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Sample records for experimental murine tumors

  1. Tumor vascularity and hematogenous metastasis in experimental murine intraocular melanoma.

    PubMed Central

    Grossniklaus, H E

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that primary tumor vascularity in a murine model of intraocular melanoma positively correlates with the development and hematogenous spread of metastasis. METHODS: Forty 12-week-old C57BL6 mice were inoculated in either the anterior chamber (AC) or posterior compartment (PC) of 1 eye with 5 x 10(5) cells/microL of Queens tissue culture melanoma cells. The inoculated eye was enucleated at 2 weeks; the mice were sacrificed at 4 weeks postinoculation, and necropsies were performed. The enucleated eyes were examined for histologic and ultrastructural features, including relationship of tumor cells to tumor vascular channels, vascular pattern, and mean vascular density. RESULTS: Melanoma grew and was confined to the eye in 12 of 20 AC eyes and 10 of 20 PC eyes. Histologic and electron microscopic examination showed tumor invasion into vascular channels. Five of 12 AC tumors (42%) and 8 of 10 PC tumors (80%) metastasized. All of the AC tumors, but none of the PC tumors, that distantly metastasized also metastasized to ipsilateral cervical lymph nodes (P = .00535). There was no statistically significant difference of vascular pattern between the melanomas that did and did not metastasize to lungs in the PC group (P = .24), although there was a significant difference in the AC group (P = .02). Tumors with high-grade vascular patterns were more likely to metastasize than tumors with low-grade vascular patterns in the AC group. The mean vascular density positively correlated with the presence and number of metastases in both groups (P = .0000 and P < .001, respectively). There was no statistically significant difference of vascular pattern and mean vascular density for AC versus PC melanoma (P = .97). CONCLUSIONS: The rate of metastasis in this murine intraocular melanoma model positively correlates with primary tumor vascularity. The melanoma metastasizes via invasion of tumor vascular channels. AC melanoma also

  2. Engineered herpes simplex virus expressing IL-12 in the treatment of experimental murine brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Jacqueline N.; Gillespie, G. Yancey; Love, Cammy E.; Randall, Suzanne; Whitley, Richard J.; Markert, James M.

    2000-01-01

    Genetically engineered, neuroattenuated herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) expressing various cytokines can improve survival when used in the treatment of experimental brain tumors. These attenuated viruses have both copies of γ134.5 deleted. Recently, we demonstrated increased survival of C57BL/6 mice bearing syngeneic GL-261 gliomas when treated with an engineered HSV expressing IL-4, as compared with treatment with the parent construct (γ134.5−) alone or with a virus expressing IL-10. Herein, we report construction of a conditionally replication-competent mutant expressing both subunits of mIL-12 (M002) and its evaluation in a syngeneic neuroblastoma murine model. IL-12 induces a helper T cell subset type 1 response, which may induce more durable antitumor effects. In vitro studies showed that, when infected with M002, both Vero cells and murine Neuro-2a neuroblastoma cells produced physiologically relevant levels of IL-12 heterodimers, as determined by ELISA. M002 was cytotoxic for Neuro-2a cells and human glioma cell lines U251MG and D54MG. Neurotoxicity studies, as defined by plaque-forming units/LD50, performed in HSV-1-sensitive A/J strain mice found that M002 was not toxic even at high doses. When evaluated in an intracranial syngeneic neuroblastoma murine model, median survival of M002-treated animals was significantly longer than the median survival of animals treated with R3659, the parent γ134.5− mutant lacking any cytokine gene insert. Immunohistochemical analysis of M002-treated tumors identified a pronounced influx of CD4+ T cells and macrophages as well as CD8+ cells when compared with an analysis of R3659-treated tumors. We conclude that M002 produced a survival benefit via oncolytic effects combined with immunologic effects meditated by helper T cells of subset type 1. PMID:10681459

  3. Tumor necrosis factor alpha signaling in the development of experimental murine pre-hepatic portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Theodorakis, Nicholas G; Wang, Yining N; Wu, Jianmin; Maluccio, Mary A; Skill, Nicholas J

    2010-01-01

    The cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFa) has previously been identified in the development of portal hypertension (PHT) by facilitating portal venous and systemic hyperemia. TNFa is reported to contribute to hyperemia via endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) induction and nitric oxide (NO) production. This study examines this hypothesis by utilizing TNFa receptor knockout mice and a murine model of pre-hepatic PHT. Plasma TNFa and NOx and tissue TNFa mRNA levels were determined in wild-type mice 0-7d post induction of pre-hepatic PHT by partial portal vein ligation (PVL). TNFa receptor knockout mice also received PVL or sham surgery and splenic pulp pressure, abdominal aortic flow and portal-systemic shunting were recorded 7d following. Portal pressure and systemic hyperemia developed rapidly following PVL. Plasma NOx was increased temporarily 2-3 days following PVL and returned to baseline by day 7. Circulating TNFa was below detectable limits of the ELISA used, as such no increase was observed. Hepatic and vascular TNFa mRNA levels were transiently changed after PVL otherwise there was no significant change. TNFa receptor targeted gene deletion did not ameliorate plasma NOx following PVL and had no effect on the development of PHT. TNFa receptor signaling plays no detectable role in the development of systemic hyperemia in the murine model of pre-hepatic PHT. Consequently, increased TNFa observed in intra-hepatic inflammatory models (CCl4) and in patients is probably related to inflammation associated with intra-hepatic pathology. Alternatively, TNFa may be signaling via a TNFa receptor independent mechanism. PMID:21383890

  4. Apoptosis in irradiated murine tumors.

    PubMed

    Stephens, L C; Ang, K K; Schultheiss, T E; Milas, L; Meyn, R E

    1991-09-01

    Early radiation responses of transplantable murine ovarian (OCaI) and hepatocellular (HCaI) carcinomas were examined at 6, 24, 48, 96, and 144 h after single photon doses of 25, 35, or 45 Gy. Previous studies using tumor growth delay and tumor radiocurability assays had shown OCaI tumors to be relatively radiosensitive and HCaI tumors to be radioresistant. At 6 h, approximately 20% of nuclei in OCaI tumors showed aberrations characteristic of cell death by apoptosis. This contrasted to an incidence of 3% in HCaI tumors. Mitotic activity was eliminated in OCaI tumors but was only transiently suppressed in HCaI tumors. At 24-96 h, OCaI tumors continued to display apoptosis and progressive necrosis, whereas HCaI tumors responded by exhibiting marked pleomorphism. Factors other than mitotic activity may influence tumor radiosensitivity, and one of these may be susceptibility to induction of apoptosis (programmed cell death), because this was a prominent early radiation response by the radiosensitive OCaI tumors.

  5. Apoptosis in irradiated murine tumors.

    PubMed

    Stephens, L C; Ang, K K; Schultheiss, T E; Milas, L; Meyn, R E

    1991-09-01

    Early radiation responses of transplantable murine ovarian (OCaI) and hepatocellular (HCaI) carcinomas were examined at 6, 24, 48, 96, and 144 h after single photon doses of 25, 35, or 45 Gy. Previous studies using tumor growth delay and tumor radiocurability assays had shown OCaI tumors to be relatively radiosensitive and HCaI tumors to be radioresistant. At 6 h, approximately 20% of nuclei in OCaI tumors showed aberrations characteristic of cell death by apoptosis. This contrasted to an incidence of 3% in HCaI tumors. Mitotic activity was eliminated in OCaI tumors but was only transiently suppressed in HCaI tumors. At 24-96 h, OCaI tumors continued to display apoptosis and progressive necrosis, whereas HCaI tumors responded by exhibiting marked pleomorphism. Factors other than mitotic activity may influence tumor radiosensitivity, and one of these may be susceptibility to induction of apoptosis (programmed cell death), because this was a prominent early radiation response by the radiosensitive OCaI tumors. PMID:1886987

  6. Antitumor and antimetastatic activity of interleukin 12 against murine tumors

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    It has recently been demonstrated that in vivo administration of murine interleukin 12 (IL-12) to mice results in augmentation of cytotoxic natural killer (NK)/lymphocyte-activated killer cell activity, enhancement of cytolytic T cell generation, and induction of interferon gamma secretion. In this study, the in vivo activity of murine IL-12 against a number of murine tumors has been evaluated. Experimental pulmonary metastases or subcutaneous growth of the B16F10 melanoma were markedly reduced in mice treated intraperitoneally with IL-12, resulting in an increase in survival time. The therapeutic effectiveness of IL-12 was dose dependent and treatment of subcutaneous tumors could be initiated up to 14 d after injection of tumor cells. Likewise, established experimental hepatic metastases and established subcutaneous M5076 reticulum cell sarcoma and Renca renal cell adenocarcinoma tumors were effectively treated by IL-12 at doses which resulted in no gross toxicity. Local peritumoral injection of IL-12 into established subcutaneous Renca tumors resulted in regression and complete disappearance of these tumors. IL-12 was as effective in NK cell-deficient beige mice or in mice depleted of NK cell activity by treatment with antiasialo GM1, suggesting that NK cells are not the primary cell type mediating the antitumor effects of this cytokine. However, the efficacy of IL-12 was greatly reduced in nude mice suggesting the involvement of T cells. Furthermore, depletion of CD8+ but not CD4+ T cells significantly reduced the efficacy of IL-12. These results demonstrate that IL-12 has potent in vivo antitumor and antimetastatic effects against murine tumors and demonstrate as well the critical role of CD8+ T cells in mediating the antitumor effects against subcutaneous tumors. PMID:8104230

  7. Irradiation Design for an Experimental Murine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ballesteros-Zebadua, P.; Moreno-Jimenez, S.; Suarez-Campos, J. E.; Celis, M. A.; Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.; Garcia-Garduno, O. A.; Rubio-Osornio, M. C.; Custodio-Ramirez, V.; Paz, C.

    2010-12-07

    In radiotherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery, small animal experimental models are frequently used, since there are still a lot of unsolved questions about the biological and biochemical effects of ionizing radiation. This work presents a method for small-animal brain radiotherapy compatible with a dedicated 6MV Linac. This rodent model is focused on the research of the inflammatory effects produced by ionizing radiation in the brain. In this work comparisons between Pencil Beam and Monte Carlo techniques, were used in order to evaluate accuracy of the calculated dose using a commercial planning system. Challenges in this murine model are discussed.

  8. The purification and properties of cancer procoagulant from murine tumors.

    PubMed

    Moore, W R

    1992-04-30

    The protease, cancer procoagulant, was isolated from three murine metastatic tumors and was purified to apparent homogeneity (SDS-PAGE) from Lewis lung cells by the sequence of (NH4)2SO4 precipitation, DE-53 anion-exchange chromatography, and Sephacryl 200 chromatography. The murine tumor enzyme has a molecular weight of 68,000 and Ca2+ is required for procoagulant and proteolytic activity; thus, the murine enzyme is very similar to that isolated from rabbit tumors. Two peptidyl chromogenic substrates of cancer procoagulant were discovered, facilitating kinetic and inhibition studies with the enzyme. The peptide substrate structures and the results of inhibition studies suggest that cancer procoagulant is thrombin-like in specificity but is a thiol protease.

  9. Limited Role of Murine ATM in Oncogene-Induced Senescence and p53-Dependent Tumor Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Pastor, Barbara; Ortega-Molina, Ana; Soria, Rebeca; Collado, Manuel; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar; Serrano, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies in human fibroblasts have provided a new general paradigm of tumor suppression according to which oncogenic signaling produces DNA damage and this, in turn, results in ATM/p53-dependent cellular senescence. Here, we have tested this model in a variety of murine experimental systems. Overexpression of oncogenic Ras in murine fibroblasts efficiently induced senescence but this occurred in the absence of detectable DNA damage signaling, thus suggesting a fundamental difference between human and murine cells. Moreover, lung adenomas initiated by endogenous levels of oncogenic K-Ras presented abundant senescent cells, but undetectable DNA damage signaling. Accordingly, K-Ras-driven adenomas were also senescent in Atm-null mice, and the tumorigenic progression of these lesions was only modestly accelerated by Atm-deficiency. Finally, we have examined chemically-induced fibrosarcomas, which possess a persistently activated DNA damage response and are highly sensitive to the activity of p53. We found that the absence of Atm favored genomic instability in the resulting tumors, but did not affect the persistent DNA damage response and did not impair p53-dependent tumor suppression. All together, we conclude that oncogene-induced senescence in mice may occur in the absence of a detectable DNA damage response. Regarding murine Atm, our data suggest that it plays a minor role in oncogene-induced senescence or in p53-dependent tumor suppression, being its tumor suppressive activity probably limited to the maintenance of genomic stability. PMID:19421407

  10. Local levels of interleukin-1beta, -4, -6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha in an experimental model of murine osteomyelitis due to staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Takashi; Magara, Shinya; Miyai, Daisuke; Nishimura, Hidetaka; Kuroki, Eiji; Furudoi, Shungo; Komori, Takahide; Ohbayashi, Chiho

    2002-07-21

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate local levels of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), -4 (IL-4), -6 (IL-6), and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), in a model of murine osteomyelitis due to Staphylococcus aureus. Cytokine levels in supernatants derived from bone homogenates were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, for 28 days following the direct implantation of murine tibiae with S.aureus. Levels of IL-1 beta and IL-6 in infected bone were elevated in the early post-infection period and then decreased. In contrast, TNF-alpha levels remained elevated 3 to 28 days post-infection, while IL-4 levels were elevated late in the course of infection. The histopathology of infected bone showed predominant infiltration of inflammatory cells and bone resorption 3 to 7 days after infection, and bone resorption and adjacent areas of formation 14 to 28 days after infection. These results suggest that the elevated IL-1 beta and IL-6 levels induced by infection may be related to bone damage mainly in the early phase of infection, and that TNF-alpha and IL-4 may at least in part be associated with histopathological changes, including both bone resorption and formation in the later phase of this osteomyelitis model.

  11. Murine Tumor Models for Oncolytic Rhabdo-Virotherapy.

    PubMed

    Falls, Theresa; Roy, Dominic Guy; Bell, John Cameron; Bourgeois-Daigneault, Marie-Claude

    2016-01-01

    The preclinical optimization and validation of novel treatments for cancer therapy requires the use of laboratory animals. Although in vitro experiments using tumor cell lines and ex vivo treatment of patient tumor samples provide a remarkable first-line tool for the initial study of tumoricidal potential, tumor-bearing animals remain the primary option to study delivery, efficacy, and safety of therapies in the context of a complete tumor microenvironment and functional immune system. In this review, we will describe the use of murine tumor models for oncolytic virotherapy using vesicular stomatitis virus. We will discuss studies using immunocompetent and immunodeficient models with respect to toxicity and therapeutic treatments, as well as the various techniques and tools available to study cancer therapy with Rhabdoviruses. PMID:27034397

  12. Immunotherapy of murine bladder cancer by irradiated tumor vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Lamm, D.L.; Riggs, D.R.; DeHaven, J.I.; Bryner, R.W. )

    1991-01-01

    This investigation explored the efficacy of irradiated autologous mouse bladder tumor (Ir-MBT2) as an active specific immunotherapeutic agent and as adjuvant therapy with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) against a subcutaneously transplanted murine bladder tumor. Tumor incidence was significantly reduced in groups receiving BCG (27%, p less than 0.005) or Ir-MBT2 with BCG (53%, p less than 0.025), compared to control (93%). Survival was significantly improved in groups treated with BCG (100%, p less than 0.005), 10(5) Ir-MBT2 with BCG (53%, p less than 0.01), or 10(7) Ir-MBT2 with BCG (47%, p less than 0.025) compared with control (13%). Surprisingly, Ir-MBT2 consistently reduced the efficacy of BCG alone. Ir-MBT2 alone (10(7)) appeared to enhance tumor growth. Autologous irradiated bladder tumor vaccine, alone or in combination with BCG, displayed no immunotherapeutic advantage. The use of irradiated tumor cell vaccine for bladder cancer therapy may reduce the results achievable with BCG alone.

  13. Analysis of murine cellular receptors for tumor-killing factor

    SciTech Connect

    Ohsawa, F.; Natori, S.

    1987-01-01

    Receptors for tumor-killing factor (TKF) on the surface of murine cells were analyzed using radioiodinated TKF. Not only sensitive cells but also insensitive cells were found to have specific receptors. Among the sensitive cells, no clear relation was observed between the number of receptors on the cell surface and sensitivity to TKF. Compounds affecting microfilaments (cytochalasin B and D) and microtubules (colchicine and Colcemid) significantly inhibited cytolysis of sensitive cells induced by receptor-bound TKF. It is concluded that internalization of receptor-bound TKF is a prerequisite for triggering cytolysis.

  14. Several murine metastasizing tumors possess a cysteine proteinase with cancer procoagulant characteristics.

    PubMed

    Falanga, A; Bolognese Dalessandro, A P; Casali, B; Roncaglioni, M C; Donati, M B

    1987-06-15

    Cancer Procoagulant (CP), a cysteine proteinase which triggers blood coagulation by directly activating Factor X (FX) in the absence of Factor VII (F VII), has recently been isolated from rabbit V2 carcinoma and biochemically characterized. We have studied the procoagulant activity of tissue extracts from 4 murine experimental tumors in order to define whether or not a F VII-independent activity with cysteine proteinase characteristics was present. The tumors studied were: Lewis lung carcinoma (3LL), B16 melanoma (B16), JW sarcoma (JWS) and the M4 variant of the mFS6 fibrosarcoma (M4). Extracts from 3LL, B16 and JWS tumor initiated coagulation in both the presence and absence of F VII, their procoagulant activity was sensitive to iodoacetamide (1 mM) and mercury chloride (0.1 mM). The procoagulant of M4 extract was dependent on the presence of F VII and was not significantly affected by the cysteine proteinase inhibitors. An Ouchterlony double immunodiffusion study showed immunological cross-reactivity of all but M4 extracts to a polyclonal antibody to purified CP. The present study suggests that the procoagulant(s) present in the murine tumors 3LL, B16 and JWS are enzymatically and immunologically indistinguishable from cancer procoagulant of the rabbit V2 carcinoma.

  15. A drug carrier targeting murine uPAR for photodynamic therapy and tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaolei; Zheng, Ke; Li, Rui; Chen, Zhuo; Yuan, Cai; Hu, Ping; Chen, Jincan; Xue, Jinping; Huang, Mingdong

    2015-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used as an effective therapeutical modality for tumors. In PDT, a photosensitizer was used to capture the light of specific wavelength, leading to the generation of reactive oxygen species and cytotoxicity surrounding the photosensitizer. Modifications of photosensitizers to enhance tumor specificity are common approaches to increase the efficacy and reduce the side effects of PDT. Previously, we developed a human serum albumin (HSA)-based drug carrier fused with the human amino-terminal fragment (hATF), which binds to a tumor surface marker (urokinase receptor, uPAR). However, hATF-HSA binds to murine uPAR much weaker (79-fold) than to human uPAR, and is not optimal for applications on murine tumor models. In this study, we developed a murine version of the drug carrier (mATF-HSA). A photosensitizer (mono-substituted β-carboxy phthalocyanine zinc, CPZ) was loaded into this carrier, giving a rather stable macromolecule (mATF-HSA:CPZ) that was shown to bind to murine uPAR in vitro. In addition, we evaluated both the photodynamic therapy efficacy and tumor retention capability of the macromolecule (at a dose of 0.05mg CPZ/kg mouse body weight) on murine hepatoma-22 (H22) tumor bearing mouse model. mATF-HSA:CPZ showed more accumulation in tumors compared to its human counterpart (hATF-HSA:CPZ) measured by quantitative fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT). Besides, mATF-HSA:CPZ exhibited a higher tumor killing efficacy than hATF-HSA:CPZ. Together, the macromolecule mATF-HSA is a promising tumor-specific drug carrier on murine tumor models and is an useful tool to study tumor biology on murine tumor models. PMID:26004218

  16. Murine macrophage heparanase: inhibition and comparison with metastatic tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Savion, N.; Disatnik, M.H.; Nevo, Z.

    1987-01-01

    Circulating macrophages and metastatic tumor cells can penetrate the vascular endothelium and migrate from the circulatory system to extravascular compartments. Both activated murine macrophages and different metastatic tumor cells attach, invade, and penetrate confluent vascular endothelial cell monolayer in vitro, by degrading heparan sulfate proteoglycans in the subendothelial extracellular matrix. The sensitivity of the enzymes from the various sources degrading the heparan sulfate proteoglycan was challenged and compared by a series of inhibitors. Activated macrophages demonstrate a heparanase with an endoglycosidase activity that cleaves from the (/sup 35/S)O/sub 4//sup -/-labeled heparan sulfate proteoglycans of the extracellular matrix 10 kDa glycosaminoglycan fragments. The degradation of (/sup 35/S)O/sub 4//sup -/-labeled extracellular matrix proteoglycans by the macrophages' heparanase is significantly inhibited in the presence of heparan sulfate (10..mu..g/ml), arteparon (10..mu..g/ml), and heparin at a concentration of 3 ..mu..g/ml. Degradation of this heparan sulfate proteoglycan is a two-step sequential process involving protease activity followed by heparanase activity. B16-BL6 metastatic melanoma cell heparanase, which is also a cell-associated enzyme, was inhibited by heparin to the same extent as the macrophage haparanase. On the other hand, heparanase of the highly metastatic variant (ESb) of a methylcholanthrene-induced T lymphoma, which is an extracellular enzyme released by the cells to the incubation medium, was more sensitive to heparin and arteparon than the macrophages' heparanase. These results may indicate the potential use of heparin or other glycosaminoglycans as specific and differential inhibitors for the formation in certain cases of blood-borne tumor metastasis.

  17. Malignant Potential of Murine Stromal Cells after Transplantation of Human Tumors into Nude Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldenberg, David M.; Pavia, Rose A.

    1981-04-01

    Human malignant cancer tumors grafted into nude mice produce tumors containing both human cancer cells and the host's stromal cells. After short-term propagation of these tumors in vitro, the murine mesenchymal cells appear transformed and are tumorigenic in nude mice. However, established human cancer cell lines fail to similarly alter adjacent murine stromal cells when used to produce tumors in nude mice. These experiments suggest that cancer cells may recruit normal cells to become malignant, qualifying the view of the clonal (unicellular) origin of cancer.

  18. Mechanism of tumor remission by cytomegalovirus in a murine lymphoma model: evidence for involvement of virally induced cellular interleukin-15.

    PubMed

    Erlach, Katja C; Reddehase, Matthias J; Podlech, Jürgen

    2015-06-01

    A murine model of B and T cell lymphomas in recipients after hematoablative conditioning for hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has previously revealed a tumor-repressive, metastasis-inhibiting function of murine cytomegalovirus (mCMV). More recently, this prediction from the experimental model was put on trial in several clinical studies that indeed gave evidence for a lower incidence of tumor relapse associated with early reactivation of latent human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) after allogeneic HCT in patients treated against different types of hematopoietic malignancies, including lymphoma and acute as well as chronic leukemias. Due to the limitations inherent to clinical studies, the tumor-repressive role of hCMV remained observational with no approach to clarify mechanisms. Although the tumor-repressive mechanisms of mCMV and hCMV may differ and depend on the type of tumor, experimental approaches in the murine model might give valuable hints for concepts to follow in clinical research. We have previously shown for the liver-adapted A20-derived B cell lymphoma E12E that mCMV does not infect the lymphoma cells for causing cell death by viral cytopathogenicity but triggers tumor-selective apoptosis at a tissue site of tumor metastasis distant from a local site of infection. This finding suggested involvement of a cytokine that triggers apoptosis, directly or indirectly. Here we used a series of differential high-density microarray analyses to identify cellular genes whose expression is specifically upregulated at the site of virus entry only by viruses capable of triggering lymphoma cell apoptosis. This strategy identified interleukin-15 (IL-15) as most promising candidate, eventually confirmed by lymphoma repression with recombinant IL-15. PMID:25805565

  19. Antifungal activity of ajoene on experimental murine paracoccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed

    Maluf, Marcia L F; Takahachi, Gisele; Svidzinski, Terezinha I E; Xander, Patricia; Apitz-Castro, Raphael; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar A; Cuman, Roberto K N

    2008-09-30

    The natural compound ajoene (4,5,9- trithiadodeca-1,6,11-triene 9-oxide) is capable of controlling infection by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis in experimental models. Swiss mice were inoculated with 5.0 x 10e6 cells of the fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Pb18 by intraperitoneal route and treated with ajoene. In weeks 2, 6, 10 and 13 of treatment, levels of anti-Pb antibodies were measured by the ELISA test and the animals were put down and their lungs, livers and spleens removed for histopathological analysis and determination of the number of viable fungus. The results show that experimental murine paracoccidioidomycosis was well established and that ajoene was capable of controlling the evolution of the disease, as it significantly reduced the levels of antibodies from the 10th week of treatment.

  20. Tumors in murine brains studied by grating-based phase contrast microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Georg; Dominietto, Marco; Kovacs, Zsofia; Schmitz, Rüdiger; Hieber, Simone E.; Thalmann, Peter; Beckmann, Felix; Müller, Bert

    2014-09-01

    Angiogenesis, i.e. the formation of vessels, is one of the key processes during tumor development. The newly formed vessels transport oxygen and nutrients from the healthy tissue to the tumor and gives tumor cells the possibility to replicate. The principle of anti-angiogenic therapy is to block angiogenic process in order to stop tumor growth. The aim of the present study is the investigation of murine glioma vascular architecture at early (7 days), intermediate (10 and 15 days) and late (23 days) stage of growth by means of grating-based phase contrast microtomography. We demonstrate that this technique yields premium contrast between healthy and cancerous parts of murine brain tissues.

  1. STRAIN-DEPENDENT SUSCEPTIBILITY TO TRANSPLACENTALLY-INDUCED MURINE LUNG TUMORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    STRAIN-DEPENDENT SUSCEPTIBILITY TO TRANSPLACENTALLY-INDUCED MURINE LUNG TUMORS
    M S Miller, J E Moore, M Xu, G B Nelson, S T Dance, N D Kock, J A Ross Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC and USEPA, Research Triangle Park, NC

    Previously, our laboratory demonstrated...

  2. Immunogenicity of murine solid tumor models as a defining feature of in vivo behavior and response to immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Melissa G; Karimi, Saman S; Barry-Holson, Keegan; Angell, Trevor E; Murphy, Katherine A; Church, Connor H; Ohlfest, John R; Hu, Peisheng; Epstein, Alan L

    2013-01-01

    Immune profiling has been widely used to probe mechanisms of immune escape in cancer and identify novel targets for therapy. Two emerging uses of immune signatures are to identify likely responders to immunotherapy regimens among individuals with cancer and to understand the variable responses seen among subjects with cancer in immunotherapy trials. Here, the immune profiles of 6 murine solid tumor models (CT26, 4T1, MAD109, RENCA, LLC, and B16) were correlated to tumor regression and survival in response to 2 immunotherapy regimens. Comprehensive profiles for each model were generated using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, and flow cytometry techniques, as well as functional studies of suppressor cell populations (regulatory T cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells), to analyze intratumoral and draining lymphoid tissues. Tumors were stratified as highly or poorly immunogenic, with highly immunogenic tumors showing a significantly greater presence of T-cell costimulatory molecules and immune suppression in the tumor microenvironment. An absence of tumor-infiltrating cytotoxic T lymphocytes and mature dendritic cells was seen across all models. Delayed tumor growth and increased survival with suppressor cell inhibition and tumor-targeted chemokine+/-dendritic cells vaccine immunotherapy were associated with high tumor immunogenicity in these models. Tumor MHC class I expression correlated with the overall tumor immunogenicity level and was a singular marker to predict immunotherapy response with these regimens. By using experimental tumor models as surrogates for human cancers, these studies demonstrate how select features of an immune profile may be utilized to identify patients most likely to respond to immunotherapy regimens. PMID:24145359

  3. Multispectral Imaging of T and B Cells in Murine Spleen and Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zipei; Jensen, Shawn M.; Messenheimer, David J.; Farhad, Mohammed; Neuberger, Michael; Bifulco, Carlo B.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in multiplex immunohistochemistry techniques allow for quantitative, spatial identification of multiple immune parameters for enhanced diagnostic and prognostic insight. However, applying such techniques to murine fixed tissues, particularly sensitive epitopes, such as CD4, CD8α, and CD19, has been difficult. We compared different fixation protocols and Ag-retrieval techniques and validated the use of multiplex immunohistochemistry for detection of CD3+CD4+ and CD3+CD8+ T cell subsets in murine spleen and tumor. This allows for enumeration of these T cell subsets within immune environments, as well as the study of their spatial distribution. PMID:26994219

  4. Altered transcription of genes coding for class I histocompatibility antigens in murine tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Three murine tumors induced by Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MLV) which exhibited loss of some or all H-2 class I antigens at the cell surface were analyzed at the DNA and RNA level with molecular probes specific of H-2 heavy chains and beta 2-microglobulin sequences. No observable difference could be detected at the DNA level between the tumors and the parent animals. However, a decrease in H-2 mRNA was observed, especially in phenotypically H-2 negative tumor, BM5R, where H-2 transcripts were at least 30-fold less abundant. These results show that an H-2-negative character may result from a general alteration in the transcription of H-2 genes, which could reflect some kind of regulatory process. PMID:6311935

  5. Genotype Directed Therapy in Murine Mismatch Repair Deficient Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kucherlapati, Melanie H.; Esfahani, Shadi; Habibollahi, Peiman; Wang, Junning; Still, Eric R.; Bronson, Roderick T.; Mahmood, Umar; Kucherlapati, Raju S.

    2013-01-01

    The PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway has frequently been found activated in human tumors. We show that in addition to Wnt signaling dysfunction, the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway is often upregulated in mouse Msh2−/− initiated intestinal tumors. NVP-BEZ235 is a dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor toxic to many cancer cell lines and currently involved in clinical trials. We have treated two mouse models involving Msh2 that develop small intestinal and/or colonic tumors with NVP-BEZ235, and a subset of animals with NVP-BEZ235 and MEK inhibitor ADZ4266. The disease phenotype has been followed with pathology, 18F FDG PET imaging, and endoscopy. Intestinal adenocarcinomas are significantly decreased in multiplicity by both drug regimens. The majority of tumors treated with combined therapy regress significantly, while a small number of highly progressed tumors persist. We have examined PTEN, AKT, MEK 1&2, MAPK, S6K, mTOR, PDPK1, and Cyclin D1 and find variable alterations that include downregulation of PTEN, upregulation of AKT and changes in its phosphorylated forms, upregulation of pMEK 1&2, p42p44MAPK, pS6K, and Cyclin D1. Apoptosis has been found intact in some tumors and not in others. Our data indicate that NVP-BEZ235 alone and in combination with ADZ4266 are effective in treating a proportion of colorectal cancers, but that highly progressed resistant tumors grow in the presence of the drugs. Pathways upregulated in some resistant tumors also include PDPK1, suggesting that metabolic inhibitors may also be useful in treating these tumors. PMID:23935891

  6. A mixture of amino acids and other small molecules present in the serum suppresses the growth of murine and human tumors in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kulcsár, Gyula; Gaál, Dezső; Kulcsár, Péter I; Schulcz, Ákos; Czömpöly, Tamás

    2013-03-01

    Previously we have hypothesized that the small molecules which are selectively accumulated in cancer cells might participate in a non-immunological antitumor surveillance mechanism. We demonstrated earlier that a mixture of experimentally selected substances ("active mixture", AM: L-arginine, L-histidine, L-methionine, L-phenylalanine, L-tyrosine, L-tryptophan, L-ascorbate, D-biotin, pyridoxine, riboflavin, adenine, L(-)malate) possesses a selective toxic effect in vitro on a variety of tumor cell lines, and we have shown that the AM selectively induces apoptosis of cancer cells in vitro. To explore the in vivo significance of our earlier findings we examined the antitumor effect of AM in Colon 26 murine colorectal adenocarcinoma, B16 murine melanoma, MXT murine mammary carcinoma, S180 murine sarcoma, P388 murine lymphoid leukemia, HL-60 human promyeloid leukemia, PC-3 human prostate carcinoma, and HT-29 human colon carcinoma tumor models. Treatment of tumor bearing mice with AM inhibited the growth of the tumors investigated, with an inhibitory effect ranging from 40 to 69%. The AM had a comparable antitumor effect with 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin in the Colon-26 tumor model, and combined treatment with AM and 5-fluorouracil or cisplatin resulted in an enhanced tumor growth inhibitory effect. The AM induced apoptosis through the mitochondrial pathway and induced G1 arrest in PC-3 cells and increased the number of apoptotic cells in PC-3 xenografts. These findings suggest that the AM might offer an interesting perspective in the treatment of cancer and in combination with other treatments may offer hope for a more effective cancer therapy.

  7. Dietary linoleate-enhanced metastasis of 4526 murine mammary tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, N.E.

    1987-01-01

    The influence of quantitative differences in dietary linoleic acid (18:2) and of the cyclooxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin (IM), on the metastasis of line 4526 mammary tumors was investigated. All mice were fed high fat (20%, w/w), semipurified diets that were prepared using different mixtures of coconut (primarily saturated) and safflower (mostly 18:2) oil and thus contained either 1, 2, 4, 8, or 12% 18:2 (w/w). The spontaneous metastasis of 4526 tumor cells from primary sites, was increased 2-4 fold in mice that were fed diets containing higher levels of 18:2 (8 and 12%). Chronic treatment of mice with a relatively low dosage of IM reduced the growth rate of primary 4526 tumors, slightly reduced metastasis in mice fed 1 and 4% 18:2, and completely inhibited the increased metastasis observed in mice fed 12% 18:2. Treatment with a higher dosage of IM reduced metastasis even further compared to controls, but did not decrease growth rate compared to the low dosage of IM. The level of 18:2 in the diet did not appear to affect the incorporation of {sup 3}H-thymidine into tumor cells of metastatic lung nodules. The effect of 18:2 may be through a modulation of arachidonic acid metabolism. This modulation, in turn, may affect particular steps in the metastatic cascade such as lodgement and survival of tumor cells.

  8. Tumor control by human cytomegalovirus in a murine model of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Coquard, Laurie; Pasquereau, Sébastien; Russo, Laetitia; Valmary-Degano, Séverine; Borg, Christophe; Pothier, Pierre; Herbein, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Although viruses can cause cancer, other studies reported the regression of human tumors upon viral infections. We investigated the cytoreductive potential of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in a murine model of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in severe-immunodeficient mice. Infection of HepG2 cells with HCMV resulted in the absence of tumor or in a limited tumor growth following injection of cells subcutaneously. By contrast all mice injected with uninfected HepG2 cells and with HepG2 cells infected with UV-treated HCMV did develop tumors without any significant restriction. Analysis of tumors indicated that in mice injected with HCMV-infected-HepG2 cells, but not in controls, a restricted cellular proliferation was observed parallel to a limited activation of the STAT3-cyclin D1 axis, decreased formation of colonies in soft agar, and activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. We conclude that HCMV can provide antitumoral effects in a murine model of HCC which requires replicative virus at some stages that results in limitation of tumor cell proliferation and enhanced apoptosis mediated through the intrinsic caspase pathway. PMID:27626063

  9. Tumor control by human cytomegalovirus in a murine model of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Coquard, Laurie; Pasquereau, Sébastien; Russo, Laetitia; Valmary-Degano, Séverine; Borg, Christophe; Pothier, Pierre; Herbein, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Although viruses can cause cancer, other studies reported the regression of human tumors upon viral infections. We investigated the cytoreductive potential of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in a murine model of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in severe-immunodeficient mice. Infection of HepG2 cells with HCMV resulted in the absence of tumor or in a limited tumor growth following injection of cells subcutaneously. By contrast all mice injected with uninfected HepG2 cells and with HepG2 cells infected with UV-treated HCMV did develop tumors without any significant restriction. Analysis of tumors indicated that in mice injected with HCMV-infected-HepG2 cells, but not in controls, a restricted cellular proliferation was observed parallel to a limited activation of the STAT3-cyclin D1 axis, decreased formation of colonies in soft agar, and activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. We conclude that HCMV can provide antitumoral effects in a murine model of HCC which requires replicative virus at some stages that results in limitation of tumor cell proliferation and enhanced apoptosis mediated through the intrinsic caspase pathway. PMID:27626063

  10. A longitudinal magnetic resonance elastography study of murine brain tumors following radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y.; Clayton, E. H.; Okamoto, R. J.; Engelbach, J.; Bayly, P. V.; Garbow, J. R.

    2016-08-01

    An accurate and noninvasive method for assessing treatment response following radiotherapy is needed for both treatment monitoring and planning. Measurement of solid tumor volume alone is not sufficient for reliable early detection of therapeutic response, since changes in physiological and/or biomechanical properties can precede tumor volume change following therapy. In this study, we use magnetic resonance elastography to evaluate the treatment effect after radiotherapy in a murine brain tumor model. Shear modulus was calculated and compared between the delineated tumor region of interest (ROI) and its contralateral, mirrored counterpart. We also compared the shear modulus from both the irradiated and non-irradiated tumor and mirror ROIs longitudinally, sampling four time points spanning 9–19 d post tumor implant. Results showed that the tumor ROI had a lower shear modulus than that of the mirror ROI, independent of radiation. The shear modulus of the tumor ROI decreased over time for both the treated and untreated groups. By contrast, the shear modulus of the mirror ROI appeared to be relatively constant for the treated group, while an increasing trend was observed for the untreated group. The results provide insights into the tumor properties after radiation treatment and demonstrate the potential of using the mechanical properties of the tumor as a biomarker. In future studies, more closely spaced time points will be employed for detailed analysis of the radiation effect.

  11. A longitudinal magnetic resonance elastography study of murine brain tumors following radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y.; Clayton, E. H.; Okamoto, R. J.; Engelbach, J.; Bayly, P. V.; Garbow, J. R.

    2016-08-01

    An accurate and noninvasive method for assessing treatment response following radiotherapy is needed for both treatment monitoring and planning. Measurement of solid tumor volume alone is not sufficient for reliable early detection of therapeutic response, since changes in physiological and/or biomechanical properties can precede tumor volume change following therapy. In this study, we use magnetic resonance elastography to evaluate the treatment effect after radiotherapy in a murine brain tumor model. Shear modulus was calculated and compared between the delineated tumor region of interest (ROI) and its contralateral, mirrored counterpart. We also compared the shear modulus from both the irradiated and non-irradiated tumor and mirror ROIs longitudinally, sampling four time points spanning 9-19 d post tumor implant. Results showed that the tumor ROI had a lower shear modulus than that of the mirror ROI, independent of radiation. The shear modulus of the tumor ROI decreased over time for both the treated and untreated groups. By contrast, the shear modulus of the mirror ROI appeared to be relatively constant for the treated group, while an increasing trend was observed for the untreated group. The results provide insights into the tumor properties after radiation treatment and demonstrate the potential of using the mechanical properties of the tumor as a biomarker. In future studies, more closely spaced time points will be employed for detailed analysis of the radiation effect.

  12. Ultrasonic enhancement of gene transfection in murine melanoma tumors.

    PubMed

    Miller, D L; Bao, S; Gies, R A; Thrall, B D

    1999-11-01

    The enhancement of gene transfection by ultrasound (US) was evaluated in vitro and in vivo using the B16 mouse melanoma model. Cultured cells were either exposed in suspensions in vitro or implanted subcutaneously in female C57BL/6 mice for 10-14 days and, subsequently exposed, in vivo. For comparison to results with a luciferase plasmid, a reporter plasmid for green fluorescent protein (GFP) was used to evaluate transfection efficiency. US was supplied by a system, similar to a Dornier HM-3 lithotripter, that produced shock waves (SW) of 24.4 MPa peak positive and 5.2 MPa peak negative pressure amplitudes at the focus. The plasmids were mixed with the suspensions to achieve 20 ,microL mL(-1), or were injected intratumorally to provide 0.2 mg DNA per mL of tumor. Acoustic cavitation was promoted by retaining 0.2 mL of air in the 1.2-mL exposure chambers in vitro and by injecting air at 10% of tumor volume in vivo. In vitro, cell counts declined to 5.3% of shams after 800 SW exposure, with 1.4% of the cells expressing GFP after 2 days of culture. In vivo, 2 days after 400 SW exposure, viable-cell recovery from excised tumors was reduced to 4.2% of shams and cell transfection was enhanced by a factor of about 8, reaching 2.5% of cell counts (p < 0.005 in t-test). These results show that strong tumor ablation induced by US shock wave treatment can be coupled with simultaneous enhancement of gene transfection. PMID:10626630

  13. Quantification of Murine Pancreatic Tumors by High Resolution Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Sastra, Stephen A.; Olive, Kenneth P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Ultrasonography is a powerful imaging modality that enables non-invasive, real time visualization of abdominal organs and tissues. This technology may be adapted for use in mice through the utilization of higher frequency transducers, allowing for extremely high resolution imaging of the mouse pancreas. This technique is particularly well-suited to pancreas imaging due to the ultrasonographic properties of the normal mouse pancreas, easily accessible imaging planes for the head and tail of the mouse pancreas, and the comparative difficulty in imaging the mouse pancreas with other technologies. A suite of measurements tools is available to characterize the normal and diseased states of tissues. Of particular utility for cancer applications is the ability to use tomography to construct a 3D tumor volume, enabling longitudinal imaging studies to track tumor development, or response to therapies. Here, we describe a detailed method for performing high resolution ultrasound to detect and measure pancreatic lesions in a genetically engineered mouse model of pancreatic ductal using the VisualSonics Vevo2100 High Resolution Ultrasound System. The method includes preparation of the animal for imaging, 2D and 3D image acquisition, and post-acquisition analysis of tumors volumes. The combined procedure has been utilized extensively by our group and others for the preclinical evaluation of novel therapeutic agents in the treatment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (1–4). PMID:23359158

  14. Genomic profiling of murine mammary tumors identifies potential personalized drug targets for p53-deficient mammary cancers

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Yash N.; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Kanchi, Krishna L.; Herschkowitz, Jason I.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Rosen, Jeffrey M.; Perou, Charles M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Targeted therapies against basal-like breast tumors, which are typically ‘triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs)’, remain an important unmet clinical need. Somatic TP53 mutations are the most common genetic event in basal-like breast tumors and TNBC. To identify additional drivers and possible drug targets of this subtype, a comparative study between human and murine tumors was performed by utilizing a murine Trp53-null mammary transplant tumor model. We show that two subsets of murine Trp53-null mammary transplant tumors resemble aspects of the human basal-like subtype. DNA-microarray, whole-genome and exome-based sequencing approaches were used to interrogate the secondary genetic aberrations of these tumors, which were then compared to human basal-like tumors to identify conserved somatic genetic features. DNA copy-number variation produced the largest number of conserved candidate personalized drug targets. These candidates were filtered using a DNA-RNA Pearson correlation cut-off and a requirement that the gene was deemed essential in at least 5% of human breast cancer cell lines from an RNA-mediated interference screen database. Five potential personalized drug target genes, which were spontaneously amplified loci in both murine and human basal-like tumors, were identified: Cul4a, Lamp1, Met, Pnpla6 and Tubgcp3. As a proof of concept, inhibition of Met using crizotinib caused Met-amplified murine tumors to initially undergo complete regression. This study identifies Met as a promising drug target in a subset of murine Trp53-null tumors, thus identifying a potential shared driver with a subset of human basal-like breast cancers. Our results also highlight the importance of comparative genomic studies for discovering personalized drug targets and for providing a preclinical model for further investigations of key tumor signaling pathways. PMID:27149990

  15. Radiation-induced nitric oxide mitigates tumor hypoxia and radioresistance in a murine SCCVII tumor model

    SciTech Connect

    Nagane, Masaki; Yasui, Hironobu; Yamamori, Tohru; Zhao, Songji; Kuge, Yuji; Tamaki, Nagara; Kameya, Hiromi; Nakamura, Hideo; Fujii, Hirotada; Inanami, Osamu

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •IR-induced NO increased tissue perfusion and pO{sub 2}. •IR increased NO production in tumors without changes in the mRNA and protein levels of NOS isoforms. •NOS activity assay showed that IR upregulated eNOS activity in tumors. •IR-induced NO decreased tumor hypoxia and altered tumor radiosensitivity. -- Abstract: Tumor hypoxia, which occurs mainly as a result of inadequate tissue perfusion in solid tumors, is a well-known challenge for successful radiotherapy. Recent evidence suggests that ionizing radiation (IR) upregulates nitric oxide (NO) production and that IR-induced NO has the potential to increase intratumoral circulation. However, the kinetics of NO production and the responsible isoforms for NO synthase in tumors exposed to IR remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the mechanism by which IR stimulates NO production in tumors and the effect of IR-induced NO on tumor radiosensitivity. Hoechst33342 perfusion assay and electron spin resonance oxymetry showed that IR increased tissue perfusion and pO{sub 2} in tumor tissue. Immunohistochemical analysis using two different hypoxic probes showed that IR decreased hypoxic regions in tumors; treatment with a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, L-NAME, abrogated the effects of IR. Moreover, IR increased endothelial NOS (eNOS) activity without affecting its mRNA or protein expression levels in SCCVII-transplanted tumors. Tumor growth delay assay showed that L-NAME decreased the anti-tumor effect of fractionated radiation (10 Gy × 2). These results suggested that IR increased eNOS activity and subsequent tissue perfusion in tumors. Increases in intratumoral circulation simultaneously decreased tumor hypoxia. As a result, IR-induced NO increased tumor radiosensitivity. Our study provides a new insight into the NO-dependent mechanism for efficient fractionated radiotherapy.

  16. Stromal CCR6 drives tumor growth in a murine transplantable colon cancer through recruitment of tumor-promoting macrophages.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Bisweswar; Shapiro, Mia; Samur, Mehmet K; Pai, Christine; Frank, Natasha Y; Yoon, Charles; Prabhala, Rao H; Munshi, Nikhil C; Gold, Jason S

    2016-08-01

    Interactions between the inflammatory chemokine CCL20 and its receptor CCR6 have been implicated in promoting colon cancer; however, the mechanisms behind this effect are poorly understood. We have previously demonstrated that deficiency of CCR6 is associated with decreased tumor macrophage accumulation in a model of sporadic intestinal tumorigenesis. In this study, we aimed to determine the role of stromal CCR6 expression in a murine syngeneic transplantable colon cancer model. We show that deficiency of host CCR6 is associated with decreased growth of syngeneic CCR6-expressing colon cancers. Colon cancers adoptively transplanted into CCR6-deficient mice have decreased tumor-associated macrophages without alterations in the number of monocytes in blood or bone marrow. CCL20, the unique ligand for CCR6, promotes migration of monocytes in vitro and promotes accumulation of macrophages in vivo. Depletion of tumor-associated macrophages decreases the growth of tumors in the transplantable tumor model. Macrophages infiltrating the colon cancers in this model secrete the inflammatory mediators CCL2, IL-1α, IL-6 and TNFα. Ccl2, Il1α and Il6 are consequently downregulated in tumors from CCR6-deficient mice. CCL2, IL-1α and IL-6 also promote proliferation of colon cancer cells, linking the decreased macrophage migration into tumors mediated by CCL20-CCR6 interactions to the delay in tumor growth in CCR6-deficient hosts. The relevance of these findings in human colon cancer is demonstrated through correlation of CCR6 expression with that of the macrophage marker CD163 as well as that of CCL2, IL1α and TNFα. Our findings support the exploration of targeting the CCL20-CCR6 pathway for the treatment of colon cancer. PMID:27622061

  17. Radiosensitizing and toxic effects of RSU-1069 on hypoxic cells in a murine tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Chaplin, D.J.; Durand, R.E.; Stratford, I.J.; Jenkins, T.C.

    1986-07-01

    RSU-1069 is one of a group of compounds of particular interest in radiobiology, since it combines the nitroimidazole ring with a side chain bearing a monofunctional alkylating agent. This compound has been shown to be a potent radiosensitizer both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, it has recently been shown to be an effective hypoxic cell cytotoxin in vitro. Our studies have been carried out using the SCCVII squamous carcinoma implanted subcutaneously in C/sub 3/H mice, using a technique we recently developed which facilitates isolation of tumor cell subpopulations from known locations relative to the tumor blood supply. The response of the separated tumor subpopulations was assessed using a soft agar clonogenic assay. For radiosensitization studies, RSU-1069 was administered i.p. at 0.5 mumol/g 20 min before irradiation and the tumors excised 20 min after irradiation. For toxicity studies, tumors were excised 16-18 hr after RSU-1069 administration. The results obtained to date clearly demonstrate that RSU-1069 is an efficient hypoxic cell radiosensitizer and cytotoxin in this murine tumor and has little effect on well perfused (i.e., oxic) cells.

  18. Characterization of tumor cell lines derived from murine gammaherpesvirus-68-infected mice.

    PubMed Central

    Usherwood, E J; Stewart, J P; Nash, A A

    1996-01-01

    Cell lines were derived from mice with murine gammaherpesvirus-68 (MHV-68)-associated lymphoproliferative disease. Four were of an ambiguous phenotype and were MHV-68 negative. One, S11, was a B lymphocyte that contained MHV-68 genomes in both linear and episomal forms and released virus. The line was clonable and grew into tumors in nude mice. This is the first naturally occurring MHV-68-positive B-cell line to be generated, and it will be an invaluable tool for the study of MHV-68 latency. PMID:8709292

  19. T cell receptor transgenic lymphocytes infiltrating murine tumors are not induced to express foxp3

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) that express the transcription factor Foxp3 are enriched within a broad range of murine and human solid tumors. The ontogeny of these Foxp3 Tregs - selective accumulation or proliferation of natural thymus-derived Treg (nTreg) or induced Treg (iTreg) converted in the periphery from naïve T cells - is not known. We used several strains of mice in which Foxp3 and EGFP are coordinately expressed to address this issue. We confirmed that Foxp3-positive CD4 T cells are enriched among tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) and splenocytes (SPL) in B16 murine melanoma-bearing C57BL/6 Foxp3EGFP mice. OT-II Foxp3EGFP mice are essentially devoid of nTreg, having transgenic CD4 T cells that recognize a class II-restricted epitope derived from ovalbumin; Foxp3 expression could not be detected in TIL or SPL in these mice when implanted with ovalbumin-transfected B16 tumor (B16-OVA). Likewise, TIL isolated from B16 tumors implanted in Pmel-1 Foxp3EGFP mice, whose CD8 T cells recognize a class I-restricted gp100 epitope, were not induced to express Foxp3. All of these T cell populations - wild-type CD4, pmel CD8 and OTII CD4 - could be induced in vitro to express Foxp3 by engagement of their T cell receptor (TCR) and exposure to transforming growth factor β (TGFβ). B16 melanoma produces TGFβ and both pmel CD8 and OTII CD4 express TCR that should be engaged within B16 and B16-OVA respectively. Thus, CD8 and CD4 transgenic T cells in these animal models failed to undergo peripheral induction of Foxp3 in a tumor microenvironment. PMID:22112546

  20. Paradoxical antiproliferative effect by a murine mammary tumor-derived epithelial cell line

    PubMed Central

    Gurzov, Esteban N; Nabha, Sanaa M; Yamamoto, Hamilto; Meng, Hong; Scharovsky, O Graciela; Bonfil, R Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Background Despite significant advancement in breast cancer therapy, there is a great need for a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in breast carcinogenesis and progression, as well as of the role of epigenetic contributions from stromal cells in mammary tumorigenesis. In this study, we isolated and characterized murine mammary tumor-derived epithelial and myofibroblast cell lines, and investigated the in vitro and in vivo effect of cellular soluble factors produced by the epithelial cell line on tumor cells. Methods Morphology, immunophenotype, cytogenetics, invasiveness, and tumorigenicity of epithelial (LM-234ep) and myofibroblast (LM-234mf) cell lines isolated from two murine mammary adenocarcinomas with common ancestor were studied. The in vitro effects of LM-234ep conditioned medium on proliferation, cell cycle distribution, and expression of cell cycle proteins, were investigated in LM-234mf cells, mouse melanoma cells (B16-F10), and human cervical adenocarcinoma cells (HeLa). The in vivo anti-tumor activity of LM-234ep conditioned media was evaluated in subcutaneous tumors formed in nude mice by B16-F10 and HeLa cells. Results LM-234ep cells were found to be cytokeratin positive and hipertriploid, whereas LM-234mf cells were α-smooth muscle actin positive and hypohexaploid. Chromosome aberrations were found in both cases. Only LM-234mf revealed to be invasive in vitro and to secrete active MMP-2, though neither of the cell types were able to produce progressing tumors. LM-234ep-derived factors were able to inhibit the in vitro growth of LM-234mf, B16-F10, and HeLa cells, inducing cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase. The administration of LM-234ep conditioned medium inhibited the growth of B16-F10 and HeLa tumors in nude mice. Conclusion Our data suggest the existence of epithelial cell variants with tumor suppressive properties within mammary tumors. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing antiproliferative and antineoplastic

  1. Impact of macrophages on tumor growth characteristics in a murine ocular tumor model.

    PubMed

    Stei, Marta M; Loeffler, Karin U; Kurts, Christian; Hoeller, Tobias; Pfarrer, Christiane; Holz, Frank G; Herwig-Carl, Martina C

    2016-10-01

    Tumor associated macrophages (TAM), mean vascular density (MVD), PAS positive extravascular matrix patterns, and advanced patients' age are associated with a poor prognosis in uveal melanoma. These correlations may be influenced by M2 macrophages and their cytokine expression pattern. Thus, the effect of TAM and their characteristic cytokines on histologic tumor growth characteristics were studied under the influence of age. Ninety five CX3CR1(+/GFP) mice (young 8-12weeks, old 10-12months) received an intravitreal injection of 1 × 10(5) HCmel12 melanoma cells. Subgroups were either systemically macrophage-depleted by Clodronate liposomes (n = 23) or received melanoma cells, which were pre-incubated with the supernatant of M1- or M2-polarized macrophages (n = 26). Eyes were processed histologically/immunohistochemically (n = 75), or for flow cytometry (n = 20) to analyze tumor size, mean vascular density (MVD), extravascular matrix patterns, extracellular matrix (ECM) and the presence/polarization of TAM. Prognostically significant extravascular matrix patterns (parallels with cross-linkings, loops, networks) were found more frequently in tumors of untreated old compared to tumors of untreated young mice (p = 0.024); as well as in tumors of untreated mice compared to tumors of macrophage-depleted mice (p = 0.014). Independent from age, M2-conditioned tumors showed more TAM (p = 0.001), increased collagen IV levels (p = 0.024) and a higher MVD (p = 0.02) than M1-conditioned tumors. Flow cytometry revealed a larger proportion of M2-macrophages in old than in young mice. The results indicate that TAM and their cytokines appear to be responsible for a more aggressive tumor phenotype. Tumor favoring and pro-angiogenic effects can be directly attributed to a M2-dominated tumor microenvironment rather than to age-dependent factors alone. However, an aged immunoprofile with an increased number of M2-macrophages may provide a tumor-favoring basis

  2. Interferon-Gamma Receptor Signaling Plays an Important Role in Restraining Murine Ovarian Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Guanglin; Leigh, Nicholas D.; Du, Wei; Zhang, Lei; Li, Li; Cao, Xuefang

    2016-01-01

    Immune cell-derived cytotoxic pathways have been implicated in antitumor immune responses. The goal of this study is to characterize how these cytotoxic pathways influence ovarian cancer development. We have utilized the TgMISIIR-TAg transgenic mouse model which expresses the transforming SV40 TAg in the ovary, leading to spontaneous development of ovarian tumors that closely mimic human epithelial ovarian cancer. To test how perforin (Prf1), granzyme B (GzmB) and interferon-gamma (IFNg) impact tumor occurrence and progression, we bred the TgMISIIR-TAg transgene into Prf1−/−, GzmB−/−, and IFNgR1−/− mice. The transgenic females developed peritoneal tumors at 9–15 weeks and succumbed at 184 ± 37 days of age with 100% penetrance (n=41). Knockout of these cytotoxic genes does not affect tumor occurrence. However, loss of function in the IFNg signaling pathway significantly expedited tumor progression with all of the IFNg R1−/− TgMISIIR-TAg females succumbing to tumor outgrowth at 167 ± 27 days of age (p=0.0074, n=24). In contrast, loss of function of Prf1 or GzmB did not significantly impact tumor progression and host survival. Since tumor cells in the IFNg R1−/− TgMISIIR-TAg mice are IFNg R1 deficient, we used the implantable MOSEC (mouse ovarian surface epithelial cell) tumor line to validate that IFNg R signaling in host immune cells but not in tumor cells impacts tumor progression. Indeed, when the IFNg -responsive MOSEC cells were inoculated, IFNg R1−/− mice exhibited significantly higher tumor burden compared to WT mice. Furthermore, a MOSEC-splenocyte co-culture system confirmed that IFNg R1−/− immune cells were less effective than WT immune cells in controlling MOSEC tumor growth in vitro. Together, these results indicate that the IFNg R signaling pathway plays an important role in restraining murine ovarian tumor progression.

  3. Role of curcumin-dependent modulation of tumor microenvironment of a murine T cell lymphoma in altered regulation of tumor cell survival

    SciTech Connect

    Vishvakarma, Naveen Kumar; Kumar, Anjani; Singh, Sukh Mahendra

    2011-05-01

    Using a murine model of a T cell lymphoma, in the present study, we report that tumor growth retarding action of curcumin involves modulation of some crucial parameters of tumor microenvironment regulating tumor progression. Curcumin-administration to tumor-bearing host caused an altered pH regulation in tumor cells associated with alteration in expression of cell survival and apoptosis regulatory proteins and genes. Nevertheless, an alteration was also observed in biophysical parameters of tumor microenvironment responsible for modulation of tumor growth pertaining to hypoxia, tumor acidosis, and glucose metabolism. The study thus sheds new light with respect to the antineoplastic action of curcumin against a tumor-bearing host with progressively growing tumor of hematological origin. This will help in optimizing application of the drug and anticancer research and therapy. - Graphical Abstract: Display Omitted

  4. Correlation between experimental human and murine skin sensitization induction thresholds.

    PubMed

    Api, Anne Marie; Basketter, David; Lalko, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative risk assessment for skin sensitization is directed towards the determination of levels of exposure to known sensitizing substances that will avoid the induction of contact allergy in humans. A key component of this work is the predictive identification of relative skin sensitizing potency, achieved normally by the measurement of the threshold (the "EC3" value) in the local lymph node assay (LLNA). In an extended series of studies, the accuracy of this murine induction threshold as the predictor of the absence of a sensitizing effect has been verified by conduct of a human repeated insult patch test (HRIPT). Murine and human thresholds for a diverse set of 57 fragrance chemicals spanning approximately four orders of magnitude variation in potency have been compared. The results confirm that there is a useful correlation, with the LLNA EC3 value helping particularly to identify stronger sensitizers. Good correlation (with half an order of magnitude) was seen with three-quarters of the dataset. The analysis also helps to identify potential outlier types of (fragrance) chemistry, exemplified by hexyl and benzyl salicylates (an over-prediction) and trans-2-hexenal (an under-prediction).

  5. Vaccination with Irradiated Tumor Cells Engineered to Secrete Murine Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Stimulates Potent, Specific, and Long-Lasting Anti-Tumor Immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dranoff, Glenn; Jaffee, Elizabeth; Lazenby, Audrey; Golumbek, Paul; Levitsky, Hyam; Brose, Katja; Jackson, Valerie; Hamada, Hirofumi; Pardoll, Drew; Mulligan, Richard C.

    1993-04-01

    To compare the ability of different cytokines and other molecules to enhance the immunogenicity of tumor cells, we generated 10 retroviruses encoding potential immunomodulators and studied the vaccination properties of murine tumor cells transduced by the viruses. Using a B16 melanoma model, in which irradiated tumor cells alone do not stimulate significant anti-tumor immunity, we found that irradiated tumor cells expressing murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) stimulated potent, long-lasting, and specific anti-tumor immunity, requiring both CD4^+ and CD8^+ cells. Irradiated cells expressing interleukins 4 and 6 also stimulated detectable, but weaker, activity. In contrast to the B16 system, we found that in a number of other tumor models, the levels of anti-tumor immunity reported previously in cytokine gene transfer studies involving live, transduced cells could be achieved through the use of irradiated cells alone. Nevertheless, manipulation of the vaccine or challenge doses made it possible to demonstrate the activity of murine GM-CSF in those systems as well. Overall, our results have important implications for the clinical use of genetically modified tumor cells as therapeutic cancer vaccines.

  6. Vaccination with irradiated tumor cells engineered to secrete murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor stimulates potent, specific, and long-lasting anti-tumor immunity.

    PubMed Central

    Dranoff, G; Jaffee, E; Lazenby, A; Golumbek, P; Levitsky, H; Brose, K; Jackson, V; Hamada, H; Pardoll, D; Mulligan, R C

    1993-01-01

    To compare the ability of different cytokines and other molecules to enhance the immunogenicity of tumor cells, we generated 10 retroviruses encoding potential immunomodulators and studied the vaccination properties of murine tumor cells transduced by the viruses. Using a B16 melanoma model, in which irradiated tumor cells alone do not stimulate significant anti-tumor immunity, we found that irradiated tumor cells expressing murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) stimulated potent, long-lasting, and specific anti-tumor immunity, requiring both CD4+ and CD8+ cells. Irradiated cells expressing interleukins 4 and 6 also stimulated detectable, but weaker, activity. In contrast to the B16 system, we found that in a number of other tumor models, the levels of anti-tumor immunity reported previously in cytokine gene transfer studies involving live, transduced cells could be achieved through the use of irradiated cells alone. Nevertheless, manipulation of the vaccine or challenge doses made it possible to demonstrate the activity of murine GM-CSF in those systems as well. Overall, our results have important implications for the clinical use of genetically modified tumor cells as therapeutic cancer vaccines. PMID:8097319

  7. THE ANTIVASCULAR ACTION OF PHYSIOTHERAPY ULTRASOUND ON A MURINE TUMOR: ROLE OF A MICROBUBBLE CONTRAST AGENT

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Andrew K. W.; Bunte, Ralph M.; Cohen, Jennie D.; Tsai, Jeff H.; Lee, William M-F.; Sehgal, Chandra M.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated whether a microbubble-containing ultrasound contrast agent had a role in the antivascular action of physiotherapy ultrasound on tumor neovasculature. Ultrasound images (B-mode and contrast-enhanced power Doppler [0.02mL Definity]) were made of 22 murine melanomas (K173522). The tumor was insonated (ISATA = 1.7 W cm−2, 1 MHz, continuous output) for 3 min and the power Doppler observations of the pre- and post-insonation tumor vascularities were analyzed. Significant reductions (p = 0.005 for analyses of color weighted fractional area) in vascularity occurred when a contrast-enhanced power Doppler study occurred prior to insonation. Vascularity was unchanged in tumors without a pre-therapy Doppler study. Histological studies revealed tissue structural changes that correlated with the ultrasound findings. The underlying etiology of the interaction between the physiotherapy ultrasound beam, the microbubble-containing contrast agent and the tumor neovasculature is unknown. It was concluded that contrast agents play an important role in the antivascular effects induced by physiotherapy ultrasound. PMID:17720299

  8. Interleukin-12 and interleukin-18 synergistically induce murine tumor regression which involves inhibition of angiogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Coughlin, C M; Salhany, K E; Wysocka, M; Aruga, E; Kurzawa, H; Chang, A E; Hunter, C A; Fox, J C; Trinchieri, G; Lee, W M

    1998-01-01

    The antitumor effect and mechanisms activated by murine IL-12 and IL-18, cytokines that induce IFN-gamma production, were studied using engineered SCK murine mammary carcinoma cells. In syngeneic A/J mice, SCK cells expressing mIL-12 or mIL-18 were less tumorigenic and formed tumors more slowly than control cells. Neither SCK.12 nor SCK.18 cells protected significantly against tumorigenesis by distant SCK cells. However, inoculation of the two cell types together synergistically protected 70% of mice from concurrently injected distant SCK cells and 30% of mice from SCK cells established 3 d earlier. Antibody neutralization studies revealed that the antitumor effects of secreted mIL-12 and mIL-18 required IFN-gamma. Interestingly, half the survivors of SCK.12 and/or SCK.18 cells developed protective immunity suggesting that anti-SCK immunity is unlikely to be responsible for protection. Instead, angiogenesis inhibition, assayed by Matrigel implants, appeared to be a property of both SCK.12 and SCK.18 cells and the two cell types together produced significantly greater systemic inhibition of angiogenesis. This suggests that inhibition of tumor angiogenesis is an important part of the systemic antitumor effect produced by mIL-12 and mIL-18. PMID:9502787

  9. Patient-derived xenograft models for pancreatic adenocarcinoma demonstrate retention of tumor morphology through incorporation of murine stromal elements.

    PubMed

    Delitto, Daniel; Pham, Kien; Vlada, Adrian C; Sarosi, George A; Thomas, Ryan M; Behrns, Kevin E; Liu, Chen; Hughes, Steven J; Wallet, Shannon M; Trevino, Jose G

    2015-05-01

    Direct implantation of viable surgical specimens provides a representative preclinical platform in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patient-derived xenografts consistently demonstrate retained tumor morphology and genetic stability. However, the evolution of the tumor microenvironment over time remains poorly characterized in these models. This work specifically addresses the recruitment and incorporation of murine stromal elements into expanding patient-derived pancreatic adenocarcinoma xenografts, establishing the integration of murine cells into networks of invading cancer cells. In addition, we provide methods and observations in the establishment and maintenance of a patient-derived pancreatic adenocarcinoma xenograft model. A total of 25 histologically confirmed pancreatic adenocarcinoma specimens were implanted subcutaneously into nonobese diabetic severe combined immunodeficiency mice. Patient demographics, staging, pathological analysis, and outcomes were analyzed. After successful engraftment of tumors, histological and immunofluorescence analyses were performed on explanted tumors. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma specimens were successfully engrafted in 15 (60%) of 25 attempts. Successful engraftment does not appear to correlate with clinicopathologic factors or patient survival. Tumor morphology is conserved through multiple passages, and tumors retain metastatic potential. Interestingly, despite morphological similarity between passages, human stromal elements do not appear to expand with invading cancer cells. Rather, desmoplastic murine stroma dominates the xenograft microenvironment after the initial implantation. Recruitment of stromal elements in this manner to support and maintain tumor growth represents a novel avenue for investigation into tumor-stromal interactions.

  10. Anti-tumor immunity generated by photodynamic therapy in a metastatic murine tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castano, Ana P.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2005-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a modality for the treatment of cancer involving excitation of photosensitizers with harmless visible light producing reactive oxygen species. The major biological effects of PDT are apoptosis of tumor cells, destruction of the blood supply and activation of the immune system. The objective of this study is to compare in an animal model of metastatic cancer, PDT alone and PDT combined with low-dose cyclophosphamide (CY). Since the tumor we used is highly metastatic, it is necessary to generate anti-tumor immunity using PDT to both cure the primary tumor and prevent death from metastasis. This immunity may be potentiated by low dose CY. In our model we used J774 cells (a Balb/c reticulum cell sarcoma line with the characteristics of macrophages) and the following PDT regimen: benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A (BPD, 2mg/kg injected IV followed after 15 min by 150 J/cm2 of 690-nm light). CY (50 mg/kg i.p.) was injected 48 hours before light delivery. BPD-PDT led to complete regression of the primary tumor in more than half the mice but no permanent cures were obtained. BPD-PDT in combination with CY led to 60% permanent cures. CY alone gave no permanent cures but did provide a survival advantage. To probe permanent immunity cured animals were rechallenged with the same tumor cell line and the tumors were rejected in 71% of mice cured with BPD-PDT plus CY. We conclude that BPD-PDT in combination with CY gives best overall results and that this is attributable to immunological response activation in addition to PDT-mediated destruction of the tumor.

  11. Primary polyoma virus-induced murine thymic epithelial tumors. A tumor model of thymus physiology.

    PubMed Central

    Hoot, G. P.; Kettman, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    Thymic tumors were induced in C3'/Bittner mice by neonatal inoculation with polyoma virus. The objective of this study was to identify the phenotypes of the cells within the tumors and to attempt to determine the origin of the neoplastic cell population(s). At the ultrastructural level, the neoplastic cells resembled normal thymic epithelium with tonofilaments and desmosomes. Immunoperoxidase staining demonstrated the presence of cytokeratin, Iak, -beta 2-microglobulin, -asialo-GM1, the thymic cortical epithelial marker ER-TR4, and the medullary epithelial marker ER-TR5. Islands of normal cortical thymocytes supported by residual normal cortical epithelium and acid phosphatase-positive cortical macrophages were interspersed in the tumors. Residual islands of normal medullary architecture with nonspecific esterase-positive IDCs were rarely identified in tumors. Most lymphocytes in the tumors were normal immature cortical thymocytes with the phenotype Tdt+, PNA+, Thy 1.2bright, Ly-1dull, H-2Kkdull, ThB+, J11d+, and Lyt-2+L3T4+. Lymphocytes in the tumors were steroid-sensitive like normal thymocytes. The proportions of Lyt-2+L3T4- and Lyt-2-L3T4+ cells were generally larger in the tumors than in normal thymus and reflected the higher frequency of lymphocytes in the tumors capable of proliferating in vitro in response to Con A plus IL-2. The data were consistent with the hypothesis that the neoplasia originates from thymic epithelium that is interspersed with normal, developing thymic lymphocytes. Images Figure 4 p[688]-a Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 p687-a Figure 7 PMID:2552813

  12. Development of apoptosis in irradiated murine tumors as a function of time and dose.

    PubMed

    Stephens, L C; Hunter, N R; Ang, K K; Milas, L; Meyn, R E

    1993-07-01

    In a previous paper (Radiat. Res. 127, 308-316, 1991), we reported that a moderately radiosensitive, transplantable murine ovarian carcinoma (OCaI) displayed apoptosis after irradiation whereas a radioresistant hepatocellular carcinoma (HCaI) did not. These initial observations have been followed up in this detailed analysis of the development of apoptosis in these two tumors as a function of time and dose. Histological sections of OCaI and HCaI carcinomas were scored at various times between 0.5 and 24 h after single doses of 2.5 or 25 Gy gamma radiation for the incidence of apoptosis. The percentage of nuclei undergoing apoptosis in untreated tumors was 5% in OCaI and 0.6% in HCaI. The peak in the number of apoptotic bodies occurred in the OCaI tumors 3-5 h after either dose. After 2.5 Gy, the peak incidence was about 20% and after 25 Gy it was about 30%. Irrespective of dose, HCaI tumors had an incidence of apoptosis of less than 3%. Based on the results of this time course, 4 h after irradiation was chosen for the determination of the dose response, over doses ranging from 2.5 to 25 Gy. The dose response for the OCaI tumors reached a plateau at 25-30% apoptotic nuclei after doses of about 7.5 Gy and above. Autoradiographic analysis of histological sections from mice injected with [3H]thymidine showed that some apoptotic bodies in the OCaI tumors arose from cycling cells. These results confirm that the apoptotic mode of cell death may represent an important response in some irradiated tumors.

  13. Development of apoptosis in irradiated murine tumors as a function of time and dose.

    PubMed

    Stephens, L C; Hunter, N R; Ang, K K; Milas, L; Meyn, R E

    1993-07-01

    In a previous paper (Radiat. Res. 127, 308-316, 1991), we reported that a moderately radiosensitive, transplantable murine ovarian carcinoma (OCaI) displayed apoptosis after irradiation whereas a radioresistant hepatocellular carcinoma (HCaI) did not. These initial observations have been followed up in this detailed analysis of the development of apoptosis in these two tumors as a function of time and dose. Histological sections of OCaI and HCaI carcinomas were scored at various times between 0.5 and 24 h after single doses of 2.5 or 25 Gy gamma radiation for the incidence of apoptosis. The percentage of nuclei undergoing apoptosis in untreated tumors was 5% in OCaI and 0.6% in HCaI. The peak in the number of apoptotic bodies occurred in the OCaI tumors 3-5 h after either dose. After 2.5 Gy, the peak incidence was about 20% and after 25 Gy it was about 30%. Irrespective of dose, HCaI tumors had an incidence of apoptosis of less than 3%. Based on the results of this time course, 4 h after irradiation was chosen for the determination of the dose response, over doses ranging from 2.5 to 25 Gy. The dose response for the OCaI tumors reached a plateau at 25-30% apoptotic nuclei after doses of about 7.5 Gy and above. Autoradiographic analysis of histological sections from mice injected with [3H]thymidine showed that some apoptotic bodies in the OCaI tumors arose from cycling cells. These results confirm that the apoptotic mode of cell death may represent an important response in some irradiated tumors. PMID:8327664

  14. SWIFT-MRI imaging and quantitative assessment of IONPs in murine tumors following intra-tumor and systemic delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Russell; Petryk, Alicia A.; Kastner, Elliot J.; Zhang, Jinjin; Ring, Hattie; Garwood, Michael; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2015-03-01

    Although preliminary clinical trials are ongoing, successful the use of iron-oxide magnetic nanoparticles (IONP) for heatbased cancer treatments will depend on advancements in: 1) nanoparticle platforms, 2) delivery of a safe and effective alternating magnetic field (AMF) to the tumor, and 3) development of non-invasive, spatially accurate IONP imaging and quantification technique. This imaging technique must be able to assess tumor and normal tissue anatomy as well as IONP levels and biodistribution. Conventional CT imaging is capable of detecting and quantifying IONPs at tissue levels above 10 mg/gram; unfortunately this level is not clinically achievable in most situations. Conventional MRI is capable of imaging IONPs at tissue levels of 0.05 mg/gm or less, however this level is considered to be below the therapeutic threshold. We present here preliminary in vivo data demonstrating the ability of a novel MRI technique, Sweep Imaging with Fourier Transformation (SWIFT), to accurately image and quantify IONPs in tumor tissue in the therapeutic concentration range (0.1-1.0 mg/gm tissue). This ultra-short, T2 MRI method provides a positive Fe contrast enhancement with a reduced signal to noise ratio. Additional IONP signal enhancement techniques such as inversion recovery spectroscopy and variable flip angle (VFA) are also being studied for potential optimization of SWIFT IONP imaging. Our study demonstrates the use of SWIFT to assess IONP levels and biodistribution, in murine flank tumors, following intra-tumoral and systemic IONP administration. ICP-MS and quantitative histological techniques are used to validate the accuracy and sensitivity of SWIFT-based IONP imaging and quantification.

  15. Detection of hypoxic fractions in murine tumors by comet assay: Comparison with other techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Q.; Kavanagh, M.C.; Newcombe, D.

    1995-12-01

    The alkaline comet assay was used to detect the hypoxic fractions of murine tumors. A total of four tumor types were tested using needle aspiration biopsies taken immediately after a radiation dose of 15 Gy. Initial studies confirmed that the normalized tail moment, a parameter reflecting single-strand DNA breaks induced by the radiation, was linearly related to radiation dose. Further, it was shown that for a mixed population (1:1) of cells irradiated under air-breathing or hypoxic conditions, the histogram of normal tail moment values obtained from analyzing 400 cells in the population had a double peak which, when fitted with two Gaussian distributions, gave a good estimate of the proportion of the two subpopulations. For the four tumor types, the means of the calculated hypoxic fractions from four or five individual tumors were 0.15 {+-} 0.04 for B16F1, 0.08 {+-} 0.04 for KHT-LP1, 0.17 {+-} 0.04 for RIF-1 and 0.04 {+-} 0.01 for SCCVII. Analysis of variance showed that the hypoxic fraction in KHT-LP1 tumors is significantly lower than those of the other three tumors (P = 0.026) but that there is no significant difference in hypoxic fraction between B16F1, RIF-1 and SCCVII tumors (P = 0.574). Results from multiple samples taken from each of five RIF-1 tumors showed that the intertumor heterogeneity of hypoxic fractions was greater than that within the same tumor. The mean hypoxic fraction obtained using the comet assay for the four tumor types was compared with the hypoxic fraction determined by the clonogenic assay, or median pO{sub 2} values, or [{sup 3}H]misonidazole binding in the same tumor types. The values of hypoxic fraction obtained with the comet assay were two to four times lower than those measured by the paired survival method. Preliminary results obtained with a dose of 5 Gy were consistent with those obtained using 15 Gy. These results suggest the further development of the comet assay for clinical studies. 21 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Investigation of the impact of the common animal facility contaminant murine norovirus on experimental murine cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Doom, Carmen M; Turula, Holly M; Hill, Ann B

    2009-09-30

    Murine norovirus (MNV) is a recently discovered pathogen that has become a common contaminant of specific pathogen-free mouse colonies. MNV-1 induces a robust interferon-beta response and causes histopathology in some mouse strains, suggesting that it may impact other mouse models of infection. Despite many concerns about MNV-1 contamination, there is little information about its impact on immune responses to other infections. This study addresses whether MNV-1 infection has an effect on a model of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. Exposure to MNV-1 resulted in a decreased CD8 T cell response to immunodominant MCMV epitopes in both BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. However, MNV-1 did not impact MCMV titers in either mouse strain, nor did it stimulate reactivation of latent MCMV. These data suggest that while MNV-1 has a mild impact on the immune response to MCMV, it is not likely to affect most experimental outcomes in immunocompetent mice in the MCMV model.

  17. Berberine inhibits human tongue squamous carcinoma cancer tumor growth in a murine xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yung-Tsuan; Yang, Jai-Sing; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Li, Tsai-Chung; Lin, Jen-Jyh; Lai, Kuang-Chi; Liao, Ching-Lung; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2009-09-01

    Our primary studies showed that berberine induced apoptosis in human tongue cancer SCC-4 cells in vitro. But there is no report to show berberine inhibited SCC-4 cancer cells in vivo on a murine xenograft animal model. SCC-4 tumor cells were implanted into mice and groups of mice were treated with vehicle, berberine (10mg/kg of body weight) and doxorubicin (4mg/kg of body weight). The tested agents were injected once per four days intraperitoneally (i.p.), with treatment starting 4 weeks prior to cells inoculation. Treatment with 4mg/kg of doxorubicin or with 10mg/kg of berberine resulted in a reduction in tumor incidence. Tumor size in xenograft mice treated with 10mg/kg berberine was significantly smaller than that in the control group. Our findings indicated that berbeirne inhibits tumor growth in a xenograft animal model. Therefore, berberine may represent a tongue cancer preventive agent and can be used in clinic. PMID:19303753

  18. Experimental murine amyloidosis: a model system for studying amyloid formation.

    PubMed Central

    Baumal, R.; Wilson, B.; Pass, E.

    1975-01-01

    Myeloma-associated and casein-induced murine amyloidosis were used as models to study the role of lymphocytes and macrophages in amyloid formation. Amyloidosis occurred rarely and in small amounts in Balb/C mice with immunoglobulin (Ig)-producing myeloma tumours but large amounts could be induced by injections of casein. Fluorescent staining of both forms of amyloid deposits by means of anti-casein- and anti-myeloma-amyloid antibodies indicated that they either crossreacted or coexisted. Nor abnormality of Ig biosynthesis was detected in amyloidosis, suggesting that abnormal degradation was responsible for production of the Ig form of amyloid. Although spleen lymphocytes of casein-injected mice with amyloidosis demonstrated diminished cellular immunologic responses, this did not indicate generalized immunologic incompetence. The non-Ig form of amyloid in casein-injected mice was shown to be produced by macrophages, and a technique was developed for increasing the yield of amyloid-containing cells. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 6 FIG. 7 FIG. 8 PMID:1080430

  19. Induction of anti-tumor immunity elicited by tumor cells expressing a murine LFA-3 analog via a recombinant vaccinia virus.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, M G; Kantor, J A; Schlom, J; Hodge, J W

    1999-03-01

    T cell activation requires binding of the T cell receptor to the major histocompatibility molecule-peptide complex in the presence of adhesion and/or costimulatory molecules such as B7-1 (CD80), B7-2 (CD86), ICAM-1 (CD54), and LFA-3 [corrected]. The major ligand of CD2 is CD48, the murine analog of human leukocyte function-associated antigen 3 (LFA-3). To determine the effect of LFA-3 expression on the immunogenicity of tumor cells, we constructed a recombinant vaccinia virus containing the murine LFA-3 gene (designated rV-LFA-3). rV-LFA-3 was shown to be functional in vitro in terms of expression of LFA-3, T cell proliferation, adhesion, and cytotoxicity. Subcutaneous inoculation of rV-LFA-3-infected murine colon adenocarcinoma tumor cells (MC38) into immunocompetent syngeneic C57BL/6 mice resulted in complete lack of tumor growth. Inoculation of MC38 cells infected with equal doses of control wild-type vaccinia virus resulted in tumor growth in all animals. In addition, partial immunological protection was demonstrated against subsequent challenge with uninfected parental tumor cells up to 56 days after vaccination with rV-LFA-3-infected cells. Anti-tumor memory was also demonstrated by using gamma-irradiated MC38 cells and cells from another carcinoma model (CT26). These studies demonstrate that expression of LFA-3 via a poxvirus vector can be used to induce anti-tumor immunity.

  20. The copper-chelating agent, trientine, suppresses tumor development and angiogenesis in the murine hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, J; Yoshiji, H; Kuriyama, S; Ikenaka, Y; Noguchi, R; Okuda, H; Tsujinoue, H; Nakatani, T; Kishida, H; Nakae, D; Gomez, D E; De Lorenzo, M S; Tejera, A M; Fukui, H

    2001-12-15

    Angiogenesis is now recognized as a crucial process in tumor development, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Since HCC is known as a hypervascular tumor, anti-angiogenesis is a promising approach to inhibit the HCC development. Trientine dihydrochloride (trientine) is used in clinical practice as an alternative copper (Cu)-chelating agent for patients with Wilson's disease of penicillamine intolerance. In our study, we examined the effect of Cu-chelating agents on tumor development and angiogenesis in the murine HCC xenograft model. Although both trientine and penicillamine in the drinking water suppressed the tumor development, trientine exerted a more potent inhibitory effect than penicillamine. In combination with a Cu-deficient diet, both trientine and penicillamine almost abolished the HCC development. Trientine treatment resulted in a marked suppression of neovascularization and increase of apoptosis in the tumor, whereas tumor cell proliferation itself was not altered. In vitro studies also exhibited that trientine is not cytotoxic for the tumor cells. On the other hand, it significantly suppressed the endothelial cell proliferation. These results suggested that Cu plays a pivotal role in tumor development and angiogenesis in the murine HCC cells, and Cu-chelators, especially trientine, could inhibit angiogenesis and enhance apoptosis in the tumor with consequent suppression of the tumor growth in vivo. Since trientine is already used in clinical practice without any serious side effects as compared to penicillamine, it may be an effective new strategy for future HCC therapy.

  1. Ureaplasma urealyticum Causes Hyperammonemia in an Experimental Immunocompromised Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohui; Karau, Melissa J.; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E.; Block, Darci R.; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.; Cunningham, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Hyperammonemia syndrome is an often fatal complication of lung transplantation which has been recently associated with Ureaplasma infection. It has not been definitely established that Ureaplasma species can cause hyperammonemia. We established a novel immunocompromised murine model of Ureaplasma urealyticum infection and used it to confirm that U. urealyticum can cause hyperammonemia. Male C3H mice were pharmacologically immunosuppressed with mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus and oral prednisone for seven days, and then challenged intratracheally (IT) and/or intraperitoneally (IP) with 107 CFU U. urealyticum over six days, while continuing immunosuppression. Spent U. urealyticum-free U9 broth was used as a negative control, with uninfected immunocompetent mice, uninfected immunosuppressed mice, and infected immunocompetent mice serving as additional controls. Plasma ammonia concentrations were compared using Wilcoxon ranks sum tests. Plasma ammonia concentrations of immunosuppressed mice challenged IT/IP with spent U9 broth (n = 14) (range 155–330 μmol/L) were similar to those of normal mice (n = 5), uninfected immunosuppressed mice (n = 5), and U. urealyticum IT/IP challenged immunocompetent mice (n = 5) [range 99–340 μmol/L, p = 0.60]. However, immunosuppressed mice challenged with U. urealyticum IT/IP (n = 20) or IP (n = 15) had higher plasma ammonia concentrations (range 225–945 μmol/L and 276–687 μmol/L, respectively) than those challenged IT/IP with spent U9 broth (p<0.001). U. urealyticum administered IT/IP or IP causes hyperammonemia in mice pharmacologically immunosuppressed with a regimen similar to that administered to lung transplant recipients. PMID:27537683

  2. Ureaplasma urealyticum Causes Hyperammonemia in an Experimental Immunocompromised Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohui; Karau, Melissa J; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E; Block, Darci R; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Cunningham, Scott A; Patel, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Hyperammonemia syndrome is an often fatal complication of lung transplantation which has been recently associated with Ureaplasma infection. It has not been definitely established that Ureaplasma species can cause hyperammonemia. We established a novel immunocompromised murine model of Ureaplasma urealyticum infection and used it to confirm that U. urealyticum can cause hyperammonemia. Male C3H mice were pharmacologically immunosuppressed with mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus and oral prednisone for seven days, and then challenged intratracheally (IT) and/or intraperitoneally (IP) with 107 CFU U. urealyticum over six days, while continuing immunosuppression. Spent U. urealyticum-free U9 broth was used as a negative control, with uninfected immunocompetent mice, uninfected immunosuppressed mice, and infected immunocompetent mice serving as additional controls. Plasma ammonia concentrations were compared using Wilcoxon ranks sum tests. Plasma ammonia concentrations of immunosuppressed mice challenged IT/IP with spent U9 broth (n = 14) (range 155-330 μmol/L) were similar to those of normal mice (n = 5), uninfected immunosuppressed mice (n = 5), and U. urealyticum IT/IP challenged immunocompetent mice (n = 5) [range 99-340 μmol/L, p = 0.60]. However, immunosuppressed mice challenged with U. urealyticum IT/IP (n = 20) or IP (n = 15) had higher plasma ammonia concentrations (range 225-945 μmol/L and 276-687 μmol/L, respectively) than those challenged IT/IP with spent U9 broth (p<0.001). U. urealyticum administered IT/IP or IP causes hyperammonemia in mice pharmacologically immunosuppressed with a regimen similar to that administered to lung transplant recipients. PMID:27537683

  3. In vivo measurement of epidermal thickness changes associated with tumor promotion in murine models

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Kevin G.; Samatham, Ravikant; Choudhury, Niloy; Gladish, James C.; Thuillier, Philippe; Jacques, Steven L.

    2010-01-01

    The characterization of tissue morphology in murine models of pathogenesis has traditionally been carried out by excision of affected tissues with subsequent immunohistological examination. Excision-based histology provides a limited two-dimensional presentation of tissue morphology at the cost of halting disease progression at a single time point and sacrifice of the animal. We investigate the use of noninvasive reflectance mode confocal scanning laser microscopy (rCSLM) as an alternative tool to biopsy in documenting epidermal hyperplasia in murine models exposed to the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). An automated technique utilizing average axial rCSLM reflectance profiles is used to extract epidermal thickness values from rCSLM data cubes. In comparisons to epidermal thicknesses determined from hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained tissue sections, we find no significant correlation to rCSLM-derived thickness values. This results from method-specific artifacts: physical alterations of tissue during H&E preparation in standard histology and specimen-induced abberations in rCSLM imaging. Despite their disagreement, both histology and rCSLM methods reliably measure statistically significant thickness changes in response to TPA exposure. Our results demonstrate that in vivo rCSLM imaging provides epithelial biologists an accurate noninvasive means to monitor cutaneous pathogenesis. PMID:20799792

  4. In vivo measurement of epidermal thickness changes associated with tumor promotion in murine models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Kevin G.; Samatham, Ravikant; Choudhury, Niloy; Gladish, James C.; Thuillier, Philippe; Jacques, Steven L.

    2010-07-01

    The characterization of tissue morphology in murine models of pathogenesis has traditionally been carried out by excision of affected tissues with subsequent immunohistological examination. Excision-based histology provides a limited two-dimensional presentation of tissue morphology at the cost of halting disease progression at a single time point and sacrifice of the animal. We investigate the use of noninvasive reflectance mode confocal scanning laser microscopy (rCSLM) as an alternative tool to biopsy in documenting epidermal hyperplasia in murine models exposed to the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). An automated technique utilizing average axial rCSLM reflectance profiles is used to extract epidermal thickness values from rCSLM data cubes. In comparisons to epidermal thicknesses determined from hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained tissue sections, we find no significant correlation to rCSLM-derived thickness values. This results from method-specific artifacts: physical alterations of tissue during H&E preparation in standard histology and specimen-induced abberations in rCSLM imaging. Despite their disagreement, both histology and rCSLM methods reliably measure statistically significant thickness changes in response to TPA exposure. Our results demonstrate that in vivo rCSLM imaging provides epithelial biologists an accurate noninvasive means to monitor cutaneous pathogenesis.

  5. Autoradiography-based, three-dimensional calculation of dose rate for murine, human-tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Koral, K F; Kwok, C S; Yang, F E; Brown, R S; Sisson, J C; Wahl, R L

    1993-11-01

    A Fast Fourier Transform method for calculating the three-dimensional dose rate distribution for murine, human-tumor xenografts is outlined. The required input includes evenly-spaced activity slices which span the tumor. Numerical values in these slices are determined by quantitative 125I autoradiography. For the absorbed dose-rate calculation, we assume the activity from both 131I- and 90Y-labeled radiopharmaceuticals would be distributed as is measured with the 125I label. Two example cases are presented: an ovarian-carcinoma xenograft with an IgG 2ak monoclonal antibody and a neuroblastoma xenograft with meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG). Considering all the volume elements in a tumor, we show, by comparison of histograms and also relative standard deviations, that the measured 125I activity and the calculated 131I dose-rate distributions, are similarly non-uniform and that they are more non-uniform than the calculated 90Y dose-rate distribution. However, the maximum-to-minimum ratio, another measure of non-uniformity, decreases by roughly an order of magnitude from one distribution to the next in the order given above. PMID:8298569

  6. RNase H and RNA-directed DNA polymerase: associated enzymatic activities of murine mammary tumor virus.

    PubMed Central

    Dion, A S; Williams, C J; Moore, D H

    1977-01-01

    The RNA-directed DNA polymerase of murine mammary tumor virus, a type B RNA tumor virus, was purified sequentially through DEAE-cellulose, phosphocellulose (step gradient), and phosphocellulose (linear salt gradient) chromatography followed by glycerol sedimentation centrifugation. During all stages of purification, coincident peaks of RNA-directed DNA polymerase activity, templated by polyribocytidylate-oligodeoxyguanidylate, and RNase H digestion of [3H]polyriboadenylate-polydeoxythymidylate were observed, and both enzymatic activities displayed a cation preference for magnesium. Under conditions that removed adventitiously associated nucleases, RNase H activity was found to co-purify with polymerase. The specificity of this nuclease was assayed with various prepared substrates, which indicated that the polymerase-associated RNase H activity was directed only against the RNA strand of an RNA-DNA hybrid. It is highly probable that RNase H (RNA-DNA hybrid: ribonucleotide-hydrolase, EC 3.1.4..34) and RNA-directed DNA polymerase of type B viruses are associated enzymatic activities analogous to those observed for avian and mammalian type C RNA tumor viruses. Images PMID:67221

  7. Accumulation of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles coated with variably sized polyethylene glycol in murine tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Esben Kjær Unmack; Nielsen, Thomas; Wittenborn, Thomas; Rydtoft, Louise Munk; Lokanathan, Arcot R.; Hansen, Line; Østergaard, Leif; Kingshott, Peter; Howard, Kenneth A.; Besenbacher, Flemming; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Kjems, Jørgen

    2012-03-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles have found widespread applications in different areas including cell separation, drug delivery and as contrast agents. Due to water insolubility and stability issues, nanoparticles utilized for biological applications require coatings such as the commonly employed polyethylene glycol (PEG). Despite its frequent use, the influence of PEG coatings on the physicochemical and biological properties of iron nanoparticles has hitherto not been studied in detail. To address this, we studied the effect of 333-20 000 Da PEG coatings that resulted in larger hydrodynamic size, lower surface charge, longer circulation half-life, and lower uptake in macrophage cells when the particles were coated with high molecular weight (Mw) PEG molecules. By use of magnetic resonance imaging, we show coating-dependent in vivo uptake in murine tumors with an optimal coating Mw of 10 000 Da.Iron oxide nanoparticles have found widespread applications in different areas including cell separation, drug delivery and as contrast agents. Due to water insolubility and stability issues, nanoparticles utilized for biological applications require coatings such as the commonly employed polyethylene glycol (PEG). Despite its frequent use, the influence of PEG coatings on the physicochemical and biological properties of iron nanoparticles has hitherto not been studied in detail. To address this, we studied the effect of 333-20 000 Da PEG coatings that resulted in larger hydrodynamic size, lower surface charge, longer circulation half-life, and lower uptake in macrophage cells when the particles were coated with high molecular weight (Mw) PEG molecules. By use of magnetic resonance imaging, we show coating-dependent in vivo uptake in murine tumors with an optimal coating Mw of 10 000 Da. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr11554a

  8. Silencing of Foxp3 delays the growth of murine melanomas and modifies the tumor immunosuppressive environment

    PubMed Central

    Franco-Molina, Moisés A; Miranda-Hernández, Diana F; Mendoza-Gamboa, Edgar; Zapata-Benavides, Pablo; Coronado-Cerda, Erika E; Sierra-Rivera, Crystel A; Saavedra-Alonso, Santiago; Taméz-Guerra, Reyes S; Rodríguez-Padilla, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Forkhead box p3 (Foxp3) expression was believed to be specific for T-regulatory cells but has recently been described in non-hematopoietic cells from different tissue origins and in tumor cells from both epithelial and non-epithelial tissues. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of Foxp3 in murine melanoma. The B16F10 cell line Foxp3 silenced with small interference Foxp3 plasmid transfection was established and named B16F10.1. These cells had lower levels of Foxp3 mRNA (quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction [0.235-fold]), protein (flow cytometry [0.02%]), CD25+ expression (0.06%), cellular proliferation (trypan blue staining), and interleukin (IL)-2 production (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [72.35 pg/mL]) than those in B16F10 wild-type (WT) cells (P<0.05). Subcutaneous inoculation of the B16F10.1 cell line into C57BL/6 mice delayed the time of visible tumor appearance, increased the time of survival, and affected the weight of tumors, and also decreased the production of IL-10, IL-2, and transforming growth factor beta compared with mice inoculated with the B16F10 WT cell line. The B16F10.1 cells derived from tumors and free of T-cells (isolated by Dynabeads and plastic attachment) expressed relatively lower levels of Foxp3 and CD25+ than B16F10 WT cells (P<0.05) in a time-dependent manner. The population of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes of T CD4+ cells (CD4+, CD4+CD25+, and CD4+CD25+Foxp3+) increased in a time-dependent manner (P<0.05) in tumors derived from B16F10 WT cells and decreased in tumors derived from B16F10.1 cells. Similar data were obtained from spleen cells. These results suggest that, in melanomas, Foxp3 partly induces tumor growth by modifying the immune system at the local and peripheral level, shifting the environment toward an immunosuppressive profile. Therapies incorporating this transcription factor could be strategies for cancer treatment. PMID:26834483

  9. Modified Gompertz equation for electrotherapy murine tumor growth kinetics: predictions and new hypotheses

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Electrotherapy effectiveness at different doses has been demonstrated in preclinical and clinical studies; however, several aspects that occur in the tumor growth kinetics before and after treatment have not yet been revealed. Mathematical modeling is a useful instrument that can reveal some of these aspects. The aim of this paper is to describe the complete growth kinetics of unperturbed and perturbed tumors through use of the modified Gompertz equation in order to generate useful insight into the mechanisms that underpin this devastating disease. Methods The complete tumor growth kinetics for control and treated groups are obtained by interpolation and extrapolation methods with different time steps, using experimental data of fibrosarcoma Sa-37. In the modified Gompertz equation, a delay time is introduced to describe the tumor's natural history before treatment. Different graphical strategies are used in order to reveal new information in the complete kinetics of this tumor type. Results The first stage of complete tumor growth kinetics is highly non linear. The model, at this stage, shows different aspects that agree with those reported theoretically and experimentally. Tumor reversibility and the proportionality between regions before and after electrotherapy are demonstrated. In tumors that reach partial remission, two antagonistic post-treatment processes are induced, whereas in complete remission, two unknown antitumor mechanisms are induced. Conclusion The modified Gompertz equation is likely to lead to insights within cancer research. Such insights hold promise for increasing our understanding of tumors as self-organizing systems and, the possible existence of phase transitions in tumor growth kinetics, which, in turn, may have significant impacts both on cancer research and on clinical practice. PMID:21029411

  10. Quantitation of Murine Stroma and Selective Purification of the Human Tumor Component of Patient-Derived Xenografts for Genomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schneeberger, Valentina E.; Allaj, Viola; Gardner, Eric E.; Rudin, Charles M.

    2016-01-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) mouse models are increasingly used for preclinical therapeutic testing of human cancer. A limitation in molecular and genetic characterization of PDX tumors is the presence of integral murine stroma. This is particularly problematic for genomic sequencing of PDX models. Rapid and dependable approaches for quantitating stromal content and purifying the malignant human component of these tumors are needed. We used a recently developed technique exploiting species-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplicon length (ssPAL) differences to define the fractional composition of murine and human DNA, which was proportional to the fractional composition of cells in a series of lung cancer PDX lines. We compared four methods of human cancer cell isolation: fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), an immunomagnetic mouse cell depletion (MCD) approach, and two distinct EpCAM-based immunomagnetic positive selection methods. We further analyzed DNA extracted from the resulting enriched human cancer cells by targeted sequencing using a clinically validated multi-gene panel. Stromal content varied widely among tumors of similar histology, but appeared stable over multiple serial tumor passages of an individual model. FACS and MCD were superior to either positive selection approach, especially in cases of high stromal content, and consistently allowed high quality human-specific genomic profiling. ssPAL is a dependable approach to quantitation of murine stromal content, and MCD is a simple, efficient, and high yield approach to human cancer cell isolation for genomic analysis of PDX tumors. PMID:27611664

  11. Quantitation of Murine Stroma and Selective Purification of the Human Tumor Component of Patient-Derived Xenografts for Genomic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Schneeberger, Valentina E; Allaj, Viola; Gardner, Eric E; Poirier, J T; Rudin, Charles M

    2016-01-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) mouse models are increasingly used for preclinical therapeutic testing of human cancer. A limitation in molecular and genetic characterization of PDX tumors is the presence of integral murine stroma. This is particularly problematic for genomic sequencing of PDX models. Rapid and dependable approaches for quantitating stromal content and purifying the malignant human component of these tumors are needed. We used a recently developed technique exploiting species-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplicon length (ssPAL) differences to define the fractional composition of murine and human DNA, which was proportional to the fractional composition of cells in a series of lung cancer PDX lines. We compared four methods of human cancer cell isolation: fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), an immunomagnetic mouse cell depletion (MCD) approach, and two distinct EpCAM-based immunomagnetic positive selection methods. We further analyzed DNA extracted from the resulting enriched human cancer cells by targeted sequencing using a clinically validated multi-gene panel. Stromal content varied widely among tumors of similar histology, but appeared stable over multiple serial tumor passages of an individual model. FACS and MCD were superior to either positive selection approach, especially in cases of high stromal content, and consistently allowed high quality human-specific genomic profiling. ssPAL is a dependable approach to quantitation of murine stromal content, and MCD is a simple, efficient, and high yield approach to human cancer cell isolation for genomic analysis of PDX tumors. PMID:27611664

  12. Inhibition of Rho-Associated Kinase 1/2 Attenuates Tumor Growth in Murine Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hinsenkamp, Isabel; Schulz, Sandra; Roscher, Mareike; Suhr, Anne-Maria; Meyer, Björn; Munteanu, Bogdan; Fuchser, Jens; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Ebert, Matthias P A; Wängler, Björn; Hopf, Carsten; Burgermeister, Elke

    2016-08-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) remains a malignant disease with high mortality. Patients are frequently diagnosed in advanced stages where survival prognosis is poor. Thus, there is high medical need to find novel drug targets and treatment strategies. Recently, the comprehensive molecular characterization of GC subtypes revealed mutations in the small GTPase RHOA as a hallmark of diffuse-type GC. RHOA activates RHO-associated protein kinases (ROCK1/2) which regulate cell contractility, migration and growth and thus may play a role in cancer. However, therapeutic benefit of RHO-pathway inhibition in GC has not been shown so far. The ROCK1/2 inhibitor 1-(5-isoquinoline sulfonyl)-homopiperazine (HA-1077, fasudil) is approved for cerebrovascular bleeding in patients. We therefore investigated whether fasudil (i.p., 10 mg/kg per day, 4 times per week, 4 weeks) inhibits tumor growth in a preclinical model of GC. Fasudil evoked cell death in human GC cells and reduced the tumor size in the stomach of CEA424-SV40 TAg transgenic mice. Small animal PET/CT confirmed preclinical efficacy. Mass spectrometry imaging identified a translatable biomarker for mouse GC and suggested rapid but incomplete in situ distribution of the drug to gastric tumor tissue. RHOA expression was increased in the neoplastic murine stomach compared with normal non-malignant gastric tissue, and fasudil reduced (auto) phosphorylation of ROCK2 at THR249 in vivo and in human GC cells in vitro. In sum, our data suggest that RHO-pathway inhibition may constitute a novel strategy for treatment of GC and that enhanced distribution of future ROCK inhibitors into tumor tissue may further improve efficacy. PMID:27566106

  13. Experimental Adaptation of Rotaviruses to Tumor Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Carlos A.; Guerrero, Rafael A.; Silva, Elver; Acosta, Orlando; Barreto, Emiliano

    2016-01-01

    A number of viruses show a naturally extended tropism for tumor cells whereas other viruses have been genetically modified or adapted to infect tumor cells. Oncolytic viruses have become a promising tool for treating some cancers by inducing cell lysis or immune response to tumor cells. In the present work, rotavirus strains TRF-41 (G5) (porcine), RRV (G3) (simian), UK (G6-P5) (bovine), Ym (G11-P9) (porcine), ECwt (murine), Wa (G1-P8), Wi61 (G9) and M69 (G8) (human), and five wild-type human rotavirus isolates were passaged multiple times in different human tumor cell lines and then combined in five different ways before additional multiple passages in tumor cell lines. Cell death caused by the tumor cell-adapted isolates was characterized using Hoechst, propidium iodide, 7-AAD, Annexin V, TUNEL, and anti-poly-(ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP) and -phospho-histone H2A.X antibodies. Multiple passages of the combined rotaviruses in tumor cell lines led to a successful infection of these cells, suggesting a gain-of-function by the acquisition of greater infectious capacity as compared with that of the parental rotaviruses. The electropherotype profiles suggest that unique tumor cell-adapted isolates were derived from reassortment of parental rotaviruses. Infection produced by such rotavirus isolates induced chromatin modifications compatible with apoptotic cell death. PMID:26828934

  14. Neutralizing murine TGFβR2 promotes a differentiated tumor cell phenotype and inhibits pancreatic cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Ostapoff, Katherine T; Cenik, Bercin Kutluk; Wang, Miao; Ye, Risheng; Xu, Xiaohong; Nugent, Desiree; Hagopian, Moriah M; Topalovski, Mary; Rivera, Lee B; Carroll, Kyla D; Brekken, Rolf A

    2014-09-15

    Elevated levels of TGFβ are a negative prognostic indicator for patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer; as a result, the TGFβ pathway is an attractive target for therapy. However, clinical application of pharmacologic inhibition of TGFβ remains challenging because TGFβ has tumor suppressor functions in many epithelial malignancies, including pancreatic cancer. In fact, direct neutralization of TGFβ promotes tumor progression of genetic murine models of pancreatic cancer. Here, we report that neutralizing the activity of murine TGFβ receptor 2 using a monoclonal antibody (2G8) has potent antimetastatic activity in orthotopic human tumor xenografts, syngeneic tumors, and a genetic model of pancreatic cancer. 2G8 reduced activated fibroblasts, collagen deposition, microvessel density, and vascular function. These stromal-specific changes resulted in tumor cell epithelial differentiation and a potent reduction in metastases. We conclude that TGFβ signaling within stromal cells participates directly in tumor cell phenotype and pancreatic cancer progression. Thus, strategies that inhibit TGFβ-dependent effector functions of stromal cells could be efficacious for the therapy of pancreatic tumors. Cancer Res; 74(18); 4996-5007. ©2014 AACR. PMID:25060520

  15. Attenuation of TGF-β signaling supports tumor progression of a mesenchymal-like mammary tumor cell line in a syngeneic murine model

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Tanuka; Gu, Xiang; Yang, Junhua; Ellies, Lesley G; Sun, Lu-Zhe

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that TGF-β functions as a tumor promoter in metastatic, mesenchymal-like breast cancer cells and that TGF-β inhibitors can effectively abrogate tumor progression in several of these models. Here we report a novel observation with the use of genetic and pharmacological approaches, and murine mammary cell injection models in both syngeneic and immune compromised mice. We found that TGF-β receptor II (TβRII) knockdown in the MMTV-PyMT derived Py8119, a mesenchymal-like murine mammary tumor cell line, resulted in increased orthotopic tumor growth potential in a syngeneic background and a similar trend in an immune compromised background. Systemic treatment with a small-molecule TGF-β receptor I kinase inhibitor induced a trend towards increased metastatic colonization of distant organs following intra cardiac inoculation of Py8119 cells, with little effect on the colonization of luminal-like Py230 cells, also derived from MMTV-PyMT tumors. Taken together, our data suggest that the attenuation of TGF-β signaling in mesenchymal-like mammary tumors does not necessarily inhibit their malignant potential, and anti-TGF-β therapeutic intervention requires greater precision in identifying molecular markers in tumors with an indication of functional TGF-β signaling. PMID:24368187

  16. Induction of Anti-Tumor Immune Responses by Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy with (177)Lu-DOTATATE in a Murine Model of a Human Neuroendocrine Tumor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yin; Pfeifer, Andreas Klaus; Myschetzky, Rebecca; Garbyal, Rajendra Singh; Rasmussen, Palle; Knigge, Ulrich; Bzorek, Michael; Kristensen, Michael Holmsgaard; Kjaer, Andreas

    2013-10-02

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is a relatively new mode of internally targeted radiotherapy currently in clinical trials. In PRRT, ionizing radioisotopes conjugated to somatostatin analogues are targeted to neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) via somatostatin receptors. Despite promising clinical results, very little is known about the mechanism of tumor control. By using NCI-H727 cells in an in vivo murine xenograft model of human NETs, we showed that (177)Lu-DOTATATE PRRT led to increased infiltration of CD86+ antigen presenting cells into tumor tissue. We also found that following treatment with PRRT, there was significantly increased tumor infiltration by CD49b+/FasL+ NK cells potentially capable of tumor killing. Further investigation into the immunomodulatory effects of PRRT will be essential in improving treatment efficacy.

  17. Comparison of serological tests for the detection of antibody to natural and experimental murine cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Lussier, G; Guénette, D; Descôteaux, J P

    1987-04-01

    Three serological tests, i.e. complement fixation test, indirect immunofluorescent assay, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were compared for sensitivity in the detection and titration of murine cytomegalovirus antibody. The three tests were compared using sera from experimentally inoculated and naturally infected mice bled at intervals from 3 to 140 days postinfection. In the acute infection, complement fixation and indirect immunofluorescent assay tests were of comparable sensitivity for early detection of antibody, whereas the ELISA was less sensitive. In persistent infection, higher titers were recorded with ELISA. Since murine cytomegalovirus has been shown to exert significant effects on the immune response of infected mice, this antigen should be included routinely in viral antibody screening programs.

  18. Photodynamic Therapy of the Murine LM3 Tumor Using Meso-Tetra (4-N,N,N-Trimethylanilinium) Porphine

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, L. L.; Juarranz, A.; Cañete, M.; Villanueva, A.; Stockert, J. C.

    2007-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer is based on the cytotoxicity induced by a photosensitizer in the presence of oxygen and visible light, resulting in cell death and tumor regression. This work describes the response of the murine LM3 tumor to PDT using meso-tetra (4-N,N,N-trimethylanilinium) porphine (TMAP). BALB/c mice with intradermal LM3 tumors were subjected to intravenous injection of TMAP (4 mg/kg) followed 24 h later by blue-red light irradiation (λmax: 419, 457, 650 nm) for 60 min (total dose: 290 J/cm2) on depilated and glycerol-covered skin over the tumor of anesthetized animals. Control (drug alone, light alone) and PDT treatments (drug + light) were performed once and repeated 48 h later. No significant differences were found between untreated tumors and tumors only treated with TMAP or light. PDT-treated tumors showed almost total but transitory tumor regression (from 3 mm to less than 1 mm) in 8/9 animals, whereas no regression was found in 1/9. PDT response was heterogeneous and each tumor showed different regression and growth delay. The survival of PDT-treated animals was significantly higher than that of TMAP and light controls, showing a lower number of lung metastasis but increased tumor-draining lymph node metastasis. Repeated treatment and reduction of tissue light scattering by glycerol could be useful approaches in studies on PDT of cancer. PMID:23675051

  19. Apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in human and murine tumor cells are initiated by isoprenoids.

    PubMed

    Mo, H; Elson, C E

    1999-04-01

    Diverse classes of phytochemicals initiate biological responses that effectively lower cancer risk. One class of phytochemicals, broadly defined as pure and mixed isoprenoids, encompasses an estimated 22,000 individual components. A representative mixed isoprenoid, gamma-tocotrienol, suppresses the growth of murine B16(F10) melanoma cells, and with greater potency, the growth of human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) and human leukemic (HL-60) cells. beta-Ionone, a pure isoprenoid, suppresses the growth of B16 cells and with greater potency, the growth of MCF-7, HL-60 and human colon adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells. Results obtained with diverse cell lines differing in ras and p53 status showed that the isoprenoid-mediated suppression of growth is independent of mutated ras and p53 functions. beta-Ionone suppressed the growth of human colon fibroblasts (CCD-18Co) but only when present at three-fold the concentration required to suppress the growth of Caco-2 cells. The isoprenoids initiated apoptosis and, concomitantly arrested cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Both suppress 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase activity. beta-Ionone and lovastatin interfered with the posttranslational processing of lamin B, an activity essential to assembly of daughter nuclei. This interference, we postulate, renders neosynthesized DNA available to the endonuclease activities leading to apoptotic cell death. Lovastatin-imposed mevalonate starvation suppressed the glycosylation and translocation of growth factor receptors to the cell surface. As a consequence, cells were arrested in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. This rationale may apply to the isoprenoid-mediated G1-phase arrest of tumor cells. The additive and potentially synergistic actions of these isoprenoids in the suppression of tumor cell proliferation and initiation of apoptosis coupled with the mass action of the diverse isoprenoid constituents of plant products may explain, in part, the impact of fruit, vegetable

  20. Functional identification of the alveolar edema reabsorption activity of murine tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed

    Elia, Nadia; Tapponnier, Maxime; Matthay, Michael A; Hamacher, Jurg; Pache, Jean-Claude; Brundler, Marie-Anne; Totsch, Martin; De Baetselier, Patrick; Fransen, Lucie; Fukuda, Norimasa; Morel, Denis R; Lucas, Rudolf

    2003-11-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) activates sodium channels in Type II alveolar epithelial cells, an important mechanism for the reported fluid resorption capacity of the cytokine. Both TNF-alpha receptor-dependent and -independent effects were proposed for this activity in vitro, the latter mechanism mediated by the lectin-like domain of the molecule. In this study, the relative contribution of the receptor-dependent versus receptor-independent activities was investigated in an in situ mouse lung model and an ex vivo rat lung model. Fluid resorption due to murine TNF-alpha (mTNF-alpha) was functional in mice that were genetically deficient in both types of mTNF-alpha receptor, establishing the importance of mTNF-alpha receptor-independent effects in this species. In addition, we assessed the capacity of an mTNF-alpha-derived peptide (mLtip), which activates sodium transport by a receptor-independent mechanism, to reduce lung water content in an isolated, ventilated, autologous blood-perfused rat lung model. The results show that in this model, mLtip, in contrast to mTNF-alpha, produced a progressive recovery of dynamic lung compliance and airway resistance after alveolar flooding. There was also a significant reduction in lung water. These results indicate that the receptor-independent lectin-like domain of mTNF-alpha has a potential physiological role in the resolution of alveolar edema in rats and mice.

  1. Tocotrienol-Adjuvanted Dendritic Cells Inhibit Tumor Growth and Metastasis: A Murine Model of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Hafid, Sitti Rahma; Chakravarthi, Srikumar; Nesaretnam, Kalanithi; Radhakrishnan, Ammu Kutty

    2013-01-01

    Tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF) from palm oil is reported to possess anti-cancer and immune-enhancing effects. In this study, TRF supplementation was used as an adjuvant to enhance the anti-cancer effects of dendritic cells (DC)-based cancer vaccine in a syngeneic mouse model of breast cancer. Female BALB/c mice were inoculated with 4T1 cells in mammary pad to induce tumor. When the tumor was palpable, the mice in the experimental groups were injected subcutaneously with DC-pulsed with tumor lysate (TL) from 4T1 cells (DC+TL) once a week for three weeks and fed daily with 1 mg TRF or vehicle. Control mice received unpulsed DC and were fed with vehicle. The combined therapy of using DC+TL injections and TRF supplementation (DC+TL+TRF) inhibited (p<0.05) tumor growth and metastasis. Splenocytes from the DC+TL+TRF group cultured with mitomycin-C (MMC)-treated 4T1 cells produced higher (p<0.05) levels of IFN-γ and IL-12. The cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) assay also showed enhanced tumor-specific killing (p<0.05) by CD8+ T-lymphocytes isolated from mice in the DC+TL+TRF group. This study shows that TRF has the potential to be used as an adjuvant to enhance effectiveness of DC-based vaccines. PMID:24069344

  2. Beneficial lactobacilli: effects on the vaginal tract in a murine experimental model.

    PubMed

    De Gregorio, Priscilla Romina; Juárez Tomás, María Silvina; Santos, Viviana; Nader-Macías, María Elena Fatima

    2012-11-01

    Vaginal probiotics containing lactic acid bacteria with activity towards pathogenic microorganisms that cause urogenital tract infections have been proposed as a valid strategy for their prophylaxis and therapy. A murine experimental model was set up to evaluate the colonization capability of beneficial human lactobacilli and their effects on the mouse vaginal mucosa and innate immune cells. Five Lactobacillus strains were intravaginally inoculated into previously estrogenized BALB/c mice. The significance of the effects observed in the vaginal tract was determined by analysis of variance using the general linear model. The numbers of viable vaginal lactobacilli were significantly higher at proestrous-estrous than those at the metaestrous-diestrous phase and decreased markedly on the days after inoculation. Lactobacilli inoculation did not cause cytological or histological modifications of the murine vaginal tract. Moreover, the intravaginal administration of Lactobacillus salivarius CRL (Centro de Referencia para Lactobacilos culture collection) 1328 and Lactobacillus gasseri CRL 1263 did not affect the amounts of granulocytes and macrophages present in vaginal washings. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that vaginal lactobacilli did not produce adverse effects on the murine vaginal tract. Therefore, they could be proposed as safe probiotic candidates to promote a balanced microbiota in the urogenital tract.

  3. A murine experimental model for the mechanical behaviour of viable right-ventricular myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Valdez-Jasso, Daniela; Simon, Marc A; Champion, Hunter C; Sacks, Michael S

    2012-01-01

    Although right-ventricular function is an important determinant of cardio-pulmonary performance in health and disease, right ventricular myocardium mechanical behaviour has received relatively little attention. We present a novel experimental method for quantifying the mechanical behaviour of transmurally intact, viable right-ventricular myocardium. Seven murine right ventricular free wall (RVFW) specimens were isolated and biaxial mechanical behaviour measured, along with quantification of the local transmural myofibre and collagen fibre architecture. We developed a complementary strain energy function based method to capture the average biomechanical response. Overall, murine RVFW revealed distinct mechanical anisotropy. The preferential alignment of the myofibres and collagen fibres to the apex-to-outflow-tract direction was consistent with this also being the mechanically stiffer axis. We also observed that the myofibre and collagen fibre orientations were remarkably uniform throughout the entire RVFW thickness. Thus, our findings indicate a close correspondence between the tissue microstructure and biomechanical behaviour of the RVFW myocardium, and are a first step towards elucidating the structure–function of non-contracted murine RVFW myocardium in health and disease. PMID:22848044

  4. Effective Treatment of Established GL261 Murine Gliomas through Picornavirus Vaccination-Enhanced Tumor Antigen-Specific CD8+ T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Renner, Danielle N; Jin, Fang; Litterman, Adam J; Balgeman, Alexis J; Hanson, Lisa M; Gamez, Jeffrey D; Chae, Michael; Carlson, Brett L; Sarkaria, Jann N; Parney, Ian F; Ohlfest, John R; Pirko, Istvan; Pavelko, Kevin D; Johnson, Aaron J

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is among the most invasive and lethal of cancers, frequently infiltrating surrounding healthy tissue and giving rise to rapid recurrence. It is therefore critical to establish experimental model systems and develop therapeutic approaches that enhance anti-tumor immunity. In the current study, we have employed a newly developed murine glioma model to assess the efficacy of a novel picornavirus vaccination approach for the treatment of established tumors. The GL261-Quad system is a variation of the GL261 syngeneic glioma that has been engineered to expresses model T cell epitopes including OVA257-264. MRI revealed that both GL261 and GL261-Quad tumors display characteristic features of human gliomas such as heterogeneous gadolinium leakage and larger T2 weighted volumes. Analysis of brain-infiltrating immune cells demonstrated that GL261-Quad gliomas generate detectable CD8+ T cell responses toward the tumor-specific Kb:OVA257-264 antigen. Enhancing this response via a single intracranial or peripheral vaccination with picornavirus expressing the OVA257-264 antigen increased anti-tumor CD8+ T cells infiltrating the brain, attenuated progression of established tumors, and extended survival of treated mice. Importantly, the efficacy of the picornavirus vaccination is dependent on functional cytotoxic activity of CD8+ T cells, as the beneficial response was completely abrogated in mice lacking perforin expression. Therefore, we have developed a novel system for evaluating mechanisms of anti-tumor immunity in vivo, incorporating the GL261-Quad model, 3D volumetric MRI, and picornavirus vaccination to enhance tumor-specific cytotoxic CD8+ T cell responses and track their effectiveness at eradicating established gliomas in vivo. PMID:25933216

  5. Effective Treatment of Established GL261 Murine Gliomas through Picornavirus Vaccination-Enhanced Tumor Antigen-Specific CD8+ T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Renner, Danielle N; Jin, Fang; Litterman, Adam J; Balgeman, Alexis J; Hanson, Lisa M; Gamez, Jeffrey D; Chae, Michael; Carlson, Brett L; Sarkaria, Jann N; Parney, Ian F; Ohlfest, John R; Pirko, Istvan; Pavelko, Kevin D; Johnson, Aaron J

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is among the most invasive and lethal of cancers, frequently infiltrating surrounding healthy tissue and giving rise to rapid recurrence. It is therefore critical to establish experimental model systems and develop therapeutic approaches that enhance anti-tumor immunity. In the current study, we have employed a newly developed murine glioma model to assess the efficacy of a novel picornavirus vaccination approach for the treatment of established tumors. The GL261-Quad system is a variation of the GL261 syngeneic glioma that has been engineered to expresses model T cell epitopes including OVA257-264. MRI revealed that both GL261 and GL261-Quad tumors display characteristic features of human gliomas such as heterogeneous gadolinium leakage and larger T2 weighted volumes. Analysis of brain-infiltrating immune cells demonstrated that GL261-Quad gliomas generate detectable CD8+ T cell responses toward the tumor-specific Kb:OVA257-264 antigen. Enhancing this response via a single intracranial or peripheral vaccination with picornavirus expressing the OVA257-264 antigen increased anti-tumor CD8+ T cells infiltrating the brain, attenuated progression of established tumors, and extended survival of treated mice. Importantly, the efficacy of the picornavirus vaccination is dependent on functional cytotoxic activity of CD8+ T cells, as the beneficial response was completely abrogated in mice lacking perforin expression. Therefore, we have developed a novel system for evaluating mechanisms of anti-tumor immunity in vivo, incorporating the GL261-Quad model, 3D volumetric MRI, and picornavirus vaccination to enhance tumor-specific cytotoxic CD8+ T cell responses and track their effectiveness at eradicating established gliomas in vivo.

  6. Tumor progression in murine leukemia virus-induced T-cell lymphomas: monitoring clonal selections with viral and cellular probes.

    PubMed Central

    Cuypers, H T; Selten, G C; Zijlstra, M; de Goede, R E; Melief, C J; Berns, A J

    1986-01-01

    Clonal selections occurring during the progression of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MuLV)-induced T-cell lymphomas in mice were examined in primary and transplanted tumors by monitoring various molecular markers: proviral integration patterns, MuLV insertions near c-myc and pim-1, and rearrangements of the immunoglobulin heavy chain and beta-chain T-cell receptor genes. The results were as follows. Moloney MuLV frequently induced oligoclonal tumors with proviral insertions near c-myc or pim-1 in the independent clones. Moloney MuLV acted as a highly efficient insertional mutagen, able to activate different (putative) oncogenes in one cell lineage. Clonal selections during tumor progression were frequently marked by the acquisition of new proviral integrations. Independent tumor cell clones exhibited a homing preference upon transplantation in syngeneic hosts and were differently affected by the route of transplantation. Images PMID:3091854

  7. Human class II major histocompatibility complex gene transfer into murine neuroblastoma leads to loss of tumorigenicity, immunity against subsequent tumor challenge, and elimination of microscopic preestablished tumors.

    PubMed

    Hock, R A; Reynolds, B D; Tucker-McClung, C L; Kwok, W W

    1995-01-01

    Immunological recognition of transformed cells is critically important to limit tumor development and proliferation. Because established tumors have escaped immune recognition and elimination, novel strategies to enhance antitumor immunity have been developed. A unique approach has used the introduction of genes encoding major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens into tumor cells. Experiments in mice have shown that the expression of syngeneic class II MHC antigens in tumor cells completely abrogates tumorigenicity and induces tumor-specific immunity. In this study we sought to determine whether a more effective antitumor immune response would be generated by introducing xenogeneic class II MHC genes into tumor cells. To address this question we used recombinant retroviruses to express human class II MHC genes in a highly malignant murine neuroblastoma cell line, Neuro-2a. We found that normal mice inoculated with Neuro-2a expressing the human class II MHC antigen did not develop tumors and were immune to subsequent challenge with unmodified Neuro-2a cells. In addition, mice bearing small established Neuro-2a tumors were cured by vaccination with Neuro-2a expressing human class II MHC. We hypothesize that a similar approach using retroviral-mediated transduction of class II MHC genes into human tumor cells may be an effective alternative to current cancer treatment.

  8. A comprehensive collection of experimentally validated primers for Polymerase Chain Reaction quantitation of murine transcript abundance

    PubMed Central

    Spandidos, Athanasia; Wang, Xiaowei; Wang, Huajun; Dragnev, Stefan; Thurber, Tara; Seed, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Background Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) is a widely applied analytical method for the accurate determination of transcript abundance. Primers for QPCR have been designed on a genomic scale but non-specific amplification of non-target genes has frequently been a problem. Although several online databases have been created for the storage and retrieval of experimentally validated primers, only a few thousand primer pairs are currently present in existing databases and the primers are not designed for use under a common PCR thermal profile. Results We previously reported the implementation of an algorithm to predict PCR primers for most known human and mouse genes. We now report the use of that resource to identify 17483 pairs of primers that have been experimentally verified to amplify unique sequences corresponding to distinct murine transcripts. The primer pairs have been validated by gel electrophoresis, DNA sequence analysis and thermal denaturation profile. In addition to the validation studies, we have determined the uniformity of amplification using the primers and the technical reproducibility of the QPCR reaction using the popular and inexpensive SYBR Green I detection method. Conclusion We have identified an experimentally validated collection of murine primer pairs for PCR and QPCR which can be used under a common PCR thermal profile, allowing the evaluation of transcript abundance of a large number of genes in parallel. This feature is increasingly attractive for confirming and/or making more precise data trends observed from experiments performed with DNA microarrays. PMID:19108745

  9. Productively Infected Murine Kaposi's Sarcoma-Like Tumors Define New Animal Models for Studying and Targeting KSHV Oncogenesis and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Ashlock, Brittany M.; Ma, Qi; Issac, Biju; Mesri, Enrique A.

    2014-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is an AIDS-defining cancer caused by the KS-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). KS tumors are composed of KSHV-infected spindle cells of vascular origin with aberrant neovascularization and erythrocyte extravasation. KSHV genes expressed during both latent and lytic replicative cycles play important roles in viral oncogenesis. Animal models able to recapitulate both viral and host biological characteristics of KS are needed to elucidate oncogenic mechanisms, for developing targeted therapies, and to trace cellular components of KS ontogeny. Herein, we describe two new murine models of Kaposi's sarcoma. We found that murine bone marrow-derived cells, whether established in culture or isolated from fresh murine bone marrow, were infectable with rKSHV.219, formed KS-like tumors in immunocompromised mice and produced mature herpesvirus-like virions in vivo. Further, we show in vivo that the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA/Vorinostat) enhanced viral lytic reactivation. We propose that these novel models are ideal for studying both viral and host contributions to KSHV-induced oncogenesis as well as for testing virally-targeted antitumor strategies for the treatment of Kaposi's sarcoma. Furthermore, our isolation of bone marrow-derived cell populations containing a cell type that, when infected with KSHV, renders a tumorigenic KS-like spindle cell, should facilitate systematic identification of KS progenitor cells. PMID:24489895

  10. Streptococcal Histone Induces Murine Macrophages To Produce Interleukin-1 and Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liping; Ignatowski, Tracey A.; Spengler, Robert N.; Noble, Bernice; Stinson, Murray W.

    1999-01-01

    The histone-like protein (HlpA) is highly conserved among streptococci. After lysis of streptococci in infected tissues, HlpA can enter the bloodstream and bind to proteoglycans in the glomerular capillaries of kidneys, where it can react with antibodies or stimulate host cell receptors. Deposits of streptococcal antigens in tissues have been associated with localized acute inflammation. In this study, we measured the ability of purified HlpA (5 to 100 μg/ml), from Streptococcus mitis, to induce the production of proinflammatory cytokines by cultured, murine peritoneal macrophages. The release of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) was time and concentration dependent and was not diminished by the presence of polymyxin B. Exposure of macrophages to a mixture of HlpA and lipoteichoic acid resulted in a synergistic response in the production of both TNF-α and IL-1. Stimulation with a mixture of HlpA and heparin resulted in reduced cytokine production (50% less IL-1 and 76% less TNF-α) compared to that by cells incubated with HlpA alone. The inclusion of antibodies specific to HlpA in macrophage cultures during stimulation with HlpA did not affect the quantity of TNF-α or IL-1 produced. These observations suggest that streptococcal histone may contribute to tissue injury at infection sites by promoting monocytes/macrophages to synthesize and release cytokines that initiate and exacerbate inflammation. Streptococcus pyogenes, which can infect tissues in enormous numbers, may release sufficient amounts of HlpA to reach the kidneys and cause acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis. PMID:10569765

  11. [Differential growth inhibition of mycobacteria by interferon-gamma-or tumor necrosis factor-alpha-treated murine peritoneal macrophages].

    PubMed

    Sato, K; Tomioka, H; Saito, H

    1996-11-01

    Growth inhibition of the intracellular mycobacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M. bovis, M. kansasii, M. avium, M. intracellulare, M. fortuitum, and M. chelonae subsp. abscessus by interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)- or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-treated murine peritoneal macrophages elicited by proteose peptone was studied in vitro. Macrophages were infected with slowly growing mycobacteria and the extracellular mycobacteria were washed out. Then, macrophages were treated with IFN-gamma or TNF-alpha at a concentration of 10 to 1000 U/ml for 2 days. In another experiment, macrophages were pretreated with these cytokines for 1 day then infected with rapidly growing mycobacteria as before. Macrophages were cultured with or without IFN-gamma or TNF-alpha for additional day. Mycobacterial growth was assessed by determination of colony-forming units on 7H11 agar plates after destruction of the macrophages. Stimulation of macrophages with IFN-gamma reduced the growth of mycobacteria. However, except for M. tuberculosis and M. bovis, growth was not inhibited by macrophages treated with TNF-alpha. IFN-gamma seems to be an important cytokine for the activation of mycobactericidal mechanisms in murine macrophages. Stimulation with IFN-gamma or TNF-alpha and subsequent phagocytosis of M. tuberculosis or M. intracellulare increased O2- production, which was assayed by the method of cytochrome C reduction by murine peritoneal macrophages. Phorbol myristate acetate-triggered-O2- production was also elevated by the cytokine pretreatment of the macrophages, suggesting that mycobacterial growth inhibition did not parallel the production of reactive oxygen intermediates in TNF alpha-activated murine peritoneal macrophages. These data suggest that bactericidal mechanisms of murine macrophages against nontuberculous mycobacteria may not depend on reactive oxygen intermediates. PMID:8958673

  12. Expression of the Wilms' tumor gene WT1 in the murine urogenital system.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, J; Schalling, M; Buckler, A J; Rogers, A; Haber, D A; Housman, D

    1991-08-01

    The Wilms' tumor gene WT1 is a recessive oncogene that encodes a putative transcription factor implicated in nephrogenesis during kidney development. In this report we analyze expression of WT1 in the murine urogenital system. WT1 is expressed in non-germ-cell components of the testis and ovaries in both young and adult mice. In situ mRNA hybridization studies demonstrate that WT1 is expressed in the granulosa and epithelial cells of ovaries, the Sertoli cells of the testis, and in the uterine wall. In addition to the 3.1-kb WT1 transcript detected by Northern blotting of RNA from kidney, uterus, and gonads, there is an approximately 2.5-kb WT1-related mRNA species in testis. The levels of WT1 mRNA in the gonads are among the highest observed, surpassing amounts detected in the embryonic kidney. During development, these levels are differentially regulated, depending on the sexual differentiation of the gonad. Expression of WT1 mRNA in the female reproductive system does not fluctuate significantly from days 4 to 40 postpartum. In contrast, WT1 mRNA levels in the tesis increase steadily after birth, reaching their highest expression levels at day 8 postpartum and decreasing slightly as the animal matures. Expression of WT1 in the gonads is detectable as early as 12.5 days postcoitum (p.c.). As an initial step toward exploring the tissue-specific expression of WT1, DNA elements upstream of WT1 were cloned and sequenced. Three putative transcription initiation sites, utilized in testis, ovaries, and uterus, were mapped by S1 nuclease protection assays. The sequences surrounding these sites have a high G + C content, and typical upstream CCAAT and TATAA boxes are not present. These studies allowed us to identify the translation initiation site for WT1 protein synthesis. We have also used an epitope-tagging protocol to demonstrate that WT1 is a nuclear protein, consistent with its role as a transcription factor. Our results demonstrate regulation of WT1 expression

  13. CD24 Is Not Required for Tumor Initiation and Growth in Murine Breast and Prostate Cancer Models

    PubMed Central

    Cremers, Natascha; Neeb, Antje; Uhle, Tanja; Dimmler, Arno; Rothley, Melanie; Allgayer, Heike; Fodde, Riccardo; Sleeman, Jonathan Paul; Thiele, Wilko

    2016-01-01

    CD24 is a small, heavily glycosylated, GPI-linked membrane protein, whose expression has been associated with the tumorigenesis and progression of several types of cancer. Here, we studied the expression of CD24 in tumors of MMTV-PyMT, Apc1572/T+ and TRAMP genetic mouse models that spontaneously develop mammary or prostate carcinoma, respectively. We found that CD24 is expressed during tumor development in all three models. In MMTV-PyMT and Apc1572T/+ breast tumors, CD24 was strongly but heterogeneously expressed during early tumorigenesis, but decreased in more advanced stages, and accordingly was increased in poorly differentiated lesions compared with well differentiated lesions. In prostate tumors developing in TRAMP mice, CD24 expression was strong within hyperplastic lesions in comparison with non-hyperplastic regions, and heterogeneous CD24 expression was maintained in advanced prostate carcinomas. To investigate whether CD24 plays a functional role in tumorigenesis in these models, we crossed CD24 deficient mice with MMTV-PyMT, Apc1572T/+ and TRAMP mice, and assessed the influence of CD24 deficiency on tumor onset and tumor burden. We found that mice negative or positive for CD24 did not significantly differ in terms of tumor initiation and burden in the genetic tumor models tested, with the exception of Apc1572T/+ mice, in which lack of CD24 reduced the mammary tumor burden slightly but significantly. Together, our data suggest that while CD24 is distinctively expressed during the early development of murine mammary and prostate tumors, it is not essential for the formation of tumors developing in MMTV-PyMT, Apc1572T/+ and TRAMP mice. PMID:26978528

  14. Adjuvant Cationic Liposomes Presenting MPL and IL-12 Induce Cell Death, Suppress Tumor Growth, and Alter the Cellular Phenotype of Tumors in a Murine Model of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) process and present antigens to T lymphocytes, inducing potent immune responses when encountered in association with activating signals, such as pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Using the 4T1 murine model of breast cancer, cationic liposomes containing monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) and interleukin (IL)-12 were administered by intratumoral injection. Combination multivalent presentation of the Toll-like receptor-4 ligand MPL and cytotoxic 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trmethylammonium-propane lipids induced cell death, decreased cellular proliferation, and increased serum levels of IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. The addition of recombinant IL-12 further suppressed tumor growth and increased expression of IL-1β, TNF-α, and interferon-γ. IL-12 also increased the percentage of cytolytic T cells, DC, and F4/80+ macrophages in the tumor. While single agent therapy elevated levels of nitric oxide synthase 3-fold above basal levels in the tumor, combination therapy with MPL cationic liposomes and IL-12 stimulated a 7-fold increase, supporting the observed cell cycle arrest (loss of Ki-67 expression) and apoptosis (TUNEL positive). In mice bearing dual tumors, the growth of distal, untreated tumors mirrored that of liposome-treated tumors, supporting the presence of a systemic immune response. PMID:25179345

  15. Strain-related effects of fenbendazole treatment on murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Ramp, A A; Hall, C; Orian, J M

    2010-07-01

    Parasitic infections are a concern in animal facilities, in view of their influence on physiological processes and the immune status of animals. Pinworms are effectively controlled with the anthelminthic fenbendazole (FBZ, [5-(phenylthio)-1H-benzamidazol-2-yl]carbamic acid methyl ester; C(15)H(13)N(3)O(2)S); however, questions remain as to whether prolonged FBZ exposure alters the disease course in specific experimental models, such as those pertaining to the immune system. We report that a three-month regimen of FBZ-medicated feed severely affected the onset and disease severity of murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a disease that mimics multiple sclerosis. Differences were recorded between mouse strains used. Our data suggest that where the use of FBZ is mandatory, its full effect should be verified on the particular EAE variant adopted by the laboratory.

  16. Carbon nanotube based respiratory gated micro-CT imaging of a murine model of lung tumors with optical imaging correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burk, Laurel M.; Lee, Yueh Z.; Heathcote, Samuel; Wang, Ko-han; Kim, William Y.; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2011-03-01

    Current optical imaging techniques can successfully measure tumor load in murine models of lung carcinoma but lack structural detail. We demonstrate that respiratory gated micro-CT imaging of such models gives information about structure and correlates with tumor load measurements by optical methods. Four mice with multifocal, Kras-induced tumors expressing firefly luciferase were imaged against four controls using both optical imaging and respiratory gated micro-CT. CT images of anesthetized animals were acquired with a custom CNT-based system using 30 ms x-ray pulses during peak inspiration; respiration motion was tracked with a pressure sensor beneath each animal's abdomen. Optical imaging based on the Luc+ signal correlating with tumor load was performed on a Xenogen IVIS Kinetix. Micro-CT images were post-processed using Osirix, measuring lung volume with region growing. Diameters of the largest three tumors were measured. Relationships between tumor size, lung volumes, and optical signal were compared. CT images and optical signals were obtained for all animals at two time points. In all lobes of the Kras+ mice in all images, tumors were visible; the smallest to be readily identified measured approximately 300 microns diameter. CT-derived tumor volumes and optical signals related linearly, with r=0.94 for all animals. When derived for only tumor bearing animals, r=0.3. The trend of each individual animal's optical signal tracked correctly based on the CT volumes. Interestingly, lung volumes also correlated positively with optical imaging data and tumor volume burden, suggesting active remodeling.

  17. Efficacy of Lysophosphatidylcholine in Combination with Antimicrobial Agents against Acinetobacter baumannii in Experimental Murine Peritoneal Sepsis and Pneumonia Models.

    PubMed

    Parra Millán, R; Jiménez Mejías, M E; Sánchez Encinales, V; Ayerbe Algaba, R; Gutiérrez Valencia, A; Pachón Ibáñez, M E; Díaz, C; Pérez Del Palacio, J; López Cortés, L F; Pachón, J; Smani, Y

    2016-08-01

    Immune response stimulation to prevent infection progression may be an adjuvant to antimicrobial treatment. Lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) is an immunomodulator involved in immune cell recruitment and activation. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the efficacy of LPC in combination with colistin, tigecycline, or imipenem in experimental murine models of peritoneal sepsis and pneumonia. We used Acinetobacter baumannii strain Ab9, which is susceptible to colistin, tigecycline, and imipenem, and multidrug-resistant strain Ab186, which is susceptible to colistin and resistant to tigecycline and imipenem. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters for colistin, tigecycline, and imipenem and the 100% minimal lethal dose (MLD100) were determined for both strains. The therapeutic efficacies of LPC, colistin (60 mg/kg of body weight/day), tigecycline (10 mg/kg/day), and imipenem (180 mg/kg/day), alone or in combination, were assessed against Ab9 and Ab186 at the MLD100 in murine peritoneal sepsis and pneumonia models. The levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, i.e., tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-10 (IL-10), were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the same experimental models after inoculating mice with the MLD of both strains. LPC in combination with colistin, tigecycline, or imipenem markedly enhanced the bacterial clearance of Ab9 and Ab186 from the spleen and lungs and reduced bacteremia and mouse mortality rates (P < 0.05) compared with those for colistin, tigecycline, and imipenem monotherapies. Moreover, at 4 h post-bacterial infection, Ab9 induced higher TNF-α and lower IL-10 levels than those with Ab186 (4 μg/ml versus 3 μg/ml [P < 0.05] and 2 μg/ml versus 3.4 μg/ml [P < 0.05], respectively). LPC treatment combined with colistin, tigecycline, or imipenem modestly reduced the severity of infection by A. baumannii strains with different resistance phenotypes compared to LPC monotherapy in both

  18. In vitro investigation of the roles of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1 in murine osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jules, Joel; Feng, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Whereas the monocyte/macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and the receptor activator of NF-кB ligand (RANKL) are essential and sufficient for osteoclastogenesis, a number of other cytokines including two proinflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin-1 (IL-1), can exert profound effects on the osteoclastogenic process. However, the precise mode of action of TNF-α and IL-1 in osteoclastogenesis remains controversial. While some groups demonstrated that these two cytokines can promote murine osteoclastogenesis in vitro in the presence of M-CSF only, we and others showed that TNF-α-/IL-1-mediated osteoclastogenesis requires permissive levels of RANKL. This chapter describes the method that we have used to investigate the effects of TNF-α and IL-1 on osteoclast formation in in vitro osteoclastogenesis assays using primary murine bone marrow macrophages (BMMs). Detailed experimental conditions are provided and critical points are discussed to help the reader use the method to independently evaluate the roles of TNF-α and IL-1 in osteoclastogenesis in vitro. Moreover, this method can be used to further elucidate the signaling mechanisms by which these two cytokines act in concert with RANKL or with each other to modulate osteoclastogenesis.

  19. STAT3 supports experimental K-RasG12D–induced murine myeloproliferative neoplasms dependent on serine phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Gough, Daniel J.; Marié, Isabelle J.; Lobry, Camille; Aifantis, Iannis

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and other myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are genetically heterogeneous but frequently display activating mutations in Ras GTPases and activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). Altered STAT3 activity is observed in up to 50% of AML correlating with poor prognosis. Activated STAT proteins, classically associated with tyrosine phosphorylation, support tumor development as transcription factors, but alternative STAT functions independent of tyrosine phosphorylation have been documented, including roles for serine-phosphorylated STAT3 in mitochondria supporting transformation by oncogenic Ras. We examined requirements for STAT3 in experimental murine K-Ras–dependent hematopoietic neoplasia. We show that STAT3 is phosphorylated on S727 but not Y705 in diseased animals. Moreover, a mouse with a point mutation abrogating STAT3 S727 phosphorylation displayed delayed onset and decreased disease severity with significantly extended survival. Activated K-Ras required STAT3 for cytokine-independent growth of myeloid progenitors in vitro, and mitochondrially restricted STAT3 and STAT3-Y705F, both transcriptionally inert mutants, supported factor-independent growth. STAT3 was dispensable for growth of normal or K-Ras–mutant myeloid progenitors in response to cytokines. However, abrogation of STAT3-S727 phosphorylation impaired factor-independent malignant growth. These data document that serine-phosphorylated mitochondrial STAT3 supports neoplastic hematopoietic cell growth induced by K-Ras. PMID:25150294

  20. Oral treatment with Bifidobacterium longum 51A reduced inflammation in a murine experimental model of gout.

    PubMed

    Vieira, A T; Galvão, I; Amaral, F A; Teixeira, M M; Nicoli, J R; Martins, F S

    2015-01-01

    Gout is an acute inflammatory disease characterised by the presence of uric acid crystals in the joint. This event promotes neutrophil infiltration and activation that leads to tissue damage. We investigated here whether the oral administration of the probiotic strain Bifidobacterium longum 5(1A) (BL) could ameliorate monosodium urate crystal (MSU)-induced inflammation in a murine model of gout. Mice received oral administration of BL or saline daily for 7 days and then were injected with MSU in the knee cavity. Treatment with BL significantly alleviated the inflammatory parameters, as seen by reduced hypernociception, reduced neutrophil accumulation in the joint and myeloperoxidase activity in periarticular tissue. There was inhibition of the production of CXCL1 and interleukin(IL)-1β in joints. Levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 were significantly higher in the knee tissue of mice treated with than control mice injected with MSU. In conclusion, oral BL treatment reduced the inflammatory response in an experimental murine model of gout, suggesting it may be useful as an adjuvant treatment in patients with gout.

  1. Rapid copper acquisition by developing murine mesothelioma: decreasing bioavailable copper slows tumor growth, normalizes vessels and promotes T cell infiltration.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Andrew; Jackaman, Connie; Beddoes, Katie M; Ricciardo, Belinda; Nelson, Delia J

    2013-01-01

    Copper, an essential trace element acquired through nutrition, is an important co-factor for pro-angiogenic factors including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Decreasing bioavailable copper has been used as an anti-angiogenic and anti-cancer strategy with promising results. However, the role of copper and its potential as a therapy in mesothelioma is not yet well understood. Therefore, we monitored copper levels in progressing murine mesothelioma tumors and analyzed the effects of lowering bioavailable copper. Copper levels in tumors and organs were assayed using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Mesothelioma tumors rapidly sequestered copper at early stages of development, the copper was then dispersed throughout growing tumor tissues. These data imply that copper uptake may play an important role in early tumor development. Lowering bioavailable copper using the copper chelators, penicillamine, trientine or tetrathiomolybdate, slowed in vivo mesothelioma growth but did not provide any cures similar to using cisplatin chemotherapy or anti-VEGF receptor antibody therapy. The impact of copper lowering on tumor blood vessels and tumor infiltrating T cells was measured using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Copper lowering was associated with reduced tumor vessel diameter, reduced endothelial cell proliferation (reduced Ki67 expression) and lower surface ICAM/CD54 expression implying reduced endothelial cell activation, in a process similar to endothelial normalization. Copper lowering was also associated with a CD4(+) T cell infiltrate. In conclusion, these data suggest copper lowering is a potentially useful anti-mesothelioma treatment strategy that slows tumor growth to provide a window of opportunity for inclusion of other treatment modalities to improve patient outcomes.

  2. Tumor necrosis factor alpha has a protective role in a murine model of systemic candidiasis.

    PubMed Central

    Louie, A; Baltch, A L; Smith, R P; Franke, M A; Ritz, W J; Singh, J K; Gordon, M A

    1994-01-01

    The role of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) in host defense against systemic Candida albicans infection was evaluated in a murine model of systemic candidiasis in which uniform death occurred between 5 and 6 days after infection. TNF-alpha was first detected at 16 h postinfection and progressively increased thereafter. Peak levels (700 to 900 pg/ml) were measured in mice near death. Administration of 0.5 to 1.0 mg of polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) TNF-alpha antibody (TNF-alpha Ab) to mice 2 h preinfection neutralized serum TNF-alpha for up to 30 h. However, this regimen shortened survival from a mean of 5.5 days for IgG controls to 3.4 days (P = 1.9 x 10(-12)). Semiquantitative cultures of spleen, lung, liver, and kidney conducted at 1, 2, and 3 days postinfection found colony counts of spleen and kidney to be significantly higher for TNF-alpha Ab recipients but only for the first 48 h. Administration of 1.5 and 1.0 mg of TNF-alpha Ab at 2 h before and 48 h after fungal injection, respectively, shortened the mean survival from 4.9 to 2.3 days (P = 5.2 x 10(-8)). This regimen neutralized serum TNF-alpha throughout infection. With this regimen, colony counts of all organs were significantly higher in TNF-alpha Ab recipients at 1, 2, and 3 days postinfection. Histopathologic studies showed an increase in the number and size of C. albicans foci in tissues. Peripheral leukocyte counts and inflammatory response in tissue were similar for TNF-alpha Ab and IgG sham recipients. In vitro, incubation of C. albicans with four to eight times the peak serum levels of TNF-alpha for up to 24 h did not inhibit the rate of germ tube or pseudohypha formation. Thus, TNF-alpha that was produced during infection with C. albicans augmented host resistance against this organism and prolonged survival. The protective effect of TNF-alpha was not mediated by increased leukocytes in blood or tissues nor by a direct anticandidal effect of TNF-alpha. This study suggests that the

  3. Genetic delivery of the murine equivalent of bevacizumab (avastin), an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor monoclonal antibody, to suppress growth of human tumors in immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masaki; Boyer, Julie L; Hackett, Neil R; Qiu, Jianping; Crystal, Ronald G

    2008-03-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) produced by tumor cells plays a central role in stimulating angiogenesis required for solid tumor growth. VEGF-specific antibodies inhibit tumor cell line growth in animal models and a humanized monoclonal anti-VEGF antibody (bevacizumab [Avastin]) is approved as a treatment for metastatic cancer. We hypothesized that administration of an adenoviral (Ad) vector expressing the murine monoclonal antibody equivalent of bevacizumab would suppress human tumor growth in vivo. The Ad vector (AdalphaVEGF) encodes the light chain and heavy chain cDNAs of monoclonal antibody A.4.6.1, a murine antibody that specifically recognizes human VEGF with the same antigen-binding site as bevacizumab. AdalphaVEGF efficacy in vivo was evaluated with A-673 rhabdomyosarcoma and DU 145 prostate carcinoma cells in human tumor cell xenografts in SCID mice. For both tumor models, AdalphaVEGF directed the expression of high anti-human VEGF IgG antibody titers in vivo, the numbers of mitotic nuclei and blood vessels in the tumor were significantly decreased (p < 0.05), tumor growth was suppressed (p < 0.05), and there was increased survival (p < 0.005). Thus, AdalphaVEGF, encoding a murine monoclonal antibody that is the equivalent of bevacizumab, effectively suppresses the growth of human tumors, suggesting gene therapy as an alternative to bevacizumab monoclonal antibody therapy.

  4. Isolation and (111)In-Oxine Labeling of Murine NK Cells for Assessment of Cell Trafficking in Orthotopic Lung Tumor Model.

    PubMed

    Malviya, Gaurav; Nayak, Tapan; Gerdes, Christian; Dierckx, Rudi A J O; Signore, Alberto; de Vries, Erik F J

    2016-04-01

    A noninvasive in vivo imaging method for NK cell trafficking is essential to gain further understanding of the pathogenesis of NK cell mediated immune response to the novel cancer treatment strategies, and to discover the homing sites and physiological distribution of NK cells. Although human NK cells can be labeled for in vivo imaging, little is known about the murine NK cell labeling and its application in animal models. This study describes the isolation and ex vivo radiolabeling of murine NK cells for the evaluation of cell trafficking in an orthotopic model of human lung cancer in mice. Scid-Tg(FCGR3A)Blt transgenic SCID mice were used to isolate NK cells from mouse splenocytes using the CD49b (DX5) MicroBeads positive selection method. The purity and viability of the isolated NK cells were confirmed by FACS analysis. Different labeling buffers and incubation times were evaluated to optimize (111)In-oxine labeling conditions. Functionality of the radiolabeled NK cell was assessed by (51)Cr-release assay. We evaluated physiological distribution of (111)In-oxine labeled murine NK cells in normal SCID mice and biodistribution in irradiated and nonirradiated SCID mice with orthotopic A549 human lung tumor lesions. Imaging findings were confirmed by histology. Results showed that incubation with 0.011 MBq of (111)In-oxine per million murine NK cells in PBS (pH 7.4) for 20 min is the best condition that provides optimum labeling efficiency without affecting cell viability and functionality. Physiological distribution in normal SCID mice demonstrated NK cells homing mainly in the spleen, while (111)In released from NK cells was excreted via kidneys into urine. Biodistribution studies demonstrated a higher lung uptake in orthotopic lung tumor-bearing mice than control mice. In irradiated mice, lung tumor uptake of radiolabeled murine NK cells decreased between 24 h and 72 h postinjection (p.i.), which was accompanied by tumor regression, while in nonirradiated mice

  5. A plasmin-activatable thrombin inhibitor reduces experimental thrombosis and assists experimental thrombolysis in murine models.

    PubMed

    Sheffield, W P; Eltringham-Smith, L J; Gataiance, S; Bhakta, V

    2015-05-01

    The leech protein hirudin is a potent natural thrombin inhibitor. Its potential as an antithrombotic agent is limited by its promotion of bleeding. We attempted to modify this profile by positioning albumin and a plasmin cleavage site on its N-terminus, in recombinant protein HSACHV3 [comprising hirudin variant 3 (HV3) fused to the C-terminus of human serum albumin (HSA) via a plasmin cleavage site (C)], Previously we showed that HSACHV3 inhibited thrombin in a plasmin-dependent manner, and that, unlike HV3, it did not increase bleeding in vivo when administered to mice. Here we tested HSACHV3 for the ability to reduce thrombosis and assist enzymatic thrombolysis in animal models. Intravenous administration of HSACHV3, but not a control protein lacking the plasmin cleavage site (HSAHV3), reduced thrombus weight by 2.1-fold in the ferric chloride-injured mouse vena cava. Similarly, thrombi formed in a rabbit jugular vein stasis model were 1.7-fold lighter in animals treated with HSACHV3 compared to those receiving HSAHV3. Administration of 60 mg/kg body weight HSACHV3 prolonged the time to occlusion in the ferric chloride-injured mouse carotid artery by threefold compared to vehicle controls, while equimolar HSAHV3 had no effect. HSACHV3 had no ability to restore flow to the murine carotid arteries occluded by ferric chloride treatment, but combining HSACHV3 (60 mg/kg) with recombinant mutant tissue plasminogen activator (TNKase) significantly reduced the time to restore patency to the artery compared to TNKase alone. Unlike unfused HV3, HSACHV3 did not increase bleeding in a mouse liver laceration model. Our results show that HSACHV3 acts as an antithrombotic agent that does not promote bleeding and which speeds the time to flow restoration when used as an adjunct to pharmacological thrombolysis in animal models. PMID:25481811

  6. Expression level and DNA methylation status of Glutathione-S-transferase genes in normal murine prostate and TRAMP tumors

    PubMed Central

    Mavis, Cory K.; Kinney, Shannon R. Morey; Foster, Barbara A.; Karpf, Adam R.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Glutathione-S-transferase (Gst) genes are down-regulated in human prostate cancer, and GSTP1 silencing is mediated by promoter DNA hypermethylation in this malignancy. We examined Gst gene expression and Gst promoter DNA methylation in normal murine prostates and Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) tumors. METHODS Primary and metastatic tumors were obtained from TRAMP mice, and normal prostates were obtained from strain-matched WT mice (n=15/group). Quantitative real-time RT-PCR was used to measure GstA4, GstK1, GstM1, GstO1, and GstP1 mRNA expression, and Western blotting and immunohistochemical staining was used to measure GstM1 and GstP1 protein expression. MassARRAY Quantitative Methylation Analysis was used to measure DNA methylation of the 5’ CpG islands of GstA4, GstK1, GstM1, GstO1, and GstP1. TRAMP-C2 cells were treated with the epigenetic remodeling drugs decitabine and trichostatin A (TSA) alone and in combination, and Gst gene expression was measured. RESULTS Of the genes analyzed, GstM1 and GstP1 were expressed at highest levels in normal prostate. All five Gst genes showed greatly reduced expression in primary tumors compared to normal prostate, but not in tumor metastases. Gst promoter methylation was unchanged in TRAMP tumors compared to normal prostate. Combined decitabine + TSA treatment significantly enhanced the expression of 4/5 Gst genes in TRAMP-C2 cells. CONCLUSIONS Gst genes are extensively downregulated in primary but not metastatic TRAMP tumors. Promoter DNA hypermethylation does not appear to drive Gst gene repression in TRAMP primary tumors; however, pharmacological studies using TRAMP cells suggest the involvement of epigenetic mechanisms in Gst gene repression. PMID:19444856

  7. Enhancement of the pro-apoptotic properties of Newcastle disease virus promotes tumor remission in syngeneic murine cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Cuadrado-Castano, Sara; Ayllon, Juan; Mansour, Mena; de la Iglesia-Vicente, Janis; Jordan, Stefan; Tripathi, Shashank; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Villar, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is considered a promising agent for cancer therapy due to its oncolytic properties. These include preferential replication in transformed cells, induction of innate and adaptive immune responses within tumors and cytopathic effects in infected tumor cells due to the activation of apoptosis. In order to enhance the latter and thus possibly enhance the overall oncolytic activity of NDV, we generated a recombinant NDV encoding the human TNF receptor Fas (rNDV-B1/Fas). rNDV-B1/Fas replicates to similar titers as its wild type (rNDV-B1) counterpart, however overexpression of Fas in infected cells leads to higher levels of cytotoxicity correlated with faster and increased apoptosis responses in which both the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways are activated earlier. Furthermore, in vivo studies in syngeneic murine melanoma model show an enhancement of the oncolytic properties of rNDV-B1/Fas, with major improvements in survival and tumor remission. Altogether, our data suggest that up-regulation of the pro-apoptotic function of NDV is a viable approach to enhance its anti-tumor properties, and adds to the currently known, rationally-based strategies to design optimized therapeutic viral vectors for the treatment of cancer. PMID:25761895

  8. Evaluation of the potential of doxorubicin loaded microbubbles as a theranostic modality using a murine tumor model.

    PubMed

    Abdalkader, Rodi; Kawakami, Shigeru; Unga, Johan; Suzuki, Ryo; Maruyama, Kazuo; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2015-06-01

    In this study, a novel phospholipid-based microbubble formulation containing doxorubicin and perfluoropropane gas (DLMB) was developed. The DLMBs were prepared by mechanical agitation of a phospholipid dispersion in the presence of perfluoropropane (PFP) gas. An anionic phospholipid, distearoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DSPG) was selected to load doxorubicin in the microbubbles by means of electrostatic interaction. The particle size, zeta potential, echogenicity and stability of the DLMBs were measured. Drug loading was ⩾ 92%. The potential of the DLMBs for use as a theranostic modality was evaluated in tumor bearing mice. Gas chromatography analysis of PFP showed significant enhancement of PFP retention when doxorubicin was used at concentrations of 10-82% equivalent to DSPG. The inhibitory effects on the proliferation of B16BL6 melanoma murine cells in vitro were enhanced using a combination of ultrasound (US) irradiation and DLMBs. Moreover, in vivo DLMBs in combination with (US) irradiation significantly inhibited the growth of B16BL6 melanoma tumor in mice. Additionally, US echo imaging showed high contrast enhancement of the DLMBs in the tumor vasculature. These results suggest that DLMBs could serve as US triggered carriers of doxorubicin as well as tumor imaging agents in cancer therapy. PMID:25795624

  9. Alpha-2,3-sialyltransferase enhances Neisseria gonorrhoeae survival during experimental murine genital tract infection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hong; Jerse, Ann E

    2006-07-01

    The addition of host-derived sialic acid to Neisseria gonorrhoeae lipooligosaccharide is hypothesized to be an important mechanism by which gonococci evade host innate defenses. This hypothesis is based primarily on in vitro assays of complement-mediated and phagocytic killing. Here we report that a nonpolar alpha-2,3-sialyltransferase (lst) mutant of N. gonorrhoeae was significantly attenuated in its capacity to colonize the lower genital tract of 17-beta estradiol-treated female BALB/c mice during competitive infection with the wild-type strain. Genetic complementation of the lst mutation restored recovery of the mutant to wild-type levels. Studies with B10.D2-HC(o)H2(d)H(2)-T18c/OSN (C5-deficient) mice showed that attenuation of the lst mutant was not due to increased sensitivity to complement-mediated bacteriolysis, a result that is consistent with recently reported host restrictions in the complement cascade. However, Lst-deficient gonococci were killed more rapidly than sialylated wild-type gonococci following intraperitoneal injection into normal mice, which is consistent with sialylation conferring protection against killing by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). As reported for human PMNs, sialylated gonococci were more resistant to killing by murine PMNs, and sialylation led to reduced association with and induction of a weaker respiratory burst in PMNs from estradiol-treated mice. In summary, these studies suggest sialylation confers a survival advantage to N. gonorrhoeae in mice by increasing resistance to PMN killing. This report is the first direct demonstration that alpha-2,3-sialyltransferase contributes to N. gonorrhoeae pathogenesis in an in vivo model. This study also validates the use of experimental murine infection to study certain aspects of gonococcal pathogenesis. PMID:16790783

  10. Macrophage depletion reduces postsurgical tumor recurrence and metastatic growth in a spontaneous murine model of melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Tham, Muly; Khoo, Karen; Yeo, Kim Pin; Kato, Masashi; Prevost-Blondel, Amelle; Angeli, Veronique; Abastado, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Surgical resection of tumors is often followed by regrowth at the primary site and metastases may emerge rapidly following removal of the primary tumor. Macrophages are important drivers of tumor growth, and here we investigated their involvement in postoperative relapse as well as explore macrophage depletion as an adjuvant to surgical resection. RETAAD mice develop spontaneous metastatic melanoma that begins in the eye. Removal of the eyes as early as 1 week of age did not prevent the development of metastases; rather, surgery led to increased proliferation of tumor cells locally and in distant metastases. Surgery-induced increase in tumor cell proliferation correlated with increased macrophage density within the tumor. Moreover, macrophages stimulate tumor sphere formation from tumor cells of post-surgical but not control mice. Macrophage depletion with a diet containing the CSF-1R specific kinase inhibitor Ki20227 following surgery significantly reduced postoperative tumor recurrence and abrogated enhanced metastatic outgrowth. Our results confirm that tumor cells disseminate early, and show that macrophages contribute both to post-surgical tumor relapse and growth of metastases, likely through stimulating a population of tumor-initiating cells. Thus macrophage depletion warrants exploration as an adjuvant to surgical resection. PMID:25762633

  11. Treatment with probiotics in experimental oral colonization by Candida albicans in murine model (DBA/2).

    PubMed

    Matsubara, V H; Silva, E G; Paula, C R; Ishikawa, K H; Nakamae, A E M

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the oral colonization by Candida albicans in experimental murine immunosuppressed DBA/2 and treatment with probiotic bacteria. To achieve these objectives, 152 DBA/2-immunosuppressed mice were orally inoculated with a suspension of C. albicans containing 10(8) viable yeast cells, the animals were treated with nystatin or with the probiotics (Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus rhamnosus). Evaluations were performed by Candida count from oral mucosa swabbing. The oral mucosa colonization by C. albicans started at day 1 after inoculation, remained maximal from day 3 until day 7, and then decreased significantly. Probiotics reduced the C. albicans colonization significantly on the oral mucosa in comparison with the untreated animal group. In the group treated with L. rhamnosus, the reduction in yeast colonization was significantly higher compared with that of the group receiving nystatin. Immunosuppressed animal model DBA/2 is a relevant model for experimental Candida oral colonization, and the treatment with probiotics in this model may be an effective alternative to prevent it.

  12. [Study of anti-tumor effects of hyperthermia combined with hydralazine on experimental tumor].

    PubMed

    Aoki, Y; Akagi, K; Kitada, N; Tanaka, Y; Fritz-Zieroth, B

    1995-11-01

    We analyzed tumor growth delay in experimental tumors after hyperthermia alone, hydralazine (HDZ) injection alone and the combination of these modalities. We also analyzed the energy parameter (ATP/Pi ratio) obtained by 31P-MRS (magnetic resonance spectroscopy). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of 31P-MRS as an index of anti-tumor effect. FM3A tumor cells were transplanted subcutaneously in the hind legs of C3H/He mice. We dipped the tumors into a heated circulating water bath. 31P-MRS was performed with a CSI spectrometer. The anti-tumor effect obtained with HDZ alone was insignificant, but combined treatment with hyperthermia and HDZ had a significant synergistic effect. The ATP/Pi ratios for all groups treated separately with HDZ or hyperthermia were not different from the control, but the ATP/Pi ratio decreased after combined use of these agents. There was a significant correlation between the decrease in ATP/Pi ratio and tumor growth delay. We observed a direct relation between the delay in tumor growth and the decline in ATP/Pi ratio after combined treatment with HDZ and hyperthermia. The ATP/Pi ratio 24 hr after treatment may be useful in predicting the efficacy of the combined use of HDZ and hyperthermia.

  13. Cytoplasmic superoxide dismutase and catalase activity and resistance to radiation lethality in murine tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Davy, C.A.; Tesfay, Z.; Jones, J.; Rosenberg, R.C.; McCarthy, C.; Rosenberg, S.O.

    1986-05-01

    Reduced species of molecular oxygen are produced by the interaction of ionizing radiation with aqueous solutions containing molecular oxygen. The enzymes catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) are thought to function in vivo as scavengers of metabolically produced peroxide and superoxide respectively. SOD has been shown to protect against the lethal effects of ionizing radiation in vitro and in vivo. The authors have investigated the relationship between the cytosolic SOD catalase content and the sensitivity to radiation lethality of a number of murine cell lines (402AX, EL-4, MB-2T3, MB-4, MEL, P-815, SAI, SP-2, and SV-3T3). K/sub i/(CN/sup -/) for murine Cu-Zn-SOD was determined to be 6.8 x 10/sup -6/ M. No cytosolic Mn-SOD activity was found in any of the cell lines studied. No correlation was found between the cytosolic Cu-Zn-SOD or cytosolic catalase activity and the resistance to radiation lethality or the murine cell lines studied.

  14. Photodynamic therapy stimulates anti-tumor immunity in a murine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroz, Pawel; Castano, Ana P.; Wu, Mei X.; Kung, Andrew L.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2007-02-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death among modern peoples largely due to metastatic disease. The ideal cancer treatment should target both the primary tumor and the metastases with the minimal toxicity. This is best accomplished by educating the body's immune system to recognize the tumor as foreign so that after the primary tumor is destroyed, distant metastases will also be eradicated. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves the IV administration of photosensitizers followed by illumination of the primary tumor with red light producing reactive oxygen species that cause vascular shutdown and tumor cell apoptosis. Anti-tumor immunity is stimulated after PDT due to the acute inflammatory response, priming of the immune system to recognize tumor-associated antigens (TAA), and induction of heat-shock proteins. The induction of specific CD8+ T lymphocyte cells that recognize major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) restricted epitopes of TAAs is a highly desirable goal in cancer therapy. We here report on PDT of mice bearing tumors that either do or do not express an established TAA. We utilized a BALB/c colon adenocarcinoma cell line termed CT26.CL25 retrovirally transduced to stably express β-galactosidase ( β-gal, a bacterial protein), and its non-β-gal expressing wild-type counterpart termed CT26 WT, as well as the control cell line consisting of CT26 transduced with the empty retroviral vector termed CT26-neo. All cells expressed class I MHC restriction element H-2Ld syngenic to BALB/c mice. Vascular PDT with a regimen of 1mg/kg BPD injected IV, and 120 J/cm2 of 690-nm laser light after 15 minutes successfully cured 100% of CT26.CL25 tumors but 0% of CT26-neo tumors and 0% of CT26 WT tumors. After 90 days tumor free interval the CT26.CL25 cured mice were rechallenged with CT26.CL25 tumor cells and 96% rejected the rechallenge while the CT26.CL25 cured mice did not reject a CT26 WT tumor cell challenge. Experiments with mice bearing two CT26.CL25 tumors (one

  15. Treatment of murine tumors using acoustic droplet vaporization-enhanced high intensity focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Meili; Jiang, Lixing; Fabiilli, Mario L.; Zhang, Aili; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Xu, Lisa X.

    2013-09-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) can be applied focally and noninvasively to thermally ablate solid tumors. Long treatment times are typically required for large tumors, which can expose patients to certain risks while potentially decreasing the therapeutic efficacy of the treatment. Acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) is a promising modality that can enhance the efficacy of tumor treatment using HIFU. In this study, the therapeutic effects of combined HIFU and ADV was evaluated in mice bearing subcutaneously-implanted 4T1 tumors. Histological examination showed that the combination of HIFU and ADV generated a mean necrotic area in the tumor that was 2.9-fold larger than with HIFU alone. A significant enhancement of necrosis was found in the periphery of the tumor, where the blood supply was abundant. Seven days after treatment, the tumors treated with combined HIFU and ADV were 30-fold smaller in volume than tumors treated with HIFU alone. The study demonstrates the potential advantage of combining HIFU and ADV in tumor treatment.

  16. Regression of murine lung tumors by the let-7 microRNA

    PubMed Central

    Trang, Phong; Medina, Pedro P.; Wiggins, Jason F.; Ruffino, Lynnsie; Kelnar, Kevin; Omotola, Michael; Homer, Robert; Brown, David; Bader, Andreas G.; Weidhaas, Joanne B.; Slack, Frank J.

    2009-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have recently emerged as an important new class of cellular regulators that control various cellular processes and are implicated in human diseases, including cancer. Here, we show that loss of let-7 function enhances lung tumor formation in vivo, strongly supporting the hypothesis that let-7 is a tumor suppressor. Moreover, we report that exogenous delivery of let-7 to established tumors in mouse models of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) significantly reduces tumor burden. These results demonstrate the therapeutic potential of let-7 in NSCLC and point to miRNA replacement therapy as a promising approach in cancer treatment. PMID:19966857

  17. Purification of Immune Cell Populations from Freshly Isolated Murine Tumors and Organs by Consecutive Magnetic Cell Sorting and Multi-parameter Flow Cytometry-Based Sorting.

    PubMed

    Salvagno, Camilla; de Visser, Karin E

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that tumors evolve together with nonmalignant cells, such as fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and immune cells. These cells constantly entangle and interact with each other creating the tumor microenvironment. Immune cells can exert both tumor-promoting and tumor-protective functions. Detailed phenotypic and functional characterization of intra-tumoral immune cell subsets has become increasingly important in the field of cancer biology and cancer immunology. In this chapter, we describe a method for isolation of viable and pure immune cell subsets from freshly isolated murine solid tumors and organs. First, we describe a protocol for the generation of single-cell suspensions from tumors and organs using mechanical and enzymatic strategies. In addition, we describe how immune cell subsets can be purified by consecutive magnetic cell sorting and multi-parameter flow cytometry-based cell sorting.

  18. Purification of Immune Cell Populations from Freshly Isolated Murine Tumors and Organs by Consecutive Magnetic Cell Sorting and Multi-parameter Flow Cytometry-Based Sorting.

    PubMed

    Salvagno, Camilla; de Visser, Karin E

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that tumors evolve together with nonmalignant cells, such as fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and immune cells. These cells constantly entangle and interact with each other creating the tumor microenvironment. Immune cells can exert both tumor-promoting and tumor-protective functions. Detailed phenotypic and functional characterization of intra-tumoral immune cell subsets has become increasingly important in the field of cancer biology and cancer immunology. In this chapter, we describe a method for isolation of viable and pure immune cell subsets from freshly isolated murine solid tumors and organs. First, we describe a protocol for the generation of single-cell suspensions from tumors and organs using mechanical and enzymatic strategies. In addition, we describe how immune cell subsets can be purified by consecutive magnetic cell sorting and multi-parameter flow cytometry-based cell sorting. PMID:27581019

  19. The combined effect of electroporation and borocaptate in boron neutron capture therapy for murine solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Ono, K; Kinashi, Y; Suzuki, M; Takagaki, M; Masunaga, S I

    2000-08-01

    10 B-Enriched borocaptate (BSH) was administered intraperitoneally to SCCVII tumor-bearing C3H / He mice. Electroporation (EP) was conducted by using a tweezers-type electrode. The (10) B contents in tumors were measured by prompt gamma-ray spectrometry. The colony formation assay was applied to investigate the antitumor effects of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and thereby to estimate the intratumor localization of BSH. The (10) B concentrations in tumors decreased with time following BSH administration, falling to 5.4(0. 1) ppm at 3 h, whereas EP treatment (3 repetitions) 15 min after BSH injection delayed the clearance of BSH from tumors, and the (10) B level remained at 19.4(0.9) ppm at 3 h. The effect of BNCT increased with the (10) B concentration in tumors, and the combination with EP showed a remarkably large cell killing effect even at 3 h after BSH injection. The effect of BNCT, i.e., slope coefficient of the cell survival curve of tumors, without EP was proportional to tumor (10) B level (r = 0.982), and that of BSH-BNCT combined with EP lay close to the same correlation line. However, tumors subjected to EP after BSH injection did not show high radiosensitivity when irradiated after conversion to a single cell suspension by enzymatic digestion. This indicates that the increase of the BNCT effect by EP was a consequence of enclosure of BSH in the interstitial space of tumor tissue and not within tumor cells. This is different from a previous in vitro study. The combination of EP and BNCT may be clinically useful, if a procedure to limit EP to the tumor region becomes available or if an alternative similar method is employed. PMID:10965028

  20. Experimental infection of Phlebotomus perniciosus by bioluminescent Leishmania infantum using murine model and artificial feeder

    PubMed Central

    Cannet, Arnaud; Akhoundi, Mohammad; Michel, Gregory; Marty, Pierre; Delaunay, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne disease that is transmitted by sandflies and caused by obligate intracellular protozoa of the genus Leishmania. In the present study, we carried out a screening on the experimental infection of Phlebotomus pernioucus by bioluminescent Leishmania infantum using murine model and artificial feeder. We developed a real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)-based method to determine individually the number of Leishmania promastigotes fed by infected flies. Among 1840 new emerged female sand flies, 428 were fed on the infected mice. After their death, they were analysed individually by RT-PCR. Our results demonstrated just a single Leishmania positive female at sixth day post meal. A total of 1070 female sand flies were exposed in contact with artificial feeder containing the human blood with two different quantities of Leishmania parasites: 2.106/mL and 1.107/mL. A blood meal including 1.107/mL LUC-promastigotes was proposed to 270 females and 75 (28%) flies were engorged. Among them, 44 (59%) were positive by RT-PCR analysis, with a relative average of 50551 Leishmania parasites. In case of blood feeding of females with 2.106/mL promastigotes, 57 out of 800 (7%) females succeed to feed from artificial feeder which 22 (39%) were positive with a relative average of 6487 parasites. PMID:27439032

  1. Vinegar Treatment Prevents the Development of Murine Experimental Colitis via Inhibition of Inflammation and Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Fengge; Feng, Jiaxuan; Wang, Xinhui; Qi, Zhimin; Shi, Xiaochen; An, Yanan; Zhang, Qiaoli; Wang, Chao; Liu, Mingyuan; Liu, Bo; Yu, Lu

    2016-02-10

    This study investigated the preventive effects of vinegar and acetic acid (the active component of vinegar) on ulcerative colitis (UC) in mice. Vinegar (5% v/v) or acetic acid (0.3% w/v) treatment significantly reduced the disease activity index and histopathological scores, attenuated body weight loss, and shortened the colon length in a murine experimental colitis model induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). Further mechanistic analysis showed that vinegar inhibited inflammation through suppressing Th1 and Th17 responses, the NLRP3 inflammasome, and MAPK signaling activation. Vinegar also inhibited endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated apoptosis in the colitis mouse model. Surprisingly, pretreatment with vinegar for 28 days before DSS induction increased levels of the commensal lactic acid-producing or acetic acid-producing bacteria, including Lactobacillus, Bifidobacteria, and Enterococcus faecalis, whereas decreased Escherichia coli levels were found in the feces of mice. These results suggest that vinegar supplementation might provide a new dietary strategy for the prevention of UC.

  2. Pharmacokinetics of indium-111-labeled antimyosin monoclonal antibody in murine experimental viral myocarditis

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, T.; Matsumori, A.; Watanabe, Y.; Tamaki, N.; Yonekura, Y.; Endo, K.; Konishi, J.; Kawai, C. )

    1990-11-01

    The pharmacokinetics of indium-111-labeled antimyosin monoclonal antibody Fab were investigated with use of murine experimental viral myocarditis as a model. The biodistribution of indium-111-labeled antimyosin antibody Fab on days 3, 5, 7, 14, 21 and 28 after encephalomyocarditis virus inoculation demonstrated that myocardial uptake increased significantly on days 5, 7 and 14 (maximum on day 7) in infected versus uninfected mice (p less than 0.001). In vivo kinetics in infected mice on day 7 demonstrated that the heart to blood ratio reached a maximum 48 h after the intravenous administration of indium-111-labeled antimyosin Fab, which was considered to be the optimal time for scintigraphy. The scintigraphic images obtained with indium-111-labeled antimyosin Fab demonstrated positive uptake in the cardiac lesion in infected mice. The pathologic study demonstrated that myocardial uptake correlated well with pathologic grades of myocardial necrosis. High performance liquid chromatography revealed the presence of an antigen-antibody complex in the circulation of infected mice after the injection of indium-111-labeled antimyosin Fab. This antigen bound to indium-111-labeled antimyosin Fab in the circulation might be whole myosin and this complex may decrease myocardial uptake and increase liver uptake. It is concluded that indium-111-labeled antimyosin monoclonal antibody Fab accumulates selectively in damaged heart tissue in mice with acute myocarditis and that indium-111-labeled antimyosin Fab scintigraphy may be a useful method for the visualization of acute myocarditis.

  3. Fumigaclavine C ameliorates dextran sulfate sodium-induced murine experimental colitis via NLRP3 inflammasome inhibition.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wenjie; Hu, Shasha; Elgehama, Ahmed; Shao, Fenli; Ren, Ren; Liu, Wen; Zhang, Wenjing; Wang, Xinlei; Tan, Renxiang; Xu, Qiang; Sun, Yang; Jiao, Ruihua

    2015-10-01

    In the present study, the effect of Fumigaclavine C, a fungal metabolite, on murine experimental colitis induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) and its possible mechanism were examined in vivo and vitro. Oral administration of Fumigaclavine C dose-dependently attenuated the loss of body weight and shortening of colon length induced by DSS. The disease activity index, histopathologic scores of musco was also significantly reduced by Fumigaclavine C treatment. Protein and mRNA levels of DSS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines in colon, including TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-17A, were markedly suppressed by Fumigaclavine C. At the same time, decreased activation of caspase-1 in peritoneal macrophages was detected in Fumigaclavine C -treated mice which suggested that the NLRP3 inflammasome activation was suppressed. Furthermore, in the LPS plus ATP cell model, we found that Fumigaclavine C dose-dependent inhibited IL-1β release and caspase-1 activation. Taken together, our results demonstrate the ability of Fumigaclavine C to inhibit NLRP3 inflammasome activation and give some evidence for its potential use in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:26320672

  4. Hyaluronidase and collagenase increase the transfection efficiency of gene electrotransfer in various murine tumors.

    PubMed

    Cemazar, Maja; Golzio, Muriel; Sersa, Gregor; Escoffre, Jean-Michel; Coer, Andrej; Vidic, Suzana; Teissie, Justin

    2012-01-01

    One of the applications of electroporation/electropulsation in biomedicine is gene electrotransfer, the wider use of which is hindered by low transfection efficiency in vivo compared with viral vectors. The aim of our study was to determine whether modulation of the extracellular matrix in solid tumors, using collagenase and hyaluronidase, could increase the transfection efficiency of gene electrotransfer in histologically different solid subcutaneous tumors in mice. Tumors were treated with enzymes before electrotransfer of plasmid DNA encoding either green fluorescent protein or luciferase. Transfection efficiency was determined 3, 9, and 15 days posttransfection. We demonstrated that pretreatment of tumors with a combination of enzymes significantly increased the transfection efficiency of electrotransfer in tumors with a high extracellular matrix area (LPB fibrosarcoma). In tumors with a smaller extracellular matrix area and less organized collagen lattice, the increase was not so pronounced (SA-1 fibrosarcoma and EAT carcinoma), whereas in B16 melanoma, in which only traces of collagen are present, pretreatment of tumors with hyaluronidase alone was more efficient than pretreatment with both enzymes. In conclusion, our results suggest that modification of the extracellular matrix could improve distribution of plasmid DNA in solid subcutaneous tumors, demonstrated by an increase in transfection efficiency, and thus have important clinical implications for electrogene therapy. PMID:21797718

  5. Triterpenoids Amplify Anti-Tumoral Effects of Mistletoe Extracts on Murine B16.F10 Melanoma In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Strüh, Christian M.; Jäger, Sebastian; Kersten, Astrid; Schempp, Christoph M.; Scheffler, Armin; Martin, Stefan F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Mistletoe extracts are often used in complementary cancer therapy although the efficacy of that therapy is controversially discussed. Approved mistletoe extracts contain mainly water soluble compounds of the mistletoe plant, i.e. mistletoe lectins. However, mistletoe also contains water-insoluble triterpenoids (mainly oleanolic acid) that have anti-tumorigenic effects. To overcome their loss in watery extracts we have solubilized mistletoe triterpenoids with cyclodextrins, thus making them available for in vivo cancer experiments. Experimental design B16.F10 subcutaneous melanoma bearing C57BL/6 mice were treated with new mistletoe extracts containing both water soluble compounds and solubilized triterpenoids. Tumor growth and survival was monitored. In addition, histological examinations of the tumor material and tumor surrounding tissue were performed. Results Addition of solubilized triterpenoids increased the anti-tumor effects of the mistletoe extracts, resulting in reduced tumor growth and prolonged survival of the mice. Histological examination of the treated tumors showed mainly tumor necrosis and some apoptotic cells with active caspase-3 and TUNEL staining. A significant decrease of CD31-positive tumor blood vessels was observed after treatment with solubilized triterpenoids and different mistletoe extracts. Conclusion We conclude that the addition of solubilized mistletoe triterpenoids to conventional mistletoe extracts improves the efficacy of mistletoe treatment and may represent a novel treatment option for malignant melanoma. PMID:23614029

  6. IFN-γ Mediates the Antitumor Effects of Radiation Therapy in a Murine Colon Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Scott A.; Sedlacek, Abigail L.; Cron, Kyle R.; Murphy, Shawn P.; Frelinger, John G.; Lord, Edith M.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer treatments using ionizing radiation (IR) therapy are thought to act primarily through the induction of tumor cell damage at a molecular level. However, a new concept has recently emerged, suggesting that the immune system is required for effective IR therapy. Our work here has identified interferon gamma (IFN-γ) as an essential cytokine for the efficacy of IR therapy. Local IR (15 Gy) to mice bearing Colon38, a colon adenocarcinoma, decreases tumor burden in wild-type animals. Interestingly, IR therapy had no effect on tumor burden in IFNγKO mice. We further determined that intratumoral levels of IFN-γ increased 2 days following IR, which directly correlated with a decrease in tumor burden that was not a result of direct cytotoxic effects of IFN-γ on tumor cells. T cells from IR-treated tumors exhibited a far greater capacity to lyse tumor cells in a 51Cr release assay, a process that was dependent on IFN-γ. CD8+ T cells were the predominant producers of IFN-γ, as demonstrated by IFN-γ intracellular staining and studies in IFN-γ reporter mice. Elimination of CD8+ T cells by antibody treatment reduced the intratumoral levels of IFN-γ by over 90%. More importantly, elimination of CD8+ T cells completely abrogated the effects of radiation therapy. Our data suggest that IFN-γ plays a pivotal role in mediating the antitumor effects of IR therapy. PMID:23583648

  7. Combining BRAF inhibitor and anti PD-L1 antibody dramatically improves tumor regression and anti tumor immunity in an immunocompetent murine model of anaplastic thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Borre, Pierre Vanden; Zurakowski, David; Kim, Yon Seon; Dennett, Kate Virginia; Amin, Salma; Freeman, Gordon James; Parangi, Sareh

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of programmed cell death-1 and its ligand is widely studied in cancer. Monoclonal antibodies blocking these molecules have had great success but little is known about them in thyroid cancer. We investigated the role of PD-L1 in thyroid cancer with respect to BRAF mutation and MAP kinase pathway activity and the effect of anti PD-L1 antibody therapy on tumor regression and intra-tumoral immune response alone or in combination with BRAF inhibitor (BRAFi). BRAFV600E cells showed significantly higher baseline expression of PD-L1 at mRNA and protein levels compared to BRAFWT cells. MEK inhibitor treatment resulted in a decrease of PD-L1 expression across all cell lines. BRAFi treatment decreased PD-L1 expression in BRAFV600E cells, but paradoxically increased its expression in BRAFWT cells. BRAFV600E mutated patients samples had a higher level of PD-L1 mRNA compared to BRAFWT (p=0.015). Immunocompetent mice (B6129SF1/J) implanted with syngeneic 3747 BRAFV600E/WT P53−/− murine tumor cells were randomized to control, PLX4720, anti PD-L1 antibody and their combination. In this model of aggressive thyroid cancer, control tumor volume reached 782.3±174.6mm3 at two weeks. The combination dramatically reduced tumor volume to 147.3±60.8, compared to PLX4720 (439.3±188.4 mm3, P=0.023) or PD-L1 antibody (716.7±62.1, P<0.001) alone. Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed intense CD8+ CTL infiltration and cytotoxicity and favorable CD8+:Treg ratio compared to each individual treatment. Our results show anti PD-L1 treatment potentiates the effect of BRAFi on tumor regression and intensifies anti tumor immune response in an immunocompetent model of ATC. Clinical trials of this therapeutic combination may be of benefit in patients with ATC. PMID:26943572

  8. Combining BRAF inhibitor and anti PD-L1 antibody dramatically improves tumor regression and anti tumor immunity in an immunocompetent murine model of anaplastic thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Brauner, Eran; Gunda, Viswanath; Vanden Borre, Pierre; Zurakowski, David; Kim, Yon Seon; Dennett, Kate Virginia; Amin, Salma; Freeman, Gordon James; Parangi, Sareh

    2016-03-29

    The interaction of programmed cell death-1 and its ligand is widely studied in cancer. Monoclonal antibodies blocking these molecules have had great success but little is known about them in thyroid cancer. We investigated the role of PD-L1 in thyroid cancer with respect to BRAF mutation and MAP kinase pathway activity and the effect of anti PD-L1 antibody therapy on tumor regression and intra-tumoral immune response alone or in combination with BRAF inhibitor (BRAFi). BRAFV600E cells showed significantly higher baseline expression of PD-L1 at mRNA and protein levels compared to BRAFWT cells. MEK inhibitor treatment resulted in a decrease of PD-L1 expression across all cell lines. BRAFi treatment decreased PD-L1 expression in BRAFV600E cells, but paradoxically increased its expression in BRAFWT cells. BRAFV600E mutated patients samples had a higher level of PD-L1 mRNA compared to BRAFWT (p=0.015). Immunocompetent mice (B6129SF1/J) implanted with syngeneic 3747 BRAFV600E/WT P53-/- murine tumor cells were randomized to control, PLX4720, anti PD-L1 antibody and their combination. In this model of aggressive thyroid cancer, control tumor volume reached 782.3±174.6mm3 at two weeks. The combination dramatically reduced tumor volume to 147.3±60.8, compared to PLX4720 (439.3±188.4 mm3, P=0.023) or PD-L1 antibody (716.7±62.1, P<0.001) alone. Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed intense CD8+ CTL infiltration and cytotoxicity and favorable CD8+:Treg ratio compared to each individual treatment. Our results show anti PD-L1 treatment potentiates the effect of BRAFi on tumor regression and intensifies anti tumor immune response in an immunocompetent model of ATC. Clinical trials of this therapeutic combination may be of benefit in patients with ATC.

  9. A murine tumor progression model for pancreatic cancer recapitulating the genetic alterations of the human disease

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Martin; Greten, Florian R.; Weber, Christoph K.; Koschnick, Stefan; Mattfeldt, Torsten; Deppert, Wolfgang; Kern, Horst; Adler, Guido; Schmid, Roland M.

    2001-01-01

    This study describes a tumor progression model for ductal pancreatic cancer in mice overexpressing TGF-α. Activation of Ras and Erk causes induction of cyclin D1-Cdk4 without increase of cyclin E or PCNA in ductal lesions. Thus, TGF-α is able to promote progression throughout G1, but not S phase. Crossbreeding with p53 null mice accelerates tumor development in TGF-α transgenic mice dramatically. In tumors developing in these mice, biallelic deletion of Ink4a/Arf or LOH of the Smad4 locus is found suggesting that loci in addition to p53 are involved in antitumor activities. We conclude that these genetic events are critical for pancreatic tumor formation in mice. This model recapitulates pathomorphological features and genetic alterations of the human disease. PMID:11159909

  10. A Multimodal Imaging Approach for Longitudinal Evaluation of Bladder Tumor Development in an Orthotopic Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Scheepbouwer, Chantal; Meyer, Sandra; Burggraaf, Maroeska J; Jose, Jithin; Molthoff, Carla F M

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the fourth most common malignancy amongst men in Western industrialized countries with an initial response rate of 70% for the non-muscle invasive type, and improving therapy efficacy is highly needed. For this, an appropriate, reliable animal model is essential to gain insight into mechanisms of tumor growth for use in response monitoring of (new) agents. Several animal models have been described in previous studies, but so far success has been hampered due to the absence of imaging methods to follow tumor growth non-invasively over time. Recent developments of multimodal imaging methods for use in animal research have substantially strengthened these options of in vivo visualization of tumor growth. In the present study, a multimodal imaging approach was addressed to investigate bladder tumor proliferation longitudinally. The complementary abilities of Bioluminescence, High Resolution Ultrasound and Photo-acoustic Imaging permit a better understanding of bladder tumor development. Hybrid imaging modalities allow the integration of individual strengths to enable sensitive and improved quantification and understanding of tumor biology, and ultimately, can aid in the discovery and development of new therapeutics. PMID:27533303

  11. A Multimodal Imaging Approach for Longitudinal Evaluation of Bladder Tumor Development in an Orthotopic Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Sandra; Burggraaf, Maroeska J.; Jose, Jithin; Molthoff, Carla F. M.

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the fourth most common malignancy amongst men in Western industrialized countries with an initial response rate of 70% for the non-muscle invasive type, and improving therapy efficacy is highly needed. For this, an appropriate, reliable animal model is essential to gain insight into mechanisms of tumor growth for use in response monitoring of (new) agents. Several animal models have been described in previous studies, but so far success has been hampered due to the absence of imaging methods to follow tumor growth non-invasively over time. Recent developments of multimodal imaging methods for use in animal research have substantially strengthened these options of in vivo visualization of tumor growth. In the present study, a multimodal imaging approach was addressed to investigate bladder tumor proliferation longitudinally. The complementary abilities of Bioluminescence, High Resolution Ultrasound and Photo-acoustic Imaging permit a better understanding of bladder tumor development. Hybrid imaging modalities allow the integration of individual strengths to enable sensitive and improved quantification and understanding of tumor biology, and ultimately, can aid in the discovery and development of new therapeutics. PMID:27533303

  12. Microdistribution of MC1R-targeted polyplexes in murine melanoma tumor tissue

    PubMed Central

    Durymanov, Mikhail O; Slastnikova, Tatiana A; Kuzmich, Alexey I; Khramtsov, Yuri V; Ulasov, Alexey V; Rosenkranz, Andrey A1; Egorov, Sergey Y; Sverdlov, Eugene D; Sobolev, Alexander S

    2013-01-01

    Targeted sodium-iodide symporter (NIS) gene transfer can be considered as a promising approach for diagnostics of specific types of cancer. For this purpose we used targeted polyplexes based on PEI–PEG–MC1SP block-copolymer containing MC1SP-peptide, a ligand specific for melanocortin receptor-1 (MC1R) overexpressed on melanoma cells. Targeted polyplexes demonstrated enhanced NIS gene transfer compared to non-targeted (lacking MC1SP) ones in vitro. Using dorsal skinfold chamber and intravital microscopy we evaluated accumulation and microdistribution of quantum dot-labeled polyplexes in tumor and normal subcutaneous tissues up to 4 hours after intravenous injection. Polyplexes demonstrated significantly higher total accumulation in tumor tissue in comparison with subcutaneous ones (control). Targeted and non-targeted polyplexes extravasated and penetrated into the tumor tissue up to 20 μm from the vessel walls. In contrast, in normal subcutaneous tissue polyplexes penetrated less than 5 μm from the vessel walls with the level of extravasated polyplexes 400-fold less than in tumor. Accumulated polyplexes in tumor tissue caused NIS gene expression. Subsequent 123I- intravenous injection resulted in 6.8 ± 1.1 and 4.5 ± 0.8 % ID/g (p < 0.001) iodide accumulation in tumors in the case of targeted and non-targeted polyplexes, respectively, as was shown using SPECT/CT. PMID:24075405

  13. Truncating Prolactin Receptor Mutations Promote Tumor Growth in Murine Estrogen Receptor-Alpha Mammary Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Obi L; Chan, Szeman Ruby; Griffith, Malachi; Krysiak, Kilannin; Skidmore, Zachary L; Hundal, Jasreet; Allen, Julie A; Arthur, Cora D; Runci, Daniele; Bugatti, Mattia; Miceli, Alexander P; Schmidt, Heather; Trani, Lee; Kanchi, Krishna-Latha; Miller, Christopher A; Larson, David E; Fulton, Robert S; Vermi, William; Wilson, Richard K; Schreiber, Robert D; Mardis, Elaine R

    2016-09-27

    Estrogen receptor alpha-positive (ERα+) luminal tumors are the most frequent subtype of breast cancer. Stat1(-/-) mice develop mammary tumors that closely recapitulate the biological characteristics of this cancer subtype. To identify transforming events that contribute to tumorigenesis, we performed whole genome sequencing of Stat1(-/-) primary mammary tumors and matched normal tissues. This investigation identified somatic truncating mutations affecting the prolactin receptor (PRLR) in all tumor and no normal samples. Targeted sequencing confirmed the presence of these mutations in precancerous lesions, indicating that this is an early event in tumorigenesis. Functional evaluation of these heterozygous mutations in Stat1(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts showed that co-expression of truncated and wild-type PRLR led to aberrant STAT3 and STAT5 activation downstream of the receptor, cellular transformation in vitro, and tumor formation in vivo. In conclusion, truncating mutations of PRLR promote tumor growth in a model of human ERα+ breast cancer and warrant further investigation. PMID:27681435

  14. Modulation of microenvironment acidity reverses anergy in human and murine tumor-infiltrating T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Calcinotto, Arianna; Filipazzi, Paola; Grioni, Matteo; Iero, Manuela; De Milito, Angelo; Ricupito, Alessia; Cova, Agata; Canese, Rossella; Jachetti, Elena; Rossetti, Monica; Huber, Veronica; Parmiani, Giorgio; Generoso, Luca; Santinami, Mario; Borghi, Martina; Fais, Stefano; Bellone, Matteo; Rivoltini, Licia

    2012-06-01

    Stimulating the effector functions of tumor-infiltrating T lymphocytes (TIL) in primary and metastatic tumors could improve active and adoptive T-cell therapies for cancer. Abnormal glycolysis, high lactic acid production, proton accumulation, and a reversed intra-extracellular pH gradient are thought to help render tumor microenvironments hostile to roving immune cells. However, there is little knowledge about how acidic microenvironments affect T-cell immunity. Here, we report that lowering the environmental pH to values that characterize tumor masses (pH 6-6.5) was sufficient to establish an anergic state in human and mouse tumor-specific CD8(+) T lymphocytes. This state was characterized by impairment of cytolytic activity and cytokine secretion, reduced expression of IL-2Rα (CD25) and T-cell receptors (TCR), and diminished activation of STAT5 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) after TCR activation. In contrast, buffering pH at physiologic values completely restored all these metrics of T-cell function. Systemic treatment of B16-OVA-bearing mice with proton pump inhibitors (PPI) significantly increased the therapeutic efficacy of both active and adoptive immunotherapy. Our findings show that acidification of the tumor microenvironment acts as mechanism of immune escape. Furthermore, they illustrate the potential of PPIs to safely correct T-cell dysfunction and improve the efficacy of T-cell-based cancer treatments.

  15. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha processing inhibitor-1 inhibits skin fibrosis in a bleomycin-induced murine model of scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Terao, Mika; Murota, Hiroyuki; Kitaba, Shun; Katayama, Ichiro

    2010-01-01

    Elevated serum concentration of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor p55 (sTNFRp55) is known to correlate with the severity of systemic sclerosis (SSc). However, it has not been verified whether this increase contributes to the pathogenesis of SSc. In this study, we found that sTNFRp55 also is increased in the bleomycin (BLM)-induced murine model of SSc. Therefore, we examined the effect of tumor necrosis factor-alpha processing inhibitor-1 (TAPI-1), the inhibitor of TNFRp55 sheddase, in this model. TAPI-1 was administered weekly to mice with skin fibrosis induced by daily BLM injections. TAPI-1 significantly suppressed BLM-induced skin thickness and the number of myofibroblasts. It also inhibited the increase of serum sTNFRp55 after 3 weeks of BLM injections. The mRNA expression of collagen type I alpha1, transforming growth factor-beta1 and alpha smooth muscle actin were decreased by TAPI-1 administration. Taken together, these findings indicate that targeting the TNFalpha converting enzyme might be a new type of therapy for patients with SSc. PMID:19758314

  16. Mitogen-regulated protein/proliferin mRNA induction following single applications of tumor promoters to murine skin.

    PubMed

    Parfett, Craig L J

    2005-07-01

    Mitogen-regulated protein/proliferin (mrp/plf) gene family transcripts rise in abundance as a response to diverse chemical and physical agents that promote morphological transformation in the murine C3H/10T1/2 cultured cell model of multi-step carcinogenesis. To determine if proliferin genes respond to tumor promoters in vivo, RNA was extracted from the whole skin of SENCAR mice after single applications of 2 or 20 microg 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA); 3.2 or 32 nmole), 20 or 40 mg benzoyl peroxide (BPO; 83, 165 micromole), or acetone vehicle alone (2.72 mmole). RNA samples were prepared from treated skin areas, 2-48 h after painting. Mrp/plf-mRNA was not detected in Northern blot hybridizations, but large increases in mRNAs for ornithine decarboxylase gene and mRNA (odc), v-jun oncogene-related transcription factor gene and mRNA (junB), egr1 (early growth response protein gene and mRNA) were measured relative to beta 2 microglobulin gene and mRNA (b2m) mRNA in response to TPA. BPO induced small relative changes in these mRNAs. Reverse transcriptase (RT)-polymerase chain reactions (PCR) detected fully-processed MRP/plf-mRNA 16-48 h after TPA treatments in five of six animals, and in three of six BPO-treated animals. The MRP/plf-mRNA species expressed in the skin were predominantly plf1 and mrp3 as determined by gene-specific restriction enzyme sites within the RT-PCR products. Expression was either undetectable or found at low levels in acetone-painted controls and was not detected during the anagen phase of the normal hair growth cycle in unpainted animals. These results demonstrate that mrp/plf-mRNA is differentially expressed in murine skin in response to mechanistically distinct tumor promoters and has potential utility as a short-term biomarker for tumor promoting effects in chemical carcinogenesis.

  17. Expression of E-Selectin, P-Selectin, and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 during Experimental Murine Listeriosis

    PubMed Central

    López, Santiago; Prats, Neus; Marco, Alberto Jesús

    1999-01-01

    The expression of adhesion molecules E-selectin, P-selectin, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) was immunohistochemically investigated during the course of experimental murine listeriosis. Infection was monitored by microbiological count of blood, liver, and spleen. After an early generalized expression of P-selectin and ICAM-1, a later regulation occurred specifically to areas of inflammation. Expression of E-selectin was faint and inconstantly detected in all of the studied organs. In the liver, typical lesions of murine listeriosis were related to the expression of ICAM-1 on sinusoidal endothelial cells and the biliary system and to the de novo expression of P-selectin in hepatic portal vessels. Inflammation in the spleen was related to the expression of ICAM-1 on red pulp sinusoidal cells, especially in the marginal sinus. High endothelial venules of inflamed lymph nodes also expressed P-selectin and ICAM-1. Lesions in the central nervous system appeared on day 3 after infection as a pyogranulomatous leptomeningitis associated with an intense expression of P-selectin and ICAM-1 in meningeal vessels, especially those in the hippocampal sulcus, suggesting a way through which inflammation initially reach the central nervous system during experimental murine listeriosis. Leptomeningitis was followed by the presence of ventriculitis, which was related to the up-regulation of ICAM-1 on choroid plexus epithelial cells, periventricular vessels and ependymal cells. Up-regulation of P-selectin and ICAM-1 during experimental murine listeriosis could play an important role in the recruitment of leukocytes, especially to the liver, lymphoid organs, and central nervous system. PMID:10514421

  18. Bacterial Delivery of Staphylococcus aureus α-Hemolysin Causes Regression and Necrosis in Murine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    St. Jean, Adam T; Swofford, Charles A; Panteli, Jan T; Brentzel, Zachary J; Forbes, Neil S

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial therapies, designed to manufacture therapeutic proteins directly within tumors, could eliminate cancers that are resistant to other therapies. To be effective, a payload protein must be secreted, diffuse through tissue, and efficiently kill cancer cells. To date, these properties have not been shown for a single protein. The gene for Staphylococcus aureus α-hemolysin (SAH), a pore-forming protein, was cloned into Escherichia coli. These bacteria were injected into tumor-bearing mice and volume was measured over time. The location of SAH relative to necrosis and bacterial colonies was determined by immunohistochemistry. In culture, SAH was released and killed 93% of cancer cells in 24 hours. Injection of SAH-producing bacteria reduced viable tissue to 9% of the original tumor volume. By inducing cell death, SAH moved the boundary of necrosis toward the tumor edge. SAH diffused 6.8 ± 0.3 µm into tissue, which increased the volume of affected tissue from 48.6 to 3,120 µm3. A mathematical model of molecular transport predicted that SAH efficacy is primarily dependent on colony size and the rate of protein production. As a payload protein, SAH will enable effective bacterial therapy because of its ability to diffuse in tissue, kill cells, and expand tumor necrosis. PMID:24590046

  19. Macrophage activation associated with chronic murine cytomegalovirus infection results in more severe experimental choroidal neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Cousins, Scott W; Espinosa-Heidmann, Diego G; Miller, Daniel M; Pereira-Simon, Simone; Hernandez, Eleut P; Chien, Hsin; Meier-Jewett, Courtney; Dix, Richard D

    2012-01-01

    The neovascular (wet) form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) leads to vision loss due to choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Since macrophages are important in CNV development, and cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific IgG serum titers in patients with wet AMD are elevated, we hypothesized that chronic CMV infection contributes to wet AMD, possibly by pro-angiogenic macrophage activation. This hypothesis was tested using an established mouse model of experimental CNV. At 6 days, 6 weeks, or 12 weeks after infection with murine CMV (MCMV), laser-induced CNV was performed, and CNV severity was determined 4 weeks later by analysis of choroidal flatmounts. Although all MCMV-infected mice exhibited more severe CNV when compared with control mice, the most severe CNV developed in mice with chronic infection, a time when MCMV-specific gene sequences could not be detected within choroidal tissues. Splenic macrophages collected from mice with chronic MCMV infection, however, expressed significantly greater levels of TNF-α, COX-2, MMP-9, and, most significantly, VEGF transcripts by quantitative RT-PCR assay when compared to splenic macrophages from control mice. Direct MCMV infection of monolayers of IC-21 mouse macrophages confirmed significant stimulation of VEGF mRNA and VEGF protein as determined by quantitative RT-PCR assay, ELISA, and immunostaining. Stimulation of VEGF production in vivo and in vitro was sensitive to the antiviral ganciclovir. These studies suggest that chronic CMV infection may serve as a heretofore unrecognized risk factor in the pathogenesis of wet AMD. One mechanism by which chronic CMV infection might promote increased CNV severity is via stimulation of macrophages to make pro-angiogenic factors (VEGF), an outcome that requires active virus replication. PMID:22570607

  20. Macrophage Activation Associated with Chronic Murine Cytomegalovirus Infection Results in More Severe Experimental Choroidal Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Cousins, Scott W.; Espinosa-Heidmann, Diego G.; Miller, Daniel M.; Pereira-Simon, Simone; Hernandez, Eleut P.; Chien, Hsin; Meier-Jewett, Courtney; Dix, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    The neovascular (wet) form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) leads to vision loss due to choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Since macrophages are important in CNV development, and cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific IgG serum titers in patients with wet AMD are elevated, we hypothesized that chronic CMV infection contributes to wet AMD, possibly by pro-angiogenic macrophage activation. This hypothesis was tested using an established mouse model of experimental CNV. At 6 days, 6 weeks, or 12 weeks after infection with murine CMV (MCMV), laser-induced CNV was performed, and CNV severity was determined 4 weeks later by analysis of choroidal flatmounts. Although all MCMV-infected mice exhibited more severe CNV when compared with control mice, the most severe CNV developed in mice with chronic infection, a time when MCMV-specific gene sequences could not be detected within choroidal tissues. Splenic macrophages collected from mice with chronic MCMV infection, however, expressed significantly greater levels of TNF-α, COX-2, MMP-9, and, most significantly, VEGF transcripts by quantitative RT-PCR assay when compared to splenic macrophages from control mice. Direct MCMV infection of monolayers of IC-21 mouse macrophages confirmed significant stimulation of VEGF mRNA and VEGF protein as determined by quantitative RT-PCR assay, ELISA, and immunostaining. Stimulation of VEGF production in vivo and in vitro was sensitive to the antiviral ganciclovir. These studies suggest that chronic CMV infection may serve as a heretofore unrecognized risk factor in the pathogenesis of wet AMD. One mechanism by which chronic CMV infection might promote increased CNV severity is via stimulation of macrophages to make pro-angiogenic factors (VEGF), an outcome that requires active virus replication. PMID:22570607

  1. Cellular basis of the genetic susceptibility of murine experimental allergic encephalomyelitis

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, T.A.; Greiner, D.L.; Goldschneider, I.

    1986-03-01

    Murine experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an induced autoimmune disease that resembles human multiple sclerosis. The authors have investigated the cellular basis of the genetic predisposition and resistance of inbred strains of mice to EAE using an adoptive transfer system between two H-2 compatible, Thy 1 antigen disparate strains of mice. Genetically EAE susceptible SJL/J strain mice (H-2/sup s/, Thy 1.2) and resistant B10.S Thy 1.1 (H-2/sub s/, Thy 1.1) strain mice were lethally irradiated (700R) and reconstituted with 5-10 x 10/sup 6/ bone marrow cells from either SJL/J or congenic B10.S (Thy 1.1 or Thy 1.2) donors. After 30-45 days, more than 95% of the thymocytes and 75% of the peripheral T cells in the chimeras were of donor origin. These lymphohemopoietic chimeras were then sensitized in their hind footpads with porcine myelin basic protein in complete Freund's adjuvant containing M. tuberculosis H/sub 37/RA, followed at 24 and 72 hours by i.v. injection of B. pertussis. Clinical signs of EAE developed in unirradiated SJL/J, but not B10.S, controls, and in irradiated B10.S and SJL/J recipients of SJL/J, but not B10.S, bone marrow. These results indicate that bone marrow cells can transfer the predisposition to EAE from genetically susceptible to genetically resistant mouse strains. The cellular component in the bone marrow that is responsible for the transfer of the genetic susceptibility to EAE is under investigation.

  2. Immune response to controlled release of immunomodulating peptides in a murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hong; Kiptoo, Paul; Williams, Todd D.; Siahaan, Teruna J.; Topp, Elizabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of controlled release on immune response to an immunomodulating peptide were evaluated in a murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model of multiple sclerosis (MS). The peptide, Ac-PLP-BPI-NH2-2 (Ac-HSLGKWLGHPDKF-(AcpGAcpGAcp)2-ITDGEATDSG-NH2; Ac = acetyl, Acp = aminocaproic acid) was designed to suppress T-cell activation in response to PLP139–151, an antigenic peptide in MS. Poly-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) microparticles containing Ac-PLP-BPI-NH2-2 (8±4 μm, 1.4±0.2% (w/w)) were prepared by a powder-in oil-in water emulsion-solvent evaporation method, sterilized and administered subcutaneously (s.c.) to SJL/J (H-2s) mice in which EAE had been induced by immunization with PLP139–151. Treatment groups received Ac-PLP-BPI-NH2-2: (i) in solution by repeated i.v. or s.c. injection, (ii) in solution co-administered with blank PLGA microparticles, (iii) in solution co-administered with Ac-PLP-BPI-NH2-2 loaded microparticles, and (iv) as Ac-PLP-BPI-NH2-2 loaded microparticles. Administration of Ac-PLP-BPI-NH2-2 as an s.c. solution produced clinical scores and maintenance of body weight comparable to i.v. solution, but with reduced overall survival, presumably due to anaphylaxis. Administration as s.c. microparticles provided a somewhat less effective reduction in symptoms but with no toxicity during treatment. Thus, the results suggest that s.c. administration of Ac-PLP-BPI-NH2-2 microparticles can provide pharmacological efficacy and reduction in dosing frequency without increased toxicity. PMID:19748537

  3. gamma-Glutamyl carboxylase activity in experimental tumor tissues: a biochemical basis for vitamin K dependence of cancer procoagulant.

    PubMed

    Roncaglioni, M C; Dalessandro, A P; Casali, B; Vermeer, C; Donati, M B

    1986-01-01

    Rabbit V2 carcinoma tissues have been described to possess a procoagulant activity with specific characteristics; this material has been purified and identified as a cysteine proteinase able to directly activate coagulation factor X. We have shown here that the procoagulant activity of V2 carcinoma extracts is depressed in warfarin-treated animals, thus suggesting that cancer procoagulant could represent a new vitamin K-dependent protein. The biochemical basis for this effect is offered by the identification of gamma-glutamyl carboxylase in the microsomal fraction of tumor tissues. The V2 carcinoma has a carboxylase activity which is increased in warfarin-treated animals. An endogenous substrate of tumor carboxylase, the nature of which has not been identified, has been found 5-fold increased in warfarin-treated animals. The presence of gamma-glutamyl carboxylase was also described in several murine tumors including both carcinomas and fibrosarcomas. It is worth mentioning that all the tumors tested produce a procoagulant with the peculiar characteristics of that described in V2 carcinoma. It is conceivable that cancer procoagulant could represent at least one of the substrates for gamma-glutamyl carboxylase in these experimental tumor tissues.

  4. Retrieval of Disseminated Tumor Cells Colonizing the Bone in Murine Breast Cancer Metastasis Models

    PubMed Central

    Welte, Thomas; Yu, Cuijuan

    2016-01-01

    In breast cancer, the most frequent site of metastasis is bone. Disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) can be detected in the bone marrow of patients by their expression of epithelial or oncogenic markers [1], and the presence and frequency of these DTCs are associated with poor prognosis. However, many of the details behind this process remain elusive, including the biological properties and fates of these apparently indolent cancer cells. To provide pre-clinical models of DTCs, we have developed a procedure that allows for controlled and enhanced delivery of tumor cells to the bone in animal experiments via injection into the iliac artery of the hind limb [2]. To our surprise, we found that most cancer cells became integrated into the solid bone matrix shortly after arriving in the bone, and only a minority can be flushed out with the bone marrow. Here we describe a method that helps to retrieve DTCs homing to the bone in which we achieve an improved recovery of those tumor cells closely associated with the bone microenvironment. In our view it is especially important to analyze these tumor cell subpopulations, as they may take full advantage of growth-, survival- and immune-protective signals provided by neighbor cells. We also show a pilot study on how this approach may be applied to the analysis of cancer dormancy. Our study suggests that the detection and retrieval of DTCs in clinical studies are incomplete because they are conducted exclusively with bone marrow aspirates. PMID:26490041

  5. Influence of WR 2721 on the efficacy of radiotherapy and chemotherapy of murine tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, J.J.; Johnson, R.K.

    1982-03-01

    The effect of WR2721 on the response of tumors to radiation, antineoplastic alkylating drugs, and DNA binding agents was evaluated and compared to the degree of normal tissue protection provided by WR 2721 against these agents. WR 2721 administered to mice bearing P388 leukemia or Lewis lung carcinoma was found to reduce the radiosensitivity of the leukemia and lung tumor by dose modifying factors of 1.4 and 1.3, respectively. WR 2721 protected bone marow, intestine, and skin from radiation by factors of 1.9. 1.4 and 1.8. WR 2721 protected mice from the lethality of cyclophosphamide by a factor of only 1.2 whereas protection from melphalan toxicity was more dramatic with a dose modifying factor of 1.6. In chemotherapy studies of established M5076 ovarian tumor, the combination of WR 2721 plus cyclophosphamide was equivalent in activity to cyclophosphamide alone. WR 2721 did not modify the antitumor activity of melphalan in early Lewis lung carcinoma did not decrease the antileukemic effects of this agent by a factor of 2.6 indicating tumor protection greater than host protection in the leukemia. The antitumor activity of the DNA binding agents etoposide (VP16-213) and mitoxantrone against systemic P388 leukemia was not diminished by WR 2721, while a substantial increase in host toxicity was noted for the combinations. The protective effects of WR 2721 against radiation and drug damage were, therefore, not entirely selective for normal tissues. In some cases the degree of tumor protection can be similar to, or greater than, normal tissue protection.

  6. Phorbal esters and calcium ionophore can prime murine peritoneal macrophages for tumor cell destruction

    SciTech Connect

    Somers, S.D.; Weiel, J.E.; Hamilton, T.A.; Adams, D.O.

    1986-06-01

    Murine macrophages from sites of inflammation develop toward tumoricidal competence by exposure to a macrophage-activating factor such as interferon-..gamma.. (IFN-..gamma..). To explore the biochemical transductional events initiated by IFN-..gamma.., peritoneal macrophages from C57BL/6J mice elicited by various sterile irritants were treated in vitro with two pharmacologic agents that mimic the action of certain second messengers. Phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and the ionophore A23187 cooperatively reproduced the ability of IFN-..gamma.. to prime macrophages for tumoricidal function. Neither agent alone was able to prime macrophages. The two agents acted on the macrophages, and target susceptibility to kill was not altered by PMA and A23187. Only active phorbol esters, which are known to bind and stimulate protein kinase C, were able to cooperate with A23187 to induce priming. A cell-permeable synthetic diacylglycerol (sn-1,2-dioctanoyl glycerol) could also prime for cytolysis. In the presence of PMA, A23187, and EGTA, addition of Ca/sup + +/ was sufficient for priming, whereas the addition of Mg/sup + +/ was much less efficient. Priming by IFN-..gamma.., however, was not blocked by EGTA. Efflux of /sup 45/Ca/sup + +/ from preloaded cells was significantly increased by A23187 and by IFN-..gamma... Quin-2/AM, an intracellular chelator of Ca/sup + +/, blocked priming by IFN-..gamma...

  7. In-vivo imaging of murine tumors using complete-angle projection fluorescence molecular tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deliolanis, Nikolaos C.; Dunham, Joshua; Wurdinger, Thomas; Figueiredo, Jose-Luiz; Bakhos, Tannous; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2009-05-01

    We interrogate the ability of free-space fluorescence tomography to image small animals in vivo using charge-coupled device (CCD) camera measurements over 360-deg noncontact projections. We demonstrate the performance of normalized dual-wavelength measurements that are essential for in-vivo use, as they account for the heterogeneous distribution of photons in tissue. In-vivo imaging is then showcased on mouse lung and brain tumors cross-validated by x-ray microcomputed tomography and histology.

  8. Interleukin-2 gene transfer into murine neuroblastoma decreases tumorigenicity and enhances systemic immunity causing regression of preestablished retroperitoneal tumors.

    PubMed

    Katsanis, E; Orchard, P J; Bausero, M A; Gorden, K B; McIvor, R S; Blazar, B R

    1994-02-01

    Murine neuroblastoma, neuro-2a, was transduced with the retroviral vector LIL-2SN in order to examine the influence of localized interleukin (IL)-2 production on the immune response against a low major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I, class II-negative, and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1-negative tumor. Two neomycin-resistant (neo R) clones, N-2a/IL-2/L (2.5 +/- 0.4 U/ml/10(6) cells/24 h) and N-2a/IL-2/H (44.6 +/- 8.8 U/ml), were studied as representative low and high IL-2 producers, respectively. Using a recently developed retroperitoneal (r.p.) model for implantation of neuroblastoma in its natural site, we demonstrated that production of IL-2 by neuro-2a reduces its tumorigenicity in a dose-dependent fashion. T-cell, but not natural killer (NK) cell, depletion significantly increased tumor induced mortality in syngeneic A/J mice. Mice genetically devoid of T-cells (C.B-17 scid/scid) also experienced a significant increase in mortality rates. This indicates that the antitumor effect of locally secreted IL-2 is mediated primarily through activation of T-cells. Immunization of mice with irradiated N-2a/IL-2/H cells resulted in protection when challenged at a later date with unmodified neuro-2a cells. Depletion of CD8+, but not CD4+, T-cells prior to vaccination abrogated the protective effect, indicating that the priming phase of the immune response is CD8+ T-cell dependent. Mice with established r.p. tumors were vaccinated with N-2a/IL-2/H, which significantly prolonged their survival compared to unimmunized controls and to mice immunized with non-IL-2-producing neuro-2a cells. Because of the similarities of this model with the human tumor, our studies indicate that IL-2-transduced neuroblastoma cells may be effective in generating systemic immunity leading to eradication of minimal residual disease.

  9. Assessment and in vivo scoring of murine experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis using optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Chu, Colin J; Herrmann, Philipp; Carvalho, Livia S; Liyanage, Sidath E; Bainbridge, James W B; Ali, Robin R; Dick, Andrew D; Luhmann, Ulrich F O

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in clinical imaging and grading our understanding of retinal immune responses and their morphological correlates in experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU), has been hindered by the requirement for post-mortem histology. To date, monitoring changes occurring during EAU disease progression and evaluating the effect of therapeutic intervention in real time has not been possible. We wanted to establish whether optical coherence tomography (OCT) could detect intraretinal changes during inflammation and to determine its utility as a tool for accurate scoring of EAU. EAU was induced in C57BL/6J mice and animals evaluated after 15, 26, 36 and 60 days. At each time-point, contemporaneous Spectralis-OCT scanning, topical endoscopic fundal imaging (TEFI), fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA) and CD45-immunolabelled histology were performed. OCT features were further characterised on retinal flat-mounts using immunohistochemistry and 3D reconstruction. Optic disc swelling and vitreous opacities detected by OCT corresponded to CD45+ cell infiltration on histology. Vasculitis identified by FFA and OCT matched perivascular myeloid and T-cell infiltrates and could be differentiated from unaffected vessels. Evolution of these changes could be followed over time in the same eye. Retinal folds were visible and found to encapsulate mixed populations of activated myeloid cells, T-cells and microglia. Using these features, an OCT-based EAU scoring system was developed, with significant correlation to validated histological (Pearson r(2) = 0.6392, P<0.0001, n = 31 eyes) and TEFI based scoring systems (r(2) = 0.6784, P<0.0001). OCT distinguishes the fundamental features of murine EAU in vivo, permits dynamic assessment of intraretinal changes and can be used to score disease severity. As a result, it allows tissue synchronisation with subsequent cellular and functional assessment and greater efficiency of animal usage. By relating OCT signals with

  10. Failure of expression of class I major histocompatibility antigens to alter tumor immunogenicity of a spontaneous murine carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Carlow, D A; Kerbel, R S; Elliott, B E

    1989-05-10

    We have shown previously that clonal immunogenic variants of murine mammary adenocarcinoma 10.1 can be isolated after treatment in vitro with the DNA-hypomethylating agent 5-azacytidine (5-aza). Such immunogenic variants frequently express elevated class I major histocompatibility complex antigens relative to the level of expression in the parent tumor and are rejected in syngeneic mice by a T-cell-dependent process. To ascertain whether elevated immunogenicity is a function of increased class I antigen expression, we isolated high class I antigen expressors from 5-aza-treated 10.1 cells by using the fluorescence-activated cell sorter. Clonal variants displaying any increase in class I antigen expression were more efficient stimulators of allo-class I antigen-specific cytolytic T-cell precursors. However, these variants displayed unaltered tumorigenicity in immunocompetent syngeneic mice. Thus, phenotypic changes other than, or in addition to, elevated class I antigen expression cause the reduced tumorigenicity of immunogenic clones of 10.1 cells isolated after 5-aza treatment.

  11. Aberrant Activation of the RANK Signaling Receptor Induces Murine Salivary Gland Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Allison P.; Dougall, William C.; Ittmann, Michael M.; Lydon, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Unlike cancers of related exocrine tissues such as the mammary and prostate gland, diagnosis and treatment of aggressive salivary gland malignancies have not markedly advanced in decades. Effective clinical management of malignant salivary gland cancers is undercut by our limited knowledge concerning the key molecular signals that underpin the etiopathogenesis of this rare and heterogeneous head and neck cancer. Without knowledge of the critical signals that drive salivary gland tumorigenesis, tumor vulnerabilities cannot be exploited that allow for targeted molecular therapies. This knowledge insufficiency is further exacerbated by a paucity of preclinical mouse models (as compared to other cancer fields) with which to both study salivary gland pathobiology and test novel intervention strategies. Using a mouse transgenic approach, we demonstrate that deregulation of the Receptor Activator of NFkB Ligand (RANKL)/RANK signaling axis results in rapid tumor development in all three major salivary glands. In line with its established role in other exocrine gland cancers (i.e., breast cancer), the RANKL/RANK signaling axis elicits an aggressive salivary gland tumor phenotype both at the histologic and molecular level. Despite the ability of this cytokine signaling axis to drive advanced stage disease within a short latency period, early blockade of RANKL/RANK signaling markedly attenuates the development of malignant salivary gland neoplasms. Together, our findings have uncovered a tumorigenic role for RANKL/RANK in the salivary gland and suggest that targeting this pathway may represent a novel therapeutic intervention approach in the prevention and/or treatment of this understudied head and neck cancer. PMID:26061636

  12. Paricalcitol, a Vitamin D Receptor Activator, Inhibits Tumor Formation in a Murine Model of Uterine Fibroids

    PubMed Central

    Halder, Sunil K.; Sharan, Chakradhari; Al-Hendy, Omar

    2014-01-01

    We examined the antitumor and therapeutic potentials of paricalcitol, an analog of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 with lower calcemic activity, against uterine fibroids using in vitro and in vivo evaluations in appropriate uterine fibroid cells and animal models. We found that paricalcitol has potential to reduce the proliferation of the immortalized human uterine fibroid cells. For the in vivo study, we generated subcutaneous tumors by injecting the Eker rat-derived uterine leiomyoma cell line (ELT-3) rat uterine fibroid-derived cell line in athymic nude mice supplemented with estrogen pellets. These mice were administered with vehicle versus paricalcitol (300 ng/kg/d) or 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (500 ng/kg/d) for 4 consecutive weeks, and the data were analyzed. We found that while both paricalcitol and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 significantly reduced fibroid tumor size, the shrinkage was slightly higher in the paricalcitol-treated group. Together, our results suggest that paricalcitol may be a potential candidate for effective, safe, and noninvasive medical treatment option for uterine fibroids. PMID:24925855

  13. Paricalcitol, a vitamin d receptor activator, inhibits tumor formation in a murine model of uterine fibroids.

    PubMed

    Halder, Sunil K; Sharan, Chakradhari; Al-Hendy, Omar; Al-Hendy, Ayman

    2014-09-01

    We examined the antitumor and therapeutic potentials of paricalcitol, an analog of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 with lower calcemic activity, against uterine fibroids using in vitro and in vivo evaluations in appropriate uterine fibroid cells and animal models. We found that paricalcitol has potential to reduce the proliferation of the immortalized human uterine fibroid cells. For the in vivo study, we generated subcutaneous tumors by injecting the Eker rat-derived uterine leiomyoma cell line (ELT-3) rat uterine fibroid-derived cell line in athymic nude mice supplemented with estrogen pellets. These mice were administered with vehicle versus paricalcitol (300 ng/kg/d) or 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (500 ng/kg/d) for 4 consecutive weeks, and the data were analyzed. We found that while both paricalcitol and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 significantly reduced fibroid tumor size, the shrinkage was slightly higher in the paricalcitol-treated group. Together, our results suggest that paricalcitol may be a potential candidate for effective, safe, and noninvasive medical treatment option for uterine fibroids.

  14. Production of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1 alpha, and interleukin-6 during murine coccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, R A; Magee, D M

    1995-01-01

    The proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were induced in mice infected with Coccidioides immitis. Analyses of the cytokine profiles of two inbred mouse strains which differ in their susceptibility to pulmonary challenge with C. immitis revealed higher levels of IL-6 in lungs from DBA/2 mice (resistant strain) than in those from BALB/c mice (susceptible strain) beginning at day 6 and continuing through day 15 postinfection. Spleen cells from both mouse strains secreted TNF-alpha, IL-1 alpha, and IL-6 in vitro in response to stimulation with killed spherules but differed in that spleen cells from the resistant strain produced increased levels of these cytokines earlier after pulmonary challenge and at increased levels throughout the course of the disease. PMID:7558338

  15. Comparison of hyperbaric xoygen and misonidazole in fractionated irradiation of murine tumors. [/sup 137/Cs

    SciTech Connect

    Suit, H.D.; Maimonis, P.; Michaels, H.B.; Sedlacek, R.

    1981-08-01

    The enhancement ratios for hyperbaric oxygen (O/sub 2/3ATA) and for misonidazole (0.3 mg/g body wt) for fractionated irradiation (5 or 10 equal doses) of two spontaneous tumors and of normal skin of the C3H mouse have been determined. Acute skin reactions were scored for mice irradiated 18 days after plucking hair from the leg. Enhancement ratios for the TCD/sub 50/ values were virtually the same for O/sub 2/3ATA and misonidazole, 1.45 to 1.55. For acute skin reaction the enhancement ratio was higher for O/sub 2/3ATA, i.e., 1.94 vs 1.54 for misonidazole.

  16. Tumor-promoting phorbol esters support the in vitro proliferation of murine pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed Central

    Spivak, J L; Hogans, B B; Stuart, R K

    1989-01-01

    The effect of tumor-promoting phorbol esters on the in vitro proliferation of mouse pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells (CFU-S) was examined using a short-term in vitro culture system and an 11-d spleen colony assay. Phorbol myristate acetate (PMA, 10(-7) M), but not the inert compound phorbol, supported the in vitro survival of day 11 CFU-S for 72 h in a manner similar to IL 3. PMA also enhanced the effect of IL 3 on the in vitro survival of day 11 CFU-S and as little as 1 h of exposure to PMA was sufficient for this purpose. The effect of PMA on CFU-S survival in vitro was not mediated by prostaglandins, did not require an established adherent cell population, and was observed at a concentration of 10(-9) M. PMA alone did not enhance the in vitro survival of day 11 CFU-S at very low concentrations of FCS but was still able to potentiate the effect of IL 3 on these cells. PMA also enhanced the in vitro survival of day 11 CFU-S from mice treated with 5-fluorouracil or from marrow cells exposed to merocyanine 540 and light. The interaction of PMA with day 11 CFU-S was not inhibited by a neutralizing antiserum to IL 3 but was inhibited by the protein kinase inhibitor H-7. Together, the data indicate that tumor-promoting phorbol esters interact with pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells. Like IL 3, their effect appears to be permissive and involves stem cells with marrow repopulating ability. PMID:2463264

  17. The pharmacokinetics of Zr-89 labeled liposomes over extended periods in a murine tumor model

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jai Woong; Mahakian, Lisa M.; Tam, Sarah; Qin, Shengping; Ingham, Elizabeth S.; Meares, Claude F.; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2014-01-01

    89Zr (t1/2 = 78.4 h), a positron-emitting metal, has been exploited for PET studies of antibodies because of its relatively long decay time and facile labeling procedures. Here, we used 89Zr to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of long-circulating liposomes over 168 hours (1 week). We first developed a liposomal-labeling method using p-isothiocyanatobenzyldesferrioxamine (df-Bz-NCS) and df-PEG1k-DSPE. Df-Bz-NCS was conjugated to 1 mol% amino- and amino-PEG2k-DSPE, where the 1 mol% df-PEG1k-DSPE was incorporated when the liposomes were formulated. Incubation of 89Zr with df, df-PEG1k, and df-PEG2k liposomes for one hour resulted in greater than 68% decay-corrected yield. The loss of the 89Zr label from liposomes after incubation in 50% human serum for 48 hours ranged from ~1 to 3% across the three formulations. Tail vein administration of the three liposomal formulations in NDL tumor-bearing mice showed that the 89Zr label at the end of the PEG2k brush was retained in the tumor, liver, spleen and whole body for a longer time interval than 89Zr labels located under the PEG2k brush. The blood clearance rate of all three liposomal formulations was similar. Overall, the results indicate that the location of the 89Zr label altered the clearance rate of intracellularly-trapped radioactivity and that df-PEG1k-DSPE provides a stable chelation site for liposomal or lipid-based particle studies over extended periods of time. PMID:25451215

  18. Cysticercosis vaccine: cross protecting immunity with T. solium antigens against experimental murine T. crassiceps cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Sciutto, E; Fragoso, G; Trueba, L; Lemus, D; Montoya, R M; Diaz, M L; Govezensky, T; Lomeli, C; Tapia, G; Larralde, C

    1990-11-01

    Vaccination of mice with an antigen extract from Taenia solium cysticerci induced protection against challenge with T. crassiceps cysticerci as successfully as did antigen extracts from T. crassiceps. Vaccination was more effective in male than in female mice and in the resistant strain (BALB/B) more so than in the susceptible strain (BALB/c). While only the resistant strain was completely protected by vaccination, the parasite load of the susceptible strain was significantly reduced by vaccination. Cross immunity between the human and murine parasites establishes murine T. crassiceps cysticercosis as a convenient laboratory model in which to test promising T. solium antigens aimed at vaccine development against T. solium cysticercosis. Further, results point to strong interactions of the immune system with sexual and histocompatibility factors in the host's dealing with cysticercosis.

  19. miRNA Expression Profiling of the Murine TH-MYCN Neuroblastoma Model Reveals Similarities with Human Tumors and Identifies Novel Candidate MiRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Terrile, Marta; Bryan, Kenneth; Vaughan, Lynsey; Hallsworth, Albert; Webber, Hannah

    2011-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs are small molecules which regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally and aberrant expression of several miRNAs is associated with neuroblastoma, a childhood cancer arising from precursor cells of the sympathetic nervous system. Amplification of the MYCN transcription factor characterizes the most clinically aggressive subtype of this disease, and although alteration of p53 signaling is not commonly found in primary tumors, deregulation of proteins involved in this pathway frequently arise in recurrent disease after pharmacological treatment. TH-MYCN is a well-characterized transgenic model of MYCN-driven neuroblastoma which recapitulates many clinicopathologic features of the human disease. Here, we evaluate the dysregulation of miRNAs in tumors from TH-MYCN mice that are either wild-type (TH-MYCN) or deficient (TH-MYCN/p53ERTAM) for the p53 tumor suppressor gene. Principal Findings We analyzed the expression of 591 miRNAs in control (adrenal) and neuroblastoma tumor tissues derived from either TH-MYCN or TH-MYCN/p53ERTAM mice, respectively wild-type or deficient in p53. Comparing miRNA expression in tumor and control samples, we identified 159 differentially expressed miRNAs. Using data previously obtained from human neuroblastoma samples, we performed a comparison of miRNA expression between murine and human tumors to assess the concordance between murine and human expression data. Notably, the miR-17-5p-92 oncogenic polycistronic cluster, which is over-expressed in human MYCN amplified tumors, was over-expressed in mouse tumors. Moreover, analyzing miRNAs expression in a mouse model (TH-MYCN/p53ERTAM) possessing a transgenic p53 allele that drives the expression of an inactive protein, we identified miR-125b-3p and miR-676 as directly or indirectly regulated by the level of functional p53. Significance Our study represents the first miRNA profiling of an important mouse model of neuroblastoma. Similarities and differences in mi

  20. Multiorgan chronic inflammatory hepatobiliary pancreatic murine model deficient in tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2

    PubMed Central

    Oz, Helieh S

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To provoke persistent/chronic multiorgan inflammatory response and to contribute to stones formation followed by fibrosis in hepatobiliary and pancreatic tissues. METHODS: Tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2 (TNFR1/R2) deficient mice reared in-house were given dibutyltin dichloride (DBTC) twice within 10 d by oral gavage delivery. Sham control animals received vehicle treatment and naïve animals remained untreated throughout the study. Animals were monitored daily for symptoms of pain and discomfort. The abdominal and hindpaw hypersensitivity were assessed with von Frey microfilaments. Exploratory behaviors were recorded at the baseline, after initiation of treatment, and before study termination. Histopathological changes were examined postmortem in tissues. Collagen accumulation and fibrosis were confirmed with Sirius Red staining. RESULTS: Animals lost weight after oral administration of DBTC and developed persistent inflammatory abdominal and hindpaw hypersensitivity compared to sham-treated controls (P < 0.0001). These pain related secondary mechanical hypersensitivity responses increased more than 2-fold in DBTC-treated animals. The drastically diminished rearing and grooming rates persisted after DBTC administration throughout the study. Gross as well as micropathology at one month confirmed that animals treated with DBTC developed chronic hepatobiliary injuries evidenced with activation of stellate cells, multifocal necrosis, fatty degeneration of hepatocytes, periportal infiltration of inflammatory cells, and prominent biliary ductal dilation. The severity of hepatitis was scored 3.7 ± 0.2 (severe) in DBTC-treated animals vs score 0 (normal) in sham-treated animals. Fibrotic thickening was extensive around portal ducts, in hepatic parenchyma as well as in lobular pancreatic structures and confirmed with Sirius Red histopathology. In addition, pancreatic microarchitecture was presented with distortion of islets, and parenchyma, infiltration of

  1. Effects of indocyanine green in treatment of murine mammary tumor by an 808-nm diode laser: an in-vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei R.; Wichert, Kelly G.; Higgins, Aaron K.; Bartels, Kenneth E.; Adams, Robert L.; Nordquist, Robert E.

    1996-04-01

    Indocyanine green was used to enhance laser-induced photothermal destruction of murine mammary tumor cells. The 808-nm diode laser used in these experiments matches the absorption peak of the indocyanine green. The combination of the laser and in situ administration of aqueous ICG provided a highly selective photothermal destruction pattern of the tumor tissue. Histology showed that within the power range of 3 to 5 watts. The ICG- targeted tumor tissues were fatally injured, while the peripheral tissues such as skin and other interdicting tissue not containing ICG were spared. Higher powers (10 to 15 watts) could inflict severe surface damage but only resulted in limited tissue penetration. Post-treatment observation also revealed surviving tumor cells, the cause of which might be the non-uniform distribution of ICG as well as the random scattering of photons inside tissue. After laser-ICG treatment, the tumor continued to grow, but at a slower rate, and to metastasize, leading to the death of the rats. The findings of our experiments question the long-term efficacy of the photothermal effect of a single treatment using the ICG and diode laser. However, the controlled killing of tumor cells on a large scale may be proven crucial when the treatment is applied repeatedly and/or in an earlier stage so that tumor growth could be stopped and metastases prevented. This photothermal interaction may also be effective when used in conjunction with other modalities.

  2. Experimental murine chronic hepatitis: results following intrahepatic inoculation of human uveitis mycoplasma-like organisms.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, L. A.; Wirostko, E.; Wirostko, B. M.

    1993-01-01

    Mycoplasma-like organisms (MLO) are non-cultivated intracellular cell-wall deficient pathogenic bacteria with a distinctive ultrastructural appearance. Diagnosis of MLO disease depends on finding the organisms in parasitized cells using a transmission electron microscope. MLO are a well studied cause of transmissible chronic plant disease responsive to antibiotics. MLO have recently been found to cause human chronic uveitis, orbital, and retinal disease with autoimmune features. Ophthalmic leucocytes in these patients display MLO parasitization. Inoculation of human uveitis MLO into mouse eyelids produced chronic uveitis. MLO also disseminated to produce randomly distributed lethal systemic disease including chronic hepatitis. MLO parasitized leucocytes were present in all disease sites. Direct intrahepatic inoculation of human hepatic pathogens is a simple and efficient technique to produce murine hepatitis. This report describes the delayed onset widespread inflammatory liver disease produced by direct intrahepatic inoculation of human chronic uveitis MLO in 12 of 20 mice versus 0 in 40 controls (P < 0.05). The liver disease was accompanied by elevated serum SGOT levels, splenomegaly, and accelerated mortality. All 12 inflamed livers displayed MLO parasitized leucocytes versus 0 of 10 control livers. The resemblance of human chronic active hepatitis, massive hepatic necrosis, and post-necrotic cirrhosis to the MLO induced murine liver disease, the role of molecular biologic techniques in the detection and classification of those bacteria, and in therapy of MLO disease are discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8398804

  3. Treatment of experimental intracranial murine melanoma with a neuroattenuated herpes simplex virus 1 mutant.

    PubMed

    Randazzo, B P; Kesari, S; Gesser, R M; Alsop, D; Ford, J C; Brown, S M; Maclean, A; Fraser, N W

    1995-08-01

    Brain metastases occur commonly in the setting of a variety of human cancers. At present, such cases are invariably fatal and highlight a need for research on new therapies. We have developed a mouse brain tumor model utilizing the Harding-Passey melanoma cell line injected intracranially into C57Bl/6 mice. Tumors develop in 100% of the mice and can be detected by magnetic resonance imaging as early as 5 days post cell injection. Death from tumor progression occurs between 12 and 16 days post cell injection. Stereotactic injection of the neuroattenuated HSV-1 strain 1716 into brain tumors 5 or 10 days postinjection of the melanoma cells results in a statistically significant increase in the time to development of neurological symptoms and in complete tumor regression and the long-term survival of some treated animals. Moreover, viral titration studies and immunohistochemistry suggest that replication of this virus is restricted to tumor cells and does not occur in the surrounding brain tissue. These results suggest that HSV-1 mutant 1716 shows particular promise for use as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of brain tumors.

  4. Fiber-mutant technique can augment gene transduction efficacy and anti-tumor effects against established murine melanoma by cytokine-gene therapy using adenovirus vectors.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yuka; Okada, Naoki; Nakagawa, Shinsaku; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Kanehira, Makiko; Nishino, Naoko; Takahashi, Koichi; Mizuno, Nobuyasu; Hayakawa, Takao; Mayumi, Tadanori

    2002-03-01

    Melanoma cells are relatively resistant to adenovirus vector (Ad)-mediated gene transfer due to the low expression of Coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR), which acts as a primitive Ad-receptor. Therefore, extremely high doses of Ad are required for effective gene therapy against melanoma. In the present study, we investigated whether fiber-mutant Ad containing the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence in the fiber knob could promote gene delivery and anti-tumor effects in the murine B16 BL6 tumor model. B16 BL6 cells (in vitro) and tumors (in vivo) infected with RGD fiber-mutant Ad containing a tumor necrosis factor alpha gene (Ad-RGD-TNFalpha) produced more TNFalpha than those infected with conventional Ad-TNFalpha. In addition, Ad-RGD-TNFalpha required about one-tenth the dosage of Ad-TNFalpha for induction of equal therapeutic effects upon intratumoral injection into established B16 BL6 tumors. Furthermore, the combination of both TNFalpha- and interleukin 12-expressing RGD fiber-mutant Ads exhibited more effective tumor regression than the Ad expressing each alone. These results suggested that the fiber-mutant for altering Ad-tropism is a very potent technology for advancing gene therapy for melanoma. PMID:11809531

  5. Dietary soy isoflavones increase metastasis to lungs in an experimental model of breast cancer with bone micro-tumors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xujuan; Belosay, Aashvini; Hartman, James A; Song, Huaxin; Zhang, Yukun; Wang, Wendan; Doerge, Daniel R; Helferich, William G

    2015-04-01

    Bone is one of the most common sites for metastasis in breast cancer (BC). Micro-metastasis in bone marrow was detected in 30% of patients with stage I, II, or III BC at primary surgery and is a strong indicator of poor prognosis. The role dietary soy isoflavones play in BC with bone micro-metastasis is unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of genistein, daidzein, (-)-equol or a mixture of soy isoflavones on BC with bone micro-metastasis using an experimental model of murine mammary cancer 4T1 cells engineered with luciferase. A small number (1000) of 4T1 cells were injected into the tibia of female Balb/c mice to establish micro-tumors in bone. Soy isoflavones were supplemented in the AIN-93G diet at 750 mg/kg and were provided to mice from 3 weeks before to 3 weeks after cell injection. Bioluminescent imaging was conducted on day 2 (D2), D6, D8, D16 and D20 post cell injection and the results indicated dietary soy isoflavones enhanced the growth of bone micro-tumors on D8. Furthermore, dietary soy isoflavones stimulated metastatic tumor formation in lungs and increased Ki-67 protein expression in these metastasized tumors. In vitro, soy isoflavones (<10 µM) had limited effects on the growth, motility or invasion of 4T1 cells. Thus, the in vivo stimulatory effect could be likely due to systemic effects between the host, 4T1 tumors and soy isoflavones. In conclusion, soy isoflavones stimulate BC with bone micro-metastasis in mice and further investigations are needed regarding their consumption by BC survivors.

  6. Characterization of murine hepatitis virus (JHM) RNA from rats with experimental encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Jackson, D P; Percy, D H; Morris, V L

    1984-09-01

    When Wistar Furth rats are inoculated intracerebrally with the murine hepatitis virus JHM they often develop a demyelinating disease with resulting hind leg paralysis. Using an RNA transfer procedure and hybridization kinetic analysis, the virus-specific RNA in these rats was characterized. The pattern of JHM-specific RNA varied with individual infections of Wistar Furth rats. However, two species of JHM-specific RNA, the nucleocapsid and a 2.1-2.4 X 10(6)-Da RNA species were generally present. A general decrease in JHM-specific RNA in brains and spinal cord samples taken later than 20 days postinoculation was observed; however, JHM-specific RNA persisted in the spinal cord longer than in the brain of these rats.

  7. Liver and circulating NK1.1(+)CD3(-) cells are increased in infection with attenuated Salmonella typhimurium and are associated with reduced tumor in murine liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Feltis, B A; Miller, J S; Sahar, D A; Kim, A S; Saltzman, D A; Leonard, A S; Wells, C L; Sielaff, T D

    2002-09-01

    An attenuated (DeltacyA, Deltacrp) strain of Salmonella typhimurium (chi4550) containing a gene for human IL-2 (chi4550pIL2) reduces hepatic tumor burden when orally inoculated into mice with liver cancer; however, wild-type S. typhimurium is also associated with cancer regression. Therefore, experiments were designed to clarify the invasiveness and the anti-tumor properties of three strains of S. typhimurium. S. typhimurium chi4550pIL2, chi4550, or wild type (WT) was incubated with mature Caco-2 and HT-29 enterocytes, and S. typhimurium internalization was assessed. For infectivity experiments, mice were orally inoculated with saline or 10(9)S. typhimurium chi4550pIL2, chi4550, or WT; 48 h later mice were sacrificed for analysis of cecal bacteria and S. typhimurium translocation to mesenteric lymph nodes. For experiments involving tumor implantation, four groups were studied: saline control, tumor alone, chi4550pIL2+tumor, and chi4550+tumor. Mice were orally inoculated with saline or S. typhimurium and underwent laparotomy 24 h later with 5 x 10(4) MCA38 murine adenocarcinoma cells injected into the spleen. On day 14, liver tumors were counted and peripheral blood and hepatic lymphocyte populations were analyzed by FACScan. Attenuated S. typhimurium exhibited decreased internalization by cultured enterocytes and decreased infectivity after oral inoculation. Mice treated with chi4550pIL2 or chi4550 had fewer liver tumors and increased populations of hepatic and circulating NK1.1(+)CD3(-) lymphocytes compared to mice treated with saline (P < 0.01). These data suggest that attenuated S. typhimurium may have an application as an anti-tumor agent.

  8. Hydrodynamic diameters of murine mammary, Rous sarcoma, and feline leukemia RNA tumor viruses: studies by laser beat frequency light-scattering spectroscopy and electron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Salmeen, I; Rimai, L; Luftig, R B; Libes, L; Retzel, E; Rich, M; McCormick, J J

    1976-01-01

    We have studied purified preparations of murine mammary tumor virus (MuMTV), Rous sarcoma virus (RSV; Prague strain), and feline leukemia virus (FeLV) by laser beat frequency light-scattering spectroscopy, ultra-centrifugation, and electron microscopy. The laser beat frequency light-scattering spectroscopy measurements yield the light-scattering intensity, weighted diffusion coefficients. The corresponding average hydrodynamic diameters, as calculated from the diffusion coefficients by the Stokes-Einstein equation for MuMTV, RSV, and FeLV, respectively, are: 144 +/- 6 nm, 147 +/- 7 nm, and 168 +/- 6 nm. Portions of the purified RSV and MuMTV preparations, from which light-scattering samples were obtained, and portions of the actual FeLV light-scattering samples were examined by negatively stained, catalase crystal-calibrated electron microscopy. The light-scattering intensity weighted averages of the electron micrograph size distributions were calculated by weighing each size by its theoretical relative scattering intensity, as obtained from published tables computed according to the Mie scattering theory. These averages and the experimentally observed hydrodynamic diameters agreed to within +/- 5%, which is the combined experimental error in the electron microscopic and light-scattering techniques. We conclude that the size distributions of singlet particles observed in the electron micrographs are statistically true representations of the sedimentation-purified solution size distributions. The sedimentation coefficients (S20, w) for MuMTV, RSV, and FeLV, respectively, are: 595 +/- 29S, 689 +/- 35S, and 880 +/- 44S. Virus partial specific volumes were taken as the reciprocals of the buoyant densities, determined in sucrose density gradients. The Svedberg equation was used to calculate particle weights from the measured diffusion and sedimentation coefficients. The particle weights for MuMTV, RSV, and FeLV, respectively, are: (3.17 +/- 0.32) x 10(8), (4.17 +/- 0

  9. Blockade of GpIIb/IIIa inhibits the release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) from tumor cell-activated platelets and experimental metastasis.

    PubMed

    Amirkhosravi, A; Amaya, M; Siddiqui, F; Biggerstaff, J P; Meyer, T V; Francis, J L

    1999-01-01

    Evidence that platelets play a role in tumor metastasis includes the observation of circulating tumor cell-platelet aggregates and the anti-metastatic effect of thrombocytopenia and anti-platelet drugs. Platelets have recently been shown to contain vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) which is released during clotting. We therefore studied the effects of (1) tumor cell-platelet adherence and tumor cell TF activity on platelet VEGF release; and (2) the effects of GpIIb/IIIa blockade on tumor cell-induced platelet VEGF release, tumor cell-induced thrombocytopenia and experimental metastasis. Adherent A375 human melanoma cells (TF+) and KG1 myeloid leukemia (TF-) cells were cultured in RPMI containing 10% fetal bovine serum. Platelet-rich plasma was obtained from normal citrated whole blood and the presence of VEGF (34 and 44 kDa isoforms) confirmed by immunoblotting. Platelet-rich plasma with or without anti-GpIIb/IIIa (Abciximab) was added to A375 monolayers and supernatant VEGF measured by ELISA. Tumor cell-induced platelet activation and release were determined by CD62P expression and serotonin release respectively. In vitro, tumor cell-platelet adherence was evaluated by flow cytometry. In vivo, thrombocytopenia and lung seeding were assessed 30 min and 18 days, respectively, after i.v. injection of Lewis Lung carcinoma (LL2) cells into control or murine 7E3 F(ab')(2) (6 mg/ kg) athymic rats. Maximal in vitro platelet activation (72% serotonin release) occurred 30 min after adding platelets to tumor cells. At this time, 87% of the A375 cells had adhered to platelets. Abciximab significantly (P<0.05) reduced platelet adherence to tumor cells as evidenced by flow cytometry. Incubation of A375 cells with platelets induced VEGF release in a time-dependent manner. This release was significantly inhibited by Abciximab (81% at 30 min; P<0.05). In the presence of fibrinogen and FII, VEGF release induced by A375 (TF+) cells was significantly higher than that induced

  10. Blockade of GpIIb/IIIa inhibits the release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) from tumor cell-activated platelets and experimental metastasis.

    PubMed

    Amirkhosravi, A; Amaya, M; Siddiqui, F; Biggerstaff, J P; Meyer, T V; Francis, J L

    1999-01-01

    Evidence that platelets play a role in tumor metastasis includes the observation of circulating tumor cell-platelet aggregates and the anti-metastatic effect of thrombocytopenia and anti-platelet drugs. Platelets have recently been shown to contain vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) which is released during clotting. We therefore studied the effects of (1) tumor cell-platelet adherence and tumor cell TF activity on platelet VEGF release; and (2) the effects of GpIIb/IIIa blockade on tumor cell-induced platelet VEGF release, tumor cell-induced thrombocytopenia and experimental metastasis. Adherent A375 human melanoma cells (TF+) and KG1 myeloid leukemia (TF-) cells were cultured in RPMI containing 10% fetal bovine serum. Platelet-rich plasma was obtained from normal citrated whole blood and the presence of VEGF (34 and 44 kDa isoforms) confirmed by immunoblotting. Platelet-rich plasma with or without anti-GpIIb/IIIa (Abciximab) was added to A375 monolayers and supernatant VEGF measured by ELISA. Tumor cell-induced platelet activation and release were determined by CD62P expression and serotonin release respectively. In vitro, tumor cell-platelet adherence was evaluated by flow cytometry. In vivo, thrombocytopenia and lung seeding were assessed 30 min and 18 days, respectively, after i.v. injection of Lewis Lung carcinoma (LL2) cells into control or murine 7E3 F(ab')(2) (6 mg/ kg) athymic rats. Maximal in vitro platelet activation (72% serotonin release) occurred 30 min after adding platelets to tumor cells. At this time, 87% of the A375 cells had adhered to platelets. Abciximab significantly (P<0.05) reduced platelet adherence to tumor cells as evidenced by flow cytometry. Incubation of A375 cells with platelets induced VEGF release in a time-dependent manner. This release was significantly inhibited by Abciximab (81% at 30 min; P<0.05). In the presence of fibrinogen and FII, VEGF release induced by A375 (TF+) cells was significantly higher than that induced

  11. Combined effects of treatment with trientine, a copper-chelating agent, and x-irradiation on tumor growth in transplantation model of a murine fibrosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masanobu; Hirai, Ryou; Ishihara, Yuusuke; Horiguchi, Noboru; Endoh, Daiji; Okui, Toyo

    2007-10-01

    Combined effects of treatment with trientine, a copper-chelating agent, and X-irradiation on development of fibrosarcoma using a murine transplantation model in vivo and on cellular survival in vitro were examined. Copper contents in the tumors and serum of trientine-treated mice were significantly lower than those of untreated mice. The tumor volumes of mouse fibrosarcoma QRsp-11 cells increased more slowly in the trientine-treated and the X-irradiated mice than in the control mice from 10 to 24 days postinoculation. The extent of inhibition of tumor growth by X-irradiation at 3 Gy was similar to that obtained by treatment with trientine. A combination of trientine and X-irradiation at 3 Gy showed inhibitory effects on tumor growth similar to those obtained by X-irradiation at 6 Gy. The results showed that trientine and X-irradiation interacted additively in inhibition of tumor growth. When QRsp-11 cells and mouse and bovine endothelial cells were treated with trientine after X-irradiation, the surviving fractions of the cells with combined treatments were essentially consistent with the products of the surviving fractions of trientine-treated cells and those of X-irradiated cells. When the cells were pretreated with trientine and X-irradiated, the surviving fractions of the pretreated cells were lower than those of cells without treatment.

  12. Vaccinia virus MUC1 immunization of mice: immune response and protection against the growth of murine tumors bearing the MUC1 antigen.

    PubMed

    Acres, R B; Hareuveni, M; Balloul, J M; Kieny, M P

    1993-08-01

    MUC1 is a mucin found on the apical surfaces of some normal mammalian mucin-secreting cells. It is characterized by heavy glycosylation and a 20-amino-acid tandem repeat segment. In most cases of human breast adenocarcinoma, this antigen is overexpressed. Moreover, abnormal glycosylation exposes a novel peptide epitope within the tandem repeat, such that antibodies to this epitope can distinguish normal from malignant adenocarcinomatous breast tissue. We have constructed a vaccinia virus (VV) that carries the cDNA for the MUC1 antigen. Murine and human cells infected with this virus express the MUC1 molecule, with three to four tandem repeats per molecule and with the tumor-associated epitopes exposed. Mice immunized with this virus produce antibodies that recognize MUC1 outside the tandem repeat, within the tandem repeat, and within the tumor-associated protein core epitope. Tumorigenic P815 (DBA) and 3T3 (BALB/c) cells have been transfected with MUC1. Thirty percent of DBA mice immunized with VV-MUC1 are protected from growth of P815-MUC1 tumors when implanted with 10(5) cells. Immunized BALB/c mice show a late development of transfected 3T3 tumor cells. Immunized mice show a moderate MUC1-specific IgG titer, but it cannot be correlated with subsequent tumor rejection. No evidence for a MUC1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte response has been found after immunization with VV-MUC1. PMID:8280702

  13. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles functionalized with fluorescent and MRI reporters for the visualization of murine tumors overexpressing αvβ3 receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, He; Arena, Francesca; Gianolio, Eliana; Boffa, Cinzia; di Gregorio, Enza; Stefania, Rachele; Orio, Laura; Baroni, Simona; Aime, Silvio

    2016-03-01

    A novel fluorescein/Gd-DOTAGA containing nanoprobe for the visualization of tumors by optical and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is reported herein. It is based on the functionalization of the surface of small mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) (~30 nm) with the arginine-glycine-aspartic (RGD) moieties, which are known to target αvβ3 integrin receptors overexpressed in several tumor cells. The obtained nanoprobe (Gd-MSNs-RGD) displays good stability, tolerability and high relaxivity (37.6 mM-1 s-1 at 21.5 MHz). After a preliminary evaluation of their cytotoxicity and targeting capability toward U87MG cells by in vitro fluorescence and MR imaging, the nanoprobes were tested in vivo by T1-weighted MR imaging of xenografted murine tumor models. The obtained results demonstrated that the Gd-MSNs-RGD nanoprobes are good reporters both in vitro and in vivo for the MR-visualization of tumor cells overexpressing αvβ3 integrin receptors.A novel fluorescein/Gd-DOTAGA containing nanoprobe for the visualization of tumors by optical and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is reported herein. It is based on the functionalization of the surface of small mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) (~30 nm) with the arginine-glycine-aspartic (RGD) moieties, which are known to target αvβ3 integrin receptors overexpressed in several tumor cells. The obtained nanoprobe (Gd-MSNs-RGD) displays good stability, tolerability and high relaxivity (37.6 mM-1 s-1 at 21.5 MHz). After a preliminary evaluation of their cytotoxicity and targeting capability toward U87MG cells by in vitro fluorescence and MR imaging, the nanoprobes were tested in vivo by T1-weighted MR imaging of xenografted murine tumor models. The obtained results demonstrated that the Gd-MSNs-RGD nanoprobes are good reporters both in vitro and in vivo for the MR-visualization of tumor cells overexpressing αvβ3 integrin receptors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Absorption and emission spectra, energy

  14. Overexpression of the chimeric plasmin-resistant VEGF165/VEGF183 (132-158) protein in murine breast cancer induces distinct vascular patterning adjacent to tumors and retarded tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui-Yong; Fan, Bing-Lin; Wu, Xin-Sheng; Mu, Ling-Min; Wang, Wen-Feng; Zhu, Wu-Ling

    2015-02-01

    A chimeric plasmin‑resistant vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)165/VEGF183 (132-158) protein, named as VEGF183 (according to the nomenclature of VEGF), designed by a previous study, was demonstrated to have an enhanced affinity for the extracellular matrix (ECM) amongst other bioactivities. However, it is now accepted that mutant VEGFs frequently demonstrate different angiogenic activities and produce different vascular patterning from the parental molecule. The present study hypothesized that VEGF183, due to its enhanced binding affinity to the ECM, would exhibit a different angiogenic activity and produce a different vascular patterning compared to those of VEGF165. Murine breast cancer EMT‑6 cells were manipulated to stably overexpress VEGF165 or VEGF183. These cells were then inoculated intradermally into BALB/c mice in order to monitor the formation of vascular patterning in skin proximal to tumors. In vivo angiogenesis experiments revealed that overexpression of VEGF183 in murine breast cancer cells resulted in irregular, disorganized and dense vascular patterning as well as induced a significant inhibition of tumor growth compared with that of VEGF165. In addition, allograft tumor immunochemical assays of VEGF183‑overexpressing tumors demonstrated significantly lower vascular densities than those of VEGF165‑overexpressing tumors; however, VEGF183 tumors had a significantly enlarged vascular caliber. Conversely, cell wound healing experiments revealed that VEGF183‑overexpressing EMT‑6 cells had significantly decreased migration rates compared with those of VEGF165‑overexpressing EMT‑6 cells. In conclusion, the results of the present study supported the hypothesis that the altered ECM affinity of VEGF induced structural alterations to vasculature. In addition, these results provided a novel insight into VEGF design and indirect evidence for the function of exon 8 in VEGF. [Corrected] PMID:25373557

  15. Induction of antigen-presenting capacity in tumor cells upon infection with non-replicating recombinant vaccinia virus encoding murine MHC class II and costimulatory molecules.

    PubMed

    Marti, W R; Oertli, D; Meko, J B; Norton, J A; Tsung, K

    1997-01-15

    The possibility of inducing antigen-presenting capacity in cells normally lacking such capacity, currently represents a major goal in vaccine research. To address this issue we attempted to generate 'artificial' APC able to stimulate CD4+ T cell responses when tumor cells were infected with a single, recombinant, vaccinia virus (rVV) containing the two genes encoding murine MHC class II I-Ak and a third gene encoding the murine B7-1 (mB7-1) costimulatory molecule. To minimize the cytopathic effect and to improve safety, in view of possible in vivo applications, we made this rVV replication incompetent by Psoralen and long wave UV treatment. Tumor cells infected with rVV encoding I-Ak alone, pulsed with hen egg white lysozyme peptide (HEL46-61), induced IL-2 secretion by an antigen-specific T hybridoma. Tumor cells infected with the rVV encoding mB7-1 provided costimulation for activating resting CD4+ T cells in the presence of ConA. Tumor cells infected with the rVV encoding I-Ak and mB7-1, and pulsed with chicken ovotransferrin peptide (conalbumin133-145), induced a significantly higher response in a specific Th2 cell clone (D10.G4.1) as compared to cells infected with rVV encoding I-Ak molecules only. Thus, this replication incompetent rVV represents a safe, multiple gene, vector system able to confer in one single infection step effective APC capacity to non-professional APCs.

  16. Pathobiology of human RH strain induced experimental toxoplasmosis in murine model.

    PubMed

    Sudan, Vikrant; Tewari, A K; Singh, Harkirat; Singh, R

    2016-09-01

    Of late, toxoplasmosis has gained immense importance as an opportunist parasite in immunocompromised patients. In immunocompromised subjects, the disease is supposed to occur in acute form and causes acute toxoplasmic encephalitis. However, the exact pathogenesis of other vital organs, particularly in acute form of infection, is still a matter of debate. Therefore, an attempt was made to study the pathogenesis of acute form of toxoplasmosis using cryopreserved human RH strain of the parasite in murine models. For this, 100 tachyzoites were given to individual mice and upon the setup of acute form of infection, the mice were euthanized and the organs were processed for histopathology. Histopathology revealed tachyzoites in liver only while severe necrosis due to multiplication of tachyzoites were visible in liver, spleen, lungs and brain. Kidneys and heart appeared more or less normal. Finally, the pathology of disease in these organs is described in detail. The present research has generated some vital information regarding necrotic changes in tissues due to acute toxoplasmosis and will defiantly help the researchers in the better understanding of disease particularly in humans and putting up of suitable treatment regime for human subjects infected with acute toxoplasmosis. PMID:27605794

  17. Cardiac-Specific YAP Activation Improves Cardiac Function and Survival in an Experimental Murine MI Model

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhiqiang; von Gise, Alexander; Zhou, Pingzhu; Gu, Fei; Ma, Qing; Jiang, Jiangming; Yau, Allan L.; Buck, Jessica N.; Gouin, Katryna A.; van Gorp, Pim R. R.; Zhou, Bin; Chen, Jinghai; Seidman, Jonathan G.; Wang, Da-zhi; Pu, William T.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Yes-Associated Protein (YAP), the terminal effector of the Hippo signaling pathway, is crucial for regulating embryonic cardiomyocyte (CM) proliferation. Objective We hypothesized that YAP activation after myocardial infarction would preserve cardiac function and improve survival. Methods and Results We used a cardiac-specific, inducible expression system to activate YAP in adult mouse heart. Activation of YAP in adult heart promoted CM proliferation and did not deleteriously affect heart function. Furthermore, YAP activation after myocardial infarction (MI) preserved heart function and reduced infarct size. Using adeno-associated virus subtype 9 (AAV9) as a delivery vector, we expressed human YAP in the adult murine myocardium immediately after MI. We found that AAV9:hYAP significantly improved cardiac function and mouse survival. AAV9:hYAP did not exert its salutary effects by reducing CM apoptosis. Rather, AAV9:hYAP stimulated adult CM proliferation. Gene expression profiling indicated that AAV9:hYAP stimulated expression of cell cycle genes and promoted a less mature cardiac gene expression signature. Conclusions Cardiac specific YAP activation after MI mitigated myocardial injury, improved cardiac function, and enhanced survival. These findings suggest that therapeutic activation of YAP or its downstream targets, potentially through AAV-mediated gene therapy, may be a strategy to improve outcome after MI. PMID:24833660

  18. Vaccine potential of plasma bead-based dual antigen delivery system against experimental murine candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Ejaj; Zia, Qamar; Fatima, Munazza Tamkeen; Owais, Mohammad; Saleemuddin, Mohammed

    2015-11-01

    The development of prophylactic anti-candidal vaccine comprising the Candida albicans cytosolic proteins (Cp) as antigen and plasma beads (PB) prepared from plasma as sustained delivery system, is described. The immune-prophylactic potential of various PBs-based dual antigen delivery systems, co-entrapping Cp pre-entrapped in PLGA microspheres were tested in the murine model. Induction of cell mediated immunity was measured by assaying DTH and NO production as well as in vitro proliferation of lymphocytes derived from the immunized animals. Expression of surface markers on APCs (CD80, CD86) and T-cells (CD4+, CD8+) was also evaluated. Humoral immune response was studied by measuring circulating anti-Cp antibodies and their subclasses. When the prophylactic efficacy of the vaccines was tested in mice challenged with virulent C. albicans, the PB-based formulation (PB-PLGA-Cp vaccine) was found to be most effective in the generation of desirable immune response, in terms of suppression of fungal load and facilitating the survival of the immunized animals.

  19. Therapeutic effect of hydroxychloroquine on colorectal carcinogenesis in experimental murine colitis.

    PubMed

    Yao, Junlin; Xie, Jiansheng; Xie, Binbin; Li, Yiran; Jiang, Liming; Sui, Xinbing; Zhou, Xiaoyun; Pan, Hongming; Han, Weidong

    2016-09-01

    Chronic inflammation in the intestine is a strong risk factor for colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC). Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is widely used as an anti-inflammatory drug in the treatment of immune-mediated inflammatory disorders and various tumors. However, little is known regarding the effects of HCQ on colitis-associated tumorigenesis. In this study, mice treated with HCQ showed a significant reduction in early-stage colitis following azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) administration, as well as a remarkable inhibition of colonic tumorigenesis and tumor growth at late stages of CAC. Mechanistically, the therapeutic effects of HCQ were attributed to inhibition of inflammatory responses and production of mutagenic reactive oxygen species (ROS) in immune cells and subsequent promotion of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in tumor cells. Furthermore, we found that HCQ inhibited the production of inflammatory cytokines and ROS in response to toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation in macrophages. Our data presented herein may help guide the clinical use of HCQ as a prevention and treatment strategy for CAC. PMID:27288548

  20. Serial Low Doses of Sorafenib Enhance Therapeutic Efficacy of Adoptive T Cell Therapy in a Murine Model by Improving Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ren-Shyan; Hwang, Jeng-Jong

    2014-01-01

    Requirements of large numbers of transferred T cells and various immunosuppressive factors and cells in the tumor microenvironment limit the applications of adoptive T cells therapy (ACT) in clinic. Accumulating evidences show that chemotherapeutic drugs could act as immune supportive instead of immunosuppressive agents when proper dosage is used, and combined with immunotherapy often results in better treatment outcomes than monotherapy. Controversial immunomodulation effects of sorafenib, a multi-kinases inhibitor, at high and low doses have been reported in several types of cancer. However, what is the range of the low-dose sorafenib will influence the host immunity and responses of ACT is still ambiguous. Here we used a well-established E.G7/OT-1 murine model to understand the effects of serial low doses of sorafenib on both tumor microenvironment and transferred CD8+ T cells and the underlying mechanisms. Sorafenib lowered the expressions of immunosuppressive factors, and enhanced functions and migrations of transferred CD8+ T cells through inhibition of STAT3 and other immunosuppressive factors. CD8+ T cells were transduced with granzyme B promoter for driving imaging reporters to visualize the activation and distribution of transferred CD8+ T cells prior to adoptive transfer. Better activations of CD8+ T cells and tumor inhibitions were found in the combinational group compared with CD8+ T cells or sorafenib alone groups. Not only immunosuppressive factors but myeloid derived suppressive cells (MDSCs) and regulatory T cells (Tregs) were decreased in sorafenib-treated group, indicating that augmentation of tumor inhibition and function of CD8+ T cells by serial low doses of sorafenib were via reversing the immunosuppressive microenvironment. These results revealed that the tumor inhibitions of sorafenib not only through eradicating tumor cells but modifying tumor microenvironment, which helps outcomes of ACT significantly. PMID:25333973

  1. Monoclonal Immunoglobulin G1 Directed against Aspergillus fumigatus Cell Wall Glycoprotein Protects against Experimental Murine Aspergillosis†

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Ashok K.; Kavishwar, A.; Keshava, G. B. Shiva; Shukla, P. K.

    2005-01-01

    Most of the biological functions related to pathogenicity and virulence reside in the fungal cell wall, which, being the outermost part of the cell, mediates the host-fungus interplay. For these reasons much effort has focused on the discovery of useful inhibitors of cell wall glucan, chitin, and mannoprotein biosynthesis. In the absence of a wide-spectrum, safe, and potent antifungal agent, a new strategy for antifungal therapy is directed towards the development of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). In the present study the MAb A9 (immunoglobulin G1 [IgG1]) was identified from hybridomas raised in BALB/c mice immunized with cell wall antigen of Aspergillus fumigatus. The immunoreactive epitopes for this IgG1 MAb appeared to be associated with a peptide moiety, and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy revealed its binding to the cell wall surface of hyphae as well as with swollen conidia. MAb A9 inhibited hyphal development as observed by MTT [3-(4,5-dimethythiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay (25.76%), reduced the duration of spore germination, and exerted an in vitro cidal effect against Aspergillus fumigatus. The in vivo protective efficacy of MAb A9 was also evaluated in a murine model of invasive aspergillosis, where a reduction in CFU (>4 log10 units) was observed in kidney tissue of BALB/c mice challenged with A. fumigatus (2 × 105 CFU/ml) and where enhanced mean survival times (19.5 days) compared to the control (7.1 days) and an irrelevant MAb (6.1 days) were also observed. PMID:16148172

  2. In vivo antitumor and antioxidative effects of a rapeseed meal protein hydrolysate on an S180 tumor-bearing murine model.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zhaohui; Yu, Wancong; Wu, Moucheng; Wang, Jiehua

    2009-11-01

    The antitumor and antioxidative activities of a rapeseed protein hydrolysate (RSCH) obtained from rapeseed meal were evaluated by using an in vivo S180 tumor-bearing Kunming mice model. Tumor-bearing female mice were given RSCH for 10 at doses of 0, 50, 100, and 150 mg/kg/d by gastric perfusion. RSCH significantly decreased the tumor weight by 44% and 53% in the 100 and 150 mg/kg/d groups, respectively, without causing mortality or growth retardation. The thymus and spleen indices (organ weight relative to body weight) were increased significantly in the 150 mg/kg/d group. The phagocytic capability of coeliac macrophages and delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) were significantly increased in tumor-bearing mice treated with RSCH at 150 mg/kg/d. RSCH administration also enhanced the superoxide dismutase activity and reduced the serum level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. Our results show that an oral RSCH administration had an antitumor protective effect and may improve immune function by reducing free radical formation and oxidative stress in a murine model.

  3. Development and evaluation of quantitative-competitive PCR for quantitation of coxsackievirus B3 RNA in experimentally infected murine tissues.

    PubMed

    Reetoo, K N; Osman, S A; Illavia, S J; Banatvala, J E; Muir, P

    1999-10-01

    A method is described for quantitation of enterovirus RNA in experimentally infected murine tissues. Viral RNA was extracted from tissue samples and amplified by reverse transcriptase PCR in the presence of an internal standard RNA. The ratio of PCR product derived from viral RNA and internal standard RNA was then determined using specific probes in a post-PCR electrochemiluminescent hybridization assay. This provided an estimate of the viral RNA copy number in the original sample, and detection of PCR product derived from internal standard RNA validated sample processing and amplification procedures. RNA copy number correlated with viral infectivity of cell culture-derived virus, and one tissue culture infective dose was found to contain approximately 10(3) genome equivalents. The ratio of RNA copy number to infectivity in myocardial tissue taken from mice during the acute phase of coxsackievirus B3 myocarditis was more variable ranging from 10(4)-10(7), and was dependent on the stage of infection, reflecting differential rates of clearance for viral RNA and viral infectivity. The assay is rapid, and could facilitate investigations which currently rely upon enterovirus quantitation by titration in cell culture. This would be useful for experimental studies of viral pathogenesis, prophylaxis and antiviral therapy.

  4. Prevention and Mitigation of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis by Murine β-Defensins via Induction of Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Bruhs, Anika; Schwarz, Thomas; Schwarz, Agatha

    2016-01-01

    The antimicrobial peptide murine β-defensin-14 (mBD14) was found to exert, in addition to its antimicrobial activity, the capacity to induce regulatory T cells as demonstrated in the model of contact hypersensitivity. Because it is induced by ultraviolet radiation, mBD14 may contribute to the antigen-specific immunosuppression by ultraviolet radiation. To prove whether this applies also for other immunologic models and because ultraviolet radiation appears to have beneficial effects on multiple sclerosis, we utilized the model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Injection of mBD14 into mice before immunization with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein caused amelioration of the disease with less central nervous system inflammation and decreased levels of proinflammatory cytokines and cytotoxic T cells. The beneficial effect was due to Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells because it was lost on in vivo depletion of regulatory T cells. mBD14, however, also acts in a therapeutic setting, because injection of mBD14 into mice with clinical features of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis reduced the clinical score significantly. Human β-defensin-3, the human orthologue of mBD14, induced in vitro regulatory T cell-specific markers in CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells, shifting these nonregulatory cells into a regulatory phenotype with suppressive features. Thus, defensins may represent candidates worth being further pursued for the therapy of multiple sclerosis. PMID:26763437

  5. Dynamic ocular surface and lacrimal gland changes induced in experimental murine dry eye.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Bing; Wang, Yu; Reinach, Peter S; Ren, Yueping; Li, Jinyang; Hua, Shanshan; Lu, Huihui; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Dry eye disease can be a consequence of lacrimal gland insufficiency in Sjögren's Syndrome or increased tear film evaporation despite normal lacrimal gland function. To determine if there is a correlation between severity effects in these models and underlying pathophysiological responses, we compared the time dependent changes in each of these parameters that occur during a 6 week period. Dry eye was induced in 6-week-old female C57BL/6 mice by exposing them to an Intelligently Controlled Environmental System (ICES). Sixty mice were housed in ICES for 1, 2, 4 and 6 weeks respectively. Twelve were raised in normal environment and received subcutaneous injections of scopolamine hydrobromide (SCOP) 3 times daily for 5 days. Another sixty mice were housed in a normal environment and received no treatment. Corneal fluorescein staining along with corneal MMP-9 and caspase-3 level measurements were performed in parallel with the TUNEL assay. Interleukin-17(IL-17), IL-23, IL-6, IL-1, TNF-α, IFN-γ and TGF-β2 levels were estimated by real-time PCR measurements of conjunctival and lacrimal gland samples (LGs). Immunohistochemistry of excised LGs along with flow cytometry in cervical lymph nodes evaluated immune cell infiltration. Light and transmission electron microscopy studies evaluated LGs cytoarchitectural changes. ICES induced corneal epithelial destruction and apoptosis peaked at 2 weeks and kept stable in the following 4 weeks. In the ICES group, lacrimal gland proinflammatory cytokine level increases were much lower than those in the SCOP group. In accord with the lower proinflammatory cytokine levels, in the ICES group, lacrimal gland cytosolic vesicular density and size exceeded that in the SCOP group. ICES and SCOP induced murine dry eye effects became progressively more severe over a two week period. Subsequently, the disease process stabilized for the next four weeks. ICES induced local effects in the ocular surface, but failed to elicit lacrimal gland

  6. Dynamic Ocular Surface and Lacrimal Gland Changes Induced in Experimental Murine Dry Eye

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Bing; Wang, Yu; Reinach, Peter S.; Ren, Yueping; Li, Jinyang; Hua, Shanshan; Lu, Huihui; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Dry eye disease can be a consequence of lacrimal gland insufficiency in Sjögren’s Syndrome or increased tear film evaporation despite normal lacrimal gland function. To determine if there is a correlation between severity effects in these models and underlying pathophysiological responses, we compared the time dependent changes in each of these parameters that occur during a 6 week period. Dry eye was induced in 6-week-old female C57BL/6 mice by exposing them to an Intelligently Controlled Environmental System (ICES). Sixty mice were housed in ICES for 1, 2, 4 and 6 weeks respectively. Twelve were raised in normal environment and received subcutaneous injections of scopolamine hydrobromide (SCOP) 3 times daily for 5 days. Another sixty mice were housed in a normal environment and received no treatment. Corneal fluorescein staining along with corneal MMP-9 and caspase-3 level measurements were performed in parallel with the TUNEL assay. Interleukin-17(IL-17), IL-23, IL-6, IL-1, TNF-α, IFN-γ and TGF-β2 levels were estimated by real-time PCR measurements of conjunctival and lacrimal gland samples (LGs). Immunohistochemistry of excised LGs along with flow cytometry in cervical lymph nodes evaluated immune cell infiltration. Light and transmission electron microscopy studies evaluated LGs cytoarchitectural changes. ICES induced corneal epithelial destruction and apoptosis peaked at 2 weeks and kept stable in the following 4 weeks. In the ICES group, lacrimal gland proinflammatory cytokine level increases were much lower than those in the SCOP group. In accord with the lower proinflammatory cytokine levels, in the ICES group, lacrimal gland cytosolic vesicular density and size exceeded that in the SCOP group. ICES and SCOP induced murine dry eye effects became progressively more severe over a two week period. Subsequently, the disease process stabilized for the next four weeks. ICES induced local effects in the ocular surface, but failed to elicit lacrimal gland

  7. Retrotransposition of long interspersed nucleotide element-1 is associated with colitis but not tumors in a murine colitic cancer model.

    PubMed

    Otsubo, Takeshi; Okamura, Tadashi; Hagiwara, Teruki; Ishizaka, Yukihito; Dohi, Taeko; Kawamura, Yuki I

    2015-01-01

    Long interspersed element-1 (L1) is a transposable element that can move within the genome, potentially leading to genome diversity and modified gene function. Although L1 activity in somatic cells is normally suppressed through DNA methylation, some L1s are activated in tumors including colorectal carcinoma. However, how L1-retrotransposition (L1-RTP) is involved in gastrointestinal disorders remains to be elucidated. We hypothesized that L1-RTP in somatic cells might contribute to colitis-associated cancer (CAC). To address this, we employed an experimental model of CAC using transgenic L1-reporter mice carrying a human L1-EGFP reporter gene. Mice were subjected to repeated cycles of colitis induced by administration of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) in drinking water with injection of carcinogen azoxymethane (AOM). L1-RTP levels were measured by a quantitative polymerase chain reaction targeting the newly inserted reporter EGFP in various tissues and cell types, including samples obtained by laser microdissection and cell sorting with flow cytometry. DNA methylation levels of the human L1 promoter were analyzed by bisulfite pyrosequencing. AOM+DSS-treated mice exhibited significantly higher levels of L1-RTP in whole colon tissue during the acute phase of colitis when compared with control naïve mice. L1-RTP levels in whole colon tissue were positively correlated with the histological severity of colitis and degree of neutrophil infiltration into the lamina propria (LP), but not with tumor development in the colon. L1-RTP was enriched in LP mesenchymal cells rather than epithelial cells (ECs), myeloid, or lymphoid cells. DNA methylation levels of the human L1 promoter region showed a negative correlation with L1-RTP levels. L1-RTP was absent from most tumors found in 22-week-old mice. In conclusion, we demonstrated that L1-RTP was induced in the mouse CAC mucosa in accordance with the acute inflammatory response; however, retrotransposition appears not to have

  8. Infrared Spectra of Human Breast Tumor Tissue and Experimental Animal Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Belkov, M. V.; Skornyakov, I. V.; Pekhnyo, V. I.; Kozachkova, A. N.; Tsarik, H. V.; Kutsenko, I. P.; Sharykina, N. I.; Butra, V. A.

    2015-01-01

    We have used Fourier transform IR spectroscopy methods to conduct comparative studies of human breast tumors and sarcoma 180 tumor grafted into mice. The IR spectral parameters used to identify tumor tissue in mice with the sarcoma 180 strain proved to be identical to the parameters for human breast tissue in cancer. In the presence of a malignant tumor in humans, the most intense C=O vibrational bands in the protein molecules are observed in the interval 1710-1680 cm-1. For a benign tumor, in the IR spectra of breast tissue the intense bands are located in the interval 1670-1650 cm-1. We spectroscopically monitored the diagnosis and the chemotherapy process using the model of sarcoma 180 in mice. As the therapeutic drugs, we used synthesized coordination compounds based on palladium complexes with diphosphonic acid derivatives. We demonstrate the promising potential of palladium complexes with zoledronic acid as an effective cytostatic. In therapy using a palladium complex with zoledronic acid, the effect of tumor growth inhibition is accompanied by a change in its spectral characteristics. The parameters of the IR spectra for tumor tissue after treatment are close to those of the IR spectra for healthy tissue.

  9. The 55-kD tumor necrosis factor receptor and CD95 independently signal murine hepatocyte apoptosis and subsequent liver failure.

    PubMed Central

    Leist, M.; Gantner, F.; Künstle, G.; Bohlinger, I.; Tiegs, G.; Bluethmann, H.; Wendel, A.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Activation of either the 55-kD tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNF-R1) or CD95 (Fas/Apo-1) causes apoptosis of cells and liver failure in mice, and has been associated with human liver disorders. The aim of this study was first to clarify the association between CD95 activation, hepatocyte apoptosis, and fulminant liver failure. Next, we investigated whether TNF-R1 and CD95 operate independently of each other in the induction of hepatocyte apoptosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Using both mice and primary liver cell cultures deficient in either TNF-R1 or functional CD95, the induction of apoptosis and hepatocyte death following activation of TNF-R1 or CD95 were studied in vitro and in various in vivo models of acute liver failure. RESULTS: In vivo or in vitro stimulation of CD95 caused apoptosis of wild-type (wt) murine hepatocytes which had not been sensitized by blocking transcription. Time course studies showed that DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation preceded, respectively, membrane lysis in vitro and necrosis in vivo. Similar results were obtained after CD95 activation in hepatocytes or livers lacking TNF-R1. Conversely, hepatocytotoxicity due to endogenous or exogenous TNF was not affected in animals or liver cell cultures lacking the expression of functional CD95. CONCLUSIONS: TNF-R1 and CD95 are independent and differentially regulated triggers of murine apoptotic liver failure. Images FIG. 3 FIG. 6 FIG. 7 FIG. 9 PMID:8900539

  10. Tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 is essential for LPS-induced sensitization and tolerance to oxygen-glucose deprivation in murine neonatal organotypic hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Markus, Tina; Cronberg, Tobias; Cilio, Corrado; Pronk, Cornelis; Wieloch, Tadeusz; Ley, David

    2009-01-01

    Inflammation and ischemia have a synergistic damaging effect in the immature brain. The role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptors 1 and 2 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced sensitization and tolerance to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) was evaluated in neonatal murine hippocampal organotypic slices. Hippocampal slices from balb/c, C57BL/6 TNFR1(-/-), TNFR2(-/-), and wild-type (WT) mice obtained at P6 were grown in vitro for 9 days. Preexposure to LPS immediately before OGD increased propidium iodide-determined cell death in regions CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus from 4 up to 48 h after OGD (P<0.001). Extending the time interval between LPS exposure and OGD to 72 h resulted in tolerance, that is reduced neuronal cell death after OGD (P<0.05). Slices from TNFR1(-/-) mice showed neither LPS-induced sensitization nor LPS-induced tolerance to OGD, whereas both effects were present in slices from TNFR2(-/-) and WT mice. Cytokine secretion (TNFalpha and interleukin-6) during LPS exposure was decreased in TNFR1(-/-) slices and increased in TNFR2(-/-) as compared with WT slices. We conclude that LPS induces sensitization or tolerance to OGD depending on the time interval between exposure to LPS and OGD in murine hippocampal slice cultures. Both paradigms are dependent on signaling through TNFR1.

  11. Effect of L-histidinol on the metabolism of 5-fluorouracil in the BALB/c x DBA/8 F1 murine tumor system.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, R C; Stolfi, R L; Martin, D S

    1988-12-01

    L-Histidinol, a structural analogue of histidine, which transiently inhibits proliferation, can protect cells from the toxic effects of proliferation-dependent chemotherapeutic agents such as 5-fluorouracil (FUra). In the BALB/c x DBA/8 F1 (hereafter called CD8F1) murine tumor system, L-histidinol protected mice from FUra-induced leukopenia, weight loss, and mortality; however, the therapeutic index was not improved since L-histidinol also protected the tumor against the toxic effects of FUra. In order to understand the mechanism of this protection, we examined the effects of L-histidinol on the metabolism of FUra. Results indicate that L-histidinol had no effect on the phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate levels in tumor, the activation of FUra to nucleotides or levels of free 5-fluorodeoxyuridine monophosphate in either tumor or bone marrow. L-Histidinol (7 mg/mouse, every 2 h for 5 doses) reduced RNA and DNA synthesis, as measured by 32P incorporation in vivo, by approximately one-half in tumor, and by 70% in bone marrow. This in turn resulted in reduced incorporation of FUra into RNA in both tumor and bone marrow. At 2 h, 4 h, and 24 h after FUra administration the level of FUra in RNA was 24-37% less in both tumor and bone marrow of mice that received L-histidinol with FUra. Using 32P as a monitor of overall RNA synthesis, the [3H]FUra/32P ratio remained unchanged, suggesting that the reduction of FUra incorporation into RNA was due to decreased RNA synthesis rather than a decrease in the number of FUra molecules per RNA chain. In contrast, L-histidinol had no effect on the in vivo inhibition of thymidylate synthetase by 5-fluorodeoxyuridine monophosphate as measured by the incorporation of [3H]-2'-deoxyuridine into DNA or on the percentages of thymidylate synthetase in the free versus 5-fluorodeoxyuridine monophosphate-bound state. We conclude that L-histidinol reduces FUra toxicity by reducing FUra incorporation into RNA. Since the major mechanism of action in the

  12. Utility of the microculture method in non-invasive samples obtained from an experimental murine model with asymptomatic leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Allahverdiyev, Adil M; Bagirova, Malahat; Cakir-Koc, Rabia; Elcicek, Serhat; Oztel, Olga Nehir; Canim-Ates, Sezen; Abamor, Emrah Sefik; Yesilkir-Baydar, Serap

    2012-07-01

    The sensitivity of diagnostic methods for visceral leishmaniasis (VL) decreases because of the low number of parasites and antibody amounts in asymptomatic healthy donors who are not suitable for invasive sample acquisition procedures. Therefore, new studies are urgently needed to improve the sensitivity and specificity of the diagnostic approaches in non-invasive samples. In this study, the sensitivity of the microculture method (MCM) was compared with polymerase chain reaction (PCR), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and immunofluorescent antibody test (IFAT) methods in an experimental murine model with asymptomatic leishmaniasis. Results showed that the percent of positive samples in ELISA, IFAT, and peripheral blood (PB) -PCR tests were 17.64%, 8.82%, and 5.88%, respectively, whereas 100% positive results were obtained with MCM and MCM-PCR methods. Thus, this study, for the first time, showed that MCM is more sensitive, specific, and economic than other methods, and the sensitivity of PCR that was performed to samples obtained from MCM was higher than sensitivity of the PCR method sampled by PB. PMID:22764296

  13. IgE expression on the surface of B1 and B2 lymphocytes in experimental murine schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, F L; Aguiar, A M; Borojevic, R; El-Cheikh, M C

    2005-07-01

    In a previous study we monitored the distribution and phenotype expression of B1 cells during the evolution of experimental murine schistosomiasis mansoni and we proposed that the B1 cells were heterogeneous: a fraction which originated in the spleen and followed the migratory pathway to mesenteric ganglia, while the other was the resident peritoneal B1-cell pool. In the present study, we have addressed the question of whether these two B1-lymphocyte populations are involved in the production of the late Ig isotype IgE, which is present in high levels in schistosomal infection. Lymphocyte expression of surface markers and immunoglobulins were monitored by immunofluorescence flow cytometry. Both in the spleen and mesenteric ganglia, the B1 and B2 cells were induced to switch from IgM to IgE in the early Th2-dominated phase of the disease, with an increase of IgE in its later phases. Conversely, peritoneal B1-IgM+ switched to the remaining IgE+ present in high numbers in the peritoneal cavity throughout the disease. We correlated the efficient induction of the expression of late Ig isotypes by B1 cells with high levels of inflammatory cytokines due to the intense host response to the presence of worms and their eggs in the abdominal cavity. In conclusion, B1 cells have a different switch behavior from IgM to IgE indicating that these cell sub-populations depend on the microenvironment.

  14. A method for histopathological study of the multifocal nature of spinal cord lesions in murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Gibson-Corley, Katherine N; Boyden, Alexander W; Leidinger, Mariah R; Lambertz, Allyn M; Ofori-Amanfo, Georgina; Naumann, Paul W; Goeken, J Adam; Karandikar, Nitin J

    2016-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a well-established mouse model for multiple sclerosis and is characterized by infiltration of mononuclear cells and demyelination within the central nervous system along with the clinical symptoms of paralysis. EAE is a multifocal and random disease, which sometimes makes histopathologic analysis of lesions difficult as it may not be possible to predict where lesions will occur, especially when evaluating cross sections of spinal cord. Consequently, lesions may be easily missed due to limited sampling in traditional approaches. To evaluate the entire length of the spinal cord while maintaining anatomic integrity, we have developed a method to section the cord within the decalcified spinal column, which allows for the study of the multifocal nature of this disease and also minimizes handling artifact. HE and Luxol fast blue staining of these spinal cord sections revealed a paucity of lesions in some areas, while others showed marked inflammation and demyelination. The percentage of spinal cord affected by EAE was evaluated at four separate areas of longitudinally sectioned cord and it varied greatly within each animal. Immunohistochemical staining of in situ spinal cords which had undergone decalcification was successful for key immuno-markers used in EAE research including CD3 for T cells, B220 for B cells and F4/80 for murine macrophages. This method will allow investigators to look at the entire spinal cord on a single slide and evaluate the spinal cord with and without classic EAE lesions. PMID:26855861

  15. Heightened expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 1 alpha, and glial fibrillary acidic protein in experimental Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Kordek, R; Nerurkar, V R; Liberski, P P; Isaacson, S; Yanagihara, R; Gajdusek, D C

    1996-01-01

    The ultrastructural pathology of myelinated axons in mice infected experimentally with the Fujisaki strain of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) virus is characterized by myelin sheath vacuolation that closely resembles that induced in murine spinal cord organotypic cultures by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), a cytokine produced by astrocytes and macrophages. To clarify the role of TNF-alpha in experimental CJD, we investigated the expression of TNF-alpha in brain tissues from CJD virus-infected mice at weekly intervals after inoculation by reverse transcription-coupled PCR, Northern and Western blot analyses, and immunocytochemical staining. Neuropathological findings by electron microscopy, as well as expression of interleukin 1 alpha and glial fibrillary acidic protein, were concurrently monitored. As determined by reverse transcription-coupled PCR, the expression of TNF-alpha, interleukin 1 alpha, and glial fibrillary acidic protein was increased by approximately 200-fold in the brains of CJD virus-inoculated mice during the course of disease. By contrast, beta-actin expression remained unchanged. Progressively increased expression of TNF-alpha in CJD virus-infected brain tissues was verified by Northern and Western blot analyses, and astrocytes in areas with striking myelin sheath vacuolation were intensely stained with an antibody against murine TNF-alpha. The collective findings of TNF-alpha overexpression during the course of clinical disease suggest that TNF-alpha may mediate the myelin sheath vacuolation observed in experimental CJD. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8790403

  16. Ultrastructural Study on Tissue Alterations Caused by Trypanosomatids in Experimental Murine Infections

    PubMed Central

    Finol, Héctor J.; Roschman-González, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The ultrastructural study in different tissues of mice experimentally infected with isolates of Trypanosoma evansi, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Leishmania mexicana reveals changes in cardiac myocytes, skeletal muscle fibers, and hepatic, adrenal, kidney, and spleen cells. Some of these changes were cytoarchitectural and others consisted of necrosis. Alterations in the microvasculature were also found. The mononuclear cell infiltrate included neutrophils, eosinophils, and macrophages. This work shows that diverse mice tissues are important target for trypanosomatids. PMID:25072046

  17. Effects of letrozole on breast cancer micro-metastatic tumor growth in bone and lung in mice inoculated with murine 4T1 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wendan; Belosay, Aashvini; Yang, Xujuan; Hartman, James A; Song, Huaxin; Iwaniec, Urszula T; Turner, Russell T; Churchwell, Mona I; Doerge, Daniel R; Helferich, William G

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the leading cancer in women worldwide. Metastasis occurs in stage IV BC with bone and lung being common metastatic sites. Here we evaluate the effects of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole on BC micro-metastatic tumor growth in bone and lung metastasis in intact and ovariectomized (OVX) mice with murine estrogen receptor negative (ER-) BC cells inoculated in tibia. Forty-eight BALB/c mice were randomly assigned to one of four groups: OVX, OVX + Letrozole, Intact, and Intact + Letrozole, and injected with 4T1 cells intra-tibially. Letrozole was subcutaneously injected daily for 23 days at a dose of 1.75 µg/g body weight. Tumor progression was monitored by bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Following necropsy, inoculated tibiae were scanned via µCT and bone response to tumor was scored from 0 (no ectopic mineralization/osteolysis) to 5 (extensive ectopic mineralization/osteolysis). OVX mice had higher tibial pathology scores indicative of more extensive bone destruction than intact mice, irrespective of letrozole treatment. Letrozole decreased serum estradiol levels and reduced lung surface tumor numbers in intact animals. Furthermore, mice receiving letrozole had significantly fewer tumor colonies and fewer proliferative cells in the lung than OVX and intact controls based on H&E and Ki-67 staining, respectively. In conclusion, BC-inoculated OVX animals had higher tibia pathology scores than BC-inoculated intact animals and letrozole reduced BC metastases to lungs. These findings suggest that, by lowering systemic estrogen level and/or by interacting with the host organ, the aromatase inhibitor letrozole has the potential to reduce ER- BC metastasis to lung. PMID:27209469

  18. Aberrant promoter hypermethylation of the death-associated protein kinase gene is early and frequent in murine lung tumors induced by cigarette smoke and tobacco carcinogens.

    PubMed

    Pulling, Leah C; Vuillemenot, Brian R; Hutt, Julie A; Devereux, Theodora R; Belinsky, Steven A

    2004-06-01

    Loss of expression of the death-associated protein (DAP)-kinase gene by aberrant promoter methylation may play an important role in cancer development and progression. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the commonality for inactivation of the DAP-kinase gene in adenocarcinomas induced in mice by chronic exposure to mainstream cigarette smoke, the tobacco carcinogens 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) and vinyl carbamate, and the occupational carcinogen methylene chloride. The timing for inactivation was also determined in alveolar hyperplasias that arise in lung cancer induced in the A/J mouse by NNK. The DAP-kinase gene was not expressed in three of five NNK-induced lung tumor-derived cell lines or in a spontaneously arising lung tumor-derived cell line. Treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine restored expression; dense methylation throughout the DAP-kinase CpG island detected by bisulfite sequencing supported methylation as the inactivating event in these cell lines. Methylation-specific PCR detected inactivation of the DAP-kinase gene in 43% of tumors associated with cigarette smoke, a frequency similar to those reported in human non-small cell lung cancer. In addition, DAP-kinase methylation was detected in 52%, 60%, and 50% of tumors associated with NNK, vinyl carbamate, and methylene chloride, respectively. Methylation was observed at similar prevalence in both NNK-induced hyperplasias and adenocarcinomas (46% versus 52%), suggesting that inactivation of this gene is one pathway for tumor development in the mouse lung. Bisulfite sequencing of both premalignant and malignant lesions revealed dense methylation, substantiating that this gene is functionally inactivated at the earliest histological stages of adenocarcinoma development. This study is the first to use a murine model of cigarette smoke-induced lung cancer and demonstrate commonality for inactivation by promoter hypermethylation of a gene implicated in the development

  19. Comparison between in vitro radiosensitivity and in vivo radioresponse of murine tumor cell lines. I: Parameters of in vitro radiosensitivity and endogenous cellular glutathione levels

    SciTech Connect

    Bristow, R.G.; Hardy, P.A.; Hill, R.P. )

    1990-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that differences in the initial low-dose region of the radiation survival curves for human tumor cells might explain the differences in clinical response of tumors to fractionated radiation treatment. In this study, which is described in two companion papers, we investigated this hypothesis directly using animal model systems. In the present paper we determined in vitro radiation survival curves for eight murine tumor cell lines of varying histopathological type and: (a) measured survival at the 2 Gy and 8 Gy dose levels, (b) fitted parameters to the linear quadratic and two component multi-target equation models of cellular survival and (c) calculated mean inactivation doses. We found that the choice of the data fitting procedure affected the absolute value, relative ranking, and power to discriminate between the cell lines of these calculated parameters. A detailed statistical study indicated that the measured surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) was the best discriminant of intrinsic radiosensitivity between the eight tumor cell lines. When these same cell lines were assayed for intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels, no correlation was found between levels of GSH and the SF2 value. Determining the SF2 value may be the method of choice to describe the low-dose region of the radiation survival curve, as it precludes the necessity of choosing a model to fit the survival data, it has excellent discriminatory powers, and it represents the survival in the radiotherapeutically relevant region of the in vitro radiation survival curve. Furthermore, as demonstrated in the companion paper, it correlates with cell survival in the tumors following 10 fractions of 2 Gy given in vivo.

  20. Both soluble and membrane-bound forms of Flt3 ligand enhance tumor immunity following "suicide" gene therapy in a murine colon carcinoma model.

    PubMed

    Alsheikhly, Abdul-Razzak; Zweiri, Jehad; Walmesley, Alice J; Watson, Alastair J M; Christmas, Stephen E

    2004-11-01

    In prodrug-activated ("suicide") gene therapy, tumor cells are transfected with the gene for an enzyme that converts an inactive prodrug, such as ganciclovir (GCV), to a toxic compound. Transfected cells are killed on administration of GCV, as also are untransfected "bystander" cells. The ability of the dendritic cell stimulatory cytokine Flt3 ligand (Flt3-L) to modulate prodrug-activated gene therapy has been investigated. Transfectants of the murine colon carcinoma MC26 were generated expressing soluble (FLS) and membrane-bound forms of Flt3-L. They were inoculated together with wild-type MC26 cells and cells expressing herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV1) thymidine kinase into BALB/c mice, which were then administered GCV. Expression of Flt3-L or FLS prevented regrowth of tumor in most mice, which was comparable to the effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), while tumors recurred in all mice receiving "suicide" gene therapy alone. Recurring tumor cells were resistant to direct killing by GCV but sensitive to "bystander" killing in vitro. Mice without tumor recurrence were rechallenged with unmodified MC26 cells. Of those mice given transfectants expressing GM-CSF, Flt3-L, or FLS, approximately 50% were immune to rechallenge. These mice also showed cytotoxic and proliferative responses to MC26 cells. These experiments show that both soluble and membrane-bound forms of Flt3-L were able to induce a protective immune response to colon carcinoma cells in a fashion similar to GM-CSF.

  1. Antitumor activity of melinjo (Gnetum gnemon L.) seed extract in human and murine tumor models in vitro and in a colon-26 tumor-bearing mouse model in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Narayanan K; Kunimasa, Kazuhiro; Yamori, Yukio; Mori, Mari; Mori, Hideki; Nakamura, Kazuki; Miller, George; Manne, Upender; Tiwari, Amit K; Narayanan, Bhagavathi

    2015-01-01

    Melinjo (Gnetum gnemon L.) seed extract (MSE) and its active ingredient gnetin C (GC), a resveratrol dimer, have been shown to possess a broad spectrum of pharmacological activities. In this study, we investigated the antitumor activity of MSE and GC using human and murine tumor cell culture models in vitro. The antitumor activity of GC was compared with trans-resveratrol (tRV), a stilbenoid polyphenol. Our results show that MSE and GC at clinically achievable concentrations significantly inhibited the proliferation of pancreatic, prostate, breast, and colon cancer cell types (P < 0.05), without affecting normal cells. Interestingly, GC exerts enhanced antitumor activity than that of tRV (P < 0.05). MSE and GC significantly induced apoptosis in all the cancer cells, indicating MSE and GC inhibit tumor cell growth by inducing apoptosis (P < 0.001). Our findings provide evidence that MSE might induce apoptosis in cancer cells via caspase-3/7-dependent and -independent mechanisms. However, GC might trigger both early and late stage apoptosis in cancer cells, at least in part by activating caspase 3/7-dependent mechanisms. Furthermore, the antitumor efficacy of MSE observed in vitro was also validated in a widely used colon-26 tumor-bearing mouse model. Oral administration of MSE at 50 and 100 mg/kg per day significantly inhibited tumor growth, intratumoral angiogenesis, and liver metastases in BALB/c mice bearing colon-26 tumors (P < 0.05). In conclusion, our findings provide evidence that MSE and GC have potent antitumor activity. Most importantly, we provide the first evidence that MSE inhibits tumor growth, intratumoral angiogenesis, and liver metastasis in a colon-26 tumor-bearing mice. PMID:26408414

  2. Effects of ionizing radiation on bone cell differentiation in an experimental murine bone cell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Lau, Patrick; Hellweg, Christine; Reitz, Guenther

    During long-term space travel astronauts are exposed to a complex mixture of different radiation types under conditions of dramatically reduced weight-bearing activity. It has been validated that astronauts loose a considerable amount of bone mass at a rate up to one to two percent each month in space. Therapeutic doses of ionizing radiation cause bone damage and increase fracture risks after treatment for head-and-neck cancer and in pelvic irradiation. For low radiation doses, the possibility of a disturbed healing potential of bone was described. Radiation induced damage has been discussed to inflict mainly on immature and healing bone. Little is known about radiation effects on bone remodelling and even less on the combined action of microgravity and radiation. Bone remodelling is a life-long process performed by balanced action of cells from the osteoblast and osteoclast lineages. While osteoblasts differentiate either into bone-lining cells or into osteocytes and play a crucial role in bone matrix synthesis, osteoclasts are responsible for bone resorption. We hypothesize that the balance between bone matrix assembly by osteocytes and bone degradation by osteoclasts is modulated by microgravity as well as by ionizing radiation. To address this, a cell model consisting of murine cell lines with the potential to differentiate into bone-forming osteoblasts (OCT-1, MC3T3-E1 S24, and MC3T3-E1 S4) was used for studying radiation response after exposure to simulated components of cosmic radiation. Cells were exposed to graded doses of 150 kV X-rays, α particles (0.525 MeV/u, 160 keV/µm; PTB, Braunschweig, Germany) and accelerated heavy ions (75 MeV/u carbon, 29 keV/µm; 95 MeV/u argon, 230 keV/µm; GANIL, Caen, France). Cell survival was measured as colony forming ability; cell cycle progression was analyzed via fluorescence-activated cell scanning (FACS) by measurement of the content of propidium iodide-stained DNA, DNA damage was visualized by γH2AX

  3. Effects of ionizing radiation on bone cell differentiation in an experimental murine bone cell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Lau, Patrick; Hellweg, Christine; Reitz, Guenther

    During long-term space travel astronauts are exposed to a complex mixture of different radiation types under conditions of dramatically reduced weight-bearing activity. It has been validated that astronauts loose a considerable amount of bone mass at a rate up to one to two percent each month in space. Therapeutic doses of ionizing radiation cause bone damage and increase fracture risks after treatment for head-and-neck cancer and in pelvic irradiation. For low radiation doses, the possibility of a disturbed healing potential of bone was described. Radiation induced damage has been discussed to inflict mainly on immature and healing bone. Little is known about radiation effects on bone remodelling and even less on the combined action of microgravity and radiation. Bone remodelling is a life-long process performed by balanced action of cells from the osteoblast and osteoclast lineages. While osteoblasts differentiate either into bone-lining cells or into osteocytes and play a crucial role in bone matrix synthesis, osteoclasts are responsible for bone resorption. We hypothesize that the balance between bone matrix assembly by osteocytes and bone degradation by osteoclasts is modulated by microgravity as well as by ionizing radiation. To address this, a cell model consisting of murine cell lines with the potential to differentiate into bone-forming osteoblasts (OCT-1, MC3T3-E1 S24, and MC3T3-E1 S4) was used for studying radiation response after exposure to simulated components of cosmic radiation. Cells were exposed to graded doses of 150 kV X-rays, α particles (0.525 MeV/u, 160 keV/µm; PTB, Braunschweig, Germany) and accelerated heavy ions (75 MeV/u carbon, 29 keV/µm; 95 MeV/u argon, 230 keV/µm; GANIL, Caen, France). Cell survival was measured as colony forming ability; cell cycle progression was analyzed via fluorescence-activated cell scanning (FACS) by measurement of the content of propidium iodide-stained DNA, DNA damage was visualized by γH2AX

  4. The Effects of Pulsed Radiation Therapy on Tumor Oxygenation in 2 Murine Models of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wobb, Jessica; Krueger, Sarah A.; Kane, Jonathan L.; Galoforo, Sandra; Grills, Inga S.; Wilson, George D.; Marples, Brian

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of low-dose pulsed radiation therapy (PRT) in 2 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) xenografts and to investigate the mechanism of action of PRT compared with standard radiation therapy (SRT). Methods and Materials: Subcutaneous radiosensitive UT-SCC-14 and radioresistant UT-SCC-15 xenografts were established in athymic NIH III HO female mice. Tumors were irradiated with 2 Gy/day by continuous standard delivery (SRT: 2 Gy) or discontinuous low-dose pulsed delivery (PRT: 0.2 Gy × 10 with 3-min pulse interval) to total doses of 20 Gy (UT14) or 40 Gy (UT15) using a clinical 5-day on/2-day off schedule. Treatment response was assessed by changes in tumor volume, {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) (tumor metabolism), and {sup 18}F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) (hypoxia) positron emission tomography (PET) imaging before, at midpoint, and after treatment. Tumor hypoxia using pimonidazole staining and vascular density (CD34 staining) were assessed by quantitative histopathology. Results: UT15 and UT14 tumors responded similarly in terms of growth delay to either SRT or PRT. When compared with UT14 tumors, UT15 tumors demonstrated significantly lower uptake of FDG at all time points after irradiation. UT14 tumors demonstrated higher levels of tumor hypoxia after SRT when compared with PRT as measured by {sup 18}F-FMISO PET. By contrast, no differences were seen in {sup 18}F-FMISO PET imaging between SRT and PRT for UT15 tumors. Histologic analysis of pimonidazole staining mimicked the {sup 18}F-FMISO PET imaging data, showing an increase in hypoxia in SRT-treated UT14 tumors but not PRT-treated tumors. Conclusions: Differences in {sup 18}F-FMISO uptake for UT14 tumors after radiation therapy between PRT and SRT were measurable despite the similar tumor growth delay responses. In UT15 tumors, both SRT and PRT were equally effective at reducing tumor hypoxia to a significant level as measured by {sup 18}F-FMISO and pimonidazole.

  5. The putative tumor suppressor gene EphA3 fails to demonstrate a crucial role in murine lung tumorigenesis or morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lahtela, Jenni; Pradhan, Barun; Närhi, Katja; Hemmes, Annabrita; Särkioja, Merja; Kovanen, Panu E.; Brown, Arthur; Verschuren, Emmy W.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is based on histological analysis and molecular profiling of targetable driver oncogenes. Therapeutic responses are further defined by the landscape of passenger mutations, or loss of tumor suppressor genes. We report here a thorough study to address the physiological role of the putative lung cancer tumor suppressor EPH receptor A3 (EPHA3), a gene that is frequently mutated in human lung adenocarcinomas. Our data shows that homozygous or heterozygous loss of EphA3 does not alter the progression of murine adenocarcinomas that result from Kras mutation or loss of Trp53, and we detected negligible postnatal expression of EphA3 in adult wild-type lungs. Yet, EphA3 was expressed in the distal mesenchyme of developing mouse lungs, neighboring the epithelial expression of its Efna1 ligand; this is consistent with the known roles of EPH receptors in embryonic development. However, the partial loss of EphA3 leads only to subtle changes in epithelial Nkx2-1, endothelial Cd31 and mesenchymal Fgf10 RNA expression levels, and no macroscopic phenotypic effects on lung epithelial branching, mesenchymal cell proliferation, or abundance and localization of CD31-positive endothelia. The lack of a discernible lung phenotype in EphA3-null mice might indicate lack of an overt role for EPHA3 in the murine lung, or imply functional redundancy between EPHA receptors. Our study shows how biological complexity can challenge in vivo functional validation of mutations identified in sequencing efforts, and provides an incentive for the design of knock-in or conditional models to assign the role of EPHA3 mutation during lung tumorigenesis. PMID:25713296

  6. Vaccinia virus Transmission through Experimentally Contaminated Milk Using a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Rehfeld, Izabelle Silva; Guedes, Maria Isabel Maldonado Coelho; Fraiha, Ana Luiza Soares; Costa, Aristóteles Gomes; Matos, Ana Carolina Diniz; Fiúza, Aparecida Tatiane Lino; Lobato, Zélia Inês Portela

    2015-01-01

    Bovine vaccinia (BV) is a zoonosis caused by Vaccinia virus (VACV), which affects dairy cattle and humans. Previous studies have detected the presence of viable virus particles in bovine milk samples naturally and experimentally contaminated with VACV. However, it is not known whether milk contaminated with VACV could be a route of viral transmission. However, anti-Orthopoxvirus antibodies were detected in humans from BV endemic areas, whom had no contact with affected cows, which suggest that other VACV transmission routes are possible, such as consumption of contaminated milk and dairy products. Therefore, it is important to study the possibility of VACV transmission by contaminated milk. This study aimed to examine VACV transmission, pathogenesis and shedding in mice orally inoculated with experimentally contaminated milk. Thirty mice were orally inoculated with milk containing 107 PFU/ml of VACV, and ten mice were orally inoculated with uncontaminated milk. Clinical examinations were performed for 30 consecutive days, and fecal samples and oral swabs (OSs) were collected every other day. Mice were euthanized on predetermined days, and tissue and blood samples were collected. Nested-PCR, plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT), viral isolation, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) methods were performed on the collected samples. No clinical changes were observed in the animals. Viral DNA was detected in feces, blood, OSs and tissues, at least in one of the times tested. The lungs displayed moderate to severe interstitial lymphohistiocytic infiltrates, and only the heart, tonsils, tongue, and stomach did not show immunostaining at the IHC analysis. Neutralizing antibodies were detected at the 20th and 30th days post infection in 50% of infected mice. The results revealed that VACV contaminated milk could be a route of viral transmission in mice experimentally infected, showing systemic distribution and shedding through feces and oral mucosa, albeit

  7. Vaccinia virus Transmission through Experimentally Contaminated Milk Using a Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Rehfeld, Izabelle Silva; Guedes, Maria Isabel Maldonado Coelho; Fraiha, Ana Luiza Soares; Costa, Aristóteles Gomes; Matos, Ana Carolina Diniz; Fiúza, Aparecida Tatiane Lino; Lobato, Zélia Inês Portela

    2015-01-01

    Bovine vaccinia (BV) is a zoonosis caused by Vaccinia virus (VACV), which affects dairy cattle and humans. Previous studies have detected the presence of viable virus particles in bovine milk samples naturally and experimentally contaminated with VACV. However, it is not known whether milk contaminated with VACV could be a route of viral transmission. However, anti-Orthopoxvirus antibodies were detected in humans from BV endemic areas, whom had no contact with affected cows, which suggest that other VACV transmission routes are possible, such as consumption of contaminated milk and dairy products. Therefore, it is important to study the possibility of VACV transmission by contaminated milk. This study aimed to examine VACV transmission, pathogenesis and shedding in mice orally inoculated with experimentally contaminated milk. Thirty mice were orally inoculated with milk containing 107 PFU/ml of VACV, and ten mice were orally inoculated with uncontaminated milk. Clinical examinations were performed for 30 consecutive days, and fecal samples and oral swabs (OSs) were collected every other day. Mice were euthanized on predetermined days, and tissue and blood samples were collected. Nested-PCR, plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT), viral isolation, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) methods were performed on the collected samples. No clinical changes were observed in the animals. Viral DNA was detected in feces, blood, OSs and tissues, at least in one of the times tested. The lungs displayed moderate to severe interstitial lymphohistiocytic infiltrates, and only the heart, tonsils, tongue, and stomach did not show immunostaining at the IHC analysis. Neutralizing antibodies were detected at the 20th and 30th days post infection in 50% of infected mice. The results revealed that VACV contaminated milk could be a route of viral transmission in mice experimentally infected, showing systemic distribution and shedding through feces and oral mucosa, albeit

  8. Role of CD8^+ T Cells in Murine Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Sheng-Le; Pernis, Benvenuto

    1992-05-01

    The course of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model for multiple sclerosis, is affected by immunoregulatory T lymphocytes. When animals are immunized with encephalitogenic peptide of myelin basic protein and recover from the first episode of EAE, they become resistant to a second induction of this disease. Animals depleted of CD8^+ T cells by antibody-mediated clearance were used to examine the role of CD8^+ T cells in EAE. These cells were found to be major participants in the resistance to a second induction of EAE but were not essential for spontaneous recovery from the first episode of the disease.

  9. Tumor Microenvironment Remodeling by 4-Methylumbelliferone Boosts the Antitumor Effect of Combined Immunotherapy in Murine Colorectal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Malvicini, Mariana; Fiore, Esteban; Ghiaccio, Valentina; Piccioni, Flavia; Rizzo, Miguel; Olmedo Bonadeo, Lucila; García, Mariana; Rodríguez, Marcelo; Bayo, Juan; Peixoto, Estanislao; Atorrasagasti, Catalina; Alaniz, Laura; Aquino, Jorge; Matar, Pablo; Mazzolini, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that a low dose of cyclophosphamide (Cy) combined with gene therapy of interleukin-12 (AdIL-12) has a synergistic, although limited, antitumoral effect in mice with colorectal carcinoma. The main mechanism involved in the efficacy of Cy+AdIL-12 was the induction of a specific immune response mediated by cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Our current aims were to evaluate the effects of 4-methylumbelliferone (4Mu), a selective inhibitor of hyaluronan (HA) synthesis, on tumor microenvironment (TME) and to investigate how 4Mu affects the therapeutic efficacy of Cy+AdIL-12. The results showed that 4Mu significantly reduced the amount of tumoral HA leading to a significant decrease in tumor interstitial pressure (TIP). As a consequence, tumor perfusion was improved allowing an increased adenoviral transgene expression. In addition, treatment with 4Mu boosted the number of cytotoxic T lymphocytes that reach the tumor after adoptive transfer resulting in a potent inhibition of tumor growth. Importantly, we observed complete tumor regression in 75% of mice when 4Mu was administrated in combination with Cy+AdIL-12. The triple combination 4Mu+Cy+AdIL-12 also induced a shift toward antiangiogenic factors production in tumor milieu. Our results showed that TME remodeling is an interesting strategy to increase the efficacy of anticancer immunotherapies based on gene and/or cell therapy. PMID:26105158

  10. STRAIN-SPECIFIC SENSITIVITY TO INDUCTION OF MURINE LUNG TUMORS FOLLOWING IN UTERO EXPOSURE TO 3-METHYLCHOLANTHRENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We previously demonstrated that different strains of fetal mice were more sensitive to lung tumor induction by 3-methylcholanthrene (MC) than were adults. Offspring from either a D2 x B6D2F1 backcross or from parental Balb/c mice exhibited a similar high incidence of lung tumors ...

  11. Comparative study of four antifungal drugs in an experimental model of murine cryptococcosis.

    PubMed

    Bava, A J; Iovannitti, C; Negroni, R

    1989-11-01

    A comparative study among amphotericin B, 5-fluorocytosine, itraconazole and fluconazole in the treatment of experimental cryptococcosis in mice, was carried out. Seventy male Balb C mice were inoculated intraperitoneally with 10(7) cells of Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans. They were divided in 7 groups of 10 animals each one: 1) treated with fluconazole by gavage at a daily dose of 16 mg/kg; 2) treated with itraconazole by gavage at a daily dose of 16 mg/kg; 3) treated with 5-fluorocytosine by gavage at a daily dose of 300 mg/kg; 4) treated with amphotericin B intraperitoneally at a dose of 6 mg/kg every other day; 5) control animals receiving polietilenglicol 200 by gavage; 6) control animals receiving distilled water by gavage and 7) control animals receiving sterile distilled water by intraperitoneal route. All the treatments started 5 days after the challenge inoculation and they were given for 2 weeks. The following parameters were taken into account: survival time, macroscopic aspect of the organ after the complete autopsy, microscopic investigation of yeasts in brain, lungs, spleen and liver, histopathology studies of these organs, the colony forming units per gram and massive seeding of brain and lungs. The survival index of the different groups was the most efficient method to measure the antifungal compounds activity. Amphotericin B increased significantly the animals survival and modified the histopathologic response in the studied organs. The colony forming units and the massive seeding in brain and lung showed that this antifungal agent is unable of producing the biological cure of this experimental model.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Bystander effect-mediated therapy of experimental brain tumor by genetically engineered tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Namba, H; Tagawa, M; Iwadate, Y; Kimura, M; Sueyoshi, K; Sakiyama, S

    1998-01-01

    Transfer of the herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene, followed by administration of ganciclovir (GCV), generates the "bystander effect," in which HSV-tk-negative wild-type cells, as well as HSV-tk-expressing cells, are killed by GCV. To eradicate an intracranial tumor by this bystander effect, we injected the tumor cells transduced with the HSV-tk gene (TK cells) in the vicinity of the preimplanted wild-type tumor and then administered GCV. Wild-type 9L-gliosarcoma cells (1 x 10[5]) were implanted into the brain of syngeneic Fisher rats. On the next day, rats were injected with TK cells (1 x 10(5) or 3 x 10[5]) or medium alone at the same brain coordinate and then treated with GCV or saline. Administration of GCV significantly prolonged the survival of the rats injected with TK cells compared with that injected with medium alone (p < 0.01). Reduction in tumor size and retardation of tumor growth were observed by serial magnetic resonance imaging in the rats that received the combination of TK cells and GCV. The results show that the bystander effect is also achieved in vivo even when TK cells and wild-type cells are not simultaneously implanted. This treatment modality circumvents potential risks accompanied with in vivo gene transfer. Because there remained substantially no HSV-tk-positive cells in the recurrent tumors, this modality offers a "safe" therapeutic strategy against human malignant gliomas. PMID:9458237

  13. Experimental Demyelination and Remyelination of Murine Spinal Cord by Focal Injection of Lysolecithin

    PubMed Central

    Keough, Michael B.; Jensen, Samuel K.; Yong, V. Wee

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system characterized by plaque formation containing lost oligodendrocytes, myelin, axons, and neurons. Remyelination is an endogenous repair mechanism whereby new myelin is produced subsequent to proliferation, recruitment, and differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells into myelin-forming oligodendrocytes, and is necessary to protect axons from further damage. Currently, all therapeutics for the treatment of multiple sclerosis target the aberrant immune component of the disease, which reduce inflammatory relapses but do not prevent progression to irreversible neurological decline. It is therefore imperative that remyelination-promoting strategies be developed which may delay disease progression and perhaps reverse neurological symptoms. Several animal models of demyelination exist, including experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and curprizone; however, there are limitations in their use for studying remyelination. A more robust approach is the focal injection of toxins into the central nervous system, including the detergent lysolecithin into the spinal cord white matter of rodents. In this protocol, we demonstrate that the surgical procedure involved in injecting lysolecithin into the ventral white matter of mice is fast, cost-effective, and requires no additional materials than those commercially available. This procedure is important not only for studying the normal events involved in the remyelination process, but also as a pre-clinical tool for screening candidate remyelination-promoting therapeutics. PMID:25867716

  14. Liposome-entrapped ampicillin in the treatment of experimental murine listeriosis and salmonellosis.

    PubMed Central

    Fattal, E; Rojas, J; Youssef, M; Couvreur, P; Andremont, A

    1991-01-01

    The tissue distribution of ampicillin entrapped in liposomes was studied in normal noninfected mice and showed that ampicillin concentrated mostly in the liver and spleen. Liposomate ampicillin was significantly more effective than free ampicillin in reducing splenic and hepatic bacterial counts in C57BL/Ka nude mice chronically infected with Listeria monocytogenes EGD. It was also significantly more effective than free ampicillin in reducing mortality in C57BL/6 mice acutely infected with Salmonella typhimurium C5. Comparison of the results with those previously obtained in the same experimental models with the same amounts of ampicillin bound to polyisohexylcyanoacrylate nanoparticles showed that liposomes were more effective than nanoparticles (M. Youssef, E. Fattal, M. J. Alonso, L. Roblot-Treupel, J. Sauzières, C. Tancrède, A. Omnès, P. Couvreur, and A. Andremont, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 32:1204-1207, 1988) in targeting ampicillin to the spleen but were less effective than nanoparticles in targeting ampicillin to the liver and reducing mortality in acute salmonellosis. PMID:2069386

  15. Murine pattern recognition receptor dectin-1 is essential in the development of experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis.

    PubMed

    Stoppelkamp, Sandra; Reid, Delyth M; Yeoh, Joyce; Taylor, Julie; McKenzie, Emma J; Brown, Gordon D; Gordon, Siamon; Forrester, John V; Wong, Simon Y C

    2015-10-01

    Mycobacteria in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) are an essential component of immunization protocols in a number of autoimmune disease animal models including experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and uveoretinitis (EAE and EAU, respectively). We determined the role in EAU of two C-type lectin receptors on myeloid cells that recognize and respond to mycobacteria. Using receptor-specific antibodies and knockout mice, we demonstrated for the first time that the macrophage mannose receptor delays disease development but does not affect severity. In contrast, dectin-1 is critically involved in the development of CFA-mediated EAU. Disease severity is reduced in dectin-1 knockout mice and antibody blockade of dectin-1 during the induction, but not the effector phase, prevents EAU development. Significantly, similar blockade of dectin-1 in vivo has no effect in non-CFA-mediated, spontaneously induced or adoptive transfer models of EAU. Thus dectin-1 plays a critical role in the ability of complete Freund's adjuvant to induce EAU in mice.

  16. Heterogeneity of Wild Leishmania major Isolates in Experimental Murine Pathogenicity and Specific Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Kébaïer, C.; Louzir, H.; Chenik, M.; Salah, A. Ben; Dellagi, K.

    2001-01-01

    Virulence variability was investigated by analyzing the experimental pathogenicity of 19 Leishmania major strains in susceptible BALB/c mice. Twelve strains were isolated from Tunisian patients with zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis; seven strains were isolated in Syria (n = 1), Saudi Arabia (n = 2), Jordan (n = 2), or Israel (n = 2). BALB/c mice were injected in the hind footpad with 2 × 106 amastigotes of the various isolates, and lesion progression was recorded weekly for 9 weeks. Interleukin-4 (IL-4) and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production of lymph node mononuclear cells activated in vitro with parasite antigens were evaluated 5 weeks after infection. We show that disease progression induced by different L. major isolates was largely heterogeneous although reproducible results were obtained when using the same isolate. Interestingly, isolates from the Middle East induced a more severe disease than did the majority of Tunisian isolates. Strains with the highest virulence tend to generate more IL-4 and less IFN-γ in vitro at week 5 postinfection as well as higher levels of early IL-4 mRNA in the lymph node draining the inoculation site at 16 h postinfection. These results suggest that L. major isolates from the field may differ in virulence, which influences the course of the disease induced in mice and the type of immune response elicited by the infected host. PMID:11447167

  17. Regional measurements of /sup 14/Cmisonidazole distribution and blood flow in subcutaneous RT-9 experimental tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Blasberg, R.; Horowitz, M.; Strong, J.; Molnar, P.; Patlak, C.; Owens, E.; Fenstermacher, J.

    1985-04-01

    Regional (/sup 14/C)misonidazole-derived radioactivity (MISO*) was measured by quantitative autoradiography in s.c. RT-9 experimental tumors 0.5, 2, and 4 h after an i.v. bolus (25 mg) and constant infusion (10 mg/h) in rats. Misonidazole (MISO) concentration in plasma, tumor, and other tissues was also measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography. The distribution of MISO* in the tumors always resulted in a characteristic pattern with high peripheral and low central values. The high-activity regions in the tumor rim achieved tissue: plasma MISO* activity ratios of 0.97 and 2.2 by 0.5 and 4 h, respectively; for central tumor regions, this ratio was 0.20 and 0.32 for the same periods, respectively. The limited distribution of MISO* to central tumor regions could be correlated to low values of blood flow (measured with (/sup 131/I)iodoantipyrine) and to diffusion from peripheral tumor regions. Low blood flow in the central regions of these tumors will significantly limit the distribution of MISO and other drugs to viable-appearing cells in these areas and could account in part for the failures of chemotherapy in certain solid tumors. Pharmacokinetic modeling indicates that 1 to 9 h may be necessary for MISO concentrations in some tumor regions to reach 50% of that in plasma.

  18. The CC chemokine CK beta-11/MIP-3 beta/ELC/Exodus 3 mediates tumor rejection of murine breast cancer cells through NK cells.

    PubMed

    Braun, S E; Chen, K; Foster, R G; Kim, C H; Hromas, R; Kaplan, M H; Broxmeyer, H E; Cornetta, K

    2000-04-15

    CK beta-11 chemoattracts T cells, B cells, dendritic cells, macrophage progenitors, and NK cells and facilitates dendritic cell and T cell interactions in secondary lymphoid tissues. We hypothesized that expression of CK beta-11 in tumor cells may generate antitumor immunity through these interactions. After transduction with the retroviral vector L(CK beta 11)SN, the murine breast cancer cell line C3L5 (C3L5-CK beta 11) showed expression of retroviral mRNA by Northern analysis and production of functional CK beta-11 by chemotaxis of human NK cells to C3L5-CK beta 11 supernatant. Only 10% of mice injected with C3L5-CK beta 11 developed tumors, compared with 100% of mice injected with a transduced control C3L5 line (C3L5-G1N). Importantly, the in vitro growth characteristics of the CK beta-11-transduced cell line were unaffected, suggesting the difference in growth in vivo was a result of chemokine production. Vaccination with C3L5-CK beta 11 partially protected animals from parental C3L5 challenge. Immunodepletion with anti-asialo-GM1 or anti-CD4 during C3L5-CK beta 11 vaccination significantly reduced CK beta-11 antitumor activity compared with control and anti-CD8-treated groups. Splenocytes from NK-depleted animals transferred the acquired immunity generated with C3L5-CK beta 11 vaccination, while splenocytes from the CD4-depleted animals did not. These results indicate, for the first time, that expression of CK beta-11 in a breast cancer cell line mediates rejection of the transduced tumor through a mechanism involving NK and CD4+ cells. Furthermore, CK beta-11-transduced tumor cells generate long-term antitumor immunity that requires CD4+ cells. These studies demonstrate the potential role of CK beta-11 as an adjuvant in stimulating antitumor responses.

  19. Systemic delivery of chTNT-3/CpG immunoconjugates for immunotherapy in murine solid tumor models.

    PubMed

    Jang, Julie K; Khawli, Leslie A; Canter, David C; Hu, Peisheng; Zhu, Tian H; Wu, Brian W; Angell, Trevor E; Li, Zhongjun; Epstein, Alan L

    2016-05-01

    CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG) potently activate the immune system by mimicking microbial DNA. Conjugation of CpG to chTNT-3, an antibody targeting the necrotic centers of tumors, enabled CpG to accumulate in tumors after systemic delivery, where it can activate the immune system in the presence of tumor antigens. CpG chemically conjugated to chTNT-3 (chTNT-3/CpG) were compared to free CpG in their ability to stimulate the immune system in vitro and reduce tumor burden in vivo. In subcutaneous Colon 26 adenocarcinoma and B16-F10 melanoma models in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice, respectively, chTNT-3/CpG, free CpG, or several different control constructs were administered systemically. Intraperitoneal injections of chTNT-3/CpG delayed tumor growth and improved survival and were comparable to intratumorally administered CpG. Compared to saline-treated mice, chTNT-3/CpG-treated mice had smaller average tumor volumes by as much as 72% in Colon 26-bearing mice and 79% in B16-bearing mice. Systemically delivered free CpG and CpG conjugated to an isotype control antibody did not reduce tumor burden or improve survival. In this study, chTNT-3/CpG retained immunostimulatory activity of the CpG moiety and enabled delivery to tumors. Because systemically administered CpG rapidly clear the body and do not accumulate into tumors, chTNT-3/CpG provide a solution to the limitations observed in preclinical and clinical trials. PMID:26960932

  20. Macrophage Phenotype in the Ocular Surface of Experimental Murine Dry Eye Disease.

    PubMed

    You, In-Cheon; Coursey, Terry G; Bian, Fang; Barbosa, Flavia L; de Paiva, Cintia S; Pflugfelder, Stephen C

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the phenotype of macrophages in the cornea and conjunctiva of C57BL/6 mice with induced experimental dry eye. C57BL/6 mice exposed to desiccating stress (DS) were evaluated at 1, 5, and 10 days and C57BL/6 mice maintained in non-stressed environment were used as controls. Whole eyes and adnexa were excised for histology or used for gene expression analysis. Location and phenotype of macrophages infiltrating the cornea and conjunctiva was evaluated by immunofluorescence analysis. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction evaluated macrophage markers and T cell-related and inflammatory cytokine expression in cornea and conjunctiva. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that macrophages reside in the conjunctiva of control and dry eye mice and their number did not change with DS. Real-time RT-PCR demonstrated that the level of M1 macrophage marker, iNOS, increased prominently in the conjunctiva at DS 10 days. In contrast, there was a non-significant decrease of the M2 marker Arg1 with DS. The levels of inflammatory cytokine, IL-12a mRNA transcript in the conjunctiva increased significantly at DS1 and decreased at DS5, while levels of IL-18 were significantly increased at DS 10. Macrophages reside in the ocular surface tissues of C57BL/6 mice. Although the number of macrophages in the conjunctiva does not change, evidence of inflammatory M1 activation after desiccating stress was observed. Better understanding of phagocyte diversity and activation in dry eye disease provide a basis for the development of phagocyte-targeted therapeutic strategies.

  1. The Role of Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A₂ in a Murine Model of Experimental Autoimmune Uveoretinitis

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, G. L.; Boldison, J.; Copland, D. A.; Adamson, P.; Gale, D.; Brandt, M.; Nicholson, L. B.; Dick, A. D.

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage activation is, in part, regulated via hydrolysis of oxidised low density lipoproteins by Lipoprotein-Associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2), resulting in increased macrophage migration, pro-inflammatory cytokine release and chemokine expression. In uveitis, tissue damage is mediated as a result of macrophage activation; hence inhibition of Lp-PLA2 may limit macrophage activation and protect the tissue. Utilising Lp-PLA2 gene-deficient (KO) mice and a pharmacological inhibitor of Lp-PLA2 (SB-435495) we aimed to determine the effect of Lp-PLA2 suppression in mediating retinal protection in a model of autoimmune retinal inflammation, experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU). Following immunisation with RBP-3 (IRBP) 1–20 or 161–180 peptides, clinical disease was monitored and severity assessed, infiltrating leukocytes were enumerated by flow cytometry and tissue destruction quantified by histology. Despite ablation of Lp-PLA2 enzyme activity in Lp-PLA2 KO mice or wild-type mice treated with SB-435495, the number of infiltrating CD45+ cells in the retina was equivalent to control EAU animals, and there was no reduction in disease severity. Thus, despite the reported beneficial effects of therapeutic Lp-PLA2 depletion in a variety of vascular inflammatory conditions, we were unable to attenuate disease, show delayed disease onset or prevent progression of EAU in Lp-PLA2 KO mice. Although EAU exhibits inflammatory vasculopathy there is no overt defect in lipid metabolism and given the lack of effect following Lp-PLA2 suppression, these data support the hypothesis that sub-acute autoimmune inflammatory disease progresses independently of Lp-PLA2 activity. PMID:25874928

  2. Efficacy of Lychnopholide Polymeric Nanocapsules after Oral and Intravenous Administration in Murine Experimental Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    de Mello, Carlos Geraldo Campos; Branquinho, Renata Tupinambá; Oliveira, Maykon Tavares; Milagre, Matheus Marques; Saúde-Guimarães, Dênia Antunes; Mosqueira, Vanessa Carla Furtado; Lana, Marta de

    2016-09-01

    The etiological treatment of Chagas disease remains neglected. The compounds available show several limitations, mainly during the chronic phase. Lychnopholide encapsulated in polymeric nanocapsules (LYC-NC) was efficacious in mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and treated by intravenous administration during the acute phase (AP). As the oral route is preferred for treatment of chronic infections, such as Chagas disease, this study evaluated the use of oral LYC-NC in the AP and also compared it with LYC-NC administered to mice by the oral and intravenous routes during the chronic phase (CP). The therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by fresh blood examination, hemoculture, PCR, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The cure rates in the AP and CP were 62.5% and 55.6%, respectively, upon oral administration of LYC-poly(d,l-lactide)-polyethylene glycol nanocapsules (LYC-PLA-PEG-NC) and 57.0% and 30.0%, respectively, with LYC-poly-ε-caprolactone nanocapsules (LYC-PCL-NC). These cure rates were significantly higher than that of free LYC, which did not cure any animals. LYC-NC formulations administered orally during the AP showed cure rates similar to that of benznidazole, but only LYC-NC cured mice in the CP. Similar results were achieved with intravenous treatment during the CP. The higher cure rates obtained with LYC loaded in PLA-PEG-NC may be due to the smaller particle size of these NC and the presence of PEG, which influence tissue diffusion and the controlled release of LYC. Furthermore, PLA-PEG-NC may improve the stability of the drug in the gastrointestinal tract. This work is the first report of cure of experimental Chagas disease via oral administration during the CP. These findings represent a new and important perspective for oral treatment of Chagas disease. PMID:27324760

  3. Systemic Inflammatory Effects of Traumatic Brain Injury, Femur Fracture, and Shock: An Experimental Murine Polytrauma Model

    PubMed Central

    Probst, C.; Mirzayan, M. J.; Mommsen, P.; Zeckey, C.; Tegeder, T.; Geerken, L.; Maegele, M.; Samii, A.; van Griensven, M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Despite broad research in neurotrauma and shock, little is known on systemic inflammatory effects of the clinically most relevant combined polytrauma. Experimental investigation in an animal model may provide relevant insight for therapeutic strategies. We describe the effects of a combined injury with respect to lymphocyte population and cytokine activation. Methods. 45 male C57BL/6J mice (mean weight 27 g) were anesthetized with ketamine/xylazine. Animals were subjected to a weight drop closed traumatic brain injury (WD-TBI), a femoral fracture and hemorrhagic shock (FX-SH). Animals were subdivided into WD-TBI, FX-SH and combined trauma (CO-TX) groups. Subjects were sacrificed at 96 h. Blood was analysed for cytokines and by flow cytometry for lymphocyte populations. Results. Mortality was 8%, 13% and 47% for FX-SH, WD-TBI and CO-TX groups (P < 0.05). TNFα (11/13/139 for FX-SH/WD-TBI/CO-TX; P < 0.05), CCL2 (78/96/227; P < 0.05) and IL-6 (16/48/281; P = 0.05) showed significant increases in the CO-TX group. Lymphocyte populations results for FX-SH, WD-TBI and CO-TX were: CD-4 (31/21/22; P = n.s.), CD-8 (7/28/34, P < 0.05), CD-4-CD-8 (11/12/18; P = n.s.), CD-56 (36/7/8; P < 0.05). Conclusion. This study shows that a combination of closed TBI and femur-fracture/ shock results in an increase of the humoral inflammation. More attention to combined injury models in inflammation research is indicated. PMID:22529516

  4. Leptin augments protective immune responses in murine macrophages and enhances potential of miltefosine against experimental visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Shivahare, Rahul; Ali, Wahid; Vishwakarma, Preeti; Natu, S M; Puri, Sunil K; Gupta, Suman

    2015-10-01

    Adverse side effects and drug resistance issues are the two most important drawbacks which influence the widespread use of existing antileishmanial drugs. Use of immune stimulating agent with standard antileishmanial might be helpful to minimize the toxic effect of drug, shorten the dose regimen and delay the emergence of resistance. In the present study, we explored the in vitro immunomodulatory potential of an immunomodulator, leptin with lower concentration of standard drug, miltefosine. The level of Th1/Th2 cytokines, production of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species and phagocytic activity was assessed by ELISA, Griess reaction and flow cytometric analysis, respectively. Leptin at a concentration of 15μg/mL showed heightened level of Th1 cytokines and nitric oxide generation from murine macrophages (J-774A.1 cells). Leptin (15μg/mL) also reduces the effective concentration of miltefosine by 2-folds from 7.5μM to 3.7μM. When given in conjunction with lower concentration of miltefosine (4μM), leptin (15μg/mL) significantly (***p<0.001) elevated the level of IL-12 (7.7 fold), TNF-α (8.1 fold) and nitric oxide (6.6 fold) along with markedly (***p<0.001) suppressed level of IL-10 and TGF-β when compared with untreated infected macrophages. Leptin plus miltefosine also induces the phagocytic ability (**p<0.01) of macrophages in comparison to leptin alone and miltefosine alone treated groups. These finding illustrate that leptin activates host macrophages to generate protective immune response for the successful elimination of Leishmania parasite at lower concentration of miltefosine and has potential for further exploration in experimental animal model of visceral leishmaniasis (VL).

  5. Molecular changes in bone marrow, tumor and serum after conductive ablation of murine 4T1 breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Przybyla, Beata D; Shafirstein, Gal; Vishal, Sagar J; Dennis, Richard A; Griffin, Robert J

    2014-02-01

    Thermal ablation of solid tumors using conductive interstitial thermal therapy (CITT) produces coagulative necrosis in the center of ablation. Local changes in homeostasis for surviving tumor and systemic changes in circulation and distant organs must be understood and monitored in order to prevent tumor re-growth and metastasis. The purpose of this study was to use a mouse carcinoma model to evaluate molecular changes in the bone marrow and surviving tumor after CITT treatment by quantification of transcripts associated with cancer progression and hyperthermia, serum cytokines, stress proteins and the marrow/tumor cross-talk regulator stromal-derived factor 1. Analysis of 27 genes and 22 proteins with quantitative PCR, ELISA, immunoblotting and multiplex antibody assays revealed that the gene and protein expression in tissue and serum was significantly different between ablated and control mice. The transcripts of four genes (Cxcl12, Sele, Fgf2, Lifr) were significantly higher in the bone marrow of treated mice. Tumors surviving ablation showed significantly lower levels of the Lifr and Sele transcripts. Similarly, the majority of transcripts measured in tumors decreased with treatment. Surviving tumors also contained lower levels of SDF-1α and HIF-1α proteins whereas HSP27 and HSP70 were higher. Of 16 serum chemokines, IFNγ and GM-CSF levels were lower with treatment. These results indicate that CITT ablation causes molecular changes which may slow cancer cell proliferation. However, inhibition of HSP27 may be necessary to control aggressiveness of surviving cancer stem cells. The changes in bone marrow are suggestive of possible increased recruitment of circulatory cancer cells. Therefore, the possibility of heightened bone metastasis after thermal ablation needs to be further investigated and inhibition strategies developed, if warranted.

  6. In vivo relaxation time measurements on a murine tumor model--prolongation of T1 after photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y H; Hawk, R M; Ramaprasad, S

    1995-01-01

    RIF tumors implanted on mice feet were investigated for changes in relaxation times (T1 and T2) after photodynamic therapy (PDT). Photodynamic therapy was performed using Photofrin II as the photosensitizer and laser light at 630 nm. A home-built proton solenoid coil in the balanced configuration was used to accommodate the tumors, and the relaxation times were measured before, immediately after, and up to several hours after therapy. Several control experiments were performed untreated tumors, tumors treated with Photofrin II alone, or tumors treated with laser light alone. Significant increases in T1s of water protons were observed after PDT treatment. In all experiments, 31P spectra were recorded before and after the therapy to study the tumor status and to confirm the onset of PDT. These studies show significant prolongation of T1s after the PDT treatment. The spin-spin relaxation measurements, on the other hand, did not show such prolongation in T2 values after PDT treatment.

  7. The triterpenoid CDDO-Me delays murine acute graft-versus-host disease with the preservation of graft-versus-tumor effects after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Minghui; Sun, Kai; Redelman, Doug; Welniak, Lisbeth A.; Murphy, William J.

    2010-01-01

    The occurrence of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and tumor relapse represent the two major obstacles impeding the efficacy of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) in cancer. We have previously shown that the synthetic triterpenoid CDDO can inhibit murine early acute GVHD but anti-tumor effects were not assessed. In the current study, we found that a new derivative of CDDO, CDDO-Me, had an increased ability to inhibit allogeneic T cell responses and induce cell death of alloreactive T cells in vitro. Administration of CDDO-Me to mice following allogeneic BMT resulted in significant and increased protection from acute lethal GVHD compared to CDDO. This correlated with reduced TNF-α production, reduced donor T cell proliferation and decreased adhesion molecule (α4β7 integrin) expression on the donor T cells. CDDO-Me was also superior to CDDO in inhibiting leukemia growth in vitro. When CDDO-Me was administered following an allogeneic BMT to leukemia-bearing mice, significant increases in survival were observed. These findings suggest that CDDO-Me is superior to CDDO in delaying acute GVHD while preserving or possibly even augmenting GVT effects. PMID:20338256

  8. Fluence Rate Differences in Photodynamic Therapy Efficacy and Activation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor after Treatment of the Tumor-Involved Murine Thoracic Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, Craig E.; Carter, Shirron L.; Czupryna, Julie; Wang, Le; Putt, Mary E.; Busch, Theresa M.

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) of the thoracic cavity can be performed in conjunction with surgery to treat cancers of the lung and its pleura. However, illumination of the cavity results in tissue exposure to a broad range of fluence rates. In a murine model of intrathoracic PDT, we studied the efficacy of 2-(1-hexyloxyethyl)-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH; Photochlor®)-mediated PDT in reducing the burden of non-small cell lung cancer for treatments performed at different incident fluence rates (75 versus 150 mW/cm). To better understand a role for growth factor signaling in disease progression after intrathoracic PDT, the expression and activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was evaluated in areas of post-treatment proliferation. The low fluence rate of 75 mW/cm produced the largest reductions in tumor burden. Bioluminescent imaging and histological staining for cell proliferation (anti-Ki-67) identified areas of disease progression at both fluence rates after PDT. However, increased EGFR activation in proliferative areas was detected only after treatment at the higher fluence rate of 150 mW/cm. These data suggest that fluence rate may affect the activation of survival factors, such as EGFR, and weaker activation at lower fluence rate could contribute to a smaller tumor burden after PDT at 75 mW/cm. PMID:26784170

  9. Metallofullerene-based Nanoplatform for Brain Tumor Brachytherapy and Longitudinal Imaging in a Murine Orthotopic Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, Michael D.; Wilson, John D.; Fuller, Christine E.; Zhang, Jianyuan; Dorn, Harry C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate in an orthotopic xenograft brain tumor model that a functionalized metallofullerene (f-Gd3N@C80) can enable longitudinal tumor imaging and, when radiolabeled with lutetium 177 (177Lu) and tetraazacyclododecane tetraacetic acid (DOTA) (177Lu-DOTA-f-Gd3N@C80), provide an anchor to deliver effective brachytherapy. Materials and Methods: All experiments involving the use of mice were carried out in accordance with protocols approved by the institutional animal care and use committee. Human glioblastoma U87MG cells were implanted by using stereotactic procedures into the brains of 37 female athymic nude-Foxn1nu mice and allowed to develop into a tumor for 8 days. T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed in five mice. Biodistribution studies were performed in 12 mice at four time points over 7 days to evaluate gadolinium content. Survival studies involved 20 mice that received infusion of a nanoplatform by means of convection-enhanced delivery (CED) 8 days after tumor implantation. Mice in survival studies were divided into two groups: one comprised untreated mice that received f-Gd3N@C80 alone and the other comprised mice treated with brachytherapy that received 1.11 MBq of 177Lu-DOTA-f-Gd3N@C80. Survival data were evaluated by using Kaplan-Meier statistical methods. Results: MR imaging showed extended tumor retention (25.6% ± 1.2 of the infused dose at 52 days, confirmed with biodistribution studies) of the f-Gd3N@C80 nanoplatform, which enabled longitudinal imaging. Successful coupling of 177Lu to the f-Gd3N@C80 surface was achieved by using a bifunctional macrocyclic chelator. The extended tumor retention allowed for effective brachytherapy, as indicated by extended survival time (>2.5 times that of the untreated group) and histologic signs of radiation-induced tumor damage. Conclusion: The authors have developed a multimodal nanoplatform and have demonstrated longitudinal tumor imaging, prolonged intratumoral probe

  10. Silica-induced apoptosis in murine macrophage: involvement of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and nuclear factor-kappaB activation.

    PubMed

    Gozal, Evelyne; Ortiz, Luis A; Zou, Xiaoyan; Burow, Matthew E; Lasky, Joseph A; Friedman, Mitchell

    2002-07-01

    Alveolar macrophages play a critical role in silica-induced lung fibrosis. Silica exposure induces tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha release and nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation, and apoptotic mechanisms have been implicated in silica-induced pathogenesis. To characterize potential relationships between these signaling events, we studied their induction in two murine macrophage cell lines. The RAW 264.7 macrophage cell line was more sensitive, and the IC-21 macrophage cell line more tolerant to silica exposure (0.2 or 1 mg/ml for 6 h) as evidenced by significantly higher apoptotic responses in RAW 264.7 (P < 0.05). RAW 264.7 macrophages exhibited enhanced TNF-alpha production and NF-kappaB activation in response to silica, whereas IC-21 macrophages did not produce TNF-alpha in response to silica and did not induce NF-kappaB nuclear binding. Inhibition of NF-kappaB in RAW 264.7 cells with BAY11-7082 significantly increased apoptosis while inhibiting TNF-alpha release. In addition, TNF-alpha and NF-kappaB activation, but not apoptosis, were induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in both cell lines, and NF-kappaB inhibition reduced LPS-induced TNF-alpha release. These data suggest that TNF-alpha induction is dependent on NF-kappaB activation in both cell lines. However, silica can induce apoptosis in murine macrophages, independently of TNF-alpha stimulation, as in IC-21 macrophages. Furthermore, NF-kappaB activation in macrophages may play dual roles, both pro- and antiapoptotic during silica injury. PMID:12091251

  11. Late administration of murine CTLA-4 blockade prolongs CD8-mediated anti-tumor effects following stimulatory cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sckisel, Gail D.; Mirsoian, Annie; Bouchlaka, Myriam N.; Tietze, Julia K.; Chen, Mingyi; Blazar, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    We have demonstrated that immunostimulatory therapies such as interleukin-2 (IL-2) and anti-CD40 (αCD40) can be combined to deliver synergistic anti-tumor effects. While this strategy has shown success, efficacy varies depending on a number of factors including tumor type and severe toxicities can be seen. We sought to determine whether blockade of negative regulators such as cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) could simultaneously prolong CD8+ T cell responses and augment T cell anti-tumor effects. We devised a regimen in which anti-CTLA-4 was administered late so as to delay contraction and minimize toxicities. This late administration both enhanced and prolonged CD8 T cell activation without the need for additional IL-2. The quality of the T cell response was improved with increased frequency of effector/effector memory phenotype cells along with improved lytic ability and bystander expansion. This enhanced CD8 response translated to improved anti-tumor responses both at the primary and metastatic sites. Importantly, toxicities were not exacerbated with combination. This study provides a platform for rational design of immunotherapy combinations to maximize anti-tumor immunity while minimizing toxicities. PMID:26423422

  12. Sexual dimorphism of liver metastasis by murine pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors is affected by expression of complement C5

    PubMed Central

    Contractor, Tanupriya; Kobayashi, Shinta; da Silva, Edaise; Clausen, Richard; Chan, Chang; Vosburgh, Evan; Tang, Laura H.; Levine, Arnold J.; Harris, Chris R.

    2016-01-01

    In a mouse model for neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas (PanNETs), liver metastasis occurred at a higher frequency in males. Male mice also had higher serum and intratumoral levels of the innate immunity protein complement C5. In mice that lost the ability to express complement C5, there was a lower frequency of metastasis, and males no longer had a higher frequency of metastasis than females. Treatment with PMX53, a small molecule antagonist of C5aR1/CD88, the receptor for complement C5a, also reduced metastasis. Mice lacking a functional gene for complement C5 had smaller primary tumors, which were less invasive and lacked the CD68+ macrophages that have previously been associated with metastasis in this type of tumor. This is the first report of a gene that causes sexual dimorphism of metastasis in a mouse model. In the human disease, which also shows sexual dimorphism for metastasis, clinically advanced tumors expressed more complement C5 than less advanced tumors. PMID:27105526

  13. The inhibition of Akt-Pdpk1 interaction efficiently suppresses the growth of murine primary liver tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Mäemets-Allas, Kristina; Belitškin, Denis; Jaks, Viljar

    2016-05-20

    The lack of primary liver tumor cells has hampered testing of potential chemotherapeutic agents in vitro. To overcome this issue we developed a primary mouse liver tumor cell line K07074. The K07074 cells were immortal, exhibited a biliary phenotype, formed colonies in soft agar and displayed an increase in Hedgehog, Notch and Akt signaling. To study the effect of single and combined inhibition of the liver tumor-related pathways on the growth of K07074 cells we treated these with small-molecule antitumor agents. While the inhibition of Akt and Notch pathways strongly inhibited the growth of K07074 cells the inhibition of Wnt and Hedgehog pathways was less efficient in cell growth suppression. Interestingly, the inhibition of Akt pathway at the level of Akt-Pdpk1 interaction was sufficient to suppress the growth of tumor cells and no significant additive effect could be detected when co-treated with the inhibitors of Wnt, Hedgehog or Notch pathways. Only when suboptimal doses of Akt-Pdpk1 interaction inhibitor NSC156529 were used an additive effect with Notch inhibition was seen. We conclude that the Akt pathway inhibitor NSC156529 is potentially useful as single treatment for liver tumors with hyperactivated Akt signaling. PMID:27103434

  14. Anti-Tumor Effects after Adoptive Transfer of IL-12 Transposon-Modified Murine Splenocytes in the OT-I-Melanoma Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Galvan, Daniel L; O'Neil, Richard T; Foster, Aaron E; Huye, Leslie; Bear, Adham; Rooney, Cliona M; Wilson, Matthew H

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of gene modified T cells provides possible immunotherapy for patients with cancers refractory to other treatments. We have previously used the non-viral piggyBac transposon system to gene modify human T cells for potential immunotherapy. However, these previous studies utilized adoptive transfer of modified human T cells to target cancer xenografts in highly immunodeficient (NOD-SCID) mice that do not recapitulate an intact immune system. Currently, only viral vectors have shown efficacy in permanently gene-modifying mouse T cells for immunotherapy applications. Therefore, we sought to determine if piggyBac could effectively gene modify mouse T cells to target cancer cells in a mouse cancer model. We first demonstrated that we could gene modify cells to express murine interleukin-12 (p35/p40 mIL-12), a transgene with proven efficacy in melanoma immunotherapy. The OT-I melanoma mouse model provides a well-established T cell mediated immune response to ovalbumin (OVA) positive B16 melanoma cells. B16/OVA melanoma cells were implanted in wild type C57Bl6 mice. Mouse splenocytes were isolated from C57Bl6 OT-I mice and were gene modified using piggyBac to express luciferase. Adoptive transfer of luciferase-modified OT-I splenocytes demonstrated homing to B16/OVA melanoma tumors in vivo. We next gene-modified OT-I cells to express mIL-12. Adoptive transfer of mIL-12-modified mouse OT-I splenocytes delayed B16/OVA melanoma tumor growth in vivo compared to control OT-I splenocytes and improved mouse survival. Our results demonstrate that the piggyBac transposon system can be used to gene modify splenocytes and mouse T cells for evaluating adoptive immunotherapy strategies in immunocompetent mouse tumor models that may more directly mimic immunotherapy applications in humans. PMID:26473608

  15. Anti-Tumor Effects after Adoptive Transfer of IL-12 Transposon-Modified Murine Splenocytes in the OT-I-Melanoma Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Aaron E.; Huye, Leslie; Bear, Adham; Rooney, Cliona M.; Wilson, Matthew H.

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of gene modified T cells provides possible immunotherapy for patients with cancers refractory to other treatments. We have previously used the non-viral piggyBac transposon system to gene modify human T cells for potential immunotherapy. However, these previous studies utilized adoptive transfer of modified human T cells to target cancer xenografts in highly immunodeficient (NOD-SCID) mice that do not recapitulate an intact immune system. Currently, only viral vectors have shown efficacy in permanently gene-modifying mouse T cells for immunotherapy applications. Therefore, we sought to determine if piggyBac could effectively gene modify mouse T cells to target cancer cells in a mouse cancer model. We first demonstrated that we could gene modify cells to express murine interleukin-12 (p35/p40 mIL-12), a transgene with proven efficacy in melanoma immunotherapy. The OT-I melanoma mouse model provides a well-established T cell mediated immune response to ovalbumin (OVA) positive B16 melanoma cells. B16/OVA melanoma cells were implanted in wild type C57Bl6 mice. Mouse splenocytes were isolated from C57Bl6 OT-I mice and were gene modified using piggyBac to express luciferase. Adoptive transfer of luciferase-modified OT-I splenocytes demonstrated homing to B16/OVA melanoma tumors in vivo. We next gene-modified OT-I cells to express mIL-12. Adoptive transfer of mIL-12-modified mouse OT-I splenocytes delayed B16/OVA melanoma tumor growth in vivo compared to control OT-I splenocytes and improved mouse survival. Our results demonstrate that the piggyBac transposon system can be used to gene modify splenocytes and mouse T cells for evaluating adoptive immunotherapy strategies in immunocompetent mouse tumor models that may more directly mimic immunotherapy applications in humans. PMID:26473608

  16. Effect of polychromatic visible light on proliferation of tumor cells under conditions in vitro and in vivo—after implantation to experimental animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knyazev, N. A.; Samoilova, K. A.; Filatova, N. A.; Galaktionova, A. A.

    2009-06-01

    The question of the character of effect of visible and near infrared (IR) radiation of Sun and artificial sources on growth of malignant tumors remains open due to controversy and a relatively small amount of available data, which restricts use of this most important environmental and the efficient physiotherapeutic factors at various human pathological states and first of all at the rehabilitation of oncological patients after radical methods of cancer treatment (surgical removal of tumor, intensive medication and radiation therapy), when immunomodulatory antiinflamatory, wound-healing and analgesic properties of visible and near IR light can be drawn. In the present work, using polychromatic visible light, close to this dominant component of the terrestrial solar radiation (380-750 nm, 40 mW/cm2) we irradiated tumor cells of the murine hepatoma (MH-22a line) under conditions in vitro (the monolayer of cells in Petri dishes) and in vivo (after subcutaneous implantation of these cells to mice of the C3HA line). A high resistance of the MH-22a cells to polychromatic visible radiation has been established under conditions in vitro: irradiation at dose 24 J/cm2 did not inhibit their proliferation whereas a dose of 9.6 J/cm2, stimulated statistically significantly proliferation of the cells (by 24-40%). However, stimulation of the tumor cell proliferation, did not develop under conditions in vivo, when mice were irradiated (9.6 J/cm2)—daily for 5 days before the implantation of tumor cells and for 5 days after implantation (in the latter case there was a probability of transcutaneous irradiation of tumor cells). By implanting to the animals of tumor cells at various concentrations (from 2ṡ105 to 25ṡ103 cells per mouse), we did not revealed at any of 10 terms of observations for 41-45 days both an increase of incidence of the tumor development and acceleration of tumor growth as well as a decrease of the animals survival as compared with group of non

  17. Enhancement of high intensity Iodine-125 brachytherapy by cis-platinum in a murine bladder tumor model

    SciTech Connect

    Nag, S.; Blatnik, A.; Soloway, M.

    1984-06-01

    The interaction of cis-platinum chemotherapy and high-intensity Iodine-125 brachytherapy was studied in C3H/He mice with MBT-2 tumors growing in the thigh. Brachytherapy was delivered by 3 Iodine-125 seeds of 10 mCi each implanted into the tumor. Ninety-six animals were randomly divided into 8 groups of 12 animals each. Each group was given either no treatment (control), cis-platinum alone or brachytherapy of 20, 40 or 50 Gy either alone or combined with cis-platinum. Cis-platinum 3 mg. per kg. was given every 5 days for 3 doses. The addition of cis-platinum enhanced the effects of Iodine-125 brachytherapy as shown by the end-points of tumor regrowth delay, local tumor control and median survival times. The sensitization enhancement ratio ranged from 1.2 to 1.9. Further experiments are to be conducted to study the normal tissue effect, therapeutic gain factor, effects of altering the time of administration of cis-platinum and the clinical use of high-intensity Iodine-125 for removable brachytherapy.

  18. Filamentous, mixed micelles of triblock copolymers enhance tumor localization of indocyanine green in a murine xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Hee; Mount, Christopher W; Dulken, Benjamin W; Ramos, Jenelyn; Fu, Caroline J; Khant, Htet A; Chiu, Wah; Gombotz, Wayne R; Pun, Suzie H

    2012-01-01

    Polymeric micelles formed by the self-assembly of amphiphilic block copolymers can be used to encapsulate hydrophobic drugs for tumor-delivery applications. Filamentous carriers with high aspect ratios offer potential advantages over spherical carriers, including prolonged circulation times. In this work, mixed micelles comprised of poly (ethylene oxide)-poly-[(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate]-poly (ethylene oxide) (PEO-PHB-PEO) and Pluronic F-127 (PF-127) were used to encapsulate a near-infrared fluorophore. The micelle formulations were assessed for tumor accumulation after tail vein injection to xenograft tumor-bearing mice by non-invasive optical imaging. The mixed micelle formulation that facilitated the highest tumor accumulation was shown by cryo-electron microscopy to be filamentous in structure compared to spherical structures of pure PF-127 micelles. In addition, increased dye loading efficiency and dye stability was attained in this mixed micelle formulation compared to pure PEO-PHB-PEO micelles. Therefore, the optimized PEO-PHB-PEO/PF-127 mixed micelle formulation offers advantages for cancer delivery over micelles formed from the individual copolymer components. PMID:22118658

  19. Filamentous, mixed micelles of triblock copolymers enhance tumor localization of indocyanine green in a murine xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hee; Mount, Christopher W; Dulken, Benjamin W; Ramos, Jenelyn; Fu, Caroline J; Khant, Htet A; Chiu, Wah; Gombotz, Wayne R; Pun, Suzie H

    2012-01-01

    Polymeric micelles formed by the self-assembly of amphiphilic block copolymers can be used to encapsulate hydrophobic drugs for tumor-delivery applications. Filamentous carriers with high aspect ratios offer potential advantages over spherical carriers, including prolonged circulation times. In this work, mixed micelles composed of poly(ethylene oxide)-poly[(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate]-poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO-PHB-PEO) and Pluronic F-127 (PF-127) were used to encapsulate a near-infrared fluorophore. The micelle formulations were assessed for tumor accumulation after tail vein injection to xenograft tumor-bearing mice by noninvasive optical imaging. The mixed micelle formulation that facilitated the highest tumor accumulation was shown by cryo-electron microscopy to be filamentous in structure compared to spherical structures of pure PF-127 micelles. In addition, increased dye loading efficiency and dye stability were attained in this mixed micelle formulation compared to pure PEO-PHB-PEO micelles. Therefore, the optimized PEO-PHB-PEO/PF-127 mixed micelle formulation offers advantages for cancer delivery over micelles formed from the individual copolymer components.

  20. Up-Regulation of GITRL on Dendritic Cells by WGP Improves Anti-Tumor Immunity in Murine Lewis Lung Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jie; Ma, Jie; Ma, Ke; Ma, Bin; Tang, Xinyi; Baidoo, Samuel Essien; Tong, Jia; Yan, Jun; Lu, Liwei; Xu, Huaxi; Wang, Shengjun

    2012-01-01

    Background β-Glucans have been shown to function as a potent immunomodulator to stimulate innate and adaptive immune responses, which contributes to their anti-tumor property. However, their mechanisms of action are still elusive. Glucocorticoid-induced TNF receptor ligand (GITRL), a member of the TNF superfamily, binds to its receptor, GITR, on both effector and regulatory T cells, generates a positive co-stimulatory signal implicated in a wide range of T cell functions, which is important for the development of immune responses. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we found that whole β-glucan particles (WGPs) could activate dendritic cells (DCs) via dectin-1 receptor, and increase the expression of GITRL on DCs in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the increased GITRL on DCs could impair the regulartory T cell (Treg)-mediated suppression and enhance effector T cell proliferation in a GITR/GITRL dependent way. In tumor models, DCs with high levels of GITRL were of great potential to prime cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses and down-regulate the suppressive activity of Treg cells, thereby leading to the delayed tumor progression. Conclusions/Significance These findings suggest that particulate β-glucans can be used as an immunomodulator to stimulate potent T cell-mediated adaptive immunity while down-regulate suppressive immune activity via GITR/GITRL interaction, leading to a more efficient defense mechanism against tumor development. PMID:23077535

  1. Acceleration of Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus-Induced Murine Mammary Tumorigenesis by a p53172H Transgene

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Gouri; Rosner, Andrea; Han, Yi; Zelazny, Edward T.; Li, Baolin; Cardiff, Robert D.; Perkins, Archibald S.

    2002-01-01

    We previously showed that a mammary-specific dominant-negative p53 transgene (WAP-p53172H) could accelerate ErbB2-induced mammary tumorigenesis in mice, but was not tumorigenic on its own. To identify other genes that cooperate with WAP-p53172H in tumorigenesis, we performed mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) proviral mutagenesis. We derived F1, N2, and N4/N5 mice from p53172H transgenic FVB mice backcrossed onto MMTV+ C3H/He mice. Results show the latency of MMTV tumorigenesis is correlated with FVB contribution. F1 tumors had the shortest latency (217 days), had a higher rate of metastasis, and were less differentiated than the N2 and N4/N5 tumors. The latency was 269 days in N2 mice, and lengthened to 346 days in N4/N5 mice. p53172H significantly accelerated MMTV tumorigenesis only in N2 mice, indicating cooperativity between p53172H and MMTV in this cohort. To identify genes that may be causally involved in MMTV-induced mammary tumorigenesis, we identified 60 sites of proviral insertion in the N2 tumors. Among the insertions in p53172H transgenic tumors were 10 genes not previously found as sites of MMTV insertion including genes involved in signaling (Pdgfra, Pde1b, Cnk1), cell adhesion (Cd44), angiogenesis (Galgt1), and transcriptional regulation (Olig1, Olig2, and Uncx4.1). These may represent cellular functions that are likely not deregulated by mutation in p53. PMID:12466138

  2. Experimental studies of combination of PDT and tumor chemotherapy or 60Co irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didziapetriene, Janina; Prasmickiene, Grazina; Sukeliene, Dalija; Rotomskis, Ricardas; Streckyte, Giedre; Atkocius, Vydmantas; Staciokiene, Laima; Smilgevicius, Valerijus

    1995-01-01

    We present experimental results obtained by combining photodynamic therapy (PDT) with tumor chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Dimethoxyhematoporphyrin (DMHp) and photosan (PS) were used as photosensitizers, pharanoxi and vincristine as antitumor drugs. The therapeutic effect of the combination of PDT and antitumor drugs (pharanoxi, vincristine) slightly increases as compared to the treatment of PDT or antitumor drug alone. The additive therapeutic effect is achieved under the combination of PDT and 60Co irradiation. It seems that the sensitizers DMHp and PS regulate lipid peroxidation in blood serum of experimental animals, which becomes more active under the influence of alkylating antitumor drugs. Therefore, they could protect an organism from negative influence of tumor chemotherapy.

  3. Heterogeneity of Gene Expression in Murine Squamous Cell Carcinoma Development—The Same Tumor by Different Means

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Noam; Kravchenko-Balasha, Nataly; Klein, Shoshana; Levitzki, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Transformation is a complex process, involving many changes in the cell. In this work, we investigated the transcriptional changes that arose during the development of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in mice. Using microarray analysis, we looked at gene expression during different stages in cancer progression in 31 mice. By analyzing tumor progression in each mouse separately, we were able to define the global changes that were common to all 31 mice, as well as significant changes that occurred in fewer individuals. We found that different genes can contribute to the tumorigenic process in different mice, and that there are many ways to acquire the malignant properties defined by Hanahan and Weinberg as “hallmarks of cancer”. Eventually, however, all these changes lead to a very similar cancerous phenotype. The finding that gene expression is strongly heterogeneous in tumors that were induced by a standardized protocol in closely related mice underscores the need for molecular characterization of human tumors and personalized therapy. PMID:23526950

  4. Growth-inhibitory Activity and Downregulation of the Class II Tumor-suppressor Gene H-rev107 in Tumor Cell Lines and Experimental Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sers, Christine; Emmenegger, Urban; Husmann, Knut; Bucher, Katharina; Andres, Ann-Catherine; Schäfer, Reinhold

    1997-01-01

    The H-rev107 gene is a new class II tumor suppressor, as defined by its reversible downregulation and growth-inhibiting capacity in HRAS transformed cell lines. Overexpression of the H-rev107 cDNA in HRAS-transformed ANR4 hepatoma cells or in FE-8 fibroblasts resulted in 75% reduction of colony formation. Cell populations of H-rev107 transfectants showed an attenuated tumor formation in nude mice. Cells explanted from tumors or maintained in cell culture for an extended period of time no longer exhibited detectable levels of the H-rev107 protein, suggesting strong selection against H-rev107 expression in vitro and in vivo. Expression of the truncated form of H-rev107 lacking the COOH-terminal membrane associated domain of 25 amino acids, had a weaker inhibitory effect on proliferation in vitro and was unable to attenuate tumor growth in nude mice. The H-rev107 mRNA is expressed in most adult rat tissues, and immunohistochemical analysis showed expression of the protein in differentiated epithelial cells of stomach, of colon and small intestine, in kidney, bladder, esophagus, and in tracheal and bronchial epithelium. H-rev107 gene transcription is downregulated in rat cell lines derived from liver, kidney, and pancreatic tumors and also in experimental mammary tumors expressing a RAS transgene. In colon carcinoma cell lines only minute amounts of protein were detectable. Thus, downregulation of H-rev107 expression may occur at the level of mRNA or protein. PMID:9049257

  5. Tumor Necrosis Factor and Its Receptors Are Crucial to Control Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin Pleural Infection in a Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Chavez-Galan, Leslie; Vesin, Dominique; Segueni, Noria; Prasad, Pritha; Buser-Llinares, Raphaële; Blaser, Guillaume; Pache, Jean-Claude; Ryffel, Bernhard; Quesniaux, Valérie F J; Garcia, Irene

    2016-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is crucial to control Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, which remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. TNF blockade compromises host immunity and may cause reactivation of latent infection, resulting in overt pulmonary, pleural, and extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Herein, we investigate the roles of TNF and TNF receptors in the control of Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) pleural infection in a murine model. As controls, wild-type mice and those with a defective CCR5, a receptor that is crucial for control of viral infection but not for tuberculosis, were used. BCG-induced pleural infection was uncontrolled and progressive in absence of TNF or TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1)/TNFR2 (TNFR1R2) with increased inflammatory cell recruitment and bacterial load in the pleural cavity, and heightened levels of pleural and serum proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, compared to wild-type control mice. The visceral pleura was thickened with chronic inflammation, which was prominent in TNF(-/-) and TNFR1R2(-/-) mice. The parietal pleural of TNF(-/-) and TNFR1R2(-/-) mice exhibited abundant inflammatory nodules containing mycobacteria, and these mice developed nonresolving inflammation and succumbed from disseminated BCG infection. By contrast, CCR5(-/-) mice survived and controlled pleural BCG infection as wild-type control mice. In conclusion, BCG-induced pleurisy was uncontrolled in the absence of TNF or TNF receptors with exacerbated inflammatory response, impaired bacterial clearance, and defective mesothelium repair, suggesting a critical role of TNF to control mycobacterial pleurisy. PMID:27456129

  6. X-ray fluorescence microscopy demonstrates preferential accumulation of a vanadium-based magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent in murine colonic tumors.

    PubMed

    Mustafi, Devkumar; Ward, Jesse; Dougherty, Urszula; Bissonnette, Marc; Hart, John; Vogt, Stefan; Karczmar, Gregory S

    2015-01-01

    Contrast agents that specifically enhance cancers on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) will allow earlier detection. Vanadium-based chelates (VCs) selectively enhance rodent cancers on MRI, suggesting selective uptake of VCs by cancers. Here we report x-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) of VC uptake by murine colon cancer. Colonic tumors in mice treated with azoxymethane/dextran sulfate sodium were identified by MRI. Then a gadolinium-based contrast agent and a VC were injected intravenously; mice were sacrificed and colons sectioned. VC distribution was sampled at 120 minutes after injection to evaluate the long-term accumulation. Gadolinium distribution was sampled at 10 minutes after injection due to its rapid washout. XFM was performed on 72 regions of normal and cancerous colon from five normal mice and four cancer-bearing mice. XFM showed that all gadolinium was extracellular, with similar concentrations in colon cancers and normal colon. In contrast, the average VC concentration was twofold higher in cancers versus normal tissue (p < .002). Cancers also contained numerous "hot spots" with intracellular VC concentrations sixfold higher than the concentration in normal colon (p < .0001). No hot spots were detected in normal colon. This is the first direct demonstration that VCs selectively accumulate in cancer cells and thus may improve cancer detection.

  7. Intrinsic susceptibility MRI identifies tumors with ALKF1174L mutation in genetically-engineered murine models of high-risk neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Jamin, Yann; Glass, Laura; Hallsworth, Albert; George, Rani; Koh, Dow-Mu; Pearson, Andrew D J; Chesler, Louis; Robinson, Simon P

    2014-01-01

    The early identification of children presenting ALK(F1174L)-mutated neuroblastoma, which are associated with resistance to the promising ALK inhibitor crizotinib and a marked poorer prognosis, has become a clinical priority. In comparing the radiology of the novel Th-ALK(F1174L)/Th-MYCN and the well-established Th-MYCN genetically-engineered murine models of neuroblastoma using MRI, we have identified a marked ALK(F1174L)-driven vascular phenotype. We demonstrate that quantitation of the transverse relaxation rate R2* (s(-1)) using intrinsic susceptibility-MRI under baseline conditions and during hyperoxia, can robustly discriminate this differential vascular phenotype, and identify MYCN-driven tumors harboring the ALK(F1174L) mutation with high specificity and selectivity. Intrinsic susceptibility-MRI could thus potentially provide a non-invasive and clinically-exploitable method to help identifying children with MYCN-driven neuroblastoma harboring the ALK(F1174L) mutation at the time of diagnosis. PMID:24667968

  8. Autotaxin and LPA receptors represent potential molecular targets for the radiosensitization of murine glioma through effects on tumor vasculature.

    PubMed

    Schleicher, Stephen M; Thotala, Dinesh K; Linkous, Amanda G; Hu, Rong; Leahy, Kathleen M; Yazlovitskaya, Eugenia M; Hallahan, Dennis E

    2011-01-01

    Despite wide margins and high dose irradiation, unresectable malignant glioma (MG) is less responsive to radiation and is uniformly fatal. We previously found that cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA(2)) is a molecular target for radiosensitizing cancer through the vascular endothelium. Autotaxin (ATX) and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptors are downstream from cPLA(2) and highly expressed in MG. Using the ATX and LPA receptor inhibitor, α-bromomethylene phosphonate LPA (BrP-LPA), we studied ATX and LPA receptors as potential molecular targets for the radiosensitization of tumor vasculature in MG. Treatment of Human Umbilical Endothelial cells (HUVEC) and mouse brain microvascular cells bEND.3 with 5 µmol/L BrP-LPA and 3 Gy irradiation showed decreased clonogenic survival, tubule formation, and migration. Exogenous addition of LPA showed radioprotection that was abrogated in the presence of BrP-LPA. In co-culture experiments using bEND.3 and mouse GL-261 glioma cells, treatment with BrP-LPA reduced Akt phosphorylation in both irradiated cell lines and decreased survival and migration of irradiated GL-261 cells. Using siRNA to knock down LPA receptors LPA1, LPA2 or LPA3 in HUVEC, we demonstrated that knockdown of LPA2 but neither LPA1 nor LPA3 led to increased viability and proliferation. However, knockdown of LPA1 and LPA3 but not LPA2 resulted in complete abrogation of tubule formation implying that LPA1 and LPA3 on endothelial cells are likely targets of BrP-LPA radiosensitizing effect. Using heterotopic tumor models of GL-261, mice treated with BrP-LPA and irradiation showed a tumor growth delay of 6.8 days compared to mice treated with irradiation alone indicating that inhibition of ATX and LPA receptors may significantly improve malignant glioma response to radiation therapy. These findings identify ATX and LPA receptors as molecular targets for the development of radiosensitizers for MG.

  9. Transplantation resistance of drug-treated allogeneic mice against murine lymphomas--II. Studies with various tumor-host combinations.

    PubMed

    Bonmassar, A; Rivosecchi-Merletti, P; Barzi, A; Goldin, A; Bonmassar, E

    1981-01-01

    Previous studies showed that treatment of mice with 5(3,3'-dimethyl-1-triazeno)-amidazole-4-carboxamide (DTIC) plus cyclophosphamide (Cy) produce profound depression of classical allograft responses and impairment of endogenous cell proliferation similar to that detectable in lethally-irradiated mice. However efficient localized graft resistance was found in the spleen of drug-treated hybrid or allogeneic mice challenged with lymphoma cells. The present report describes the genetic patterns of this type of natural resistance [hereafter called drug-resistant inhibition of tumors (DRIT) in various tumor-host combinations DRIT was evaluated measuring the extent of 125I-5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine (125IUdR) uptake in the spleen and liver of leukemic hosts. The results of the experiments performed with two H-2d (i.e. L1210 and LSTRA), one H-2b (i.e. L5MF-22) and one H-2a (i.e. LAF-17) lymphomas inoculated into drug-treated recipients pointed out that: (a) tumor cell proliferation was markedly inhibited in the spleen and weakly or not impaired in the liver of D end Hh-1-incompatible euthymic or nude mice responder for the hh system; (b) no resistance was found in the spleen and liver of Hh-1-compatible B10.A (2R) mice against L5MF-22 lymphoma or of SJL recipients genetically non-responder for the Hh system, against LSTRA cells; (c) splenic resistance against L1210 leukemia was detectable in Hh-compatible B10.A or B10.A (5R) mice; (d) splenic and liver resistance was found in Hh-incompatible but genetically Hh non-responder SJL or C3H mice against L5MF-22 or LSTRA lymphomas, respectively. These results showed that the genetic patterns of the DRIT system parallels the Hh-type immunity in certain tumor-host combinations [(a) and (b)] but not in others [(a) and (d)], as previously detected in lethally-irradiated mice. It is concluded that genetically-controlled lymphoma graft resistance can be retained by mice treated with high doses of antitumor drugs, capable of abrogating

  10. The MEK inhibitor trametinib separates murine graft-versus-host disease from graft-versus-tumor effects

    PubMed Central

    Itamura, Hidekazu; Tawara, Isao; Kubota, Yasushi; Kariya, Ryusho; Okada, Seiji; Kimura, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for hematologic malignancies is limited by the difficulty in suppressing graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) without compromising graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effects. We previously showed that RAS/MEK/ERK signaling depends on memory differentiation in human T cells, which confers susceptibility to selective inhibition of naive T cells. Actually, antineoplastic MEK inhibitors selectively suppress alloreactive T cells, sparing virus-specific T cells in vitro. Here, we show that trametinib, a MEK inhibitor clinically approved for melanoma, suppresses GVHD safely without affecting GVT effects in vivo. Trametinib prolonged survival of GVHD mice and attenuated GVHD symptoms and pathology in the gut and skin. It inhibited ERK1/2 phosphorylation and expansion of donor T cells, sparing Tregs and B cells. Although high-dose trametinib inhibited myeloid cell engraftment, low-dose trametinib suppressed GVHD without severe adverse events. Notably, trametinib facilitated the survival of mice transplanted with allogeneic T cells and P815 tumor cells with no residual P815 cells observed in the livers and spleens, whereas tacrolimus resulted in P815 expansion. These results confirm that trametinib selectively suppresses GVHD-inducing T cells while sparing antitumor T cells in vivo, which makes it a promising candidate for translational studies aimed at preventing or treating GVHD. PMID:27699218

  11. The MEK inhibitor trametinib separates murine graft-versus-host disease from graft-versus-tumor effects

    PubMed Central

    Itamura, Hidekazu; Tawara, Isao; Kubota, Yasushi; Kariya, Ryusho; Okada, Seiji; Kimura, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for hematologic malignancies is limited by the difficulty in suppressing graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) without compromising graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effects. We previously showed that RAS/MEK/ERK signaling depends on memory differentiation in human T cells, which confers susceptibility to selective inhibition of naive T cells. Actually, antineoplastic MEK inhibitors selectively suppress alloreactive T cells, sparing virus-specific T cells in vitro. Here, we show that trametinib, a MEK inhibitor clinically approved for melanoma, suppresses GVHD safely without affecting GVT effects in vivo. Trametinib prolonged survival of GVHD mice and attenuated GVHD symptoms and pathology in the gut and skin. It inhibited ERK1/2 phosphorylation and expansion of donor T cells, sparing Tregs and B cells. Although high-dose trametinib inhibited myeloid cell engraftment, low-dose trametinib suppressed GVHD without severe adverse events. Notably, trametinib facilitated the survival of mice transplanted with allogeneic T cells and P815 tumor cells with no residual P815 cells observed in the livers and spleens, whereas tacrolimus resulted in P815 expansion. These results confirm that trametinib selectively suppresses GVHD-inducing T cells while sparing antitumor T cells in vivo, which makes it a promising candidate for translational studies aimed at preventing or treating GVHD.

  12. Murine cytotoxic activated macrophages inhibit aconitase in tumor cells. Inhibition involves the iron-sulfur prosthetic group and is reversible.

    PubMed

    Drapier, J C; Hibbs, J B

    1986-09-01

    Previous studies show that cytotoxic activated macrophages cause inhibition of DNA synthesis, inhibition of mitochondrial respiration, and loss of intracellular iron from tumor cells. Here we examine aconitase, a citric acid cycle enzyme with a catalytically active iron-sulfur cluster, to determine if iron-sulfur clusters are targets for activated macrophage-induced iron removal. Results show that aconitase activity declines dramatically in target cells after 4 h of co-cultivation with activated macrophages. Aconitase inhibition occurs simultaneously with arrest of DNA synthesis, another early activated macrophage-induced metabolic change in target cells. Dithionite partially prevents activated macrophage induced aconitase inhibition. Furthermore, incubation of injured target cells in medium supplemented with ferrous ion plus a reducing agent causes near-complete reconstitution of aconitase activity. The results show that removal of a labile iron atom from the [4Fe-4S] cluster, by a cytotoxic activated macrophage-mediated mechanism, is causally related to aconitase inhibition. PMID:3745439

  13. Low intensity vibration mitigates tumor progression and protects bone quantity and quality in a murine model of myeloma.

    PubMed

    Pagnotti, Gabriel M; Chan, M Ete; Adler, Benjamin J; Shroyer, Kenneth R; Rubin, Janet; Bain, Steven D; Rubin, Clinton T

    2016-09-01

    Myeloma facilitates destruction of bone and marrow. Since physical activity encourages musculoskeletal preservation we evaluated whether low-intensity vibration (LIV), a means to deliver mechanical signals, could protect bone and marrow during myeloma progression. Immunocompromised-mice (n=25) were injected with human-myeloma cells, while 8 (AC) were saline-injected. Myeloma-injected mice (LIV; n=13) were subjected to daily-mechanical loading (15min/d; 0.3g @ 90Hz) while 12 (MM) were sham-handled. At 8w, femurs had 86% less trabecular bone volume fraction (BV/TV) in MM than in AC, yet only a 21% decrease in LIV was observed in comparison to AC, reflecting a 76% increase versus MM. Cortical BV was 21% and 15% lower in MM and LIV, respectively, than in AC; LIV showing 30% improvement over MM. Similar outcomes were observed in the axial skeleton, showing a 35% loss in MM with a 27% improved retention of bone in the L5 of LIV-treated mice as compared to MM. Transcortical-perforations in the femur from myeloma-induced osteolysis were 9× higher in MM versus AC, reduced by 57% in LIV. Serum-TRACP5b, 61% greater in MM versus AC, rose by 33% in LIV compared to AC, a 45% reduction in activity when compared to MM. Histomorphometric analyses of femoral trabecular bone demonstrated a 70% elevation in eroded surfaces of MM versus AC, while measures in LIV were 58% below those in MM. 72% of marrow in the femur of MM mice contained tumor, contrasted by a 31% lower burden in LIV. MM mice (42%) presented advanced-stage necrosis of tibial marrow while present in just 8% of LIV. Myeloma infiltration inversely correlated to measures of bone quality, while LIV slowed the systemic, myeloma-associated decline in bone quality and inhibited tumor progression through the hindlimbs. PMID:27262776

  14. Differential innate immune cell signatures and effects regulated by toll-like receptor 4 during murine lung tumor promotion.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Carla-Maria; Xiong, Ka-Na; Velmurugan, Kalpana; Xiong, Julie; Osgood, Ross S; Bauer, Alison K

    2016-04-01

    Tumor promotion is an early and critical stage during lung adenocarcinoma (ADC). We previously demonstrated that Tlr4 mutant mice were more susceptible to butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT)-induced pulmonary inflammation and tumor promotion in comparison to Tlr4-sufficient mice. Our study objective was to elucidate the underlying differences in Tlr4 mutant mice in innate immune cell populations, their functional responses, and the influence of these cellular differences on ADC progenitor (type II) cells following BHT-treatment. BALB (Tlr4-sufficient) and C.C3-Tlr4(Lps-d)/J (BALB(Lpsd); Tlr4 mutant) mice were treated with BHT (promoter) followed by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and flow cytometry processing on the lungs. ELISAs, Club cell enrichment, macrophage function, and RNA isolation were also performed. Bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) co-cultured with a type II cell line were used for wound healing assays. Innate immune cells significantly increased in whole lung in BHT-treated BALB(Lpsd) mice compared to BALB mice. BHT-treated BALB(Lpsd) mice demonstrated enhanced macrophage functionality, increased epithelial wound closure via BMDMs, and increased Club cell number in BALB(Lpsd) mice, all compared to BALB BHT-treated mice. Cytokine/chemokine (Kc, Mcp1) and growth factor (Igf1) levels also significantly differed among the strains and within macrophages, gene expression, and cell surface markers collectively demonstrated a more plastic phenotype in BALB(Lpsd) mice. Therefore, these correlative studies suggest that distinct innate immune cell populations are associated with the differences observed in the Tlr4-mutant model. Future studies will investigate the macrophage origins and the utility of the pathways identified herein as indicators of immune system deficiencies and lung tumorigenesis. PMID:27093379

  15. Chemopreventive effects of Cuminum cyminum in chemically induced forestomach and uterine cervix tumors in murine model systems.

    PubMed

    Gagandeep; Dhanalakshmi, Sivanandhan; Méndiz, Ester; Rao, Agra Ramesha; Kale, Raosaheb Kathalupant

    2003-01-01

    Lately, a strong correlation has been established between diet and cancer. For ages, cumin has been a part of the diet. It is a popular spice regularly used as a flavoring agent in a number of ethnic cousins. In the present study, cancer chemopreventive potentials of different doses of a cumin seed-mixed diet were evaluated against benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P]-induced forestomach tumorigenesis and 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA)-induced uterine cervix tumorigenesis. Results showed a significant inhibition of stomach tumor burden (tumors per mouse) by cumin. Tumor burden was 7.33 +/- 2.10 in the B(a)P-treated control group, whereas it reduced to 3.10 +/- 0.57 (P < 0.001) by a 2.5% dose and 3.11 +/- 0.60 (P <0.001) by a 5% dose of cumin seeds. Cervical carcinoma incidence, compared with the MCA-treated control group (66.67%), reduced to 27.27% (P < 0.05) by a diet of 5% cumin seeds and to 12.50% (P < 0.05) by a diet of 7.5% cumin seeds. The effect of 2.5 and 5% cumin seed-mixed diets was also examined on carcinogen/xenobiotic metabolizing phase I and phase II enzymes, antioxidant enzymes, glutathione content, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and lipid peroxidation in the liver of Swiss albino mice. Levels of cytochrome P-450 (cyt P-450) and cytochrome b5 (cyt b(5)) were significantly augmented (P < 0.05) by the 2.5% dose of cumin seed diet. The levels of cyt P-450 reductase and cyt b(5) reductase were increased (significance level being from P < 0.05 to P < 0.01) by both doses of cumin. Among the phase II enzymes, glutathione S-transferase specific activity increased (P < 0.005) by the 5% dose, whereas that of DT-diaphorase increased significantly (P < 0.05) by both doses used (2.5 and 5%). In the antioxidant system, significant elevation of the specific activities of superoxide dismutase (P < 0.01) and catalase (P < 0.05) was observed with the 5% dose of cumin. The activities of glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase remained unaltered by both doses of cumin. The level

  16. Protection Provided by an Encapsulated Live Attenuated ΔabcBA Strain of Brucella ovis against Experimental Challenge in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Ana Patrícia C.; Macêdo, Auricélio A.; Silva, Teane M. A.; Ximenes, Luana C. A.; Brandão, Humberto M.; Paixão, Tatiane A.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the Brucella ovis ΔabcBA strain as a vaccine candidate in the murine model. BALB/c mice were subcutaneously or intraperitoneally immunized with a single dose or three doses of the B. ovis ΔabcBA strain and then were challenged with wild-type B. ovis. Single or multiple immunizations provided only mild protection, with significantly smaller numbers of wild-type B. ovis CFU in the livers of immunized mice but not in the spleens. Encapsulation of B. ovis ΔabcBA significantly improved protection against experimental challenges in both BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. Furthermore, immunization with encapsulated B. ovis ΔabcBA markedly prevented lesions in the spleens and livers of experimentally challenged mice. These results demonstrated that the encapsulated B. ovis ΔabcBA strain confers protection to mice; therefore, this strain has potential as a vaccine candidate for rams. PMID:25947146

  17. NLRP3 inflammasome as a target of berberine in experimental murine liver injury: interference with P2X7 signalling.

    PubMed

    Vivoli, Elisa; Cappon, Andrea; Milani, Stefano; Piombanti, Benedetta; Provenzano, Angela; Novo, Erica; Masi, Alessio; Navari, Nadia; Narducci, Roberto; Mannaioni, Guido; Moneti, Gloriano; Oliveira, Claudia P; Parola, Maurizio; Marra, Fabio

    2016-10-01

    Berberine (BRB) is commonly used in herbal medicine, but its mechanisms of action are poorly understood. In the present study, we tested BRB in steatohepatitis induced by a methionine- and choline-deficient (MCD) diet, in acute acetaminophen intoxication and in cultured murine macrophages. BRB markedly improved parameters of liver injury and necroinflammation induced by the MCD diet, although increased mortality was observed by mechanisms independent of bacterial infections or plasma levels of BRB. The MCD diet induced up-regulation of all components of the NLRP3 (NACHT, LRR and PYD domain-containing protein 3) inflammasome, and increased hepatic levels of mature IL-1β (interleukin 1β). All of these parameters were significantly reduced in mice treated with BRB. In mice administered an acetaminophen overdose, a model dependent on inflammasome activation, BRB reduced mortality and ALT (alanine aminotransferase) elevation, and limited the expression of inflammasome components. In vitro, LPS (lipopolysaccharide)-induced activation of NLRP3 inflammasome in RAW264.7 murine macrophages was markedly decreased by pre-incubation with BRB. BRB significantly limited the activation of the purinergic receptor P2X7, involved in the late phases of inflammasome activation. Upon P2X7 knockdown, the ability of BRB to block LPS-induced secretion of IL-1β was lost. These data indicate that administration of BRB ameliorates inflammation and injury in two unrelated murine models of liver damage. We demonstrate for the first time that BRB interferes with activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome pathway in vivo and in vitro, through a mechanism based on interference with activation of P2X7, a purinergic receptor involved in inflammasome activation. PMID:27439970

  18. NLRP3 inflammasome as a target of berberine in experimental murine liver injury: interference with P2X7 signalling.

    PubMed

    Vivoli, Elisa; Cappon, Andrea; Milani, Stefano; Piombanti, Benedetta; Provenzano, Angela; Novo, Erica; Masi, Alessio; Navari, Nadia; Narducci, Roberto; Mannaioni, Guido; Moneti, Gloriano; Oliveira, Claudia P; Parola, Maurizio; Marra, Fabio

    2016-10-01

    Berberine (BRB) is commonly used in herbal medicine, but its mechanisms of action are poorly understood. In the present study, we tested BRB in steatohepatitis induced by a methionine- and choline-deficient (MCD) diet, in acute acetaminophen intoxication and in cultured murine macrophages. BRB markedly improved parameters of liver injury and necroinflammation induced by the MCD diet, although increased mortality was observed by mechanisms independent of bacterial infections or plasma levels of BRB. The MCD diet induced up-regulation of all components of the NLRP3 (NACHT, LRR and PYD domain-containing protein 3) inflammasome, and increased hepatic levels of mature IL-1β (interleukin 1β). All of these parameters were significantly reduced in mice treated with BRB. In mice administered an acetaminophen overdose, a model dependent on inflammasome activation, BRB reduced mortality and ALT (alanine aminotransferase) elevation, and limited the expression of inflammasome components. In vitro, LPS (lipopolysaccharide)-induced activation of NLRP3 inflammasome in RAW264.7 murine macrophages was markedly decreased by pre-incubation with BRB. BRB significantly limited the activation of the purinergic receptor P2X7, involved in the late phases of inflammasome activation. Upon P2X7 knockdown, the ability of BRB to block LPS-induced secretion of IL-1β was lost. These data indicate that administration of BRB ameliorates inflammation and injury in two unrelated murine models of liver damage. We demonstrate for the first time that BRB interferes with activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome pathway in vivo and in vitro, through a mechanism based on interference with activation of P2X7, a purinergic receptor involved in inflammasome activation.

  19. Garlic (Allium sativum) stimulates lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha production from J774A.1 murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sung, Jessica; Harfouche, Youssef; De La Cruz, Melissa; Zamora, Martha P; Liu, Yan; Rego, James A; Buckley, Nancy E

    2015-02-01

    Garlic (Allium sativum) is known to have many beneficial attributes such as antimicrobial, antiatherosclerotic, antitumorigenetic, and immunomodulatory properties. In the present study, we investigated the effects of an aqueous garlic extract on macrophage cytokine production by challenging the macrophage J774A.1 cell line with the garlic extract in the absence or presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) under different conditions. The effect of allicin, the major component of crushed garlic, was also investigated. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, it was found that garlic and synthetic allicin greatly stimulated tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) production in macrophages treated with LPS. The TNF-α secretion levels peaked earlier and were sustained for a longer time in cells treated with garlic and LPS compared with cells treated with LPS alone. Garlic acted in a time-dependent manner. We suggest that garlic, at least partially via its allicin component, acts downstream from LPS to stimulate macrophage TNF-α secretion. PMID:25366263

  20. Selective In Vivo Targeting of Human Liver Tumors by Optimized AAV3 Vectors in a Murine Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Yuanhui; Ejjigani, Anila; Yin, Zifei; Lu, Yuan; Wang, Lina; Wang, Meng; Li, Jun; Hu, Zhongbo; Aslanidi, George V.; Zhong, Li; Gao, Guangping

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Current challenges for recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector–based cancer treatment include the low efficiency and the lack of specificity in vivo. rAAV serotype 3 (rAAV3) vectors have previously been shown to be ineffective in normal mouse tissues following systemic administration. In the present study, we report that rAAV3 vectors can efficiently target and transduce various human liver cancer cells in vivo. Elimination of specific surface-exposed serine and threonine residues on rAAV3 capsids results in further augmentation in the transduction efficiency of these vectors, without any change in the viral tropism and cellular receptor interactions. In addition, we have identified a potential chemotherapy drug, shikonin, as a multifunctional compound to inhibit liver tumor growth as well as to significantly enhance the efficacy of rAAV vector-based gene therapy in vivo. Furthermore, we also document that suppression of tumorigenesis in a human liver cancer xenograft model can be achieved through systemic administration of the optimized rAAV3 vectors carrying a therapeutic gene, and shikonin at a dose that does not lead to liver damage. Our research provides a novel means to achieve not only targeted delivery but also the potential for gene therapy of human liver cancer. PMID:25296041

  1. Selective in vivo targeting of human liver tumors by optimized AAV3 vectors in a murine xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Ling, Chen; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Yuanhui; Ejjigani, Anila; Yin, Zifei; Lu, Yuan; Wang, Lina; Wang, Meng; Li, Jun; Hu, Zhongbo; Aslanidi, George V; Zhong, Li; Gao, Guangping; Srivastava, Arun; Ling, Changquan

    2014-12-01

    Current challenges for recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector-based cancer treatment include the low efficiency and the lack of specificity in vivo. rAAV serotype 3 (rAAV3) vectors have previously been shown to be ineffective in normal mouse tissues following systemic administration. In the present study, we report that rAAV3 vectors can efficiently target and transduce various human liver cancer cells in vivo. Elimination of specific surface-exposed serine and threonine residues on rAAV3 capsids results in further augmentation in the transduction efficiency of these vectors, without any change in the viral tropism and cellular receptor interactions. In addition, we have identified a potential chemotherapy drug, shikonin, as a multifunctional compound to inhibit liver tumor growth as well as to significantly enhance the efficacy of rAAV vector-based gene therapy in vivo. Furthermore, we also document that suppression of tumorigenesis in a human liver cancer xenograft model can be achieved through systemic administration of the optimized rAAV3 vectors carrying a therapeutic gene, and shikonin at a dose that does not lead to liver damage. Our research provides a novel means to achieve not only targeted delivery but also the potential for gene therapy of human liver cancer.

  2. First-in-Human Phase 1 Trial of Agarose Beads Containing Murine RENCA Cells in Advanced Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Barry H.; Parikh, Tapan; Andrada, Zoe P.; Fahey, Thomas J.; Berman, Nathaniel; Wiles, Madeline; Nazarian, Angelica; Thomas, Joanne; Arreglado, Anna; Akahoho, Eugene; Wolf, David J.; Levine, Daniel M.; Parker, Thomas S.; Gazda, Lawrence S.; Ocean, Allyson J.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Agarose macrobeads containing mouse renal adenocarcinoma cells (RMBs) release factors, suppressing the growth of cancer cells and prolonging survival in spontaneous or induced tumor animals, mediated, in part, by increased levels of myocyte-enhancing factor (MEF2D) via EGFR-and AKT-signaling pathways. The primary objective of this study was to determine the safety of RMBs in advanced, treatment-resistant metastatic cancers, and then its efficacy (survival), which is the secondary objective. METHODS Thirty-one patients underwent up to four intraperitoneal implantations of RMBs (8 or 16 macrobeads/kg) via laparoscopy in this single-arm trial (FDA BB-IND 10091; NCT 00283075). Serial physical examinations, laboratory testing, and PET-CT imaging were performed before and three months after each implant. RESULTS RMBs were well tolerated at both dose levels (mean 660.9 per implant). AEs were (Grade 1/2) with no treatment-related SAEs. CONCLUSION The data support the safety of RMB therapy in advanced-malignancy patients, and the preliminary evidence for their potential efficacy is encouraging. A Phase 2 efficacy trial is ongoing. PMID:27499645

  3. Garlic (Allium sativum) stimulates lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha production from J774A.1 murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sung, Jessica; Harfouche, Youssef; De La Cruz, Melissa; Zamora, Martha P; Liu, Yan; Rego, James A; Buckley, Nancy E

    2015-02-01

    Garlic (Allium sativum) is known to have many beneficial attributes such as antimicrobial, antiatherosclerotic, antitumorigenetic, and immunomodulatory properties. In the present study, we investigated the effects of an aqueous garlic extract on macrophage cytokine production by challenging the macrophage J774A.1 cell line with the garlic extract in the absence or presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) under different conditions. The effect of allicin, the major component of crushed garlic, was also investigated. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, it was found that garlic and synthetic allicin greatly stimulated tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) production in macrophages treated with LPS. The TNF-α secretion levels peaked earlier and were sustained for a longer time in cells treated with garlic and LPS compared with cells treated with LPS alone. Garlic acted in a time-dependent manner. We suggest that garlic, at least partially via its allicin component, acts downstream from LPS to stimulate macrophage TNF-α secretion.

  4. Mechanisms for virus-induced liver disease: tumor necrosis factor-mediated pathology independent of natural killer and T cells during murine cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Orange, J S; Salazar-Mather, T P; Opal, S M; Biron, C A

    1997-01-01

    The contribution of endogenous NK cells and cytokines to virus-induced liver pathology was evaluated during murine cytomegalovirus infections of mice. In immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice, the virus induced a self-limited liver disease characterized by hepatitis, with focal inflammation, and large grossly visible subcapsular necrotic foci. The inflammatory foci were most numerous and contained the greatest number of cells 3 days after infection; they colocalized with areas of viral antigen expression. The largest number of necrotic foci was found 2 days after infection. Overall hepatic damage, assessed as increased expression of liver enzymes in serum, accompanied the development of inflammatory and necrotic foci. Experiments with neutralizing antibodies demonstrated that although virus-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF) can have antiviral effects, it also mediated significant liver pathology. TNF was required for development of hepatic necrotic foci and increased levels of liver enzymes in serum but not for increased numbers of inflammatory foci. The necrotic foci and liver enzyme indications of pathology occurred independently of NK and T cells, because mice rendered NK-cell deficient by treatment with antibodies, T- and B-cell-deficient Rag-/- mice, and NK- and T-cell-deficient E26 mice all manifested both parameters of disease. Development of necrotic foci and maximally increased levels of liver enzymes in serum also were TNF dependent in NK-cell-deficient mice. Moreover, in the immunodeficient E26 mice, virus-induced liver disease was progressive, with eventual death of the host, and neutralization of TNF significantly increased longevity. These results establish conditions separating hepatitis from significant liver damage and demonstrate a cytokine-mediated component to viral pathogenesis. PMID:9371583

  5. Activation of tumor suppressor protein p53 is required for Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced apoptosis in M1-D macrophages.

    PubMed

    Son, Kyung-No; Pugazhenthi, Subbiah; Lipton, Howard L

    2009-10-01

    Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) is a highly cytolytic picornavirus that persists in the mouse central nervous system (CNS) largely in macrophages with infection maintained by macrophage-to-macrophage spread. Infected macrophages in the CNS undergo apoptosis. We recently showed that M1-D macrophages infected with the low-neurovirulence TMEV BeAn virus became apoptotic through the mitochondrial pathway that is Bax mediated. Our present analyses of the molecular events and signaling pathway(s) culminating in the mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization that initiates the caspase cascade and apoptosis of BeAn virus-infected M1-D macrophages revealed activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase by 2 to 3 h postinfection (p.i.), followed by phosphorylation of tumor suppressor protein p53 Ser 15 at 3 to 6 h p.i., stabilizing p53 levels until 6 h p.i. Activated p53 upregulated the transcription of proapoptotic puma and noxa genes at 2 to 4 h p.i. and their BH3-only protein expression, followed by the loss of detectable prosurvival Mcl-1 and A1 proteins at 4 to 10 h p.i. Degradation of the prosurvival proteins is known to release Bax, which forms homo-oligomers and translocates into and permeabilizes the mitochondrial outer membrane. Inhibition of phospho-p38 by two specific inhibitors, SB203580 and BIRB796, led to a significant decrease in apoptosis at 10 h p.i., with no effect on virus titers (only SB203580 tested). Together, these data indicate that p53 activation is required for the induction of apoptosis in infected M1-D cells.

  6. Lon Mutant of Brucella abortus Induces Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha in Murine J774.A1 Macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sungdo; Choi, Young-Sill; Park, Sang-Hee; Kim, Young-Rok; Chu, Hyuk; Hwang, Kyu-Jam; Park, Mi-Yeoun

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to isolate a Brucella lon mutant and to analyze the cytokine response of B. lon mutant during macrophage infection. Methods A wild-type Brucella abortus strain was mutagenized by Tn5 transposition. From the mouse macrophage J774.A1 cells, total RNA was isolated at 0 hours, 6 hours, 12 hours, and 24 hours after infection with Brucella. Using mouse cytokine microarrays, we measured transcriptional levels of the cytokine response, and validated our results with a reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay to confirm the induction of cytokine messenger RNA (mRNA). Results In host J774.A1 macrophages, mRNA levels of T helper 1 (Th1)-type cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), interleukin-2 (IL-2), and IL-3, were significantly higher in the lon mutant compared to wild-type Brucella and the negative control. TNF-α levels in cell culture media were induced as high as 2 μg/mL after infection with the lon mutant, a greater than sixfold change. Conclusion In order to understand the role of the lon protein in virulence, we identified and characterized a novel B. lon mutant. We compared the immune response it generates to the wild-type Brucella response in a mouse macrophage cell line. We demonstrated that the B. lon mutants induce TNF-α expression from the host J774.A1 macrophage. PMID:24524018

  7. IL-15 superagonist/IL-15RαSushi-Fc fusion complex (IL-15SA/IL-15RαSu-Fc; ALT-803) markedly enhances specific subpopulations of NK and memory CD8+ T cells, and mediates potent anti-tumor activity against murine breast and colon carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Peter S.; Kwilas, Anna R.; Xu, Wenxin; Alter, Sarah; Jeng, Emily K.; Wong, Hing C.

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-15-N72D superagonist-complexed with IL-15RαSushi-Fc fusion protein (IL-15SA/IL-15RαSu-Fc; ALT-803) has been reported to exhibit significant anti-tumor activity in murine myeloma, rat bladder cancer, and murine glioblastoma models. In this study, we examined the immunomodulatory and anti-tumor effects of IL-15SA/IL-15RαSu-Fc in tumor-free and highly metastatic tumor-bearing mice. Here, IL-15SA/IL-15RαSu-Fc significantly expanded natural killer (NK) and CD8+ T cells. In examining NK cell subsets, the greatest significant increase was in highly cytotoxic and migrating (CD11b+, CD27hi; high effector) NK cells, leading to enhanced function on a per-cell basis. CD8+ T cell subset analysis determined that IL-15SA/IL-15RαSu-Fc significantly increased IL-15 responding memory (CD122+, CD44+) CD8+ T cells, in particular those having the innate (NKG2D+, PD1−) phenotype. In 4T1 breast tumor–bearing mice, IL-15SA/IL-15RαSu-Fc induced significant anti-tumor activity against spontaneous pulmonary metastases, depending on CD8+ T and NK cells, and resulting in prolonged survival. Similar anti-tumor activity was seen in the experimental pulmonary metastasis model of CT26 colon carcinoma cells, particularly when IL-15SA/IL-15RαSu-Fc was combined with a cocktail of checkpoint inhibitors, anti-CTLA-4 and anti-PD-L1. Altogether, these studies showed for the first time that IL-15SA/IL-15RαSu-Fc (1) promoted the development of high effector NK cells and CD8+ T cell responders of the innate phenotype, (2) enhanced function of NK cells, and (3) played a vital role in reducing tumor metastasis and ultimately survival, especially in combination with checkpoint inhibitors. PMID:26910920

  8. Rosmarinus officinalis L. extract ameliorates intestinal inflammation through MAPKs/NF-κB signaling in a murine model of acute experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Medicherla, Kanakaraju; Ketkar, Avanee; Sahu, Bidya Dhar; Sudhakar, Godi; Sistla, Ramakrishna

    2016-07-13

    We investigated the anti-inflammatory and anti-colitis effects of Rosmarinus officinalis L. extract (RE) by using both in vitro LPS-activated mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages and in vivo dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced experimental murine colitis and suggested the underlying possible mechanisms. Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis was performed to identify the major components present in the RE. The clinical signs, biochemistry, immunoblot, ELISA and histology in colon tissues were assessed in order to elucidate the beneficial effect of RE. RE suppressed the LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production and the expressions of inflammatory proteins in macrophages. Administration of RE (50 and 100 mg kg(-1)) also significantly reduced the severity of DSS-induced murine colitis, as assessed by the clinical symptoms, colon length and histology. RE administration prevented the DSS-induced activation of p38, ERK and JNK MAPKs, attenuated IκBα phosphorylation and subsequent nuclear translocation and DNA binding of NF-κB (p65). RE also suppressed the COX-2 and iNOS expressions, decreased the levels of TNF-α and IL-6 cytokines and the myeloperoxidase activity in the colon tissue. Histological observation revealed that RE administration alleviated mucosal damage and inflammatory cell infiltration induced by DSS in the colon tissue. Hence, RE could be used as a new preventive and therapeutic food ingredient or as a dietary supplement for inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:27349640

  9. Efficacy of an experimental azithromycin cream for prophylaxis of tick-transmitted lyme disease spirochete infection in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Piesman, Joseph; Hojgaard, Andrias; Ullmann, Amy J; Dolan, Marc C

    2014-01-01

    As an alternative to oral prophylaxis for the prevention of tick transmission of Borrelia burgdorferi, we tested antibiotic cream prophylactic formulations in a murine model of spirochete infection. A 4% preparation of doxycycline cream afforded no protection, but a single application of 4% azithromycin cream was 100% protective when applied directly to the tick bite site at the time of tick removal. Indeed, the azithromycin cream was 100% effective when applied at up to 3 days after tick removal and protected 74% of mice exposed to tick bite when applied at up to 2 weeks after tick removal. Azithromycin cream was also protective when applied at a site distal to the tick bite site, suggesting that it was having a systemic effect in addition to a local transdermal effect. Mice that were protected from tick-transmitted infection did not seroconvert and did not infect larval ticks on xenodiagnosis. Azithromycin cream formulations appear to hold promise for Lyme disease prophylaxis. PMID:24165183

  10. Vitamin A Deficiency Promotes Inflammation by Induction of Type 2 Cytokines in Experimental Ovalbumin-Induced Asthma Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Cui, Weiwei; Zhang, Peng; Gu, Jingmin; Tian, Yuan; Gao, Xiuzhu; Liu, Yaqing; Jin, Zheng; Yan, Dongmei; Zhu, Xun; Li, Dong

    2016-10-01

    Vitamin A (VA) deficiency is one of the most common malnutrition conditions. Recent reports showed that VA plays an important role in the immune balance; lack of VA could result in enhanced type 2 immune response characterized by increased type 2 cytokine production and type 2 innate lymphoid cell infiltration and activation. Type 2 immune response plays protective role in anti-infection but plays pathological role in asthmatic disease. In order to investigate the role of VA in the asthmatic disease, we used ovalbumin-induced asthma murine model and observed the pathological changes between mouse-received VA-deficient and VA-sufficient diets. We also measured the type 2 cytokine expressions to reveal the potential mechanism. Our results showed that VA deficiency exacerbates ovalbumin-induced lung inflammation and type 2 cytokine productions. Thus, VA deficiency, or malnutrition in further extent, may contribute to the increasing prevalence of asthma. PMID:27525423

  11. Efficacy of an experimental azithromycin cream for prophylaxis of tick-transmitted lyme disease spirochete infection in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Piesman, Joseph; Hojgaard, Andrias; Ullmann, Amy J; Dolan, Marc C

    2014-01-01

    As an alternative to oral prophylaxis for the prevention of tick transmission of Borrelia burgdorferi, we tested antibiotic cream prophylactic formulations in a murine model of spirochete infection. A 4% preparation of doxycycline cream afforded no protection, but a single application of 4% azithromycin cream was 100% protective when applied directly to the tick bite site at the time of tick removal. Indeed, the azithromycin cream was 100% effective when applied at up to 3 days after tick removal and protected 74% of mice exposed to tick bite when applied at up to 2 weeks after tick removal. Azithromycin cream was also protective when applied at a site distal to the tick bite site, suggesting that it was having a systemic effect in addition to a local transdermal effect. Mice that were protected from tick-transmitted infection did not seroconvert and did not infect larval ticks on xenodiagnosis. Azithromycin cream formulations appear to hold promise for Lyme disease prophylaxis.

  12. Altered Lipid Composition of Surfactant and Lung Tissue in Murine Experimental Malaria-Associated Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Scaccabarozzi, Diletta; Deroost, Katrien; Lays, Natacha; Omodeo Salè, Fausta; Van den Steen, Philippe E; Taramelli, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    Malaria-associated acute lung injury (MA-ALI) and its more severe form malaria-associated acute respiratory distress syndrome (MA-ARDS) are common, often fatal complications of severe malaria infections. However, little is known about their pathogenesis. In this study, biochemical alterations of the lipid composition of the lungs were investigated as possible contributing factors to the severity of murine MA-ALI/ARDS. C57BL/6J mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 to induce lethal MA-ARDS, or with Plasmodium chabaudi AS, a parasite strain that does not induce lung pathology. The lipid profile of the lung tissue from mice infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 developing MA-ALI/ARDS, but not that from mice without lung pathology or controls, was characterized by high levels of phospholipids -mainly phosphatidylcholine- and esterified cholesterol. The high levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids and the linoleic/oleic fatty acid ratio of the latter reflect the fatty acid composition of plasma cholesterol esters. In spite of the increased total polyunsaturated fatty acid pool, which augments the relative oxidability of the lung membranes, and the presence of hemozoin, a known pro-oxidant, no excess oxidative stress was detected in the lungs of Plasmodium berghei NK65 infected mice. The bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of Plasmodium berghei NK65 infected mice was characterized by high levels of plasma proteins. The phospholipid profile of BAL large and small aggregate fractions was also different from uninfected controls, with a significant increase in the amounts of sphingomyelin and lysophosphatidylcholine and the decrease in phosphatidylglycerol. Both the increase of proteins and lysophosphatidylcholine are known to decrease the intrinsic surface activity of surfactant. Together, these data indicate that an altered lipid composition of lung tissue and BAL fluid, partially ascribed to oedema and lipoprotein infiltration, is a characteristic feature of murine

  13. Altered Lipid Composition of Surfactant and Lung Tissue in Murine Experimental Malaria-Associated Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Scaccabarozzi, Diletta; Deroost, Katrien; Lays, Natacha; Taramelli, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    Malaria-associated acute lung injury (MA-ALI) and its more severe form malaria-associated acute respiratory distress syndrome (MA-ARDS) are common, often fatal complications of severe malaria infections. However, little is known about their pathogenesis. In this study, biochemical alterations of the lipid composition of the lungs were investigated as possible contributing factors to the severity of murine MA-ALI/ARDS. C57BL/6J mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 to induce lethal MA-ARDS, or with Plasmodium chabaudi AS, a parasite strain that does not induce lung pathology. The lipid profile of the lung tissue from mice infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 developing MA-ALI/ARDS, but not that from mice without lung pathology or controls, was characterized by high levels of phospholipids -mainly phosphatidylcholine- and esterified cholesterol. The high levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids and the linoleic/oleic fatty acid ratio of the latter reflect the fatty acid composition of plasma cholesterol esters. In spite of the increased total polyunsaturated fatty acid pool, which augments the relative oxidability of the lung membranes, and the presence of hemozoin, a known pro-oxidant, no excess oxidative stress was detected in the lungs of Plasmodium berghei NK65 infected mice. The bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of Plasmodium berghei NK65 infected mice was characterized by high levels of plasma proteins. The phospholipid profile of BAL large and small aggregate fractions was also different from uninfected controls, with a significant increase in the amounts of sphingomyelin and lysophosphatidylcholine and the decrease in phosphatidylglycerol. Both the increase of proteins and lysophosphatidylcholine are known to decrease the intrinsic surface activity of surfactant. Together, these data indicate that an altered lipid composition of lung tissue and BAL fluid, partially ascribed to oedema and lipoprotein infiltration, is a characteristic feature of murine

  14. Colonization of the murine hindgut by sacral crest-derived neural precursors: experimental support for an evolutionarily conserved model.

    PubMed

    Kapur, R P

    2000-11-01

    Enteric ganglia in the hindgut are derived from separate vagal and sacral neural crest populations. Two conflicting models, based primarily on avian data, have been proposed to describe the contribution of sacral neural crest cells. One hypothesizes early colonization of the hindgut shortly after neurulation, and the other states that sacral crest cells reside transiently in the extraenteric ganglion of Remak and colonize the hindgut much later, after vagal crest-derived neural precursors arrive. In this study, I show that Wnt1-lacZ-transgene expression, an "early" marker of murine neural crest cells, is inconsistent with the "early-colonization" model. Although Wnt1-lacZ-positive sacral crest cells populate pelvic ganglia in the mesenchyme surrounding the hindgut, they are not found in the gut prior to the arrival of vagal crest cells. Similarly, segments of murine hindgut harvested prior to the arrival of vagal crest cells and grafted under the renal capsule fail to develop enteric neurons, unless adjacent pelvic mesenchyme is included in the graft. When pelvic mesenchyme from DbetaH-nlacZ transgenic embryos is apposed with nontransgenic hindgut, neural precursors from the mesenchyme colonize the hindgut and form intramural ganglion cells that express the transgenic marker. Contribution of sacral crest-derived cells to the enteric nervous system is not affected by cocolonization of grafts by vagal crest-derived neuroglial precursors. The findings complement recent studies of avian chimeras and support an evolutionarily conserved model in which sacral crest cells first colonize the extramural ganglion and secondarily enter the hindgut mesenchyme.

  15. Identification and cloning of a novel isoform of mouse secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor, mSLPI-beta, overexpressed in murine leukemias and a highly liver metastatic tumor, IMC-HA1 cells.

    PubMed

    Morita, M; Arakawa, H; Nishimura, S

    1999-01-01

    Several genes showing transcriptional alteration in a highly liver metastatic murine carcinoma cell line, IMC-HA1, were identified by mRNA differential display system. Among them, a gene identical to mSLPI was isolated as mSLPI-alpha and -beta. They were produced through an alternative splicing. Their full-length cDNA sequences were determined, and their expression in various murine tumors and normal tissues was analysed. The deduced translation product of mSLPI-alpha showed 59% identity to hSLPI. Although mSLPI-beta had the same 103-amino-acid sequence from the carboxyl terminus, the amino terminus showed hydrophilicity opposite mSLPI-alpha or hSLPI. The mSLPI-alpha was expressed ubiquitously in various tumor cell lines. Interestingly, however, mSLPI-beta expression was only observed in P388 and L1210 leukemias and IMC-HA1 cells, and in lower amounts in three normal tissues (thymus, lung and spleen), suggesting that mSLPI, and in particular the unusual splicing product, mSLPI-beta, plays a specific role in these cells, including malignant processes of tumor cells.

  16. Soluble fibrin augments platelet/tumor cell adherence in vitro and in vivo, and enhances experimental metastasis.

    PubMed

    Biggerstaff, J P; Seth, N; Amirkhosravi, A; Amaya, M; Fogarty, S; Meyer, T V; Siddiqui, F; Francis, J L

    1999-01-01

    There is considerable evidence for a relationship between hemostasis and malignancy. Since platelet adhesion to tumor cells has been implicated in the metastatic process and plasma levels of fibrinogen (Fg) and soluble fibrin (sFn) monomer are increased in cancer, we hypothesized that these molecules might enhance tumor-platelet interaction. We therefore studied binding of sFn monomer to tumor cells in a static microplate adhesion assay and determined the effect of pre-treating tumor cells with sFn on tumor cell-induced thrombocytopenia and experimental metastasis. Soluble fibrin (produced by adding thrombin to FXIII- and plasminogen-free Fg in the presence of Gly-Pro-Arg-Pro-amide (GPRP-NH2) significantly increased platelet adherence to tumor cells. This effect was primarily mediated by the integrins alphaIIb beta3 on the platelet and CD 54 (ICAM-1) on the tumor cells. Platelets adhered to untreated A375 cells (28 +/- 8 platelets/tumor cell) and this was not significantly affected by pre-treatment of the tumor cells with fibrinogen or GPRP-NH2. Although thrombin treatment increased adherence, pre-incubation of the tumor cells with sFn resulted in a further increase in platelet binding to tumor cells. In contrast to untreated tumor cells, intravenous injection of sFn-treated A 375 cells reduced the platelet count in anticoagulated mice, supporting the in vitro finding that sFn enhanced tumor cell-platelet adherence. In a more aggressive model of experimental metastasis, treating tumor cells with sFn enhanced lung seeding by 65% compared to untreated cells. Extrapolation of our data to the clinical situation suggests that coagulation activation, and subsequent increase in circulating Fn monomer, may enhance platelet adhesion to circulating tumor cells and thereby facilitate metastatic spread.

  17. Soluble fibrin augments platelet/tumor cell adherence in vitro and in vivo, and enhances experimental metastasis.

    PubMed

    Biggerstaff, J P; Seth, N; Amirkhosravi, A; Amaya, M; Fogarty, S; Meyer, T V; Siddiqui, F; Francis, J L

    1999-01-01

    There is considerable evidence for a relationship between hemostasis and malignancy. Since platelet adhesion to tumor cells has been implicated in the metastatic process and plasma levels of fibrinogen (Fg) and soluble fibrin (sFn) monomer are increased in cancer, we hypothesized that these molecules might enhance tumor-platelet interaction. We therefore studied binding of sFn monomer to tumor cells in a static microplate adhesion assay and determined the effect of pre-treating tumor cells with sFn on tumor cell-induced thrombocytopenia and experimental metastasis. Soluble fibrin (produced by adding thrombin to FXIII- and plasminogen-free Fg in the presence of Gly-Pro-Arg-Pro-amide (GPRP-NH2) significantly increased platelet adherence to tumor cells. This effect was primarily mediated by the integrins alphaIIb beta3 on the platelet and CD 54 (ICAM-1) on the tumor cells. Platelets adhered to untreated A375 cells (28 +/- 8 platelets/tumor cell) and this was not significantly affected by pre-treatment of the tumor cells with fibrinogen or GPRP-NH2. Although thrombin treatment increased adherence, pre-incubation of the tumor cells with sFn resulted in a further increase in platelet binding to tumor cells. In contrast to untreated tumor cells, intravenous injection of sFn-treated A 375 cells reduced the platelet count in anticoagulated mice, supporting the in vitro finding that sFn enhanced tumor cell-platelet adherence. In a more aggressive model of experimental metastasis, treating tumor cells with sFn enhanced lung seeding by 65% compared to untreated cells. Extrapolation of our data to the clinical situation suggests that coagulation activation, and subsequent increase in circulating Fn monomer, may enhance platelet adhesion to circulating tumor cells and thereby facilitate metastatic spread. PMID:10919717

  18. Bromocriptine induces parapoptosis as the main type of cell death responsible for experimental pituitary tumor shrinkage

    SciTech Connect

    Palmeri, Claudia Mariela Petiti, Juan Pablo; Valle Sosa, Liliana del; Gutierrez, Silvina; Paul, Ana Lucia de; Mukdsi, Jorge Humberto; Torres, Alicia Ines

    2009-10-01

    Bromocriptine (Bc) produces pituitary tumoral mass regression which induces the cellular death that was classically described as apoptosis. However, recent works have related that other mechanisms of cell death could also be involved in the maintenance of physiological and pathological pituitary homeostasis. The aim of this study was to evaluate and characterize the different types of cell death in the involution induced by Bc in experimental rat pituitary tumors. The current study demonstrated that Bc induced an effective regression of estrogen induced pituitary tumors by a mechanism identified as parapoptosis. This alternative cell death was ultrastructurally recognized by extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization and an increased cell electron density, represented around 25% of the total pituitary cells counted. Furthermore, the results obtained from biochemical assays did not correspond to the criteria of apoptosis or necrosis. We also investigated the participation of p38, ERK1/2 and PKC{delta} in the parapoptotic pathway. An important observation was the significant increase in phosphorylated forms of these MAPKs, the holoenzyme and catalytic fragments of PKC{delta} in nuclear fractions after Bc administration compared to control and estrogen treated rats. Furthermore, the immunolocalization at ultrastructural level of these kinases showed a similar distribution pattern, with a prevalent localization at nuclear level in lactotrophs from Bc treated rats. In summary, we determined that parapoptosis is the predominant cell death type involved in the regression of pituitary tumors in response to Bc treatment, and may cause the activation of PKC{delta}, ERK1/2 and p38.

  19. Experimental heating properties of re-entrant type resonant cavity applicator for deep tumor hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Nakano, A; Kato, K; Tsuchiya, K; Nakazawa, K; Yabuhara, T; Uzuka, T; Takahashi, H

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the heating properties of a new type hyperthermia system composed of a re-entrant type resonant cavity applicator for a deep tumor of the abdominal region. In this heating method, a human body is placed between the two inner electrodes, and is heated with electromagnetic fields stimulated in the cavity without contact between the surface of the human body and the applicator. First, the experimental heating results of an agar-muscle equivalent phantom were presented. Second, we performed an experiment with a lard-agar phantom. The center region of the agar phantom could be heated selectively without generating hot spots in the lard layers. From these results, it was found that our newly developed heating method is useful for a deep-seated tumor hyperthermia treatment.

  20. Classical Mathematical Models for Description and Prediction of Experimental Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Benzekry, Sébastien; Lamont, Clare; Beheshti, Afshin; Tracz, Amanda; Ebos, John M. L.; Hlatky, Lynn; Hahnfeldt, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Despite internal complexity, tumor growth kinetics follow relatively simple laws that can be expressed as mathematical models. To explore this further, quantitative analysis of the most classical of these were performed. The models were assessed against data from two in vivo experimental systems: an ectopic syngeneic tumor (Lewis lung carcinoma) and an orthotopically xenografted human breast carcinoma. The goals were threefold: 1) to determine a statistical model for description of the measurement error, 2) to establish the descriptive power of each model, using several goodness-of-fit metrics and a study of parametric identifiability, and 3) to assess the models' ability to forecast future tumor growth. The models included in the study comprised the exponential, exponential-linear, power law, Gompertz, logistic, generalized logistic, von Bertalanffy and a model with dynamic carrying capacity. For the breast data, the dynamics were best captured by the Gompertz and exponential-linear models. The latter also exhibited the highest predictive power, with excellent prediction scores (≥80%) extending out as far as 12 days in the future. For the lung data, the Gompertz and power law models provided the most parsimonious and parametrically identifiable description. However, not one of the models was able to achieve a substantial prediction rate (≥70%) beyond the next day data point. In this context, adjunction of a priori information on the parameter distribution led to considerable improvement. For instance, forecast success rates went from 14.9% to 62.7% when using the power law model to predict the full future tumor growth curves, using just three data points. These results not only have important implications for biological theories of tumor growth and the use of mathematical modeling in preclinical anti-cancer drug investigations, but also may assist in defining how mathematical models could serve as potential prognostic tools in the clinic. PMID:25167199

  1. CD8+ Cells Regulate the T helper-17 Response in an Experimental Murine Model of Sjögren Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, X.; Schaumburg, C.S.; Coursey, T.G.; Siemasko, K.F.; Volpe, E. A.; Gandhi, N.B.; Li, D.-Q.; Niederkorn, J.Y.; Stern, M.E.; Pflugfelder, S.C.; de Paiva, C.S.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the regulatory function of CD8+ cells in T helper (Th) 17 cell-mediated corneal epithelial barrier disruption that develops in a murine desiccating stress (DS) model that resembles Sjögren syndrome. CD8+ cell depletion promoted generation of IL-17A producing CD4+ T cells via activation of dendritic cells in both the ocular surface and draining cervical lymph nodes in C57BL/6 mice subjected to DS. T cell-deficient nude recipient mice receiving adoptively transferred CD4+ T cells from CD8+ cell-depleted donors exposed to DS displayed increased CD4+ T cell infiltration and elevated IL-17A and CCL20 levels in the ocular surface, which was associated with greater corneal barrier disruption. Enhanced DS-specific corneal barrier disruption in CD8-depleted donor mice correlated with a Th17-mediated expression of matrixmetalloproteinases (MMP-3 and MMP-9) in the recipient corneal epithelium. Co-transfer of CD8+ CD103+ Tregs did not affect the ability of DS-specific pathogenic CD4+ T cells to infiltrate and cause ocular surface disease in the nude recipients, showing that CD8+ cells regulate the afferent arm of DS-induced immune response. In summary, CD8+ regulatory cells suppress generation of a pathogenic Th17 response that plays a pivotal role in DS-induced disruption of corneal barrier function. PMID:24022789

  2. Implant-associated localized osteitis in murine femur fracture by biofilm forming Staphylococcus aureus: a novel experimental model.

    PubMed

    Windolf, Ceylan D; Meng, Wei; Lögters, Tim T; MacKenzie, Colin R; Windolf, Joachim; Flohé, Sascha

    2013-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (SA) is the most common causative agent for implant-associated osteitis. The present study characterizes a novel model of a low grade acute SA osteitis with bone defect in the femur which is stabilized by a titanium locking plate. Wild-type Balb/c mice were osteotomized, fixed by a locking plate and infected with SA. Mice underwent debridement 7 and 14 days later and were sacrificed at Day 28. At Days 7, 14, and 28 after inoculation local and systemic cell populations and IL-6 were analyzed. Fracture healing was quantified by radiography. The control group underwent the same procedure without infection. The bacterial load of implant-associated osteitis with biofilm formation was quantified by counting CFU and real-time PCR. Fracture healing determined by radiography was delayed in infected compared to non-infected mice. Throughout the investigation period CFU and leukocyte counts, as well as IL-6 levels were found to be significantly elevated in infected mice at the infection site but not systemically. Our murine model allows the detailed investigation of implant associated localized osteitis with biofilm producing SA and its influence on fracture healing. The model provides a tool to analyze therapeutic or prophylactic approaches to the problem of biofilm-associated osteitis.

  3. Implementation and experimental results of 4D tumor tracking using robotic couch

    PubMed Central

    Buzurovic, I.; Yu, Y.; Werner-Wasik, M.; Biswas, T.; Anne, P. R.; Dicker, A. P.; Podder, T. K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study presents the implementation and experimental results of a novel technique for 4D tumor tracking using a commercially available and commonly used treatment couch and evaluates the tumor tracking accuracy in clinical settings. Methods: Commercially available couch is capable of positioning the patient accurately; however, currently there is no provision for compensating physiological movement using the treatment couch in real-time. In this paper, a real-time couch tracking control technique is presented together with experimental results in tumor motion compensation in four dimensions (superior-inferior, lateral, anterior-posterior, and time). To implement real-time couch motion for tracking, a novel control system for the treatment couch was developed. The primary functional requirements for this novel technique were: (a) the treatment couch should maintain all previous/normal features for patient setup and positioning, (b) the new control system should be used as a parallel system when tumor tracking would be deployed, and (c) tracking could be performed in a single direction and/or concurrently in all three directions of the couch motion (longitudinal, lateral, and vertical). To the authors’ best knowledge, the implementation of such technique to a regular treatment couch for tumor tracking has not been reported so far. To evaluate the performance of the tracking couch, we investigated the mechanical characteristics of the system such as system positioning resolution, repeatability, accuracy, and tracking performance. Performance of the tracking system was evaluated using dosimetric test as an endpoint. To investigate the accuracy of real-time tracking in the clinical setting, the existing clinical treatment couch was replaced with our experimental couch and the linear accelerator was used to deliver 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans with and without tracking. The results

  4. Epidermal growth factor prolongs survival time of tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Amagase, H; Tamura, K; Okuhira, M; Kakimoto, M; Amano, H; Hashimoto, K; Fuwa, T; Tsukagoshi, S

    1990-05-01

    We observed that human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) alone prolonged the survival time of mice bearing various murine syngeneic tumors as well as athymic nude mice bearing human xenografts. No changes in the subcutaneous solid tumor mass volume were observed. Prolongation of survival time by hEGF was observed in mice bearing murine epidermoid carcinoma (BSC) and human gastric carcinoma (KATO III), but not in murine epidermoid carcinoma (KLN205) or human epidermoid carcinoma (A431). Human tumor cells such as A431, KATO III, and murine tumor cells, KLN205, BSC had roughly 2 X 10(6), 3 X 10(4), 1.3 X 10(3) and 1 X 10(3) EGF receptors/cell, respectively. Although KLN205 and BSC tumor cells maintained nearly the same number of EGF receptors, the effects of hEGF were very different. Although A431 tumor cells had nearly 100 times more receptors than KATO III cells, the prolongation of survival time of mice bearing A431 by hEGF was no better than that of mice bearing KATO III. Accordingly, it appears that this prolongation of survival time by hEGF is independent of the number of EGF receptors on tumor cells. In addition, hEGF was shown to inhibit experimental pulmonary metastasis of murine BSC tumor, but was ineffective with murine KLN205 tumor. These results suggest that prolongation of survival time by hEGF may result from the inhibition of tumor cell metastasis and EGF may play a role in preventing the metastasis of certain malignant neoplasms unrelated to its effects through the EGF receptor on tumor cells.

  5. Inhibition of cytokine-induced microvascular arrest of tumor cells by recombinant endostatin prevents experimental hepatic melanoma metastasis.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Lorea; Valcárcel, María; Carrascal, Teresa; Egilegor, Eider; Salado, Clarisa; Sim, B Kim Lee; Vidal-Vanaclocha, Fernando

    2004-01-01

    We investigated effects of endostatin (ES) in the prometastatic microenvironment of inflammation occurring during the microvascular phase of cancer cell infiltration in the liver. We used a model of intrasplenic injection of B16 melanoma (B16M) cells leading to hepatic metastasis through vascular cell adhesion molecule-(VCAM-1)-mediated capillary arrest of cancer cells via interleukin-18 (IL-18)-dependent mechanism. We show that administration of 50 mg/kg recombinant human (rh) ES 30 min before B16M, plus repetition of same dose for 3 additional days decreased metastasis number by 60%. A single dose of rhES before B16M injection reduced hepatic microvascular retention of luciferase-transfected B16M by 40% and inhibited hepatic production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and IL-18 and VCAM-1 expression by hepatic sinusoidal endothelia (HSE). Consistent with these data, rhES inhibited VCAM-1-dependent B16M cell adhesion to primary cultured HSE receiving B16M conditioned medium, and it abolished the HSE cell production of TNF-alpha and IL-18 induced by tumor-derived vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF). rhES abrogated recombinant murine VEGF-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of KDR/flk-1 receptor in HSE cells, preventing the proinflammatory action of tumor-derived VEGF on HSE. rhES also abolished hepatic production of TNF-alpha, microvascular retention of luciferase-transfected B16M, and adhesion of B16M cells to isolated HSE cells, all of them induced in mice given 5 micro g/kg recombinant murine VEGF for 18 h. This capillary inflammation-deactivating capability constitutes a nonantiangiogenic antitumoral action of endostatin that decreases cancer cell arrest within liver microvasculature and prevents metastases promoted by proinflammatory cytokines induced by VEGF. PMID:14729638

  6. CNS tumors and exposure to acrylonitrile: inconsistency between experimental and epidemiology studies.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, J. J.; Strother, D. E.

    1999-01-01

    Acrylonitrile is a potent CNS tumorigen in rats leading to concern that it may be a tumorigen in humans. There have been 12 epidemiology studies of 37,352 workers exposed to acrylonitrile which evaluate CNS cancers. We summarize and evaluate these epidemiology studies for CNS cancers using the methods of meta-analysis. Our analyses indicate that workers with acrylonitrile exposure have null findings for CNS cancer (relative risk = 1.1, 95% confidence interval 0.8-1.5), which are in stark contrast to the projected risk to humans using the rat findings (relative risk = 3.5, 95% confidence interval 3.0-4.0). We discuss several explanations for the inconsistency between animal and human findings, including the possibility that the acrylonitrile-induced rat CNS tumors may not be relevant to humans. Given the rarity of CNS tumors in humans and a lack of understanding of the causal mechanisms of these tumors in rats, however, a more definitive conclusion will have to await additional experimental and observational data. Nevertheless, the epidemiology evidence indicates that acrylonitrile is not a potent CNS tumorigen. PMID:11550315

  7. A natural diterpenoid kamebacetal A with anti-tumor activity: Theoretical and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Tang, Fu-ming; Zhang, Yi-Heng; Chen, Zhong

    2010-06-01

    Kamebacetal A ( 1) is an ent-kaurane diterpenoid isolated from Isodon racemosa (Hemsl) Hara. This natural product exhibits significant cytotoxicity against human Bel-7402 and HO-8910 tumor cells. The geometrical conformation of 1 has been optimized at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d) level of theory. The results indicated that the calculated geometric parameters are close to the X-ray crystal structure. The theoretical 13C NMR chemical shifts of 1 were also calculated at the GIAO-B3LYP level of theory with different basis sets. The calculated NMR chemical shifts are in closer agreement with the experimental results. A molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) map was used in an attempt to identify key features of the kamebacetal A to account for its anti-tumor activity. MEP investigations reveal that compound 1, which shows anti-tumor activity, possesses electron-rich regions that extend over the hydroxyl and carbonyl groups of compound 1. The data generated in this study is valuable as it provides an insight into kamebacetal A molecular and structure-activity relationships.

  8. Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... plants (aflatoxins) Excessive sunlight exposure Genetic problems Obesity Radiation exposure Viruses Types of tumors known to be caused by viruses are: Cervical cancer (human papillomavirus) Hepatocellular carcinoma (hepatitis B and hepatitis C ...

  9. Does Carica papaya leaf-extract increase the platelet count? An experimental study in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Dharmarathna, Sinhalagoda Lekamlage Chandi Asoka; Wickramasinghe, Susiji; Waduge, Roshitha Nilmini; Rajapakse, Rajapakse Peramune Veddikkarage Jayanthe; Kularatne, Senanayake Abeysinghe Mudiyanselage

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the potential role of fresh Carica papaya (C. papaya) leaf extract on haematological and biochemical parameters and toxicological changes in a murine model. Methods In total 36 mice were used for the trial. Fresh C. papaya leaf extract [0.2 mL (2 g)/mouse] was given only to the test group (18 mice). General behavior, clinical signs and feeding patterns were recorded. Blood and tissue samples were collected at intervals. Haematological parameters including platelet, red blood cell (RBC), white blood cell (WBC), packed cell volume (PCV), serum biochemistry including serum creatinine, serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT) and serum glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (SGPT) were determined. Organs for possible histopathological changes were examined. Results Neither group exhibited alteration of behavior or reduction in food and water intake. Similarly, no significant changes in SGOT, SGPT and serum creatinine levels were detected in the test group. Histopathological organ changes were not observed in either group of mice except in three liver samples of the test group which had a mild focal necrosis. The platelet count (11.33±0.35)×105/µL (P=0.000 04) and the RBC count (7.97±0.61)×106/µL (P=0.000 03) were significantly increased in the test group compared to that of the controls. However, WBC count and PCV (%) values were not changed significantly in the test group. The platelet count in the test group started to increase significantly from Day 3 (3.4±0.18×105/µL), reaching almost a fourfold higher at Day 21 (11.3×105/µL), while it was 3.8×105/µL and 5.5×105/µL at Day 3 and Day 21 respectively in the control. Likewise, the RBC count in the test group increased from 6×106/µL to 9×106/ µL at Day 21 while it remained near constant in the control group (6×106/µL). Conclusions Fresh C. papaya leaf extract significantly increased the platelet and RBC counts in the test group as compared to controls. Therefore, it is very

  10. Embryonic stem cell transplantation after experimental traumatic brain injury dramatically improves neurological outcome, but may cause tumors.

    PubMed

    Riess, Peter; Molcanyi, Marek; Bentz, Kristine; Maegele, Mark; Simanski, Christian; Carlitscheck, Christoph; Schneider, Annette; Hescheler, Jürgen; Bouillon, Bertil; Schäfer, Ute; Neugebauer, Edmund

    2007-01-01

    Transplantation of embryonic stem (ES) cells may provide cures for the damaged nervous system. Pre-differentiated ES or neuronal precursor cells have been investigated in various animal models of neurodegenerative diseases including traumatic brain injury (TBI). To our knowledge, no study has yet examined the effects of undifferentiated, murine ES cells on functional recovery and tumorigenity following implantation into injured rat brains. We evaluated the effect of transplantation of undifferentiated, murine embryonic cells on the recovery of motor function following lateral fluid percussion brain injury in Sprague-Dawley rats. At 3 days post-injury, animals received stereotactic injections of either embryonic stem cell suspension or injections of phosphate buffered saline without cells (control) into the injured cortex. Neurological motor function assessments were performed before injury, 72 h, 1, 3, and 6 weeks after transplantation using a Rotatrod and a Composite Neuroscore test. During this time period brain injured animals receiving ES cell transplantation showed a significant improvement in the Rotarod Test and in the Composite Neuroscore Test as compared to phosphate buffered saline (PBS)-treated animals. At 1 week post-transplantation, ES cells were detectable in 100% of transplanted animals. At 7 weeks following transplantation, EScells were detectable in only one animal. Two of 10 xenotransplanted animals revealed tumor formation over the observation period. These findings provide evidence for therapeutic potency of embryonic stem cell transplantation after TBI in rat, but also raise serious safety concerns about the use of such cells in human.

  11. Method of hyperthermia and tumor size influence effectiveness of doxorubicin release from thermosensitive liposomes in experimental tumors.

    PubMed

    Willerding, Linus; Limmer, Simone; Hossann, Martin; Zengerle, Anja; Wachholz, Kirsten; Ten Hagen, Timo L M; Koning, Gerben A; Sroka, Ronald; Lindner, Lars H; Peller, Michael

    2016-01-28

    Systemic chemotherapy of solid tumors could be enhanced by local hyperthermia (HT) in combination with thermosensitive liposomes (TSL) as drug carriers. In such an approach, effective HT of the tumor is considered essential for successful triggering local drug release and targeting of the drug to the tumor. To investigate the effect of HT method on the effectiveness of drug delivery, a novel laser-based HT device designed for the use in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was compared systematically with the frequently used cold light lamp and water bath HT. Long circulating phosphatidyldiglycerol-based TSL (DPPG2-TSL) with encapsulated doxorubicin (DOX) were used as drug carrier enabling intravascular drug release. Experiments were performed in male Brown Norway rats with a syngeneic soft tissue sarcoma (BN 175) located on both hind legs. One tumor was heated while the second tumor remained unheated as a reference. Six animals were investigated per HT method. DPPG2-TSL were injected i.v. at a stable tumor temperature above 40°C. Thereafter, temperature was maintained for 60min. Total DOX concentration in plasma, tumor tissue and muscle was determined post therapy by HPLC. Finally, the new laser-based device was tested in a MRI environment at 3T using DPPG2-TSL with encapsulated Gd-based contrast agent. All methods showed effective DOX delivery by TSL with 4.5-23.1ng/mg found in the heated tumors. In contrast, DOX concentration in the non-heated tumors was 0.5±0.1ng/mg. Independent of used HT methods, higher DOX levels were found in the smaller tumors. In comparison water bath induced lowest DOX delivery but still showing fourfold higher DOX concentrations compared to the non-heated tumors. With the laser-based applicator, a 13 fold higher DOX deposition was possible for large tumors and a 15 fold higher for the small tumors, respectively. Temperature gradients in the tumor tissue were higher with the laser and cold light lamp (-0.3°C/mm to -0.5°C/mm) compared to

  12. Action of hexachlorobenzene on tumor growth and metastasis in different experimental models

    SciTech Connect

    Pontillo, Carolina Andrea; Rojas, Paola; Chiappini, Florencia; Sequeira, Gonzalo; Cocca, Claudia; Crocci, Máximo; Colombo, Lucas; Lanari, Claudia; and others

    2013-05-01

    Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) is a widespread organochlorine pesticide, considered a possible human carcinogen. It is a dioxin-like compound and a weak ligand of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We have found that HCB activates c-Src/HER1/STAT5b and HER1/ERK1/2 signaling pathways and cell migration, in an AhR-dependent manner in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro the effect of HCB (0.005, 0.05, 0.5, 5 μM) on cell invasion and metalloproteases (MMPs) 2 and 9 activation in MDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, we examined in vivo the effect of HCB (0.3, 3, 30 mg/kg b.w.) on tumor growth, MMP2 and MMP9 expression, and metastasis using MDA-MB-231 xenografts and two syngeneic mouse breast cancer models (spontaneous metastasis using C4-HI and lung experimental metastasis using LM3). Our results show that HCB (5 μM) enhances MMP2 expression, as well as cell invasion, through AhR, c-Src/HER1 pathway and MMPs. Moreover, HCB increases MMP9 expression, secretion and activity through a HER1 and AhR-dependent mechanism, in MDA-MB-231 cells. HCB (0.3 and 3 mg/kg b.w.) enhances subcutaneous tumor growth in MDA-MB-231 and C4-HI in vivo models. In vivo, using MDA-MB-231 model, the pesticide (0.3, 3 and 30 mg/kg b.w.) activated c-Src, HER1, STAT5b, and ERK1/2 signaling pathways and increased MMP2 and MMP9 protein levels. Furthermore, we observed that HCB stimulated lung metastasis regardless the tumor hormone-receptor status. Our findings suggest that HCB may be a risk factor for human breast cancer progression. - Highlights: ► HCB enhances MMP2 and MMP9 expression and cell invasion in MDA-MB-231, in vitro. ► HCB-effects are mediated through AhR, HER1 and/or c-Src. ► HCB increases subcutaneous tumor growth in MDA-MB-231 and C4-HI in vivo models. ► HCB activates c-Src/HER1 pathway and increases MMPs levels in MDA-MB-231 tumors. ► HCB stimulates lung metastasis in C4-HI and LM3 in vivo models.

  13. Acidic extracellular pH of tumors induces octamer-binding transcription factor 4 expression in murine fibroblasts in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Som, Avik; Bloch, Sharon; Ippolito, Joseph E.; Achilefu, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT-4) is an important marker of cellular de-differentiation that can be induced by environmental stressors, such as acidity. Here we demonstrate that chronic acidic stress in solid tumors induced OCT-4 expression in fibroblasts and other stromal cells in four tumor models. The results have implications for how tumors utilize pH modulation to recruit associated stromal cells, induce partial reprogramming of tumor-associated stromal cells, and respond to therapy. PMID:27302093

  14. Murine Typhus

    PubMed Central

    Dzul-Rosado, Karla R; Zavala Velázquez, Jorge Ernesto; Zavala-Castro, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Rickettsia typhi: is an intracellular bacteria who causes murine typhus. His importance is reflected in the high frequency founding specific antibodies against Rickettsia typhi in several worldwide seroepidemiological studies, the seroprevalence ranging between 3-36%. Natural reservoirs of R. typhi are rats (some species belonging the Rattus Genus) and fleas (Xenopsylla cheopis) are his vector. This infection is associated with overcrowding, pollution and poor hygiene. Typically presents fever, headache, rash on trunk and extremities, in some cases may occur organ-specific complications, affecting liver, kidney, lung or brain. Initially the disease is very similar to other diseases, is very common to confuse the murine typhus with Dengue fever, therefore, ignorance of the disease is a factor related to complications or non-specific treatments for the resolution of this infection. This paper presents the most relevant information to consider about the rickettsiosis caused by Rickettsia typhi. PMID:24893060

  15. Tumor-Targeted Nanomedicines

    PubMed Central

    ElBayoumi, Tamer A.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The efficacy of drug delivery systems can be enhanced by making them target-specific via the attachment of various ligands. We attempted to enhance tumor accumulation and therapeutic effect of doxorubicin-loaded long-circulating PEGylated liposomes (Doxil®, ALZA Corp.) by coupling to their surface the anti-cancer monoclonal antibody 2C5 (mAb 2C5) with nuclesome (NS)-restricted activity, that can recognize the surface of various tumor but not normal cells and specifically targets pharmaceutical carriers to tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. Following earlier in vitro results with various cancer cell lines, the mAb 2C5-liposomes were studied in vivo vs. plain and non-specific IgG-liposomes. Experimental design Antibody coupling to Doxil® was performed via the “post-insertion” technique. Using 111In-labeled liposomes, the tissue biodistribution and pharmacokinetic profile were studied, as well as their accumulation in tumors in mice was followed by the whole-body γ-scintigraphic imaging. Therapeutic efficacy of mAb 2C5-targeted Doxil® vs. non-specific IgG-modified and original Doxil® controls was followed by registering live tumor growth and determining tumor weights upon mice sacrifice. Results mAb2C5 antibody-targeted liposomes demonstrate enhanced accumulation in tumors, and the in vivo therapeutic activity of the mAb 2C5-Doxil® treatment was found to be significantly superior, resulting in final tumor weights of only 25-40% compared to all Doxil® control treatments, when tested against the subcutaneous primary murine tumors of 4T1 and C26 and human PC3 tumor in nude mice. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the remarkable capability of 2C5-targeted Doxil® to specifically deliver its cargo into various tumors significantly increasing the efficacy of therapy. PMID:19276264

  16. Effects of an epidermal growth factor receptor-based cancer vaccine on wound healing and inflammation processes in murine experimental models.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Dasha; Chacón, Lewis; Casacó, Angel; Ledón, Nuris; Fernández, Nidia; Iglesias, Arianna; Hernández, Diana R; Sánchez, Belinda; Pérez, Rolando

    2014-02-01

    Anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) therapies have been proven clinically effective for a variety of epithelial tumours. Vaccination of mice with the extracellular domain (ECD) of autologous EGFR overcomes the tolerance to self-EGFR and has antimetastatic effect on EGFR+ tumour. Because EGF/EGFR-signalling plays an important role in the inflammation stage of wound healing, the main objective of this study was to explore the possible role of murine (m) EGFR-ECD vaccine in the croton-oil-induced ear oedema and wound healing process in mice as autologous experimental models, mimicking the possible post-surgical wound complication in patients treated with human EGFR-ECD/VSSP vaccine. Mice were intramuscularly immunised four times; biweekly with the mEGFR-ECD/VSSP/Mont. Seven days later, an 8 mm diameter, full-thickness skin wound was created on the back of each animal. Immunisation induced a strong specific humoral response against the mEGFR-ECD protein and a DTH dose-response curve but interestingly, animals treated with mEGFR-ECD/VSSP/Mont had similar inflammatory and healing speed responses compared to control ones. These data suggest that application of mEGFR-ECD/VSSP vaccine as a therapeutic approach in cancer patients could not elicit a poor healing process after surgery.

  17. Lack of effect of Candida albicans mannan on development of protective immune responses in experimental murine candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Garner, R E; Domer, J E

    1994-02-01

    Candida albicans mannoprotein (MAN) administered to mice before or during immunization with viable C. albicans downregulates MAN-specific delayed hypersensitivity. In the experiments reported here we determined the effect of MAN downregulation on protective immunity in minimally immunized mice, i.e., mice exposed to C. albicans either intradermally or intragastrically, and in maximally immunized mice, i.e., mice immunized by a combination of intradermal and intragastric exposure, in experimental systemic candidiasis. MAN suppression did not induce statistically significant alterations in the protective responses in experimental candidiasis, although 8 of 12 groups of mice treated with MAN had fewer CFU of C. albicans in their kidneys than their non-MAN-treated counterparts. The results emphasize the lack of correlation of delayed hypersensitivity with protection in candidiasis and suggest that MAN may contain epitopes involved in the protective response.

  18. Desferal (DFO) induced Ga-67 washout from normal tissue, tumor and abscess in experimental animals

    SciTech Connect

    Oster, Z.H.; Som, P.; Atkins, H.L.; Brill, A.B.

    1980-01-01

    In the experimental animal, desferal (DFO) given intravenously washes out Ga-67 from all tissues. This effect is not uniform: blood activity is reduced very markedly, while liver activity is less affected. Maximal effect of DFO occurs if given close to the Ga-67 injection. When the time interval between the two is increased, the absolute amount of Ga-67 excreted in the urine in excess of the spontaneous excretion is reduced. Administration of DFO does not effect Ga-67 gastrointestinal excretion. In three animal tumor models (EMT-6 sarcoma in Balb/c mice, spontaneous adenocarcinoma in mice, and spontaneous adenocarcinoma in the rabbit) and in sterile abscess-bearing rats, the administration of DFO 24 hrs after Ga-67-citrate improves significantly the target-to-nontarget ratio. Animals given 50 mg/kg DFO I.V. after Ga-67 citrate showed a significant reduction in the whole-body activity as seen in a one-week follow up.

  19. Laser-induced hyperthemia in the treatment of ocular tumors: experimental evaluation of temperature rise in rabbits' eyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svaasand, Lars O.; Morinelli, Elisa; Gomer, Charles J.

    1990-08-01

    Experimental results for the optical properties of ocular tumors in the red to near infrared region from 600-900 nm and at the near infrared wavelength of 1064 nm are presented. The tumor models have been human retinoblastoma heterotransplanted in athyinic mice and B16 melanotic melanoma in athymic mice. The steady state retinal and tumor temperature rise during 1064 nm laser irradiation have been examined in vivo in normal albino and pigmented rabbits eye and in Greene''s melanoma inoculated in the retinachoroidal layers. 2.

  20. Management of large aggressive nonfunctional pituitary tumors: experimental medical options when surgery and radiation fail.

    PubMed

    Miller, Brandon A; Rutledge, W Caleb; Ioachimescu, Adriana G; Oyesiku, Nelson M

    2012-10-01

    Pituitary adenomas are generally considered benign tumors; however, a subset of these tumors displays aggressive behavior and are not easily cured. The protocol for nonsurgical treatment of aggressive pituitary lesions is less standardized than that of other central nervous system tumors. Aggressive surgical treatment, radiation, dopamine agonists, antiangiogenic drugs, and other chemotherapeutics all have roles in the treatment of aggressive pituitary tumors. More studies are needed to improve outcomes for patients with aggressive pituitary tumors.

  1. Reactive changes of retinal microglia during fatal murine cerebral malaria: effects of dexamethasone and experimental permeabilization of the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Medana, I M; Chan-Ling, T; Hunt, N H

    2000-03-01

    Microglial activation and redistribution toward blood vessels are some of the earliest observable events occurring within the central nervous system (CNS) during fatal murine cerebral malaria (FMCM). To investigate stimuli that might modulate microglial reactivity during FMCM we have performed two experimental manipulations and observed microglial responses in retinal whole mounts. First, to determine whether increased blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability in the absence of the malaria parasite initiates the microglial changes, BBB function was compromised experimentally by intracarotid injection of arabinose and retinae were examined 12, 24, or 36 hours later. Second, to determine whether the immune response against the malaria parasite modulates microglial reactivity, infected mice were treated with dexamethasone before day 4 postinoculation. This treatment regime ameliorates cerebral complications without affecting parasite growth. We observed that increased BBB permeability was sufficient to elicit thickening of microglial processes and redistribution of microglia toward the vasculature, characteristic of the early stages of FMCM. However, despite the presence of plasma constituents in the CNS for up to 36 hours, microglia with amoeboid and vacuolated morphology were not observed. Dexamethasone treatment inhibited the up-regulation of alpha-D-galactose expression and reactive morphological changes in microglia during FMCM. These results suggest that disruption of the CNS milieu by entry of plasma constituents, or circulating malaria parasites in the absence of an immune response, by themselves are insufficient to induce the reactive microglial changes that are characteristic of FMCM. In addition, dexamethasone-sensitive event(s), presumably associated with immune system activation, occurring within the first few days of malaria infection are essential for the development of reactive microglia and subsequent fatal neurological complications.

  2. The efficacy of hydro alcoholic extract of Seidlitzia rosmarinus on experimental zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis lesions in murine model

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Maryam; Fata, Abdolmajid; Khamesipour, Ali; Rakhshandeh, Hasan; Miramin Mohammadi, Akram; Salehi, Ghodratollah; Monavari, Hadi

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Leishmaniasis is one of the most important parasitic infectious diseases in the world. Since last century, many efforts have been made to control and treat the disease, but appropriate vaccines, pesticides and medicines are not available or even eligible. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of hydro-alcoholic extract of Seidlitzia rosmarinus on the lesions of experimental Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (CL) in Balb/c mice. Materials and Methods: The population study was 60 Ballb/c mice which divided to 6 groups, all infected with Leishmania major [MRHO/75/IR]. Soon after the ulcer started to appear in the early stage, a dose of provided herbal extract with 5, 10 and 15% concentration applied on each lesion. The surface area of the lesions measured during an interval of 10 days. Direct Giemsa stained smears prepared two and four weeks after treatment. Results: Increasing the mean size of the lesions was statistically significant compared to those in control group (p>0.001). Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL) developed in all of the mice including the control group that received Eucerine alone. Survival rate in group receiving 15% S. rosmarinus extracts showed significantly higher compared to mice in control group (p<0.001). Conclusion: Hydro-alcoholic extracts of S.rosmarinus with concentrations below15% did not show a therapeutic effect on experimental CL ulcers of Balb/c mice. Further studies with higher concentrations or nano particles are recommended. PMID:25386402

  3. Convection-enhanced delivery of sorafenib and suppression of tumor progression in a murine model of brain melanoma through the inhibition of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3.

    PubMed

    Zou, Zhaoxia; Yin, Yufang; Lin, Jenny; Hsu, Li-Chen J; Brandon, Vanessa L; Yang, Fan; Jove, Richard; Jandial, Rahul; Li, Gang; Chen, Mike Y

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT Despite recent advances, metastatic melanoma remains a terminal disease, in which life-threatening brain metastasis occurs in approximately half of patients. Sorafenib is a multikinase inhibitor that induces apoptosis of melanoma cells in vitro. However, systemic administration has been ineffective because adequate tissue concentrations cannot be achieved. This study investigated if convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of sorafenib would enhance tumor control and survival via inhibition of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) pathway in a murine model of metastatic brain melanoma. METHODS Melanoma cells treated with sorafenib in vitro were examined for signaling and survival changes. The effect of sorafenib given by CED was assessed by bioluminescent imaging and animal survival. RESULTS The results showed that sorafenib induced cell death in the 4 established melanoma cell lines and in 1 primary cultured melanoma cell line. Sorafenib inhibited Stat3 phosphorylation in HTB65, WYC1, and B16 cells. Accordingly, sorafenib treatment also decreased expression of Mcl-1 mRNA in melanoma cell lines. Because sorafenib targets multiple pathways, the present study demonstrated the contribution of the Stat3 pathway by showing that mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) Stat3 +/+ cells were significantly more sensitive to sorafenib than MEF Stat3 -/- cells. In the murine model of melanoma brain metastasis used in this study, CED of sorafenib increased survival by 150% in the treatment group compared with animals receiving the vehicle control (p < 0.01). CED of sorafenib also significantly abrogated tumor growth. CONCLUSIONS The data from this study indicate that local delivery of sorafenib effectively controls brain melanoma. These findings validate further investigation of the use of CED to distribute molecularly targeted agents. PMID:26544779

  4. Convection-enhanced delivery of sorafenib and suppression of tumor progression in a murine model of brain melanoma through the inhibition of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3.

    PubMed

    Zou, Zhaoxia; Yin, Yufang; Lin, Jenny; Hsu, Li-Chen J; Brandon, Vanessa L; Yang, Fan; Jove, Richard; Jandial, Rahul; Li, Gang; Chen, Mike Y

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT Despite recent advances, metastatic melanoma remains a terminal disease, in which life-threatening brain metastasis occurs in approximately half of patients. Sorafenib is a multikinase inhibitor that induces apoptosis of melanoma cells in vitro. However, systemic administration has been ineffective because adequate tissue concentrations cannot be achieved. This study investigated if convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of sorafenib would enhance tumor control and survival via inhibition of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) pathway in a murine model of metastatic brain melanoma. METHODS Melanoma cells treated with sorafenib in vitro were examined for signaling and survival changes. The effect of sorafenib given by CED was assessed by bioluminescent imaging and animal survival. RESULTS The results showed that sorafenib induced cell death in the 4 established melanoma cell lines and in 1 primary cultured melanoma cell line. Sorafenib inhibited Stat3 phosphorylation in HTB65, WYC1, and B16 cells. Accordingly, sorafenib treatment also decreased expression of Mcl-1 mRNA in melanoma cell lines. Because sorafenib targets multiple pathways, the present study demonstrated the contribution of the Stat3 pathway by showing that mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) Stat3 +/+ cells were significantly more sensitive to sorafenib than MEF Stat3 -/- cells. In the murine model of melanoma brain metastasis used in this study, CED of sorafenib increased survival by 150% in the treatment group compared with animals receiving the vehicle control (p < 0.01). CED of sorafenib also significantly abrogated tumor growth. CONCLUSIONS The data from this study indicate that local delivery of sorafenib effectively controls brain melanoma. These findings validate further investigation of the use of CED to distribute molecularly targeted agents.

  5. Computational simulation of temperature elevations in tumors using Monte Carlo method and comparison to experimental measurements in laser photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Manuchehrabadi, Navid; Chen, Yonghui; Lebrun, Alexander; Ma, Ronghui; Zhu, Liang

    2013-12-01

    Accurate simulation of temperature distribution in tumors induced by gold nanorods during laser photothermal therapy relies on precise measurements of thermal, optical, and physiological properties of the tumor with or without nanorods present. In this study, a computational Monte Carlo simulation algorithm is developed to simulate photon propagation in a spherical tumor to calculate laser energy absorption in the tumor and examine the effects of the absorption (μ(a)) and scattering (μ(s)) coefficients of tumors on the generated heating pattern in the tumor. The laser-generated energy deposition distribution is then incorporated into a 3D finite-element model of prostatic tumors embedded in a mouse body to simulate temperature elevations during laser photothermal therapy using gold nanorods. The simulated temperature elevations are compared with measured temperatures in PC3 prostatic tumors in our previous in vivo experimental studies to extract the optical properties of PC3 tumors containing different concentrations of gold nanorods. It has been shown that the total laser energy deposited in the tumor is dominated by μ(a), while both μ(a) and μ(s) shift the distribution of the energy deposition in the tumor. Three sets of μ(a) and μ(s) are extracted, representing the corresponding optical properties of PC3 tumors containing different concentrations of nanorods to laser irradiance at 808 nm wavelength. With the injection of 0.1 cc of a 250 optical density (OD) nanorod solution, the total laser energy absorption rate is increased by 30% from the case of injecting 0.1 cc of a 50 OD nanorod solution, and by 125% from the control case without nanorod injection. Based on the simulated temperature elevations in the tumor, it is likely that after heating for 15 min, permanent thermal damage occurs in the tumor injected with the 250 OD nanorod solution, while thermal damage to the control tumor and the one injected with the 50 OD nanorod solution may be

  6. DMXAA causes tumor site-specific vascular disruption in murine non-small cell lung cancer, and like the endogenous non-canonical cyclic dinucleotide STING agonist, 2'3'-cGAMP, induces M2 macrophage repolarization.

    PubMed

    Downey, Charlene M; Aghaei, Mehrnoosh; Schwendener, Reto A; Jirik, Frank R

    2014-01-01

    The vascular disrupting agent 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA), a murine agonist of the stimulator of interferon genes (STING), appears to target the tumor vasculature primarily as a result of stimulating pro-inflammatory cytokine production from tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). Since there were relatively few reports of DMXAA effects in genetically-engineered mutant mice (GEMM), and models of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in particular, we examined both the effectiveness and macrophage dependence of DMXAA in various NSCLC models. The DMXAA responses of primary adenocarcinomas in K-rasLA1/+ transgenic mice, as well as syngeneic subcutaneous and metastatic tumors, generated by a p53R172HΔg/+; K-rasLA1/+ NSCLC line (344SQ-ELuc), were assessed both by in vivo bioluminescence imaging as well as by histopathology. Macrophage-dependence of DMXAA effects was explored by clodronate liposome-mediated TAM depletion. Furthermore, a comparison of the vascular structure between subcutaneous tumors and metastases was carried out using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Interestingly, in contrast to the characteristic hemorrhagic necrosis produced by DMXAA in 344SQ-ELuc subcutaneous tumors, this agent failed to cause hemorrhagic necrosis of either 344SQ-ELuc-derived metastases or autochthonous K-rasLA1/+ NSCLCs. In addition, we found that clodronate liposome-mediated depletion of TAMs in 344SQ-ELuc subcutaneous tumors led to non-hemorrhagic necrosis due to tumor feeding-vessel occlusion. Since NSCLC were comprised exclusively of TAMs with anti-inflammatory M2-like phenotype, the ability of DMXAA to re-educate M2-polarized macrophages was examined. Using various macrophage phenotypic markers, we found that the STING agonists, DMXAA and the non-canonical endogenous cyclic dinucleotide, 2'3'-cGAMP, were both capable of re-educating M2 cells towards an M1 phenotype. Our findings demonstrate that the choice of preclinical model and the anatomical site of a

  7. A Well-Controlled Experimental System to Study Interactions of Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes with Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Neubert, Natalie J.; Soneson, Charlotte; Barras, David; Baumgaertner, Petra; Rimoldi, Donata; Delorenzi, Mauro; Fuertes Marraco, Silvia A.; Speiser, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    While T cell-based immunotherapies are steadily improving, there are still many patients who progress, despite T cell-infiltrated tumors. Emerging evidence suggests that T cells themselves may provoke immune escape of cancer cells. Here, we describe a well-controlled co-culture system for studying the dynamic T cell – cancer cell interplay, using human melanoma as a model. We explain starting material, controls, and culture parameters to establish reproducible and comparable cultures with highly heterogeneous tumor cells. Low passage melanoma cell lines and melanoma-specific CD8+ T cell clones generated from patient blood were cultured together for up to 3 days. Living melanoma cells were isolated from the co-culture system by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. We demonstrate that the characterization of isolated melanoma cells is feasible using flow cytometry for protein expression analysis as well as an Agilent whole human genome microarray and the NanoString technology for differential gene expression analysis. In addition, we identify five genes (ALG12, GUSB, RPLP0, KRBA2, and ADAT2) that are stably expressed in melanoma cells independent of the presence of T cells or the T cell-derived cytokines IFNγ and TNFα. These genes are essential for correct normalization of gene expression data by NanoString. Further to the characterization of melanoma cells after exposure to CTLs, this experimental system might be suitable to answer a series of questions, including how the affinity of CTLs for their target antigen influences the melanoma cell response and whether CTL-induced gene expression changes in melanoma cells are reversible. Taken together, our human T cell – melanoma cell culture system is well suited to characterize immune-related mechanisms in cancer cells. PMID:27625650

  8. A Well-Controlled Experimental System to Study Interactions of Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes with Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Neubert, Natalie J; Soneson, Charlotte; Barras, David; Baumgaertner, Petra; Rimoldi, Donata; Delorenzi, Mauro; Fuertes Marraco, Silvia A; Speiser, Daniel E

    2016-01-01

    While T cell-based immunotherapies are steadily improving, there are still many patients who progress, despite T cell-infiltrated tumors. Emerging evidence suggests that T cells themselves may provoke immune escape of cancer cells. Here, we describe a well-controlled co-culture system for studying the dynamic T cell - cancer cell interplay, using human melanoma as a model. We explain starting material, controls, and culture parameters to establish reproducible and comparable cultures with highly heterogeneous tumor cells. Low passage melanoma cell lines and melanoma-specific CD8+ T cell clones generated from patient blood were cultured together for up to 3 days. Living melanoma cells were isolated from the co-culture system by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. We demonstrate that the characterization of isolated melanoma cells is feasible using flow cytometry for protein expression analysis as well as an Agilent whole human genome microarray and the NanoString technology for differential gene expression analysis. In addition, we identify five genes (ALG12, GUSB, RPLP0, KRBA2, and ADAT2) that are stably expressed in melanoma cells independent of the presence of T cells or the T cell-derived cytokines IFNγ and TNFα. These genes are essential for correct normalization of gene expression data by NanoString. Further to the characterization of melanoma cells after exposure to CTLs, this experimental system might be suitable to answer a series of questions, including how the affinity of CTLs for their target antigen influences the melanoma cell response and whether CTL-induced gene expression changes in melanoma cells are reversible. Taken together, our human T cell - melanoma cell culture system is well suited to characterize immune-related mechanisms in cancer cells. PMID:27625650

  9. A Well-Controlled Experimental System to Study Interactions of Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes with Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Neubert, Natalie J.; Soneson, Charlotte; Barras, David; Baumgaertner, Petra; Rimoldi, Donata; Delorenzi, Mauro; Fuertes Marraco, Silvia A.; Speiser, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    While T cell-based immunotherapies are steadily improving, there are still many patients who progress, despite T cell-infiltrated tumors. Emerging evidence suggests that T cells themselves may provoke immune escape of cancer cells. Here, we describe a well-controlled co-culture system for studying the dynamic T cell – cancer cell interplay, using human melanoma as a model. We explain starting material, controls, and culture parameters to establish reproducible and comparable cultures with highly heterogeneous tumor cells. Low passage melanoma cell lines and melanoma-specific CD8+ T cell clones generated from patient blood were cultured together for up to 3 days. Living melanoma cells were isolated from the co-culture system by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. We demonstrate that the characterization of isolated melanoma cells is feasible using flow cytometry for protein expression analysis as well as an Agilent whole human genome microarray and the NanoString technology for differential gene expression analysis. In addition, we identify five genes (ALG12, GUSB, RPLP0, KRBA2, and ADAT2) that are stably expressed in melanoma cells independent of the presence of T cells or the T cell-derived cytokines IFNγ and TNFα. These genes are essential for correct normalization of gene expression data by NanoString. Further to the characterization of melanoma cells after exposure to CTLs, this experimental system might be suitable to answer a series of questions, including how the affinity of CTLs for their target antigen influences the melanoma cell response and whether CTL-induced gene expression changes in melanoma cells are reversible. Taken together, our human T cell – melanoma cell culture system is well suited to characterize immune-related mechanisms in cancer cells.

  10. Cytogenetic and molecular observations in human and experimental salivary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Sandros, J; Stenman, G; Mark, J

    1990-02-01

    The chromosomal banding patterns in 189 benign and malignant salivary gland tumors are reviewed. For comparison, karyotypic data from a recent series of polyoma virus-induced salivary gland tumors in the mouse are discussed. Special interest is focused on the relationships between the highly specific patterns of translocations and deletions in these tumors and different genes involved in neoplasia, in particular oncogenes, and tumor suppressor genes.

  11. Impact of Stroma on the Growth, Microcirculation, and Metabolism of Experimental Prostate Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zechmann, Christian M; Woenne, Eva C; Brix, Gunnar; Radzwill, Nicole; Ilg, Martin; Bachert, Peter; Peschke, Peter; Kirsch, Stefan; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Delorme, Stefan; Semmler, Wolfhard; Kiessling, Fabian

    2007-01-01

    Abstract In prostate cancers (PCa), the formation of malignant stroma may substantially influence tumor phenotype and aggressiveness. Thus, the impact of the orthotopic and subcutaneous implantations of hormone-sensitive (H), hormone-insensitive (HI), and anaplastic (AT1) Dunning PCa in rats on growth, microcirculation, and metabolism was investigated. For this purpose, dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([1H]MRS) were applied in combination with histology. Consistent observations revealed that orthotopic H tumors grew significantly slower compared to subcutaneous ones, whereas the growth of HI and AT1 tumors was comparable at both locations. Histologic analysis indicated that glandular differentiation and a close interaction of tumor cells and smooth muscle cells (SMC) were associated with slow tumor growth. Furthermore, there was a significantly lower SMC density in subcutaneous H tumors than in orthotopic H tumors. Perfusion was observed to be significantly lower in orthotopic H tumors than in subcutaneous H tumors. Regional blood volume and permeability-surface area product showed no significant differences between tumor models and their implantation sites. Differences in growth between subcutaneous and orthotopic H tumors can be attributed to tumor-stroma interaction and perfusion. Here, SMC, may stabilize glandular structures and contribute to the maintenance of differentiated phenotype. PMID:17325744

  12. Evaluation of s.c. route of immunization by homologous radio attenuated live vaccine in experimental murine model of visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sanchita; Khanra, Supriya; Chakraborty, Anindita; Roy, Syamal; Manna, Madhumita

    2016-06-01

    Our previous studies in BALB/c mice showed substantial protection against the experimental murine visceral leishmaniasis (MVL) when the animals were immunized with γ-irradiated live Leishmania donovani parasites through intra peritoneal (i.p.) and intra muscular (i.m.) routes respectively. The observations encouraged us to check the prophylactic efficacy of subcutaneous (s.c.) route as it is better alternative for human trial. The mice immunized with two subsequent doses of the radio attenuated homologous vaccine were challenged with virulent L. donovani parasites. Seventy-five days post infection, the animals were sacrificed. The extent of protection against the disease was evaluated by assessing the reduction of parasite burden in spleen and liver, the generation of free radicals (NO & ROS) and release of the cytokines from T-lymphocyte helper 1 (Th 1) and T-lymphocyte helper 2 (Th 2) along with the measurement of the serum immunoglobulins. The reductions in parasitic burden were observed up to 21 and 24 % in spleen and liver of the immunized groups with NO and ROS productions 27 and 34 % respectively. Whereas the increase in IFN gamma releases was between 19 and 34 %, the decrease in IL-10 release was not more than 22 %. This indicates the failure of the establishment of pronounced Th1 ambience which was further corroborated by the observed IgG2a and IgG1 ratio. The present study when compared with our previous observations with i.m. and i.p. routes revealed that s.c. route may not be a good choice for the use of radio attenuated vaccine.

  13. Evaluation of s.c. route of immunization by homologous radio attenuated live vaccine in experimental murine model of visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sanchita; Khanra, Supriya; Chakraborty, Anindita; Roy, Syamal; Manna, Madhumita

    2016-06-01

    Our previous studies in BALB/c mice showed substantial protection against the experimental murine visceral leishmaniasis (MVL) when the animals were immunized with γ-irradiated live Leishmania donovani parasites through intra peritoneal (i.p.) and intra muscular (i.m.) routes respectively. The observations encouraged us to check the prophylactic efficacy of subcutaneous (s.c.) route as it is better alternative for human trial. The mice immunized with two subsequent doses of the radio attenuated homologous vaccine were challenged with virulent L. donovani parasites. Seventy-five days post infection, the animals were sacrificed. The extent of protection against the disease was evaluated by assessing the reduction of parasite burden in spleen and liver, the generation of free radicals (NO & ROS) and release of the cytokines from T-lymphocyte helper 1 (Th 1) and T-lymphocyte helper 2 (Th 2) along with the measurement of the serum immunoglobulins. The reductions in parasitic burden were observed up to 21 and 24 % in spleen and liver of the immunized groups with NO and ROS productions 27 and 34 % respectively. Whereas the increase in IFN gamma releases was between 19 and 34 %, the decrease in IL-10 release was not more than 22 %. This indicates the failure of the establishment of pronounced Th1 ambience which was further corroborated by the observed IgG2a and IgG1 ratio. The present study when compared with our previous observations with i.m. and i.p. routes revealed that s.c. route may not be a good choice for the use of radio attenuated vaccine. PMID:27413317

  14. Therapeutic immunization with radio-attenuated Leishmania parasites through i.m. route revealed protection against the experimental murine visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sanchita; Manna, Madhumita; Khanra, Supriya; Ghosh, Moumita; Bhar, Radhaballav; Chakraborty, Anindita; Roy, Syamal

    2012-07-01

    After our promising results from prophylactic and therapeutic study (i.p. route) with the radio-attenuated Leishmania donovani parasites against experimental murine visceral leishmaniasis, we prompted to check their therapeutic efficacy through i.m route. BALB/c mice were infected with highly virulent L. donovani parasites. After 75 days, mice were treated with gamma (γ)-irradiated parasites. A second therapeutic immunization was given after 15 days of first immunization. The protection against kala-azar was estimated with the reduction of Leishman-Donovan unit from spleen and liver that scored up to 80% and 93%, respectively, while a twofold increase in nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) productions has been observed in the immunized groups of animals. These groups of mice also showed disease regression by skewing Th2 cytokines (IL-10) towards Th1 cytokine (IFN-γ) bias along with the increased generation of NO and ROS, while the infected control group of mice without such treatment surrendered to the disease. Establishment of Th1 ambience in the treated groups has also been supported from the measured antileishmanial antibody IgG subsets (IgG2a and IgG1) with higher anti-soluble Leishmania antigen-specific IgG2a titer. As seen in our previous studies, doses of attenuation by γ-radiation should be taken into serious consideration. Attenuation of parasites at 50 Gy of absorbed dose of gamma rays has not worked well. Thus, therapeutic use of L. donovani parasites radio-attenuated at particular doses can be exploited as a promising vaccine agent. Absence of any adjuvant may increase its acceptability as vaccine candidate further.

  15. Lx2-32c–loaded polymeric micelles with small size for intravenous drug delivery and their inhibitory effect on tumor growth and metastasis in clinically associated 4T1 murine breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li-qing; Huang, Wei; Gao, Zhong-gao; Fang, Wei-shuo; Jin, Ming-ji

    2016-01-01

    Lx2-32c is a novel taxane derivative with a strong antitumor activity. In this study, we developed Lx2-32c–loaded polymeric micelles (Lx2-32c-PMs) with small size and investigated their antitumor efficacy against tumor growth and metastasis on 4T1 murine breast cancer cell line with Cremophor EL–based Lx2-32c solution as the control. In this study, copolymer monomethoxy polyethylene glycol2000–polylactide1300 was used to prepare Lx2-32c-PMs by film hydration method, and their physicochemical properties were characterized as well, according to morphology, particle size, zeta potential, in vitro drug release, and reconstitution stability. Under confocal laser scanning microscopy, it was observed that Lx2-32c-PMs could be effectively taken up by 4T1 cells in a time-dependent manner. Cell Counting Kit-8 assay showed that the IC50 of Lx2-32c-PMs was 0.3827 nM. Meanwhile, Lx2-32c-PMs had better ability to promote apoptosis and induce G2/M cycle block and polyploidy formation, compared with Lx2-32c solution. More importantly, in vivo animal studies showed that compared to Lx2-32c solution, Lx2-32c-PMs possessed better ability not only to effectively inhibit the tumor growth, but also to significantly suppress spontaneous and postoperative metastasis to distant organs in 4T1 orthotopic tumor-bearing mice. Consequently, Lx2-32c-PMs have significantly prolonged the survival lifetime of tumor-bearing mice. Thus, our study reveals that Lx2-32c-PMs had favorable antitumor activity and exhibited a good prospect for application in the field of antitumor therapy. PMID:27799769

  16. Loss of p53 Attenuates the Contribution of IL-6 Deletion on Suppressed Tumor Progression and Extended Survival in Kras-Driven Murine Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhao; Zhang, Jishuai; Wang, Yanxiao; Chen, Jicheng; Li, Xiubin; Ye, Hui; Tang, Chuanhao; Cheng, Xuan; Hou, Ning; Yang, Xiao; Wong, Kwok-Kin

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is involved in lung cancer tumorigenesis, tumor progression, metastasis, and drug resistance. Previous studies show that blockade of IL-6 signaling can inhibit tumor growth and increase drug sensitivity in mouse models. Clinical trials in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) reveal that IL-6 targeted therapy relieves NSCLC-related anemia and cachexia, although other clinical effects require further study. We crossed IL-6-/- mice with KrasG12D mutant mice, which develop lung tumors after activation of mutant KrasG12D, to investigate whether IL-6 inhibition contributes to tumor progression and survival time in vivo. KrasG12D; IL-6-/- mice exhibited increased tumorigenesis, but slower tumor growth and longer survival, than KrasG12D mice. Further, in order to investigate whether IL-6 deletion contributes to suppression of lung cancer metastasis, we generated KrasG12D; p53flox/flox; IL-6-/- mice, which developed lung cancer with a trend for reduced metastases and longer survival than KrasG12D; p53flox/flox mice. Tumors from KrasG12D; IL-6-/- mice showed increased expression of TNFα and decreased expression of CCL-19, CCL-20 and phosphorylated STAT3 (pSTAT3) than KrasG12D mice; however, these changes were not present between tumors from KrasG12D; p53flox/flox; IL-6-/- and KrasG12D; p53flox/flox mice. Upregulation of pSTAT3 and phosphorylated AKT (pAKT) were observed in KrasG12D tumors with p53 deletion. Taken together, these results indicate that IL-6 deletion accelerates tumorigenesis but delays tumor progression and prolongs survival time in a Kras-driven mouse model of lung cancer. However, these effects can be attenuated by p53 deletion. PMID:24260500

  17. Gallotannin-rich Caesalpinia spinosa fraction decreases the primary tumor and factors associated with poor prognosis in a murine breast cancer model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Several treatment alternatives are available for primary breast cancer, although those for metastatic disease or inflammation associated with tumor progression are ineffective. Therefore, there is a great need for new therapeutic alternatives capable of generating an immune response against residual tumor cells, thus contributing to eradication of micrometastases and cancer stem cells. The use of complex natural products is an excellent therapeutic alternative widely used by Chinese, Hindu, Egyptian, and ancestral Latin-American Indian populations. Methods The present study evaluated cytotoxic, antitumor, and tumor progression activities of a gallotannin-rich fraction derived from Caesalpinia spinosa (P2Et). The parameters evaluated in vitro were mitochondrial membrane depolarization, phosphatidylserine externalization, caspase 3 activation, DNA fragmentation, and clonogenic activity. The parameters evaluated in vivo were tumor growth, leukocyte number, metastatic cell number, and cytokine production by flow cytometry. Results The in vitro results showed that the P2Et fraction induced apoptosis with mitochondrial membrane potential loss, phosphatidylserine externalization, caspase 3 activation, DNA fragmentation, and decreased clonogenic capacity of 4T1 cells. In vivo, the P2Et fraction induced primary tumor reduction in terms of diameter and weight in BALB/c mice transplanted with 4T1 cells and decreased numbers of metastatic cells, mainly in the spleen. Furthermore, decreases in the number of peripheral blood leukocytes (leukemoid reaction) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) serum levels were found, which are events associated with a poor prognosis. The P2Et fraction exerts its activity on the primary tumor, reduces cell migration to distant organs, and decreases IL-6 serum levels, implying tumor microenvironment mechanisms. Conclusions Overall, the P2Et fraction lessens risk factors associated with tumor progression and diminishes primary tumor size, showing

  18. TLR4/IFNγ pathways induce tumor regression via NOS II-dependent NO and ROS production in murine breast cancer models.

    PubMed

    Lamrani, Myriam; Sassi, Nejia; Paul, Catherine; Yousfi, Nadhir; Boucher, Jean-Luc; Gauthier, Nolwenn; Labbé, Jérôme; Seignez, Cédric; Racoeur, Cindy; Athias, Anne; Guerreiro, Romain; Vergely, Catherine; Rochette, Luc; Bettaieb, Ali; Jeannin, Jean-François

    2016-05-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 agonists have emerged as a new group of molecules used for cancer therapy. They have been exploited to enhance the immunogenicity of current chemotherapeutic regimens. However, their effects on cancer cells remain elusive. Here, we showed that a TLR4 agonist, namely a synthetic lipid A analog (ALA), OM-174, exhibits antitumor effects in several mammary tumor mouse models. We also showed that immune components are involved in such effects, as attested to by the failure of ALA to induce tumor regression or an increase of animal survival in mice knocked-out for interferon γ (IFNγ) or TLR4. TLR4 and IFNγ receptor (INFR2) expressed by cancer cells are involved in the antitumor efficacy of ALA since this last did not inhibit tumor growth in mice bearing a tumor but lacking TLR4 or IFNγ receptor 2 (IFNR2). Mechanistic investigations revealed that nitric oxide (NO), superoxide and peroxynitrite produced by uncoupling of inducible NO synthase (NOS II) in cancer cells are key mediators of ALA and IFNγ-mediated tumor growth inhibition. We present here a comprehensive picture of tumor cell death induction, in vivo and in vitro, by immunotherapy and for the first time the involvement of the TLR4/IFNγ/NOS II pathway in immunotherapy was investigated. PMID:27467924

  19. Impact of wall shear stress and ligand avidity on binding of anti-CD146-coated nanoparticles to murine tumor endothelium under flow.

    PubMed

    Thomann, Stefan; Baek, Sunhwa; Ryschich, Eduard

    2015-11-24

    The endothelial phenotype of tumor blood vessels differs from the liver and forms an important base for endothelium-specific targeting by antibody-coated nanoparticles. Although differences of shear stress and ligand avidity can modulate the nanoparticle binding to endothelium, these mechanisms are still poorly studied. This study analyzed the binding of antibody-coated nanoparticles to tumor and liver endothelium under controlled flow conditions and verified this binding in tumor models in vivo. Binding of anti-CD146-coated nanoparticles, but not of antibody was significantly reduced under increased wall shear stress and the degree of nanoparticle binding correlated with the avidity of the coating. The intravascular wall shear stress favors nanoparticle binding at the site of higher avidity of endothelial epitope which additionally promotes the selectivity to tumor endothelium. After intravenous application in vivo, pegylated self-coated nanoparticles showed specific binding to tumor endothelium, whereas the nanoparticle binding to the liver endothelium was very low. This study provides a rationale that selective binding of mAb-coated nanoparticles to tumor endothelium is achieved by two factors: higher expression of endothelial epitope and higher nanoparticle shearing from liver endothelium. The combination of endothelial marker targeting and the use of shear stress-controlled nanoparticle capture can be used for selective intratumoral drug delivery.

  20. Effect of Chia oil (Salvia Hispanica) rich in omega-3 fatty acids on the eicosanoid release, apoptosis and T-lymphocyte tumor infiltration in a murine mammary gland adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Espada, C E; Berra, M A; Martinez, M J; Eynard, A R; Pasqualini, M E

    2007-07-01

    We investigated the effects of certain dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and related eicosanoids on the growth and metastasis formation of a murine mammary gland adenocarcinoma. Salvia hispanica (ChO) and Carthamus tinctorius (SaO) vegetable oil sources of omega-3 and -6 PUFAs and a commercial diet as control (CO), were used. We analysed fatty acids of neoplastic cells (NC) membranes by GLC; the eicosanoids 12- HETE and 12-HHT (LOX and COX metabolites) by HPLC and apoptosis and T-lymphocyte infiltration by flow cytometry and microscopy. NC from ChO groups showed lower levels of arachidonic acid and of both eicosanoids compared to SaO and CO (p<0.05). The ChO diet decreased the tumor weight and metastasis number (p<0.05). Apoptosis and T-lymphocyte infiltration were higher and mitosis decreased with respect to the other diets (p<0.05). Present data showed that ChO, an ancient and almost unknown source of omega-3, inhibits growth and metastasis in this tumor model.

  1. CD8+ T Cell Clones Specific for the 5T4 Antigen Target Renal Cell Carcinoma Tumor-Initiating Cells in a Murine Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Tykodi, Scott S.; Satoh, Shoko; Deming, Janise D.; Chou, Jeffrey; Harrop, Richard; Warren, Edus H.

    2012-01-01

    The tumor antigen 5T4 is frequently expressed at high levels on renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and other epithelial carcinomas. Surveys of normal tissues demonstrate abundant 5T4 expression on placental trophoblast cells with limited expression elsewhere. 5T4 is the target for a therapeutic cancer vaccine (MVA-5T4) that elicits 5T4-specific serological, proliferative, and CTL responses. However, the anti-tumor activity of 5T4-specific CTL has not been extensively characterized. CD8+ T cells from HLA-A2+ healthy donors (n=4) or RCC patients (n=2) were stimulated in vitro with the HLA-A2-binding nonamer peptides 5T417–25 or 5T497–105 and screened by flow cytometry with specific tetramers (TET). CD8+/TET+ T cell clones specific for 5T417–25 or 5T497–105 peptide were isolated from 4/6 and 1/4 donors respectively. A subset of clones specific for 5T417–25 was cytolytic for MVA-5T4 infected HLA-A2+ LCL target cells and for constitutively HLA-A2- and 5T4- expressing RCC tumor cell lines (including A498 RCC). In a xenoengraftment assay, the co-inoculation of a representative 5T417–25-specific CTL clone with A498 RCC tumors cells into immune deficient mice completely prevented growth of A498 tumors. Taken together, these data demonstrate high avidity CD8+ CTL able to recognize the naturally-processed 5T417–25 epitope on RCC tumor cells including putative tumor-initiating cells are present in peripheral blood of both healthy donors and RCC patients. CD8+ T cell immunity targeting 5T417–25 is therefore of substantial interest both as a potential target for further development of vaccination or adoptive cellular immunotherapy and for immune monitoring studies in association with nonspecific immunotherapies. PMID:22892449

  2. Intravascular contrast agent-enhanced MRI measuring contrast clearance and tumor blood volume and the effects of vascular modifiers in an experimental tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Bentzen, Lise . E-mail: lise@oncology.dk; Vestergaard-Poulsen, Peter; Nielsen, Thomas; Overgaard, Jens; Bjornerud, Atle; Briley-Saebo, Karen; Horsman, Michael R.; Ostergaard, Leif

    2005-03-15

    Purpose: To examine the feasibility of using the MRI blood pool agent NC100150 for evaluation of tumor blood volume (TBV) estimates by both dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and susceptibility contrast MRI assays in an experimental tumor. Contrast agent clearance (K{sup trans}; depends on perfusion and permeability) from the DCE-MRI time curves was estimated, and changes in TBV and K{sup trans} were measured after administration of two drugs that reduce perfusion by different mechanisms. Methods and materials: The DCE-MRI experiments were simulated with expected physiologic values for the C3H mouse mammary carcinoma. The C3H tumor was examined by DCE-MRI and susceptibility contrast MRI with NC100150 (NC100150 Injection, Clariscan; Amersham Health, Oslo, Norway) after treatment with either hydralazine or combretastatin (Oxigene, Boston, MA). Results: Simulations showed that reliable estimates of changes in TBV and K{sup trans} could be performed with DCE-MRI. Hydralazine was shown to reduce TBV as measured by both assays and to reduce K{sup trans}. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI also suggested that TBV and K{sup trans} were reduced in combretastatin-treated tumors, and the TBV reduction was confirmed by susceptibility contrast MRI. Data suggested the drug to affect mainly the total TBV, whereas microvessels as such seemed less altered. Conclusion: The study supports the use of the combined DCE-MRI and susceptibility contrast MRI assay with a blood pool agent in characterizing tumors and their response to treatment.

  3. Novel recombinant protein FlaA N/C increases tumor radiosensitivity via NF-κB signaling in murine breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ying; Wu, Dongming; Fan, Yuanchun; Li, Peigeng; Du, Hongfei; Shi, Jiao; Wang, Dan; Zhou, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    The recombinant protein flagellin A (FlaA) N/C, derived from the flagellin protein of Legionella pneumophila, has been shown to increase the expression of cytoprotective cytokines, activate the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway, and increase the survival of mice following total body irradiation. Determi ning whether FlaA N/C has a sensitizing effect on tumor radiation or a direct tumoricidal effect is critical for its application as an effective radiation protection agent. The present study investigated the molecular mechanism underlying the tumor radiosensitivity of FlaA N/C. FlaA N/C was found to increase tumor apoptosis and autophagy, regulate the cell cycle and increase radiosensitivity in 4T1 tumor cells. Furthermore, FlaA N/C was found to promote radiosensitivity by activating NF-κB signaling. Finally, the present study analyzed FlaA N/C-enhanced radiosensitivity in animal models, and FlaA N/C was found to significantly prolong the survival period of mice after total body radiation. This indicates that FlaA N/C might be a novel radiation sensitizer in tumor radiation therapy. PMID:27703525

  4. Penetration of intra-arterially administered vincristine in experimental brain tumor1,2

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Frances M.; Eller, Susan L.; Grossman, Stuart A.

    2004-01-01

    Vincristine is an integral part of the “PCV” regimen that is commonly administered to treat primary brain tumors. The efficacy of vincristine as a single agent in these tumors has been poorly studied. This study was designed to determine whether vincristine enters normal rat brain or an intracranially or subcutaneously implanted glioma and to assess the presence of the efflux pump P-glycoprotein (P-gp) on tumor and vascular endothelial cells. The 9L rat gliosarcoma was implanted intracranially and subcutaneously in three Fischer 344 rats. On day 7, [3H]vincristine (50 μCi, 4.8 μg) was injected into the carotid artery, and the animals were euthanized 10 or 20 min later. Quantitative autoradiography revealed that vincristine levels in the liver were 6- to 11-fold greater than in the i.c. tumor, and 15- to 37-fold greater than in normal brain, the reverse of the expected pattern with intra-arterial delivery. Vincristine levels in the s.c. tumor were 2-fold higher than levels in the i.c. tumor. P-gp was detected with JSB1 antibody in vascular endothelium of both normal brain and the i.c. tumor, but not in the tumor cells in either location, or in endothelial cells in the s.c. tumor. These results demonstrate that vincristine has negligible penetration of normal rat brain or i.c. 9L glioma despite intra-arterial delivery and the presence of blood-brain barrier dysfunction as demonstrated by Evan’s blue. Furthermore, this study suggests that P-gp-mediated efflux from endothelium may explain these findings. The lack of penetration of vincristine into brain tumor and the paucity of single-agent activity studies suggest that vincristine should not be used in the treatment of primary brain tumors. PMID:15494097

  5. Photodynamic therapy with laser scanning mode of tumor irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chepurna, Oksana; Shton, Irina; Kholin, Vladimir; Voytsehovich, Valerii; Popov, Viacheslav; Pavlov, Sergii; Gamaleia, Nikolai; Wójcik, Waldemar; Zhassandykyzy, Maral

    2015-12-01

    In this study we propose a new version of photodynamic therapy performed by laser scanning. The method consists in tumor treatment by a light beam of a small cross section which incrementally moves through the chosen area with a defined delay at each point and repetitively re-scans a zone starting from the initial position. Experimental evaluation of the method in vitro on murine tumor model showed that despite the dose, applied by scanning irradiation mode, was 400 times lower, the tumor inhibition rate conceded to attained with continuous irradiation mode by only 20%.

  6. Prophylactic and therapeutic effects of a monoclonal antibody to tumor necrosis factor-alpha in experimental gram-negative shock.

    PubMed

    Silva, A T; Bayston, K F; Cohen, J

    1990-08-01

    A monoclonal antibody to recombinant murine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha), TN3-19.12, was used to explore pathogenetic mechanisms and therapeutic strategies in gram-negative shock. In mice receiving an LD90 dose of Escherichia coli O111, TN3-19.12 prevented death if given 1.5 h before or 30 min after challenge. Less protection was conferred if the antibody was given 2.5 h after challenge. In control mice receiving an irrelevant antibody, L2-3D9, TNF alpha levels rose (less than or equal to 185.1 +/- 26.1 ng/ml) by 90 min and had returned to baseline by 5 h. Mice receiving TN3-19.12 did not have this response. TN3-19.12 was of limited benefit in mice receiving Pseudomonas aeruginosa but had no protective effect in cyclophosphamide-treated mice receiving Klebsiella pneumoniae. In L2-3D9-treated mice, TNF alpha levels were elevated to 61.8 +/- 27.9 and 49.7 +/- 5.1 ng/ml by 90 min in the two models, respectively. TNF alpha levels in TN3-19.12-treated mice in these two models were very low (3.9-5.5 ng/ml). TNF alpha is a mediator in gram-negative shock; antibody to TNF alpha can be of value in prophylaxis and treatment, but its clinical use remains to be established.

  7. The use of Zymosan A and bacteria anchored to tumor cells for effective cancer immunotherapy: B16-F10 murine melanoma model.

    PubMed

    Waldmannová, Eva; Caisová, Veronika; Fáberová, Julie; Sváčková, Petra; Kovářová, Markéta; Sváčková, Denisa; Kumžáková, Zuzana; Jačková, Adéla; Vácová, Nikol; Nedbalová, Pavla; Horká, Marie; Kopecký, Jan; Ženka, Jan

    2016-10-01

    The idea of using killed microorganisms or their parts for a stimulation of immunity in the cancer immunotherapy is very old, but the question of interactions and binding of these preparations to tumor cells has not been addressed so far. The attachment of Zymosan A and both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria to tumor cells was tested in in vivo experiments. This binding was accomplished by charge interactions, anchoring based on hydrophobic chains and covalent bonds and proved to be crucial for a strong immunotherapeutic effect. The establishment of conditions for simultaneous stimulation of both Toll-like and phagocytic receptors led to very strong synergy. It resulted in tumor shrinkage and its temporary or permanent elimination. The role of neutrophils in cancer immunotherapy was demonstrated and the mechanism of their action (frustrated phagocytosis) was proposed. Finally, therapeutic approaches applicable for safe human cancer immunotherapy are discussed. Heat killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis covalently attached to tumor cells seems to be promising tool for this therapy.

  8. Potentiated cyclophosphane: experimental study of the effect on tumor development and efficiency of cytostatic therapy.

    PubMed

    Amosova, E N; Zueva, E P; Razina, T G; Krylova, S G; Shilova, N V; Epstein, O I

    2003-01-01

    Experiments on animals with transplanted tumors (Lewis lung carcinoma and carcinosarcoma Walker-256) showed that combination treatment with cyclophosphane and its homeopathically potentiated forms increases antiblastic activity of the preparation.

  9. High intensity focused ultrasound enhances anti-tumor immunity by inhibiting the negative regulatory effect of miR-134 on CD86 in a murine melanoma model

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min; Zha, He; Sun, Hui; Li, Xue-Ru; Li, Ai-Fang; Gu, Yue; Duan, Liang; Luo, Jin-Yong; Li, Chong-Yan; Wang, Yan; Wang, Zhi-Biao; He, Tong-Chuan; Zhou, Lan

    2015-01-01

    HIFU has been demonstrated to enhance anti-tumor immunity, however, the mechanism of which has not been well elucidated. Emerging evidence indicates that miRNAs play important roles in immune response. In this study, we used the B16F10 melanoma allograft mouse model to investigate the role of miRNAs in HIFU-enhanced anti-tumor immunity. We found that HIFU treatment decreased circulating B16F10 cells and pulmonary metastasis nodules while increased IFN-γ and TNF-α in the peripheral blood and cumulative mouse survival, which was associated with inhibition of miR-134 expression and activation of CD86 expression in tumor tissues. Further, we determined that miR-134 directly binds to the 3′UTR of CD86 mRNA to suppress its expression in B16F10 cells. When B16F10 cells transfected with miR-134 were co-cultured with normal splenic lymphocytes, the secretion of IFN-γ and TNF-α from lymphocytes was reduced and B16F10 cell survival was increased. HIFU exposure efficiently decreased miR-134 while increased CD86 expression in B16F10 cells in vitro. CD86 knockdown with siRNA markedly rescued the viability of HIFU-treated B16F10 cells that co-cultured with lymphocytes. Altogether, our results suggest that HIFU down-regulates miR-134 to release the inhibition of miR-134 on CD86 in melanoma cells, thereby enhancing anti-tumor immune response. PMID:26485753

  10. Imaging Hypoxia in Xenografted and Murine Tumors With {sup 18}F-Fluoroazomycin Arabinoside: A Comparative Study Involving MICROPET, Autoradiography, PO{sub 2}-Polarography, and Fluorescence Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Busk, Morten Horsman, Michael R.; Jakobsen, Steen; Keiding, Susanne; Kogel, Albert J. van der; Bussink, Johan; Overgaard, Jens

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET) allows noninvasive assessment of tumor hypoxia; however the combination of low resolution and slow tracer clearance from nonhypoxic tissue is problematic. The aim of this study was to examine the in vivo hypoxia selectivity of fluoroazomycin arabinoside ([{sup 18}F]-FAZA), a promising tracer with improved washout kinetics from oxygenated tissue. Methods and Materials: Three squamous cell carcinomas and one fibrosarcoma with widely differing spatial patterns of vascularization, hypoxia, and necrosis were grown in mice and evaluated with PET and complementary methods. Results: Eppendorf electrode measurements consistently demonstrated median PO{sub 2} values <1 mm Hg. In accordance with that, PET revealed that all tumors accumulated [{sup 18}F]-FAZA in excess of reference tissue. Next the two-dimensional spatial distribution of [{sup 18}F]-FAZA (from autoradiography) was compared with fluorescence images of the same tumor sections showing localization of the hypoxia marker pimonidazole and the perfusion marker Hoechst 33342. Pixel-by-pixel analysis of co-registered images showed a highly significant co-localization between the two hypoxia markers and an inverse correlation (except for the fibrosarcoma) between the distribution of [{sup 18}F]-FAZA and Hoechst dye. Moreover intratumoral heterogeneity in tracer distribution was clearly visible on autoradiograms, with a [{sup 18}F]-FAZA concentration approximately six times higher in poorly oxygenated areas than in vascular hot spots. Conclusions: The distribution of [{sup 18}F]-FAZA is consistent with hypoxia as the key driving force for tracer tissue retention in a selection of tumors with widely differing physiology.

  11. Prostate tumor attenuation in the nu/nu murine model due to anti-sarcosine antibodies in folate-targeted liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Heger, Zbynek; Polanska, Hana; Merlos Rodrigo, Miguel Angel; Guran, Roman; Kulich, Pavel; Kopel, Pavel; Masarik, Michal; Eckschlager, Tomas; Stiborova, Marie; Kizek, Rene; Adam, Vojtech

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we describe the preparation of liposomes with folate-targeting properties for the encapsulation of anti-sarcosine antibodies (antisarAbs@LIP) and sarcosine (sar@LIP). The competitive inhibitory effects of exogenously added folic acid supported the role of folate targeting in liposome internalization. We examined the effects of repeated administration on mice PC-3 xenografts. Sar@LIP treatment significantly increased tumor volume and weight compared to controls treated with empty liposomes. Moreover, antisarAbs@LIP administration exhibited a mild antitumor effect. We also identified differences in gene expression patterns post-treatment. Furthermore, Sar@LIP treatment resulted in decreased amounts of tumor zinc ions and total metallothioneins. Examination of the spatial distribution across the tumor sections revealed a sarcosine-related decline of the MT1X isoform within the marginal regions but an elevation after antisarAbs@LIP administration. Our exploratory results demonstrate the importance of sarcosine as an oncometabolite in PCa. Moreover, we have shown that sarcosine can be a potential target for anticancer strategies in management of PCa. PMID:27646588

  12. Prostate tumor attenuation in the nu/nu murine model due to anti-sarcosine antibodies in folate-targeted liposomes.

    PubMed

    Heger, Zbynek; Polanska, Hana; Merlos Rodrigo, Miguel Angel; Guran, Roman; Kulich, Pavel; Kopel, Pavel; Masarik, Michal; Eckschlager, Tomas; Stiborova, Marie; Kizek, Rene; Adam, Vojtech

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we describe the preparation of liposomes with folate-targeting properties for the encapsulation of anti-sarcosine antibodies (antisarAbs@LIP) and sarcosine (sar@LIP). The competitive inhibitory effects of exogenously added folic acid supported the role of folate targeting in liposome internalization. We examined the effects of repeated administration on mice PC-3 xenografts. Sar@LIP treatment significantly increased tumor volume and weight compared to controls treated with empty liposomes. Moreover, antisarAbs@LIP administration exhibited a mild antitumor effect. We also identified differences in gene expression patterns post-treatment. Furthermore, Sar@LIP treatment resulted in decreased amounts of tumor zinc ions and total metallothioneins. Examination of the spatial distribution across the tumor sections revealed a sarcosine-related decline of the MT1X isoform within the marginal regions but an elevation after antisarAbs@LIP administration. Our exploratory results demonstrate the importance of sarcosine as an oncometabolite in PCa. Moreover, we have shown that sarcosine can be a potential target for anticancer strategies in management of PCa. PMID:27646588

  13. A Combretastatin-Mediated Decrease in Neutrophil Concentration in Peripheral Blood and the Impact on the Anti-Tumor Activity of This Drug in Two Different Murine Tumor Models

    PubMed Central

    Bohn, Anja Bille; Wittenborn, Thomas; Brems-Eskildsen, Anne Sofie; Laurberg, Tinne; Bertelsen, Lotte Bonde; Nielsen, Thomas; Stødkilde-Jørgensen, Hans; Møller, Bjarne Kuno; Horsman, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    The vascular disrupting agent combretastatin A-4 disodium phosphate (CA4P) induces fluctuations in peripheral blood neutrophil concentration. Because neutrophils have the potential to induce both vascular damage and angiogenesis we analyzed neutrophil involvement in the anti-tumoral effects of CA4P in C3H mammary carcinomas in CDF1 mice and in SCCVII squamous cell carcinomas in C3H/HeN mice. Flow cytometry analyses of peripheral blood before and up to 144 h after CA4P administration (25 and 250 mg/kg) revealed a decrease 1 h after treatment, followed by an early (3–6 h) and a late (>72 h) increase in the granulocyte concentration. We suggest that the early increase (3–6 h) in granulocyte concentration was caused by the initial decrease at 1 h and found that the late increase was associated with tumor size, and hence independent of CA4P. No alterations in neutrophil infiltration into the C3H tumor after CA4P treatment (25 and 250 mg/kg) were found. Correspondingly, neutrophil depletion in vivo, using an anti-neutrophil antibody, followed by CA4P treatment (25 mg/kg) did not increase the necrotic fraction in C3H tumors significantly. However, by increasing the CA4P dose to 250 mg/kg we found a significant increase of 359% in necrotic fraction when compared to neutrophil-depleted mice; in mice with no neutrophil depletion CA4P induced an 89% change indicating that the presence of neutrophils reduced the effect of CA4P. In contrast, neither CA4P nor 1A8 affected the necrotic fraction in the SCCVII tumors significantly. Hence, we suggest that the initial decrease in granulocyte concentration was caused by non-tumor-specific recruitment of neutrophils and that neutrophils may attenuate CA4P-mediated anti-tumor effect in some tumor models. PMID:25299269

  14. Discussion based on numerical and experimental studies on heating characteristics of an RF rectangular resonant cavity applicator for hyperthermia targeting deep-seated tumors.

    PubMed

    Tange, Yutaka; Kanai, Yasushi; Saitoh, Yoshiaki

    2007-01-01

    The heating characteristics of an RF rectangular cavity applicator for hyperthermic treatment that targets deep-seated tumors were investigated numerically and experimentally. In the numerical study, Maxwell's equations and heat transfer equations were solved for a dielectric phantom with and without blood flow. Conductive caps attached to the dielectric phantom to shield the non-tumor regions. The experimental study showed the validity and possibility of heating deep-seated tumors. Thus, the rectangular resonant cavity applicator with an L-type antenna can heat deep-seated tumors.

  15. Enhancement of photodynamic therapy due to hyperbaric hyperoxia: an experimental study of Walker 256 tumors in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicola, Jorge H.; Colussi, Valdir C.; Nicola, Ester M. D.; Metze, Konradin

    1997-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), which is now an approved treatment for many types of cancers, is based on the simultaneous involvement of three factors, namely: tumor tissue retention of a specific photosensitizer; local illumination of the lesion with a visible light source and the occurrence of oxygen in the triplet state. Theoretically, a change in any one of these factors may be compensated by a change in the other two factors, leading to the same therapeutic result. In practice, this is not true, since we are dealing with living tissue, but we may expect to find an ideal combination of these three factors which may give the best clinical results. In this work we present experimental results of PDT under Hyperbaric hyperoxia (HBO) in tumor masses of the dorsal subcutaneous tissue of rats. These tumors were created by previous inoculation of 'Walker 256' neoplastic cells Hematoporphyrin Ester (HpE) was administered as the photosensitizer. The rats were pressurized at up to 3 atm with a 100 percent continuous oxygen ventilation environment in a specially designed hyperbaric chamber. The skin area above the tumor was photosensitized for 45 minutes with a 7 mw HeNe laser. Twenty four hours later, the tumor was removed for study. In all the animals treated with PDT/HBO histology revealed a very important reduction in the number of tumor cells as compared with the PDT controls in normal atmospheric condition, showing numerous apoptotic as well as necrotic cells at the border of the radiated area. The observed enhancement in the PDT for this situation is, of course, related to the extra oxygen in the circulatory system.

  16. Experimental radioimmunotherapy of a xenografted human colonic tumor (GW-39) producing carcinoembryonic antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Goldenberg, D.M.; Gaffar, S.A.; Bennett, S.J.; Beach, J.L.

    1981-11-01

    Experiments were undertaken to evaluate the antitumor effects of 131I-labeled goat antibody immunoglobulin G prepared against carcinoembryonic antigen in hamsters bearing the carcinoembryonic antigen-producing GW-39 human colonic carcinoma. At a single injection of 1 mCi 131I and higher, a marked growth inhibition of GW-39 tumors, as well as a considerable increase in the survival time of the tumor-bearing hamsters, could be achieved. At a dose of 1 mCi, the radioactive affinity-purified antibody appeared to be superior to radioactive normal goat immunoglobulin G in influencing tumor growth and survival time, but no significant difference could be seen at the higher dose of 2 mCi given. Radiobiological calculations indicated that the tumors received, at up to 20 days after therapy, 1325 rads for the specific antibody and only 411 rads for the normal immunoglobulin G preparation. These findings encourage the further evaluation of antibodies to tumor markers for isotopic cancer therapy.

  17. Phloretin increases the anti-tumor efficacy of intratumorally delivered heat-shock protein 70 kDa (HSP70) in a murine model of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Abkin, Sergey V; Ostroumova, Olga S; Komarova, Elena Y; Meshalkina, Darya A; Shevtsov, Maxim A; Margulis, Boris A; Guzhova, Irina V

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant HSP70 chaperone exerts a profound anticancer effect when administered intratumorally. This action is based on the ability of HSP70 to penetrate tumor cells and extract its endogenous homolog. To enhance the efficacy of HSP70 cycling, we employed phloretin, a flavonoid that enhances the pore-forming activity of the chaperone on artificial membranes. Phloretin increased the efficacy of HSP70 penetration in B16 mouse melanoma cells and K-562 human erythroblasts; this was accompanied with increased transport of the endogenous HSP70 to the plasma membrane. Importantly, treatment with HSP70 combined with phloretin led to the elevation of cell sensitivity to cytotoxic lymphocytes by 16-18 % compared to treatment with the chaperone alone. The incubation of K-562 cells with biotinylated HSP70 and phloretin increased the amount of the chaperone released from cells, suggesting that chaperone cycling could trigger a specific anti-tumor response. We studied the effect of the combination of HSP70 and phloretin using B16 melanoma and a novel method of HSP70-gel application. We found that the addition of phloretin to the gel reduced tumor weight almost fivefold compared with untreated mice, while the life span of the animals extended from 25 to 39 days. The increased survival was corroborated by the activation of innate and adaptive immunity; interestingly, HSP70 was more active in induction of CD8+ cell-mediated toxicity and γIFN production while phloretin contributed largely to the CD56+ cell response. In conclusion, the combination of HSP70 with phloretin could be a novel treatment for efficient immunotherapy of intractable cancers such as skin melanoma. PMID:26646850

  18. Inhibition of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase by stereoisomers of 1-methyl tryptophan in an experimental graft-versus-tumor model.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ji-Young; Lee, Sung-Eun; Park, Gyenogsin; Choi, Eun Young; Min, Chang-Ki

    2014-10-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is a rate-limiting enzyme in tryptophan catabolism that plays an important role in the induction of immune tolerance. Its role in graft-versus-tumor effect after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) remains unclear. Using a murine graft-versus-tumor model of reduced-intensity allo-HSCT followed by donor leukocyte infusion (DLI), we examined the role of IDO inhibition. Two stereoisomers of 1-methyl tryptophan (1-MT), a small-molecule inhibitor of IDO, reduced the growth of inoculated tumor in the mice that received DLI and had higher expression of IDO1 and IFNγ. However, L-1MT, but not D-1MT, mitigated tumor growth in mice that did not receive DLI and did not express IDO1 and IFNγ. Accordingly, both stereoisomers reduced plasma kynurenine concentrations early after DLI and enhanced in vitro cytotoxic lymphocyte function after allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction. Furthermore, L-1MT was more efficient in causing direct cytotoxic effects than D-1MT. Our results suggest that IDO inhibition can benefit anti-tumor therapy in the setting of reduced-intensity allo-SCT using DLI. PMID:24971697

  19. Mechanisms of tumor necrosis in photodynamic therapy with a chlorine photosensitizer: experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privalov, Valeriy A.; Lappa, Alexander V.; Bigbov, Elmir N.

    2011-02-01

    A photodynamic therapy experiment on 118 inbred white mice with transplanted Ehrlich's tumor (mouse mammary gland adenocarcinoma) is performed to reveal mechanisms of necrosis formation. In 7-10 days the tumor of 1-1.5 cm diameter is formed under skin at the injection point, and PDT procedure is applied. There were used a chlorine type photosensitizer RadachlorineTM and 662 nm wavelength diode laser. The drug is injected by intravenously at the dose of 40 mg/kg; the irradiation is executed in 2-2.5 hours at the surface dose of about 200 J/cm2. Each of the mice had a photochemical reaction in form of destructive changes at the irradiation region with subsequent development of dry coagulation necrosis. After rejection of the necrosis there occurred epithelization of defect tissues in a tumor place. Histological investigations were conducted in different follow-up periods, in 5 and 30 min, 1, 3, 6, and 12 hours, 1, 3, 7 and 28 days after irradiation. They included optical microscopy, immune marker analysis, morphometry with measurements of volume density of epithelium, tumor stroma and necroses, vascular bed. The investigations showed that an important role in damaging mechanisms of photodynamic action belongs to hypoxic injuries of tumor mediated by micro vascular disorders and blood circulatory disturbances. The injuries are formed in a few stages: microcirculation angiospasm causing vessel paresis, irreversible stases in capillaries, diapedetic hemorrhages, thromboses, and thrombovasculitis. It is marked mucoid swelling and fibrinoid necrosis of vascular tissue. Progressive vasculitises result in total vessel obliteration and tumor necrosis.

  20. Experimental study of radiopharmaceuticals based on technetium-99m labeled derivative of glucose for tumor diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeltchan, R.; Medvedeva, A.; Sinilkin, I.; Bragina, O.; Chernov, V.; Stasyuk, E.; Rogov, A.; Il'ina, E.; Larionova, L.; Skuridin, V.; Dergilev, A.

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: to study the potential utility of 1-thio-D-glucose labeled with 99mTc for cancer imaging in laboratory animals. Materials and method: the study was carried out in cell cultures of normal CHO (Chinese hamster ovary cells CHO) and malignant tissues MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7). To evaluate the uptake of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose in normal and tumor tissue cells, 25 MBq of 1-thio-D-glucose labeled with 99mTc was added to the vials with 3 million cells and incubated for 30 minutes at room temperature. After centrifugation of the vials with cells, the supernatant was removed. Radioactivity in vials with normal and tumor cells was then measured. In addition, the study included 40 mice of C57B 1/6j lines with tumor lesion of the right femur. For neoplastic lesions, Lewis lung carcinoma model was used. Following anesthesia, mice were injected intravenously with 25MBq of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose. Planar scintigraphy was performed 15 minutes later in a matrix of 512x512 pixels for 5 minutes. Results: when measuring the radioactivity of normal and malignant cells after incubation with 99mTc-1-thio-D- glucose, it was found that the radioactivity of malignant cells was higher than that of normal cells. The mean values of radioactivity levels in normal and malignant cells were 0.3±0.15MBq and 1.07±0.6MBq, respectively. All examined animals had increased accumulation of 99mTc-1-thio- D-glucose at the tumor site. The accumulation of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose in the tumor was on average twice as high as compared to the symmetric region. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose is a prospective radiopharmaceutical for cancer visualization. In addition, high accumulation of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose in the culture of cancer cells and in tumor tissue of animals demonstrates tumor tropism of the radiopharmaceutical.

  1. Tumor site prediction using spatiotemporal detection of subclinical hyperemia in experimental photocarcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konger, Raymond L.; Xu, Zhengbin; Sahu, Ravi P.; Kim, Young L.

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate that a spatial and temporal analysis of subclinical hyperemia reliably predicts specific areas at high risk for skin tumor development during photocarcinogenesis. To determine detailed spatiotemporal patterns of inflammatory angiogenesis foci in a relatively large area, we developed a mesoscopic (between microscopic and macroscopic) imaging approach. This method relies on our earlier finding that the combination of a spectral analysis of hemoglobin with diffuse-light-suppressed imaging can increase the image resolution, contrast and penetration depth to visualize microvasculature Hgb content in the large tissue area. In our recent study, SKH1 hairless albino mice were irradiated for 10 weeks with a carcinogen dose of UVB. Using our newly developed mesoscopic imaging methods, we imaged the mice over 20 - 30 weeks after stopping UVB, and excised hyperemic/non-hyperemic areas at several different timepoints. We show that persistent hyperemic foci can predict future tumor formation. In particular, our imaging approach allows us to assess the spatial and temporal extent of subclinical inflammatory foci, which in turn can predict sites of future overlying tumor formation. In addition, although COX-2 inhibitors are known to suppress skin cancer development in humans, it remains unclear whether the chemopreventive activity of COX-2 inhibitors are chiefly attributable to their anti-inflammatory effects. Our study provides evidence that subclinical subepithelial inflammatory foci occur prior to overt tumor formation, and that these areas are highly predictive for future tumor formation, that celecoxib's ability to suppress tumorigenesis is tightly linked to its ability to reduce the area of subclinical inflammatory foci.

  2. Suppression of colorectal cancer subcutaneous xenograft and experimental lung metastasis using nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery to tumor neovasculature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Zhao, Mei; Liu, Ya-Rong; Luan, Xin; Guan, Ying-Yun; Lu, Qin; Yu, De-Hong; Bai, Fan; Chen, Hong-Zhuan; Fang, Chao

    2014-01-01

    Antiangiogenic therapy is a validated approach for colorectal cancer (CRC) treatment. However, diverse adverse effects inevitably appear due to the off-target effect of the approved antiangiogenic inhibitors on the physiological functions and homeostasis. This study was to investigate a new tumor vessel targeting nanoparticulate drug delivery system, F56 peptide conjugated nanoparticles loading vincristine (F56-VCR-NP), for the effective treatment of CRC subcutaneous xenograft and experimental lung metastasis model. The controlled release behavior and in vivo pharmacokinetic profile of F56-VCR-NP were characterized. The tumor vessel targeting and antiangiogenic activity of F56-VCR-NP was evaluated in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC, a classical cell model mimicking tumor vascular EC), subcutaneous human HCT-15 xenograft in immunodeficient nude mice, and experimental CT-26 lung metastasis model in immunocompetent mice. The therapeutic efficacy (animal survival and toxicity) was further investigated in the model of CT-26 lung metastasis in mice. F56-VCR-NP could achieve 30-day controlled drug release in PBS (pH 7.4) and exhibited favorable long-circulating feature in vivo. F56-VCR-NP could accurately target the CRC neovasculature and elicit nanoparticle internalization in the tumor vascular EC, where the antiangiogenic VCR-induced dramatic EC apoptosis and necrosis of CRC tissue. F56-VCR-NP significantly prolonged the mouse survival with no obvious toxicity (weight loss and anepithymia) in the CT-26 lung metastasis mice model, and this pronounced antitumor effect was closely related with the decreased microvessel density in the metastases. The present nanoparticle-based targeted antiangiogenic therapy may provide a new promising approach for the therapy of CRC and lung metastasis, which deserves further translational research.

  3. Intravenous administration of the selective toll-like receptor 7 agonist DSR-29133 leads to anti-tumor efficacy in murine solid tumor models which can be potentiated by combination with fractionated radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Dovedi, Simon J.; Adlard, Amy L.; Ota, Yosuke; Murata, Masashi; Sugaru, Eiji; Koga-Yamakawa, Erina; Eguchi, Ken; Hirose, Yuko; Yamamoto, Setsuko; Umehara, Hiroki; Honeychurch, Jamie; Cheadle, Eleanor J.; Hughes, Gareth; Jewsbury, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    Strategies to augment anti-cancer immune responses have recently demonstrated therapeutic utility. To date clinical success has been achieved through targeting co-inhibitory checkpoints such as CTLA-4, PD-1, and PD-L1. However, approaches that target co-activatory pathways are also being actively being developed. Here we report that the novel TLR7-selective agonist DSR-29133 is well tolerated in mice and leads to acute immune activation. Administration of DSR-29133 leads to the induction of IFNα/γ, IP-10, TNFα, IL-1Ra and IL-12p70, and to a reduction in tumor burden in syngeneic models of renal cancer (Renca), metastatic osteosarcoma (LM8) and colorectal cancer (CT26). Moreover, we show that the efficacy of DSR-29133 was significantly improved when administered in combination with low-dose fractionated radiotherapy (RT). Effective combination therapy required weekly administration of DSR-29133 commencing on day 1 of a fractionated RT treatment cycle, whereas no enhancement of radiation response was observed when DSR-29133 was administered at the end of the fractionated RT cycle. Combined therapy resulted in curative responses in a high proportion of mice bearing established CT26 tumors which was dependent on the activity of CD8+ T-cells but independent of CD4+ T-cells and NK/NKT cells. Moreover, long-term surviving mice originally treated with DSR-29133 and RT were protected by a tumor-specific memory immune response which could prevent tumor growth upon rechallenge. These results demonstrate that DSR-29133 is a potent selective TLR7 agonist that when administered intravenously can induce anti-tumor immune responses that can be further enhanced through combination with low-dose fractionated RT. PMID:26959743

  4. Intravenous administration of the selective toll-like receptor 7 agonist DSR-29133 leads to anti-tumor efficacy in murine solid tumor models which can be potentiated by combination with fractionated radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dovedi, Simon J; Adlard, Amy L; Ota, Yosuke; Murata, Masashi; Sugaru, Eiji; Koga-Yamakawa, Erina; Eguchi, Ken; Hirose, Yuko; Yamamoto, Setsuko; Umehara, Hiroki; Honeychurch, Jamie; Cheadle, Eleanor J; Hughes, Gareth; Jewsbury, Philip J; Wilkinson, Robert W; Stratford, Ian J; Illidge, Timothy M

    2016-03-29

    Strategies to augment anti-cancer immune responses have recently demonstrated therapeutic utility. To date clinical success has been achieved through targeting co-inhibitory checkpoints such as CTLA-4, PD-1, and PD-L1. However, approaches that target co-activatory pathways are also being actively being developed. Here we report that the novel TLR7-selective agonist DSR-29133 is well tolerated in mice and leads to acute immune activation. Administration of DSR-29133 leads to the induction of IFNα/γ, IP-10, TNFα, IL-1Ra and IL-12p70, and to a reduction in tumor burden in syngeneic models of renal cancer (Renca), metastatic osteosarcoma (LM8) and colorectal cancer (CT26). Moreover, we show that the efficacy of DSR-29133 was significantly improved when administered in combination with low-dose fractionated radiotherapy (RT). Effective combination therapy required weekly administration of DSR-29133 commencing on day 1 of a fractionated RT treatment cycle, whereas no enhancement of radiation response was observed when DSR-29133 was administered at the end of the fractionated RT cycle. Combined therapy resulted in curative responses in a high proportion of mice bearing established CT26 tumors which was dependent on the activity of CD8+ T-cells but independent of CD4+ T-cells and NK/NKT cells. Moreover, long-term surviving mice originally treated with DSR-29133 and RT were protected by a tumor-specific memory immune response which could prevent tumor growth upon rechallenge. These results demonstrate that DSR-29133 is a potent selective TLR7 agonist that when administered intravenously can induce anti-tumor immune responses that can be further enhanced through combination with low-dose fractionated RT. PMID:26959743

  5. Suppression of NF-κB signaling and NLRP3 inflammasome activation in macrophages is responsible for the amelioration of experimental murine colitis by the natural compound fraxinellone

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xue-Feng; Ouyang, Zi-Jun; Feng, Li-Li; Chen, Gong; Guo, Wen-Jie; Shen, Yan; Wu, Xu-Dong; Sun, Yang Xu, Qiang

    2014-11-15

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) affects millions of people worldwide. Although the etiology of this disease is uncertain, accumulating evidence indicates a key role for the activated mucosal immune system. In the present study, we examined the effects of the natural compound fraxinellone on dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis in mice, an animal model that mimics IBD. Treatment with fraxinellone significantly reduced weight loss and diarrhea in mice and alleviated the macroscopic and microscopic signs of the disease. In addition, the activities of myeloperoxidase and alkaline phosphatase were markedly suppressed, while the levels of glutathione were increased in colitis tissues following fraxinellone treatment. This compound also decreased the colonic levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-18 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in a concentration-dependent manner. These effects of fraxinellone in mice with experimental colitis were attributed to its inhibition of CD11b{sup +} macrophage infiltration. The mRNA levels of macrophage-related molecules in the colon, including intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1), vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM1), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2), were also markedly inhibited following fraxinellone treatment. The results from in vitro assays showed that fraxinellone significantly reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of nitric oxide (NO), IL-1β and IL-18 as well as the activity of iNOS in both THP-1 cells and mouse primary peritoneal macrophages. The mechanisms responsible for these effects were attributed to the inhibitory role of fraxinellone in NF-κB signaling and NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Overall, our results support fraxinellone as a novel drug candidate in the treatment of colonic inflammation. - Highlights: • Fraxinellone, a lactone compound, alleviated DSS induced colitis. • The effects of fraxinellone were attributed to its inhibition on

  6. [A novel experimental approach to immunotherapy against malignant brain tumor with the mouse IFN-gamma gene transfer].

    PubMed

    Nishihara, K

    1989-01-01

    To investigate the effect of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) on the immunotherapy, we used the autocrinically stimulated system in which a mouse IFN-gamma cDNA was transferred by infection with a chimeric retrovirus containing the IFN-gamma gene. First, we established a tumor specific CTL clone (E-4) against 203-glioma cells (a 20-methylcholanthrene induced mouse ependymoblastoma line of C57BL/6 mouse origin), and then transferred murine IFN-gamma cDNA into E-4 by using retroviral vector (pSVX(Mu gamma delta A]. Out of five gene-transferred subclones, E gamma-4, E gamma-5, E gamma-6, E gamma-7 and E gamma-9, two subclones (E gamma-6 and E gamma-9) constitutively produced 8- to 10-fold amounts of IFN-gamma as compared with the parental E-4. Moreover, these two subclones exhibited two to three times higher killing activity against 203-glioma than the parental cells. The enhancement of the killing activities was abrogated by an adequate addition of anti-IFN-gamma antibody. No alteration was seen after the gene transfer in cell surface phenotypes, Thy-1+, Lyt-1-, Lyt-2+3+ and asialo-GM1-. Fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis showed that the surface expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class I antigen, H-2Kb, of parental E-4 was augmented remarkably, and it was not altered by the IFN-gamma gene transfer, but the Class II antigen, I-Ab, was slightly enhanced on the two IFN-gamma-producing sublines. Since it is considered that in the vicinity of the constitutively IFN-gamma-producing CTL cells, tumor cells are exposed to a high concentration of IFN-gamma and may be stimulated to induce or enhance the expression of surface antigens including MHC antigens as well as tumor associated antigens in relation to immune recognition. The 203-glioma cells pretreated with IFN-gamma were more efficiently killed by both the parental E-4 and the gene-transferred sublines. It was thus suggested that the specific tumor killing activity of the gene

  7. Brain tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Black, K. L.; Mazziotta, J. C.; Becker, D. P.

    1991-01-01

    Recent advances in experimental tumor biology are being applied to critical clinical problems of primary brain tumors. The expression of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors, which are sparse in normal brain, is increased as much as 20-fold in brain tumors. Experimental studies show promise in using labeled ligands to these receptors to identify the outer margins of malignant brain tumors. Whereas positron emission tomography has improved the dynamic understanding of tumors, the labeled selective tumor receptors with positron emitters will enhance the ability to specifically diagnose and greatly aid in the pretreatment planning for tumors. Modulation of these receptors will also affect tumor growth and metabolism. Novel methods to deliver antitumor agents to the brain and new approaches using biologic response modifiers also hold promise to further improve the management of brain tumors. Images PMID:1848735

  8. Correlated expression of HMGA2 and PLAG1 in thyroid tumors, uterine leiomyomas and experimental models.

    PubMed

    Klemke, Markus; Müller, Marietta Henrike; Wosniok, Werner; Markowski, Dominique Nadine; Nimzyk, Rolf; Helmke, Burkhard Maria; Bullerdiek, Jörn

    2014-01-01

    In pleomorphic adenomas of the salivary glands (PASG) recurrent chromosomal rearrangements affecting either 8q12 or 12q14∼15 lead to an overexpression of the genes of the genuine transcription factor PLAG1 or the architectural transcription factor HMGA2, respectively. Both genes are also affected by recurrent chromosomal rearrangements in benign adipocytic tumors as e. g. lipomas and lipoblastomas. Herein, we observed a strong correlation between the expression of HMGA2 and PLAG1 in 14 benign and 23 malignant thyroid tumors. To address the question if PLAG1 can be activated by HMGA2, the expression of both genes was quantified in 32 uterine leiomyomas 17 of which exhibited an overexpression of HMGA2. All leiomyomas with HMGA2 overexpression also revealed an activation of PLAG1 in the absence of detectable chromosome 8 abnormalities affecting the PLAG1 locus. To further investigate if the overexpression of PLAG1 is inducible by HMGA2 alone, HMGA2 was transiently overexpressed in MCF-7 cells. An increased PLAG1 expression was observed 24 and 48 h after transfection. Likewise, stimulation of HMGA2 by FGF1 in adipose tissue-derived stem cells led to a simultaneous increase of PLAG1 mRNA. Altogether, these data suggest that HMGA2 is an upstream activator of PLAG1. Accordingly, this may explain the formation of tumors as similar as lipomas and lipoblastomas resulting from an activation of either of both genes by chromosomal rearrangements.

  9. Ablative Tumor Radiation Can Change the Tumor Immune Cell Microenvironment to Induce Durable Complete Remissions

    PubMed Central

    Filatenkov, Alexander; Baker, Jeanette; Mueller, Antonia M.S.; Kenkel, Justin; Ahn, G-One; Dutt, Suparna; Zhang, Nigel; Kohrt, Holbrook; Jensen, Kent; Dejbakhsh-Jones, Sussan; Shizuru, Judith A.; Negrin, Robert N.; Engleman, Edgar G.; Strober, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The goals of the study were to elucidate the immune mechanisms that contribute to desirable complete remissions of murine colon tumors treated with single radiation dose of 30 Gy. This dose is at the upper end of the ablative range used clinically to treat advanced or metastatic colorectal, liver, and non-small cell lung tumors. Experimental design Changes in the tumor immune microenvironment of single tumor nodules exposed to radiation were studied using 21 day (>1 cm in diameter) CT26 and MC38 colon tumors. These are well-characterized weakly immunogenic tumors. Results We found that the high dose radiation transformed the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment resulting in an intense CD8+ T cell tumor infiltrate, and a loss of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). The change was dependent on antigen cross-presenting CD8+ dendritic cells, secretion of IFN-γ, and CD4+ T cells expressing CD40L. Anti-tumor CD8+ T cells entered tumors shortly after radiotherapy, reversed MDSC infiltration, and mediated durable remissions in an IFN-γ dependent manner. Interestingly, extended fractionated radiation regimen did not result in robust CD8+ T cell infiltration. Conclusion For immunologically sensitive tumors, these results indicate that remissions induced by a short course of high dose radiation therapy depend on the development of anti-tumor immunity that is reflected by the nature and kinetics of changes induced in the tumor cell microenvironment. These results suggest that systematic examination of the tumor immune microenvironment may help in optimizing the radiation regimen used to treat tumors by adding a robust immune response. PMID:25869387

  10. Resistance of novel mouse strains different in MHC class I and the NKC domain to the development of experimental tumors.

    PubMed

    Fišerová, Anna; Richter, Jan; Čapková, Katarína; Bieblová, Jana; Mikyšková, Romana; Reiniš, Milan; Indrová, Marie

    2016-08-01

    To elucidate the immunological mechanisms critical for tumor progression, we bred novel mouse strains, different in the NKC and H-2D domains. We used inbreeding to generate hybrids of Balb/c and C57BL/6 of stable H-2Db+d-NK1.1neg and H-2Db-d+NK1.1high phenotypes. We analyzed the growth of three established MHC class I-deficient tumor cell lines: TC-1/A9 tumor (HPV-associated) and B16F10 melanoma, both syngeneic to C57BL/6, and the MCB8 (3-methycholanthrene-induced tumor) syngeneic to Balb/c. Furthermore, we induced colorectal carcinoma by azoxymethane-DSS treatment to test the susceptibility to chemically-induced primary cancer. We found that the novel strains spontaneously regressed the tumor transplants syngeneic to both Balb/c (MCB8) and C57BL/6 (B16F10 and TC-1/A9) mice. The H2-Db+d-NK1.1neg, but not the H2-Db-d+NK1.1high strain was also highly resistant to chemically-induced colorectal cancer in comparison to the parental mice. The immune changes during TC-1/A9 cancer development involved an increase of the NK cell distribution in the peripheral blood and spleen along with higher expression of NKG2D activation antigen; this was in correlation with the time-dependent rise of cytotoxic activity in comparison to C57BL/6 mice. The TC-1/A9 cancer regression was accompanied by higher proportion of B cells in the spleen and B220+/CD86+ activated antigen-presenting B cells distributed in the lymphoid organs, as well as in the periphery. The changes in the T-cell population were represented mainly by the prevalence of T helper cells reflected by grown CD4/CD8 ratio, most prominent in the b+d-NK1.1neg strain. The results of the present study imply usefulness of the two novel mouse strains as an experimental model for further studies of tumor resistance mechanisms. PMID:27279019

  11. Experimental radioimmunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Buchsbaum, D J; Langmuir, V K; Wessels, B W

    1993-01-01

    Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies have been used for radioimmunotherapy studies with human tumor spheroids and murine and human tumor xenografts in experimental animals. This paper reviews the work that has been performed in these models with different types of cancer, and highlights those papers that have presented dosimetry estimates and attempts to correlate the findings. Radioimmunotherapy studies in multicell spheroids, as a model for micrometastases, have been performed in human neuroblastoma, colon cancer, and melanoma cell lines using 131I-, 125I-, 186Re-, and 212Bi-labeled antibodies. The uniform geometry of the spheroid has allowed radiation dose estimates to be made. Up to three logs of cell kill have been achieved with 131I- and 186Re-specific antibody with minimal toxicity from labeled nonspecific antibody, but 212Bi-antibody had little effect because of its short half-life as shown by Langmuir. It appears that the two most important factors for therapeutic efficacy in this model are good penetration of the radiolabeled antibody and an adequate radionuclide half-life to allow penetration of the immunoconjugate prior to significant radionuclide decay. Radioimmunotherapy studies in animals bearing transplants of colon cancer, leukemia, lymphoma, hepatoma, renal cell carcinoma, neuroblastoma, glioma, mammary carcinoma, small cell lung carcinoma, cervical carcinoma, ovarian carcinoma, and bladder cancer have been performed with 131I, 90Y, 186Re, 153Sm, and 177Lu beta emitting, and 212Bi alpha emitting radionuclides conjugated to monoclonal antibodies. A few studies compared different radionuclides in the same model system. The approaches that have been used in these studies to estimate tumor dosimetry include the MIRD approach, thermoluminescent dosimetry, autoradiography, and comparison to external irradiation. The majority of investigators have estimated the dose to tumor and normal organs using MIRD-based calculations (time-activity curve and

  12. Assessment of Augmented Immune Surveillance and Tumor Cell Death by Cytoplasmic Stabilization of p53 as a Chemopreventive Strategy of 3 Promising Medicinal Herbs in Murine 2-Stage Skin Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ali, Farrah; Khan, Rehan; Khan, Abdul Quaiyoom; Lateef, Md Abdul; Maqbool, Tahir; Sultana, Sarwat

    2014-07-01

    Cancer is the final outcome of a plethora of events. Targeting the proliferation or inducing programmed cell death in a proliferating population is a major standpoint in the cancer therapy. However, proliferation is regulated by several cellular and immunologic processes. This study reports the inhibition of proliferation by augmenting immune surveillance, silencing acute inflammation, and inducing p53-mediated apoptosis of skin cancer by 3 promising medicinal extracts. We used the well-characterized model for experimental skin carcinogenesis in mice for 32 weeks to study the chemopreventive effect of the methanolic extracts of Trigonella foenumgraecum, Eclipta alba, and Calendula officinalis. All 3 extracts reduced the number, incidence, and multiplicity of tumors, which was confirmed by the pathologic studies that showed regressed tumors. There was a significant reduction in the PCNA+ nuclei in all treatment groups 32 weeks after the initiation. Mechanistic studies revealed that proliferative population in tumors is diminished by the restoration of the endogenous antioxidant defense, inhibition of the stress-related signal-transducing element NFκB, reduction of inflammation, enhancement of immunosurveillance of the genetically mutated cells, along with silencing of the cell cycle progression signals. Finally, all 3 medicinal extracts induced stable expression of p53 within the tumors, confirmed by the CFDA-Cy3 apoptosis assay. Results of our study confirm that these extracts not only limit the rate of proliferation by inhibition of the processes integral to cancer development but also induce stable cytoplasmic expression of p53-mediated apoptosis, leading to fewer and regressed tumors in mice.

  13. Identification of tumor-associated cassette exons in human cancer through EST-based computational prediction and experimental validation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many evidences report that alternative splicing, the mechanism which produces mRNAs and proteins with different structures and functions from the same gene, is altered in cancer cells. Thus, the identification and characterization of cancer-specific splice variants may give large impulse to the discovery of novel diagnostic and prognostic tumour biomarkers, as well as of new targets for more selective and effective therapies. Results We present here a genome-wide analysis of the alternative splicing pattern of human genes through a computational analysis of normal and cancer-specific ESTs from seventeen anatomical groups, using data available in AspicDB, a database resource for the analysis of alternative splicing in human. By using a statistical methodology, normal and cancer-specific genes, splice sites and cassette exons were predicted in silico. The condition association of some of the novel normal/tumoral cassette exons was experimentally verified by RT-qPCR assays in the same anatomical system where they were predicted. Remarkably, the presence in vivo of the predicted alternative transcripts, specific for the nervous system, was confirmed in patients affected by glioblastoma. Conclusion This study presents a novel computational methodology for the identification of tumor-associated transcript variants to be used as cancer molecular biomarkers, provides its experimental validation, and reports specific biomarkers for glioblastoma. PMID:20813049

  14. COMPARISON OF TOPICAL INTERLEUKIN-1 VS TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR-ALPHA BLOCKADE WITH CORTICOSTEROID THERAPY ON MURINE CORNEAL INFLAMMATION, NEOVASCULARIZATION, AND TRANSPLANT SURVIVAL (AN AMERICAN OPHTHALMOLOGICAL SOCIETY THESIS)

    PubMed Central

    Dana, Reza

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) play critical roles in mediating corneal inflammation. In this study, topical blockade of IL-1 and TNF-α, alone or in combination, was compared to conventional corticosteroid anti-inflammatory therapy in suppressing infiltration of the cornea by antigen-presenting Langerhans cells (LCs) and in promoting corneal transplant survival in a mouse model of keratoplasty. Methods: Study drugs included topical 2% IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), 1.5% soluble TNF-α receptor (sTNFR), and 1% prednisolone phosphate (Pred), all formulated in hyaluronic acid vehicle. Fifty eyes of BALB/c mice were used for LC studies where the numbers of LCs were determined 1 week after electrocautery to the corneal surface or transplantation of C57BL/6 corneas. Additionally, 65 BALB/c mice received corneal allografts and were randomized to receive one of the following for 8 weeks: (1) IL-1Ra, (2) sTNFR, (3) Pred, (4) combined IL-1Ra and Pred, or (5) vehicle alone. Results: Mean suppression of LC infiltration after electrocautery or transplantation was 67% and 71%, respectively, for IL-1Ra, 40% and 62% for sTNFR, 70% and 72% for sTNFR+IL-1Ra, and 77% and 78% for Pred alone. Rejection rates were 15% for IL-1Ra (P = .01), 38% for sTNFR (P = .1), 17% for Pred (P = .02), and 7% for combined IL-1Ra+Pred (P = .002) as compared to 69% for the vehicle-treated group. IL-1Ra and Pred, but not sTNFR, significantly inhibited post-transplantation neovascularization. Conclusions: Topical IL-1Ra and prednisolone are comparable in their capacity to promote graft survival. sTNFR therapy, though effective, has much lower efficacy as compared to IL-1Ra or Pred. Combination IL-1Ra and steroid therapy offers only minimal added efficacy over either agent used alone. PMID:18427620

  15. Intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin therapy for murine bladder tumors: initiation of the response by fibronectin-mediated attachment of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin.

    PubMed

    Ratliff, T L; Palmer, J O; McGarr, J A; Brown, E J

    1987-04-01

    Intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is considered to be one of the most effective treatments for superficial bladder cancer. Although the mechanisms by which BCG inhibits tumor growth are not known, previous studies have shown that systemic immunization to BCG and the local expression of the immune response in the bladder are associated with a favorable response to BCG therapy. We have investigated the conditions required for the initiation of an immunological response after the intravesical instillation of BCG. Initial histological studies showed that BCG attached to the bladder wall only in areas where the urothelium was damaged by electrocautery and suggested that attachment was associated with the fibrin clot. Quantitative studies verified the histological observations. Minimal BCG attachment (mean less than 10(2) colony forming units) was observed in normal bladders in contrast with a mean of 1.42 X 10(4) colony forming units/bladder in bladders damaged by electrocautery (10 separate experiments). BCG attachment to the bladder wall was durable since organisms were observed in bladders 48 h after instillation. To investigate the proteins to which BCG attached, we tested the binding of BCG to extracellular matrix and inflammatory proteins which comprise a significant portion of the fibrin clot. BCG bound in vitro to coverslips coated in vivo with extracellular matrix proteins but did not bind to control albumin-coated coverslips. BCG also bound to coverslips coated with purified plasma fibronectin but not to coverslips coated with other purified extracellular matrix proteins including laminin, fibrinogen, and type IV collagen. BCG attachment to coverslips coated with either extracellular matrix proteins or purified fibronectin was inhibited by antibodies specific for fibronectin. Moreover, BCG attachment to cauterized bladders in vivo was inhibited by antifibronectin antibodies. These results demonstrate that fibronectin mediates the attachment of BCG

  16. Intranasal Delivery of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Significantly Extends Survival of Irradiated Mice with Experimental Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Balyasnikova, Irina V; Prasol, Melanie S; Ferguson, Sherise D; Han, Yu; Ahmed, Atique U; Gutova, Margarita; Tobias, Alex L; Mustafi, Devkumar; Rincón, Esther; Zhang, Lingjiao; Aboody, Karen S; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2014-01-01

    Treatment options of glioblastoma multiforme are limited due to the blood–brain barrier (BBB). In this study, we investigated the utility of intranasal (IN) delivery as a means of transporting stem cell–based antiglioma therapeutics. We hypothesized that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) delivered via nasal application could impart therapeutic efficacy when expressing TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in a model of human glioma. 111In-oxine, histology and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were utilized to track MSCs within the brain and associated tumor. We demonstrate that MSCs can penetrate the brain from nasal cavity and infiltrate intracranial glioma xenografts in a mouse model. Furthermore, irradiation of tumor-bearing mice tripled the penetration of 111In-oxine–labeled MSCs in the brain with a fivefold increase in cerebellum. Significant increase in CXCL12 expression was observed in irradiated xenograft tissue, implicating a CXCL12-dependent mechanism of MSCs migration towards irradiated glioma xenografts. Finally, MSCs expressing TRAIL improved the median survival of irradiated mice bearing intracranial U87 glioma xenografts in comparison with nonirradiated and irradiated control mice. Cumulatively, our data suggest that IN delivery of stem cell–based therapeutics is a feasible and highly efficacious treatment modality, allowing for repeated application of modified stem cells to target malignant glioma. PMID:24002694

  17. Experimental and theoretical advances in functional understanding of flavonoids as anti-tumor agents.

    PubMed

    Babu, Bandarugattu V; Konduru, Naveen K; Nakanishi, Waro; Hayashi, Satoko; Ahmed, Naseem; Mitrasinovic, Petar M

    2013-02-01

    The potential of flavonoids to act as anti-tumor agents has been recognized but not fully understood because flavonoids are acting at several stages in cancer progression with distinct structure-function relationships. A whole family of structurally different flavonoids is herein described by reviewing some critical aspects of their pro-oxidant behavior in vitro/vivo and in cell systems by which they may work as antioxidants. Different classes of flavonoids (chalcones, flavones, isoflavones, flavanols, flavanones and anthocyanins) are synthetically mimicked using natural product structure-antioxidant activity relationships that are relevant for their enhanced function against cancer as well as severe inflammation conditions under which an increased oxidative stress is often implicated. In the context of the common mechanisms of flavonoid action, clinical data on benefits of flavonoids in fighting against cancer are discussed. A structural basis needed to improve antioxidant activity of these agents is elaborated in more detail.

  18. Tumor necrosis factor soluble receptors circulate during experimental and clinical inflammation and can protect against excessive tumor necrosis factor alpha in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Van Zee, K J; Kohno, T; Fischer, E; Rock, C S; Moldawer, L L; Lowry, S F

    1992-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha), a primary mediator of systemic responses to sepsis and infection, can be injurious to the organism when present in excessive quantities. Here we report that two types of naturally occurring soluble TNF receptors (sTNFR-I and sTNFR-II) circulate in human experimental endotoxemia and in critically ill patients and demonstrate that they neutralize TNF alpha-induced cytotoxicity and immunoreactivity in vitro. Utilizing immunoassays that discriminate between total sTNFR-I and sTNFR-I not bound to TNF alpha, we show that sTNFR-I-TNF alpha complexes may circulate even in the absence of detectable free TNF alpha. To investigate the therapeutic possibilities of sTNFR-I, recombinant protein was administered to nonhuman primates with lethal bacteremia and found to attenuate hemodynamic collapse and cytokine induction. We conclude that soluble receptors for TNF alpha are inducible in inflammation and circulate at levels sufficient to block the in vitro cytotoxicity associated with TNF alpha levels observed in nonlethal infection. Administration of sTNFR-I can prevent the adverse pathologic sequelae caused by the exaggerated TNF alpha production observed in lethal sepsis. Images PMID:1317575

  19. Theory and Experimental Validation of a Spatio-temporal Model of Chemotherapy Transport to Enhance Tumor Cell Kill

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhihui; Chuang, Yao-Li; Dogra, Prashant; Butner, Joseph D.; Day, Armin; Xu, Rong; Shen, Haifa; Simbawa, Eman; AL-Fhaid, A. S.; Mahmoud, S. R.; Curley, Steven A.; Ferrari, Mauro; Cristini, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that continuously releasing drug molecules into the tumor over an extended period of time may significantly improve the chemotherapeutic efficacy by overcoming physical transport limitations of conventional bolus drug treatment. In this paper, we present a generalized space- and time-dependent mathematical model of drug transport and drug-cell interactions to quantitatively formulate this hypothesis. Model parameters describe: perfusion and tissue architecture (blood volume fraction and blood vessel radius); diffusion penetration distance of drug (i.e., a function of tissue compactness and drug uptake rates by tumor cells); and cell death rates (as function of history of drug uptake). We performed preliminary testing and validation of the mathematical model using in vivo experiments with different drug delivery methods on a breast cancer mouse model. Experimental data demonstrated a 3-fold increase in response using nano-vectored drug vs. free drug delivery, in excellent quantitative agreement with the model predictions. Our model results implicate that therapeutically targeting blood volume fraction, e.g., through vascular normalization, would achieve a better outcome due to enhanced drug delivery. Author Summary Cancer treatment efficacy can be significantly enhanced through the elution of drug from nano-carriers that can temporarily stay in the tumor vasculature. Here we present a relatively simple yet powerful mathematical model that accounts for both spatial and temporal heterogeneities of drug dosing to help explain, examine, and prove this concept. We find that the delivery of systemic chemotherapy through a certain form of nano-carriers would have enhanced tumor kill by a factor of 2 to 4 over the standard therapy that the patients actually received. We also find that targeting blood volume fraction (a parameter of the model) through vascular normalization can achieve more effective drug delivery and tumor kill. More importantly

  20. [A method for choosing preparations that reduce the toxicity of cytostatics in experimental chemotherapy of tumors].

    PubMed

    Zueva, E P; Iaremenko, K V

    1989-01-01

    A special scale is proposed to evaluate the level of toxicity of drugs during experimental chemotherapy of tumours. The method allows to standardize somehow the choice of the drugs reducing the toxic action of cytostatics and also to compare different drugs to choose the most effective correctors of cytostatic therapy. PMID:2707428

  1. Immunosuppression by Murine Sarcoma Virus (Moloney)

    PubMed Central

    Chan, S. P.; Hook, W. A.; Turner, W.; Chirigos, M. A.

    1970-01-01

    Infection of mice with the murine sarcoma virus (Moloney) markedly suppressed the humoral antibody response to sheep erythrocyte antigen injected 10 days after infection, when tumor size was maximal, and on day 26, when primary tumors had partially regressed. Humoral antibody response was also inhibited when antigen was injected at the time secondary tumors and metastases were evident. No significant suppression of humoral antibody was seen when mice were injected with sheep erythrocyte antigen 5 days after virus infection. Inhibition of the cellular immune response of murine sarcoma virus (Moloney)-infected mice, as measured by the increased survival time of skin grafts, was also determined. Mice that were infected 5 days prior to grafting demonstrated prolonged survival of grafts, suggesting a suppression of cellular immunity. These mice had a graft survival time 14 days greater than noninfected controls. No significant prolongation of graft survival was seen in mice grafted at the times of maximum primary tumor growth, of primary tumor regression, or when secondary tumors had appeared. PMID:16557730

  2. Effect of in vivo activation of natural killer (NK) cells by a tilorone analogue on the survival of mice injected intravenously with different experimental murine tumours

    PubMed Central

    ALGARRA, I.; GONZÁLEZ, A.; PÉREZ, M.; GAFORIO, J J; GARRIDO, F.

    1996-01-01

    We studied the effect of a tilorone analogue (RMI 10,874DA) and anti-asialo GM1 serum on the survival of BALB/c and C57B1/6 mice after i.v. injections of different syngeneic murine tumour cells. Tumour lines used were different clones from chemically (GR9 wild type, GR9.B9, B7.1.B4, B7.1.B5, B7.2.38), and ultraviolet light (GRUV3)-induced sarcomas; B16 melanoma and LSTRA and YC8 lymphomas. Pretreatment of mice with tilorone inhibited metastatic colonization and increased survival significantly in all cases. In some tumour systems, the effect was attenuated when high numbers of cells were injected. Abrogation of NK cells with anti-asialo GM1 serum significantly decreased (in all tumours and at different cell doses) survival in comparison with untreated mice injected with tumours, regardless of cell dose used. These results clearly suggest that NK cell activation in vivo by the tilorone analogue we tested prolongs survival and inhibits metastasis formation in mice, even when pretreatment consists of a single dose of the analogue. PMID:8608652

  3. Dimethyl fumarate ameliorates dextran sulfate sodium-induced murine experimental colitis by activating Nrf2 and suppressing NLRP3 inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiuting; Zhou, Wei; Zhang, Xin; Lu, Ping; Du, Qianming; Tao, Lei; Ding, Yang; Wang, Yajing; Hu, Rong

    2016-07-15

    In the present study, we examined the effects of dimethyl fumarate (DMF) on dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced murine colitis, an animal model which mimics human IBD. Oral administration of DMF dose-dependently attenuated body weight loss, colon length shortening and colonic pathological damage including decreased myeloperoxidase (MPO) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activities in DSS-treated mice. Increased glutathione (GSH) induced by DMF demonstrated its potential antioxidant capacity. In addition, Nrf2 and its downstream genes were markedly activated by DMF. Furthermore, protein and mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 were markedly suppressed by DMF. At the same time, decreased activation of caspase-1 was detected in DMF-treated mice, indicating that the NLRP3 inflammasome activation was suppressed. The in vitro study verified a negative regulation of DMF and its intestinal metabolite on NLRP3 inflammasome. Moreover, the inhibitory effect was found to be mostly dependent on Nrf2 which decreased mitochondrial ROS (mROS) generation and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) release. Taken together, our results demonstrated the ability of DMF to inhibit NLRP3 inflammasome activation and its potential use in the treatment of NLRP3-associated diseases. PMID:27184504

  4. Monoclonal antibody to Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus defines a determinant on myelin and oligodendrocytes, and augments demyelination in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Yamada, M; Zurbriggen, A; Fujinami, R S

    1990-06-01

    Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) causes a chronic demyelinating disease in mice. The mechanisms underlying the demyelination have not been fully elucidated. We have raised a mAb to TMEV (DA strain), H8, that reacts both with TMEV VP-1 and galactocerebroside (GC). In mouse brain cultures, cells positive for the mAb H8 epitope were double labeled with antibody to myelin basic protein, indicating that those cells were oligodendrocytes. Further, mAb H8 could immunostain myelin structures in frozen sections from mouse brains. When injected intravenously into mice with acute allergic encephalomyelitis, mAb H8 increased by 10-fold the size of demyelinated areas within the spinal cords. This is the first report demonstrating that an antibody to virus can enhance demyelination of a central nervous system disease. Ig fractions from the sera of mice with chronic TMEV infection had antibody(s) to GC, as well as to TMEV, as determined by ELISA. Furthermore, a competition ELISA for TMEV or GC antigen revealed that sera from these infected mice contained antibody(s) with the same specificity as mAb H8. Our results indicate that antibodies generated by immune response to TMEV can react with myelin and oligodendrocytes, and contribute to demyelination through an immune process.

  5. Monoclonal antibody to Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus defines a determinant on myelin and oligodendrocytes, and augments demyelination in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) causes a chronic demyelinating disease in mice. The mechanisms underlying the demyelination have not been fully elucidated. We have raised a mAb to TMEV (DA strain), H8, that reacts both with TMEV VP-1 and galactocerebroside (GC). In mouse brain cultures, cells positive for the mAb H8 epitope were double labeled with antibody to myelin basic protein, indicating that those cells were oligodendrocytes. Further, mAb H8 could immunostain myelin structures in frozen sections from mouse brains. When injected intravenously into mice with acute allergic encephalomyelitis, mAb H8 increased by 10-fold the size of demyelinated areas within the spinal cords. This is the first report demonstrating that an antibody to virus can enhance demyelination of a central nervous system disease. Ig fractions from the sera of mice with chronic TMEV infection had antibody(s) to GC, as well as to TMEV, as determined by ELISA. Furthermore, a competition ELISA for TMEV or GC antigen revealed that sera from these infected mice contained antibody(s) with the same specificity as mAb H8. Our results indicate that antibodies generated by immune response to TMEV can react with myelin and oligodendrocytes, and contribute to demyelination through an immune process. PMID:1693653

  6. [Protective activity of S-PT84, a heat-killed preparation of Lactobacillus pentosus, against oral and gastric candidiasis in an experimental murine model].

    PubMed

    Hayama, Kazumi; Ishijima, Sanae; Ono, Yoshiko; Izumo, Takayuki; Ida, Masayuki; Shibata, Hiroshi; Abe, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    The effect of S-PT84, a heat-killed preparation of Lactobacillus pentosus on growth of Candida albicans was examined in vitro and in vivo. The mycelial growth was effectively inhibited by S-PT84 and seemed to bind to the hyphae. We assessed the potential of S-PT84 for treatment of oral and gastric candidiasis using a murine model. When 2 mg of S-PT84 was administered three times into the oral cavity of orally Candida infected mice, the score of lesions on the tongue was improved on day 2. When 50 μl and 200 μl of S-PT84 (10 mg/ml) were administered three times into the oral cavity (0.5 mg × 3) and the stomach (2 mg × 3) of the same mouse model, the number of viable Candida cells in the stomach was reduced significantly on day 2. These findings suggest the possibility that S-PT84 has potential as a food ingredient supporting anti-Candida treatment, especially for Candida infection in the gastrointestinal tract.

  7. Inhibition of Bladder Tumor Growth by Chitooligosaccharides in an Experimental Carcinogenesis Model

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, João C.; Sereno, José; Garrido, Patricia; Parada, Belmiro; Cunha, Maria F. X.; Reis, Flávio; Pintado, Manuela E.; Santos-Silva, Alice

    2012-01-01

    Urinary bladder cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide, with the highest incidence in industrialized countries. Patients with cancer commonly use unconventional and complementary therapy including nutraceuticals. In this study we evaluated the efficacy of chitooligosaccharides (in orange juice) in rat bladder cancer chemoprevention and as therapeutic agent, on a rat model of urinary bladder carcinogenesis induced with N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl) nitrosamine. Results indicate that chitooligosaccharides may have a preventive effect on bladder cancer development and a curative effect upon established bladder tumors, dependent on the concentration ingested 500 mg/kg b.w., every three days, showed capacity to inhibit and prevent the proliferation of bladder cancer; however, this was associated with secondary effects such as hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia. The use of lower doses (50 and 250 mg/kg b.w.) showed only therapeutic effects. It is further suggested that this antitumor effect might be due to its expected anti-inflammatory action, as well as by mechanisms not directly dependent of COX-2 inhibition, such as cellular proliferation control and improvement in antioxidant profile. PMID:23342389

  8. Tumor tracking based on correlation models in scanned ion beam therapy: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seregni, M.; Kaderka, R.; Fattori, G.; Riboldi, M.; Pella, A.; Constantinescu, A.; Saito, N.; Durante, M.; Cerveri, P.; Bert, C.; Baroni, G.

    2013-07-01

    Accurate dose delivery to extra-cranial lesions requires tumor motion compensation. An effective compensation can be achieved by real-time tracking of the target position, either measured in fluoroscopy or estimated through correlation models as a function of external surrogate motion. In this work, we integrated two internal/external correlation models (a state space model and an artificial neural network-based model) into a custom infra-red optical tracking system (OTS). Dedicated experiments were designed and conducted at GSI (Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung). A robotic breathing phantom was used to reproduce regular and irregular internal target motion as well as external thorax motion. The position of a set of markers placed on the phantom thorax was measured with the OTS and used by the correlation models to infer the internal target position in real-time. Finally, the estimated target position was provided as input for the dynamic steering of a carbon ion beam. Geometric results showed that the correlation models transversal (2D) targeting error was always lower than 1.3 mm (root mean square). A significant decrease of the dosimetric error with respect to the uncompensated irradiation was achieved in four out of six experiments, demonstrating that phase shifts are the most critical irregularity for external/internal correlation models.

  9. Application of Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) Nanoparticles in Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) of an Experimental Tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Norio; Kume, Kyo; Tsutumi, Kotaro; Fukunaga, Yukihiro; Ito, Shinnji; Imamura, Yoshiaki; Bibin, Andriana B.

    2011-12-01

    Nano-sized particles has been used for the photodynamic and sonodynamic treatments of pre-clinical cancer study in previous studies [1-7]. In this study, the 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) solution mixed with TiO2 nanoparticles was oral-administrated into the nude mouse transplanted under the skin with a human prostate cancer cell line. The experimental tumor model tissue (7×7×7 mm3) was measured of the size at different times after the photodynamic therapy (PDT) by laser to take a growth curve of the tumor. The treatment efficacy was jugged from the growth curves comparing different conditions. In the presence of the nanoparticle, the PDT treatment effect was enhanced those in the absence of the particles. Furthermore, the sonodynamic therapy (SDT) effect also enhanced with the nanoparticle to produce more OH radicals by ultrasound irradiation. These combination therapy of PDT and SDT with nanoparticles was very effectively resulted to be useful as a clinical use in future.

  10. Approaches for modeling interstitial ultrasound ablation of tumors within or adjacent to bone: Theoretical and experimental evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Serena J.; Prakash, Punit; Salgaonkar, Vasant; Jones, Peter D.; Cam, Richard N.; Han, Misung; Rieke, Viola; Burdette, E. Clif; Diederich, Chris J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The objectives of this study were to develop numerical models of interstitial ultrasound ablation of tumors within or adjacent to bone, to evaluate model performance through theoretical analysis, and to validate the models and approximations used through comparison to experiments. Methods 3D transient biothermal and acoustic finite element models were developed, employing four approximations of 7 MHz ultrasound propagation at bone/soft tissue interfaces. The various approximations considered or excluded reflection, refraction, angle-dependence of transmission coefficients, shear mode conversion, and volumetric heat deposition. Simulations were performed for parametric and comparative studies. Experiments within ex vivo tissues and phantoms were performed to validate the models by comparison to simulations. Temperature measurements were conducted using needle thermocouples or MR temperature imaging (MRTI). Finite element models representing heterogeneous tissue geometries were created based on segmented MR images. Results High ultrasound absorption at bone/soft tissue interfaces increased the volumes of target tissue that could be ablated. Models using simplified approximations produced temperature profiles closely matching both more comprehensive models and experimental results, with good agreement between 3D calculations and MRTI. The correlation coefficients between simulated and measured temperature profiles in phantoms ranged from 0.852 to 0.967 (p-value < 0.01) for the four models. Conclusions Models using approximations of interstitial ultrasound energy deposition around bone/soft tissue interfaces produced temperature distributions in close agreement with comprehensive simulations and experimental measurements. These models may be applied to accurately predict temperatures produced by interstitial ultrasound ablation of tumors near and within bone, with applications toward treatment planning. PMID:24102393

  11. Tumor Necrosis Factor, but Not Neutrophils, Alters the Metabolic Profile in Acute Experimental Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marina C; Tavares, Luciana P; Vago, Juliana P; Batista, Nathália V; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M; Vieira, Angelica T; Menezes, Gustavo B; Sousa, Lirlândia P; van de Loo, Fons A J; Teixeira, Mauro M; Amaral, Flávio A; Ferreira, Adaliene V M

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic alterations are associated with arthritis apart from obesity. However, it is still unclear which is the underlying process behind these metabolic changes. Here, we investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in this process in an acute model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). Immunized male BALB/c mice received an intra-articular injection of PBS (control) or methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA) into their knees, and were also pre-treated with different drugs: Etanercept, an anti-TNF drug, DF2156A, a CXCR1/2 receptor antagonist, or a monoclonal antibody RB6-8C5 to deplete neutrophils. Local challenge with mBSA evoked an acute neutrophil influx into the knee joint, and enhanced the joint nociception, along with a transient systemic metabolic alteration (higher levels of glucose and lipids, and altered adipocytokines). Pre-treatment with the conventional biological Etanercept, an inhibitor of TNF action, ameliorated the nociception and the acute joint inflammation dominated by neutrophils, and markedly improved many of the altered systemic metabolites (glucose and lipids), adipocytokines and PTX3. However, the lessening of metabolic changes was not due to diminished accumulation of neutrophils in the joint by Etanercept. Reduction of neutrophil recruitment by pre-treating AIA mice with DF2156A, or even the depletion of these cells by using RB6-8C5 reduced all of the inflammatory parameters and hypernociception developed after AIA challenge, but could not prevent the metabolic changes. Therefore, the induction of joint inflammation provoked acute metabolic alterations which were involved with TNF. We suggest that the role of TNF in arthritis-associated metabolic changes is not due to local neutrophils, which are the major cells present in this model, but rather due to cytokines. PMID:26742100

  12. In Vitro and In Vivo Effects of Tumor Suppressor Gene PTEN on Endometriosis: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Juan; Zhu, Qiaoying; Jia, Xuemei; Yu, Ningzhu; Li, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Background Endometriosis can cause dysmenorrhea and infertility. Its pathogenesis has not yet been clarified and its treatment continues to pose enormous challenges. The protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTEN) gene is a tumor suppressor gene. The aim of this study was to investigate the role and significance of PTEN protein in the occurrence, development, and treatment of endometriosis through changes in apoptosis rate, cell cycle, and angiogenesis. Material/Methods PTEN was overexpressed and silenced in lentiviral vectors and inserted into primary endometrial cells. The changes in cell cycle and apoptosis in the different PTEN expression groups were evaluated using flow cytometry. Vessel growth mimicry was observed using 3-dimensional culture. A human-mouse chimeric endometriosis model was constructed using SCID mice. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry were used to detect pathological changes in ectopic endometrial tissues and the expression of VEGF protein in a human-mouse chimeric endometriosis mouse model. Results PTEN overexpression significantly increased apoptosis and inhibited the cell cycle compared with the silenced and control groups. Furthermore, cells expressing low PTEN levels were better able to undergo vasculogenic mimicry, and exhibited significantly increased angiogenesis compared to cells overexpressing PTEN. We found that ectopic foci were more easily formed in the endometrial tissue of SCID mice with low PTEN expression, and the VEGF expression in this group was relatively high. Conclusions PTEN inhibits the occurrence and development of endometriosis by regulating angiogenesis and the apoptosis and cell cycle of endometrial cells; therefore, we propose that the PTEN gene can be used to treat endometriosis. PMID:27744455

  13. Tumor Necrosis Factor, but Not Neutrophils, Alters the Metabolic Profile in Acute Experimental Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Marina C.; Tavares, Luciana P.; Vago, Juliana P.; Batista, Nathália V.; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M.; Vieira, Angelica T.; Menezes, Gustavo B.; Sousa, Lirlândia P.; van de Loo, Fons A. J.; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Amaral, Flávio A.; Ferreira, Adaliene V. M.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic alterations are associated with arthritis apart from obesity. However, it is still unclear which is the underlying process behind these metabolic changes. Here, we investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in this process in an acute model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). Immunized male BALB/c mice received an intra-articular injection of PBS (control) or methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA) into their knees, and were also pre-treated with different drugs: Etanercept, an anti-TNF drug, DF2156A, a CXCR1/2 receptor antagonist, or a monoclonal antibody RB6-8C5 to deplete neutrophils. Local challenge with mBSA evoked an acute neutrophil influx into the knee joint, and enhanced the joint nociception, along with a transient systemic metabolic alteration (higher levels of glucose and lipids, and altered adipocytokines). Pre-treatment with the conventional biological Etanercept, an inhibitor of TNF action, ameliorated the nociception and the acute joint inflammation dominated by neutrophils, and markedly improved many of the altered systemic metabolites (glucose and lipids), adipocytokines and PTX3. However, the lessening of metabolic changes was not due to diminished accumulation of neutrophils in the joint by Etanercept. Reduction of neutrophil recruitment by pre-treating AIA mice with DF2156A, or even the depletion of these cells by using RB6-8C5 reduced all of the inflammatory parameters and hypernociception developed after AIA challenge, but could not prevent the metabolic changes. Therefore, the induction of joint inflammation provoked acute metabolic alterations which were involved with TNF. We suggest that the role of TNF in arthritis-associated metabolic changes is not due to local neutrophils, which are the major cells present in this model, but rather due to cytokines. PMID:26742100

  14. Classification of Murine Gastrointestinal Tumors

    Cancer.gov

    The following standards for histological assessment came out of the MMHCC-sponsored symposium, "Mouse Models of Intestinal Neoplasia", convened at the Jackson Laboratories with the purpose of bringing specialists together to examine GEM with intestinal neoplasia systematically. The meeting was designed to allow a panel including 7 pathologists and 4 basic scientists to examine and describe the morphology of intestinal neoplasia in GEM, to develop standardized nomenclature for these lesions, to develop recommendations for histologic handling of intestinal tissues from GEM, and to compare the morphology of colorectal lesions from GEM to human colorectal neoplasia.

  15. Classification of Murine Pulmonary Tumors

    Cancer.gov

    This WEB site contains a digital atlas of virtual histological slides with representative mouse and human pulmonary proliferative lesions. It complements the paper "Classification of Proliferative Pulmonary Lesions of the Mouse: Recommendations of the Mouse Models of Human Cancers Consortium" by Alexander Yu. Nikitin, Ana Alcaraz, Miriam R. Anver, Roderick T. Bronson, Robert D. Cardiff, Darlene Dixon, Armando E. Fraire, Edward W. Gabrielson, William T. Gunning, Diana C. Haines, Matthew H. Kaufman, R. Ilona Linnoila, Robert R. Maronpot, Alan S. Rabson, Robert L. Reddick, Sabine Rehm, Nora Rozengurt, Hildegard M. Schuller, Elena N. Shmidt, William D. Travis, Jerrold M. Ward and Tyler Jacks published in Cancer Research 64: 2307-2316, 2004

  16. A Detailed Analysis of the Murine TAP Transporter Substrate Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Burgevin, Anne; Saveanu, Loredana; Kim, Yohan; Barilleau, Émilie; Kotturi, Maya; Sette, Alessandro; van Endert, Peter; Peters, Bjoern

    2008-01-01

    Background The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) supplies cytosolic peptides into the endoplasmic reticulum for binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. Its specificity therefore influences the repertoire of peptides presented by MHC molecules. Compared to human TAP, murine TAP's binding specificity has not been characterized as well, even though murine systems are widely used for basic studies of antigen processing and presentation. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed a detailed experimental analysis of murine TAP binding specificity by measuring the binding affinities of 323 peptides. Based on this experimental data, a computational model of murine TAP specificity was constructed. The model was compared to previously generated data on human and murine TAP specificities. In addition, the murine TAP specificities for known epitopes and random peptides were predicted and compared to assess the impact of murine TAP selectivity on epitope selection. Conclusions/Significance Comparisons to a previously constructed model of human TAP specificity confirms the well-established differences for peptide substrates with positively charged C-termini. In addition these comparisons show that several residues at the N-terminus of peptides which strongly influence binding to human TAP showed little effect on binding to murine TAP, and that the overall influence of the aminoterminal residues on peptide affinity for murine TAP is much lower than for the human transporter. Murine TAP also partly prefers different hydrophobic amino acids than human TAP in the carboxyterminal position. These species-dependent differences in specificity determined in vitro are shown to correlate with the epitope repertoire recognized in vivo. The quantitative model of binding specificity of murine TAP developed herein should be useful for interpreting epitope mapping and immunogenicity data obtained in humanized mouse models. PMID:18545702

  17. Tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R inhibits human prostate cancer experimental bone metastasis in mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Toneri, Makoto; Miwa, Shinji; Zhang, Yong; Hu, Cameron; Yano, Shuya; Matsumoto, Yasunori; Bouvet, Michael; Nakanishi, Hayao; Hoffman, Robert M.; Zhao, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Bone metastasis is a frequent occurrence in prostate cancer patients and often is lethal. Zoledronic acid (ZOL) is often used for bone metastasis with limited efficacy. More effective models and treatment methods are required to improve the outcome of prostate cancer patients. In the present study, the effects of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R were analyzed in vitro and in vivo on prostate cancer cells and experimental bone metastasis. Both ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R inhibited the growth of PC-3 cells expressing red fluorescent protien in vitro. To investigate the efficacy of S. typhimurium A1-R on prostate cancer experimental bone metastasis, we established models of both early and advanced stage bone metastasis. The mice were treated with ZOL, S. typhimurium A1-R, and combination therapy of both ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R. ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R inhibited the growth of solitary bone metastases. S. typhimurium A1-R treatment significantly decreased bone metastasis and delayed the appearance of PC-3 bone metastases of multiple mouse models. Additionally, S. typhimurium A1-R treatment significantly improved the overall survival of the mice with multiple bone metastases. The results of the present study indicate that S. typhimurium A1-R is useful to prevent and inhibit prostate cancer bone metastasis and has potential for future clinical use in the adjuvant setting. PMID:26431498

  18. Tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R inhibits human prostate cancer experimental bone metastasis in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Toneri, Makoto; Miwa, Shinji; Zhang, Yong; Hu, Cameron; Yano, Shuya; Matsumoto, Yasunori; Bouvet, Michael; Nakanishi, Hayao; Hoffman, Robert M; Zhao, Ming

    2015-10-13

    Bone metastasis is a frequent occurrence in prostate cancer patients and often is lethal. Zoledronic acid (ZOL) is often used for bone metastasis with limited efficacy. More effective models and treatment methods are required to improve the outcome of prostate cancer patients. In the present study, the effects of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R were analyzed in vitro and in vivo on prostate cancer cells and experimental bone metastasis. Both ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R inhibited the growth of PC-3 cells expressing red fluorescent protien in vitro. To investigate the efficacy of S. typhimurium A1-R on prostate cancer experimental bone metastasis, we established models of both early and advanced stage bone metastasis. The mice were treated with ZOL, S. typhimurium A1-R, and combination therapy of both ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R. ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R inhibited the growth of solitary bone metastases. S. typhimurium A1-R treatment significantly decreased bone metastasis and delayed the appearance of PC-3 bone metastases of multiple mouse models. Additionally, S. typhimurium A1-R treatment significantly improved the overall survival of the mice with multiple bone metastases. The results of the present study indicate that S. typhimurium A1-R is useful to prevent and inhibit prostate cancer bone metastasis and has potential for future clinical use in the adjuvant setting.

  19. Trace element profiles in murine Lewis lung carcinoma by radioisotope-induced X-ray fluorescence.

    PubMed Central

    Frank, A. S.; Schauble, M. K.; Preiss, I. L.

    1986-01-01

    Trace element profiles of various body tissues and tumor were established during growth of the Lewis lung tumor (LLT) with the use of radioisotope-induced X-ray fluorescence (RIXRF) analysis. The LLT, a highly malignant experimental murine tumor, resembles its human counterpart, has a well-defined life cycle, and kills its host in 30 days. When compared with normal controls, Zn, Br, and Rb levels in lung, liver, and skeletal muscle and Zn and Sr levels in bone from tumor-bearing mice exhibited large fluctuations at critical points in the tumor life cycle. In addition, the 24-day primary tumor trace element profile resembled that of its tissue of origin, normal lung, and was quite different from other normal tissues studied. These findings indicate that trace element profiles may help in the diagnosis, staging, and monitoring of disease. RIXRF is an excellent technique for this purpose because it is sensitive and relatively nondestructive of samples and has multielement capabilities. Images Figure 1 p423-a PMID:3953767

  20. Optimal Transthoracic Targeting of Liver Tumors Using Dual-mode Ultrasound Arrays: A numerical and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casper, Andrew; Ballard, John; Ebbini, Emad

    2010-03-01

    The targets of therapeutic ultrasound are often located behind strongly scattering objects and layered tissue. These inhomogeneities can degrade the intended foci and misdirect acoustic energy causing unwanted hot spots or failure to meet the therapeutic endpoint at the target. We have previously shown the capabilities of dual-mode ultrasound arrays (DMUAs) in imaging strongly scattering objects in the path of the HIFU beam and, consequently, refocusing the beam to optimize the power deposition at the target while minimizing direct exposure to the obstacles. This capability may be a key to successful transthoracic targeting of abdominal tumors. We have experimentally verified the efficacy of this approach in improving the quality of the therapeutic focus and minimizing collateral damage to critical tissue structures in the path of the HIFU beam. In order to study the phenomena associated with transthoracic focusing more thoroughly, we have developed a finite-difference time-domain simulation capable of characterizing the transient propagation of the therapeutic beam through inhomogeneous, attenuating media. This simulation is shown to provide the necessary information for aberration correction of deep seated foci as well as control over the acoustic field at select points. In addition, the FDTD simulation allows for computation of the temperature rise throughout the therapeutic region as governed by the transient bioheat transfer equation. We have validated the predictive abilities of our simulation with hydrophone measurements as well as thermocouple readings from within tissue mimicking phantoms. The experimental validation of the simulation model allows for its use as a key component in treatment planning of thermal therapy using HIFU. Experimental and simulation results demonstrating the role of the advantages of incorporation of the computational model in optimizing the quality of HIFU beams will be presented and discussed.

  1. Effect of consecutive lower-dose cisplatin in enhancement of 5-fluorouracil cytotoxicity in experimental tumor cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Araki, H; Fukushima, M; Kamiyama, Y; Shirasaka, T

    2000-11-28

    It is known that cisplatin (CDDP) potentiates the cytotoxicity of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and that the biochemical mechanism is an increase in the intracellular reduced folate levels in the tumor cells. We investigated the effect of consecutive administration with lower-dose CDDP on intracellular accumulation of reduced folate and the activity of methionine synthase, a key enzyme in intracellular methionine synthesis. When CDDP (1 mg/kg) was administered i.p. to ascitic Yoshida sarcoma-bearing rats for 4 consecutive days, both the reduced folate levels and methionine synthase activity in the cells significantly increased, as the same as a single 5 mg/kg dose of CDDP. Furthermore, when Yoshida sarcoma-bearing rats were pre-treated with 1 mg/kg CDDP for 5 consecutive days, [14C]L-methionine incorporation into the isolated ascitic cells was significantly inhibited as compared to that in non-treated cells, suggesting that consecutive administration of lower-dose CDDP is capable of inducing the intracellular modulation of reduced folate levels and methionine synthase activity via inhibition of cellular uptake of methionine. In addition, 5-day administration of lower-dose (1 mg/kg) CDDP potentiated the antitumor effect of 5 mg/kg S-1, a new oral preparation of tegafur, given for 7 consecutive days, and this combined effect was almost similar to the antitumor effect of a combination of S-1 and a single conventional dose (5 mg/kg) of CDDP. Consecutive lower-dose CDDP also may be concluded to act as an important modulator of the enhancement of 5-FU cytotoxicity in experimental tumors.

  2. Vaccination against strontium-90-induced bone tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Reif, A.E.; Triest, W.E.

    1983-09-01

    The thesis was tested that immunization against a murine osteosarcoma virus can reduce the incidence of bone tumors induced by /sup 90/Sr. C57BL/6J female mice (190) were divided into three sets of 2 groups. Each set consisted of a control group and an experimental group treated ip with 1.0 muCi /sup 90/Sr at 66 days of age. The three sets of groups received the following additional treatments: none (controls), 6 injections of Formalin-inactivated FBJ osteosarcoma virus (vaccinated group), or 6 injections of active FBJ virus (active virus controls). Only 1 bone tumor developed in a mouse not treated with /sup 90/Sr in the active virus controls. In /sup 90/Sr-treated mice, vaccination reduced bone tumor deaths during the first 600 days from 9 of 36 in controls to 1 of 33 in vaccinated mice (P less than .01), but bone tumor deaths during the entire life-span, 10 of 36 and 5 of 33, respectively, were not significantly different (P . .07). Thus the vaccination procedure delayed the development of bone tumors. In contrast, injection of active virus into /sup 90/Sr-treated mice increased the lifetime incidence of bone tumors from 10 of 36 in controls to 19 of 32 (P . .01).

  3. Tumor blood vessel "normalization" improves the therapeutic efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in experimental oral cancer

    SciTech Connect

    D. W. Nigg

    2012-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the efficacy of BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA) to treat tumors in a hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer with no normal tissue radiotoxicity and moderate, albeit reversible, mucositis in precancerous tissue around treated tumors. It is known that boron targeting of the largest possible proportion of tumor cells contributes to the success of BNCT and that tumor blood vessel normalization improves drug delivery to the tumor. Within this context, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of blood vessel normalization on the therapeutic efficacy and potential radiotoxicity of BNCT in the hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer.

  4. Aerosolized clindamycin is superior to aerosolized dexamethasone or clindamycin-dexamethasone combination in the treatment of severe Porphyromonas gingivalis aspiration pneumonia in an experimental murine model.

    PubMed

    Nemec, Ana; Pavlica, Zlatko; Nemec-Svete, Alenka; Eržen, Damijan; Milutinović, Aleksandra; Petelin, Milan

    2012-02-01

    Adjunctive corticosteroid treatment to reduce excessive local inflammatory response in pneumonia is controversial. To study the effects of an early local adjunct dexamethasone treatment on the course of pneumonia and inflammatory/cytokine response, mice were intratracheally inoculated with live Porphyromonas gingivalis and treated with either clindamycin (C), dexamethasone (D), C+D combination, or were not treated (Pg). Six mice from each group were euthanized at 6, 24, 72, and 168 hours after inoculation. Levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, soluble TNF-α receptors (sTNFR1 and sTNFR2), interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6 in the serum and lung-homogenate supernatant were determined. Lung samples were histopathologically assessed and all findings compared to those found in 24 sham-inoculated mice (phosphate-buffered saline [PBS]). Severe P. gingivalis-induced bronchopneumonia progressed from 24 hours, peaked at 72 hours, and resolved after 168 hours with changes in local and systemic cytokine levels. Clindamycin-treated mice developed only mild bronchopneumonia that resolved fast (72 hours) with an early (6-24 hours) normalization of local and systemic cytokine levels. Similar course of pneumonia and cytokine level changes were observed in mice treated with C+D, but later. Early (6-24 hours) local elevation of sTNFRs was observed in C and C+D groups of mice, whereas nontreated (Pg) mice had increased systemic sTNFRs. Severe bronchopneumonia with delayed resolution was observed in D-group mice, with an early local and systemic decrease in sTNFR1 and persistent elevation of local TNF-α. Clindamycin or a clindamycin-dexamethasone combination treatment significantly improves the course of P. gingivalis-aspiration pneumonia, but more so if clindamycin alone is used. A favorable course of pneumonia seems to be associated with an early elevation of sTNFRs and normalization of TNF-α.

  5. Immunodetection of Murine Lymphotoxins in Eukaryotic Cells.

    PubMed

    Boitchenko, Veronika E.; Korobko, Vyacheslav G.; Prassolov, Vladimir S.; Kravchenko, Vladimir V.; Kuimov, Alexander N.; Turetskaya, Regina L.; Kuprash, Dmitry V.; Nedospasov, Sergei A.

    2000-10-01

    Lymphotoxins alpha and beta (LTalpha and LTbeta) are members of tumor necrosis factor superfamily. LT heterotrimers exist on the surface of lymphocytes and signal through LTbeta receptor while soluble LTalpha homotrimer can signal through TNF receptors p55 and p75. LT-, as well as TNF-mediated signaling are important for the organogenesis and maintenance of microarchitecture of secondary lymphoid organs in mice and has been implicated in the mechanism of certain inflammatory syndromes in humans. In this study we describe the generation of eukaryotic expression plasmids encoding murine LTalpha and LTbeta genes and a prokaryotic expression construct for murine LTalpha. Using recombinant proteins expressed by these vectors as tools for antisera selection, we produced and characterized several polyclonal antibodies capable of detecting LT proteins in eukaryotic cells.

  6. In vivo evidence for CD4+ and CD8+ suppressor T cells in vaccination-induced suppression of murine experimental autoimmune thyroiditis

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, J.C.; Kong, Y.C. )

    1991-09-01

    In several experimental autoimmune diseases, including experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT), vaccination with attenuated autoantigen-specific T cells has provided protection against subsequent induction of disease. However, the mechanism(s) of vaccination-induced suppression remains to be clarified. Since the authors have previously shown that suppression generated by pretreatment with mouse thyroglobulin (MTg) or thyroid-stimulating hormone in EAT is mediated by CD4+, not CD8+, suppressor T cells, they examined the role of T cell subsets in vaccination-induced suppression of EAT. Mice were vaccinated with irradiated, MTg-primed, and MTg-activated spleen cells and then challenged. Pretreatment with these cells suppressed EAT induced by immunization with MTg and adjuvant, but not by adoptive transfer of thyroiditogenic cells, suggesting a mechanism of afferent suppression. The activation of suppressor mechanisms did not require CD8+ cells, since mice depleted of CD8+ cells before vaccination showed reduced EAT comparable to control vaccinated mice. Furthermore, depletion of either the CD4+ or the CD8+ subset after vaccination did not significantly abrogate suppression. However, suppression was eliminated by the depletion of both CD4+ and CD8+ cells in vaccinated mice. These results provide evidence for the cooperative effects of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in vaccination-induced suppression of EAT.

  7. Immunocompetent murine models for the study of glioblastoma immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma remains a lethal diagnosis with a 5-year survival rate of less than 10%. (NEJM 352:987-96, 2005) Although immunotherapy-based approaches are capable of inducing detectable immune responses against tumor-specific antigens, improvements in clinical outcomes are modest, in no small part due to tumor-induced immunosuppressive mechanisms that promote immune escape and immuno-resistance. Immunotherapeutic strategies aimed at bolstering the immune response while neutralizing immunosuppression will play a critical role in improving treatment outcomes for glioblastoma patients. In vivo murine models of glioma provide an invaluable resource to achieving that end, and their use is an essential part of the preclinical workup for novel therapeutics that need to be tested in animal models prior to testing experimental therapies in patients. In this article, we review five contemporary immunocompetent mouse models, GL261 (C57BL/6), GL26 (C57BL/6) CT-2A (C57BL/6), SMA-560 (VM/Dk), and 4C8 (B6D2F1), each of which offer a suitable platform for testing novel immunotherapeutic approaches. PMID:24779345

  8. Research in radiobiology: Final report of work in progress in immunobiology of experimental host-tumor relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-15

    Our work on the immunobiology of tumors induced in normal mice by non-ionizing radiation and chemical carcinogens has previously demonstrated a correlation between MHC molecule expression and the immunogenicity of tumors in a transplanted syngeneic host. Such that immunogenic or regressive tumors were found to demonstrate higher constitutive or inducible levels of MHC expression, while most virulent, aggressive tumors exhibited a low level of MHC Class I expression. We attributed much of the control of MHC molecule expression by antigen-bearing tumors and normal cells to the immunological status of the host since the host must provide the appropriate stimulus to enhance MHC antigen expression by the invading tumor. Our results with UVR-induced tumors suggested that a significant role is played by the T-cell lymphokine, {gamma}-interferon ({gamma}IFN), in the modulation of MHC molecule expression in vivo. Virulent tumors, induced by boneseeking radionuclides, may be refractory to {gamma}IFN stimulation of MHC molecule expression. It is also possible that certain tumors might be fully responsive to the Class I modulatory influences by {gamma}IFN, but exhibit a reduced capacity to stimulate the synthesis of this lymphokine by host T cells. We present experiments designed to : Describe the virulence, latency period, and transplantation characteristics of {sup 238}PU, {sup 24l}Am, and {sup 228}Th tumors arising as osteogenic sarcomas and hepatic carcinomas, to determine the relationship between inducible expression of MHC Class I molecules by {gamma}IFN and in vivo immunogenicity of these radioisotype-induced tumors, and to elucidate any molecular mechanisms responsible for a lack of responsiveness to a {gamma}IFN failure by the host to induce host {gamma}IFN production.

  9. Research in radiobiology: Final report of work in progress in immunobiology of experimental host-tumor relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-15

    Our work on the immunobiology of tumors induced in normal mice by non-ionizing radiation and chemical carcinogens has previously demonstrated a correlation between MHC molecule expression and the immunogenicity of tumors in a transplanted syngeneic host. Such that immunogenic or regressive tumors were found to demonstrate higher constitutive or inducible levels of MHC expression, while most virulent, aggressive tumors exhibited a low level of MHC Class I expression. We attributed much of the control of MHC molecule expression by antigen-bearing tumors and normal cells to the immunological status of the host since the host must provide the appropriate stimulus to enhance MHC antigen expression by the invading tumor. Our results with UVR-induced tumors suggested that a significant role is played by the T-cell lymphokine, [gamma]-interferon ([gamma]IFN), in the modulation of MHC molecule expression in vivo. Virulent tumors, induced by boneseeking radionuclides, may be refractory to [gamma]IFN stimulation of MHC molecule expression. It is also possible that certain tumors might be fully responsive to the Class I modulatory influences by [gamma]IFN, but exhibit a reduced capacity to stimulate the synthesis of this lymphokine by host T cells. We present experiments designed to : Describe the virulence, latency period, and transplantation characteristics of [sup 238]PU, [sup 24l]Am, and [sup 228]Th tumors arising as osteogenic sarcomas and hepatic carcinomas, to determine the relationship between inducible expression of MHC Class I molecules by [gamma]IFN and in vivo immunogenicity of these radioisotype-induced tumors, and to elucidate any molecular mechanisms responsible for a lack of responsiveness to a [gamma]IFN failure by the host to induce host [gamma]IFN production.

  10. Effects of Tumor Microenvironment Heterogeneity on Nanoparticle Disposition and Efficacy in Breast Cancer Tumor Models

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gina; Darr, David B.; Santos, Charlene M.; Ross, Mark; Valdivia, Alain; Jordan, Jamie L.; Midkiff, Bentley R.; Cohen, Stephanie; Feinberg, Nana Nikolaishvili; Miller, C. Ryan; Tarrant, Teresa K.; Rogers, Arlin B.; Dudley, Andrew C.; Perou, Charles M.; Zamboni, William C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Tumor cells are surrounded by a complex microenvironment. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the role of heterogeneity of the tumor microenvironment in the variability of nanoparticle (NP) delivery and efficacy. Experimental designs C3(1)-T-Antigen genetically engineered mouse model (C3-TAg) and T11/TP53Null orthotopic syngeneic murine transplant model (T11) representing human breast tumor subtypes basal-like and claudin-low, respectively, were evaluated. For the pharmacokinetic studies, non-liposomal doxorubicin (NL-doxo) or polyethylene glycol tagged (PEGylated) liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) was administered at 6 mg/kg intravenously (IV) x1. Area-under-the concentration versus time curve (AUC) of doxorubicin was calculated. Macrophages, collagen, and the amount of vasculature were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Chemokines and cytokines were measured by multiplex immunochemistry. NL-doxo or PLD was administered at 6 mg/kg IV weekly x6 in efficacy studies. Analyses of intermediary tumor response and overall survival were performed. Results Plasma AUC of NL-doxo and PLD encapsulated and released doxorubicin were similar between two models. However, tumor sum total AUC of PLD was 2-fold greater in C3-TAg compared with T11 (P<0.05). T11 tumors showed significantly higher expression of CC chemokine ligand (CCL) 2 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-a, greater vascular quantity, and decreased expression of VEGF-c compared to C3-TAg (P<0.05). PLD was more efficacious compared to NL-doxo in both models. Conclusion The tumor microenvironment and/or tumor cell features of breast cancer affected NP tumor delivery and efficacy, but not the small molecule drug. Our findings reveal the role of the tumor microenvironment in variability of NP delivery and therapeutic outcomes. PMID:25231403

  11. [Combined use of lentinan with X-ray therapy in an experimental mouse tumor system (Part 3). Combined effect on metastatic tumors].

    PubMed

    Shiio, T; Ohishi, K; Niitsu, I; Hayashibara, H; Tsuchiya, Y; Yoshihama, T; Moriyuki, H

    1988-03-01

    Combination effect of lentinan with X-ray irradiation on the metastatic mouse tumors, L1210, KLN205 and Lewis lung carcinoma were studied. Combination use of lentinan with X-ray therapy prolonged the life of BDF1 mice bearing L1210 leukemia in the suitable combination conditions. Combination effects of lentinan with X-ray therapy were also observed on the suppression of the growth of KLN205 squamous cell carcinoma and on the suppression of the metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma. Especially, in the case that lentinan was administered before or after X-ray local irradiation in the pulmonary metastasis system of Lewis lung carcinoma, a marked suppression of pulmonary metastasis was observed and 2 to 4 mice among 8 tested mice were tumor free.

  12. Systemic antitumor immunity in experimental brain tumor therapy using a multimutated, replication-competent herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Todo, T; Rabkin, S D; Sundaresan, P; Wu, A; Meehan, K R; Herscowitz, H B; Martuza, R L

    1999-11-20

    Replication-competent, attenuated herpes simplex virus (HSV) vectors have been developed for viral oncolytic therapy of primary and metastatic malignant brain tumors. However, the role of the host immune responses in the brain has not been elucidated. N18 neuroblastoma cells were used as a tumor model in syngeneic A/J mice to test the therapeutic efficacy of G207, a conditionally replicating HSV vector, in an immunocompetent condition. G207 inoculated intraneoplastically exhibited a prominent oncolytic antitumor effect in mice harboring N18 tumors in the brain or subcutaneously, and, in addition, elicited a systemic antitumor immune response. Subcutaneous tumor therapy with G207 caused regression of a remote, established tumor in the brain or in the periphery, which was potentially mediated by the systemic antitumor immune response, and provided persistent tumor-specific protection against N18 tumor rechallenge in the brain as well as in the periphery. Antitumor immunity was associated with an elevation of specific CTL activity against N18 tumor cells that persisted for at least 13 months. The results suggest that the oncolytic antitumor action of replication-competent HSV may be augmented by induction of specific and systemic antitumor immunity effective both in the periphery and in the brain.

  13. Influence of antimicrobial therapy on kinetics of tumor necrosis factor levels in experimental endocarditis caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Mohler, J; Fantin, B; Mainardi, J L; Carbon, C

    1994-05-01

    The kinetics of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) levels in serum during therapy with cell wall-active agents (ceftriaxone, imipenem) and gentamicin were investigated in rabbits with experimental endocarditis caused by an isogenic pair of Klebsiella pneumoniae strains: a TEM-3 beta-lactamase-producing strain (KpR) or its susceptible variant (KpS). In vitro, KpR was resistant to ceftriaxone and was susceptible to gentamicin and imipenem, while KpS was susceptible to all three antibiotics. Serum TNF levels were determined in control rabbits hourly after bacterial inoculation and then daily; they were determined in treated animals hourly after the first antibiotic injection and then daily during a 4-day therapy with either imipenem (60 mg/kg of body weight four times daily), ceftriaxone (75 mg/kg once daily), or gentamicin (4 mg/kg once daily) alone or in combination with ceftriaxone. After a transient peak (10.2 +/- 3.1 ng/ml) at 90 min following bacterial challenge, serum TNF levels remained low and stable in control animals. The peak in the serum TNF levels occurred 4 h after the first antibiotic injection and with ceftriaxone was significantly higher (P < 0.05) against KpS (1.99 +/- 0.52 ng/ml) than against KpR (1.40 +/- 0.17 ng/ml). Against the KpR strain, the levels observed with ceftriaxone were significantly higher (P < 0.05) than those obtained with the other therapeutic regimens (0.70 to 0.80 ng/ml). On the day of sacrifice, effective regimens were associated with low TNF levels. We concluded that TNF production depends on (i) the antiobiotic's mechanism of action and the susceptibility of the strain at the early phase of therapy, without any effect of the rapidity of bacterial killing, and (ii) the final reduction of the bacterial count at a later stage of therapy.

  14. Influence of antimicrobial therapy on kinetics of tumor necrosis factor levels in experimental endocarditis caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Mohler, J; Fantin, B; Mainardi, J L; Carbon, C

    1994-01-01

    The kinetics of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) levels in serum during therapy with cell wall-active agents (ceftriaxone, imipenem) and gentamicin were investigated in rabbits with experimental endocarditis caused by an isogenic pair of Klebsiella pneumoniae strains: a TEM-3 beta-lactamase-producing strain (KpR) or its susceptible variant (KpS). In vitro, KpR was resistant to ceftriaxone and was susceptible to gentamicin and imipenem, while KpS was susceptible to all three antibiotics. Serum TNF levels were determined in control rabbits hourly after bacterial inoculation and then daily; they were determined in treated animals hourly after the first antibiotic injection and then daily during a 4-day therapy with either imipenem (60 mg/kg of body weight four times daily), ceftriaxone (75 mg/kg once daily), or gentamicin (4 mg/kg once daily) alone or in combination with ceftriaxone. After a transient peak (10.2 +/- 3.1 ng/ml) at 90 min following bacterial challenge, serum TNF levels remained low and stable in control animals. The peak in the serum TNF levels occurred 4 h after the first antibiotic injection and with ceftriaxone was significantly higher (P < 0.05) against KpS (1.99 +/- 0.52 ng/ml) than against KpR (1.40 +/- 0.17 ng/ml). Against the KpR strain, the levels observed with ceftriaxone were significantly higher (P < 0.05) than those obtained with the other therapeutic regimens (0.70 to 0.80 ng/ml). On the day of sacrifice, effective regimens were associated with low TNF levels. We concluded that TNF production depends on (i) the antiobiotic's mechanism of action and the susceptibility of the strain at the early phase of therapy, without any effect of the rapidity of bacterial killing, and (ii) the final reduction of the bacterial count at a later stage of therapy. PMID:8067731

  15. Enhanced Ablation of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound with Microbubbles: An Experimental Study on Rabbit Hepatic VX2 Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    He Wei; Wang Wei Zhou Ping; Wang, Yixiang J.; Zhou Peng; Li Ruizhen; Wang Jinsheng; Ahuja, Anil T.

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to assess the enhanced effect of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation with microbubbles on rabbit hepatic VX2 tumors and to compare the detection sensitivity of CEUS and CECT to determine the residual viable tissue after ablation of HIFU. Methods: Forty rabbits with hepatic VX2 tumors were randomly separated into two groups (20 animals per group) before HIFU ablation. A bolus of 0.2 mL of saline or a microbubble-based ultrasound (US) contrast agent was injected intravenously to group I rabbits and group II rabbits, respectively. The HIFU ablation procedure was started 15 s after the injection. Tumors were examined with grayscale contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) immediately before and after HIFU ablation. Histopathologic assessment was performed immediately after treatment imaging. Results: Before ablation, intense contrast enhancement during arterial phase was observed at the whole tumors or the periphery of the tumors by CEUS and CECT. Lower HIFU energy was used in group II than in group I (P < 0.001). Histopathologic assessment revealed local residual viable tumor tissues due to incomplete ablation in 47.4% (9/19) of tumors in group I and 10% (2/20) of tumors in group II (P < 0.05). The concordance rate of CEUS (90.9%) with histopathology on residual tumor detection was higher than that of CECT (27.3%, P < 0.05). Conclusions: Introduction of the microbubble agent enhances HIFU therapeutic efficacy. CEUS proves to have high sensitivity in assessment of residual viable rabbit VX2 tumor after HIFU.

  16. [Study on targeting drug delivery system--the characteristics of methotrexate microsphere and experimental treatment of hepatic tumor in rats by arterial embolization].

    PubMed

    Chen, Q H; Lu, W G; Ge, Q H; Sheng, Q; Zhang, Y; Xie, X H; Wang, Y; Wu, M C; Zhang, X H

    1991-01-01

    Preparation of methotrexate microsphere (MTX-ms) by emulsion-freezing technique was introduced and the experimental results proved that MTX entrapped in the microspheres exhibited good stabilities towards temperature, cobalt-60 radiation and light. The dissolution and inflation rate of the microspheres in pH 7.4 buffer solution at different times measured by Coulter counter was presented. Antitumor activity of MTX-ms after hepatic arterial embolization was examined in a model of liver tumor in Wistar rats. The group of rats treated with MTX-ms showed a rather significant reduction in tumor growth and more extended tumor necrosis as compared with the other groups, e.g. normal saline solution, MTX solution, placebo gelatin-ms and the results demonstrate that the effect of arterial chemoembolization used by MTX-ms is superior to that of the groups either using arterial chemotherapy or arterial embolization alone in treating rat liver cancer.

  17. Role of Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in the Production of Prostaglandin E2 and Nitric Oxide during Experimental Murine Paracoccidioidomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Sargi, S. C.; Dalalio, M. M. O.; Moraes, A. G.; Visentainer, J. E. L.; Morais, D. R.; Visentainer, J. V.

    2013-01-01

    There has recently been increased interest in the potential health effects of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on the immune system. Paracoccidioidomycosis is the most important endemic mycosis in Latin America. Macrophages have a fundamental role and act as first line of organism defense. The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of n-3 fatty acids on the production of PGE2 and NO by mice infected with Pb18 and fed a diet enriched with LNA for 8 weeks. To study the effect of omega-3 fatty acids on macrophage activity during experimental paracoccidioidomycosis, mice were infected with Pb18 and fed a diet supplemented with LNA. PGE2 in the serum of animals was analyzed and NO in the supernatants of macrophages cultured and challenged in vitro with Pb18 was measured. Omega-3 fatty acids seemed to decrease the production of PGE2 in vivo in the infected group fed an LNA-supplemented diet during the 4th and 8th weeks of the experiment. At the same time, we observed an increase in synthesis of NO by peritoneal macrophages in this group. Omega-3 fatty acids thus appear to have an immunomodulatory effect in paracoccidioidomycosis. PMID:24455741

  18. Metabolic Imaging: A link between Lactate Dehydrogenase A, Lactate and Tumor Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Sunitha B.; Vider, Jelena; Russell, James; Blasberg, Ronald; Koutcher, Jason A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We compared the metabolic profiles and the association between LDH-A expression and lactate production in two isogenic murine breast cancer cell lines and tumors (67NR and 4T1). These cell lines were derived from a single mammary tumor and have different growth and metabolic phenotypes. Experimental Design LDH-A expression, lactate concentration, glucose utilization and oxygen consumption were measured in cells, and the potential relationship between tumor lactate levels (measured by magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI)) and tumor glucose utilization (measured by [18F] 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography ([18F]FDG-PET)) was assessed in orthotopic breast tumors derived from these cell lines. Results We show a substantial difference in LDH-A expression between 67NR and 4T1 cells under normoxia and hypoxia. We also show that small orthotopic 4T1 tumors generate tenfold more lactate than corresponding 67NR tumors. The high lactate levels in small primary 4T1 tumors are associated with intense pimonidazole staining (a hypoxia indicator). Less intense hypoxia staining was observed in the larger 67NR tumors, and is consistent with the gradual increase and plateau of lactate concentration in enlarging 67NR tumors. Conclusions Lactate-MRSI has a greater dynamic range than [18F]FDG-PET and may be a more sensitive measure with which to evaluate the aggressive and metastatic potential of primary breast tumors. PMID:21844011

  19. Evaluation of three recombinant multi-antigenic vaccines composed of surface and secretory antigens of Toxoplasma gondii in murine models of experimental toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Dziadek, Bozena; Gatkowska, Justyna; Brzostek, Anna; Dziadek, Jaroslaw; Dzitko, Katarzyna; Grzybowski, Marcin; Dlugonska, Henryka

    2011-01-17

    The great clinical and economical impact of Toxoplasma gondii infections makes the development of an effective vaccine for controlling toxoplasmosis an extremely important aim. In the presented study, we evaluate the protective and immunogenic properties of three recombinant subunit vaccines composed of rROP2+rGRA4+rSAG1, rROP2+rROP4+rGRA4 and rROP2+rROP4+rSAG1 proteins of T. gondii in an experimental toxoplasmosis model in the C3H/HeJ and C57BL/6 mouse strains. All three recombinant vaccines induced partial protection as measured by the reduction of brain cyst burden following challenge with five tissue cysts of the low virulence DX T. gondii strain. The level of protection was dependent on the antigen composition of the vaccine and the genetic background of the laboratory animals. The strongest protection against chronic toxoplasmosis was induced in both C3H/HeJ and C57BL/6 mice by the mixture of rhoptry proteins rROP2 and rROP4 combined with tachyzoite major protein rSAG1. The average parasite burden in these groups of mice was reduced by 71% and 90%, respectively, compared to non-vaccinated mice. The observed protective effect was related to the vaccine-induced cellular and humoral immune responses, as measured by the antigen-induced release of the Th1 cytokines IFN-γ and IL-2, the antigen-stimulated proliferation of spleen cells of vaccinated animals in comparison to control animals and the development of systemic antigen-specific IgG1 and IgG2a (C3H/HeJ) or IgG2c (C57BL/6) antibodies. Our studies show that recombinant rROP2, rROP4, rGRA4 and rSAG1 antigens may be promising candidates for a subunit vaccine against toxoplasmosis. Additionally, we demonstrate that the ideal composition of vaccine antigens can be equally effective in mice with different genetic backgrounds and variable levels of innate resistance to toxoplasmosis, resulting in strong protection against T. gondii invasion.

  20. Diphtheria toxin-based recombinant murine IL-2 fusion toxin for depleting murine regulatory T cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wei, Min; Marino, Jose; Trowell, Aaron; Zhang, Huiping; Stromp Peraino, Jaclyn; Rajasekera, Priyani V; Madsen, Joren C; Sachs, David H; Huang, Christene A; Benichou, Gilles; Wang, Zhirui

    2014-09-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a subpopulation of CD4(+) T cells which suppress immune responses of effector cells and are known to play a very important role in protection against autoimmune disease development, induction of transplantation tolerance and suppression of effective immune response against tumor cells. An effective in vivo Treg depletion agent would facilitate Treg-associated studies across many research areas. In this study, we have developed diphtheria toxin-based monovalent and bivalent murine IL-2 fusion toxins for depleting murine IL-2 receptor positive cells including CD25(+) Treg in vivo. Their potencies were assessed by in vitro protein synthesis inhibition and cell proliferation inhibition assays using a murine CD25(+) CTLL-2 cell line. Surprisingly, in contrast to our previously developed recombinant fusion toxins, the monovalent isoform (DT390-mIL-2) was approximately 4-fold more potent than its bivalent counterpart (DT390-bi-mIL-2). Binding analysis by flow cytometry demonstrated that the monovalent isoform bound stronger than the bivalent version. In vivo Treg depletion with the monovalent murine IL-2 fusion toxin was performed using C57BL/6J (B6) mice. Spleen Treg were significantly depleted with a maximum reduction of ∼70% and detectable as early as 12 h after the last injection. The spleen Treg numbers were reduced until Day 3 and returned to control levels by Day 7. We believe that this monovalent murine IL-2 fusion toxin will be an effective in vivo murine Treg depleter. PMID:25147093

  1. Differential tumor necrosis factor alpha expression by astrocytes from experimental allergic encephalomyelitis-susceptible and -resistant rat strains

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    There is evidence that the cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF- alpha) contributes to the pathogenesis of neurological autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) and experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE). TNF-alpha exerts damaging effects on oligodendrocytes, the myelin-producing cell of the central nervous system (CNS), and myelin itself. We have recently demonstrated TNF- alpha expression from astrocytes induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), interferon gamma (IFN-gamma), and interleukin 1 beta (IL-1 beta). Astrocytes secrete TNF-alpha in response to LPS alone, and can be primed by IFN-gamma to enhance LPS-induced TNF-alpha production. IFN- gamma and IL-1 beta, cytokines known to be present in the CNS during neurological disease states, do not induce TNF-alpha production alone, but act synergistically to stimulate astrocyte TNF-alpha expression. Inbred Lewis and Brown-Norway (BN) rats differ in genetic susceptibility to EAE, which is controlled in part by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes. We examined TNF-alpha gene expression by astrocytes derived from BN rats (resistant to EAE) and Lewis rats (highly susceptible). Astrocytes from BN rats express TNF- alpha mRNA and protein in response to LPS alone, yet IFN-gamma does not significantly enhance LPS-induced TNF-alpha expression, nor do they express appreciable TNF-alpha in response to the combined stimuli of IFN-gamma/IL-1 beta. In contrast, astrocytes from Lewis rats express low levels of TNF-alpha mRNA and protein in response to LPS, and are extremely responsive to the priming effect of IFN-gamma for subsequent TNF-alpha gene expression. Also, Lewis astrocytes produce TNF-alpha in response to IFN-gamma/IL-1 beta. The differential TNF-alpha production by astrocytes from BN and Lewis strains is not due to the suppressive effect of prostaglandins, because the addition of indomethacin does not alter the differential pattern of TNF-alpha expression. Furthermore, Lewis and BN astrocytes

  2. Tumor endothelial marker 1-specific DNA vaccination targets tumor vasculature.

    PubMed

    Facciponte, John G; Ugel, Stefano; De Sanctis, Francesco; Li, Chunsheng; Wang, Liping; Nair, Gautham; Sehgal, Sandy; Raj, Arjun; Matthaiou, Efthymia; Coukos, George; Facciabene, Andrea

    2014-04-01

    Tumor endothelial marker 1 (TEM1; also known as endosialin or CD248) is a protein found on tumor vasculature and in tumor stroma. Here, we tested whether TEM1 has potential as a therapeutic target for cancer immunotherapy by immunizing immunocompetent mice with Tem1 cDNA fused to the minimal domain of the C fragment of tetanus toxoid (referred to herein as Tem1-TT vaccine). Tem1-TT vaccination elicited CD8+ and/or CD4+ T cell responses against immunodominant TEM1 protein sequences. Prophylactic immunization of animals with Tem1-TT prevented or delayed tumor formation in several murine tumor models. Therapeutic vaccination of tumor-bearing mice reduced tumor vascularity, increased infiltration of CD3+ T cells into the tumor, and controlled progression of established tumors. Tem1-TT vaccination also elicited CD8+ cytotoxic T cell responses against murine tumor-specific antigens. Effective Tem1-TT vaccination did not affect angiogenesis-dependent physiological processes, including wound healing and reproduction. Based on these data and the widespread expression of TEM1 on the vasculature of different tumor types, we conclude that targeting TEM1 has therapeutic potential in cancer immunotherapy.

  3. Increased KIT inhibition enhances therapeutic efficacy in gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Teresa S.; Cavnar, Michael J.; Cohen, Noah A.; Sorenson, Eric C.; Greer, Jonathan B.; Seifert, Adrian M.; Crawley, Megan H.; Green, Benjamin L.; Popow, Rachel; Pillarsetty, Nagavarakishore; Veach, Darren R.; Ku, Anson T.; Rossi, Ferdinand; Besmer, Peter; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Zeng, Shan; DeMatteo, Ronald P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most common human sarcoma and a model of targeted molecular therapy. GIST depends on oncogenic KIT signaling and responds to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib. However, imatinib is rarely curative. We hypothesized that PLX3397, which inhibits KIT and CSF1R, would be more efficacious than imatinib in GIST by also depleting tumor-associated macrophages, which are generally thought to support tumor growth. Experimental Design We treated KitV558del/+ mice that develop GIST or mice with subcutaneous human GIST xenografts with imatinib or PLX3397 and analyzed tumor weight, cellular composition, histology, molecular signaling, and fibrosis. In vitro assays on human GIST cell lines were also performed. Results PLX3397 was more effective than imatinib in reducing tumor weight and cellularity in both KitV558del/+ murine GIST and human GIST xenografts. The superiority of PLX3397 did not depend on depletion of tumor-associated macrophages, since adding CSF1R inhibition did not improve the effects of imatinib. Instead, PLX3397 was a more potent KIT inhibitor than imatinib in vitro. PLX3397 therapy also induced substantial intratumoral fibrosis, which impaired the subsequent delivery of small molecules. Conclusions PLX3397 therapy has greater efficacy than imatinib in pre-clinical GIST models and warrants study in GIST patients. The resultant intratumoral fibrosis may represent one of the barriers to achieving complete tumor eradication. PMID:24583793

  4. Combination of anti-angiogenic therapies reduces osteolysis and tumor burden in experimental breast cancer bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Bachelier, Richard; Confavreux, Cyrille B; Peyruchaud, Olivier; Croset, Martine; Goehrig, Delphine; van der Pluijm, Gabri; Clézardin, Philippe

    2014-09-15

    The clinical efficacy of anti-angiogenic monotherapies in metastatic breast cancer is less than originally anticipated, and it is not clear what the response of bone metastasis to anti-angiogenic therapies is. Here, we examined the impact of neutralizing tumor-derived vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in animal models of subcutaneous tumor growth and bone metastasis formation. Silencing of VEGF expression (Sh-VEGF) in osteotropic human MDA-MB-231/B02 breast cancer cells led to a substantial growth inhibition of subcutaneous Sh-VEGF B02 tumor xenografts, as a result of reduced angiogenesis, when compared to that observed with animals bearing mock-transfected (Sc-VEGF) B02 tumors. However, there was scant evidence that either the silencing of tumor-derived VEGF or the use of a VEGF-neutralizing antibody (bevacizumab) affected B02 breast cancer bone metastasis progression in animals. We also examined the effect of vatalanib (a VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor) in this mouse model of bone metastasis. However, vatalanib failed to inhibit bone metastasis caused by B02 breast cancer cells. In sharp contrast, vatalanib in combination with bevacizumab reduced not only bone destruction but also skeletal tumor growth in animals bearing breast cancer bone metastases, when compared with either agent alone. Thus, our study highlights the importance of targeting both the tumor compartment and the host tissue (i.e., skeleton) to efficiently block the development of bone metastasis. We believe this is a crucially important observation as the clinical benefit of anti-angiogenic monotherapies in metastatic breast cancer is relatively modest. PMID:24615579

  5. Chemokines, costimulatory molecules and fusion proteins for the immunotherapy of solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Melissa G; Russell, Sarah M; Bass, Rikki S; Epstein, Alan L

    2011-11-01

    In this article, the role of chemokines and costimulatory molecules in the immunotherapy of experimental murine solid tumors and immunotherapy used in ongoing clinical trials are presented. Chemokine networks regulate physiologic cell migration that may be disrupted to inhibit antitumor immune responses or co-opted to promote tumor growth and metastasis in cancer. Recent studies highlight the potential use of chemokines in cancer immunotherapy to improve innate and adaptive cell interactions and to recruit immune effector cells into the tumor microenvironment. Another critical component of antitumor immune responses is antigen priming and activation of effector cells. Reciprocal expression and binding of costimulatory molecules and their ligands by antigen-presenting cells and naive lymphocytes ensures robust expansion, activity and survival of tumor-specific effector cells in vivo. Immunotherapy approaches using agonist antibodies or fusion proteins of immunomodulatory molecules significantly inhibit tumor growth and boost cell-mediated immunity. To localize immune stimulation to the tumor site, a series of fusion proteins consisting of a tumor-targeting monoclonal antibody directed against tumor necrosis and chemokines or costimulatory molecules were generated and tested in tumor-bearing mice. While several of these reagents were initially shown to have therapeutic value, combination therapies with methods to delete suppressor cells had the greatest effect on tumor growth. In conclusion, a key conclusion that has emerged from these studies is that successful immunotherapy will require both advanced methods of immunostimulation and the removal of immunosuppression in the host.

  6. Observation the Distribution of Titanium Dioxide Nano-particles in an Experimental Tumor Tissue by a Raman Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibin, Andriana B.; Kume, Kyo; Tsutumi, Kotaro; Fukunaga, Yukihiro; Ito, Shinnji; Imamura, Yoshiaki; Miyoshi, Norio

    2011-12-01

    One of the most important technologies of the 21st century is nanotechnology. Many researchers will have been focusing to employ nanotechnology for medical purpose. Our team was interested in focusing to the application of titanium dioxide (TiO2), as nano-particles, for medical purpose especially drug delivery for the cancer and tumor. The administrations of TiO2 nano-particle via the oral administration of the interface layer particles into the mouse transplanted squamous-cell-carcinoma (SCC) have already conducted. Histology study and Raman spectroscope data were applied to the serial section of frozen tumor tissue in order to observe the distribution of TiO2 nano-particle within the SCC tissue. We used near infrared laser Raman microscopy system, the wavelength is 785 nm. Hematoxyline & eosin stained image and the Raman microscopy system were also used for analyzing the photodynamic therapy (PDT) with 5-ALA and TiO2-particle-sol [TiO2]-ALA-treated tumor samples. As the result, we demonstrated the distribution of TiO2, where TiO2 particles were detected to be distributed in the blood vessel at the bleeding in the SCC tumor tissue. PDT with TiO2 nano-particles that is presented in the SCC-transplanted mouse tumor model can cause the enhancement of photodynamic reaction by nano-particles. Therefore, the combinations of PDT with TiO2 nano-particles may have a possibility to be introduced to the human body in near future for diagnose and PDT treatment of the tumor.

  7. Enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of experimental pancreatic tumor in vivo by block copolymer-coated magnetite nanoparticles with TGF-beta inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Michiaki; Kano, Mitsunobu R; Morishita, Yasuyuki; Ota, Motomi; Imai, Yutaka; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Sekino, Masaki; Ueno, Shoogo; Miyazono, Kohei; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2009-12-16

    Early detection of solid tumors, particularly pancreatic cancer, is of substantial importance in clinics. Enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with iron oxide nanoparticles is an available way to detect the cancer. The effective and selective accumulation of these nanoparticles in the tumor tissue is needed for improved imaging, and in this regard, their longevity in the blood circulation time is crucial. We developed here block copolymer-coated magnetite nanoparticles for pancreatic cancer imaging, by means of a chelation between the carboxylic acid groups in poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(aspartic acid) block copolymer (PEG-PAsp) and Fe on the surface of the iron oxide nanoparticles. These nanoparticles had considerably narrow distribution, even upon increased ionic strength or in the presence of fetal bovine serum. The PEG-PAsp-coated nanoparticles were further shown to be potent as a contrast agent for enhanced MRI for an experimental pancreatic cancer, xenografts of the human-derived BxPC3 cell line in BALB/c nude mice, with combined administration of TGF-beta inhibitor. Iron staining of tumor tissue confirmed the accumulation of the nanoparticles in tumor tissue. Use of the PEG-PAsp-coated magnetite nanoparticles, combined with the TGF-beta inhibitor, is of promising clinical importance for the detection of intractable solid cancers, including pancreatic cancer.

  8. Enhanced resection and improved survival in murine neuroblastoma (C1300-NB) after preoperative immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fowler, C L; Brooks, S P; Squire, R; Rich, G A; Rossman, J E; Finegold, M J; Allen, J E; Cooney, D R

    1991-04-01

    Advanced neuroblastoma treated with standard chemotherapy has a poor prognosis. Combination immunotherapy for murine neuroblastoma with retinyl palmitate, low-dose cyclophosphamide, and interleukin-2 resulted in increased survival, impaired tumor growth, easier surgical resection, and increased class I expression or tumor cells. Preoperative immunotherapy may be useful in treatment of advanced human neuroblastoma.

  9. Viral Engineering of Chimeric Antigen Receptor Expression on Murine and Human T Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Hammill, Joanne A; Afsahi, Arya; Bramson, Jonathan L; Helsen, Christopher W

    2016-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of a bolus of tumor-specific T lymphocytes into cancer patients is a promising therapeutic strategy. In one approach, tumor specificity is conferred upon T cells via engineering expression of exogenous receptors, such as chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). Here, we describe the generation and production of both murine and human CAR-engineered T lymphocytes using retroviruses. PMID:27581020

  10. The Diaryl Oxazole PC-046 is a Tubulin-Binding Agent with Experimental Anti-Tumor Efficacy in Hematologic Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Landowski, Terry H.; Samulitis, Betty K.; Dorr, Robert T.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Microtubule targeting agents are among the most widely used chemotherapeutics for both solid and hematological malignancies. This study characterizes the diaryl-oxazole based anticancer agent PC-046, which was originally identified for development based on selective activity in deleted in pancreas cancer locus 4 (DPC4/SMAD4) deficient tumors. PC-046 has growth inhibitory activity in a variety of tumor types in vitro, and efficacy in SCID mice was shown in human tumor xenografts of MV-4-11 acute myeloid leukemia, MM.1S multiple myeloma, and DU-145 prostate cancer. Pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated relatively high oral bioavailability (71%) with distribution to both plasma and bone marrow. No myelosuppression was seen in non-tumor bearing SCID mice given a single dose just under the acute lethal dose. The COMPARE algorithm in the NCI-60 cell line panel demonstrated that PC-046 closely correlated to other known tubulin destabilizing agents (correlation coefficients ≈ 0.7 for vincristine and vinblastine). Mechanism of action studies showed cell cycle arrest in metaphase and inhibition of tubulin polymerization. Overall, these studies show that PC-046 is a synthetically-derived, small molecule microtubule destabilizing agent. Advantages over existing microtubule destabilizing agents include ease of synthesis, lack of MDR cross-resistance, good oral bioavailability and the lack of acute myelotoxicity. PMID:24037082

  11. Immune Adjuvant Activity of Pre-Resectional Radiofrequency Ablation Protects against Local and Systemic Recurrence in Aggressive Murine Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Fumito; Ku, Amy W.; Bucsek, Mark J.; Muhitch, Jason B.; Vardam-Kaur, Trupti; Kim, Minhyung; Fisher, Daniel T.; Camoriano, Marta; Khoury, Thaer; Skitzki, Joseph J.; Gollnick, Sandra O.; Evans, Sharon S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose While surgical resection is a cornerstone of cancer treatment, local and distant recurrences continue to adversely affect outcome in a significant proportion of patients. Evidence that an alternative debulking strategy involving radiofrequency ablation (RFA) induces antitumor immunity prompted the current investigation of the efficacy of performing RFA prior to surgical resection (pre-resectional RFA) in a preclinical mouse model. Experimental Design Therapeutic efficacy and systemic immune responses were assessed following pre-resectional RFA treatment of murine CT26 colon adenocarcinoma. Results Treatment with pre-resectional RFA significantly delayed tumor growth and improved overall survival compared to sham surgery, RFA, or resection alone. Mice in the pre-resectional RFA group that achieved a complete response demonstrated durable antitumor immunity upon tumor re-challenge. Failure to achieve a therapeutic benefit in immunodeficient mice confirmed that tumor control by pre-resectional RFA depends on an intact adaptive immune response rather than changes in physical parameters that make ablated tumors more amenable to a complete surgical excision. RFA causes a marked increase in intratumoral CD8+ T lymphocyte infiltration, thus substantially enhancing the ratio of CD8+ effector T cells: FoxP3+ regulatory T cells. Importantly, pre-resectional RFA significantly increases the number of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells within the tumor microenvironment and tumor-draining lymph node but had no impact on infiltration by myeloid-derived suppressor cells, M1 macrophages or M2 macrophages at tumor sites or in peripheral lymphoid organs (i.e., spleen). Finally, pre-resectional RFA of primary tumors delayed growth of distant tumors through a mechanism that depends on systemic CD8+ T cell-mediated antitumor immunity. Conclusion Improved survival and antitumor systemic immunity elicited by pre-resectional RFA support the translational potential of this neoadjuvant

  12. MR guided thermal therapy of pancreatic tumors with endoluminal, intraluminal and interstitial catheter-based ultrasound devices: preliminary theoretical and experimental investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Punit; Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Scott, Serena J.; Jones, Peter; Hensley, Daniel; Holbrook, Andrew; Plata, Juan; Sommer, Graham; Diederich, Chris J.

    2013-02-01

    Image-guided thermal interventions have been proposed for potential palliative and curative treatments of pancreatic tumors. Catheter-based ultrasound devices offer the potential for temporal and 3D spatial control of the energy deposition profile. The objective of this study was to apply theoretical and experimental techniques to investigate the feasibility of endogastric, intraluminal and transgastric catheter-based ultrasound for MR guided thermal therapy of pancreatic tumors. The transgastric approach involves insertion of a catheter-based ultrasound applicator (array of 1.5 mm OD x 10 mm transducers, 360° or sectored 180°, ~7 MHz frequency, 13-14G cooling catheter) directly into the pancreas, either endoscopically or via image-guided percutaneous placement. An intraluminal applicator, of a more flexible but similar construct, was considered for endoscopic insertion directly into the pancreatic or biliary duct. An endoluminal approach was devised based on an ultrasound transducer assembly (tubular, planar, curvilinear) enclosed in a cooling balloon which is endoscopically positioned within the stomach or duodenum, adjacent to pancreatic targets from within the GI tract. A 3D acoustic bio-thermal model was implemented to calculate acoustic energy distributions and used a FEM solver to determine the transient temperature and thermal dose profiles in tissue during heating. These models were used to determine transducer parameters and delivery strategies and to study the feasibility of ablating 1-3 cm diameter tumors located 2-10 mm deep in the pancreas, while thermally sparing the stomach wall. Heterogeneous acoustic and thermal properties were incorporated, including approximations for tumor desmoplasia and dynamic changes during heating. A series of anatomic models based on imaging scans of representative patients were used to investigate the three approaches. Proof of concept (POC) endogastric and transgastric applicators were fabricated and experimentally

  13. Ultrastructural characterization of craniopharyngioma at the tumor boundary: A structural comparison with an experimental toxic model using "oil machinery" fluid, with emphasis on Rosenthal fibers.

    PubMed

    Tena-Suck, Martha Lilia; Morales-Del Ángel, Andrea Y; Hernández-Campos, María Elena; Fernández-Valverde, Francisca; Ortíz-Plata, Alma; Hernández, Alma Delia; Santamaría, Abel

    2015-10-01

    Craniopharyngiomas (CPs) are cystic, encapsulated, slow-growing epithelial tumors. CPs can be aggressive forms invading and resorting surrounding structures of adjacent brain tissue, where Rosenthal fibers (RFs) are expressed. The aim of this study was to investigate the ultrastructure of these fibers in human biopsies and compare it with an experimental toxic model produced by the cortical infusion of the oil cyst fluid ("Oil machinery" fluid or OMF) from CPs to rats. For this purpose, the CPs from ten patients were examined by light and electron microscopy. OMF was administered to rats intracortically. Immunohistochemical detection of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin was assessed. In both freshly obtained CPs and rat brain tissue, the presence of abundant cellular debris, lipid-laden macrophages, reactive gliosis, inflammation and extracellular matrix destruction were seen. Ultrastructural results suggest focal pathological disturbances and an altered microenvironment surrounding the tumor-brain junction, with an enhanced presence of RFs in human tumors. In contrast, in the rat brain different degrees of cellular disorganization with aberrant filament-filament interactions and protein aggregation were seen, although RFs were absent. Our immunohistochemical findings in CPs also revealed an enhanced expression of GFAP and vimentin in RFs at the peripheral, but not at the central (body) level. Through these findings we hypothesize that the continuous OMF release at the CPs boundary may cause tissue alterations, including damaging of the extracellular matrix, and possibly contributing to RFs formation, a condition that was not possible to reproduce in the experimental model. The presence of RFs at the CPs boundary might be considered as a major criterion for the degree of CPs invasiveness to normal tissue. The lack of RFs reactivity in the experimental model reveals that the invasive component of CPs is not present in the OMF, although the fluid

  14. Tumor immunotherapy in the mouse with the use of 131I-labeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Zalcberg, J.R.; Thompson, C.H.; Lichtenstein, M.; McKenzie, I.F.

    1984-03-01

    This report describes the use of 131I-labeled monoclonal antibodies in two experimental models for tumor immunotherapy. In vitro treatment of the radiation-induced murine thymoma ITT-1-75NS with radiolabeled anti-Ly-2.1 significantly impaired subsequent tumor growth in vivo. However, in vivo treatment of this tumor, which previously had been injected into C57BL/6 mice, was unsuccessful. By contrast, in vitro treatment of a human colorectal tumor cell line (COLO 205) with 131I-labeled 250-30.6--a monoclonal antibody directed against a secretory component of normal and malignant gastrointestinal epithelium--completely inhibited subsequent tumor growth in BALB/c nude (nu/nu) mice. Furthermore, in vivo treatment of preexisting human colorectal tumor xenografts significantly impaired progressive tumor growth. Although some tumor inhibition was also produced by unlabeled 250-30.6 antibody, this response was considerably amplified by treatment with (131I)-labeled 250-30.6 (P less than .05), suggesting that in vivo treatment of human tumors with the use of 131I-labeled monoclonal antibodies may be clinically beneficial. The antithyroid drug propylthiouracil was used to reduce dehalogenation of the radiolabeled immunoglobulins in an attempt to improve their therapeutic efficacy.

  15. Feasibility and Utility of Telephone-Based Psychological Support for People with Brain Tumor: A Single-Case Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Stephanie; Ownsworth, Tamara; Shum, David H. K.

    2015-01-01

    Rates of psychological distress are high following diagnosis and treatment of brain tumor. There can be multiple barriers to accessing psychological support, including physical and cognitive impairments and geographical limitations. Tele-based support could provide an effective and more flexible option for delivering psychological interventions. The present study aimed to investigate the feasibility and utility of a telephone-based psychotherapy intervention for people with brain tumor. A single-case multiple-baseline design was employed with a 4–7-week baseline phase, 10-week treatment phase, and 5-week maintenance phase including a booster session. Four participants with a benign or malignant brain tumor (three males and one female; aged 34–49 years), received 10 sessions of tele-based therapy and a booster session at 4 weeks post-treatment. Levels of depression, anxiety, and illness cognitions were monitored on a weekly basis throughout each phase whilst measures of quality of life, stress, and self-concept were administered at the start and end of each phase. Weekly measures were analyzed using a combination of both visual analysis and Tau-U statistics. Of the four participants, two of them demonstrated significant gains in mental health (depression and/or anxiety) and a significant decrease in their levels of helplessness (p < 0.05). The other two participants did not show gains in mental health or change in illness cognitions. All participants reported improvement in quality of life post-treatment. The results of the study provide preliminary support concerning the feasibility and utility of tele-based therapy for some people with brain tumor. Further research examining factors influencing the outcomes of tele-based psychological support is needed. PMID:25859430

  16. Peripherally cross-linking the shell of core-shell polymer micelles decreases premature release of physically loaded combretastatin A4 in whole blood and increases its mean residence time and subsequent potency against primary murine breast tumors after IV administration

    PubMed Central

    Wakaskar, Rajesh R.; Bathena, Sai Praneeth R.; Tallapaka, Shailendra; Ambardekar, Vishakha V.; Gautum, Nagsen; Thakare, Rhishikesh N.; Simet, Samantha M.; Curran, Stephen M.; Singh, Rakesh K.; Dong, Yuxiang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Determine the feasibility and potential benefit of peripherally cross-linking the shell of core-shell polymer micelles on the premature release of physically loaded hydrophobic drug in whole blood and subsequent potency against solid tumors. Methods Individual Pluronic F127 polymer micelles (F127 PM) peripherally cross-linked with ethylenediamine at 76% of total PEO blocks (X-F127 PM) were physically loaded with combretastatin A4 (CA4) by the solid dispersion method and compared to CA4 physically loaded in uncross-linked F127 PM, CA4 in DMSO in vitro, or water-soluble CA4 phosphate (CA4P) in vivo. Results X-F127 PM had similar CA4 loading and aqueous solubility as F127 PM up to 10 mg CA4 / mL at 22.9 wt% and did not aggregate in PBS or 90% (v/v) human serum at 37°C for at least 24 h. In contrast, X-F127 PM decreased the unbound fraction of CA4 in whole blood (fu) and increased the mean plasma residence time and subsequent potency of CA4 against the vascular function and growth of primary murine 4T1 breast tumors over CA4 in F127 PM and water-soluble CA4P after IV administration. Conclusions Given that decreasing the fu is an indication of decreased drug release, peripherally cross-linking the shell of core-shell polymer micelles may be a simple approach to decrease premature release of physically loaded hydrophobic drug in the blood and increase subsequent potency in solid tumors. PMID:25223962

  17. Nicotine, acetylcholine and bombesin are trophic growth factors in neuroendocrine cell lines derived from experimental hamster lung tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Schueller, H.M.; Nylen, E.; Park, P.; Becker, K.L. George Washington Univ., Washington, DC )

    1990-01-01

    Neuroendocrine hamster lung tumors, induced by exposure to 60% hyperoxia and subcutaneous administration of the tobacco-specific nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) for 12 weeks, were placed in cell culture. By subsequent selective transfer of epithelial cells and maintenance in an atmosphere of 8% CO{sub 2}, cell lines with characteristics of neuroendocrine cells were established. The neuroendocrine markers expressed by these cell lines included electron dense neuroendocrine secretion granules as well as secretion of calcitonin and mammalian bombesin. In keeping with data previously reported for a human neuroendocrine lung tumor cell line, nicotine, acetylcholien, and mammalian bombesin (MB) acted as strongrowth factors in these neuroendocrine hamster tumor lines. The mitogenic effect of nicotine an acetylcholine was abolished by nicotinic receptor inhibition while the effects of mammalian bombesin were inhibited by an antagonist of MB receptors. Our data suggest that a receptor-mediated mitogenic effect of nicotine on neuroendocrine lung cells may be instrumental in the induction of smoking-associated small cell lung cancer.

  18. Iodine-125 Seeds Strand for Treatment of Tumor Thrombus in Inferior Vena Cava: An Experimental Study in a Rabbit Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wen Yan, Zhiping Luo, Jianjun Fang, Zhuting Wu, Linlin Liu, QingXin Qu, Xudong Liu, Lingxiao Wang, Jianhua

    2013-10-15

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to establish an animal model of implanted inferior vena cava tumor thrombus (IVCTT) and to evaluate the effect of linear iodine-125 seeds strand in treating implanted IVCTT. Methods: Tumor cell line VX{sub 2} was inoculated subcutaneously into New Zealand rabbit to develop the parent tumor. The tumor strip was inoculated into inferior vena cava (IVC) to establish the IVCTT model. The IVCTT was confirmed by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) after 2 weeks. Twelve rabbits with IVCTT were randomly divided into two groups. Treatment group (group T; n = 6) underwent Iodine-125 seeds brachytherapy, and the control group (group C; n = 6) underwent blank seeds strand. The blood laboratory examination (including blood routine examination, hepatic and renal function), body weight, survival time, and IVCTT volume by MDCT were monitored. All rabbits were dissected postmortem, and the therapeutic effects were evaluated on the basis of histopathology. The proliferating cell nuclear antigen index (PI) and apoptosis index (AI) of IVCTT were compared between two groups. T test, Wilcoxon rank test, and Kaplan-Meier survival curve analysis were used. Results: The success rate of establishing IVCTT was 100 %. The body weight loss and cachexia of rabbits in group C appeared earlier than in group T. Body weight in the third week, the mean survival time, PI, AI in groups T and C were 2.23 {+-} 0.12 kg, 57.83 {+-} 8.68 days, (16.73 {+-} 5.18 %), (29.47 {+-} 7.18 %), and 2.03 {+-} 0.13 kg, 43.67 {+-} 5.28 days, (63.01 {+-} 2.01 %), (6.02 {+-} 2.93 %), respectively. There were statistically significant differences between group T and group C (P < 0.05). The IVCTT volume of group T was remarkably smaller than that of group C. Conclusions: Injecting and suspensory fixing VX2 tumor strip into IVC is a reliable method to establish IVCTT animal model. The linear Iodine-125 seeds strand brachytherapy was a safe and effective method for treating IVCTT

  19. Core Needle Biopsy of Breast Cancer Tumors Increases Distant Metastases in a Mouse Model12

    PubMed Central

    Mathenge, Edward Gitau; Dean, Cheryl Ann; Clements, Derek; Vaghar-Kashani, Ahmad; Photopoulos, Steffany; Coyle, Krysta Mila; Giacomantonio, Michael; Malueth, Benjamin; Nunokawa, Anna; Jordan, Julie; Lewis, John D.; Gujar, Shashi Ashok; Marcato, Paola; Lee, Patrick W.K.; Giacomantonio, Carman Anthony

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Incisional biopsies, including the diagnostic core needle biopsy (CNB), routinely performed before surgical excision of breast cancer tumors are hypothesized to increase the risk of metastatic disease. In this study, we experimentally determined whether CNB of breast cancer tumors results in increased distant metastases and examine important resultant changes in the primary tumor and tumor microenvironment associated with this outcome. METHOD: To evaluate the effect of CNB on metastasis development, we implanted murine mammary 4T1 tumor cells in BALB/c mice and performed CNB on palpable tumors in half the mice. Subsequently, emulating the human scenario, all mice underwent complete tumor excision and were allowed to recover, with attendant metastasis development. Tumor growth, lung metastasis, circulating tumor cell (CTC) levels, variation in gene expression, composition of the tumor microenvironment, and changes in immunologic markers were compared in biopsied and non-biopsied mice. RESULTS: Mice with biopsied tumors developed significantly more lung metastases compared to non-biopsied mice. Tumors from biopsied mice contained a higher frequency of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) accompanied by reduced CD4 + T cells, CD8 + T cells, and macrophages, suggesting biopsy-mediated development of an increasingly immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. We also observed a CNB-dependent up-regulation in the expression of SOX4, Ezh2, and other key epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) genes, as well as increased CTC levels among the biopsy group. CONCLUSION: CNB creates an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, increases EMT, and facilitates release of CTCs, all of which likely contribute to the observed increase in development of distant metastases. PMID:25425969

  20. Femur Window Chamber Model for In Vivo Cell Tracking in the Murine Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yonghong; Maeda, Azusa; Bu, Jiachuan; DaCosta, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow is a complex organ that contains various hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells. These cells are involved in many biological processes, including hematopoiesis, immune regulation and tumor regulation. Commonly used methods for understanding cellular actions in the bone marrow, such as histology and blood counts, provide static information rather than capturing the dynamic action of multiple cellular components in vivo. To complement the standard methods, a window chamber (WC)-based model was developed to enable serial in vivo imaging of cells and structures in the murine bone marrow. This protocol describes a surgical procedure for installing the WC in the femur, in order to facilitate long-term optical access to the femoral bone marrow. In particular, to demonstrate its experimental utility, this WC approach was used to image and track neutrophils within the vascular network of the femur, thereby providing a novel method to visualize and quantify immune cell trafficking and regulation in the bone marrow. This method can be applied to study various biological processes in the murine bone marrow, such as hematopoiesis, stem cell transplantation, and immune responses in pathological conditions, including cancer. PMID:27500928

  1. Experimental study of the maternal effects on tumor immunity of infant mice with C1300 mouse neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, I; Kawakatsu, H; Kidowaki, T; Matumura, T; Sugimoto, T; Sawada, T

    1988-04-01

    The spontaneous regression of neuroblastoma (NB), one of the most common malignant tumors in childhood, is found to occur in 1% to 2% of patients with NB, especially in young infants. An unexpectedly favorable response to therapy is also noticed in infants suggesting the potential presence of an immune mechanism. Monoclonal C1300-S and C1300A-4 cell lines were established from polyclonal C1300 cells in our laboratory. Adult female A/J mice that had rejected 1 x 10(3) NB cells (C1300S-3) or 1 x 10(5)-10(6) NB cells (C1300A-4) were used as immunized mothers. The immunized mothers with C1300A-4 or C1300S-3 were found to have specific antibodies to C1300S-3 cells by 51Cr release assay of complement dependent cytotoxicity. Newborn mice, 24 hours after birth from immunized or nonimmunized mothers, were inoculated with 1 x 10(3) C1300S-3 NB cells. The same antibody that was assayed in the immunized mothers was detected in this offspring by the antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity (ADCC). The tumor incidence in the offspring of the immunized mothers was found to be less than that of the offspring of the nonimmunized mothers. This study suggests that the lower tumor incidence in the offspring of immunized mothers compared with offspring of nonimmunized mothers may be attributed to their ADCC activity. Furthermore, the antibody that has the ADCC activity was proven to be immunoglobulin G by a serum absorption test using IgG absorbant. This study offers insight into the relationship between transported mother-infant immunoglobulins and on its potential control of NB.

  2. Selective cytotoxicity of murine monoclonal antibody LAM2 against human small-cell carcinoma in the presence of human complement: possible use for in vitro elimination of tumor cells from bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Stahel, R A; Mabry, M; Sabbath, K; Speak, J A; Bernal, S D

    1985-05-15

    LAM2 is a murine IgM monoclonal antibody (MAb) which binds strongly to the cell membrane of human lung small-cell carcinoma (SCC) and squamous-cell carcinoma but not to normal bone-marrow cells. The cytotoxicity of this antibody in the presence of human complement was investigated in vitro by chromium release and clonogenic assays. The optimal treatment conditions included incubation with antibody for 30 min at 37 degrees C followed by 3 additions of human complement 30 min apart. Cell lysis ranged from 94 to 98% in 4 SCC cell lines at antibody dilutions of 1:100: a lower level of lysis (60%) occurred in a lung squamous-cell carcinoma cell line. The cytotoxic effect was strictly complement-dependent. No cytotoxic effect was seen with other human cell lines including lung adenocarcinoma, lung large-cell carcinoma, myeloid leukemia, and lymphoblastic leukemia. No lysis was seen with nucleated marrow cells from healthy volunteers. Normal marrow cells in excess did not inhibit SCC cell lysis. Incubation with antibody and complement resulted in a 100-fold reduction of colony formation of SCC cells, but did not reduce the number of colonies of marrow-cell precursors, including CFU-GEMM, BFU-E, and CFU-C. The selective cytotoxicity of LAM2 antibody to SCC, but not to normal bone-marrow cells, suggests that this antibody may be useful for the in vitro elimination of SCC cells from the bone marrow.

  3. Experimental validation of heterogeneity-corrected dose-volume prescription on respiratory-averaged CT images in stereotactic body radiotherapy for moving tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Miyabe, Yuki; Matsuo, Yukinori; Kamomae, Takeshi; Nakata, Manabu; Yano, Shinsuke; Sawada, Akira; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to experimentally assess the validity of heterogeneity-corrected dose-volume prescription on respiratory-averaged computed tomography (RACT) images in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for moving tumors. Four-dimensional computed tomography (CT) data were acquired while a dynamic anthropomorphic thorax phantom with a solitary target moved. Motion pattern was based on cos (t) with a constant respiration period of 4.0 sec along the longitudinal axis of the CT couch. The extent of motion (A{sub 1}) was set in the range of 0.0-12.0 mm at 3.0-mm intervals. Treatment planning with the heterogeneity-corrected dose-volume prescription was designed on RACT images. A new commercially available Monte Carlo algorithm of well-commissioned 6-MV photon beam was used for dose calculation. Dosimetric effects of intrafractional tumor motion were then investigated experimentally under the same conditions as 4D CT simulation using the dynamic anthropomorphic thorax phantom, films, and an ionization chamber. The passing rate of {gamma} index was 98.18%, with the criteria of 3 mm/3%. The dose error between the planned and the measured isocenter dose in moving condition was within {+-} 0.7%. From the dose area histograms on the film, the mean {+-} standard deviation of the dose covering 100% of the cross section of the target was 102.32 {+-} 1.20% (range, 100.59-103.49%). By contrast, the irradiated areas receiving more than 95% dose for A{sub 1} = 12 mm were 1.46 and 1.33 times larger than those for A{sub 1} = 0 mm in the coronal and sagittal planes, respectively. This phantom study demonstrated that the cross section of the target received 100% dose under moving conditions in both the coronal and sagittal planes, suggesting that the heterogeneity-corrected dose-volume prescription on RACT images is acceptable in SBRT for moving tumors.

  4. Efficacy of quercetin against chemically induced murine oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    DROGUETT, DANIEL; CASTILLO, CHRISTIAN; LEIVA, ELBA; THEODULOZ, CRISTINA; SCHMEDA-HIRSCHMANN, GUILLERMO; KEMMERLING, ULRIKE

    2015-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common form of head and neck cancer, and oxidative damage is associated with the development of OSCCs. Antioxidants have therefore been proposed for use as chemoprotective agents against different types of cancer. In the present study, the effect of the antioxidant quercetin, administered at doses of 10 and 100 mg/kg/day, was investigated in an experimental murine model of 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4-NQO)-induced carcinogenesis. The survival of the treated animals, the plasmatic levels of reduced glutathione and the type and severity of lesions (according the International Histological Classification of Tumors and Bryne's Multifactorial Grading System for the Invasive Tumor Front) were assessed. Additionally, the organization of the extracellular matrix was analyzed by carbohydrate and collagen histochemistry, and immunohistochemistry was used to assess the expression of the tumor markers proliferating cell nuclear antigen and mutated p53. The results indicate that, despite the promising effect of quercetin in other studies, this drug is ineffective as a chemoprotective agent against 4-NQO-induced OSCC in mice at the assayed doses. PMID:26622865

  5. FTY720 induces apoptosis in B16F10-NEX2 murine melanoma cells, limits metastatic development in vivo, and modulates the immune system

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Felipe V.; Arruda, Denise C.; Figueiredo, Carlos R.; Massaoka, Mariana H.; Matsuo, Alisson L.; Bueno, Valquiria; Rodrigues, Elaine G.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Available chemotherapy presents poor control over the development of metastatic melanoma. FTY720 is a compound already approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of patients with multiple sclerosis. It has also been observed that FTY720 inhibits tumor growth in vivo (experimental models) and in vitro (animal and human tumor cells). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of FTY720 on a metastatic melanoma model and in tumor cell lines. METHODS: We analyzed FTY720 efficacy in vivo in a syngeneic murine metastatic melanoma model, in which we injected tumor cells intravenously into C57BL/6 mice and then treated the mice orally with the compound for 7 days. We also treated mice and human tumor cell lines with FTY720 in vitro, and cell viability and death pathways were analyzed. RESULTS: FTY720 treatment limited metastatic melanoma growth in vivo and promoted a dose-dependent decrease in the viability of murine and human tumor cells in vitro. Melanoma cells treated with FTY720 exhibited characteristics of programmed cell death, reactive oxygen species generation, and increased β-catenin expression. In addition, FTY720 treatment resulted in an immunomodulatory effect in vivo by decreasing the percentage of Foxp3+ cells, without interfering with CD8+ T cells or lymphocyte-producing interferon-gamma. CONCLUSION: Further studies are needed using FTY720 as a monotherapy or in combined therapy, as different types of cancer cells would require a variety of signaling pathways to be extinguished. PMID:23917669

  6. Nanoelectroablation therapy for murine basal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nuccitelli, Richard; Tran, Kevin; Athos, Brian; Kreis, Mark; Nuccitelli, Pamela; Chang, Kris S.; Epstein, Ervin H.; Tang, Jean Y.

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoelectroablation is a new, non-thermal therapy that triggers apoptosis in tumors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low energy, ultrashort, high voltage pulses ablate the tumor with little or no scar. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoelectroablation eliminates 99.8% of the BCC but may leave a few remnants behind. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pilot clinical trials on human BCCs are ongoing and leave no remnants in most cases. -- Abstract: When skin tumors are exposed to non-thermal, low energy, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF), apoptosis is initiated both in vitro and in vivo. This nanoelectroablation therapy has already been proven effective in treating subdermal murine allograft tumors. We wanted to determine if this therapy would be equally effective in the treatment of autochthonous BCC tumors in Ptch1{sup +/-}K14-Cre-ER p53 fl/fl mice. These tumors are similar to human BCCs in histology and in response to drug therapy . We have treated 27 BCCs across 8 mice with either 300 pulses of 300 ns duration or 2700 pulses of 100 ns duration, all at 30 kV/cm and 5-7 pulses per second. Every nsPEF-treated BCC began to shrink within a day after treatment and their initial mean volume of 36 {+-} 5 (SEM) mm{sup 3} shrunk by 76 {+-} 3% over the ensuing two weeks. After four weeks, they were 99.8% ablated if the size of the treatment electrode matched the tumor size. If the tumor was larger than the 4 mm wide electrode, multiple treatments were needed for complete ablation. Treated tumors were harvested for histological analysis at various times after treatment and exhibited apoptosis markers. Specifically, pyknosis of nuclei was evident as soon as 2 days after nsPEF treatment, and DNA fragmentation as detected via TUNEL staining was also evident post treatment. Nanoelectroablation is effective in triggering apoptosis and remission of radiation-induced BCCs with a single 6 min-long treatment of 2700 pulses.

  7. β-carotene Regulates the Murine Liver Microenvironment of a Metastatic Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ji Ye; Kim, Yoo-Sun; Kim, Yuri

    2013-01-01

    Background: The anticarcinogenic effects of β-carotene (BC) have been well-characterized. However, the effect of BC on the microenvironment of a tumor remains to be investigated, especially since normal tissue proximal to a tumor has been shown to play a critical role in cancer progression and metastasis. For young children, neuroblastoma (NB) is the most common extracranial solid cancer diagnosed. Therefore, in the present study, effect of BC on the murine liver microenvironment of a metastatic NB was evaluated. Methods: Using a mouse model, three experimental groups were established: control mice, mice receiving an injection of SK-N-BE(2)C cells (TC), and mice receiving an injection of SK-N-BE(2)C cells plus 2 mg/kg BC twice a week (BC). Eight weeks after the injection of tumor, liver tissues were collected from all three groups, with the TC and BC tissues collected proximal to the metastatic NBs. Results: Compared to control tissues, BC tissues exhibited lower levels of proliferation, apoptosis, and metastasis. Assays for these processes included the detection of lower levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), Bax, MMP2, and MMP9. In addition, higher levels of Bcl-2 were detected. Fewer cells undergoing an epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) were also observed in the BC group. Furthermore, BC tissues were associated with reduced expression of cancer stem cell marker, delta-like 1 homologue (DLK1), lower levels of VEGF mRNA and fewer CD31-positive cells. Finally, The antioxidant capability of the tumor microenvironment for the BC group was enhanced with higher expression levels of glutathione peroxidase (GPX), catalase, and manganese superoxide (MnSOD) detected. Conclusion: These data suggest that BC affects the microenvironment of a tumor, and this enhances the anti-cancer effects of BC. PMID:25337563

  8. Enhanced dendritic cell maturation by TNF-alpha or cytidine-phosphate-guanosine DNA drives T cell activation in vitro and therapeutic anti-tumor immune responses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Brunner, C; Seiderer, J; Schlamp, A; Bidlingmaier, M; Eigler, A; Haimerl, W; Lehr, H A; Krieg, A M; Hartmann, G; Endres, S

    2000-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) manipulated ex vivo can induce tumor immunity in experimental murine tumor models. To improve DC-based tumor vaccination, we studied whether DC maturation affects the T cell-activating potential in vitro and the induction of tumor immunity in vivo. Maturation of murine bone marrow-derived DC was induced by GM-CSF plus IL-4 alone or by further addition of TNF-alpha or a cytidine-phosphate-guanosine (CpG)-containing oligonucleotide (ODN-1826), which mimics the immunostimulatory effect of bacterial DNA. Flow cytometric analysis of costimulatory molecules and MHC class II showed that DC maturation was stimulated most by ODN-1826, whereas TNF-alpha had an intermediate effect. The extent of maturation correlated with the secretion of IL-12 and the induction of alloreactive T cell proliferation. In BALB/c mice, s.c. injection of colon carcinoma cells resulted in rapidly growing tumors. In this model, CpG-ODN-stimulated DC cocultured with irradiated tumor cells also induced prophylactic protection most effectively and were therapeutically effective when administered 3 days after tumor challenge. Thus, CpG-ODN-enhanced DC maturation may represent an efficient means to improve clinical tumor vaccination.

  9. Absence of hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase activity in murine Dunn osteosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Abelson, H.T.; Gorka, C.

    1983-09-01

    The transplantable murine Dunn osteosarcoma has no detectable hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.8) activity. This was established from the tumors directly and from tissue culture cell lines derived from the tumor using a variety of assays: e.g., no (3H)hypoxanthine uptake into tumor or tissue culture cells, no conversion of (3H)hypoxanthine to (3H)IMP by cell extracts from tumors or tissue culture cells, no growth of tissue culture cells in hypoxanthine:aminopterin:thymidine medium, and normal growth of these cells in 10 microM 6-mercaptopurine. Ten human osteosarcomas have been assayed, and two have no apparent hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase enzyme activity. After high-dose methotrexate treatment in vivo, murine tumors could be selectively killed and normal tissues could be spared by using a rescue regimen of hypoxanthine-thymidine-allopurinol.

  10. Silibinin modulates caudal-type homeobox transcription factor (CDX2), an intestine specific tumor suppressor to abrogate colon cancer in experimental rats.

    PubMed

    Sangeetha, N; Nalini, N

    2015-01-01

    To authenticate the colon cancer preventive potential of silibinin, the efficacy of silibinin needs to be tested by evaluating an organ-specific biomarker. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of silibinin on the colonic expression of the caudal-type homeobox transcription factor (CDX2) an intestine specific tumor suppressor gene and its downstream targets in the colon of rats challenged with 1,2 dimethyl hydrazine (DMH). Rats of groups 1 and 2 were treated as control and silibinin control. Rats under groups 3 and 4 were given DMH (20 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) subcutaneously) once a week for 15 consecutive weeks from the 4th week of the experimental period. In addition, group 4 rats alone were treated with silibinin (50 mg/kg b.w. per os) everyday throughout the study period of 32 weeks. Histological investigation and messenger RNA and protein expression studies were performed in the colonic tissues of experimental rats. Findings of the study revealed that DMH administration significantly decreased the expression of CDX2 and Guanylyl cyclase C (GCC) in the colon of experimental rats. Further the decreased levels of CDX2 protein, colonic mucin content, and increased number of mast cells in the colon of DMH alone-administered rats reflects the onset of carcinogenesis. The pathological changes caused due to CDX2 suppression were attenuated by silibinin supplementation.

  11. Unimpaired Autoreactive T-Cell Traffic Within the Central Nervous System During Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-Mediated inhibition of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korner, Heinrich; Goodsall, Anna L.; Lemckert, Frances A.; Scallon, Bernard J.; Ghrayeb, John; Ford, Andrew L.; Sedgwick, Jonathon D.

    1995-11-01

    The critical role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) as a mediator in autoimmune inflammatory processes is evident from in vivo studies with TNF-blocking agents. However, the mechanisms by which TNF, and possibly also its homologue lymphotoxin α, contributes to development of pathology in rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn disease and in animal models like experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis is unclear. Possibilities include regulation of vascular adhesion molecules enabling leukocyte movement into tissues or direct cytokine-mediated effector functions such as mediation of tissue damage. Here we show that administration of a TNF receptor (55 kDa)-IgG fusion protein prevented clinical signs of actively induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Significantly, the total number of CD4^+ T lymphocytes isolated from the central nervous system of clinically healthy treated versus diseased control animals was comparable. By using a CD45 congenic model of passively transferred experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis to enable tracking of myelin basic protein-specific effector T lymphocytes, prevention of clinical signs of disease was again demonstrated in treated animals but without quantitative or qualitative impediment to the movement of autoreactive T lymphocytes to and within the central nervous system. Thus, despite the uninterrupted movement of specific T lymphocytes into the target tissue, subsequent disease development was blocked. This provides compelling evidence for a direct effector role of TNF/lymphotoxin α in autoimmune tissue damage.

  12. Adhesion: a confounding bias in murine cervical heterotopic heart transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jinghui; Chen, Qi; Liu, Fang; Fu, Zhiren; Wang, Quanxing

    2015-01-01

    Tissue adhesion is a common postsurgical phenomenon among the human population. This complication also occurs in murine transplant models. In this study, we investigated the impact of adhesion on murine cervical heterotopic heart transplantation by using sodium hyaluronate (SH) as an anti-adhesive agent. Our study revealed that SH administration produced no significant effect on histological change, TNF-α, IFN-γ, MCP-1, IL-2, IL-6 and IL-10 expression, CD4+ T, CD8+ T, or neutrophil and macrophage counts. Our findings suggest that SH was biocompatible and non-immunogenic. Later, we observed that adhesion not only affected the survival of the graft without mediating rejection, but was closely related to the severity of rejection as manifested by larger and more severe adhesion formation in total-allomismatched and MHC class II-allomismatched murine cardiac allografts. Therefore, we inferred that using the murine cervical heterotopic heart transplant model may lead to an exaggerated p-value in statistical significance testing which could mislead experimenters in considering that the results are more significant than the fact. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first demonstration that proves that adhesion was a confounding bias in the murine cervical heterotopic heart transplant model and highlights the possibilities for improvement in future use. PMID:26550450

  13. [Tumor-induced immunosuppression].

    PubMed

    Paul, S; Calmels, B; Régulier, E

    2002-01-01

    Tumor immunology is based on two essential concepts: immune surveillance, which implicate the host immune reactions against tumor cells, and tumor immune escape, which refers to the tumor-cell evasion process against the host immune system. The notion that a deficit in immune cell functions permits tumor growth has received experimental support with the discovery of several different biochemical defects in T lymphocytes that infiltrate cancers. Furthermore, expression of self-antigens on the tumor surface impose potential barriers to the development of effective immune response. Tumors are able to overcome immune surveillance by changing the polarity of effectors cells, thus down-regulating the proliferation of tumor-specific cytotoxic T cells, or altering the effector compositions of immune cells within the tumor milieu, or both. Understanding the interaction between cancer cells and host immune cells is of importance for clinical applications or immunotherapy in cancer treatment. PMID:11937439

  14. Differential effects of anti-tumor necrosis factor monoclonal antibodies on systemic inflammatory responses in experimental endotoxemia in chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    van der Poll, T; Levi, M; van Deventer, S J; ten Cate, H; Haagmans, B L; Biemond, B J; Büller, H R; Hack, C E; ten Cate, J W

    1994-01-15

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is considered to be a pivotal mediator of endotoxin-induced lethality. To assess the intermediate role of TNF in specific systemic inflammatory responses known to contribute to tissue injury in endotoxemia, eight healthy adult chimpanzees were intravenously injected with Escherichia coli endotoxin (4 ng/kg). In four of these animals the administration of endotoxin was followed immediately by a bolus intravenous injection of an anti-TNF monoclonal antibody (15 mg/kg). Treatment with anti-TNF completely prevented the endotoxin-induced increase in serum TNF activity, and profoundly reduced the appearance of interleukin-6 and -8 (both P < .05). Neutrophilia and lymphopenia were not affected by anti-TNF, whereas neutrophil degranulation, as measured by the plasma concentrations of elastase-alpha 1-antitrypsin complexes, was only slightly reduced (peak levels after endotoxin alone 31.0 +/- 3.4 ng/mL, versus 25.5 +/- 3.4 ng/mL after endotoxin with anti-TNF; P < .05). Anti-TNF did not influence endotoxin-induced activation of the coagulation system, as reflected by unchanged increases in the plasma concentrations of the prothrombin fragment F1 + 2 and thrombin-antithrombin III complexes. In contrast, anti-TNF strongly attenuated the activation of the fibrinolytic system, ie, peak plasma levels of plasmin-alpha 2-antiplasmin were 33.8 +/- 11.1 nmol/L after endotoxin alone and 17.0 +/- 2.9 nmol/L after endotoxin with anti-TNF (P < .05). These results suggest that TNF is not the common mediator of systemic inflammatory changes in low-grade endotoxemia. Moreover, the finding that in this mild model anti-TNF specifically inhibited fibrinolysis suggests that treatment with anti-TNF potentially may enhance the tendency towards microvascular thrombosis in sepsis.

  15. Membrane Glycolipids Content Variety in Gastrointestinal Tumors and Transplantable Hepatomas in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Jun; Lv, Can Qun; Wang, Bo-Liang; Mei, Ping; Xu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the variety of plasma contents of membrane glycolipids in 65 gastrointestinal tumors and 31 transplant hepatomas in mice. Material/Methods The experimental model was a transplantable murine hepatoma. Experimental mice were divided into 3 groups. Results The LSA and TSA content in the 2 groups were significantly difference (p<0.01), and were significantly lower in the therapeutic group than in the control group (p<0.01). Conclusions These results indicate that membrane glycolipids index LSA and TSA are sensitive markers in gastrointestinal tumors. In the transplanted hepatomas in mice, they may be considered as ancillary indicators for judging the therapeutic effect of hepatoma. PMID:27554918

  16. Membrane Glycolipids Content Variety in Gastrointestinal Tumors and Transplantable Hepatomas in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jun; Lv, Can Qun; Wang, Bo-Liang; Mei, Ping; Xu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to investigate the variety of plasma contents of membrane glycolipids in 65 gastrointestinal tumors and 31 transplant hepatomas in mice. MATERIAL AND METHODS The experimental model was a transplantable murine hepatoma. Experimental mice were divided into 3 groups. RESULTS The LSA and TSA content in the 2 groups were significantly difference (p<0.01), and were significantly lower in the therapeutic group than in the control group (p<0.01). CONCLUSIONS These results indicate that membrane glycolipids index LSA and TSA are sensitive markers in gastrointestinal tumors. In the transplanted hepatomas in mice, they may be considered as ancillary indicators for judging the therapeutic effect of hepatoma. PMID:27554918

  17. Effect of carbon monoxide breathing on hypoxia and radiation response in the SCCVII tumor in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Grau, C.; Marianne, M.D.; Nordsmark, M.; Khalil, A.A.; Horsman, M.R.; Overgaard, J. )

    1994-06-15

    The purpose of this study was the influence of a clinically relevant concentration of carbon monoxide (CO) on tumor oxygenation and responses to irradiation. The murine tumor model was the SCCVII squamous cell carcinoma transplanted to the feet of C3H/Km mice. Sixty minutes of breathing CO at 200 ppm resulted in a carboxyhemoglobin level of 15%. This resulted in a reduction in p50 (the oxygen partial pressure at which hemoglobin is 50% saturated) to 78% of the control value, and a decrease in tumor blood perfusion to 73% of the control value. The combined effect of a decrease in effective hemoglobin and blood perfusion resulted in a reduction in tumor oxygen supply to 62% of the control value. In agreement with this, intratumoral pO[sub 2] measurements showed a significant increase in tumor hypoxia, such that the percentage of measurements with low pO[sub 2] ([le] 5 mmHg) increased from 33% to 62%. The fraction of clonogenic hypoxic cells, measured radiobiologically by paired cell survival curves, similarly increased from 0.2% to 3.8%. Radiation sensitivity, evaluated from in vivo-in vitro excision assay, was significantly decreased by CO in 1, 4, 8, and 12 fractions were 0.71, 0.77, 0.83, and 0.71, respectively. The present SCCVII tumor data confirm the general experimental observation that CO breathing significantly increases tumor hypoxia and reduces the effectiveness of ionizing irradiation. 22 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Role of Interleukin-6 in the Radiation Response of Liver Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Miao-Fen; Hsieh, Ching-Chuan; Chen, Wen-Cheng; Lai, Chia-Hsuan

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the role of interleukin (IL)-6 in biological sequelae and tumor regrowth after irradiation for hepatic malignancy, which are critical for the clinical radiation response of liver tumors. Methods and Materials: The Hepa 1-6 murine hepatocellular cancer cell line was used to examine the radiation response by clonogenic assays and tumor growth delay in vivo. After irradiation in a single dose of 6 Gy in vitro or 15 Gy in vivo, biological changes including cell death and tumor regrowth were examined by experimental manipulation of IL-6 signaling. The effects of blocking IL-6 were assessed by cells preincubated in the presence of IL-6-neutralizing antibody for 24 hours or stably transfected with IL-6-silencing vectors. The correlations among tumor responses, IL-6 levels, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) recruitment were examined using animal experiments. Results: Interleukin-6 expression was positively linked to irradiation and radiation resistance, as demonstrated by in vitro and in vivo experiments. Interleukin-6-silencing vectors induced more tumor inhibition and DNA damage after irradiation. When subjects were irradiated with a sublethal dose, the regrowth of irradiated tumors significantly correlated with IL-6 levels and MDSC recruitment in vivo. Furthermore, blocking of IL-6 could overcome irradiation-induced MDSC recruitment and tumor regrowth after treatment. Conclusion: These data demonstrate that IL-6 is important in determining the radiation response of liver tumor cells. Irradiation-induced IL-6 and the subsequent recruitment of MDSC could be responsible for tumor regrowth. Therefore, treatment with concurrent IL-6 inhibition could be a potential therapeutic strategy for increasing the radiation response of tumors.

  19. Deregulated proliferation and differentiation in brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Swartling, Fredrik J; Čančer, Matko; Frantz, Aaron; Weishaupt, Holger; Persson, Anders I

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenesis, the generation of new neurons, is deregulated in neural stem cell (NSC)- and progenitor-derived murine models of malignant medulloblastoma and glioma, the most common brain tumors of children and adults, respectively. Molecular characterization of human malignant brain tumors, and in particular brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs), has identified neurodevelopmental transcription factors, microRNAs, and epigenetic factors known to inhibit neuronal and glial differentiation. We are starting to understand how these factors are regulated by the major oncogenic drivers in malignant brain tumors. In this review, we will focus on the molecular switches that block normal neuronal differentiation and induce brain tumor formation. Genetic or pharmacological manipulation of these switches in BTSCs has been shown to restore the ability of tumor cells to differentiate. We will discuss potential brain tumor therapies that will promote differentiation in order to reduce treatment-resistance, suppress tumor growth, and prevent recurrence in patients. PMID:25416506

  20. Sinus Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumors Nasal Deformities Choanal Atresia Epiphora (Excessive Tearing) Disclosure Statement Printer Friendly Sinus Tumors Abtin Tabaee, MD Introduction Tumors of the nose and paranasal sinuses are rare, accounting for fewer than 1% of all tumors. These ...

  1. Combined preoperative and postoperative immunotherapy for murine C1300 neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Fowler, C L; Brooks, S P; Rossman, J E; Cooney, D R

    1993-03-01

    Preoperative treatment of