higashi, Yasuo; Aicheler, Markus; Heikkinen, Samuli; Wuensch, Walter; /CERN

    2011-11-04

    Cyclic thermal stresses produced by rf pulsed heating can be the limiting factor on the attainable reliable gradients for room temperature linear accelerators. This is especially true for structures that have complicated features for wakefield damping. These limits could be pushed higher by using special types of copper, copper alloys, or other conducting metals in constructing partial or complete accelerator structures. Here we present an experimental study aimed at determining the potential of these materials for tolerating cyclic thermal fatigue due to rf magnetic fields. A special cavity that has no electric field on the surface was employed in these studies. The cavity shape concentrates the magnetic field on one flat surface where the test material is placed. The materials tested in this study have included oxygen free electronic grade copper, copper zirconium, copper chromium, hot isostatically pressed copper, single crystal copper, electroplated copper, Glidcop(reg. sign), copper silver, and silver plated copper. The samples were exposed to different machining and heat treatment processes prior to rf processing. Each sample was tested to a peak pulsed heating temperature of approximately 110 C and remained at this temperature for approximately 10 x 10{sup 6} rf pulses. In general, the results showed the possibility of pushing the gradient limits due to pulsed heating fatigue by the use of copper zirconium and copper chromium alloys.

  2. Experimental study of rf pulsed heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Lisa; Tantawi, Sami; Dolgashev, Valery; Nantista, Christopher; Higashi, Yasuo; Aicheler, Markus; Heikkinen, Samuli; Wuensch, Walter

    2011-04-01

    Cyclic thermal stresses produced by rf pulsed heating can be the limiting factor on the attainable reliable gradients for room temperature linear accelerators. This is especially true for structures that have complicated features for wakefield damping. These limits could be pushed higher by using special types of copper, copper alloys, or other conducting metals in constructing partial or complete accelerator structures. Here we present an experimental study aimed at determining the potential of these materials for tolerating cyclic thermal fatigue due to rf magnetic fields. A special cavity that has no electric field on the surface was employed in these studies. The cavity shape concentrates the magnetic field on one flat surface where the test material is placed. The materials tested in this study have included oxygen free electronic grade copper, copper zirconium, copper chromium, hot isostatically pressed copper, single crystal copper, electroplated copper, Glidcop®, copper silver, and silver plated copper. The samples were exposed to different machining and heat treatment processes prior to rf processing. Each sample was tested to a peak pulsed heating temperature of approximately 110°C and remained at this temperature for approximately 10×106 rf pulses. In general, the results showed the possibility of pushing the gradient limits due to pulsed heating fatigue by the use of copper zirconium and copper chromium alloys.

  3. An experimental and modeling study of grain-scale uranium desorption from field-contaminated sediments and the potential influence of microporosity on mass-transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoliker, D.; Liu, C.; Kent, D. B.; Zachara, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    The aquifer below the 300-Area of the Hanford site (Richland, WA, USA) is plagued by a persistent plume of dissolved uranium (U(VI)) in excess of the Environmental Protection Agency drinking water maximum contamination level even after the removal of highly contaminated sediments. The aquifer sediments in the seasonally saturated lower vadose zone act as both a source and sink for uranium during stage changes in the nearby Columbia River. Diffusion limitation of uranium mass-transfer within these sediments has been cited as a potential cause of the plume's persistence. Equilibrium U(VI) sorption is a strong function of variable chemical conditions, especially carbonate, hydrogen, and uranyl ion activities. Field-contaminated sediments from the site require up to 1,000 hours to reach equilibrium in static batch reactors. Increases in U(VI) concentrations over longer time-scales result from changes in chemical conditions, which drive reactions with sediments that favor U(VI) desorption. Grain-scale U(VI) sorption/desorption rates are slow, likely owing to diffusion of U(VI) and other solutes through intra-granular pore domains. In order to improve understanding of the impact of intra-granular diffusion and chemical reactions controlling grain-scale U(VI) release, experiments were conducted on individual particle size fractions of a <8 mm composite of field-contaminated, lower vadose zone sediments. For each size fraction, equilibrium U(VI) sorption/desorption in static batch reactors was well-described by surface complexation models over a range of chemical conditions applicable to the field site. Desorption rates from individual size fractions in flow-through batch reactors, examined under a single set of constant chemical conditions with multiple stop-flow events, were similar for all size fractions <2 mm. Kinetic U(VI) desorption in flow-through batch reactors was modeled using a multi-rate surface complexation approach, where sorption/desorption rates were

  4. Effect of eutrophication upon radionuclide dynamics in the Sacca di Goro lagoon (Po River Delta, Italy): a combined field, experimental and modeling study.

    PubMed

    Bondavalli, Cristina

    2003-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on the relationship between eutrophication and radionuclide circulation at the whole ecosystem scale in the shallow estuarine environment of the Sacca di Goro (Po River Delta, Italy). This lagoon is frequently affected by dystrophic crises, due to decomposition of huge amounts of macroalgae (mainly Ulva rigida), and critical conditions created at the interface between sediment and water are such that Cs-137 accumulated in the sediment can be mobilized and made available in the water column. The release of cesium from sediment in this ecosystem has been evaluated through a field experiment in which chemical conditions typical of anoxic crises were artificially created in enclosures. Also a lab experiment was carried out to shed light on possible cesium release by decomposing macroalgae. The two experiments allowed drawing conclusions on crucial factors controlling cesium release in the Sacca di Goro, the first objective of this research. The second objective was understanding the fate of radiocesium once transported in the water column. To this end ecological information gathered during the experiments and a yearly sampling campaign, has been converted into whole-system seasonal networks describing ecosystem flow structure for the Sacca di Goro. Analyzed by network analysis this model has provided clues about the dynamics of Cs-137 in terms of preferential pathways, sinks, sources, and cycling activity. Sediment, together with seston and dissolved cesium, appear to be the most significant components in the circulation of Cs-137; while macroalgal biomasses play a crucial role as an indirect causal factor.

  5. Experimental percolation studies of random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinerman, A.; Weddell, J.

    2017-06-01

    This report establishes an experimental method of studying electrically percolating networks at a higher resolution than previously implemented. This method measures the current across a conductive sheet as a function of time as elliptical pores are cut into the sheet. This is done utilizing a Universal Laser System X2-600 100 W CO2 laser system with a 76 × 46 cm2 field and 394 dpc (dots/cm) resolution. This laser can cut a random system of elliptical pores into a conductive sheet with a potential voltage applied across it and measures the current versus time. This allows for experimental verification of a percolation threshold as a function of the ellipse's aspect ratio (minor/major diameter). We show that as an ellipse's aspect ratio approaches zero, the percolation threshold approaches one. The benefit of this method is that it can experimentally measure the effect of removing small pores, as well as pores with complex geometries, such as an asterisk from a conductive sheet.

  6. An Experimental Study of the Rainfall Variability Within TRMM/GPM Precipitation Radar and Microwave Sensor Instantaneous Field of View During MC3E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokay, Ali; Petersen, Arthur; Gatlin, Patrick N.; Wingo, Matt; Wolff, David B.; Carey, Lawrence D.

    2011-01-01

    Dual tipping bucket gauges were operated at 16 sites in support of ground based precipitation measurements during Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E). The experiment is conducted in North Central Oklahoma from April 22 through June 6, 2011. The gauge sites were distributed around Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research facility where the minimum and maximum separation distances ranged from 1 to 12 km. This study investigates the rainfall variability by employing the stretched exponential function. It will focus on the quantitative assessment of the partial beam of the experiment area in both convective and stratiform rain. The parameters of the exponential function will also be determined for various events. This study is unique for two reasons. First is the existing gauge setup and the second is the highly convective nature of the events with rain rates well above 100 mm h-1 for 20 minutes. We will compare the findings with previous studies.

  7. An Experimental Study of the Rainfall Variability Within TRMM/GPM Precipitation Radar and Microwave Sensor Instantaneous Field of View During MC3E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokay, Ali; Petersen, Walter Arthur; Gatlin, Patrick N.; Wingo, Matt; Wolff, David B.; Carey, Lawrence D.

    2011-01-01

    Dual tipping bucket gauges were operated at 16 sites in support of ground based precipitation measurements during Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E). The experiment is conducted in North Central Oklahoma from April 22 through June 6, 2011. The gauge sites were distributed around Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research facility where the minimum and maximum separation distances ranged from 1 to 12 km. This study investigates the rainfall variability by employing the stretched exponential function. It will focus on the quantitative assessment of the partial beam of the experiment area in both convective and stratiform rain. The parameters of the exponential function will also be determined for various events. This study is unique for two reasons. First is the existing gauge setup and the second is the highly convective nature of the events with rain rates well above 100 mm/h for 20 minutes. We will compare the findings with previous studies.

  8. Wright Field turboprop study

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenzetti, R.C.; Dull, P.P.

    1981-01-01

    The considered investigation was conducted as part of an effort to reduce aircraft fuel costs. Turboprops are very fuel efficient at speeds below Mach 0.6. One of the most promising approaches to reduce fuel consumption in the speed range from Mach 0.6 to 0.8 is related to an employment of the swept eight to ten blade propeller (propfan) being developed by NASA. All studies to date indicate that turboshaft engines with propfans might save 15% or more of the fuel used by a turbofan engine of comparable technology. Attention is given to a turboprop status review, contractor studies, the NASA propfan program, an in-house performance study, specific problems which have to be solved to make a twin-turboprop, 100-150 passenger transport a viable possibility for the early 1990s, and turboprop dilemmas.

  9. Experimental Studies on the Effects of Thermal Bumps in the Flow-Field around a Flat Plate using a Hypersonic Wind Tunnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    The main part is made of PEEK but the insert is still DURATEC 750. The density of  of PEEK is 1480 3kg m and maximum service temperature for...short term testing is 300 degree. The thermal conductivity of PEEK c is 0.24 W m K and the specific heat capacity of PEEK is 31.8 10 J kg K . These...2005). Effect of the laser repetition rate on the drag reduction rate was studied in supersonic flow by Sasoh et al. (Sasoh, Sekiya et al.) and Kim et

  10. Coding Major Fields of Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobbitt, L. G.; Carroll, C. D.

    The National Center for Education Statistics conducts surveys which require the coding of the respondent's major field of study. This paper presents a new system for the coding of major field of study. It operates on-line i a Computer Assisted Telephone Interview (CATI) environment and allows conversational checks to verify coding directly from…

  11. The phase-field approach as a tool for experimental validations in fracture mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dally, Tim; Weinberg, Kerstin

    2017-07-01

    In a phase-field approach to fracture crack propagation is modeled by means of an additional continuous field. In this paper, two problems of linear elastic fracture mechanics are studied experimentally and numerically in order to evaluate the practicability of the phase-field approach and to validate the measured parameters. At first, a three-point bending experiment of silicon dies is simulated assuming static plate bending. Then, wave propagation and spallation in a Hopkinson bar test are analyzed in a dynamic regime. The simulations show that phase-field fracture reproduces the experimental results with high accuracy. The results are comparable to other fracture simulations, e.g., the cohesive element technique. In total, the phase-field approach to fracture is capable of tracking crack evolution in a very convenient and quantitatively correct way.

  12. On the validity of modeling concepts for (the simulation of) groundwater flow in lowland peat areas - case study at the Zegveld experimental field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trambauer, P.; Nonner, J.; Heijkers, J.; Uhlenbrook, S.

    2011-02-01

    The groundwater flow models currently used in the western part of The Netherlands and in other similar peaty areas are thought to be a too simplified representation of the hydrological reality. One of the reasons is that due to the schematization of the subsoil, its heterogeneity cannot be represented adequately. Moreover, the applicability of Darcy's law in these types of soils has been questioned, but this law forms the basis of most groundwater flow models. With the purpose of assessing the typical heterogeneity of the subsoil and to verify the applicability of Darcy's law fieldwork was completed at a research site in the western part of The Netherlands. The assessments were carried for the so called Complex Confining Layer (CCL), which is the Holocene peaty to clayey layer overlying Pleistocene sandy deposits. Borehole drilling through the CCL with a hand auger was completed and revealed the typical heterogeneous character of this layer showing a dominance of muddy, humified peat which is alternated with fresher peat and clay. Slug tests were carried out to study the applicability of Darcy's law given that previous studies suggested the non validity for humified peat soils given by a variable hydraulic conductivity K with the hydraulic gradient. For higher humification degrees, the experiments indeed suggested a variable K, but this seems to be the result of the inappropriate use of steady-state formulae for transient experiments in peaty environments. The muddy peat sampled has a rather plastic nature, and the high compressibility of this material leads to transient behavior. However, using transient formulae, the slug tests conducted for different initial hydraulic heads showed that there was hardly any evidence of a variation of the hydraulic conductivity with the hydraulic gradient. Therefore, Darcy's law can be used for peat soils. The heterogeneity of the subsoil and the apparent applicability of Darcy's law were taking into account for the detailed

  13. Synchronization in coupled Ikeda delay systems. Experimental observations using Field Programmable Gate Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valli, D.; Muthuswamy, B.; Banerjee, S.; Ariffin, M. R. K.; Wahab, A. W. A.; Ganesan, K.; Subramaniam, C. K.; Kurths, J.

    2014-06-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the use of a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) as a physical platform for realizing chaotic delay differential equations (DDE). Moreover, using our platform, we also experimentally study the synchronization between two time delayed systems. We illustrate two different experimental approaches - one is hardware co-simulation (using a Digilent Atlys with a Xilinx Spartan-6 FPGA) and the other is analog output (using a Terasic DE2-115 with an Altera Cyclone IV E FPGA).

  14. The Impact of Funding through the RF President’s Grants for Young Scientists (the field – Medicine) on Research Productivity: A Quasi-Experimental Study and a Brief Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Saygitov, Ruslan T.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of grants on research productivity has been investigated by a number of retrospective studies. The results of these studies vary considerably. The objective of my study was to investigate the impact of funding through the RF President’s grants for young scientists on the research productivity of awarded applicants. The study compared the number of total articles and citations for awarded and rejected applicants who in 2007 took part in competitions for young candidates of science (CoS’s) and doctors of science (DoS’s) in the scientific field of medicine. The bibliometric analysis was conducted for the period from 2003 to 2012 (five years before and after the competition). The source of bibliometric data is the eLIBRARY.RU database. The impact of grants on the research productivity of Russian young scientists was assessed using the meta-analytical approach based on data from quasi-experimental studies conducted in other countries. The competition featured 149 CoS’s and 41 DoS’s, out of which 24 (16%) and 22 (54%) applicants, respectively, obtained funding. No difference in the number of total articles and citations at baseline, as well as in 2008–2012, for awarded and rejected applicants was found. The combination of data from the Russian study and other quasi-experimental studies (6 studies, 10 competitions) revealed a small treatment effect – an increase in the total number of publications over a 4–5-year period after the competition by 1.23 (95% CI 0.48–1.97). However, the relationship between the number of total publications published by applicants before and after the competition revealed that this treatment effect is an effect of the “maturation” of scientists with a high baseline publication activity – not of grant funding. PMID:24475203

  15. The impact of funding through the RF President's grants for young scientists (the field--medicine) on research productivity: a quasi-experimental study and a brief systematic review.

    PubMed

    Saygitov, Ruslan T

    2014-01-01

    The impact of grants on research productivity has been investigated by a number of retrospective studies. The results of these studies vary considerably. The objective of my study was to investigate the impact of funding through the RF President's grants for young scientists on the research productivity of awarded applicants. The study compared the number of total articles and citations for awarded and rejected applicants who in 2007 took part in competitions for young candidates of science (CoS's) and doctors of science (DoS's) in the scientific field of medicine. The bibliometric analysis was conducted for the period from 2003 to 2012 (five years before and after the competition). The source of bibliometric data is the eLIBRARY.RU database. The impact of grants on the research productivity of Russian young scientists was assessed using the meta-analytical approach based on data from quasi-experimental studies conducted in other countries. The competition featured 149 CoS's and 41 DoS's, out of which 24 (16%) and 22 (54%) applicants, respectively, obtained funding. No difference in the number of total articles and citations at baseline, as well as in 2008-2012, for awarded and rejected applicants was found. The combination of data from the Russian study and other quasi-experimental studies (6 studies, 10 competitions) revealed a small treatment effect--an increase in the total number of publications over a 4-5-year period after the competition by 1.23 (95% CI 0.48-1.97). However, the relationship between the number of total publications published by applicants before and after the competition revealed that this treatment effect is an effect of the "maturation" of scientists with a high baseline publication activity--not of grant funding.

  16. Characterization of Neutron Field in the Experimental Fast Reactor Joyo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Takashi; Maeda, Shigetaka; Aoyama, Takafumi

    2003-06-01

    In order to assure the reliability and accuracy of neutron flux and related characteristics such as dpa, helium production and fuel power in the irradiation test of JOYO, reactor dosimetry and neutronic calculation have been developed. The detailed calculation was conducted using transport and Monte Carlo codes with the core subassembly composition obtained by three dimensional diffusion theory. Helium Accumulation Fluence Monitor (HAFM) were also used to measure the neutron fluence. The calculation method was verified by the comparison of measured fuel power based on the PIE data and adjusted neutron flux using measured reaction rates. As a result, it was confirmed that the calculation with experimental correction can characterize the JOYO neutron field precisely and meet the specified accuracy set for each irradiation test.

  17. Theoretical and experimental studies on the foundation theoretical and experimental studies on the foundation of mesomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudnovsky, A.; Wu, S.

    1992-06-01

    The report summarizes a closely coupled experimental and theoretical investigation of various stages of Fracture Process: (1) accumulation of 'damage' on submicroscopical and microscopical scales leading to crack initiation; (2) slow (subcritical) crack growth and an evolution of the damage zone; (3) transition to dynamic crack growth and the catastrophic failure. The experimental part of the program is focused on the observation and quantitative characterization of damage preceding and accompanying crack initiation and growth. A special experimental setup for studying the fracture process under variable stress field is reported in Chapter 2. A leading role of crack-damage interaction in fracture process is well documented. A new formalism for solution of crack-microcrack array interaction problem and its successful implementation in the evaluation of crack layer driving forces is presented in Chapter 3. A new model of the process zone, which generalizes the well-known Dagdale-Barenblatt model is presented in Chapter 4. A new measure for material toughness and the prediction of R-curve behavior illustrate the practical application of our model. Experimental examinations of our model under various test conditions are reported in Chapters 4, 5 and 6. The development of the constitutive equations for Crack Layer evolution and their experimental examinations under stress relaxation, fatigue and creep conditions are reported in Chapters 5 and 6. An accelerated test procedure and the formulation of crack layer instability criteria as a substitution for the conventional fracture toughness parameters are also discussed in Chapter 6.

  18. Experimental Methods for Studying Generations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieting, Stephen G.

    This paper represents two intentions: to discuss the need for theoretical advance in generational studies, and to make suggestions about expanding the design repertoire of generational studies in the interests of these theory developments. First, because generational phenomena on the face seem intransigent to experiment, a comment on…

  19. Miscibility studies of two twist-bend nematic liquid crystal dimers with different average molecular curvatures. A comparison between experimental data and predictions of a Landau mean-field theory for the NTB-N phase transition.

    PubMed

    López, D O; Robles-Hernández, B; Salud, J; de la Fuente, M R; Sebastián, N; Diez-Berart, S; Jaen, X; Dunmur, D A; Luckhurst, G R

    2016-02-14

    We report a calorimetric study of a series of mixtures of two twist-bend liquid crystal dimers, the 1'',7''-bis(4-cyanobiphenyl)-4'-yl heptane (CB7CB) and 1''-(2',4-difluorobiphenyl-4'-yloxy)-9''-(4-cyanobiphenyl-4'-yloxy) nonane (FFO9OCB), the molecules of which have different effective molecular curvatures. High-resolution heat capacity measurements in the vicinity of the NTB-N phase transition for a selected number of binary mixtures clearly indicate a first order NTB-N phase transition for all the investigated mixtures, the strength of which decreases when the nematic range increases. Published theories predict a second order NTB-N phase transition, but we have developed a self-consistent mean field Landau model using two key order parameters: a symmetric and traceless tensor for the orientational order and a short-range vector field which is orthogonal to the helix axis and rotates around of the heliconical structure with an extremely short periodicity. The theory, in its simplified form, depends on two effective elastic constants and explains satisfactorily our heat capacity measurements and also predicts a first-order NTB-N phase transition. In addition, as a complementary source of experimental measurements, the splay (K1) and bend (K3) elastic constants in the conventional nematic phase for the pure compounds and some selected mixtures have been determined.

  20. FURTHER STUDIES IN EXPERIMENTAL ATHEROSCLEROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Adler, I.

    1917-01-01

    by the very extensive but more or less intermittent blocking of the pulmonary circulation by the oil. The musculature of the artery appears to be the main force applied to overcome the resistance in the circulation. In no case has hypertrophy of the right heart been found. The lesions in the pulmonary arteries of the dogs produced experimentally are closely analogous to atherosclerosis of the human pulmonary artery. PMID:19868168

  1. Field experimental design comparisons to detect field effects associated with agronomic traits in Upland cotton

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Field variation is one of the important factors that can have a significant impact on genetic data analysis. Ineffective control of field variation may result in an inflated residual variance and/or biased estimation of genetic variations and/or effects. In this study, we addressed this problem by m...

  2. Experimental Investigation of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer Enhancement in Microgravity in the Presence of Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, C.

    2000-01-01

    The research carried out in the Heat Transfer Laboratory of the Johns Hopkins University was motivated by previous studies indicating that in terrestrial applications nucleate boiling heat transfer can be increased by a factor of 50 when compared to values obtained for the same system without electric fields. Imposing an external electric field holds the promise to improve pool boiling heat transfer in low gravity, since a phase separation force other than gravity is introduced. The influence of electric fields on bubble formation has been investigated both experimentally and theoretically.

  3. Experimental studies on semi active suspension systems with various dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, B. Anil; Bharath Raj, Ch; Rajendar, K.

    2015-12-01

    Some results of an experimental probe on semi Active suspension systems with various Dampers have been studied in the present paper. Dampers with different configurations were studied by using Magneto Rheological gel Damper. A comparison have been done for different configurations of Dampers viz.MR gel Damper with Magnetic field, MR gel Damper without magnetic field, Damper with conventional oil, Natural vibration without damper.

  4. Experimental study and evaluation of radioprotective drugs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. E.; Thomson, J. F.

    1968-01-01

    Experimental study evaluates radioprotective drugs administered before exposure either orally or intravenously. Specifically studied are the sources of radiation, choice of radiation dose, choice of animals, administration of drugs, the toxicity of protective agents and types of protective drug.

  5. [Experimental studies in Polish psychiatric journals].

    PubMed

    Małyszczak, Krzysztof; Sieradzki, Adrian; Kiejna, Andrzej

    2003-01-01

    Scientific studies in psychiatry from a methodological point of view could be divided into correlational and experimental. Experimental studies are based on active selection of independent and dependent variables, attributing values of the independent variable to persons under study and measuring values of dependent variables. An example of the experimental study is a comparison of two therapeutic methods. Experiments are feeble to selection, informational and confounding bias. This review comprises experimental papers published in journals: "Psychiatria Polska", "Postepy Psychiatrii i Neurologii", "Farmakoterapia w Psychiatrii i Neurologii", "Rocznik Psychogeriatryczny", "Wiadomości Psychiatryczne" oraz "Alkoholizm i Narkomania" from January 1998 to December 2002. 11 experimental publications, 6 randomised, 2 probably randomised and 3 case-control studies were found. The smallest study included 14 persons, the largest 180 persons. The number of experimental groups varied from 2 to 4. 9 studies evaluated features of specific methods of therapy and rehabilitation, among them 6 evaluated efficacy of medications. 2 studies evaluated relations between psychopathological and physiological variables. Experiments were based on groups of patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia (3), alcohol and drug dependence (2), depression (3), insomnia (1), bronchial asthma (1), and hypertension (1). The review showed that experimental studies do not form a main-stream in Polish psychiatric journals.

  6. Experimental study of visual accommodation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornsweet, T. N.; Crane, H. D.

    1972-01-01

    A summary report of a research effort related to the human visual accommodation system is presented. A theoretical study of the accommodation system was made. Subsequent effort was aimed at the development of specialized instrumentation for experiments designed to lead to understanding the nature of the control system in human accommodation. The necessary instrumentation consisted primarily of: (1) an automatic optometer to measure the state of eye focus, (2) a focus stimulator device to control the apparent optical distance to any target, and (3) a two-dimensional eye tracker. The concepts and designs of the first two instruments have been published in the open literature, but this report contains the first detailed treatment of the Purkinje eye tracker developed under this program. The report also discusses an accommodation lag model to explain the ability of the eye to apparently know the polarity of focus error even though the blur on the retina is to a first-approximation an even function. The interaction of the accommodation and eye movement systems is also discussed, as is the ability to train the visual accommodation system to a surprisingly responsive condition in only a few hours of training.

  7. Experimental and theoretical studies in nonlinear aeroelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attar, Peter Joseph

    Experimental and theoretical studies are conducted in the field of nonlinear aeroelasticity. Specifically two aeroelastic configurations, a flapping flag and a delta wing, are investigated and correlations between theory and experiment are presented. Two nonlinear structural theories are used to describe the structural behavior of the two models which are studied. The delta wing structural behavior is modeled using the nonlinear plate theory of von Karman. The nonlinearity in this model is due to the coupling between the out-of-plane and in-plane deflections and the model allows for moderately large out-of-plane plate deflections. The flapping flag structural model is a nonlinear beam theory which includes nonlinearities due to both large curvature and inertia. The axial deflection in this model is related to the out-of-plane deflection using an axially inextensible theory. The aerodynamic theory used is potential flow theory, which is applicable to low speed flows. The equation which describes potential flow is the Laplace equation, which is a linear partial differential equation. The Laplace equation is solved using a vortex lattice method. Aeroelastic solutions are found using both the classic small disturbance linearized fluid-structure interface boundary condition and the exact nonlinear boundary condition. The aeroelastic model which includes the nonlinear boundary conditions also includes a free wake solution. Several reduced order methods are explored. Normal mode solutions, both for the structural and aerodynamic models, are studied along with a proper orthogonal decomposition model for the aerodynamic flow. A brief description of a parallel implementation of the aeroelastic simulation code is also given and the parallel speedup is shown to be nearly linear for a certain class of problems. Correlation between theory and experiment is presented for both the delta wing and flapping flag model. Several steady angle of attack cases were investigated for the

  8. Field experimental observations of highly graded sediment plumes.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jacob Hjelmager; Saremi, Sina; Jimenez, Carlos; Hadjioannou, Louis

    2015-06-15

    A field experiment in the waters off the south-eastern coast of Cyprus was carried out to study near-field formation of sediment plumes from dumping. Different loads of sediment were poured into calm and limpid waters one at the time from just above the sea surface. The associated plumes, gravitating towards the seafloor, were filmed simultaneously by four divers situated at different depths in the water column, and facing the plume at different angles. The processes were captured using GoPro-Hero-series cameras. The high-quality underwater footage from near-surface, mid-depth and near-bed positions gives unique insight into the dynamics of the descending plume and near-field dispersion processes, and enables good understanding of flow and sediment transport processes involved from-release-to-deposition of the load in a non-scaled environment. The high resolution images and footages are available through the link provided herein. Observations support the development of a detailed multi-fractional sediment plume model. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Experimental Study of Lift-Generated Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J.; Nixon, David (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The flow fields of vortices, whether bouyancy-driven or lift-generated, are fascinating fluid-dynamic phenomena which often possess intense swirl velocities and complex time-dependent behavior. As part of the on-going study of vortex behavior, this paper presents a historical overview of the research conducted on the structure and modification of the vortices generated by the lifting surfaces of subsonic transport aircraft. It is pointed out that the characteristics of lift-generated vortices are related to the aerodynamic shapes that produce them and that various arrangements of surfaces can be used to produce different vortex structures. The primary purpose of the research to be described is to find a way to reduce the hazard potential of lift-generated vortices shed by subsonic transport aircraft in the vicinity of airports during landing and takeoff operations. It is stressed that lift-generated vortex wakes are so complex that progress towards a solution requires application of a combined theoretical and experimental research program because either alone often leads to incorrect conclusions. It is concluded that a satisfactory aerodynamic solution to the wake-vortex problem at airports has not yet been found but a reduction in the impact of the wake-vortex hazard on airport capacity may become available in the foreseeable future through wake-vortex avoidance concepts currently under study. The material to be presented in this overview is drawn from aerospace journals that are available publicly.

  10. An improved mixed numerical-experimental method for stress field calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, H. M. R.; Guedes, R. M.; Vaz, M. A.

    2007-07-01

    In this work a numerical-experimental method is used to study the dynamic behavior of an aluminum plate subjected to a small mass impact. The out-of-plane displacements, due to transient bending wave propagation, were assessed for successive time instants, using double pulse TV-holography, also known as pulsed ESPI. The experimental setup and the image processing methods were improved to allow the calculation of the plate transient stress field. Integral transforms are used to obtain the strain fields from spatial derivatives of displacements noisy data. A numerical simulation of the plate transient response was carried out with FEM Ansys ®. For this purpose a PZT transducer was used to record the impact force history, which was inputted in the numerical model. Finally, the comparisons between numerical and experimental results are presented in order to validate the present methodology.

  11. Experimental Treatment for Burn Victims in Field Hospitals.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-01

    useful as reported in the literature for the in vitro study of human skin graft rejection 1191 adaptation of the published assay to guinea pig cells can...FIELD HOSPITALS In Annual/Final Report Iv I.V. Yannas and E.M. Skrabut " D T r August 1985 ELECTE JAN 0 WE Supported by D U.S. ARMY MEDICAL RESEARCH AND...for public release; distributi(n unlimited LD wA-J LThe findings in this report are not to be construed as an official Department of the Army position

  12. Experimental and field investigations on uprooting of riparian vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvani, Giulio; Francalanci, Simona; Solari, Luca; Gumiero, Bruna

    2017-04-01

    The morphology of a river reach is the result of many processes involving the motion of sediment (erosion, transport and deposition), the hydrological regime and the development and growth of vegetation. River evolution in the presence of vegetation depends on establishment of pioneer woody riparian seedlings on bars, and consequently on either their survival or death. Flooding events can cause young vegetation mortality by uprooting (Corenblit et al., 2007). These processes, despite their important implications on river morphodynamics, have been poorly investigated in the past. Most of previous research focused on the mechanism of root breakage and on measuring the vegetation resistance to uprooting in the vertical direction, while few works considered the effect of flow direction on the uprooting process (Bywater-Reyes et al., 2015). In this work, we focused on vegetation uprooting due to flow and to bed erosion. We considered two different types of vegetation: Avena Sativa, grown from seeds in external boxes, was used to investigate instantaneous uprooting, and Salix Purpurea, collected in the field, for delayed uprooting (namely type I and type II mechanisms, according to Edmaier et al., 2011). The experiments were carried out in a 5 m long flume in the Hydraulic Laboratory in Florence. A 2 m long mobile bed was build inside the flume, and vegetation was arranged according to several configurations on it. Both types of vegetation were subject to constant discharges to investigate the effects of a general bed degradation in modifying the occurrence of uprooting. We also performed some experiments with Avena Sativa located in a fixed bed and subjected to an increasing flow discharge in order to simulate instantaneous uprooting due to the action of hydrodynamic forces. We measured flow velocity, flow discharge and water depth and characterized vegetation by stem and root diameter, height and root length. The experimental results have been interpreted in terms of a

  13. An experimental study on pedestrian classification.

    PubMed

    Munder, S; Gavrila, D M

    2006-11-01

    Detecting people in images is key for several important application domains in computer vision. This paper presents an in-depth experimental study on pedestrian classification; multiple feature-classifier combinations are examined with respect to their ROC performance and efficiency. We investigate global versus local and adaptive versus nonadaptive features, as exemplified by PCA coefficients, Haar wavelets, and local receptive fields (LRFs). In terms of classifiers, we consider the popular Support Vector Machines (SVMs), feed-forward neural networks, and k-nearest neighbor classifier. Experiments are performed on a large data set consisting of 4,000 pedestrian and more than 25,000 nonpedestrian (labeled) images captured in outdoor urban environments. Statistically meaningful results are obtained by analyzing performance variances caused by varying training and test sets. Furthermore, we investigate how classification performance and training sample size are correlated. Sample size is adjusted by increasing the number of manually labeled training data or by employing automatic bootstrapping or cascade techniques. Our experiments show that the novel combination of SVMs with LRF features performs best. A boosted cascade of Haar wavelets can, however, reach quite competitive results, at a fraction of computational cost. The data set used in this paper is made public, establishing a benchmark for this important problem.

  14. Experimental study on feedback control system of plasma position

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, M.; Otsuka, M.; Nishi, M.; Kanamori, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Uchikawa, S.

    1981-01-01

    Performance of the feedback control system for the horizontal plasma position in the small shell-less tokamak, HT-1, has been studied numerically and experimentally. Emphasis was put on verifying the validity of coupling parameter evaluation methods for poloidal field coils and structures such as the vaccum vessel and the transformer iron core. The effect of the iron core on the poloidal field distribution was analyzed numerically. Mutual inductances between poloidal field coils and structures were obtained from the calculated eddy currents. Using these calculated parameters, the indicial response of the feedback control loop was studied analytically. Good agreement between calculations and experiments was obtained.

  15. (Studies in quantum field theory)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    During the period 4/1/89--3/31/90 the theoretical physics group supported by Department of Energy Contract No. AC02-78ER04915.A015 and consisting of Professors Bender and Shrauner, Associate Professor Papanicolaou, Assistant Professor Ogilvie, and Senior Research Associate Visser has made progress in many areas of theoretical and mathematical physics. Professors Bender and Shrauner, Associate Professor Papanicolaou, Assistant Professor Ogilvie, and Research Associate Visser are currently conducting research in many areas of high energy theoretical and mathematical physics. These areas include: strong-coupling approximation; classical solutions of non-Abelian gauge theories; mean-field approximation in quantum field theory; path integral and coherent state representations in quantum field theory; lattice gauge calculations; the nature of perturbation theory in large order; quark condensation in QCD; chiral symmetry breaking; the 1/N expansion in quantum field theory; effective potential and action in quantum field theories, including OCD; studies of the early universe and inflation, and quantum gravity.

  16. Experimental Investigation of Effectiveness of Magnetic Field on Food Freezing Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Toru; Takeuchi, Yuri; Masuda, Kazunori; Watanabe, Manabu; Shirakashi, Ryo; Fukuda, Yutaka; Tsuruta, Takaharu; Yamamoto, Kazutaka; Koga, Nobumitsu; Hiruma, Naoya; Ichioka, Jun; Takai, Kiyoshi

    Recently, several food refrigeration equipments that utilize magnetic field have attracted much attention from food production companies, consumers and mass media. However, the effectiveness of the freezers is not scientifically examined. Therefore, the effectiveness should be clarified by experiments or theoretical considerations. In this study, the effect of weak magnetic field (about 0.0005 T) on freezing process of several kinds of foods was investigated by using a specially designed freezer facilitated with magnetic field generator. The investigation included the comparison of freezing curves, drip amount, physicochemical evaluations on color and texture, observation of microstructure, and sensory evaluation. From the results of the control experiments, it can be concluded that weak magnetic field around 0.0005 T provided no significant difference on temperature history during freezing and on the qualities of frozen foods, within our experimental conditions.

  17. The importance of accurate experimental data to marginal field development

    SciTech Connect

    Overa, S.J.; Lingelem, M.N.

    1997-12-31

    Since exploration started in the Norwegian North Sea in 1965 a total of 196 fields have been discovered. Less than one-third of these fields have been developed. The marginal fields can not be developed economically with current technology even though some of those fields have significant reserves. The total cost to develop one of those large installations is estimated to be 2--5 billion US dollars. Therefore new technology is needed to lower the designed and installed costs of each unit. The need for new physical property data is shown. The value of valid operating data from present units is also pointed out.

  18. Experimental Visualization of Bubble Formation from an Orifice In Microgravity in the Presence of Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, C.; Iacona, E.; Foldes, I. B.; Suner, G.; Milburn, C.

    2002-01-01

    The formation of air bubbles injected into a stagnant, isothermal liquid in microgravity through an orifice was studied. The bubbles grew very large in microgravity. They attained a nearly spherical shape and showed pronounced affinity towards coalescence in the absence of electric fields and other perturbations. Under the influence of electric fields, periodic detachment was observed, with bubble sizes larger than in terrestrial conditions. The bubble shape was elongated. After detachment, the bubbles moved away from the electrode at which they formed without coalescing with other bubbles. Experimental data on bubble shape and size at detachment showed good agreement with models.

  19. Experimental Visualization of Bubble Formation from an Orifice In Microgravity in the Presence of Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, C.; Iacona, E.; Foldes, I. B.; Suner, G.; Milburn, C.

    2002-01-01

    The formation of air bubbles injected into a stagnant, isothermal liquid in microgravity through an orifice was studied. The bubbles grew very large in microgravity. They attained a nearly spherical shape and showed pronounced affinity towards coalescence in the absence of electric fields and other perturbations. Under the influence of electric fields, periodic detachment was observed, with bubble sizes larger than in terrestrial conditions. The bubble shape was elongated. After detachment, the bubbles moved away from the electrode at which they formed without coalescing with other bubbles. Experimental data on bubble shape and size at detachment showed good agreement with models.

  20. Test of Scintillometer Saturation Correction Methods Using Field Experimental Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleissl, J.; Hartogensis, O. K.; Gomez, J. D.

    2010-12-01

    Saturation of large aperture scintillometer (LAS) signals can result in sensible heat flux measurements that are biased low. A field study with LASs of different aperture sizes and path lengths was performed to investigate the onset of, and corrections for, signal saturation. Saturation already occurs at {C_n^2 ≈ 0.074 D^{5/3} λ^{1/3} L^{-8/3}}, where {C_n^2} is the structure parameter of the refractive index, D is the aperture size, λ is the wavelength, L is the transect length, which is smaller than theoretically derived saturation limits. At a transect length of 1 km, a height of 2.5 m, and aperture ≈0.15 m the correction factor exceeds 5% already at {C_n^2=2× 10^{-12}m^{-2/3}}, which will affect many practical applications of scintillometry. The Clifford correction method, which only depends on {C_n^2} and the transect geometry, provides good saturation corrections over the range of conditions observed in our study. The saturation correction proposed by Ochs and Hill results in correction factors that are too small in large saturation regimes. An inner length scale dependence of the saturation correction factor was not observed. Thus for practical applications the Clifford correction method should be applied.

  1. Experimental evidence for seismoelectric observations at field scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzhauer, Julia; Yaramanci, Ugur

    2010-05-01

    In the past decades, seismoelectric has concentrated a growing interest as a promising tool for hydrogeophysical studies. Resulting from an electrokinetic coupling in porous saturated media traversed by an acoustic wave, this method could ultimately offer a direct access to various hydraulic parameters ranging from porosity to permeability or fluids conductivity. In some other aspects it also occasionally showed some ability to thin-layer resolution. Within the development of the new test-site Schillerslage with typical north-German geology, consisting of two shallow quaternary aquifers separated by a till layer over cretaceous marl, we tested the observability of the seismoelectric signal along with various conventional (seismic, georadar, geoelectric) and unconventional (magnetic resonance sounding -MRS, spectral induced polarisation -SIP) geophysical methods as well as boreholes analysis. The special focus was on the converted seismoelectric signal, an electromagnetic wave acting as a vertical dipole which should theoretically display on the seismoelectrogram as a horizontal arrival. This converted wave appears when the incident acoustic wave meets a hydraulic discontinuity affecting the pore space in any geometrical or chemical manner. This electromagnetic signal fades out rapidly, due to its dipole nature and its weakness, so that its relevance is restricted to the near surface characterisation. In the given setting, such a wave could either initiate at the water table or originate from an abrupt transition from sand to till. Decision was made to record both seismic and seismoelectric signal concomitantly. To allow the detection of the later signal, the field layout was gradually adjusted. Considering the source, hammer-seismic was chosen for its precision in near surface application and automatic trigger-techniques producing major disturbances in the first 10 ms of the seismoelectrogram were abandoned in favour of manual triggering. To avoid any further noise

  2. An Experimental Study of Thrust Augmenting Ejectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    A , AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF THRUST AUG’XENTING EJECTORS THESIS William D. Lewis Captain 11. S. Army AFIT/GAE/Ai/83D- 13 1 DTIC Li~i ELECTE JANI...83D-13 AN LEPERIMENTAL STUDY OF THRUST AUG-M..TING EJECTORS "l•HSIS William D. Levis Captain U. S. Army AF1T/GAAE/AA/$3D- 13 ’jK Approved for public...release; distribution unliaited I V .,, AFIT/GAE/AA/83D- 13 AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF THRUST AUGMENTING EJECTORS THESIS Presented to *he Faculty of the

  3. EDF field operation computerization study

    SciTech Connect

    Guillot, L.; Pirus, D.

    2006-07-01

    The main control room has been the subject of extensive research and actions into improved operations assistance. On the other hand, few studies concern the need for field operation improvements, which have few assistance resources adapted to working requirements. Why? Past studies have shown the inability of technology to assume job constraints (insufficient screen readability, excessive equipment weight, prohibitive response times). Nevertheless, today new technologies can be adapted to field operations, and they justify further study. Real needs exist: local operations are often complex and are led in difficult environments where conditions prevent the use of paper-based documents. The issue is a significant risk of error which might impact plant reliability. The cumbersome nature of paper procedures, the working environment and the operational feed-back of experience led us to concentrate on the field operation to identify how it may be improved by the use of these new technologies. Such equipment would allow a better traceability and quality of actions. Possibility of communications with other plant personnel and information sharing may be also immediately available for all. This paper presents a study which intends to collect assistance requirements through an analysis of working practices and organizations with local personnel. Our aim is to identify which of those might benefit from IT support. This collection was obtained through interviews and observations. These two methods helped us to define potential needs, constraints and consequences for work organization. This paper presents the study results and findings, identifies professions which may benefit from the use of wearable computers and describes how the reliability and efficiency of human actions would be improved. Finally we identify design requirements and criteria to be used for writing the technical specifications for a test prototype. (authors)

  4. Theoretical and experimental studies of elementary physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bodek, A.; Ferbel, T.; Melissinos, A.C.; Olsen, S.; Slattery, P.; Tipton, P.; Das, A.; Hagen, C.R.; Rajeev, S.G.; Okubo, S.

    1992-04-30

    The experimental high energy physics program is directed toward the execution of experiments that probe the basic constituents of matter and the forces between them. These experiments are carried out at national and international accelerator facilities. At the current time, we are primarily concentrating on the following projects: Direct photon production in hadronic reactions (Fermilab E706); Production of hybrid mesons in the nuclear Coulomb field; The D-Zero experiment at the Tevatron collider; Deep inelastic neutrino- and electron-nucleon scattering at FNAL and SLAC; Nonlinear QED at critical field strengths at SLAC; The Experiments at KEK (AMY, 17keV neutrino); The CDF experiment at the Tevatron collider; and SSC-related detector R D on scintillating tile- and diamond-based calorimetry and microstrip tracking detectors.

  5. Influence of a stationary magnetic field on water relations in lettuce seeds. Part II: experimental results.

    PubMed

    Reina, F G; Pascual, L A; Fundora, I A

    2001-12-01

    An experimental study on water absorption by lettuce seeds previously treated in a stationary magnetic field of 0-10 mT is presented. A significant increase in the rate with which the seeds absorb water is observed in the interval 0-10 mT of magnetic treatment. An increment in the total mass of absorbed water in this interval is also observed. These results are consistent with the reports on the increase of germination rate of the seeds, and the theoretical calculation of the variations induced by magnetic fields in the ionic currents across the cellular membrane. The fields originate in changes in the ionic concentration and thus in the osmotic pressure which regulates the entrance of water to the seeds. The good correlation between the theoretical approach and experimental results provides strong evidence that the magnetic field alters the water relations in seeds, and this effect may be the explanation of the reported alterations in germination rate of seeds by the magnetic field.

  6. Experimental comparison of ring and diamond shaped planar Hall effect bridge magnetic field sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksen, Anders Dahl; Rizzi, Giovanni; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2015-09-01

    Planar Hall effect magnetic field sensors with ring and diamond shaped geometries are experimentally compared with respect to their magnetic field sensitivity and total signal variation. Theoretically, diamond shaped sensors are predicted to be 41% more sensitive than corresponding ring shaped sensors for negligible shape anisotropy. To experimentally validate this, we have fabricated both sensor geometries in the exchange-biased stack Ni80Fe20(tFM)/Cu(tCu)/Mn80Ir20(10 nm) with tFM=10 , 20, and 30 nm and tCu=0 , 0.3, and 0.6 nm. Sensors from each stack were characterized by external magnetic field sweeps, which were analyzed in terms of a single domain model. The total signal variation of the diamond sensors was generally found to be about 40% higher than that for the ring sensors in agreement with theoretical predictions. However, for the low-field sensitivity, the corresponding improvement varied from 0% to 35% where the largest improvement was observed for sensor stacks with comparatively strong exchange bias. This is explained by the ring sensors being less affected by shape anisotropy than the diamond sensors. To study the effect of shape anisotropy, we also characterized sensors that were surrounded by the magnetic stack with a small gap of 3 μm. These sensors were found to be less affected by shape anisotropy and thus showed higher low-field sensitivities.

  7. Determining Pressure and Velocity Fields from Experimental Schlieren Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Frank M.; Allshouse, Michael R.; Morrison, P. J.; Swinney, Harry L.

    2015-11-01

    Internal gravity waves generated by tidal flow over bottom topography in the ocean are important because they contribute significantly to the energy composition of the ocean. Determination of the instantaneous internal wave energy flux requires knowledge of the pressure and velocity fields, each of which is difficult to measure in the ocean or the laboratory. However, the density perturbation field can be measured using a laboratory technique known as ``synthetic schlieren.'' We present an analytical method for deducing both the pressure and velocity fields from the density perturbation field. This yields the instantaneous energy flux of linear internal waves. Our method is verified in tests with data from a Navier-Stokes direct numerical simulation. The method is then applied to laboratory schlieren data obtained for the conditions in the numerical simulations. MRA and HLS were supported by ONR. FML and PJM supported by DOE contract DE-FG02-04ER-54742.

  8. Experimental and Modeling Studies of Massif Anorthosites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longhi, John

    1999-01-01

    This termination report covers the latter part of a single research effort spanning several grant cycles. During this time there was a single title, "Experimental and Modeling Studies of Massif Anorthosites", but there were several contract numbers as the mode and location of NASA contract administration changed. Initially, the project was funded as an increment to the PI's other grant, "Early Differentiation of the Moon: Experimental and Modeling Studies", but subsequently it became an independent grant. Table 1 contains a brief summary of the dates and contract numbers.

  9. Experimental and computational studies of dynamic stall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, L. W.; Platzer, M. F.; Chandrasekhara, M. S.; Ekaterinaris, J.

    1989-01-01

    A review of dynamic stall research in progress under the Navy-NASA Joint Institute of Aeronautics is presented. This effort, which includes both experimental and computational studies of the dynamic stall process, is directed toward better understanding and modeling of the fluid flow that occurs on helicopters and aircraft flying in conditions that induce dynamic stall. The results of research now in progress are presented, with discussion of the experimental program on compressibility effects on dynamic stall, related CFD studies of the stall process based on Navier-Stokes modeling, and viscous-inviscid flow modeling of the incipient stall process.

  10. Experimental Problem Solving: An Instructional Improvement Field Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, John A.; Maynes, Florence J.

    1983-01-01

    An instructional program based on expert-novice differences in experimental problem-solving performance was taught to grade six students (N=265). Performance was assessed with multiple-choice and open-ended measures of specific transfer. Between-group comparisons using pretest scores as covariate showed treatment condition students consistently…

  11. Experimental and theoretical investigation of implantable cardiac pacemaker exposed to low frequency magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Babouri, A; Hedjeidj, A; Guendouz, L

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents in vitro investigation of an implantable cardiac pacemaker exposed to low frequency magnetic fields. The method used in this study is based on the interaction by inductive coupling through the loop formed by the pacemaker and its loads and the surrounding medium. This interaction results in an induced electromotive force between the terminals of the pacemaker, which can potentially disturb its operation. The studied frequencies are 50/60 Hz and 10/25 kHz. The experimental tests were carried out on several cardiac pacemakers, single chamber, and dual chamber. The results show a window effect of the detection circuits of cardiac pacemakers for the four studied frequencies. The modelling of the test bed requires studying the effects of the induced currents generated by the application of a magnetic field. Analytical calculations and Numerical simulations were carried out. We modelled the interactions of the magnetic field with a simplified representation of pacemaker embedded in the medium. The comparison of the results in the air and in vitro enabled us to make an equivalent electric model. The results obtained in experimental and theoretical studies allowed us to validate the test bed. The method applied is valid for other medical implants such as cardiac defibrillators, implant hearing aids system...etc.

  12. Plant Taxonomy as a Field Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalby, D. H.

    1970-01-01

    Suggests methods of teaching plant identification and taxonomic theory using keys, statistical analyses, and biometrics. Population variation, genotype- environment interaction and experimental taxonomy are used in laboratory and field. (AL)

  13. Plant Taxonomy as a Field Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalby, D. H.

    1970-01-01

    Suggests methods of teaching plant identification and taxonomic theory using keys, statistical analyses, and biometrics. Population variation, genotype- environment interaction and experimental taxonomy are used in laboratory and field. (AL)

  14. Experimental studies of mechanical joints by automated grating (moire) interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dymny, G.; Kujawinska, M.; Salbut, L.; Boronski, D.

    2005-06-01

    Current design, analysis and control engineering applications require effective experimental methodologies and tools for determination of displacement and strain fields as well as material characterization. One of the most important problem in engineering objects is proper design and quality of joints between elements in the form of welds, glued and riveted joints and many others. Specificly the fatigue and fracture mechanics problems in joints are difficult to analyze numerically, therefore they need experimental support. In the paper we present the results of static, dynamic and fatigue experiments performed by grating (moire) interferometry systems. These full-field optical extensometers provide information about in-plane displacement field (u,v) and strain fields (ɛx, ɛy, γxy) in the region of a joint subjected to various modes of loads. It is shown that proper design of full-field extensometer (insensitivity to vibration, good quality of interferogram, automatic analysis of long series of interferograms) allows to use it efficiently directly at conventional loading machine in workshop environment and for long term fatigue tests. In the paper we present results of studies of: conventional laser welds (static, fatigue tests), friction stir weld (static tests), riveted joint (static, fatigue tests). The methodology of determination of local material constants in different zones of a joint (inc. Poisson ratio, Young"s modulus) is given. The future trends in hybrid experimental-numerical analysis of joints in conventional and novel material are discussed.

  15. Experimental Approaches to Studying Biological Electron Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Robert A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Provides an overview on biological electron-transfer reactions, summarizing what is known about how distance, spatial organization, medium, and other factors affect electron transfer. Experimental approaches, including studies of bimolecular electron transfer reactions (electrostatic effects and precursor complexes), are considered. (JN)

  16. Computational and experimental analysis of TMS-induced electric field vectors critical to neuronal activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieg, Todd D.; Salinas, Felipe S.; Narayana, Shalini; Fox, Peter T.; Mogul, David J.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) represents a powerful technique to noninvasively modulate cortical neurophysiology in the brain. However, the relationship between the magnetic fields created by TMS coils and neuronal activation in the cortex is still not well-understood, making predictable cortical activation by TMS difficult to achieve. Our goal in this study was to investigate the relationship between induced electric fields and cortical activation measured by blood flow response. Particularly, we sought to discover the E-field characteristics that lead to cortical activation. Approach. Subject-specific finite element models (FEMs) of the head and brain were constructed for each of six subjects using magnetic resonance image scans. Positron emission tomography (PET) measured each subject’s cortical response to image-guided robotically-positioned TMS to the primary motor cortex. FEM models that employed the given coil position, orientation, and stimulus intensity in experimental applications of TMS were used to calculate the electric field (E-field) vectors within a region of interest for each subject. TMS-induced E-fields were analyzed to better understand what vector components led to regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) responses recorded by PET. Main results. This study found that decomposing the E-field into orthogonal vector components based on the cortical surface geometry (and hence, cortical neuron directions) led to significant differences between the regions of cortex that were active and nonactive. Specifically, active regions had significantly higher E-field components in the normal inward direction (i.e., parallel to pyramidal neurons in the dendrite-to-axon orientation) and in the tangential direction (i.e., parallel to interneurons) at high gradient. In contrast, nonactive regions had higher E-field vectors in the outward normal direction suggesting inhibitory responses. Significance. These results provide critical new

  17. Computational and experimental analysis of TMS-induced electric field vectors critical to neuronal activation.

    PubMed

    Krieg, Todd D; Salinas, Felipe S; Narayana, Shalini; Fox, Peter T; Mogul, David J

    2015-08-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) represents a powerful technique to noninvasively modulate cortical neurophysiology in the brain. However, the relationship between the magnetic fields created by TMS coils and neuronal activation in the cortex is still not well-understood, making predictable cortical activation by TMS difficult to achieve. Our goal in this study was to investigate the relationship between induced electric fields and cortical activation measured by blood flow response. Particularly, we sought to discover the E-field characteristics that lead to cortical activation. Subject-specific finite element models (FEMs) of the head and brain were constructed for each of six subjects using magnetic resonance image scans. Positron emission tomography (PET) measured each subject's cortical response to image-guided robotically-positioned TMS to the primary motor cortex. FEM models that employed the given coil position, orientation, and stimulus intensity in experimental applications of TMS were used to calculate the electric field (E-field) vectors within a region of interest for each subject. TMS-induced E-fields were analyzed to better understand what vector components led to regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) responses recorded by PET. This study found that decomposing the E-field into orthogonal vector components based on the cortical surface geometry (and hence, cortical neuron directions) led to significant differences between the regions of cortex that were active and nonactive. Specifically, active regions had significantly higher E-field components in the normal inward direction (i.e., parallel to pyramidal neurons in the dendrite-to-axon orientation) and in the tangential direction (i.e., parallel to interneurons) at high gradient. In contrast, nonactive regions had higher E-field vectors in the outward normal direction suggesting inhibitory responses. These results provide critical new understanding of the factors by which TMS induces cortical

  18. EBTS:DESIGN AND EXPERIMENTAL STUDY.

    SciTech Connect

    PIKIN,A.; ALESSI,J.; BEEBE,E.; KPONOU,A.; PRELEC,K.; KUZNETSOV,G.; TIUNOV,M.

    2000-11-06

    Experimental study of the BNL Electron Beam Test Stand (EBTS), which is a prototype of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), is currently underway. The basic physics and engineering aspects of a high current EBIS implemented in EBTS are outlined and construction of its main systems is presented. Efficient transmission of a 10 A electron beam through the ion trap has been achieved. Experimental results on generation of multiply charged ions with both continuous gas and external ion injection confirm stable operation of the ion trap.

  19. Experimental Treatment of Burn Victims in Field Hospitals.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-28

    procedures of biochemistry and polymer chemisty. One of these analogs, a highly porous collagen-glycosaminoglycan (CG) copolymer has been tested on over 100...Several methods were experimentally tested before designing a monolayer panning technique. The panning technique was based on the use of a monoclonal...antigen in humans. However, the efficacy of the method was not conclusively tested with the guinea pig model due to eventual lack of evidence that the

  20. Field enhancement factor dependence on electric field and implications on microscale gas breakdown: Theory and experimental interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alejandro Buendia, Jose; Venkattraman, Ayyaswamy

    2015-12-01

    In this letter, we obtain a better understanding of effective field enhancement factors (β eff) in the context of microscale gas breakdown with specific emphasis on its dependence on applied electric field. The theoretical dependence of β eff on electric field for various hemi-ellipsoidal asperities indicates that the value of β eff decreases with increasing electric field. The interpretation of experimental data using a typical one-dimensional modified Paschen law indicates a qualitatively similar electric field dependence even though the data could not be completely explained using a single effective asperity size. The values of β eff extracted from seven independent experimental datasets for microscale breakdown of argon and air are shown to be consistent and an empirical dependence on electric field is determined.

  1. Experimental Identification of Electric Field Excitation Mechanisms in a Structural Transition of Tokamak Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Itoh, K.; Ido, T.; Kamiya, K.; Itoh, S.-I.; Miura, Y.; Nagashima, Y.; Fujisawa, A.; Inagaki, S.; Ida, K.; Hoshino, K.

    2016-08-01

    Self-regulation between structure and turbulence, which is a fundamental process in the complex system, has been widely regarded as one of the central issues in modern physics. A typical example of that in magnetically confined plasmas is the Low confinement mode to High confinement mode (L-H) transition, which is intensely studied for more than thirty years since it provides a confinement improvement necessary for the realization of the fusion reactor. An essential issue in the L-H transition physics is the mechanism of the abrupt “radial” electric field generation in toroidal plasmas. To date, several models for the L-H transition have been proposed but the systematic experimental validation is still challenging. Here we report the systematic and quantitative model validations of the radial electric field excitation mechanism for the first time, using a data set of the turbulence and the radial electric field having a high spatiotemporal resolution. Examining time derivative of Poisson’s equation, the sum of the loss-cone loss current and the neoclassical bulk viscosity current is found to behave as the experimentally observed radial current that excites the radial electric field within a few factors of magnitude.

  2. Experimental Identification of Electric Field Excitation Mechanisms in a Structural Transition of Tokamak Plasmas

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, T.; Itoh, K.; Ido, T.; Kamiya, K.; Itoh, S.-I.; Miura, Y.; Nagashima, Y.; Fujisawa, A.; Inagaki, S.; Ida, K.; Hoshino, K.

    2016-01-01

    Self-regulation between structure and turbulence, which is a fundamental process in the complex system, has been widely regarded as one of the central issues in modern physics. A typical example of that in magnetically confined plasmas is the Low confinement mode to High confinement mode (L-H) transition, which is intensely studied for more than thirty years since it provides a confinement improvement necessary for the realization of the fusion reactor. An essential issue in the L-H transition physics is the mechanism of the abrupt “radial” electric field generation in toroidal plasmas. To date, several models for the L-H transition have been proposed but the systematic experimental validation is still challenging. Here we report the systematic and quantitative model validations of the radial electric field excitation mechanism for the first time, using a data set of the turbulence and the radial electric field having a high spatiotemporal resolution. Examining time derivative of Poisson’s equation, the sum of the loss-cone loss current and the neoclassical bulk viscosity current is found to behave as the experimentally observed radial current that excites the radial electric field within a few factors of magnitude. PMID:27489128

  3. Experimental Identification of Electric Field Excitation Mechanisms in a Structural Transition of Tokamak Plasmas.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Itoh, K; Ido, T; Kamiya, K; Itoh, S-I; Miura, Y; Nagashima, Y; Fujisawa, A; Inagaki, S; Ida, K; Hoshino, K

    2016-08-04

    Self-regulation between structure and turbulence, which is a fundamental process in the complex system, has been widely regarded as one of the central issues in modern physics. A typical example of that in magnetically confined plasmas is the Low confinement mode to High confinement mode (L-H) transition, which is intensely studied for more than thirty years since it provides a confinement improvement necessary for the realization of the fusion reactor. An essential issue in the L-H transition physics is the mechanism of the abrupt "radial" electric field generation in toroidal plasmas. To date, several models for the L-H transition have been proposed but the systematic experimental validation is still challenging. Here we report the systematic and quantitative model validations of the radial electric field excitation mechanism for the first time, using a data set of the turbulence and the radial electric field having a high spatiotemporal resolution. Examining time derivative of Poisson's equation, the sum of the loss-cone loss current and the neoclassical bulk viscosity current is found to behave as the experimentally observed radial current that excites the radial electric field within a few factors of magnitude.

  4. Numerical and Experimental Determination of the Geometric Far Field for Round Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, L. Danielle; Bridges, James; Brown, Cliff; Khavaran, Abbas

    2003-01-01

    To reduce ambiguity in the reporting of far field jet noise, three round jets operating at subsonic conditions have recently been studied at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The goal of the investigation was to determine the location of the geometric far field both numerically and experimentally. The combination of the WIND Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes solver and the MGBK jet noise prediction code was used for the computations, and the experimental data was collected in the Aeroacoustic Propulsion Laboratory. While noise sources are distributed throughout the jet plume, at great distances from the nozzle the noise will appear to be emanating from a point source and the assumption of linear propagation is valid. Closer to the jet, nonlinear propagation may be a problem, along with the known geometric issues. By comparing sound spectra at different distances from the jet, both from computational methods that assume linear propagation, and from experiments, the contributions of geometry and nonlinearity can be separately ascertained and the required measurement distance for valid experiments can be established. It is found that while the shortest arc considered here (approx. 8D) was already in the geometric far field for the high frequency sound (St greater than 2.0), the low frequency noise due to its extended source distribution reached the geometric far field at or about 50D. It is also found that sound spectra at far downstream angles does not strictly scale on Strouhal number, an observation that current modeling does not capture.

  5. Improved field experimental designs and quantitative evaluation of aquatic ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, D.H.; Thomas, J.M.

    1984-05-01

    The paired-station concept and a log transformed analysis of variance were used as methods to evaluate zooplankton density data collected during five years at an electrical generation station on Lake Michigan. To discuss the example and the field design necessary for a valid statistical analysis, considerable background is provided on the questions of selecting (1) sampling station pairs, (2) experimentwise error rates for multi-species analyses, (3) levels of Type I and II error rates, (4) procedures for conducting the field monitoring program, and (5) a discussion of the consequences of violating statistical assumptions. Details for estimating sample sizes necessary to detect changes of a specified magnitude are included. Both statistical and biological problems with monitoring programs (as now conducted) are addressed; serial correlation of successive observations in the time series obtained was identified as one principal statistical difficulty. The procedure reduces this problem to a level where statistical methods can be used confidently. 27 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  6. Optimization of Geometries for Experimental Searches of Chameleon Scalar Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skavysh, Vladimir; Arif, Muhammad; Shahi, Chandra; Haun, Robert; Snow, Mike; Li, Ke; Heacock, Benjamin; Young, Albert; Indiana Univeristy Team; National Institute of Standards; Technology Team; North Carolina State University Team

    2015-04-01

    The chameleon scalar field theory is a dynamic model of dark energy. This model is unique in that it gives predictions which can be tested in terrestrial experiments. Here, we consider the prediction that the chameleon field exacts a force on objects in vacuum. Due to symmetry of typical objects, this force is usually miniscule. However, the chameleon force on a single surface can be surprisingly large, which is why we investigate whether there exist geometries for which the net chameleon force on an object is large enough to be measured. Moreover, we consider multi-body systems, such as the setup of the high-frequency short-range gravity experiment at Indiana University (arXiv:hep-ph/0303057v2), which consists of three oscillating parallel plates.

  7. Experimental Measurement of the Flow Field of Heavy Trucks

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Browand; Charles Radovich

    2005-05-31

    Flat flaps that enclose the trailer base on the sides and top are known to reduce truck drag and reduce fuel consumption. Such flapped-truck geometries have been studied in laboratory wind tunnels and in field tests. A recent review of wind tunnel data for a variety of truck geometries and flow Reynolds numbers show roughly similar values of peak drag reduction, but differ in the determination of the optimum flap angle. Optimum angles lie in the range 12 degrees-20 degrees, and may be sensitive to Reynolds number and truck geometry. The present field test is undertaken to provide additional estimates of the magnitude of the savings to be expected on a typical truck for five flap angles 10, 13, 16, 19, and 22 degrees. The flaps are constructed from a fiberglass-epoxy-matrix material and are one-quarter of the base width in length (about 61 cm, or 2 feet). They are attached along the rear door hinge lines on either side of the trailer, so that no gap appears at the joint between the flap and the side of the trailer The flap angle is adjusted by means of two aluminum supports. The present test is performed on the NASA Crows Landing Flight Facility at the northern end of the San Joaquin valley in California. The main runway is approximately 2400 meters in length, and is aligned approximately in a north-south direction The test procedure is to make a series of runs starting at either end of the runway. All runs are initiated under computer control to accelerate the truck to a target speed of 60 mph (96 6 km/hr), to proceed at the target speed for a fixed distance, and to decelerate at the far end of the runway. During a run, the broadcast fuel rate, the engine rpm, forward speed, elapsed time--as well as several other parameters (10 in all)--are digitized at a rate of 100 digitizations per second. Various flapped-conditions are interspersed with the ''no flaps'' control, and are sequenced in a different order on different days. Approximately 310 runs are accumulated

  8. Prediction of sonic boom from experimental near-field overpressure data. Volume 1: Method and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glatt, C. R.; Hague, D. S.; Reiners, S. J.

    1975-01-01

    A computerized procedure for predicting sonic boom from experimental near-field overpressure data has been developed. The procedure extrapolates near-field pressure signatures for a specified flight condition to the ground by the Thomas method. Near-field pressure signatures are interpolated from a data base of experimental pressure signatures. The program is an independently operated ODIN (Optimal Design Integration) program which obtains flight path information from other ODIN programs or from input.

  9. Experimental and computational study of thaumasite structure

    SciTech Connect

    Scholtzová, Eva; Kucková, Lenka; Kožíšek, Jozef; Pálková, Helena; Tunega, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    The structure of thaumasite has been studied experimentally by means of a single crystal X-ray diffraction and FTIR methods, and theoretically using density functional theory (DFT) method. Very good agreement was achieved between calculated and experimental structural parameters. In addition, calculations offered the refinement of the positions of the hydrogen atoms. The detailed analysis of the hydrogen bonds existing in the thaumasite structure has been performed. Several types of hydrogen bonds have been classified. The water molecules coordinating Ca{sup 2+} cation act as proton donors in moderate O-H···O hydrogen bonds formed with CO₃⁻²and SO₄⁻² anions. The multiple O-H···O hydrogen bonds exist among water molecules themselves. Finally, relatively weak hydrogen bonds form water molecules with the OH groups from the coordination sphere of the Si(OH)₆⁻² anion. Further, calculated vibrational spectrum allowed complete assignment of all vibrational modes which are not available from the experimental spectrum that has a complex structure with overlapped bands, especially below 1500 cm⁻¹. Highlights: • The thaumasite structure was studied experimentally and using DFT method. • We used DFT method for the refinement of the positions of hydrogen atoms. • A detailed analysis of the hydrogen bonds was done. • A complete assignment of all bands to particular types of vibrations was done.

  10. Experimental Study of the Current Filamentation Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Brian; Muggli, Patric; Silva, Luis O.; Martins, Joana; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Fedurin, Mikhail; Kusche, Karl; Babzien, Marcus; Huang, Chengkun; Mori, Warren

    2012-10-01

    The Current Filamentation Instability (CFI) is of central importance for the propagation of relativistic electron beams in plasmas. CFI has potential relevance to astrophysics, afterglow of gamma ray bursts, inertial confinement fusion, energy transport in the fast-igniter concept, and places an upper limit on the plasma density and accelerating gradient in PWFA's. An experimental study at the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory with the 60MeV e^- beam and cm length plasma. The experiment included the systematic study and characterization of the instability as a function of the beam charge and plasma density. The transverse beam profile is measured directly at the plasma exit using OTR. Experimental results show the transition from plasma focusing to CFI near kpσr=1 characterized by the appearance of multiple (1-5) beam filaments and scaling of the transverse filament size with the plasma skin depth. Suppression of the instability is seen by lowering the growth rate of the instability by reducing the beam charge. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with theory and simulations and we present and discuss simulation and experimental results.

  11. Experimental investigation of the velocity field and skin friction for convecting vortex/boundary layer interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacRorie, Michael; Pauley, Wayne R.

    1993-01-01

    The interaction between propagating spanwise vortices and a turbulent boundary layer was studied experimentally. The experimental techniques include hotwire anemometry and smoke visualization. The results focus on the relationship between the passage of vortex structures and the response of the boundary layer in terms of unsteady mean velocity, wall shear, and turbulence quantities. Both positive and negative circulation vortices were studied at three different heights above the test surface. The results indicate that the height of the vortex above the surface has an effect on the wall shear response. However, vortex height and strength are related in this experiment. A phase lag between the passage of the vortex center and the peak wall shear stress response is demonstrated. This phase lag was found to increase with streamwise distance. An examination of the response of the mean and turbulent velocity fields in the boundary layer shows that the phase lag is confined to a region close to the wall.

  12. Microhabitat identity of two species of sheet-web spiders: field experimental demonstration.

    PubMed

    Toft, S

    1987-05-01

    Descriptive studies reveal that web-site characteristics of two sympatric species of sheet-web spiders, Linyphia triangularis and L. tenuipalpis are similar, even though their body sizes and web sizes are significantly different. The hypothesis of identical web-sites were tested by a species exchange experiment in the field. Here the residence times of adult females of each species released in webs of the other species were compared to the residence times of other females released in own species' webs. As there was no differences between the species-exchange series and the control series, the experimental results supported the conclusions of the descriptive studies. The utility of testing habitat parameter differences experimentally, and the significance of the results to the ecology of the species, in particular to their interspecific interactions, are discussed.

  13. Experimental analysis of the velocity field of the air flowing through the swirl diffusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaszczur, M.; Branny, M.; Karch, M.; Borowski, M.

    2016-09-01

    The article presents the results of experimental studies of flow of air through diffusers. Presented laboratory model is a simplification of the real system and was made in a geometric scale 1:10. Simplifying refer both to the geometry of the object and conditions of air flow. The aim of the study is to determine the actual velocity fields of air flowing out of the swirl diffuser. The results obtained for the diffuser various settings are presented. We have tested various flow rates of air. Stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (SPIV) method was used to measure all velocity vector components. The experimental results allow to determine the actual penetration depth of the supply air into the room. This will allow for better definition of the conditions of ventilation in buildings.

  14. Real versus Simulated Mobile Phone Exposures in Experimental Studies

    PubMed Central

    Panagopoulos, Dimitris J.; Johansson, Olle; Carlo, George L.

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether exposures to mobile phone radiation in biological/clinical experiments should be performed with real-life Electromagnetic Fields (EMFs) emitted by commercially available mobile phone handsets, instead of simulated EMFs emitted by generators or test phones. Real mobile phone emissions are constantly and unpredictably varying and thus are very different from simulated emissions which employ fixed parameters and no variability. This variability is an important parameter that makes real emissions more bioactive. Living organisms seem to have decreased defense against environmental stressors of high variability. While experimental studies employing simulated EMF-emissions present a strong inconsistency among their results with less than 50% of them reporting effects, studies employing real mobile phone exposures demonstrate an almost 100% consistency in showing adverse effects. This consistency is in agreement with studies showing association with brain tumors, symptoms of unwellness, and declines in animal populations. Average dosimetry in studies with real emissions can be reliable with increased number of field measurements, and variation in experimental outcomes due to exposure variability becomes less significant with increased number of experimental replications. We conclude that, in order for experimental findings to reflect reality, it is crucially important that exposures be performed by commercially available mobile phone handsets. PMID:26346766

  15. Real versus Simulated Mobile Phone Exposures in Experimental Studies.

    PubMed

    Panagopoulos, Dimitris J; Johansson, Olle; Carlo, George L

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether exposures to mobile phone radiation in biological/clinical experiments should be performed with real-life Electromagnetic Fields (EMFs) emitted by commercially available mobile phone handsets, instead of simulated EMFs emitted by generators or test phones. Real mobile phone emissions are constantly and unpredictably varying and thus are very different from simulated emissions which employ fixed parameters and no variability. This variability is an important parameter that makes real emissions more bioactive. Living organisms seem to have decreased defense against environmental stressors of high variability. While experimental studies employing simulated EMF-emissions present a strong inconsistency among their results with less than 50% of them reporting effects, studies employing real mobile phone exposures demonstrate an almost 100% consistency in showing adverse effects. This consistency is in agreement with studies showing association with brain tumors, symptoms of unwellness, and declines in animal populations. Average dosimetry in studies with real emissions can be reliable with increased number of field measurements, and variation in experimental outcomes due to exposure variability becomes less significant with increased number of experimental replications. We conclude that, in order for experimental findings to reflect reality, it is crucially important that exposures be performed by commercially available mobile phone handsets.

  16. Technical Note: Experimental results from a prototype high-field inline MRI-linac.

    PubMed

    Liney, G P; Dong, B; Begg, J; Vial, P; Zhang, K; Lee, F; Walker, A; Rai, R; Causer, T; Alnaghy, S J; Oborn, B M; Holloway, L; Metcalfe, P; Barton, M; Crozier, S; Keall, P

    2016-09-01

    The pursuit of real-time image guided radiotherapy using optimal tissue contrast has seen the development of several hybrid magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-treatment systems, high field and low field, and inline and perpendicular configurations. As part of a new MRI-linac program, an MRI scanner was integrated with a linear accelerator to enable investigations of a coupled inline MRI-linac system. This work describes results from a prototype experimental system to demonstrate the feasibility of a high field inline MR-linac. The magnet is a 1.5 T MRI system (Sonata, Siemens Healthcare) was located in a purpose built radiofrequency (RF) cage enabling shielding from and close proximity to a linear accelerator with inline (and future perpendicular) orientation. A portable linear accelerator (Linatron, Varian) was installed together with a multileaf collimator (Millennium, Varian) to provide dynamic field collimation and the whole assembly built onto a stainless-steel rail system. A series of MRI-linac experiments was performed to investigate (1) image quality with beam on measured using a macropodine (kangaroo) ex vivo phantom; (2) the noise as a function of beam state measured using a 6-channel surface coil array; and (3) electron contamination effects measured using Gafchromic film and an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). (1) Image quality was unaffected by the radiation beam with the macropodine phantom image with the beam on being almost identical to the image with the beam off. (2) Noise measured with a surface RF coil produced a 25% elevation of background intensity when the radiation beam was on. (3) Film and EPID measurements demonstrated electron focusing occurring along the centerline of the magnet axis. A proof-of-concept high-field MRI-linac has been built and experimentally characterized. This system has allowed us to establish the efficacy of a high field inline MRI-linac and study a number of the technical challenges and solutions.

  17. Boundary Layer Study. Experimental Validation Test Plan. Phase 4

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-01

    areas of experimental fluid mechanics, fiber technology, and control systems. During his four year activities in Owens - Corning Fiber Glass Technical...Flow and Temperature Fields of a Novel Fiberizing System - Owens - Corning Technical Report. 3. Direct Digital Control of the Flow Rate of an Electric...Melter - Owens - Corning Technical Report. 4. Numerical Study of the Flow of a Oravity Driven Non-Lsothermal Liquid Jet - Owens - Corning Technical Report

  18. An experimental study of the glottal jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasikova, Darina; Sidlof, Petr; Kotek, Michal; Kopecky, Vaclav

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents results of the flow field analysis in a static scaled model of human larynx. Here we are focused on the effect of the nozzle gap parameter and the incoming flow velocity. The study is performed in the aerodynamic channel using the PIV technique.

  19. Experimental Demonstration of Anomalous Field Enhancement in All-Dielectric Transition Magnetic Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingbo; Liu, Xiaoming; Zhou, Ji; Kudyshev, Zhaxylyk; Litchinitser, Natalia M

    2015-11-04

    Anomalous field enhancement accompanied by resonant absorption phenomenon was originally discussed in the context of plasma physics and in applications related to radio-communications between the ground and spacecraft returning to Earth. Indeed, there is a critical period of time when all communications are lost due to the reflection/absorption of electromagnetic waves by the sheath of plasma created by a high speed vehicle re-entering the atmosphere. While detailed experimental studies of these phenomena in space are challenging, the emergence of electromagnetic metamaterials enables researchers exceptional flexibility to study them in the laboratory environment. Here, we experimentally demonstrated the strong localized field enhancement of magnetic field for an electromagnetic wave propagating in Mie-resonance-based inhomogeneous metamaterials with magnetic permeability gradually changing from positive to negative values. Although these experiments were performed in the microwave frequency range, the proposed all-dielectric approach to transition metamaterials can be extended to terahertz, infrared, and visible frequencies. We anticipate that these results, besides most basic science aspects, hold the potential for numerous applications, including low-intensity nonlinear transformation optics, topological photonics, and the broader area of surface and interface science.

  20. Experimental Demonstration of Anomalous Field Enhancement in All-Dielectric Transition Magnetic Metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jingbo; Liu, Xiaoming; Zhou, Ji; Kudyshev, Zhaxylyk; Litchinitser, Natalia M.

    2015-01-01

    Anomalous field enhancement accompanied by resonant absorption phenomenon was originally discussed in the context of plasma physics and in applications related to radio-communications between the ground and spacecraft returning to Earth. Indeed, there is a critical period of time when all communications are lost due to the reflection/absorption of electromagnetic waves by the sheath of plasma created by a high speed vehicle re-entering the atmosphere. While detailed experimental studies of these phenomena in space are challenging, the emergence of electromagnetic metamaterials enables researchers exceptional flexibility to study them in the laboratory environment. Here, we experimentally demonstrated the strong localized field enhancement of magnetic field for an electromagnetic wave propagating in Mie-resonance-based inhomogeneous metamaterials with magnetic permeability gradually changing from positive to negative values. Although these experiments were performed in the microwave frequency range, the proposed all-dielectric approach to transition metamaterials can be extended to terahertz, infrared, and visible frequencies. We anticipate that these results, besides most basic science aspects, hold the potential for numerous applications, including low-intensity nonlinear transformation optics, topological photonics, and the broader area of surface and interface science. PMID:26531855

  1. Experimental Demonstration of Anomalous Field Enhancement in All-Dielectric Transition Magnetic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jingbo; Liu, Xiaoming; Zhou, Ji; Kudyshev, Zhaxylyk; Litchinitser, Natalia M.

    2015-11-01

    Anomalous field enhancement accompanied by resonant absorption phenomenon was originally discussed in the context of plasma physics and in applications related to radio-communications between the ground and spacecraft returning to Earth. Indeed, there is a critical period of time when all communications are lost due to the reflection/absorption of electromagnetic waves by the sheath of plasma created by a high speed vehicle re-entering the atmosphere. While detailed experimental studies of these phenomena in space are challenging, the emergence of electromagnetic metamaterials enables researchers exceptional flexibility to study them in the laboratory environment. Here, we experimentally demonstrated the strong localized field enhancement of magnetic field for an electromagnetic wave propagating in Mie-resonance-based inhomogeneous metamaterials with magnetic permeability gradually changing from positive to negative values. Although these experiments were performed in the microwave frequency range, the proposed all-dielectric approach to transition metamaterials can be extended to terahertz, infrared, and visible frequencies. We anticipate that these results, besides most basic science aspects, hold the potential for numerous applications, including low-intensity nonlinear transformation optics, topological photonics, and the broader area of surface and interface science.

  2. Feasibility study of the AOSTA experimental campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carta, M.; Blaise, P.; Bethaz, C.; Boccia, F.; Fabrizio, V.; Geslot, B.; Grossi, A.; Gruel, A.

    2016-03-01

    The reduction of the nuclear waste is one of the most important nuclear issues. The high radiotoxicity of the spent fuel is due to plutonium and some minor actinides (MAs) such as neptunium, americium and curium, above all. One way to reduce their hazard is to destroy by fission MAs in appropriate nuclear reactors. To allow the MAs destruction an important effort have been done on the nuclear data due to the poor knowledge in this field. In the framework of one of the NEA Expert Group on Integral Experiments for Minor Actinide Management an analysis of the feasibility of MAs irradiation campaign in the TAPIRO fast research reactor is carried out. This paper provides preliminary results obtained by calculations modelling the irradiation, in different TAPIRO irradiation channels, of some CEA samples coming from the French experimental campaign OSMOSE, loaded with different contents of MAs, in order to access, through particular peak spectrometry, to their capture cross section. On the basis of neutron transport calculation results, obtained by both deterministic and Monte Carlo methods, an estimate of the irradiated samples counting levels from the AOSTA (Activation of OSMOSE Samples in TAPIRO) experimental campaign is provided.

  3. Theoretical and experimental studies of reentry plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, M. G.; Kang, S.

    1973-01-01

    A viscous shock-layer analysis was developed and used to calculate nonequilibrium-flow species distributions in the plasma layer of the RAM vehicle. The theoretical electron-density results obtained are in good agreement with those measured in flight. A circular-aperture flush-mounted antenna was used to obtain a comparison between theoretical and experimental antenna admittance in the presence of ionized boundary layers of low collision frequency. The electron-temperature and electron-density distributions in the boundary layer were independently measured. The antenna admittance was measured using a four-probe microwave reflectometer and these measured values were found to be in good agreement with those predicted. Measurements were also performed with another type of circular-aperture antenna and good agreement was obtained between the calculations and the experimental results. A theoretical analysis has been completed which permits calculation of the nonequilibrium, viscous shock-layer flow field for a sphere-cone body. Results are presented for two different bodies at several different altitudes illustrating the influences of bluntness and chemical nonequilibrium on several gas dynamic parameters of interest. Plane-wave transmission coefficients were calculated for an approximate space-shuttle body using a typical trajectory.

  4. Experimental studies on waste paper pulp biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R; Sharma, D; Rao, K S; Jain, R C

    2002-07-01

    In continuation of their studies on Biodegradation of cellulosic waste materials, the authors have presented their experimental data on biodegradation on waste paper pulp. Greater efficiency in the cow dung and M3 culture experimental setups have been pointed out and discussed. Necessity of detailed data evaluation of temperature, pH, dry weight, cellulose, protein, carbohydrate, Nitrate, Phosphate & Potassium levels is suggested. Derivation of %, absolute and increase/decrease % of BOO, COD and VS have been pointed out for the first time in solid waste Biodegradation. Further data evaluation and derivation of critical reaction rate kinetics have been recommended for further studies in solid waste-degradation to achieve quicker Bioconversion of cellulosic wastes into compost.

  5. Field-structured composite studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, James Ellis; Williamson, Rodney L.

    2004-04-01

    Field-structured composites (FSCs) were produced by hosting micron-sized gold-coated nickel particles in a pre-polymer and allowing the mixture to cure in a magnetic field environment. The feasibility of controlling a composite's electrical conductivity using feedback control applied to the field coils was investigated. It was discovered that conductivity in FSCs is primarily determined by stresses in the polymer host matrix due to cure shrinkage. Thus, in cases where the structuring field was uniform and unidirectional so as to produce chainlike structures in the composite, no electrical conductivity was measured until well after the structuring field was turned off at the gel point. In situations where complex, rotating fields were used to generate complex, three-dimensional structures in a composite, very small, but measurable, conductivity was observed prior to the gel point. Responsive, sensitive prototype chemical sensors were developed based on this technology with initial tests showing very promising results.

  6. Theoretical and experimental studies of elementary particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodek, A.; Ferbel, T.; Melissinos, A. C.; Olsen, S. L.; Slattery, P.; Tipton, P.; Das, A.; Hagen, C. R.; Rajeev, S. G.; Okubo, S.

    This report discusses fixed target experimentation at Fermilab; the D-zero collider experiment at Fermilab; deep inelastic lepton nucleon scattering; non-accelerator experiments and non-linear quantum electrodynamics (QED); the AMY experiment at TRISTAN and other activities at KEK; the collider detector at Fermilab; laser switched linac; preparations for experiments at the SSC; search for massive stable particles; and the Advanced Study Institute on techniques and concepts of high energy physics.

  7. Theoretical and experimental examination of near-field acoustic levitation.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Hideyuki; Kamakura, Tomoo; Matsuda, Kazuhisa

    2002-04-01

    A planar object can be levitated stably close to a piston sound source by making use of acoustic radiation pressure. This phenomenon is called near-field acoustic levitation [Y. Hashimoto et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 100, 2057-2061 (1996)]. In the present article, the levitation distance is predicted theoretically by numerically solving basic equations in a compressible viscous fluid subject to the appropriate initial and boundary conditions. Additionally, experiments are carried out using a 19.5-kHz piston source with a 40-mm aperture and various aluminum disks of different sizes. The measured levitation distance agrees well with the theory, which is different from a conventional theory, and the levitation distance is not inversely proportional to the square root of the surface density of the levitated disk in a strict sense.

  8. Interpretation of experimental results on Kondo systems with crystal field.

    PubMed

    Romero, M A; Aligia, A A; Sereni, J G; Nieva, G

    2014-01-15

    We present a simple approach to calculate the thermodynamic properties of single Kondo impurities including orbital degeneracy and crystal field effects (CFE) by extending a previous proposal by Schotte and Schotte (1975 Phys. Lett. 55A 38). Comparison with exact solutions for the specific heat of a quartet ground state split into two doublets shows deviations below 10% in the absence of CFE and a quantitative agreement for moderate or large CFE. As an application, we fit the measured specific heat of the compounds CeCu2Ge2, CePd3Si0.3, CePdAl, CePt, Yb2Pd2Sn and YbCo2Zn20. The agreement between theory and experiment is very good or excellent depending on the compound, except at very low temperatures due to the presence of magnetic correlations (not accounted for in the model).

  9. Ecological effects of the insecticide imidacloprid and a pollutant from antidandruff shampoo in experimental rice fields.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Bayo, Francisco; Goka, Kouichi

    2006-06-01

    Ecological changes caused by the insecticide imidacloprid and a pollutant from antidandruff shampoos (zinc pyrithione) were monitored in experimental paddies throughout a cultivation period. A total of 88 species were observed, with 54 of them aquatic. Plankton, nekton, benthic, and terrestrial communities from imidacloprid fields had significantly less abundance of organisms compared with control and shampoo-treated fields, either for the entire period or during early stages. The absence of Chironomus yoshimatsui and typical paddy ostracods from imidacloprid fields was most remarkable; as a consequence, green algae blooms (Spirogyra sp.) developed, which in turn hampered the establishment of weeds. Such changes occurred while residues of imidacloprid in water were present at levels greater than 1 microg/L. The overall diversity was similar in all fields and increased constantly until the end of the study. Phytophagous insects dominated in early communities, gradually giving way to predators and scavengers during late stages, but imidacloprid fields had a lower proportion of the latter trophic group. Multivariate analyses helped to describe and differentiate the communities between treatments and control. Hazard- and risk-assessment methods overestimated the effects of zinc pyrithione but failed to predict imidacloprid impacts, probably because of deficiencies in the exposure and relevant toxicity data used.

  10. Experimental study of the chaotic waterwheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutherford, George; Erxleben, Amy; Rosa, Epaminondas, Jr.

    2007-03-01

    The chaotic waterwheel is often given as an example of a mechanical system that can exhibit chaotic behavior. Its early demonstration by Malkus and the realization that it can be modeled by the Lorenz equations has secured it a prominent place in almost every general presentation of chaos. It seems quite surprising, then, that no experimental investigations of this textbook system have ever been published. To fill this historic gap, and to initiate an experimental study of this incredibly rich dynamic system, our lab has constructed a research-grade waterwheel consisting of a vacuum-formed polycarbonate frame in which 36 cylindrical cells are mounted on an 18 inch diameter. The wheel and its axis can be tilted, and water is fed into the top of the wheel and drains out through thin tubes at the bottom of each cell. An aluminum skirt at the wheel's periphery passes through a variable gap magnet to provide magnetic braking. Angular time series data are collected with an absolute rotary encoder. The data are smoothed and angular velocity and acceleration are calculated via fast fourier transforms. The data show quasi-uniform rotation as well as periodic and chaotic motion and agree fairly well with computer simulations of the idealized wheel equations. We will discuss differences between the experimental data and the simulation predictions as well as plans for future studies.

  11. Experimental studies of gravitation and feebler forces

    SciTech Connect

    Cowsik, R.

    1993-04-01

    The theoretical motivations and the experimental context pertaining to the recent experimental studies of the Weak equivalence Principle and the {open_quotes}Fifth Force{close_quotes} are reviewed briefly. With such a backdrop, the innovative design and the technical details of the several new experiments in this area are presented with a special emphasis on the experiments underway at Gauribidanur, situated on the Deccan Plateau. These experiments jointly rule out the existence of any new forces coupling to baryon or lepton number with a coupling greater than about 10{sup {minus}4} of gravitation per a.m.u. at ranges of about 0.5m and longer. In a few years the author hopes to test the weak equivalence principle with sensitivity exceeding 10{sup {minus}13}.

  12. Selective Cooperation in the Supermarket : Field Experimental Evidence for Indirect Reciprocity.

    PubMed

    Lange, Florian; Eggert, Frank

    2015-12-01

    Numerous laboratory experiments suggest that mechanisms of indirect reciprocity might account for human cooperation. However, conclusive field data supporting the predictions of indirect reciprocity in everyday life situations is still scarce. Here, we attempt to compensate for this lack by examining the determinants of cooperative behavior in a German supermarket. Our methods were as follows: Confederates of the experimenter lined up at the checkout, apparently to buy a single item. As an act of cooperation, the waiting person in front (the potential helper) could allow the confederate to go ahead. By this means, the potential helper could take a cost (additional waiting time) by providing the confederate with a benefit (saved waiting time). We recorded the potential helpers' behavior and the number of items they purchased as a quantitative measure proportional to the confederate's benefit. Moreover, in a field experimental design, we varied the confederates' image by manipulating the item they purchased (beer vs. water). As predicted, the more waiting time they could save, the more likely the confederates were to receive cooperation. This relationship was moderated by the confederates' image. Cost-to-benefit ratios were required to be more favorable for beer-purchasing individuals to receive cooperation. Our results demonstrate that everyday human cooperation can be studied unobtrusively in the field and that cooperation among strangers is selective in a way that is consistent with current models of indirect reciprocity.

  13. Effects of Fipronil Insecticide Application on Sympetrum sp. Larvae and Adults in Experimental Rice Paddy Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinguji, Hiroshi; Ueda, Tetsuyuki; Tsunoda, Manami; Aihara, Shoko; Saito, Mitsuo

    The effect of on sowing and before transplanting application of the phenyl pyrazole insecticide, fipronil, on the survivorship Sympetrum spp. was investigated in plots of an experimental rice paddy field. In addition, the effect of two pesticide applications on rice weevils was investigated. A total of nine paddy plots were used in this study: three were treated with fipronil at the before transplanting application , three at the on sowing application, and the three remaining plots were left untreated for use as controls. Fipronil concentrations in paddy water at the time of application in before transplanting and on sowing treatments reached 1.45 and 1.20 μg/L, respectively. A comparison of experimental and control plots revealed a marked absence of Sympetrum frequens larvae, exuviae and adults from fipronil-treated fields. Adult density of Sympetrum sp. and members of Lestidae in paddy fields before transplanting application were considerably lower than in control plots. Our results show that before transplanting application is more effective than on sowing application for treating rice weevils, but that on sowing application may still be harm against dragonflies.

  14. Experimental validation of sound field control with a circular double-layer array of loudspeakers.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ji-Ho; Jacobsen, Finn

    2013-04-01

    This paper is concerned with experimental validation of a recently proposed method of controlling sound fields with a circular double-layer array of loudspeakers [Chang and Jacobsen, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 131(6), 4518-4525 (2012)]. The double-layer of loudspeakers is realized with 20 pairs of closed-box loudspeakers mounted back-to-back. Source strengths are obtained with several solution methods by modeling loudspeakers as a weighted combination of monopoles and dipoles. Sound pressure levels of the controlled sound fields are measured inside and outside the array in an anechoic room, and performance indices are calculated. The experimental results show that a method of combining pure contrast maximization with a pressure matching technique provides only a small error in the listening zone between the desired and the reproduced fields, and at the same time reduces the sound level in the quiet zone as expected in the simulation studies well above the spatial Nyquist frequency except at a few frequencies. It is also shown that errors in the positions of the loudspeakers can be critical to the results at frequencies where the distance between the inner and the outer array is close to half a wavelength.

  15. Electrophoretic field gradient focusing: an investigation of the experimental parameters.

    PubMed

    Tuñón, Pilar González; Wang, Yating; Myers, Peter; Bartle, Keith D; Bowhill, Larry; Ivory, Cornelius F; Ansell, Richard J

    2008-01-01

    Electrophoretic field gradient focusing has been used to separate the two oxidation states of myoglobin (Mb), and to separate Mb from bromophenol blue (BPB). Polyacrylamide and Sephadex were shown to be suitable packing materials whilst silica led to band broadening with Mb. BPB and Mb could be simultaneously focused apart using either a fixed 21-electrode setup or a dynamic 6-electrode setup. Using a dynamic three-electrode setup either analyte could be focused but not both simultaneously. It was shown that a higher ionic strength buffer in the separation channel compared to the coolant channel enhanced focusing between electrodes due to a conductivity gradient. Different running buffers were investigated and it was found that using a pH 8.6 buffer containing N,N,N-tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris) and phosphate ions the oxidation states of Mb could be separated but the separation of Mb from BPB was not as good as would be hoped for. Using a pH 8.6 buffer containing Tris, N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-3-propanesulphonate and chloride ions as running buffer, BPB and Mb could be well separated but the two oxidation states of Mb merged.

  16. An ab initio study of many isomers of S 2O 2. A combined theoretical and experimental analysis of the harmonic force field and molecular structure of cis-planar OSSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsden, Colin J.; Smith, Brian J.

    1990-03-01

    Thirteen singlet and six triplet isomers of S 2O 2 have been studied by ab initio methods; a DZ(P) basis was used for most calculations, but a larger TZ(2)P basis was used for a few final results. All geometries were fully optimized. The nine most stable singlet isomers were all found to be true local minima at the SCF level. Vibrational frequencies, IR intensities and MP3 energies (at the SCF geometries) are reported. Although a triplet form of S 2O 2 is the most stable at the SCF level, a singlet isomer is the global minimum when MP3 energies are included; this isomer is a thio species related to SO 3, and at the TZ(2)P/CCD level it is some 70 kJ mol -1 more stable than the cis-planar OSSO isomer which has been identified by microwave spectroscopy in an SO 2 discharge by Lovas et al. cis- and trans-planar isomers are found to be almost degenerate. Our best estimates for the equilibrium structure of the lowest energy isomer are r (SS) = 1.881 (10) Å, r(SO) = 1.431 (5) Å and < SSO = 120.4 (0.5)°, and for the ground-state rotational constants are A0 = 10327(160), B0 = 4355(50) and C0 = 3063(25) MHz; its binding energy compared to 2 SO is about 100 kJ mol -1 at the TZ(2)P/CCD level. The strikingly long formal SS double bond in cis-planar OSSO cannot be understood using the orbital (SCF) approximation, but its length is satisfactorily predicted by correlated methods which show the importance of the HOMO→LUMO double excitation to be substantial. For the global minimum structure, however, the SCF description is a reasonably good approximation. Factors determining the importance of correlation in the description of SS linkages are discussed. The potential function linking cis- and trans-planar OSSO isomers has been studied by SCF, MP3 and CISD methods; two electronic configurations were found to cross near a dihedral angle of 90°, so all these single-references methods failed to give physically realistic results. The DZ(P)/SCF harmonic force fields for

  17. Field experimental approach to bromide leaching as affected by scale-specific rainfall characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendroth, Ole; Vasquez, Vicente; Matocha, Christopher J.

    2011-06-01

    Although inherent soil spatial and temporal variabilities complicate analysis of solute leaching, impacts of specific processes associated with rainfall amount, intensity, and frequency on solute leaching under field conditions require investigation. The objective of this study was to introduce (1) a new experimental approach to quantify bromide (Br-) leaching under field conditions as influenced by rainfall characteristics and (2) analytical opportunities applicable to scale-specific spatial treatment distribution. The quantitative range of treatments was established in nonrandom periodically oscillating patterns. The characteristic length of a period over which a treatment fluctuates was considered the specific treatment scale. A Br- tracer study was established in the field with treatments applied at two different spatial scales. The tracer was applied with a sprayer in a transect of 32 plots, each 2 m long, followed by a site-specific sprinkler irrigation, and 128 soil cores subsequently taken at 0.5 m intervals and divided into 10-cm depth increments. The scale-specific associations between treatments and Br- center of mass (COM) were addressed. Treatments can be periodically imposed over specific scales and their spatial relationships quantified with semivariance and power spectral analysis. An additive state-space model was applied to separate the long- and short-wave components of Br- COM. Subsequently, the large-scale process was described in an autoregressive state-space model. The proposed experimental approach and the separation of small- and large-scale variability components support studying soil ecosystem processes that vary at different scales even in the presence of underlying large-scale trends that are currently considered obstacles in field research.

  18. Experimental Studying of Dust Particles Charging by Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrikov, A. V.; Fortov, V. E.; Petrov, O. F.; Vorona, N. A.; Vasiliev, M. N.

    2008-09-07

    The studying of the dusty plasma properties under electron beam action are of great interest because it gives the unique opportunities for experimental investigation of strongly coupled systems as well as for developing the new dusty plasma technologies of creating the new composite materials. Highly charged dust particle generates electrostatic field that can accelerate positive ions to high power. It gives the unique possibilities of using these macroparticles (for deeply ions implantation, as catalysts for increasing rate of reactions with the high energy barrier, in the new ionic engines etc.). Presented work deals with the experimental investigation of dust particles charging under direct influence of electron beam. On the basis of experimental data the average velocities of dust particles were obtained and the charge of macroparticle was estimated.

  19. Colloids and Radionuclide Transport: A Field, Experimental and Modeling Effort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, P.; Zavarin, M.; Sylwester, E. E.; Allen, P. G.; Williams, R. W.; Kersting, A. B.

    2002-05-01

    Natural inorganic colloids (< 1 micron particles) found in groundwater can sorb low-solubility actinides and may provide a pathway for transport through geological aquifers. The importance of colloid-facilitated transport to the transport of low-solubility actinides, such as Pu, is still not well understood. In an effort to better understand the dominant geochemical mechanisms that control Pu transport, we have performed a series of sorption/desorption experiments using mineral colloids. We focused on natural colloidal minerals present in water samples collected from both saturated and vadose zone waters at the Nevada Test Site. These minerals include zeolites, clays, silica, Mn-oxides, Fe-oxides, and calcite. X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy ( both XANES and EXAFS) was performed in order to characterize the speciation of sorbed plutonium. The XANES spectra show that only Pu(IV) was detected (within experimental error) on these mineral surfaces when the starting Pu oxidation state was +5, indicating that Pu(V) was reduced to Pu(IV) during sorption. The EXAFS detected Pu-M and Pu-C interactions (where M=Fe, Mn, or Si) indicating Pu(IV) surface complexation along with carbonate ternary complex formation on most of the minerals tested. Although the plutonium sorption as Pu(IV) species is mineral independent, the actual sorption paths are different for different minerals. The sorption rates were compared to the rates of plutonium disproportionation under similar conditions. The batch sorption/desorption experiments of Pu(IV) and Pu(V) onto colloidal zeolite (clinoptilolite, colloids particle size 171 ñ 25 nm) were conducted in synthetic groundwater (similar to J-13, Yucca Mountain standard) with a pH range from 4 to 10 and initial plutonium concentration of 10-9 M. The results show that Pu(IV) sorption takes place within an hour, while the rates of Pu(V) sorption onto the colloids is much slower and mineral dependent. The kinetic results from the batch

  20. Design of organic scintillators for non-standard radiation field dosimetry: experimental setup.

    PubMed

    Norman H, Machado R; Maximiliano, Trujillo T; Javier E, García G; Diana C, Narvaez G; Paula A, Marín M; Róbinson A, Torres V

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental setup designed for sensing the luminescent light coming from an organic plastic scintillator stimulated with ionizing radiation. This device is intended to be a part of a complete dosimeter system for characterization of small radiation fields which is the project of the doctoral thesis of the medical physicist at the Radiation Oncology facility of Hospital San Vicente Fundación in conjunction with the Universidad de Antioquia of Medellín Colombia. Some preliminary results predict a good performance of the unit, but further studies must be conducted in order to have a completed evaluation of the system. This is the first step in the development of an accuracy tool for measurement of non-standard fields in the Radiotherapy or Radiosurgery processes.

  1. Experimental concept for examination of biological effects of magnetic field concealed by gravity.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, M; Tomita-Yokotani, K; Hashimoto, H; Takai, M; Tsushima, M; Nakamura, T

    2004-01-01

    Space is not only a place to study biological effects of gravity, but also provides unique opportunities to examine other environmental factors, where the biological actions are masked by gravity on the ground. Even the earth's magnetic field is steadily acting on living systems, and is known to influence many biological processes. A systematic survey and assessment of its action are difficult to conduct in the presence of dominant factors, such as gravity. Investigation of responses of biological systems against the combined environment of zero-gravity and zero-magnetic field might establish the baseline for the analysis of biological effects of magnetic factors. We propose, in this paper, an experimental concept in this context, together with a practical approach of the experiments, both in orbit and on the ground, with a thin magnetic shielding film. Plant epicotyl growth was taken as an exemplar index to evaluate technical and scientific feasibility of the proposed system concept.

  2. Planned waveguide electric field breakdown studies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Faya; Li Zenghai

    2012-12-21

    This paper presents an experimental setup for X-band rf breakdown studies. The setup is composed of a section of WR90 waveguide with a tapered pin located at the middle of the waveguide E-plane. Another pin is used to rf match the waveguide so it operates in a travelling wave mode. By adjusting the penetration depth of the tapered pin, different surface electric field enhancements can be obtained. The setup will be used to study the rf breakdown rate dependence on power flow in the waveguide for a constant maximum surface electric field on the pin. Two groups of pins have been designed. The Q of one group is different and very low. The other has a similar Q. With the test of the two groups of pins, we should be able to discern how the net power flow and Q affect the breakdown. Furthermore, we will apply an electron beam treatment to the pins to study its effect on breakdown. Overall, these experiments should be very helpful in understanding rf breakdown phenomena and could significantly benefit the design of high gradient accelerator structures.

  3. Experimental study of turbulent flame kernel propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Mansour, Mohy; Peters, Norbert; Schrader, Lars-Uve

    2008-07-15

    Flame kernels in spark ignited combustion systems dominate the flame propagation and combustion stability and performance. They are likely controlled by the spark energy, flow field and mixing field. The aim of the present work is to experimentally investigate the structure and propagation of the flame kernel in turbulent premixed methane flow using advanced laser-based techniques. The spark is generated using pulsed Nd:YAG laser with 20 mJ pulse energy in order to avoid the effect of the electrodes on the flame kernel structure and the variation of spark energy from shot-to-shot. Four flames have been investigated at equivalence ratios, {phi}{sub j}, of 0.8 and 1.0 and jet velocities, U{sub j}, of 6 and 12 m/s. A combined two-dimensional Rayleigh and LIPF-OH technique has been applied. The flame kernel structure has been collected at several time intervals from the laser ignition between 10 {mu}s and 2 ms. The data show that the flame kernel structure starts with spherical shape and changes gradually to peanut-like, then to mushroom-like and finally disturbed by the turbulence. The mushroom-like structure lasts longer in the stoichiometric and slower jet velocity. The growth rate of the average flame kernel radius is divided into two linear relations; the first one during the first 100 {mu}s is almost three times faster than that at the later stage between 100 and 2000 {mu}s. The flame propagation is slightly faster in leaner flames. The trends of the flame propagation, flame radius, flame cross-sectional area and mean flame temperature are related to the jet velocity and equivalence ratio. The relations obtained in the present work allow the prediction of any of these parameters at different conditions. (author)

  4. Continuous game dynamics: an experimental study.

    SciTech Connect

    Patelli, P.; Sato, Yuzuru

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we study an experiment with human agents strategically interacting in a game characterized by continuous time and continuous strategy space. The research is focused in studying the agents interaction dynamic under different experimental settings. The agents play a two person game that is an extension of the classic Cournot duopoly. Having agents making decision continuously allows us to track the temporal structure of strategy evolution very precisely. We can follow the agents continuous behavior evolution avoiding the data under-sampling. To our knowledge this is the first attempt to approach experimentally the continuous time decision making. We also emphasize that the focus of our work is not the Cournot model but rather the more general problem of studying the agents strategic interaction dynamic in continuous space time. Flaming the problem as the well studied Cournot Duopoly would be a good starting point. In economics dynamics studies the oligopoly model literature in both discrete and continuous time is one of the richest. There is also a vast literature in experimental economics about repeated games in general and more specifically in duopoly/oligopoly models. Cox and Walker studied whether subjects can learn to play the Cournot Duopoly strategies comparing the experimental results with the theoretical prediction of learning models. The Cox Walker experiment differs from our settings because it is in discrete time and is an evolutionary dynamics framework through a random matching mechanism of the experimental subjects. From the theoretical perspective many works have been focused in studying the Cournot model in a dynamical settings. Okuguchi and Szidarovsky formulated a continuous time version of the Cournot Oligopoly with multiproduct firms. They analyzed the stability of the equilibrium and proved that it is stable, under certain conditions, independently from the value of the adjustments. Chiarella and Khomin extended this analysis to

  5. Experimental Study of Dust Grain Charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, James F; Venturini, Catherine C.; Comfort, Richard H.; Mian, Abbas M.

    1999-01-01

    The results of an experimental study of the charging mechanisms of micron size dust grains are presented. Individual dust grains are electrodynamically suspended and exposed to an electron beam of known energy and flux, and to far ultraviolet radiation of known wavelength and intensity. Changes in the charge-to-mass ratio of the grain are directly measured as a function of incident beam (electron and/or photon), grain size and composition. Comparisons of our results to theoretical models that predict the grain response are presented.

  6. Experimental Study of Dust Grain Charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, James F; Venturini, Catherine C.; Comfort, Richard H.; Mian, Abbas M.

    1999-01-01

    The results of an experimental study of the charging mechanisms of micron size dust grains are presented. Individual dust grains are electrodynamically suspended and exposed to an electron beam of known energy and flux, and to far ultraviolet radiation of known wavelength and intensity. Changes in the charge-to-mass ratio of the grain are directly measured as a function of incident beam (electron and/or photon), grain size and composition. Comparisons of our results to theoretical models that predict the grain response are presented.

  7. Experimental Study of Active Vibration Control.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-15

    final versions of these reports will be sent to AFOSR. III. PUBLICATIONS ANTICIPATED 1. M . A. Masse, W. L. Hallauer Jr., and R. N. Gehling , "A Plane Grid...REPORT NUMBER 12. GOVT ACCESSION NO. S . RECIPIENT’S CATALOC NUMBER AFDSR -Th.O 3-p s .I * - J/POTt 4. TITLE (Me Su"Ide) S . TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD...COVERED EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF ACTIVE VIBRATION AN14UAL: CONTROL 15 MAR 82-14 MAR 83 S . PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(e) I. CONTRACT OR GRANT

  8. Experimental Study of Active Vibration Control.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-27

    83 RFOSR-TR-84-8955 UNCLASSIFIED F S -28iF0 /iN E7 hFOS-hK!IilF/h2011 l I ALF 1 M2 11111.121 MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATONAL SVlCAU O...34)g 4(GMO 2. OVTACSSION No.3. RECIPIENTSCTLGNBE 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) S . TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF ACTIVE VIBRATION...CONTROL Final Scientific Report Mar. 15, 1982-Aug. 31, 1983 6. PERFORMING OIG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(&) S . CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER( s ) William L

  9. Experimental Study of Nucleon Structure and QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Ping Chen

    2012-03-01

    Overview of Experimental Study of Nucleon Structure and QCD, with focus on the spin structure. Nucleon (spin) Structure provides valuable information on QCD dynamics. A decade of experiments from JLab yields these exciting results: (1) valence spin structure, duality; (2) spin sum rules and polarizabilities; (3) precision measurements of g{sub 2} - high-twist; and (4) first neutron transverse spin results - Collins/Sivers/A{sub LT}. There is a bright future as the 12 GeV Upgrade will greatly enhance our capability: (1) Precision determination of the valence quark spin structure flavor separation; and (2) Precision extraction of transversity/tensor charge/TMDs.

  10. Experimental Study of Electronic States at Interfaces.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    relaxation time of 4 to 20 conduction band back to the bound states is long nsec is obtained, inspection of the phonon density-of- enough then the Is...AiBI 929 EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF ELECTRONIC STATES AT INTERFACES 1/1 STATE PNVSICS A J SIEVERS 1987 AFOSR-TR-87-0851 U LSIFIE D AFOSR-8885 - FG 2112 L...NAME OF MONITORING ORGANIZATION i (~able) AORN Cornell University 9 e) AFOSR/NE 6c. ADDRESS (City, State , and ZIP Code) 7b ADDRESS (City, State , and

  11. Toltrazuril treatment of cystoisosporosis in dogs under experimental and field conditions.

    PubMed

    Daugschies, A; Mundt, H C; Letkova, V

    2000-10-01

    Coccidia of the genus Cystoisospora cause mild to severe diarrhoea in dogs. The effects of toltrazuril treatment on cystoisosporosis were studied under experimental and field conditions. Twenty-four puppies were experimentally infected each with 4 x 10(4) oocysts of the Cystoisospora ohioensis group. Three groups of six puppies were treated 3 dpi with 10, 20 or 30 mg/kg body weight of toltrazuril suspension (5%); the remaining six puppies served as non-treated controls. Toltrazuril suspension or microgranulate were given once in a dose of 10 or 20 mg/kg body weight, respectively, to naturally infected puppies in conventional dog breeding facilities, depending on the coproscopical evidence of infection. Oocyst excretion and clinical data were recorded. Under experimental conditions, the non-treated puppies excreted oocysts beginning at 6 dpi and suffered from catarrhalic to haemorrhagic diarrhoea. On 12 dpi, four of six non-treated puppies died. Irrespective of the dose, toltrazuril treatment totally suppressed oocyst excretion and no diarrhoea or other signs of disease were observed in the treated groups. Natural Cystoisospora infections were regularly found during the 3rd or 4th week of age in dog breeding facilities although not always associated with diarrhoea. A single oral application of toltrazuril abrogated oocyst shedding and the treated puppies remained generally coproscopically negative during the following 2-4 weeks. Cystoisospora is pathogenic for puppies and can induce severe disease. Natural infections are common in conventional dog breeding facilities. Toltrazuril treatment is suitable for controlling cystoisosporosis under experimental and field conditions. A single oral treatment for puppies in the 3rd or 4th week of age is recommended.

  12. Organ models in wound ballistics: experimental study.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Mustafa Tahir; Oğünç, Gökhan; Eryilmaz, Mehmet; Yiğit, Taner; Menteş, Mustafa Oner; Dakak, Mehmet; Uzar, Ali Ihsan; Oner, Köksal

    2007-01-01

    Effects of various types and diameters of guns and related treatment principles are different. Our study was performed to experimentally demonstrate the effects of different gunshots in body tissues. 9x19 mm hand-gun and 7.62x51 mm G-3 infantry rifle were used in the study. Injury models were created through hand-gun and rifle shootings at isolated soft tissue, lower extremity, liver and intestine tissue simulants made of ballistic candle. High-speed cameras were used to capture 1000 frames per second. Images were examined and wound mechanisms were evaluated. It was observed that the colon content distributed more within the surrounding tissues by the rifle shootings comparing with hand-gun shootings and could be an infection source due to the large size of the cavity in the colon. Especially when the bullets hitting the bone were investigated, it was seen that much more tissue injury occurs with high speed bullets due to bullet deformation and fragmentation. However, no significant difference was found between the effect of hand-gun and rifle bullets passing through the extremity without hitting the bone. To know the type of the gun that caused the injury and its characteristics will allow to estimate severity and size of the injury before the treatment and to focus on different alternatives of treatment. Therefore, use of appropriate models is required in experimental studies.

  13. Experimental studies with Stronglyloides papillosus in goats.

    PubMed

    Pienaar, J G; Basson, P A; du Plessis, J L; Collins, H M; Naude, T W; Boyazoglu, P A; Boomker, J; Reyers, F; Pienaar, W L

    1999-09-01

    Unusual clinical and pathological observations in the field in goats and sheep suffering from Strongyloides papillosus infection prompted experimental work on this parasite. Goats were infected percutaneously with either single or multiple, low or high levels of S. papillosus. Young goats up to 12 months of age were found to be the most susceptible. Some animals, however, showed substantial resistance to infective doses. Clinical signs included transient diarrhoea, misshapen, elongated faecal pellets terminally, dehydration, anorexia, cachexia, gnashing of teeth, foaming at the mouth, anaemia and nervous signs such as ataxia, a wide-based stance, stupor and nystagmus. A 'pushing syndrome' was seen in 22% of the animals. The pathological changes are described and included enteritis, status spongiosus in the brain, hepatosis leading to rupture of the liver, nephrosis, pulmonary oedema, interstitial pneumonia and pneumonia. About 6% of the goats died acutely from fatal hepatic rupture. The development of an acquired immunity was determined. The immunity elicited an allergic skin reaction at the application site of larvae or injection sites of larval metabolites. This immunity, however, could be breached by large doses of larvae. The most profound clinicopathological changes induced by the parasites were an anaemia (most pronounced in the young goats) and hypophosphataemia. Trace element analyses provided evidence of Cu, Mn and possibly Se deficiencies in some goats.

  14. Experimental methods in compressor noise studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewy, S.; Jubelin, B.

    Rotating blade machines are a very important source of aeronautical noise. The present investigation is concerned with studies of noise generated by axial compressors, taking into account aircraft jet engines. The introduction of high bypass ratio engines for subsonic transportation led to a very pronounced improvement in performance and, in addition, also to a significant decrease in jet noise. The fan has now become the primary noise source. The theoretical background of compressor noise studies is examined, taking into account the resolution of the wave equation in a guided medium, the cut-off properties of a duct, azimuthal modes generated by a rotating source, and consequences of the theoretical model. The sound emission upstream of a compressor at subsonic and transonic speeds is considered along with details regarding the experimental methods suited to the study of compressor noise.

  15. Developments in the field of allergy in 2010 through the eyes of Clinical and Experimental Allergy.

    PubMed

    Katelaris, C H; Linneberg, A; Magnan, A; Thomas, W R; Wardlaw, A J; Wark, P

    2011-12-01

    In 2010 over 200 articles were published in Clinical and Experimental Allergy including editorials, reviews, opinion articles, letters, book reviews and of course at the heart of the journal, papers containing original data which have moved the field of allergy forward on a number of fronts. For the third year running the editors felt it would be of value to summarize the key messages contained in these papers as a snapshot of where the cutting edge of research into allergic disease is leading. We have broadly followed the sections of the journal, although this year the mechanistic articles are grouped together and the studies involving experimental models of disease are discussed throughout the paper. In the field of asthma and rhinitis phenotypes and biomarkers continue to a major pre-occupation of our authors. There is continued interest in mechanisms of inflammation and disordered lung function with the mouse model of asthma continuing to offer new insights. There is also a steady flow of papers investigating new therapies, including those derived from plants and herbs, although many are mechanistic with too few high quality clinical trials. The mechanisms involved in allergic disease are well covered with many strong papers using clinical material to ask relevant questions. Pro-pre and snybiotics continue to be of major interest to our authors and this remains a controversial and complicated field. The discipline of epidemiology has retained its interest in risk factors for the development of allergic disease with a view to refining and debating the reasons for the allergy epidemic. There is continued interest in the relationship between helminthic disease and allergy with a new twist in 2010 involving studies using infection with helminths as a potential treatment. The genetics of allergic disease continues to be very productive, although the field has moved on from only investigating single nucleotide polymorphisms of candidate genes to Genome Wide

  16. Experimental pencil beam kernels derivation for 3D dose calculation in flattening filter free modulated fields.

    PubMed

    Azcona, Juan Diego; Barbés, Benigno; Wang, Lilie; Burguete, Javier

    2016-01-07

    This paper presents a method to obtain the pencil-beam kernels that characterize a megavoltage photon beam generated in a flattening filter free (FFF) linear accelerator (linac) by deconvolution from experimental measurements at different depths. The formalism is applied to perform independent dose calculations in modulated fields. In our previous work a formalism was developed for ideal flat fluences exiting the linac's head. That framework could not deal with spatially varying energy fluences, so any deviation from the ideal flat fluence was treated as a perturbation. The present work addresses the necessity of implementing an exact analysis where any spatially varying fluence can be used such as those encountered in FFF beams. A major improvement introduced here is to handle the actual fluence in the deconvolution procedure. We studied the uncertainties associated to the kernel derivation with this method. Several Kodak EDR2 radiographic films were irradiated with a 10 MV FFF photon beam from two linacs from different vendors, at the depths of 5, 10, 15, and 20cm in polystyrene (RW3 water-equivalent phantom, PTW Freiburg, Germany). The irradiation field was a 50mm diameter circular field, collimated with a lead block. The 3D kernel for a FFF beam was obtained by deconvolution using the Hankel transform. A correction on the low dose part of the kernel was performed to reproduce accurately the experimental output factors. Error uncertainty in the kernel derivation procedure was estimated to be within 0.2%. Eighteen modulated fields used clinically in different treatment localizations were irradiated at four measurement depths (total of fifty-four film measurements). Comparison through the gamma-index to their corresponding calculated absolute dose distributions showed a number of passing points (3%, 3mm) mostly above 99%. This new procedure is more reliable and robust than the previous one. Its ability to perform accurate independent dose calculations was

  17. Experimental pencil beam kernels derivation for 3D dose calculation in flattening filter free modulated fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diego Azcona, Juan; Barbés, Benigno; Wang, Lilie; Burguete, Javier

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a method to obtain the pencil-beam kernels that characterize a megavoltage photon beam generated in a flattening filter free (FFF) linear accelerator (linac) by deconvolution from experimental measurements at different depths. The formalism is applied to perform independent dose calculations in modulated fields. In our previous work a formalism was developed for ideal flat fluences exiting the linac’s head. That framework could not deal with spatially varying energy fluences, so any deviation from the ideal flat fluence was treated as a perturbation. The present work addresses the necessity of implementing an exact analysis where any spatially varying fluence can be used such as those encountered in FFF beams. A major improvement introduced here is to handle the actual fluence in the deconvolution procedure. We studied the uncertainties associated to the kernel derivation with this method. Several Kodak EDR2 radiographic films were irradiated with a 10 MV FFF photon beam from two linacs from different vendors, at the depths of 5, 10, 15, and 20cm in polystyrene (RW3 water-equivalent phantom, PTW Freiburg, Germany). The irradiation field was a 50mm diameter circular field, collimated with a lead block. The 3D kernel for a FFF beam was obtained by deconvolution using the Hankel transform. A correction on the low dose part of the kernel was performed to reproduce accurately the experimental output factors. Error uncertainty in the kernel derivation procedure was estimated to be within 0.2%. Eighteen modulated fields used clinically in different treatment localizations were irradiated at four measurement depths (total of fifty-four film measurements). Comparison through the gamma-index to their corresponding calculated absolute dose distributions showed a number of passing points (3%, 3mm) mostly above 99%. This new procedure is more reliable and robust than the previous one. Its ability to perform accurate independent dose calculations was

  18. Millimeter wave near-field study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kefauver, Neill

    1990-01-01

    The possibility is evaluated of current technology measuring large aperture millimeter wave antennas. Included are a mathematical modeling of system errors, experimental data supporting error model, predictions of system accuracy at millimeter wavelengths, advantage of near-field measurements, and a cost estimate for a facility upgrade. The use is emphasized of software compensation and other inexpensive alternatives to develop a near optimum solution to near-field measurement problems at millimeter wavelengths.

  19. Environmental behavior of the fungicide metalaxyl in experimental tobacco field.

    PubMed

    Triantafyllidis, Vasilios; Hela, Dimitra; Patakioutas, George

    2013-01-01

    The loss of metalaxyl, a systemic fungicide, was determined in runoff water from loamy soil plots of various surface slopes cultivated with tobacco, over a period of 170 days. Conditions were selected to simulate agricultural practices employed in the Mediterranean region. The surface slopes of plots were 0, 2.5, 5, 7.5, 10% and both cultivated and uncultivated (control) areas were simultaneously monitored. The cumulative losses of metalaxyl in surface runoff from tilled and untilled plots with a slope of 10% were estimated at 0.469% and 0.740% of the initial applied active ingredient respectively, while for the plots with a slope 0% they were 0.033% and 0.044%. The dissipation in topsoil was studied for a period of 110 days. The half-lives that were calculated using first-order kinetics ranged from 13.7 to 16.6 days in tobacco soil and from 13.8 to 17 days in non-cropped soil. The dissipation of metalaxyl from the topsoil in cultivation of tobacco was higher in comparison with the untilled plots (46-62% and 52-69% respectively, of the applied dose in 23 days after the second application). The slope of soil surface, the compound solubility and sorption capacities are the main parameters that influenced the transport of metalaxyl residues via surface water in soil-water systems.

  20. Evolution of an experimental population of Phytophthora capsici in the field

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Populations of the vegetable pathogen Phytophthora capsici are often highly diverse, with limited gene flow between fields. To investigate the structure of a newly established, experimental population, an uninfested research field was inoculated with two single zoospore isolates of P. capsici in Sep...

  1. Experimental and Modeling Studies of High Temperature Combustion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-07

    AD-AI15 908 TEXAS UNIV AT AUSTIN F/6 21/2 EXPERIMENTAL AND MODELING STUDIES OF HIGH TEMPERATURE COM13USTIO-ETC(U) jJUN 82 W C SARDINER OAAG29-78-6...matter, ignition of natural gas-air mixtures presents an explosion hazard that has been studied before in connection with the transi- tion to... can be reason- ably well understood in terms of reaction mechanisms and rate constants repre- sentative of the current state-of-the-art in this field

  2. On the proper study design applicable to experimental balneology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Csaba

    2016-08-01

    The simple message of this paper is that it is the high time to reevaluate the strategies and optimize the efforts for investigation of thermal (spa) waters. Several articles trying to clear mode of action of medicinal waters have been published up to now. Almost all studies apply the unproven hypothesis, namely the inorganic ingredients are in close connection with healing effects of bathing. Change of paradigm would be highly necessary in this field taking into consideration the presence of several biologically active organic substances in these waters. A successful design for experimental mechanistic studies is approved.

  3. On the proper study design applicable to experimental balneology.

    PubMed

    Varga, Csaba

    2016-08-01

    The simple message of this paper is that it is the high time to reevaluate the strategies and optimize the efforts for investigation of thermal (spa) waters. Several articles trying to clear mode of action of medicinal waters have been published up to now. Almost all studies apply the unproven hypothesis, namely the inorganic ingredients are in close connection with healing effects of bathing. Change of paradigm would be highly necessary in this field taking into consideration the presence of several biologically active organic substances in these waters. A successful design for experimental mechanistic studies is approved.

  4. Experimental Study of Top Heat Mode Thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirashima, Masao; Kimura, Kenichiro; Utsumi, Yoichi; Kimura, Kenichi; Negishi, Kanji

    The purpose of this study is to develop the top heat mode thermosyphon that is very attractive means, for example, to accumulate directly the summer solar energy into the underground soil for the winter season. In this case, it can exclude the complex piping and mechanical pump to circulate the hot water absorbed the solar energy through the piping system buried in the soil layer. The several ideas concerning the top heat thermosyphon had been proposed, however, there were few reports on the definite experiments. The authors have carried out the experimental study of the top heat mode thermosyphon, with a simple lifting pipe, which could draw the working liquid from the under condenser to the upper evaporator section. The improvement of the main construction parts such as evaporator, lifting pipe, liquid reservoir trap and vapour nozzle have been performed in the present experiment in order to obtain the optimum operation range.

  5. Experimental studies of the magnetized friction force

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A. V.; Litvinenko, V. N.; Gaalnander, B.; Lofnes, T.; Ziemann, V.; Sidorin, A.; Smirnov, A.

    2006-06-15

    High-energy electron cooling, presently considered as an essential tool for several applications in high-energy and nuclear physics, requires an accurate description of the friction force which ions experience by passing through an electron beam. Present low-energy electron coolers can be used for a detailed study of the friction force. In addition, parameters of a low-energy cooler can be chosen in a manner to reproduce regimes expected in future high-energy operation. Here, we report a set of dedicated experiments in CELSIUS aimed at a detailed study of the magnetized friction force. Some results of the accurate comparison of experimental data with the friction force formulas are presented.

  6. Retrograde arterialized venous flap: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Moshammer, Harald E T; Schwarzl, Franz X; Haas, Franz M; Maechler, Heinrich; Pierer, Gerhard; Wiltgen, Marco; Koch, Horst

    2003-01-01

    An experimental model was established to study circulation in retrograde arterialized venous flaps (RAVF). Venous flaps measuring 7 x 4 cm with a matching venous system were harvested from both forearms of 10 fresh human cadavers. In each trial, both flaps were simultaneously perfused with heparinized human blood driven by a pulsatile circulation model. In each trial there was one flap with retrograde perfusion, and one flap with antegrade perfusion. Clinical assessment, measurement of outflow, and angiographic examination with digitally assisted assessment after 3 h of perfusion showed better results for retrograde perfusion in 8 of the 10 trials. This study indicates that blood circulation in the periphery of arterialized venous flaps can be enhanced by retrograde arterialization. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Experimental Study of Perpendicular Exchange Spring Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Andreas; Supper, Natacha; Lengsfield, Byron; Margulies, David; Moser, Andreas; Fullerton, Eric

    2007-03-01

    We have investigated the magnetic reversal and recording properties of perpendicular exchange spring media. These structures, which combine a soft and a hard layer material^1, have recently been proposed as suitable candidates for advanced perpendicular magnetic recording^2. Previous studies^3 have also shown that the magnetization reversal can be tuned by means of a suitable coupling layer. In our study, we have investigated structures that consist of two magnetic layers having different HK-values and being separated by a coupling layer of adjustable thickness. Similar to the results of our previous work on longitudinal exchange spring media^4, we find that there is an optimum coupling layer thickness, at which the magnetic reversal field is minimized. We also observe in our magnetometry experiments that the most robust parameter to quantify this improved magnetization reversal is the closure field HS. The anticipated writability improvements for exchange spring media with optimal interlayer coupling strength are corroborated by detailed recording studies. [1] E.E. Fullerton et al., Phys. Rev. B 58, 12193 (1998); [2] R. Victora et al., IEEE Trans. MAG 41, 537 (2005); [3] K.C. Schuermann et al., J Appl. Phys. 99, 08Q904 (2006); [4] N. Supper et al., IEEE Trans. MAG 41, 3238 (2005)

  8. Molecular simulations and experimental studies of zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moloy, Eric C.

    Zeolites are microporous aluminosilicate tetrahedral framework materials that have symmetric cages and channels with open-diameters between 0.2 and 2.0 nm. Zeolites are used extensively in the petrochemical industries for both their microporosity and their catalytic properties. The role of water is paramount to the formation, structure, and stability of these materials. Zeolites frequently have extra-framework cations, and as a result, are important ion-exchange materials. Zeolites also play important roles as molecular sieves and catalysts. For all that is known about zeolites, much remains a mystery. How, for example, can the well established metastability of these structures be explained? What is the role of water with respect to the formation, stabilization, and dynamical properties? This dissertation addresses these questions mainly from a modeling perspective, but also with some experimental work as well. The first discussion addresses a special class of zeolites: pure-silica zeolites. Experimental enthalpy of formation data are combined with molecular modeling to address zeolitic metastability. Molecular modeling is used to calculate internal surface areas, and a linear relationship between formation enthalpy and internal surface areas is clearly established, producing an internal surface energy of approximately 93 mJ/m2. Nitrate bearing sodalite and cancrinite have formed under the caustic chemical conditions of some nuclear waste processing centers in the United States. These phases have fouled expensive process equipment, and are the primary constituents of the resilient heels in the bottom of storage tanks. Molecular modeling, including molecular mechanics, molecular dynamics, and density functional theory, is used to simulate these materials with respect to structure and dynamical properties. Some new, very interesting results are extracted from the simulation of anhydrous Na6[Si6Al 6O24] sodalite---most importantly, the identification of two distinct

  9. Regulation of cellular function via electromagnetic field frequency and extracellular environment: A theoretical- experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghian, Toloo; Sheikh, Abdul; Narmoneva, Daria; Kogan, Andrei

    2015-03-01

    Application of external electric field (EF) as a non-pharmacological, non-invasive tool to control cell function is of great therapeutic interest. We developed a theoretical-experimental approach to investigate the biophysical mechanisms of EF interaction with cells in electrode-free physiologically-relevant configuration. Our numerical results demonstrated that EF frequency is the major parameter to control cell response to EF. Non-oscillating or low-frequency EF leads to charge accumulation on the cell surface membrane that may mediate membrane initiated cell responses. In contrast, high-frequency EF penetrates the cell membrane and reaches cell cytoplasm, where it may directly activate intracellular responses. The theoretical predictions were confirmed in our experimental studies of the effects of applied EF on vascular cell function. Results show that non-oscillating EF increases vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression while field polarity controls cell adhesion rate. High-frequency, but not low frequency, EF provides differential regulation of cytoplasmic focal adhesion kinase and VEGF expression depending on the substrate, with increased expression in cells cultured on RGD-rich synthetic hydrogels, and decreased expression for matrigel culture. The authors acknowledge the financial support from the NSF (DMR-1206784 & DMR-0804199 to AK); the NIH (1R21 DK078814-01A1 to DN) and the University of Cincinnati (Interdisciplinary Faculty Research Support Grant to DN and AK).

  10. An Experimental Determination of Static Magnetic Fields Induced Noise in Living Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, Megan; Laramee, Craig

    2013-03-01

    Living systems are constantly exposed to static magnetic fields (SMFs) from both natural and man-made sources. Exposures vary in dose and duration ranging from geomagnetic (~50 μT) to residential and industrial (~10s of mT) fields. Efforts to characterize responses to SMFs have yielded conflicting results, showing a dependence on experimental variables used. Here we argue that low to moderate SMF exposure is a sub-threshold perturbation operating below thermal noise, and assays that evaluate statistical characteristics of a single cell may identify responses not consistently found by population averaging approaches. Recent studies of gene expression show that it is a stochastic process capable of producing bursting dynamics. Moreover, theoretical and experimental methods have also been developed to allow quantitative estimates of the associated biophysical parameters. These developments provide a new way to assess responses of living systems to SMFs. In this work, we report on our efforts to use single molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization to assess responses of NIH-3T3 cells to SMF exposure at flux densities ranging from 1 to 440 mT for 48 hours. Results will contribute to determining mechanisms by which SMF exposure influences gene expression.

  11. An Experimental Study of Soft Lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qianhong; Gacka, Thomas; Nathan, Rungun; Wu, Li-Zhu; Cbmss Team

    2012-11-01

    Lift generation in soft porous media, as a planing surface glides over it, is a new topic in porous media flow with superior potential for lubrication and squeeze damping. This paper presents the first experimental study of this phenomenon. The experimental setup consists of a running conveyer belt covered with a soft porous sheet, and a stationary instrumented inclined planar upper board. Twelve pressure transducers mounted on the upper board captured the pore pressure generation, while a load cell was used to capture the total lifting force, arising from both the pore pressure and the compression of the solid fibers. One finds that the pore pressure distribution is consistent with theoretical predictions (Feng and Weinbaum, JFM, 2000; Wu et al., MSSE, 2006, 2011), and depends on the running belt velocity, U, the mechanical properties of the porous material, and the compression ratios of the porous layer. For a typical trial (h2/h1=5,h2/h0=1, U=3.8 m/s, where h2, h1, and h0 are the leading edge, trailing edge, and undeformed porous layer thicknesses, respectively), 68% of the lifting force was generated by the pore pressure. It conclusively demonstrates the validity of using soft porous materials for super lubrication. applications. Villanova Cellular Biomechanics and Sports Science Laboratory.

  12. Experimental studies of quasi-fission reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B.B.

    1988-01-01

    A large number of recent experimental studies have shown that a substantial fraction of the total reaction cross section in heavy-ion reactions is found in fission-like processes, which do not result from the fission decay of a completely fused system. Following the suggestion of Swiatecki such processes, which represents a complete relaxation of the relative kinetic energy and a substantial amount of net mass transfer between the two fragments, are denoted quasi-fission reactions. They are distinct from compound fission reactions by bypassing the stage of a completely fused-system. This typically means that they are associated with short reaction times, which results in several measurable characteristics such as broken forward-backward symmetries, large anisotropies of the angular distributions and increased widths of the fragment mass distributions. The distinction between quasi-fission and deep inelastic reactions is less stringent and has the character of a gradual evolution from one reaction type to the other, as found also as quasi-elastic reaction evolves into deeply inelastic processes as a function of the total kinetic energy loss. In the present paper some of the experimental data characterizing quasi-fission reactions are reviewed and discussed. 22 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Experimental studies of auroral arc generators

    SciTech Connect

    Suszcynsky, D.M.; Borovsky, J.E.; Thomsen, M.F.

    1997-08-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). An all-sky video camera system was deployed in Eagle, Alaska at the foot of the magnetic field line that threads geosynchronous satellite 1989-046 as part of a campaign to study correlations of ground-based auroral activity with satellite-based plasma and energetic particle measurements. The overall intent of the project was to study magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling as it relates to the aurora, and, in particular, to look for signatures that may help to identify various auroral generator mechanism(s). During this study, our efforts were primarily directed towards identifying the generator mechanism(s) for pulsating aurora. Our data, though not conclusive, are found to support theories that propose a cyclotron resonance mechanism for the generation of auroral pulsations.

  14. Experimental Studies of Shock Effects on Magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, M.; Gattacceca, J.; Tikoo, S. M.

    2013-05-01

    In lunar and meteorite paleomagnetism shock effects from impacts are critically important, and have led to a reexamination of shock remanent magnetism (SRM) and shock demagnetization at higher shock levels than formerly. Shock effects can be divided into direct effects of shock on magnetization and shock induced phase transitions that affect magnetization. The latter have been studied in iron (e.g. Wasilewski, 1974), pyrrhotite (e.g. Rochette et al., 2003,) and magnetite (e.g. Ding et al., 2008). For direct effects in the low shock range, where deformation is elastic, piezoremanent magnetism (PRM) is a good guide and the strength of SRM depends similarly upon the ratio of the magnetoelastic energy to other energy terms, the strength of the shock, and the ambient field. One aspect of SRM emphasized in the early studies and confirmed by many later workers is the enhancement of its intensity by repeated shocks. The acquisition of SRM and the demagnetization of remanence by shock, depending upon the presence of an ambient field, are both dominantly in the lowest microcoercivity ranges and correspondingly stronger in multidomain samples than in finer grained carriers. In this range of relatively low shock <5GPa, field (AF) demagnetization may be used to identify and eliminate SRM. SRM will be removed at lower AF fields (typically by 10-20 mT) than thermal remanent magnetization (TRM) or saturation isothermal remanent magnetization (IRMs), which occupy the entire range of coercivities in a sample. Thermal methods are not ideal for removing SRM overprints in Fe-Ni bearing samples because SRM may be carried in grains which have low coercivity, but high blocking temperatures (up to ~500°C) (Tikoo et al., 2013). Shock waves in the range of 0.6-1.5 GPa were produced in regions a few mm in diameter with pulsed lasers and acquisition of SRM was shown to record the ambient field linearly and with an efficiency somewhat weaker than TRM (Gattacceca et al., 2008). Using penthrite

  15. Studies on Weak Electromagnetic Fields Effects in Chick Embryos.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-31

    of them for the field exposed eggs , the other for the controls. In the first one called "Experimental incubator", are located cylindric coils or...of fertilized chicken eggs in these experimental conditions. In our previous and present studies of EMFs effects on chick embryos development, the...of 34C for eggs in- F30. DISTISUTIONIAVAILAPUTY 00 "ITRACT 21. ABSTRACT SECURITY CLASSIFICATION UCkSSPION~oumITED 03 SAMES As apt. DOI USERS(U

  16. [Endodontics in horses. An experimental study].

    PubMed

    Garcia, F; Sanromán, F; Llorens, M P

    1990-04-01

    A total of 44 experimental endodontic treatments were performed in incisors of eight horses of different ages. Four different endodontic pastes were used: Cloropercha, AH26 De Trey, Eugenol-Endometasone, and Universal N2. Gutta-percha points were also included in the last two treatments. Access to the pulp cavity of incisors was gained through their vestibular and occlusal faces. Holes drilled in vestibular faces were sealed with composite and those drilled in occlusal faces were sealed with Amalgama. Animals were observed during eighteen months at least after endodontics. Radiographic controls were done just after surgery and before slaughtering. Treated incisors and alveoli were studied histopathologically. During the experiment all animals were in good condition. They ate apparently without trouble, and neither clinical nor radiological signs were present.

  17. Lipid peroxidation in experimental uveitis: sequential studies.

    PubMed

    Goto, H; Wu, G S; Chen, F; Kristeva, M; Sevanian, A; Rao, N A

    1992-06-01

    Previously we have detected the occurrence of retinal lipid peroxidation initiated by phagocyte-derived oxygen radicals in experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU). In the current studies, the confirmation of inflammation-mediated lipid peroxidation was proceeded further to include measurement of multiple parameters, including conjugated dienes, ketodienes, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and fluorescent chromolipids. The assay for myeloperoxidase, a measure for the number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the inflammatory sites was also carried out. The levels of all these parameters were followed through the course of EAU development. The sequential evaluation of histologic changes using both light and electron microscopy was also carried out and the results were correlated with lipid peroxidation indices. These data suggest that the retinal lipid peroxidation plays a causative role in the subsequent retinal degeneration.

  18. Experimental Studies in Helicopter Vertical Climb Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKillip, Robert M., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Data and analysis from an experimental program to measure vertical climb performance on an eight-foot model rotor are presented. The rotor testing was performed using a unique moving-model facility capable of accurately simulating the flow conditions during axial flight, and was conducted from July 9, 1992 to July 16, 1992 at the Dynamic Model Track, or 'Long Track,' just prior to its demolition in August of 1992. Data collected during this brief test program included force and moment time histories from a sting-mounted strain gauge balance, support carriage velocity, and rotor rpm pulses. In addition, limited video footage (of marginal use) was recorded from smoke flow studies for both simulated vertical climb and descent trajectories. Analytical comparisons with these data include a series of progressively more detailed calculations ranging from simple momentum theory, a prescribed wake method, and a free-wake prediction.

  19. [Brackets and friction in orthodontics: experimental study].

    PubMed

    Ben Rejeb Jdir, Saloua; Tobji, Samir; Turki, Wiem; Dallel, Ines; Khedher, Nedra; Ben Amor, Adel

    2015-09-01

    Many authors have been involved in developing brackets in order to improve the quality, stability, speed and efficiency of orthodontic treatment. In order to reduce friction between bracket and archwire, new therapeutic approaches have been devised based on novel technologies. Among these innovative techniques, self-ligating brackets are increasingly popular. SLBs can be classified into several categories according to their mode of action and their materials. We performed an experimental study to compare the friction forces generated during the sliding of orthodontic archwires made from various alloys through conventional and self-ligating brackets. Results show the favorable influence of SLBs, compared to conventional systems using elastomeric or metal ligatures, on the level of friction, particularly when shape-memory Ni-Ti archwires are used. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2015.

  20. Experimental study of solar simulator mirror cryocontamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galjaev, V. L.; Makarov, A. A.; Afanassiev, N. A.

    1994-01-01

    The background and tasks formulation of the study of Solar Simulator collimation mirror cryocontamination in Large Thermal Vacuum Facility are outlined, research methods and experiment procedures are described, experimental relationships obtained are analyzed and practical recommendations are given. The accepted procedure of thermal vacuum tests as a rule defines the sequence of operations for verifying the spacecraft under test without taking into account measures for preventing Solar Simulator collimation mirror contamination and degradation. On the other hand, evacuation procedures is defined for conditions of achieving the required vacuum in the shortest possible time with using the available evacuation equipment at a regime close to the optimum one. Similarly, cryopanel cooling down cyclogram and test object preparation process are not analyzed from the viewpoint of ways of reducing environmental detrimental effects on thermal vacuum facility contamination-sensitive systems. Solar Simulator mirror contamination and its reflective characteristics change results in degradation of solar flux parameters and reduction of simulator continuous operation time. Methods of consideration of optical effects due to mirror surface contamination are actually missing. The effects themselves are not quite understood and data cited in literature as a rule, were obtained under conditions different from real thermal vacuum facility and therefore should be subjected to additional experimental verification. Only in the last few years contamination effect on optical surfaces degradation has been considered with using empirical relations. Mirror reflective properties degradation leads to the increase of Solar Simulator errors. This ultimately has an adverse effect on S/C ground development, schedule and cost of thermal vacuum tests. Besides, the mirror maintenance in operable state becomes more expensive. The present paper is dedicated to the study of Solar Simulator collimation

  1. Experimental study of solar simulator mirror cryocontamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galjaev, V. L.; Makarov, A. A.; Afanassiev, N. A.

    1994-01-01

    The background and tasks formulation of the study of Solar Simulator collimation mirror cryocontamination in Large Thermal Vacuum Facility are outlined, research methods and experiment procedures are described, experimental relationships obtained are analyzed and practical recommendations are given. The accepted procedure of thermal vacuum tests as a rule defines the sequence of operations for verifying the spacecraft under test without taking into account measures for preventing Solar Simulator collimation mirror contamination and degradation. On the other hand, evacuation procedures is defined for conditions of achieving the required vacuum in the shortest possible time with using the available evacuation equipment at a regime close to the optimum one. Similarly, cryopanel cooling down cyclogram and test object preparation process are not analyzed from the viewpoint of ways of reducing environmental detrimental effects on thermal vacuum facility contamination-sensitive systems. Solar Simulator mirror contamination and its reflective characteristics change results in degradation of solar flux parameters and reduction of simulator continuous operation time. Methods of consideration of optical effects due to mirror surface contamination are actually missing. The effects themselves are not quite understood and data cited in literature as a rule, were obtained under conditions different from real thermal vacuum facility and therefore should be subjected to additional experimental verification. Only in the last few years contamination effect on optical surfaces degradation has been considered with using empirical relations. Mirror reflective properties degradation leads to the increase of Solar Simulator errors. This ultimately has an adverse effect on S/C ground development, schedule and cost of thermal vacuum tests. Besides, the mirror maintenance in operable state becomes more expensive. The present paper is dedicated to the study of Solar Simulator collimation

  2. New experimental technique for the measurement of the velocity field in thin films falling over obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landel, Julien R.; Daglis, Ana; McEvoy, Harry; Dalziel, Stuart B.

    2014-11-01

    We present a new experimental technique to measure the surface velocity of a thin falling film. Thin falling films are important in various processes such as cooling in heat exchangers or cleaning processes. For instance, in a household dishwasher cleaning depends on the ability of a thin draining film to remove material from a substrate. We are interested in the impact of obstacles attached to a substrate on the velocity field of a thin film flowing over them. Measuring the velocity field of thin falling films is a challenging experimental problem due to the small depth of the flow and the large velocity gradient across its depth. We propose a new technique based on PIV to measure the plane components of the velocity at the surface of the film over an arbitrarily large area and an arbitrarily large resolution, depending mostly on the image acquisition technique. We perform experiments with thin films of water flowing on a flat inclined surface, made of glass or stainless steel. The typical Reynolds number of the film is of the order of 100 to 1000, computed using the surface velocity, the film thickness and the kinematic viscosity of the film. We measure the modification to the flow field, from a viscous-gravity regime, caused by small solid obstacles, such as three-dimensional hemispherical obstacles and two-dimensional steps. We compare our results with past theoretical and numerical studies. This material is based upon work supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency under Contract No. HDTRA1-12-D-0003-0001.

  3. Experimental manipulation of floral scent bouquets restructures flower-visitor interactions in the field.

    PubMed

    Larue, Anne-Amélie C; Raguso, Robert A; Junker, Robert R

    2016-03-01

    A common structural feature of natural communities is the non-random distribution of pairwise interactions between organisms of different trophic levels. For plant-animal interactions, it is predicted that both stochastic processes and functional plant traits that facilitate or prevent interactions are responsible for these patterns. However, unbiased manipulative field experiments that rigorously test the effects of individual traits on community structure are lacking. We address this gap by manipulating floral scent bouquets in the field. Manipulation of floral scent bouquets led to quantitative as well as qualitative restructuring of flower-visitor networks, making them more generalized. Olfactometer trials confirmed both positive and negative responses to scent bouquets. Our results clearly show that the distribution of insect visitors to the two abundant study plant species reflects the insects' species-specific preferences for floral scents, rather than for visual or morphological floral traits. Thus, floral scents may be of major importance in partitioning flower-visitor interactions. Integrating experimental manipulations of plant traits with field observations of interaction patterns thus represents a promising approach for revealing the processes that structure species assemblages in natural communities. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2015 British Ecological Society.

  4. Pulmonary paragonimiasis: clinical and experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Im, J G; Kong, Y; Shin, Y M; Yang, S O; Song, J G; Han, M C; Kim, C W; Cho, S Y; Ham, E K

    1993-05-01

    Pulmonary paragonimiasis is a disease caused by a lung fluke. It is endemic to East Asia, but there have been several case reports in North America. Human infestation occurs by ingestion of raw or incompletely cooked freshwater crab or crayfish infected with metacercaria. A retrospective study was performed with 78 patients who lived in South Korea and had chest radiographic findings of pleuropulmonary disease; it was subsequently shown that they had paragonimiasis. The diagnosis was based on positive results of serologic tests for Paragonimus-specific antibody or on the detection of eggs in sputum samples. Radiologic findings from these 78 patients were correlated with the pathologic and radiologic findings from a study of experimentally induced pulmonary paragonimiasis in 21 cats. Findings from the correlative study document that the typical radiologic manifestations of pulmonary paragonimiasis vary with the stage of the disease. Early findings include pneumothorax or hydropneumothorax, focal airspace consolidation, and linear opacities and are caused by the migration of juvenile worms. Later findings include thin-walled cysts, dense masslike consolidation, nodules, or bronchiectasis and are due to worm cysts.

  5. A numerical and experimental study of confined swirling jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikjooy, M.; Mongia, H. C.; Samuelsen, G. S.; Mcdonell, V. G.

    1989-01-01

    A numerical and experimental study of a confined strong swirling flow is presented. Detailed velocity measurements are made using a two-component laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) technique. Computations are performed using a differential second-moment (DSM) closure. The effect of inlet dissipation rate on calculated mean and turbulence fields is investigated. Various model constants are employed in the pressure-strain model to demonstrate their influences on the predicted results. Finally, comparison of the DSM calculations with the algebraic second-monent (ASM) closure results shows that the DSM is better suited for complex swirling flow analysis.

  6. Evaluation used underground water drain pipes of experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, T.; Ohara, J.; Fujisawa, K.; Nakano, R.; Tabata, Y.

    2010-12-01

    The landslide measures in Japan, using the method of landslide reduce groundwater. The method is to drill a horizontal boring. Typically, this construction method 5mm diameter hole was opened in four directions was opened by drilling a 40mm VP pipe made of 90mm is inserted into the hole. Currently, the pipe has been used experimentally in the field. First, in this study, we have constructed a model to observe the water flowing through the pipe. Water gathering and water leakage obtained from two experiments using the model. Drainage performance has been evaluated from the results.

  7. A numerical and experimental study of confined swirling jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikjooy, M.; Mongia, H. C.; Samuelsen, G. S.; Mcdonell, V. G.

    1989-01-01

    A numerical and experimental study of a confined strong swirling flow is presented. Detailed velocity measurements are made using a two-component laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) technique. Computations are performed using a differential second-moment (DSM) closure. The effect of inlet dissipation rate on calculated mean and turbulence fields is investigated. Various model constants are employed in the pressure-strain model to demonstrate their influences on the predicted results. Finally, comparison of the DSM calculations with the algebraic second-monent (ASM) closure results shows that the DSM is better suited for complex swirling flow analysis.

  8. Experimental Study of Alluvial Fan Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delorme, P.; Devauchelle, O.; Barrier, L.; Métivier, F.

    2015-12-01

    At the outlet of mountain ranges, rivers flow onto flatter lowlands. The associated change of slope causes sediment deposition. As the river is free to move laterally, it builds conical sedimentary structures called alluvial fans. Their location at the interface between erosional and depositional areas makes them valuable sedimentary archives. To decipher these sedimentary records, we need to understand the dynamics of their growth. Most natural fans are built by braided streams. However, to avoid the complexity of braided rivers, we develop a small-scale experiment in which an alluvial fan is formed by a single channel. We use a mixture of water and glycerol to produce a laminar river. The fluid is mixed with corindon sand (~ 300 μm) in a tilted channel and left free to form a fan around its outlet. The sediment and water discharges are constant during an experimental run. We record the fan progradation and the channel morphology with top-view pictures. We also generate an elevation map with an optical method based on the deformation of a moiré pattern. We observe that, to leading order, the fan remains self-affine as it grows, with a constant slope. We compare two recent studies about the formation of one-dimensionnal fan [Guerit et al. 2014] and threshold rivers [Seizilles et al. 2013] to our experimental findings. In particular, we propose a theory witch relates the fan morphology to the control parameters ( fluid and sediment discharges, grain size). Our observation accord with the predictions, suggesting that the fan is built near the threshold of sediment motion. Finally, we intend to expand our interpretation to alluvial fans build by single-thread channels ( Okavango, Bostwana; Taquari and Paraguay, Brasil; Pastaza, Peru).

  9. Mentoring Field Directors: A National Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellison, Martha L.; Raskin, Miriam S.

    2014-01-01

    In social work field education, mentoring is underused and lacks research data. There is a paucity of research that examines the effect mentoring has on social work field directors who administer field programs at the undergraduate and/or graduate level. This exploratory study fills this void by examining the mentoring opportunities and…

  10. Field Guides in Academe: A Citation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Dianne

    2006-01-01

    Field guides are common in libraries but are generally not considered scholarly. This study examines citations to fifty field guides to determine how they were used in scholarly publications, finding that field guides are frequently cited as a source of data on the ranges, habits, and descriptions of plants and animals.

  11. An Experimental Study of Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey W.; Niederhaus, Charles E.

    1996-01-01

    Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability occurs when a planar interface separating two fluids of different density is impulsively accelerated In the direction of its normal. It is one of the most fundamental of fluid instabilities and is of importance in fields ranging from astrophysics to materials processing. Because RM instability experiments are normally carried out in shock tubes, where the generation of a sharp well controlled interface between gases is difficult, there is a scarcity of good experimental results. The experiments presented here utilize a novel technique which circumvents many of the experimental difficulties that have previously limited the study of RM instability. In this system, the instability is generated by bouncing a thin rectangular tank containing two liquids off of a fixed spring. Results obtained from these experiments yield particularly well visualized images of the nonlinear development of the instability. However, because the run time in these experiments is limited, new experiments capable of achieving longer run times are planned.

  12. Update on the Experimental Study of Current Filamentation Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Brian; Muggli, Patric; Martins, Joana; Silva, Luis; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Fedurin, Mikhail; Kusche, Karl; Babzien, Marcus; Huang, Chengkun; Mori, Warren

    2011-10-01

    Current Filamentation Instability (CFI) is of central importance for propagation of relativistic electron beams in plasmas. CFI has potential relevance to astrophysics, magnetic field/radiation generation in afterglow of gamma ray bursts, and inertial confinement fusion, energy transport in fast-igniter concept. An experiment is underway at Accelerator Test Facility at BNL with 60 MeV electron beam and capillary discharge plasma. The goal is to conduct a systematic study and characterize CFI as function of beam (charge, transverse and longitudinal profile) and plasma (plasma density) parameters. The transverse beam profile is measured directly at the plasma exit with OTR from a gold-coated silicon window. Initial experimental results show reduction of the beam transverse size with the appearance of multiple beam filaments and the size and number of individual filaments depend on the plasma density. We will present early experimental results and outline next steps. Work supported by NSF and US DOE.

  13. A Computational and Experimental Study of Slit Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, C. K. W.; Ju, H.; Jones, M. G.; Watson, W. R.; Parrott, T. L.

    2003-01-01

    Computational and experimental studies are carried out to offer validation of the results obtained from direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the flow and acoustic fields of slit resonators. The test cases include slits with 90-degree corners and slits with 45-degree bevel angle housed inside an acoustic impedance tube. Three slit widths are used. Six frequencies from 0.5 to 3.0 kHz are chosen. Good agreement is found between computed and measured reflection factors. In addition, incident sound waves having white noise spectrum and a prescribed pseudo-random noise spectrum are used in subsequent series of tests. The computed broadband results are again found to agree well with experimental data. It is believed the present results provide strong support that DNS can eventually be a useful and accurate prediction tool for liner aeroacoustics. The usage of DNS as a design tool is discussed and illustrated by a simple example.

  14. Experimental study of a Hall current plasma accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhongmin

    Electromagnetic propulsion holds the promise of potential prime space propulsion by combining high exhaust velocities with high mass flow rates compared to other electric propulsion devices. The primary objective of this study is to experimentally investigate the plasma acceleration due to Hall effect in the presence of applied magnetic and electric fields. This is the first attempt to integrate a non-equilibrium microwave plasma with a Hall current plasma accelerator. A linear Hall current plasma accelerator segmented with 5 pairs of electrodes was developed and tested. A non-equilibrium microwave plasma generated by a 6 kW microwave generator was used to feed the accelerator. The discharge voltage, current, and the Hall current through each pair of the electrodes were measured. Velocity measurement techniques including the MHD open-circuit, the combined emissive probe and MHD open-circuit, and the time-of-flight electrostatic probe were developed and implemented. The near field plasma properties were also measured by multiple Langmuir probes. Theoretical analyses were conducted using both electromagnetic and electrostatic models. Both models predicted that large axial electric field and ionization fraction are critical to obtaining high specific impulse and efficient acceleration. The role of the magnetic field is to trap the electrons, and thus distribute the electric field across the whole plasma for acceleration of ions. The experimental results show that axial discharge voltages increased with increasing magnetic field. A strong plasma acceleration zone was noted at the region closest to the cathode. Within this zone, the Hall current and Hall parameter are much larger than elsewhere along the flow path. So is the axial electric field. This suggested a very strong Hall effect in the accelerator. The mean Hall parameters varied from less than one to the order of 10 in the high power tests. Significant acceleration of the plasma by the linear Hall current

  15. Experimental study of nanofiber production through forcespinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padron, Simon; Fuentes, Arturo; Caruntu, Dumitru; Lozano, Karen

    2013-01-01

    A newly developed method of producing nanofibers, called forcespinning, has proven to be a viable alternative to mass produce nanofibers. Unlike electrospinning, the most common method currently being employed (which draws fibers through the use of electrostatic force), forcespinning utilizes centrifugal forces which allow for a host of new materials to be processed into nanofibers (given that electric fields are not required) while also providing a significant increase in yield and ease of production. This work presents a detailed explanation of the fiber formation process. The study is conducted using high speed photography to capture the jet initiation process at the orifice and to track the trajectories of the resulting jets. The effects that influential controllable parameters have on the fiber trajectories and final fiber diameters are presented. The forcespinning controllable parameters include the spinneret angular velocity and aspect ratio, orifice radius and orientation, fluid viscoelasticity and surface tension, fluid fill level, solvent evaporation rate, temperature, and distance of spinneret orifice to collector.

  16. Experimental study of a crystal positron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chehab, R.; Cizeron, R.; Sylvia, C.; Baier, V.; Beloborodov, K.; Bukin, A.; Burdin, S.; Dimova, T.; Drozdetsky, A.; Druzhinin, V.; Dubrovin, M.; Golubev, V.; Serednyakov, S.; Shary, V.; Strakhovenko, V.; Artru, X.; Chevallier, M.; Dauvergne, D.; Kirsch, R.; Lautesse, Ph.; Poizat, J.-C.; Remillieux, J.; Jejcic, A.; Keppler, P.; Major, J.; Gatignon, L.; Bochek, G.; Kulibaba, V.; Maslov, N.; Bogdanov, A.; Potylitsin, A.; Vnukov, I.

    2002-01-01

    Tungsten crystals oriented on their <111> axis, were submitted to 6 and 10 GeV electron beams on the SPS-CERN transfer lines. The crystals, 4 and 8 mm thick, used alone or associated to 4 mm thick amorphous disk, were studied as positron sources. The emerging positrons were detected by a Drift Chamber partially immersed in a magnetic field, where their trajectories were reconstructed providing the energy spectrum and the angular distribution. Significant enhancements were observed for the crystal source when compared to the amorphous one of the same thickness. The gain was larger than 3 and 2 for the 4 mm and 8 mm targets, respectively. The presented results look very promising for e+e- linear colliders.

  17. Experimental methods in studying child language acquisition.

    PubMed

    Ambridge, Ben; Rowland, Caroline F

    2013-03-01

    This article reviews the some of the most widely used methods used for studying children's language acquisition including (1) spontaneous/naturalistic, diary, parental report data, (2) production methods (elicited production, repetition/elicited imitation, syntactic priming/weird word order), (3) comprehension methods (act-out, pointing, intermodal preferential looking, looking while listening, conditioned head turn preference procedure, functional neuroimaging) and (4) judgment methods (grammaticality/acceptability judgments, yes-no/truth-value judgments). The review outlines the types of studies and age-groups to which each method is most suited, as well as the advantage and disadvantages of each. We conclude by summarising the particular methodological considerations that apply to each paradigm and to experimental design more generally. These include (1) choosing an age-appropriate task that makes communicative sense (2) motivating children to co-operate, (3) choosing a between-/within-subjects design, (4) the use of novel items (e.g., novel verbs), (5) fillers, (6) blocked, counterbalanced and random presentation, (7) the appropriate number of trials and participants, (8) drop-out rates (9) the importance of control conditions, (10) choosing a sensitive dependent measure (11) classification of responses, and (12) using an appropriate statistical test. WIREs Cogn Sci 2013, 4:149-168. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1215 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. The authors declare no conflict of interest. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Theoretical & Experimental Studies of Elementary Particles

    SciTech Connect

    McFarland, Kevin

    2012-10-04

    Abstract High energy physics has been one of the signature research programs at the University of Rochester for over 60 years. The group has made leading contributions to experimental discoveries at accelerators and in cosmic rays and has played major roles in developing the theoretical framework that gives us our ``standard model'' of fundamental interactions today. This award from the Department of Energy funded a major portion of that research for more than 20 years. During this time, highlights of the supported work included the discovery of the top quark at the Fermilab Tevatron, the completion of a broad program of physics measurements that verified the electroweak unified theory, the measurement of three generations of neutrino flavor oscillations, and the first observation of a ``Higgs like'' boson at the Large Hadron Collider. The work has resulted in more than 2000 publications over the period of the grant. The principal investigators supported on this grant have been recognized as leaders in the field of elementary particle physics by their peers through numerous awards and leadership positions. Most notable among them is the APS W.K.H. Panofsky Prize awarded to Arie Bodek in 2004, the J.J. Sakurai Prizes awarded to Susumu Okubo and C. Richard Hagen in 2005 and 2010, respectively, the Wigner medal awarded to Susumu Okubo in 2006, and five principal investigators (Das, Demina, McFarland, Orr, Tipton) who received Department of Energy Outstanding Junior Investigator awards during the period of this grant. The University of Rochester Department of Physics and Astronomy, which houses the research group, provides primary salary support for the faculty and has waived most tuition costs for graduate students during the period of this grant. The group also benefits significantly from technical support and infrastructure available at the University which supports the work. The research work of the group has provided educational opportunities for graduate students

  19. Cancer promotion in a mouse-skin model by a 60-Hz magnetic field: I. Experimental design and exposure system

    SciTech Connect

    Stuchly, M.A.; Lecuyer, D.W.; McLean, J. )

    1991-01-01

    The rationale for selection of an animal model, the experimental design, and the design and evaluation of an exposure system used in studies of 60-Hz magnetic fields are described. The studies were conceived to assay development of cancer and immune responsiveness in mice exposed to magnetic fields. The exposure system utilized a quadrupole-coil configuration to minimize stray magnetic fields. Four square-wound coil provided a uniform field within a volume occupied by 16 animal cages. The magnetic field had a mean flux density of 2 mT that varied less than {plus minus} 10% within the volume occupied by animals' cages. The flux density decreased to less than 0.1 microT at a distance of 2 m from the coils. In each exposure system 32 animals could be housed in plastic cages.

  20. Validity of archaeomagnetic field recording: an experimental pottery kiln at Coppengrave, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnepp, Elisabeth; Leonhardt, Roman; Korte, Monika; Klett-Drechsel, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    Palaeomagnetic data obtained from archaeological materials are used for reconstructions of the Earth's magnetic field of the past millennia. While many studies tested the reliability of this recorder for palaeointensity only a few studies did this for direction. The study presents an archaeomagnetic and rock magnetic investigation applied to an experimental pottery kiln, which was operated in 2003 to produce stone ware. This kind of high-quality pottery needs a temperature of at least 1160 °C. Shortly before heating of the kiln direct absolute measurements of the absolute geomagnetic field vector have been carried out close to it. After cooling of the kiln 24 oriented palaeomagnetic samples have been taken. Although Curie temperatures are about 580 °C, that is the typical temperature for magnetite, thermal as well as alternating field demagnetisations reveal also a considerable amount of hematite as magnetic carrier. This mixture of magnetite and hematite is dominated by pseudo-single domain grains. Demagnetisation removed in some cases weak secondary components, but in most cases the specimens carried a single component thermoremanent magnetisation. The mean characteristic remanent magnetisation direction agrees on 95 per cent confidence level with the directly measured field direction. Archaeointensity was obtained from five specimens with the Thellier-Coe method and with the multiple-specimen palaeointensity domain-state corrected method. Six of these specimens also provided a result of the Dekkers-Böhnel method, which overestimated the archaeointensity by about 9 per cent compared to the direct value, while after correction for fraction the value agrees very well. For the multiple-specimen palaeointensity domain-state corrected method only fractions between 25 and 75 per cent have been used and specimens showing alteration have been excluded. Above 450 °C many specimens showed alteration of the magnetic grains. Because median destructive temperatures were

  1. Validity of archaeomagnetic field recording: an experimental pottery kiln at Coppengrave, Germany.

    PubMed

    Schnepp, Elisabeth; Leonhardt, Roman; Korte, Monika; Klett-Drechsel, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    Palaeomagnetic data obtained from archaeological materials are used for reconstructions of the Earth's magnetic field of the past millennia. While many studies tested the reliability of this recorder for palaeointensity only a few studies did this for direction. The study presents an archaeomagnetic and rock magnetic investigation applied to an experimental pottery kiln, which was operated in 2003 to produce stone ware. This kind of high-quality pottery needs a temperature of at least 1160 °C. Shortly before heating of the kiln direct absolute measurements of the absolute geomagnetic field vector have been carried out close to it. After cooling of the kiln 24 oriented palaeomagnetic samples have been taken. Although Curie temperatures are about 580 °C, that is the typical temperature for magnetite, thermal as well as alternating field demagnetisations reveal also a considerable amount of hematite as magnetic carrier. This mixture of magnetite and hematite is dominated by pseudo-single domain grains. Demagnetisation removed in some cases weak secondary components, but in most cases the specimens carried a single component thermoremanent magnetisation. The mean characteristic remanent magnetisation direction agrees on 95 per cent confidence level with the directly measured field direction. Archaeointensity was obtained from five specimens with the Thellier-Coe method and with the multiple-specimen palaeointensity domain-state corrected method. Six of these specimens also provided a result of the Dekkers-Böhnel method, which overestimated the archaeointensity by about 9 per cent compared to the direct value, while after correction for fraction the value agrees very well. For the multiple-specimen palaeointensity domain-state corrected method only fractions between 25 and 75 per cent have been used and specimens showing alteration have been excluded. Above 450 °C many specimens showed alteration of the magnetic grains. Because median destructive

  2. Seating Position and Interaction in Triads: A Field Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverstein, C. Harris; Stang, David J.

    1976-01-01

    Relationships between seating position, length of acquaintance between subjects, observer bias toward the experimental outcome, and interaction rates are examined in a field study. Subjects with greatest visual centrality spoke most often. Length of acquaintance between subjects was unrelated to interaction rates. (Author/DEP)

  3. Inertial electrostatic confinement: Theoretical and experimental studies of spherical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Ryan

    Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) is a means to confine ions for fusion purposes with electrostatic fields in a converging geometry. Its engineering simplicity makes it appealing when compared to magnetic confinement devices. It is hoped that such a device may one day be a net energy producer, but it has near term applications as a neutron generator. We study spherical IECs (SIECs), both theoretically and experimentally. Theoretically, we compute solutions in the free molecular limit and map out regions in control parameter space conducive to the formation of double potential wells. In addition, several other observables are mapped in the control parameter space. Such studies predict the threshold for the phenomena of "core splitting" to occur when the fractional well depth (FWD) is ˜70%-80%. With respect to double potential wells, it is shown that an optimal population of electrons exists for double well formation. In addition, double well depth is relatively insensitive to space charge spreading of ion beams. Glow discharge devices are studied experimentally with double and single Langmuir probes. The postulated micro-channeling phenomenon is verified with density measurements along a micro-channel and along the radius where micro-channels are absent. In addition, the measurements allow an evaluation of the neutrality of micro-channels and the heterogeneous structure of "Star Mode". It is shown that, despite visual evidence, micro-channeling persists well into "Jet" mode. In addition, the threshold for the "Star" mode to "Jet" mode transition is obtained experimentally. The studies have revealed new techniques for estimating tangential electric field components and studying the focusing of ion flow.

  4. Field Studies of Human Systems: A Cooperative Learning Field Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harbeck, Richard

    1997-01-01

    Advocates that geography teachers undertake field studies of human systems with their students. Describes a learning process in which teachers take students to a human system (supermarket, hotel) and guide them through exploration and analysis of the system with the goal of building skills that can transfer to other geographic tasks. (MJP)

  5. Experimental Study of Gas Hydrate Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fandino, O.; Ruffine, L.

    2011-12-01

    Important quantities of methane and other gases are trapped below the seafloor and in the permafrost by an ice-like solid, called gas hydrates or clathrate hydrates. The latter is formed when water is mixing with different gases at high pressures and low temperatures. Due to a their possible use as a source of energy [1] or the problematic related to flow assurance failure in pipelines [2] the understanding of their processes of formation/destabilisation of these structures becomes a goal for many laboratories research as well as industries. In this work we present an experimental study on the stochastic behaviour of hydrate formation from a bulk phase. The method used here for the experiments was to repeat several time the same hydrate formation procedure and to notice the different from one experiment to another. A variable-volume type high-pressure apparatus with two sapphire windows was used. This device, already presented by Ruffine et al.[3], allows us to perform both kinetics and phase equilibrium measurements. Three initial pressure conditions were considered here, 5.0 MPa, 7.5 MPa and 10.0 MPa. Hydrates have been formed, then allowed to dissociate by stepwise heating. The memory effect has also been investigated after complete dissociation. It turned out that, although the thermodynamics conditions of formation and/or destabilization were reproducible. An attempt to determine the influence of pressure on the nucleation induction time will be discussed. References 1. Sum, A. K.; Koh, C. A.; Sloan, E. D., Clathrate Hydrates: From Laboratory Science to Engineering Practice. Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research 2009, 48, 7457-7465. 2. Sloan, E. D., A changing hydrate paradigm-from apprehension to avoidance to risk management. Fluid Phase Equilibria 2005, 228, 67-74. 3. Ruffine, L.; Donval, J. P.; Charlou, J. L.; Cremière, A.; Zehnder, B. H., Experimental study of gas hydrate formation and destabilisation using a novel high-pressure apparatus. Marine

  6. Experimental study of periodic flow effects on spanwise vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Molina, Cruz Daniel; Lopez Sanchez, Erick Javier; Ruiz Chavarria, Gerardo; Medina Ovando, Abraham

    2014-11-01

    We present an experimental study about the spanwise vortex produced in a flow going out of a channel in shallow waters. This vortex travels in front of the dipole. The velocity field measurement was done using the PIV technique, and DPIVsoft (https://www.irphe.fr/ ~meunier/) was used for data processing. In this case the flow has a periodic forcing to simulate ocean tides. The experiment was conducted in a channel with variable width and the measurements were made using three different values of the aspect ratio width-depth. We present results of the position, circulation of this spanwise vortex and the flow inversion effect. The change of flow direction modify the intensity of the vortex, but it does not destroy it. The vertical components of the velocity field contributes particle transport. G. Ruiz Chavarria, E. J. Lopez Sanchez and C. D. Garcia Molina acknowledge DGAPA-UNAM by support under project IN 116312 (Vorticidad y ondas no lineales en fluidos).

  7. Experimental and theoretical researches on arc structure in a self-field thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Kagaya, Y.; Yoshikawa, T.; Tahara, H.; Yasui, H.

    1987-05-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies on the MPD arc structure in a self-field thruster have been done with the plasma diagnostics and computational simulation analyses in order to understand the mechanisms of the heating, acceleration and limiting phenomenon. It is found that the current patterns depend strongly on the propellant species and discharge current level and that the features on current conduction below the critical current are divided into two cases, depending on the rare and molecular gases as the propellants. Furthermore, the existence of two energetic heating regions is confirmed. In the cathode active region, more than 50 percent of the electric power is consumed; the heated plasma is compressed radially by the strong pumping force and expanded as the cathode jet. In the anode active region, the potential with the negative slope is formed adjacently to the anode surface at the low current level except for H2 propellant. 18 references.

  8. Experimental Investigation of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer Enhancement in Microgravity in the Presence of Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Cila

    1996-01-01

    Boiling is an effective mode of heat transfer since high heat flux levels are possible driven by relatively small temperature differences. The high heat transfer coefficients associated with boiling have made the use of these processes increasingly attractive to aerospace engineering. Applications of this type include compact evaporators in the thermal control of aircraft avionics and spacecraft environments, heat pipes, and use of boiling to cool electronic equipment. In spite of its efficiency, cooling based on liquid-vapor phase change processes has not yet found wide application in aerospace engineering due to specific problems associated with the low gravity environment. After a heated surface has reached the superheat required for the initiation of nucleate boiling, bubbles will start forming at nucleation sites along the solid interface by evaporation of the liquid. Bubbles in contact with the wall will continue growing by this mechanism until they detach. In terrestrial conditions, bubble detachment is determined by the competition between body forces (e.g. buoyancy) and surface tension forces that act to anchor the bubble along the three phase contact line. For a given body force potential and a balance of tensions along the three phase contact line, bubbles must reach a critical size before the body force can cause them to detach from the wall. In a low gravity environment the critical bubble size for detachment is much larger than under terrestrial conditions, since buoyancy is a less effective means of bubble removal. Active techniques of heat transfer enhancement in single phase and phase change processes by utilizing electric fields have been the subject of intensive research during recent years. The field of electrohydrodynamics (EHD) deals with the interactions between electric fields, flow fields and temperature fields. Previous studies indicate that in terrestrial applications nucleate boiling heat transfer can be increased by a factor of 50 as

  9. Field testing of the experimental wood preservative N'N-naphtaloylhydroxylamine : five and eight years results

    Treesearch

    Frederick Green; Rachel A. Arango; Stan T. Lebow

    2010-01-01

    Field trials were designed to evaluate the ability of the experimental wood preservative N’N-naphthaloylhydroxylamine (NHA) to inhibit fungal decay and termite damage at the USDA Harrison Experimental Forest (HEF) in Saucier, MS. Twenty replicate 19 x 19 x 457 mm (0.75 x 0.75 x 18 in.) southern yellow pine stakes and 10 replicate 19 x 19 x 76 mm (0.75 x 0.75 x 3 in.)...

  10. VDTs: Field levels, epidemiology, and laboratory studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kavet, R.; Tell, R.A. )

    1991-07-01

    As the use of video display terminals (VDTs) has expanded, questions have been raised as to whether working at a VDT affects the risk of adverse pregnancy outcome. A particular focus for these questions has been the very low frequency (VLF) magnetic field produced by a VDT's horizontal deflection coil. VDTs also produce VLF electric fields, extremely low frequency (ELF) electric and magnetic fields, and static electric fields, Ten studies of pregnancy outcome in VDT operators have been conducted in six countries, and with one exception, none has concluded that magnetic fields from VDTs may predispose pregnant operators to spontaneous abortion or congenital malformation. The epidemiologic studies conducted thus far do not provide a basis for concluding that VDT work and adverse pregnancy outcome are associated. Studies of fetal resorptions and malformations in rodents exposed to VLF magnetic fields have produced inconsistent findings. Two laboratories in Sweden that studied mice have reported positive results, one laboratory showing field-related malformations (but not resorptions) and the other showing field-related resorptions (but not malformations). Two Canadian laboratories have reported negative results in rats and mice. Studies of avian embryos have also yielded inconsistent results, but lacking a maternal-fetal placental interface, avian embryos are a questionable model for evaluating human reproductive risks. Finally, VLF electric and magnetic fields measured at the operator position are in compliance with field strength standards and guidelines that have been established around the world. 55 refs.

  11. Developments in the field of allergy in 2011 through the eyes of Clinical and Experimental Allergy.

    PubMed

    Arshad, S H; Dharmage, S C; Ferreira, F; Fixman, E D; Gadermaier, G; Hauser, M; Sampson, A P; Teran, L M; Wallner, M; Wardlaw, A J

    2012-12-01

    As in previous years, we felt it would be of value to our readership to summarize the new information provided by the authors who have published in Clinical and Experimental Allergy in 2011 and set this in the context of recent advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis and management of allergic disease in all its many manifestations. In 2011, about 210 articles were published in Clinical and Experimental Allergy including editorials, reviews, opinion articles, guidelines, letters, book reviews and of course at the heart of the journal, papers containing original data. As before, this review is divided into sections based on the way the journal is structured, although this year we have grouped together all the papers dealing with mechanisms of allergic disease, whether they involve patients (clinical mechanisms), pure in vitro studies (basic mechanisms) or animal models (experimental models), as we felt this was a more coherent way to deal with the subject. In the field of asthma and rhinitis, the relationship between airway inflammation and airway dysfunction was of perennial interest to investigators, as were phenotypes and biomarkers. Aspirin hypersensitivity appeared in studies in several papers and there was new interest in asthma in the elderly. The mechanisms involved in allergic disease describe advances in our understanding of T cell responses, the relationship between inflammation and disease, mast cell and basophil activation, steroid resistance and novel therapies. In the section dealing with epidemiology, studies seeking to identify risk factors for allergic disease including vitamin D are prominent, as once again are studies investigating gene-environment interactions. The clinical allergy section focuses on drug allergy, food allergy and immunotherapy. The area of oral immunotherapy for food allergy is well covered and we were grateful to Stephen Durham for guest editing an outstanding special issue on immunotherapy in the centenary year of

  12. Experimental study of finite Larmor radius effects

    SciTech Connect

    Struve, K.W.

    1980-08-01

    Linear Z-pinches in Ar, Kr, Xe, N/sub 2/, and He are experimentally studied in regimes where strong finite Larmor radius effects could provide a significant stabilizing effect. Scaling arguments show that for deuterium such a pinch has an electron line density of order 2 x 10/sup 15//cm. For higher Z plasmas a higher line density is allowed, the exact value of which depends on the average ion charge. The pinch is formed by puffing gas axially through the cathode towards the anode of an evacuated pinch chamber. When the gas reaches the anode, the pinch bank is fired. The pinch current rises in 2 to 3 ..mu..sec to a maximum of 100 to 200 kA. The pinch bank capacitance is 900 ..mu..F, and the external inductance is 100 nH. Additionally, the bank is fused to increase dI/dt. The primary diagnostics are a framing camera, a spatially resolved Mach-Zehnder interferometer, and X-ray absorption.

  13. Experimental study of trimethyl aluminum decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhi; Pan, Yang; Yang, Jiuzhong; Jiang, Zhiming; Fang, Haisheng

    2017-09-01

    Trimethyl aluminum (TMA) is an important precursor used for metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) of most Al-containing structures, in particular of nitride structures. The reaction mechanism of TMA with ammonia is neither clear nor certain due to its complexity. Pyrolysis of trimethyl metal is the start of series of reactions, thus significantly affecting the growth. Experimental study of TMA pyrolysis, however, has not yet been conducted in detail. In this paper, a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer is adopted to measure the TMA decomposition from room temperature to 800 °C in a special pyrolysis furnace, activated by soft X-ray from the synchrotron radiation. The results show that generation of methyl, ethane and monomethyl aluminum (MMA) indicates the start of the pyrolysis process. In the low temperature range from 25 °C to 700 °C, the main product is dimethyl aluminum (DMA) from decomposition of TMA. For temperatures larger than 700 °C, the main products are MMA, DMA, methyl and ethane.

  14. Pulmonary emphysema induced by methylphenidate: experimental study.

    PubMed

    Rapello, Gabriel Victor Guimarães; Antoniolli, Andréia; Pereira, Daniel Martins; Facco, Gilberto; Pêgo-Fernandes, Paulo Manuel; Pazetti, Rogério

    2015-01-01

    Methylphenidate is the most widely used drug for treating attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. However, it has important side effects, such as abdominal pain, insomnia, anorexia and loss of appetite, and also some cases of early severe emphysema after drug abuse have been reported. Our aim was to investigate the development of pulmonary emphysema in rats that were subjected to different doses of methylphenidate. Experimental study carried out at the laboratory of a public university. Eighteen male Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control (0.9% saline solution); MP 0.8 (methylphenidate, 0.8 mg/kg); MP 1.2 (methylphenidate, 1.2 mg/kg). After 90 days of daily gavage, the animals were sacrificed and lung tissue samples were prepared for analysis on the mean alveolar diameter (Lm). The Lm was greater in MP 0.8 (47.91 ± 3.13; P < 0.01) and MP 1.2 (46.36 ± 4.39; P < 0.05) than in the control group (40.00 ± 3.48). Methylphenidate caused an increase in the alveolar diameter of rats, which was compatible with human pulmonary emphysema.

  15. [Experimental study on the Eu isotopic enrichment].

    PubMed

    Huang, Xue-ren; Zhong, Da; Mei, Gang-hua; Zhu, Xi-wen

    2002-10-01

    The polarized atomic beam has found many applications, such as in studying atomic scattering processes, producing polarized nucleus, verifying the parity principle, measuring surface parameters and enriching isotopes. In this paper, we mainly described the experiment of Eu isotope enrichment by means of magnetic deflection. According to the special inner energy level structure of Eu atom, we analyzed the theory of the polarized atomic beam and described the main experimental set-up. Using one coherent laser with the wavelength of 601.9 nm and sigma polarization, Eu153 atoms have been selectively optical pumped and polarized, so positive and negative polarized atomic beams could be produced. The polarized atomic beams have been focused and defocused after passing through the deflection by hex-magnet. Finally, some clear enrichmental signal has been obtained in way of hot-wire detection. During the process of the experiment, we carefully selected the optimized conditions, the Eu153 enrichment effect of 4% can be achieved using only one coherent laser.

  16. Experimental investigation on the near flow field of dual stream nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudhakar, S.; Karthikeyan, N.; Ashwin Kumar, S.

    2017-04-01

    An experimental investigation was carried out to investigate the effect of beveling of primary nozzle exit in the near field of a dual stream nozzle flow. Two exit geometry configurations of primary stream nozzle viz., (a) circular (b) bevel along with one exit geometry of the secondary stream-circular, were studied. Experiments were carried out at both subsonic and supersonic primary nozzle operating conditions Mp=0.96 and 1.2. The secondary nozzle exit Mach number was maintained at 0.65 and 0.85 respectively to maintain the velocity ratio of 0.7 between the primary and secondary jet. The by-pass ratio for this investigation is maintained at 2.0. Flow visualization using retro-reflective shadowgraph technique was used for the qualitative visualization of the near flow field at the Mach number of 1.2. The mean and turbulent quantities in near flow field were obtained using particle image Velocimetry (2D-PIV). The flow visualization and PIV investigations show significant change in mean and turbulent quantities brought about in the near field due to the beveling of the primary nozzle. PIV results show increase in the potential core length and reduction in turbulence levels in the potential core by the secondary flow regardless of the jet exit geometry. A differential trend is seen in the shear layer growth and the turbulence characteristics between the shorter and longer lips sides of the beveled nozzle. In the dual stream configurations, bevel nozzle shows lower Reynolds stress values than the circular one except in the shorter lip side at the larger downstream locations.

  17. Experimental studies of gas-aerosol reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Anand

    1991-05-01

    The aqueous phase oxidation of SO2 by H2O2 is believed to the principle mechanism for atmospheric sulfate formation in cloud droplets. However, no studies in noncloud aerosol systems have been reported. The objective is to quantify the importance of the noncloud liquid phase reactions of SO2 by H2O2 in the atmosphere. Growth rates of submicron droplets exposed to SO2 and H2O2 were measured using the tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) technique (Rader and McMurry, 1986). The technique uses differential mobility analyzers (DMA's) to generate monodisperse particles and to measure particle size after the reaction. To facilitate submicron monodisperse droplet production with the DMA, a low-ion-concentration charter capable of generating singly charged particles up to 1.0 microns was developed and experimentally evaluated. The experiments were performed using dry and deliquesced (NH4)2SO4 particles with SO2 and H2O2 concentrations from 0-860 ppb and 0-150 ppb, respectively. No growth was observed for dry particles. For droplets greater than or equal to 0.3 microns, the fractional diameter growth was independent of particle size and for droplets less than or equal to 0.2 microns, it decreased as particle size decreased. The observed decrease is due to NH3 evaporation. As ammonia evaporates, droplet pH decreases causing the oxidation rate to decrease, leading to a lower growth rate. To predict the size-dependent growth rates, a theoretical model was developed using solution thermodynamics, gas/particle equilibrium, and chemical kinetics. The experimental and theoretical results are in reasonable agreement. For dry (NH4)2SO4 particles exposed to SO2, H2O2, NH3, and H2O vapor, surface reaction-controlled growth was observed. Particle growth was very sensitive to particle composition. No growth was observed for Polystyrene latex particles, whereas (NH4)2SO4 particles doped with catalysts (Fe(2+), Fe(3+), Mn(2+) and Cu(2+)) in a molar ratio of 1:500 grew slower than

  18. Experimental Studies of Gas-Aerosol Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Anand

    1991-02-01

    The aqueous phase oxidation of SO_2 by H_2O_2 is believed to be the principle mechanism for atmospheric sulfate formation in cloud droplets. However, no studies in noncloud aerosol systems have been reported. The objective of this thesis is to quantify the importance of the noncloud liquid phase reactions of SO_2 by H_2O_2 in the atmosphere. In this thesis growth rates of submicron droplets exposed to SO_2 and H_2 O_2 were measured using the tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) technique (Rader and McMurry, 1986). The technique uses differential mobility analyzers (DMAs) to generate monodisperse particles and to measure particle size after the reaction. To facilitate submicron monodisperse droplet production with the DMA, a low-ion-concentration charger capable of generating singly charged particles up to 1.0 μm was developed and experimentally evaluated. The experiments were performed using dry and deliquesced (NH_4)_2SO _4 particles with SO_2 and H_2O_2 concentrations from 0-860 ppb and 0-150 ppb, respectively. No growth was observed for dry particles. For droplets >=0.3 mum, the fractional diameter growth was independent of particle size and for droplets <=0.2 mum, it decreased as particle size decreased. The observed decrease is due to NH_3 evaporation. As ammonia evaporates, droplet pH decreases causing the oxidation rate to decrease, leading to a lower growth rate. To predict the size-dependent growth rates, a theoretical model was developed using solution thermodynamics, gas/particle equilibrium and chemical kinetics. The experimental and theoretical results are in reasonable agreement. For dry (NH_4) _2SO_4 particles exposed to SO_2, H_2O _2, NH_3 and H_2O vapor, surface reaction-controlled growth was observed. Particle growth was very sensitive to particle composition. No growth was observed for Polystyrene latex particles, whereas (NH_4) _2SO_4 particles doped with catalysts (Fe^{2+} , Fe^{3+}, Mn ^{2+}, Cu^{2+ }) in a molar ratio of 1:500 grew

  19. Evapotranspiration studies for protective barriers: Experimental plans

    SciTech Connect

    Link, S.O.; Waugh, W.J.

    1989-11-01

    This document describes a general theory and experimental plans for predicting evapotranspiration in support of the Protective Barrier Program. Evapotranspiration is the combined loss of water from plants and soil surfaces to the atmosphere. 45 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  20. An experimental study on microwave electron gun

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.; Wu, J.; Wang, Y.

    1995-12-31

    We report both the simulation and experimental results of using a ring cathode instead of the solid cathode to reduce the back bombardment effect of a thermionic cathode microwave electron gun. The result shows that the back bombardment power is decreased about 2/3 without changing the beam quality apparently which allows operation at higher repetition rate. Experimental results are compared with the simulation with good agreement.

  1. Experimental Study of Lunar and SNC Magmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, Malcolm J.

    1998-01-01

    The research described in this progress report involved the study of petrological, geochemical and volcanic processes that occur on the Moon and the SNC parent body, generally accepted to be Mars. The link between these studies is that they focus on two terrestrial-type parent bodies somewhat smaller than earth, and the fact that they focus on the role of volatiles in magmatic processes and on processes of magma evolution on these planets. The work on the lunar volcanic glasses has resulted in some exciting new discoveries over the years of this grant. We discovered small metal blebs initially in the Al5 green glass, and determined the significant importance of this metal in fixing the oxidation state of the parent magma (Fogel and Rutherford, 1995). More recently, we discovered a variety of metal blebs in the Al7 orange glass. Some of these Fe-Ni metal blebs were in the glass; others were in olivine phenocrysts. The importance of these metal spheres is that they fix the oxidation state of the parent magma during the eruption, and also indicate changes during the eruption (Weitz et al., 1997) They also yield important information about the composition of the gas phase present, the gas which drove the lunar fire-fountaining. One of the more exciting and controversial findings in our research over the past year has been the possible fractionation of H from D during shock (experimental) of hornblende bearing samples (Minitti et al., 1997). This research is directed at explaining some of the low H2O and high D/H observed in hydrous phases in the SNC meteorites.

  2. Experimental verification of the nonadiabatic effect in strong-field ionization with elliptical polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min; Liu, Ming-Ming; Geng, Ji-Wei; Han, Meng; Sun, Xufei; Shao, Yun; Deng, Yongkai; Wu, Chengyin; Peng, Liang-You; Gong, Qihuang; Liu, Yunquan

    2017-05-01

    We perform high-resolution measurement of ellipticity-resolved momentum distributions from tunneling ionization of atoms along the major and minor axes in strong elliptically polarized fields, respectively. With developing a subcycle nonadiabatic strong-field tunneling theory for arbitrary laser polarization, we show that the electron initial conditions for positions and momenta after the tunneling are nonadiabatically intertwined with the instantaneous laser field. We extract the transverse and longitudinal momentum distributions at the tunnel exit with respect to the field ellipticity. We calibrate the laser intensity with ab initio calculation by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The nonadiabatic effects are confirmed experimentally and theoretically. Disentangling the effect of the long-range Coulomb potential from the laser field, we have further demonstrated that the momentum-time structure of the tunneling wave packet in strong laser fields can be approximatively imaged when treating the Coulomb effect perturbatively.

  3. ELF electric and magnetic fields: Pacific Northwest Laboratory studies

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.E.

    1992-06-01

    Studies have been conducted at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to examine extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields for possible biological effects in animals. Three areas of investigation are reported here: (1) studies on the nervous system, including behavior and neuroendocrine function, (2) experiments on cancer development in animals, and (3) measurements of currents and electric fields induced in animal models by exposure to external magnetic fields. In behavioral experiments, rats have been shown to be responsive to ELF electric field exposure. Furthermore, experimental data indicate that short-term memory may be affected in albino rats exposed to combined ELF and static magnetic fields. Neuroendocrine studies have been conducted to demonstrate an apparent stress-related response in rats exposed to 60-Hz electric fields. Nighttime pineal melatonin levels have been shown to be significantly depressed in animals exposed to either electric or magnetic fields. A number of animal tumor models are currently under investigation to examine possible relationships between ELF exposure and carcinogenesis. Finally, theoretical and experimental measurements have been performed which form the basis for animals and human exposure comparisons.

  4. ELF electric and magnetic fields: Pacific Northwest Laboratory studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, L. E.

    1992-06-01

    Studies were conducted at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to examine extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields for possible biological effects in animals. Three areas of investigation are reported here: (1) studies on the nervous system, including behavior and neuroendocrine function; (2) experiments on cancer development in animals; and (3) measurements of currents and electric fields induced in animal models by exposure to external magnetic fields. In behavioral experiments, rats were shown to be responsive to ELF electric field exposure. Furthermore, experimental data indicate that short-term memory may be affected in albino rats exposed to combined ELF and static magnetic fields. Neuroendocrine studies were conducted to demonstrate an apparent stress-related response in rats exposed to 60-Hz electric fields. Nighttime pineal melatonin levels were shown to be significantly depressed in animals exposed to either electric or magnetic fields. A number of animal tumor models are currently under investigation to examine possible relationships between ELF exposure and carcinogenesis. Finally, theoretical and experimental measurements were performed which form the basis for animals and human exposure comparisons.

  5. Experimental and computational studies of nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajjha, Ravikanth S.

    The goals of this dissertation were (i) to experimentally investigate the fluid dynamic and heat transfer performance of nanofluids in a circular tube, (ii) to study the influence of temperature and particle volumetric concentration of nanofluids on thermophysical properties, heat transfer and pumping power, (iii) to measure the rheological properties of various nanofluids and (iv) to investigate using a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) technique the performance of nanofluids in the flat tube of a radiator. Nanofluids are a new class of fluids prepared by dispersing nanoparticles with average sizes of less than 100 nm in traditional heat transfer fluids such as water, oil, ethylene glycol and propylene glycol. In cold regions of the world, the choice of base fluid for heat transfer applications is an ethylene glycol or propylene glycol mixed with water in different proportions. In the present research, a 60% ethylene glycol (EG) or propylene glycol (PG) and 40% water (W) by mass fluid mixture (60:40 EG/W or 60:40 PG/W) was used as a base fluid, which provides freeze protection to a very low level of temperature. Experiments were conducted to measure the convective heat transfer coefficient and pressure loss of nanofluids flowing in a circular tube in the fully developed turbulent regime. The experimental measurements were carried out for aluminum oxide (Al2O3), copper oxide (CuO) and silicon dioxide (SiO2) nanoparticles dispersed in 60:40 EG/W base fluid. Experiments revealed that the heat transfer coefficient of nanofluids showed an increase with the particle volumetric concentration. Pressure loss was also observed to increase with the nanoparticle volumetric concentration. New correlations for the Nusselt number and the friction factor were developed. The effects of temperature and particle volumetric concentration on different thermophysical properties (e.g. viscosity, thermal conductivity, specific heat and density) and subsequently on the Prandtl number

  6. Experimental evidence of using a circularly polarized electric field to control spiral turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Lin; Zhou, Yi; Li, Qian; Qiao, Chun; Ouyang, Qi

    2013-10-01

    Experimental evidence of the use of a circularly polarized electric field to control the spiral turbulence in a reaction-diffusion system is presented. The spiral turbulence obtained in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction is shown to be forced into ordered stable spiral waves or “targetlike” waves by a circularly polarized electric field with appropriate frequency and intensity. An Arnold's-tongue-shaped control phase diagram is obtained, illustrating the resonance essence of the control.

  7. Analytical and experimental studies of wakes behind circularly capped bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessler, W. F.

    The wakes behind circularly capped bubbles are examined by means of an experimental and analytical study. A single two-inch diameter bubble is injected into a six by three foot fluid column, one half inch thick, producing an essentially two-dimensional flow. Aspirin powder placed in the fluid column just prior to bubble release highlights the structure of the flow field before dissolving. High speed film and sequenced photographs are taken to document the observed results. Pressure-time measurements are made with sensitive capacitive transducers mounted in the rear column wall and are synchronized with photographs using a high speed clock. Experimental fluids, prepared by mixing water and glycerine in varying proportions, are used to study the effects of viscosity on bubble shape and wake structure. Testing is performed over a range of Reynolds numbers from 14 to 29,655 which includes the transition from circularly capped to ellipsoidal bubble shape. Experimental data is reduced and summarized in convenient dimensionless form to permit comparison with analytical predictions.

  8. Experimental study on the effect of nozzle hole-to-hole angle on the near-field spray of diesel injector using fast X-ray phase-contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xusheng; Moon, Seoksu; Gao, Jian; Dufresne, Eric M.; Fezzaa, Kamel; Wang, Jin

    2016-12-01

    Fuel atomization and vaporization process play a critical role in determining the engine combustion and emission. The primary near-nozzle breakup is the vital link between the fuel emerging from the nozzle and the fully atomized spray. In this study, the near-nozzle spray characteristics of diesel injector with different umbrella angle (UA) were investigated using high-speed X-ray phase-contrast imaging and quantitative image processing. A classic ‘dumbbell’ profile of spray width (SW) composed of three stages: opening stage, semisteady stage and closing stage. The SW peak of two-hole injectors was more than twice of that of single-hole injector at the opening and closing stages, corresponding to the hollow-cone spray. This indicated the vortex flow was formed with the increase of the UA. The higher injection pressure had little influence on the SW while led to earlier breakup closer to the nozzle. Significant fuel effect on the SW at higher needle lift was found. However, this effect could be neglect at lower needle lift due to the leading role of internal flow and cavitation on the near-field spray characteristics. In addition, the morphology-based breakup process was observed, which highlighted the important effect of internal flow on the spray development. The possibility of using hollow-cone spray in diesel injector was also discussed.

  9. Industrial Noise and Tooth Wear - Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Cavacas, Maria Alzira; Tavares, Vitor; Borrecho, Gonçalo; Oliveira, Maria João; Oliveira, Pedro; Brito, José; Águas, Artur; dos Santos, José Martins

    2015-01-01

    Tooth wear is a complex multifactorial process that involves the loss of hard dental tissue. Parafunctional habits have been mentioned as a self-destructive process caused by stress, which results in hyperactivity of masticatory muscles. Stress manifests itself through teeth grinding, leading to progressive teeth wear. The effects of continuous exposure to industrial noise, a “stressor” agent, cannot be ignored and its effects on the teeth must be evaluated. Aims: The aim of this study was to ascertain the effects of industrial noise on dental wear over time, by identifying and quantifying crown area loss. Material and Methods: 39 Wistar rats were used. Thirty rats were divided in 3 experimental groups of 10 animals each. Animals were exposed to industrial noise, rich in LFN components, for 1, 4 and 7 months, with an average weekly exposure of 40 hours (8h/day, 5 days/week with the weekends in silence). The remaining 9 animals were kept in silence. The areas of the three main cusps of the molars were measured under light microscopy. Statistical analysis used: A two-way ANOVA model was applied at significance level of 5%. Results: The average area of the molar cusps was significantly different between exposed and non-exposed animals. The most remarkable differences occurred between month 1 and 4. The total crown loss from month 1 to month 7 was 17.3% in the control group, and 46.5% in the exposed group, and the differences between these variations were significant (p<0.001). Conclusions: Our data suggest that industrial noise is an important factor in the pathogenesis of tooth wear. PMID:25798052

  10. Computational and Experimental Flow Field Analyses of Separate Flow Chevron Nozzles and Pylon Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massey, Steven J.; Thomas, Russell H.; AbdolHamid, Khaled S.; Elmiligui, Alaa A.

    2003-01-01

    A computational and experimental flow field analyses of separate flow chevron nozzles is presented. The goal of this study is to identify important flow physics and modeling issues required to provide highly accurate flow field data which will later serve as input to the Jet3D acoustic prediction code. Four configurations are considered: a baseline round nozzle with and without a pylon, and a chevron core nozzle with and without a pylon. The flow is simulated by solving the asymptotically steady, compressible, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations using an implicit, up-wind, flux-difference splitting finite volume scheme and standard two-equation kappa-epsilon turbulence model with a linear stress representation and the addition of a eddy viscosity dependence on total temperature gradient normalized by local turbulence length scale. The current CFD results are seen to be in excellent agreement with Jet Noise Lab data and show great improvement over previous computations which did not compensate for enhanced mixing due to high temperature gradients.

  11. Comparision of efficacy of two experimental bovine leptospira vaccines under laboratory and field.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, G; Roy, Parimal

    2014-05-15

    Two different inactivated vaccines for bovine leptospirosis were prepared with five different Leptospira serovars namely australis, ballum, hardjo, hebdomadis and pomona and adjuvanted with Montanide ISA 206 (Vaccine-I) or adjuvanted with Aluminium hydroxide gel (Vaccine-II) to evaluate the efficacy of the vaccines. The immunogenicity of the vaccines was studied in rabbits under experimental condition and in cattle under field condition for a period of 180 days. Antibody response against five different leptospira serovars ranged from 6.84 log2 to 9.64 log2 (GM-MAT titres) in rabbits at 180 days after vaccination with vaccine I, whereas in vaccine II, the titre value ranged from 5.64 log2 to 7.44 log2. In the case of cattle under field condition, vaccine I showed GM-MAT titres of 6.84 log2 to 7.69 log2 against five different serovars at 150 days following vaccination. Such titres were maintained following vaccination with vaccine II for 120 days only. It is concluded that vaccine I is a better vaccine than vaccine II. However both the vaccines showed high immune response of 5.64 log2 at six months of immunization. Vaccination did not cause any adverse reaction in the vaccinated cattle. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Computatonal and experimental study of laminar flames

    SciTech Connect

    Smooke, M.D.; Long, M.B.

    1993-12-01

    This research has centered on an investigation of the effects of complex chemistry and detailed transport on the structure and extinction of hydrocarbon flames in counterflow, cylindrical and coflowing axisymmetric configurations. The authors have pursued both computational and experimental aspects of the research in parallel. The computational work has focused on the application of accurate and efficient numerical methods for the solution of the one and two-dimensional nonlinear boundary value problems describing the various reacting systems. Detailed experimental measurements were performed on axisymmetric coflow flames using two-dimensional imaging techniques. In particular, spontaneous Raman scattering and laser induced fluorescence were used to measure the temperature, major and minor species profiles.

  13. Experimental study of uncentralized squeeze film dampers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    The vibration response of a rotor system supported by a squeeze film damper (SFD) was experimentally investigated in order to provide experimental data in support of the Rotor/Stator Interactive Finite Element theoretical development. Part of the investigation required the designing and building of a rotor/SFD system that could operate with or without end seals in order to accommodate different SFD lengths. SFD variables investigated included clearance, eccentricity mass, fluid pressure, and viscosity and temperature. The results show inlet pressure, viscosity and clearance have significant influence on the damper performance and accompanying rotor response.

  14. Biomass thermochemical gasification: Experimental studies and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ajay

    The overall goals of this research were to study the biomass thermochemical gasification using experimental and modeling techniques, and to evaluate the cost of industrial gas production and combined heat and power generation. This dissertation includes an extensive review of progresses in biomass thermochemical gasification. Product gases from biomass gasification can be converted to biopower, biofuels and chemicals. However, for its viable commercial applications, the study summarizes the technical challenges in the gasification and downstream processing of product gas. Corn stover and dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS), a non-fermentable byproduct of ethanol production, were used as the biomass feedstocks. One of the objectives was to determine selected physical and chemical properties of corn stover related to thermochemical conversion. The parameters of the reaction kinetics for weight loss were obtained. The next objective was to investigate the effects of temperature, steam to biomass ratio and equivalence ratio on gas composition and efficiencies. DDGS gasification was performed on a lab-scale fluidized-bed gasifier with steam and air as fluidizing and oxidizing agents. Increasing the temperature resulted in increases in hydrogen and methane contents and efficiencies. A model was developed to simulate the performance of a lab-scale gasifier using Aspen Plus(TM) software. Mass balance, energy balance and minimization of Gibbs free energy were applied for the gasification to determine the product gas composition. The final objective was to optimize the process by maximizing the net energy efficiency, and to estimate the cost of industrial gas, and combined heat and power (CHP) at a biomass feedrate of 2000 kg/h. The selling price of gas was estimated to be 11.49/GJ for corn stover, and 13.08/GJ for DDGS. For CHP generation, the electrical and net efficiencies were 37 and 86%, respectively for corn stover, and 34 and 78%, respectively for DDGS. For

  15. A Computational and Experimental Investigation of a Three-Dimensional Hypersonic Scramjet Inlet Flow Field. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Scott Douglas

    1991-01-01

    A combined computational and experimental parametric study of the internal aerodynamics of a generic three dimensional sidewall compression scramjet inlet configuration was performed. The study was designed to demonstrate the utility of computational fluid dynamics as a design tool in hypersonic inlet flow fields, to provide a detailed account of the nature and structure of the internal flow interactions, and to provide a comprehensive surface property and flow field database to determine the effects of contraction ratio, cowl position, and Reynolds number on the performance of a hypersonic scramjet inlet configuration.

  16. Impact of field-induced quantum confinement on the onset of tunneling field-effect transistors: Experimental verification

    SciTech Connect

    Smets, Quentin Verreck, Devin; Heyns, Marc M.; Verhulst, Anne S.; Martens, Koen; Lin, Han Chung; Kazzi, Salim El; Simoen, Eddy; Collaert, Nadine; Thean, Aaron; Raskin, Jean-Pierre

    2014-11-17

    The Tunneling Field-Effect Transistor (TFET) is a promising device for future low-power logic. Its performance is often predicted using semiclassical simulations, but there is usually a large discrepancy with experimental results. An important reason is that Field-Induced Quantum Confinement (FIQC) is neglected. Quantum mechanical simulations show FIQC delays the onset of Band-To-Band Tunneling (BTBT) with hundreds of millivolts in the promising line-TFET configuration. In this letter, we provide experimental verification of this delayed onset. We accomplish this by developing a method where line-TFET are modeled using highly doped MOS capacitors (MOS-CAP). Using capacitance-voltage measurements, we demonstrate AC inversion by BTBT, which was so far unobserved in MOS-CAP. Good agreement is shown between the experimentally obtained BTBT onset and quantum mechanical predictions, proving the need to include FIQC in all TFET simulations. Finally, we show that highly doped MOS-CAP is promising for characterization of traps deep into the conduction band.

  17. Autoalloplast. An experimental and clinical study.

    PubMed

    Stucker, F J

    1982-03-01

    The concept of an autoalloplast offers the convenience of an alloplast and the safety and reliability of an autograft. An alloplast that acts as a scaffold for fibrous tissue ingrowth retains many of the characteristics of an autograft when reimplanted. Fibrous encapsulation is essential to the retention of all implanted impermeable synthetic materials. They then retain a potential for extrusion. Polyamide mesh, which allows the ingrowth of fibrous tissue, is a synthetic implant that circumvents the potential for extrusion. The fibrous tissue ingrowth provides substance to the graft, which permits precise carving with a scalpel after the initial implantation into a vascular area. A suitable period is necessary to allow fibrous tissue ingrowth. The incorporated mesh material is then harvested, shaped, and reimplanted into the augmentation site as an autoalloplast. A three-phase animal study to determine the feasibility of the autoalloplast concept is presented. It showed that fibrous incorporation of polyamide mesh occurs, and harvesting and reimplantation were feasible. It also demonstrated the superiority of the autoalloplast to withstand trauma without extrusion when compared with autogenous cartilage, polyamide mesh without fibrous assimilation, and Silastic. Since 1974, twenty-one humans have received successful implants with the autoalloplast. The patients have been followed up for two to 7 1/2 years, with all cases successful to date. The prospect of nurturing and biologically assimilating an implant in a safe and controlled area of a host and its subsequent reimplantation expands the field of reconstructive surgery and offers a practical method for managing certain facial deformities.

  18. Magnetic field effects on human lymphocytes: methodological assessments and experimental evidences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milani, Marziale; Ballerini, Monica; Baroni, Giuliana; Ferraro, Lorenzo; Barberis, Massimo; Cannone, Maria

    2000-04-01

    The results are discussed of a systematic investigation on the electromagnetic field exposure consequences on human lymphocytes. These artificial fields have intensities comparable with the Earth magnetic field one, and are used for exposures up to 4 days. Different and complementary techniques are used to safely assess the consequences of ElectroMagnetic Fields (EMF) on the cells; in particular morphology, metabolism and population dynamics are investigated. The recourse to ultra microscopy, pressure monitoring in sealed bottles, atomic mass spectroscopy. Far IR Fourier Transform and cytofluorimetry techniques give a good insight in the EMF induced changes. A statistically significant deviation of irradiated samples with respect to the control ones are reported. A critical analysis and a survey of similar experiments reported in literature lead us to the exam of the experimental set up with attention to the geometry of the irradiation system. Finally the role of different magnetic field detectors in the reproducibility of the experiments will be carefully discussed.

  19. Study of microcirculation of the ocular ciliary body in experimental kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Obrubov, S A; Ivanova, A O; Klyuchnikov, S O; Dreval, A A; Boginskaya, O A

    2014-08-01

    We studied disorders in ciliary body microcirculation in experimental chronic glomerulonephritis with tubulointerstitial nephritis and evaluated the hemodynamic effects of low-frequency pulsed electromagnetic field in this pathology. Laser Doppler flowmetry demonstrated vasospasm with reduced nutrient blood fl ow in the ciliary body of animals with experimental chronic glomerulonephritis with tubulointerstitial nephritis. The exposure to low-frequency pulsed electromagnetic field using developed technology will lead to significant reduction of the vascular tone and improve arterial blood supply to the microcirculatory bed.

  20. Experimental realization of fluence field modulated CT using digital beam attenuation

    PubMed Central

    Szczykutowicz, TP; Mistretta, CA

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Tailoring CT scan acquisition parameters to individual patients is a topic of much research in the CT imaging community. It is now common place to find automatically adjusted tube current options for modern CT scanners. In addition, the use of beam shaping filters, commonly called bowtie filters, is available on most CT systems and allows for different body regions to receive different incident x-ray fluence distributions. However, no method currently exists which allows for the form of the incident x-ray fluence distribution to change as a function of view angle. This study represents the first experimental realization of fluence field modulated CT (FFMCT) for a c-arm geometry CT scan. Methods: X-ray fluence modulation is accomplished using a digital beam attenuator (DBA). The device is composed of 10 iron wedge pairs that modulate the thickness of iron x-rays must traverse before reaching a patient. Using this device, experimental data was taken using a Siemens Zeego c-arm scanner. Scans were performed on a cylindrical polyethylene phantom and on two different sections of an anthropomorphic phantom. The DBA was used to equalize the x-ray fluence striking the detector for each scan. Non DBA, or “flat field” scans were also acquired of the same phantom objects for comparison. In addition, a scan was performed in which the DBA was used to enable volume of interest (VOI) imaging. In VOI, only a small sub-volume within a patient receives full dose and the rest of the patient receives a much lower dose. Data corrections unique to using a piece-wise constant modulator were also developed. Results The feasibility of FFMCT implemented using a DBA device has been demonstrated. Initial results suggest dose reductions of up to 3.6 times relative to “flat field” CT. In addition to dose reduction, the DBA enables a large improvement in image noise uniformity and the ability to provide regionally enhanced signal to noise using VOI imaging techniques. Conclusions

  1. Systematic study of bubble nuclei in relativistic mean field model

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, A.; Åberg, S.; Bajpeyi, A.

    2016-01-15

    We have theoretically studied potential bubble nuclei ({sup 20,22}O, {sup 34,36}Si, and {sup 46}Ar), which are experimentally accessible and have attracted several studies in the recent past. Relativistic mean field is employed in conjunction with the NL–SH parameter set. Our results show that among the possible candidates, {sup 22}Oand {sup 34}Si may be the most prominent candidates, showing significant depletion of density at the center, which could be verified experimentally in the near future with some of the experiments underway.

  2. Naturalistic Field Studies of Sleep and Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-05-1-0099 TITLE: Naturalistic Field Studies of Sleep and...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Naturalistic Field Studies of Sleep and Performance 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-05-1-0099 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...Center (SPRC) conducts human and animal  studies  in laboratory and field settings in support of basic and applied sleep  research at Washington State

  3. Model refinement for offshore platforms: Experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min; Chen, Zongli; Wu, Yanjian

    2017-08-01

    Offshore jacket platforms are widely used in offshore oil and gas exploitation. Finite element models of such structures need to have many degrees of freedom (DOFs) to represent the geometrical detail of complex structures, thereby leading to incompatibility in the number of DOFs of experimental models. To bring them both to the same order while ensuring that the essential eigen- properties of the refined model match those of experimental models, an extended model refinement procedure is presented in this paper. Vibration testing of an offshore jacket platform model is performed to validate the applicability of the proposed approach. A full-order finite element model of the platform is established and then tuned to meet the measured modal properties identified from the acceleration signals. Both model reduction and modal expansion methods are investigated, as well as various scenarios of sensor arrangements. Upon completion of the refinement, the updated jacket platform model matches the natural frequencies of the measured model well.

  4. Experimental Study of Sterilizing Molds by Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jin-lian; Niu, Yong

    1998-02-01

    An ultrasound method of sterilizing aspergillus flavus and fusarium is proposed and demonstrated. The dependence of sterilizing effect on ultrasonic intensity, frequency, and treatment time is experimentally investigated. The density of surviving spores decreases first with increasing ultrasonic frequency and then increases with the further increase of the frequency, that is to say, there exists the optimum frequency 26 kHz at which the killing rate is near 100%. The killing rate seems proportional to the intensity and the time.

  5. High field Q slope and the baking effect: Review of recent experimental results and new data on Nb heat treatments

    SciTech Connect

    G. Ciovati, G. Myneni, F. Stevie, P. Maheshwari, D. Griffis

    2010-02-01

    The performance of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities made of bulk Nb at high fields (peak surface magnetic field greater than about 90 mT) is characterized by exponentially increasing rf losses (high-field Q slope), in the absence of field emission, which are often mitigated by low-temperature (100–140°C, 12–48 h) baking. In this contribution, recent experimental results and phenomenological models to explain this effect will be briefly reviewed. New experimental results on the high-field Q slope will be presented for cavities that had been heat treated in a vacuum furnace at high temperature without subsequent chemical etching. These studies are aimed at understanding the role of hydrogen on the high-field Q slope and at the passivation of the Nb surface during heat treatment. Improvement of the cavity performances, particularly of the cavities’ quality factor, have been obtained following the high-temperature heat treatments, while secondary ion mass spectroscopy surface analysis measurements on Nb samples treated with the cavities revealed significantly lower hydrogen concentration than for samples that followed standard cavity treatments.

  6. High field Q slope and the baking effect: Review of recent experimental results and new data on Nb heat treatments

    DOE PAGES

    G. Ciovati; Myneni, G.; Stevie, F.; ...

    2010-02-22

    Here, the performance of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities made of bulk Nb at high fields (peak surface magnetic field greater than about 90 mT) is characterized by exponentially increasing rf losses (high-field Q-slope), in the absence of field emission, which are often mitigated by low temperature (100-140 °C, 12-48 h) baking. In this contribution, recent experimental results and phenomenological models to explain this effect will be briefly reviewed. New experimental results on the high-field Q-slope will be presented for cavities that had been heat treated in a vacuum furnace at high temperature without subsequent chemical etching. These studies are aimedmore » at understanding the role of hydrogen on the high-field Q-slope and at the passivation of the Nb surface during heat treatment. Improvement of the cavity performances, particularly of the cavities’ quality factor, have been obtained following the high temperature heat-treatments, while SIMS surface analysis measurements on Nb samples treated with the cavities revealed significantly lower hydrogen concentration than for samples that followed standard cavity treatments.« less

  7. High field Q slope and the baking effect: Review of recent experimental results and new data on Nb heat treatments

    SciTech Connect

    G. Ciovati; Myneni, G.; Stevie, F.; Maheshwari, P.; Griffis, D.

    2010-02-22

    Here, the performance of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities made of bulk Nb at high fields (peak surface magnetic field greater than about 90 mT) is characterized by exponentially increasing rf losses (high-field Q-slope), in the absence of field emission, which are often mitigated by low temperature (100-140 °C, 12-48 h) baking. In this contribution, recent experimental results and phenomenological models to explain this effect will be briefly reviewed. New experimental results on the high-field Q-slope will be presented for cavities that had been heat treated in a vacuum furnace at high temperature without subsequent chemical etching. These studies are aimed at understanding the role of hydrogen on the high-field Q-slope and at the passivation of the Nb surface during heat treatment. Improvement of the cavity performances, particularly of the cavities’ quality factor, have been obtained following the high temperature heat-treatments, while SIMS surface analysis measurements on Nb samples treated with the cavities revealed significantly lower hydrogen concentration than for samples that followed standard cavity treatments.

  8. Experimental and analytical study of rotating cavitation

    SciTech Connect

    Kamijo, Kenjiro; Shimura, Takashi; Tsujimoto, Yoshinobu

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes experimental and analytical results of rotating cavitation. There are four major sections in this paper. The first section presents the main characteristics of rotating cavitation which was found in the inducer test using a water tunnel. The second section describes the rotating cavitation which occurred in the development test of an LE-7 liquid oxygen pump for the H-II rocket. Also described in this section is how the rotating cavitation was suppressed. The rotating cavitation was the cause of both super synchronous shaft vibration and an unstable head coefficient curve. The third section presents how the theory of rotating cavitation was developed. The final section shows the measured cavitation compliance and mass flow gain factor of the LE-7 pump inducer for comparison of the experimental and analytical results of the rotating cavitation of the LE-7 pump inducer. Almost all the information presented in this paper has already been reported by Kamijo et al. (1977, 1980, 1993, 1993) and by Shimura (1993). In the present paper, the authors attempt to combine and give a clear overview of the experimental and analytical results described in the previous papers to systematically show their experience and findings on rotating cavitation.

  9. Age, Women, and Hiring: An Experimental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lahey, Joanna N.

    2008-01-01

    As baby boomers reach retirement age, demographic pressures on public programs may cause policy makers to cut benefits and encourage employment at later ages. But how much demand exists for older workers? This paper reports on a field experiment to determine hiring conditions for older women in entry-level jobs in two cities. A younger worker is…

  10. Experimental evidence for field-induced emergent clock anisotropies in the XY pyrochlore Er2Ti2O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudet, J.; Hallas, A. M.; Thibault, J.; Butch, N. P.; Dabkowska, H. A.; Gaulin, B. D.

    2017-02-01

    The XY pyrochlore antiferromagnet Er2Ti2O7 exhibits a rare case of Z6 discrete symmetry breaking in its ψ2 magnetic ground state. Despite being well-studied theoretically, systems with high discrete symmetry breakings are uncommon in nature. Thus, Er2Ti2O7 provides an experimental playground for the study of broken Zn symmetry, for n >2 . A recent theoretical work examined the effect of a magnetic field on a pyrochlore lattice with broken Z6 symmetry and applied it to Er2Ti2O7 . This study predicted multiple domain transitions depending on the crystallographic orientation of the magnetic field, inducing rich and controllable magnetothermodynamic behavior. In this work, we present neutron scattering measurements on Er2Ti2O7 with a magnetic field applied along the [001] and [111] directions and provide experimental observation of these exotic domain transitions. In a [001] field, we observe a ψ2 to ψ3 transition at a critical field of 0.18 ±0.05 T. We are thus able to extend the concept of the spin-flop transition, which has long been observed in Ising systems, to higher discrete Zn symmetries. In a [111] field, we observe a series of domain-based phase transitions for fields of 0.15 ±0.03 T and 0.40 ±0.03 T. We show that these field-induced transitions are consistent with the emergence of twofold, threefold, and possibly sixfold Zeeman terms. Considering all the possible ψ2 and ψ3 domains, these Zeeman terms can be mapped onto an analog clock—exemplifying a literal clock anisotropy. Lastly, our quantitative analysis of the [001] domain transition in Er2Ti2O7 is consistent with order-by-disorder as the dominant ground state selection mechanism.

  11. Theoretical and experimental comparisons of nearfield electrogalvanic fields due to nonlinear polarization layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, R. G.

    1985-02-01

    Based on completed experimental electric-field scans and the corresponding finite-element field predictions, it appears that the finite-element numerical technique presents a strong analytical tool in calculating the nearfield (within 650 micrometers electric-field distributions about active microcells. This was analytically achieved with the new double membrane finite-element configuration representing nonlinear polarization and by using a local tangent slope (impedance) definition dependent on the local potential difference. The experimental determination of the normal current was realized with a newly developed scanning vibrating electrode technique. The finite-element model utilizes a priori measured uncoupled polarization curves for pure iron and pure copper. The current densities and the electric field intensity was calculated for all the grid points within the electrolyte and on its boundaries. Results appear to indicate that first order anodic mass loss can be predicted using finite-element predicted current density distributions on the anodic surface and the imposition of Faraday's law. The electric-field correlation established for the normal current-density vector provides the confidence to proceed in the evaluation of electric fields associated with pitting and crevice corrosion.

  12. Experimental study on behavior of GFRP stiffened panels under compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kankeri, Pradeep; Ganesh Mahidhar, P. K.; Prakash, S. Suriya; Ramji, M.

    2015-03-01

    Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) materials are extensively used in the aerospace and marine industries because of their high strength and stiffness to weight ratio and excellent corrosion resistance. Stiffened panels are commonly used in aircraft wing and fuselage parts. The present study focuses on the behavior of composite stiffened panels under compressive loading. With the introduction of stiffeners to unstiffened composite plates, the structural stiffness of the panel increases resulting in higher strength and stiffness. Studies in the past have shown that the critical structural failure mode under compressive loading of a stiffened composite panel is by local buckling. The present study attempts to evaluate the mechanical behavior of composite stiffened panels under compression using blade stiffener configuration and in particular on the behavior of the skin- stiffener interface through experimental testing. A novel test fixture is developed for experimental testing of GFRP stiffened panels. A non-contact whole field strain analysis technique called digital image correlation (DIC) is used for capturing the strain and damage mechanisms. Blade stiffeners increased the strength, stiffness and reduced the out-of plane displacement at failure. The failure of both the unstiffened and stiffened panels was through local buckling rather than through material failure. DIC was able to capture the strain localization and buckling failure modes.

  13. Experimental study of shear layer instability below a free surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Matthieu A.; Bardet, Philippe M.

    2015-11-01

    Relaxation of a laminar boundary layer at a free surface is an inviscidly unstable process and can lead to millimeter-scale surface waves, influencing interfacial processes. Due to the small time- and length-scales involved, previous experimental studies have been limited to visual observations and point-wise measurements of the surface profile to determine instability onset and frequency. However, effects of viscosity, surface tension, and non-linearity of the wave profile have not been systematically studied. In fact, no data have been reported on the velocity fields associated with this instability. In the present study, planar laser induced fluorescence and particle image velocimetry provide surface profiles coupled with liquid phase velocity fields for this instability in a time resolved manner. Wave steepness (ak, with a the amplitude and k the wave number) and Reynolds and Weber numbers based on momentum thickness range from 0 to 1.2, 143 to 177, and 4.79 to 6.61, respectively. Large datasets are analyzed to gain statistical information on the surface behavior. Discrete vortices are resolved, showing that the shear layer becomes unstable and rolls up above a Reynolds number of 140. The detection onset and steepness of the subsequent surface deformation by the vortices depend upon the Weber number. Non-linear behavior such as vortex motion and wave profile asymmetry are observed at steepness larger than 0.5.

  14. An experimental studies with disk MHD channels on argon plazma

    SciTech Connect

    Koneev, S.M.A.; Kovalev, L.K.; Larionoff, A.E.; Poltavets, V.N.

    1994-12-31

    The most interesting works carried out over the past few years in the field of MHD generating electric power are the ones studying disk MHD channels. The results published give a hope to overcome one of the MHD generator essential disadvantages - relatively low effectiveness of converting heat power into electric one. In some works performed by different authors and at different plants the coefficients of energy conversion achieving 20% have been obtained and there is a hint of the future possible increase of up to 40%. In the majority of experimental studies non-equilibrium ionized inertial gases (Ar, He) with alkali metal (Cs, K) were used as a working medium, the operating temperature being 1800-2000 K. The present paper is dedicated to an experimental test rig-with-a-disk-MHD-channel development for operating on thermally ionized Ar with the temperature of up to 9000 K and pressure 10 up to 10 Pa. For heating a working medium an electric arc in a special plazmotron is used. As the experiments on linear MHD channels have shown, along the whole working area the plasma is non-equilibrium with a substantial break off of an electron temperature providing conductivity of more then 100 Sm/m. The aim of creation this test rig is in simulating the processes of the working medium flow and electric energy generation in disk MHD channels. An important research element is calculation techniques debugging and acquiring experience of development and carrying out disk MHD generator studies for the following experimental full-scale MHD plants with a disk channel to be created.

  15. Wright's shifting balance theory: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Wade, M J; Goodnight, C J

    1991-08-30

    Experimental confirmation of Wright's shifting balance theory of evolution, one of the most comprehensive theories of adaptive evolution, is presented. The theory is regarded by many as a cornerstone of modern evolutionary thought, but there has been little direct empirical evidence supporting it. Some of its underlying assumptions are viewed as contradictory, and the existence and efficacy of the theory's fundamental adaptive process, interdemic selection, is the focus of controversy. Interdemic selection was imposed on large arrays of laboratory populations of the flour beetle Tribolium castaneum in the manner described by Wright: the differential dispersion of individuals from demes of high fitness into demes of low fitness. A significant increase in average fitness was observed in the experimental arrays when compared to control populations with equivalent but random migration rates. The response was not proportional to the selection differential: The largest response occurred with interdemic selection every two generations rather than every generation or every three generations. The results indicate that the interdemic phase of Wright's shifting balance theory can increase average fitness and suggest that gene interactions are involved in the observed response.

  16. Experimental Study of Surface Dissolution Features on Kimberlite Indicator Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIsaac, E.; Fedortchouk, Y.

    2009-05-01

    During the ascent to the Earth's surface kimberlite magmas entrain mantle minerals - chromites, ilmenites, garnets and the most desirable - diamonds. Kimberlite magma partially dissolves these minerals during the ascent, producing different types of surface features on the minerals. Experiments showed that surface features on diamonds can be used to constrain composition of magmatic fluid. However, examining mantle minerals with more complex chemical compositions, such as chromites and ilmenites, could provide more detailed information about the composition and evolution of fluid system in the magmas, as determination of the depth of their entrainment is possible. This study experimentally investigates dissolution of chromites and ilmenites in melts with C-O-H fluid. The surface features produced at these conditions are then compared to the surface features on minerals recovered from kimberlites. The experiments were done in a piston-cylinder apparatus at 1350 - 1400°C and 1 GPa. Rounded natural mineral grains were placed in a synthetic mixture of Ca-Mg-Si-C-H-O composition with 0, 5, 13, 15, and 31 wt% H2O and 0, 5, and 27 wt% CO2. The experimental results investigated using Field-Emission Scanning Electron Microscope showed that angular step-like dissolution surfaces, which are common for natural kimberlitic chromites, develop only in the presence of H2O-rich fluid phase. The reaction of chromite with H2O dissolved in the melt and with dry melt caused smoothing of chromite surfaces. Chromite dissolution in CO2-rich melts produced rounded and polyhedral relief features. Both the smooth and polyhedral types of features are not typical for natural kimberlite-hosted chromite grains. Ilmenite underwent rapid dissolution at our experimental conditions. In H2O-rich fluid ilmenite produced "pyramidal" type of surface features previously described as the most common for natural kimberlitic ilmenites. The experimental results were compared to the natural minerals

  17. Calculating rheologic properties of magmas from field observations combined with experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verberne, R.; Ulmer, P.; Muntener, O.

    2010-12-01

    In order to investigate the emplacement processes that occur in shallow level plutonic magma reservoirs, we try to relate phase assemblages and mineral composition to the emplacement history of a particular rock suite by combining field and experimental approaches to understand the physical, rheological and temporal evolution of crystallizing batholiths. Here we present a case study of the Listino Ring Structure of the Adamello Batholith, N-Italy, where processes of interaction between felsic and mafic magmas, such as mafic dike injection in partly crystallized silicic magmas, dike disaggregation, enclave formation, and near-solidus shearing were studied in glacier-polished outcrops. Most of these phenomena are generally assigned to fluid dynamic processes operating in a magma reservoir (Turner & Campbell, 1986), where rheological barriers (e.g. viscosity contrast) inhibit chemical mixing of mafic magmas with crystal-rich silicic magmas (Sparks & Marshall, 1986; Blundy & Sparks, 1992). Our approach centers around the determination of mineral assemblages and crystal fractions present at the time of the process under investigation. The mineral assemblage at the time of injection of mafic magmas, can be determined from the observation that minerals from the host magma are being mechanically incorporated as phenocrysts into the mafic enclaves before quenching occurs. In the case of synmagmatic deformation, the crystals present during deformation can possibly be identified by determining the crystal fraction displaying plastic deformation. Having determined the modal mineralogy and composition of phases, combining with whole rock chemistry of both magmas and a pressure estimate obtained from Al-in-Hornblende barometry by Blundy & Caddick (unpublished), allows us to constrain the temperature and H2O-content of the host magma. The melt fraction and composition of the host magma can then be calculated from available experimental data, and the melt composition can be

  18. Design and experimental study of a novel giant magnetostrictive actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Guangming; Zhang, Peilin; He, Zhongbo; Li, Dongwei; Huang, Yingjie; Xie, Wenqiang

    2016-12-01

    Giant magnetostrictive actuator has been widely used in precise driving occasions for its excellent performance. However, in driving a switching valve, especially the ball-valve in an electronic controlled injector, the actuator can't exhibit its good performance for limits in output displacement and responding speed. A novel giant magnetostrictive actuator, which can reach its maximum displacement for being exerted with no bias magnetic field, is designed in this paper. Simultaneously, elongating of the giant magetostrictive material is converted to shortening of the actuator's axial dimension with the help of an output rod in "T" type. Furthermore, to save responding time, the driving voltage with high opening voltage while low holding voltage is designed. Responding time and output displacement are studied experimentally with the help of a measuring system. From measured results, designed driving voltage can improve the responding speed of actuator displacement quite effectively. And, giant magnetostrictive actuator can output various steady-state displacements to reach more driving effects.

  19. Experimental Study of Kink-like Modes in NSTX Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ge; Podesta, Mario

    2014-10-01

    Internal kink modes destabilized by energetic trapped particles can cause particle losses and deteriorate plasma performance in toroidal fusion devices. In this study, we characterized the main properties of kink-link instabilities in National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) plasmas, including the wave number spectrum, effective mode growth rate and real frequency, as a function of the thermal plasma, fast ion and magnetic field parameters, which is re-constructed using LRDfit and TRANSP, utilizing experimental data from motional Stark effect(MSE) diagnostic for direct measurements of the q profiles. Results indicate that the bursting fishbone modes are unstable at preferentially higher fast ion beta regime, while the long-lived non-resonant kink (NRK) modes are unstable at lower and higher fast ion beta values. Both the fishbones and the NRK tend to be stable with q-min above around 1.5. Partly supported by US-DoE Contract DE-AC02- 09CH11466.

  20. Apprenticeships, Collaboration and Scientific Discovery in Academic Field Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madden, Derek Scott; Grayson, Diane J.; Madden, Erinn H.; Milewski, Antoni V.; Snyder, Cathy Ann

    2012-11-01

    Teachers may use apprenticeships and collaboration as instructional strategies that help students to make authentic scientific discoveries as they work as amateur researchers in academic field studies. This concept was examined with 643 students, ages 14-72, who became proficient at field research through cognitive apprenticeships with the Smithsonian Institute, School for Field Studies and Earthwatch. Control student teams worked from single research goals and sets of methods, while experimental teams varied goals, methods, and collaborative activities in Kenya, Costa Rica, Panama, and Ecuador. Results from studies indicate that students who conducted local pilot studies, collaborative symposia, and ongoing, long-term fieldwork generated significantly more data than did control groups. Research reports of the experimental groups were ranked highest by experts, and contributed the most data to international science journals. Data and anecdotal information in this report indicate that structured collaboration in local long-term studies using apprenticeships may increase the potential for students' academic field studies contribution of new information to science.

  1. Stressing biological samples with pulsed magnetic fields: physical aspects and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delle Side, D.; Specchia, V.; D'Attis, S.; Giuffreda, E.; Quarta, G.; Calcagnile, L.; Bozzetti, M. P.; Nassisi, V.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic field effects are diffused among living organisms. They are mainly studied with static or extremely low frequency fields, while scarce information is available for pulsed fields. This work is devoted to the study of the interaction between Drosophila melanogaster, both adults and larvae, and pulsed magnetic fields. We exposed the organisms to a peak field of 0.4 T, lasting for about 2 μ s, within an ad hoc designed copper coil. Adult individuals didn't present any deregulation of repetitive sequences in the germ line of Drosophila. Instead, we noticed a marked magnetic field effect in larvae. Polytene chromosomes coming from treated individuals showed the presence of heat shock puffs; the same organisms revealed also an upregulation of the genes encoding for the Hsp70 protein. These observations suggest that the larvae underwent an oxidative stress caused by the modulation of free radicals' yield induced by the magnetic field through a radical pair mechanism.

  2. Performance of current measurement system in poloidal field power supply for Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D. M.; Li, J.; Wan, B. N.; Lu, Z.; Wang, L. S.; Jiang, L.; Lu, C. H.; Huang, J.

    2016-11-01

    As one of the core subsystems of the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST), the poloidal field power system supplies energy to EAST's superconducting coils. To measure the converter current in the poloidal field power system, a current measurement system has been designed. The proposed measurement system is composed of a Rogowski coil and a newly designed integrator. The results of the resistor-inductor-capacitor discharge test and the converter equal current test show that the current measurement system provides good reliability and stability, and the maximum error of the proposed system is less than 1%.

  3. Experimental simulation of two-particle quantum entanglement using classical fields.

    PubMed

    Lee, K F; Thomas, J E

    2002-03-04

    We experimentally demonstrate simulation of two entangled quantum bits using classical fields of two frequencies and two polarizations. Multiplication of optical heterodyne beat signals from two spatially separated regions simulates coincidence detection of two particles. The product signal so obtained contains several frequency components, one of which can be selected by bandpass frequency filtering. The bandpassed signal contains two indistinguishable, interfering contributions, permitting simulation of four polarization-entangled Bell-like states. These classical field methods may be useful in small scale simulations of quantum logic operations that require multiparticle entanglement without collapse.

  4. Performance of current measurement system in poloidal field power supply for Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Liu, D M; Li, J; Wan, B N; Lu, Z; Wang, L S; Jiang, L; Lu, C H; Huang, J

    2016-11-01

    As one of the core subsystems of the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST), the poloidal field power system supplies energy to EAST's superconducting coils. To measure the converter current in the poloidal field power system, a current measurement system has been designed. The proposed measurement system is composed of a Rogowski coil and a newly designed integrator. The results of the resistor-inductor-capacitor discharge test and the converter equal current test show that the current measurement system provides good reliability and stability, and the maximum error of the proposed system is less than 1%.

  5. Tracer Developments: Results of Experimental Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.C.; Ahn, J.H.; Bentley, H.; Moore, J.N.; Veggeberg, S.

    1986-01-21

    Tracers can be used to monitor the movement of groundwaters and geothermal fluids and they can be used as a reference to quantify changes in fluid chemistry as a result of injection. Despite their potential importance to the geothermal operator, very few tracers are presently available and of those that are, little is known about their stability or behavior at the elevated temperatures that typify resources capable of electric power generation. During the past two years the University of Utah Research Institute has been involved in tracer research and testing, largely through the DOE Injection Research Program. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the results of these laboratory and field investigations.

  6. Experimental clean combustor program: Noise study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sofrin, T. G.; Riloff, N., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Under a Noise Addendum to the NASA Experimental Clean Combustor Program (ECCP) internal pressure fluctuations were measured during tests of JT9D combustor designs conducted in a burner test rig. Measurements were correlated with burner operating parameters using an expression relating farfield noise to these parameters. For a given combustor, variation of internal noise with operating parameters was reasonably well predicted by this expression but the levels were higher than farfield predictions and differed significantly among several combustors. For two burners, discharge stream temperature fluctuations were obtained with fast-response thermocouples to allow calculation of indirect combustion noise which would be generated by passage of the temperature inhomogeneities through the high pressure turbine stages of a JT9D turbofan engine. Using a previously developed analysis, the computed indirect combustion noise was significantly lower than total low frequency core noise observed on this and several other engines.

  7. Experimental study of external fuel vaporization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szetela, E. J.; Tevelde, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    The fuel properties used in the design of a flash vaporization system for aircraft gas turbine engines were evaluated in experiments using a flowing system to determine critical temperature and pressure, boiling points, dew points, heat transfer coefficients, deposit formation rates, and deposit removal. Three fuels were included in the experiments: Jet-A, an experimental referree broad specification fuel, and a premium No. 2 diesel fuel. Engine conditions representing a NASA Energy Efficient Engine at sea-level take-off, cruise, and idle were simulated in the vaporization system and it was found that single phase flow was maintained in the heat exchanger and downstream of the throttle. Deposits encountered in the heat exchanger represented a thermal resistance as high as 1300 sq M K/watt and a deposit formation rate over 1000 gC/sq cm hr.

  8. Experimental and theoretical study of ornidazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh, P.; Gunasekaran, S.; Gnanasambandan, T.; Seshadri, S.

    2016-01-01

    The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and the Fourier transform Raman (FT-Raman) spectra of the title molecule in solid phase were recorded in the region 4000-400 cm- 1 and 4000-100 cm- 1 respectively. The geometrical parameters and energies were investigated with the help of Density Functional Theory (DFT) employing B3LYP method and 6-31G (d, p) basis set. The analysis was supported by electrostatic potential maps and calculation of HOMO-LUMO. UV, FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of ornidazole were calculated and compared with experimental results. Thermodynamic properties like entropy, heat capacity, have been calculated for the molecule. The predicted first hyperpolarizability also shows that the molecule might have a reasonably good non-linear optical (NLO) behavior. The intramolecular contacts have been interpreted using natural bond orbital (NBO) and natural localized molecular orbital (NLMO) analysis.

  9. Experimental land observing data system feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, J. L.; Kraiman, H.

    1982-01-01

    An end-to-end data system to support a Shuttle-based Multispectral Linear Array (MLA) mission in the mid-1980's was defined. The experimental Land Observing System (ELOS) is discussed. A ground system that exploits extensive assets from the LANDSAT-D Program to effectively meet the objectives of the ELOS Mission was defined. The goal of 10 meter pixel precision, the variety of data acquisition capabilities, and the use of Shuttle are key to the mission requirements, Ground mission management functions are met through the use of GSFC's Multi-Satellite Operations Control Center (MSOCC). The MLA Image Generation Facility (MIGF) combines major hardware elements from the Applications Development Data System (ADDS) facility and LANDSAT Assessment System (LAS) with a special purpose MLA interface unit. LANDSAT-D image processing techniques, adapted to MLA characteristics, form the basis for the use of existing software and the definition of new software required.

  10. Experimental study of external fuel vaporization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szetela, E. J.; Tevelde, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    The fuel properties used in the design of a flash vaporization system for aircraft gas turbine engines were evaluated in experiments using a flowing system to determine critical temperature and pressure, boiling points, dew points, heat transfer coefficients, deposit formation rates, and deposit removal. Three fuels were included in the experiments: Jet-A, an experimental referree broad specification fuel, and a premium No. 2 diesel fuel. Engine conditions representing a NASA Energy Efficient Engine at sea-level take-off, cruise, and idle were simulated in the vaporization system and it was found that single phase flow was maintained in the heat exchanger and downstream of the throttle. Deposits encountered in the heat exchanger represented a thermal resistance as high as 1300 sq M K/watt and a deposit formation rate over 1000 gC/sq cm hr.

  11. Experimental studies of collision and fragmentation phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, William K.; Davis, D. R.; Weidenschilling, S. J.

    1987-01-01

    The reduction and publication of an extensive data set collected in experiments over several years at Ames and PSI is briefly examined. Hartmann has been assembling data sets from his experiments on catastrophic fragmentation of various materials, including basalt, other igneous rock, ice, and weak dirt clods. Weidenschilling and Davis have continued to gather and reduce data on oblique impacts. The data indicate a power law distribution of ejecta mass vs. velocity, with a slope that is independent of azimuth, and does not vary with impact angle from normal impacts to at least 75 deg from vertical. In order to improve models of coagulation of dust aggregates in the solar nebula, SJW developed an apparatus for drop tests of fragile projectiles. Davis and Weidenschilling continued to collect and analyze experimental data on collisional catastrophic disruption at the Ames Vertical Gun Range.

  12. [Experimental studies of sonography of the meniscus].

    PubMed

    Casser, H R; Füsting, M; Tenbrock, F

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this examination was to recognize and, if possible, avoid the origin of artifact images in sonograms caused anatomically and by the physics of ultrasound. Experimental investigations were carried out in a waterbath on models of knee joints using Schlierenoptics and on specimens from corpse knees. When a sector transducer was used, the artifact images that originated in the joint cavity appeared outside the cavity on the sonogram so that there were no danger of mistaking them for reflected images of tears in lesions of the meniscus. In sonography, the surfaces of tears reflect a strong signal, but diagnosis depends on the position of the edges of the tears to the direction of the ultrasonic waves, which means to get a reliable record of tears of the meniscus is only possible by means of a dynamic examination technique.

  13. Experimental Study of Torsional Column Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nile, Alfred S

    1939-01-01

    Thirty-three 24ST aluminum-alloy 2- by 2- by 0.10-inch channels, with lengths ranging from 10 to 90 inches were tested at Stanford University in compression to obtain an experimental verification of the theoretical formulas for torsional failure developed by Eugene E. Lundquist of the N.A.C.A. The observed critical loads and twist-axis locations were sufficiently close to the values obtained from the formulas to establish the substantial validity of the latter. The differences between observed and computed results were small enough to be accounted for by small and mostly unavoidable differences between actual test conditions and those assumed in deriving the formulas. Some data were obtained from the shorter specimens regarding the growth of the buckles that resulted in local buckling failure.

  14. Experimental studies on sexual reproduction in diatoms.

    PubMed

    Chepurnov, Victor A; Mann, David G; Sabbe, Koen; Vyverman, Wim

    2004-01-01

    The diatoms are the most speciose group of algae, having global ecological significance in the carbon and silicon cycles. They are almost unique among algae in being diplontic, and sexual reproduction is an obligate stage in the life cycle of most diatom species. It is unclear which are the principal factors that have fostered the evolutionary success of diatoms, but the unique life cycle (which is correlated with a curious wall structure and cell division mechanism) and size-dependent control of sexuality must have played an important part. Progress in understanding life cycle dynamics and their interrelationships with population biology and evolution will depend on how successfully sex can be initiated and manipulated experimentally, and our review provides a foundation for such work. Relevant data are scattered in time and come mostly from non-English publications, producing a false impression of diatoms as recalcitrant with respect to sexualization. Recent advances dependent on experimental cultures include the discovery of widespread heterothallism (including some complex types of behavior) in pennate diatoms, sexual diversity among clones of centric diatoms, more flexible size restitution strategies in centric diatoms than had been suspected, and use of reproductive isolation as a criterion in diatom taxonomy. We identify unsolved problems in the life history of diatoms, including aspects of sexualization, cell-cell recognition, sexual reproduction, and the development of the special expanding cell (the auxospore), which is crucial to morphogenesis in this group. Some of these problems are being addressed using modern molecular genetic tools, and progress will be facilitated when whole-genome sequences are published (e.g., for Thalassiosira pseudonana). Problems of culture maintenance and methods for manipulating the life cycle are discussed.

  15. Computational and experimental study of laminar flames

    SciTech Connect

    Smooke, Mitchell

    2015-05-29

    During the past three years, our research has centered on an investigation of the effects of complex chemistry and detailed transport on the structure and extinction of hydrocarbon flames in coflowing axisymmetric configurations. We have pursued both computational and experimental aspects of the research in parallel on both steady-state and time-dependent systems. The computational work has focused on the application of accurate and efficient numerical methods for the solution of the steady-state and time-dependent boundary value problems describing the various reacting systems. Detailed experimental measurements were performed on axisymmetric coflow flames using two-dimensional imaging techniques. Previously, spontaneous Raman scattering, chemiluminescence, and laser-induced fluorescence were used to measure the temperature, major and minor species profiles. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) has been used to investigate velocity distributions and for calibration of time-varying flames. Laser-induced incandescence (LII) with an extinction calibration was used to determine soot volume fractions, while soot surface temperatures were measured with three-color optical pyrometry using a color digital camera. A blackbody calibration of the camera allows for determination of soot volume fraction as well, which can be compared with the LII measurements. More recently, we have concentrated on a detailed characterization of soot using a variety of techniques including time-resolved LII (TiRe-LII) for soot primary particles sizes, multi-angle light scattering (MALS) for soot radius of gyration, and spectrally-resolved line of sight attenuation (spec-LOSA). Combining the information from all of these soot measurements can be used to determine the soot optical properties, which are observed to vary significantly depending on spatial location and fuel dilution. Our goal has been to obtain a more fundamental understanding of the important fluid dynamic and chemical interactions in

  16. Experimental Investigation of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer Enhancement in Microgravity in the Presence of Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Cila

    1999-01-01

    In boiling high heat fluxes are possible driven by relatively small temperature differences, which make its use increasingly attractive in aerospace applications. The objective of the research is to develop ways to overcome specific problems associated with boiling in the low gravity environment by substituting the buoyancy force with the electric force to enhance bubble removal from the heated surface. Previous studies indicate that in terrestrial applications nucleate boiling heat transfer can be increased by a factor of 50, as compared to values obtained for the same system without electric fields. The goal of our research is to experimentally explore the mechanisms responsible for EHD heat transfer enhancement in boiling in low gravity conditions, by visualizing the temperature distributions in the vicinity of the heated surface and around the bubble during boiling using real-time holographic interferometry (HI) combined with high-speed cinematography. In the first phase of the project the influence of the electric field on a single bubble is investigated. Pool boiling is simulated by injecting a single bubble through a nozzle into the subcooled liquid or into the thermal boundary layer developed along the flat heater surface. Since the exact location of bubble formation is known, the optical equipment can be aligned and focused accurately, which is an essential requirement for precision measurements of bubble shape, size and deformation, as well as the visualization of temperature fields by HI. The size of the bubble and the frequency of bubble departure can be controlled by suitable selection of nozzle diameter and mass flow rate of vapor. In this approach effects due to the presence of the electric field can be separated from effects caused by the temperature gradients in the thermal boundary layer. The influence of the thermal boundary layer can be investigated after activating the heater at a later stage of the research. For the visualization experiments a

  17. Experimental evidence of transport of pesticides through field soils - a review

    SciTech Connect

    Flury, M.

    1996-01-01

    Much information is available in the literature about pesticide transport through soils at the field scale. The purpose of this study is to review the literature with a focus on pesticide leaching to groundwater. The literature was compiled and discussed with respect to different factors that influence pesticide leaching. Pesticide leaching below the root zone has been demonstrated in sandy as well as in loamy soils. Particularly in loamy soils, there is evidence that even strongly adsorbing chemicals can move along preferential flow pathways and that the travel times of pesticides are comparable to those of conservative solutes. The amounts of pesticides leached below the root zone by worst case rainfall events depend on the chemical properties and can reach up to 5% of the applied mass. When there is no heavy rainfall shortly following application of chemicals, the mass annually leached below the root zone is in the range of <0.1 to 1%, occasionally it can reach up to 4%. Although a direct comparison cannot be made, the mass lost by leaching seems generally to be smaller than that lost by runoff, depending of course on the slope of the fields. Several factors that affect pesticide leaching, such as surface preparation, soil structure, soil water content, type of irrigation, pesticide formulation, time of application and rainfall events, are discussed with support of experimental evidence. While some factors showed inconsistent effects, others show promise in controlling leaching mechanisms. These latter factors include initial water content, surface preparation, and time of pesticide application. Based on the reviewed literature recommendations were made for future research activities. 172 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  18. Calibration of aero-structural reduced order models using full-field experimental measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, R.; Bartram, G.; Beberniss, T.; Wiebe, R.; Spottswood, S. M.

    2017-03-01

    The structural response of hypersonic aircraft panels is a multi-disciplinary problem, where the nonlinear structural dynamics, aerodynamics, and heat transfer models are coupled. A clear understanding of the impact of high-speed flow effects on the structural response, and the potential influence of the structure on the local environment, is needed in order to prevent the design of overly-conservative structures, a common problem in past hypersonic programs. The current work investigates these challenges from a structures perspective. To this end, the first part of this investigation looks at the modeling of the response of a rectangular panel to an external heating source (thermo-structural coupling) where the temperature effect on the structure is obtained from forward looking infrared (FLIR) measurements and the displacement via 3D-digital image correlation (DIC). The second part of the study uses data from a previous series of wind-tunnel experiments, performed to investigate the response of a compliant panel to the effects of high-speed flow, to train a pressure surrogate model. In this case, the panel aero-loading is obtained from fast-response pressure sensitive paint (PSP) measurements, both directly and from the pressure surrogate model. The result of this investigation is the use of full-field experimental measurements to update the structural model and train a computational efficient model of the loading environment. The use of reduced order models, informed by these full-field physical measurements, is a significant step toward the development of accurate simulation models of complex structures that are computationally tractable.

  19. Experimental study of a mini-magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikhislamov, I. F.; Zakharov, Yu P.; Posukh, V. G.; Melekhov, A. V.; Antonov, V. M.; Boyarintsev, E. L.; Ponomarenko, A. G.

    2014-02-01

    Magnetospheres at ion kinetic scales, or mini-magnetospheres, possess unusual features as predicted by numerical simulations. However, there are practically no data on the subject from space observations and the data which are available are far too incomplete. In this paper we describe the results of a laboratory experiment on the interaction of plasma flow with a magnetic dipole with parameters such that the ion inertial length is larger than the size of an observed magnetosphere. A detailed structure of the non-coplanar or out-of-plane component of the magnetic field has been obtained in the meridian plane. The independence of this component on dipole moment reversal, as was reported in a previous work, has been verified. In the tail distinct lobes and a central current sheet have been observed. It was found that lobe regions adjacent to boundary layer are dominated by a non-coplanar component of magnetic field. Tail-ward oriented electric current in the plasma associated with that component appears to be equal to the ion current in the upstream part of magnetosphere and in the tail current sheet implying that electrons are stationary in those regions while the ions flow by. The data obtained strongly support the proposed model of mini-magnetosphere based on two-fluid effects as described by the Hall term.

  20. Influence of different types of electromagnetic fields on skin reparatory processes in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Matic, Milan; Lazetic, Bogosav; Poljacki, Mirjana; Djuran, Verica; Matic, Aleksandra; Gajinov, Zorica

    2009-05-01

    Wound healing is a very complex process, some phases of which have only recently been explained. Magnetic and electromagnetic fields can modulate this process in a non-thermal way. The aim of this research was to compare the influence of constant and pulsed electromagnetic fields and low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on wound healing in experimental animals. The experiment was conducted on 120 laboratory rats divided into four groups of 30 animals each (constant electromagnetic field, pulsed electromagnetic field, LLLT and control group). It lasted for 21 days. Under the influence of the constant electromagnetic field the healing of the skin defect was accelerated in comparison with the control group. The difference was statistically significant in all the weeks of the experiment at the P < 0.01 level. Accelerated healing was also observed under the influence of the pulsed electromagnetic field (P < 0.05). In the group of animals exposed to LLLT, the healing of the skin defect was faster than in the control group. The statistical significance was at the P < 0.05 level. Different types of electromagnetic fields have a promoting effect on the wound healing process.

  1. Zoom Versus Full-Field Sensitivity at the ETS (Experimental Test System)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-17

    observing roles played by the Experimental Test System (ETS) have expanded from deep-space artificial satellite surveillance and Earth- approaching...asteroid searches to encompass daytime observations of near-Earth satellites and searches for debris in near-Earth orbit. The latter work is...to characterize scintillations, sensitiv- ity, responsivity, color corrections to a standard astronomical system, optimum field of view for a given

  2. Study of the electric field inside microchannel plate multipliers

    SciTech Connect

    Gatti, E.; Oba, K.; Rehak, P.

    1982-01-01

    Electric field inside high gain microchannel plate multipliers was studied. The calculations were based directly on the solution of the Maxwell equations applied to the microchannel plate (MCP) rather than on the conventional lumped RC model. The results are important to explain the performance of MCP's, (1) under a pulsed bias tension and, (2) at high rate conditions. The results were tested experimentally and a new method of MCP operation free from the positive ion feedback was demonstrated.

  3. Species-specific photosynthetic responses of four coniferous seedlings to open-field experimental warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, S.; Yoon, S. J.; Yoon, T. K.; Han, S. H.; Lee, J.; Lee, D.; Kim, S.; Hwang, J.; Cho, M.; Son, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Temperature increase under climate change is expected to affect photosynthesis of tree species. Biochemical models generally suggest that the elevated temperature increases the photosynthetic carbon fixation, however, many opposing results were reported as well. We aimed to examine the photosynthetic responses of four coniferous seedlings to projected future temperature increase, by conducting an open-field warming experiment. Experimental warming set-up using infra-red heater was built in 2011 and the temperature in warming plots has been regulated to be consistently 3oC higher than that of control plots. The seeds of Abies holophylla (AH), A. koreana (AK), Pinus densiflora (PD), and P. koraiensis (PK) were planted in each 1 m × 1 m plot (n=3) in April, 2012. Monthly net photosynthetic rates (Pn; μmol CO2 m-2 s-1) of 1-year-old seedlings (n=9) from June to November, 2013 were measured using CIRAS-2 (PP-Systems, UK) and photosynthetic parameters (the apparent quantum yield; ф; µmol CO2 mol-1, the dark respiration rate; Rd; µmol CO2 mol-1, and the light compensation point; LCP; µmol mol-1 s-1) were also calculated from the light-response curve of photosynthesis in August, 2013. Chlorophyll contents were measured using DMSO extraction method. Monthly Pn was generally higher for PD and decreased for AK in warmed plots than in control plots (Fig. 1). Pn of AK and PK did not show any significant difference, however, Pn of PK in October and November increased by experimental warming. Pn of PD also showed the highest increase in November and this distinct increase of Pn in autumn might be caused by delayed cessation of photosynthesis by temperature elevation. ф and Rd in warmed plots were higher for PD and lower for AK, while LCP did not significantly differ by treatments for all species. Because ф is considered to be related to the efficiency of harvesting and using light, the change in ф might have caused the response of Pn to warming in this study. Decreases

  4. Experimental Measurement of the Magnetic Field Spectrum In HSX Using Passing Particle Drifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, V.; Talmadge, J. N.; Anderson, F. S. B.; Anderson, D. T.; Almagri, A. F.

    2000-10-01

    The fluorescent mesh and electron gun technique is used to map the drift surfaces produced by a moderate energy (450eV) electron beam in HSX. The drift surfaces are mapped at several toroidal locations for magnetic fields ranging from 60 to 1000 gauss in both co- and counter-clockwise directions. The deviation of the particle from a flux surface is obtained by comparing the 450 eV particle orbit to that of a 20 eV particle. The experimental data show very good agreement with the expected scaling of the drift with the square root of the energy. By analyzing the magnitude and phase of the particle excursion from a flux surface, an approximate magnetic field spectrum can be obtained. We apply this technique to analyzing particle motion in HSX at very low fields (60 gauss). The experimental results indicate that the toroidal curvature in HSX is small and that the drift orbit in HSX is reduced by the high effective transform compared to an equivalent tokamak-like device. Details of the implementation and experimental results are presented.

  5. Experimental Study of Stellar Reactions at CNS

    SciTech Connect

    Kubono, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Amadio, G.; Hayakawa, S.; He, J. J.; Saito, A.; Teranishi, T.; Nishimura, S.; Fukunishi, N.; Iwasa, N.; Inafuku, K.; Kato, S.; Tanaka, M. H.; Fuchi, Y.; Moon, J. Y.; Kwon, K.; Lee, C. S.; Khiem, Le Hong; Chen, A.

    2006-11-02

    After a brief review on low-energy RI beam production technology, nuclear astrophysics programs at CNS are presented including a scope of the field in the Wako campus. The CRIB project involves a total development of the whole facility to maximize the low-energy RI beam intensities, including the ion source, the AVF cyclotron and the low-energy RI beam separator CRIB, Some recent nuclear astrophysics experiments performed with the RI beams were discussed, including the measurement of the 14O({alpha},p)17F reaction, the key stellar reaction for the onset of the high-temperature rp-process. The first experiment performed with a newly installed high-resolution magnetic spectrograph PA of CNS was also presented. Collaboration possibilities for nuclear astrophysics in the RIKEN campus are also touched.

  6. Efficiency of experimental rice (Oryza sativa L.) fields in mitigating diazinon runoff toxicity to Hyalella azteca.

    PubMed

    Moore, Matthew T; Lizotte, Richard E; Kröger, Robert

    2009-06-01

    This study assessed the viability of using planted, mature rice fields in mitigating diazinon (an organophosphate insecticide) runoff toxicity using aqueous 48 h Hyalella azteca whole effluent toxicity bioassays. Rice fields decreased diazinon concentrations 80.1%-99.9% compared with 10.8% in the unvegetated field control. H. azteca survival responses coincided with observed diazinon concentrations. Estimated LC50 effects dilutions (%) ranged from 1.15 to 1.47 for inflow samples and 1.66 (unvegetated), 6.44 (rice field A), and >100 (rice field B) outflow samples. Decreases in inflow versus outflow aqueous toxicity were 77.1%-100% in rice fields compared with 18.7% in the unvegetated field.

  7. An experimental study of jet exhaust simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, W. B., III

    1975-01-01

    Afterbody drag predictions for jet aircraft are usually made experimentally with the jet exhaust flow simulated. The physical gas properties of the fluid used for the model jet exhaust can affect the accuracy of simulation of the airplane's jet exhaust plume. The effect of the accuracy of this simulation on afterbody drag was investigated by wind-tunnel tests with single engine model. In addition to unheated air as the exhaust gas, the decomposition products of three different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide were utilized. The air jet simulation consistently resulted in higher boattail drag than hydrogen peroxide simulation. The differences in drag for the various exhaust gases are attributed to different plume shapes and entrainment properties of the gases. The largest differences in drag due to exhaust gas properties were obtained for the combination of high transonic Mach numbers and high boattail angles. For these conditions, the current data indicate that the use of air to simulate a nonafterburning turbojet exhaust can result in an increase in afterbody amounting to 20 percent of the nonafterburning turbojet value.

  8. Experimental study on HVAC sound parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bujoreanu, C.; Benchea, M.

    2016-08-01

    HVAC system represent major source of buildings internal noise and therefore they are designed to provide a human acoustic comfort besides the thermal and air quality requirements. The paper experimentally investigates three types of commercial air handler units (AHU) with different ducts cross-section sizes and inlet-outlet configuration. The measurements are performed in an anechoic room. The measurements are carried out at different fan's speeds, ranging the power-charge from 30-100% while the duct air flow is slowly adjusted from full open to full closed, between 0-500 Pa. The sound pressure levels of the radiant units are rated using NR curves. Also, the supply and the outdoor ducts sound levels are compared in order to point the frequencies where the noise must be reduced. Third-octave band analysis of random noise of an air handling unit from a HVAC system is realized, using measurement procedures that agrees the requirements of the ISO 3744:2011 and ISO 5136:2010 standards. The comparatively results highlight the effects of the geometry, air flow pressure and power-charging dependencies upon the sound level. This is the start for a noise reduction strategy.

  9. Experimental Studies of Mars-Analog Brines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.; Bullock, Mark A.

    1999-01-01

    Evaporite deposits may represent significant sinks of mobile cations (e.g., those of Ca, N, Mg, and Fe) and anions (e.g., those of C, N, S, and Cl) among the materials composing the Martian surface and upper crust. Carbon and nitrogen are especially interesting because of their role as atmospheric gases which can become incorporated into crustal rocks. However, the nature of evaporite precursor brines formed under Martian conditions is poorly understood. To date, only a very limited number of laboratory investigations have been reported which have any bearing on a better understanding of various processes related to brine or evaporite formation on Mars. Here we report on preliminary laboratory experiments that exposed igneous minerals analogous to those in Martian (Shergottites, Nakhlites, and Chassigny (SNC) group) meteorites to a simulated Martian atmosphere and pure, deoxygenated water. Analysis of the water over intervals of time approaching 1 year showed that atmospheric gases dissolved to form carbonate and nitrate ions while minerals dissolved to form sulfate and chloride along with various cations. On an annual basis, ion formation gave a carbonate/sulfate ratio that is comparable to the ratio found among salts in SNC meteorites. The sulfate/chloride ratio of the experimental brines is higher than in SNC meteorites but lower than in surface soils measured at the Viking and Pathfinder landing sites.

  10. Experimental studies of a drumlike silencer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choy, Y. S.; Huang, Lixi

    2002-11-01

    The theoretical finding of the broadband performance of a reactive silencer is validated experimentally. The silencer consists of two highly stretched membranes lining part of the duct and backed by two long and shallow cavities. The test rig was built with a small square duct of 5 cm in dimension, and each cavity is 5 cm deep and 25 cm long. Two types of metal foils, stainless steel and copper, were used, and the lowest membrane-to-air mass ratio was 1.3. A transmission loss in excess of 10 dB was achieved over more than one octave band. For one configuration close to the optimal parameters, the predicted ratio of the frequency band limits is 2.47, while the experiment gave 2.35. Three spectral peaks were found in the stopband, as predicted, but the peaks were broader than prediction, indicating the presence of significant sound energy dissipation mechanisms. Comparison with theoretical simulation shows that the cavity damping dominates over membrane friction. Tests using heavier membranes and membrane with different levels of tension also agree with predictions. Issues of practical implementation of the concept as a flow-through silencer are also addressed. copyright 2002 Acoustical Society of America.

  11. CVD parameter study using strategy of experimentation

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.E.

    1984-07-01

    An experimental design strategy was used to determine the operating characteristics of an apparatus for forming tungsten-rhenium (W-Re) alloys by chemical vapor deposition. The metal deposits were made at 650/sup 0/C by the hydrogen reduction of a 10 percent rhenium hexafluoride and 90 percent gas mixture at 0.66 to 4.00 kPa (5 to 30 torr). Hydrogen flow rates ranged from 550 to 2770 ..mu..mol/s and mixed metal fluoride flows ranged from 41 to 130 ..mu..mol/s. An operating point was sought that would produce a high strength alloy, so the deposition results were fit by least squares regression to second order response equations. Seven properties were measured: deposition rate, average composition, maximum composition, minimum composition, sample standard deviation of the composition, microhardness as a measure of the amount of A15 phase, and as-deposited surface quality. A set of operating parameters was determined that was predicted to yield a 23 w/o Re alloy with an 1100 DPH (diamond pyramid hardness) microhardness.

  12. Experimental model to study sedimentary kidney stones.

    PubMed

    Grases, F; Llobera, A

    1998-01-01

    An experimental model to reproduce, to some extent, the conditions prevailing during the formation of the so-called sedimentary urinary stones, was developed. The results obtained demonstrated that in the absence of organic matter no calcium phosphate crystals were deposited in cavities with scarce liquid renovation. Nevertheless, in such case a regular hydroxyapatite layer was developed on the walls around the cavity. The presence of crystallization inhibitors cannot stop indefinitely the crystal development. Therefore, phytate manifested important inhibitory effects in concentrations normally found in urine (0.77-1.54 x 10(-6) mol/l), whereas citrate only manifested important inhibitory effects when found at high urinary concentrations (2.64 x 10(-3) mol/l). When mucin (a glycoprotein) was present in the urine, a clear deposit of calcified organic material was formed. The organic matter appeared mixed with the spherulites of hydroxyapatite, this demonstrating the capacity of the glycoprotein agglomerates to act as heterogeneous nucleants of calcium salts and their important role in the formation of sedimentary stones. The structural features of the obtained in vitro deposits were compared with the fine structure of human sedimentary phosphate calculi. Scanning electron microscopy images demonstrated a good correspondence between in vitro experiments and in vivo observations.

  13. Experimental study of low Reynolds number nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grisnik, Stanley P.; Smith, Tamara A.; Saltz, Larry E.

    1987-01-01

    High-performance electrothermal thrusters operate in a low nozzle-throat Reynolds number regime. Under these conditions, the flow boundary layer occupies a large volume inside the nozzle, contributing to large viscous losses. Four nozzles (conical, bell, trumpet, and modified trumpet) and a sharp-edged orifice were evaluated over a Reynolds number range of 500 to 9000 with unheated nitrogen and hydrogen. The nozzles showed significant decreases in specific impulse efficiency with decreasing Reynolds number. At Reynolds numbers less than 1000, all four nozzles were probably filled with a large boundary layer. The discharge coefficient decreased with Reynolds number in the same manner as the specific impulse efficiency. The bell and modified trumpet nozzles had discharge coefficients 4 to 8 percent higher than those of the cone or trumpet nozzles. The Two-Dimensional Kinetics (TDK) nozzle analysis computer program was used to predict nozzle performance. The results were then compared to the experimental results in order to determine the accuracy of the program within this flow regime.

  14. An experimental study of human birth models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumer, Alexa; Gossmann, Roseanna; Fauci, Lisa J.; Leftwich, Megan C.

    2016-11-01

    The laboring uterus is a complex and dynamic fluid system. Relatively little is known about the fluid properties in this system. However, the two primary fluids of interest, amniotic fluid and vernix caseosa, likely play integral roles in the force transferred to the fetus during the final stages of parturition. This investigation probes the role of fluid in the force transfer during delivery by considering physical models that determine the role of various components of the full system. The first experimental model represents the fetus passing through the birth canal as concentric cylinders with a fluid filled gap. The rigid, inner cylinder moves through the highly flexible outer cylinder at a prescribed velocity. The geometry of the inner cylinder is varied by aspect ratio and length. A total of five different inner geometries are used to fully investigate the parameter space. As the inner cylinder moves through the outer cylinder, strain measurements are taken. These measurements are converted to force measurements as a function of time and position in the outer cylinder. The results of these experiments are compared with numerical results to form a more complete picture of force transfer. This model can be used as the foundation for predicting the force needed to deliver a fetus in the final stages of parturition. Additionally, more complex models, that incorporate uterine contraction forces, are being developed.

  15. Experimental Studies of Mars-Analog Brines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.; Bullock, Mark A.

    1999-01-01

    Evaporite deposits may represent significant sinks of mobile cations (e.g., those of Ca, N, Mg, and Fe) and anions (e.g., those of C, N, S, and Cl) among the materials composing the Martian surface and upper crust. Carbon and nitrogen are especially interesting because of their role as atmospheric gases which can become incorporated into crustal rocks. However, the nature of evaporite precursor brines formed under Martian conditions is poorly understood. To date, only a very limited number of laboratory investigations have been reported which have any bearing on a better understanding of various processes related to brine or evaporite formation on Mars. Here we report on preliminary laboratory experiments that exposed igneous minerals analogous to those in Martian (Shergottites, Nakhlites, and Chassigny (SNC) group) meteorites to a simulated Martian atmosphere and pure, deoxygenated water. Analysis of the water over intervals of time approaching 1 year showed that atmospheric gases dissolved to form carbonate and nitrate ions while minerals dissolved to form sulfate and chloride along with various cations. On an annual basis, ion formation gave a carbonate/sulfate ratio that is comparable to the ratio found among salts in SNC meteorites. The sulfate/chloride ratio of the experimental brines is higher than in SNC meteorites but lower than in surface soils measured at the Viking and Pathfinder landing sites.

  16. Experimental Vertical Stability Studies for ITER Performance and Design Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, D A; Casper, T A; Eidietis, N; Ferrera, M; Gates, D A; Hutchinson, I H; Jackson, G L; Kolemen, E; Leuer, J A; Lister, J; LoDestro, L L; Meyer, W H; Pearlstein, L D; Sartori, F; Walker, M L; Welander, A S; Wolfe, S M

    2008-10-13

    Operating experimental devices have provided key inputs to the design process for ITER axisymmetric control. In particular, experiments have quantified controllability and robustness requirements in the presence of realistic noise and disturbance environments, which are difficult or impossible to characterize with modeling and simulation alone. This kind of information is particularly critical for ITER vertical control, which poses some of the highest demands on poloidal field system performance, since the consequences of loss of vertical control can be very severe. The present work describes results of multi-machine studies performed under a joint ITPA experiment on fundamental vertical control performance and controllability limits. We present experimental results from Alcator C-Mod, DIII-D, NSTX, TCV, and JET, along with analysis of these data to provide vertical control performance guidance to ITER. Useful metrics to quantify this control performance include the stability margin and maximum controllable vertical displacement. Theoretical analysis of the maximum controllable vertical displacement suggests effective approaches to improving performance in terms of this metric, with implications for ITER design modifications. Typical levels of noise in the vertical position measurement which can challenge the vertical control loop are assessed and analyzed.

  17. Experimental studies on ion mobility in xenon-trimethylamine mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trindade, A. M. F.; Encarnação, P. M. C. C.; Escada, J.; Cortez, A. F. V.; Neves, P. N. B.; Conde, C. A. N.; Borges, F. I. G. M.; Santos, F. P.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper we present experimental results for ion reduced mobilities (K0) in gaseous trimethylamine, TMA—(CH3)3N, and xenon-TMA mixtures for reduced electric fields E/N between 7.5 and 60 Td and in the pressure range from 0.5 to 10 Torr, at room temperature. Both in the mixtures and in pure TMA only one peak was observed in the time of arrival spectra, which is believed to be due to two TMA ions with similar mass, (CH3)3N+ (59 u) and (CH3)2CH2N+ (58 u), whose mobility is indistinguishable in our experimental system. The possibility of ion cluster formation is also discussed. In pure TMA, for the E/N range investigated, an average value of 0.56 cm2V-1s-1 was obtained for the reduced mobility of TMA ions. For the studied mixtures, it was observed that even a very small amount of gaseous TMA (~0.2%) in xenon leads to the production of the above referred TMA ions or clusters. The reduced mobility value of this ion or ions in Xe-TMA mixtures is higher than the value in pure TMA: around 0.8 cm2V-1s-1 for TMA concentrations from 0.2% to about 10%, decreasing for higher TMA percentages, eventually converging to the reduced mobility value in pure TMA.

  18. Dynamic modelling and experimental study of asymmetric optothermal microactuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuying; Chun, Qin; You, Qingyang; Wang, Yingda; Zhang, Haijun

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports the dynamic modelling and experimental study of an asymmetric optothermal microactuator (OTMA). According to the principle of thermal flux, a theoretical model for instantaneous temperature distribution of an expansion arm is established and the expression of expansion increment is derived. Dynamic expansion properties of the arm under laser pulse irradiation are theoretically analyzed indicating that both of the maximum expansion and expansion amplitude decrease with the pulse frequency increasing. Experiments have been further carried out on an OTMA fabricated by using an excimer laser micromachining system. It is shown that the OTMA deflects periodically with the same frequency of laser pulse irradiation. Experimental results also prove that both OTMA's maximum deflection and deflection amplitude (related to maximum expansion and expansion amplitude of the arm) decrease as frequency increases, matching with the theoretical model quite well. Even though the OTMA's deflection decrease at higher frequency, it is still capable of generating 8.2 μm maximum deflection and 4.2 μm deflection amplitude under 17 Hz/2 mW laser pulse irradiation. This work improves the potential applications of optothermal microactuators in micro-opto-electro-mechanical system (MOEMS) and micro/nano-technology fields.

  19. Method to deterministically study photonic nanostructures in different experimental instruments.

    PubMed

    Husken, B H; Woldering, L A; Blum, C; Vos, W L

    2009-01-01

    We describe an experimental method to recover a single, deterministically fabricated nanostructure in various experimental instruments without the use of artificially fabricated markers, with the aim to study photonic structures. Therefore, a detailed map of the spatial surroundings of the nanostructure is made during the fabrication of the structure. These maps are made using a series of micrographs with successively decreasing magnifications. The graphs reveal intrinsic and characteristic geometric features that can subsequently be used in different setups to act as markers. As an illustration, we probe surface cavities with radii of 65 nm on a silica opal photonic crystal with various setups: a focused ion beam workstation; a scanning electron microscope (SEM); a wide field optical microscope and a confocal microscope. We use cross-correlation techniques to recover a small area imaged with the SEM in a large area photographed with the optical microscope, which provides a possible avenue to automatic searching. We show how both structural and optical reflectivity data can be obtained from one and the same nanostructure. Since our approach does not use artificial grids or markers, it is of particular interest for samples whose structure is not known a priori, like samples created solely by self-assembly. In addition, our method is not restricted to conducting samples.

  20. Music Performance As an Experimental Approach to Hyperscanning Studies

    PubMed Central

    Acquadro, Michaël A. S.; Congedo, Marco; De Riddeer, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Humans are fundamentally social and tend to create emergent organizations when interacting with each other; from dyads to families, small groups, large groups, societies, and civilizations. The study of the neuronal substrate of human social behavior is currently gaining momentum in the young field of social neuroscience. Hyperscanning is a neuroimaging technique by which we can study two or more brains simultaneously while participants interact with each other. The aim of this article is to discuss several factors that we deem important in designing hyperscanning experiments. We first review hyperscanning studies performed by means of electroencephalography (EEG) that have been relying on a continuous interaction paradigm. Then, we provide arguments for favoring ecological paradigms, for studying the emotional component of social interactions and for performing longitudinal studies, the last two aspects being largely neglected so far in the hyperscanning literature despite their paramount importance in social sciences. Based on these premises, we argue that music performance is a suitable experimental setting for hyperscanning and that for such studies EEG is an appropriate choice as neuroimaging modality. PMID:27252641

  1. Indigenous Studies as an International Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pino-Robles, Rodolfo

    This paper proposes the development of Indigenous Studies as an international field, both in the sense of advancing the discipline internationally, wherever there are Indigenous peoples, and in the sense of incorporating international perspectives into curricula. In Canada, Indigenous Studies has been and is still treated as something to be done…

  2. Lessons from a Dominican Republic Field Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunter, Michael M., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Utilizing student-centered pedagogy, this case study explores an increasingly prominent and instructive addition to traditional academic coursework--the field study experience. This is particularly true in the arena of environmental education where students learn best by experiencing environmental problems first-hand and then interacting with…

  3. Field studies on pesticides and birds: Unexpected and unique relations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blus, L.J.; Henny, Charles J.

    1997-01-01

    We review the advantages and disadvantages of experimental and field studies for determining effects of pesticides on birds. Important problems or principles initially discovered in the field include effects of DDT (through its metabolite DDE) on eggshell thickness, reproductive success, and population stability; trophic-level bioaccumulation of the lipid-soluble organochlorine pesticides; indirect effects on productivity and survival through reductions in the food supply and cover by herbicides and insecticides; unexpected toxic effects and routes of exposure of organophosphorus compounds such as famphur and dimethoate; effects related to simultaneous application at full strength of several pesticides of different classes; and others. Also, potentially serious bird problems with dicofol, based on laboratory studies, later proved negligible in the field. In refining field tests of pesticides, the selection of a species or group of species to study is important, because exposure routes may vary greatly, and 10-fold interspecific differences in sensitivity to pesticides are relatively common. Although there are limitations with field investigations, particularly uncontrollable variables that must be addressed, the value of a well-designed field study far outweighs its shortcomings.

  4. Field studies on pesticides and birds: unexpected and unique relations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blus, L.J.; Henny, C.J.

    1997-01-01

    We review the advantages and disadvantages of experimental and field studies for determining effects of pesticides on birds. Important problems or principles initially discovered in the field include effects of DDT (through its metabolite DDE) on eggshell thickness, reproductive success, and population stability; trophic-level bioaccumulation of the lipid-soluble organochlorine pesticides; indirect effects on productivity and survival through reductions in the food supply and cover by herbicides and insecticides; unexpected toxic effects and routes of exposure of organophosphorus compounds such as famphur and dimethoate; effects related to simultaneous application at full strength of several pesticides of different classes; and others. Also, potentially serious bird problems with dicofol, based on laboratory studies, later proved negligible in the field. In refining field tests of pesticides, the selection of a species or group of species to study is important, because exposure routes may vary greatly, and 10-fold interspecific differences in sensitivity to pesticides are relatively common. Although there are limitations with field investigations, particularly uncontrollable variables that must be addressed, the value of a well-designed field study far outweighs its shortcomings

  5. Experimental Observation of a Metal-insulator Transition in 2D at Zero Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravchenko, S. V.

    1996-03-01

    The scaling theory of Abrahams et al. ^1 has had considerable success in describing many features of metal-insulator transitions. Within this theory, which was developed for non-interacting electrons, no such transition is possible in two-dimensional electron systems (2DES) in the absence of a magnetic field. However, we show experimentally that an ultra-high-mobility 2DES on the surface of silicon does exhibit the signature of a true metal-insulator phase transition at zero magnetic field at a critical electron density n_c ~10^11 cm-2. The energy of electron-electron interactions, ignored in the scaling theory,^1 is the dominant parameter in this 2DES. The resistivity, ρ, is empirically found to scale near the critical point both with temperature T and electric field E so that it can be represented by the form ρ(T,n_s)=ρ(T/T_0(n_s)) as Earrow0 or ρ(E,n_s)=ρ(E/E_0(n_s)) as Tarrow0. At the transition, the resistivity is close to 3h/e^2. Both scaling parameters, T0 and E_0, show power law behavior at the critical point. This is characteristic of a true phase transition and strongly resembles, in particular, the superconductor-insulator transition in disordered thin films,^2 as well as the transition between quantum Hall liquid and insulator.^3 Many high-mobility samples from two different sources (Institute for Metrological Service, Russia, and Siemens AG, Germany) with different oxide thicknesses and gate materials have been studied and similar results were found. Work done in collaboration with J. E. Furneaux, Whitney Mason, V. M. Pudalov, and M. D'Iorio, supported by NSF. ^1 E. Abrahams, P. W. Anderson, D. C. Licciardello, and T. V. Ramakrishnan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 42, 673 (1979). ^2 Y. Liu, K. A. McGreer, B. Nease, D. B. Haviland, G. Martinez, J. W. Halley, and A. M. Goldman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 67, 2068 (1991). ^3 T. Wang, K. P. Clark, G. F. Spencer, A. M. Mack, and W. P. Kirk, Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 709 (1994).

  6. Experimental correlation of electric fields and Raman signals in SERS and TERS.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Zachary D; Wang, Hao; Kwasnieski, Daniel T; Marr, James M

    2015-08-09

    Enhanced Raman scattering from plasmonic nanostructures associated with surface enhanced (SERS) and tip enhanced (TERS) is seeing a dramatic increase in applications from bioimaging to chemical catalysis. The importance of gap-modes for high sensitivity indicates plasmon coupling between nanostructures plays an important role. However, the observed Raman scattering can change with different geometric arrangements of nanoparticles, excitation wavelengths, and chemical environments; suggesting differences in the local electric field. Our results indicate that molecules adsorbed to the nanostructures are selectively enhanced in the presence of competing molecules. This selective enhancement arises from controlled interactions between nanostructures, such as an isolated nanoparticle and a TERS tip. Complementary experiments suggest that shifts in the vibrational frequency of reporter molecules can be correlated to the electric field. Here we present a strategy that utilizes the controlled formation of coupled plasmonic structures to experimentally measure both the magnitude of the electric fields and the observed Raman scattering.

  7. Numerical Simulations and Accompanying Experimental Investigations of Magnetoplasmadynamic Thrusters with Coaxial Applied Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haag, Daniel; Auweter-Kurtz, Monika; Fertig, Markus; Herdrich, Georg

    An overview is given on a numerical simulation program for applied field magnetoplasmadynamic (AF-MPD) thrusters, which is currently under development at the Institute of Space Systems (IRS). The program allows the simulation of argon plasma flows in thermal and chemical non-equilibrium. The code is based on an axisymmetric finite volume method on unstructured, adaptive meshes. An externally applied magnetic field can be taken into account employing the vector potential formulation. Azimuthal velocity and magnetic field are handled by a quasi three-dimensional approach with vanishing azimuthal derivatives. Additionally, a laboratory AF-MPD thruster for the power range of 10-20 kW has been built up at IRS. The goal of the experimental investigations is the characterization of the operation and performance parameters of the thruster.

  8. Interaction Between Flames and Electric Fields Studied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, Zeng-Guang; Hegde, Uday

    2003-01-01

    The interaction between flames and electric fields has long been an interesting research subject that has theoretical importance as well as practical significance. Many of the reactions in a flame follow an ionic pathway: that is, positive and negative ions are formed during the intermediate steps of the reaction. When an external electric field is applied, the ions move according to the electric force (the Coulomb force) exerted on them. The motion of the ions modifies the chemistry because the reacting species are altered, it changes the velocity field of the flame, and it alters the electric field distribution. As a result, the flame will change its shape and location to meet all thermal, chemical, and electrical constraints. In normal gravity, the strong buoyant effect often makes the flame multidimensional and, thus, hinders the detailed study of the problem.

  9. Studying electric fields in dipolarization fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2014-11-01

    In Earth's magnetotail, sharp increases in the magnetic field known as dipolarization fronts are associated with high-speed plasma flows that connect Earth's ionosphere via electric currents. Some aspects of these dipolarization fronts have puzzled scientists; in particular, the dip in magnetic field that occurs just ahead of the dipolarization front layer is not well understood. Sun et al. analyze observations made using the Cluster satellites to elucidate the details of electric fields associated with dipolarization fronts. The study shows that a type of electric current known as a Hall current dominates in the dipolarization front region and in the region where the magnetic field dips, but this current flows in opposite directions in these two regions.

  10. A Numerical/Experimental Study of Nitinol Actuator Springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auricchio, Ferdinando; Scalet, Giulia; Urbano, Marco

    2014-07-01

    This study deals with the numerical modeling, simulation and experimental analysis of shape-memory alloy (SMA) helicoidal springs. An experimental campaign is conducted on both SMA straight wires and helicoidal springs that experienced the same annealing process. Then, we use such experimental results to investigate three phenomenological constitutive models able to represent SMA macroscopic behavior. In particular, after the identification of all the material parameters from experimental results on SMA wires, we inspect the thermo-mechanical behavior of SMA helicoidal springs by comparing numerical predictions to experimental data. Finally, we discuss models capabilities and some aspects characterizing SMA material behavior.

  11. Theoretical and experimental studies of auditory processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamma, Shihab; Krishnaprasad, P. S.

    1994-03-01

    Over the last year, work has progressed in the three basic areas that are emphasized in this proposal: (1) Peripheral auditory implementations; (2) Auditory cortical processing; and (3) Theoretical analysis of neural network architectures. In the first topic, we have completed a detailed analysis and implementation of the early auditory model originally formulated in the previous grant period. Specifically, we have determined the underlying mechanisms that give rise to noise robustness and self-normalization in the early auditory spectra. A patented VLSI implementation of the model has been accomplished. In the second area of research, we have completed a survey of response properties in the anterior auditory field, especially with regard to the cells' responses to FM and single tone stimuli. Finally, in the third focus area, we have developed new recursive algorithms (mimicing recursive neural network architectures) for building systematically, approximate basis function representations. The new algorithms known as orthogonal matching pursuit algorithms are applicable to a wide class of problems, ranging from fitting radial basis function approximations to wavelet-bases models for transfer functions of linear systems.

  12. Design and performance issues of RF coils utilized in ultra high field MRI: experimental and numerical evaluations.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Tamer S; Kangarlu, Alayar; Chakeress, Donald W

    2005-07-01

    In this paper, two TEM resonators were evaluated experimentally and numerically at 8 tesla (T) (340 MHz for 1H imaging). The coils were constructed to be 21.2-cm long (standard) and 11-cm long (a proposed less claustrophobic design). The experimental evaluation was done on a single cadaver using an ultra high field, 8 T, whole-body magnet. The numerical modeling was performed using an in-house finite difference time domain packagethat treats the coil and the load (anatomically detailed human head model) as a single system. The coils were tested with quadrature excitation at different coil alignment positions with respect to human head. For head imaging at 8 T, the overall numerical and experimental results demonstrated that when compared to the longer coil, the shorter coil provides superior signal-to-noise ratio, coil sensitivity, and excite field in the biological regions that lie within both of the coils' structures. A study of the RF (excite/receive fields) homogeneity showed variations in the performance of both coils that are mostly dependant on the region of interest and the position of coil with respect to the head. As such, depending on the application, the shorter coil could be effectively utilized.

  13. Experimental Study of Shale Rock Self-Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restuccia, Francesco; Ptak, Nicolas; Rein, Guillermo

    2016-04-01

    Self-heating phenomena due to spontaneous exothermic reactions in oxidative environments are common for many porous materials, even at low temperatures. Combustion of shale outcrop formations has been reported in recent years, with self-heating a potential initiating cause. This work studies experimentally and for the first time the self-heating behavior of shale rock, a porous sedimentary rock. Using field samples collected from shale outcrop at Kimmeridge Bay (UK) and the Frank-Kamenetskii theory of criticality, we determine effective kinetic parameters and thermal properties for different shale particle size distributions and upscale the results to field formations of different thicknesses. We show that for fine particle sizes, with diameter below 2mm, spontaneous ignition is possible for rock formations of thickness between 25m and 5.4m at ambient temperatures between 16°C and 44°C. For the same temperature range, the required thickness is between 375km and 15km for coarse particles of diameter below 17mm. This shows that shale rock is reactive, with reactivity highly dependent on particle diameter, and self-ignition is possible for small particles in outcrops or formations accidentally exposed to oxygen.

  14. Experimental and theoretical studies of subsonic fan noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mani, R.; Berkofske, K.

    1976-01-01

    The noise generated by inlet turbulence impinging on a subsonic axial flow fan was studied as a function of tip speed, flow coefficient, and intensity and scale of turbulence was carried out. Both turbulence and far field acoustic measurements were made. The new elements introduced in the theoretical analysis were accounting for blade loading dependent noise mechanisms and consideration of anisotropic turbulence impinging on the rotor because of inlet flow contraction effects. Experimentally an unexplained increase of noise at about 1/2 and 1 1/2 times blade passsing frequency was observed at low flow coefficients even though there was no evidence of compressor surge. In the final version the theory does a fair job of predicting variations of noise with blade loading and tip speed. Alteration of inlet turbulence length scales produced some but not very pronounced changes in the far field PWL spectra. Some degree of eddy contraction and resulting anisotropy were essential to explain the concentration of energy around blade passing frequencies.

  15. Schmallenberg virus infection in South American camelids: Field and experimental investigations.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Claudia; Beer, Martin; Hoffmann, Bernd

    2015-11-18

    During the first epizootic wave of the novel, teratogenic Schmallenberg virus (SBV, Orthobunyavirus) in ruminants in Northern Europe, serological evidence of a previous SBV-infection demonstrated that South American camelids (SAC) are also susceptible to SBV. However, their potential role in SBV spread remains unknown. To investigate the prevalence and course of SBV-infection in SAC, a German field study and an animal trial with three llamas and three alpacas were conducted. From September 2012 to December 2013, 313 of 502 SAC (62.35%) were found SBV seropositive, but negative for SBV-RNA. The estimated between-district (94.23% of 52) and median within-district (71.43%) and herd (73.13%) SBV seroprevalence in German SAC was similar to the seroprevalence reported in cattle herds and sheep flocks at the time. An age of >1 year was found a statistically significant risk factor for SBV-infection, which could be explained by the spatio-temporal spread of SBV in Germany during the study period. No clinical signs or an increase of abortion and congenital malformation associated with SBV-infection in SAC were reported by the study participants. Similar to SBV-infected ruminants, SBV-RNAemia in experimentally SBV-infected SAC was detected for a short time between days 3 and 7 after infection (dpi), and seroconversion occurred between 9 and 21 dpi. Despite the similar virological and serological results, the lack of clinical signs and congenital malformation associated with SBV-infection suggests that SBV causes subclinical infection in SAC. However, their role as reservoirs in the spread of SBV has to be further investigated.

  16. Experimental study on artificially triggered lightning using high power lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, S.; Shimada, Y.; Yasuda, H.; Yamanaka, C.; Fujita, H.; Izawa, Y.; Yamanaka, T.; Wang, D.; Kawasaki, Z.; Matsu-ura, K.; Ishikubo, Y.; Adachi, M.

    1996-05-01

    A series of laboratory experiments has been conducted to investigate the initiating effects of laser plasma channel on electrical discharge. It was confirmed that the plasma channels reduce the required electrical field strength for electrical discharges to occur by a factor of 6. A field experimental site targeting natural lightning is being prepared. The thunderstorm monitoring system and the laser and optical systems have been developed and tested against various weather conditions. The results from the laboratory experiments and field experiments will be discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Experimental study of the polymer powder film thickness uniformity produced by the corona discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazlyyyakhmatov, Marsel

    2017-01-01

    The results of an experimental study of the polymer powder film thickness uniformity are presented. Polymer powder films are produced by the electrostatic field of corona discharge. Epoxy and epoxy-polyester powder films with thickness in the range of 30-120 microns are studied. Experimentally confirmed possibility of using these coatings as protective matching layer of piezoceramic transducers at frequencies of 0.5-15 MHz.

  18. Folding kinetics of WW domains with the united residue force field for bridging microscopic motions and experimental measurements

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Rui; Maisuradze, Gia G.; Suñol, David; Todorovski, Toni; Macias, Maria J.; Xiao, Yi; Scheraga, Harold A.; Czaplewski, Cezary; Liwo, Adam

    2014-01-01

    To demonstrate the utility of the coarse-grained united-residue (UNRES) force field to compare experimental and computed kinetic data for folding proteins, we have performed long-time millisecond-timescale canonical Langevin molecular dynamics simulations of the triple β-strand from the Formin binding protein 28 WW domain and six nonnatural variants, using UNRES. The results have been compared with available experimental data in both a qualitative and a quantitative manner. Complexities of the folding pathways, which cannot be determined experimentally, were revealed. The folding mechanisms obtained from the simulated folding kinetics are in agreement with experimental results, with a few discrepancies for which we have accounted. The origins of single- and double-exponential kinetics and their correlations with two- and three-state folding scenarios are shown to be related to the relative barrier heights between the various states. The rate constants obtained from time profiles of the fractions of the native, intermediate, and unfolded structures, and the kinetic equations fitted to them, correlate with the experimental values; however, they are about three orders of magnitude larger than the experimental ones for most of the systems. These differences are in agreement with the timescale extension derived by scaling down the friction of water and averaging out the fast degrees of freedom when passing from all-atom to a coarse-grained representation. Our results indicate that the UNRES force field can provide accurate predictions of folding kinetics of these WW domains, often used as models for the study of the mechanisms of proein folding. PMID:25489078

  19. Experimental determination of field factors ([Formula: see text]) for small radiotherapy beams using the daisy chain correction method.

    PubMed

    Lárraga-Gutiérrez, José Manuel

    2015-08-07

    Recently, Alfonso et al proposed a new formalism for the dosimetry of small and non-standard fields. The proposed new formalism is strongly based on the calculation of detector-specific beam correction factors by Monte Carlo simulation methods, which accounts for the difference in the response of the detector between the small and the machine specific reference field. The correct calculation of the detector-specific beam correction factors demands an accurate knowledge