Science.gov

Sample records for experimental model estudo

  1. Experimental Models of Cryptococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Sabiiti, Wilber; May, Robin C.; Pursall, E. Rhiannon

    2012-01-01

    Cryptococcosis is a life-threatening fungal disease that infects around one million people each year. Establishment and progression of disease involves a complex interplay between the fungus and a diverse range of host cell types. Over recent years, numerous cellular, tissue, and animal models have been exploited to probe this host-pathogen interaction. Here we review the range of experimental models that are available for cryptococcosis research and compare the relative advantages and limitations of the different systems. PMID:22007224

  2. Experimental Models for Neurotrauma Research.

    PubMed

    Davidsson, Johan; Risling, Mårten

    2016-01-01

    Physical trauma in the central nervous system (CNS) is usually the result of a number of forces in different directions and dimensions. A large number of experimental models have been developed to improve the possibilities to understand the outcome of CNS trauma. In this chapter, we will describe the need for a variety of experimental models for research on traumatic brain injury (TBI) and spinal cord injury (SCI). Models can serve different needs, such as: to test new treatments for injuries, to reveal thresholds for injuries, to provide a better understanding of injury mechanisms, or to test tools and methods for translation between experiments and clinical data. In this chapter, we will discuss on the validation of models and translation between experimental and clinical studies. PMID:27604724

  3. The updated experimental proteinoid model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.; Nakashima, T.; Przybylski, A.; Syren, R. M.

    1982-01-01

    The experimental proteinoid model includes new results indicating that polymers sufficiently rich in basic amino acid catalyze the synthesis of peptides from ATP and amino acids and of oligonucleotides from ATP. The need for simulation syntheses of amino acids yielding significant proportions of basic amino acids is now in focus. The modeled simultaneous protocellular synthesis of peptides and polynucleotides is part of a more comprehensive proposal for the origin of the coded genetic mechanism. The finding of membrane and action potentials in proteinoid microspheres, with or without added lecithin, is reported. The crucial nature of a nonrandom matrix for protocells is developed.

  4. EXPERIMENTAL MODELLING OF AORTIC ANEURYSMS

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Barry J; Corbett, Timothy J; Cloonan, Aidan J; O’Donnell, Michael R; Walsh, Michael T; Vorp, David A; McGloughlin, Timothy M

    2009-01-01

    A range of silicone rubbers were created based on existing commercially available materials. These silicones were designed to be visually different from one another and have distinct material properties, in particular, ultimate tensile strengths and tear strengths. In total, eleven silicone rubbers were manufactured, with the materials designed to have a range of increasing tensile strengths from approximately 2-4MPa, and increasing tear strengths from approximately 0.45-0.7N/mm. The variations in silicones were detected using a standard colour analysis technique. Calibration curves were then created relating colour intensity to individual material properties. All eleven materials were characterised and a 1st order Ogden strain energy function applied. Material coefficients were determined and examined for effectiveness. Six idealised abdominal aortic aneurysm models were also created using the two base materials of the study, with a further model created using a new mixing technique to create a rubber model with randomly assigned material properties. These models were then examined using videoextensometry and compared to numerical results. Colour analysis revealed a statistically significant linear relationship (p<0.0009) with both tensile strength and tear strength, allowing material strength to be determined using a non-destructive experimental technique. The effectiveness of this technique was assessed by comparing predicted material properties to experimentally measured methods, with good agreement in the results. Videoextensometry and numerical modelling revealed minor percentage differences, with all results achieving significance (p<0.0009). This study has successfully designed and developed a range of silicone rubbers that have unique colour intensities and material strengths. Strengths can be readily determined using a non-destructive analysis technique with proven effectiveness. These silicones may further aid towards an improved understanding of the

  5. Experimental models of hepatocellular carcinoma☆

    PubMed Central

    Newell, Philippa; Villanueva, Augusto; Friedman, Scott L.; Koike, Kazuhiko; Llovet, Josep M.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common and deadly cancer whose pathogenesis is incompletely understood. Comparative genomic studies from human HCC samples have classified HCCs into different molecular subgroups; yet, the unifying feature of this tumor is its propensity to arise upon a background of inflammation and fibrosis. This review seeks to analyze the available experimental models in HCC research and to correlate data from human populations with them in order to consolidate our efforts to date, as it is increasingly clear that different models will be required to mimic different subclasses of the neoplasm. These models will be instrumental in the evaluation of compounds targeting specific molecular pathways in future preclinical studies. PMID:18314222

  6. Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Experimental Models

    PubMed Central

    Lengyel, E; Burdette, JE; Kenny, HA; Matei, D; Pilrose, J; Haluska, P.; Nephew, KP; Hales, DB; Stack, MS

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (OvCa) is associated with high mortality and, as the majority (>75%) of women with OvCa have metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis, rates of survival have not changed appreciably over 30 years. A mechanistic understanding of OvCa initiation and progression is hindered by the complexity of genetic and/or environmental initiating events and lack of clarity regarding the cell(s) or tissue(s) of origin. Metastasis of OvCa involves direct extension or exfoliation of cells and cellular aggregates into the peritoneal cavity, survival of matrix-detached cells in a complex ascites fluid phase, and subsequent adhesion to the mesothelium lining covering abdominal organs to establish secondary lesions containing host stromal and inflammatory components. Development of experimental models to recapitulate this unique mechanism of metastasis presents a remarkable scientific challenge and many approaches used to study other solid tumors (lung, colon, and breast, for example) are not transferable to OvCa research given the distinct metastasis pattern and unique tumor microenvironment. This review will discuss recent progress in the development and refinement of experimental models to study OvCa. Novel cellular, three-dimensional organotypic, and ex vivo models are considered and the current in vivo models summarized. The review critically evaluates currently available genetic mouse models of OvCa, the emergence of xenopatients, and the utility of the hen model to study OvCa prevention, tumorigenesis, metastasis, and chemoresistance. As these new approaches more accurately recapitulate the complex tumor microenvironment, it is predicted that new opportunities for enhanced understanding of disease progression, metastasis and therapeutic response will emerge. PMID:23934194

  7. Experimental models of liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Willebrords, Joost; Maes, Michaël; Colle, Isabelle; van den Bossche, Bert; de Oliveira, Claudia Pinto Marques Souza; Andraus, Wellington; Alves, Venâncio Avancini Ferreira; Leclercq, Isabelle; Vinken, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is a wound healing response to insults and as such affects the entire world population. In industrialized countries, the main causes of liver fibrosis include alcohol abuse, chronic hepatitis virus infection and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. A central event in liver fibrosis is the activation of hepatic stellate cells, which is triggered by a plethora of signaling pathways. Liver fibrosis can progress into more severe stages, known as cirrhosis, when liver acini are substituted by nodules, and further to hepatocellular carcinoma. Considerable efforts are currently devoted to liver fibrosis research, not only with the goal of further elucidating the molecular mechanisms that drive this disease, but equally in view of establishing effective diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. The present paper provides a state-of-the-art overview of in vivo and in vitro models used in the field of experimental liver fibrosis research. PMID:26047667

  8. New model systems for experimental evolution.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sinéad

    2013-07-01

    Microbial experimental evolution uses a few well-characterized model systems to answer fundamental questions about how evolution works. This special section highlights novel model systems for experimental evolution, with a focus on marine model systems that can be used to understand evolutionary responses to global change in the oceans.

  9. Experimental model updating using frequency response functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Yu; Liu, Xi; Dong, Xinjun; Wang, Yang; Pu, Qianhui

    2016-04-01

    In order to obtain a finite element (FE) model that can more accurately describe structural behaviors, experimental data measured from the actual structure can be used to update the FE model. The process is known as FE model updating. In this paper, a frequency response function (FRF)-based model updating approach is presented. The approach attempts to minimize the difference between analytical and experimental FRFs, while the experimental FRFs are calculated using simultaneously measured dynamic excitation and corresponding structural responses. In this study, the FRF-based model updating method is validated through laboratory experiments on a four-story shear-frame structure. To obtain the experimental FRFs, shake table tests and impact hammer tests are performed. The FRF-based model updating method is shown to successfully update the stiffness, mass and damping parameters of the four-story structure, so that the analytical and experimental FRFs match well with each other.

  10. Physical and Mathematical Modeling in Experimental Papers.

    PubMed

    Möbius, Wolfram; Laan, Liedewij

    2015-12-17

    An increasing number of publications include modeling. Often, such studies help us to gain a deeper insight into the phenomena studied and break down barriers between experimental and theoretical communities. However, combining experimental and theoretical work is challenging for authors, reviewers, and readers. To help maximize the usefulness and impact of combined theoretical and experimental research, this Primer describes the purpose, usefulness, and different types of models and addresses the practical aspect of integrated publications by outlining characteristics of good modeling, presentation, and fruitful collaborations.

  11. Physical and Mathematical Modeling in Experimental Papers.

    PubMed

    Möbius, Wolfram; Laan, Liedewij

    2015-12-17

    An increasing number of publications include modeling. Often, such studies help us to gain a deeper insight into the phenomena studied and break down barriers between experimental and theoretical communities. However, combining experimental and theoretical work is challenging for authors, reviewers, and readers. To help maximize the usefulness and impact of combined theoretical and experimental research, this Primer describes the purpose, usefulness, and different types of models and addresses the practical aspect of integrated publications by outlining characteristics of good modeling, presentation, and fruitful collaborations. PMID:26687351

  12. Modelling from the experimental developmental biologists viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Economou, Andrew D; Green, Jeremy B A

    2014-11-01

    In this review we consider Reaction-Diffusion as the archetype of a model in developmental biology. We consider its history in relation to experimental work since it was first proposed in 1952 by Turing and revived in the 1970s by Meinhardt. We then discuss the most recent examples of experiments that address this model, including the challenges that remain in capturing the physico-chemical manifestation of the model mechanism in a real developmental system. Finally we discuss the model's current status and use in the experimental community. PMID:25026465

  13. Experimental Modeling of Proliferative Vitreoretinopathy. An Experimental Morphological Study.

    PubMed

    Khoroshilova-Maslova, I P; Leparskaya, N L; Nabieva, M M; Andreeva, L D

    2015-05-01

    A model of proliferative vitreoretinopathy induced by simultaneous intravitreal injection of recombinant IL-1β and platelet concentrate is created and its main morphological manifestations are studied on Chinchilla rabbits. The model reflects pathogenesis of proliferative vitreoretinopathy: epiretinal membrane with the formation of retinal plication, traction detachment of the retina; moderate inflammatory reaction in the uveal tract, in the optic nerve infundibulum, in the vitreous body; intact structural elements of the retina, dissociation of the retinal pigmented epithelium cells with their subsequent migration. The model is adequate to the clinical picture of proliferative vitreoretinopathy in humans, which recommends it for experimental studies of the efficiency of drug therapy and prevention of this disease. PMID:26033599

  14. Improving the physiological realism of experimental models.

    PubMed

    Vinnakota, Kalyan C; Cha, Chae Y; Rorsman, Patrik; Balaban, Robert S; La Gerche, Andre; Wade-Martins, Richard; Beard, Daniel A; Jeneson, Jeroen A L

    2016-04-01

    The Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) project aims to develop integrative, explanatory and predictive computational models (C-Models) as numerical investigational tools to study disease, identify and design effective therapies and provide an in silico platform for drug screening. Ultimately, these models rely on the analysis and integration of experimental data. As such, the success of VPH depends on the availability of physiologically realistic experimental models (E-Models) of human organ function that can be parametrized to test the numerical models. Here, the current state of suitable E-models, ranging from in vitro non-human cell organelles to in vivo human organ systems, is discussed. Specifically, challenges and recent progress in improving the physiological realism of E-models that may benefit the VPH project are highlighted and discussed using examples from the field of research on cardiovascular disease, musculoskeletal disorders, diabetes and Parkinson's disease. PMID:27051507

  15. Improving the physiological realism of experimental models.

    PubMed

    Vinnakota, Kalyan C; Cha, Chae Y; Rorsman, Patrik; Balaban, Robert S; La Gerche, Andre; Wade-Martins, Richard; Beard, Daniel A; Jeneson, Jeroen A L

    2016-04-01

    The Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) project aims to develop integrative, explanatory and predictive computational models (C-Models) as numerical investigational tools to study disease, identify and design effective therapies and provide an in silico platform for drug screening. Ultimately, these models rely on the analysis and integration of experimental data. As such, the success of VPH depends on the availability of physiologically realistic experimental models (E-Models) of human organ function that can be parametrized to test the numerical models. Here, the current state of suitable E-models, ranging from in vitro non-human cell organelles to in vivo human organ systems, is discussed. Specifically, challenges and recent progress in improving the physiological realism of E-models that may benefit the VPH project are highlighted and discussed using examples from the field of research on cardiovascular disease, musculoskeletal disorders, diabetes and Parkinson's disease.

  16. Transitional Employment Experimental Model (TEEM). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Personnel Board, Sacramento.

    The final report of the Transitional Employemnt Experimental Model (TEEM) Project, a research and development project providing a potential model for a large scale manpower absorption program in times of economic need, is presented. One major purpose of the project was to demonstrate the viability of providing suitable job placement for the…

  17. Comparing fluid mechanics models with experimental data.

    PubMed Central

    Spedding, G R

    2003-01-01

    The art of modelling the physical world lies in the appropriate simplification and abstraction of the complete problem. In fluid mechanics, the Navier-Stokes equations provide a model that is valid under most circumstances germane to animal locomotion, but the complexity of solutions provides strong incentive for the development of further, more simplified practical models. When the flow organizes itself so that all shearing motions are collected into localized patches, then various mathematical vortex models have been very successful in predicting and furthering the physical understanding of many flows, particularly in aerodynamics. Experimental models have the significant added convenience that the fluid mechanics can be generated by a real fluid, not a model, provided the appropriate dimensionless groups have similar values. Then, analogous problems can be encountered in making intelligible but independent descriptions of the experimental results. Finally, model predictions and experimental results may be compared if, and only if, numerical estimates of the likely variations in the tested quantities are provided. Examples from recent experimental measurements of wakes behind a fixed wing and behind a bird in free flight are used to illustrate these principles. PMID:14561348

  18. Experimental and Modeling Studies of Massif Anorthosites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longhi, John

    1999-01-01

    This termination report covers the latter part of a single research effort spanning several grant cycles. During this time there was a single title, "Experimental and Modeling Studies of Massif Anorthosites", but there were several contract numbers as the mode and location of NASA contract administration changed. Initially, the project was funded as an increment to the PI's other grant, "Early Differentiation of the Moon: Experimental and Modeling Studies", but subsequently it became an independent grant. Table 1 contains a brief summary of the dates and contract numbers.

  19. Experimental Concepts for Testing Seismic Hazard Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzocchi, W.; Jordan, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic hazard analysis is the primary interface through which useful information about earthquake rupture and wave propagation is delivered to society. To account for the randomness (aleatory variability) and limited knowledge (epistemic uncertainty) of these natural processes, seismologists must formulate and test hazard models using the concepts of probability. In this presentation, we will address the scientific objections that have been raised over the years against probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA). Owing to the paucity of observations, we must rely on expert opinion to quantify the epistemic uncertainties of PSHA models (e.g., in the weighting of individual models from logic-tree ensembles of plausible models). The main theoretical issue is a frequentist critique: subjectivity is immeasurable; ergo, PSHA models cannot be objectively tested against data; ergo, they are fundamentally unscientific. We have argued (PNAS, 111, 11973-11978) that the Bayesian subjectivity required for casting epistemic uncertainties can be bridged with the frequentist objectivity needed for pure significance testing through "experimental concepts." An experimental concept specifies collections of data, observed and not yet observed, that are judged to be exchangeable (i.e., with a joint distribution independent of the data ordering) when conditioned on a set of explanatory variables. We illustrate, through concrete examples, experimental concepts useful in the testing of PSHA models for ontological errors in the presence of aleatory variability and epistemic uncertainty. In particular, we describe experimental concepts that lead to exchangeable binary sequences that are statistically independent but not identically distributed, showing how the Bayesian concept of exchangeability generalizes the frequentist concept of experimental repeatability. We also address the issue of testing PSHA models using spatially correlated data.

  20. [Experimental models of human skin aging].

    PubMed

    Nikolakis, G; Zoschke, C; Makrantonaki, E; Hausmann, C; Schäfer-Korting, M; Zouboulis, C C

    2016-02-01

    The skin is a representative model for the study of human aging. Despite the high regenerative capacity of the skin, skin physiology changes over the course of life. Medical and cosmetic research is trying to prevent aging, to slow, to stop, or to reverse it. Effects of age-related DNA damage and of changing skin structure on pharmacological parameters are largely unknown. This review article summarizes the state of scientific knowledge in the field of experimental models of human skin aging and shows approaches to improve organotypic skin models, to develop predictive models of aging, and improve aging research.

  1. [Experimental models of human skin aging].

    PubMed

    Nikolakis, G; Zoschke, C; Makrantonaki, E; Hausmann, C; Schäfer-Korting, M; Zouboulis, C C

    2016-02-01

    The skin is a representative model for the study of human aging. Despite the high regenerative capacity of the skin, skin physiology changes over the course of life. Medical and cosmetic research is trying to prevent aging, to slow, to stop, or to reverse it. Effects of age-related DNA damage and of changing skin structure on pharmacological parameters are largely unknown. This review article summarizes the state of scientific knowledge in the field of experimental models of human skin aging and shows approaches to improve organotypic skin models, to develop predictive models of aging, and improve aging research. PMID:26743051

  2. Optimal Experimental Design for Model Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Myung, Jay I.; Pitt, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Models of a psychological process can be difficult to discriminate experimentally because it is not easy to determine the values of the critical design variables (e.g., presentation schedule, stimulus structure) that will be most informative in differentiating them. Recent developments in sampling-based search methods in statistics make it possible to determine these values, and thereby identify an optimal experimental design. After describing the method, it is demonstrated in two content areas in cognitive psychology in which models are highly competitive: retention (i.e., forgetting) and categorization. The optimal design is compared with the quality of designs used in the literature. The findings demonstrate that design optimization has the potential to increase the informativeness of the experimental method. PMID:19618983

  3. Optimal Experimental Design for Model Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myung, Jay I.; Pitt, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Models of a psychological process can be difficult to discriminate experimentally because it is not easy to determine the values of the critical design variables (e.g., presentation schedule, stimulus structure) that will be most informative in differentiating them. Recent developments in sampling-based search methods in statistics make it…

  4. Cholestasis: human disease and experimental animal models.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Garay, Emilio Alberto

    2003-01-01

    Cholestasis may result from a failure in bile secretion in hepatocytes or ductular cells, or from a blockade to the free bile flow. Human cholestasis may be induced by many drugs, being antibiotics the more common. Other types of cholestasis seen in humans are a group of familial cholestatic disorders, obstructive cholestasis, primary biliary cirrhosis, extrahepatic biliary atresia, primary sclerosing cholangitis, cholestasis of pregnancy, oral contraceptive-induced cholestasis, and sepsis-induced cholestasis. Experimental animal models allow the understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms involved and their clinical correlates. The most common experimental models of intrahepatic cholestasis are estrogen-induced, endotoxin-induced and drug-induced cholestasis. A well known model of extrahepatic biliary obstruction is common bile duct ligation. Drug-induced cholestasis were described using different drugs. On this regard, alpha naphthylisothiocyanate treatment has been extensively used, permitting to describe not only cholestatic alterations but also compensatory mechanisms. Congenital defficiency of transport proteins also were studied in natural rat models of cholestasis. The experimental animal models allow to define down-regulated alterations of hepatocyte transport proteins, and up-regulated ones acting as compensatory mechanisms. In conclusion, animal model and transport protein studies are necessary for the progressive understanding of congenital and acquired human cholestasis, and regulatory mechanisms that operate on liver cells.

  5. Macrophages and Uveitis in Experimental Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Mérida, Salvador; Palacios, Elena; Bosch-Morell, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Resident and infiltrated macrophages play relevant roles in uveitis as effectors of innate immunity and inductors of acquired immunity. They are major effectors of tissue damage in uveitis and are also considered to be potent antigen-presenting cells. In the last few years, experimental animal models of uveitis have enabled us to enhance our understanding of the leading role of macrophages in eye inflammation processes, including macrophage polarization in experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis and the major role of Toll-like receptor 4 in endotoxin-induced uveitis. This improved knowledge should guide advantageous iterative research to establish mechanisms and possible therapeutic targets for human uveitis resolution. PMID:26078494

  6. Experimental Flow Models for SSME Flowfield Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, L. C.; Ramsey, P. E.

    1989-01-01

    Full scale flow models with extensive instrumentation were designed and manufactured to provide data necessary for flow field characterization in rocket engines of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) type. These models include accurate flow path geometries from the pre-burner outlet through the throat of the main combustion chamber. The turbines are simulated with static models designed to provide the correct pressure drop and swirl for specific power levels. The correct turbopump-hot gas manifold interfaces were designed into the flow models to permit parametric/integration studies for new turbine designs. These experimental flow models provide a vehicle for understanding the fluid dynamics associated with specific engine issues and also fill the more general need for establishing a more detailed fluid dynamic base to support development and verification of advanced math models.

  7. Irradiation Design for an Experimental Murine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ballesteros-Zebadua, P.; Moreno-Jimenez, S.; Suarez-Campos, J. E.; Celis, M. A.; Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.; Garcia-Garduno, O. A.; Rubio-Osornio, M. C.; Custodio-Ramirez, V.; Paz, C.

    2010-12-07

    In radiotherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery, small animal experimental models are frequently used, since there are still a lot of unsolved questions about the biological and biochemical effects of ionizing radiation. This work presents a method for small-animal brain radiotherapy compatible with a dedicated 6MV Linac. This rodent model is focused on the research of the inflammatory effects produced by ionizing radiation in the brain. In this work comparisons between Pencil Beam and Monte Carlo techniques, were used in order to evaluate accuracy of the calculated dose using a commercial planning system. Challenges in this murine model are discussed.

  8. Experimental "evolutional machines": mathematical and experimental modeling of biological evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brilkov, A. V.; Loginov, I. A.; Morozova, E. V.; Shuvaev, A. N.; Pechurkin, N. S.

    Experimentalists possess model systems of two major types for study of evolution continuous cultivation in the chemostat and long-term development in closed laboratory microecosystems with several trophic structure If evolutionary changes or transfer from one steady state to another in the result of changing qualitative properties of the system take place in such systems the main characteristics of these evolution steps can be measured By now this has not been realized from the point of view of methodology though a lot of data on the work of both types of evolutionary machines has been collected In our experiments with long-term continuous cultivation we used the bacterial strains containing in plasmids the cloned genes of bioluminescence and green fluorescent protein which expression level can be easily changed and controlled In spite of the apparent kinetic diversity of evolutionary transfers in two types of systems the general mechanisms characterizing the increase of used energy flow by populations of primer producent can be revealed at their study According to the energy approach at spontaneous transfer from one steady state to another e g in the process of microevolution competition or selection heat dissipation characterizing the rate of entropy growth should increase rather then decrease or maintain steady as usually believed The results of our observations of experimental evolution require further development of thermodynamic theory of open and closed biological systems and further study of general mechanisms of biological

  9. Modeling biomedical experimental processes with OBI

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Experimental descriptions are typically stored as free text without using standardized terminology, creating challenges in comparison, reproduction and analysis. These difficulties impose limitations on data exchange and information retrieval. Results The Ontology for Biomedical Investigations (OBI), developed as a global, cross-community effort, provides a resource that represents biomedical investigations in an explicit and integrative framework. Here we detail three real-world applications of OBI, provide detailed modeling information and explain how to use OBI. Conclusion We demonstrate how OBI can be applied to different biomedical investigations to both facilitate interpretation of the experimental process and increase the computational processing and integration within the Semantic Web. The logical definitions of the entities involved allow computers to unambiguously understand and integrate different biological experimental processes and their relevant components. Availability OBI is available at http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/obi/2009-11-02/obi.owl PMID:20626927

  10. Experimental Animal Models in Periodontology: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Struillou, Xavier; Boutigny, Hervé; Soueidan, Assem; Layrolle, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    In periodontal research, animal studies are complementary to in vitro experiments prior to testing new treatments. Animal models should make possible the validation of hypotheses and prove the safety and efficacy of new regenerating approaches using biomaterials, growth factors or stem cells. A review of the literature was carried out by using electronic databases (PubMed, ISI Web of Science). Numerous animal models in different species such as rats, hamsters, rabbits, ferrets, canines and primates have been used for modeling human periodontal diseases and treatments. However, both the anatomy and physiopathology of animals are different from those of humans, making difficult the evaluation of new therapies. Experimental models have been developed in order to reproduce major periodontal diseases (gingivitis, periodontitis), their pathogenesis and to investigate new surgical techniques. The aim of this review is to define the most pertinent animal models for periodontal research depending on the hypothesis and expected results. PMID:20556202

  11. [Experimental model of ocular ischemic diseases].

    PubMed

    Kiseleva, T N; Chudin, A V

    2014-01-01

    The review presents the most common methods of modeling of retinal ischemia in vitro (chemical ischemia with iodoacetic acid, incubation of the retinal pigment epithelium cells with oligomycin, deprivation of oxygen and glucose) and in vivo (a model with increased intraocular pressure, cerebral artery occlusion, chronic ligation of the carotid arteries, photocoagulation of the retinal vessels, occlusion of the central retinal artery, endothelin-1 administration). Modeling ischemic injury in rats is the most frequently used method in studies, because the blood supply of their eyes is similar to blood flow in the human eyes. Each method has its own advantages and disadvantages. Application of methods depends on the purpose of the experimental study. Currently model of ocular ischemic disease can be obtained easily by injecting vasoconstrictive drug endothelin-1. It is the most widely used method of high intraocular pressure induced ocular ischemic damage similar to glaucoma, occlusion of central retinal artery or ophthalmic artery in human. The development of experimental models of ocular ischemic diseases and detailed investigation of mechanisms of impairment of microcirculation are useful for improve the efficiency of diagnostic and treatment of ischemic diseases of retina and optic nerve. PMID:25971134

  12. Experimental models of repetitive brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Weber, John T

    2007-01-01

    Repetitive traumatic brain injury (TBI) occurs in a significant portion of trauma patients, especially in specific populations, such as child abuse victims or athletes involved in contact sports (e.g. boxing, football, hockey, and soccer). A continually emerging hypothesis is that repeated mild injuries may cause cumulative damage to the brain, resulting in long-term cognitive dysfunction. The growing attention to this hypothesis is reflected in several recent experimental studies of repeated mild TBI in vivo. These reports generally demonstrate cellular and cognitive dysfunction after repetitive injury using rodent TBI models. In some cases, data suggests that the effects of a second mild TBI may be synergistic, rather than additive. In addition, some studies have found increases in cellular markers associated with Alzheimer's disease after repeated mild injuries, which demonstrates a direct experimental link between repetitive TBI and neurodegenerative disease. To complement the findings from humans and in vivo experimentation, my laboratory group has investigated the effects of repeated trauma in cultured brain cells using a model of stretch-induced mechanical injury in vitro. In these studies, hippocampal cells exhibited cumulative damage when mild stretch injuries were repeated at either 1-h or 24-h intervals. Interestingly, the extent of damage to the cells was dependent on the time between repeated injuries. Also, a very low level of stretch, which produced no cell damage on its own, induced cell damage when it was repeated several times at a short interval (every 2 min). Although direct comparisons to the clinical situation are difficult, these types of repetitive, low-level, mechanical stresses may be similar to the insults received by certain athletes, such as boxers, or hockey and soccer players. This type of in vitro model could provide a reliable system in which to study the mechanisms underlying cellular dysfunction following repeated injuries. As

  13. Graphical Models for Quasi-Experimental Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Yongnam; Steiner, Peter M.; Hall, Courtney E.; Su, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Experimental and quasi-experimental designs play a central role in estimating cause-effect relationships in education, psychology, and many other fields of the social and behavioral sciences. This paper presents and discusses the causal graphs of experimental and quasi-experimental designs. For quasi-experimental designs the authors demonstrate…

  14. Colonic perianastomotic carcinogenesis in an experimental model

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Holanda, Sergio; Rodrigo, Luis; Pinyol-Felis, Carme; Vinyas-Salas, Joan

    2008-01-01

    Background To examine the effect of anastomosis on experimental carcinogenesis in the colon of rats. Methods Forty-three 10-week-old male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were operated on by performing an end-to-side ileorectostomy. Group A:16 rats received no treatment. Group B: 27 rats received 18 subcutaneous injections weekly at a dose of 21 mg/kg wt of 1–2 dimethylhydrazine (DMH), from the eighth day after the intervention. Animals were sacrificed between 25–27 weeks. The number of tumours, their localization, size and microscopic characteristics were recorded. A paired chi-squared analysis was performed comparing tumoral induction in the perianastomotic zone with the rest of colon with faeces. Results No tumours appeared in the dimethylhydrazine-free group. The percentage tumoral area was greater in the perianastomotic zone compared to tumours which had developed in the rest of colon with faeces (p = 0.014). Conclusion We found a cocarcinogenic effect due to the creation of an anastomosis, when using an experimental model of colonic carcinogenesis induced by DMH in rats. PMID:18667092

  15. Effects of anethole in nociception experimental models.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Alessandra Mileni Versuti; Ames, Franciele Queiroz; Otani, Fernando; de Oliveira, Rubia Maria Weffort; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar Aparecida

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the antinociceptive activity of anethole (anethole 1-methoxy-4-benzene (1-propenyl)), major compound of the essential oil of star anise (Illicium verum), in different experimental models of nociception. The animals were pretreated with anethole (62.5, 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg) one hour before the experiments. To eliminate a possible sedative effect of anethole, the open field test was conducted. Anethole (62.5, 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg) showed an antinociceptive effect in the writhing model induced by acetic acid, in the second phase of the formalin test (125 and 250 mg/kg) in the test of glutamate (62.5, 125, and 250 mg/kg), and expresses pain induced by ACF (250 mg/kg). In contrast, anethole was not able to increase the latency time on the hot plate and decrease the number of flinches during the initial phase of the formalin test in any of the doses tested. It was also demonstrated that anethole has no association with sedative effects. Therefore, these data showed that anethole, at all used doses, has no sedative effect and has an antinociceptive effect. This effect may be due to a decrease in the production/release of inflammatory mediators. PMID:25506382

  16. Effects of Anethole in Nociception Experimental Models

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, Alessandra Mileni Versuti; Ames, Franciele Queiroz; Otani, Fernando; de Oliveira, Rubia Maria Weffort; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar Aparecida

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the antinociceptive activity of anethole (anethole 1-methoxy-4-benzene (1-propenyl)), major compound of the essential oil of star anise (Illicium verum), in different experimental models of nociception. The animals were pretreated with anethole (62.5, 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg) one hour before the experiments. To eliminate a possible sedative effect of anethole, the open field test was conducted. Anethole (62.5, 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg) showed an antinociceptive effect in the writhing model induced by acetic acid, in the second phase of the formalin test (125 and 250 mg/kg) in the test of glutamate (62.5, 125, and 250 mg/kg), and expresses pain induced by ACF (250 mg/kg). In contrast, anethole was not able to increase the latency time on the hot plate and decrease the number of flinches during the initial phase of the formalin test in any of the doses tested. It was also demonstrated that anethole has no association with sedative effects. Therefore, these data showed that anethole, at all used doses, has no sedative effect and has an antinociceptive effect. This effect may be due to a decrease in the production/release of inflammatory mediators. PMID:25506382

  17. Experimental, Numerical and Observational Models in Geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lithgow-Bertelloni, Carolina

    2015-04-01

    Geodynamics, the study of the forces that drives all Earth's processes is a rich field that deeply connects all aspects of geological and geophysical studies, from surface observations of the sedimentary record to knowledge of deep Earth structure from mineral physics and seismology. In the context of the solid Earth geodynamics primarily focuses on lithosphere and mantle dynamics, while core dynamics is the purview of geomagnetism. I will focus this talk on the former, its historical context and future developments. We have known the equations of motion and mechanics for ~200 years, but only relatively recently can they be solved with enough accuracy and resolution to do geology. We have made great strides since Arthur Holmes conceptual models of mantle flow, thanks to computational and experimental advances. We can know model plate boundaries globally with resolutions in the order of a few kms and image temperature and velocity simultaneously in the laboratory in 3D and non-intrusively. We have also learned a great deal about the physics of the Earth, from composition to rheology. New theories on plate boundary rheology are paving the way for self-consistent generation of plates from mantle flow. New computational methods allow for adaptive meshing, fabric development and history, so we can study deformation and compare directly to geological observations in mountain ranges and continental rifts. We can use ever more sophisticated images of mantle structure from seismic and other geophysical data to probe the relationship between melting, flow and dynamical processes. We can reconstruct landscapes and relief, plate motions and sedimentation and ask how much the mantle has contributed to drainage reversal, sedimentation and climate change. The future of the field is ever brighter.

  18. A human experimental model of episodic pain.

    PubMed

    Petrini, Laura; Hennings, Kristian; Li, Xi; Negro, Francesco; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2014-12-01

    An experimental model of daily episodic pain was developed to investigate peripheral sensitization and cortical reorganization in healthy individuals. Two experiments (A and B) were conducted. Experiments A and B consisted of one and five consecutive days, respectively, in which the participants were subjected to 45 min of intense painful cutaneous electrical stimulation (episodic pain session), using a stimulus paradigm that in animals has been shown to induce long-term potentiation. These electrical stimulations produced a verbal pain rating of approximately 85 on a 0-100 verbal rating scale (VRS). Physiological (blood flow and axon flare reflex), psychophysical (perception threshold and verbal pain ratings) and electrophysiological (128 channels recorded somatosensory evoked potential (SEP)) measurements were recorded. The stimulation evoked a visible axon flare reflex and caused significantly increased cutaneous blood flow around the site of the stimulation. Axon flare reflex and blood flow reached a plateau on day one in all the subjects and no significant changes between the days were observed. The results showed that the effect of the electrical stimulations changed over the five days; pain potentiation was induced on the first day (significant increase in the verbal pain ratings during the 45 min stimulation) but not on any of the subsequent days. After five days of subsequent pain induction, the global field power showed a significant reduction in P2 amplitude in the late stage (200-370 ms, in the central-parietal area). In conclusion, the results suggest that in healthy individuals this model of episodic pain produces a rapid adaptation after day one and that generates significant SEP changes at day five.

  19. Experimental modelling of outburst flood - bed interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrivick, J. L.; Xie, Z.; Sleigh, A.; Hubbard, M.

    2009-04-01

    Outburst floods are a sudden release and advancing wave of water and sediment, with a peak discharge that is often several orders of magnitude greater than perennial flows. Common outburst floods from natural sources include those from glacial and moraine-impounded lakes, freshwater dyke and levee bursts, volcanic debris dams, landslides, avalanches, coastal bay-bars, and those from tree or vegetation dams. Outburst flood hazards are regularly incorporated into risk assessments for urban, coastal and mountainous areas, for example. Outburst flood hazards are primarily due to direct impacts, caused by a frontal surge wave, from debris within a flow body, and from the mass and consistency of the flows. A number of secondary impacts also pose hazards, including widespread deposition of sediment and blocked tributary streams. It is rapid landscape change, which is achieved the mobilization and redistribution of sediment that causes one of the greatest hazards due to outburst floods. The aim of this project is therefore to parameterise hydrodynamic - sedimentary interactions in experimental outburst floods. Specifically, this project applies laboratory flume modelling, which offers a hitherto untapped opportunity for examining complex interactions between water and sediment within outburst floods. The experimental set-up is of a tradition lock-gate design with a straight 4 m long tank. Hydraulics are scaled at 1:20 froude scale and the following controls on frontal wave flow-bed interactions and hence on rapid landscape change are being investigated: 1. Pre-existing mobile sediment effects, fixed bed roughness effects, sediment concentration effects, mobile bed effects. An emphasis is being maintained on examining the downstream temporal and spatial change in physical character of the water / sediment frontal wave. Facilities are state-of-the-art with a fully-automated laser bed-profiler to measure bed elevation after a run, Seatek arrays to measure transient flow

  20. Biomass thermochemical gasification: Experimental studies and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ajay

    The overall goals of this research were to study the biomass thermochemical gasification using experimental and modeling techniques, and to evaluate the cost of industrial gas production and combined heat and power generation. This dissertation includes an extensive review of progresses in biomass thermochemical gasification. Product gases from biomass gasification can be converted to biopower, biofuels and chemicals. However, for its viable commercial applications, the study summarizes the technical challenges in the gasification and downstream processing of product gas. Corn stover and dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS), a non-fermentable byproduct of ethanol production, were used as the biomass feedstocks. One of the objectives was to determine selected physical and chemical properties of corn stover related to thermochemical conversion. The parameters of the reaction kinetics for weight loss were obtained. The next objective was to investigate the effects of temperature, steam to biomass ratio and equivalence ratio on gas composition and efficiencies. DDGS gasification was performed on a lab-scale fluidized-bed gasifier with steam and air as fluidizing and oxidizing agents. Increasing the temperature resulted in increases in hydrogen and methane contents and efficiencies. A model was developed to simulate the performance of a lab-scale gasifier using Aspen Plus(TM) software. Mass balance, energy balance and minimization of Gibbs free energy were applied for the gasification to determine the product gas composition. The final objective was to optimize the process by maximizing the net energy efficiency, and to estimate the cost of industrial gas, and combined heat and power (CHP) at a biomass feedrate of 2000 kg/h. The selling price of gas was estimated to be 11.49/GJ for corn stover, and 13.08/GJ for DDGS. For CHP generation, the electrical and net efficiencies were 37 and 86%, respectively for corn stover, and 34 and 78%, respectively for DDGS. For

  1. Experimentally Induced Mammalian Models of Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Yoshitomi, Takeshi; Zorumski, Charles F.; Izumi, Yukitoshi

    2015-01-01

    A wide variety of animal models have been used to study glaucoma. Although these models provide valuable information about the disease, there is still no ideal model for studying glaucoma due to its complex pathogenesis. Animal models for glaucoma are pivotal for clarifying glaucoma etiology and for developing novel therapeutic strategies to halt disease progression. In this review paper, we summarize some of the major findings obtained in various glaucoma models and examine the strengths and limitations of these models. PMID:26064891

  2. Combined experimental/analytical modeling using component mode synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, D.R.; Carne, T.G.; Gregory, D.L.; Miller, A.K.

    1984-01-01

    This study evaluates the accuracy of computed model frequencies and mode shapes obtained from a combined experimental/analytical model for a simple beam structure. The structure was divided into two subsystems, and one subsystem was tested to obtain its free-free modes. Using a Component Mode Synthesis (CMS) technique, the experimental model data base for one subsystem was directly coupled with a finite element model of the other subsystem to create an experimental/analytical model of the total structure. Both the translational and rotational elements of the residual flexibilities and mode shapes at the interface of the experimental subsystem were measured and used in the coupling. The modal frequencies and mode shapes obtained for the combined experimental/analytical model are compared to those for a reference finite element model of the entire structure. The sensitivity of the CMS model predictions to errors in the modal parameters and residual flexibilities, which are required to define a subsystem, is also examined.

  3. Modeling and experimental investigating loop heat pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Kiseev, V.M.; Pogorelov, N.P.; Nouroutdinov, V.A.

    1995-12-31

    Design variants of two-phase systems of thermal control with heat flux inversion and experimental data are presented. Simplified functional dependence of heat flux for loop heat pipes with heat flux inversion versus effective pore radius of capillary structures under various external conditions are obtained.

  4. Combined experimental/analytical modeling using component mode synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, D.R.; Carne, T.G.; Gregory, D.L.; Miller, A.K.

    1984-04-01

    This study evaluates the accuracy of computed modal frequencies and mode shapes obtained from a combined experimental/analytical model for a simple beam structure. The structure was divided into two subsystems and one subsystem was tested to obtain its free-free modes. Using a Component Mode Synthesis (CMS) technique, the experimental modal data base for one subsystem was directly coupled with a finite element model of the other subsystem to create an experimental/analytical model of the total structure. Both the translational and rotational elements of the residual flexibilities and mode shapes at the interface of the experimental subsystem were measured and used in the coupling. The modal frequencies and mode shapes obtained for the combined experimental/analytical model are compared to those for a reference finite element model of the entire structure. The sensitivity of the CMS model predictions to errors in the modal parameters and residual flexibilities, which are required to define a subsystem, is also examined.

  5. Experimental Diabetes Mellitus in Different Animal Models.

    PubMed

    Al-Awar, Amin; Kupai, Krisztina; Veszelka, Médea; Szűcs, Gergő; Attieh, Zouhair; Murlasits, Zsolt; Török, Szilvia; Pósa, Anikó; Varga, Csaba

    2016-01-01

    Animal models have historically played a critical role in the exploration and characterization of disease pathophysiology and target identification and in the evaluation of novel therapeutic agents and treatments in vivo. Diabetes mellitus disease, commonly known as diabetes, is a group of metabolic disorders characterized by high blood glucose levels for a prolonged time. To avoid late complications of diabetes and related costs, primary prevention and early treatment are therefore necessary. Due to its chronic symptoms, new treatment strategies need to be developed, because of the limited effectiveness of the current therapies. We overviewed the pathophysiological features of diabetes in relation to its complications in type 1 and type 2 mice along with rat models, including Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) rats, BB rats, LEW 1AR1/-iddm rats, Goto-Kakizaki rats, chemically induced diabetic models, and Nonobese Diabetic mouse, and Akita mice model. The advantages and disadvantages that these models comprise were also addressed in this review. This paper briefly reviews the wide pathophysiological and molecular mechanisms associated with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, particularly focusing on the challenges associated with the evaluation and predictive validation of these models as ideal animal models for preclinical assessments and discovering new drugs and therapeutic agents for translational application in humans. PMID:27595114

  6. Experimental Diabetes Mellitus in Different Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Al-awar, Amin; Veszelka, Médea; Szűcs, Gergő; Attieh, Zouhair; Murlasits, Zsolt; Török, Szilvia; Pósa, Anikó; Varga, Csaba

    2016-01-01

    Animal models have historically played a critical role in the exploration and characterization of disease pathophysiology and target identification and in the evaluation of novel therapeutic agents and treatments in vivo. Diabetes mellitus disease, commonly known as diabetes, is a group of metabolic disorders characterized by high blood glucose levels for a prolonged time. To avoid late complications of diabetes and related costs, primary prevention and early treatment are therefore necessary. Due to its chronic symptoms, new treatment strategies need to be developed, because of the limited effectiveness of the current therapies. We overviewed the pathophysiological features of diabetes in relation to its complications in type 1 and type 2 mice along with rat models, including Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) rats, BB rats, LEW 1AR1/-iddm rats, Goto-Kakizaki rats, chemically induced diabetic models, and Nonobese Diabetic mouse, and Akita mice model. The advantages and disadvantages that these models comprise were also addressed in this review. This paper briefly reviews the wide pathophysiological and molecular mechanisms associated with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, particularly focusing on the challenges associated with the evaluation and predictive validation of these models as ideal animal models for preclinical assessments and discovering new drugs and therapeutic agents for translational application in humans.

  7. Experimental Diabetes Mellitus in Different Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Al-awar, Amin; Veszelka, Médea; Szűcs, Gergő; Attieh, Zouhair; Murlasits, Zsolt; Török, Szilvia; Pósa, Anikó; Varga, Csaba

    2016-01-01

    Animal models have historically played a critical role in the exploration and characterization of disease pathophysiology and target identification and in the evaluation of novel therapeutic agents and treatments in vivo. Diabetes mellitus disease, commonly known as diabetes, is a group of metabolic disorders characterized by high blood glucose levels for a prolonged time. To avoid late complications of diabetes and related costs, primary prevention and early treatment are therefore necessary. Due to its chronic symptoms, new treatment strategies need to be developed, because of the limited effectiveness of the current therapies. We overviewed the pathophysiological features of diabetes in relation to its complications in type 1 and type 2 mice along with rat models, including Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) rats, BB rats, LEW 1AR1/-iddm rats, Goto-Kakizaki rats, chemically induced diabetic models, and Nonobese Diabetic mouse, and Akita mice model. The advantages and disadvantages that these models comprise were also addressed in this review. This paper briefly reviews the wide pathophysiological and molecular mechanisms associated with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, particularly focusing on the challenges associated with the evaluation and predictive validation of these models as ideal animal models for preclinical assessments and discovering new drugs and therapeutic agents for translational application in humans. PMID:27595114

  8. Cooking Potatoes: Experimentation and Mathematical Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Xiao Dong

    2002-01-01

    Describes a laboratory activity involving a mathematical model of cooking potatoes that can be solved analytically. Highlights the microstructure aspects of the experiment. Provides the key aspects of the results, detailed background readings, laboratory procedures and data analyses. (MM)

  9. Experimentally validated finite element model of electrocaloric multilayer ceramic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, N. A. S. E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk Correia, T. M. E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk; Rokosz, M. K. E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk

    2014-07-28

    A novel finite element model to simulate the electrocaloric response of a multilayer ceramic capacitor (MLCC) under real environment and operational conditions has been developed. The two-dimensional transient conductive heat transfer model presented includes the electrocaloric effect as a source term, as well as accounting for radiative and convective effects. The model has been validated with experimental data obtained from the direct imaging of MLCC transient temperature variation under application of an electric field. The good agreement between simulated and experimental data, suggests that the novel experimental direct measurement methodology and the finite element model could be used to support the design of optimised electrocaloric units and operating conditions.

  10. Gear Windage Modeling Progress - Experimental Validation Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunz, Rob; Handschuh, Robert F.

    2008-01-01

    In the Subsonics Rotary Wing (SRW) Project being funded for propulsion work at NASA Glenn Research Center, performance of the propulsion system is of high importance. In current rotorcraft drive systems many gearing components operate at high rotational speed (pitch line velocity > 24000 ft/ min). In our testing of high speed helical gear trains at NASA Glenn we have found that the work done on the air - oil mist within the gearbox can become a significant part of the power loss of the system. This loss mechanism is referred to as windage. The effort described in this presentation is to try to understand the variables that affect windage, develop a good experimental data base to validate, the analytical project being conducted at Penn State University by Dr. Rob Kunz under a NASA SRW NRA. The presentation provides an update to the status of these efforts.

  11. Modeling Graves' Orbitopathy in Experimental Graves' Disease.

    PubMed

    Banga, J P; Moshkelgosha, S; Berchner-Pfannschmidt, U; Eckstein, A

    2015-09-01

    Graves' orbitopathy (GO), also known as thyroid eye disease is an inflammatory disease of the orbital tissue of the eye that arises as a consequence of autoimmune thyroid disease. The central feature of the disease is the production of antibodies to the thyrotropin hormone receptor (TSHR) that modulate the function of the receptor leading to autoimmune hyperthyroidism and GO. Over the years, all viable preclinical models of Graves' disease have been incomplete and singularly failed to progress in the treatment of orbital complications. A new mouse model of GO based upon immunogenic presentation of human TSHR A-subunit plasmid by close field electroporation is shown to lead to induction of prolonged functional antibodies to TSHR resulting in chronic disease with subsequent progression to GO. The stable preclinical GO model exhibited pathologies reminiscent of human disease characterized by orbital remodeling by inflammation and adipogenesis. Inflammatory lesions characterized by CD3+ T cells and macrophages were localized in the orbital muscle tissue. This was accompanied by extensive adipogenesis of orbital fat in some immune animals. Surprisingly, other signs of orbital involvement were reminiscent of eyelid inflammation involving chemosis, with dilated and congested orbital blood vessels. More recently, the model is replicated in the author's independent laboratories. The pre-clinical model will provide the basis to study the pathogenic and regulatory roles of immune T and B cells and their subpopulations to understand the initiation, pathophysiology, and progression of GO.

  12. Experimental evaluations of the microchannel flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, K. J.

    2015-06-01

    Recent advances have enabled a new wave of biomechanics measurements, and have renewed interest in selecting appropriate rheological models for soft tissues such as the liver, thyroid, and prostate. The microchannel flow model was recently introduced to describe the linear response of tissue to stimuli such as stress relaxation or shear wave propagation. This model postulates a power law relaxation spectrum that results from a branching distribution of vessels and channels in normal soft tissue such as liver. In this work, the derivation is extended to determine the explicit link between the distribution of vessels and the relaxation spectrum. In addition, liver tissue is modified by temperature or salinity, and the resulting changes in tissue responses (by factors of 1.5 or greater) are reasonably predicted from the microchannel flow model, simply by considering the changes in fluid flow through the modified samples. The 2 and 4 parameter versions of the model are considered, and it is shown that in some cases the maximum time constant (corresponding to the minimum vessel diameters), could be altered in a way that has major impact on the observed tissue response. This could explain why an inflamed region is palpated as a harder bump compared to surrounding normal tissue.

  13. Ideal Experimental Rat Models for Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Woo; Kim, Sung Hoon; Min, Seon Ok

    2011-01-01

    There are many limitations for conducting liver disease research in human beings due to the high cost and potential ethical issues. For this reason, conducting a study that is difficult to perform in humans using appropriate animal models, can be beneficial in ascertaining the pathological physiology, and in developing new treatment modalities. However, it is difficult to determine the appropriate animal model which is suitable for research purposes, since every patient has different and diverse clinical symptoms, adverse reactions, and complications due to the pathological physiology. Also, it is not easy to reproduce identically various clinical situations in animal models. Recently, the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals has tightened up the regulations, and therefore it is advisable to select the appropriate animals and decide upon the appropriate quantities through scientific and systemic considerations before conducting animal testing. Therefore, in this review article the authors examined various white rat animal testing models and determined the appropriate usable rat model, and the pros and cons of its application in liver disease research. The authors believe that this review will be beneficial in selecting proper laboratory animals for research purposes. PMID:26421020

  14. Experimental Design and Multiplexed Modeling Using Titrimetry and Spreadsheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Peter De B.; Kolbrich, Erin; Cline, Jennifer

    2002-07-01

    The topics of experimental design and modeling are important for inclusion in the undergraduate curriculum. Many general chemistry and quantitative analysis courses introduce students to spreadsheet programs, such as MS Excel. Students in the laboratory sections of these courses use titrimetry as a quantitative measurement method. Unfortunately, the only model that students may be exposed to in introductory chemistry courses is the working curve that uses the linear model. A novel experiment based on a multiplex model has been devised for titrating several vinegar samples at a time. The multiplex titration can be applied to many other routine determinations. An experimental design model is fit to titrimetric measurements using the MS Excel LINEST function to estimate concentration from each sample. This experiment provides valuable lessons in error analysis, Class A glassware tolerances, experimental simulation, statistics, modeling, and experimental design.

  15. Scaled Experimental Modeling of VHTR Plenum Flows

    SciTech Connect

    ICONE 15

    2007-04-01

    Abstract The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is the leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project in the U.S. which has the goal of demonstrating the production of emissions free electricity and hydrogen by 2015. Various scaled heated gas and water flow facilities were investigated for modeling VHTR upper and lower plenum flows during the decay heat portion of a pressurized conduction-cooldown scenario and for modeling thermal mixing and stratification (“thermal striping”) in the lower plenum during normal operation. It was concluded, based on phenomena scaling and instrumentation and other practical considerations, that a heated water flow scale model facility is preferable to a heated gas flow facility and to unheated facilities which use fluids with ranges of density to simulate the density effect of heating. For a heated water flow lower plenum model, both the Richardson numbers and Reynolds numbers may be approximately matched for conduction-cooldown natural circulation conditions. Thermal mixing during normal operation may be simulated but at lower, but still fully turbulent, Reynolds numbers than in the prototype. Natural circulation flows in the upper plenum may also be simulated in a separate heated water flow facility that uses the same plumbing as the lower plenum model. However, Reynolds number scaling distortions will occur at matching Richardson numbers due primarily to the necessity of using a reduced number of channels connected to the plenum than in the prototype (which has approximately 11,000 core channels connected to the upper plenum) in an otherwise geometrically scaled model. Experiments conducted in either or both facilities will meet the objectives of providing benchmark data for the validation of codes proposed for NGNP designs and safety studies, as well as providing a better understanding of the complex flow phenomena in the plenums.

  16. Software reliability: Repetitive run experimentation and modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagel, P. M.; Skrivan, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    A software experiment conducted with repetitive run sampling is reported. Independently generated input data was used to verify that interfailure times are very nearly exponentially distributed and to obtain good estimates of the failure rates of individual errors and demonstrate how widely they vary. This fact invalidates many of the popular software reliability models now in use. The log failure rate of interfailure time was nearly linear as a function of the number of errors corrected. A new model of software reliability is proposed that incorporates these observations.

  17. Experimental Control of Simple Pendulum Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medina, C.

    2004-01-01

    This paper conveys information about a Physics laboratory experiment for students with some theoretical knowledge about oscillatory motion. Students construct a simple pendulum that behaves as an ideal one, and analyze model assumption incidence on its period. The following aspects are quantitatively analyzed: vanishing friction, small amplitude,…

  18. Experimental Investigation of Iron Plasma Opacity Models

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, J. E.; Rochau, G. A.; Hansen, S. B.; Nash, T. J.; Nielsen, D. S.; Lake, P. W.; Iglesias, C. A.; Mancini, R. C.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Golovkin, I.; Wang, P.; Blancard, C.; Cosse, Ph.; Faussurier, G.; Gilleron, F.; Pain, J. C.; Abdallah, J. Jr.; Pradhan, A. K.; Nahar, S. N.

    2009-09-10

    Recent experiments extended iron opacity model tests to temperatures above 150 eV for the first time. The experiments use the Z Facility to volumetrically heat a CH-tamped Fe/Mg plasma using x-rays. The frequency dependent sample transmission is measured by viewing a backlight through the sample. The plasma conditions are inferred from the Mg K-shell absorption. The strategy for this research is to examine the underlying physics within Fe opacity models by comparisons with the measured transmission. Physics topics of interest include charge state distribution, energy level structure, and line broadening. In this talk we discuss methods to exploit the data and advance understanding for these topics. In addition, we review new experiments under way to further improve the data and to achieve higher energy density conditions.

  19. Performance Modeling of Experimental Laser Lightcrafts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Chen, Yen-Sen; Liu, Jiwen; Myrabo, Leik N.; Mead, Franklin B., Jr.; Turner, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A computational plasma aerodynamics model is developed to study the performance of a laser propelled Lightcraft. The computational methodology is based on a time-accurate, three-dimensional, finite-difference, chemically reacting, unstructured grid, pressure-based formulation. The underlying physics are added and tested systematically using a building-block approach. The physics modeled include non-equilibrium thermodynamics, non-equilibrium air-plasma finite-rate kinetics, specular ray tracing, laser beam energy absorption and refraction by plasma, non-equilibrium plasma radiation, and plasma resonance. A series of transient computations are performed at several laser pulse energy levels and the simulated physics are discussed and compared with those of tests and literatures. The predicted coupling coefficients for the Lightcraft compared reasonably well with those of tests conducted on a pendulum apparatus.

  20. Experimental Forelimb Allotransplantation in Canine Model.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sa-Hyeok; Eun, Seok-Chan

    2016-01-01

    As reconstructive transplantation is gaining popularity as a viable alternative for upper limb amputees, it is becoming increasingly important for plastic surgeons to renew surgical skills and knowledge of this area. Forelimb allotransplantation research has been performed previously in rodent and swine models. However, preclinical canine forelimb allotransplantation studies are lacking in the literature. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the surgical skills necessary to successfully perform forelimb transplantation in canines as a means to prepare for clinical application. A total of 18 transplantation operations on canines were performed. The recipient limb was shortened at the one-third proximal forearm level. The operation was performed in the following order: bones (two reconstructive plates), muscles and tendons (separately sutured), nerves (median, ulnar, and radial nerve), arteries (two), and veins (two). The total mean time of transplantation was 5 hours ± 30 minutes. All of the animals that received transplantation were treated with FK-506 (tacrolimus, 2 mg/kg) for 7 days after surgery. Most allografts survived with perfect viability without vascular problems during the early postoperative period. The canine forelimb allotransplantation model is well qualified to be a suitable training model for standard transplantation and future research work. PMID:27597952

  1. Experimental Forelimb Allotransplantation in Canine Model

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    As reconstructive transplantation is gaining popularity as a viable alternative for upper limb amputees, it is becoming increasingly important for plastic surgeons to renew surgical skills and knowledge of this area. Forelimb allotransplantation research has been performed previously in rodent and swine models. However, preclinical canine forelimb allotransplantation studies are lacking in the literature. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the surgical skills necessary to successfully perform forelimb transplantation in canines as a means to prepare for clinical application. A total of 18 transplantation operations on canines were performed. The recipient limb was shortened at the one-third proximal forearm level. The operation was performed in the following order: bones (two reconstructive plates), muscles and tendons (separately sutured), nerves (median, ulnar, and radial nerve), arteries (two), and veins (two). The total mean time of transplantation was 5 hours ± 30 minutes. All of the animals that received transplantation were treated with FK-506 (tacrolimus, 2 mg/kg) for 7 days after surgery. Most allografts survived with perfect viability without vascular problems during the early postoperative period. The canine forelimb allotransplantation model is well qualified to be a suitable training model for standard transplantation and future research work. PMID:27597952

  2. Different experimental approaches in modelling cataractogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kyselova, Zuzana

    2010-01-01

    Cataract, the opacification of eye lens, is the leading cause of blindness worldwide. At present, the only remedy is surgical removal of the cataractous lens and substitution with a lens made of synthetic polymers. However, besides significant costs of operation and possible complications, an artificial lens just does not have the overall optical qualities of a normal one. Hence it remains a significant public health problem, and biochemical solutions or pharmacological interventions that will maintain the transparency of the lens are highly required. Naturally, there is a persistent demand for suitable biological models. The ocular lens would appear to be an ideal organ for maintaining culture conditions because of lacking blood vessels and nerves. The lens in vivo obtains its nutrients and eliminates waste products via diffusion with the surrounding fluids. Lens opacification observed in vivo can be mimicked in vitro by addition of the cataractogenic agent sodium selenite (Na2SeO3) to the culture medium. Moreover, since an overdose of sodium selenite induces also cataract in young rats, it became an extremely rapid and convenient model of nuclear cataract in vivo. The main focus of this review will be on selenium (Se) and its salt sodium selenite, their toxicological characteristics and safety data in relevance of modelling cataractogenesis, either under in vivo or in vitro conditions. The studies revealing the mechanisms of lens opacification induced by selenite are highlighted, the representatives from screening for potential anti-cataract agents are listed. PMID:21217865

  3. Experimental models of hepatocellular carcinoma: developments and evolution.

    PubMed

    Wu, Long; Tang, Zhao-You; Li, Yan

    2009-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignancies in the world. The biological mechanisms of hepatocarcinogenesis and progression are poorly understood. Experimental models of HCC provide valuable tools to evaluate the risk factors, new treatment modalities and biologic characteristics. Under the constant evolution in model design and technology development, new experimental models continue to emerge, including spontaneous models, induced models, viral models, transplantable models, and genetically engineered models. These models are used as tools to investigate basic biological mechanisms of growth and differentiation, oncogene function, and as systems to test new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. Each model has its own advantages and disadvantages. The progress in HCC model construction and studies are summarized in this review. PMID:19399516

  4. Experimental Validation of a Thermoelastic Model for SMA Hybrid Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.

    2001-01-01

    This study presents results from experimental validation of a recently developed model for predicting the thermomechanical behavior of shape memory alloy hybrid composite (SMAHC) structures, composite structures with an embedded SMA constituent. The model captures the material nonlinearity of the material system with temperature and is capable of modeling constrained, restrained, or free recovery behavior from experimental measurement of fundamental engineering properties. A brief description of the model and analysis procedures is given, followed by an overview of a parallel effort to fabricate and characterize the material system of SMAHC specimens. Static and dynamic experimental configurations for the SMAHC specimens are described and experimental results for thermal post-buckling and random response are presented. Excellent agreement is achieved between the measured and predicted results, fully validating the theoretical model for constrained recovery behavior of SMAHC structures.

  5. Experimentally testing the standard cosmological model

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, D.N. Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL )

    1990-11-01

    The standard model of cosmology, the big bang, is now being tested and confirmed to remarkable accuracy. Recent high precision measurements relate to the microwave background; and big bang nucleosynthesis. This paper focuses on the latter since that relates more directly to high energy experiments. In particular, the recent LEP (and SLC) results on the number of neutrinos are discussed as a positive laboratory test of the standard cosmology scenario. Discussion is presented on the improved light element observational data as well as the improved neutron lifetime data. alternate nucleosynthesis scenarios of decaying matter or of quark-hadron induced inhomogeneities are discussed. It is shown that when these scenarios are made to fit the observed abundances accurately, the resulting conclusions on the baryonic density relative to the critical density, {Omega}{sub b}, remain approximately the same as in the standard homogeneous case, thus, adding to the robustness of the standard model conclusion that {Omega}{sub b} {approximately} 0.06. This latter point is the deriving force behind the need for non-baryonic dark matter (assuming {Omega}{sub total} = 1) and the need for dark baryonic matter, since {Omega}{sub visible} < {Omega}{sub b}. Recent accelerator constraints on non-baryonic matter are discussed, showing that any massive cold dark matter candidate must now have a mass M{sub x} {approx gt} 20 GeV and an interaction weaker than the Z{sup 0} coupling to a neutrino. It is also noted that recent hints regarding the solar neutrino experiments coupled with the see-saw model for {nu}-masses may imply that the {nu}{sub {tau}} is a good hot dark matter candidate. 73 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Experimental photoallergic contact dermatitis: a mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Maguire, H.C. Jr.; Kaidbey, K.

    1982-09-01

    We have induced photoallergic contact dermatitis in mice to 3,3',4',5 tetrachlorosalicylanilide (TCSA), chlorpromazine and 6-methylcoumarin. These compounds are known to produce photoallergic contact dermatitis in humans. The photoallergic contact dermatitis reaction in the mouse is immunologically specific viz. mice photosensitized to TCSA react, by photochallenge, to that compound and not to chlorpromazine, and conversely. The reaction requires UVA at both sensitization and challenge. It appears to be T-cell mediated in that it can be passively transferred to syngeneic mice by lymph node cells from actively sensitized mice, the histology of the reactions resembles that of classic allergic contact dermatitis in mice, challenge reactions are seen at 24 but not at 4 hr, and photoallergic contact dermatitis can be induced in B-cell deficient mice. The availability of a mouse model for the study of photo-ACD will facilitate the identification of pertinent control mechanisms and may aid in the management of the disease. It is likely that a bioassay for photoallergens of humans can be based on this mouse model.

  7. Experimental and analytical generic space station dynamic models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. K.; Edighoffer, H. H.

    1986-01-01

    A dynamic model used for verification of analytical and experimental methods is documented. The model consists of five substructures to simulate the multibody, low frequency nature of large space structures. Design considerations which led to a fundamental vibration frequency of less than one Hz are described. Finite element analysis used to predict the vibration modes and frequencies of the experimental model is presented. In addition, modeling of cable suspension effects using prestressed vibration analysis is described. Details of the expermental and analytical models are included to permit replication of the study. Results of the modal vibration tests and analysis are presented in a separate document.

  8. Segmented Polynomial Models in Quasi-Experimental Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasik, John L.

    1981-01-01

    The use of segmented polynomial models is explained. Examples of design matrices of dummy variables are given for the least squares analyses of time series and discontinuity quasi-experimental research designs. Linear combinations of dummy variable vectors appear to provide tests of effects in the two quasi-experimental designs. (Author/BW)

  9. Experimental Models on Effects of Psychostimulants.

    PubMed

    Kõks, Sulev

    2015-01-01

    Psychostimulants are a diverse group of substances that cause an increase in psychomotor activity at least in part through their actions on catecholaminergic systems including the dopaminergic mesolimbic pathways. Animal models used to study addiction are based on the psychomotor stimulant theory of addiction. The basics of this theory are that the reinforcing effects and the addition liabilities of the drugs can be predicted from their ability to induce psychomotor activation. This approach focuses on the ability of the drugs to directly control the animal's behavior and to induce psychomotor stimulation, and is consistent with the behavioral definition of addiction and behavioral sensitization. Animal experiments have the advantage over clinical studies of lower variation and fewer confounding effects. PMID:26070755

  10. Experimental Models on Effects of Psychostimulants.

    PubMed

    Kõks, Sulev

    2015-01-01

    Psychostimulants are a diverse group of substances that cause an increase in psychomotor activity at least in part through their actions on catecholaminergic systems including the dopaminergic mesolimbic pathways. Animal models used to study addiction are based on the psychomotor stimulant theory of addiction. The basics of this theory are that the reinforcing effects and the addition liabilities of the drugs can be predicted from their ability to induce psychomotor activation. This approach focuses on the ability of the drugs to directly control the animal's behavior and to induce psychomotor stimulation, and is consistent with the behavioral definition of addiction and behavioral sensitization. Animal experiments have the advantage over clinical studies of lower variation and fewer confounding effects.

  11. Experimental investigation of a flapping wing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubel, Tatjana Y.; Tropea, Cameron

    The main objective of this research study was to investigate the aerodynamic forces of an avian flapping wing model system. The model size and the flow conditions were chosen to approximate the flight of a goose. Direct force measurements, using a three-component balance, and PIV flow field measurements parallel and perpendicular to the oncoming flow, were performed in a wind tunnel at Reynolds numbers between 28,000 and 141,000 (3-15 m/s), throughout a range of reduced frequencies between 0.04 and 0.20. The appropriateness of quasi-steady assumptions used to compare 2D, time-averaged particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements in the wake with direct force measurements was evaluated. The vertical force coefficient for flapping wings was typically significantly higher than the maximum coefficient of the fixed wing, implying the influence of unsteady effects, such as delayed stall, even at low reduced frequencies. This puts the validity of the quasi-steady assumption into question. The (local) change in circulation over the wing beat cycle and the circulation distribution along the wingspan were obtained from the measurements in the tip and transverse vortex planes. Flow separation could be observed in the distribution of the circulation, and while the circulation derived from the wake measurements failed to agree exactly with the absolute value of the circulation, the change in circulation over the wing beat cycle was in excellent agreement for low and moderate reduced frequencies. The comparison between the PIV measurements in the two perpendicular planes and the direct force balance measurements, show that within certain limitations the wake visualization is a powerful tool to gain insight into force generation and the flow behavior on flapping wings over the wing beat cycle.

  12. Experimental investigation of a flapping wing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubel, Tatjana Y.; Tropea, Cameron

    2009-05-01

    The main objective of this research study was to investigate the aerodynamic forces of an avian flapping wing model system. The model size and the flow conditions were chosen to approximate the flight of a goose. Direct force measurements, using a three-component balance, and PIV flow field measurements parallel and perpendicular to the oncoming flow, were performed in a wind tunnel at Reynolds numbers between 28,000 and 141,000 (3-15 m/s), throughout a range of reduced frequencies between 0.04 and 0.20. The appropriateness of quasi-steady assumptions used to compare 2D, time-averaged particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements in the wake with direct force measurements was evaluated. The vertical force coefficient for flapping wings was typically significantly higher than the maximum coefficient of the fixed wing, implying the influence of unsteady effects, such as delayed stall, even at low reduced frequencies. This puts the validity of the quasi-steady assumption into question. The (local) change in circulation over the wing beat cycle and the circulation distribution along the wingspan were obtained from the measurements in the tip and transverse vortex planes. Flow separation could be observed in the distribution of the circulation, and while the circulation derived from the wake measurements failed to agree exactly with the absolute value of the circulation, the change in circulation over the wing beat cycle was in excellent agreement for low and moderate reduced frequencies. The comparison between the PIV measurements in the two perpendicular planes and the direct force balance measurements, show that within certain limitations the wake visualization is a powerful tool to gain insight into force generation and the flow behavior on flapping wings over the wing beat cycle.

  13. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Experimental Models

    PubMed Central

    Price, Anthony N.; Cheung, King K.; Cleary, Jon O; Campbell, Adrienne E; Riegler, Johannes; Lythgoe, Mark F

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is the modality of choice for clinical studies of the heart and vasculature, offering detailed images of both structure and function with high temporal resolution. Small animals are increasingly used for genetic and translational research, in conjunction with models of common pathologies such as myocardial infarction. In all cases, effective methods for characterising a wide range of functional and anatomical parameters are crucial for robust studies. CMR is the gold-standard for the non-invasive examination of these models, although physiological differences, such as rapid heart rate, make this a greater challenge than conventional clinical imaging. However, with the help of specialised magnetic resonance (MR) systems, novel gating strategies and optimised pulse sequences, high-quality images can be obtained in these animals despite their small size. In this review, we provide an overview of the principal CMR techniques for small animals for example cine, angiography and perfusion imaging, which can provide measures such as ejection fraction, vessel anatomy and local blood flow, respectively. In combination with MR contrast agents, regional dysfunction in the heart can also be identified and assessed. We also discuss optimal methods for analysing CMR data, particularly the use of semi-automated tools for parameter measurement to reduce analysis time. Finally, we describe current and emerging methods for imaging the developing heart, aiding characterisation of congenital cardiovascular defects. Advanced small animal CMR now offers an unparalleled range of cardiovascular assessments. Employing these methods should allow new insights into the structural, functional and molecular basis of the cardiovascular system. PMID:21331311

  14. Mathematical Models and the Experimental Analysis of Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazur, James E.

    2006-01-01

    The use of mathematical models in the experimental analysis of behavior has increased over the years, and they offer several advantages. Mathematical models require theorists to be precise and unambiguous, often allowing comparisons of competing theories that sound similar when stated in words. Sometimes different mathematical models may make…

  15. A systematic review of animal models for experimental neuroma.

    PubMed

    Toia, Francesca; Giesen, Thomas; Giovanoli, Pietro; Calcagni, Maurizio

    2015-10-01

    Peripheral neuromas can result in an unbearable neuropathic pain and functional impairment. Their treatment is still challenging, and their optimal management is to be defined. Experimental research still plays a major role, but - although numerous neuroma models have been proposed on different animals - there is still no single model recognised as being the reference. Several models show advantages over the others in specific aspects of neuroma physiopathology, prevention or treatment, making it unlikely that a single model could be of reference. A reproducible and standardised model of peripheral neuroma would allow better comparison of results from different studies. We present a systematic review of the literature on experimental in vivo models, analysing advantages and disadvantages, specific features and indications, with the goal of providing suggestions to help their standardisation. Published models greatly differ in the animal and the nerve employed, the mechanisms of nerve injury and the evaluation methods. Specific experimental models exist for terminal neuromas and neuromas in continuity (NIC). The rat is the most widely employed animal, the rabbit being the second most popular model. NIC models are more actively researched, but it is more difficult to generate such studies in a reproducible manner. Nerve transection is considered the best method to cause terminal neuromas, whereas partial transection is the best method to cause NIC. Traditional histomorphology is the historical gold-standard evaluation method, but immunolabelling, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and proteomics are gaining increasing popularity. Computerised gait analysis is the gold standard for motor-recovery evaluation, whereas mechanical testing of allodynia and hyperalgesia reproducibly assesses sensory recovery. This review summarises current knowledge on experimental neuroma models, and it provides a useful tool for defining experimental protocols

  16. Mutant mice: experimental organisms as materialised models in biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Huber, Lara; Keuck, Lara K

    2013-09-01

    Animal models have received particular attention as key examples of material models. In this paper, we argue that the specificities of establishing animal models-acknowledging their status as living beings and as epistemological tools-necessitate a more complex account of animal models as materialised models. This becomes particularly evident in animal-based models of diseases that only occur in humans: in these cases, the representational relation between animal model and human patient needs to be generated and validated. The first part of this paper presents an account of how disease-specific animal models are established by drawing on the example of transgenic mice models for Alzheimer's disease. We will introduce an account of validation that involves a three-fold process including (1) from human being to experimental organism; (2) from experimental organism to animal model; and (3) from animal model to human patient. This process draws upon clinical relevance as much as scientific practices and results in disease-specific, yet incomplete, animal models. The second part of this paper argues that the incompleteness of models can be described in terms of multi-level abstractions. We qualify this notion by pointing to different experimental techniques and targets of modelling, which give rise to a plurality of models for a specific disease.

  17. Experimental tests of the standard model.

    SciTech Connect

    Nodulman, L.

    1998-11-11

    The title implies an impossibly broad field, as the Standard Model includes the fermion matter states, as well as the forces and fields of SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1). For practical purposes, I will confine myself to electroweak unification, as discussed in the lectures of M. Herrero. Quarks and mixing were discussed in the lectures of R. Aleksan, and leptons and mixing were discussed in the lectures of K. Nakamura. I will essentially assume universality, that is flavor independence, rather than discussing tests of it. I will not pursue tests of QED beyond noting the consistency and precision of measurements of {alpha}{sub EM} in various processes including the Lamb shift, the anomalous magnetic moment (g-2) of the electron, and the quantum Hall effect. The fantastic precision and agreement of these predictions and measurements is something that convinces people that there may be something to this science enterprise. Also impressive is the success of the ''Universal Fermi Interaction'' description of beta decay processes, or in more modern parlance, weak charged current interactions. With one coupling constant G{sub F}, most precisely determined in muon decay, a huge number of nuclear instabilities are described. The slightly slow rate for neutron beta decay was one of the initial pieces of evidence for Cabbibo mixing, now generalized so that all charged current decays of any flavor are covered.

  18. The Standard Solar Model versus Experimental Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuel, O.

    2000-12-01

    The standard solar model (ssm) assumes the that Sun formed as a homogeneous body, its interior consists mostly of hydrogen, and its radiant energy comes from H-fusion in its core. Two sets of measurements indicate the ssm is wrong: 1. Analyses of material in the planetary system show that - (a) Fe, O, Ni, Si, Mg, S and Ca have high nuclear stability and comprise 98+% of ordinary meteorites that formed at the birth of the solar system; (b) the cores of inner planets formed in a central region consisting mostly of heavy elements like Fe, Ni and S; (c) the outer planets formed mostly from elements like H, He and C; and (d) isotopic heterogeneities accompanied these chemical gradients in debris of the supernova that exploded here 5 billion years ago to produce the solar system (See Origin of the Elements at http://www.umr.edu/õm/). 2. Analyses of material coming from the Sun show that - (a) there are not enough neutrinos for H-fusion to be its main source of energy; (b) light-weight isotopes (mass =L) of He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe in the solar wind are enriched relative to heavy isotopes (mass = H) by a factor, f, where log f = 4.56 log [H/L] -- - Eq. (1); (c) solar flares by-pass 3.4 of these 9-stages of diffusion and deplete the light-weight isotopes of He, Ne, Mg and Ar by a factor, f*, where log f* = -1.7 log [H/L] --- Eq. (2); (d) proton-capture on N-14 increased N-15 in the solar wind over geologic time; and (e) solar flares dredge up nitrogen with less N-15 from this H-fusion reaction. Each observation above is unexplained by ssm. After correcting photospheric abundances for diffusion [Observation 2(b)], the most abundant elements in the bulk sun are Fe, Ni, O, Si, S, Mg and Ca, the same elements that comprise ordinary meteorites [Observation 1(a)]. The probability that Eq. (1) would randomly select these elements from the photosphere, i.e., the likelihood for a meaningless agreement between observations 2(b) and 1(a), is < 2.0E(-33). Thus, ssm does not describe the

  19. Current Experimental Basis for Modeling Ice Accretions on Swept Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario

    2005-01-01

    This work presents a review of the experimental basis for modeling ice accretions on swept wings. Experimental work related to ice accretion physics on swept wings conducted between 1954 and 2004 is reviewed. Proposed models or explanations of scallop formations are singled out and discussed. Special emphasis is placed on reviewing the work done to determine the basic macroscopic mechanisms of scallop formation. The role of feather growth and its connection to scallop growth is discussed. Conceptual steps in modeling scallop formations are presented. Research elements needed for modeling are discussed.

  20. Stiffness of Carpentry Connections - Numerical Modelling vs. Experimental Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kekeliak, Miloš; Gocál, Jozef; Vičan, Josef

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, numerical modelling of the traditional carpentry connection with mortise and tenon is presented. Numerical modelling is focused on its stiffness and the results are compared to results of experimental tests carried out by (Feio, 2005) [6]. To consider soft behaviour of wood in carpentry connections, which are related to its surface roughness and geometrical accuracy of the contact surfaces, the characteristics of the normal contact stiffness, determined experimentally, are introduced in the numerical model. Parametric study by means of numerical modelling with regard to the sensitivity of connection stiffness to contact stiffness is presented. Based on the study results, in conclusion there are presented relevant differences between the results of numerical modelling and experimental tests (Feio, 2005) [6].

  1. Combustion modeling for experimentation in a space environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berlad, A. L.

    1974-01-01

    The merits of combustion experimentation in a space environment are assessed, and the impact of such experimentation on current theoretical models is considered. It is noted that combustion theory and experimentation for less than normal gravitational conditions are incomplete, inadequate, or nonexistent. Extensive and systematic experimentation in a space environment is viewed as essential for more adequate and complete theoretical models of such processes as premixed flame propagation and extinction limits, premixed flame propagation in droplet and particle clouds, ignition and autoignition in premixed combustible media, and gas jet combustion of unpremixed reactants. Current theories and models in these areas are described, and some combustion studies that can be undertaken in the Space Shuttle Program are proposed, including crossed molecular beam, turbulence, and upper pressure limit (of gases) studies.

  2. Combined experimental/analytical modeling of shell/payload structures

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, D.R.; Miller, A.K.; Carne, T.G.

    1985-12-01

    This study evaluates the accuracy of computed modal frequencies obtained from a combined experimental/analytical model of a shell/payload structure. A component mode synthesis technique was used which incorporated free modes and residual effects. The total structure is physically divided into the two subsystems which are connected through stiff joints. The payload was tested to obtain its free-free modes, while a finite element model of the shell was analyzed to obtain its modal description. Both the translational and rotational components of the experimental mode shapes at the payload interface were used in the coupling. Sensitivity studies were also performed to determine the effect of neglecting the residual terms of the payload. Results from a previous study of a combined experimental/analytical model for a beam structure are also given. The beam structure was used to examine the basic procedures and difficulties in experimentally measuring, and analytically accounting for the rotational and residual quantities.

  3. Design and Implementation of an Experimental Segway Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younis, Wael; Abdelati, Mohammed

    2009-03-01

    The segway is the first transportation product to stand, balance, and move in the same way we do. It is a truly 21st-century idea. The aim of this research is to study the theory behind building segway vehicles based on the stabilization of an inverted pendulum. An experimental model has been designed and implemented through this study. The model has been tested for its balance by running a Proportional Derivative (PD) algorithm on a microprocessor chip. The model has been identified in order to serve as an educational experimental platform for segways.

  4. Experimental study and modeling of a novel magnetorheological elastomer isolator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jian; Du, Haiping; Li, Weihua; Li, Yancheng; Li, Jianchun; Sun, Shuaishuai; Deng, H. X.

    2013-11-01

    This paper reports an experimental setup aiming at evaluating the performance of a newly designed magnetorheological elastomer (MRE) seismic isolator. As a further effort to explore the field-dependent stiffness/damping properties of the MRE isolator, a series of experimental testing were conducted. Based upon the analysis of the experimental responses and the characteristics of the MRE isolator, a new model that is capable of reproducing the unique MRE isolator dynamics behaviors is proposed. The validation results verify the model’s effectiveness to portray the MRE isolator. A study on the field-dependent parameters is then provided to make the model valid with fluctuating magnetic fields. To fully explore the mechanism of the proposed model, an investigation relating the dependence of the proposed model on every parameter is carried out.

  5. Modeling, Robust Control, and Experimental Validation of a Supercavitating Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar Sanabria, David

    This dissertation considers the mathematical modeling, control under uncertainty, and experimental validation of an underwater supercavitating vehicle. By traveling inside a gas cavity, a supercavitating vehicle reduces hydrodynamic drag, increases speed, and minimizes power consumption. The attainable speed and power efficiency make these vehicles attractive for undersea exploration, high-speed transportation, and defense. However, the benefits of traveling inside a cavity come with difficulties in controlling the vehicle dynamics. The main challenge is the nonlinear force that arises when the back-end of the vehicle pierces the cavity. This force, referred to as planing, leads to oscillatory motion and instability. Control technologies that are robust to planing and suited for practical implementation need to be developed. To enable these technologies, a low-order vehicle model that accounts for inaccuracy in the characterization of planing is required. Additionally, an experimental method to evaluate possible pitfalls in the models and controllers is necessary before undersea testing. The major contribution of this dissertation is a unified framework for mathematical modeling, robust control synthesis, and experimental validation of a supercavitating vehicle. First, we introduce affordable experimental methods for mathematical modeling and controller testing under planing and realistic flow conditions. Then, using experimental observations and physical principles, we create a low-order nonlinear model of the longitudinal vehicle motion. This model quantifies the planing uncertainty and is suitable for robust controller synthesis. Next, based on the vehicle model, we develop automated tools for synthesizing controllers that deliver a certificate of performance in the face of nonlinear and uncertain planing forces. We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the proposed controllers ensure higher performance when the uncertain planing dynamics are

  6. Computational modeling of epilepsy for an experimental neurologist

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Abbey B.; Netoff, Theoden I.

    2013-01-01

    Computational modeling can be a powerful tool for an experimentalist, providing a rigorous mathematical model of the system you are studying. This can be valuable in testing your hypotheses and developing experimental protocols prior to experimenting. This paper reviews models of seizures and epilepsy at different scales, including cellular, network, cortical region, and brain scales by looking at how they have been used in conjunction with experimental data. At each scale, models with different levels of abstraction, the extraction of physiological detail, are presented. Varying levels of detail are necessary in different situations. Physiologically realistic models are valuable surrogates for experimental systems because, unlike in an experiment, every parameter can be changed and every variable can be observed. Abstract models are useful in determining essential parameters of a system, allowing the experimentalist to extract principles that explain the relationship between mechanisms and the behavior of the system. Modeling is becoming easier with the emergence of platforms dedicated to neuronal modeling and databases of models that can be downloaded. Modeling will never be a replacement for animal and clinical experiments, but it should be a starting point in designing experiments and understanding their results. PMID:22617489

  7. Finite element modeling for validation of structural damage identification experimentation.

    SciTech Connect

    Stinemates, D. W.; Bennett, J. G.

    2001-01-01

    The project described in this report was performed to couple experimental and analytical techniques in the field of structural health monitoring and darnage identification. To do this, a finite dement model was Constructed of a simulated three-story building used for damage identification experiments. The model was used in conjunction with data from thie physical structure to research damage identification algorithms. Of particular interest was modeling slip in joints as a function of bolt torque and predicting the smallest change of torque that could be detected experimentally. After being validated with results from the physical structure, the model was used to produce data to test the capabilities of damage identification algorithms. This report describes the finite element model constructed, the results obtained, and proposed future use of the model.

  8. An Experimentally Determined Evolutionary Model Dramatically Improves Phylogenetic Fit

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Jesse D.

    2014-01-01

    All modern approaches to molecular phylogenetics require a quantitative model for how genes evolve. Unfortunately, existing evolutionary models do not realistically represent the site-heterogeneous selection that governs actual sequence change. Attempts to remedy this problem have involved augmenting these models with a burgeoning number of free parameters. Here, I demonstrate an alternative: Experimental determination of a parameter-free evolutionary model via mutagenesis, functional selection, and deep sequencing. Using this strategy, I create an evolutionary model for influenza nucleoprotein that describes the gene phylogeny far better than existing models with dozens or even hundreds of free parameters. Emerging high-throughput experimental strategies such as the one employed here provide fundamentally new information that has the potential to transform the sensitivity of phylogenetic and genetic analyses. PMID:24859245

  9. An Experimental Study and Constitutive Modeling of Saturated Porous Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, S. Y.; Shao, J. F.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the experimental characterization and constitutive modeling of saturated porous rocks. A typical porous chalk is investigated. Drained hydrostatic and triaxial compression tests are first performed to characterize the basic mechanical behavior of chalk. Drained triaxial tests with constant interstitial pressure are then carried out to study the effects of interstitial pressure on the plastic deformation and failure criterion. Finally, undrained triaxial compression tests are performed to investigate poromechanical coupling in saturated conditions. Based on the experimental data and some relevant micromechanical considerations, a micromechanics-based plastic model is proposed and extended to poroplastic coupling using the effective stress concept. The proposed model is verified through comparisons between the numerical results and experimental data for both drained and undrained tests.

  10. Experimental Verification of Structural-Acoustic Modelling and Design Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MARBURG, S.; BEER, H.-J.; GIER, J.; HARDTKE, H.-J.; RENNERT, R.; PERRET, F.

    2002-05-01

    A number of papers have been published on the simulation of structural-acoustic design optimization. However, extensive work is required to verify these results in practical applications. Herein, a steel box of 1·0×1·1×1·5 m with an external beam structure welded on three surface plates was investigated. This investigation included experimental modal analysis and experimental measurements of certain noise transfer functions (sound pressure at points inside the box due to force excitation at beam structure). Using these experimental data, the finite element model of the structure was tuned to provide similar results. With a first structural mode at less than 20 Hz, the reliable frequency range was identified up to about 60 Hz. Obviously, the finite element model could not be further improved only by mesh refinement. The tuning process will be explained in detail since there was a number of changes that helped to improve the structure. Other changes did not improve the structure. Although this model of the box could be expected as a rather simple structure, it can be considered to be a complex structure for simulation purposes. A defined modification of the physical model verified the simulation model. In a final step, the optimal location of stiffening beam structures was predicted by simulation. Their effect on the noise transfer function was experimentally verified. This paper critically discusses modelling techniques that are applied for structural-acoustic simulation of sedan bodies.

  11. Experimental models of hepatotoxicity related to acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Maes, Michaël; Vinken, Mathieu; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Acute liver failure can be the consequence of various etiologies, with most cases arising from drug-induced hepatotoxicity in Western countries. Despite advances in this field, the management of acute liver failure continues to be one of the most challenging problems in clinical medicine. The availability of adequate experimental models is of crucial importance to provide a better understanding of this condition and to allow identification of novel drug targets, testing the efficacy of new therapeutic interventions and acting as models for assessing mechanisms of toxicity. Experimental models of hepatotoxicity related to acute liver failure rely on surgical procedures, chemical exposure or viral infection. Each of these models has a number of strengths and weaknesses. This paper specifically reviews commonly used chemical in vivo and in vitro models of hepatotoxicity associated with acute liver failure. PMID:26631581

  12. Experimental models of hepatotoxicity related to acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Maes, Michaël; Vinken, Mathieu; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    Acute liver failure can be the consequence of various etiologies, with most cases arising from drug-induced hepatotoxicity in Western countries. Despite advances in this field, the management of acute liver failure continues to be one of the most challenging problems in clinical medicine. The availability of adequate experimental models is of crucial importance to provide a better understanding of this condition and to allow identification of novel drug targets, testing the efficacy of new therapeutic interventions and acting as models for assessing mechanisms of toxicity. Experimental models of hepatotoxicity related to acute liver failure rely on surgical procedures, chemical exposure or viral infection. Each of these models has a number of strengths and weaknesses. This paper specifically reviews commonly used chemical in vivo and in vitro models of hepatotoxicity associated with acute liver failure. PMID:26631581

  13. Experimental models of hepatotoxicity related to acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Maes, Michaël; Vinken, Mathieu; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Acute liver failure can be the consequence of various etiologies, with most cases arising from drug-induced hepatotoxicity in Western countries. Despite advances in this field, the management of acute liver failure continues to be one of the most challenging problems in clinical medicine. The availability of adequate experimental models is of crucial importance to provide a better understanding of this condition and to allow identification of novel drug targets, testing the efficacy of new therapeutic interventions and acting as models for assessing mechanisms of toxicity. Experimental models of hepatotoxicity related to acute liver failure rely on surgical procedures, chemical exposure or viral infection. Each of these models has a number of strengths and weaknesses. This paper specifically reviews commonly used chemical in vivo and in vitro models of hepatotoxicity associated with acute liver failure.

  14. Experimental validation of flexible robot arm modeling and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulsoy, A. Galip

    1989-01-01

    Flexibility is important for high speed, high precision operation of lightweight manipulators. Accurate dynamic modeling of flexible robot arms is needed. Previous work has mostly been based on linear elasticity with prescribed rigid body motions (i.e., no effect of flexible motion on rigid body motion). Little or no experimental validation of dynamic models for flexible arms is available. Experimental results are also limited for flexible arm control. Researchers include the effects of prismatic as well as revolute joints. They investigate the effect of full coupling between the rigid and flexible motions, and of axial shortening, and consider the control of flexible arms using only additional sensors.

  15. Modeling and managing experimental data using FuGE.

    PubMed

    Jones, Andrew R; Lister, Allyson L; Hermida, Leandro; Wilkinson, Peter; Eisenacher, Martin; Belhajjame, Khalid; Gibson, Frank; Lord, Phil; Pocock, Matthew; Rosenfelder, Heiko; Santoyo-Lopez, Javier; Wipat, Anil; Paton, Norman W

    2009-06-01

    The Functional Genomics Experiment data model (FuGE) has been developed to increase the consistency and efficiency of experimental data modeling in the life sciences, and it has been adopted by a number of high-profile standardization organizations. FuGE can be used: (1) directly, whereby generic modeling constructs are used to represent concepts from specific experimental activities; or (2) as a framework within which method-specific models can be developed. FuGE is both rich and flexible, providing a considerable number of modeling constructs, which can be used in a range of different ways. However, such richness and flexibility also mean that modelers and application developers have choices to make when applying FuGE in a given context. This paper captures emerging best practice in the use of FuGE in the light of the experience of several groups by: (1) proposing guidelines for the use and extension of the FuGE data model; (2) presenting design patterns that reflect recurring requirements in experimental data modeling; and (3) describing a community software tool kit (STK) that supports application development using FuGE. We anticipate that these guidelines will encourage consistent usage of FuGE, and as such, will contribute to the development of convergent data standards in omics research.

  16. Comparison of hybrid Hall thruster model to experimental measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharfe, Michelle K.; Gascon, Nicolas; Cappelli, Mark A.; Fernandez, Eduardo

    2006-08-01

    A two-dimensional hybrid particle-in-cell numerical model has been constructed in the radial-axial plane with the intent of examining the physics governing Hall thruster operation. The electrons are treated as a magnetized quasi-one-dimensional fluid and the ions are treated as collisionless, unmagnetized discrete particles. The anomalously high electron conductivity experimentally observed in Hall thrusters is accounted for using experimental measurements of electron mobility in the Stanford Hall Thruster. While an experimental mobility results in improved simulation of electron temperature and electric potential relative to a Bohm-type model, results suggest that energy losses due to electron wall interactions may also be an important factor in accurately simulating plasma properties. Using a simplified electron wall damping model modified to produce general agreement with experimental measurements, an evaluation is made of differing treatments of electron mobility, background gas, neutral wall interactions, and charge exchange collisions. Although background gas results in two populations of neutrals, the increased neutral density has little effect on other plasma properties. Diffuse neutral wall interactions are in better agreement with experimental measurements than specular scattering. Also, charge exchange collisions result in an increase in average neutral velocity of 11% and a decrease in average ion velocity of 4% near the exit plane. The momentum exchange that occurs during charge exchange collisions is found to be negligible.

  17. Experimental, numerical and analytical models of mantle starting plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulliette, D. L.; Loper, D. E.

    1995-12-01

    The results of a combined experimental, numerical and analytical investigation of starting thermal plumes are described, to obtain a better perspective on plumes within the Earth's mantle. Thermal plumes were generated experimentally in a tank of corn syrup by means of an electrical heater. Viscosity ratios of 400, 30 000, and 10 8 were generated by varying the temperature of the tank. Plumes for the smaller ratios had the traditional 'balloon-on-astring' shape, but that at the highest ratio had a novel morphology. The plume heads in the first two cases were observed to rise at roughly a constant speed, in contrast to most previous studies which found the plume heads to accelerate. Loss of buoyancy from the plume head owing to heat loss is believed to be responsible for this difference. Starting plumes were simulated numerically using an axisymmetric, finite-element code to solve the Boussinesq equations at finite Prandtl numbers. The constant rise speed observed experimentally was confirmed by the numerical simulation for the viscosity ratios of 400 and 30 000, but numerical instability prevented simulation of the case with a viscosity ratio of 10 8. There was very good agreement between the experimental and numerical rise speeds. An analytical model was developed which reduces to previous models in limiting cases. This parameterization gives better agreement with the experimental and numerical results than does any previous model.

  18. A numerical cloud model for the support of laboratory experimentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagen, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    A numerical cloud model is presented which can describe the evolution of a cloud starting from moist aerosol-laden air through the diffusional growth regime. The model is designed for the direct support of cloud chamber laboratory experimentation, i.e., experiment preparation, real-time control and data analysis. In the model the thermodynamics is uncoupled from the droplet growth processes. Analytic solutions for the cloud droplet growth equations are developed which can be applied in most laboratory situations. The model is applied to a variety of representative experiments.

  19. Experimental Models of Microvascular Immunopathology: The Example of Cerebral Malaria

    PubMed Central

    El-Assaad, Fatima; Combes, Valery; Grau, Georges ER

    2015-01-01

    Human cerebral malaria is a severe and often lethal complication of Plasmodium falciparum infection. Complex host and parasite interactions should the precise mechanisms involved in the onset of this neuropathology. Adhesion of parasitised red blood cells and host cells to endothelial cells lead to profound endothelial alterations that trigger immunopathological changes, varying degrees of brain oedema and can compromise cerebral blood flow, cause cranial nerve dysfunction and hypoxia. Study of the cerebral pathology in human patients is limited to clinical and genetic field studies in endemic areas, thus cerebral malaria (CM) research relies heavily on experimental models. The availability of malaria models allows study from the inoculation of Plasmodium to the onset of disease and permit invasive experiments. Here, we discuss some aspects of our current understanding of CM, the experimental models available and some important recent findings extrapolated from these models. PMID:26430675

  20. Microbiome and Asthma: What Have Experimental Models Already Taught Us?

    PubMed Central

    Bonamichi-Santos, R.; Aun, M. V.; Agondi, R. C.; Kalil, J.; Giavina-Bianchi, P.

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease that imposes a substantial burden on patients, their families, and the community. Although many aspects of the pathogenesis of classical allergic asthma are well known by the scientific community, other points are not yet understood. Experimental asthma models, particularly murine models, have been used for over 100 years in order to better understand the immunopathology of asthma. It has been shown that human microbiome is an important component in the development of the immune system. Furthermore, the occurrence of many inflammatory diseases is influenced by the presence of microbes. Again, experimental models of asthma have helped researchers to understand the relationship between the microbiome and respiratory inflammation. In this review, we discuss the evolution of murine models of asthma and approach the major studies involving the microbiome and asthma. PMID:26266269

  1. Developing an Experimental Model of Vascular Toxicity in Embryonic Zebrafish

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developing an Experimental Model of Vascular Toxicity in Embryonic Zebrafish Tamara Tal, Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, U.S. EPA Background: There are tens of thousands of chemicals that have yet to be fully evaluated for their toxicity by validated in vivo testing ...

  2. Experimental Models of Ocular Infection with Toxoplasma Gondii

    PubMed Central

    Dukaczewska, Agata; Tedesco, Roberto; Liesenfeld, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Ocular toxoplasmosis is a vision-threatening disease and the major cause of posterior uveitis worldwide. In spite of the continuing global burden of ocular toxoplasmosis, many critical aspects of disease including the therapeutic approach to ocular toxoplasmosis are still under debate. To assist in addressing many aspects of the disease, numerous experimental models of ocular toxoplasmosis have been established. In this article, we present an overview on in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo models of ocular toxoplasmosis available to date. Experimental studies on ocular toxoplasmosis have recently focused on mice. However, the majority of murine models established so far are based on intraperitoneal and intraocular infection with Toxoplasma gondii. We therefore also present results obtained in an in vivo model using peroral infection of C57BL/6 and NMRI mice that reflects the natural route of infection and mimics the disease course in humans. While advances have been made in ex vivo model systems or larger animals to investigate specific aspects of ocular toxoplasmosis, laboratory mice continue to be the experimental model of choice for the investigation of ocular toxoplasmosis. PMID:26716018

  3. Theories linguistiques, modeles informatiques, experimentation psycholinguistique (Linguistic Theories, Information-Processing Models, Psycholinguistic Experimentation)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubois, Daniele

    1975-01-01

    Delineates and elaborates upon the underlying psychological postulates in linguistic and information-processing models, and shows the interdependence of psycholinguistics and linguistic analysis. (Text is in French.) (DB)

  4. First experimental constraints on the disformally coupled Galileon model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neveu, J.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Astier, P.; Besançon, M.; Conley, A.; Guy, J.; Möller, A.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Babichev, E.

    2014-09-01

    Aims: The Galileon model is a modified gravity model that can explain the late-time accelerated expansion of the Universe. In a previous work, we derived experimental constraints on the Galileon model with no explicit coupling to matter and showed that this model agrees with the most recent cosmological data. In the context of braneworld constructions or massive gravity, the Galileon model exhibits a disformal coupling to matter, which we study in this paper. Methods: After comparing our constraints on the uncoupled model with recent studies, we extend the analysis framework to the disformally coupled Galileon model and derive the first experimental constraints on that coupling, using precise measurements of cosmological distances and the growth rate of cosmic structures. Results: In the uncoupled case, with updated data, we still observe a low tension between the constraints set by growth data and those from distances. In the disformally coupled Galileon model, we obtain better agreement with data and favour a non-zero disformal coupling to matter at the 2.5σ level. This gives an interesting hint of the possible braneworld origin of Galileon theory.

  5. Regression Model Optimization for the Analysis of Experimental Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulbrich, N.

    2009-01-01

    A candidate math model search algorithm was developed at Ames Research Center that determines a recommended math model for the multivariate regression analysis of experimental data. The search algorithm is applicable to classical regression analysis problems as well as wind tunnel strain gage balance calibration analysis applications. The algorithm compares the predictive capability of different regression models using the standard deviation of the PRESS residuals of the responses as a search metric. This search metric is minimized during the search. Singular value decomposition is used during the search to reject math models that lead to a singular solution of the regression analysis problem. Two threshold dependent constraints are also applied. The first constraint rejects math models with insignificant terms. The second constraint rejects math models with near-linear dependencies between terms. The math term hierarchy rule may also be applied as an optional constraint during or after the candidate math model search. The final term selection of the recommended math model depends on the regressor and response values of the data set, the user s function class combination choice, the user s constraint selections, and the result of the search metric minimization. A frequently used regression analysis example from the literature is used to illustrate the application of the search algorithm to experimental data.

  6. Experimental, statistical, and biological models of radon carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, F.T.

    1991-09-01

    Risk models developed for underground miners have not been consistently validated in studies of populations exposed to indoor radon. Imprecision in risk estimates results principally from differences between exposures in mines as compared to domestic environments and from uncertainties about the interaction between cigarette-smoking and exposure to radon decay products. Uncertainties in extrapolating miner data to domestic exposures can be reduced by means of a broad-based health effects research program that addresses the interrelated issues of exposure, respiratory tract dose, carcinogenesis (molecular/cellular and animal studies, plus developing biological and statistical models), and the relationship of radon to smoking and other copollutant exposures. This article reviews experimental animal data on radon carcinogenesis observed primarily in rats at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Recent experimental and mechanistic carcinogenesis models of exposures to radon, uranium ore dust, and cigarette smoke are presented with statistical analyses of animal data. 20 refs., 1 fig.

  7. A combined experimental and modeling approach to uranium casting

    SciTech Connect

    Korzekwa, D.; Dunn, P.

    1994-08-01

    U casting was studied using a combined experimental and modeling approach; the U is cast into graphite molds using vacuum induction melting. Mold design and process parameters were varied. FLOW-3D and ABAQUS codes were used. Temperature predictions were compared with experimental data from thermcouples in the mold; initial metal and mold temperatures were used in input to FLOW-3D. Fluid flow predictions were validated using static and dynamic radiographic data. Dynamic radiographic videos of gold castings were compared to 3D simulations.

  8. Numerical and experimental modelling of the radial compressor stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syka, Tomáš; Matas, Richard; LuÅáček, Ondřej

    2016-06-01

    This article deals with the description of the numerical and experimental model of the new compressor stage designed for process centrifugal compressors. It's the first member of the new stages family developed to achieve the state of the art thermodynamic parameters. This stage (named RTK01) is designed for high flow coefficient with 3D shaped impeller blades. Some interesting findings were gained during its development. The article is focused mainly on some interesting aspects of the development methodology and numerical simulations improvement, not on the specific stage properties. Conditions and experimental equipment, measured results and their comparison with ANSYS CFX and NUMECA FINE/Turbo CFD simulations are described.

  9. Icing simulation: A survey of computer models and experimental facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potapczuk, M. G.; Reinmann, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    A survey of the current methods for simulation of the response of an aircraft or aircraft subsystem to an icing encounter is presented. The topics discussed include a computer code modeling of aircraft icing and performance degradation, an evaluation of experimental facility simulation capabilities, and ice protection system evaluation tests in simulated icing conditions. Current research focussed on upgrading simulation fidelity of both experimental and computational methods is discussed. The need for increased understanding of the physical processes governing ice accretion, ice shedding, and iced airfoil aerodynamics is examined.

  10. Damping formulas and experimental values of damping in flutter models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, Robert P

    1940-01-01

    The problem of determining values of structural damping for use in flutter calculations is discussed. The concept of equivalent viscous damping is reviewed and its relation to the structural damping coefficient g introduced in NACA Technical Report No. 685 is shown. The theory of normal modes is reviewed and a number of methods are described for separating the motions associated with different modes. Equations are developed for use in evaluating the damping parameters from experimental data. Experimental results of measurements of damping in several flutter models are presented.

  11. Experimental Evaluation of Equivalent-Fluid Models for Melamine Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Albert R.; Schiller, Noah H.

    2016-01-01

    Melamine foam is a soft porous material commonly used in noise control applications. Many models exist to represent porous materials at various levels of fidelity. This work focuses on rigid frame equivalent fluid models, which represent the foam as a fluid with a complex speed of sound and density. There are several empirical models available to determine these frequency dependent parameters based on an estimate of the material flow resistivity. Alternatively, these properties can be experimentally educed using an impedance tube setup. Since vibroacoustic models are generally sensitive to these properties, this paper assesses the accuracy of several empirical models relative to impedance tube measurements collected with melamine foam samples. Diffuse field sound absorption measurements collected using large test articles in a laboratory are also compared with absorption predictions determined using model-based and measured foam properties. Melamine foam slabs of various thicknesses are considered.

  12. The History and Evolution of Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury Models.

    PubMed

    Povlishock, John

    2016-01-01

    This narrative provides a brief history of experimental animal model development for the study of traumatic brain injury. It draws upon a relatively rich history of early animal modeling that employed higher order animals to assess concussive brain injury while exploring the importance of head movement versus stabilization in evaluating the animal's response to injury. These themes are extended to the development of angular/rotational acceleration/deceleration models that also exploited brain movement to generate both the morbidity and pathology typically associated with human traumatic brain injury. Despite the significance of these early model systems, their limitations and overall practicality are discussed. Consideration is given to more contemporary rodent animal models that replicate individual/specific features of human injury, while via various transgenic technologies permitting the evaluation of injury-mediated pathways. The narrative closes on a reconsideration of higher order, porcine animal models of injury and their implication for preclinical/translational research. PMID:27604709

  13. Hosting Infection: Experimental Models to Assay Candida Virulence

    PubMed Central

    MacCallum, Donna M.

    2012-01-01

    Although normally commensals in humans, Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, Candida glabrata, and Candida krusei are capable of causing opportunistic infections in individuals with altered physiological and/or immunological responses. These fungal species are linked with a variety of infections, including oral, vaginal, gastrointestinal, and systemic infections, with C. albicans the major cause of infection. To assess the ability of different Candida species and strains to cause infection and disease requires the use of experimental infection models. This paper discusses the mucosal and systemic models of infection available to assay Candida virulence and gives examples of some of the knowledge that has been gained to date from these models. PMID:22235206

  14. Recapitulating Human Gastric Cancer Pathogenesis: Experimental Models of Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lin; El Zaatari, Mohamad; Merchant, Juanita L

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on the various experimental models to study gastric cancer pathogenesis, with the role of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) used as the major examples. We review differences in human stomach anatomy compared to the stomachs of the experimental models, including the mouse and invertebrate models such as Drosophila and C. elegans. The contribution of major signaling pathways, e.g., Notch, Hedgehog, AKT/PI3K is discussed in the context of their potential contribution to foregut tumorigenesis. We critically examine the rationale behind specific GEMMs, chemical carcinogens, dietary promoters, Helicobacter infection, and direct mutagenesis of relevant oncogenes and tumor suppressor that have been developed to study gastric cancer pathogenesis. Despite species differences, more efficient and effective models to test specific genes and pathways disrupted in human gastric carcinogenesis have yet to emerge. As we better understand these species differences, "humanized" versions of mouse models will more closely approximate human gastric cancer pathogenesis. Towards that end, epigenetic marks on chromatin, the gut microbiota, and ways of manipulating the immune system will likely move center stage, permitting greater overlap between rodent and human cancer phenotypes thus providing a unified progression model. PMID:27573785

  15. Transvaginal ultrasound ovarian diathermy: sheep as an experimental model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Some techniques of transvaginal ovarian drilling have been previously described. Nevertheless a monopolar transvaginal ovarian cauterization, that use the expertise and safety of transvaginal puncture for oocyte captation seems to be an easier and feasible approach. The aim of this study was to develop a minimally invasive ovarian cauterization technique under transvaginal ultrasound control, and to evaluate the safety of the transvaginal ovarian monopolar cauterization, female sheep at reproductive age were used as an experimental model. Findings An experimental study was performed in a university research center. Seventeen female sheep (15 Corriedale e 2 Suffolk) in reproductive age were submitted to transvaginal ovarian cauterization with a monopolar Valleylab Force 2 electrocautery. Macroscopic and microscopic lesions were assessed. Ovarian size were 1.31 cm2 ± 0,43 (Corriedale) and 3.41 cm2 ± 0,64 (Suffolk). From 30 ovaries from Corriedale sheep punctured, only 3 were cauterized, presenting macroscopic and typical microscopic lesion. In the Suffolk sheep group, only one ovary was cauterized. No lesion could be found in the needle path. Conclusions This is the first experimental animal model described for ovarian cauterization needle guided by transvaginal ultrasound. The sheep does not seem to be the ideal animal model to study this technique. Another animal model, whose ovaries are better identified by transvaginal ultrasound should be sought for this technique, theoretically less invasive, before it could be offered safely to women with polycystic ovary syndrome. PMID:22243998

  16. Experimental support for a model of birdsong production.

    PubMed

    Mindlin, G B; Gardner, T J; Goller, F; Suthers, R

    2003-10-01

    In this work we present an experimental validation of a recently proposed model for the production of birdsongs. We have previously observed that driving the model with simple functions of time, which represent tensions in vocal muscles, produces a wide variety of sounds resembling birdsongs. In this work we drive the model with functions whose time dependence comes from recordings of muscle activities and air sac pressure. We simultaneously recorded the birds' songs and compared them with the synthetic songs. The model produces recognizable songs. Beyond finding a qualitative agreement, we also test some predictions of the model concerning the relative levels of activity in the gating muscles at the beginning and end of a syllable.

  17. Experimental support for a model of birdsong production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mindlin, G. B.; Gardner, T. J.; Goller, F.; Suthers, R.

    2003-10-01

    In this work we present an experimental validation of a recently proposed model for the production of birdsongs. We have previously observed that driving the model with simple functions of time, which represent tensions in vocal muscles, produces a wide variety of sounds resembling birdsongs. In this work we drive the model with functions whose time dependence comes from recordings of muscle activities and air sac pressure. We simultaneously recorded the birds’ songs and compared them with the synthetic songs. The model produces recognizable songs. Beyond finding a qualitative agreement, we also test some predictions of the model concerning the relative levels of activity in the gating muscles at the beginning and end of a syllable.

  18. Experimental support for a model of birdsong production.

    PubMed

    Mindlin, G B; Gardner, T J; Goller, F; Suthers, R

    2003-10-01

    In this work we present an experimental validation of a recently proposed model for the production of birdsongs. We have previously observed that driving the model with simple functions of time, which represent tensions in vocal muscles, produces a wide variety of sounds resembling birdsongs. In this work we drive the model with functions whose time dependence comes from recordings of muscle activities and air sac pressure. We simultaneously recorded the birds' songs and compared them with the synthetic songs. The model produces recognizable songs. Beyond finding a qualitative agreement, we also test some predictions of the model concerning the relative levels of activity in the gating muscles at the beginning and end of a syllable. PMID:14682974

  19. Experimental animal data and modeling of late somatic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1988-01-01

    This section is restricted to radiation-induced life shortening and cancer and mainly to studies with external radiation. The emphasis will be on the experimental data that are available and the experimental systems that could provide the type of data with which to either formulate or test models. Genetic effects which are of concern are not discussed in this section. Experimental animal radiation studies fall into those that establish general principles and those that demonstrate mechanisms. General principles include the influence of dose, radiation quality, dose rate, fractionation, protraction and such biological factors as age and gender. The influence of these factors are considered as general principles because they are independent, at least qualitatively, of the species studied. For example, if an increase in the LET of the radiation causes an increased effectiveness in cancer induction in a mouse a comparable increase in effectiveness can be expected in humans. Thus, models, whether empirical or mechanistic, formulated from experimental animal data should be generally applicable.

  20. The dog kidney as experimental model in endourology: anatomic contribution.

    PubMed

    Pereira-Sampaio, Marco A; Marques-Sampaio, Beatriz P S; Henry, Robert W; Favorito, Luciano A; Sampaio, Francisco J B

    2009-06-01

    Abstract A systematic study of the morphometry and the collecting system of the canine kidney is presented and compared with previous findings in humans. Renal measurements (kidney length, width, and thickness) were recorded. In addition, 110 three-dimensional endocasts of the kidney collecting system were produced and studied. Anatomic details, important to research and surgical training in endourology, were observed and recorded in canine kidneys. Dogs whose height was more than 70 cm at the withers presented similar kidney measurements to those found in the adult human. The collecting system consisted only of a renal pelvis with a variable number of recesses around its perimeter. The dog kidney is not a good model for experimental studies that consider the morphology of the collecting system. Kidneys from dogs taller than 70 cm, however, might be useful as a model in experimental studies in which renal volume is an important aspect, such as shockwave lithotripsy and endourology.

  1. Experimental investigation and modeling of scale effects in jet ejectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, W. G.; Wang, I.; Jaworski, J. W.; Brikner, N. A.; Protz, J. M.

    2010-08-01

    Three microscale jet ejectors were designed and tested to induce a suction draft using a supersonic micronozzle. Each axisymmetric nozzle was fabricated using three-dimensional electro-discharge machining to create throat diameters of 64, 187 and 733 µm with design expansion ratios of 2.5:1 and design ejector area ratios of 8. The experimental data using nitrogen gas for the motive fluid indicate that the ejector can produce a sufficient suction draft to enable its substitution for high-speed turbomachinery in micro engine applications. A pumping power density of 308 kW L-1 is observed experimentally, which agrees well with a theoretical model including losses associated with the suction flow inlet and viscous effects in the motive nozzle and mixing regions. The present theoretical model further predicts a maximum achievable power density of 1 MW L-1 for microscale ejectors with a throat diameter of 10 µm and throat Reynolds number of 1300.

  2. Spectral Analysis and Experimental Modeling of Ice Accretion Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, D. J.; Breuer, K. S.; Torres, B. E.; Hansman, R. J., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    A self-consistent scheme for relating wind tunnel ice accretion roughness to the resulting enhancement of heat transfer is described. First, a spectral technique of quantitative analysis of early ice roughness images is reviewed. The image processing scheme uses a spectral estimation technique (SET) which extracts physically descriptive parameters by comparing scan lines from the experimentally-obtained accretion images to a prescribed test function. Analysis using this technique for both streamwise and spanwise directions of data from the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) are presented. An experimental technique is then presented for constructing physical roughness models suitable for wind tunnel testing that match the SET parameters extracted from the IRT images. The icing castings and modeled roughness are tested for enhancement of boundary layer heat transfer using infrared techniques in a "dry" wind tunnel.

  3. Experimental testing and computational modeling of flat oval duct deflection

    SciTech Connect

    Smolinski, P.J.; Palmer, G.S.

    1998-10-01

    The deflection characteristics of spiral seam flat oval HVAC duct are examined in this study, and the effects of duct size, wall thickness, and the size spacing, and type of external reinforcement on the duct deformation are investigated. A duct test setup and a deflection measurement frame were developed for measuring the deformation of flat oval duct, and experimental testing was performed on a variety of duct configurations to measure the duct deflections at various positive and negative internal pressures. Finite element computer models of the ducts were developed to predict the deflections. The correlation between the predictions of the computer model and the data from the experimental testing is highly variable with differences ranging from a few percent to several hundred percent. In general, it was found that there was closer agreement between the finite element results and the experimental measurements for smaller duct and at locations of type 2 external reinforcements. This may be due to the fact that the finite element model assumed the idealized flat oval shape and this shape was better matched by smaller ducts and near the external reinforcement. It was also found that in some cases, unreinforced duct could achieve higher pressures than type 1 reinforced duct before exceeding the deflection limits. Sources of error include the uneven surface of the mastic in the measurement of the duct joint deflection and the variance of the actual duct shape from the idealized shape used in the finite element model. This study did not examine the variability of the experimental results due to differences in duct shape or manufacture.

  4. Experimental models of hepatic fibrosis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Wasser, S; Tan, C E

    1999-01-01

    The rat is a frequently used experimental model in studies involving human disease. We review several methods of inducing hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis in rats. These include induction by hepatotoxins and hepatocarcinogens such as carbon tetrachloride, dimethylnitrosamine, thioacetamide and furan; the hepatoxin-cum-nutrient, alcohol; a high fat-low choline-low protein diet; immunologic agents such as heterologous serum or bacterial cell wall products; and obstructive jaundice and biliary cirrhosis by common bile duct ligation. PMID:10374036

  5. Experimental model of heterotopic ossification in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Zotz, T.G.G.; de Paula, J.B.; Moser, A.D.L.

    2012-01-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a metaplastic biological process in which there is newly formed bone in soft tissues adjacent to large joints, resulting in joint mobility deficit. In order to determine which treatment techniques are more appropriate for such condition, experimental models of induced heterotopic bone formation have been proposed using heterologous demineralized bone matrix implants and bone morphogenetic protein and other tissues. The objective of the present experimental study was to identify a reliable protocol to induce HO in Wistar rats, based on autologous bone marrow (BM) implantation, comparing 3 different BM volumes and based on literature evidence of this HO induction model in larger laboratory animals. Twelve male Wistar albino rats weighing 350/390 g were used. The animals were anesthetized for blood sampling before HO induction in order to quantify serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP). HO was induced by BM implantation in both quadriceps muscles of these animals, experimental group (EG). Thirty-five days after the induction, another blood sample was collected for ALP determination. The results showed a weight gain in the EG and no significant difference in ALP levels when comparing the periods before and after induction. Qualitative histological analysis confirmed the occurrence of heterotopic ossification in all 12 EG rats. In conclusion, the HO induction model was effective when 0.35 mL autologous BM was applied to the quadriceps of Wistar rats. PMID:22473322

  6. Amplified energy harvester from footsteps: design, modeling, and experimental analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ya; Chen, Wusi; Guzman, Plinio; Zuo, Lei

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents the design, modeling and experimental analysis of an amplified footstep energy harvester. With the unique design of amplified piezoelectric stack harvester the kinetic energy generated by footsteps can be effectively captured and converted into usable DC power that could potentially be used to power many electric devices, such as smart phones, sensors, monitoring cameras, etc. This doormat-like energy harvester can be used in crowded places such as train stations, malls, concerts, airport escalator/elevator/stairs entrances, or anywhere large group of people walk. The harvested energy provides an alternative renewable green power to replace power requirement from grids, which run on highly polluting and global-warming-inducing fossil fuels. In this paper, two modeling approaches are compared to calculate power output. The first method is derived from the single degree of freedom (SDOF) constitutive equations, and then a correction factor is applied onto the resulting electromechanically coupled equations of motion. The second approach is to derive the coupled equations of motion with Hamilton's principle and the constitutive equations, and then formulate it with the finite element method (FEM). Experimental testing results are presented to validate modeling approaches. Simulation results from both approaches agree very well with experimental results where percentage errors are 2.09% for FEM and 4.31% for SDOF.

  7. Systematic effects in CALOR simulation code to model experimental configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Job, P.K.; Proudfoot, J. ); Handler, T. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); Gabriel, T.A. )

    1991-03-27

    CALOR89 code system is being used to simulate test beam results and the design parameters of several calorimeter configurations. It has been bench-marked against the ZEUS, D{theta} and HELIOS data. This study identifies the systematic effects in CALOR simulation to model the experimental configurations. Five major systematic effects are identified. These are the choice of high energy nuclear collision model, material composition, scintillator saturation, shower integration time, and the shower containment. Quantitative estimates of these systematic effects are presented. 23 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

  8. Survey of Experimental Tests of the IBA Model

    SciTech Connect

    Casten, R. F.

    1980-01-01

    A survey of experimental tests of the Interacting Boson Approximation (IBA) Model is presented covering even and odd mass nuclei in the region from A ≈ 80 to A ≈ 230. Both positive and negative parity states with both high and low spin are discussed. Topics included concern energy levels, electromagnetic transition rates, two nucleon transfer and inelastic scattering. Special attention is given to nuclear symmetries and transitional regions. Comparison with other models is made where appropriate. The distinction between IBA-1 and IBA-2 is discussed including their respective areas of applicability.

  9. Waste glass corrosion modeling: Comparison with experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Bourcier, W.L.

    1993-11-01

    A chemical model of glass corrosion will be used to predict the rates of release of radionuclides from borosilicate glass waste forms in high-level waste repositories. The model will be used both to calculate the rate of degradation of the glass, and also to predict the effects of chemical interactions between the glass and repository materials such as spent fuel, canister and container materials, backfill, cements, grouts, and others. Coupling between the degradation processes affecting all these materials is expected. Models for borosilicate glass dissolution must account for the processes of (1) kinetically-controlled network dissolution, (2) precipitation of secondary phases, (3) ion exchange, (4) rate-limiting diffusive transport of silica through a hydrous surface reaction layer, and (5) specific glass surface interactions with dissolved cations and anions. Current long-term corrosion models for borosilicate glass employ a rate equation consistent with transition state theory embodied in a geochemical reaction-path modeling program that calculates aqueous phase speciation and mineral precipitation/dissolution. These models are currently under development. Future experimental and modeling work to better quantify the rate-controlling processes and validate these models are necessary before the models can be used in repository performance assessment calculations.

  10. Non-Shock Initiation Model for Explosive Families: Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, M. U.; Todd, S. N.; Caipen, T. L.; Jensen, C. B.; Hughs, C. G.

    2009-12-01

    The "DaMaGe-Initiated-Reaction" (DMGIR) computational model has been developed to predict the response of high explosives to non-shock mechanical insults. The distinguishing feature of this model is the introduction of a damage variable, which relates the evolution of damage to the initiation of a reaction in the explosive, and its growth to detonation. Specifically designed experiments were used to study the initiation process of each explosive family with embedded shock sensors and optical diagnostics. The experimental portion of this model development began with a study of PBXN-5 to develop DMGIR model coefficients for the rigid plastic bonded family, followed by studies of the cast, and bulk-moldable explosive families. The experimental results show an initiation mechanism that is related to input energy and material damage, with well defined initiation thresholds for each explosive family. These initiation details will extend the predictive capability of the DMGIR model from the rigid family into the cast and bulk-moldable families.

  11. Non-shock initiation model for explosive families : experimental results.

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Mark U.; Jensen, Charles B.; Todd, Steven N.; Hugh, Chance G.; Caipen, Terry L.

    2010-03-01

    The 'DaMaGe-Initiated-Reaction' (DMGIR) computational model has been developed to predict the response of high explosives to non-shock mechanical insults. The distinguishing feature of this model is the introduction of a damage variable, which relates the evolution of damage to the initiation of a reaction in the explosive, and its growth to detonation. Specifically designed experiments were used to study the initiation process of each explosive family with embedded shock sensors and optical diagnostics. The experimental portion of this model development began with a study of PBXN-5 to develop DMGIR model coefficients for the rigid plastic bonded family, followed by studies of the cast, and bulk-moldable explosive families. The experimental results show an initiation mechanism that is related to input energy and material damage, with well defined initiation thresholds for each explosive family. These initiation details will extend the predictive capability of the DMGIR model from the rigid family into the cast and bulk-moldable families.

  12. Experimental Models to Study Lymphatic and Blood Vascular Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lu; Wu, Lily

    2011-01-01

    As a model system for the understanding of human cancer, the mouse has proved immensely valuable. Indeed, studies of mouse models have helped to define the nature of cancer as a genetic disease and demonstrated the causal role of genetic events found in tumors. As an experimental platform, they have provided critical insight into the process of tumor metastasis in the lymphovascular system. Once viewed with skepticism, mouse models are now an integral arm of basic and clinical cancer research. The use of a genetically tractable organism that shares organ systems and an immense degree of genetic similarity to humans provides a means to examine multiple features of human disease. Mouse models enable development and testing of new approaches to disease prevention and treatment, identification of early diagnostic markers and novel therapeutic targets, and an understanding of the in vivo biology and genetics of tumor initiation, promotion, progression, and metastasis. This review summarizes recent mouse models for lymphangiogenesis and the process of lymphovascular metastasis, focusing on the use of the cornea as an experimental platform for lymphangiogenesis in inflammation and immunity, and on the use of molecular and viral vector mediated imaging and to identify and monitor lymph node metastases of prostate cancer. PMID:21480239

  13. Experimental models in vaccine research: malaria and leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, C; Gomes, R

    2013-02-01

    Animal models have a long history of being useful tools, not only to test and select vaccines, but also to help understand the elaborate details of the immune response that follows infection. Different models have been extensively used to investigate putative immunological correlates of protection against parasitic diseases that are important to reach a successful vaccine. The greatest challenge has been the improvement and adaptation of these models to reflect the reality of human disease and the screening of vaccine candidates capable of overcoming the challenge of natural transmission. This review will discuss the advantages and challenges of using experimental animal models for vaccine development and how the knowledge achieved can be extrapolated to human disease by looking into two important parasitic diseases: malaria and leishmaniasis.

  14. Precisely parameterized experimental and computational models of tissue organization.

    PubMed

    Molitoris, Jared M; Paliwal, Saurabh; Sekar, Rajesh B; Blake, Robert; Park, JinSeok; Trayanova, Natalia A; Tung, Leslie; Levchenko, Andre

    2016-02-01

    Patterns of cellular organization in diverse tissues frequently display a complex geometry and topology tightly related to the tissue function. Progressive disorganization of tissue morphology can lead to pathologic remodeling, necessitating the development of experimental and theoretical methods of analysis of the tolerance of normal tissue function to structural alterations. A systematic way to investigate the relationship of diverse cell organization to tissue function is to engineer two-dimensional cell monolayers replicating key aspects of the in vivo tissue architecture. However, it is still not clear how this can be accomplished on a tissue level scale in a parameterized fashion, allowing for a mathematically precise definition of the model tissue organization and properties down to a cellular scale with a parameter dependent gradual change in model tissue organization. Here, we describe and use a method of designing precisely parameterized, geometrically complex patterns that are then used to control cell alignment and communication of model tissues. We demonstrate direct application of this method to guiding the growth of cardiac cell cultures and developing mathematical models of cell function that correspond to the underlying experimental patterns. Several anisotropic patterned cultures spanning a broad range of multicellular organization, mimicking the cardiac tissue organization of different regions of the heart, were found to be similar to each other and to isotropic cell monolayers in terms of local cell-cell interactions, reflected in similar confluency, morphology and connexin-43 expression. However, in agreement with the model predictions, different anisotropic patterns of cell organization, paralleling in vivo alterations of cardiac tissue morphology, resulted in variable and novel functional responses with important implications for the initiation and maintenance of cardiac arrhythmias. We conclude that variations of tissue geometry and topology

  15. Experimental modelling of aortic aneurysms: novel applications of silicone rubbers.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Barry J; Corbett, Timothy J; Cloonan, Aidan J; O'Donnell, Michael R; Walsh, Michael T; Vorp, David A; McGloughlin, Timothy M

    2009-10-01

    A range of silicone rubbers were created based on existing commercially available materials. These silicones were designed to be visually different from one another and have distinct material properties, in particular, ultimate tensile strengths and tear strengths. In total, eleven silicone rubbers were manufactured, with the materials designed to have a range of increasing tensile strengths from approximately 2 to 4 MPa, and increasing tear strengths from approximately 0.45 to 0.7 N/mm. The variations in silicones were detected using a standard colour analysis technique. Calibration curves were then created relating colour intensity to individual material properties. All eleven materials were characterised and a 1st order Ogden strain energy function applied. Material coefficients were determined and examined for effectiveness. Six idealised abdominal aortic aneurysm models were also created using the two base materials of the study, with a further model created using a new mixing technique to create a rubber model with randomly assigned material properties. These models were then examined using videoextensometry and compared to numerical results. Colour analysis revealed a statistically significant linear relationship (p<0.0009) with both tensile strength and tear strength, allowing material strength to be determined using a non-destructive experimental technique. The effectiveness of this technique was assessed by comparing predicted material properties to experimentally measured methods, with good agreement in the results. Videoextensometry and numerical modelling revealed minor percentage differences, with all results achieving significance (p<0.0009). This study has successfully designed and developed a range of silicone rubbers that have unique colour intensities and material strengths. Strengths can be readily determined using a non-destructive analysis technique with proven effectiveness. These silicones may further aid towards an improved understanding of

  16. Precisely parameterized experimental and computational models of tissue organization†

    PubMed Central

    Sekar, Rajesh B.; Blake, Robert; Park, JinSeok; Trayanova, Natalia A.; Tung, Leslie; Levchenko, Andre

    2016-01-01

    Patterns of cellular organization in diverse tissues frequently display a complex geometry and topology tightly related to the tissue function. Progressive disorganization of tissue morphology can lead to pathologic remodeling, necessitating the development of experimental and theoretical methods of analysis of the tolerance of normal tissue function to structural alterations. A systematic way to investigate the relationship of diverse cell organization to tissue function is to engineer two-dimensional cell monolayers replicating key aspects of the in vivo tissue architecture. However, it is still not clear how this can be accomplished on a tissue level scale in a parameterized fashion, allowing for a mathematically precise definition of the model tissue organization and properties down to a cellular scale with a parameter dependent gradual change in model tissue organization. Here, we describe and use a method of designing precisely parameterized, geometrically complex patterns that are then used to control cell alignment and communication of model tissues. We demonstrate direct application of this method to guiding the growth of cardiac cell cultures and developing mathematical models of cell function that correspond to the underlying experimental patterns. Several anisotropic patterned cultures spanning a broad range of multicellular organization, mimicking the cardiac tissue organization of different regions of the heart, were found to be similar to each other and to isotropic cell monolayers in terms of local cell–cell interactions, reflected in similar confluency, morphology and connexin-43 expression. However, in agreement with the model predictions, different anisotropic patterns of cell organization, paralleling in vivo alterations of cardiac tissue morphology, resulted in variable and novel functional responses with important implications for the initiation and maintenance of cardiac arrhythmias. We conclude that variations of tissue geometry and

  17. Experimental model for civilian ballistic brain injury biomechanics quantification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiangyue; Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A; Guan, Yabo; Gennarelli, Thomas A

    2007-01-01

    Biomechanical quantification of projectile penetration using experimental head models can enhance the understanding of civilian ballistic brain injury and advance treatment. Two of the most commonly used handgun projectiles (25-cal, 275 m/s and 9 mm, 395 m/s) were discharged to spherical head models with gelatin and Sylgard simulants. Four ballistic pressure transducers recorded temporal pressure distributions at 308kHz, and temporal cavity dynamics were captured at 20,000 frames/second (fps) using high-speed digital video images. Pressures ranged from 644.6 to -92.8 kPa. Entry pressures in gelatin models were higher than exit pressures, whereas in Sylgard models entry pressures were lower or equivalent to exit pressures. Gelatin responded with brittle-type failure, while Sylgard demonstrated a ductile pattern through formation of micro-bubbles along projectile path. Temporary cavities in Sylgard models were 1.5-2x larger than gelatin models. Pressures in Sylgard models were more sensitive to projectile velocity and diameter increase, indicating Sylgard was more rate sensitive than gelatin. Based on failure patterns and brain tissue rate-sensitive characteristics, Sylgard was found to be an appropriate simulant. Compared with spherical projectile data, full-metal jacket (FMJ) projectiles produced different temporary cavity and pressures, demonstrating shape effects. Models using Sylgard gel and FMJ projectiles are appropriate to enhance understanding and mechanisms of ballistic brain injury. PMID:17166502

  18. Hydroforming Of Patchwork Blanks — Numerical Modeling And Experimental Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamprecht, Klaus; Merklein, Marion; Geiger, Manfred

    2005-08-01

    In comparison to the commonly applied technology of tailored blanks the concept of patchwork blanks offers a number of additional advantages. Potential application areas for patchwork blanks in automotive industry are e.g. local reinforcements of automotive closures, structural reinforcements of rails and pillars as well as shock towers. But even if there is a significant application potential for patchwork blanks in automobile production, industrial realization of this innovative technique is decelerated due to a lack of knowledge regarding the forming behavior and the numerical modeling of patchwork blanks. Especially for the numerical simulation of hydroforming processes, where one part of the forming tool is replaced by a fluid under pressure, advanced modeling techniques are required to ensure an accurate prediction of the blanks' forming behavior. The objective of this contribution is to provide an appropriate model for the numerical simulation of patchwork blanks' forming processes. Therefore, different finite element modeling techniques for patchwork blanks are presented. In addition to basic shell element models a combined finite element model consisting of shell and solid elements is defined. Special emphasis is placed on the modeling of the weld seam. For this purpose the local mechanical properties of the weld metal, which have been determined by means of Martens-hardness measurements and uniaxial tensile tests, are integrated in the finite element models. The results obtained from the numerical simulations are compared to experimental data from a hydraulic bulge test. In this context the focus is laid on laser- and spot-welded patchwork blanks.

  19. Experimental model for civilian ballistic brain injury biomechanics quantification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiangyue; Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A; Guan, Yabo; Gennarelli, Thomas A

    2007-01-01

    Biomechanical quantification of projectile penetration using experimental head models can enhance the understanding of civilian ballistic brain injury and advance treatment. Two of the most commonly used handgun projectiles (25-cal, 275 m/s and 9 mm, 395 m/s) were discharged to spherical head models with gelatin and Sylgard simulants. Four ballistic pressure transducers recorded temporal pressure distributions at 308kHz, and temporal cavity dynamics were captured at 20,000 frames/second (fps) using high-speed digital video images. Pressures ranged from 644.6 to -92.8 kPa. Entry pressures in gelatin models were higher than exit pressures, whereas in Sylgard models entry pressures were lower or equivalent to exit pressures. Gelatin responded with brittle-type failure, while Sylgard demonstrated a ductile pattern through formation of micro-bubbles along projectile path. Temporary cavities in Sylgard models were 1.5-2x larger than gelatin models. Pressures in Sylgard models were more sensitive to projectile velocity and diameter increase, indicating Sylgard was more rate sensitive than gelatin. Based on failure patterns and brain tissue rate-sensitive characteristics, Sylgard was found to be an appropriate simulant. Compared with spherical projectile data, full-metal jacket (FMJ) projectiles produced different temporary cavity and pressures, demonstrating shape effects. Models using Sylgard gel and FMJ projectiles are appropriate to enhance understanding and mechanisms of ballistic brain injury.

  20. Experimental refutation of a class of ψ-epistemic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, M. K.; Olislager, L.; Duport, F.; Safioui, J.; Pironio, S.; Massar, S.

    2013-09-01

    The quantum state ψ is a mathematical object used to determine the outcome probabilities of measurements on physical systems. Its fundamental nature has been the subject of discussions since the origin of the theory: Is it ontic, that is, does it correspond to a real property of the physical system? Or is it epistemic, that is, does it merely represent our knowledge about the system? Recent advances in the foundations of quantum theory show that epistemic models that obey a simple continuity condition are in conflict with quantum theory already at the level of a single system. Here we report an experimental test of continuous epistemic models using high-dimensional attenuated coherent states of light traveling in an optical fiber. Due to nonideal state preparation (of coherent states with imperfectly known phase) and nonideal measurements (arising from losses and inefficient detection), this experiment tests only epistemic models that satisfy additional constraints which we discuss in detail. Our experimental results are in agreement with the predictions of quantum theory and provide constraints on a class of ψ-epistemic models.

  1. Sheet Hydroforming Process Numerical Model Improvement Through Experimental Results Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriele, Papadia; Antonio, Del Prete; Alfredo, Anglani

    2010-06-01

    The increasing application of numerical simulation in metal forming field has helped engineers to solve problems one after another to manufacture a qualified formed product reducing the required time [1]. Accurate simulation results are fundamental for the tooling and the product designs. The wide application of numerical simulation is encouraging the development of highly accurate simulation procedures to meet industrial requirements. Many factors can influence the final simulation results and many studies have been carried out about materials [2], yield criteria [3] and plastic deformation [4,5], process parameters [6] and their optimization. In order to develop a reliable hydromechanical deep drawing (HDD) numerical model the authors have been worked out specific activities based on the evaluation of the effective stiffness of the blankholder structure [7]. In this paper after an appropriate tuning phase of the blankholder force distribution, the experimental activity has been taken into account to improve the accuracy of the numerical model. In the first phase, the effective capability of the blankholder structure to transfer the applied load given by hydraulic actuators to the blank has been explored. This phase ended with the definition of an appropriate subdivision of the blankholder active surface in order to take into account the effective pressure map obtained for the given loads configuration. In the second phase the numerical results obtained with the developed subdivision have been compared with the experimental data of the studied model. The numerical model has been then improved, finding the best solution for the blankholder force distribution.

  2. Of mice and men: modelling post-stroke depression experimentally

    PubMed Central

    Kronenberg, G; Gertz, K; Heinz, A; Endres, M

    2014-01-01

    At least one-third of stroke survivors suffer from depression. The development of comorbid depression after stroke is clinically highly significant because post-stroke depression is associated with increased mortality, slows recovery and leads to worse functional outcomes. Here, we review the evidence that post-stroke depression can be effectively modelled in experimental rodents via a variety of approaches. This opens an exciting new window onto the neurobiology of depression and permits probing potential underlying mechanisms such as disturbed cellular plasticity, neuroendocrine dysregulation, neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration in a novel context. From the point of view of translational stroke research, extending the scope of experimental investigations beyond the study of short-term end points and, in particular, acute lesion size, may help improve the relevance of preclinical results to human disease. Furthermore, accumulating evidence from both clinical and experimental studies offers the tantalizing prospect of 5-hydroxytryptaminergic antidepressants as the first pharmacological therapy for stroke that would be available during the subacute and chronic phases of recovery. Interdisciplinary neuropsychiatric research will be called on to dissect the mechanisms underpinning the beneficial effects of antidepressants on stroke recovery. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Animal Models in Psychiatry Research. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-20 PMID:24838087

  3. Analytical modeling and experimental characterization of chemotaxis in Serratia marcescens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Jiang; Wei, Guopeng; Wright Carlsen, Rika; Edwards, Matthew R.; Marculescu, Radu; Bogdan, Paul; Sitti, Metin

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a modeling and experimental framework to characterize the chemotaxis of Serratia marcescens (S. marcescens) relying on two-dimensional and three-dimensional tracking of individual bacteria. Previous studies mainly characterized bacterial chemotaxis based on population density analysis. Instead, this study focuses on single-cell tracking and measuring the chemotactic drift velocity VC from the biased tumble rate of individual bacteria on exposure to a concentration gradient of l-aspartate. The chemotactic response of S. marcescens is quantified over a range of concentration gradients (10-3 to 5 mM/mm) and average concentrations (0.5×10-3 to 2.5 mM). Through the analysis of a large number of bacterial swimming trajectories, the tumble rate is found to have a significant bias with respect to the swimming direction. We also verify the relative gradient sensing mechanism in the chemotaxis of S. marcescens by measuring the change of VC with the average concentration and the gradient. The applied full pathway model with fitted parameters matches the experimental data. Finally, we show that our measurements based on individual bacteria lead to the determination of the motility coefficient μ (7.25×10-6 cm2/s) of a population. The experimental characterization and simulation results for the chemotaxis of this bacterial species contribute towards using S. marcescens in chemically controlled biohybrid systems.

  4. Experimental realization of the topological Haldane model with ultracold fermions.

    PubMed

    Jotzu, Gregor; Messer, Michael; Desbuquois, Rémi; Lebrat, Martin; Uehlinger, Thomas; Greif, Daniel; Esslinger, Tilman

    2014-11-13

    The Haldane model on a honeycomb lattice is a paradigmatic example of a Hamiltonian featuring topologically distinct phases of matter. It describes a mechanism through which a quantum Hall effect can appear as an intrinsic property of a band structure, rather than being caused by an external magnetic field. Although physical implementation has been considered unlikely, the Haldane model has provided the conceptual basis for theoretical and experimental research exploring topological insulators and superconductors. Here we report the experimental realization of the Haldane model and the characterization of its topological band structure, using ultracold fermionic atoms in a periodically modulated optical honeycomb lattice. The Haldane model is based on breaking both time-reversal symmetry and inversion symmetry. To break time-reversal symmetry, we introduce complex next-nearest-neighbour tunnelling terms, which we induce through circular modulation of the lattice position. To break inversion symmetry, we create an energy offset between neighbouring sites. Breaking either of these symmetries opens a gap in the band structure, which we probe using momentum-resolved interband transitions. We explore the resulting Berry curvatures, which characterize the topology of the lowest band, by applying a constant force to the atoms and find orthogonal drifts analogous to a Hall current. The competition between the two broken symmetries gives rise to a transition between topologically distinct regimes. By identifying the vanishing gap at a single Dirac point, we map out this transition line experimentally and quantitatively compare it to calculations using Floquet theory without free parameters. We verify that our approach, which allows us to tune the topological properties dynamically, is suitable even for interacting fermionic systems. Furthermore, we propose a direct extension to realize spin-dependent topological Hamiltonians.

  5. Huntington's disease and mitochondrial alterations: emphasis on experimental models.

    PubMed

    Pérez-De la Cruz, Verónica; Carrillo-Mora, Paul; Santamaría, Abel

    2010-06-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an inheritable neurological disorder coursing with degeneration of basal ganglia and producing chorea and dementia. One common factor accounting for neurodegeneration in this disorder is mitochondrial deterioration at both morphologic and functional levels. The development of experimental models in animals or cell preparations to resemble pathologic and pathogenic conditions of this disorder has served for more than four decades to describe part of the mechanistic alterations that could be occurring in mitochondria of HD patients, and the subsequent design of therapeutic alternatives where mitochondrial alterations are the primary target. In this minireview we describe some of the most relevant studies at the experimental level, giving support to the hypothesis that mitochondria play a central role in HD pathogenesis.

  6. Experimental rat models of chronic allograft nephropathy: a review

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Badri; Haylor, John

    2014-01-01

    Chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN) is the leading cause of late allograft loss after renal transplantation (RT), which continues to remain an unresolved problem. A rat model of CAN was first described in 1969 by White et al. Although the rat model of RT can be technically challenging, it is attractive because the pathogenesis of CAN is similar to that following human RT and the pathological features of CAN develop within months as compared with years in human RT. The rat model of RT is considered as a useful investigational tool in the field of experimental transplantation research. We have reviewed the literature on studies of rat RT reporting the donor and recipient strain combinations that have investigated resultant survival and histological outcomes. Several different combinations of inbred and outbred rat combinations have been reported to investigate the multiple aspects of transplantation, including acute rejection, cellular and humoral rejection mechanisms and their treatments, CAN, and potential targets for its prevention. PMID:25092995

  7. A two-Higgs-doublet model facing experimental hints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crivellin, Andreas; Heeck, Julian; Stoffer, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Physics beyond the Standard Model has so far eluded our experimental probes. Nevertheless, a number of interesting anomalies have accumulated that can be taken as hints towards new physics: BaBar, Belle, and LHCb have found deviations of approximately 3:8σ in B → Dτν and B → D*τν; the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon differs by about 3σ from the theoretic prediction; the branching ratio for τ → μνν is about 2σ above the Standard Model expectation; and CMS and ATLAS found hints for a non-zero decay rate of h → μτ at 2.6σ. Here we consider these processes within a lepton-specific two-Higgs doublet model with additional non-standard Yukawa couplings and show how (and which of) these excesses can be accommodated.

  8. Experimentally driven atomistic model of 1,2 polybutadiene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkourmpis, Thomas; Mitchell, Geoffrey R.

    2014-02-01

    We present an efficient method of combining wide angle neutron scattering data with detailed atomistic models, allowing us to perform a quantitative and qualitative mapping of the organisation of the chain conformation in both glass and liquid phases. The structural refinement method presented in this work is based on the exploitation of the intrachain features of the diffraction pattern and its intimate linkage with atomistic models by the use of internal coordinates for bond lengths, valence angles, and torsion rotations. Atomic connectivity is defined through these coordinates that are in turn assigned by pre-defined probability distributions, thus allowing for the models in question to be built stochastically. Incremental variation of these coordinates allows for the construction of models that minimise the differences between the observed and calculated structure factors. We present a series of neutron scattering data of 1,2 polybutadiene at the region 120-400 K. Analysis of the experimental data yields bond lengths for CC and C  C of 1.54 Å and 1.35 Å, respectively. Valence angles of the backbone were found to be at 112° and the torsion distributions are characterised by five rotational states, a three-fold trans-skew± for the backbone and gauche± for the vinyl group. Rotational states of the vinyl group were found to be equally populated, indicating a largely atactic chan. The two backbone torsion angles exhibit different behaviour with respect to temperature of their trans population, with one of them adopting an almost all trans sequence. Consequently, the resulting configuration leads to a rather persistent chain, something indicated by the value of the characteristic ratio extrapolated from the model. We compare our results with theoretical predictions, computer simulations, RIS models and previously reported experimental results.

  9. Experimentally driven atomistic model of 1,2 polybutadiene

    SciTech Connect

    Gkourmpis, Thomas; Mitchell, Geoffrey R.

    2014-02-07

    We present an efficient method of combining wide angle neutron scattering data with detailed atomistic models, allowing us to perform a quantitative and qualitative mapping of the organisation of the chain conformation in both glass and liquid phases. The structural refinement method presented in this work is based on the exploitation of the intrachain features of the diffraction pattern and its intimate linkage with atomistic models by the use of internal coordinates for bond lengths, valence angles, and torsion rotations. Atomic connectivity is defined through these coordinates that are in turn assigned by pre-defined probability distributions, thus allowing for the models in question to be built stochastically. Incremental variation of these coordinates allows for the construction of models that minimise the differences between the observed and calculated structure factors. We present a series of neutron scattering data of 1,2 polybutadiene at the region 120–400 K. Analysis of the experimental data yields bond lengths for Cî—¸C and C î—» C of 1.54 Å and 1.35 Å, respectively. Valence angles of the backbone were found to be at 112° and the torsion distributions are characterised by five rotational states, a three-fold trans-skew± for the backbone and gauche± for the vinyl group. Rotational states of the vinyl group were found to be equally populated, indicating a largely atactic chan. The two backbone torsion angles exhibit different behaviour with respect to temperature of their trans population, with one of them adopting an almost all trans sequence. Consequently, the resulting configuration leads to a rather persistent chain, something indicated by the value of the characteristic ratio extrapolated from the model. We compare our results with theoretical predictions, computer simulations, RIS models and previously reported experimental results.

  10. Electromechanical properties of smart aggregate: theoretical modeling and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianjun; Kong, Qingzhao; Shi, Zhifei; Song, Gangbing

    2016-09-01

    Smart aggregate (SA), as a piezoceramic-based multi-functional device, is formed by sandwiching two lead zirconate titanate (PZT) patches with copper shielding between a pair of solid-machined cylindrical marble blocks with epoxy. Previous researches have successfully demonstrated the capability and reliability of versatile SAs to monitor the structural health of concrete structures. However, the previous works concentrated mainly on the applications of SAs in structural health monitoring; no reasonable theoretical model of SAs was proposed. In this paper, electromechanical properties of SAs were investigated using a proposed theoretical model. Based on one dimensional linear theory of piezo-elasticity, the dynamic solutions of a SA subjected to an external harmonic voltage were solved. Further, the electric impedance of the SA was computed, and the resonance and anti-resonance frequencies were calculated based on derived equations. Numerical analysis was conducted to discuss the effects of the thickness of epoxy layer and the dimension of PZT patch on the fundamental resonance and anti-resonance frequencies as well as the corresponding electromechanical coupling factor. The dynamic solutions based on the proposed theoretical model were further experimentally verified with two SA samples. The fundamental resonance and anti-resonance frequencies of SAs show good agreements in both theoretical and experimental results. The presented analysis and results contribute to the overall understanding of SA properties and help to optimize the working frequencies of SAs in structural health monitoring of civil structures.

  11. Size exclusion deep bed filtration: Experimental and modelling uncertainties

    SciTech Connect

    Badalyan, Alexander You, Zhenjiang; Aji, Kaiser; Bedrikovetsky, Pavel; Carageorgos, Themis; Zeinijahromi, Abbas

    2014-01-15

    A detailed uncertainty analysis associated with carboxyl-modified latex particle capture in glass bead-formed porous media enabled verification of the two theoretical stochastic models for prediction of particle retention due to size exclusion. At the beginning of this analysis it is established that size exclusion is a dominant particle capture mechanism in the present study: calculated significant repulsive Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek potential between latex particles and glass beads is an indication of their mutual repulsion, thus, fulfilling the necessary condition for size exclusion. Applying linear uncertainty propagation method in the form of truncated Taylor's series expansion, combined standard uncertainties (CSUs) in normalised suspended particle concentrations are calculated using CSUs in experimentally determined parameters such as: an inlet volumetric flowrate of suspension, particle number in suspensions, particle concentrations in inlet and outlet streams, particle and pore throat size distributions. Weathering of glass beads in high alkaline solutions does not appreciably change particle size distribution, and, therefore, is not considered as an additional contributor to the weighted mean particle radius and corresponded weighted mean standard deviation. Weighted mean particle radius and LogNormal mean pore throat radius are characterised by the highest CSUs among all experimental parameters translating to high CSU in the jamming ratio factor (dimensionless particle size). Normalised suspended particle concentrations calculated via two theoretical models are characterised by higher CSUs than those for experimental data. The model accounting the fraction of inaccessible flow as a function of latex particle radius excellently predicts normalised suspended particle concentrations for the whole range of jamming ratios. The presented uncertainty analysis can be also used for comparison of intra- and inter-laboratory particle size exclusion data.

  12. Hydration of calcium sulfoaluminate cements - Experimental findings and thermodynamic modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Winnefeld, Frank; Lothenbach, Barbara

    2010-08-15

    Calcium sulfoaluminate cements (CSA) are a promising low-CO{sub 2} alternative to ordinary Portland cements and are as well of interest concerning their use as binder for waste encapsulation. In this study, the hydration of two CSA cements has been investigated experimentally and by thermodynamic modelling between 1 h and 28 days at w/c ratios of 0.72 and 0.80, respectively. The main hydration product of CSA is ettringite, which precipitates together with amorphous Al(OH){sub 3} until the calcium sulfate is consumed after around 1-2 days of hydration. Afterwards, monosulfate is formed. In the presence of belite, straetlingite occurs as an additional hydration product. The pore solution analysis reveals that straetlingite can bind a part of the potassium ions, which are released by the clinker minerals. The microstructure of both cements is quite dense even after 16 h of hydration, with not much pore space available at a sample age of 28 days. The pore solution of both cements is dominated during the first hours of hydration by potassium, sodium, calcium, aluminium and sulfate; the pH is around 10-11. When the calcium sulfate is depleted, the sulfate concentration drops by a factor of 10. This increases pH to around 12.5-12.8. Based on the experimental data, a thermodynamic hydration model for CSA cements based on cement composition, hydration kinetics of clinker phases and calculations of thermodynamic equilibria by geochemical speciation has been established. The modelled phase development with ongoing hydration agrees well with the experimental findings.

  13. Hepatitis C Virus Experimental Model Systems and Antiviral drug Research*

    PubMed Central

    Uprichard, Susan L.

    2010-01-01

    An estimated 130 million people worldwide are chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) making it a leading cause of liver disease worldwide. Because the currently available therapy of pegylated interferon-alpha and ribavirin is only effective in a subset of patients, the development of new HCV antivirals is a healthcare imperative. This review discusses the experimental models available for HCV antiviral drug research, recent advances in HCV antiviral drug development, as well as active research being pursued to facilitate development of new HCV-specific therapeutics. PMID:20960298

  14. Rhabdomyosarcomas: an overview on the experimental animal models

    PubMed Central

    Zanola, Alessandra; Rossi, Stefania; Faggi, Fiorella; Monti, Eugenio; Fanzani, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Rhabdomyosarcomas (RMS) are aggressive childhood soft-tissue malignancies deriving from mesenchymal progenitors that are committed to muscle-specific lineages. Despite the histopathological signatures associated with three main histological variants, termed embryonal, alveolar and pleomorphic, a plethora of genetic and molecular changes are recognized in RMS. Over the years, exposure to carcinogens or ionizing radiations and gene-targeting approaches in vivo have greatly contributed to disclose some of the mechanisms underlying RMS onset. In this review, we describe the principal distinct features associated with RMS variants and focus on the current available experimental animal models to point out the molecular determinants cooperating with RMS development and progression. PMID:22225829

  15. Experimental modelling of ground deformation associated with shallow magma intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galland, O.

    2012-04-01

    Active volcanoes experience ground deformation as a response to the dynamics of underground magmatic systems. The analysis of ground deformation patterns may provide important constraints on the dynamics and shape of the underlying volcanic plumbing systems. Nevertheless, these analyses usually take into account simplistic shapes (sphere, dykes, sills) and the results cannot be verified as the modelled systems are buried. In this contribution, I will present new results from experimental models of magma intrusion, in which both the evolution of ground deformation during intrusion and the shape of the underlying intrusion are monitored in 3D. The models consisted of a molten vegetable oil, simulating low viscosity magma, injected into cohesive fine-grained silica flour, simulating the brittle upper crust; oil injection resulted is sheet intrusions (dykes, sills and cone sheets). The initial topography in the models was flat. While the oil was intruding, the surface of the models slightly lifted up to form a smooth relief, which was mapped through time. After an initial symmetrical development, the uplifted area developed asymmetrically; at the end of the experiments, the oil always erupted at the steepest edge of the uplifted area. After the experiment, the oil solidified, the intrusion was excavated and the shape of its top surface mapped. The comparison between the uplifted zone and the underlying intrusions showed that (1) the complex shapes of the uplifted areas reflected the complex shapes of the underlying intrusions, (2) the time evolution of the uplifted zone was correlated with the evolution of the underlying intrusion, and (3) the early asymmetrical evolution of the uplifted areas can be used to predict the location of the eruption of the oil. The experimental results also suggest that complex intrusion shapes (inclined sheet, cone sheet, complex sill) may have to be considered more systematically in analyses of ground deformation patterns on volcanoes.

  16. Experimental modelling of ground deformation associated with shallow magma intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galland, Olivier

    2012-02-01

    Active volcanoes experience ground deformation as a response to the dynamics of underground magmatic systems. The analysis of ground deformation patterns may provide important constraints on the dynamics and shape of the underlying volcanic plumbing systems. Nevertheless, these analyses usually take into account simplistic shapes (sphere, dykes, sills) and the results cannot be verified as the modelled systems are buried. In this paper, I present new results from experimental models of magma intrusion, in which both the evolution of ground deformation during intrusion and the shape of the underlying intrusion are monitored. The models consisted of a molten vegetable oil, simulating low viscosity magma, injected into cohesive fine-grained silica flour, simulating the brittle upper crust; oil injection resulted is sheet intrusions (dykes, sills and cone sheets). The initial topography in the models was flat. While the oil was intruding, the surface of the models slightly lifted up to form a smooth relief, which was mapped through time. After an initial symmetrical development, the uplifted area developed asymmetrically; at the end of the experiments, the oil always erupted at the steepest edge of the uplifted area. After the experiment, the oil solidified, the intrusion was excavated and the shape of its top surface mapped. The comparison between the uplifted zone and the underlying intrusions showed that (1) the complex shapes of the uplifted areas reflected the complex shapes of the underlying intrusions, (2) the time evolution of the uplifted zone was correlated with the evolution of the underlying intrusion, and (3) the early asymmetrical evolution of the uplifted areas can be used to predict the location of the eruption of the oil. The experimental results also suggest that complex intrusion shapes (inclined sheet, cone sheet, complex sill) may have to be considered more systematically in the analyses of ground deformation patterns on volcanoes.

  17. Internally electrodynamic particle model: Its experimental basis and its predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng-Johansson, J. X.

    2010-03-01

    The internally electrodynamic (IED) particle model was derived based on overall experimental observations, with the IED process itself being built directly on three experimental facts: (a) electric charges present with all material particles, (b) an accelerated charge generates electromagnetic waves according to Maxwell’s equations and Planck energy equation, and (c) source motion produces Doppler effect. A set of well-known basic particle equations and properties become predictable based on first principles solutions for the IED process; several key solutions achieved are outlined, including the de Broglie phase wave, de Broglie relations, Schrödinger equation, mass, Einstein mass-energy relation, Newton’s law of gravity, single particle self interference, and electromagnetic radiation and absorption; these equations and properties have long been broadly experimentally validated or demonstrated. A conditioned solution also predicts the Doebner-Goldin equation which emerges to represent a form of long-sought quantum wave equation including gravity. A critical review of the key experiments is given which suggests that the IED process underlies the basic particle equations and properties not just sufficiently but also necessarily.

  18. Internally electrodynamic particle model: Its experimental basis and its predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng-Johansson, J. X.

    2010-03-15

    The internally electrodynamic (IED) particle model was derived based on overall experimental observations, with the IED process itself being built directly on three experimental facts: (a) electric charges present with all material particles, (b) an accelerated charge generates electromagnetic waves according to Maxwell's equations and Planck energy equation, and (c) source motion produces Doppler effect. A set of well-known basic particle equations and properties become predictable based on first principles solutions for the IED process; several key solutions achieved are outlined, including the de Broglie phase wave, de Broglie relations, Schroedinger equation, mass, Einstein mass-energy relation, Newton's law of gravity, single particle self interference, and electromagnetic radiation and absorption; these equations and properties have long been broadly experimentally validated or demonstrated. A conditioned solution also predicts the Doebner-Goldin equation which emerges to represent a form of long-sought quantum wave equation including gravity. A critical review of the key experiments is given which suggests that the IED process underlies the basic particle equations and properties not just sufficiently but also necessarily.

  19. An experimental methodology for a fuzzy set preference model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turksen, I. B.; Willson, Ian A.

    1992-01-01

    models and vague linguistic preferences has greatly limited the usefulness and predictive validity of existing preference models. A fuzzy set preference model that uses linguistic variables and a fully interactive implementation should be able to simultaneously address these issues and substantially improve the accuracy of demand estimates. The parallel implementation of crisp and fuzzy conjoint models using identical data not only validates the fuzzy set model but also provides an opportunity to assess the impact of fuzzy set definitions and individual attribute choices implemented in the interactive methodology developed in this research. The generalized experimental tools needed for conjoint models can also be applied to many other types of intelligent systems.

  20. Elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema: insights from experimental models.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Mariana A; Rocco, Patricia R M

    2011-12-01

    Several distinct stimuli can be used to reproduce histological and functional features of human emphysema, a leading cause of disability and death. Since cigarette smoke is the main cause of emphysema in humans, experimental researches have attempted to reproduce this situation. However, this is an expensive and cumbersome method of emphysema induction, and simpler, more efficacious alternatives have been sought. Among these approaches, elastolytic enzymes have been widely used to reproduce some characteristics of human cigarette smoke-induced disease, such as: augmentation of airspaces, inflammatory cell influx into the lungs, and systemic inflammation. Nevertheless, the use of elastase-induced emphysema models is still controversial, since the disease pathways involved in elastase induction may differ from those occurring in smoke-induced emphysema. This indicates that the choice of an emphysema model may impact the results of new therapies or drugs being tested. The aim of this review is to compare the mechanisms of disease induction in smoke and elastase emphysema models, to describe the differences among various elastase models, and to establish the advantages and disadvantages of elastase-induced emphysema models. More studies are required to shed light on the mechanisms of elastase-induced emphysema. PMID:22159348

  1. Elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema: insights from experimental models.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Mariana A; Rocco, Patricia R M

    2011-12-01

    Several distinct stimuli can be used to reproduce histological and functional features of human emphysema, a leading cause of disability and death. Since cigarette smoke is the main cause of emphysema in humans, experimental researches have attempted to reproduce this situation. However, this is an expensive and cumbersome method of emphysema induction, and simpler, more efficacious alternatives have been sought. Among these approaches, elastolytic enzymes have been widely used to reproduce some characteristics of human cigarette smoke-induced disease, such as: augmentation of airspaces, inflammatory cell influx into the lungs, and systemic inflammation. Nevertheless, the use of elastase-induced emphysema models is still controversial, since the disease pathways involved in elastase induction may differ from those occurring in smoke-induced emphysema. This indicates that the choice of an emphysema model may impact the results of new therapies or drugs being tested. The aim of this review is to compare the mechanisms of disease induction in smoke and elastase emphysema models, to describe the differences among various elastase models, and to establish the advantages and disadvantages of elastase-induced emphysema models. More studies are required to shed light on the mechanisms of elastase-induced emphysema.

  2. Immunology and Homeopathy. 3. Experimental Studies on Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Bellavite, Paolo; Ortolani, Riccardo; Conforti, Anita

    2006-01-01

    A search of the literature and the experiments carried out by the authors of this review show that there are a number of animal models where the effect of homeopathic dilutions or the principles of homeopathic medicine have been tested. The results relate to the immunostimulation by ultralow doses of antigens, the immunological models of the ‘simile’, the regulation of acute or chronic inflammatory processes and the use of homeopathic medicines in farming. The models utilized by different research groups are extremely etherogeneous and differ as the test medicines, the dilutions and the outcomes are concerned. Some experimental lines, particularly those utilizing mice models of immunomodulation and anti-inflammatory effects of homeopathic complex formulations, give support to a real effect of homeopathic high dilutions in animals, but often these data are of preliminary nature and have not been independently replicated. The evidence emerging from animal models is supporting the traditional ‘simile’ rule, according to which ultralow doses of compounds, that in high doses are pathogenic, may have paradoxically a protective or curative effect. Despite a few encouraging observational studies, the effectiveness of the homeopathic prevention or therapy of infections in veterinary medicine is not sufficiently supported by randomized and controlled trials. PMID:16786046

  3. Antioxidant Capacity: Experimental Determination by EPR Spectroscopy and Mathematical Modeling.

    PubMed

    Polak, Justyna; Bartoszek, Mariola; Chorążewski, Mirosław

    2015-07-22

    A new method of determining antioxidant capacity based on a mathematical model is presented in this paper. The model was fitted to 1000 data points of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy measurements of various food product samples such as tea, wine, juice, and herbs with Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) values from 20 to 2000 μmol TE/100 mL. The proposed mathematical equation allows for a determination of TEAC of food products based on a single EPR spectroscopy measurement. The model was tested on the basis of 80 EPR spectroscopy measurements of herbs, tea, coffee, and juice samples. The proposed model works for both strong and weak antioxidants (TEAC values from 21 to 2347 μmol TE/100 mL). The determination coefficient between TEAC values obtained experimentally and TEAC values calculated with proposed mathematical equation was found to be R(2) = 0.98. Therefore, the proposed new method of TEAC determination based on a mathematical model is a good alternative to the standard EPR method due to its being fast, accurate, inexpensive, and simple to perform. PMID:26120897

  4. Experimental investigation and model development for a harmonic drive transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preissner, Curt; Shu, Deming; Royston, Thomas J.

    2007-09-01

    Harmonic drive transmissions (HDTs) are compact, low-backlash, high-ratio, high-resolution rotary motion transmissions. One application to benefit from these attributes is the revolute joint robot. Engineers at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) are investigating the use of this type of robot for the positioning of an x-ray detector; understanding the properties of the robot components is crucial to modeling positioner behavior. The robot bearing elements had been investigated previously, leaving the transmission as the missing component. While the benefits of HDTs are well known, the disadvantages, including fluctuating dissipation characteristics and nonlinear stiffness, are not understood as well. These characteristics can contribute uncontrolled dynamics to the overall robot performance. A dynamometer has been constructed at the APS to experimentally measure the HDT's response. Empirical torque and position data were recorded for multiple transmission load cases and input conditions. In turn, a computer model of the dynamometer HDT system was constructed to approximate the observed response.

  5. Experimental investigation and model development for a harmonic drive transmission.

    SciTech Connect

    Preissner, C.; Shu, D.; Royston, T. J.; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago

    2007-01-01

    Harmonic drive transmissions (HDTs) are compact, low-backlash, high-ratio, high-resolution rotary motion transmissions. One application to benefit from these attributes is the revolute joint robot. Engineers at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) are investigating the use of this type of robot for the positioning of an x-ray detector; understanding the properties of the robot components is crucial to modeling positioner behavior. The robot bearing elements had been investigated previously, leaving the transmission as the missing component. While the benefits of HDTs are well known, the disadvantages, including fluctuating dissipation characteristics and nonlinear stiffness, are not understood as well. These characteristics can contribute uncontrolled dynamics to the overall robot performance. A dynamometer has been constructed at the APS to experimentally measure the HDT's response. Empirical torque and position data were recorded for multiple transmission load cases and input conditions. In turn, a computer model of the dynamometer HDT system was constructed to approximate the observed response.

  6. An experimental mouse model for hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kiminori; Kohara, Michinori

    2011-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection affects approximately 170 million people and is a major global health problem because infected individuals can develop liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Despite significant improvements in antiviral drugs, only around 50% of treated patients with genotype 1 and 4 demonstrate HCV clearance. Unfortunately, an anti-HCV vaccine is still not available. To progress treatment of HCV, it is necessary to understand the mechanism(s) by which HCV infects hepatocytes, and how the host immune response prevents the spread of the virus. Because HCV infects only humans and chimpanzees, it is difficult to evaluate immune response mechanisms, and the effects of chemicals and new technologies on these response mechanisms. These difficulties underline the importance of establishing a small HCV-infected animal model. This review focuses on the progress made in recent years towards the development of an experimental mouse model for HCV.

  7. Performance Modeling of an Experimental Laser Propelled Lightcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Chen, Yen-Sen; Liu, Jiwen; Myrabo, Leik N.; Mead, Franklin B., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    A computational plasma aerodynamics model is developed to study the performance of an experimental laser propelled lightcraft. The computational methodology is based on a time-accurate, three-dimensional, finite-difference, chemically reacting, unstructured grid, pressure- based formulation. The underlying physics are added and tested systematically using a building-block approach. The physics modeled include non-equilibn'um thermodynamics, non-equilibrium air-plasma finite-rate kinetics, specular ray tracing, laser beam energy absorption and equi refraction by plasma, non-equilibrium plasma radiation, and plasma resonance. A series of transient computations are performed at several laser pulse energy levels and the simulated physics are discussed and compared with those of tests and literature. The predicted coupling coefficients for the lightcraft compared reasonably well with those of tests conducted on a pendulum apparatus.

  8. Modeling and Experimentation on a Two-dimensional Synthetic jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yunfei; Mohseni, Kamran

    2007-11-01

    Hotwire anemometry is employed in order to investigate the spatial development of a two-dimensional synthetic jet. Flow velocity at various locations downstream from a slit is measured. A self similar behavior in the measured velocity is observed. An analytical model for a steady synthetic jet is developed that accurately matches the experimental data. As observed by other groups, the two-dimensional synthetic jet spreads at a rate higher than a continuous jet. This rate is accurately predicted by our model. It is identified that the main difference between a continuous jet and a synthetic jet is the higher value of the virtual viscosity (eddy viscosity) in a synthetic jet. This is attributed to the pulsate nature of a synthetic jet that makes it more susceptible to turbulence.

  9. Interactive simulation of embolization coils: modeling and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Dequidt, Jérémie; Marchal, Maud; Duriez, Christian; Kerien, Erwan; Cotin, Stéphane

    2008-01-01

    Coil embolization offers a new approach to treat aneurysms. This medical procedure is namely less invasive than an open-surgery as it relies on the deployment of very thin platinum-based wires within the aneurysm through the arteries. When performed intracranially, this procedure must be particularly accurate and therefore carefully planned and performed by experienced radiologists. A simulator of the coil deployment represents an interesting and helpful tool for the physician by providing information on the coil behavior. In this paper, an original modeling is proposed to obtain interactive and accurate simulations of coil deployment. The model takes into account geometric nonlinearities and uses a shape memory formulation to describe its complex geometry. An experimental validation is performed in a contact-free environment to identify the mechanical properties of the coil and to quantitatively compare the simulation with real data. Computational performances are also measured to insure an interactive simulation. PMID:18979807

  10. Experimental platynosomosis: Characterization of parasite development in the mouse model.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Hudson A; Mati, Vitor L T; Melo, Alan L

    2015-06-30

    Despite the veterinary importance of species of Platynosomum, biliary trematode parasites of birds and mammals with worldwide distribution and a growing role in feline practice, the basic parasitological aspects of platynosomosis is still not completely understood due to the scarcity of studies in experimental models. In the present study, metacercariae of Platynosomum illiciens obtained from naturally infected tropical house geckos (Hemidactylus mabouia) in an urban area of Brazil were force-fed to mice of the AKR/J strain (100 metacercariae/animal). Groups of mice were euthanized at 60, 120, 160 and 240 days post-infection (DPI), and the biliary tree of the animals (intrahepatic biliary ducts, common hepatic and bile ducts, cystic duct and gallbladder) were examined for the presence of adult parasites. Recovered flukes were counted, classified by their site of origin (i.e., intrahepatic or extrahepatic biliary ducts) and morphologically analyzed under light microscope. The number of adult parasites obtained at 60, 120, 160 and 240 DPI was 22 ± 6 (16-32), 41 ± 14 (18-48), 27 ± 11 (18-40) and 20 ± 6 (13-30), respectively, and no significant differences in total worm burden at the different experimental times were observed. However, 41%, 51%, 75% and 95% of the parasites were found in the common hepatic and bile ducts at 60, 120, 160 and 240 DPI, respectively, suggesting the occurrence of parasitic migration to the extrahepatic biliary tree during infection; however, no parasites were observed in the gallbladder or cystic duct. Regarding the morphometric analysis, progressive growth of P. illiciens during the experimental time was observed, and the parasites collected from the extrahepatic bile ducts were larger than those obtained from the intrahepatic ducts at the same time of infection. Parasites obtained from the extrahepatic biliary tree of the mice at 160 DPI had similar measurements to those of parasites obtained at 240 DPI, and those measurements were

  11. Contaminant plume configuration and movement: an experimental model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alencoao, A.; Reis, A.; Pereira, M. G.; Liberato, M. L. R.; Caramelo, L.; Amraoui, M.; Amorim, V.

    2009-04-01

    The relevance of Science and Technology in our daily routines makes it compulsory to educate citizens who have both scientific literacy and scientific knowledge. These will allow them to be intervening citizens in a constantly changing society. Thus, physical and natural sciences are included in school curricula, both in primary and secondary education, with the fundamental aim of developing in the students the skills, attitudes and knowledge needed for the understanding of the planet Earth and its real problems. On the other hand, teaching in Geosciences is more and more based on practical methodologies which use didactic material, sustaining teachers' pedagogical practices and facilitating students' learning tasks suggested on the syllabus defined for each school level. Themes related to exploring the different components of the Hydrological Cycle and themes related to natural environment protection and preservation, namely water resources and soil contamination by industrial and urban sewage are examples of subject matters included on the Portuguese syllabus. These topics motivated the conception and construction of experimental models for the study of the propagation of pollutants on a porous medium. The experimental models allow inducing a horizontal flux of water though different kinds of permeable substances (e.g. sand, silt), with contamination spots on its surface. These experimental activities facilitate the student to understand the flow path of contaminating substances on the saturated zone and to observe the contaminant plume configuration and movement. The activities are explored in a teaching and learning process perspective where the student builds its own knowledge through real question- problem based learning which relate Science, Technology and Society. These activities have been developed in the framework of project ‘Water in the Environment' (CV/PVI/0854) of the POCTI Program (Programa Operacional "Ciência, Tecnologia, Inovação") financed

  12. Effect of intraarticular propolis in an experimental septic arthritis model.

    PubMed

    Oner, Mithat; Kafadar, Ibrahim; Guney, Ahmet; Halici, Mehmet; Deniz, Kemal; Turk, Yildirim; Argun, Mahmut

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of intraarticular propolis compared with systemic antibiotic treatment in an experimental septic arthritis model. Thirty-two rabbits were infected intraarticularly by Staphylococcus aureus. The rabbits were randomly divided into four groups, including a control group and three experimental groups. Drainage was the only procedure performed in group I (control group). The animals were treated with daily intramuscular cefazolin sodium (75 mg/kg) for 7 days in group II. In group III, intraarticular ethanolic extract of propolis (0.5 mg/ml) was injected to the infected knees under sterile conditions on days 7, 14, and 21 after drainage. In group IV, the rabbits received both intramuscular cefazolin sodium as in group II and intraarticular ethanolic extract of propolis as in group III. After 8 weeks, the animals were killed and joint histopathological and scanning electron microscopic parameters were assessed. The best clinical score was obtained in group IV. There were statistically significant differences among all the groups (P<0.05). The highest total score of the histological examination was found in group I and the best total score was obtained in group IV. There were statistically significant differences among the groups when we evaluated the scores of the parameters as loss of chondrocytes, loss of matrix, and pannus in-growth (P<0.05). But there was no significant difference among the groups for the scores of cloning of the chondrocytes (P>0.05). The highest scanning electron microscopy score was found in group I and the best score was obtained in group IV. Our results confirm the safety and efficacy of intraarticular propolis and synergistic effect of propolis when used with cefazolin in an experimental septic arthritis model.

  13. Experimental Model of Intervertebral Disk Mediated Postoperative Epidural Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Larionov, Sergey N.; Sorokovikov, V.A.; Erdyneyev, K.C.; Lepekhova, S.A.; Goldberg, O.A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Postoperative epidural fibrosis (EF) after lumbar discectomy is the most common and at the same time controversial issue. Purpose The etiology and pathogenesis creates a lot of discussion and selection of methods of treatment and prevention continues. Methods LIV laminectomy with dura mater (DM) exposition was done in 24 rats, and then, 0.3 ml of elements of suspension of autologous intervertebral disk was implicated on DM. As autologous intervertebral disk, we used the intervertebral disk from amputated tail. In all the animals, incisions were closed with 3/0 Vicryl. EF was examined. Fibroblast cell density was calculated in each field at ×40 magnification: Grade 1 - fewer than 100 fibroblasts in each field; Grade 2 - 100-150 fibroblasts in each field; Grade 3 - more than 150 fibroblasts in each field. Results Based on histological results, we confirmed our model of experiment. On the 30th day of evaluation, there were significant histological evidences of postoperative epidural adhesions in experimental animals, which included the obliteration of epidural space, the presence of adhesions in the dura and nerve roots, the restructuring of the yellow ligament, bone sclerosis, excessive appearance of fibrous tissue around the autologous intervertebral disk tissue that applied on the DM. Conclusion In our work, we describe a new experimental model, where the elements of autologous intervertebral disk play the role of inflammation trigger, which cause postoperative scar and EF. PMID:27647957

  14. Experimental Model of Intervertebral Disk Mediated Postoperative Epidural Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Larionov, Sergey N.; Sorokovikov, V.A.; Erdyneyev, K.C.; Lepekhova, S.A.; Goldberg, O.A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Postoperative epidural fibrosis (EF) after lumbar discectomy is the most common and at the same time controversial issue. Purpose The etiology and pathogenesis creates a lot of discussion and selection of methods of treatment and prevention continues. Methods LIV laminectomy with dura mater (DM) exposition was done in 24 rats, and then, 0.3 ml of elements of suspension of autologous intervertebral disk was implicated on DM. As autologous intervertebral disk, we used the intervertebral disk from amputated tail. In all the animals, incisions were closed with 3/0 Vicryl. EF was examined. Fibroblast cell density was calculated in each field at ×40 magnification: Grade 1 - fewer than 100 fibroblasts in each field; Grade 2 - 100-150 fibroblasts in each field; Grade 3 - more than 150 fibroblasts in each field. Results Based on histological results, we confirmed our model of experiment. On the 30th day of evaluation, there were significant histological evidences of postoperative epidural adhesions in experimental animals, which included the obliteration of epidural space, the presence of adhesions in the dura and nerve roots, the restructuring of the yellow ligament, bone sclerosis, excessive appearance of fibrous tissue around the autologous intervertebral disk tissue that applied on the DM. Conclusion In our work, we describe a new experimental model, where the elements of autologous intervertebral disk play the role of inflammation trigger, which cause postoperative scar and EF.

  15. Taenia solium: Development of an Experimental Model of Porcine Neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Fleury, Agnès; Trejo, Armando; Cisneros, Humberto; García-Navarrete, Roberto; Villalobos, Nelly; Hernández, Marisela; Villeda Hernández, Juana; Hernández, Beatriz; Rosas, Gabriela; Bobes, Raul J; de Aluja, Aline S; Sciutto, Edda; Fragoso, Gladis

    2015-01-01

    Human neurocysticercosis (NC) is caused by the establishment of Taenia solium larvae in the central nervous system. NC is a severe disease still affecting the population in developing countries of Latin America, Asia, and Africa. While great improvements have been made on NC diagnosis, treatment, and prevention, the management of patients affected by extraparenchymal parasites remains a challenge. The development of a T. solium NC experimental model in pigs that will allow the evaluation of new therapeutic alternatives is herein presented. Activated oncospheres (either 500 or 1000) were surgically implanted in the cerebral subarachnoid space of piglets. The clinical status and the level of serum antibodies in the animals were evaluated for a 4-month period after implantation. The animals were sacrificed, cysticerci were counted during necropsy, and both the macroscopic and microscopic characteristics of cysts were described. Based on the number of established cysticerci, infection efficiency ranged from 3.6% (1000 oncospheres) to 5.4% (500 oncospheres). Most parasites were caseous or calcified (38/63, 60.3%) and were surrounded by an exacerbated inflammatory response with lymphocyte infiltration and increased inflammatory markers. The infection elicited specific antibodies but no neurological signs. This novel experimental model of NC provides a useful tool to evaluate new cysticidal and anti-inflammatory approaches and it should improve the management of severe NC patients, refractory to the current treatments. PMID:26252878

  16. Taenia solium: Development of an Experimental Model of Porcine Neurocysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Fleury, Agnès; Trejo, Armando; Cisneros, Humberto; García-Navarrete, Roberto; Villalobos, Nelly; Hernández, Marisela; Villeda Hernández, Juana; Hernández, Beatriz; Rosas, Gabriela; Bobes, Raul J.; S. de Aluja, Aline; Sciutto, Edda; Fragoso, Gladis

    2015-01-01

    Human neurocysticercosis (NC) is caused by the establishment of Taenia solium larvae in the central nervous system. NC is a severe disease still affecting the population in developing countries of Latin America, Asia, and Africa. While great improvements have been made on NC diagnosis, treatment, and prevention, the management of patients affected by extraparenchymal parasites remains a challenge. The development of a T. solium NC experimental model in pigs that will allow the evaluation of new therapeutic alternatives is herein presented. Activated oncospheres (either 500 or 1000) were surgically implanted in the cerebral subarachnoid space of piglets. The clinical status and the level of serum antibodies in the animals were evaluated for a 4-month period after implantation. The animals were sacrificed, cysticerci were counted during necropsy, and both the macroscopic and microscopic characteristics of cysts were described. Based on the number of established cysticerci, infection efficiency ranged from 3.6% (1000 oncospheres) to 5.4% (500 oncospheres). Most parasites were caseous or calcified (38/63, 60.3%) and were surrounded by an exacerbated inflammatory response with lymphocyte infiltration and increased inflammatory markers. The infection elicited specific antibodies but no neurological signs. This novel experimental model of NC provides a useful tool to evaluate new cysticidal and anti-inflammatory approaches and it should improve the management of severe NC patients, refractory to the current treatments. PMID:26252878

  17. Spatiotemporal properties of microsaccades: Model predictions and experimental tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jian-Fang; Yuan, Wu-Jie; Zhou, Zhao

    2016-10-01

    Microsaccades are involuntary and very small eye movements during fixation. Recently, the microsaccade-related neural dynamics have been extensively investigated both in experiments and by constructing neural network models. Experimentally, microsaccades also exhibit many behavioral properties. It’s well known that the behavior properties imply the underlying neural dynamical mechanisms, and so are determined by neural dynamics. The behavioral properties resulted from neural responses to microsaccades, however, are not yet understood and are rarely studied theoretically. Linking neural dynamics to behavior is one of the central goals of neuroscience. In this paper, we provide behavior predictions on spatiotemporal properties of microsaccades according to microsaccade-induced neural dynamics in a cascading network model, which includes both retinal adaptation and short-term depression (STD) at thalamocortical synapses. We also successfully give experimental tests in the statistical sense. Our results provide the first behavior description of microsaccades based on neural dynamics induced by behaving activity, and so firstly link neural dynamics to behavior of microsaccades. These results indicate strongly that the cascading adaptations play an important role in the study of microsaccades. Our work may be useful for further investigations of the microsaccadic behavioral properties and of the underlying neural dynamical mechanisms responsible for the behavioral properties.

  18. Experimental measurements of seismoelectric signals in borehole models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Hu, Hengshan; Guan, Wei

    2015-12-01

    An experimental system is built for the electrokinetic measurements with a small scaled seismoelectric detector and a high resolution digitizer (1 MS s-1, 22 bits). The acoustic and seismoelectric experiments are carried out in different borehole models at the high frequency of 90 kHz in the laboratory. All the localized seismoelectric signals that accompany compressional wave, shear wave and Stoneley wave are first clearly observed with a monopole source in sandstone boreholes that are saturated by tap water. The amplitudes of these signals are measured in the range of 1-120 μV, which is useful for designing the seismoelectric logging instruments. Then the amplitude ratio of electric signal to acoustic pressure (REP) for each of the three waves is calculated and compared with the theoretical simulations. Based on the experimental data, we find that seismoelectric logging signals as well as REP become stronger at the more permeable borehole model. We also find that seismoelectric logging signals are more sensitive to permeability and porosity compared with acoustic logging signals. Therefore, this study verifies the feasibility of seismoelectric well logging, and further indicates that the seismoelectric logging technique might be a preferable method to estimate formation parameters in the field measurements.

  19. The KSR1: Experimentation and modeling of poststore

    SciTech Connect

    Rosti, E.; Smirni, E.; Wagner, T.D.; Apon, A.W.; Dowdy, L.W.

    1993-02-01

    Kendall Square Research introduced the KSR1 system in 1991. The architecture is based on a ring of rings of 64-bit microprocessors. It is a distributed, shared memory system and is scalable. The memory structure is unique and is the key to understanding the system. Different levels of caching eliminates physical memory addressing and leads to the ALLCACHE{trademark} scheme. Since requested data may be found in any of several caches, the initial access time is variable. Once pulled into the local (sub)cache, subsequent access times are fixed and minimal. Thus, the KSR1 is a Cache-Only Memory Architecture (COMA) system.This paper describes experimentation and an analytic model of the KSR1. The focus is on the poststore programmer option. With the poststore option, the programmer can elect to broadcast the updated value of a variable to all processors that might have a copy. This may save time for threads on other processors, but delays the broadcasting thread and places additional traffic on the ring. The specific issue addressed is to determine under what conditions poststore is beneficial. The analytic model and the experimental observations are in good agreement. They indicate that the decision to use poststore depends both on the application and the current system load.

  20. The KSR1: Experimentation and modeling of poststore

    SciTech Connect

    Rosti, E. . Dipt. di Scienze dell'Informazione); Smirni, E.; Wagner, T.D.; Apon, A.W.; Dowdy, L.W. . Dept. of Computer Science)

    1993-02-01

    Kendall Square Research introduced the KSR1 system in 1991. The architecture is based on a ring of rings of 64-bit microprocessors. It is a distributed, shared memory system and is scalable. The memory structure is unique and is the key to understanding the system. Different levels of caching eliminates physical memory addressing and leads to the ALLCACHE[trademark] scheme. Since requested data may be found in any of several caches, the initial access time is variable. Once pulled into the local (sub)cache, subsequent access times are fixed and minimal. Thus, the KSR1 is a Cache-Only Memory Architecture (COMA) system.This paper describes experimentation and an analytic model of the KSR1. The focus is on the poststore programmer option. With the poststore option, the programmer can elect to broadcast the updated value of a variable to all processors that might have a copy. This may save time for threads on other processors, but delays the broadcasting thread and places additional traffic on the ring. The specific issue addressed is to determine under what conditions poststore is beneficial. The analytic model and the experimental observations are in good agreement. They indicate that the decision to use poststore depends both on the application and the current system load.

  1. Spatiotemporal properties of microsaccades: Model predictions and experimental tests

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jian-Fang; Yuan, Wu-Jie; Zhou, Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Microsaccades are involuntary and very small eye movements during fixation. Recently, the microsaccade-related neural dynamics have been extensively investigated both in experiments and by constructing neural network models. Experimentally, microsaccades also exhibit many behavioral properties. It’s well known that the behavior properties imply the underlying neural dynamical mechanisms, and so are determined by neural dynamics. The behavioral properties resulted from neural responses to microsaccades, however, are not yet understood and are rarely studied theoretically. Linking neural dynamics to behavior is one of the central goals of neuroscience. In this paper, we provide behavior predictions on spatiotemporal properties of microsaccades according to microsaccade-induced neural dynamics in a cascading network model, which includes both retinal adaptation and short-term depression (STD) at thalamocortical synapses. We also successfully give experimental tests in the statistical sense. Our results provide the first behavior description of microsaccades based on neural dynamics induced by behaving activity, and so firstly link neural dynamics to behavior of microsaccades. These results indicate strongly that the cascading adaptations play an important role in the study of microsaccades. Our work may be useful for further investigations of the microsaccadic behavioral properties and of the underlying neural dynamical mechanisms responsible for the behavioral properties. PMID:27739541

  2. Taenia solium: Development of an Experimental Model of Porcine Neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Fleury, Agnès; Trejo, Armando; Cisneros, Humberto; García-Navarrete, Roberto; Villalobos, Nelly; Hernández, Marisela; Villeda Hernández, Juana; Hernández, Beatriz; Rosas, Gabriela; Bobes, Raul J; de Aluja, Aline S; Sciutto, Edda; Fragoso, Gladis

    2015-01-01

    Human neurocysticercosis (NC) is caused by the establishment of Taenia solium larvae in the central nervous system. NC is a severe disease still affecting the population in developing countries of Latin America, Asia, and Africa. While great improvements have been made on NC diagnosis, treatment, and prevention, the management of patients affected by extraparenchymal parasites remains a challenge. The development of a T. solium NC experimental model in pigs that will allow the evaluation of new therapeutic alternatives is herein presented. Activated oncospheres (either 500 or 1000) were surgically implanted in the cerebral subarachnoid space of piglets. The clinical status and the level of serum antibodies in the animals were evaluated for a 4-month period after implantation. The animals were sacrificed, cysticerci were counted during necropsy, and both the macroscopic and microscopic characteristics of cysts were described. Based on the number of established cysticerci, infection efficiency ranged from 3.6% (1000 oncospheres) to 5.4% (500 oncospheres). Most parasites were caseous or calcified (38/63, 60.3%) and were surrounded by an exacerbated inflammatory response with lymphocyte infiltration and increased inflammatory markers. The infection elicited specific antibodies but no neurological signs. This novel experimental model of NC provides a useful tool to evaluate new cysticidal and anti-inflammatory approaches and it should improve the management of severe NC patients, refractory to the current treatments.

  3. Simulation model for the Closed Plant Experimental Facilities of CEEF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Ishikawa, Y.; Kibe, S.; Nitta, K.

    The Closed Ecology Experiment Facilities (CEEF) is a testbed for CELSS investigations. CEEF including the physico-chemical material regenerative system has been constructed for the experiments of material circulation among plants, breeding animals, humans (crew of the CEEF). Because CEEF is a complex system, an appropriate schedule for the operation must be prepared in advance. The CEEF behavioral Prediction System, CPS, that will help to confirm the operation schedule, is under development. CPS will simulate CEEF's behavior with data (conditions of equipments, quantity of materials in tanks, etc.) of CEEF and an operation schedule that will be made by the operation team everyday, before the schedule will be carried out. The result of the simulation will show whether the operation schedule is appropriate or not. In order to realize CPS, models of the simulation program that is installed in CPS must mirror the real facilities of CEEF. A flexible algorithm for the first step of development of the simulation program was already investigated. The next step was development of a replicate simulation model of the material circulation system for the Closed Plant Experimental Facilities (CPEF) that is a part of CEEF. All the parts of real material circulation system for CPEF are connected together and work as a complex mechanism. In the simulation model, the system was separated into 38 units according to its operational segmentation. In order to develop each model for its corresponding unit, specifications for the model were fixed based on the specifications of the real part. These models were put into a simulation model for the system.

  4. The non-human primate experimental glaucoma model.

    PubMed

    Burgoyne, Claude F

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the current strengths and weaknesses of the non-human primate (NHP) experimental glaucoma (EG) model through sections devoted to its history, methods, important findings, alternative optic neuropathy models and future directions. NHP EG has become well established for studying human glaucoma in part because the NHP optic nerve head (ONH) shares a close anatomic association with the human ONH and because it provides the only means of systematically studying the very earliest visual system responses to chronic intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation, i.e. the conversion from ocular hypertension to glaucomatous damage. However, NHPs are impractical for studies that require large animal numbers, demonstrate spontaneous glaucoma only rarely, do not currently provide a model of the neuropathy at normal levels of IOP, and cannot easily be genetically manipulated, except through tissue-specific, viral vectors. The goal of this summary is to direct NHP EG and non-NHP EG investigators to the previous, current and future accomplishment of clinically relevant knowledge in this model.

  5. Toxin-Induced Experimental Models of Learning and Memory Impairment

    PubMed Central

    More, Sandeep Vasant; Kumar, Hemant; Cho, Duk-Yeon; Yun, Yo-Sep; Choi, Dong-Kug

    2016-01-01

    Animal models for learning and memory have significantly contributed to novel strategies for drug development and hence are an imperative part in the assessment of therapeutics. Learning and memory involve different stages including acquisition, consolidation, and retrieval and each stage can be characterized using specific toxin. Recent studies have postulated the molecular basis of these processes and have also demonstrated many signaling molecules that are involved in several stages of memory. Most insights into learning and memory impairment and to develop a novel compound stems from the investigations performed in experimental models, especially those produced by neurotoxins models. Several toxins have been utilized based on their mechanism of action for learning and memory impairment such as scopolamine, streptozotocin, quinolinic acid, and domoic acid. Further, some toxins like 6-hydroxy dopamine (6-OHDA), 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and amyloid-β are known to cause specific learning and memory impairment which imitate the disease pathology of Parkinson’s disease dementia and Alzheimer’s disease dementia. Apart from these toxins, several other toxins come under a miscellaneous category like an environmental pollutant, snake venoms, botulinum, and lipopolysaccharide. This review will focus on the various classes of neurotoxin models for learning and memory impairment with their specific mechanism of action that could assist the process of drug discovery and development for dementia and cognitive disorders. PMID:27598124

  6. Toxin-Induced Experimental Models of Learning and Memory Impairment.

    PubMed

    More, Sandeep Vasant; Kumar, Hemant; Cho, Duk-Yeon; Yun, Yo-Sep; Choi, Dong-Kug

    2016-01-01

    Animal models for learning and memory have significantly contributed to novel strategies for drug development and hence are an imperative part in the assessment of therapeutics. Learning and memory involve different stages including acquisition, consolidation, and retrieval and each stage can be characterized using specific toxin. Recent studies have postulated the molecular basis of these processes and have also demonstrated many signaling molecules that are involved in several stages of memory. Most insights into learning and memory impairment and to develop a novel compound stems from the investigations performed in experimental models, especially those produced by neurotoxins models. Several toxins have been utilized based on their mechanism of action for learning and memory impairment such as scopolamine, streptozotocin, quinolinic acid, and domoic acid. Further, some toxins like 6-hydroxy dopamine (6-OHDA), 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and amyloid-β are known to cause specific learning and memory impairment which imitate the disease pathology of Parkinson's disease dementia and Alzheimer's disease dementia. Apart from these toxins, several other toxins come under a miscellaneous category like an environmental pollutant, snake venoms, botulinum, and lipopolysaccharide. This review will focus on the various classes of neurotoxin models for learning and memory impairment with their specific mechanism of action that could assist the process of drug discovery and development for dementia and cognitive disorders. PMID:27598124

  7. Toxicity of Nanoparticles and an Overview of Current Experimental Models

    PubMed Central

    Bahadar, Haji; Maqbool, Faheem; Niaz, Kamal; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a rapidly growing field having potential applications in many areas. Nanoparticles (NPs) have been studied for cell toxicity, immunotoxicity, and genotoxicity. Tetrazolium-based assays such as MTT, MTS, and WST-1 are used to determine cell viability. Cell inflammatory response induced by NPs is checked by measuring inflammatory biomarkers, such as IL-8, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor, using ELISA. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay is used for cell membrane integrity. Different types of cell cultures, including cancer cell lines have been employed as in vitro toxicity models. It has been generally agreed that NPs interfere with either assay materials or with detection systems. So far, toxicity data generated by employing such models are conflicting and inconsistent. Therefore, on the basis of available experimental models, it may be difficult to judge and list some of the more valuable NPs as more toxic to biological systems and vice versa. Considering the potential applications of NPs in many fields and the growing apprehensions of FDA about the toxic potential of nanoproducts, it is the need of the hour to look for new internationally agreed free of bias toxicological models by focusing more on in vivo studies. PMID:26286636

  8. Autoimmune Diabetes: An Overview of Experimental Models and Novel Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    You, Sylvaine; Chatenoud, Lucienne

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) results from a chronic and selective destruction of insulin-secreting β-cells within the islets of Langerhans of the pancreas by autoreactive CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes. The use of animal models of T1D was instrumental for deciphering the steps of the autoimmune process leading to T1D. The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse and the bio-breeding (BB) rat spontaneously develop the disease similar to the human pathology in terms of the immune responses triggering autoimmune diabetes and of the genetic and environmental factors influencing disease susceptibility. The generation of genetically modified models allowed refining our understanding of the etiology and the pathogenesis of the disease. In the present review, we provide an overview of the experimental models generated and used to gain knowledge on the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the breakdown of self-tolerance in T1D and the progression of the autoimmune response. Immunotherapeutic interventions designed in these animal models and translated into the clinical arena in T1D patients will also be discussed. PMID:26530798

  9. Esophageal aerodynamics in an idealized experimental model of tracheoesophageal speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erath, Byron D.; Hemsing, Frank S.

    2016-03-01

    Flow behavior is investigated in the esophageal tract in an idealized experimental model of tracheoesophageal speech. The tracheoesophageal prosthesis is idealized as a first-order approximation using a straight, constant diameter tube. The flow is scaled according to Reynolds, Strouhal, and Euler numbers to ensure dynamic similarity. Flow pulsatility is produced by a driven orifice that approximates the kinematics of the pharyngoesophageal segment during tracheoesophageal speech. Particle image velocimetry data are acquired in three orthogonal planes as the flow exits the model prosthesis and enters the esophageal tract. Contrary to prior investigations performed in steady flow with the prosthesis oriented in-line with the flow direction, the fluid dynamics are shown to be highly unsteady, suggesting that the esophageal pressure field will be similarly complex. A large vortex ring is formed at the inception of each phonatory cycle, followed by the formation of a persistent jet. This vortex ring appears to remain throughout the entire cycle due to the continued production of vorticity resulting from entrainment between the prosthesis jet and the curved esophageal walls. Mean flow in the axial direction of the esophagus produces significant stretching of the vortex throughout the phonatory cycle. The stagnation point created by the jet impinging on the esophageal wall varies throughout the cycle due to fluctuations in the jet trajectory, which most likely arises due to flow separation within the model prosthesis. Applications to tracheoesophageal speech, including shortcomings of the model and proposed future plans, are discussed.

  10. Autonomous learning derived from experimental modeling of physical laws.

    PubMed

    Grabec, Igor

    2013-05-01

    This article deals with experimental description of physical laws by probability density function of measured data. The Gaussian mixture model specified by representative data and related probabilities is utilized for this purpose. The information cost function of the model is described in terms of information entropy by the sum of the estimation error and redundancy. A new method is proposed for searching the minimum of the cost function. The number of the resulting prototype data depends on the accuracy of measurement. Their adaptation resembles a self-organized, highly non-linear cooperation between neurons in an artificial NN. A prototype datum corresponds to the memorized content, while the related probability corresponds to the excitability of the neuron. The method does not include any free parameters except objectively determined accuracy of the measurement system and is therefore convenient for autonomous execution. Since representative data are generally less numerous than the measured ones, the method is applicable for a rather general and objective compression of overwhelming experimental data in automatic data-acquisition systems. Such compression is demonstrated on analytically determined random noise and measured traffic flow data. The flow over a day is described by a vector of 24 components. The set of 365 vectors measured over one year is compressed by autonomous learning to just 4 representative vectors and related probabilities. These vectors represent the flow in normal working days and weekends or holidays, while the related probabilities correspond to relative frequencies of these days. This example reveals that autonomous learning yields a new basis for interpretation of representative data and the optimal model structure. PMID:22840918

  11. Role of breathing in cardiac performance: experimental and mathematical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Binh Q.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1999-05-01

    Due to the close proximity of the heart and lungs within a closed chest environment, we expect breathing to affect various cardiac performance parameters and hence cardiac output. We present an integrative approach to study heart-lung interactions, combining a mathematical formulation of the circulation system with imaging techniques using echo-planar magnetic resonance imaging (EPI) and dynamic x-ray CT (EBCT). We hypothesize that appropriate synchronization of mechanical ventilation to cardiac-cycle specific events can improve cardiac function, i.e. stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO). Computational and experimental results support the notion that heart-lung interaction, leading to altered cardiac output associated with inspiration/expiration, is not directly associated with lung inflation/deflation and thus is felt to be more influenced by pleural pressure changes. The mathematical model of the circulation demonstrates the importance of cardiac-cycle specific timing of ventilation on cardiac function and matches with experimentally observed relationships found in animal models studied via EBCT and human studies using EPI. Results show that positive pressure mechanical ventilation timed to systolic events may increase SV and CO by up to 30%, mainly by increased filling of the ventricles during diastole. Similarly, negative pressure (spontaneous) respiration has its greatest effect on ventricular diastolic filling. Cardiac-gated mechanical ventilation may provide sufficient cardiac augmentation to warrant further investigation as a minimally-invasive technique for temporary cardiac assist. Through computational modeling and advanced imaging protocols, we were able to uniquely study heart-lung interactions within the intact milieu of the never-invaded thorax.

  12. Experimental Modeling of the Formation of Saucer-Shaped sills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galland, O.; Planke, S.; Malthe-Sorenssen, A.

    2007-12-01

    Many magma intrusions in sedimentary basins are sills, and especially saucer-shaped sills. These features are observed in many places (i.e. South Africa; the Norwegian and North Sea; Siberia; Argentina). Sand injectites exhibit similar geometries. The occurrence of such features in so various settings suggests that their emplacement results from fundamental processes in sedimentary basins. To understand such processes, we performed experimental modeling of saucer-shaped sill emplacement. The experiments consist of injecting a molten low viscosity vegetable oil (model magma) at a constant flow rate into a fine-grained Coulomb silica flour (model rock). When the oil starts intruding, the initially flat surface of the model inflates and forms a smooth dome. At the end of the experiment, the oil erupts at the edge of the dome. After the experiment, the oil cools and solidifies, the resulting solid intrusion is unburied and exposed, and its upper surface digitalized. For our purpose, we did our experiments without external deformation. We performed two series of experiments with varying depth of injection. The first series consisted of injection into a homogeneous medium. The resulting intrusions were cone-sheets and dykes. The second series consisted of heterogeneous models where the heterogeneity was a weak layer made of a flexible net. The resulting intrusions were made of (1) a horizontal basal sill emplaced along the weakness, and (2) inclined sheets nucleating at the edges of the basal sill and propagating upward and outward. The inclined sheets exhibited a convex shape, i.e. a decreasing slope outward. In addition, the deeper the sills emplaced, the larger they were. Our experimental results are consistent with saucer-shaped features in nature. We infer from our results that the transition between the basal sills and the inclined sheets results from a transition of emplacement processes. We suggest that the basal sill emplace by open (mode I) fracturing, whereas

  13. Modeling a nuclear reactor for experimental purposes. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Berta, V T

    1980-01-01

    The Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) Facility is a scale model of a commercial PWR and is as fully functional and operational as the generic commercial counterpart. LOFT was designed and built for experimental purposes as part of the overall NRC reactor safety research program. The purpose of LOFT is to assess the capability of reactor safety systems to perform their intended functions during occurrences of off-normal conditions in a commercial nuclear reactor. Off-normal conditions arising from large and small break loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA), operational transients, and anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) were to be investigated. This paper describes the LOFT model of the generic PWR and summarizes the experiments that have been conducted in the context of the significant findings involving the complex transient thermal-hydraulics and the consequent effects on the commercial reactor analytical licensing techniques. Through these techniques the validity of the LOFT model as a scaled counterpart of the generic PWR is shown.

  14. Thermal infrared spectroscopy and modeling of experimentally shocked basalts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, J. R.; Staid, M.I.; Kraft, M.D.

    2007-01-01

    New measurements of thermal infrared emission spectra (250-1400 cm-1; ???7-40 ??m) of experimentally shocked basalt and basaltic andesite (17-56 GPa) exhibit changes in spectral features with increasing pressure consistent with changes in the structure of plagioclase feldspars. Major spectral absorptions in unshocked rocks between 350-700 cm-1 (due to Si-O-Si octahedral bending vibrations) and between 1000-1250 cm-1 (due to Si-O antisymmetric stretch motions of the silica tetrahedra) transform at pressures >20-25 GPa to two broad spectral features centered near 950-1050 and 400-450 cm-1. Linear deconvolution models using spectral libraries composed of common mineral and glass spectra replicate the spectra of shocked basalt relatively well up to shock pressures of 20-25 GPa, above which model errors increase substantially, coincident with the onset of diaplectic glass formation in plagioclase. Inclusion of shocked feldspar spectra in the libraries improves fits for more highly shocked basalt. However, deconvolution models of the basaltic andesite select shocked feldspar end-members even for unshocked samples, likely caused by the higher primary glass content in the basaltic andesite sample.

  15. Computational reverse shoulder prosthesis model: Experimental data and verification.

    PubMed

    Martins, A; Quental, C; Folgado, J; Ambrósio, J; Monteiro, J; Sarmento, M

    2015-09-18

    The reverse shoulder prosthesis aims to restore the stability and function of pathological shoulders, but the biomechanical aspects of the geometrical changes induced by the implant are yet to be fully understood. Considering a large-scale musculoskeletal model of the upper limb, the aim of this study is to evaluate how the Delta reverse shoulder prosthesis influences the biomechanical behavior of the shoulder joint. In this study, the kinematic data of an unloaded abduction in the frontal plane and an unloaded forward flexion in the sagittal plane were experimentally acquired through video-imaging for a control group, composed of 10 healthy shoulders, and a reverse shoulder group, composed of 3 reverse shoulders. Synchronously, the EMG data of 7 superficial muscles were also collected. The muscle force sharing problem was solved through the minimization of the metabolic energy consumption. The evaluation of the shoulder kinematics shows an increase in the lateral rotation of the scapula in the reverse shoulder group, and an increase in the contribution of the scapulothoracic joint to the shoulder joint. Regarding the muscle force sharing problem, the musculoskeletal model estimates an increased activity of the deltoid, teres minor, clavicular fibers of the pectoralis major, and coracobrachialis muscles in the reverse shoulder group. The comparison between the muscle forces predicted and the EMG data acquired revealed a good correlation, which provides further confidence in the model. Overall, the shoulder joint reaction force was lower in the reverse shoulder group than in the control group. PMID:26206550

  16. [Experimental modeling of nucleoprotein disposal disorders in systemic lupus erythematosus].

    PubMed

    Trofimenko, A S; Gontar, I P; Paramonova, O V; Simakova, E S; Zborovskaya, I A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research was to adapt the experimental model simulating the nucleoprotein disposal disorders in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) for further study of its extracorporeal correction, as well as to assess validity of the model by short-term experiment. Twenty to female Wistar rats were intraperitoneally injected with the chromatin-containing extract from bovine liver followed by intravenous administration of anti-DNA antibodies derived from SLE patients. After these procedures plasma concentrations of anti-dsDNA, circulating immune complexes and DNA became sharply increased, together with distinct elevation of leukocytes. On the contrary, changes in erythrocytes, platelets, total protein concentration, creatinine, asparagine and alanine aminotransferase activities, as well as blood coagulation time were changed insignificantly. Using direct immunofluorescence of cryosections, we detected human IgG deposition in rat kidneys treated in accordance with the simulation protocol. Thus, our model reproduces essential DNA disposal disorders in SLE without any animal death or the life-threatening changes in examined markers during short-term experiment. PMID:26539869

  17. Experimental validation of a numerical model for subway induced vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S.; Degrande, G.; Lombaert, G.

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents the experimental validation of a coupled periodic finite element-boundary element model for the prediction of subway induced vibrations. The model fully accounts for the dynamic interaction between the train, the track, the tunnel and the soil. The periodicity or invariance of the tunnel and the soil in the longitudinal direction is exploited using the Floquet transformation, which allows for an efficient formulation in the frequency-wavenumber domain. A general analytical formulation is used to compute the response of three-dimensional invariant or periodic media that are excited by moving loads. The numerical model is validated by means of several experiments that have been performed at a site in Regent's Park on the Bakerloo line of London Underground. Vibration measurements have been performed on the axle boxes of the train, on the rail, the tunnel invert and the tunnel wall, and in the free field, both at the surface and at a depth of 15 m. Prior to these vibration measurements, the dynamic soil characteristics and the track characteristics have been determined. The Bakerloo line tunnel of London Underground has been modelled using the coupled periodic finite element-boundary element approach and free field vibrations due to the passage of a train at different speeds have been predicted and compared to the measurements. The correspondence between the predicted and measured response in the tunnel is reasonably good, although some differences are observed in the free field. The discrepancies are explained on the basis of various uncertainties involved in the problem. The variation in the response with train speed is similar for the measurements as well as the predictions. This study demonstrates the applicability of the coupled periodic finite element-boundary element model to make realistic predictions of the vibrations from underground railways.

  18. Experimental and Numerical Modeling of Segregation in Metallic Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosbah, S.; Bellet, M.; Gandin, Ch.-A.

    2010-03-01

    Electromagnetic levitation (EML) has been used as an experimental technique for investigating the effect of the nucleation and cooling rate on segregation and structure formation in metallic alloys. The technique has been applied to aluminum-copper alloys. For all samples, the primary phase nucleation has been triggered by the contact of the levitated droplet with an alumina plate at a given undercooling. Based on the recorded temperature curves, the heat extraction rate and the nucleation undercooling for the primary dendritic and the secondary eutectic structures have been determined. Metallurgical characterizations have consisted of composition measurements using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry and the analysis of SEM images. The distribution maps drawn for the composition, the volume fraction of the eutectic structure, and the dendrite arm spacing (DAS) reveal strong correlations. Analysis of the measurements with the help of a cellular-automaton (CA)-finite-element (FE) model is also proposed. The model involves a new coupling scheme between the CA and FE methods and a segregation model accounting for diffusion in the solid and liquid phases. Extensive validation of the model has been carried out on a typical equiaxed grain configuration, i.e., considering the free growth of a mushy zone in an undercooled melt. It demonstrates its capability of dealing with mass exchange inside and outside the envelope of a growing primary dendritic structure. The model has been applied to predict the temperature curve, the segregation, and the eutectic volume fraction obtained upon single-grain nucleation and growth from the south pole of a spherical domain with and without triggering of the nucleation of the primary solid phase, thus simulating the solidification of a levitated droplet. Predictions permit a direct interpretation of the measurements.

  19. Cracking in autoclaved aerated concrete: Experimental investigation and XFEM modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Ferretti, D.

    2015-01-15

    The paper aims to investigate and model cracking development in beams and deep-beams made of autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC). Fracture mechanics of AAC has been first studied by performing three-point bending tests on beams, similar to those commonly used for ordinary concrete elements. In some of these tests, crack growth has been also monitored by using ESPI laser technique. In this way, it has been possible to calibrate the main parameters of a proper cohesive law by means of extended finite element inverse analysis. Subsequently, cracking tests have been also performed on deep-beams, whose behavior is more representative of full scale walls. To validate the proposed cohesive law, deep-beam experimental behavior has been finally simulated through XFEM.

  20. Some advances in experimentation supporting development of viscoplastic constitutive models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, J. R.; Robinson, D. N.

    1985-01-01

    The development of a biaxial extensometer capable of measuring axial, torsion, and diametral strains to near-microstrain resolution at elevated temperatures is discussed. An instrument with this capability was needed to provide experimental support to the development of viscoplastic constitutive models. The advantages gained when torsional loading is used to investigate inelastic material response at elevated temperatures are highlighted. The development of the biaxial extensometer was conducted in two stages. The first involved a series of bench calibration experiments performed at room temperature. The second stage involved a series of in-place calibration experiments conducted at room and elevated temperature. A review of the calibration data indicated that all performance requirements regarding resolution, range, stability, and crosstalk had been met by the subject instrument over the temperature range of interest, 21 C to 651 C. The scope of the in-place calibration experiments was expanded to investigate the feasibility of generating stress relaxation data under torsional loading.

  1. The chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). A multifaceted experimental model.

    PubMed

    Ribatti, Domenico

    2016-08-01

    During avian development the mesodermal layers of the allantois and chorion fuse to form the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). This structure rapidly expands generating a rich vascular network that provides an interface for gas and waste exchange. The CAM allows to study tissue grafts, tumor growth and metastasis, wound healing, drugs delivery and toxicologic analysis, and angiogenic and anti-angiogenic molecules. The CAM is relatively simple, quick, and low-cost model that allows screening of a large number of pharmacological samples in a short time; does not require administrative procedures for obtaining ethics committee approval for animal experimentation. Moreover, being naturally immunodeficient, the chick embryo may receive transplantations from different tissues and species, without immune responses. PMID:27178379

  2. Bayesian experimental design for identification of model propositions and conceptual model uncertainty reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Hai V.; Tsai, Frank T.-C.

    2015-09-01

    The lack of hydrogeological data and knowledge often results in different propositions (or alternatives) to represent uncertain model components and creates many candidate groundwater models using the same data. Uncertainty of groundwater head prediction may become unnecessarily high. This study introduces an experimental design to identify propositions in each uncertain model component and decrease the prediction uncertainty by reducing conceptual model uncertainty. A discrimination criterion is developed based on posterior model probability that directly uses data to evaluate model importance. Bayesian model averaging (BMA) is used to predict future observation data. The experimental design aims to find the optimal number and location of future observations and the number of sampling rounds such that the desired discrimination criterion is met. Hierarchical Bayesian model averaging (HBMA) is adopted to assess if highly probable propositions can be identified and the conceptual model uncertainty can be reduced by the experimental design. The experimental design is implemented to a groundwater study in the Baton Rouge area, Louisiana. We design a new groundwater head observation network based on existing USGS observation wells. The sources of uncertainty that create multiple groundwater models are geological architecture, boundary condition, and fault permeability architecture. All possible design solutions are enumerated using a multi-core supercomputer. Several design solutions are found to achieve an 80%-identifiable groundwater model in 5 years by using six or more existing USGS wells. The HBMA result shows that each highly probable proposition can be identified for each uncertain model component once the discrimination criterion is achieved. The variances of groundwater head predictions are significantly decreased by reducing posterior model probabilities of unimportant propositions.

  3. Experimental Characterization and Micromechanical Modelling of Anisotropic Slates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Feng; Wei, Kai; Liu, Wu; Hu, Shao-Hua; Hu, Ran; Zhou, Chuang-Bing

    2016-09-01

    Laboratory tests were performed in this study to examine the anisotropic physical and mechanical properties of the well-foliated Jiujiang slate. The P-wave velocity and the apparent Young's modulus were found to increase remarkably with the foliation angle θ, and the compressive strength at any confining pressure varies in a typical U-shaped trend, with the maximum strength consistently attained at θ = 90° and the minimum strength at θ = 45°. The slate samples failed in three typical patterns relevant to the foliation angle, i.e. shear failure across foliation planes for θ ≤ 15°, sliding along foliation planes for 30° ≤ θ ≤ 60° and axial splitting along foliation planes for θ = 90°. The stress-strain curves at any given foliation angle and confining pressure display an initial nonlinear phase, a linear elastic phase, a crack initiation and growth phase, as well as a rapid stress drop phase and a residual stress phase. Based on the experimental evidences, a micromechanical damage-friction model was proposed for the foliated slate by simply modelling the foliation planes as a family of elastic interfaces and by characterizing the interaction between the foliation planes and the rock matrix with a nonlinear damage evolution law associated with the inclination angle. The proposed model was applied to predict the deformational and strength behaviours of the foliated slate under triaxial compressive conditions using the material parameters calibrated with the uniaxial and/or triaxial test data, with good agreement between the model predictions and the laboratory measurements.

  4. Monitoring SERS-based contrast agents in atherosclerosis experimental models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machtoub, Lina H.

    2011-03-01

    There have been enormous progresses in developing a class of multimodal contrast agents, which combine MRI with optical imaging. Contrast agent targeting can provide enhanced diagnostic information, allowing differentiation between variable and stable atherosclerotic plaques. Recently an intensive efforts have been working on the development of contrast agents that can improve the ability to detect and characterize atherosclerosis in clinical and preclinical applications. Earlier studies on hyperlipidemic rabbits using in vivo MRI have shown accumulation of USPIOs in plaques with a high macrophage content that induces magnetic resonance (MR) signal changes correlated to the absolute iron content in the aortic arch. A potent new class of nanoparticles contrast agents have recently drawn much attention for its wide diverse diagnostic and potential therapeutic applications particularly in monitoring the inflammatory responses. In our previous studies we have investigated SPIO contrast agents uptakes in hepatic and spleen tissues taken from NZW rabbits. The scope of this work encompasses application of an emerging hybrid imaging modality, SERSbased nonlinear optical microscopy, in investigating atherosclerosis experimental models. In this work experiments are performed on contrast treated tissue sections taken from aortic arch of atherosclerotic animal model. Marked contrast enhancement has been observed in the treated aortic sections compared with the untreated control. The obtained images are compared with immunohistochemistry .The work presented can be promising for future studies on in vivo detection of macrophages in human plaques and early detection of atherosclerotic diseases.

  5. Experimental Verification of Computational Models for Laminated Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles E.; Coats, Timothy W.; Glaessgen, Edward H.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of the research reported herein is to develop a progressive damage methodology capable of predicting the residual strength of continuous fiber-reinforced, laminated, polymer matrix composites with through-penetration damage. The fracture behavior of center-notch tension panels with thin crack-like slits was studied. Since fibers are the major load-carrying constituent in polymer matrix composites, predicting the residual strength of a laminate requires a criterion for fiber fracture. The effects on fiber strain due to other damage mechanisms such as matrix cracking and delaminations must also be modeled. Therefore, the research herein examines the damage mechanisms involved in translaminate fracture and identifies the toughening mechanisms responsible for damage growth resistance in brittle epoxy matrix systems. The mechanics of matrix cracking and fiber fracture are discussed as is the mathematical framework for the progressive damage model developed by the authors. The progressive damage analysis algorithms have been implemented into a general purpose finite element code developed by NASA, the Computational Structural Mechanics Testbed (COMET). Damage growth is numerically simulated and the analytical residual strength predictions are compared to experimental results for a variety of notched panel configurations and materials systems.

  6. Experimental consequences of a horizontal gauge model for CP nonconservation

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, W.; Soni, A.

    1985-05-13

    The experimental consequences of a model that links CP nonconservation with horizontal interactions and is based on the gauge group SU/sub l//sup W/(2) x SU/sub R//sup H/(2) x U/sup Y/ (1) are investigated. The magnitude of the observed CP nonconservation and that of the K/sub L/-K/sub S/ mass difference constrains the horizontal gauge boson masses (M/sub s/crR) such that 66 TeV> or approx. =M/sub s/crR>5 TeV. The model implies an extremely small value for Vertical Barepsilon'/epsilonVertical Bar. The branching ratio for K/sub L/..--> mu..e (K..--> pi mu..e) could be greater than roughly-equal10/sup -10/ (approx.10/sup -12/). theta/sub QFD/ vanishes at the tree level. The contribution from the gauge sector, arising at two loops, is also discussed.

  7. Experimental Models Combining Traumatic Brain Injury and Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Thelin, Eric P

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the most common causes of death and disability, and cerebral hypoxia is a frequently occurring harmful secondary event in TBI patients. The hypoxic conditions that occur on the scene of accident, where the airways are often obstructed or breathing is in other ways impaired, could be reproduced using animal TBI models where oxygen delivery is strictly controlled throughout the entire experimental procedure. Monitoring physiological parameters of the animal is of utmost importance in order to maintain an adequate quality of the experiment. Peripheral oxygen saturation, O2 pressure (pO2) in the blood, or fraction of inhaled O2 (FiO2) could be used as goals to validate the hypoxic conditions. Different models of traumatic brain injury could be used to inflict desired injury type, whereas effects then could be studied using radiological, physiological and functional tests. In order to confirm that the brain has been affected by a hypoxic injury, appropriate substances in the affected cerebral tissue, cerebrospinal fluid, or serum should be analyzed. PMID:27604734

  8. An experimental model of ischemia in rabbit hindlimb.

    PubMed Central

    Hong, J. H.; Bahk, Y. W.; Suh, J. S.; Kwak, B. K.; Shim, H. J.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, H. S.; Moon, Y. H.; Kim, S. J.; Chung, J. W.; Park, J. H.

    2001-01-01

    This study was performed to establish an experimental model of ischemia for the investigation of new treatment modality of limb-threatening ischemia. We produced ischemia in the hindlimbs of 8 New Zealand white rabbits. Under general anesthesia, the left femoral artery was exposed, freed, and excised from distal external iliac artery to proximal popliteal and saphenous arteries. And then both hindlimbs were serially examined to assess the ischemia according to the time table until postoperative 6 weeks. We assessed clinical observation, blood pressure, radioisotopic perfusion scan, and angiography. Clinical ischemic changes of the operated feet were observed in 63%. The blood pressure of left calves was measurable on postoperative day 3 (p<0.05, vs preoperative day 2) and then gradually increased to reach a plateau in postoperative week 6. Radioisotopic arterial perfusion showed similar profiles as in blood pressure. Angiography of ischemic hindlimbs demonstrated a few collateral vessels arising from the internal iliac artery with the reconstitution of the posterior tibial artery in postoperative week 2. In postoperative week 6, collaterals remained the same in number. However, these became dilated and tortuous and showed reconstitution in distal hindleg. In conclusion, this is a reproducible, measurable, and economical animal model of hind limb ischemia. PMID:11641535

  9. Experimental osteonecrosis: development of a model in rodents administered alendronate.

    PubMed

    Conte, Nicolau; Spolidorio, Luis Carlos; Andrade, Cleverton Roberto de; Esteves, Jônatas Caldeira; Marcantonio, Elcio

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to cause bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws to develop in a rodent model. Adult male Holtzman rats were assigned to one of two experimental groups to receive alendronate (AL; 1 mg/kg/week; n = 6) or saline solution (CTL; n = 6). After 60 days of drug therapy, all animals were subjected to first lower molar extraction, and 28 days later, animals were euthanized. All rats treated with alendronate developed osteonecrosis, presenting as ulcers and necrotic bone, associated with a significant infection process, especially at the inter-alveolar septum area and crestal regions. The degree of vascularization, the levels of C-telopeptide cross-linked collagen type I and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, as well as the bone volume were significantly reduced in these animals. Furthermore, on radiographic analysis, animals treated with alendronate presented evident sclerosis of the lamina dura of the lower first molar alveolar socket associated with decreased radiographic density in this area. These findings indicate that the protocol developed in the present study opens new perspectives and could be a good starting model for future property design. PMID:27556684

  10. Development of Experimental Tissue Models for Blast Injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Benjamin; Bo, Chiara; Williams, Alun; Jardine, Andy; Brown, Katherine

    2013-06-01

    There is a pressing need to better understand the relationship between the intensity of a blast wave and the clinical consequences for victims of an explosion. In order to quantitatively study how these factors correlate with one another, blast injury tissue models are being developed. Sections of larynx, trachea and pulmonary tissue were excised from a recently sacrificed pig and maintained on ice prior to testing. The samples were subjected to strain rates of between 0.001 s-1 and 1000 s-1 in the laboratory by using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar and quasi-static testing apparatus. During high strain rate testing, samples were housed in a polycarbonate chamber which permitted experimentation on tissue held in fluid. Data were analysed using 1, 2 and 3 wave analysis software in Matlab to yield information about the material properties of both undamaged and damaged tissues. In addition, macroscopic changes in tissue organization were also visualized using histopathological techniques. This work is being extended to cellular and animal models to derive more detailed information about the underlying molecular changes relating to blast-induced damage and repair. The Royal British Legion Centre for Blast Injury Studies.

  11. Schizoxylon as an experimental model for studying interkingdom symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Muggia, Lucia; Fernández-Brime, Samantha; Grube, Martin; Wedin, Mats

    2016-10-01

    Experiments to re-synthesise lichens so far focused on co-cultures of fungal and algal partners. However, recent studies have revealed that bacterial communities colonise lichens in a stable and host-specific manner. We were therefore interested in testing how lichenised fungi and algae interact with selected bacteria in an experimental setup. We selected the symbiotic system of Schizoxylon albescens and the algal genera Coccomyxa and Trebouxia as a suitable model. We isolated bacterial strains from the naturally occurring bacterial fraction of freshly collected specimens and established tripartite associations under mixed culture experiments. The bacteria belong to Actinobacteria, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria and corresponded to groups already found associated with fungi including lichens. In mixed cultures with Coccomyxa, the fungus formed a characteristic filamentous matrix and tightly contacted the algae; the bacteria distributed in small patches between the algal cells and attached to the cell walls. In mixed cultures with Trebouxia, the fungus did not develop the filamentous matrix, but bacterial cells were observed to be tightly adhering to the fungal hyphae. Our experiments show that this tripartite fungal-algal-bacterial model system can be maintained in culture and can offer multiple opportunities for functional studies based on experiments under controlled conditions in the laboratory. PMID:27507738

  12. Experimental Investigation and Modeling of Copper Smelting Slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starodub, Konstantin; Kuminova, Yaroslava; Dinsdale, Alan; Cheverikin, Vladimir; Filichkina, Vera; Saynazarov, Abdukahhar; Khvan, Alexandra; Kondratiev, Alex

    2016-07-01

    Effective extraction of copper from sulfide ores requires careful operation of a copper smelter, which in turn depends very much on chemistry of the feed and resulted slag and matte. For example, chemical composition of copper smelting slags has to be in a certain range to ensure that their properties are within specific limits. Disobeying these rules may lead to complications in smelting operation, poor quality of the copper products, and premature shutdown of the copper smelter. In the present paper the microstructure and phase composition of slags from the Almalyk copper flash smelter were investigated experimentally and then modeled thermodynamically to evaluate potential ways of improvement and optimization of the copper smelting process and its products. The slag samples were taken at different stages of the copper smelting process: on slag tapping, after slag transportation to a deposition site, and at the site. Experimental investigation included the XRD, XRF, and SEM techniques, which were also confirmed by the traditional wet chemistry analysis. Thermodynamic modeling was carried out using thermochemical software package MTDATA, which enables thermodynamic and physical properties of the matte, slag, and gas phases to be calculated in a wide range of temperatures, pressures, and chemical compositions. In addition, slag viscosities and corresponding matte settling rates were estimated using the modified Urbain and Utigard-Warczok models, and the Hadamard-Rybczynski equation, respectively. It was found that the copper content in the slags may vary significantly depending on the location of slag sampling. Cu was found to be present as sulfide particles, almost no Cu was found to be dissolved in the slag. Analysis of microstructure and phase composition showed that major phase found in the samples is fayalite, while other phases are complex spinels (based on magnetite), different sulfides, and a glass-like phase. Thermodynamic calculations demonstrated the

  13. Modeling and experimental validation of unsteady impinging flames

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandes, E.C.; Leandro, R.E.

    2006-09-15

    This study reports on a joint experimental and analytical study of premixed laminar flames impinging onto a plate at controlled temperature, with special emphasis on the study of periodically oscillating flames. Six types of flame structures were found, based on parametric variations of nozzle-to-plate distance (H), jet velocity (U), and equivalence ratio (f). They were classified as conical, envelope, disc, cool central core, ring, and side-lifted flames. Of these, the disc, cool central core, and envelope flames were found to oscillate periodically, with frequency and sound pressure levels increasing with Re and decreasing with nozzle-to-plate distance. The unsteady behavior of these flames was modeled using the formulation derived by Durox et al. [D. Durox, T. Schuller, S. Candel, Proc. Combust. Inst. 29 (2002) 69-75] for the cool central core flames where the convergent burner acts as a Helmholtz resonator, driven by an external pressure fluctuation dependent on a velocity fluctuation at the burner mouth after a convective time delay {tau}. Based on this model, the present work shows that {tau} = [Re[2jtanh{sup -1}((2{delta}{omega}+(1+N)j{omega}{sup 2}-j{omega}{sub 0}{sup 2})/ (2{delta}{omega}+(1-N)j{omega}{sup 2}-j{omega}{sub 0}{sup 2}))]+2{pi}K]/{omega}, i.e., there is a relation between oscillation frequency ({omega}), burner acoustic characteristics ({omega}{sub 0},{delta}), and time delay {tau}, not explicitly dependent on N, the flame-flow normalized interaction coefficient [D. Durox, T. Schuller, S. Candel, Proc. Combust. Inst. 29 (2002) 69-75], because {partial_derivative}t/{partial_derivative}N = 0. Based on flame motion and noise analysis, K was found to physically represent the integer number of perturbations on flame surface or number of coherent structures on impinging jet. Additionally, assuming that {tau}={beta}H/U, where H is the nozzle-to-plate distance and U is the mean jet velocity, it is shown that {beta}{sub Disc}=1.8, {beta}{sub CCC}=1

  14. Experimental Investigation and Modeling of Copper Smelting Slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starodub, Konstantin; Kuminova, Yaroslava; Dinsdale, Alan; Cheverikin, Vladimir; Filichkina, Vera; Saynazarov, Abdukahhar; Khvan, Alexandra; Kondratiev, Alex

    2016-10-01

    Effective extraction of copper from sulfide ores requires careful operation of a copper smelter, which in turn depends very much on chemistry of the feed and resulted slag and matte. For example, chemical composition of copper smelting slags has to be in a certain range to ensure that their properties are within specific limits. Disobeying these rules may lead to complications in smelting operation, poor quality of the copper products, and premature shutdown of the copper smelter. In the present paper the microstructure and phase composition of slags from the Almalyk copper flash smelter were investigated experimentally and then modeled thermodynamically to evaluate potential ways of improvement and optimization of the copper smelting process and its products. The slag samples were taken at different stages of the copper smelting process: on slag tapping, after slag transportation to a deposition site, and at the site. Experimental investigation included the XRD, XRF, and SEM techniques, which were also confirmed by the traditional wet chemistry analysis. Thermodynamic modeling was carried out using thermochemical software package MTDATA, which enables thermodynamic and physical properties of the matte, slag, and gas phases to be calculated in a wide range of temperatures, pressures, and chemical compositions. In addition, slag viscosities and corresponding matte settling rates were estimated using the modified Urbain and Utigard-Warczok models, and the Hadamard-Rybczynski equation, respectively. It was found that the copper content in the slags may vary significantly depending on the location of slag sampling. Cu was found to be present as sulfide particles, almost no Cu was found to be dissolved in the slag. Analysis of microstructure and phase composition showed that major phase found in the samples is fayalite, while other phases are complex spinels (based on magnetite), different sulfides, and a glass-like phase. Thermodynamic calculations demonstrated the

  15. Numerical modeling and experimental testing of a solar grill

    SciTech Connect

    Olwi, I.; Khalifa, A. )

    1993-02-01

    The sun provides a free, nonpolluting and everlasting source of energy. Considerable research has been carried out to utilize solar energy for purposes such as water heating, high temperature ovens, and conversion to electrical energy. One of the interesting forms for utilizing solar energy is cooking. The main disadvantage of solar energy systems has been the low efficiency attained in most of its practical applications. It is expected, however, that due to continuing decreases in the availability of other energy sources such as oil and coal, along with the safety problems associated with nuclear energy, man's need for utilization of solar energy will increase, thus leading him to find the ways and means to develop adequate and efficient solar-powered systems. In camps, where tents are used to accommodate people, cooking is done via conventional gas stoves. This usually takes place in extremely crowded areas which become highly fireprone. Solar oven cookers seem to be a viable alternative considering both economy and safety. Among the various forms of solar cookers, the oven-type solar cooker is known to be the best in terms of efficiency. One of the most practical and efficient forms of solar oven cookers is the outdoor portable solar grill (Bar-B-Q), developed by Khalifa et al. The solar grill is a light and portable unit that utilizes solar energy to grill meat. One of the best types of grilling with this cooker is the well-known Shish Kebab or Bar-B-Q. A detailed description for the design of the solar grill is provided as follows. This paper is aimed at providing experimental results and formulating a numerical model for the solar grill. Results of the two approaches are then compared to verify the validity of the numerical simulation. An experimental and theoretical investigation was conducted on the solar grill in order to study the factors that affect its design and performance.

  16. Experimental Investigation of the NASA Common Research Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, Melissa B.; Dittberner, Ashley

    2010-01-01

    An experimental aerodynamic investigation of the NASA Common Research Model has been conducted in the NASA NTF (National Transonic Facility). Data have been obtained at chord Reynolds numbers of 5, 19.8 and 30 million for the WB and WBT0 configurations. Data have also been obtained at a chord Reynolds number of 5 million for the WBNP, WBT+2 and WBT-2 configurations. Force and moment, surface pressure and surface flow visualization data were obtained but only the force and moment data are presented herein. Model deformation measurements, aeroelastic, nacelle/pylon Reynolds number and tail effects have been assessed. The model deformation measurements showed more twist as you go out the wing span, with a break in the high q(sub infinity) data close to CL = 0.6 which is consistent with separation near the tip. Increases in dynamic pressure give an increase in pitching moment and drag and a decrease in lift for the WB and WBT0 configuration at Mach = 0.7, 0.85 and 0.87. The addition of a nacelle/pylon gave an increase in drag, decrease in lift and a less nose down pitching moment around the design lift condition of 0.5. Increases in chord Reynolds number have been found to follow the normal Reynolds number trends except at the 19.8 million low q(sub infinity) cases. The abnormality of the 19.8 million low q(sub infinity) cases is being investigated. The tail effects also follow the expected trends. All of the data shown fall within the 2-sigma limits for repeatability.

  17. Thermal infrared spectroscopy and modeling of experimentally shocked plagioclase feldspars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, J. R.; Horz, F.; Staid, M.I.

    2003-01-01

    Thermal infrared emission and reflectance spectra (250-1400 cm-1; ???7???40 ??m) of experimentally shocked albite- and anorthite-rich rocks (17-56 GPa) demonstrate that plagioclase feldspars exhibit characteristic degradations in spectral features with increasing pressure. New measurements of albite (Ab98) presented here display major spectral absorptions between 1000-1250 cm-1 (8-10 ??m) (due to Si-O antisymmetric stretch motions of the silica tetrahedra) and weaker absorptions between 350-700 cm-1 (14-29 ??m) (due to Si-O-Si octahedral bending vibrations). Many of these features persist to higher pressures compared to similar features in measurements of shocked anorthite, consistent with previous thermal infrared absorption studies of shocked feldspars. A transparency feature at 855 cm-1 (11.7 ??m) observed in powdered albite spectra also degrades with increasing pressure, similar to the 830 cm-1 (12.0 ??m) transparency feature in spectra of powders of shocked anorthite. Linear deconvolution models demonstrate that combinations of common mineral and glass spectra can replicate the spectra of shocked anorthite relatively well until shock pressures of 20-25 GPa, above which model errors increase substantially, coincident with the onset of diaplectic glass formation. Albite deconvolutions exhibit higher errors overall but do not change significantly with pressure, likely because certain clay minerals selected by the model exhibit absorption features similar to those in highly shocked albite. The implication for deconvolution of thermal infrared spectra of planetary surfaces (or laboratory spectra of samples) is that the use of highly shocked anorthite spectra in end-member libraries could be helpful in identifying highly shocked calcic plagioclase feldspars.

  18. Development of an improved animal model of experimental autoimmune myositis

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Juan; Zhang, Hong-Ya; Feng, Guo-Dong; Feng, Dong-Yun; Jia, Hong-Ge

    2015-01-01

    Multiple animal models of experimental autoimmune myositis (EAM) have been developed. However, these models vary greatly in the severity of disease and reproducibility. The goal of this study was to test whether vaccination twice with increased dose of rat myosin and pertussis toxin (PT) could induce EAM with severer disease in mice. BALB/c mice were injected with 1 mg rat myosin in 50% complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) weekly for four times and one time of PT (EAM) or twice with 1.5 mg myosin in CFA and PT (M-EAM). In comparison with that in the CFA and PT injected controls, vaccination with rat myosin and injection PT significantly reduced the muscle strength and EMG duration, elevated serum creatine kinase levels, promoted inflammatory infiltration in the muscle tissues, leading to pathological changes in the muscle tissues, demonstrating to induce EAM. Interestingly, we found that vaccination twice with the high dose of myosin and PT prevented EAM-related gain in body weights and caused significantly less muscle strength in mice. More importantly, all of the mice receiving high dose of myosin and PT survived while 3 out of 16 mice with four times of low dose of myosin died. Finally, vaccination with high dose of myosin promoted CD4+ and CD8+ T cell infiltration in the muscle tissues and up-regulated MHC-I expression in the muscle tissues of mice. Hence, the new model of EAM is a time-saving, efficient and easily replicable tool for studying autoimmune myositis. PMID:26823763

  19. In-Body Network Biomedical Applications: From Modeling to Experimentation.

    PubMed

    Loscri, Valeria; Matekovits, Ladislau; Peter, Ildiko; Vegni, Anna Maria

    2016-01-01

    Innovative diagnostic approaches and therapies are more and more based on the use of injections or oral delivery of nanoparticle sized substances. For a better understanding of the overall phenomena, aiming to facilitate a safe application at large scale, the development of accurate models and analysis techniques are required. These techniques take into consideration different aspects of the overall process: accurate numerical modeling of the different phases of the nanoparticles in the body, and knowledge of the local environment, that can be varying very fast within a short-range in the body itself. Such aspects should be taken into account to correctly predict the amount of drug and its timely release for the specific disease. Deep and accurate analysis of the interaction between the nanoparticles and the biological fluid where the nanoparticles are immersed is mandatory for an efficient correlation of all these aspects. Because of their biocompatibility, in this paper, we focus our attention on systems of Titanium (Ti), and its oxide (e.g., TiO2), given their specific features in terms of density, lack of cytotoxic effects, etc. Specifically, we present the study and design of an in-body system by characterizing each of the emission, diffusion, and reception processes with a proper realistic model. The theoretical investigation is further supported by experimental study of the morphology and other important characteristics (e.g., the pH of the particles, and thermal stability) of TiO2 systems when immersed in a Ringer solution, in order to derive important information related to their potential toxicity inside the human body.

  20. Early differentiation of the Moon: Experimental and modeling studies and experimental and modeling studies of massif anorthosites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longhi, John

    1994-01-01

    NASA grant NAG9-329 was in effect from 3/1/89 to 8/31/94, the last 18 months being a no-cost extension. While the grant was in effect, the P.I., coworkers, and students gave 22 talks and poster sessions at professional meetings, published 12 articles in referred journals (one more is in press, and another is in review), and edited 2 workshop reports relevant to this project. Copies of all the publications are appended to this report. The major accomplishments during the grant period have derived from three quarters: 1) the application of quantitative models of fractional crystallization and partial melting to various problems in planetary science, such as the petrogenesis of picritic glasses and mare basalts and the implications of the SNC meteorites for martian evolution; 2) an experimental study of silicate liquid immiscibility relevant to early lunar differentiation and the petrogenesis of evolved highlands rocks; and 3) experimental studies of massif anorthosites and related rocks that provide terrestrial analogs for the proposed origin of lunar anorthosites by multistage processes. The low-pressure aspects of the quantitative models were developed by the P.I. in the 1980s with NASA support and culminated with a paper comparing the crystallization of terrestrial and lunar lavas. The basis for the high-pressure modifications to the quantitative models is a data set gleaned from high pressure melting experiments done at Lamont and is supplemented by published data from other labs that constrain the baric and compositional dependences of various liquidus phase boundaries such as olivine/orthopyroxene, relevant to the melting of the mantles of the terrestrial planets. With these models it is possible to predict not only the thermal and compositional evolution of magmatic liquids ranging in composition from lumar mare basalt to terrestrial calc-alkaline basalts, but also the small increments of fractional melting that are produced when mantle rises adiabatically

  1. The Use of Experimental Structures to Model Protein Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Katebi, Ataur R.; Sankar, Kannan; Jia, Kejue; Jernigan, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The number of solved protein structures submitted in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) has increased dramatically in recent years. For some specific proteins, this number is very high – for example, there are over 550 solved structures for HIV-1 protease, one protein that is essential for the life cycle of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) which causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in humans. The large number of structures for the same protein and its variants include a sample of different conformational states of the protein. A rich set of structures solved experimentally for the same protein has information buried within the dataset that can explain the functional dynamics and structural mechanism of the protein. To extract the dynamics information and functional mechanism from the experimental structures, this chapter focuses on two methods – Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Elastic Network Models (ENM). PCA is a widely used statistical dimensionality reduction technique to classify and visualize high-dimensional data. On the other hand, ENMs are well-established simple biophysical method for modeling the functionally important global motions of proteins. This chapter covers the basics of these two. Moreover, an improved ENM version that utilizes the variations found within a given set of structures for a protein is described. As a practical example, we have extracted the functional dynamics and mechanism of HIV-1 protease dimeric structure by using a set of 329 PDB structures of this protein. We have described, step by step, how to select a set of protein structures, how to extract the needed information from the PDB files for PCA, how to extract the dynamics information using PCA, how to calculate ENM modes, how to measure the congruency between the dynamics computed from the principal components (PCs) and the ENM modes, and how to compute entropies using the PCs. We provide the computer programs or references to software tools to

  2. The use of experimental structures to model protein dynamics.

    PubMed

    Katebi, Ataur R; Sankar, Kannan; Jia, Kejue; Jernigan, Robert L

    2015-01-01

    The number of solved protein structures submitted in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) has increased dramatically in recent years. For some specific proteins, this number is very high-for example, there are over 550 solved structures for HIV-1 protease, one protein that is essential for the life cycle of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) which causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in humans. The large number of structures for the same protein and its variants include a sample of different conformational states of the protein. A rich set of structures solved experimentally for the same protein has information buried within the dataset that can explain the functional dynamics and structural mechanism of the protein. To extract the dynamics information and functional mechanism from the experimental structures, this chapter focuses on two methods-Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Elastic Network Models (ENM). PCA is a widely used statistical dimensionality reduction technique to classify and visualize high-dimensional data. On the other hand, ENMs are well-established simple biophysical method for modeling the functionally important global motions of proteins. This chapter covers the basics of these two. Moreover, an improved ENM version that utilizes the variations found within a given set of structures for a protein is described. As a practical example, we have extracted the functional dynamics and mechanism of HIV-1 protease dimeric structure by using a set of 329 PDB structures of this protein. We have described, step by step, how to select a set of protein structures, how to extract the needed information from the PDB files for PCA, how to extract the dynamics information using PCA, how to calculate ENM modes, how to measure the congruency between the dynamics computed from the principal components (PCs) and the ENM modes, and how to compute entropies using the PCs. We provide the computer programs or references to software tools to accomplish each step

  3. COMPUTATIONAL AND EXPERIMENTAL MODELING OF SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Lam; Dimitri Gidaspow

    2000-09-01

    The objective if this study was to develop a predictive experimentally verified computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model for gas-liquid-solid flow. A three dimensional transient computer code for the coupled Navier-Stokes equations for each phase was developed. The principal input into the model is the viscosity of the particulate phase which was determined from a measurement of the random kinetic energy of the 800 micron glass beads and a Brookfield viscometer. The computed time averaged particle velocities and concentrations agree with PIV measurements of velocities and concentrations, obtained using a combination of gamma-ray and X-ray densitometers, in a slurry bubble column, operated in the bubbly-coalesced fluidization regime with continuous flow of water. Both the experiment and the simulation show a down-flow of particles in the center of the column and up-flow near the walls and nearly uniform particle concentration. Normal and shear Reynolds stresses were constructed from the computed instantaneous particle velocities. The PIV measurement and the simulation produced instantaneous particle velocities. The PIV measurement and the simulation produced similar nearly flat horizontal profiles of turbulent kinetic energy of particles. This phase of the work was presented at the Chemical Reaction Engineering VIII: Computational Fluid Dynamics, August 6-11, 2000 in Quebec City, Canada. To understand turbulence in risers, measurements were done in the IIT riser with 530 micron glass beads using a PIV technique. The results together with simulations will be presented at the annual meeting of AIChE in November 2000.

  4. Triptolide ameliorates colonic fibrosis in an experimental rat model.

    PubMed

    Tao, Qingsong; Wang, Baochai; Zheng, Yu; Li, Guanwei; Ren, Jianan

    2015-08-01

    Triptolide is known to exert anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities; however, its impact on intestinal fibrosis has not been previously examined. Based on our previous studies of the suppressive activity of triptolide on human colonic subepithelial myofibroblasts and the therapeutic efficacy of triptolide in Crohn's disease, it was hypothesized that triptolide may have beneficial effects on intestinal fibrosis. In the present study, colonic fibrosis was induced in rats by 6 weekly repeated administration with a low-dose of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) and was then treated with triptolide or PBS daily (control) simultaneously. Extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition in the colon was examined with image analysis of Masson Trichrome staining. Total collagen levels in colonic homogenates were measured by a Sircol assay. Collagen Iα1 transcripts and collagen I protein were measured ex vivo in the isolated colonic subepithelial myofibroblasts by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunoblot analysis, respectively. The results indicated that triptolide decreased ECM deposition and collagen production in the colon, and inhibited collagen Iα1 transcripts and collagen I protein expression in the isolated subepithelial myofibroblasts of the rats with colonic fibrosis. In conclusion, triptolide ameliorates colonic fibrosis in the experimental rat model, suggesting triptolide may be a promising compound for inflammatory bowel disease treatment. PMID:25845760

  5. Effect of ankaferd blood stopper in experimental peritoneal adhesion model

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Oktay; Pehlivanli, Faruk; Kocael, Ahmet; Pekcici, Recep; Duymus, Esat; Akgedik, Sukran; Guler, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Ankaferd Blood Stopper (ABS) is an herbal extract attained from 5 different plants. It has the therapeutic potential to be used for the management of external hemorrhage and controlling gastrointestinal bleedings. To date, the safety of ABS for intraperitoneal usage is not clear. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness and safety of using intraperitoneal ABS in an experimental peritoneal adhesion model. Methods Twenty-four male Wistar Albino rats were used in the study. The rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: saline, ABS, and control. On the 10th day, all rats were euthanized. The adhesions were evaluated by Nair's macroscopic adhesion classification, and pathologically evaluated with Zühlke's microscopic adhesion classification. Results macroscopic and microscopic comparison between the ABS and saline groups did not show any differences but both the ABS and saline groups were superior when compared to the control group. Conclusion ABS was found equally effective with saline on the abdominal adhesions and to no effect on postoperative adhesion formation. PMID:27073792

  6. Triptolide ameliorates colonic fibrosis in an experimental rat model

    PubMed Central

    TAO, QINGSONG; WANG, BAOCHAI; ZHENG, YU; LI, GUANWEI; REN, JIANAN

    2015-01-01

    Triptolide is known to exert anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities; however, its impact on intestinal fibrosis has not been previously examined. Based on our previous studies of the suppressive activity of triptolide on human colonic subepithelial myofibroblasts and the therapeutic efficacy of triptolide in Crohn’s disease, it was hypothesized that triptolide may have beneficial effects on intestinal fibrosis. In the present study, colonic fibrosis was induced in rats by 6 weekly repeated administration with a low-dose of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) and was then treated with triptolide or PBS daily (control) simultaneously. Extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition in the colon was examined with image analysis of Masson Trichrome staining. Total collagen levels in colonic homogenates were measured by a Sircol assay. Collagen Iα1 transcripts and collagen I protein were measured ex vivo in the isolated colonic subepithelial myofibroblasts by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunoblot analysis, respectively. The results indicated that triptolide decreased ECM deposition and collagen production in the colon, and inhibited collagen Iα1 transcripts and collagen I protein expression in the isolated subepithelial myofibroblasts of the rats with colonic fibrosis. In conclusion, triptolide ameliorates colonic fibrosis in the experimental rat model, suggesting triptolide may be a promising compound for inflammatory bowel disease treatment. PMID:25845760

  7. Experimental Classical Flutter Reesults of a Composite Advanced Turboprop Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehmed, O.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental results are presented that show the effects of blade pitch angle and number of blades on classical flutter of a composite advanced turboprop (propfan) model. An increase in the number of blades on the rotor or the blade pitch angle is destablizing which shows an aerodynamic coupling or cascade effect between blades. The flutter came in suddenly and all blades vibrated at the same frequency but at different amplitudes and with a common predominant phase angle between consecutive blades. This further indicates aerodynamic coupling between blades. The flutter frequency was between the first two blade normal modes, signifying an aerodynamic coupling between the normal modes. Flutter was observed at all blade pitch angles from small to large angles-of-attack of the blades. A strong blade response occurred, for four blades at the two-per-revolution (2P) frequency, when the rotor speed was near the crossing of the flutter mode frequency and the 2P order line. This is because the damping is low near the flutter condition and the interblade phase angle of the flutter mode and the 2P response are the same.

  8. The mechanisms of coronary restenosis: insights from experimental models

    PubMed Central

    Ferns, Gordon AA; Avades, Tony Y

    2000-01-01

    Since its introduction into clinical practice, more than 20 years ago, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) has proven to be an effective, minimally invasive alternative to coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). During this time there have been great improvements in the design of balloon catheters, operative procedures and adjuvant drug therapy, and this has resulted in low rates of primary failure and short-term complications. However, the potential benefits of angioplasty are diminished by the high rate of recurrent disease. Up to 40% of patients undergoing angioplasty develop clinically significant restenosis within a year of the procedure. Although the deployment of endovascular stents at the time of angioplasty improves the short-term outcome, ‘in-stent’ stenosis remains an enduring problem. In order to gain an insight into the mechanisms of restenosis, several experimental models of angioplasty have been developed. These have been used together with the tools provided by recent advances in molecular biology and catheter design to investigate restenosis in detail. It is now possible to deliver highly specific molecular antagonists, such as antisense gene sequences, to the site of injury. The knowledge provided by these studies may ultimately lead to novel forms of intervention. The present review is a synopsis of our current understanding of the pathological mechanisms of restenosis. PMID:10762439

  9. Comparison of Laboratory Experimental Data to XBeach Numerical Model Output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirci, Ebru; Baykal, Cuneyt; Guler, Isikhan; Sogut, Erdinc

    2016-04-01

    generating data sets for testing and validation of sediment transport relationships for sand transport in the presence of waves and currents. In these series, there is no structure in the basin. The second and third series of experiments were designed to generate data sets for development of tombolos in the lee of detached 4m-long rubble mound breakwater that is 4 m from the initial shoreline. The fourth series of experiments are conducted to investigate tombolo development in the lee of a 4m-long T-head groin with the head section in the same location of the second and the third tests. The fifth series of experiments are used to investigate tombolo development in the lee of a 3-m-long rubble-mound breakwater positioned 1.5 m offshore of the initial shoreline. In this study, the data collected from the above mentioned five experiments are used to compare the results of the experimental data with XBeach numerical model results, both for the "no-structure" and "with-structure" cases regarding to sediment transport relationships in the presence of only waves and currents as well as the shoreline changes together with the detached breakwater and the T-groin. The main purpose is to investigate the similarities and differences between the laboratory experimental data behavior with XBeach numerical model outputs for these five cases. References: Baykal, C., Sogut, E., Ergin, A., Guler, I., Ozyurt, G.T., Guler, G., and Dogan, G.G. (2015). Modelling Long Term Morphological Changes with XBeach: Case Study of Kızılırmak River Mouth, Turkey, European Geosciences Union, General Assembly 2015, Vienna, Austria, 12-17 April 2015. Gravens, M.B. and Wang, P. (2007). "Data report: Laboratory testing of longshore sand transport by waves and currents; morphology change behind headland structures." Technical Report, ERDC/CHL TR-07-8, Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory, US Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, MS. Roelvink, D., Reniers, A., van Dongeren, A., van Thiel de

  10. Experimental modelling of flow - bed interactions in Jökulhlaups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrivick, J. L.; Xie, Z.; Sleigh, A.; Hubbard, M.

    2009-04-01

    Jökulhlaups (glacial outburst floods) are a sudden release and advancing wave of water and sediment from a glacier, with a peak discharge that is often several orders of magnitude greater than perennial flows. Jökulhlaup hazards are regularly incorporated into risk assessments for glaciated areas because the associated flood hazards are numerous. Jökulhlaup hazards are primarily due to direct impacts, caused by a frontal surge wave, from debris within a flow body, and from the mass and consistency of the flows. A number of secondary impacts also pose hazards, including widespread deposition of sediment and blocked tributary streams. It is rapid landscape change, which is achieved the mobilization and redistribution of sediment that causes one of the greatest hazards due to jökulhlaups. However, direct measurement of such phenomena is virtually impossible. The aim of this project is therefore to parameterise hydrodynamic - sedimentary interactions in experimental jökulhlaups. Specifically, this project applies laboratory flume modelling, which offers a hitherto untapped opportunity for examining complex interactions between water and sediment within outburst floods. The experimental set-up is of a tradition lock-gate design with a straight 4 m long tank. Hydraulics are scaled at 1:20 froude scale and the following controls on frontal wave flow-bed interactions and hence on rapid landscape change are being investigated: 1. Pre-existing mobile sediment effects, fixed bed roughness effects, sediment concentration effects, mobile bed effects. An emphasis is being maintained on examining the downstream temporal and spatial change in physical character of the water / sediment frontal wave. Facilities are state-of-the-art with a fully-automated laser bed-profiler to measure bed elevation after a run, Seatek arrays to measure transient flow depths, 0.5 Hz Ultrasonic Velocimeter Profiling to measure within-flow velocities, and Ultrasonic High-Concentration Meter (UHCM

  11. Solar-Powered Desalination: A Modelling and Experimental Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, Jimmy; Andrews, John

    2007-10-01

    materials were investigated: copper-nickel and a commercially available plastic. The modelling and design of a three effects MEE system is also discussed. The effects of the important design and operating parameters (recovery ratio, thermal energy, parasitic electrical energy, distillate production and solar collection area) controlling the cost of fresh water determined both from the computer simulation and experimental results are presented and analysed in this paper. Future work in the overall research program is also outlined.

  12. Aerothermal modeling, phase 1. Volume 2: Experimental data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenworthy, M. J.; Correa, S. M.; Burrus, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    The experimental test effort is discussed. The test data are presented. The compilation is divided into sets representing each of the 18 experimental configurations tested. A detailed description of each configuration, and plots of the temperature difference ratio parameter or pattern factor parameter calculated from the test data are also provided.

  13. Principles of model building: an experimentation-aided approach to development of models for signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Ambhighainath; Levchenko, Andre

    2012-01-01

    Living cells continuously probe their environment and respond to a multitude of external cues. The information about the environment is carried by signaling cascades that act as "internal transducing and computing modules," coupled into complex and interconnected networks. A comprehensive understanding of how cells make decisions therefore necessitates a sound theoretical framework, which can be achieved through mathematical modeling of the signaling networks. In this chapter, we conceptually describe the typical workflow involved in building mathematical models that are motivated by and are developed in a tight integration with experimental analysis. In particular, we delineate the steps involved in a generic, iterative experimentation-driven model-building process, both through informal discussion and using a recently published study as an example. Experiments guide the initial development of mathematical models, including choice of appropriate template model and parameter revision. The model can then be used to generate and test hypotheses quickly and inexpensively, aiding in judicious design of future experiments. These experiments, in turn, are used to update the model. The model developed at the end of this exercise not only predicts functional behavior of the system under study but also provides insight into the biophysical underpinnings of signaling networks.

  14. Design, experimentation, and modeling of a novel continuous biodrying process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navaee-Ardeh, Shahram

    biodrying reactor were the type of biomass feed and the outlet relative humidity profiles. The biomass feed is mill specific and since one mill was studied for this study, the nutrition level of the biomass feed was found adequate for the microbial activity, and hence the type of biomass is a fixed parameter. The influence of outlet relative humidity profile was investigated on the overall performance and the complexity index of the continuous biodrying reactor. The best biodrying efficiency was achieved at an outlet relative humidity profile which controls the removal of unbound water at the wet-bulb temperature in the 1st and 2nd compartments of the reactor, and the removal of bound water at the dry-bulb temperature in the 3rd and 4th compartments. Through a systematic modeling approach, a 2-D model was developed to describe the transport phenomena in the continuous biodrying reactor. The results of the 2-D model were in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data. It was found that about 30% w/w of the total water removal (drying rate) takes place in the 1st and 2nd compartments mainly under a convection dominated mechanism, whereas about 70% w/w of the total water removal takes place in the 3rd and 4th compartments where a bioheat-diffusion dominated mechanism controls the transport phenomena. The 2-D model was found to be an appropriate tool for the estimation of the total water removal rate (drying rate) in the continuous biodrying reactor when compared to the 1-D model. A dimensionless analysis was performed on the 2-D model and established the preliminary criteria for the scale-up of the continuous biodrying process. Finally, a techno-economic assessment of the continuous biodrying process revealed that there is great potential for the implementation of the biodrying process in Canadian pulp and paper mills. The techno-economic results were compared to the other competitive existing drying technologies. It was proven that the continuous biodrying process

  15. Design, experimentation, and modeling of a novel continuous biodrying process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navaee-Ardeh, Shahram

    biodrying reactor were the type of biomass feed and the outlet relative humidity profiles. The biomass feed is mill specific and since one mill was studied for this study, the nutrition level of the biomass feed was found adequate for the microbial activity, and hence the type of biomass is a fixed parameter. The influence of outlet relative humidity profile was investigated on the overall performance and the complexity index of the continuous biodrying reactor. The best biodrying efficiency was achieved at an outlet relative humidity profile which controls the removal of unbound water at the wet-bulb temperature in the 1st and 2nd compartments of the reactor, and the removal of bound water at the dry-bulb temperature in the 3rd and 4th compartments. Through a systematic modeling approach, a 2-D model was developed to describe the transport phenomena in the continuous biodrying reactor. The results of the 2-D model were in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data. It was found that about 30% w/w of the total water removal (drying rate) takes place in the 1st and 2nd compartments mainly under a convection dominated mechanism, whereas about 70% w/w of the total water removal takes place in the 3rd and 4th compartments where a bioheat-diffusion dominated mechanism controls the transport phenomena. The 2-D model was found to be an appropriate tool for the estimation of the total water removal rate (drying rate) in the continuous biodrying reactor when compared to the 1-D model. A dimensionless analysis was performed on the 2-D model and established the preliminary criteria for the scale-up of the continuous biodrying process. Finally, a techno-economic assessment of the continuous biodrying process revealed that there is great potential for the implementation of the biodrying process in Canadian pulp and paper mills. The techno-economic results were compared to the other competitive existing drying technologies. It was proven that the continuous biodrying process

  16. Hysteresis modeling and experimental validation of a magnetorheological damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xian-Xu; Chen, Peng; Qian, Li-Jun; Zhu, An-Ding

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, for modeling the MR dampers, based on the phenomenological model, a normalized phenomenological model is derived through incorporating a "normalization" concept and a restructured model is proposed and realized also with incorporation of the "normalization" concept. In order to demonstrate, a multi-islands genetic algorithm (GA) is employed to identify the parameters of the restructured model, the normalized phenomenological model as well as the phenomenological model. The research results indicate that, as compared with the phenomenological model and the normalized phenomenological model, (1) the restructured model not only can effectively decrease the number of the model parameters and reduce the complexity of the model, but also can describe the nonlinear hysteretic behavior of MR dampers more accurately, and (2) the normalized phenomenological model can improve the model efficiency as compared with the phenomenological model, although not as good as the restructured model.

  17. Element concentrations and cataract: an experimental animal model.

    PubMed

    Ciaralli, L; Giordano, R; Costantini, S; Sepe, A; Cruciani, F; Moramarco, A; Antonelli, B; Balacco-Gabrieli, C

    2001-04-01

    The determination of inorganic ions in cataractous human lenses has been the subject of several investigations; nevertheless, few studies have been concerned with trace element contents in lenses, and data are sometimes contradictory. An animal experimental model of induced cataract is here proposed with the aim of evaluating the changes of Ca, Na, K, Cu and Zn concentrations. The cataract was produced by an Nd:YAG Laser treatment of the right eye of sexteen male rabbits. The determination of the elements was performed by atomic absorption spectrometry (both flame and flameless methods) after an acid digestion of samples. Compared with the results obtained in left lenses used as a control (Ca 14.4+/-5.7 mg/kg d.w.; Na 1.3+/-0.5 g/kg d.w.; K 9.9+/-1.1 g/kg d.w.; Cu 0.24+/-0.09 mg/kg d.w.; Zn 24.8+/-2.3 mg/kg d.w.), the mean concentration values of opaque lenses showed some significant changes for Ca, Na, and Cu (Ca 123.7+/-106.6 mg/kg d.w.; Na 4.5+/-4.3 g/kg d.w; Cu 0.43+/-0.21 mg/kg d.w.). Potassium showed a tendency to decrease, and zinc to increase. Positive correlations were found between calcium and sodium both in controls (r=0.73, p<0.001) and in treated lenses (r= 0.87, p<0.0001). An inverse correlation between Ca and K confirmed the tendency of potassium to decrease.

  18. Proconvulsant potential of cyproheptadine in experimental animal models.

    PubMed

    Singh, Damanpreet; Goel, Rajesh Kumar

    2010-08-01

    In epileptic patients cyproheptadine is frequently prescribed as an appetite stimulant for the treatment of anorexia associated with anti-epileptic drugs and for the management of 'serotonin syndrome' in depressed epileptic patients. However, the study of serotonergic and histaminergic pathway shows that the decreased neurotransmission of serotonin and histamine in the brain reduces seizures threshold. Since, cyproheptadine interferes with these pathways via antagonizing subtypes of 5-HT(1/2) receptors and H(1) receptor, therefore the present study was undertaken to investigate its effect on seizures threshold, so as to substantiate its use in epileptics. In the present study convulsions were induced in mice by, maximum electroshock (MES), picrotoxin, and pentylenetetrazol (PTZ). Cyproheptadine (4 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered per se and along with clinically used anti-epileptic drugs (phenytoin 25 mg/kg, i.p. and diazepam 5 mg/kg, i.p.) in different groups of mice, onset and extent of convulsions in these groups were compared with that of vehicle control and anti-epileptics per se treated groups. Percentage mortality in all groups was also determined. Results depicted a significant increase in duration of tonic hind limb extension in MES and decrease in latency to clonic convulsions induced by PTZ and picrotoxin in cyproheptadine treated groups (per se and along with anti-epileptics), as compared to vehicle control and anti-epileptics per se treated groups respectively. Percentage mortality was also increased with cyproheptadine treatment. Therefore it is concluded that cyproheptadine pretreatment reduces threshold, increases severity of seizures and decreases the efficacy of clinically used anti-epileptic drugs in experimental animal models of convulsions.

  19. Subsurface Immobilization of Plutonium: Experimental and Model Validation Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Rittmann, Bruce E; Deo, Randhir P; Reed, Donald T

    2008-08-13

    We conducted a coordinated experimental and modeling study centered on the interaction of Shewanella alga BrY (S. alga) with plutonium species and phases. Plutonium is the key contaminant of concern at several DOE sites that are being addressed by the overall ERSP program. The over-arching goal of this research was to understand the long-term stability of bio-precipitated immobilized plutonium phases under changing redox conditions in biologically active systems. To initiate the process of plutonium immobilization, a side-by-side comparison of the bioreduction of uranyl and plutonyl species was conducted with S. alga. Uranyl was reduced in our system, consistent with literature reports, but we noted coupling between abiotic and biotic processes and observed that non-reductive pathways to precipitation typically exist. Additionally, a key role of biogenic Fe2+, which is known to reduce uranyl at low pH, is suggested. In contrast, residual organics, present in biologically active systems, reduce Pu(VI) species to Pu(V) species at near-neutral pH. The predominance of relatively weak complexes of PuO2+ is an important difference in how the uranyl and plutonyl species interacted with S. alga. Pu(V) also led to increased toxicity towards S. alga and is also more easily reduced by microbial activity. Biogenic Fe2+, produced by S. alga when Fe3+ is present as an electron acceptor, also played a key role in understanding redox controls and pathways in this system. Overall, the bioreduction of plutonyl was observed under anaerobic conditions, which favor its immobilization in the subsurface. Understanding the mechanism by which redox control is established in biologically active systems is a key aspect of remediation and immobilization strategies for actinides when they are present as subsurface contaminants.

  20. Effects of Montelukast in an Experimental Model of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Angı, Serkan; Eken, Hüseyin; Kılıc, Erol; Karaköse, Oktay; Balci, Gürhan; Somuncu, Erkan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND We evaluated the hematological, biochemical, and histopathological effects of Montelukast on pancreatic damage in an experimental acute pancreatitis model created by cerulein in rats before and after the induction of pancreatitis. MATERIAL AND METHODS Forty rats were divided into 4 groups with 10 rats each. The study groups were: the Cerulein (C) group, the Cerulein + early Montelukast (CMe) group, the Cerulein + late Montelukast (CMl) group, and the Control group. The pH, pO2, pCO2, HCO3, leukocyte, hematocrit, pancreatic amylase, and lipase values were measured in the arterial blood samples taken immediately before rats were killed. RESULTS There were statistically significant differences between the C group and the Control group in the values of pancreatic amylase, lipase, blood leukocyte, hematocrit, pH, pO2, pCO2, HCO3, and pancreatic water content, and also in each of the values of edema, inflammation, vacuolization, necrosis, and total histopathological score (P<0.05). When the CMl group and C group were compared, no statistically significant differences were found in any parameter analyzed. When the CMe group was compared with the C group, pancreatic amylase, lipase, pH, PO2, pCO2, HCO3, pancreatic water content, histopathological edema, inflammation, and total histopathological score values were significantly different between the groups (P<0.05). Finally, when the CMe group and the Control group were compared, significant differences were found in all except 2 (leukocyte and pO2) parameters (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS Leukotriene receptor antagonists used in the late phases of pancreatitis might not result in any benefit; however, when they are given in the early phases or prophylactically, they may decrease pancreatic damage. PMID:27479458

  1. Effects of Montelukast in an Experimental Model of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Angı, Serkan; Eken, Hüseyin; Kılıç, Erol; Karaköse, Oktay; Balci, Gürhan; Somuncu, Erkan

    2016-01-01

    Background We evaluated the hematological, biochemical, and histopathological effects of Montelukast on pancreatic damage in an experimental acute pancreatitis model created by cerulein in rats before and after the induction of pancreatitis. Materials/Methods Forty rats were divided into 4 groups with 10 rats each. The study groups were: the Cerulein (C) group, the Cerulein + early Montelukast (CMe) group, the Cerulein + late Montelukast (CMl) group, and the Control group. The pH, pO2, pCO2, HCO3, leukocyte, hematocrit, pancreatic amylase, and lipase values were measured in the arterial blood samples taken immediately before rats were killed. Results There were statistically significant differences between the C group and the Control group in the values of pancreatic amylase, lipase, blood leukocyte, hematocrit, pH, pO2, pCO2, HCO3, and pancreatic water content, and also in each of the values of edema, inflammation, vacuolization, necrosis, and total histopathological score (P<0.05). When the CMl group and C group were compared, no statistically significant differences were found in any parameter analyzed. When the CMe group was compared with the C group, pancreatic amylase, lipase, pH, PO2, pCO2, HCO3, pancreatic water content, histopathological edema, inflammation, and total histopathological score values were significantly different between the groups (P<0.05). Finally, when the CMe group and the Control group were compared, significant differences were found in all except 2 (leukocyte and pO2) parameters (P<0.05). Conclusions Leukotriene receptor antagonists used in the late phases of pancreatitis might not result in any benefit; however, when they are given in the early phases or prophylactically, they may decrease pancreatic damage. PMID:27479458

  2. Fish immune responses against endoparasitic nematodes - experimental models.

    PubMed

    Buchmann, K

    2012-09-01

    Vertebrates mount a series of immune reactions when invaded by helminths but antihelmintic immune strategies allow, in many cases, the first invaders of the non-immune host to survive for prolonged periods, whereas subsequent larval invaders of the same parasite species face increased host resistance and thereby decreased colonization success. This concomitant immunity may represent a trade-off between adverse side effects (associated with killing of large helminths in the host tissue) and the need for future protection against invasion. Encapsulation and isolation of large live endoparasitic larvae may be associated with less pathology compared to coping with excess dead parasite tissue in host organs. Likewise, live adult nematodes may be accepted in tissues at a certain activity level for the same reasons. Various host cell receptors bind helminth molecules after which signal-transducing events lead to mobilization of specific reaction patterns depending on the combination of receptors and ligands involved. Both innate and adaptive responses (humoral and cellular) are prominent actors, but skewing of the Th1 lymphocyte response towards a Th2 type is a characteristic element of antihelminthic responses in mammalian hosts. Similar patterns may be expected also to occur in at least some fish species, such as salmonids, producing relevant cytokines, MHCII and CD4+ cells required for these lymphocyte subpopulations. Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua L., is without these immunological elements that indicate that alternative reaction pathways exist in at least some fish groups. Recent achievements within teleost immunology have made it possible to track these host responses in fish and the present work outlines the main immune reactions in fish against helminths and suggests three experimental fish models for exploration of these immune pathways in fish infected with nematodes.

  3. An Experimental Model for Magnetoconvection in the Earth Tangent Cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aujogue, K.; Pothérat, A.; Sreenivasan, B.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new experimental setup developed to model the flow in the region of the Earth Tangent Cylinder. Indeed, this flow is known to play a pivotal role in the dynamo mechanism that sustains the Earth magnetic field, and in the drift of its magnetic north pole. Our experiment reproduces the interplay in between magnetic, rotating and buoyant forces inside a transparent conducting liquid confined in an Earth like geometry, in an hemisphere heated up on the inside cooled down on the outside, filled up with sulphuric acid and spinning in a high magnetic field. This way, a flow governed by the MAC balance is visualised using Particle Image Velocimetry for the first time, whilst thermocouple measurements provide access to heat transfer between the heating core and the modelled Core Mantle Boundary (CMB). The apparatus was operated at Ekman number (ratio of the viscous force over the Coriolis force) of the order of 10^(-4) to 10^(-5) as well as Elsasser number (ratio of the Lorentz force over the Coriolis force) of the order of 0.1 to 1 and Rayleigh number (ratio of the buoyancy over the conductivities) up to 20 times critical. Without magnetic field, we recovered well-established scalings for the onset of plane convection in rotation, and scalings for the thermal wind associated to convection. Under the influence of the magnetic field, i.e. for Elsasser number larger than 0, we were able to show that convective plumes evolve to wider structures extending higher towards the pole, and that heat transfer from the solid core to the CMB are significantly enhanced as a result. An example of results obtain throughout our experiment is given by figure 1. It corresponds to a side view of the setup. The outside of the dome is colled by running water. The inside of the dome is filled by sulphuric acid and warmed up at its centered by a heater. Thanks to PIV measurement, we can observed convective plumes along the Earth Tangent Cylinder. These findings are supported by

  4. COMPUTATIONAL AND EXPERIMENTAL MODELING OF SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Paul C.K. Lam; Isaac K. Gamwo; Dimitri Gidaspow

    2002-05-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a predictive experimentally verified computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model for gas-liquid-solid flow. A three dimensional transient computer code for the coupled Navier-Stokes equations for each phase was developed and is appended in this report. The principal input into the model is the viscosity of the particulate phase which was determined from a measurement of the random kinetic energy of the 800 micron glass beads and a Brookfield viscometer. The details are presented in the attached paper titled ''CFD Simulation of Flow and Turbulence in a Slurry Bubble Column''. This phase of the work is in press in a referred journal (AIChE Journal, 2002) and was presented at the Fourth International Conference on Multiphase Flow (ICMF 2001) in New Orleans, May 27-June 1, 2001 (Paper No. 909). The computed time averaged particle velocities and concentrations agree with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements of velocities and concentrations, obtained using a combination of gamma-ray and X-ray densitometers, in a slurry bubble column, operated in the bubbly-coalesced fluidization regime with continuous flow of water. Both the experiment and the simulation show a down-flow of particles in the center of the column and up-flow near the walls and nearly uniform particle concentration. Normal and shear Reynolds stresses were constructed from the computed instantaneous particle velocities. The PIV measurement and the simulation produced instantaneous particle velocities. The PIV measurement and the simulation produced similar nearly flat horizontal profiles of turbulent kinetic energy of particles. To better understand turbulence we studied fluidization in a liquid-solid bed. This work was also presented at the Fourth International Conference on Multiphase Flow (ICMF 2001, Paper No. 910). To understand turbulence in risers, measurements were done in the IIT riser with 530 micron glass beads using a PIV technique. This report

  5. Modeling, simulation and experimental verification of constitutive models for energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Haberman, K.S.; Bennett, J.G.; Assay, B.W.

    1997-09-01

    Simulation of the complete response of components and systems composed of energetic materials, such as PBX-9501 is important in the determination of the safety of various explosive systems. For example, predicting the correct state of stress, rate of deformation and temperature during penetration is essential in the prediction of ignition. Such simulation requires accurate constitutive models. These models must also be computationally efficient to enable analysis of large scale three dimensional problems using explicit lagrangian finite element codes such as DYNA3D. However, to be of maximum utility, these predictions must be validated against robust dynamic experiments. In this paper, the authors report comparisons between experimental and predicted displacement fields in PBX-9501 during dynamic deformation, and describe the modeling approach. The predictions used Visco-SCRAM and the Generalized Method of Cells which have been implemented into DYNA3D. The experimental data were obtained using laser-induced fluorescence speckle photography. Results from this study have lead to more accurate models and have also guided further experimental work.

  6. Modeling human nonalcoholic steatohepatitis-associated changes in drug transporter expression using experimental rodent models.

    PubMed

    Canet, Mark J; Hardwick, Rhiannon N; Lake, April D; Dzierlenga, Anika L; Clarke, John D; Cherrington, Nathan J

    2014-04-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is a prevalent form of chronic liver disease that can progress to the more advanced stage of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). NASH has been shown to alter drug transporter regulation and may have implications in the development of adverse drug reactions. Several experimental rodent models have been proposed for the study of NASH, but no single model fully recapitulates all aspects of the human disease. The purpose of the current study was to determine which experimental NASH model best reflects the known alterations in human drug transporter expression to enable more accurate drug disposition predictions in NASH. Both rat and mouse NASH models were used in this investigation and include the methionine and choline deficient (MCD) diet model, atherogenic diet model, ob/ob and db/db mice, and fa/fa rats. Pathologic scoring evaluations demonstrated that MCD and atherogenic rats, as well as ob/ob and db/db mice, developed NASH. Liver mRNA and protein expression analyses of drug transporters showed that in general, efflux transporters were induced and uptake transporters were repressed in the rat MCD and the mouse ob/ob and db/db models. Lastly, concordance analyses suggest that both the mouse and rat MCD models as well as mouse ob/ob and db/db NASH models show the most similarity to human transporter mRNA and protein expression. These results suggest that the MCD rat and mouse model, as well as the ob/ob and db/db mouse models, may be useful for predicting altered disposition of drugs with similar kinetics across humans and rodents.

  7. Experimental-based modeling of a support structure as part of a full system model

    SciTech Connect

    CARNE,THOMAS G.; DOHRMANN,CLARK R.

    2000-02-29

    Structural dynamic systems are often attached to a support structure to simulate proper boundary conditions during testing. In some cases the support structure is fairly simple and can be modeled by discrete springs and dampers. In other cases the desired test conditions necessitate the use of a support structural that introduces dynamics of its own. For such cases a more complex structural dynamic model is required to simulate the response of the full combined system. In this paper experimental frequency response functions, admittance function modeling concepts, and least squares reductions are used to develop a support structure model including both translational and rotational degrees of freedom at an attachment location. Subsequently, the modes of the support structure are estimated, and a NASTRAN model is created for attachment to the tested system.

  8. COMPUTATIONAL AND EXPERIMENTAL MODELING OF SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Lam; Dimitri Gidaspow

    2001-08-01

    This project is a collaborative effort between the University of Akron, Illinois Institute of Technology and two industries: UOP and Energy International. The tasks involve the development of transient two and three dimensional computer codes for slurry bubble column reactors, optimization, comparison to data, and measurement of input parameters, such as the viscosity and restitution coefficients. To understand turbulence, measurements were done in the riser with 530 micron glass beads using a PIV technique. This report summarizes the measurements and simulations completed as described in details in the attached paper, ''Computational and Experimental Modeling of Three-Phase Slurry-Bubble Column Reactor.'' The Particle Image Velocimetry method described elsewhere (Gidaspow and Huilin, 1996) was used to measure the axial and tangential velocities of the particles. This method was modified with the use of a rotating colored transparent disk. The velocity distributions obtained with this method shows that the distribution is close to Maxwellian. From the velocity measurements the normal and the shear stresses were computed. Also with the use of the CCD camera a technique was developed to measure the solids volume fraction. The granular temperature profile follows the solids volume fraction profile. As predicted by theory, the granular temperature is highest at the center of the tube. The normal stress in the direction of the flow is approximately 10 times larger than that in the tangential direction. The <{nu}{prime}{sub z}{nu}{prime}{sub z}> is lower at the center where the <{nu}{prime}{sub {theta}}{nu}{prime}{sub {theta}}> is higher at that point. The Reynolds shear stress was small, producing a restitution coefficient near unity. The normal Reynolds stress in the direction of flow is large due to the fact that it is produced by the large gradient of velocity in the direction of flow compared to the small gradient in the {theta} and r directions. The kinetic theory

  9. Missing experimental challenges to the Standard Model of particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perovic, Slobodan

    The success of particle detection in high energy physics colliders critically depends on the criteria for selecting a small number of interactions from an overwhelming number that occur in the detector. It also depends on the selection of the exact data to be analyzed and the techniques of analysis. The introduction of automation into the detection process has traded the direct involvement of the physicist at each stage of selection and analysis for the efficient handling of vast amounts of data. This tradeoff, in combination with the organizational changes in laboratories of increasing size and complexity, has resulted in automated and semi-automated systems of detection. Various aspects of the semi-automated regime were greatly diminished in more generic automated systems, but turned out to be essential to a number of surprising discoveries of anomalous processes that led to theoretical breakthroughs, notably the establishment of the Standard Model of particle physics. The automated systems are much more efficient in confirming specific hypothesis in narrow energy domains than in performing broad exploratory searches. Thus, in the main, detection processes relying excessively on automation are more likely to miss potential anomalies and impede potential theoretical advances. I suggest that putting substantially more effort into the study of electron-positron colliders and increasing its funding could minimize the likelihood of missing potential anomalies, because detection in such an environment can be handled by the semi-automated regime-unlike detection in hadron colliders. Despite virtually unavoidable excessive reliance on automated detection in hadron colliders, their development has been deemed a priority because they can operate at currently highest energy levels. I suggest, however, that a focus on collisions at the highest achievable energy levels diverts funds from searches for potential anomalies overlooked due to tradeoffs at the previous energy

  10. Model development experimental programs as part of the NRC reactor safety research

    SciTech Connect

    Young, M.W.; Hsu, Y.Y.

    1982-07-01

    Experimental and model development programs have a key impact on the overall success of code calculational capabilities in addition to supporting regulatory and licensing decisions. The reactor safety research effort undertaken by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has as one of several objectives to obtain experimental data for model and code development and code assessment. This article highlights recent research sponsored under the thermal-hydraulic model-development experimental programs at NRC.

  11. An Experimental Approach to Mathematical Modeling in Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledder, Glenn

    2008-01-01

    The simplest age-structured population models update a population vector via multiplication by a matrix. These linear models offer an opportunity to introduce mathematical modeling to students of limited mathematical sophistication and background. We begin with a detailed discussion of mathematical modeling, particularly in a biological context.…

  12. A green infrastructure experimental site for developing and evaluating models

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Ecosystems Research Division (ERD) of the U.S. EPA’s National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) in Athens, GA has a 14-acre urban watershed which has become an experimental research site for green infrastructure studies. About half of the watershed is covered by pervious la...

  13. Evaluating experimental design for soil-plant model selection with Bayesian model averaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wöhling, Thomas; Geiges, Andreas; Nowak, Wolfgang; Gayler, Sebastian

    2013-04-01

    The objective selection of appropriate models for realistic simulations of coupled soil-plant processes is a challenging task since the processes are complex, not fully understood at larger scales, and highly non-linear. Also, comprehensive data sets are scarce, and measurements are uncertain. In the past decades, a variety of different models have been developed that exhibit a wide range of complexity regarding their approximation of processes in the coupled model compartments. We present a method for evaluating experimental design for maximum confidence in the model selection task. The method considers uncertainty in parameters, measurements and model structures. Advancing the ideas behind Bayesian Model Averaging (BMA), the model weights in BMA are perceived as uncertain quantities with assigned probability distributions that narrow down as more data are made available. This allows assessing the power of different data types, data densities and data locations in identifying the best model structure from among a suite of plausible models. The models considered in this study are the crop models CERES, SUCROS, GECROS and SPASS, which are coupled to identical routines for simulating soil processes within the modelling framework Expert-N. The four models considerably differ in the degree of detail at which crop growth and root water uptake are represented. Monte-Carlo simulations were conducted for each of these models considering their uncertainty in soil hydraulic properties and selected crop model parameters. The models were then conditioned on field measurements of soil moisture, leaf-area index (LAI), and evapotranspiration rates (from eddy-covariance measurements) during a vegetation period of winter wheat at the Nellingen site in Southwestern Germany. Following our new method, we derived the BMA model weights (and their distributions) when using all data or different subsets thereof. We discuss to which degree the posterior BMA mean outperformed the prior BMA

  14. Theory and application of experimental model analysis in earthquake engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moncarz, P. D.

    The feasibility and limitations of small-scale model studies in earthquake engineering research and practice is considered with emphasis on dynamic modeling theory, a study of the mechanical properties of model materials, the development of suitable model construction techniques and an evaluation of the accuracy of prototype response prediction through model case studies on components and simple steel and reinforced concrete structures. It is demonstrated that model analysis can be used in many cases to obtain quantitative information on the seismic behavior of complex structures which cannot be analyzed confidently by conventional techniques. Methodologies for model testing and response evaluation are developed in the project and applications of model analysis in seismic response studies on various types of civil engineering structures (buildings, bridges, dams, etc.) are evaluated.

  15. Maneuver simulation model of an experimental hovercraft for the Antarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murao, Rinichi

    Results of an investigation of a hovercraft model designed for Antarctic conditions are presented. The buoyancy characteristics, the propellant control system, and simulation model control are examined. An ACV (air cushion vehicle) model of the hovercraft is used to examine the flexibility and friction of the skirt. Simulation results are presented which show the performance of the hovercraft.

  16. Students' transition from an engineering model to a science model of experimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauble, Leona; Klopfer, Leopold E.; Raghavan, Kalyani

    This study investigates the hypothesis that when children are engaged in science experiments, the goal of which is to understand relations among causes and effects, they often use the engineering model of experimentation, characterized by the more familiar goal of manipulating variables to produce a desired outcome. Sixteen fifth- and sixth-graders worked on two experimentation problems consistent with the engineering and science models, respectively. The context in which these problems were framed was also varied, to encourage adoption of either an engineering or science model. Over six 40-min sessions, the group achieved significant increases in the percentages of inferences about variables that were both correct and valid. Improvement was greatest for those who began with the engineering problem and then went on to the science problem. The science model was associated with broader exploration, more selectiveness about evidence interpreted, and greater attention to establishing that some variables are not causal. The findings suggest that research on scientific inquiry processes should attend not only to the science content students are reasoning about, but also to their beliefs about the goals of inquiry.

  17. Theoretical and experimental modeling of a rail gun accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheleznyj, V. B.; Zagorskij, A. V.; Katsnel'Son, S. S.; Kudryavtsev, A. V.; Plekhanov, A. V.

    1993-04-01

    Results of a series of experiments in the acceleration of macrobodies are analyzed using an integral model of a current arc and a quasi-1D magnetic gasdynamic model. The integral model uses gasdynamic equations averaged by the size of a plasma pump and equations based on the second Kirchhoff's law for electrical current. The quasi-1D model is based on 1D magnetic gasdynamic equations for mean values of density, pressure, velocity, and internal power. Electromagnetic parameters are determined from Maxwell integral equations. It is concluded that the proposed models take into account the major mechanisms of momentum loss and are capable of adequately describing electromagnetic rail accelerators.

  18. Quantum Dynamics Simulations for Modeling Experimental Pump-Probe Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Brett; Nayyar, Sahil; Liss, Kyle; Weinacht, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Time-resolved studies of quantum dynamics have benefited greatly from developments in ultrafast table-top and free electron lasers. Advances in computer software and hardware have lowered the barrier for performing calculations such that relatively simple simulations allow for direct comparison with experimental results. We describe here a set of quantum dynamics calculations in low-dimensional molecular systems. The calculations incorporate coupled electronic-nuclear dynamics, including two interactions with an applied field and nuclear wave packet propagation. The simulations were written and carried out by undergraduates as part of a senior research project, with the specific goal of allowing for detailed interpretation of experimental pump-probe data (in additional to the pedagogical value).

  19. Finding the right balance between groundwater model complexity and experimental effort via Bayesian model selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöniger, Anneli; Illman, Walter A.; Wöhling, Thomas; Nowak, Wolfgang

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater modelers face the challenge of how to assign representative parameter values to the studied aquifer. Several approaches are available to parameterize spatial heterogeneity in aquifer parameters. They differ in their conceptualization and complexity, ranging from homogeneous models to heterogeneous random fields. While it is common practice to invest more effort into data collection for models with a finer resolution of heterogeneities, there is a lack of advice which amount of data is required to justify a certain level of model complexity. In this study, we propose to use concepts related to Bayesian model selection to identify this balance. We demonstrate our approach on the characterization of a heterogeneous aquifer via hydraulic tomography in a sandbox experiment (Illman et al., 2010). We consider four increasingly complex parameterizations of hydraulic conductivity: (1) Effective homogeneous medium, (2) geology-based zonation, (3) interpolation by pilot points, and (4) geostatistical random fields. First, we investigate the shift in justified complexity with increasing amount of available data by constructing a model confusion matrix. This matrix indicates the maximum level of complexity that can be justified given a specific experimental setup. Second, we determine which parameterization is most adequate given the observed drawdown data. Third, we test how the different parameterizations perform in a validation setup. The results of our test case indicate that aquifer characterization via hydraulic tomography does not necessarily require (or justify) a geostatistical description. Instead, a zonation-based model might be a more robust choice, but only if the zonation is geologically adequate.

  20. Experimental assessment of wall shear flow in models.

    PubMed

    Affeld, K; Kertzscher, U; Goubergrits, L

    2002-01-01

    The blood flow immediately adjacent to the wall of a blood vessel or an artificial surface is of great interest. This flow defines the shear stress at the wall and is known to have a great physiological importance. The use of models is a viable method to investigate this flow. However, even in models the shear stress at the wall is difficult to assess. A new optical method is based on transparent models and uses particles in the model fluid, which are only visible near the wall. This is achieved with a model fluid having a defined opacity. This fluid obscures particles in the center of the models, but permits the observation and recording of particles close to the wall. The method has been applied for Hagen-Poiseuille flow and for the likewise well researched flow in a tube with a sudden expansion. PMID:12122270

  1. A plasmin-activatable thrombin inhibitor reduces experimental thrombosis and assists experimental thrombolysis in murine models.

    PubMed

    Sheffield, W P; Eltringham-Smith, L J; Gataiance, S; Bhakta, V

    2015-05-01

    The leech protein hirudin is a potent natural thrombin inhibitor. Its potential as an antithrombotic agent is limited by its promotion of bleeding. We attempted to modify this profile by positioning albumin and a plasmin cleavage site on its N-terminus, in recombinant protein HSACHV3 [comprising hirudin variant 3 (HV3) fused to the C-terminus of human serum albumin (HSA) via a plasmin cleavage site (C)], Previously we showed that HSACHV3 inhibited thrombin in a plasmin-dependent manner, and that, unlike HV3, it did not increase bleeding in vivo when administered to mice. Here we tested HSACHV3 for the ability to reduce thrombosis and assist enzymatic thrombolysis in animal models. Intravenous administration of HSACHV3, but not a control protein lacking the plasmin cleavage site (HSAHV3), reduced thrombus weight by 2.1-fold in the ferric chloride-injured mouse vena cava. Similarly, thrombi formed in a rabbit jugular vein stasis model were 1.7-fold lighter in animals treated with HSACHV3 compared to those receiving HSAHV3. Administration of 60 mg/kg body weight HSACHV3 prolonged the time to occlusion in the ferric chloride-injured mouse carotid artery by threefold compared to vehicle controls, while equimolar HSAHV3 had no effect. HSACHV3 had no ability to restore flow to the murine carotid arteries occluded by ferric chloride treatment, but combining HSACHV3 (60 mg/kg) with recombinant mutant tissue plasminogen activator (TNKase) significantly reduced the time to restore patency to the artery compared to TNKase alone. Unlike unfused HV3, HSACHV3 did not increase bleeding in a mouse liver laceration model. Our results show that HSACHV3 acts as an antithrombotic agent that does not promote bleeding and which speeds the time to flow restoration when used as an adjunct to pharmacological thrombolysis in animal models. PMID:25481811

  2. MELCOR model for an experimental 17x17 spent fuel PWR assembly.

    SciTech Connect

    Cardoni, Jeffrey

    2010-11-01

    A MELCOR model has been developed to simulate a pressurized water reactor (PWR) 17 x 17 assembly in a spent fuel pool rack cell undergoing severe accident conditions. To the extent possible, the MELCOR model reflects the actual geometry, materials, and masses present in the experimental arrangement for the Sandia Fuel Project (SFP). The report presents an overview of the SFP experimental arrangement, the MELCOR model specifications, demonstration calculation results, and the input model listing.

  3. Precipitation of experimental autoallergic uveoretinitis by cyclosporin A withdrawal: an experimental model of uveitis relapse.

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, E G; Dinning, W J; Kasp, E; Graham, E M; Dumonde, D C

    1989-01-01

    This study set out to determine whether withdrawal of cyclosporin A (CyA) in Lewis rats sensitized to retinal S antigen would precipitate experimental autoallergic uveoretinitis (EAU), and whether challenge of such animals with S antigen or an unrelated stimulus would accelerate EAU onset after drug withdrawal. Rats were sensitized with 50 micrograms S antigen in Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) and EAU onset was suppressed by 18 days of treatment with CyA at doses ranging from 3 to 10 mg/kg daily. Without challenge, seven out of 11 animals developed EAU with a median onset of 78 days. This was reduced to 68 days in rats challenged on day 32 with FCA alone, to 48 days with 10 micrograms S antigen in FCA, and to 41 days with 50 micrograms S antigen in FCA. The incidence, onset and severity of anterior uveitis and extent of photoreceptor destruction were related to both CyA dose and nature of challenge. The extent of photoreceptor destruction ran parallel with severity of anterior uveitis; and delayed-type hypersensitivity reactivity on day 43 was related to both severity of anterior uveitis (P less than 0.001) and photoreceptor damage (P less than 0.002). At the highest dose, CyA also delayed the appearance of antibody to S antigen; however, subsequent antibody levels were unrelated to EAU severity or to nature of challenge. The results indicate that CyA-induced suppression of the immunological response to S antigen can recover spontaneously after drug withdrawal, that challenge with either S antigen or FCA alone can accelerate the subsequent onset of EAU, and that these phenomena may provide a basis for investigating mechanisms underlying relapse of human uveoretinitis. Images Fig. 5 PMID:2805414

  4. Redesign of Library Workflows: Experimental Models for Electronic Resource Description.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, Karen

    This paper explores the potential for and progress of a gradual transition from a highly centralized model for cataloging to an iterative, collaborative, and broadly distributed model for electronic resource description. The purpose is to alert library managers to some experiments underway and to help them conceptualize new methods for defining,…

  5. Electro-thermal modelling of a supercapacitor and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrueta, Alberto; San Martín, Idoia; Hernández, Andoni; Ursúa, Alfredo; Sanchis, Pablo

    2014-08-01

    This paper reports on the electro-thermal modelling of a Maxwell supercapacitor (SC), model BMOD0083 with a rated capacitance of 83 F and rated voltage of 48 V. One electrical equivalent circuit was used to model the electrical behaviour whilst another served to simulate the thermal behaviour. The models were designed to predict the SC operating voltage and temperature, by taking the electric current and ambient temperature as input variables. A five-stage iterative method, applied to three experiments, served to obtain the parameter values for each model. The models were implemented in MATLAB-Simulink®, where they interacted to reciprocally provide information. These models were then validated through a number of tests, subjecting the SC to different current and frequency profiles. These tests included the validation of a bank of supercapacitors integrated into an electric microgrid, in a real operating environment. Satisfactory results were obtained from the electric and thermal models, with RMSE values of less than 0.65 V in all validations.

  6. Experimental Validation and Applications of a Fluid Infiltration Model

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Cindy S.; Hunt, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Horizontal infiltration experiments were performed to validate a plug flow model that minimizes the number of parameters that must be measured. Water and silicone oil at three different viscosities were infiltrated into glass beads, desert alluvium, and silica powder. Experiments were also performed with negative inlet heads on air-dried silica powder, and with water and oil infiltrating into initially water moist silica powder. Comparisons between the data and model were favorable in most cases, with predictions usually within 40% of the measured data. The model is extended to a line source and small areal source at the ground surface to analytically predict the shape of two-dimensional wetting fronts. Furthermore, a plug flow model for constant flux infiltration agrees well with field data and suggests that the proposed model for a constant-head boundary condition can be effectively used to predict wetting front movement at heterogeneous field sites if averaged parameter values are used. PMID:20428480

  7. Experimental Models Combining TBI, Hemorrhagic Shock, and Hypoxemia.

    PubMed

    Leung, Lai Yee; Deng-Bryant, Ying; Shear, Deborah; Tortella, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Animal models of traumatic brain injury (TBI) provide important tools for studying the pathobiology of brain trauma and for evaluating therapeutic or diagnostic targets. Incorporation of additional insults such as hemorrhagic shock (HS) and/or hypoxemia (HX) into these models more closely recreates clinical scenarios as TBI often occurs in conjunction with these systemic insults (i.e., polytrauma). We have developed a rat model of polytrauma that combines penetrating TBI, HS and HX. Following brain trauma, HX was induced by reducing the inspired oxygen while HS was induced by withdrawing blood to lower the mean arterial pressure. The physiological, histological, and behavioral aspects of this animal model have been characterized and have demonstrated exacerbating effects of systemic insults on penetrating TBI. As such, this model may facilitate the use of simultaneous assessments of multiple mechanisms and provide a platform for testing novel diagnostic and therapeutic targets. PMID:27604733

  8. Evaluation of advanced materials through experimental mechanics and modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Yii-Ching

    1993-01-01

    Composite materials have been frequently used in aerospace vehicles. Very often defects are inherited during the manufacture and damages are inherited during the construction and services. It becomes critical to understand the mechanical behavior of such composite structure before it can be further used. One good example of these composite structures is the cylindrical bottle of solid rocket motor case with accidental impact damages. Since the replacement of this cylindrical bottle is expensive, it is valuable to know how the damages affects the material, and how it can be repaired. To reach this goal, the damage must be characterized and the stress/strain field must be carefully analyzed. First the damage area, due to impact, is surveyed and identified with a shearography technique which uses the principle of speckle shearing interferometry to measure displacement gradient. Within the damage area of a composite laminate, such as the bottle of solid rocket motor case, all layers are considered to be degraded. Once a lamina being degraded the stiffness as well as strength will be drastically decreased. It becomes a critical area of failure to the whole bottle. And hence the stress/strain field within and around a damage should be accurately evaluated for failure prediction. To investigate the stress/strain field around damages a Hybrid-Numerical method which combines experimental measurement and finite element analysis is used. It is known the stress or strain at the singular point can not be accurately measured by an experimental technique. Nevertheless, if the location is far away from the singular spot, the displacement can be found accurately. Since it reflects the true displacement field locally regardless of the boundary conditions, it is an excellent input data for a finite element analysis to replace the usually assumed boundary conditions. Therefore, the Hybrid-Numerical method is chosen to avoid the difficulty and to take advantage of both experimental

  9. Evaluation of advanced materials through experimental mechanics and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yii-Ching

    1993-11-01

    Composite materials have been frequently used in aerospace vehicles. Very often defects are inherited during the manufacture and damages are inherited during the construction and services. It becomes critical to understand the mechanical behavior of such composite structure before it can be further used. One good example of these composite structures is the cylindrical bottle of solid rocket motor case with accidental impact damages. Since the replacement of this cylindrical bottle is expensive, it is valuable to know how the damages affects the material, and how it can be repaired. To reach this goal, the damage must be characterized and the stress/strain field must be carefully analyzed. First the damage area, due to impact, is surveyed and identified with a shearography technique which uses the principle of speckle shearing interferometry to measure displacement gradient. Within the damage area of a composite laminate, such as the bottle of solid rocket motor case, all layers are considered to be degraded. Once a lamina being degraded the stiffness as well as strength will be drastically decreased. It becomes a critical area of failure to the whole bottle. And hence the stress/strain field within and around a damage should be accurately evaluated for failure prediction. To investigate the stress/strain field around damages a Hybrid-Numerical method which combines experimental measurement and finite element analysis is used. It is known the stress or strain at the singular point can not be accurately measured by an experimental technique. Nevertheless, if the location is far away from the singular spot, the displacement can be found accurately. Since it reflects the true displacement field locally regardless of the boundary conditions, it is an excellent input data for a finite element analysis to replace the usually assumed boundary conditions. Therefore, the Hybrid-Numerical method is chosen to avoid the difficulty and to take advantage of both experimental

  10. A prediction model for ocular damage - Experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Heussner, Nico; Vagos, Márcia; Spitzer, Martin S; Stork, Wilhelm

    2015-08-01

    With the increasing number of laser applications in medicine and technology, accidental as well as intentional exposure of the human eye to laser sources has become a major concern. Therefore, a prediction model for ocular damage (PMOD) is presented within this work and validated for long-term exposure. This model is a combination of a raytracing model with a thermodynamical model of the human and an application which determines the thermal damage by the implementation of the Arrhenius integral. The model is based on our earlier work and is here validated against temperature measurements taken with porcine eye samples. For this validation, three different powers were used: 50mW, 100mW and 200mW with a spot size of 1.9mm. Also, the measurements were taken with two different sensing systems, an infrared camera and a fibre optic probe placed within the tissue. The temperatures were measured up to 60s and then compared against simulations. The measured temperatures were found to be in good agreement with the values predicted by the PMOD-model. To our best knowledge, this is the first model which is validated for both short-term and long-term irradiations in terms of temperature and thus demonstrates that temperatures can be accurately predicted within the thermal damage regime. PMID:26267496

  11. Pore water pressure variations in Subpermafrost groundwater : Numerical modeling compared with experimental modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivière, Agnès.; Goncalves, Julio; Jost, Anne; Font, Marianne

    2010-05-01

    Development and degradation of permafrost directly affect numerous hydrogeological processes such as thermal regime, exchange between river and groundwater, groundwater flows patterns and groundwater recharge (Michel, 1994). Groundwater in permafrost area is subdivided into two zones: suprapermafrost and subpermafrost which are separated by permafrost. As a result of the volumetric expansion of water upon freezing and assuming ice lenses and frost heave do not form freezing in a saturated aquifer, the progressive formation of permafrost leads to the pressurization of the subpermafrost groundwater (Wang, 2006). Therefore disappearance or aggradation of permafrost modifies the confined or unconfined state of subpermafrost groundwater. Our study focuses on modifications of pore water pressure of subpermafrost groundwater which could appear during thawing and freezing of soil. Numerical simulation allows elucidation of some of these processes. Our numerical model accounts for phase changes for coupled heat transport and variably saturated flow involving cycles of freezing and thawing. The flow model is a combination of a one-dimensional channel flow model which uses Manning-Strickler equation and a two-dimensional vertically groundwater flow model using Richards equation. Numerical simulation of heat transport consisted in a two dimensional model accounting for the effects of latent heat of phase change of water associated with melting/freezing cycles which incorporated the advection-diffusion equation describing heat-transfer in porous media. The change of hydraulic conductivity and thermal conductivity are considered by our numerical model. The model was evaluated by comparing predictions with data from laboratory freezing experiments. Experimental design was undertaken at the Laboratory M2C (Univesité de Caen-Basse Normandie, CNRS, France). The device consisted of a Plexiglas box insulated on all sides except on the top. Precipitation and ambient temperature are

  12. Dynamic modeling and experimental results for a head tilt response.

    PubMed

    Geisinger, Dario; Ferreira, Enrique; Suarez, Alejo; Suarez, Hamlet

    2010-01-01

    The estimation of the vertical in humans is important in everyday life although the mechanisms involved are not completely understood yet. This paper presents two sets of experiments with normal subjects, using the same virtual reality setup, aiming to help in this understanding. First, a steady state experiment is presented, which is used to determine the gravitational vertical precision while the second, a dynamical transient response experiment, is used to find dynamic models of each subject response. Results show that the dynamic models are able to reproduce the results of the steady state experiment while having the benefits that a dynamic model brings to evaluate subjects performance.

  13. Passive Superconducting Shielding: Experimental Results and Computer Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, B. A.; Kamiya, K.

    2003-01-01

    Passive superconducting shielding for magnetic refrigerators has advantages over active shielding and passive ferromagnetic shielding in that it is lightweight and easy to construct. However, it is not as easy to model and does not fail gracefully. Failure of a passive superconducting shield may lead to persistent flux and persistent currents. Unfortunately, modeling software for superconducting materials is not as easily available as is software for simple coils or for ferromagnetic materials. This paper will discuss ways of using available software to model passive superconducting shielding.

  14. Modeling and experimental testing of a smart composite bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrashekhara, K.; Nanni, Antonio; Watkins, Steve E.; Kumar, Prakash

    2003-10-01

    An all composite bridge with integral sensor network has been designed and built at the University of Missouri-Rolla (UMR). An extensive experimental study and finite element analysis were carried out to obtain and compare properties (stiffness, strength, failure modes) of 76 mm (3 in) square hollow pultruded Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) tubes and their assemblies. Tube assemblies were used in the fabrication of bridge deck designed for H-20 truckloads as specified by the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO). The bridge is 9.14 m (30 ft) long and is 2.74 m (9 ft) wide. All the coupons were tested under three- or four-point bending. Experimental results show excellent linear elastic behavior up to failure and are in good agreement with finite element solutions. A quarter portion of the full-sized bridge deck was then tested for its structural performance under design and fatigue loading and also for ultimate load capacity to evaluate the bridge response. The characteristics of the full-size bridge deck were determined by analyzing the performed tests. The test sample showed almost no reduction in stiffness or strength after 2 million cycles of fatigue loading in excess of the design load. The bridge was installed at the UMR campus in July 2000. The bridge is equipped with fiber optic sensors, and the response of the bridge will be remotely monitored.

  15. Fantastic animals as an experimental model to teach animal adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Guidetti, Roberto; Baraldi, Laura; Calzolai, Caterina; Pini, Lorenza; Veronesi, Paola; Pederzoli, Aurora

    2007-01-01

    Background Science curricula and teachers should emphasize evolution in a manner commensurate with its importance as a unifying concept in science. The concept of adaptation represents a first step to understand the results of natural selection. We settled an experimental project of alternative didactic to improve knowledge of organism adaptation. Students were involved and stimulated in learning processes by creative activities. To set adaptation in a historic frame, fossil records as evidence of past life and evolution were considered. Results The experimental project is schematized in nine phases: review of previous knowledge; lesson on fossils; lesson on fantastic animals; planning an imaginary world; creation of an imaginary animal; revision of the imaginary animals; adaptations of real animals; adaptations of fossil animals; and public exposition. A rubric to evaluate the student's performances is reported. The project involved professors and students of the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia and of the "G. Marconi" Secondary School of First Degree (Modena, Italy). Conclusion The educational objectives of the project are in line with the National Indications of the Italian Ministry of Public Instruction: knowledge of the characteristics of living beings, the meanings of the term "adaptation", the meaning of fossils, the definition of ecosystem, and the particularity of the different biomes. At the end of the project, students will be able to grasp particular adaptations of real organisms and to deduce information about the environment in which the organism evolved. This project allows students to review previous knowledge and to form their personalities. PMID:17767729

  16. Experimental modelling of fragmentation applied to volcanic explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haug, Øystein Thordén; Galland, Olivier; Gisler, Galen R.

    2013-12-01

    Explosions during volcanic eruptions cause fragmentation of magma and host rock, resulting in fragments with sizes ranging from boulders to fine ash. The products can be described by fragment size distributions (FSD), which commonly follow power laws with exponent D. The processes that lead to power-law distributions and the physical parameters that control D remain unknown. We developed a quantitative experimental procedure to study the physics of the fragmentation process through time. The apparatus consists of a Hele-Shaw cell containing a layer of cohesive silica flour that is fragmented by a rapid injection of pressurized air. The evolving fragmentation of the flour is monitored with a high-speed camera, and the images are analysed to obtain the evolution of the number of fragments (N), their average size (A), and the FSD. Using the results from our image-analysis procedure, we find transient empirical laws for N, A and the exponent D of the power-law FSD as functions of the initial air pressure. We show that our experimental procedure is a promising tool for unravelling the complex physics of fragmentation during phreatomagmatic and phreatic eruptions.

  17. New experimental models of skin homeostasis and diseases.

    PubMed

    Larcher, F; Espada, J; Díaz-Ley, B; Jaén, P; Juarranz, A; Quintanilla, M

    2015-01-01

    Homeostasis, whose regulation at the molecular level is still poorly understood, is intimately related to the functions of epidermal stem cells. Five research groups have been brought together to work on new in vitro and in vivo skin models through the SkinModel-CM program, under the auspices of the Spanish Autonomous Community of Madrid. This project aims to analyze the functions of DNA methyltransferase 1, endoglin, and podoplanin in epidermal stem cell activity, homeostasis, and skin cancer. These new models include 3-dimensional organotypic cultures, immunodeficient skin-humanized mice, and genetically modified mice. Another aim of the program is to use skin-humanized mice to model dermatoses such as Gorlin syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum in order to optimize new protocols for photodynamic therapy. PMID:24878038

  18. Pulmonary fluid flow challenges for experimental and mathematical modeling.

    PubMed

    Levy, Rachel; Hill, David B; Forest, M Gregory; Grotberg, James B

    2014-12-01

    Modeling the flow of fluid in the lungs, even under baseline healthy conditions, presents many challenges. The complex rheology of the fluids, interaction between fluids and structures, and complicated multi-scale geometry all add to the complexity of the problem. We provide a brief overview of approaches used to model three aspects of pulmonary fluid and flow: the surfactant layer in the deep branches of the lung, the mucus layer in the upper airway branches, and closure/reopening of the airway. We discuss models of each aspect, the potential to capture biological and therapeutic information, and open questions worthy of further investigation. We hope to promote multi-disciplinary collaboration by providing insights into mathematical descriptions of fluid-mechanics in the lung and the kinds of predictions these models can make. PMID:25096289

  19. EXPERIMENTAL MODELS FOR THE STUDY OF ORAL CLEFTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicology and teratology studies routinely utilize animal models to determine the potential for chemical and physical agents to produce reproductive and developmental toxicity, including birth defects such as cleft palate. The standardized teratology screen typically tests co...

  20. Pulmonary Fluid Flow Challenges for Experimental and Mathematical Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Rachel; Hill, David B.; Forest, M. Gregory; Grotberg, James B.

    2014-01-01

    Modeling the flow of fluid in the lungs, even under baseline healthy conditions, presents many challenges. The complex rheology of the fluids, interaction between fluids and structures, and complicated multi-scale geometry all add to the complexity of the problem. We provide a brief overview of approaches used to model three aspects of pulmonary fluid and flow: the surfactant layer in the deep branches of the lung, the mucus layer in the upper airway branches, and closure/reopening of the airway. We discuss models of each aspect, the potential to capture biological and therapeutic information, and open questions worthy of further investigation. We hope to promote multi-disciplinary collaboration by providing insights into mathematical descriptions of fluid-mechanics in the lung and the kinds of predictions these models can make. PMID:25096289

  1. New experimental models of skin homeostasis and diseases.

    PubMed

    Larcher, F; Espada, J; Díaz-Ley, B; Jaén, P; Juarranz, A; Quintanilla, M

    2015-01-01

    Homeostasis, whose regulation at the molecular level is still poorly understood, is intimately related to the functions of epidermal stem cells. Five research groups have been brought together to work on new in vitro and in vivo skin models through the SkinModel-CM program, under the auspices of the Spanish Autonomous Community of Madrid. This project aims to analyze the functions of DNA methyltransferase 1, endoglin, and podoplanin in epidermal stem cell activity, homeostasis, and skin cancer. These new models include 3-dimensional organotypic cultures, immunodeficient skin-humanized mice, and genetically modified mice. Another aim of the program is to use skin-humanized mice to model dermatoses such as Gorlin syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum in order to optimize new protocols for photodynamic therapy.

  2. Dynamic modelling and experimental validation of three wheeled tilting vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amati, Nicola; Festini, Andrea; Pelizza, Luigi; Tonoli, Andrea

    2011-06-01

    The present paper describes the study of the stability in the straight running of a three-wheeled tilting vehicle for urban and sub-urban mobility. The analysis was carried out by developing a multibody model in the Matlab/SimulinkSimMechanics environment. An Adams-Motorcycle model and an equivalent analytical model were developed for the cross-validation and for highlighting the similarities with the lateral dynamics of motorcycles. Field tests were carried out to validate the model and identify some critical parameters, such as the damping on the steering system. The stability analysis demonstrates that the lateral dynamic motions are characterised by vibration modes that are similar to that of a motorcycle. Additionally, it shows that the wobble mode is significantly affected by the castor trail, whereas it is only slightly affected by the dynamics of the front suspension. For the present case study, the frame compliance also has no influence on the weave and wobble.

  3. Experimental analysis and modeling of a stormwater perlite filter.

    PubMed

    Gironás, Jorge; Adriasola, José M; Fernández, Bonifacio

    2008-06-01

    This paper presents the study of a mixed porous media composed of expanded perlite and a nonwoven needle-punched geotextile used to reduce the suspended solids load and concentration in urban runoff. Laboratory procedures were designed to quantify the suspended solids removal efficiency and variation in time of filtration rate. Different grain-size distributions of expanded perlite, diverse suspended solids concentrations, and different hydraulic and geometric conditions were tested to determine the most effective filter media. A dimensionless parameter, termed Global Performance Index (GPI), was developed to reach this objective. Measured data were also used to build a dimensional and a regression model to represent the performance of the filter media mathematically. The theory, derivation, and performance of both models are presented and compared with an existent empirical model. The dimensional model better reproduces the observations, becoming a useful tool for the design, operation, and evaluation of commercial porous media filters.

  4. Europium anomaly in plagioclase feldspar: experimental results and semiquantitative model.

    PubMed

    Weill, D F; Drake, M J

    1973-06-01

    The partition of europium between plagioclase feldspar and magmatic liquid is considered in terms of the distribution coefficients for divalent and trivalent europium. A model equation is derived giving the europium anomaly in plagioclase as a function of temperature and oxygen fugacity. The model explains europium anomalies in plagioclase synthesized under controlled laboratory conditions as well as the variations of the anomaly observed in natural terrestrial and extraterrestrial igneous rocks.

  5. An experimental test of plant canopy reflectance models on cotton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemaster, E. W.

    1974-01-01

    Extensive data on the plant parameters necessary to evaluate any model are presented for a cotton crop. The variation of the bidirectional reflectance function with observer altitude, observer azimuth, and sun altitude angle is presented for a high density cotton crop having leaf index of 19. A comparison with the quantitative behavior obtained from the Suits model is accomplished in the wavelength region from 400 nm to 1050 nm.

  6. Europium anomaly in plagioclase feldspar - Experimental results and semiquantitative model.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weill, D. F.; Drake, M. J.

    1973-01-01

    The partition of europium between plagioclase feldspar and magmatic liquid is considered in terms of the distribution coefficients for divalent and trivalent europium. A model equation is derived giving the europium anomaly in plagioclase as a function of temperature and oxygen fugacity. The model explains europium anomalies in plagioclase synthesized under controlled laboratory conditions as well as the variations of the anomaly observed in natural terrestrial and extraterrestrial igneous rocks.

  7. Europium anomaly in plagioclase feldspar: experimental results and semiquantitative model.

    PubMed

    Weill, D F; Drake, M J

    1973-06-01

    The partition of europium between plagioclase feldspar and magmatic liquid is considered in terms of the distribution coefficients for divalent and trivalent europium. A model equation is derived giving the europium anomaly in plagioclase as a function of temperature and oxygen fugacity. The model explains europium anomalies in plagioclase synthesized under controlled laboratory conditions as well as the variations of the anomaly observed in natural terrestrial and extraterrestrial igneous rocks. PMID:17806582

  8. Transient Dynamics Modeling of Experimental Hypersonic Inlet Unstart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchins, Kelley E.; Szmuk, Michael; Clemens, Noel T.; Akella, Maruthi R.; Donbar, Jeffrey M.; Gogineni, Sivaram

    2012-11-01

    During unstart, the rapid upstream propagation of a hypersonic engine's inlet-isolator shock system can be readily detected through pressure measurements. Specifically, the magnitude of the pressure readings suddenly and dramatically increases as soon as the leading edge of the shock system passes the measurement location. In this work, attempts to model the transient dynamics governing shock motion have been made through the use of system identification techniques. The result of these efforts is a partially nonlinear dynamic model that describes shock motion through pressure signals. The process reveals the possibility of partitioning the nonlinear behaviors from the linear dynamics with relative ease. Related attempts are then made to create a model where the nonlinear portion has been pre-specified leaving only the linear portion to be determined by system identification. The modeling and identification process specific to the unstart data used is discussed, and successful models are presented for both the full system identification and the partitioned model cases. The suitability of various input data types is explored, and comments on practicality are made. This work is supported in part by AFRL under SBIR contract.

  9. Nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) and its experimental models

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Steven L.; Johnson, Mary A.; Miller, Neil R.

    2011-01-01

    Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION) can be divided into nonarteritic (NAION) and arteritic (AAION) forms. NAION makes up ~85% of all cases of AION, and until recently was poorly understood. There is no treatment for NAION, and its initiating causes are poorly understood, in part because NAION is not lethal, making it difficult to obtain fresh, newly affected tissue for study. In-vivo electrophysiology and post-mortem studies reveal specific responses that are associated with NAION. New models of NAION have been developed which enable insights into the pathophysiological events surrounding this disease. These models include both rodent and primate species, and the power of a `vertically integrated' multi-species approach can help in understanding the common cellular mechanisms and physiological responses to clinical NAION, and to identify potential approaches to treatment. The models utilize laser light to activate intravascular photoactive dye to induce capillary vascular thrombosis, while sparing the larger vessels. The observable optic nerve changes associated with rodent models of AION (rAION) and primate NAION (pNAION) are indistinguishable from that seen in clinical disease, including sectoral axonal involvement, and in-vivo electrophysiological data from these models are consistent with clinical data. Early post-infarct events reveal an unexpected inflammatory response, and changes in intraretinal gene expression for both stress response, while sparing outer retinal function, which occurs in AAION models. Histologically, the NAION models reveal an isolated loss of retinal ganglion cells by apoptosis. There are changes detectable by immunohistochemistry suggesting that other retinal cells mount a brisk response to retinal ganglion cell distress without themselves dying. The optic nerve ultimately shows axonal loss and scarring. Inflammation is a prominent early histological feature. This suggests that clinically, specific modulation of inflammation may

  10. Experimental Investigation and Modeling of Integrated Tri-generation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetinkaya, Eda

    Energy demand in the world is increasing with population growth and higher living standards. Today, the need for energy requires a focus on renewable sources without abandoning fossil fuels. Efficient use of energy is one of the most important tasks in modern energy systems to achieve. In addition to the energy need, growing environmental concerns are linked with energy is emerged. Multi-purpose energy generation allows a higher efficiency by generating more outputs with the same input in the same system. Tri-generation systems are expected to provide at least three commodities, such as heating, cooling, desalination, storable fuel production and some other useful outputs, in addition to power generation. In this study, an experimental investigation of gasification is presented and two integrated tri-generation systems are proposed. The first integrated tri-generation system (System 1) utilizes solar energy as input and the outputs are power, fresh water and hot water. It consists of four sub-systems, namely solar power tower system, desalination system, Rankine cycle and organic Rankine cycle (ORC). The second integrated tri-generation system (System 2) utilizes coal and biomass as input and the outputs are power, fuel and hot water. It consists of five sub-systems: gasification plant, Brayton cycle, Rankine cycle, Fischer-Tropsch synthesis plant and an organic Rankine cycle (ORC). Experimental investigation includes coal and biomass gasification, where the experimental results of synthesis gas compositions are utilized in the analysis of the second systems. To maximize efficiency, heat losses from the system should be minimized through a recovery system to make the heat a useful commodity for other systems, such as ORCs which can utilize the low-grade heat. In this respect, ORCs are first analyzed for three different configurations in terms of energy and exergy efficiencies altering working fluids to increase the power output. Among two types of coal and one type

  11. Computational modeling and experimental characterization of indoor aerosol transport

    SciTech Connect

    Konecni, S.; Whicker, J. J.; Martin, R. A.

    2002-01-01

    When a hazardous aerosol or gas is inadvertently or deliberately released in an occupied facility, the airborne material presents a hazard to people. Inadvertent accidents and exposures continue to occur in Los Alamos and other nuclear facilities despite state-of-art engineering and administrative controls, and heightened diligence. Despite the obvious need in occupational settings and for homeland defense, the body of research in hazardous aerosol dispersion and control in large, complex, ventilated enclosures is extremely limited. The science governing generation, transport, inhalation, and detection of airborne hazards is lacking and must be developed to where it can be used by engineers or safety professionals in the prediction of worker exposure, in the prevention of accidents, or in the mitigation of terrorist actions. In this study, a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, CFX5.4, and experiments were used to assess flow field characteristics, and to investigate aerosol release and transport in a large, ventilated workroom in a facility at Savannah River Site. Steady state CFD results illustrating a complex, ventilation-induced, flow field with vortices, velocity gradients, and quiet zones are presented, as are time-dependent CFD and experimental aerosol dispersion results. The comparison of response times between CFD and experimental results was favorable. It is believed that future applications of CFD and experiments can have a favorable impact on the design of ventilation (HVAC) systems and worker safety with consideration to facility costs. Ultimately, statistical methods will be used in conjunction with CFD calculations to determine the optimal number and location of detectors, as well as optimal egress routes in event of a release.

  12. Experimental Intra-Abdominal Abscesses in Rats: Development of an Experimental Model

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, William M.; Onderdonk, Andrew B.; Bartlett, John G.; Gorbach, Sherwood L.

    1974-01-01

    An animal model has been developed to study the evolution of intra-abdominal abscesses. Gelatin capsules containing pooled colonic contents and barium sulfate were prepared in an anaerobic chamber and implanted into the pelvic region of Wistar rats. The natural course of the ensuing disease was studied in various groups according to the source of the inoculum and sex of the recipient. Colonic contents derived from rats fed a grain diet produced a highly lethal disease with an 80% mortality rate for males and 100% for females. Most deaths occurred within 3 days of implantation, and autopsies showed generalized peritonitis. The addition of blood to the inoculum caused a rapidly fatal peritonitis in all animals. With an inoculum derived from meat-fed rats implanted in male recipients, there was a biphasic disease. Initially, there was peritonitis associated with 43% mortality. All animals that survived this acute period developed discrete intra-abdominal abscesses by the seventh postoperative day. The latter stage was characterized by an indolent course and progressive enlargement of abscesses. PMID:4611922

  13. Experimental Study and Dynamic Modeling of Metal Rubber Isolating Bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ke; Zhou, Yanguo; Jiang, Jian

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, dynamic shear mechanical properties of a new metal rubber isolating bearing is tested and studied. The mixed damping model is provided for theoretical modeling of MR isolating bearing, the shear stiffness and damping characteristics of the MR bearing can be analyzed separately and easily discussed, and the mixed damping model is proved to be an rather effective approach. The test results indicate that loading frequency bears little impact over shear property of metal rubber isolating bearing, the total energy consumption of metal rubber isolating bearing increases with the increase in loading amplitude. With the increase in loading amplitude, the stiffness of the isolating bearing will reduce showing its “soft property” and the type of damping force gradually changes to be close to dry friction. The features of “soft property” and dry friction energy consumption of metal rubber isolating bearing are very useful in practical engineering application.

  14. Experimental evolution of sprays in a lung model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burguete, Javier; Aliseda, Alberto

    2015-11-01

    We present the first results of an experiment conceived to observe the evolution of sprays inside the lungs. We have built a model that covers the first 6 generations (from the trachea to segmental bronchi of 5th generation). This setup is placed on a wind tunnel, and the flow inside the model is induced by a vacuum pump that emulates the breathing process using a valve. We inject a previously determined distribution of particles (water droplets), whose average diameter can be modified. Then, we measure the droplet distribution in different branches and compare how the droplet distribution is modified at each generation. The parameters that control the behavior are the average diameter of the original distribution, the airflow rate inside the model and the frequency of the breathing cycle.

  15. An experimental study on a model Stirling engine car

    SciTech Connect

    Sohma, Yutaka; Wu, Chungming; Isshiki, Seita; Ushiyama, Izumi

    1999-07-01

    A Stirling engine is a mechanical device that operates on a closed regenerative thermodynamic cycle, with cyclic compression and expansion of the working fluid at different temperature levels. The flow is controlled by volume changes, and there exists a net conversion of the heat to work. Stirling engines are ideally suited to off-grid electric power generation because of their multi-fuel capability, potentially high efficiency and low noise. The first model Stirling Techno-rally was held in August 1997 for further promotion of the clean and quiet Stirling engine as one of the Centennial Anniversary events of JSME. In the race, more than one hundred cars competed for the time on a course of 13 meters length and 30 centimeters width. In Ashikaga Institute of Technology, a model Stirling engine car Ashikaga Gekkoh was made for this event. In this paper the authors report on this model car that won the championship of the Stirling Techno-rally.

  16. Laser ablation of a turbid medium: Modeling and experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Brygo, F.; Semerok, A.; Weulersse, J.-M.; Thro, P.-Y.; Oltra, R.

    2006-08-01

    Q-switched Nd:YAG laser ablation of a turbid medium (paint) is studied. The optical properties (absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient, and its anisotropy) of a paint are determined with a multiple scattering model (three-flux model), and from measurements of reflection-transmission of light through thin layers. The energy deposition profiles are calculated at wavelengths of 532 nm and 1.064 {mu}m. They are different from those described by a Lambert-Beer law. In particular, the energy deposition of the laser beam is not maximum on the surface but at some depth inside the medium. The ablated rate was measured for the two wavelengths and compared with the energy deposition profile predicted by the model. This allows us to understand the evolution of the ablated depth with the wavelength: the more the scattering coefficient is higher, the more the ablated depth and the threshold fluence of ablation decrease.

  17. Experimental validation of sheath models at intermediate radio frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolewski, Mark

    2013-09-01

    Sheaths in radio-frequency (rf) discharges play a dominant role in determining important properties such as the efficiency of power delivery and utilization, plasma spatial uniformity, and ion energy distributions (IEDs). To obtain high quality predictions for these properties requires sheath models that have been rigorously tested and validated. We have performed such tests in capacitively coupled and rf-biased inductively coupled discharges, for inert as well as reactive gases, over two or more orders of magnitude in frequency, voltage, and plasma density. We measured a complete set of model input and output parameters including rf current and voltage waveforms, rf plasma potential measured by a capacitive probe, electron temperature and ion saturation current measured by Langmuir probe and other techniques, and IEDs measured by mass spectrometers and gridded energy analyzers. Experiments concentrated on the complicated, intermediate-frequency regime of ion dynamics, where the ion transit time is comparable to the rf period and the ion current oscillates strongly during the rf cycle. The first models tested used several simplifying assumptions including fluid treatment of ions, neglect of electron inertia, and the oscillating step approximation for the electron profile. These models were nevertheless able to yield rather accurate predictions for current waveforms, sheath impedance, and the peak energies in IEDs. More recently, the oscillating step has been replaced by an exact solution of Poisson's equation. This results in a modest improvement in the agreement with measured electrical characteristics and IED peak amplitudes. The new model also eliminates the need for arbitrary or nonphysical boundary conditions that arises in step models, replacing them with boundary conditions that can be obtained directly from measurements or theories of the presheath.

  18. A review of natural lightning - Experimental data and modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uman, M. A.; Krider, E. P.

    1982-01-01

    A critical review is presented of the currents and the electric and magnetic fields characteristic of each of the salient discharge processes which make up cloud-to-ground and intracloud lightning. Emphasis is placed on the more recent work in which measured waveform variation is in the microsecond and submicrosecond range, since it is this time-scale that is of primary importance in lightning/aircraft interactions. The state-of-the-art of the modeling of lightning currents and fields is discussed in detail. A comprehensive bibliography is given of all literature relating to both lightning measurements and models.

  19. Diagnostic modeling of the ARM experimental configuration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Somerville, R.C.J.

    1998-04-01

    A major accomplishment of this work was to demonstrate the viability of using in-situ data in both mid-continent North America (SGP CART site) and Tropical Western Pacific (TOGA-COARE) locations to provide the horizontal advective flux convergences which force and constrain the Single-Column Model (SCM) which was the main theoretical tool of this work. The author has used TOGA-COARE as a prototype for the ARM TWP site. Results show that SCMs can produce realistic budgets over the ARM sites without relying on parameterization-dependent operational numerical weather prediction objective analyses. The single-column model is diagnostic rather than prognostic. It is numerically integrated in time as an initial value problem which is forced and constrained by observational data. The input is an observed initial state, plus observationally derived estimates of the time-dependent advection terms in the conservation equations, provided at all model layers. Its output is a complete heat and water budget, including temperature and moisture profiles, clouds and their radiative properties, diabatic heating terms, surface energy balance components, and hydrologic cycle elements, all specified as functions of time. These SCM results should be interpreted in light of the original motivation and purpose of ARM and its goal to improve the treatment of cloud-radiation interactions in climate models.

  20. Cellulose and the twofold screw axis: Modeling and experimental arguments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crystallography indicates that molecules in crystalline cellulose either have 2-fold screw-axis (21) symmetry or closely approximate it, leading to short distances between H4 and H1' across the glycosidic linkage. Therefore, modeling studies of cellobiose often show elevated energies for 21 structur...

  1. Dynamic modelling and experimental study of cantilever beam with clearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, B.; Jin, W.; Han, L.; He, Z.

    2012-05-01

    Clearances occur in almost all mechanical systems, typically such as the clearance between slide plate of gun barrel and guide. Therefore, to study the clearances of mechanisms can be very important to increase the working performance and lifetime of mechanisms. In this paper, rigid dynamic modelling of cantilever with clearance was done according to the subject investigated. In the rigid dynamic modelling, clearance is equivalent to the spring-dashpot model, the impact of beam and boundary face was also taken into consideration. In ADAMS software, the dynamic simulation was carried out according to the model above. The software simulated the movement of cantilever with clearance under external excitation. Research found: When the clearance is larger, the force of impact will become larger. In order to study how the stiffness of the cantilever's supporting part influences natural frequency of the system, A Euler beam which is restricted by a draught spring and a torsion spring at its end was raised. Through numerical calculation, the relationship between natural frequency and stiffness was found. When the value of the stiffness is close to the limit value, the corresponding boundary condition is illustrated. An ADAMS experiment was carried out to check the theory and the simulation.

  2. Experimental modeling of explosive blast-related traumatic brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Alley, Matthew D; Schimizze, Benjamin R; Son, Steven F

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to characterize the interaction of explosive blast waves through simulated anatomical systems. We have developed physical models and a systematic approach for testing traumatic brain injury (TBI) mechanisms and occurrences. A simplified series of models consisting of spherical poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) shells housing synthetic gelatins as brain simulants have been utilized. A series of experiments was conducted to compare the sensitivity of the system response to mechanical properties of the simulants under high strain-rate explosive blasts. Small explosive charges were directed at the models to produce a realistic blast wave in a scaled laboratory setting. Blast profiles were measured and analyzed to compare system response severity. High-speed shadowgraph imaging captured blast wave interaction with the head model while particle tracking captured internal response for displacement and strain correlation. The results suggest amplification of shock waves inside the head near material interfaces due to impedance mismatches. In addition, significant relative displacement was observed between the interacting materials suggesting large strain values of nearly 5%. Further quantitative results were obtained through shadowgraph imaging of the blasts confirming a separation of time scales between blast interaction and bulk movement. These results lead to a conclusion that primary blast effects may potentially contribute significantly to the occurrence of military associated TBI. PMID:20580931

  3. Chemically induced skin carcinogenesis: Updates in experimental models (Review)

    PubMed Central

    NEAGU, MONICA; CARUNTU, CONSTANTIN; CONSTANTIN, CAROLINA; BODA, DANIEL; ZURAC, SABINA; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.; TSATSAKIS, ARISTIDIS M.

    2016-01-01

    Skin cancer is one of the most common malignancies affecting humans worldwide, and its incidence is rapidly increasing. The study of skin carcinogenesis is of major interest for both scientific research and clinical practice and the use of in vivo systems may facilitate the investigation of early alterations in the skin and of the mechanisms involved, and may also lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies for skin cancer. This review outlines several aspects regarding the skin toxicity testing domain in mouse models of chemically induced skin carcinogenesis. There are important strain differences in view of the histological type, development and clinical evolution of the skin tumor, differences reported decades ago and confirmed by our hands-on experience. Using mouse models in preclinical testing is important due to the fact that, at the molecular level, common mechanisms with human cutaneous tumorigenesis are depicted. These animal models resemble human skin cancer development, in that genetic changes caused by carcinogens and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and simultaneous inflammation sustained by pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines favor tumor progression. Drugs and environmental conditions can be tested using these animal models. keeping in mind the differences between human and rodent skin physiology. PMID:26986013

  4. Experimental Analysis and Modeling of the Crushing of Honeycomb Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminanda, Y.; Castanié, B.; Barrau, J.-J.; Thevenet, P.

    2005-05-01

    In the aeronautical field, sandwich structures are widely used for secondary structures like flaps or landing gear doors. The modeling of low velocity/low energy impact, which can lead to a decrease of the structure strength by 50%, remains a designer’s main problem. Since this type of impact has the same effect as quasi-static indentation, the study focuses on the behavior of honeycomb cores under compression. The crushing phenomenon has been well identified for years but its mechanism is not described explicitly and the model proposed may not satisfy industrial purposes. To understand the crushing mechanism, honeycomb test specimens made of Nomex™, aluminum alloy and paper were tested. During the crushing, a CCD camera showed that the cell walls buckled very quickly. The peak load recorded during tests corresponded to the buckling of the common edge of three honeycomb cells. Further tests on corner structures to simulate only one vertical edge of a honeycomb cell show a similar behavior. The different specimens exhibited similar load/displacement curves and the differences observed were only due to the behavior of the different materials. As a conclusion of this phenomenological study, the hypothesis that loads are mainly taken by the vertical edge can be made. So, a honeycomb core subjected to compression can be modeled by a grid of nonlinear springs. A simple analytical model was then developed and validated by tests on Nomex™ honeycomb core indented by different sized spherical indenters. A good correlation between theory and experiment was found. This result can be used to satisfactorily model using finite elements the indentation on a sandwich structure with a metallic or composite skin and honeycomb core.

  5. Hydrodynamic Modelling and Experimental Analysis of FE-DMFC Stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kablou, Yashar

    Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) present some unique features such as having liquid fuel, quick refueling process, compact design and high energy density. These characteristics make them incredibly suitable as a promising power source for portable electronic applications, such as cell phones or laptop computers. Despite of these positive aspects, the commercial development of DMFCs has nevertheless been hindered by some important issues such as, carbon dioxide formation at the anode compartment and, methanol crossover through the membrane. Many researchers have tried to model the two-phase flow behavior inside the DMFC anode compartment using the "homogenous flow modelling" approach, which has proven to be inaccurate specially when dealing with DMFC stacks. On the other hand, several strategies to prevent methanol crossover have been suggested in the literature, including the use of a flowing electrolyte between the DMFC anode and cathode compartments. Preliminary tests on flowing electrolyte direct methanol fuel cells (FE-DMFCs) have shown promising results; however, further investigation should be carried out on the stack level. In the first part of this study, a quasi two-dimensional numerical model was developed, to predict the two-phase flow behavior within the DMFC anode compartment, both in single cell and stack levels. Various types of flow modelling approaches and void fraction correlations were utilized to estimate the pressure drop across the anode compartment. It was found that the "separated flow modelling" approach, as well as CISE correlation for void fraction (developed at the CISE labs in Milan), yield the best results. In the second part, a five-cell FE-DMFC stack unit with a parallel serpentine flow bed design and U-type manifold configuration, was developed and tested at various operating conditions. It was found that, the flowing electrolyte effectively reduced methanol crossover and, improved the stack performance.

  6. The comparison of immobility time in experimental rat swimming models.

    PubMed

    Calil, Caroline Morini; Marcondes, Fernanda Klein

    2006-09-27

    Rat swimming models have been used in studies about stress and depression. However, there is no consensus about interpreting immobility (helplessness or adaptation) in the literature. In the present study, immobility time, glucose and glycogen mobilization, corticosterone and the effect of desipramine and diazepam were investigated in two different models: swimming stress and the forced swimming test. Immobility time was lower in swimming stress than in the forced swimming test. Both swimming models increased corticosterone levels in comparison with control animal levels. Moreover, swimming stress induced higher corticosterone levels than the forced swimming test did [F(2,14)=59.52; p<0.001]. Liver glycogen content values differed from one another (swimming stressmodel or swimming stress. Desipramine decreased the immobility time in the forced swimming test in both the single [F(2,25)=20.63; p<0.0001] and retest [F(2,37)=7.28; p=0.002] swimming session, without changes in the swimming stress model. Diazepam increased the immobility time in the swimming stress but not in the forced swimming test during the single [F(2,26)=11.24; p=0.0003] and retest sessions [F(2,38)=4.17; p=0.02]. It was concluded that swimming stress and the forced swimming test induced different behavior, hormonal and metabolic responses and represented different situations to the animal.

  7. Quantitative experimental modelling of fragmentation during explosive volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thordén Haug, Ø.; Galland, O.; Gisler, G.

    2012-04-01

    Phreatomagmatic eruptions results from the violent interaction between magma and an external source of water, such as ground water or a lake. This interaction causes fragmentation of the magma and/or the host rock, resulting in coarse-grained (lapilli) to very fine-grained (ash) material. The products of phreatomagmatic explosions are classically described by their fragment size distribution, which commonly follows power laws of exponent D. Such descriptive approach, however, considers the final products only and do not provide information on the dynamics of fragmentation. The aim of this contribution is thus to address the following fundamental questions. What are the physics that govern fragmentation processes? How fragmentation occurs through time? What are the mechanisms that produce power law fragment size distributions? And what are the scaling laws that control the exponent D? To address these questions, we performed a quantitative experimental study. The setup consists of a Hele-Shaw cell filled with a layer of cohesive silica flour, at the base of which a pulse of pressurized air is injected, leading to fragmentation of the layer of flour. The fragmentation process is monitored through time using a high-speed camera. By varying systematically the air pressure (P) and the thickness of the flour layer (h) we observed two morphologies of fragmentation: "lift off" where the silica flour above the injection inlet is ejected upwards, and "channeling" where the air pierces through the layer along sub-vertical conduit. By building a phase diagram, we show that the morphology is controlled by P/dgh, where d is the density of the flour and g is the gravitational acceleration. To quantify the fragmentation process, we developed a Matlab image analysis program, which calculates the number and sizes of the fragments, and so the fragment size distribution, during the experiments. The fragment size distributions are in general described by power law distributions of

  8. The Minimized Power Geometric model: An analytical mixing model for calculating polyphase rock viscosities consistent with experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huet, B.; Yamato, P.; Grasemann, B.

    2014-04-01

    Here we introduce the Minimized Power Geometric (MPG) model which predicts the viscosity of any polyphase rocks deformed during ductile flow. The volumetric fractions and power law parameters of the constituting phases are the only model inputs required. The model is based on a minimization of the mechanical power dissipated in the rock during deformation. In contrast to existing mixing models based on minimization, we use the Lagrange multipliers method and constraints of strain rate and stress geometric averaging. This allows us to determine analytical expressions for the polyphase rock viscosity, its power law parameters, and the partitioning of strain rate and stress between the phases. The power law bulk behavior is a consequence of our model and not an assumption. Comparison of model results with 15 published experimental data sets on two-phase aggregates shows that the MPG model reproduces accurately both experimental viscosities and creep parameters, even where large viscosity contrasts are present. In detail, the ratio between experimental and MPG-predicted viscosities averages 1.6. Deviations from the experimental values are likely to be due to microstructural processes (strain localization and coeval other deformation mechanisms) that are neglected by the model. Existing models that are not based on geometric averaging show a poorer fit with the experimental data. As long as the limitations of the mixing models are kept in mind, the MPG model offers great potential for applications in structural geology and numerical modeling.

  9. First principles Candu fuel model and validation experimentation

    SciTech Connect

    Corcoran, E.C.; Kaye, M.H.; Lewis, B.J.; Thompson, W.T.; Akbari, F.; Higgs, J.D.; Verrall, R.A.; He, Z.; Mouris, J.F.

    2007-07-01

    Many modeling projects on nuclear fuel rest on a quantitative understanding of the co-existing phases at various stages of burnup. Since the various fission products have considerably different abilities to chemically associate with oxygen, and the O/M ratio is slowly changing as well, the chemical potential (generally expressed as an equivalent oxygen partial pressure) is a function of burnup. Concurrently, well-recognized small fractions of new phases such as inert gas, noble metals, zirconates, etc. also develop. To further complicate matters, the dominant UO{sub 2} fuel phase may be non-stoichiometric and most of minor phases have a variable composition dependent on temperature and possible contact with the coolant in the event of a sheathing defect. A Thermodynamic Fuel Model to predict the phases in partially burned Candu nuclear fuel containing many major fission products has been under development. This model is capable of handling non-stoichiometry in the UO{sub 2} fluorite phase, dilute solution behaviour of significant solute oxides, noble metal inclusions, a second metal solid solution U(Pd-Rh-Ru)3, zirconate and uranate solutions as well as other minor solid phases, and volatile gaseous species. The treatment is a melding of several thermodynamic modeling projects dealing with isolated aspects of this important multi-component system. To simplify the computations, the number of elements has been limited to twenty major representative fission products known to appear in spent fuel. The proportion of elements must first be generated using SCALES-5. Oxygen is inferred from the concentration of the other elements. Provision to study the disposition of very minor fission products is included within the general treatment but these are introduced only on an as needed basis for a particular purpose. The building blocks of the model are the standard Gibbs energies of formation of the many possible compounds expressed as a function of temperature. To these data

  10. Impact Flash Physics: Modeling and Comparisons With Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rainey, E.; Stickle, A. M.; Ernst, C. M.; Schultz, P. H.; Mehta, N. L.; Brown, R. C.; Swaminathan, P. K.; Michaelis, C. H.; Erlandson, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    Hypervelocity impacts frequently generate an observable "flash" of light with two components: a short-duration spike due to emissions from vaporized material, and a long-duration peak due to thermal emissions from expanding hot debris. The intensity and duration of these peaks depend on the impact velocity, angle, and the target and projectile mass and composition. Thus remote sensing measurements of planetary impact flashes have the potential to constrain the properties of impacting meteors and improve our understanding of impact flux and cratering processes. Interpreting impact flash measurements requires a thorough understanding of how flash characteristics correlate with impact conditions. Because planetary-scale impacts cannot be replicated in the laboratory, numerical simulations are needed to provide this insight for the solar system. Computational hydrocodes can produce detailed simulations of the impact process, but they lack the radiation physics required to model the optical flash. The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) developed a model to calculate the optical signature from the hot debris cloud produced by an impact. While the phenomenology of the optical signature is understood, the details required to accurately model it are complicated by uncertainties in material and optical properties and the simplifications required to numerically model radiation from large-scale impacts. Comparisons with laboratory impact experiments allow us to validate our approach and to draw insight regarding processes that occur at all scales in impact events, such as melt generation. We used Sandia National Lab's CTH shock physics hydrocode along with the optical signature model developed at APL to compare with a series of laboratory experiments conducted at the NASA Ames Vertical Gun Range. The experiments used Pyrex projectiles to impact pumice powder targets with velocities ranging from 1 to 6 km/s at angles of 30 and 90 degrees with respect to

  11. Effect of pre-experimental maintenance care duration on the development of gingivitis in a partial mouth experimental gingivitis model.

    PubMed

    Van der Weijden, G A; Timmerman, M F; Danser, M M; Nijboer, A; Saxton, C A; Van der Velden, U

    1994-05-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate if different periods of supervised oral hygiene prior to the experimental gingivitis trial have an effect on the amount of inflammation which develops in the 'toothshield' model. Two groups were compared. One group (Group A) was supervised over a 5-month period before experimental gingivitis. Six months later Group A participated in a second trial, this time receiving only a 1-month pretrial. A second group (Group B) which served as a control was supervised over a pre-trial period of 1-month prior to the start of the experimental gingivitis phase. During the pre-trial period all subjects undertook a regime of vigorous oral hygiene which included polishing of the test quadrant in the upper jaw and supervised subgingival brushing, interdental taping or the use of toothpicks. The presence of plaque and bleeding were assessed. Following the pre-trial period all plaque control measures in the experimental area were prevented during oral hygiene periods by the temporary placement of soft, loosely fitting vinyl toothshield guard. During this period they accumulated plaque rapidly and developed a generalized gingivitis. The results of this study indicate that, irrespective of the length of the pretrial period, subjects by group develop a comparable mean level of plaque and gingival bleeding. However, the extent to which gingivitis develops differs among individuals and was for a number of subjects not consistent. Therefore, in designing an experimental gingivitis trial care should be taken to include a sufficient number of subjects to account for individual variation.

  12. Modeling sample variables with an Experimental Factor Ontology

    PubMed Central

    Malone, James; Holloway, Ele; Adamusiak, Tomasz; Kapushesky, Misha; Zheng, Jie; Kolesnikov, Nikolay; Zhukova, Anna; Brazma, Alvis; Parkinson, Helen

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Describing biological sample variables with ontologies is complex due to the cross-domain nature of experiments. Ontologies provide annotation solutions; however, for cross-domain investigations, multiple ontologies are needed to represent the data. These are subject to rapid change, are often not interoperable and present complexities that are a barrier to biological resource users. Results: We present the Experimental Factor Ontology, designed to meet cross-domain, application focused use cases for gene expression data. We describe our methodology and open source tools used to create the ontology. These include tools for creating ontology mappings, ontology views, detecting ontology changes and using ontologies in interfaces to enhance querying. The application of reference ontologies to data is a key problem, and this work presents guidelines on how community ontologies can be presented in an application ontology in a data-driven way. Availability: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/efo Contact: malone@ebi.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:20200009

  13. Congenital Transmission of Experimental Leishmaniasis in a Hamster Model

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, Yaneth; Rodriguez, Luz D.; Bonilla, Diana L.; Peniche, Alex G.; Henao, Hector; Saldarriaga, Omar; Travi, Bruno L.

    2012-01-01

    Little information is available on transplacental transmission of Leishmania spp. We determined the frequency and impact of congenital infection caused by Leishmania panamensis or L. donovani in experimentally infected hamsters. A polymerase chain reaction showed that congenital transmission occurred in 25.8% (24 of 93) of offspring born to L. panamensis-infected hamsters and 14.6% (11 of 75) offspring born to L. donovani-infected hamsters. Mortality during lactation was higher in offspring born to L. panamensis-infected hamsters and offspring born to L. donovani-infected hamsters than controls, and lymphoproliferation to Leishmania was more frequent in offspring born to L. panamensis-infected hamsters (17.4%, 11 of 63) than in offspring born to L. donovani-infected hamsters (8.5%, 3 of 35). After weaning, only offspring born to L. donovani-infected hamsters had lower weight gain (P < 0.001) and hematocrit levels (P = 0.0045) than controls. Challenge of offspring born to L. panamensis-infected hamsters with L. panamensis showed no differences in lesion evolution, and offspring born to L. donovani-infected hamsters were more susceptible to L. donovani challenge than controls. Consequently, prenatal exposure of hamsters to L. donovani significantly increased the mortality risk and susceptibility to secondary homologous infection. PMID:22556079

  14. Vaporization inside a mini microfin tube: experimental results and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diani, A.; Rossetto, L.

    2015-11-01

    This paper proposes a comparison among the common R134a and the extremely low GWP refrigerant R1234yf during vaporization inside a mini microfin tube. This microfin tube has an internal diameter of 2.4 mm, it has 40 fins, with a fin height of 0.12 mm. Due to the high heat transfer coefficients shown by this tube, this technology can lead to a refrigerant charge reduction. Tests were run in the Heat Transfer in Micro Geometries Lab of the Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale of the Università di Padova. Mass velocities range between 375 and 940 kg m-2 s-1, heat fluxes from 10 to 50 kW m-2, vapour qualities from 0.10 to 0.99, at a saturation temperature of 30°C. The comparison among the two fluids is proposed at the same operating conditions, in order to highlight the heat transfer and pressure drop differences among the two refrigerants. In addition, two correlations are proposed to estimate the heat transfer coefficient and frictional pressure drop during refrigerant flow boiling inside mini microfin tubes. These correlations well predict the experimental values, and thus they can be used as a useful tool to design evaporators based on these mini microfin tubes.

  15. Experimental observations and theoretical models for beam-beam phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Kheifets, S.

    1981-03-01

    The beam-beam interaction in storage rings exhibits all the characteristics of nonintegrable dynamical systems. Here one finds all kinds of resonances, closed orbits, stable and unstable fixed points, stochastic layers, chaotic behavior, diffusion, etc. The storage ring itself being an expensive device nevertheless while constructed and put into operation presents a good opportunity of experimentally studying the long-time behavior of both conservative (proton machines) and nonconservative (electron machines) dynamical systems - the number of bunch-bunch interactions routinely reaches values of 10/sup 10/-10/sup 11/ and could be increased by decreasing the beam current. At the same time the beam-beam interaction puts practical limits for the yield of the storage ring. This phenomenon not only determines the design value of main storage ring parameters (luminosity, space charge parameters, beam current), but also in fact prevents many of the existing storage rings from achieving design parameters. Hence, the problem has great practical importance along with its enormous theoretical interest. A brief overview of the problem is presented.

  16. Experimental Investigation of Very Large Model Wind Turbine Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charmanski, Kyle; Wosnik, Martin

    2013-11-01

    The decrease in energy yield in large wind farms (array losses) and associated revenue losses can be significant. When arrays are sufficiently large they can reach what is known as a fully developed wind turbine array boundary layer, or fully developed wind farm condition. This occurs when the turbulence statistics and the structure of the turbulence, within and above a wind farm, as well as the performance of the turbines remain the same from one row to the next. The study of this condition and how it is affected by parameters such as turbine spacing, power extraction, tip speed ratio, etc. is important for the optimization of large wind farms. An experimental investigation of the fully developed wind farm condition was conducted using a large array of porous disks (upstream) and realistically scaled 3-bladed wind turbines with a diameter of 0.25m. The turbines and porous disks were placed inside a naturally grown turbulent boundary layer in the 6m × 2.5m × 72m test section of the UNH Flow Physics Facility which can achieve test section velocities of up to 14 m/s and Reynolds numbers δ+ = δuτ / ν ~ 20 , 000 . Power, rate of rotation and rotor thrust were measured for select turbines, and hot-wire anemometry was used for flow measurements.

  17. Experimental models for evaluating antithrombotic therapies in replantation microsurgery.

    PubMed

    Cooley, B C; Gould, J S

    1987-01-01

    A variety of anticoagulation and antiplatelet aggregation agents are in use clinically, and in applications to microvascular surgery, a clear choice for the most effective therapy has not been determined. Models of vascular trauma combined with microvascular anastomosis have been developed for comparing the efficacy of these agents in maintaining vascular patency. In a rat model of microvascular thrombosis, heparin effectively prevents occlusion in both arteries and veins, at clinical levels of administration. Aspirin helps prevent thrombosis, but not as well as heparin. These results support the beneficial effect of antithrombotic drug therapies, and suggest a more potent role of the heparin-inhibited fibrin clot over platelet aggregation in creating thrombotic occlusion of small vessels.

  18. The Stepwise Mutation Model: An Experimental Evaluation Utilizing Hemoglobin Variants

    PubMed Central

    Fuerst, Paul A.; Ferrell, Robert E.

    1980-01-01

    The stepwise mutation model of Ohta and Kimura (1973) was proposed to explain patterns of genetic variability revealed by means of electrophoresis. The assumption that electrophoretic mobility was principally determined by unit changes in net molecular charge has been criticized by Johnson (1974, 1977). This assumption has been tested directly using hemoglobin. Twenty-seven human hemoglobin variants with known amino acid substitutions, and 26 nonhuman hemoglobins with known sequences were studied by starch gel electrophoresis. Of these hemoglobins, 60 to 70% had electrophoretic mobilities that could be predicted solely on the basis of net charge calculated from the amino acid composition alone, ignoring tertiary structure. Only four hemoglobins showed a mobility that was clearly different from an expected mobility calculated using only the net charge of the molecule. For the remaining 30% of hemoglobins studied, mobility was determined by a combination of net charge and other unidentified components, probably reflecting changes in ionization of some amino acid residues as a result of small alterations in tertiary structure due to the amino acid substitution in the variant. For the nonhuman hemoglobins, the deviation of a sample from its expected mobility increased with increasing amino acid divergence from human hemoglobin A.—It is concluded that the net electrostatic charge of a molecule is the principal determinant of electrophoretic mobility under the conditions studied. However, because of the significant deviation from strict stepwise mobility detected for 30 to 40% of the variants studied, it is further concluded that the infinite-allele model of Kimura and Crow (1964) or a "mixed model" such as that proposed by Li (1976) may be more appropriate than the stepwise mutation model for the analysis of much of the available electrophoretic data from natural populations. PMID:17248992

  19. Experimental Benchmarking of Fire Modeling Simulations. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Greiner, Miles; Lopez, Carlos

    2003-10-08

    A series of large-scale fire tests were performed at Sandia National Laboratories to simulate a nuclear waste transport package under severe accident conditions. The test data were used to benchmark and adjust the Container Analysis Fire Environment (CAFE) computer code. CAFE is a computational fluid dynamics fire model that accurately calculates the heat transfer from a large fire to a massive engulfed transport package. CAFE will be used in transport package design studies and risk analyses.

  20. Neurobehavioral effects of liraglutide and sitagliptin in experimental models.

    PubMed

    Kamble, Mayur; Gupta, Rachna; Rehan, Harmeet S; Gupta, Lalit K

    2016-03-01

    Glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1) receptor agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are two currently approved therapies for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Present study evaluated the effect of liraglutide (a long-acting GLP-1 agonist) and sitagliptin (a DPP-4 inhibitor) on nociception, anxiety, depression-like behavior and cognition in rats or mice. Nociception was assessed using tail-flick test; anxiety-behavior in open-field test and elevated plus maze (EPM) test while depression-like behavior was evaluated in forced swim test (FST) and tail-suspension test (TST). Cognition was assessed in EPM and Morris water maze (MWM) following memory deficit induced by pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) or scopolamine. In tail-flick test sitagliptin (6 mg/kg) produced transient nociceptive effect. Liraglutide (200 µg/kg) reduced peripheral square crossings by rats in open field test as well as reduced closed arm entries in the EPM, indicating a decline in exploratory behavior. In FST and TST models for depression, the duration of immobility with sitagliptin (6 mg/kg) was reduced significantly in comparison to control group suggesting its antidepressant effect. Liraglutide did not show any antidepressant action. In EPM test for cognition, liraglutide and sitagliptin ameliorated the increase in transfer latency caused by PTZ in a dose-dependent manner. In MWM liraglutide and sitagliptin prevented the scopolamine-induced increase of the escape latency. This study shows that sitagliptin has mild antinociceptive effect and anti-depressant effect in the animal models of depression while liraglutide did not have such an effect. Liraglutide showed anxiogenic effects in the animal models. Both liraglutide and sitagliptin produced cognitive improvement in the animal models. PMID:26849938

  1. Formulation of an experimental substructure model using a Craig-Bampton based transmission simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammer, Daniel C.; Allen, Mathew S.; Mayes, Randy L.

    2015-12-01

    Experimental-analytical substructuring is attractive when there is motivation to replace one or more system subcomponents with an experimental model. This experimentally derived substructure can then be coupled to finite element models of the rest of the structure to predict the system response. The transmission simulator method couples a fixture to the component of interest during a vibration test in order to improve the experimental model for the component. The transmission simulator is then subtracted from the tested system to produce the experimental component. The method reduces ill-conditioning by imposing a least squares fit of constraints between substructure modal coordinates to connect substructures, instead of directly connecting physical interface degrees of freedom. This paper presents an alternative means of deriving the experimental substructure model, in which a Craig-Bampton representation of the transmission simulator is created and subtracted from the experimental measurements. The corresponding modal basis of the transmission simulator is described by the fixed-interface modes, rather than free modes that were used in the original approach. These modes do a better job of representing the shape of the transmission simulator as it responds within the experimental system, leading to more accurate results using fewer modes. The new approach is demonstrated using a simple finite element model based example with a redundant interface.

  2. Microbial dormancy improves development and experimental validation of ecosystem model

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Gangsheng; Jagadamma, Sindhu; Mayes, Melanie; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Steinweg, Jessica M.; Gu, Lianhong; Post, Wilfred M.

    2014-07-11

    Climate feedbacks from soils can result from environmental change followed by response of plant and microbial communities, and/or associated changes in nutrient cycling. Explicit consideration of microbial life history traits and functions may be necessary to predict climate feedbacks due to changes in the physiology and community composition of microbes and their associated effect on carbon cycling. Here, we enhanced the Microbial-Enzyme-mediated Decomposition (MEND) model by incorporating microbial dormancy and the ability to track multiple isotopes of carbon. We tested two versions of MEND, i.e., MEND with dormancy and MEND without dormancy, against long-term (270 d) lab incubations of fourmore » soils with isotopically-labeled substrates. MEND without dormancy adequately fitted multiple observations (total and 14C respiration, and dissolved organic carbon), but at the cost of significantly underestimating the total microbial biomass. The MEND with dormancy improved estimates of microbial biomass by 20 71% over the MEND without dormancy. We observed large differences for two fitted model parameters, the specific maintenance and growth rates for active microbes, depending on whether dormancy was considered. Together our model extrapolations of the incubation study show that long-term soil incubations with observations in multiple carbon pools are necessary to estimate both decomposition and microbial parameters. These efforts should provide essential support to future field- and global-scale simulations and enable more confident predictions of feedbacks between environmental change and carbon cycling.« less

  3. Microbial dormancy improves development and experimental validation of ecosystem model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Gangsheng; Jagadamma, Sindhu; Mayes, Melanie; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Steinweg, Jessica M.; Gu, Lianhong; Post, Wilfred M.

    2014-07-11

    Climate feedbacks from soils can result from environmental change followed by response of plant and microbial communities, and/or associated changes in nutrient cycling. Explicit consideration of microbial life history traits and functions may be necessary to predict climate feedbacks due to changes in the physiology and community composition of microbes and their associated effect on carbon cycling. Here, we enhanced the Microbial-Enzyme-mediated Decomposition (MEND) model by incorporating microbial dormancy and the ability to track multiple isotopes of carbon. We tested two versions of MEND, i.e., MEND with dormancy and MEND without dormancy, against long-term (270 d) lab incubations of four soils with isotopically-labeled substrates. MEND without dormancy adequately fitted multiple observations (total and 14C respiration, and dissolved organic carbon), but at the cost of significantly underestimating the total microbial biomass. The MEND with dormancy improved estimates of microbial biomass by 20 71% over the MEND without dormancy. We observed large differences for two fitted model parameters, the specific maintenance and growth rates for active microbes, depending on whether dormancy was considered. Together our model extrapolations of the incubation study show that long-term soil incubations with observations in multiple carbon pools are necessary to estimate both decomposition and microbial parameters. These efforts should provide essential support to future field- and global-scale simulations and enable more confident predictions of feedbacks between environmental change and carbon cycling.

  4. Experimental modeling of diapirs, Parts 1 and 2: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, M.P.A.; Cornelius, R.R.; Talbot, C.J.

    1988-01-01

    The manner in which sedimentary overburden accumulates significantly influences the growth of syndepositional salt structures. To determine the general principles of this influence for application to specific instances in nature, we carried out 16 experiments using scaled centrifuged models to simulate the effect of variable sedimentary loading on the geometry, kinematics, and dynamics of syndepositional salt structures. This topic has been almost entirely ignored in both material and mathematical modeling of salt structures. The rheology of four modeling materials was determined. The equivalent shear viscosity of terrigenous clastic overburdens in the Mesozoic section of a Gulf Coast interior basin and in the Pleistocene section of the northern Gulf of Mexico was estimated by dynamic scaling to be 5 x 10/sup 20/ Pa/center dot/s and 3 x 10/sup 20/ Pa/center dot/s, respectively; the equivalent viscosity of Mesozoic Gulf Coast carbonates was estimated to be 2 x 10/sup 21/ Pa/center dot/s. 95 refs., 67 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. Circulation Control Model Experimental Database for CFD Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paschal, Keith B.; Neuhart, Danny H.; Beeler, George B.; Allan, Brian G.

    2012-01-01

    A 2D circulation control wing was tested in the Basic Aerodynamic Research Tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center. A traditional circulation control wing employs tangential blowing along the span over a trailing-edge Coanda surface for the purpose of lift augmentation. This model has been tested extensively at the Georgia Tech Research Institute for the purpose of performance documentation at various blowing rates. The current study seeks to expand on the previous work by documenting additional flow-field data needed for validation of computational fluid dynamics. Two jet momentum coefficients were tested during this entry: 0.047 and 0.114. Boundary-layer transition was investigated and turbulent boundary layers were established on both the upper and lower surfaces of the model. Chordwise and spanwise pressure measurements were made, and tunnel sidewall pressure footprints were documented. Laser Doppler Velocimetry measurements were made on both the upper and lower surface of the model at two chordwise locations (x/c = 0.8 and 0.9) to document the state of the boundary layers near the spanwise blowing slot.

  6. Experimental performance evaluation of human balance control models.

    PubMed

    Huryn, Thomas P; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Croft, Elizabeth A; Koehle, Michael S; Van der Loos, H F Machiel

    2014-11-01

    Two factors commonly differentiate proposed balance control models for quiet human standing: 1) intermittent muscle activation and 2) prediction that overcomes sensorimotor time delays. In this experiment we assessed the viability and performance of intermittent activation and prediction in a balance control loop that included the neuromuscular dynamics of human calf muscles. Muscles were driven by functional electrical stimulation (FES). The performance of the different controllers was compared based on sway patterns and mechanical effort required to balance a human body load on a robotic balance simulator. All evaluated controllers balanced subjects with and without a neural block applied to their common peroneal and tibial nerves, showing that the models can produce stable balance in the absence of natural activation. Intermittent activation required less stimulation energy than continuous control but predisposed the system to increased sway. Relative to intermittent control, continuous control reproduced the sway size of natural standing better. Prediction was not necessary for stable balance control but did improve stability when control was intermittent, suggesting a possible benefit of a predictor for intermittent activation. Further application of intermittent activation and predictive control models may drive prolonged, stable FES-controlled standing that improves quality of life for people with balance impairments. PMID:24771586

  7. Analytical, Experimental, and Modelling Studies of Lunar and Terrestrial Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskin, Larry A.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of our research has been to understand the paths and the processes of planetary evolution that produced planetary surface materials as we find them. Most of our work has been on lunar materials and processes. We have done studies that obtain geological knowledge from detailed examination of regolith materials and we have reported implications for future sample-collecting and on-surface robotic sensing missions. Our approach has been to study a suite of materials that we have chosen in order to answer specific geologic questions. We continue this work under NAG5-4172. The foundation of our work has been the study of materials with precise chemical and petrographic analyses, emphasizing analysis for trace chemical elements. We have used quantitative models as tests to account for the chemical compositions and mineralogical properties of the materials in terms of regolith processes and igneous processes. We have done experiments as needed to provide values for geochemical parameters used in the models. Our models take explicitly into account the physical as well as the chemical processes that produced or modified the materials. Our approach to planetary geoscience owes much to our experience in terrestrial geoscience, where samples can be collected in field context and sampling sites revisited if necessary. Through studies of terrestrial analog materials, we have tested our ideas about the origins of lunar materials. We have been mainly concerned with the materials of the lunar highland regolith, their properties, their modes of origin, their provenance, and how to extrapolate from their characteristics to learn about the origin and evolution of the Moon's early igneous crust. From this work a modified model for the Moon's structure and evolution is emerging, one of globally asymmetric differentiation of the crust and mantle to produce a crust consisting mainly of ferroan and magnesian igneous rocks containing on average 70-80% plagioclase, with a large

  8. Stochastic Approach for Modeling of DNAPL Migration in Heterogeneous Aquifers: Model Development and Experimental Data Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, D. W.; Illangasekare, T. H.; Turner, A.; Russell, T. F.

    2004-12-01

    Modeling of the complex behavior of DNAPLs in naturally heterogeneous subsurface formations poses many challenges. Even though considerable progress have been made in developing improved numerical schemes to solve the governing partial differential equations, most of these methods still rely on deterministic description of the processes. This research explores the use of stochastic differential equations to model multiphase flow in heterogeneous aquifers, specifically the flow of DNAPLs in saturated soils. The models developed are evaluated using experimental data generated in two-dimensional test systems. A fundamental assumption used in the model formulation is that the movement of a fluid particle in each phase is described by a stochastic process and that the positions of all fluid particles over time are governed by a specific law. It is this law, which we seek to determine. The approach results in a nonlinear stochastic differential equation describing the position of the non-wetting phase fluid particle. The nonlinearity in the stochastic differential equation arises because both the drift and diffusion coefficients depend on the volumetric fraction of the phase, which in turn depends on the position of the fluid particles in the problem domain. The concept of a fluid particle is central to the development of the proposed model. Expressions for both saturation and volumetric fraction are developed using this concept of fluid particle. Darcy's law and the continuity equation are used to derive a Fokker-Planck equation governing flow. The Ito calculus is then applied to derive a stochastic differential equation(SDE) for the non-wetting phase. This SDE has both drift and diffusion terms which depend on the volumetric fraction of the non-wetting phase. Standard stochastic theories based on the Ito calculus and the Wiener process and the equivalent Fokker-Planck PDE's are typically used to model diffusion processes. However, these models, in their usual form

  9. Experimentally validated pencil beam scanning source model in TOPAS.

    PubMed

    Lin, Liyong; Kang, Minglei; Solberg, Timothy D; Ainsley, Christopher G; McDonough, James E

    2014-11-21

    The presence of a low-dose envelope, or 'halo', in the fluence profile of a proton spot can increase the output of a pencil beam scanning field by over 10%. This study evaluated whether the Monte Carlo simulation code, TOPAS 1.0-beta 8, based on Geant4.9.6 with its default physics list, can predict the spot halo at depth in phantom by incorporating a halo model within the proton source distribution. Proton sources were modelled using three 2D Gaussian functions, and optimized until simulated spot profiles matched measurements at the phantom surface out to a radius of 100 mm. Simulations were subsequently compared with profiles measured using EBT3 film in Solidwater® phantoms at various depths for 100, 115, 150, 180, 210 and 225 MeV proton beams. Simulations predict measured profiles within a 1 mm distance to agreement for 2D profiles extending to the 0.1% isodose, and within 1 mm/1% Gamma criteria over the integrated curve of spot profile as a function of radius. For isodose lines beyond 0.1% of the central spot dose, the simulated primary spot sigma is smaller than the measurement by up to 15%, and can differ by over 1 mm. The choice of particle interaction algorithm and phantom material were found to cause ~1 mm range uncertainty, a maximal 5% (0.3 mm) difference in spot sigma, and maximal 1 mm and ~2 mm distance to agreement in isodoses above and below the 0.1% level, respectively. Based on these observations, therefore, the selection of physics model and the application of Solidwater® as water replacement material in simulation and measurement should be used with caution.

  10. Experimentally validated pencil beam scanning source model in TOPAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liyong; Kang, Minglei; Solberg, Timothy D.; Ainsley, Christopher G.; McDonough, James E.

    2014-11-01

    The presence of a low-dose envelope, or ‘halo’, in the fluence profile of a proton spot can increase the output of a pencil beam scanning field by over 10%. This study evaluated whether the Monte Carlo simulation code, TOPAS 1.0-beta 8, based on Geant4.9.6 with its default physics list, can predict the spot halo at depth in phantom by incorporating a halo model within the proton source distribution. Proton sources were modelled using three 2D Gaussian functions, and optimized until simulated spot profiles matched measurements at the phantom surface out to a radius of 100 mm. Simulations were subsequently compared with profiles measured using EBT3 film in Solidwater® phantoms at various depths for 100, 115, 150, 180, 210 and 225 MeV proton beams. Simulations predict measured profiles within a 1 mm distance to agreement for 2D profiles extending to the 0.1% isodose, and within 1 mm/1% Gamma criteria over the integrated curve of spot profile as a function of radius. For isodose lines beyond 0.1% of the central spot dose, the simulated primary spot sigma is smaller than the measurement by up to 15%, and can differ by over 1 mm. The choice of particle interaction algorithm and phantom material were found to cause ~1 mm range uncertainty, a maximal 5% (0.3 mm) difference in spot sigma, and maximal 1 mm and ~2 mm distance to agreement in isodoses above and below the 0.1% level, respectively. Based on these observations, therefore, the selection of physics model and the application of Solidwater® as water replacement material in simulation and measurement should be used with caution.

  11. Longitudinal variation of the equatorial ionosphere: Modeling and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, J. R.; Asevedo, W. D.; dos Santos, P. C. P.; Petry, A.; Bailey, G. J.; Batista, I. S.; Abdu, M. A.

    2013-02-01

    We describe a new version of the Parameterized Regional Ionospheric Model (PARIM) which has been modified to include the longitudinal dependences. This model has been reconstructed using multidimensional Fourier series. To validate PARIM results, the South America maps of critical frequencies for the E (foE) and F (foF2) regions were compared with the values calculated by Sheffield Plasmasphere-Ionosphere Model (SUPIM) and IRI representations. PARIM presents very good results, the general characteristics of both regions, mainly the presence of the equatorial ionization anomaly, were well reproduced for equinoctial conditions of solar minimum and maximum. The values of foF2 and hmF2 recorded over Jicamarca (12°S; 77°W; dip lat. 1°N; mag. declination 0.3°) and sites of the conjugate point equatorial experiment (COPEX) campaign Boa Vista (2.8°N; 60.7°W; dip lat. 11.4°; mag. declination -13.1°), Cachimbo (9.5°S; 54.8°W; dip lat. -1.8°; mag. declination -15.5°), and Campo Grande (20.4°S; 54.6°W; dip lat. -11.1°; mag. declination -14.0°) have been used in this work. foF2 calculated by PARIM show good agreement with the observations, except during morning over Boa Vista and midnight-morning over Campo Grande. Some discrepancies were also found for the F-region peak height (hmF2) near the geomagnetic equator during times of F3 layer occurrences. IRI has underestimated both foF2 and hmF2 over equatorial and low latitude sectors during evening-nighttimes, except for Jicamarca where foF2 values were overestimated.

  12. Uterine glands: development, function and experimental model systems

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Paul S.; Spencer, Thomas E.; Bartol, Frank F.; Hayashi, Kanako

    2013-01-01

    Development of uterine glands (adenogenesis) in mammals typically begins during the early post-natal period and involves budding of nascent glands from the luminal epithelium and extensive cell proliferation in these structures as they grow into the surrounding stroma, elongate and mature. Uterine glands are essential for pregnancy, as demonstrated by the infertility that results from inhibiting the development of these glands through gene mutation or epigenetic strategies. Several genes, including forkhead box A2, beta-catenin and members of the Wnt and Hox gene families, are implicated in uterine gland development. Progestins inhibit uterine epithelial proliferation, and this has been employed as a strategy to develop a model in which progestin treatment of ewes for 8 weeks from birth produces infertile adults lacking uterine glands. More recently, mouse models have been developed in which neonatal progestin treatment was used to permanently inhibit adenogenesis and adult fertility. These studies revealed a narrow and well-defined window in which progestin treatments induced permanent infertility by impairing neonatal gland development and establishing endometrial changes that result in implantation defects. These model systems are being utilized to better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying uterine adenogenesis and endometrial function. The ability of neonatal progestin treatment in sheep and mice to produce infertility suggests that an approach of this kind may provide a contraceptive strategy with application in other species. Recent studies have defined the temporal patterns of adenogenesis in uteri of neonatal and juvenile dogs and work is underway to determine whether neonatal progestin or other steroid hormone treatments might be a viable contraceptive approach in this species. PMID:23619340

  13. Experimentally derived model to predict permeability behavior of mudstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, J.; Flemings, P. B.; Day-Stirrat, R.; Germaine, J. T.

    2010-12-01

    We use uniaxial consolidation experiments to analyze the permeability evolution during consolidation for mudstones with varying composition to develop a predictive permeability model for mudstones. We admixed silt-sized silica to dry, natural Boston Blue Clay (BBC) powder in five different mass ratios. The result is mixtures of silty clay and clayey silt with percentages of clay-sized particles varying between 36 % and 57 %. To recreate natural conditions yet remove variability and soil disturbance, we resedimented all mixtures to a total stress of 100 kPa. We then loaded them to a vertical effective stress of 2.4 MPa in an uniaxial, constant-rate-of-strain consolidation device. We show that vertical permeability increases exponentially with void ratio and decreasing clay content. There is an order of magnitude difference in permeability at a given void ratio for clay contents varying from 36 % to 57 % (by mass). We developed a model that predicts the permeability of silt-clay mixtures based on knowledge of the composition and void ratio alone. The model assumes that flow occurs through the clay-matrix. Thus, the effective permeability is controlled by the void ratio of the clay fraction. At a given stress level, the clay void ratio increases with silt content: large pores are preserved in silty samples due to stress-bridging which does not allow the clay particles to consolidate. Mudstones are important to practical and fundamental programs. They are a key cap rock for subsurface hydrocarbons and geologic storage of CO2. Over the last decade, large amounts of natural gas have been produced from mudstone (shale) gas fields.

  14. Experimentally validated pencil beam scanning source model in TOPAS.

    PubMed

    Lin, Liyong; Kang, Minglei; Solberg, Timothy D; Ainsley, Christopher G; McDonough, James E

    2014-11-21

    The presence of a low-dose envelope, or 'halo', in the fluence profile of a proton spot can increase the output of a pencil beam scanning field by over 10%. This study evaluated whether the Monte Carlo simulation code, TOPAS 1.0-beta 8, based on Geant4.9.6 with its default physics list, can predict the spot halo at depth in phantom by incorporating a halo model within the proton source distribution. Proton sources were modelled using three 2D Gaussian functions, and optimized until simulated spot profiles matched measurements at the phantom surface out to a radius of 100 mm. Simulations were subsequently compared with profiles measured using EBT3 film in Solidwater® phantoms at various depths for 100, 115, 150, 180, 210 and 225 MeV proton beams. Simulations predict measured profiles within a 1 mm distance to agreement for 2D profiles extending to the 0.1% isodose, and within 1 mm/1% Gamma criteria over the integrated curve of spot profile as a function of radius. For isodose lines beyond 0.1% of the central spot dose, the simulated primary spot sigma is smaller than the measurement by up to 15%, and can differ by over 1 mm. The choice of particle interaction algorithm and phantom material were found to cause ~1 mm range uncertainty, a maximal 5% (0.3 mm) difference in spot sigma, and maximal 1 mm and ~2 mm distance to agreement in isodoses above and below the 0.1% level, respectively. Based on these observations, therefore, the selection of physics model and the application of Solidwater® as water replacement material in simulation and measurement should be used with caution. PMID:25349982

  15. Experimental determination of the rattle of simple models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clevenson, S. A.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of the excitation frequency on the rattle boundaries of simple models was investigated. The frequency range investigated was from 40 to 4,000 Hz. A 1-inch steel ball was studied to determine the rattle boundary for both vertical motion and for the ball suspended as a pendulum. Effects of surface contact and weight were also studied. Results indicate that the shape of the rattle boundary depends on the particular configuration being investigated as well as the range of frequency being investigated. Although there was condiderable scatter in the data, the general trend indicates that the level of acceleration required for the onset of rattle was independent of excitation frequency.

  16. An experimental electronic model for a neuronal cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos-Cantón, I.; Rangel-López, A.; Martel-Gallegos, G.; Zarazúa, S.; Vertiz-Hérnandez, A.

    2014-04-01

    Over the last two decades, the study of information transmission in living beings has acquired great relevance, because it regulates and conducts the functioning of all of the organs in the body. In information transmission pathways, the neuron plays an important role in that it receives, transmits, and processes electrical signals from different parts of the human body; these signals are transmitted as electrical impulses called action potentials, and they transmit information from one neuron to another. In this work, and with the aim of developing experiments for teaching biological processes, we implemented an electronic circuit of the neuron cell device and its mathematical model based on piecewise linear functions.

  17. Inference of ICF implosion core mix using experimental data and theoretical mix modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Sherrill, Leslie Welser; Haynes, Donald A; Cooley, James H; Sherrill, Manolo E; Mancini, Roberto C; Tommasini, Riccardo; Golovkin, Igor E; Haan, Steven W

    2009-01-01

    The mixing between fuel and shell materials in Inertial Confinement Fusion (lCF) implosion cores is a current topic of interest. The goal of this work was to design direct-drive ICF experiments which have varying levels of mix, and subsequently to extract information on mixing directly from the experimental data using spectroscopic techniques. The experimental design was accomplished using hydrodynamic simulations in conjunction with Haan's saturation model, which was used to predict the mix levels of candidate experimental configurations. These theoretical predictions were then compared to the mixing information which was extracted from the experimental data, and it was found that Haan's mix model predicted trends in the width of the mix layer as a function of initial shell thickness. These results contribute to an assessment of the range of validity and predictive capability of the Haan saturation model, as well as increasing confidence in the methods used to extract mixing information from experimental data.

  18. Pathophysiology of unilateral pulmonary aspergillosis in an experimental rat model.

    PubMed

    Becker, Martin J; De Marie, Siem; Fens, Marcel H A M; Haitsma, Jack J; Verbrugh, Henri A; Lachmann, Burkhard; Bakker-Woudenberg, Irma A J M

    2006-03-01

    Because little is known about the pathophysiology of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA), we examined changes in pulmonary and general physiology during this disease in an animal model. In a model of fatal left-sided IPA, 19 persistently neutropenic rats were monitored for clinical signs including body temperature, body weight and respiratory distress. A separate group of nine rats with IPA was used for measurements of arterial blood pressure, arterial O2 and CO2 pressure, lung compliance and surfactant function. Body temperature and body weight decreased, whereas respiratory distress increased during progression of the disease. Compared to uninfected controls, in rats with IPA arterial blood pressure and lung compliance were significantly lower, and left lung minimal surface tension was significantly higher. Right lung surfactant function was not affected. Arterial O2 and CO2 pressures were not different between rats with IPA and uninfected controls. Infection with Aspergillus fumigatus in neutropenic rats resulted in hypothermia, body weight loss and respiratory distress. Loss of left lung function was probably compensated by the uninfected right lung, even in a late stage of the disease. Circulatory failure was a major feature in the terminal phase of the infection. PMID:16519016

  19. Experimental support for a predictive osmotic model of clay membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, S.J.; Marine, I.W.

    1983-01-01

    Osmosis has been cited as a mechanism for explaining anomalously high fluid pressures in the subsurface. Clays and shales act as membranes, and osmotic flux across these units may result in pressures sufficiently high to explain these anomalies. The theoretical osmotic pressures as calculated solely from solution properties can be quite large; however, it is not yet resolved whether these geologic membranes are sufficiently ideal to generate such pressures. Osmotic efficiencies of a Na-bentonite membrane were measured by a series of hyperfiltration experiments using various molarities of NaCl at two different porosities. The highest osmotic efficiency (0.8912) occurred at the lower porosity and the lowest NaCl input solution. The lowest measured osmotic efficiency (0.0423) occurred at the high porosity and the highest NaCl input concentration. The osmotic efficiencies obtained from the hyperfiltration experiments correlate very favorably with the Fritz-Marine Membrane Model. This model predicts that the maximum osmotically-induced hydraulic pressures in the subsurface should occur across shales having low porosities and high cation exchange capacities in which the unit separates solutions of brackish waters. 25 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  20. Experimental Models in Syrian Golden Hamster Replicate Human Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunan; Kayoumu, Abudurexiti; Lu, Guotao; Xu, Pengfei; Qiu, Xu; Chen, Liye; Qi, Rong; Huang, Shouxiong; Li, Weiqin; Wang, Yuhui; Liu, George

    2016-01-01

    The hamster has been shown to share a variety of metabolic similarities with humans. To replicate human acute pancreatitis with hamsters, we comparatively studied the efficacy of common methods, such as the peritoneal injections of caerulein, L-arginine, the retrograde infusion of sodium taurocholate, and another novel model with concomitant administration of ethanol and fatty acid. The severity of pancreatitis was evaluated by serum amylase activity, pathological scores, myeloperoxidase activity, and the expression of inflammation factors in pancreas. The results support that the severity of pathological injury is consistent with the pancreatitis induced in mice and rat using the same methods. Specifically, caerulein induced mild edematous pancreatitis accompanied by minimal lung injury, while L-arginine induced extremely severe pancreatic injury including necrosis and neutrophil infiltration. Infusion of Na-taurocholate into the pancreatic duct induced necrotizing pancreatitis in the head of pancreas and lighter inflammation in the distal region. The severity of acute pancreatitis induced by combination of ethanol and fatty acids was between the extent of caerulein and L-arginine induction, with obvious inflammatory cells infiltration. In view of the advantages in lipid metabolism features, hamster models are ideally suited for the studies of pancreatitis associated with altered metabolism in humans. PMID:27302647

  1. Models, assumptions, and experimental tests of flows near magnetized boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, M. Umair

    2015-11-01

    We present a history of research on the magnetized plasma boundary and recent first measurements of particle flows in such structures in laboratory plasmas using multi-dimensional laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). Our measurements show that the canonical model for this boundary proposed in 1982 [Chodura, Phys. Fluids (1982)] is inaccurate for systems where the ion-neutral collision length is less than at least 4 times the ion gyro radius. Rather, our measurements validate more sophisticated plasma boundary fluid models that take neutral collisions into account [Riemann, Phys. Plasmas (1994); Ahedo, Phys. Plasmas (1997); Siddiqui et al., Phys. Plasmas (2014)]. In light of these results, we show that both three-dimensional ion and neutral velocity distribution functions are strongly affected near the boundary. We discuss effects of these perturbed distributions on wall loading and erosion in experiments and applications such as divertor tokamak scrape-off layers and Hall thrusters. Finally, we propose modern definitions of the oft-used term, ``magnetic presheath.'' This work is supported by U.S. National Science Foundation grant number PHY-1360278.

  2. Neutrophil function in an experimental model of hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vedanarayanan, V V; Kaplan, B S; Fong, J S

    1987-03-01

    To understand the role of neutrophil leukocytosis in hemolytic uremic syndrome, we studied the changes in neutrophil function in the modified generalized Shwartzman reaction in rabbits. This model resembles hemolytic uremic syndrome associated with endotoxemia. At the end of an endotoxin infusion, we observed leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and a decrease in hematocrit associated with schistocytosis. Plasma B-glucuronidase levels increased and this was associated with a decrease in neutrophil content of the enzyme. The chemotactic index and neutrophil aggregation to zymosan-activated serum were impaired compared to controls. The neutrophil procoagulant content increased after endotoxin infusion. The serum creatinine concentration and proteinuria increased in the endotoxin-treated animals. The changes returned to normal by 48 h. Renal cortical malondialdehyde, a reflection of lipid peroxidation, was higher in the endotoxin-treated animals than in the controls. We have shown enzyme release by neutrophils, impairment of chemotaxis and aggregation, increased procoagulant content in neutrophils, and evidence of lipid peroxidation in renal cortical tissue in this model. These observations raise the possibility that leukocytes may have a role in the pathogenesis of the hemolytic uremic syndrome. PMID:3550673

  3. Experimental Models in Syrian Golden Hamster Replicate Human Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunan; Kayoumu, Abudurexiti; Lu, Guotao; Xu, Pengfei; Qiu, Xu; Chen, Liye; Qi, Rong; Huang, Shouxiong; Li, Weiqin; Wang, Yuhui; Liu, George

    2016-01-01

    The hamster has been shown to share a variety of metabolic similarities with humans. To replicate human acute pancreatitis with hamsters, we comparatively studied the efficacy of common methods, such as the peritoneal injections of caerulein, L-arginine, the retrograde infusion of sodium taurocholate, and another novel model with concomitant administration of ethanol and fatty acid. The severity of pancreatitis was evaluated by serum amylase activity, pathological scores, myeloperoxidase activity, and the expression of inflammation factors in pancreas. The results support that the severity of pathological injury is consistent with the pancreatitis induced in mice and rat using the same methods. Specifically, caerulein induced mild edematous pancreatitis accompanied by minimal lung injury, while L-arginine induced extremely severe pancreatic injury including necrosis and neutrophil infiltration. Infusion of Na-taurocholate into the pancreatic duct induced necrotizing pancreatitis in the head of pancreas and lighter inflammation in the distal region. The severity of acute pancreatitis induced by combination of ethanol and fatty acids was between the extent of caerulein and L-arginine induction, with obvious inflammatory cells infiltration. In view of the advantages in lipid metabolism features, hamster models are ideally suited for the studies of pancreatitis associated with altered metabolism in humans. PMID:27302647

  4. Protein folding dynamics: the diffusion-collision model and experimental data.

    PubMed Central

    Karplus, M.; Weaver, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    The diffusion-collision model of protein folding is assessed. A description is given of the qualitative aspects and quantitative results of the diffusion-collision model and their relation to available experimental data. We consider alternative mechanisms for folding and point out their relationship to the diffusion-collision model. We show that the diffusion-collision model is supported by a growing body of experimental and theoretical evidence, and we outline future directions for developing the model and its applications. PMID:8003983

  5. Nonsequential modeling of laser diode stacks using Zemax: simulation, optimization, and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Coluccelli, Nicola

    2010-08-01

    Modeling a real laser diode stack based on Zemax ray tracing software that operates in a nonsequential mode is reported. The implementation of the model is presented together with the geometric and optical parameters to be adjusted to calibrate the model and to match the simulated intensity irradiance profiles with the experimental profiles. The calibration of the model is based on a near-field and a far-field measurement. The validation of the model has been accomplished by comparing the simulated and experimental transverse irradiance profiles at different positions along the caustic formed by a lens. Spot sizes and waist location are predicted with a maximum error below 6%.

  6. MULTI-ISOPTOPE PROCESS MONITOR: A COMPARISON OF MODEL AND EXPERIMENTAL VALIDATION

    SciTech Connect

    Orton, Christopher R.; Fraga, Carlos G.; Christensen, Richard; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2009-10-01

    The MIP Monitoring concept was demonstrated through a series of simulations as well as experiments. While qualitatively these studies generated similar results, there were significant differences between the simulated and experimentally determined spectra. This chapter investigates these differences between modeled and experimentally determined CZT gamma spectra and subsequent PCA analysis generated from each.

  7. Modelling, simulation and construction of a dc/dc boost power converter: a school experimental system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva-Ortigoza, R.; Silva-Ortigoza, G.; Hernández-Guzmán, V. M.; Saldaña-González, G.; Marcelino-Aranda, M.; Marciano-Melchor, M.

    2012-05-01

    We introduce a dc/dc boost power converter as a didactic prototype intended to support courses on electric circuit analysis experimentally. The corresponding mathematical model is obtained, the converter is designed and an experimental setup is described, constructed and tested. Simplicity of construction as well as low cost of components renders the feasible introduction of this equipment in undergraduate laboratories.

  8. Modelling, Simulation and Construction of a DC/DC Boost Power Converter: A School Experimental System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva-Ortigoza, R.; Silva-Ortigoza, G.; Hernandez-Guzman, V. M.; Saldana-Gonzalez, G.; Marcelino-Aranda, M.; Marciano-Melchor, M.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a dc/dc boost power converter as a didactic prototype intended to support courses on electric circuit analysis experimentally. The corresponding mathematical model is obtained, the converter is designed and an experimental setup is described, constructed and tested. Simplicity of construction as well as low cost of components renders…

  9. An Experimental and Kinetic Modeling Study of Methyl Decanoate Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Sarathy, S M; Thomson, M J; Pitz, W J; Lu, T

    2010-02-19

    Biodiesel is typically a mixture of long chain fatty acid methyl esters for use in compression ignition engines. Improving biofuel engine performance requires understanding its fundamental combustion properties and the pathways of combustion. This research study presents new combustion data for methyl decanoate in an opposed-flow diffusion flame. An improved detailed chemical kinetic model for methyl decanoate combustion is developed, which serves as the basis for deriving a skeletal mechanism via the direct relation graph method. The novel skeletal mechanism consists of 648 species and 2998 reactions. This mechanism well predicts the methyl decanoate opposed-flow diffusion flame data. The results from the flame simulations indicate that methyl decanoate is consumed via abstraction of hydrogen atoms to produce fuel radicals, which lead to the production of alkenes. The ester moiety in methyl decanoate leads to the formation of low molecular weight oxygenated compounds such as carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, and ketene.

  10. Experimental results and modeling of a dynamic hohlraum on SATURN

    SciTech Connect

    Derzon, M.S.; Allshouse, G.O.; Deeney, C.; Leeper, R.J.; Nash, T.J.; Matuska, W.; Peterson, D.L.; MacFarlane, J.J.; Ryutov, D.D.

    1998-06-01

    Experiments were performed at SATURN, a high current z-pinch, to explore the feasibility of creating a hohlraum by imploding a tungsten wire array onto a low-density foam. Emission measurements in the 200--280 eV energy band were consistent with a 110--135 eV Planckian before the target shock heated, or stagnated, on-axis. Peak pinch radiation temperatures of nominally 160 eV were obtained. Measured early time x-ray emission histories and temperature estimates agree well with modeled performance in the 200--280 eV band using a 2D radiation magneto-hydrodynamics code. However, significant differences are observed in comparisons of the x-ray images and 2D simulations.

  11. Developments in computation, modeling and experimentation: Impacts on R D

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J.K.

    1989-10-01

    The original objective was to document the feasibility of the coordinated research program sponsored by ECUT called Materials-by-Design (MBD).'' The MBD program funds research to develop hierarchical models to predict materials' performance based on microstructural information. This paper was specifically prepared for this meeting to help technical staff and their managers justify and plan for an advanced computer infrastructure within their companies. In order to do this, several additional objectives for this paper are (1) to foster an appreciation of the dramatic increase in computational power that have occurred over the last forty years, (2) to encourage better utilization of supercomputing in current scientific research by identifying current issues and opportunities, and (3) to promote anticipation and enthusiasm for the dramatic changes supercomputers currently being developed will offer scientists in the near future.

  12. Implant healing in experimental animal models of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Le, Nga N; Rose, Michael B; Levinson, Howard; Klitzman, Bruce

    2011-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus is becoming increasingly prevalent worldwide. Additionally, there is an increasing number of patients receiving implantable devices such as glucose sensors and orthopedic implants. Thus, it is likely that the number of diabetic patients receiving these devices will also increase. Even though implantable medical devices are considered biocompatible by the Food and Drug Administration, the adverse tissue healing that occurs adjacent to these foreign objects is a leading cause of their failure. This foreign body response leads to fibrosis, encapsulation of the device, and a reduction or cessation of device performance. A second adverse event is microbial infection of implanted devices, which can lead to persistent local and systemic infections and also exacerbates the fibrotic response. Nearly half of all nosocomial infections are associated with the presence of an indwelling medical device. Events associated with both the foreign body response and implant infection can necessitate device removal and may lead to amputation, which is associated with significant morbidity and cost. Diabetes mellitus is generally indicated as a risk factor for the infection of a variety of implants such as prosthetic joints, pacemakers, implantable cardioverter defibrillators, penile implants, and urinary catheters. Implant infection rates in diabetic patients vary depending upon the implant and the microorganism, however, for example, diabetes was found to be a significant variable associated with a nearly 7.2% infection rate for implantable cardioverter defibrillators by the microorganism Candida albicans. While research has elucidated many of the altered mechanisms of diabetic cutaneous wound healing, the internal healing adjacent to indwelling medical devices in a diabetic model has rarely been studied. Understanding this healing process is crucial to facilitating improved device design. The purpose of this article is to summarize the physiologic factors that

  13. Formulation of an experimental substructure model using a Craig-Bampton based transmission simulator

    DOE PAGES

    Kammer, Daniel C.; Allen, Matthew S.; Mayes, Randall L.

    2015-09-26

    An experimental–analytical substructuring is attractive when there is motivation to replace one or more system subcomponents with an experimental model. This experimentally derived substructure can then be coupled to finite element models of the rest of the structure to predict the system response. The transmission simulator method couples a fixture to the component of interest during a vibration test in order to improve the experimental model for the component. The transmission simulator is then subtracted from the tested system to produce the experimental component. This method reduces ill-conditioning by imposing a least squares fit of constraints between substructure modal coordinatesmore » to connect substructures, instead of directly connecting physical interface degrees of freedom. This paper presents an alternative means of deriving the experimental substructure model, in which a Craig–Bampton representation of the transmission simulator is created and subtracted from the experimental measurements. The corresponding modal basis of the transmission simulator is described by the fixed-interface modes, rather than free modes that were used in the original approach. Moreover, these modes do a better job of representing the shape of the transmission simulator as it responds within the experimental system, leading to more accurate results using fewer modes. The new approach is demonstrated using a simple finite element model based example with a redundant interface.« less

  14. Formulation of an experimental substructure model using a Craig-Bampton based transmission simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Kammer, Daniel C.; Allen, Matthew S.; Mayes, Randall L.

    2015-09-26

    An experimental–analytical substructuring is attractive when there is motivation to replace one or more system subcomponents with an experimental model. This experimentally derived substructure can then be coupled to finite element models of the rest of the structure to predict the system response. The transmission simulator method couples a fixture to the component of interest during a vibration test in order to improve the experimental model for the component. The transmission simulator is then subtracted from the tested system to produce the experimental component. This method reduces ill-conditioning by imposing a least squares fit of constraints between substructure modal coordinates to connect substructures, instead of directly connecting physical interface degrees of freedom. This paper presents an alternative means of deriving the experimental substructure model, in which a Craig–Bampton representation of the transmission simulator is created and subtracted from the experimental measurements. The corresponding modal basis of the transmission simulator is described by the fixed-interface modes, rather than free modes that were used in the original approach. Moreover, these modes do a better job of representing the shape of the transmission simulator as it responds within the experimental system, leading to more accurate results using fewer modes. The new approach is demonstrated using a simple finite element model based example with a redundant interface.

  15. An experimental study of a VVER reactor's steam generator model operating in the condensing mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, A. V.; Remizov, O. V.

    2012-05-01

    Results obtained from an experimental study of a VVER reactor's steam generator model operating in the condensing mode are presented. The obtained empirical dependence for calculating the power of heat exchangers operating in the steam condensation mode is presented.

  16. Challenges in experimental data integration within genome-scale metabolic models.

    PubMed

    Bourguignon, Pierre-Yves; Samal, Areejit; Képès, François; Jost, Jürgen; Martin, Olivier C

    2010-01-01

    A report of the meeting "Challenges in experimental data integration within genome-scale metabolic models", Institut Henri Poincaré, Paris, October 10-11 2009, organized by the CNRS-MPG joint program in Systems Biology.

  17. Challenges in experimental data integration within genome-scale metabolic models

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A report of the meeting "Challenges in experimental data integration within genome-scale metabolic models", Institut Henri Poincaré, Paris, October 10-11 2009, organized by the CNRS-MPG joint program in Systems Biology. PMID:20412574

  18. Covariances of evaluated nuclear data based upon uncertainty information of experimental data and nuclear models

    SciTech Connect

    Poenitz, W.P.; Peelle, R.W.

    1986-11-17

    A straightforward derivation is presented for the covariance matrix of evaluated cross sections based on the covariance matrix of the experimental data and propagation through nuclear model parameters. 10 refs.

  19. Experimental Realization of the Harper-Hofstadter Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Colin

    Extensions of Berry's phase and the quantum Hall effect have led to the discovery of new states of matter with topological properties. Traditionally, this has been achieved using magnetic fields or spin-orbit interactions, which couple only to charged particles. For neutral ultracold atoms, synthetic magnetic fields have been created that are strong enough to realize the Harper-Hofstadter model. In this talk, I report on work studying Bose-Einstein condensation in the Harper-Hofstadter Hamiltonian with one-half flux quantum per lattice unit cell. The diffraction pattern of the superfluid state directly shows the momentum distribution of the wavefunction, which is gauge-dependent, and it reveals both the reduced symmetry of the vector potential and the degeneracy of the ground state. I present an adiabatic, many-body state preparation protocol via the Mott insulating phase and show the superfluid ground state in a three-dimensional lattice with moderate interactions. I will discuss progress towards a triple-superlattice implementation as well as prospects for exploring exotic states close to the Mott transition.

  20. Infrared thermography for CFRP inspection: computational model and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Henrique C.; Zhang, Hai; Morioka, Karen; Ibarra-Castanedo, Clemente; López, Fernando; Maldague, Xavier P. V.; Tarpani, José R.

    2016-05-01

    Infrared Thermography (IRT) is a well-known Non-destructive Testing (NDT) technique. In the last decades, it has been widely applied in several fields including inspection of composite materials (CM), specially the fiber-reinforced polymer matrix ones. Consequently, it is important to develop and improve efficient NDT techniques to inspect and assess the quality of CM parts in order to warranty airworthiness and, at the same time, reduce costs of airline companies. In this paper, active IRT is used to inspect carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) at laminate with artificial inserts (built-in sample) placed on different layers prior to the manufacture. Two optical active IRT are used. The first is pulsed thermography (PT) which is the most widely utilized IRT technique. The second is a line-scan thermography (LST) technique: a dynamic technique, which can be employed for the inspection of materials by heating a component, line-by-line, while acquiring a series of thermograms with an infrared camera. It is especially suitable for inspection of large parts as well as complex shaped parts. A computational model developed using COMSOL Multiphysics® was used in order to simulate the inspections. Sequences obtained from PT and LST were processed using principal component thermography (PCT) for comparison. Results showed that it is possible to detect insertions of different sizes at different depths using both PT and LST IRT techniques.

  1. An analogue experimental model of depth fluctuations in lava lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witham, Fred; Woods, Andrew W.; Gladstone, Charlotte

    2006-07-01

    Lava lakes, consisting of molten degassing lava in summit craters of active basaltic volcanoes, sometimes exhibit complex cycles of filling and emptying on time-scales of hours to weeks such as recorded at Pu’u’O’o in Hawaii and Oldoinyo Lengai in Tanzania. Here we report on a new series of analogue laboratory experiments of two-phase flow in a reservoir-conduit-lava lake system which spontaneously generates oscillations in the depth of liquid within the lake. During the recharge phase, gas supplied from a subsurface reservoir of degassing magma drives liquid magma up the conduit, causing the lake to fill. As the magmastatic pressure in the lake increases, the upward supply of magma, driven by the gas bubbles, falls. Eventually the upflow becomes unstable, and liquid drains downwards from the lake, driven by the magmastatic pressure of the overlying lake, suppressing the ascent of any more bubbles from the chamber. At a later stage, once the lake has drained sufficiently, the descent speed of liquid through the conduit decreases below the ascent speed of the bubbles, and the recharge cycle resumes. Application of a quantitative model of the experiments to the natural system is broadly consistent with field data.

  2. Oncostatic effects of fluoxetine in experimental colon cancer models.

    PubMed

    Kannen, Vinicius; Garcia, Sergio Britto; Silva, Wilson A; Gasser, Martin; Mönch, Romana; Alho, Eduardo Joaquim Lopes; Heinsen, Helmut; Scholz, Claus-Jürgen; Friedrich, Mike; Heinze, Katrin Gertrud; Waaga-Gasser, Ana Maria; Stopper, Helga

    2015-09-01

    Colon cancer is one of the most common tumors in the human population. Recent studies have shown a reduced risk for colon cancer in patients given the antidepressant fluoxetine (FLX). The exact mechanism by which FLX might protect from colon cancer remains however controversial. Here, FLX reduced the development of different colon tumor xenografts, as well as proliferation in hypoxic tumor areas within them. FLX treatment also decreased microvessel numbers in tumors. Although FLX did not increase serum and tumor glucose levels as much as the colon chemotherapy gold standard Fluorouracil did, lactate levels were significantly augmented within tumors by FLX treatment. The gene expression of the MCT4 lactate transporter was significantly downregulated. Total protein amounts from the third and fifth mitochondrial complexes were significantly decreased by FLX in tumors. Cell culture experiments revealed that FLX reduced the mitochondrial membrane potential significantly and disabled the reactive oxygen species production of the third mitochondrial complex. Furthermore, FLX arrested hypoxic colon tumor cells in the G0/G1 phase of the cell-cycle. The expression of key cell-cycle-related checkpoint proteins was enhanced in cell culture and in vivo experiments. Therefore, we suggest FLX impairs energy generation, cell cycle progression and proliferation in tumor cells, especially under condition of hypoxia. This then leads to reduced microvessel formation and tumor shrinkage in xenograft models. PMID:26004136

  3. Wall conditioning for ITER: Current experimental and modeling activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douai, D.; Kogut, D.; Wauters, T.; Brezinsek, S.; Hagelaar, G. J. M.; Hong, S. H.; Lomas, P. J.; Lyssoivan, A.; Nunes, I.; Pitts, R. A.; Rohde, V.; de Vries, P. C.

    2015-08-01

    Wall conditioning will be required in ITER to control fuel and impurity recycling, as well as tritium (T) inventory. Analysis of conditioning cycle on the JET, with its ITER-Like Wall is presented, evidencing reduced need for wall cleaning in ITER compared to JET-CFC. Using a novel 2D multi-fluid model, current density during Glow Discharge Conditioning (GDC) on the in-vessel plasma-facing components (PFC) of ITER is predicted to approach the simple expectation of total anode current divided by wall surface area. Baking of the divertor to 350 °C should desorb the majority of the co-deposited T. ITER foresees the use of low temperature plasma based techniques compatible with the permanent toroidal magnetic field, such as Ion (ICWC) or Electron Cyclotron Wall Conditioning (ECWC), for tritium removal between ITER plasma pulses. Extrapolation of JET ICWC results to ITER indicates removal comparable to estimated T-retention in nominal ITER D:T shots, whereas GDC may be unattractive for that purpose.

  4. Experimental murine amyloidosis: a model system for studying amyloid formation.

    PubMed Central

    Baumal, R.; Wilson, B.; Pass, E.

    1975-01-01

    Myeloma-associated and casein-induced murine amyloidosis were used as models to study the role of lymphocytes and macrophages in amyloid formation. Amyloidosis occurred rarely and in small amounts in Balb/C mice with immunoglobulin (Ig)-producing myeloma tumours but large amounts could be induced by injections of casein. Fluorescent staining of both forms of amyloid deposits by means of anti-casein- and anti-myeloma-amyloid antibodies indicated that they either crossreacted or coexisted. Nor abnormality of Ig biosynthesis was detected in amyloidosis, suggesting that abnormal degradation was responsible for production of the Ig form of amyloid. Although spleen lymphocytes of casein-injected mice with amyloidosis demonstrated diminished cellular immunologic responses, this did not indicate generalized immunologic incompetence. The non-Ig form of amyloid in casein-injected mice was shown to be produced by macrophages, and a technique was developed for increasing the yield of amyloid-containing cells. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 6 FIG. 7 FIG. 8 PMID:1080430

  5. Performance of semirigid timber frame with Lagscrewbolt connections: experimental, analytical, and numerical model results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Takuro; Nakatani, Makoto; Tesfamariam, Solomon

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents analytical and numerical models for semirigid timber frame with Lagscrewbolt (LSB) connections. A series of static and reverse cyclic experimental tests were carried out for different beam sizes (400, 500, and 600 mm depth) and column-base connections with different numbers of LSBs (4, 5, 8). For the beam-column connections, with increase in beam depth, moment resistance and stiffness values increased, and ductility factor reduced. For the column-base connection, with increase in the number of LSBs, the strength, stiffness, and ductility values increased. A material model available in OpenSees, Pinching4 hysteretic model, was calibrated for all connection test results. Finally, analytical model of the portal frame was developed and compared with the experimental test results. Overall, there was good agreement with the experimental test results, and the Pinching4 hysteretic model can readily be used for full-scale structural model.

  6. Development of a stochastic dynamical model for hermetic compressor's components with experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontanela, F.; Silva, O. M.; Lenzi, A.; Ritto, T. G.

    2016-08-01

    The analysis of household compressor's components is typically evaluated by using mathematical-mechanical models, and many decisions are taken based on simulations. However, such an investigation is usually performed in a deterministic framework, which cannot consider manufacturing variabilities and epistemic uncertainties. In this paper, a stochastic structural model that considers data and model uncertainties is developed for a discharge pipe connected to a hermetic compressor's shell. An experimental test rig is constructed to test each part separately, and an identification strategy is proposed to fit the stochastic model to experimental results. Finally, the impact of the uncertainties in each structural component on the dynamical responses of the whole system is investigated. It turns out that: (1) the proposed stochastic dynamical model presented very good results when compared to the experimental responses, and (2) uncertainties in the discharge pipe model play an important role in the coupled system dynamics.

  7. Foundation heat exchangers for residential ground source heat pump systems Numerical modeling and experimental validation

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Lu; Cullin, James; Spitler, Jeffery; Im, Piljae; Fisher, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    A new type of ground heat exchanger that utilizes the excavation often made for basements or foundations has been proposed as an alternative to conventional ground heat exchangers. This article describes a numerical model that can be used to size these foundation heat exchanger (FHX) systems. The numerical model is a two-dimensional finite-volume model that considers a wide variety of factors, such as soil freezing and evapotranspiration. The FHX numerical model is validated with one year of experimental data collected at an experimental house located near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The model shows good agreement with the experimental data-heat pump entering fluid temperatures typically within 1 C (1.8 F) - with minor discrepancies due to approximations, such as constant moisture content throughout the year, uniform evapotranspiration over the seasons, and lack of ground shading in the model.

  8. Atmosphere Behavior in Gas-Closed Mouse-Algal Systems: An Experimental and Modelling Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Averner, M. M.; Moore, B., III; Bartholomew, I.; Wharton, R.

    1985-01-01

    A dual approach of mathematical modelling and laboratory experimentation aimed at examining the gas exchange characteristics of artificial animal/plant systems closed to the ambient atmosphere was initiated. The development of control techniques and management strategies for maintaining the atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide and oxygen at physiological levels is examined. A mathematical model simulating the atmospheric behavior in these systems was developed and an experimental gas closed system was constructed. These systems are described and preliminary results are presented.

  9. [Experimental model of severe local radiation injuries of the skin after X-rays].

    PubMed

    Kotenko, K V; Moroz, B B; Nasonova, T A; Dobrynina, O A; LIpengolz, A A; Gimadova, T I; Deshevoy, Yu B; Lebedev, V G; Lyrschikova, A V; Eremin, I I

    2013-01-01

    The experimental model of severe local radiation injuries skin under the influence of a relatively soft X-rays on a modified device RAP 100-10 produced by "Diagnostica-M" (Russia) was proposed. The model can be used as pre-clinical studies in small experimental animals in order to improve the treatment of local radiation injuries, especially in the conditions of application of cellular therapy.

  10. Experimental Modeling of Dynamic Shallow Dip-Slip Faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uenishi, K.

    2010-12-01

    In our earlier study (AGU 2005, SSJ 2005, JPGU 2006), using a finite difference technique, we have conducted some numerical simulations related to the source dynamics of shallow dip-slip earthquakes, and suggested the possibility of the existence of corner waves, i.e., shear waves that carry concentrated kinematic energy and generate extremely strong particle motions on the hanging wall of a nonvertical fault. In the numerical models, a dip-slip fault is located in a two-dimensional, monolithic linear elastic half space, and the fault plane dips either vertically or 45 degrees. We have investigated the seismic wave field radiated by crack-like rupture of this straight fault. If the fault rupture, initiated at depth, arrests just below or reaches the free surface, four Rayleigh-type pulses are generated: two propagating along the free surface into the opposite directions to the far field, the other two moving back along the ruptured fault surface (interface) downwards into depth. These downward interface pulses may largely control the stopping phase of the dynamic rupture, and in the case the fault plane is inclined, on the hanging wall the interface pulse and the outward-moving Rayleigh surface pulse interact with each other and the corner wave is induced. On the footwall, the ground motion is dominated simply by the weaker Rayleigh pulse propagating along the free surface because of much smaller interaction between this Rayleigh and the interface pulse. The generation of the downward interface pulses and corner wave may play a crucial role in understanding the effects of the geometrical asymmetry on the strong motion induced by shallow dip-slip faulting, but it has not been well recognized so far, partly because those waves are not expected for a fault that is located and ruptures only at depth. However, the seismological recordings of the 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan, the 2004 Niigata-ken Chuetsu, Japan, earthquakes as well as a more recent one in Iwate-Miyagi Inland

  11. Ureaplasma urealyticum Causes Hyperammonemia in an Experimental Immunocompromised Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohui; Karau, Melissa J.; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E.; Block, Darci R.; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.; Cunningham, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Hyperammonemia syndrome is an often fatal complication of lung transplantation which has been recently associated with Ureaplasma infection. It has not been definitely established that Ureaplasma species can cause hyperammonemia. We established a novel immunocompromised murine model of Ureaplasma urealyticum infection and used it to confirm that U. urealyticum can cause hyperammonemia. Male C3H mice were pharmacologically immunosuppressed with mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus and oral prednisone for seven days, and then challenged intratracheally (IT) and/or intraperitoneally (IP) with 107 CFU U. urealyticum over six days, while continuing immunosuppression. Spent U. urealyticum-free U9 broth was used as a negative control, with uninfected immunocompetent mice, uninfected immunosuppressed mice, and infected immunocompetent mice serving as additional controls. Plasma ammonia concentrations were compared using Wilcoxon ranks sum tests. Plasma ammonia concentrations of immunosuppressed mice challenged IT/IP with spent U9 broth (n = 14) (range 155–330 μmol/L) were similar to those of normal mice (n = 5), uninfected immunosuppressed mice (n = 5), and U. urealyticum IT/IP challenged immunocompetent mice (n = 5) [range 99–340 μmol/L, p = 0.60]. However, immunosuppressed mice challenged with U. urealyticum IT/IP (n = 20) or IP (n = 15) had higher plasma ammonia concentrations (range 225–945 μmol/L and 276–687 μmol/L, respectively) than those challenged IT/IP with spent U9 broth (p<0.001). U. urealyticum administered IT/IP or IP causes hyperammonemia in mice pharmacologically immunosuppressed with a regimen similar to that administered to lung transplant recipients. PMID:27537683

  12. Ureaplasma urealyticum Causes Hyperammonemia in an Experimental Immunocompromised Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohui; Karau, Melissa J; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E; Block, Darci R; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Cunningham, Scott A; Patel, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Hyperammonemia syndrome is an often fatal complication of lung transplantation which has been recently associated with Ureaplasma infection. It has not been definitely established that Ureaplasma species can cause hyperammonemia. We established a novel immunocompromised murine model of Ureaplasma urealyticum infection and used it to confirm that U. urealyticum can cause hyperammonemia. Male C3H mice were pharmacologically immunosuppressed with mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus and oral prednisone for seven days, and then challenged intratracheally (IT) and/or intraperitoneally (IP) with 107 CFU U. urealyticum over six days, while continuing immunosuppression. Spent U. urealyticum-free U9 broth was used as a negative control, with uninfected immunocompetent mice, uninfected immunosuppressed mice, and infected immunocompetent mice serving as additional controls. Plasma ammonia concentrations were compared using Wilcoxon ranks sum tests. Plasma ammonia concentrations of immunosuppressed mice challenged IT/IP with spent U9 broth (n = 14) (range 155-330 μmol/L) were similar to those of normal mice (n = 5), uninfected immunosuppressed mice (n = 5), and U. urealyticum IT/IP challenged immunocompetent mice (n = 5) [range 99-340 μmol/L, p = 0.60]. However, immunosuppressed mice challenged with U. urealyticum IT/IP (n = 20) or IP (n = 15) had higher plasma ammonia concentrations (range 225-945 μmol/L and 276-687 μmol/L, respectively) than those challenged IT/IP with spent U9 broth (p<0.001). U. urealyticum administered IT/IP or IP causes hyperammonemia in mice pharmacologically immunosuppressed with a regimen similar to that administered to lung transplant recipients. PMID:27537683

  13. FOCAL: an experimental design tool for systematizing metabolic discoveries and model development.

    PubMed

    Tervo, Christopher J; Reed, Jennifer L

    2012-12-13

    Current computational tools can generate and improve genome-scale models based on existing data; however, for many organisms, the data needed to test and refine such models are not available. To facilitate model development, we created the forced coupling algorithm, FOCAL, to identify genetic and environmental conditions such that a reaction becomes essential for an experimentally measurable phenotype. This reaction's conditional essentiality can then be tested experimentally to evaluate whether network connections occur or to create strains with desirable phenotypes. FOCAL allows network connections to be queried, which improves our understanding of metabolism and accuracy of developed models.

  14. Analytical and experimental study of control effort associated with model reference adaptive control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messer, R. S.; Haftka, R. T.; Cudney, H. H.

    1992-01-01

    Numerical simulation results presently obtained for the performance of model reference adaptive control (MRAC) are experimentally verified, with a view to accounting for differences between the plant and the reference model after the control function has been brought to bear. MRAC is both experimentally and analytically applied to a single-degree-of-freedom system, as well as analytically to a MIMO system having controlled differences between the reference model and the plant. The control effort is noted to be sensitive to differences between the plant and the reference model.

  15. Experimental parameter estimation method for nonlinear viscoelastic composite material models: an application on arterial tissue.

    PubMed

    Sunbuloglu, Emin; Bozdag, Ergun; Toprak, Tuncer; Islak, Civan

    2013-01-01

    This study is aimed at setting a method of experimental parameter estimation for large-deforming nonlinear viscoelastic continuous fibre-reinforced composite material model. Specifically, arterial tissue was investigated during experimental research and parameter estimation studies, due to medical, scientific and socio-economic importance of soft tissue research. Using analytical formulations for specimens under combined inflation/extension/torsion on thick-walled cylindrical tubes, in vitro experiments were carried out with fresh sheep arterial segments, and parameter estimation procedures were carried out on experimental data. Model restrictions were pointed out using outcomes from parameter estimation. Needs for further studies that can be developed are discussed.

  16. Experimental characterization and modeling of a three-variant magnetic shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigenbaum, Heidi P.; Ciocanel, Constantin; Eberle, J. Lance; Dikes, Jason L.

    2016-10-01

    Researchers have attempted to characterize and predict the magneto-mechanical behavior of magnetic shape memory alloys (MSMAs) for over a decade. However, all prior experimental investigations on MSMA have been performed on samples accommodating two martensite variants and generally the MSMA is only exposed to two-dimensional magneto-mechanical loading. As efforts have been underway to develop models able to predict the most general (i.e. 3D) loading conditions for MSMAs with three-varints, there is also a need for experimental data to support the calibration and validation of these models. This paper presents magneto-mechanical data from experiments where MSMA specimens, whose microstructure accommodates three martensite variants, is subjected to three-dimensional magneto-mechanical loading, along with model predictions of these experimental results. The 3D magneto-mechanical model deployed here is a modified version of the model developed by our group (LaMaster et al 2015 J. Intell. Mater. Syst. Struct. 26 663-79), and assumes that three martensite variants coexist in the material. The LaMaster et al model captures some of the general trends seen in the experimental data, but does not predict the data with a high degree of accuracy. Possible reasons for the mismatch between experimental data and model predictions are discussed.

  17. Anisotropic Behaviour of Sand in the Small Strain Domain. Experimental Measurements and Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezaoui, A.; Di Benedetto, H.; Van Bang, D.

    This paper deals with the initial and loading path induced anisotropy for a sub angular granular material, Hostun sand. The "quasi" elastic properties observed in the small strain domain (<10-5 m/m) are considered. A "static and dynamic" triaxial device is used for the experimental campaign. First, the five parameters of the transverse isotropic elastic compliance tensor are experimentally obtained. The experimental investigations consist in applying small axial cyclic loadings (strain amplitude cycle ɛsa≅ 10-5 m/m) and four types of dynamic wave propagations, generated by piezoelectric sensors (compressive and shear waves in axial and radial directions). The followed isotropic and deviatoric stress path underlines the effects of respectively inherent and induced anisotropy. A rheological hypoelastic model, called DBGS model, which takes into account the stress induced anisotropy, is firstly described. This model is not sufficient to properly describe experimental results at isotropic stress state as well as thus obtained during deviatoric stress path for medium and large strain. Then, an extension of the model is proposed, called DBGSP model, where strain induced anisotropy is taken into account. The concept of virtual strain induced anisotropy is introduced in this rheological hypoelastic model developed at ENTPE, and the ability of the model to foresee experimental behaviour is checked.

  18. Modelling multi-scale deformation of amorphous glassy polymers with experimentally motivated evolution of the microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engqvist, Jonas; Wallin, Mathias; Ristinmaa, Matti; Hall, Stephen A.; Plivelic, Tomás S.

    2016-11-01

    Novel experimental data, obtained recently using advanced multi-scale experiments, have been used to develop a micro-mechanically motivated constitutive model for amorphous glassy polymers. Taking advantage of the experiments, the model makes use of a microstructural deformation gradient to incorporate the experimentally obtained deformation of the microstructure, as well as its evolving orientation. By comparing results from the model to experimental data, it is shown that the proposed approach is able to accurately predict glassy polymer deformation over a wide range of length-scales, from the macroscopic response (mm range) down to the deformation of the microstructure (nm range). The proposed model is evaluated by comparing the numerical response to experimental results on multiple scales from an inhomogeneous cold drawing experiment of glassy polycarbonate. Besides the macroscopic force-displacement response, a qualitative comparison of the deformation field at the surface of the specimen is performed. Furthermore, the predicted evolution of the fabric orientation is compared to experimental results obtained from X-ray scattering experiments. The model shows very good agreement with the experimental data over a wide range of length scales.

  19. Suits reflectance models for wheat and cotton - Theoretical and experimental tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chance, J. E.; Lemaster, E. W.

    1977-01-01

    Plant canopy reflectance models developed by Suits are tested for cotton and Penjamo winter wheat. Properties of the models are discussed, and the concept of model depth is developed. The models' predicted exchange symmetry for specular irradiance with respect to sun polar angle and observer polar angle agreed with field data for cotton and wheat. Model calculations and experimental data for wheat reflectance vs sun angle disagreed. Specular reflectance from 0.50 to 1.10 micron shows fair agreement between the model and wheat measurements. An Appendix includes the physical and optical parameters for wheat necessary to apply Suits' models.

  20. Experimentation with GRACE, the Generic Model of Emotions For Computational Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Thi-Hai-Ha; Duhaut, Dominique

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, we present a model of emotions that we proposed in EmotiRob project. First of all, we make a comparison of recent models of emotions and show that our model is generic in basing on the theories of emotions of Ortony et al., of Lazarus, of Scherer and then the personality theory of Meyers-Brigg and Meyers. Then, we present our experimentation with the first instance of the model and its result to validate our work.

  1. A Risk Prediction Model for Smoking Experimentation in Mexican American Youth

    PubMed Central

    Talluri, Rajesh; Wilkinson, Anna V.; Spitz, Margaret R.; Shete, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Background Smoking experimentation in Mexican American youth is problematic. In light of the research showing that preventing smoking experimentation is a valid strategy for smoking prevention, there is a need to identify Mexican American youth at high risk for experimentation. Methods A prospective population-based cohort of 1179 adolescents of Mexican descent was followed for 5 years starting in 2005–06. Participants completed a baseline interview at a home visit followed by three telephone interviews at intervals of approximately 6 months and additional interviews at two home visits in 2008–09 and 2010–11. The primary end point of interest in this study was smoking experimentation. Information regarding social, cultural, and behavioral factors (e.g., acculturation, susceptibility to experimentation, home characteristics, household influences) was collected at baseline using validated questionnaires. Results Age, sex, cognitive susceptibility, household smoking behavior, peer influence, neighborhood influence, acculturation, work characteristics, positive outcome expectations, family cohesion, degree of tension, ability to concentrate, and school discipline were found to be associated with smoking experimentation. In a validation dataset, the proposed risk prediction model had an AUC of 0.719 (95% confidence interval, 0.637 to 0.801)for predicting absolute risk for smoking experimentation within 1 year. Conclusions The proposed risk prediction model is able to quantify the risk of smoking experimentation in Mexican American adolescents. PMID:25063521

  2. D-Galactosamine Intoxication in Experimental Animals: Is it Only an Experimental Model of Acute Liver Failure?

    PubMed Central

    Saracyn, Marek; Zdanowski, Robert; Brytan, Marek; Kade, Grzegorz; Nowak, Zbigniew; Patera, Janusz; Dyrla, Przemysław; Gil, Jerzy; Wańkowicz, Zofia

    2015-01-01

    Background Short-term administration of Galactosamine to experimental animals causes liver damage and acute liver failure (ALF), as well as acute renal failure in some cases. The aim of our study was to describe kidney disorders that developed in the course of galactosamine-induced liver failure. Material/Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 2 groups: a study group administered galactosamine intraperitoneally and a control group administered saline. Results All the animals in the study group developed liver damage and failure within 48 h, with significant increase of alanine (p<0.001), aspartate aminotransferases (p<0.0001), bilirubin (p<0.004), and ammonia (p<0.005) and decrease of albumin (p<0.001) concentrations. Acute renal failure was observed in all test animals, with a significant increase in creatinine (p<0.001) and urea (p<0.001) concentrations and a decrease in creatinine clearance (p<0.0012). Moreover, osmotic clearance (p<0.001), daily natriuresis (p<0.003), and fractional sodium excretion (p<0.016) decreased significantly in this group of animals. The ratio of urine osmolality to serum osmolality did not change. Histopathology of the liver revealed massive necrosis of hepatocytes, whereas renal histopathology showed no changes. Conclusions Acute renal failure that developed in the course of galactosamine-induced ALF was of a functional nature, with the kidneys retaining the ability to concentrate urine and retain sodium, and there were no renal changes in the histopathological examination. It seems that the experimental model of ALF induced by galactosamine can be viewed as a model of hepatorenal syndrome that occurs in the course of acute damage and liver failure. PMID:26009004

  3. Experimental validation of a new biphasic model of the contact mechanics of the porcine hip

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qianqian; Jin, Zhongmin; Williams, Sophie; Fisher, John; Wilcox, Ruth K

    2014-01-01

    Hip models that incorporate the biphasic behaviour of articular cartilage can improve understanding of the joint function, pathology of joint degeneration and effect of potential interventions. The aim of this study was to develop a specimen-specific biphasic finite element model of a porcine acetabulum incorporating a biphasic representation of the articular cartilage and to validate the model predictions against direct experimental measurements of the contact area in the same specimen. Additionally, the effect of using a different tension–compression behaviour for the solid phase of the articular cartilage was investigated. The model represented different radial clearances and load magnitudes. The comparison of the finite element predictions and the experimental measurement showed good agreement in the location, size and shape of the contact area, and a similar trend in the relationship between contact area and load was observed. There was, however, a deviation of over 30% in the magnitude of the contact area, which might be due to experimental limitations or to simplifications in the material constitutive relationships used. In comparison with the isotropic solid phase model, the tension–compression solid phase model had better agreement with the experimental observations. The findings provide some confidence that the new biphasic methodology for modelling the cartilage is able to predict the contact mechanics of the hip joint. The validation provides a foundation for future subject-specific studies of the human hip using a biphasic cartilage model. PMID:24878736

  4. An outcome-based learning model to identify emerging threats : experimental and simulation results.

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Moyano, I. J.; Conrad, S. H.; Andersen, D. F.; Decision and Information Sciences; SNL; Univ. at Albany

    2007-01-01

    The authors present experimental and simulation results of an outcome-based learning model as it applies to the identification of emerging threats. This model integrates judgment, decision making, and learning theories to provide an integrated framework for the behavioral study of emerging threats.

  5. Experimental models of virus-induced demyelination of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Dal Canto, M C; Rabinowitz, S G

    1982-02-01

    One of the arguments in favor of a viral pathogenesis for multiple sclerosis is the existence of several experimental and natural animal models of virus-induced primary demyelination. This review deals comprehensively with such models. Well-known examples of demyelinating viral infections in their natural host are JHM, Theiler, visna, and canine distemper encephalomyelitides. Recent reports of experimental murine infections with pathogens such as vesicular stomatitis, Chandipura, herpes simplex, Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis, and Semliki Forest viruses are also discussed. The thrust of the review is to include viral models suspected of producing primary demyelination on an immunopathological basis.

  6. Minimally Invasive Swine Experimental Model for the In Vivo Study of Liver Metabolism of Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, O; Romano, R; Scarpati, G; Esposito, C; Cavaglià, E; Corona, M

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To develop a clinically relevant porcine model for the study of hepatic metabolism of drugs by means of hepatic vein catheterization. Materials and Methods: review of literature and elaboration of a hypothesis, design of an experimental method. Results: recent clinical studies were conducted by withdrawing cirrhotic patients’ blood from right hepatic vein during hepatic vein pressure gradient measurements. Basing on our personal clinical experience and evaluation of research needs, an experimental model is proposed. Conclusions: contemporary measurement of peripheral and hepatic concentration of drugs by peripheral vein and hepatic vein catheterization can be used to create a reliable and reproducible porcine model to study liver metabolism of drugs in vivo. PMID:23905064

  7. Numerical modeling and experimental measurements of water spray impact and transport over a cylinder.

    SciTech Connect

    Avedisian, C. T.; Presser, Cary; DesJardin, Paul Edward; Hewson, John C.; Yoon, Sam Sukgoo

    2005-03-01

    This study compares experimental measurements and numerical simulations of liquid droplets over heated (to a near surface temperature of 423 K) and unheated cylinders. The numerical model is based on an unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) formulation using a stochastic separated flow (SSF) approach for the droplets that includes submodels for droplet dispersion, heat and mass transfer, and impact on a solid surface. The details of the droplet impact model are presented and the model is used to simulate water spray impingement on a cylinder. Computational results are compared with experimental measurements using phase Doppler interferometry (PDI).

  8. Modelling Simple Experimental Platform for In Vitro Study of Drug Elution from Drug Eluting Stents (DES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalachev, L. V.

    2016-06-01

    We present a simple model of experimental setup for in vitro study of drug release from drug eluting stents and drug propagation in artificial tissue samples representing blood vessels. The model is further reduced using the assumption on vastly different characteristic diffusion times in the stent coating and in the artificial tissue. The model is used to derive a relationship between the times at which the measurements have to be taken for two experimental platforms, with corresponding artificial tissue samples made of different materials with different drug diffusion coefficients, to properly compare the drug release characteristics of drug eluting stents.

  9. Experimentally validated quantitative linear model for the device physics of elastomeric microfluidic valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartalov, Emil P.; Scherer, Axel; Quake, Stephen R.; Taylor, Clive R.; Anderson, W. French

    2007-03-01

    A systematic experimental study and theoretical modeling of the device physics of polydimethylsiloxane "pushdown" microfluidic valves are presented. The phase space is charted by 1587 dimension combinations and encompasses 45-295μm lateral dimensions, 16-39μm membrane thickness, and 1-28psi closing pressure. Three linear models are developed and tested against the empirical data, and then combined into a fourth-power-polynomial superposition. The experimentally validated final model offers a useful quantitative prediction for a valve's properties as a function of its dimensions. Typical valves (80-150μm width) are shown to behave like thin springs.

  10. Experimental validation of finite element modelling of a modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xijin; Wang, Ling; Al-Hajjar, Mazen; Jin, Zhongmin; Wilcox, Ruth K; Fisher, John

    2014-07-01

    Finite element models are becoming increasingly useful tools to conduct parametric analysis, design optimisation and pre-clinical testing for hip joint replacements. However, the verification of the finite element model is critically important. The purposes of this study were to develop a three-dimensional anatomic finite element model for a modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement for predicting its contact mechanics and to conduct experimental validation for a simple finite element model which was simplified from the anatomic finite element model. An anatomic modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement model (anatomic model) was first developed and then simplified with reasonable accuracy to a simple modular total hip replacement model (simplified model) for validation. The contact areas on the articulating surface of three polyethylene liners of modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement bearings with different clearances were measured experimentally in the Leeds ProSim hip joint simulator under a series of loading conditions and different cup inclination angles. The contact areas predicted from the simplified model were then compared with that measured experimentally under the same conditions. The results showed that the simplification made for the anatomic model did not change the predictions of contact mechanics of the modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement substantially (less than 12% for contact stresses and contact areas). Good agreements of contact areas between the finite element predictions from the simplified model and experimental measurements were obtained, with maximum difference of 14% across all conditions considered. This indicated that the simplification and assumptions made in the anatomic model were reasonable and the finite element predictions from the simplified model were valid.

  11. Experimental Evidence of the Superiority of the Prevalence Model of Conceptual Change over the Classical Models and Repetition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potvin, Patrice; Sauriol, Érik; Riopel, Martin

    2015-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study investigated the effects on 558 grades five and six students of three different teaching conditions: the "classical" model of conceptual change (for which cognitive conflict is considered as a precondition to the transformation of knowledge), the "prevalence" model of conceptual change (in which…

  12. A systematic multiscale modeling and experimental approach to protect grain boundaries in magnesium alloys from corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Horstemeyer, Mark R.; Chaudhuri, Santanu

    2015-09-30

    A multiscale modeling Internal State Variable (ISV) constitutive model was developed that captures the fundamental structure-property relationships. The macroscale ISV model used lower length scale simulations (Butler-Volmer and Electronics Structures results) in order to inform the ISVs at the macroscale. The chemomechanical ISV model was calibrated and validated from experiments with magnesium (Mg) alloys that were investigated under corrosive environments coupled with experimental electrochemical studies. Because the ISV chemomechanical model is physically based, it can be used for other material systems to predict corrosion behavior. As such, others can use the chemomechanical model for analyzing corrosion effects on their designs.

  13. Experimental and modeling study of the uranium (VI) sorption on goethite.

    PubMed

    Missana, Tiziana; García-Gutiérrez, Miguel; Maffiotte, Cesar

    2003-04-15

    Acicular goethite was synthesized in the laboratory and its main physicochemical properties (composition, microstructure, surface area, and surface charge) were analyzed as a previous step to sorption experiments. The stability of the oxide, under the conditions used in sorption studies, was also investigated. The sorption of U(VI) onto goethite was studied under O(2)- and CO(2)-free atmosphere and in a wide range of experimental conditions (pH, ionic strength, radionuclide, and solid concentration), in order to assess the validity of different surface complexation models available for the interpretation of sorption data. Three different models were used to fit the experimental data. The first two models were based on the diffuse double layer concept. The first one (Model 1) considered two different monodentate complexes with the goethite surface and the second (Model 2) a single binuclear bidentate complex. A nonelectrostatic (NE) approach was used as a third model and, in that case, the same species considered in Model 1 were used. The results showed that all the models are able to describe the sorption behavior fairly well as a function of pH, electrolyte concentration, and U(VI) concentration. However, Model 2 fails in the description of the uranium sorption behavior as a function of the sorbent concentration. This demonstrates the importance of checking the validity of any surface complexation model under the widest possible range of experimental conditions.

  14. Population-reaction model and microbial experimental ecosystems for understanding hierarchical dynamics of ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Hosoda, Kazufumi; Tsuda, Soichiro; Kadowaki, Kohmei; Nakamura, Yutaka; Nakano, Tadashi; Ishii, Kojiro

    2016-02-01

    Understanding ecosystem dynamics is crucial as contemporary human societies face ecosystem degradation. One of the challenges that needs to be recognized is the complex hierarchical dynamics. Conventional dynamic models in ecology often represent only the population level and have yet to include the dynamics of the sub-organism level, which makes an ecosystem a complex adaptive system that shows characteristic behaviors such as resilience and regime shifts. The neglect of the sub-organism level in the conventional dynamic models would be because integrating multiple hierarchical levels makes the models unnecessarily complex unless supporting experimental data are present. Now that large amounts of molecular and ecological data are increasingly accessible in microbial experimental ecosystems, it is worthwhile to tackle the questions of their complex hierarchical dynamics. Here, we propose an approach that combines microbial experimental ecosystems and a hierarchical dynamic model named population-reaction model. We present a simple microbial experimental ecosystem as an example and show how the system can be analyzed by a population-reaction model. We also show that population-reaction models can be applied to various ecological concepts, such as predator-prey interactions, climate change, evolution, and stability of diversity. Our approach will reveal a path to the general understanding of various ecosystems and organisms. PMID:26747638

  15. Comparison of Computational, Model and Experimental, Example Trained Neural Networks for Processing Speckled Fringe Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, A. J.; Fite, E. B.; Thorp, S. A.; Mehmed, O.

    1998-01-01

    The responses of artificial neural networks to experimental and model-generated inputs are compared for detection of damage in twisted fan blades using electronic holography. The training-set inputs, for this work, are experimentally generated characteristic patterns of the vibrating blades. The outputs are damage-flag indicators or second derivatives of the sensitivity-vector-projected displacement vectors from a finite element model. Artificial neural networks have been trained in the past with computational-model- generated training sets. This approach avoids the difficult inverse calculations traditionally used to compare interference fringes with the models. But the high modeling standards are hard to achieve, even with fan-blade finite-element models.

  16. Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project (PlioMIP): Experimental Design and Boundary Conditions (Experiment 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haywood, A. M.; Dowsett, H. J.; Robinson, M. M.; Stoll, D. K.; Dolan, A. M.; Lunt, D. J.; Otto-Bliesner, B.; Chandler, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    The Palaeoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project has expanded to include a model intercomparison for the mid-Pliocene warm period (3.29 to 2.97 million yr ago). This project is referred to as PlioMIP (the Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project). Two experiments have been agreed upon and together compose the initial phase of PlioMIP. The first (Experiment 1) is being performed with atmosphere only climate models. The second (Experiment 2) utilizes fully coupled ocean-atmosphere climate models. Following on from the publication of the experimental design and boundary conditions for Experiment 1 in Geoscientific Model Development, this paper provides the necessary description of differences and/or additions to the experimental design for Experiment 2.

  17. Activated sludge pilot plant: comparison between experimental and predicted concentration profiles using three different modelling approaches.

    PubMed

    Le Moullec, Y; Potier, O; Gentric, C; Leclerc, J P

    2011-05-01

    This paper presents an experimental and numerical study of an activated sludge channel pilot plant. Concentration profiles of oxygen, COD, NO(3) and NH(4) have been measured for several operating conditions. These profiles have been compared to the simulated ones with three different modelling approaches, namely a systemic approach, CFD and compartmental modelling. For these three approaches, the kinetics model was the ASM-1 model (Henze et al., 2001). The three approaches allowed a reasonable simulation of all the concentration profiles except for ammonium for which the simulations results were far from the experimental ones. The analysis of the results showed that the role of the kinetics model is of primary importance for the prediction of activated sludge reactors performance. The fact that existing kinetics parameters in the literature have been determined by parametric optimisation using a systemic model limits the reliability of the prediction of local concentrations and of the local design of activated sludge reactors. PMID:21489593

  18. Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project (PlioMIP): experimental design and boundary conditions (Experiment 2)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haywood, A.M.; Dowsett, H.J.; Robinson, M.M.; Stoll, D.K.; Dolan, A.M.; Lunt, D.J.; Otto-Bliesner, B.; Chandler, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    The Palaeoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project has expanded to include a model intercomparison for the mid-Pliocene warm period (3.29 to 2.97 million yr ago). This project is referred to as PlioMIP (the Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project). Two experiments have been agreed upon and together compose the initial phase of PlioMIP. The first (Experiment 1) is being performed with atmosphere-only climate models. The second (Experiment 2) utilises fully coupled ocean-atmosphere climate models. Following on from the publication of the experimental design and boundary conditions for Experiment 1 in Geoscientific Model Development, this paper provides the necessary description of differences and/or additions to the experimental design for Experiment 2.

  19. Experimental constraints on the neutrino oscillations and a simple model of three-flavor mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Raczka, P.A.; Szymacha, A. ); Tatur, S. )

    1994-02-01

    A simple model of neutrino mixing is considered which contains only one right-handed neutrino field coupled, via the mass term, to the three usual left-handed fields. This is the simplest model that allows for three-flavor neutrino oscillations. The existing experimental limits on the neutrino oscillations are used to obtain constraints on the two free-mixing parameters of the model. A specific sum rule relating the oscillation probabilities of different flavors is derived.

  20. A Novel Multiple Objective Optimization Framework for Constraining Conductance-Based Neuron Models by Experimental Data

    PubMed Central

    Druckmann, Shaul; Banitt, Yoav; Gidon, Albert; Schürmann, Felix; Markram, Henry; Segev, Idan

    2007-01-01

    We present a novel framework for automatically constraining parameters of compartmental models of neurons, given a large set of experimentally measured responses of these neurons. In experiments, intrinsic noise gives rise to a large variability (e.g., in firing pattern) in the voltage responses to repetitions of the exact same input. Thus, the common approach of fitting models by attempting to perfectly replicate, point by point, a single chosen trace out of the spectrum of variable responses does not seem to do justice to the data. In addition, finding a single error function that faithfully characterizes the distance between two spiking traces is not a trivial pursuit. To address these issues, one can adopt a multiple objective optimization approach that allows the use of several error functions jointly. When more than one error function is available, the comparison between experimental voltage traces and model response can be performed on the basis of individual features of interest (e.g., spike rate, spike width). Each feature can be compared between model and experimental mean, in units of its experimental variability, thereby incorporating into the fitting this variability. We demonstrate the success of this approach, when used in conjunction with genetic algorithm optimization, in generating an excellent fit between model behavior and the firing pattern of two distinct electrical classes of cortical interneurons, accommodating and fast-spiking. We argue that the multiple, diverse models generated by this method could serve as the building blocks for the realistic simulation of large neuronal networks. PMID:18982116

  1. Experimental verification of a prediction model for hydrate-bearing sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkert, S.; Grozic, J. L. H.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents an experimental verification of a prediction model for the mechanical properties of hydrate-bearing sand. The model is examined using experimental drained triaxial test results of three independent data sets, which are associated with different hydrate formations and testing conditions. For each data set, an optimization process is applied based on numerical modeling of the testing conditions in order to evaluate the pure sand properties. Based on these properties, the model forecasts the stress-stain curves for different hydrate saturations, based on an advanced hydrate simulator. Although the model does not show a fair forecast with "ice-seeding" hydrate formation samples and for specimens tested under gas saturation, it predicts the mechanical behavior of samples with "partly saturated" hydrate formation tested under water saturation.

  2. Thermodynamics of shape memory alloy wire: Modeling, experimental calibration, and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Bi-Chiau

    A thermomechanical model for a shape memory alloy (SMA) wire under uniaxial loading is implemented in a finite element framework, and simulation results are compared with mechanical and infrared experimental data. The constitutive model is a one-dimensional strain-gradient continuum model of an SMA wire element, including two internal field variables, possible unstable mechanical behavior, and the relevant thermomechanical couplings resulting from latent heat effects. The model is calibrated to recent and new experiments of typical commercially available polycrystalline NiTi wire. The shape memory effect and pseudoelastic behaviors are demonstrated numerically as a function of applied displacement rate and environmental parameters, and the results compare favorably to experimental data. The model is then used to simulate a simple SMA actuator device, and its performance is assessed for different thermal boundary conditions.

  3. Theoretical and experimental correlation of low-speed model helicopter blade slap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Daniel Chin-Leung; Hubbard, James E., Jr.

    1985-09-01

    The operating conditions under which the assumptions made in the Widnall and Wolf (1980) model of low-speed helicopter blade slap are correct are investigated. Using a limited number of miniature pressure transducers on a scale model helicopter rotor blade, the load distribution near the tip is estimated and used as input to the Widnall and Wolf model to determine the structure of the trailing vortex. The geometry of the blade-vortex interaction is determined by smoke visualization techniques. The unsteady load on the blade resulting from the blade-gust interaction is modeled as a distribution of acoustic dipoles. The predicted sound pressure level is compared with the experimentally obtained far-field acoustic signature. Good agreement is found between the Widnall and Wolf model and the experimental results for the blade-vortex interactions in the region outside the vortex core.

  4. Emerging Trends in Heart Valve Engineering: Part IV. Computational Modeling and Experimental Studies.

    PubMed

    Kheradvar, Arash; Groves, Elliott M; Falahatpisheh, Ahmad; Mofrad, Mohammad K; Hamed Alavi, S; Tranquillo, Robert; Dasi, Lakshmi P; Simmons, Craig A; Jane Grande-Allen, K; Goergen, Craig J; Baaijens, Frank; Little, Stephen H; Canic, Suncica; Griffith, Boyce

    2015-10-01

    In this final portion of an extensive review of heart valve engineering, we focus on the computational methods and experimental studies related to heart valves. The discussion begins with a thorough review of computational modeling and the governing equations of fluid and structural interaction. We then move onto multiscale and disease specific modeling. Finally, advanced methods related to in vitro testing of the heart valves are reviewed. This section of the review series is intended to illustrate application of computational methods and experimental studies and their interrelation for studying heart valves.

  5. Model-free constrained data-driven iterative reference input tuning algorithm with experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radac, Mircea-Bogdan; Precup, Radu-Emil

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the design and experimental validation of a new model-free data-driven iterative reference input tuning (IRIT) algorithm that solves a reference trajectory tracking problem as an optimization problem with control signal saturation constraints and control signal rate constraints. The IRIT algorithm design employs an experiment-based stochastic search algorithm to use the advantages of iterative learning control. The experimental results validate the IRIT algorithm applied to a non-linear aerodynamic position control system. The results prove that the IRIT algorithm offers the significant control system performance improvement by few iterations and experiments conducted on the real-world process and model-free parameter tuning.

  6. Model wall and recovery temperature effects on experimental heat transfer data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Throckmorton, D. A.; Stone, D. R.

    1974-01-01

    Basic analytical procedures are used to illustrate, both qualitatively and quantitatively, the relative impact upon heat transfer data analysis of certain factors which may affect the accuracy of experimental heat transfer data. Inaccurate knowledge of adiabatic wall conditions results in a corresponding inaccuracy in the measured heat transfer coefficient. The magnitude of the resulting error is extreme for data obtained at wall temperatures approaching the adiabatic condition. High model wall temperatures and wall temperature gradients affect the level and distribution of heat transfer to an experimental model. The significance of each of these factors is examined and its impact upon heat transfer data analysis is assessed.

  7. Experimental study and modelling of selenite sorption onto illite and smectite clays.

    PubMed

    Missana, T; Alonso, U; García-Gutiérrez, M

    2009-06-15

    This study provides a large set of experimental selenite sorption data for pure smectite and illite. Similar sorption behavior existed in both clays: linear within a large range of the Se concentrations investigated (from 1x10(-10) to 1x10(-3) M); and independent of ionic strength. Selenite sorption was also analysed in the illite/smectite system with the clays mixed in two different proportions, as follows: (a) 30% illite-70% smectite and (b) 43% illite-57% smectite. The objective of the study was to provide the simplest model possible to fit the experimental data, a model also capable of describing selenite sorption in binary illite/smectite clay systems. Selenite sorption data, separately obtained in the single mineral systems, were modeled using both a one- and a two-site non-electrostatic model that took into account the formation of two complexes at the edge sites of the clay. Although the use of a two-site model slightly improved the fit of data at a pH below 4, the simpler one-site model reproduced satisfactorily all the sorption data from pH 3 to 8. The complexation constants obtained by fitting sorption data of the individual minerals were incorporated into a model to predict the adsorption of selenium in the illite/smectite mixtures; the model's predictions were consistent with the experimental adsorption data. PMID:19403144

  8. Ecosystem effects of environmental flows: Modelling and experimental floods in a dryland river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shafroth, P.B.; Wilcox, A.C.; Lytle, D.A.; Hickey, J.T.; Andersen, D.C.; Beauchamp, Vanessa B.; Hautzinger, A.; McMullen, L.E.; Warner, A.

    2010-01-01

    Successful environmental flow prescriptions require an accurate understanding of the linkages among flow events, geomorphic processes and biotic responses. We describe models and results from experimental flow releases associated with an environmental flow program on the Bill Williams River (BWR), Arizona, in arid to semiarid western U.S.A. Two general approaches for improving knowledge and predictions of ecological responses to environmental flows are: (1) coupling physical system models to ecological responses and (2) clarifying empirical relationships between flow and ecological responses through implementation and monitoring of experimental flow releases. We modelled the BWR physical system using: (1) a reservoir operations model to simulate reservoir releases and reservoir water levels and estimate flow through the river system under a range of scenarios, (2) one- and two-dimensional river hydraulics models to estimate stage-discharge relationships at the whole-river and local scales, respectively, and (3) a groundwater model to estimate surface- and groundwater interactions in a large, alluvial valley on the BWR where surface flow is frequently absent. An example of a coupled, hydrology-ecology model is the Ecosystems Function Model, which we used to link a one-dimensional hydraulic model with riparian tree seedling establishment requirements to produce spatially explicit predictions of seedling recruitment locations in a Geographic Information System. We also quantified the effects of small experimental floods on the differential mortality of native and exotic riparian trees, on beaver dam integrity and distribution, and on the dynamics of differentially flow-adapted benthic macroinvertebrate groups. Results of model applications and experimental flow releases are contributing to adaptive flow management on the BWR and to the development of regional environmental flow standards. General themes that emerged from our work include the importance of response

  9. Clinical pharmacology of analgesics assessed with human experimental pain models: bridging basic and clinical research

    PubMed Central

    Oertel, Bruno Georg; Lötsch, Jörn

    2013-01-01

    The medical impact of pain is such that much effort is being applied to develop novel analgesic drugs directed towards new targets and to investigate the analgesic efficacy of known drugs. Ongoing research requires cost-saving tools to translate basic science knowledge into clinically effective analgesic compounds. In this review we have re-examined the prediction of clinical analgesia by human experimental pain models as a basis for model selection in phase I studies. The overall prediction of analgesic efficacy or failure of a drug correlated well between experimental and clinical settings. However, correct model selection requires more detailed information about which model predicts a particular clinical pain condition. We hypothesized that if an analgesic drug was effective in an experimental pain model and also a specific clinical pain condition, then that model might be predictive for that particular condition and should be selected for development as an analgesic for that condition. The validity of the prediction increases with an increase in the numbers of analgesic drug classes for which this agreement was shown. From available evidence, only five clinical pain conditions were correctly predicted by seven different pain models for at least three different drugs. Most of these models combine a sensitization method. The analysis also identified several models with low impact with respect to their clinical translation. Thus, the presently identified agreements and non-agreements between analgesic effects on experimental and on clinical pain may serve as a solid basis to identify complex sets of human pain models that bridge basic science with clinical pain research. PMID:23082949

  10. Elements of a flexible approach for conceptual hydrological modeling: 2. Application and experimental insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavetski, Dmitri; Fenicia, Fabrizio

    2011-11-01

    In this article's companion paper, flexible approaches for conceptual hydrological modeling at the catchment scale were motivated, and the SUPERFLEX framework, based on generic model components, was introduced. In this article, the SUPERFLEX framework and the "fixed structure" GR4H model (an hourly version of the popular GR4J model) are applied to four hydrologically distinct experimental catchments in Europe and New Zealand. The estimated models are scrutinized using several diagnostic measures, ranging from statistical metrics, such as the statistical reliability and precision of the predictive distribution of streamflow, to more process-oriented diagnostics based on flow-duration curves and the correspondence between model states and groundwater piezometers. Model performance was clearly catchment specific, with a single fixed structure unable to accommodate intercatchment differences in hydrological behavior, including seasonality and thresholds. This highlights an important limitation of any "fixed" model structure. In the experimental catchments, the ability of competing model hypotheses to reproduce hydrological signatures of interest could be interpreted on the basis of independent fieldwork insights. The potential of flexible frameworks such as SUPERFLEX is then examined with respect to systematic and stringent hypothesis-testing in hydrological modeling, for characterizing catchment diversity, and, more generally, for aiding progress toward a more unified formulation of hydrological theory at the catchment scale. When interpreted in physical process-oriented terms, the flexible approach can also serve as a language for dialogue between modeler and experimentalist, facilitating the understanding, representation, and interpretation of catchment behavior.

  11. Combined Experimental and Numerical Diagnostics for Near-field Flow around a Supersonic Flight Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Atsushi; Shimizu, Katsuya; Suzuki, Kakuei; Sasoh, Akihiro; Murakami, Keiichi; Aoyama, Takashi

    A system for evaluating the near-field pressure distribution around a supersonic flight model by combining experimental and numerical diagnostics has been developed. Experimental measurement is conducted using a ballistic range with four kinds of axi-symmetric flight models. Schlieren flow visualization is recorded using a high-speed framing camera and near-field pressure histories are measured using piezoelectric pressure transducers flush-mounted on the surface of flat plates in the test section. The numerical diagnostics is done using FaSTAR, a numerical simulation tool developed by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). The experimental and numerical data are compared to each other, and the numerical results well validated. Based on the numerical results, it becomes possible to estimate the accuracy of experimental conditions including the flight path and angle of attack, which cannot readily be determined only from experimental data, and to discuss the relationship between peak overpressure and aerodynamic performance. Satisfactory agreement between the experimental and numerical results at a flight Mach number of 1.66±0.02 and important insights related to rear boom strength are obtained.

  12. Benchmark models and experimental data for a U(20) polyethylene-moderated critical system

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, Larry; Busch, Robert D.; Bowen, Douglas G

    2015-01-01

    This work involves the analysis of recent experiments performed on the Aerojet General Nucleonics (AGN)-201M (AGN) polyethylene-moderated research reactor at the University of New Mexico (UNM). The experiments include 36 delayed critical (DC) configurations and 11 positive-period and rod-drop measurements (transient sequences). The Even Parity Neutron Transport (EVENT) radiation transport code was chosen to analyze these steady state and time-dependent experimental configurations. The UNM AGN specifications provided in a benchmark calculation report (2007) were used to initiate AGN EVENT model development and to test the EVENT AGN calculation methodology. The results of the EVENT DC experimental analyses compared well with the experimental data; the average AGN EVENT calculation bias in the keff is –0.0048% for the Legrendre Flux Expansion Order of 11 (P11) cases and +0.0119% for the P13 cases. The EVENT transient analysis also compared well with the AGN experimental data with respect to predicting the reactor period and control rod worth values. This paper discusses the benchmark models used, the recent experimental configurations, and the EVENT experimental analysis.

  13. Laser transmission welding of composites - Part B: Experimental validation of numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akué Asséko, André Chateau; Cosson, Benoît; Schmidt, Fabrice; Le Maoult, Yannick; Gilblas, Rémi; Lafranche, Eric

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, experimental measurements are performed to confirm the global analytical model (refraction and absorption phenomena) presented in the previous work. Initially, an experimental approach to the estimation of the laser beam spread in a semi-transparent composite and at interface (width of the output beam) subjected to an incident heat flux, was presented. This parameter represents a fundamental input data for the global analytical model (refraction and absorption) during the numerical simulation of transmission infrared welding. Then, an experimental setup for the temperature measurement is performed using infrared camera, during infrared transmission welding of materials joints to validate the welding simulation results (a transient numerical model, based both on conduction and radiation mode heat transfer) with the developed analytical model. The commercial FEM software COMSOL Multiphysics® is used to compute temperature distribution by implementing a radiative source term. Numerical simulations are compared with experimental data. The agreement between simulations and experiments is fair, which gives confidence to use the developed model with acceptable accuracy.

  14. Endothelial dysfunction in experimental models of arterial hypertension: cause or consequence?

    PubMed

    Bernatova, Iveta

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is a risk factor for other cardiovascular diseases and endothelial dysfunction was found in humans as well as in various commonly employed animal experimental models of arterial hypertension. Data from the literature indicate that, in general, endothelial dysfunction would not be the cause of experimental hypertension and may rather be secondary, that is, resulting from high blood pressure (BP). The initial mechanism of endothelial dysfunction itself may be associated with a lack of endothelium-derived relaxing factors (mainly nitric oxide) and/or accentuation of various endothelium-derived constricting factors. The involvement and role of endothelium-derived factors in the development of endothelial dysfunction in individual experimental models of hypertension may vary, depending on the triggering stimulus, strain, age, and vascular bed investigated. This brief review was focused on the participation of endothelial dysfunction, individual endothelium-derived factors, and their mechanisms of action in the development of high BP in the most frequently used rodent experimental models of arterial hypertension, including nitric oxide deficient models, spontaneous (pre)hypertension, stress-induced hypertension, and selected pharmacological and diet-induced models.

  15. An Improved Experimental Model of Hemorrhoids in Rats: Evaluation of Antihemorrhoidal Activity of an Herbal Formulation

    PubMed Central

    Azeemuddin, Mohammed; Viswanatha, Gollapalle Lakshminarayanashastry; Thippeswamy, Agadi HireMath; Baig, Mirza Rizwan; Kavya, Kethaganahalli Jayaramaiah; Patki, Pralhad Sadashiv; Shyam, Ramakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To improve the existing experimental model of croton oil-induced hemorrhoids in rats by using Evans Blue (EB) dye extravasation technique. Further, an herbal formulation (Pilex) was evaluated for its antihemorrhoidal activity in this model. Methods. Two sets of experiments were carried out: first to improve the experimental model and to validate the same using Pilex and second to evaluate the effect of Pilex on cytoarchitecture of rectoanal tissue in croton oil-induced hemorrhoids. In both sets, hemorrhoids were induced to all the animals, except normal controls, by applying croton oil via rectoanal region and the effect of Pilex ointment (PO), Pilex granules (PG), and combination of PG and PO was evaluated. In the first set, extravasation of EB dye, TNF-α, IL-6, and rectoanal coefficient (RAC) was determined. In the second set, severity of score, RAC, and histopathology were evaluated. Results. The elevated levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and extravasations of EB dye were decreased with the Pilex treatment. The cytoarchitecture of rectoanal portion of the animals treated with Pilex was near to normal. Conclusion. The improved experimental model of hemorrhoid is useful in quantifying the inflammatory exudates and extent of inflammation. In this improved experimental model Pilex showed antihemorrhoidal activity, which further validates its clinical usage. PMID:25006493

  16. Using experimental human influenza infections to validate a viral dynamic model and the implications for prediction.

    PubMed

    Chen, S C; You, S H; Liu, C Y; Chio, C P; Liao, C M

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this work was to use experimental infection data of human influenza to assess a simple viral dynamics model in epithelial cells and better understand the underlying complex factors governing the infection process. The developed study model expands on previous reports of a target cell-limited model with delayed virus production. Data from 10 published experimental infection studies of human influenza was used to validate the model. Our results elucidate, mechanistically, the associations between epithelial cells, human immune responses, and viral titres and were supported by the experimental infection data. We report that the maximum total number of free virions following infection is 10(3)-fold higher than the initial introduced titre. Our results indicated that the infection rates of unprotected epithelial cells probably play an important role in affecting viral dynamics. By simulating an advanced model of viral dynamics and applying it to experimental infection data of human influenza, we obtained important estimates of the infection rate. This work provides epidemiologically meaningful results, meriting further efforts to understand the causes and consequences of influenza A infection.

  17. Experimental And Numerical Modelling Of The Priming Operation In Spacecraft Propulsion Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lema, Marcos; Pinho, Jorge; Steelant, Johan; Lopez-Pena, Fernando; Rambaud, Patrick

    2011-05-01

    The present study investigates experimentally and numerically the fluid hammer phenomenon in a confined environment, representing the priming operation of spacecraft propulsion systems. For the experimental approach, a new facility has been designed at the von Karman Institute, which can reproduce all the physical phenomena taking place in the propellant lines during a priming process. The simplified test procedure allows the recording of the pressure evolution of the liquid front with a fast response pressure transducer. The numerical approach is done with the numerical codes used by the European Space Agency (ESA) to support the propulsion systems design, i.e. EcosimPro/ESPSS and CFD-ACE+, simulating the experimental configuration both with 1D and 3D approaches. Comparing the numerical results with the experimental measurements indicates that the modelling of two-phase, two-component transient flows is a requirement for a proper simulation.

  18. A comparative study of behaviors of ventilated supercavities between experimental models with different mounting configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Jae; Kawakami, Ellison; Karn, Ashish; Arndt, Roger E. A.

    2016-08-01

    Small-scale water tunnel experiments of the phenomenon of supercavitation can be carried out broadly using two different kinds of experimental models-in the first model (forward facing model, or FFM), the incoming flow first interacts with the cavitator at front, which is connected to the strut through a ventilation pipe. The second model could have the strut and the ventilation pipe preceding the cavitator (backward facing model, or BFM). This is the continuation of a water tunnel study of the effects of unsteady flows on axisymmetric supercavities. In this study, the unwanted effect of test model configuration on supercavity shape in periodic flows was explored through a comparison of FFM and BFM models. In our experiments, it was found that periodic gust flows have only a minimal effect on the maximum diameter and the cavity length can be shortened above a certain vertical velocity of periodic flows. These findings appear to be robust regardless of the model configuration.

  19. Experimental Model of Saccular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in Swines with Pericardium Sac

    PubMed Central

    Aquino, Maurício de Amorim; de Barros, Svetlana Maria Wanderley; Castro, Aldemar Araújo; Pitta, Guilherme Benjamin Brandão; Pereira, Adamastor Humberto

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To consider modifications in an experimental model of saccular aortic aneurysm, aiming at better reproducibility, to be used in the development of vascular prostheses. Methods: Experimental study in two phases, developed in the Center of Experimental Surgery and Bioterium (CCEB) of the University of Health Sciences of Alagoas (UNCISAL), with 11 hybrid swine, female, mean weight of 20 ± 5 kg, according to modifications in the Perini technique was performed. In the first phase, the aneurysm was confectioned with bovine pericardial patch. In the second phase, fifteen days later, the patency of the aneurysms was confirmed by Doppler ultrasonography. The described variables were aortic and aneurysm sac patency, incidence of rupture, morbidity and mortality. The statistical analysis program used was STATA v.8. Results: All animals survived to the procedures. Surgical mean time was 73 minutes. Aneurysm rupture, proximal or distal aortic thrombosis, visceral or legs ischemia weren't observed. Parietal thrombus formation was observed in all of the aneurysms, two of which (18%; IC 95% = 3.98 - 48.84) were occluded and nine (82%; IC 95% = 51.15 - 96.01) were patent. Conclusion: In this series, the modifications carried out in the technique related to the surgical approach, race, anesthesia, and imaging exams reproduced the experimental model, reducing its costs, without hindering the analysis of the variables. The satisfactory patency ratio allows the method to be used in experimental models for the development of vascular prostheses. PMID:27074279

  20. Experimental validation of coupled heat, air and moisture transfer modeling in multilayer building components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferroukhi, M. Y.; Abahri, K.; Belarbi, R.; Limam, K.; Nouviaire, A.

    2016-10-01

    The present paper lies to study the coupled heat, air and moisture transfer in multi-layer building materials. Concerning the modeling part, the interest is to predict the hygrothermal behavior, by developing a macroscopic model that incorporates simultaneously the diffusive, convective and conductive effects on the building elements. Heat transfer is considered in the strongly coupled situation where the mass and heat flux are temperature, vapor pressure and total pressure dependents. The model input parameters are evaluated experimentally through the development of various experimental prototypes in the laboratory. Thereafter, an experimental setup has been established in order to evaluate the hygrothermal process of several multilayer walls configurations. The experimental procedure consists to follow the temperature and relative humidity evolutions within the samples thickness, submitted to controlled and fixed boundary conditions. This procedure points out diverging conclusion between different testing materials combinations (e.g. red-brick and polystyrene). In fact, the hygrothermal behavior of the tested configurations is completely dependent on both materials selection and their thermophysical properties. Finally, comparison between numerical and experimental results showed good agreement with acceptable errors margins with an average of 3 %.

  1. An experimental manipulation of metacognition: a test of the metacognitive model of obsessive-compulsive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Myers, Samuel G; Wells, Adrian

    2013-05-01

    The metacognitive model of obsessive-compulsive symptoms [Wells, A. (1997). Cognitive therapy of anxiety disorders: A practice manual and conceptual guide. Chichester, UK: Wiley] assigns a necessary causal role to metacognitive beliefs in the development of symptoms. The current study tested the model by evaluating the effects of experimentally manipulating such beliefs. A 2×2 factorial design was used. Thirty-two students with high and 32 students with low obsessional symptoms were subject to an experimental (metacognitive belief induction) or control (no metacognitive belief induction) condition. All participants underwent fake EEG recordings and were informed that the EEG could sense hypothalamus activity caused by having thoughts related to drinking. Participants in the experimental condition were told that if such thoughts were detected they may be exposed to an aversive noise. Controls were told that they may hear an aversive noise but this would be unrelated to the thoughts they had. Results showed a significant interaction effect between level of obsessional symptoms and belief induction. Analysis of this effect demonstrated that in the high obsession group, participants in the experimental condition had significantly more intrusions about drinking, time spent thinking about these intrusions and discomfort from them, than controls. There were also significant main effects on some measures, such as effort to control intrusions about drinking, with higher scores in the experimental condition irrespective of levels of obsessional symptoms. Results support the metacognitive model.

  2. Smooth muscle modeling and experimental identification: application to bladder isometric contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laforêt, Jérémy; Guiraud, David; Andreu, David; Taillades, Hubert; Azevedo Coste, Christine

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents an original smooth muscle model based on the Huxley microscopic approach. This model is the main part of a comprehensive lower urinary track model. The latter is used for simulation studies and is assessed through experiments on rabbits, for which a subset of parameters is estimated, using intravesical pressure measurements in isometric conditions. Bladder contraction is induced by electrical stimulation that determines the onset and thus synchronizes simulation and experimental data. Model sensitivity versus parameter accuracy is discussed and allows the definition of a subset of four parameters that must be accurately identified in order to obtain good fitting between experimental and acquired data. Preliminary experimental data are presented as well as model identification results. They show that the model is able to follow the pressure changes induced by an artificial stimulus in isometric contractions. Moreover, the model gives an insight into the internal changes in calcium concentration and the ratio of the different chemical species present in the muscle cells, in particular the bounded and unbounded actin and myosin and the normalized concentration of intracellular calcium.

  3. Making the abstract concrete: the role of norms and values in experimental modeling.

    PubMed

    Peschard, Isabelle F; van Fraassen, Bas C

    2014-06-01

    Experimental modeling is the construction of theoretical models hand in hand with experimental activity. As explained in Section 1, experimental modeling starts with claims about phenomena that use abstract concepts, concepts whose conditions of realization are not yet specified; and it ends with a concrete model of the phenomenon, a model that can be tested against data. This paper argues that this process from abstract concepts to concrete models involves judgments of relevance, which are irreducibly normative. In Section 2, we show, on the basis of several case studies, how these judgments contribute to the determination of the conditions of realization of the abstract concepts and, at the same time, of the quantities that characterize the phenomenon under study. Then, in Section 3, we compare this view on modeling with other approaches that also have acknowledged the role of relevance judgments in science. To conclude, in Section 4, we discuss the possibility of a plurality of relevance judgments and introduce a distinction between locally and generally relevant factors.

  4. New Experimental Models of Diabetic Nephropathy in Mice Models of Type 2 Diabetes: Efforts to Replicate Human Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Soler, María José; Riera, Marta; Batlle, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease. The use of experimental models of DN has provided valuable information regarding many aspects of DN, including pathophysiology, progression, implicated genes, and new therapeutic strategies. A large number of mouse models of diabetes have been identified and their kidney disease was characterized to various degrees. Most experimental models of type 2 DN are helpful in studying early stages of DN, but these models have not been able to reproduce the characteristic features of more advanced DN in humans such as nodules in the glomerular tuft or glomerulosclerosis. The generation of new experimental models of DN created by crossing, knockdown, or knockin of genes continues to provide improved tools for studying DN. These models provide an opportunity to search for new mechanisms involving the development of DN, but their shortcomings should be recognized as well. Moreover, it is important to recognize that the genetic background has a substantial effect on the susceptibility to diabetes and kidney disease development in the various models of diabetes. PMID:22461787

  5. Experimental modification and identification of the DSS-13 antenna control system model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racho, C. S.; Gawronski, W. K.

    1993-01-01

    This work is the first step toward increasing the bandwidth of the DSS-13 antenna position loop controller. A wider bandwidth of the controller allows for faster tracking rates and better pointing performance under windy conditions. To achieve this goal, the antenna control system model has to be improved, such that it will accurately reflect the dynamic properties of the antenna. The existing analytical model, due to its many uncertainties, could not be used in the design of the controller. However, by using experimental data, the analytical model is modified and improved, and a new model is obtained through system identification techniques.

  6. Nanoparticle detection limits of TNO's Rapid Nano: modeling and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Walle, Peter; Kumar, Pragati; Ityaksov, Dmitry; Versulis, Richard; Maas, Diederik J.; Kievit, Olaf; Janssen, Jochem; van der Donck, Jacques C. J.

    2012-11-01

    TNO has developed the Rapid Nano scanner to detect nanoparticles on EUVL mask blanks. This scanner was designed to be used in particle qualifications of EUV reticle handling equipment. In this paper we present an end-to-end model of the Rapid Nano detection process. All important design parameters concerning illumination, detection and noise are included in the model. The prediction from the model matches the performance that was experimentally determined (59 nm LSE). The model will be used to design and predict the performance of future generations of particle scanners.

  7. Modeling and experimental verification for a broad beam light transport in optical tomography.

    PubMed

    Janunts, Edgar; Pöschinger, Thomas; Eisa, Fabian; Langenbucher, Achim

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a general theoretical model for computing a broad beam excitation light transport in a 3D diffusion medium. The model is based on the diffusion approximation of the radiative transport equation. An analytical approach for the light propagation is presented by deriving a corresponding Green's function. A finite cylindrical domain with a rectangular cross section was considered as a 3D homogeneous phantom model. The results of the model are compared with corresponding experimental data. The measurements are done on solid and liquid phantoms replicating tissue-like optical properties.

  8. Hybrid experimental/analytical models of structural dynamics - Creation and use for predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balmes, Etienne

    1993-01-01

    An original complete methodology for the construction of predictive models of damped structural vibrations is introduced. A consistent definition of normal and complex modes is given which leads to an original method to accurately identify non-proportionally damped normal mode models. A new method to create predictive hybrid experimental/analytical models of damped structures is introduced, and the ability of hybrid models to predict the response to system configuration changes is discussed. Finally a critical review of the overall methodology is made by application to the case of the MIT/SERC interferometer testbed.

  9. Issues concerning the updating of finite-element models from experimental data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Shane A.

    1994-01-01

    Some issues concerning the updating of dynamic finite-element models by incorporation of experimental data are examined here. It is demonstrated how the number of unknowns can be greatly reduced if the physical nature of the model is maintained. The issue of uniqueness is also examined and it is shown that a number of previous workers have been mistaken in their attempts to define both sufficient and necessary measurement requirements for the updating problem to be solved uniquely. The relative merits of modal and frequency response function (frf) data are discussed and it is shown that for measurements at fewer degrees of freedom than are present in the model, frf data will be unlikely to converge easily to a solution. It is then examined how such problems may become more tractable by using new experimental techniques which would allow measurements at all degrees of freedom present in the mathematical model.

  10. Introduction of damping into the flexible multibody belt-drive model: A numerical and experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čepon, Gregor; Manin, Lionel; Boltežar, Miha

    2009-07-01

    In this paper the belt-drive model using an absolute nodal coordinate formulation is presented. Using this approach the damping forces are usually neglected and only the elastic forces are taken into account. The aim of this paper is to introduce a damping mechanism into the belt-drive model and to verify it against experimental data. Different damping mechanisms are proposed for the damping of the longitudinal and bending deformations and several experiments were conducted in order to obtain the damping properties. Good agreement between the numerical result and the experimentally obtained data was found. Finally, the applicability of the belt-drive model was presented in a comparison with the pinned-pinned beam model.

  11. Viability of human composite tissue model for experimental study of burns.

    PubMed

    Qu, Miao; Kruse, Stephan; Pitsch, Heinz; Pallua, Norbert; Nourbakhsh, Mahtab

    2016-08-01

    Experimental studies of burns are primarily performed with animal models that have important anatomical and physiological differences relative to human systems. The aim of this study was to develop a human experimental burn model using composite tissue obtained from bariatric surgery. We established a new protocol to maintain viable sections of human cutaneous and subcutaneous (sub/cutaneous) tissue in vitro. Under the conditions selected, multiparametric flow cytometry and histological analysis confirmed the viability and integrity of the human sub/cutaneous tissue for at least 5 days. Furthermore, we utilized a precision McKenna burner to inflict burns on the human tissue model under well-defined thermal conditions in vitro. Our data showed a localized, temporally restricted polarization of the resident macrophages in the subcutaneous human tissue in response to specific thermal forces. Therefore, our model provides a useful alternative to animal studies for further detailed investigations of human responses to injuries and treatments. PMID:27585227

  12. Experimental testing procedures and dynamic model validation for vanadium redox flow battery storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baccino, Francesco; Marinelli, Mattia; Nørgård, Per; Silvestro, Federico

    2014-05-01

    The paper aims at characterizing the electrochemical and thermal parameters of a 15 kW/320 kWh vanadium redox flow battery (VRB) installed in the SYSLAB test facility of the DTU Risø Campus and experimentally validating the proposed dynamic model realized in Matlab-Simulink. The adopted testing procedure consists of analyzing the voltage and current values during a power reference step-response and evaluating the relevant electrochemical parameters such as the internal resistance. The results of different tests are presented and used to define the electrical characteristics and the overall efficiency of the battery system. The test procedure has general validity and could also be used for other storage technologies. The storage model proposed and described is suitable for electrical studies and can represent a general model in terms of validity. Finally, the model simulation outputs are compared with experimental measurements during a discharge-charge sequence.

  13. Experimental investigation and modeling of a wet flue gas desulfurization pilot plant

    SciTech Connect

    Kiil, S.; Michelsen, M.L.; Dam-Johansen, K.

    1998-07-01

    A detailed model for a wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) pilot plant, based on the packed tower concept, has been developed. All important rate-determining steps, absorption of SO{sub 2}, oxidation of HSO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, dissolution of limestone, and crystallization of gypsum were included. Population balance equations, governing the description of particle size distributions of limestone in the plant, were derived. Model predictions were compared to experimental data such as gas-phase concentration profiles of SO{sub 2}, slurry pH profiles, solids content of the slurry, liquid-phase concentrations, and residual limestone in the gypsum. Simulations were found to match experimental data for the two limestone types investigated. A parameter study of the model was conducted with the purpose of validating assumptions and extracting information on wet FGD systems. The modeling tools developed may be applicable to other wet FGD plants.

  14. Silicon CVD on powders in fluidized bed: Experimental and multifluid Eulerian modelling study

    SciTech Connect

    Cadoret, L.; Reuge, N; Pannala, Sreekanth; Syamlal, M; Coufort, C; Caussat, B

    2007-01-01

    The Computational Fluid Dynamics code MFIX was used for transient simulations of silicon Fluidized Bed Chemical Vapor Deposition (FBCVD) from silane (SiH4) on coarse alumina powders. FBCVD experiments were first performed to obtain a reference database for modelling. Experimental thermal profiles existing along the bed were considered in the model. 3D simulations provide better results than 2D ones and predict silane conversion rate with a mean deviation of 9% compared to experimental values. The model can predict the temporal and spatial evolutions of local void fractions, gas and particle velocities, species gas fractions and silicon deposition rate. We aim at mid term to model FBCVD treatments of submicronic powders in a vibrated reactor since we have performed experiments proving the efficacy of the process to treat submicronic particles.

  15. Silicon CVD on powders in fluidized bed: Experimental and multifluid Eulerian modelling study

    SciTech Connect

    Cadoret, L.; Reuge, N.; Pannala, S.; Syamlal, M.; Coufort, C.; Caussat, B.

    2007-09-25

    The Computational Fluid Dynamics code MFIX was used for transient simulations of silicon Fluidized Bed Chemical Vapor Deposition (FBCVD) from silane (SiH4) on coarse alumina powders. FBCVD experiments were first performed to obtain a reference database for modelling. Experimental thermal profiles existing along the bed were considered in the model. 3D simulations provide better results than 2D ones and predict silane conversion rate with a mean deviation of 9% compared to experimental values. The model can predict the temporal and spatial evolutions of local void fractions, gas and particle velocities, species gas fractions and silicon deposition rate. We aim at mid term to model FBCVD treatments of submicronic powders in a vibrated reactor since we have performed experiments proving the efficacy of the process to treat submicronic particles.

  16. Absorption of Fast Waves at Moderate to High Ion Cyclotron Harmonics: Experimental Results and Theoretical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsker, R. I.; Choi, M.; Prater, R.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Luo, Y.; Baity, F. W.; Murakami, M.; Porkolab, M.

    2006-10-01

    Strong absorption of fast Alfvén waves (FW) by ion cyclotron damping has been observed in DIII-D at the 4th and 5th harmonic of an injected beam while only weak absorption is observed at the 8th harmonic. The experimental results are compared with three different theoretical models; differences between the predictions of the models suggest the possible importance of finite-width orbit effects at high harmonics. In a linear model, it is found that damping on fast ions from neutral beam injection can be significant even at the 8th harmonic under experimentally relevant conditions. This is tested in experiments in DIII-D with FW power at 60 MHz and at 116 MHz. A novel Dα charge exchange recombination diagnostic is used to observe interaction of the FW power with beam ions. The results are compared with modeling with quasilinear and with orbit-following codes.

  17. Experimental implementation of bit commitment in the noisy-storage model.

    PubMed

    Ng, Nelly Huei Ying; Joshi, Siddarth K; Ming, Chia Chen; Kurtsiefer, Christian; Wehner, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    Fundamental primitives such as bit commitment and oblivious transfer serve as building blocks for many other two-party protocols. Hence, the secure implementation of such primitives is important in modern cryptography. Here we present a bit commitment protocol that is secure as long as the attacker's quantum memory device is imperfect. The latter assumption is known as the noisy-storage model. We experimentally executed this protocol by performing measurements on polarization-entangled photon pairs. Our work includes a full security analysis, accounting for all experimental error rates and finite size effects. This demonstrates the feasibility of two-party protocols in this model using real-world quantum devices. Finally, we provide a general analysis of our bit commitment protocol for a range of experimental parameters. PMID:23271659

  18. Modelling and experimental verification of a water alleviation system for the NASP. [National Aerospace Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanfossen, G. James

    1992-01-01

    One possible low speed propulsion system for the National Aerospace Plane is a liquid air cycle engine (LACE). The LACE system uses the heat sink in the liquid hydrogen propellant to liquefy air in a heat exchanger which is then pumped up to high pressure and used as the oxidizer in a hydrogen liquid air rocket. The inlet airstream must be dehumidified or moisture could freeze on the cryogenic heat exchangers and block them. The main objective of this research has been to develop a computer simulation of the cold tube/antifreeze-spray water alleviation system and to verify the model with experimental data. An experimental facility has been built and humid air tests were conducted on a generic heat exchanger to obtain condensing data for code development. The paper describes the experimental setup, outlines the method of calculation used in the code, and presents comparisons of the calculations and measurements. Cause of discrepancies between the model and data are explained.

  19. Experimental study of cancellous bone under large strains and a constitutive probabilistic model.

    PubMed

    Kefalas, V; Eftaxiopoulos, D A

    2012-02-01

    Experimental study of bovine cancellous bone up to compaction under uniaxial compression and up to fracture under tension, has been pursued in this article. Compression experiments have revealed the known three stages of the constitutive response, namely the initial increasing and softening branches at moderate strains, the plateau region at large strains and the hardening part at very large strains under compaction. Tension tests have quantified the increasing and softening branches of the stress-strain curve up to fracture. Subsequently, a constitutive mechanical model, for the simulation of the experimental findings up to very large strains (75% engineering strain under compression), is proposed. The model is based on the statistical description of (a) the failure process of the trabecular structure at small and moderate strains and (b) the compaction process of the trabecular mass at very large strains under compression. Several fitting cases indicated that the presented constitutive law can capture the evolution of the experimental results. PMID:22301172

  20. Modeling and Experimental Investigation of Methylcyclohexane Ignition in a Rapid Compression Machine

    SciTech Connect

    Pitz, W J; Naik, C V; Mhaold?in, T N; Curran, H J; Orme, J P; Simmie, J M; Westbrook, C K

    2005-10-13

    A new mechanism for the oxidation of methylcyclohexane has been developed. The mechanism combined a newly-developed low temperature mechanism with a previously developed high temperature mechanism. Predictions from the chemical kinetic model have been compared to experimentally measured ignition delay times from a rapid compression machine. Predicted ignition delay times using the initial estimates of the methylcyclohexyl peroxy radical isomerization rate constants were much longer than those measured at low temperatures. The initial estimates of isomerization rate constants were modified based on the experimental findings of Gulati and Walker that indicate a much slower rate of isomerization. Predictions using the modified rate constants for isomerizations yielded faster ignition at lower temperatures that greatly improved the agreement between model predictions and the experimental data. These findings point to much slower isomerization rates for methylcyclohexyl peroxy radicals than previously expected.

  1. Experimental observation, theoretical models, and biomechanical inference in the study of mandibular form.

    PubMed

    Daegling, D J; Hylander, W L

    2000-08-01

    Experimental studies and mathematical models are disparate approaches for inferring the stress and strain environment in mammalian jaws. Experimental designs offer accurate, although limited, characterization of biomechanical behavior, while mathematical approaches (finite element modeling in particular) offer unparalleled precision in depiction of strain magnitudes, directions, and gradients throughout the mandible. Because the empirical (experimental) and theoretical (mathematical) perspectives differ in their initial assumptions and their proximate goals, the two methods can yield divergent conclusions about how masticatory stresses are distributed in the dentary. These different sources of inference may, therefore, tangibly influence subsequent biological interpretation. In vitro observation of bone strain in primate mandibles under controlled loading conditions offers a test of finite element model predictions. Two issues which have been addressed by both finite element models and experimental approaches are: (1) the distribution of torsional shear strains in anthropoid jaws and (2) the dissipation of bite forces in the human alveolar process. Not surprisingly, the experimental data and mathematical models agree on some issues, but on others exhibit discordance. Achieving congruence between these methods is critical if the nature of the relationship of masticatory stress to mandibular form is to be intelligently assessed. A case study of functional/mechanical significance of gnathic morphology in the hominid genus Paranthropus offers insight into the potential benefit of combining theoretical and experimental approaches. Certain finite element analyses claim to have identified a biomechanical problem unrecognized in previous comparative work, which, in essence, is that the enlarged transverse dimensions of the postcanine corpus may have a less important role in resisting torsional stresses than previously thought. Experimental data have identified

  2. Experimental observation, theoretical models, and biomechanical inference in the study of mandibular form.

    PubMed

    Daegling, D J; Hylander, W L

    2000-08-01

    Experimental studies and mathematical models are disparate approaches for inferring the stress and strain environment in mammalian jaws. Experimental designs offer accurate, although limited, characterization of biomechanical behavior, while mathematical approaches (finite element modeling in particular) offer unparalleled precision in depiction of strain magnitudes, directions, and gradients throughout the mandible. Because the empirical (experimental) and theoretical (mathematical) perspectives differ in their initial assumptions and their proximate goals, the two methods can yield divergent conclusions about how masticatory stresses are distributed in the dentary. These different sources of inference may, therefore, tangibly influence subsequent biological interpretation. In vitro observation of bone strain in primate mandibles under controlled loading conditions offers a test of finite element model predictions. Two issues which have been addressed by both finite element models and experimental approaches are: (1) the distribution of torsional shear strains in anthropoid jaws and (2) the dissipation of bite forces in the human alveolar process. Not surprisingly, the experimental data and mathematical models agree on some issues, but on others exhibit discordance. Achieving congruence between these methods is critical if the nature of the relationship of masticatory stress to mandibular form is to be intelligently assessed. A case study of functional/mechanical significance of gnathic morphology in the hominid genus Paranthropus offers insight into the potential benefit of combining theoretical and experimental approaches. Certain finite element analyses claim to have identified a biomechanical problem unrecognized in previous comparative work, which, in essence, is that the enlarged transverse dimensions of the postcanine corpus may have a less important role in resisting torsional stresses than previously thought. Experimental data have identified

  3. Experimental study of rigorous nonlinear model predictive control for a packed distillation column

    SciTech Connect

    Junesam Lin; Shi-Shang Jang; Junghui Chen

    1996-12-31

    Dynamic modeling of distillation processes has been substantial in the recently years. In this work, a rigorous model for packed bed distillation system is solved using the method of collocation polynomial. The control methodology used is the two-phase approach that devises an on-line identification phase and an on-line optimization phase. The experimental studies show that the on-line control using this approach is feasible and performs better than traditional controllers. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  4. The accessory limb model: an alternative experimental system of limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Endo, Tetsuya; Gardiner, David M; Makanae, Aki; Satoh, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Accessory limb model (ALM) was developed as an experimental model and functional assay for limb regeneration. The ALM provides several ways to identify pathways and test for signaling molecules that regulate limb regeneration. Here, we summarize the history of the ALM and describe the specific details involved in inducing ectopic blastemas and limbs from a skin wound on the side of the arm. PMID:25740480

  5. An Experimental Model for Analyzing Strategies for Financing Higher Education in New York State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of Postsecondary Research, Information Systems, and Institutional Aid.

    Described is an experimental, quantitative model developed by the New York State Education Department to evaluate state-level financing strategies for higher education. It can be used to address a variety of questions and takes into account a host of direct and indirect relationships. It uses computer software and optimization algorithms developed…

  6. Spatial Visualization Ability and Impact of Drafting Models: A Quasi Experimental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsioloudis, Petros J.; Jovanovic, Vukica

    2014-01-01

    A quasi experimental study was done to determine significant positive effects among three different types of visual models and to identify whether any individual type or combination contributed towards a positive increase of spatial visualization ability for students in engineering technology courses. In particular, the study compared the use of…

  7. Nonlinear numerical modelling and experimental validation of multilayer piezoelectric vibration energy scavengers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blažević, D.; Zelenika, S.

    2015-05-01

    Scavenging of low-level ambient vibrations i.e. the conversion of kinetic into electric energy, is proven as effective means of powering low consumption electronic devices such as wireless sensor nodes. Cantilever based scavengers are characterised by several advantages and thus thoroughly investigated; analytical models based on a distributed parameter approach, Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and eigenvalue analysis have thus been developed and experimentally verified. Finite element models (FEM) have also been proposed employing different modelling approaches and commercial software packages with coupled analysis capabilities. An approach of using a FEM analysis of a piezoelectric cantilever bimorph under harmonic excitation is used in this work. Modal, harmonic and linear and nonlinear transient analyses are performed. Different complex dynamic effects are observed and compared to the results obtained by using a distributed parameter model. The influence of two types of finite elements and three mesh densities is also investigated. A complex bimorph cantilever, based on commercially available Midé Technology® Volture energy scavengers, is then considered. These scavengers are characterised by an intricate multilayer structure not investigated so far in literature. An experimental set-up is developed to evaluate the behaviour of the considered class of devices. The results of the modal and the harmonic FEM analyses of the behaviour of the multilayer scavengers are verified experimentally for three different tip masses and 12 different electrical load values. A satisfying agreement between numerical and experimental results is achieved.

  8. Lipid metabolism, adipocyte depot physiology and utilization of meat animals as experimental models for metabolic research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Meat animals are unique as experimental models for both lipid metabolism and adipocyte studies because of their direct economic value for animal production. This paper discusses the principles that regulate adipogenesis in major meat animals (beef cattle, dairy cattle, and pigs), the definition of a...

  9. Computational Modelling of Patella Femoral Kinematics During Gait Cycle and Experimental Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Raman

    2016-06-01

    The effect of loading and boundary conditions on patellar mechanics is significant due to the complications arising in patella femoral joints during total knee replacements. To understand the patellar mechanics with respect to loading and motion, a computational model representing the patella femoral joint was developed and validated against experimental results. The computational model was created in IDEAS NX and simulated in MSC ADAMS/VIEW software. The results obtained in the form of internal external rotations and anterior posterior displacements for a new and experimentally simulated specimen for patella femoral joint under standard gait condition were compared with experimental measurements performed on the Leeds ProSim knee simulator. A good overall agreement between the computational prediction and the experimental data was obtained for patella femoral kinematics. Good agreement between the model and the past studies was observed when the ligament load was removed and the medial lateral displacement was constrained. The model is sensitive to ±5 % change in kinematics, frictional, force and stiffness coefficients and insensitive to time step.

  10. Comparison of experimental coupled helicopter rotor/body stability results with a simple analytical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, P. P.; Venkatesan, C.

    1988-01-01

    The results of an analytical study aimed at predicting the aeromechanical stability of a helicopter in ground resonance, with the inclusion of aerodynamic forces are presented. The theoretical results are found to be in good agreement with the experimental results, available in literature, indicating that the coupled rotor/fuselage system can be represented by a reasonably simple mathematical model.

  11. Falling Chains as Variable-Mass Systems: Theoretical Model and Experimental Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Sousa, Celia A.; Gordo, Paulo M.; Costa, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we revisit, theoretically and experimentally, the fall of a folded U-chain and of a pile-chain. The model calculation implies the division of the whole system into two subsystems of variable mass, allowing us to explore the role of tensional contact forces at the boundary of the subsystems. This justifies, for instance, that the…

  12. Modeling the influence of cyclodextrins on oral absorption of low solubility drugs: II. Experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Gamsiz, Ece Dilber; Miller, Lee; Thombre, Avinash G; Ahmed, Imran; Carrier, Rebecca Lyn

    2010-02-01

    A model was developed for predicting the influence of cyclodextrins (CDs) delivered as a physical mixture with drug on oral absorption. CDs are cyclic oligosaccharides which form inclusion complexes with many drugs and are often used as solubilizing agents. The purpose of this work is to compare the simulation predictions with in vitro as well as in vivo experimental results to test the model's ability to capture the influence of CD on key processes in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract environment. Dissolution and absorption kinetics of low solubility drugs (Naproxen and Nifedipine) were tested in the presence and absence of CD in a simulated gastrointestinal environment. Model predictions were also compared with in vivo experimental results (Glibenclamide and Carbamazepine) from the literature to demonstrate the model's ability to predict oral bioavailability. Comparisons of simulation and experimental results indicate that a model incorporating the influence of CD (delivered as a physical mixture) on dissolution kinetics and binding of neutral drug can predict trends in the influence of CD on bioavailability. Overall, a minimal effect of CD dosed as a physical mixture was observed and predicted. Modeling may aid in enabling rational design of CD containing formulations.

  13. Computing the modal mass from the state space model in combined experimental-operational modal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cara, Javier

    2016-05-01

    Modal parameters comprise natural frequencies, damping ratios, modal vectors and modal masses. In a theoretic framework, these parameters are the basis for the solution of vibration problems using the theory of modal superposition. In practice, they can be computed from input-output vibration data: the usual procedure is to estimate a mathematical model from the data and then to compute the modal parameters from the estimated model. The most popular models for input-output data are based on the frequency response function, but in recent years the state space model in the time domain has become popular among researchers and practitioners of modal analysis with experimental data. In this work, the equations to compute the modal parameters from the state space model when input and output data are available (like in combined experimental-operational modal analysis) are derived in detail using invariants of the state space model: the equations needed to compute natural frequencies, damping ratios and modal vectors are well known in the operational modal analysis framework, but the equation needed to compute the modal masses has not generated much interest in technical literature. These equations are applied to both a numerical simulation and an experimental study in the last part of the work.

  14. Vibrations inside buildings due to subway railway traffic. Experimental validation of a comprehensive prediction model.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Patrícia; Ruiz, Jésus Fernández; Alves Costa, Pedro; Medina Rodríguez, L; Cardoso, António Silva

    2016-10-15

    The present paper focuses on the experimental validation of a numerical approach previously proposed by the authors for the prediction of vibrations inside buildings due to railway traffic in tunnels. The numerical model is based on the concept of dynamic substructuring and is composed by three autonomous models to simulate the following main parts of the problem: i) generation of vibrations (train-track interaction); ii) propagation of vibrations (track-tunnel-ground system); iii) reception of vibrations (building coupled to the ground). The experimental validation consists in the comparison between the results predicted by the proposed numerical model and the measurements performed inside a building due to the railway traffic in a shallow tunnel located in Madrid. Apart from the brief description of the numerical model and of the case study, the main options and simplifications adopted on the numerical modeling strategy are discussed. The balance adopted between accuracy and simplicity of the numerical approach proved to be a path to follow in order to transfer knowledge to engineering practice. Finally, the comparison between numerical and experimental results allowed finding a good agreement between both, fact that ensures the ability of the proposed modeling strategy to deal with real engineering practical problems.

  15. Using experimental information to produce a model of the transmembrane domain of the ion channel phospholamban.

    PubMed Central

    Herzyk, P; Hubbard, R E

    1998-01-01

    Molecular models of the transmembrane domain of the phospholamban pentamer have been generated by a computational method that uses the experimentally measured effects of systematic single-site mutations as a guiding force in the modeling procedure. This method makes the assumptions that 1) the phospholamban transmembrane domain is a parallel five-helix bundle, and 2) nondisruptive mutation positions are lipid exposed, whereas 3) disruptive or partially disruptive mutations are not. Our procedure requires substantially less computer time than systematic search methods, allowing rapid assessment of the effects of different experimental results on the helix arrangement. The effectiveness of the approach is investigated in test calculations on two helix-dimer systems of known structure. Two independently derived sets of mutagenesis data were used to define the restraints for generating models of phospholamban. Both resulting models are left-handed, highly symmetrical pentamers. Although the overall bundle geometry is very similar in the two models, the orientation of individual helices differs by approximately 50 degrees, resulting in different sets of residues facing the pore. This demonstrates how differences in restraints can have an effect on the model structures generated, and how the violation of these restraints can identify inconsistent experimental data. PMID:9512019

  16. An experimental and kinetic modeling study of n-propanol and iso-propanol combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Frassoldati, Alessio; Cuoci, Alberto; Faravelli, Tiziano; Ranzi, Eliseo; Niemann, Ulrich; Seiser, Reinhard; Seshadri, Kalyanasundaram

    2010-01-15

    A kinetic model is developed to describe combustion of n-propanol and iso-propanol. It is validated by comparing predictions made using this kinetic model with new experimental data on structures of counterflow non-premixed flames and previously reported data over a wide range of configurations and conditions. The elementary pyrolysis reactions of methanol and ethanol are well-known and were used as a starting point for extension to propanol. A detailed description leading to evaluation of rate constants for initiation reactions, metathesis reactions, decomposition reactions, and four-center molecular dehydration reactions are given. Decomposition and oxidation of primary intermediate products are described using a previously developed semi-detailed kinetic model for hydrocarbon fuels. The kinetic mechanism is made up of more than 7000 reactions among 300 species. The structures of counterflow non-premixed flames were measured by removing gas samples from the flame and analyzing the samples using a gas chromatograph. The flame structures were measured under similar conditions for both fuels to elucidate the similarities and differences in combustion characteristics of the two isomers. The profiles measured include those of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, propanal, and acetone. These species are considered to be pollutants. Validation of the kinetic model was first performed by comparing predictions with experimental data reported in the literature obtained in flow reactors and shock tubes. In these configurations, combustion is not influenced by molecular transport. The agreement between the kinetic model and experimental data was satisfactory. The predictions of the kinetic model were then compared with new and previously reported experimental data on structures of counterflow non-premixed flames of both isomers. The agreement between the kinetic model and experimental data was again satisfactory. Satisfactory agreement was also obtained when the predictions of the

  17. A comparative study of behaviors of ventilated supercavities between experimental models with different mounting configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Jae; Kawakami, Ellison; Karn, Ashish; Arndt, Roger E. A.

    2016-08-01

    Small-scale water tunnel experiments of the phenomenon of supercavitation can be carried out broadly using two different kinds of experimental models–in the first model (forward facing model, or FFM), the incoming flow first interacts with the cavitator at front, which is connected to the strut through a ventilation pipe. The second model could have the strut and the ventilation pipe preceding the cavitator (backward facing model, or BFM). This is the continuation of a water tunnel study of the effects of unsteady flows on axisymmetric supercavities. In this study, the unwanted effect of test model configuration on supercavity shape in periodic flows was explored through a comparison of FFM and BFM models. In our experiments, it was found that periodic gust flows have only a minimal effect on the maximum diameter and the cavity length can be shortened above a certain vertical velocity of periodic flows. These findings appear to be robust regardless of the model configuration.

  18. Experimental in vivo and in vitro models of multiple sclerosis: EAE and beyond.

    PubMed

    Kipp, Markus; van der Star, Baukje; Vogel, Daphne Y S; Puentes, Fabìola; van der Valk, Paul; Baker, David; Amor, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Although the primary cause of multiple sclerosis (MS) is unknown, the widely accepted view is that aberrant (auto)immune responses possibly arising following infection(s) are responsible for the destructive inflammatory demyelination and neurodegeneration in the central nervous system (CNS). This notion, and the limited access of human brain tissue early in the course of MS, has led to the development of autoimmune, viral and toxin-induced demyelination animal models as well as the development of human CNS cell and organotypic brain slice cultures in an attempt to understand events in MS. The autoimmune models, collectively known as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), and viral models have shaped ideas of how environmental factors may trigger inflammation, demyelination and neurodegeneration in the CNS. Understandably, these models have also heavily influenced the development of therapies targeting the inflammatory aspect of MS. Demyelination and remyelination in the absence of overt inflammation are better studied in toxin-induced demyelination models using cuprizone and lysolecithin. The paradigm shift of MS as an autoimmune disease of myelin to a neurodegenerative disease has required more appropriate models reflecting the axonal and neuronal damage. Thus, secondary progressive EAE and spastic models have been crucial to develop neuroprotective approaches. In this review the current in vivo and in vitro experimental models to examine pathological mechanisms involved in inflammation, demyelination and neuronal degeneration, as well as remyelination and repair in MS are discussed. Since this knowledge is the basis for the development of new therapeutic approaches for MS, we particularly address whether the currently available models truly reflect the human disease, and discuss perspectives to further optimise and develop more suitable experimental models to study MS.

  19. Aerodynamic experimentation with ducted models as applied to hypersonic air-breathing vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goon'ko, Yu. P.

    A methodology of experimentation in high supersonic wind tunnels for studying aerodynamic characteristics of hypersonic flying vehicles powered by air-breathing engines is discussed. Investigations of such total aerodynamic forces as drag, lift and pitching moment at testing the models are implicit when the air flow through the model ducts is accomplished so that to provide the simulation of the external flow around the airplane and flow over the inlets, but the operating engines and, hence, the exhaust jets are not modeled. The methods used for testing such models are based on the measurement of duct stream parameters alongside with the balance measurement of aerodynamic forces acting on the models. In the tests, aerometric tools are used such as narrow metering nozzles (plugs), pitot and static pressure probes, stagnation temperature probes and pressure orifices in walls of the model duct. The aerometric data serve to determine the flow rate and momentum of the stream at the duct exit. The internal non-simulated forces of the model ducts are also determined using the conservation equations for energy, mass flow and momentum, and these forces are eliminated from the aerodynamic test results. The techniques of the said model testing have been well developed as applied to supersonic aircraft, however their application for hypersonic vehicles whose models are tested at high supersonic speeds, Mach number M∞>4, implies some specific features. In the present paper, the results of experimental and theoretical study of these features are discussed. Some experimental data on aerodynamics of hypersonic aircraft models received in methodological tests are also presented. The tunnel experiments have been carried out in the Mach number range M∞=2-6.

  20. Experimental in vivo and in vitro models of multiple sclerosis: EAE and beyond.

    PubMed

    Kipp, Markus; van der Star, Baukje; Vogel, Daphne Y S; Puentes, Fabìola; van der Valk, Paul; Baker, David; Amor, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Although the primary cause of multiple sclerosis (MS) is unknown, the widely accepted view is that aberrant (auto)immune responses possibly arising following infection(s) are responsible for the destructive inflammatory demyelination and neurodegeneration in the central nervous system (CNS). This notion, and the limited access of human brain tissue early in the course of MS, has led to the development of autoimmune, viral and toxin-induced demyelination animal models as well as the development of human CNS cell and organotypic brain slice cultures in an attempt to understand events in MS. The autoimmune models, collectively known as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), and viral models have shaped ideas of how environmental factors may trigger inflammation, demyelination and neurodegeneration in the CNS. Understandably, these models have also heavily influenced the development of therapies targeting the inflammatory aspect of MS. Demyelination and remyelination in the absence of overt inflammation are better studied in toxin-induced demyelination models using cuprizone and lysolecithin. The paradigm shift of MS as an autoimmune disease of myelin to a neurodegenerative disease has required more appropriate models reflecting the axonal and neuronal damage. Thus, secondary progressive EAE and spastic models have been crucial to develop neuroprotective approaches. In this review the current in vivo and in vitro experimental models to examine pathological mechanisms involved in inflammation, demyelination and neuronal degeneration, as well as remyelination and repair in MS are discussed. Since this knowledge is the basis for the development of new therapeutic approaches for MS, we particularly address whether the currently available models truly reflect the human disease, and discuss perspectives to further optimise and develop more suitable experimental models to study MS. PMID:25876447

  1. Individual Subject Meta-Analysis of Parameters for Giardia duodenalis Shedding in Animal Experimental Models

    PubMed Central

    Adell, A. D.; Miller, W. A.; Harvey, D. J.; Van Wormer, E.; Wuertz, S.; Conrad, P. A.

    2014-01-01

    Giardia duodenalis is a zoonotic protozoan parasite with public health importance worldwide. While articles about animal model infectivity have been published for G. duodenalis, the studies have used diverse protocols and parameters to evaluate the infectivity of this protozoan parasite. Hence, the objectives of this study were to (1) conduct a meta-analysis of published literature for cyst shedding and diarrhea outcomes in animal models and (2) develop recommendations to help standardize experimental dose response studies. Results showed that, for the outcome of cyst shedding in faeces, the covariates of infective stage (cyst versus trophozoite), Giardia dose, and the interactions between doses and infective stage, as well as dose and species of experimental host, were all significant (P value ≤ 0.05). This study suggests inoculation of the experimental host with cysts rather than trophozoites and administration of higher doses of Giardia will most likely result in cyst shedding. Based on the results of this meta-analysis, the infective stage (cyst versus trophozoite), parasite dose, and the interactions between dose and infective stage, as well as dose and species of experimental host, should be considered when designing experimental dose response studies that will assist in the study of zoonotic neglected tropical diseases globally. PMID:24800229

  2. Individual subject meta-analysis of parameters for Giardia duodenalis shedding in animal experimental models.

    PubMed

    Adell, A D; Miller, W A; Harvey, D J; Van Wormer, E; Wuertz, S; Conrad, P A

    2014-01-01

    Giardia duodenalis is a zoonotic protozoan parasite with public health importance worldwide. While articles about animal model infectivity have been published for G. duodenalis, the studies have used diverse protocols and parameters to evaluate the infectivity of this protozoan parasite. Hence, the objectives of this study were to (1) conduct a meta-analysis of published literature for cyst shedding and diarrhea outcomes in animal models and (2) develop recommendations to help standardize experimental dose response studies. Results showed that, for the outcome of cyst shedding in faeces, the covariates of infective stage (cyst versus trophozoite), Giardia dose, and the interactions between doses and infective stage, as well as dose and species of experimental host, were all significant (P value ≤ 0.05). This study suggests inoculation of the experimental host with cysts rather than trophozoites and administration of higher doses of Giardia will most likely result in cyst shedding. Based on the results of this meta-analysis, the infective stage (cyst versus trophozoite), parasite dose, and the interactions between dose and infective stage, as well as dose and species of experimental host, should be considered when designing experimental dose response studies that will assist in the study of zoonotic neglected tropical diseases globally.

  3. Combined Neurotrauma Models: Experimental Models Combining Traumatic Brain Injury and Secondary Insults.

    PubMed

    Simon, Dennis W; Vagni, Vincent M; Kochanek, Patrick M; Clark, Robert S B

    2016-01-01

    Patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) frequently present with concomitant injuries that may cause secondary brain injury and impact outcomes. Animal models have been developed that combine contemporary models of TBI with a secondary neurologic insult such as hypoxia, shock, long bone fracture, and radiation exposure. Combined injury models may be particularly useful when modeling treatment strategies and in efforts to map basic research to a heterogeneous patient population. Here, we review these models and their collective contribution to the literature on TBI. In addition, we provide protocols and notes for two well-characterized models of TBI plus hemorrhagic shock. PMID:27604730

  4. Selecting appropriate animal models and experimental designs for endocrine disruptor research and testing studies.

    PubMed

    Stokes, William S

    2004-01-01

    Evidence that chemicals in the environment may cause developmental and reproductive abnormalities in fish and wildlife by disrupting normal endocrine functions has increased concern about potential adverse human health effects from such chemicals. US laws have now been enacted that require the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to develop and validate a screening program to identify chemicals in food and water with potential endocrine-disrupting activity. EPA subsequently proposed an Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program that uses in vitro and in vivo test systems to identify chemicals that may adversely affect humans and ecologically important animal species. However, the endocrine system can be readily modulated by many experimental factors, including diet and the genetic background of the selected animal strain or stock. It is therefore desirable to minimize or avoid factors that cause or contribute to experimental variation in endocrine disruptor research and testing studies. Standard laboratory animal diets contain high and variable levels of phytoestrogens, which can modulate physiologic and behavioral responses similar to both endogenous estrogen as well as exogenous estrogenic chemicals. Other studies have determined that some commonly used outbred mice and rats are less responsive to estrogenic substances than certain inbred mouse and rat strains for various estrogen-sensitive endpoints. It is therefore critical to select appropriate biological models and diets for endocrine disruptor studies that provide optimal sensitivity and specificity to accomplish the research or testing objectives. An introduction is provided to 11 other papers in this issue that review these and other important laboratory animal experimental design considerations in greater detail, and that review laboratory animal and in vitro models currently being used or evaluated for endocrine disruptor research and testing. Selection of appropriate animal models and experimental design

  5. Experimental Validation of a Computational Fluid Dynamics Model of Copper Electrowinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, Martin J.; Philip Schwarz, M.

    2010-12-01

    The hydrodynamics that occur in the space between the electrode plates in copper electrowinning (EW) are simulated using a computational fluid dynamics model (CFD). The model solves for the phases of gas oxygen bubbles and electrolyte using the Navier-Stokes equations in a CFD framework. An oxygen source is added to the anode, which sets up a recirculation pattern. The gradients in copper near the cathode lead to buoyancy forces, which result in an uplift in the electrolyte close to the cathode. This study investigates the experimental validation of the CFD model using a small/medium-scale real EW system. The predicted fluid velocity profiles are compared with the experimental values, which have been measured along various cross sections of the gap between the anode and the cathode. The results show that the CFD model accurately predicts the velocity profile at several heights in the plate pair. The CFD model prediction of the gas hold-up and the recirculation pattern is compared with visualizations from the experiment. The CFD model prediction is shown to be good across several different operating conditions and geometries, showing that the fundamental underlying equations used in the CFD model transfer to these cases without adjusting the model parameters.

  6. Calibration and Validation of a 6-DOF Laser Propelled Lightcraft Flight Dynamics Model vs. Experimental Data

    SciTech Connect

    Kenoyer, David A.; Anderson, Kurt S.; Myrabo, Leik N.

    2008-04-28

    A detailed description is provided of the flight dynamics model and development, as well as the procedures used and results obtained in the verification, validation, and calibration of a further refined, flight dynamics system model for a laser lightcraft. The full system model is composed of individual aerodynamic, engine, laser beam, variable vehicle inertial, and 6 DOF dynamics models which have been integrated to represent all major phenomena in a consistent framework. The resulting system level model and associated code was then validated and calibrated using experimental flight information from a 16 flight trajectory data base. This model and code are being developed for the purpose of providing a physics-based predictive tool, which may be used to evaluate the performance of proposed future lightcraft vehicle concepts, engine systems, beam shapes, and active control strategies, thereby aiding in the development of the next generation of laser propelled lightcraft. This paper describes the methods used for isolating the effects of individual component models (e.g. beam, engine, dynamics, etc.) so that the performance of each of these key components could be assessed and adjusted as necessary. As the individual component models were validated, a protocol was developed which permitted the investigators to focus on individual aspects of the system and thereby identify phenomena which explain system behavior, and account for observed deviations between portions of the simulation predictions from experimental flights. These protocols are provided herein, along with physics-based explanations for deviations observed.

  7. Manipulating lek size and composition using decoys: an experimental investigation of lek evolution models.

    PubMed

    Jiguet, Frédéric; Bretagnolle, Vincent

    2006-12-01

    Four theoretical models have been proposed to account for the origin and maintenance of leks: hotspot, female preference, hotshot, and black hole models. Each has been validated in particular cases, and most are not mutually exclusive; therefore, it has been difficult to contrast and separate them, empirically and experimentally. By using decoys to mimic natural leks in the little bustard, artificial leks attracted wild birds. Then, by manipulating artificial lek size and structure (sex ratio, male phenotype), the study of responses of wild males and females allowed us to test specific predictions derived from the four classical models of lek evolution. The hotspot model was not supported because female decoys did not attract wild males. Conversely, hotshot males do exist in this species (attracting both wild females and males), as does a female preference for a particular lek size (four males). Finally, males aggressive toward decoys attracted fewer females, consistent with one of the mechanisms by which the black hole model may work. Therefore, three models of lek evolution were partly or fully supported by our experimental results: hotshot, female preference, and black hole models. We suggest that these models actually fit within each other, ensuring the evolution, functioning, and long-term maintenance of leks. PMID:17109318

  8. Experimental predictions drawn from a computational model of sign-trackers and goal-trackers.

    PubMed

    Lesaint, Florian; Sigaud, Olivier; Clark, Jeremy J; Flagel, Shelly B; Khamassi, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Gaining a better understanding of the biological mechanisms underlying the individual variation observed in response to rewards and reward cues could help to identify and treat individuals more prone to disorders of impulsive control, such as addiction. Variation in response to reward cues is captured in rats undergoing autoshaping experiments where the appearance of a lever precedes food delivery. Although no response is required for food to be delivered, some rats (goal-trackers) learn to approach and avidly engage the magazine until food delivery, whereas other rats (sign-trackers) come to approach and engage avidly the lever. The impulsive and often maladaptive characteristics of the latter response are reminiscent of addictive behaviour in humans. In a previous article, we developed a computational model accounting for a set of experimental data regarding sign-trackers and goal-trackers. Here we show new simulations of the model to draw experimental predictions that could help further validate or refute the model. In particular, we apply the model to new experimental protocols such as injecting flupentixol locally into the core of the nucleus accumbens rather than systemically, and lesioning of the core of the nucleus accumbens before or after conditioning. In addition, we discuss the possibility of removing the food magazine during the inter-trial interval. The predictions from this revised model will help us better understand the role of different brain regions in the behaviours expressed by sign-trackers and goal-trackers. PMID:24954026

  9. Experimental predictions drawn from a computational model of sign-trackers and goal-trackers.

    PubMed

    Lesaint, Florian; Sigaud, Olivier; Clark, Jeremy J; Flagel, Shelly B; Khamassi, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Gaining a better understanding of the biological mechanisms underlying the individual variation observed in response to rewards and reward cues could help to identify and treat individuals more prone to disorders of impulsive control, such as addiction. Variation in response to reward cues is captured in rats undergoing autoshaping experiments where the appearance of a lever precedes food delivery. Although no response is required for food to be delivered, some rats (goal-trackers) learn to approach and avidly engage the magazine until food delivery, whereas other rats (sign-trackers) come to approach and engage avidly the lever. The impulsive and often maladaptive characteristics of the latter response are reminiscent of addictive behaviour in humans. In a previous article, we developed a computational model accounting for a set of experimental data regarding sign-trackers and goal-trackers. Here we show new simulations of the model to draw experimental predictions that could help further validate or refute the model. In particular, we apply the model to new experimental protocols such as injecting flupentixol locally into the core of the nucleus accumbens rather than systemically, and lesioning of the core of the nucleus accumbens before or after conditioning. In addition, we discuss the possibility of removing the food magazine during the inter-trial interval. The predictions from this revised model will help us better understand the role of different brain regions in the behaviours expressed by sign-trackers and goal-trackers.

  10. Experimental predictions drawn from a computational model of sign-trackers and goal-trackers

    PubMed Central

    Lesaint, Florian; Sigaud, Olivier; Clark, Jeremy J.; Flagel, Shelly B.; Khamassi, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Gaining a better understanding of the biological mechanisms underlying the individual variation observed in response to rewards and reward cues could help to identify and treat individuals more prone to disorders of impulsive control, such as addiction. Variation in response to reward cues is captured in rats undergoing autoshaping experiments where the appearance of a lever precedes food delivery. Although no response is required for food to be delivered, some rats (goal-trackers) learn to approach and avidly engage the magazine until food delivery, whereas other rats (sign-trackers) come to approach and engage avidly the lever. The impulsive and often maladaptive characteristics of the latter response are reminiscent of addictive behaviour in humans. In a previous article, we developed a computational model accounting for a set of experimental data regarding sign-trackers and goal-trackers. Here we show new simulations of the model to draw experimental predictions that could help further validate or refute the model. In particular, we apply the model to new experimental protocols such as injecting flupentixol locally into the core of the nucleus accumbens rather than systemically, and lesioning of the core of the nucleus accumbens before or after conditioning. In addition, we discuss the possibility of removing the food magazine during the inter-trial interval. The predictions from this revised model will help us better understand the role of different brain regions in the behaviours expressed by sign-trackers and goal-trackers. PMID:24954026

  11. Human experimental pain models: A review of standardized methods in drug development

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, K. Sunil kumar; Naidu, M. U. R.; Rani, P. Usha; Rao, T. Ramesh Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Human experimental pain models are essential in understanding the pain mechanisms and appear to be ideally suited to test analgesic compounds. The challenge that confronts both the clinician and the scientist is to match specific treatments to different pain-generating mechanisms and hence reach a pain treatment tailored to each individual patient. Experimental pain models offer the possibility to explore the pain system under controlled settings. Standardized stimuli of different modalities (i.e., mechanical, thermal, electrical, or chemical) can be applied to the skin, muscles, and viscera for a differentiated and comprehensive assessment of various pain pathways and mechanisms. Using a multimodel-multistructure testing, the nociception arising from different body structures can be explored and modulation of specific biomarkers by new and existing analgesic drugs can be profiled. The value of human experimental pain models is to link animal and clinical pain studies, providing new possibilities for designing successful clinical trials. Spontaneous pain, the main compliant of the neuropathic patients, but currently there is no human model available that would mimic chronic pain. Therefore, current human pain models cannot replace patient studies for studying efficacy of analgesic compounds, although being helpful for proof-of-concept studies and dose finding. PMID:23626642

  12. Network Pharmacology Strategies Toward Multi-Target Anticancer Therapies: From Computational Models to Experimental Design Principles

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jing; Aittokallio, Tero

    2014-01-01

    Polypharmacology has emerged as novel means in drug discovery for improving treatment response in clinical use. However, to really capitalize on the polypharmacological effects of drugs, there is a critical need to better model and understand how the complex interactions between drugs and their cellular targets contribute to drug efficacy and possible side effects. Network graphs provide a convenient modeling framework for dealing with the fact that most drugs act on cellular systems through targeting multiple proteins both through on-target and off-target binding. Network pharmacology models aim at addressing questions such as how and where in the disease network should one target to inhibit disease phenotypes, such as cancer growth, ideally leading to therapies that are less vulnerable to drug resistance and side effects by means of attacking the disease network at the systems level through synergistic and synthetic lethal interactions. Since the exponentially increasing number of potential drug target combinations makes pure experimental approach quickly unfeasible, this review depicts a number of computational models and algorithms that can effectively reduce the search space for determining the most promising combinations for experimental evaluation. Such computational-experimental strategies are geared toward realizing the full potential of multi-target treatments in different disease phenotypes. Our specific focus is on system-level network approaches to polypharmacology designs in anticancer drug discovery, where we give representative examples of how network-centric modeling may offer systematic strategies toward better understanding and even predicting the phenotypic responses to multi-target therapies.

  13. Experimental characterisation and modelling of deformation- induced microstructure in an A6061 aluminium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreyca, J. F.; Falahati, A.; Kozeschnik, E.

    2016-03-01

    For industry, the mechanical properties of a material in form of flow curves are essential input data for finite element simulations. Current practice is to obtain flow curves experimentally and to apply fitting procedures to obtain constitutive equations that describe the material response to external loading as a function of temperature and strain rate. Unfortunately, the experimental procedure for characterizing flow curves is complex and expensive, which is why the prediction of flow-curves by computer modelling becomes increasingly important. In the present work, we introduce a state parameter based model that is capable of predicting the flow curves of an A6061 aluminium alloy in different heat-treatment conditions. The model is implemented in the thermo-kinetic software package MatCalc and takes into account precipitation kinetics, subgrain formation, dynamic recovery by spontaneous annihilation and dislocation climb. To validate the simulation results, a series of compression tests is performed on the thermo-mechanical simulator Gleeble 1500.

  14. Dynamic modeling and experimental simulation of active solar energy systems for the evaluation of control strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiller, S. R.; Warren, M. L.; Wahlig, M.

    1980-11-01

    Dynamic modeling and experimental simulation are used to evaluate control strategies for active solar energy systems. Performance of proportional and on/off collector loop controllers are evaluated and compared using a theoretical dynamic collector model. Use of the experimental test facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for evaluating the effect of controls and control strategies on hydronic space heating system performance is also discussed. Both the computer model and the test facility allow evaluation of control strategies using various flow rates, controller set points, insolation patterns, ambient temperature conditions, and collector types. The test facility also allows comparison of collector and load loop flow strategies based on various system configurations and building load demands.

  15. Bridging the Gap of Standardized Animals Models for Blast Neurotrauma: Methodology for Appropriate Experimental Testing.

    PubMed

    VandeVord, Pamela J; Leonardi, Alessandra Dal Cengio; Ritzel, David

    2016-01-01

    Recent military combat has heightened awareness to the complexity of blast-related traumatic brain injuries (bTBI). Experiments using animal, cadaver, or biofidelic physical models remain the primary measures to investigate injury biomechanics as well as validate computational simulations, medical diagnostics and therapies, or protection technologies. However, blast injury research has seen a range of irregular and inconsistent experimental methods for simulating blast insults generating results which may be misleading, cannot be cross-correlated between laboratories, or referenced to any standard for exposure. Both the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command and the National Institutes of Health have noted that there is a lack of standardized preclinical models of TBI. It is recommended that the blast injury research community converge on a consistent set of experimental procedures and reporting of blast test conditions. This chapter describes the blast conditions which can be recreated within a laboratory setting and methodology for testing in vivo models within the appropriate environment.

  16. Understanding electricity generation in osmotic microbial fuel cells through integrated experimental investigation and mathematical modeling.

    PubMed

    Qin, Mohan; Ping, Qingyun; Lu, Yaobin; Abu-Reesh, Ibrahim M; He, Zhen

    2015-11-01

    Osmotic microbial fuel cells (OsMFCs) are a new type of MFCs with integrating forward osmosis (FO). However, it is not well understood why electricity generation is improved in OsMFCs compared to regular MFCs. Herein, an approach integrating experimental investigation and mathematical model was adopted to address the question. Both an OsMFC and an MFC achieved similar organic removal efficiency, but the OsMFC generated higher current than the MFC with or without water flux, resulting from the lower resistance of FO membrane. Combining NaCl and glucose as a catholyte demonstrated that the catholyte conductivity affected the electricity generation in the OsMFC. A mathematical model of OsMFCs was developed and validated with the experimental data. The model predicated the variation of internal resistance with increasing water flux, and confirmed the importance of membrane resistance. Increasing water flux with higher catholyte conductivity could decrease the membrane resistance. PMID:26091574

  17. Drilling in cortical bone: a finite element model and experimental investigations.

    PubMed

    Lughmani, Waqas A; Bouazza-Marouf, Kaddour; Ashcroft, Ian

    2015-02-01

    Bone drilling is an essential part of many orthopaedic surgery procedures, including those for internal fixation and for attaching prosthetics. Estimation and control of bone drilling forces are critical to prevent drill-bit breakthrough, excessive heat generation, and mechanical damage to the bone. An experimental and computational study of drilling in cortical bone has been conducted. A 3D finite element (FE) model for prediction of thrust forces experienced during bone drilling has been developed. The model incorporates the dynamic characteristics involved in the process along with geometrical considerations. An elastic-plastic material model is used to predict the behaviour of cortical bone during drilling. The average critical thrust forces and torques obtained using FE analysis are found to be in good agreement with the experimental results.

  18. Model calculations and experimental measurements of the response of HMX porous beds to deflagration and shock

    SciTech Connect

    Aldis, D.F.; Lee, E.L.; Simpson, R.L.; Weston, A.M.

    1989-08-04

    The experimental research on the response of porous beds of HMX has yielded a body of evidence which includes accurate measurements of gas flow, compaction ratio, detonation transit distance and time. As the experimental research has progressed, we have developed a 1D numerical model (1DUCT) to describe this response in a special hydrodynamic code in which the gas phase is allowed to flow through a solid phase. Gas phase relative velocity is limited to be subsonic. In addition we have developed special constitutive and fluid EOS models (2DUCT) for use with the 2D Lagrange hydrocode, DYNA2D, in which there is no cell to cell gas phase mass transfer. Our study strategy was to analyze several, very different experiments to derive values of phenomenological parameters in the model. These experiments include squib ignited events where relative gas flow is important and compression ignition tests where it is not. 26 refs., 18 figs.

  19. An experimental and modeling study of fires in ventilated ducts; Part 1: Liquid fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Comitis, S.C.; Glasser, D.; Young, B.D. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1994-03-01

    A theoretical model for fire propagation through a fuel-lined duct with a radially well-mixed axial flow is presented. The gas-phase is modeled as a steady-state process whereas the condensed-phase (fuel source) is taken to be the cause of transient fire propagation along the duct. Experiments were performed in a small-scale duct where fire propagation and gas temperature histories were acquired. Experimental results confirm hypotheses of pseudo-steady-state gas-phase processes. Theory and experiment display transient fire propagation for typical duct fire scenarios where initial fuel mass loading is constant with respect to duct length. The phenomena observed, as predicted by theory, is an initial jump'' of the fully developed combustion process followed by convergence to a steady-state constant fire propagation speed. The theory is in all important aspects able to quantitatively model the experimental results.

  20. Analytical model and experimental verification of the critical power for modulation instability in optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Alem, Mehdi; Soto, Marcelo A; Thévenaz, Luc

    2015-11-16

    Modulation instability is thoroughly investigated and a simple analytical model for its power critically modifying the wave properties in terms of system parameters is derived and experimentally validated. The differences on the modulation instability gain spectrum in lossless and lossy optical fibers are analyzed based on theoretical models and numerical simulations. In particular the impact of background noise on the behavior of modulation instability is studied analytically and verified by measurements and simulations. The proposed analytical model is experimentally validated by monitoring the wave propagation along an optical fiber using a Brillouin optical time-domain analyzer. This way, the evolution of the optical signal traveling through optical fibers, especially, the pump depletion and the recurrence phenomenon are investigated. PMID:26698435

  1. Understanding electricity generation in osmotic microbial fuel cells through integrated experimental investigation and mathematical modeling.

    PubMed

    Qin, Mohan; Ping, Qingyun; Lu, Yaobin; Abu-Reesh, Ibrahim M; He, Zhen

    2015-11-01

    Osmotic microbial fuel cells (OsMFCs) are a new type of MFCs with integrating forward osmosis (FO). However, it is not well understood why electricity generation is improved in OsMFCs compared to regular MFCs. Herein, an approach integrating experimental investigation and mathematical model was adopted to address the question. Both an OsMFC and an MFC achieved similar organic removal efficiency, but the OsMFC generated higher current than the MFC with or without water flux, resulting from the lower resistance of FO membrane. Combining NaCl and glucose as a catholyte demonstrated that the catholyte conductivity affected the electricity generation in the OsMFC. A mathematical model of OsMFCs was developed and validated with the experimental data. The model predicated the variation of internal resistance with increasing water flux, and confirmed the importance of membrane resistance. Increasing water flux with higher catholyte conductivity could decrease the membrane resistance.

  2. A phase-field model for ductile fracture at finite strains and its experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambati, Marreddy; Kruse, Roland; De Lorenzis, Laura

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a phase-field model for ductile fracture previously proposed in the kinematically linear regime is extended to the three-dimensional finite strain setting, and its predictions are qualitatively and quantitatively compared with several experimental results, both from ad-hoc tests carried out by the authors and from the available literature. The proposed model is based on the physical assumption that fracture occurs when a scalar measure of the accumulated plastic strain reaches a critical value, and such assumption is introduced through the dependency of the phase-field degradation function on this scalar measure. The proposed model is able to capture the experimentally observed sequence of elasto-plastic deformation, necking and fracture phenomena in flat specimens; the occurrence of cup-and-cone fracture patterns in axisymmetric specimens; the role played by notches and by their size on the measured displacement at fracture; and the sequence of distinct cracking events observed in more complex specimens.

  3. Electrosurgical vessel sealing tissue temperature: experimental measurement and finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Roland K; Chastagner, Matthew W; Dodde, Robert E; Shih, Albert J

    2013-02-01

    The temporal and spatial tissue temperature profile in electrosurgical vessel sealing was experimentally measured and modeled using finite element modeling (FEM). Vessel sealing procedures are often performed near the neurovascular bundle and may cause collateral neural thermal damage. Therefore, the heat generated during electrosurgical vessel sealing is of concern among surgeons. Tissue temperature in an in vivo porcine femoral artery sealed using a bipolar electrosurgical device was studied. Three FEM techniques were incorporated to model the tissue evaporation, water loss, and fusion by manipulating the specific heat, electrical conductivity, and electrical contact resistance, respectively. These three techniques enable the FEM to accurately predict the vessel sealing tissue temperature profile. The averaged discrepancy between the experimentally measured temperature and the FEM predicted temperature at three thermistor locations is less than 7%. The maximum error is 23.9%. Effects of the three FEM techniques are also quantified.

  4. Experimental evidence and model explanation for cell population characteristics modification when applying sequential photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabino, L. G.; de Negreiros, L. M. V.; Vollet-Filho, J. D.; Ferreira, J.; Tirapelli, D. P. C.; Novais, P. C.; Tirapelli, L. F.; Kurachi, C.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2011-03-01

    We present experimental evidence of the existence of cell variability in terms of threshold light dose for Hep G2 (liver cancer cells) cultured. Using a theoretical model to describe the effects caused by successive photodynamic therapy (PDT) sessions, and based on the consequences of a partial response we introduce the threshold dose distribution concept within a tumor. The experimental model consists in a stack of flasks, and simulates subsequent layers of a tissue exposed to PDT application. The result indicates that cells from the same culture could respond in different ways to similar PDT induced-damages. Moreover, the consequence is a partial killing of the cells submitted to PDT, and the death fraction decreased at each in vitro PDT session. To demonstrate the occurrence of cell population modification as a response to PDT, we constructed a simple theoretical model and assumed that the threshold dose distribution for a cell population of a tumor is represented by a modified Gaussian distribution.

  5. [Sutureless hepatic transection using a new radiofrequency assisted device. Theoretical model, experimental study and clinic trial].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Serrano, María Ángeles; Grande, Luis; Burdío, Fernando; Berjano, Enrique; Poves, Ignasi; Quesada, Rita

    2011-03-01

    The ideal instrument for performing hepatic transection should combine safe and rapid haemostasis in a single tool. We present a new multidisciplinary investigation designed to develop a hepatic transection device assisted by radiofrequency (RF); the investigation included: a computerised theoretical model, and experimental study and a clinical trial of this device. The theoretic modelling was performed by computer, based on the Finite Elements Method (FEM), with the objective of studying the distribution of electrical energy and temperature in the tissue, and to assess the effect of the characteristics of the instrument. The experimental study, based on an in vivo porcine model, suggested that the new instrument would allow the transection velocity of the hepatic parenchyma to be increased with lower bleeding per transection area compared with other techniques extensively used in liver surgery. These data should enable the first phase of clinical trial to be conducted, with preliminary results that suggest that the new device is safe and effective.

  6. Development and experimental test of an analytical model of the orifice pulse tube refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storch, Peter J.; Radebaugh, Ray

    1988-01-01

    An analytical model for the orifice pulse tube is developed, in which the system is described in terms of average enthalpy flow with such simplifying assumptions as an ideal gas and sinusoidal pressure variation. Phasor analysis is used to represent temperature, pressure, and mass-flow rate waves in vector form. The model predictions, namely, that the refrigeration power of a pulse-tube refrigerator is proportional to the average pressure, the pulse frequency, the mass-flow ratio, and the square of the dynamic pressure ratio, were verified by experimental measurements. It was found that, as a result of the simplifying assumptions, the magnitudes of the refrigeration power predicted by the model were between three and five times greater than experimental values.

  7. Numerical modelling and experimental investigation of drug release from layered silicone matrix systems.

    PubMed

    Snorradóttir, Bergthóra S; Jónsdóttir, Fjóla; Sigurdsson, Sven Th; Thorsteinsson, Freygardur; Másson, Már

    2013-07-16

    Medical devices and polymeric matrix systems that release drugs or other bioactive compounds are of interest for a variety of applications. The release of the drug can be dependent on a number of factors such as the solubility, diffusivity, dissolution rate and distribution of the solid drug in the matrix. Achieving the goal of an optimal release profile can be challenging when relying solely on traditional experimental work. Accurate modelling complementing experimentation is therefore desirable. Numerical modelling is increasingly becoming an integral part of research and development due to the significant advances in computer simulation technology. This work focuses on numerical modelling and investigation of multi-layered silicone matrix systems. A numerical model that can be used to model multi-layered systems was constructed and validated by comparison with experimental data. The model could account for the limited dissolution rate and effect of the drug distribution on the release profiles. Parametric study showed how different factors affect the characteristics of drug release. Multi-layered medical silicone matrices were prepared in special moulds, where the quantity of drug in each layer could be varied, and release was investigated with Franz-diffusion cell setup. Data for long-term release was fitted to the model and the full depletion of the system predicted. The numerical model constructed for this study, whose input parameters are the diffusion, effective dissolution rate and dimensional solubility coefficients, does not require any type of steady-state approximation. These results indicate that numerical model can be used as a design tool for development of controlled release systems such as drug-loaded medical devices.

  8. Experimental liver fibrosis research: update on animal models, legal issues and translational aspects

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is defined as excessive extracellular matrix deposition and is based on complex interactions between matrix-producing hepatic stellate cells and an abundance of liver-resident and infiltrating cells. Investigation of these processes requires in vitro and in vivo experimental work in animals. However, the use of animals in translational research will be increasingly challenged, at least in countries of the European Union, because of the adoption of new animal welfare rules in 2013. These rules will create an urgent need for optimized standard operating procedures regarding animal experimentation and improved international communication in the liver fibrosis community. This review gives an update on current animal models, techniques and underlying pathomechanisms with the aim of fostering a critical discussion of the limitations and potential of up-to-date animal experimentation. We discuss potential complications in experimental liver fibrosis and provide examples of how the findings of studies in which these models are used can be translated to human disease and therapy. In this review, we want to motivate the international community to design more standardized animal models which might help to address the legally requested replacement, refinement and reduction of animals in fibrosis research. PMID:24274743

  9. Analytical modeling and experimental validation of a structurally integrated piezoelectric energy harvester on a thin plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aridogan, U.; Basdogan, I.; Erturk, A.

    2014-04-01

    Vibration-based energy harvesting using piezoelectric cantilevers has been extensively studied over the past decade. As an alternative to cantilevered harvesters, piezoelectric patch harvesters integrated to thin plates can be more convenient for use in marine, aerospace and automotive applications since these systems are often composed of thin plate-like structures with various boundary conditions. In this paper, we present analytical electroelastic modeling of a piezoelectric energy harvester structurally integrated to a thin plate along with experimental validations. The distributed-parameter electroelastic model of the thin plate with the piezoceramic patch harvester is developed based on Kirchhoff’s plate theory for all-four-edges clamped (CCCC) boundary conditions. Closed-form steady-state response expressions for coupled electrical output and structural vibration are obtained under transverse point force excitation. Analytical electroelastic frequency response functions (FRFs) relating the voltage output and vibration response to force input are derived and generalized for different boundary conditions. Experimental validation and extensive theoretical analysis efforts are then presented with a case study employing a thin PZT-5A piezoceramic patch attached on the surface of a rectangular aluminum CCCC plate. The importance of positioning of the piezoceramic patch harvester is discussed through an analysis of dynamic strain distribution on the overall plate surface. The electroelastic model is validated by a comparison of analytical and experimental FRFs for a wide range of resistive electrical boundary conditions. Finally, power generation performance of the structurally integrated piezoceramic patch harvester from multiple vibration modes is investigated analytically and experimentally.

  10. Prediction of velopharyngeal orifice area: a re-examination of model experimentation.

    PubMed

    Smith, B E; Weinberg, B

    1980-10-01

    Warren has advanced a modification of the hydrokinetic equation for predicting velopharyngeal orifice area (Warren and DuBois, 1964). In the present work, this equation was subjected to extensive controlled model experimentation. The results of this experimentation show that, given the pressure differential across the orifice and the rate of airflow through the orifice, accurate predictions can be made of the area of the velopharyngeal port. These results were interpreted to provide strong support for both clinical and research use of the hydrokinetic equation for predicting velopharyngeal orifice area.

  11. Experimental test of the no-go theorem for continuous ψ-epistemic models

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Kai-Yu; Zhang, Xin-Ding; Guo, Guang-Zhou; Ai, Bao-Quan; Yan, Hui; Zhu, Shi-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Quantum states are the key mathematical objects in quantum theory; however, there is still much debate concerning what a quantum state truly represents. One such century-old debate is whether a quantum state is ontic or epistemic. Recently, a no-go theorem was proposed, stating that the continuous ψ-epistemic models cannot reproduce the measurement statistic of quantum states. Here we experimentally test this theorem with high-dimensional single photon quantum states without additional assumptions except for the fair-sampling assumption. Our experimental results reproduce the prediction of quantum theory and support the no-go theorem. PMID:27241283

  12. Autoignition chemistry of the hexane isomers: An experimental and kinetic modeling study

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, H.J.; Gaffuri, P.; Pitz, W.J.; Westbrook, C.K.; Leppard, W.R.

    1995-06-01

    Autoignition of the five distinct isomers of hexane is studied experimentally under motored engine conditions and computationally using a detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism. Computed and experimental results are compared and used to help understand the chemical factors leading to engine knock in spark-ignited engines and the molecular structure factors contributing to octane rating for hydrocarbon fuels. The kinetic model reproduces observed variations in critical compression ratio with fuel structure, and it also provides intermediate and final product species concentrations in very dose agreement with observed results. In addition, the computed results provide insights into the kinetic origins of fuel octane sensitive.

  13. Prediction of velopharyngeal orifice area: a re-examination of model experimentation.

    PubMed

    Smith, B E; Weinberg, B

    1980-10-01

    Warren has advanced a modification of the hydrokinetic equation for predicting velopharyngeal orifice area (Warren and DuBois, 1964). In the present work, this equation was subjected to extensive controlled model experimentation. The results of this experimentation show that, given the pressure differential across the orifice and the rate of airflow through the orifice, accurate predictions can be made of the area of the velopharyngeal port. These results were interpreted to provide strong support for both clinical and research use of the hydrokinetic equation for predicting velopharyngeal orifice area. PMID:6934041

  14. Bidirectional Connected Control Method Applied to an Experimental Structural Model Split into Four Substructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, T.; Seto, K.; Toyoda, H.; Takano, T.

    2016-09-01

    Connected Control Method (CCM) is a well-known mechanism in the field of civil structural vibration control that utilizes mutual reaction forces between plural buildings connected by dampers as damping force. However, the fact that CCM requires at least two buildings to obtain reaction force prevents CCM from further development. In this paper, a novel idea to apply CCM onto a single building by splitting the building into four substructures is presented. An experimental model structure split into four is built and CCM is applied by using four magnetic dampers. Experimental analysis is carried out and basic performance and effectiveness of the presented idea is confirmed.

  15. Experimental test of the no-go theorem for continuous ψ-epistemic models.

    PubMed

    Liao, Kai-Yu; Zhang, Xin-Ding; Guo, Guang-Zhou; Ai, Bao-Quan; Yan, Hui; Zhu, Shi-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Quantum states are the key mathematical objects in quantum theory; however, there is still much debate concerning what a quantum state truly represents. One such century-old debate is whether a quantum state is ontic or epistemic. Recently, a no-go theorem was proposed, stating that the continuous ψ-epistemic models cannot reproduce the measurement statistic of quantum states. Here we experimentally test this theorem with high-dimensional single photon quantum states without additional assumptions except for the fair-sampling assumption. Our experimental results reproduce the prediction of quantum theory and support the no-go theorem.

  16. Photovoltaic Grid-Connected Modeling and Characterization Based on Experimental Results

    PubMed Central

    Humada, Ali M.; Hojabri, Mojgan; Sulaiman, Mohd Herwan Bin; Hamada, Hussein M.; Ahmed, Mushtaq N.

    2016-01-01

    A grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) system operates under fluctuated weather condition has been modeled and characterized based on specific test bed. A mathematical model of a small-scale PV system has been developed mainly for residential usage, and the potential results have been simulated. The proposed PV model based on three PV parameters, which are the photocurrent, IL, the reverse diode saturation current, Io, the ideality factor of diode, n. Accuracy of the proposed model and its parameters evaluated based on different benchmarks. The results showed that the proposed model fitting the experimental results with high accuracy compare to the other models, as well as the I-V characteristic curve. The results of this study can be considered valuable in terms of the installation of a grid-connected PV system in fluctuated climatic conditions. PMID:27035575

  17. Photovoltaic Grid-Connected Modeling and Characterization Based on Experimental Results.

    PubMed

    Humada, Ali M; Hojabri, Mojgan; Sulaiman, Mohd Herwan Bin; Hamada, Hussein M; Ahmed, Mushtaq N

    2016-01-01

    A grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) system operates under fluctuated weather condition has been modeled and characterized based on specific test bed. A mathematical model of a small-scale PV system has been developed mainly for residential usage, and the potential results have been simulated. The proposed PV model based on three PV parameters, which are the photocurrent, IL, the reverse diode saturation current, Io, the ideality factor of diode, n. Accuracy of the proposed model and its parameters evaluated based on different benchmarks. The results showed that the proposed model fitting the experimental results with high accuracy compare to the other models, as well as the I-V characteristic curve. The results of this study can be considered valuable in terms of the installation of a grid-connected PV system in fluctuated climatic conditions. PMID:27035575

  18. The Langley Research Center CSI phase-0 evolutionary model testbed-design and experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. K.; Horta, Lucas G.; Elliott, K. B.

    1991-01-01

    A testbed for the development of Controls Structures Interaction (CSI) technology is described. The design philosophy, capabilities, and early experimental results are presented to introduce some of the ongoing CSI research at NASA-Langley. The testbed, referred to as the Phase 0 version of the CSI Evolutionary model (CEM), is the first stage of model complexity designed to show the benefits of CSI technology and to identify weaknesses in current capabilities. Early closed loop test results have shown non-model based controllers can provide an order of magnitude increase in damping in the first few flexible vibration modes. Model based controllers for higher performance will need to be robust to model uncertainty as verified by System ID tests. Data are presented that show finite element model predictions of frequency differ from those obtained from tests. Plans are also presented for evolution of the CEM to study integrated controller and structure design as well as multiple payload dynamics.

  19. Comparison of GEANT4 very low energy cross section models with experimental data in water

    SciTech Connect

    Incerti, S.; Ivanchenko, A.; Karamitros, M.; Mantero, A.; Moretto, P.; Tran, H. N.; Mascialino, B.; Champion, C.; Ivanchenko, V. N.; Bernal, M. A.; Francis, Z.; Villagrasa, C.; Baldacchino, G.; Gueye, P.; Capra, R.; Nieminen, P.; Zacharatou, C.

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: The GEANT4 general-purpose Monte Carlo simulation toolkit is able to simulate physical interaction processes of electrons, hydrogen and helium atoms with charge states (H{sup 0}, H{sup +}) and (He{sup 0}, He{sup +}, He{sup 2+}), respectively, in liquid water, the main component of biological systems, down to the electron volt regime and the submicrometer scale, providing GEANT4 users with the so-called ''GEANT4-DNA'' physics models suitable for microdosimetry simulation applications. The corresponding software has been recently re-engineered in order to provide GEANT4 users with a coherent and unique approach to the simulation of electromagnetic interactions within the GEANT4 toolkit framework (since GEANT4 version 9.3 beta). This work presents a quantitative comparison of these physics models with a collection of experimental data in water collected from the literature. Methods: An evaluation of the closeness between the total and differential cross section models available in the GEANT4 toolkit for microdosimetry and experimental reference data is performed using a dedicated statistical toolkit that includes the Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistical test. The authors used experimental data acquired in water vapor as direct measurements in the liquid phase are not yet available in the literature. Comparisons with several recommendations are also presented. Results: The authors have assessed the compatibility of experimental data with GEANT4 microdosimetry models by means of quantitative methods. The results show that microdosimetric measurements in liquid water are necessary to assess quantitatively the validity of the software implementation for the liquid water phase. Nevertheless, a comparison with existing experimental data in water vapor provides a qualitative appreciation of the plausibility of the simulation models. The existing reference data themselves should undergo a critical interpretation and selection, as some of the series exhibit significant

  20. Experimental Characterization and Micromechanical Modeling of Woven Carbon/Copper Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Pauly, Christopher C.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy

    1997-01-01

    The results of an extensive experimental characterization and a preliminary analytical modeling effort for the elastoplastic mechanical behavior of 8-harness satin weave carbon/copper (C/Cu) composites are presented. Previous experimental and modeling investigations of woven composites are discussed, as is the evolution of, and motivation for, the continuing research on C/Cu composites. Experimental results of monotonic and cyclic tension, compression, and Iosipescu shear tests, and combined tension-compression tests, are presented. With regard to the test results, emphasis is placed on the effect of strain gauge size and placement, the effect of alloying the copper matrix to improve fiber-matrix bonding, yield surface characterization, and failure mechanisms. The analytical methodology used in this investigation consists of an extension of the three-dimensional generalized method of cells (GMC-3D) micromechanics model, developed by Aboudi (1994), to include inhomogeneity and plasticity effects on the subcell level. The extension of the model allows prediction of the elastoplastic mechanical response of woven composites, as represented by a true repeating unit cell for the woven composite. The model is used to examine the effects of refining the representative geometry of the composite, altering the composite overall fiber volume fraction, changing the size and placement of the strain gauge with respect to the composite's reinforcement weave, and including porosity within the infiltrated fiber yarns on the in-plane elastoplastic tensile, compressive, and shear response of 8-harness satin C/Cu. The model predictions are also compared with the appropriate monotonic experimental results.