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Sample records for experimental murine tumors

  1. Experimental validation of an inverse fluorescence Monte Carlo model to extract concentrations of metabolically relevant fluorophores from turbid phantoms and a murine tumor model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chengbo; Rajaram, Narasimhan; Vishwanath, Karthik; Jiang, Tony; Palmer, Gregory M.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. An inverse Monte Carlo based model has been developed to extract intrinsic fluorescence from turbid media. The goal of this work was to experimentally validate the model to extract intrinsic fluorescence of three biologically meaningful fluorophores related to metabolism from turbid media containing absorbers and scatterers. Experimental studies were first carried out on tissue-mimicking phantoms that contained individual fluorophores and their combinations, across multiple absorption, scattering, and fluorophore concentrations. The model was then tested in a murine tumor model to determine both the kinetics of fluorophore uptake as well as overall tissue fluorophore concentration through extraction of the intrinsic fluorescence of an exogenous contrast agent that reports on glucose uptake. Results show the model can be used to recover the true intrinsic fluorescence spectrum with high accuracy (R2=0.988) as well as accurately compute fluorophore concentration in both single and multiple fluorophores phantoms when appropriate calibration standards are available. In the murine tumor, the model-corrected intrinsic fluorescence could be used to differentiate drug dose injections between different groups. A strong linear correlation was observed between the extracted intrinsic fluorescence intensity and injected drug dose, compared with the distorted turbid tissue fluorescence.

  2. Experimental validation of an inverse fluorescence Monte Carlo model to extract concentrations of metabolically relevant fluorophores from turbid phantoms and a murine tumor model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chengbo; Rajaram, Narasimhan; Vishwanath, Karthik; Jiang, Tony; Palmer, Gregory M.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. An inverse Monte Carlo based model has been developed to extract intrinsic fluorescence from turbid media. The goal of this work was to experimentally validate the model to extract intrinsic fluorescence of three biologically meaningful fluorophores related to metabolism from turbid media containing absorbers and scatterers. Experimental studies were first carried out on tissue-mimicking phantoms that contained individual fluorophores and their combinations, across multiple absorption, scattering, and fluorophore concentrations. The model was then tested in a murine tumor model to determine both the kinetics of fluorophore uptake as well as overall tissue fluorophore concentration through extraction of the intrinsic fluorescence of an exogenous contrast agent that reports on glucose uptake. Results show the model can be used to recover the true intrinsic fluorescence spectrum with high accuracy (R2=0.988) as well as accurately compute fluorophore concentration in both single and multiple fluorophores phantoms when appropriate calibration standards are available. In the murine tumor, the model-corrected intrinsic fluorescence could be used to differentiate drug dose injections between different groups. A strong linear correlation was observed between the extracted intrinsic fluorescence intensity and injected drug dose, compared with the distorted turbid tissue fluorescence. PMID:22894524

  3. Irradiation Design for an Experimental Murine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ballesteros-Zebadua, P.; Moreno-Jimenez, S.; Suarez-Campos, J. E.; Celis, M. A.; Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.; Garcia-Garduno, O. A.; Rubio-Osornio, M. C.; Custodio-Ramirez, V.; Paz, C.

    2010-12-07

    In radiotherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery, small animal experimental models are frequently used, since there are still a lot of unsolved questions about the biological and biochemical effects of ionizing radiation. This work presents a method for small-animal brain radiotherapy compatible with a dedicated 6MV Linac. This rodent model is focused on the research of the inflammatory effects produced by ionizing radiation in the brain. In this work comparisons between Pencil Beam and Monte Carlo techniques, were used in order to evaluate accuracy of the calculated dose using a commercial planning system. Challenges in this murine model are discussed.

  4. Irradiation Design for an Experimental Murine Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballesteros-Zebadúa, P.; Lárraga-Gutierrez, J. M.; García-Garduño, O. A.; Rubio-Osornio, M. C.; Custodio-Ramírez, V.; Moreno-Jimenez, S.; Suarez-Campos, J. E.; Paz, C.; Celis, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    In radiotherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery, small animal experimental models are frequently used, since there are still a lot of unsolved questions about the biological and biochemical effects of ionizing radiation. This work presents a method for small-animal brain radiotherapy compatible with a dedicated 6MV Linac. This rodent model is focused on the research of the inflammatory effects produced by ionizing radiation in the brain. In this work comparisons between Pencil Beam and Monte Carlo techniques, were used in order to evaluate accuracy of the calculated dose using a commercial planning system. Challenges in this murine model are discussed.

  5. Limited Role of Murine ATM in Oncogene-Induced Senescence and p53-Dependent Tumor Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Pastor, Barbara; Ortega-Molina, Ana; Soria, Rebeca; Collado, Manuel; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar; Serrano, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies in human fibroblasts have provided a new general paradigm of tumor suppression according to which oncogenic signaling produces DNA damage and this, in turn, results in ATM/p53-dependent cellular senescence. Here, we have tested this model in a variety of murine experimental systems. Overexpression of oncogenic Ras in murine fibroblasts efficiently induced senescence but this occurred in the absence of detectable DNA damage signaling, thus suggesting a fundamental difference between human and murine cells. Moreover, lung adenomas initiated by endogenous levels of oncogenic K-Ras presented abundant senescent cells, but undetectable DNA damage signaling. Accordingly, K-Ras-driven adenomas were also senescent in Atm-null mice, and the tumorigenic progression of these lesions was only modestly accelerated by Atm-deficiency. Finally, we have examined chemically-induced fibrosarcomas, which possess a persistently activated DNA damage response and are highly sensitive to the activity of p53. We found that the absence of Atm favored genomic instability in the resulting tumors, but did not affect the persistent DNA damage response and did not impair p53-dependent tumor suppression. All together, we conclude that oncogene-induced senescence in mice may occur in the absence of a detectable DNA damage response. Regarding murine Atm, our data suggest that it plays a minor role in oncogene-induced senescence or in p53-dependent tumor suppression, being its tumor suppressive activity probably limited to the maintenance of genomic stability. PMID:19421407

  6. Effect of N-methylformamide on radiocurability of murine tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Iwakawa, M.; Milas, L.

    1988-01-01

    N-Methylformamide (NMF) is a polar solvent with maturational activity, i.e., it induces malignant cells to form more differentiated phenotypes. In addition, it renders tumor cells more sensitive to chemotherapeutic drugs and ionizing radiation. In the present study, NMF failed to augment radiocurability, as measured by the single-dose TCD50 assay, of two murine tumors: an 8-mm fibrosarcoma (FSA) and a 6-mm mammary carcinoma (MCA-K). NMF, at a dose of 300 mg/kg, was given ip daily for several days before and/or after local tumor irradiation.

  7. Immunotherapy of murine bladder cancer by irradiated tumor vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Lamm, D.L.; Riggs, D.R.; DeHaven, J.I.; Bryner, R.W. )

    1991-01-01

    This investigation explored the efficacy of irradiated autologous mouse bladder tumor (Ir-MBT2) as an active specific immunotherapeutic agent and as adjuvant therapy with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) against a subcutaneously transplanted murine bladder tumor. Tumor incidence was significantly reduced in groups receiving BCG (27%, p less than 0.005) or Ir-MBT2 with BCG (53%, p less than 0.025), compared to control (93%). Survival was significantly improved in groups treated with BCG (100%, p less than 0.005), 10(5) Ir-MBT2 with BCG (53%, p less than 0.01), or 10(7) Ir-MBT2 with BCG (47%, p less than 0.025) compared with control (13%). Surprisingly, Ir-MBT2 consistently reduced the efficacy of BCG alone. Ir-MBT2 alone (10(7)) appeared to enhance tumor growth. Autologous irradiated bladder tumor vaccine, alone or in combination with BCG, displayed no immunotherapeutic advantage. The use of irradiated tumor cell vaccine for bladder cancer therapy may reduce the results achievable with BCG alone.

  8. Quantitative Monitoring of Murine Lung Tumors by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Krupnick, Alexander Sasha; Tidwell, Vanessa K.; Engelbach, John A.; Alli, Vamsi V.; Nehorai, Arye; You, Ming; Vikis, Haris G.; Gelman, Andrew E.; Kreisel, Daniel; Garbow, Joel R.

    2013-01-01

    Primary lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related death in the western world and the lung is a common site for recurrence of extra-thoracic malignancies. Small-animal (rodent) models of cancer can play a very valuable role in the development of improved therapeutic strategies. However, detection of murine pulmonary tumors and their subsequent response to therapy, in situ, is challenging. We have recently described magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a reliable, reproducible, and non-destructive modality for the detection and serial monitoring of pulmonary tumors. Combining respiratory-gated data acquisition methods with manual and automated segmentation algorithms described by our laboratory, pulmonary tumor burden can be quantitatively measured in approximately one hour (data acquisition plus analysis) per mouse. Quantitative, analytic methods are described for measuring tumor burden in both primary (discrete tumors) and metastatic (diffuse tumors) disease. Thus, small-animal MRI represents a novel and unique research tool for preclinical investigation of therapeutic strategies for treatment of pulmonary malignancies and may be valuable in evaluating new compounds targeting lung cancer in vivo. PMID:22222788

  9. Radiobiologic effect of intermittent radiation exposure in murine tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Sugie, Chikao . E-mail: chikao@bg8.so-net.ne.jp; Shibamoto, Yuta; Ito, Masato; Ogino, Hiroyuki; Miyamoto, Akihiko; Fukaya, Nobuyuki; Niimi, Hiroshige; Hashizume, Takuya

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: In stereotactic irradiation using a linear accelerator, the effect of radiation may be reduced during intermittent exposures owing to recovery from sublethal damage in tumor cells. After our previous in vitro study suggesting this phenomenon, we investigated the issue in murine tumors. Methods and Materials: We used EMT6 and SCCVII tumors approximately 1 cm in diameter growing in the hind legs of syngeneic mice. Three schedules of intermittent radiation were investigated. First, 2 fractions of 10 Gy were given at an interval of 15-360 min to investigate the pattern of recovery from sublethal damage. Second, 5 fractions of 4 Gy were given with interfraction intervals of 2.5-15 min each. Third, 10 fractions of 2 Gy were given with interfraction intervals of 1-7 min each. Doses of 15-20 Gy were also given without interruption to estimate the dose-modifying factors. Tumors were excised 20 h later, and tumor cell survival was determined by an in vivo-in vitro assay. Results: In the 2-fraction experiment, the increase in cell survival with elongation of the interval was much less than that observed in our previous in vitro study. In the 5- and 10-fraction experiments, no significant increase in cell survival was observed after the intermittent exposures. Moreover, cell survival decreased at most points of the 5-fraction experiments by interruption of radiation in both EMT6 and SCCVII tumors. In the 10-fraction experiment, cell survival also decreased when the interruption was 3 or 7 min in EMT6 tumors. Conclusion: The results of the present in vivo studies were different from those of our in vitro studies in which cell survival increased significantly when a few minutes or longer intervals were posed between fractions. This suggests that recovery from sublethal damage in vivo may be counterbalanced by other phenomena such as reoxygenation that sensitizes tumor cells to subsequent irradiation.

  10. Efficacy of posaconazole in murine experimental sporotrichosis.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Silva, Fabiola; Capilla, Javier; Mayayo, Emilio; Guarro, Josep

    2012-05-01

    We developed a murine model of systemic sporotrichosis by using three strains of each of the two commonest species causing sporotrichosis, i.e., Sporothrix schenckii sensu stricto and Sporothrix brasiliensis, in order to evaluate the efficacy of posaconazole (PSC). The drug was administered at a dose of 2.5 or 5 mg/kg of body weight twice a day by gavage, and one group was treated with amphotericin B (AMB) as a control treatment. Posaconazole, especially at 5 mg/kg, showed good efficacy against all the strains tested, regardless of their MICs, as measured by prolonged survival, tissue burden reduction, and histopathology.

  11. Efficacy of Posaconazole in Murine Experimental Sporotrichosis

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Silva, Fabiola; Capilla, Javier; Mayayo, Emilio

    2012-01-01

    We developed a murine model of systemic sporotrichosis by using three strains of each of the two commonest species causing sporotrichosis, i.e., Sporothrix schenckii sensu stricto and Sporothrix brasiliensis, in order to evaluate the efficacy of posaconazole (PSC). The drug was administered at a dose of 2.5 or 5 mg/kg of body weight twice a day by gavage, and one group was treated with amphotericin B (AMB) as a control treatment. Posaconazole, especially at 5 mg/kg, showed good efficacy against all the strains tested, regardless of their MICs, as measured by prolonged survival, tissue burden reduction, and histopathology. PMID:22330929

  12. Interleukin-27 signaling promotes immunity against endogenously arising murine tumors.

    PubMed

    Natividad, Karlo D T; Junankar, Simon R; Mohd Redzwan, Norhanani; Nair, Radhika; Wirasinha, Rushika C; King, Cecile; Brink, Robert; Swarbrick, Alexander; Batten, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-27 (IL-27) is a pleiotropic cytokine but its immunosuppressive effects predominate during many in vivo immunological challenges. Despite this, evidence from tumor cell line transfer models suggested that IL-27 could promote immune responses in the tumor context. However, the role of IL-27 in immunity against tumors that develop in situ and in tumor immunosurveillance remain undefined. In this study, we demonstrate that tumor development and growth are accelerated in IL-27 receptor α (Il27ra)-deficient mice. Enhanced tumor growth in both carcinogen-induced fibrosarcoma and oncogene-driven mammary carcinoma was associated with decreased interferon-γ production by CD4 and CD8 T cells and increased numbers of regulatory T-cells (Treg). This is the first study to show that IL-27 promotes protective immune responses against endogenous tumors, which is critical as the basis for future development of an IL-27 based therapeutic agent.

  13. Interleukin-27 Signaling Promotes Immunity against Endogenously Arising Murine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Natividad, Karlo D. T.; Junankar, Simon R.; Mohd Redzwan, Norhanani; Nair, Radhika; Wirasinha, Rushika C.; King, Cecile; Brink, Robert; Swarbrick, Alexander; Batten, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-27 (IL-27) is a pleiotropic cytokine but its immunosuppressive effects predominate during many in vivo immunological challenges. Despite this, evidence from tumor cell line transfer models suggested that IL-27 could promote immune responses in the tumor context. However, the role of IL-27 in immunity against tumors that develop in situ and in tumor immunosurveillance remain undefined. In this study, we demonstrate that tumor development and growth are accelerated in IL-27 receptor α (Il27ra)-deficient mice. Enhanced tumor growth in both carcinogen-induced fibrosarcoma and oncogene-driven mammary carcinoma was associated with decreased interferon-γ production by CD4 and CD8 T cells and increased numbers of regulatory T-cells (Treg). This is the first study to show that IL-27 promotes protective immune responses against endogenous tumors, which is critical as the basis for future development of an IL-27 based therapeutic agent. PMID:23554861

  14. Tumors in murine brains studied by grating-based phase contrast microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Georg; Dominietto, Marco; Kovacs, Zsofia; Schmitz, Rüdiger; Hieber, Simone E.; Thalmann, Peter; Beckmann, Felix; Müller, Bert

    2014-09-01

    Angiogenesis, i.e. the formation of vessels, is one of the key processes during tumor development. The newly formed vessels transport oxygen and nutrients from the healthy tissue to the tumor and gives tumor cells the possibility to replicate. The principle of anti-angiogenic therapy is to block angiogenic process in order to stop tumor growth. The aim of the present study is the investigation of murine glioma vascular architecture at early (7 days), intermediate (10 and 15 days) and late (23 days) stage of growth by means of grating-based phase contrast microtomography. We demonstrate that this technique yields premium contrast between healthy and cancerous parts of murine brain tissues.

  15. STRAIN-DEPENDENT SUSCEPTIBILITY TO TRANSPLACENTALLY-INDUCED MURINE LUNG TUMORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    STRAIN-DEPENDENT SUSCEPTIBILITY TO TRANSPLACENTALLY-INDUCED MURINE LUNG TUMORS
    M S Miller, J E Moore, M Xu, G B Nelson, S T Dance, N D Kock, J A Ross Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC and USEPA, Research Triangle Park, NC

    Previously, our laboratory demonstrated...

  16. Sequence dependence of administration of human recombinant tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-2 in murine tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, R J; Gauny, S; Chan, A; Landre, P; Winkelhake, J L

    1989-02-01

    Simultaneous administration of recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (rhTNF) and interleukin-2 (rhIL-2) has been shown to block tumor take in murine models. We investigated the effects of sequence and schedule of administration as a function of tumor burden with two tumor models (B16 and Meth A). rhTNF followed by rhIL-2 had extraordinary antitumor efficacy, but rhIL-2 followed by rhTNF was much less effective. Sequential rhTNF/rhIL-2 therapy resulted in complete tumor regression, whereas simultaneous therapy resulted in complete tumor regression, whereas simultaneous therapy resulted in only reduced growth rate. Experiments with genetically immunodeficient mice suggested that T cell factors may be required for synergistic antitumor activity.

  17. Immunogenicity of murine solid tumor models as a defining feature of in vivo behavior and response to immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Melissa G; Karimi, Saman S; Barry-Holson, Keegan; Angell, Trevor E; Murphy, Katherine A; Church, Connor H; Ohlfest, John R; Hu, Peisheng; Epstein, Alan L

    2013-01-01

    Immune profiling has been widely used to probe mechanisms of immune escape in cancer and identify novel targets for therapy. Two emerging uses of immune signatures are to identify likely responders to immunotherapy regimens among individuals with cancer and to understand the variable responses seen among subjects with cancer in immunotherapy trials. Here, the immune profiles of 6 murine solid tumor models (CT26, 4T1, MAD109, RENCA, LLC, and B16) were correlated to tumor regression and survival in response to 2 immunotherapy regimens. Comprehensive profiles for each model were generated using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, and flow cytometry techniques, as well as functional studies of suppressor cell populations (regulatory T cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells), to analyze intratumoral and draining lymphoid tissues. Tumors were stratified as highly or poorly immunogenic, with highly immunogenic tumors showing a significantly greater presence of T-cell costimulatory molecules and immune suppression in the tumor microenvironment. An absence of tumor-infiltrating cytotoxic T lymphocytes and mature dendritic cells was seen across all models. Delayed tumor growth and increased survival with suppressor cell inhibition and tumor-targeted chemokine+/-dendritic cells vaccine immunotherapy were associated with high tumor immunogenicity in these models. Tumor MHC class I expression correlated with the overall tumor immunogenicity level and was a singular marker to predict immunotherapy response with these regimens. By using experimental tumor models as surrogates for human cancers, these studies demonstrate how select features of an immune profile may be utilized to identify patients most likely to respond to immunotherapy regimens.

  18. Cone beam CT tumor vasculature dynamic study (Murine model)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dong; Ning, Ruola; Conover, David; Ricardo, Betancourt; Liu, Shaohua

    2008-03-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is the process by which new blood vessels are formed from the existing vessels in a tumor to promote tumor growth. Tumor angiogenesis has important implications in the diagnosis and treatment of various solid tumors. Flat panel detector based cone beam CT opens up a new way for detection of tumors, and tumor angiogenesis associated with functional CBCT has the potential to provide more information than traditional functional CT due to more overall coverage during the same scanning period and the reconstruction being isotropic resulting in a more accurate 3D volume intensity measurement. A functional study was conducted by using CBCT to determine the degree of the enhancement within the tumor after injecting the contrast agent intravenously. For typical doses of contrast material, the amount of enhancement is proportional to the concentration of this material within the region of interest. A series of images obtained at one location over time allows generation of time-attenuation data from which a number of semi-quantitative parameters, such as enhancement rate, can be determined. An in vivo mice study with and without mammo tumor was conducted on our prototype CBCT system, and half scan scheme is used to determine the time-intensity curve within the VOI of the mouse. The CBCT has an x-ray tube, a gantry with slip ring technology, and a 40×30 cm Varian Paxscan 4030CB real time FPD.

  19. Systemic administration of attenuated Salmonella choleraesuis carrying thrombospondin-1 gene leads to tumor-specific transgene expression, delayed tumor growth and prolonged survival in the murine melanoma model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Che-Hsin; Wu, Chao-Liang; Shiau, Ai-Li

    2005-02-01

    Some anaerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria have been used experimentally as anticancer agents because of their selective growth in the hypoxia regions of solid tumors after systemic administration. We have previously shown the feasibility of using attenuated Salmonella choleraesuis as a gene delivery vector. In this study, we exploited S. choleraesuis carrying thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) gene for treating primary melanoma and experimental pulmonary metastasis in the syngeneic murine B16F10 melanoma model. Systemic administration of S. choleraesuis allowed targeted gene delivery to tumors. The bacteria accumulated preferentially in tumors over livers and spleens at ratios ranging from 1000:1 to 10,000:1. The level of transgene expression via S. choleraesuis-mediated gene transfer in tumors could reach more than 1800-fold higher than in livers and spleens. Notably, bacterial accumulation was also observed in the lungs with metastatic nodules, but not in healthy lungs. When administered into mice bearing subcutaneous or pulmonary metastatic melanomas, S. choleraesuis carrying TSP-1 gene significantly inhibited tumor growth and enhanced survival of the mice. Immunohistochemical studies in the tumors from these mice displayed decreased intratumoral microvessel density. Taken together, these findings suggest that TSP-1 gene therapy delivered by S. choleraesuis may be effective for the treatment of primary as well as metastatic melanomas.

  20. Low concentrations of human neutrophil peptide ameliorate experimental murine colitis

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Takuro; Sakiyama, Toshio; Kanmura, Shuji; Hashimoto, Shinichi; Ibusuki, Kazunari; Tanoue, Shiroh; Komaki, Yuga; Arima, Shiho; Nasu, Yuichiro; Sasaki, Fumisato; Taguchi, Hiroki; Numata, Masatsugu; Uto, Hirofumi; Tsubouchi, Hirohito; Ido, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Human neutrophil peptides (HNPs) not only have antimicrobial properties, but also exert multiple immunomodulatory effects depending on the concentration used. We have previously demonstrated that the intraperitoneal administration of high-dose HNP-1 (100 µg/day) aggravates murine dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis, suggesting a potential pro-inflammatory role for HNPs at high concentrations. However, the role of low physiological concentrations of HNPs in the intestinal tract remains largely unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of low concentrations of HNPs on intestinal inflammation. We first examined the effects of the mild transgenic overexpression of HNP-1 in DSS-induced colitis. HNP-1 transgenic mice have plasma HNP-1 levels similar to the physiological concentrations in human plasma. Compared to wild-type mice treated with DSS, HNP-1 transgenic mice treated with DSS had significantly lower clinical and histological scores, and lower colonic mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. We then injected low-dose HNP-1 (5 µg/day) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) intraperitoneally into C57BL/6N and BALB/c mice administered DSS. The HNP-1-treated mice exhibited significantly milder colitis with reduced expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines compared with the PBS-treated mice. Finally, we examined the in vitro effects of HNP-1 on the expression of cytokines associated with macrophage activation. Low physiological concentrations of HNP-1 did not significantly affect the expression levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6 or IL-10 in colonic lamina propria mononuclear cells activated with heat-killed Escherichia coli, suggesting that the anti-inflammatory effects of HNP-1 on murine colitis may not be exerted by direct action on intestinal macrophages. Collectively, our data demonstrated a biphasic dose-dependent effect of HNP-1 on DSS-induced colitis: an amelioration at

  1. Low concentrations of human neutrophil peptide ameliorate experimental murine colitis.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Takuro; Sakiyama, Toshio; Kanmura, Shuji; Hashimoto, Shinichi; Ibusuki, Kazunari; Tanoue, Shiroh; Komaki, Yuga; Arima, Shiho; Nasu, Yuichiro; Sasaki, Fumisato; Taguchi, Hiroki; Numata, Masatsugu; Uto, Hirofumi; Tsubouchi, Hirohito; Ido, Akio

    2016-12-01

    Human neutrophil peptides (HNPs) not only have antimicrobial properties, but also exert multiple immunomodulatory effects depending on the concentration used. We have previously demonstrated that the intraperitoneal administration of high-dose HNP-1 (100 µg/day) aggravates murine dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis, suggesting a potential pro-inflammatory role for HNPs at high concentrations. However, the role of low physiological concentrations of HNPs in the intestinal tract remains largely unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of low concentrations of HNPs on intestinal inflammation. We first examined the effects of the mild transgenic overexpression of HNP-1 in DSS-induced colitis. HNP-1 transgenic mice have plasma HNP-1 levels similar to the physiological concentrations in human plasma. Compared to wild-type mice treated with DSS, HNP-1 transgenic mice treated with DSS had significantly lower clinical and histological scores, and lower colonic mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. We then injected low-dose HNP-1 (5 µg/day) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) intraperitoneally into C57BL/6N and BALB/c mice administered DSS. The HNP-1-treated mice exhibited significantly milder colitis with reduced expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines compared with the PBS-treated mice. Finally, we examined the in vitro effects of HNP-1 on the expression of cytokines associated with macrophage activation. Low physiological concentrations of HNP-1 did not significantly affect the expression levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6 or IL-10 in colonic lamina propria mononuclear cells activated with heat-killed Escherichia coli, suggesting that the anti-inflammatory effects of HNP-1 on murine colitis may not be exerted by direct action on intestinal macrophages. Collectively, our data demonstrated a biphasic dose-dependent effect of HNP-1 on DSS-induced colitis: an

  2. Altered transcription of genes coding for class I histocompatibility antigens in murine tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Three murine tumors induced by Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MLV) which exhibited loss of some or all H-2 class I antigens at the cell surface were analyzed at the DNA and RNA level with molecular probes specific of H-2 heavy chains and beta 2-microglobulin sequences. No observable difference could be detected at the DNA level between the tumors and the parent animals. However, a decrease in H-2 mRNA was observed, especially in phenotypically H-2 negative tumor, BM5R, where H-2 transcripts were at least 30-fold less abundant. These results show that an H-2-negative character may result from a general alteration in the transcription of H-2 genes, which could reflect some kind of regulatory process. PMID:6311935

  3. Multispectral Imaging of T and B Cells in Murine Spleen and Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zipei; Jensen, Shawn M.; Messenheimer, David J.; Farhad, Mohammed; Neuberger, Michael; Bifulco, Carlo B.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in multiplex immunohistochemistry techniques allow for quantitative, spatial identification of multiple immune parameters for enhanced diagnostic and prognostic insight. However, applying such techniques to murine fixed tissues, particularly sensitive epitopes, such as CD4, CD8α, and CD19, has been difficult. We compared different fixation protocols and Ag-retrieval techniques and validated the use of multiplex immunohistochemistry for detection of CD3+CD4+ and CD3+CD8+ T cell subsets in murine spleen and tumor. This allows for enumeration of these T cell subsets within immune environments, as well as the study of their spatial distribution. PMID:26994219

  4. Cabozantinib Eradicates Advanced Murine Prostate Cancer by Activating Anti-Tumor Innate Immunity.

    PubMed

    Patnaik, Akash; Swanson, Kenneth D; Csizmadia, Eva; Solanki, Aniruddh; Landon-Brace, Natalie; Gehring, Marina P; Helenius, Katja; Olson, Brian M; Pyzer, Athalia R; Wang, Lily C; Elemento, Olivier; Novak, Jesse; Thornley, Thomas B; Asara, John M; Montaser, Laleh; Timmons, Joshua J; Morgan, Todd M; Wang, Yugang; Levantini, Elena; Clohessy, John G; Kelly, Kathleen; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Rosenblatt, Jacalyn M; Avigan, David E; Ye, Huihui; Karp, Jeffrey M; Signoretti, Sabina; Balk, Steven P; Cantley, Lewis C

    2017-03-08

    Several kinase inhibitors that target aberrant signaling pathways in tumor cells have been deployed in cancer therapy. However, their impact on the tumor immune microenvironment remains poorly understood. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor cabozantinib showed striking responses in cancer clinical trial patients across several malignancies. Here we show that cabozantinib rapidly eradicates invasive, poorly-differentiated PTEN/p53 deficient murine prostate cancer. This was associated with enhanced release of neutrophil chemotactic factors from tumor cells, including CXCL12 and HMGB1, resulting in robust infiltration of neutrophils into the tumor. Critically, cabozantinib-induced tumor clearance in mice was abolished by antibody-mediated granulocyte depletion or HMGB1 neutralization or blockade of neutrophil chemotaxis with the CXCR4 inhibitor, plerixafor. Collectively, these data demonstrate that cabozantinib triggers a neutrophil-mediated anti-cancer innate immune response, resulting in tumor clearance.

  5. Dietary linoleate-enhanced metastasis of 4526 murine mammary tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, N.E.

    1987-01-01

    The influence of quantitative differences in dietary linoleic acid (18:2) and of the cyclooxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin (IM), on the metastasis of line 4526 mammary tumors was investigated. All mice were fed high fat (20%, w/w), semipurified diets that were prepared using different mixtures of coconut (primarily saturated) and safflower (mostly 18:2) oil and thus contained either 1, 2, 4, 8, or 12% 18:2 (w/w). The spontaneous metastasis of 4526 tumor cells from primary sites, was increased 2-4 fold in mice that were fed diets containing higher levels of 18:2 (8 and 12%). Chronic treatment of mice with a relatively low dosage of IM reduced the growth rate of primary 4526 tumors, slightly reduced metastasis in mice fed 1 and 4% 18:2, and completely inhibited the increased metastasis observed in mice fed 12% 18:2. Treatment with a higher dosage of IM reduced metastasis even further compared to controls, but did not decrease growth rate compared to the low dosage of IM. The level of 18:2 in the diet did not appear to affect the incorporation of {sup 3}H-thymidine into tumor cells of metastatic lung nodules. The effect of 18:2 may be through a modulation of arachidonic acid metabolism. This modulation, in turn, may affect particular steps in the metastatic cascade such as lodgement and survival of tumor cells.

  6. Nardilysin regulates inflammation, metaplasia, and tumors in murine stomach

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Yuto; Ikuta, Kozo; Kimura, Takeshi; Chiba, Tsutomu; Oshima, Hiroko; Oshima, Masanobu; Nishi, Eiichiro; Seno, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Chronic inflammation contributes to a wide variety of human disorders. In the stomach, longstanding gastritis often results in structural alterations in the gastric mucosa, including metaplastic changes and gastric cancers. Therefore, it is important to elucidate factors that are involved in gastric inflammation. Nardilysin (N-arginine dibasic convertase; Nrdc) is a metalloendopeptidase of the M16 family that promotes ectodomain shedding of the precursor forms of various growth factors and cytokines by enhancing the protease activities of a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) proteins. Here, we have demonstrated that Nrdc crucially regulates gastric inflammation caused by Helicobacter felis infection or forced expression of prostaglandin E2 in K19-C2mE mice. Metaplastic changes following gastric inflammation were suppressed by the deletion of Nrdc. Furthremore, the deletion of Nrdc significantly suppressed N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced gastric tumorigenesis in the murine stomach. These data may lead to a global therapeutic approach against various gastric disorders by targeting Nrdc. PMID:28230087

  7. A longitudinal magnetic resonance elastography study of murine brain tumors following radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y.; Clayton, E. H.; Okamoto, R. J.; Engelbach, J.; Bayly, P. V.; Garbow, J. R.

    2016-08-01

    An accurate and noninvasive method for assessing treatment response following radiotherapy is needed for both treatment monitoring and planning. Measurement of solid tumor volume alone is not sufficient for reliable early detection of therapeutic response, since changes in physiological and/or biomechanical properties can precede tumor volume change following therapy. In this study, we use magnetic resonance elastography to evaluate the treatment effect after radiotherapy in a murine brain tumor model. Shear modulus was calculated and compared between the delineated tumor region of interest (ROI) and its contralateral, mirrored counterpart. We also compared the shear modulus from both the irradiated and non-irradiated tumor and mirror ROIs longitudinally, sampling four time points spanning 9-19 d post tumor implant. Results showed that the tumor ROI had a lower shear modulus than that of the mirror ROI, independent of radiation. The shear modulus of the tumor ROI decreased over time for both the treated and untreated groups. By contrast, the shear modulus of the mirror ROI appeared to be relatively constant for the treated group, while an increasing trend was observed for the untreated group. The results provide insights into the tumor properties after radiation treatment and demonstrate the potential of using the mechanical properties of the tumor as a biomarker. In future studies, more closely spaced time points will be employed for detailed analysis of the radiation effect.

  8. Therapy of Experimental Nerve Sheath Tumors Using Oncolytic Viruses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Abstract follows. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Oncolytic HSV, angiogenesis, MPNST , mouse model 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...reliable tumor models for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors ( MPNST ). Several existing and novel oncolytic HSV vectors will then be tested on these...from G47A increases cytotoxicity in vitro to human endothelial cells and murine Nfl" MPNST cell lines. Inhibition of MPNST M2 tumor growth in vivo was

  9. T-Cell Receptor Gene Therapy of Established Tumors in a Murine Melanoma Model

    PubMed Central

    Abad, John D.; Wrzensinski, Claudia; Overwijk, Willem; De Witte, Moniek A.; Jorritsma, Annelies; Hsu, Gary; Gattinoni, Luca; Cohen, Cyrille J.; Paulos, Chrystal M.; Palmer, Douglas C.; Haanen, John B. A. G.; Schumacher, Ton N. M.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Morgan, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Adoptive cell transfer therapy using tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes for patients with metastatic melanoma has demonstrated significant objective response rates. One major limitation of these current therapies is the frequent inability to isolate tumor-reactive lymphocytes for treatment. Genetic engineering of peripheral blood lymphocytes with retroviral vectors encoding tumor antigen-specific T-cell receptors (TCRs) bypasses this restriction. To evaluate the efficacy of TCR gene therapy, a murine treatment model was developed. A retroviral vector was constructed encoding the pmel-1 TCR genes targeting the B16 melanoma antigen, gp100. Transduction of C57BL/6 lymphocytes resulted in efficient pmel-1 TCR expression. Lymphocytes transduced with this retrovirus specifically recognized gp100-pulsed target cells as measured by interferon-γ secretion assays. Upon transfer into B16 tumor-bearing mice, the genetically engineered lymphocytes significantly slowed tumor development. The effectiveness of tumor treatment was directly correlated with the number of TCR-engineered T cells administered. These results demonstrated that TCR gene therapy targeting a native tumor antigen significantly delayed the growth of established tumors. When C57BL/6 lymphocytes were added to antigen-reactive pmel-1 T cells, a reduction in the ability of pmel-1 T cell to treat B16 melanomas was seen, suggesting that untransduced cells may be deleterious to TCR gene therapy. This model may be a powerful tool for evaluating future TCR gene transfer-based strategies. PMID:18157006

  10. T-cell receptor gene therapy of established tumors in a murine melanoma model.

    PubMed

    Abad, John D; Wrzensinski, Claudia; Overwijk, Willem; De Witte, Moniek A; Jorritsma, Annelies; Hsu, Cary; Gattinoni, Luca; Cohen, Cyrille J; Paulos, Chrystal M; Palmer, Douglas C; Haanen, John B A G; Schumacher, Ton N M; Rosenberg, Steven A; Restifo, Nicholas P; Morgan, Richard A

    2008-01-01

    Adoptive cell transfer therapy using tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes for patients with metastatic melanoma has demonstrated significant objective response rates. One major limitation of these current therapies is the frequent inability to isolate tumor-reactive lymphocytes for treatment. Genetic engineering of peripheral blood lymphocytes with retroviral vectors encoding tumor antigen-specific T-cell receptors (TCRs) bypasses this restriction. To evaluate the efficacy of TCR gene therapy, a murine treatment model was developed. A retroviral vector was constructed encoding the pmel-1 TCR genes targeting the B16 melanoma antigen, gp100. Transduction of C57BL/6 lymphocytes resulted in efficient pmel-1 TCR expression. Lymphocytes transduced with this retrovirus specifically recognized gp100-pulsed target cells as measured by interferon-gamma secretion assays. Upon transfer into B16 tumor-bearing mice, the genetically engineered lymphocytes significantly slowed tumor development. The effectiveness of tumor treatment was directly correlated with the number of TCR-engineered T cells administered. These results demonstrated that TCR gene therapy targeting a native tumor antigen significantly delayed the growth of established tumors. When C57BL/6 lymphocytes were added to antigen-reactive pmel-1 T cells, a reduction in the ability of pmel-1 T cell to treat B16 melanomas was seen, suggesting that untransduced cells may be deleterious to TCR gene therapy. This model may be a powerful tool for evaluating future TCR gene transfer-based strategies.

  11. Isolation and molecular characterization of cancer stem cells in MMTV-Wnt-1 murine breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Cho, Robert W; Wang, Xinhao; Diehn, Maximilian; Shedden, Kerby; Chen, Grace Y; Sherlock, Gavin; Gurney, Austin; Lewicki, John; Clarke, Michael F

    2008-02-01

    In human breast cancers, a phenotypically distinct minority population of tumorigenic (TG) cancer cells (sometimes referred to as cancer stem cells) drives tumor growth when transplanted into immunodeficient mice. Our objective was to identify a mouse model of breast cancer stem cells that could have relevance to the study of human breast cancer. To do so, we used breast tumors of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-Wnt-1 mice. MMTV-Wnt-1 breast tumors were harvested, dissociated into single-cell suspensions, and sorted by flow cytometry on Thy1, CD24, and CD45. Sorted cells were then injected into recipient background FVB/NJ female syngeneic mice. In six of seven tumors examined, Thy1+CD24+ cancer cells, which constituted approximately 1%-4% of tumor cells, were highly enriched for cells capable of regenerating new tumors compared with cells of the tumor that did not fit this profile ("not-Thy1+CD24+"). Resultant tumors had a phenotypic diversity similar to that of the original tumor and behaved in a similar manner when passaged. Microarray analysis comparing Thy1+CD24+ tumor cells to not-Thy1+CD24+ cells identified a list of differentially expressed genes. Orthologs of these differentially expressed genes predicted survival of human breast cancer patients from two different study groups. These studies suggest that there is a cancer stem cell compartment in the MMTV-Wnt-1 murine breast tumor and that there is a clinical utility of this model for the study of cancer stem cells.

  12. Modulation of prostaglandin biosynthesis in murine mammary adenocarcinoma tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shalinsky, D.R.

    1988-01-01

    In efforts to exploit the differential oxygen levels within the subcompartments of solid neoplasms, this project has focused on modulating prostaglandin (PG) biosynthesis under aerobic and hypoxic conditions. Mammary adenocarcinoma tumor cells (Line 4526), either intact or sonicated, were incubated with either 2.0 uM {sup 14}C-arachidonic acid (AA) or 20.0 uM {sup 14}C-PGH{sub 2}, respectively. Following metabolism, products were extracted, separated by thin layer chromatography and analyzed by radiochromatographic scan. PGE{sub 2} was predominantly formed with minimal amounts of PGF{sub 2a} or PGD{sub 2}. Indomethacin and ibuprofen inhibited the PGE{sub 2} formation from AA with an IC{sub 50} value of 6.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} and 9.6 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}M, respectively. Suspended cells in glass vials were made hypoxic by flushing with N{sub 2} for varying time intervals to study AA metabolism. A time-dependent inhibition of PG biosynthesis was observed under hypoxia, and by 30 min, the PGE{sub 2} synthesis was reduced by 50% which was further inhibited by indomethacin. Misonidazole, a 2-nitroimidazole analogue, partially reversed the inhibition of PGE{sub 2} synthesis under hypoxia by 49% at 100 uM. However, misonidazole did not affect PG biosynthesis under aerobic conditions. The stimulation of PGE{sub 2} biosynthesis by misonidazole under hypoxia was blocked by indomethacin, suggesting that misonidazole can not act independently of the cyclooxygenase.

  13. Radiation-induced nitric oxide mitigates tumor hypoxia and radioresistance in a murine SCCVII tumor model

    SciTech Connect

    Nagane, Masaki; Yasui, Hironobu; Yamamori, Tohru; Zhao, Songji; Kuge, Yuji; Tamaki, Nagara; Kameya, Hiromi; Nakamura, Hideo; Fujii, Hirotada; Inanami, Osamu

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •IR-induced NO increased tissue perfusion and pO{sub 2}. •IR increased NO production in tumors without changes in the mRNA and protein levels of NOS isoforms. •NOS activity assay showed that IR upregulated eNOS activity in tumors. •IR-induced NO decreased tumor hypoxia and altered tumor radiosensitivity. -- Abstract: Tumor hypoxia, which occurs mainly as a result of inadequate tissue perfusion in solid tumors, is a well-known challenge for successful radiotherapy. Recent evidence suggests that ionizing radiation (IR) upregulates nitric oxide (NO) production and that IR-induced NO has the potential to increase intratumoral circulation. However, the kinetics of NO production and the responsible isoforms for NO synthase in tumors exposed to IR remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the mechanism by which IR stimulates NO production in tumors and the effect of IR-induced NO on tumor radiosensitivity. Hoechst33342 perfusion assay and electron spin resonance oxymetry showed that IR increased tissue perfusion and pO{sub 2} in tumor tissue. Immunohistochemical analysis using two different hypoxic probes showed that IR decreased hypoxic regions in tumors; treatment with a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, L-NAME, abrogated the effects of IR. Moreover, IR increased endothelial NOS (eNOS) activity without affecting its mRNA or protein expression levels in SCCVII-transplanted tumors. Tumor growth delay assay showed that L-NAME decreased the anti-tumor effect of fractionated radiation (10 Gy × 2). These results suggested that IR increased eNOS activity and subsequent tissue perfusion in tumors. Increases in intratumoral circulation simultaneously decreased tumor hypoxia. As a result, IR-induced NO increased tumor radiosensitivity. Our study provides a new insight into the NO-dependent mechanism for efficient fractionated radiotherapy.

  14. TUMOR INDUCTION BY MURINE SARCOMA VIRUS IN AKR AND C58 MICE

    PubMed Central

    Chieco-Bianchi, Luigi; Colombatti, Alfonso; Collavo, Dino; Sendo, Fujiro; Aoki, Tadao; Fischinger, Peter J.

    1974-01-01

    Adult AKR and C58 mice injected intramuscularly with murine sarcoma virus, Moloney isolate (M-MSV), developed high incidence of nonregressing local tumors. Histologically, these tumors revealed the typical pleomorphism of M-MSV sarcomas; in some cases, however, neoplastic tissue showed a nodular or diffuse growth of monomorphic myoblastlike cells, reminiscent of clonal aggregates. No depression of immune reactivity was found in M-MSV-injected mice as evaluated by direct hemolytic plaque-forming cells against SRBC and by virus-neutralizing antibody production. The MSV recovered from the induced tumors proved to be, by neutralization assay, a Gross (G)-MSV pseudotype. Moreover, tumor cell suspensions absorbed out cytotoxic antibody directed against G-cell surface antigens. Therefore, the conclusion was drawn that MSV with envelope characteristics of endogenous G leukemia virus had formed in vivo through a phenotypic mixing phenomenon. The failure of tumors to regress has been interpreted as mainly due to the partial unresponsiveness of host immune reactivity towards G-MuLV specified antigens. Since MSV-tumors arose in AKR mice after a very long latent period, the possibility was considered that this relative resistance might depend on immunologic mechanisms. In fact, M-MSV-injected AKR mice immunodepressed by goat antimouse lymphocyte serum or rendered partially tolerant by neonatal M-MuLV inoculation developed sarcomas with higher incidence and with a shorter latency. Furthermore, the MSV recovered from these early tumors proved to be the original Moloney pseudotype. PMID:4608945

  15. Critical roles of TIPE2 protein in murine experimental colitis

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Yunwei; Sun, Honghong; Morrissey, Samantha; Porturas, Thomas; Liu, Suxia; Hua, Xianxin; Chen, Youhai H.

    2014-01-01

    Both commensal bacteria and infiltrating inflammatory cells play essential roles in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. The molecular mechanisms whereby these pathogenic factors are regulated during the disease are not fully understood. We report here that a member of the TNFAIP8 (tumor necrosis factor-α-induced protein 8) family called TIPE2 (TNFAIP8-like 2, or TNFAIP8L2) plays a crucial role in regulating commensal bacteria dissemination and inflammatory cell function in experimental colitis induced by dextran sodium sulfate (DSS). Following DSS treatment, TIPE2-deficient mice, or chimeric mice that are deficient in TIPE2 only in their hematopoietic cells, lost less body weight and survived longer than wild type controls. Consistent with this clinical observation, TIPE2-deficient mice exhibited significantly less severe colitis and colonic damage. This was associated with a marked reduction in the colonic expression of inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-12. Importantly, the ameliorated DSS-induced colitis in TIPE2−/− mice was also associated with reduced local dissemination of commensal bacteria and a weaker systemic inflammatory response. Combined with our previous report that TIPE2 is a negative regulator of anti-bacterial immunity, these results indicate that TIPE2 promotes colitis by inhibiting mucosal immunity to commensal bacteria. PMID:24973456

  16. Local tumor irradiation augments the response to IL-2 therapy in a murine renal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Younes, E; Haas, G P; Dezso, B; Ali, E; Maughan, R L; Kukuruga, M A; Montecillo, E; Pontes, J E; Hillman, G G

    1995-10-15

    We have previously demonstrated that local tumor irradiation effectively enhanced the therapeutic effect of IL-2 therapy on pulmonary metastases from a murine renal adenocarcinoma, Renca. Irradiation with 300 rad to the left lung only, followed by systemic IL-2 therapy, results in increased tumor reduction in both lungs, suggesting that radiation enhances the systemic effect of immunotherapy. In this study, we show that irradiation of the tumor-bearing organ is essential for the combined effect of both modalities. This effect is radiation dose-dependent as increases in the radiation dosage result in greater tumor reduction in the irradiated field as well as systemically in nonirradiated fields when combined with immunotherapy. We find that irradiation has a direct inhibitory effect on Renca cell growth in vitro. Irradiation of Renca cells also causes an upregulation in H-2Kd class I MHC antigen detectable at 300 rad and more pronounced with 800 rad. By in vivo selective depletion of lymphocyte subsets, we demonstrate the involvement of Lyt-2+ and L3T4+ T cell subsets and AsGM1+ cells, including NK cells, in the antitumor effect mediated by tumor irradiation and IL-2 therapy. Immunohistochemistry studies, performed on lung sections, showed a significant infiltration of CD3+ T cells and macrophages in the tumor nodules following treatment with tumor irradiation and IL-2 therapy. Our studies indicate that the mechanism of interaction between tumor irradiation and immunotherapy may include radiation-induced alterations in the tumor growth and antigenicity which may enhance or trigger an anti-tumor response elicited by IL-2 and mediated by T cells, AsGM1+ cells, and macrophages.

  17. The potentiation of radiation response on murine tumor by fludarabine phosphate.

    PubMed

    Kim, J H; Alfieri, A A; Kim, S H; Fuks, Z

    1986-04-01

    Fludarabine phosphate is a synthetic analog of beta-arabinofuranosyl adenine (beta-ara-A), an anti-viral agent. Since beta-ara-A has been shown to be an effective inhibitor of potentially lethal damage (PLD) repair in cell culture system but ineffective in in vivo tumors, we carried out experiments to determine whether fludarabine phosphate which is not inactivated by adenosine deaminase potentiates the radiation effects on in vivo murine tumor. The combined effects of single acute fludarabine phosphate (600 mg/kg) and single dose of X-irradiation (20 Gy) on Meth-A fibrosarcomas in BALB/c mice produced more than 90% tumor control, while the radiation alone resulted in less than 10% tumor control. The radiosensitizing effect by fludarabine phosphate was higher when the drug was administered immediately prior to X-irradiation. The dose modifying factor of fludarabine phosphate is estimated to be 1.6 at 400 mg/kg. Experiments with fractionated irradiation and fludarabine phosphate similarly showed a high rate of tumor control. The present study suggests that inhibitors of PLD repair including several antiviral agents may have potential utility in the treatment of some radioresistant human tumors by radiotherapy.

  18. T cell receptor transgenic lymphocytes infiltrating murine tumors are not induced to express foxp3

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) that express the transcription factor Foxp3 are enriched within a broad range of murine and human solid tumors. The ontogeny of these Foxp3 Tregs - selective accumulation or proliferation of natural thymus-derived Treg (nTreg) or induced Treg (iTreg) converted in the periphery from naïve T cells - is not known. We used several strains of mice in which Foxp3 and EGFP are coordinately expressed to address this issue. We confirmed that Foxp3-positive CD4 T cells are enriched among tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) and splenocytes (SPL) in B16 murine melanoma-bearing C57BL/6 Foxp3EGFP mice. OT-II Foxp3EGFP mice are essentially devoid of nTreg, having transgenic CD4 T cells that recognize a class II-restricted epitope derived from ovalbumin; Foxp3 expression could not be detected in TIL or SPL in these mice when implanted with ovalbumin-transfected B16 tumor (B16-OVA). Likewise, TIL isolated from B16 tumors implanted in Pmel-1 Foxp3EGFP mice, whose CD8 T cells recognize a class I-restricted gp100 epitope, were not induced to express Foxp3. All of these T cell populations - wild-type CD4, pmel CD8 and OTII CD4 - could be induced in vitro to express Foxp3 by engagement of their T cell receptor (TCR) and exposure to transforming growth factor β (TGFβ). B16 melanoma produces TGFβ and both pmel CD8 and OTII CD4 express TCR that should be engaged within B16 and B16-OVA respectively. Thus, CD8 and CD4 transgenic T cells in these animal models failed to undergo peripheral induction of Foxp3 in a tumor microenvironment. PMID:22112546

  19. Gender-Specific Transfusion Affects Tumor-Associated Neutrophil: Macrophage Ratios in Murine Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Douglas D.; Kelher, Marguerite R.; Meng, Xianzhong; Fullerton, David A.; Lee, Joon H.; Silliman, Christopher C.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Perioperative blood transfusion has been linked to decreased survival for pancreas cancer. Noting clinical data associating female blood products with increased morbidity, our lab has demonstrated that transfusion of female blood augments metastatic events compared to male blood in an immunocompetent murine pancreatic cancer model. It has been suggested that tumor-associated macrophages correlate with tumor progression by promoting angiogenesis. More recently, tumor-associated neutrophils have been implicated in aggressive tumor behavior. We hypothesize that differences in gender-specific transfusion-mediated pancreatic cancer progression are due to microenvironmental changes within the tumor. To test this hypothesis, we examined tumor-associated neutrophils and macrophage ratios in male and female mice with pancreatic cancer receiving blood transfusion from male or female donors. Methods C57/BL6 mice, age 7–9 weeks, underwent splenic inoculation with 2.5×105 PanO2 murine pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells. Mice were transfused on post-op day 7 with 1 ml/kg supernatant from day 42 male or female packed red cells. Necropsy was performed at 5 weeks or earlier for clinical deterioration, and tumors harvested. Frozen sections (5 μm) were stained for neutrophils and macrophages by immunofluorescence. Data were analyzed using ANOVA; p≤0.05 was used to determine significance; N≥3 per group. Results Clinically, male mice had greater morbidity and mortality than female mice when receiving female blood products, with roughened hair coat, development of ascites and death due to bowel obstruction. In evaluating the tumor microenvironment from mice receiving female blood products, male mice were noted to have a greater neutrophil to macrophage ratio than female mice, 0.176±0.028 vs. 0.073±0.012, p=0.03. When examining neutrophil to macrophage ratio in mice receiving male blood products, no difference was noted (p=0.48). Conclusions Male mice with pancreas

  20. Correlation between experimental human and murine skin sensitization induction thresholds.

    PubMed

    Api, Anne Marie; Basketter, David; Lalko, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative risk assessment for skin sensitization is directed towards the determination of levels of exposure to known sensitizing substances that will avoid the induction of contact allergy in humans. A key component of this work is the predictive identification of relative skin sensitizing potency, achieved normally by the measurement of the threshold (the "EC3" value) in the local lymph node assay (LLNA). In an extended series of studies, the accuracy of this murine induction threshold as the predictor of the absence of a sensitizing effect has been verified by conduct of a human repeated insult patch test (HRIPT). Murine and human thresholds for a diverse set of 57 fragrance chemicals spanning approximately four orders of magnitude variation in potency have been compared. The results confirm that there is a useful correlation, with the LLNA EC3 value helping particularly to identify stronger sensitizers. Good correlation (with half an order of magnitude) was seen with three-quarters of the dataset. The analysis also helps to identify potential outlier types of (fragrance) chemistry, exemplified by hexyl and benzyl salicylates (an over-prediction) and trans-2-hexenal (an under-prediction).

  1. Role of curcumin-dependent modulation of tumor microenvironment of a murine T cell lymphoma in altered regulation of tumor cell survival

    SciTech Connect

    Vishvakarma, Naveen Kumar; Kumar, Anjani; Singh, Sukh Mahendra

    2011-05-01

    Using a murine model of a T cell lymphoma, in the present study, we report that tumor growth retarding action of curcumin involves modulation of some crucial parameters of tumor microenvironment regulating tumor progression. Curcumin-administration to tumor-bearing host caused an altered pH regulation in tumor cells associated with alteration in expression of cell survival and apoptosis regulatory proteins and genes. Nevertheless, an alteration was also observed in biophysical parameters of tumor microenvironment responsible for modulation of tumor growth pertaining to hypoxia, tumor acidosis, and glucose metabolism. The study thus sheds new light with respect to the antineoplastic action of curcumin against a tumor-bearing host with progressively growing tumor of hematological origin. This will help in optimizing application of the drug and anticancer research and therapy. - Graphical Abstract: Display Omitted

  2. Targeting geranylgeranylation reduces adrenal gland tumor burden in a murine model of prostate cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Jacqueline E; Neighbors, Jeffrey D; Tong, Huaxiang; Henry, Michael D; Hohl, Raymond J

    2015-08-01

    The isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway (IBP) is critical for providing substrates for the post-translational modification of proteins key in regulating malignant cell properties, including proliferation, invasion, and migration. Inhibitors of the IBP, including statins and nitrogenous bisphosphonates, are used clinically for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and bone disease respectively. The statins work predominantly in the liver, while the nitrogenous bisphosphonates are highly sequestered to bone. Inhibition of the entire IBP is limited by organ specificity and side effects resulting from depletion of all isoprenoids. We have developed a novel compound, disodium [(6Z,11E,15E)-9-[bis(sodiooxy)phosphoryl]-17-hydroxy-2,6,12,16-tetramethyheptadeca-2,6,11,15-tetraen-9-yl]phosphonate (GGOHBP), which selectively targets geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase, reducing post-translational protein geranylgeranylation. Intracardiac injection of luciferase-expressing human-derived 22Rv1 PCa cells into SCID mice resulted in tumor development in bone (100 %), adrenal glands (72 %), mesentery (22 %), liver (17 %), and the thoracic cavity (6 %). Three weeks after tumor inoculation, daily subcutaneous (SQ) injections of 1.5 mg/kg GGOHBP or the vehicle were given for one month. Dissected tumors revealed a reduction in adrenal gland tumors corresponding to a 54 % (P < 0.005) reduction in total adrenal gland tumor weight of the treated mice as compared to vehicle-treated controls. Western blot analysis of the harvested tissues showed a reduction in Rap1A geranylgeranylation in adrenal glands and mesenteric tumors of the treated mice while non-tumorous tissues and control mice showed no Rap1A alteration. Our findings detail a novel bisphosphonate compound capable of preferentially altering the IBP in tumor-burdened adrenal glands of a murine model of PCa metastasis.

  3. Targeting geranylgeranylation reduces adrenal gland tumor burden in a murine model of prostate cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, Jacqueline E; Neighbors, Jeffrey D; Tong, Huaxiang; Henry, Michael D; Hohl, Raymond J

    2016-01-01

    The isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway (IBP) is critical for providing substrates for the post-translational modification of proteins key in regulating malignant cell properties, including proliferation, invasion, and migration. Inhibitors of the IBP, including statins and nitrogenous bisphosphonates, are used clinically for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and bone disease respectively. The statins work predominantly in the liver, while the nitrogenous bisphosphonates are highly sequestered to bone. Inhibition of the entire IBP is limited by organ specificity and side effects resulting from depletion of all isoprenoids. We have developed a novel compound, disodium [(6Z,11E,15E)-9-[bis(sodiooxy)phosphoryl]-17-hydroxy-2,6,12,16-tetramethyheptadeca-2,6,11,15-tetraen-9-yl]phosphonate (GGOHBP), which selectively targets geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase (GGDPS), reducing post-translational protein geranylgeranylation. Intracardiac injection of luciferase-expressing human-derived 22Rv1 PCa cells into SCID mice resulted in tumor development in bone (100%), adrenal glands (72%), mesentery (22%), liver (17%), and the thoracic cavity (6%). Three weeks after tumor inoculation, daily subcutaneous (SQ) injections of 1.5 mg/kg GGOHBP or the vehicle were given for one month. Dissected tumors revealed areduction in adrenal gland tumors corresponding to a 54% (P < 0.005) reduction in total adrenal gland tumor weight of the treated mice as compared to vehicle-treated controls. Western blot analysis of the harvested tissues showed a reduction in Rap1A geranylgeranylation in adrenal glands and mesenteric tumors of the treated mice while non-tumorous tissues and control mice showed no Rap1A alteration. Our findings detail a novel bisphosphonate compound capable of preferentially altering the IBP in tumor-burdened adrenal glands of a murine model of PCa metastasis. PMID:26070429

  4. Muscarinic activation enhances the anti-proliferative effect of paclitaxel in murine breast tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Español, Alejandro Javier; Jacob, Guillermina; Dmytrenko, Ganna; Sales, María Elena

    2013-10-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) are expressed in cells without nervous origin. mAChR are up-regulated in tumor cells and their stimulation can modulate tumor growth. In this work we investigated the ability of mAChR activation to induce tumor cell death. We studied the action of a combination of low doses of the muscarinic agonist carbachol plus paclitaxel, a chemotherapeutic agent frequently used in breast cancer treatment, in terms of effectiveness. Long term treatment with carbachol exerted anti-proliferative actions on LM2 and LM3 murine mammary adenocarcinoma cells, similarly to paclitaxel. The combination of carbachol with paclitaxel at submaximal concentrations, added during 20 h decreased tumor cell proliferation in a more potent manner than each drug added separately. This effect was reverted by the muscarinic antagonist atropine, and was due to a potentiation of tumor cell apoptosis tested by TUNEL assay. This treatment did not affect the proliferation of the non tumorigenic mammary cell line NMuMG. In conclusion, the combination of a muscarinic agonist plus paclitaxel should be tested as a useful therapeutic tool in breast cancer treatment.

  5. Partial characterization of n-butanol-solubilized rejection-type antigens of syngeneic murine colon tumors.

    PubMed

    Sato, N; Kikuchi, K

    1985-04-01

    Previous investigation of the transplantation immunity of 2 cultured murine colon lines of BALB/c origin, C-C36 and C-C26, showed these tumor lines to be immunogenic against individual tumors and to have possibly cross-reactive, tumor-rejection-type antigens. For characterization of the molecular features of tumor-rejection antigens expressed on the colon tumor cells, n-butanol was used for the extraction of rejection-type antigens from tumor cells and immunogenic molecules were analyzed on transplantation immunity. The data demonstrated that extraction of the rejection-type antigens from C-C36 and C-C26 surface membrane without cellular lysis was possible with n-butanol treatment of these cells, and immunogenic activities of these extracts from C-C36 and C-C26 cells were more potent than those of nonionic detergent Nonidet P40 extracts in the tumor-rejection assays. The extracts were partially characterized by chromatographic separation on Sephadex G-200 gel filtration and lectin-affinity chromatography. It was suggested that the C-C36 antigens responsible for tumor-rejection activity against the same tumor cells had a molecular weight range of approximately 150,000 to 250,000 (fraction II) in the presence of 5 mM EDTA and had been eluted into unbound fractions to lens culinaris lectin on affinity chromatography. Moreover, immunization of mice with antigens from the same fractions (fraction II) of n-butanol extracts of C-C26 tumor on the gel filtration could induce the resistance against challenged C-C36 as well as against challenged C-C26 tumor growth. These results may indicate that solubilized tumor-rejection-type antigens found in C-C36 and C-C26 colon tumors have a size similar to that of the molecules and that cross-reacting, rejection-type antigens between these cells are the products of the same gene clusters or somatic derivatives of a single gene.

  6. The Relationship between the Antitumor Effect of the IL-12 Gene Therapy and the Expression of Th1 Cytokines in an HPV16-Positive Murine Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    García Paz, Flor; Madrid Marina, Vicente; Morales Ortega, Ausencio; Santander González, Abimelec; Peralta Zaragoza, Oscar; Burguete García, Ana; Torres Poveda, Kirvis; Moreno, José; Alcocer González, Juan; Hernandez Marquez, Eva; Bermúdez Morales, Victor

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The goal of the present study was to investigate the effect of IL-12 expressed in plasmid on the Th1 cytokine profile in an experimental HPV16-positive murine tumor model and the association with the IL-12's antitumor effect. Methods. Mice were injected with BMK-16/myc cells to establish HPV16-positive tumor and then pNGVL3-mIL-12 plasmid; pcDNA3 plasmid or PBS was injected directly into tumor site. The antitumor effect of the treatment was evaluated and the cytokines expression profile in each tumor tissue was analyzed. Results. Treatment with pNGVL3-mIL-12 plasmid had a significant antitumor effect, and a Th2-Th3-type cytokines prolife was detected in the murine tumor model with expression of the cytokines IL-10, IL-4, and TGF-β1. However, after the tumor was treated with three intratumoral injections of plasmid containing IL-12 cDNA, it showed a cytokine profile associated with Th1 with expression of IL-2, IL-12, and IFN-γ cytokines and reduced expression of IL-10, IL-4, and TGF-β1. Conclusions. The treatment with the IL-12 gene in the experimental HPV16-positive tumor model promoted the activation of the cellular immune response via expression of a Th1-type cytokine profile and was associated with the inhibition of tumor growth. Thus, IL-12 treatment represents a novel approach for gene therapy against cervical cancer. PMID:24808638

  7. Generation of a murine hepatic angiosarcoma cell line and reproducible mouse tumor model.

    PubMed

    Rothweiler, Sonja; Dill, Michael T; Terracciano, Luigi; Makowska, Zuzanna; Quagliata, Luca; Hlushchuk, Ruslan; Djonov, Valentin; Heim, Markus H; Semela, David

    2015-03-01

    Hepatic angiosarcoma (AS) is a rare and highly aggressive tumor of endothelial origin with dismal prognosis. Studies of the molecular biology of AS and treatment options are limited as animal models are rare. We have previously shown that inducible knockout of Notch1 in mice leads to spontaneous formation of hepatic AS. The aims of this study were to: (1) establish and characterize a cell line derived from this murine AS, (2) identify molecular pathways involved in the pathogenesis and potential therapeutic targets, and (3) generate a tumor transplantation model. AS cells retained specific endothelial properties such as tube formation activity, as well as expression of CD31 and Von Willebrand factor. However, electron microscopy analysis revealed signs of dedifferentiation with loss of fenestrae and loss of contact inhibition. Microarray and pathway analysis showed substantial changes in gene expression and revealed activation of the Myc pathway. Exposing the AS cells to sorafenib reduced migration, filopodia dynamics, and cell proliferation but did not induce apoptosis. In addition, sorafenib suppressed ERK phosphorylation and expression of cyclin D2. Injection of AS cells into NOD/SCID mice resulted in formation of undifferentiated tumors, confirming the tumorigenic potential of these cells. In summary, we established and characterized a murine model of spontaneous AS formation and hepatic AS cell lines as a useful in vitro tool. Our data demonstrate antitumor activity of sorafenib in AS cells with potent inhibition of migration, filopodia formation, and cell proliferation, supporting further evaluation of sorafenib as a novel treatment strategy. In addition, AS cell transplantation provides a subcutaneous tumor model useful for in vivo preclinical drug testing.

  8. Interleukin-12 and interleukin-18 synergistically induce murine tumor regression which involves inhibition of angiogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Coughlin, C M; Salhany, K E; Wysocka, M; Aruga, E; Kurzawa, H; Chang, A E; Hunter, C A; Fox, J C; Trinchieri, G; Lee, W M

    1998-01-01

    The antitumor effect and mechanisms activated by murine IL-12 and IL-18, cytokines that induce IFN-gamma production, were studied using engineered SCK murine mammary carcinoma cells. In syngeneic A/J mice, SCK cells expressing mIL-12 or mIL-18 were less tumorigenic and formed tumors more slowly than control cells. Neither SCK.12 nor SCK.18 cells protected significantly against tumorigenesis by distant SCK cells. However, inoculation of the two cell types together synergistically protected 70% of mice from concurrently injected distant SCK cells and 30% of mice from SCK cells established 3 d earlier. Antibody neutralization studies revealed that the antitumor effects of secreted mIL-12 and mIL-18 required IFN-gamma. Interestingly, half the survivors of SCK.12 and/or SCK.18 cells developed protective immunity suggesting that anti-SCK immunity is unlikely to be responsible for protection. Instead, angiogenesis inhibition, assayed by Matrigel implants, appeared to be a property of both SCK.12 and SCK.18 cells and the two cell types together produced significantly greater systemic inhibition of angiogenesis. This suggests that inhibition of tumor angiogenesis is an important part of the systemic antitumor effect produced by mIL-12 and mIL-18. PMID:9502787

  9. Experimental infection of murine and human macrophages with Cystoisospora belli.

    PubMed

    Resende, Deisy V; Lages-Silva, Eliane; Assis, Dnieber C; Prata, Aluízio; Oliveira-Silva, Márcia B

    2009-08-01

    Extraintestinal cystoisosporosis by Cystoisospora belli has already been reported in HIV/AIDS patients, generally involving preferential invasion of mesenteric and trachaeobronchial lymph nodes, liver and spleen by unizoic cysts of this parasite, which may infect macrophages. To test this hypothesis, murine and human macrophages were exposed to sporozoites of C. belli and cultures were observed daily after contact with these cells. The parasites penetrated and multiplied by endodyogeny in both cell types and inserted themselves inside perinuclear vacuoles. After 48 h, extracellular parasites were removed from macrophage cultures and incubated in Monkey Kidney Rhesus cells (MK2) where there was intense multiplication. This is the first report of infection of macrophages by this parasite, which supports the hypothesis that these could act as C. belli host cells in extraintestinal sites.

  10. Effects of inhibitors of radiation-induced potentially lethal damage repair on chemotherapy in murine tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Nakatsugawa, S.; Sugahara, T.

    1982-09-01

    Enhancement of various antitumor drugs effects by inhibitors of radiation-induced potentially lethal damage (PLD) repair was studied in three murine tumors (EMT-6, RIF-1 and SQ-1). In EMT-6 tumors, PLD repair inhibitors, 3'-deoxyguanosine (3'dG) and 7904 (a derivative of 3'-deoxyadenosine) showed a marked enhancement of tumor growth inhibition by anticancerous drugs (FT-207 (a derivative of 5-FU), bleomycin, Ara-C, ACNU). However, the effects of mitomycin-C and vincristine were not potentiated by the inhibitors. In SQ-1 carcinomas, another repair inhibitor, ara-A (1-..beta..-D-arabinofuranosyladenine) (32 mg/kg) potentiated the effect of ACNU. In RIF-1 sarcomas, in which a low PLD repair function has been reported after ionizing radiation exposure, the potentiation was not so marked as in EMT-6 or SQ-1 tumors. Thus, as a possibility, the potentiation by inhibitors of radiation-induced PLD repair might be a result of the inhibition of chemical-induced PLD repair. The study of this field may contribute to the improvement of cancer treatment not only by radiotherapy but also by chemotherapy.

  11. Tert-butylhydroquinone Compromises Survival in Murine Experimental Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiahong; Hu, Heng; Ren, Xuefang; Simpkins, James W.

    2016-01-01

    tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ), an Nrf2 signaling pathway inducer that is widely used as a food additive in the U.S., prevents oxidative stress-induced cytotoxicity in neurons. This study assesses the effects of tBHQ on ischemic stroke outcomes in mice. We measured infarct size, neurological deficits, and brain volume after tBHQ treatments in murine permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) model in vivo. Further, we evaluated the regulation of tBHQ on mitochondrial function in cerebrovascular endothelial cells in vitro, which is critical to the blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability. Our results demonstrated that tBHQ increased post-stroke mortality and worsened stroke outcomes. Mitochondrial function was suppressed by tBHQ treatment of cerebrovascular endothelial cells, and this suppression was potentiated by co-treatment with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the bacterial mimic. These data indicate that tBHQ-exacerbated stroke damage might due to the compromised BBB permeability in permanent stroke. PMID:26827673

  12. Tephrosia purpurea alleviates phorbol ester-induced tumor promotion response in murine skin.

    PubMed

    Saleem, M; Ahmed Su; Alam, A; Sultana, S

    2001-02-01

    In recent years, considerable emphasis has been placed on identifying new cancer chemopreventive agents, which could be useful for the human population. Tephrosia purpurea has been shown to possess significant activity against hepatotoxicity, pharmacological and physiological disorders. Earlier we showed that Tephrosia purpurea inhibits benzoyl peroxide-mediated cutaneous oxidative stress and toxicity. In the present study, we therefore assessed the effect of Tephrosia purpurea on 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbal-13-acetate (TPA; a well-known phorbol ester) induced cutaneous oxidative stress and toxicity in murine skin. The pre-treatment of Swiss albino mice with Tephrosia purpurea prior to application of croton oil (phorbol ester) resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of cutaneous carcinogenesis. Skin tumor initiation was achieved by a single topical application of 7,12-dimethyl benz(a)anthracene (DMBA) (25 microg per animal per 0.2 ml acetone) to mice. Ten days later tumor promotion was started by twice weekly topical application of croton oil (0.5% per animal per 0.2 ml acetone, v /v). Topical application of Tephrosia purpurea 1 h prior to each application of croton oil (phorbol ester) resulted in a significant protection against cutaneous carcinogenesis in a dose-dependent manner. The animals pre-treated with Tephrosia purpurea showed a decrease in both tumor incidence and tumor yield as compared to the croton oil (phorbol ester)-treated control group. In addition, a significant reduction in TPA-mediated induction in cutaneous ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity and [3H]thymidine incorporation was also observed in animals pre-treated with a topical application of Tephrosia purpurea. The effect of topical application of Tephrosia purpurea on TPA-mediated depletion in the level of enzymatic and non-enzymatic molecules in skin was also evaluated and it was observed that topical application of Tephrosia purpurea prior to TPA resulted in the significant recovery of

  13. STRAIN-DEPENDENT SUSCEPTIBILITY TO TRANSPLACENTALLY-INDUCED MURINE LUNG TUMORS AND DNA ADDUCTS OF 3-METHYLCHOLANTHRENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Strain-dependent susceptibility to transplacentally-induced murine lung tumors and DNA adducts of 3methylcholanthrene G B Nelson, J A Ross, J E Moore, M Xu, N D Kock, M S Miller Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC and USEPA, Research Triangle Park, NC.

    It has been de...

  14. Phenotypes of murine leukemia virus-induced tumors: influence of 3' viral coding sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Ott, D E; Keller, J; Sill, K; Rein, A

    1992-01-01

    Murine leukemia viruses (MuLVs) induce leukemias and lymphomas in mice. We have used fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis to determine the hematopoietic phenotypes of tumor cells induced by a number of MuLVs. Tumor cells induced by ecotropic Moloney, amphotropic 4070A, and 10A1 MuLVs and by two chimeric MuLVs, Mo(4070A) and Mo(10A1), were examined with antibodies to 13 lineage-specific cell surface markers found on myeloid cell, T-cell, and B-cell lineages. The chimeric Mo(4070A) and Mo(10A1) MuLVs, consisting of Moloney MuLV with the carboxy half of the Pol region and nearly all of the Env region of 4070A and 10A1, respectively, were constructed to examine the possible influence of these sequences on Moloney MuLV-induced tumor cell phenotypes. In some instances, these phenotypic analyses were supplemented by Southern blot analysis for lymphoid cell-specific genomic DNA rearrangements at the immunoglobulin heavy-chain, the T-cell receptor gamma, and the T-cell receptor beta loci. The results of our analysis showed that Moloney MuLV, 4070A, Mo(4070A), and Mo(10A1) induced mostly T-cell tumors. Moloney MuLV and Mo(4070A) induced a wide variety of T-cell phenotypes, ranging from immature to mature phenotypes, while 4070A induced mostly prothymocyte and double-negative (CD4- CD8-) T-cell tumors. The tumor phenotypes obtained with 10A1 and Mo(10A1) were each less variable than those obtained with the other MuLVs tested. 10A1 uniformly induced a tumor consisting of lineage marker-negative cells that lack lymphoid cell-specific DNA rearrangements and histologically appear to be early undifferentiated erythroid cell-like precursors. The Mo(10A1) chimera consistently induced an intermediate T-cell tumor. The chimeric constructions demonstrated that while 4070A 3' pol and env sequences apparently did not influence the observed tumor cell phenotypes, the 10A1 half of pol and env had a strong effect on the phenotypes induced by Mo(10A1) that resulted in a phenotypic

  15. In vivo measurement of epidermal thickness changes associated with tumor promotion in murine models

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Kevin G.; Samatham, Ravikant; Choudhury, Niloy; Gladish, James C.; Thuillier, Philippe; Jacques, Steven L.

    2010-01-01

    The characterization of tissue morphology in murine models of pathogenesis has traditionally been carried out by excision of affected tissues with subsequent immunohistological examination. Excision-based histology provides a limited two-dimensional presentation of tissue morphology at the cost of halting disease progression at a single time point and sacrifice of the animal. We investigate the use of noninvasive reflectance mode confocal scanning laser microscopy (rCSLM) as an alternative tool to biopsy in documenting epidermal hyperplasia in murine models exposed to the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). An automated technique utilizing average axial rCSLM reflectance profiles is used to extract epidermal thickness values from rCSLM data cubes. In comparisons to epidermal thicknesses determined from hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained tissue sections, we find no significant correlation to rCSLM-derived thickness values. This results from method-specific artifacts: physical alterations of tissue during H&E preparation in standard histology and specimen-induced abberations in rCSLM imaging. Despite their disagreement, both histology and rCSLM methods reliably measure statistically significant thickness changes in response to TPA exposure. Our results demonstrate that in vivo rCSLM imaging provides epithelial biologists an accurate noninvasive means to monitor cutaneous pathogenesis. PMID:20799792

  16. Murine tumor necrosis-inducing factor: purification and effects on myelomonocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Green, S; Dobrjansky, A; Chiasson, M A

    1982-06-01

    The tumor necrosis-inducing factor (TNF) found in sera of Corynebacterium parvum-treated, endotoxin-stressed BALB/C and outbred albino CD-1 mice has been purified to a single band of protein by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis after identification and removal of contaminating albumin and transferrin. This purified TNF has a molecular weight of 140,000, is glycoprotein in nature, and migrates on free electrophoresis as an alpha 2-globulin. TNF activity was continuously monitored during purification by bioassay in vitro (tumor cell lysis) and was confirmed by demonstration of induction of tumor necrosis in vivo. A single target tumor cell line, murine myelomonocytic leukemia (WEHI/3), was used in both assays. In the in vivo assay, controls were heat-inactivated samples of TNF. As additional controls, a line of TNF-resistant WEHI/3 cells was used in the in vitro assay. Results from in vivo radiolabeling of TNF-sensitive and TNF-resistant cells indicated a difference between their cytoplasmic peptide profiles. Optimal TNF production was not altered in C. parvum-endotoxin-treated mice by treatment with silica, a substance that is specifically toxic for macrophages. Exposure of mice to 650 rad whole-body radiation, which is not markedly damaging to macrophage elements in the reticuloendothelial system, completely abrogated the ability of the mice to produce TNF after C. parvum-endotoxin treatment. These findings suggest that in the sera of C. parvum-endotoxin-treated mice the protein that induces necrosis in tumors may not be of macrophage origin.

  17. Accumulation of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles coated with variably sized polyethylene glycol in murine tumors.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Esben Kjær Unmack; Nielsen, Thomas; Wittenborn, Thomas; Rydtoft, Louise Munk; Lokanathan, Arcot R; Hansen, Line; Østergaard, Leif; Kingshott, Peter; Howard, Kenneth A; Besenbacher, Flemming; Nielsen, Niels Chr; Kjems, Jørgen

    2012-04-07

    Iron oxide nanoparticles have found widespread applications in different areas including cell separation, drug delivery and as contrast agents. Due to water insolubility and stability issues, nanoparticles utilized for biological applications require coatings such as the commonly employed polyethylene glycol (PEG). Despite its frequent use, the influence of PEG coatings on the physicochemical and biological properties of iron nanoparticles has hitherto not been studied in detail. To address this, we studied the effect of 333-20,000 Da PEG coatings that resulted in larger hydrodynamic size, lower surface charge, longer circulation half-life, and lower uptake in macrophage cells when the particles were coated with high molecular weight (M(w)) PEG molecules. By use of magnetic resonance imaging, we show coating-dependent in vivo uptake in murine tumors with an optimal coating M(w) of 10,000 Da.

  18. Automated segmentation of murine lung tumors in x-ray micro-CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swee, Joshua K. Y.; Sheridan, Clare; de Bruin, Elza; Downward, Julian; Lassailly, Francois; Pizarro, Luis

    2014-03-01

    Recent years have seen micro-CT emerge as a means of providing imaging analysis in pre-clinical study, with in-vivo micro-CT having been shown to be particularly applicable to the examination of murine lung tumors. Despite this, existing studies have involved substantial human intervention during the image analysis process, with the use of fully-automated aids found to be almost non-existent. We present a new approach to automate the segmentation of murine lung tumors designed specifically for in-vivo micro-CT-based pre-clinical lung cancer studies that addresses the specific requirements of such study, as well as the limitations human-centric segmentation approaches experience when applied to such micro-CT data. Our approach consists of three distinct stages, and begins by utilizing edge enhancing and vessel enhancing non-linear anisotropic diffusion filters to extract anatomy masks (lung/vessel structure) in a pre-processing stage. Initial candidate detection is then performed through ROI reduction utilizing obtained masks and a two-step automated segmentation approach that aims to extract all disconnected objects within the ROI, and consists of Otsu thresholding, mathematical morphology and marker-driven watershed. False positive reduction is finally performed on initial candidates through random-forest-driven classification using the shape, intensity, and spatial features of candidates. We provide validation of our approach using data from an associated lung cancer study, showing favorable results both in terms of detection (sensitivity=86%, specificity=89%) and structural recovery (Dice Similarity=0.88) when compared against manual specialist annotation.

  19. Interaction between omega 3 PUFA and UVB radiation: Photoprotective effect in normal and tumoral murine melanocytes?

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Renata Ottes; Bustos, Silvina Odete; Gonzalez, Juliana Ramos; Soares, Camila Wink; Barbosa, Makely Daiane; Chammas, Roger; Votto, Ana Paula de Souza; Trindade, Gilma Santos

    2016-11-01

    Omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega 3 PUFA) are attracting a growing interest as potential adjuvants for cancer prevention and treatment. There is evidence about photoprotection in normal cells, but few previous studies have evaluated it in tumoral cells. Therefore, this study investigated the effect of α-linolenic acid (ALA) in normal murine melanocytic cells (Melan-a) and in tumoral murine melanocytic cells (B16F10) exposed to UVB radiation. Our results showed that ALA exhibited an antiproliferative effect in B16F10 cells, and had minimal effect in Melan-a cells, as demonstrated by MTT assay. On the other hand, the combination of ALA (7.5μM) and UVB (0.01J/cm(2)) showed a protective effect for both cell lines, Melan-a and B16F10. ALA and UVB combined or UVB alone induced an accumulation of cell lines at the S/G2/M phase. In addition, the combination of ALA and UVB, and UVB alone, both induced cell death in 24h; and in 48h, ALA attenuated this effect in both cells. Further to these findings, it was demonstrated that ALA did not alter ROS levels in both cells exposed to UVB radiation. The effect of an omega 6 PUFA, linoleic acid, under the same conditions of ALA were tested. It was not protective in either cell line. Therefore, our results can be very important since it was shown another role to an omega 3 PUFA as a photoprotective agent in a melanoma cell.

  20. Silencing of Foxp3 delays the growth of murine melanomas and modifies the tumor immunosuppressive environment

    PubMed Central

    Franco-Molina, Moisés A; Miranda-Hernández, Diana F; Mendoza-Gamboa, Edgar; Zapata-Benavides, Pablo; Coronado-Cerda, Erika E; Sierra-Rivera, Crystel A; Saavedra-Alonso, Santiago; Taméz-Guerra, Reyes S; Rodríguez-Padilla, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Forkhead box p3 (Foxp3) expression was believed to be specific for T-regulatory cells but has recently been described in non-hematopoietic cells from different tissue origins and in tumor cells from both epithelial and non-epithelial tissues. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of Foxp3 in murine melanoma. The B16F10 cell line Foxp3 silenced with small interference Foxp3 plasmid transfection was established and named B16F10.1. These cells had lower levels of Foxp3 mRNA (quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction [0.235-fold]), protein (flow cytometry [0.02%]), CD25+ expression (0.06%), cellular proliferation (trypan blue staining), and interleukin (IL)-2 production (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [72.35 pg/mL]) than those in B16F10 wild-type (WT) cells (P<0.05). Subcutaneous inoculation of the B16F10.1 cell line into C57BL/6 mice delayed the time of visible tumor appearance, increased the time of survival, and affected the weight of tumors, and also decreased the production of IL-10, IL-2, and transforming growth factor beta compared with mice inoculated with the B16F10 WT cell line. The B16F10.1 cells derived from tumors and free of T-cells (isolated by Dynabeads and plastic attachment) expressed relatively lower levels of Foxp3 and CD25+ than B16F10 WT cells (P<0.05) in a time-dependent manner. The population of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes of T CD4+ cells (CD4+, CD4+CD25+, and CD4+CD25+Foxp3+) increased in a time-dependent manner (P<0.05) in tumors derived from B16F10 WT cells and decreased in tumors derived from B16F10.1 cells. Similar data were obtained from spleen cells. These results suggest that, in melanomas, Foxp3 partly induces tumor growth by modifying the immune system at the local and peripheral level, shifting the environment toward an immunosuppressive profile. Therapies incorporating this transcription factor could be strategies for cancer treatment. PMID:26834483

  1. Modified Gompertz equation for electrotherapy murine tumor growth kinetics: predictions and new hypotheses

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Electrotherapy effectiveness at different doses has been demonstrated in preclinical and clinical studies; however, several aspects that occur in the tumor growth kinetics before and after treatment have not yet been revealed. Mathematical modeling is a useful instrument that can reveal some of these aspects. The aim of this paper is to describe the complete growth kinetics of unperturbed and perturbed tumors through use of the modified Gompertz equation in order to generate useful insight into the mechanisms that underpin this devastating disease. Methods The complete tumor growth kinetics for control and treated groups are obtained by interpolation and extrapolation methods with different time steps, using experimental data of fibrosarcoma Sa-37. In the modified Gompertz equation, a delay time is introduced to describe the tumor's natural history before treatment. Different graphical strategies are used in order to reveal new information in the complete kinetics of this tumor type. Results The first stage of complete tumor growth kinetics is highly non linear. The model, at this stage, shows different aspects that agree with those reported theoretically and experimentally. Tumor reversibility and the proportionality between regions before and after electrotherapy are demonstrated. In tumors that reach partial remission, two antagonistic post-treatment processes are induced, whereas in complete remission, two unknown antitumor mechanisms are induced. Conclusion The modified Gompertz equation is likely to lead to insights within cancer research. Such insights hold promise for increasing our understanding of tumors as self-organizing systems and, the possible existence of phase transitions in tumor growth kinetics, which, in turn, may have significant impacts both on cancer research and on clinical practice. PMID:21029411

  2. Cloning of the murine counterpart of the tumor-associated antigen H-L6: Epitope mapping of the human and murine L6 antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, C.P.; Farr, A.G.; Marken, J.S. |

    1995-10-03

    The murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) L6 was raised against human lung carcinoma cells and found to recognize an antigen which is highly expressed on lung, breast, colon, and ovarian carcinomas. Promising results in phase 1 clinical studies with this antibody or its chimerized counterpart suggest the antigen recognized by mAb L6 (H-L6) is an attractive target for monoclonal antibody-based cancer therapy. Further development of L6 as an anti-tumor-targeting agent would benefit from the development of a murine model. However, initial attempts to develop such a model were hampered by our inability to generate antibodies against the murine homologue of the L6 antigen, M-L6. Here we describe the preparation of the mAb 12A8, which was raised against murine thymic epithelial cells, the tissue distribution of the murine antigen recognized by 12A8, the cloning of a cDNA encoding the 12A8 target antigen, and the demonstration that this antigen is M-L6. Using H-L6/M-L6 chimeric proteins, we show that the region of the M-L6 protein recognized by mAb 12A8 corresponds to the region of H-L6 recognized by mAb L6. There are five amino acid differences in the regions of the H-L6 and M-L6 proteins recognized by L6 and 12A8, respectively. We further mapped the protein epitope recognized by L6 by individually exchanging each of these residues in H-L6 with the corresponding residue found in M-L6. Substitution of the single H-L6 residue Leu122 with Ser resulted in the H-L6 mutant HL6-L122S which failed to bind L6. The HL6-L122S mutant also failed to bind 12A8. Substituting residue Ser122 in M-L6 with Leu did not prevent 12A8 binding and did not result in L6 binding. The availability of mAb 12A8 and the finding that it recognizes the same region of M-L6 that is recognized by L6 on H-L6 might allow the development of a murine tumor model in which the L6 antigen can be further evaluated as a therapeutic target. 31 refs., 7 figs.

  3. High-dose dietary zinc promotes prostate intraepithelial neoplasia in a murine tumor induction model.

    PubMed

    Ko, Young Hwii; Woo, Yu Jeong; Kim, Jin Wook; Choi, Hoon; Kang, Seok Ho; Lee, Jeong Gu; Kim, Je Jong; Park, Hong Seok; Cheon, Jun

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate the role of high-dose dietary zinc in the process of prostate malignancy, 60 Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups: tumor induction with carcinogen and hormone (group 1), oral zinc administration without tumor induction (group 2), oral zinc administration with tumor induction (group 3) and a control without zinc administration or tumor induction (group 4). Zinc was supplied orally in the form of zinc sulfate heptahydrate dissolved in drinking water to groups 2 and 3 for 20 weeks. Although the serum level of zinc measured at 20 weeks was maintained similarly in each group (P = 0.082), intraprostatic zinc concentrations were statistically different. Group 1 prostates contained the least amount of zinc in both the dorsolateral and ventral lobes at levels of 36.3 and 4.8 microg g(-1), respectively. However, in group 3, zinc levels increased in both lobes to 59.3 and 12.1 microg g(-1), respectively, comparable with that of group 4 (54.5 +/- 14.6 and 14.1 +/- 2.4 microg g(-1)). In spite of these increases in zinc concentration, the prevalence of prostate intraepithelial neoplasm was rather increased in group 3 (53.3% and 46.7%) compared with group 1 (33.3% and 33.3%) in both dorsolateral and ventral prostate lobes. Although prostate intraepithelial neoplasm did not develop in any prostate in group 4, zinc administration did induce prostate intraepithelial neoplasm in group 2 (46.7% and 40.0%). Thus, although high dietary zinc increased intraprostatic zinc concentrations, it promoted, instead of preventing, prostate intraepithelial neoplasm in a murine prostate malignancy induction model.

  4. Tumor-associated macrophages favor C26 murine colon carcinoma cell proliferation in an oxidative stress-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Luput, Lavinia; Licarete, Emilia; Sesarman, Alina; Laura, Patras; Alupei, Marius Costel; Banciu, Manuela

    2017-02-17

    The role of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) in the development of colon carcinoma is still controversial. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the TAM‑driven processes that may affect colon cancer cell proliferation. To achieve this purpose, murine macrophages were co-cultured with C26 murine colon carcinoma cells at a cell density ratio that approximates physiological conditions for colon carcinoma development in vivo. In this respect, the effects of TAM-mediated angiogenesis, inflammation and oxidative stress on the proliferative capacity of C26 murine colon carcinoma cells were studied. To gain insight into the TAM-driven oxidative stress, NADPH oxidase, the main pro-oxidant enzyme in macrophages, was inhibited. Our data revealed that the stimulatory effects of TAMs on C26 cell proliferation may be related mainly to their pro-oxidant actions exerted by NADPH oxidase activity, which maintains the redox status and the angiogenic capacity of the tumor microenvironment. Additionally, the anti-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic effects of TAMs on tumor cells were found to create a favorable microenvironment for C26 colon carcinoma development and progression. In conclusion, our data confirmed the protumor role of TAMs in the development of colon carcinoma in an oxidative stress-dependent manner that potentiates the angiogenic capacity of the tumor microenvironment. These data may offer valuable information for future tumor-targeted therapies based on TAM 're-education' strategies.

  5. Targeting antisense mitochondrial ncRNAs inhibits murine melanoma tumor growth and metastasis through reduction in survival and invasion factors.

    PubMed

    Lobos-González, Lorena; Silva, Verónica; Araya, Mariela; Restovic, Franko; Echenique, Javiera; Oliveira-Cruz, Luciana; Fitzpatrick, Christopher; Briones, Macarena; Villegas, Jaime; Villota, Claudio; Vidaurre, Soledad; Borgna, Vincenzo; Socias, Miguel; Valenzuela, Sebastián; Lopez, Constanza; Socias, Teresa; Varas, Manuel; Díaz, Jorge; Burzio, Luis O; Burzio, Verónica A

    2016-09-06

    We reported that knockdown of the antisense noncoding mitochondrial RNAs (ASncmtRNAs) induces apoptotic death of several human tumor cell lines, but not normal cells, suggesting this approach for selective therapy against different types of cancer. In order to translate these results to a preclinical scenario, we characterized the murine noncoding mitochondrial RNAs (ncmtRNAs) and performed in vivo knockdown in syngeneic murine melanoma models. Mouse ncmtRNAs display structures similar to the human counterparts, including long double-stranded regions arising from the presence of inverted repeats. Knockdown of ASncmtRNAs with specific antisense oligonucleotides (ASO) reduces murine melanoma B16F10 cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in vitro through downregulation of pro-survival and metastasis markers, particularly survivin. For in vivo studies, subcutaneous B16F10 melanoma tumors in C57BL/6 mice were treated systemically with specific and control antisense oligonucleotides (ASO). For metastasis studies, tumors were resected, followed by systemic administration of ASOs and the presence of metastatic nodules in lungs and liver was assessed. Treatment with specific ASO inhibited tumor growth and metastasis after primary tumor resection. In a metastasis-only assay, mice inoculated intravenously with cells and treated with the same ASO displayed reduced number and size of melanoma nodules in the lungs, compared to controls. Our results suggest that ASncmtRNAs could be potent targets for melanoma therapy. To our knowledge, the ASncmtRNAs are the first potential non-nuclear targets for melanoma therapy.

  6. Targeting antisense mitochondrial ncRNAs inhibits murine melanoma tumor growth and metastasis through reduction in survival and invasion factors

    PubMed Central

    Lobos-González, Lorena; Silva, Verónica; Araya, Mariela; Restovic, Franko; Echenique, Javiera; Oliveira-Cruz, Luciana; Fitzpatrick, Christopher; Briones, Macarena; Villegas, Jaime; Villota, Claudio; Vidaurre, Soledad; Borgna, Vincenzo; Socias, Miguel; Valenzuela, Sebastián; Lopez, Constanza; Socias, Teresa; Varas, Manuel; Díaz, Jorge; Burzio, Luis O.; Burzio, Verónica A.

    2016-01-01

    We reported that knockdown of the antisense noncoding mitochondrial RNAs (ASncmtRNAs) induces apoptotic death of several human tumor cell lines, but not normal cells, suggesting this approach for selective therapy against different types of cancer. In order to translate these results to a preclinical scenario, we characterized the murine noncoding mitochondrial RNAs (ncmtRNAs) and performed in vivo knockdown in syngeneic murine melanoma models. Mouse ncmtRNAs display structures similar to the human counterparts, including long double-stranded regions arising from the presence of inverted repeats. Knockdown of ASncmtRNAs with specific antisense oligonucleotides (ASO) reduces murine melanoma B16F10 cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in vitro through downregulation of pro-survival and metastasis markers, particularly survivin. For in vivo studies, subcutaneous B16F10 melanoma tumors in C57BL/6 mice were treated systemically with specific and control antisense oligonucleotides (ASO). For metastasis studies, tumors were resected, followed by systemic administration of ASOs and the presence of metastatic nodules in lungs and liver was assessed. Treatment with specific ASO inhibited tumor growth and metastasis after primary tumor resection. In a metastasis-only assay, mice inoculated intravenously with cells and treated with the same ASO displayed reduced number and size of melanoma nodules in the lungs, compared to controls. Our results suggest that ASncmtRNAs could be potent targets for melanoma therapy. To our knowledge, the ASncmtRNAs are the first potential non-nuclear targets for melanoma therapy. PMID:27507060

  7. MART-1 adenovirus-transduced dendritic cell immunization in a murine model of metastatic central nervous system tumor.

    PubMed

    Broder, Howard; Anderson, Andrea; Kremen, Thomas J; Odesa, Sylvia K; Liau, Linda M

    2003-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells that have been shown to play a critical role in the initiation of host immune responses against tumor antigens. In this study, a recombinant adenovirus vector encoding the melanoma-associated antigen, MART-1, was used to transduce murine DCs, which were then tested for their ability to activate cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and induce protective immunity against B16 melanoma tumor cells implanted intracranially. Genetic modifications of murine bone marrow-derived DCs to express MART-1 was achieved through the use of an E1-deficient, recombinant adenovirus vector. Sixty-two C57BL/6 mice were immunized subcutaneously with AdVMART-1-transduced DCs (n = 23), untransduced DCs (n = 17), or sterile saline (n = 22). Using the B16 murine melanoma, which naturally expresses the MART-1 antigen, all the mice were then challenged intracranially with viable, unmodified syngeneic B16 tumor cells 7 days later. Splenocytes from representative animals in each group were harvested for standard cytotoxicity (CTL) and enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays. The remaining mice were followed for survival. Immunization of C57BL/6 mice with DCs transduced with an adenoviral vector encoding the MART-1 antigen elicited the development of antigen-specific CTL responses. As evidenced by a prolonged survival curve when compared to control-immunized mice with intracranial B16 tumors, AdMART-1-DC vaccination was able to elicit partial protection against central nervous system tumor challenge in vivo.

  8. Quantitation of Murine Stroma and Selective Purification of the Human Tumor Component of Patient-Derived Xenografts for Genomic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Schneeberger, Valentina E; Allaj, Viola; Gardner, Eric E; Poirier, J T; Rudin, Charles M

    2016-01-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) mouse models are increasingly used for preclinical therapeutic testing of human cancer. A limitation in molecular and genetic characterization of PDX tumors is the presence of integral murine stroma. This is particularly problematic for genomic sequencing of PDX models. Rapid and dependable approaches for quantitating stromal content and purifying the malignant human component of these tumors are needed. We used a recently developed technique exploiting species-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplicon length (ssPAL) differences to define the fractional composition of murine and human DNA, which was proportional to the fractional composition of cells in a series of lung cancer PDX lines. We compared four methods of human cancer cell isolation: fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), an immunomagnetic mouse cell depletion (MCD) approach, and two distinct EpCAM-based immunomagnetic positive selection methods. We further analyzed DNA extracted from the resulting enriched human cancer cells by targeted sequencing using a clinically validated multi-gene panel. Stromal content varied widely among tumors of similar histology, but appeared stable over multiple serial tumor passages of an individual model. FACS and MCD were superior to either positive selection approach, especially in cases of high stromal content, and consistently allowed high quality human-specific genomic profiling. ssPAL is a dependable approach to quantitation of murine stromal content, and MCD is a simple, efficient, and high yield approach to human cancer cell isolation for genomic analysis of PDX tumors.

  9. Quantitation of Murine Stroma and Selective Purification of the Human Tumor Component of Patient-Derived Xenografts for Genomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schneeberger, Valentina E.; Allaj, Viola; Gardner, Eric E.; Rudin, Charles M.

    2016-01-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) mouse models are increasingly used for preclinical therapeutic testing of human cancer. A limitation in molecular and genetic characterization of PDX tumors is the presence of integral murine stroma. This is particularly problematic for genomic sequencing of PDX models. Rapid and dependable approaches for quantitating stromal content and purifying the malignant human component of these tumors are needed. We used a recently developed technique exploiting species-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplicon length (ssPAL) differences to define the fractional composition of murine and human DNA, which was proportional to the fractional composition of cells in a series of lung cancer PDX lines. We compared four methods of human cancer cell isolation: fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), an immunomagnetic mouse cell depletion (MCD) approach, and two distinct EpCAM-based immunomagnetic positive selection methods. We further analyzed DNA extracted from the resulting enriched human cancer cells by targeted sequencing using a clinically validated multi-gene panel. Stromal content varied widely among tumors of similar histology, but appeared stable over multiple serial tumor passages of an individual model. FACS and MCD were superior to either positive selection approach, especially in cases of high stromal content, and consistently allowed high quality human-specific genomic profiling. ssPAL is a dependable approach to quantitation of murine stromal content, and MCD is a simple, efficient, and high yield approach to human cancer cell isolation for genomic analysis of PDX tumors. PMID:27611664

  10. Eradication of established murine tumors using a novel cell-free vaccine: dendritic cell-derived exosomes.

    PubMed

    Zitvogel, L; Regnault, A; Lozier, A; Wolfers, J; Flament, C; Tenza, D; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, P; Raposo, G; Amigorena, S

    1998-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen presenting cells with the unique capacity to induce primary and secondary immune responses in vivo. Here, we show that DCs secrete antigen presenting vesicles, called exosomes, which express functional Major Histocompatibility Complex class I and class II, and T-cell costimulatory molecules. Tumor peptide-pulsed DC-derived exosomes prime specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes in vivo and eradicate or suppress growth of established murine tumors in a T cell-dependent manner. Exosome-based cell-free vaccines represent an alternative to DC adoptive therapy for suppressing tumor growth.

  11. A novel combination immunotherapy for cancer by IL-13Rα2-targeted DNA vaccine and immunotoxin in murine tumor models.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Hideyuki; Terabe, Masaki; Berzofsky, Jay A; Husain, Syed R; Puri, Raj K

    2011-11-15

    Optimum efficacy of therapeutic cancer vaccines may require combinations that generate effective antitumor immune responses, as well as overcome immune evasion and tolerance mechanisms mediated by progressing tumor. Previous studies showed that IL-13Rα2, a unique tumor-associated Ag, is a promising target for cancer immunotherapy. A targeted cytotoxin composed of IL-13 and mutated Pseudomonas exotoxin induced specific killing of IL-13Rα2(+) tumor cells. When combined with IL-13Rα2 DNA cancer vaccine, surprisingly, it mediated synergistic antitumor effects on tumor growth and metastasis in established murine breast carcinoma and sarcoma tumor models. The mechanism of synergistic activity involved direct killing of tumor cells and cell-mediated immune responses, as well as elimination of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and, consequently, regulatory T cells. These novel results provide a strong rationale for combining immunotoxins with cancer vaccines for the treatment of patients with advanced cancer.

  12. Topical levamisole hydrochloride therapy attenuates experimental murine allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Heyao; Zhang, Jiali; Gao, Chunsheng; Zhu, Ying; Wang, Chen; Zheng, Wenjie

    2007-12-22

    Allergic rhinitis is one of the most common chronic diseases. There are a number of effective therapeutic options for allergic rhinitis patients, such as intranasal corticosteroids. How to avoid the adverse effects of these traditional medicines has come to public attention and started the search for effective and safe medicine. We used BALB/c mice with experimental allergic rhinitis, and determined that levamisole delivered locally (intranasal, i.n.) could attenuate early-phase inflammatory response, decrease histamine, suppress edema and eosinophil infiltration, and diminish the ovalbumin-specific serum IgE level. Detailed analysis of cytokine gene expression showed that levamisole can decrease IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 mRNA and increase IL-12, IL-18 and IFN-gamma mRNA. Levamisole showed analogous effects of down-regulating Th2 cytokines with budesonide and distinct up-regulating effects on Th1 cytokines gene expression. Our findings offer potential options for allergic rhinitis therapy.

  13. Experimental Adaptation of Rotaviruses to Tumor Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Carlos A.; Guerrero, Rafael A.; Silva, Elver; Acosta, Orlando; Barreto, Emiliano

    2016-01-01

    A number of viruses show a naturally extended tropism for tumor cells whereas other viruses have been genetically modified or adapted to infect tumor cells. Oncolytic viruses have become a promising tool for treating some cancers by inducing cell lysis or immune response to tumor cells. In the present work, rotavirus strains TRF-41 (G5) (porcine), RRV (G3) (simian), UK (G6-P5) (bovine), Ym (G11-P9) (porcine), ECwt (murine), Wa (G1-P8), Wi61 (G9) and M69 (G8) (human), and five wild-type human rotavirus isolates were passaged multiple times in different human tumor cell lines and then combined in five different ways before additional multiple passages in tumor cell lines. Cell death caused by the tumor cell-adapted isolates was characterized using Hoechst, propidium iodide, 7-AAD, Annexin V, TUNEL, and anti-poly-(ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP) and -phospho-histone H2A.X antibodies. Multiple passages of the combined rotaviruses in tumor cell lines led to a successful infection of these cells, suggesting a gain-of-function by the acquisition of greater infectious capacity as compared with that of the parental rotaviruses. The electropherotype profiles suggest that unique tumor cell-adapted isolates were derived from reassortment of parental rotaviruses. Infection produced by such rotavirus isolates induced chromatin modifications compatible with apoptotic cell death. PMID:26828934

  14. Role for Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha in Murine Cytomegalovirus Transcriptional Reactivation in Latently Infected Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Christian O.; Seckert, Christof K.; Dreis, Doris; Reddehase, Matthias J.; Grzimek, Natascha K. A.

    2005-01-01

    Interstitial pneumonia is a major clinical manifestation of primary or recurrent cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in immunocompromised recipients of a bone marrow transplant. In a murine model, lungs were identified as a prominent site of CMV latency and recurrence. Pulmonary latency of murine CMV is characterized by high viral genome burden and a low incidence of variegated immediate-early (IE) gene expression, reflecting a sporadic activity of the major IE promoters (MIEPs) and enhancer. The enhancer-flanking promoters MIEP1/3 and MIEP2 are switched on and off during latency in a ratio of ∼2:1. MIEP1/3 latency-associated activity generates the IE1 transcript of the ie1/3 transcription unit but not the alternative splicing product IE3 that encodes the essential transactivator of early gene expression. Splicing thus appeared to be an important checkpoint for maintenance of latency. In accordance with previous work of others, we show here that signaling by the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) activates IE1/3 transcription in vivo. As an addition to current knowledge, Poisson distribution analysis revealed an increased incidence of IE1/3 transcriptional events as well as a higher amount of transcripts per event. Notably, TNF-α promoted the splicing to IE3 transcripts, but transcription did not proceed to the M55/gB early gene. Moreover, the activated transcriptional state induced by TNF-α did not predispose latently infected mice to a higher incidence of virus recurrence after hematoablative treatment. In conclusion, TNF-α is an important inductor of IE gene transcriptional reactivation, whereas early genes downstream in the viral replicative cycle appear to be the rate-limiting checkpoint(s) for virus recurrence. PMID:15596827

  15. Attenuation of TGF-β signaling supports tumor progression of a mesenchymal-like mammary tumor cell line in a syngeneic murine model

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Tanuka; Gu, Xiang; Yang, Junhua; Ellies, Lesley G; Sun, Lu-Zhe

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that TGF-β functions as a tumor promoter in metastatic, mesenchymal-like breast cancer cells and that TGF-β inhibitors can effectively abrogate tumor progression in several of these models. Here we report a novel observation with the use of genetic and pharmacological approaches, and murine mammary cell injection models in both syngeneic and immune compromised mice. We found that TGF-β receptor II (TβRII) knockdown in the MMTV-PyMT derived Py8119, a mesenchymal-like murine mammary tumor cell line, resulted in increased orthotopic tumor growth potential in a syngeneic background and a similar trend in an immune compromised background. Systemic treatment with a small-molecule TGF-β receptor I kinase inhibitor induced a trend towards increased metastatic colonization of distant organs following intra cardiac inoculation of Py8119 cells, with little effect on the colonization of luminal-like Py230 cells, also derived from MMTV-PyMT tumors. Taken together, our data suggest that the attenuation of TGF-β signaling in mesenchymal-like mammary tumors does not necessarily inhibit their malignant potential, and anti-TGF-β therapeutic intervention requires greater precision in identifying molecular markers in tumors with an indication of functional TGF-β signaling. PMID:24368187

  16. Redundancy between Cysteine Cathepsins in Murine Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Allan, Euan Ramsay Orr; Yates, Robin Michael

    2015-01-01

    The cysteine cathepsins B, S, and L are functionally linked to antigen processing, and hence to autoimmune disorders such as multiple sclerosis. Stemming from several studies that demonstrate that mice can be protected from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) through the pharmacologic inhibition of cysteine cathepsins, it has been suggested that targeting these enzymes in multiple sclerosis may be of therapeutic benefit. Utilizing mice deficient in cysteine cathepsins both individually and in combination, we found that the myelin-associated antigen myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) was efficiently processed and presented by macrophages to CD4+ T cells in the individual absence of cathepsin B, S or L. Similarly, mice deficient in cathepsin B or S were susceptible to MOG-induced EAE and displayed clinical progression and immune infiltration into the CNS, similar to their wild-type counterparts. Owing to a previously described CD4+ T cell deficiency in mice deficient in cathepsin L, such mice were protected from EAE. When multiple cysteine cathepsins were simultaneously inhibited via genetic deletion of both cathepsins B and S, or by a cathepsin inhibitor (LHVS), MHC-II surface expression, MOG antigen presentation and EAE were attenuated or prevented. This study demonstrates the functional redundancy between cathepsin B, S and L in EAE, and suggests that the inhibition of multiple cysteine cathepsins may be needed to modulate autoimmune disorders such as multiple sclerosis.

  17. The mechanism of local tumor irradiation combined with interleukin 2 therapy in murine renal carcinoma: histological evaluation of pulmonary metastases.

    PubMed

    Dezso, B; Haas, G P; Hamzavi, F; Kim, S; Montecillo, E J; Benson, P D; Pontes, J E; Maughan, R L; Hillman, G G

    1996-09-01

    We have demonstrated that tumor irradiation enhanced the therapeutic effect of interleukin 2 (IL-2) on pulmonary metastases from a murine renal adenocarcinoma, Renca. To investigate the mechanism of interaction between tumor irradiation and IL-2 therapy, we have histologically evaluated the effects of each therapy alone or in combination on Renca pulmonary metastases. Following treatment of established lung metastases with irradiation and IL-2 therapy, lung sections were processed for H&E or immunohistochemical staining. We found that tumor irradiation or IL-2 therapy locally induced vascular damage, resulting in multifocal hemorrhages and mononuclear cell mobilization in the lung tissue. This effect was amplified in lungs treated with the combined therapy. Immunohistochemistry showed that irradiation produced a macrophage influx into irradiated tumor nodules, and systemic IL-2 therapy induced T-cell infiltration in tumor nodules. Lungs treated with the combined therapy exhibited massive macrophage, T-cell, and natural killer cell mobilization in disintegrating tumor nodules and in the lung tissue. This combined therapy caused a decrease in the number of proliferating tumor cells and an increase in the number of apoptotic cells, which were more marked than with either therapy alone. We suggest that the macrophages mobilized by radiation-induced tissue injury could play a role in phagocytosis of apoptotic tumor cells, processing and presenting of tumor antigens for a systemic immune response activated by IL-2. Tumor destruction may result from the concomitant action of activated T cells, natural killer cells, and macrophages infiltrating the tumor nodules.

  18. Bidirectional Estrogen-Like Effects of Genistein on Murine Experimental Autoimmune Ovarian Disease.

    PubMed

    Ding, Qiao; Wang, Yuxiao; Li, Na; Zhu, Kexue; Hu, Jielun; Wang, Sunan; Zhu, Fan; Nie, Shaoping

    2016-11-08

    This study was to investigate the bidirectional estrogen-like effects of genistein on murine experimental autoimmune ovarian disease (AOD). Female BALB/c mice were induced by immunization with a peptide from murine zona pellucida. The changes of estrous cycle, ovarian histomorphology were measured, and the levels of serum sex hormone were analyzed using radioimmunoassay. Proliferative responses of the ovary were also determined by immunohistochemistry. Administration of 25 or 45 mg/kg body weight genistein enhanced ovary development with changes in serum sex hormone levels and proliferative responses. Meanwhile, the proportions of growing and mature follicles increased and the incidence of autoimmune oophoritis decreased, which exhibited normal ovarian morphology in administration of 25 or 45 mg/kg body weight genistein, while a lower dose (5 mg/kg body weight genistein) produced the opposite effect. These findings suggest that genistein exerts bidirectional estrogen-like effects on murine experimental AOD, while a high dose (45 mg/kg body weight) of genistein may suppress AOD.

  19. Bidirectional Estrogen-Like Effects of Genistein on Murine Experimental Autoimmune Ovarian Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Qiao; Wang, Yuxiao; Li, Na; Zhu, Kexue; Hu, Jielun; Wang, Sunan; Zhu, Fan; Nie, Shaoping

    2016-01-01

    This study was to investigate the bidirectional estrogen-like effects of genistein on murine experimental autoimmune ovarian disease (AOD). Female BALB/c mice were induced by immunization with a peptide from murine zona pellucida. The changes of estrous cycle, ovarian histomorphology were measured, and the levels of serum sex hormone were analyzed using radioimmunoassay. Proliferative responses of the ovary were also determined by immunohistochemistry. Administration of 25 or 45 mg/kg body weight genistein enhanced ovary development with changes in serum sex hormone levels and proliferative responses. Meanwhile, the proportions of growing and mature follicles increased and the incidence of autoimmune oophoritis decreased, which exhibited normal ovarian morphology in administration of 25 or 45 mg/kg body weight genistein, while a lower dose (5 mg/kg body weight genistein) produced the opposite effect. These findings suggest that genistein exerts bidirectional estrogen-like effects on murine experimental AOD, while a high dose (45 mg/kg body weight) of genistein may suppress AOD. PMID:27834809

  20. A new experimental murine aspergillosis model to identify strains of Aspergillus fumigatus with reduced virulence.

    PubMed

    Sarfati, J; Diaquin, M; Debeaupuis, J P; Schmidt, A; Lecaque, D; Beauvais, A; Latge, J P

    2002-01-01

    Experimental animals are an obligate screen to investigate microorganism pathogenicity. Numerous animal models have been used to analyse the virulence of the opportunistic human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus but none of the experimental models used previously have been satisfactory. This report discuss these models and presents a murine model of pulmonary aspergillosis that is very easy and the most adapted to compare the pathogenicity of A. fumigatus strains. Strains to be tested are inoculated intranasally and synchronously to mice and strains isolated from the lung of mice killed by the infection are typed. The number of colonies recovered is directly correlated to the virulence of the strain.

  1. Radiation-induced effects on murine kidney tumor cells: role in the interaction of local irradiation and immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Younes, E; Haas, G P; Dezso, B; Ali, E; Maughan, R L; Montecillo, E; Pontes, J E; Hillman, G G

    1995-06-01

    Local tumor irradiation enhances the effect of interleukin-2 (IL-2) therapy in the Renca murine renal adenocarcinoma model. To investigate the mechanism(s) of this interaction, we studied the in vitro and in vivo effects of irradiation on the tumor cells. Tumor cells from in situ irradiated renal tumors had diminished proliferation in vitro. A similar growth inhibition was noted following injection of irradiated Renca cells into naive mice, but this effect could be overcome by injecting more cells. Histologic evaluation of tumors derived from irradiated cells revealed a decrease in mitosis and an increase in multinucleated giant cells, apoptosis and micronecrosis. The presence of irradiated tumor reduced the growth of nonirradiated tumor cells when both were injected into separate flanks of the same animal, suggesting that irradiated tumor cells may trigger a systemic antitumor response. Interleukin-2 therapy given after injection of irradiated tumor cells caused a significant increase in leukocytic infiltrates and micronecrosis. Our findings indicate that radiation directly affects tumor growth and induces a systemic mechanism which could be enhanced by IL-2.

  2. Effect of recombinant human interferon-alpha A/D on in vivo murine tumor cell growth.

    PubMed

    Uno, K; Shimizu, S; Inaba, K; Kitaura, M; Nakahira, K; Kato, T; Yamaguchi, Y; Muramatsu, S

    1988-05-01

    We investigated the effect of human recombinant interferon-alpha A/D A/D-IFN), which is known to delay the growth of murine tumor cells, on the growth of S1 and R1 subline cells of murine Meth A fibrosarcoma in the peritoneal cavity of mice. In vitro growth of S1 cells was sensitive to, and that of R1 cells was resistant to, the direct effect of A/D-IFN, as with murine natural IFN-alpha/beta, which was used originally to isolate these sublines. In vivo, however, the growth of not only S1 cells but also R1 cells was suppressed by the administration of A/D-IFN, and the survival time of tumor-bearing mice was prolonged. Although A/D-IFN had a direct effect on S1 cells in vivo, R1 cells were susceptible only to the indirect effect via the host cells. Macrophages (M phi) harvested from the peritoneal cavity of A/D-IFN-treated mice bearing ascitic R1 cells were very effective in suppressing the in vitro growth of R1 cells; those from non-R1-bearing A/D-IFN-treated mice were less effective. The results of in vitro experiments indicate that M phi are very probably activated by the synergism of A/D-IFN and M phi diameter-activating factor(s) produced by lymphoid cells in tumor-bearing mice.

  3. Apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in human and murine tumor cells are initiated by isoprenoids.

    PubMed

    Mo, H; Elson, C E

    1999-04-01

    Diverse classes of phytochemicals initiate biological responses that effectively lower cancer risk. One class of phytochemicals, broadly defined as pure and mixed isoprenoids, encompasses an estimated 22,000 individual components. A representative mixed isoprenoid, gamma-tocotrienol, suppresses the growth of murine B16(F10) melanoma cells, and with greater potency, the growth of human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) and human leukemic (HL-60) cells. beta-Ionone, a pure isoprenoid, suppresses the growth of B16 cells and with greater potency, the growth of MCF-7, HL-60 and human colon adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells. Results obtained with diverse cell lines differing in ras and p53 status showed that the isoprenoid-mediated suppression of growth is independent of mutated ras and p53 functions. beta-Ionone suppressed the growth of human colon fibroblasts (CCD-18Co) but only when present at three-fold the concentration required to suppress the growth of Caco-2 cells. The isoprenoids initiated apoptosis and, concomitantly arrested cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Both suppress 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase activity. beta-Ionone and lovastatin interfered with the posttranslational processing of lamin B, an activity essential to assembly of daughter nuclei. This interference, we postulate, renders neosynthesized DNA available to the endonuclease activities leading to apoptotic cell death. Lovastatin-imposed mevalonate starvation suppressed the glycosylation and translocation of growth factor receptors to the cell surface. As a consequence, cells were arrested in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. This rationale may apply to the isoprenoid-mediated G1-phase arrest of tumor cells. The additive and potentially synergistic actions of these isoprenoids in the suppression of tumor cell proliferation and initiation of apoptosis coupled with the mass action of the diverse isoprenoid constituents of plant products may explain, in part, the impact of fruit, vegetable

  4. Tumor necrosis factor mediates lung antibacterial host defense in murine Klebsiella pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Laichalk, L L; Kunkel, S L; Strieter, R M; Danforth, J M; Bailie, M B; Standiford, T J

    1996-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a proinflammatory cytokine which has recently been shown to have beneficial effects in the setting of acquired host immunity. However, the role of TNF in innate immune responses, as in the setting of bacterial pneumonia, has been incompletely characterized. To determine the role of TNF in gram-negative bacterial pneumonia, CBA/J mice were challenged with 10(2) CFU of Klebsiella pneumoniae intratracheally, resulting in the time-dependent expression of TNF MRNA and protein within the lung. Passive immunization of animals with a soluble TNF receptor-immunoglobulin (Ig) construct (sTNFR:Fc) intraperitoneally 2 h prior to K. pneumoniae inoculation resulted in a significant reduction in bronchoalveolar lavage neutrophils, but not macrophages, at 48 h, as compared with animals receiving control IgG1. Furthermore, treatment with sTNFR:Fc resulted in 19.6- and 13.5-fold increases in K. pneumoniae CFU in lung homogenates and plasma, respectively, as compared with animals receiving control IgG1. Finally, treatment of Klebsiella-infected mice with sTNFR:Fc markedly decreased both short- and long-term survival of these animals. In conclusion, our studies indicate that endogenous TNF is a critical component of antibacterial host defense in murine Klebsiella pneumonia. PMID:8945568

  5. Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor Ameliorates Joint Disease in Murine Collagen- Induced Arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Richard O.; Feldmann, Marc; Maini, Ravinder N.

    1992-10-01

    There is considerable evidence implicating tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. This evidence is based not only on the universal presence of TNF-α in arthritic joints accompanied by the upregulation of TNF-α receptors but also on the effects of neutralizing TNF-α in joint cell cultures. Thus, neutralization of TNF-α in vitro results in inhibition of the production of interleukin 1, which like TNF-α, is believed to contribute to joint inflammation and erosion. To determine the validity of this concept in vivo, the effect of administering TNF-neutralizing antibodies to mice with collagen-induced arthritis has been studied. This disease model was chosen because of its many immunological and pathological similarities to human rheumatoid arthritis. TN3-19.12, a hamster IgG1 monoclonal antibody to murine TNF-α/β, was injected i.p. into mice either before the onset of arthritis or after the establishment of clinical disease. Anti-TNF administered prior to disease onset significantly reduced paw swelling and histological severity of arthritis without reducing the incidence of arthritis or the level of circulating anti-type II collagen IgG. More relevant to human disease was the capacity of the antibody to reduce the clinical score, paw swelling, and the histological severity of disease even when injected after the onset of clinical arthritis. These results have implications for possible modes of therapy of human arthritis.

  6. Generation of murine tumor cell lines deficient in MHC molecule surface expression using the CRISPR/Cas9 system

    PubMed Central

    Lenkl, Clarissa; Goyal, Ashish; Diederichs, Sven; Dickes, Elke; Osen, Wolfram

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the CRISPR/Cas9 technology was used to establish murine tumor cell lines, devoid of MHC I or MHC II surface expression, respectively. The melanoma cell line B16F10 and the murine breast cancer cell line EO-771, the latter stably expressing the tumor antigen NY-BR-1 (EO-NY), were transfected with an expression plasmid encoding a β2m-specific single guide (sg)RNA and Cas9. The resulting MHC I negative cells were sorted by flow cytometry to obtain single cell clones, and loss of susceptibility of peptide pulsed MHC I negative clones to peptide-specific CTL recognition was determined by IFNγ ELISpot assay. The β2m knockout (KO) clones did not give rise to tumors in syngeneic mice (C57BL/6N), unless NK cells were depleted, suggesting that outgrowth of the β2m KO cell lines was controlled by NK cells. Using sgRNAs targeting the β-chain encoding locus of the IAb molecule we also generated several B16F10 MHC II KO clones. Peptide loaded B16F10 MHC II KO cells were insusceptible to recognition by OT-II cells and tumor growth was unaltered compared to parental B16F10 cells. Thus, in our hands the CRISPR/Cas9 system has proven to be an efficient straight forward strategy for the generation of MHC knockout cell lines. Such cell lines could serve as parental cells for co-transfection of compatible HLA alleles together with human tumor antigens of interest, thereby facilitating the generation of HLA matched transplantable tumor models, e.g. in HLAtg mouse strains of the newer generation, lacking cell surface expression of endogenous H2 molecules. In addition, our tumor cell lines established might offer a useful tool to investigate tumor reactive T cell responses that function independently from MHC molecule surface expression by the tumor. PMID:28301575

  7. Antigenicity of UV radiation-induced murine tumors correlates positively with the level of adenosine deaminase activity.

    PubMed

    Aukerman, S L; Fidler, I J

    1987-01-01

    The specific activities of adenosine deaminase (ADA) in 16 murine tumor cell lines derived from seven UV light-induced neoplasms (melanoma and fibrosarcoma) were determined. In each case, the specific activity of ADA correlated positively with the antigenicity of the tumor cells. Highly antigenic cell lines that regress upon introduction into syngeneic hosts had on average 4- to 6-fold higher ADA specific activities than cell lines of low antigenicity that grow progressively in syngeneic hosts. The antigenic differences are probably not related to intracellular cAMP levels, as the level of cAMP differed only 2-fold between the two groups of cell lines.

  8. Murine Dendritic Cells Pulsed with Whole Tumor Lysates Mediate Potent Antitumor Immune Responses in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fields, R. C.; Shimizu, K.; Mule, J. J.

    1998-08-01

    The highly efficient nature of dendritic cells (DC) as antigen-presenting cells raises the possibility of uncovering in tumor-bearing hosts very low levels of T cell reactivity to poorly immunogenic tumors that are virtually undetectable by other means. Here, we demonstrate the in vitro and in vivo capacities of murine bone marrow-derived, cytokine-driven DC to elicit potent and specific anti-tumor responses when pulsed with whole tumor lysates. Stimulation of naive spleen-derived T cells by tumor lysate-pulsed DC generated tumor-specific proliferative cytokine release and cytolytic reactivities in vitro. In addition, in two separate strains of mice with histologically distinct tumors, s.c. injections of DC pulsed with whole tumor lysates effectively primed these animals to reject subsequent lethal challenges with viable parental tumor cells and, important to note, also mediated significant reductions in the number of metastases established in the lungs. Tumor rejection depended on host-derived CD8+ T cells and, to a lesser extent, CD4+ T cells. Spleens from mice that had rejected their tumors contained specific precursor cytotoxic T lymphocytes. The use of whole tumor lysates as a source of tumor-associated antigen(s) for pulsing of DC circumvents several limitations encountered with other methods as well as provides certain distinct advantages, which are discussed. These data serve as rationale for our recent initiation of a phase I clinical trial of immunization with autologous tumor lysate-pulsed DC in adult and pediatric cancer patients.

  9. Effective Treatment of Established GL261 Murine Gliomas through Picornavirus Vaccination-Enhanced Tumor Antigen-Specific CD8+ T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Renner, Danielle N; Jin, Fang; Litterman, Adam J; Balgeman, Alexis J; Hanson, Lisa M; Gamez, Jeffrey D; Chae, Michael; Carlson, Brett L; Sarkaria, Jann N; Parney, Ian F; Ohlfest, John R; Pirko, Istvan; Pavelko, Kevin D; Johnson, Aaron J

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is among the most invasive and lethal of cancers, frequently infiltrating surrounding healthy tissue and giving rise to rapid recurrence. It is therefore critical to establish experimental model systems and develop therapeutic approaches that enhance anti-tumor immunity. In the current study, we have employed a newly developed murine glioma model to assess the efficacy of a novel picornavirus vaccination approach for the treatment of established tumors. The GL261-Quad system is a variation of the GL261 syngeneic glioma that has been engineered to expresses model T cell epitopes including OVA257-264. MRI revealed that both GL261 and GL261-Quad tumors display characteristic features of human gliomas such as heterogeneous gadolinium leakage and larger T2 weighted volumes. Analysis of brain-infiltrating immune cells demonstrated that GL261-Quad gliomas generate detectable CD8+ T cell responses toward the tumor-specific Kb:OVA257-264 antigen. Enhancing this response via a single intracranial or peripheral vaccination with picornavirus expressing the OVA257-264 antigen increased anti-tumor CD8+ T cells infiltrating the brain, attenuated progression of established tumors, and extended survival of treated mice. Importantly, the efficacy of the picornavirus vaccination is dependent on functional cytotoxic activity of CD8+ T cells, as the beneficial response was completely abrogated in mice lacking perforin expression. Therefore, we have developed a novel system for evaluating mechanisms of anti-tumor immunity in vivo, incorporating the GL261-Quad model, 3D volumetric MRI, and picornavirus vaccination to enhance tumor-specific cytotoxic CD8+ T cell responses and track their effectiveness at eradicating established gliomas in vivo.

  10. PD-1 Blockade and OX40 Triggering Synergistically Protects against Tumor Growth in a Murine Model of Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xin; Cheng, Dali; Xia, Zhijun; Luan, Meng; Zhang, Shulan

    2014-01-01

    The co-inhibitory receptor Programmed Death-1 (PD-1) curtails immune responses and prevent autoimmunity, however, tumors exploit this pathway to escape from immune destruction. The co-stimulatory receptor OX40 is upregulated on T cells following activation and increases their clonal expansion, survival and cytokine production when engaged. Although antagonistic anti-PD-1 or agonistic anti-OX40 antibodies can promote the rejection of several murine tumors, some poorly immunogenic tumors were refractory to this treatment. In the present study, we evaluated the antitumor effects and mechanisms of combinatorial PD-1 blockade and OX40 triggering in a murine ID8 ovarian cancer model. Although individual anti-PD-1 or OX40 mAb treatment was ineffective in tumor protection against 10-day established ID8 tumor, combined anti-PD-1/OX40 mAb treatment markedly inhibited tumor outgrowth with 60% of mice tumor free 90 days after tumor inoculation. Tumor protection was associated with a systemic immune response with memory and antigen specificity and required CD4+ cells and CD8+ T cells. The anti-PD-1/OX40 mAb treatment increased CD4+ and CD8+ cells and decreased immunosuppressive CD4+FoxP3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells and CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid suppressor cells (MDSC), giving rise to significantly higher ratios of both effector CD4+ and CD8+ cells to Treg and MDSC in peritoneal cavity; Quantitative RT-PCR data further demonstrated the induction of a local immunostimulatory milieu by anti-PD-1/OX40 mAb treatment. The splenic CD8+ T cells from combined mAb treated mice produced high levels of IFN-γ upon tumor antigen stimulation and exhibited antigen-specific cytolytic activity. To our knowledge, this is the first study testing the antitumor effects of combined anti-PD-1/OX40 mAb in a murine ovarian cancer model, and our results provide a rationale for clinical trials evaluating ovarian cancer immunotherapy using this combination of mAb. PMID:24586709

  11. PD-1 blockade and OX40 triggering synergistically protects against tumor growth in a murine model of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xin; Cheng, Dali; Xia, Zhijun; Luan, Meng; Zhang, Shulan

    2014-01-01

    The co-inhibitory receptor Programmed Death-1 (PD-1) curtails immune responses and prevent autoimmunity, however, tumors exploit this pathway to escape from immune destruction. The co-stimulatory receptor OX40 is upregulated on T cells following activation and increases their clonal expansion, survival and cytokine production when engaged. Although antagonistic anti-PD-1 or agonistic anti-OX40 antibodies can promote the rejection of several murine tumors, some poorly immunogenic tumors were refractory to this treatment. In the present study, we evaluated the antitumor effects and mechanisms of combinatorial PD-1 blockade and OX40 triggering in a murine ID8 ovarian cancer model. Although individual anti-PD-1 or OX40 mAb treatment was ineffective in tumor protection against 10-day established ID8 tumor, combined anti-PD-1/OX40 mAb treatment markedly inhibited tumor outgrowth with 60% of mice tumor free 90 days after tumor inoculation. Tumor protection was associated with a systemic immune response with memory and antigen specificity and required CD4(+) cells and CD8(+) T cells. The anti-PD-1/OX40 mAb treatment increased CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells and decreased immunosuppressive CD4(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells and CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) myeloid suppressor cells (MDSC), giving rise to significantly higher ratios of both effector CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells to Treg and MDSC in peritoneal cavity; Quantitative RT-PCR data further demonstrated the induction of a local immunostimulatory milieu by anti-PD-1/OX40 mAb treatment. The splenic CD8(+) T cells from combined mAb treated mice produced high levels of IFN-γ upon tumor antigen stimulation and exhibited antigen-specific cytolytic activity. To our knowledge, this is the first study testing the antitumor effects of combined anti-PD-1/OX40 mAb in a murine ovarian cancer model, and our results provide a rationale for clinical trials evaluating ovarian cancer immunotherapy using this combination of mAb.

  12. Tumor necrosis factor receptors support murine hematopoietic progenitor function in the early stages of engraftment.

    PubMed

    Pearl-Yafe, Michal; Mizrahi, Keren; Stein, Jerry; Yolcu, Esma S; Kaplan, Ofer; Shirwan, Haval; Yaniv, Isaac; Askenasy, Nadir

    2010-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family receptors/ligands are important participants in hematopoietic homeostasis, in particular as essential negative expansion regulators of differentiated clones. As a prominent injury cytokine, TNF-alpha has been traditionally considered to suppress donor hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell function after transplantation. We monitored the involvement of TNF receptors (TNF-R) 1 and 2 in murine hematopoietic cell engraftment and their inter-relationship with Fas. Transplantation of lineage-negative (lin(-)) bone marrow cells (BMC) from TNF receptor-deficient mice into wild-type recipients showed defective early engraftment and loss of durable hematopoietic contribution upon recovery of host hematopoiesis. Consistently, cells deficient in TNF receptors had reduced competitive capacity as compared to wild-type progenitors. The TNF receptors were acutely upregulated in bone marrow (BM)-homed donor cells (wild-type) early after transplantation, being expressed in 60%-75% of the donor cells after 6 days. Both TNF receptors were detected in fast cycling, early differentiating progenitors, and were ubiquitously expressed in the most primitive progenitors with long-term reconstituting potential (lin(-)c-kit(+) stem cell antigen (SCA)-1(+)). BM-homed donor cells were insensitive to apoptosis induced by TNF-alpha and Fas-ligand and their combination, despite reciprocal inductive cross talk between the TNF and Fas receptors. The engraftment supporting effect of TNF-alpha is attributed to stimulation of progenitors through TNF-R1, which involves activation of the caspase cascade. This stimulatory effect was not observed for TNF-R2, and this receptor did not assume redundant stimulatory function in TNFR1-deficient cells. It is concluded that TNF-alpha plays a tropic role early after transplantation, which is essential to successful progenitor engraftment.

  13. SIRT3 is a Mitochondrial Tumor Suppressor and Genetic Loss Results in a Murine Model for ER/PR-Positive Mammary Tumors Connecting Metabolism and Carcinogenesis Mitochondrial Tumor Suppressor. Revision

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    breast cancer in younger women have been established by altering the expression of BRCA genes . In contrast, there are no murine models for the...overarching goal of this proposal is to determine if the mitochondrial sirtuin SIRT3 is a tumor suppressor gene (TSG) that may be used to: (1...tumors. Based on these results we initially proposed a hypothesis that longevity genes impact the process of carcinogenesis via the maintenance of

  14. Expression of the Wilms' tumor gene WT1 in the murine urogenital system.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, J; Schalling, M; Buckler, A J; Rogers, A; Haber, D A; Housman, D

    1991-08-01

    The Wilms' tumor gene WT1 is a recessive oncogene that encodes a putative transcription factor implicated in nephrogenesis during kidney development. In this report we analyze expression of WT1 in the murine urogenital system. WT1 is expressed in non-germ-cell components of the testis and ovaries in both young and adult mice. In situ mRNA hybridization studies demonstrate that WT1 is expressed in the granulosa and epithelial cells of ovaries, the Sertoli cells of the testis, and in the uterine wall. In addition to the 3.1-kb WT1 transcript detected by Northern blotting of RNA from kidney, uterus, and gonads, there is an approximately 2.5-kb WT1-related mRNA species in testis. The levels of WT1 mRNA in the gonads are among the highest observed, surpassing amounts detected in the embryonic kidney. During development, these levels are differentially regulated, depending on the sexual differentiation of the gonad. Expression of WT1 mRNA in the female reproductive system does not fluctuate significantly from days 4 to 40 postpartum. In contrast, WT1 mRNA levels in the tesis increase steadily after birth, reaching their highest expression levels at day 8 postpartum and decreasing slightly as the animal matures. Expression of WT1 in the gonads is detectable as early as 12.5 days postcoitum (p.c.). As an initial step toward exploring the tissue-specific expression of WT1, DNA elements upstream of WT1 were cloned and sequenced. Three putative transcription initiation sites, utilized in testis, ovaries, and uterus, were mapped by S1 nuclease protection assays. The sequences surrounding these sites have a high G + C content, and typical upstream CCAAT and TATAA boxes are not present. These studies allowed us to identify the translation initiation site for WT1 protein synthesis. We have also used an epitope-tagging protocol to demonstrate that WT1 is a nuclear protein, consistent with its role as a transcription factor. Our results demonstrate regulation of WT1 expression

  15. CD24 Is Not Required for Tumor Initiation and Growth in Murine Breast and Prostate Cancer Models.

    PubMed

    Cremers, Natascha; Neeb, Antje; Uhle, Tanja; Dimmler, Arno; Rothley, Melanie; Allgayer, Heike; Fodde, Riccardo; Sleeman, Jonathan Paul; Thiele, Wilko

    2016-01-01

    CD24 is a small, heavily glycosylated, GPI-linked membrane protein, whose expression has been associated with the tumorigenesis and progression of several types of cancer. Here, we studied the expression of CD24 in tumors of MMTV-PyMT, Apc1572/T+ and TRAMP genetic mouse models that spontaneously develop mammary or prostate carcinoma, respectively. We found that CD24 is expressed during tumor development in all three models. In MMTV-PyMT and Apc1572T/+ breast tumors, CD24 was strongly but heterogeneously expressed during early tumorigenesis, but decreased in more advanced stages, and accordingly was increased in poorly differentiated lesions compared with well differentiated lesions. In prostate tumors developing in TRAMP mice, CD24 expression was strong within hyperplastic lesions in comparison with non-hyperplastic regions, and heterogeneous CD24 expression was maintained in advanced prostate carcinomas. To investigate whether CD24 plays a functional role in tumorigenesis in these models, we crossed CD24 deficient mice with MMTV-PyMT, Apc1572T/+ and TRAMP mice, and assessed the influence of CD24 deficiency on tumor onset and tumor burden. We found that mice negative or positive for CD24 did not significantly differ in terms of tumor initiation and burden in the genetic tumor models tested, with the exception of Apc1572T/+ mice, in which lack of CD24 reduced the mammary tumor burden slightly but significantly. Together, our data suggest that while CD24 is distinctively expressed during the early development of murine mammary and prostate tumors, it is not essential for the formation of tumors developing in MMTV-PyMT, Apc1572T/+ and TRAMP mice.

  16. Lessons from probiotic-host interaction studies in murine models of experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Claes, Ingmar J J; De Keersmaecker, Sigrid C J; Vanderleyden, Jos; Lebeer, Sarah

    2011-10-01

    In inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), it is known that besides genetic and environmental factors (e.g. diet, drugs, stress), the microbiota play an important role in the pathogenesis. Patients with IBD have an altered microbiota (dysbiosis) and therefore, probiotics, defined as 'live micro-organisms that when administered in adequate amounts can confer a health benefit on the host', have been suggested as nutritional supplements to restore these imbalances. The best response on probiotics among the different types of IBD appears to be in the case of ulcerative colitis. Although probiotics show promise in IBD in both clinical and animal studies, further mechanistic studies are necessary to optimize the use of probiotics as supporting therapy in IBD. Murine models of experimental colitis have been used for decades to study this pathology, and these models have been proven useful to search for new therapeutic approaches. The purpose of this review is to summarize probiotic-host interaction studies in murine models of experimental colitis and to evaluate how these models can further help in understanding these complex interactions. Unraveling the molecular mechanisms behind the beneficial effects will assist in better and possibly more efficient probiotic formulations.

  17. Methotrexate treatment in murine experimental systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE); clinical benefits associated with cytokine manipulation.

    PubMed Central

    Segal, R; Dayan, M; Zinger, H; Mozes, E

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of Methotrexate (MTX) on the development and the course of experimental murine SLE, as well as on the cytokine profile involved in the disease. SLE was induced in naive BALB/c female mice by injection of the human anti-DNA MoAb bearing a common idiotype (16/6 Id). Six weeks following immunization, when high levels of autoantibodies were demonstrated, the mice were treated with MTX (2 mg/kg once a week) for a period of 10 months. MTX treatment had no effect on 16/6 Id-induced autoantibody production. However, MTX treatment had beneficial effects on the clinical manifestations of the experimental disease (i.e. leucocyte counts, levels of protein in the urine and immune complex deposits in the kidneys). Thus, only 20% of 16/6 Id-immunized BALB/c mice that were treated with MTX had immune complex deposits in their kidneys compared with 100% of SLE-afflicted BALB/c mice that were not treated. We have observed a significant elevation in IL-1, tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and IL-10 secretion in BALB/c mice afflicted with experimental SLE. IL-2, IL-4, IL-6 and interferon-gamma (INF-gamma) levels were decreased in these mice compared with the levels detected in healthy controls. Treatment with MTX reversed the levels of all the above cytokines to normal levels observed in control mice. These studies demonstrate therapeutic effects of MTX on murine experimental SLE. The normal cytokine profile observed following treatment with MTX is suggested to play a role in the amelioration of the clinical manifestations of experimental SLE. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7621594

  18. Experimental chemotherapy of human tumors heterotransplanted in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Giovanella, B C

    1980-01-01

    Human tumors heterotransplanted in nude mice offer the most realistic model for experimental chemotherapy of human neoplasms. Almost all the known human malignancies have been successfully transplanted in the nudes, although the rate of takes varies considerably between different tumor types. So far, a good correlation has been observed between the results obtained treating with the same drug the same tumor in the patient and in the nude mouse. Our experience in this field is, however, still too limited for the direct extrapolation of chemotherapeutic results obtained in the nudes to human tumors.

  19. Adjuvant Cationic Liposomes Presenting MPL and IL-12 Induce Cell Death, Suppress Tumor Growth, and Alter the Cellular Phenotype of Tumors in a Murine Model of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) process and present antigens to T lymphocytes, inducing potent immune responses when encountered in association with activating signals, such as pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Using the 4T1 murine model of breast cancer, cationic liposomes containing monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) and interleukin (IL)-12 were administered by intratumoral injection. Combination multivalent presentation of the Toll-like receptor-4 ligand MPL and cytotoxic 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trmethylammonium-propane lipids induced cell death, decreased cellular proliferation, and increased serum levels of IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. The addition of recombinant IL-12 further suppressed tumor growth and increased expression of IL-1β, TNF-α, and interferon-γ. IL-12 also increased the percentage of cytolytic T cells, DC, and F4/80+ macrophages in the tumor. While single agent therapy elevated levels of nitric oxide synthase 3-fold above basal levels in the tumor, combination therapy with MPL cationic liposomes and IL-12 stimulated a 7-fold increase, supporting the observed cell cycle arrest (loss of Ki-67 expression) and apoptosis (TUNEL positive). In mice bearing dual tumors, the growth of distal, untreated tumors mirrored that of liposome-treated tumors, supporting the presence of a systemic immune response. PMID:25179345

  20. Strain-related effects of fenbendazole treatment on murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Ramp, A A; Hall, C; Orian, J M

    2010-07-01

    Parasitic infections are a concern in animal facilities, in view of their influence on physiological processes and the immune status of animals. Pinworms are effectively controlled with the anthelminthic fenbendazole (FBZ, [5-(phenylthio)-1H-benzamidazol-2-yl]carbamic acid methyl ester; C(15)H(13)N(3)O(2)S); however, questions remain as to whether prolonged FBZ exposure alters the disease course in specific experimental models, such as those pertaining to the immune system. We report that a three-month regimen of FBZ-medicated feed severely affected the onset and disease severity of murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a disease that mimics multiple sclerosis. Differences were recorded between mouse strains used. Our data suggest that where the use of FBZ is mandatory, its full effect should be verified on the particular EAE variant adopted by the laboratory.

  1. Hypoxia imaging predicts success of hypoxia-induced cytosine deaminase/5-fluorocytosine gene therapy in a murine lung tumor model.

    PubMed

    Lee, B-F; Lee, C-H; Chiu, N-T; Hsia, C-C; Shen, L-H; Shiau, A-L

    2012-04-01

    Tc-99m-HL91 is a hypoxia imaging biomarker. The aim of this study was to investigate the value of Tc-99m-HL91 imaging for hypoxia-induced cytosine deaminase (CD)/5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) gene therapy in a murine lung tumor model. C57BL/6 mice were implanted with Lewis lung carcinoma cells transduced with the hypoxia-inducible promoter-driven CD gene (LL2/CD) or luciferase gene (LL2/Luc) serving as the control. When tumor volumes reached 100 mm(3), pretreatment images were acquired after injection of Tc-99m-HL91. The mice were divided into low and high hypoxic groups based on the tumor-to-non-tumor ratio of Tc-99m-HL91. They were injected daily with 5-FC (500 mg kg(-1)) or the vehicle for 1 week. When tumor volumes reached 1000 mm(3), autoradiography and histological examinations were performed. Treatment with 5-FC delayed tumor growth and enhanced the survival of mice bearing high hypoxic LL2/CD tumors. The therapeutic effect of hypoxia-induced CD/5-FC gene therapy was more pronounced in high hypoxic tumors than in low hypoxic tumors. This study provides the first evidence that Tc-99m-HL91 can serve as an imaging biomarker for predicting the treatment responses of hypoxia-regulated CD/5-FC gene therapy in animal tumor models. Our results suggest that hypoxia imaging using Tc-99m-HL91 has the predictive value for the success of hypoxia-directed treatment regimens.

  2. Carbon nanotube based respiratory gated micro-CT imaging of a murine model of lung tumors with optical imaging correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burk, Laurel M.; Lee, Yueh Z.; Heathcote, Samuel; Wang, Ko-han; Kim, William Y.; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2011-03-01

    Current optical imaging techniques can successfully measure tumor load in murine models of lung carcinoma but lack structural detail. We demonstrate that respiratory gated micro-CT imaging of such models gives information about structure and correlates with tumor load measurements by optical methods. Four mice with multifocal, Kras-induced tumors expressing firefly luciferase were imaged against four controls using both optical imaging and respiratory gated micro-CT. CT images of anesthetized animals were acquired with a custom CNT-based system using 30 ms x-ray pulses during peak inspiration; respiration motion was tracked with a pressure sensor beneath each animal's abdomen. Optical imaging based on the Luc+ signal correlating with tumor load was performed on a Xenogen IVIS Kinetix. Micro-CT images were post-processed using Osirix, measuring lung volume with region growing. Diameters of the largest three tumors were measured. Relationships between tumor size, lung volumes, and optical signal were compared. CT images and optical signals were obtained for all animals at two time points. In all lobes of the Kras+ mice in all images, tumors were visible; the smallest to be readily identified measured approximately 300 microns diameter. CT-derived tumor volumes and optical signals related linearly, with r=0.94 for all animals. When derived for only tumor bearing animals, r=0.3. The trend of each individual animal's optical signal tracked correctly based on the CT volumes. Interestingly, lung volumes also correlated positively with optical imaging data and tumor volume burden, suggesting active remodeling.

  3. Efficacy of Lysophosphatidylcholine in Combination with Antimicrobial Agents against Acinetobacter baumannii in Experimental Murine Peritoneal Sepsis and Pneumonia Models

    PubMed Central

    Parra Millán, R.; Jiménez Mejías, M. E.; Sánchez Encinales, V.; Ayerbe Algaba, R.; Gutiérrez Valencia, A.; Pachón Ibáñez, M. E.; Díaz, C.; Pérez del Palacio, J.; López Cortés, L. F.; Smani, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Immune response stimulation to prevent infection progression may be an adjuvant to antimicrobial treatment. Lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) is an immunomodulator involved in immune cell recruitment and activation. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the efficacy of LPC in combination with colistin, tigecycline, or imipenem in experimental murine models of peritoneal sepsis and pneumonia. We used Acinetobacter baumannii strain Ab9, which is susceptible to colistin, tigecycline, and imipenem, and multidrug-resistant strain Ab186, which is susceptible to colistin and resistant to tigecycline and imipenem. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters for colistin, tigecycline, and imipenem and the 100% minimal lethal dose (MLD100) were determined for both strains. The therapeutic efficacies of LPC, colistin (60 mg/kg of body weight/day), tigecycline (10 mg/kg/day), and imipenem (180 mg/kg/day), alone or in combination, were assessed against Ab9 and Ab186 at the MLD100 in murine peritoneal sepsis and pneumonia models. The levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, i.e., tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-10 (IL-10), were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the same experimental models after inoculating mice with the MLD of both strains. LPC in combination with colistin, tigecycline, or imipenem markedly enhanced the bacterial clearance of Ab9 and Ab186 from the spleen and lungs and reduced bacteremia and mouse mortality rates (P < 0.05) compared with those for colistin, tigecycline, and imipenem monotherapies. Moreover, at 4 h post-bacterial infection, Ab9 induced higher TNF-α and lower IL-10 levels than those with Ab186 (4 μg/ml versus 3 μg/ml [P < 0.05] and 2 μg/ml versus 3.4 μg/ml [P < 0.05], respectively). LPC treatment combined with colistin, tigecycline, or imipenem modestly reduced the severity of infection by A. baumannii strains with different resistance phenotypes compared to LPC monotherapy in both

  4. Functional interactions between Lmo2, the Arf tumor suppressor, and Notch1 in murine T-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Treanor, Louise M; Volanakis, Emmanuel J; Zhou, Sheng; Lu, Taihe; Sherr, Charles J; Sorrentino, Brian P

    2011-05-19

    LMO2 is a target of chromosomal translocations in T-cell tumors and was activated by retroviral vector insertions in T-cell tumors from X-SCID patients in gene therapy trials. To better understand the cooperating genetic events in LMO2-associated T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), we investigated the roles of Arf tumor suppressor loss and Notch activation in murine models of transplantation. Lmo2 overexpression enhanced the expansion of primitive DN2 thymocytes, eventually facilitating the stochastic induction of clonal CD4(+)/CD8(+) malignancies. Inactivation of the Arf tumor suppressor further increased the self-renewal capacity of the primitive, preleukemic thymocyte pool and accelerated the development of aggressive, Lmo2-induced T-cell lympholeukemias. Notch mutations were frequently detected in these Lmo2-induced tumors. The Arf promoter was not directly engaged by Lmo2 or mutant Notch, and use of a mouse model in which activation of a mutant Notch allele depends on previous engagement of the Arf promoter revealed that Notch activation could occur as a subsequent event in T-cell tumorigenesis. Therefore, Lmo2 cooperates with Arf loss to enhance self-renewal in primitive thymocytes. Notch mutation and Arf inactivation appear to independently cooperate in no requisite order with Lmo2 overexpression in inducing T-ALL, and all 3 events remained insufficient to guarantee immediate tumor development.

  5. Oral treatment with Bifidobacterium longum 51A reduced inflammation in a murine experimental model of gout.

    PubMed

    Vieira, A T; Galvão, I; Amaral, F A; Teixeira, M M; Nicoli, J R; Martins, F S

    2015-01-01

    Gout is an acute inflammatory disease characterised by the presence of uric acid crystals in the joint. This event promotes neutrophil infiltration and activation that leads to tissue damage. We investigated here whether the oral administration of the probiotic strain Bifidobacterium longum 5(1A) (BL) could ameliorate monosodium urate crystal (MSU)-induced inflammation in a murine model of gout. Mice received oral administration of BL or saline daily for 7 days and then were injected with MSU in the knee cavity. Treatment with BL significantly alleviated the inflammatory parameters, as seen by reduced hypernociception, reduced neutrophil accumulation in the joint and myeloperoxidase activity in periarticular tissue. There was inhibition of the production of CXCL1 and interleukin(IL)-1β in joints. Levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 were significantly higher in the knee tissue of mice treated with than control mice injected with MSU. In conclusion, oral BL treatment reduced the inflammatory response in an experimental murine model of gout, suggesting it may be useful as an adjuvant treatment in patients with gout.

  6. In vitro investigation of the roles of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1 in murine osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jules, Joel; Feng, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Whereas the monocyte/macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and the receptor activator of NF-кB ligand (RANKL) are essential and sufficient for osteoclastogenesis, a number of other cytokines including two proinflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin-1 (IL-1), can exert profound effects on the osteoclastogenic process. However, the precise mode of action of TNF-α and IL-1 in osteoclastogenesis remains controversial. While some groups demonstrated that these two cytokines can promote murine osteoclastogenesis in vitro in the presence of M-CSF only, we and others showed that TNF-α-/IL-1-mediated osteoclastogenesis requires permissive levels of RANKL. This chapter describes the method that we have used to investigate the effects of TNF-α and IL-1 on osteoclast formation in in vitro osteoclastogenesis assays using primary murine bone marrow macrophages (BMMs). Detailed experimental conditions are provided and critical points are discussed to help the reader use the method to independently evaluate the roles of TNF-α and IL-1 in osteoclastogenesis in vitro. Moreover, this method can be used to further elucidate the signaling mechanisms by which these two cytokines act in concert with RANKL or with each other to modulate osteoclastogenesis.

  7. Rapid Copper Acquisition by Developing Murine Mesothelioma: Decreasing Bioavailable Copper Slows Tumor Growth, Normalizes Vessels and Promotes T Cell Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Crowe, Andrew; Jackaman, Connie; Beddoes, Katie M.; Ricciardo, Belinda; Nelson, Delia J.

    2013-01-01

    Copper, an essential trace element acquired through nutrition, is an important co-factor for pro-angiogenic factors including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Decreasing bioavailable copper has been used as an anti-angiogenic and anti-cancer strategy with promising results. However, the role of copper and its potential as a therapy in mesothelioma is not yet well understood. Therefore, we monitored copper levels in progressing murine mesothelioma tumors and analyzed the effects of lowering bioavailable copper. Copper levels in tumors and organs were assayed using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Mesothelioma tumors rapidly sequestered copper at early stages of development, the copper was then dispersed throughout growing tumor tissues. These data imply that copper uptake may play an important role in early tumor development. Lowering bioavailable copper using the copper chelators, penicillamine, trientine or tetrathiomolybdate, slowed in vivo mesothelioma growth but did not provide any cures similar to using cisplatin chemotherapy or anti-VEGF receptor antibody therapy. The impact of copper lowering on tumor blood vessels and tumor infiltrating T cells was measured using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Copper lowering was associated with reduced tumor vessel diameter, reduced endothelial cell proliferation (reduced Ki67 expression) and lower surface ICAM/CD54 expression implying reduced endothelial cell activation, in a process similar to endothelial normalization. Copper lowering was also associated with a CD4+ T cell infiltrate. In conclusion, these data suggest copper lowering is a potentially useful anti-mesothelioma treatment strategy that slows tumor growth to provide a window of opportunity for inclusion of other treatment modalities to improve patient outcomes. PMID:24013775

  8. Differential induction of tumor necrosis factor alpha in murine and human leukocytes by Mycoplasma arthritidis-derived superantigen.

    PubMed Central

    Rink, L; Nicklas, W; Alvarez-Ossorio, L; Koester, M; Kirchner, H

    1994-01-01

    Mycoplasma arthritidis-derived superantigen (MAS) is exclusively produced by M. arthritidis, which is the only known mycoplasma to produce a superantigen. As a superantigen, MAS shows properties similar to those of the staphylococcal enterotoxins and related substances, such as binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II and V beta-specific stimulation of T cells. In this series of experiments, we demonstrate some differences between MAS and other superantigens. MAS induced the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) mRNA in human as well as in murine leukocytes. However, only in murine leukocytes was the mRNA adequately translated into the protein. In human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, we found only small amounts of TNF, whereas in murine spleen cells we detected levels more than three times higher. The proliferative response to MAS has been shown to be restricted to I-E alpha in the murine MHC. Furthermore, TNF was induced in I-E alpha+ bone marrow-derived macrophages by MAS. In these cells, MAS rapidly induced very high levels of TNF and the amounts of mRNA detected correlated to the amount of protein produced. In comparison with other superantigens, including the staphylococcal enterotoxins, toxic shock syndrome toxin 1, and exfoliative toxin A, the failure of MAS to induce TNF-alpha in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells is specific for MAS and not common to all superantigens. The direct activation of bone marrow-derived macrophages also seems to be specific for MAS. These data suggest that the induction of TNF-alpha by MAS is dependent on the strength of binding to the MHC class II molecule. Images PMID:8300207

  9. Isolation and (111)In-Oxine Labeling of Murine NK Cells for Assessment of Cell Trafficking in Orthotopic Lung Tumor Model.

    PubMed

    Malviya, Gaurav; Nayak, Tapan; Gerdes, Christian; Dierckx, Rudi A J O; Signore, Alberto; de Vries, Erik F J

    2016-04-04

    A noninvasive in vivo imaging method for NK cell trafficking is essential to gain further understanding of the pathogenesis of NK cell mediated immune response to the novel cancer treatment strategies, and to discover the homing sites and physiological distribution of NK cells. Although human NK cells can be labeled for in vivo imaging, little is known about the murine NK cell labeling and its application in animal models. This study describes the isolation and ex vivo radiolabeling of murine NK cells for the evaluation of cell trafficking in an orthotopic model of human lung cancer in mice. Scid-Tg(FCGR3A)Blt transgenic SCID mice were used to isolate NK cells from mouse splenocytes using the CD49b (DX5) MicroBeads positive selection method. The purity and viability of the isolated NK cells were confirmed by FACS analysis. Different labeling buffers and incubation times were evaluated to optimize (111)In-oxine labeling conditions. Functionality of the radiolabeled NK cell was assessed by (51)Cr-release assay. We evaluated physiological distribution of (111)In-oxine labeled murine NK cells in normal SCID mice and biodistribution in irradiated and nonirradiated SCID mice with orthotopic A549 human lung tumor lesions. Imaging findings were confirmed by histology. Results showed that incubation with 0.011 MBq of (111)In-oxine per million murine NK cells in PBS (pH 7.4) for 20 min is the best condition that provides optimum labeling efficiency without affecting cell viability and functionality. Physiological distribution in normal SCID mice demonstrated NK cells homing mainly in the spleen, while (111)In released from NK cells was excreted via kidneys into urine. Biodistribution studies demonstrated a higher lung uptake in orthotopic lung tumor-bearing mice than control mice. In irradiated mice, lung tumor uptake of radiolabeled murine NK cells decreased between 24 h and 72 h postinjection (p.i.), which was accompanied by tumor regression, while in nonirradiated mice

  10. Characterization of AKR murine leukemia virus sequences in AKR mouse substrains and structure of integrated recombinant genomes in tumor tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Quint, W; Quax, W; van der Putten, H; Berns, A

    1981-01-01

    A specific cDNA probe of AKR murine leukemia virus (AKR-MLV) was prepared to detect AKR-MLV sequences in normal and tumor tissues in a variety of AKR mouse substrains. AKR strains contained up to six endogenous AKR-MLV genomes. All substrains tested had one AKR-MLV locus in common, and closely related substrains had several proviruses integrated in an identical site. Virus-induced tumors in the AKR/FuRdA and AKR/JS strains showed a reintegration pattern of AKR-MLV sequences unique for the individual animal, suggesting a monoclonal origin for the outgrown tumors. An analysis of tumor DNAs from the AKR/FuRdA and AKR/JS substrains with restriction enzymes cleaving within the proviral genome revealed a new EcoRI restriction site and BamHI restriction site not present in normal tissues. The positions of these sites corresponded both with cleavage sites of EcoRI and BamHI in integrated Moloney recombinants and with the structure of isolated AKR mink cell focus-forming viruses. All tumors analyzed to data contain nearly identical integrated recombinant genomes, suggesting a causal relationship between the formation of recombinants and the leukemogenic process. Images PMID:6268802

  11. Expression level and DNA methylation status of Glutathione-S-transferase genes in normal murine prostate and TRAMP tumors

    PubMed Central

    Mavis, Cory K.; Kinney, Shannon R. Morey; Foster, Barbara A.; Karpf, Adam R.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Glutathione-S-transferase (Gst) genes are down-regulated in human prostate cancer, and GSTP1 silencing is mediated by promoter DNA hypermethylation in this malignancy. We examined Gst gene expression and Gst promoter DNA methylation in normal murine prostates and Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) tumors. METHODS Primary and metastatic tumors were obtained from TRAMP mice, and normal prostates were obtained from strain-matched WT mice (n=15/group). Quantitative real-time RT-PCR was used to measure GstA4, GstK1, GstM1, GstO1, and GstP1 mRNA expression, and Western blotting and immunohistochemical staining was used to measure GstM1 and GstP1 protein expression. MassARRAY Quantitative Methylation Analysis was used to measure DNA methylation of the 5’ CpG islands of GstA4, GstK1, GstM1, GstO1, and GstP1. TRAMP-C2 cells were treated with the epigenetic remodeling drugs decitabine and trichostatin A (TSA) alone and in combination, and Gst gene expression was measured. RESULTS Of the genes analyzed, GstM1 and GstP1 were expressed at highest levels in normal prostate. All five Gst genes showed greatly reduced expression in primary tumors compared to normal prostate, but not in tumor metastases. Gst promoter methylation was unchanged in TRAMP tumors compared to normal prostate. Combined decitabine + TSA treatment significantly enhanced the expression of 4/5 Gst genes in TRAMP-C2 cells. CONCLUSIONS Gst genes are extensively downregulated in primary but not metastatic TRAMP tumors. Promoter DNA hypermethylation does not appear to drive Gst gene repression in TRAMP primary tumors; however, pharmacological studies using TRAMP cells suggest the involvement of epigenetic mechanisms in Gst gene repression. PMID:19444856

  12. Combined millimeter wave and cyclophosphamide therapy of an experimental murine melanoma.

    PubMed

    Logani, Mahendra K; Bhanushali, Ashok; Anga, Altaf; Majmundar, Amar; Szabo, Imre; Ziskin, Marvin C

    2004-10-01

    The objective of the present studies was to investigate whether millimeter wave (MMW) therapy can increase the efficacy of cyclophosphamide (CPA), a commonly used anti-cancer drug. The effect of combined MMW-CPA treatment on melanoma growth was compared to CPA treatment alone in a murine model. MMWs were produced with a Russian made YAV-1 generator. The device produced 42.2 +/- 0.2 GHz modulated wave radiation through a 10 x 20 mm rectangular output horn. The animals, SKH-1 hairless female mice, were irradiated on the nasal area. Peak SAR and incident power density were measured as 730 +/- 100 W/kg and 36.5 +/- 5 mW/cm2, respectively. The maximum skin surface temperature elevation measured at the end of 30 min irradiation was 1.5 degrees C. B16F10 melanoma cells (0.2 x 10(6)) were implanted subcutaneously into the left flank of mice on day 1 of the experiment. On days 4-8, CPA was administered intraperitoneally (30 mg/kg/day). MMW irradiation was applied concurrently with, prior to or following CPA administration. A significant reduction (P < .05) in tumor growth was observed with CPA treatment, but MMW irradiation did not provide additional therapeutic benefit as compared to CPA alone. Similar results were obtained when MMW irradiation was applied both prior to and following CPA treatment.

  13. Enhancement of the pro-apoptotic properties of Newcastle disease virus promotes tumor remission in syngeneic murine cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Cuadrado-Castano, Sara; Ayllon, Juan; Mansour, Mena; de la Iglesia-Vicente, Janis; Jordan, Stefan; Tripathi, Shashank; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Villar, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is considered a promising agent for cancer therapy due to its oncolytic properties. These include preferential replication in transformed cells, induction of innate and adaptive immune responses within tumors and cytopathic effects in infected tumor cells due to the activation of apoptosis. In order to enhance the latter and thus possibly enhance the overall oncolytic activity of NDV, we generated a recombinant NDV encoding the human TNF receptor Fas (rNDV-B1/Fas). rNDV-B1/Fas replicates to similar titers as its wild type (rNDV-B1) counterpart, however overexpression of Fas in infected cells leads to higher levels of cytotoxicity correlated with faster and increased apoptosis responses in which both the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways are activated earlier. Furthermore, in vivo studies in syngeneic murine melanoma model show an enhancement of the oncolytic properties of rNDV-B1/Fas, with major improvements in survival and tumor remission. Altogether, our data suggest that up-regulation of the pro-apoptotic function of NDV is a viable approach to enhance its anti-tumor properties, and adds to the currently known, rationally-based strategies to design optimized therapeutic viral vectors for the treatment of cancer. PMID:25761895

  14. Evaluation of the potential of doxorubicin loaded microbubbles as a theranostic modality using a murine tumor model.

    PubMed

    Abdalkader, Rodi; Kawakami, Shigeru; Unga, Johan; Suzuki, Ryo; Maruyama, Kazuo; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2015-06-01

    In this study, a novel phospholipid-based microbubble formulation containing doxorubicin and perfluoropropane gas (DLMB) was developed. The DLMBs were prepared by mechanical agitation of a phospholipid dispersion in the presence of perfluoropropane (PFP) gas. An anionic phospholipid, distearoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DSPG) was selected to load doxorubicin in the microbubbles by means of electrostatic interaction. The particle size, zeta potential, echogenicity and stability of the DLMBs were measured. Drug loading was ⩾ 92%. The potential of the DLMBs for use as a theranostic modality was evaluated in tumor bearing mice. Gas chromatography analysis of PFP showed significant enhancement of PFP retention when doxorubicin was used at concentrations of 10-82% equivalent to DSPG. The inhibitory effects on the proliferation of B16BL6 melanoma murine cells in vitro were enhanced using a combination of ultrasound (US) irradiation and DLMBs. Moreover, in vivo DLMBs in combination with (US) irradiation significantly inhibited the growth of B16BL6 melanoma tumor in mice. Additionally, US echo imaging showed high contrast enhancement of the DLMBs in the tumor vasculature. These results suggest that DLMBs could serve as US triggered carriers of doxorubicin as well as tumor imaging agents in cancer therapy.

  15. Photodynamic therapy stimulates anti-tumor immunity in a murine mastocytoma model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroz, Pawel; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2008-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves the IV administration of photosensitizers followed by illumination of the tumor with red light producing reactive oxygen species that eventually cause vascular shutdown and tumor cell apoptosis. Anti-tumor immunity is stimulated after PDT due to the acute inflammatory response, recognition of tumor-specific antigens, and induction of heat-shock proteins, while the three commonest cancer therapies (surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy) all tend to suppress the immune system. Like many other immunotherapies, the extent of the immune response after PDT tends to depend on the antigenicity of the particular tumor, or in other words, whether the tumor contains proteins with the correct characteristics to provide peptides that can bind to MHC class I molecules and provide a target for cytolytic T lymphocytes. We have described certain mouse tumors containing defined or naturally occurring tumor associated antigens that respond particularly well to PDT, and potent immune responses capable of destroying distant untreated tumors can be induced. In this report we address the induction of immunity after PDT of the DBA2 mastocytoma known as P815. This tumor was the first mouse tumor to be shown to possess a tumor-rejection antigen capable of being recognized by cytotoxic T-cells.

  16. Cytoplasmic superoxide dismutase and catalase activity and resistance to radiation lethality in murine tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Davy, C.A.; Tesfay, Z.; Jones, J.; Rosenberg, R.C.; McCarthy, C.; Rosenberg, S.O.

    1986-05-01

    Reduced species of molecular oxygen are produced by the interaction of ionizing radiation with aqueous solutions containing molecular oxygen. The enzymes catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) are thought to function in vivo as scavengers of metabolically produced peroxide and superoxide respectively. SOD has been shown to protect against the lethal effects of ionizing radiation in vitro and in vivo. The authors have investigated the relationship between the cytosolic SOD catalase content and the sensitivity to radiation lethality of a number of murine cell lines (402AX, EL-4, MB-2T3, MB-4, MEL, P-815, SAI, SP-2, and SV-3T3). K/sub i/(CN/sup -/) for murine Cu-Zn-SOD was determined to be 6.8 x 10/sup -6/ M. No cytosolic Mn-SOD activity was found in any of the cell lines studied. No correlation was found between the cytosolic Cu-Zn-SOD or cytosolic catalase activity and the resistance to radiation lethality or the murine cell lines studied.

  17. Differential effect of isotype on efficacy of anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha chimeric antibodies in experimental septic shock

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Immune complexes containing human gamma (g)1 or murine g2a antibodies generate secondary effector mechanisms via Fc receptor binding or complement activation, whereas those containing human g4 or murine g1 antibodies generally do not. Therefore, isotype selection of therapeutic antibodies may have important clinical consequences. In a rabbit model of human tumor necrosis factor (rhuTNF)-induced pyrexia, a murine/human chimeric g4 anti-human TNF-alpha monoclonal antibody (mAb) (cCB0011) showed a dose-dependent inhibition of pyrexia, whereas a g1 isotype variant of the same mAb gave a marked pyrexia that was seen at all doses indicative of an immune complex-mediated response. To investigate whether isotype difference could influence mAb efficacy in pathological disease states, hamster/murine chimeric g1 and g2a anti- murine TNF-alpha mAbs (TN3g1, TN3g2a) were studied in experimental shock in mice and rats. In lipopolysaccharide-induced shock in mice, treatment with TN3g1 mAb at 30 and 3 mg/kg resulted in 90% survival by 72 h (p < or = 0.004), and prolonged survival to 45 h (p < or = 0.05), respectively, compared with 100% mortality by 27 h in controls. In contrast, a g2a isotype variant of the same mAb (30 mg/kg) resulted in only 10% survival by 72 h (p < or = 0.05). In a neutropenic sepsis model in rats there was greater survival in animals receiving the g1 isotype of TN3 compared with g2a isotype variant (70 vs. 27%; p < or = 0.005) with 100% mortality in the controls. These differences were not due to the pharmacokinetic profiles of the mAbs. In models of experimental shock antibody isotype can affect outcome with inactive isotypes (human g4 and murine g1) being more efficacious than active isotypes (human g1 and murine g2a). PMID:8113678

  18. Obesity triggers enhanced MDSC accumulation in murine renal tumors via elevated local production of CCL2.

    PubMed

    Hale, Malika; Itani, Farah; Buchta, Claire M; Wald, Gal; Bing, Megan; Norian, Lyse A

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is one of the leading risk factors for developing renal cell carcinoma, an immunogenic tumor that is treated clinically with immunostimulatory therapies. Currently, however, the mechanisms linking obesity with renal cancer incidence are unclear. Using a model of diet-induced obesity, we found that obese BALB/c mice with orthotopic renal tumors had increased total frequencies of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) in renal tumors and spleens by d14 post-tumor challenge, relative to lean counterparts. Renal tumors from obese mice had elevated concentrations of the known myeloid cell chemoattractant CCL2, which was produced locally by increased percentages of dendritic cells, macrophages, B cells, and CD45- cells in tumors. MDSC expression of the CCL2 receptor, CCR2, was unaltered by obesity but greater percentages of CCR2+ MDSCs were present in renal tumors from obese mice. Of note, the intracellular arginase levels and per-cell suppressive capacities of tumor-infiltrating and splenic MDSCs were unchanged in obese mice relative to lean controls. Thus, our findings suggest that obesity promotes renal tumor progression via development of a robust immunosuppressive environment that is characterized by heightened local and systemic MDSC prevalence. Targeted intervention of the CCL2/CCR2 pathway may facilitate immune-mediated renal tumor clearance in the obese.

  19. Monitoring PDT effects in murine tumors by spectroscopic and imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaprasad, Subbaraya; Rzepka, Elzbieta; Pi, Jiaxiong; Joshi, Shantaram S.; Dobhal, Mahabeer; Missert, Joseph; Pandey, Ravindra K.

    2004-04-01

    The changes in the tumor that occur following photodynamic therapy (PDT) were studied using a small animal MR imager operating at 7Tesla. The animal model used in these studies was mice bearing radiation induced fibrosarcoma (RIF) tumor on the foot dorsum. The mice were injected with 10μM/kg of one of the photosensitizers: (1) Photofrin, (2) Non-fluorinated porphyrin photosensitizer (DOD-1), (3) Fluorinated porphyrin photosensitizer (DOD-2) and, (4) Fluorinated chlorin photosensitizer (DOD-6). Laser light at 630 or 650 nm (150 mW/cm2, 270 joules/cm2) was delivered to the tumor at 2-24 hours of photosensitizer administration. The MR spectroscopic and imaging examination of the tumors involved both the 1H and 31P nuclei. The tumor bioenergetics was measured by 31P spectroscopy. The water proton relaxivity and diffusion measurements were used to obtain local changes in different regions of the tumor. Changes in 31P MR spectra were observed following PDT using Photofrin and fluorinated chlorin sensitizer (DOD-6). However, no significant changes were observed when the fluorinated porphyrin and its nonfluorinated analog were used. The PDT induced changes in tumor volumes showed significant tumor regression with Photofrin, fluorinated porphyrin and chlorin sensitizers. No tumor regression was observed with the non labeled porphyrin sensitizer and the growth profile followed the general pattern of unperturbed tumors. Serial noninvasive measurements of tumor response to PDT are measurable by both MRI and MRS. The MR derived parameters that are characteristic of the tumor status before and after the therapy are discussed here.

  20. Pomalidomide shows significant therapeutic activity against CNS lymphoma with a major impact on the tumor microenvironment in murine models.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhimin; Qiu, Yushi; Personett, David; Huang, Peng; Edenfield, Brandy; Katz, Jason; Babusis, Darius; Tang, Yang; Shirely, Michael A; Moghaddam, Mehran F; Copland, John A; Tun, Han W

    2013-01-01

    Primary CNS lymphoma carries a poor prognosis. Novel therapeutic agents are urgently needed. Pomalidomide (POM) is a novel immunomodulatory drug with anti-lymphoma activity. CNS pharmacokinetic analysis was performed in rats to assess the CNS penetration of POM. Preclinical evaluation of POM was performed in two murine models to assess its therapeutic activity against CNS lymphoma. The impact of POM on the CNS lymphoma immune microenvironment was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. In vitro cell culture experiments were carried out to further investigate the impact of POM on the biology of macrophages. POM crosses the blood brain barrier with CNS penetration of ~ 39%. Preclinical evaluations showed that it had significant therapeutic activity against CNS lymphoma with significant reduction in tumor growth rate and prolongation of survival, that it had a major impact on the tumor microenvironment with an increase in macrophages and natural killer cells, and that it decreased M2-polarized tumor-associated macrophages and increased M1-polarized macrophages when macrophages were evaluated based on polarization status. In vitro studies using various macrophage models showed that POM converted the polarization status of IL4-stimulated macrophages from M2 to M1, that M2 to M1 conversion by POM in the polarization status of lymphoma-associated macrophages is dependent on the presence of NK cells, that POM induced M2 to M1 conversion in the polarization of macrophages by inactivating STAT6 signaling and activating STAT1 signaling, and that POM functionally increased the phagocytic activity of macrophages. Based on our findings, POM is a promising therapeutic agent for CNS lymphoma with excellent CNS penetration, significant preclinical therapeutic activity, and a major impact on the tumor microenvironment. It can induce significant biological changes in tumor-associated macrophages, which likely play a major role in its therapeutic activity against CNS

  1. Experimental Reactivation of Pulmonary Mycobacterium avium Complex Infection in a Modified Cornell-Like Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woo Sik; Kim, Jong-Seok; Kim, Hong Min; Kwon, Kee Woong; Cho, Sang-Nae; Shin, Sung Jae; Koh, Won-Jung

    2015-01-01

    The latency and reactivation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection has been well studied. However, there have been few studies of the latency and reactivation of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), the most common etiological non-tuberculous Mycobacterium species next to M. tuberculosis in humans worldwide. We hypothesized that latent MAC infections can be reactivated following immunosuppression after combination chemotherapy with clarithromycin and rifampicin under experimental conditions. To this end, we employed a modified Cornell-like murine model of tuberculosis and investigated six strains consisting of two type strains and four clinical isolates of M. avium and M. intracellulare. After aerosol infection of each MAC strain, five to six mice per group were euthanized at 2, 4, 10, 18, 28 and 35 weeks post-infection, and lungs were sampled to analyze bacterial burden and histopathology. One strain of each species maintained a culture-negative state for 10 weeks after completion of 6 weeks of chemotherapy, but was reactivated after 5 weeks of immunosuppression in the lungs with dexamethasone (three out of six mice in M. avium infection) or sulfasalazine (four out of six mice in both M. avium and M. intracellulare infection). The four remaining MAC strains exhibited decreased bacterial loads in response to chemotherapy; however, they remained at detectable levels and underwent regrowth after immunosuppression. In addition, the exacerbated lung pathology demonstrated a correlation with bacterial burden after reactivation. In conclusion, our results suggest the possibility of MAC reactivation in an experimental mouse model, and experimentally demonstrate that a compromised immune status can induce reactivation and/or regrowth of MAC infection. PMID:26406237

  2. Targeting of interleukin (IL)-17A inhibits PDL1 expression in tumor cells and induces anticancer immunity in an estrogen receptor-negative murine model of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yun-Feng; Chen, Chen; Li, Dongqing; Liu, Min; Lv, Zhuang-Wei; Ji, Yanhong; Xu, Jiru

    2017-01-31

    The expression of IL-17A and programmed death ligand 1 (PDL1) is increased in estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer. IL-17A promotes tumor cell survival and invasiveness and inhibits the antitumor immune response. The PDL1-PD1 (programmed death protein 1) signaling pathway promotes escape from immune surveillance in tumor cells. The pro-tumor properties of IL-17A and PDL1 in various cancers have been previously examined; however, the relationship and roles of IL-17A and PDL1 in ER-negative breast cancer have not been evaluated. Therefore, we assessed whether IL-17A promotes PDL1 expression in tumor cells and whether targeting of IL-17A could inhibit ER-negative breast cancer progression in a murine model. Our study revealed that IL-17A promoted PDL1 expression in human and mouse cells. In the murine cancer model, targeting of IL-17A inhibited PDL1 expression in the tumor microenvironment, decreased the percentage of Treg cells in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, and promoted CD4+ and CD8+ T cells to secrete interferon gamma. More importantly, treatment with combined anti-IL-17A and anti-PDL1 antibodies enhanced antitumor effects in favor of tumor eradication. Thus, our study established a pro-tumor role of IL-17A in promoting tumor immune escape and supports the development of a novel cytokine immunotherapy against breast cancer.

  3. Purification of Immune Cell Populations from Freshly Isolated Murine Tumors and Organs by Consecutive Magnetic Cell Sorting and Multi-parameter Flow Cytometry-Based Sorting.

    PubMed

    Salvagno, Camilla; de Visser, Karin E

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that tumors evolve together with nonmalignant cells, such as fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and immune cells. These cells constantly entangle and interact with each other creating the tumor microenvironment. Immune cells can exert both tumor-promoting and tumor-protective functions. Detailed phenotypic and functional characterization of intra-tumoral immune cell subsets has become increasingly important in the field of cancer biology and cancer immunology. In this chapter, we describe a method for isolation of viable and pure immune cell subsets from freshly isolated murine solid tumors and organs. First, we describe a protocol for the generation of single-cell suspensions from tumors and organs using mechanical and enzymatic strategies. In addition, we describe how immune cell subsets can be purified by consecutive magnetic cell sorting and multi-parameter flow cytometry-based cell sorting.

  4. Protective Role of Interleukin-17 in Murine NKT Cell-Driven Acute Experimental Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wondimu, Zenebech; Santodomingo-Garzon, Tania; Le, Tai; Swain, Mark G.

    2010-01-01

    NKT cells are highly enriched within the liver. On activation NKT cells rapidly release large quantities of different cytokines which subsequently activate, recruit, or modulate cells important for the development of hepatic inflammation. Recently, it has been demonstrated that NKT cells can also produce interleukin-17 (IL-17), a proinflammatory cytokine that is also known to have diverse immunoregulatory effects. The role played by IL-17 in hepatic inflammation is unclear. Here we show that during α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer)-induced hepatitis in mice, a model of hepatitis driven by specific activation of the innate immune system via NKT cells within the liver, NK1.1+ and CD4+ iNKT cells rapidly produce IL-17 and are the main IL-17-producing cells within the liver. Administration of IL-17 neutralizing monoclonal antibodies before αGalCer injection significantly exacerbated hepatitis, in association with a significant increase in hepatic neutrophil and proinflammatory monocyte (ie, producing IL-12, tumor necrosis factor-α) recruitment, and increased hepatic mRNA and protein expression for the relevant neutrophil and monocyte chemokines CXCL5/LIX and CCL2/MCP-1, respectively. In contrast, administration of exogenous recombinant murine IL-17 before α-GalCer injection ameliorated hepatitis and inhibited the recruitment of inflammatory monocytes into the liver. Our results demonstrate that hepatic iNKT cells specifically activated with α-GalCer rapidly produce IL-17, and IL-17 produced after α-GalCer administration inhibits the development of hepatitis. PMID:20847291

  5. Experimental infection of Phlebotomus perniciosus by bioluminescent Leishmania infantum using murine model and artificial feeder

    PubMed Central

    Cannet, Arnaud; Akhoundi, Mohammad; Michel, Gregory; Marty, Pierre; Delaunay, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne disease that is transmitted by sandflies and caused by obligate intracellular protozoa of the genus Leishmania. In the present study, we carried out a screening on the experimental infection of Phlebotomus pernioucus by bioluminescent Leishmania infantum using murine model and artificial feeder. We developed a real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)-based method to determine individually the number of Leishmania promastigotes fed by infected flies. Among 1840 new emerged female sand flies, 428 were fed on the infected mice. After their death, they were analysed individually by RT-PCR. Our results demonstrated just a single Leishmania positive female at sixth day post meal. A total of 1070 female sand flies were exposed in contact with artificial feeder containing the human blood with two different quantities of Leishmania parasites: 2.106/mL and 1.107/mL. A blood meal including 1.107/mL LUC-promastigotes was proposed to 270 females and 75 (28%) flies were engorged. Among them, 44 (59%) were positive by RT-PCR analysis, with a relative average of 50551 Leishmania parasites. In case of blood feeding of females with 2.106/mL promastigotes, 57 out of 800 (7%) females succeed to feed from artificial feeder which 22 (39%) were positive with a relative average of 6487 parasites. PMID:27439032

  6. Administration of Murine Stromal Vascular Fraction Ameliorates Chronic Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Semon, Julie A.; Zhang, Xiujuan; Pandey, Amitabh C.; Alandete, Sandra M.; Maness, Catherine; Zhang, Shijia; Scruggs, Brittni A.; Strong, Amy L.; Sharkey, Steven A.; Beuttler, Marc M.; Gimble, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Administration of adipose-derived stromal/stem cells (ASCs) represents a promising therapeutic approach for autoimmune diseases since they have been shown to have immunomodulatory properties. The uncultured, nonexpanded counterpart of ASCs, the stromal vascular fraction (SVF), is composed of a heterogeneous mixture of cells. Although administration of ex vivo culture-expanded ASCs has been used to study immunomodulatory mechanisms in multiple models of autoimmune diseases, less is known about SVF-based therapy. The ability of murine SVF cells to treat myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein35–55-induced experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE) was compared with that of culture-expanded ASCs in C57Bl/6J mice. A total of 1 × 106 SVF cells or ASCs were administered intraperitoneally concomitantly with the induction of disease. The data indicate that intraperitoneal administration of ASCs significantly ameliorated the severity of disease course. They also demonstrate, for the first time, that the SVF effectively inhibited disease severity and was statistically more effective than ASCs. Both cell therapies also demonstrated a reduction in tissue damage, a decrease in inflammatory infiltrates, and a reduction in sera levels of interferon-γ and interleukin-12. Based on these data, SVF cells effectively inhibited EAE disease progression more than culture-expanded ASCs. PMID:23981726

  7. Detection of antibodies against Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus GDVII strain in experimental guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Häger, C; Glage, S; Held, N; Bleich, E M; Burghard, A; Mähler, M; Bleich, André

    2016-10-01

    A disease affecting guinea pigs called 'guinea pig lameness' characterized by clinical signs of depression, lameness of limbs, flaccid paralysis, weight loss and death within a few weeks was first described by Römer in 1911. After a research group in our facility kept laboratory guinea pigs from two different origins together in one room, lameness was observed in two animals. Further investigations revealed a serological immune response against Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV; GDVII strain) in these animals. Histopathology of the lumbar spinal cord of these animals showed mononuclear cell infiltration and necrotic neurons in the anterior horn. Therefore, all guinea pigs from this contaminated animal unit, from other units in our facility, as well as from different European institutions and breeding centres were screened for antibodies directed against GDVII. Our investigations showed that approximately 80% of all guinea pigs from the contaminated animal unit were seropositive for GDVII, whereas animals from other separate units were completely negative. In addition, 43% of tested sera from the different European institutions and breeding centres contained antibodies against GDVII. The present data confirm that an unknown viral infection causes an immune response in experimental guinea pigs leading to seroconversion against GDVII and that guinea pigs from a commercial breeder are the source of the infection.

  8. A comparative evaluation of different DNA vaccine candidates against experimental murine leishmaniasis due to L. major.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Sami Ben Hadj; Bahloul, Chokri; Robbana, Cyrine; Askri, Souhir; Dellagi, Koussay

    2004-04-16

    Over the past few years, several reports of DNA vaccines against murine cutaneous experimental leishmaniasis came out with promising but sometimes discordant results. The present studies were designed to compare, under similar conditions, the protective effects in the highly susceptible BALB/c mice of DNA vaccine candidates encoding to various Leishmania major antigens. The candidate DNA vaccines encode to the following antigens: LACK, PSA2, Gp63, LeIF and two newly identified p20 and Ribosomal like protein, in addition to different truncated portions of the LACK antigen. The most promising gene was LACK and it is more protective when it is used as a p24 truncated form. Furthermore, the presence of a tandem repeats of immunostimulating sequences (ISS) in the plasmid backbone played an important adjuvant effect in the observed protective effect induced by the DNA vaccine encoding to the LACKp24. Nevertheless, neither of the DNA vaccine candidates was able to mount a full protection in BALB/c mice challenged with a highly virulent L. major strain. Further improvements of the DNA vaccination approach are still needed to design a fully protective vaccine against leishmaniasis. Three directions of investigations are currently explored: DNA vaccines using a cocktail of antigens; Prime/Boost approach; and association of immune modulators with the candidate antigens.

  9. Vinegar Treatment Prevents the Development of Murine Experimental Colitis via Inhibition of Inflammation and Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Fengge; Feng, Jiaxuan; Wang, Xinhui; Qi, Zhimin; Shi, Xiaochen; An, Yanan; Zhang, Qiaoli; Wang, Chao; Liu, Mingyuan; Liu, Bo; Yu, Lu

    2016-02-10

    This study investigated the preventive effects of vinegar and acetic acid (the active component of vinegar) on ulcerative colitis (UC) in mice. Vinegar (5% v/v) or acetic acid (0.3% w/v) treatment significantly reduced the disease activity index and histopathological scores, attenuated body weight loss, and shortened the colon length in a murine experimental colitis model induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). Further mechanistic analysis showed that vinegar inhibited inflammation through suppressing Th1 and Th17 responses, the NLRP3 inflammasome, and MAPK signaling activation. Vinegar also inhibited endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated apoptosis in the colitis mouse model. Surprisingly, pretreatment with vinegar for 28 days before DSS induction increased levels of the commensal lactic acid-producing or acetic acid-producing bacteria, including Lactobacillus, Bifidobacteria, and Enterococcus faecalis, whereas decreased Escherichia coli levels were found in the feces of mice. These results suggest that vinegar supplementation might provide a new dietary strategy for the prevention of UC.

  10. Heterogeneous Blood-Tumor Barrier Permeability Determines Drug Efficacy in Experimental Brain Metastases of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lockman, Paul R.; Mittapalli, Rajendar K.; Taskar, Kunal S.; Rudraraju, Vinay; Gril, Brunilde; Bohn, Kaci A.; Adkins, Chris E.; Roberts, Amanda; Thorsheim, Helen R.; Gaasch, Julie A.; Huang, Suyun; Palmieri, Diane; Steeg, Patricia S.; Smith, Quentin R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Brain metastases of breast cancer appear to be increasing in incidence, confer significant morbidity, and threaten to compromise gains made in systemic chemotherapy. The blood-tumor barrier (BTB) is compromised in many brain metastases, however, the extent to which this influences chemotherapeutic delivery and efficacy is unknown. Herein, we answer this question by measuring BTB passive integrity, chemotherapeutic drug uptake, and anticancer efficacy in vivo in two breast cancer models that metastasize preferentially to brain. Experimental Design Experimental brain metastasis drug uptake and BTB permeability were simultaneously measured using novel fluorescent and phosphorescent imaging techniques in immune compromised mice. Drug-induced apoptosis and vascular characteristics were assessed using immunofluorescent microscopy. Results Analysis of >2000 brain metastases from two models (human 231-BR-Her2 and murine 4T1-BR5) demonstrated partial BTB permeability compromise in >89% lesions, varying in magnitude within and between metastases. Brain metastasis uptake of 14C- paclitaxel and 14C- doxorubicin was generally greater than normal brain but <15% of that of other tissues or peripheral metastases, and only reached cytotoxic concentrations in a small subset (~10%) of the most permeable metastases. Neither drug significantly decreased the experimental brain metastatic ability of 231-BR-Her2 tumor cells. BTB permeability was associated with vascular remodeling and correlated with over expression of the pericyte protein, desmin. Conclusions This work demonstrates that the BTB remains a significant impediment to standard chemotherapeutic delivery and efficacy in experimental brain metastases of breast cancer. New brain permeable drugs will be needed. Evidence is presented for vascular remodeling in BTB permeability alterations. PMID:20829328

  11. Triterpenoids Amplify Anti-Tumoral Effects of Mistletoe Extracts on Murine B16.F10 Melanoma In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Strüh, Christian M.; Jäger, Sebastian; Kersten, Astrid; Schempp, Christoph M.; Scheffler, Armin; Martin, Stefan F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Mistletoe extracts are often used in complementary cancer therapy although the efficacy of that therapy is controversially discussed. Approved mistletoe extracts contain mainly water soluble compounds of the mistletoe plant, i.e. mistletoe lectins. However, mistletoe also contains water-insoluble triterpenoids (mainly oleanolic acid) that have anti-tumorigenic effects. To overcome their loss in watery extracts we have solubilized mistletoe triterpenoids with cyclodextrins, thus making them available for in vivo cancer experiments. Experimental design B16.F10 subcutaneous melanoma bearing C57BL/6 mice were treated with new mistletoe extracts containing both water soluble compounds and solubilized triterpenoids. Tumor growth and survival was monitored. In addition, histological examinations of the tumor material and tumor surrounding tissue were performed. Results Addition of solubilized triterpenoids increased the anti-tumor effects of the mistletoe extracts, resulting in reduced tumor growth and prolonged survival of the mice. Histological examination of the treated tumors showed mainly tumor necrosis and some apoptotic cells with active caspase-3 and TUNEL staining. A significant decrease of CD31-positive tumor blood vessels was observed after treatment with solubilized triterpenoids and different mistletoe extracts. Conclusion We conclude that the addition of solubilized mistletoe triterpenoids to conventional mistletoe extracts improves the efficacy of mistletoe treatment and may represent a novel treatment option for malignant melanoma. PMID:23614029

  12. Interaction between the microtubule inhibitor tubulozole and gamma-irradiation in murine tumors in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Distelmans, W.; Van Ginckel, R.; Vanherck, W.; Willebrords, R.; De Brabander, M.; Wouters, L.; Van den Winkel, P.; De Backer, G.

    1989-01-01

    The combined effect of the microtubule inhibitor tubulozole and gamma-irradiation has been investigated in vivo in subcutaneous MO4 fibrosarcomas and Lewis Lung carcinomas. A marked interactive effect on tumor growth was observed when 160 mg/kg tubulozole was orally administered before the tumors were treated with 10 Gy radiation. Dose dependency and optimal effect were obtained on tumor growth of MO4 tumor bearing animals when the drug treatment was given 6 hr prior to the irradiation. The optimal pretreatment time coincided with the time at which a peak mitotic index in the tumor tissue was observed. An enhancing effect is also noticed at other doses of radiation in MO4 tumors pretreated 6 hr before with 160 mg/kg tubulozole. The interactive effect is maintained in a clinically relevant dose fractionation schedule whereby 8 fractions of 2 Gy each were pretreated 6 hr before with 80 mg/kg tubulozole. Tubulozole-T, the stereo-isomer of tubulozole, neither exhibits any antimicrotubular action nor exerts an antitumoral effect on its own or in combination with gamma-irradiation. The possible mechanisms of interaction between tubulozole and gamma-irradiation in tumor tissue are discussed.

  13. Comparison of microwave and magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia radiosensitization in murine breast tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giustini, Andrew J.; Petryk, Alicia A.; Hoopes, Paul J.

    2011-03-01

    Hyperthermia has been shown to be an effective radiosensitizer. Its utility as a clinical modality has been limited by a minimally selective tumor sensitivity and the inability to be delivered in a tumor-specific manner. Recent in vivo studies (rodent and human) have shown that cancer cell-specific cytotoxicity can be effectively and safely delivered via iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (mNP) and an appropriately matched noninvasive alternating magnetic field (AMF). To explore the tumor radiosensitization potential of mNP hyperthermia we used a syngeneic mouse breast cancer model, dextran-coated 110 nm hydrodynamic diameter mNP and a 169 kHz / 450 Oe (35.8 kA/m) AMF. Intradermally implanted (flank) tumors (150 +/- 40 mm3) were treated by injection of 0.04 ml mNP (7.5 mg Fe) / cm3 into the tumor and an AMF (35.8 kA/m and 169 kHz) exposure necessary to achieve a CEM (cumulative equivalent minute) thermal dose of 60 (CEM 60). Tumors were treated with mNP hyperthermia (CEM 60), radiation alone (15 Gy, single dose) and in combination. Compared to the radiation and heat alone treatments, the combined treatment resulted in a greater than two-fold increase in tumor regrowth tripling time (tumor treatment efficacy). None of the treatments resulted in significant normal tissue toxicity or morbidity. Studies were also conducted to compare the radiosensitization effect of mNP hyperthermia with that of microwave-induced hyperthermia. The effects of incubation of nanoparticles within tumors (to allow nanoparticles to be endocytosed) before application of AMF and radiation were determined. This preliminary information suggests cancer cell specific hyperthermia (i.e. antibody-directed or anatomically-directed mNP) is capable of providing significantly greater radiosensitization / therapeutic ratio enhancement than other forms of hyperthermia delivery.

  14. Different processing of LH/hCG receptors in cultured rat luteal cells and murine Leydig tumor cells (MLTC-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Kellokumpu, S.

    1987-02-01

    The metabolic fate of LH/hCG receptors after exposure to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) was examined in cultured rat luteal cells and murine Leydig tumor cells (MLTC-1). Kinetic studies performed after pulse-labelling of the cells with (/sup 125/I)hCG indicated that the bound hormone was lost much more rapidly from the tumor cells than from the luteal cells. The tumor cells were also found to internalize and degrade the hormone more effectively than the luteal cells. Chemical cross-linking and analyses by SDS-PAGE of this material revealed that both cell types also released, in addition to intact hCG, two previously characterized receptor fragment-(/sup 125/I)hCG complexes (M/sub r/ 96,000 and 74,000) into the medium, although their amount was negligible in MLTC-1 cells. Possibly due to rapid discharge of the ligand from its receptor, no similar complexes could be detected inside the MLTC-1 cells, suggesting that they were released directly from the cell surface. However, the M/sub r/ 74,000 complex was observed inside MLTC-1 cells if chloroquine, a lysosomotropic agent, was present during the incubations. This suggests that the internalized receptor also becomes degraded, at least when complexed to hCG. The results thus provide evidence that there exist two different mechanisms for proteolytic processing of LH/hCG receptors in these target cells. In tumor cells, the degradation seems to occur almost exclusively intracellularly, whereas in luteal cells a substantial portion of the receptors is also degraded at the cell surface.

  15. Effects of Combined Soy Isoflavone Extract and Docetaxel Treatment on Murine 4T1 Breast Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Hejazi, Ehsan; Nasrollahzadeh, Javad; Fatemi, Ramina; Barzegar-Yar Mohamadi, Leila; Saliminejad, Kioomars; Amiri, Zohre; Kimiagar, Masoud; Houshyari, Mohammad; Tavakoli, Maryam; Idali, Farah

    2015-01-01

    Background Emergence of drug resistance has brought major problems in chemotherapy. Using nutrients in combination with chemotherapy could be beneficial for improvement of sensitivity of tumors to drug resistance. Soybean-derived isoflavones have been suggested as chemopreventive agents for certain types of cancer, particularly breast cancer. In this study, the synergistic effects of soy isoflavone extract in combination with docetaxel in murine 4T1 breast tumor model were investigated. Methods In this study, mice were divided into 4 groups (15 mice per group) of control, the dietary Soy Isoflavone Extract (SIE, 100 mg/kg diet), the Docetaxel (DOCE, 10 mg/kg) injection and the combination of dietary soy isoflavone extract and intravenous docetaxel injection (DOCE+SIE). After 3 injections of docetaxel (once a week), 7 mice were sacrificed to analyze MKI67 gene and protein expressions and the rest were monitored for diet consumption, tumor growth and survival rates. Results In DOCE+SIE group, diet consumption was significantly higher than DOCE group. While lifespan showed a trend towards improvement in DOCE+SIE group, no significant difference was observed among the 4 studied groups. Tumor volume was not significantly affected in treated groups. A lower but not significant MKI67 protein expression was detected in western blot in DOCE+SIE group. The mRNA expression was not significantly different among groups. Conclusion The results suggest that the combination of soy isoflavone as an adjunct to docetaxel chemotherapy can be effective in improving diet consumption in breast cancer. PMID:25926948

  16. Microdistribution of MC1R-targeted polyplexes in murine melanoma tumor tissue.

    PubMed

    Durymanov, Mikhail O; Slastnikova, Tatiana A; Kuzmich, Alexey I; Khramtsov, Yuri V; Ulasov, Alexey V; Rosenkranz, Andrey A; Egorov, Sergey Y; Sverdlov, Eugene D; Sobolev, Alexander S

    2013-12-01

    Targeted sodium-iodide symporter (NIS) gene transfer can be considered as a promising approach for diagnostics of specific types of cancer. For this purpose we used targeted polyplexes based on PEI-PEG-MC1SP block-copolymer containing MC1SP-peptide, a ligand specific for melanocortin receptor-1 (MC1R) overexpressed on melanoma cells. Targeted polyplexes demonstrated enhanced NIS gene transfer compared to non-targeted (lacking MC1SP) ones in vitro. Using dorsal skinfold chamber and intravital microscopy we evaluated accumulation and microdistribution of quantum dot-labeled polyplexes in tumor and normal subcutaneous tissues up to 4 h after intravenous injection. Polyplexes demonstrated significantly higher total accumulation in tumor tissue in comparison with subcutaneous ones (control). Targeted and non-targeted polyplexes extravasated and penetrated into the tumor tissue up to 20 μm from the vessel walls. In contrast, in normal subcutaneous tissue polyplexes penetrated not more than 3 μm from the vessel walls with the level of extravasated polyplexes 400-fold less than in tumor. Accumulated polyplexes in tumor tissue caused NIS gene expression. Subsequent (123)I(-) intravenous injection resulted in 6.8 ± 1.1 and 4.5 ± 0.8% ID/g (p < 0.001) iodide accumulation in tumors in the case of targeted and non-targeted polyplexes, respectively, as was shown using SPECT/CT.

  17. Microdistribution of MC1R-targeted polyplexes in murine melanoma tumor tissue

    PubMed Central

    Durymanov, Mikhail O; Slastnikova, Tatiana A; Kuzmich, Alexey I; Khramtsov, Yuri V; Ulasov, Alexey V; Rosenkranz, Andrey A1; Egorov, Sergey Y; Sverdlov, Eugene D; Sobolev, Alexander S

    2013-01-01

    Targeted sodium-iodide symporter (NIS) gene transfer can be considered as a promising approach for diagnostics of specific types of cancer. For this purpose we used targeted polyplexes based on PEI–PEG–MC1SP block-copolymer containing MC1SP-peptide, a ligand specific for melanocortin receptor-1 (MC1R) overexpressed on melanoma cells. Targeted polyplexes demonstrated enhanced NIS gene transfer compared to non-targeted (lacking MC1SP) ones in vitro. Using dorsal skinfold chamber and intravital microscopy we evaluated accumulation and microdistribution of quantum dot-labeled polyplexes in tumor and normal subcutaneous tissues up to 4 hours after intravenous injection. Polyplexes demonstrated significantly higher total accumulation in tumor tissue in comparison with subcutaneous ones (control). Targeted and non-targeted polyplexes extravasated and penetrated into the tumor tissue up to 20 μm from the vessel walls. In contrast, in normal subcutaneous tissue polyplexes penetrated less than 5 μm from the vessel walls with the level of extravasated polyplexes 400-fold less than in tumor. Accumulated polyplexes in tumor tissue caused NIS gene expression. Subsequent 123I- intravenous injection resulted in 6.8 ± 1.1 and 4.5 ± 0.8 % ID/g (p < 0.001) iodide accumulation in tumors in the case of targeted and non-targeted polyplexes, respectively, as was shown using SPECT/CT. PMID:24075405

  18. A Multimodal Imaging Approach for Longitudinal Evaluation of Bladder Tumor Development in an Orthotopic Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Sandra; Burggraaf, Maroeska J.; Jose, Jithin; Molthoff, Carla F. M.

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the fourth most common malignancy amongst men in Western industrialized countries with an initial response rate of 70% for the non-muscle invasive type, and improving therapy efficacy is highly needed. For this, an appropriate, reliable animal model is essential to gain insight into mechanisms of tumor growth for use in response monitoring of (new) agents. Several animal models have been described in previous studies, but so far success has been hampered due to the absence of imaging methods to follow tumor growth non-invasively over time. Recent developments of multimodal imaging methods for use in animal research have substantially strengthened these options of in vivo visualization of tumor growth. In the present study, a multimodal imaging approach was addressed to investigate bladder tumor proliferation longitudinally. The complementary abilities of Bioluminescence, High Resolution Ultrasound and Photo-acoustic Imaging permit a better understanding of bladder tumor development. Hybrid imaging modalities allow the integration of individual strengths to enable sensitive and improved quantification and understanding of tumor biology, and ultimately, can aid in the discovery and development of new therapeutics. PMID:27533303

  19. Regulatory B cells present in lymph nodes draining a murine tumor.

    PubMed

    Maglioco, Andrea; Machuca, Damián G; Camerano, Gabriela; Costa, Héctor A; Ruggiero, Raúl; Dran, Graciela I

    2014-01-01

    In cancer, B cells have been classically associated with antibody secretion, antigen presentation and T cell activation. However, a possible role for B lymphocytes in impairing antitumor response and collaborating with tumor growth has been brought into focus. Recent reports have described the capacity of B cells to negatively affect immune responses in autoimmune diseases. The highly immunogenic mouse tumor MCC loses its immunogenicity and induces systemic immune suppression and tolerance as it grows. We have previously demonstrated that MCC growth induces a distinct and progressive increase in B cell number and proportion in the tumor draining lymph nodes (TDLN), as well as a less prominent increase in T regulatory cells. The aim of this research was to study B cell characteristics and function in the lymph node draining MCC tumor and to analyze whether these cells may be playing a role in suppressing antitumor response and favoring tumor progression. Results indicate that B cells from TDLN expressed increased CD86 and MHCII co-stimulatory molecules indicating activated phenotype, as well as intracellular IL-10, FASL and Granzyme B, molecules with regulatory immunosuppressive properties. Additionally, B cells showed high inhibitory upon T cell proliferation ex vivo, and a mild capacity to secrete antibodies. Our conclusion is that even when evidence of B cell-mediated activity of the immune response is present, B cells from TDLN exhibit regulatory phenotype and inhibitory activity, probably contributing to the state of immunological tolerance characteristic of the advanced tumor condition.

  20. Truncating Prolactin Receptor Mutations Promote Tumor Growth in Murine Estrogen Receptor-Alpha Mammary Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Obi L; Chan, Szeman Ruby; Griffith, Malachi; Krysiak, Kilannin; Skidmore, Zachary L; Hundal, Jasreet; Allen, Julie A; Arthur, Cora D; Runci, Daniele; Bugatti, Mattia; Miceli, Alexander P; Schmidt, Heather; Trani, Lee; Kanchi, Krishna-Latha; Miller, Christopher A; Larson, David E; Fulton, Robert S; Vermi, William; Wilson, Richard K; Schreiber, Robert D; Mardis, Elaine R

    2016-09-27

    Estrogen receptor alpha-positive (ERα+) luminal tumors are the most frequent subtype of breast cancer. Stat1(-/-) mice develop mammary tumors that closely recapitulate the biological characteristics of this cancer subtype. To identify transforming events that contribute to tumorigenesis, we performed whole genome sequencing of Stat1(-/-) primary mammary tumors and matched normal tissues. This investigation identified somatic truncating mutations affecting the prolactin receptor (PRLR) in all tumor and no normal samples. Targeted sequencing confirmed the presence of these mutations in precancerous lesions, indicating that this is an early event in tumorigenesis. Functional evaluation of these heterozygous mutations in Stat1(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts showed that co-expression of truncated and wild-type PRLR led to aberrant STAT3 and STAT5 activation downstream of the receptor, cellular transformation in vitro, and tumor formation in vivo. In conclusion, truncating mutations of PRLR promote tumor growth in a model of human ERα+ breast cancer and warrant further investigation.

  1. Transcriptional modulation using HDACi depsipeptide promotes immune cell-mediated tumor destruction of murine B16 melanoma.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Takashi; Sato, Atsuko; Chun, Nicole A L; Hara, Mayumi; Naito, Yuki; Kobayashi, Yukiko; Kano, Yasuhiko; Ohtsuki, Mamitaro; Furukawa, Yusuke; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2008-06-01

    With melanoma, as with many other malignancies, aberrant transcriptional repression is a hallmark of refractory cancer. To restore gene expression, use of a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) is expected to be effective. Our recent DNA micro-array analysis showed that the HDACi depsipeptide (FK228) significantly enhances gp100 antigen expression. Herein, we demonstrate that depsipeptide promotes tumor-specific T-cell-mediated killing of B16/F10 murine melanoma cells. First, by a quantitative assay of caspase-3/7 activity, a sublethal dose of depsipeptide was determined (ED50: 5 nM), in which p21(Waf1/Cip1) and Fas were sufficiently evoked concomitantly with histone H3 acetylation. Second, the sublethal dose of depsipeptide treatment with either a recombinant Fas ligand or tumor-specific T cells synergistically enhanced apoptotic cell death in B16/F10 cells in vitro. Furthermore, we found that depsipeptide increased levels of perforin in T cells. Finally, in vivo metastatic growth of B16/F10 in the lung was significantly inhibited by a combination of depsipeptide treatment and immune cell adoptive transfer from immunized mice using irradiated B16 cells and gp100-specific (Pmel-1) TCR transgenic mice (P<0.05, vs cell transfer alone). Consequently, employment of a transcriptional modulation strategy using HDACis might prove to be a useful pretreatment for human melanoma immunotherapy.

  2. FOXO3 programs tumor-associated DCs to become tolerogenic in human and murine prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Stephanie K.; Zhu, Ziqiang; Riboldi, Elena; Shafer-Weaver, Kim A.; Stagliano, Katherine E.R.; Sklavos, Martha M.; Ambs, Stefan; Yagita, Hideo; Hurwitz, Arthur A.

    2011-01-01

    The limited success of cancer immunotherapy is often attributed to the loss of antigen-specific T cell function in situ. However, the mechanism for this loss of function is unknown. In this study, we describe a population of tumor-associated DCs (TADCs) in both human and mouse prostate cancer that tolerizes and induces suppressive activity in tumor-specific T cells. In tumors from human prostate cancer patients and transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice, TADCs expressed elevated levels of FOXO3 and Foxo3, respectively, which correlated with expression of suppressive genes that negatively regulate T cell function. Silencing FOXO3 and Foxo3 with siRNAs abrogated the ability of human and mouse TADCs, respectively, to tolerize and induce suppressive activity by T cells. Silencing Foxo3 in mouse TADCs was also associated with diminished expression of tolerogenic mediators, such as indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase, arginase, and TGF-β, and upregulated expression of costimulatory molecules and proinflammatory cytokines. Importantly, transfer of tumor-specific CD4+ Th cells into TRAMP mice abrogated TADC tolerogenicity, which was associated with reduced Foxo3 expression. These findings demonstrate that FOXO3 may play a critical role in mediating TADC-induced immune suppression. Moreover, our results identify what we believe to be a novel target for preventing CTL tolerance and enhancing immune responses to cancer by modulating the immunosuppressive activity of TADCs found in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:21436588

  3. Antiinflammatory Effect of Phytosterols in Experimental Murine Colitis Model: Prevention, Induction, Remission Study

    PubMed Central

    Aldini, Rita; Micucci, Matteo; Cevenini, Monica; Fato, Romana; Bergamini, Christian; Nanni, Cristina; Cont, Massimiliano; Camborata, Cecilia; Spinozzi, Silvia; Montagnani, Marco; Roda, Giulia; D'Errico-Grigioni, Antonia; Rosini, Francesca; Roda, Aldo; Mazzella, Giuseppe; Chiarini, Alberto; Budriesi, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    Phytosterols, besides hypocholesterolemic effect, present anti-inflammatory properties. Little information is available about their efficacy in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). Therefore, we have evaluated the effect of a mixture of phytosterols on prevention/induction/remission in a murine experimental model of colitis. Phytosterols were administered x os before, during and after colitis induction with Dextran Sodium Sulfate (DSS) in mice. Disease Activity Index (DAI), colon length, histopathology score, 18F-FDG microPET, oxidative stress in the intestinal tissue (ileum and colon) and gallbladder ileum and colon spontaneous and carbachol (CCh) induced motility, plasma lipids and plasma, liver and biliary bile acids (BA) were evaluated. A similar longitudinal study was performed in a DSS colitis control group. Mice treated with DSS developed severe colitis as shown by DAI, colon length, histopathology score, 18F-FDG microPET, oxidative stress. Both spontaneous and induced ileal and colonic motility were severely disturbed. The same was observed with gallbladder. DSS colitis resulted in an increase in plasma cholesterol, and a modification of the BA pattern. Phytosterols feeding did not prevent colitis onset but significantly reduced the severity of the disease and improved clinical and histological remission. It had strong antioxidant effects, almost restored colon, ileal and gallbladder motility. Plasmatic levels of cholesterol were also reduced. DSS induced a modification in the BA pattern consistent with an increase in the intestinal BA deconjugating bacteria, prevented by phytosterols. Phytosterols seem a potential nutraceutical tool for gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases, combining metabolic systematic and local anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:25268769

  4. Antiinflammatory effect of phytosterols in experimental murine colitis model: prevention, induction, remission study.

    PubMed

    Aldini, Rita; Micucci, Matteo; Cevenini, Monica; Fato, Romana; Bergamini, Christian; Nanni, Cristina; Cont, Massimiliano; Camborata, Cecilia; Spinozzi, Silvia; Montagnani, Marco; Roda, Giulia; D'Errico-Grigioni, Antonia; Rosini, Francesca; Roda, Aldo; Mazzella, Giuseppe; Chiarini, Alberto; Budriesi, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    Phytosterols, besides hypocholesterolemic effect, present anti-inflammatory properties. Little information is available about their efficacy in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). Therefore, we have evaluated the effect of a mixture of phytosterols on prevention/induction/remission in a murine experimental model of colitis. Phytosterols were administered x os before, during and after colitis induction with Dextran Sodium Sulfate (DSS) in mice. Disease Activity Index (DAI), colon length, histopathology score, 18F-FDG microPET, oxidative stress in the intestinal tissue (ileum and colon) and gallbladder ileum and colon spontaneous and carbachol (CCh) induced motility, plasma lipids and plasma, liver and biliary bile acids (BA) were evaluated. A similar longitudinal study was performed in a DSS colitis control group. Mice treated with DSS developed severe colitis as shown by DAI, colon length, histopathology score, 18F-FDG microPET, oxidative stress. Both spontaneous and induced ileal and colonic motility were severely disturbed. The same was observed with gallbladder. DSS colitis resulted in an increase in plasma cholesterol, and a modification of the BA pattern. Phytosterols feeding did not prevent colitis onset but significantly reduced the severity of the disease and improved clinical and histological remission. It had strong antioxidant effects, almost restored colon, ileal and gallbladder motility. Plasmatic levels of cholesterol were also reduced. DSS induced a modification in the BA pattern consistent with an increase in the intestinal BA deconjugating bacteria, prevented by phytosterols. Phytosterols seem a potential nutraceutical tool for gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases, combining metabolic systematic and local anti-inflammatory effects.

  5. Cellular basis of the genetic susceptibility of murine experimental allergic encephalomyelitis

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, T.A.; Greiner, D.L.; Goldschneider, I.

    1986-03-01

    Murine experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an induced autoimmune disease that resembles human multiple sclerosis. The authors have investigated the cellular basis of the genetic predisposition and resistance of inbred strains of mice to EAE using an adoptive transfer system between two H-2 compatible, Thy 1 antigen disparate strains of mice. Genetically EAE susceptible SJL/J strain mice (H-2/sup s/, Thy 1.2) and resistant B10.S Thy 1.1 (H-2/sub s/, Thy 1.1) strain mice were lethally irradiated (700R) and reconstituted with 5-10 x 10/sup 6/ bone marrow cells from either SJL/J or congenic B10.S (Thy 1.1 or Thy 1.2) donors. After 30-45 days, more than 95% of the thymocytes and 75% of the peripheral T cells in the chimeras were of donor origin. These lymphohemopoietic chimeras were then sensitized in their hind footpads with porcine myelin basic protein in complete Freund's adjuvant containing M. tuberculosis H/sub 37/RA, followed at 24 and 72 hours by i.v. injection of B. pertussis. Clinical signs of EAE developed in unirradiated SJL/J, but not B10.S, controls, and in irradiated B10.S and SJL/J recipients of SJL/J, but not B10.S, bone marrow. These results indicate that bone marrow cells can transfer the predisposition to EAE from genetically susceptible to genetically resistant mouse strains. The cellular component in the bone marrow that is responsible for the transfer of the genetic susceptibility to EAE is under investigation.

  6. Effects of lysed Enterococcus faecalis FK-23 on experimental allergic rhinitis in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Luping; Shimada, Takashi; Chen, Ruoxi; Lu, Meiping; Zhang, Qingzhao; Lu, Wenmin; Yin, Min; Enomoto, Tadao; Cheng, Lei

    2012-01-01

    In the current study, we sought to investigate whether lysed Enterococcus faecalis FK-23 (LFK), a heat-killed probiotic preparation, attenuated eosinophil influx into the upper airway and had immunomodulatory activity in a murine allergic rhinitis model. Eighteen BALB/c mice were divided into three groups; the ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized/challenged group, which received saline orally for 6 weeks (OVA group), the OVA-sensitized/challenged group, which received LFK orally for 6 weeks (LFK-fed group), and the non-sensitized group, which received saline for 6 weeks (saline control group). Nasal rubbing and sneezing were monitored during the study. After the final challenge, interleukin (IL)-4, interferon (IFN)-γ, and OVA-specific IgE levels in the sera and splenocyte culture supernatants were determined, eosinophilic infiltrate into the upper airway was quantified, and splenic CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) were examined by flow cytometry. We found that nasal rubbing was significantly reduced in LFK-fed mice compared to the OVA group on d 27 and 35, and sneezing was significantly inhibited by LFK administration for 35 d. LFK-fed mice had significantly less eosinophil influx into the nasal mucosa than the OVA group. There were no significant differences between the LFK-fed group and OVA group in the serum and splenocyte culture supernatant levels of IL-4, IFN-γ, and OVA-specific IgE. Interestingly, the LFK-fed mice had a significantly greater percentage of splenic CD4+CD25+ Tregs than OVA group. Our results indicate that oral administration of LFK may alleviate nasal symptoms, reduce nasal eosinophilia, and increase the percentage of CD4+CD25+ Tregs in experimental allergic rhinitis. PMID:23554753

  7. Macrophage activation associated with chronic murine cytomegalovirus infection results in more severe experimental choroidal neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Cousins, Scott W; Espinosa-Heidmann, Diego G; Miller, Daniel M; Pereira-Simon, Simone; Hernandez, Eleut P; Chien, Hsin; Meier-Jewett, Courtney; Dix, Richard D

    2012-01-01

    The neovascular (wet) form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) leads to vision loss due to choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Since macrophages are important in CNV development, and cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific IgG serum titers in patients with wet AMD are elevated, we hypothesized that chronic CMV infection contributes to wet AMD, possibly by pro-angiogenic macrophage activation. This hypothesis was tested using an established mouse model of experimental CNV. At 6 days, 6 weeks, or 12 weeks after infection with murine CMV (MCMV), laser-induced CNV was performed, and CNV severity was determined 4 weeks later by analysis of choroidal flatmounts. Although all MCMV-infected mice exhibited more severe CNV when compared with control mice, the most severe CNV developed in mice with chronic infection, a time when MCMV-specific gene sequences could not be detected within choroidal tissues. Splenic macrophages collected from mice with chronic MCMV infection, however, expressed significantly greater levels of TNF-α, COX-2, MMP-9, and, most significantly, VEGF transcripts by quantitative RT-PCR assay when compared to splenic macrophages from control mice. Direct MCMV infection of monolayers of IC-21 mouse macrophages confirmed significant stimulation of VEGF mRNA and VEGF protein as determined by quantitative RT-PCR assay, ELISA, and immunostaining. Stimulation of VEGF production in vivo and in vitro was sensitive to the antiviral ganciclovir. These studies suggest that chronic CMV infection may serve as a heretofore unrecognized risk factor in the pathogenesis of wet AMD. One mechanism by which chronic CMV infection might promote increased CNV severity is via stimulation of macrophages to make pro-angiogenic factors (VEGF), an outcome that requires active virus replication.

  8. CFTR is a tumor suppressor gene in murine and human intestinal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Than, BLN; Linnekamp, JF; Starr, TK; Largaespada, DA; Rod, A; Zhang, Y; Bruner, V; Abrahante, J; Schumann, A; Luczak, T; Niemczyk, A; O’Sullivan, MG; Medema, JP; Fijneman, RJA; Meijer, GA; Van den Broek, E; Hodges, CA; Scott, PM; Vermeulen, L; Cormier, RT

    2016-01-01

    CFTR, the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene, encodes for the CFTR protein that plays an essential role in anion regulation and tissue homeostasis of various epithelia. In the gastrointestinal (GI) tract CFTR promotes chloride and bicarbonate secretion, playing an essential role in ion and acid–base homeostasis. Cftr has been identified as a candidate driver gene for colorectal cancer (CRC) in several Sleeping Beauty DNA transposon-based forward genetic screens in mice. Further, recent epidemiological and clinical studies indicate that CF patients are at high risk for developing tumors in the colon. To investigate the effects of CFTR dysregulation on GI cancer, we generated ApcMin mice that carried an intestinal-specific knockout of Cftr. Our results indicate that Cftr is a tumor suppressor gene in the intestinal tract as Cftr mutant mice developed significantly more tumors in the colon and the entire small intestine. In Apc+/+ mice aged to ~ 1 year, Cftr deficiency alone caused the development of intestinal tumors in >60% of mice. Colon organoid formation was significantly increased in organoids created from Cftr mutant mice compared with wild-type controls, suggesting a potential role of Cftr in regulating the intestinal stem cell compartment. Microarray data from the Cftr-deficient colon and the small intestine identified dysregulated genes that belong to groups of immune response, ion channel, intestinal stem cell and other growth signaling regulators. These associated clusters of genes were confirmed by pathway analysis using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA). We also conducted RNA Seq analysis of tumors from Apc+/+ Cftr knockout mice and identified sets of genes dysregulated in tumors including altered Wnt β-catenin target genes. Finally we analyzed expression of CFTR in early stage human CRC patients stratified by risk of recurrence and found that loss of expression of CFTR was significantly associated with poor disease

  9. CFTR is a tumor suppressor gene in murine and human intestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Than, B L N; Linnekamp, J F; Starr, T K; Largaespada, D A; Rod, A; Zhang, Y; Bruner, V; Abrahante, J; Schumann, A; Luczak, T; Niemczyk, A; O'Sullivan, M G; Medema, J P; Fijneman, R J A; Meijer, G A; Van den Broek, E; Hodges, C A; Scott, P M; Vermeulen, L; Cormier, R T

    2016-08-11

    CFTR, the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene, encodes for the CFTR protein that plays an essential role in anion regulation and tissue homeostasis of various epithelia. In the gastrointestinal (GI) tract CFTR promotes chloride and bicarbonate secretion, playing an essential role in ion and acid-base homeostasis. Cftr has been identified as a candidate driver gene for colorectal cancer (CRC) in several Sleeping Beauty DNA transposon-based forward genetic screens in mice. Further, recent epidemiological and clinical studies indicate that CF patients are at high risk for developing tumors in the colon. To investigate the effects of CFTR dysregulation on GI cancer, we generated Apc(Min) mice that carried an intestinal-specific knockout of Cftr. Our results indicate that Cftr is a tumor suppressor gene in the intestinal tract as Cftr mutant mice developed significantly more tumors in the colon and the entire small intestine. In Apc(+/+) mice aged to ~1 year, Cftr deficiency alone caused the development of intestinal tumors in >60% of mice. Colon organoid formation was significantly increased in organoids created from Cftr mutant mice compared with wild-type controls, suggesting a potential role of Cftr in regulating the intestinal stem cell compartment. Microarray data from the Cftr-deficient colon and the small intestine identified dysregulated genes that belong to groups of immune response, ion channel, intestinal stem cell and other growth signaling regulators. These associated clusters of genes were confirmed by pathway analysis using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA). We also conducted RNA Seq analysis of tumors from Apc(+/+) Cftr knockout mice and identified sets of genes dysregulated in tumors including altered Wnt β-catenin target genes. Finally we analyzed expression of CFTR in early stage human CRC patients stratified by risk of recurrence and found that loss of expression of CFTR was significantly associated with poor disease

  10. Schedule dependency of the antitumor activity and toxicity of polyethylene glycol-modified interleukin 2 in murine tumor models.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, R J; Aukerman, S L; Katre, N V; Winkelhake, J L; Young, J D

    1989-12-01

    Modification of recombinant human interleukin 2 (rhIL-2) with monomethoxy polyethylene glycol has been shown to alter its pharmacokinetic properties. Therefore, we investigated the pharmacological parameters of schedule and dose in order to assess the impact on the in vivo antitumor activity of this modification. The antitumor efficacy, as well as the toxicity, of polyethylene glycol-interleukin 2 (PEG-IL-2) was compared to that of rhIL-2 in three transplantable syngeneic murine tumor models, Meth A fibrosarcoma, B16 melanoma, and Pan-02 pancreatic carcinoma. At equitoxic dose levels, the antitumor activity of PEG-IL-2 was far superior to that of rhIL-2 in all three tumor models. This efficacy of PEG-IL-2 was dose dependent and was greatest on a Q7D x 2 schedule in Meth A and B16. When the same total doses were further divided and delivered on any of several alternative schedules, either the efficacy was reduced or the toxicity of the treatments was increased. In Pan-02, a rhIL-2-resistant tumor, PEG-IL-2 treatment on either the Q7D x 2, Q4D x 3, or Q3D x 4 schedule resulted in approximately a 200% increase in lifespan; however, the toxicity of the treatment increased as the interval between doses was shortened. Simulations of the pharmacokinetic profiles of these various regimens suggested that the toxicity of PEG-IL-2 and rhIL-2 was related to the minimum plasma concentration that was obtained and the time interval between peak levels. The efficacy of the treatment was associated with the interleukin 2 plasma peak height, since a dose response was observed; however, peak plasma concentration did not appear to be the only parameter which determined efficacy. We hypothesize that this observed schedule dependence is also affected by the kinetics of the host's biological response to rhIL-2.

  11. Influence of WR 2721 on the efficacy of radiotherapy and chemotherapy of murine tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, J.J.; Johnson, R.K.

    1982-03-01

    The effect of WR2721 on the response of tumors to radiation, antineoplastic alkylating drugs, and DNA binding agents was evaluated and compared to the degree of normal tissue protection provided by WR 2721 against these agents. WR 2721 administered to mice bearing P388 leukemia or Lewis lung carcinoma was found to reduce the radiosensitivity of the leukemia and lung tumor by dose modifying factors of 1.4 and 1.3, respectively. WR 2721 protected bone marow, intestine, and skin from radiation by factors of 1.9. 1.4 and 1.8. WR 2721 protected mice from the lethality of cyclophosphamide by a factor of only 1.2 whereas protection from melphalan toxicity was more dramatic with a dose modifying factor of 1.6. In chemotherapy studies of established M5076 ovarian tumor, the combination of WR 2721 plus cyclophosphamide was equivalent in activity to cyclophosphamide alone. WR 2721 did not modify the antitumor activity of melphalan in early Lewis lung carcinoma did not decrease the antileukemic effects of this agent by a factor of 2.6 indicating tumor protection greater than host protection in the leukemia. The antitumor activity of the DNA binding agents etoposide (VP16-213) and mitoxantrone against systemic P388 leukemia was not diminished by WR 2721, while a substantial increase in host toxicity was noted for the combinations. The protective effects of WR 2721 against radiation and drug damage were, therefore, not entirely selective for normal tissues. In some cases the degree of tumor protection can be similar to, or greater than, normal tissue protection.

  12. Adriamycin effects and the interactions of adriamycin with x irradiation on murine mammary tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Dethlefsen, L.A.; Riley, R.M.

    1982-04-01

    The effects of a single intraperitoneal injection of adriamycin (10 mg/kg) on a slow-growing C3H mouse mammary tumor (Slow) were analyzed volumetrically, biochemically, autoradiographically, and flow cytometrically. Adriamycin, at this dose, did not induce regression in tumor volume but did inhibit the growth rate for several days. The (/sup 3/H)TdR pulse-labeling index was initially high (23% at 7 hr vs 16% for control) but then dropped to 8% at 96 hr postinjection. Qualitatively, the flow cytometric data supported these trends with the percentage of cells in S phase being about 95, 85, and 85%, respectively, at 7, 24, and 96 hr postinjection. In contrast, the (/sup 3/H)TdR incorporation even though quite valuable, was initially in agreement but at 96 hr postinjection, it was about 145% of control. The fraction of cells in G/sub 2/M was more than 350% of control at 72 hr and was still over 180% at 120 hr postinjection; however, the mitotic index per se was basically unchanged during this period. Thus the extended effect on the volumetric growth rate appears to be due primarily to the extensive G/sub 2/ arrest. Adriamycin also affects the subsequent X-irradiation response. The dose for local tumor control from a single irradiation was markedly elevated at 24 hr in the Slow line (slow growing) and at 96 hr after adriamycin injection in the S102F line (fast growing). These X-ray plus drug results are contrary to the results anticipated from the effects of adriamycin, as published in general, and specifically from the cytokinetic effects of adriamycin on the tumors reported here as well as those published previously. These results indicate that the interaction of drugs with X irradiation in solid tumors in vivo is much more complicated than expected from the numerous published in vitro studies.

  13. Proteolysis-a characteristic of tumor-initiating cells in murine metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hillebrand, Larissa E.; Bengsch, Fee; Hochrein, Jochen; Hülsdünker, Jan; Bender, Julia; Follo, Marie; Busch, Hauke; Boerries, Melanie; Reinheckel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Tumor initiating cells (TICs) have been identified and functionally characterized in hematological malignancies as well as in solid tumors such as breast cancer. In addition to their high tumor-initiating potential, TICs are founder cells for metastasis formation and are involved in chemotherapy resistance. In this study we explored molecular pathways which enable this tumor initiating potential for a cancer cell subset of the transgenic MMTV-PyMT mouse model for metastasizing breast cancer. The cell population, characterized by the marker profile CD24+CD90+CD45−, showed a high tumorigenicity compared to non-CD24+CD90+CD45− cancer cells in colony formation assays, as well as upon orthotopic transplantation into the mammary fat pad of mice. In addition, these orthotopically grown CD24+CD90+CD45− TICs metastasized to the lungs. The transcriptome of TICs freshly isolated from primary tumors by cell sorting was compared with that of sorted non-CD24+CD90+CD45− cancer cells by RNA-seq. In addition to more established TIC signatures, such as epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition or mitogen signaling, an upregulated gene set comprising several classes of proteolytic enzymes was uncovered in the TICs. Accordingly, TICs showed high intra- and extracellular proteolytic activity. Application of a broad range of protease inhibitors to TICs in a colony formation assay reduced anchorage independent growth and had an impact on colony morphology in 3D cell culture assays. We conclude that CD24+CD90+CD45− cells of the MMTV- PyMT mouse model possess an upregulated proteolytic signature which could very well represent a functional hallmark of metastatic TICs from mammary carcinomas. PMID:27542270

  14. CTLA-4 blockade enhances the therapeutic effect of an attenuated poxvirus vaccine targeting p53 in an established murine tumor model.

    PubMed

    Espenschied, Jonathan; Lamont, Jeffrey; Longmate, Jeff; Pendas, Solange; Wang, Zhongde; Diamond, Don J; Ellenhorn, Joshua D I

    2003-03-15

    p53 is overexpressed by half of all cancers, and is an attractive target for a vaccine approach to immunotherapy. p53 overexpression is frequently the result of point mutations, which leaves the majority of the protein in its wild-type form. Therefore, the majority of p53 sequence is wild type, making it a self-protein for which tolerance plays a role in limiting immune responses. To overcome tolerance to p53, we have expressed wild-type murine p53 in the nonpathogenic attenuated poxvirus, modified vaccinia virus Ankara (recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara expressing wild-type murine p53 (rMVAp53)). Mice immunized with rMVAp53 vaccine developed vigorous p53-specific CTL responses. rMVAp53 vaccine was evaluated for its ability to inhibit the outgrowth of the syngeneic murine sarcoma Meth A, which overexpresses mutant p53. Mice were inoculated with a lethal dose (5 x 10(5) cells injected s.c.) of Meth A tumor cells and vaccinated by i.p. injection 3 days later with 5 x 10(7) PFU of rMVAp53. The majority of mice remained tumor free and resistant to rechallenge with Meth A tumor cells. We wished to determine whether rMVAp53 immunization could effect the rejection of an established, palpable Meth A tumor. In subsequent experiments, mice were injected with 10(6) Meth A tumor cells, and treated 6 days later with anti-CTLA-4 Ab (9H10) and rMVAp53. The majority of treated mice had complete tumor regression along with lasting tumor immunity. In vivo Ab depletion confirmed that the antitumor effect was primarily CD8 and to a lesser extent CD4 dependent. These experiments demonstrate the potential of a novel cell-free vaccine targeting p53 in malignancy.

  15. Effects of monoterpenes and mevinolin on murine colon tumor CT-26 in vitro and its hepatic "metastases" in vivo.

    PubMed

    Broitman, S A; Wilkinson, J; Cerda, S; Branch, S K

    1996-01-01

    Tumors derived from the colonic epithelium exhibit cholesterol metabolism which is clearly different from that in fibroblasts, hepatocytes, adrenals, and ovaries. In hepatocytes and fibroblasts MEV inhibition of the rate limiting step in cholesterol synthesis HMG Co A reductase can be overcome by the uptake of LDL. Colon cancer cells however do not overcome MEV inhibition by LDL uptake but rather exhibit further growth suppression Mevinolin (Mevacor), a drug used to lower serum cholesterol levels has the advantage of accumulating in the liver to approximately 95% with the first pass. A small but variable percentage of non-sterol precursors may escape inhibition and be utilized for other pathways in the isoprenylation of certain proteins, among them members of the ras family. Mutated ras, an oncogene, is found in 40-50% of colon tumors and the expression of a functional gene product is dependent on isoprenylation for anchorage to the tumor cell membrane. d-Limonene, a relatively non-toxic monoterpene found in orange skin oil, selectively inhibits isoprenylation and also accumulates to some extent in the liver. It was hypothesized that the differences in mevalonate metabolism between hepatocytes and colon tumor cells could provide a chemotherapeutic advantage in which MEV and/or d-limonene could effectively inhibit cholesterol synthesis and post-translational modification of proteins with non-sterol cholesterol precursors in colon tumor derived hepatic metastases and thus inhibit their growth. Since each drug affects aspects of mevalonate synthesis at different points, the effects of the combination of their agents on inhibiting tumor metastases was investigated to ascertain if these could be additive. In tissue culture, MEV and d-limonene significantly inhibited the growth of CT-26, a murine transplantable colon tumor. Cholesterol synthesis assessed in these cells indicated that in lipid deficient media the following additions-25-hydroxycholesterol, and LDL

  16. Different efficacy of in vivo herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene transduction and ganciclovir treatment on the inhibition of tumor growth of murine and human melanoma cells and rat glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Berenstein, M; Adris, S; Ledda, F; Wolfmann, C; Medina, J; Bravo, A; Mordoh, J; Chernajovsky, Y; Podhajcer, O L

    1999-01-01

    Initial studies have demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy for cancer treatment of in vivo transfer of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene followed by ganciclovir (GCV) treatment. However, recent studies have questioned the validity of this approach. Using retroviral vector-producing cells (VPC) as a source for in vivo gene transfer, we evaluated the efficacy of in vivo transduction of malignant cells using three different tumor cell models: B16 murine and IIB-MEL-LES human melanomas and a C6 rat glioblastoma. In vitro studies showed a bystander effect only in C6 cells. In vivo studies showed an inhibition of tumor growth in the two melanoma models when tumor cells were coinjected with VPC-producing retroviral vectors carrying the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene, followed by GCV treatment; however, 100% of mice developed tumors in both models. Under similar experimental conditions, 70% (7 of 10) of syngeneic rats completely rejected stereotactically transferred C6 tumor cells; most of them (5 of 10) showed a prolonged survival. Treating established C6 tumors with VPC-producing retroviral vectors carrying the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene and GCV led to the cure of 33% (4 of 12) of the animals. Rats that rejected tumor growth developed an antitumor immune memory, leading to a rejection of a stereotactic contralateral challenge with parental cells. The immune infiltrate, which showed the presence of T lymphocytes, macrophages, and polymorphonuclear cells at the site of the first injection and mainly T lymphocytes and macrophages at the site of tumor challenge, strengthened the importance of the immune system in achieving complete tumor rejection.

  17. Imaging thiol redox status in murine tumors in vivo with rapid-scan electron paramagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epel, Boris; Sundramoorthy, Subramanian V.; Krzykawska-Serda, Martyna; Maggio, Matthew C.; Tseytlin, Mark; Eaton, Gareth R.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Rosen, Gerald M.; Kao, Joseph P. Y.; Halpern, Howard J.

    2017-03-01

    Thiol redox status is an important physiologic parameter that affects the success or failure of cancer treatment. Rapid scan electron paramagnetic resonance (RS EPR) is a novel technique that has shown higher signal-to-noise ratio than conventional continuous-wave EPR in in vitro studies. Here we used RS EPR to acquire rapid three-dimensional images of the thiol redox status of tumors in living mice. This work presents, for the first time, in vivo RS EPR images of the kinetics of the reaction of 2H,15N-substituted disulfide-linked dinitroxide (PxSSPx) spin probe with intracellular glutathione. The cleavage rate is proportional to the intracellular glutathione concentration. Feasibility was demonstrated in a FSa fibrosarcoma tumor model in C3H mice. Similar to other in vivo and cell model studies, decreasing intracellular glutathione concentration by treating mice with L-buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) markedly altered the kinetic images.

  18. Therapeutic effects of garenoxacin in murine experimental secondary pneumonia by Streptococcus pneumoniae after influenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Yoshiko; Furuya, Yuri; Nozaki, Yusuke; Takahata, Masahiro; Nomura, Nobuhiko; Mitsuyama, Junichi

    2014-02-01

    In a pneumococcal pneumonia murine model following influenza virus infection, garenoxacin was more effective than other fluoroquinolones and demonstrated high levels of bacterial eradication in the lung, low mortality, and potent histopathological improvements. Garenoxacin could potentially be used for the treatment of secondary pneumococcal pneumonia following influenza.

  19. Solanum lyratum Extracts Induce Extrinsic and Intrinsic Pathways of Apoptosis in WEHI-3 Murine Leukemia Cells and Inhibit Allograft Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jai-Sing; Wu, Chia-Chun; Kuo, Chao-Lin; Lan, Yu-Hsuan; Yeh, Chin-Chung; Yu, Chien-Chih; Lien, Jin-Cherng; Hsu, Yuan-Man; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Wood, W. Gibson; Tsuzuki, Minoru; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the molecular mechanisms of cell cycle arrest and apoptotic death induced by Solanum lyratum extracts (SLE) or diosgenin in WEHI-3 murine leukemia cells in vitro and antitumor activity in vivo. Diosgenin is one of the components of SLE. Our study showed that SLE and diosgenin decreased the viable WEHI-3 cells and induced G0/G1 phase arrest and apoptosis in concentration- or time-dependent manners. Both reagents increased the levels of ROS production and decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). SLE- and diosgenin-triggered apoptosis is mediated through modulating the extrinsic and intrinsic signaling pathways. Intriguingly, the p53 inhibitor (pifithrin-α), anti-Fas ligand (FasL) mAb, and specific inhibitors of caspase-8 (z-IETD-fmk), caspase-9 (z-LEHD-fmk), and caspase-3 (z-DEVD-fmk) blocked SLE- and diosgenin-reduced cell viability of WEHI-3 cells. The in vivo study demonstrated that SLE has marked antitumor efficacy against tumors in the WEHI-3 cell allograft model. In conclusion, SLE- and diosgenin-induced G0/G1 phase arrest and triggered extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways via p53 activation in WEHI-3 cells. SLE also exhibited antitumor activity in vivo. Our findings showed that SLE may be potentially efficacious in the treatment of leukemia in the future. PMID:22611426

  20. Radiation dose fractionation studies with hypoxic cell radiosensitizers using a murine tumor. [X-ray; mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, R.P.

    1982-03-01

    The ability of five nitroimidazoles, metronidazole (MET), misonidazole (MISO), desmethymisonidazole (DMM), SR 2508 and SR 2555, to sensitize the KHT sarcoma to radiation treatment has been compared for drug doses in the range 0-1.5 g/Kg. Single radiation doses or two different daily fractionation schedules (4 fractions of 5 Gy each or 7 fraction of 3 Gy each) were used; the tumor cell survival was determined using either an in vivo or in vitro colony assay. Each radiation (100 kVp X rays at 11 Gy/min) treatment was given locally, 60-70 min (MET) or 30-40 min (other drugs) after either intraperitoneal (MET, MISO, DMM) or intraveous (SR 2508, SR 2555) injection of the drugs; these times have been shown to be optimum for this tumor. For the single doses and both fractionation schedules the tumor cell survival, following the irradiation treatment, declined as the drug dose increased in the range 0 to 0.75 g/Kg for all the drugs, but above this dose level a plateau was reached and the amount of sensitization remained essentially constant. In this plateau region the reduction in survival achieved was similar for single doses and 5 Gy fraction but was less for 3 Gy fractions, indicating that sensitization was smaller for the smaller dose fractions. For the 4 x 5 Gy fractionation schedule the plateau level of survival was lowest for MISO, DMM and SR 2508, slightly higher for SR 2555 and much higher for MET. For the 3 Gy fractions SR 2508 appeared slightly less effective than MISO and DMM.

  1. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha antagonism by the murine tumor necrosis factor-alpha receptor 2-Fc fusion protein exacerbates histoplasmosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Deepe, George S

    2007-06-01

    Treatment of some inflammatory conditions with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) antagonists is efficacious, but such treatments are associated with infections with intracellular pathogens, including Histoplasma capsulatum. We explored protective immunity to H. capsulatum in mice given a fusion protein consisting of TNF-alpha receptor 2 (TNFR2) bound to the Fc portion of mouse IgG1. Intraperitoneal administration of this inhibitor exacerbated primary or secondary pulmonary infection at dosages ranging from 1 to 5 mg/kg. All mice with primary infection given the inhibitor succumbed to infection within 10-21 days of treatment. In secondary histoplasmosis, mice receiving 1, but not 5, mg/kg survived treatment. Fungal burden was increased even if treatment with the inhibitor was initiated after the onset of infection. The inflammatory response of the lungs of mice given the inhibitor did not differ from that of mice given control vehicle. Susceptibility was not associated with major alterations in cytokines known to protect or exacerbate infection. However, expression of nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2) was depressed early in primary infection. These results demonstrate that antagonism of endogenous TNF-alpha by this fusion protein modulates susceptibility. Impaired immunity is not a result of altered cytokine responses or changes in the inflammation and may not be demonstrable in other murine strains.

  2. Syndecan-1 deficiency promotes tumor growth in a murine model of colitis-induced colon carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Binder Gallimidi, Adi; Nussbaum, Gabriel; Hermano, Esther; Weizman, Barak; Meirovitz, Amichay; Vlodavsky, Israel; Götte, Martin; Elkin, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Syndecan-1 (Sdc1) is an important member of the cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan family, highly expressed by epithelial cells in adult organisms. Sdc1 is involved in the regulation of cell migration, cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, growth-factor, chemokine and integrin activity, and implicated in inflammatory responses and tumorigenesis. Gastrointestinal tract represents an important anatomic site where loss of Sdc1 expression was reported both in inflammation and malignancy. However, the biological significance of Sdc1 in chronic colitis-associated tumorigenesis has not been elucidated. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to test the effects of Sdc1 loss on colorectal tumor development in inflammation-driven colon tumorigenesis. Utilizing a mouse model of colitis-related colon carcinoma induced by the carcinogen azoxymethane (AOM), followed by the inflammatory agent dextran sodium sulfate (DSS), we found that Sdc1 deficiency results in increased susceptibility to colitis-associated tumorigenesis. Importantly, colitis-associated tumors developed in Sdc1-defficient mice were characterized by increased local production of IL-6, activation of STAT3, as well as induction of several STAT3 target genes that act as important effectors of colonic tumorigenesis. Altogether, our results highlight a previously unknown effect of Sdc1 loss in progression of inflammation-associated cancer and suggest that decreased levels of Sdc1 may serve as an indicator of colon carcinoma progression in the setting of chronic inflammation. PMID:28350804

  3. Stable Escherichia coli-Clostridium acetobutylicum shuttle vector for secretion of murine tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed

    Theys, J; Nuyts, S; Landuyt, W; Van Mellaert, L; Dillen, C; Böhringer, M; Dürre, P; Lambin, P; Anné, J

    1999-10-01

    Recombinant plasmids were constructed to secrete mouse tumor necrosis factor alpha (mTNF-alpha) from Clostridium acetobutylicum. The shuttle plasmids contained the clostridial endo-beta1, 4-glucanase (eglA) promoter and signal sequence that was fused in frame to the mTNF-alpha cDNA. The construction was first tested in Escherichia coli and then introduced in C. acetobutylicum DSM792 by electroporation. Controls confirmed the presence and stability of the recombinant plasmids in this organism. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and an in vitro cytotoxic assay were used to monitor expression and secretion of mTNF-alpha during growth. Significant levels of biologically active mTNF-alpha were measured in both lysates and supernatants. The present report deals with investigations on the elaboration of a gene transfer system for cancer treatment using anaerobic bacteria.

  4. Estrogen decreases chemokine levels in murine mammary tissue: implications for the regulatory role of MIP-1 alpha and MCP-1/JE in mammary tumor formation.

    PubMed

    Fanti, Peter; Nazareth, Michael; Bucelli, Robert; Mineo, Michael; Gibbs, Kathleen; Kumin, Michael; Grzybek, Kevin; Hoeltke, Janice; Raiber, Lisa; Poppenberg, Kristin; Janis, Kelly; Schwach, Catherine; Aronica, Susan M

    2003-11-01

    Estrogen contributes to the development of breast cancer through mechanisms that are not completely understood. Estrogen influences the function of immune effector cells, primarily through alterations in cytokine expression. Chemokines are proinflammatory cytokines that attract various immune cells to the site of tissue injury or inflammation, and activate many cell types, including T lymphocytes and monocytes. As an initial step toward ultimately determining whether regulation of chemokine expression and/or biological activity by estrogen could potentially be a contributing factor to the development and progression of mammary tumors, we evaluated the effect of estrogen on the expression of specific chemokines in murine mammary tissue. We also evaluated whether exposure of female mice to various chemokines could alter the growth of mammary tumors in the presence of estrogen. We report here that estrogen significantly decreases levels of the chemokines MIP-1alpha and MCP-1/JE in murine mammary tissue. Co-treatment with 4-hydroxytamoxifen partially reverses the suppressive effect of estrogen on MIP-1alpha levels. Estrogen increases the growth of CCL- 51 cell-based tumors in the mammary glands of female mice. Co-treatment with the chemokine MIP-1alpha or MCP- 1/JE substantially decreases the ability of estrogen to stimulate the formation of CCL-51 cell-based tumors. Our results show that estrogen might influence the bioactivity of specific chemokines through alteration of chemokine expression in mammary tissue, and further suggest that decreases in murine chemokines evoked by estrogen exposure could contribute to the promotion of mammary tumor growth.

  5. Expression of the EWS/FLI-1 oncogene in murine primary bone-derived cells Results in EWS/FLI-1-dependent, ewing sarcoma-like tumors.

    PubMed

    Castillero-Trejo, Yeny; Eliazer, Susan; Xiang, Lilin; Richardson, James A; Ilaria, Robert L

    2005-10-01

    Ewing sarcoma is the second most common malignant pediatric bone tumor. Over 80% of Ewing sarcoma contain the oncogene EWS/FLI-1, which encodes the EWS/FLI-1 oncoprotein, a hybrid transcription factor comprised of NH2-terminal sequences from the RNA-binding protein EWS and the DNA-binding and COOH-terminal regions of the Ets transcription factor FLI-1. Although numerous genes are dysregulated by EWS/FLI-1, advances in Ewing sarcoma cancer biology have been hindered by the lack of an animal model because of EWS/FLI-1-mediated cytotoxicity. In this study, we have developed conditions for the isolation and propagation of murine primary bone-derived cells (mPBDC) that stably express EWS/FLI-1. Early-passage EWS/FLI-1 mPBDCs were immortalized in culture but inefficient at tumor induction, whereas later-passage cells formed sarcomatous tumors in immunocompetent syngeneic mice. Murine EWS/FLI-1 tumors contained morphologically primitive cells that lacked definitive lineage markers. Molecular characterization of murine EWS/FLI-1 tumors revealed that some but not all had acquired a novel, clonal in-frame p53 mutation associated with a constitutive loss of p21 expression. Despite indications that secondary events facilitated EWS/FLI-1 mPBDC tumorigenesis, cells remained highly dependent on EWS/FLI-1 for efficient transformation in clonogenic assays. This Ewing sarcoma animal model will be a useful tool for dissecting the molecular pathogenesis of Ewing sarcoma and provides rationale for the broader use of organ-specific progenitor cell populations for the study of human sarcoma.

  6. Role of gamma interferon in induction of natural killer activity by Legionella pneumophila in vitro and in an experimental murine infection model.

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, D K; Friedman, H; Stewart, W E; Klein, T W; Djeu, J Y

    1988-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila has been shown to induce gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) both in vitro and in vivo during experimental infections of mice. With complement-mediated serologic depletion of murine splenocytes, the cellular sources of IFN-gamma following in vitro stimulation with L. pneumophila antigens were Thy-1.2+, Lyt-2-, L3T4-, and asialo-GM1+, which is consistent with the natural killer (NK) cell phenotype. Additionally, Percoll density discontinuous centrifugation demonstrated that maximal production of IFN coincided with high NK activity in fractions which were enriched for large granular lymphocytes. Furthermore, 18- to 24-h incubation of splenocytes with L. pneumophila whole-cell vaccine resulted in augmented NK cytotoxic activity against YAC-1 tumor target cells in a 51Cr release assay. The addition of macrophages to purified large granular lymphocyte populations augmented both IFN-gamma production and NK activity, suggesting that antigen is required for optimal responses. In an experimental infection model using an intratracheal inoculation route, NK activity was enhanced in the spleen, peripheral blood, and lung cells of infected mice, with maximal stimulation in the lung leukocytes at the site of infection. The results of the present study indicate that NK cells respond in vivo and in vitro to stimulation by L. pneumophila by producing IFN-gamma and by increased cytolytic activity. PMID:3128479

  7. The role of tumor protein 53 mutations in common human cancers and targeting the murine double minute 2-p53 interaction for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Hamzehloie, Tayebeh; Mojarrad, Majid; Hasanzadeh Nazarabadi, Mohammad; Shekouhi, Sahar

    2012-03-01

    The gene TP53 (also known as protein 53 or tumor protein 53), encoding transcription factor P53, is mutated or deleted in half of human cancers, demonstrating the crucial role of P53 in tumor suppression. There are reports of nearly 250 independent germ line TP53 mutations in over 100 publications. The P53 protein has the structure of a transcription factor and, is made up of several domains. The main function of P53 is to organize cell defense against cancerous transformation. P53 is a potent transcription factor that is activated in response to diverse stresses, leading to the induction of cell cycle arrest, apoptosis or senescence. The P53 tumor suppressor is negatively regulated in cells by the murine double minute 2 (MDM2) protein. Murine double minute 2 favors its nuclear export, and stimulates its degradation. Inhibitors of the P53-MDM2 interaction might be attractive new anticancer agents that could be used to activate wild-type P53 in tumors. Down regulation of MDM2 using an small interfering RNA (siRNA) approach has recently provided evidence for a new role of MDM2 in the P53 response, by modulating the inhibition of the cyclindependent kinase 2 (cdk2) by P21/WAF1 (also known as cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1 or CDK-interacting protein 1).

  8. Eradication of tumor colonization and invasion by a B cell-specific immunotoxin in a murine model for human primary intraocular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhuqing; Mahesh, Sankaranarayana P; Shen, De Fen; Liu, Baoying; Siu, Willie O; Hwang, Frank S; Wang, Qing-Chen; Chan, Chi-Chao; Pastan, Ira; Nussenblatt, Robert B

    2006-11-01

    Human primary intraocular lymphoma (PIOL) is predominantly a B cell-originated malignant disease with no appropriate animal models and effective therapies available. This study aimed to establish a mouse model to closely mimic human B-cell PIOL and to test the therapeutic potential of a recently developed immunotoxin targeting human B-cell lymphomas. Human B-cell lymphoma cells were intravitreally injected into severe combined immunodeficient mice. The resemblance of this tumor model to human PIOL was examined by fundoscopy, histopathology, immunohistochemistry, and evaluated for molecular markers. The therapeutic effectiveness of immunotoxin HA22 was tested by injecting the drug intravitreally. Results showed that the murine model resembles human PIOL closely. Pathologic examination revealed that the tumor cells initially colonized on the retinal surface, followed by infiltrating through the retinal layers, expanding preferentially in the subretinal space, and eventually penetrating through the retinal pigment epithelium into the choroid. Several putative molecular markers for human PIOL were expressed in vivo in this model. Tumor metastasis into the central nervous system was also observed. A single intravitreal injection of immunotoxin HA22 after the establishment of the PIOL resulted in complete regression of the tumor. This is the first report of a murine model that closely mimics human B-cell PIOL. This model may be a valuable tool in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of human PIOL and for the evaluation of new therapeutic approaches. The results of B cell-specific immunotoxin therapy may have clinical implications in treating human PIOL.

  9. Multiorgan chronic inflammatory hepatobiliary pancreatic murine model deficient in tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2

    PubMed Central

    Oz, Helieh S

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To provoke persistent/chronic multiorgan inflammatory response and to contribute to stones formation followed by fibrosis in hepatobiliary and pancreatic tissues. METHODS: Tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2 (TNFR1/R2) deficient mice reared in-house were given dibutyltin dichloride (DBTC) twice within 10 d by oral gavage delivery. Sham control animals received vehicle treatment and naïve animals remained untreated throughout the study. Animals were monitored daily for symptoms of pain and discomfort. The abdominal and hindpaw hypersensitivity were assessed with von Frey microfilaments. Exploratory behaviors were recorded at the baseline, after initiation of treatment, and before study termination. Histopathological changes were examined postmortem in tissues. Collagen accumulation and fibrosis were confirmed with Sirius Red staining. RESULTS: Animals lost weight after oral administration of DBTC and developed persistent inflammatory abdominal and hindpaw hypersensitivity compared to sham-treated controls (P < 0.0001). These pain related secondary mechanical hypersensitivity responses increased more than 2-fold in DBTC-treated animals. The drastically diminished rearing and grooming rates persisted after DBTC administration throughout the study. Gross as well as micropathology at one month confirmed that animals treated with DBTC developed chronic hepatobiliary injuries evidenced with activation of stellate cells, multifocal necrosis, fatty degeneration of hepatocytes, periportal infiltration of inflammatory cells, and prominent biliary ductal dilation. The severity of hepatitis was scored 3.7 ± 0.2 (severe) in DBTC-treated animals vs score 0 (normal) in sham-treated animals. Fibrotic thickening was extensive around portal ducts, in hepatic parenchyma as well as in lobular pancreatic structures and confirmed with Sirius Red histopathology. In addition, pancreatic microarchitecture was presented with distortion of islets, and parenchyma, infiltration of

  10. A cyclopalladated complex interacts with mitochondrial membrane thiol-groups and induces the apoptotic intrinsic pathway in murine and cisplatin-resistant human tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Systemic therapy for cancer metastatic lesions is difficult and generally renders a poor clinical response. Structural analogs of cisplatin, the most widely used synthetic metal complexes, show toxic side-effects and tumor cell resistance. Recently, palladium complexes with increased stability are being investigated to circumvent these limitations, and a biphosphinic cyclopalladated complex {Pd2 [S(-)C2, N-dmpa]2 (μ-dppe)Cl2} named C7a efficiently controls the subcutaneous development of B16F10-Nex2 murine melanoma in syngeneic mice. Presently, we investigated the melanoma cell killing mechanism induced by C7a, and extended preclinical studies. Methods B16F10-Nex2 cells were treated in vitro with C7a in the presence/absence of DTT, and several parameters related to apoptosis induction were evaluated. Preclinical studies were performed, and mice were endovenously inoculated with B16F10-Nex2 cells, intraperitoneally treated with C7a, and lung metastatic nodules were counted. The cytotoxic effects and the respiratory metabolism were also determined in human tumor cell lines treated in vitro with C7a. Results Cyclopalladated complex interacts with thiol groups on the mitochondrial membrane proteins, causes dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential, and induces Bax translocation from the cytosol to mitochondria, colocalizing with a mitochondrial tracker. C7a also induced an increase in cytosolic calcium concentration, mainly from intracellular compartments, and a significant decrease in the ATP levels. Activation of effector caspases, chromatin condensation and DNA degradation, suggested that C7a activates the apoptotic intrinsic pathway in murine melanoma cells. In the preclinical studies, the C7a complex protected against murine metastatic melanoma and induced death in several human tumor cell lineages in vitro, including cisplatin-resistant ones. The mitochondria-dependent cell death was also induced by C7a in human tumor cells. Conclusions The

  11. Characterization of murine hepatitis virus (JHM) RNA from rats with experimental encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Jackson, D P; Percy, D H; Morris, V L

    1984-09-01

    When Wistar Furth rats are inoculated intracerebrally with the murine hepatitis virus JHM they often develop a demyelinating disease with resulting hind leg paralysis. Using an RNA transfer procedure and hybridization kinetic analysis, the virus-specific RNA in these rats was characterized. The pattern of JHM-specific RNA varied with individual infections of Wistar Furth rats. However, two species of JHM-specific RNA, the nucleocapsid and a 2.1-2.4 X 10(6)-Da RNA species were generally present. A general decrease in JHM-specific RNA in brains and spinal cord samples taken later than 20 days postinoculation was observed; however, JHM-specific RNA persisted in the spinal cord longer than in the brain of these rats.

  12. Experimental murine cryptococcal infection results in contamination of bedding with Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Mednick, Aron; Shi, Li; Casadevall, Arturo

    2003-07-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a fungal pathogen that survives in diverse environments. To determine whether cages of mice infected with C. neoformans posed an infection risk to animal caregivers, we investigated whether the fungus could be isolated from the bedding or stool of mice infected by intratracheal (i.t.), intravenous (i.v.), or intraperitoneal (i.p.) routes. The bedding of mice infected i.t. was contaminated with C. neoformans. In contrast, no contamination of bedding with C. neoformans was detected in cages of mice infected i.v. or i.p. C. neoformans was not isolated from murine feces. The C. neoformans strain recovered from bedding material was indistinguishable from the infecting strain by biochemical and molecular techniques. This result suggests that precautions may be warranted when disposing bedding from cages that housed mice with pulmonary C. neoformans infection.

  13. Stat3 is a candidate epigenetic biomarker of perinatal Bisphenol A exposure associated with murine hepatic tumors with implications for human health

    PubMed Central

    Weinhouse, Caren; Bergin, Ingrid L.; Harris, Craig; Dolinoy, Dana C.

    2015-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC) that has been implicated as a potential carcinogen and epigenotoxicant. We have previously reported dose-dependent incidence of hepatic tumors in 10-month-old isogenic mice perinatally exposed to BPA. Here, we evaluated DNA methylation at 3 candidate genes (Esr1, Il-6st, and Stat3) in liver tissue of BPA-exposed mice euthanized at 2 time points: post-natal day 22 (PND22; n = 147) or 10-months of age (n = 78, including n = 18 with hepatic tumors). Additionally, DNA methylation profiles were analyzed at human homologs of murine candidate genes in human fetal liver samples (n = 50) with known liver tissue BPA levels. Candidate genes were chosen based on reported expression changes in both rodent and human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Regions for bisulfite sequencing were chosen by mining whole genome next generation sequencing methylation datasets of both mice and human liver samples with known perinatal BPA exposures. One of 3 candidate genes, Stat3, displayed dose-dependent DNA methylation changes in both 10-month mice with liver tumors as compared to those without liver tumors and 3-week sibling mice from the same exposure study, implicating Stat3 as a potential epigenetic biomarker of both early life BPA exposure and adult disease in mice. DNA methylation profiles within STAT3 varied with liver tissue BPA level in human fetal liver samples as well, suggesting STAT3 may be a translationally relevant candidate biomarker. These data implicate Stat3 as a potential early life biomarker of adult murine liver tumor risk following early BPA exposure with early evidence of relevance to human health. PMID:26542749

  14. A novel Tc-99 m and fluorescence labeled peptide as a multimodal imaging agent for targeting angiogenesis in a murine tumor model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myoung Hyoun; Kim, Chang Guhn; Kim, Seul-Gi; Kim, Dae-Weung

    2016-11-01

    The serine-aspartic acid-valine (SDV) peptide binds specifically to integrin αV β3 . In the present study, we successfully developed a TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-SDV peptide labeled with both Tc-99 m and TAMRA to target the integrin αV β3 of tumor cells; furthermore, we evaluated the diagnostic performance of Tc-99 m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-SDV as a dual-modality imaging agent for tumor of the murine model. TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-SDV was synthesized using Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthesis. Radiolabeling of TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-SDV with Tc-99 m was done using ligand exchange methods. Labeling stability and cytotoxicity studies were performed. Gamma camera imaging, biodistribution and ex vivo imaging studies were performed in murine models with HT-1080 and HT-29 tumors. A tumor tissue slide was prepared and analyzed using confocal microscopy. After radiolabeling procedures with Tc-99 m, the Tc-99 m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-SDV complexes were prepared in high yield (>99%). In the gamma camera imaging study, a substantial uptake of Tc-99 m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-SDV into HT-1080 tumor (integrin αV β3 positive) and low uptake of Tc-99 m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-SDV into HT-29 tumor (integrin αV β3 negative) were demonstrated. A competition study revealed that HT-1080 tumor uptake was effectively blocked by the co-injection of an excess concentration of SDV. Specific uptake of Tc-99 m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-SDV was confirmed by biodistribution, ex vivo imaging and confocal microscopy studies. Our in vivo and in vitro studies revealed substantial uptake of Tc-99 m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-SDV in the integrin αV β3 -positive tumor. Tc-99 m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-SDV could be a good candidate for a dual-modality imaging agent targeting tumor angiogenesis. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Tumor necrosis factor plays a protective role in experimental murine cutaneous leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The ability of mice to resist infection with L. major correlated directly with the capacity of their LNC to produce TNF in response to in vitro parasite challenge. Blocking TNF in vivo by passively administering anti-TNF antibodies exacerbated the course of L. major infection, resulting in substantially larger cutaneous lesions and elevated numbers of parasites within those lesions. In addition, treatment of infected mice with exogenous rHuTNF afforded host protection as evidenced by smaller lesion size and decreased parasite counts. Taken together, these results suggest a central role for TNF in resistance to L. major. PMID:2584936

  16. Microvascular architecture of experimental colon tumors in the rat.

    PubMed

    Skinner, S A; Tutton, P J; O'Brien, P E

    1990-04-15

    Tumor cell proliferation is dependent upon concurrent growth of a supporting vasculature. This study aims to characterize the structural features of the microvasculature within a primary tumor model. There were 22 colon tumors induced in 16 rats by repeated administration of dimethylhydrazine. A cast of the microvessels was prepared by intraarterial administration of acrylic resin (Mercox). After corrosion of the tissue, the cast was examined by scanning electron microscopy. Tumors 2.6 to 12.0 mm in diameter were examined. Within polypoid carcinomas up to 5.7 mm in diameter, there were two distinct vascular zones, a luminal vascular zone continuous with the vasculature of normal mucosa and a central zone continuous with the normal submucosa and muscularis propria vessels. Within both vascular zones, the organization of microvessels had the same general pattern as in normal mucosa. However, in tumors with diameters greater than 5.7 mm, the vasculature was seen to be disorganized and of a greater density than normal. In the smallest tumors, few morphological changes were seen in the individual microvessels when compared to normal. However, with tumor growth, there was elongation and increased diameters of the microvessels within the tumor. Microvessels within the luminal zone of the tumors which could definitely be traced to veins had diameters of 50 to 100 microns (compared to 12 to 30 microns for normal venules). Individual microvessels varied in diameter along their course forming saccular dilations in places. Networks of frequently anastomosing microvessels were formed. Extravasation of resin occurred from some microvessels. Elongated vessels of uniform diameter which travel distances up to 2 mm without branching were seen and were probably arterioles. These appearances indicate that there are two distinct stages of development of the vasculature within primary tumors, an early phase where the tumor is supplied by the preexisting host microvessels, followed by a

  17. Superoxide dismutase induces G1-phase cell cycle arrest by down-regulated expression of Cdk-2 and cyclin-E in murine sarcoma S180 tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongyue; Liu, Anjun

    2013-06-01

    As an efficient reactive oxygen species-scavenging enzyme, superoxide dismutase (SOD) has been shown to inhibit tumor growth and interfere with motility and invasiveness of cancer cells. In this study, the molecular mechanisms of cell cycle arrest when S180 tumor cells were exposed to high levels of SOD were investigated. Here, both murine sarcoma S180 tumor cells and NIH-3T3 mouse fibroblasts were respectively treated with varying concentrations of Cu/Zn-SOD for 24, 48 and 72 h to determine optimal dose of SOD, which was a concentration of 800 U/ml SOD for 48 h. It is found that SOD induced S180 cell cycle arrest at G1-phase with decreasing level of superoxide production, whereas SOD had less effect on proliferation of NIH-3T3 cells. Moreover, the expression rate of Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) in S180 tumor cells was suppressed after SOD treatment, which indicated the inhibition of DNA synthesis in S180 cells. Besides, there were significant down-regulations of cyclin-E and Cdk-2 in S180 cells after SOD treatment, which contributed to the blockage of G1/S transition in S180 cell cycle. Together, our data confirmed that SOD could notably inhibit proliferation of S180 tumor cell and induce cell cycle arrest at G1-phase by down-regulating expressions of cyclin-E and Cdk-2.

  18. Effect of preexisting anti-herpes immunity on the efficacy of herpes simplex viral therapy in a murine intraperitoneal tumor model.

    PubMed

    Lambright, E S; Kang, E H; Force, S; Lanuti, M; Caparrelli, D; Kaiser, L R; Albelda, S M; Molnar-Kimber, K L

    2000-10-01

    HSV-1716, a replicating nonneurovirulent herpes simplex virus type 1, has shown efficacy in treating multiple types of human tumors in immunodeficient mice. Since the majority of the human population has been previously exposed to herpes simplex virus, the efficacy of HSV-based oncolytic therapy was investigated in an immunocompetent animal tumor model. EJ-6-2-Bam-6a, a tumor cell line derived from h-ras-transformed murine fibroblast, exhibit a diffuse growth pattern in the peritoneal cavity of BALB/c mice and replicate HSV-1716 to titers observed in human tumors. An established intraperitoneal (ip) tumor model of EJ-6-2-Bam-6a in naive and HSV-immunized mice was used to evaluate the efficacy of single or multiple ip administrations of HSV-1716 (4 x 10(6) pfu/treatment) or of carrier cells, which are irradiated, ex vivo virally infected EJ-6-2-Bam-6a cells that can amplify the viral load in situ. All treated groups significantly prolonged survival versus media control with an approximately 40% long-term survival rate (cure) in the multiply treated, HSV-naive animals. Prior immunization of the mice with HSV did not significantly decrease the median survival of the single or multiply treated HSV-1716 or the carrier cell-treated groups. These studies support the development of replication-selective herpes virus mutants for use in localized intraperitoneal malignancies.

  19. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles functionalized with fluorescent and MRI reporters for the visualization of murine tumors overexpressing αvβ3 receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, He; Arena, Francesca; Gianolio, Eliana; Boffa, Cinzia; di Gregorio, Enza; Stefania, Rachele; Orio, Laura; Baroni, Simona; Aime, Silvio

    2016-03-01

    A novel fluorescein/Gd-DOTAGA containing nanoprobe for the visualization of tumors by optical and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is reported herein. It is based on the functionalization of the surface of small mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) (~30 nm) with the arginine-glycine-aspartic (RGD) moieties, which are known to target αvβ3 integrin receptors overexpressed in several tumor cells. The obtained nanoprobe (Gd-MSNs-RGD) displays good stability, tolerability and high relaxivity (37.6 mM-1 s-1 at 21.5 MHz). After a preliminary evaluation of their cytotoxicity and targeting capability toward U87MG cells by in vitro fluorescence and MR imaging, the nanoprobes were tested in vivo by T1-weighted MR imaging of xenografted murine tumor models. The obtained results demonstrated that the Gd-MSNs-RGD nanoprobes are good reporters both in vitro and in vivo for the MR-visualization of tumor cells overexpressing αvβ3 integrin receptors.A novel fluorescein/Gd-DOTAGA containing nanoprobe for the visualization of tumors by optical and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is reported herein. It is based on the functionalization of the surface of small mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) (~30 nm) with the arginine-glycine-aspartic (RGD) moieties, which are known to target αvβ3 integrin receptors overexpressed in several tumor cells. The obtained nanoprobe (Gd-MSNs-RGD) displays good stability, tolerability and high relaxivity (37.6 mM-1 s-1 at 21.5 MHz). After a preliminary evaluation of their cytotoxicity and targeting capability toward U87MG cells by in vitro fluorescence and MR imaging, the nanoprobes were tested in vivo by T1-weighted MR imaging of xenografted murine tumor models. The obtained results demonstrated that the Gd-MSNs-RGD nanoprobes are good reporters both in vitro and in vivo for the MR-visualization of tumor cells overexpressing αvβ3 integrin receptors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Absorption and emission spectra, energy

  20. Comparison of virulence of different Sporothrix schenckii clinical isolates using experimental murine model.

    PubMed

    Brito, Marcelly M S; Conceição-Silva, Fatima; Morgado, Fernanda N; Raibolt, Priscila S; Schubach, Armando; Schubach, Tania P; Schäffer, Guido M V; Borba, Cintia M

    2007-12-01

    The virulence of two strains of Sporothrix schenckii isolated from patients with lymphocutaneous or disseminated sporotrichosis were examined in BALB/c mice (Group 1 and 2, respectively). The mice were inoculated subcutaneously into the left hind footpad with 4 x 10(6) S. schenckii yeast cells in order to evaluate (i) the development of cutaneous lesions, (ii) signs of inactivity, (iii) weight loss, (iv) survival rates, (v) number of viable yeast cells in the lungs and spleen, (vi) splenic index, (vii) extent of organ lesions, and (viii) immunological responses. Comparison of the two groups showed more severe disease in Group 2 mice that developed significant weight and hair loss associated with inactivity and left hind footpad lesions that extended close to the testicular area. The histopathology and large number of viable microorganisms isolated from the spleen confirmed the higher invasive ability of this strain. Moreover, a decrease of an in vitro specific lymphoproliferative response and IFN-gamma production were observed over time in Group 2 mice. As a result, at the end of the experiment, the S. schenckii-antigen (Ss-Ag) response was considered negative with a stimulation index (SI) = 2. In contrast, Group 1 mice presented a positive response to Ss-Ag (SI = 14.1). These results confirm the existence of different virulence profiles in S. schenckii strains. In addition, the use of subcutaneous inoculation as a suitable route for verification of the pathogenicity of this fungus in the murine model was confirmed.

  1. Gan-Lu-Yin Inhibits Proliferation and Migration of Murine WEHI-3 Leukemia Cells and Tumor Growth in BALB/C Allograft Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fon-Chang; Pan, Chun-Hsu; Lai, Ming-Tsung; Chang, Shu-Jen; Chung, Jing-Gung; Wu, Chieh-Hsi

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the antitumor effect of Gan-Lu-Yin (GLY), a traditional Chinese herbal formula, on leukemia. Ethanolic extract of GLY was applied to evaluate its regulatory mechanisms in proliferation, migration, and differentiation of WEHI-3 leukemic cells as well as antitumor effect on BALB/c mice model. The results showed that GLY markedly reduced cell proliferation and migration with induced differentiation of WEHI-3 cells. The expression level of phosphorylated FAK, Akt, ERK1/2, and Rb was decreased p21 expression while level was increased in WEHI-3 treated with GLY. The results of cell cycle analysis revealed that GLY treatment could markedly induce G1 phase arrest and decrease cell population in S phase. Moreover, experimental results demonstrated that GLY decreased the protein expression and enzyme activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9. GLY treatment also reduced WEHI-3 leukemic infiltration in liver and spleen and tumor growth in animal model. Accordingly, GLY demonstrated an inhibitory effect on tumor growth with a regulatory mechanism partially through inhibiting FAK, Akt, and ERK expression in WEHI-3 cells. GLY may provide a promising antileukemic approach in the clinical application. PMID:23573143

  2. Automated assessment of bone changes in cross-sectional micro-CT studies of murine experimental osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Tonia L.; Marenzana, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Objective The degradation of articular cartilage, which characterises osteoarthritis (OA), is usually paired with excessive bone remodelling, including subchondral bone sclerosis, cysts, and osteophyte formation. Experimental models of OA are widely used to investigate pathogenesis, yet few validated methodologies for assessing periarticular bone morphology exist and quantitative measurements are limited by manual segmentation of micro-CT scans. The aim of this work was to chart the temporal changes in periarticular bone in murine OA by novel, automated micro-CT methods. Methods OA was induced by destabilisation of the medial meniscus (DMM) in 10-week old male mice and disease assessed cross-sectionally from 1- to 20-weeks post-surgery. A novel approach was developed to automatically segment subchondral bone compartments into plate and trabecular bone in micro-CT scans of tibial epiphyses. Osteophyte volume, as assessed by shape differences using 3D image registration, and by measuring total epiphyseal volume was performed. Results Significant linear and volumetric structural modifications in subchondral bone compartments and osteophytes were measured from 4-weeks post-surgery and showed progressive changes at all time points; by 20 weeks, medial subchondral bone plate thickness increased by 160±19.5 μm and the medial osteophyte grew by 0.124±0.028 μm3. Excellent agreement was found when automated measurements were compared with manual assessments. Conclusion Our automated methods for assessing bone changes in murine periarticular bone are rapid, quantitative, and highly accurate, and promise to be a useful tool in future preclinical studies of OA progression and treatment. The current approaches were developed specifically for cross-sectional micro-CT studies but could be applied to longitudinal studies. PMID:28334010

  3. Serial Low Doses of Sorafenib Enhance Therapeutic Efficacy of Adoptive T Cell Therapy in a Murine Model by Improving Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ren-Shyan; Hwang, Jeng-Jong

    2014-01-01

    Requirements of large numbers of transferred T cells and various immunosuppressive factors and cells in the tumor microenvironment limit the applications of adoptive T cells therapy (ACT) in clinic. Accumulating evidences show that chemotherapeutic drugs could act as immune supportive instead of immunosuppressive agents when proper dosage is used, and combined with immunotherapy often results in better treatment outcomes than monotherapy. Controversial immunomodulation effects of sorafenib, a multi-kinases inhibitor, at high and low doses have been reported in several types of cancer. However, what is the range of the low-dose sorafenib will influence the host immunity and responses of ACT is still ambiguous. Here we used a well-established E.G7/OT-1 murine model to understand the effects of serial low doses of sorafenib on both tumor microenvironment and transferred CD8+ T cells and the underlying mechanisms. Sorafenib lowered the expressions of immunosuppressive factors, and enhanced functions and migrations of transferred CD8+ T cells through inhibition of STAT3 and other immunosuppressive factors. CD8+ T cells were transduced with granzyme B promoter for driving imaging reporters to visualize the activation and distribution of transferred CD8+ T cells prior to adoptive transfer. Better activations of CD8+ T cells and tumor inhibitions were found in the combinational group compared with CD8+ T cells or sorafenib alone groups. Not only immunosuppressive factors but myeloid derived suppressive cells (MDSCs) and regulatory T cells (Tregs) were decreased in sorafenib-treated group, indicating that augmentation of tumor inhibition and function of CD8+ T cells by serial low doses of sorafenib were via reversing the immunosuppressive microenvironment. These results revealed that the tumor inhibitions of sorafenib not only through eradicating tumor cells but modifying tumor microenvironment, which helps outcomes of ACT significantly. PMID:25333973

  4. Role of CCL7 in Type I Hypersensitivity Reactions in Murine Experimental Allergic Conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chuan-Hui; Collins, Andrea M.; Boettner, Douglas R.; Yang, YanFen

    2017-01-01

    Molecules that are necessary for ocular hypersensitivity reactions include the receptors CCR1 and CCR3; CCL7 is a ligand for these receptors. Therefore, we explored the role of CCL7 in mast cell activity and motility in vitro and investigated the requirement for CCL7 in a murine model of IgE-mediated allergic conjunctivitis. For mast cells treated with IgE and Ag, the presence of CCL7 synergistically enhanced degranulation and calcium influx. CCL7 also induced chemotaxis in mast cells. CCL7-deficient bone marrow–derived mast cells showed decreased degranulation following IgE and Ag treatment compared with wild-type bone marrow–derived mast cells, but there was no difference in degranulation when cells were activated via an IgE-independent pathway. In vivo, CCL7 was upregulated in conjunctival tissue during an OVA-induced allergic response. Notably, the early-phase clinical symptoms in the conjunctiva after OVA challenge were significantly higher in OVA-sensitized wild-type mice than in control challenged wild-type mice; the increase was suppressed in CCL7-deficient mice. In the OVA-induced allergic response, the numbers of conjunctival mast cells were lower in CCL7-deficient mice than in wild-type mice. Our results demonstrate that CCL7 is required for maximal OVA-induced ocular anaphylaxis, mast cell recruitment in vivo, and maximal FcεRI-mediated mast cell activation in vitro. A better understanding of the role of CCL7 in mediating ocular hypersensitivity reactions will provide insights into mast cell function and novel treatments for allergic ocular diseases. PMID:27956527

  5. Growth inhibition, tumor maturation, and extended survival in experimental brain tumors in rats treated with phenylacetate.

    PubMed

    Ram, Z; Samid, D; Walbridge, S; Oshiro, E M; Viola, J J; Tao-Cheng, J H; Shack, S; Thibault, A; Myers, C E; Oldfield, E H

    1994-06-01

    Phenylacetate is a naturally occurring plasma component that suppresses the growth of tumor cells and induces differentiation in vitro. To evaluate the in vivo potential and preventive and therapeutic antitumor efficacy of sodium phenylacetate against malignant brain tumors, Fischer 344 rats (n = 50) bearing cerebral 9L gliosarcomas received phenylacetate by continuous s.c. release starting on the day of tumor inoculation (n = 10) using s.c. osmotic minipumps (550 mg/kg/day for 28 days). Rats with established brain tumors (n = 12) received continuous s.c. phenylacetate supplemented with additional daily i.p. dose (300 mg/kg). Control rats (n = 25) were treated in a similar way with saline. Rats were sacrificed during treatment for electron microscopic studies of their tumors, in vivo proliferation assays, and measurement of phenylacetate levels in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Treatment with phenylacetate extended survival when started on the day of tumor inoculation (P < 0.01) or 7 days after inoculation (P < 0.03) without any associated adverse effects. In the latter group, phenylacetate levels in pooled serum and cerebrospinal fluid samples after 7 days of treatment were in the therapeutic range as determined in vitro (2.45 mM in serum and 3.1 mM in cerebrospinal fluid). Electron microscopy of treated tumors demonstrated marked hypertrophy and organization of the rough endoplasmic reticulum, indicating cell differentiation, in contrast to the scant and randomly distributed endoplasmic reticulum in tumors from untreated animals. In addition, in vitro studies demonstrated dose-dependent inhibition of the rate of tumor proliferation and restoration of anchorage dependency, a marker of phenotypic reversion. Phenylacetate, used at clinically achievable concentrations, prolongs survival of rats with malignant brain tumors through induction of tumor differentiation. Its role in the treatment of brain tumors and other cancers should be explored further.

  6. Anti-tumor necrosis factor VNAR single domains reduce lethality and regulate underlying inflammatory response in a murine model of endotoxic shock

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In sepsis, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is the key factor triggering respiratory burst, tissue injury and disseminated coagulation. Anti-TNF strategies based on monoclonal antibodies or F(ab’)2 fragments have been used in sepsis with contradictory results. Immunoglobulin new antigen receptors (IgNAR) are a unique subset of antibodies consisting of five constant (CNAR) and one variable domains (VNAR). VNAR domains are the smallest, naturally occurring, antibody-based immune recognition units, having potential use as therapy. Our aim was to explore the impact of an anti-TNF VNAR on survival in an experimental model of endotoxic shock. Also, mRNA expression and serum protein of several inflammatory molecules were measured. Results Endotoxic shock was induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in male Balb/c mice. Animals were treated with anti-TNF VNAR domains, F(ab’)2 antibody fragments, or saline solution 15 minutes before, 2 h and 24 h after lethal dose100 (LD100) LPS administration. TNF blockade with either VNAR domains or F(ab’)2 fragments were associated with lower mortality (60% and 75%, respectively) compared to LD100. Challenge with LPS induced significant production of serum TNF and interleukins -10 and -6 at 3 h. After that, significant reduction of IL-6 at 24 h (vs 3 h) was shown only in the VNAR group. Nitrites level also increased in response to LPS. In liver, TNF and IL-10 mRNA expression showed a pro-inflammatory imbalance in response to LPS. Blocking TNF was associated with a shift towards an anti-inflammatory status; however, polarization was more pronounced in animals receiving F(ab’)2 fragments than in those with VNAR therapy. With regard to IL-6, gene expression was increased at 3 h in all groups. TNF blockade was associated with rapid and sustained suppression of IL-6 expression, even more evident in the VNAR group. Finally, expression of inducible-nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) increased in response to LPS at 3 h, but this

  7. Induction of murine tumors in adult mice by a combination of either avian sarcoma virus or human adenovirus and syngeneic mouse embryo cells.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, M; Nitta, K

    1983-01-01

    Primary murine Rous sarcoma was produced in adult mice of seven strains, C57BL/6, DBA/2, BALB/c, C3H/He, CBAJ, AKR, and DDD, by s.c. inoculation of a mixture of 5 X 10(6) chicken tumor cells containing Schmidt-Ruppin Rous sarcoma virus and 9- to 12-day-old mouse embryo cells (MEC) (2 X 10(6) ) of the syngeneic strain. The sarcoma developed at the site of injection in almost all mice tested, but there were some differences in the latent period and the survival time among mouse strains. When the number of cells inoculated was reduced to 5 X 10(4) for chicken tumor cells induced by the Schmidt-Ruppin strain of Rous sarcoma virus (SR-CTC) and 2 X 10(4) for MEC, no tumor was produced in C3H/He mice. These tumors had strain specificity and the Schmidt-Ruppin strain of Rous sarcoma virus genome in masked form. The tumor at the site of injection originated in the embryo cells injected along with SR-CTC. This was confirmed by CBAT6/T6 marker chromosome analysis of the tumor cells of CBA mice induced with SR-CTC plus CBAT6/T6 MEC and also confirmed by transplantation of a C57BL/6 X C3H/He F1 tumor which had been induced with SR-CTC plus C3H/He or C57BL/6 MEC. Tumor induction in adult mouse by a mixture of virus and syngeneic 9- to 14-day-old embryo cells was tested for human adenovirus serotype 12 (Ad12) and simian virus 40. Primary Ad12 tumor was also induced in adult CBA, C3H/He, and DDD mice by 4 X 10(5 to 6) 50% tissue culture infective dose of Ad12 with 5 X 10(6) syngeneic embryo cells. This tumor contained Ad12 T-antigen-positive particles in cells. But in the case of simian virus 40, the tumor did not appear for about 300 days of observation.

  8. Wedelolactone mitigates UVB induced oxidative stress, inflammation and early tumor promotion events in murine skin: plausible role of NFkB pathway.

    PubMed

    Ali, Farrah; Khan, Bilal Azhar; Sultana, Sarwat

    2016-09-05

    UVB (Ultra-violet B) radiation is one of the major etiological factors in various dermal pathology viz. dermatitis, actinic folliculitis, solar urticaria, psoriasis and cancer among many others. UVB causes toxic manifestation in tissues by inciting inflammatory and tumor promoting events. We have designed this study to assess the anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor promotion effect of Wedelolactone (WDL) a specific IKK inhibitor. Results indicate significant restoration of anti-oxidative enzymes due to WDL treatments. We also found that WDL was effective in mitigating inflammatory markers consisting of MPO (myeloperoxidase), Mast cells trafficking, Langerhans cells suppression and COX 2 expression up regulation due to UVB exposure. We also deduce that WDL presented a promising intervention in attenuating early tumor promotion events caused by UVB exposure as indicated by the results of ODC (Ornithine Decarboxylase), Thymidine assay, Vimentin and VEGF (Vascular-endothelial growth factor) expression. This study was able to provide substantial cues for the therapeutic ability of Wedelolactone against inflammatory and tumor promoting events in murine skin depicting plausible role of NFkB pathway.

  9. Inhibition of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-induced tumor promotion in murine skin by systemic effects of ultraviolet irradiation.

    PubMed

    Gensler, H L; Simpson, P J; Powell, M B

    1992-07-01

    Systemic effects of UVB irradiation (280-320 nm) have been shown to prevent subsequent chemical tumorigenesis induced by an initiation-promotion protocol. The present investigation was designed to determine whether initiation or promotion is prevented by UV irradiation. Groups of 25 B6D2F1/J mice received 12 weeks of intermittent dorsal UVB radiation treatments administered before, or 3 weeks after, initiation with a single application of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene on the ventral skin. All mice were promoted ventrally with 5 micrograms 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) applied three times weekly throughout the experiment. UV irradiation consisted of five 30-min exposures per week to a bank of 6 Westinghouse FS40 sunlamps. UV irradiation applied before or after initiation resulted in a decrease of 18-16 tumors per group of 25 mice, for a reduction of 61 and 50%, respectively, at 24 weeks after the first TPA treatment. Thus, prevention of tumor development was similar whether the UV influence was present or not during initiation. This finding suggests that the UV prevention of promotion could account for UV inhibition of skin tumors induced by an initiation-promotion regimen. Consistent with this concept, pretreatment of mice with dorsal UVB radiation was found to reduce DNA synthesis after exposure to TPA by 46%, although it did not decrease tritiated benzo[a]pyrene binding to DNA, in ventral epidermis. Thus, UVB irradiation systemically reduced TPA-induced tumor promotion in murine skin.

  10. Dynamic ocular surface and lacrimal gland changes induced in experimental murine dry eye.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Bing; Wang, Yu; Reinach, Peter S; Ren, Yueping; Li, Jinyang; Hua, Shanshan; Lu, Huihui; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Dry eye disease can be a consequence of lacrimal gland insufficiency in Sjögren's Syndrome or increased tear film evaporation despite normal lacrimal gland function. To determine if there is a correlation between severity effects in these models and underlying pathophysiological responses, we compared the time dependent changes in each of these parameters that occur during a 6 week period. Dry eye was induced in 6-week-old female C57BL/6 mice by exposing them to an Intelligently Controlled Environmental System (ICES). Sixty mice were housed in ICES for 1, 2, 4 and 6 weeks respectively. Twelve were raised in normal environment and received subcutaneous injections of scopolamine hydrobromide (SCOP) 3 times daily for 5 days. Another sixty mice were housed in a normal environment and received no treatment. Corneal fluorescein staining along with corneal MMP-9 and caspase-3 level measurements were performed in parallel with the TUNEL assay. Interleukin-17(IL-17), IL-23, IL-6, IL-1, TNF-α, IFN-γ and TGF-β2 levels were estimated by real-time PCR measurements of conjunctival and lacrimal gland samples (LGs). Immunohistochemistry of excised LGs along with flow cytometry in cervical lymph nodes evaluated immune cell infiltration. Light and transmission electron microscopy studies evaluated LGs cytoarchitectural changes. ICES induced corneal epithelial destruction and apoptosis peaked at 2 weeks and kept stable in the following 4 weeks. In the ICES group, lacrimal gland proinflammatory cytokine level increases were much lower than those in the SCOP group. In accord with the lower proinflammatory cytokine levels, in the ICES group, lacrimal gland cytosolic vesicular density and size exceeded that in the SCOP group. ICES and SCOP induced murine dry eye effects became progressively more severe over a two week period. Subsequently, the disease process stabilized for the next four weeks. ICES induced local effects in the ocular surface, but failed to elicit lacrimal gland

  11. Retrotransposition of long interspersed nucleotide element-1 is associated with colitis but not tumors in a murine colitic cancer model.

    PubMed

    Otsubo, Takeshi; Okamura, Tadashi; Hagiwara, Teruki; Ishizaka, Yukihito; Dohi, Taeko; Kawamura, Yuki I

    2015-01-01

    Long interspersed element-1 (L1) is a transposable element that can move within the genome, potentially leading to genome diversity and modified gene function. Although L1 activity in somatic cells is normally suppressed through DNA methylation, some L1s are activated in tumors including colorectal carcinoma. However, how L1-retrotransposition (L1-RTP) is involved in gastrointestinal disorders remains to be elucidated. We hypothesized that L1-RTP in somatic cells might contribute to colitis-associated cancer (CAC). To address this, we employed an experimental model of CAC using transgenic L1-reporter mice carrying a human L1-EGFP reporter gene. Mice were subjected to repeated cycles of colitis induced by administration of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) in drinking water with injection of carcinogen azoxymethane (AOM). L1-RTP levels were measured by a quantitative polymerase chain reaction targeting the newly inserted reporter EGFP in various tissues and cell types, including samples obtained by laser microdissection and cell sorting with flow cytometry. DNA methylation levels of the human L1 promoter were analyzed by bisulfite pyrosequencing. AOM+DSS-treated mice exhibited significantly higher levels of L1-RTP in whole colon tissue during the acute phase of colitis when compared with control naïve mice. L1-RTP levels in whole colon tissue were positively correlated with the histological severity of colitis and degree of neutrophil infiltration into the lamina propria (LP), but not with tumor development in the colon. L1-RTP was enriched in LP mesenchymal cells rather than epithelial cells (ECs), myeloid, or lymphoid cells. DNA methylation levels of the human L1 promoter region showed a negative correlation with L1-RTP levels. L1-RTP was absent from most tumors found in 22-week-old mice. In conclusion, we demonstrated that L1-RTP was induced in the mouse CAC mucosa in accordance with the acute inflammatory response; however, retrotransposition appears not to have

  12. A Novel Tumor Antigen and Foxp3 Dual-Targeting Tumor Cell Vaccine Enhances the Immunotherapy in a Murine Model of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    DATES COVERED t 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Novel Tumor Antigen and Foxp3 Dual-Targeting Tumor Cell Vaccine 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Enhances the...past year I have generated Foxp3-over expressing RENCA cells, as the source of candidate dual targeting tumor cells vaccine . We have performed...controlled vaccine therapy in RENCA model in three different schedules. When applied in a pre- vaccine schedule, RENCA and RENCA Foxp3 tumor cell vaccine

  13. Enhancement of survivin-specific anti-tumor immunity by adenovirus prime protein-boost immunity strategy with DDA/MPL adjuvant in a murine melanoma model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Qian; Zhang, Hai-Hong; Liu, Chen-Lu; Wu, Hui; Wang, Peng; Xia, Qiu; Zhang, Li-Xing; Li, Bo; Wu, Jia-Xin; Yu, Bin; Gu, Tie-Jun; Yu, Xiang-Hui; Kong, Wei

    2013-09-01

    As an ideal tumor antigen, survivin has been widely used for tumor immunotherapy. Nevertheless, no effective protein vaccine targeting survivin has been reported, which may be due to its poor ability to induce cellular immunity. Thus, a suitable immunoadjuvant and optimized immunization strategy can greatly enhance the cellular immune response to this protein vaccine. DDA/MPL (monophosphoryl lipid A formulated with cationic dimethyldioctadecylammonium) has been reported to enhance the antigen uptake and presentation to T cells as an adjuvant. Meanwhile, a heterologous prime-boost strategy can enhance the cellular immunity of a protein vaccine by applying different antigen-presenting systems. Here, DDA/MPL and an adenovirus prime-protein boost strategy were applied to enhance the specific anti-tumor immunity of a truncated survivin protein vaccine. Antigen-specific IFN-γ-secreting T cells were increased by 10-fold, and cytotoxic T lympohocytes (CTLs) were induced effectively when the protein vaccine was combined with the DDA/MPL adjuvant. Meanwhile, the Th1 type cellular immune response was strongly enhanced and tumor inhibition was significantly increased by 96% with the adenovirus/protein prime-boost strategy, compared to the protein homologous prime-boost strategy. Moreover, this adjuvanted heterologous prime-boost strategy combined with oxaliplatin could significantly enhance the efficiency of tumor growth inhibition through promoting the proliferation of splenocytes. Thus, our results provide a novel vaccine strategy for cancer therapy using an adenovirus prime-protein boost strategy in a murine melanoma model, and its combination with oxaliplatin may further enhance the anti-tumor efficacy while alleviating side effects of the drug.

  14. Experimental chemotherapy with combinations of ergosterol biosynthesis inhibitors in murine models of Chagas' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado, R A; Molina, J; Payares, G; Urbina, J A

    1993-01-01

    We report the effects of ketoconazole and the bistriazole ICI 195,739 acting alone or in combination with the allylamine terbinafine (Lamisil) on murine models of Chagas' disease. Mice infected with 10(5) Trypanosoma (Schizotrypanum) cruzi blood trypomastigotes and treated orally with 30 mg of ketoconazole per kg of body weight per day for 7 days, starting at 24 h postinoculation, had 100% survival after 35 days, while controls (untreated) or animals that received 15 mg of ketoconazole or 100 mg of terbinafine per kg/day by the same route had 0% survival after the same period of time. However, all mice receiving the combination of 15 mg of ketoconazole plus 100 mg of terbinafine per kg/day survived for 35 days after infection; it was shown that the survival of the animals treated with this combination was statistically greater than that obtained with either drug acting alone and was indistinguishable from that observed with the high doses of ketoconazole, indicating a synergistic action of the drugs in vivo. However, most animals that survived after the 7-day treatments were not cured, as indicated by a delayed but persistent parasitemia. When the treatment was extended to 14 days, 100% survival was obtained 10 weeks after inoculation for mice treated with 30 mg of ketoconazole per kg/day and the combination of 15 mg of ketoconazole per kg/day plus 100 mg of terbinafine per kg/day, while two-thirds of the mice treated with 15 mg of ketoconazole per kg/day alone were alive after the 14-day treatment; controls or animals that received 100 mg of terbinafine per kg/day did not survive after 25 days. Parasitemia in all surviving mice was negative after 55 days but parasitological cure, as assessed by subinoculation of organs in naive animals, was predominant only in animals that received the combined drug treatment. We also investigated the bistriazole ICI 195,739 and found, as reported previously, that just 1 mg of the compound per kg/day administered orally for 5 days

  15. Infrared Spectra of Human Breast Tumor Tissue and Experimental Animal Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Belkov, M. V.; Skornyakov, I. V.; Pekhnyo, V. I.; Kozachkova, A. N.; Tsarik, H. V.; Kutsenko, I. P.; Sharykina, N. I.; Butra, V. A.

    2015-01-01

    We have used Fourier transform IR spectroscopy methods to conduct comparative studies of human breast tumors and sarcoma 180 tumor grafted into mice. The IR spectral parameters used to identify tumor tissue in mice with the sarcoma 180 strain proved to be identical to the parameters for human breast tissue in cancer. In the presence of a malignant tumor in humans, the most intense C=O vibrational bands in the protein molecules are observed in the interval 1710-1680 cm-1. For a benign tumor, in the IR spectra of breast tissue the intense bands are located in the interval 1670-1650 cm-1. We spectroscopically monitored the diagnosis and the chemotherapy process using the model of sarcoma 180 in mice. As the therapeutic drugs, we used synthesized coordination compounds based on palladium complexes with diphosphonic acid derivatives. We demonstrate the promising potential of palladium complexes with zoledronic acid as an effective cytostatic. In therapy using a palladium complex with zoledronic acid, the effect of tumor growth inhibition is accompanied by a change in its spectral characteristics. The parameters of the IR spectra for tumor tissue after treatment are close to those of the IR spectra for healthy tissue.

  16. In vivo therapy of a murine B cell tumor (BCL1) using antibody-ricin A chain immunotoxins

    SciTech Connect

    Krolick, K.A.; Uhr, J.W.; Slavin, S.; Vitetta, E.S.

    1982-06-01

    Prolonged remissions were induced in mice bearing advanced BCL1 tumors by the combined approach of nonspecific cytoreductive therapy and administration of a tumor-reactive immunotoxin. Thus, the vast majority of the tumor cells (approximately 95%) were first killed by nonspecific cytoreductive therapy using total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and splenectomy. The residual tumor cells were then eliminated by intravenous administration of an anti-delta immunotoxin. In three of four experiments, all animals treated in the above fashion appeared tumor free 12-16 wk later. In one experiment, blood cells from the mice in remission were transferred to normal BALB/c recipients, and the latter animals have not developed detectable tumor for the 6 mo of observation. Because 1-10 adoptively transferred BCL1 cells will cause tumor in normal BALB/c mice by 12 wk, the inability to transfer tumor to recipients might indicate that the donor animals were tumor free. In the remainder of the animals treated with the tumor-reactive immunotoxin there was a substantial remission in all animals, but the disease eventually reappeared. In contrast, all mice treated with the control immunotoxin or antibody alone relapsed significantly earlier (3-4 wk after splenectomy).

  17. Tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 is essential for LPS-induced sensitization and tolerance to oxygen-glucose deprivation in murine neonatal organotypic hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Markus, Tina; Cronberg, Tobias; Cilio, Corrado; Pronk, Cornelis; Wieloch, Tadeusz; Ley, David

    2009-01-01

    Inflammation and ischemia have a synergistic damaging effect in the immature brain. The role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptors 1 and 2 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced sensitization and tolerance to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) was evaluated in neonatal murine hippocampal organotypic slices. Hippocampal slices from balb/c, C57BL/6 TNFR1(-/-), TNFR2(-/-), and wild-type (WT) mice obtained at P6 were grown in vitro for 9 days. Preexposure to LPS immediately before OGD increased propidium iodide-determined cell death in regions CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus from 4 up to 48 h after OGD (P<0.001). Extending the time interval between LPS exposure and OGD to 72 h resulted in tolerance, that is reduced neuronal cell death after OGD (P<0.05). Slices from TNFR1(-/-) mice showed neither LPS-induced sensitization nor LPS-induced tolerance to OGD, whereas both effects were present in slices from TNFR2(-/-) and WT mice. Cytokine secretion (TNFalpha and interleukin-6) during LPS exposure was decreased in TNFR1(-/-) slices and increased in TNFR2(-/-) as compared with WT slices. We conclude that LPS induces sensitization or tolerance to OGD depending on the time interval between exposure to LPS and OGD in murine hippocampal slice cultures. Both paradigms are dependent on signaling through TNFR1.

  18. Evaluation of azithromycin, trovafloxacin and grepafloxacin as prophylaxis for experimental murine melioidosis.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Dermot J; Sefton, Armine M; Brooks, Timothy J G; Laws, Thomas R; Simpson, Andrew J H; Atkins, Helen S

    2010-07-01

    The efficacies of the azalide azithromycin and the fluoroquinolones trovafloxacin and grepafloxacin for pre- and post-exposure prophylaxis of infection with high or low challenge doses of Burkholderia pseudomallei strain 576 were assessed in an experimental mouse model. Trovafloxacin and grepafloxacin afforded significant levels of protection, whereas azithromycin was ineffective and potentially detrimental. Overall, the data suggest that some fluoroquinolones may have potential utility in prophylaxis of melioidosis and suggest that azithromycin would not be effective in prophylaxis of B. pseudomallei infection.

  19. Ultrastructural Study on Tissue Alterations Caused by Trypanosomatids in Experimental Murine Infections

    PubMed Central

    Finol, Héctor J.; Roschman-González, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The ultrastructural study in different tissues of mice experimentally infected with isolates of Trypanosoma evansi, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Leishmania mexicana reveals changes in cardiac myocytes, skeletal muscle fibers, and hepatic, adrenal, kidney, and spleen cells. Some of these changes were cytoarchitectural and others consisted of necrosis. Alterations in the microvasculature were also found. The mononuclear cell infiltrate included neutrophils, eosinophils, and macrophages. This work shows that diverse mice tissues are important target for trypanosomatids. PMID:25072046

  20. Prevention of murine experimental autoimmune orchitis by recombinant human interleukin-6.

    PubMed

    Li, Lu; Itoh, Masahiro; Ablake, Maila; Macrì, Battesimo; Bendtzen, Klaus; Nicoletti, Ferdinando

    2002-02-01

    We studied the effect of exogenously administered recombinant human interleukin (IL)-6 on the development of experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) in C3H/Hej mice. IL-6 significantly reduced histological signs of EAO and appearance of delayed type hypersensitivity against the immunizing testicular germinal cells. The effect was seen even though the cytokine was administered for only 6 consecutive days and 2 weeks after immunization.

  1. Effects of ionizing radiation on bone cell differentiation in an experimental murine bone cell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Lau, Patrick; Hellweg, Christine; Reitz, Guenther

    During long-term space travel astronauts are exposed to a complex mixture of different radiation types under conditions of dramatically reduced weight-bearing activity. It has been validated that astronauts loose a considerable amount of bone mass at a rate up to one to two percent each month in space. Therapeutic doses of ionizing radiation cause bone damage and increase fracture risks after treatment for head-and-neck cancer and in pelvic irradiation. For low radiation doses, the possibility of a disturbed healing potential of bone was described. Radiation induced damage has been discussed to inflict mainly on immature and healing bone. Little is known about radiation effects on bone remodelling and even less on the combined action of microgravity and radiation. Bone remodelling is a life-long process performed by balanced action of cells from the osteoblast and osteoclast lineages. While osteoblasts differentiate either into bone-lining cells or into osteocytes and play a crucial role in bone matrix synthesis, osteoclasts are responsible for bone resorption. We hypothesize that the balance between bone matrix assembly by osteocytes and bone degradation by osteoclasts is modulated by microgravity as well as by ionizing radiation. To address this, a cell model consisting of murine cell lines with the potential to differentiate into bone-forming osteoblasts (OCT-1, MC3T3-E1 S24, and MC3T3-E1 S4) was used for studying radiation response after exposure to simulated components of cosmic radiation. Cells were exposed to graded doses of 150 kV X-rays, α particles (0.525 MeV/u, 160 keV/µm; PTB, Braunschweig, Germany) and accelerated heavy ions (75 MeV/u carbon, 29 keV/µm; 95 MeV/u argon, 230 keV/µm; GANIL, Caen, France). Cell survival was measured as colony forming ability; cell cycle progression was analyzed via fluorescence-activated cell scanning (FACS) by measurement of the content of propidium iodide-stained DNA, DNA damage was visualized by γH2AX

  2. Infection of murine macrophages with Toxoplasma gondii is associated with release of transforming growth factor beta and downregulation of expression of tumor necrosis factor receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Bermudez, L E; Covaro, G; Remington, J

    1993-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is capable of invading and multiplying within murine peritoneal macrophages. Previous studies have shown that treatment of macrophage monolayers with recombinant gamma interferon but not tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is associated with intracellular killing of T. gondii by macrophages. Furthermore, infection of macrophages with T. gondii prevents their stimulation for mycobactericidal activity by TNF. Since transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) is known to suppress a number of functions in macrophages, we investigated the influence of infection with T. gondii on macrophage TNF receptors and on production of TGF-beta. Infection with T. gondii was associated with increased production of TGF-beta and downregulation of TNF receptors. This effect was observed early after infection and was partially inhibited by anti-TGF-beta 1 antibody. PMID:8406801

  3. The Effects of Pulsed Radiation Therapy on Tumor Oxygenation in 2 Murine Models of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wobb, Jessica; Krueger, Sarah A.; Kane, Jonathan L.; Galoforo, Sandra; Grills, Inga S.; Wilson, George D.; Marples, Brian

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of low-dose pulsed radiation therapy (PRT) in 2 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) xenografts and to investigate the mechanism of action of PRT compared with standard radiation therapy (SRT). Methods and Materials: Subcutaneous radiosensitive UT-SCC-14 and radioresistant UT-SCC-15 xenografts were established in athymic NIH III HO female mice. Tumors were irradiated with 2 Gy/day by continuous standard delivery (SRT: 2 Gy) or discontinuous low-dose pulsed delivery (PRT: 0.2 Gy × 10 with 3-min pulse interval) to total doses of 20 Gy (UT14) or 40 Gy (UT15) using a clinical 5-day on/2-day off schedule. Treatment response was assessed by changes in tumor volume, {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) (tumor metabolism), and {sup 18}F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) (hypoxia) positron emission tomography (PET) imaging before, at midpoint, and after treatment. Tumor hypoxia using pimonidazole staining and vascular density (CD34 staining) were assessed by quantitative histopathology. Results: UT15 and UT14 tumors responded similarly in terms of growth delay to either SRT or PRT. When compared with UT14 tumors, UT15 tumors demonstrated significantly lower uptake of FDG at all time points after irradiation. UT14 tumors demonstrated higher levels of tumor hypoxia after SRT when compared with PRT as measured by {sup 18}F-FMISO PET. By contrast, no differences were seen in {sup 18}F-FMISO PET imaging between SRT and PRT for UT15 tumors. Histologic analysis of pimonidazole staining mimicked the {sup 18}F-FMISO PET imaging data, showing an increase in hypoxia in SRT-treated UT14 tumors but not PRT-treated tumors. Conclusions: Differences in {sup 18}F-FMISO uptake for UT14 tumors after radiation therapy between PRT and SRT were measurable despite the similar tumor growth delay responses. In UT15 tumors, both SRT and PRT were equally effective at reducing tumor hypoxia to a significant level as measured by {sup 18}F-FMISO and pimonidazole.

  4. Vaccinia virus Transmission through Experimentally Contaminated Milk Using a Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Rehfeld, Izabelle Silva; Guedes, Maria Isabel Maldonado Coelho; Fraiha, Ana Luiza Soares; Costa, Aristóteles Gomes; Matos, Ana Carolina Diniz; Fiúza, Aparecida Tatiane Lino; Lobato, Zélia Inês Portela

    2015-01-01

    Bovine vaccinia (BV) is a zoonosis caused by Vaccinia virus (VACV), which affects dairy cattle and humans. Previous studies have detected the presence of viable virus particles in bovine milk samples naturally and experimentally contaminated with VACV. However, it is not known whether milk contaminated with VACV could be a route of viral transmission. However, anti-Orthopoxvirus antibodies were detected in humans from BV endemic areas, whom had no contact with affected cows, which suggest that other VACV transmission routes are possible, such as consumption of contaminated milk and dairy products. Therefore, it is important to study the possibility of VACV transmission by contaminated milk. This study aimed to examine VACV transmission, pathogenesis and shedding in mice orally inoculated with experimentally contaminated milk. Thirty mice were orally inoculated with milk containing 107 PFU/ml of VACV, and ten mice were orally inoculated with uncontaminated milk. Clinical examinations were performed for 30 consecutive days, and fecal samples and oral swabs (OSs) were collected every other day. Mice were euthanized on predetermined days, and tissue and blood samples were collected. Nested-PCR, plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT), viral isolation, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) methods were performed on the collected samples. No clinical changes were observed in the animals. Viral DNA was detected in feces, blood, OSs and tissues, at least in one of the times tested. The lungs displayed moderate to severe interstitial lymphohistiocytic infiltrates, and only the heart, tonsils, tongue, and stomach did not show immunostaining at the IHC analysis. Neutralizing antibodies were detected at the 20th and 30th days post infection in 50% of infected mice. The results revealed that VACV contaminated milk could be a route of viral transmission in mice experimentally infected, showing systemic distribution and shedding through feces and oral mucosa, albeit

  5. Vaccinia virus Transmission through Experimentally Contaminated Milk Using a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Rehfeld, Izabelle Silva; Guedes, Maria Isabel Maldonado Coelho; Fraiha, Ana Luiza Soares; Costa, Aristóteles Gomes; Matos, Ana Carolina Diniz; Fiúza, Aparecida Tatiane Lino; Lobato, Zélia Inês Portela

    2015-01-01

    Bovine vaccinia (BV) is a zoonosis caused by Vaccinia virus (VACV), which affects dairy cattle and humans. Previous studies have detected the presence of viable virus particles in bovine milk samples naturally and experimentally contaminated with VACV. However, it is not known whether milk contaminated with VACV could be a route of viral transmission. However, anti-Orthopoxvirus antibodies were detected in humans from BV endemic areas, whom had no contact with affected cows, which suggest that other VACV transmission routes are possible, such as consumption of contaminated milk and dairy products. Therefore, it is important to study the possibility of VACV transmission by contaminated milk. This study aimed to examine VACV transmission, pathogenesis and shedding in mice orally inoculated with experimentally contaminated milk. Thirty mice were orally inoculated with milk containing 107 PFU/ml of VACV, and ten mice were orally inoculated with uncontaminated milk. Clinical examinations were performed for 30 consecutive days, and fecal samples and oral swabs (OSs) were collected every other day. Mice were euthanized on predetermined days, and tissue and blood samples were collected. Nested-PCR, plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT), viral isolation, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) methods were performed on the collected samples. No clinical changes were observed in the animals. Viral DNA was detected in feces, blood, OSs and tissues, at least in one of the times tested. The lungs displayed moderate to severe interstitial lymphohistiocytic infiltrates, and only the heart, tonsils, tongue, and stomach did not show immunostaining at the IHC analysis. Neutralizing antibodies were detected at the 20th and 30th days post infection in 50% of infected mice. The results revealed that VACV contaminated milk could be a route of viral transmission in mice experimentally infected, showing systemic distribution and shedding through feces and oral mucosa, albeit

  6. Evaluation of azithromycin, trovafloxacin and grepafloxacin as prophylaxis against experimental murine Brucella melitensis infection.

    PubMed

    Atkins, Helen S; Spencer, Stephen; Brew, Simon D; Jenner, Dominic C; Sefton, Armine M; MacMillan, Alastair P; Brooks, Timothy J G; Simpson, Andrew J H

    2010-07-01

    The prophylactic potential of the azalide azithromycin as well as the fluoroquinolones trovafloxacin and grepafloxacin was assessed for the control of infection with Brucella melitensis in an experimental mouse model, determined by reduction in splenic bacterial burden. Trovafloxacin showed limited protective efficacy when administered 2h following a low-dose B. melitensis challenge, whereas grepafloxacin was ineffective. In comparison, azithromycin provided significant control of infection both following low- and high-dose challenges. Overall, the data confirm the potential utility of azithromycin in the prophylaxis of brucellosis and suggest that neither trovafloxacin nor grepafloxacin would likely be valuable for post-exposure prophylaxis of Brucella infection.

  7. Combination therapy with metformin and coenzyme Q10 in murine experimental autoimmune arthritis.

    PubMed

    Jhun, JooYeon; Lee, SeungHoon; Kim, Se-Young; Na, Hyun Sik; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Jeong, Jeong-Hee; Park, Sung Hwan; Cho, Mi-La

    2016-01-01

    Metformin (Met) and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) are reported to have therapeutic functions in several inflammatory diseases. These drugs have shown anti-inflammatory effects and have been utilized in mouse models of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, there is no evidence of the additive effect of Met and CoQ10 in RA. Although Met and CoQ10 may be involved in the improvement of mitochondrial dysfunction, limited information is available regarding whether this effect can improve mitochondrial dysfunction in RA in particular. In this study, we sought to determine whether Met and CoQ10 attenuate the severity of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and show an additive effect in a mouse model. The combination of Met and CoQ10 improved CIA, reducing joint inflammation, Th17 differentiation and IgG production. In contrast, the combination of Met and CoQ10 induced Treg differentiation. Osteoclastogenesis was reduced by the combination of Met and CoQ10. The protein expression of interleukin-1β, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in mice splenocytes exposed to lipopolysaccharide decreased after drug combination therapy. We also found that the expression of JC-1 and COX IV were enhanced by treatment with the combination of Met and CoQ10. Moreover, the combination of Met and CoQ10 promoted mitochondrial O2 consumption. These findings suggest that the combination of Met and CoQ10 reduced CIA severity, improving mitochondrial dysfunction compared to Met or CoQ10 alone. These results present a novel, significant preventive targets in RA and may enhance our understanding of its pathogenesis.

  8. Combining Theoretical and Experimental Techniques to Study Murine Heart Transplant Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Arciero, Julia C.; Maturo, Andrew; Arun, Anirudh; Oh, Byoung Chol; Brandacher, Gerald; Raimondi, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    The quality of life of organ transplant recipients is compromised by complications associated with life-long immunosuppression, such as hypertension, diabetes, opportunistic infections, and cancer. Moreover, the absence of established tolerance to the transplanted tissues causes limited long-term graft survival rates. Thus, there is a great medical need to understand the complex immune system interactions that lead to transplant rejection so that novel and effective strategies of intervention that redirect the system toward transplant acceptance (while preserving overall immune competence) can be identified. This study implements a systems biology approach in which an experimentally based mathematical model is used to predict how alterations in the immune response influence the rejection of mouse heart transplants. Five stages of conventional mouse heart transplantation are modeled using a system of 13 ordinary differential equations that tracks populations of both innate and adaptive immunity as well as proxies for pro- and anti-inflammatory factors within the graft and a representative draining lymph node. The model correctly reproduces known experimental outcomes, such as indefinite survival of the graft in the absence of CD4+ T cells and quick rejection in the absence of CD8+ T cells. The model predicts that decreasing the translocation rate of effector cells from the lymph node to the graft delays transplant rejection. Increasing the starting number of quiescent regulatory T cells in the model yields a significant but somewhat limited protective effect on graft survival. Surprisingly, the model shows that a delayed appearance of alloreactive T cells has an impact on graft survival that does not correlate linearly with the time delay. This computational model represents one of the first comprehensive approaches toward simulating the many interacting components of the immune system. Despite some limitations, the model provides important suggestions of

  9. STRAIN-SPECIFIC SENSITIVITY TO INDUCTION OF MURINE LUNG TUMORS FOLLOWING IN UTERO EXPOSURE TO 3-METHYLCHOLANTHRENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We previously demonstrated that different strains of fetal mice were more sensitive to lung tumor induction by 3-methylcholanthrene (MC) than were adults. Offspring from either a D2 x B6D2F1 backcross or from parental Balb/c mice exhibited a similar high incidence of lung tumors ...

  10. Tumor Microenvironment Remodeling by 4-Methylumbelliferone Boosts the Antitumor Effect of Combined Immunotherapy in Murine Colorectal Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Malvicini, Mariana; Fiore, Esteban; Ghiaccio, Valentina; Piccioni, Flavia; Rizzo, Miguel; Olmedo Bonadeo, Lucila; García, Mariana; Rodríguez, Marcelo; Bayo, Juan; Peixoto, Estanislao; Atorrasagasti, Catalina; Alaniz, Laura; Aquino, Jorge; Matar, Pablo; Mazzolini, Guillermo

    2015-09-01

    We have previously demonstrated that a low dose of cyclophosphamide (Cy) combined with gene therapy of interleukin-12 (AdIL-12) has a synergistic, although limited, antitumoral effect in mice with colorectal carcinoma. The main mechanism involved in the efficacy of Cy+AdIL-12 was the induction of a specific immune response mediated by cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Our current aims were to evaluate the effects of 4-methylumbelliferone (4Mu), a selective inhibitor of hyaluronan (HA) synthesis, on tumor microenvironment (TME) and to investigate how 4Mu affects the therapeutic efficacy of Cy+AdIL-12. The results showed that 4Mu significantly reduced the amount of tumoral HA leading to a significant decrease in tumor interstitial pressure (TIP). As a consequence, tumor perfusion was improved allowing an increased adenoviral transgene expression. In addition, treatment with 4Mu boosted the number of cytotoxic T lymphocytes that reach the tumor after adoptive transfer resulting in a potent inhibition of tumor growth. Importantly, we observed complete tumor regression in 75% of mice when 4Mu was administrated in combination with Cy+AdIL-12. The triple combination 4Mu+Cy+AdIL-12 also induced a shift toward antiangiogenic factors production in tumor milieu. Our results showed that TME remodeling is an interesting strategy to increase the efficacy of anticancer immunotherapies based on gene and/or cell therapy.

  11. Effects of Different Electroacupuncture Scheduling Regimens on Murine Bone Tumor-Induced Hyperalgesia: Sex Differences and Role of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Smeester, Branden A.; Al-Gizawiy, Mona; Beitz, Alvin J.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that electroacupuncture (EA) is able to reduce hyperalgesia in rodent models of persistent pain, but very little is known about the analgesic effects and potential sex differences of different EA treatment regimens. In the present study, we examined the effects of five different EA treatments on tumor-induced hyperalgesia in male and female mice. EA applied to the ST-36 acupoint either twice weekly (EA-2X/3) beginning on postimplantation day (PID) 3 or prophylactically three times prior to implantation produced the most robust and longest lasting antinociceptive effects. EA treatment given once per week beginning at PID 7 only produced an antinociceptive effect in female animals. The analgesic effect of EA-2X/3 began earlier in males, but lasted longer in females indicating sex differences in EA. We further demonstrate that EA-2X/3 elicits a marked decrease in tumor-associated inflammation as evidenced by a significant reduction in tumor-associated neutrophils at PID 7. Moreover, EA-2X/3 produced a significant reduction in tumor-associated PGE2 as measured in microperfusate samples. Collectively, these data provide evidence that EA-2X/3 treatment reduces tumor-induced hyperalgesia, which is associated with a decrease in tumor-associated inflammation and PGE2 concentration at the tumor site suggesting possible mechanisms by which EA reduces tumor nociception. PMID:23320035

  12. Tumor Microenvironment Remodeling by 4-Methylumbelliferone Boosts the Antitumor Effect of Combined Immunotherapy in Murine Colorectal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Malvicini, Mariana; Fiore, Esteban; Ghiaccio, Valentina; Piccioni, Flavia; Rizzo, Miguel; Olmedo Bonadeo, Lucila; García, Mariana; Rodríguez, Marcelo; Bayo, Juan; Peixoto, Estanislao; Atorrasagasti, Catalina; Alaniz, Laura; Aquino, Jorge; Matar, Pablo; Mazzolini, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that a low dose of cyclophosphamide (Cy) combined with gene therapy of interleukin-12 (AdIL-12) has a synergistic, although limited, antitumoral effect in mice with colorectal carcinoma. The main mechanism involved in the efficacy of Cy+AdIL-12 was the induction of a specific immune response mediated by cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Our current aims were to evaluate the effects of 4-methylumbelliferone (4Mu), a selective inhibitor of hyaluronan (HA) synthesis, on tumor microenvironment (TME) and to investigate how 4Mu affects the therapeutic efficacy of Cy+AdIL-12. The results showed that 4Mu significantly reduced the amount of tumoral HA leading to a significant decrease in tumor interstitial pressure (TIP). As a consequence, tumor perfusion was improved allowing an increased adenoviral transgene expression. In addition, treatment with 4Mu boosted the number of cytotoxic T lymphocytes that reach the tumor after adoptive transfer resulting in a potent inhibition of tumor growth. Importantly, we observed complete tumor regression in 75% of mice when 4Mu was administrated in combination with Cy+AdIL-12. The triple combination 4Mu+Cy+AdIL-12 also induced a shift toward antiangiogenic factors production in tumor milieu. Our results showed that TME remodeling is an interesting strategy to increase the efficacy of anticancer immunotherapies based on gene and/or cell therapy. PMID:26105158

  13. Propranolol induces a favourable shift of anti-tumor immunity in a murine spontaneous model of melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Wrobel, Ludovic Jean; Bod, Lloyd; Lengagne, Renée; Kato, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    In a previous study on a xenograft model of melanoma, we showed that the beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol inhibits melanoma development by modulating angiogenesis, proliferation and cell survival. Stress hormones can influence tumor development in different ways and norepinephrine was shown to downregulate antitumor immune responses by favoring the accumulation of immunosuppressive cells, impairing the function of lymphocytes. We assessed the effect of propranolol on antitumor immune response in the MT/Ret mouse model of melanoma. Propranolol treatment delayed primary tumor growth and metastases development in MT/Ret mice. Consistent with our previous observations in human melanoma xenografts, propranolol induces a decrease in cell proliferation and vessel density in the primary tumors and in metastases. In this immunocompetent model, propranolol significantly reduced the infiltration of myeloid cells, particularly neutrophils, in the primary tumor. Inversely, cytotoxic tumor infiltrating lymphocytes were more frequent in the tumor stroma of treated mice. In a consistent manner, we observed the same shift in the proportions of infiltrating leukocytes in the metastases of treated mice. Our results suggest that propranolol, by decreasing the infiltration of immunosuppressive myeloid cells in the tumor microenvironment, restores a better control of the tumor by cytotoxic cells. PMID:27788481

  14. Comparative study of four antifungal drugs in an experimental model of murine cryptococcosis.

    PubMed

    Bava, A J; Iovannitti, C; Negroni, R

    1989-11-01

    A comparative study among amphotericin B, 5-fluorocytosine, itraconazole and fluconazole in the treatment of experimental cryptococcosis in mice, was carried out. Seventy male Balb C mice were inoculated intraperitoneally with 10(7) cells of Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans. They were divided in 7 groups of 10 animals each one: 1) treated with fluconazole by gavage at a daily dose of 16 mg/kg; 2) treated with itraconazole by gavage at a daily dose of 16 mg/kg; 3) treated with 5-fluorocytosine by gavage at a daily dose of 300 mg/kg; 4) treated with amphotericin B intraperitoneally at a dose of 6 mg/kg every other day; 5) control animals receiving polietilenglicol 200 by gavage; 6) control animals receiving distilled water by gavage and 7) control animals receiving sterile distilled water by intraperitoneal route. All the treatments started 5 days after the challenge inoculation and they were given for 2 weeks. The following parameters were taken into account: survival time, macroscopic aspect of the organ after the complete autopsy, microscopic investigation of yeasts in brain, lungs, spleen and liver, histopathology studies of these organs, the colony forming units per gram and massive seeding of brain and lungs. The survival index of the different groups was the most efficient method to measure the antifungal compounds activity. Amphotericin B increased significantly the animals survival and modified the histopathologic response in the studied organs. The colony forming units and the massive seeding in brain and lung showed that this antifungal agent is unable of producing the biological cure of this experimental model.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Supplementation by vitamin D compounds does not affect colonic tumor development in vitamin D sufficient murine models

    PubMed Central

    Irving, Amy A.; Halberg, Richard B.; Albrecht, Dawn M.; Plum, Lori A.; Krentz, Kathleen J.; Clipson, Linda; Drinkwater, Norman; Amos-Landgraf, James M.; Dove, William F.; DeLuca, Hector F.

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that sunlight exposure and vitamin D are each associated with a lower risk of colon cancer. The few controlled supplementation trials testing vitamin D in humans reported to date show conflicting results. We have used two genetic models of familial colon cancer, the ApcPirc/+ (Pirc) rat and the ApcMin/+ (Min) mouse, to investigate the effect of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OH)D3] and two analogs of vitamin D hormone on colonic tumors. Longitudinal endoscopic monitoring allowed us to test the efficacy of these compounds in preventing newly arising colonic tumors and in affecting established colonic tumors. 25(OH)D3 and two analogs of vitamin D hormone each failed to reduce tumor multiplicities or alter the growth patterns of colonic tumors in the Pirc rat or the Min mouse. PMID:21907701

  16. Interleukin-7 enhances the in vivo anti-tumor activity of tumor-reactive CD8+ T cells with induction of IFN-gamma in a murine breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chun-Hui; Yang, Xue-Qin; Zhu, Cheng-Liang; Liu, Shao-Ping; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Wang, Fu-Bing

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is a potent anti-apoptotic cytokine that enhances immune effector cell functions and is essential for lymphocyte survival. While it known to induce differentiation and proliferation in some haematological malignancies, including certain types of leukaemias and lymphomas, little is known about its role in solid tumours, including breast cancer. In the current study, we investigated whether IL-7 could enhance the in vivo antitumor activity of tumor-reactive CD8+ T cells with induction of IFN-γ in a murine breast cancer model. Human IL-7 cDNA was constructed into the eukaryotic expression plasmid pcDNA3.1, and then the recombinational pcDNA3.1-IL-7 was intratumorally injected in the TM40D BALB/C mouse graft model. Serum and intracellular IFN-γ levels were measured by ELISA and flow cytometry, respectively. CD8+ T cell-mediated cytotoxicity was analyzed using the MTT method. Our results showed that IL-7 administration significantly inhibited tumor growth from day 15 after direct intratumoral injection of pcDNA3.1-IL-7. The anti-tumor effect correlated with a marked increase in the level of IFN-γ and breast cancer cells-specific CTL cytotoxicity. In vitro cytotoxicity assays showed that IL-7-treatment could augment cytolytic activity of CD8+ T cells from tumor bearing mice, while anti-IFN-γ blocked the function of CD8+ T cells, suggesting that IFN-γ mediated the cytolytic activity of CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, in vivo neutralization of CD8+ T lymphocytes by CD8 antibodies reversed the antitumor benefit of IL-7. Thus, we demonstrated that IL-7 exerts anti-tumor activity mainly through activating CD8+ T cells and stimulating them to secrete IFN-γ in a murine breast tumor model. Based on these results, our study points to a potential novel way to treat breast cancer and may have important implications for clinical immunotherapy.

  17. Pomegranate (Punica granatum) peel is effective in a murine model of experimental Cryptosporidium parvum.

    PubMed

    Al-Mathal, Ebtisam M; Alsalem, Afaf M

    2012-07-01

    Cryptosporidiosis, a major health issue for neonatal calves, is caused by the parasite Cryptosporidium parvum, which is highly resistant to drug treatments. To date, many anti-parasitic drugs have been tested, but only a few have been shown to be partially effective in treating cryptosporidiosis. Previous studies have indicated that pomegranate (Punica granatum) possesses anti-plasmodium, anti-cestode, and anti-nematode activities. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of P. granatum peel on suckling mice infected with experimental C. parvum. At 4days of age, 72 neonatal albino mice were randomly divided into five groups: G1: healthy controls, G2: infected/untreated controls, G3: uninfected/distilled water-treated, G4: uninfected/P. granatum peel-treated, and G5: infected/P. granatum peel-treated. Mice were experimentally-infected by oral administration of 1×10(3)C. parvum oocysts per animal. On day 7 post-inoculation (pi), treated mice received an aqueous suspension of P. granatum peel orally (3g/kg body weight). The presence of diarrhea, oocyst shedding, and weight gain/loss, and the histopathology of ileal sections were examined. Infected mice treated with the P. granatum peel suspension showed improvement in all parameters examined. Additionally, these mice did not exhibit any clinical symptoms and no deaths occurred. Oocyst shedding was very significantly reduced in the P. granatum-treated mice by day 14 pi (P<.05), and was completely eliminated by day 28 pi. The mean weight gain of the P. granatum-treated mice was significantly higher than that of the infected/untreated controls throughout the study (P<.01). Histopathological analysis of ileal sections further supported the clinical and parasitological findings. The histological architecture of villi from the P. granatum-treated mice on day 14 pi showed visible improvement in comparison with the infected/untreated controls, including renewed brush borders, reduced numbers of C. parvum

  18. Accumulation of protein carbonyls within cerebellar astrocytes in murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jianzheng; Bizzozero, Oscar A.

    2010-01-01

    Recent work from our laboratory has implicated protein carbonylation in the pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis (MS) and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). The present study was designed to determine the changes in protein carbonylation during the disease progression, and to identify the target cells and modified proteins in the cerebellum of EAE animals, prepared by active immunization of C57/BL6 mice with MOG35-55 peptide. In this model, protein carbonylation was maximal at the peak of the disease (acute phase) to decrease thereafter (chronic phase). Double immunofluorescence microscopy of affected cerebella showed that carbonyls accumulate in white matter astrocytes, and to a lesser extent in microglia/macrophages, both in the acute and chronic phase. Surprisingly, T cells, oligodendrocytes and neurons were barely stained. By 2D-oxyblot and mass spectrometry, β-actin, β-tubulin, GFAP and HSC-71 were identified as the major targets of carbonylation throughout disease. Using a pull-down/western blot method we found a significant increase in the proportion of carbonylated β-actin, β-tubulin and GFAP in the chronic phase but not in the acute phase. These results suggest that as disease progresses from the inflammatory to the neurodegenerative phase there may be an inappropriate removal of oxidized cytoskeletal proteins. Additionally, the extensive accumulation of carbonylated GFAP in the chronic phase of EAE may be responsible for the abnormal shape of astrocytes observed at this stage. PMID:20857508

  19. Notch signalling suppresses regulatory T-cell function in murine experimental autoimmune uveitis.

    PubMed

    Rong, Hua; Shen, Hongjie; Xu, Yueli; Yang, Hai

    2016-12-01

    Autoimmune uveitis is an intraocular inflammatory disorder in developed countries. Understanding the mechanisms underlying the development and modulation of immune reaction in uveitic eyes is critical for designing therapeutic interventions. Here we investigated the role of Notch signalling in regulatory T-cell (Treg cell) function during experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU). Using the Foxp3-GFP reporter mouse strain, the significance of Notch signalling for the function of infiltrating Treg cells was characterized in an EAU model. We found that infiltrating Treg cells substantially expressed Notch-1, Notch-2, JAG1 and DLL1 in uveitic eyes. Activation of Notch signalling, represented by expression of HES1 and HES5, was enhanced in infiltrating Treg cells. Treatment with JAG1 and DLL1 down-regulated Foxp3 expression and immunosuppressive activity of isolated infiltrating Treg cells in vitro, whereas neutralizing antibodies against JAG1 and DLL1 diminished Notch ligand-mediated negative effects on Treg cells. To investigate the significance of Notch signalling for Treg cell function in vivo, lentivirus-derived Notch short hairpin RNAs were transduced into in vitro expanded Treg cells before adoptive transfer of Treg cells into EAU mice. Transfer of Notch-1-deficient Treg cells remarkably reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine production and inflammatory cell infiltration in uveitic eyes. Taken together, Notch signalling negatively modulates the immunosuppressive function of infiltrating Treg cells in mouse EAU.

  20. Influences of aortic motion and curvature on vessel expansion in murine experimental aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Goergen, Craig J.; Azuma, Junya; Barr, Kyla N.; Magdefessel, Lars; Kallop, Dara Y.; Gogineni, Alvin; Grewall, Amarjeet; Weimer, Robby M.; Connolly, Andrew J.; Dalman, Ronald L.; Taylor, Charles A.; Tsao, Philip S.; Greve, Joan M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to quantitatively compare aortic curvature and motion to resulting aneurysm location, direction of expansion, and pathophysiology in experimental abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Methods and Results Magnetic resonance imaging was performed at 4.7T with: 1) a 3D acquisition for vessel geometry and 2) a 2D cardiac-gated acquisition to quantify luminal motion. Male 24-week-old mice were imaged before and after AAA formation induced by angiotensin II (AngII)-filled osmotic pump implantation or infusion of elastase. AngII-induced AAAs formed near the location of maximum abdominal aortic curvature, and the leftward direction of expansion was correlated with the direction of suprarenal aortic motion. Elastase-induced AAAs formed in a region of low vessel curvature and had no repeatable direction of expansion. AngII significantly increased mean blood pressure (22.7mmHg; p<0.05), while both models showed a significant two-fold decrease in aortic cyclic strain (p<0.05). Differences in patterns of elastin degradation and localization of fluorescent signal from protease-activated probes were also observed. Conclusions The direction of AngII aneurysm expansion correlated with the direction of motion, medial elastin dissection, and adventitial remodeling. Anterior infrarenal aortic motion correlated with medial elastin degradation in elastase-induced aneurysms. Results from both models suggest a relationship between aneurysm pathology and aortic geometry and motion. PMID:21071686

  1. Experimental Demyelination and Remyelination of Murine Spinal Cord by Focal Injection of Lysolecithin

    PubMed Central

    Keough, Michael B.; Jensen, Samuel K.; Yong, V. Wee

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system characterized by plaque formation containing lost oligodendrocytes, myelin, axons, and neurons. Remyelination is an endogenous repair mechanism whereby new myelin is produced subsequent to proliferation, recruitment, and differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells into myelin-forming oligodendrocytes, and is necessary to protect axons from further damage. Currently, all therapeutics for the treatment of multiple sclerosis target the aberrant immune component of the disease, which reduce inflammatory relapses but do not prevent progression to irreversible neurological decline. It is therefore imperative that remyelination-promoting strategies be developed which may delay disease progression and perhaps reverse neurological symptoms. Several animal models of demyelination exist, including experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and curprizone; however, there are limitations in their use for studying remyelination. A more robust approach is the focal injection of toxins into the central nervous system, including the detergent lysolecithin into the spinal cord white matter of rodents. In this protocol, we demonstrate that the surgical procedure involved in injecting lysolecithin into the ventral white matter of mice is fast, cost-effective, and requires no additional materials than those commercially available. This procedure is important not only for studying the normal events involved in the remyelination process, but also as a pre-clinical tool for screening candidate remyelination-promoting therapeutics. PMID:25867716

  2. The Membrane Attack Complex of Complement is Required for the Development of Murine Experimental Cerebral Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Theresa N.; Darley, Meghan M.; Hu, Xianzhen; Billker, Oliver; Rayner, Julian C.; Ahras, Malika; Wohler, Jillian E.; Barnum, Scott R.

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is the most severe complication of Plasmodium falciparum infection and accounts for a large number of malaria fatalities worldwide. Recent studies demonstrated that C5−/− mice are resistant to experimental CM (ECM) and suggested that protection was due to loss of C5a-induced inflammation. Surprisingly, we observed that C5aR−/− mice were fully susceptible to disease, indicating that C5a is not required for ECM. C3aR−/− and C3aR−/− × C5aR−/− mice were equally as susceptible to ECM as wild type mice, indicating that neither complement anaphylatoxin receptor is critical for ECM development. In contrast, C9 deposition in the brains of mice with ECM suggested an important role for the terminal complement pathway. Treatment with anti-C9 antibody significantly increased survival time and reduced mortality in ECM. Our data indicate that protection from ECM in C5−/− mice is mediated through inhibition of MAC formation and not through C5a-induced inflammation. PMID:21572031

  3. Systemic delivery of chTNT-3/CpG immunoconjugates for immunotherapy in murine solid tumor models.

    PubMed

    Jang, Julie K; Khawli, Leslie A; Canter, David C; Hu, Peisheng; Zhu, Tian H; Wu, Brian W; Angell, Trevor E; Li, Zhongjun; Epstein, Alan L

    2016-05-01

    CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG) potently activate the immune system by mimicking microbial DNA. Conjugation of CpG to chTNT-3, an antibody targeting the necrotic centers of tumors, enabled CpG to accumulate in tumors after systemic delivery, where it can activate the immune system in the presence of tumor antigens. CpG chemically conjugated to chTNT-3 (chTNT-3/CpG) were compared to free CpG in their ability to stimulate the immune system in vitro and reduce tumor burden in vivo. In subcutaneous Colon 26 adenocarcinoma and B16-F10 melanoma models in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice, respectively, chTNT-3/CpG, free CpG, or several different control constructs were administered systemically. Intraperitoneal injections of chTNT-3/CpG delayed tumor growth and improved survival and were comparable to intratumorally administered CpG. Compared to saline-treated mice, chTNT-3/CpG-treated mice had smaller average tumor volumes by as much as 72% in Colon 26-bearing mice and 79% in B16-bearing mice. Systemically delivered free CpG and CpG conjugated to an isotype control antibody did not reduce tumor burden or improve survival. In this study, chTNT-3/CpG retained immunostimulatory activity of the CpG moiety and enabled delivery to tumors. Because systemically administered CpG rapidly clear the body and do not accumulate into tumors, chTNT-3/CpG provide a solution to the limitations observed in preclinical and clinical trials.

  4. Estimating biologically relevant parameters under uncertainty for experimental within-host murine West Nile virus infection.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Soumya; Guedj, Jeremie; Ribeiro, Ruy M; Moses, Melanie; Perelson, Alan S

    2016-04-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is an emerging pathogen that has decimated bird populations and caused severe outbreaks of viral encephalitis in humans. Currently, little is known about the within-host viral kinetics of WNV during infection. We developed mathematical models to describe viral replication, spread and host immune response in wild-type and immunocompromised mice. Our approach fits a target cell-limited model to viremia data from immunocompromised knockout mice and an adaptive immune response model to data from wild-type mice. Using this approach, we first estimate parameters governing viral production and viral spread in the host using simple models without immune responses. We then use these parameters in a more complex immune response model to characterize the dynamics of the humoral immune response. Despite substantial uncertainty in input parameters, our analysis generates relatively precise estimates of important viral characteristics that are composed of nonlinear combinations of model parameters: we estimate the mean within-host basic reproductive number,R0, to be 2.3 (95% of values in the range 1.7-2.9); the mean infectious virion burst size to be 2.9 plaque-forming units (95% of values in the range 1.7-4.7); and the average number of cells infected per infectious virion to be between 0.3 and 0.99. Our analysis gives mechanistic insights into the dynamics of WNV infection and produces estimates of viral characteristics that are difficult to measure experimentally. These models are a first step towards a quantitative understanding of the timing and effectiveness of the humoral immune response in reducing host viremia and consequently the epidemic spread of WNV.

  5. Efficacy of Lychnopholide Polymeric Nanocapsules after Oral and Intravenous Administration in Murine Experimental Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    de Mello, Carlos Geraldo Campos; Branquinho, Renata Tupinambá; Oliveira, Maykon Tavares; Milagre, Matheus Marques; Saúde-Guimarães, Dênia Antunes; Mosqueira, Vanessa Carla Furtado; Lana, Marta de

    2016-09-01

    The etiological treatment of Chagas disease remains neglected. The compounds available show several limitations, mainly during the chronic phase. Lychnopholide encapsulated in polymeric nanocapsules (LYC-NC) was efficacious in mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and treated by intravenous administration during the acute phase (AP). As the oral route is preferred for treatment of chronic infections, such as Chagas disease, this study evaluated the use of oral LYC-NC in the AP and also compared it with LYC-NC administered to mice by the oral and intravenous routes during the chronic phase (CP). The therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by fresh blood examination, hemoculture, PCR, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The cure rates in the AP and CP were 62.5% and 55.6%, respectively, upon oral administration of LYC-poly(d,l-lactide)-polyethylene glycol nanocapsules (LYC-PLA-PEG-NC) and 57.0% and 30.0%, respectively, with LYC-poly-ε-caprolactone nanocapsules (LYC-PCL-NC). These cure rates were significantly higher than that of free LYC, which did not cure any animals. LYC-NC formulations administered orally during the AP showed cure rates similar to that of benznidazole, but only LYC-NC cured mice in the CP. Similar results were achieved with intravenous treatment during the CP. The higher cure rates obtained with LYC loaded in PLA-PEG-NC may be due to the smaller particle size of these NC and the presence of PEG, which influence tissue diffusion and the controlled release of LYC. Furthermore, PLA-PEG-NC may improve the stability of the drug in the gastrointestinal tract. This work is the first report of cure of experimental Chagas disease via oral administration during the CP. These findings represent a new and important perspective for oral treatment of Chagas disease.

  6. Efficacy of Lychnopholide Polymeric Nanocapsules after Oral and Intravenous Administration in Murine Experimental Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Mello, Carlos Geraldo Campos; Branquinho, Renata Tupinambá; Oliveira, Maykon Tavares; Milagre, Matheus Marques; Saúde-Guimarães, Dênia Antunes; Mosqueira, Vanessa Carla Furtado

    2016-01-01

    The etiological treatment of Chagas disease remains neglected. The compounds available show several limitations, mainly during the chronic phase. Lychnopholide encapsulated in polymeric nanocapsules (LYC-NC) was efficacious in mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and treated by intravenous administration during the acute phase (AP). As the oral route is preferred for treatment of chronic infections, such as Chagas disease, this study evaluated the use of oral LYC-NC in the AP and also compared it with LYC-NC administered to mice by the oral and intravenous routes during the chronic phase (CP). The therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by fresh blood examination, hemoculture, PCR, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The cure rates in the AP and CP were 62.5% and 55.6%, respectively, upon oral administration of LYC–poly(d,l-lactide)–polyethylene glycol nanocapsules (LYC-PLA-PEG-NC) and 57.0% and 30.0%, respectively, with LYC–poly-ε-caprolactone nanocapsules (LYC-PCL-NC). These cure rates were significantly higher than that of free LYC, which did not cure any animals. LYC-NC formulations administered orally during the AP showed cure rates similar to that of benznidazole, but only LYC-NC cured mice in the CP. Similar results were achieved with intravenous treatment during the CP. The higher cure rates obtained with LYC loaded in PLA-PEG-NC may be due to the smaller particle size of these NC and the presence of PEG, which influence tissue diffusion and the controlled release of LYC. Furthermore, PLA-PEG-NC may improve the stability of the drug in the gastrointestinal tract. This work is the first report of cure of experimental Chagas disease via oral administration during the CP. These findings represent a new and important perspective for oral treatment of Chagas disease. PMID:27324760

  7. The CC chemokine CK beta-11/MIP-3 beta/ELC/Exodus 3 mediates tumor rejection of murine breast cancer cells through NK cells.

    PubMed

    Braun, S E; Chen, K; Foster, R G; Kim, C H; Hromas, R; Kaplan, M H; Broxmeyer, H E; Cornetta, K

    2000-04-15

    CK beta-11 chemoattracts T cells, B cells, dendritic cells, macrophage progenitors, and NK cells and facilitates dendritic cell and T cell interactions in secondary lymphoid tissues. We hypothesized that expression of CK beta-11 in tumor cells may generate antitumor immunity through these interactions. After transduction with the retroviral vector L(CK beta 11)SN, the murine breast cancer cell line C3L5 (C3L5-CK beta 11) showed expression of retroviral mRNA by Northern analysis and production of functional CK beta-11 by chemotaxis of human NK cells to C3L5-CK beta 11 supernatant. Only 10% of mice injected with C3L5-CK beta 11 developed tumors, compared with 100% of mice injected with a transduced control C3L5 line (C3L5-G1N). Importantly, the in vitro growth characteristics of the CK beta-11-transduced cell line were unaffected, suggesting the difference in growth in vivo was a result of chemokine production. Vaccination with C3L5-CK beta 11 partially protected animals from parental C3L5 challenge. Immunodepletion with anti-asialo-GM1 or anti-CD4 during C3L5-CK beta 11 vaccination significantly reduced CK beta-11 antitumor activity compared with control and anti-CD8-treated groups. Splenocytes from NK-depleted animals transferred the acquired immunity generated with C3L5-CK beta 11 vaccination, while splenocytes from the CD4-depleted animals did not. These results indicate, for the first time, that expression of CK beta-11 in a breast cancer cell line mediates rejection of the transduced tumor through a mechanism involving NK and CD4+ cells. Furthermore, CK beta-11-transduced tumor cells generate long-term antitumor immunity that requires CD4+ cells. These studies demonstrate the potential role of CK beta-11 as an adjuvant in stimulating antitumor responses.

  8. Mechanisms of reduction of tumor recurrence with carbon dioxide laser in experimental mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Lanzafame, R J; McCormack, C J; Rogers, D W; Naim, J O; Herrera, H R; Hinshaw, J R

    1988-12-01

    This study compares local tumor recurrence after low energy CO2 laser wound sterilization with recurrence after scalpel, laser or electrocautery excision. Wound histologic changes were studied to understand the mechanism of the interaction between the laser and wound. Single implants of R3230AC mammary tumor were grown to an average diameter of 24 millimeters in the mammary ridge of 80 female fisher 344 rats. Rats were anesthesized with pentobarbital and randomized into groups, each with similar tumor size: scalpel (S), laser (L), laser with wound sterilization (LV), scalpel with sterilization (SV) and electrocautery (E). All surgical procedures were performed by the same surgeon with the same technique, with the exception of the instruments used. Tow rats from each group were sacrificed immediately and the wounds examined histologically. The Sharplan 1100 CO2 laser was used with a 125 millimeter hand piece in focus and in continuous wave for groups L and LV. Sterilization in groups LV and SV was performed with 5 millimeter spot size by heating the site gently without causing blanching of tissue. Excision in group E was performed with coagulating current from a monopolar cautery (Valley Lab). Rats were examined periodically for 30 days and those dying during this period were excluded from analysis. The incidence of wound recurrence was eight of 12 in group S; five of eight, L; four of 13, E; three of 12, LV, and two of nine, SV (p less than 0 .05). Histologic changes in the wound demonstrated viable tumor in all groups, with fewer areas present in groups E, SV and LV. Local thermal effects and the noncontact nature of the CO2 laser make it an effective adjunct in reducing local tumor recurrence by enhancing the cytoreductive capability of surgical procedures.

  9. Mesenchymal stem cells engineered to express selectin ligands and IL-10 exert enhanced therapeutic efficacy in murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Wenbin; Pham, Victor; Liu, Linan; Riazifar, Milad; Pone, Egest J; Zhang, Shirley Xian; Ma, Fengxia; Lu, Mengrou; Walsh, Craig M.; Zhao, Weian

    2015-01-01

    Systemic administration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) affords the potential to ameliorate the symptoms of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) in both preclinical and clinical studies. However, the efficacy of MSC-based therapy for MS likely depends on the number of cells that home to inflamed tissues and on the controlled production of paracrine and immunomodulatory factors. Previously, we reported that engineered MSCs expressing P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and Sialyl-Lewisx (SLeX) via mRNA transfection facilitated the targeted delivery of anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) to inflamed ear. Here, we evaluated whether targeted delivery of MSCs with triple PSGL1/SLeX/IL-10 engineering improves therapeutic outcomes in mouse experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a murine model for human MS. We found PSGL-1/SLeX mRNA transfection significantly enhanced MSC homing to the inflamed spinal cord. This is consistent with results from in vitro flow chamber assays in which PSGL-1/SleX mRNA transfection significantly increased the percentage of rolling and adherent cells on activated brain microvascular endothelial cells, which mimic the inflamed endothelium of blood brain/spinal cord barrier in EAE. In addition, IL-10-transfected MSCs show significant inhibitory activity on the proliferation of CD4+ T lymphocytes from EAE mice. In vivo treatment with MSCs engineered with PSGL-1/SLeX/IL-10 in EAE mice exhibited a superior therapeutic function over native (unmodified) MSCs, evidenced by significantly improved myelination and decreased lymphocytes infiltration into the white matter of the spinal cord. Our strategy of targeted delivery of performance-enhanced MSCs could potentially be utilized to increase the effectiveness of MSC-based therapy for MS and other central nervous system (CNS) disorders. PMID:26584349

  10. In vivo relaxation time measurements on a murine tumor model--prolongation of T1 after photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y H; Hawk, R M; Ramaprasad, S

    1995-01-01

    RIF tumors implanted on mice feet were investigated for changes in relaxation times (T1 and T2) after photodynamic therapy (PDT). Photodynamic therapy was performed using Photofrin II as the photosensitizer and laser light at 630 nm. A home-built proton solenoid coil in the balanced configuration was used to accommodate the tumors, and the relaxation times were measured before, immediately after, and up to several hours after therapy. Several control experiments were performed untreated tumors, tumors treated with Photofrin II alone, or tumors treated with laser light alone. Significant increases in T1s of water protons were observed after PDT treatment. In all experiments, 31P spectra were recorded before and after the therapy to study the tumor status and to confirm the onset of PDT. These studies show significant prolongation of T1s after the PDT treatment. The spin-spin relaxation measurements, on the other hand, did not show such prolongation in T2 values after PDT treatment.

  11. A multi-antigen vaccine in combination with an immunotoxin targeting tumor-associated fibroblast for treating murine melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jinxu; Hu, Biliang; Li, Si; Zhang, Chupei; Liu, Yarong; Wang, Pin

    2016-01-01

    A therapeutically effective cancer vaccine must generate potent antitumor immune responses and be able to overcome tolerance mechanisms mediated by the progressing tumor itself. Previous studies showed that glycoprotein 100 (gp100), tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TRP1), and tyrosinase-related protein 2 (TRP2) are promising immunogens for melanoma immunotherapy. In this study, we administered these three melanoma-associated antigens via lentiviral vectors (termed LV-3Ag) and found that this multi-antigen vaccine strategy markedly increased functional T-cell infiltration into tumors and generated protective and therapeutic antitumor immunity. We also engineered a novel immunotoxin, αFAP-PE38, capable of targeting fibroblast activation protein (FAP)-expressing fibroblasts within the tumor stroma. When combined with αFAP-PE38, LV-3Ag exhibited greatly enhanced antitumor effects on tumor growth in an established B16 melanoma model. The mechanism of action underlying this combination treatment likely modulates the immune suppressive tumor microenvironment and, consequently, activates cytotoxic CD8+ T cells capable of specifically recognizing and destroying tumor cells. Taken together, these results provide a strong rationale for combining an immunotoxin with cancer vaccines for the treatment of patients with advanced cancer. PMID:27119119

  12. A systematic analysis of experimental immunotherapies on tumors differing in size and duration of growth

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Frank T.; Thisted, Ronald A.; Rowley, Donald A.; Schreiber, Hans

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a systematic analysis to determine the reason for the apparent disparity of success of immunotherapy between clinical and experimental cancers. To do this, we performed a search of PubMed using the keywords “immunotherapy” AND “cancer” for the years of 1980 and 2010. The midspread of experimental tumors used in all the relevant literature published in 2010 were between 0.5–121 mm3 in volume or had grown for four to eight days. Few studies reported large tumors that could be considered representative of clinical tumors, in terms of size and duration of growth. The predominant effect of cancer immunotherapies was slowed or delayed outgrowth. Regression of tumors larger than 200 mm3 was observed only after passive antibody or adoptive T cell therapy. The effectiveness of other types of immunotherapy was generally scattered. By comparison, very few publications retrieved by the 1980 search could meet our selection criteria; all of these used tumors smaller than 100 mm3, and none reported regression. In the entire year of 2010, only 13 used tumors larger than 400 mm3, and nine of these reported tumor regression. Together, these results indicate that most recent studies, using many diverse approaches, still treat small tumors only to report slowed or delayed growth. Nevertheless, a few recent studies indicate effective therapy against large tumors when using passive antibody or adoptive T cell therapy. For the future, we aspire to witness the increased use of experimental studies treating tumors that model clinical cancers in terms of size and duration of growth. PMID:22720238

  13. CD4⁺ T cells play a crucial role for lenalidomide in vivo anti-tumor activity in murine multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Bi, Enguang; Hong, Sungyoul; Qian, Jianfei; Zheng, Chengyun; Wang, Michael; Yi, Qing

    2015-11-03

    Lenalidomide modulates the host immune response against myeloma via multiple actions. Although these effects have been elucidated in vitro, the central action of lenalidomide-mediated anti-myeloma immune response in vivo is not clear. To investigate its immune action in vivo, we selected the murine myeloma cell line 5TGM1, which is resistant to direct tumoricidal effects of lenalidomide in vitro and in immunodeficient mice, but sensitive to lenalidomide treatment in 5TGM1-bearing immunocompetent mice. Depletion of CD4+ T cells, but not NK cells, B cells, or CD8+ T cells, deprived lenalidomide of its therapeutic effects on 5TGM1-bearing immunocompetent mice. Lenalidomide significantly increased the numbers of IFN-γ-secreting CD4+ and CD8+ T cells but had no effects on NK cells and B cells in this mouse model. Lenalidomide slightly decreased the number of CD25+Foxp3+ T cells but increased perforin expression in CD8+ T cells in vivo. Using this mouse model for investigation of anti-tumor immune action of lenalidomide, we demonstrated that lenalidomide facilitated a type-1 anti-tumor immune response in vivo. The CD4+ T cell subset may play a critical role in the lenalidomide-mediated anti-myeloma immune response in vivo.

  14. Trastuzumab improves tumor perfusion and vascular delivery of cytotoxic therapy in a murine model of HER2+ breast cancer: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Sorace, Anna G; Quarles, C Chad; Whisenant, Jennifer G; Hanker, Ariella B; McIntyre, J Oliver; Sanchez, Violeta M; Yankeelov, Thomas E

    2016-01-01

    To employ in vivo imaging and histological techniques to identify and quantify vascular changes early in the course of treatment with trastuzumab in a murine model of HER2+ breast cancer. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) was used to quantitatively characterize vessel perfusion/permeability (via the parameter K (trans) ) and the extravascular extracellular volume fraction (v e ) in the BT474 mouse model of HER2+ breast cancer (N = 20) at baseline, day one, and day four following trastuzumab treatment (10 mg/kg). Additional cohorts of mice were used to quantify proliferation (Ki67), microvessel density (CD31), pericyte coverage (α-SMA) by immunohistochemistry (N = 44), and to quantify human VEGF-A expression (N = 29) throughout the course of therapy. Longitudinal assessment of combination doxorubicin ± trastuzumab (N = 42) tested the hypothesis that prior treatment with trastuzumab will increase the efficacy of subsequent doxorubicin therapy. Compared to control tumors, trastuzumab-treated tumors exhibited a significant increase in K (trans) (P = 0.035) on day four, indicating increased perfusion and/or vessel permeability and a simultaneous significant increase in v e (P = 0.01), indicating increased cell death. Immunohistochemical and ELISA analyses revealed that by day four the trastuzumab-treated tumors had a significant increase in vessel maturation index (i.e., the ratio of α-SMA to CD31 staining) compared to controls (P < 0.001) and a significant decrease in VEGF-A (P = 0.03). Additionally, trastuzumab dosing prior to doxorubicin improved the overall effectiveness of the therapies (P < 0.001). This study identifies and validates improved perfusion characteristics following trastuzumab therapy, resulting in an improvement in trastuzumab-doxorubicin combination therapy in a murine model of HER2+ breast cancer. This data suggests properties of vessel maturation. In particular, the use of DCE-MRI, a clinically available imaging

  15. Trastuzumab improves tumor perfusion and vascular delivery of cytotoxic therapy in a murine model of HER2+ breast cancer: preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Quarles, C. Chad; Whisenant, Jennifer G.; Hanker, Ariella B.; McIntyre, J. Oliver; Sanchez, Violeta M.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    To employ in vivo imaging and histological techniques to identify and quantify vascular changes early in the course of treatment with trastuzumab in a murine model of HER2+ breast cancer. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) was used to quantitatively characterize vessel perfusion/permeability (via the parameter Ktrans) and the extravascular extracellular volume fraction (ve) in the BT474 mouse model of HER2+ breast cancer (N = 20) at baseline, day one, and day four following trastuzumab treatment (10 mg/kg). Additional cohorts of mice were used to quantify proliferation (Ki67), microvessel density (CD31), pericyte coverage (α-SMA) by immunohistochemistry (N = 44), and to quantify human VEGF-A expression (N = 29) throughout the course of therapy. Longitudinal assessment of combination doxorubicin ± trastuzumab (N = 42) tested the hypothesis that prior treatment with trastuzumab will increase the efficacy of subsequent doxorubicin therapy. Compared to control tumors, trastuzumab-treated tumors exhibited a significant increase in Ktrans (P = 0.035) on day four, indicating increased perfusion and/or vessel permeability and a simultaneous significant increase in ve (P = 0.01), indicating increased cell death. Immunohistochemical and ELISA analyses revealed that by day four the trastuzumab-treated tumors had a significant increase in vessel maturation index (i.e., the ratio of α-SMA to CD31 staining) compared to controls (P < 0.001) and a significant decrease in VEGF-A (P = 0.03). Additionally, trastuzumab dosing prior to doxorubicin improved the overall effectiveness of the therapies (P < 0.001). This study identifies and validates improved perfusion characteristics following trastuzumab therapy, resulting in an improvement in trastuzumab-doxorubicin combination therapy in a murine model of HER2+ breast cancer. This data suggests properties of vessel maturation. In particular, the use of DCE-MRI, a clinically available imaging method

  16. CXCR3 deficiency enhances tumor progression by promoting macrophage M2 polarization in a murine breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Oghumu, Steve; Varikuti, Sanjay; Terrazas, Cesar; Kotov, Dmitri; Nasser, Mohd W; Powell, Catherine A; Ganju, Ramesh K; Satoskar, Abhay R

    2014-09-01

    Tumor associated macrophages play a vital role in determining the outcome of breast cancer. We investigated the contribution of the chemokine receptor CXCR3 to antitumor immune responses using a cxcr3 deficient mouse orthotopically injected with a PyMT breast cancer cell line. We observed that cxcr3 deficient mice displayed increased IL-4 production and M2 polarization in the tumors and spleens compared to WT mice injected with PyMT cells. This was accompanied by larger tumor development in cxcr3(-/-) than in WT mice. Further, tumor-promoting myeloid derived immune cell populations accumulated in higher proportions in the spleens of cxcr3 deficient mice. Interestingly, cxcr3(-/-) macrophages displayed a deficiency in up-regulating inducible nitric oxide synthase after stimulation by either IFN-γ or PyMT supernatants. Stimulation of bone marrow derived macrophages by PyMT supernatants also resulted in greater induction of arginase-1 in cxcr3(-/-) than WT mice. Further, cxcr3(-/-) T cells activated with CD3/CD28 in vitro produced greater amounts of IL-4 and IL-10 than T cells from WT mice. Our data suggests that a greater predisposition of cxcr3 deficient macrophages towards M2 polarization contributes to an enhanced tumor promoting environment in cxcr3 deficient mice. Although CXCR3 is known to be expressed on some macrophages, this is the first report that demonstrates a role for CXCR3 in macrophage polarization and subsequent breast tumor outcomes. Targeting CXCR3 could be a potential therapeutic approach in the management of breast cancer tumors.

  17. Experimental Transmission of Bighorn Sheep Sinus Tumors to Bighorn Sheep (Ovis canadensis canadensis) and Domestic Sheep.

    PubMed

    Fox, K A; Wootton, S; Marolf, A; Rouse, N; LeVan, I; Spraker, T; Miller, M; Quackenbush, S

    2016-11-01

    Bighorn sheep sinus tumors are a recently described disease affecting the paranasal sinuses of Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis canadensis). Several features of this disease suggest an infectious cause, although a specific etiologic agent has not been identified. To test the hypothesis that bighorn sheep sinus tumors are caused by an infectious agent, we inoculated 4 bighorn sheep lambs and 4 domestic sheep lambs intranasally with a cell-free filtrate derived from a naturally occurring bighorn sheep sinus tumor; we held 1 individual of each species as a control. Within 18 months after inoculation, all 4 inoculated domestic sheep (100%) and 1 of the 4 inoculated bighorn sheep (25%) developed tumors within the ethmoid sinuses or nasal conchae, with features similar to naturally occurring bighorn sheep sinus tumors. Neither of the uninoculated sheep developed tumors. Histologically, the experimentally transmitted tumors were composed of stellate to spindle cells embedded within a myxoid matrix, with marked bone production. Tumor cells stained positively with vimentin, S100, alpha smooth muscle actin, and osteocalcin, suggesting origin from a multipotent mesenchymal cell. A periosteal origin for these tumors is suspected. Immunohistochemical staining for the envelope protein of JSRV (with cross-reactivity to ENTV) was equivocal, and PCR assays specific for these agents were negative.

  18. Metallofullerene-based Nanoplatform for Brain Tumor Brachytherapy and Longitudinal Imaging in a Murine Orthotopic Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, Michael D.; Wilson, John D.; Fuller, Christine E.; Zhang, Jianyuan; Dorn, Harry C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate in an orthotopic xenograft brain tumor model that a functionalized metallofullerene (f-Gd3N@C80) can enable longitudinal tumor imaging and, when radiolabeled with lutetium 177 (177Lu) and tetraazacyclododecane tetraacetic acid (DOTA) (177Lu-DOTA-f-Gd3N@C80), provide an anchor to deliver effective brachytherapy. Materials and Methods: All experiments involving the use of mice were carried out in accordance with protocols approved by the institutional animal care and use committee. Human glioblastoma U87MG cells were implanted by using stereotactic procedures into the brains of 37 female athymic nude-Foxn1nu mice and allowed to develop into a tumor for 8 days. T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed in five mice. Biodistribution studies were performed in 12 mice at four time points over 7 days to evaluate gadolinium content. Survival studies involved 20 mice that received infusion of a nanoplatform by means of convection-enhanced delivery (CED) 8 days after tumor implantation. Mice in survival studies were divided into two groups: one comprised untreated mice that received f-Gd3N@C80 alone and the other comprised mice treated with brachytherapy that received 1.11 MBq of 177Lu-DOTA-f-Gd3N@C80. Survival data were evaluated by using Kaplan-Meier statistical methods. Results: MR imaging showed extended tumor retention (25.6% ± 1.2 of the infused dose at 52 days, confirmed with biodistribution studies) of the f-Gd3N@C80 nanoplatform, which enabled longitudinal imaging. Successful coupling of 177Lu to the f-Gd3N@C80 surface was achieved by using a bifunctional macrocyclic chelator. The extended tumor retention allowed for effective brachytherapy, as indicated by extended survival time (>2.5 times that of the untreated group) and histologic signs of radiation-induced tumor damage. Conclusion: The authors have developed a multimodal nanoplatform and have demonstrated longitudinal tumor imaging, prolonged intratumoral probe

  19. Sexual dimorphism of liver metastasis by murine pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors is affected by expression of complement C5.

    PubMed

    Contractor, Tanupriya; Kobayashi, Shinta; da Silva, Edaise; Clausen, Richard; Chan, Chang; Vosburgh, Evan; Tang, Laura H; Levine, Arnold J; Harris, Chris R

    2016-05-24

    In a mouse model for neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas (PanNETs), liver metastasis occurred at a higher frequency in males. Male mice also had higher serum and intratumoral levels of the innate immunity protein complement C5. In mice that lost the ability to express complement C5, there was a lower frequency of metastasis, and males no longer had a higher frequency of metastasis than females. Treatment with PMX53, a small molecule antagonist of C5aR1/CD88, the receptor for complement C5a, also reduced metastasis. Mice lacking a functional gene for complement C5 had smaller primary tumors, which were less invasive and lacked the CD68+ macrophages that have previously been associated with metastasis in this type of tumor. This is the first report of a gene that causes sexual dimorphism of metastasis in a mouse model. In the human disease, which also shows sexual dimorphism for metastasis, clinically advanced tumors expressed more complement C5 than less advanced tumors.

  20. Anti-Tumor Effects after Adoptive Transfer of IL-12 Transposon-Modified Murine Splenocytes in the OT-I-Melanoma Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Galvan, Daniel L; O'Neil, Richard T; Foster, Aaron E; Huye, Leslie; Bear, Adham; Rooney, Cliona M; Wilson, Matthew H

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of gene modified T cells provides possible immunotherapy for patients with cancers refractory to other treatments. We have previously used the non-viral piggyBac transposon system to gene modify human T cells for potential immunotherapy. However, these previous studies utilized adoptive transfer of modified human T cells to target cancer xenografts in highly immunodeficient (NOD-SCID) mice that do not recapitulate an intact immune system. Currently, only viral vectors have shown efficacy in permanently gene-modifying mouse T cells for immunotherapy applications. Therefore, we sought to determine if piggyBac could effectively gene modify mouse T cells to target cancer cells in a mouse cancer model. We first demonstrated that we could gene modify cells to express murine interleukin-12 (p35/p40 mIL-12), a transgene with proven efficacy in melanoma immunotherapy. The OT-I melanoma mouse model provides a well-established T cell mediated immune response to ovalbumin (OVA) positive B16 melanoma cells. B16/OVA melanoma cells were implanted in wild type C57Bl6 mice. Mouse splenocytes were isolated from C57Bl6 OT-I mice and were gene modified using piggyBac to express luciferase. Adoptive transfer of luciferase-modified OT-I splenocytes demonstrated homing to B16/OVA melanoma tumors in vivo. We next gene-modified OT-I cells to express mIL-12. Adoptive transfer of mIL-12-modified mouse OT-I splenocytes delayed B16/OVA melanoma tumor growth in vivo compared to control OT-I splenocytes and improved mouse survival. Our results demonstrate that the piggyBac transposon system can be used to gene modify splenocytes and mouse T cells for evaluating adoptive immunotherapy strategies in immunocompetent mouse tumor models that may more directly mimic immunotherapy applications in humans.

  1. Ethanol and aloe emodin alter the p53 mutational spectrum in ultraviolet radiation-induced murine skin tumors.

    PubMed

    Badgwell, Donna B; Walker, Christopher M; Baker, Whitney T; Strickland, Faith M

    2004-03-01

    Mutations in the p53 tumor-suppressor gene contribute to the development of skin cancer, and the spectrum of mutations in this gene correlates with specific physical and chemical carcinogens in the environment. Cosmetics may contain alcohols and/or aloe emodin (AE). Although these compounds are not carcinogenic when applied to the skin, they may increase the carcinogenicity of ultraviolet (UV) radiation. We investigated whether ethanol (EtOH) and AE alone or combined with UV radiation cause mutations in the p53 gene. In the absence of UV radiation, C3H/HeN mice chronically treated for up to 33 wk with AE in 25% EtOH-in-water vehicle or vehicle alone failed to develop tumors and had no mutations in exons 4-8 of the p53 gene. UV radiation alone induced skin tumors, which had mutations predominantly in p53 exons 5 and 8. In contrast, mutations arising in UV + EtOH-or UV + AE-treated groups were more broadly distributed throughout the p53 gene. Mutations were found in exons 4, 6, and 7, as well as in exons 5 and 8. This altered distribution of mutations across the p53 DNA sequence more closely resembles the pattern observed in TP53 from human skin tumors at sun-exposed sites than that in the p53 gene of mice treated with UV alone. Thus, treatment with UV radiation in combination with two chemicals not thought to be carcinogenic, alcohol, and AE results in a broader distribution of mutations in a critical tumor-suppressor gene.

  2. SIRT3 Is a Mitochondrial Tumor Suppressor and Genetic Loss Results in a Murine Model for ER/PR-Positive Mammary Tumors Connecting Metabolism and Carcinogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    and determine if these targets are regulated by extracellular stimuli known to activate sirtuin function (e.g., resveratrol ). These targets will... resveratrol or overexpression of a MnSOD gene will prevent increases in ROS in MEFs and/or decrease the development of mammary tumors in Sirt3

  3. Experimental studies of combination of PDT and tumor chemotherapy or 60Co irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didziapetriene, Janina; Prasmickiene, Grazina; Sukeliene, Dalija; Rotomskis, Ricardas; Streckyte, Giedre; Atkocius, Vydmantas; Staciokiene, Laima; Smilgevicius, Valerijus

    1995-01-01

    We present experimental results obtained by combining photodynamic therapy (PDT) with tumor chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Dimethoxyhematoporphyrin (DMHp) and photosan (PS) were used as photosensitizers, pharanoxi and vincristine as antitumor drugs. The therapeutic effect of the combination of PDT and antitumor drugs (pharanoxi, vincristine) slightly increases as compared to the treatment of PDT or antitumor drug alone. The additive therapeutic effect is achieved under the combination of PDT and 60Co irradiation. It seems that the sensitizers DMHp and PS regulate lipid peroxidation in blood serum of experimental animals, which becomes more active under the influence of alkylating antitumor drugs. Therefore, they could protect an organism from negative influence of tumor chemotherapy.

  4. Targeted oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 1 eradicates experimental pancreatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Gayral, Marion; Lulka, Hubert; Hanoun, Naima; Biollay, Coline; Sèlves, Janick; Vignolle-Vidoni, Alix; Berthommé, Hervé; Trempat, Pascal; Epstein, Alberto L; Buscail, Louis; Béjot, Jean-Luc; Cordelier, Pierre

    2015-02-01

    As many other cancers, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) progression is associated with a series of hallmark changes for cancer cells to secure their own growth success. Yet, these very changes render cancer cells highly sensitive to viral infection. A promising strategy may rely on and exploit viral replication for tumor destruction, whereby infection of tumor cells by a replication-conditional virus may lead to cell destruction and simultaneous release of progeny particles that can spread and infect adjacent tumor cells, while sparing healthy tissues. In the present study, we used Myb34.5, a second-generation replication-conditional herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) mutant in which ICP6 gene expression is defective and expression of the HSV-1 γ134.5 gene is regulated by the cellular B-myb promoter. We found that B-myb is present in experimental PDAC and tumors, and is overexpressed in patients' tumors, as compared with normal adjacent pancreas. Myb34.5 replicates to high level in human PDAC cell lines and is associated with cell death by apoptosis. In experimental models of PDAC, mice receiving intratumoral Myb34.5 injections appeared healthy and tumor progression was inhibited, with evidence of tumor necrosis, hemorrhage, viral replication, and cancer cell death by apoptosis. Combining standard-of-care chemotherapy with Myb34.5 successfully led to a very impressive antitumoral effect that is rarely achieved in this experimental model, and resulted in a greater reduction in tumor growth than chemotherapy alone. These promising results warrant further evaluation in early phase clinical trial for patients diagnosed with PDAC for whom no effective treatment is available.

  5. A cytomegalovirus-based vaccine expressing a single tumor-specific CD8+ T-cell epitope delays tumor growth in a murine model of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Klyushnenkova, Elena N; Kouiavskaia, Diana V; Parkins, Christopher J; Caposio, Patrizia; Botto, Sara; Alexander, Richard B; Jarvis, Michael A

    2012-06-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a highly immunogenic virus that results in a persistent, life-long infection in the host typically with no ill effects. Certain unique features of CMV, including its capacity to actively replicate in the presence of strong host CMV-specific immunity, may give CMV an advantage compared with other virus-based vaccine delivery platforms. In the present study, we tested the utility of mouse CMV (mCMV)-based vaccines expressing human prostate-specific antigen (PSA) for prostate cancer immunotherapy in double-transgenic mice expressing PSA and HLA-DRB1*1501 (DR2bxPSA F1 mice). We assessed the capacity of 2 mCMV-based vectors to induce PSA-specific CD8 T-cell responses and affect the growth of PSA-expressing Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of the Mouse Prostate tumors (TRAMP-PSA). In the absence of tumor challenge, immunization with mCMV vectors expressing either a H2-D(b)-restricted epitope PSA(65-73) (mCMV/PSA(65-73)) or the full-length gene for PSA (mCMV/PSA(FL)) induced comparable levels of CD8 T-cell responses that increased (inflated) with time. Upon challenge with TRAMP-PSA tumor cells, animals immunized with mCMV/PSA(65-73) had delay of tumor growth and increased PSA-specific CD8 T-cell responses, whereas animals immunized with mCMV/PSA(FL) showed progressive tumor growth and no increase in number of splenic PSA(65-73)-specific T cells. The data show that a prototype CMV-based prostate cancer vaccine can induce an effective antitumor immune response in a "humanized" double-transgenic mouse model. The observation that mCMV/PSA(FL) is not effective against TRAMP-PSA is consistent with our previous findings that HLA-DRB1*1501-restricted immune responses to PSA are associated with suppression of effective CD8 T-cell responses to TRAMP-PSA tumors.

  6. The EP1 receptor for prostaglandin E2 promotes the development and progression of malignant murine skin tumors

    PubMed Central

    Surh, Inok; Rundhaug, Joyce E.; Pavone, Amy; Mikulec, Carol; Abel, Erika; Simper, Melissa; Fischer, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    High levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis resulting from the upregulation of COX-2 has been shown to be critical for the development of non-melanoma skin tumors. This effect of PGE2 is likely mediated by one or more of its 4 G-protein coupled membrane receptors, EP1–4. A previous study showed that BK5.EP1 transgenic mice produced more carcinomas than wild type (WT) mice using initiation/promotion protocols, although the tumor response was dependent on the type of tumor promoter used. In this study, a single topical application of either 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) or benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), alone, was found to elicit squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) in the BK5.EP1 transgenic mice, but not in WT mice. While the epidermis of both WT and transgenic mice was hyperplastic several days after DMBA, this effect regressed in the WT mice while proliferation continued in the transgenic mice. Several parameters associated with carcinogen initiation were measured and were found to be similar between genotypes, including CYP1B1 and aromatase expression, B[a]P adduct formation, Ras activity and keratinocyte stem cell numbers. However, EP1 transgene expression elevated COX-2 levels in the epidermis and SCC could be completely prevented in DMBA-treated BK5.EP1 mice either by feeding the selective COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib in their diet or by crossing them onto a COX-2 null background. These data suggest that the tumor promoting/progressing effects of EP1 require the PGE2 synthesized by COX-2. PMID:21739481

  7. Intratesticular expression of mRNAs of both interferon γ and tumor necrosis factor α is significantly increased in experimental autoimmune orchitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Terayama, Hayato; Naito, Munekazu; Qu, Ning; Hirai, Shuichi; Kitaoka, Miyuki; Ogawa, Yuki; Itoh, Masahiro

    2011-04-01

    Experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) is one of the models of immunological male infertility. Murine EAO is CD4+T cell-dependent and classically induced by immunization with a testicular homogenate and adjuvants. We previously established that immunization with viable syngeneic testicular germ cells (TGC) can also induce murine EAO with no use of any adjuvant. Analyses of this EAO model have already revealed that cultured spleen cells of immunized mice secreted interferon (IFN)-γ and that treatment of the immunized mice with anti-IFN-γ monoclonal antibodies significantly suppressed the EAO. It is known that both IFN-γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α are representative cytokines of Th1 cells and exhibit local toxicity toward the seminiferous epithelium in vivo. However, changes in these two cytokines in EAO-affected testes have not yet been investigated. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the expression of intratesticular IFN-γ and TNF- α mRNAs in TGC-induced EAO using real-time RT-PCR. The results demonstrated that the intratesticular mRNAs for both IFN-γ and TNF-α significantly increased, while other cytokines such as IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6 and TGF-β did not show dramatic changes in the immunized mice. These results suggest that secretion of significant amounts of IFN-γ and TNF-α in situ contributes to the spermatogenic disturbance in EAO.

  8. Comparison of iron oxide nanoparticle and microwave hyperthermia alone or combined with cisplatinum in murine breast tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petryk, Alicia A.; Stigliano, Robert V.; Giustini, Andrew J.; Gottesman, Rachel E.; Trembly, B. S.; Kaufman, Peter A.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2011-03-01

    Surgery, radiation and chemotherapy are currently the most commonly used cancer therapies. Hyperthermia has been shown to work effectively with radiation and chemotherapy cancer treatments. The major obstacle faced by previous hyperthermia techniques has been the inability to deliver heat to the tumor in a precise manner. The ability to deliver cytotoxic hyperthermia to tumors (from within individual cells) via iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (mNP) is a promising new technology that has the ability to greatly improve the therapeutic ratio of hyperthermia as an individual modality and as an adjuvant therapy in combination with other modalities. Although the parameters have yet to be conclusively defined, preliminary data suggests mNP hyperthermia can achieve greater cytotoxicity (in vitro) than conventional water bath hyperthermia methods. At this time, our theory is that intracellular nanoparticle heating is more effective in achieving the combined effect than extracellular heating techniques.1 However, understanding the importance of mNP association and uptake is critical in understanding the potential novelty of the heating modality. Our preliminary data suggests that the mNP heating technique, which did not provide time for particle uptake by the cells, resulted in similar efficacy to microwave hyperthermia. mNP hyperthermia/cisplatinum results have shown a tumor growth delay greater than either modality alone at comparable doses.

  9. Distribution of anionic sites on the capillary endothelium in an experimental brain tumor model.

    PubMed

    Vincent, S; DePace, D; Finkelstein, S

    1988-02-01

    The distribution of anionic domains on the capillary endothelium of experimental brain tumors was determined using cationic ferritin (CF) in order to ascertain whether the pattern of these domains is different from that on normal cerebral capillaries. Tumors were induced by stereotaxic injection of cultured neoplastic glial cells, A15A5, into the caudate nucleus of Sprague-Dawley rats. Following a 14-21 day growth period tumors appeared as vascularized, sharply circumscribed masses which caused compression of the surrounding brain tissue. Anionic domains were distributed in a patchy and irregular pattern on the luminal plasma membrane of the endothelia of blood vessels in the tumors. Some variability in this pattern was observed infrequently in limited regions of the tumor where there was either a continuous layer of CF or an absence of CF binding. Plasmalemmal vesicles, coated vesicles, coated pits, multivesicular bodies, and some junctional complexes showed varying degrees of labeling with the probe. Capillaries in the tumor periphery and normal cerebral vessels showed a uniform distribution of anionic groups. These results indicate that there is an altered surface charge on the endothelial luminal plasma membrane of blood vessels in brain tumors. A correlation may exist between the altered surface charge and the degree to which the blood-brain barrier is impaired in these vessels.

  10. Inhibitory effect of sesquiterpene lactones from Saussurea lappa on tumor necrosis factor-alpha production in murine macrophage-like cells.

    PubMed

    Cho, J Y; Park, J; Yoo, E S; Baik, K U; Jung, J H; Lee, J; Park, M H

    1998-10-01

    Total methanol extract of Saussurea lappa radix (Compositae) showed potent inhibitory effect on the production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), a proinflammatory cytokine, in murine macrophage-like cell (RAW264.7 cells) in our previous screening studies on 120 Korean medicinal plants. The activity-guided purification of the plant resulted in the isolation of three components. The chemical structures of the components isolated were established by spectroscopic analyses as sesquiterpene lactones [cynaropicrin (1), reynosin (2), and santamarine (3)]. These three compounds inhibited TNF-alpha production in a dose-dependent manner. The molar concentrations of cynaropicrin, reynosin, and santamarine producing 50% inhibition (IC50) of TNF-alpha production were 2.86 micrograms/ml (8.24 microM), 21.7 micrograms/ml (87.4 microM), and 26.2 micrograms/ml (105 microM), respectively. However, treatment with sulphydryl (SH) compounds such as L-cysteine, dithiothreitol, and 2-mercaptoethanol abrogated the inhibitory effect of cynaropicrin on TNF-alpha production. Therefore, we conclude that the principal inhibitory component of Saussurea lappa is cynaropicrin and its inhibitory effect is mediated through conjugation with SH-groups of target proteins.

  11. Antitumor activity of orally administered maitake α-glucan by stimulating antitumor immune response in murine tumor

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Yuki; Nakayama, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Akihiro; Naito, Kenta; Konishi, Morichika

    2017-01-01

    Maitake α-glucan, YM-2A, isolated from Grifola frondosa, has been characterized as a highly α-1,6-branched α-1,4 glucan. YM-2A has been shown to possess an anti-virus effect in mice; however, it does not directly inhibit growth of the virus in vitro, indicating that the anti-virus effect of YM-2A might be associated with modulation of the host immune system. In this study, we found that oral administration of YM-2A could inhibit tumor growth and improve survival rate in two distinct mouse models of colon-26 carcinoma and B16 melanoma. Orally administered YM-2A enhanced antitumor immune response by increasing INF-γ-expressing CD4+ and CD8+ cells in the spleen and INF-γ-expressing CD8+ cells in tumor-draining lymph nodes. In vitro study showed that YM-2A directly activated splenic CD11b+ myeloid cells, peritoneal macrophages and bone marrow-derived dendritic cells, but did not affect splenic CD11b- lymphocytes or colon-26 tumor cells. YM-2A is more slowly digested by pancreatic α-amylase than are amylopectin and rabbit liver glycogen, and orally administered YM-2A enhanced the expression of MHC class II and CD86 on dendritic cells and the expression of MHC class II on macrophages in Peyer’s patches. Furthermore, in vitro stimulation of YM-2A increased the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in Peyer’s patch CD11c+ cells. These results suggest that orally administered YM-2A can activate dendritic cells and macrophages in Peyer’s patches, inducing systemic antitumor T-cell response. Thus, YM-2A might be a candidate for an oral therapeutic agent in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:28278221

  12. Hepatitis C Virus-Induced Cancer Stem Cell-Like Signatures in Cell Culture and Murine Tumor Xenografts▿

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Naushad; Allam, Heba; May, Randal; Sureban, Sripathi M.; Bronze, Michael S.; Bader, Ted; Umar, Shahid; Anant, Srikant; Houchen, Courtney W.

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a prominent risk factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Similar to most solid tumors, HCCs are believed to contain poorly differentiated cancer stem cell-like cells (CSCs) that initiate tumorigenesis and confer resistance to chemotherapy. In these studies, we demonstrate that the expression of an HCV subgenomic replicon in cultured cells results in the acquisition of CSC traits. These traits include enhanced expression of doublecortin and CaM kinase-like-1 (DCAMKL-1), Lgr5, CD133, α-fetoprotein, cytokeratin-19 (CK19), Lin28, and c-Myc. Conversely, curing of the replicon from these cells results in diminished expression of these factors. The putative stem cell marker DCAMKL-1 is also elevated in response to the overexpression of a cassette of pluripotency factors. The DCAMKL-1-positive cells isolated from hepatoma cell lines by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) form spheroids in Matrigel. The HCV RNA abundance and NS5B levels are significantly reduced by the small interfering RNA (siRNA)-led depletion of DCAMKL-1. We further demonstrate that HCV replicon-expressing cells initiate distinct tumor phenotypes compared to the tumors initiated by parent cells lacking the replicon. This HCV-induced phenotype is characterized by high-level expression/coexpression of DCAMKL-1, CK19, α-fetoprotein, and active c-Src. The results obtained by the analysis of liver tissues from HCV-positive patients and liver tissue microarrays reiterate these observations. In conclusion, chronic HCV infection appears to predispose cells toward the path of acquiring cancer stem cell-like traits by inducing DCAMKL-1 and hepatic progenitor and stem cell-related factors. DCAMKL-1 also represents a novel cellular target for combating HCV-induced hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:21937640

  13. Murine responses to recombinant MVA versus ALVAC vaccines against tumor-associated antigens, gp100 and 5T4.

    PubMed

    Hanwell, David G; McNeil, Bryan; Visan, Lucian; Rodrigues, Lauren; Dunn, Pamela; Shewen, Patricia E; Macallum, Grace E; Turner, Patricia V; Vogel, Thorsten U

    2013-05-01

    Virally vectored cancer vaccines comprise a new form of immunotherapy that aim to generate anti-tumor immune responses with potential for tumor clearance and enhanced patient survival. Here, we compared 2 replication-deficient poxviruses modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) and ALVAC(2) in their ability to induce antigen expression and immunogenicity of the tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) 5T4 and gp100. To facilitate the comparison, recombinant MVA-gp100M and ALVAC(2)-5T4 were constructed to complement existing ALVAC(2)-gp100M and MVA-5T4 vectors. Recombinant TAA expression in chicken embryo fibroblast cells was confirmed by Western blot analysis. 5T4 expression was approximately equal for both viruses, whereas ALVAC-derived gp100 was quickly degraded, at a time point when MVA-derived gp100 was still stable and expressed at high levels. Human leukocyte antigen-A2 transgenic mice were vaccinated with recombinant viruses and the CD8 T-cell responses elicited against each TAA were monitored by interferon-γ enzyme-linked immunospot. No 5T4 peptide responses were detected using splenocytes from mice vaccinated with either vector, whereas vaccination with MVA elicited a significantly higher gp100-specific response than ALVAC(2) at 10 PFU (P<0.001). In CD-1 mice, each vector elicited similar 5T4 antibody responses, whereas MVA was more potent and induced gp100 antibody responses at a lower immunization dose than ALVAC (P<0.001). In this study, immunogenicity varied depending on the viral vector used and reflected vector-associated differences in in vitro TAA expression and stability. These findings suggest that novel vector-transgene combinations must be assessed individually when designing vaccines, and that stability of vector-encoded proteins produced in vitro may be useful as a predictor for in vitro immunogenicity.

  14. Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha-Induced Recruitment of Inflammatory Mononuclear Cells Leads to Inflammation and Altered Brain Development in Murine Cytomegalovirus-Infected Newborn Mice.

    PubMed

    Seleme, Maria C; Kosmac, Kate; Jonjic, Stipan; Britt, William J

    2017-04-15

    Congenital human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is a significant cause of abnormal neurodevelopment and long-term neurological sequelae in infants and children. Resident cell populations of the developing brain have been suggested to be more susceptible to virus-induced cytopathology, a pathway thought to contribute to the clinical outcomes following intrauterine HCMV infection. However, recent findings in a newborn mouse model of the infection in the developing brain have indicated that elevated levels of proinflammatory mediators leading to mononuclear cell activation and recruitment could underlie the abnormal neurodevelopment. In this study, we demonstrate that treatment with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-neutralizing antibodies decreased the frequency of CD45(+) Ly6C(hi) CD11b(+) CCR2(+) activated myeloid mononuclear cells (MMCs) and the levels of proinflammatory cytokines in the blood and the brains of murine CMV-infected mice. This treatment also normalized neurodevelopment in infected mice without significantly impacting the level of virus replication. These results indicate that TNF-α is a major component of the inflammatory response associated with altered neurodevelopment that follows murine CMV infection of the developing brain and that a subset of peripheral blood myeloid mononuclear cells represent a key effector cell population in this model of virus-induced inflammatory disease of the developing brain.IMPORTANCE Congenital human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is the most common viral infection of the developing human fetus and can result in neurodevelopmental sequelae. Mechanisms of disease leading to neurodevelopmental deficits in infected infants remain undefined, but postulated pathways include loss of neuronal progenitor cells, damage to the developing vascular system of the brain, and altered cellular positioning. Direct virus-mediated cytopathic effects cannot explain the phenotypes of brain damage in most infected infants. Using a

  15. Canonical Wnt Signaling Drives Tumor-Like Lesions from Sox2-Positive Precursors of the Murine Olfactory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Nils W.; Neumann, Julia E.; Ahlfeld, Julia; Wefers, Annika K.; Merk, Daniel J.; Ohli, Jasmin

    2016-01-01

    Canonical Wnt signaling is known to promote proliferation of olfactory stem cells. In order to investigate the effects of a constitutive activation of Wnt signaling in Sox2-positive precursor cells of the olfactory epithelium, we used transgenic mice that allowed an inducible deletion of exon 3 of the Ctnnb1 gene, which is responsible for the phosphorylation and degradation of Ctnnb1 protein. After induction of aberrant Wnt activation by Ctnnb1 deletion at embryonic day 14, such mice developed tumor-like lesions in upper parts of the nasal cavity. We still observed areas of epithelial hyperplasia within the olfactory epithelium following early postnatal Wnt activation, but the olfactory epithelial architecture remained unaffected in most parts when Wnt was activated at postnatal day 21 or later. In summary, our results suggest an age-dependent tumorigenic potential of aberrant Wnt signaling in the olfactory epithelium of mice. PMID:27902722

  16. Compatibility of the Linear-Quadratic Formalism and Biologically Effective Dose Concept to High-Dose-Per-Fraction Irradiation in a Murine Tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Otsuka, Shinya; Shibamoto, Yuta; Iwata, Hiromitsu; Murata, Rumi; Sugie, Chikao; Ito, Masato; Ogino, Hiroyuki

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the compliance of linear-quadratic (LQ) model calculations in the high-dose range as used in stereotactic irradiation in a murine tumor model. Methods and Materials: Female 10-week-old Balb/c mice bearing 1-cm-diameter EMT6 tumors in the hind legs were used. Single doses of 10-25 Gy were compared with 2-5 fractions of 4-13 Gy given at 4-hour intervals. Cell survival after irradiation was determined by an in vivo-in vitro assay. Using an {alpha}/{beta} ratio determined for in vitro EMT6 cells and the LQ formalism, equivalent single doses for the hypofractionated doses were calculated. They were then compared with actually measured equivalent single doses for the hypofractionated doses. These fractionation schedules were also compared simultaneously to investigate the concordance/divergence of dose-survival curves plotted against actual radiation doses and biologically effective doses (BED). Results: Equivalent single doses for hypofractionated doses calculated from LQ formalism were lower than actually measured doses by 21%-31% in the 2- or 3-fraction experiments and by 27%-42% in the 4- or 5-fraction experiments. The differences were all significant. When a higher {alpha}/{beta} ratio was assumed, the discrepancy became smaller. In direct comparison of the 2- to 5-fraction schedules, respective dose-response curves almost overlapped when cell survival was plotted against actual radiation doses. However, the curves tended to shift downward by increasing the fraction number when cell survival was plotted against BED calculated using an {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 3.5 Gy for in vitro EMT6 cells. Conclusion: Conversion of hypofractionated radiation doses to single doses using the LQ formalism underestimated the in vivo effect of hypofractionated radiation by approximately 20%-40%. The discrepancy appeared to be larger than that seen in the previous in vitro study and tended to increase with the fraction number. BED appeared to be an unreliable measure

  17. Blood flow in an experimental rat brain tumor by tissue equilibration and indicator fractionation.

    PubMed

    Graham, M M; Spence, A M; Abbott, G L; O'Gorman, L; Muzi, M

    1987-01-01

    The tissue equilibration technique (Kety) was compared with the indicator fractionation technique for the measurement of blood flow to normal brain and an experimental brain tumor in the rat. The tumor was a cloned astrocytic glioma implanted in the cerebral hemisphere of F-344 rats. I-125 Iodoantipyrine, using a rising infusion for one minute, was used for the tissue equilibration technique. C-14 butanol, injected as a bolus 8 seconds before sacrifice, was used for the indicator fractionation technique. Samples were assayed using liquid scintillation counting and the iodoantipyrine results were regressed against the butanol results. For normal tissue R = 0.832, SEE = 0.115 ml/g/min, and Slope = 0.626. For tumor R = 0.796, SEE = 0.070 ml/g/min, and Slope = 0.441. The iodoantipyrine tissue/blood partition coefficient for normal hemisphere (gray and white matter) was 0.861 +/-0.037 (SD) and for tumor was 0.876 +/-0.042. The indicator fractionation technique with C-14 butanol underestimated blood flow in a consistent manner, probably because of incomplete extraction, early washout of activity from tissue and from evaporation of butanol during processing. Our experiments revealed no differences between tumor and normal brain tissue that might invalidate the comparison of iodoantipyrine blood flow results in brain tumors and surrounding normal brain.

  18. Chemopreventive effects of Cuminum cyminum in chemically induced forestomach and uterine cervix tumors in murine model systems.

    PubMed

    Gagandeep; Dhanalakshmi, Sivanandhan; Méndiz, Ester; Rao, Agra Ramesha; Kale, Raosaheb Kathalupant

    2003-01-01

    Lately, a strong correlation has been established between diet and cancer. For ages, cumin has been a part of the diet. It is a popular spice regularly used as a flavoring agent in a number of ethnic cousins. In the present study, cancer chemopreventive potentials of different doses of a cumin seed-mixed diet were evaluated against benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P]-induced forestomach tumorigenesis and 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA)-induced uterine cervix tumorigenesis. Results showed a significant inhibition of stomach tumor burden (tumors per mouse) by cumin. Tumor burden was 7.33 +/- 2.10 in the B(a)P-treated control group, whereas it reduced to 3.10 +/- 0.57 (P < 0.001) by a 2.5% dose and 3.11 +/- 0.60 (P <0.001) by a 5% dose of cumin seeds. Cervical carcinoma incidence, compared with the MCA-treated control group (66.67%), reduced to 27.27% (P < 0.05) by a diet of 5% cumin seeds and to 12.50% (P < 0.05) by a diet of 7.5% cumin seeds. The effect of 2.5 and 5% cumin seed-mixed diets was also examined on carcinogen/xenobiotic metabolizing phase I and phase II enzymes, antioxidant enzymes, glutathione content, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and lipid peroxidation in the liver of Swiss albino mice. Levels of cytochrome P-450 (cyt P-450) and cytochrome b5 (cyt b(5)) were significantly augmented (P < 0.05) by the 2.5% dose of cumin seed diet. The levels of cyt P-450 reductase and cyt b(5) reductase were increased (significance level being from P < 0.05 to P < 0.01) by both doses of cumin. Among the phase II enzymes, glutathione S-transferase specific activity increased (P < 0.005) by the 5% dose, whereas that of DT-diaphorase increased significantly (P < 0.05) by both doses used (2.5 and 5%). In the antioxidant system, significant elevation of the specific activities of superoxide dismutase (P < 0.01) and catalase (P < 0.05) was observed with the 5% dose of cumin. The activities of glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase remained unaltered by both doses of cumin. The level

  19. Colocalization of aromatase in spinal cord astrocytes: Differences in expression and relationship to mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in murine models of a painful and a non-painful bone tumor

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Elaine E; Smeester, Branden A; Michlitsch, Kyle S; Lee, Jang-Hern; Beitz, Alvin J

    2015-01-01

    While spinal cord astrocytes play a key role in the generation of cancer pain, there have been no studies that have examined the relationship of tumor-induced astrocyte activation and aromatase expression during the development of cancer pain. Here, we examined tumor-induced mechanical hyperalgesia and cold allodynia, and changes in GFAP and aromatase expression in murine models of painful and non-painful bone cancer. We demonstrate that implantation of fibrosarcoma cells, but not melanoma cells, produces robust mechanical hyperalgesia and cold allodynia in tumor-bearing mice compared to saline-injected controls. Secondly, this increase in mechanical hyperalgesia and cold allodynia is mirrored by significant increases in both spinal astrocyte activity and aromatase expression in the dorsal horn of fibrosarcoma-bearing mice. Importantly, we show that aromatase is only found within a subset of astrocytes and not in neurons in the lumbar spinal cord. Finally, administration of an aromatase inhibitor reduced tumor-induced hyperalgesia in fibrosarcoma-bearing animals. We conclude that a painful fibrosarcoma tumor induces a significant increase in spinal astrocyte activation and aromatase expression and that the up-regulation of aromatase plays a role in the development of bone tumor-induced hyperalgesia. Since spinal aromatase is also upregulated, but to a lesser extent, in non-painful melanoma bone tumors, it may also be neuroprotective and responsive to the changing tumor environment. PMID:26071956

  20. Garlic (Allium sativum) stimulates lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha production from J774A.1 murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sung, Jessica; Harfouche, Youssef; De La Cruz, Melissa; Zamora, Martha P; Liu, Yan; Rego, James A; Buckley, Nancy E

    2015-02-01

    Garlic (Allium sativum) is known to have many beneficial attributes such as antimicrobial, antiatherosclerotic, antitumorigenetic, and immunomodulatory properties. In the present study, we investigated the effects of an aqueous garlic extract on macrophage cytokine production by challenging the macrophage J774A.1 cell line with the garlic extract in the absence or presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) under different conditions. The effect of allicin, the major component of crushed garlic, was also investigated. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, it was found that garlic and synthetic allicin greatly stimulated tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) production in macrophages treated with LPS. The TNF-α secretion levels peaked earlier and were sustained for a longer time in cells treated with garlic and LPS compared with cells treated with LPS alone. Garlic acted in a time-dependent manner. We suggest that garlic, at least partially via its allicin component, acts downstream from LPS to stimulate macrophage TNF-α secretion.

  1. First-in-Human Phase 1 Trial of Agarose Beads Containing Murine RENCA Cells in Advanced Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Barry H.; Parikh, Tapan; Andrada, Zoe P.; Fahey, Thomas J.; Berman, Nathaniel; Wiles, Madeline; Nazarian, Angelica; Thomas, Joanne; Arreglado, Anna; Akahoho, Eugene; Wolf, David J.; Levine, Daniel M.; Parker, Thomas S.; Gazda, Lawrence S.; Ocean, Allyson J.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Agarose macrobeads containing mouse renal adenocarcinoma cells (RMBs) release factors, suppressing the growth of cancer cells and prolonging survival in spontaneous or induced tumor animals, mediated, in part, by increased levels of myocyte-enhancing factor (MEF2D) via EGFR-and AKT-signaling pathways. The primary objective of this study was to determine the safety of RMBs in advanced, treatment-resistant metastatic cancers, and then its efficacy (survival), which is the secondary objective. METHODS Thirty-one patients underwent up to four intraperitoneal implantations of RMBs (8 or 16 macrobeads/kg) via laparoscopy in this single-arm trial (FDA BB-IND 10091; NCT 00283075). Serial physical examinations, laboratory testing, and PET-CT imaging were performed before and three months after each implant. RESULTS RMBs were well tolerated at both dose levels (mean 660.9 per implant). AEs were (Grade 1/2) with no treatment-related SAEs. CONCLUSION The data support the safety of RMB therapy in advanced-malignancy patients, and the preliminary evidence for their potential efficacy is encouraging. A Phase 2 efficacy trial is ongoing. PMID:27499645

  2. Antitumor efficacy of interleukin-2 alone and in combination with adriamycin and dacarbazine in murine solid tumor systems.

    PubMed

    LoRusso, P M; Aukerman, S L; Polin, L; Redman, B G; Valdivieso, M; Biernat, L; Corbett, T H

    1990-09-15

    Recombinant interleukin-2 (IL-2)/chemotherapy combinations have recently entered clinical trial. The rationale for sequencing has primarily been empiric or based on in vitro data. To establish in vivo models for chemoimmunotherapy trials, we investigated IL-2 alone and in combination with dacarbazine (DTIC) and adriamycin. IL-2 (as a single agent given i.v. at 1-3 x 10(5) Cetus units once daily for 5 days, repeated 7-10 days later), was highly active against an immunogenic line of colon adenocarcinoma no. 11/A [tumor growth inhibition (T/C) = 0% with cures]. It was modestly active against colon adenocarcinoma no. 38 (T/C = 39%), mammary adenocarcinoma no. 16/C (T/C = 18%), and B16 melanoma (T/C = 21%). IL-2 was inactive against colon adenocarcinoma no. 7/A (T/C = 83%). Combination trials were done using DTIC and IL-2 against colon no. 7/A and upstaged colon no. 11/A. The combination of adriamycin and IL-2 was tested against mammary adenocarcinoma no. 16/C. In the DTIC/IL-2 combination trials, the combination was superior over either agent used alone. In the IL-2/adriamycin trials, the combination was no better than adriamycin alone at optimum dosages.

  3. NLRP3 inflammasome as a target of berberine in experimental murine liver injury: interference with P2X7 signalling.

    PubMed

    Vivoli, Elisa; Cappon, Andrea; Milani, Stefano; Piombanti, Benedetta; Provenzano, Angela; Novo, Erica; Masi, Alessio; Navari, Nadia; Narducci, Roberto; Mannaioni, Guido; Moneti, Gloriano; Oliveira, Claudia P; Parola, Maurizio; Marra, Fabio

    2016-10-01

    Berberine (BRB) is commonly used in herbal medicine, but its mechanisms of action are poorly understood. In the present study, we tested BRB in steatohepatitis induced by a methionine- and choline-deficient (MCD) diet, in acute acetaminophen intoxication and in cultured murine macrophages. BRB markedly improved parameters of liver injury and necroinflammation induced by the MCD diet, although increased mortality was observed by mechanisms independent of bacterial infections or plasma levels of BRB. The MCD diet induced up-regulation of all components of the NLRP3 (NACHT, LRR and PYD domain-containing protein 3) inflammasome, and increased hepatic levels of mature IL-1β (interleukin 1β). All of these parameters were significantly reduced in mice treated with BRB. In mice administered an acetaminophen overdose, a model dependent on inflammasome activation, BRB reduced mortality and ALT (alanine aminotransferase) elevation, and limited the expression of inflammasome components. In vitro, LPS (lipopolysaccharide)-induced activation of NLRP3 inflammasome in RAW264.7 murine macrophages was markedly decreased by pre-incubation with BRB. BRB significantly limited the activation of the purinergic receptor P2X7, involved in the late phases of inflammasome activation. Upon P2X7 knockdown, the ability of BRB to block LPS-induced secretion of IL-1β was lost. These data indicate that administration of BRB ameliorates inflammation and injury in two unrelated murine models of liver damage. We demonstrate for the first time that BRB interferes with activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome pathway in vivo and in vitro, through a mechanism based on interference with activation of P2X7, a purinergic receptor involved in inflammasome activation.

  4. Targeted Inhibition of Heat Shock Protein 90 Suppresses Tumor Necrosis Factor–α and Ameliorates Murine Intestinal Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Colm B.; Strassheim, Derek; Aherne, Carol M.; Yeckes, Alyson R.; Jedlicka, Paul; de Zoeten, Edwin F.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are chronic intestinal inflammatory diseases thought to reflect a dysregulated immune response. Although antibody-based inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) has provided relief to many inflammatory bowel diseases patients, these therapies are either ineffective in a patient subset or lose their efficacy over time, leaving an unmet need for alternatives. Given the critical role of the heat shock response in regulating inflammation, this study proposed to define the impact of selective inhibition of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) on intestinal inflammation. Using multiple preclinical mouse models of inflammatory bowel diseases, we demonstrate a potent anti-inflammatory effect of selective inhibition of the HSP90 C-terminal ATPase using the compound novobiocin. Novobiocin-attenuated dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis and CD45RBhigh adoptive-transfer colitis through the suppression of inflammatory cytokine secretion, including TNF-α. In vitro assays demonstrate that CD4+ T cells treated with novobiocin produced significantly less TNF-α measured by intracellular cytokine staining and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. This corresponded to significantly decreased nuclear p65 translocation by Western blot and a decrease in nuclear factor-κB luciferase activity in Jurkat T cells. Finally, to verify the anti-TNF action of novobiocin, 20-week-old TNFΔARE mice were treated for 2 weeks with subcutaneous administration of novobiocin. This model has high levels of circulating TNF-α and exhibits spontaneous transmural segmental ileitis. Novobiocin treatment significantly reduced inflammatory cell infiltrate in the ileal lamina propria. HSP90 inhibition with novobiocin offers a novel method of inflammatory cytokine suppression without potential for the development of tolerance that limits current antibody-based methods. PMID:24552830

  5. ED-110, a novel indolocarbazole, prevents the growth of experimental tumors in mice.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, H; Iguchi, T; Yoshinari, T; Kojiri, K; Suda, H; Okura, A

    1993-05-01

    A new indolocarbazole compound, ED-110, which was obtained by glucosylating a microbial product (BE-13793C) and is a potent topoisomerase I inhibitor, showed characteristic inhibitory effects on the growth of 12 human tumor cell lines tested. The IC50 values of ED-110 against 9 of the 12 lines ranged from 11.5 micrograms/ml to 0.07 microgram/ml, while the remaining 3 lines were quite resistant (IC50, > 100 micrograms/ml). In in vivo experiments, i.p. treatment with ED-110 increased the survival period by more than two-fold in mice implanted i.p. with P388, L1210, L5178Y or EL4 murine leukemic cells. The minimum effective dose increasing the life-span of mice bearing P388 leukemia by 25% was < 2.5 mg/kg/day x 10 and the maximum tolerated dose was > 160 mg/kg/day x 10. ED-110 was also effective against the spontaneous metastasis of mouse Meth A fibrosarcoma cells and the growth of xenografted MKN-45 human stomach cancer cells as well as s.c. implanted mouse colon 26 and IMC carcinoma cells. These results indicated that ED-110 may have potential as a new antineoplastic agent with a large chemotherapeutic index and a wide range of effective doses.

  6. A high affinity HSF-1 binding site in the 5'-untranslated region of the murine tumor necrosis factor-alpha gene is a transcriptional repressor.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ishwar S; He, Ju-Ren; Calderwood, Stuart; Hasday, Jeffrey D

    2002-02-15

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) is a pivotal early mediator of host defenses that is essential for survival in infections. We previously reported that exposing macrophages to febrile range temperatures (FRT) (38.5-40 degrees C) markedly attenuates TNFalpha expression by causing abrupt and premature cessation of transcription. We showed that this inhibitory effect of FRT is mediated by an alternatively activated repressor form of heat shock factor 1 (HSF-1) and that a fragment of the TNFalpha gene comprising a minimal 85-nucleotide (nt) proximal promoter and the 138-nt 5'-untranslated region (UTR) was sufficient for mediating this effect. In the present study we have used an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) to identify a high affinity binding site for HSF-1 in the 5'-UTR of the TNFalpha gene and have used a chromosome immunoprecipitation assay to show that HSF-1 binds to this region of the endogenous TNFalpha gene. Mutational inactivation of this site blocks the inhibitory effect of overexpressed HSF-1 on activity of the minimal TNFalpha promoter (-85/+138) in Raw 264.7 murine macrophages, identifying this site as an HSF-1-dependent repressor. However, the same mutation fails to block repression of a full-length (-1080/+138) TNFalpha promoter construct by HSF-1 overexpression, and HSF-1 binds to upstream sequences in the regions -1080/-845, -533/-196, and -326/-39 nt in EMSA, suggesting that additional HSF-1-dependent repressor elements are present upstream of the minimal -85-nt promoter. Furthermore, although mutation of the HSF-1 binding site in the minimal TNFalpha promoter construct abrogates HSF-1-mediated repression, the same mutation fails to abrogate repression of this construct by high levels of HSF-1 overexpression or exposure to 39.5 degrees C. This suggests that HSF-1 might repress TNFalpha transcription through redundant mechanisms, some of which might not require high affinity binding of HSF-1.

  7. Mechanisms for virus-induced liver disease: tumor necrosis factor-mediated pathology independent of natural killer and T cells during murine cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Orange, J S; Salazar-Mather, T P; Opal, S M; Biron, C A

    1997-01-01

    The contribution of endogenous NK cells and cytokines to virus-induced liver pathology was evaluated during murine cytomegalovirus infections of mice. In immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice, the virus induced a self-limited liver disease characterized by hepatitis, with focal inflammation, and large grossly visible subcapsular necrotic foci. The inflammatory foci were most numerous and contained the greatest number of cells 3 days after infection; they colocalized with areas of viral antigen expression. The largest number of necrotic foci was found 2 days after infection. Overall hepatic damage, assessed as increased expression of liver enzymes in serum, accompanied the development of inflammatory and necrotic foci. Experiments with neutralizing antibodies demonstrated that although virus-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF) can have antiviral effects, it also mediated significant liver pathology. TNF was required for development of hepatic necrotic foci and increased levels of liver enzymes in serum but not for increased numbers of inflammatory foci. The necrotic foci and liver enzyme indications of pathology occurred independently of NK and T cells, because mice rendered NK-cell deficient by treatment with antibodies, T- and B-cell-deficient Rag-/- mice, and NK- and T-cell-deficient E26 mice all manifested both parameters of disease. Development of necrotic foci and maximally increased levels of liver enzymes in serum also were TNF dependent in NK-cell-deficient mice. Moreover, in the immunodeficient E26 mice, virus-induced liver disease was progressive, with eventual death of the host, and neutralization of TNF significantly increased longevity. These results establish conditions separating hepatitis from significant liver damage and demonstrate a cytokine-mediated component to viral pathogenesis. PMID:9371583

  8. Conventional murine gene targeting.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Albert G; Sun, Yue

    2013-01-01

    Murine gene knockout models engineered over the last two decades have continued to demonstrate their potential as invaluable tools in understanding the role of gene function in the context of normal human development and disease. The more recent elucidation of the human and mouse genomes through sequencing has opened up the capability to elucidate the function of every human gene. State-of-the-art mouse model generation allows, through a multitude of experimental steps requiring careful standardization, gene function to be reliably and predictably ablated in a live model system. The application of these standardized methodologies to directly target gene function through murine gene knockout has to date provided comprehensive and verifiable genetic models that have contributed tremendously to our understanding of the cellular and molecular pathways underlying normal and disease states in humans. The ensuing chapter provides an overview of the latest steps and procedures required to ablate gene function in a murine model.

  9. Efficacy of amoxycillin-clavulanate in an experimental model of murine pneumonia caused by AmpC-non-hyperproducing clinical isolates of Escherichia coli resistant to cefoxitin.

    PubMed

    Docobo-Pérez, F; Fernández-Cuenca, F; Pachón-Ibáñez, M E; Pascual, A; Pichardo, C; Martínez-Martínez, L; Pachón, J

    2008-06-01

    The algorithms included in most automated systems used for antimicrobial susceptibility testing (e.g., Vitek 2) consider that Escherichia coli isolates resistant to cefoxitin are AmpC-hyperproducers and, consequently, resistant also to amoxycillin-clavulanate. However, a recent study revealed that 30% of E. coli clinical isolates resistant to cefoxitin remained susceptible in vitro to amoxycillin-clavulanate. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the in-vivo efficacy of amoxycillin-clavulanate in the treatment of an experimental model of pneumonia, using two clonally related isolates (with identical repetitive extragenic palindromic sequence (REP)-PCR patterns) of AmpC-non-hyperproducing and OmpF-lacking E. coli (Ec985 and Ec571) that were resistant to cefoxitin and susceptible to cefotaxime and amoxycillin-clavulanate. MICs were determined using a microdilution technique, and in-vitro bactericidal activity was tested using time-kill assays. The in-vivo efficacy of amoxycillin, amoxycillin-clavulanate and cefotaxime against both isolates was tested in a murine pneumonia model using immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice. Ec571 (a TEM-1/2 producer) was resistant to amoxycillin, whereas Ec985 (a TEM-1/2 non-producer) was susceptible. Amoxycillin, amoxycillin-clavulanate and cefotaxime were bactericidal for Ec985, and amoxycillin-clavulanate and cefotaxime were bactericidal for Ec571 at different concentrations and time-points, as determined using time-kill assays. Treatment with amoxycillin, amoxycillin-clavulanate and cefotaxime reduced the bacterial lung concentration of Ec985 compared with non-treated controls (p <0.05), whereas amoxycillin-clavulanate and cefotaxime showed efficacy against Ec571 when compared with the control and amoxycillin groups (p <0.05). Regardless of the exact underlying mechanism(s) of resistance, amoxycillin-clavulanate was effective in the experimental murine model in the treatment of pneumonia caused by AmpC-non-hyperproducing strains of E

  10. The Brucella abortus Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase is required for optimal resistance to oxidative killing by murine macrophages and wild-type virulence in experimentally infected mice.

    PubMed

    Gee, Jason M; Valderas, Michelle Wright; Kovach, Michael E; Grippe, Vanessa K; Robertson, Gregory T; Ng, Wai-Leung; Richardson, John M; Winkler, Malcolm E; Roop, R Martin

    2005-05-01

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoretic analysis of cell lysates from Brucella abortus 2308 and the isogenic hfq mutant Hfq3 revealed that the RNA binding protein Hfq (also known as host factor I or HF-I) is required for the optimal stationary phase production of the periplasmic Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase SodC. An isogenic sodC mutant, designated MEK2, was constructed from B. abortus 2308 by gene replacement, and the sodC mutant exhibited much greater susceptibility to killing by O(2)(-) generated by pyrogallol and the xanthine oxidase reaction than the parental 2308 strain supporting a role for SodC in protecting this bacterium from O(2)(-) of exogenous origin. The B. abortus sodC mutant was also found to be much more sensitive to killing by cultured resident peritoneal macrophages from C57BL6J mice than 2308, and the attenuation displayed by MEK2 in cultured murine macrophages was enhanced when these phagocytes were treated with gamma interferon (IFN-gamma). The attenuation displayed by the B. abortus sodC mutant in both resting and IFN-gamma-activated macrophages was alleviated, however, when these host cells were treated with the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin. Consistent with its increased susceptibility to killing by cultured murine macrophages, the B. abortus sodC mutant also displayed significant attenuation in experimentally infected C57BL6J mice compared to the parental strain. These experimental findings indicate that SodC protects B. abortus 2308 from the respiratory burst of host macrophages. They also suggest that reduced SodC levels may contribute to the attenuation displayed by the B. abortus hfq mutant Hfq3 in the mouse model.

  11. Bromocriptine induces parapoptosis as the main type of cell death responsible for experimental pituitary tumor shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Palmeri, Claudia Mariela; Petiti, Juan Pablo; Sosa, Liliana del Valle; Gutiérrez, Silvina; De Paul, Ana Lucía; Mukdsi, Jorge Humberto; Torres, Alicia Inés

    2009-10-01

    Bromocriptine (Bc) produces pituitary tumoral mass regression which induces the cellular death that was classically described as apoptosis. However, recent works have related that other mechanisms of cell death could also be involved in the maintenance of physiological and pathological pituitary homeostasis. The aim of this study was to evaluate and characterize the different types of cell death in the involution induced by Bc in experimental rat pituitary tumors. The current study demonstrated that Bc induced an effective regression of estrogen induced pituitary tumors by a mechanism identified as parapoptosis. This alternative cell death was ultrastructurally recognized by extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization and an increased cell electron density, represented around 25% of the total pituitary cells counted. Furthermore, the results obtained from biochemical assays did not correspond to the criteria of apoptosis or necrosis. We also investigated the participation of p38, ERK1/2 and PKC delta in the parapoptotic pathway. An important observation was the significant increase in phosphorylated forms of these MAPKs, the holoenzyme and catalytic fragments of PKC delta in nuclear fractions after Bc administration compared to control and estrogen treated rats. Furthermore, the immunolocalization at ultrastructural level of these kinases showed a similar distribution pattern, with a prevalent localization at nuclear level in lactotrophs from Bc treated rats. In summary, we determined that parapoptosis is the predominant cell death type involved in the regression of pituitary tumors in response to Bc treatment, and may cause the activation of PKC delta, ERK1/2 and p38.

  12. Bromocriptine induces parapoptosis as the main type of cell death responsible for experimental pituitary tumor shrinkage

    SciTech Connect

    Palmeri, Claudia Mariela Petiti, Juan Pablo; Valle Sosa, Liliana del; Gutierrez, Silvina; Paul, Ana Lucia de; Mukdsi, Jorge Humberto; Torres, Alicia Ines

    2009-10-01

    Bromocriptine (Bc) produces pituitary tumoral mass regression which induces the cellular death that was classically described as apoptosis. However, recent works have related that other mechanisms of cell death could also be involved in the maintenance of physiological and pathological pituitary homeostasis. The aim of this study was to evaluate and characterize the different types of cell death in the involution induced by Bc in experimental rat pituitary tumors. The current study demonstrated that Bc induced an effective regression of estrogen induced pituitary tumors by a mechanism identified as parapoptosis. This alternative cell death was ultrastructurally recognized by extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization and an increased cell electron density, represented around 25% of the total pituitary cells counted. Furthermore, the results obtained from biochemical assays did not correspond to the criteria of apoptosis or necrosis. We also investigated the participation of p38, ERK1/2 and PKC{delta} in the parapoptotic pathway. An important observation was the significant increase in phosphorylated forms of these MAPKs, the holoenzyme and catalytic fragments of PKC{delta} in nuclear fractions after Bc administration compared to control and estrogen treated rats. Furthermore, the immunolocalization at ultrastructural level of these kinases showed a similar distribution pattern, with a prevalent localization at nuclear level in lactotrophs from Bc treated rats. In summary, we determined that parapoptosis is the predominant cell death type involved in the regression of pituitary tumors in response to Bc treatment, and may cause the activation of PKC{delta}, ERK1/2 and p38.

  13. Tropism of the in situ growth from biopsies of childhood neuroectodermal tumors following transplantation into experimental teratoma.

    PubMed

    Jamil, Seema; Hultman, Isabell; Cedervall, Jessica; Ali, Rouknuddin Q; Fuchs, Gabriel; Gustavsson, Bengt; Asmundsson, Jurate; Sandstedt, Bengt; Kogner, Per; Ährlund-Richter, Lars

    2014-04-01

    Experimental teratoma induced from human pluripotent stem cells with normal karyotype can be described as a failed embryonic process and includes besides advanced organoid development also large elements of tissue with a prolonged occurrence of immature neural components. Such immature components, although benign, exhibit strong morphological resemblance with tumors of embryonic neuroectodermal origin. Here, we demonstrate that biopsy material from childhood tumors of neural embryonic origin transplanted to mature experimental teratoma can show an exclusive preference for matching tissue. Tumor specimens from five children with; Supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumor (sPNET); Pilocytic astrocytoma of the brainstem; Classic medulloblastoma; peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor (pPNET) or neuroblastoma (NB), respectively, were transplanted. Analysis of up to 120 sections of each tumor revealed an engraftment for three of the transplanted tumors: pPNET, sPNET, and NB, with a protruding growth from the latter two that were selected for detailed examination. The histology revealed a strict tropism with a non-random integration into what morphologically appeared as matched embryonic microenvironment recuperating the patient tumor histology. The findings suggest specific advantages over xenotransplantation and lead us to propose that transplantation to the human embryonic microenvironment in experimental teratoma can be a well-needed complement for preclinical in vivo studies of childhood neuroectodermal tumors.

  14. Classical Mathematical Models for Description and Prediction of Experimental Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Benzekry, Sébastien; Lamont, Clare; Beheshti, Afshin; Tracz, Amanda; Ebos, John M. L.; Hlatky, Lynn; Hahnfeldt, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Despite internal complexity, tumor growth kinetics follow relatively simple laws that can be expressed as mathematical models. To explore this further, quantitative analysis of the most classical of these were performed. The models were assessed against data from two in vivo experimental systems: an ectopic syngeneic tumor (Lewis lung carcinoma) and an orthotopically xenografted human breast carcinoma. The goals were threefold: 1) to determine a statistical model for description of the measurement error, 2) to establish the descriptive power of each model, using several goodness-of-fit metrics and a study of parametric identifiability, and 3) to assess the models' ability to forecast future tumor growth. The models included in the study comprised the exponential, exponential-linear, power law, Gompertz, logistic, generalized logistic, von Bertalanffy and a model with dynamic carrying capacity. For the breast data, the dynamics were best captured by the Gompertz and exponential-linear models. The latter also exhibited the highest predictive power, with excellent prediction scores (≥80%) extending out as far as 12 days in the future. For the lung data, the Gompertz and power law models provided the most parsimonious and parametrically identifiable description. However, not one of the models was able to achieve a substantial prediction rate (≥70%) beyond the next day data point. In this context, adjunction of a priori information on the parameter distribution led to considerable improvement. For instance, forecast success rates went from 14.9% to 62.7% when using the power law model to predict the full future tumor growth curves, using just three data points. These results not only have important implications for biological theories of tumor growth and the use of mathematical modeling in preclinical anti-cancer drug investigations, but also may assist in defining how mathematical models could serve as potential prognostic tools in the clinic. PMID:25167199

  15. Implementation and experimental results of 4D tumor tracking using robotic couch

    SciTech Connect

    Buzurovic, I.; Yu, Y.; Werner-Wasik, M.; Biswas, T.; Anne, P. R.; Dicker, A. P.; Podder, T. K.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: This study presents the implementation and experimental results of a novel technique for 4D tumor tracking using a commercially available and commonly used treatment couch and evaluates the tumor tracking accuracy in clinical settings. Methods: Commercially available couch is capable of positioning the patient accurately; however, currently there is no provision for compensating physiological movement using the treatment couch in real-time. In this paper, a real-time couch tracking control technique is presented together with experimental results in tumor motion compensation in four dimensions (superior-inferior, lateral, anterior-posterior, and time). To implement real-time couch motion for tracking, a novel control system for the treatment couch was developed. The primary functional requirements for this novel technique were: (a) the treatment couch should maintain all previous/normal features for patient setup and positioning, (b) the new control system should be used as a parallel system when tumor tracking would be deployed, and (c) tracking could be performed in a single direction and/or concurrently in all three directions of the couch motion (longitudinal, lateral, and vertical). To the authors' best knowledge, the implementation of such technique to a regular treatment couch for tumor tracking has not been reported so far. To evaluate the performance of the tracking couch, we investigated the mechanical characteristics of the system such as system positioning resolution, repeatability, accuracy, and tracking performance. Performance of the tracking system was evaluated using dosimetric test as an endpoint. To investigate the accuracy of real-time tracking in the clinical setting, the existing clinical treatment couch was replaced with our experimental couch and the linear accelerator was used to deliver 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans with and without tracking. The results of

  16. Modulation of biochemical parameters by Hemidesmus indicus in cumene hydroperoxide-induced murine skin: possible role in protection against free radicals-induced cutaneous oxidative stress and tumor promotion.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Sarwat; Khan, Naghma; Sharma, Sonia; Alam, Aftab

    2003-03-01

    Hemidesmus indicus has been shown to possess significant activity against immunotoxicity and other pharmacological and physiological disorders. In this communication, we have shown the modulating effect of H. indicus on cumene hydroperoxide-mediated cutaneous oxidative stress and tumor promotion response in murine skin. Cumene hydroperoxide treatment (30 mg per animal) increased cutaneous microsomal lipid peroxidation and induction of xanthine oxidase activity which are accompanied by decrease in the activities of cutaneous antioxidant enzymes and depletion in the level of glutathione. Parallel to these changes a sharp decrease in the activities of phase II metabolizing enzymes was observed. Cumene hydroperoxide treatment also induced the ornithine decarboxylase activity and enhanced the [3H]-thymidine uptake in DNA synthesis in murine skin. Application of ethanolic extract of H. indicus at a dose level of 1.5 and 3.0mg/kg body weight in acetone prior to that of cumene hydroperoxide treatment resulted in significant inhibition of cumene hydroperoxide-induced cutaneous oxidative stress, epidermal ornithine decarboxylase activity and enhanced DNA synthesis in a dose-dependent manner. Enhanced susceptibility of cutaneous microsomal membrane for lipid peroxidation and xanthine oxidase activity were significantly reduced (P<0.01). In addition the depleted level of glutathione, inhibited activities of antioxidants and phase II metabolizing enzymes were recovered to significant level (P<0.05). In summary, our data suggest that H. indicus is an effective chemopreventive agent in skin and capable of ameliorating hydroperoxide-induced cutaneous oxidative stress and tumor promotion.

  17. 5′-AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Supports the Growth of Aggressive Experimental Human Breast Cancer Tumors*

    PubMed Central

    Laderoute, Keith R.; Calaoagan, Joy M.; Chao, Wan-ru; Dinh, Dominc; Denko, Nicholas; Duellman, Sarah; Kalra, Jessica; Liu, Xiaohe; Papandreou, Ioanna; Sambucetti, Lidia; Boros, Laszlo G.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid tumor growth can establish metabolically stressed microenvironments that activate 5′-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a ubiquitous regulator of ATP homeostasis. Previously, we investigated the importance of AMPK for the growth of experimental tumors prepared from HRAS-transformed mouse embryo fibroblasts and for primary brain tumor development in a rat model of neurocarcinogenesis. Here, we used triple-negative human breast cancer cells in which AMPK activity had been knocked down to investigate the contribution of AMPK to experimental tumor growth and core glucose metabolism. We found that AMPK supports the growth of fast-growing orthotopic tumors prepared from MDA-MB-231 and DU4475 breast cancer cells but had no effect on the proliferation or survival of these cells in culture. We used in vitro and in vivo metabolic profiling with [13C]glucose tracers to investigate the contribution of AMPK to core glucose metabolism in MDA-MB-231 cells, which have a Warburg metabolic phenotype; these experiments indicated that AMPK supports tumor glucose metabolism in part through positive regulation of glycolysis and the nonoxidative pentose phosphate cycle. We also found that AMPK activity in the MDA-MB-231 tumors could systemically perturb glucose homeostasis in sensitive normal tissues (liver and pancreas). Overall, our findings suggest that the contribution of AMPK to the growth of aggressive experimental tumors has a critical microenvironmental component that involves specific regulation of core glucose metabolism. PMID:24993821

  18. A natural diterpenoid kamebacetal A with anti-tumor activity: Theoretical and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Tang, Fu-ming; Zhang, Yi-Heng; Chen, Zhong

    2010-06-01

    Kamebacetal A ( 1) is an ent-kaurane diterpenoid isolated from Isodon racemosa (Hemsl) Hara. This natural product exhibits significant cytotoxicity against human Bel-7402 and HO-8910 tumor cells. The geometrical conformation of 1 has been optimized at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d) level of theory. The results indicated that the calculated geometric parameters are close to the X-ray crystal structure. The theoretical 13C NMR chemical shifts of 1 were also calculated at the GIAO-B3LYP level of theory with different basis sets. The calculated NMR chemical shifts are in closer agreement with the experimental results. A molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) map was used in an attempt to identify key features of the kamebacetal A to account for its anti-tumor activity. MEP investigations reveal that compound 1, which shows anti-tumor activity, possesses electron-rich regions that extend over the hydroxyl and carbonyl groups of compound 1. The data generated in this study is valuable as it provides an insight into kamebacetal A molecular and structure-activity relationships.

  19. Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... plants (aflatoxins) Excessive sunlight exposure Genetic problems Obesity Radiation exposure Viruses Types of tumors known to be caused by or linked with viruses are: Cervical cancer (human papillomavirus) Most anal cancers (human papillomavirus) Some throat ...

  20. Does Carica papaya leaf-extract increase the platelet count? An experimental study in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Dharmarathna, Sinhalagoda Lekamlage Chandi Asoka; Wickramasinghe, Susiji; Waduge, Roshitha Nilmini; Rajapakse, Rajapakse Peramune Veddikkarage Jayanthe; Kularatne, Senanayake Abeysinghe Mudiyanselage

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the potential role of fresh Carica papaya (C. papaya) leaf extract on haematological and biochemical parameters and toxicological changes in a murine model. Methods In total 36 mice were used for the trial. Fresh C. papaya leaf extract [0.2 mL (2 g)/mouse] was given only to the test group (18 mice). General behavior, clinical signs and feeding patterns were recorded. Blood and tissue samples were collected at intervals. Haematological parameters including platelet, red blood cell (RBC), white blood cell (WBC), packed cell volume (PCV), serum biochemistry including serum creatinine, serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT) and serum glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (SGPT) were determined. Organs for possible histopathological changes were examined. Results Neither group exhibited alteration of behavior or reduction in food and water intake. Similarly, no significant changes in SGOT, SGPT and serum creatinine levels were detected in the test group. Histopathological organ changes were not observed in either group of mice except in three liver samples of the test group which had a mild focal necrosis. The platelet count (11.33±0.35)×105/µL (P=0.000 04) and the RBC count (7.97±0.61)×106/µL (P=0.000 03) were significantly increased in the test group compared to that of the controls. However, WBC count and PCV (%) values were not changed significantly in the test group. The platelet count in the test group started to increase significantly from Day 3 (3.4±0.18×105/µL), reaching almost a fourfold higher at Day 21 (11.3×105/µL), while it was 3.8×105/µL and 5.5×105/µL at Day 3 and Day 21 respectively in the control. Likewise, the RBC count in the test group increased from 6×106/µL to 9×106/ µL at Day 21 while it remained near constant in the control group (6×106/µL). Conclusions Fresh C. papaya leaf extract significantly increased the platelet and RBC counts in the test group as compared to controls. Therefore, it is very

  1. Plecanatide and dolcanatide, novel guanylate cyclase-C agonists, ameliorate gastrointestinal inflammation in experimental models of murine colitis

    PubMed Central

    Shailubhai, Kunwar; Palejwala, Vaseem; Arjunan, Krishna Priya; Saykhedkar, Sayali; Nefsky, Bradley; Foss, John A; Comiskey, Stephen; Jacob, Gary S; Plevy, Scott E

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of orally administered plecanatide or dolcanatide, analogs of uroguanylin, on amelioration of colitis in murine models. METHODS: The cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) stimulatory potency of plecanatide and dolcanatide was measured using a human colon carcinoma T84 cell-based assay. For animal studies all test agents were formulated in phosphate buffered saline. Sulfasalazine or 5-amino salicylic acid (5-ASA) served as positive controls. Effect of oral treatment with test agents on amelioration of acute colitis induced either by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in drinking water or by rectal instillation of trinitrobenzene sulfonic (TNBS) acid, was examined in BALB/c and/or BDF1 mice. Additionally, the effect of orally administered plecanatide on the spontaneous colitis in T-cell receptor alpha knockout (TCRα-/-) mice was also examined. Amelioration of colitis was assessed by monitoring severity of colitis, disease activity index and by histopathology. Frozen colon tissues were used to measure myeloperoxidase activity. RESULTS: Plecanatide and dolcanatide are structurally related analogs of uroguanylin, which is an endogenous ligand of guanylate cyclase-C (GC-C). As expected from the agonists of GC-C, both plecanatide and dolcanatide exhibited potent cGMP-stimulatory activity in T84 cells. Once-daily treatment by oral gavage with either of these analogs (0.05-0.5 mg/kg) ameliorated colitis in both DSS and TNBS-induced models of acute colitis, as assessed by body weight, reduction in colitis severity (P < 0.05) and disease activity index (P < 0.05). Amelioration of colitis by either of the drug candidates was comparable to that achieved by orally administered sulfasalazine or 5-ASA. Plecanatide also effectively ameliorated colitis in TCRα-/- mice, a model of spontaneous colitis. As dolcanatide exhibited higher resistance to proteolysis in simulated gastric and intestinal juices, it was selected for further studies. CONCLUSION: This is

  2. Action of hexachlorobenzene on tumor growth and metastasis in different experimental models

    SciTech Connect

    Pontillo, Carolina Andrea; Rojas, Paola; Chiappini, Florencia; Sequeira, Gonzalo; Cocca, Claudia; Crocci, Máximo; Colombo, Lucas; Lanari, Claudia; and others

    2013-05-01

    Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) is a widespread organochlorine pesticide, considered a possible human carcinogen. It is a dioxin-like compound and a weak ligand of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We have found that HCB activates c-Src/HER1/STAT5b and HER1/ERK1/2 signaling pathways and cell migration, in an AhR-dependent manner in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro the effect of HCB (0.005, 0.05, 0.5, 5 μM) on cell invasion and metalloproteases (MMPs) 2 and 9 activation in MDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, we examined in vivo the effect of HCB (0.3, 3, 30 mg/kg b.w.) on tumor growth, MMP2 and MMP9 expression, and metastasis using MDA-MB-231 xenografts and two syngeneic mouse breast cancer models (spontaneous metastasis using C4-HI and lung experimental metastasis using LM3). Our results show that HCB (5 μM) enhances MMP2 expression, as well as cell invasion, through AhR, c-Src/HER1 pathway and MMPs. Moreover, HCB increases MMP9 expression, secretion and activity through a HER1 and AhR-dependent mechanism, in MDA-MB-231 cells. HCB (0.3 and 3 mg/kg b.w.) enhances subcutaneous tumor growth in MDA-MB-231 and C4-HI in vivo models. In vivo, using MDA-MB-231 model, the pesticide (0.3, 3 and 30 mg/kg b.w.) activated c-Src, HER1, STAT5b, and ERK1/2 signaling pathways and increased MMP2 and MMP9 protein levels. Furthermore, we observed that HCB stimulated lung metastasis regardless the tumor hormone-receptor status. Our findings suggest that HCB may be a risk factor for human breast cancer progression. - Highlights: ► HCB enhances MMP2 and MMP9 expression and cell invasion in MDA-MB-231, in vitro. ► HCB-effects are mediated through AhR, HER1 and/or c-Src. ► HCB increases subcutaneous tumor growth in MDA-MB-231 and C4-HI in vivo models. ► HCB activates c-Src/HER1 pathway and increases MMPs levels in MDA-MB-231 tumors. ► HCB stimulates lung metastasis in C4-HI and LM3 in vivo models.

  3. Murine Typhus

    PubMed Central

    Dzul-Rosado, Karla R; Zavala Velázquez, Jorge Ernesto; Zavala-Castro, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Rickettsia typhi: is an intracellular bacteria who causes murine typhus. His importance is reflected in the high frequency founding specific antibodies against Rickettsia typhi in several worldwide seroepidemiological studies, the seroprevalence ranging between 3-36%. Natural reservoirs of R. typhi are rats (some species belonging the Rattus Genus) and fleas (Xenopsylla cheopis) are his vector. This infection is associated with overcrowding, pollution and poor hygiene. Typically presents fever, headache, rash on trunk and extremities, in some cases may occur organ-specific complications, affecting liver, kidney, lung or brain. Initially the disease is very similar to other diseases, is very common to confuse the murine typhus with Dengue fever, therefore, ignorance of the disease is a factor related to complications or non-specific treatments for the resolution of this infection. This paper presents the most relevant information to consider about the rickettsiosis caused by Rickettsia typhi. PMID:24893060

  4. Effects of an epidermal growth factor receptor-based cancer vaccine on wound healing and inflammation processes in murine experimental models.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Dasha; Chacón, Lewis; Casacó, Angel; Ledón, Nuris; Fernández, Nidia; Iglesias, Arianna; Hernández, Diana R; Sánchez, Belinda; Pérez, Rolando

    2014-02-01

    Anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) therapies have been proven clinically effective for a variety of epithelial tumours. Vaccination of mice with the extracellular domain (ECD) of autologous EGFR overcomes the tolerance to self-EGFR and has antimetastatic effect on EGFR+ tumour. Because EGF/EGFR-signalling plays an important role in the inflammation stage of wound healing, the main objective of this study was to explore the possible role of murine (m) EGFR-ECD vaccine in the croton-oil-induced ear oedema and wound healing process in mice as autologous experimental models, mimicking the possible post-surgical wound complication in patients treated with human EGFR-ECD/VSSP vaccine. Mice were intramuscularly immunised four times; biweekly with the mEGFR-ECD/VSSP/Mont. Seven days later, an 8 mm diameter, full-thickness skin wound was created on the back of each animal. Immunisation induced a strong specific humoral response against the mEGFR-ECD protein and a DTH dose-response curve but interestingly, animals treated with mEGFR-ECD/VSSP/Mont had similar inflammatory and healing speed responses compared to control ones. These data suggest that application of mEGFR-ECD/VSSP vaccine as a therapeutic approach in cancer patients could not elicit a poor healing process after surgery.

  5. Effect of Topical Administration of Fractions and Isolated Molecules from Plant Extracts on Skin Wound Healing: A Systematic Review of Murine Experimental Models

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Fernanda Barbosa; Pinto, Marcus Vinicius Mello; Sartori, Sirlene Souza Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose. Skin wound healing is a dynamic process driven by molecular events responsible for the morphofunctional repair of the injured tissue. In a systematic review, we analyzed the relevance of plant fractions and isolates on skin wound healing. By revising preclinical investigations with murine models, we investigated if the current evidence could support clinical trials. Methods. Studies were selected in the MEDLINE/PubMed and Scopus databases according to the PRISMA statement. All 32 identified studies were submitted to data extraction and the methodological bias was investigated according to ARRIVE strategy. Results. The studies demonstrated that plant fractions and isolates are able to modulate the inflammatory process during skin wound healing, being also effective in attenuating the oxidative tissue damage in the scar tissue and stimulating cell proliferation, neoangiogenesis, collagen synthesis, granulation tissue expansion, reepithelialization, and the wound closure rate. However, we identified serious methodological flaws in all studies, such as the high level of reporting bias and absence of standardized experimental designs, analytical methods, and outcome measures. Conclusion. Considering these limitations, the current evidence generated from flawed methodological animal studies makes it difficult to determine the relevance of herbal medicines to treat skin wounds and derails conducting clinical studies. PMID:27829707

  6. Essential pathogenic role for endogenous interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) during disease onset phase of murine experimental autoimmune orchitis. I. In vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Itoh, M; Yano, A; Xie, Q; Iwahashi, K; Takeuchi, Y; Meroni, P L; Nicoletti, F

    1998-03-01

    We previously found that immunization of CH3/He male mice with syngeneic testicular germ cells (TGC) without the aid of any adjuvants was sufficient to induce DTH to TGC and experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO). To evaluate the role of endogenous IFN-gamma in this model, C3H/He mice immunized subcutaneously with TGC on days 0 and 14 received a single injection of anti-murine IFN-gamma MoAb on day 15, 20 or 25. On day 45, DTH to TGC was tested, testis specimens were collected for histological examination, and blood samples collected for IFN-gamma measurement. The results showed that whilst MoAb treatment on day 15 or 25 did not influence DTH responses, EAO development, and appearance of IFN-gamma in the circulation, treatment on day 20 significantly suppressed all of them. Thus, a single injection with anti-IFN-gamma MoAb may successfully down-regulate testicular autoimmunity, provided that the treatment is given at an optimal time point during disease development.

  7. Handheld confocal laser endomicroscopic imaging utilizing tumor-specific fluorescent labeling to identify experimental glioma cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Martirosyan, Nikolay L.; Georges, Joseph; Kalani, M. Yashar S.; Nakaji, Peter; Spetzler, Robert F.; Feuerstein, Burt G.; Preul, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: We have reported that handheld confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) can be used with various nonspecific fluorescent dyes to improve the microscopic identification of brain tumor and its boundaries. Here, we show that CLE can be used experimentally with tumor-specific fluorescent labeling to define glioma margins in vivo. Methods: Thirteen rats underwent craniectomy and in vivo imaging 21 days after implantation with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled U251 (n = 7) cells or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpressing F98 cells (n = 6). Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) conjugated EGFR fluorescent antibody (FITC-EGFR) was applied for contrast in F98 tumors. Confocal images of normal brain, obvious tumor, and peritumoral zones were collected using the CLE system. Bench-top confocal microscopy and hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections were correlated with CLE images. Results: GFP and FITC-EGFR fluorescence of glioma cells were detected by in vivo visible-wavelength fluorescence CLE. CLE of GFP-labeled tumors revealed bright individual satellite tumor cells within peritumoral tissue, a definitive tumor border, and subcellular structures. Imaging with FITC-EGFR labeling provided weaker contrast in F98-EGFR tumors but was able to delineate tumor cells. Imaging with both methods in various tumor regions correlated with standard confocal imaging and clinical histology. Conclusions: These data suggest that in vivo CLE of selectively tagged neoplasms could allow specific interactive identification of tumoral areas. Imaging of GFP and FITC-EGFR provides real-time histologic information precisely related to the site of microscopic imaging of tumor. PMID:28144472

  8. Tumor-Targeted Nanomedicines

    PubMed Central

    ElBayoumi, Tamer A.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The efficacy of drug delivery systems can be enhanced by making them target-specific via the attachment of various ligands. We attempted to enhance tumor accumulation and therapeutic effect of doxorubicin-loaded long-circulating PEGylated liposomes (Doxil®, ALZA Corp.) by coupling to their surface the anti-cancer monoclonal antibody 2C5 (mAb 2C5) with nuclesome (NS)-restricted activity, that can recognize the surface of various tumor but not normal cells and specifically targets pharmaceutical carriers to tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. Following earlier in vitro results with various cancer cell lines, the mAb 2C5-liposomes were studied in vivo vs. plain and non-specific IgG-liposomes. Experimental design Antibody coupling to Doxil® was performed via the “post-insertion” technique. Using 111In-labeled liposomes, the tissue biodistribution and pharmacokinetic profile were studied, as well as their accumulation in tumors in mice was followed by the whole-body γ-scintigraphic imaging. Therapeutic efficacy of mAb 2C5-targeted Doxil® vs. non-specific IgG-modified and original Doxil® controls was followed by registering live tumor growth and determining tumor weights upon mice sacrifice. Results mAb2C5 antibody-targeted liposomes demonstrate enhanced accumulation in tumors, and the in vivo therapeutic activity of the mAb 2C5-Doxil® treatment was found to be significantly superior, resulting in final tumor weights of only 25-40% compared to all Doxil® control treatments, when tested against the subcutaneous primary murine tumors of 4T1 and C26 and human PC3 tumor in nude mice. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the remarkable capability of 2C5-targeted Doxil® to specifically deliver its cargo into various tumors significantly increasing the efficacy of therapy. PMID:19276264

  9. Optimization of chitosan nanoparticles for colon tumors using experimental design methodology.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anekant; Jain, Sanjay K

    2016-12-01

    Purpose Colon-specific drug delivery systems (CDDS) can improve the bio-availability of drugs through the oral route. A novel formulation for oral administration using ligand coupled chitosan nanoparticles bearing 5-Flurouracil (5FU) encapsulated in enteric coated pellets has been investigated for CDDS. Method The effect of polymer concentration, drug concentration, stirring time and stirring speed on the encapsulation efficiency, and size of nanoparticles were evaluated. The best (or optimum) formulation was obtained by response surface methodology. Using the experimental data, analysis of variance has been carried out to evolve linear empirical models. Using a new methodology, polynomial models have been evolved and the parametric analysis has been carried out. In order to target nanoparticles to the hyaluronic acid (HA) receptors present on colon tumors, HA coupled nanoparticles were tested for their efficacy in vivo. The HA coupled nanoparticles were encapsulated in pellets and were enteric coated to release the drug in the colon. Results Drug release studies under conditions of mimicking stomach to colon transit have shown that the drug was protected from being released in the physiological environment of the stomach and small intestine. The relatively high local drug concentration with prolonged exposure time provides a potential to enhance anti-tumor efficacy with low systemic toxicity for the treatment of colon cancer. Conclusions Conclusively, HA coupled nanoparticles can be considered as the potential candidate for targeted drug delivery and are anticipated to be promising in the treatment of colorectal cancer.

  10. Desferal (DFO) induced Ga-67 washout from normal tissue, tumor and abscess in experimental animals

    SciTech Connect

    Oster, Z.H.; Som, P.; Atkins, H.L.; Brill, A.B.

    1980-01-01

    In the experimental animal, desferal (DFO) given intravenously washes out Ga-67 from all tissues. This effect is not uniform: blood activity is reduced very markedly, while liver activity is less affected. Maximal effect of DFO occurs if given close to the Ga-67 injection. When the time interval between the two is increased, the absolute amount of Ga-67 excreted in the urine in excess of the spontaneous excretion is reduced. Administration of DFO does not effect Ga-67 gastrointestinal excretion. In three animal tumor models (EMT-6 sarcoma in Balb/c mice, spontaneous adenocarcinoma in mice, and spontaneous adenocarcinoma in the rabbit) and in sterile abscess-bearing rats, the administration of DFO 24 hrs after Ga-67-citrate improves significantly the target-to-nontarget ratio. Animals given 50 mg/kg DFO I.V. after Ga-67 citrate showed a significant reduction in the whole-body activity as seen in a one-week follow up.

  11. Laser-induced hyperthemia in the treatment of ocular tumors: experimental evaluation of temperature rise in rabbits' eyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svaasand, Lars O.; Morinelli, Elisa; Gomer, Charles J.

    1990-08-01

    Experimental results for the optical properties of ocular tumors in the red to near infrared region from 600-900 nm and at the near infrared wavelength of 1064 nm are presented. The tumor models have been human retinoblastoma heterotransplanted in athyinic mice and B16 melanotic melanoma in athymic mice. The steady state retinal and tumor temperature rise during 1064 nm laser irradiation have been examined in vivo in normal albino and pigmented rabbits eye and in Greene''s melanoma inoculated in the retinachoroidal layers. 2.

  12. The efficacy of hydro alcoholic extract of Seidlitzia rosmarinus on experimental zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis lesions in murine model

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Maryam; Fata, Abdolmajid; Khamesipour, Ali; Rakhshandeh, Hasan; Miramin Mohammadi, Akram; Salehi, Ghodratollah; Monavari, Hadi

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Leishmaniasis is one of the most important parasitic infectious diseases in the world. Since last century, many efforts have been made to control and treat the disease, but appropriate vaccines, pesticides and medicines are not available or even eligible. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of hydro-alcoholic extract of Seidlitzia rosmarinus on the lesions of experimental Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (CL) in Balb/c mice. Materials and Methods: The population study was 60 Ballb/c mice which divided to 6 groups, all infected with Leishmania major [MRHO/75/IR]. Soon after the ulcer started to appear in the early stage, a dose of provided herbal extract with 5, 10 and 15% concentration applied on each lesion. The surface area of the lesions measured during an interval of 10 days. Direct Giemsa stained smears prepared two and four weeks after treatment. Results: Increasing the mean size of the lesions was statistically significant compared to those in control group (p>0.001). Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL) developed in all of the mice including the control group that received Eucerine alone. Survival rate in group receiving 15% S. rosmarinus extracts showed significantly higher compared to mice in control group (p<0.001). Conclusion: Hydro-alcoholic extracts of S.rosmarinus with concentrations below15% did not show a therapeutic effect on experimental CL ulcers of Balb/c mice. Further studies with higher concentrations or nano particles are recommended. PMID:25386402

  13. The C5 convertase is not required for activation of the terminal complement pathway in murine experimental cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Theresa N; Darley, Meghan M; Weckbach, Sebastian; Stahel, Philip F; Tomlinson, Stephen; Barnum, Scott R

    2012-07-13

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is the most severe manifestation of clinical malaria syndromes and has a high fatality rate especially in the developing world. Recent studies demonstrated that C5(-/-) mice are resistant to experimental CM (ECM) and that protection was due to the inability to form the membrane attack complex. Unexpectedly, we observed that C4(-/-) and factor B(-/-) mice were fully susceptible to disease, indicating that activation of the classical or alternative pathways is not required for ECM. C3(-/-) mice were also susceptible to ECM, indicating that the canonical C5 convertases are not required for ECM development and progression. Abrogation of ECM by treatment with anti-C9 antibody and detection of C5a in serum of C3(-/-) mice confirmed that C5 activation occurs in ECM independent of C5 convertases. Our data indicate that activation of C5 in ECM likely occurs via coagulation enzymes of the extrinsic protease pathway.

  14. Development of novel murine mammary imaging windows to examine wound healing effects on leukocyte trafficking in mammary tumors with intravital imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sobolik, Tammy; Su, Ying-Jun; Ashby, Will; Schaffer, David K.; Wells, Sam; Wikswo, John P.; Zijlstra, Andries; Richmond, Ann

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We developed mammary imaging windows (MIWs) to evaluate leukocyte infiltration and cancer cell dissemination in mouse mammary tumors imaged by confocal microscopy. Previous techniques relied on surgical resection of a skin flap to image the tumor microenvironment restricting imaging time to a few hours. Utilization of mammary imaging windows offers extension of intravital imaging of the tumor microenvironment. We have characterized strengths and identified some previously undescribed potential weaknesses of MIW techniques. Through iterative enhancements of a transdermal portal we defined conditions for improved quality and extended confocal imaging time for imaging key cell-cell interactions in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:28243517

  15. Development of novel murine mammary imaging windows to examine wound healing effects on leukocyte trafficking in mammary tumors with intravital imaging.

    PubMed

    Sobolik, Tammy; Su, Ying-Jun; Ashby, Will; Schaffer, David K; Wells, Sam; Wikswo, John P; Zijlstra, Andries; Richmond, Ann

    2016-01-01

    We developed mammary imaging windows (MIWs) to evaluate leukocyte infiltration and cancer cell dissemination in mouse mammary tumors imaged by confocal microscopy. Previous techniques relied on surgical resection of a skin flap to image the tumor microenvironment restricting imaging time to a few hours. Utilization of mammary imaging windows offers extension of intravital imaging of the tumor microenvironment. We have characterized strengths and identified some previously undescribed potential weaknesses of MIW techniques. Through iterative enhancements of a transdermal portal we defined conditions for improved quality and extended confocal imaging time for imaging key cell-cell interactions in the tumor microenvironment.

  16. An MMP13-Selective Inhibitor Delays Primary Tumor Growth and the Onset of Tumor-Associated Osteolytic Lesions in Experimental Models of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Manisha; Huang, Dexing; Blick, Tony; Connor, Andrea; Reiter, Lawrence A.; Hardink, Joel R.; Lynch, Conor C.; Waltham, Mark; Thompson, Erik W.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the effects of the matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP13)-selective inhibitor, 5-(4-{4-[4-(4-fluorophenyl)-1,3-oxazol-2-yl]phenoxy}phenoxy)-5-(2-methoxyethyl) pyrimidine-2,4,6(1H,3H,5H)-trione (Cmpd-1), on the primary tumor growth and breast cancer-associated bone remodeling using xenograft and syngeneic mouse models. We used human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells inoculated into the mammary fat pad and left ventricle of BALB/c Nu/Nu mice, respectively, and spontaneously metastasizing 4T1.2-Luc mouse mammary cells inoculated into mammary fat pad of BALB/c mice. In a prevention setting, treatment with Cmpd-1 markedly delayed the growth of primary tumors in both models, and reduced the onset and severity of osteolytic lesions in the MDA-MB-231 intracardiac model. Intervention treatment with Cmpd-1 on established MDA-MB-231 primary tumors also significantly inhibited subsequent growth. In contrast, no effects of Cmpd-1 were observed on soft organ metastatic burden following intracardiac or mammary fat pad inoculations of MDA-MB-231 and 4T1.2-Luc cells respectively. MMP13 immunostaining of clinical primary breast tumors and experimental mice tumors revealed intra-tumoral and stromal expression in most tumors, and vasculature expression in all. MMP13 was also detected in osteoblasts in clinical samples of breast-to-bone metastases. The data suggest that MMP13-selective inhibitors, which lack musculoskeletal side effects, may have therapeutic potential both in primary breast cancer and cancer-induced bone osteolysis. PMID:22253746

  17. Effects of a Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Antagonist on Experimentally Induced Rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Jeon, Eun-ju; Park, Shi-Nae; Park, Kyung-Ho; Park, Yong-Soo; Yeo, Sang Won

    2011-01-01

    This prospective, randomized, and controlled study examined the effects of tumor necrosis factor soluble receptor type I (sTNFRI, a TNF-α antagonist) on experimentally induced rhinosinusitis in rats. The experimental groups received an instillation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plus an intramuscular injection of amoxicillin/clavulanate (antibiotic group), an instillation of sTNFRI (sTNFRI group), an instillation of sTNFRI and an injection of amoxicillin/clavulanate (sTNFRI/antibiotic group), or no additional treatment (LPS group). Histopathological changes were determined using hematoxylin-eosin and periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining. Leakage of exudate was determined using fluorescence microscopy. Vascular permeability was measured using the Evans blue dye technique. Expression of MUC5AC was measured using reverse transcriptase PCR. The sTNFRI, antibiotic, and sTNFRI/antibiotic groups had significantly less capillary permeability, mucosal edema, PAS staining, and expression of MUC5AC than the LPS group. There were no differences in capillary permeability, mucosal edema, PAS staining, and MUC5AC expression between the sTNFRI and sTNFRI/antibiotic groups. The antibiotic group had PAS staining similar to that of the sTNFRI and sTNFRI/antibiotic groups but had a greater increase in capillary permeability, mucosal edema, and MUC5AC expression. This study shows that sTNFRI reduces inflammatory activity and mucus hypersecretion in LPS-induced rhinosinusitis in rats. PMID:21772791

  18. Neovascularization and tumor growth in the rabbit brain. A model for experimental studies of angiogenesis and the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed Central

    Zagzag, D.; Brem, S.; Robert, F.

    1988-01-01

    A model for the study of tumor angiogenesis within the rabbit brain is presented. Implantation of the VX2 carcinoma provides a reproducible tumor accompanied by angiogenesis. The authors report the sequential growth, histology, tumor neovascularization, and vascular permeability of this tumor following its intracerebral implantation. Tumor angiogenesis correlates with the rapid and logarithmic intracerebral tumor growth. The proliferation of blood vessels in the tumor and the organization of tumor cells around tumor vessels are described. Breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (detected by Evans blue leakage) starts in the early stages of tumor development and becomes prominent as the tumor vasculature and size increase. This model is useful for experimental studies of angiogenesis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 6 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 10 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 15 PMID:2451889

  19. A murine model of experimental autoimmune lens-induced uveitis using Klebsiella O3 lipopolysaccharide as a potent immunological adjuvant.

    PubMed Central

    Yokochi, T.; Fujii, Y.; Nakashima, I.; Asai, J.; Kiuchi, M.; Kojima, K.; Kato, N.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune uveitis and finally panophthalmitis could be produced in mice by repeated immunization of syngeneic eyeball extract mixed with Klebsiella O3 lipopolysaccharide (KO3 LPS) as a powerful immunological adjuvant. No ocular lesions were produced in mice given eyeball extract emulsified in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), KO3 LPS alone or eyeball extract alone. Histopathological changes in the ocular lesions at the early stage after the second or tertiary immunization were characterized by infiltration with inflammatory cells in the ciliary body and iris. The iridocyclitis was followed by extensive infiltration of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) into the cornea, lens and the surrounding tissues after repeated immunization. Finally, these areas were replaced by granulomatous tissues infiltrated with mononuclear cells. On the other hand, the structure of the retina and sclera was partially preserved. Those mice exhibited production of autoantibodies and development of the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) to syngeneic eyeball extract. Moreover, ocular lesions could be produced in normal recipient mice by transfer of sensitized lymphocytes from hyperimmunized mice. Therefore, it was suggested that the ocular lesions produced by repeated immunization with the mixture of eyeball extract and KO3 LPS were due to the autoimmune mechanism. This might be useful to model immunological phenomena in the pathogenesis of human phacoantigenic uveitis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8292555

  20. Caput epididymitis but not orchitis was induced by vasectomy in a murine model of experimental autoimmune orchitis.

    PubMed

    Qu, Ning; Terayama, Hayato; Naito, Munekazu; Ogawa, Yuki; Hirai, Shuichi; Kitaoka, Miyuki; Yi, Shuang-Qin; Itoh, Masahiro

    2008-06-01

    Immunization of mice with viable syngeneic testicular germ cells (TGC) alone can induce autoimmune responses against autoantigens of both round and elongating spermatids, resulting in the development of experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO). Histological lesions in this EAO model without an adjuvant are characterized by lymphocytic infiltration into the testes, spermatogenic disturbance, and a complete lack of epididymitis. In this study, we investigated the effects of vasectomy (Vx) on TGC-induced EAO expecting that Vx augments the severity of testicular inflammation in A/J mice. The results showed that mice receiving Vx alone exhibited no significant inflammatory cell response in either the testes or epididymides, and mice receiving shamVx+TGC immunization had EAO with no epididymitis. In sharp contrast, no EAO was found in the testes of any mice receiving Vx+TGC immunization. Instead, caput epididymitis involving CD4+T cells, CD8+T cells, B cells, and macrophages were induced in them with striking elevation of the tissue levels of both IL6 and IL10 mRNA. Furthermore, serum autoantibodies induced by shamVx+TGC immunization were reactive with both round (immature) and elongating (mature) spermatids; however, those induced by Vx+TGC immunization were specific to acrosomes of mature spermatids and spermatozoa. These unexpected results indicate that Vx may induce the mode by which autoreactive lymphocytes gain access to TGC autoantigens in the epididymides, leading to autoimmune responses against the autoantigens of mature rather than immature spermatids.

  1. Cutting edge: the membrane attack complex of complement is required for the development of murine experimental cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Theresa N; Darley, Meghan M; Hu, Xianzhen; Billker, Oliver; Rayner, Julian C; Ahras, Malika; Wohler, Jillian E; Barnum, Scott R

    2011-06-15

    Cerebral malaria is the most severe complication of Plasmodium falciparum infection and accounts for a large number of malaria fatalities worldwide. Recent studies demonstrated that C5(-/-) mice are resistant to experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) and suggested that protection was due to loss of C5a-induced inflammation. Surprisingly, we observed that C5aR(-/-) mice were fully susceptible to disease, indicating that C5a is not required for ECM. C3aR(-/-) and C3aR(-/-) × C5aR(-/-) mice were equally susceptible to ECM as were wild-type mice, indicating that neither complement anaphylatoxin receptor is critical for ECM development. In contrast, C9 deposition in the brains of mice with ECM suggested an important role for the terminal complement pathway. Treatment with anti-C9 Ab significantly increased survival time and reduced mortality in ECM. Our data indicate that protection from ECM in C5(-/-) mice is mediated through inhibition of membrane attack complex formation and not through C5a-induced inflammation.

  2. The C5 Convertase Is Not Required for Activation of the Terminal Complement Pathway in Murine Experimental Cerebral Malaria*

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Theresa N.; Darley, Meghan M.; Weckbach, Sebastian; Stahel, Philip F.; Tomlinson, Stephen; Barnum, Scott R.

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is the most severe manifestation of clinical malaria syndromes and has a high fatality rate especially in the developing world. Recent studies demonstrated that C5−/− mice are resistant to experimental CM (ECM) and that protection was due to the inability to form the membrane attack complex. Unexpectedly, we observed that C4−/− and factor B−/− mice were fully susceptible to disease, indicating that activation of the classical or alternative pathways is not required for ECM. C3−/− mice were also susceptible to ECM, indicating that the canonical C5 convertases are not required for ECM development and progression. Abrogation of ECM by treatment with anti-C9 antibody and detection of C5a in serum of C3−/− mice confirmed that C5 activation occurs in ECM independent of C5 convertases. Our data indicate that activation of C5 in ECM likely occurs via coagulation enzymes of the extrinsic protease pathway. PMID:22689574

  3. Convection-enhanced delivery of sorafenib and suppression of tumor progression in a murine model of brain melanoma through the inhibition of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3.

    PubMed

    Zou, Zhaoxia; Yin, Yufang; Lin, Jenny; Hsu, Li-Chen J; Brandon, Vanessa L; Yang, Fan; Jove, Richard; Jandial, Rahul; Li, Gang; Chen, Mike Y

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT Despite recent advances, metastatic melanoma remains a terminal disease, in which life-threatening brain metastasis occurs in approximately half of patients. Sorafenib is a multikinase inhibitor that induces apoptosis of melanoma cells in vitro. However, systemic administration has been ineffective because adequate tissue concentrations cannot be achieved. This study investigated if convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of sorafenib would enhance tumor control and survival via inhibition of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) pathway in a murine model of metastatic brain melanoma. METHODS Melanoma cells treated with sorafenib in vitro were examined for signaling and survival changes. The effect of sorafenib given by CED was assessed by bioluminescent imaging and animal survival. RESULTS The results showed that sorafenib induced cell death in the 4 established melanoma cell lines and in 1 primary cultured melanoma cell line. Sorafenib inhibited Stat3 phosphorylation in HTB65, WYC1, and B16 cells. Accordingly, sorafenib treatment also decreased expression of Mcl-1 mRNA in melanoma cell lines. Because sorafenib targets multiple pathways, the present study demonstrated the contribution of the Stat3 pathway by showing that mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) Stat3 +/+ cells were significantly more sensitive to sorafenib than MEF Stat3 -/- cells. In the murine model of melanoma brain metastasis used in this study, CED of sorafenib increased survival by 150% in the treatment group compared with animals receiving the vehicle control (p < 0.01). CED of sorafenib also significantly abrogated tumor growth. CONCLUSIONS The data from this study indicate that local delivery of sorafenib effectively controls brain melanoma. These findings validate further investigation of the use of CED to distribute molecularly targeted agents.

  4. Selectivity of boron carriers for boron neutron capture therapy: pharmacological studies with borocaptate sodium, L-boronophenylalanine and boric acid in murine tumors.

    PubMed

    Gregoire, V; Begg, A C; Huiskamp, R; Verrijk, R; Bartelink, H

    1993-04-01

    Borocaptate sodium (BSH) and L-boronophenylalanine (L-BPA) are two boron carriers used for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in the treatment of glioblastoma and melanoma, respectively. The suitability of these two compounds was evaluated on the basis of pharmacokinetic studies aiming at characterizing their biodistribution, tumor uptake and tumor selectivity. Boric acid was also used as a reference compound since it is nonselective and relatively freely diffusible. The compounds were investigated in two tumor models, a B16 pigmented melanoma and the RIF1 sarcoma. Mice were sacrificed after different boron doses at various post-injection times and tissue and plasma levels measured using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The proposed minimum effective tumor boron concentration of 15 ppm was achieved in both tumor models for the three compounds tested, although only for L-BPA in the melanoma was this achieved when tumor-plasma ratios were above 1. In the RIF1 model, maximum tumor concentrations of 44 and 31 ppm B were reached after administration of 50 micrograms B/g body weight for boric acid and BSH, respectively. After administration of 12.5 micrograms B/g of L-BPA, maximum concentrations of 15 and 21 ppm were found in the RIF1 and B16 models, respectively. Tumor-plasma ratios (TPR) for BSH remained close to or below unity at all times studied in both tumors. Brain levels of BSH were very low, however, leading to tumor-brain ratios markedly greater than 1 at all times. L-BPA and boric acid showed TPR values above unity in both tumor models, reaching 3.2 in B16.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Inhibition of iNOS activity enhances the anti-tumor effects of alpha-galactosylceramide in established murine cancer model.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hiroyasu; Ando, Tatsuya; Seishima, Mitsuru

    2015-12-08

    Alpha-garactosylceramide (GalCer) has been shown to have anti-tumor effect in the basic research and clinical studies. However, anti-tumor effect of GalCer is limited. The administration of GalCer increases the production of IFN-γ which is involved in the suppression of tumor growth. On the other hand, the enhancement of IFN-γ production increases immunosuppressive factors such as nitric oxide. This suppressive action might impair the anti-tumor effect of GalCer. In the present study, we evaluated the anti-tumor effect of GalCer in the absence of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). In lung metastatic model, the number of tumor nodules in the lung of iNOS-KO mice treated with GalCer was significantly reduced compared with that of WT mice treated with GalCer. Moreover, L-NAME, which is the inhibitor for iNOS, enhanced the anti-tumor effect of GalCer in lung metastatic model. The frequency of CD8+ cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid increased in iNOS-KO mice treated with GalCer. The administration of GalCer increased the frequency of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in the lung from tumor-bearing WT mice, but the increase of MDSCs in the lung was not induced in iNOS-KO mice. The subcutaneous tumor experiments revealed that the administration of GalCer in the absence of iNOS expression significantly enhanced the induction of tumor antigen-specific response. Finally, our results indicated that the inhibition of iNOS expression could enhance the therapeutic efficacy of GalCer via the increase of tumor antigen-specific immune response and the suppression of MDSCs.

  6. The role of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 in a murine model of experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis.

    PubMed

    Crawford, G L; Boldison, J; Copland, D A; Adamson, P; Gale, D; Brandt, M; Nicholson, L B; Dick, A D

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage activation is, in part, regulated via hydrolysis of oxidised low density lipoproteins by Lipoprotein-Associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2), resulting in increased macrophage migration, pro-inflammatory cytokine release and chemokine expression. In uveitis, tissue damage is mediated as a result of macrophage activation; hence inhibition of Lp-PLA2 may limit macrophage activation and protect the tissue. Utilising Lp-PLA2 gene-deficient (KO) mice and a pharmacological inhibitor of Lp-PLA2 (SB-435495) we aimed to determine the effect of Lp-PLA2 suppression in mediating retinal protection in a model of autoimmune retinal inflammation, experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU). Following immunisation with RBP-3 (IRBP) 1-20 or 161-180 peptides, clinical disease was monitored and severity assessed, infiltrating leukocytes were enumerated by flow cytometry and tissue destruction quantified by histology. Despite ablation of Lp-PLA2 enzyme activity in Lp-PLA2 KO mice or wild-type mice treated with SB-435495, the number of infiltrating CD45+ cells in the retina was equivalent to control EAU animals, and there was no reduction in disease severity. Thus, despite the reported beneficial effects of therapeutic Lp-PLA2 depletion in a variety of vascular inflammatory conditions, we were unable to attenuate disease, show delayed disease onset or prevent progression of EAU in Lp-PLA2 KO mice. Although EAU exhibits inflammatory vasculopathy there is no overt defect in lipid metabolism and given the lack of effect following Lp-PLA2 suppression, these data support the hypothesis that sub-acute autoimmune inflammatory disease progresses independently of Lp-PLA2 activity.

  7. Highly efficient tumor transduction and antitumor efficacy in experimental human malignant mesothelioma using replicating gibbon ape leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Kubo, S; Takagi-Kimura, M; Logg, C R; Kasahara, N

    2013-12-01

    Retroviral replicating vectors (RRVs) have been shown to achieve efficient tumor transduction and enhanced therapeutic benefit in a wide variety of cancer models. Here we evaluated two different RRVs derived from amphotropic murine leukemia virus (AMLV) and gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV), in human malignant mesothelioma cells. In vitro, both RRVs expressing the green fluorescent protein gene efficiently replicated in most mesothelioma cell lines tested, but not in normal mesothelial cells. Notably, in ACC-MESO-1 mesothelioma cells that were not permissive for AMLV-RRV, the GALV-RRV could spread efficiently in culture and in mice with subcutaneous xenografts by in vivo fluorescence imaging. Next, GALV-RRV expressing the cytosine deaminase prodrug activator gene showed efficient killing of ACC-MESO-1 cells in a prodrug 5-fluorocytosine dose-dependent manner, compared with AMLV-RRV. GALV-RRV-mediated prodrug activator gene therapy achieved significant inhibition of subcutaneous ACC-MESO-1 tumor growth in nude mice. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR demonstrated that ACC-MESO-1 cells express higher PiT-1 (GALV receptor) and lower PiT-2 (AMLV receptor) compared with normal mesothelial cells and other mesothelioma cells, presumably accounting for the distinctive finding that GALV-RRV replicates much more robustly than AMLV-RRV in these cells. These data indicate the potential utility of GALV-RRV-mediated prodrug activator gene therapy in the treatment of mesothelioma.

  8. A Well-Controlled Experimental System to Study Interactions of Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes with Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Neubert, Natalie J.; Soneson, Charlotte; Barras, David; Baumgaertner, Petra; Rimoldi, Donata; Delorenzi, Mauro; Fuertes Marraco, Silvia A.; Speiser, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    While T cell-based immunotherapies are steadily improving, there are still many patients who progress, despite T cell-infiltrated tumors. Emerging evidence suggests that T cells themselves may provoke immune escape of cancer cells. Here, we describe a well-controlled co-culture system for studying the dynamic T cell – cancer cell interplay, using human melanoma as a model. We explain starting material, controls, and culture parameters to establish reproducible and comparable cultures with highly heterogeneous tumor cells. Low passage melanoma cell lines and melanoma-specific CD8+ T cell clones generated from patient blood were cultured together for up to 3 days. Living melanoma cells were isolated from the co-culture system by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. We demonstrate that the characterization of isolated melanoma cells is feasible using flow cytometry for protein expression analysis as well as an Agilent whole human genome microarray and the NanoString technology for differential gene expression analysis. In addition, we identify five genes (ALG12, GUSB, RPLP0, KRBA2, and ADAT2) that are stably expressed in melanoma cells independent of the presence of T cells or the T cell-derived cytokines IFNγ and TNFα. These genes are essential for correct normalization of gene expression data by NanoString. Further to the characterization of melanoma cells after exposure to CTLs, this experimental system might be suitable to answer a series of questions, including how the affinity of CTLs for their target antigen influences the melanoma cell response and whether CTL-induced gene expression changes in melanoma cells are reversible. Taken together, our human T cell – melanoma cell culture system is well suited to characterize immune-related mechanisms in cancer cells. PMID:27625650

  9. A Well-Controlled Experimental System to Study Interactions of Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes with Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Neubert, Natalie J; Soneson, Charlotte; Barras, David; Baumgaertner, Petra; Rimoldi, Donata; Delorenzi, Mauro; Fuertes Marraco, Silvia A; Speiser, Daniel E

    2016-01-01

    While T cell-based immunotherapies are steadily improving, there are still many patients who progress, despite T cell-infiltrated tumors. Emerging evidence suggests that T cells themselves may provoke immune escape of cancer cells. Here, we describe a well-controlled co-culture system for studying the dynamic T cell - cancer cell interplay, using human melanoma as a model. We explain starting material, controls, and culture parameters to establish reproducible and comparable cultures with highly heterogeneous tumor cells. Low passage melanoma cell lines and melanoma-specific CD8+ T cell clones generated from patient blood were cultured together for up to 3 days. Living melanoma cells were isolated from the co-culture system by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. We demonstrate that the characterization of isolated melanoma cells is feasible using flow cytometry for protein expression analysis as well as an Agilent whole human genome microarray and the NanoString technology for differential gene expression analysis. In addition, we identify five genes (ALG12, GUSB, RPLP0, KRBA2, and ADAT2) that are stably expressed in melanoma cells independent of the presence of T cells or the T cell-derived cytokines IFNγ and TNFα. These genes are essential for correct normalization of gene expression data by NanoString. Further to the characterization of melanoma cells after exposure to CTLs, this experimental system might be suitable to answer a series of questions, including how the affinity of CTLs for their target antigen influences the melanoma cell response and whether CTL-induced gene expression changes in melanoma cells are reversible. Taken together, our human T cell - melanoma cell culture system is well suited to characterize immune-related mechanisms in cancer cells.

  10. Therapeutic immunization with radio-attenuated Leishmania parasites through i.m. route revealed protection against the experimental murine visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sanchita; Manna, Madhumita; Khanra, Supriya; Ghosh, Moumita; Bhar, Radhaballav; Chakraborty, Anindita; Roy, Syamal

    2012-07-01

    After our promising results from prophylactic and therapeutic study (i.p. route) with the radio-attenuated Leishmania donovani parasites against experimental murine visceral leishmaniasis, we prompted to check their therapeutic efficacy through i.m route. BALB/c mice were infected with highly virulent L. donovani parasites. After 75 days, mice were treated with gamma (γ)-irradiated parasites. A second therapeutic immunization was given after 15 days of first immunization. The protection against kala-azar was estimated with the reduction of Leishman-Donovan unit from spleen and liver that scored up to 80% and 93%, respectively, while a twofold increase in nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) productions has been observed in the immunized groups of animals. These groups of mice also showed disease regression by skewing Th2 cytokines (IL-10) towards Th1 cytokine (IFN-γ) bias along with the increased generation of NO and ROS, while the infected control group of mice without such treatment surrendered to the disease. Establishment of Th1 ambience in the treated groups has also been supported from the measured antileishmanial antibody IgG subsets (IgG2a and IgG1) with higher anti-soluble Leishmania antigen-specific IgG2a titer. As seen in our previous studies, doses of attenuation by γ-radiation should be taken into serious consideration. Attenuation of parasites at 50 Gy of absorbed dose of gamma rays has not worked well. Thus, therapeutic use of L. donovani parasites radio-attenuated at particular doses can be exploited as a promising vaccine agent. Absence of any adjuvant may increase its acceptability as vaccine candidate further.

  11. Efficacy of High-Dose Meropenem (Six Grams per Day) in Treatment of Experimental Murine Pneumonia Induced by Meropenem-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Shigeki; Iwanaga, Naoki; Takemoto, Koji; Miyazaki, Taiga; Yanagihara, Kastunori; Miyazaki, Yoshitsugu; Mukae, Hiroshi; Kohno, Shigeru; Izumikawa, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    High-dose meropenem (MEPM; 6 g/day) has been approved as a treatment for purulent meningitis; however, little is known regarding its in vivo efficacy in refractory lower respiratory tract infections. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of MEPM at 6 g/day in a murine model of severe pneumonia caused by MEPM-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Experimental pneumonia induced by MEPM-resistant P. aeruginosa was treated with normal-dose MEPM (150 mg/kg of body weight, simulating a 3-g/day regimen in humans) or high-dose MEPM (500 mg/kg, simulating a 6-g/day regimen in humans). Mice treated with high-dose MEPM showed significantly restored survival relative to that of untreated mice and tended to show a survival rate higher than that of mice treated with normal-dose MEPM. The viable bacterial counts (of two clinical isolates) in the lungs decreased significantly in mice treated with high-dose MEPM from those for untreated mice (P < 0.001) or mice treated with normal-dose MEPM (P, <0.01 and <0.05). The number of inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was also significantly lower in mice treated with high-dose MEPM than in untreated mice. The free MEPM concentration in the epithelial lining fluid (ELF) exceeded 16 μg/ml for 85 min in mice treated with high-dose MEPM, but not for mice treated with normal-dose MEPM. Our results demonstrate that high-dose MEPM (6 g/day) might provide better protection against pneumonia caused by MEPM-resistant strains of P. aeruginosa than the dose normally administered (less than 3 g/day).

  12. Gallotannin-rich Caesalpinia spinosa fraction decreases the primary tumor and factors associated with poor prognosis in a murine breast cancer model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Several treatment alternatives are available for primary breast cancer, although those for metastatic disease or inflammation associated with tumor progression are ineffective. Therefore, there is a great need for new therapeutic alternatives capable of generating an immune response against residual tumor cells, thus contributing to eradication of micrometastases and cancer stem cells. The use of complex natural products is an excellent therapeutic alternative widely used by Chinese, Hindu, Egyptian, and ancestral Latin-American Indian populations. Methods The present study evaluated cytotoxic, antitumor, and tumor progression activities of a gallotannin-rich fraction derived from Caesalpinia spinosa (P2Et). The parameters evaluated in vitro were mitochondrial membrane depolarization, phosphatidylserine externalization, caspase 3 activation, DNA fragmentation, and clonogenic activity. The parameters evaluated in vivo were tumor growth, leukocyte number, metastatic cell number, and cytokine production by flow cytometry. Results The in vitro results showed that the P2Et fraction induced apoptosis with mitochondrial membrane potential loss, phosphatidylserine externalization, caspase 3 activation, DNA fragmentation, and decreased clonogenic capacity of 4T1 cells. In vivo, the P2Et fraction induced primary tumor reduction in terms of diameter and weight in BALB/c mice transplanted with 4T1 cells and decreased numbers of metastatic cells, mainly in the spleen. Furthermore, decreases in the number of peripheral blood leukocytes (leukemoid reaction) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) serum levels were found, which are events associated with a poor prognosis. The P2Et fraction exerts its activity on the primary tumor, reduces cell migration to distant organs, and decreases IL-6 serum levels, implying tumor microenvironment mechanisms. Conclusions Overall, the P2Et fraction lessens risk factors associated with tumor progression and diminishes primary tumor size, showing

  13. Lx2-32c–loaded polymeric micelles with small size for intravenous drug delivery and their inhibitory effect on tumor growth and metastasis in clinically associated 4T1 murine breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li-qing; Huang, Wei; Gao, Zhong-gao; Fang, Wei-shuo; Jin, Ming-ji

    2016-01-01

    Lx2-32c is a novel taxane derivative with a strong antitumor activity. In this study, we developed Lx2-32c–loaded polymeric micelles (Lx2-32c-PMs) with small size and investigated their antitumor efficacy against tumor growth and metastasis on 4T1 murine breast cancer cell line with Cremophor EL–based Lx2-32c solution as the control. In this study, copolymer monomethoxy polyethylene glycol2000–polylactide1300 was used to prepare Lx2-32c-PMs by film hydration method, and their physicochemical properties were characterized as well, according to morphology, particle size, zeta potential, in vitro drug release, and reconstitution stability. Under confocal laser scanning microscopy, it was observed that Lx2-32c-PMs could be effectively taken up by 4T1 cells in a time-dependent manner. Cell Counting Kit-8 assay showed that the IC50 of Lx2-32c-PMs was 0.3827 nM. Meanwhile, Lx2-32c-PMs had better ability to promote apoptosis and induce G2/M cycle block and polyploidy formation, compared with Lx2-32c solution. More importantly, in vivo animal studies showed that compared to Lx2-32c solution, Lx2-32c-PMs possessed better ability not only to effectively inhibit the tumor growth, but also to significantly suppress spontaneous and postoperative metastasis to distant organs in 4T1 orthotopic tumor-bearing mice. Consequently, Lx2-32c-PMs have significantly prolonged the survival lifetime of tumor-bearing mice. Thus, our study reveals that Lx2-32c-PMs had favorable antitumor activity and exhibited a good prospect for application in the field of antitumor therapy. PMID:27799769

  14. Impact of wall shear stress and ligand avidity on binding of anti-CD146-coated nanoparticles to murine tumor endothelium under flow.

    PubMed

    Thomann, Stefan; Baek, Sunhwa; Ryschich, Eduard

    2015-11-24

    The endothelial phenotype of tumor blood vessels differs from the liver and forms an important base for endothelium-specific targeting by antibody-coated nanoparticles. Although differences of shear stress and ligand avidity can modulate the nanoparticle binding to endothelium, these mechanisms are still poorly studied. This study analyzed the binding of antibody-coated nanoparticles to tumor and liver endothelium under controlled flow conditions and verified this binding in tumor models in vivo. Binding of anti-CD146-coated nanoparticles, but not of antibody was significantly reduced under increased wall shear stress and the degree of nanoparticle binding correlated with the avidity of the coating. The intravascular wall shear stress favors nanoparticle binding at the site of higher avidity of endothelial epitope which additionally promotes the selectivity to tumor endothelium. After intravenous application in vivo, pegylated self-coated nanoparticles showed specific binding to tumor endothelium, whereas the nanoparticle binding to the liver endothelium was very low. This study provides a rationale that selective binding of mAb-coated nanoparticles to tumor endothelium is achieved by two factors: higher expression of endothelial epitope and higher nanoparticle shearing from liver endothelium. The combination of endothelial marker targeting and the use of shear stress-controlled nanoparticle capture can be used for selective intratumoral drug delivery.

  15. Modeling the spatial distribution of chronic tumor hypoxia: implications for experimental and clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Powathil, Gibin; Kohandel, Mohammad; Milosevic, Michael; Sivaloganathan, Siv

    2012-01-01

    Tumor oxygenation status is considered one of the important prognostic markers in cancer since it strongly influences the response of cancer cells to various treatments; in particular, to radiation therapy. Thus, a proper and accurate assessment of tumor oxygen distribution before the treatment may highly affect the outcome of the treatment. The heterogeneous nature of tumor hypoxia, mainly influenced by the complex tumor microenvironment, often makes its quantification very difficult. The usual methods used to measure tumor hypoxia are biomarkers and the polarographic needle electrode. Although these techniques may provide an acceptable assessment of hypoxia, they are invasive and may not always give a spatial distribution of hypoxia, which is very useful for treatment planning. An alternative method to quantify the tumor hypoxia is to use theoretical simulations with the knowledge of tumor vasculature. The purpose of this paper is to model tumor hypoxia using a known spatial distribution of tumor vasculature obtained from image data, to analyze the accuracy of polarographic needle electrode measurements in quantifying hypoxia, to quantify the optimum number of measurements required to satisfactorily evaluate the tumor oxygenation status, and to study the effects of hypoxia on radiation response. Our results indicate that the model successfully generated an accurate oxygenation map for tumor cross-sections with known vascular distribution. The method developed here provides a way to estimate tumor hypoxia and provides guidance in planning accurate and effective therapeutic strategies and invasive estimation techniques. Our results agree with the previous findings that the needle electrode technique gives a good estimate of tumor hypoxia if the sampling is done in a uniform way with 5-6 tracks of 20-30 measurements each. Moreover, the analysis indicates that the accurate measurement of oxygen profile can be very useful in determining right radiation doses to the

  16. Effect of Chia oil (Salvia Hispanica) rich in omega-3 fatty acids on the eicosanoid release, apoptosis and T-lymphocyte tumor infiltration in a murine mammary gland adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Espada, C E; Berra, M A; Martinez, M J; Eynard, A R; Pasqualini, M E

    2007-07-01

    We investigated the effects of certain dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and related eicosanoids on the growth and metastasis formation of a murine mammary gland adenocarcinoma. Salvia hispanica (ChO) and Carthamus tinctorius (SaO) vegetable oil sources of omega-3 and -6 PUFAs and a commercial diet as control (CO), were used. We analysed fatty acids of neoplastic cells (NC) membranes by GLC; the eicosanoids 12- HETE and 12-HHT (LOX and COX metabolites) by HPLC and apoptosis and T-lymphocyte infiltration by flow cytometry and microscopy. NC from ChO groups showed lower levels of arachidonic acid and of both eicosanoids compared to SaO and CO (p<0.05). The ChO diet decreased the tumor weight and metastasis number (p<0.05). Apoptosis and T-lymphocyte infiltration were higher and mitosis decreased with respect to the other diets (p<0.05). Present data showed that ChO, an ancient and almost unknown source of omega-3, inhibits growth and metastasis in this tumor model.

  17. Frequent mutation of Apc gene in rat colon tumors and mucin-depleted foci, preneoplastic lesions in experimental colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Femia, Angelo Pietro; Dolara, Piero; Giannini, Augusto; Salvadori, Maddalena; Biggeri, Annibale; Caderni, Giovanna

    2007-01-15

    Mucin-depleted foci (MDF) are microscopic dysplastic lesions induced in the colon of rodents by specific colon carcinogens. Most MDF show Wnt pathway activation, whereas only a subset shows mutations in the Ctnnb1 gene, coding for beta-catenin. Because Apc is a member of the Wnt pathway and the most frequent mutated gene in human colon cancer, we tested whether MDF harbor Apc mutations. F344 rats were treated twice with 150 mg/kg of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine. After 15 or 28 weeks, MDF, aberrant crypt foci (ACF), and tumors were collected. We screened a segment of the Apc gene comprising the region homologous to the mutation cluster region (MCR) of human APC, which frequently shows mutations in experimental colon tumors. Mutations were identified by PCR amplification and sequencing in 6:24 MDF (25%), 7:23 tumors (30%), 0:24 ACF (0%). Most of the mutations (92%) in MDF and tumors were localized in a region upstream from the MCR. All mutations were single-base substitutions and mainly formed by G:C-->A:T and C:G-->T:A transitions. The pattern of nucleotide changes was similar in MDF and tumors, and, interestingly, the same mutation in codon 1047 was found in two MDF and in three tumors. Four out of the six mutations found in MDF were nonsense mutations, and two were missense. All mutations in tumors determined a protein truncation. These results show that Apc mutations are present in MDF with a frequency similar to that of tumors, strengthening the evidence that they are precancerous lesions in colon carcinogenesis.

  18. Perfusion, oxygenation status and growth of experimental tumors upon photodynamic therapy with Pd-bacteriopheophorbide.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, Debra K; Thews, Oliver; Scherz, Avigdor; Salomon, Yoram; Vaupel, Peter

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the anti-tumor effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT) using a novel bacteriochlorophyll derivative, palladium-bacteriopheophorbide (TOOKAD) on tumor growth, perfusion and oxygenation. Rat DS-sarcomas were treated with either TOOKAD-PDT (2 mg/kg, i.v., immediate illumination) or one of the control treatments (sham-treatment, illumination without photosensitizer, or photosensitizer without illumination). The light source was an infrared-A irradiator fitted with appropriate filters, so that the wavelengths applied (665-800 nm) included the absorption maximum of TOOKAD at 763 nm. Tumor volume was monitored for 90 days after treatment or until a target volume (3.5 ml) was reached. TOOKAD-PDT dramatically inhibited tumor growth with 92% of tumors not reaching the target volume within the observation period. In further experiments, tumor perfusion was assessed using laser Doppler flowmetry. Upon TOOKAD-PDT treatment, a rapid, pronounced decrease in perfusion was seen, down to levels corresponding to only 3% of initial values. Tumor oxygenation monitoring revealed parallel decreases, with levels corresponding to anoxia being reached. The significant anti-tumor effects presented in this report, taken together with the chemical and pharmacokinetic properties of the novel photosensitizer TOOKAD, underline the therapeutic potential of this approach in which flow stasis and induction of anoxia are key elements.

  19. Photodynamic therapy with laser scanning mode of tumor irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chepurna, Oksana; Shton, Irina; Kholin, Vladimir; Voytsehovich, Valerii; Popov, Viacheslav; Pavlov, Sergii; Gamaleia, Nikolai; Wójcik, Waldemar; Zhassandykyzy, Maral

    2015-12-01

    In this study we propose a new version of photodynamic therapy performed by laser scanning. The method consists in tumor treatment by a light beam of a small cross section which incrementally moves through the chosen area with a defined delay at each point and repetitively re-scans a zone starting from the initial position. Experimental evaluation of the method in vitro on murine tumor model showed that despite the dose, applied by scanning irradiation mode, was 400 times lower, the tumor inhibition rate conceded to attained with continuous irradiation mode by only 20%.

  20. Improved drug delivery and therapeutic efficacy of PEgylated liposomal doxorubicin by targeting anti-HER2 peptide in murine breast tumor model.

    PubMed

    Zahmatkeshan, Masoumeh; Gheybi, Fatemeh; Rezayat, Seyed Mahdi; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza

    2016-04-30

    Targeted cancer therapy is a powerful therapeutic strategy to management of cancer. HER2 as an anticancer target has long been studied. Its overexpression plays an important role in the pathogenesis and progressiveness of breast and other cancers. To establish efficient and reliable drug delivery to HER2-overexpressing cells, the authors of this study have developed anti-HER2 (ErbB2) peptide-liposomal formulations of doxorubicin (DOX) by an engineered breast tumor-targeting peptide ligand, AHNP, Anti-HER2/neu peptide, (FCDGFYACYADV) with three glycine amino acids as spacer before its original sequencing. Towards this goal, PEGylated liposome doxorubicin (PLD) bearing different ligand densities of AHNP was prepared and characterized for their size, zeta potential and peptide conjugation. The AHNP functionalization and density effects on breast tumor cell uptake, selective cytotoxicity, prevention of tumor growth and the tissue biodistribution of encapsulated DOX were studied in mice bearing TUBO breast cancer tumor model. The findings demonstrated that increasing the ligand density of AHNP increases cytotoxicity and cell-uptake in SKBR3 and TUBO cells which overexpress HER2 but not in MDA-MB-231with low HER2 expression profile. The anticancer activity was also superior for targeted liposomal DOX with more AHNP densities. Overall, the results showed that optimum AHNP density functionalization of PLD can significantly improve selectivity and the therapeutic index of liposomal DOX in the treatment of HER2 positive breast cancer and merits further investigation.

  1. AKT1 Activation is Obligatory for Spontaneous BCC Tumor Growth in a Murine Model that Mimics Some Features of Basal Cell Nevus Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Arianna L; Back, Jung Ho; Zhu, Yucui; Tang, Xiuwei; Yardley, Nathan P; Kim, Katherine J; Athar, Mohammad; Bickers, David R

    2016-10-01

    Patients with basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS), also known as Gorlin syndrome, develop numerous basal cell carcinomas (BCC) due to germline mutations in the tumor suppressor PTCH1 and aberrant activation of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling. Therapies targeted at components of the Hh pathway, including the smoothened (SMO) inhibitor vismodegib, can ablate these tumors clinically, but tumors recur upon drug discontinuation. Using SKH1-Ptch1(+/-) as a model that closely mimics the spontaneous and accelerated growth pattern of BCCs in patients with BCNS, we show that AKT1, a serine/threonine protein kinase, is intrinsically activated in keratinocytes derived from the skin of newborn Ptch1(+/-) mice in the absence of carcinogenic stimuli. Introducing Akt1 haplodeficiency in Ptch1(+/-) mice (Akt1(+/-) Ptch1(+/-)) significantly abrogated BCC growth. Similarly, pharmacological inhibition of AKT with perifosine, an alkyl phospholipid AKT inhibitor, diminished the growth of spontaneous and UV-induced BCCs. Our data demonstrate an obligatory role for AKT1 in BCC growth, and targeting AKT may help reduce BCC tumor burden in BCNS patients. Cancer Prev Res; 9(10); 794-802. ©2016 AACR.

  2. Poly (I:C)-DOTAP cationic nanoliposome containing multi-epitope HER2-derived peptide promotes vaccine-elicited anti-tumor immunity in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Alipour Talesh, Ghazal; Ebrahimi, Zahra; Badiee, Ali; Mansourian, Mercedeh; Attar, Hossein; Arabi, Leila; Jalali, Seyed Amir; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza

    2016-08-01

    In the current study we aimed at developing a vaccine delivery/adjuvant system to enhance anti-tumor immunity against the natural multi-epitope HER2/Neu-derived P5 peptide. Polyriboinosinic: polyribocytidylic acid [Poly (I:C)] is a strong immunoadjuvant able to enhance specific antitumor immunity induced by peptide-based vaccines. Nevertheless, delivering the peptide and adjuvant intracellularly into their target site remains a challenging issue. We hypothesized this barrier could be overcome through the use of a cationic nanoliposome carrier system which can carry and protect the antigen and adjuvant in the extracellular environment and augment the induction of antitumor immunity. P5 was encapsulated in cationic nanoliposomes composed of 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium propane (DOTAP)-Cholesterol either alone or complexed with Poly (I:C). Immunocompetent BALB/c mice were immunized with the formulations 3 times in two-week intervals and the efficiency and type of immune response were then evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. The groups immunized with Lip-P5+PIC (DOTAP-Cholestrol-P5+Poly (I:C)) and Lip+PIC (DOTAP-Cholestrol+Poly (I:C)) enhanced the release of Interferon (IFN)-γ in comparison with other groups. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that Lip-P5+PIC formulation induced the highest level of IFN-γ in CD8(+) lymphocytes. Lip-P5+PIC, Lip+PIC and Lip-P5 (DOTAP-Cholestrol-P5) provided some extent of protection in terms of tumor regression in TUBO tumor mice model during the first 65days post tumor challenge but at the end only the tumors of mice immunized with Lip-P5+PIC were significantly smaller than all other groups. Furthermore, tumors of mice receiving Lip-P5+PIC grew at a significantly slower rate throughout the observation period. Our results showed that the combination of Poly (I:C) and DOTAP with the tumor antigen and without applying additional T-helper epitope induced strong antitumor responses. The observations presented here are of great interest

  3. Experimental pretargeting studies of cancer with a humanized anti-CEA x murine anti-[In-DTPA] bispecific antibody construct and a (99m)Tc-/(188)Re-labeled peptide.

    PubMed

    Karacay, H; McBride, W J; Griffiths, G L; Sharkey, R M; Barbet, J; Hansen, H J; Goldenberg, D M

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to localize (99m)Tc and (188)Re radionuclides to tumors, using a bispecific antibody (bsMAb) in a two-step approach where the radionuclides are attached to novel peptides incorporating moieties recognized by one arm of the bsMAb. A chemically cross-linked human/murine bsMAb, hMN-14 x 734 (Fab' x Fab'), anti-carcinoembryonic antigen [CEA] x anti-indium-DTPA was prepared as a prelude to constructing a fully humanized bsMAb for future clinical application. N,N'-o-Phenylenedimaleimide was used to cross-link the Fab' fragments of the two antibodies at their hinge regions. This construct was shown to be >92% pure and fully reactive with CEA and a divalent (indium)DTPA-peptide. For pretargeting purposes, a peptide, IMP-192 [Ac-Lys(In-DTPA)-Tyr-Lys(In-DTPA)-Lys(TscG-Cys-)-NH(2) ¿TscG = 3-thiosemicarbazonylglyoxyl¿], with two indium-DTPAs and a chelate for selectively binding (99m)Tc or (188)Re, was synthesized. IMP-192 was formulated in a "single dose" kit and later radiolabeled with (99m)Tc (94-99%) at up to 1836 Ci/mmol and with (188)Re (97%) at 459-945 Ci/mmol of peptide. [(99m)Tc]IMP-192 was shown to be stable by extensive in vitro and in vivo testing and had no specific uptake in the tumor with minimal renal uptake. The biodistribution of the hMN-14 x murine 734 bsMAb was compared alone and in a pretargeting setting to a fully murine anti-CEA (F6) x 734 bsMAb that was reported previously [Gautherot, E., Bouhou, J., LeDoussal, J.-M., Manetti, C., Martin, M., Rouvier, E., and Barbet, J. (1997) Therapy for colon carcinoma xenografts with bispecific antibody-targeted, iodine-131-labeled bivalent hapten. Cancer 80 (Suppl.), 2618-2623]. Both bsMAbs maintained their integrity and dual binding specificity in vivo, but the hMN-14 x m734 was cleared more rapidly from the blood. This coincided with an increased uptake of the hMN-14 x m734 bsMAb in the liver and spleen, suggesting an active reticuloendothelial cell recognition mechanism of this mixed

  4. A novel highly potent trivalent TGF-β receptor trap inhibits early-stage tumorigenesis and tumor cell invasion in murine Pten-deficient prostate glands.

    PubMed

    Qin, Tai; Barron, Lindsey; Xia, Lu; Huang, Haojie; Villarreal, Maria M; Zwaagstra, John; Collins, Cathy; Yang, Junhua; Zwieb, Christian; Kodali, Ravindra; Hinck, Cynthia S; Kim, Sun Kyung; Reddick, Robert L; Shu, Chang; O'Connor-McCourt, Maureen D; Hinck, Andrew P; Sun, Lu-Zhe

    2016-12-27

    The effects of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signaling on prostate tumorigenesis has been shown to be strongly dependent on the stage of development, with TGF-β functioning as a tumor suppressor in early stages of disease and as a promoter in later stages. To study in further detail the paradoxical tumor-suppressive and tumor-promoting roles of the TGF-β pathway, we investigated the effect of systemic treatment with a TGF-β inhibitor on early stages of prostate tumorigenesis. To ensure effective inhibition, we developed and employed a novel trivalent TGF-β receptor trap, RER, comprised of domains derived from the TGF-β type II and type III receptors. This trap was shown to completely block TβRII binding, to antagonize TGF-β1 and TGF-β3 signaling in cultured epithelial cells at low picomolar concentrations, and it showed equal or better anti-TGF-β activities than a pan TGF-β neutralizing antibody and a TGF-β receptor I kinase inhibitor in various prostate cancer cell lines. Systemic administration of RER inhibited prostate tumor cell proliferation as indicated by reduced Ki67 positive cells and invasion potential of tumor cells in high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) lesions in the prostate glands of Pten conditional null mice. These results provide evidence that TGF-β acts as a promoter rather than a suppressor in the relatively early stages of this spontaneous prostate tumorigenesis model. Thus, inhibition of TGF-β signaling in early stages of prostate cancer may be a novel therapeutic strategy to inhibit the progression as well as the metastatic potential in patients with prostate cancer.

  5. Tumor-penetration and antitumor efficacy of cetuximab are enhanced by co-administered iRGD in a murine model of human NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang; Yang, Jie; Ding, Manhua; Li, Liantao; Lu, Zheng; Zhang, Qing; Zheng, Junnian

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-associated mortality, worldwide. For this reason, novel therapies are required for the treatment of this devastating disease. Cetuximab is a monoclonal antibody against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is overexpressed in a variety of solid tumors, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The therapeutic efficacy of cetuximab for NSCLC is limited to use as a monotherapy or in combination with chemotherapy. The objective of the present study was to develop a novel strategy to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of cetuximab for NSCLC by a co-administration with the tumor-penetrating internalizing RGD peptide (iRGD). Human NSCLC subcutaneous xenograft models established with the A549 cell line in nude mice were treated with 30 mg/kg cetuximab, 4 mg/kg iRGD, cetuximab plus iRGD or phosphate-buffered saline. The tumor-penetration, in vivo therapeutic efficacy and involved mechanism were evaluated. The present study showed that the A549 xenograft model is sensitive to the co-administration of cetuximab and iRGD. Treatment with cetuximab plus iRGD resulted in a significant increase in the tumor-penetration of cetuximab and tumor reduction compared with cetuximab monotherapy. In conclusion, iRGD enhances the effects of co-administered cetuximab in an NSCLC model. The combined application of cetuximab and iRGD may be a novel strategy to enhance the clinical therapeutic efficacy of cetuximab for the treatment of NSCLC. PMID:27899989

  6. A novel highly potent trivalent TGF-β receptor trap inhibits early-stage tumorigenesis and tumor cell invasion in murine Pten-deficient prostate glands

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Tai; Barron, Lindsey; Xia, Lu; Huang, Haojie; Villarreal, Maria M.; Zwaagstra, John; Collins, Cathy; Yang, Junhua; Zwieb, Christian; Kodali, Ravindra; Hinck, Cynthia S.; Kim, Sun Kyung; Reddick, Robert L.; Shu, Chang; O’Connor-McCourt, Maureen D.; Hinck, Andrew P.; Sun, Lu-Zhe

    2016-01-01

    The effects of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signaling on prostate tumorigenesis has been shown to be strongly dependent on the stage of development, with TGF-β functioning as a tumor suppressor in early stages of disease and as a promoter in later stages. To study in further detail the paradoxical tumor-suppressive and tumor-promoting roles of the TGF-β pathway, we investigated the effect of systemic treatment with a TGF-β inhibitor on early stages of prostate tumorigenesis. To ensure effective inhibition, we developed and employed a novel trivalent TGF-β receptor trap, RER, comprised of domains derived from the TGF-β type II and type III receptors. This trap was shown to completely block TβRII binding, to antagonize TGF-β1 and TGF-β3 signaling in cultured epithelial cells at low picomolar concentrations, and it showed equal or better anti-TGF-β activities than a pan TGF-β neutralizing antibody and a TGF-β receptor I kinase inhibitor in various prostate cancer cell lines. Systemic administration of RER inhibited prostate tumor cell proliferation as indicated by reduced Ki67 positive cells and invasion potential of tumor cells in high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) lesions in the prostate glands of Pten conditional null mice. These results provide evidence that TGF-β acts as a promoter rather than a suppressor in the relatively early stages of this spontaneous prostate tumorigenesis model. Thus, inhibition of TGF-β signaling in early stages of prostate cancer may be a novel therapeutic strategy to inhibit the progression as well as the metastatic potential in patients with prostate cancer. PMID:27863384

  7. In Vivo Imaging of Experimental Melanoma Tumors using the Novel Radiotracer 68Ga-NODAGA-Procainamide (PCA)

    PubMed Central

    Kertész, István; Vida, András; Nagy, Gábor; Emri, Miklós; Farkas, Antal; Kis, Adrienn; Angyal, János; Dénes, Noémi; Szabó, Judit P.; Kovács, Tünde; Bai, Péter; Trencsényi, György

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The most aggressive form of skin cancer is the malignant melanoma. Because of its high metastatic potential the early detection of primary melanoma tumors and metastases using non-invasive PET imaging determines the outcome of the disease. Previous studies have already shown that benzamide derivatives, such as procainamide (PCA) specifically bind to melanin pigment. The aim of this study was to synthesize and investigate the melanin specificity of the novel 68Ga-labeled NODAGA-PCA molecule in vitro and in vivo using PET techniques. Methods: Procainamide (PCA) was conjugated with NODAGA chelator and was labeled with Ga-68 (68Ga-NODAGA-PCA). The melanin specificity of 68Ga-NODAGA-PCA was tested in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo using melanotic B16-F10 and amelanotic Melur melanoma cell lines. By subcutaneous and intravenous injection of melanoma cells tumor-bearing mice were prepared, on which biodistribution studies and small animal PET/CT scans were performed for 68Ga-NODAGA-PCA and 18FDG tracers. Results: 68Ga-NODAGA-PCA was produced with high specific activity (14.9±3.9 GBq/µmol) and with excellent radiochemical purity (98%<), at all cases. In vitro experiments showed that 68Ga-NODAGA-PCA uptake of B16-F10 cells was significantly (p≤0.01) higher than Melur cells. Ex vivo biodistribution and in vivo PET/CT studies using subcutaneous and metastatic tumor models showed significantly (p≤0.01) higher 68Ga-NODAGA-PCA uptake in B16-F10 primary tumors and lung metastases in comparison with amelanotic Melur tumors. In experiments where 18FDG and 68Ga-NODAGA-PCA uptake of B16-F10 tumors was compared, we found that the tumor-to-muscle (T/M) and tumor-to-lung (T/L) ratios were significantly (p≤0.05 and p≤0.01) higher using 68Ga-NODAGA-PCA than the 18FDG accumulation. Conclusion: Our novel radiotracer 68Ga-NODAGA-PCA showed specific binding to the melanin producing experimental melanoma tumors. Therefore, 68Ga-NODAGA-PCA is a suitable diagnostic radiotracer for

  8. Generation of a complement-derived chemotactic factor for tumor cells in experimentally induced peritoneal exudates and its effect on the local metastasis of circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Orr, F. W.; Mokashi, S.; Delikatny, J.

    1982-01-01

    A chemotactic factor for tumor cells was found in inflammatory exudate fluids induced by giving intraperitoneal injections of glycogen to Sprague-Dawley rats. The quantity of chemotactic activity and the period of time during which it could be detected correlated with the inflammatory reaction, measured by the cellular composition of the exudates and their content of protein and lysosomal enzymes. In gel filtration the chemotactic factor behaved mainly as a molecule having a molecular weight of approximately 6000 daltons. Its biologic activity was blocked by antiserums directed against C5 but not by antiserums against C3 or C4. In these two respects, the factor generated in vivo has the same properties as a previously described chemotactic factor that can be generated in vitro by proteolysis of purified C5 or C5a. Chemotactic activity was not detected in the glycogen-induced peritoneal exudates of rats depleted of serum complement by cobra venom factor. Intravenously injected Walker tumor cells arrested and formed metastases in the mesenteries of rats with peritonitis in greater numbers than in normal controls, animals depleted of complement during the experimental period, or animals given intraperitoneal injections of the vasopermeability agent, histamine. The growth of tumor cells in vitro was not promoted by peritoneal exudate fluids, nor was the number of metastases on vivo greater than in negative controls, in animals in which peritonitis was induced 24 hours after the intravenous injection of tumor cells. It is argued that chemotactic mechanisms can contribute to the formation of metastases at sites of tissue injury. PMID:7091299

  9. CD8+ T-cell clones specific for the 5T4 antigen target renal cell carcinoma tumor-initiating cells in a murine xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Tykodi, Scott S; Satoh, Shoko; Deming, Janise D; Chou, Jeffrey; Harrop, Richard; Warren, Edus H

    2012-09-01

    The tumor antigen 5T4 is frequently expressed at high levels on renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and other epithelial carcinomas. Surveys of normal tissues demonstrate abundant 5T4 expression on placental trophoblast cells with limited expression elsewhere. 5T4 is the target for a therapeutic cancer vaccine (MVA-5T4) that elicits 5T4-specific serological, proliferative, and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses. However, the antitumor activity of 5T4-specific CTL has not been extensively characterized. CD8 T cells from HLA-A2 healthy donors (n=4) or RCC patients (n=2) were stimulated in vitro with the HLA-A2-binding nonamer peptides 5T417-25 or 5T497-105 and screened by flow cytometry with specific tetramers (TET). CD8/TET T-cell clones specific for 5T417-25 or 5T497-105 peptide were isolated from 4/6 and 1/4 donors, respectively. A subset of clones specific for 5T417-25 was cytolytic for MVA-5T4-infected HLA-A2 EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell line target cells and for constitutively HLA-A2-expressing and 5T4-expressing RCC tumor cell lines (including A498 RCC). In a xenoengraftment assay, the coinoculation of a representative 5T417-25-specific CTL clone with A498 RCC tumors cells into immune-deficient mice completely prevented growth of A498 tumors. Taken together, these data demonstrate high-avidity CD8 CTL able to recognize the naturally processed 5T417-25 epitope on RCC tumor cells including putative tumor-initiating cells are present in peripheral blood of both healthy donors and RCC patients. CD8T-cell immunity targeting 5T417-25 is therefore of substantial interest both as a potential target for further development of vaccination or adoptive cellular immunotherapy and for immune monitoring studies in association with nonspecific immunotherapies.

  10. An interdisciplinary computational/experimental approach to evaluate drug-loaded gold nanoparticle tumor cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Louis T; England, Christopher G; Wu, Min; Lowengrub, John; Frieboes, Hermann B

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Clinical translation of cancer nanotherapy has largely failed due to the infeasibility of optimizing the complex interaction of nano/drug/tumor/patient parameters. We develop an interdisciplinary approach modeling diffusive transport of drug-loaded gold nanoparticles in heterogeneously-vascularized tumors. Materials & methods: Evaluated lung cancer cytotoxicity to paclitaxel/cisplatin using novel two-layer (hexadecanethiol/phosphatidylcholine) and three-layer (with high-density-lipoprotein) nanoparticles. Computer simulations calibrated to in-vitro data simulated nanotherapy of heterogeneously-vascularized tumors. Results: Evaluation of free-drug cytotoxicity between monolayer/spheroid cultures demonstrates a substantial differential, with increased resistance conferred by diffusive transport. Nanoparticles had significantly higher efficacy than free-drug. Simulations of nanotherapy demonstrate 9.5% (cisplatin) and 41.3% (paclitaxel) tumor radius decrease. Conclusion: Interdisciplinary approach evaluating gold nanoparticle cytotoxicity and diffusive transport may provide insight into cancer nanotherapy. PMID:26829163

  11. GROWTH FACTORS AND COX2 IN WOUND HEALING: AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY WITH EHRLICH TUMORS

    PubMed Central

    SALGADO, Flávio L. L.; ARTIGIANI-NETO, Ricardo; LOPES-FILHO, Gaspar de Jesus

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Healing is an innate biological phenomenon, and carcinogenesis acquired, but with common humoral and cellular elements. Carcinogenesis interferes negatively in healing. Aim: To evaluate the histological changes in laparotomy scars of healthy Balb/c mice and with an Ehrlich tumor in its various forms of presentation. Methods: Fifty-four mice were divided into three groups of 18 animals. First group was the control; the second had Ehrlich tumor with ascites; and the third had the subcutaneous form of this tumor. Seven days after tumor inoculation, all 54 mice were submitted to laparotomy. All of the animals in the experiment were operated on again on 7th day after surgery, with resection of the scar and subsequent euthanasia of the animal. The scars were sent for histological assessment using immunohistochemical techniques to evaluate Cox-2 (cyclooxygenase 2), VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) and FGF (fibroblast growth factor). Semi-quantitatively analysis was done in the laparotomy scars and in the abdominal walls far away from the site of the operation. Results: Assessing the weight of the animals, the correct inoculation of the tumor and weight gain in the group with tumoral ascites was observed. The histological studies showed that groups with the tumor showed a statistically significant higher presence of Cox-2 compared to the control. In the Cox-2 analysis of the abdominal wall, the ascites group showed the most significant difference. VEGF did not present any significant differences between the three groups, regardless of the site. The FGF showed a significant increase in animals with the tumor. Conclusion: Histological findings in both laparotomy scar and the abdominal wall showed that with Ehrlich's neoplasia there was an exacerbated inflammatory response, translated by more intense expression of Cox-2 and greater fibroblast proliferation, translated by more intense expression of FGF, that is, it stimulated both the immediate

  12. Prostate tumor attenuation in the nu/nu murine model due to anti-sarcosine antibodies in folate-targeted liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Heger, Zbynek; Polanska, Hana; Merlos Rodrigo, Miguel Angel; Guran, Roman; Kulich, Pavel; Kopel, Pavel; Masarik, Michal; Eckschlager, Tomas; Stiborova, Marie; Kizek, Rene; Adam, Vojtech

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we describe the preparation of liposomes with folate-targeting properties for the encapsulation of anti-sarcosine antibodies (antisarAbs@LIP) and sarcosine (sar@LIP). The competitive inhibitory effects of exogenously added folic acid supported the role of folate targeting in liposome internalization. We examined the effects of repeated administration on mice PC-3 xenografts. Sar@LIP treatment significantly increased tumor volume and weight compared to controls treated with empty liposomes. Moreover, antisarAbs@LIP administration exhibited a mild antitumor effect. We also identified differences in gene expression patterns post-treatment. Furthermore, Sar@LIP treatment resulted in decreased amounts of tumor zinc ions and total metallothioneins. Examination of the spatial distribution across the tumor sections revealed a sarcosine-related decline of the MT1X isoform within the marginal regions but an elevation after antisarAbs@LIP administration. Our exploratory results demonstrate the importance of sarcosine as an oncometabolite in PCa. Moreover, we have shown that sarcosine can be a potential target for anticancer strategies in management of PCa. PMID:27646588

  13. Noninvasive Optical Imaging of UV-Induced Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Murine Skin: Studies of Early Tumor Development and Vitamin D Enhancement of Protoporphyrin IX Production

    PubMed Central

    Rollakanti, Kishore R.; Anand, Sanjay; Davis, Scott C.; Pogue, Brian W.; Maytin, Edward V.

    2015-01-01

    Better noninvasive techniques are needed to monitor protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) levels before and during photodynamic therapy (PDT) of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin. Our aim was to evaluate: (1) multispectral fluorescent imaging of ultraviolet light (UV)-induced cancer and precancer in a mouse model of SCC; (2) multispectral imaging and probe-based fluorescence detection as a tool to study Vitamin D (VD) effects on aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-induced PpIX synthesis. Dorsal skin of hairless mice was imaged weekly during a 24-week UV carcinogenesis protocol. Hot spots of PpIX fluorescence were detectable by multispectral imaging beginning at 14 weeks of UV exposure. Many hot spots disappeared after cessation of UV at week 20, but others persisted or became visible after week 20, and corresponded to tumors that eventually became visible by eye. In SCC-bearing mice pretreated with topical VD before ALA application, our optical techniques confirmed that VD preconditioning induces a tumor-selective increase in PpIX levels. Fluorescence-based optical imaging of PpIX is a promising tool for detecting early SCC lesions of the skin. Pretreatment with VD can increase the ability to detect early tumors, providing a potential new way to improve efficacy of ALA-PDT. PMID:26223149

  14. Combination of Oral Vitamin D3 with Photodynamic Therapy Enhances Tumor Cell Death in a Murine Model of Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Sanjay; Rollakanti, Kishore R.; Horst, Ronald L.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Maytin, Edward V.

    2014-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), in which 5-ALA (a precursor for protoporphyrin IX, PpIX) is administered prior to exposure to light, is a nonscarring treatment for skin cancers. However, for deep tumors, ALA-PDT is not always effective due to inadequate production of PpIX. We previously developed and reported a combination approach in which the active form of vitamin D3 (calcitriol) is given systemically prior to PDT to improve PpIX accumulation and to enhance PDT-induced tumor cell death; calcitriol, however, poses a risk of hypercalcemia. Here, we tested a possible strategy to circumvent the problem of hypercalcemia by substituting natural dietary vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol; D3) for calcitriol. Oral D3 supplementation (10 days of a 10-fold elevated D3 diet) enhanced PpIX levels 3- to 4-fold, and PDT-mediated cell death 20-fold, in subcutaneous A431 tumors. PpIX levels and cell viability in normal tissues were not affected. Hydroxylated metabolic forms of D3 were only modestly elevated in serum, indicating minimal hypercalcemic risk. These results show that brief oral administration of cholecalciferol can serve as a safe neoadjuvant to ALA-PDT. We suggest a clinical study, using oral vitamin D3 prior to PDT, should be considered to evaluate this promising new approach to treating human skin cancer. PMID:24807677

  15. Expression of a tumor necrosis factor-alpha transgene in murine lung causes lymphocytic and fibrosing alveolitis. A mouse model of progressive pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Y; Araki, K; Vesin, C; Garcia, I; Kapanci, Y; Whitsett, J A; Piguet, P F; Vassalli, P

    1995-01-01

    The murine TNF-alpha gene was expressed under the control of the human surfactant protein SP-C promoter in transgenic mice. A number of the SP-C TNF-alpha mice died at birth or after a few weeks with very severe lung lesions. Surviving mice transmitted a pulmonary disease to their offspring, the severity and evolution of which was related to the level of TNF-alpha mRNA in the lung; TNF-alpha RNA was detected in alveolar epithelium, presumably in type II epithelial cells. In a longitudinal study of two independent mouse lines, pulmonary pathology, at 1-2 mo of age, consisted of a leukocytic alveolitis with a predominance of T lymphocytes. Leukocyte infiltration was associated with endothelial changes and increased levels of mRNA for the endothelial adhesion molecule VCAM-1. In the following months, alveolar spaces enlarged in association with thickening of the alveolar walls due to an accumulation of desmin-containing fibroblasts, collagen fibers, and lymphocytes. Alveolar surfaces were lined by regenerating type II epithelial cells, and alveolar spaces contained desquamating epithelial cells in places. Platelet trapping in the damaged alveolar capillaries was observed. Pulmonary pathology in the SP-C TNF-alpha mice bears a striking resemblance to human idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, in which increased expression of TNF-alpha in type II epithelial cells has also been noted. These mice provide a valuable animal model for understanding the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis and exploring possible therapeutic approaches. Images PMID:7542280

  16. Induction of a Specific Strong Polyantigenic Cellular Immune Response after Short-Term Chemotherapy Controls Bacillary Reactivation in Murine and Guinea Pig Experimental Models of Tuberculosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Guirado, Evelyn; Gil, Olga; Cáceres, Neus; Singh, Mahavir; Vilaplana, Cristina; Cardona, Pere-Joan

    2008-01-01

    RUTI is a therapeutic vaccine that is generated from detoxified and liposomed Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell fragments that has demonstrated its efficacy in the control of bacillus reactivation after short-term chemotherapy. The aim of this study was to characterize the cellular immune response generated after the therapeutic administration of RUTI and to corroborate the lack of toxicity of the vaccine. Mouse and guinea pig experimental models were infected with a low-dose M. tuberculosis aerosol. RUTI-treated animals showed the lowest bacillary load in both experimental models. RUTI also decreased the percentage of pulmonary granulomatous infiltration in the mouse and guinea pig models. This was not the case after Mycobacterium bovis BCG treatment. Cellular immunity was studied through the characterization of the intracellular gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing cells after the splenocytes' stimulation with M. tuberculosis-specific structural and growth-related antigens. Our data show that the difference between the therapeutic administration of BCG and RUTI resides mainly in the stronger activation of IFN-γ+ CD4+ cells and CD8+ cells against tuberculin purified protein derivative, ESAT-6, and Ag85B that RUTI generates. Both vaccines also triggered a specific immune response against the M. tuberculosis structural antigens Ag16kDa and Ag38kDa and a marked mRNA expression of IFN-γ, tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-12, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and RANTES in the lung. The results show that RUTI's therapeutic effect is linked not only to the induction of a Th1 response but also to the stimulation of a quicker and stronger specific immunity against structural and growth-related antigens that reduces both the bacillary load and the pulmonary pathology. PMID:18524883

  17. Enhancement of photodynamic therapy due to hyperbaric hyperoxia: an experimental study of Walker 256 tumors in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicola, Jorge H.; Colussi, Valdir C.; Nicola, Ester M. D.; Metze, Konradin

    1997-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), which is now an approved treatment for many types of cancers, is based on the simultaneous involvement of three factors, namely: tumor tissue retention of a specific photosensitizer; local illumination of the lesion with a visible light source and the occurrence of oxygen in the triplet state. Theoretically, a change in any one of these factors may be compensated by a change in the other two factors, leading to the same therapeutic result. In practice, this is not true, since we are dealing with living tissue, but we may expect to find an ideal combination of these three factors which may give the best clinical results. In this work we present experimental results of PDT under Hyperbaric hyperoxia (HBO) in tumor masses of the dorsal subcutaneous tissue of rats. These tumors were created by previous inoculation of 'Walker 256' neoplastic cells Hematoporphyrin Ester (HpE) was administered as the photosensitizer. The rats were pressurized at up to 3 atm with a 100 percent continuous oxygen ventilation environment in a specially designed hyperbaric chamber. The skin area above the tumor was photosensitized for 45 minutes with a 7 mw HeNe laser. Twenty four hours later, the tumor was removed for study. In all the animals treated with PDT/HBO histology revealed a very important reduction in the number of tumor cells as compared with the PDT controls in normal atmospheric condition, showing numerous apoptotic as well as necrotic cells at the border of the radiated area. The observed enhancement in the PDT for this situation is, of course, related to the extra oxygen in the circulatory system.

  18. Experimental radioimmunotherapy of a xenografted human colonic tumor (GW-39) producing carcinoembryonic antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Goldenberg, D.M.; Gaffar, S.A.; Bennett, S.J.; Beach, J.L.

    1981-11-01

    Experiments were undertaken to evaluate the antitumor effects of 131I-labeled goat antibody immunoglobulin G prepared against carcinoembryonic antigen in hamsters bearing the carcinoembryonic antigen-producing GW-39 human colonic carcinoma. At a single injection of 1 mCi 131I and higher, a marked growth inhibition of GW-39 tumors, as well as a considerable increase in the survival time of the tumor-bearing hamsters, could be achieved. At a dose of 1 mCi, the radioactive affinity-purified antibody appeared to be superior to radioactive normal goat immunoglobulin G in influencing tumor growth and survival time, but no significant difference could be seen at the higher dose of 2 mCi given. Radiobiological calculations indicated that the tumors received, at up to 20 days after therapy, 1325 rads for the specific antibody and only 411 rads for the normal immunoglobulin G preparation. These findings encourage the further evaluation of antibodies to tumor markers for isotopic cancer therapy.

  19. Mechanisms of tumor necrosis in photodynamic therapy with a chlorine photosensitizer: experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privalov, Valeriy A.; Lappa, Alexander V.; Bigbov, Elmir N.

    2011-02-01

    A photodynamic therapy experiment on 118 inbred white mice with transplanted Ehrlich's tumor (mouse mammary gland adenocarcinoma) is performed to reveal mechanisms of necrosis formation. In 7-10 days the tumor of 1-1.5 cm diameter is formed under skin at the injection point, and PDT procedure is applied. There were used a chlorine type photosensitizer RadachlorineTM and 662 nm wavelength diode laser. The drug is injected by intravenously at the dose of 40 mg/kg; the irradiation is executed in 2-2.5 hours at the surface dose of about 200 J/cm2. Each of the mice had a photochemical reaction in form of destructive changes at the irradiation region with subsequent development of dry coagulation necrosis. After rejection of the necrosis there occurred epithelization of defect tissues in a tumor place. Histological investigations were conducted in different follow-up periods, in 5 and 30 min, 1, 3, 6, and 12 hours, 1, 3, 7 and 28 days after irradiation. They included optical microscopy, immune marker analysis, morphometry with measurements of volume density of epithelium, tumor stroma and necroses, vascular bed. The investigations showed that an important role in damaging mechanisms of photodynamic action belongs to hypoxic injuries of tumor mediated by micro vascular disorders and blood circulatory disturbances. The injuries are formed in a few stages: microcirculation angiospasm causing vessel paresis, irreversible stases in capillaries, diapedetic hemorrhages, thromboses, and thrombovasculitis. It is marked mucoid swelling and fibrinoid necrosis of vascular tissue. Progressive vasculitises result in total vessel obliteration and tumor necrosis.

  20. Systemic siRNA Delivery with a Dual pH-Responsive and Tumor-targeted Nanovector for Inhibiting Tumor Growth and Spontaneous Metastasis in Orthotopic Murine Model of Breast Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Bo; Kang, Lin; Chen, Liqing; Sun, Ping; Jin, Mingji; Wang, Qiming; Bae, You Han; Huang, Wei; Gao, Zhonggao

    2017-01-01

    Phenylboronic acid (PBA)-mediated tumor targeting nanovector is an attractive strategy for enhancing siRNA delivery and treatment of metastatic cancers. However, its nonspecific binding with various biological membranes containing cis-diol moieties restricts its potential application by systematic administration. Herein, we constructed a novel pH-activated “sheddable” PEG-coated nanoparticle for effective treatment of primary tumors and metastases, which was based on the conjugation of catechol group modified poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-Cat) and PBA-terminated polyethylenimine (PEI-PBA) via the borate ester formed between PBA and Cat. By virtue of the pH-dependent stability of borate ester in an aqueous medium, the PEG-shell could “shield” the PBA ligand in systemic circulation to reduce its “off-target effect”, while PEG was detached at tumor extracellular pH (~6.5) to expose intact PBA moiety. Simultaneously, the PBA ligand could bind with overexpressed sialic acid residues on cancer cells, giving rise to enhanced cellular internalization. In addition, the PBA moieties could also couple with each 3'-end ribose of double-stranded siRNA. siRNAs were used as both a payload and a pH-responsive intermolecular cross-linker, and thereby acquired sufficient stability during circulating in blood and a rapidly triggered release in response to acidic endosomal/lysosomal pH-stimuli. As a result, this dual pH-sensitive nanoparticle showed enhanced siRNA uptake, gene silencing efficacy and anti-metastatic effects in vitro. Furthermore, in vivo studies demonstrated that PBA-based nanoparticles effectively accumulated in tumor and inhibited tumor growth and metastasis in 4T1 orthotopic mammary tumor model after intravenous administration. PMID:28042340

  1. Seasonal dependency of the effects of experimental stressors on tumor metastasis in mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Perissin, L; Zorzet, S; Rapozzi, V; Paoletti, D; Giraldi, T

    1994-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that the application of stressor paradigms in experimental animals affects tumor incidence and progression. However, a high heterogeneity appears both for the animal-tumor system used and for the characteristics of the stressor employed. A high variability was observed also with the application of rotational stress, a carefully and widely characterized mild psychological stressor, to mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma. The aim of this work has been therefore to examine the possible seasonal dependency of the effects of experimental stressors (rotational stress, forced immobilization and electric foot shock) on spontaneous lung metastasis formation in mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma. The possible participation of pineal gland and of melatonin have also been examined including in the experimental protocol the measurement of melatonin urinary excretion. The stressor paradigms used significantly increased metastasis weight in spring, in comparison with non-stressed animals. When examined in winter, rotational stress and foot shock significantly decreased metastasis formation, in comparison with non-stressed mice. The effects of forced immobilization were not season-dependent. The melatonin urinary excretion has been measured in relation to the seasonal effects of rotational stress. Nocturnal melatonin excretion is markedly increased by rotational stress in spring and is remarkably decreased in winter. These variations in endogenous melatonin levels caused by rotational stress appear to directly correlate with the effects of the stressor or metastasis. These results lend support to the view that the mechanisms underlying the tumor enhancing action of stressors involve the psychoneuroendocrine network, and indicate the relevance of chronobiology in experimental cancer research and neuro-immuno-modulation.

  2. Experimental study of radiopharmaceuticals based on technetium-99m labeled derivative of glucose for tumor diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeltchan, R.; Medvedeva, A.; Sinilkin, I.; Bragina, O.; Chernov, V.; Stasyuk, E.; Rogov, A.; Il'ina, E.; Larionova, L.; Skuridin, V.; Dergilev, A.

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: to study the potential utility of 1-thio-D-glucose labeled with 99mTc for cancer imaging in laboratory animals. Materials and method: the study was carried out in cell cultures of normal CHO (Chinese hamster ovary cells CHO) and malignant tissues MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7). To evaluate the uptake of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose in normal and tumor tissue cells, 25 MBq of 1-thio-D-glucose labeled with 99mTc was added to the vials with 3 million cells and incubated for 30 minutes at room temperature. After centrifugation of the vials with cells, the supernatant was removed. Radioactivity in vials with normal and tumor cells was then measured. In addition, the study included 40 mice of C57B 1/6j lines with tumor lesion of the right femur. For neoplastic lesions, Lewis lung carcinoma model was used. Following anesthesia, mice were injected intravenously with 25MBq of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose. Planar scintigraphy was performed 15 minutes later in a matrix of 512x512 pixels for 5 minutes. Results: when measuring the radioactivity of normal and malignant cells after incubation with 99mTc-1-thio-D- glucose, it was found that the radioactivity of malignant cells was higher than that of normal cells. The mean values of radioactivity levels in normal and malignant cells were 0.3±0.15MBq and 1.07±0.6MBq, respectively. All examined animals had increased accumulation of 99mTc-1-thio- D-glucose at the tumor site. The accumulation of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose in the tumor was on average twice as high as compared to the symmetric region. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose is a prospective radiopharmaceutical for cancer visualization. In addition, high accumulation of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose in the culture of cancer cells and in tumor tissue of animals demonstrates tumor tropism of the radiopharmaceutical.

  3. Tumor site prediction using spatiotemporal detection of subclinical hyperemia in experimental photocarcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konger, Raymond L.; Xu, Zhengbin; Sahu, Ravi P.; Kim, Young L.

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate that a spatial and temporal analysis of subclinical hyperemia reliably predicts specific areas at high risk for skin tumor development during photocarcinogenesis. To determine detailed spatiotemporal patterns of inflammatory angiogenesis foci in a relatively large area, we developed a mesoscopic (between microscopic and macroscopic) imaging approach. This method relies on our earlier finding that the combination of a spectral analysis of hemoglobin with diffuse-light-suppressed imaging can increase the image resolution, contrast and penetration depth to visualize microvasculature Hgb content in the large tissue area. In our recent study, SKH1 hairless albino mice were irradiated for 10 weeks with a carcinogen dose of UVB. Using our newly developed mesoscopic imaging methods, we imaged the mice over 20 - 30 weeks after stopping UVB, and excised hyperemic/non-hyperemic areas at several different timepoints. We show that persistent hyperemic foci can predict future tumor formation. In particular, our imaging approach allows us to assess the spatial and temporal extent of subclinical inflammatory foci, which in turn can predict sites of future overlying tumor formation. In addition, although COX-2 inhibitors are known to suppress skin cancer development in humans, it remains unclear whether the chemopreventive activity of COX-2 inhibitors are chiefly attributable to their anti-inflammatory effects. Our study provides evidence that subclinical subepithelial inflammatory foci occur prior to overt tumor formation, and that these areas are highly predictive for future tumor formation, that celecoxib's ability to suppress tumorigenesis is tightly linked to its ability to reduce the area of subclinical inflammatory foci.

  4. Dendritic Cells in the Context of Human Tumors: Biology and Experimental Tools.

    PubMed

    Volovitz, Ilan; Melzer, Susanne; Amar, Sarah; Bocsi, József; Bloch, Merav; Efroni, Sol; Ram, Zvi; Tárnok, Attila

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are the most potent and versatile antigen-presenting cells (APC) in the immune system. DC have an exceptional ability to comprehend the immune context of a captured antigen based on molecular signals identified from its vicinity. The analyzed information is then conveyed to other immune effector cells. Such capability enables DC to play a pivotal role in mediating either an immunogenic response or immune tolerance towards an acquired antigen. This review summarizes current knowledge on DC in the context of human tumors. It covers the basics of human DC biology, elaborating on the different markers, morphology and function of the different subsets of human DC. Human blood-borne DC are comprised of at least three subsets consisting of one plasmacytoid DC (pDC) and two to three myeloid DC (mDC) subsets. Some tissues have unique DC. Each subset has a different phenotype and function and may induce pro-tumoral or anti-tumoral effects. The review also discusses two methods fundamental to the research of DC on the single-cell level: multicolor flow cytometry (FCM) and image-based cytometry (IC). These methods, along with new genomics and proteomics tools, can provide high-resolution information on specific DC subsets and on immune and tumor cells with which they interact. The different layers of collected biological data may then be integrated using Immune-Cytomics modeling approaches. Such novel integrated approaches may help unravel the complex network of cellular interactions that DC carry out within tumors, and may help harness this complex immunological information into the development of more effective treatments for cancer.

  5. Intravenous administration of the selective toll-like receptor 7 agonist DSR-29133 leads to anti-tumor efficacy in murine solid tumor models which can be potentiated by combination with fractionated radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Dovedi, Simon J.; Adlard, Amy L.; Ota, Yosuke; Murata, Masashi; Sugaru, Eiji; Koga-Yamakawa, Erina; Eguchi, Ken; Hirose, Yuko; Yamamoto, Setsuko; Umehara, Hiroki; Honeychurch, Jamie; Cheadle, Eleanor J.; Hughes, Gareth; Jewsbury, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    Strategies to augment anti-cancer immune responses have recently demonstrated therapeutic utility. To date clinical success has been achieved through targeting co-inhibitory checkpoints such as CTLA-4, PD-1, and PD-L1. However, approaches that target co-activatory pathways are also being actively being developed. Here we report that the novel TLR7-selective agonist DSR-29133 is well tolerated in mice and leads to acute immune activation. Administration of DSR-29133 leads to the induction of IFNα/γ, IP-10, TNFα, IL-1Ra and IL-12p70, and to a reduction in tumor burden in syngeneic models of renal cancer (Renca), metastatic osteosarcoma (LM8) and colorectal cancer (CT26). Moreover, we show that the efficacy of DSR-29133 was significantly improved when administered in combination with low-dose fractionated radiotherapy (RT). Effective combination therapy required weekly administration of DSR-29133 commencing on day 1 of a fractionated RT treatment cycle, whereas no enhancement of radiation response was observed when DSR-29133 was administered at the end of the fractionated RT cycle. Combined therapy resulted in curative responses in a high proportion of mice bearing established CT26 tumors which was dependent on the activity of CD8+ T-cells but independent of CD4+ T-cells and NK/NKT cells. Moreover, long-term surviving mice originally treated with DSR-29133 and RT were protected by a tumor-specific memory immune response which could prevent tumor growth upon rechallenge. These results demonstrate that DSR-29133 is a potent selective TLR7 agonist that when administered intravenously can induce anti-tumor immune responses that can be further enhanced through combination with low-dose fractionated RT. PMID:26959743

  6. Intravenous administration of the selective toll-like receptor 7 agonist DSR-29133 leads to anti-tumor efficacy in murine solid tumor models which can be potentiated by combination with fractionated radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dovedi, Simon J; Adlard, Amy L; Ota, Yosuke; Murata, Masashi; Sugaru, Eiji; Koga-Yamakawa, Erina; Eguchi, Ken; Hirose, Yuko; Yamamoto, Setsuko; Umehara, Hiroki; Honeychurch, Jamie; Cheadle, Eleanor J; Hughes, Gareth; Jewsbury, Philip J; Wilkinson, Robert W; Stratford, Ian J; Illidge, Timothy M

    2016-03-29

    Strategies to augment anti-cancer immune responses have recently demonstrated therapeutic utility. To date clinical success has been achieved through targeting co-inhibitory checkpoints such as CTLA-4, PD-1, and PD-L1. However, approaches that target co-activatory pathways are also being actively being developed. Here we report that the novel TLR7-selective agonist DSR-29133 is well tolerated in mice and leads to acute immune activation. Administration of DSR-29133 leads to the induction of IFNα/γ, IP-10, TNFα, IL-1Ra and IL-12p70, and to a reduction in tumor burden in syngeneic models of renal cancer (Renca), metastatic osteosarcoma (LM8) and colorectal cancer (CT26). Moreover, we show that the efficacy of DSR-29133 was significantly improved when administered in combination with low-dose fractionated radiotherapy (RT). Effective combination therapy required weekly administration of DSR-29133 commencing on day 1 of a fractionated RT treatment cycle, whereas no enhancement of radiation response was observed when DSR-29133 was administered at the end of the fractionated RT cycle. Combined therapy resulted in curative responses in a high proportion of mice bearing established CT26 tumors which was dependent on the activity of CD8+ T-cells but independent of CD4+ T-cells and NK/NKT cells. Moreover, long-term surviving mice originally treated with DSR-29133 and RT were protected by a tumor-specific memory immune response which could prevent tumor growth upon rechallenge. These results demonstrate that DSR-29133 is a potent selective TLR7 agonist that when administered intravenously can induce anti-tumor immune responses that can be further enhanced through combination with low-dose fractionated RT.

  7. Suppression of NF-κB signaling and NLRP3 inflammasome activation in macrophages is responsible for the amelioration of experimental murine colitis by the natural compound fraxinellone

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xue-Feng; Ouyang, Zi-Jun; Feng, Li-Li; Chen, Gong; Guo, Wen-Jie; Shen, Yan; Wu, Xu-Dong; Sun, Yang Xu, Qiang

    2014-11-15

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) affects millions of people worldwide. Although the etiology of this disease is uncertain, accumulating evidence indicates a key role for the activated mucosal immune system. In the present study, we examined the effects of the natural compound fraxinellone on dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis in mice, an animal model that mimics IBD. Treatment with fraxinellone significantly reduced weight loss and diarrhea in mice and alleviated the macroscopic and microscopic signs of the disease. In addition, the activities of myeloperoxidase and alkaline phosphatase were markedly suppressed, while the levels of glutathione were increased in colitis tissues following fraxinellone treatment. This compound also decreased the colonic levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-18 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in a concentration-dependent manner. These effects of fraxinellone in mice with experimental colitis were attributed to its inhibition of CD11b{sup +} macrophage infiltration. The mRNA levels of macrophage-related molecules in the colon, including intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1), vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM1), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2), were also markedly inhibited following fraxinellone treatment. The results from in vitro assays showed that fraxinellone significantly reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of nitric oxide (NO), IL-1β and IL-18 as well as the activity of iNOS in both THP-1 cells and mouse primary peritoneal macrophages. The mechanisms responsible for these effects were attributed to the inhibitory role of fraxinellone in NF-κB signaling and NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Overall, our results support fraxinellone as a novel drug candidate in the treatment of colonic inflammation. - Highlights: • Fraxinellone, a lactone compound, alleviated DSS induced colitis. • The effects of fraxinellone were attributed to its inhibition on

  8. In vivo 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of experimental murine tumours and human tumour xenografts: effects of blood flow modification.

    PubMed Central

    Bremner, J. C.; Counsell, C. J.; Adams, G. E.; Stratford, I. J.; Wood, P. J.; Dunn, J. F.; Radda, G. K.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of hydralazine on tumours appears to vary depending on tumour type. Blood flow and radiation sensitivity decrease more in murine tumours than human tumour xenografts. In this study a comparison between various tumour types has been made using in vivo 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMRS) to follow the metabolic responses occurring after clamping or intravenous administration of hydralazine (5 mg kg-1). Large increases in the Pi/total phosphate ratio were found with the murine sarcomas, KHT and RIF-1 implanted into C3H/He mice. However little or no effect was seen for the two human xenografted tumours, HX118 and HT29 implanted in MFI nu/nu/01a mice. An intermediate response was observed for KHT tumours grown in nu/nu mice. All tumours showed a large response to clamping. The anaesthetic Hypnorm/Hypnovel has a great influence on the response of the tumour metabolism to hydralazine appearing to both prolong and increase the changes induced. There is evidence to support the theory that the changes in 31P spectra are related to the oxygen status of the tumours. PMID:1931606

  9. In-vivo experimental demonstration that hyperhistaminism counteracts tumor-growth.

    PubMed

    Dellarovere, F; Broccio, G; Granata, A; Fimiani, V

    1994-01-01

    Induction of hyperhistaminism in peritoneum of rats by daily intraperitoneal supply of 0.005 mu g of histamine, counteracts the growth of 10(3) Yoshida ascite sarcoma cells only if administration precedes inoculation of tumor cells and has a long duration. Treating animals for two weeks before tumor cell inoculation we observed significant 70% survival, that was increased to 80% continuing the supply for 20-days after the inoculation; treatment for 3 days before or 20 days after the inoculation did not show significant results. The condition created in rat peritoneum is similar to that in allergic people, and our data in animals confirm statistical data observed in allergic people showing decreased incidence of neoplastic disease due to histamine, that appears to be integrated in a highly potent immunoregulatory circuit.

  10. Enhanced growth and experimental metastasis of chemically induced tumor in ultraviolet irradiated syngeneic mice.

    PubMed

    Gensler, H L; Chen, H

    1991-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that ultraviolet (UV) irradiation induces a systemic effect which enhances subsequent tumor induction by benzo[a]pyrene in a manner which is dependent on the dose of benzo[a]pyrene. The present study was designed to test whether UV-B irradiation renders mice susceptible to subcutaneous or intravenous injection of a regressor tumor induced by benzo[a]pyrene. The sources of UV-B irradiation were banks of 6 Westinghouse FS-40 sunlamps, situated 20 cm above the mouse cages. Female BALB/cAnNHsd received five 30-min dorsal UV-B radiation treatments per week for 12 weeks, resulting in a total dose of approx. 6.4 x 10(5) J m-2. Two to seven days after termination of UV treatments, syngeneic regressor tumor cells (BP2) induced by benzo[a]pyrene were injected subcutaneously or intravenously into irradiated mice and unirradiated controls. By 38 days post subcutaneous implantation, 24/30 and 3/30 BP2 implants were detectable in the irradiated and unirradiated mice, respectively. Ultraviolet irradiated mice were also unable to reject lung colonies resulting from intravenous administration of BP2 cells, although they were rejected by unirradiated mice. The mean number of lung colonies per mouse was 16- to 35-fold greater in UV irradiated mice than in unirradiated controls, at 14 to 17 days post injection. Thus, UV irradiation rendered mice, with no known exposure to benzo[a]pyrene, susceptible to a subcutaneous or intravenous injection of a regressor tumor induced by benzo[a]pyrene.

  11. Correlated Expression of HMGA2 and PLAG1 in Thyroid Tumors, Uterine Leiomyomas and Experimental Models

    PubMed Central

    Klemke, Markus; Müller, Marietta Henrike; Wosniok, Werner; Markowski, Dominique Nadine; Nimzyk, Rolf; Helmke, Burkhard Maria; Bullerdiek, Jörn

    2014-01-01

    In pleomorphic adenomas of the salivary glands (PASG) recurrent chromosomal rearrangements affecting either 8q12 or 12q14∼15 lead to an overexpression of the genes of the genuine transcription factor PLAG1 or the architectural transcription factor HMGA2, respectively. Both genes are also affected by recurrent chromosomal rearrangements in benign adipocytic tumors as e. g. lipomas and lipoblastomas. Herein, we observed a strong correlation between the expression of HMGA2 and PLAG1 in 14 benign and 23 malignant thyroid tumors. To address the question if PLAG1 can be activated by HMGA2, the expression of both genes was quantified in 32 uterine leiomyomas 17 of which exhibited an overexpression of HMGA2. All leiomyomas with HMGA2 overexpression also revealed an activation of PLAG1 in the absence of detectable chromosome 8 abnormalities affecting the PLAG1 locus. To further investigate if the overexpression of PLAG1 is inducible by HMGA2 alone, HMGA2 was transiently overexpressed in MCF-7 cells. An increased PLAG1 expression was observed 24 and 48 h after transfection. Likewise, stimulation of HMGA2 by FGF1 in adipose tissue-derived stem cells led to a simultaneous increase of PLAG1 mRNA. Altogether, these data suggest that HMGA2 is an upstream activator of PLAG1. Accordingly, this may explain the formation of tumors as similar as lipomas and lipoblastomas resulting from an activation of either of both genes by chromosomal rearrangements. PMID:24516594

  12. Expression of a tumor necrosis factor alpha transgene in murine pancreatic beta cells results in severe and permanent insulitis without evolution towards diabetes

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Mice bearing a tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha transgene controlled by an insulin promoter developed an increasingly severe lymphocytic insulitis, apparently resulting from the induction of endothelial changes with features similar to those observed in other places of intense lymphocytic traffic. This was accompanied by dissociation of the endocrine tissue (without marked decrease in its total mass), islet fibrosis, and the development of intraislet ductules containing, by places, beta cells in their walls, suggesting a regenerative capacity. Islet disorganization and fibrosis did not result from lymphocytic infiltration, since they were also observed in SCID mice bearing the transgene. Diabetes never developed, even though a number of potentially inducing conditions were used, including the prolonged perfusion of interferon gamma and the permanent expression of a nontolerogenic viral protein on beta cells (obtained by using mice bearing two transgenes). It is concluded that (a) a slow process of TNF release in pancreatic islets induces insulitis, and may be instrumental in the insulitis resulting from local cell-mediated immune reactions, but (b) that insulitis per se is not diabetogenic, lymphocyte stimulation by cells other than beta cells being necessary to trigger extensive beta cell damage. This provides an explanation for the discrepancy between the occurrence of insulitis and that of clinical disease in autoimmune diabetes. PMID:1460428

  13. Neuroantigen-specific, tolerogenic vaccines: GM-CSF is a fusion partner that facilitates tolerance rather than immunity to dominant self-epitopes of myelin in murine models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Vaccination strategies that elicit antigen-specific tolerance are needed as therapies for autoimmune disease. This study focused on whether cytokine-neuroantigen (NAg) fusion proteins could inhibit disease in chronic murine models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and thus serve as potential therapeutic modalities for multiple sclerosis. Results A fusion protein comprised of murine GM-CSF as the N-terminal domain and the encephalitogenic MOG35-55 peptide as the C-terminal domain was tested as a tolerogenic, therapeutic vaccine (TTV) in the C57BL/6 model of EAE. Administration of GMCSF-MOG before active induction of EAE, or alternatively, at the onset of EAE blocked the development and progression of EAE. Covalent linkage of the GM-CSF and MOG35-55 domains was required for tolerogenic activity. Likewise, a TTV comprised of GM-CSF and PLP139-151 was a tolerogen in the SJL model of EAE. Conclusion These data indicated that fusion proteins containing GM-CSF coupled to myelin auto-antigens elicit tolerance rather than immunity. PMID:22208499

  14. Ablative Tumor Radiation Can Change the Tumor Immune Cell Microenvironment to Induce Durable Complete Remissions

    PubMed Central

    Filatenkov, Alexander; Baker, Jeanette; Mueller, Antonia M.S.; Kenkel, Justin; Ahn, G-One; Dutt, Suparna; Zhang, Nigel; Kohrt, Holbrook; Jensen, Kent; Dejbakhsh-Jones, Sussan; Shizuru, Judith A.; Negrin, Robert N.; Engleman, Edgar G.; Strober, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The goals of the study were to elucidate the immune mechanisms that contribute to desirable complete remissions of murine colon tumors treated with single radiation dose of 30 Gy. This dose is at the upper end of the ablative range used clinically to treat advanced or metastatic colorectal, liver, and non-small cell lung tumors. Experimental design Changes in the tumor immune microenvironment of single tumor nodules exposed to radiation were studied using 21 day (>1 cm in diameter) CT26 and MC38 colon tumors. These are well-characterized weakly immunogenic tumors. Results We found that the high dose radiation transformed the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment resulting in an intense CD8+ T cell tumor infiltrate, and a loss of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). The change was dependent on antigen cross-presenting CD8+ dendritic cells, secretion of IFN-γ, and CD4+ T cells expressing CD40L. Anti-tumor CD8+ T cells entered tumors shortly after radiotherapy, reversed MDSC infiltration, and mediated durable remissions in an IFN-γ dependent manner. Interestingly, extended fractionated radiation regimen did not result in robust CD8+ T cell infiltration. Conclusion For immunologically sensitive tumors, these results indicate that remissions induced by a short course of high dose radiation therapy depend on the development of anti-tumor immunity that is reflected by the nature and kinetics of changes induced in the tumor cell microenvironment. These results suggest that systematic examination of the tumor immune microenvironment may help in optimizing the radiation regimen used to treat tumors by adding a robust immune response. PMID:25869387

  15. Anti-tumor immunological response induced by cryoablation and anti-CTLA-4 antibody in an in vivo RM-1 cell prostate cancer murine model.

    PubMed

    Li, F; Guo, Z; Yu, H; Zhang, X; Si, T; Liu, C; Yang, X; Qi, L

    2014-01-01

    Cryoablation combination therapy with blockade of the T-cell inhibitory receptor CTL-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4) may augment the anti-tumor immune response (ATIR). It is crucial to determine the duration of ATIR after cryoablation and anti-CTLA-4 antibody therapy to determine the most appropriate treatment interval of therapy. To investigate the characteristics of ATIR induced by cryoablation and anti-CTLA-4 antibody therapy, we developed a prostate cancer model system to test the capacity of cryoablation and anti -CTLA-4 antibody to generate ATIR. Mice were randomly assigned to receive no treatment (group A), cryoablation only (group B), cryoablation plus anti-CTLA-4 antibody (group C), or anti-CTLA-4 antibody only (group D). We collected specimens on days 0, 7, 14 and 21 to study the ATIR through different techniques. Our results indicated that cryoablation induced ATIR and further enhanced this effect and reduced the number of distant metastases through combination with anti-CTLA-4 antibody. ATIR induced by cryoablation was achieved through decreasing regulatory T cell (Treg) number. The number of Tregs induced by cryoablation was lowest on day 14 but then returned to preoperative levels on day 21, indicating that ATIR induced by cryoablation was time-dependent. However, ATIR induced by anti-CTLA-4 antibody might be mainly achieved through influencing Treg function, which was exactly not by decreasing Treg number and still maintain its ATIR effect on day 21 after therapy. In conclusion, ATIR induced by cryoablation was achieved through decreasing Treg number and is time-dependent, whereas ATIR caused by anti-CTLA-4 antibody was achieved exactly not by decreasing Treg number and not time-dependent in the first 21 days after therapy.

  16. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha inversely regulates prostaglandin D2 and prostaglandin E2 production in murine macrophages. Synergistic action of cyclic AMP on cyclooxygenase-2 expression and prostaglandin E2 synthesis.

    PubMed

    Fournier, T; Fadok, V; Henson, P M

    1997-12-05

    Increased synthesis of insulin-like growth factor-1 is induced in murine macrophages by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha). Accordingly, we have investigated mechanisms regulating synthesis of PGE2 that might contribute to autocrine/paracrine effects on insulin-like growth factor-1 production. In response to zymosan, TNFalpha specifically induced a 5-fold increase in PGE2 synthesis, at the same time decreasing PGD2 production in a reciprocal fashion. Activators of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), such as PGE2 itself or dibutyryl cyclic AMP, did not modify PGE2 production by themselves but potentiated the TNFalpha-induced increase in PGE2; this effect required both RNA and protein synthesis. No significant change in arachidonate release or production of other eicosanoids was observed. The inducible form of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) but not of the constitutive form COX1 was implicated in the generation of both PGE2 and PGD2 in these cells by use of specific inhibitors and effects of dexamethasone. Neither COX1 nor COX2 protein levels were affected by TNFalpha or PKA activators used alone, whereas in association, marked up-regulation of COX2 mRNA and protein was observed. Incubations of cells carried out with PGH2 demonstrated that PGE2 synthase activity was increased after a TNFalpha pretreatment. Taken together, our results suggest that TNFalpha induced a switch from the PGD2 to PGE2 synthesis pathway by regulating PGE2 synthase expression and/or activity and that activators of PKA markedly potentiated the TNFalpha-induced increase in PGE2 through up-regulation of COX2 gene expression.

  17. Assessment of Augmented Immune Surveillance and Tumor Cell Death by Cytoplasmic Stabilization of p53 as a Chemopreventive Strategy of 3 Promising Medicinal Herbs in Murine 2-Stage Skin Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ali, Farrah; Khan, Rehan; Khan, Abdul Quaiyoom; Lateef, Md Abdul; Maqbool, Tahir; Sultana, Sarwat

    2014-07-01

    Cancer is the final outcome of a plethora of events. Targeting the proliferation or inducing programmed cell death in a proliferating population is a major standpoint in the cancer therapy. However, proliferation is regulated by several cellular and immunologic processes. This study reports the inhibition of proliferation by augmenting immune surveillance, silencing acute inflammation, and inducing p53-mediated apoptosis of skin cancer by 3 promising medicinal extracts. We used the well-characterized model for experimental skin carcinogenesis in mice for 32 weeks to study the chemopreventive effect of the methanolic extracts of Trigonella foenumgraecum, Eclipta alba, and Calendula officinalis. All 3 extracts reduced the number, incidence, and multiplicity of tumors, which was confirmed by the pathologic studies that showed regressed tumors. There was a significant reduction in the PCNA+ nuclei in all treatment groups 32 weeks after the initiation. Mechanistic studies revealed that proliferative population in tumors is diminished by the restoration of the endogenous antioxidant defense, inhibition of the stress-related signal-transducing element NFκB, reduction of inflammation, enhancement of immunosurveillance of the genetically mutated cells, along with silencing of the cell cycle progression signals. Finally, all 3 medicinal extracts induced stable expression of p53 within the tumors, confirmed by the CFDA-Cy3 apoptosis assay. Results of our study confirm that these extracts not only limit the rate of proliferation by inhibition of the processes integral to cancer development but also induce stable cytoplasmic expression of p53-mediated apoptosis, leading to fewer and regressed tumors in mice.

  18. Heating stents with radio frequency energy to prevent tumor ingrowth: modeling and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Thomas P.; Lawes, Kate; Goldberg, S. Nahum

    1998-04-01

    Stents are often inserted into internal orifices to treat blockage due to tumor ingrowth. Stents are favored due to their minimally invasive nature, possible avoidance of a surgical procedure, and their ability to palliate surgically non-resectable disease. Because of rapid tumor growth however, a treatment means to prevent overgrowth through the stent and resultant blockage is required. To further this goal, experiments were performed in which a stent was placed in tissue and heated with radiofrequency (RF) energy to coagulate a cylinder of tissue, thereby eradicating viable tissue in the proximity of the stent. Temperatures were measured at the central stent surface and edges over time during a 5 - 10 minute heating in phantom and in fresh tissue. In addition, a finite element model was used to simulate the electric field and temperature distribution. Blood flow was also introduced in the model by evaluating RF application to stents to determine effectiveness of the energy applications. Changing perfusion and tissue electrical conductivity as a function of temperature was applied as the tissue was heated to 100 degree(s)C. Results from the electric field model will be shown as well as the thermal distribution over time from the simulations. Lastly, results from the damage integral will be discussed.

  19. Structural and metabolic characterization of RNAs from rats with experimental Guerin tumor - I. Nucleotide composition of RNAs from the liver and tumor tissues of rats.

    PubMed

    Ratkiewicz, A; Galasinski, W

    1976-01-01

    The characteristics of the ribonucleic acids of Guerin tumor was the subject of this work. The effect of tumor development on the structure of the ribonucleic acids in the liver of tumor bearing rats was studied. Some differences of nucleotide compositions in RNAs isolated from subcellular fractions of liver of control and tumor bearing rats and of cancer tissue were observed. The nucleotide compositions of cancer nuclear RNA is distinctly different from liver RNA. The changes in primary structure of liver RNAs due by development of tumor in rats may be result of metabolic peculiarities of these RNAs.

  20. Coregistration of ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging with a preliminary investigation of the spatial colocalization of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 expression and tumor perfusion in a murine tumor model.

    PubMed

    Loveless, Mary E; Whisenant, Jennifer G; Wilson, Kevin; Lyshchik, Andrej; Sinha, Tuhin K; Gore, John C; Yankeelov, Thomas E

    2009-01-01

    We present an ultrasonography (US)-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) coregistration technique and examine its application in a preliminary multimodal, multiparametric study in a preclinical model of breast cancer. Nine mice were injected with 67NR breast cancer cells and imaged 6 and 9 days later with 4.7 T MRI and high-frequency US. Tumor volumes from each data set were segmented independently by two investigators and coregistered using an iterative closest point algorithm. In addition to anatomic images, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) distribution images from the central tumor slice using VEGFR2-targeted ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) and measurements of perfusion and extravascular-extracellular volume fraction using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI were acquired from five mice for multiparametric coregistration. Parametric maps from each modality were coregistered and examined for spatial correlation. Average registration root mean square (RMS) error was 0.36 +/- 0.11 mm, less than approximately two voxels. Segmented volumes were compared between investigators to minimize interobserver variability; the average RMS error was 0.23 +/- 0.09 mm. In the preliminary study, VEGFR2-targeted UCA data did not demonstrate direct spatial correlation with magnetic resonance measures of vascular properties. In summary, a method for accurately coregistering small animal US and MRI has been presented that allows for comparison of quantitative metrics provided by the two modalities.

  1. Galangin, a dietary flavonol inhibits tumor initiation during experimental pulmonary tumorigenesis by modulating xenobiotic enzymes and antioxidant status.

    PubMed

    Devadoss, Dinesh; Ramar, Manikandan; Chinnasamy, Arulvasu

    2014-02-05

    The aim of present study was to elucidate anti-initiating efficacy of galangin against benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P)-induced lung carcinogenesis in male Swiss albino mice. Therefore, the activities of xenobiotic metabolic enzymes such as phase I and II were examined in lung as well as liver tissues (to compare the effects between target and non-target organs). Besides, the activities/levels of tissue marker enzymes, antioxidants, lipid peroxidation (LPO), cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) expressions and histological observation of lungs were also analyzed. B(a)P (50 mg/kg body weight) was administered to male Swiss albino mice (20-25 g) to experimentally induce lung cancer. B(a)P-induced animals showed increased activity of phase I (Cytochrome P450, Cytochrome b5, NADPH Cytochrome P450 redcutase and NADH Cytochrome b5 reductase) drug metabolic enzymes, LPO levels, tissue marker enzymes and decreased activity of phase II metabolic enzymes (glutathione-S-transferase, DT-diaphorase and UDP-glucuronyl transferase) as well as antioxidant levels. Histological examination of lungs revealed severe alveolar and bronchiolar damages in B(a)P-induced mice. Immunohistochemical and western blot analysis of CYP1A1 increased significantly in lung tissues of B(a)P-induced animals. Treatment with galangin (20 mg/kg body weight) efficiently counteracted all the above anomalies and restored cellular homeostasis. Our results demonstrate that galangin can modify xenobiotic enzymes in murine model of pulmonary tumorigenesis.

  2. The effect of Neovastat (AE-941) on an experimental metastatic bone tumor model.

    PubMed

    Weber, Michael H; Lee, Joanne; Orr, F William

    2002-02-01

    Bone metastases are generally associated with bone destruction which occurs in response to factors secreted by metastatic cells. Some of these factors secreted by the metastatic cells activate osteoclats while others are proteases that degrade bone collagen. To determine if Neovastat (AE-941), a naturally occurring multi-functional inhibitor of angiogenesis, is able to regulate properties that are thought to have relevance to their propensity to form bone metastases in vivo, we used the human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cell line which can metastasize to bone. We showed that Neovastat prevented the degradation of osteoid-like radiolabeled extracellular matrices which was induced by incubation of human SaOS-2 osteoblast-like cells with MDA-MB-231 cells. Moreover, Neovastat was demonstrated to inhibit the gelatinolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 expressed by MDA-MB-231 cells. The potential of Neovastat to retard the spread, growth, and osteolysis of MDA-MB-231 cells was then estimated in vivo. Histomorphometric analysis of the vertebral bodies indicated that MDA-MB-231 cells inoculated in nude mice (intracardiac) successfully generate osteolytic metastases with an 83% reduction of the volume of medullary bone (p< or =0.01). However, when tumor-bearing animals were treated orally with Neovastat, there was only a 19% decrease in medullary bone thus indicating that Neovastat can prevent bone metastasis in this model. Consistent with histological results, radiographic analysis indicated that Neovastat decreased the number of osteolytic lesions by 33% (p< or =0.3). Moreover, a decrease in the tumor volume in bone was observed in Neovastat-treated animals. These results indicate that Neovastat may be useful in preventing bone metastasis in cancer patients.

  3. Theory and Experimental Validation of a Spatio-temporal Model of Chemotherapy Transport to Enhance Tumor Cell Kill

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhihui; Chuang, Yao-Li; Dogra, Prashant; Butner, Joseph D.; Day, Armin; Xu, Rong; Shen, Haifa; Simbawa, Eman; AL-Fhaid, A. S.; Mahmoud, S. R.; Curley, Steven A.; Ferrari, Mauro; Cristini, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that continuously releasing drug molecules into the tumor over an extended period of time may significantly improve the chemotherapeutic efficacy by overcoming physical transport limitations of conventional bolus drug treatment. In this paper, we present a generalized space- and time-dependent mathematical model of drug transport and drug-cell interactions to quantitatively formulate this hypothesis. Model parameters describe: perfusion and tissue architecture (blood volume fraction and blood vessel radius); diffusion penetration distance of drug (i.e., a function of tissue compactness and drug uptake rates by tumor cells); and cell death rates (as function of history of drug uptake). We performed preliminary testing and validation of the mathematical model using in vivo experiments with different drug delivery methods on a breast cancer mouse model. Experimental data demonstrated a 3-fold increase in response using nano-vectored drug vs. free drug delivery, in excellent quantitative agreement with the model predictions. Our model results implicate that therapeutically targeting blood volume fraction, e.g., through vascular normalization, would achieve a better outcome due to enhanced drug delivery. Author Summary Cancer treatment efficacy can be significantly enhanced through the elution of drug from nano-carriers that can temporarily stay in the tumor vasculature. Here we present a relatively simple yet powerful mathematical model that accounts for both spatial and temporal heterogeneities of drug dosing to help explain, examine, and prove this concept. We find that the delivery of systemic chemotherapy through a certain form of nano-carriers would have enhanced tumor kill by a factor of 2 to 4 over the standard therapy that the patients actually received. We also find that targeting blood volume fraction (a parameter of the model) through vascular normalization can achieve more effective drug delivery and tumor kill. More importantly

  4. Aberrant EphB/ephrin-B expression in experimental gastric lesions and tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Shintaro; Saeki, Noritaka; Ogawa, Kazushige

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether the expression profiles of EphB receptor and ephrin-B ligand can be used as markers for dysplastic/oncogenic transformation in gastric mucosa. METHODS: The protein expression and localization of EphB and ephrin-B in normal, ulcerated regenerating, and dysplastic gastric mucosa were examined in a rat experimental model by immunolabeling, and mRNA expression was assessed in four human gastric carcinoma cell lines by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: Ephrin-B- and EphB-expressing regions were divided along the pit-gland axis in normal gastric units. EphB2 was transiently upregulated in the experimental ulcer, and its expression domain extended to gastric pits and/or the luminal surface where ephrin-B-expressing pit cells reside. EphB2, B3, and B4 and ephrin-B1 were coexpressed in the experimental gastric dysplasia, and more than one ligand-receptor pair was highly expressed in each of the gastric carcinoma cell lines. CONCLUSION: Robust and stable coexpression of EphB and ephrin-B is a feature common to experimentally induced gastric dysplasia and human gastric carcinoma cell lines as compared to normal gastric and ulcerated regenerating epithelia. Thus, EphB/ephrin-B may be a useful marker combination for dysplastic/oncogenic transformation in gastric cancer. PMID:25593460

  5. Experimental investigations in hamsters and rabbits with DNA extracted from human uterine tumors.

    PubMed

    Nastac, E; Athanasiu, P; Predescu, E; Stoian, M; Hozoc, M; Perju, A

    1980-01-01

    Experimental inoculation of a DNA preparation extracted from a fragment of non-irradiated human uterine cervix carcinoma was followed by the appearance of neoplasia in four hamsters and of lymphosarcoma in one rabbit. Similar DNA preparations obtained from three cases of irradiated human uterine cervix carcinoma and from a human uterine fibroma proved to have no biological activity.

  6. Tumor tracking based on correlation models in scanned ion beam therapy: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seregni, M.; Kaderka, R.; Fattori, G.; Riboldi, M.; Pella, A.; Constantinescu, A.; Saito, N.; Durante, M.; Cerveri, P.; Bert, C.; Baroni, G.

    2013-07-01

    Accurate dose delivery to extra-cranial lesions requires tumor motion compensation. An effective compensation can be achieved by real-time tracking of the target position, either measured in fluoroscopy or estimated through correlation models as a function of external surrogate motion. In this work, we integrated two internal/external correlation models (a state space model and an artificial neural network-based model) into a custom infra-red optical tracking system (OTS). Dedicated experiments were designed and conducted at GSI (Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung). A robotic breathing phantom was used to reproduce regular and irregular internal target motion as well as external thorax motion. The position of a set of markers placed on the phantom thorax was measured with the OTS and used by the correlation models to infer the internal target position in real-time. Finally, the estimated target position was provided as input for the dynamic steering of a carbon ion beam. Geometric results showed that the correlation models transversal (2D) targeting error was always lower than 1.3 mm (root mean square). A significant decrease of the dosimetric error with respect to the uncompensated irradiation was achieved in four out of six experiments, demonstrating that phase shifts are the most critical irregularity for external/internal correlation models.

  7. [Protective activity of S-PT84, a heat-killed preparation of Lactobacillus pentosus, against oral and gastric candidiasis in an experimental murine model].

    PubMed

    Hayama, Kazumi; Ishijima, Sanae; Ono, Yoshiko; Izumo, Takayuki; Ida, Masayuki; Shibata, Hiroshi; Abe, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    The effect of S-PT84, a heat-killed preparation of Lactobacillus pentosus on growth of Candida albicans was examined in vitro and in vivo. The mycelial growth was effectively inhibited by S-PT84 and seemed to bind to the hyphae. We assessed the potential of S-PT84 for treatment of oral and gastric candidiasis using a murine model. When 2 mg of S-PT84 was administered three times into the oral cavity of orally Candida infected mice, the score of lesions on the tongue was improved on day 2. When 50 μl and 200 μl of S-PT84 (10 mg/ml) were administered three times into the oral cavity (0.5 mg × 3) and the stomach (2 mg × 3) of the same mouse model, the number of viable Candida cells in the stomach was reduced significantly on day 2. These findings suggest the possibility that S-PT84 has potential as a food ingredient supporting anti-Candida treatment, especially for Candida infection in the gastrointestinal tract.

  8. Genistein regulates tumor microenvironment and exhibits anticancer effect in dimethyl hydrazine-induced experimental colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sekar, Vasudevan; Anandasadagopan, Suresh Kumar; Ganapasam, Sudhandiran

    2016-11-12

    Colon cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality, worldwide. Cancer stem cells are attractive targets for therapeutic interventions since their abnormal growth may trigger tumor initiation, progression, and recurrence. Colon cancer in rats were induced with 1, 2-dimethyl hydrazine (DMH) and treated with genistein, an isoflavone rich in the soy food products, which also possesses various biological activities. Genistein treatment regulates enzymatic and non-enzymatic anti-oxidants in the DMH-induced colonic tissue microenvironment. Alcian blue staining in colonic tissue reveals that mucin secretion was found to be depleted in DMH-induced group of animals. The alterations were normalized in the genistein-treated groups. Also, the mast cell population and collagen deposition were reduced as compared to induced group. Genistein treatment reduces the prognostic marker Argyrophilic nuclear organizer region (AgNOR) and proliferating cell nucleolar antigen (PCNA) in DMH-induced group of rats. DMH administration induces oxidative stress, whereas genistein activates nuclear factor-erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf-2) and its downstream target hemoxygenase-1 (HO-1). Colonic stem cell marker protein CD133, CD44, and β-catenin expressions were found to be increased in DMH-induced group of animals as compared to control group of rats. Genistein treatment suppressed the expression of these stem cell markers suggesting rapid dysfunctional activation and proliferation of colonic stem cell-induced by DMH. The results of this study indicate that genistein administration in rats restored the colonic niche that was damaged by DMH and inhibits colon cancer progression. © 2016 BioFactors, 42(6):623-637, 2016.

  9. Tumor Necrosis Factor, but Not Neutrophils, Alters the Metabolic Profile in Acute Experimental Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Marina C.; Tavares, Luciana P.; Vago, Juliana P.; Batista, Nathália V.; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M.; Vieira, Angelica T.; Menezes, Gustavo B.; Sousa, Lirlândia P.; van de Loo, Fons A. J.; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Amaral, Flávio A.; Ferreira, Adaliene V. M.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic alterations are associated with arthritis apart from obesity. However, it is still unclear which is the underlying process behind these metabolic changes. Here, we investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in this process in an acute model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). Immunized male BALB/c mice received an intra-articular injection of PBS (control) or methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA) into their knees, and were also pre-treated with different drugs: Etanercept, an anti-TNF drug, DF2156A, a CXCR1/2 receptor antagonist, or a monoclonal antibody RB6-8C5 to deplete neutrophils. Local challenge with mBSA evoked an acute neutrophil influx into the knee joint, and enhanced the joint nociception, along with a transient systemic metabolic alteration (higher levels of glucose and lipids, and altered adipocytokines). Pre-treatment with the conventional biological Etanercept, an inhibitor of TNF action, ameliorated the nociception and the acute joint inflammation dominated by neutrophils, and markedly improved many of the altered systemic metabolites (glucose and lipids), adipocytokines and PTX3. However, the lessening of metabolic changes was not due to diminished accumulation of neutrophils in the joint by Etanercept. Reduction of neutrophil recruitment by pre-treating AIA mice with DF2156A, or even the depletion of these cells by using RB6-8C5 reduced all of the inflammatory parameters and hypernociception developed after AIA challenge, but could not prevent the metabolic changes. Therefore, the induction of joint inflammation provoked acute metabolic alterations which were involved with TNF. We suggest that the role of TNF in arthritis-associated metabolic changes is not due to local neutrophils, which are the major cells present in this model, but rather due to cytokines. PMID:26742100

  10. Tumor Necrosis Factor, but Not Neutrophils, Alters the Metabolic Profile in Acute Experimental Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marina C; Tavares, Luciana P; Vago, Juliana P; Batista, Nathália V; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M; Vieira, Angelica T; Menezes, Gustavo B; Sousa, Lirlândia P; van de Loo, Fons A J; Teixeira, Mauro M; Amaral, Flávio A; Ferreira, Adaliene V M

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic alterations are associated with arthritis apart from obesity. However, it is still unclear which is the underlying process behind these metabolic changes. Here, we investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in this process in an acute model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). Immunized male BALB/c mice received an intra-articular injection of PBS (control) or methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA) into their knees, and were also pre-treated with different drugs: Etanercept, an anti-TNF drug, DF2156A, a CXCR1/2 receptor antagonist, or a monoclonal antibody RB6-8C5 to deplete neutrophils. Local challenge with mBSA evoked an acute neutrophil influx into the knee joint, and enhanced the joint nociception, along with a transient systemic metabolic alteration (higher levels of glucose and lipids, and altered adipocytokines). Pre-treatment with the conventional biological Etanercept, an inhibitor of TNF action, ameliorated the nociception and the acute joint inflammation dominated by neutrophils, and markedly improved many of the altered systemic metabolites (glucose and lipids), adipocytokines and PTX3. However, the lessening of metabolic changes was not due to diminished accumulation of neutrophils in the joint by Etanercept. Reduction of neutrophil recruitment by pre-treating AIA mice with DF2156A, or even the depletion of these cells by using RB6-8C5 reduced all of the inflammatory parameters and hypernociception developed after AIA challenge, but could not prevent the metabolic changes. Therefore, the induction of joint inflammation provoked acute metabolic alterations which were involved with TNF. We suggest that the role of TNF in arthritis-associated metabolic changes is not due to local neutrophils, which are the major cells present in this model, but rather due to cytokines.

  11. In Vitro and In Vivo Effects of Tumor Suppressor Gene PTEN on Endometriosis: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Juan; Zhu, Qiaoying; Jia, Xuemei; Yu, Ningzhu; Li, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Background Endometriosis can cause dysmenorrhea and infertility. Its pathogenesis has not yet been clarified and its treatment continues to pose enormous challenges. The protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTEN) gene is a tumor suppressor gene. The aim of this study was to investigate the role and significance of PTEN protein in the occurrence, development, and treatment of endometriosis through changes in apoptosis rate, cell cycle, and angiogenesis. Material/Methods PTEN was overexpressed and silenced in lentiviral vectors and inserted into primary endometrial cells. The changes in cell cycle and apoptosis in the different PTEN expression groups were evaluated using flow cytometry. Vessel growth mimicry was observed using 3-dimensional culture. A human-mouse chimeric endometriosis model was constructed using SCID mice. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry were used to detect pathological changes in ectopic endometrial tissues and the expression of VEGF protein in a human-mouse chimeric endometriosis mouse model. Results PTEN overexpression significantly increased apoptosis and inhibited the cell cycle compared with the silenced and control groups. Furthermore, cells expressing low PTEN levels were better able to undergo vasculogenic mimicry, and exhibited significantly increased angiogenesis compared to cells overexpressing PTEN. We found that ectopic foci were more easily formed in the endometrial tissue of SCID mice with low PTEN expression, and the VEGF expression in this group was relatively high. Conclusions PTEN inhibits the occurrence and development of endometriosis by regulating angiogenesis and the apoptosis and cell cycle of endometrial cells; therefore, we propose that the PTEN gene can be used to treat endometriosis. PMID:27744455

  12. Tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R inhibits human prostate cancer experimental bone metastasis in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Toneri, Makoto; Miwa, Shinji; Zhang, Yong; Hu, Cameron; Yano, Shuya; Matsumoto, Yasunori; Bouvet, Michael; Nakanishi, Hayao; Hoffman, Robert M; Zhao, Ming

    2015-10-13

    Bone metastasis is a frequent occurrence in prostate cancer patients and often is lethal. Zoledronic acid (ZOL) is often used for bone metastasis with limited efficacy. More effective models and treatment methods are required to improve the outcome of prostate cancer patients. In the present study, the effects of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R were analyzed in vitro and in vivo on prostate cancer cells and experimental bone metastasis. Both ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R inhibited the growth of PC-3 cells expressing red fluorescent protien in vitro. To investigate the efficacy of S. typhimurium A1-R on prostate cancer experimental bone metastasis, we established models of both early and advanced stage bone metastasis. The mice were treated with ZOL, S. typhimurium A1-R, and combination therapy of both ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R. ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R inhibited the growth of solitary bone metastases. S. typhimurium A1-R treatment significantly decreased bone metastasis and delayed the appearance of PC-3 bone metastases of multiple mouse models. Additionally, S. typhimurium A1-R treatment significantly improved the overall survival of the mice with multiple bone metastases. The results of the present study indicate that S. typhimurium A1-R is useful to prevent and inhibit prostate cancer bone metastasis and has potential for future clinical use in the adjuvant setting.

  13. Structural and metabolic characterization of RNAs from rats with experimental Guerin tumor - II. metabolic peculiarities of RNAs from the liver and tumor tissues of rats.

    PubMed

    Ratkiewicz, A; Galasinski, W

    1976-01-01

    Metabolic peculiarities of RNAs in the liver of the tumor bearing and in the tumor tissue were found. The synthesis of nuclear RNA in liver of tumor bearing rats is distinctly disordered in comparison to that of control rats. The level of 14C-orotic acid incorporation into RNA of cancer tissue is manifold lower than that into the liver RNA. The studies on turnover rate showed the metabolic heterogeneity of the nuclear RNAs. The part of them showed a short turnover, the other RNAs were degraded much slower.

  14. Phenotype and function of tumor-associated neutrophils and their subsets in early-stage human lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Eruslanov, Evgeniy B

    2017-03-10

    Neutrophils accumulate in many types of human and murine tumors and represent a significant portion of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells. Our current understanding of the role of neutrophils in tumor development has depended primarily on murine models of cancer. However, there are crucial species differences in the evolution of tumors, genetic diversity, immune and inflammatory responses, and intrinsic biology of neutrophils that might have a profound impact on the tumor development and function of neutrophils in mouse versus human tumors. To date, the majority of experimental approaches to study neutrophils in cancer patients have been limited to the examination of circulating blood neutrophils. The phenotype and function of tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs) in humans, particularly in the early stages of tumor development, have not been extensively investigated. Thus, the long-term goal of our work has been to characterize human TANs and determine their specific role in tumor development. Here, we summarize our findings on human TANs obtained from human early stage lung cancer patients. We will describe the phenotypes of different TAN subsets identified in early stage lung tumors, as well as their functional dialog with T cells.

  15. Tumor blood vessel "normalization" improves the therapeutic efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in experimental oral cancer

    SciTech Connect

    D. W. Nigg

    2012-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the efficacy of BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA) to treat tumors in a hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer with no normal tissue radiotoxicity and moderate, albeit reversible, mucositis in precancerous tissue around treated tumors. It is known that boron targeting of the largest possible proportion of tumor cells contributes to the success of BNCT and that tumor blood vessel normalization improves drug delivery to the tumor. Within this context, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of blood vessel normalization on the therapeutic efficacy and potential radiotoxicity of BNCT in the hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer.

  16. Improvement of Parameter Estimations in Tumor Growth Inhibition Models on Xenografted Animals: Handling Sacrifice Censoring and Error Caused by Experimental Measurement on Larger Tumor Sizes.

    PubMed

    Pierrillas, Philippe B; Tod, Michel; Amiel, Magali; Chenel, Marylore; Henin, Emilie

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of censoring due to animal sacrifice on parameter estimates and tumor volume calculated from two diameters in larger tumors during tumor growth experiments in preclinical studies. The type of measurement error that can be expected was also investigated. Different scenarios were challenged using the stochastic simulation and estimation process. One thousand datasets were simulated under the design of a typical tumor growth study in xenografted mice, and then, eight approaches were used for parameter estimation with the simulated datasets. The distribution of estimates and simulation-based diagnostics were computed for comparison. The different approaches were robust regarding the choice of residual error and gave equivalent results. However, by not considering missing data induced by sacrificing the animal, parameter estimates were biased and led to false inferences in terms of compound potency; the threshold concentration for tumor eradication when ignoring censoring was 581 ng.ml(-1), but the true value was 240 ng.ml(-1).

  17. Enterocyte-specific A20 deficiency sensitizes to tumor necrosis factor–induced toxicity and experimental colitis

    PubMed Central

    Vereecke, Lars; Sze, Mozes; Guire, Conor Mc; Rogiers, Brecht; Chu, Yuanyuan; Schmidt-Supprian, Marc; Pasparakis, Manolis

    2010-01-01

    A20 is a nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) target gene that encodes a ubiquitin-editing enzyme that is essential for the termination of NF-κB activation after tumor necrosis factor (TNF) or microbial product stimulation and for the prevention of TNF-induced apoptosis. Mice lacking A20 succumb to inflammation in several organs, including the intestine, and A20 mutations have been associated with Crohn’s disease. However, ablation of NF-κB activity, specifically in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs), promotes intestinal inflammation. As A20 deficiency sensitizes cells to TNF-induced apoptosis yet also promotes NF-κB activity, it is not clear if A20 deficiency in IECs would exacerbate or ameliorate intestinal inflammation. We generated mice lacking A20 specifically in IECs. These mice did not show spontaneous intestinal inflammation but exhibited increased susceptibility to experimental colitis, and their IECs were hypersensitive to TNF-induced apoptosis. The resulting TNF-driven breakdown of the intestinal barrier permitted commensal bacterial infiltration and led to systemic inflammation. These studies define A20 as a major antiapoptotic protein in the intestinal epithelium and further indicate that defects in A20 might contribute to inflammatory bowel disease in humans. PMID:20530205

  18. Successful delivery of docetaxel to rat brain using experimentally developed nanoliposome: a treatment strategy for brain tumor.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Tapan Kumar; Mandal, Dipika; Dey, Goutam; Pal, Murari Mohan; Paul, Paramita; Chakraborty, Samrat; Ali, Kazi Asraf; Mukherjee, Biswajit; Bandyopadhyay, Amal Kumar; Mandal, Mahitosh

    2017-11-01

    Docetaxel (DTX) is found to be very effective against glioma cell in vitro. However, in vivo passage of DTX through BBB is extremely difficult due to the physicochemical and pharmacological characteristics of the drug. No existing formulation is successful in this aspect. Hence, in this study, effort was made to send DTX through blood-brain barrier (BBB) to brain to treat diseases such as solid tumor of brain (glioma) by developing DTX-loaded nanoliposomes. Primarily drug-excipients interaction was evaluated by FTIR spectroscopy. The DTX-loaded nanoliposomes (L-DTX) were prepared by lipid layer hydration technique and characterized physicochemically. In vitro cellular uptake in C6 glioma cells was investigated. FTIR data show that the selected drug and excipients were chemically compatible. The unilamellar vesicle size was less than 50 nm with smooth surface. Drug released slowly from L-DTX in vitro in a sustained manner. The pharmacokinetic data shows more extended action of DTX from L-DTX in experimental rats than the free-drug and Taxotere®. DTX from L-DTX enhanced 100% drug concentration in brain as compared with Taxotere® in 4 h. Thus, nanoliposomes as vehicle may be an encouraging strategy to treat glioma with DTX.

  19. A Dual Target-directed Agent against Interleukin-6 Receptor and Tumor Necrosis Factor α ameliorates experimental arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youngkyun; Yi, Hyoju; Jung, Hyerin; Rim, Yeri Alice; Park, Narae; Kim, Juryun; Jung, Seung Min; Park, Sung-Hwan; Park, Young Woo; Ju, Ji Hyeon

    2016-01-01

    A considerable proportion of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) do not respond to monospecific agents. The purpose of our study was to generate a hybrid form of biologics, targeting tumor-necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R), and determine its anti-arthritic properties in vitro and in vivo. A novel dual target-directed agent (DTA(A7/sTNFR2)) was generated by conjugating soluble TNF receptor 2 (sTNFR2) to the Fc region of A7, a new anti-IL-6R antibody obtained by screening the phage display human antibody library. DTA(A7/sTNFR2) inhibited the proliferation and migration of fibroblast-like synoviocytes from patients with RA (RA-FLS) more efficiently than single target-directed agents. DTA(A7/sTNFR2) also blocked osteoclastogenesis from bone marrow cells. The arthritis severity scores of the experimental arthritis mice with DTA(A7/sTNFR2) tended to be lower than those of mice with IgG, A7, or sTNFR2. Histological data suggested that DTA(A7/sTNFR2) is more efficient than single-target drugs in preventing joint destruction and bone loss. These results were confirmed in vivo using the minicircle system. Taken together, the results show that DTA(A7/sTNFR2) may be a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of RA. PMID:26841833

  20. [Immunologic assessment and acoustic "stressing situation" in an experimental system BALB/c mice, the Tsc-3T3 tumor].

    PubMed

    Favre, R; Grallan, B; Verrier, C; Serafino, X; Carcassonne, Y

    1982-01-18

    Previous results in Hamsters showed enhancement of tumor takes in animals exposed to acoustic aggression. Since this phenomenon could be due to immunodepression, we investigated whether this was the case in a better defined system of inbred BALB/c Mice. The results show that in these conditions, the tumor graft could not transgress a minor histocompatibility antigen nor decrease the protective effects of polyoma virus against tumor challenge and that all the immune tests investigated were unaltered.

  1. In vivo evidence for CD4+ and CD8+ suppressor T cells in vaccination-induced suppression of murine experimental autoimmune thyroiditis

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, J.C.; Kong, Y.C. )

    1991-09-01

    In several experimental autoimmune diseases, including experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT), vaccination with attenuated autoantigen-specific T cells has provided protection against subsequent induction of disease. However, the mechanism(s) of vaccination-induced suppression remains to be clarified. Since the authors have previously shown that suppression generated by pretreatment with mouse thyroglobulin (MTg) or thyroid-stimulating hormone in EAT is mediated by CD4+, not CD8+, suppressor T cells, they examined the role of T cell subsets in vaccination-induced suppression of EAT. Mice were vaccinated with irradiated, MTg-primed, and MTg-activated spleen cells and then challenged. Pretreatment with these cells suppressed EAT induced by immunization with MTg and adjuvant, but not by adoptive transfer of thyroiditogenic cells, suggesting a mechanism of afferent suppression. The activation of suppressor mechanisms did not require CD8+ cells, since mice depleted of CD8+ cells before vaccination showed reduced EAT comparable to control vaccinated mice. Furthermore, depletion of either the CD4+ or the CD8+ subset after vaccination did not significantly abrogate suppression. However, suppression was eliminated by the depletion of both CD4+ and CD8+ cells in vaccinated mice. These results provide evidence for the cooperative effects of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in vaccination-induced suppression of EAT.

  2. Research in radiobiology: Final report of work in progress in immunobiology of experimental host-tumor relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-15

    Our work on the immunobiology of tumors induced in normal mice by non-ionizing radiation and chemical carcinogens has previously demonstrated a correlation between MHC molecule expression and the immunogenicity of tumors in a transplanted syngeneic host. Such that immunogenic or regressive tumors were found to demonstrate higher constitutive or inducible levels of MHC expression, while most virulent, aggressive tumors exhibited a low level of MHC Class I expression. We attributed much of the control of MHC molecule expression by antigen-bearing tumors and normal cells to the immunological status of the host since the host must provide the appropriate stimulus to enhance MHC antigen expression by the invading tumor. Our results with UVR-induced tumors suggested that a significant role is played by the T-cell lymphokine, [gamma]-interferon ([gamma]IFN), in the modulation of MHC molecule expression in vivo. Virulent tumors, induced by boneseeking radionuclides, may be refractory to [gamma]IFN stimulation of MHC molecule expression. It is also possible that certain tumors might be fully responsive to the Class I modulatory influences by [gamma]IFN, but exhibit a reduced capacity to stimulate the synthesis of this lymphokine by host T cells. We present experiments designed to : Describe the virulence, latency period, and transplantation characteristics of [sup 238]PU, [sup 24l]Am, and [sup 228]Th tumors arising as osteogenic sarcomas and hepatic carcinomas, to determine the relationship between inducible expression of MHC Class I molecules by [gamma]IFN and in vivo immunogenicity of these radioisotype-induced tumors, and to elucidate any molecular mechanisms responsible for a lack of responsiveness to a [gamma]IFN failure by the host to induce host [gamma]IFN production.

  3. Research in radiobiology: Final report of work in progress in immunobiology of experimental host-tumor relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-15

    Our work on the immunobiology of tumors induced in normal mice by non-ionizing radiation and chemical carcinogens has previously demonstrated a correlation between MHC molecule expression and the immunogenicity of tumors in a transplanted syngeneic host. Such that immunogenic or regressive tumors were found to demonstrate higher constitutive or inducible levels of MHC expression, while most virulent, aggressive tumors exhibited a low level of MHC Class I expression. We attributed much of the control of MHC molecule expression by antigen-bearing tumors and normal cells to the immunological status of the host since the host must provide the appropriate stimulus to enhance MHC antigen expression by the invading tumor. Our results with UVR-induced tumors suggested that a significant role is played by the T-cell lymphokine, {gamma}-interferon ({gamma}IFN), in the modulation of MHC molecule expression in vivo. Virulent tumors, induced by boneseeking radionuclides, may be refractory to {gamma}IFN stimulation of MHC molecule expression. It is also possible that certain tumors might be fully responsive to the Class I modulatory influences by {gamma}IFN, but exhibit a reduced capacity to stimulate the synthesis of this lymphokine by host T cells. We present experiments designed to : Describe the virulence, latency period, and transplantation characteristics of {sup 238}PU, {sup 24l}Am, and {sup 228}Th tumors arising as osteogenic sarcomas and hepatic carcinomas, to determine the relationship between inducible expression of MHC Class I molecules by {gamma}IFN and in vivo immunogenicity of these radioisotype-induced tumors, and to elucidate any molecular mechanisms responsible for a lack of responsiveness to a {gamma}IFN failure by the host to induce host {gamma}IFN production.

  4. Role of Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in the Production of Prostaglandin E2 and Nitric Oxide during Experimental Murine Paracoccidioidomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Sargi, S. C.; Dalalio, M. M. O.; Moraes, A. G.; Visentainer, J. E. L.; Morais, D. R.; Visentainer, J. V.

    2013-01-01

    There has recently been increased interest in the potential health effects of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on the immune system. Paracoccidioidomycosis is the most important endemic mycosis in Latin America. Macrophages have a fundamental role and act as first line of organism defense. The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of n-3 fatty acids on the production of PGE2 and NO by mice infected with Pb18 and fed a diet enriched with LNA for 8 weeks. To study the effect of omega-3 fatty acids on macrophage activity during experimental paracoccidioidomycosis, mice were infected with Pb18 and fed a diet supplemented with LNA. PGE2 in the serum of animals was analyzed and NO in the supernatants of macrophages cultured and challenged in vitro with Pb18 was measured. Omega-3 fatty acids seemed to decrease the production of PGE2 in vivo in the infected group fed an LNA-supplemented diet during the 4th and 8th weeks of the experiment. At the same time, we observed an increase in synthesis of NO by peritoneal macrophages in this group. Omega-3 fatty acids thus appear to have an immunomodulatory effect in paracoccidioidomycosis. PMID:24455741

  5. Maladjusted host immune responses induce experimental cerebral malaria-like pathology in a murine Borrelia and Plasmodium co-infection model.

    PubMed

    Normark, Johan; Nelson, Maria; Engström, Patrik; Andersson, Marie; Björk, Rafael; Moritz, Thomas; Fahlgren, Anna; Bergström, Sven

    2014-01-01

    In the Plasmodium infected host, a balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory responses is required to clear the parasites without inducing major host pathology. Clinical reports suggest that bacterial infection in conjunction with malaria aggravates disease and raises both mortality and morbidity in these patients. In this study, we investigated the immune responses in BALB/c mice, co-infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 parasites and the relapsing fever bacterium Borrelia duttonii. In contrast to single infections, we identified in the co-infected mice a reduction of L-Arginine levels in the serum. It indicated diminished bioavailability of NO, which argued for a dysfunctional endothelium. Consistent with this, we observed increased sequestration of CD8+ cells in the brain as well over expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM by brain endothelial cells. Co-infected mice further showed an increased inflammatory response through IL-1β and TNF-α, as well as inability to down regulate the same through IL-10. In addition we found loss of synchronicity of pro- and anti-inflammatory signals seen in dendritic cells and macrophages, as well as increased numbers of regulatory T-cells. Our study shows that a situation mimicking experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) is induced in co-infected mice due to loss of timing and control over regulatory mechanisms in antigen presenting cells.

  6. Enhanced Ablation of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound with Microbubbles: An Experimental Study on Rabbit Hepatic VX2 Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    He Wei; Wang Wei Zhou Ping; Wang, Yixiang J.; Zhou Peng; Li Ruizhen; Wang Jinsheng; Ahuja, Anil T.

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to assess the enhanced effect of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation with microbubbles on rabbit hepatic VX2 tumors and to compare the detection sensitivity of CEUS and CECT to determine the residual viable tissue after ablation of HIFU. Methods: Forty rabbits with hepatic VX2 tumors were randomly separated into two groups (20 animals per group) before HIFU ablation. A bolus of 0.2 mL of saline or a microbubble-based ultrasound (US) contrast agent was injected intravenously to group I rabbits and group II rabbits, respectively. The HIFU ablation procedure was started 15 s after the injection. Tumors were examined with grayscale contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) immediately before and after HIFU ablation. Histopathologic assessment was performed immediately after treatment imaging. Results: Before ablation, intense contrast enhancement during arterial phase was observed at the whole tumors or the periphery of the tumors by CEUS and CECT. Lower HIFU energy was used in group II than in group I (P < 0.001). Histopathologic assessment revealed local residual viable tumor tissues due to incomplete ablation in 47.4% (9/19) of tumors in group I and 10% (2/20) of tumors in group II (P < 0.05). The concordance rate of CEUS (90.9%) with histopathology on residual tumor detection was higher than that of CECT (27.3%, P < 0.05). Conclusions: Introduction of the microbubble agent enhances HIFU therapeutic efficacy. CEUS proves to have high sensitivity in assessment of residual viable rabbit VX2 tumor after HIFU.

  7. Adoptive transfer of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis after in vitro treatment with recombinant murine interleukin-12. Preferential expansion of interferon-gamma-producing cells and increased expression of macrophage-associated inducible nitric oxide synthase as immunomodulatory mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Waldburger, K. E.; Hastings, R. C.; Schaub, R. G.; Goldman, S. J.; Leonard, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    In an adoptive transfer model of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis, stimulation of lymph node cells with proteolipid protein and recombinant murine interleukin (rmIL)-12 before cell transfer accelerated the onset and exacerbates clinical disease. In vitro stimulation with proteolipid protein in the presence of rmIL-12 was associated with an increase in interferon-gamma-producing cells and a decrease in IL-4-producing cells, indicating a preferential expansion of Th1 effector cells. This was supported by the finding that severe disease with rapid onset could be transferred with as few as 10 x 10(6) rmIL-12-stimulated lymph node cells. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed that the accelerated onset of disease after in vitro stimulation with rmIL-12 coincided with an acute inflammatory response in the central nervous system. At peak disease, both control and rmIL-12 treatment groups exhibited extensive cellular infiltration with characteristic perivascular cuffing. No notable differences in either the cellular composition or cytokine expression within the lesions were seen between groups. However, the frequency of macrophages that stained positively for inducible nitric oxide synthase was increased in animals challenged with rmIL-12-treated lymph node cells. The results suggest that, in addition to promoting the preferential expansion of interferon-gamma-producing cells by rmIL-12 in vitro, secondary in vivo effects leading to macrophage activation and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression may contribute to the severe and protracted course of central nervous system inflammation in this model. Images Figure 2 PMID:8579100

  8. Tumor-associated macrophages: effectors of angiogenesis and tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Coffelt, Seth B; Hughes, Russell; Lewis, Claire E

    2009-08-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are a prominent inflammatory cell population in many tumor types residing in both perivascular and avascular, hypoxic regions of these tissues. Analysis of TAMs in human tumor biopsies has shown that they express a variety of tumor-promoting factors and evidence from transgenic murine tumor models has provided unequivocal evidence for the importance of these cells in driving angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, immunosuppression, and metastasis. This review will summarize the mechanisms by which monocytes are recruited into tumors, their myriad, tumor-promoting functions within tumors, and the influence of the tumor microenvironment in driving these activities. We also discuss recent attempts to both target/destroy TAMs and exploit them as delivery vehicles for anti-cancer gene therapy.

  9. Daikenchuto (TU-100) Suppresses Tumor Development in the Azoxymethane and APC(min/+) Mouse Models of Experimental Colon Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hasebe, Takumu; Matsukawa, Jun; Ringus, Daina; Miyoshi, Jun; Hart, John; Kaneko, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Kono, Toru; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Kohgo, Yutaka; Wang, Chong-Zi; Yuan, Chun-Su; Bissonnette, Marc; Musch, Mark W; Chang, Eugene B

    2017-01-01

    Chemopreventative properties of traditional medicines and underlying mechanisms of action are incompletely investigated. This study demonstrates that dietary daikenchuto (TU-100), comprised of ginger, ginseng, and Japanese pepper effectively suppresses intestinal tumor development and progression in the azoxymethane (AOM) and APC(min/+) mouse models. For the AOM model, TU-100 was provided after the first of six biweekly AOM injections. Mice were sacrificed at 30 weeks. APC(min/+) mice were fed diet without or with TU-100 starting at 6 weeks, and sacrificed at 24 weeks. In both models, dietary TU-100 decreased tumor size. In APC (min/+) mice, the number of small intestinal tumors was significantly decreased. In the AOM model, both TU-100 and Japanese ginseng decreased colon tumor numbers. Decreased Ki-67 and β-catenin immunostaining and activation of numerous transduction pathways involved in tumor initiation and progression were observed. EGF receptor expression and stimulation/phosphorylation in vitro were investigated in C2BBe1 cells. TU-100, ginger, and 6-gingerol suppressed EGF receptor induced Akt activation. TU-100 and ginseng and to a lesser extent ginger or 6-gingerol inhibited EGF ERK1/2 activation. TU-100 and some of its components and metabolites of these components inhibit tumor progression in two mouse models of colon cancer by blocking downstream pathways of EGF receptor activation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Radiosensitization of two murine fibrosarcomas with 6-thioguanine.

    PubMed

    Kim, J H; Alfieri, A A; Kim, S H; Hong, S S

    1990-03-01

    In Vivo murine tumor experiments were carried out to determine whether 6-thioguanine (6-TG) could enhance the cytotoxic effects of radiation on tumors. The combined effects of single and fractionated x-irradiation were evaluated on the transplanted methylcholanthrene induced fibrosarcoma (Meth-A) in BALB/c mice, a moderately radioresponsive tumor and on the radiation induced fibrosarcoma (RIF) in C3H/He mice, a highly radioresistant tumor. The combined treatment of single administration of 6-TG (25 mg/kg) and of x-irradiation (20 Gy) on Meth-A tumors produced more than 90% tumor control, whereas the radiation alone resulted in less than 5% tumor control. The radiosensitizing effect by 6-TG was higher when the drug was administered either 1 to 8 hr prior to or 24 hr after x-irradiation. The dose modification factor of single dose 6-TG (10 mg/kg) is estimated to be 1.47 for Meth-A tumor and 1.25 for RIF tumor. The tumor control rates of fractionated irradiation alone and with concomitant 6-TG in Meth-A tumors were 14% and 59%, respectively. Based on the studies reported here and well documented pharmacokinetics in humans, it is suggested that combined radiation therapy and 6-TG may provide an enhanced therapeutic effect even in tumor varieties where the drug has no apparent anti-tumor activity on non-irradiated cells.

  11. A new experimental system for irradiating tumors in mice using a linear accelerator under specific pathogen-free conditions.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, M; Inamura, K; Tahara, S; Kurabayashi, Y; Akagi, T; Asaumi, J; Togami, I; Takemoto, M; Honda, O; Morioka, Y; Kawasaki, S; Hiraki, Y

    1999-06-01

    We developed a reliable system for the irradiation of xenografted tumors in mice which allows for accurate local irradiation under specific pathogen-free conditions. The system presented here consists of acrylic supports for mice and an acrylic box connected to a pump through 0.22 microns pore-sized filters. Mice with xenotransplanted tumors growing on their right hind legs were set on the supports and put into the box in a laminar flow hood. The tumors of 7 mice were irradiated simultaneously with X-rays of 6 and 10 MV generated by a linear accelerator at a dose rate of 3.1-4.7 Gy/min. The air was ventilated through filters during irradiation in the closed box. Microorganism tests confirmed that no bacteria entered or left the box. One of the significant characteristics of this setup is that it allows for irradiation under conditions of acute hypoxia, which is obtained using an integrated tourniquet. The dose variation among 7 tumors was less than 1%. The rest of the mouse's body was shielded effectively by a half-field technique and a lead block. As a result, the whole body dose for the mice was 0-4% of the total dose absorbed by the tumor. Due to the high dose rate and the ability to irradiate 7 mice simultaneously under specific pathogen-free conditions, this new system can be considered a time-saving and valuable tool for radiation oncology research.

  12. Targeting tumor-associated macrophages in an experimental glioma model with a recombinant immunotoxin to folate receptor beta.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Taku; Tanaka, Masashi; Tsuneyoshi, Yasuhiro; Xu, Baohui; Michie, Sara A; Hasui, Kazuhisa; Hirano, Hirofumi; Arita, Kazunori; Matsuyama, Takami

    2009-10-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are frequently found in glioblastomas and a high degree of macrophage infiltration is associated with a poor prognosis for glioblastoma patients. However, it is unclear whether TAMs in glioblastomas promote tumor growth. In this study, we found that folate receptor beta (FR beta) was expressed on macrophages in human glioblastomas and a rat C6 glioma implanted subcutaneously in nude mice. To target FR beta-expressing TAMs, we produced a recombinant immunotoxin consisting of immunoglobulin heavy and light chain Fv portions of an anti-mouse FR beta monoclonal antibody and Pseudomonas exotoxin A. Injection of the immunotoxin into C6 glioma xenografts in nude mice significantly depleted TAMs and reduced tumor growth. The immunotoxin targeting FR beta-expressing macrophages will provide a therapeutic tool for human glioblastomas.

  13. In-vivo imaging of nanoshell extravasation from solid tumor vasculature by photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Meng-Lin; Schwartz, Jon A.; Wang, James; Stoica, George; Wang, Lihong V.

    2007-02-01

    In this study, high resolution reflection-mode (backward-mode) photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) is used to noninvasively image progressive extravasation and accumulation of nanoshells within a solid tumor in vivo. This study takes advantage of the strong near-infrared absorption of nanoshells, a novel type of optically tunable gold nanoparticles that tend to extravasate from leaky tumor vasculatures (i.e., passive targeting) via the "enhanced permeability and retention" effect due to their nanoscale size. Tumors were grown in immunocompetent BALB/c mice by subcutaneous inoculation of CT26.wt murine colon carcinoma cells. PEGylated nanoshells with a peak optical absorption at ~800 nm were intravenously administered. Pre-scans prior to nanoshell injection were taken using a 584-nm laser source to highlight blood content and an 800-nm laser source to mark the background limit for nanoshell accumulation. After injection, the three-dimensional nanoshell distribution inside the tumor was monitored by PAM for 7 hours. Experimental results show that nanoshell accumulation is heterogeneous in tumors: more concentrated within the tumor cortex and largely absent from the tumor core. This correlates with others' observation that drug delivery within tumor cores is ineffective because of both high interstitial pressure and tendency to necrosis of tumor cores. Since nanoshells have been recently applied to thermal therapy for subcutaneous tumors, we anticipate that PAM will be important to this therapeutic technique.

  14. Chemokines, costimulatory molecules and fusion proteins for the immunotherapy of solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Melissa G; Russell, Sarah M; Bass, Rikki S; Epstein, Alan L

    2011-11-01

    In this article, the role of chemokines and costimulatory molecules in the immunotherapy of experimental murine solid tumors and immunotherapy used in ongoing clinical trials are presented. Chemokine networks regulate physiologic cell migration that may be disrupted to inhibit antitumor immune responses or co-opted to promote tumor growth and metastasis in cancer. Recent studies highlight the potential use of chemokines in cancer immunotherapy to improve innate and adaptive cell interactions and to recruit immune effector cells into the tumor microenvironment. Another critical component of antitumor immune responses is antigen priming and activation of effector cells. Reciprocal expression and binding of costimulatory molecules and their ligands by antigen-presenting cells and naive lymphocytes ensures robust expansion, activity and survival of tumor-specific effector cells in vivo. Immunotherapy approaches using agonist antibodies or fusion proteins of immunomodulatory molecules significantly inhibit tumor growth and boost cell-mediated immunity. To localize immune stimulation to the tumor site, a series of fusion proteins consisting of a tumor-targeting monoclonal antibody directed against tumor necrosis and chemokines or costimulatory molecules were generated and tested in tumor-bearing mice. While several of these reagents were initially shown to have therapeutic value, combination therapies with methods to delete suppressor cells had the greatest effect on tumor growth. In conclusion, a key conclusion that has emerged from these studies is that successful immunotherapy will require both advanced methods of immunostimulation and the removal of immunosuppression in the host.

  15. Observation the Distribution of Titanium Dioxide Nano-particles in an Experimental Tumor Tissue by a Raman Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibin, Andriana B.; Kume, Kyo; Tsutumi, Kotaro; Fukunaga, Yukihiro; Ito, Shinnji; Imamura, Yoshiaki; Miyoshi, Norio

    2011-12-01

    One of the most important technologies of the 21st century is nanotechnology. Many researchers will have been focusing to employ nanotechnology for medical purpose. Our team was interested in focusing to the application of titanium dioxide (TiO2), as nano-particles, for medical purpose especially drug delivery for the cancer and tumor. The administrations of TiO2 nano-particle via the oral administration of the interface layer particles into the mouse transplanted squamous-cell-carcinoma (SCC) have already conducted. Histology study and Raman spectroscope data were applied to the serial section of frozen tumor tissue in order to observe the distribution of TiO2 nano-particle within the SCC tissue. We used near infrared laser Raman microscopy system, the wavelength is 785 nm. Hematoxyline & eosin stained image and the Raman microscopy system were also used for analyzing the photodynamic therapy (PDT) with 5-ALA and TiO2-particle-sol [TiO2]-ALA-treated tumor samples. As the result, we demonstrated the distribution of TiO2, where TiO2 particles were detected to be distributed in the blood vessel at the bleeding in the SCC tumor tissue. PDT with TiO2 nano-particles that is presented in the SCC-transplanted mouse tumor model can cause the enhancement of photodynamic reaction by nano-particles. Therefore, the combinations of PDT with TiO2 nano-particles may have a possibility to be introduced to the human body in near future for diagnose and PDT treatment of the tumor.

  16. Tumor blood vessel "normalization" improves the therapeutic efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in experimental oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Molinari, Ana J; Pozzi, Emiliano C C; Monti Hughes, Andrea; Heber, Elisa M; Garabalino, Marcela A; Thorp, Silvia I; Miller, Marcelo; Itoiz, Maria E; Aromando, Romina F; Nigg, David W; Trivillin, Verónica A; Schwint, Amanda E

    2012-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the efficacy of BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA) to treat tumors in a hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer with no normal tissue radiotoxicity and moderate, albeit reversible, mucositis in precancerous tissue around treated tumors. It is known that boron targeting of the largest possible proportion of tumor cells contributes to the success of BNCT and that tumor blood vessel normalization improves drug delivery to the tumor. Within this context, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of blood vessel normalization on the therapeutic efficacy and potential radiotoxicity of BNCT in the hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer. Blood vessel normalization was induced by two doses of thalidomide in tumor-bearing hamsters on 2 consecutive days. All studies in thalidomide-treated animals were performed 48 h after the first dose of thalidomide, previously established as the window of normalization. Biodistribution studies were performed with BPA at a dose of 15.5 mg (10)B/kg in thalidomide-treated (Th+) and untreated (Th-) tumor-bearing hamsters. The effect of blood vessel normalization prior to BPA administration on the efficacy of BNCT was assessed in in vivo BNCT studies at the RA-3 Nuclear Reactor in tumor-bearing hamsters. Group I was treated with BPA-BNCT after treatment with thalidomide (Th+ BPA-BNCT). Group II was treated with BPA-BNCT alone (Th- BPA-BNCT). Group III was treated with the beam only after treatment with thalidomide (Th+ BO), and Group IV was treated with the beam only (Th- BO). Groups I and II were given the same dose of BPA (15.5 mg (10)B/kg), and all groups (I-IV) were exposed to the same neutron fluence. Two additional groups were treated with the beam only at a higher dose to exacerbate mucositis in precancerous tissue and to explore the potential direct protective effect of thalidomide on radiation-induced mucositis in a scenario of more severe toxicity, i.e. Group V (Th+ hdBO) and Group

  17. The diaryl oxazole PC-046 is a tubulin-binding agent with experimental anti-tumor efficacy in hematologic cancers.

    PubMed

    Landowski, Terry H; Samulitis, Betty K; Dorr, Robert T

    2013-12-01

    Microtubule targeting agents are among the most widely used chemotherapeutics for both solid and hematological malignancies. This study characterizes the diaryl-oxazole based anticancer agent PC-046, which was originally identified for development based on selective activity in deleted in pancreas cancer locus 4 (DPC4/SMAD4) deficient tumors. PC-046 has growth inhibitory activity in a variety of tumor types in vitro, and efficacy in SCID mice was shown in human tumor xenografts of MV-4-11 acute myeloid leukemia, MM.1S multiple myeloma, and DU-145 prostate cancer. Pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated relatively high oral bioavailability (71%) with distribution to both plasma and bone marrow. No myelosuppression was seen in non-tumor bearing SCID mice given a single dose just under the acute lethal dose. The COMPARE algorithm in the NCI-60 cell line panel demonstrated that PC-046 closely correlated to other known tubulin destabilizing agents (correlation coefficients ≈0.7 for vincristine and vinblastine). Mechanism of action studies showed cell cycle arrest in metaphase and inhibition of tubulin polymerization. Overall, these studies show that PC-046 is a synthetically-derived, small molecule microtubule destabilizing agent. Advantages over existing microtubule destabilizing agents include ease of synthesis, lack of MDR cross-resistance, good oral bioavailability and the lack of acute myelotoxicity.

  18. The Diaryl Oxazole PC-046 is a Tubulin-Binding Agent with Experimental Anti-Tumor Efficacy in Hematologic Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Landowski, Terry H.; Samulitis, Betty K.; Dorr, Robert T.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Microtubule targeting agents are among the most widely used chemotherapeutics for both solid and hematological malignancies. This study characterizes the diaryl-oxazole based anticancer agent PC-046, which was originally identified for development based on selective activity in deleted in pancreas cancer locus 4 (DPC4/SMAD4) deficient tumors. PC-046 has growth inhibitory activity in a variety of tumor types in vitro, and efficacy in SCID mice was shown in human tumor xenografts of MV-4-11 acute myeloid leukemia, MM.1S multiple myeloma, and DU-145 prostate cancer. Pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated relatively high oral bioavailability (71%) with distribution to both plasma and bone marrow. No myelosuppression was seen in non-tumor bearing SCID mice given a single dose just under the acute lethal dose. The COMPARE algorithm in the NCI-60 cell line panel demonstrated that PC-046 closely correlated to other known tubulin destabilizing agents (correlation coefficients ≈ 0.7 for vincristine and vinblastine). Mechanism of action studies showed cell cycle arrest in metaphase and inhibition of tubulin polymerization. Overall, these studies show that PC-046 is a synthetically-derived, small molecule microtubule destabilizing agent. Advantages over existing microtubule destabilizing agents include ease of synthesis, lack of MDR cross-resistance, good oral bioavailability and the lack of acute myelotoxicity. PMID:24037082

  19. Inoculum effect on the efficacies of amoxicillin-clavulanate, piperacillin-tazobactam, and imipenem against extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing and non-ESBL-producing Escherichia coli in an experimental murine sepsis model.

    PubMed

    Docobo-Pérez, F; López-Cerero, L; López-Rojas, R; Egea, P; Domínguez-Herrera, J; Rodríguez-Baño, J; Pascual, A; Pachón, J

    2013-05-01

    Escherichia coli is commonly involved in infections with a heavy bacterial burden. Piperacillin-tazobactam and carbapenems are among the recommended empirical treatments for health care-associated complicated intra-abdominal infections. In contrast to amoxicillin-clavulanate, both have reduced in vitro activity in the presence of high concentrations of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing and non-ESBL-producing E. coli bacteria. Our goal was to compare the efficacy of these antimicrobials against different concentrations of two clinical E. coli strains, one an ESBL-producer and the other a non-ESBL-producer, in a murine sepsis model. An experimental sepsis model {~5.5 log10 CFU/g [low inoculum concentration (LI)] or ~7.5 log(10) CFU/g [high inoculum concentration (HI)]} using E. coli strains ATCC 25922 (non-ESBL producer) and Ec1062 (CTX-M-14 producer), which are susceptible to the three antimicrobials, was used. Amoxicillin-clavulanate (50/12.5 mg/kg given intramuscularly [i.m.]), piperacillin-tazobactam (25/3.125 mg/kg given intraperitoneally [i.p.]), and imipenem (30 mg/kg i.m.) were used. Piperacillin-tazobactam and imipenem reduced spleen ATCC 25922 strain concentrations (-2.53 and -2.14 log10 CFU/g [P < 0.05, respectively]) in the HI versus LI groups, while amoxicillin-clavulanate maintained its efficacy (-1.01 log10 CFU/g [no statistically significant difference]). Regarding the Ec1062 strain, the antimicrobials showed lower efficacy in the HI than in the LI groups: -0.73, -1.89, and -1.62 log10 CFU/g (P < 0.05, for piperacillin-tazobactam, imipenem, and amoxicillin-clavulanate, respectively, although imipenem and amoxicillin-clavulanate were more efficacious than piperacillin-tazobactam). An adapted imipenem treatment (based on the time for which the serum drug concentration remained above the MIC obtained with a HI of the ATCC 25922 strain) improved its efficacy to -1.67 log10 CFU/g (P < 0.05). These results suggest that amoxicillin

  20. Inoculum Effect on the Efficacies of Amoxicillin-Clavulanate, Piperacillin-Tazobactam, and Imipenem against Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase (ESBL)-Producing and Non-ESBL-Producing Escherichia coli in an Experimental Murine Sepsis Model

    PubMed Central

    López-Cerero, L.; López-Rojas, R.; Egea, P.; Domínguez-Herrera, J.; Rodríguez-Baño, J.; Pascual, A.; Pachón, J.

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli is commonly involved in infections with a heavy bacterial burden. Piperacillin-tazobactam and carbapenems are among the recommended empirical treatments for health care-associated complicated intra-abdominal infections. In contrast to amoxicillin-clavulanate, both have reduced in vitro activity in the presence of high concentrations of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing and non-ESBL-producing E. coli bacteria. Our goal was to compare the efficacy of these antimicrobials against different concentrations of two clinical E. coli strains, one an ESBL-producer and the other a non-ESBL-producer, in a murine sepsis model. An experimental sepsis model {∼5.5 log10 CFU/g [low inoculum concentration (LI)] or ∼7.5 log10 CFU/g [high inoculum concentration (HI)]} using E. coli strains ATCC 25922 (non-ESBL producer) and Ec1062 (CTX-M-14 producer), which are susceptible to the three antimicrobials, was used. Amoxicillin-clavulanate (50/12.5 mg/kg given intramuscularly [i.m.]), piperacillin-tazobactam (25/3.125 mg/kg given intraperitoneally [i.p.]), and imipenem (30 mg/kg i.m.) were used. Piperacillin-tazobactam and imipenem reduced spleen ATCC 25922 strain concentrations (−2.53 and −2.14 log10 CFU/g [P < 0.05, respectively]) in the HI versus LI groups, while amoxicillin-clavulanate maintained its efficacy (−1.01 log10 CFU/g [no statistically significant difference]). Regarding the Ec1062 strain, the antimicrobials showed lower efficacy in the HI than in the LI groups: −0.73, −1.89, and −1.62 log10 CFU/g (P < 0.05, for piperacillin-tazobactam, imipenem, and amoxicillin-clavulanate, respectively, although imipenem and amoxicillin-clavulanate were more efficacious than piperacillin-tazobactam). An adapted imipenem treatment (based on the time for which the serum drug concentration remained above the MIC obtained with a HI of the ATCC 25922 strain) improved its efficacy to −1.67 log10 CFU/g (P < 0.05). These results suggest that

  1. Role of Notch/VEGF-Receptor 3 in Breast Tumor Angiogenesis and Lymphangiogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    role for notch in murine mammary tumorigenesis , progress has been made in developing two new transgenic lines that will allow for conditional activation...in murine mammary tumorigenesis , progress has been made in developing two new transgenic lines that will allow for conditional activation or...murine mammary tumorigenesis and 2) studies of the inhibitory effects of a Notch antagonist (Notch decoy) in a murine mammary tumor model. To study the

  2. Role of Notch/VEGF-Receptor 3 in Breast Tumor Angiogenesis and Lymphangiogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    in a murine mammary tumor model. In aim 1, to study the role for notch in murine mammary tumorigenesis , progress has been made in developing two new...ACCOMPLISHMENTS • Developed a EF-1-flox-NotchIC mouse line that expresses an activated form of Notch1 with within the murine vasculature when...interaction between Notch and VEGFR-3 in breast cancer. To study the role for notch in murine mammary tumorigenesis , progress has been made in developing

  3. MR guided thermal therapy of pancreatic tumors with endoluminal, intraluminal and interstitial catheter-based ultrasound devices: preliminary theoretical and experimental investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Punit; Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Scott, Serena J.; Jones, Peter; Hensley, Daniel; Holbrook, Andrew; Plata, Juan; Sommer, Graham; Diederich, Chris J.

    2013-02-01

    Image-guided thermal interventions have been proposed for potential palliative and curative treatments of pancreatic tumors. Catheter-based ultrasound devices offer the potential for temporal and 3D spatial control of the energy deposition profile. The objective of this study was to apply theoretical and experimental techniques to investigate the feasibility of endogastric, intraluminal and transgastric catheter-based ultrasound for MR guided thermal therapy of pancreatic tumors. The transgastric approach involves insertion of a catheter-based ultrasound applicator (array of 1.5 mm OD x 10 mm transducers, 360° or sectored 180°, ~7 MHz frequency, 13-14G cooling catheter) directly into the pancreas, either endoscopically or via image-guided percutaneous placement. An intraluminal applicator, of a more flexible but similar construct, was considered for endoscopic insertion directly into the pancreatic or biliary duct. An endoluminal approach was devised based on an ultrasound transducer assembly (tubular, planar, curvilinear) enclosed in a cooling balloon which is endoscopically positioned within the stomach or duodenum, adjacent to pancreatic targets from within the GI tract. A 3D acoustic bio-thermal model was implemented to calculate acoustic energy distributions and used a FEM solver to determine the transient temperature and thermal dose profiles in tissue during heating. These models were used to determine transducer parameters and delivery strategies and to study the feasibility of ablating 1-3 cm diameter tumors located 2-10 mm deep in the pancreas, while thermally sparing the stomach wall. Heterogeneous acoustic and thermal properties were incorporated, including approximations for tumor desmoplasia and dynamic changes during heating. A series of anatomic models based on imaging scans of representative patients were used to investigate the three approaches. Proof of concept (POC) endogastric and transgastric applicators were fabricated and experimentally

  4. Immune Adjuvant Activity of Pre-Resectional Radiofrequency Ablation Protects against Local and Systemic Recurrence in Aggressive Murine Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Fumito; Ku, Amy W.; Bucsek, Mark J.; Muhitch, Jason B.; Vardam-Kaur, Trupti; Kim, Minhyung; Fisher, Daniel T.; Camoriano, Marta; Khoury, Thaer; Skitzki, Joseph J.; Gollnick, Sandra O.; Evans, Sharon S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose While surgical resection is a cornerstone of cancer treatment, local and distant recurrences continue to adversely affect outcome in a significant proportion of patients. Evidence that an alternative debulking strategy involving radiofrequency ablation (RFA) induces antitumor immunity prompted the current investigation of the efficacy of performing RFA prior to surgical resection (pre-resectional RFA) in a preclinical mouse model. Experimental Design Therapeutic efficacy and systemic immune responses were assessed following pre-resectional RFA treatment of murine CT26 colon adenocarcinoma. Results Treatment with pre-resectional RFA significantly delayed tumor growth and improved overall survival compared to sham surgery, RFA, or resection alone. Mice in the pre-resectional RFA group that achieved a complete response demonstrated durable antitumor immunity upon tumor re-challenge. Failure to achieve a therapeutic benefit in immunodeficient mice confirmed that tumor control by pre-resectional RFA depends on an intact adaptive immune response rather than changes in physical parameters that make ablated tumors more amenable to a complete surgical excision. RFA causes a marked increase in intratumoral CD8+ T lymphocyte infiltration, thus substantially enhancing the ratio of CD8+ effector T cells: FoxP3+ regulatory T cells. Importantly, pre-resectional RFA significantly increases the number of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells within the tumor microenvironment and tumor-draining lymph node but had no impact on infiltration by myeloid-derived suppressor cells, M1 macrophages or M2 macrophages at tumor sites or in peripheral lymphoid organs (i.e., spleen). Finally, pre-resectional RFA of primary tumors delayed growth of distant tumors through a mechanism that depends on systemic CD8+ T cell-mediated antitumor immunity. Conclusion Improved survival and antitumor systemic immunity elicited by pre-resectional RFA support the translational potential of this neoadjuvant

  5. Moloney murine leukemia virus activates NF-kappa B.

    PubMed Central

    Pak, J; Faller, D V

    1996-01-01

    Nonacutely transforming retroviruses, such as Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV), differ from transforming viruses in their mechanisms of tumor induction. While the transforming viruses cause tumors by transduction of oncogenes, the leukemia retroviruses, lacking oncogenes, employ other mechanisms, including promoter insertion and enhancer activation. Although these two mechanisms occur in many tumors induced by leukemia viruses, a substantial proportion of such tumors do not show site-specific proviral insertions. Thus, other, unidentified virus-driven mechanisms may participate in tumorigenesis. In these studies, we show that infection of cells by M-MuLV activates expression of Rel family transcription factors. In murine cells chronically infected with M-MuLV, gel shift analyses with kappaB DNA-binding motifs from the murine immunoglobulin kappa light chain enhancer demonstrated induction of at least two distinct kappaB enhancer-binding complexes. Supershifting and immunoblotting analyses defined p50, p52, RelB, and c-Rel subunits as constituents of these virus-induced protein complexes. Transient transfections performed with kappaB-dependent reporter plasmids showed transcriptional activation in M-MuLV-infected cells relative to uninfected cells. Induction of Rel/NF-kappaB transcription factor activity by M-MuLV infection may prove relevant to the mechanism of M-MuLV-induced leukemia. PMID:8648762

  6. Ultrastructural characterization of craniopharyngioma at the tumor boundary: A structural comparison with an experimental toxic model using "oil machinery" fluid, with emphasis on Rosenthal fibers.

    PubMed

    Tena-Suck, Martha Lilia; Morales-Del Ángel, Andrea Y; Hernández-Campos, María Elena; Fernández-Valverde, Francisca; Ortíz-Plata, Alma; Hernández, Alma Delia; Santamaría, Abel

    2015-10-01

    Craniopharyngiomas (CPs) are cystic, encapsulated, slow-growing epithelial tumors. CPs can be aggressive forms invading and resorting surrounding structures of adjacent brain tissue, where Rosenthal fibers (RFs) are expressed. The aim of this study was to investigate the ultrastructure of these fibers in human biopsies and compare it with an experimental toxic model produced by the cortical infusion of the oil cyst fluid ("Oil machinery" fluid or OMF) from CPs to rats. For this purpose, the CPs from ten patients were examined by light and electron microscopy. OMF was administered to rats intracortically. Immunohistochemical detection of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin was assessed. In both freshly obtained CPs and rat brain tissue, the presence of abundant cellular debris, lipid-laden macrophages, reactive gliosis, inflammation and extracellular matrix destruction were seen. Ultrastructural results suggest focal pathological disturbances and an altered microenvironment surrounding the tumor-brain junction, with an enhanced presence of RFs in human tumors. In contrast, in the rat brain different degrees of cellular disorganization with aberrant filament-filament interactions and protein aggregation were seen, although RFs were absent. Our immunohistochemical findings in CPs also revealed an enhanced expression of GFAP and vimentin in RFs at the peripheral, but not at the central (body) level. Through these findings we hypothesize that the continuous OMF release at the CPs boundary may cause tissue alterations, including damaging of the extracellular matrix, and possibly contributing to RFs formation, a condition that was not possible to reproduce in the experimental model. The presence of RFs at the CPs boundary might be considered as a major criterion for the degree of CPs invasiveness to normal tissue. The lack of RFs reactivity in the experimental model reveals that the invasive component of CPs is not present in the OMF, although the fluid

  7. Apoptosis mediated chemosensitization of tumor cells to 5-fluorouracil on supplementation of fish oil in experimental colon carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rani, Isha; Sharma, Bhoomika; Kumar, Sandeep; Kaur, Satinder; Agnihotri, Navneet

    2017-03-01

    5-Fluorouracil has been considered as a cornerstone therapy for colorectal cancer; however, it suffers from low therapeutic response rate and severe side effects. Therefore, there is an urgent need to increase the clinical efficacy of 5-fluorouracil. Recently, fish oil rich in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids has been reported to chemosensitize tumor cells to anti-cancer drugs. This study is designed to understand the underlying mechanisms of synergistic effect of fish oil and 5-fluorouracil by evaluation of tumor cell-associated markers such as apoptosis and DNA damage. The colon cancer was developed by administration of N,N-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride and dextran sulfate sodium salt. Further these animals were treated with 5-fluorouracil, fish oil, or a combination of both. In carcinogen-treated animals, a decrease in DNA damage and apoptotic index was observed. There was also a decrease in the expression of Fas, FasL, caspase 8, and Bax, and an increase in Bcl-2. In contrast, administration of 5-fluorouracil and fish oil as an adjuvant increased both DNA damage and apoptotic index by activation of both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways as compared to the other groups. The increased pro-apoptotic effect by synergism of 5-fluorouracil and fish oil may be attributed to the incorporation of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in membrane, which alters membrane fluidity in cancer cells. In conclusion, this study highlights that the induction of apoptotic pathway by fish oil may increase the susceptibility of tumors to chemotherapeutic regimens.

  8. Nicotine, acetylcholine and bombesin are trophic growth factors in neuroendocrine cell lines derived from experimental hamster lung tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Schueller, H.M.; Nylen, E.; Park, P.; Becker, K.L. George Washington Univ., Washington, DC )

    1990-01-01

    Neuroendocrine hamster lung tumors, induced by exposure to 60% hyperoxia and subcutaneous administration of the tobacco-specific nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) for 12 weeks, were placed in cell culture. By subsequent selective transfer of epithelial cells and maintenance in an atmosphere of 8% CO{sub 2}, cell lines with characteristics of neuroendocrine cells were established. The neuroendocrine markers expressed by these cell lines included electron dense neuroendocrine secretion granules as well as secretion of calcitonin and mammalian bombesin. In keeping with data previously reported for a human neuroendocrine lung tumor cell line, nicotine, acetylcholien, and mammalian bombesin (MB) acted as strongrowth factors in these neuroendocrine hamster tumor lines. The mitogenic effect of nicotine an acetylcholine was abolished by nicotinic receptor inhibition while the effects of mammalian bombesin were inhibited by an antagonist of MB receptors. Our data suggest that a receptor-mediated mitogenic effect of nicotine on neuroendocrine lung cells may be instrumental in the induction of smoking-associated small cell lung cancer.

  9. Peripherally cross-linking the shell of core-shell polymer micelles decreases premature release of physically loaded combretastatin A4 in whole blood and increases its mean residence time and subsequent potency against primary murine breast tumors after IV administration

    PubMed Central

    Wakaskar, Rajesh R.; Bathena, Sai Praneeth R.; Tallapaka, Shailendra; Ambardekar, Vishakha V.; Gautum, Nagsen; Thakare, Rhishikesh N.; Simet, Samantha M.; Curran, Stephen M.; Singh, Rakesh K.; Dong, Yuxiang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Determine the feasibility and potential benefit of peripherally cross-linking the shell of core-shell polymer micelles on the premature release of physically loaded hydrophobic drug in whole blood and subsequent potency against solid tumors. Methods Individual Pluronic F127 polymer micelles (F127 PM) peripherally cross-linked with ethylenediamine at 76% of total PEO blocks (X-F127 PM) were physically loaded with combretastatin A4 (CA4) by the solid dispersion method and compared to CA4 physically loaded in uncross-linked F127 PM, CA4 in DMSO in vitro, or water-soluble CA4 phosphate (CA4P) in vivo. Results X-F127 PM had similar CA4 loading and aqueous solubility as F127 PM up to 10 mg CA4 / mL at 22.9 wt% and did not aggregate in PBS or 90% (v/v) human serum at 37°C for at least 24 h. In contrast, X-F127 PM decreased the unbound fraction of CA4 in whole blood (fu) and increased the mean plasma residence time and subsequent potency of CA4 against the vascular function and growth of primary murine 4T1 breast tumors over CA4 in F127 PM and water-soluble CA4P after IV administration. Conclusions Given that decreasing the fu is an indication of decreased drug release, peripherally cross-linking the shell of core-shell polymer micelles may be a simple approach to decrease premature release of physically loaded hydrophobic drug in the blood and increase subsequent potency in solid tumors. PMID:25223962

  10. Iodine-125 Seeds Strand for Treatment of Tumor Thrombus in Inferior Vena Cava: An Experimental Study in a Rabbit Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wen Yan, Zhiping Luo, Jianjun Fang, Zhuting Wu, Linlin Liu, QingXin Qu, Xudong Liu, Lingxiao Wang, Jianhua

    2013-10-15

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to establish an animal model of implanted inferior vena cava tumor thrombus (IVCTT) and to evaluate the effect of linear iodine-125 seeds strand in treating implanted IVCTT. Methods: Tumor cell line VX{sub 2} was inoculated subcutaneously into New Zealand rabbit to develop the parent tumor. The tumor strip was inoculated into inferior vena cava (IVC) to establish the IVCTT model. The IVCTT was confirmed by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) after 2 weeks. Twelve rabbits with IVCTT were randomly divided into two groups. Treatment group (group T; n = 6) underwent Iodine-125 seeds brachytherapy, and the control group (group C; n = 6) underwent blank seeds strand. The blood laboratory examination (including blood routine examination, hepatic and renal function), body weight, survival time, and IVCTT volume by MDCT were monitored. All rabbits were dissected postmortem, and the therapeutic effects were evaluated on the basis of histopathology. The proliferating cell nuclear antigen index (PI) and apoptosis index (AI) of IVCTT were compared between two groups. T test, Wilcoxon rank test, and Kaplan-Meier survival curve analysis were used. Results: The success rate of establishing IVCTT was 100 %. The body weight loss and cachexia of rabbits in group C appeared earlier than in group T. Body weight in the third week, the mean survival time, PI, AI in groups T and C were 2.23 {+-} 0.12 kg, 57.83 {+-} 8.68 days, (16.73 {+-} 5.18 %), (29.47 {+-} 7.18 %), and 2.03 {+-} 0.13 kg, 43.67 {+-} 5.28 days, (63.01 {+-} 2.01 %), (6.02 {+-} 2.93 %), respectively. There were statistically significant differences between group T and group C (P < 0.05). The IVCTT volume of group T was remarkably smaller than that of group C. Conclusions: Injecting and suspensory fixing VX2 tumor strip into IVC is a reliable method to establish IVCTT animal model. The linear Iodine-125 seeds strand brachytherapy was a safe and effective method for treating IVCTT

  11. Tumor immunotherapy in the mouse with the use of 131I-labeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Zalcberg, J.R.; Thompson, C.H.; Lichtenstein, M.; McKenzie, I.F.

    1984-03-01

    This report describes the use of 131I-labeled monoclonal antibodies in two experimental models for tumor immunotherapy. In vitro treatment of the radiation-induced murine thymoma ITT-1-75NS with radiolabeled anti-Ly-2.1 significantly impaired subsequent tumor growth in vivo. However, in vivo treatment of this tumor, which previously had been injected into C57BL/6 mice, was unsuccessful. By contrast, in vitro treatment of a human colorectal tumor cell line (COLO 205) with 131I-labeled 250-30.6--a monoclonal antibody directed against a secretory component of normal and malignant gastrointestinal epithelium--completely inhibited subsequent tumor growth in BALB/c nude (nu/nu) mice. Furthermore, in vivo treatment of preexisting human colorectal tumor xenografts significantly impaired progressive tumor growth. Although some tumor inhibition was also produced by unlabeled 250-30.6 antibody, this response was considerably amplified by treatment with (131I)-labeled 250-30.6 (P less than .05), suggesting that in vivo treatment of human tumors with the use of 131I-labeled monoclonal antibodies may be clinically beneficial. The antithyroid drug propylthiouracil was used to reduce dehalogenation of the radiolabeled immunoglobulins in an attempt to improve their therapeutic efficacy.

  12. Experimental and clinical results of mTHPC (Foscan)-mediated photodynamic therapy for malignant brain tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostron, Herwig; Obwegeser, Alois; Jakober, Rosanna; Zimmermann, Andreas; Rueck, Angelika C.

    1998-05-01

    M-THPC, a second generation photosensitizer, has greater potential of phototoxicity than the first generation PS hematoporphyrinderivative because of greater light penetration depth into tissue and higher therapeutic index. The uptake, selectivity and kinetics of C-14 labeled mTHPC was investigated in a C6 glioma induced rat model. The highest amount was detected at 48 to 96 hours after intraperitoneal injection with a ratio of 150:1 of tumor to normal brain concentration (0.53 vs. 0.003 (mu) g/g tissue). A high selectivity was also confirmed by confocal laserscanning microscope in frozen sections of the human glioblastoma. Up to now 15 patients underwent mTHPC-mediated PDT presenting with primary (n equals 2), recurrent (n equals 8) glioblastoma multiform or recurrent metastatic disease of the brain (n equals 3) and of the scull base (n equals 2). After sensitization with 0.15 FoscanR mg/kg i.v. a gross tumor removal was performed on day 4 followed by intraoperative PDT by a KTP pumped dye laser or a diode laser emitting at 652 nm (light dose of 20 J/cm2). Patients with primary glioblastomas underwent additional radiation therapy with one progressing after 5 months, the other is surviving for 6 months, patients with recurrent glioblastomas demonstrated a median time to progression of 4 months and a median survival of 6 months, patients with metastasis faired better with only one progressing after 6 months the remaining 4 patients are alive demonstrating a complete response with a median survival time of 7 months. Our first clinical results of mTHPC mediated PDT in brain tumors demonstrate that the survival time of our patients are not superior as compared to the first generation sensitizer. Due to its superior photophysical properties however, mTHPC should be intensely investigated for its use in neurosurgery.

  13. Standardization, Evaluation, and Area-Under-Curve Analysis of Human and Murine Treg Suppressive Function.

    PubMed

    Akimova, Tatiana; Levine, Matthew H; Beier, Ulf H; Hancock, Wayne W

    2016-01-01

    FOXP3+ T-regulatory (Treg) cells have important roles in immune homeostasis, and alterations in their number and function can predispose to diseases ranging from autoimmunity to allograft rejection and tumor growth. Reliable identification of human Tregs remains a persistent problem due to a lack of specific markers. The most definitive Treg characterization currently involves combined assessment of phenotypic, epigenetic and functional parameters, with the latter typically involving in vitro Treg suppression assays. Unfortunately, suppression assays are frequently performed using differing methods and readouts, limiting comparisons between studies. We provide a perspective on our experience with human and murine Treg suppression assay conditions, including Treg data obtained in clinical transplant studies, Tregs isolated from healthy donors and treated with epigenetically active compounds, and Tregs from standard murine strains (C57BL/6 and BALB/c). We provide detailed descriptions and illustrations of typical problems, shortcomings and troubleshooting; describe new modifications and approaches; and present a new method for calculation of suppressive assay data using a modified area-under-curve (AUC) method. This method allows us to directly compare Treg suppressive function between multiple patients (such as in clinical transplant studies), to reliably track changes in Treg function from the same person over time, or compare effects of Treg-modulating compounds tested with different healthy donors Tregs in separate or combined experimental settings.

  14. Dendritic Cell-Based Vaccination in Cancer: Therapeutic Implications Emerging from Murine Models

    PubMed Central

    Mac Keon, Soledad; Ruiz, María Sol; Gazzaniga, Silvina; Wainstok, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a pivotal role in the orchestration of immune responses, and are thus key targets in cancer vaccine design. Since the 2010 FDA approval of the first cancer DC-based vaccine (Sipuleucel-T), there has been a surge of interest in exploiting these cells as a therapeutic option for the treatment of tumors of diverse origin. In spite of the encouraging results obtained in the clinic, many elements of DC-based vaccination strategies need to be optimized. In this context, the use of experimental cancer models can help direct efforts toward an effective vaccine design. This paper reviews recent findings in murine models regarding the antitumoral mechanisms of DC-based vaccination, covering issues related to antigen sources, the use of adjuvants and maturing agents, and the role of DC subsets and their interaction in the initiation of antitumoral immune responses. The summary of such diverse aspects will highlight advantages and drawbacks in the use of murine models, and contribute to the design of successful DC-based translational approaches for cancer treatment. PMID:26042126

  15. Interferon-gamma and transforming growth factor-beta modulate the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases and tumor necrosis factor-alpha production induced by Fc gamma-receptor stimulation in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rose, D M; Winston, B W; Chan, E D; Riches, D W; Henson, P M

    1997-09-08

    Engagement of receptors for the Fc region of IgG (Fc gamma R) can activate a variety of biological responses in macrophages, and these responses can be modulated either positively or negatively by co-stimulation with a variety of agents including cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). We have previously demonstrated that Fc gamma R crosslinking activates the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family members p42MAPK, p38, and JNK. Herein, we examined the modulatory effect of IFN-gamma, TGF-beta, and platelet-activating factor (PAF) on Fc gamma R-induced MAPK activation in murine macrophages. Fc gamma R-induced activation of p42MAPK and JNK was augmented nearly two-fold by pretreatment with IFN-gamma. Conversely, TGF-beta pretreatment suppressed Fc gamma R-induced activation of p42MAPK, JNK, and p38. These modulatory effects of IFN-gamma and TGF-beta on MAPK activation correlated with changes in Fc gamma R-stimulated TNF-alpha production by these two cytokines.

  16. Experimental validation of heterogeneity-corrected dose-volume prescription on respiratory-averaged CT images in stereotactic body radiotherapy for moving tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Miyabe, Yuki; Matsuo, Yukinori; Kamomae, Takeshi; Nakata, Manabu; Yano, Shinsuke; Sawada, Akira; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to experimentally assess the validity of heterogeneity-corrected dose-volume prescription on respiratory-averaged computed tomography (RACT) images in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for moving tumors. Four-dimensional computed tomography (CT) data were acquired while a dynamic anthropomorphic thorax phantom with a solitary target moved. Motion pattern was based on cos (t) with a constant respiration period of 4.0 sec along the longitudinal axis of the CT couch. The extent of motion (A{sub 1}) was set in the range of 0.0-12.0 mm at 3.0-mm intervals. Treatment planning with the heterogeneity-corrected dose-volume prescription was designed on RACT images. A new commercially available Monte Carlo algorithm of well-commissioned 6-MV photon beam was used for dose calculation. Dosimetric effects of intrafractional tumor motion were then investigated experimentally under the same conditions as 4D CT simulation using the dynamic anthropomorphic thorax phantom, films, and an ionization chamber. The passing rate of {gamma} index was 98.18%, with the criteria of 3 mm/3%. The dose error between the planned and the measured isocenter dose in moving condition was within {+-} 0.7%. From the dose area histograms on the film, the mean {+-} standard deviation of the dose covering 100% of the cross section of the target was 102.32 {+-} 1.20% (range, 100.59-103.49%). By contrast, the irradiated areas receiving more than 95% dose for A{sub 1} = 12 mm were 1.46 and 1.33 times larger than those for A{sub 1} = 0 mm in the coronal and sagittal planes, respectively. This phantom study demonstrated that the cross section of the target received 100% dose under moving conditions in both the coronal and sagittal planes, suggesting that the heterogeneity-corrected dose-volume prescription on RACT images is acceptable in SBRT for moving tumors.

  17. Perillyl Alcohol Protects Against Fe-NTA-Induced Nephrotoxicity and Early Tumor Promotional Events in Rat Experimental Model

    PubMed Central

    Jahangir, Tamanna

    2007-01-01

    Plants have been widely used as protective agents against a wide variety of processes and compounds that damage tissues via free radical mechanisms. Perillyl alcohol (PA) is a naturally occurring monoterpene found in the essential oils of numerous species of plants including mints, cherries and celery seeds. This monocyclic monoterpene has shown antioxidant and therapeutic activity in various studies against various xenobiotics. In this study, we have analyzed the effects of PA against single intraperitoneal dose of ferric nitrilotriacetate (Fe-NTA) (9 mg iron per kg body weight)-induced nephrotoxicity and early tumor promotional events. The pretreatment of Fe-NTA-treated rats with 0.5% per kg body weight dose and 1% per kg body weight dose of PA for seven consecutive days significantly reversed the Fe-NTA-induced malondialdehyde formation, xanthine oxidase activity (P < 0.001), ornithine decarboxylase activity (P < 0.001) and 3[H]thymidine incorporation in renal DNA (P < 0.001) with simultaneous significant depletion in serum toxicity markers blood urea nitrogen and creatinine (P < 0.001). Significant restoration at both the doses was recorded in depleted renal glutathione content, and its dependent enzymes with prophylactic treatment of PA. Present results suggest that PA potentially attenuates against Fe-NTA-induced oxidative damage and tumor promotional events that preclude its development as a future drug to avert the free radical-induced toxicity. PMID:18227911

  18. Efficacy of quercetin against chemically induced murine oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    DROGUETT, DANIEL; CASTILLO, CHRISTIAN; LEIVA, ELBA; THEODULOZ, CRISTINA; SCHMEDA-HIRSCHMANN, GUILLERMO; KEMMERLING, ULRIKE

    2015-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common form of head and neck cancer, and oxidative damage is associated with the development of OSCCs. Antioxidants have therefore been proposed for use as chemoprotective agents against different types of cancer. In the present study, the effect of the antioxidant quercetin, administered at doses of 10 and 100 mg/kg/day, was investigated in an experimental murine model of 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4-NQO)-induced carcinogenesis. The survival of the treated animals, the plasmatic levels of reduced glutathione and the type and severity of lesions (according the International Histological Classification of Tumors and Bryne's Multifactorial Grading System for the Invasive Tumor Front) were assessed. Additionally, the organization of the extracellular matrix was analyzed by carbohydrate and collagen histochemistry, and immunohistochemistry was used to assess the expression of the tumor markers proliferating cell nuclear antigen and mutated p53. The results indicate that, despite the promising effect of quercetin in other studies, this drug is ineffective as a chemoprotective agent against 4-NQO-induced OSCC in mice at the assayed doses. PMID:26622865

  19. Miniature Microwave Applicator for Murine Bladder Hyperthermia Studies

    PubMed Central

    Salahi, Sara; Maccarini, Paolo F.; Rodrigues, Dario B.; Etienne, Wiguins; Landon, Chelsea D.; Inman, Brant A.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Stauffer, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Novel combinations of heat with chemotherapeutic agents are often studied in murine tumor models. Currently, no device exists to selectively heat small tumors at depth in mice. In this project, we modelled, built and tested a miniature microwave heat applicator, the physical dimensions of which can be scaled to adjust the volume and depth of heating to focus on the tumor volume. Of particular interest is a device that can selectively heat murine bladder. Materials and Methods Using Avizo® segmentation software, we created a numerical mouse model based on micro-MRI scan data. The model was imported into HFSS™ simulation software and parametric studies were performed to optimize the dimensions of a water-loaded circular waveguide for selective power deposition inside a 0.15ml bladder. A working prototype was constructed operating at 2.45GHz. Heating performance was characterized by mapping fiber-optic temperature sensors along catheters inserted at depths of 0-1mm (subcutaneous), 2-3mm (vaginal), and 4-5mm (rectal) below the abdominal wall, with the mid-depth catheter adjacent to the bladder. Core temperature was monitored orally. Results Thermal measurements confirm the simulations which demonstrate that this applicator can provide local heating at depth in small animals. Measured temperatures in murine pelvis show well-localized bladder heating to 42-43°C while maintaining normothermic skin and core temperatures. Conclusions Simulation techniques facilitate the design optimization of microwave antennas for use in pre-clinical applications such as localized tumor heating in small animals. Laboratory measurements demonstrate the effectiveness of a new miniature water-coupled microwave applicator for localized heating of murine bladder. PMID:22690856

  20. Maximizing Immune Response to Carbohydrate Antigens on Breast Tumors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-01

    antigens expressed on breast tumors. Towards this end we are developing peptide mimotopes of tumor associated carbohydrate antigens as they are T cell...dependent antigens. In our progress to date we have shown the 1) immunization with peptide mimotope activates a specific cellular response to a model murine...tumor cell line; 2) vaccination of mice with peptide eradicates established tumor; 3) Immunization with DNA format of the peptide suppresses tumor

  1. Pharmacokinetics of murine p75-Fc fusion protein and MP6-XT22 anti-murine TNF-alpha mAb in mice.

    PubMed

    Filler, Scott G; Solis, Norma V; Guo, Jane; Doellgast, George; Ruiz-Garcia, Ana; Pan, Wei-Jian

    2007-05-01

    Immunologic limitations make it difficult to study the pharmacokinetic effects of human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blockers in murine models. To counter this, we have studied the pharmacokinetics in mice of two murine analogs of human TNF blockers, a murine p75-FC fusion protein (analogous to etanercept), and the rat MP6-XT22 anti-murine TNF mAb (analogous to infliximab). We analyzed the pharmacokinetics of the murine p75-Fc protein and MP6-XT22 antibody in mice that were uninfected and in mice with disseminated candidiasis in order to confirm dosing strategies and interpret future studies evaluating the efficacy and tolerability of these agents in mice. We propose that, while conducting safety or efficacy studies in murine disease models, it is reasonable to administer the murine p75-Fc protein to mice at <10 mg/kg every 4-5 days, and the MP6-XT22 antibody at 10-20 mg/kg every 4-5 days.