Science.gov

Sample records for experimental head injury

  1. Neuropeptides in Experimental Head Injury.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-28

    within the left hippocampal gyrus, corpus collosum and the lateral ventricle. In all animals, subarachnoid hemorrhage was distributed over the left...stereoisomer (n = 6) or saline (n = 6) had no effect on cardiovascular or electrophysiological function . Preliminary work in our laboratory with a rat model of...improve neurological function and EEG following brainstem compression in the cat (19). This study and the results obtained from spinal cord injury

  2. Experimental high-velocity missile head injury.

    PubMed

    Allen, I V; Scott, R; Tanner, J A

    1982-09-01

    A standardized experimental high-velocity penetrating head-injury model has been produced in which pathological lesions were observed, not only in the wound track but at sites more remote from the track in the hypothalamus, brain stem and cerebellum. Diffuse subarachnoid haemorrhage was common and intraventricular haemorrhage was a constant feature. Other constant histological abnormalities were:L 1. Perivascular "ring' haemorrhages. 2. Perivascular haemorrhage with a surrounding zone of decreased staining intensity. 3. Perivascular increased staining intensity. 4. Areas of decreased staining intensity apparently dissociated from areas of haemorrhage. The pathogenesis of the perivascular lesions is discussed and preliminary studies suggest that these may be the site of early oedema. The implications of this experiment for military surgery and for ballistic protection of the head are discussed.

  3. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... before. Often, the injury is minor because your skull is hard and it protects your brain. But ... injuries can be more severe, such as a skull fracture, concussion, or traumatic brain injury. Head injuries ...

  4. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... scalp internal head injuries, which may involve the skull, the blood vessels within the skull, or the brain Fortunately, most childhood falls or ... knock the brain into the side of the skull or tear blood vessels. Some internal head injuries ...

  5. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... injury, cerebral contusion, cerebral laceration, coma, head trauma, hematoma, impaired consciousness, postconcussion syndrome, skull fracture, skull penetration, stupor, vegetative state Family Health, Infants ...

  6. Head injuries.

    PubMed

    Yanko, J

    1984-08-01

    In summary, the broad term "head injury" represents a large variety of more specific injuries. In order to anticipate and plan appropriate patient care, nurses need information regarding the cause of injury, the impact site, and the patient's clinical course in addition to current assessment findings. The nurse must also anticipate sequelae from secondary brain injury due to hypoxia, edema, increased intracranial pressure, changes in regional blood flows, or hypovolemic shock due to internal bleeding in another body system or cavity. The head-injured patient is a complex patient requiring intensive nursing care, observation, and assessment. By incorporating knowledge of the mechanisms of injury into nursing observations and assessments, nurses can provide more effective nursing interventions.

  7. Experimental Injury Biomechanics of the Pediatric Head and Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulies, Susan; Coats, Brittany

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability among children and young adults in the United States and results in over 2,500 childhood deaths, 37,000 hospitalizations, and 435,000 emergency department visits each year (Langlois et al. 2004). Computational models of the head have proven to be powerful tools to help us understand mechanisms of adult TBI and to determine load thresholds for injuries specific to adult TBI. Similar models need to be developed for children and young adults to identify age-specific mechanisms and injury tolerances appropriate for children and young adults. The reliability of these tools, however, depends heavily on the availability of pediatric tissue material property data. To date the majority of material and structural properties used in pediatric computer models have been scaled from adult human data. Studies have shown significant age-related differences in brain and skull properties (Prange and Margulies 2002; Coats and Margulies 2006a, b), indicating that the pediatric head cannot be modeled as a miniature adult head, and pediatric computer models incorporating age-specific data are necessary to accurately mimic the pediatric head response to impact or rotation. This chapter details the developmental changes of the pediatric head and summarizes human pediatric properties currently available in the literature. Because there is a paucity of human pediatric data, material properties derived from animal tissue are also presented to demonstrate possible age-related differences in the heterogeneity and rate dependence of tissue properties. The chapter is divided into three main sections: (1) brain, meninges, and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF); (2) skull; and (3) scalp.

  8. Head injury - first aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... happen from a gunshot to the head. Head injuries include: Concussion , in which the brain is shaken, is the most common type of traumatic brain injury. Scalp wounds. Skull fractures. Head injuries ...

  9. Head injury. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 22 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Radiographic Evaluation; Epidemiology of Head Injury; Emergency Care and Initial Evaluation; Skull Fracture and Traumatic Cerebrospinal Fluid Fistulas; Mild Head Injury; and Injuries of the Cranial Nerves.

  10. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... won't stop crying complains of head and neck pain (younger or nonverbal children may be more fussy) ... vision pupils of unequal size weakness or paralysis neck pain or stiffness seizure If your child is unconscious: ...

  11. Mania following head injury.

    PubMed

    Yatham, L N; Benbow, J C; Jeffers, A M

    1988-03-01

    A case of mania following head injury in an individual with a genetic predisposition to schizophrenia is reported. It is argued that the head injury is probably causative in his case and suggested that head injury should be considered as one of the aetiological factors in secondary mania.

  12. Head Injury Prevention Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fax: 847-378-0600 www.NeurosurgeryToday.org A traumatic brain injury (TBI) is defined as a blow or jolt to the head or a penetrating head injury that disrupts the normal function of the brain. TBI can result when the head suddenly and ...

  13. Head Injuries in Soccer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Karl B.

    1989-01-01

    This article reviews the medical literature on head injuries in soccer and concludes that protective headgear to reduce these injuries may not be as effective as rule changes and other measures, such as padding goal posts. (IAH)

  14. Experimental study of blast-induced traumatic brain injury using a physical head model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiangyue; Pintar, Frank A; Yoganandan, Narayan; Gennarelli, Thomas A; Son, Steven F

    2009-11-01

    This study was conducted to quantify intracranial biomechanical responses and external blast overpressures using physical head model to understand the biomechanics of blast traumatic brain injury and to provide experimental data for computer simulation of blast-induced brain trauma. Ellipsoidal-shaped physical head models, made from 3-mm polycarbonate shell filled with Sylgard 527 silicon gel, were used. Six blast tests were conducted in frontal, side, and 45 degrees oblique orientations. External blast overpressures and internal pressures were quantified with ballistic pressure sensors. Blast overpressures, ranging from 129.5 kPa to 769.3 kPa, were generated using a rigid cannon and 1.3 to 3.0 grams of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) plastic sheet explosive (explosive yield of 13.24 kJ and TNT equivalent mass of 2.87 grams for 3 grams of material). The PETN plastic sheet explosive consisted of 63% PETN powder, 29% plasticizer, and 8% nitrocellulose with a density of 1.48 g/cm3 and detonation velocity of 6.8 km/s. Propagation and reflection of the shockwave was captured using a shadowgraph technique. Shockwave speeds ranging from 423.3 m/s to 680.3 m/s were recorded. The model demonstrated a two-stage response: a pressure dominant (overpressure) stage followed by kinematic dominant (blast wind) stage. Positive pressures in the brain simulant ranged from 75.1 kPa to 1095 kPa, and negative pressures ranged from -43.6 kPa to -646.0 kPa. High- and normal-speed videos did not reveal observable deformations in the brain simulant from the neutral density markers embedded in the midsagittal plane of the head model. Amplitudes of the internal positive and negative pressures were found to linearly correlate with external overpressure. Results from the current study suggested a pressure-dominant brain injury mechanism instead of strain injury mechanism under the blast severity of the current study. These quantitative results also served as the validation and calibration

  15. Overview of Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... appear to be more serious than it is. Did You Know... Because the scalp has many blood ... these symptoms occur, prompt medical attention is essential. Did You Know... The degree of external head injury ...

  16. Woodpeckers and head injury.

    PubMed

    May, P R; Fuster, J M; Newman, P; Hirschman, A

    1976-02-28

    The woodpecker is an experiment in Nature, a model for the investigation of mechanisms of basic importance for head injury and its prevention. A preliminary anatomical study of the woodpecker's head suggests that it may be fruitful to explore impact protective systems which are radically different from those in common use.

  17. Preventing head injuries in children

    MedlinePlus

    Concussion - preventing in children; Traumatic brain injury - preventing in children; TBI - children; Safety - preventing head injury ... not ride on these vehicles. After having a concussion or mild head injury , your child may need ...

  18. Pediatric head injury.

    PubMed

    Tulipan, N

    1998-01-01

    Pediatric head injury is a public health problem that exacts a high price from patients, their families and society alike. While much of the brain damage in head-injured patients occurs at the moment of impact, secondary injuries can be prevented by aggressive medical and surgical intervention. Modern imaging devices have simplified the task of diagnosing intracranial injuries. Recent advances in monitoring technology have made it easier to assess the effectiveness of medical therapy. These include intracranial pressure monitoring devices that are accurate and safe, and jugular bulb monitoring which provides a continuous, qualitative measure of cerebral blood flow. The cornerstones of treatment remain hyperventilation and osmotherapy. Despite maximal treatment, however, the mortality and morbidity associated with pediatric head injury remains high. Reduction of this mortality and morbidity will likely depend upon prevention rather than treatment.

  19. Heading and head injuries in soccer.

    PubMed

    Kirkendall, D T; Jordan, S E; Garrett, W E

    2001-01-01

    In the world of sports, soccer is unique because of the purposeful use of the unprotected head for controlling and advancing the ball. This skill obviously places the player at risk of head injury and the game does carry some risk. Head injury can be a result of contact of the head with another head (or other body parts), ground, goal post, other unknown objects or even the ball. Such impacts can lead to contusions, fractures, eye injuries, concussions or even, in rare cases, death. Coaches, players, parents and physicians are rightly concerned about the risk of head injury in soccer. Current research shows that selected soccer players have some degree of cognitive dysfunction. It is important to determine the reasons behind such deficits. Purposeful heading has been blamed, but a closer look at the studies that focus on heading has revealed methodological concerns that question the validity of blaming purposeful heading of the ball. The player's history and age (did they play when the ball was leather and could absorb significant amounts of water), alcohol intake, drug intake, learning disabilities, concussion definition and control group use/composition are all factors that cloud the ability to blame purposeful heading. What does seem clear is that a player's history of concussive episodes is a more likely explanation for cognitive deficits. While it is likely that the subconcussive impact of purposeful heading is a doubtful factor in the noted deficits, it is unknown whether multiple subconcussive impacts might have some lingering effects. In addition, it is unknown whether the noted deficits have any affect on daily life. Proper instruction in the technique is critical because if the ball contacts an unprepared head (as in accidental head-ball contacts), the potential for serious injury is possible. To further our understanding of the relationship of heading, head injury and cognitive deficits, we need to: learn more about the actual impact of a ball on the

  20. Anaphylaxis due to head injury.

    PubMed

    Bruner, Heather C; Bruner, David I

    2015-05-01

    Both anaphylaxis and head injury are often seen in the emergency department, but they are rarely seen in combination. We present a case of a 30-year-old woman who presented with anaphylaxis with urticaria and angioedema following a minor head injury. The patient responded well to intramuscular epinephrine without further complications or airway compromise. Prior case reports have reported angioedema from hereditary angioedema during dental procedures and maxillofacial surgery, but there have not been any cases of first-time angioedema or anaphylaxis due to head injury.

  1. Anaphylaxis Due to Head Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bruner, Heather C.; Bruner, David I.

    2015-01-01

    Both anaphylaxis and head injury are often seen in the emergency department, but they are rarely seen in combination. We present a case of a 30-year-old woman who presented with anaphylaxis with urticaria and angioedema following a minor head injury. The patient responded well to intramuscular epinephrine without further complications or airway compromise. Prior case reports have reported angioedema from hereditary angioedema during dental procedures and maxillofacial surgery, but there have not been any cases of first-time angioedema or anaphylaxis due to head injury. PMID:25987924

  2. Memory and head injury severity.

    PubMed

    Dikmen, S; Temkin, N; McLean, A; Wyler, A; Machamer, J

    1987-12-01

    One hundred and two consecutive head injured patients were studied at 1 and 12 months after injury. Their performances were compared with a group of uninjured friends. The results indicate that impairment in memory depends on the type of task used, time from injury to testing, and on the severity of head injury (that is, degree of impaired consciousness). Head injury severity indices are more closely related to behavioural outcome early as compared with later after injury. At 1 year, only those with deep or prolonged impaired consciousness (as represented by greater than 1 day of coma, Glasgow Coma Scale of 8 or less, and post traumatic amnesia of 2 weeks or greater) are performing significantly worse than comparison subjects.

  3. Preventing head and neck injury.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, A S; McCrory, P

    2005-06-01

    A wide range of head and neck injury risks are present in sport, including catastrophic injury. The literature since 1980 on prevention of head and neck injury in sport was reviewed, focusing on catastrophic and brain injury and identifying the range of injury prevention methods in use. There have been few formal evaluations of injury prevention methods. Approaches that are considered, or have been proven, to be successful in preventing injury include: modification of the baseball; implementation of helmet standards in ice hockey and American football and increased wearing rates; use of full faceguards in ice hockey; changes in rules associated with body contact; implementation of rules to reduce the impact forces in rugby scrums. Helmets and other devices have been shown to reduce the risk of severe head and facial injury, but current designs appear to make little difference to rates of concussion. Research methods involving epidemiological, medical, and human factors are required in combination with biomechanical and technological approaches to reduce further injury risks in sport.

  4. DELUSIONAL DISORDERS AFTER HEAD INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Sabhesan, S.; Natarajan, M.

    1988-01-01

    SUMMARY Delusional disorders have been fundamental to the behaviour problems seen in patients during the early recovery phase of head injury. One hundred and twenty three patients admitted in the Trauma Ward were followed up and the nature and types of the delusions were studied. Their emergence in relation to cognitive recovery and the significance of other factors, such as pre-traumatic personality, alcohol abuse, severity of injury etc., in the genesis of such delusions are presented. PMID:21927281

  5. Closed head experimental traumatic brain injury increases size and bone volume of callus in mice with concomitant tibial fracture

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Rhys D; Grills, Brian L; Church, Jarrod E; Walsh, Nicole C; McDonald, Aaron C; Agoston, Denes V; Sun, Mujun; O’Brien, Terence J; Shultz, Sandy R; McDonald, Stuart J

    2016-01-01

    Concomitant traumatic brain injury (TBI) and long bone fracture are commonly observed in multitrauma and polytrauma. Despite clinical observations of enhanced bone healing in patients with TBI, the relationship between TBI and fracture healing remains poorly understood, with clinical data limited by the presence of several confounding variables. Here we developed a novel trauma model featuring closed-skull weight-drop TBI and concomitant tibial fracture in order to investigate the effect of TBI on fracture healing. Male mice were assigned into Fracture + Sham TBI (FX) or Fracture + TBI (MULTI) groups and sacrificed at 21 and 35 days post-injury for analysis of healing fractures by micro computed tomography (μCT) and histomorphometry. μCT analysis revealed calluses from MULTI mice had a greater bone and total tissue volume, and displayed higher mean polar moment of inertia when compared to calluses from FX mice at 21 days post-injury. Histomorphometric results demonstrated an increased amount of trabecular bone in MULTI calluses at 21 days post-injury. These findings indicate that closed head TBI results in calluses that are larger in size and have an increased bone volume, which is consistent with the notion that TBI induces the formation of a more robust callus. PMID:27682431

  6. [Bipolar head injury with global amnesia].

    PubMed

    Ingebrigtsen, Tor; Sollid, Snorre; MacFarlane, Martin; Dahlberg, Tore

    2003-12-23

    We report the first case of bipolar head injury, that is, subsequent head injuries sustained near both poles of the Earth. The injury caused a true global amnesia with loss of memory for the journey around the globe. This case history illustrates how modern emergency services have reduced the hazards of polar exploration, and how a second impact after a primary head injury may cause life-threatening complications.

  7. Clinical Trials in Head Injury

    PubMed Central

    NARAYAN, RAJ K.; MICHEL, MARY ELLEN; Ansell, Beth; Baethmann, Alex; Biegon, Anat; Bracken, Michael B.; Bullock, M. Ross; Choi, Sung C.; Clifton, Guy L.; Contant, Charles F.; Coplin, William M.; Dietrich, W. Dalton; Ghajar, Jamshid; Grady, Sean M.; Grossman, Robert G.; Hall, Edward D.; Heetderks, William; Hovda, David A.; Jallo, Jack; Katz, Russell L.; Knoller, Nachshon; Kochanek, Patrick M.; Maas, Andrew I.; Majde, Jeannine; Marion, Donald W.; Marmarou, Anthony; Marshall, Lawrence F.; McIntosh, Tracy K.; Miller, Emmy; Mohberg, Noel; Muizelaar, J. Paul; Pitts, Lawrence H.; Quinn, Peter; Riesenfeld, Gad; Robertson, Claudia S.; Strauss, Kenneth I.; Teasdale, Graham; Temkin, Nancy; Tuma, Ronald; Wade, Charles; Walker, Michael D.; Weinrich, Michael; Whyte, John; Wilberger, Jack; Young, A. Byron; Yurkewicz, Lorraine

    2006-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains a major public health problem globally. In the United States the incidence of closed head injuries admitted to hospitals is conservatively estimated to be 200 per 100,000 population, and the incidence of penetrating head injury is estimated to be 12 per 100,000, the highest of any developed country in the world. This yields an approximate number of 500,000 new cases each year, a sizeable proportion of which demonstrate signficant long-term disabilities. Unfortunately, there is a paucity of proven therapies for this disease. For a variety of reasons, clinical trials for this condition have been difficult to design and perform. Despite promising pre-clinical data, most of the trials that have been performed in recent years have failed to demonstrate any significant improvement in outcomes. The reasons for these failures have not always been apparent and any insights gained were not always shared. It was therefore feared that we were running the risk of repeating our mistakes. Recognizing the importance of TBI, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) sponsored a workshop that brought together experts from clinical, research, and pharmaceutical backgrounds. This workshop proved to be very informative and yielded many insights into previous and future TBI trials. This paper is an attempt to summarize the key points made at the workshop. It is hoped that these lessons will enhance the planning and design of future efforts in this important field of research. PMID:12042091

  8. Essential radiology for head injury

    SciTech Connect

    Mok, D.W.H.; Kreel, L.

    1988-01-01

    The book covers the guidelines established by the Royal College of Radiologists for the radiographic evaluation of head injuries. It presents a chapter reviewing the normal radiologic anatomy of the skull in six different projections. The advantages and limitations of each projection are addressed. The third chapter, contains 43 radiographs dedicated to the calcified pineal gland and other intracranial calcifications. The book reports on specific types of fractures: linear fractures of the vault, depressed fractures of the vault, fractures in children, fractures of the base of the skull, and fractures of the facial bones.

  9. Medicolegal aspects of athletic head injury.

    PubMed

    Davis, P M; McKelvey, M K

    1998-01-01

    This article reviews the legal aspects of head injuries resulting from a variety of athletic activities, focusing primarily on head and brain injuries resulting from the playing of football, boxing, horseback riding, winter sports (hockey and skiing), and soccer. Part 1 give a general overview of the occurrence of head injuries in athletics and the potential for litigation. Part 2 reviews the history of and increase in sports injury litigation, as well as resulting changes in the law. In Part 3, the current status of athletic head injury litigation, the parties involved, types of claims brought, and viable defenses are discussed. Finally, Part 4 reviews different ways to reduce athletic head injury litigation through better equipment design and adequate warning and instructions for users and coaches.

  10. Experimental traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury, a leading cause of death and disability, is a result of an outside force causing mechanical disruption of brain tissue and delayed pathogenic events which collectively exacerbate the injury. These pathogenic injury processes are poorly understood and accordingly no effective neuroprotective treatment is available so far. Experimental models are essential for further clarification of the highly complex pathology of traumatic brain injury towards the development of novel treatments. Among the rodent models of traumatic brain injury the most commonly used are the weight-drop, the fluid percussion, and the cortical contusion injury models. As the entire spectrum of events that might occur in traumatic brain injury cannot be covered by one single rodent model, the design and choice of a specific model represents a major challenge for neuroscientists. This review summarizes and evaluates the strengths and weaknesses of the currently available rodent models for traumatic brain injury. PMID:20707892

  11. Chronic subdural haematoma after snowboard head injury.

    PubMed

    Uzura, M; Taguchi, Y; Matsuzawa, M; Watanabe, H; Chiba, S

    2003-02-01

    Two cases of chronic subdural haematoma following a snowboard head injury are reported. Although such cases are rare in sport, the risk in snowboarders is higher than expected. Evaluation of a snowboarder with a history of head injury, albeit mild, who complains of headaches should include computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging to allow rapid identification of any intracranial pathology.

  12. Return to work (RTW) after head injury.

    PubMed

    McMordie, W R; Barker, S L; Paolo, T M

    1990-01-01

    This study explored return to work (RTW) after head injury from survey data on 177 cases of head injury. Although 45% of the sample study did engage in some work-related activity only 19% were in competitive employment positions. Factors which were related to RTW after head injury were: age when injured, sex, length of loss of consciousness and Likert ratings of learning, motor and ambulation impairment. Many of those who did return to competitive employment did so in less demanding positions than held pre-injury. Limitations of the current study and suggestions for future research are ventured.

  13. Head and neck injuries in young athletes.

    PubMed

    Proctor, M R; Cantu, R C

    2000-10-01

    Careful study of the pathophysiology and epidemiology of sports-related spine injuries brings to light many common features. The incidence increases as the sport becomes increasingly violent and aggressive. Poor conditioning and lack of knowledge of the proper techniques of the sport put the athlete at significant risk for head and spine injury. Improper helmet fit and the use of the head as an offensive weapon also are common features of injury. Although recognition of these features has resulted in a dramatic reduction in catastrophic neurological injury, the athlete remains at risk for less severe head and spine injury, and concussion remains at epidemic proportions at high school, university, and professional levels. It is hoped that careful recognition of the signs of concussion and knowledge of return-to-play criteria will prevent catastrophic complications from minor head injuries, although the long-term effects of multiple concussions on cognition may be problematic.

  14. Neuropsychological evaluation of mild head injury.

    PubMed Central

    Gentilini, M; Nichelli, P; Schoenhuber, R; Bortolotti, P; Tonelli, L; Falasca, A; Merli, G A

    1985-01-01

    Neuropsychological deficits following mild head injury have been reported recently in the literature. The purpose of this study was to investigate this issue with a strict methodological approach. The neuropsychological performance of 50 mildly head injured patients was compared with that of 50 normal controls chosen with the case-control approach. No conclusive evidence was found that mild head injury causes cognitive impairment one month after the trauma. PMID:3981170

  15. Head injuries of Roman gladiators.

    PubMed

    Kanz, Fabian; Grossschmidt, Karl

    2006-07-13

    Gladiator remains from a recently unearthed cemetery in ancient Ephesus (Turkey) offer a unique opportunity for proving common theories involving the weaponry and techniques of gladiator fighting based on the evidence supplied by cranial bones. This mass grave is the first of its kind to undergo a thorough osteological and forensic examination. A minimum number of individuals (MNI) analyses revealed that at least 68 individuals. All individuals found turned out to have been males aged between 20 and 30 years, except for one female associated with a female slave gravestone, and one male aged 45-55 years, had been buried in this area of the cemetery. The male mean body height was 168 cm (S.D.=5 cm), which lies inside the normal range of height for Roman populations at those times. Eleven (16% of MNI) individuals exhibit a total of 16 well-healed antemortal cranial traumata. Five of the 11 individuals showed multiple trauma. Ten (15% of MNI) individuals exhibited a total of 10 perimortal cranial traumata. This is a surprisingly high frequency of deadly head injuries, taking into account that most of the gladiator types wore helmets. A possible explanation could be the frequently reported deathblow technique used by the hammer-carrying death god "Dis Pater". The gladiator weaponry is well known through historical sources. At least one injury per known type of offensive weapon could be identified, as well as evidence for the most popular, the gladiator trident, which was found to be represented by one perimortem and two antemortem injuries. Overall the reportedly very strict nature of combat rules for gladiator fights could be confirmed by the absence of multiple perimortal traumatized individuals, showing a lack of the excessive violence commonly observed on medieval battle ground victims. This graveyard gives the opportunity to confirm historical aspects and to check the reliability of forensic methods for identification of antemortem, perimortem, or postmortem bone

  16. Head injuries in helmeted child bicyclists.

    PubMed Central

    Grimard, G.; Nolan, T.; Carlin, J. B.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the characteristics and the severity of head and facial injuries to helmeted child bicyclists, and whether the helmet contributed to the injury, and to study factors related to bicycle accidents. DESIGN: Retrospective review of two case series. Children sustaining head injury while not wearing helmets were studied as a form of reference group. SETTING: Large paediatric teaching hospital. SUBJECTS: 34 helmeted child bicyclists and 155 non-helmeted bicyclists, aged 5-14 years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Number of injuries, type of injuries, injury severity score, deaths, and accident circumstances. RESULTS: 79% of the head injuries of the helmeted child group were mild and two thirds of these had facial injuries. Children in the helmet group were in a greater proportion of bike-car collisions than the no helmet group and at least 15% of the helmets were lost on impact. There were no injuries secondary to the helmet. CONCLUSIONS: Most of the head injuries sustained by the helmeted children were of mild severity and there was no evidence to suggest that the helmet contributed to injury. Nevertheless, consideration should be given to designing a facial protector for the bicycle helmet and to improvement of the fastening device. PMID:9345988

  17. Experimental Glaucoma Causes Optic Nerve Head Neural Rim Tissue Compression: A Potentially Important Mechanism of Axon Injury

    PubMed Central

    Fortune, Brad; Reynaud, Juan; Hardin, Christy; Wang, Lin; Sigal, Ian A.; Burgoyne, Claude F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We tested the hypothesis that experimental glaucoma (EG) results in greater thinning of the optic nerve head (ONH) neural rim tissue than the peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) tissue. Methods Longitudinal spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) imaging of the ONH and peripapillary RNFL was performed every other week under manometric IOP control (10 mm Hg) in 51 nonhuman primates (NHP) during baseline and after induction of unilateral EG. The ONH parameter minimum rim area (MRA) was derived from 80 radial B-scans centered on the ONH; RNFL cross-sectional area (RNFLA) from a peripapillary circular B-scan with 12° diameter. Results In control eyes, MRA was 1.00 ± 0.19 mm2 at baseline and 1.00 ± 0.19 mm2 at the final session (P = 0.77), while RNFLA was 0.95 ± 0.09 and 0.95 ± 0.10 mm2, respectively (P = 0.96). In EG eyes, MRA decreased from 1.00 ± 0.19 mm2 at baseline to 0.63 ± 0.21 mm2 at the final session (P < 0.0001), while RNFLA decreased from 0.95 ± 0.09 to 0.74 ± 0.19 mm2, respectively (P < 0.0001). Thus, MRA decreased by 36.4 ± 20.6% in EG eyes, significantly more than the decrease in RNFLA (21.7 ± 19.4%, P < 0.0001). Other significant changes in EG eyes included increased Bruch's membrane opening (BMO) nonplanarity (P < 0.05), decreased BMO aspect ratio (P < 0.0001), and decreased MRA angle (P < 0.001). Bruch's membrane opening area did not change from baseline in either control or EG eyes (P = 0.27, P = 0.15, respectively). Conclusions Optic nerve head neural rim tissue thinning exceeded peripapillary RNFL thinning in NHP EG. These results support the hypothesis that axon bundles are compressed transversely within the ONH rim along with glaucomatous deformation of connective tissues. PMID:27564522

  18. [Haemostatic activation in head injury].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Polo, C M; Suarez-Pinilla, M A; Nebra-Puertas, A; Monton-Dito, J M; Millastre-Benito, A; Salvo-Callen, L

    2003-09-01

    A relationship between Central Nervous System and coagulation has been known since the work by Goodnight et al5. When an encephalic injury occurs tissue damage causes the release of thromboplastin-related products, mainly the Tissular Factor. This release produces an activation of the coagulation system specially through its extrinsic path. With this physiopathologic basis we attempt to improve the knowledge of this relation by performing a prospective study at the Intensive Care Unit of our Hospital. The study included 67 patients with cranioencephalic trauma alone, with an average Glasgow coma scale score of 10 and a control group consisting of 40 healthy subjects. Two peripheral vein blood extractions were performed, at admission and 24 hours later. Global coagulation parameters (prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, platelet count and fibrinogen), hypercoagulability markers (prothrombin fragments F1+2 and thrombin-antithrombin complex (TAT)) and thrombolisis markers (D-dimer) were determined. Our results show that early after head trauma an increase in fragments F1+2, TAT and Ddimer occur. After the first 24 hours a significant decrease in hypercoagulability markers levels is detected. Modification of the global coagulation parameters was also detected. In conclusion, early after a cranioencephalic trauma a simultaneous state of hypercoagulability and thrombolysis occur which may have the purpose of improving the hemostatic balance.

  19. Delayed facial palsy after head injury.

    PubMed Central

    Puvanendran, K; Vitharana, M; Wong, P K

    1977-01-01

    Where facial palsy follows head injury after many days, the mechanism is not clear, and there has been no detailed study on this condition. In this prospective study, an attempt is made to estimate this complication of head injury, and to study its pathogenesis, natural history, prognosis, and sequelae which differ markedly from Bell's palsy. It has a much worse prognosis and so surgical decompression should be considered early in this condition. Images PMID:301556

  20. Cognitive outcomes of multiple mild head injuries in children.

    PubMed

    Bijur, P E; Haslum, M; Golding, J

    1996-06-01

    This study assessed cumulative effects of multiple mild head injuries on cognitive functioning in children. Subjects included 1586 children with one mild head injury, 278 with two, and 51 with three or more head injuries between birth and age 10 years and controls without head injuries matched on gender and total number of injuries. The number of head injuries and injuries not to the head was associated with decreasing performance on measures of intelligence (p < .01), reading (p < .01), and math (p = .02). There was no interaction between case-control status and number of injuries, indicating a similar relationship between cognitive outcomes and number of injuries in head-injured cases and controls. After adjustment for covariates, the relationship between number of injuries and cognitive outcomes became nonsignificant. This study suggests that cognitive deficits associated with multiple mild head injury are due to social and personal factors related to multiple injuries and not to specific damage to the head.

  1. Helmets, head injury and concussion in sport.

    PubMed

    Bonfield, Christopher M; Shin, Samuel S; Kanter, Adam S

    2015-07-01

    Research on the mechanism of concussion in recent years has been focused on the mechanism of injury as well as strategies to minimize or reverse injury. Sports-related head injury research has led to the development of head protective gear that has evolved over the years. Headgears have been designed to protect athletes from skull fractures, subdural hemorrhages and concussions. Over the years, through experience of athletes and continued scientific research, improvements in helmet design have been made. Although these advances have decreased the number of catastrophic injuries throughout sports, the effects on concussions are promising, but largely unproven. In this review, we will discuss development of helmets and studies analyzing their level of protection for both concussion and head injury. This will help us understand what future developments are still needed to minimize the risk of concussion among athletes in various forms of sports.

  2. On Impact: Students with Head Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canto, Angela I.; Chesire, David J.; Buckley, Valerie A.

    2011-01-01

    Students with head injuries may not be as "low incidence" as previously believed. Recent efforts from the American Academy of Pediatrics (2010), the National Football League, and other agencies are attempting to raise awareness of traumatic brain injury (TBI) among students. Along with awareness, there has been an increased publicity effort via…

  3. Pediatricians Offer Heads-Up for Preventing Soccer Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163060.html Pediatricians Offer Heads-Up for Preventing Soccer Injuries Sprains and strains ... benefit from wearing heel cups or arch supports. Head injuries: Concussions are a common soccer-related injury. ...

  4. Car Accident Reconstruction and Head Injury Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chawla, A.; Grover, V.; Mukherjee, S.; Hassan, A. M.

    2013-04-01

    Estimation of brain damage remains an elusive issue and controlled tests leading to brain damage cannot be carried out on volunteers. This study reconstructs real-world car accidents to estimate the kinematics of the head impact. This data is to be used to estimate the head injury measures through computer simulations and then correlate reported skull as well as brain damage to impact measures; whence validating the head FE model (Willinger, IJCrash 8:605-617, 2003). In this study, two crash cases were reconstructed. Injury correlation was successful in one of these cases in that the injuries to the brain of one of the car drivers could be correlated in terms of type, location and severity when compared with the tolerance limits of relevant injury parameters (Willinger, IJCrash 8:605-617, 2003).

  5. Neck injury response to direct head impact.

    PubMed

    Ivancic, Paul C

    2013-01-01

    Previous in vivo studies have observed flexion of the upper or upper/middle cervical spine and extension at inferior spinal levels due to direct head impacts. These studies hypothesized that hyperflexion may contribute to injury of the upper or middle cervical spine during real-life head impact. Our objectives were to determine the cervical spine injury response to direct head impact, document injuries, and compare our results with previously reported in vivo data. Our model consisted of a human cadaver neck (n=6) mounted to the torso of a rear impact dummy and carrying a surrogate head. Rearward force was applied to the model's forehead using a cable and pulley system and free-falling mass of 3.6kg followed by 16.7kg. High-speed digital cameras tracked head, vertebral, and pelvic motions. Average peak spinal rotations observed during impact were statistically compared (P<0.05) to physiological ranges obtained from intact flexibility tests. Peak head impact force was 249 and 504N for the 3.6 and 16.7kg free-falling masses, respectively. Occipital condyle loads reached 205.3N posterior shear, 331.4N compression, and 7.4Nm extension moment. We observed significant increases in intervertebral extension peaks above physiologic at C6/7 (26.3° vs. 5.7°) and C7/T1 (29.7° vs. 4.6°) and macroscopic ligamentous and osseous injuries at C6 through T1 due to the 504N impacts. Our results indicate that a rearward head shear force causes complex neck loads of posterior shear, compression, and extension moment sufficient to injure the lower cervical spine. Real-life neck injuries due to motor vehicle crashes, sports impacts, or falls are likely due to combined loads transferred to the neck by direct head impact and torso inertial loads.

  6. Analysis of finite element models for head injury investigation: reconstruction of four real-world impacts.

    PubMed

    Franklyn, Melanie; Fildes, Brian; Zhang, Liying; Yang, King; Sparke, Laurie

    2005-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that both excessive linear and rotational accelerations are the cause of head injuries. Although the head injury criterion has been beneficial as an indicator of head injury risk, it only considers linear acceleration, so there is a need to consider both types of motion in future safety standards. Advanced models of the head/brain complex have recently been developed to gain a better understanding of head injury biomechanics. While these models have been verified against laboratory experimental data, there is a lack of suitable real-world data available for validation. Hence, using two computer models of the head/brain, the objective of the current study was to reconstruct four real-world crashes with known head injury outcomes in a full-vehicle crash laboratory, simulate head/brain responses using kinematics obtained during these reconstructions, and to compare the results predicted by the models against the actual injuries sustained by the occupant. Cases where the occupant sustained no head injuries (AIS 0) and head injuries of severity AIS 4, AIS 5, and multiple head injuries were selected. Data collected from a 9-accelerometer skull were input into the Wayne State University Head Injury Model (WSUHIM) and the NHTSA Simulated Injury Monitor (SIMon). The results demonstrated that both models were able to predict varying injury severities consistent with the difference in AIS injury levels in the real-world cases. The WSUHIM predicted a slightly higher injury threshold than the SIMon, probably due to the finer mesh and different software used for the simulations, and could also determine regions of the brain which had been injured. With further validation, finite element models can be used to establish an injury criterion for each type of brain injury in the future.

  7. Head injury from a bungee run.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pankaj; Convery, Fiona; Watt, Michael; Fulton, Ailsa; McKinstry, Steven; Flannery, Thomas

    2012-04-01

    An adaptation of bungee jumping, 'bungee running', involves participants attempting to run as far as they can whilst connected to an elastic rope which is anchored to a fixed point. Usually considered a safe recreational activity, we report a potentially life-threatening head injury following a bungee running accident.

  8. Experimental Investigation of Cavitation as a Possible Damage Mechanism in Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury in Post-Mortem Human Subject Heads.

    PubMed

    Salzar, Robert S; Treichler, Derrick; Wardlaw, Andrew; Weiss, Greg; Goeller, Jacques

    2017-01-13

    The potential of blast-induced traumatic brain injury from the mechanism of localized cavitation of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is investigated. While the mechanism and criteria for non-impact blast-induced traumatic brain injury is still unknown, this study demonstrates that local cavitation in the CSF layer of the cranial volume could contribute to these injuries. The cranial contents of three post-mortem human subject (PMHS) heads were replaced with both a normal saline solution and a ballistic gel mixture with a simulated CSF layer. Each were instrumented with multiple pressure transducers and placed inside identical shock tubes at two different research facilities. Sensor data indicates that cavitation may have occurred in the PMHS models at pressure levels below those for a 50% risk of blast lung injury. This study points to skull flexion, the result of the shock wave on the front of the skull leading to a negative pressure in the contrecoup, as a possible mechanism that contributes to the onset of cavitation. Based on observation of intracranial pressure transducer data from the PMHS model, cavitation onset is thought to occur from approximately a 140 kPa head-on incident blast.

  9. Head injuries and bicycle helmet laws.

    PubMed

    Robinson, D L

    1996-07-01

    The first year of the mandatory bicycle helmet laws in Australia saw increased helmet wearing from 31% to 75% of cyclists in Victoria and from 31% of children and 26% of adults in New South Wales (NSW) to 76% and 85%. However, the two major surveys using matched before and after samples in Melbourne (Finch et al. 1993; Report No. 45, Monash Univ. Accident Research Centre) and throughout NSW (Smith and Milthorpe 1993; Roads and Traffic Authority) observed reductions in numbers of child cyclists 15 and 2.2 times greater than the increase in numbers of children wearing helmets. This suggests the greatest effect of the helmet law was not to encourage cyclists to wear helmets, but to discourage cycling. In contrast, despite increases to at least 75% helmet wearing, the proportion of head injuries in cyclists admitted or treated at hospital declined by an average of only 13%. The percentage of cyclists with head injuries after collisions with motor vehicles in Victoria declined by more, but the proportion of head injured pedestrians also declined; the two followed a very similar trend. These trends may have been caused by major road safety initiatives introduced at the same time as the helmet law and directed at both speeding and drink-driving. The initiatives seem to have been remarkably effective in reducing road trauma for all road users, perhaps affecting the proportions of victims suffering head injuries as well as total injuries. The benefits of cycling, even without a helmet, have been estimated to outweigh the hazards by a factor of 20 to 1 (Hillman 1993. Cycle helmets-the case for and against. Policy Studies Institute, London). Consequently, a helmet law, whose most notable effect was to reduce cycling, may have generated a net loss of health benefits to the nation. Despite the risk of dying from head injury per hour being similar for unhelmeted cyclists and motor vehicle occupants, cyclists alone have been required to wear head protection. Helmets for motor

  10. Catastrophic Head Injuries in High School and Collegiate Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Frederick O.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the incidence of catastrophic head injuries within high school and college sports. Data from a national surveillance system indicated that a football-related fatality occurred every year except one from 1945-99, mainly related to head injuries. From 1984-99, 69 football head-related injuries resulted in permanent disability. Deaths and…

  11. Radial head fracture associated with posterior interosseous nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Terra, Bernardo Barcellos; Sassine, Tannus Jorge; Lima, Guilherme de Freitas; Rodrigues, Leandro Marano; Padua, David Victoria Hoffmann; Nadai, Anderson de

    2016-01-01

    Fractures of the radial head and radial neck correspond to 1.7-5.4% of all fractures and approximately 30% may present associated injuries. In the literature, there are few reports of radial head fracture with posterior interosseous nerve injury. This study aimed to report a case of radial head fracture associated with posterior interosseous nerve injury.

  12. Regressive language in severe head injury.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, I V; Skinhoj, E

    1976-09-01

    In a follow-up study of 50 patients with severe head injuries three patients had echolalia. One patient with initially global aphasia had echolalia for some weeks when he started talking. Another patient with severe diffuse brain damage, dementia, and emotional regression had echolalia. The dysfunction was considered a detour performance. In the third patient echolalia and palilalia were details in a total pattern of regression lasting for months. The patient, who had extensive frontal atrophy secondary to a very severe head trauma, presented an extreme state of regression returning to a foetal-body pattern and behaving like a baby.

  13. Delusional reduplication following closed-head injury.

    PubMed

    Rogers, M J; Franzen, M D

    1992-01-01

    Somatic delusions following brain injury are not uncommon, and have been well documented in the literature. This study documents a case of somatic delusion which was seen in a patient following a head injury secondary to a motorcycle accident. Although perhaps not typical it serves to illustrate an interesting example of a somatic delusion following head trauma. On recovery from coma this patient reported the existence of a 'third arm' adjacent to the limb that had received the greatest impact in the accident. The patient was unreceptive to any counter-persuasions and in fact remained largely unconcerned about this addition to his anatomy. A thorough neuropsychological evaluation was carried out in an attempt to seek an explanation for this phenomenon. The results suggest that the phenomenon has at least a partly psychiatric aetiology rather than a purely neurological foundation.

  14. Outcome rating scales for pediatric head injury.

    PubMed

    Haley, Stephen M; Graham, Robert J; Dumas, Helene M

    2004-01-01

    Intensivists, surgeons, neurologists, and others involved in pediatric intensive care units (PICUs) have an important investment in both short-and long-term outcomes of children and adolescents with head injury who are treated under their care. Outcomes are most often documented by either single- or multiple-item rating scales and are implemented both during and after hospital care. For this review, the authors have organized the content of rating scales into 6 general classes: (1) mortality prediction, (2) severity, (3) global recovery, (4) activity restrictions, (5) secondary adverse conditions, and (6) limitations in participation, quality of life, and health status. Rating scales that describe the outcomes of children and adolescents after head injury are used to monitor medical and functional recovery, guide clinical management, drive quality assurance initiatives, and conduct clinical research. The authors restrict their selective review to rating scales that describe child outcomes (vs family) and that have been reported and applied in the outcome literature. Although head injury is a major cause of mortality and short- and long-term morbidity in children and adolescents, there is no consensus on which rating scales are optimal for hospital care or community follow-up. Major considerations for clinical use are feasibility, type of outcome information needed, content breadth across multiple ages and levels of recovery, and utility in determining the short-term impact of PICU care on long-term outcome.

  15. Does Promoting Bicycle-Helmet Wearing Reduce Childhood Head Injuries?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farley, Celine; Vaez, Marjan; Laflamme, Lucie

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of the study are to assess the impact of a community-based bicycle-helmet program aimed at children aged 5-12 years (about 140,000). A quasi-experimental design, including a control group, was used. Sex- and age-group-based changes in the risk of bicycle-related head injury leading to hospitalisation were measured, using rate…

  16. Head injury management guidelines for general practitioners.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Jeremy C

    2011-07-01

    A complete examination of a head injured patient in the hospital requires a number of instruments. These include a stethoscope, sphygmomanometer, ophthalmoscope, otoscope, cotton wool, safety pin, tuning fork, reflex hammer and a small key to test the plantar response. Few of these are required at the accident scene. This is because, in the hospital, the aim is optimal definitive treatment. At the accident scene, the aim is prevention of secondary injury, rapid recording of the most important findings and safe efficient transport to the hospital. This short paper reviews how the local doctor should undertake a neurosurgical assessment of traumatic brain injury patients. Moreover, the primary management at accident scenes is described and the rationale behind the approach is outlined.

  17. [Repeated head injury during judo practice].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Kazue

    2014-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injuries, if repeated, can cause permanent brain damage, or even death. I examined five published documents(three judicial decisions, one official injury report, and one book)to analyze incidents in which high school students who, while practicing judo, experienced acute subdural hematoma(ASDH)with grave outcomes, despite the fact that they had been examined by neurosurgeons. The five students, first-grade boy and girl of junior high school and two first-grade boys and one second-grade girl of senior high school, were hit on the head during extracurricular judo practice and were taken to the neurosurgery department of different hospitals. They were all novices or unskilled players. The initial diagnoses were ASDH in three cases, concussion in one, and headache in one. Although the surgeons, except in one case, prohibited the students from returning to play, the juveniles resumed judo practice soon. Some of them complained of continued headaches, but they kept practicing. Between 17 and 82 days after the first injury, they received the fateful hits to their heads, and they were brought to the emergency rooms. MRI and CT revealed ASDH in all;two of them died, and the other three remain in persistent vegetative state. Neurosurgeons should take the initiative to prevent severe brain injury of young athletes through collaborations with the athletes themselves, fellow athletes, family members, coaches, teachers, athletic directors, and other physicians. They should pay close attention to headaches and other signs and symptoms of concussion and prohibit the athletes from returning to play until they are confirmed to be symptom free for recommended periods, insisting that safety comes first.

  18. Selecting children for head CT following head injury

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, A; Nickerson, E; Trefan, L; Houston, R; Hyde, P; Pearson, G; Edwards, R; Parslow, RC; Maconochie, I

    2016-01-01

    Objective Indicators for head CT scan defined by the 2007 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines were analysed to identify CT uptake, influential variables and yield. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Hospital inpatient units: England, Wales, Northern Ireland and the Channel Islands. Patients Children (<15 years) admitted to hospital for more than 4 h following a head injury (September 2009 to February 2010). Interventions CT scan. Main outcome measures Number of children who had CT, extent to which NICE guidelines were followed and diagnostic yield. Results Data on 5700 children were returned by 90% of eligible hospitals, 84% of whom were admitted to a general hospital. CT scans were performed on 30.4% of children (1734), with a higher diagnostic yield in infants (56.5% (144/255)) than children aged 1 to 14 years (26.5% (391/1476)). Overall, only 40.4% (984 of 2437 children) fulfilling at least one of the four NICE criteria for CT actually underwent one. These children were much less likely to receive CT if admitted to a general hospital than to a specialist centre (OR 0.52 (95% CI 0.45 to 0.59)); there was considerable variation between healthcare regions. When indicated, children >3 years were much more likely to have CT than those <3 years (OR 2.35 (95% CI 2.08 to 2.65)). Conclusion Compliance with guidelines and diagnostic yield was variable across age groups, the type of hospital and region where children were admitted. With this pattern of clinical practice the risks of both missing intracranial injury and overuse of CT are considerable. PMID:27449674

  19. Are head, neck and facial injuries markers of domestic violence?

    PubMed

    Ochs, H A; Neuenschwander, M C; Dodson, T B

    1996-06-01

    Few data exist regarding the relationship between the location of injuries and the presence of domestic violence. This study of 127 people at an inner-city hospital emergency department found that most patients had head, neck and facial injuries. Although only 23 percent of patients with such injuries were victims of domestic violence, 94.4 percent of victims of domestic violence had head, neck and facial injuries. The study results indicate that head, neck and facial injuries could be markers of domestic violence.

  20. Why one fakes a head injury affects how one fakes a head injury.

    PubMed

    Erdal, Kristi

    2009-01-01

    Identifying suspect effort in neuropsychological assessments has been investigated in clinical samples and experimental simulation paradigms. While patients' incentives, such as compensation, are commonly thought to impact motivation, other motivational influences, such as attention-seeking, have been largely unexplored. To this end, undergraduates (n=202) were asked to fake a head injury on the Dot Counting Test, California Verbal Learning Test, and Benton Visual Retention Test. Participants were assigned to one of four Motivation conditions (no motivation, avoiding blame, compensation, attention-seeking). Analyses revealed that those with compensation- and attention-seeking motivations performed significantly worse than those with blame avoidance and no motivations, suggesting that type of motivation affects performance on neuropsychological assessment. The relative similarity between compensation-seekers and attention-seekers, however, suggests that the two groups would be difficult to differentiate. Preliminary findings suggest that compensation-seekers may favor errors of omission and attention-seekers may favor errors of commission in their performance; however this finding requires replication.

  1. Characterizing Discourse Deficits Following Penetrating Head Injury: A Preliminary Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coelho, Carl; Le, Karen; Mozeiko, Jennifer; Hamilton, Mark; Tyler, Elizabeth; Krueger, Frank; Grafman, Jordan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Discourse analyses have demonstrated utility for delineating subtle communication deficits following closed head injuries (CHIs). The present investigation examined the discourse performance of a large group of individuals with penetrating head injury (PHI). Performance was also compared across 6 subgroups of PHI based on lesion locale. A…

  2. Why do children vomit after minor head injury?

    PubMed Central

    Brown, F; Brown, J; Beattie, T

    2000-01-01

    Objective—To determine factors associated with vomiting after minor head injury in a paediatric population with the intention of defining the role of vomiting in management decisions. Methods—A prospective study of all patients presenting with minor head injury to the Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Edinburgh, between 1 May and 30 June 1997. Information regarding basic demographics, features of the head injury and past and family history was noted on a proforma. This included mechanism of injury, site of impact, presence or absence of scalp haematoma, skull fracture or brain injury and intrinsic factors such as age, family history of migraine and a personal history of migraine, its childhood variants and associated conditions. The relation between vomiting and these features was analysed using χ2 and Fisher's exact tests. Results—563 children aged from birth to 13 years presented with minor head injury. Complete data were obtained on 463 patients. Some 15.8% vomited after minor head injury. Comparing vomiters with non-vomiters the only associated factors that could be identified were a past history of recurrent vomiting or motion sickness (p= 0.0035, p=0.036 respectively). Conclusions—Vomiting after minor head injury seems to be related to individual intrinsic factors rather than specific features of the head injury and its role in management decisions needs to be explored further. PMID:10921815

  3. Premorbid prevalence of poor academic performance in severe head injury.

    PubMed Central

    Haas, J F; Cope, D N; Hall, K

    1987-01-01

    A study of 80 head injured patients revealed poor premorbid academic performance in up to 50% of the sample. Poor academic performance, as defined by diagnosis of learning disability, multiple failed academic subjects, or school dropout during secondary education, is not a previously cited risk factor for head injury. These findings have important implications in the identification of a high risk population and in the subsequent ability to reduce the incidence of head injury. PMID:3819755

  4. Recurrent athletic head injury: risks and when to retire.

    PubMed

    Cantu, Robert C

    2003-07-01

    This article focuses on the issues related to recurrent athletic head injuries; specifically, when cumulative exponential injury or the second impact syndrome may be anticipated. Case histories and research studies are used to illustrate the salient points. A signs-and-symptoms checklist for use in concussion evaluation and management is included. Finally, the topic of when to retire after repeated athletic head injuries is discussed and illustrated with a case study.

  5. Golf ball-related head injuries in children.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Jimmy; Kaplan, Allen M

    2008-08-01

    Golf has become one of the most popular sports in the world. Golf-related head injuries are well-documented and include golf club, golf cart, and more recently golf ball trauma. We report on 2 cases of golf ball-associated traumatic brain injuries. The unique biomechanics of golf ball head trauma are reviewed. Initially golf injuries may cause minor clinical signs, with absence of skull fractures. However, the association of significant underlying intracranial hemorrhage should prompt a thorough neurologic evaluation.

  6. Aphasic disorder in patients with closed head injury.

    PubMed Central

    Levin, H S; Grossman, R G; Kelly, P J

    1976-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of 50 patients with closed head injury disclosed that anomic errors and word finding difficulty were prominent sequelae as nearly half of the series had defective scores on tests of naming and/or word association. Aphasic disturbance was associated with severity of brain injury as reflected by prolonged coma and injury of the brain stem. PMID:1011017

  7. Head and neck injury risks in heavy metal: head bangers stuck between rock and a hard bass

    PubMed Central

    Patton, Declan

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the risks of mild traumatic brain injury and neck injury associated with head banging, a popular dance form accompanying heavy metal music. Design Observational studies, focus group, and biomechanical analysis. Participants Head bangers. Main outcome measures Head Injury Criterion and Neck Injury Criterion were derived for head banging styles and both popular heavy metal songs and easy listening music controls. Results An average head banging song has a tempo of about 146 beats per minute, which is predicted to cause mild head injury when the range of motion is greater than 75°. At higher tempos and greater ranges of motion there is a risk of neck injury. Conclusion To minimise the risk of head and neck injury, head bangers should decrease their range of head and neck motion, head bang to slower tempo songs by replacing heavy metal with adult oriented rock, only head bang to every second beat, or use personal protective equipment. PMID:19091761

  8. Neuropsychiatric changes following penetrating head injury in children

    PubMed Central

    Badhiwala, Jetan H.; Blackham, Janet R.; Bhardwaj, Ratan D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Penetrating head injuries demand the prompt attention of a neurosurgeon. While most neurosurgical centers are experienced in the acute management of these injuries, less is known about the long-term neuropsychiatric sequelae of penetrating head trauma. In adults, direct injury to the frontal lobe classically has been associated with mental status changes. However, there is less published data in children. Case Description: We report the case of a 12-year-old boy who suffered a penetrating head injury to the frontal lobes secondary to a self-inflicted gunshot wound, and experienced subsequent resolution of pre-existing bipolar disorder and new onset of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Conclusion: Children with penetrating head injury require close multidisciplinary follow-up in order to monitor, and accordingly implement management strategies, for associated sequelae, including behavioral and neuropsychiatric changes. PMID:25422782

  9. Head Injury- A Maxillofacial Surgeon’s Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Choonthar, Muralee Mohan; Raghothaman, Ananthan; Prasad, Rajendra; Pandya, Kalpa

    2016-01-01

    Injuries and violence are one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide. A substantial portion of these injuries involve the maxillofacial region. Among the concomitant injuries, injuries to the head and cervical spine are amongst those that demand due consideration on account of their life threatening behaviour. Studies have shown that facial fractures have a strong association with traumatic brain injury. Knowledge of the types and mechanisms of traumatic brain injury is crucial for their treatment. Many a times, facial fractures tend to distract our attention from more severe and often life threatening injuries. Early diagnosis of these intracranial haemorrhage leads to prompt treatment which is essential to improve the outcome of these patients. An oral and maxillofacial surgeon should be able to suspect and diagnose head injury and also provide adequate initial management. PMID:26894193

  10. Anhedonia in combat veterans with penetrating head injury.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jeffrey D; Krueger, Frank; Raymont, Vanessa; Solomon, Jeffrey; Knutson, Kristine M; Barbey, Aron K; Poore, Joshua C; Wassermann, Eric M; Grafman, Jordan

    2015-09-01

    Anhedonia is a common symptom following traumatic brain injury. The neural basis of anhedonia is poorly understood, but believed to involve disturbed reward processing, rather than the loss of sense of pleasure. This analysis was undertaken to determine if injury to specific regions of prefrontal cortex (PFC) result in anhedonia. A CT-based lesion analysis was undertaken in 192 participants of the Vietnam Head Injury Study, most with penetrating head injury. Participants were divided into left and right ventrolateral prefrontal, bilateral ventromedial prefrontal, and other injury locations. Anhedonia was measured by self-report in each group using the four-item anhedonia subscale score of the Beck Depression Inventory-II. Individuals with right ventrolateral injury reported greater severity of anhedonia compared to those with injury in the left ventrolateral region. These findings support an association between injury in the right ventrolateral PFC and anhedonia.

  11. Injuries to the head and neck in Homer's Odyssey.

    PubMed

    Stathopoulos, Panagiotis; Ghaly, Ghaly Adly; Azari, Afroditi

    2016-07-01

    The Odyssey and the Iliad are the most prominent works of ancient Greek epic poetry, and we have retrieved injuries to the head and neck mentioned in the Odyssey. We studied the texts both in ancient Greek and the translations in modern Greek and English and searched for references to trauma to the head and neck. We recorded the injuries, the attacker and defender, the weapons used, the site, and the result. There were 11 injuries of the head and neck, nine of which were fatal.

  12. Scales of gravity in head injury.

    PubMed

    Muller, G E

    1975-01-01

    From the head injury onward the victim loses control over his own existence and starts a long journey through the various fields of forces determining his destiny until he can reassume control. Scales of gravity applied at different points in time vary and sometimes contradict each other. The vital scale is an immediate emergency scale, determined by the need to save a life, observe and treat a coma, and detect early complications, and the criteria are those of intensive care, surgery, and neurosurgery. The neurological and neuropsychological scale established towards the end of the first hospitalisation, assesses brain damage by neurological investigations, ophthalmological and otological tests and a neuropsychological evaluation. First individual psychiatric reactions appear at this stage. The psychosocial scale should consider information provided by previous scales, but also evaluate pre- and post-traumatic personality, family setting, social, legal, administrative and economic realities, residual skills, previous profession, possibilities of reinstatement and above all, motivation. Probably the neurological and neuropsychological scale provide the best common point of reference for a global assessment. These scales of gravity are examined in their relationship to traditional clinical thinking in different countries. A prospective and descriptive system of a "European" cofification as proposed within the framework of the European Communities is described.

  13. Fatal pediatric head injury due to toppled television: does the injury pattern overlap with abusive head trauma?

    PubMed

    Kodikara, Sarathchandra; Pollanen, Michael

    2012-07-01

    Pediatric head injuries can occur from abusive head trauma (AHT) or accidents. Accidental pediatric head injuries caused by cathode-ray tube televisions (CRTT) toppling have become a 'silent epidemic'. Differentiation between a fatal case of AHT and CRTT toppling could be vexing when the historical and scene evidence are subtle. A 2-year-old girl was found unresponsive in her house and could not be resuscitated. A 27" CRTT was found fallen from its stand onto the floor at the scene. The siblings report that the deceased was climbing on the television stand when it toppled. Autopsy revealed a spectrum of head injuries including, contusions, fractures, bilateral acute subdural hemorrhages, subarachnoid hemorrhages, brain contusion-lacerations and corpus callosal hemorrhages. Microscopy of the eyes revealed bilateral acute retinal hemorrhages. The cause of death was given as crushing injuries of head and brain. The skull fracture pattern is compatible with an accident causing crush injury due to the toppled CRTT rather than AHT. The injury pattern reconfirms that the head is the most vulnerable site in case of CRTT tipover. Although there may be an overlap between the injury pattern in AHT and in CRTT tipover cases, a careful evaluation of the history and scene and autopsy findings such as the crushing nature of the skull fractures and distribution of injury, can solve this problem.

  14. Why Do Woodpeckers Resist Head Impact Injury: A Biomechanical Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lizhen; Cheung, Jason Tak-Man; Pu, Fang; Li, Deyu; Zhang, Ming; Fan, Yubo

    2011-01-01

    Head injury is a leading cause of morbidity and death in both industrialized and developing countries. It is estimated that brain injuries account for 15% of the burden of fatalities and disabilities, and represent the leading cause of death in young adults. Brain injury may be caused by an impact or a sudden change in the linear and/or angular velocity of the head. However, the woodpecker does not experience any head injury at the high speed of 6–7 m/s with a deceleration of 1000 g when it drums a tree trunk. It is still not known how woodpeckers protect their brain from impact injury. In order to investigate this, two synchronous high-speed video systems were used to observe the pecking process, and the force sensor was used to measure the peck force. The mechanical properties and macro/micro morphological structure in woodpecker's head were investigated using a mechanical testing system and micro-CT scanning. Finite element (FE) models of the woodpecker's head were established to study the dynamic intracranial responses. The result showed that macro/micro morphology of cranial bone and beak can be recognized as a major contributor to non-impact-injuries. This biomechanical analysis makes it possible to visualize events during woodpecker pecking and may inspire new approaches to prevention and treatment of human head injury. PMID:22046293

  15. Why do woodpeckers resist head impact injury: a biomechanical investigation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lizhen; Cheung, Jason Tak-Man; Pu, Fang; Li, Deyu; Zhang, Ming; Fan, Yubo

    2011-01-01

    Head injury is a leading cause of morbidity and death in both industrialized and developing countries. It is estimated that brain injuries account for 15% of the burden of fatalities and disabilities, and represent the leading cause of death in young adults. Brain injury may be caused by an impact or a sudden change in the linear and/or angular velocity of the head. However, the woodpecker does not experience any head injury at the high speed of 6-7 m/s with a deceleration of 1000 g when it drums a tree trunk. It is still not known how woodpeckers protect their brain from impact injury. In order to investigate this, two synchronous high-speed video systems were used to observe the pecking process, and the force sensor was used to measure the peck force. The mechanical properties and macro/micro morphological structure in woodpecker's head were investigated using a mechanical testing system and micro-CT scanning. Finite element (FE) models of the woodpecker's head were established to study the dynamic intracranial responses. The result showed that macro/micro morphology of cranial bone and beak can be recognized as a major contributor to non-impact-injuries. This biomechanical analysis makes it possible to visualize events during woodpecker pecking and may inspire new approaches to prevention and treatment of human head injury.

  16. Head Injury With Subsequent, Intermittent, Nonschizophrenic, Psychotic Symptoms and Violence

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Carl C.; Kelly, Ruby P.

    1987-01-01

    A young, black, adult woman presented to an outpatient clinic for treatment with a history of intermittent, nonschizophrenic, psychotic symptoms. Blacks, because of their situational sociology, may be more predisposed to severe head injuries, and this acquired biologic factor may be, in part, responsible for the high rates of black-on-black murder. The use of beta blockers is discussed as an adjunct in the treatment of violence occurring in patients with a past history of severe head injury. PMID:3694693

  17. Head motions while riding roller coasters: implications for brain injury.

    PubMed

    Pfister, Bryan J; Chickola, Larry; Smith, Douglas H

    2009-12-01

    The risk of traumatic brain injury (TBI) while riding roller coasters has received substantial attention. Case reports of TBI around the time of riding roller coasters have led many medical professionals to assert that the high gravitational forces (G-forces) induced by roller coasters pose a significant TBI risk. Head injury research, however, has shown that G-forces alone cannot predict TBI. Established head injury criterions and procedures were employed to compare the potential of TBI between daily activities and roller coaster riding. Three-dimensional head motions were measured during 3 different roller coaster rides, a pillow fight, and car crash simulations. Data was analyzed and compared with published data, using similar analyses of head motions. An 8.05 m/s car crash lead to the largest head injury criterion measure of 28.1 and head impact power of 3.41, over 6 times larger than the roller coaster rides of 4.1 and 0.36. Notably, the linear and rotational components of head acceleration during roller coaster rides were milder than those induced by many common activities. As such, there appears to be an extremely low risk of TBI due to the head motions induced by roller coaster rides.

  18. Head motions while riding roller coasters: Implications for brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Chickola, Larry; Smith, Douglas H.

    2009-01-01

    The risk of traumatic brain injury (TBI) while riding roller coasters has received substantial attention. Case reports of TBI around the time of riding roller coasters have led many medical professionals to assert that the high gravitational forces (G-forces) induced by roller coasters pose a significant TBI risk. Head injury research, however, has shown that G-forces alone cannot predict TBI. Established head injury criterions and procedures were employed to compare the potential of TBI between daily activities and roller coaster riding. Three dimensional head motions were measured during three different roller coaster rides, a pillow fight, and car crash simulations. Data was analyzed and compared to published data using similar analyses of head motions. An 8.05m/s car crash lead to the largest head injury criterion measure (HIC15) of 28.1 and head impact factor (HIP) of 3.41, over six times larger than the roller coaster rides of 4.1 and 0.36. Notably, the linear and rotational components of head acceleration during roller coaster rides were milder than those induced by many common activities. As such, there appears to be an extremely low risk of TBI due to the head motions induced by roller coaster rides. PMID:19901817

  19. A Drosophila model of closed head traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Katzenberger, Rebeccah J; Loewen, Carin A; Wassarman, Douglas R; Petersen, Andrew J; Ganetzky, Barry; Wassarman, David A

    2013-10-29

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a substantial health issue worldwide, yet the mechanisms responsible for its complex spectrum of pathologies remains largely unknown. To investigate the mechanisms underlying TBI pathologies, we developed a model of TBI in Drosophila melanogaster. The model allows us to take advantage of the wealth of experimental tools available in flies. Closed head TBI was inflicted with a mechanical device that subjects flies to rapid acceleration and deceleration. Similar to humans with TBI, flies with TBI exhibited temporary incapacitation, ataxia, activation of the innate immune response, neurodegeneration, and death. Our data indicate that TBI results in death shortly after a primary injury only if the injury exceeds a certain threshold and that age and genetic background, but not sex, substantially affect this threshold. Furthermore, this threshold also appears to be dependent on the same cellular and molecular mechanisms that control normal longevity. This study demonstrates the potential of flies for providing key insights into human TBI that may ultimately provide unique opportunities for therapeutic intervention.

  20. On Impact: A Case of a Student with Head Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckley, Valerie A.; Chesire, David J.; Canto, Angela I.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a case of a student with head injuries. While the symptom presentation for students with traumatic brain injury (TBI) can be vastly different, this case represents common symptoms seen in students who are recovering from a concussion. The authors suggest that school psychologists query the teacher and parents about their…

  1. [Head injuries in Duckburg in 1959 and 2009].

    PubMed

    Juul, Agnete M; Rasmussen, Mads; Koch, Klaus Ulrik; Juul, Niels

    2016-12-12

    Comic books have been a part of popular culture through generations. Debates concerning their graphic depictions of violence have been ongoing for nearly as long. Our aim was to examine if the violence in "Donald Duck & Co." (a weekly published Danish comic book), illustrated through the number of head injuries, increased in the period from 1959 to 2009. The comic book vintages from the years 1959 and 2009 were read, and the number of head injuries noted. The head injuries were characterized by severity, in part by a modified Glasgow Coma Scale and in part by a newly developed Comic Book Coma Scale. The number of head injuries were equal in the examined years, however, the number of head injuries per page decreased from 1/10 pages to 1/20 pages. Donald Duck sustained a better part of the injuries increasing from 17% in 1959 to 33% in 2009. The study indicates that we, with peace of mind, can read a comic book while the rest of the family takes care of the dishes at Christmas.

  2. A different approach to missile induced head injuries.

    PubMed

    Pabuscu, Yüksel; Bulakbasi, Nail; Kocaoglu, Murat; Ustünsöz, Bahri; Tayfun, Cem

    2003-01-01

    Missile induced head injuries can be influenced by the anatomical location of the injury, i.e. type of tissue and by the ballistic properties such as the design of the weapon and the mass, shape and construction of the projectile, as well as its velocity characteristics and trajectory angle. In the diagnostic work up of the patients with missile induced head injuries, every available modality can be used. It is important, however, to recognize that CT scan is the primary and most efficacious diagnostic tool in such patients. In this article we have identified risk factors for both morbidity and mortality in patients with missile induced head injury with excluding the patients who had also extracranial serious trauma and systemic disease.

  3. Clinical predictors of abnormal head computed tomography scan in patients who are conscious after head injury

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Rakesh Kumar; Munivenkatappa, Ashok; Prathyusha, Vasuki; Shukla, Dhaval P.; Devi, Bhagavatula Indira

    2017-01-01

    Background: Indication of a head computed tomography (CT) scan in a patient who remains conscious after head injury is controversial. We aimed to determine the clinical features that are most likely to be associated with abnormal CT scan in patients with a history of head injury, and who are conscious at the time of presentation to casualty. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective observation study of patients presented to casualty with history of head injury, and who were conscious, i.e., Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) 15 at the time of evaluation. All patients underwent head CT scan. The CT scan was reported as abnormal if it showed any pathology ascribed to trauma. The following variables were used: age, gender, mode of injury (road traffic accident, fall, assault, and others), duration since injury, and history of transient loss of consciousness, headache, vomiting, ear/nose bleeding, and seizures. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify the clinical features that predicted an abnormal CT scan. Results: During the observation period, a total of 1629 patients with head injury were evaluated, out of which 453 were in GCS 15. Abnormal CT scan was present in 195 (43%) patients. Among all the variables, the following were found significantly associated with abnormal CT scan: duration since injury (>12 h) P < 0.001; vomiting odds, ratio (OR) 1.89 (1.23, 2.80), P < 0.001; and presence of any symptom, OR 2.36 (1.52, 3.71), P < 0.001. Conclusion: A patient with GCS 15 presenting after 12 hours of injury with vomiting or combination of symptoms has a significant risk of abnormal head CT scan. PMID:28149084

  4. Penetrating head injury from angle grinder: A cautionary tale.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumaran, S; Balamurgan, N; Arthanari, K; Thirumalaikolundusubramanian, P

    2010-01-01

    Penetrating cranial injury is a potentially life-threatening condition. Injuries resulting from the use of angle grinders are numerous and cause high-velocity penetrating cranial injuries. We present a series of two penetrating head injuries associated with improper use of angle grinder, which resulted in shattering of disc into high velocity missiles with reference to management and prevention. One of those hit on the forehead of the operator and the other on the occipital region of the co-worker at a distance of five meters. The pathophysiological consequence of penetrating head injuries depends on the kinetic energy and trajectory of the object. In the nearby healthcare center the impacted broken disc was removed without realising the consequences and the wound was packed. As the conscious level declined in both, they were referred. CT brain revealed fracture in skull and changes in the brain in both. Expeditious removal of the penetrating foreign body and focal debridement of the scalp, skull, dura, and involved parenchyma and Watertight dural closure were carried out. The most important thing is not to remove the impacted foreign body at the site of accident. Craniectomy around the foreign body, debridement and removal of foreign body without zigzag motion are needed. Removal should be done following original direction of projectile injury. The neurological sequelae following the non missile penetrating head injuries are determined by the severity and location of initial injury as well as the rapidity of the exploration and fastidious debridement.

  5. Dizziness following head injury: a neuro-otological study.

    PubMed

    Davies, R A; Luxon, L M

    1995-03-01

    Dizziness is a frequent and debilitating complications of head injury and accounts for increasing numbers of medico-legal claims. A detailed neuro-otological study was carried out from the records of 100 patients with post-traumatic dizziness to explore the neuro-otological basis of their symptoms: 50 patients presenting for medico-legal purposes (group I) and 50 presenting for management of their vestibular symptoms (group II). The two groups showed a similar sex distribution, a similar range of causes of head injury and similar severity of head injury (72 minor, 24 moderate and 4 severe). Of the 100, 88 showed at least one audio-vestibular abnormality on testing. Vertigo of the benign positional paroxysmal type was the commonest vestibular diagnosis in both groups (61/100), and only 8 patients showed central vestibular abnormalities. Fifty-three patients had audiometric abnormalities attributable to the head injury, the commonest of which was a high-tone sensorineural hearing loss. There was no significant difference in the incidence of any of the abnormalities in the medico-legal group (group I) when compared with the symptom management group (group II). The results provide strong evidence for an organic basis to recurring dizziness after head injury, whether or not a claim for compensation is pending, and emphasize the need for specialist neuro-otological investigation if abnormalities are to be identified and managed correctly.

  6. Minimizing Liability Risks of Head and Neck Injuries in Football

    PubMed Central

    Heck, Jonathan F.; Weis, Michael P.; Gartland, James M.; Weis, Craig R.

    1994-01-01

    Although catastrophic head and neck injuries in football occur infrequently, their occurrence is almost always followed by litigation. The athletic trainer has to be sure he/she has adequate liability insurance to cover the costs of a defense and a possible judgment. General claims filed against athletic staffs usually deal with instruction, equipment, matching of participants, supervision, and/or postinjury care. The defenses to these claims include: statutory immunity, assumption of risk, releases or waivers, and the reckless disregard standard. The athletic trainer plays a key role in head and neck injury prevention and care, and must be aware of litigation possibilities, along with methods of risk management. We present recommendations aimed at minimizing the risk of head and neck injuries and the risk of liability. The areas covered are: preparing for head and neck lawsuits, preventing head and neck injuries, and postcatastrophic injury care. We base these recommendations on principles that the athletic trainer can easily apply to other areas, broadening the risk management concept presented. ImagesFig 1.Fig 5.Fig 6.Fig 7. PMID:16558275

  7. The postconcussion syndrome and the sequelae of mild head injury.

    PubMed

    Evans, R W

    1992-11-01

    The postconcussion syndrome refers to a large number of symptoms and signs that may occur alone or in combination following usually mild head injury. The most common complaints are headaches, dizziness, fatigue, irritability, anxiety, insomnia, loss of consciousness and memory, and noise sensitivity. Mild head injury is a major public health concern because the annual incidence is about 150 per 100,000 population, accounting for 75% or more of all head injuries. The postconcussion syndrome has been recognized for at least the last few hundred years and has been the subject of intense controversy for more than 100 years. The Hollywood head injury myth has been an important contributor to persisting skepticism and might be countered by educational efforts and counter-examples from boxing. The organicity of the postconcussion syndrome has now become well documented. Abnormalities following mild head injury have been reported in neuropathologic, neurophysiologic, neuroimaging, and neuropsychologic studies. There are multiple sequelae of mild head injury, including headaches of multiple types, cranial nerve symptoms and signs, psychologic and somatic complaints, and cognitive impairment. Rare sequelae include hematomas, seizures, transient global amnesia, tremor, and dystonia. Neuroimaging and physiologic and psychologic testing should be used judiciously based on the problems of the particular patient rather than in a cookbook fashion. Prognostic studies clearly substantiate the existence of a postconcussion syndrome. Manifestations of the postconcussion syndrome are common, with resolution in most patients by 3 to 6 months after the injury. Persistent symptoms and cognitive deficits are present in a distinct minority of patients for additional months or years. Risk factors for persisting sequelae include age over 40 years; lower educational, intellectual, and socioeconomic level; female gender; alcohol abuse; prior head injury; and multiple trauma. Although a small

  8. Development of head injury assessment reference values based on NASA injury modeling.

    PubMed

    Somers, Jeffrey T; Granderson, Bradley; Melvin, John W; Tabiei, Ala; Lawrence, Charles; Feiveson, Alan; Gernhardt, Michael; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Patalak, John

    2011-11-01

    NASA is developing a new crewed vehicle and desires a lower risk of injury compared to automotive or commercial aviation. Through an agreement with the National Association of Stock Car Auto Racing, Inc. (NASCAR®), an analysis of NASCAR impacts was performed to develop new injury assessment reference values (IARV) that may be more relevant to NASA's context of vehicle landing operations. Head IARVs associated with race car impacts were investigated by analyzing all NASCAR recorded impact data for the 2002-2008 race seasons. From the 4015 impact files, 274 impacts were selected for numerical simulation using a custom NASCAR restraint system and Hybrid III 50th percentile male Finite Element Model (FEM) in LS-DYNA. Head injury occurred in 27 of the 274 selected impacts, and all of the head injuries were mild concussions with or without brief loss of consciousness. The 247 noninjury impacts selected were representative of the range of crash dynamics present in the total set of impacts. The probability of head injury was estimated for each metric using an ordered probit regression analysis. Four metrics had good correlation with the head injury data: head resultant acceleration, head change in velocity, HIC 15, and HIC 36. For a 5% risk of AIS≥1/AIS≥2 head injuries, the following IARVs were found: 121.3/133.2 G (head resultant acceleration), 20.3/22.0 m/s (head change in velocity), 1,156/1,347 (HIC 15), and 1,152/1,342 (HIC 36) respectively. Based on the results of this study, further analysis of additional datasets is recommended before applying these results to future NASA vehicles.

  9. The King's Outcome Scale for Childhood Head Injury and Injury Severity and Outcome Measures in Children with Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvert, Sophie; Miller, Helen E.; Curran, Andrew; Hameed, Biju; McCarter, Renee; Edwards, Richard J.; Hunt, Linda; Sharples, Peta Mary

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to relate discharge King's Outcome Scale for Childhood Head Injury (KOSCHI) category to injury severity and detailed outcome measures obtained in the first year post-traumatic brain injury (TBI). We used a prospective cohort study. Eighty-one children with TBI were studied: 29 had severe, 15 moderate, and 37 mild TBI. The…

  10. MRI Correlation of Radial Head Fractures and Forearm Injuries.

    PubMed

    Awan, Hisham; Goitz, Robert

    2017-03-01

    Background: Radial head fractures can be associated with soft tissue injuries of the forearm and wrist. The Essex-Lopresti injury can lead to significant morbidity, especially if the diagnosis is not made acutely. Better identification of such injuries is needed to allow optimal surgical treatment and prevent long-term sequelae. We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to correlate the degree of soft tissue injuries with radial head fractures. Methods: Sixteen pairs of forearms with an associated radial head fracture in 15 patients prospectively underwent an MRI within 2 weeks of their injury. MRI findings were correlated with fracture type, associated soft tissue injury, and presence of symptomatic wrist pain. Results: According to the modified Mason classification, there were 8 type I, 5 type II, and 3 type III radial head fractures. Wrist pain was reported in 8 of 16 extremities, and 2 had associated wrist pathology, including an acute scaphoid fracture in 1 patient and a preexisting stage II scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC) wrist in another patient. The MRI findings included an elbow effusion in all 16 patients, edema in the proximal third of the radius in 15 extremities, which extended to the middle third in 3 extremities, edema of the interosseous membrane (IOM) in 5 extremities, and edema of the soft tissues including the supinator and/or pronator quadratus in 13 extremities. Conclusions: Eighty percent of patients with edema of the IOM had associated wrist pain. Soft tissue injuries of the forearm did not correlate with the severity of the radial head fracture.

  11. Impalement head injury with serrated meat knife.

    PubMed

    Binitie, Op; Shilong, Dj; Ugwu, Bt; Ekedigwe, Je; Oyeniran, Oo; Adighije, Pf; Mairiga, An; Ninmol, Pj; Alayande, B

    2012-01-01

    An unsuspecting motorcycle passenger was ambushed and impaled on the right side of the head with a 30cm serrated meat carving knife during a sectarian crisis in the city of Jos, Plateau State, Nigeria. The patient escaped running with the knife in his head and was rescued to a military hospital from where he was promptly transferred within 90 minutes of the incident to the Emergency Department of Jos University Teaching Hospital (JUTH), Jos. Prompt resuscitation and CT brain imaging facilitated a successful neurosurgical intervention and a good outcome in the management of this patient.

  12. Development of Head Injury Assessment Reference Values Based on NASA Injury Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somers, Jeffrey T.; Melvin, John W.; Tabiei, Ala; Lawrence, Charles; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Granderson, Bradley; Feiveson, Alan; Gernhardt, Michael; Patalak, John

    2011-01-01

    NASA is developing a new capsule-based, crewed vehicle that will land in the ocean, and the space agency desires to reduce the risk of injury from impact during these landings. Because landing impact occurs for each flight and the crew might need to perform egress tasks, current injury assessment reference values (IARV) were deemed insufficient. Because NASCAR occupant restraint systems are more effective than the systems used to determine the current IARVs and are similar to NASA s proposed restraint system, an analysis of NASCAR impacts was performed to develop new IARVs that may be more relevant to NASA s context of vehicle landing operations. Head IARVs associated with race car impacts were investigated by completing a detailed analysis of all of the 2002-2008 NASCAR impact data. Specific inclusion and exclusion criteria were used to select 4071 impacts from the 4015 recorder files provided (each file could contain multiple impact events). Of the 4071 accepted impacts, 274 were selected for numerical simulation using a custom NASCAR restraint system and Humanetics Hybrid-III 50th percentile numerical dummy model in LS-DYNA. Injury had occurred in 32 of the 274 selected impacts, and 27 of those injuries involved the head. A majority of the head injuries were mild concussions with or without brief loss of consciousness. The 242 non-injury impacts were randomly selected and representative of the range of crash dynamics present in the total set of 4071 impacts. Head dynamics data (head translational acceleration, translational change in velocity, rotational acceleration, rotational velocity, HIC-15, HIC-36, and the Head 3ms clip) were filtered according to SAE J211 specifications and then transformed to a log scale. The probability of head injury was estimated using a separate logistic regression analysis for each log-transformed predictor candidate. Using the log transformation constrains the estimated probability of injury to become negligible as IARVs approach

  13. Defense and Veterans Head Injury Program: background and overview.

    PubMed

    Salazar, A M; Zitnay, G A; Warden, D L; Schwab, K A

    2000-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the principal cause of death and disability for young Americans, with an estimated societal cost of over $39 billion per year. The Defense and Veterans Head Injury Program (DVHIP) represents a close collaboration among the Departments of Defense (DoD) and Veterans Affairs (DVA), the Brain Injury Association (BIA), and the International Brain Injury Association (IBIA). Its principal mission is to ensure that military and veteran patients with head injury receive TBI-specific evaluation, treatment, rehabilitation, and follow-up, while at the same time addressing the readiness mission of the military and helping to define optimal care for victims of TBI nationwide. Defense and Veterans Head Injury Program activities can be grouped into three broad classes: (1) TBI education, community service, and primary prevention projects; (2) combined TBI clinical treatment, rehabilitation, and clinical research projects; and (3) clinically linked TBI laboratory research projects. It is thus based on a prudent integration of clinical care and follow-up with programmatic clinical and clinically related laboratory research, TBI prevention, and education. This previously nonexistent clinical infrastructure now offers a valuable base for ongoing TBI clinical research.

  14. Evaluation of Head and Brain Injury Risk Functions using Sub-Injurious Human Volunteer Data.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Erin J; Gabler, Lee F; McGhee, James S; Olszko, Ardyn V; Chancey, Valeta Carol; Crandall, Jeff; Panzer, Matthew B

    2017-03-30

    Risk assessment models are developed to estimate the probability of brain injury during head impact using mechanical response variables such as head kinematics and brain tissue deformation. Existing injury risk functions have been developed using different datasets based on human volunteer and scaled animal injury responses to impact. However, many of these functions have not been independently evaluated with respect to laboratory-controlled human response data. In this study, the specificity of fourteen existing brain injury risk functions was assessed by evaluating their ability to correctly predict non-injurious response using previously conducted sled tests with well-instrumented human research volunteers. Six degree-of-freedom head kinematics data were obtained for 335 sled tests involving subjects in frontal, lateral, and oblique sled conditions up to 16 Gs peak sled acceleration. A review of the medical reports associated with each individual test indicated no clinical diagnosis of mild or moderate brain injury in any of the cases evaluated. Kinematic-based head and brain injury risk probabilities were calculated directly from the kinematic data, while strain-based risks were determined through finite element model simulation of the 335 tests. Several injury risk functions sub¬stanti¬ally over pre¬dict the likelihood of concussion and diffuse axonal injury; proposed maximum principal strain (MPS)-based injury risk functions predicted nearly 80 concussions and 14 cases of severe diffuse axonal injury out of the 335 non-injurious cases. This work is an important first step in assessing the efficacy of existing brain risk functions and highlights the need for more predictive injury assessment models.

  15. [Reflection around the return home of a head injury patient].

    PubMed

    Mouling, Virginie; Lambert, Marie; Charlier, Nathalie; Fonseca, Dolores

    2016-05-01

    The rehabilitation of people having suffered a head injury requires an inter-disciplinary perspective. Understanding the family dynamics as well as assessing the patient's resources and limits help professionals organise the necessary support to guide the patient and their family towards social reintegration.

  16. The risks of minor head injury in the warfarinised patient.

    PubMed

    Volans, A P

    1998-05-01

    The risk factors affecting intracranial haemorrhage in warfarinised patients are described and an attempt made to calculate the risk of haemorrhage in warfarinised patients with minor head injuries. Using the data from studies of patients with spontaneous haemorrhage while taking warfarin, guidelines for treatment and given and the likely outcome predicted.

  17. Social Cognition after Head Injury: Sarcasm and Theory of Mind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Channon, S.; Pellijeff, A.; Rule, A.

    2005-01-01

    Closed head injury (CHI) is associated with communication difficulties in everyday social interactions. Previous work has reported impaired comprehension of sarcasm, using sarcastic remarks where the intended meaning is the opposite of the sincere or literal meaning. Participants with CHI in the present study were assessed using two types of…

  18. The risks of minor head injury in the warfarinised patient.

    PubMed Central

    Volans, A P

    1998-01-01

    The risk factors affecting intracranial haemorrhage in warfarinised patients are described and an attempt made to calculate the risk of haemorrhage in warfarinised patients with minor head injuries. Using the data from studies of patients with spontaneous haemorrhage while taking warfarin, guidelines for treatment and given and the likely outcome predicted. PMID:9639176

  19. Accidental low velocity atypical missile injury to the head.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Saurabh

    2008-12-01

    Missile injuries on the head are mostly due to firearms. Atypical missiles may be encountered in case of shrapnel of bomb explosions but rarely because of stones. The present case is a rare case where a stone propelled by the pressure from the rear wheel of a speeding truck on the highway, struck the head of a 7-year-old girl resulting in fatality. Reconstruction of the incident on the basis of history and postmortem findings throws some light on the mechanism. The case is unique as it is the first reported case of an accidental missile injury to the head resulting in fatality without any direct human involvement for propulsion of the projectile.

  20. BIOMECHANICS OF HEAD INJURY IN OLYMPIC TAEKWONDO AND BOXING

    PubMed Central

    Fife, G.P.; Pieter, W.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose was to examine differences between taekwondo kicks and boxing punches in resultant linear head acceleration (RLA), head injury criterion (HIC15), peak head velocity, and peak foot and fist velocities. Data from two existing publications on boxing punches and taekwondo kicks were compared. Methods For taekwondo head impacts a Hybrid II Crash Dummy (Hybrid II) head was instrumented with a tri-axial accelerometer mounted inside the Hybrid II head. The Hybrid II was fixed to a height-adjustable frame and fitted with a protective taekwondo helmet. For boxing testing, a Hybrid III Crash Dummy head was instrumented with an array of tri-axial accelerometers mounted at the head centre of gravity. Results Differences in RLA between the roundhouse kick (130.11±51.67 g) and hook punch (71.23±32.19 g, d = 1.39) and in HIC15 (clench axe kick: 162.63±104.10; uppercut: 24.10±12.54, d = 2.29) were observed. Conclusions Taekwondo kicks demonstrated significantly larger magnitudes than boxing punches for both RLA and HIC. PMID:24744497

  1. Long-term outcome after severe head injury.

    PubMed Central

    Lewin, W; Marshall, T F; Roberts, A H

    1979-01-01

    From a consecutive series of 7000 patients with head injuries admitted to the regional accident service, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford between 10 and 24 years earlier, every patient was taken who had been amnesic or unconscious for one week or longer. Of these 479 patients, all but ten were traced, and either the cause of death was established or the survivors examined. Ten years after injury 4% were totally disabled, and 14% severely disabled to a degree precluding normal occupational or social life. Of the remainder, 49% had recovered, and the rest were dead. Additionally, a selected series of 64 patients whose unconsciousness had been prolonged for a month or more were studied. Forty of these had survived between three and 25 years after injury and were re-examined. On the basis of age at injury, the worst state of neurological responsiveness, and the duration of posttraumatic amnesia, the outcome of head injury can be predicted reliably in most cases. Patients and relatives need more reassurance and simple psychotherapeutic support, especially in the first few months after injury. Extrapolation from our figures suggests that each year in England and Wales 210 patients survive totally disabled and another 1500 are severely disabled. PMID:119567

  2. Epidemiology of children with head injury: a national overview

    PubMed Central

    Trefan, L; Houston, R; Pearson, G; Edwards, R; Hyde, P; Maconochie, I; Parslow, RC; Kemp, A

    2016-01-01

    Background The National Confidential Enquiry describes the epidemiology of children admitted to hospital with head injury. Method Children (<15 years old) who died or were admitted for >4 h with head injury were identified from 216 UK hospitals (1 September 2009 to 28 February 2010). Data were collected using standard proformas and entered on to a database. A descriptive analysis of the causal mechanisms, child demographics, neurological impairment, CT findings, and outcome at 72 h are provided. Results Details of 5700 children, median age 4 years (range 0–14.9 years), were analysed; 1093 (19.2%) were <1 year old, 3500 (61.4%) were boys. There was a significant association of head injury with social deprivation 39.7/100 000 (95% CI 37.0 to 42.6) in the least deprived first quintile vs. 55.1 (95% CI 52.1 to 58.2) in the most deprived fifth quintile (p<0.01). Twenty-four children died (0.4%). Most children were admitted for one night or less; 4522 (79%) had a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 15 or were Alert (on AVPU (Alert, Voice, Pain, Unresponsive)). The most common causes of head injury were falls (3537 (62.1%); children <5 years), sports-related incidents (783 (13.7%); median age 12.4 years), or motor vehicle accidents (MVAs) (401 (7.1%); primary-school-aged children). CT scans were performed in 1734 (30.4%) children; 536 (30.9%) were abnormal (skull fracture and/or intracranial injury or abnormality): 269 (7.6%) were falls, 82 (10.5%) sports related and 100 (25%). A total of 357 (6.2%) children were referred to social care because of child protection concerns (median age 9 months (range 0–14.9 years)). Conclusions The data described highlight priorities for targeted age-specific head injury prevention and have the potential to provide a baseline to evaluate the effects of regional trauma networks (2012) and National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) head injury guidelines (2014), which were revised after the study was completed

  3. Impact of Head Injury on Families: An Introduction for Family Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosciulek, John F.

    1995-01-01

    Coping with the impact of a family member's head injury is one of the most difficult tasks that can confront a family. An overview of head injury etiology, sequelae, and impact on families is presented. Provides guidelines for counseling families of persons with head injuries and suggestions for research. (Author/JBJ)

  4. Investigation of traumatic brain injuries using the next generation of simulated injury monitor (SIMon) finite element head model.

    PubMed

    Takhounts, Erik G; Ridella, Stephen A; Hasija, Vikas; Tannous, Rabih E; Campbell, J Quinn; Malone, Dan; Danelson, Kerry; Stitzel, Joel; Rowson, Steve; Duma, Stefan

    2008-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate potential for traumatic brain injuries (TBI) using a newly developed, geometrically detailed, finite element head model (FEHM) within the concept of a simulated injury monitor (SIMon). The new FEHM is comprised of several parts: cerebrum, cerebellum, falx, tentorium, combined pia-arachnoid complex (PAC) with cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF), ventricles, brainstem, and parasagittal blood vessels. The model's topology was derived from human computer tomography (CT) scans and then uniformly scaled such that the mass of the brain represents the mass of a 50th percentile male's brain (1.5 kg) with the total head mass of 4.5 kg. The topology of the model was then compared to the preliminary data on the average topology derived from Procrustes shape analysis of 59 individuals. Material properties of the various parts were assigned based on the latest experimental data. After rigorous validation of the model using neutral density targets (NDT) and pressure data, the stability of FEHM was tested by loading it simultaneously with translational (up to 400 g) combined with rotational (up to 24,000 rad/s2) acceleration pulses in both sagittal and coronal planes. Injury criteria were established in the manner shown in Takhounts et al. (2003a). After thorough validation and injury criteria establishment (cumulative strain damage measure--CSDM for diffuse axonal injuries (DAI), relative motion damage measure--RMDM for acute subdural hematoma (ASDH), and dilatational damage measure--DDM for contusions and focal lesions), the model was used in investigation of mild TBI cases in living humans based on a set of head impact data taken from American football players at the collegiate level. It was found that CSDM and especially RMDM correlated well with angular acceleration and angular velocity. DDM was close to zero for most impacts due to their mild severity implying that cavitational pressure anywhere in the brain was not reached. Maximum

  5. Bicycle helmets are highly effective at preventing head injury during head impact: head-form accelerations and injury criteria for helmeted and unhelmeted impacts.

    PubMed

    Cripton, Peter A; Dressler, Daniel M; Stuart, Cameron A; Dennison, Christopher R; Richards, Darrin

    2014-09-01

    Cycling is a popular form of recreation and method of commuting with clear health benefits. However, cycling is not without risk. In Canada, cycling injuries are more common than in any other summer sport; and according to the US National Highway and Traffic Safety Administration, 52,000 cyclists were injured in the US in 2010. Head injuries account for approximately two-thirds of hospital admissions and three-quarters of fatal injuries among injured cyclists. In many jurisdictions and across all age levels, helmets have been adopted to mitigate risk of serious head injuries among cyclists and the majority of epidemiological literature suggests that helmets effectively reduce risk of injury. Critics have raised questions over the actual efficacy of helmets by pointing to weaknesses in existing helmet epidemiology including selection bias and lack of appropriate control for the type of impact sustained by the cyclist and the severity of the head impact. These criticisms demonstrate the difficulty in conducting epidemiology studies that will be regarded as definitive and the need for complementary biomechanical studies where confounding factors can be adequately controlled. In the bicycle helmet context, there is a paucity of biomechanical data comparing helmeted to unhelmeted head impacts and, to our knowledge, there is no data of this type available with contemporary helmets. In this research, our objective was to perform biomechanical testing of paired helmeted and unhelmeted head impacts using a validated anthropomorphic test headform and a range of drop heights between 0.5m and 3.0m, while measuring headform acceleration and Head Injury Criterion (HIC). In the 2m (6.3m/s) drops, the middle of our drop height range, the helmet reduced peak accelerations from 824g (unhelmeted) to 181g (helmeted) and HIC was reduced from 9667 (unhelmeted) to 1250 (helmeted). At realistic impact speeds of 5.4m/s (1.5m drop) and 6.3m/s (2.0m drop), bicycle helmets changed the

  6. [Ballistic approach in head injuries caused by missiles].

    PubMed

    Jourdan, P; Billant, J B; Desgeorges, M

    1989-01-01

    If the missile head injury treatment is relatively well codified, wound ballistic, on the other hand, is not well known of neurosurgeons. Different means of study and tissue simulants are being listed. In face of numerous contradictory results, we shall only retain the M.L. Fackler method with 10% gelatin. Experimental results will depend on: 1. Missile parameters. For instance, in soft homogeneous tissue, one can discern shells with an uncertain path, full jacketed bullets which tumble after a variable "neck", and non jacketed missiles which cause wound through "mushrooming" and/or fragmentation effect. Buckshot wounds obey the rule "all or none". 2. Body reactions, particularly the clash with a hard material like bone, which can overturn everything described in soft tissues. These wound ballistic notions have lead us to formulate two pathogenic hypothesizes, allowing us to understand sometime case reports which had first seemed paradoxical: the brain structure, enclosed in the skull will not able to survive any major temporary cavity, the more or less deep missile pathway through the skull will be very different according to the type and energy of the missile, and to the hardness of pierced bone.

  7. Current topics in sports-related head injuries: a review.

    PubMed

    Nagahiro, Shinji; Mizobuchi, Yoshifumi

    2014-01-01

    We review the current topic in sports-related head injuries including acute subdural hematoma (ASDH), concussion, and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Sports-related ASDH is a leading cause of death and severe morbidity in popular contact sports like American football in the USA and judo in Japan. It is thought that rotational acceleration is most likely to produce not only cerebral concussion but also ASDH due to the rupture of a parasagittal bridging vein, depending on the severity of the rotational acceleration injury. Repeated sports head injuries increase the risk for future concussion, cerebral swelling, ASDH or CTE. To avoid fatal consequences or CTE resulting from repeated concussions, an understanding of the criteria for a safe post-concussion return to play (RTP) is essential. Once diagnosed with a concussion, the athlete must not be allowed to RTP the same day and should not resume play before the concussion symptoms have completely resolved. If brain damage has been confirmed or a subdural hematoma is present, the athlete should not be allowed to participate in any contact sports. As much remains unknown regarding the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of sports-related concussion, ASDH, and CTE, basic and clinical studies are necessary to elucidate the crucial issues in sports-related head injuries.

  8. Cerebral Salt-Wasting Syndrome Caused by Minor Head Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tsurumi, Yuko; Tsurumi, Arihito

    2017-01-01

    A 34-year-old woman was admitted to hospital after sustaining a head injury in a motor vehicle accident (day 1). No signs of neurological deficit, skull fracture, brain contusion, or intracranial bleeding were evident. She was discharged without symptoms on day 4. However, headache and nausea worsened on day 8, at which time serum sodium level was noted to be 121 mEq/L. Treatment with sodium chloride was initiated, but serum sodium decreased to 116 mEq/L on day 9. Body weight decreased in proportion to the decrease in serum sodium. Cerebral salt-wasting syndrome was diagnosed. This case represents the first illustration of severe hyponatremia related to cerebral salt-wasting syndrome caused by a minor head injury. PMID:28194285

  9. Written discourse of adolescents with closed head injury.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Brenda M; Proctor, Adele

    2002-11-01

    Written discourse of adolescents with closed head injury (CHI) was compared to that of normal controls. It was expected that the writing of adolescents with CHI would be disordered on one or more of the eight measurements used (productivity, efficiency, lexical, incomplete, or elliptic cohesion, global or local coherence, and maze use). Eight adolescents with closed head injury and matched controls provided written descriptions of a pictured activity. Analysis using t-tests indicated that adolescents with CHI used fewer words to express each idea in writing (p = 0.05), and that the relationship between successive ideas was rated as less than that of controls (p = 0.002). Implications are that written as well as oral discourse should be assessed after CHI. Writing is a more controlled process than speaking; and, therefore, may be used clinically to structure the development of ideas after CHI.

  10. Cerebral Salt-Wasting Syndrome Caused by Minor Head Injury.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Toshiki; Tsurumi, Yuko; Tsurumi, Arihito

    2017-01-01

    A 34-year-old woman was admitted to hospital after sustaining a head injury in a motor vehicle accident (day 1). No signs of neurological deficit, skull fracture, brain contusion, or intracranial bleeding were evident. She was discharged without symptoms on day 4. However, headache and nausea worsened on day 8, at which time serum sodium level was noted to be 121 mEq/L. Treatment with sodium chloride was initiated, but serum sodium decreased to 116 mEq/L on day 9. Body weight decreased in proportion to the decrease in serum sodium. Cerebral salt-wasting syndrome was diagnosed. This case represents the first illustration of severe hyponatremia related to cerebral salt-wasting syndrome caused by a minor head injury.

  11. Skull roentgenography in the evaluation of head injury

    SciTech Connect

    North, S.; Pollak, E.W.

    1983-04-01

    The role of skull roentgenograms in determining choice of therapy, hospital admission, and length of hospitalization was evaluated in 106 consecutive patients with head injury. Thirty patients were discharged from the emergency room after initial evaluation and had uneventful recovery. Seventy-six were admitted and discharged without operative treatment one to ten days later. Only five had pathologic skull findings roentgenographicaly. Of these, one was discharged from the emergency department; the remaining four were admitted because of abnormal neurologic findings. All five recovered uneventfully. Another patient who had a normal roentgenographic evaluation required subsequent admission for craniotomy. Skull roentgenograms were an unimportant factor in the management of head injury patients and did not eliminate the need for complete and serial neurologic evaluation.

  12. A Review of Sport-Related Head Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Nagahiro, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    We review current topics in sport-related head injuries including acute subdural hematoma (ASDH), traumatic cerebrovascular disease, cerebral concussion, and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Sports-related ASDH is a leading cause of death and severe morbidity in popular contact sports like American football and Japanese judo. Rotational acceleration can cause either cerebral concussion or ASDH due to rupture of a parasagittal bridging vein. Although rare, approximately 80% of patients with cerebral infarction due to sport participation are diagnosed with ischemia or infarction due to arterial dissection. Computed tomography angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, and ultrasound are useful for diagnosing arterial dissection; ultrasound is particularly useful for detecting dissection of the common and internal carotid arteries. Repeated sports head injuries increase the risks of future concussion, cerebral swelling, ASDH, and CTE. To avoid fatal consequences of CTE, it is essential to understand the criteria for safe post-concussion sports participation. Once diagnosed with a concussion, an athlete should not be allowed to return to play on the same day and should not resume sports before the concussion symptoms have completely resolved. Information about the risks and management of head injuries in different sports should be widely disseminated in educational institutions and by sport organization public relations campaigns. PMID:27182494

  13. Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome in head injury: a missed insult.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, R K; Soryal, I N; Pentland, B

    2000-01-01

    A survey of the use of thiamine in patients at risk from Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) in Scottish specialist neurosurgical units, and a 2-year retrospective study of 218 at-risk patients admitted to a regional neurosurgical unit with a head injury were undertaken. Although responses to the survey indicated otherwise, the study revealed that there was no consistent practice regarding thiamine administration. Overall, 20.6% of patients received thiamine, with an alcohol history being the only factor correlating with thiamine administration. Of known alcoholics and heavy drinkers, 56.1% and 26.2% respectively received thiamine as in-patients; 44.5% of patients received additional carbohydrate loads in the form of i.v. dextrose or parenteral nutrition, but only 28.9% of these received thiamine as well. Although the actual thiamine status of these patients was not known, given the difficulties of diagnosing WKS in the presence of a head injury, the conclusion is that written protocols are needed in units to ensure that head injury patients at risk of WKS receive appropriate thiamine treatment or prophylaxis.

  14. Incidence of intracranial tumors following hospitalization for head injuries (Denmark).

    PubMed

    Inskip, P D; Mellemkjaer, L; Gridley, G; Olsen, J H

    1998-01-01

    The incidence of brain and other intracranial tumors following head trauma was evaluated in a cohort of 228,055 Danish residents hospitalized because of concussion, fractured skull, or other head injury between 1977 and 1992 and followed for an average of eight years (maximum, 17 years). Traffic accidents, falls, and sports-related incidents were the usual causes of the injury. Malignant and benign neoplasms were identified by linking the study roster with records of the Danish Cancer Registry for the years 1977 to 1993. This approach precludes differential reporting of injuries by study participants as an explanation for any associations seen. Intracranial tumors of the nervous system occurred more often than expected based on incidence rates for the Danish population; however, most of the excess occurred during the first year after the injury and likely was due to the detection of tumors that were present before the injury occurred. Excluding the first year of follow-up, the standardized incidence ratio (SIR) was 1.15 (95 percent confidence interval [CI] = 0.99-1.32). The same general temporal pattern was seen for the major subtypes of brain tumor as for all types combined. SIRs after the first year were 1.0 for glioma (CI = 0.8-1.2), 1.2 for meningioma (CI = 0.8-1.7), and 0.8 for neurilemmoma (CI = 0.4-1.7). However, hemangioblastoma and hemangioma were more frequent than expected, based on 15 cases (SIR = 2.6, CI = 1.4-4.2). Results indicate that head trauma causes, at most, a small increase in the overall risk of brain tumors during the ensuing 15 years; however, a possible association with intracranial vascular tumors warrants further evaluation.

  15. Injury Risk Assessment of Non-Lethal Projectile Head Impacts

    PubMed Central

    Oukara, Amar; Nsiampa, Nestor; Robbe, Cyril; Papy, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Kinetic energy non-lethal projectiles are used to impart sufficient effect onto a person in order to deter uncivil or hazardous behavior with a low probability of permanent injury. Since their first use, real cases indicate that the injuries inflicted by such projectiles may be irreversible and sometimes lead to death, especially for the head impacts. Given the high velocities and the low masses involved in such impacts, the assessment approaches proposed in automotive crash tests and sports may not be appropriate. Therefore, there is a need of a specific approach to assess the lethality of these projectiles. In this framework, some recent research data referred in this article as “force wall approach” suggest the use of three lesional thresholds (unconsciousness, meningeal damages and bone damages) that depend on the intracranial pressure. Three corresponding critical impact forces are determined for a reference projectile. Based on the principle that equal rigid wall maximal impact forces will produce equal damage on the head, these limits can be determined for any other projectile. In order to validate the consistence of this innovative method, it is necessary to compare the results with other existing assessment methods. This paper proposes a comparison between the “force wall approach” and two different head models. The first one is a numerical model (Strasbourg University Finite Element Head Model-SUFEHM) from Strasbourg University; the second one is a mechanical surrogate (Ballistics Load Sensing Headform-BLSH) from Biokinetics. PMID:25400712

  16. Injury risk assessment of non-lethal projectile head impacts.

    PubMed

    Oukara, Amar; Nsiampa, Nestor; Robbe, Cyril; Papy, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Kinetic energy non-lethal projectiles are used to impart sufficient effect onto a person in order to deter uncivil or hazardous behavior with a low probability of permanent injury. Since their first use, real cases indicate that the injuries inflicted by such projectiles may be irreversible and sometimes lead to death, especially for the head impacts. Given the high velocities and the low masses involved in such impacts, the assessment approaches proposed in automotive crash tests and sports may not be appropriate. Therefore, there is a need of a specific approach to assess the lethality of these projectiles. In this framework, some recent research data referred in this article as "force wall approach" suggest the use of three lesional thresholds (unconsciousness, meningeal damages and bone damages) that depend on the intracranial pressure. Three corresponding critical impact forces are determined for a reference projectile. Based on the principle that equal rigid wall maximal impact forces will produce equal damage on the head, these limits can be determined for any other projectile. In order to validate the consistence of this innovative method, it is necessary to compare the results with other existing assessment methods. This paper proposes a comparison between the "force wall approach" and two different head models. The first one is a numerical model (Strasbourg University Finite Element Head Model-SUFEHM) from Strasbourg University; the second one is a mechanical surrogate (Ballistics Load Sensing Headform-BLSH) from Biokinetics.

  17. Biomechanical aspects of sports-related head injuries.

    PubMed

    Park, Min S; Levy, Michael L

    2008-02-01

    With the increased conditioning, size, and speed of professional athletes and the increase in individuals engaging in sports and recreational activities, there is potential for rising numbers of traumatic brain injuries in sports. Fortunately, parallel strides in basic research technology and improvements in computer and video technology have created a new era of discovery in the study of the biomechanical aspects of sports-related head injuries. Although prevention will always be the most important factor in reducing the incidence of sports-related traumatic brain injuries, ongoing studies will lead to the development of newer protective equipment, improved recognition and management of concussions on the field of play, and modification of rules and guidelines to make these activities safer and more enjoyable.

  18. Outcomes following childhood head injury: a population study

    PubMed Central

    Hawley, C; Ward, A; Magnay, A; Long, J

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To identify outcomes following head injury (HI) among a population of children admitted to one hospital centre and to compare outcomes between different severity groups. Methods: A postal follow up of children admitted with HI to one National Health Service Trust, between 1992 and 1998, was carried out. Children were aged 5–15 years at injury (mean 9.8), followed up at a mean of 2.2 years post-injury. Parents of 526 injured children (419 mild, 58 moderate, 49 severe) and 45 controls completed questionnaires. Outcomes were assessed using the King's Outcome Scale for Childhood Head Injury (KOSCHI). Results: Frequent behavioural, emotional, memory, and attention problems were reported by one third of the severe group, one quarter of the moderate, and 10–18% of the mild. Personality change since HI was reported for 148 children (28%; 21% mild HI, 46% moderate, 69% severe). There was a significant relationship between injury severity and KOSCHI outcomes. Following the HI, 252 (48%) had moderate disability (43% mild HI, 64% moderate, 69% severe), while 270 (51%) made a good recovery (57% mild HI, 36% moderate, 22% severe). There was a significant association between social deprivation and poor outcome (p = 0.002). Only 30% (158) of children received hospital follow up after the HI. All children with severe disability received appropriate follow up, but 64% of children with moderate disability received none. No evidence was found to suggest a threshold of injury severity below which the risk of late sequelae could be safely discounted. Conclusions: Children admitted with mild HI may be at risk of poor outcomes, but often do not receive routine hospital follow up. A postal questionnaire combined with the KOSCHI to assess outcomes after HI may be used to identify children who would benefit from clinical assessment. Further research is needed to identify factors that place children with mild HI at risk of late morbidity. PMID:15090570

  19. Development/global validation of a 6-month-old pediatric head finite element model and application in investigation of drop-induced infant head injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhigang; Luo, Xiao; Zhang, Jinhuan

    2013-12-01

    Drop is a frequent cause for infant head injury. To date, finite element (FE) modeling was gradually used to investigate child head dynamic response under drop impact conditions, however, two shortages still exist on this topic: (1) due to ethical reasons, none of developed 6-month-old (6MO) head FE model was found to be quantitatively validated against child cadaver tests at similar age group; (2) drop height and impact surface stiffness effects on infant head responses were not comprehensively investigated. In this study, motivated by the recently published material properties of soft tissues (skull and suture, etc.) and reported pediatric head global cadaver tests, a 6MO child head FE model was developed and simulated results compared with the child cadaver experimental data under compression and drop conditions. Comparison of results indicated that the FE model showed a fairly good biofidelic behavior in most dynamic responses. The validated FE model was further used to investigate effects of different drop heights and impact surface stiffness on the head dynamic responses. Numerical results show that the pediatric head mechanical parameters (peak acceleration, HIC, maximal vonMises stress and maximal first principal strain of skull) keep increasing with the increase in drop height, and exhibit "logarithmic function" shapes at "fast-slow" trends with increase in impact surface stiffness. Based on above analysis, the regressions were conducted to describe the relationship between drop height and impact surface stiffness and head global injury predictors (head peak acceleration, HIC, etc.). This paper provides a fundamental study of child head injury mechanism and protection under drop conditions.

  20. Neuropathological changes in a lamb model of non-accidental head injury (the shaken baby syndrome).

    PubMed

    Finnie, J W; Blumbergs, P C; Manavis, J; Turner, R J; Helps, S; Vink, R; Byard, R W; Chidlow, G; Sandoz, B; Dutschke, J; Anderson, R W G

    2012-08-01

    Non-accidental head injury (NAHI), also termed the "shaken baby syndrome", is a major cause of death and severe neurological dysfunction in children under three years of age, but it is debated whether shaking alone is sufficient to produce brain injury and mortality or whether an additional head impact is required. In an attempt to resolve this question, we used a lamb model of NAHI since these animals have a relatively large gyrencephalic brain and weak neck muscles resembling those of a human infant. Three anaesthetised lambs of lower body weight than others in the experimental group died unexpectedly after being shaken, proving that shaking alone can be lethal. In these lambs, axonal injury, neuronal reaction and albumin extravasation were widely distributed in the hemispheric white matter, brainstem and at the craniocervical junction, and of much greater magnitude than in higher body weight lambs which did not die. Moreover, in the eyes of these shaken lambs, there was damage to retinal inner nuclear layer neurons, mild, patchy ganglion cell axonal injury, widespread Muller glial reaction, and uveal albumin extravasation. This study proved that shaking of a subset of lambs can result in death, without an additional head impact being required.

  1. Overreporting of Closed-Head Injury Symptoms on the MMPI-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, David T. R.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI-2) validity scales were compared for 20 nonclinical participants, 18 subjects asked to fake injury, 18 head injury patients not seeking compensation, and 30 compensation-seeking head injury patients. Results suggest that MMPI-2 overreporting scales are sensitive to complaint fabrication and…

  2. Platelet aggregability in relation to impaired consciousness after head injury.

    PubMed Central

    Vecht, C J; Minderhoud, J M; Sibinga, C T

    1975-01-01

    ADP-induced platelet aggregation was studied for up to six weeks in 34 patients with head injuries. The patients were divided into three groups according to the degree of impaired consciousness assessed by a clinical coma scale, and change in platelet aggregation was related to the coma score. Platelet aggregation was markedly reduced in all eight patients dying within 24 hours of injury. All 17 patients who remained unconscious for four days or more showed decreased platelet aggregation up to nine days after admission, the most marked effect being on the second day. Platelet function in this group returned to normal within 16 days. Nine patients with only slightly impaired consciousness also showed subnormal platelet aggregation during the first few days with a return to normal by the fourth day. Platelet counts remained within normal limits in all groups. We suggest that during coma following head injury brainstem dysfunction induces neurohumoral changes in the blood which are responsible for a decrease in platelet function. PMID:1214015

  3. Pediatric head injury: a pain for the emergency physician?

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Shu-Ling; Lee, Khai Pin; Lee, Jan Hau; Ong, Gene Yong-Kwang; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock

    2015-01-01

    The prompt diagnosis and initial management of pediatric traumatic brain injury poses many challenges to the emergency department (ED) physician. In this review, we aim to appraise the literature on specific management issues faced in the ED, specifically: indications for neuroimaging, choice of sedatives, applicability of hyperventilation, utility of hyperosmolar agents, prophylactic anti-epileptics, and effect of hypothermia in traumatic brain injury. A comprehensive literature search of PubMed and Embase was performed in each specific area of focus corresponding to the relevant questions. The majority of the head injured patients presenting to the ED are mild and can be observed. Clinical prediction rules assist the ED physician in deciding if neuroimaging is warranted. In cases of major head injury, prompt airway control and careful use of sedation are necessary to minimize the chance of hypoxia, while avoiding hyperventilation. Hyperosmolar agents should be started in these cases and normothermia maintained. The majority of the evidence is derived from adult studies, and most treatment modalities are still controversial. Recent multicenter trials have highlighted the need to establish common platforms for further collaboration. PMID:27752566

  4. Missile injuries in head - neck and maxillo-facial region - an experience in eastern nepal.

    PubMed

    Wakode, P T; Ghimire, Anand; Acharya, Roshan

    2008-06-01

    Ballistic injuries to head-neck and maxillofacial region is quite common problem nowadays. Most of the time the injuries seem to be dreadful but the mechanism of the injuries caused by ballistics and the anatomical conditions of maxillofacial and head-neck region mitigate the severity of the injuries. Proper primary management followed by reconstruction and management of associated injuries decreases the mortality and morbidity of missile injuries in head-neck and maxillofacial region. Eleven cases of missile injuries in head-neck and maxillofacial region are included in the present study. The mechanism of the injury and the ideal management strategy for the ballistics injuries in the region has been discussed in the article.

  5. Multivariate head injury threshold measures for various sized children seated behind vehicle seats in rear impacts.

    PubMed

    Saczalski, Kenneth; Sances, Anthony; Kumaresan, Srirangam; Pozzi, Mark; Saczalski, Todd; Burton, J L; Lewis, P

    2004-01-01

    Government recommendations to place children into the rear areas of motor vehicles to avoid airbag induced injuries have been complicated by the fact that most adult occupied front seats will collapse into the rear area during rear-impacts, and thus pose another potentially serious injury hazard to rear-seated children. Many variables affect whether or not a front seat occupant will collapse into the rear child, and whether that interaction could be injurious to the child. For instance, the severity of rear impact, coupled with front and rear occupant sizes (mass and stature), and the level of front seat strength, all interrelate to influence whether or not a rear seated child is likely to be impacted and possibly injured. The most common types of child injuries in these instances are head and chest injuries. In this study, a "high-low" experimental method was employed with a multi-level "factorial analysis" technique to study "multivariate" biomechanics of child head injury potential determined from rear-seated 3 and 6 year-old child surrogates in different types of vehicle bodies mounted to a sled system. The sled-buck systems were towed rearward into crushable barriers that matched the crash pulses of the vehicle types being tested. Various sizes of adult surrogates (i.e. 50 kg up to 110 kg), seated in both the "typical" low strength "single recliner" collapsing type front seat (i.e. 3.2 kN) and a much stronger "belt-integrated" seat design (i.e. up to 14.5 kN), were tested in the two different "sled body-buck" set-ups at various impact levels (i.e. 22.5 to 50 kph). One set-up used a popular minivan vehicle body with "built-in booster" seats for the 3 year-old. The other used a 4-door family sedan vehicle body with the 6 year-old in a standard rear bench seat. The parameters of the tests enabled the experimental data to be combined into polynomial "head injury" functions of the independent variables so the "likelihood" of rear child head-injury potential could

  6. [Cognitive rehabilitation in closed head injuries in childhood and adolescence].

    PubMed

    Yelín, B

    1996-11-01

    The objective of cognitive neuro-rehabilitation is to give the patient with sequelae of moderate or severe head injury the hope of functional improvement, by means of strategies which mainly involve the basic mechanisms of learning, the higher cerebral functions and affective-emotional aspects. The various cognitive defects and the three basic ways of treating them are described: Training the different components of cognitive function. Compensatory training (adjacent development areas). Functional and integrative training. A brief reference is also made to the pharmacological treatment given to some patients.

  7. Social cognition after head injury: sarcasm and theory of mind.

    PubMed

    Channon, Shelley; Pellijeff, Asa; Rule, Andrea

    2005-05-01

    Closed head injury (CHI) is associated with communication difficulties in everyday social interactions. Previous work has reported impaired comprehension of sarcasm, using sarcastic remarks where the intended meaning is the opposite of the sincere or literal meaning. Participants with CHI in the present study were assessed using two types of sarcastic items, those with a directly opposite meaning and those with an indirect, non-literal but not directly opposite meaning. The CHI group was differentially poorer at comprehending sarcastic versus sincere remarks, although type of sarcastic materials did not influence performance. Errors involved not only literal interpretations, but also incorrect non-literal interpretations. Theory of mind (mentalising) was also assessed by comparing comprehension of human actions with control physical events. The CHI group was selectively impaired on the mentalising component of this task, and mentalising scores correlated with sarcasm comprehension. The implications of the findings for our understanding of impaired sarcastic comprehension after acquired brain injury are discussed.

  8. Folic acid enhances early functional recovery in a piglet model of pediatric head injury.

    PubMed

    Naim, Maryam Y; Friess, Stuart; Smith, Colin; Ralston, Jill; Ryall, Karen; Helfaer, Mark A; Margulies, Susan S

    2010-01-01

    For stroke and spinal cord injury, folic acid supplementation has been shown to enhance neurodevelopment and to provide neuroprotection. We hypothesized that folic acid would reduce brain injury and improve neurological outcome in a neonatal piglet model of traumatic brain injury (TBI), using 4 experimental groups of 3- to 5-day-old female piglets. Two groups were intubated, anesthetized and had moderate brain injury induced by rapid axial head rotation without impact. One group of injured (Inj) animals received folic acid (Fol; 80 μg/kg) by intraperitoneal (IP) injection 15 min following injury, and then daily for 6 days (Inj + Fol; n = 7). The second group of injured animals received an IP injection of saline (Sal) at the same time points (Inj + Sal; n = 8). Two uninjured (Uninj) control groups (Uninj + Fol, n = 8; Uninj + Sal, n = 7) were intubated, anesthetized and received folic acid (80 μg/kg) or saline by IP injection at the same time points as the injured animals following a sham procedure. Animals underwent neurobehavioral and cognitive testing on days 1 and 4 following injury to assess behavior, memory, learning and problem solving. Serum folic acid and homocysteine levels were collected prior to injury and again before euthanasia. The piglets were euthanized 6 days following injury, and their brains were perfusion fixed for histological analysis. Folic acid levels were significantly higher in both Fol groups on day 6. Homocysteine levels were not affected by treatment. On day 1 following injury, the Inj + Fol group showed significantly more exploratory interest, and better motor function, learning and problem solving compared to the Inj + Sal group. Inj + Fol animals had a significantly lower cognitive composite dysfunction score compared to all other groups on day 1. These functional improvements were not seen on day 4 following injury. Axonal injury measured by β-amyloid precursor protein staining 6 days after injury was not affected by treatment

  9. Folic Acid Enhances Early Functional Recovery in a Piglet Model of Pediatric Head Injury

    PubMed Central

    Naim, Maryam Y.; Friess, Stuart; Smith, Colin; Ralston, Jill; Ryall, Karen; Helfaer, Mark A.; Margulies, Susan S.

    2011-01-01

    For stroke and spinal cord injury, folic acid supplementation has been shown to enhance neurodevelopment and to provide neuroprotection. We hypothesized that folic acid would reduce brain injury and improve neurological outcome in a neonatal piglet model of traumatic brain injury (TBI), using 4 experimental groups of 3- to 5-day-old female piglets. Two groups were intubated, anesthetized and had moderate brain injury induced by rapid axial head rotation without impact. One group of injured (Inj) animals received folic acid (Fol; 80 μg/kg) by intraperitoneal (IP) injection 15 min following injury, and then daily for 6 days (Inj + Fol; n = 7). The second group of injured animals received an IP injection of saline (Sal) at the same time points (Inj + Sal; n = 8). Two uninjured (Uninj) control groups (Uninj + Fol, n = 8; Uninj + Sal, n = 7) were intubated, anesthetized and received folic acid (80 μg/kg) or saline by IP injection at the same time points as the injured animals following a sham procedure. Animals underwent neurobehavioral and cognitive testing on days 1 and 4 following injury to assess behavior, memory, learning and problem solving. Serum folic acid and homocysteine levels were collected prior to injury and again before euthanasia. The piglets were euthanized 6 days following injury, and their brains were perfusion fixed for histological analysis. Folic acid levels were significantly higher in both Fol groups on day 6. Homocysteine levels were not affected by treatment. On day 1 following injury, the Inj + Fol group showed significantly more exploratory interest, and better motor function, learning and problem solving compared to the Inj + Sal group. Inj + Fol animals had a significantly lower cognitive composite dysfunction score compared to all other groups on day 1. These functional improvements were not seen on day 4 following injury. Axonal injury measured by β-amyloid precursor protein staining 6 days after injury was not affected by treatment

  10. Apnoea and brain swelling in non-accidental head injury

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, A; Stoodley, N; Cobley, C; Coles, L; Kemp, K; Geddes, J

    2003-01-01

    Aims: (1) To identify whether infants and young children admitted to hospital with subdural haematomas (SDH) secondary to non-accidental head injury (NAHI), suffer from apnoea leading to radiological evidence of hypoxic ischaemic brain damage, and whether this is related to a poor prognosis; and (2) to determine what degree of trauma is associated with NAHI. Methods: Retrospective case series (1992–98) with case control analysis of 65 children under 2 years old, with an SDH secondary to NAHI. Outcome measures were presenting symptoms, associated injuries and apnoea at presentation, brain swelling or hypoxic ischaemic changes on neuroimaging, and clinical outcome (KOSCHI). Results: Twenty two children had a history of apnoea at presentation to hospital. Apnoea was significantly associated with hypoxic ischaemic brain damage. Severe symptoms at presentation, apnoea, and diffuse brain swelling/hypoxic ischaemic damage were significantly associated with a poor prognosis. Eighty five per cent of cases had associated injuries consistent with a diagnosis of non-accidental injury. Conclusions: Coma at presentation, apnoea, and diffuse brain swelling or hypoxic ischaemia all predict a poor outcome in an infant who has suffered from SDH after NAHI. There is evidence of associated violence in the majority of infants with NAHI. At this point in time we do not know the minimum forces necessary to cause NAHI. It is clear however that it is never acceptable to shake a baby. PMID:12765909

  11. Current Practices in Injury Prevention and Safety Helmet Use Among Head Injury Patients in an Army Outpatient Care Setting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-05-01

    for which safety helmets or other protective head gear would also be appropriate. Biking 58% Wrestling 7% Karate 7% Rockclimbing 7% Kickboxing 7...activities: biking, rollerblading, baseball, kickboxing , rockclimbing, wrestling and karate. These Head Injury Prevention 36 activities all increase... Kickboxing , wrestling and karate were grouped into a contact collision group. This group was at the highest risk of head injury with any type of

  12. Head, Neck, Face, and Shoulder Injuries in Female and Male Rugby Players.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havkins, Sabina B.

    1986-01-01

    Injuries to 150 players in the Southern California Rugby Football Union were studied in order to compare head, neck, face, and shoulder injury rates for female and male players. While overall rates did not differ significantly, women received fewer disabling injuries. Ways to decrease injuries are recommended. (Author/MT)

  13. Traumatic Brain Injury by a Closed Head Injury Device Induces Cerebral Blood Flow Changes and Microhemorrhages

    PubMed Central

    Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Bandaru, Sharath; Zakaria, Nisrine; Shen, Yimin; Kou, Zhifeng; Zhang, Liying; Haacke, Ewart Mark; Cavanaugh, John M

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Traumatic brain injury is a poly-pathology characterized by changes in the cerebral blood flow, inflammation, diffuse axonal, cellular, and vascular injuries. However, studies related to understanding the temporal changes in the cerebral blood flow following traumatic brain injury extending to sub-acute periods are limited. In addition, knowledge related to microhemorrhages, such as their detection, localization, and temporal progression, is important in the evaluation of traumatic brain injury. Materials and Methods: Cerebral blood flow changes and microhemorrhages in male Sprague Dawley rats at 4 h, 24 h, 3 days, and 7 days were assessed following a closed head injury induced by the Marmarou impact acceleration device (2 m height, 450 g brass weight). Cerebral blood flow was measured by arterial spin labeling. Microhemorrhages were assessed by susceptibility-weighted imaging and Prussian blue histology. Results: Traumatic brain injury rats showed reduced regional and global cerebral blood flow at 4 h and 7 days post-injury. Injured rats showed hemorrhagic lesions in the cortex, corpus callosum, hippocampus, and brainstem in susceptibility-weighted imaging. Injured rats also showed Prussian blue reaction products in both the white and gray matter regions up to 7 days after the injury. These lesions were observed in various areas of the cortex, corpus callosum, hippocampus, thalamus, and midbrain. Conclusions: These results suggest that changes in cerebral blood flow and hemorrhagic lesions can persist for sub-acute periods after the initial traumatic insult in an animal model. In addition, microhemorrhages otherwise not seen by susceptibility-weighted imaging are present in diverse regions of the brain. The combination of altered cerebral blood flow and microhemorrhages can potentially be a source of secondary injury changes following traumatic brain injury and may need to be taken into consideration in the long-term care of these cases. PMID:26605126

  14. Urban–rural differences in pediatric traumatic head injuries: A prospective nationwide study

    PubMed Central

    Halldorsson, Jonas G; Flekkoy, Kjell M; Gudmundsson, Kristinn R; Arnkelsson, Gudmundur B; Arnarson, Eirikur Orn

    2007-01-01

    Aims To estimate differences in the incidence of recorded traumatic head injuries by gender, age, severity, and geographical area. Methods The study was prospective and nationwide. Data were collected from all hospitals, emergency units and healthcare centers in Iceland regarding all Icelandic children and adolescents 0–19 years old consecutively diagnosed with traumatic head injuries (N = 550) during a one-year period. Results Annual incidence of minimal, mild, moderate/severe, and fatal head injuries (ICD-9 850–854) was 6.41 per 1000, with 95% confidence interval (CI) 5.9, 7.0. Annual incidence of minimal head injuries (ICD-9 850) treated at emergency units was 4.65 (CI 4.2, 5.1) per 1000, mild head injuries admitted to hospital (ICD-9 850) was 1.50 (CI 1.3, 1.8) per 1000, and moderate/severe nonfatal injuries (ICD-9 851–854) was 0.21 (CI 0.1, 0.3) per 1000. Death rate was 0.05 (CI 0.0, 0.1) per 1000. Young children were at greater risk of sustaining minimal head injuries than older ones. Boys were at greater risk than girls were. In rural areas, incidence of recorded minimal head injuries was low. Conclusions Use of nationwide estimate of the incidence of pediatric head injury shows important differences between urban and rural areas as well as between different age groups. PMID:19300630

  15. Traumatic Brain Injury: Imaging Spectrum from Mild to Severe Closed Head Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-11-01

    recent advances in TBI treatment. Decompressive Craniotomy has been a mainstay of severe penetrating head injury in current conflicts. It allows...immediate room for swelling while improving intracerebral bloodflow. An interesting surgical craniotomy technique was developed at the onset of the...for recovery and replacement later. This keeps the patient’s own bone viable. Stereolithography is now used to digitally reconstruct the patient’s

  16. Head Injury Secondary to Suspected Child Maltreatment: Results of a Prospective Canadian National Surveillance Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Susan; Ward, Michelle; Moreau, Katherine; Fortin, Gilles; King, Jim; MacKay, Morag; Plint, Amy

    2011-01-01

    Objective: We sought to determine the incidence, clinical features, and demographic profile of head injury secondary to suspected child maltreatment (abuse or neglect) in Canada to help inform the development and evaluation of prevention programs for abusive head injuries. Methods: From March 1, 2005 to February 28, 2008, an average of 2,545…

  17. Dimensions of Family Coping with Head Injury: A Replication and Extension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosciulek, John F.

    1997-01-01

    Studied the dimensions that underlie family coping with head injury by replicating and extending an earlier study. Identified two dimensions: (1) using social support versus cognitive coping; and (2) head injury--focused coping versus family tension management. Results provide additional evidence regarding the structure of family coping across…

  18. Head injury predictors in sports trauma--a state-of-the-art review.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Fábio A O; de Sousa, Ricardo J Alves

    2015-08-01

    Head injuries occur in a great variety of sports. Many of these have been associated with neurological injuries, affecting the central nervous system. Some examples are motorsports, cycling, skiing, horse riding, mountaineering and most contact sports such as football, ice and field hockey, soccer, lacrosse, etc. The outcome of head impacts in these sports can be very severe. The worst-case scenarios of permanent disability or even death are possibilities. Over recent decades, many In recent decades, a great number of head injury criteria and respective thresholds have been proposed. However, the available information is much dispersed and a consensus has still not been achieved regarding the best injury criteria or even their thresholds. This review paper gives a thorough overview of the work carried out by the scientific community in the field of impact biomechanics about head injuries sustained during sports activity. The main goal is to review the head injury criteria, as well as their thresholds. Several are reviewed, from the predictors based on kinematics to the ones based on human tissue thresholds. In this work, we start to briefly introduce the head injuries and their mechanisms commonly seen as a result of head trauma in sports. Then, we present and summarize the head injury criteria and their respective thresholds.

  19. An unusual presentation of a minor head injury sustained during a game of rugby.

    PubMed

    Rimal, Debesh; Thapa, Sonu R; Munasinghe, Namal; Errington, Mark

    2007-07-01

    In the UK, about 2% of the population attend the accident and emergency (A&E) department every year after a head injury. A majority of the patients have minor head injury and are discharged. Studies reveal that patients who reattend the A&E after a minor head injury represent a high-risk group. Concussion injuries are common and not all require treatment at the time of presentation. However, some may worsen after initial presentation and develop signs of serious head injury. A case of minor head injury as a result of head butt during a game of rugby, not associated with alteration in conscious state or focal neurological signs, and subsequent development of frontal lobe abscess a month later is reported. It is important that patients fit to be discharged at the time of consultation are discharged in the care of a responsible adult with clear head injury instruction sheets and are advised to return should their symptoms change. A high index of suspicion should be maintained and an early imaging technique, such as CT scan should be considered in patients reattending the A&E with persistent symptoms even after minor head injury.

  20. Assessment of head injury of children due to golf ball impact.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heow Pueh; Wang, Fang

    2010-10-01

    Head trauma injury due to impact by a flying golf ball is one of the most severe possible injury accidents on the golf course. Numerical simulations based on the finite element method are presented to investigate head injury in children due to impact by a flying golf ball. The stress and energy flow patterns in a head model during the golf ball impact are computed for various combinations of striking speed, falling angle of the golf ball before impact, and impact location. It is found that a child is more prone to head injury due to golf ball impact on the frontal and side/temporal areas. The simulated results are found to conform to the clinical reports on children's head injuries from flying golf balls.

  1. Head injuries in winter sports: downhill skiing, snowboarding, sledding, snowmobiling, ice skating and ice hockey.

    PubMed

    Chaze, Brian; McDonald, Patrick

    2009-02-01

    Winter sports are often associated with high speed, which carries with it the potential for collision. As such, head injuries are among the more commonly encountered injuries in winter-related sporting activities. This article focuses on popular winter sports such as downhill skiing and snowboarding, sledding, snowmobiling, ice skating, and hockey. In virtually all of these activities, the incidence and severity of head injuries can be reduced by the use of appropriate protective headgear.

  2. Head injuries in winter sports: downhill skiing, snowboarding, sledding, snowmobiling, ice skating and ice hockey.

    PubMed

    Chaze, Brian; McDonald, Patrick

    2008-02-01

    Winter sports are often associated with high speed, which carries with it the potential for collision. As such, head injuries are among the more commonly encountered injuries in winter-related sporting activities. This article focuses on popular winter sports such as downhill skiing and snowboarding, sledding, snowmobiling, ice skating, and hockey. In virtually all of these activities, the incidence and severity of head injuries can be reduced by the use of appropriate protective headgear.

  3. Epileptogenesis following experimentally induced traumatic brain injury - a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chandel, Shammy; Gupta, Sunil Kumar; Medhi, Bikash

    2016-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a complex neurotrauma in civilian life and the battlefield with a broad spectrum of symptoms, long-term neuropsychological disability, as well as mortality worldwide. Posttraumatic epilepsy (PTE) is a common outcome of TBI with unknown mechanisms, followed by posttraumatic epileptogenesis. There are numerous rodent models of TBI available with varying pathomechanisms of head injury similar to human TBI, but there is no evidence for an adequate TBI model that can properly mimic all aspects of clinical TBI and the first successive spontaneous focal seizures follow a single episode of neurotrauma with respect to epileptogenesis. This review aims to provide current information regarding the various experimental animal models of TBI relevant to clinical TBI. Mossy fiber sprouting, loss of dentate hilar neurons along with recurrent seizures, and epileptic discharge similar to human PTE have been studied in fluid percussion injury, weight-drop injury, and cortical impact models, but further refinement of animal models and functional test is warranted to better understand the underlying pathophysiology of posttraumatic epileptogenesis. A multifaceted research approach in TBI model may lead to exploration of the potential treatment measures, which are a major challenge to the research community and drug developers. With respect to clinical setting, proper patient data collection, improved clinical trials with advancement in drug delivery strategies, blood-brain barrier permeability, and proper monitoring of level and effects of target drug are also important.

  4. Diffuse axonal injury induced by simultaneous moderate linear and angular head accelerations in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, X Y; Li, J; Feng, D F; Gu, L

    2010-08-11

    Diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is one of the most common and important pathologic features of human traumatic brain injury (TBI), accounting for high mortality and development of persistent post-traumatic neurologic sequelae. Although a relatively high number of therapies have been shown to be effective in experimental models, there are currently few treatments that are effective for improving the prognosis of clinical DAI. A major reason is the failure of current models to validly reproduce the pathophysiological characteristics observed after clinical DAI. In the present study, we employed a specially designed, highly controllable model to induce a sudden rotation in the coronal plane (75 degrees rotation at 1.6x10(4) degrees/s) combined with lateral translation (1.57 cm displacement at 3.4x10(2) cm/s) to the rat's head. We were interested in discovering whether the combined accelerations could reproduce the pathophysiological changes analogous to those seen in human DAI. The axonal injury as assessed with amyloid protein precursor (APP) as a marker was consistently present in all injured rats. The commonly injured brain regions included the subcortical regions, deep white matter, corpus callosum and brain stem. The evolution of APP accumulations in brain sections depicted the detailed progression of axonal pathology. Ultrastructural studies gave further insights into the presence and progression of axonal injury. All injured rats exhibited transient physiological dysfunction, as well as immediate and dramatic neurological impairment that still persisted at 14 days after injury. These results suggest that this model reproduced the major pathophysiological changes analogous to those observed after severe clinical TBI and provides an attractive vehicle for experimental brain injury research.

  5. Epidemiology of head injury in Malaysian children: a hospital-based study.

    PubMed

    Rohana, J; Ong, L C; Abu Hassan, A

    1998-09-01

    A prospective observational study was carried out at the Emergency Department, Hospital Kuala Lumpur to determine the proportion of accidental head injury among children and the circumstances of injury. The study was carried out from November 1993 to January 1994 on all children below 14 years who presented to the Emergency Department with accidental head injury. Accidental head injury made up (4.75%) of all cases seen at the Casualty Department. The ratio of boys to girls was 2:1. The mean age of head injured children was 5.2 (S.D. 3.63) years. The leading cause of head injury was fall (63%) followed by road traffic accidents (RTA) in (30.7%) while the rest were due to 'impact' (injury caused by flying object or missiles) injuries. More than half (54.4%) of those injured in RTA were pedestrians. Pedestrian injury was particularly important in the 5-< 14 years age group, where adult supervision was lacking in two thirds of the children. None of the patients who were involved in vehicle-related injuries had used a suitable protective or restraining device. All three patients who died were from this group. This study emphasises the need for stricter enforcement of laws related to the use of protective devices and measures to decrease child pedestrian injury. The issues of lack of adult supervision, both in and outside the home need to be addressed.

  6. Effects of head restraint and seat redesign on neck injury risk in rear-end crashes.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Charles M; Wells, Joann K; Lund, Adrian K

    2003-06-01

    Automobile insurance claims were examined to determine the rates of neck injuries in rear-end crashes for vehicles with and without redesigned head restraints, redesigned seats, or both. Results indicate that the improved geometric fit of head restraints observed in many newer vehicle models are reducing the risk of whiplash injury substantially among female drivers (about 37% in the Ford Taurus and Mercury Sable), but have very little effect among male drivers. New seat designs, such as active head restraints that move upward and closer to drivers' heads during a rear impact, give added benefit, producing about a 43% reduction in whiplash injury claims (55% reduction among female drivers). Estimated effects of Volvo's Whiplash Injury Prevention System and Toyota's Whiplash Injury Lessening design were based on smaller samples and were not statistically significant.

  7. A conceptual model of emergency physician decision making for head computed tomography in mild head injury.

    PubMed

    Probst, Marc A; Kanzaria, Hemal K; Schriger, David L

    2014-06-01

    The use of computed tomographic scanning in blunt head trauma has increased dramatically in recent years without an accompanying rise in the prevalence of injury or hospital admission for serious conditions. Because computed tomography is neither harmless nor inexpensive, researchers have attempted to optimize utilization, largely through research that describes which clinical variables predict intracranial injury, and use this information to develop clinical decision instruments. Although such techniques may be useful when the benefits and harms of each strategy (neuroimaging vs observation) are quantifiable and amenable to comparison, the exact magnitude of these benefits and harms remains unknown in this clinical scenario. We believe that most clinical decision instrument development efforts are misguided insofar as they ignore critical, nonclinical factors influencing the decision to image. In this article, we propose a conceptual model to illustrate how clinical and nonclinical factors influence emergency physicians making this decision. We posit that elements unrelated to standard clinical factors, such as personality of the physician, fear of litigation and of missed diagnoses, patient expectations, and compensation method, may have equal or greater impact on actual decision making than traditional clinical factors. We believe that 3 particular factors deserve special consideration for further research: fear of error/malpractice, financial incentives, and patient engagement. Acknowledgement and study of these factors will be essential if we are to understand how emergency physicians truly make these decisions and how test-ordering behavior can be modified.

  8. Development of a Finite Element Head Model for the Study of Impact Head Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bin; Tse, Kwong-Ming; Chen, Ning; Tan, Long-Bin; Zheng, Qing-Qian; Yang, Hui-Min; Hu, Min; Pan, Gang; Lee, Heow-Pueh

    2014-01-01

    This study is aimed at developing a high quality, validated finite element (FE) human head model for traumatic brain injuries (TBI) prediction and prevention during vehicle collisions. The geometry of the FE model was based on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of a volunteer close to the anthropometry of a 50th percentile male. The material and structural properties were selected based on a synthesis of current knowledge of the constitutive models for each tissue. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was simulated explicitly as a hydrostatic fluid by using a surface-based fluid modeling method. The model was validated in the loading condition observed in frontal impact vehicle collision. These validations include the intracranial pressure (ICP), brain motion, impact force and intracranial acceleration response, maximum von Mises stress in the brain, and maximum principal stress in the skull. Overall results obtained in the validation indicated improved biofidelity relative to previous FE models, and the change in the maximum von Mises in the brain is mainly caused by the improvement of the CSF simulation. The model may be used for improving the current injury criteria of the brain and anthropometric test devices. PMID:25405201

  9. Experimental model for civilian ballistic brain injury biomechanics quantification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiangyue; Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A; Guan, Yabo; Gennarelli, Thomas A

    2007-01-01

    Biomechanical quantification of projectile penetration using experimental head models can enhance the understanding of civilian ballistic brain injury and advance treatment. Two of the most commonly used handgun projectiles (25-cal, 275 m/s and 9 mm, 395 m/s) were discharged to spherical head models with gelatin and Sylgard simulants. Four ballistic pressure transducers recorded temporal pressure distributions at 308kHz, and temporal cavity dynamics were captured at 20,000 frames/second (fps) using high-speed digital video images. Pressures ranged from 644.6 to -92.8 kPa. Entry pressures in gelatin models were higher than exit pressures, whereas in Sylgard models entry pressures were lower or equivalent to exit pressures. Gelatin responded with brittle-type failure, while Sylgard demonstrated a ductile pattern through formation of micro-bubbles along projectile path. Temporary cavities in Sylgard models were 1.5-2x larger than gelatin models. Pressures in Sylgard models were more sensitive to projectile velocity and diameter increase, indicating Sylgard was more rate sensitive than gelatin. Based on failure patterns and brain tissue rate-sensitive characteristics, Sylgard was found to be an appropriate simulant. Compared with spherical projectile data, full-metal jacket (FMJ) projectiles produced different temporary cavity and pressures, demonstrating shape effects. Models using Sylgard gel and FMJ projectiles are appropriate to enhance understanding and mechanisms of ballistic brain injury.

  10. Microwave Hematoma Detector for the Rapid Assessment of Head Injuries

    SciTech Connect

    Hadded, W.; Chang, J.; Rosenbury, T.; Dallum, G.; Welsch, P.; Scott, D.; Duarte, D.; Acevedo-Bolton, V.

    2000-02-11

    A non-invasive microwave device for the detection of epi/subdural hemorrhaging (hematoma) is under current development. The final device will be highly portable and allow real time assessment of head injuries, thereby satisfying early detection needs of the field technician as well as providing a tool for repetitious monitoring of high-risk individuals. The device will adopt the advanced technology of micropower impulse radar (MIR) which is a state of the art low cost ultra wide band (UWB) microwave radar developed here at LLNL. It will consist of a MIR transmitting and receiving module, a computer based signal processing module, and a device-to-patient signal coupling module--the UWB antenna. The prototype design is being guided by the needs of the patient and the practitioner along with the prerequisites of the technology including issues such as the specificity of the device, efficacy of diagnosis, accuracy, robustness, and patient comfort. The prototype development follows a concurrent approach which .includes experiments designed to evaluate requirements of the radar and antenna design, phantom development to facilitate laboratory investigations, and investigation into the limits of adapting pre-existing non-medical MIR devices to medical applications. This report will present the accomplishments and project highlights to date in the fiscal year 1999. Future project projections will also be discussed.

  11. Neurological outcome after experimental lung injury.

    PubMed

    Bickenbach, Johannes; Biener, Ingeborg; Czaplik, Michael; Nolte, Kay; Dembinski, Rolf; Marx, Gernot; Rossaint, Rolf; Fries, Michael

    2011-12-15

    We examined the influences of acute lung injury and hypoxia on neurological outcome. Functional performance was assessed using a neurocognitive test and a neurologic deficit score (NDS) five days before. On experimental day, mechanically ventilated pigs were randomized to hypoxia only (HO group, n=5) or to acute lung injury (ALI group, n=5). Hemodynamics, respiratory mechanics, systemic cytokines and further physiologic variables were obtained at baseline, at the time of ALI, 2, 4 and 8h thereafter. Subsequently, injured lungs were recruited and animals weaned from the ventilator. Neurocognitive testing was re-examined for five days. Then, brains were harvested for neurohistopathology. After the experiment, neurocognitive performance was significantly worsened and the NDS increased in the ALI group. Histopathology revealed no significant differences. Oxygenation was comparable between groups although significantly higher inspiratory pressures occured after ALI. Cytokines showed a trend towards higher levels after ALI. Neurocognitive compromise after ALI seems due to a more pronounced inflammatory response and complex mechanical ventilation.

  12. Report investigating the importance of head restraint positioning in reducing neck injury in rear impact.

    PubMed

    Maher, J

    2000-03-01

    Neck injury resulting from rear impact (often known as whiplash) is a serious cause of road trauma. It is often underestimated or overlooked because such injuries are minor on traditional injury scales but can result in long term pain and disability. The paper begins with a brief review of research into head restraints and whiplash done so far. A review of international head restraint regulations revealed the absence of any horizontal offset requirements. A review of seat strength requirements and testing procedures showed that a regulation that required a collapsible seat would involve significant compliance testing. This paper concludes a preliminary project conducted by the Federal Office of Road Safety (FORS) where the head restraints for twenty Australian market vehicles were assessed using known performance criteria. A key finding of the report was that most of the vehicles allowed for vertical adjustment of the head restraint. Also important was that none of the vehicles measured allowed horizontal adjustment and on some of the head restraints the horizontal displacement increased as the vertical height increased. As the understanding of neck injury mechanisms in rear impact develops, there may be some scope for FORS to facilitate the improvement of these standards. Further research into neck injury mechanisms may reveal yielding seat backs or new 'active' head restraint technology as a more effective countermeasure. In the meantime, educating occupants to correctly adjust their head restraints seems to be an effective way to reduce injuries in existing vehicles.

  13. Abusive head trauma and accidental head injury: a 20-year comparative study of referrals to a hospital child protection team

    PubMed Central

    John, Simon; Vincent, Andrea L; Reed, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Aim To describe children referred for suspected abusive head trauma (AHT) to a hospital child protection team in Auckland, New Zealand. Methods Comparative review of demographics, histories, injuries, investigations and diagnostic outcomes for referrals under 15 years old from 1991 to 2010. Results Records were available for 345 children. Referrals increased markedly (88 in the first decade, 257 in the second), but the diagnostic ratio was stable: AHT 60%, accidental or natural 29% and uncertain cause 11%. The probability of AHT was similar regardless of socio-economic status or ethnicity. In children under 2 years old with accidental head injuries (75/255, 29%) or AHT (180/255, 71%), characteristics of particular interest for AHT included no history of trauma (88/98, 90%), no evidence of impact to the head (84/93, 90%), complex skull fractures with intracranial injury (22/28, 79%), subdural haemorrhage (160/179, 89%) and hypoxic ischaemic injury (38/39, 97%). In children over 2 years old, these characteristics did not differ significantly between children with accidental head injuries (21/47, 45%) and AHT (26/47, 55%). The mortality of AHT was higher in children over 2 years old (10/26, 38%) than under 2 years (19/180, 11%). Conclusions The striking increase in referrals for AHT probably represents increasing incidence. The decision to refer a hospitalised child with a head injury for assessment for possible AHT should not be influenced by socio-economic status or ethnicity. Children over 2 years old hospitalised for AHT are usually injured by mechanisms involving impact and should be considered at high risk of death. PMID:26130384

  14. A case of organic brain syndrome following head injury successfully treated with carbamazepine.

    PubMed

    Bouvy, P F; van de Wetering, B J; Meerwaldt, J D; Bruijn, J B

    1988-03-01

    A case of organic brain syndrome occurring in relation to psychological stress 2 years after a severe head injury is described. Treatment with haloperidol resulted only in slight improvement. A dramatic improvement was achieved with carbamazepine.

  15. Bicyclists, Helmets and Head Injuries: A Rider-Based Study of Helmet Use and Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasserman, Richard C.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Of 516 bicyclists interviewed, 19 percent owned helmets but only eight percent were wearing them. Riders wearing helmets were more highly educated and reported higher car seat belt use. Helmets afford protection from bicycling head injuries. (Author/BJV)

  16. Neurologic impairment following closed head injury predicts post-traumatic neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Villasana, L.E.; Westbrook, G.L.; Schnell, E.

    2014-01-01

    In the mammalian hippocampus, neurogenesis persists into adulthood, and increased generation of newborn neurons could be of clinical benefit following concussive head injuries. Post-traumatic neurogenesis has been well documented using “open” traumatic brain injury (TBI) models in rodents; however, human TBI most commonly involves closed head injury. Here we used a closed head injury (CHI) model to examine post-traumatic hippocampal neurogenesis in mice. All mice were subjected to the same CHI protocol, and a gross-motor based injury severity score was used to characterize neurologic impairment one hour after the injury. When analyzed 2 weeks later, post-traumatic neurogenesis was significantly increased only in mice with a high degree of transient neurologic impairment immediately after injury. This increase was associated with an early increase in c-fos activity, and subsequent reactive astrocytosis and microglial activation in the dentate gyrus. Our results demonstrate that the initial degree of neurologic impairment after closed head injury predicts the induction of secondary physiologic and pathophysiologic processes, and that animals with severe neurologic impairment early after injury manifest an increase in post-traumatic neurogenesis in the absence of gross anatomic pathology. PMID:24861442

  17. Cerebral Salt Wasting Syndrome following Head Injury in a Child Managed Successfully with Fludrocortisone.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Nagendra; Pathak, Santosh; Gupta, Murli Manohar; Agrawal, Nikhil

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral salt wasting (CSW) syndrome is an important cause of hyponatremia in head injuries apart from syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH). Proper diagnosis and differentiation between these two entities are necessary for management as the treatment is quite opposite in both conditions. Fludrocortisone can help in managing CSW where alone saline infusion does not work. We report a 17-month-old female child with head injury managed successfully with saline infusion and fludrocortisone.

  18. Rotational head kinematics in football impacts: an injury risk function for concussion.

    PubMed

    Rowson, Steven; Duma, Stefan M; Beckwith, Jonathan G; Chu, Jeffrey J; Greenwald, Richard M; Crisco, Joseph J; Brolinson, P Gunnar; Duhaime, Ann-Christine; McAllister, Thomas W; Maerlender, Arthur C

    2012-01-01

    Recent research has suggested a possible link between sports-related concussions and neurodegenerative processes, highlighting the importance of developing methods to accurately quantify head impact tolerance. The use of kinematic parameters of the head to predict brain injury has been suggested because they are indicative of the inertial response of the brain. The objective of this study is to characterize the rotational kinematics of the head associated with concussive impacts using a large head acceleration dataset collected from human subjects. The helmets of 335 football players were instrumented with accelerometer arrays that measured head acceleration following head impacts sustained during play, resulting in data for 300,977 sub-concussive and 57 concussive head impacts. The average sub-concussive impact had a rotational acceleration of 1230 rad/s(2) and a rotational velocity of 5.5 rad/s, while the average concussive impact had a rotational acceleration of 5022 rad/s(2) and a rotational velocity of 22.3 rad/s. An injury risk curve was developed and a nominal injury value of 6383 rad/s(2) associated with 28.3 rad/s represents 50% risk of concussion. These data provide an increased understanding of the biomechanics associated with concussion and they provide critical insight into injury mechanisms, human tolerance to mechanical stimuli, and injury prevention techniques.

  19. Exploration of Pedestrian Head Injuries-Collision Parameter Relationships through a Combination of Retrospective Analysis and Finite Element Method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjun; Su, Sen; Qiu, Jinlong; Zhang, Yongyong; Yin, Zhiyong

    2016-12-16

    There are a very limited number of reports concerning the relationship between pedestrian head injuries and collision parameters through a combination of statistical analysis methods and finite element method (FEM). This study aims to explore the characteristics of pedestrian head injuries in car-pedestrian collisions at different parameters by using the two means above. A retrospective analysis of pedestrian head injuries was performed based on detailed investigation data of 61 car-pedestrian collision cases. The head damage assessment parameters (head injury criterion (HIC), peak stress on the skull, maximal principal strain for the brain) in car-pedestrian simulation experiments with four contact angles and three impact velocities were obtained by FEM. The characteristics of the pedestrian head injuries were discussed by comparing and analyzing the statistical analysis results and finite element analysis results. The statistical analysis results demonstrated a significant difference in skull fractures, contusion and laceration of brain and head injuries on the abbreviated injury scale (AIS)3+ was found at different velocities (p < 0.05) and angles (p < 0.05). The simulation results showed that, in pedestrian head-to-hood impacts, the values of head damage assessment parameters increased with impact velocities. At the same velocity, these values from the impact on the pedestrian's back were successively greater than on the front or the side. Furthermore, head injury reconstruction and prediction results of two selected cases were consistent with the real injuries. Overall, it was further spelled out that, for shorter stature pedestrians, increased head impact velocity results in greater head injury severity in car-pedestrian collision, especially in pedestrian head-to-hood impacts. Under a back impact, the head has also been found to be at greater damage risk for shorter stature pedestrians, which may have implications on automotive design and pedestrian

  20. Characteristics of Syntactic Comprehension Deficits Following Closed Head Injury versus Left Cerebrovascular Accident.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler-Hinz, Susan; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Two studies examined the ability to assign thematic roles and to coindex referentially dependent noun phrases in closed head injured adults (N=20), adult stroke patients (N=20), and normal adults (N=20). Results suggested that syntactic comprehension disturbances are similar following left cerebral hemisphere infarction and closed head injury.…

  1. Influence of age and fall type on head injuries in infants and toddlers

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Nicole G.; Wood, Joanne; Margulies, Susan S.; Christian, Cindy W.

    2011-01-01

    Age-based differences in fall type and neuroanatomy in infants and toddlers may affect clinical presentations and injury patterns. Objective Our goal is to understand the influence of fall type and age on injuries to help guide clinical evaluation. Design/Setting/Participants Retrospectively, 285 children 0–48 months with accidental head injury from a fall and brain imaging between 2000–2006 were categorized by age (infant=<1 year and toddler=1–4 years) and fall type: low (≤3 ft), intermediate (>3 and <10 ft), high height falls (≥10 ft) and stair falls. Outcome Measures Clinical manifestations were noted and head injuries separated into primary (bleeding) and secondary (hypoxia, edema). The influence of age and fall type on head injuries sustained was evaluated. Results Injury patterns in children <4 yrs varied with age. Despite similar injury severity scores, infants sustained more skull fractures than toddlers (71% v. 39%). Of children with skull fractures, 11% had no evidence of scalp/facial soft tissue swelling. Of the patients with primary intracranial injury, 30% had no skull fracture and 8% had neither skull fracture nor cranial soft tissue injury. Low height falls resulted in primary intracranial injury without soft tissue or skull injury in infants (6%) and toddlers (16%). Conclusions Within a given fall type, age-related differences in injuries exist between infants and toddlers. When interpreting a fall history, clinicians must consider the fall type and influence of age on resulting injury. For young children, intracranial injury is not always accompanied by external manifestations of their injury. PMID:22079853

  2. Head and neck injuries in young athletes: thorough return-to-play examinations are necessary.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Dan

    2003-11-01

    Catastrophic head and neck injuries in athletes will always be a great concern in our society. The unpredictability of sports, which gives them the competitiveness that we love, will always make it extremely difficult to eliminate these injuries completely. Medical personal and sports officials need to attack this problem through improved safety equipment and rule changes.

  3. Chronic Post-Traumatic Headache after Head Injury in Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, Charlotte; Nagiub, George; Abu-Arafeh, Ishaq

    2008-01-01

    This was a prospective, observational study of children aged 3 to 15 years admitted to hospital with head injury (HI). Demographic data and information on the nature of the HI, and history of premorbid headache were collected. A structured telephone questionnaire was used to interview parents and children 2 months after injury and at 4-monthly…

  4. Children's head injuries in the Vietnamese refugee population in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Goh, K Y; Poon, W S

    1995-10-01

    All Vietnamese patients with head injuries from two of the largest refugee camps in Hong Kong are routinely referred to the Neurosurgical Unit of the Prince of Wales Hospital for management. In order to determine the epidemiology of head injuries in this population group, we have retrospectively reviewed all hospitalized cases over a 4 year period from January 1990 to December 1993. We have found a unique social situation in this population group, with an unusually high proportion of paediatric cases (2253 per 100,000 children aged 5 years or less), compared with other epidemiological studies. The most common mechanism of injury in between 57 and 75 per cent of cases was a fall from bed. Based on this information, appropriate preventive measures have been recommended and have successfully decreased the incidence of head injuries. This study demonstrates the value and effectiveness of epidemiological studies in identifying a previously unrecognized health risk in a specified population group.

  5. Epidemiologic Impact of Rapid Industrialization on Head Injury Based on Traffic Accident Statistics in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Chung, You Nam; Park, Young Seok; Min, Kyung Soo; Lee, Mou Seop; Kim, Young Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study is to estimate the incidence trend of head injury and the mortality based on traffic accident statistics and to investigate the impacts of rapid industrialization and economic growth on epidemiology of head injury in Korea over the period 1970–2012 including both pre-industrialized and post-industrialized stages. Methods We collected data of head injury estimated from traffic accident statistics and seven hospital based reports to see incidence trends between 1970 and 2012. We also investigated the population structure and Gross National Income (GNI) per capita of Korea over the same period. The age specific data were investigated from 1992 to 2012. Results The incidence of head injury gradually rose in the 1970s and the 1980s but stabilized until the 1990s with transient rise and then started to decline slowly in the 2000s. The mortality grew until 1991 but gradually declined ever since. However, the old age groups showed rather slight increase in both rates. The degree of decrease in the mortality has been more rapid than the incidence on head injury. Conclusion In Korea during the low income stage, rapid industrialization cause considerable increase in the mortality and the incidence of head injury. During the high income stage, the incidence of head injury gradually declined and the mortality dropped more rapidly than the incidence due to preventive measures and satisfactory medical care. Nevertheless, the old age groups revealed rather slight increase in both rates owing to the large population structure and the declining birth rate. PMID:26962421

  6. Tau hyperphosphorylation in apolipoprotein E-deficient and control mice after closed head injury.

    PubMed

    Genis, L; Chen, Y; Shohami, E; Michaelson, D M

    2000-05-15

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE)-deficient mice have learning and memory impairments that are associated with specific neurochemical changes and hyperphosphorylation of distinct epitopes of the cytoskeletal protein tau. Furthermore, such mice are highly susceptible to the sequelae of brain trauma and their ability to recover from head injury is impaired. In the present study we investigated the extent that the neuronal maintenance and repair impairments of apoE-deficient mice are related to aberrations at the tau phosphorylation level. This was pursued by subjecting control and apoE-deficient mice to closed head injury (CHI) and examination, utilizing immunoblot assays, of the resulting effects on tau phosphorylation. The results thus obtained revealed that tau of apoE-deficient mice is hyperphosphorylated before CHI and that this insult results in transient tau hyperphosphorylation, whose extent and time course in the two mouse groups varied markedly. Tau hyperphosphorylation in the injured controls was maximal by about 4 hr after injury and reverted to basal levels by 24 hr. In contrast, almost no head injury-induced tau hyperphosphorylation was observed in the apoE-deficient mice at 4 hr after injury. Some tau hyper-phosphorylation was detected in the head-injured apoE-deficient mice after longer time intervals, but its extent was markedly lower than the maximal values obtained in the head injured controls. These findings show that the chronic neuronal impairments brought about by apoE deficiency and the acute response to head injury are both associated with hyperphosphorylation of the same tau domain and that the ability of apoE-deficient mice to mount the acute tau hyperphosphorylation response to head injury is impaired.

  7. Study the efficacy of neuroprotective drugs on brain physiological properties during focal head injury using optical spectroscopy data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abookasis, David; Shochat, Ariel

    2016-03-01

    We present a comparative evaluation of five different neuroprotective drugs in the early phase following focal traumatic brain injury (TBI) in mouse intact head. The effectiveness of these drugs in terms of changes in brain tissue morphology and hemodynamic properties was experimentally evaluated through analysis of the optical absorption coefficient and spectral reduced scattering parameters in the range of 650-1000 nm. Anesthetized male mice (n=50 and n=10 control) were subjected to weight drop model mimics real life focal head trauma. Monitoring the effect of injury and neuroprotective drugs was obtained by using a diffuse reflectance spectroscopy system utilizing independent source-detector separation and location. Result indicates that administration of minocycline improve hemodynamic and reduced the level of tissue injury at an early phase post-injury while hypertonic saline treatment decrease brain water content. These findings highlight the heterogeneity between neuroprotective drugs and the ongoing controversy among researchers regarding which drug therapy is preferred for treatment of TBI. On the other hand, our results show the capability of optical spectroscopy technique to noninvasively study brain function following injury and drug therapy.

  8. Inosine improves functional recovery after experimental traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Dachir, Shlomit; Shabashov, Dalia; Trembovler, Victoria; Alexandrovich, Alexander G; Benowitz, Larry I; Shohami, Esther

    2014-03-25

    Despite years of research, no effective therapy is yet available for the treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The most prevalent and debilitating features in survivors of TBI are cognitive deficits and motor dysfunction. A potential therapeutic method for improving the function of patients following TBI would be to restore, at least in part, plasticity to the CNS in a controlled way that would allow for the formation of compensatory circuits. Inosine, a naturally occurring purine nucleoside, has been shown to promote axon collateral growth in the corticospinal tract (CST) following stroke and focal TBI. In the present study, we investigated the effects of inosine on motor and cognitive deficits, CST sprouting, and expression of synaptic proteins in an experimental model of closed head injury (CHI). Treatment with inosine (100 mg/kg i.p. at 1, 24 and 48 h following CHI) improved outcome after TBI, significantly decreasing the neurological severity score (NSS, p<0.04 vs. saline), an aggregate measure of performance on several tasks. It improved non-spatial cognitive performance (object recognition, p<0.016 vs. saline) but had little effect on sensorimotor coordination (rotarod) and spatial cognitive functions (Y-maze). Inosine did not affect CST sprouting in the lumbar spinal cord but did restore levels of the growth-associated protein GAP-43 in the hippocampus, though not in the cerebral cortex. Our results suggest that inosine may improve functional outcome after TBI.

  9. Head Injuries in School-Age Children Who Play Golf.

    PubMed

    Reuter-Rice, Karin; Krebs, Madelyn; Eads, Julia K

    2016-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability in children. We conducted a prospective study, which examined injury characteristics and outcomes of school-age children of 5.0-15.0 years (N = 10) who were admitted to hospital for a TBI. This study evaluated the role of age, gender, the Glasgow Coma Scale, mechanisms and severity of injury, and functional outcomes. Seventy percent of the children sustained a TBI from a fall. We also found that playing golf was associated with 40% of the TBIs, with three (30%) children being unrestrained passengers in a moving golf cart and another one (10%) was struck by a golf club. Injury awareness could have benefited or prevented most injuries, and school nurses are in the best position to provide preventative practice education. In golf-centric communities, prevention of golf-related injuries should include education within the schools.

  10. [Acute head injuries in primary health care--internet survey conducted with general practitioners].

    PubMed

    Luoto, Teemu M; Artsola, Minna; Helminen, Mika; Liimatainen, Suvi; Kosunen, Elise; Ohman, Juha

    2013-01-01

    Patients with head injury constitute a large population treated in primary health care. It is essential to recognize patients with traumatic brain injury among this notable population to determine the need for more specific evaluation. General practitioners (n=331) in Pirkanmaa hospital district in Finland received an email link to answer the survey. The response rate was 54.1% (n=179). Mean survey score was 20.5 points (max. 25). Only acquaintance with the national traumatic brain injury practice guidelines was associated with greater survey scores. The general practitioners' level of knowledge in managing head injuries was good. Deficiencies were found in the questions dealt with post-traumatic amnesia and the definition of traumatic brain injury.

  11. Acute and long-term management of sports-related closed head injuries.

    PubMed

    Asthagiri, Ashok R; Dumont, Aaron S; Sheehan, Jonas M

    2003-07-01

    Aggressive participation in athletics is rewarded in many ways in our society. As long as there is such strong impetus for participation in athletics, the risks of head injuries for participants will remain. Important strides made in understanding of the pathophysiology of head injuries may lead to improved treatment strategies in the future. In light of the current lack of effective therapies, however, the best options remain injury prevention, early and appropriate recognition, and limitation of subsequent, further injury. Frequently the medical staff is encouraged to allow the athlete to return to play based on the desires of the coach, team, fans, parents, and even the athlete himself. A thorough understanding of the potentially serious risks of repetitive injury, however, mandates that only a proper conservative period of observation and evaluation will best serve the competitor.

  12. Head Injuries in School-Age Children Who Play Golf

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reuter-Rice, Karin; Krebs, Madelyn; Eads, Julia K.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability in children. We conducted a prospective study, which examined injury characteristics and outcomes of school-age children of 5.0-15.0 years (N = 10) who were admitted to hospital for a TBI. This study evaluated the role of age, gender, the Glasgow Coma Scale, mechanisms and…

  13. [Mild head injury in children and adults: Diagnostic challenges in the emergency department].

    PubMed

    Leidel, B A; Lindner, T; Wolf, S; Bogner, V; Steinbeck, A; Börner, N; Peiser, C; Audebert, H J; Biberthaler, P; Kanz, K-G

    2015-06-01

    Mild head injuries are one of the most frequent reasons for attending emergency departments and are particularly challenging in different ways. While clinically important injuries are infrequent, delayed or missed injuries may lead to fatal consequences. The initial mostly inconspicuous appearance may not reflect the degree of intracranial injury and computed tomography (CT) is necessary to rule out covert injuries. Furthermore, infants and young children with a lack of or rudimentary cognitive and language development are challenging, especially for those examiners not familiar with pediatric care. Established check lists of clinical risk factors for children and adults regarding traumatic brain injuries allow specific and rational decision-making for cranial CT imaging. Clinically important intracranial injuries can be reliably detected and unnecessary radiation exposure avoided at the same time.

  14. Experimental pulmonary inflammatory injury in the monkey.

    PubMed Central

    Revak, S D; Rice, C L; Schraufstätter, I U; Halsey, W A; Bohl, B P; Clancy, R M; Cochrane, C G

    1985-01-01

    by the return to full activity of four out of five BAL samples after their incubation with the reducing agent dithiothreitol in the presence of methionine sulfoxide peptide reductase. The specific activity of catalase in the BAL fluids of animals given 3-amino, 1,2,4 triazole (AT) 1 h before lavaging showed drops from 0.97 in untreated monkeys to 0.04 in FNLP-treated and 0.49 in PMA-treated monkeys. MPO levels also fell in the AT-treated injured animals from 16.59 to 0.85 delta OD/min X ml in FNLP animals in the absence and presence of AT, and 30.47 to 0.60 delta OD/min X ml in PMA-treated animals. Inhibition of MPO by AT was shown in vitro to be H2O2 dependent. Total glutathione levels in the BAL fluids did not change appreciably after FNLP or PMA treatment. These studies present substantial evidence of the generation of both proteases and oxidants during the establishment of acute pulmonary inflammatory injury in an experimental primate model. Images PMID:2995448

  15. Does routine follow up after head injury help? A randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed Central

    Wade, D T; Crawford, S; Wenden, F J; King, N S; Moss, N E

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the Medical Disability Society's 1988 recommendation that "every patient attending hospital after a head injury should be registered and offered an outpatient follow up appointment" by determining whether offering a routine follow up service to patients presenting to hospital with a head injury of any severity affects outcome six months later. DESIGN: A randomised controlled trial design with masked assessment of outcome. SETTING: A mixed rural and urban health district with a population of about 560000. PATIENTS: 1156 consecutive patients resident in Oxfordshire aged between 16 and 65 years presenting over 13 months to accident and emergency departments or admitted to hospital and diagnosed as having a head injury of any severity, including those with other injuries. INTERVENTIONS: Patients were registered and randomised to one of two groups. Both groups continued to receive the standard service offered by the hospitals. The early follow up group were approached at 7-10 days after injury and offered additional information, advice, support, and further intervention as needed. All randomised patients were approached for follow up assessment six months after injury by independent clinicians blind to their group. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Validated questionnaires were used to elicit ratings of post-concussion symptoms (the Rivermead postconcussion symptoms questionnaire), and changes in work, relationships, leisure, social, and domestic activities (the Rivermead head injury follow up questionnaire). RESULTS: The two groups were comparable at randomisation. Data was obtained at six months on 226 of 577 "control" patients and 252 of 579 "trial" patients (59% were lost to follow up). There were no significant differences overall between the trial and control groups at follow up, but subgroup analysis of the patients with moderate or severe head injuries (posttraumatic amnesia > or = one hour, or admitted to hospital), showed that those in the early

  16. “Studying Injured Minds” – The Vietnam Head Injury Study and 40 Years of Brain Injury Research

    PubMed Central

    Raymont, Vanessa; Salazar, Andres M.; Krueger, Frank; Grafman, Jordan

    2011-01-01

    The study of those who have sustained traumatic brain injuries (TBI) during military conflicts has greatly facilitated research in the fields of neuropsychology, neurosurgery, psychiatry, neurology, and neuroimaging. The Vietnam Head Injury Study (VHIS) is a prospective, long-term follow-up study of a cohort of 1,221 Vietnam veterans with mostly penetrating brain injuries, which has stretched over more than 40 years. The scope of this study, both in terms of the types of injury and fields of examination, has been extremely broad. It has been instrumental in extending the field of TBI research and in exposing pressing medical and social issues that affect those who suffer such injuries. This review summarizes the history of conflict-related TBI research and the VHIS to date, as well as the vast range of important findings the VHIS has established. PMID:21625624

  17. Biomechanical studies in an ovine model of non-accidental head injury.

    PubMed

    Anderson, R W G; Sandoz, B; Dutschke, J K; Finnie, J W; Turner, R J; Blumbergs, P C; Manavis, J; Vink, R

    2014-08-22

    This paper presents the head kinematics of a novel ovine model of non-accidental head injury (NAHI) that consists only of a naturalistic oscillating insult. Nine, 7-to-10-day-old anesthetized and ventilated lambs were subjected to manual shaking. Two six-axis motion sensors tracked the position of the head and torso, and a triaxial accelerometer measured head acceleration. Animals experienced 10 episodes of shaking over 30 min, and then remained under anesthesia for 6h until killed by perfusion fixation of the brain. Each shaking episode lasted for 20s resulting in about 40 cycles per episode. Each cycle typically consisted of three impulsive events that corresponded to specific phases of the head's motion; the most substantial of these were interactions typically with the lamb's own torso, and these generated accelerations of 30-70 g. Impulsive loading was not considered severe. Other kinematic parameters recorded included estimates of head power transfer, head-torso flexion, and rate of flexion. Several styles of shaking were also identified across episodes and subjects. Axonal injury, neuronal reaction and albumin extravasation were widely distributed in the hemispheric white matter, brainstem and at the craniocervical junction and to a much greater magnitude in lower body weight lambs that died. This is the first biomechanical description of a large animal model of NAHI in which repetitive naturalistic insults were applied, and that reproduced a spectrum of injury associated with NAHI.

  18. Cerebral sinodural thrombosis following minor head injury in children.

    PubMed

    Pikis, Stylianos; Moscovici, Samuel; Itshayek, Eyal; Cohen, José E

    2013-04-01

    Cerebral sinodural thrombosis (CSDT) is a rare complication of minor head trauma in children. Despite recommendations, anticoagulation is frequently withheld. We aimed to evaluate the etiology, clinical presentation, risk factors, diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of pediatric CSDT following minor head trauma, and specifically to evaluate factors associated with anticoagulation use following minor head trauma in pediatric patients with CSDT. A literature search from 1990 to 2012 identified manuscripts discussing epidemiology, risk factors, clinical presentation, management, and outcome in pediatric patients with CSDT subsequent to minor head trauma. One pediatric patient diagnosed with CSDT following minor head trauma in our institution was also included in the study. There were 18 pediatric patients with CSDT following minor trauma, including the current patient. Mean patient age was 7.8years (range 23months-15years). There was a strong female predominance (2.4:1). Vomiting and headache were the most common symptoms. Five patients had pre-existing risk factors (gastroenteritis, protein S deficiency, estroprogestenic medication, elevated antiphospholipid antibodies, malnutrition). Anticoagulation was administered to six patients with additional risk factors, severe symptoms, or deterioration. There was no mortality, 12 patients recovered fully, and four patients improved with residual symptoms. One patient required lumboperitoneal shunt placement. Pediatric CSDT is a rare complication of minor head trauma, with variable presentation. Anticoagulation has generally been reserved for patients suffering from severe symptoms, for those who deteriorate neurologically during observation, and for those who suffer from a concomitant prothrombotic disorder.

  19. Experimental inhalation injury in the goat.

    PubMed

    Walker, H L; McLeod, C G; McManus, W F

    1981-11-01

    Inhalation injuries are usually produced by inhalation of gaseous or particulate products of incomplete combustion and are rarely due to heat per se unless steam is inhaled. The clinical and anatomic characteristics of an appropriate animal model should mimic the disease encountered clinically. A model of inhalation injury has been produced in anesthetized goats through the use of a modified bee smoker. The smoke is delivered at a low temperature and contains byproducts of incomplete combustion. This reproducible injury produces necrotic tracheobronchitis and bronchiolitis with pseudomembrane and cast formation in association with mild multifocal atelectasis and bronchopneumonia. These lesions spontaneously resolve within 3 weeks without supportive therapy. The upper trachea, protected from smoke injury by the inflated cuff of the endotracheal tube, showed no evidence of injury. This nonlethal injury is proposed as an appropriate model for evaluation of the pathophysiology and treatment of inhalation injury.

  20. [Intracranial occlusion of the internal carotid artery after minor closed head injury].

    PubMed

    Nakashima, S; Tomokiyo, M; Koga, H; Furukawa, Y; Nomura, S; Shimokawa, S; Nakagawa, S; Anegawa, S; Hayashi, T

    2001-10-01

    Thrombosis of the extracranial portion of the internal carotid artery as a result of nonpenetrating head and neck injury is not uncommon. However, intracranial occlusion of the internal carotid artery after minor head and neck injury without skull fracture is rare. We report a case of 14-year-old male who suffered a minor head injury during an athletic meeting of his school and developed a right hemiparesis and a lethargy state resulting from thrombosis of the supraclinoid portion of the left internal carotid artery. On admission, skull films and a CT scan revealed no abnormality. One hour later, he fully recovered. One day later, no definite lesions were detected on T1-weighted and T2-weighted image of MRI, but an abnormal high signal lesion in the left frontal lobe was detected on diffusion-weighted image of MRI. On additional MR angiography, intracranial occlusion of the internal carotid artery due to dissection was demonstrated.

  1. Head injury in heroes of the Civil War and its lasting influence.

    PubMed

    Sabourin, Victor M; Holland, Ryan; Mau, Christine; Gandhi, Chirag D; Prestigiacomo, Charles J

    2016-07-01

    The Civil War era was an age-defining period in the history of the United States of America, the effects of which are still seen in the nation today. In this era, the issue of head injury pervaded society. From the president of the United States, Abraham Lincoln, to the officers and soldiers of the Union and Confederate armies, and to the population at large, head injury and its ramifications gripped the nation. This article focuses on 3 individuals: Major General John Sedgwick, First Lieutenant Alonzo Cushing, and Harriet Tubman, as examples of the impact that head injury had during this era. These 3 individuals were chosen for this article because of their lasting legacies, contributions to society, and interesting connections to one another.

  2. The Epidemiology of Hospital-Referred Head Injury in Ardabil City

    PubMed Central

    Farzaneh, Esmaeil; Abbasi, Vahid; Kahnamouei-aghdam, Fariba; Molaei, Behnam; Iziy, Elham; Ojaghi, Habib

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose. Trauma is the leading cause of death for youth in developing countries. Given the prevalence of head trauma (HT) in society and its complication and burden, the epidemiologic study of head trauma is necessary and is the main aim of this study. Materials and Methods. This retrospective population-based survey describes the epidemiology of head injury in a defined population in Ardabil city. It includes all 204 patients with head injury referred to the University Hospital of Ardabil, Iran, during 2013-2014. Data were collected by a checklist and analyzed by statistical methods in SPSS.19. Significance level p < 0.05 was considered. Results. Of all registered cases, 146 (71.6%) were male and the rest of them were female. Most of HT patients lived in Ardabil city (60.8%). The mean age of patients was 22.6 ± 25.9 and most of victims were young. 24.5% of traumatic patients have injuries in severe to critical level (grade 3-4). The most cause of trauma was accidents (41.7%). Most of injuries occurred in night (55.9%) and in summer season (42.2%). Causes were traffic accident in 41.7%. Conclusion. Results showed that the leading cause of head trauma especially in the warm seasons is accidents and so, designing programs to reduce road accidents can dramatically reduce the rate of trauma in the future in Ardabil province. PMID:28255457

  3. Traumatic pneumorrachis after isolated closed head injuries: An up-to-date review.

    PubMed

    Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios F; Singh, Ranjodh; Stefanopoulos, Panagiotis; Petsanas, Adamantios; Hadjigeorgiou, Fivos G; Fountas, Kostas

    2016-12-01

    Pneumorrachis (PR) is characterized by the presence of air within the spinal canal. It can be classified descriptively into internal or intradural and external or epidural. The causes of PR can be divided as iatrogenic, nontraumatic and traumatic. In the present study, a comprehensive literature search was conducted to identify all previous cases of PR after an isolate head injury. Two additional cases were also reported. We concluded, that PR after isolated head injuries is a rare but likely an underdiagnosed entity. It is a marker of severe injury and the majority of such patients have a poor outcome. Although, PR is usually asymptomatic and reabsorbs spontaneously, prompt recognition and management of the underlying cause is essential. Therefore, clinicians should maintain a high level of suspicion for serious underlying injury in cases where initial radiological imaging reveals intraspinal air.

  4. Prevention and management of infections associated with combat-related head and neck injuries.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Kyle; Hayes, David K; Blice, Jeffrey P; Hale, Robert G

    2008-03-01

    Maxillofacial injuries constitute 16% of all war-related injuries. This review focuses on data available from military and civilian studies to provide evidence-based recommendations for the modification of infections associated with combat-related injuries to the head and neck. The major emphasis of this review is on the study of subsequent infection, perioperative antimicrobial prophylaxis, debridement of devitalized tissue, optimal time to wound closure to achieve a water tight seal, wound irrigation with removal of debris and gross contaminants, fracture fixation, and removal of ocular foreign bodies with intravitreal antibiotics. Further studies are needed in combat-related injuries to the head and neck in military personnel to provide the highest evidence-based medicine recommendations.

  5. Orbital emphysema following nose blowing as a sequel of a snowboard related head injury.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Y; Sakakibara, Y; Uchida, K; Kishi, H

    2004-10-01

    A case of orbital emphysema as a sequel of a snowboard related head injury is reported. It is believed that a fracture of the medial orbital wall was caused by the increased intraorbital pressure when the patient hit his forehead on the snowy ground, allowing air to enter the orbit when he blew his nose. Wearing goggles may prevent this type of sports related injury.

  6. Toppled television sets and head injuries in the pediatric population: a framework for prevention.

    PubMed

    Cusimano, Michael D; Parker, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    Injuries to children caused by falling televisions have become more frequent during the last decade. These injuries can be severe and even fatal and are likely to become even more common in the future as TVs increase in size and become more affordable. To formulate guidelines for the prevention of these injuries, the authors systematically reviewed the literature on injuries related to toppling televisions. The authors searched MEDLINE, PubMed, Embase, Scopus, CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar according to the Cochrane guidelines for all studies involving children 0-18 years of age who were injured by toppled TVs. Factors contributing to injury were categorized using Haddon's Matrix, and the public health approach was used as a framework for developing strategies to prevent these injuries. The vast majority (84%) of the injuries occurred in homes and more than three-fourths were unwitnessed by adult caregivers. The TVs were most commonly large and elevated off the ground. Dressers and other furniture not designed to support TVs were commonly involved in the TV-toppling incident. The case fatality rate varies widely, but almost all deaths reported (96%) were due to brain injuries. Toddlers between the ages of 1 and 3 years most frequently suffer injuries to the head and neck, and they are most likely to suffer severe injuries. Many of these injuries require brain imaging and neurosurgical intervention. Prevention of these injuries will require changes in TV design and legislation as well as increases in public education and awareness. Television-toppling injuries can be easily prevented; however, the rates of injury do not reflect a sufficient level of awareness, nor do they reflect an acceptable effort from an injury prevention perspective.

  7. Acute cervical spinal subdural hematoma not related to head injury.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Yul; Ju, Chang Il; Kim, Seok Won

    2010-06-01

    We report an extremely rare case of traumatic cervical spinal subdural hematoma not related to intracranial injury. There has been no report on traumatic cervical spinal subdrual hematoma not related to intracranial injury. A 27-year-old female patient was admitted to our emergency room due to severe neck pain and right arm motor weakness after car collision. On admission, she presented with complete monoplegia and hypoesthesia of right arm. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed subdural hematoma compressing spinal cord. Lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis revealed 210,000 red blood cells/mm(3). She was managed conservatively by administrations of steroid pulse therapy and CSF drainage. Her muscle power of right arm improved to a Grade III 16 days after admission. Follow-up MRI taken 16th days after admission revealed almost complete resolution of the hematoma. Here, the authors report a traumatic cervical spinal SDH not associated with intracranial injury.

  8. Experimental Injury Biomechanics of the Pediatric Neck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nightingale, Roger W.; Luck, Jason F.

    Motor vehicle related crashes rank as the most common cause of spinal related injuries in the pediatric population (Platzer et al. 2007; Brown et al. 2001; Kokoska et al. 2001; Eleraky et al. 2000; Hamilton and Myles 1992a; Bonadio 1993; Babcock 1975). Pediatric spinal related trauma accounts for between 1 and 12 % of all spinal related injuries (Hamilton and Myles 1992a; Hadley et al. 1988; Aufdermaur 1974). Cervical spine trauma in children accounts for approximately 2 % of all cervical spinal injuries (Henrys et al. 1977). Approximately 1-2 % of all children admitted for traumatic injury are related to injuries to the cervical spine (Platzer et al. 2007; Brown et al. 2001; Kokoska et al. 2001; Orenstein et al. 1994; Rachesky et al. 1987). Overall, pediatric neck injury rates are significantly lower than adult rates; however, the neck injury rate in children between the ages of 11 and 15 years approaches the adult rate of 18.8 per 100,000 (McGrory et al 1993; Myers and Winkelstein 1995). For children less than 11 years of age, neck injuries are relatively rare (1.2 per 100,000), but have particularly devastating consequences (McGrory et al. 1993). The overall mortality rate amongst victims of pediatric spinal trauma is approximately 16-41 % but considerably higher for the youngest ages (Platzer et al. 2007; Brown et al. 2001; Kokoska et al. 2001; Eleraky et al. 2000; Givens et al. 1996; Orenstein et al. 1994; Hamilton and Myles 1992b).

  9. Spasm of the near reflex associated with head injury.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Christopher; Sachdev, Arun; Gottlob, Irene

    2002-03-01

    Spasm of the near reflex is characterized by intermittent miosis, convergence spasm and pseudomyopia with blurred vision at distance. Usually, it is a functional disorder in young patients with underlying emotional problems. Only rarely is it caused by organic disorder. We report a patient who developed convergent spasm associated with miosis after head trauma at the age of 84 years.

  10. Head injury or head motion? Assessment and quantification of motion artifacts in diffusion tensor imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Ling, Josef; Merideth, Flannery; Caprihan, Arvind; Pena, Amanda; Teshiba, Terri; Mayer, Andrew R

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between head motion and diffusion values such as fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) is currently not well understood. Simulation studies suggest that head motion may introduce either a positive or negative bias, but this has not been quantified in clinical studies. Moreover, alternative measures for removing bias as result of head motion, such as the removal of problematic gradients, has been suggested but not carefully evaluated. The current study examined the impact of head motion on FA and MD across three common pipelines (tract-based spatial statistics, voxelwise, and region of interest analyses) and determined the impact of removing diffusion weighted images. Our findings from a large cohort of healthy controls indicate that while head motion was associated with a positive bias for both FA and MD, the effect was greater for MD. The positive bias was observed across all three analysis pipelines and was present following established protocols for data processing, suggesting that current techniques (i.e., correction of both image and gradient table) for removing motion bias are likely insufficient. However, the removal of images with gross artifacts did not fundamentally change the relationship between motion and DTI scalar values. In addition, Monte Carlo simulations suggested that the random removal of images increases the bias and reduces the precision of both FA and MD. Finally, we provide an example of how head motion can be quantified across different neuropsychiatric populations, which should be implemented as part of any diffusion tensor imaging quality assurance protocol.

  11. A mouse model of weight-drop closed head injury: emphasis on cognitive and neurological deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Khalin, Igor; Jamari, Nor Laili Azua; Razak, Nadiawati Bt Abdul; Hasain, Zubaidah Bt; Nor, Mohd Asri bin Mohd; Zainudin, Mohd Hakimi bin Ahmad; Omar, Ainsah Bt; Alyautdin, Renad

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability in individuals worldwide. Producing a clinically relevant TBI model in small-sized animals remains fairly challenging. For good screening of potential therapeutics, which are effective in the treatment of TBI, animal models of TBI should be established and standardized. In this study, we established mouse models of closed head injury using the Shohami weight-drop method with some modifications concerning cognitive deficiency assessment and provided a detailed description of the severe TBI animal model. We found that 250 g falling weight from 2 cm height produced severe closed head injury in C57BL/6 male mice. Cognitive disorders in mice with severe closed head injury could be detected using passive avoidance test on day 7 after injury. Findings from this study indicate that weight-drop injury animal models are suitable for further screening of brain neuroprotectants and potentially are similar to those seen in human TBI. PMID:27212925

  12. Modeling and Optimization of Airbag Helmets for Preventing Head Injuries in Bicycling.

    PubMed

    Kurt, Mehmet; Laksari, Kaveh; Kuo, Calvin; Grant, Gerald A; Camarillo, David B

    2017-04-01

    Bicycling is the leading cause of sports-related traumatic brain injury. Most of the current bike helmets are made of expanded polystyrene (EPS) foam and ultimately designed to prevent blunt trauma, e.g., skull fracture. However, these helmets have limited effectiveness in preventing brain injuries. With the availability of high-rate micro-electrical-mechanical systems sensors and high energy density batteries, a new class of helmets, i.e., expandable helmets, can sense an impending collision and expand to protect the head. By allowing softer liner medium and larger helmet sizes, this novel approach in helmet design provides the opportunity to achieve much lower acceleration levels during collision and may reduce the risk of brain injury. In this study, we first develop theoretical frameworks to investigate impact dynamics of current EPS helmets and airbag helmets-as a form of expandable helmet design. We compared our theoretical models with anthropomorphic test dummy drop test experiments. Peak accelerations obtained from these experiments with airbag helmets achieve up to an 8-fold reduction in the risk of concussion compared to standard EPS helmets. Furthermore, we construct an optimization framework for airbag helmets to minimize concussion and severe head injury risks at different impact velocities, while avoiding excessive deformation and bottoming-out. An optimized airbag helmet with 0.12 m thickness at 72 ± 8 kPa reduces the head injury criterion (HIC) value to 190 ± 25 at 6.2 m/s head impact velocity compared to a HIC of 1300 with a standard EPS helmet. Based on a correlation with previously reported HIC values in the literature, this airbag helmet design substantially reduces the risks of severe head injury up to 9 m/s.

  13. Head Injury and the Post-Trauma Vision Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padula, William V.; Shapiro, Jannie B.

    1993-01-01

    This article considers the visual rehabilitation of patients recovering from traumatic brain injuries. Characteristics, symptoms, and associated neuromotor difficulties of posttrauma vision syndrome are listed, as are common posture and gait adaptations. A neuro-optometric rehabilitative and orientation/mobility evaluation is recommended, as is…

  14. Long term bicycle related head injury trends for New South Wales, Australia following mandatory helmet legislation.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Jake; Walter, Scott R; Grzebieta, Raphael H

    2013-01-01

    Since the 1991 enactment of mandatory helmet legislation (MHL) for cyclists in New South Wales (NSW), Australia, there has been extensive debate as to its effect on head injury rates at a population level. Many previous studies have focused on the impact of MHL around the time of enactment, while little has been done to examine the ongoing effects. We aimed to extend prior work by investigating long-term trends in cyclist head and arm injuries over the period 1991-2010. The counts of cyclists hospitalised with head or arm injuries were jointly modelled with log-linear regression. The simultaneous modelling of related injury mechanisms avoids the need for actual exposure data and accounts for the effects of changes in the cycling environment, cycling behaviour and general safety improvements. Models were run separately with population counts, bicycle imports, the average weekday counts of cyclists in Sydney CBD and cycling estimates from survey data as proxy exposures. Overall, arm injuries were higher than head injuries throughout the study period, consistent with previous post-MHL observations. The trends in the two injury groups also significantly diverged, such that the gap between rates increased with time. The results suggest that the initial observed benefit of MHL has been maintained over the ensuing decades. There is a notable additional safety benefit after 2006 that is associated with an increase in cycling infrastructure spending. This implies that the effect of MHL is ongoing and progress in cycling safety in NSW has and will continue to benefit from focusing on broader issues such as increasing cycling infrastructure.

  15. Epidemiology and treatment outcome of head injury in children: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Nnadi, M. O. N.; Bankole, O. B.; Fente, B. G.

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Head injury in children is a major concern all over the world. The increasing level of poverty in the world is exposing more children to trauma situations. The future consequences of trauma in these children are enormous, hence prevention they say, is better than cure. Aim of the Study: The study was designed to determine the etiological pattern, age group affectation and treatment outcome in children managed for head injury in our center. Methods: It was a prospective, descriptive and cross-sectional study of children with head injuries managed in our center from July 2010 to December 2013. Data were collected using structured proforma that was part of our prospective Data Bank approved by our hospital Research and Ethics Committee. Data were collected in accident and emergency unit, Intensive Care Unit, wards and out-patient clinic. The data was analyzed using Epi Info 7 software. Results: Total of 76 children managed by the unit and followed-up to a minimum of 3 months qualified for the study. There were 42 males. The age ranged from 7 months to 18 years with a mean of 8.66 years. There were 30 adolescent/teenagers. Road traffic accident formed 63.15%. Pedestrian accident was more among preschool and school children. Thirty-seven patients had mild head injury. Sixty-six patients were managed conservatively. The commonest posttraumatic effect was seizure (15.79%). Good functional outcome (≥4) was seen in 92.1%. Mode of accident and severity of injury affected the outcome. Conclusions: The etiologies of traumatic brain injury, from our study, were age dependent with falls commonest in toddlers and pedestrian accident commonest in pre-school and school ages. The outcome of treatment was related to severity of injury. PMID:25624926

  16. New Sensors to Track Head Acceleration during Possible Injurious Events

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    axial accelerometer that is small enough to be placed in the ear canal portion of communication earplugs ( earpieces ) thereby improving the...developed that are small enough to be placed in the ear canal portion of communication earplugs ( earpieces ) as a way of improving the coupling and thus...and Coupling of Earpiece Accelerometers in the Human Head, paper 2006-01-3657 in Proceedings SAE Motorsports Conference and Exhibition, Dec 2006

  17. Field Marshal Erwin Rommel: the head injury that may have prolonged the Second World War.

    PubMed

    Fuhrman, Heather A; Mullin, Jeffrey P; Sloffer, Chris A

    2016-07-01

    War-related head injury, indeed neurological injury in general, has been a part of the history of humankind for as long as there has been warfare. Such injuries can result in the removal of the individual from combat, thus eliminating any subsequent contribution that he or she might have made to the battle. However, at times, the injuries can have more wide-reaching effects. In the case of commanders or leaders, the impact of their injuries may include the loss of their influence, planning, and leadership, and thus have a disproportionate effect on the battle, or indeed the war. Field Marshal Erwin Rommel was a talented military strategist and leader who was respected by friends and foes alike. He held an honored reputation by the German people and the military leadership. His head injury on July 17, 1944, resulted in his being removed from the field of battle in northern France, but also meant that he was not able to lend his stature to the assassination attempt of Adolph Hitler on July 20. It is possible that, had he been able to lend his stature to the events, Hitler's hold on the nation's government might have been loosened, and the war might have been brought to an end a year earlier. The authors review Rommel's career, his injury, the subsequent medical treatment, and his subsequent death.

  18. An Analysis of Beta-Blocker Administration Pre-and Post-Traumatic Brain Injury with Subanalyses for Head Injury Severity and Myocardial Injury.

    PubMed

    Edavettal, Mathew; Gross, Brian W; Rittenhouse, Katelyn; Alzate, James; Rogers, Amelia; Estrella, Lisa; Miller, Jo Ann; Rogers, Frederick B

    2016-12-01

    A growing body of literature indicates that beta-blocker administration after traumatic brain injury (TBI) is cerebroprotective, limiting secondary injury; however, the effects of preinjury beta blocker status remain poorly understood. We sought to characterize the effects of pre- and postinjury beta-blocker administration on mortality with subanalyses accounting for head injury severity and myocardial injury. In a Level II trauma center, all admissions of patients ≥18 years with a head Abbreviated Injury Scale Score ≥2, Glasgow Coma Scale ≤13 from May 2011 to May 2013 were queried. Demographic, injury-specific, and outcome variables were analyzed using univariate analyses. Subsequent multivariate analyses were conducted to determine adjusted odds of mortality for beta-blocker usage controlling for age, Injury Severity Score, head Abbreviated Injury Scale, arrival Glasgow Coma Scale, ventilator use, and intensive care unit stay. A total of 214 trauma admissions met inclusion criteria: 112 patients had neither pre- nor postinjury beta-blocker usage, 46 patients had preinjury beta-blocker usage, and 94 patients had postinjury beta-blocker usage. Both unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios of preinjury beta-blocker were insignificant with respect to mortality. However, postinjury in-hospital administration of beta blockers was found to significantly in the decrease of mortality in both univariate (P = 0.002) and multivariate analyses (P = 0.001). Our data indicate that beta-blocker administration post-TBI in hospital reduces odds of mortality; however, preinjury beta-blocker usage does not. Additionally, myocardial injury is a useful indicator for beta-blocker administration post-TBI. Further research into which beta blockers confer the best benefits as well as the optimal period of beta-blocker administration post-TBI is recommended.

  19. Playgrounds and Head Injuries: A Problem for the School Business Manager.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, Theodora Briggs

    1987-01-01

    A survey of hospital emergency rooms revealed that nearly half of all playground falls resulted in head injuries. Playground surfaces should be evaluated for "Surface Impact Performance" and the "Severity Index"--both measures to determine ability to absorb impact. Nine other playground hazards are illustrated and described.…

  20. Referential Cohesion and Logical Coherence of Narration after Closed Head Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, G. Albyn; Coelho, Carl A.

    2004-01-01

    A group with closed head injury was compared to neurologically intact controls regarding the referential cohesion and logical coherence of narrative production. A sample of six stories was obtained with tasks of cartoon-elicited story-telling and auditory-oral retelling. We found deficits in the clinical group with respect to referential cohesion,…

  1. An Occupational Therapy Work Skills Assessment for Individuals with Head Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell, Irene; Higham, Julie; McLean, Alison M.

    2003-01-01

    Describes an occupational therapy skills assessment protocol developed and used to evaluate physical, cognitive, and behavioral abilities for persons seeking to return to work following head injuries. It measures them within the framework of productivity, interpersonal skills, and safety. (Contains 48 references.) (Author/JOW)

  2. A novel head-neck cooling device for concussion injury in contact sports

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huan; Wang, Bonnie; Jackson, Kevin; Miller, Claire M.; Hasadsri, Linda; Llano, Daniel; Rubin, Rachael; Zimmerman, Jarred; Johnson, Curtis; Sutton, Brad

    2015-01-01

    Emerging research on the long-term impact of concussions on athletes has allowed public recognition of the potentially devastating effects of these and other mild head injuries. Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a multifaceted disease for which management remains a clinical challenge. Recent pre-clinical and clinical data strongly suggest a destructive synergism between brain temperature elevation and mTBI; conversely, brain hypothermia, with its broader, pleiotropic effects, represents the most potent neuro-protectant in laboratory studies to date. Although well-established in selected clinical conditions, a systemic approach to accomplish regional hypothermia has failed to yield an effective treatment strategy in traumatic brain injury (TBI). Furthermore, although systemic hypothermia remains a potentially valid treatment strategy for moderate to severe TBIs, it is neither practical nor safe for mTBIs. Therefore, selective head-neck cooling may represent an ideal strategy to provide therapeutic benefits to the brain. Optimizing brain temperature management using a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) spacesuit spinoff head-neck cooling technology before and/or after mTBI in contact sports may represent a sensible, practical, and effective method to potentially enhance recover and minimize post-injury deficits. In this paper, we discuss and summarize the anatomical, physiological, preclinical, and clinical data concerning NASA spinoff head-neck cooling technology as a potential treatment for mTBIs, particularly in the context of contact sports. PMID:28123788

  3. A novel head-neck cooling device for concussion injury in contact sports.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Wang, Bonnie; Jackson, Kevin; Miller, Claire M; Hasadsri, Linda; Llano, Daniel; Rubin, Rachael; Zimmerman, Jarred; Johnson, Curtis; Sutton, Brad

    2015-01-01

    Emerging research on the long-term impact of concussions on athletes has allowed public recognition of the potentially devastating effects of these and other mild head injuries. Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a multifaceted disease for which management remains a clinical challenge. Recent pre-clinical and clinical data strongly suggest a destructive synergism between brain temperature elevation and mTBI; conversely, brain hypothermia, with its broader, pleiotropic effects, represents the most potent neuro-protectant in laboratory studies to date. Although well-established in selected clinical conditions, a systemic approach to accomplish regional hypothermia has failed to yield an effective treatment strategy in traumatic brain injury (TBI). Furthermore, although systemic hypothermia remains a potentially valid treatment strategy for moderate to severe TBIs, it is neither practical nor safe for mTBIs. Therefore, selective head-neck cooling may represent an ideal strategy to provide therapeutic benefits to the brain. Optimizing brain temperature management using a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) spacesuit spinoff head-neck cooling technology before and/or after mTBI in contact sports may represent a sensible, practical, and effective method to potentially enhance recover and minimize post-injury deficits. In this paper, we discuss and summarize the anatomical, physiological, preclinical, and clinical data concerning NASA spinoff head-neck cooling technology as a potential treatment for mTBIs, particularly in the context of contact sports.

  4. Non-Accidental Head Injury in New Zealand: The Outcome of Referral to Statutory Authorities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Patrick; MacCormick, Judith; Strange, Rebecca

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the outcome of referral to the statutory authorities for infants under 2 years with non-accidental head injury (NAHI), and to establish whether the authorities held sufficient information to develop a risk profile for these cases. Methods: Retrospective review of cases admitted to hospital in Auckland, New Zealand from 1988…

  5. Depressed Skull Fractures: A Pattern of Abusive Head Injury in Three Older Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Anselm C. W.; Ou, Yvonne; Fong, Dawson

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To describe a pattern of abusive head injury in a series of children older than 4 years of age. Methods: A hospital chart review of abused children with skull fractures from 1999 to 2001 was carried out. The clinical features, social background, and subsequent outcome and management are described. Results: An 11-year-old girl and a pair…

  6. Psychosocial Issues Following Severe Head Injury in Adolescence: Individual and Family Perceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergland, Martha A.; Thomas, Kenneth R.

    1991-01-01

    Examined psychosocial functioning and transition to adult status following adolescent closed head injury. Used case study approach to describe changes in functioning following discharge and return to family and school from perspective of injured individual and primary caregiver. Found dependence in many areas of adult functioning, underscoring…

  7. The effects of alcohol on head injury in the motor vehicle crash victim.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Rebecca M; Maio, Ronald F; Hill, Elizabeth M; Zink, Brian J

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if alcohol potentiates the severity of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in motor vehicle crash (MVC) victims, controlling for crash severity characteristics. Prior studies evaluating effects of alcohol on TBI have not accounted for severity of crash. We evaluated severity of head injury by Marshall score [a classification scale of intracranial pathology on head computed axial tomogram (CT)], and blood-alcohol concentration (BAC), while controlling for crash characteristics [traffic accident deformity score (TAD) and belt use]. Marshall scores were determined from initial CT or autopsy reports, by a neurosurgeon, and were categorized into less severe injury (<3) and more severe (> or =3). Logistic regression using this variable as the outcome parameter and crash characteristics, age and BAC as predictors was done, and the odds ratio (OR) and 0.95 confidence interval (0.95 CI) calculated. Fifty-eight patients were analysed: 41% were BAC positive, 30% had a modified Marshall score of > or =3. Patients with positive BAC were 2.1-fold more likely to have a more severe head injury as measured on CT scan by the Marshall scores. We suggest that alcohol potentiates severity of TBI as determined from head CT among MVC victims. Further research will be needed to substantiate this finding as well as to determine its long-term effect on clinical outcome.

  8. Diagnostic possibilities of closed head injuries of acceleration type using computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Tatalović-Osterman, L; Jadro-Santel, D; Besenski, N

    1991-01-01

    A group of 42 patients with closed head injuries of acceleration type is reported. All of them were treated at various departments of the General Hospital in Maribor. The aim of investigation was to find out the diagnostic possibilities of head and brain damages in closed head injuries of acceleration type by the method of computed tomography (CT) and making comparison with the clinical picture of each individual patient. The patients were not investigated at random but were grouped in accordance with the direction of traumatic force action. The CT analyses were performed according to characteristic patterns of traumatic brain disease. The circumstances of head injury were reliable guidelines for devoting more attention to some brain areas. The density of each lesion was examined, too. The investigation has shown that lesions of "inner cerebral trauma" pattern (ICT-Grcević 1965) are visible on CT at least as often as coup-contrecoup lesions or even more. Only in cases with latero-lateral direction of traumatizing force (control group) coup-contrecoup lesions were found more frequently. Deep cerebral lesions of the latero-lateral type of acceleration head trauma were never or seldom encountered.

  9. [Tracheal rupture in a patient with head and thoracic injuries].

    PubMed

    Cuéllar, E; Egea, A; González, J M; Hinojosa, A; Fernández-Valderrama, A; Gil, E; Benítez, A

    1995-01-01

    A 49-year-old patient presented with cranioencephalic injuries including subdural hematoma and severe mass effect, facial and thoracic injuries with bilateral rib fractures but no parenchymatous lesions or extrapulmonary air. After surgical evacuation of the subdural hematoma, the patient entered the intensive care unit. Twenty-four hours later the patient pulled out the tubes, which were reinserted after signs of respiratory failure appeared. A series of clinical and radiological signs then followed, namely subcutaneous cervicothoracic emphysema, mediastinitis accompanied by hyperinsufflated balloon tamponade (pressures < 28 cmH2O). Tracheal rupture was suspected, but fibrebronchoscopy through the trachea revealed no damage. Surgical exploration 72 hours after admission confirmed high tracheal rupture near the pars membranacea. The damage was sutured, but sepsis with severe respiratory distress and mediastinitis led to death.

  10. Vehicle related factors that influence injury outcome in head-on collisions.

    PubMed

    Blum, Jeremy J; Scullion, Paul; Morgan, Richard M; Digges, Kennerly; Kan, Cing-Dao; Park, Shinhee; Bae, Hanil

    2008-10-01

    This study specifically investigated a range of vehicle-related factors that are associated with a lower risk of serious or fatal injury to a belted driver in a head-on collision. This analysis investigated a range of structural characteristics, quantities that describes the physical features of a passenger vehicle, e.g., stiffness or frontal geometry. The study used a data-mining approach (classification tree algorithm) to find the most significant relationships between injury outcome and the structural variables. The algorithm was applied to 120,000 real-world, head-on collisions, from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's (NHTSA's) State Crash data files, that were linked to structural attributes derived from frontal crash tests performed as part of the USA New Car Assessment Program. As with previous literature, the analysis found that the heavier vehicles were correlated with lower injury risk to their drivers. This analysis also found a new and significant correlation between the vehicle's stiffness and injury risk. When an airbag deployed, the vehicle's stiffness has the most statistically significant correlation with injury risk. These results suggest that in severe collisions, lower intrusion in the occupant cabin associated with higher stiffness is at least as important to occupant protection as vehicle weight for self-protection of the occupant. Consequently, the safety community might better improve self-protection by a renewed focus on increasing vehicle stiffness in order to improve crashworthiness in head-on collisions.

  11. Timing of Concussion Diagnosis is Related to Head Impact Exposure Prior to Injury

    PubMed Central

    Beckwith, Jonathan G.; Greenwald, Richard M.; Chu, Jeffrey J.; Crisco, Joseph J.; Rowson, Steven; Duma, Stefan M.; Broglio, Steven P.; McAllister, Thomas W.; Guskiewicz, Kevin M.; Mihalik, Jason P.; Anderson, Scott; Schnebel, Brock; Brolinson, P. Gunnar; Collins, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Concussions are commonly undiagnosed in an athletic environment because the post-injury signs and symptoms may be mild, masked by the subject, or unrecognized. This study compares measures of head impact frequency, location and kinematic response prior to cases of immediate and delayed concussion diagnosis. Methods Football players from eight collegiate and six high school teams wore instrumented helmets during play (n=1,208), of which ninety-five were diagnosed with concussion (105 total cases). Acceleration data recorded by the instrumented helmets was reduced to five kinematic metrics: peak linear and rotational acceleration, GSI, HIC15, and change in head velocity (Δv). Additionally, each impact was assigned to one of four general location regions (Front, Back, Side, and Top), and the number of impacts sustained prior to injury was calculated over two time periods (one and seven days). Results All head kinematic measures associated with injury, except peak rotational acceleration (p = 0.284), were significantly higher for cases of immediate diagnosis than delayed diagnosis (p<0.05). Players with delayed diagnosis sustained a significantly higher number of head impacts on the day of injury (32.9 ±24.9; p < 0.001) and within seven days of injury (69.7 ±43.3; p = 0.006) than players with immediate diagnosis (16.5 ±15.1 and 50.2 ±43.6). Impacts associated with concussion occurred most frequently to the Front of the head (46%) followed by the Top (25%), Side (16%), and Back (13%) with the number of impacts by location independent of temporal diagnosis (χ2(3) = 4.72; p = 0.19). Conclusions Concussions diagnosed immediately after an impact event are associated with the highest kinematic measures, while those characterized by delayed diagnosis are preceded by a higher number of impacts. PMID:23135364

  12. Maternal reporting of behaviour following very severe blunt head injury.

    PubMed Central

    Kinsella, G; Packer, S; Olver, J

    1991-01-01

    Mothers of 40 very severely head injured male subjects rated their son's behaviour on the Current Behaviour Scale and their ratings were compared with mothers' ratings of 40 control male subjects. The scale was able to discriminate the two groups, by utilising two factors--loss of emotional control and loss of motivation. The mothers' level of emotional distress was closely related to their reporting of loss of emotional control in their sons, but reporting of loss of motivation, or lowered arousal, was strongly predicted by the functional disability of the son. The utility of refining the measurement of post-trauma behaviour is discussed. PMID:1865205

  13. A prospective surveillance of paediatric head injuries in Singapore: a dual-centre study

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Shu-Ling; Chew, Su Yah; Feng, Jasmine Xun Yi; Teo, Penny Yun Lin; Chin, Sock Teng; Liu, Nan; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study the causes of head injuries among the paediatric population in Singapore, and the association between causes and mortality, as well as the need for airway or neurosurgical intervention. Design This is a prospective observational study utilising data from the trauma surveillance system from January 2011 to March 2015. Setting Paediatric emergency departments (EDs) of KK Women's and Children's Hospital and the National University Health System. Participants We included children aged <16 years presenting to the paediatric EDs with head injuries who required a CT scan, admission for monitoring of persistent symptoms, or who died from the head injury. We excluded children who presented with minor mechanisms and those whose symptoms had spontaneously resolved. Primary and secondary outcome measures Primary composite outcome was defined as death or the need for intubation or neurosurgical intervention. Secondary outcomes included length of hospital stay and type of neurosurgical intervention. Results We analysed 1049 children who met the inclusion criteria. The mean age was 6.7 (SD 5.2) years. 260 (24.8%) had a positive finding on CT. 17 (1.6%) children died, 52 (5.0%) required emergency intubation in the ED and 58 (5.5%) underwent neurosurgery. The main causes associated with severe outcomes were motor vehicle crashes (OR 7.2, 95% CI 4.3 to 12.0) and non-accidental trauma (OR 5.8, 95% CI 1.8 to 18.6). This remained statistically significant when we stratified to children aged <2 years and performed a multivariable analysis adjusting for age and location of injury. For motor vehicle crashes, less than half of the children were using restraints. Conclusions Motor vehicle crashes and non-accidental trauma causes are particularly associated with poor outcomes among children with paediatric head injury. Continued vigilance and compliance with injury prevention initiatives and legislature are vital. PMID:26908533

  14. Focally perfused succinate potentiates brain metabolism in head injury patients.

    PubMed

    Jalloh, Ibrahim; Helmy, Adel; Howe, Duncan J; Shannon, Richard J; Grice, Peter; Mason, Andrew; Gallagher, Clare N; Stovell, Matthew G; van der Heide, Susan; Murphy, Michael P; Pickard, John D; Menon, David K; Carpenter, T Adrian; Hutchinson, Peter J; Carpenter, Keri Lh

    2016-01-01

    Following traumatic brain injury, complex cerebral energy perturbations occur. Correlating with unfavourable outcome, high brain extracellular lactate/pyruvate ratio suggests hypoxic metabolism and/or mitochondrial dysfunction. We investigated whether focal administration of succinate, a tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate interacting directly with the mitochondrial electron transport chain, could improve cerebral metabolism. Microdialysis perfused disodium 2,3-(13)C2 succinate (12 mmol/L) for 24 h into nine sedated traumatic brain injury patients' brains, with simultaneous microdialysate collection for ISCUS analysis of energy metabolism biomarkers (nine patients) and nuclear magnetic resonance of (13)C-labelled metabolites (six patients). Metabolites 2,3-(13)C2 malate and 2,3-(13)C2 glutamine indicated tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolism, and 2,3-(13)C2 lactate suggested tricarboxylic acid cycle spinout of pyruvate (by malic enzyme or phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and pyruvate kinase), then lactate dehydrogenase-mediated conversion to lactate. Versus baseline, succinate perfusion significantly decreased lactate/pyruvate ratio (p = 0.015), mean difference -12%, due to increased pyruvate concentration (+17%); lactate changed little (-3%); concentrations decreased for glutamate (-43%) (p = 0.018) and glucose (-15%) (p = 0.038). Lower lactate/pyruvate ratio suggests better redox status: cytosolic NADH recycled to NAD(+) by mitochondrial shuttles (malate-aspartate and/or glycerol 3-phosphate), diminishing lactate dehydrogenase-mediated pyruvate-to-lactate conversion, and lowering glutamate. Glucose decrease suggests improved utilisation. Direct tricarboxylic acid cycle supplementation with 2,3-(13)C2 succinate improved human traumatic brain injury brain chemistry, indicated by biomarkers and (13)C-labelling patterns in metabolites.

  15. Chronic Histopathological and Behavioral Outcomes of Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury in Adult Male Animals

    PubMed Central

    Osier, Nicole D.; Carlson, Shaun W.; DeSana, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this review is to survey the use of experimental animal models for studying the chronic histopathological and behavioral consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The strategies employed to study the long-term consequences of TBI are described, along with a summary of the evidence available to date from common experimental TBI models: fluid percussion injury; controlled cortical impact; blast TBI; and closed-head injury. For each model, evidence is organized according to outcome. Histopathological outcomes included are gross changes in morphology/histology, ventricular enlargement, gray/white matter shrinkage, axonal injury, cerebrovascular histopathology, inflammation, and neurogenesis. Behavioral outcomes included are overall neurological function, motor function, cognitive function, frontal lobe function, and stress-related outcomes. A brief discussion is provided comparing the most common experimental models of TBI and highlighting the utility of each model in understanding specific aspects of TBI pathology. The majority of experimental TBI studies collect data in the acute postinjury period, but few continue into the chronic period. Available evidence from long-term studies suggests that many of the experimental TBI models can lead to progressive changes in histopathology and behavior. The studies described in this review contribute to our understanding of chronic TBI pathology. PMID:25490251

  16. Helmet legislation and admissions to hospital for cycling related head injuries in Canadian provinces and territories: interrupted time series analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, Tim; Turgeon, Alexis F; Zarychanski, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between helmet legislation and admissions to hospital for cycling related head injuries among young people and adults in Canada. Design Interrupted time series analysis using data from the National Trauma Registry Minimum Data Set. Setting Canadian provinces and territories; between 1994 and 2003, six of 10 provinces implemented helmet legislation. Participants All admissions (n=66 716) to acute care hospitals in Canada owing to cycling related injury between 1994 and 2008. Main outcome measure Rate of admissions to hospital for cycling related head injuries before and after the implementation of provincial helmet legislation. Results Between 1994 and 2008, 66 716 hospital admissions were for cycling related injuries in Canada. Between 1994 and 2003, the rate of head injuries among young people decreased by 54.0% (95% confidence interval 48.2% to 59.8%) in provinces with helmet legislation compared with 33.1% (23.3% to 42.9%) in provinces and territories without legislation. Among adults, the rate of head injuries decreased by 26.0% (16.0% to 36.3%) in provinces with legislation but remained constant in provinces and territories without legislation. After taking baseline trends into consideration, however, we were unable to detect an independent effect of legislation on the rate of hospital admissions for cycling related head injuries. Conclusions Reductions in the rates of admissions to hospital for cycling related head injuries were greater in provinces with helmet legislation, but injury rates were already decreasing before the implementation of legislation and the rate of decline was not appreciably altered on introduction of legislation. While helmets reduce the risk of head injuries and we encourage their use, in the Canadian context of existing safety campaigns, improvements to the cycling infrastructure, and the passive uptake of helmets, the incremental contribution of provincial helmet legislation to reduce

  17. Interleukin (IL)-8 immunoreactivity of injured axons and surrounding oligodendrocytes in traumatic head injury.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takahito; Ago, Kazutoshi; Nakamae, Takuma; Higo, Eri; Ogata, Mamoru

    2016-06-01

    Interleukin (IL)-8 has been suggested to be a positive regulator of myelination in the central nervous system, in addition to its principal role as a chemokine for neutrophils. Immunostaining for beta-amyloid precursor protein (AβPP) is an effective tool for detecting traumatic axonal injury, although AβPP immunoreactivity can also indicate axonal injury due to hypoxic causes. In this study, we examined IL-8 and AβPP immunoreactivity in sections of corpus callosum obtained from deceased patients with blunt head injury and from equivalent control tissue. AβPP immunoreactivity was detected in injured axons, such as axonal bulbs and varicose axons, in 24 of 44 head injury cases. These AβPP immunoreactive cases had survived for more than 3h. The AβPP immunostaining pattern can be classified into two types: traumatic (Pattern 1) and non-traumatic (Pattern 2) axonal injuries, which we described previously [Hayashi et al. Int. J. Legal Med. 129 (2015) 1085-1090]. Three of 44 control cases also showed AβPP immunoreactive injured axons as Pattern 2. In contrast, IL-8 immunoreactivity was detected in 7 AβPP immunoreactive and in 2 non-AβPP immunoreactive head injury cases, but was not detected in any of the 44 control cases, including the 3 AβPP immunoreactive control cases. The IL-8 immunoreactive cases had survived from 3 to 24 days, whereas those cases who survived less than 3 days (n=29) and who survived 90 days (n=1) were not IL-8 immunoreactive. Moreover, IL-8 was detected as Pattern 1 axons only. In addition, double immunofluorescence analysis showed that IL-8 is expressed by oligodendrocytes surrounding injured axons. In conclusion, our results suggest that immunohistochemical detection of IL-8 may be useful as a complementary diagnostic marker of traumatic axonal injury.

  18. An Independent, Prospective, Head to Head Study of the Reliability and Validity of Neurocognitive Test Batteries for the Assessment of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    to Head Study of the Reliability and Validity of Neurocognitive Test Batteries for the Assessment of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury PRINCIPAL...CONTRACT NUMBER Validity of Neurocognitive Test Batteries for the Assessment of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1...tools (NCAT’s) for the acute neurocognitive assessment, tracking cognitive recovery, and informing clinical management after mild traumatic brain injury

  19. The Preventive Effect of Head Injury by Helmet Type in Motorcycle Crashes: A Rural Korean Single-Center Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Kang-Min; Noble, Jennifer; Kim, Sang-Chul; Jeon, Hyeok-Jin; Kim, Jin-Yong; Do, Han-Ho; Park, Sang-O; Lee, Kyeong-Ryong; Baek, Kwang-Je

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The goal of this study was to determine the preventive effect on head injury by helmet type: full face helmet (FFH), open face helmet (OFH), and half-coverage helmet (HCH). Methods. This is a retrospective observational study of motorcycle crash victims between June 2012 and May 2015 in a rural town in Korea. We performed multiple linear regression to predict the effect of each type of helmet compared to unhelmeted status in preventing head injury using dependent variables based on the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) and applied logistic regression modeling to compare the incidence of head injury. Results. Of the 738 patients, the number of FFH patients was 33.5%, followed by unhelmeted (27.8%), OFH (17.6%), and HCH (13.0%) patients. The FFH and OFH group had a lower head maximum AIS than unhelmeted group (coefficient: −0.368, 95% CI: −0.559 to −0.177 and coefficient: −0.235, 95% CI: −0.459 to −0.010, resp.) and only FFHs experienced a reduction effect of severe and minor head injury (OR: 0.206, 95% CI: 0.080 to 0.533 and OR: 0.589, 95% CI: 0.377 to 0.920, resp.). Conclusions. FFHs and OFHs reduce the risk of head injury, and FFHs have a more preventive effect on head injury in motorcycle crashes. PMID:27340652

  20. Changes in head injury with the New Zealand bicycle helmet law.

    PubMed

    Robinson, D L

    2001-09-01

    It was claimed that the bicycle helmet law in New Zealand reduced head injuries to adult cyclists by 28% (Povey, L.J., Frith, W.J., Graham, P.G., 1999. Cycle helmet effectiveness in New Zealand. Accident Analysis and Prevention 31, 763-770). However, the pre-law increase in adults wearing helmets (from 30% in 1990 to 43% in 1993) was accompanied by a fall of 45 head injuries per 100 limb injuries (i.e. -3.47 for every 1% increase in helmet wearing) compared with a fall of 11 when wearing increased from 43 to 93% with the law (-0.23 for every 1% increase in wearing). Unless voluntary wearing is 15 times more effective in reducing head injuries, it seems likely that the apparent effects (as described by Povey et al., 1999) were an artefact caused by failure to fit time trends in their model. Such inconsistency of effects over periods of substantial change compared with periods of little change in helmet wearing may be a useful indicator of the presence of trends. Because the large increases in wearing with helmet laws have not resulted in any obvious change over and above existing trends, helmet laws and major helmet promotion campaigns are likely to prove less beneficial and less cost effective than proven road-safety measures, such as enforcement of speed limits and drink-driving laws, education of motorists and cyclists and treatment of accident black spots and known hazards for cyclists.

  1. Did Emperor Moctezuma II's head injury and subsequent death hasten the fall of the Aztec nation?

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Gonzalo M

    2015-07-01

    This article analyzes the head injury of Emperor Moctezuma as one of those injuries that affected the course of history. The Emperor's death arguably changed the fate of an entire nation and led to the destruction of the Aztec civilization. Moctezuma died in the evening hours of June 30, 1520, in his palace in the Aztec capital, Tenochtitlan, while a prisoner of the Spanish conquistadors. The Emperor had been speaking to his people in an effort to persuade them to cease hostilities against Hernán Cortés, his Spanish soldiers, and Indian allies. Both Spanish and Indian contemporary sources document that he sustained a severe head injury when one of his own warriors hit him with a rock thrown from a sling. However, after the Conquest of Mexico some of the information collected by Spanish friars from Indian stories, songs, and pictorial representations raised the possibility that Moctezuma died of strangulation or stabbing at the hands of the Spaniards. There is even a suggestion of suicide. This issue remains unresolved and emotionally charged. The historical and clinical analysis of the events surrounding Moctezuma's death indicates that the Emperor most likely died as a consequence of head injury. The author has attempted to present a neutral analysis but agrees with Benjamin Keen that neutrality may be unattainable, no matter how remote the subject of historical inquiry is from the present.

  2. Dual task performance after focal cerebral lesions and closed head injuries.

    PubMed

    Vilkki, J; Virtanen, S; Surma-Aho, O; Servo, A

    1996-11-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate that focal frontal lobe lesions and closed head injuries cause a deficit in the deliberate minimizing of dual task decrements that follow when two separate tasks should be done concurrently. In single tasks, subjects counted backwards and cancelled visual targets as quickly and accurately as possible on separate 1 min trials. In the dual task, they were required to do both tasks simultaneously, taking care that performance on neither task would be notably more impaired than on the other, as only the performance showing a larger percentage decrement from the corresponding single task performance was taken into account as the result of the test. Patients with acute closed head injury displayed more pronounced dual task decrement than the controls. This deficit was not secondary to inefficiency on the single tasks but was related to the depth of coma at admission, the acuteness of injury and age. Contrary to expectation, patients with focal frontal lobe lesions or patients with subacute closed head injury did not demonstrate abnormal dual task decrement.

  3. Update on injury mechanisms in abusive head trauma--shaken baby syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nadarasa, Jeyendran; Deck, Caroline; Meyer, Franck; Willinger, Rémy; Raul, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-12-01

    Violently shaking a baby leads to clinical presentations ranging from seizures to cardiopulmonary arrest. The main injuries sustained are retinal hemorrhages, subdural hemorrhages, and sometimes fractures and spine injury. It is important to have a global view of the injuries sustained by the infant to correctly discuss the biomechanical aspects of abusive head trauma. Recent works based on finite element models have shown that whiplash-shaking alone is enough to generate vitreo-retinal traction leading to retinal hemorrhage and to cause the rupture of bridging veins leading to subdural hemorrhage. We will review the main papers dealing with the mechanisms of shaken baby syndrome and present the most relevant hypothesis concerning the biomechanical aspects of injuries related to shaken baby syndrome.

  4. Head and Maxillofacial Injuries in Child and Adolescent Victims of Automotive Accidents

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcanti, Alessandro Leite; Lino, Thiago Henrique de Araujo; de Oliveira, Thaliny Batista Sarmento; de Oliveira, Thaisy Sarmento Batista; Cardoso, Andreia Medeiros Rodrigues; de Macedo, Rodrigo Feliciano; Padilha, Wilton Wilney Nascimento; Xavier, Alidianne Fabia Cabral

    2014-01-01

    Background. Victims of motor vehicle accidents may suffer multiple lesions, including maxillofacial injuries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and factors associated with head, facial, and maxillofacial injuries in child and adolescent victims of automobile accidents. A cross-sectional study was carried out with analysis of forensic medical reports from the Legal Medical Institute of Campina Grande, Brazil, between January 2008 and December 2011. Descriptive and inferential statistical analysis was conducted using the chi-square test (α = 0.05). From 1613 medical reports analyzed, the sample is composed 232 (14.4%) reports referring to child and adolescent victims of automobile accidents aged 0–19 years of both sexes. Victims were mostly adolescents aged from 15 to 19 years (64.2%), males (73.7%), and motorcyclists (51.3%). More than half of the victims had single lesions (54.3%) located in the head (20.7%) and face (21.6%). Head injuries occurred more frequently in children aged 0–4 years (53.8%, PR = 5.065, 95% CI = 1.617–5.870) and pedestrians (30.4%, PR = 2.039, 95% CI = 1.024–4.061), while facial and maxillofacial injuries occurred in higher proportion among females (31.1%, PR = 0.489, 95% CI = 0.251–0.954). Our findings suggest that accidents involving motorcyclists are the most prevalent, affecting male adolescents aged from 15 to 19 years, resulting in a high frequency of injuries in the head and face regions. PMID:25574492

  5. Could heart rate variability predict outcome in patients with severe head injury? A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rapenne, T; Moreau, D; Lenfant, F; Vernet, M; Boggio, V; Cottin, Y; Freysz, M

    2001-07-01

    Despite major improvements in the resuscitation of patients with head injury, the outcome of patients with head trauma often remains poor and difficult to establish. Heart rate variability (HRV) analysis is a noninvasive tool used to measure autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity. The aim of this prospective study was to investigate whether HRV analysis might be a useful adjunct for predicting outcome in patients with severe head injury. Twenty patients with severe head trauma (Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] or= 10) to HRV in patients characterized by a worsened neurologic state (GCS < 10). Statistical analysis used the Kruskal-Wallis test, P < .05. To assess whether HRV could predict evolution to brain death, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated the day after trauma for Total Power, natural logarithm of high-frequency component of spectral analysis (LnHF), natural logarithm of low-frequency component of spectral analysis (LnLF), and root mean square for successive interval differences (rMSSD). Seven patients died between Day 1 and Day 5 after trauma. Six of those had progressed to brain death. In these six patients, at Day 1, Global HRV and parasympathetic tone were significantly higher. Referring to the area under the rMSSD ROC curve, HRV might provide useful information in predicting early evolution of patients with severe head trauma. During the awakening period, global HRV and the parasympathetic tone were significantly lower in the worsened neurologic state group. In conclusion, HRV could be helpful as a predictor of imminent brain death

  6. Head and neck control varies with perturbation acceleration but not jerk: implications for whiplash injuries

    PubMed Central

    Siegmund, Gunter P; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have proposed that a high rate of acceleration onset, i.e. high jerk, during a low-speed vehicle collision increases the risk of whiplash injury by triggering inappropriate muscle responses and/or increasing peak head acceleration. Our goal was to test these proposed mechanisms at realistic jerk levels and then to determine how collision jerk affects the potential for whiplash injuries. Twenty-three seated volunteers (8 F, 15 M) were exposed to multiple experiments involving perturbations simulating the onset of a vehicle collision in eyes open and eyes closed conditions. In the first experiment, subjects experienced five forward and five rearward perturbations to look for the inappropriate muscle responses and ‘floppy’ head kinematics previously attributed to high jerk perturbations. In the second experiment, we independently varied the jerk (∼125 to 3 000 m s−3) and acceleration (∼0.65 to 2.6 g) of the perturbation to assess their effect on the electromyographic (EMG) responses of the sternocleidomastoid (SCM), scalene (SCAL) and cervical paraspinal (PARA) muscles and the kinematic responses of the head and neck. In the first experiment, we found neither inappropriate muscle responses nor floppy head kinematics when subjects had their eyes open, but observed two subjects with floppy head kinematics with eyes closed. In the second experiment, we found that about 70% of the variations in the SCM and SCAL responses and about 95% of the variations in head/neck kinematics were explained by changes in perturbation acceleration in both the eyes open and eyes closed conditions. Less than 2% of the variation in the muscle and kinematic responses was explained by changes in perturbation jerk and, where significant, response amplitudes diminished with increasing jerk. Based on these findings, collision jerk appears to have little or no role in the genesis of whiplash injuries in low-speed vehicle crashes. PMID:19237420

  7. The Current State of Head and Neck Injuries in Extreme Sports

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vinay K.; Rango, Juan; Connaughton, Alexander J.; Lombardo, Daniel J.; Sabesan, Vani J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Since their conception during the mid-1970s, international participation in extreme sports has grown rapidly. The recent death of extreme snowmobiler Caleb Moore at the 2013 Winter X Games has demonstrated the serious risks associated with these sports. Purpose: To examine the incidence and prevalence of head and neck injuries (HNIs) in extreme sports. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiological study. Methods: The National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) was used to acquire data from 7 sports (2000-2011) that were included in the Winter and Summer X Games. Data from the NEISS database were collected for each individual sport per year and type of HNI. Cumulative data for overall incidence and injuries over the entire 11-year period were calculated. National estimates were determined using NEISS-weighted calculations. Incidence rates were calculated for extreme sports using data from Outdoor Foundation Participation Reports. Results: Over 4 million injuries were reported between 2000 and 2011, of which 11.3% were HNIs. Of all HNIs, 83% were head injuries and 17% neck injuries. The 4 sports with the highest total incidence of HNI were skateboarding (129,600), snowboarding (97,527), skiing (83,313), and motocross (78,236). Severe HNI (cervical or skull fracture) accounted for 2.5% of extreme sports HNIs. Of these, skateboarding had the highest percentage of severe HNIs. Conclusion: The number of serious injuries suffered in extreme sports has increased as participation in the sports continues to grow. A greater awareness of the dangers associated with these sports offers an opportunity for sports medicine and orthopaedic physicians to advocate for safer equipment, improved on-site medical care, and further research regarding extreme sports injuries. PMID:26535369

  8. Motor Vehicle Crash Brain Injury in Infants and Toddlers: A Suitable Model for Inflicted Head Injury?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Mahim; Vavilala, Monica S.; Feldman, Kenneth W.; Hallam, Daniel K.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Children involved in motor vehicle crash (MVC) events might experience angular accelerations similar to those experienced by children with inflicted traumatic brain injury (iTBI). This is a pilot study to determine whether the progression of signs and symptoms and radiographic findings of MVC brain injury (mvcTBI) in children of the age…

  9. [Headache as the consequence of brain concussion and contusion in closed head injuries in children].

    PubMed

    Lemka, M

    1999-01-01

    The most frequent type of head injury in children is closed head trauma with brain concussion or contusion, and headache is the dominant complaint of early and late postinjury period. Because of scant number of studies on the problem of occurrence, characteristics and persistence of posttraumatic headache this study was undertaken in a group of 100 children (29 girls and 71 boys), aged 3-14 years old, 90 after brain concussion and 10 after contusion. Children with a history of injuries, central nervous system infections, with headaches before injury and chronic diseases were excluded. In 9 cases linear skull fracture was present after injury. The material was examined within one week after trauma, and then after 3, 6, and 12 months. After 3 months EEG was performed and repeated after 6 and 12 months in children with persistent headache or those without headache but with abnormal EEG results in the first examination. According to the additional diagnostic examinations, I excluded other causes of headache, besides head injury. In my observation 83% of children had headache after brain concussion and contusion. The majority--56%--had acute posttraumatic headache, but 27% of children complained of chronic headache, mainly tension type headache. Only 3% had migraine. In 21% of all group of 100 children, I noticed the headache persisting during the whole year of my observation. The important risk factor for the occurrence of posttraumatic headache were the age of child at the moment injury and the period of unconsciousness. The electroencephalographic recording still remains the important additional examination of posttraumatic consequences.

  10. Assessment of brainstem damage by the auditory brainstem response in acute severe head injury.

    PubMed Central

    Tsubokawa, T; Nishimoto, H; Yamamoto, T; Kitamura, M; Katayama, Y; Moriyasu, N

    1980-01-01

    In 64 cases suffering from severe head injury (Glasgow coma scale: less than seven- the auditory brainstem responses (FARs) recorded at the vertex, which are thought to be volumet conducted far-field potentials reflecting the sequential electrical activities of the auditory afferen) system in the brainstem, were recorded in the neurosurgical intensive care room immediately after admission. The alterations in the responses were compared with the types of primary injury, neurological signs., CT findings and outcome following treatment. Based on the results obtained, it is concluded that the FAR is a useful indicator for predicting the effects of treatment on brainstem damage in patients with severe head injury, and that it provides more reliable information about the function of the brainstem than the neurological signs or CT findings. Moreover, it also offers a diagnostic method for primary brainstem injury. Three cases or primary brainstem injury without lesions in the supratentorial region were diagnosed by means of combined CT and FAR recording. Images PMID:7441277

  11. Saccade sequences as markers for cerebral dysfunction following mild closed head injury.

    PubMed

    Heitger, M H; Anderson, T J; Jones, R D

    2002-01-01

    Diffuse axonal injury caused by mild closed head injury (CHI) is likely to affect the neural networks concerned with the planning and execution of sequences of memory-guided saccades. Thirty subjects with mild CHI and thirty controls were tested on 2- and 3-step sequences of memory-guided saccades. CHI subjects showed more directional errors, larger position errors, and hypermetria of primary saccades and final eye position. No deficits were seen in temporal accuracy (timing and rhythm). These results suggest that computerized tests of saccade sequences can provide sensitive markers of cerebral dysfunction after mild CHI.

  12. Combat body armor and injuries to the head, face, and neck region: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Tong, Darryl; Beirne, Ross

    2013-04-01

    There has been a reported increase in combat-related head, face, and neck (HFN) injuries among service personnel wearing combat body armor (CBA) that have deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan. Modern ceramic plate CBA has decreased the incidence of fatal-penetrating injuries to the torso but offers no protection to the limbs and face which remain exposed to gunshot wounds and fragments from explosive devices. The aim of this review was to systematically summarize the literature reporting on HFN injuries sustained by combat personnel wearing CBA and to highlight recommendations for increased protection to the facial region. Three major contributing factors were identified with this proportional increase in HFN injuries, namely the increased survivability of soldiers because of CBA, fragments injuries from explosive devices, and the lack of protection to the face and limbs. There appears to be no evidence to suggest that by virtue of wearing CBA the likelihood of sustaining an HFN injury increases as such, but a higher incidence of fragment injuries to the HFN region may be due to the more common use of improvised explosive devicess and other explosive devices. Further development of lightweight protection for the face is needed.

  13. JSNT-Guidelines for the Management of Severe Head Injury (Abridged edition).

    PubMed

    Shima, Katsuji; Aruga, Tohru; Onuma, Takehide; Shigemori, Minoru

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to introduce the principal part of the JSNT-guidelines for the management of severe head injury in adults. The JSNT-guidelines were developed in 2000 by the Guidelines Committee of the Japan Society of Neurotraumatology (JSNT) based on the results of literature review and the Committee consensus. The guidelines updated in 2006 consist of 7 topics pertaining not only to prehospital care, initial, ICU and surgical management, but also the management of pediatric and geriatric patients. The JSNT-guidelines are of practical nature accounting for the difference in the medical system and conditions in Japan, but in their essence they are similar to those of Western countries. Reports on the application of these guidelines indicate their positive affect on the results of management of severe head injury.

  14. AHEAD Study: an observational study of the management of anticoagulated patients who suffer head injury

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Suzanne; Kuczawski, Maxine; Teare, M Dawn; Stevenson, Matt; Goodacre, Steve; Ramlakhan, Shammi; Morris, Francis; Rothwell, Joanne

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Management of anticoagulated patients after head injury is unclear due to lack of robust evidence. This study aimed to determine the adverse outcome rate in these patients and identify risk factors associated with poor outcome. Design Multicentre, observational study using routine patient records. Setting 33 emergency departments in England and Scotland. Participants 3566 adults (aged ≥16 years) who had suffered blunt head injury and were currently taking warfarin. Main outcome measures Primary outcome measure was rate of adverse outcome defined as death or neurosurgery following initial injury, clinically significant CT scan finding or reattendance with related complication within 10 weeks of initial hospital attendance. Secondary objectives included identifying risk factors for adverse outcome using univariable and multivariable analyses. Results Clinical data available for 3534/3566 patients (99.1%), median age 79 years; mean initial international normalised ratio (INR) 2.67 (SD 1.34); 81.2% Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) 15: 59.8% received a CT scan with significant head injury-related finding in 5.4% (n=208); 0.5% underwent neurosurgery; 1.2% patients suffered a head injury-related death. Overall adverse outcome rate was 5.9% (95% CI 5.2% to 6.7%). Patients with GCS=15 and no associated symptoms had lowest risk of adverse outcome (risk 2.7%; 95% CI 2.1 to 3.6). Patients with GCS=15 multivariable analysis (using imputation) found risk of adverse outcome to increase when reporting at least one associated symptom: vomiting (relative risk (RR) 1.8; 95% CI 1.0 to 3.4), amnesia (RR 3.5; 95% CI 2.1 to 5.7), headache (RR 1.3; 95% CI 0.8 to 2.2), loss of consciousness (RR 1.75; 95% CI 1.0 to 3.0). INR measurement did not predict adverse outcome in patients with GCS=15 (RR 1.1; 95% CI 1.0 to 1.2). Conclusions In alert warfarinised patients following head injury, the presence of symptoms is associated with greater risk of adverse outcome. Those with GCS=15

  15. Influence of two anesthetic techniques on blood sugar level in head injury patients: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manoj; Tripathi, Manoj; Malviya, Deepak; Malviya, P. S.; Kumar, Virendra; Tyagi, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Background: Head injury presents a major worldwide social, economic, and health problem. Hyperglycemia is a significant indicator of the severity of injury and predictor of outcome, which can easily be prevented. There has been a long-standing controversy regarding the use of inhalational or intravenous (i.v.) anesthetic agents for surgery of head injury cases and impact of these agents on blood sugar level. Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study is to find out anesthetic drugs and technique having minimal or no effect on the blood sugar, and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) of patients with a head injury by comparing two types of anesthetic techniques in surgery of head injury patients. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective, randomized, and comparative study, conducted on 60 adult head injury patients. The patients were divided into two groups of 30 each. Group I patients received induction with sevoflurane and then had O2 + air + sevoflurane for maintenance with controlled ventilation. Group II patients received induction with i.v. propofol and then had O2 + air + propofol for maintenance with controlled ventilation. Injection fentanyl was used in both the groups at the time of induction and in intermittent boluses in maintenance. In observation, blood sugar level and mean arterial pressure were assessed at different time periods perioperatively in both groups while GCS was analyzed pre- and post-operatively. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was performed by Microsoft Excel 2010 using t-test for comparison between the two groups and Z-test for comparison of proportions. Results and Conclusion: Blood sugar level was found significantly higher in patients of sevoflurane group at 30 min after induction, at the end of surgery, and 1 h after the end of anesthesia than propofol group patients. This increase of blood sugar level did not have any significant alteration in the GCS profile of the patients in sevoflurane group as compared to propofol group

  16. Newborn brachial plexus injuries: The twisting and extension of the fetal head as contributing causes.

    PubMed

    Sandmire, H; Morrison, J; Racinet, C; Hankins, G; Pecorari, D; Gherman, R

    2008-02-01

    The exact mechanism of the causation of brachial plexus injury (BPI) has long been a matter of controversy. It is our opinion that the twisting and the extension of the fetal head, during the labour and delivery process, will increase the stretching of the neck, thus contributing to the labour forces as the cause of BPI. Our opinions are offered to other researchers and readers for their consideration of how the labour forces can cause BPI.

  17. Disability after severe head injury: observations on the use of the Glasgow Outcome Scale.

    PubMed Central

    Jennett, B; Snoek, J; Bond, M R; Brooks, N

    1981-01-01

    The nature of the neurological and mental disabilities resulting from severe head injuries are analysed in 150 patients. Mental handicap contributed more significantly to overall social disability than did neurological deficits. This social handicap is readily described by the Glasgow Outcome Scale, an extended version of which is described and compared with alternatives. Comments are made about the quality of life in disabled survivors. PMID:6453957

  18. Pontomedullary lacerations and concomitant head and neck injuries: their underlying mechanism. A prospective autopsy study.

    PubMed

    Živković, Vladimir; Nikolić, Slobodan; Strajina, Veljko; Babić, Dragan; Djonić, Danijela; Djurić, Marija

    2012-09-01

    It is a well-documented fact that pontomedullary lacerations (PML) occur as a result of severe craniocervical injury, but their underlying mechanism has yet to be fully clarified. The aim of this prospective study has been to give greater insight into the underlying mechanism of PML through determining the site of blunt head-impact, as well as the presence of concomitant head and neck injuries in cases of brainstem PML. A total of 56 cases with partial PML have been analysed for this study. The case group was composed of 40 men and 16 women, averaging in age 44.2 ± 19.2 years and consisting of 7 motorcyclists, 4 bicyclists, 18 car occupants, 16 pedestrians, and 10 victims of falls from a height, as well as 1 victim of a fall from standing height. The presented study has shown that there are several possible mechanisms of PML. Impact to the chin, with or without a skull base fracture, most often leads to this fatal injury, due to the impact force transmission either through the jawbone or vertebral column; most likely in combination with a fronto-posterior hyperextension of the head. Additionally, lateral head-impacts with subsequent hinge fractures and PML may also be a possible mechanism. The jawbone and other facial bones are able to act as shock absorbers, and their fracture may diminish the energy transfer towards the skull and protect the brain and brainstem from injury. The upper cervical spine can act as damper and energy absorber as well, and may prevent any occurrence of fracture to the base of the skull.

  19. [The hardness of the traumatic object and the extent of injury (as exemplified by head injuries)].

    PubMed

    Shadymov, A B; Kazymov, M A

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to study the influence of the surface hardness of a traumatic agent on the extent and character of the injury to the soft and bone tissues of the cranial vault associated with various forms of injurious exposure. The authors evaluated forensic medical significance of the hardness as one of the most important properties of the major injurious agents involved in the formation of skull fractures and soft tissue ruptures under effect of an impact action or compression. The objects differing in the hardness of the contact element (striking pin) were studied in comparison with the hardness of the bone tissue. The extent and morphological features of the injuries to the bones and soft tissues in different parts of the skull were compared with reference to deformation and strength characteristics developing in response to a blow and compression.

  20. Role of Roux-en-Y feeding jejunostomy for patients with acute head injury.

    PubMed

    Denis, R; Lucas, C E; Grabow, D; Darmody, W R; Ledgerwood, A M

    1983-06-01

    The total care of a patient with severe head injury is challenging and may extend for weeks, months, or even years. A major challenge of this care includes nutritional support: swallowing is impaired, aspiration accompanies gastric tube feeding, parenteral nutrition is limited to short term in hospital care, and needle jejunostomy or transabdominal jejunostomy are prone to inadvertent removal. The role of Roux-en-Y feeding jejunostomy was evaluated in 13 patients with acute head injury. Procedure related complications include prolapse of the ostomy (1 patient) and stoma-ischemia requiring revision (1 patient). The effect of ostomy tube feedings on gastric acid secretions was studied in five patients, and no significant change was noted when saline feeding was compared to blenderized diet feeding. Blenderized diet feedings were advanced gradually, and antidiarrheals were added as needed once gastrointestinal function returned. In conclusion, Roux-en-Y feeding jejunostomy provides an attractive, safe method for long-term enteral nutrition in the head injury patient. Easy replacement of the feeding tube facilitates nursing care, and the threat of acid-induced stress gastric bleeding is not enhanced.

  1. Hemodynamic and morphologic responses in mouse brain during acute head injury imaged by multispectral structured illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, Boris; Mathews, Marlon S.; Abookasis, David

    2015-03-01

    Multispectral imaging has received significant attention over the last decade as it integrates spectroscopy, imaging, tomography analysis concurrently to acquire both spatial and spectral information from biological tissue. In the present study, a multispectral setup based on projection of structured illumination at several near-infrared wavelengths and at different spatial frequencies is applied to quantitatively assess brain function before, during, and after the onset of traumatic brain injury in an intact mouse brain (n=5). For the production of head injury, we used the weight drop method where weight of a cylindrical metallic rod falling along a metal tube strikes the mouse's head. Structured light was projected onto the scalp surface and diffuse reflected light was recorded by a CCD camera positioned perpendicular to the mouse head. Following data analysis, we were able to concurrently show a series of hemodynamic and morphologic changes over time including higher deoxyhemoglobin, reduction in oxygen saturation, cell swelling, etc., in comparison with baseline measurements. Overall, results demonstrates the capability of multispectral imaging based structured illumination to detect and map of brain tissue optical and physiological properties following brain injury in a simple noninvasive and noncontact manner.

  2. Halstead-Reitan Deficit Scores in Assessment of Nonimpact Head Injury.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, James Ernest; Johnson, Andrew M; Slade, Anne M

    2017-01-01

    Comparisons were made between neuropsychological deficit scores generated by the Reitan-Wolfson system of interpretation (1993) and the computerized Revised Comprehensive Norms for an Expanded Halstead-Reitan Battery (Heaton, Miller, Taylor, Grant, & PAR Staff, 2005 ). The scores were obtained from seat-belted litigants and insurance claimants subjected to extreme physical forces in motor vehicle accidents. Subjects had not sustained direct impact to the head but met criteria for mild traumatic brain injury. The word "nonimpact" has been used to describe this form of head injury. Consistent with previous studies, the Reitan-Wolfson system generated deficit scores suggestive of a greater degree of impairment than the Revised Comprehensive Norms. Demographic characteristics of the normative data used in each interpretive system and the operational definition of impairment were scrutinized. Likely or possible determinants of deficit score discrepancies were identified. On the basis of this information, a method of using the two interpretive procedures in an integrated manner to assess nonimpact head injury was suggested.

  3. Incidental cranial CT findings in head injury patients in a Nigerian tertiary hospital

    PubMed Central

    Ogbole, Godwin I.; Adeleye, Amos O.; Owolabi, Mayowa O.; Olatunji, Richard B.; Yusuf, Bolutife P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Incidental findings on computed tomography (CT) scans are occasionally noted in patients presenting with head injury. Since it can be assumed that head injured patients are of normal health status before the accident, these findings may be a representation of their frequency in the general population. Our aim was to determine the prevalence of such incidental findings among head injured patients in Nigeria's foremost center of clinical neurosciences. Materials and Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of CT scan images of 591 consecutive eligible patients over a 5-year period (2006-2010) to identify incidental findings. The images were evaluated by consensus agreement of two radiologists. Associations with gender and age were explored using appropriate statistical tests with an alpha level of 0.05. Results: The mean patient age was 34.6 ± 21.2 years, and male to female ratio was 3.2: 1. Incidental findings were noted in 503/591 (85.1 %) of the scans. Intracranial calcification was the commonest finding occurring in 61.8% of patients. Over 90% of the findings were benign. Compared with older ones, patients under the age of 60 were less likely, (P < 0.001), to have incidental findings. Conclusion: Although the majority of incidental findings in this African cohort of head injury patients are benign some clinically significant lesions were detectable. It is therefore recommended that such findings be adequately described in the radiological reports for proper counseling and follow-up. PMID:25949036

  4. Dropped-head syndrome resulting from injury to the central spinal cord at the upper cervical level.

    PubMed

    Rust, C L; Ching, A C; Hart, R A

    2011-04-01

    There are many causes of paraspinal muscle weakness which give rise to the dropped-head syndrome. In the upper cervical spine the central portion of the spinal cord innervates the cervical paraspinal muscles. Dropped-head syndrome resulting from injury to the central spinal cord at this level has not previously been described. We report two patients who were treated acutely for this condition. Both presented with weakness in the upper limbs and paraspinal cervical musculature after a fracture of C2. Despite improvement in the strength of the upper limbs, the paraspinal muscle weakness persisted in both patients. One ultimately underwent cervicothoracic fusion to treat her dropped-head syndrome. While the cause of the dropped-head syndrome cannot be definitively ascribed to the injuries to the spinal cord, this pattern is consistent with the known patho-anatomical mechanisms of both injury to the central spinal cord and dropped-head syndrome.

  5. Diffuse optical monitoring of hemodynamic changes in piglet brain with closed head injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chao; Eucker, Stephanie A.; Durduran, Turgut; Yu, Guoqiang; Ralston, Jill; Friess, Stuart H.; Ichord, Rebecca N.; Margulies, Susan S.; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2009-05-01

    We used a nonimpact inertial rotational model of a closed head injury in neonatal piglets to simulate the conditions following traumatic brain injury in infants. Diffuse optical techniques, including diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS), were used to measure cerebral blood oxygenation and blood flow continuously and noninvasively before injury and up to 6 h after the injury. The DCS measurements of relative cerebral blood flow were validated against the fluorescent microsphere method. A strong linear correlation was observed between the two techniques (R=0.89, p<0.00001). Injury-induced cerebral hemodynamic changes were quantified, and significant changes were found in oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations, total hemoglobin concentration, blood oxygen saturation, and cerebral blood flow after the injury. The diffuse optical measurements were robust and also correlated well with recordings of vital physiological parameters over the 6-h monitoring period, such as mean arterial blood pressure, arterial oxygen saturation, and heart rate. Finally, the diffuse optical techniques demonstrated sensitivity to dynamic physiological events, such as apnea, cardiac arrest, and hypertonic saline infusion. In total, the investigation corraborates potential of the optical methods for bedside monitoring of pediatric and adult human patients in the neurointensive care unit.

  6. Diffuse optical monitoring of hemodynamic changes in piglet brain with closed head injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chao; Eucker, Stephanie A.; Durduran, Turgut; Yu, Guoqiang; Ralston, Jill; Friess, Stuart H.; Ichord, Rebecca N.; Margulies, Susan S.; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2011-01-01

    We used a nonimpact inertial rotational model of a closed head injury in neonatal piglets to simulate the conditions following traumatic brain injury in infants. Diffuse optical techniques, including diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS), were used to measure cerebral blood oxygenation and blood flow continuously and noninvasively before injury and up to 6 h after the injury. The DCS measurements of relative cerebral blood flow were validated against the fluorescent microsphere method. A strong linear correlation was observed between the two techniques (R = 0.89, p < 0.00001). Injury-induced cerebral hemodynamic changes were quantified, and significant changes were found in oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations, total hemoglobin concentration, blood oxygen saturation, and cerebral blood flow after the injury. The diffuse optical measurements were robust and also correlated well with recordings of vital physiological parameters over the 6-h monitoring period, such as mean arterial blood pressure, arterial oxygen saturation, and heart rate. Finally, the diffuse optical techniques demonstrated sensitivity to dynamic physiological events, such as apnea, cardiac arrest, and hypertonic saline infusion. In total, the investigation corraborates potential of the optical methods for bedside monitoring of pediatric and adult human patients in the neurointensive care unit. PMID:19566308

  7. Protein and Nitrogen Metabolism Changes Following Closed Head Injury or Cardiothoracic Surgery in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hak, Emily B.; Rogers, David A.; Storm, Michael C.; Helms, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We compared markers of protein metabolism between children who had a controlled injury and an acute traumatic event. Significant protein catabolism occurs after acute severe injury. During surgery the injury is controlled and the degree of subsequent catabolism may be blunted. METHODS This was a prospective, unblinded observational study in 10 children 2 to 12 years old with a closed head injury (CHI) and an admission Physiologic Stability Index of ≥ 10 and in 10 children who underwent elective cardiothoracic surgery (CTS). Nutrient intake, nitrogen balance, serum albumin and prealbumin, urinary 3-methylhistidine excretion, and 3-methylhistidine to creatinine ratios were evaluated on days 1, 2, 3, 4, and 10 after injury. RESULTS Nutrient intake was similar in both groups on study days 1–4 and did not meet estimated needs. By day 10, 7 patients in the CTS group and 2 patients in the CHI group had been discharged home. The 3 CTS patients were still in the ICU while the 8 hospitalized CHI patients had been transferred to the floor. Compared to the CTS group, nitrogen balance in the CHI group was lower on day 1. On day 10, nitrogen balance and prealbumin were greater in the CHI group than in the CTS group, consistent with recovery and increased nutrient intake. CONCLUSIONS Markers of protein metabolism follow similar patterns after CTS or CHI in children. However, markers of protein metabolism indicate more severe catabolism soon after injury in CHI. PMID:23118637

  8. Temporal MRI characterization, neurobiochemical and neurobehavioral changes in a mouse repetitive concussive head injury model

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhihui; Wang, Ping; Morgan, Drake; Lin, Dan; Pan, Jianchun; Lin, Fan; Strang, Kevin H.; Selig, Tyler M.; Perez, Pablo D.; Febo, Marcelo; Chang, Binggong; Rubenstein, Richard; Wang, Kevin K.W.

    2015-01-01

    Single and repeated sports-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), also referred to as concussion, can result in chronic post-concussive syndrome (PCS), neuropsychological and cognitive deficits, or chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). However PCS is often difficult to diagnose using routine clinical, neuroimaging or laboratory evaluations, while CTE currently only can be definitively diagnosed postmortem. We sought to develop an animal model to simulate human repetitive concussive head injury for systematic study. In this study, mice received single or multiple head impacts by a stereotaxic impact device with a custom-made rubber tip-fitted impactor. Dynamic changes in MRI, neurobiochemical markers (Tau hyperphosphorylation and glia activation in brain tissues) and neurobehavioral functions such as anxiety, depression, motor function and cognitive function at various acute/subacute (1-7 day post-injury) and chronic (14-60 days post-injury) time points were examined. To explore the potential biomarkers of rCHI, serum levels of total Tau (T-Tau) and phosphorylated Tau (P-Tau) were also monitored at various time points. Our results show temporal dynamics of MRI consistent with structural perturbation in the acute phase and neurobiochemical changes (P-Tau and GFAP induction) in the subacute and chronic phase as well as development of chronic neurobehavioral changes, which resemble those observed in mTBI patients. PMID:26058556

  9. Experimental injury study of children seated behind collapsing front seats in rear impacts.

    PubMed

    Saczalski, Kenneth J; Sances, Anthony; Kumaresan, Srirangam; Burton, Joseph L; Lewis, Paul R

    2003-01-01

    In the mid 1990's the U.S. Department of Transportation made recommendations to place children and infants into the rear seating areas of motor vehicles to avoid front seat airbag induced injuries and fatalities. In most rear-impacts, however, the adult occupied front seats will collapse into the rear occupant area and pose another potentially serious injury hazard to the rear-seated children. Since rear-impacts involve a wide range of speeds, impact severity, and various sizes of adults in collapsing front seats, a multi-variable experimental method was employed in conjunction with a multi-level "factorial analysis" technique to study injury potential of rear-seated children. Various sizes of Hybrid III adult surrogates, seated in a "typical" average strength collapsing type of front seat, and a three-year-old Hybrid III child surrogate, seated on a built-in booster seat located directly behind the front adult occupant, were tested at various impact severity levels in a popular "minivan" sled-buck test set up. A total of five test configurations were utilized in this study. Three levels of velocity changes ranging from 22.5 to 42.5 kph were used. The average of peak accelerations on the sled-buck tests ranged from approximately 8.2 G's up to about 11.1 G's, with absolute peak values of just over 14 G's at the higher velocity change. The parameters of the test configuration enabled the experimental data to be combined into a polynomial "injury" function of the two primary independent variables (i.e. front seat adult occupant weight and velocity change) so that the "likelihood" of rear child "injury potential" could be determined over a wide range of the key parameters. The experimentally derived head injury data was used to obtain a preliminary HIC (Head Injury Criteria) polynomial fit at the 900 level for the rear-seated child. Several actual accident cases were compared with the preliminary polynomial fit. This study provides a test efficient, multi

  10. Watch what you say and how you say it: differential response to speech by participants with and without head injuries.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D M; Dixon, D R; Coon, R C; Hilker, K; Gouvier, W D

    2002-01-01

    Previous research has shown that both prosodic and content variations in speech register are important when addressing all individuals. Motherese speech register has been associated with higher levels of perceived disability and is viewed more negatively by individuals with a history of head injury. This research was conducted to investigate the separate contributions of content and prosody in producing differential response to speech by individuals with and without a history of head injury. Participants included 210 introductory psychology students with and without head injuries. No significant demographic differences were found between these groups. Participants listened to 4 sets of audiotaped instructions from afictitious home economics teacher containing prosodic and content variations. Afterward, they rated the teacher on the following dimensions: liking, positive impact, negative impact, grade level being taught, and whether they would recommend hiring this teacher. Analysis of variance revealed there were no significant group differences between participants rating with normal speech. As expected, both groups favored the normal speech register over motherese. However, the group with head injuries consistently rated the speech with motherese content as more negative, less likable, less likely to hire, and aimed at a lower grade level. Participants with head injuries also rated the speech register with motherese prosody as less likable and less likely to hire. These results suggest that when addressing individuals with head injuries, both what you say and how you say it are important.

  11. Vietnam Head Injury Study Phase III: A 30 Year Post-Injury Follow-Up Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    subjects and 13 controls. To date, there have been a total of 144 participants. All subjects have had blood samples taken for genetic analysis and all...been a total of 144 participants. All subjects have had blood samples taken for genetic analysis and all head-injured subjects have undergone a CT

  12. Finite element analysis of occupant head injuries: parametric effects of the side curtain airbag deployment interaction with a dummy head in a side impact crash.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xingqiao; Potula, S; Grewal, H; Solanki, K N; Tschopp, M A; Horstemeyer, M F

    2013-06-01

    In this study, we investigated and assessed the dependence of dummy head injury mitigation on the side curtain airbag and occupant distance under a side impact of a Dodge Neon. Full-scale finite element vehicle simulations of a Dodge Neon with a side curtain airbag were performed to simulate the side impact. Owing to the wide range of parameters, an optimal matrix of finite element calculations was generated using the design method of experiments (DOE); the DOE method was performed to independently screen the finite element results and yield the desired parametric influences as outputs. Also, analysis of variance (ANOVA) techniques were used to analyze the finite element results data. The results clearly show that the influence of moving deformable barrier (MDB) strike velocity was the strongest influence parameter on both cases for the head injury criteria (HIC36) and the peak head acceleration, followed by the initial airbag inlet temperature. Interestingly, the initial airbag inlet temperature was only a ~30% smaller influence than the MDB velocity; also, the trigger time was a ~54% smaller influence than the MDB velocity when considering the peak head accelerations. Considering the wide range in MDB velocities used in this study, results of the study present an opportunity for design optimization using the different parameters to help mitigate occupant injury. As such, the initial airbag inlet temperature, the trigger time, and the airbag pressure should be incorporated into vehicular design process when optimizing for the head injury criteria.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qiang; Watts, Lora Tally; Li, Wei; Duong, Timothy Q

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability in the USA. Common causes of TBI include falls, violence, injuries from wars, and vehicular and sporting accidents. The initial direct mechanical damage in TBI is followed by progressive secondary injuries such as brain swelling, perturbed cerebral blood flow (CBF), abnormal cerebrovascular reactivity (CR), metabolic dysfunction, blood-brain-barrier disruption, inflammation, oxidative stress, and excitotoxicity, among others. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers the means to noninvasively probe many of these secondary injuries. MRI has been used to image anatomical, physiological, and functional changes associated with TBI in a longitudinal manner. This chapter describes controlled cortical impact (CCI) TBI surgical procedures, a few common MRI protocols used in TBI imaging, and, finally, image analysis pertaining to experimental TBI imaging in rats.

  14. Some Observations on the Use of the Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Cognitive Ability in Adults with Head Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tupper, David E.

    1990-01-01

    The study provides descriptive data on use of the Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Cognitive Ability with 39 adults with closed head injury. Correlational analyses indicated significant relationships between coma duration and performance on the Perceptual Speed and Memory clusters of the test. Time since injury did not correlate with test results.…

  15. Social interaction attenuates the extent of secondary neuronal damage following closed head injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Doulames, Vanessa M.; Vilcans, Meghan; Lee, Sangmook; Shea, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Recovery following Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) can vary tremendously among individuals. Lifestyle following injury, including differential social interactions, may modulate the extent of secondary injury following TBI. To examine this possibility under controlled conditions, closed head injury (CHI) was induced in C57Bl6 mice using a standardized weight drop device after which mice were either housed in isolation or with their original cagemates (“socially-housed”) for 4 weeks. CHI transiently impaired novel object recognition (NOR) in both isolated and social mice, confirming physical and functional injury. By contrast, Y maze navigation was impaired in isolated but not social mice at 1–4 weeks post CHI. CHI increased excitotoxic signaling in hippocampal slices from all mice, which was transiently exacerbated by isolation at 2 weeks post CHI. CHI slightly increased reactive oxygen species and did not alter levels of amyloid beta (Abeta), total or phospho-tau, total or phosphorylated neurofilaments. CHI increased serum corticosterone in both groups, which was exacerbated by isolation. These findings support the hypothesis that socialization may attenuate secondary damage following TBI. In addition, a dominance hierarchy was noted among socially-housed mice, in which the most submissive mouse displayed indices of stress in the above analyses that were statistically identical to those observed for isolated mice. This latter finding underscores that the nature and extent of social interaction may need to vary among individuals to provide therapeutic benefit. PMID:26528156

  16. Experimental study of head loss and filtration for LOCA debris

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, D.V.; Souto, F.J.

    1996-02-01

    A series of controlled experiments were conducted to obtain head loss and filtration characteristics of debris beds formed of NUKON{trademark} fibrous fragments, and obtain data to validate the semi-theoretical head loss model developed in NUREG/CR-6224. A thermally insulated closed-loop test set-up was used to conduct experiments using beds formed of fibers only and fibers intermixed with particulate debris. A total of three particulate mixes were used to simulate the particulate debris. The head loss data were obtained for theoretical fiber bed thicknesses of 0.125 inches to 4.0 inches; approach velocities of 0.15 to 1.5 ft/s; temperatures of 75 F and 125 F; and sludge-to-fiber nominal concentration ratios of 0 to 60. Concentration measurements obtained during the first flushing cycle were used to estimate the filtration efficiencies of the debris beds. For test conditions where the beds are fairly uniform, the head loss data were predictable within an acceptable accuracy range by the semi-theoretical model. The model was equally applicable for both pure fiber beds and the mixed beds. Typically the model over-predicted the head losses for very thin beds and for thin beds at high sludge-to-fiber mass ratios. This is attributable to the non-uniformity of such debris beds. In this range the correlation can be interpreted to provide upper bound estimates of head loss. This is pertinent for loss of coolant accidents in boiling water reactors.

  17. Simulative investigation on head injuries of electric self-balancing scooter riders subject to ground impact.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun; Shang, Shi; Qi, Hongsheng; Yu, Guizhen; Wang, Yunpeng; Chen, Peng

    2016-04-01

    The safety performance of an electric self-balancing scooter (ESS) has recently become a main concern in preventing its further wide application as a major candidate for green transportation. Scooter riders may suffer severe brain injuries in possible vehicle crash accidents not only from contact with a windshield or bonnet but also from secondary contact with the ground. In this paper, virtual vehicle-ESS crash scenarios combined with finite element (FE) car models and multi-body scooter/human models are set up. Post-impact kinematic gestures of scooter riders under various contact conditions, such as different vehicle impact speeds, ESS moving speeds, impact angles or positions, and different human sizes, are classified and analyzed. Furthermore, head-ground impact processes are reconstructed using validated FE head models, and important parameters of contusion and laceration (e.g., coup or contrecoup pressures and Von Mises stress and the maximum shear stress) are extracted and analyzed to assess the severity of regional contusion from head-ground contact. Results show that the brain injury risk increases with vehicle speeds and ESS moving speeds and may provide fundamental knowledge to popularize the use of a helmet and the vehicle-fitted safety systems, and lay a strong foundation for the reconstruction of ESS-involved accidents. There is scope to improve safety for the use of ESS in public roads according to the analysis and conclusions.

  18. Short-term and long-term outcome of athletic closed head injuries.

    PubMed

    Webbe, Frank M; Barth, Jeffrey T

    2003-07-01

    The continued development of the sport environment as a laboratory for clinical investigation of mild head injury has greatly advanced the use of neuropsychological assessment in evaluating brain-injured athletes, and tracking their symptoms and recovery in an objective manner. The use of neurocognitive baseline measures has become critical in determining whether a brain-injured athlete has recovered function sufficiently to return to play. The rapid growth of computerized and web-based neurocognitive assessment measures provides an efficient, valid technology to put such testing within the reach of most institutions and organizations that field sport teams. Moreover, the knowledge of the recovery curve following mild head injury in the sport environment can be generalized to the management of MTBI in general clinical environments where baseline measures are unlikely. What we know today is that sideline assessments of severity are not predictive of which athletes will show the most typical 5- to 10-day recovery period and which will report persistent PCS complaints and exhibit impaired neurocognitive performance for an extended time. The research on mechanisms of brain injury in MTBI suggests that unpredictable, diffuse white-matter damage may control much of the variability in functional impairments and recovery duration.

  19. Beneficial effect of cerebrolysin on moderate and severe head injury patients: result of a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Wong, G K C; Zhu, X L; Poon, W S

    2005-01-01

    Cerebrolysin is used as a neurotrophic agent for the treatment of ischemic stroke and Alzheimer's Disease. Exploratory studies in patients with post-acute traumatic brain injury have shown that this treatment might help improve recovery. Aim of this study was to investigate whether addition of Cerebrolysin to the initial treatment regimen of moderate and severe head injury patients would improve their outcome. At 6 months, 67% of the patients (Cerebrolysin group) attained good outcome (GOS 3-5). The study group was compared with the historical cohort of patients from the hospital trauma data bank, with age, sex and admitting GCS matching. More patients tended to a good outcome in the Cerebrolysin group (P = 0.065). No significant side-effect requiring cessation of Cerebrolysin was noted. It can be concluded that the use of Cerebrolysin as part of the initial management of moderate and severe head injury is safe and well tolerated. The results suggest that Cerebrolysin is beneficial in regard to the outcome in these patients, especially in elderly patients.

  20. Novel aspects of the neuropathology of the vegetative state after blunt head injury.

    PubMed

    Graham, D I; Maxwell, W L; Adams, J Hume; Jennett, Bryan

    2005-01-01

    A detailed neuropathological study was undertaken of the brains of patients who had been assessed clinically as vegetative after blunt head injury. There were 35 cases, (33 male; median age 38 years) with a survival of 6.5-19 months (median 9): 17 were injured in a road traffic accident, 9 after assault and 6 after a fall; 3 were recorded as having had a lucid interval. There was an intracranial hematoma in 9 and the median contusion index was 4; raised intracranial pressure was identified in 25, grades 2 and 3 diffuse traumatic axonal injury was present in 25, ischemic damage in 15 and hydrocephalus in 27. Thalamic and hippocampal damage was present in 28 and stereological studies revealed a differential loss of neurons in three principal nuclei of the thalamus and in different sectors of the hippocampus. Immunohistochemistry provided evidence of an inflammatory reaction and in situ DNA fragmentation, features that are strongly indicative of a continuing neuronal loss in subcortical gray matter. These findings provide evidence for the importance of diffuse brain damage to white matter as the structural basis of the vegetative state after blunt head injury with contributions from neuronal loss in the thalami and the hippocampus. Although amyloid plaques and tau inclusions were identified in some, their contribution did not seem important in the ultimate clinical outcome.

  1. Patterns, aetiology and risk factors of intimate partner violence-related injuries to head, neck and face in Chinese women

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Intimate partner violence (IPV) related injuries have been recognized among health care professionals. However, few studies have provided detailed information on injuries to the head, neck and face regions in Chinese women. As abused Chinese women are generally unwilling to disclose IPV and there are differences in socio-demographic characteristics, societal norms and behaviours, the women may exhibit different patterns, aetiology and risk factors of IPV-related HNF injuries. This study aims to examine the patterns of head, neck and face injuries presenting to Accident and Emergency departments, including the anatomical regions, types, severity, aetiology and demographic and non-demographic risk factors of injuries inflicted by intimate partners in Chinese context. Methods Medical charts of 223 women presented to the Accident and Emergency departments of two regional hospitals in Hong Kong between January 2010 and December 2011 were reviewed independently by two reviewers. Results Head, neck and face injuries remained the most common injuries found in abused Chinese women (77.6%), and punching with a fist was the most common aetiology (60.2%). In particular, punching with a fist was significantly associated on the upper third of the maxillofacial region (p = .01) and the back part of the head (p = .03). Moreover, cohabiting and separated women were more likely to have multiple injuries than those who were married (OR = 3.3, 95% CI = 1.4, 7.8; OR = 2.1, 95% CI = .4, 11.9). Conclusions The findings enhance the understanding of head, neck and face injuries and inform clinicians about the linkage among injuries and risks in abused Chinese women. PMID:24410868

  2. Galveston Brain Injury Conference 2010: clinical and experimental aspects of blast injury.

    PubMed

    Masel, Brent E; Bell, Randy S; Brossart, Shawn; Grill, Raymond J; Hayes, Ronald L; Levin, Harvey S; Rasband, Matthew N; Ritzel, David V; Wade, Charles E; DeWitt, Douglas S

    2012-08-10

    Blast injury is the most prevalent source of mortality and morbidity among combatants in Operations Iraqi and Enduring Freedom. Blast-induced neurotrauma (BINT) is a common cause of mortality, and even mild BINT may be associated with chronic cognitive and emotional deficits. In addition to military personnel, the increasing use of explosives by terrorists has resulted in growing numbers of blast injuries in civilian populations. Since the medical and rehabilitative communities are likely to be faced with increasing numbers of patients suffering from blast injury, the 2010 Galveston Brain Injury Conference focused on topics related to the diagnosis, treatment, and mechanisms of BINT. Although past military actions have resulted in large numbers of blast casualties, BINT is considered the signature injury of the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. The attention focused on BINT has led to increased financial support for research on blast effects, contributing to the development of better experimental models of blast injury and a clearer understanding of the mechanisms of BINT. This more thorough understanding of blast injury mechanisms will result in novel and more effective therapeutic and rehabilitative strategies designed to reduce injury and facilitate recovery, thereby improving long-term outcomes in patients suffering from the devastating and often lasting effects of BINT. The following is a summary of the 2010 Galveston Brain Injury Conference, that included presentations related to the diagnosis and treatment of acute BINT, the evaluation of the long-term neuropsychological effects of BINT, summaries of current experimental models of BINT, and a debate about the relative importance of primary blast effects on the acute and long-term consequences of blast exposure.

  3. Comparative evaluation of MRS and SPECT in prognostication of patients with mild to moderate head injury.

    PubMed

    Dhandapani, Sivashanmugam; Sharma, Anurag; Sharma, Karamchand; Das, Lakshman

    2014-05-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) have only been individually studied in patients with head injury. This study aimed to comparatively assess both in patients with mild to moderate head injury. Patients with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 9-14 who underwent MRS and/or SPECT were evaluated in relation to various clinical factors and neurological outcome at 3months. There were 56 SPECT (Tc99m-ethylcysteinate dimer [ECD]) studies and 41 single voxel proton MRS performed in 53 patients, with 41 patients having both. Of the 41 who underwent MRS, 13 had a lower N-acetyl-aspartate/creatine (NAA/Cr) ratio, 14 had a higher choline (Cho)/Cr ratio, 19 were normal, and nine had bilateral MRS abnormalities. Of the 56 who underwent SPECT, 22 and 19 had severe and moderate hypoperfusion, respectively. Among those in Traumatic Coma Data Bank CT scan category 1 and 2, 50% had MRS abnormalities, whereas 64% had SPECT hypoperfusion, suggesting greater incremental validity of SPECT over MRS. In univariate analyses, GCS, moderate/severe hypoperfusion and bilateral SPECT changes were found to have significant association with unfavorable outcome (odds ratio 13.2, 15.9, and 4.4, and p values <0.01, 0.01, and 0.05, respectively). Patients with lower NAA/Cr ratio in MRS had more unfavorable outcomes, however this was not significant. In multivariate analysis employing binary logistic regression, GCS and severe hypoperfusion on SPECT were noted to have significant association with unfavorable outcome, independent of age, CT scan category, and MRS abnormalities (p values=0.02 and 0.04, respectively). To conclude, ECD-SPECT seems to have greater sensitivity, incremental validity and prognostic value than single voxel proton MRS in select patients with head injury, with only severe hypoperfusion in SPECT significantly associated with unfavorable outcome independent of other confounding factors.

  4. Experimental Models of Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI)

    PubMed Central

    Gilliss, Brian M.; Looney, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is defined clinically as acute lung injury occurring within six hours of the transfusion of any blood product. It is the leading cause of transfusion-related death in the United States, but under-recognition and diagnostic uncertainty have limited clinical research to smaller case control studies. In this review we will discuss the contribution of experimental models to the understanding of TRALI pathophysiology and potential therapeutic approaches. Experimental models suggest that TRALI occurs when a host, with a primed immune system, is exposed to an activating agent such as anti-leukocyte antibody or a biologic response modifier such as lysophosphatidylcholines. Recent work has suggested a critical role for platelets in antibody-based experimental models and identified potential therapeutic strategies for TRALI. PMID:21134622

  5. Referential cohesion and logical coherence of narration after closed head injury.

    PubMed

    Davis, G Albyn; Coelho, Carl A

    2004-06-01

    A group with closed head injury was compared to neurologically intact controls regarding the referential cohesion and logical coherence of narrative production. A sample of six stories was obtained with tasks of cartoon-elicited story-telling and auditory-oral retelling. We found deficits in the clinical group with respect to referential cohesion, logical coherence, and accuracy of narration. The occurrence of deficits depended on the condition of narrative production and, to some extent, on the particular story used. The primary implications of this study pertain to the attention given by researchers to the feature of discourse production being studied and processing demands of the task.

  6. Injuries of the head from backface deformation of ballistic protective helmets under ballistic impact.

    PubMed

    Rafaels, Karin A; Cutcliffe, Hattie C; Salzar, Robert S; Davis, Martin; Boggess, Brian; Bush, Bryan; Harris, Robert; Rountree, Mark Steve; Sanderson, Ellory; Campman, Steven; Koch, Spencer; Dale Bass, Cameron R

    2015-01-01

    Modern ballistic helmets defeat penetrating bullets by energy transfer from the projectile to the helmet, producing helmet deformation. This deformation may cause severe injuries without completely perforating the helmet, termed "behind armor blunt trauma" (BABT). As helmets become lighter, the likelihood of larger helmet backface deformation under ballistic impact increases. To characterize the potential for BABT, seven postmortem human head/neck specimens wearing a ballistic protective helmet were exposed to nonperforating impact, using a 9 mm, full metal jacket, 124 grain bullet with velocities of 400-460 m/s. An increasing trend of injury severity was observed, ranging from simple linear fractures to combinations of linear and depressed fractures. Overall, the ability to identify skull fractures resulting from BABT can be used in forensic investigations. Our results demonstrate a high risk of skull fracture due to BABT and necessitate the prevention of BABT as a design factor in future generations of protective gear.

  7. Spillway-Induced Salmon Head Injury Triggers the Generation of Brain αII-Spectrin Breakdown Product Biomarkers Similar to Mammalian Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Miracle, Ann; Denslow, Nancy D.; Kroll, Kevin J.; Liu, Ming Cheng; Wang, Kevin K. W.

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in biomedical research have resulted in the development of specific biomarkers for diagnostic testing of disease condition or physiological risk. Of specific interest are αII-spectrin breakdown products (SBDPs), which are produced by proteolytic events in traumatic brain injury and have been used as biomarkers to predict the severity of injury in humans and other mammalian brain injury models. This study describes and demonstrates the successful use of antibody-based mammalian SBDP biomarkers to detect head injury in migrating juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) that have been injured during passage through high-energy hydraulic environments present in spillways under different operational configurations. Mortality and injury assessment techniques currently measure only near-term direct mortality and easily observable acute injury. Injury-based biomarkers may serve as a quantitative indicator of subacute physical injury and recovery, and aid hydropower operators in evaluation of safest passage configuration and operation actions for migrating juvenile salmonids. We describe a novel application of SBDP biomarkers for head injury for migrating salmon. To our knowledge, this is the first documented cross-over use of a human molecular biomarker in a wildlife and operational risk management scenario. PMID:19214235

  8. Spillway-induced salmon head injury triggers the generation of brain alphaII-spectrin breakdown product biomarkers similar to mammalian traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Miracle, Ann; Denslow, Nancy D; Kroll, Kevin J; Liu, Ming Cheng; Wang, Kevin K W

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in biomedical research have resulted in the development of specific biomarkers for diagnostic testing of disease condition or physiological risk. Of specific interest are alphaII-spectrin breakdown products (SBDPs), which are produced by proteolytic events in traumatic brain injury and have been used as biomarkers to predict the severity of injury in humans and other mammalian brain injury models. This study describes and demonstrates the successful use of antibody-based mammalian SBDP biomarkers to detect head injury in migrating juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) that have been injured during passage through high-energy hydraulic environments present in spillways under different operational configurations. Mortality and injury assessment techniques currently measure only near-term direct mortality and easily observable acute injury. Injury-based biomarkers may serve as a quantitative indicator of subacute physical injury and recovery, and aid hydropower operators in evaluation of safest passage configuration and operation actions for migrating juvenile salmonids. We describe a novel application of SBDP biomarkers for head injury for migrating salmon. To our knowledge, this is the first documented cross-over use of a human molecular biomarker in a wildlife and operational risk management scenario.

  9. Sir Hugh Cairns and World War II British advances in head injury management, diffuse brain injury, and concussion: an Oxford tale.

    PubMed

    Stone, James L; Patel, Vimal; Bailes, Julian E

    2016-11-01

    The authors trace the Oxford, England, roots of World War II (WWII)-related advances in head injury management, the biomechanics of concussion and brain injury, and postwar delineation of pathological findings in severe concussion and diffuse brain injury in man. The prominent figure in these developments was the charismatic and innovative Harvey Cushing-trained neurosurgeon Sir Hugh Cairns. Cairns, who was to closely emulate Cushing's surgical and scholarly approach, is credited with saving thousands of lives during WWII by introducing and implementing innovative programs such as helmets for motorcyclists, mobile neurosurgical units near battle zones, and the military usage of penicillin. In addition, he inspired and taught a generation of neurosurgeons, neurologists, and neurological nurses in the care of brain and spinal cord injuries at Oxford's Military Hospital for Head Injuries. During this time Cairns also trained the first full-time female neurosurgeon. Pivotal in supporting animal research demonstrating the critical role of acceleration in the causation of concussion, Cairns recruited the physicist Hylas Holbourn, whose research implicated rotary acceleration and shear strains as particularly damaging. Cairns' work in military medicine and head injury remain highly influential in efforts to mitigate and manage brain injury.

  10. Neurodegeneration in the somatosensory cortex after experimental diffuse brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Lisembee, Amanda M.

    2012-01-01

    Disruption and consequent reorganization of central nervous system circuits following traumatic brain injury may manifest as functional deficits and behavioral morbidities. We previously reported axotomy and neuronal atrophy in the ventral basal (VB) complex of the thalamus, without gross degeneration after experimental diffuse brain injury in adult rats. Pathology in VB coincided with the development of late-onset aberrant behavioral responses to whisker stimulation, which lead to the current hypothesis that neurodegeneration after experimental diffuse brain injury includes the primary somatosensory barrel cortex (S1BF), which receives projection of VB neurons and mediates whisker somatosensation. Over 28 days after midline fluid percussion brain injury, argyrophilic reaction product within superficial layers and layer IV barrels at 1 day progresses into the cortex to subcortical white matter by 7 days, and selective inter-barrel septa and subcortical white matter labeling at 28 days. Cellular consequences were determined by stereological estimates of neuronal nuclear volumes and number. In all cortical layers, neuronal nuclear volumes significantly atrophied by 42–49% at 7 days compared to sham, which marginally attenuated by 28 days. Concomitantly, the number of healthy neurons was reduced by 34–45% at 7 days compared to sham, returning to control levels by 28 days. Progressive neurodegeneration, including argyrophilic reaction product and neuronal nuclear atrophy, indicates injury-induced damage and reorganization of the reciprocal thalamocortical projections that mediate whisker somatosensation. The rodent whisker barrel circuit may serve as a discrete model to evaluate the causes and consequences of circuit reorganization after diffuse brain injury. PMID:21597967

  11. Head injury as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease: the evidence 10 years on; a partial replication

    PubMed Central

    Fleminger, S; Oliver, D; Lovestone, S; Rabe-Hesketh, S; Giora, A

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To determine, using a systematic review of case-control studies, whether head injury is a significant risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. We sought to replicate the findings of the meta-analysis of Mortimer et al (1991). Methods: A predefined inclusion criterion specified case-control studies eligible for inclusion. A comprehensive and systematic search of various electronic databases, up to August 2001, was undertaken. Two independent reviewers screened studies for eligibility. Fifteen case-control studies were identified that met the inclusion criteria, of which seven postdated the study of Mortimer et al. Results: We partially replicated the results of Mortimer et al. The meta-analysis of the seven studies conducted since 1991 did not reach significance. However, analysis of all 15 case-control studies was significant (OR 1.58, 95% CI 1.21 to 2.06), indicating an excess history of head injury in those with Alzheimer's disease. The finding of Mortimer et al that head injury is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease only in males was replicated. The excess risk of head injury in those with Alzheimer's disease is only found in males (males: OR 2.29, 95% CI 1.47 to 2.06; females: OR 0.91, 95% CI 0.56 to 1.47). Conclusions: This study provides support for an association between a history of previous head injury and the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. PMID:12810767

  12. Secondary skull fractures in head wounds inflicted by captive bolt guns: autopsy findings and experimental simulation.

    PubMed

    Perdekamp, Markus Grosse; Kneubuehl, Beat P; Ishikawa, Takaki; Nadjem, Hadi; Kromeier, Jan; Pollak, Stefan; Thierauf, Annette

    2010-11-01

    Apart from one article published by Rabl and Sigrist in 1992 (Rechtsmedizin 2:156-158), there are no further reports on secondary skull fractures in shots from captive bolt guns. Up to now, the pertinent literature places particular emphasis on the absence of indirect lesions away from the impact point, when dealing with the wounding capacity of slaughterer's guns. The recent observation of two suicidal head injuries accompanied by skull fractures far away from the bolt's path gave occasion to experimental studies using simulants (glycerin soap, balls from gelatin) and skull–brain models. As far as ballistic soap was concerned, the dimensions of the bolt's channel were assessed by multi-slice computed tomography before cutting the blocks open. The test shots to gelatin balls and to skull-brain models were documented by means of a high-speed motion camera. As expected, the typical temporary cavity effect of bullets fired from conventional guns could not be observed when captive bolt stunners were discharged. Nevertheless, the visualized transfer of kinetic energy justifies the assumption that the secondary fractures seen in thin parts of the skull were caused by a hydraulic burst effect.

  13. A prospective observational study to assess the diagnostic accuracy of clinical decision rules for children presenting to emergency departments after head injuries (protocol): the Australasian Paediatric Head Injury Rules Study (APHIRST)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Head injuries in children are responsible for a large number of emergency department visits. Failure to identify a clinically significant intracranial injury in a timely fashion may result in long term neurodisability and death. Whilst cranial computed tomography (CT) provides rapid and definitive identification of intracranial injuries, it is resource intensive and associated with radiation induced cancer. Evidence based head injury clinical decision rules have been derived to aid physicians in identifying patients at risk of having a clinically significant intracranial injury. Three rules have been identified as being of high quality and accuracy: the Canadian Assessment of Tomography for Childhood Head Injury (CATCH) from Canada, the Children’s Head Injury Algorithm for the Prediction of Important Clinical Events (CHALICE) from the UK, and the prediction rule for the identification of children at very low risk of clinically important traumatic brain injury developed by the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) from the USA. This study aims to prospectively validate and compare the performance accuracy of these three clinical decision rules when applied outside the derivation setting. Methods/design This study is a prospective observational study of children aged 0 to less than 18 years presenting to 10 emergency departments within the Paediatric Research in Emergency Departments International Collaborative (PREDICT) research network in Australia and New Zealand after head injuries of any severity. Predictor variables identified in CATCH, CHALICE and PECARN clinical decision rules will be collected. Patients will be managed as per the treating clinicians at the participating hospitals. All patients not undergoing cranial CT will receive a follow up call 14 to 90 days after the injury. Outcome data collected will include results of cranial CTs (if performed) and details of admission, intubation, neurosurgery and death. The

  14. Experimental testing of flight control head up displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berjal, M.

    1978-01-01

    Experiments and tests with 4 generations of head up displays was reported. The CV 191, based on fighter aircraft gunsights was replaced by the CV 193, with several improvements. The CV 193 V incorporates the velocity vector reference mark, eliminates much other data, clusters the rest in a small area of the visual field and is seen together with the outside landscape. The CV 91 presents only velocity vector and total angle of descent data, used when runway and horizon are visible; TC 121 displays an outline of the runway and can be used in visual and instrument approaches.

  15. The response of cerebral cortex to haemorrhagic damage: experimental evidence from a penetrating injury model.

    PubMed

    Purushothuman, Sivaraman; Marotte, Lauren; Stowe, Sally; Johnstone, Daniel M; Stone, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the response of the brain to haemorrhagic damage is important in haemorrhagic stroke and increasingly in the understanding the cerebral degeneration and dementia that follow head trauma and head-impact sports. In addition, there is growing evidence that haemorrhage from small cerebral vessels is important in the pathogenesis of age-related dementia (Alzheimer's disease). In a penetration injury model of rat cerebral cortex, we have examined the neuropathology induced by a needlestick injury, with emphasis on features prominent in the ageing and dementing human brain, particularly plaque-like depositions and the expression of related proteins. Needlestick lesions were made in neo- and hippocampal cortex in Sprague Dawley rats aged 3-5 months. Brains were examined after 1-30 d survival, for haemorrhage, for the expression of hyperphosphorylated tau, Aβ, amyloid precursor protein (APP), for gliosis and for neuronal death. Temporal cortex from humans diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease was examined with the same techniques. Needlestick injury induced long-lasting changes-haem deposition, cell death, plaque-like deposits and glial invasion-along the needle track. Around the track, the lesion induced more transient changes, particularly upregulation of Aβ, APP and hyperphosporylated tau in neurons and astrocytes. Reactions were similar in hippocampus and neocortex, except that neuronal death was more widespread in the hippocampus. In summary, experimental haemorrhagic injury to rat cerebral cortex induced both permanent and transient changes. The more permanent changes reproduced features of human senile plaques, including the formation of extracellular deposits in which haem and Aβ-related proteins co-localised, neuronal loss and gliosis. The transient changes, observed in tissue around the direct lesion, included the upregulation of Aβ, APP and hyperphosphorylated tau, not associated with cell death. The findings support the possibility that

  16. Topical diagnostics of traumatic condylar injuries and alloplastic reconstruction of temporomandibular joint heads.

    PubMed

    Gvenetadze, Z; Danelia, T; Nemsadze, G; Gvenetadze, G

    2014-04-01

    Condylar fractures have an important place in facial traumatic injuries. Classification of condylar fractures according to clinical-anatomic picture is common in clinical practice. According to this classification there are: 1) fractures of mandibular joint head, aka intraarticular fractures, 2) condylar neck fractures or high extra articular fractures, 3) condylar base fractures. Radiographic imaging plays important role in diagnosing condylar fractures along with knowledge of clinical symptoms. We used computer tomography imaging in our clinical practice. Three-dimensional imaging of computer tomography gives exact information about location of condylar fractures, impact of fractured fragments, displacement of condylar head from articular fossa. This method is mostly important for the cases which are hard to diagnose (fractures of mandibular joint head, aka intraarticular fractures). For this group of patients surgical treatment is necessary with the method of arthroplasty. We have observed 5 patients with bilateral, fragmented, high condylar fractures. In all cases the surgery was performed on both sides with bone cement and titanium mini-plates. Long-term effects of the treatment included observation from 6 months to 2 years. In all cases anatomic and functional results were good. Shape of the mandible is restored, opening of mouth 3-3.5 cm, absence of malocclusion.

  17. Variability in the control of head movements in seated humans: a link with whiplash injuries?

    PubMed Central

    Vibert, N; MacDougall, H G; de Waele, C; Gilchrist, D P D; Burgess, A M; Sidis, A; Migliaccio, A; Curthoys, I S; Vidal, P P

    2001-01-01

    passive biomechanical properties of their head-neck ensemble to compensate for the perturbation. In our study, proprioception was the sole source of sensory information as long as the head did not move. We therefore presume that the EMG responses and head movements we observed were mainly triggered by the activation of stretch receptors in the hips, trunk and/or neck. The visualisation of an imaginary reference in space during sideways impulses significantly reduced the head roll exhibited by floppy subjects. This suggests that the adoption by the central nervous system of an extrinsic, ‘allocentric’ frame of reference instead of an intrinsic, ‘egocentric’ one may be instrumental for the selection of the stiff strategy. The response of floppy subjects appeared to be maladaptive and likely to increase the risk of whiplash injury during motor vehicle accidents. Evolution of postural control may not have taken into account the implications of passive, high-acceleration perturbations affecting seated subjects. PMID:11313451

  18. Severe head injury in children: emergency access to neurosurgery in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Tasker, R C; Morris, K P; Forsyth, R J; Hawley, C A; Parslow, R C

    2006-01-01

    Objective To determine the scale of acute neurosurgery for severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) in childhood, and whether surgical evacuation for haematoma is achieved within four hours of presentation to an emergency department. Methods A 12 month audit of emergency access to all specialist neurosurgical and intensive care services in the UK. Severe TBI in a child was defined as that necessitating admission to intensive care. Results Of 448 children with severe head injuries, 91 (20.3%) underwent emergency neurosurgery, and 37% of these surgical patients had at least one non‐reactive and dilated pupil. An acute subdural or epidural haematoma was present in 143/448 (31.9%) children, of whom 66 (46.2%) underwent surgery. Children needing surgical evacuation of haematoma were at a median distance of 29 km (interquartile range (IQR) 11.8–45.7) from their neurosurgical centre. One in four children took longer than one hour to reach hospital after injury. Once in an accident and emergency department, 41% took longer than fours hours to arrive at the regional centre. The median interval between time of accident and arrival at the surgical centre was 4.5 hours (IQR 2.23–7.73), and 79% of inter‐hospital transfers were undertaken by the referring hospital rather than the regional centre. In cases where the regional centre undertook the transfer, none were completed within four hours of presentation—the median interval was 6.3 hours (IQR 5.1–8.12). Conclusions The system of care for severely head injured children in the UK does not achieve surgical evacuation of a significant haematoma within four hours. The recommendation to use specialist regional paediatric transfer teams delays rather than expedites the emergency service. PMID:16794092

  19. Brain injury prediction: assessing the combined probability of concussion using linear and rotational head acceleration.

    PubMed

    Rowson, Steven; Duma, Stefan M

    2013-05-01

    Recent research has suggested possible long term effects due to repetitive concussions, highlighting the importance of developing methods to accurately quantify concussion risk. This study introduces a new injury metric, the combined probability of concussion, which computes the overall risk of concussion based on the peak linear and rotational accelerations experienced by the head during impact. The combined probability of concussion is unique in that it determines the likelihood of sustaining a concussion for a given impact, regardless of whether the injury would be reported or not. The risk curve was derived from data collected from instrumented football players (63,011 impacts including 37 concussions), which was adjusted to account for the underreporting of concussion. The predictive capability of this new metric is compared to that of single biomechanical parameters. The capabilities of these parameters to accurately predict concussion incidence were evaluated using two separate datasets: the Head Impact Telemetry System (HITS) data and National Football League (NFL) data collected from impact reconstructions using dummies (58 impacts including 25 concussions). Receiver operating characteristic curves were generated, and all parameters were significantly better at predicting injury than random guessing. The combined probability of concussion had the greatest area under the curve for all datasets. In the HITS dataset, the combined probability of concussion and linear acceleration were significantly better predictors of concussion than rotational acceleration alone, but not different from each other. In the NFL dataset, there were no significant differences between parameters. The combined probability of concussion is a valuable method to assess concussion risk in a laboratory setting for evaluating product safety.

  20. Partial Kluver-Bucy syndrome as a delayed manifestation of head injury.

    PubMed

    Bhat, P S; Pardal, P K; Das, R C

    2009-07-01

    After traumatic brain injury (TBI), the most disabling problems are generally related to neuropsychiatric sequelae, including personality change and cognitive impairment, rather than neurophysical sequelae. Kluver-Bucy syndrome (KBS) is a rare neurobehavioral condition, first described in 1937 as an experimental neurobehavioral syndrome in monkeys with bitemporal brain lesions. The syndrome in man was subsequently observed to be transient or permanent in a variety of neurodegenerative disorders and after traumatic, nontraumatic and infectious brain injury. However, partial KBS may occur in the absence of the classic bilateral temporal lesion, though rare. Pharmacological treatment of post-TBI neuropsychiatric sequelae consists of symptomatic, functional and hypothetical approaches. Specific pharmacological treatment consists of antipsychotics, anti-kindling anticonvulsants or a combination thereof. A case of partial KBS presenting as delayed manifestation of traumatic brain injury that improved with carbamazapine and antipsychotics is presented.

  1. Should all anticoagulated patients with head injury receive a CT scan? Decision-analysis modelling of an observational cohort

    PubMed Central

    Kuczawski, Maxine; Stevenson, Matt; Goodacre, Steve; Teare, M Dawn; Ramlakhan, Shammi; Morris, Francis; Mason, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Objectives It is not currently clear whether all anticoagulated patients with a head injury should receive CT scanning or only those with evidence of traumatic brain injury (eg, loss of consciousness or amnesia). We aimed to determine the cost-effectiveness of CT for all compared with selective CT use for anticoagulated patients with a head injury. Design Decision-analysis modelling of data from a multicentre observational study. Setting 33 emergency departments in England and Scotland. Participants 3566 adults (aged ≥16 years) who had suffered blunt head injury, were taking warfarin and underwent selective CT scanning. Main outcome measures Estimated expected benefits in terms of quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were the entire cohort to receive a CT scan; estimated increased costs of CT and also the potential cost implications associated with patient survival and improved health. These values were used to estimate the cost per QALY of implementing a strategy of CT for all patients compared with observed practice based on guidelines recommending selective CT use. Results Of the 1420 of 3534 patients (40%) who did not receive a CT scan, 7 (0.5%) suffered a potentially avoidable head injury-related adverse outcome. If CT scanning had been performed in all patients, appropriate treatment could have gained 3.41 additional QALYs but would have incurred £193 149 additional treatment costs and £130 683 additional CT costs. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of £94 895/QALY gained for unselective compared with selective CT use is markedly above the threshold of £20–30 000/QALY used by the UK National Institute for Care Excellence to determine cost-effectiveness. Conclusions CT scanning for all anticoagulated patients with head injury is not cost-effective compared with selective use of CT scanning based on guidelines recommending scanning only for those with evidence of traumatic brain injury. Trial registration number NCT 02461498. PMID

  2. Influence of impact speed on head and brain injury outcome in vulnerable road user impacts to the car hood.

    PubMed

    Fredriksson, Rikard; Zhang, Liying; Boström, Ola; Yang, King

    2007-10-01

    EuroNCAP and regulations in Europe and Japan evaluate the pedestrian protection performance of cars. The test methods are similar and they all have requirements for the passive protection of the hood area at a pedestrian to car impact speed of 40 km/h. In Europe, a proposal for a second phase of the regulation mandates a brake-assist system along with passive requirements. The system assists the driver in optimizing the braking performance during panic braking, resulting in activation only when the driver brakes sufficiently. In a European study this was estimated to occur in about 50% of pedestrian accidents. A future system for brake assistance will likely include automatic braking, in response to a pre-crash sensor, to avoid or mitigate injuries of vulnerable road users. An important question is whether these systems will provide sufficient protection, or if a parallel, passive pedestrian protection system will be necessary. This study investigated the influence of impact speed on head and brain injury risk, in impacts to the carhood. One car model was chosen and a rigid adjustable plate was mounted under the hood. Free-flying headform impacts were carried out at 20 and 30 km/h head impact velocities at different under-hood distances, 20 to 100 mm; and were compared to earlier tests at 40 km/h. The EEVC WG17 adult pedestrian headform was used for non-rotating tests and a Hybrid III adult 50th percentile head was used for rotational tests where linear and rotational acceleration was measured. Data from the rotational tests was used as input to a validated finite element model of the human head, the Wayne State University Head Injury Model (WSUHIM). The model was utilized to assess brain injury risk and potential injury mechanism in a pedestrian-hood impact. Although this study showed that it was not necessarily true that a lower HIC value reduced the risk for brain injury, it appeared, for the tested car model, under-hood distances of 60 mm in 20 km/h and 80 mm

  3. Involvement of nitric oxide system in experimental muscle crush injury.

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, I; Abassi, Z; Coleman, R; Milman, F; Winaver, J; Better, O S

    1998-01-01

    Muscle crush injury is often complicated by hemodynamic shock, electrolyte disorders, and myoglobinuric renal failure. In this study, we examined the involvement of the nitric oxide (NO) system in the development of muscle damage in an experimental model of crush injury induced by exertion of standardized mechanical pressure on tibialis muscle of rat. The intact limb served as a control. Four days after injury, the crushed muscle was characterized by extreme capillary vasodilatation as demonstrated by histological morphometric analysis. These changes were accompanied by muscle hyperperfusion as evaluated by measurements of femoral blood flow (ultrasonic flowmetry) and capillary blood flow (laser-doppler flowmetry). Treatment with Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor, largely decreased the hyperperfusion. Furthermore, the expression of the different NOS isoforms, assessed by reverse transcription-PCR and immunoreactive levels, determined by Western blot, revealed a remarkable induction of the inducible NOS in the crushed limb. Similarly, endothelial NOS mRNA increased gradually after the induction of muscle damage. In contrast, the major muscular NOS, i.e., neuronal isoform remained unchanged. In line with the alterations in the mRNA levels, Western blot analysis revealed parallel changes in the immunoreactive levels of the various NOS. These findings indicate that muscle crush is associated with activation of the NO system mainly due to enhancement of iNOS. This may contribute to NO-dependent extreme vasodilatation in the injured muscle and aggravate the hypovolemic shock after crush injury. PMID:9502774

  4. Experimental traumatic brain injury alters ethanol consumption and sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Lowing, Jennifer L; Susick, Laura L; Caruso, James P; Provenzano, Anthony M; Raghupathi, Ramesh; Conti, Alana C

    2014-10-15

    Altered alcohol consumption patterns after traumatic brain injury (TBI) can lead to significant impairments in TBI recovery. Few preclinical models have been used to examine alcohol use across distinct phases of the post-injury period, leaving mechanistic questions unanswered. To address this, the aim of this study was to describe the histological and behavioral outcomes of a noncontusive closed-head TBI in the mouse, after which sensitivity to and consumption of alcohol were quantified, in addition to dopaminergic signaling markers. We hypothesized that TBI would alter alcohol consumption patterns and related signal transduction pathways that were congruent to clinical observations. After midline impact to the skull, latency to right after injury, motor deficits, traumatic axonal injury, and reactive astrogliosis were evaluated in C57BL/6J mice. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) accumulation was observed in white matter tracts at 6, 24, and 72 h post-TBI. Increased intensity of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunoreactivity was observed by 24 h, primarily under the impact site and in the nucleus accumbens, a striatal subregion, as early as 72 h, persisting to 7 days, after TBI. At 14 days post-TBI, when mice were tested for ethanol sensitivity after acute high-dose ethanol (4 g/kg, intraperitoneally), brain-injured mice exhibited increased sedation time compared with uninjured mice, which was accompanied by deficits in striatal dopamine- and cAMP-regulated neuronal phosphoprotein, 32 kDa (DARPP-32) phosphorylation. At 17 days post-TBI, ethanol intake was assessed using the Drinking-in-the-Dark paradigm. Intake across 7 days of consumption was significantly reduced in TBI mice compared with sham controls, paralleling the reduction in alcohol consumption observed clinically in the initial post-injury period. These data demonstrate that TBI increases sensitivity to ethanol-induced sedation and affects downstream signaling mediators of striatal

  5. Vestibular and stabilometric findings in whiplash injury and minor head trauma.

    PubMed

    Nacci, A; Ferrazzi, M; Berrettini, S; Panicucci, E; Matteucci, J; Bruschini, L; Ursino, F; Fattori, B

    2011-12-01

    Vertigo and postural instability following whiplash and/or minor head injuries is very frequent. According to some authors, post-whiplash vertigo cannot be caused by real injury to vestibular structures; other authors maintain that vestibular damage is possible even in the case of isolated whiplash, with vascular or post-traumatic involvement. Furthermore, many of the balance disorders reported after trauma can be justified by post-traumatic modification to the cervical proprioceptive input, with consequent damage to the vestibular spinal reflex. The aim of this study was to evaluate the vestibular condition and postural status in a group of patients (Group A, n = 90) affected with balance disorders following whiplash, and in a second group (Group B, n = 20) with balance disorders after minor head injury associated with whiplash. Both groups were submitted to videonystagmography (VNG) and stabilometric investigation (open eyes - O E, closed eyes - CE, closed eyes with head retroflexed - CER) within 15 days of their injuries and repeated within 10 days after conclusion of cervical physiotherapy treatment. The VNG tests revealed vestibulopathy in 19% of cases in Group A (11% peripheral, 5% central, 3% in an undefined site) and in 60% of subjects in Group B (50% peripheral, 10% central). At the follow-up examination, all cases of non-compensated labyrinth deficit showed signs of compensation, while there were two cases (2%) in Group A and one case (5%) in Group B of PPV. As far as the altered posturographic recordings are concerned, while there was no specific pattern in the two groups, they were clearly pathologic, especially during CER. Both in OE and in CE there was an increase in the surface values and in those pertaining to shifting of the gravity centre on the sagittal plane, which was even more evident during CER. In Group A, the pre-post-physiotherapy comparison of CER results showed that there was a statistically significant improvement in the majority of the

  6. Lightning injury as a blast injury of skull, brain, and visceral lesions: clinical and experimental evidences.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, M; Hosoda, Y; Fujishiro, Y; Tuyuki, A; Kikuchi, K; Obara, H; Kitagawa, N; Ishikawa, T

    2001-12-01

    The present study attempts to better understand the mechanism of injuries associated with direct lightning strikes. We reviewed the records of 256 individuals struck by lightning between 1965 and 1999, including 56 people who were killed. Basal skull fracture, intracranial haemorrhage, pulmonary haemorrhage, or solid organ rupture was suspected in three men who died. Generally these lesions have been attributed to current flow or falling after being struck. However, examination of surface injuries sustained suggested that the true cause was concussion secondary to blast injury resulting from vaporization of water on the body surface by a surface flashover spark. To investigate this hypothesis, an experimental model of a lightning strike was created in the rat. Saline-soaked blotting paper was used to simulate wet clothing or skin, and an artificial lightning impulse was applied. The resultant lesions were consistent with our hypothesis that the blast was reinforced by the concussive effect of water vaporization. The concordance between the clinical and experimental evidence argues strongly for blast injury as an important source of morbidity and mortality in lightning strikes.

  7. An experimental evaluation of head-up display formats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naish, J. M.; Miller, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    Three types of head-up display format are investigated. Type 1 is an unreferenced (conventional) flight director, type 2 is a ground referenced flight path display, and type 3 is a ground referenced director. Formats are generated by computer and presented by reflecting collimation against a simulated forward view in flight. Pilots, holding commercial licenses, fly approaches in the instrument flight mode and in a combined instrument and visual flight mode. The approaches are in wind shear with varied conditions of visibility, offset, and turbulence. The displays are equivalent in pure tracking but there is a slight advantage for the unreferenced director in poor conditions. Flight path displays are better for tracking in the combined flight mode, possibly because of poor director control laws and the division of attention between superimposed fields. Workloads is better for the type 2 displays. The flight path and referenced director displays are criticized for effects of symbol motion and field limiting. In the subjective judgment of pilots familiar with the director displays, they are rated clearly better than path displays, with a preference for the unreferenced director. There is a fair division of attention between superimposed fields.

  8. The Head Injury Retrieval Trial (HIRT): a single-centre randomised controlled trial of physician prehospital management of severe blunt head injury compared with management by paramedics only

    PubMed Central

    Garner, Alan A; Mann, Kristy P; Fearnside, Michael; Poynter, Elwyn; Gebski, Val

    2015-01-01

    Background Advanced prehospital interventions for severe brain injury remains controversial. No previous randomised trial has been conducted to evaluate additional physician intervention compared with paramedic only care. Methods Participants in this prospective, randomised controlled trial were adult patients with blunt trauma with either a scene GCS score <9 (original definition), or GCS<13 and an Abbreviated Injury Scale score for the head region ≥3 (modified definition). Patients were randomised to either standard ground paramedic treatment or standard treatment plus a physician arriving by helicopter. Patients were evaluated by 30-day mortality and 6-month Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) scores. Due to high non-compliance rates, both intention-to-treat and as-treated analyses were preplanned. Results 375 patients met the original definition, of which 197 was allocated to physician care. Differences in the 6-month GOS scores were not significant on intention-to-treat analysis (OR 1.11, 95% CI 0.74 to 1.66, p=0.62) nor was the 30-day mortality (OR 0.91, 95% CI 0.60 to 1.38, p=0.66). As-treated analysis showed a 16% reduction in 30-day mortality in those receiving additional physician care; 60/195 (29%) versus 81/180 (45%), p<0.01, Number needed to treat =6. 338 patients met the modified definition, of which 182 were allocated to physician care. The 6-month GOS scores were not significantly different on intention-to-treat analysis (OR 1.14, 95% CI 0.73 to 1.75, p=0.56) nor was the 30-day mortality (OR 1.05, 95% CI 0.66 to 1.66, p=0.84). As-treated analyses were also not significantly different. Conclusions This trial suggests a potential mortality reduction in patients with blunt trauma with GCS<9 receiving additional physician care (original definition only). Confirmatory studies which also address non-compliance issues are needed. Trial registration number NCT00112398. PMID:25795741

  9. Imaging of penetrating injuries of the head and neck:current practice at a level I trauma center in the United States.

    PubMed

    Saito, Naoko; Hito, Rania; Burke, Peter A; Sakai, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    Penetrating neck injuries are commonly related to stab wounds and gunshot wounds in the United States. The injuries are classified by penetration site in terms of the three anatomical zones of the neck. Based on this zonal classification system, penetrating injuries to the head and neck have traditionally been evaluated by conventional angiography and/or surgical exploration. In recent years, multidetector-row computed tomography (CT) angiography has significantly improved detectability of vascular injuries and extravascular injuries in the setting of penetrating injuries. CT angiography is a fast and minimally invasive imaging modality to evaluate penetrating injuries of the head and neck for stable patients. The spectrum of penetrating neck injuries includes vascular injury (extravasation, pseudoaneurysm, dissection, occlusion, and arteriovenous fistula), aerodigestive injury (esophageal and tracheal injuries), salivary gland injury, neurologic injury (spinal canal and cerebral injuries), and osseous injury, all of which can be evaluated using CT angiography. Familiarity with the complications and imaging characteristics of penetrating injuries of the head and neck is essential for accurate diagnosis and optimal treatment.

  10. Righting Reflex Predicts Long-Term Histological and Behavioral Outcomes in a Closed Head Model of Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Grin’kina, Natalia M.; Li, Yang; Haber, Margalit; Sangobowale, Michael; Nikulina, Elena; Le’Pre, Charm; El Sehamy, Alexander M.; Dugue, Rachelle; Ho, Johnson S.

    2016-01-01

    Blunt impact produces a heterogeneous brain injury in people and in animal models of traumatic brain injury. We report that a single closed head impact to adult C57/BL6 mice produced two injury syndromes (CHI-1 and CHI-2). CHI-1 mice spontaneously reinitiated breathing after injury while CHI-2 mice had prolonged apnea and regained breathing only after cardiopulmonary resuscitation and supplementation of 100% O2. The CHI-1 group significantly regained righting reflex more rapidly than the CHI-2 group. At 7 days post-injury, CHI-1, but not CHI-2 mice, acquired but had no long-term retention of an active place avoidance task. The behavioral deficits of CHI-1 and CHI-2 mice were retained one-month after the injury. CHI-1 mice had loss of hippocampal neurons and localized white matter injury at one month after injury. CHI-2 had a larger loss of hippocampal neurons and more widespread loss of myelin and axons. High-speed videos made during the injury were followed by assessment of breathing and righting reflex. These videos show that CHI-2 mice experienced a larger vertical g-force than CHI-1 mice. Time to regain righting reflex in CHI-2 mice significantly correlated with vertical g-force. Thus, physiological responses occurring immediately after injury can be valuable surrogate markers of subsequent behavioral and histological deficits. PMID:27657499

  11. Famous head injuries of the first aerial war: deaths of the "Knights of the Air".

    PubMed

    Koul, Prateeka; Mau, Christine; Sabourin, Victor M; Gandhi, Chirag D; Prestigiacomo, Charles J

    2015-07-01

    World War I advanced the development of aviation from the concept of flight to the use of aircraft on the battlefield. Fighter planes advanced technologically as the war progressed. Fighter pilot aces Francesco Baracca and Manfred von Richthofen (the Red Baron) were two of the most famous pilots of this time period. These courageous fighter aces skillfully maneuvered their SPAD and Albatros planes, respectively, while battling enemies and scoring aerial victories that contributed to the course of the war. The media thrilled the public with their depictions of the heroic feats of fighter pilots such as Baracca and the Red Baron. Despite their aerial prowess, both pilots would eventually be shot down in combat. Although the accounts of their deaths are debated, it is undeniable that both were victims of traumatic head injury.

  12. Clinical application of event related potentials in patients with brain tumours and traumatic head injuries.

    PubMed

    Olbrich, H M; Nau, H E; Zerbin, D; Lanczos, L; Lodemann, E; Engelmeier, M P; Grote, W

    1986-01-01

    Event related potential recording and psychometric evaluation of cognitive impairment were carried out on 21 patients with brain tumours, 21 patients with severe head injuries and 24 controls. The tumour and trauma patients who met the psychometric inclusion criteria for dementia, but not the non-demented patients, had significantly longer N2 and P3 latencies than the controls. In assessing individual patients P3 latency correctly differentiated between demented and non-demented patients in 81% of cases (for N2 latency 77%). Particularly P3 latency may provide a practical and objective measure of mental impairment in neurosurgical disorders producing dementia. Marked asymmetry in N2 and P3 amplitudes between hemispheres was observed in a number of cases. No significant relationship was found between diminution of N2 and P3 components and side of lesion.

  13. Continuous monitoring of cortical perfusion by laser Doppler flowmetry in ventilated patients with head injury.

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, P J; Smielewski, P; Czosnyka, M; Pickard, J D

    1994-01-01

    A method for monitoring cortical perfusion by laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) in the neurointensive care unit is described. Out of 22 patients with head injuries, reliable and long term recordings were obtained in 16. Laser Doppler flowmetry registered changes in cortical microcirculatory flow in response to spontaneous waves of raised intracranial pressure, and to therapeutic manoeuvres that altered the cerebral perfusion pressure. Comparisons of variations in flux signal with cerebral perfusion pressure provided an indication of the autoregulatory state of the cortical microcirculation, and analysis of raw LDF data demonstrated an autoregulatory breakpoint of cerebral perfusion pressure of 58 mm Hg, below which cortical perfusion failed. Although middle cerebral artery flow velocities were generally tightly coupled with LDF signal changes, episodes of uncoupling were seen. The potential uses and limitations of LDF in the neurointensive care setting are discussed. Images PMID:7964816

  14. Snapshot view of emergency neurosurgical head injury care in Great Britain and Ireland

    PubMed Central

    Crimmins, D.; Palmer, J.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To study the availability of neurosurgical intensive care for the traumatically brain injured in all 36 neurosurgical centres in the United Kingdom and Ireland receiving head injuries, the response times to referral, and the advice given to the referring hospitals.
METHODS—Telephone survey of receiving neurosurgeons regarding their bed status and their advice on three hypothetical case scenarios. Outcome measures included response times for an acute head injury to be accepted to a neurosurgical centre; the intensive care bed status; variations in advice given to the referring hospitals with regard to ventilation, use of mannitol, steroids, anticonvulsants, and antibiotics.
RESULTS—There were 43 neurosurgical intensive care beds available for an overall estimated population of 63.6 million. There were 1.8 beds available/million of the population for non-ventilated patients, 0.64 beds available/million for ventilated patients, and 0.55 beds available/million for ventilated paediatric patients. London had a shortage of beds with 0.19 adult beds for ventilation/million north of the Thames and 0.14 adult beds for ventilation/million south of the Thames. The median response time for a patient with an extradural haematoma to be accepted for transfer was 6 minutes and 89% of such a referral was accepted within 30 minutes. Clinically significant delays in receiving referrals (over 30 minutes) occurred in four units. Practices regarding the use of hyperventilation, mannitol, anticonvulsants, and antibiotics showed little conformity and in some cases were against the available evidence and advice given by published guidelines.
CONCLUSIONS—There is a severe shortage of available emergency neurosurgical beds especially in the south east of England. The lack of immediately available neurosurgical intensive care beds results in delays of transfer that could adversely affect the outcome of surgery for traumatic intracranial haematoma. Advice given to the

  15. Head Impact Severity Measures for Evaluating Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Risk Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Greenwald, Richard M.; Gwin, Joseph T.; Chu, Jeffrey J.; Crisco, Joseph J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To quantify sensitivity of various biomechanical measures of head impact (linear acceleration, rotational acceleration, impact duration, impact location) to clinical diagnosis of concussion in American football players and to develop a novel measure of head impact severity which combines these measures into a single score that better predicts the incidence of concussion. Methods On-field head impact data were collected from 449 football players at 13 organizations (n = 289,916) using in-helmet systems of six single axis accelerometers. 1,2,3,4,5 Concussions were diagnosed by medical staff and later associated with impact data. Principal Component Analysis 6, 7 and a weighting coefficient based on impact location were used to transform correlated head impact measures into a new composite variable (wPCS). The predictive power of linear acceleration, rotational acceleration, Head Injury Criteria, and wPCS was quantified using Receiver Operating Characteristic8,9,10 curves. The null hypothesis that a measure was no more predictive than guessing was tested (α=0.05). Additionally, ROC curves for wPCS and classical measures were directly compared to test the hypothesis that wPCS was more predictive of concussion than classic measures (α=0.05). Results When all impacts were considered, every biomechanical measure evaluated was statistically more predictive of concussion than guessing (p < 0.005). However, for the top 1% and 2% of impacts based on linear acceleration, a subset that consisted of 82% of all diagnosed concussions, only wPCS was significantly more predictive of concussion than guessing (p<0.03), and, when compared to each other, wPCS was more predictive of concussion than classical measures for the top 1% and 2% of all data (p < 0.04). Conclusions A weighted combination of several biomechanical inputs, including impact location, is more predictive of concussion than a single biomechanical measure. This study is the first to quantify improvements in

  16. Construct Validity of WAIS-R Factors: Neuropsychological Test Correlates in Adults Referred for Evaluation of Possible Head Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Elisabeth M. S.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A 3-factor solution of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale--Revised (WAIS-R) in 260 adults with suspected head injury suggested relatively good construct validity for the factors, based on correlations with neuropsychological tests. Findings are discussed in terms of the multidimensional nature of neuropsychological tests and WAIS-R factors.…

  17. Susceptibility of the MMPI-2-RF neurological complaints and cognitive complaints scales to over-reporting in simulated head injury.

    PubMed

    Bolinger, Elizabeth; Reese, Caitlin; Suhr, Julie; Larrabee, Glenn J

    2014-02-01

    We examined the effect of simulated head injury on scores on the Neurological Complaints (NUC) and Cognitive Complaints (COG) scales of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF). Young adults with a history of mild head injury were randomly assigned to simulate head injury or give their best effort on a battery of neuropsychological tests, including the MMPI-2-RF. Simulators who also showed poor effort on performance validity tests (PVTs) were compared with controls who showed valid performance on PVTs. Results showed that both scales, but especially NUC, are elevated in individuals simulating head injury, with medium to large effect sizes. Although both scales were highly correlated with all MMPI-2-RF over-reporting validity scales, the relationship of Response Bias Scale to both NUC and COG was much stronger in the simulators than controls. Even accounting for over-reporting on the MMPI-2-RF, NUC was related to general somatic complaints regardless of group membership, whereas COG was related to both psychological distress and somatic complaints in the control group only. Neither scale was related to actual neuropsychological performance, regardless of group membership. Overall, results provide further evidence that self-reported cognitive symptoms can be due to many causes, not necessarily cognitive impairment, and can be exaggerated in a non-credible manner.

  18. Nursing care of service members with head injury during the Vietnam war.

    PubMed

    Yost, Terri L

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe and analyze the nursing management of head-injured soldiers by military nurses serving in the Vietnam War. This study used traditional historical methods and a military history framework. Primary sources included original military reports, letters, and policies from the Vietnam War period (located in the archives of the Army Medical Department, Office of Medical History in Falls Church, VA); journal articles of the time period; and autobiographical texts. Secondary sources consisted of biographical and historical texts and Web sites of historical societies. Findings supported that advances in medicine, nursing, and technology throughout the 1960s have an overall positive impact on patient care in a combat zone. The Vietnam War was a time when new theories in the management of head injuries led directly to overall improvements in survival. In conclusion, nurses were professionally and emotionally challenged on a near daily basis but were able to directly apply new nursing science in a combat environment to help improve survivability for those who may not have previously survived off the battlefield.

  19. Intraparenchymal hemorrhage segmentation from clinical head CT of patients with traumatic brain injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Snehashis; Wilkes, Sean; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Butman, John A.; Pham, Dzung L.

    2015-03-01

    Quantification of hemorrhages in head computed tomography (CT) images from patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) has potential applications in monitoring disease progression and better understanding of the patho-physiology of TBI. Although manual segmentations can provide accurate measures of hemorrhages, the processing time and inter-rater variability make it infeasible for large studies. In this paper, we propose a fully automatic novel pipeline for segmenting intraparenchymal hemorrhages (IPH) from clinical head CT images. Unlike previous methods of model based segmentation or active contour techniques, we rely on relevant and matching examples from already segmented images by trained raters. The CT images are first skull-stripped. Then example patches from an "atlas" CT and its manual segmentation are used to learn a two-class sparse dictionary for hemorrhage and normal tissue. Next, for a given "subject" CT, a subject patch is modeled as a sparse convex combination of a few atlas patches from the dictionary. The same convex combination is applied to the atlas segmentation patches to generate a membership for the hemorrhages at each voxel. Hemorrhages are segmented from 25 subjects with various degrees of TBI. Results are compared with segmentations obtained from an expert rater. A median Dice coefficient of 0.85 between automated and manual segmentations is achieved. A linear fit between automated and manual volumes show a slope of 1.0047, indicating a negligible bias in volume estimation.

  20. Can deficits in empathy after head injury be improved by compassionate imagery?

    PubMed

    O'Neill, M; McMillan, T M

    2012-01-01

    Severe head injury (SHI) can result in problems in empathising, which in turn is associated with social difficulties. Compassionate imagery can increase compassion in non-brain injured people and can alter how they relate to themselves and others. This preliminary study investigates whether compassionate imagery can increase empathy in those with low empathy after SHI. A between-group repeated measures design was used wth 24 participants with severe SHI and low empathy, randomly allocated to a single treatment session of compassionate imagery or a control condition of relaxation. Empathy, self-compassion and relaxation were assessed pre- and post-intervention and fear of compassion pre-intervention as a potential covariate. A group effect of compassionate imagery on empathy was not found, F(1, 21) = 0.12, p = .73. A non-specific increase in self-compassion approached significance, T = 78.00, p = 0.07, r = -.26. Fear of compassion did not correlate significantly with changes in self-compassion or empathy. Demographic and injury factors associated with SHI that may impact on treatment effectiveness are discussed. Further research that takes these factors into account is warranted.

  1. From conception to evaluation of mobile services for people with head injury: A participatory design perspective.

    PubMed

    Groussard, Pierre-Yves; Pigot, Hélène; Giroux, Sylvain

    2015-12-17

    Adults with cognitive impairments lack the means to organise their daily life, plan their appointments, cope with fatigue, and manage their budget. They manifest interest in using new technologies to be part of society. Unfortunately, the applications offered on smart phones are often beyond their cognitive abilities. The goal of this study was to design a mobile cognitive assistant to enhance autonomy of people living with acquired traumatic brain injury. Participatory design methodologies guided this research by involving adults with cognitive impairments (CI) and their caregivers in the early stages of the design process. The population of the study is composed of four male adults who present cognitive impairments (three with head injury and one with stroke) and three caregivers. The first phase of this research was to design the Services Assistance Mobile and Intelligent (SAMI) application based on the needs expressed by the participants. During three focus groups, needs emerged concerning planning, health monitoring and money management and led to the implementation of assistive solutions on an Android mobile phone. During the second phase, the participants evaluated the mobile assistant SAMI at home for eight weeks. The results demonstrate that the participants were able to participate actively in the conception of SAMI and to use it successfully. People with CI showed a slight improvement in their life satisfaction. Due to the small number of participants, these promising results need to be confirmed by a larger-scale study.

  2. Systemic Administration of Induced Neural Stem Cells Regulates Complement Activation in Mouse Closed Head Injury Models

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Mou; Dong, Qin; Yao, Hui; Lu, Yingzhou; Ji, Xinchao; Zou, Mingming; Yang, Zhijun; Xu, Minhui; Xu, Ruxiang

    2017-01-01

    Complement activation plays important roles in the pathogenesis of central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Patients face neurological disorders due to the development of complement activation, which contributes to cell apoptosis, brain edema, blood-brain barrier dysfunction and inflammatory infiltration. We previously reported that induced neural stem cells (iNSCs) can promote neurological functional recovery in closed head injury (CHI) animals. Remarkably, we discovered that local iNSC grafts have the potential to modulate CNS inflammation post-CHI. In this study, we aimed to explore the role of systemically delivered iNSCs in complement activation following CNS injury. Our data showed that iNSC grafts decreased the levels of sera C3a and C5a and down-regulated the expression of C3d, C9, active Caspase-3 and Bax in the brain, kidney and lung tissues of CHI mice. Furthermore, iNSC grafts decreased the levels of C3d+/NeuN+, C5b-9+/NeuN+, C3d+/Map2+ and C5b-9+/Map2+ neurons in the injured cortices of CHI mice. Subsequently, we explored the mechanisms underlying these effects. With flow cytometry analysis, we observed a dramatic increase in complement receptor type 1-related protein y (Crry) expression in iNSCs after CHI mouse serum treatment. Moreover, both in vitro and in vivo loss-of-function studies revealed that iNSCs could modulate complement activation via Crry expression. PMID:28383046

  3. Magnitude of pedestrian head injuries & fatalities in Bangalore, south India: A retrospective study from an apex neurotrauma center

    PubMed Central

    Pruthi, Nupur; Ashok, M.; Shiva, Kumar V.; Jhavar, Ketaki; Sampath, S.; Devi, B. Indira

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Pedestrians contribute to 30-40 per cent of all road traffic injuries in India. However, there is a paucity of literature on pedestrian head injury as compared to two wheeler trauma. The purpose of the present study was to study the pattern of pedestrian injuries and their outcome with a special focus on head injuries. Methods: The study was conducted in two parts in the Trauma Center at National Institute of Mental Health & Neuro Sciences, Bangalore. A retrospective study was conducted at the casualty services of the hospital in which 529 consecutive pedestrians who sustained injury in a road traffic accident were studied from June to September 2009. In the second part, records from the hospital mortuary were retrospectively analyzed from 2007 to 2009. An analysis of 326 patients who died as a pedestrian in road accidents during this period was performed. Results: Patients in both paediatric and elderly age groups constituted 47.6 per cent (252/529) of all casualty admissions. Majority of the pedestrian injuries (41.7%, 221/529) occurred between 1600 - 2100 h; 87.1 per cent of all patients received some primary care before admission. The most common offending vehicle was a two wheeler (49.1%, 260/529). At the time of admission, 55.2 per cent (292/529) patients had sustained a moderate or severe head injury (GCS 3-13), and 40.5 per cent (214/529) had an abnormal CT scan. In addition, 90.4 per cent (478/529) patients had also sustained associated injuries. Major thoracoabdominal trauma was seen in 4 per cent and spine injury in 2.3 per cent of the patients. The mortality rate was 6.6 per cent. In the postmortem group, pedestrian deaths constituted 26.2 per cent of all the postmortems conducted. Two wheelers were the offending vehicle in the majority of the fatal crashes (39.9%). Interpretation & conclusions: Pedestrian injuries form a major part of the workload of a neurotrauma emergency. Majority of them sustained moderate to severe head

  4. Repeated Closed Head Injury in Mice Results in Sustained Motor and Memory Deficits and Chronic Cellular Changes

    PubMed Central

    Bolton Hall, Amanda N.; Joseph, Binoy; Brelsfoard, Jennifer M.; Saatman, Kathryn E.

    2016-01-01

    Millions of mild traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) occur every year in the United States, with many people subject to multiple head injuries that can lead to chronic behavioral dysfunction. We previously reported that mild TBI induced using closed head injuries (CHI) repeated at 24h intervals produced more acute neuron death and glial reactivity than a single CHI, and increasing the length of time between injuries to 48h reduced the cumulative acute effects of repeated CHI. To determine whether repeated CHI is associated with behavioral dysfunction or persistent cellular damage, mice receiving either five CHI at 24h intervals, five CHI at 48h intervals, or five sham injuries at 24h intervals were evaluated across a 10 week period after injury. Animals with repeated CHI exhibited motor coordination and memory deficits, but not gait abnormalities when compared to sham animals. At 10wks post-injury, no notable neuron loss or glial reactivity was observed in the cortex, hippocampus, or corpus callosum. Argyrophilic axons were found in the pyramidal tract of some injured animals, but neither silver stain accumulation nor inflammatory responses in the injury groups were statistically different from the sham group in this region. However, argyrophilic axons, microgliosis and astrogliosis were significantly increased within the optic tract of injured animals. Repeated mild CHI also resulted in microgliosis and a loss of neurofilament protein 200 in the optic nerve. Lengthening the inter-injury interval from 24h to 48h did not effectively reduce these behavioral or cellular responses. These results suggest that repeated mild CHI results in persistent behavioral dysfunction and chronic pathological changes within the visual system, neither of which was significantly attenuated by lengthening the inter-injury interval from 24h to 48h. PMID:27427961

  5. Head injury from falls in children younger than 6 years of age

    PubMed Central

    Burrows, P; Trefan, L; Houston, R; Hughes, J; Pearson, G; Edwards, R J; Hyde, P; Maconochie, I; Parslow, R C; Kemp, A M

    2015-01-01

    The risk of serious head injury (HI) from a fall in a young child is ill defined. The relationship between the object fallen from and prevalence of intracranial injury (ICI) or skull fracture is described. Method Cross-sectional study of HIs from falls in children (<6 years) admitted to UK hospitals, analysed according to the object fallen from and associated Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) or alert, voice, pain, unresponsive (AVPU) and CT scan results. Results Of 1775 cases ascertained (median age 18 months, 54.7% boys), 87% (1552) had a GCS=15/AVPU=alert. 19.3% (342) had a CT scan: 32% (110/342) were abnormal; equivalent to 5.9% of the overall population, 16.9% (58) had isolated skull fractures and 13.7% (47) had ICI (49% (23/47) had an associated skull fracture). The prevalence of ICI increased with neurological compromise; however, 12% of children with a GCS=15/AVPU=alert had ICI. When compared to falls from standing, falls from a person's arms (233 children (mean age 1 year)) had a significant relative OR for a skull fracture/ICI of 6.94 (95% CI 3.54 to 13.6), falls from a building (eg, window or attic) (mean age 3 years) OR 6.84 (95% CI 2.65 to 17.6) and from an infant or child product (mean age 21 months) OR 2.75 (95% CI 1.36 to 5.65). Conclusions Most HIs from a fall in these children admitted to hospital were minor. Infants, dropped from a carer's arms, those who fell from infant products, a window, wall or from an attic had the greatest chance of ICI or skull fracture. These data inform prevention and the assessment of the likelihood of serious injury when the object fallen from is known. PMID:26297697

  6. Skull fracture and haemorrhage pattern among fatal and nonfatal head injury assault victims – a critical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Saurabh; Tripathi, Chandrabhal

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: Background: The global incidence of fatal head injuries as the result of assault is greater than the number of non-fatal cases. The important factors that determine the outcome in terms of survival of such head injury cases include the type of weapon used, type and site of skull fracture, intra cranial haemorrhage and the brain injury. The present study aims to highlight the role of skull fractures as an indirect indicator of force of impact and the intra cranial haemorrhage by a comparative study of assault victims with fatal and nonfatal head injuries. Methods: 91 head injury cases resulting from assault were studied in the Department of Forensic Medicine, IMS, BHU Varanasi over a period of 2 years from which 18 patients survived and 73 cases had a lethal outcome. Details of the fatal cases were obtained from the police inquest and an autopsy while examination of the surviving patients was done after obtaining an informed consent. The data so obtained were analyzed and presented in the study. Results: Assault with firearms often led to fatality whereas with assault involving blunt weapons the survival rate was higher. Multiple cranial bones were involved in 69.3% cases while comminuted fracture of the skull was common among the fatal cases. Fracture of the base of the skull was noted only in the fatal cases and a combination of subdural and subarachnoid haemorrhage was found in the majority of the fatal cases. Conclusions: The present study shows skull fractures to be an important indicator of severity of trauma in attacks to the head. Multiple bone fracture, comminuted fracture and base fractures may be considered as high risk factors in attempted homicide cases. PMID:21483205

  7. Caregivers' voices: The experiences of caregivers of children who sustained serious accidental and non-accidental head injury in early childhood.

    PubMed

    Wharewera-Mika, Julie; Cooper, Erana; Kool, Bridget; Pereira, Susana; Kelly, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    Head injury is a leading cause of mortality and acquired neurological impairment in children. Head-injured children may have neurobehavioural deficits that persist for years following injury. Head injury can result in significant and persistent caregiver burden, including mental health issues, family stress and disorganisation, and unmet social and healthcare service needs. Few studies have examined the healthcare and social service needs of children and their families following head injury sustained at an early age. This qualitative study aims to describe the experiences of caregivers of children who sustained a serious head injury (particularly non-accidental head injury) before the age of 2 years. Caregivers were interviewed up to 15 years following the initial injury. Semi-structured interviews with 21 caregivers of 15 children (aged 3-15 years at the time of interview) were completed. Thematic analysis of interview data generated three key themes: impact, support and information. The study's findings reveal the broad impact of serious childhood head injury on caregivers, specifically the significant distress and burden brought about through lack of information, challenges in accessing support and inconsistent care. Recommendations for developing a quality 'model of care' and improving ease of access to supports for caregivers are provided.

  8. [Dropped Head Syndrome after whiplash injury in a patient treated for a Hodgkin's lymphoma by mantle field radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Schlienger, M; Ferroir, J-P; Huguet, F; Deluen, F; Pène, F; Marseguerra, R; Touboul, E

    2013-02-01

    The authors report a case of Dropped Head Syndrome with an unusually rapid onset after an accident in a patient with a history of Hodgkin's lymphoma cured by chemotherapy and mantle field radiotherapy and compare this case to the rare published cases of chronic Dropped Head Syndrome occurring after this type of treatment. A 56-year-old man was treated at the age 36 years for supra-diaphragmatic Hodgkin's lymphoma by chemotherapy and mantle field radiotherapy according to a standard technique and standard doses (40Gy, 20 fractions, 27 days). Seventeen years after the end of treatment, he experienced a violent whiplash injury, rapidly followed by a Dropped Head Syndrome, similar to the cases of chronic Dropped Head Syndrome already described in the context of Hodgkin's lymphoma (permanent flexion of the head, only reduced in the supine position). Physical and neurophysiological examination, electromyogram, and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the diagnosis of Dropped Head Syndrome. Very few treatment options are available for the major disability related to Dropped Head Syndrome. This type of subacute onset of Dropped Head Syndrome has not been previously described. The good results of radiation therapy after chemotherapy allow a dose reduction to 30Gy in the involved regions. This, together with recent progress in treatment planning, should allow eradication of these complications.

  9. Injuries to the head and face in Brazilian adolescents and teenagers victims of non-natural deaths.

    PubMed

    Leite Cavalcanti, A; Barros De Alencar, C Y; Sant'Anna Araujo Rodrigues, I; Suenya de Almeida Pinto, M; Fabia Cabral Xavier, A; Leite Cavalcanti, C; Gondim Valenciq, A M

    2012-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the occurrence of injuries to the head and face in adolescent and teenager victims of non-natural deaths. A retrospective study was undertaken by the analysis of medical forensic reports obtained from medical forensic examinations performed at the Department of Forensic Medicine of the city of Campina Grande, PB, Brazil, between January 2003 and December 2007. From a total of 607 reports issued during this time span, the study sample consisted of 423 reports (69.6%) referring to adolescents and teenagers of both genders, aged 12 to 18 years, who were confirmed to have died from external causes. The causes of death were encoded according to the Chapter XX of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10). The majority of victims were 17 year old males (25.8%). Firearms (33.3%) and transport accidents (32.2%) were the most common causes of death, with boys showing a 3.7 times greater likelihood of getting killed by firearms than girls. There was statistically significant relationship between the occurrence of transport accidents and gender. The majority of victims (71.6%) presented with multiple injuries throughout the body. There was statistically significant relationship between the occurrence of transport accidents and the presence of multiple injuries. A high percentage of the victims presented with injuries to the head and face. There was statistically significant relationship between the occurrence of transport accidents and the presence of injury to the head. Fatal gunshot wounds and transport accidents were the main causes of death of male adolescents and teenagers. The victims presented with multiple injuries, especially to the head and face, and the mandible was the most frequently injured facial bone. .

  10. Head injury trends and helmet use in skiers and snowboarders in Western Canada, 2008-2009 to 2012-2013: an ecological study.

    PubMed

    Dickson, T J; Trathen, S; Terwiel, F A; Waddington, G; Adams, R

    2017-02-01

    This research explored associations between helmet use and head injuries in snowsports by investigating reported snowsport injuries in Western Canada from 2008-2009 to 2012-2013. The key finding was that increased helmet use (from 69% to 80%) was not associated with a reduction in reported head injuries. Over the study period, the average rate of reported head injuries was 0.2/1000 skier visits, with a statistically significant variation (P < 0.001). The line of best fit showed an non-significant upward trend (P = 0.13). Lacerations were the only subcategory of head injuries that decreased significantly with helmet use. A higher proportion of people who reported a head injury were wearing a helmet than for injuries other than to the head. Skiers were more likely to report a head injury when wearing a helmet than snowboarders (P < 0.001 cf. P = 0.22). There were significant differences in characteristics of helmet and non-helmet wearers. Helmet wearers were more likely to be: young adults (P < 0.001); beginner/novices (P = 0.004); and snowboarders (P < 0.001), but helmet wearing was not associated with gender (P = 0.191). Further research is needed to explore the possible reasons for the failure of helmets to reduce head injuries, for example, increased reporting of head injuries and increased risk-taking combined with over-rating of the helmets' protection.

  11. The impact-acceleration model of head injury: injury severity predicts motor and cognitive performance after trauma.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, A; Marmarou, A; Czigner, A; Yamamoto, M; Demetriadou, K; Shirotani, T; Marmarou, C; Dunbar, J

    1999-12-01

    This study examines neuropsychological dysfunction after varying severities of the Impact Acceleration Model of diffuse traumatic brain injury. Adult rats (340 g-400 g) were divided into five groups, and exposed to varying degrees of Impact Acceleration Injury (1 m, 2 m, 2.1 m/500 g and second insult). After injury, animals were allowed to recover; acute neurological reflexes, beam walk score, beam balance score, inclined plane score, and Morris Water Maze score were then assessed at multiple time points. Injury of all severities caused significant motor and cognitive deficits. With milder injuries these effects were transient; however, with more severe injuries no recovery in function was seen. The addition of hypoxia and hypotension made a moderate injury worse than a severe injury. The acute neurological reflexes, the beam balance test and the inclined plane test distinguished between the more severely injured groups, but were affected less by mild injury. The beam walk test was sensitive to mild injury, but appeared unable to distinguish between the severe groups. The Morris Water Maze was sensitive for all injury groups, but appeared to adopt a different response profile with secondary insult. This study has for the first time characterized the degree of motor and cognitive deficits in rodents exposed to differing severities of Impact Acceleration Injury. These data confirm that the tests considered, and the Injury Model used, provide a useful system for the consideration of potential therapies which might ameliorate neuropsychological deficits in diffuse brain injury.

  12. Embedded-structure template for electronic records affects patient note quality and management for emergency head injury patients

    PubMed Central

    Sonoo, Tomohiro; Iwai, Satoshi; Inokuchi, Ryota; Gunshin, Masataka; Kitsuta, Yoichi; Nakajima, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Along with article-based checklists, structured template recording systems have been reported as useful to create more accurate clinical recording, but their contributions to the improvement of the quality of patient care have been controversial. An emergency department (ED) must manage many patients in a short time. Therefore, such a template might be especially useful, but few ED-based studies have examined such systems. A structured template produced according to widely used head injury guidelines was used by ED residents for head injury patients. The study was conducted by comparing each 6-month period before and after launching the system. The quality of the patient notes and factors recorded in the patient notes to support the head computed tomography (CT) performance were evaluated by medical students blinded to patient information. The subject patients were 188 and 177 in respective periods. The numbers of patient notes categorized as “CT indication cannot be determined” were significantly lower in the postintervention term (18% → 9.0%), which represents the patient note quality improvement. No difference was found in the rates of CT performance or CT skip without clearly recorded CT indication in the patient notes. The structured template functioned as a checklist to support residents in writing more appropriately recorded patient notes in the ED head injury patients. Such a template customized to each clinical condition can facilitate standardized patient management and can improve patient safety in the ED. PMID:27749590

  13. Cerebral perfusion pressure and risk of brain hypoxia in severe head injury: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Marín-Caballos, Antonio J; Murillo-Cabezas, Francisco; Cayuela-Domínguez, Aurelio; Domínguez-Roldán, Jose M; Rincón-Ferrari, M Dolores; Valencia-Anguita, Julio; Flores-Cordero, Juan M; Muñoz-Sánchez, M Angeles

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Higher and lower cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) thresholds have been proposed to improve brain tissue oxygen pressure (PtiO2) and outcome. We study the distribution of hypoxic PtiO2 samples at different CPP thresholds, using prospective multimodality monitoring in patients with severe traumatic brain injury. Methods This is a prospective observational study of 22 severely head injured patients admitted to a neurosurgical critical care unit from whom multimodality data was collected during standard management directed at improving intracranial pressure, CPP and PtiO2. Local PtiO2 was continuously measured in uninjured areas and snapshot samples were collected hourly and analyzed in relation to simultaneous CPP. Other variables that influence tissue oxygen availability, mainly arterial oxygen saturation, end tidal carbon dioxide, body temperature and effective hemoglobin, were also monitored to keep them stable in order to avoid non-ischemic hypoxia. Results Our main results indicate that half of PtiO2 samples were at risk of hypoxia (defined by a PtiO2 equal to or less than 15 mmHg) when CPP was below 60 mmHg, and that this percentage decreased to 25% and 10% when CPP was between 60 and 70 mmHg and above 70 mmHg, respectively (p < 0.01). Conclusion Our study indicates that the risk of brain tissue hypoxia in severely head injured patients could be really high when CPP is below the normally recommended threshold of 60 mmHg, is still elevated when CPP is slightly over it, but decreases at CPP values above it. PMID:16356218

  14. Development of Experimental Tissue Models for Blast Injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Benjamin; Bo, Chiara; Williams, Alun; Jardine, Andy; Brown, Katherine

    2013-06-01

    There is a pressing need to better understand the relationship between the intensity of a blast wave and the clinical consequences for victims of an explosion. In order to quantitatively study how these factors correlate with one another, blast injury tissue models are being developed. Sections of larynx, trachea and pulmonary tissue were excised from a recently sacrificed pig and maintained on ice prior to testing. The samples were subjected to strain rates of between 0.001 s-1 and 1000 s-1 in the laboratory by using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar and quasi-static testing apparatus. During high strain rate testing, samples were housed in a polycarbonate chamber which permitted experimentation on tissue held in fluid. Data were analysed using 1, 2 and 3 wave analysis software in Matlab to yield information about the material properties of both undamaged and damaged tissues. In addition, macroscopic changes in tissue organization were also visualized using histopathological techniques. This work is being extended to cellular and animal models to derive more detailed information about the underlying molecular changes relating to blast-induced damage and repair. The Royal British Legion Centre for Blast Injury Studies.

  15. Repeated mild closed head injury impairs short-term visuospatial memory and complex learning.

    PubMed

    Hylin, Michael J; Orsi, Sara A; Rozas, Natalia S; Hill, Julia L; Zhao, Jing; Redell, John B; Moore, Anthony N; Dash, Pramod K

    2013-05-01

    Concussive force can cause neurocognitive and neurobehavioral dysfunction by inducing functional, electrophysiological, and/or ultrastructural changes within the brain. Although concussion-triggered symptoms typically subside within days to weeks in most people, in 15%-20% of the cases, symptomology can continue beyond this time point. Problems with memory, attention, processing speed, and cognitive flexibility (e.g., problem solving, conflict resolution) are some of the prominent post-concussive cognitive symptoms. Repeated concussions (with loss or altered consciousness), which are common to many contact sports, can exacerbate these symptoms. The pathophysiology of repeated concussions is not well understood, nor is an effective treatment available. In order to facilitate drug discovery to treat post-concussive symptoms (PCSs), there is a need to determine if animal models of repeated mild closed head injury (mCHI) can mimic the neurocognitive and histopathological consequences of repeated concussions. To this end, we employed a controlled cortical impact (CCI) device to deliver a mCHI directly to the skull of mice daily for 4 days, and examined the ensuing neurological and neurocognitive functions using beam balance, foot-fault, an abbreviated Morris water maze test, context discrimination, and active place avoidance tasks. Repeated mCHI exacerbated vestibulomotor, motor, short-term memory and conflict learning impairments as compared to a single mCHI. Learning and memory impairments were still observed in repeated mCHI mice when tested 3 months post-injury. Repeated mCHI also reduced cerebral perfusion, prolonged the inflammatory response, and in some animals, caused hippocampal neuronal loss. Our results show that repeated mCHI can reproduce some of the deficits seen after repeated concussions in humans and may be suitable for drug discovery studies and translational research.

  16. Pattern of Head Injuries (Cranio-cerebral) due to Homicide in Association with Other Injuries: A Retrospective Post-mortem Study Autopsied at Dhaka Medical College Morgue House.

    PubMed

    Akber, E B; Alam, M T; Rahman, K M; Jahan, I; Musa, S A

    2016-04-01

    Annually, homicide contributes to a greater number of the total head injury cases. This retrospective study was conducted from 1(st) January 2009 to 31(st)December 2011 at Dhaka Medical College Mortuary. During this study period of three years a total of 15300 autopsies were done of which 5649 cases (36.84%) were of head injuries. Of them 747(13.22%) were of homicidal, 4080(72.22%) road-traffic accidents, 502(8.88%) accidental and 320(5.66%) cases of fall from heights. Three hundred ninety eight (398) urban cases (53.27%) out numbered 307 rural cases (41.09%) followed by 42 unknown cases (5.62%). Most cases belong to the younger age group i.e. 21-40 years (43.34%) with male preponderance 470(63.10%). Defense wounds were present in 281 cases (37.82%) out of the total 747 homicidal head injuries. There were 206(27.57%) upper limb, 176(23.56%) spinal, 139(18.60%) abdominal, 135(18.07%) thoracic, 58(7.76%) lower limb and 33(4.41%) pelvic injuries found as associated injury. There were 258(34.53%) fractures of occipital followed by 209(28.29%) parietal, 113(15.01%) frontal, 104(13.75%) temporal, 24(3.21%) ant. Cranial fossa, 23(3.07%) post. Cranial fossa and 16(2.08%) of middle cranial fossa fractures. Extradural haemorrhage was more i.e. 434 cases (58.43%) followed by subdural, combination of all, subarachnoid and intra-cerebral haemorrhages. Cases of concussion were more common i.e. 445(59.75%) than lacerated and combination of them. Blunt weapon tops the list of causative weapons i.e. 669(89.22%) than firearms 59(8.07%) and sharp pointed weapons 19(2.68%).

  17. Adipofascial radial artery perforator flap interposition to treat post-traumatic radioulnar synostosis in a patient with head injury

    PubMed Central

    Samson, Deepak; Power, Dominic; Tan, Simon

    2015-01-01

    We report this 47-year-old man who presented with polytrauma following a fall from a roof in March 2011. He sustained a head injury and a complex, comminuted forearm fracture. He underwent an open reduction and internal fixation of the fracture at the time of injury, but later developed a rigid type 2 diaphyseal radioulnar synostosis, with loss of forearm rotation. Synostosis excision and a radial artery perforator-based adipofascial interposition flap to prevent recurrence has resulted in a good functional outcome and no recurrence at 2.5 years follow-up. PMID:25725026

  18. Occupational injuries with captive lance-headed vipers (Bothrops moojeni): experience from a snake farm in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, S A; Silveira, P V; Peixoto-Filho, F M; Jorge, M T; Sandoz, A

    2000-07-01

    We studied occupational injuries with captive lance-headed vipers (Bothrops moojeni) that occurred in a snake farm in south-eastern Brazil from February 1981 to May 1999. The risk of injury, taking into account 13 cases of snake-associated injuries (12 of them snake bites) was 2.73 per 10,000 person-days of work, and 3.51 per 100,000 venom extractions. Thirteen cases of injury occurred in seven workers, whereas 18 workers were never injured, suggesting that some individuals have a higher risk of injury than others perhaps due to lack of concentration or overconfidence. Eight episodes of occupational injuries occurring in four technicians, including a case of eye injury due to splashed venom during extraction, are reported. Assessment of whether envenoming occurred was facilitated by knowledge of the snake species and size, history of recent venom extraction and snake feeding, and examination of snake venom glands. Hypersensitivity reactions (anaphylaxis and serum sickness) to antivenom are a risk particularly to those workers who were bitten more than once and medicated previously. Antivenom therefore should not be administered to these individuals unless there is clear evidence that envenoming occurred or is likely to have occurred. Hypersensitivity to the venom is also a health concern for workers from snake farms.

  19. Heightened false memory: a long-term sequela of severe closed head injury.

    PubMed

    Ries, Michele; Marks, William

    2006-01-01

    Declarative memory impairment is a common long-term sequela of severe closed head injury (CHI). Although veridical memory performance following severe CHI has received attention in the literature, little is known about false memory production in this population. Within the present study, both long-term survivors of severe CHI and matched control participants studied and were tested on six 12-items word lists from the Deese Roediger McDermott (DRM) paradigm. Word lists from the DRM are composed of words that are strongly semantically associated to a non-presented word (i.e., the critical lure). Prior studies have shown that healthy young adults show a high level of false recall and recognition memory for the critical lures, and it was hypothesized individuals with severe CHI would show heightened susceptibility to false memory compared to control participants due to difficulty with monitoring of memory. It was further hypothesized that severe CHI participants would show high confidence in their false memories. Consistent with hypotheses, results indicated that although severe CHI participants remembered fewer actual list items, they made more semantically related intrusion errors (recall) and false-positive responses (recognition) than the control participants. Severe CHI participants also showed greater confidence in their false memories than did control participants. The results are interpreted in the context of theoretical accounts of false memory, and possible structural and functional brain changes that might account for the Severe CHI group's memory performance are discussed.

  20. A comparison of neuropsychological and situational assessment for predicting employability after closed head injury.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, J M; Hayden, M E; Paulman, R G

    2000-08-01

    The relationships among neuropsychological assessment, situational assessment, and judgments of future employability in 127 survivors of moderate to severe closed head injury were evaluated. Participants received a comprehensive neuropsychological battery and a situational vocational evaluation. Two groups were created, based on employment recommendation from the situational evaluation. A seven-factor model was found to account for the preponderance of variance within the neuropsychological battery used, and one factor was predictive of group assignment from situational assessment. However, the present data reinforce the predominance of findings in the literature that indicate that, in general, no individual neuropsychological test can be used to predict vocational performance in more environmentally relevant environments. Exceptions to this "rule" may occur when comparisons between results of formal neuropsychological tests and situational evaluation are limited to very simple, very circumscribed, and/or very well-defined functions. Thus, situational assessment is seen as a critical adjunct to neuropsychological assessment in making "real-world" predictions. The particular situational assessment used in this study was internally valid, an important finding given the importance of situational assessment in ecologically valid predictions.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography in relation to the neurobehavioral sequelae of mild and moderate head injuries.

    PubMed

    Levin, H S; Amparo, E; Eisenberg, H M; Williams, D H; High, W M; McArdle, C B; Weiner, R L

    1987-05-01

    Twenty patients admitted for minor or moderate closed-head injury were studied to investigate the relationship between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and neurobehavioral sequelae. The MRI scans demonstrated 44 more intracranial lesions than did concurrent computerized tomography (CT) scans in 17 patients (85%); most of these lesions were located in the frontal and temporal regions. Estimates of lesion volume based on MRI were frequently greater than with CT; however, MRI disclosed no additional lesions that required surgical evacuation. Neuropsychological assessment during the initial hospitalization revealed deficits in frontal lobe functioning and memory that were related to the size and localization of the lesions as defined by MRI. Follow-up MRI and neuropsychological testing at 1 month (13 cases) and 3 months (six cases) disclosed marked reduction of lesion size paralleled by improvement in cognition and memory. These findings encourage further investigation of the prognostic utility of MRI for the clinical management and rehabilitation of mild or moderate head injury.

  2. Non-surgical treatment of massive traumatic corpus callosum hematoma after blunt head injury: A case report.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, A; Elgamal, E; Elsayed, A A; Wasserberg, J; Kuncz, A

    2016-01-01

    Massive hematoma of the corpus callosum caused by blunt head trauma is an extremely rare lesion. Most frequent traumatic lesions involve the corpus callosum are diffuse axonal injuries. They might be associated with small hemorrhagic foci in the hemispheric and brain stem white matter, intraventricular hemorrhages, subarachnoid hemorrhages, traumatic lesions of the septum pellucidum and fornix. Many cases of corpus callosum injury present with permanent disconnection syndrome. We present a case of a 32-year-old female suffered blunt head trauma resulted in massive corpus callosum hematoma which was managed non-surgically. The patient initially had a reduced conscious level and symptoms of disconnection syndrome, and significant recovery was observed at 6 months follow up.

  3. Elbow joint stability following experimental osteoligamentous injury and reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Deutch, Søren R; Jensen, Steen L; Tyrdal, Stein; Olsen, Bo S; Sneppen, Otto

    2003-01-01

    Elbow joint dislocation was simulated in cadaveric specimens to quantify laxity induced by radial head and coronoid process lesions, either alone or in combination with collateral ligament insufficiency. The effects of lateral ligament reconstruction and radial head prosthesis replacement were also considered. Absence of the radial head and the coronoid process induced rotatory laxity of 145% and 128% (both P <.01), respectively, compared with the intact joint. When both were absent, the joints subluxated regardless of collateral ligament status. Isolated radial head prosthesis implantation prevented this subluxation, and laxity almost normalized. Lateral collateral ligament reconstruction prevented major laxity even in the absence of the radial head. Lateral collateral ligament reconstruction and radial head prosthetic replacement yielded restraint against gross instability in the maximal unstable situation (terrible triad). The lateral collateral ligament is the prime stabilizer to external rotation, and reconstruction of this alone, even with an absent radial head, is beneficial.

  4. Incidental frontal lobe mixed density epidermoid tumor in a patient of head injury: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pankaj; Mittal, Radheyshyam; Gandhi, Ashok; Sharma, Achal; Gandhi, Sapna

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of the epidermoid tumor is approximately 0.2–1.8% of all intracranial tumors. Epidermoid tumors are typically intradural, but extra-axial in location and only rarely found within the brain substance. We are reporting the first case of incidental mixed density frontal epidermoid tumor in a patient of head injury. Difficulty in the preoperative diagnosis and uncommon presentation of the intracranial epidermoid tumor prompted us to report this case. PMID:26425171

  5. Effects of external helmet accessories on biomechanical measures of head injury risk: An ATD study using the HYBRIDIII headform.

    PubMed

    Butz, Robert C; Knowles, Brooklynn M; Newman, James A; Dennison, Christopher R

    2015-11-05

    Competitive cycling is a popular activity in North America for which injuries to the head account for the majority of hospitalizations and fatalities. In cycling, use of helmet accessories (e.g. cameras) has become widespread. As a consequence, standards organizations and the popular media are discussing the role these accessories could play in altering helmet efficacy and head injury risk. We conducted impacts to a helmeted anthropomorphic headform, with and without camera accessories, at speeds of 4m/s and 6m/s, and measured head accelerations, forces on the head-form skull, and used the Simulated Injury Monitor to estimate brain tissue strain. The presence of the camera reduced peak linear head acceleration (51% - 4m/s impacts, 61% - 6m/s, p<0.05). Skull fracture risk based on kinematics was always less than 1%. For 4m/s impacts, peak angular accelerations were lower (47%, p<0.05), as were peak angular velocities (14%) with the velocity effect approaching significance (p=0.06), with the camera accessory. For 6m/s impacts, accelerations were on average higher (5%, p>0.05) as were velocities (77%, p<0.05). Skull forces were never greater than 443.2N, well below forces associated with fracture. Brain tissue strain, the cumulative strain damage measure at 25% (CSDM-25), was lower (56%, p<0.05) in 4m/s but higher (125%, p>0.05) in 6m/s impacts with the camera accessory. Based on CSDM-25 for 4m/s tests, the risk of severe concussion was reduced (p<0.05) from 25% (no camera) to 7% (camera). For 6m/s tests, risks were on average increased (p>0.05) from 18% (no camera) to 58% (camera).

  6. Angular Impact Mitigation System for Bicycle Helmets to Reduce Head Acceleration and Risk of Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Kirk; Dau, Nathan; Feist, Florian; Deck, Caroline; Willinger, Rémy; Madey, Steven M.; Bottlang, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Angular acceleration of the head is a known cause of traumatic brain injury (TBI), but contemporary bicycle helmets lack dedicated mechanisms to mitigate angular acceleration. A novel Angular Impact Mitigation (AIM) system for bicycle helmets has been developed that employs an elastically suspended aluminum honeycomb liner to absorb linear acceleration in normal impacts as well as angular acceleration in oblique impacts. This study tested bicycle helmets with and without AIM technology to comparatively assess impact mitigation. Normal impact tests were performed to measure linear head acceleration. Oblique impact tests were performed to measure angular head acceleration and neck loading. Furthermore, acceleration histories of oblique impacts were analyzed in a computational head model to predict the resulting risk of TBI in the form of concussion and diffuse axonal injury (DAI). Compared to standard helmets, AIM helmets resulted in a 14% reduction in peak linear acceleration (p < 0.001), a 34% reduction in peak angular acceleration (p < 0.001), and a 22% to 32% reduction in neck loading (p < 0.001). Computational results predicted that AIM helmets reduced the risk of concussion and DAI by 27% and 44%, respectively. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that AIM technology could effectively improve impact mitigation compared to a contemporary expanded polystyrene-based bicycle helmet, and may enhance prevention of bicycle-related TBI. Further research is required. PMID:23770518

  7. Angular Impact Mitigation system for bicycle helmets to reduce head acceleration and risk of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Kirk; Dau, Nathan; Feist, Florian; Deck, Caroline; Willinger, Rémy; Madey, Steven M; Bottlang, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Angular acceleration of the head is a known cause of traumatic brain injury (TBI), but contemporary bicycle helmets lack dedicated mechanisms to mitigate angular acceleration. A novel Angular Impact Mitigation (AIM) system for bicycle helmets has been developed that employs an elastically suspended aluminum honeycomb liner to absorb linear acceleration in normal impacts as well as angular acceleration in oblique impacts. This study tested bicycle helmets with and without AIM technology to comparatively assess impact mitigation. Normal impact tests were performed to measure linear head acceleration. Oblique impact tests were performed to measure angular head acceleration and neck loading. Furthermore, acceleration histories of oblique impacts were analyzed in a computational head model to predict the resulting risk of TBI in the form of concussion and diffuse axonal injury (DAI). Compared to standard helmets, AIM helmets resulted in a 14% reduction in peak linear acceleration (p<0.001), a 34% reduction in peak angular acceleration (p<0.001), and a 22-32% reduction in neck loading (p<0.001). Computational results predicted that AIM helmets reduced the risk of concussion and DAI by 27% and 44%, respectively. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that AIM technology could effectively improve impact mitigation compared to a contemporary expanded polystyrene-based bicycle helmet, and may enhance prevention of bicycle-related TBI. Further research is required.

  8. Epiplakin attenuates experimental mouse liver injury by chaperoning keratin reorganization

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Sandra; Wögenstein, Karl L.; Österreicher, Christoph H.; Guldiken, Nurdan; Chen, Yu; Doler, Carina; Wiche, Gerhard; Boor, Peter; Haybaeck, Johannes; Strnad, Pavel; Fuchs, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Epiplakin is a member of the plakin protein family and exclusively expressed in epithelial tissues where it binds to keratins. Epiplakin-deficient (Eppk1−/−) mice displayed no obvious spontaneous phenotype, but their keratinocytes showed a faster keratin network breakdown in response to stress. The role of epiplakin in the stressed liver remained to be elucidated. Methods Wild-type (WT) and Eppk1−/− mice were subjected to common bile duct ligation (CBDL) or fed with a 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC)-containing diet. The importance of epiplakin during keratin reorganization was assessed in primary hepatocytes. Results Our experiments revealed that epiplakin is expressed in hepatocytes and cholangiocytes, and binds to keratin 8 (K8) and K18 via multiple domains. In several liver stress models epiplakin and K8 genes displayed identical expression patterns and transgenic K8 overexpression resulted in elevated hepatic epiplakin levels. After CBDL and DDC treatment, Eppk1−/− mice developed a more pronounced liver injury and their livers contained larger amounts of hepatocellular keratin granules, indicating impaired disease-induced keratin network reorganization. In line with these findings, primary Eppk1−/− hepatocytes showed increased formation of keratin aggregates after treatment with the phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid, a phenotype which was rescued by the chemical chaperone trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO). Finally, transfection experiments revealed that Eppk1−/− primary hepatocytes were less able to tolerate forced K8 overexpression and that TMAO treatment rescued this phenotype. Conclusion Our data indicate that epiplakin plays a protective role during experimental liver injuries by chaperoning disease-induced keratin reorganization. PMID:25617501

  9. Experimental Creep Life Assessment for the Advanced Stirling Convertor Heater Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, David L.; Kalluri, Sreeramesh; Shah, Ashwin R.; Korovaichuk, Igor

    2010-01-01

    includes direct benchmark experimental creep assessment. This element provides high-fidelity creep testing of prototypical heater head test articles to investigate the relevant material issues and multiaxial stress state. Benchmark testing provides required data to evaluate the complex life assessment methodology and to validate that analysis. Results from current benchmark heater head tests and newly developed experimental methods are presented. In the concluding remarks, the test results are shown to compare favorably with the creep strain predictions and are the first experimental evidence for a robust ASC heater head creep life.

  10. Identification of Serum MicroRNA Signatures for Diagnosis of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in a Closed Head Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Erin S.; Bhomia, Manish; Hutchison, Mary Anne; Balakathiresan, Nagaraja S.; Grunberg, Neil E.; Maheshwari, Radha K.

    2014-01-01

    Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have highlighted the problems of diagnosis and treatment of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). MTBI is a heterogeneous injury that may lead to the development of neurological and behavioral disorders. In the absence of specific diagnostic markers, mTBI is often unnoticed or misdiagnosed. In this study, mice were induced with increasing levels of mTBI and microRNA (miRNA) changes in the serum were determined. MTBI was induced by varying weight and fall height of the impactor rod resulting in four different severity grades of the mTBI. Injuries were characterized as mild by assessing with the neurobehavioral severity scale-revised (NSS-R) at day 1 post injury. Open field locomotion and acoustic startle response showed behavioral and sensory motor deficits in 3 of the 4 injury groups at day 1 post injury. All of the animals recovered after day 1 with no significant neurobehavioral alteration by day 30 post injury. Serum microRNA (miRNA) profiles clearly differentiated injured from uninjured animals. Overall, the number of miRNAs that were significantly modulated in injured animals over the sham controls increased with the severity of the injury. Thirteen miRNAs were found to identify mTBI regardless of its severity within the mild spectrum of injury. Bioinformatics analyses revealed that the more severe brain injuries were associated with a greater number of miRNAs involved in brain related functions. The evaluation of serum miRNA may help to identify the severity of brain injury and the risk of developing adverse effects after TBI. PMID:25379886

  11. A Literature Review of Musculoskeletal Injuries to the Human Neck and the Effects of Head-Supported Mass Worn by Soldier

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    caught up with the neck, it went into full extension. During extension, the lower spine facet joint ( C5 to C6) experiences different loading conditions...protrusion was seen in the C5 through C7 intervertebral disks. Surveys that are intended to identify techniques employed by pilots to reduce the incidence of...additional head-supported mass. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Head supported mass, neck injury, cervical spine injury, aviation, aircrew helmets, NVGs 16. SECURITY

  12. Internal Carotid Artery Fibromuscular Dysplasia in a Child: Incidental Postmortem Finding after Head Injury

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Arulselvi; Aggarwal, Garima; Agarwal, Deepak; Lalwani, Sanjeev

    2017-01-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is a rare, segmental, nonatheromatous, and noninflammatory arterial disease of unknown etiology. It predominantly involves renal artery (60–75%) followed by extracranial part of the internal carotid artery and vertebral arteries (25–30%). The disease typically affects middle-aged women and involves intermediate-sized arteries throughout the body. There are rare case reports of extracranial FMD compounding a trauma case. A patient was brought to trauma center emergency with a history of fall from height. There were one previous episode of seizure and two episodes of vomiting. His Glasgow Coma Scale on admission was E1V1M4. Noncontrast computed tomography of the head showed fracture on the right zygomatic, temporal, and parietal bone, with underlying thin subdural hemorrhage. The patient underwent left frontotemporoparietal decompressive craniectomy and lax duraplasty with bone flap in bone bank. On the 1st postoperative day, he succumbed to his injuries despite timely surgery and necessary interventions. It was only postmortem when FMD was diagnosed in carotid artery by histopathological examination. On microscopy, intimal changes were seen in the form of expansion of subendothelial loose matrix with mesenchymal cells, thickening and hyalinization of the internal elastic lamina, areas of duplication and disruption of internal elastic lamina. Medial wall changes included thickening of the wall, focal loss of the smooth muscle, and replacement with fibrosis (dysplastic change). This case emphasizes the importance of considering this disease in the differential diagnosis of children and young adults with stroke (which subsequently lead to his fall). PMID:28042220

  13. Long-term sleep disturbances in adolescents after minor head injury.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Y; Tzischinsky, O; Epstein, R; Etzioni, A; Lavie, P; Pillar, G

    2001-02-01

    It has been demonstrated that patients in the acute phase after minor head injury (MHI) complain of sleep disturbances. The purpose of the present study was to characterize the long-term effects of MHI on sleep in adolescents. Nineteen adolescents who had suffered MHI 3 years before the study and had complained of sleep disturbances completed a sleep questionnaire and were investigated in the sleep laboratory by whole-night polysomnographic recordings and were actigraphically monitored for 5 days at home. Questionnaire results revealed severe complaints regarding sleep behavior. Polysomnographic recordings revealed that in comparison with controls, MHI was associated with lower sleep efficiency (79.8 +/- [9.8]% vs 87.7 +/- [6.8]%; P < 0.005), with more wake time (10.6 +/- [9.0]% vs 3.4 +/- [4.4]%; P < 0.005), and with more awakenings lasting more than 3 minutes (2.1 +/- [1.5] vs 0.6 +/- [0.8]; P < 0.005). These findings were confirmed by actigraphic monitoring that revealed lower sleep efficiency (90 +/- [5]% vs 94 +/- [3]%; P < 0.05), more minutes of wake time (49 +/- [21] min vs 28 +/- [15] min; P < 0.05), and a trend toward more awakenings longer than 5 minutes (1.8 +/- [0.8] vs 1.2 +/- [0.8]; P = 0.063). Our data demonstrated that 3 years after MHI without any discernible clinical sequel, adolescents still complain of sleep disturbances that could be confirmed by both polysomnographic and actigraphic monitoring.

  14. The Effect of Various Types of Motorcycle Helmets on Cervical Spine Injury in Head Injury Patients: A Multicenter Study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Mau-Roung; Chu, Shu-Fen; Tsai, Shin-Han; Bai, Chyi-Huey; Chiu, Wen-Ta

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The relationship between cervical spine injury (CSI) and helmet in head injury (HI) patients following motorcycle crashes is crucial. Controversy still exists; therefore we evaluated the effect of various types of helmets on CSI in HI patients following motorcycle crashes and researched the mechanism of this effect. Patients and Methods. A total of 5225 patients of motorcycle crashes between 2000 and 2009 were extracted from the Head Injury Registry in Taiwan. These patients were divided into case and control groups according to the presence of concomitant CSI. Helmet use and types were separately compared between the two groups and the odds ratio of CSI was obtained by using multiple logistic regression analysis. Results. We observed that 173 (3.3%) of the HI patients were associated with CSI. The HI patients using a helmet (odds ratio (OR) = 0.31, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.19−0.49), full-coverage helmet (0.19, 0.10−0.36), and partial-coverage helmet (0.35, 0.21−0.56) exhibited a significantly decreased rate of CSI compared with those without a helmet. Conclusion. Wearing full-coverage and partial-coverage helmets significantly reduced the risk of CSI among HI patients following motorcycle crashes. This effect may be due to the smooth surface and hard padding materials of helmet. PMID:25705663

  15. Frontal lobe changes after severe diffuse closed head injury in children: a volumetric study of magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Berryhill, P; Lilly, M A; Levin, H S; Hillman, G R; Mendelsohn, D; Brunder, D G; Fletcher, J M; Kufera, J; Kent, T A; Yeakley, J

    1995-09-01

    In view of the pathophysiology and biomechanics of severe closed head injury (CHI) in children, we postulated that the frontal lobes sustain diffuse injury, even in the absence of focal brain lesions detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study quantitated the morphological effects of CHI on the frontal lobes in children who sustained head trauma of varying severity. The MRI findings of 14 children who had sustained severe CHIs (Glasgow Coma Scale score of < or = 8) were compared with the findings in a matched group of 14 children having sustained mild head injuries (Glasgow Coma Scale score of 13-15). The patients ranged in age from 5 to 15 years at the time of their MRIs, which were acquired at least 3 months postinjury. MRI findings revealed no focal areas of abnormal signal in the frontal lobes. Volumetric analysis disclosed that the total prefrontal cerebrospinal fluid increased and the gray matter volume decreased in the patients with severe CHI, relative to the mildly injured comparison group. Gray matter volume was also reduced in the orbitofrontal and dorsolateral regions of the brains of children with severe CHI, relative to the children who sustained mild head trauma. These volumetric findings indicate that prefrontal tissue loss occurs after severe CHI in children, even in the absence of focal brain lesions in this area. Nearly two-thirds of the children who sustained severe CHIs were moderately disabled after an average postinjury interval of 3 years or more, whereas 12 of the 14 patients with mild CHIs attained a good recovery (2 were moderately disabled) by the time of study.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Association between head injury and helmet use in alpine skiers: cohort study from a Swiss level 1 trauma center.

    PubMed

    Baschera, Dominik; Hasler, Rebecca M; Taugwalder, David; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis; Raabe, Andreas

    2015-04-15

    The association between helmet use during alpine skiing and incidence and severity of head injuries was analyzed. All patients admitted to a level 1 trauma center for traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) sustained from skiing accidents during the seasons 2000-2001 and 2010-2011 were eligible. Primary outcome was the association between helmet use and severity of TBI measured by Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), computed tomography (CT) results, and necessity of neurosurgical intervention. Of 1362 patients injured during alpine skiing, 245 (18%) sustained TBI and were included. TBI was fatal in 3%. Head injury was in 76% minor (Glasgow Coma Scale, 13-15), 6% moderate, and 14% severe. Number and percentage of TBI patients showed no significant trend over the investigated seasons. Forty-five percent of the 245 patients had pathological CT findings and 26% of these required neurosurgical intervention. Helmet use increased from 0% in 2000-2001 to 71% in 2010-2011 (p<0.001). The main analysis, comparing TBI in patients with or without a helmet, showed an adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 1.44 (p=0.430) for suffering moderate-to-severe head injury in helmet users. Analyses comparing off-piste to on-slope skiers revealed a significantly increased OR among off-piste skiers of 7.62 (p=0.004) for sustaining a TBI requiring surgical intervention. Despite increases in helmet use, we found no decrease in severe TBI among alpine skiers. Logistic regression analysis showed no significant difference in TBI with regard to helmet use, but increased risk for off-piste skiers. The limited protection of helmets and dangers of skiing off-piste should be targeted by prevention programs.

  17. Development, Implementation, and Validation of Supported Employment Model(s) for Traumatically Brain Injured Persons. Head Injury Re-entry Project (Project HIRe). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Dale F.; Menz, Fredrick E.

    The final report of the Head Injury Re-entry Project (Project HIRe) describes activities of this 3-year (1987 to 1990) project, which used a "best practices" model approach and a community-based employment strategy with persons having traumatic brain injury (TBI) in nonurban areas. Among 15 project accomplishments are the following: (1)…

  18. Monte Carlo and experimental internal radionuclide dosimetry in RANDO head phantom.

    PubMed

    Ghahraman Asl, Ruhollah; Nasseri, Shahrokh; Parach, Ali Asghar; Zakavi, Seyed Rasoul; Momennezhad, Mehdi; Davenport, David

    2015-09-01

    Monte Carlo techniques are widely employed in internal dosimetry to obtain better estimates of absorbed dose distributions from irradiation sources in medicine. Accurate 3D absorbed dosimetry would be useful for risk assessment of inducing deterministic and stochastic biological effects for both therapeutic and diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine. The goal of this study was to experimentally evaluate the use of Geant4 application for tomographic emission (GATE) Monte Carlo package for 3D internal dosimetry using the head portion of the RANDO phantom. GATE package (version 6.1) was used to create a voxel model of a human head phantom from computed tomography (CT) images. Matrix dimensions consisted of 319 × 216 × 30 voxels (0.7871 × 0.7871 × 5 mm(3)). Measurements were made using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100). One rod-shaped source with 94 MBq activity of (99m)Tc was positioned in the brain tissue of the posterior part of the human head phantom in slice number 2. The results of the simulation were compared with measured mean absorbed dose per cumulative activity (S value). Absorbed dose was also calculated for each slice of the digital model of the head phantom and dose volume histograms (DVHs) were computed to analyze the absolute and relative doses in each slice from the simulation data. The S-values calculated by GATE and TLD methods showed a significant correlation (correlation coefficient, r(2) ≥ 0.99, p < 0.05) with each other. The maximum relative percentage differences were ≤14% for most cases. DVHs demonstrated dose decrease along the direction of movement toward the lower slices of the head phantom. Based on the results obtained from GATE Monte Carlopackage it can be deduced that a complete dosimetry simulation study, from imaging to absorbed dose map calculation, is possible to execute in a single framework.

  19. Functional and molecular correlates following single and repeated rat closed-head concussion; indices of vulnerability following brain injury.

    PubMed

    Mountney, Andrea; Boutte, Angela; Cartagena, Casandra M; Flerlage, William J; Johnson, David; Rho, Chanyang; Lu, Xi-Chun M; Yarnell, Angela M; Marcsisin, Sean R; Sousa, Jason; Vuong, Chau; Zottig, Victor E; Leung, Lai Yee; Deng-Bryant, Ying; Gilsdorf, Janice; Tortella, Frank C; Shear, Deborah A

    2017-03-22

    Closed-head concussive injury is one of the most common causes of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Isolated concussions frequently produce acute neurological impairments; however, individuals typically recover spontaneously within a short time frame. In contrast, brain injuries resulting from multiple concussions can result in cumulative damage and elevated risk of developing chronic brain pathologies, including chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Increased attention has focused on identification of diagnostic markers that can prognostically serve as indices of brain health after injury, revealing the temporal profile of vulnerability to a second insult. Such markers may demarcate adequate recovery periods before concussed patients can return to required activities. We developed a non-invasive closed-head impact model which captures the hallmark symptoms of concussion in the absence of gross tissue damage. Animals were subjected to single or repeated concussive impact and examined using a battery of neurological, vestibular, sensorimotor, and molecular metrics. A single concussion induced transient, but marked acute neurological impairment, gait alterations, neuronal death, and increased glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression in brain tissue. As expected, repeated concussions exacerbated sensorimotor dysfunction, prolonged gait abnormalities, induced neuroinflammation, and upregulated GFAP and Tau. These animals also exhibited chronic functional neurologic impairments with sustained astrogliosis and white matter thinning. Acute changes in molecular signatures correlated with behavioral impairments; while, increased times to regain consciousness and balance impairments were associated with higher GFAP and neuroinflammation. Overall, behavioral consequences of either single or repeated concussive impact injuries appeared to resolve more quickly than the underlying molecular, metabolic and neuropathologic abnormalities. This observation, which is supported

  20. Closed head injury causes hyperexcitability in rat hippocampal CA1 but not in CA3 pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Griesemer, Désirée; Mautes, Angelika M

    2007-12-01

    Traumatic brain injury frequently elicits epileptic seizures hours or days after the impact. The mechanisms on cellular level are poorly understood. Because posttraumatic epilepsy appears in many cases as a temporal-lobe epilepsy which originated the hippocampus, we studied trauma-induced hyperexcitability on the cellular level in this brain area. We used the model of closed head injury to analyse the electrophysiological changes in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal cells and in interneurones of the CA1 field, which is extremely sensitive to ischemia. We found that morphologically closed head injury (CHI) led to a gradual progressive, cell type specific time course in neuronal degeneration. To analyse electrophysiological impairment we measured resting membrane potential, recorded spontaneous action potentials and induced action potentials by current pulses at different times after CHI. We found a dramatic increase in the frequency of spontaneous action potentials of CA1 but not of CA3 pyramidal cells after CHI. This hyperexcitability was maximal at 2 h (4.5-fold higher than sham), was also observed at 24 h after CHI and disappeared after 3 days. We found that CA1 interneurones responded by a much weaker increase of AP frequency after CHI. We conclude that the strong hyperexcitability after CHI is cell-type specific and transient. The understanding of the complex neuronal interactions probably offers a promising possibility for pharmacological intervention to prevent posttraumatic epilepsy.

  1. Experimental studies on twin PTCs driven by dual piston head linear compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gour, Abhay S.; Joy, Joewin; Sagar, Pankaj; Sudharshan, H.; Mallappa, A.; Karunanithi, R.; Jacob, S.

    2017-02-01

    An experimental study on pulse tube cryocooler is presented with a twin pulse tube configuration. The study is conducted with a dual piston head linear compressor design which is developed indigenously. The two identical pulse tube cryocoolers are operated by a single linear motor which generates 1800 out of phase dual pressure waves. The advantages of the configuration being the reduction in fabrication cost and the increased cooling power. The compressor is driven at a frequency of 48 Hz using indigenously developed PWM based power supply. The CFD study of pulse tube cryocooler is discussed along with the experimental cool down results. A detailed experimental and FEM based studies on the fabrication procedure of heat exchangers is conducted to ensure better heat transfer in the same.

  2. Experimental analysis and extinction of self-injurious escape behavior.

    PubMed

    Iwata, B A; Pace, G M; Kalsher, M J; Cowdery, G E; Cataldo, M F

    1990-01-01

    Three studies are presented in which environmental correlates of self-injurious behavior were systematically examined and later used as the basis for treatment. In Study 1, 7 developmentally disabled subjects were exposed to a series of conditions designed to identify factors that maintain self-injurious behavior: attention contingent on self-injurious behavior (positive reinforcement), escape from or avoidance of demands contingent on self-injurious behaviour (negative reinforcement), alone (automatic reinforcement), and play (control). Results of a multielement design showed that each subject's self-injurious behavior occurred more frequently in the demand condition, suggesting that the behavior served an avoidance or escape function. Six of the 7 subjects participated in Study 2. During educational sessions, "escape extinction" was applied as treatment for their self-injurious behavior in a multiple baseline across subjects design. Results showed noticeable reduction or elimination of self-injurious behavior for each subject and an increase in compliance with instructions in all subjects for whom compliance data were taken. The 7th subject, whose self-injurious behavior during Study 1 occurred in response to medical demands (i.e., physical examinations), participated in Study 3. Treatment was comprised of extinction, as in Study 2, plus reinforcement for tolerance of the examination procedure, and was evaluated in a multiple baseline across settings design. Results showed that the treatment was successful in eliminating self-injurious behavior and that its effects transferred across eight new therapists and three physicians. General implications for the design, interpretation, and uses of assessment studies are discussed.

  3. Health-related quality of life among people with epilepsy with mild seizure-related head injuries.

    PubMed

    Friedman, David E; Islam, Shahidul; Ettinger, Alan B

    2013-06-01

    Seizure-related head injury (SRHI) is an under-recognized condition frequently experienced by people with epilepsy (PWE). The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential impact of SRHI on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among PWE receiving care in a tertiary epilepsy center. Consecutive adult PWE receiving care at the Baylor Comprehensive Epilepsy Center (BCEC) were recruited for the study. After their informed consent was obtained, patients were administered the QOLIE-31 to measure HRQOL and the NDDI-E to screen for depression. Simple linear regression was used to identify clinical variables associated with HRQOL and that included SRHI obtained systematically at each clinic visit. Data were also compared between the SRHI and non-SRHI groups. Participants included 172 subjects. Recurrent mild SRHI occurred in 50 (29%) subjects. Factors with a negative effect on HRQOL included depression (slope=-19.99 [95% CI -25.16, -14.81]; p<.0001), recurrent SRHI (-17.02 [-22.35, -11.69]; p<.0001), past SRHI (-13.46 [-18.43, -8.48]; p<.0001), and seizure frequency (-0.17 [-0.26, -0.07]; p=0.001) on univariate analysis. With stepwise multiple regression, depression and recurrent SRHI significantly impacted HRQOL with slopes (95% CI; p-value) of (-17.53 [-22.34, -12.73]; p<.0001) and (-14.03 [-18.78, -9.28]; p<.0001), respectively. Patient-derived HRQOL is negatively associated with depression and recurrent SRHI, independently. There has been a justifiable increased awareness of the potential effects of head injuries among healthy individuals. Our data suggest that head injuries can certainly be detrimental among PWE, and greater efforts should be made to recognize and formulate prevention strategies for SRHI.

  4. Experimental Analysis and Extinction of Self-Injurious Escape Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iwata, Brian A.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Three studies investigated environmental correlates of self-injurious behavior in seven developmentally disabled children and adolescents which were then later used for treatment. Correlates investigated included positive reinforcement, negative reinforcement, automatic reinforcement, and control. "Escape extinction" was successfully…

  5. Coagulation Defects in Experimental Hepatic Injury in the Dog

    PubMed Central

    Osbaldiston, G. W.; Hoffman, Marcia W.

    1971-01-01

    Alteration in activity of blood coagulation factors in dogs with acute hepatic injury caused by oral carbon tetrachloride dosing was studied. Coagulation Factors II, VII and IX were dramatically reduced within 48 hours but recovered to normal in the next five days. Because surgery is rarely performed on dogs with hepatic necrosis, the use of fresh whole blood tranfusion to improve the coagulation defect in hepatic injury was also studied. Transfusion was found to have only a temporary beneficial effect. PMID:4253461

  6. Mechanisms of Head and Neck Injuries Sustained by Helmeted Motorcyclists in Fatal Real-World Crashes: Analysis of 47 In-Depth Cases.

    PubMed

    Whyte, Thomas; Gibson, Tom; Anderson, Robert; Eager, David; Milthorpe, Bruce

    2016-10-01

    Despite an improved understanding of traumatic head and neck injury mechanisms, the impact tests required by major motorcycle helmet standards have remained unchanged for decades. Development of new test methods must reflect the specific impact loads causing injury in real crashes as well as test criteria appropriate for the observed injury profiles. This study analysed a collection of in-depth crash investigations of fatally injured helmeted riders in the Adelaide metropolitan region between 1983 and 1994 inclusive to review the head and neck injury patterns that resulted from specific types of impact. Inertial brain injury was sustained in 49% of examined cases, most often resulting from facial impacts but also in a large proportion of tangential, run over, and occipital impact cases. Focal brain and brainstem injury was also common (53%) and regularly associated with skull vault (11/12) and skull base fractures (22/31). Prevention of these fractures in impacts outside the area of required protection and in impacts with a straight edge would provide a significant increase in helmeted rider protection. Cervical spinal cord injury was sustained in facial, straight edge, and tangential impacts on the head. Motorcycle helmets are effective for preventing local skull fractures in impacts for which they are designed, whereas other serious injuries such as basilar skull fracture (BSF) and inertial brain injury persist despite helmet protection. Further impact test procedures should be developed for injurious impact types not currently assessed by major helmet standards, in particular facial impacts, and using test criteria based on commonly observed injuries. This study provides the necessary link, from impact load to injury, for guiding impact test development.

  7. The Brain Tourniquet: Physiological Isolation of Brain Regions Damaged by Traumatic Head Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-19

    brain slices were treated after injury with either a nootropic agent (aniracetam, cyclothiazide, IDRA 21, or 1-BCP) or the antiepileptic drug...pharmacological approach. 15. SUBJECT TERMS traumatic brain injury, cell necrosis, neuroprotection, nootropics , epilepsy, long-term potentiation...render their use problematic in an effective brain tourniquet system. We chose to focus our investigations on the nootropic (cognition enhancing) drugs

  8. Numerical and experimental study of actuator performance on piezoelectric microelectromechanical inkjet print head.

    PubMed

    Van So, Pham; Jun, Hyun Woo; Lee, Jaichan

    2013-12-01

    We have investigated the actuator performance of a piezoelectrically actuated inkjet print head via the numerical and experimental analysis. The actuator consisting of multi-layer membranes, such as piezoelectric, elastic and other buffer layers, and ink chamber was fabricated by MEMS processing. The maximum displacement of the actuator membrane obtained in the experiment is explained by numerical analysis. A simulation of the actuator performance with fluidic damping shows that the resonant frequency of the membrane in liquid is reduced from its resonant frequency in air by a factor of three, which was also verified in the experiment. These simulation and experimental studies demonstrate how much "dynamic force," in terms of a membrane's maximum displacement, maximum force and driving frequency, can be produced by an actuator membrane interacting with fluid.

  9. [Experimental model of severe local radiation injuries of the skin after X-rays].

    PubMed

    Kotenko, K V; Moroz, B B; Nasonova, T A; Dobrynina, O A; LIpengolz, A A; Gimadova, T I; Deshevoy, Yu B; Lebedev, V G; Lyrschikova, A V; Eremin, I I

    2013-01-01

    The experimental model of severe local radiation injuries skin under the influence of a relatively soft X-rays on a modified device RAP 100-10 produced by "Diagnostica-M" (Russia) was proposed. The model can be used as pre-clinical studies in small experimental animals in order to improve the treatment of local radiation injuries, especially in the conditions of application of cellular therapy.

  10. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and Traumatic Brain Injury (Head and Spinal)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    of BDNF and its receptor, trkB in response to injury. This study demonstrated that regions of the brain that are resistant to cell damage have...increased gene expression for BDNF and its high affinity receptor, tyrosine kinase B ( trkB ) during the acute periods after injury. Study 2 examined whether...the alterations in mRNA levels following FP injury resulted in subsequent alterations in protein levels of BDNF and trkB and activation of the ERK/MAP

  11. Podocyte Injury and Albuminuria in Experimental Hyperuricemic Model Rats

    PubMed Central

    Asakawa, Shinichiro; Morimoto, Chikayuki; Shiraishi, Takeshi; Nakamura, Takashi; Tamura, Yoshifuru; Kumagai, Takanori; Hosoyamada, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    Although hyperuricemia is shown to accelerate chronic kidney disease, the mechanisms remain unclear. Accumulating studies also indicate that uric acid has both pro- and antioxidant properties. We postulated that hyperuricemia impairs the function of glomerular podocytes, resulting in albuminuria. Hyperuricemic model was induced by oral administration of 2% oxonic acid, a uricase inhibitor. Oxonic acid caused a twofold increase in serum uric acid levels at 8 weeks when compared to control animals. Hyperuricemia in this model was associated with the increase in blood pressure and the wall-thickening of afferent arterioles as well as arcuate arteries. Notably, hyperuricemic rats showed significant albuminuria, and the podocyte injury marker, desmin, was upregulated in the glomeruli. Conversely, podocin, the key component of podocyte slit diaphragm, was downregulated. Structural analysis using transmission electron microscopy confirmed podocyte injury in this model. We found that urinary 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine levels were significantly increased and correlated with albuminuria and podocytopathy. Interestingly, although the superoxide dismutase mimetic, tempol, ameliorated the vascular changes and the hypertension, it failed to reduce albuminuria, suggesting that vascular remodeling and podocyte injury in this model are mediated through different mechanisms. In conclusion, vasculopathy and podocytopathy may distinctly contribute to the kidney injury in a hyperuricemic state. PMID:28337250

  12. Pilot study of the effects of mixed light touch manual therapies on active duty soldiers with chronic post-traumatic stress disorder and injury to the head.

    PubMed

    Davis, Lauren; Hanson, Brenda; Gilliam, Sara

    2016-01-01

    This pilot study was designed to examine the effects of mixed Light Touch Manual Therapies (LTMT) on headache, anxiety and other symptoms suffered by active duty United States service members experiencing chronic Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Ten service members diagnosed with PTSD and having a self-reported injury to the head acquired at least two years prior, were provided with two hour-long sessions of mixed LTMT given a week apart. Data to assess the immediate and durable effects were gathered before and after the LTMT sessions. Results indicate that headache, anxiety, and pain interference were significantly reduced during the course of the pilot study. This suggests that mixed LTMT may be helpful in reducing some of the symptoms of PTSD and injury to the head. Further studies will be needed to determine if LTMT is an effective non-pharmacological treatment for headache, anxiety or other problems associated with PTSD or injury to the head.

  13. Biomechanics of Head, Neck, and Chest Injury Prevention for Soldiers: Phase 2 and 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-01

    provide normal physiologic pressure to the eye during the duration of testing (0.29 psi or 14.95 mmHg). Intraocular pressure was measured before and...Element Model (FEM) skull and skin CAD geometry (Figure 15). Therefore, this model simulates physiologic facial anatomy around the eye, including the...quantify physical damage to the tissues and structures of the eye. Second, injury risk for physiologic injuries was calculated using the peak

  14. Head injury and risk of Parkinson disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Siavash; Etminan, Mahyar; Aminzadeh, Farhad; Samii, Ali

    2013-08-01

    Head trauma has been implicated in the etiopathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). We performed a meta-analysis to investigate the association between head trauma and the risk of developing PD. We included observational studies if they (1) clearly defined PD, (2) defined head trauma leading to concussion, and (3) presented odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) or provided data to compute these statistics. Random effect model was used to estimate the pooled, adjusted OR. Heterogeneity between studies was evaluated with the Q test and the I(2) statistic. We conducted a sensitivity analysis to assess the influence of each study and repeated the analysis by excluding the studies with the largest weights. We used funnel plot to assess the presence of publication bias. After reviewing more than 636 article titles, 34 articles were selected for full review. In total, 22 studies (19 case-control studies, 2 nested case-control studies, and 1 cohort study) were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled OR for the association of PD and head trauma was 1.57 (95% CI, 1.35-1.83). The results of our meta-analysis indicate that a history of head trauma that results in concussion is associated with a higher risk of developing PD. © 2013 Movement Disorder Society.

  15. A Novel Closed-Head Model of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Using Focal Primary Overpressure Blast to the Cranium in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Guley, Natalie H.; Rogers, Joshua T.; Del Mar, Nobel A.; Deng, Yunping; Islam, Rafiqul M.; D'Surney, Lauren; Ferrell, Jessica; Deng, Bowei; Hines-Beard, Jessica; Bu, Wei; Ren, Huiling; Elberger, Andrea J.; Marchetta, Jeffrey G.; Rex, Tonia S.; Honig, Marcia G.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) from focal head impact is the most common form of TBI in humans. Animal models, however, typically use direct impact to the exposed dura or skull, or blast to the entire head. We present a detailed characterization of a novel overpressure blast system to create focal closed-head mild TBI in mice. A high-pressure air pulse limited to a 7.5 mm diameter area on the left side of the head overlying the forebrain is delivered to anesthetized mice. The mouse eyes and ears are shielded, and its head and body are cushioned to minimize movement. This approach creates mild TBI by a pressure wave that acts on the brain, with minimal accompanying head acceleration-deceleration. A single 20-psi blast yields no functional deficits or brain injury, while a single 25–40 psi blast yields only slight motor deficits and brain damage. By contrast, a single 50–60 psi blast produces significant visual, motor, and neuropsychiatric impairments and axonal damage and microglial activation in major fiber tracts, but no contusive brain injury. This model thus reproduces the widespread axonal injury and functional impairments characteristic of closed-head mild TBI, without the complications of systemic or ocular blast effects or head acceleration that typically occur in other blast or impact models of closed-skull mild TBI. Accordingly, our model provides a simple way to examine the biomechanics, pathophysiology, and functional deficits that result from TBI and can serve as a reliable platform for testing therapies that reduce brain pathology and deficits. PMID:26414413

  16. A Novel Closed-Head Model of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Using Focal Primary Overpressure Blast to the Cranium in Mice.

    PubMed

    Guley, Natalie H; Rogers, Joshua T; Del Mar, Nobel A; Deng, Yunping; Islam, Rafiqul M; D'Surney, Lauren; Ferrell, Jessica; Deng, Bowei; Hines-Beard, Jessica; Bu, Wei; Ren, Huiling; Elberger, Andrea J; Marchetta, Jeffrey G; Rex, Tonia S; Honig, Marcia G; Reiner, Anton

    2016-02-15

    Mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) from focal head impact is the most common form of TBI in humans. Animal models, however, typically use direct impact to the exposed dura or skull, or blast to the entire head. We present a detailed characterization of a novel overpressure blast system to create focal closed-head mild TBI in mice. A high-pressure air pulse limited to a 7.5 mm diameter area on the left side of the head overlying the forebrain is delivered to anesthetized mice. The mouse eyes and ears are shielded, and its head and body are cushioned to minimize movement. This approach creates mild TBI by a pressure wave that acts on the brain, with minimal accompanying head acceleration-deceleration. A single 20-psi blast yields no functional deficits or brain injury, while a single 25-40 psi blast yields only slight motor deficits and brain damage. By contrast, a single 50-60 psi blast produces significant visual, motor, and neuropsychiatric impairments and axonal damage and microglial activation in major fiber tracts, but no contusive brain injury. This model thus reproduces the widespread axonal injury and functional impairments characteristic of closed-head mild TBI, without the complications of systemic or ocular blast effects or head acceleration that typically occur in other blast or impact models of closed-skull mild TBI. Accordingly, our model provides a simple way to examine the biomechanics, pathophysiology, and functional deficits that result from TBI and can serve as a reliable platform for testing therapies that reduce brain pathology and deficits.

  17. Statins alleviate experimental nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiang Qun; Lim, Tony K Y; Lee, Seunghwan; Zhao, Yuan Qing; Zhang, Ji

    2011-05-01

    The statins are a well-established class of drugs that lower plasma cholesterol levels by inhibiting HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A) reductase. They are widely used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and for the prevention of coronary heart disease. Recent studies suggest that statins have anti-inflammatory effects beyond their lipid-lowering properties. We sought to investigate whether statins could affect neuropathic pain by mediating nerve injury-associated inflammatory responses. The effects of hydrophilic rosuvastatin and lipophilic simvastatin were examined in the mouse partial sciatic nerve ligation model. Systemic daily administration of either statin from days 0 to 14 completely prevented the development of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. When administered from days 8 to 14 after injury, both statins dose-dependently reduced established hypersensitivity. After treatment, the effects of the statins were washed out within 2 to 7 days, depending on dose. Effects of both statins in alleviating mechanical allodynia were further confirmed in a different injury-associated neuropathic pain model, mental nerve chronic constriction, in rats. Both statins were able to abolish interleukin-1β expression in sciatic nerve triggered by nerve ligation. Additionally, quantitative analysis with Iba-1 and glial fibrillary acid protein immunoreactivity demonstrated that rosuvastatin and simvastatin significantly reduced the spinal microglial and astrocyte activation produced by sciatic nerve injury. The increase of interleukin-1β mRNA in the ipsilateral side of spinal cords was also reduced by the treatment of either statin. We identified a potential new application of statins in the treatment of neuropathic pain. The pain-alleviating effects of statins are likely attributable to their immunomodulatory effects.

  18. Serum copper concentration as an index of experimental lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, W.F.; Molteni, A.; Ts'ao, C.; Ischiropoulos, H. )

    1989-01-01

    Serum copper (Cu) concentration was evaluated as an index of lung injury in two rat models of pneumotoxicity: hemithoracic irradiation and monocrotaline ingestion. In both models there was a dose- and time-dependent increase in serum Cu concentration. This hypercupremia paralleled the development of pulmonary endothelial dysfunction (decreased lung plasminogen activator activity and increased prostacyclin production) and pulmonary fibrosis (hydroxyproline accumulation). In the radiation model, lung injury and hypercupremia persisted for at least 6 months, and were spared similarly when the total dose was delivered in multiple daily fractions as compared to single doses. In irradiated rats, the elevated serum Cu concentration was accompanied by increases in plasma ceruloplasmin, lung Cu concentration, and lung Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. In monocrotaline-treated rats, lung damage and hypercupremia also were accompanied by a reduction in liver Cu concentration, and by a direct correlation between the concentrations of Cu and SGOT in the serum. In both models, some but not all modifiers of lung damage (penicillamine, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, pentoxifylline) also partially prevented the insult-induced hypercupremia. In contrast, serum iron concentration was largely independent of treatment in all experiments. These data suggest that elevated serum copper concentration is an accurate and minimally invasive index of lung injury in irradiated and monocrotaline-treated rats.

  19. Head injury management algorithm as described in Hippocrates' "peri ton en cephali traumaton".

    PubMed

    Dimopoulos, Vassilios G; Machinis, Theofilos G; Fountas, Kostas N; Robinson, Joe S

    2005-12-01

    HIPPOCRATIC WORKS LEND themselves still today to the modern physician for further analysis of his approach to the diagnosis and treatment of various pathological conditions. We present an attempt to systematize his methodology regarding the management of head trauma and present it in the format of a modern-era algorithm.

  20. Appropriate Treatment of Head Injuries by Surgeons During the Civil War

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    presentation of an EDH is unconsciousness after the incident followed by a “ lucid ” interval, then the patient falls back into a decreased level of...time he complained of a constant dull, heavy pain at the back of his head. At night he suffered from unpleasant dreams and hallucinations, which

  1. The validation and application of a finite element human head model for frontal skull fracture analysis.

    PubMed

    Asgharpour, Z; Baumgartner, D; Willinger, R; Graw, M; Peldschus, S

    2014-05-01

    Traumatic head injuries can result from vehicular accidents, sports, falls or assaults. The current advances in computational methods and the detailed finite element models of the human head provide a significant opportunity for biomechanical study of human head injuries. The biomechanical characteristics of the human head through head impact scenarios can be studied in detail by using the finite element models. Skull fracture is one of the most frequent occurring types of head injuries. The purpose of this study is to analyse the experimental head impacts on cadavers by means of the Strasbourg University Finite Element Head Model (SUFEHM). The results of the numerical model and experimental data are compared for validation purpose. The finite element model has also been applied to predict the skull bone fracture in frontal impacts. The head model includes the scalp, the facial bone, the skull, the cerebral spinal fluid, the meninges, the cerebrum and the cerebellum. The model is used to simulate the experimental frontal head impact tests using a cylindrical padded impactor. Results of the computational simulation shows that the model correlated well with a number of experimental data and a global fracture pattern has been predicted well by the model. Therefore the presented numerical model could be used for reconstruction of head impacts in different impact conditions also the forensic application of the head model would provide a tool for investigation of the causes and mechanism of head injuries.

  2. A Spanish Language Narrative Simulation to Prevent Horseback Riding Head Injury among Rural Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arrowsmith, Heather E.; Cole, Henry P.; Mazur, Joan M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: A Spanish language version of an exercise about adolescent horseback riders' exposure to traumatic brain injuries was integrated into the Spanish curriculum in a rural Kentucky high school. Design: An exploratory case study design with two groups of students. Setting and Method: Thirty-eight students, enrolled in intermediate Spanish IV…

  3. Closed Head Injury in Infants and Preschool Children: Research and Practice Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagnato, Stephen J.; Feldman, Heidi

    1989-01-01

    The article examines the sparse literature on acquired brain injury in infants and preschoolers, including epidemiology, neuropathology, neurodevelopmental outcome, and treatment efficacy. It suggests blending applied research and clinical practice, emphasizing team approaches, focusing on family involvement, integrating assessment and treatment…

  4. Intellectual Performance and Reading Skills after Localized Head Injury in Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chadwick, Oliver; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Ninety-seven school-age children who had previously sustained a unilateral compound depressed fracture of the skull were studied using tests of intelligence and reading attainment. Intellectual impairment was significantly associated with overall severity of brain trauma. Neither the child's age at injury nor the brain hemisphere damaged had…

  5. An Experimental Study: Does the Neuroprotective Effect Increase When Hypothermia Deepens After Traumatic Brain Injury?

    PubMed Central

    Girisgin, Abdullah Sadik; Kalkan, Erdal; Ergin, Mehmet; Keskin, Fatih; Dundar, Zerrin Defne; Kebapcioglu, Sedat; Kocak, Sedat; Cander, Basar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Experimental approaches have been promising with the use of therapeutic hypothermia after Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) whereas clinical data have not supported its efficacy. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate whether using selective deeper brain cooling correlates with a more neuroprotective effect on Intracranial Pressure (ICP) increments following TBI in rats. Materials and Methods: Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (mean weight = 300 g; n = 25) were subjected to brain injury using a modified Marmarou method. Immediately after the onset of TBI, rats were randomized into three groups. Selective brain cooling was applied around the head using ice packages. Intracranial Temperature (ICT) and ICP were continuously measured at 0, 30, 60, 120, and 180 minutes and recorded for all groups. Group 1 (n = 5) was normothermia and was assigned as the control group. Group 2 (n = 10) received moderate hypothermia with a target ICT of between 32°C - 33°C and Group 3 (n = 10) was given a deeper hypothermia with a target ICT of below 32°C. Results: All subjects reached the target ICT by the 30th minute of hypothermia induction. The ICT was significantly different in Group 2 compared to Group 1 only at the 120th minute (P = 0.017), while ICP was significantly lower starting from the 30th minute (P = 0.015). The ICT was significantly lower in Group 3 compared to Groups 1 and 2 starting from the 30th minute (P = 0.001 and P = 0.003, respectively). The ICP was significantly lower in Group 3 compared to Group 1 starting from 30th minute (P = 0.001); however, a significant difference in ICP between Group 3 and Group 2 was observed only at the 180th minute (P = 0.047). Conclusions: Results of this study indicate that selective brain cooling is an effective method of decreasing ICP in rats; however, the deeper hypothermia caused a greater decrease in ICP three hours after hypothermia induction. PMID:26023335

  6. Colloid-induced kidney injury: experimental evidence may help to understand mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Schortgen, Frédérique; Brochard, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    Fluid resuscitation is widely used, and many patients are therefore exposed to plasma volume expanders. Among these, colloids, particularly hydroxyethyl starches, have been shown in recent experiments and clinical studies to induce acute kidney injury. The mechanisms of colloid-induced acute kidney injury remain incompletely elucidated. The risks associated with colloid osmotic pressure elevation in vivo and the high incidence of osmotic nephrosis lesions in experimental models and clinical studies indicate that hydroxyethyl starches can no longer be considered safe. PMID:19435473

  7. To determine the effect of metoclopramide on gastric emptying in severe head injuries: a prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Marino, L V; Kiratu, E M; French, S; Nathoo, N

    2003-02-01

    To determine the effect of 8-hourly administration of 10 mg intravenous metoclopramide, over a 48-h period on gastric emptying in severe head injury (SHI), 22 patients were prospectively randomized (Glasgow Coma Score of 3-8) to receive 2 ml of intravenous metoclopramide or 2 ml of 5% saline 8-hourly for 48 h. Baseline and serial blood paracetamol absorption assays were performed at time (t) = 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 min on day 0 and day 2. The area under the curve between the day 0 and day 2 was used to measure the degree of gastric emptying. In SHI, sequential doses of metoclopramide did not appear to improve gastric motility within subject comparisons (p = 0.65) and between subject comparisons (placebo p = 0.4 and drug p = 0.12). Metoclopramide has no significant prokinetic effect on gastric emptying in SHI patients when given in the early postinjury period.

  8. Taurine attenuates hippocampal and corpus callosum damage, and enhances neurological recovery after closed head injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Gu, Y; Zhao, Y; Qian, K; Sun, M

    2015-04-16

    The protective effects of taurine against closed head injury (CHI) have been reported. This study was designed to investigate whether taurine reduced white matter damage and hippocampal neuronal death through suppressing calpain activation after CHI in rats. Taurine (50 mg/kg) was administered intravenously 30 min and 4 h again after CHI. It was found that taurine lessened the corpus callosum damage, attenuated the neuronal cell death in hippocampal CA1 and CA3 subfields and improved the neurological functions 7 days after CHI. Moreover, it suppressed the over-activation of calpain, enhanced the levels of calpastatin, and reduced the degradation of neurofilament heavy protein, myelin basic protein and αII-spectrin in traumatic tissue 24 h after CHI. These data confirm the protective effects of taurine against gray and white matter damage due to CHI, and suggest that down-regulating calpain activation could be one of the protective mechanisms of taurine against CHI.

  9. Experimental Injury Biomechanics of the Pediatric Extremities and Pelvis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivarsson, Johan; Okamoto, Masayoshi; Takahashi, Yukou

    The paucity of pediatric postmortem human subjects (PMHS) for biomechanical research has led to the development of biofidelity requirements and injury assessment reference values (IARVs) for pediatric anthropomorphic test devices (ATDs) through geometrical scaling of adult PMHS data. Geometrical scaling relies on the assumption of geometrical similarity between the adult and child and does not account for any differences in tissue material properties. Attempts have been made to improve the accuracy of the scaled responses and IARVs by also accounting for the difference in Young's modulus between adult and pediatric bone (Irwin and Mertz 1997; van Ratingen et al. 1997; Mertz et al. 2001; Ivarsson et al. 2004a, b). However, the development of more biofidelic pediatric ATDs and accurate IARVs requires access to validation data that do not rely on the assumptions and simplifications associated with scaling. Access to accurate data from testing of pediatric tissues and anatomical structures would also facilitate the development of computational models for simulation of the response and injury of pediatric subjects in various loading situations.

  10. The pathophysiology of repetitive concussive traumatic brain injury in experimental models; new developments and open questions.

    PubMed

    Brody, David L; Benetatos, Joseph; Bennett, Rachel E; Klemenhagen, Kristen C; Mac Donald, Christine L

    2015-05-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in the pathophysiology of repetitive concussive traumatic brain injury (rcTBI) in large part due to the association with dramatic cases of progressive neurological deterioration in professional athletes, military personnel, and others. However, our understanding of the pathophysiology of rcTBI is less advanced than for more severe brain injuries. Most prominently, the mechanisms underlying traumatic axonal injury, microglial activation, amyloid-beta accumulation, and progressive tau pathology are not yet known. In addition, the role of injury to dendritic spine cytoskeletal structures, vascular reactivity impairments, and microthrombi are intriguing and subjects of ongoing inquiry. Methods for quantitative analysis of axonal injury, dendritic injury, and synaptic loss need to be refined for the field to move forward in a rigorous fashion. We and others are attempting to develop translational approaches to assess these specific pathophysiological events in both animals and humans to facilitate clinically relevant pharmacodynamic assessments of candidate therapeutics. In this article, we review and discuss several of the recent experimental results from our lab and others. We include new initial data describing the difficulty in modeling progressive tau pathology in experimental rcTBI, and results demonstrating that sertraline can alleviate social interaction deficits and depressive-like behaviors following experimental rcTBI plus foot shock stress. Furthermore, we propose a discrete set of open, experimentally tractable questions that may serve as a framework for future investigations. In addition, we also raise several important questions that are less experimentally tractable at this time, in hopes that they may stimulate future methodological developments to address them. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Traumatic Brain Injury".

  11. Electromagnetic Head-And-Neck Hyperthermia Applicator: Experimental Phantom Verification and FDTD Model

    SciTech Connect

    Paulides, Margarethus M. . E-mail: M.Paulides@ErasmusMC.nl; Bakker, Jurriaan F.; Rhoon, Gerard C. van

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To experimentally verify the feasibility of focused heating in the neck region by an array of two rings of six electromagnetic antennas. We also measured the dynamic specific absorption rate (SAR) steering possibilities of this setup and compared these SAR patterns to simulations. Methods and Materials: Using a specially constructed laboratory prototype head-and-neck applicator, including a neck-mimicking cylindrical muscle phantom, we performed SAR measurements by electric field, Schottky-diode sheet measurements and, using the power-pulse technique, by fiberoptic thermometry and infrared thermography. Using phase steering, we also steered the SAR distribution in radial and axial directions. All measured distributions were compared with the predictions by a finite-difference time-domain-based electromagnetic simulator. Results: A central 50% iso-SAR focus of 35 {+-} 3 mm in diameter and about 100 {+-} 15 mm in length was obtained for all investigated settings. Furthermore, this SAR focus could be steered toward the desired location in the radial and axial directions with an accuracy of {approx}5 mm. The SAR distributions as measured by all three experimental methods were well predicted by the simulations. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that focused heating in the neck is feasible and that this focus can be effectively steered in the radial and axial directions. For quality assurance measurements, we believe that the Schottky-diode sheet provides the best compromise among effort, speed, and accuracy, although a more specific and improved design is warranted.

  12. What Is a Plume: An Experimental Perspective on Heads, Tails and Entrainment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lithgow-Bertelloni, C. R.; Newsome, W.; Davies, D.; Cotel, A. J.; Hart, S. R.; Whitehead, J. A.

    2010-12-01

    The concept of mantle plumes has had a significant impact on our ideas about mantle geochemical heterogeneity and evolution. And yet many aspects remain controversial from their geochemical signature, excess temperature and seismic detectability to their very existence. We take an experimental approach not to tackle the question of plume survival in the mantle, but rather to characterize quantitatively the temperature and velocity structure of a single thermal plume and hence define unambiguously and objectively the structure of the plume (head, conduit and source material) and the degree of entrainment. We have developed an automated Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry and Thermometry (SPIVeT) non-invasive visualization system to measure the 3-D velocity and temperature structure of thermal plumes in very viscous fluids. We augmented existing techniques of velocimetry by developing a hybrid particle tracking/particle image velocimetry method for better removal of spurious vectors. Thermochromic liquid crystals were used to extract temperature, but because of their limited color play, a finite volume numerical model using the SPIV velocities as inputs aided in the reconstruction of the temperature field, although only one contour is truly reliable. We performed a series of experiments in a cubic tank (30 cm on the side) with corn syrup and a circular heater 2 cm in diameter, set to temperatures ranging from 38-80 C. We analyze the results using the concepts of dynamical systems analysis and in particular Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCS). We found the unstable manifold to define the boundary of the head with respect to the surrounding fluid, but did not locate in our experiments the stable manifold that would encircle all material to be entrained. We determine, by advecting tracers with the experimentally measured velocities mass maps that show the radial and vertical origin of plume material. We have developed a stretching metric that quantifies the shape

  13. Second-Impact Syndrome and a Small Subdural Hematoma: An Uncommon Catastrophic Result of Repetitive Head Injury with a Characteristic Imaging Appearance

    PubMed Central

    Gean, Alisa D.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract There have been a handful of previously published cases of athletes who were still symptomatic from a prior head injury, and then suffered a second injury in which a thin, acute subdural hematoma (SDH) with unilateral hemisphere vascular engorgement was demonstrated on CT scan. In those cases, the cause of the brain swelling/dysautoregulation was ascribed to the presence of the acute SDH rather than to the acceleration/deceleration forces that caused the SDH. We believe that the brain swelling is due to “second-impact dysautoregulation,” rather than due to the effect of the SDH on the underlying hemisphere. To support our hypothesis, we present 10 additional cases of acute hemispheric swelling in association with small SDHs in athletes who received a second head injury while still symptomatic from a previous head injury. The clinical history and the unique neuroimaging features of this entity on CT are described and illustrated in detail. The CT findings included an engorged cerebral hemisphere with initial preservation of grey-white matter differentiation, and abnormal mass effect and midline shift that appeared disproportionately greater than the size of the SDH. In addition, the imaging similarities between our patients and those with non-accidental head trauma (shaken-baby syndrome) will be discussed. PMID:20536318

  14. [CT-findings in penetrating captive bolt injuries to the head and brain: analysis of the trauma-related CT-findings and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Bula-Sternberg, J; Laniado, M; Kittner, T; Bonnaire, F; Lein, T; Bula, P

    2011-11-01

    Penetrating gunshot injuries to the head and brain are rare in Germany and the rest of Western Europe. Due to the small number of cases over here no consistent diagnostic and therapeutic standards exist in this respect. Thus these kinds of injuries present a great challenge to the attending physicians. Most of these violations are a result of a suicidal attempt or an accident. Beside violations by firearms also penetrating injuries to the head and brain due to captive bolt devices, as used in slaughtery business for the "humane" killing of animals, occur from time to time. The impact on the head differs from that caused by firearms because no projectile is leaving the barrel and the used bolt, as a fix part of the device, does not remain in the affected tissue. That implies characteristic results within the radiological imaging that might be pathbreaking for the further treatment, because the origin of such a head injury is often unknown during primary care. Consequently the knowledge of these specific findings is central to the radiologist to make the appropriate diagnosis. Based on some clinical examples the trauma-related CT-findings are introduced and a short overview of the relevant literature is also given.

  15. Impact of Mild Head Injury on Neuropsychological Performance in Healthy Older Adults: Longitudinal Assessment in the AIBL Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Matthew A.; Masters, Colin L.; Ames, David; Foster, Jonathan K.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is suggested to be a significant risk factor for dementia. However, little research has been conducted into long-term neuropsychological outcomes after head trauma. Participants from the Australian Imaging, Biomarkers and Lifestyle Study of Ageing (AIBL) who had recovered after sustaining a mild TBI involving loss of consciousness more than 5 years previously were compared with matched controls across a 3-year period. Bayesian nested-domain modeling was used to estimate the effect of TBI on neuropsychological performance. There was no evidence for a chronic effect of mild TBI on any neuropsychological domain compared to controls. Within the TBI group, there was some evidence suggesting that the age that the head trauma occurred and the duration of unconsciousness were modulators of episodic memory. However, these findings were not robust. Taken together, these findings indicate that adults who have sustained a TBI resulting in loss of consciousness, but who recover to a healthy level of cognitive functioning, do not experience frank deficits in cognitive ability. PMID:27242516

  16. Monitoring closed head injury induced changes in brain physiology with orthogonal diffuse near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abookasis, David; Shochat, Ariel; Mathews, Marlon S.

    2014-03-01

    We applied an orthogonal diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (o-DRS) to assess brain physiology following closed head injury (CHI). CHI was induced in anesthetized male mice by weight-drop device using ~50gram cylindrical metal falling from a height of 90 cm onto the intact scalp. A total of twenty-six mice were used in the experiments divided randomly into three groups as follows: Group 1 (n=11) consisted of injured mice monitored for 1 hour every 10 minutes. Group 2 (n=10) were the control mice not experience CHI. Group 3 (n=5) consisted of injured mice monitored every minute up to 20 minutes. Measurement of optical quantities of brain tissue (absorption and reduced scattering coefficients) in the near-infrared window from 650 to 1000 nm were carried out by employing different source-detector distances and locations to provide depth sensitivity. With respect to baseline, we found difference in brain hemodynamic properties following injury. In addition, o-DRS successfully evaluate the structural variations likely from evolving cerebral edema throughout exploring the scattering spectral shape.

  17. Detection of secondary insults by brain tissue pO2 and bedside microdialysis in severe head injury.

    PubMed

    Sarrafzadeh, A S; Sakowitz, O W; Callsen, T A; Lanksch, W R; Unterberg, A W

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated bedside cerebral on-line microdialysis for early detection of cerebral hypoxia in patients with traumatic brain injury. 24 severely head injured patients (Glasgow Coma Score < or = 8) were studied. Patients underwent continuous brain tissue PO2 (PtiO2) monitoring using the LICOX (GMS mbH, Germany) microcatheter device. The catheter was placed into the non-lesioned frontal white matter within 32.2 (7-48) hrs post injury. The microdialysis catheter (CMA 100, Sweden) was placed close to the PtiO2 probe via a 2- or 3-way skull screw, connected to a pump and perfused with Ringer solution (0.3 microliter/min). The microdialysis samples were collected hourly and analyzed at the bedside for glucose, lactate, lactate-pyruvate-ratio and glutamate (CMA 600, Sweden). We identified 252 episodes of impending hypoxia (PtiO2 < 15 mm Hg; 11,810 minutes) and 38 episodes of cerebral hypoxia (PtiO2 < 10 mm Hg; 1996 minutes). Before cerebral hypoxia, glucose decreased significantly. Glutamate was unchanged when no hypoxia or impending hypoxia occurred but increased 3-4 fold before a hypoxic episode appeared. We conclude that early metabolic detection of cerebral hypoxia before a critical decrease in brain tissue PtiO2 is seen and possibly allows earlier changes in treatment (e.g. reduction of hyperventilation therapy).

  18. Citicoline protects brain against closed head injury in rats through suppressing oxidative stress and calpain over-activation.

    PubMed

    Qian, Ke; Gu, Yi; Zhao, Yumei; Li, Zhenzong; Sun, Ming

    2014-07-01

    Citicoline, a natural compound that functions as an intermediate in the biosynthesis of cell membrane phospholipids, is essential for membrane integrity and repair. It has been reported to protect brain against trauma. This study was designed to investigate the protective effects of citicoline on closed head injury (CHI) in rats. Citicoline (250 mg/kg i.v. 30 min and 4 h after CHI) lessened body weight loss, and improved neurological functions significantly at 7 days after CHI. It markedly lowered brain edema and blood-brain barrier permeability, enhanced the activities of superoxide dismutase and the levels of glutathione, reduced the levels of malondialdehyde and lactic acid. Moreover, citicoline suppressed the activities of calpain, and enhanced the levels of calpastatin, myelin basic protein and αII-spectrin in traumatic tissue 24 h after CHI. Also, it attenuated the axonal and myelin sheath damage in corpus callosum and the neuronal cell death in hippocampal CA1 and CA3 subfields 7 days after CHI. These data demonstrate the protection of citicoline against white matter and grey matter damage due to CHI through suppressing oxidative stress and calpain over-activation, providing additional support to the application of citicoline for the treatment of traumatic brain injury.

  19. Outcome of pediatric head injury patients admitted as unknown at a level-i apex trauma centre

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Haradhan Deb; Tandon, Vivek; Mahapatra, Ashok Kumar; Gupta, Deepak Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Patients with head injury who are not identified at admission are a challenge to manage and in this backdrop we decided to analyze our data of such pediatric patients for their outcome. Materials and Methods: It was a retrospective study conducted at the level-I trauma center. A total of 12 consecutive pediatric (<20 years) age group patients whose identities were not known at the time of admission were included in the study. Results: All 12 patients were male. The road traffic accident was the most common cause of injury (8, 67%). Mean age of the patients were 16.75 ± 4.45 years. Computerized tomography (CT) scan showed cerebral contusion in four (33%) patients. Six (50%) patients needed surgery and others were treated conservatively. During the course of hospital treatment, one (8%) patient died, two (16%) had good recovery, and four (33%) were moderately disabled. Among the 12 patients identity, eight (67%) could be ascertained. Seven (58%) patients were sent home with their relatives, one (8%) was referred to a district hospital and three (25%) remained as unknown and were referred to destitute home for rehabilitation. Conclusion: Unidentified patients of pediatric age group have better outcome if proper care is provided in time. PMID:26396599

  20. Dual-wavelength laser speckle imaging for monitoring brain metabolic and hemodynamic response to closed head traumatic brain injury in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kofman, Itamar; Abookasis, David

    2015-10-01

    The measurement of dynamic changes in brain hemodynamic and metabolism events following head trauma could be valuable for injury prognosis and for planning of optimal medical treatment. Specifically, variations in blood flow and oxygenation levels serve as important biomarkers of numerous pathophysiological processes. We employed the dual-wavelength laser speckle imaging (DW-LSI) technique for simultaneous monitoring of changes in brain hemodynamics and cerebral blood flow (CBF) at early stages of head trauma in a mouse model of intact head injury (n=10). For induction of head injury, we used a weight-drop device involving a metal mass (˜50 g) striking the mouse's head in a regulated manner from a height of ˜90 cm. In comparison to baseline measurements, noticeable dynamic variations were revealed immediately and up to 1 h postinjury, which indicate the severity of brain damage and highlight the ability of the DW-LSI arrangement to track brain pathophysiology induced by injury. To validate the monitoring of CBF by DW-LSI, measurements with laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) were also performed (n=5), which confirmed reduction in CBF following injury. A secondary focus of the study was to investigate the effectiveness of hypertonic saline as a neuroprotective agent, inhibiting the development of complications after brain injury in a subgroup of injured mice (n=5), further demonstrating the ability of DW-LSI to monitor the effects upon brain dynamics of drug treatment. Overall, our findings further support the use of DW-LSI as a noninvasive, cost-effective tool to assess changes in hemodynamics under a variety of pathological conditions, suggesting its potential contribution to the biomedical field. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first to make use of the DW-LSI modality in a small animal model to (1) investigate brain function during the critical first hour of closed head injury trauma, (2) correlate between injury parameters of LDF measurements, and (3

  1. Head Injury as a Risk Factor for Dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of 32 Observational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanjun; Li, Yongming; Li, Xiaotao; Zhang, Shuang; Zhao, Jincheng; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Tian, Guozhong

    2017-01-01

    Background Head injury is reported to be associated with increased risks of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in many but not all the epidemiological studies. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate the relative effect of head injury on dementia and AD risks. Methods Relevant cohort and case-control studies published between Jan 1, 1990, and Mar 31, 2015 were searched in PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, and ScienceDirect. We used the random-effect model in this meta-analysis to take into account heterogeneity among studies. Results Data from 32 studies, representing 2,013,197 individuals, 13,866 dementia events and 8,166 AD events, were included in the analysis. Overall, the pooled relative risk (RR) estimates showed that head injury significantly increased the risks of any dementia (RR = 1.63, 95% CI 1.34–1.99) and AD (RR = 1.51, 95% CI 1.26–1.80), with no evidence of publication bias. However, when considering the status of unconsciousness, head injury with loss of consciousness did not show significant association with dementia (RR = 0.92, 95% CI 0.67–1.27) and AD (RR = 1.49, 95% CI 0.91–2.43). Additionally, this positive association did not reach statistical significance in female participants. Conclusions The findings from this meta-analysis indicate that head injury is associated with increased risks of dementia and AD. PMID:28068405

  2. Reduplication of an event after head injury? A cautionary case report.

    PubMed

    Marshall, J C; Halligan, P W; Wade, D T

    1995-03-01

    We report the case of a 69 year-old man who suffered head trauma in a road-traffic accident. Subsequently, there was personality change, memory-impairment and the persisting 'delusion' that he had been involved in an earlier car-accident. On the basis of detailed interviews with the patient (and his wife), we provide an explicit account of how the content of his reduplicative paramnesia could have arisen. We are concerned to stress that the patient's 'delusion' is a belief held on reasonable grounds.

  3. Optimizing cerebral perfusion pressure during fiberoptic bronchoscopy in severe head injury: effect of hyperventilation.

    PubMed

    Previgliano, I J; Ripoll, P I; Chiappero, G; Galíndez, F; Germani, L; González, D H; Ferrari, N; Hlavnicka, A; Purvis, C

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate if Hyperventilation (HV) could avoid the Intracranial Pressure (ICP) peak that occurs during Fiberoptic Bronchoscopy (FB) in severely head injured patients. A Cerebral Perfusion Pressure (CPP) > 75 mmHg was maintained in 34 patients, with a subgroup randomized to receive controlled HV during FB. Measurements were done before the procedure, during maximum ICP values and 30 minutes after FB. The HV group had minor ICP values after FB, without differences in CPP and ICP peak values.

  4. Pathologic electrographic changes after experimental traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Bragin, Anatol; Li, Lin; Almajano, Joyel; Alvarado-Rojas, Catalina; Reid, Aylin Y.; Staba, Richard J.; Engel, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective To investigate possible electroencephalography (EEG) correlates of epileptogenesis after traumatic brain injury (TBI) using the fluid percussion model. Methods Experiments were conducted on adult 2- to 4-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats. Two groups of animals were studied: (1) the TBI group with depth and screw electrodes implanted immediately after the fluid percussion injury (FPI) procedure, and (2) a naive age-matched control group with the same electrode implantation montage. Pairs of tungsten microelectrodes (50 µm outer diameter) and screw electrodes were implanted in neocortex inside the TBI core, areas adjacent to TBI, and remote areas. EEG activity, recorded on the day of FPI, and continuously for 2 weeks, was analyzed for possible electrographic biomarkers of epileptogenesis. Video-EEG monitoring was also performed continuously in the TBI group to capture electrographic and behavioral seizures until the caps came off (28–189 days), and for 1 week, at 2, 3, and 6 months of age, in the control group. Results Pathologic high-frequency oscillations (pHFOs) with a central frequency between 100 and 600 Hz, were recorded from microelectrodes, beginning during the first two post-FPI weeks, in 7 of 12 animals in the TBI group (58%) and never in the controls. pHFOs only occurred in cortical areas within or adjacent to the TBI core. These were associated with synchronous multiunit discharges and popSpikes, duration 15–40 msec. Repetitive pHFOs and EEG spikes (rHFOSs) formed paroxysmal activity, with a unique arcuate pattern, in the frequency band 10–16 Hz in the same areas as isolated pHFOs, and these events were also recorded by screw electrodes. Although loss of caps prevented long-term recordings from all rats, pHFOs and rHFOSs occurred during the first 2 weeks in all four animals that later developed seizures, and none of the rats without these events developed late seizures. Significance pHFOs, similar to those associated with

  5. Experimental Injury Biomechanics of the Pediatric Thorax and Abdomen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, Richard; Ivarsson, Johan; Maltese, Matthew R.

    Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death and injury for children in the United States. Pediatric anthropomorphic test devices (ATD) and computational models are important tools for the evaluation and optimization of automotive restraint systems for child occupants. The thorax interacts with the restraints within the vehicle, and any thoracic model must mimic this interaction in a biofidelic manner to ensure that restraint designs protect humans as intended. To define thoracic biofidelity for adults, Kroell et al. (1974) conducted blunt impacts to the thoraces of adult postmortem human subjects (PMHS), which have formed the basis for biofidelity standards for modern adult ATD thoraces (Mertz et al. 1989). The paucity of pediatric PMHS for impact research led to the development of pediatric model biofidelity requirements through scaling. Geometric scale factors and elastic moduli of skull and long bone have been used to scale the adult thoracic biofidelity responses to the 3-, 6-, and 10-year-old child (Irwin and Mertz 1997; Mertz et al. 2001; van Ratingen et al. 1997). There is currently a need for data that apply to the child without scaling, both for validation of scaling methods used in the past and to confirm the validity of the specifications currently used to develop models of the child.

  6. Head injuries in the 18th century: the management of the damaged brain.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Jeremy C

    2013-07-01

    The 18th century was the time when trauma neurosurgery began to develop into the modern discipline. Before this, the management had, for the most part, changed little from the days of Hippocrates, Celsus, and Galen. Attention was directed to skull injuries, and the brain was treated as the seat of the rational soul but without other function. Symptoms after trauma were attributed to injuries to the bone and meninges. Following the lead of the Royal Academy of Surgery in Paris, it was accepted from the 1730s that the brain was the seat of symptoms after cranial trauma. During the 18th century, at least 12 surgeons published articles on cranial injury, 6 describing significant clinical series on this topic. They were Henri-François Le Dran (1685-1770) of Paris, Percival Pott (1714-1788) of London, James Hill (1703-1776) from Dumfries, Sylvester O'Halloran (1728-1807) of Limerick (Ireland), William Dease (1750-1798) of Dublin, and John Abernethy (1764-1831) of London. This article analyzes these series. Each individual made a different contribution. It is suggested that the relatively lesser-known James Hill in Scotland demonstrated the greatest understanding of the management of brain trauma and achieved the best results. A product of the Scottish Enlightenment, he adapted his management to his own experience and was not tied to the accepted authorities of his day, but he improved the management of each case following his experience with previous patients. He deserves to be remembered.

  7. Neurological findings in pediatric penetrating head injury at a university teaching hospital in Durban, South Africa: a 23-year retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Muballe, Kadhaya David; Hardcastle, Timothy; Kiratu, Erastus

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVES Penetrating traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) can be divided into gunshot wounds or stab wounds based on the mechanisms of injury. Pediatric penetrating TBIs are of major concern as many parental and social factors may be involved in the causation. The authors describe the penetrating cranial injuries in pediatric patient subgroups at risk and presenting to the Department of Neurosurgery at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, by assessment of the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score and review of the common neurological manifestations including cranial nerve abnormalities. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective chart review of children who presented with penetrating TBIs between 1985 and 2007 at a university teaching hospital. Descriptive statistical analysis with univariate and multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the variables. RESULTS Out of 223 children aged 16 years and younger with penetrating TBIs seen during the study period, stab wounds were causal in 127 (57%) of the patients, while gunshot injuries were causal in 96 (43%). Eighty-four percent of the patients were male. Apart from abnormal GCS scores, other neurological abnormalities were noted in 109 (48.9%) of the patients, the most common being cranial nerve deficits (22.4%) and hemiparesis. There was a strong correlation between left-sided stab wounds and development of seizures. The mean age of patients with neurological abnormalities was 11.72 years whereas that of patients with no neurological abnormalities was 8.96 years. CONCLUSIONS Penetrating head injuries in children are not as uncommon as previously thought. There was no correlation between the age group of the patients and the mechanism of injury, which implies that stab or gunshot injuries could occur in any of our pediatric population with the same frequency. While gunshot injuries accounted for 56% of the patient population, stab injuries still accounted for 44%. Following penetrating head injuries, neurological

  8. Effects of Neurosurgical Treatment and Severity of Head Injury on Cognitive Functioning, General Health and Incidence of Mental Disorders in Patients With Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rezaei, Sajjad; Asgari, Karim; Yousefzadeh, Shahrokh; Moosavi, Heshmat-Allah; Kazemnejad, Ehsan

    2012-01-01

    Background Neurosurgical treatment and the severity of head injury (HI) can have remarkable effect on patients’ neuropsychiatric outcomes. Objectives This research aimed to study the effect of these factors on cognitive functioning, general health and incidence of mental disorders in patients with a traumatic brain injury (TBI). Patients and Methods In this descriptive, longitudinal study, 206 TBI patients entered the study by consecutive sampling; they were then compared according to neurosurgery status and severity of their HI. Both groups underwent neurosurgical and psychological examinations. The mini mental state examination (MMSE) and general health questionnaire–28 items (GHQ-28) were administered to the study participants. At follow-up, four months later, the groups underwent a structured clinical interview by a psychiatrist based on the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, fourth edition (DSM-IV) diagnostic criteria regarding the presence of mental disorders. Results Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) and multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) were performed and adjusted for the effect of confounding variables (age, gender, Glasgow outcome scale (GOS) , and level of education). The severity of HI had the most significant effect for the following variables; cognitive functioning and physical symptoms (P < 0.05). The effect of the neurosurgical treatment factor was not significant; however, the interaction effect of the two variables on social dysfunction, and total score of the GHQ-28 questionnaire appeared to be significant (P < 0.05). Fisher's exact test indicated that after a four month follow-up period, no significant differences were seen between the two groups (with or without neurosurgery) in the incidence of mental disorders, while χ2 Test showed that having a more severe HI is significantly correlated with the incidence of mental disorders (P < 0.01). Conclusions The implications of this study should be discussed with an

  9. Backspatter on the firearm and hand in experimental close-range gunshots to the head.

    PubMed

    Karger, Bernd; Nüsse, Roland; Bajanowski, Thomas

    2002-09-01

    The deposition of backspatter on the firearm or person shooting can greatly assist the reconstruction of shooting incidents. Backspatter was investigated in experimental transverse gunshots (9-mm Luger) to the heads of calves (n = 9) from shooting distances of 0 to 10 cm. The firearms were examined with a magnifying glass; the surgical gloves and the right sleeve worn by the person shooting were examined with a stereomicroscope. On the firearms, backspatter of blood was found in five of the nine cases, and one or both gloves showed bloodspatter deposits in six and the right sleeves in four cases. Most droplets were 1 to 3 mm and circular or elongated. In addition, a fine spray of tiny blood deposits was present on the firearm and textiles in four cases. The distribution of the droplets on the firearms varied: the areas included regions shielded by prominent parts, and the droplets were predominantly located on the extensor side of the fingers and the radial aspect of the hands and sleeves. Backspatter of tiny bone fragments was recovered from the firearm and sleeve in only one case, but tissue (bone, fat, muscle, skin) was present on the ground in front of the entrance wound in seven cases. A careful investigation, including appropriate lightning and magnification, is necessary for reliable statements concerning the absence of backspatter or the extent of backspatter present.

  10. Laboratory prototype for experimental validation of MR-guided radiofrequency head and neck hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulides, M. M.; Bakker, J. F.; Hofstetter, L. W.; Numan, W. C. M.; Pellicer, R.; Fiveland, E. W.; Tarasek, M.; Houston, G. C.; van Rhoon, G. C.; Yeo, D. T. B.; Kotek, G.

    2014-05-01

    Clinical studies have established a strong benefit from adjuvant mild hyperthermia (HT) to radio- and chemotherapy for many tumor sites, including the head and neck (H&N). The recently developed HYPERcollar allows the application of local radiofrequency HT to tumors in the entire H&N. Treatment quality is optimized using electromagnetic and thermal simulators and, whenever placement risk is tolerable, assessed using invasively placed thermometers. To replace the current invasive procedure, we are investigating whether magnetic resonance (MR) thermometry can be exploited for continuous and 3D thermal dose assessment. In this work, we used our simulation tools to design an MR compatible laboratory prototype applicator. By simulations and measurements, we showed that the redesigned patch antennas are well matched to 50 Ω (S11<-10 dB). Simulations also show that, using 300 W input power, a maximum specific absorption rate (SAR) of 100 W kg-1 and a temperature increase of 4.5 °C in 6 min is feasible at the center of a cylindrical fat/muscle phantom. Temperature measurements using the MR scanner confirmed the focused heating capabilities and MR compatibility of the setup. We conclude that the laboratory applicator provides the possibility for experimental assessment of the feasibility of hybrid MR-HT in the H&N region. This versatile design allows rigorous analysis of MR thermometry accuracy in increasingly complex phantoms that mimic patients' anatomies and thermodynamic characteristics.

  11. Simulation-based training improves ITU staff knowledge in the management of head injuries.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew; Jankowski, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the polytrauma situation is a phenomenon often seen at UK hospitals. Without immediate access to dedicated neurocritical care facilities, the potential for under-treatment of the underlying brain injury and serious neurological sequalae is high, especially if staff on the general intensive care units on which these patients are treated lack confidence in this area of practice, a reality confirmed by our baseline study. We found that by engaging staff by implementing a regular simulation-based team training programme, we were able to boost the skills, knowledge, and ultimately confidence levels in treating TBI amongst these groups of staff. "Buy-in" by those concerned was high, and we found that self-reported scores for the attributes described above were improved considerably and consistently by our intervention. This quality improvement project has been rolled out through several iterations to become sustainable, has significant cost-saving potential, and will hopefully lead to proven improved clinical outcomes for this group of patients.

  12. Boric acid reduces axonal and myelin damage in experimental sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Kızılay, Zahir; Erken, Haydar Ali; Çetin, Nesibe Kahraman; Aktaş, Serdar; Abas, Burçin İrem; Yılmaz, Ali

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of boric acid in experimental acute sciatic nerve injury. Twenty-eight adult male rats were randomly divided into four equal groups (n = 7): control (C), boric acid (BA), sciatic nerve injury (I), and sciatic nerve injury + boric acid treatment (BAI). Sciatic nerve injury was generated using a Yasargil aneurysm clip in the groups I and BAI. Boric acid was given four times at 100 mg/kg to rats in the groups BA and BAI after injury (by gavage at 0, 24, 48 and 72 hours) but no injury was made in the group BA. In vivo electrophysiological tests were performed at the end of the day 4 and sciatic nerve tissue samples were taken for histopathological examination. The amplitude of compound action potential, the nerve conduction velocity and the number of axons were significantly lower and the myelin structure was found to be broken in group I compared with those in groups C and BA. However, the amplitude of the compound action potential, the nerve conduction velocity and the number of axons were significantly greater in group BAI than in group I. Moreover, myelin injury was significantly milder and the intensity of nuclear factor kappa B immunostaining was significantly weaker in group BAI than in group I. The results of this study show that administration of boric acid at 100 mg/kg after sciatic nerve injury in rats markedly reduces myelin and axonal injury and improves the electrophysiological function of injured sciatic nerve possibly through alleviating oxidative stress reactions.

  13. Boric acid reduces axonal and myelin damage in experimental sciatic nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Kızılay, Zahir; Erken, Haydar Ali; Çetin, Nesibe Kahraman; Aktaş, Serdar; Abas, Burçin İrem; Yılmaz, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of boric acid in experimental acute sciatic nerve injury. Twenty-eight adult male rats were randomly divided into four equal groups (n = 7): control (C), boric acid (BA), sciatic nerve injury (I), and sciatic nerve injury + boric acid treatment (BAI). Sciatic nerve injury was generated using a Yasargil aneurysm clip in the groups I and BAI. Boric acid was given four times at 100 mg/kg to rats in the groups BA and BAI after injury (by gavage at 0, 24, 48 and 72 hours) but no injury was made in the group BA. In vivo electrophysiological tests were performed at the end of the day 4 and sciatic nerve tissue samples were taken for histopathological examination. The amplitude of compound action potential, the nerve conduction velocity and the number of axons were significantly lower and the myelin structure was found to be broken in group I compared with those in groups C and BA. However, the amplitude of the compound action potential, the nerve conduction velocity and the number of axons were significantly greater in group BAI than in group I. Moreover, myelin injury was significantly milder and the intensity of nuclear factor kappa B immunostaining was significantly weaker in group BAI than in group I. The results of this study show that administration of boric acid at 100 mg/kg after sciatic nerve injury in rats markedly reduces myelin and axonal injury and improves the electrophysiological function of injured sciatic nerve possibly through alleviating oxidative stress reactions. PMID:27904499

  14. Language and motor disorders after penetrating head injury in Viet Nam.

    PubMed

    Mohr, J P; Weiss, G H; Caveness, W F; Dillon, J D; Kistler, J P; Meirowsky, A M; Rish, B L

    1980-12-01

    Aphasia occurred in 244 of 1030 patients with head wounds, correlating with gunshot cause (p < 0.03) and initial loss of consciousness (p < 10(-6)). Aphasia disappeared within 10 years in 84 cases (34%). Sensorimotor aphasia usually changed to motor aphasia; motor aphasia disappeared; and sensory aphasia persisted. These improvements continued years after the accompanying hemiparesis stabilized, and were not related to wound site, depth, or whether the wound was caused by gunshot or fragment. Parietal wounds caused hemiparesis more often (p < 10(-6))than did wounds elsewhere. Regardless of the features of the hemiparesis initially, the severity of the final syndrome was greatest in the hand and arm and least in the face.

  15. Embedded-structure template for electronic records affects patient note quality and management for emergency head injury patients: An observational pre and post comparison quality improvement study.

    PubMed

    Sonoo, Tomohiro; Iwai, Satoshi; Inokuchi, Ryota; Gunshin, Masataka; Kitsuta, Yoichi; Nakajima, Susumu

    2016-10-01

    Along with article-based checklists, structured template recording systems have been reported as useful to create more accurate clinical recording, but their contributions to the improvement of the quality of patient care have been controversial. An emergency department (ED) must manage many patients in a short time. Therefore, such a template might be especially useful, but few ED-based studies have examined such systems.A structured template produced according to widely used head injury guidelines was used by ED residents for head injury patients. The study was conducted by comparing each 6-month period before and after launching the system. The quality of the patient notes and factors recorded in the patient notes to support the head computed tomography (CT) performance were evaluated by medical students blinded to patient information.The subject patients were 188 and 177 in respective periods. The numbers of patient notes categorized as "CT indication cannot be determined" were significantly lower in the postintervention term (18% → 9.0%), which represents the patient note quality improvement. No difference was found in the rates of CT performance or CT skip without clearly recorded CT indication in the patient notes.The structured template functioned as a checklist to support residents in writing more appropriately recorded patient notes in the ED head injury patients. Such a template customized to each clinical condition can facilitate standardized patient management and can improve patient safety in the ED.

  16. Descriptive and Experimental Analysis of Variables Maintaining Self-Injurious Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerman, Dorothea C.; Iwata, Brian A.

    1993-01-01

    Independent descriptive (correlational) and functional (experimental) analyses, conducted with six subjects with profound mental retardation exhibiting self-injurious behavior (SIB), found that the descriptive analysis was useful in identifying the extent to which SIB was related to social versus nonsocial contingencies but was limited in its…

  17. Experimental investigation of head resistance reduction in bubbly Couette-Taylor flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maryami, R.; Javadpoor, M.; Farahat, S.

    2016-12-01

    Small bubble experiments are carried out in a circulating vertical Couette-Taylor flow system to investigate the effect of air bubbles on head resistance. In the system with inner rotating cylinder and circulating flow, flow is combined with circumferential and axial flow. Moreover, the variation range of rotational Reynolds number is 7 × 103 ≤ {Re}_{ω } ≤ 70 × 103 and small bubbles are dispersed into fully turbulent flow which consists of Taylor vortices. The modification of head resistance is examined by measuring the pressure difference between two certain holes along the cylinders axis. The results show that head resistance is decreased in the presence of small bubbles and a head resistance reduction greater than 60 % is achieved in low {Re}_{ω } s and in all {Re}_{ax} s changing from 299.15 to 396.27. The effect of air bubbles on vortices could be possible reason for head resistance reduction. Since Taylor vortices are stable in this regime, bubbles decrease the momentum transfer by elongating vortices along the axis of cylinders and decreasing their numbers. The positive effect of air bubbles on head resistance reduction is diminished when {Re}_{ω } is increased. Moreover, in certain ranges of {Re}_{ω }, small bubbles enhance head resistance when {Re}_{ax} is increased. It is predicted that negative effect of small bubbles on head resistance reduction is due to flow turbulence enhancement when {Re}_{ω } and {Re}_{ax} are increased.

  18. The first concussion crisis: head injury and evidence in early American football.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Emily A

    2014-05-01

    In the early 21st century, sports concussion has become a prominent public health problem, popularly labeled "The Concussion Crisis." Football-related concussion contributes much of the epidemiological burden and inspires much of the public awareness. Though often cast as a recent phenomenon, the crisis in fact began more than a century ago, as concussions were identified among footballers in the game's first decades. This early concussion crisis subsided-allowing the problem to proliferate-because work was done by football's supporters to reshape public acceptance of risk. They appealed to an American culture that permitted violence, shifted attention to reforms addressing more visible injuries, and legitimized football within morally reputable institutions. Meanwhile, changing demands on the medical profession made practitioners reluctant to take a definitive stance. Drawing on scientific journals, public newspapers, and personal letters of players and coaches, this history of the early crisis raises critical questions about solutions being negotiated at present.

  19. Early diagnosis of diffuse brain damage resulting from a blunt head injury.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Mamoru

    2007-03-01

    Diffuse types of traumatic brain injury (TBI) are more difficult to diagnose than focal types in forensic postmortem examination, since macroscopic abnormalities may be minimal. In addition, most microscopic findings are not specific to TBI and are sometimes not obvious in cases when the survival period is short. Therefore, early diagnosis of diffuse TBI is most difficult. Histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations of various elements including axons, nerve cells, and glial cells in a sufficient number of blocks are indispensable. Mapping of changes in these elements with complicated focal lesions, even if the lesions are trivial, on anatomical diagrams would be useful. The combination of histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations as well as analysis of the exact history of the trauma, if possible, and elimination of other causes of death would lead to accurate diagnosis of diffuse types of TBI in cases when the survival period is brief.

  20. Is erythropoietin a worthy candidate for traumatic brain injury or are we heading the wrong way?

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, Giovanni; Alafaci, Concetta; Ghezzi, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability in the modern society. Although primary prevention is the only strategy that can counteract the primary brain damage, numerous preclinical studies have been accumulated in order to find therapeutic strategies against the secondary damage. In this scenario erythropoietin (EPO) has been shown to be a promising candidate as neuroprotective agent. A recent clinical trial, however, has shown that EPO has not an overall effect on outcomes following TBI thus renewing old concerns.  However, the results of a prespecified sensitivity analysis indicate that the effect of EPO on mortality remains still unclear. In the light of these observations, further investigations are needed to resolve doubts on EPO effectiveness in order to provide a more solid base for tailoring conclusive clinical trials. PMID:27239280

  1. Accidental head explosion: an unusual blast wave injury as a result of self-made fireworks.

    PubMed

    Kunz, S N; Zinka, B; Peschel, O; Fieseler, S

    2011-07-15

    A 33-year old hobby pyrotechnician sustained a lethal craniofacial trauma secondary to a salute fireworks blast. He was examining a misfire of a self-constructed salute gun, when it detonated, causing an explosively rupture of his forehead, which led to his immediate death. An autopsy was performed to achieve knowledge of the injury and to be able to reconstruct the events that lead to it. The pressure effect of the explosion caused a shredded rupture of the forehead with a regional spread of brain tissue and small polygonal skull fragments up to 30m from the detonation site. Furthermore multiple cinderlike fragments of black powder were embedded in the skin of the face and the anterior aspect of the neck (s.c. blast tattoo). The complete destruction of the forehead in combination with the multiple blast tattooing suggested that the explosion detonated while he was leaning over the device.

  2. [How to quantify the severity of brain injury during intensive care after adult head trauma].

    PubMed

    Stocchetti, N; Canavesi, K; Longhi, L; Magnoni, S; Protti, A; Pagan, F; Colombo, A

    2003-04-01

    Adequate early assessment of brain damage is essential. Location, extension and severity of structural damage affect brain function and ultimately determine the outcome. The extent of functional impairment, and the morphology of intracranial lesions, require specific treatment, often a combination of medical and surgical interventions. Brain damage usually evolves over time, and repeated assessments are necessary. Clinical evaluation is often biased by concomitant sedation and/or anesthesia, but remains necessary. A revision of the literature is presented. Brain damage is assessed combining clinical and instrumental data. Clinical examination is performed assessing the 3 components of the Glasgow Coma Scale. Spontaneous or stimulated (pain stimulus) eye opening, verbal and motor responses are observed after hemodynamic and respiratory stabilisation. Unfortunately a significant proportion of patients can not be properly examined for several reasons: eye opening can be altered by palpebral and facial injuries, verbal response can be impaired by maxillo-facial injuries or by endotracheal intubation, and motor response remains the most consistent parameter. Sedation, analgesia and myorelaxants, however, can profoundly diminish or abolish the motor response to maximal stimulation, so that examination should be performed after clearance of drugs. Often alcohol or other substances can further impair the neurological performances. Pupils diameter and reactivity to light should be observed, excluding pharmacologic effects (as dilation due to catecholamines) and direct ocular or orbital damage. The CT scan is necessary for disclosing surgical masses and for identifying the extent of diffuse damage and the location of focal lesions. These data should be combined with additional functional exploration, as provided by cerebral extraction of oxygen and electrophysiologic data. Early estimation of cerebral damage is complex and prone to mistakes. Accurate, repeated evaluations

  3. Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Is Neuroprotective in Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xin L.; Wright, David K.; Liu, Shijie J.; Semple, Bridgette D.; Johnston, Leigh; Jones, Nigel C.; Cook, Andrew D.; Hamilton, John A.; O'Brien, Terence J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an international health concern with a complex pathogenesis resulting in major long-term neurological, neurocognitive, and neuropsychiatric outcomes. Although neuroinflammation has been identified as an important pathophysiological process resulting from TBI, the function of specific inflammatory mediators in the aftermath of TBI remains poorly understood. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is an inflammatory cytokine that has been reported to have neuroprotective effects in various animal models of neurodegenerative disease that share pathological similarities with TBI. The importance of GM-CSF in TBI has yet to be studied, however. We examined the role of GM-CSF in TBI by comparing the effects of a lateral fluid percussion (LFP) injury or sham injury in GM-CSF gene deficient (GM-CSF-/-) versus wild-type (WT) mice. After a 3-month recovery interval, mice were assessed using neuroimaging and behavioral outcomes. All mice given a LFP injury displayed significant brain atrophy and behavioral impairments compared with those given sham-injuries; however, this was significantly worse in the GM-CSF-/- mice compared with the WT mice. GM-CSF-/- mice given LFP injury also had reduced astrogliosis compared with their WT counterparts. These novel findings indicate that the inflammatory mediator, GM-CSF, may have significant protective properties in the chronic sequelae of experimental TBI and suggest that further research investigating GM-CSF and its potential benefits in the injured brain is warranted. PMID:24392832

  4. Behavioural and psychosocial sequelae of severe closed head injury and regional cerebral blood flow: a SPECT study.

    PubMed Central

    Oder, W; Goldenberg, G; Spatt, J; Podreka, I; Binder, H; Deecke, L

    1992-01-01

    Thirty six patients (31 male, 5 female) who had suffered severe closed head injury were re-examined at an average of 39.3 (SD 12.8, range 7-66) months after the injury. Behavioural symptoms were measured using the Giessen test. The relatives' reports were used for data analysis to ensure that results were valid. The neurophysical impairment subscale of the Glasgow assessment schedule was completed by two neurologists, and the number connection test was completed by each patient. The adjective mood scale was completed by each relative. All patients were investigated by single photon emission computerised tomography (SPECT). Exploratory factor analysis using the principal components method was carried out separately for SPECT results and psychological measures and correlations were sought between the resulting factors. Factor analysis of the data from the Giessen test identified social isolation, disinhibition, and aggressive behaviour as major components of post-traumatic personality changes; it indicates that these behavioural features are independent of the level of neurological and neuropsychological impairment, which loaded on a single independent factor. Relatives' psychic health seemed to be relatively resistant to physical and cognitive disability and was mainly affected by disinhibitive behaviour. The highest correlation was between frontal flow indices and disinhibitive behaviour (p less than 0.01): the severity of disinhibition increased with lower frontal flow rates. There was a significant but somewhat weaker correlation (p less than 0.05) between flow indices of the left cerebral hemisphere and social isolation. Low flow values of the right brain regions were related to aggressive behaviour (p less than 0.05). Neurological and cognitive impairment correlated negatively with the thalamus; worse neurological and cognitive performance indicate by raised scores on the neurophysical scale and on the number connection test was associated with low thalamic

  5. Influence of basal cisterns, midline shift and pathology on outcome in head injury.

    PubMed

    Athiappan, S; Muthukumar, N; Srinivasan, U S

    1993-05-01

    The relationship of outcome to the basal cisterns, midline shift and pathology as seen on initial CT scan was assessed in 107 moderate and severe head injured patients. The mortality rates were 82 cases (76%) and 29 cases (27%) among those with obliterated and normal basal cisterns, and 74 cases (69%) and 42 cases (39%) when the midline shift was present and absent, respectively. The state of the cisterns and midline shift was correlated with the type of intracranial pathology and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores. The state of the cisterns and midline shift was more important for those with single contusions and intra-cerebral haematoma (ICH) than for those with multiple lesions, extradural haematoma, subdural haematoma, diffuse cerebral oedema and normal CT scan. The state of the above two parameters when correlated with GCS score, showed that they were important for those with higher GCS scores. This indicates that the status of the cisterns and midline shift is correlated with the type of pathology and GCS score rather than these parameters taken alone in prediction.

  6. Dural sinus obstruction following head injury: a diagnostic and clinical study.

    PubMed

    Benifla, Mony; Yoel, Uri; Melamed, Israel; Merkin, Vladimir; Cohen, Avi; Shelef, Ilan

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study is to describe the clinical characteristics of patients with skull fracture adjacent to a dural venous sinus (DVS) and evaluate the role of CT venography (CTV) in the diagnosis of the effect of this fracture on the involved DVS. METHODS The study comprised patients with vault or skull base fracture adjacent to a DVS who were admitted to 1 medical center during a 2-year period. The medical records were reviewed for the clinical and radiographic characteristics. All patients had undergone CTV to evaluate potential DVS pathology. The clinical and radiological findings of the patients with DVS pathology were compared with those of the patients with normal DVS. The groups were compared using the chi-square and t-tests for categorical and continuous data, respectively. The potential risk for poor outcome among the patients with DVS pathology was also investigated. RESULTS Of 434 patients with skull fractures, 41 (9.4%) had fractures adjacent to a DVS. DVS pathology was detected in 51% of patients (21 of 41 patients). For 9 (43%) patients, obstruction was extraluminal without thrombosis, and 12 (57%) patients had dural sinus thrombosis (DST). In patients with a positive-CTV scan, the severity of injury according to the Glasgow Coma Scale score at presentation was correlated with the presence of DST (p = 0.007). The sensitivity of noncontrast CT (NCCT) for DVS involvement was 38% among the patients with positive-CTV scans. For patients with DVS pathology, poor outcome was correlated with DST (intraluminal), rather than extraluminal obstruction without thrombosis (p = 0.02), and superior sagittal sinus (SSS) involvement (p = 0.05). CONCLUSIONS NCCT is not sensitive enough to detect DVS obstruction in patients with skull fracture adjacent to a DVS, and CTV should be performed in order to rule it out. A correlation was found between the severity of injury and the presence of DST, rather than extraluminal obstruction. The authors' findings

  7. Experimental Test of Spatial Updating Models for Monkey Eye-Head Gaze Shifts

    PubMed Central

    Van Grootel, Tom J.; Van der Willigen, Robert F.; Van Opstal, A. John

    2012-01-01

    How the brain maintains an accurate and stable representation of visual target locations despite the occurrence of saccadic gaze shifts is a classical problem in oculomotor research. Here we test and dissociate the predictions of different conceptual models for head-unrestrained gaze-localization behavior of macaque monkeys. We adopted the double-step paradigm with rapid eye-head gaze shifts to measure localization accuracy in response to flashed visual stimuli in darkness. We presented the second target flash either before (static), or during (dynamic) the first gaze displacement. In the dynamic case the brief visual flash induced a small retinal streak of up to about 20 deg at an unpredictable moment and retinal location during the eye-head gaze shift, which provides serious challenges for the gaze-control system. However, for both stimulus conditions, monkeys localized the flashed targets with accurate gaze shifts, which rules out several models of visuomotor control. First, these findings exclude the possibility that gaze-shift programming relies on retinal inputs only. Instead, they support the notion that accurate eye-head motor feedback updates the gaze-saccade coordinates. Second, in dynamic trials the visuomotor system cannot rely on the coordinates of the planned first eye-head saccade either, which rules out remapping on the basis of a predictive corollary gaze-displacement signal. Finally, because gaze-related head movements were also goal-directed, requiring continuous access to eye-in-head position, we propose that our results best support a dynamic feedback scheme for spatial updating in which visuomotor control incorporates accurate signals about instantaneous eye- and head positions rather than relative eye- and head displacements. PMID:23118883

  8. A brief report on MRI investigation of experimental traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Timothy Q.; Watts, Lora T.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a major cause of death and disability. This is a brief report based on a symposium presentation to the 2014 Chinese Neurotrauma Association Meeting in San Francisco, USA. It covers the work from our laboratory in applying multimodal MRI to study experimental traumatic brain injury in rats with comparisons made to behavioral tests and histology. MRI protocols include structural, perfusion, manganese-enhanced, diffusion-tensor MRI, and MRI of blood-brain barrier integrity and cerebrovascular reactivity. PMID:26981069

  9. Dexpanthenol attenuates lipid peroxidation and testicular damage at experimental ischemia and reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Etensel, Barlas; Ozkisacik, Sezen; Ozkara, Esra; Karul, Aslihan; Oztan, Onur; Yazici, Mesut; Gürsoy, Harun

    2007-02-01

    Prevention of tissue damage after testicular torsion caused by I/R injury is still a clinical and experimental problem. There are many experimental studies made with several chemicals in the literature for decreasing the effect of reactive oxygen species after ischemia and reperfusion. Dexpanthenol (Dxp) is the biologically active alcohol of pantothenic acid. Pantothenic acid increases the content of reduced glutathione, Coenzyme A and ATP in cell. We studied the effect of Dxp on lipid peroxidation and testicular damage. Forty adult rats were separated randomly into five groups: group Sh, Sham-operation; group TD, torsion-detorsion; group NS, torsion-normal saline-detorsion; group D, torsion-Dxp 250 mg/kg detorsion; group D2, torsion-Dxp 500 mg/kg detorsion group. Serum MDA levels were taken before detorsion, after torsion at the first and fifth minute and at the first hour. Tissue sample was taken at the first hour. The alterations of I/R injury on testis were histological graded. Serum MDA levels were significantly lower in group D2 compared to all groups. The histopathology score of group D2 was significantly lower than groups TD, NS and D. Histopathological score and serum MDA levels are strikingly compatible. Dxp attenuated lipid peroxidation and tissue damage at I/R injury. This effect depends on its antioxidant effect with increasingly reduced glutathione, Coenzyme A and ATP. The effect of Dxp on I/R injury has been shown for the first time in the experimental testicular torsion.

  10. The First Concussion Crisis: Head Injury and Evidence in Early American Football

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In the early 21st century, sports concussion has become a prominent public health problem, popularly labeled “The Concussion Crisis.” Football-related concussion contributes much of the epidemiological burden and inspires much of the public awareness. Though often cast as a recent phenomenon, the crisis in fact began more than a century ago, as concussions were identified among footballers in the game’s first decades. This early concussion crisis subsided—allowing the problem to proliferate—because work was done by football’s supporters to reshape public acceptance of risk. They appealed to an American culture that permitted violence, shifted attention to reforms addressing more visible injuries, and legitimized football within morally reputable institutions. Meanwhile, changing demands on the medical profession made practitioners reluctant to take a definitive stance. Drawing on scientific journals, public newspapers, and personal letters of players and coaches, this history of the early crisis raises critical questions about solutions being negotiated at present. PMID:24625171

  11. The Mental Health Sequelae of Traumatic Head Injury in South Vietnamese Ex-Political Detainees Who Survived Torture

    PubMed Central

    Mollica, Richard F.; Chernoff, Miriam C.; Berthold, S. Megan; Lavelle, James; Lyoo, In Kyoon; Renshaw, Perry

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the relationship between traumatic head injury (THI) and psychiatric morbidity in torture survivors. We examine the relationship between THI and depression, PTSD, post-concussive syndrome (PCS), disability and poor health status in Vietnamese ex-political detainees who survived incarceration in Vietnamese re-education camps. A community sample of ex-political detainees (n=337) and a non-THI, non-ex-detainee comparison group (n=82) were surveyed. 78% of the ex-political detainees had experienced THI. 90.6% of the ex-political detainees and 3.6% of the comparison group had experienced 7 or more trauma events. Depression and PTSD were greater in ex-detainees than the comparison group (40.9% vs 23.2% and 13.4% vs 0%). Dose-effect relationships for THI and trauma/torture in the ex-political detainee group were significant. Logistic regression in the pooled sample of ex-detainees and the comparison group confirmed the independent impact of THI from trauma/torture on psychiatric morbidity (OR for PTSD=22.4; 95% CI: 3.0-165.8). These results demonstrate important effects of THI on depression and PTSD in Vietnamese ex-detainees who have survived torture. PMID:24962448

  12. Iatrogenic salivary duct injury in head and neck cancer patients: Report of four cases and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Kulyapina, Alena; Ochandiano-Caicoya, Santiago; Navarro-Cuellar, Carlos; Navarro-Vila, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The lesions of the salivary ducts may be idiopathic, post- traumatic, or iatrogenic and lead to sialocele formation with persistent painful facial swelling or cutaneous fistula formation. No consensus on treatment of this condition exists: the options of treatment include needle aspiration, pressure dressings, antisialogogue therapy, radiotherapy, botulinum toxin and surgical approaches as duct repair, diversion, ligation, different drainage systems and even parotidectomy/submaxilectomy. The management and special features of iatrogenic salivary duct injury in patients with oral cancer who underwent head and neck reconstructive surgery has not been described yet. Material and Methods: We present four cases of iatrogenic lesions of salivary ducts and its management in patients with oral cancer. Conclusions: The iatrogenic lesions of salivary ducts are to be taken into account in patients with oral cancer as the distal ends of salivary ducts could be involved in the margins of surgical resection. Different options of treatment of this complication are described. Key words:Sialocele, oral cancer, salivary duct. PMID:25136433

  13. Knotting of a nasogastric feeding tube in a child with head injury: A case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Nasiru J; Bot, Gyang Markus; Hassan, Ismail; Shilong, Danaan J; Obande, Joseph O; Aliu, Salamat Ahuoiza; Dung, Ezekiel D; Shehu, Bello B

    2014-01-01

    Nasogastric intubation is one of the most common routine nonoperative procedures available for the hospital care of patients. The insertion and removal of this tube is associated with many complications. The complications include trauma, nasal septal abscess and inadvertent entry into the cranial cavity and trachea, ulceration, bleeding from varices and perforation. Knotting of the nasogastric tube is one of the very rare complications of nasogastric intubation particularly in children. To the best of our knowledge there are very few reported cases in children. The technique used in the patient was the application of a steady tug which allows the lower oesophageal sphincter to open, therefore enabling the removal of the nasogastric tube. The possible predispositions to knotting of a nasogastric tube include small bore tubes, excess tube length and gastric surgery. We postulate that reduced gastric tone is another possible predisposing factor with head injury being the most likely reason in the index patient. We also challenge the fact that the small sized stomach is a risk factor for knotting of a feeding tube if the functional status and tone are normal, because of the rarity in children.

  14. Head impact in a snowboarding accident.

    PubMed

    Bailly, N; Llari, M; Donnadieu, T; Masson, C; Arnoux, P J

    2016-05-17

    To effectively prevent sport traumatic brain injury (TBI), means of protection need to be designed and tested in relation to the reality of head impact. This study quantifies head impacts during a typical snowboarding accident to evaluate helmet standards. A snowboarder numerical model was proposed, validated against experimental data, and used to quantify the influence of accident conditions (speed, snow stiffness, morphology, and position) on head impacts (locations, velocities, and accelerations) and injury risk during snowboarding backward falls. Three hundred twenty-four scenarios were simulated: 70% presented a high risk of mild TBI (head peak acceleration >80 g) and 15% presented a high risk of severe TBI (head injury criterion >1000). Snow stiffness, speed, and snowboarder morphology were the main factors influencing head impact metrics. Mean normal head impact speed (28 ± 6 km/h) was higher than equivalent impact speed used in American standard helmet test (ASTM F2040), and mean tangential impact speed, not included in standard tests, was 13.8 (±7 km/h). In 97% of simulated impacts, the peak head acceleration was below 300 g, which is the pass/fail criteria used in standard tests. Results suggest that initial speed, impacted surface, and pass/fail criteria used in helmet standard performance tests do not fully reflect magnitude and variability of snowboarding backward-fall impacts.

  15. Effect of Fasting on the Metabolic Response of Liver to Experimental Burn Injury

    PubMed Central

    Orman, Mehmet A.; Ierapetritou, Marianthi G.; Androulakis, Ioannis P.; Berthiaume, Francois

    2013-01-01

    Liver metabolism is altered after systemic injuries such as burns and trauma. These changes have been elucidated in rat models of experimental burn injury where the liver was isolated and perfused ex vivo. Because these studies were performed in fasted animals to deplete glycogen stores, thus simplifying quantification of gluconeogenesis, these observations reflect the combined impact of fasting and injury on liver metabolism. Herein we asked whether the metabolic response to experimental burn injury is different in fed vs. fasted animals. Rats were subjected to a cutaneous burn covering 20% of the total body surface area, or to similar procedures without administering the burn, hence a sham-burn. Half of the animals in the burn and sham-burn groups were fasted starting on postburn day 3, and the others allowed to continue ad libitum. On postburn day 4, livers were isolated and perfused for 1 hour in physiological medium supplemented with 10% hematocrit red blood cells. The uptake/release rates of major carbon and nitrogen sources, oxygen, and carbon dioxide were measured during the perfusion and the data fed into a mass balance model to estimate intracellular fluxes. The data show that in fed animals, injury increased glucose output mainly from glycogen breakdown and minimally impacted amino acid metabolism. In fasted animals, injury did not increase glucose output but increased urea production and the uptake of several amino acids, namely glutamine, arginine, glycine, and methionine. Furthermore, sham-burn animals responded to fasting by triggering gluconeogenesis from lactate; however, in burned animals the preferred gluconeogenic substrate was amino acids. Taken together, these results suggest that the fed state prevents the burn-induced increase in hepatic amino acid utilization for gluconeogenesis. The role of glycogen stores and means to increase and/or maintain internal sources of glucose to prevent increased hepatic amino acid utilization warrant further

  16. MRL/MpJ mice show unique pathological features after experimental kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Shiozuru, Daichi; Ichii, Osamu; Kimura, Junpei; Nakamura, Teppei; Elewa, Yaser Hosny Ali; Otsuka-Kanazawa, Saori; Kon, Yasuhiro

    2016-02-01

    Clarification of the renal repair process is crucial for developing novel therapeutic strategies for kidney injury. MRL/MpJ mice have a unique repair process characterized by low scar formation. The pathological features of experimentally injured MRL/MpJ and C57BL/6 mouse kidneys were compared to examine the renal repair process. The dilation and atrophy of renal tubules were observed in folic acid (FA)-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) in both strains, and the histopathological injury scores and number of interleukin (IL)-1F6-positive damaged distal tubules and kidney injury molecule 1 (KIM-1)-positive damaged proximal tubules drastically increased 1 day after AKI induction. However, KIM-1-positive tubules and the elevation of serum renal function markers were significantly fewer and lower, respectively, in MRL/MpJ mice at days 2 and 7 after AKI. After traumatic kidney injury (TKI) via needle puncture, severe tubular necrotic lesions in the punctured area and fibrosis progressed in both strains. Indices for fibrosis such as aniline blue-positive area, number of alpha smooth muscle actin-positive myofibroblasts, and messenger RNA expression levels of Tgfb1 and Mmp2 indicated lower fibrotic activity in MRL/MpJ kidneys. Characteristically, only MRL/MpJ kidneys manifested remarkable calcification around the punctured area beginning 7 days after TKI. The pathological features of injured MRL/MpJ and C57BL/6 kidneys differed, especially those of kidneys with mild proximal tubular injuries after FA-induced AKI. Lower fibrotic activity and increased calcification after TKI were observed in MRL/MpJ kidneys. These findings clarified the unique pathological characteristics of MRL/MpJ mouse kidneys and contribute to understanding of the renal repair process after kidney injury.

  17. The Current State of Knowledge of Hepatic Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury Based on Its Study in Experimental Models

    PubMed Central

    Mendes-Braz, M.; Elias-Miró, M.; Jiménez-Castro, M. B.; Casillas-Ramírez, A.; Ramalho, F. S.; Peralta, C.

    2012-01-01

    The present review focuses on the numerous experimental models used to study the complexity of hepatic ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Although experimental models of hepatic I/R injury represent a compromise between the clinical reality and experimental simplification, the clinical transfer of experimental results is problematic because of anatomical and physiological differences and the inevitable simplification of experimental work. In this review, the strengths and limitations of the various models of hepatic I/R are discussed. Several strategies to protect the liver from I/R injury have been developed in animal models and, some of these, might find their way into clinical practice. We also attempt to highlight the fact that the mechanisms responsible for hepatic I/R injury depend on the experimental model used, and therefore the therapeutic strategies also differ according to the model used. Thus, the choice of model must therefore be adapted to the clinical question being answered. PMID:22649277

  18. The life and work of the Dumfries surgeon James Hill (1703-1776): his contributions to the management of cancer and of head injury.

    PubMed

    Macintyre, Iain

    2016-11-01

    James Hill was apprenticed to the formidable Edinburgh surgeon, physician and philosopher George Young from whom he learned the value of careful observation and scepticism in medicine. As a surgeon in Dumfries he was able to take advantage of newly established medical journals to publish case reports. His book Cases in Surgery summarised three aspects of his life's work as a surgeon. In it he provides a classical description of the features and transmission of sibbens (endemic syphilis) and suggests from careful clinical observation that sibbens and venereal syphilis were the same disease. His success with treatment of cancer led him to advocate curative rather than palliative excision, a view that ran counter to accepted contemporary practice. Hill's ability to diagnose cerebral compression caused by bleeding following head injury enabled him to treat this successfully by directed trephine and drainage. His results on the treatment of head injury were the best to be published in their day and an important addition to the increasing understanding of the basis of the management of head injury.

  19. Evaluation of the Effect of Glibenclamide in Patients With Diffuse Axonal Injury Due to Moderate to Severe Head Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Zafardoost, Peyman; Ghasemi, Amir Abbas; Salehpour, Firooz; Piroti, Chia; Ziaeii, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Background Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health problem worldwide. Secondary injuries after TBI, including diffuse axonal injury (DAI) often occur, and proper treatments are needed in this regard. It has been shown that glibenclamide could reduce secondary brain damage after experimental TBI and improve outcomes. Objectives We aim to evaluate the role of glibenclamide on the short-term outcome of patients with DAI due to moderate to severe TBI. Patients and Methods In this controlled randomized clinical trial, 40 patients with moderate to severe TBI were assigned to glibenclamide (n = 20) and control (n = 20) groups. Six hours after admission the intervention group received 1.25 mg glibenclamide every 12 hours. The Glasgow coma scale (GCS) was administered at admission, in the first 24 and 48 hours, at one week post-trauma and at discharge. The Glasgow outcome scale (GOS) was also administered at discharge. All results were evaluated and compared between groups. Results Patients treated with glibenclamide compared to the control group had a significantly better GCS score one week post-trauma (P = 0.003) and at discharge (P = 0.004), as well as a better GOS score at discharge (P = 0.001). The glibenclamide group also had a shorter length of hospital stay compared to the control group (P = 0.03). In the control group, two patients (10%) died during the first week post-trauma, but there was no mortality in the glibenclamide group (P = 0.48). Conclusions Treatment with glibenclamide in patients with DAI due to moderate to severe TBI significantly improves short-term outcomes. PMID:28184360

  20. Ursolic Acid Ameliorates Early Brain Injury After Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury in Mice by Activating the Nrf2 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hui; Wang, Handong; Zhu, Lin; Wei, Wuting

    2017-02-01

    Previous studies have indicated oxidative stress and inflammatory injury as significant contributors to the secondary damage associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Ursolic acid (UA) has been demonstrated to exert anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects on cerebral ischemia by activating the nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway. However, the effects of UA on TBI remain unclear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential roles of UA in the activation of the Nrf2 pathway using an experimental TBI model and the underlying mechanism. Wild-type (WT) and Nrf2((-/-)) mice were divided into eight groups: (1) sham; (2) TBI; (3) TBI + vehicle; (4) TBI + 50 mg/kg UA; (5) TBI + 100 mg/kg UA; (6) TBI + 150 mg/kg UA; (7) TBI + Nrf2((-/-)) + vehicle; (8) TBI + Nrf2((-/-)) + UA. All mice underwent the TBI with the exception of the sham group. The neurologic outcomes of the mice were evaluated at 24 h after TBI, as well as the expression of Nrf2, NQO1, HO1,SOD, GPx, and MDA. Treatment of UA significantly ameliorated brain edema and the neurological insufficiencies after TBI. In addition, UA treatment markedly strengthened the nuclear translocation of Nrf2 protein and increased the expression of NQO1 and HO1. Moreover, UA significantly increased the expression of AKT, an Nrf2 upstream factor, suggesting that UA play a neuroprotective role through the activation of the Nrf2-ARE signal pathway. On the contrary, UA showed no neuroprotective effect on the Nrf2((-/-)) mice. These data indicated that UA increases the activity of antioxidant enzymes and attenuated brain injury via Nrf2 factor.

  1. A Military Relevant Model of Closed Concussive Head Injury: Longitudinal Studies Characterizing and Validating Single and Repetitive mTBI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    may serve as indicators of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). This injury model represents a mild clinically relevant injury. Briefly, PCI injury...consciousness after concussion. These findings suggest that brain cathepsin B has a role in multiple TBI models and is linked to neurological deficits...Mountney A, Deng-Bryant Y, Schmid K, Shear D, Tortella F (2014) The WRAIR projectile concussive impact model of mild traumatic brain injury: re- design

  2. Weapon identification using antemortem computed tomography with virtual 3D and rapid prototype modeling--a report in a case of blunt force head injury.

    PubMed

    Woźniak, Krzysztof; Rzepecka-Woźniak, Ewa; Moskała, Artur; Pohl, Jerzy; Latacz, Katarzyna; Dybała, Bogdan

    2012-10-10

    A frequent request of a prosecutor referring to forensic autopsy is to determine the mechanism of an injury and to identify the weapons used to cause those injuries. This task could be problematic in many ways, including changes in the primary injury caused by medical intervention and the process of healing. To accomplish this task, the forensic pathologist has to gather all possible information during the post-mortem examination. The more data is collected, the easier it is to obtain an accurate answer to the prosecutor's question. The authors present a case of head injuries that the victim sustained under unknown circumstances. The patient underwent neurosurgical treatment which resulted in alteration of the bone fracture pattern. The only way to evaluate this injury was to analyze antemortem clinical data, especially CT scans, with virtual 3D reconstruction of the fractured skull. A physical model of a part of the broken skull was created with the use of 3D printing. These advanced techniques, applied for the first time in Poland for forensic purposes, allowed investigators to extract enough data to develop a hypothesis about the mechanism of injury and the weapon most likely used.

  3. An introductory characterization of a combat-casualty-care relevant swine model of closed head injury resulting from exposure to explosive blast.

    PubMed

    Bauman, Richard A; Ling, Geoffrey; Tong, Lawrence; Januszkiewicz, Adolph; Agoston, Dennis; Delanerolle, Nihal; Kim, Young; Ritzel, Dave; Bell, Randy; Ecklund, James; Armonda, Rocco; Bandak, Faris; Parks, Steven

    2009-06-01

    Explosive blast has been extensively used as a tactical weapon in Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and more recently in Operation Enduring Freedom(OEF). The polytraumatic nature of blast injuries is evidence of their effectiveness,and brain injury is a frequent and debilitating form of this trauma. In-theater clinical observations of brain-injured casualties have shown that edema, intracranial hemorrhage, and vasospasm are the most salient pathophysiological characteristics of blast injury to the brain. Unfortunately, little is known about exactly how an explosion produces these sequelae as well as others that are less well documented. Consequently, the principal objective of the current report is to present a swine model of explosive blast injury to the brain. This model was developed during Phase I of the DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) PREVENT (Preventing Violent Explosive Neurotrauma) blast research program. A second objective is to present data that illustrate the capabilities of this model to study the proximal biomechanical causes and the resulting pathophysiological, biochemical,neuropathological, and neurological consequences of explosive blast injury to the swine brain. In the concluding section of this article, the advantages and limitations of the model are considered, explosive and air-overpressure models are compared, and the physical properties of an explosion are identified that potentially contributed to the in-theater closed head injuries resulting from explosions of improvised explosive devices (IEDs).

  4. Understanding Edward Muybridge: historical review of behavioral alterations after a 19th-century head injury and their multifactorial influence on human life and culture.

    PubMed

    Manjila, Sunil; Singh, Gagandeep; Alkhachroum, Ayham M; Ramos-Estebanez, Ciro

    2015-07-01

    Edward Muybridge was an Anglo-American photographer, well known for his pioneering contributions in photography and his invention of the "zoopraxiscope," a forerunner of motion pictures. However, this 19th-century genius, with two original patents in photographic technology, made outstanding contributions in art and neurology alike, the latter being seldom acknowledged. A head injury that he sustained changed his behavior and artistic expression. The shift of his interests from animal motion photography to human locomotion and gait remains a pivotal milestone in our understanding of patterns in biomechanics and clinical neurology, while his own behavioral patterns, owing to an injury to the orbitofrontal cortex, remain a mystery even for cognitive neurologists. The behavioral changes he exhibited and the legal conundrum that followed, including a murder of which he was acquitted, all depict the complexities of his personality and impact of frontal lobe injuries. This article highlights the life journey of Muybridge, drawing parallels with Phineas Gage, whose penetrating head injury has been studied widely. The wide sojourn of Muybridge also illustrates the strong connections that he maintained with Stanford and Pennsylvania universities, which were later considered pinnacles of higher education on the two coasts of the United States.

  5. Safe management of paediatric penetrating head injury without a CT scanner: A strategy for humanitarian surgeons based on experience in southern Afghanistan

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, P; Nott, DM; Gentleman, D

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In many parts of the world, access to a CT scanner remains almost non-existent, and patients with a head injury are managed expectantly, often with poor results. Recent military medical experience in southern Afghanistan using a well-equipped surgical facility with a CT scanner has provided new insights into safe surgical practice in resource-poor environments. Methods All cases of children aged under 16 years with penetrating head injury who were treated in a trauma unit in southern Afghanistan by a single neurosurgeon between 2008 and 2010 were reviewed. Based on a previously published retrospective review, a clinical strategy aimed specifically at generalist surgeons is proposed for selecting children who can benefit from surgical intervention in environments with no access to CT scanners. Results Fourteen patients were reviewed, of whom three had a tangential wound, 10 had a penetrating wound with retained fragments and one had a perforating injury. Two operations for generalist surgeons are described in detail: limited wound excision; and simple decompression of the intra-cranial compartment without brain resection or dural repair. Conclusions In resource-poor environments, clinically-based criteria may be used as a safe and appropriate strategy for selecting children who may benefit from relatively straightforward surgery after penetrating brain injury. PMID:26890836

  6. Brain Injury After Proton Therapy or Carbon Ion Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer and Skull Base Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Miyawaki, Daisuke Murakami, Masao; Demizu, Yusuke; Sasaki, Ryohei; Niwa, Yasue; Terashima, Kazuki; Nishimura, Hideki; Hishikawa, Yoshio; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the incidence of early delayed or late morbidity of Brain after particle therapy for skull base tumors and head-and-neck cancers. Methods and Materials: Between May 2001 and December 2005, 59 patients with cancerous invasion of the skull base were treated with proton or carbon ion therapy at the Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center. Adverse events were assessed according to the magnetic resonance imaging findings (late effects of normal tissue-subjective, objective, management, analytic [LENT-SOMA]) and symptoms (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events [CTCAE], version 3.0). Dose-volume histograms were used to analyze the relationship between the dose and volume of the irradiated brain and the occurrence of brain injury. The median follow-up time was 33 months. Results: Of the 48 patients treated with proton therapy and 11 patients treated with carbon ion radiotherapy, 8 (17%) and 7 (64%), respectively, developed radiation-induced brain changes (RIBCs) on magnetic resonance imaging (LENT-SOMA Grade 1-3). Four patients (7%) had some clinical symptoms, such as vertigo and headache (CTCAE Grade 2) or epilepsy (CTCAE Grade 3). The actuarial occurrence rate of RIBCs at 2 and 3 years was 20% and 39%, respectively, with a significant difference in the incidence between the proton and carbon ion radiotherapy groups. The dose-volume histogram analyses revealed significant differences between Brain lobes with and without RIBCs in the actuarial volume of brain lobes receiving high doses. Conclusion: Particle therapies produced minimal symptomatic brain toxicities, but sequential evaluation with magnetic resonance imaging detected a greater incidence of RIBCs. Significant differences were observed in the irradiated brain volume between Brain lobes with and without RIBCs.

  7. Identification of traumatic injury in burned cranial bone: an experimental approach.

    PubMed

    Pope, Elayne J; Smith, O'Brian C

    2004-05-01

    Interpreting patterns of injury in victims of fire-related deaths poses challenges for forensic investigators. Determining manner of death (accident, suicide or homicide) using charred remains is compounded by the thermal distortion and fragmentation of soft and skeletal tissues. Heat degrades thin cranial structures and obscures the characteristic signatures of perimortem ballistic, blunt, and sharp force trauma in bone, making differentiation from thermal trauma difficult. This study documents the survivability and features of traumatic injury through all stages of burning for soft tissue reduction and organic degradation of cranial bone. Forty cadaver heads were burned in environments simulating forensic fires. Progression of thermal degradation was photographically documented throughout the destructive stages for soft tissues and bone to establish expected burn sequence patterns for the head. In addition to testing intact vaults, a percentage were selectively traumatized to introduce the variables of soft tissue disruption, fractures, impact marks, and incisions throughout the cremation process. Skeletal materials were recovered, reconstructed, and correlated with photographs to discern burn patterns and survivability of traumatic features. This study produced two important results: (1) Identification of preexistent trauma is possible in reconstructed burned cranial bone. Signatures of ballistic (internal and external bevel, secondary fractures), blunt force (impact site, radiating fractures), and sharp force (incisions, stabs, sectioning) survive the cremation process. (2) In non-traumatized specimens, the skull does not explode from steam pressure but does fragment as a result of external forces (collapsed debris, extinguishment methods) and handling. The features of both results are sequentially described throughout the progression of thermal destruction.

  8. An Ultrasonic-Adaptive Beamforming Method and Its Application for Trans-skull Imaging of Certain Types of Head Injuries; Part I: Transmission Mode.

    PubMed

    Shapoori, Kiyanoosh; Sadler, Jeff; Wydra, Adrian; Malyarenko, Eugene V; Sinclair, Anthony N; Maev, Roman Gr

    2015-05-01

    A new adaptive beamforming algorithm for imaging via small-aperture 1-D ultrasonic-phased arrays through composite layered structures is reported. Such structures cause acoustic phase aberration and wave refraction at undulating interfaces and can lead to significant distortion of an ultrasonic field pattern produced by conventional beamforming techniques. This distortion takes the form of defocusing the ultrasonic field transmitted through the barrier and causes loss of resolution and overall degradation of image quality. To compensate for the phase aberration and the refractional effects, we developed and examined an adaptive beamforming algorithm for small-aperture linear-phased arrays. After accurately assessing the barrier's local geometry and sound speed, the method calculates a new timing scheme to refocus the distorted beam at its original location. As a tentative application, implementation of this method for trans-skull imaging of certain types of head injuries through human skull is discussed. Simulation and laboratory results of applying the method on skull-mimicking phantoms are presented. Correction of up to 2.5 cm focal point displacement at up to 10 cm depth under our skull phantom is demonstrated. Quantitative assessment of the method in a variety of temporal focusing scenarios is also reported. Overall temporal deviation on the order of a few nanoseconds was observed between the simulated and experimental results. The single-point adaptive focusing results demonstrate strong potential of our approach for diagnostic imaging through intact human skull. The algorithms were implemented on an ultrasound advanced open-platform controlling 64 active elements on a 128-element phased array.

  9. 3D Numerical modeling and its experimental verifications for an inhomogeneous head phantom using broadband fNIR system.

    PubMed

    Sultan, E; Pourrezaei, K; Ghandjbakhche, A; Daryoush, A S

    2014-03-01

    Modeling behavior of broadband (30-1000 MHz) frequency modulated near infrared photons through a multilayer phantom is of interest to optical bio-imaging research. Photon dynamics in phantom are predicted using three-dimension (3D) finite element numerical simulation and are related to the measured insertion loss and phase for a given human head geometry in this paper based on three layers of phantom each with distinct optical parameter properties. Simulation and experimental results are achieved for single, two, and three layers solid phantoms using COMSOL (COMSOL AB, Tegnérgatan 23, SE-111 40, Stockholm, Sweden) (for FEM) simulation and custom-designed broadband free space optical transmitter (Tx) and receiver (Rx) modules that are developed for photon migration at wavelengths of 680, 795, and 850 nm. Standard error is used to compute error between two-dimension and 3D FE modeling along with experimental results by fitting experimental data to the functional form of afrequency+b. Error results are shown at narrowband and broadband frequency modulation. Confidence in numerical modeling of the photonic behavior using 3D FEM for human head has been established here by comparing the reflection mode's experimental results with the predictions made by COMSOL for known commercial solid brain phantoms.

  10. Monitoring hemodynamic and morphologic responses to closed head injury in a mouse model using orthogonal diffuse near-infrared light reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abookasis, David; Shochat, Ariel; Mathews, Marlon S.

    2013-04-01

    The authors' aim is to assess and quantitatively measure brain hemodynamic and morphological variations during closed-head injury (CHI) in mice using orthogonal diffuse near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (o-DRS). CHI is a type of injury to the head that does not penetrate the skull. Usually, it is caused by mechanical blows to the head and frequently occurs in traffic accidents, falls, and assaults. Measurements of brain optical properties, namely absorption and reduced scattering coefficients in the wavelength range from 650 to 1000 nm were carried out by employing different source-detector distance and locations to provide depth sensitivity on an intact scalp over the duration of the whole experiment. Furthermore, alteration in both cortical hemodynamics and morphologic markers, i.e., scattering power and amplitude properties were derived. CHI was induced in anesthetized male mice by a weight-drop model using ˜50 g cylindrical metal falling from a height of 90 cm onto the intact scalp producing an impact of 4500 g cm. With respect to baseline, difference in brain physiological properties was observed following injury up to 1 h post-trauma. Additionally, the reduced scattering spectral shapes followed Mie scattering theory was quantified and clearly shows changes in both scattering amplitude and power from baseline indicating structural variations likely from evolving cerebral edema during CHI. We further demonstrate high correlation between scattering amplitude and scattering power, with more than 20% difference in slope in comparison to preinjury. This result indicates the possibility of using the slope also as a marker for detection of structural changes. Finally, experiments investigating brain function during the first 20 min postinjury were conducted and changes in chromophore concentrations and scattering were observed. Overall, our experiments demonstrate the potential of using the proposed technique as a valuable quantitative noninvasive tool for

  11. Lifetime Prevalence and Factors Associated with Head Injury among Older People in Low and Middle Income Countries: A 10/66 Study

    PubMed Central

    Khan, A.; Prince, M.; Brayne, C.; Prina, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a growing public health problem around the world, yet there is little information on the prevalence of head injury in low and middle income countries (LMICs). We utilised data collected by the 10/66 research group to investigate the lifetime prevalence of head injury in defined sites in low and middle income countries, its risk factors and its relationship with disability. Methods We analysed data from one-phase cross-sectional surveys of all residents aged 65 years and older (n = 16430) distributed across twelve sites in eight low and middle income countries (China, Cuba, Dominican Republic, India, Venezuela, Mexico, Peru, and Puerto Rico). Self-reported cases of head injury with loss of consciousness were identified during the interview. A sensitivity analysis including data provided by informants of people with dementia was also used to estimate the impact of this information on the estimates. Prevalence ratios (PR) from Poisson regressions were used to identify associated risk factors. Results The standardised lifetime prevalence of TBI ranged from 0.3% in China to 14.6% in rural Mexico and Venezuela. Being male (PR: 1.6, 95% CI: 1.29–1.82), younger (PR: 0.95, 95% CI: 0.92–0.99), with lower education (PR 0.91, 95% CI: 0.86–0.96), and having fewer assets (PR 0.92, 95% CI: 0.88–0.96), was associated with a higher prevalence of TBI when pooling estimates across sites. Discussion Our analysis revealed that the prevalence of TBI in LMICs is similar to that of developed nations. Considering the growing impact of TBI on health resources in these countries, there is an urgent need for further research. PMID:26146992

  12. Found in translation: understanding the biology and behavior of experimental traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Bondi, Corina O.; Semple, Bridgette D.; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J.; Osier, Nicole D.; Carlson, Shaun W.; Dixon, C. Edward; Giza, Christopher C.; Kline, Anthony E.

    2014-01-01

    BONDI, C.O., B.D. Semple, L.J. Noble-Haeusslein, N.D. Osier, S.W. Carlson, C.E. Dixon, C.C. Giza and A.E. Kline. Found in translation: understanding the biology and behavior of experimental traumatic brain injury. NEUROSCI BIOBEHAV REV. The aim of this review is to discuss in greater detail the topics covered in the recent symposium entitled “Traumatic brain injury: laboratory and clinical perspectives,” presented at the 2014 International Behavioral Neuroscience Society annual meeting. Herein we review contemporary laboratory models of traumatic brain injury (TBI) including common assays for sensorimotor and cognitive behavior. New modalities to evaluate social behavior after injury to the developing brain, as well as the attentional set-shifting test (AST) as a measure of executive function in TBI, will be highlighted. Environmental enrichment (EE) will be discussed as a preclinical model of neurorehabilitation, and finally, an evidence-based approach to sports-related concussion will be considered. The review consists predominantly of published data, but some discussion of ongoing or future directions is provided. PMID:25496906

  13. Connecting clinical and experimental investigations of awareness in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Dockree, Paul M; O'Connell, Redmond G; Robertson, Ian H

    2015-01-01

    Questionnaire-based demonstrations of impaired self-awareness (SA) after traumatic brain injury (TBI) are not always supported by experimental studies of in-the-moment or online awareness. This chapter begins by describing the clinical phenomenon of impaired SA, how it is measured, and why its interdependency with mechanisms of online awareness may provide the scaffolding from which appraisals of cognitive functioning can be accurately revised following a brain injury. We review research that has measured unawareness of errors in routine action in TBI patients and propose more rigorous methodological approaches to studying the emergent properties of awareness with greater clarity in the laboratory. We discuss how neuropsychological and electrophysiologic studies are beginning to inform our understanding of impaired error processing in TBI patients and we highlight recent theory proposing that online metacognitive processes accumulate evidence of erroneous responses in a graded fashion. Neural signals with amplitudes that scale with the strength of accruing evidence and peak latencies that mark the threshold at which awareness emerges represent important neural mechanisms to examine the breakdown of error awareness after brain injury. We also discuss how errors can be investigated in relation to different sources of evidence that contribute to aware experiences after brain injury. Finally, we explore conditions beyond error signaling, and how different "objects of insight" that require retrospective and prospective judgments of confidence need to be examined in relation to the clinical phenomenon of impaired SA.

  14. Effect of TREM-1 blockade and single nucleotide variants in experimental renal injury and kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tammaro, A.; Kers, J.; Emal, D.; Stroo, I.; Teske, G. J. D.; Butter, L. M.; Claessen, N.; Damman, J.; Derive, M.; Navis, G.; Florquin, S.; Leemans, J. C.; Dessing, M. C.

    2016-01-01

    Renal ischemia reperfusion (IR)-injury induces activation of innate immune response which sustains renal injury and contributes to the development of delayed graft function (DGF). Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (TREM-1) is a pro-inflammatory evolutionary conserved pattern recognition receptor expressed on a variety of innate immune cells. TREM-1 expression increases following acute and chronic renal injury. However, the function of TREM-1 in renal IR is still unclear. Here, we investigated expression and function of TREM-1 in a murine model of renal IR using different TREM-1 inhibitors: LP17, LR12 and TREM-1 fusion protein. In a human study, we analyzed the association of non-synonymous single nucleotide variants in the TREM1 gene in a cohort comprising 1263 matching donors and recipients with post-transplant outcomes, including DGF. Our findings demonstrated that, following murine IR, renal TREM-1 expression increased due to the influx of Trem1 mRNA expressing cells detected by in situ hybridization. However, TREM-1 interventions by means of LP17, LR12 and TREM-1 fusion protein did not ameliorate IR-induced injury. In the human renal transplant cohort, donor and recipient TREM1 gene variant p.Thr25Ser was not associated with DGF, nor with biopsy-proven rejection or death-censored graft failure. We conclude that TREM-1 does not play a major role during experimental renal IR and after kidney transplantation. PMID:27928159

  15. Impact of an Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist and Erythropoietin on Experimental Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Grothusen, Christina; Hagemann, Angelika; Attmann, Tim; Braesen, Jan; Broch, Ole; Cremer, Jochen; Schoettler, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Background. Revascularization of infarcted myocardium results in release of inflammatory cytokines mediating myocardial reperfusion injury and heart failure. Blockage of inflammatory pathways dampens myocardial injury and reduces infarct size. We compared the impact of the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist Anakinra and erythropoietin on myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. In contrast to others, we hypothesized that drug administration prior to reperfusion reduces myocardial damage. Methods and Results. 12–15 week-old Lewis rats were subjected to myocardial ischemia by a 1 hr occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery. After 15 min of ischemia, a single shot of Anakinra (2 mg/kg body weight (bw)) or erythropoietin (5000 IE/kg bw) was administered intravenously. In contrast to erythropoietin, Anakinra decreased infarct size (P < 0.05, N = 4/group) and troponin T levels (P < 0.05, N = 4/group). Conclusion. One-time intravenous administration of Anakinra prior to myocardial reperfusion reduces infarct size in experimental ischemia/reperfusion injury. Thus, Anakinra may represent a treatment option in myocardial infarction prior to revascularization. PMID:22649318

  16. Finger injuries caused by power-operated windows of motor vehicles: an experimental cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Hohendorff, B; Weidermann, C; Pollinger, P; Burkhart, K J; Konerding, M A; Prommersberger, K J; Rommens, P M

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this experimental cadaver study was to investigate which kinds of lesions could occur in jam events between the glass and seal entry of power-operated motor vehicle side door windows at two different closing forces. Ten hands of fresh cadaver specimens were used. Three different hand positions chosen to simulate real events in which a finger is jammed between the glass and seal entry of the window of a current motor vehicle were examined. The index, middle, ring, and little finger of each hand were separately jammed both at the proximal and distal interphalangeal joint at closing forces of 300 and 500 N with a constant window glass closing speed of 10 cm/s. Macroscopically visible injuries were documented and radiographs of all fingers were obtained in two standard planes. At a closing force of 300 N, contusion marks of the skin, palmar joint instabilities and superficial skin lesions occurred, whilst at 500 N superficial skin lesions, superficial and deep open crush injuries, and fractures were observed. The results of this study experimentally demonstrate the kinds of finger injuries that could be expected in real jam events between the glass and seal entry in automatic power-operated windows.

  17. Experimental study of playback giant magnetic resonance head nonlinearity in perpendicular recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, P.; Stoev, K.; Liu, F.; Vadde, A.; Gibbons, M.; Lederman, M.; Re, M.

    2003-05-01

    In this article, nonlinear distortions of the playback giant magnetic resonance (GMR) sensor in perpendicular recording are characterized in both time and frequency domains. We use three perpendicular media with different Mrt (0.46, 0.6, and 0.8 emu/cm2) and two groups of similar magnetic-read width (MRW) but different junction type [contiguous junction (CJ) and lead-over-lay (LOL)] GMR heads. Square-wave patterns at moderate densities are recorded to minimize NLTS, partial erasure, and transition broadening effects. Both time- and frequency-domain measurements indicate that the LOL-type GMR heads show playback nonlinearity (7%-23%), while the CJ-type GMR heads do not. Micromagnetic simulation is utilized to understand the hard bias field with different junction designs. The result indicates that the hard bias (HB) field in LOL type (HB field ˜6.9 Oe) at the air bearing surface (ABS) and stripe center is much lower than that in CJ type (HB field ˜54.0 Oe). Therefore, the free layer with large HB-HB distance will be more susceptible to saturation.

  18. Resolvin D1 protects against inflammation in experimental acute pancreatitis and associated lung injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Zhou, Dan; Long, Fei-Wu; Chen, Ke-Ling; Yang, Hong-Wei; Lv, Zhao-Yin; Zhou, Bin; Peng, Zhi-Hai; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Li, Yuan; Zhou, Zong-Guang

    2016-03-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory condition that may lead to multisystemic organ failure with considerable mortality. Recently, resolvin D1 (RvD1) as an endogenous anti-inflammatory lipid mediator has been confirmed to protect against many inflammatory diseases. This study was designed to investigate the effects of RvD1 in acute pancreatitis and associated lung injury. Acute pancreatitis varying from mild to severe was induced by cerulein or cerulein combined with LPS, respectively. Mice were pretreated with RvD1 at a dose of 300 ng/mouse 30 min before the first injection of cerulein. Severity of AP was assessed by biochemical markers and histology. Serum cytokines and myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels in pancreas and lung were determined for assessing the extent of inflammatory response. NF-κB activation was determined by Western blotting. The injection of cerulein or cerulein combined with LPS resulted in local injury in the pancreas and corresponding systemic inflammatory changes with pronounced severity in the cerulein and LPS group. Pretreated RvD1 significantly reduced the degree of amylase, lipase, TNF-α, and IL-6 serum levels; the MPO activities in the pancreas and the lungs; the pancreatic NF-κB activation; and the severity of pancreatic injury and associated lung injury, especially in the severe acute pancreatitis model. These results suggest that RvD1 is capable of improving injury of pancreas and lung and exerting anti-inflammatory effects through the inhibition of NF-κB activation in experimental acute pancreatitis, with more notable protective effect in severe acute pancreatitis. These findings indicate that RvD1 may constitute a novel therapeutic strategy in the management of severe acute pancreatitis.

  19. The role and modulation of autophagy in experimental models of myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen-Scarabelli, Carol; Agrawal, Pratik R.; Saravolatz, Louis; Abuniat, Cadigia; Scarabelli, Gabriele; Stephanou, Anastasis; Loomba, Leena; Narula, Jagat; Scarabelli, Tiziano M.; Knight, Richard

    2014-01-01

    A physiological sequence called autophagy qualitatively determines cellular viability by removing protein aggregates and damaged cytoplasmic constituents, and contributes significantly to the degree of myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. This tightly orchestrated catabolic cellular ‘housekeeping’ process provides cells with a new source of energy to adapt to stressful conditions. This process was first described as a pro-survival mechanism, but increasing evidence suggests that it can also lead to the demise of the cell. Autophagy has been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple cardiac conditions including myocardial I/R injury. However, a debate persists as to whether autophagy acts as a protective mechanism or contributes to the injurious effects of I/R injury in the heart. This controversy may stem from several factors including the variability in the experimental models and species, and the methodology used to assess autophagy. This review provides updated knowledge on the modulation and role of autophagy in isolated cardiac cells subjected to I/R, and the growing interest towards manipulating autophagy to increase the survival of cardiac myocytes under conditions of stress-most notably being I/R injury. Perturbation of this evolutionarily conserved intracellular cleansing autophagy mechanism, by targeted modulation through, among others, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) modulators, calcium lowering agents, resveratrol, longevinex, sirtuin activators, the proapoptotic gene Bnip3, IP3 and lysosome inhibitors, may confer resistance to heart cells against I/R induced cell death. Thus, therapeutic manipulation of autophagy in the challenged myocardium may benefit post-infarction cardiac healing and remodeling. PMID:25593583

  20. Establishment and evaluation of an experimental rat model for high-altitude intestinal barrier injury

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Han; Zhou, Dai-Jun; Chen, Zhang; Zhou, Qi-Quan; Wu, Kui; Tian, Kun; Li, Zhi-Wei; Xiao, Zhen-Liang

    2017-01-01

    In the present study an experimental high-altitude intestinal barrier injury rat model was established by simulating an acute hypoxia environment, to provide an experimental basis to assess the pathogenesis, prevention and treatment of altitude sickness. A total of 70 healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two groups: Control group (group C) and a high-altitude hypoxia group (group H). Following 2 days adaptation, the rats in group H were exposed to a simulated 4,000-m, high-altitude hypoxia environment for 3 days to establish the experimental model. To evaluate the model, bacterial translocation, serum lipopolysaccharide level, pathomorphology, ultrastructure and protein expression in rats were assessed. The results indicate that, compared with group C, the rate of bacterial translocation and the apoptotic index of intestinal epithelial cells were significantly higher in group H (P<0.01). Using a light microscope it was determined that the intestinal mucosa was thinner in group H, there were fewer epithelial cells present and the morphology was irregular. Observations with an electron microscope indicated that the intestinal epithelial cells in group H were injured, the spaces among intestinal villi were wider, the tight junctions among cells were open and lanthanum nitrate granules (from the fixing solution) had diffused into the intestinal mesenchyme. The expression of the tight junction protein occludin was also decreased in group H. Therefore, the methods applied in the present study enabled the establishment of a stable, high-altitude intestinal barrier injury model in rats. PMID:28352318

  1. Effect of fucoidan extracted from mozuku on experimental cartilaginous tissue injury.

    PubMed

    Osaki, Tomohiro; Kitahara, Koudai; Okamoto, Yoshiharu; Imagawa, Tomohiro; Tsuka, Takeshi; Miki, Yasunari; Kawamoto, Hitoshi; Saimoto, Hiroyuki; Minami, Saburo

    2012-11-13

    We investigated the effect of fucoidan, a sulfated polysaccharide, on acceleration of healing of experimental cartilage injury in a rabbit model. An injured cartilage model was surgically created by introduction of three holes, one in the articular cartilage of the medial trochlea and two in the trochlear sulcus of the distal femur. Rabbits in three experimental groups (F groups) were orally administered fucoidan of seven different molecular weights (8, 50, 146, 239, 330, 400, or 1000 kD) for 3 weeks by screening. Control (C group) rabbits were provided water ad libitum. After the experimental period, macroscopic examination showed that the degree of filling in the fucoidan group was higher than that in the C group. Histologically, the holes were filled by collagen fiber and fibroblasts in the C group, and by chondroblasts and fibroblasts in the F groups. Image analysis of Alcian blue- and safranin O-stained F-group specimens showed increased production of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and proteoglycans (PGs), respectively. Some injured holes were well repaired both macroscopically and microscopically and were filled with cartilage tissues; cartilage matrices such as PGs and GAGs were produced in groups F 50, F 146, and F 239. Thus, fucoidan administration enhanced morphologically healing of cartilage injury.

  2. Diffuse neuronal perikaryal amyloid precursor protein immunoreactivity in an ovine model of non-accidental head injury (the shaken baby syndrome).

    PubMed

    Finnie, John W; Manavis, Jim; Blumbergs, Peter C

    2010-02-01

    Non-accidental head injury ("shaken baby syndrome") is a major cause of death and disability in infants and young children, but it is uncertain whether shaking alone is sufficient to cause brain damage or an additional head impact is required. Accordingly, we used manual shaking in an ovine model in an attempt to answer this question since lambs have a relatively large gyrencephalic brain and weak neck muscles resembling a human infant. Neuronal perikaryal and axonal reactions were quantified 6 hours after shaking using amyloid precursor protein (APP) immunohistochemistry. Neuronal perikaryal APP was widely distributed in the brain and spinal cord, the first time such a diffuse neuronal stress response after shaking has been demonstrated, but axonal immunoreactivity was minimal and largely confined to the rostral cervical spinal cord at the site of maximal loading. No ischaemic-hypoxic damage was found in haematoxylin and eosin-stained sections.

  3. Single Application of a CB1 Receptor Antagonist Rapidly Following Head Injury Prevents Long-Term Hyperexcitability in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Echegoyen, Julio; Armstrong, Caren; Morgan, Robert J.; Soltesz, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Effective prophylaxis for post-traumatic epilepsy currently does not exist, and clinical trials using anticonvulsant drugs have yielded no long-term antiepileptogenic effects. We report that a single, rapid post-traumatic application of the proconvulsant cannabinoid type-1 receptor antagonist SR141716A (Rimonabant-- Acomplia®) abolishes the long-term increase in seizure susceptibility caused by head injury in rats. These results indicate that, paradoxically, a seizure-enhancing drug may disrupt the epileptogenic process if applied within a short therapeutic time window. PMID:19369036

  4. Head kinematics during shaking associated with abusive head trauma.

    PubMed

    Lintern, T O; Puhulwelle Gamage, N T; Bloomfield, F H; Kelly, P; Finch, M C; Taberner, A J; Nash, M P; Nielsen, P M F

    2015-09-18

    Abusive head trauma (AHT) is a potentially fatal result of child abuse but the mechanisms of injury are controversial. To address the hypothesis that shaking alone is sufficient to elicit the injuries observed, effective computational and experimental models are necessary. This paper investigates the use of a coupled rigid-body computational modelling framework to reproduce in vivo shaking kinematics in AHT. A sagittal plane OpenSim computational model of a lamb was developed and used to interpret biomechanical data from in vivo shaking experiments. The acceleration of the head during shaking was used to provide in vivo validation of the associated computational model. Results of this study demonstrated that peak accelerations occurred when the head impacted the torso and produced acceleration magnitudes exceeding 200ms(-)(2). The computational model demonstrated good agreement with the experimental measurements and was shown to be able to reproduce the high accelerations that occur during impact. The biomechanical results obtained with the computational model demonstrate the utility of using a coupled rigid-body modelling framework to describe infant head kinematics in AHT.

  5. An experimental study on effects of pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate on ischemia-reperfusion injury in testis

    PubMed Central

    Kemahli, Eray; Yildiz, Mevlüt; Firat, Tülin; Özyalvaçli, Mehmet Emin; Üyetürk, Uğur; Yilmaz, Burak; Gücük, Adnan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this experimental study was to investigate the histopathological and biochemical effects of pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, an antioxidant and inhibitor of NF-kβ, on ischemiareperfusion injury in rats. Methods: A total of 21 male Wistar-Albino rats were randomly distributed into three groups as sham group (Group 1), ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) group (Group 2) and I/R with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) group (Group 3). Left testicles of rats in Groups 2 and 3 underwent testicular torsion of 720° for four hours and 100 mg/kg of PDTC was administered intraperitoneally prior to detorsion in Group 3. An hour after detorsion process, left orchiectomies were performed and 5 ml of intracardiac blood samples were drawn from rats in all three groups. Histopathological examination of testis tissues performed and measurement of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in blood samples were taken. Results: Elevated levels of MDA and decreased SOD activity, together with decreased Johnson tubular biopsy scores consistent with I/R injury were observed in Group 2 (p<0.05). Group 1 and Group 3 were similar in terms of MDA levels, SOD activity, and Johnson scores (p>0.05). Conclusions: Our results indicated that PDTC may have beneficial effects for alleviation of I/R injury in testicular tissue in rats. Understanding the underlying mechanisms and exploration of its diagnostic and therapeutic potential requires further randomized, controlled trials on a larger scale. PMID:27330576

  6. Voluntary Exercise Preconditioning Activates Multiple Antiapoptotic Mechanisms and Improves Neurological Recovery after Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zaorui; Sabirzhanov, Boris; Wu, Junfang; Faden, Alan I.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Physical activity can attenuate neuronal loss, reduce neuroinflammation, and facilitate recovery after brain injury. However, little is known about the mechanisms of exercise-induced neuroprotection after traumatic brain injury (TBI) or its modulation of post-traumatic neuronal cell death. Voluntary exercise, using a running wheel, was conducted for 4 weeks immediately preceding (preconditioning) moderate-level controlled cortical impact (CCI), a well-established experimental TBI model in mice. Compared to nonexercised controls, exercise preconditioning (pre-exercise) improved recovery of sensorimotor performance in the beam walk task, as well as cognitive/affective functions in the Morris water maze, novel object recognition, and tail-suspension tests. Further, pre-exercise reduced lesion size, attenuated neuronal loss in the hippocampus, cortex, and thalamus, and decreased microglial activation in the cortex. In addition, exercise preconditioning activated the brain-derived neurotrophic factor pathway before trauma and amplified the injury-dependent increase in heat shock protein 70 expression, thus attenuating key apoptotic pathways. The latter include reduction in CCI-induced up-regulation of proapoptotic B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)-homology 3–only Bcl-2 family molecules (Bid, Puma), decreased mitochondria permeabilization with attenuated release of cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), reduced AIF translocation to the nucleus, and attenuated caspase activation. Given these neuroprotective actions, voluntary physical exercise may serve to limit the consequences of TBI. PMID:25419789

  7. Biosensor for Hepatocellular Injury Corresponds to Experimental Scoring of Hepatosplenic Schistosomiasis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Sombetzki, Martina; Koslowski, Nicole; Doss, Sandra; Loebermann, Micha; Trauner, Michael; Reisinger, Emil C; Sauer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Severe hepatosplenic injury of mansonian schistosomiasis is caused by Th2 mediated granulomatous response against parasite eggs entrapped within the periportal tissue. Subsequent fibrotic scarring and deformation/sclerosing of intrahepatic portal veins lead to portal hypertension, ascites, and oesophageal varices. The murine model of Schistosoma mansoni (S. mansoni) infection is suitable to establish the severe hepatosplenic injury of disease within a reasonable time scale for the development of novel antifibrotic or anti-infective strategies against S. mansoni infection. The drawback of the murine model is that the material prepared for complex analysis of egg burden, granuloma size, hepatic inflammation, and fibrosis is limited due to small amounts of liver tissue and blood samples. The objective of our study was the implementation of a macroscopic scoring system for mice livers to determine infection-related organ alterations of S. mansoni infection. In addition, an in vitro biosensor system based on the detection of hepatocellular injury in HepG2/C3A cells following incubation with serum of moderately (50 S. mansoni cercariae) and heavily (100 S. mansoni cercariae) infected mice affirmed the value of our scoring system. Therefore, our score represents a valuable tool in experimental schistosomiasis to assess severity of hepatosplenic schistosomiasis and reduce animal numbers by saving precious tissue samples.

  8. EFFECT OF USE OF BONE-MARROW CENTRIFUGATE ON MUSCLE INJURY TREATMENT: EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON RABBITS

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Daniel Ferreira Fernandes; Guarniero, Roberto; Vaz, Carlos Eduardo Sanches; de Santana, Paulo José

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of bone-marrow centrifugate on the healing of muscle injuries in rabbits. Methods: This experimental study involved use of fifteen adult male New Zealand White rabbits. Each animal received a transverse lesion in the middle of the right tibialis anterior muscle, to which an absorbable collagen sponge, soaked in a centrifugate of bone marrow aspirate from the ipsilateral iliac bone, was added. The left hind limb was used as a control and underwent the same injury, but in this case only the absorbable collagen sponge. Thirty days later, the animals were sacrificed to study the muscle healing. These muscle areas were subjected to histological analysis with histomorphometry, with the aim of measuring the number of muscle cells per square micrometer undergoing regeneration and the proportion of resultant fibrosis. Results: The centrifugation method used in this study resulted in an average concentration of nucleated cells greater than the number of these cells in original aspirates, without causing significant cell destruction. Addition of the bone marrow centrifugate did not result in any significant increase in the number of muscle cells undergoing regeneration, in relation to the control group. There was also no significant difference in the proportion of resultant fibrosis, compared with the control group. Conclusion: Administration of the bone marrow centrifugate used in this study did not favor healing of muscle injuries in rabbits. PMID:27047832

  9. Voluntary Exercise Preconditioning Activates Multiple Antiapoptotic Mechanisms and Improves Neurological Recovery after Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zaorui; Sabirzhanov, Boris; Wu, Junfang; Faden, Alan I; Stoica, Bogdan A

    2015-09-01

    Physical activity can attenuate neuronal loss, reduce neuroinflammation, and facilitate recovery after brain injury. However, little is known about the mechanisms of exercise-induced neuroprotection after traumatic brain injury (TBI) or its modulation of post-traumatic neuronal cell death. Voluntary exercise, using a running wheel, was conducted for 4 weeks immediately preceding (preconditioning) moderate-level controlled cortical impact (CCI), a well-established experimental TBI model in mice. Compared to nonexercised controls, exercise preconditioning (pre-exercise) improved recovery of sensorimotor performance in the beam walk task, as well as cognitive/affective functions in the Morris water maze, novel object recognition, and tail-suspension tests. Further, pre-exercise reduced lesion size, attenuated neuronal loss in the hippocampus, cortex, and thalamus, and decreased microglial activation in the cortex. In addition, exercise preconditioning activated the brain-derived neurotrophic factor pathway before trauma and amplified the injury-dependent increase in heat shock protein 70 expression, thus attenuating key apoptotic pathways. The latter include reduction in CCI-induced up-regulation of proapoptotic B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)-homology 3-only Bcl-2 family molecules (Bid, Puma), decreased mitochondria permeabilization with attenuated release of cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), reduced AIF translocation to the nucleus, and attenuated caspase activation. Given these neuroprotective actions, voluntary physical exercise may serve to limit the consequences of TBI.

  10. Mediators' Emotional Responses to Self-Injurious Behavior: An Experimental Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mossman, Dominique A.; Hastings, Richard P.; Brown, Tony

    2002-01-01

    Sixty mediators from British schools for children with mental retardation watched one of five matched videos depicting no self-injury, self-injury maintained by positive reinforcement, self-injury maintained by negative reinforcement, and self-injury unrelated to social events. Self-injury maintained by negative reinforcement was associated with…

  11. Improved recovery and delayed cytokine induction after closed head injury in mice with central overexpression of the secreted isoform of the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Tehranian, Roya; Andell-Jonsson, Siv; Beni, Sara M; Yatsiv, Ido; Shohami, Esther; Bartfai, Tamas; Lundkvist, Johan; Iverfeldt, Kerstin

    2002-08-01

    The acute inflammatory response following traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been shown to play an important role in the development of secondary tissue damage. The proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha), are induced early after brain injury and have been implicated in the delayed damage. The IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) has been shown to modulate the proinflammatory cytokine cascade by blocking the binding of IL-1 to its signaling receptor. In this study, we investigated the effect of transgenic overexpression of IL-1ra on the cytokine expression and neurological damage in a closed head injury (CHI) model of TBI. The neurological recovery, as analyzed by neurological severity score (NSS), was significantly higher in transgenic mice overexpressing the human secreted form of IL-1ra in astrocytes, directed by the murine glial fibrillary acidic protein promoter, as compared to wild-type mice. Analysis of tissue levels of cytokines by ELISA showed increased levels of TNFalpha in the cerebral cortex from the wild type mice 1 h after injury. After 4 h significant increases in the levels of IL-1beta and IL-6 were observed in the wild type mice. In the transgenic mice, on the other hand, no effect on TNFalpha levels was observed and no significant increases in IL-1beta and IL-6 levels could be detected until 6 h after injury. Thus, it can be concluded that blockage of IL-1 signaling by elevated levels of IL-1ra has a neuroprotective effect, in agreement with previous reports, and that central overexpression of IL-1ra results in delayed proinflammatory cytokine induction and improved neurological recovery after traumatic brain injury.

  12. HEAD INJURY ASSESSMENT IN JUVENILE CHINOOK USING THE ALPHA II-SPECTRIN BIOMARKER: EFFECTS OF PRESSURE CHANGES AND PASSAGE THROUGH A REMOVABLE SPILLWAY WEIR

    SciTech Connect

    Jonason, C.; Miracle, A.

    2009-01-01

    The cytoskeletal protein alpha II-spectrin has specifi c neurodegenerative mechanisms that allow the necrotic (injury-induced) and apoptotic (non-injury-induced) pathways of proteolysis to be differentiated in an immunoblot. Consequently, αII-spectrin breakdown products (SBDPs) are potential biomarkers for diagnosing traumatic brain injury (TBI). The purpose of the following investigation, consisting of two studies, was to evaluate the utility of the spectrin biomarker in diagnosing TBI in fi sh that travel through hydroelectric dams in the Columbia and Snake Rivers. The fi rst study used hyperbaric pressure chambers to simulate the pressure changes that affect fi sh during passage through a Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Kaplan turbine. The second study tested the effect of a removable spillway weir (RSW) on the passage of juvenile chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). This study was conducted in tandem with a balloon-tag study by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Brain samples from fi sh were collected and analyzed using an immunoblot for SBDPs, and imaging software was used to quantify the protein band density and determine the ratio of cleaved protein to total protein. The biomarker analyses found higher SBDP expression levels in fi sh that were exposed to lower pressure nadirs and fi sh that passed through the RSW at a deep orientation. In general, the incidence of injuries observed after treatment positively correlated with expression levels, suggesting that the biomarker method of analysis is comparable to traditional methods of injury assessment. It was also found that, for some treatments, the 110 kDa spectrin fragment (SBDP 110) correlated more strongly with necrotic head injury incidence and mortality rates than did the total cleaved protein or the 120 kDa fragment. These studies will be informative in future decisions regarding the design of turbines and fi sh passage structures in hydroelectric dams and will hopefully contribute to the

  13. Blockade of acute microglial activation by minocycline promotes neuroprotection and reduces locomotor hyperactivity after closed head injury in mice: a twelve-week follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Homsi, Shadi; Piaggio, Tomaso; Croci, Nicole; Noble, Florence; Plotkine, Michel; Marchand-Leroux, Catherine; Jafarian-Tehrani, Mehrnaz

    2010-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes a wide spectrum of consequences, such as microglial activation, cerebral inflammation, and focal and diffuse brain injury, as well as functional impairment. In this study we aimed to investigate the effects of acute treatment with minocycline as an inhibitor of microglial activation on cerebral focal and diffuse lesions, and on the spontaneous locomotor activity following TBI. The weight-drop model was used to induce TBI in mice. Microglial activation and diffuse axonal injury (DAI) were detected by immunohistochemistry using CD11b and ss-amyloid precursor protein (ss-APP) immunolabeling, respectively. Focal injury was determined by the measurement of the brain lesion volume. Horizontal and vertical locomotor activities were measured for up to 12 weeks post-injury by an automated actimeter. Minocycline or vehicle were administered three times post-insult, at 5 min (90 mg/kg i.p.), 3 h, and 9 h post-TBI (45 mg/kg i.p.). Minocycline treatment attenuated microglial activation by 59% and reduced brain lesion volume by 58%, yet it did not affect DAI at 24 h post-TBI. More interestingly, minocycline significantly decreased TBI-induced locomotor hyperactivity at 48 h post-TBI, and its effect lasted for up to 8 weeks. Taken together, the results indicate that microglial activation appears to play an important role in the development of TBI-induced focal injury and the subsequent locomotor hyperactivity, and its short-term inhibition provides long-lasting functional recovery after TBI. These findings emphasize the fact that minocycline could be a promising new therapeutic strategy for head-injured patients.

  14. Defining the biomechanical and biological threshold of murine mild traumatic brain injury using CHIMERA (Closed Head Impact Model of Engineered Rotational Acceleration).

    PubMed

    Namjoshi, Dhananjay R; Cheng, Wai Hang; Bashir, Asma; Wilkinson, Anna; Stukas, Sophie; Martens, Kris M; Whyte, Tom; Abebe, Zelalem A; McInnes, Kurt A; Cripton, Peter A; Wellington, Cheryl L

    2017-03-05

    CHIMERA (Closed Head Impact Model of Engineered Rotational Acceleration) is a recently described animal model of traumatic brain injury (TBI) that primarily produces diffuse axonal injury (DAI) characterized by white matter inflammation and axonal damage. CHIMERA was specifically designed to reliably generate a variety of TBI severities using precise and quantifiable biomechanical inputs in a nonsurgical user-friendly platform. The objective of this study was to define the lower limit of single impact mild TBI (mTBI) using CHIMERA by characterizing the dose-response relationship between biomechanical input and neurological, behavioral, neuropathological and biochemical outcomes. Wild-type male mice were subjected to a single CHIMERA TBI using six impact energies ranging from 0.1 to 0.7J, and post-TBI outcomes were assessed over an acute period of 14days. Here we report that single TBI using CHIMERA induces injury dose- and time-dependent changes in behavioral and neurological deficits, axonal damage, white matter tract microgliosis and astrogliosis. Impact energies of 0.4J or below produced no significant phenotype (subthreshold), 0.5J led to significant changes for one or more phenotypes (threshold), and 0.6 and 0.7J resulted in significant changes in all outcomes assessed (mTBI). We further show that linear head kinematics are the most robust predictors of duration of unconsciousness, severity of neurological deficits, white matter injury, and microgliosis following single TBI. Our data extend the validation of CHIMERA as a biofidelic animal model of DAI and establish working parameters to guide future investigations of the mechanisms underlying axonal pathology and inflammation induced by mechanical trauma.

  15. Head Trauma with or without Mild Brain Injury Increases the Risk of Future Traumatic Death: A Controlled Prospective 15-Year Follow-Up Study.

    PubMed

    Vaaramo, Kalle; Puljula, Jussi; Tetri, Sami; Juvela, Seppo; Hillbom, Matti

    2015-10-15

    Patients who have recovered from traumatic brain injury (TBI) show an increased risk of premature death. To investigate long-term mortality rates in a population admitted to the hospital for head injury (HI), we conducted a population-based prospective case-control, record-linkage study, All subjects who were living in Northern Ostrobothnia, and who were admitted to Oulu University Hospital in 1999 because of HI (n=737), and 2196 controls matched by age, gender, and residence randomly drawn from the population of Northern Ostrobothnia were included. Death rate and causes of death in HI subjects during 15 years of follow-up was compared with the general population controls. The crude mortality rates were 56.9, 18.6, and 23.8% for subjects having moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), mild TBI, and head injury without TBI, respectively. The corresponding approximate annual mortality rates were 6.7%, 1.4%, and 1.9%. All types of index HI predicted a significant risk of traumatic death in the future. Subjects who had HI without TBI had an increased risk of both death from all causes (hazard ratio 2.00; 95% confidence interval 1.57-2.55) and intentional or unintentional traumatic death (4.01, 2.20-7.30), compared with controls. The main founding was that even HI without TBI carries an increased risk of future traumatic death. The reason for this remains unknown and further studies are needed. To prevent such premature deaths, post-traumatic therapy should include an interview focusing on lifestyle factors.

  16. Experimental evaluation of neural probe’s insertion induced injury based on digital image correlation method

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wenguang Ma, Yakun; Li, Zhengwei

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: The application of neural probes in clinic has been challenged by probes’ short lifetime when implanted into brain tissue. The primary goal is to develop an evaluation system for testing brain tissue injury induced by neural probe’s insertion using microscope based digital image correlation method. Methods: A brain tissue phantom made of silicone rubber with speckle pattern on its surface was fabricated. To obtain the optimal speckle pattern, mean intensity gradient parameter was used for quality assessment. The designed testing system consists of three modules: (a) load module for simulating neural electrode implantation process; (b) data acquisition module to capture micrographs of speckle pattern and to obtain reactive forces during the insertion of the probe; (c) postprocessing module for extracting tissue deformation information from the captured speckle patterns. On the basis of the evaluation system, the effects of probe wedge angle, insertion speed, and probe streamline on insertion induced tissue injury were investigated. Results: The optimal quality speckle pattern can be attained by the following fabrication parameters: spin coating rate—1000 r/min, silicone rubber component A: silicone rubber component B: softener: graphite = 5 ml: 5 ml: 2 ml: 0.6 g. The probe wedge angle has a significant effect on tissue injury. Compared to wedge angle 40° and 20°, maximum principal strain of 60° wedge angle was increased by 40.3% and 87.5%, respectively; compared with a relatively higher speed (500 μm/s), the maximum principle strain within the tissue induced by slow insertion speed (100 μm/s) was increased by 14.3%; insertion force required by probe with convex streamline was smaller than the force of traditional probe. Based on the experimental results, a novel neural probe that has a rounded tip covered by a biodegradable silk protein coating with convex streamline was proposed, which has both lower insertion and micromotion induced tissue

  17. Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) happens when a bump, blow, jolt, or other head injury causes damage to the brain. Every year, millions of people in the U.S. suffer brain injuries. More than half are bad enough that ...

  18. Comparative toxicity of oxygenated monoterpenoids in experimental hydroalcoholic lotions to permethrin-resistant adult head lice.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Audino, Paola; Picollo, María Inés; Gallardo, Anabella; Toloza, Ariel; Vassena, Claudia; Mougabure-Cueto, Gastón

    2011-07-01

    The use of botanical compounds such as essential oils has recently become the subject of great interest as a natural means of pest control because of their ovicidal, larvicidal, or adulticidal activity against various insect species including head lice. We tested and compared the efficacy of pure oxygenated monoterpenoids that are main ingredients of essential oils of good biological activity. We used pulegone and citral, components of Aloysia citrodora, and geraniol, citronellol, and linalool, components of Geranium sp. oil. We found that citronellol and geraniol showed the highest knockdown and mortality effect (>60%) on adults of both sexes (50:50%) and third-stage nymphs. Pulegone, linalool, and citral showed knockdown percentages between 42 and 55%, and mortality percentages between 47 and 53%. A simple linear regression analysis showed statistically significant relationships between the studied toxic effects and viscosity of the monoterpenoids (p < 0.05), but not with their partition coefficient (log P).

  19. Lizard tail spinal cord: a new experimental model of spinal cord injury without limb paralysis.

    PubMed

    Szarek, Dariusz; Marycz, Krzysztof; Lis, Anna; Zawada, Zbigniew; Tabakow, Paweł; Laska, Jadwiga; Jarmundowicz, Włodzimierz

    2016-04-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a well-known devastating lesion that sadly is very resistant to all treatment attempts. This fact has stimulated the exploration of multiple regenerative strategies that are examined at both the basic and clinical level. For laboratory research, differentin vivomodels are used, but each has many important limitations. The main limitation of these models is the high level of animal suffering related to the inflicted neurologic injury. It has caused a growing tendency to limit the injury, but this, in turn, produces incomplete SCI models and uncertainties in the neuroregeneration interpretation. To overcome such limitations, a new experimental SCI model is proposed. Geckos have been extensively examined as a potential animal model of SCI. Their spinal cord extends into the tail and can be transected without causing the typical neurologic consequences observed in rat models. In this study, we compared the gecko tail SCI model with the rat model of thoracic SCI. Anatomic and histologic analyses showed comparability between the gecko and rat in diameter of spinal canal and spinal cord, as well as applicability of multiple staining techniques (hematoxylin and eosin, immunostaining, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy). We tested the suitability ofin vivostudy with 3 prototype implants for the reconstruction of SCI: a multichannel sponge, a multilaminar tube, and a gel cylinder. These were compared with a spinal cord excision (control). A 20-wk observation revealed no adverse effects of SCI on the animals' well-being. The animals were easily housed and observed. Histologic analysis showed growth of nervous tissue elements on implant surface and implant cellular colonization. The study showed that the gecko SCI model can be used as a primary model for the assessment of SCI treatment methods. It provides a platform for testing multiple solutions with limited animal suffering before performing tests on mammals. Detailed results of

  20. Experimental Models of Status Epilepticus and Neuronal Injury for Evaluation of Therapeutic Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Doodipala Samba; Kuruba, Ramkumar

    2013-01-01

    This article describes current experimental models of status epilepticus (SE) and neuronal injury for use in the screening of new therapeutic agents. Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures. SE is an emergency condition associated with continuous seizures lasting more than 30 min. It causes significant mortality and morbidity. SE can cause devastating damage to the brain leading to cognitive impairment and increased risk of epilepsy. Benzodiazepines are the first-line drugs for the treatment of SE, however, many people exhibit partial or complete resistance due to a breakdown of GABA inhibition. Therefore, new drugs with neuroprotective effects against the SE-induced neuronal injury and degeneration are desirable. Animal models are used to study the pathophysiology of SE and for the discovery of newer anticonvulsants. In SE paradigms, seizures are induced in rodents by chemical agents or by electrical stimulation of brain structures. Electrical stimulation includes perforant path and self-sustaining stimulation models. Pharmacological models include kainic acid, pilocarpine, flurothyl, organophosphates and other convulsants that induce SE in rodents. Neuronal injury occurs within the initial SE episode, and animals exhibit cognitive dysfunction and spontaneous seizures several weeks after this precipitating event. Current SE models have potential applications but have some limitations. In general, the experimental SE model should be analogous to the human seizure state and it should share very similar neuropathological mechanisms. The pilocarpine and diisopropylfluorophosphate models are associated with prolonged, diazepam-insensitive seizures and neurodegeneration and therefore represent paradigms of refractory SE. Novel mechanism-based or clinically relevant models are essential to identify new therapies for SE and neuroprotective interventions. PMID:24013377

  1. Multiparametric, Longitudinal Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging Reveals Acute Injury and Chronic Recovery in Experimental Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Mandeville, Emiri T.; Can, Anil; Blasi, Francesco; Climov, Mihail; Daneshmand, Ali; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Yu, Esther; Radhakrishnan, Harsha; Lo, Eng H.; Sakadžić, Sava; Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina; Ayata, Cenk

    2013-01-01

    Progress in experimental stroke and translational medicine could be accelerated by high-resolution in vivo imaging of disease progression in the mouse cortex. Here, we introduce optical microscopic methods that monitor brain injury progression using intrinsic optical scattering properties of cortical tissue. A multi-parametric Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) platform for longitudinal imaging of ischemic stroke in mice, through thinned-skull, reinforced cranial window surgical preparations, is described. In the acute stages, the spatiotemporal interplay between hemodynamics and cell viability, a key determinant of pathogenesis, was imaged. In acute stroke, microscopic biomarkers for eventual infarction, including capillary non-perfusion, cerebral blood flow deficiency, altered cellular scattering, and impaired autoregulation of cerebral blood flow, were quantified and correlated with histology. Additionally, longitudinal microscopy revealed remodeling and flow recovery after one week of chronic stroke. Intrinsic scattering properties serve as reporters of acute cellular and vascular injury and recovery in experimental stroke. Multi-parametric OCT represents a robust in vivo imaging platform to comprehensively investigate these properties. PMID:23940761

  2. Multiparametric, longitudinal optical coherence tomography imaging reveals acute injury and chronic recovery in experimental ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Vivek J; Mandeville, Emiri T; Can, Anil; Blasi, Francesco; Climov, Mihail; Daneshmand, Ali; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Yu, Esther; Radhakrishnan, Harsha; Lo, Eng H; Sakadžić, Sava; Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina; Ayata, Cenk

    2013-01-01

    Progress in experimental stroke and translational medicine could be accelerated by high-resolution in vivo imaging of disease progression in the mouse cortex. Here, we introduce optical microscopic methods that monitor brain injury progression using intrinsic optical scattering properties of cortical tissue. A multi-parametric Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) platform for longitudinal imaging of ischemic stroke in mice, through thinned-skull, reinforced cranial window surgical preparations, is described. In the acute stages, the spatiotemporal interplay between hemodynamics and cell viability, a key determinant of pathogenesis, was imaged. In acute stroke, microscopic biomarkers for eventual infarction, including capillary non-perfusion, cerebral blood flow deficiency, altered cellular scattering, and impaired autoregulation of cerebral blood flow, were quantified and correlated with histology. Additionally, longitudinal microscopy revealed remodeling and flow recovery after one week of chronic stroke. Intrinsic scattering properties serve as reporters of acute cellular and vascular injury and recovery in experimental stroke. Multi-parametric OCT represents a robust in vivo imaging platform to comprehensively investigate these properties.

  3. Strain relief from the cerebral ventricles during head impact: experimental studies on natural protection of the brain.

    PubMed

    Ivarsson, J; Viano, D C; Lövsund, P; Aldman, B

    2000-02-01

    Physical models of the parasagittal human skull/brain have been tested to investigate whether the cerebral ventricles provide natural protection of the brain by relieving strain during head rotation. A sophisticated model included anatomical structures, and a semicircular model consisted of a cylinder divided into two semicircles. Silicone gel simulated the brain and was detached from the vessel by a layer of liquid paraffin simulating the cerebrospinal fluid. Both models were run with and without an elliptical inclusion filled with liquid paraffin simulating a cerebral ventricle. The 2D models were exposed to angular acceleration by a pendulum impact causing 7600 rad/s2 peak rotational acceleration with 6 ms pulse duration. After rotating 100 degrees, the models were decelerated during 30 ms. The trajectory of grid markers was analyzed from high-speed video (1000 frames/s). Rigid-body displacement, shear strain and principal strain were determined from the displacement of three-point sets inferior and superior to the ventricle. For the subventricular (inferior) region in the sophisticated model, approximately 40% lower peak strain values were obtained in the model with ventricle than in the one without. Subcortical displacement was reduced by 12%. Corresponding strain reduction in the subcortical (superior) region was approximately 40% following the acceleration and 25% following the deceleration. Similar but less pronounced effects were found for the semicircular model. The lateral ventricles play an important role as strain relievers and provide natural protection against brain injury.

  4. Integrated Experimental Platforms to Study Blast Injuries: a Bottom-Up Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Chiara

    2013-06-01

    Developing a cellular and molecular understanding of the nature of traumatic and post-traumatic effects of blast events on live biological samples is critical for improving clinical outcomes.1 To investigate the consequences of pressure waves upon cellular structures and the underlying physiological and biochemical changes, we are using an integrated approach to study the material and biological properties of cells, tissues and organs when subjected to extreme conditions. In particular we have developed a confined Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) system, which allows us to subject cells in suspension or in a monolayer to compression waves of the order of few MPa and duration of hundreds of microseconds.2 The chamber design also enables recovery of the biological samples for cellular and molecular analysis. Specifically, cell survivability, viability, proliferation and morphological changes are investigated post compression for different cell populations. The SHPB platform, coupled with Quasi-Static experiments, is also used to determine stress-strain curves of soft biological tissues under compression at low, medium and high strain rates. Samples are also examined using histological techniques to study macro- and microscopical changes induced by compression waves. Finally, a shock tube has been developed to replicate primary blast damage on organs (i.e. mice lungs) and cell monolayers by generating single or multiple air blast of the order of kPa and few milliseconds duration. This platform allows us to visualize post-traumatic morphological changes at the cellular level as a function of the stimulus pressure and duration as well as biomarker signatures of blast injuries. Adapting and integrating a variety of approaches with different experimental platforms allows us to sample a vast pressure-time space in terms of biological and structural damage that mimic blast injuries and also to determine which physical parameters (peak pressure, stimulus duration, impulse

  5. Experimental and Computational Analysis of Unidirectional Flow Through Stirling Engine Heater Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Scott D.; Dyson, Rodger W.; Tew, Roy C.; Demko, Rikako

    2006-01-01

    A high efficiency Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG) is being developed for possible use in long-duration space science missions. NASA s advanced technology goals for next generation Stirling convertors include increasing the Carnot efficiency and percent of Carnot efficiency. To help achieve these goals, a multi-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code is being developed to numerically model unsteady fluid flow and heat transfer phenomena of the oscillating working gas inside Stirling convertors. In the absence of transient pressure drop data for the zero mean oscillating multi-dimensional flows present in the Technology Demonstration Convertors on test at NASA Glenn Research Center, unidirectional flow pressure drop test data is used to compare against 2D and 3D computational solutions. This study focuses on tracking pressure drop and mass flow rate data for unidirectional flow though a Stirling heater head using a commercial CFD code (CFD-ACE). The commercial CFD code uses a porous-media model which is dependent on permeability and the inertial coefficient present in the linear and nonlinear terms of the Darcy-Forchheimer equation. Permeability and inertial coefficient were calculated from unidirectional flow test data. CFD simulations of the unidirectional flow test were validated using the porous-media model input parameters which increased simulation accuracy by 14 percent on average.

  6. Bilateral non-traumatic aseptic osteonecrosis in the femoral head. An experimental study of incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Hauzeur, J.P.; Pasteels, J.L.; Orloff, S.

    1987-10-01

    Thirty-five patients who were seen with non-traumatic aseptic osteonecrosis of the femoral head were included in a study of the contralateral hip to evaluate the incidence of bilateral disease. We used not only conventional radiography and scintigraphy but also measurement of intramedullary pressure and core biopsy. Pain was caused by 14.3 per cent of the contralateral hips, a lesion was demonstrated on plain radiographs in 51.4 per cent, and increased isotopic uptake was seen in 31.4 per cent. Histological study of specimens obtained by osteomedullary biopsy (after special procedure) showed bilateral necrosis in 88.5 per cent of the patients. After a mean follow-up of thirty-four months, only one of nine hips that were painless and had negative radiographic and isotopic findings, but had positive findings on biopsy, became painful and radiographically positive. The intramedullary pressure in the intertrochanteric area was recorded in each hip, and no correlation was found with the radiographic stage or with pain.

  7. Experimental investigation on a high head model Francis turbine during load rejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, R.; Bergan, C.; Cervantes, M. J.; Gandhi, B. K.; Dahlhaug, O. G.

    2016-11-01

    Francis-99 is a set of workshop aiming to determine the state of the art of high head model Francis turbine simulations (flow and structure) under steady and transient operating conditions as well as to promote their development and knowledge dissemination openly. The first workshop (Trondheim, 2014) was concerned with steady state operation. The second workshop will focus on transient operations such as load variation and start-stop. In the present work, 2-D particle image velocimetry (PIV) with synchronized pressure measurements performed in the draft tube cone of the Francis-99 test case during load rejection is presented. Pressure sensors were mounted in the vaneless space and draft tube cone to estimate the instantaneous pressure fluctuations while operating the turbine from the best efficiency point (9.8°) to part load (6.7°) with the presence of a rotating vortex rope (RVR). The time-resolved velocity and pressure data are presented in this paper showing the transition in the turbine from one state to another.

  8. Numerical and Experimental Evaluation of Picoliter Inkjet Head for Micropatterning of Printed Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Young-Seuck; Kim, Changsung Sean; Sok Park, Yoon; Sim, Won-Chul; Park, Changsung; Joung, Jaewoo; Park, Jin-Goo; Oh, Yongsoo

    2010-05-01

    A design process based on multiphysics modeling and micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) fabrication has been established to develop a picoliter inkjet printhead for micro-patterning for printed electronics. Piezoelectric actuator is designed with numerical analysis using Covent-Ware with consideration of electrical characteristic of piezoelectric material and physical characteristic of silicon structure. The displacements of a piezoelectric actuator according to voltage waveform are evaluated and verified by laser doppler vibrometer (LDV). Piezoelectric printheads have been fabricated with silicon and silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers by MEMS process and silicon to silicon bonding method. As a preliminary approach, liquid metal jetting phenomena are identified by simulating droplet ejection and droplet formation in a consequent manner. Parametric studies are followed by the design optimization process to deduce key issues to inkjet head performance: printhead configuration, input voltage amplitude, ink viscosity and meniscus movement using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). By adjusting the driving voltage along with optimizing the drive waveform, the droplet volume and velocity can be controlled and evaluated by a drop watcher system. As a result, inkjet printhead capable of ejecting 1 pL droplet, which is required by electronic applications such as fabricating metal lines on printed circuit board (PCB), is developed.

  9. Screening of biochemical and molecular mechanisms of secondary injury and repair in the brain after experimental blast-induced traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Kochanek, Patrick M; Dixon, C Edward; Shellington, David K; Shin, Samuel S; Bayır, Hülya; Jackson, Edwin K; Kagan, Valerian E; Yan, Hong Q; Swauger, Peter V; Parks, Steven A; Ritzel, David V; Bauman, Richard; Clark, Robert S B; Garman, Robert H; Bandak, Faris; Ling, Geoffrey; Jenkins, Larry W

    2013-06-01

    Abstract Explosive blast-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the signature insult in modern combat casualty care and has been linked to post-traumatic stress disorder, memory loss, and chronic traumatic encephalopathy. In this article we report on blast-induced mild TBI (mTBI) characterized by fiber-tract degeneration and axonal injury revealed by cupric silver staining in adult male rats after head-only exposure to 35 psi in a helium-driven shock tube with head restraint. We now explore pathways of secondary injury and repair using biochemical/molecular strategies. Injury produced ∼25% mortality from apnea. Shams received identical anesthesia exposure. Rats were sacrificed at 2 or 24 h, and brain was sampled in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Hippocampal samples were used to assess gene array (RatRef-12 Expression BeadChip; Illumina, Inc., San Diego, CA) and oxidative stress (OS; ascorbate, glutathione, low-molecular-weight thiols [LMWT], protein thiols, and 4-hydroxynonenal [HNE]). Cortical samples were used to assess neuroinflammation (cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors; Luminex Corporation, Austin, TX) and purines (adenosine triphosphate [ATP], adenosine diphosphate, adenosine, inosine, 2'-AMP [adenosine monophosphate], and 5'-AMP). Gene array revealed marked increases in astrocyte and neuroinflammatory markers at 24 h (glial fibrillary acidic protein, vimentin, and complement component 1) with expression patterns bioinformatically consistent with those noted in Alzheimer's disease and long-term potentiation. Ascorbate, LMWT, and protein thiols were reduced at 2 and 24 h; by 24 h, HNE was increased. At 2 h, multiple cytokines and chemokines (interleukin [IL]-1α, IL-6, IL-10, and macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha [MIP-1α]) were increased; by 24 h, only MIP-1α remained elevated. ATP was not depleted, and adenosine correlated with 2'-cyclic AMP (cAMP), and not 5'-cAMP. Our data reveal (1) gene-array alterations similar to disorders of

  10. Head position and impact direction in whiplash injuries: associations with MRI-verified lesions of ligaments and membranes in the upper cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Kaale, Bertel Rune; Krakenes, Jostein; Albrektsen, Grethe; Wester, Knut

    2005-11-01

    In the present study, we compared magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of soft tissue structures in the upper cervical spine between whiplash-associated disorder (WAD) patients and population-based control persons, and examined whether MRI-verified abnormalities in WAD patients were related to accident-related factors hypothesized to be of importance for severity of injury. A total of 92 whiplash patients and 30 control persons, randomly drawn, were included. Information on the accident-related factors (i.e., head position and impact direction) was obtained by a questionnaire that was answered within 1 week after the accident. The MRI examination was performed 2-9 (mean 6) years after the accident. Focus was on MRI abnormalities of the alar and the transverse ligaments, and the tectorial and posterior atlanto-occipital membranes, graded 0-3. For all neck structures, the whiplash patients had more high-grade lesions (grade 2 or 3) than the control persons (Chi-square test, p < 0.055). An abnormal alar ligament was most common (66.3% graded 2 or 3). Whiplash patients who had been sitting with their head/neck turned to one side at the moment of collision more often had high-grade lesions of the alar and transverse ligaments (p < 0.001, p = 0.040, respectively). Severe injuries to the transverse ligament and the posterior atlanto-occipital membrane were more common in front than in rear end collisions (p < 0.001, p = 0.001, respectively). In conclusion, the difference in MRI-verified lesions between WAD patients and control persons, and in particular the association with head position and impact direction at time of accident, indicate that these lesions are caused by the whiplash trauma.

  11. Effects of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury on muscle activity of head, neck and trunk muscles: a cross-sectional evaluation.

    PubMed

    Tecco, Simona; Salini, Vincenzo; Teté, Stefano; Festa, Felice

    2007-07-01

    This study evaluated the that effects a pathology of the knee, due to an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, has on muscular activity of neck, head, and trunk muscles. Twenty-five (25) subjects (mean age 28+/-9 years) with ACL injury of the left knee were compared with a control no-pathology group. Surface electromyography (sEMG) at mandibular rest position and maximal voluntary clenching (MVC) wasused to evaluate muscular activity of the areas: masseter, anterior temporalis, posterior cervicals, sternocleidomastoid (SCM), and upper and lower trapezius. The sEMG activity of each muscle, as well as the asymmetry index between the right and the left sides, were compared between the two groups. Subjects in the study group showed a significant increase in the asymmetry index of the sEMG activity of the anterior temporalis at mandibular rest position (p<0.05). At rest, the areas of anterior temporalis and masseter in the control group showed a significantly lower sEMG activity compared with subjects in the study group, both in the right and the left sides (p<0.05). The same was found for the sEMG activity of the areas of SCM and lower trapezius. At MVC, the right areas of anterior temporalis and masseter in the study subjects showed a significantly lower sEMG activity compared with the control group. The same was observed for the lower trapezius area, both in the right and the left sides. In general, ACL injury appears to provide a change in the sEMG activity of head, neck and trunk muscles.

  12. Experimental characterization of a transition from collisionless to collisional interaction between head-on-merging supersonic plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Moser, Auna L. Hsu, Scott C.

    2015-05-15

    We present results from experiments on the head-on merging of two supersonic plasma jets in an initially collisionless regime for the counter-streaming ions. The plasma jets are of either an argon/impurity or hydrogen/impurity mixture and are produced by pulsed-power-driven railguns. Based on time- and space-resolved fast-imaging, multi-chord interferometry, and survey-spectroscopy measurements of the overlapping region between the merging jets, we observe that the jets initially interpenetrate, consistent with calculated inter-jet ion collision lengths, which are long. As the jets interpenetrate, a rising mean-charge state causes a rapid decrease in the inter-jet ion collision length. Finally, the interaction becomes collisional and the jets stagnate, eventually producing structures consistent with collisional shocks. These experimental observations can aid in the validation of plasma collisionality and ionization models for plasmas with complex equations of state.

  13. Rapid renal alpha-1 antitrypsin gene induction in experimental and clinical acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Zager, Richard A; Johnson, Ali C M; Frostad, Kirsten B

    2014-01-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) is a hepatic stress protein with protease inhibitor activity. Recent evidence indicates that ischemic or toxic injury can evoke selective changes within kidney that resemble a hepatic phenotype. Hence, we tested the following: i) Does acute kidney injury (AKI) up-regulate the normally renal silent AAT gene? ii) Does rapid urinary AAT excretion result? And iii) Can AAT's anti-protease/anti-neutrophil elastase (NE) activity protect injured proximal tubule cells? CD-1 mice were subjected to ischemic or nephrotoxic (glycerol, maleate, cisplatin) AKI. Renal functional and biochemical assessments were made 4-72 hrs later. Rapidly following injury, 5-10 fold renal cortical and isolated proximal tubule AAT mRNA and protein increases occurred. These were paralleled by rapid (>100 fold) increases in urinary AAT excretion. AKI also induced marked increases in renal cortical/isolated proximal tubule NE mRNA. However, sharp NE protein levels declines resulted, which strikingly correlated (r, -0.94) with rising AAT protein levels (reflecting NE complexing by AAT/destruction). NE addition to HK-2 cells evoked ∼95% cell death. AAT completely blocked this NE toxicity, as well as Fe induced oxidant HK-2 cell attack. Translational relevance of experimental AAT gene induction was indicated by ∼100-1000 fold urinary AAT increases in 22 AKI patients (matching urine NGAL increases). We conclude: i) AKI rapidly up-regulates the renal cortical/proximal tubule AAT gene; ii) NE gene induction also results; iii) AAT can confer cytoprotection, potentially by blocking/reducing cytotoxic NE accumulation; and iv) marked increases in urinary AAT excretion in AKI patients implies clinical relevance of the AKI- AAT induction pathway.

  14. The Connective Tissue Components of Optic Nerve Head Cupping in Monkey Experimental Glaucoma Part 1: Global Change

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hongli; Ren, Ruojin; Lockwood, Howard; Williams, Galen; Libertiaux, Vincent; Downs, Crawford; Gardiner, Stuart K.; Burgoyne, Claude F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To characterize optic nerve head (ONH) connective tissue change within 21 monkey experimental glaucoma (EG) eyes, so as to identify its principal components. Methods Animals were imaged three to five times at baseline then every 2 weeks following chronic unilateral IOP elevation, and euthanized early through end-stage confocal scanning laser tomographic change. Optic nerve heads were serial-sectioned, three-dimensionally (3D) reconstructed, delineated, and quantified. Overall EG versus control eye differences were assessed by general estimating equations (GEE). Significant, animal-specific, EG eye change was required to exceed the maximum physiologic intereye differences in six healthy animals. Results Overall EG eye change was significant (P < 0.0026) and animal-specific EG eye change most frequent, for five phenomena (number of EG eyes and range of animal-specific change): posterior laminar deformation (21, −29 to −437 μm), laminar thickening (11, 20–73 μm) and thinning (3, −23 to −31 μm), scleral canal expansion (17, 20–139 μm), outward anterior (16, −16 to −124 μm) and posterior (17, −22 to −279 μm) laminar insertion migration, and peripapillary scleral bowing (11, 21–77 μm). Experimental glaucoma versus control eye laminar thickness differences were bimodal in behavior, being thickened in most EG eyes demonstrating the least deformation and less thickened or thinned in most EG eyes demonstrating the greatest deformation. Conclusions Our postmortem studies retrospectively identify five connective tissue components of ONH “cupping” in monkey EG which serve as targets for longitudinally staging and phenotyping ONH connective tissue alteration within all forms of monkey and human optic neuropathy. PMID:26641545

  15. Motor, visual and emotional deficits in mice after closed-head mild traumatic brain injury are alleviated by the novel CB2 inverse agonist SMM-189.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Anton; Heldt, Scott A; Presley, Chaela S; Guley, Natalie H; Elberger, Andrea J; Deng, Yunping; D'Surney, Lauren; Rogers, Joshua T; Ferrell, Jessica; Bu, Wei; Del Mar, Nobel; Honig, Marcia G; Gurley, Steven N; Moore, Bob M

    2014-12-31

    We have developed a focal blast model of closed-head mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) in mice. As true for individuals that have experienced mild TBI, mice subjected to 50-60 psi blast show motor, visual and emotional deficits, diffuse axonal injury and microglial activation, but no overt neuron loss. Because microglial activation can worsen brain damage after a concussive event and because microglia can be modulated by their cannabinoid type 2 receptors (CB2), we evaluated the effectiveness of the novel CB2 receptor inverse agonist SMM-189 in altering microglial activation and mitigating deficits after mild TBI. In vitro analysis indicated that SMM-189 converted human microglia from the pro-inflammatory M1 phenotype to the pro-healing M2 phenotype. Studies in mice showed that daily administration of SMM-189 for two weeks beginning shortly after blast greatly reduced the motor, visual, and emotional deficits otherwise evident after 50-60 psi blasts, and prevented brain injury that may contribute to these deficits. Our results suggest that treatment with the CB2 inverse agonist SMM-189 after a mild TBI event can reduce its adverse consequences by beneficially modulating microglial activation. These findings recommend further evaluation of CB2 inverse agonists as a novel therapeutic approach for treating mild TBI.

  16. Treatment of experimental avascular necrosis of the femoral head with hyperbaric oxygen in rats: histological evaluation of the femoral heads during the early phase of the reparative process.

    PubMed

    Levin, D; Norman, D; Zinman, C; Rubinstein, L; Sabo, E; Misselevich, I; Reis, D; Boss, J H

    1999-10-01

    The healing of vascular deprivation-induced necrosis of the femoral head of rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen was compared with that in untreated rats. The amount of necrotic bone, extent of osteoneogenesis, degree of remodeling, and changes of the articular cartilage were histologically graded on a semiquantitative scale of 0 to 3+. On the 2nd, 7th, and 21st postoperative days, there were no differences between the two groups. Newly formed appositional and intramembranous bone was more abundant and remodeling was more advanced in the femoral heads of the hyperbaric oxygen-treated than untreated rats sacrificed on the 42nd postoperative day; also there was less necrotic debris in the femoral heads of the treated rats. There were no differences in the severity of the degenerative changes of the articular cartilage of the treated and untreated rats. Exposure of rats to hyperbaric oxygen does not preserve tissue viability after all arteries supplying the femoral head are severed. Yet, resulting in an increased oxygen tension of the tissues, it seems to provide the optimal settings for reparative processes. The results suggest that hyperoxygenation-mediated relief of ischemia enhances the fibroblastic, angioblastic, osteoblastic, and osteoclastic activities such that healing of the rats' necrotic femoral heads is expedited.

  17. Numerical modeling of an experimental shock tube for traumatic brain injury studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Michael; Regele, Jonathan D.

    2015-11-01

    Unfortunately, Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) are encountered commonly by both civilians and military soldiers throughout the world. Over a decade of medical history suggests that traumatic brain injury (TBI) may result from exposure to the blast waves created by these explosions, even if the person does not experience any immediate injury or lose consciousness. Medical researchers study the exposure of mice and rats to blast waves created in specially designed shock tubes to understand the effect on brain tissue. A newly developed table-top shock tube with a short driver section has been developed for mice experiments to reduce the time necessary to administer the blast radiation and increase the amount of statistical information available. In this study, numerical simulations of this shock tube are performed to assess how the blast wave takes its shape. The pressure profiles obtained from the numerical results are compared with the pressure histories from the experimental pressure transducers. The results show differences in behavior from what was expected, but the blast wave may still be an effective means of studying TBI.

  18. Olive leaf extract facilitates healing of experimental cartilaginous injuries in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Gong, Dezheng; Geng, Chengyan; Jiang, Liping; Wang, Lihui; Yoshimuram, Hiroyuki; Zhong, Laifu

    2011-03-01

    We investigated the restorative effect of orally administered olive leaf extract (OLE) on experimentally produced cartilaginous injuries in rabbits. In total, three holes in the left stifle joint, including one in the medial trochlear ridge and two in the trochlear sulcus (proximal and distal) of articular cartilage, were prepared surgically using a drill. For the control group only tap water alone was administered daily, and for the OLE group a water-based solution of OLE (500 mg/kg/day) was administered daily. The injured areas were observed macroscopically and histologically at 3 weeks after the operation. The results indicate that OLE facilitated healing of the three holes and increased the weight of the biceps femoris muscle. Histological examination revealed that in the OLE group, matured cartilage tissues and connective tissues were mixed with regenerated or maturing cartilage tissues with massive proliferation in the injured parts, around which the proliferation of undifferentiated blast cells and the tissue with cartilage substrates were observed. The histological score of the OLE group was significantly lower than that of the control group. The percentage of proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive cartilage cells in the OLE group was higher than in the control group. Mean density of the restored area observed with Safranin O staining was higher in the OLE group than in the control group. Therefore, OLE is effective for enhancing the healing of cartilaginous injuries. OLE may also have a beneficial effect of slowing and reducing the pathogenesis of degenerative joint diseases in humans.

  19. Estradiol worsens the syndrome of ischemia-reperfusion injury in an experimental lung transplantation model.

    PubMed

    Santana-Rodríguez, Norberto; Clavo, Bernardino; Llontop, Pedro; López, Ana; García-Castellano, José Manuel; Machín, Rubén P; Ponce, Miguel A; Fiuza, María D; García-Herrera, Ricardo; Brito, Yanira; Yordi, Nagib Atallah; Chirino, Ricardo

    2011-06-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is a common complication after lung transplantation. There is evidence that reactive oxygen species are involved in its pathogenesis. We designed an experimental study to evaluate whether the administration of antioxidants to lung transplantation recipients protects against IRI and early acute rejection (AR). Twenty-five rats received left lung transplants after 6 h of ischemia. Fifty minutes before the reperfusion, groups of five rats received a single dose of desferrioxamine (20 mg/kg), estradiol (25 mg/kg), or melatonin (10 mg/kg). The animals were killed 48 h after surgery and the postoperative outcome, IRI, and AR were evaluated. The frequency of severe injury and of moderate-to-severe edema was higher in animals treated with estradiol than in the control group (P = 0.022 and P = 0.026, respectively). No significant changes in the degree of IRI or AR were observed in the groups treated with desferrioxamine or melatonin. In our study, treatment with the antioxidants melatonin or desferrioxamine before reperfusion had no effects on IRI damage or on AR frequency or severity. However, treatment with estradiol resulted in a worse postoperative outcome and in severe edema. Therefore, despite the antioxidant capacity of estradiol, it is recommended that an evaluation of these adverse effects of estradiol in human lung transplant recipients be performed.

  20. Forensic investigation into a death: post-traumatic amnesia in a worker with a work-related head injury sustained in a coal-fired thermal power plant in India.

    PubMed

    Muralidhar, Venkiteswaran

    2017-03-15

    This is the first reported case of a work-related head injury in a coal-fired thermal power plant in India. This case highlights the trend of not reporting work injuries due to fears of reprisal from the management team that may include the termination of employment. Post-traumatic amnesia in a worker presenting with head trauma must be recognised by coworkers, so the cause of injury can be elicited early and the victim gets timely medical help. There are few published studies on work-related traumatic brain injury, and they provide no information on either anatomical localisation or signs and symptoms. It is imperative that this under-researched area is studied, so detailed epidemiology and accurate national and global statistics are made available to address this dangerous yet preventable condition.

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Analysis of Ischemia/Reperfusion in Experimental Acute Renal Injury.

    PubMed

    Pohlmann, Andreas; Arakelyan, Karen; Seeliger, Erdmann; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2016-01-01

    Imbalance between renal oxygen delivery and demand in the first hours after reperfusion is suggested to be decisive in the pathophysiological chain of events leading to ischemia-induced acute kidney injury. Here we describe blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for continuous monitoring of the deoxyhemoglobin-sen